Science.gov

Sample records for renal dynamic imaging

  1. Dynamic noninvasive monitoring of renal function in vivo by fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goiffon, Reece J.; Akers, Walter J.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.; Lee, Hyeran; Achilefu, Samuel

    2009-03-01

    Kidneys normally filter the blood of excess salts and metabolic products, such as urea, while retaining plasma proteins. In diseases such as multiple myeloma and diabetes mellitus, the renal function is compromised and protein escapes into the urine. In this study, we present the use of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLI) to image excess serum protein in urine (proteinuria). The near-infrared fluorescent dye LS-288 has distinct lifetimes when bound to protein versus free in solution, providing contrast between the protein-rich viscera and the mostly protein-free bladder. FLI with LS-288 in mice revealed that fluorescence lifetime (FLT) differences in the bladder relative to surrounding tissues was due to the fractional contributions of the bound and unbound dye molecules. The FLT of LS-288 decreased in the case of proteinuria while fluorescence intensity was unchanged. The results show that FLI can be useful for the dynamic imaging of protein-losing nephropathy due to diabetes mellitus and other renal diseases and suggest the potential use of the FLI to distinguish tumors from fluid-filled cysts in the body.

  2. Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Reproducibility of Histogram Analysis on Pharmacokinetic Parameters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Yi; Su, Zi-Hua; Xu, Xiao; Sun, Zhi-Peng; Duan, Fei-Xue; Song, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Lu; Wang, Ying-Wei; Ma, Xin; Guo, Ai-Tao; Ma, Lin; Ye, Hui-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been increasingly used to evaluate the permeability of tumor vessel. Histogram metrics are a recognized promising method of quantitative MR imaging that has been recently introduced in analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters in oncology due to tumor heterogeneity. In this study, 21 patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) underwent paired DCE-MRI studies on a 3.0 T MR system. Extended Tofts model and population-based arterial input function were used to calculate kinetic parameters of RCC tumors. Mean value and histogram metrics (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) of each pharmacokinetic parameter were generated automatically using ImageJ software. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility and scan-rescan reproducibility were evaluated using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficient of variation (CoV). Our results demonstrated that the histogram method (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) was not superior to the conventional Mean value method in reproducibility evaluation on DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters (K( trans) &Ve) in renal cell carcinoma, especially for Skewness and Kurtosis which showed lower intra-, inter-observer and scan-rescan reproducibility than Mean value. Our findings suggest that additional studies are necessary before wide incorporation of histogram metrics in quantitative analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:27380733

  3. Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Reproducibility of Histogram Analysis on Pharmacokinetic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-yi; Su, Zi-hua; Xu, Xiao; Sun, Zhi-peng; Duan, Fei-xue; Song, Yuan-yuan; Li, Lu; Wang, Ying-wei; Ma, Xin; Guo, Ai-tao; Ma, Lin; Ye, Hui-yi

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been increasingly used to evaluate the permeability of tumor vessel. Histogram metrics are a recognized promising method of quantitative MR imaging that has been recently introduced in analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters in oncology due to tumor heterogeneity. In this study, 21 patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) underwent paired DCE-MRI studies on a 3.0 T MR system. Extended Tofts model and population-based arterial input function were used to calculate kinetic parameters of RCC tumors. Mean value and histogram metrics (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) of each pharmacokinetic parameter were generated automatically using ImageJ software. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility and scan–rescan reproducibility were evaluated using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficient of variation (CoV). Our results demonstrated that the histogram method (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) was not superior to the conventional Mean value method in reproducibility evaluation on DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters (K trans & Ve) in renal cell carcinoma, especially for Skewness and Kurtosis which showed lower intra-, inter-observer and scan-rescan reproducibility than Mean value. Our findings suggest that additional studies are necessary before wide incorporation of histogram metrics in quantitative analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:27380733

  4. Renal arteries (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A renal angiogram is a test used to examine the blood vessels of the kidneys. The test is performed ... main vessel of the pelvis, up to the renal artery that leads into the kidney. Contrast medium ...

  5. Pitfalls and Limitations of Radionuclide Renal Imaging in Adults.

    PubMed

    Keramida, Georgia; James, Jacqueline M; Prescott, Mary C; Peters, Adrien Michael

    2015-09-01

    To understand pitfalls and limitations in adult renography, it is necessary to understand firstly the physiology of the kidney, especially the magnitude and control of renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate and tubular fluid flow rate, and secondly the pharmacokinetics and renal handling of the three most often used tracers, Tc-99m-mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3), Tc-99m-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) and Tc-99m-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). The kidneys may be imaged dynamically with Tc-99m-MAG3 or Tc-99m-DTPA, with or without diuretic challenge, or by static imaging with Tc-99m-DMSA. Protocols are different according to whether the kidney is native or transplanted. Quantitative analysis of dynamic data includes measurement of renal vascularity (important for the transplanted kidney), absolute tracer clearance rates, differential renal function (DRF) and response to diuretic challenge. Static image reveals functional renal parenchymal damage, both focal and global, is useful in the clinical management of obstructive uropathy, renal stone disease and hypertension (under angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition), and is the preferred technique for determining DRF. Diagnosis based on morphological appearances is important in transplant management. Even though nuclear medicine is now in the era of hybrid imaging, renal imaging remains an important subspecialty in nuclear medicine and requires a sound basing in applied physiology, the classical supporting discipline of nuclear medicine.

  6. Imaging of haemodialysis: renal and extrarenal findings.

    PubMed

    Degrassi, Ferruccio; Quaia, Emilio; Martingano, Paola; Cavallaro, Marco; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2015-06-01

    Electrolyte alterations and extra-renal disorders are quite frequent in patients undergoing haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. The native kidneys may be the site of important pathologies in patients undergoing dialysis, especially in the form of acquired renal cystic disease with frequent malignant transformation. Renal neoplasms represents an important complication of haemodialysis-associated acquired cystic kidney disease and imaging surveillance is suggested. Extra-renal complications include renal osteodistrophy, brown tumours, and thoracic and cardiovascular complications. Other important fields in which imaging techniques may provide important informations are arteriovenous fistula and graft complications. Teaching points • Renal neoplasms represent a dreaded complication of haemodialysis.• In renal osteodystrophy bone resorption typically manifests along the middle phalanges.• Brown tumours are well-defined lytic lesions radiographically, possibly causing bone expansion.• Vascular calcifications are very common in patients undergoing haemodialysis.• Principal complications of the AV fistula consist of thrombosis, aneurysms and pseudoaneurysms. PMID:25680325

  7. Imaging in acute renal infection in children

    SciTech Connect

    Sty, J.R.; Wells, R.G.; Starshak, R.J.; Schroeder, B.A.

    1987-03-01

    Infection is the most common disease of the urinary tract in children, and various imaging techniques have been used to verify its presence and location. On retrospective analysis, 50 consecutive children with documented upper urinary tract infection had abnormal findings on renal cortical scintigraphy with 99mTc-glucoheptonate. The infection involved the renal poles only in 38 and the poles plus other renal cortical areas in eight. Four had abnormalities that spared the poles. Renal sonograms were abnormal in 32 of 50 children. Excretory urograms were abnormal in six of 23 children in whom they were obtained. Vesicoureteral reflux was found in 34 of 40 children in whom voiding cystourethrography was performed. These data show the high sensitivity of renal cortical scintigraphy with 99mTc-glucoheptonate in documenting upper urinary tract infection. The location of the abnormalities detected suggests that renal infections spread via an ascending mode and implies that intrarenal reflux is a major contributing factor.

  8. Hyperpolarized Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Potential and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (d-DNP) technology has enabled a new paradigm for renal imaging investigations. It allows standard magnetic resonance imaging complementary renal metabolic and functional fingerprints within seconds without the use of ionizing radiation. Increasing evidence supports its utility in preclinical research in which the real-time interrogation of metabolic turnover can aid the physiological and pathophysiological metabolic and functional effects in ex vivo and in vivo models. The method has already been translated to humans, although the clinical value of this technology is unknown. In this paper, I review the potential benefits and pitfalls associated with dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization in preclinical research and its translation to renal patients. PMID:26973539

  9. Image-Guided Adrenal and Renal Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Karun V.; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Swerdlow, Daniel; DaSilva, Daniel; Beck, Avi; Jain, Nidhi; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Image-guided biopsy is a safe and well-established technique that is familiar to most interventional radiologists (IRs). Improvements in image-guidance, biopsy tools and biopsy techniques now routinely allow for safe biopsy of renal and adrenal lesions which traditionally were considered difficult to reach or technically challenging. Image-guided biopsy is used to establish the definitive tissue diagnosis in adrenal mass lesions that can not be fully characterized with imaging or laboratory tests alone. It is also used to establish definitive diagnosis in some cases of renal parenchymal disease and has an expanding role in diagnosis and characterization of renal masses prior to treatment. Although basic principles and techniques for image-guided needle biopsy are similar regardless of organ, this paper will highlight some technical considerations, indications and complications which are unique to the adrenal gland and kidney because of their anatomic location and physiologic features. PMID:20540919

  10. Gallium-68 EDTA PET/CT for Renal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Michael S; Hicks, Rodney J

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear medicine renal imaging provides important functional data to assist in the diagnosis and management of patients with a variety of renal disorders. Physiologically stable metal chelates like ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriamine penta-acetate (DTPA) are excreted by glomerular filtration and have been radiolabelled with a variety of isotopes for imaging glomerular filtration and quantitative assessment of glomerular filtration rate. Gallium-68 ((68)Ga) EDTA PET usage predates Technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) renal imaging, but virtually disappeared with the widespread adoption of gamma camera technology that was not optimal for imaging positron decay. There is now a reemergence of interest in (68)Ga owing to the greater availability of PET technology and use of (68)Ga to label other radiotracers. (68)Ga EDTA can be used a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA for wide variety of clinical indications. A key advantage of PET for renal imaging over conventional scintigraphy is 3-dimensional dynamic imaging, which is particularly helpful in patients with complex anatomy in whom planar imaging may be nondiagnostic or difficult to interpret owing to overlying structures containing radioactive urine that cannot be differentiated. Other advantages include accurate and absolute (rather than relative) camera-based quantification, superior spatial and temporal resolution and integrated multislice CT providing anatomical correlation. Furthermore, the (68)Ga generator enables on-demand production at low cost, with no additional patient radiation exposure compared with conventional scintigraphy. Over the past decade, we have employed (68)Ga EDTA PET/CT primarily to answer difficult clinical questions in patients in whom other modalities have failed, particularly when it was envisaged that dynamic 3D imaging would be of assistance. We have also used it as a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA if unavailable owing to supply issues, and have additionally examined the role of

  11. Changes of renal blood flow after ESWL: assessment by ASL MR imaging, contrast enhanced MR imaging, and renal resistive index.

    PubMed

    Abd Ellah, Mohamed; Kremser, Christian; Pallwein, Leo; Aigner, Friedrich; Schocke, Michael; Peschel, Reinhard; Pedross, Florian; Pinggera, Germar-Michael; Wolf, Christian; Alsharkawy, Mostafa A M; Jaschke, Werner; Frauscher, Ferdinand

    2010-10-01

    The annual incidence of stone formation is increased in the industrialised world. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy is a non-invasive effective treatment of upper urinary tract stones. This study is aimed to evaluate changes of renal blood flow in patients undergoing extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) by arterial spin labeling (ASL) MR imaging, contrast enhanced dynamic MR imaging, and renal resistive index (RI). Thirteen patients with nephrolithiasis were examined using MR imaging and Doppler ultrasound 12h before and 12h after ESWL. ASL sequence was done for both kidneys and followed by contrast enhanced MR imaging. In addition RI Doppler ultrasound measurements were performed. A significant increase in RI (p<0.001) was found in both treated and untreated kidneys. ASL MR imaging also showed significant changes in both kidneys (p<0.001). Contrast enhanced dynamic MR imaging did not show significant changes in the kidneys. ESWL causes changes in RI and ASL MR imaging, which seem to reflect changes in renal blood flow.

  12. Nuclear renal imaging in acute pyelonephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Handmaker, H.

    1982-07-01

    Patients with acute pyelonephritis may present with a spectrum of clinical signs and symptoms. There are few noninvasive diagnostic studies, however, to confirm or exclude this diagnosis. A small number of patients, generally those with severe disease, will demonstrate radiographic changes on excretory urography, but the lack of sensitivity of the IVP in early, acute pyelonephritis is well documented. Several radionuclide techniques have been proposed to assist in the earlier detection of this clinical problem including imaging with Mercury-197 chlormerodrin, Gallium-67 citrate, Technetium-99m glucoheptonate. Technetium-99m DMSA, and, more recently, Indium-111 labeled white blood cells. The success of the renal cortical imaging agents as well as those which localize in infection are described in this report. There appears to be a complimentary role or the cortical imaging agents and the radiopharmaceuticals which localize in bacterial infection. Cortical agents offer the advantage of specific assessment of functioning renal tissue and a convenient, rapid method for following the response to treatment in a noninvasive manner. A pattern is described which may be diagnostic; correlation with Gallium-67 citrate of Indium-111 WBCs may increase the probability of infection as the cause for the cortical abnormality. The measurement of differential renal function using cortical agents provides additional information to assist the clinician in predicting the late effects of infection. Improved sensitivity and specificity, and a reproducible method for following the response to therapy in patients with acute pyelonephritis are the advantages of the techniques described.

  13. Imaging of adrenal and renal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Nancy A; Lostumbo, Antonella; Adam, Sharon Z; Remer, Erick M; Nikolaidis, Paul; Yaghmai, Vahid; Berggruen, Senta M; Miller, Frank H

    2015-10-01

    Hemorrhage of the kidneys and adrenal glands has many etiologies. In the adrenal glands, trauma, anticoagulation, stress, sepsis, surgery, and neoplasms are common causes of hemorrhage. In the kidneys, reasons for hemorrhage include trauma, bleeding diathesis, vascular diseases, infection, infarction, hemorrhagic cyst rupture, the Antopol-Goldman lesion, and neoplasms. Angiomyolipoma and renal cell carcinoma are the neoplasms most commonly associated with hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal cortical carcinoma, metastases, and pheochromocytoma are associated with hemorrhage in the adrenal glands. Understanding the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging features, and causes of hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal glands is critical. It is also important to keep in mind that mimickers of hemorrhage exist, including lymphoma in both the kidneys and adrenal glands, and melanoma metastases in the adrenal glands. Appropriate imaging follow-up of renal and adrenal hemorrhage should occur to exclude an underlying malignancy as the cause. If there is suspicion for malignancy that cannot be definitively diagnosed on imaging, surgery or biopsy may be warranted. Angiography may be indicated when there is a suspected underlying vascular disease. Unnecessary intervention, such as nephrectomy, may be avoided in patients with benign causes or no underlying disease. Appropriate management is dependent on accurate diagnosis of the cause of renal or adrenal hemorrhage and it is incumbent upon the radiologist to determine the etiology.

  14. The renal sinus: pathologic spectrum and multimodality imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Rha, Sung Eun; Byun, Jae Young; Jung, Seung Eun; Oh, Soon Nam; Choi, Yeong-Jin; Lee, Ahwon; Lee, Jae Mun

    2004-10-01

    Various pathologic conditions can occur in the renal sinus, primarily originating in the constituents of the renal sinus, and the renal sinus can be secondarily involved by surrounding renal parenchymal and adjacent retroperitoneal lesions. Lipomatosis and cysts are common renal sinus lesions with little clinical significance, but differentiation from other pathologic conditions is important. Renal vascular lesions such as renal artery aneurysm or arteriovenous fistula can mimic other parapelvic or peripelvic lesions at excretory urography, but their vascular nature is evident at color Doppler ultrasonography, contrast material-enhanced computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Although most tumors originating in the renal pelvis are transitional cell carcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma, renal parenchymal tumors such as renal cell carcinoma or benign multilocular cystic nephroma have a tendency to grow into the renal sinus. Rare tumors of mesenchymal origin can develop in the renal sinus, but their imaging findings are nonspecific. The observation of renal sinus fat is important for detecting a small tumor located in that area and determining the exact tumor stage. Multiplanar CT or MR images can allow exact evaluation of the extent of complex renal sinus disease.

  15. High sensitive volumetric imaging of renal microcirculation in vivo using ultrahigh sensitive optical microangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Zhongwei; Jung, Yeongri; Jia, Yali; An, Lin; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2011-03-01

    We present a non-invasive, label-free imaging technique called Ultrahigh Sensitive Optical Microangiography (UHSOMAG) for high sensitive volumetric imaging of renal microcirculation. The UHS-OMAG imaging system is based on spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), which uses a 47000 A-line scan rate CCD camera to perform an imaging speed of 150 frames per second that takes only ~7 seconds to acquire a 3D image. The technique, capable of measuring slow blood flow down to 4 um/s, is sensitive enough to image capillary networks, such as peritubular capillaries and glomerulus within renal cortex. We show superior performance of UHS-OMAG in providing depthresolved volumetric images of rich renal microcirculation. We monitored the dynamics of renal microvasculature during renal ischemia and reperfusion. Obvious reduction of renal microvascular density due to renal ischemia was visualized and quantitatively analyzed. This technique can be helpful for the assessment of chronic kidney disease (CKD) which relates to abnormal microvasculature.

  16. Contrast medium administration and image acquisition parameters in renal CT angiography: what radiologists need to know

    PubMed Central

    Saade, Charbel; Deeb, Ibrahim Alsheikh; Mohamad, Maha; Al-Mohiy, Hussain; El-Merhi, Fadi

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, exponential advances in computed tomography (CT) technology have resulted in improved spatial and temporal resolution. Faster image acquisition enabled renal CT angiography to become a viable and effective noninvasive alternative in diagnosing renal vascular pathologies. However, with these advances, new challenges in contrast media administration have emerged. Poor synchronization between scanner and contrast media administration have reduced the consistency in image quality with poor spatial and contrast resolution. Comprehensive understanding of contrast media dynamics is essential in the design and implementation of contrast administration and image acquisition protocols. This review includes an overview of the parameters affecting renal artery opacification and current protocol strategies to achieve optimal image quality during renal CT angiography with iodinated contrast media, with current safety issues highlighted. PMID:26728701

  17. Medical imaging of renal diseases-suggested indication for different modalities.

    PubMed

    Bell, E G; McAfee, J G; Makhuli, Z N

    1981-04-01

    The diagnostic work-up of the urologic patient must be tailored to the presenting symptom complex, carefully selecting from the many modilities available, those most likely to establish the diagnosis and extent of the suspected lesions. Intravenous urography is the most rewarding initial procedure for many presenting symptoms, including suspected masses, pyuria, hematuria, and flank pain. Nuclear imaging is particularly effective in differentiating renal lobulations from true masses, in demonstrating parenchymal scarring in chronic pyelonephritis when the IVP is equivocal, and in assessing the decrease in perfusion and function in obstructive nephropathy when the IVP is indeterminate. It is the preferred procedure for acute renal infarction and acute tubular necrosis and has a greater sensitivity of detection for renal trauma than the IVP. Gallium-67 renal imaging appear helpful in the detection of occult pyelonephritis or interstitial nephritis. However, it cannot differentiate focal acute pyelonephritis from abscess or abscess from neoplasm. Ultrasoneography is the initial procedure of choice in the differentiation of cystic from solid renal masses and in anuria or oliguria. When a kidney fails to visualize by IVP or nuclear imaging, it can confirm or rule out obstruction. In upper tract infections, it may demonstrate renal or perirenal abscess. Although retrograde pyelography is performed less frequently in recent years, it remains extremely useful in confirming and relieving obstructive uropathy and in delineating tumors of the collecting system. Computed tomography effectively demonstrates hydronephrosis, renal abscess, tumors, and cysts and retroperitoneal involvement. More experience is needed to judge the efficiency of "dynamic" CT for the quantification of renal function. Renal angiography remains invaluable as a secondary procedure (as opposed to initial screening) in renal trauma, vascular anomalies, and in renal tumors to delineate the anatomy of the

  18. Renal Blood Oxygenation Level–Dependent Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Vivier, Pierre-Hugues; Storey, Pippa; Chandarana, Hersh; Yamamoto, Akira; Tantillo, Kristopher; Khan, Umer; Zhang, Jeff L.; Sigmund, Eric E.; Rusinek, Henry; Babb, James S.; Bubenheim, Michael; Lee, Vivian S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the impact of oral water and intravenous furosemide challenges on blood oxygenation level–dependent magnetic resonance imaging measurements in the kidney and to examine the contribution of R2 (=1/T2) to changes in R2* (=1/T2*). Materials and Methods This Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act–compliant study had institutional review board approval, and written informed consent was obtained from all subjects. Nine healthy volunteers were imaged at 3 T on 2 visits. During each visit, a baseline fasting magnetic resonance acquisition was followed by a diuretic challenge: oral water load for the first visit and furosemide for the second. R2* and R2 values in the renal cortex and medulla were measured using multiple gradient echo and multiple spin echo sequences, respectively, and R2’ values were computed as R2’ = R2* − R2. Timed urinary output was also measured. Results Averaged across all subjects, the R2* response to furosemide was greater than to water and greater in the medulla than the cortex. The mean R2 responses exhibited the same trends but were uniformly smaller than the mean R2* responses. The peak changes in R2* and R2 appeared, on average, 10 to 14 minutes before peak urinary output. The median percentage contribution of R2 to R2* changes was 16% in the medulla after both challenges. In the cortex, the median contribution was 48% after water load and 58% after furosemide challenge. Conclusions The contributions of R2 to R2* changes after water load and furosemide challenge are not negligible, especially in the renal cortex. In routine clinical practice, R2* could be used alone as a rough surrogate for R2’ in the medulla. However, in the cortex, both R2 and R2* should be measured to obtain accurate values of R2’. PMID:23385400

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Biomarker for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Kwon, Young Suk; Labib, Mina; Foran, David J.; Singer, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    As the most common neoplasm arising from the kidney, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) continues to have a significant impact on global health. Conventional cross-sectional imaging has always served an important role in the staging of RCC. However, with recent advances in imaging techniques and postprocessing analysis, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) now has the capability to function as a diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic biomarker for RCC. For this narrative literature review, a PubMed search was conducted to collect the most relevant and impactful studies from our perspectives as urologic oncologists, radiologists, and computational imaging specialists. We seek to cover advanced MR imaging and image analysis techniques that may improve the management of patients with small renal mass or metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26609190

  20. Imaging Manifestations of Hematologic Diseases with Renal and Perinephric Involvement.

    PubMed

    Purysko, Andrei S; Westphalen, Antonio C; Remer, Erick M; Coppa, Christopher P; Leão Filho, Hilton M; Herts, Brian R

    2016-01-01

    The kidneys and perinephric tissues can be affected by a variety of hematologic disorders, which usually occur in the setting of multisystem involvement. In many of these disorders, imaging is used to evaluate the extent of disease, guide biopsy, and/or monitor disease activity and patient response to therapy. Lymphoma, leukemia, and multiple myeloma commonly manifest as multiple parenchymal or perinephric lesions. Erdheim-Chester disease and Rosai-Dorfman disease, rare forms of multisystemic histiocytosis, are often identified as perinephric and periureteral masses. Renal abnormalities depicted at imaging in patients with sickle cell disease include renal enlargement, papillary necrosis, and renal medullary carcinoma. Sickle cell disease, along with other causes of intravascular hemolysis, can also lead to hemosiderosis of the renal cortex. Thrombosis of renal veins is sometimes seen in patients with coagulation disorders but more often occurs in association with certain malignancies and nephrotic syndrome. Immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease is another multisystem process that often produces focal renal lesions, seen along with involvement of more characteristic organs such as the pancreas. Perinephric lesions with calcifications should raise the possibility of secondary amyloidosis, especially in patients with a history of lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Although the imaging patterns of renal and perinephric involvement are usually not specific for a single entity, and the same entity can manifest with different or overlapping patterns, familiarity with these patterns and key clinical and histopathologic features may help to narrow the differential diagnosis and determine the next step of care. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27257766

  1. Redistribution of renal blood flow after SWL evaluated by Gd-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi, M R; Chavez, D R; Cannillo, J; Saltzman, B; Prasad, P V

    1998-02-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) is currently accepted as an effective noninvasive treatment for a wide variety of urinary tract calculi. However, the bioeffects of high-energy shockwaves on renal parenchyma have yet to be fully elucidated. The objective of this study was to measure the acute changes in regional renal hemodynamics associated with SWL utilizing dynamic gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Seven patients who underwent SWL for renal calculi had an MRI study within 4 hours after the treatment. To assess renal hemodynamics, a bolus of Gd DTPA (0.03 mmol/kg) was administered, and dynamic contrast enhanced images was obtained. Regions of interest (ROI) were defined over the cortex and medulla to obtain signal intensity-v-time curves. The contralateral kidney in each patient was used as the control. The initial slope of the contrast-enhanced signal intensity-v-time curve was used as a measure of the perfusion index (PI). In six patients, perfusion imaging showed a consistent trend of decreased cortical flow (29+/-8%) and a concomitant increase in medullary flow (34+/-14%) in the region of the kidney that was targeted with SWL in six patients (86%). This study shows that renal hemodynamics are modified by SWL. We hypothesize that this change represents a shunting of flow from cortex to medulla in an attempt to prevent ischemia of the medulla.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the kidney: renal masses

    SciTech Connect

    Hricak, H.; Williams, R.D.; Moon, K.L. Jr.; Moss, A.A.; Alpers, C.; Crooks, L.E.; Kaufman, L.

    1983-06-01

    Fifteen patients with a variety of renal masses were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), computed tomography, ultrasound, and intravenous urography. NMR clearly differentiated between simple renal cysts and other renal masses. On spin echo images, the simple renal cyst appeared as a round or slightly oval, homogeneous low-intensity mass with characteristically long T1 and T2 values. The thickness of the cyst wall was not measurable. The cyst had a smooth outer margin and a distict, sharp interface with normal parenchyma. Hemorrhagic cysts were seen as high-intensity lesions. Renal cell carcinomas displayed a wide range of intensity. The T1 and T2 values of the tumors were always different from those of the surrounding renal parenchyma. Tumor pseudocapsule was identified in four of five patients examined. All carcinomas were accurately staged by NMR and extension of the tumor thrombus into the inferior vena cava was demonstrated. The authors predict that if these preliminary results are confirmed by data from a larger number of patients, NMR will play a significant role in renal imaging.

  3. /sup 97/Ru-DMSA for delayed renal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Oster, Z.H.; Som, P.; Gil, M.C.

    1981-10-01

    Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) was labeled with /sup 97/Ru both with and without the addition of SnCl-2H/sub 2/O. The tin-containing preparation was found to induce higher cortical deposition of /sup 97/Ru-DMSA than the tin-free preparation. Visualization of the renal cortex was excellent 4 to 48 hours after injection in normal dogs and in dogs with renal insufficiency. It is concluded that /sup 97/Ru-(SN/sup 2 +/)-DMSA is a potentially useful renal imaging agent when delayed scintigraphy is necessary because of decompensation of the kidneys.

  4. /sup 97/Ru-DMSA for delayed renal imaging. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Oster, Z.H.; Som, P.; Gil, M.C.; Goldman, A.G.; Fairchild, R.G.; Meinken, G.E.; Srivastava, S.C.; Atkins, H.L.; Richards, P.; Brill, A.B.

    1981-01-01

    Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) was labeled with /sup 97/Ru both with and without the addition of SnCl.2H/sub 2/O. The tin-containing preparation was found to induce higher cortical deposition of /sup 97/Ru-DMSA than the tin-free preparation. Visualization of the renal cortex was excellent 4 to 48 hours after injection in normal dogs with renal insufficiency. It is concluded that /sup 97/Ru-(Sn+/sup 2/)-DMSA is a potentially useful renal imaging agent when delayed scintigraphy is necessary because of decompensaton of the kidneys.

  5. Appraisal of lupus nephritis by renal imaging with gallium-67

    SciTech Connect

    Bakir, A.A.; Lopez-Majano, V.; Hryhorczuk, D.O.; Rhee, H.L.; Dunea, G.

    1985-08-01

    To assess the activity of lupus nephritis, 43 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were studied by gallium imaging. Delayed renal visualization 48 hours after the gallium injection, a positive result, was noted in 25 of 48 scans. Active renal disease was defined by the presence of hematuria, pyuria (10 or more red blood cells or white blood cells per high-power field), proteinuria (1 g or more per 24 hours), a rising serum creatinine level, or a recent biopsy specimen showing proliferative and/or necrotizing lesions involving more than 20 percent of glomeruli. Renal disease was active in 18 instances, inactive in 23, and undetermined in seven (a total of 48 scans). Sixteen of the 18 scans (89 percent) in patients with active renal disease showed positive findings, as compared with only four of 23 scans (17 percent) in patients with inactive renal disease (p less than 0.001). Patients with positive scanning results had a higher rate of hypertension (p = 0.02), nephrotic proteinuria (p = 0.01), and progressive renal failure (p = 0.02). Mild mesangial nephritis (World Health Organization classes I and II) was noted only in the patients with negative scanning results (p = 0.02) who, however, showed a higher incidence of severe extrarenal SLE (p = 0.04). It is concluded that gallium imaging is a useful tool in evaluating the activity of lupus nephritis.

  6. New imaging applications in the evaluation of pediatric renal disease.

    PubMed

    Norton, Karen I

    2003-04-01

    Continued improvements in imaging technology have changed many of the traditional diagnostic algorithms for evaluating pediatric renal disease. Newer imaging modalities offer more accurate, specific, and early diagnoses, but can be time consuming and costly. Less invasive modalities, such as ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging have widespread applications in pediatric practice. The risks of radiation exposure, contrast toxicity, and sedation or anesthesia versus the potential benefits of obtaining precise diagnostic information should always be considerations before electing any imaging procedure in children.

  7. Dynamics of Urinary Calprotectin after Renal Ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Ebbing, Jan; Seibert, Felix S.; Pagonas, Nikolaos; Bauer, Frederic; Miller, Kurt; Kempkensteffen, Carsten; Günzel, Karsten; Bachmann, Alexander; Seifert, Hans H.; Rentsch, Cyrill A.; Ardelt, Peter; Wetterauer, Christian; Amico, Patrizia; Babel, Nina; Westhoff, Timm H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Urinary calprotectin has been identified as a promising biomarker for acute kidney injury. To date, however, the time-dependent changes of this parameter during acute kidney injury remain elusive. The aim of the present work was to define the time-course of urinary calprotectin secretion after ischaemia/reperfusion-induced kidney injury in comparison to neutrophil gelatinase—associated lipocalin, thereby monitoring the extent of tubular damage in nephron sparing surgery for kidney tumours. Methods: The study population consisted of 42 patients. Thirty-two patients underwent either open or endoscopic nephron sparing surgery for kidney tumours. During the surgery, the renal arterial pedicle was clamped with a median ischaemic time of 13 minutes (interquartile range, 4.5–20.3 minutes) in 26 patients. Ten retro-peritoneoscopic living donor nephrectomy patients and 6 nephron sparing surgery patients in whom the renal artery was not clamped served as controls. Urinary calprotectin and neutrophil gelatinase—associated lipocalin concentrations were repeatedly measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and assessed according to renal function parameters. Results: Urinary concentrations of calprotectin and neutrophil gelatinase—associated lipocalin increased significantly after ischaemia/reperfusion injury, whereas concentrations remained unchanged after nephron sparing surgery without ischaemia/reperfusion injury and after kidney donation. Calprotectin and neutrophil gelatinase—associated lipocalin levels were significantly increased 2 and 8 hours, respectively, post-ischaemia. Both proteins reached maximal concentrations after 48 hours, followed by a subsequent persistent decrease. Maximal neutrophil gelatinase—associated lipocalin and calprotectin concentrations were 9-fold and 69-fold higher than their respective baseline values. The glomerular filtration rate was only transiently impaired at the first post-operative day after ischaemia

  8. Renal Papillary Necrosis Appearing as Bladder Cancer on Imaging.

    PubMed

    Dagrosa, Lawrence M; Ghali, Fady; Gormley, Elizabeth Ann

    2016-01-01

    A 79-year-old woman with a history of diabetes mellitus and recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) presented with acute onset left lower quadrant pain, left-sided back pain, vomiting, and dysuria. Abdominopelvic CT scan revealed left hydroureteronephrosis to the level of the left ureterovesical junction (UVJ) where a bladder mass appeared to be obstructing the left ureteral orifice. The obstruction was ultimately found to be the result of a sloughed renal papilla lodged in the distal ureter, which created an inflammatory mass at the UVJ. Her history of diabetes and frequent UTIs likely predisposed her to the development of renal papillary necrosis (RPN) that resulted in sloughing of a renal papilla, distal ureteral obstruction with subsequent bladder inflammation that mimicked a bladder mass on imaging. RPN is a condition associated with many etiologies and likely represents a common final pathway of several diseases. Although several hypotheses exist, it is primarily thought to be ischemic in nature and is related to the underlying physiology of the renal papillae. We present a case of hydroureteronephrosis and bladder mass secondary to a sloughed renal papilla from RPN. PMID:27579408

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sikka, Amrita; Adam, Sharon Z; Wood, Cecil; Hoff, Frederick; Harmath, Carla B; Miller, Frank H

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic metastases are rare but are thought to be most commonly from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). These metastases can present many years after the initial tumor is resected, and accordingly, these patients require prolonged imaging follow-up. Although the computed tomographic findings of these metastases have been extensively reviewed in the literature, little has been written about the magnetic resonance imaging appearance of these metastases. Pancreatic metastases from RCC are typically T1 hypointense and T2 hyperintense. After intravenous administration of gadolinium, they are typically hypervascular and less commonly hypovascular. Chemical shift and diffusion-weighted imaging can aid in the diagnosis of these metastases.

  10. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  11. Renal cell carcinoma: histological classification and correlation with imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Muglia, Valdair F; Prando, Adilson

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the seventh most common histological type of cancer in the Western world and has shown a sustained increase in its prevalence. The histological classification of RCCs is of utmost importance, considering the significant prognostic and therapeutic implications of its histological subtypes. Imaging methods play an outstanding role in the diagnosis, staging and follow-up of RCC. Clear cell, papillary and chromophobe are the most common histological subtypes of RCC, and their preoperative radiological characterization, either followed or not by confirmatory percutaneous biopsy, may be particularly useful in cases of poor surgical condition, metastatic disease, central mass in a solitary kidney, and in patients eligible for molecular targeted therapy. New strategies recently developed for treating renal cancer, such as cryo and radiofrequency ablation, molecularly targeted therapy and active surveillance also require appropriate preoperative characterization of renal masses. Less common histological types, although sharing nonspecific imaging features, may be suspected on the basis of clinical and epidemiological data. The present study is aimed at reviewing the main clinical and imaging findings of histological RCC subtypes.

  12. Regional evaluation of renal dynamics in post transplant kidneys with Tc-99m DTPA and scinti-camera

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, T.; Akuta, K.; Aoki, S.; Furunishi, H.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, T.; Nakane, Y.; Pak, K.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze the regional renal dynamic process (renal perfusion, accumulation and clearance) using Tc-99m DTPA and assess for the regional renal indices from this analysis early to detect acute tubular necrosis and acute rejection of post transplant kidneys. The subjects were 6 normal donors and 10 post renal transplant patients. Tc-99m DTPA (20 mCi) was injected into the vein by a bolus, and its activity change in the kidney was measured by a scintillation camera, and stored each 1 sec. for 20 sec. following each 15 sec. for 20 min. in the computer, to calculate the renal functional indices: the perfusion index, the blood flow mean transit time, the accumulation rate and the clearance rate in the cortex, medulla and pelvis, whose R.O.I. regions were separated in the early and late scinti-images. The accumulation ratio, a new parameter, which is the second upslope part of Tc-99m DTPA renogram, and the clearance rate were calculated from H/A method. The authors made the functional images of these indices to estimate their regional distribution. The accumulation rate and the clearance rate only in the cortex were markedly decreased in the acute tubular necrosis and the rejection, which functional images showed irregular distributions. It was possible to evaluate the renal perfusion with Tc-99m DTPA, separated from the renal accumulation and clearance process. The authors' method gave the assessment of the regional renal disorders with the functional images; the renal disorders in acute tubular necrosis and acute rejection exist mainly in the cortex.

  13. Imaging-based diagnosis of acute renal allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Thölking, Gerold; Schuette-Nuetgen, Katharina; Kentrup, Dominik; Pawelski, Helga; Reuter, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best available treatment for patients with end stage renal disease. Despite the introduction of effective immunosuppressant drugs, episodes of acute allograft rejection still endanger graft survival. Since efficient treatment of acute rejection is available, rapid diagnosis of this reversible graft injury is essential. For diagnosis of rejection, invasive core needle biopsy of the graft is the “gold-standard”. However, biopsy carries the risk of significant graft injury and is not immediately feasible in patients taking anticoagulants. Therefore, a non-invasive tool assessing the whole organ for specific and fast detection of acute allograft rejection is desirable. We herein review current imaging-based state of the art approaches for non-invasive diagnostics of acute renal transplant rejection. We especially focus on new positron emission tomography-based as well as targeted ultrasound-based methods. PMID:27011915

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in the staging of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kabala, J E; Gillatt, D A; Persad, R A; Penry, J B; Gingell, J C; Chadwick, D

    1991-08-01

    A prospective study has been carried out to examine the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the investigation of renal cell carcinoma in 24 patients. In all cases the inferior vena cava (IVC) was well demonstrated with MRI. In 14 out of 15 patients where surgical correlation was available, the MRI and operative staging were in agreement. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomographic (CT) staging were in agreement in 16 out of the 17 patients where both were performed. In one case, CT suggested hepatic invasion but this was found not to be present on MRI and at operation. Magnetic resonance imaging also provided substantial additional information in three patients, including two cases where MRI demonstrated a patent IVC that appeared occluded on CT (one of which also had vertebral metastases seen on MRI but missed on CT) and one case where CT failed to demonstrate minimal involvement of the IVC. Magnetic resonance imaging is an accurate means of staging renal cell carcinoma with clear advantages over CT. In no case in this series was inferior vena cavography found to be necessary.

  15. Renal Graft Fibrosis and Inflammation Quantification by an Automated Fourier-Transform Infrared Imaging Technique.

    PubMed

    Vuiblet, Vincent; Fere, Michael; Gobinet, Cyril; Birembaut, Philippe; Piot, Olivier; Rieu, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Renal interstitial fibrosis and interstitial active inflammation are the main histologic features of renal allograft biopsy specimens. Fibrosis is currently assessed by semiquantitative subjective analysis, and color image analysis has been developed to improve the reliability and repeatability of this evaluation. However, these techniques fail to distinguish fibrosis from constitutive collagen or active inflammation. We developed an automatic, reproducible Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) imaging-based technique for simultaneous quantification of fibrosis and inflammation in renal allograft biopsy specimens. We generated and validated a classification model using 49 renal biopsy specimens and subsequently tested the robustness of this classification algorithm on 166 renal grafts. Finally, we explored the clinical relevance of fibrosis quantification using FTIR imaging by comparing results with renal function at 3 months after transplantation (M3) and the variation of renal function between M3 and M12. We showed excellent robustness for fibrosis and inflammation classification, with >90% of renal biopsy specimens adequately classified by FTIR imaging. Finally, fibrosis quantification by FTIR imaging correlated with renal function at M3, and the variation in fibrosis between M3 and M12 correlated well with the variation in renal function over the same period. This study shows that FTIR-based analysis of renal graft biopsy specimens is a reproducible and reliable label-free technique for quantifying fibrosis and active inflammation. This technique seems to be more relevant than digital image analysis and promising for both research studies and routine clinical practice.

  16. Renal Graft Fibrosis and Inflammation Quantification by an Automated Fourier-Transform Infrared Imaging Technique.

    PubMed

    Vuiblet, Vincent; Fere, Michael; Gobinet, Cyril; Birembaut, Philippe; Piot, Olivier; Rieu, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Renal interstitial fibrosis and interstitial active inflammation are the main histologic features of renal allograft biopsy specimens. Fibrosis is currently assessed by semiquantitative subjective analysis, and color image analysis has been developed to improve the reliability and repeatability of this evaluation. However, these techniques fail to distinguish fibrosis from constitutive collagen or active inflammation. We developed an automatic, reproducible Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) imaging-based technique for simultaneous quantification of fibrosis and inflammation in renal allograft biopsy specimens. We generated and validated a classification model using 49 renal biopsy specimens and subsequently tested the robustness of this classification algorithm on 166 renal grafts. Finally, we explored the clinical relevance of fibrosis quantification using FTIR imaging by comparing results with renal function at 3 months after transplantation (M3) and the variation of renal function between M3 and M12. We showed excellent robustness for fibrosis and inflammation classification, with >90% of renal biopsy specimens adequately classified by FTIR imaging. Finally, fibrosis quantification by FTIR imaging correlated with renal function at M3, and the variation in fibrosis between M3 and M12 correlated well with the variation in renal function over the same period. This study shows that FTIR-based analysis of renal graft biopsy specimens is a reproducible and reliable label-free technique for quantifying fibrosis and active inflammation. This technique seems to be more relevant than digital image analysis and promising for both research studies and routine clinical practice. PMID:26683669

  17. Science to Practice: Renal Hypoxia and Fat Deposition in Diabetic Neuropathy—New Insights with Functional Renal MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Morrell, Glen R.; Zhang, Jeff L.; Lee, Vivian S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Despite being a valuable tool for evaluation of the kidneys, renal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in clinical practice has been limited to depiction of anatomy and provides little diagnostic information about the health and function of the kidney in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetic nephropathy. In this issue, Peng et al (1) have used two MR imaging methods that go beyond depiction of anatomy to show renal function: renal blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) MR imaging, which shows oxygen levels in the kidney, and chemical shift–selective imaging, which shows the relative content of fat in the kidney parenchyma. In a mouse model of diabetes, Peng et al have shown higher fat and lower oxygen levels in kidneys of mice with diabetes than in those of normal controls. These MR imaging methods may help clarify the role of fat deposition and hypoxia in the progression of CKD. As the factors that contribute to the progression of CKD are better understood, ultimately more widespread clinical use for functional renal MR imaging protocols such as renal BOLD and chemical shift–selective imaging may be found to evaluate the severity of CKD and monitor the efficacy of clinical interventions, altering the course of disease progression. PMID:24261489

  18. Dynamics of renal electrolyte excretion in growing mice.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Katharina; Ripper, Maria; Tegtmeier, Ines; Humberg, Evelyn; Sterner, Christina; Reichold, Markus; Warth, Richard; Bandulik, Sascha

    2013-01-01

    Genetically modified mice represent important models for elucidating renal pathophysiology, but gene deletions frequently cause severe failure to thrive. In such cases, the analysis of the phenotype is often limited to the first weeks of life when renal excretory function undergoes dramatic physiological changes. Here, we investigated the postnatal dynamics of urinary ion excretion in mice. The profiles of urinary electrolyte excretion of mice were examined from birth until after weaning using an automated ion chromatography system. Postnatally, mice grew about 0.4 g/day, except during two phases with slower weight gain: (i) directly after birth during adaptation to extrauterine conditions (P0-P2) and (ii) during the weaning period (P15-P21), when nutrition changed from mother's milk to solid chow and water. During the first 3 days after birth, remarkable changes in urinary Na(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and phosphate concentrations occurred, whereas K(+) and Cl(-) concentrations hardly changed. From days 4-14 after birth, Na(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), K(+), and Cl(-) concentrations remained relatively stable at low levels. Urinary concentrations of creatinine, NH4(+), phosphate, and sulfate constantly increased from birth until after weaning. Profiles of salt excretion in KCNJ10(-/-) mice exemplified the relevance of age-dependent analysis of urinary excretion. In conclusion, the most critical phases for analysis of renal ion excretion during the first weeks of life are directly after birth and during the weaning period. The age dependence of urinary excretion varies for the different ions. This should be taken into consideration when the renal phenotype of mice is investigated during the first weeks of life. PMID:24296675

  19. Incidence and predictive factors of benign renal lesions in Korean patients with preoperative imaging diagnoses of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Park, Seo Yong; Jeon, Seong Soo; Lee, Seo Yeon; Jeong, Byong Chang; Seo, Seong Il; Lee, Hyun Moo; Choi, Han Yong

    2011-03-01

    The present study was performed to determine the incidence and predictive factors of benign renal lesions in Korean patients undergoing nephrectomy for presumed renal cell carcinoma on preoperative imaging. We analyzed the pathologic reports and medical records of 1,598 eligible patients with unilateral, nonmetastatic, and nonfamilial renal masses. Of the 1,598 renal masses, 114 (7.1%) were benign lesions, including angiomyolipoma in 47 (2.9%), oncocytoma in 23 (1.4%), and complicated cysts in 18 (1.1%) patients. On univariate analysis, the proportion of benign lesions was significantly higher in female patients, and in patients with smaller tumors, cystic renal masses, and without gross hematuria as a presenting symptom. When renal lesions were stratified by tumor size, the proportion of benign as opposed to malignant lesions decreased significantly as tumor size increased. On multivariate analysis, female gender, smaller tumor size, and cystic lesions were significantly associated with benign histological features. The findings in this large cohort of Korean patients show a lower incidence (7.1%) of benign renal lesions than those of previous Western reports. Female gender, cystic renal lesions, and smaller tumor size are independent predictors of benign histological features.

  20. Role of FDG PET/CT in imaging of renal lesions.

    PubMed

    Kochhar, R; Brown, R K; Wong, C O; Dunnick, N R; Frey, K A; Manoharan, P

    2010-08-01

    Focal incidental renal lesions are commonly encountered on positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) imaging. The vast majority of these lesions are benign. However, the interpretation of renal lesions can be problematic if the imaging criteria of simple cysts are not met. Limited literature exists on the characterisation of renal masses with metabolic imaging. The purpose of this article is to focus on the imaging features of benign and malignant renal masses with PET/CT. The lesions discussed include renal cyst, angiomyolipoma, oncocytoma, renal cell carcinoma, renal metastases and other infiltrating neoplastic processes affecting the kidney. Both the anatomical and metabolic features which characterise these benign and malignant entities are described. We emphasise the importance of viewing the CT component to identify the typical morphological features and discuss how to best use hybrid imaging for management of renal lesions. Metabolic imaging has a promising role in the imaging of renal lesions and can help prevent unnecessary biopsies and ensure optimal management of suspicious lesions.

  1. Bilateral renal lymphangiectasia: radiological findings by ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Elbanna, Khaled Youssef; Almutairi, Badr M; Zidan, Ahmed Touni

    2015-01-01

    Renal lymphangiectasia is a rare benign condition of the kidney without specific clinical presentations. Classic imaging findings are described in literature. Here, we present a case of renal lymphangiectasia with history of bilateral flank pain and abnormal renal function tests. The radiological appearance on ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) showed features of bilateral renal lymphangiectasia but the patient refused invasive procedure for aspiration of the cysts. So, follow-up of the patient was done by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Imaging findings of our case on US, CT, and MRI are discussed along with details of the additional finding of dilated retroperitoneal lymphatic channels, cisterna chyli, as well as the thoracic duct.

  2. Objective improvement in renal function post-Dietl's crisis: Documented on renal dynamic scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Parida, Girish Kumar; Tripathi, Madhavi; Kumar, Kunal; Damle, Nishikant

    2016-01-01

    Dietl's crisis is one of the treatable causes of intermittent abdominal pain. The pain is due to acute hydronephrosis that leads to stretching of the pelvis. The most common cause of this intermittent hydronephrosis is aberrant renal vessel at lower pole that causes pelvi-ureteric junction obstruction.(PUJO). High insertion of the ureter is one of the other rare causes. We present a case of 5-year-old boy with intermittent abdominal pain and distension with ultrasonography features of gross left hydronephrosis. Renal dynamic scan.(RDS) with ethylene dicysteine showed negligible functioning left kidney. On third follow-up day, the patient passed a lot of urine with decrease in abdominal pain and distension. Then, again the patient was sent to us 8.days after the first study for repeat RDS, which showed significant improvement in function and decreased in the size of left kidney though with persistent PUJO. On exploration high insertion of the ureter at pelvis was found to be the cause and was treated. PMID:27385903

  3. Dynamic granularity of imaging systems

    DOE PAGES

    Geissel, Matthias; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathon E.; Porter, John L.

    2015-11-04

    Imaging systems that include a specific source, imaging concept, geometry, and detector have unique properties such as signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, spatial resolution, distortions, and contrast. Some of these properties are inherently connected, particularly dynamic range and spatial resolution. It must be emphasized that spatial resolution is not a single number but must be seen in the context of dynamic range and consequently is better described by a function or distribution. We introduce the “dynamic granularity” Gdyn as a standardized, objective relation between a detector’s spatial resolution (granularity) and dynamic range for complex imaging systems in a given environment rathermore » than the widely found characterization of detectors such as cameras or films by themselves. We found that this relation can partly be explained through consideration of the signal’s photon statistics, background noise, and detector sensitivity, but a comprehensive description including some unpredictable data such as dust, damages, or an unknown spectral distribution will ultimately have to be based on measurements. Measured dynamic granularities can be objectively used to assess the limits of an imaging system’s performance including all contributing noise sources and to qualify the influence of alternative components within an imaging system. Our article explains the construction criteria to formulate a dynamic granularity and compares measured dynamic granularities for different detectors used in the X-ray backlighting scheme employed at Sandia’s Z-Backlighter facility.« less

  4. Dynamic granularity of imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Geissel, Matthias; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathon E.; Porter, John L.

    2015-11-04

    Imaging systems that include a specific source, imaging concept, geometry, and detector have unique properties such as signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, spatial resolution, distortions, and contrast. Some of these properties are inherently connected, particularly dynamic range and spatial resolution. It must be emphasized that spatial resolution is not a single number but must be seen in the context of dynamic range and consequently is better described by a function or distribution. We introduce the “dynamic granularity” Gdyn as a standardized, objective relation between a detector’s spatial resolution (granularity) and dynamic range for complex imaging systems in a given environment rather than the widely found characterization of detectors such as cameras or films by themselves. We found that this relation can partly be explained through consideration of the signal’s photon statistics, background noise, and detector sensitivity, but a comprehensive description including some unpredictable data such as dust, damages, or an unknown spectral distribution will ultimately have to be based on measurements. Measured dynamic granularities can be objectively used to assess the limits of an imaging system’s performance including all contributing noise sources and to qualify the influence of alternative components within an imaging system. Our article explains the construction criteria to formulate a dynamic granularity and compares measured dynamic granularities for different detectors used in the X-ray backlighting scheme employed at Sandia’s Z-Backlighter facility.

  5. Image-based retrieval system and computer-aided diagnosis system for renal cortical scintigraphy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumcuoğlu, Erkan; Nar, Fatih; Uğur, Omer; Bozkurt, M. Fani; Aslan, Mehmet

    2008-03-01

    Cortical renal (kidney) scintigraphy images are 2D images (256x256) acquired in three projection angles (posterior, right-posterior-oblique and left-posterior-oblique). These images are used by nuclear medicine specialists to examine the functional morphology of kidney parenchyma. The main visual features examined in reading the images are: size, location, shape and activity distribution (pixel intensity distribution within the boundary of each kidney). Among the above features, activity distribution (in finding scars if any) was found to have the least interobserver reproducibility. Therefore, in this study, we developed an image-based retrieval (IBR) and a computer-based diagnosis (CAD) system, focused on this feature in particular. The developed IBR and CAD algorithms start with automatic segmentation, boundary and landmark detection. Then, shape and activity distribution features are computed. Activity distribution feature is obtained using the acquired image and image set statistics of the normal patients. Active Shape Model (ASM) technique is used for more accurate kidney segmentation. In the training step of ASM, normal patient images are used. Retrieval performance is evaluated by calculating precision and recall. CAD performance is evaluated by specificity and sensitivity. To our knowledge, this paper is the first IBR or CAD system reported in the literature on renal cortical scintigraphy images.

  6. Dynamic optically multiplexed imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachlin, Yaron; Shah, Vinay; Shepard, R. Hamilton; Shih, Tina

    2015-09-01

    Optically multiplexed imagers overcome the tradeoff between field of view and resolution by superimposing images from multiple fields of view onto a single focal plane. In this paper, we consider the implications of independently shifting each field of view at a rate exceeding the frame rate of the focal plane array and with a precision that can exceed the pixel pitch. A sequence of shifts enables the reconstruction of the underlying scene, with the number of frames required growing inversely with the number of multiplexed images. As a result, measurements from a sufficiently fast sampling sensor can be processed to yield a low distortion image with more pixels than the original focal plane array, a wider field of view than the original optical design, and an aspect ratio different than the original lens. This technique can also enable the collection of low-distortion, wide field of view videos. A sequence of sub-pixel spatial shifts extends this capability to allow the recovery of a wide field of view scene at sub-pixel resolution. To realize this sensor concept, a novel and compact divided aperture multiplexed sensor, capable of rapidly and precisely shifting its fields of view, was prototyped. Using this sensor, we recover twenty-four megapixel images from a four-megapixel focal plane and show the feasibility of simultaneous de-multiplexing and super-resolution.

  7. Recent advances in cross-sectional renal imaging-an oncologic perspective: the current concepts and the future challenges.

    PubMed

    Ganeshan, Dhakshinamoorthy; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Nikolaidis, Paul; Sanyal, Rupan; Bhosale, Priya

    2013-01-01

    Renal imaging remains a critical tool to differentiate and manage benign from malignant renal disorders. Conventional multidetector computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) provide great anatomical details, although lack functional information and specificity. The lack of resolution undermines the functional capabilities of nuclear medicine imaging. Functional MR imaging has shown strong utility in imaging of renal masses, with evolving techniques such as diffusion, perfusion, and blood oxygen level-dependent sequences. At the same time, newer techniques like dual-energy CT and CT perfusion are also showing promise in renal oncologic imaging.This article will discuss the recent advances in MR imaging and CT techniques pertaining to renal oncological applications.

  8. Renal Relevant Radiology: Radiologic Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic; Mittal, Ankush; Mittal, Pardeep

    2014-01-01

    Summary Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease is a systemic disorder and the most common hereditary renal disease, which is characterized by cyst growth, progressive renal enlargement, and development of renal failure. The cystic nature of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and its renal and extrarenal complications (kidney stones, cyst hemorrhage, intracerebral aneurysm, liver cysts, cardiac valve abnormalities, etc.) give radiologic imaging studies a central role in the management of these patients. This article reviews the indications, comparative use, and limitation of various imaging modalities (ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, computerized tomography scan, Positron emission tomography scan, and renal scintigraphy) for the diagnosis and management of complications in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Finally, this work provides evidence for the value of total kidney volume to predict disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. PMID:24370765

  9. Dynamic imaging of brain function

    PubMed Central

    Hyder, Fahmeed

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there have been unprecedented methodological advances in the dynamic imaging of brain activities. Electrophysiological, optical, and magnetic resonance methods now allow mapping of functional activation (or deactivation) by measurement of neuronal activity (e.g., membrane potential, ion flux, neurotransmitter flux), energy metabolism (e.g., glucose consumption, oxygen consumption, creatine kinase flux), and functional hyperemia (e.g., blood oxygenation, blood flow, blood volume). Properties of the glutamatergic synapse are used as a model to reveal activities at the nerve terminal and their associated changes in energy demand and blood flow. This approach reveals that each method measures different tissue- and/or cell-specific components with specified spatiotemporal resolution. While advantages and disadvantages of different methods are apparent and often used to supersede one another in terms of specificity and/or sensitivity, no particular technique is the optimal dynamic brain imaging method because each method is unique in some respect. Because the demand for energy substrates is a fundamental requirement for function, energy-based methods may allow quantitative dynamic imaging in vivo. However there are exclusive neurobiological insights gained by combining some of these different dynamic imaging techniques. PMID:18839085

  10. High-NaCl diet impairs dynamic renal blood flow autoregulation in rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Aso; DiBona, Gerald F; Grimberg, Elisabeth; Nguy, Lisa; Mikkelsen, Minne Line Nedergaard; Marcussen, Niels; Guron, Gregor

    2014-03-15

    This study examined the effects of 2 wk of high-NaCl diet on kidney function and dynamic renal blood flow autoregulation (RBFA) in rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure (ACRF). Male Sprague-Dawley rats received either chow containing adenine or were pair-fed an identical diet without adenine (controls). After 10 wk, rats were randomized to either remain on the same diet (0.6% NaCl) or to be switched to high 4% NaCl chow. Two weeks after randomization, renal clearance experiments were performed under isoflurane anesthesia and dynamic RBFA, baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), systolic arterial pressure variability (SAPV), and heart rate variability were assessed by spectral analytical techniques. Rats with ACRF showed marked reductions in glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow (RBF), whereas mean arterial pressure and SAPV were significantly elevated. In addition, spontaneous BRS was reduced by ∼50% in ACRF animals. High-NaCl diet significantly increased transfer function fractional gain values between arterial pressure and RBF in the frequency range of the myogenic response (0.06-0.09 Hz) only in ACRF animals (0.3 ± 4.0 vs. -4.4 ± 3.8 dB; P < 0.05). Similarly, a high-NaCl diet significantly increased SAPV in the low-frequency range only in ACRF animals. To conclude, a 2-wk period of a high-NaCl diet in ACRF rats significantly impaired dynamic RBFA in the frequency range of the myogenic response and increased SAPV in the low-frequency range. These abnormalities may increase the susceptibility to hypertensive end-organ injury and progressive renal failure by facilitating pressure transmission to the microvasculature.

  11. Complications of sporadic, hereditary, and acquired renal cysts: cross-sectional imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Tonolini, Massimo; Rigiroli, Francesca; Villa, Federica; Bianco, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Commonly encountered in the general adult and elderly population, in most cases simple renal cysts are confidently diagnosed on imaging studies and do not require further workup or treatment. However, large or growing renal cysts sometimes cause symptoms or signs such as hypertension, palpable mass, flank or abdominal pain, obstructive uropathy, and hematuria, which may indicate the need for minimally invasive percutaneous or laparoscopic treatment. Furthermore, severe complications such as cystic hemorrhage, rupture, or superinfection may occur, particularly in patients with polycystic renal disorders, either hereditary (namely adult polycystic kidney diseases) or acquired in chronic renal failure. This pictorial essay reviews and discusses the cross-sectional imaging appearances of symptomatic and complicated sporadic, hereditary, and acquired renal cysts. Early cross-sectional imaging with multidetector computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging or both, including contrast enhancement unless contraindicated by renal dysfunction, is warranted to investigate clinical and laboratory signs suggesting retroperitoneal hemorrhage or infection in patients with pre-existent renal cysts, particularly if large, multiple, or hereditary.

  12. Renal nerves dynamically regulate renal blood flow in conscious, healthy rabbits.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Alicia M; Pellegrino, Peter R; Zucker, Irving H

    2016-01-15

    Despite significant clinical interest in renal denervation as a therapy, the role of the renal nerves in the physiological regulation of renal blood flow (RBF) remains debated. We hypothesized that the renal nerves physiologically regulate beat-to-beat RBF variability (RBFV). This was tested in chronically instrumented, healthy rabbits that underwent either bilateral surgical renal denervation (DDNx) or a sham denervation procedure (INV). Artifact-free segments of RBF and arterial pressure (AP) from calmly resting, conscious rabbits were used to extract RBFV and AP variability for time-domain, frequency-domain, and nonlinear analysis. Whereas steady-state measures of RBF, AP, and heart rate did not statistically differ between groups, DDNx rabbits had greater RBFV than INV rabbits. AP-RBF transfer function analysis showed greater admittance gain in DDNx rabbits than in INV rabbits, particularly in the low-frequency (LF) range where systemic sympathetic vasomotion gives rise to AP oscillations. In the LF range, INV rabbits exhibited a negative AP-RBF phase shift and low coherence, consistent with the presence of an active control system. Neither of these features were present in the LF range of DDNx rabbits, which showed no phase shift and high coherence, consistent with a passive, Ohm's law pressure-flow relationship. Renal denervation did not significantly affect nonlinear RBFV measures of chaos, self-affinity, or complexity, nor did it significantly affect glomerular filtration rate or extracellular fluid volume. Cumulatively, these data suggest that the renal nerves mediate LF renal sympathetic vasomotion, which buffers RBF from LF AP oscillations in conscious, healthy rabbits. PMID:26538235

  13. Renal nerves dynamically regulate renal blood flow in conscious, healthy rabbits.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Alicia M; Pellegrino, Peter R; Zucker, Irving H

    2016-01-15

    Despite significant clinical interest in renal denervation as a therapy, the role of the renal nerves in the physiological regulation of renal blood flow (RBF) remains debated. We hypothesized that the renal nerves physiologically regulate beat-to-beat RBF variability (RBFV). This was tested in chronically instrumented, healthy rabbits that underwent either bilateral surgical renal denervation (DDNx) or a sham denervation procedure (INV). Artifact-free segments of RBF and arterial pressure (AP) from calmly resting, conscious rabbits were used to extract RBFV and AP variability for time-domain, frequency-domain, and nonlinear analysis. Whereas steady-state measures of RBF, AP, and heart rate did not statistically differ between groups, DDNx rabbits had greater RBFV than INV rabbits. AP-RBF transfer function analysis showed greater admittance gain in DDNx rabbits than in INV rabbits, particularly in the low-frequency (LF) range where systemic sympathetic vasomotion gives rise to AP oscillations. In the LF range, INV rabbits exhibited a negative AP-RBF phase shift and low coherence, consistent with the presence of an active control system. Neither of these features were present in the LF range of DDNx rabbits, which showed no phase shift and high coherence, consistent with a passive, Ohm's law pressure-flow relationship. Renal denervation did not significantly affect nonlinear RBFV measures of chaos, self-affinity, or complexity, nor did it significantly affect glomerular filtration rate or extracellular fluid volume. Cumulatively, these data suggest that the renal nerves mediate LF renal sympathetic vasomotion, which buffers RBF from LF AP oscillations in conscious, healthy rabbits.

  14. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    ScienceCinema

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2016-07-12

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  15. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-02-20

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  16. Estimation of Response Functions Based on Variational Bayes Algorithm in Dynamic Images Sequences

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We proposed a nonparametric Bayesian model based on variational Bayes algorithm to estimate the response functions in dynamic medical imaging. In dynamic renal scintigraphy, the impulse response or retention functions are rather complicated and finding a suitable parametric form is problematic. In this paper, we estimated the response functions using nonparametric Bayesian priors. These priors were designed to favor desirable properties of the functions, such as sparsity or smoothness. These assumptions were used within hierarchical priors of the variational Bayes algorithm. We performed our algorithm on the real online dataset of dynamic renal scintigraphy. The results demonstrated that this algorithm improved the estimation of response functions with nonparametric priors. PMID:27631007

  17. Estimation of Response Functions Based on Variational Bayes Algorithm in Dynamic Images Sequences

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We proposed a nonparametric Bayesian model based on variational Bayes algorithm to estimate the response functions in dynamic medical imaging. In dynamic renal scintigraphy, the impulse response or retention functions are rather complicated and finding a suitable parametric form is problematic. In this paper, we estimated the response functions using nonparametric Bayesian priors. These priors were designed to favor desirable properties of the functions, such as sparsity or smoothness. These assumptions were used within hierarchical priors of the variational Bayes algorithm. We performed our algorithm on the real online dataset of dynamic renal scintigraphy. The results demonstrated that this algorithm improved the estimation of response functions with nonparametric priors.

  18. Advantage of indium-111 leukocytes over ultrasound in imaging an infected renal cyst

    SciTech Connect

    Fortner, A.; Taylor, A. Jr.; Alazraki, N.; Datz, F.L.

    1986-07-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte scanning is a highly sensitive and specific method of detecting abscesses. This report describes a patient with polycystic kidneys and a single infected cyst. Ultrasound could not determine which cyst was infected, but the infected cyst could be localized by (/sup 111/In)leukocyte imaging in conjunction with a (/sup 99m/Tc)DMSA renal scan. The two radionuclide studies were used to identify an infected renal cyst and direct ultrasound guided aspiration.

  19. Renal tubular receptor imaging with iodine-131-labeled peanut lectin: pharmacokinetics and renal clearance mechanism in animals

    SciTech Connect

    Boniface, G.R.; Suresh, M.R.; Willans, D.J.; Tam, Y.K.; Shysh, A.; Longenecker, B.M.; Noujaim, A.A.

    1986-05-01

    Intravenously administered peanut lectin (PNA), iodinated with /sup 131/I ((/sup 131/I)PNA), is rapidly cleared from the plasma by the kidneys in dogs (clearance (total body) = 17.52 +/- 8.74 ml/min). Dynamic gamma camera renal scintigraphy demonstrated renal accumulation and excretion phases of the (/sup 131/I)PNA renogram in dogs and rabbits (% injection dose-at-peak = 21.8 +/- 3.3% and 19.6 +/- 4.3%, time-to-peak = 44.6 +/- 4.8 min and 37.2 +/- 6.9 min, respectively). Immunoperoxidase staining of kidney sections, following i.v. administered PNA, demonstrated predominant accumulation by the proximal tubules of mice, rabbits, and dogs. The basement membrane was intensely stained at early times p.i. while intracellular and luminal PNA was evident within 1 hr. Urine analysis confirmed the presence of intact (/sup 131/I)PNA in the bladder contents, while protein degradation products, and a small percentage of the free iodide (less than 5%) were noted within 1 hr p.i. The relative proportion of free iodide increased at later times p.i. (greater than 6 hr). A receptor mediated excretion mechanism is proposed for the clearance of PNA and may be useful for the study of renal tubular function.

  20. Computer-Aided Detection of Exophytic Renal Lesions on Non-Contrast CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianfei; Wang, Shijun; Linguraru, Marius George; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    Renal lesions are important extracolonic findings on computed tomographic colonography (CTC). They are difficult to detect on non-contrast CTC images due to low image contrast with surrounding objects. In this paper, we developed a novel computer-aided diagnosis system to detect a subset of renal lesions, exophytic lesions, by 1) exploiting efficient belief propagation to segment kidneys, 2) establishing an intrinsic manifold diffusion on kidney surface, 3) searching for potential lesion-caused protrusions with local maximum diffusion response, and 4) exploring novel shape descriptors, including multi-scale diffusion response, with machine learning to classify exophytic renal lesions. Experimental results on the validation dataset with 167 patients revealed that manifold diffusion significantly outperformed conventional shape features (p < 1e − 3) and resulted in 95% sensitivity with 15 false positives per patient for detecting exophytic renal lesions. Five-fold cross-validation also demonstrated that our method could stably detect exophytic renal lesions. These encouraging results demonstrated that manifold diffusion is a key means to enable accurate computer-aided diagnosis of renal lesions. PMID:25189363

  1. Technetium-99m pyrophosphate imaging in acute renal failure associated with nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, R.; Mishkin, F.S.

    1986-10-01

    Technetium-99m pyrophosphate (Tc-PYP) imaging was performed in five patients with acute renal failure associated with nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis. Four patients had phencyclidine intoxication and one had viral pneumonia. During the acute phase, marked uptake of pyrophosphate was seen in all patients in several muscle groups, but always in the thigh adductors. The results show that phencyclidine intoxication can result in diffuse muscle uptake of Tc-PYP without overt evidence of muscle injury. Tc-PYP imaging may provide a clue to the cause of acute renal failure in patients with suspected rhabdomyolysis in whom elevations of serum creatine phosphokinase concentrations are equivocal.

  2. The role of imaging in the diagnosis and management of renal stone disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Masselli, G; Weston, M; Spencer, J

    2015-12-01

    The distinction of pain in pregnancy due to urolithiasis from that related to physiological dilation of the renal tract is a common conundrum as renal colic is one of the commonest causes for non-obstetric pain in pregnancy. Ultrasound is the first-line imaging test but although it may demonstrate renal dilation, it may not show the cause. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is able to make the distinction. Physiological dilation will show smooth tapering of the ureter in the middle third as it is compressed between the gravid uterus and the retroperitoneum. Obstruction due to calculi causes renal enlargement and perinephric oedema. When a stone is lodged in the lower ureter, a standing column of dilated ureter will be seen below the physiological constriction. The stone itself may be shown. Computed tomography (CT) is an acceptable alternative if there is a contraindication to MRI, but even low-dose regimes involve some ionising radiation. This paper serves to highlight the role of MRI compared to US and CT in the imaging of renal colic in pregnancy. Multidisciplinary collaboration between obstetricians, urologists, and radiologists is required for effective management. PMID:26454345

  3. Image-guided percutaneous microwave ablation of small renal tumours: short- and mid-term outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Genson, Pierre-Yves; Mourey, Eric; Moulin, Morgan; Favelier, Sylvain; Di Marco, Lucy; Chevallier, Olivier; Cercueil, Jean-Pierre; Krausé, Denis; Cormier, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose is to assess the short- and mid-term outcomes of microwave ablation (MWA) of small renal tumours in selected patients. Methods From August 2012 to February 2015, 29 renal tumours in 23 patients (17 male, 6 female, mean age 75 years) were treated by percutaneous MWA under imaging guidance. The tumours were 1-4.7 cm in diameter (mean size, 2.7 cm). Therapeutic effects were assessed at follow-up with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). All patients were followed up for 2-25 months (mean, 12.2 months) to observe the therapeutic effects and complications. Changes in renal function at day 1 after treatment were statistically analyzed using the Student paired t-test or the paired Wilcoxon test. Results Technical success was achieved in all cases. One severe bleeding complication post-procedure occurred leading to death. No other unexpected side effects were observed after the MWA procedures. Clinical effectiveness was 100%. None of the patients showed recurrence on MRI imaging follow-up. No significant changes in renal function were noted after treatment (P=0.57). Conclusions Our preliminary study demonstrates that the use of MWA for the treatment of small renal tumours can be applied as safely and efficiently as other ablative techniques in selected patients not eligible for surgery. PMID:26682134

  4. Percutaneous Ablation for Small Renal Masses—Imaging Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Iannuccilli, Jason D.; Grand, David J.; Dupuy, Damian E.; Mayo-Smith, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided percutaneous thermal ablation is a safe and effective nephron-sparing alternative to surgical resection for the treatment of small renal tumors. Assessment of treatment efficacy relies heavily on interval follow-up imaging after treatment. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) both play a pivotal role in evaluating the treatment zone, identifying residual tumor, and detecting early and delayed procedure-related complications. This article discusses a surveillance imaging protocol for patients who undergo percutaneous thermal ablation of renal tumors, and also illustrates the typical appearances of both successfully treated tumors and residual disease on contrast-enhanced CT or MRI. In addition, it discusses the imaging appearance of potential early and delayed treatment-related complications to facilitate their prompt detection and management. PMID:24596440

  5. [Dynamic renal scintigraphy in assessing kidney function in patients with nonspecific colitis].

    PubMed

    Topchiĭ, T V; Moskalenko, N I; Man'kovskaia, O L; Morozova, N L

    1990-11-01

    Research into the morphofunctional status of the kidneys was conducted in patients with nonspecific colitis-NC (nonspecific ulcerative colitis-NUC and Crohn's disease). Urodynamics and partial function of the kidneys were assessed in 74 NC patients (51 NUC patients and 23 patients with Crohn's disease) on the basis of the findings of two-nuclide dynamic renal scintigraphy with 131I-hippuran and 99mTc-pentatech. Despite the absence of clinical symptomatology of urinary tract lesions, marked dysfunction of the kidneys of various degree (depending on severity of disease, tactics of its treatment and a type of surgical intervention) was noted in NC patients. In most cases changes of renal function were without visible clinical manifestations and were frequently undetectable by routine laboratory tests. Therefore dynamic renal scintigraphy was found necessary for investigation on NC patients. PMID:2259285

  6. Shadow Attenuation With High Dynamic Range Images

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shadow often interferes with accurate image analysis. To mitigate shadow effects in near-earth imagery (2 m above ground level), we created high dynamic range (HDR) nadir images and used them to measure grassland ground cover. HDR composites were created by merging three differentially-exposed image...

  7. Automatic alignment of renal DCE-MRI image series for improvement of quantitative tracer kinetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zikic, Darko; Sourbron, Steven; Feng, Xinxing; Michaely, Henrik J.; Khamene, Ali; Navab, Nassir

    2008-03-01

    Tracer kinetic modeling with dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and the quantification of the kinetic parameters are active fields of research which have the potential to improve the measurement of renal function. However, the strong coronal motion of the kidney in the time series inhibits an accurate assessment of the kinetic parameters. Automatic motion correction is challenging due to the large movement of the kidney and the strong intensity changes caused by the injected bolus. In this work, we improve the quantification results by a template matching motion correction method using a gradient-based similarity measure. Thus, a tedious manual motion correction is replaced by an automatic procedure. The only remaining user interaction is reduced to a selection of a reference slice and a coarse manual segmentation of the kidney in this slice. These steps do not present an overhead to the interaction needed for the assessment of the kinetic parameters. In order to achieve reliable and fast results, we constrain the degrees of freedom for the correction method as far as possible. Furthermore, we compare our method to deformable registration using the same similarity measure. In all our tests, the presented template matching correction was superior to the deformable approach in terms of reliability, leading to more accurate parameter quantification. The evaluation on 10 patient data series with 180-230 images each demonstrate that the quantitative analysis by a two-compartment model can be improved by our method.

  8. Groupwise Image Registration Guided by a Dynamic Digraph of Images.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhenyu; Fan, Yong

    2016-04-01

    For groupwise image registration, graph theoretic methods have been adopted for discovering the manifold of images to be registered so that accurate registration of images to a group center image can be achieved by aligning similar images that are linked by the shortest graph paths. However, the image similarity measures adopted to build a graph of images in the extant methods are essentially pairwise measures, not effective for capturing the groupwise similarity among multiple images. To overcome this problem, we present a groupwise image similarity measure that is built on sparse coding for characterizing image similarity among all input images and build a directed graph (digraph) of images so that similar images are connected by the shortest paths of the digraph. Following the shortest paths determined according to the digraph, images are registered to a group center image in an iterative manner by decomposing a large anatomical deformation field required to register an image to the group center image into a series of small ones between similar images. During the iterative image registration, the digraph of images evolves dynamically at each iteration step to pursue an accurate estimation of the image manifold. Moreover, an adaptive dictionary strategy is adopted in the groupwise image similarity measure to ensure fast convergence of the iterative registration procedure. The proposed method has been validated based on both simulated and real brain images, and experiment results have demonstrated that our method was more effective for learning the manifold of input images and achieved higher registration accuracy than state-of-the-art groupwise image registration methods.

  9. Segmentation of Individual Renal Cysts from MR Images in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Kyungsoo; Park, Bumwoo; Sun, Hongliang; Wang, Jinhong; Tao, Cheng; Chapman, Arlene B.; Torres, Vicente E.; Grantham, Jared J.; Mrug, Michal; Bennett, William M.; Flessner, Michael F.; Landsittel, Doug P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objective To evaluate the performance of a semi-automated method for the segmentation of individual renal cysts from magnetic resonance (MR) images in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Design, setting, participants, & measurements This semi-automated method was based on a morphologic watershed technique with shape-detection level set for segmentation of renal cysts from MR images. T2-weighted MR image sets of 40 kidneys were selected from 20 patients with mild to moderate renal cyst burden (kidney volume < 1500 ml) in the Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease (CRISP). The performance of the semi-automated method was assessed in terms of two reference metrics in each kidney: the total number of cysts measured by manual counting and the total volume of cysts measured with a region-based thresholding method. The proposed and reference measurements were compared using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman analysis. Results Individual renal cysts were successfully segmented with the semi-automated method in all 20 cases. The total number of cysts in each kidney measured with the two methods correlated well (ICC, 0.99), with a very small relative bias (0.3% increase with the semi-automated method; limits of agreement, 15.2% reduction to 17.2% increase). The total volume of cysts measured using both methods also correlated well (ICC, 1.00), with a small relative bias of <10% (9.0% decrease in the semi-automated method; limits of agreement, 17.1% increase to 43.3% decrease). Conclusion This semi-automated method to segment individual renal cysts in ADPKD kidneys provides a quantitative indicator of severity in early and moderate stages of the disease. PMID:23520042

  10. Renal Allograft Torsion: US and CT Imaging Findings of a Rare Posttransplant Complication.

    PubMed

    Dewan, Rohit; Dasyam, Anil K; Tan, Henke; Furlan, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Vascular torsion is a rare renal transplant complication which requires prompt diagnosis and surgery to salvage allograft function. We report here a case of renal allograft torsion with interesting imaging findings on unenhanced CT and color Doppler ultrasound. A 60-year-old woman with a history of pancreas and kidney transplant presented to the emergency room with nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and minimal urine output. Unenhanced CT of the abdomen demonstrated an enlarged and malrotated renal allograft with moderate hydronephrosis. Color Doppler ultrasound demonstrated lack of vascularity within the allograft. The patient was taken urgently to the operating room where the renal allograft was found twisted 360 degrees around the vascular pedicle. After the allograft was detorsed, the color of the kidney returned and the Doppler signals for arterial flow improved. Intraoperative biopsy showed no evidence of infarct or acute cellular rejection. The detorsed kidney was surgically fixed in position in its upper and lower poles. Follow-up ultrasound 1 day later demonstrated normal blood flow to the renal allograft and the serum level of creatinine returned to normal.

  11. Digital vascular imaging and selective renin sampling in evaluation of vascular anatomy in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, G A; Irving, J D; Farrington, K; Varghese, Z; Persaud, J W; Sweny, P; Moorhead, J F; Fernando, O N

    1983-01-01

    Sixty-five renal transplant recipients underwent digital vascular imaging of the graft and simultaneous selective venous sampling for plasma renin activity. Renal artery stenosis was found in seven patients but did not appear to be functionally important. Diffuse intrarenal arterial attenuation was found in seven patients and was associated with impaired graft function and perfusion; it may indicate chronic rejection. Lower pole hypoperfusion was found in nine patients without impaired graft function or perfusion; its clinical relevance is uncertain. Aneurysmal dilatation of the main renal artery was found in two patients. Severe hypertension was common in patients with these three major abnormalities, but a causal association between the abnormality and hypertension could rarely be inferred. It may be the abnormalities on digital vascular imaging, especially diffuse intrarenal arterial attenuation and lower pole hypoperfusion, are secondary to severe hypertension. Digital vascular imaging with simultaneous selective venous sampling for plasma renin activity is useful in evaluating the vascular anatomy of the grafted kidney and in assessing any abnormality found. The combined procedure was well tolerated by all patients with no complications and no incidence of acute tubular dysfunction or proteinuria after the investigation. Images p1005-a PMID:6403169

  12. Live-Animal Imaging of Renal Function by Multiphoton Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kenneth W.; Sutton, Timothy A.; Sandoval, Ruben M.

    2015-01-01

    Intravital microscopy, microscopy of living animals, is a powerful research technique that combines the resolution and sensitivity found in microscopic studies of cultured cells with the relevance and systemic influences of cells in the context of the intact animal. The power of intravital microscopy has recently been extended with the development of multiphoton fluorescence microscopy systems capable of collecting optical sections from deep within the kidney at subcellular resolution, supporting high-resolution characterizations of the structure and function of glomeruli, tubules, and vasculature in the living kidney. Fluorescent probes are administered to an anesthetized, surgically prepared animal, followed by image acquisition for up to 3 hr. Images are transferred via a high-speed network to specialized computer systems for digital image analysis. This general approach can be used with different combinations of fluorescent probes to evaluate processes such as glomerular permeability, proximal tubule endocytosis, microvascular flow, vascular permeability, mitochondrial function, and cellular apoptosis/necrosis. PMID:23042524

  13. Photorefractive Crystal Compresses Dynamic Range Of Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1991-01-01

    Experiment shows dynamic range of spatial variations of illumination within image compressed by use of photorefractive crystal. In technique, photorefractive crystal placed in optical path at some stage preceding video camera, photographic camera, or final photodetector stage. Provided brightness of parts of scene vary as slowly as or more slowly than photorefractive crystal responds, effect exploited to provide real-time dynamic-range compression to prevent saturation of bright areas in video or photographic images of scene, helping to preserve spatial-variation information in such images.

  14. Comparative imaging study in ultrasound, MRI, CT, and DSA using a multimodality renal artery phantom

    SciTech Connect

    King, Deirdre M.; Fagan, Andrew J.; Moran, Carmel M.; Browne, Jacinta E.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: A range of anatomically realistic multimodality renal artery phantoms consisting of vessels with varying degrees of stenosis was developed and evaluated using four imaging techniques currently used to detect renal artery stenosis (RAS). The spatial resolution required to visualize vascular geometry and the velocity detection performance required to adequately characterize blood flow in patients suffering from RAS are currently ill-defined, with the result that no one imaging modality has emerged as a gold standard technique for screening for this disease. Methods: The phantoms, which contained a range of stenosis values (0%, 30%, 50%, 70%, and 85%), were designed for use with ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray computed tomography, and x-ray digital subtraction angiography. The construction materials used were optimized with respect to their ultrasonic speed of sound and attenuation coefficient, MR relaxometry (T{sub 1},T{sub 2}) properties, and Hounsfield number/x-ray attenuation coefficient, with a design capable of tolerating high-pressure pulsatile flow. Fiducial targets, incorporated into the phantoms to allow for registration of images among modalities, were chosen to minimize geometric distortions. Results: High quality distortion-free images of the phantoms with good contrast between vessel lumen, fiducial markers, and background tissue to visualize all stenoses were obtained with each modality. Quantitative assessments of the grade of stenosis revealed significant discrepancies between modalities, with each underestimating the stenosis severity for the higher-stenosed phantoms (70% and 85%) by up to 14%, with the greatest discrepancy attributable to DSA. Conclusions: The design and construction of a range of anatomically realistic renal artery phantoms containing varying degrees of stenosis is described. Images obtained using the main four diagnostic techniques used to detect RAS were free from artifacts and exhibited adequate contrast

  15. Enhanced resolution of interstitial fibrosis in pediatric renal allograft biopsies using image analysis of trichrome stain.

    PubMed

    Birk, Patricia E; Gill, John S; Blydt-Hansen, Tom D; Gibson, Ian W

    2010-11-01

    The Banff classification is ill suited to detect subtle histologic progression in renal allografts. We present image analysis methodology to precisely quantify IF in pediatric renal allograft biopsies routinely stained with MT. The mean area %IF was determined in 105 pediatric renal allograft biopsies. Associations between %IF or Banff ci scores and estimated GFR were determined using GEE modeling. Logistic regression was used to estimate IF progression. Percent IF (mean ± s.d.) was 6.83% ± 3.94, 10.39 ± 5.23%, and 20.53 ± 8.74 in patients with ci0, ci1, and ci2, respectively. The difference in %IF between biopsies with ci0, ci1, and ci2 was not proportionately incremental: compared to ci2, ci0 had 67% less IF (p < 0.0001), while ci1 had 48% less IF (p < 0.0001). AR had no impact on the precision of %IF measurements. Each 0.5% decrement in %IF was associated with a 1 mL/min per 1.73 m² increase in GFR (p < 0.004). Histologic progression was demonstrated by increasing %IF values (p < 0.0001) and could be estimated by IF = 2.61 × (months) + 6.43. This readily adaptable methodology may be used for the longitudinal assessment of IF in pediatric protocol renal allograft biopsies.

  16. Renal safety of intravenous gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in patients awaiting liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Katherine M; Parikh, Mehul R; Runge, Thomas M; Perez, Sebastian D; Sakaria, Sonali S; Subramanian, Ram M

    2015-11-01

    Renal dysfunction in cirrhosis carries a high morbidity and mortality. Given the potential risk of contrast-induced nephropathy associated with iodinated intravenous contrast used in computed tomography (CT), alternate contrast modalities for abdominal imaging in liver transplant candidates need to be examined. The purpose of this study was to examine the renal safety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium in patients awaiting liver transplantation. The study involved a retrospective analysis of 352 patients of abdominal MRI with low-dose gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance) (0.05 mmol/kg) in patients with cirrhosis and without renal replacement therapy at a single center during the period from 2007 to 2013. For each case, serum creatinine before and within a few days after the MRI were compared. In addition, the patients were analyzed for the development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), a reported complication of gadolinium in chronic kidney disease. The pre-MRI serum creatinine values ranged from 0.36 to 4.86 mg/dL, with 70 patients (20%) having values ≥ 1.5 mg/dL. A comparison of the pre- and post-MRI serum creatinine values did not demonstrate a clinically significant difference (mean change = 0.017 mg/dL; P = 0.38), including those patients with a pre-MRI serum creatinine ≥ 1.5 mg/dL. In addition, no cases of NSF were noted. In conclusion, our findings suggest that MRI with low-dose gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance) is a nonnephrotoxic imaging modality in liver transplant candidates, and its use can be cautiously expanded to liver transplant candidates with concomitant renal insufficiency.

  17. Nephron blood flow dynamics measured by laser speckle contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Sosnovtseva, Olga V; Pavlov, Alexey N; Cupples, William A; Sorensen, Charlotte Mehlin; Marsh, Donald J

    2011-02-01

    Tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) has an important role in autoregulation of renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Because of the characteristics of signal transmission in the feedback loop, the TGF undergoes self-sustained oscillations in single-nephron blood flow, GFR, and tubular pressure and flow. Nephrons interact by exchanging electrical signals conducted electrotonically through cells of the vascular wall, leading to synchronization of the TGF-mediated oscillations. Experimental studies of these interactions have been limited to observations on two or at most three nephrons simultaneously. The interacting nephron fields are likely to be more extensive. We have turned to laser speckle contrast imaging to measure the blood flow dynamics of 50-100 nephrons simultaneously on the renal surface of anesthetized rats. We report the application of this method and describe analytic techniques for extracting the desired data and for examining them for evidence of nephron synchronization. Synchronized TGF oscillations were detected in pairs or triplets of nephrons. The amplitude and the frequency of the oscillations changed with time, as did the patterns of synchronization. Synchronization may take place among nephrons not immediately adjacent on the surface of the kidney.

  18. Automated 3D renal segmentation based on image partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeghiazaryan, Varduhi; Voiculescu, Irina D.

    2016-03-01

    Despite several decades of research into segmentation techniques, automated medical image segmentation is barely usable in a clinical context, and still at vast user time expense. This paper illustrates unsupervised organ segmentation through the use of a novel automated labelling approximation algorithm followed by a hypersurface front propagation method. The approximation stage relies on a pre-computed image partition forest obtained directly from CT scan data. We have implemented all procedures to operate directly on 3D volumes, rather than slice-by-slice, because our algorithms are dimensionality-independent. The results picture segmentations which identify kidneys, but can easily be extrapolated to other body parts. Quantitative analysis of our automated segmentation compared against hand-segmented gold standards indicates an average Dice similarity coefficient of 90%. Results were obtained over volumes of CT data with 9 kidneys, computing both volume-based similarity measures (such as the Dice and Jaccard coefficients, true positive volume fraction) and size-based measures (such as the relative volume difference). The analysis considered both healthy and diseased kidneys, although extreme pathological cases were excluded from the overall count. Such cases are difficult to segment both manually and automatically due to the large amplitude of Hounsfield unit distribution in the scan, and the wide spread of the tumorous tissue inside the abdomen. In the case of kidneys that have maintained their shape, the similarity range lies around the values obtained for inter-operator variability. Whilst the procedure is fully automated, our tools also provide a light level of manual editing.

  19. Quantitative imaging mass spectrometry of renal sulfatides: validation by classical mass spectrometric methods1[S

    PubMed Central

    Marsching, Christian; Jennemann, Richard; Heilig, Raphael; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Hopf, Carsten; Sandhoff, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Owing to its capability of discriminating subtle mass-altering structural differences such as double bonds or elongated acyl chains, MALDI-based imaging MS (IMS) has emerged as a powerful technique for analysis of lipid distribution in tissue at moderate spatial resolution of about 50 μm. However, it is still unknown if MS1-signals and ion intensity images correlate with the corresponding apparent lipid concentrations. Analyzing renal sulfated glycosphingolipids, sulfatides, we validate for the first time IMS-signal identities using corresponding sulfatide-deficient kidneys. To evaluate the extent of signal quenching effects interfering with lipid quantification, we surgically dissected the three major renal regions (papillae, medulla, and cortex) and systematically compared MALDI IMS of renal sulfatides with quantitative analyses of corresponding lipid extracts by on-target MALDI TOF-MS and by ultra-performance LC-ESI-(triple-quadrupole)tandem MS. Our results demonstrate a generally strong correlation (R2 > 0.9) between the local relative sulfatide signal intensity in MALDI IMS and absolute sulfatide quantities determined by the other two methods. However, high concentrations of sulfatides in the papillae and medulla result in an up to 4-fold signal suppression. In conclusion, our study suggests that MALDI IMS is useful for semi-quantitative dissection of relative local changes of sulfatides and possibly other lipids in tissue. PMID:25274613

  20. Analysis of the Sensitivity and Specificity of Noninvasive Imaging Tests for the Diagnosis of Renal Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Borelli, Flavio Antonio de Oliveira; Pinto, Ibraim M. F.; Amodeo, Celso; Smanio, Paola E. P.; Kambara, Antonio M.; Petisco, Ana Claudia G.; Moreira, Samuel M.; Paiva, Ricardo Calil; Lopes, Hugo Belotti; Sousa, Amanda G. M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Aging and atherosclerosis are related to renovascular hypertension in elderly individuals. Regardless of comorbidities, renal artery stenosis is itself an important cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Objective To define the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of noninvasive imaging tests used in the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis. Methods In a group of 61 patients recruited, 122 arteries were analized, thus permitting the definition of sensitivity, specificity, and the relative contribution of each imaging study performed (Doppler, scintigraphy and computed tomographic angiography in comparison to renal arteriography). Results The mean age was 65.43 years (standard deviation: 8.7). Of the variables related to the study population that were compared to arteriography, two correlated with renal artery stenosis, renal dysfunction and triglycerides. The median glomerular filtration rate was 52.8 mL/min/m2. Doppler showed sensitivity of 82.90%, specificity of 70%, a positive predictive value of 85% and negative predictive value of 66.70%. For tomography, sensitivity was 66.70%, specificity 80%, positive predictive value 87.50% and negative predictive value 55.20%. With these findings, we could identify the imaging tests that best detected stenosis. Conclusion Tomography and Doppler showed good quality and efficacy in the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis, with Doppler having the advantage of not requiring the use of contrast medium for the assessment of a disease that is common in diabetics and is associated with renal dysfunction and severe left ventricular dysfunction. PMID:24061685

  1. Virtual center for renal support: technological approach to patient physiological image.

    PubMed

    Prado, Manuel; Roa, Laura; Reina-Tosina, Javier; Palma, Alfonso; Milán, José Antonio

    2002-12-01

    The patient physiological image (PPI) is a novel concept which manages the knowledge of the virtual center for renal support (VCRS), currently being developed by the Biomedical Engineering Group of the University of Seville. PPI is a virtual "replica" of the patient, built by means of a mathematical model, which represents several physiological subsystems of a renal patient. From a technical point of view, PPI is a component-oriented software module based on cutting-edge modeling and simulation technology. This paper provides a methodological and technological approach to the PPI. Computational architecture of PPI-based VCRS is also described. This is a multi-tier and multi-protocol system. Data are managed by several ORDBMS instances. Communications design is based on the virtual private network (VPN) concept. Renal patients have a minimum reliable access to the VCRS through a public switch telephone network--X.25 gateway. Design complies with the universal access requirement, allowing an efficient and inexpensive connection even in rural environments and reducing computational requirements in the patient's remote access unit. VCRS provides support for renal patients' healthcare, increasing the quality and quantity of monitored biomedical signals, predicting events as hypotension or low dialysis dose, assisting further to avoid them by an online therapy modification and easing diagnostic tasks. An online therapy adjustment experiment simulation is presented. Finally, the presented system serves as a computational aid for research in renal physiology. This is achieved by an open and reusable modeling and simulation architecture which allows the interaction among models and data from different scales and computer platforms, and a faster transference of investigation models toward clinical applications.

  2. Imaging of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome: a potential bioterrorism agent of military significance.

    PubMed

    Bui-Mansfield, Liem T; Cressler, Dana K

    2011-11-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is a potentially fatal infectious disease with worldwide distribution. Its etiologic agents are viruses of the genus Hantavirus of the virus family Bunyaviridae. Hypothetical ease of production and distribution of these agents, with their propensity to incapacitate victims and overwhelm health care resources, lend themselves as significant potential biological agents of terrorism. HFRS has protean clinical manifestations, which may mimic upper respiratory tract infection, nephrolithiasis, and Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome and may delay proper treatment. Sequelae of HFRS, such as hemorrhage, acute renal failure, retroperitoneal edema, pancreatitis, pulmonary edema, and neurologic symptoms, can be detected by different imaging modalities. Medical providers caring for HFRS patients must be aware of its radiologic features, which may help to confirm its clinical diagnosis. In this article, the authors review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and complications of HFRS. PMID:22165665

  3. Tip cells act as dynamic cellular anchors in the morphogenesis of looped renal tubules in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Weavers, Helen; Skaer, Helen

    2013-11-11

    Tissue morphogenesis involves both the sculpting of tissue shape and the positioning of tissues relative to one another in the body. Using the renal tubules of Drosophila, we show that a specific distal tubule cell regulates both tissue architecture and position in the body cavity. Focusing on the anterior tubules, we demonstrate that tip cells make transient contacts with alary muscles at abdominal segment boundaries, moving progressively forward as convergent extension movements lengthen the tubule. Tip cell anchorage antagonizes forward-directed, TGF-β-guided tubule elongation, thereby ensuring the looped morphology characteristic of renal tubules from worms to humans. Distinctive tip cell exploratory behavior, adhesion, and basement membrane clearing underlie target recognition and dynamic interactions. Defects in these features obliterate tip cell anchorage, producing misshapen and misplaced tubules with impaired physiological function. PMID:24229645

  4. Understanding synthesis imaging dynamic range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, R.

    2013-03-01

    We develop a general framework for quantifying the many different contributions to the noise budget of an image made with an array of dishes or aperture array stations. Each noise contribution to the visibility data is associated with a relevant correlation timescale and frequency bandwidth so that the net impact on a complete observation can be assessed when a particular effect is not captured in the instrumental calibration. All quantities are parameterised as function of observing frequency and the visibility baseline length. We apply the resulting noise budget analysis to a wide range of existing and planned telescope systems that will operate between about 100 MHz and 5 GHz to ascertain the magnitude of the calibration challenges that they must overcome to achieve thermal noise limited performance. We conclude that calibration challenges are increased in several respects by small dimensions of the dishes or aperture array stations. It will be more challenging to achieve thermal noise limited performance using 15 m class dishes rather than the 25 m dishes of current arrays. Some of the performance risks are mitigated by the deployment of phased array feeds and more with the choice of an (alt,az,pol) mount, although a larger dish diameter offers the best prospects for risk mitigation. Many improvements to imaging performance can be anticipated at the expense of greater complexity in calibration algorithms. However, a fundamental limitation is ultimately imposed by an insufficient number of data constraints relative to calibration variables. The upcoming aperture array systems will be operating in a regime that has never previously been addressed, where a wide range of effects are expected to exceed the thermal noise by two to three orders of magnitude. Achieving routine thermal noise limited imaging performance with these systems presents an extreme challenge. The magnitude of that challenge is inversely related to the aperture array station diameter.

  5. Dynamical Spectral Unmixing of Multitemporal Hyperspectral Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrot, Simon; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Jutten, Christian

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of unmixing a time series of hyperspectral images. We propose a dynamical model based on linear mixing processes at each time instant. The spectral signatures and fractional abundances of the pure materials in the scene are seen as latent variables, and assumed to follow a general dynamical structure. Based on a simplified version of this model, we derive an efficient spectral unmixing algorithm to estimate the latent variables by performing alternating minimizations. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated on synthetic and real multitemporal hyperspectral images.

  6. Dynamic metamaterial aperture for microwave imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sleasman, Timothy; Imani, Mohammadreza F.; Gollub, Jonah N.; Smith, David R.

    2015-11-16

    We present a dynamic metamaterial aperture for use in computational imaging schemes at microwave frequencies. The aperture consists of an array of complementary, resonant metamaterial elements patterned into the upper conductor of a microstrip line. Each metamaterial element contains two diodes connected to an external control circuit such that the resonance of the metamaterial element can be damped by application of a bias voltage. Through applying different voltages to the control circuit, select subsets of the elements can be switched on to create unique radiation patterns that illuminate the scene. Spatial information of an imaging domain can thus be encoded onto this set of radiation patterns, or measurements, which can be processed to reconstruct the targets in the scene using compressive sensing algorithms. We discuss the design and operation of a metamaterial imaging system and demonstrate reconstructed images with a 10:1 compression ratio. Dynamic metamaterial apertures can potentially be of benefit in microwave or millimeter wave systems such as those used in security screening and through-wall imaging. In addition, feature-specific or adaptive imaging can be facilitated through the use of the dynamic aperture.

  7. Robust detection of renal calculi from non-contract CT images using TV-flow and MSER features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianfei; Wang, Shijun; Linguraru, Marius George; Summers, Ronald M.

    2013-03-01

    Renal calculi are one of the most painful urologic disorders causing 3 million treatments per year in the United States. The objective of this paper is the automated detection of renal calculi from CT colonography (CTC) images on which they are one of the major extracolonic findings. However, the primary purpose of the CTC protocols is not for the detection of renal calculi, but for screening of colon cancer. The kidneys are imaged with significant amounts of noise in the non-contrast CTC images, which makes the detection of renal calculi extremely challenging. We propose a computer-aided diagnosis method to detect renal calculi in CTC images. It is built on three novel techniques: 1) total variation (TV) flow to reduce image noise while keeping calculi, 2) maximally stable extremal region (MSER) features to find calculus candidates, 3) salient feature descriptors based on intensity properties to train a support vector machine classifier and filter false positives. We selected 23 CTC cases with 36 renal calculi to analyze the detection algorithm. The calculus size ranged from 1.0mm to 6.8mm. Fifteen cases were selected as the training dataset, and the remaining eight cases were used for the testing dataset. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) values were 0.92 in the training datasets and 0.93 in the testing datasets. The testing dataset confidence interval for AUC reported by ROCKIT was [0.8799, 0.9591] and the training dataset was [0.8974, 0.9642]. These encouraging results demonstrated that our detection algorithm can robustly and accurately identify renal calculi from CTC images.

  8. Imaging Renal Urea Handling in Rats at Millimeter Resolution using Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance Relaxometry

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Galen D.; von Morze, Cornelius; Verkman, Alan S.; Koelsch, Bertram L.; Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Lustig, Michael; Ronen, Sabrina M.; Bok, Robert A.; Sands, Jeff M.; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Wang, Zhen J.; Larsen, Jan Henrik Ardenkjær; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    In vivo spin spin relaxation time (T2) heterogeneity of hyperpolarized [13C,15N2]urea in the rat kidney was investigated. Selective quenching of the vascular hyperpolarized 13C signal with a macromolecular relaxation agent revealed that a long-T2 component of the [13C,15N2]urea signal originated from the renal extravascular space, thus allowing the vascular and renal filtrate contrast agent pools of the [13C,15N2]urea to be distinguished via multi-exponential analysis. The T2 response to induced diuresis and antidiuresis was performed with two imaging agents: hyperpolarized [13C,15N2]urea and a control agent hyperpolarized bis-1,1-(hydroxymethyl)-1-13C-cyclopropane-2H8. Large T2 increases in the inner-medullar and papilla were observed with the former agent and not the latter during antidiuresis. Therefore, [13C,15N2]urea relaxometry is sensitive to two steps of the renal urea handling process: glomerular filtration and the inner-medullary urea transporter (UT)-A1 and UT-A3 mediated urea concentrating process. Simple motion correction and subspace denoising algorithms are presented to aid in the multi exponential data analysis. Furthermore, a T2-edited, ultra long echo time sequence was developed for sub-2 mm3 resolution 3D encoding of urea by exploiting relaxation differences in the vascular and filtrate pools. PMID:27570835

  9. Reliability of whole slide images as a diagnostic modality for renal allograft biopsies.

    PubMed

    Jen, Kuang-Yu; Olson, Jean L; Brodsky, Sergey; Zhou, Xin J; Nadasdy, Tibor; Laszik, Zoltan G

    2013-05-01

    The use of digital whole slide images (WSI) in the field of pathology has become feasible for routine diagnostic purposes and has become more prevalent in recent years. This type of technology offers many advantages but must show the same degree of diagnostic reliability as conventional glass slides. Several studies have examined this issue in various settings and indicate that WSI are a reliable method for diagnostic pathology. Since transplant pathology is a highly specialized field that requires not only accurate but rapid diagnostic evaluation of biopsy materials, this field may greatly benefit from the use of WSI. In this study, we assessed the reliability of using WSI compared to conventional glass slides in renal allograft biopsies. We examined morphologic features and diagnostic categories defined by the Banff 07 Classification of Renal Allograft Pathology as well as additional morphologic features not included in this classification scheme. We found that intraobserver scores, when comparing the use of glass slides versus WSI, showed substantial agreement for both morphologic features (κ = 0.68) and acute rejection diagnostic categories (κ = 0.74). Furthermore, interobserver reliability was comparable for morphologic features (κ = 0.44 [glass] vs 0.42 [WSI]) and acute rejection diagnostic categories (κ = 0.49 [glass] vs 0.51 [WSI]). These data indicate that WSI are as reliable as glass slides for the evaluation of renal allograft biopsies.

  10. Assessment of renal oxygenation during partial nephrectomy using DLP hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Sara L.; Thapa, Abhas; Holzer, Michael S.; Jackson, Neil; Mir, Saad A.; Donnally, Chester J.; Wehner, Eleanor; Raj, Ganesh V.; Livingston, Edward; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A.; Zuzak, Karel J.

    2011-03-01

    Digital Light Processing (DLP®) hyperspectral imaging (HsI) is a non-invasive method used to construct a highly sensitive, real-time tissue oxygenation map through the measurement of the percentage of oxyhemoglobin. We have demonstrated that this technology can detect the oxyhemoglobin in the blood vessels on the surface of the kidney and we have used this to monitor renal perfusion during kidney cancer operations, where the blood supply to the kidney is interrupted for a period of time. This technology may allow us to "personalize" surgery based on the oxygenation profile.

  11. Sequential cytokine dynamics in chronic rejection of rat renal allografts: roles for cytokines RANTES and MCP-1.

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, K C; Azuma, H; Tilney, N L

    1995-01-01

    Chronic rejection, the most important cause of long-term graft failure, is thought to result from both alloantigen-dependent and -independent factors. To examine these influences, cytokine dynamics were assessed by semiquantitative competitive reverse transcriptase-PCR and by immunohistology in an established rat model of chronic rejection lf renal allografts. Isograft controls develop morphologic and immunohistologic changes that are similar to renal allograft changes, although quantitatively less intense and at a delayed speed; these are thought to occur secondary to antigen-independent events. Sequential cytokine expression was determined throughout the process. During an early reversible allograft rejection episode, both T-cell associated [interleukin (IL) 2, IL-2 receptor, IL-4, and interferon gamma] and macrophage (IL-1 alpha, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and IL-6) products were up-regulated despite transient immunosuppression. RANTES (regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted) peaked at 2 weeks; intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) was maximally expressed at 6 weeks. Macrophage products such as monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) increased dramatically (to 10 times), presaging intense peak macrophage infiltration at 16 weeks. In contrast, in isografts, ICAM-1 peaked at 24 weeks. MCP-1 was maximally expressed at 52 weeks, commensurate with a progressive increase in infiltrating macrophages. Cytokine expression in the spleen of allograft and isograft recipients was insignificant. We conclude that chronic rejection of kidney allografts in rats is predominantly a local macrophage-dependent event with intense up-regulation of macrophage products such as MCP-1, IL-6, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. The cytokine expression in isografts emphasizes the contribution of antigen-independent events. The dynamics of RANTES expression between early and late phases of chronic rejection suggest a key role in mediating the events of the

  12. Cardiovascular and pulmonary dynamics by quantitative imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, E. H.

    1976-01-01

    The accuracy and range of studies on cardiovascular and pulmonary functions can be greatly facilitated if the motions of the underlying organ systems throughout individual cycles can be directly visualized and readily measured with minimum or preferably no effect on these motions. Achievement of this objective requires development of techniques for quantitative noninvasive or minimally invasive dynamic and stop-action imaging of the organ systems. A review of advances in dynamic quantitative imaging of moving organs reveals that the revolutionary value of cross-sectional and three-dimensional images produced by various types of radiant energy such as X-rays and gamma rays, positrons, electrons, protons, light, and ultrasound for clinical diagnostic and biomedical research applications is just beginning to be realized. The fabrication of a clinically useful cross-section reconstruction device with sensing capabilities for both anatomical structural composition and chemical composition may be possible and awaits future development.

  13. Overcoming Dynamic Disturbances in Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Eric W.; Dente, Gregory C.; Lyon, Richard G.; Chesters, Dennis; Gong, Qian

    2000-01-01

    We develop and discuss a methodology with the potential to yield a significant reduction in complexity, cost, and risk of space-borne optical systems in the presence of dynamic disturbances. More robust systems almost certainly will be a result as well. Many future space-based and ground-based optical systems will employ optical control systems to enhance imaging performance. The goal of the optical control subsystem is to determine the wavefront aberrations and remove them. Ideally reducing an aberrated image of the object under investigation to a sufficiently clear (usually diffraction-limited) image. Control will likely be distributed over several elements. These elements may include telescope primary segments, telescope secondary, telescope tertiary, deformable mirror(s), fine steering mirror(s), etc. The last two elements, in particular, may have to provide dynamic control. These control subsystems may become elaborate indeed. But robust system performance will require evaluation of the image quality over a substantial range and in a dynamic environment. Candidate systems for improvement in the Earth Sciences Enterprise could include next generation Landsat systems or atmospheric sensors for dynamic imaging of individual, severe storms. The technology developed here could have a substantial impact on the development of new systems in the Space Science Enterprise; such as the Next Generation Space Telescope(NGST) and its follow-on the Next NGST. Large Interferometric Systems of non-zero field, such as Planet Finder and Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure, could benefit. These systems most likely will contain large, flexible optormechanical structures subject to dynamic disturbance. Furthermore, large systems for high resolution imaging of planets or the sun from space may also benefit. Tactical and Strategic Defense systems will need to image very small targets as well and could benefit from the technology developed here. We discuss a novel

  14. Overcoming Dynamic Disturbances in Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Eric W.; Dente, Gregory C.; Lyon, Richard G.; Chesters, Dennis; Gong, Qian

    2000-01-01

    We develop and discuss a methodology with the potential to yield a significant reduction in complexity, cost, and risk of space-borne optical systems in the presence of dynamic disturbances. More robust systems almost certainly will be a result as well. Many future space-based and ground-based optical systems will employ optical control systems to enhance imaging performance. The goal of the optical control subsystem is to determine the wavefront aberrations and remove them. Ideally reducing an aberrated image of the object under investigation to a sufficiently clear (usually diffraction-limited) image. Control will likely be distributed over several elements. These elements may include telescope primary segments, telescope secondary, telescope tertiary, deformable mirror(s), fine steering mirror(s), etc. The last two elements, in particular, may have to provide dynamic control. These control subsystems may become elaborate indeed. But robust system performance will require evaluation of the image quality over a substantial range and in a dynamic environment. Candidate systems for improvement in the Earth Sciences Enterprise could include next generation Landsat systems or atmospheric sensors for dynamic imaging of individual, severe storms. The technology developed here could have a substantial impact on the development of new systems in the Space Science Enterprise; such as the Next Generation Space Telescope(NGST) and its follow-on the Next NGST. Large Interferometric Systems of non-zero field, such as Planet Finder and Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure, could benefit. These systems most likely will contain large, flexible optomechanical structures subject to dynamic disturbance. Furthermore, large systems for high resolution imaging of planets or the sun from space may also benefit. Tactical and Strategic Defense systems will need to image very small targets as well and could benefit from the technology developed here. We discuss a novel

  15. Dynamic 99mTc-MAG3 renography: images for quality control obtained by combining pharmacokinetic modelling, an anthropomorphic computer phantom and Monte Carlo simulated scintillation camera imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brolin, Gustav; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina; Ljungberg, Michael

    2013-05-01

    In dynamic renal scintigraphy, the main interest is the radiopharmaceutical redistribution as a function of time. Quality control (QC) of renal procedures often relies on phantom experiments to compare image-based results with the measurement setup. A phantom with a realistic anatomy and time-varying activity distribution is therefore desirable. This work describes a pharmacokinetic (PK) compartment model for 99mTc-MAG3, used for defining a dynamic whole-body activity distribution within a digital phantom (XCAT) for accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based images for QC. Each phantom structure is assigned a time-activity curve provided by the PK model, employing parameter values consistent with MAG3 pharmacokinetics. This approach ensures that the total amount of tracer in the phantom is preserved between time points, and it allows for modifications of the pharmacokinetics in a controlled fashion. By adjusting parameter values in the PK model, different clinically realistic scenarios can be mimicked, regarding, e.g., the relative renal uptake and renal transit time. Using the MC code SIMIND, a complete set of renography images including effects of photon attenuation, scattering, limited spatial resolution and noise, are simulated. The obtained image data can be used to evaluate quantitative techniques and computer software in clinical renography.

  16. Dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative susceptibility mapping with ultrashort echo time MRI for evaluating renal function.

    PubMed

    Xie, Luke; Layton, Anita T; Wang, Nian; Larson, Peder E Z; Zhang, Jeff L; Lee, Vivian S; Liu, Chunlei; Johnson, G Allan

    2016-01-15

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI can provide key insight into renal function. DCE MRI is typically achieved through an injection of a gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agent, which has desirable T1 quenching and tracer kinetics. However, significant T2* blooming effects and signal voids can arise when Gd becomes very concentrated, especially in the renal medulla and pelvis. One MRI sequence designed to alleviate T2* effects is the ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence. In the present study, we observed T2* blooming in the inner medulla of the mouse kidney, despite using UTE at an echo time of 20 microseconds and a low dose of 0.03 mmol/kg Gd. We applied quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and resolved the signal void into a positive susceptibility signal. The susceptibility values [in parts per million (ppm)] were converted into molar concentrations of Gd using a calibration curve. We determined the concentrating mechanism (referred to as the concentrating index) as a ratio of maximum Gd concentration in the inner medulla to the renal artery. The concentrating index was assessed longitudinally over a 17-wk course (3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 17 wk of age). We conclude that the UTE-based DCE method is limited in resolving extreme T2* content caused by the kidney's strong concentrating mechanism. QSM was able to resolve and confirm the source of the blooming effect to be the large positive susceptibility of concentrated Gd. UTE with QSM can complement traditional magnitude UTE and offer a powerful tool to study renal pathophysiology. PMID:26447222

  17. The Role of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Quantification in Differentiating Benign and Malignant Renal Masses by 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Göya, Cemil; Hamidi, Cihad; Bozkurt, Yaşar; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Kuday, Suzan; Gümüş, Hatice; Türkçü, Gül; Hattapoğlu, Salih; Bilici, Aslan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) is a widely-accepted diagnostic modality whose efficacy has been investigated by numerous past studies in the differentiation of malignant lesions from benign entities. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the characterization of renal lesions. Study Design: Diagnostic accuracy study. Methods: A total of 137 patients with renal lesions were included in this study. The median apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values as well as the b 800 and b 1600 signal intensities of normal kidneys, solid components of mixed renal masses, and total cystic lesions were evaluated. Results: There were significant differences between the ADC values of lesions and normal renal parenchyma, and between the ADC values of benign and malignant renal lesions on DWIs at b values of 800 and 1600 s/mm2 (p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively). There were significant differences between the ADC values of Bosniak Category 1 and 2 cysts and the ADC values of Bosniak Category 1 and 3 cysts on DWIs at b values of 800 s/mm2 (p<0.001) and 1600 s/mm2 (p<0.001). A cutoff value of 1.902 × 10−3 mm2/s for the ADC with a b value of 800 s/mm2 provided 88% sensitivity and 96% specificity for differentiation between benign and malignant renal lesions. A cutoff value of 1.623 × 10−3 mm2/s for the ADC with a b value of 1600 s/mm2 provided 79% sensitivity and 96% specificity (p<0.001) for the differentiation between benign and malignant renal lesions. Conclusion: Accurate assessment of renal masses is important for determining the necessity for surgical intervention. DWI provides additional value by differentiating benign from malignant renal tumors and can be added to routine kidney MRI protocols. PMID:26185715

  18. Bayesian blind separation and deconvolution of dynamic image sequences using sparsity priors.

    PubMed

    Tichy, Ondrej; Smidl, Vaclav

    2015-01-01

    A common problem of imaging 3-D objects into image plane is superposition of the projected structures. In dynamic imaging, projection overlaps of organs and tissues complicate extraction of signals specific to individual structures with different dynamics. The problem manifests itself also in dynamic tomography as tissue mixtures are present in voxels. Separation of signals specific to dynamic structures belongs to the category of blind source separation. It is an underdetermined problem with many possible solutions. Existing separation methods select the solution that best matches their additional assumptions on the source model. We propose a novel blind source separation method based on probabilistic model of dynamic image sequences assuming each source dynamics as convolution of an input function and a source specific kernel (modeling organ impulse response or retention function). These assumptions are formalized as a Bayesian model with hierarchical prior and solved by the Variational Bayes method. The proposed prior distribution assigns higher probability to sparse source images and sparse convolution kernels. We show that the results of separation are relevant to selected tasks of dynamic renal scintigraphy. Accuracy of tissue separation with simulated and clinical data provided by the proposed method outperformed accuracy of previously developed methods measured by the mean square and mean absolute errors of estimation of simulated sources and the sources separated by an expert physician. MATLAB implementation of the algorithm is available for download. PMID:25181364

  19. Global ENA Imaging of Earth's Dynamic Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Pontus

    2015-04-01

    The interaction between singly charged ions of Earth's magnetosphere and its neutral exosphere and upper atmosphere gives rise to Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs). This has enabled several missions to remotely image the global injection dynamics of the ring current and plasma sheet, the outflow of ions from Earth's polar regions, and the location of the sub-solar magnetopause. In this presentation we review ENA observations by the Astrid, IMAGE, TWINS and IBEX missions. We focus on results from the IMAGE/HENA Camera including observations of proton and oxygen ion injections in to the ring current and their impact on the force-balance and ionospheric coupling in the inner magnetosphere. We report also on the status of inversion techniques for retrieving the ion spatial and pitch-angle distributions from ENA images. The presentation concludes with a discussion of future next steps in ENA instrumentation and analysis capabilities required to deliver the science as recommended by the Heliophysics Decadal Survey.

  20. When is contrast-enhanced sonography preferable over conventional ultrasound combined with Doppler imaging in renal transplantation?

    PubMed Central

    Zeisbrich, Markus; Kihm, Lars P.; Drüschler, Felix; Zeier, Martin; Schwenger, Vedat

    2015-01-01

    Conventional ultrasound in combination with colour Doppler imaging is still the standard diagnostic procedure for patients after renal transplantation. However, while conventional ultrasound in combination with Doppler imaging can diagnose renal artery stenosis and vein thrombosis, it is not possible to display subtle microvascular tissue perfusion, which is crucial for the evaluation of acute and chronic allograft dysfunctions. In contrast, real-time contrast-enhanced sonography (CES) uses gas-filled microbubbles not only to visualize but also to quantify renal blood flow and perfusion even in the small renal arterioles and capillaries. It is an easy to perform and non-invasive imaging technique that augments diagnostic capabilities in patients after renal transplantation. Specifically in the postoperative setting, CES has been shown to be superior to conventional ultrasound in combination with Doppler imaging in uncovering even subtle microvascular disturbances in the allograft perfusion. In addition, quantitative perfusion parameters derived from CES show predictive capability regarding long-term kidney function. PMID:26413289

  1. Texture-learning-based system for three-dimensional segmentation of renal parenchyma in abdominal CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Cong-Qi; Chang, Yuan-Hsiang; Wang, Li-Jen; Wong, Yon-Choeng; Chiang, Yang-Jen; Jiang, Yan-Yau

    2009-02-01

    Abdominal CT images are commonly used for the diagnosis of kidney diseases. With the advances of CT technology, processing of CT images has become a challenging task mainly because of the large number of CT images being studied. This paper presents a texture-learning based system for the three-dimensional (3D) segmentation of renal parenchyma in abdominal CT images. The system is designed to automatically delineate renal parenchyma and is based on the texturelearning and the region-homogeneity-based approaches. The first approach is achieved with the texture analysis using the gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) features and an artificial neural network (ANN) to determine if a pixel in the CT image is likely to fall within the renal parenchyma. The second approach incorporates a two-dimensional (2D) region growing to segment renal parenchyma in single CT image slice and a 3D region growing to propagate the segmentation results to neighboring CT image slices. The criterion for the region growing is a test of region-homogeneity which is defined by examining the ANN outputs. In system evaluation, 10 abdominal CT image sets were used. Automatic segmentation results were compared with manually segmentation results using the Dice similarity coefficient. Among the 10 CT image sets, our system has achieved an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.87 that clearly shows a high correlation between the two segmentation results. Ultimately, our system could be incorporated in applications for the delineation of renal parenchyma or as a preprocessing in a CAD system of kidney diseases.

  2. Preparation and evaluation of (99m)Tc-DMSA lyophilized kit for renal imaging.

    PubMed

    Jan, Syed Umer; Abbass, Hafiz Ghulam

    2013-05-01

    Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) has been evaluated and used with technetium 99m ((99m)Tc) in imaging of kidneys. DMSA lyophilized kits were prepared and radiolabelled with (99m)Tc. Paper and thin-layer chromatography have been employed using various eluent systems for the radiochemical analysis, percentage labeling and binding capacity of (99m)Tc-DMSA. Female albino rabbits were used for this study. Biological data obtained after intravenous injection of radiolabelled DMSA to female albino rabbits revealed 32.42% uptake and long retention time in the kidneys. On the basis of animal biodistribution data, it is suggested that DMSA when labeled with (99m)Tc is useful complex for renal imaging and can be successfully applied as a diagnostic tool in nuclear medicine. Clinical biodistribution and radiation dosimetry studies are planned in future.

  3. Geometry-independent assessment of renal volume in polycystic kidney disease from magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Turco, Dario; Severi, Stefano; Mignani, Renzo; Magistroni, Riccardo; Corsi, Cristiana

    2015-01-01

    Total renal volume (TRV) is an important quantitative indicator of the progression of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease proposes a method for TRV computation based on manual tracing and geometric modeling. We developed a fast and nearly-automated technique for kidney segmentation and automatically compute TRV. In this study we aim to compare TRV estimates derived from these two different approaches. The highly-automated technique for the analysis of MR images was tested on 30 ADPKD patients. TRV was computed from both axial and coronal acquisitions, and compared to measurements based on geometric modeling by linear regression and Bland Altman analysis. In addition, to assess reproducibility, intra-observer and inter-observer variabilities were computed. The results of this study provide the feasibility of using a nearly-automated approach for accurate and fast evaluation of TRV also in markedly enlarged ADPKD kidneys. PMID:26736943

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of pre-operative imaging findings in presumed clinical T1a renal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    NAKASHIMA, KAZUFUMI; KITAGAWA, YASUHIDE; IZUMI, KOUJI; MIZOKAMI, ATSUSHI; GABATA, TOSHIFUMI; NAMIKI, MIKIO

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development of recent imaging modalities, certain pathological misdiagnoses remain for surgical specimens of presumed small renal cell carcinomas (RCCs). In the present study, a retrospective analysis of benign pathological lesions diagnosed as small RCC prior to surgery was performed. In total, the cases of 196 sporadic renal tumors that was surgically treated as clinical T1a RCCs were reviewed, and the accuracy of the pathological diagnoses was calculated. The pre-operative findings for benign pathological lesions was investigated, and the lesions were observed in 13 (6.63%) of the 196 tumors. Pre-operative computed tomography images were obtained in all cases, and magnetic resonance images were available in 10 cases. The diagnostic accuracy of imaging modalities was significantly lower in the tumors with a diameter of ≤20 mm. In all cases, the possible pathological diagnosis of RCC could not be excluded even by retrospective imaging analysis. Several benign pathological lesions were found in small renal masses presumed to be clinical T1a RCC. In conclusion, there may be limitations to the pre-operative imaging for certain types of small renal mass. PMID:27123087

  5. Nonlinear dynamics of heart rate variability in response to orthostatism and hemodialysis in chronic renal failure patients: recurrence analysis approach.

    PubMed

    González, Hortensia; Infante, Oscar; Pérez-Grovas, Héctor; Jose, Marco V; Lerma, Claudia

    2013-02-01

    We studied the response of heart rate variability to hemodialysis and orthostatism using traditional linear indexes and 9 recurrence quantification analysis indexes to reveal changes in the heart rate dynamics. Twenty healthy subjects and 19 chronic renal failure patients treated with hemodialysis thrice a week were included. Five-minute heart rate variability time series were obtained during supine position (clinostatism) and orthostatism from each participant; recordings in renal patients were repeated after hemodialysis. Linear indexes were consistent with sympathetic predominance in response to orthostatism in the control group. Renal patients before hemodialysis showed increased sympathetic predominance in clinostatism, with further increase in orthostatism and hemodialysis. In response to orthostatism, 4 recurrence indexes changed in the control group, while in renal patients any of them changed before hemodialysis and 1 changed after hemodialysis. In clinostatism, renal patients (both before and after hemodialysis) had higher laminarity, trapping time, and recurrence time than the control group. Recurrence indexes showed that the heart rate dynamics in renal patients are different from healthy subjects, suggesting loss of access to some regulatory conditions. These findings are consistent with reports of sympathetic stimulation induced by hemodialysis and active standing.

  6. Digital Image Correlation with Dynamic Subset Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ghulam Mubashar; MacNish, Cara; Dyskin, Arcady; Shufrin, Igor

    2016-09-01

    The quality of the surface pattern and selection of subset size play a critical role in achieving high accuracy in Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The subset size in DIC is normally selected by testing different subset sizes across the entire image, which is a laborious procedure. This also leads to the problem that the worst region of the surface pattern influences the performance of DIC across the entire image. In order to avoid these limitations, a Dynamic Subset Selection (DSS) algorithm is proposed in this paper to optimize the subset size for each point in an image before optimizing the correlation parameters. The proposed DSS algorithm uses the local pattern around the point of interest to calculate a parameter called the Intensity Variation Ratio (Λ), which is used to optimize the subset size. The performance of the DSS algorithm is analyzed using numerically generated images and is compared with the results of traditional DIC. Images obtained from laboratory experiments are also used to demonstrate the utility of the DSS algorithm. Results illustrate that the DSS algorithm provides a better alternative to subset size "guessing" and finds an appropriate subset size for each point of interest according to the local pattern.

  7. Obstacle penetrating dynamic radar imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Romero, Carlos E.; Zumstein, James E.; Chang, John T.; Leach, Jr.. Richard R.

    2006-12-12

    An obstacle penetrating dynamic radar imaging system for the detection, tracking, and imaging of an individual, animal, or object comprising a multiplicity of low power ultra wideband radar units that produce a set of return radar signals from the individual, animal, or object, and a processing system for said set of return radar signals for detection, tracking, and imaging of the individual, animal, or object. The system provides a radar video system for detecting and tracking an individual, animal, or object by producing a set of return radar signals from the individual, animal, or object with a multiplicity of low power ultra wideband radar units, and processing said set of return radar signals for detecting and tracking of the individual, animal, or object.

  8. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Jeffrey; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Kang, Misun; Voisin, Sophie; Cheng, Chu-Lin; Horita, Jusuke; Perfect, Edmund

    2013-01-01

    Many terrestrial ecosystem processes are constrained by water availability and transport within the soil. Knowledge of plant water fluxes is thus critical for assessing mechanistic processes linked to biogeochemical cycles, yet resolution of root structure and xylem water transport dynamics has been a particularly daunting task for the ecologist. Through neutron imaging, we demonstrate the ability to non-invasively monitor individual root functionality and water fluxes within Zea mays L. (maize) and Panicum virgatum L. (switchgrass) seedlings growing in a sandy medium. Root structure and growth were readily imaged by neutron radiography and neutron computed tomography. Seedlings were irrigated with water or deuterium oxide and imaged through time as a growth lamp was cycled on to alter leaf demand for water. Sub-millimeter scale resolution reveals timing and magnitudes of root water uptake, redistribution within the roots, and root-shoot hydraulic linkages, relationships not well characterized by other techniques.

  9. Dynamic Environmental Photosynthetic Imaging Reveals Emergent Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Jeffrey A; Savage, Linda J; Zegarac, Robert; Hall, Christopher C; Satoh-Cruz, Mio; Davis, Geoffry A; Kovac, William Kent; Chen, Jin; Kramer, David M

    2016-06-22

    Understanding and improving the productivity and robustness of plant photosynthesis requires high-throughput phenotyping under environmental conditions that are relevant to the field. Here we demonstrate the dynamic environmental photosynthesis imager (DEPI), an experimental platform for integrated, continuous, and high-throughput measurements of photosynthetic parameters during plant growth under reproducible yet dynamic environmental conditions. Using parallel imagers obviates the need to move plants or sensors, reducing artifacts and allowing simultaneous measurement on large numbers of plants. As a result, DEPI can reveal phenotypes that are not evident under standard laboratory conditions but emerge under progressively more dynamic illumination. We show examples in mutants of Arabidopsis of such "emergent phenotypes" that are highly transient and heterogeneous, appearing in different leaves under different conditions and depending in complex ways on both environmental conditions and plant developmental age. These emergent phenotypes appear to be caused by a range of phenomena, suggesting that such previously unseen processes are critical for plant responses to dynamic environments. PMID:27336966

  10. Motility Contrast Imaging and Tissue Dynamics Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, David D.; An, Ran; Turek, John

    Motion is the defining physiological characteristic of living matter. If we are interested in how things function, then the way they move is most informative. Motion provides an endogenous and functional suite of biomarkers that are sensitive to subtle changes that occur under applied pharmacological doses or cellular stresses. This chapter reviews the application of biodynamic imaging to measure cellular dynamics in three-dimensional tissue culture for drug screening applications. Nanoscale and microscale motions are detected through statistical fluctuations in dynamic speckle across an ensemble of cells within each resolution voxel. Tissue dynamics spectroscopy generates drug-response spectrograms that serve as phenotypic fingerprints of drug action and can differentiate responses from heterogeneous regions of tumor tissue.

  11. Review of Source Images is Necessary for the Evaluation of Gadolinium-Enhanced MR Angiography for Renal Artery Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wehrschuetz, M. Aschauer, M.; Portugaller, H.; Stix, A.; Wehrschuetz-Sigl, E.; Hausegger, K.; Ebner, F.

    2004-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess interobserver variability and accuracy in the evaluation of renal artery stenosis (RAS) with gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography (MRA) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in patients with hypertension. The authors found that source images are more accurate than maximum intensity projection (MIP) for depicting renal artery stenosis. Two independent radiologists reviewed MRA and DSA from 38 patients with hypertension. Studies were postprocessed to display images in MIP and source images. DSA was the standard for comparison in each patient. For each main renal artery, percentage stenosis was estimated for any stenosis detected by the two radiologists. To calculate sensitivity, specificity and accuracy, MRA studies and stenoses were categorized as normal, mild (1-39%), moderate (40-69%) or severe ({>=}70%), or occluded. DSA stenosis estimates of 70% or greater were considered hemodynamically significant. Analysis of variance demonstrated that MIP estimates of stenosis were greater than source image estimates for both readers. Differences in estimates for MIP versus DSA reached significance in one reader. The interobserver variance for MIP, source images and DSA was excellent (0.80< {kappa}{<=} 0.90). The specificity of source images was high (97%) but less for MIP (87%); average accuracy was 92% for MIP and 98% for source images. In this study, source images are significantly more accurate than MIP images in one reader with a similar trend was observed in the second reader. The interobserver variability was excellent. When renal artery stenosis is a consideration, high accuracy can only be obtained when source images are examined.

  12. Three new renal simulators for use in nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dullius, Marcos; Fonseca, Mateus; Botelho, Marcelo; Cunha, Clêdison; Souza, Divanízia

    2014-03-01

    Renal scintigraphy is useful to provide both functional and anatomic information of renal flow of cortical functions and evaluation of pathological collecting system. The objective of this study was develop and evaluate the performance of three renal phantoms: Two anthropomorphic static and another dynamic. The static images of the anthropomorphic phantoms were used for comparison with static renal scintigraphy with 99mTc-DMSA in different concentrations. These static phantoms were manufactured in two ways: one was made of acrylic using as mold a human kidney preserved in formaldehyde and the second was built with ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) in a 3D printer. The dynamic renal phantom was constructed of acrylic to simulate renal dynamics in scintigraphy with 99mTc-DTPA. These phantoms were scanned with static and dynamic protocols and compared with clinical data. Using these phantoms it is possible to acquire similar renal images as in the clinical scintigraphy. Therefore, these new renal phantoms can be very effective for use in the quality control of renal scintigraphy, and image processing systems.

  13. Emerging role of high-resolution imaging in the detection of renal osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashish K; Masterson, Rosemary; Holt, Stephen G; Toussaint, Nigel D

    2016-10-01

    The term renal osteodystrophy refers to changes in bone morphology induced by chronic kidney disease (CKD) and represents the skeletal component of the entity 'chronic kidney disease - mineral and bone disorder'. Changes in turnover, mineralization, mass and microarchitecture impair bone quality, compromising strength and increasing susceptibility to fractures. Fractures are more common in CKD compared with the general population and result in increased morbidity and mortality. Screening for fracture risk and management of renal osteodystrophy are hindered by the complex, and still only partially understood, pathophysiology and the inadequacy of currently available diagnostic methods. Bone densitometry and bone turnover markers, although potentially helpful, have significant limitations in patients with CKD, and the 'gold standard' test of bone biopsy is infrequently performed in routine clinical practice. However, recent advances in high-resolution bone microarchitecture imaging may offer greater potential for quantification and assessment of bone structure and strength and, when used in conjunction with serum biomarkers, may allow non-invasive testing for a diagnostic virtual bone biopsy. PMID:27042945

  14. Phase correlation imaging of unlabeled cell dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lihong; Rajshekhar, Gannavarpu; Wang, Ru; Bhaduri, Basanta; Sridharan, Shamira; Mir, Mustafa; Chakraborty, Arindam; Iyer, Rajashekar; Prasanth, Supriya; Millet, Larry; Gillette, Martha U.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-09-01

    We present phase correlation imaging (PCI) as a novel approach to study cell dynamics in a spatially-resolved manner. PCI relies on quantitative phase imaging time-lapse data and, as such, functions in label-free mode, without the limitations associated with exogenous markers. The correlation time map outputted in PCI informs on the dynamics of the intracellular mass transport. Specifically, we show that PCI can extract quantitatively the diffusion coefficient map associated with live cells, as well as standard Brownian particles. Due to its high sensitivity to mass transport, PCI can be applied to studying the integrity of actin polymerization dynamics. Our results indicate that the cyto-D treatment blocking the actin polymerization has a dominant effect at the large spatial scales, in the region surrounding the cell. We found that PCI can distinguish between senescent and quiescent cells, which is extremely difficult without using specific markers currently. We anticipate that PCI will be used alongside established, fluorescence-based techniques to enable valuable new studies of cell function.

  15. Phase correlation imaging of unlabeled cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lihong; Rajshekhar, Gannavarpu; Wang, Ru; Bhaduri, Basanta; Sridharan, Shamira; Mir, Mustafa; Chakraborty, Arindam; Iyer, Rajashekar; Prasanth, Supriya; Millet, Larry; Gillette, Martha U; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We present phase correlation imaging (PCI) as a novel approach to study cell dynamics in a spatially-resolved manner. PCI relies on quantitative phase imaging time-lapse data and, as such, functions in label-free mode, without the limitations associated with exogenous markers. The correlation time map outputted in PCI informs on the dynamics of the intracellular mass transport. Specifically, we show that PCI can extract quantitatively the diffusion coefficient map associated with live cells, as well as standard Brownian particles. Due to its high sensitivity to mass transport, PCI can be applied to studying the integrity of actin polymerization dynamics. Our results indicate that the cyto-D treatment blocking the actin polymerization has a dominant effect at the large spatial scales, in the region surrounding the cell. We found that PCI can distinguish between senescent and quiescent cells, which is extremely difficult without using specific markers currently. We anticipate that PCI will be used alongside established, fluorescence-based techniques to enable valuable new studies of cell function. PMID:27615512

  16. Phase correlation imaging of unlabeled cell dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lihong; Rajshekhar, Gannavarpu; Wang, Ru; Bhaduri, Basanta; Sridharan, Shamira; Mir, Mustafa; Chakraborty, Arindam; Iyer, Rajashekar; Prasanth, Supriya; Millet, Larry; Gillette, Martha U.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We present phase correlation imaging (PCI) as a novel approach to study cell dynamics in a spatially-resolved manner. PCI relies on quantitative phase imaging time-lapse data and, as such, functions in label-free mode, without the limitations associated with exogenous markers. The correlation time map outputted in PCI informs on the dynamics of the intracellular mass transport. Specifically, we show that PCI can extract quantitatively the diffusion coefficient map associated with live cells, as well as standard Brownian particles. Due to its high sensitivity to mass transport, PCI can be applied to studying the integrity of actin polymerization dynamics. Our results indicate that the cyto-D treatment blocking the actin polymerization has a dominant effect at the large spatial scales, in the region surrounding the cell. We found that PCI can distinguish between senescent and quiescent cells, which is extremely difficult without using specific markers currently. We anticipate that PCI will be used alongside established, fluorescence-based techniques to enable valuable new studies of cell function. PMID:27615512

  17. Renal infarction resulting from traumatic renal artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sik; Kim, Won; Jin, Gong Yong; Na, Ki Ryang; Yun, Il Yong; Park, Sung Kwang

    2008-06-01

    Renal artery dissection may be caused by iatrogenic injury, trauma, underlying arterial diseases such as fibromuscular disease, atherosclerotic disease, or connective tissue disease. Radiological imaging may be helpful in detecting renal artery pathology, such as renal artery dissection. For patients with acute, isolated renal artery dissection, surgical treatment, endovascular management, or medical treatment have been considered effective measures to preserve renal function. We report a case of renal infarction that came about as a consequence of renal artery dissection.

  18. Renal Proteomic Responses to Severe Sepsis and Surgical Trauma: Dynamic Analysis of Porcine Tissue Biopsies.

    PubMed

    Matejovic, Martin; Tuma, Zdenek; Moravec, Jiri; Valesova, Lenka; Sykora, Roman; Chvojka, Jiri; Benes, Jan; Mares, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Although the burden of septic acute kidney injury continues to increase, the molecular pathogenesis remains largely obscure. The aim of this exploratory study was a discovery-driven analysis of dynamic kidney tissue protein expression changes applied for the first time in a classic large mammal model of sepsis. To achieve this goal, analyses of protein expression alterations were performed in serial samples of kidney cortical biopsies (before, 12 and 22 h of sepsis) in mechanically ventilated pigs challenged with continuous infusion of pseudomonas aeruginosa and compared with sham-operated control data. Global protein expression was analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Normodynamic sepsis was associated with 43% reduction in glomerular filtration. The exposure to surgical stress per se altered the renal protein expression profile, while sepsis induced distinct and highly dynamic proteome evolution shifting the balance toward cellular distress phenotype. We identified 20 proteins whose expression changes discriminated effects of sepsis from those induced by surgery. The data implicate endoplasmic reticulum stress, oxidative stress, mitochondrial energy metabolism, immune/inflammatory signaling, and tubular transport as major activated pathways. Thus, by coupling the power of sequential tissue proteomics with whole-animal physiological studies, our study helped to establish a first global overview of critical renal proteomic events occurring during surgical trauma and early sepsis in a porcine model. The study supports the notion that multiple potentially subtle and even transient changes in several proteins which are members of key functional interrelated systems appear to play a role in septic acute kidney injury. PMID:27070328

  19. Electromagnetic imaging of dynamic brain activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Leahy, R. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Lewis, P.; Lewine, J.; George, J. ); Singh, M. . Dept. of Radiology)

    1991-01-01

    Neural activity in the brain produces weak dynamic electromagnetic fields that can be measured by an array of sensors. Using a spatio-temporal modeling framework, we have developed a new approach to localization of multiple neural sources. This approach is based on the MUSIC algorithm originally developed for estimating the direction of arrival of signals impinging on a sensor array. We present applications of this technique to magnetic field measurements of a phantom and of a human evoked somatosensory response. The results of the somatosensory localization are mapped onto the brain anatomy obtained from magnetic resonance images.

  20. Electromagnetic imaging of dynamic brain activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Leahy, R.; Lewis, P.; Lewine, J.; George, J.; Singh, M.

    1991-12-31

    Neural activity in the brain produces weak dynamic electromagnetic fields that can be measured by an array of sensors. Using a spatio-temporal modeling framework, we have developed a new approach to localization of multiple neural sources. This approach is based on the MUSIC algorithm originally developed for estimating the direction of arrival of signals impinging on a sensor array. We present applications of this technique to magnetic field measurements of a phantom and of a human evoked somatosensory response. The results of the somatosensory localization are mapped onto the brain anatomy obtained from magnetic resonance images.

  1. Erythrocyte flow and dynamic hematocrit in the renal papilla of the rat.

    PubMed

    Zimmerhackl, B; Dussel, R; Steinhausen, M

    1985-12-01

    The microcirculation of the renal papilla was investigated in 32 vasa recta of Wistar rats. Using fluorescence microscopy in combination with a high-sensitivity television system we measured the velocity and flux of fluorescent-tagged erythrocytes in descending (DVR) and ascending vasa recta (AVR). After staining the plasma with fluorescent high molecular weight dextran we determined the diameters of DVR and AVR. Red cell flux (Qrbc) was determined from the ratio of the frequency of fluorescent-tagged red cells detected per unit time (fFITC) to the number of fluorescent-tagged red cells per nanoliter packed red cells (NFITC). From red cell velocity (Vrbc) and vessel diameter (D) we calculated the volume flow (Vapp). The dynamic hematocrit was directly derived as the ratio of Qrbc to Vapp. During antidiuresis Vrbc was 1.35 +/- 0.15 mm X s-1 (mean +/- SE) in DVR and 0.47 +/- 0.07 mm X s-1 in AVR. Qrbc in the same vessels averaged 3.26 +/- 0.9 and 1.72 +/- 0.35 nl X min-1, respectively. The diameter in DVR was 14.3 +/- 0.9 and in AVR 17.9 +/- 0.9 micron. From these values we calculated a dynamic hematocrit of 26 +/- 4 in DVR and 25 +/- 4% in AVR. The systemic hematocrit was 44 +/- 1%. The dynamic hematocrit in vasa recta represented 59 +/- 9 and 57 +/- 8% of the value in the systemic circulation, respectively.

  2. Computer-aided detection of renal calculi from noncontrast CT images using TV-flow and MSER features

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianfei; Wang, Shijun; Turkbey, Evrim B.; Linguraru, Marius George; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Renal calculi are common extracolonic incidental findings on computed tomographic colonography (CTC). This work aims to develop a fully automated computer-aided diagnosis system to accurately detect renal calculi on CTC images. Methods: The authors developed a total variation (TV) flow method to reduce image noise within the kidneys while maintaining the characteristic appearance of renal calculi. Maximally stable extremal region (MSER) features were then calculated to robustly identify calculi candidates. Finally, the authors computed texture and shape features that were imported to support vector machines for calculus classification. The method was validated on a dataset of 192 patients and compared to a baseline approach that detects calculi by thresholding. The authors also compared their method with the detection approaches using anisotropic diffusion and nonsmoothing. Results: At a false positive rate of 8 per patient, the sensitivities of the new method and the baseline thresholding approach were 69% and 35% (p < 1e − 3) on all calculi from 1 to 433 mm3 in the testing dataset. The sensitivities of the detection methods using anisotropic diffusion and nonsmoothing were 36% and 0%, respectively. The sensitivity of the new method increased to 90% if only larger and more clinically relevant calculi were considered. Conclusions: Experimental results demonstrated that TV-flow and MSER features are efficient means to robustly and accurately detect renal calculi on low-dose, high noise CTC images. Thus, the proposed method can potentially improve diagnosis. PMID:25563255

  3. Computer-aided detection of renal calculi from noncontrast CT images using TV-flow and MSER features

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jianfei; Wang, Shijun; Turkbey, Evrim B.; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.; Linguraru, Marius George

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Renal calculi are common extracolonic incidental findings on computed tomographic colonography (CTC). This work aims to develop a fully automated computer-aided diagnosis system to accurately detect renal calculi on CTC images. Methods: The authors developed a total variation (TV) flow method to reduce image noise within the kidneys while maintaining the characteristic appearance of renal calculi. Maximally stable extremal region (MSER) features were then calculated to robustly identify calculi candidates. Finally, the authors computed texture and shape features that were imported to support vector machines for calculus classification. The method was validated on a dataset of 192 patients and compared to a baseline approach that detects calculi by thresholding. The authors also compared their method with the detection approaches using anisotropic diffusion and nonsmoothing. Results: At a false positive rate of 8 per patient, the sensitivities of the new method and the baseline thresholding approach were 69% and 35% (p < 1e − 3) on all calculi from 1 to 433 mm{sup 3} in the testing dataset. The sensitivities of the detection methods using anisotropic diffusion and nonsmoothing were 36% and 0%, respectively. The sensitivity of the new method increased to 90% if only larger and more clinically relevant calculi were considered. Conclusions: Experimental results demonstrated that TV-flow and MSER features are efficient means to robustly and accurately detect renal calculi on low-dose, high noise CTC images. Thus, the proposed method can potentially improve diagnosis.

  4. Dynamic MEG imaging of focal neuronal sources

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.W.; Leahy R.M.; Mosher, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    We describe inverse methods for using the magnetoencephalogram (MEG) to image neural current sources associated with functional activation in the cerebral cortex. A Bayesian formulation is presented that is based on a Gibbs prior which reflects the sparse, focal nature of neural activation. The model includes a dynamic component so that we can utilize the full spatio-temporal data record to reconstruct a sequence of images reflecting changes in the current source amplitudes during activation. The model consists of the product of a binary field, representing the areas of activation in the cerebral cortex, and a time series at each site which represents the dynamic changes in the source amplitudes at the active sites. Our estimation methods are based on the optimization of three different functions of the posterior density. Each of these methods requires the estimation of a binary field which we compute using a mean field annealing method. We demonstrate and compare our methods in application to computer generated and experimental phantom data.

  5. Renal papillary necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your provider. Alternative Names Necrosis - renal papillae; Renal medullary necrosis Images Kidney anatomy Kidney - blood and urine flow References Ruggenenti P, Cravedi P, Remuzzi G. Microvascular and macrovascular diseases of the kidney. In: Taal MW, Chertow GM, ...

  6. Monitoring dynamic systems with multiparameter fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtsev, Volodymyr; Felekyan, Suren; Woźniak, Anna K; König, Marcelle; Sandhagen, Carl; Kühnemuth, Ralf; Seidel, Claus A M; Oesterhelt, Filipp

    2007-01-01

    A new general strategy based on the use of multiparameter fluorescence detection (MFD) to register and quantitatively analyse fluorescence images is introduced. Multiparameter fluorescence imaging (MFDi) uses pulsed excitation, time-correlated single-photon counting and a special pixel clock to simultaneously monitor the changes in the eight-dimensional fluorescence information (fundamental anisotropy, fluorescence lifetime, fluorescence intensity, time, excitation spectrum, fluorescence spectrum, fluorescence quantum yield, distance between fluorophores) in real time. The three spatial coordinates are also stored. The most statistically efficient techniques known from single-molecule spectroscopy are used to estimate fluorescence parameters of interest for all pixels, not just for the regions of interest. Their statistical significance is judged from a stack of two-dimensional histograms. In this way, specific pixels can be selected for subsequent pixel-based subensemble analysis in order to improve the statistical accuracy of the parameters estimated. MFDi avoids the need for sequential measurements, because the registered data allow one to perform many analysis techniques, such as fluorescence-intensity distribution analysis (FIDA) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), in an off-line mode. The limitations of FCS for counting molecules and monitoring dynamics are discussed. To demonstrate the ability of our technique, we analysed two systems: (i) interactions of the fluorescent dye Rhodamine 110 inside and outside of a glutathione sepharose bead, and (ii) microtubule dynamics in live yeast cells of Schizosaccharomyces pombe using a fusion protein of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) with Minichromosome Altered Loss Protein 3 (Mal3), which is involved in the dynamic cycle of polymerising and depolymerising microtubules. PMID:17160654

  7. Determinations of renal cortical and medullary oxygenation using BOLD Magnetic Resonance Imaging and selective diuretics

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Lizette; Glockner, James F.; Woollard, John; Textor, Stephen C.; Romero, Juan C.; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that blood O2 level dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD MRI) can detect changes in cortical proximal tubule (PT) and medullary thick ascending limb of Henle (TAL) oxygenation consequent to successive administration of furosemide and acetazolamide (Az). Assessment of PT and TAL function could be useful to monitor renal disease states in vivo. Therefore, the adjunct use of diuretics that inhibit Na+ reabsorption selectively in PT and TAL, Az and furosemide, respectively, may help discern tubular function by using BOLD MRI to detect changes in tissue oxygenation. Material and Methods BOLD MRI signal R2* (inversely related to oxygenation) and tissue oxygenation with intrarenal O2 probes were measured in pigs that received either furosemide (0.5mg/kg) or Az (15mg/kg) alone, Az sequentially after furosemide (n=6 each, 15-minute intervals), or only saline vehicle (n=3). Results R2* decreased in the cortex of Az-treated and medulla of furosemide-treated kidneys, corresponding to an increase in their tissue O2 assessed with probes. However, BOLD MRI also showed decreased cortical R2* following furosemide that was additive to the Az-induced decrease. Az administration, both alone and after furosemide, also decreased renal blood flow (−26±3.5 and −29.2±3%, respectively, p<0.01). Conclusion These results suggest that an increase in medullary and cortical tissue O2 elicited by selective diuretics is detectable by BOLD MRI, but may be complicated by hemodynamic effects of the drugs. Therefore, the BOLD MRI signal may reflect functional changes additional to oxygenation, and needs to be interpreted cautiously. PMID:20856128

  8. Advancing Cardiovascular, Neurovascular, and Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Small Rodents Using Cryogenic Radiofrequency Coil Technology

    PubMed Central

    Niendorf, Thoralf; Pohlmann, Andreas; Reimann, Henning M.; Waiczies, Helmar; Peper, Eva; Huelnhagen, Till; Seeliger, Erdmann; Schreiber, Adrian; Kettritz, Ralph; Strobel, Klaus; Ku, Min-Chi; Waiczies, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Research in pathologies of the brain, heart and kidney have gained immensely from the plethora of studies that have helped shape new methods in magnetic resonance (MR) for characterizing preclinical disease models. Methodical probing into preclinical animal models by MR is invaluable since it allows a careful interpretation and extrapolation of data derived from these models to human disease. In this review we will focus on the applications of cryogenic radiofrequency (RF) coils in small animal MR as a means of boosting image quality (e.g., by supporting MR microscopy) and making data acquisition more efficient (e.g., by reducing measuring time); both being important constituents for thorough investigational studies on animal models of disease. This review attempts to make the (bio)medical imaging, molecular medicine, and pharmaceutical communities aware of this productive ferment and its outstanding significance for anatomical and functional MR in small rodents. The goal is to inspire a more intense interdisciplinary collaboration across the fields to further advance and progress non-invasive MR methods that ultimately support thorough (patho)physiological characterization of animal disease models. In this review, current and potential future applications for the RF coil technology in cardiovascular, neurovascular, and renal disease will be discussed. PMID:26617515

  9. Advancing Cardiovascular, Neurovascular, and Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Small Rodents Using Cryogenic Radiofrequency Coil Technology.

    PubMed

    Niendorf, Thoralf; Pohlmann, Andreas; Reimann, Henning M; Waiczies, Helmar; Peper, Eva; Huelnhagen, Till; Seeliger, Erdmann; Schreiber, Adrian; Kettritz, Ralph; Strobel, Klaus; Ku, Min-Chi; Waiczies, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Research in pathologies of the brain, heart and kidney have gained immensely from the plethora of studies that have helped shape new methods in magnetic resonance (MR) for characterizing preclinical disease models. Methodical probing into preclinical animal models by MR is invaluable since it allows a careful interpretation and extrapolation of data derived from these models to human disease. In this review we will focus on the applications of cryogenic radiofrequency (RF) coils in small animal MR as a means of boosting image quality (e.g., by supporting MR microscopy) and making data acquisition more efficient (e.g., by reducing measuring time); both being important constituents for thorough investigational studies on animal models of disease. This review attempts to make the (bio)medical imaging, molecular medicine, and pharmaceutical communities aware of this productive ferment and its outstanding significance for anatomical and functional MR in small rodents. The goal is to inspire a more intense interdisciplinary collaboration across the fields to further advance and progress non-invasive MR methods that ultimately support thorough (patho)physiological characterization of animal disease models. In this review, current and potential future applications for the RF coil technology in cardiovascular, neurovascular, and renal disease will be discussed.

  10. Evidence of a heterogeneous tissue oxygenation: renal ischemia/reperfusion injury in a large animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Nicole J.; Huffman, Scott W.; Alemozaffar, Mehrdad; Gage, Frederick A.; Levin, Ira W.; Elster, Eric A.

    2013-03-01

    Renal ischemia that occurs intraoperatively during procedures requiring clamping of the renal artery (such as renal procurement for transplantation and partial nephrectomy for renal cancer) is known to have a significant impact on the viability of that kidney. To better understand the dynamics of intraoperative renal ischemia and recovery of renal oxygenation during reperfusion, a visible reflectance imaging system (VRIS) was developed to measure renal oxygenation during renal artery clamping in both cooled and warm porcine kidneys. For all kidneys, normothermic and hypothermic, visible reflectance imaging demonstrated a spatially distinct decrease in the relative oxy-hemoglobin concentration (%HbO2) of the superior pole of the kidney compared to the middle or inferior pole. Mean relative oxy-hemoglobin concentrations decrease more significantly during ischemia for normothermic kidneys compared to hypothermic kidneys. VRIS may be broadly applicable to provide an indicator of organ ischemia during open and laparoscopic procedures.

  11. The incidence and location of prostatic calculi on noncontrast computed tomography images in patients with renal calculi.

    PubMed

    Balasar, Mehmet; Poyraz, Necdet; Göğer, Yunus Emre; Unal, Yunus; Pişkin, Mehmet Mesut

    2015-08-01

    In this study, the incidence and location of prostatic calculi on noncontrast abdominal computed tomography (NCACT) images of patients with and without renal stones were investigated. Between 2006 and 2013, NCACT images were taken of 133 patients treated for renal stones (Group I) and of 100 age-matched control patients with putative urinary stone disease (Group II) in our clinic. The incidence and location of prostatic calculi on these images were determined. The location of prostatic calculus was classified as type A if they were located in the main prostatic ducts, and type B if they were located outside the ducts. Prostatic calculi were present in 44.4% of patients in Group I and 21.0% of patients in Group II. The incidence of prostatic calculi was significantly higher in patients with urinary stones compared with those without (P<0.001). The location of prostatic calculi in Group I included 74.6% type A and 25.4% type B while in Group II the locations were 76.2% type A and 23.8% type B. The incidence of prostatic calculi is more prevalent in patients with renal stones. On NCACT images, prostatic calculi were mostly detected in the main prostatic ducts, which were defined as type A. PMID:25991494

  12. The incidence and location of prostatic calculi on noncontrast computed tomography images in patients with renal calculi.

    PubMed

    Balasar, Mehmet; Poyraz, Necdet; Göğer, Yunus Emre; Unal, Yunus; Pişkin, Mehmet Mesut

    2015-08-01

    In this study, the incidence and location of prostatic calculi on noncontrast abdominal computed tomography (NCACT) images of patients with and without renal stones were investigated. Between 2006 and 2013, NCACT images were taken of 133 patients treated for renal stones (Group I) and of 100 age-matched control patients with putative urinary stone disease (Group II) in our clinic. The incidence and location of prostatic calculi on these images were determined. The location of prostatic calculus was classified as type A if they were located in the main prostatic ducts, and type B if they were located outside the ducts. Prostatic calculi were present in 44.4% of patients in Group I and 21.0% of patients in Group II. The incidence of prostatic calculi was significantly higher in patients with urinary stones compared with those without (P<0.001). The location of prostatic calculi in Group I included 74.6% type A and 25.4% type B while in Group II the locations were 76.2% type A and 23.8% type B. The incidence of prostatic calculi is more prevalent in patients with renal stones. On NCACT images, prostatic calculi were mostly detected in the main prostatic ducts, which were defined as type A.

  13. Imaging via complete cantilever dynamic detection: general dynamic mode imaging and spectroscopy in scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Somnath, Suhas; Collins, Liam; Matheson, Michael A; Sukumar, Sreenivas R; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-10-14

    We develop and implement a multifrequency spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging mode, referred to as general dynamic mode (GDM), that captures the complete spatially- and stimulus dependent information on nonlinear cantilever dynamics in scanning probe microscopy (SPM). GDM acquires the cantilever response including harmonics and mode mixing products across the entire broadband cantilever spectrum as a function of excitation frequency. GDM spectra substitute the classical measurements in SPM, e.g. amplitude and phase in lock-in detection. Here, GDM is used to investigate the response of a purely capacitively driven cantilever. We use information theory techniques to mine the data and verify the findings with governing equations and classical lock-in based approaches. We explore the dependence of the cantilever dynamics on the tip-sample distance, AC and DC driving bias. This approach can be applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of other systems within and beyond dynamic SPM. GDM is expected to be useful for separating the contribution of different physical phenomena in the cantilever response and understanding the role of cantilever dynamics in dynamic AFM techniques. PMID:27607339

  14. Imaging via complete cantilever dynamic detection: general dynamic mode imaging and spectroscopy in scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somnath, Suhas; Collins, Liam; Matheson, Michael A.; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    We develop and implement a multifrequency spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging mode, referred to as general dynamic mode (GDM), that captures the complete spatially- and stimulus dependent information on nonlinear cantilever dynamics in scanning probe microscopy (SPM). GDM acquires the cantilever response including harmonics and mode mixing products across the entire broadband cantilever spectrum as a function of excitation frequency. GDM spectra substitute the classical measurements in SPM, e.g. amplitude and phase in lock-in detection. Here, GDM is used to investigate the response of a purely capacitively driven cantilever. We use information theory techniques to mine the data and verify the findings with governing equations and classical lock-in based approaches. We explore the dependence of the cantilever dynamics on the tip-sample distance, AC and DC driving bias. This approach can be applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of other systems within and beyond dynamic SPM. GDM is expected to be useful for separating the contribution of different physical phenomena in the cantilever response and understanding the role of cantilever dynamics in dynamic AFM techniques.

  15. Imaging via complete cantilever dynamic detection: General dynamic mode imaging and spectroscopy in scanning probe microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Somnath, Suhas; Collins, Liam; Matheson, Michael A.; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-09-08

    We develop and implement a multifrequency spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging mode, referred to as general dynamic mode (GDM), that captures the complete spatially- and stimulus dependent information on nonlinear cantilever dynamics in scanning probe microscopy (SPM). GDM acquires the cantilever response including harmonics and mode mixing products across the entire broadband cantilever spectrum as a function of excitation frequency. GDM spectra substitute the classical measurements in SPM, e.g. amplitude and phase in lock-in detection. Here, GDM is used to investigate the response of a purely capacitively driven cantilever. We use information theory techniques to mine the data and verify themore » findings with governing equations and classical lock-in based approaches. We explore the dependence of the cantilever dynamics on the tip–sample distance, AC and DC driving bias. This approach can be applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of other systems within and beyond dynamic SPM. In conclusion, GDM is expected to be useful for separating the contribution of different physical phenomena in the cantilever response and understanding the role of cantilever dynamics in dynamic AFM techniques.« less

  16. Optical imaging of tumor hypoxia dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Gregory M.; Fontanella, Andrew N.; Zhang, Guoqing; Hanna, Gabi; Fraser, Cassandra L.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of the tumor microenvironment and hypoxia plays a significant role in determining cancer progression, treatment response, and treatment resistance. That the tumor microenvironment is highly heterogeneous with significant intratumor and intertumor variability presents a significant challenge in developing effective cancer therapies. Critical to understanding the role of the tumor microenvironment is the ability to dynamically quantify oxygen levels in the vasculature and tissue in order to elucidate the roles of oxygen supply and consumption, spatially and temporally. To this end, we describe the use of hyperspectral imaging to characterize hemoglobin absorption to quantify hemoglobin content and oxygen saturation, as well as dual emissive fluorescent∕phosphorescent boron nanoparticles, which serve as ratiometric indicators of tissue oxygen tension. Applying these techniques to a window-chamber tumor model illustrates the role of fluctuations in hemoglobin saturation in driving changes in tissue oxygenation, the two being significantly correlated (r = 0.77). Finally, a green-fluorescence-protein reporter for hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) provides an endpoint for hypoxic stress in the tumor, which is used to demonstrate a significant association between tumor hypoxia dynamics and HIF-1 activity in an in vivo demonstration of the technique. PMID:21198195

  17. Optical imaging of tumor hypoxia dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Gregory M.; Fontanella, Andrew N.; Zhang, Guoqing; Hanna, Gabi; Fraser, Cassandra L.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2010-11-01

    The influence of the tumor microenvironment and hypoxia plays a significant role in determining cancer progression, treatment response, and treatment resistance. That the tumor microenvironment is highly heterogeneous with significant intratumor and intertumor variability presents a significant challenge in developing effective cancer therapies. Critical to understanding the role of the tumor microenvironment is the ability to dynamically quantify oxygen levels in the vasculature and tissue in order to elucidate the roles of oxygen supply and consumption, spatially and temporally. To this end, we describe the use of hyperspectral imaging to characterize hemoglobin absorption to quantify hemoglobin content and oxygen saturation, as well as dual emissive fluorescent/phosphorescent boron nanoparticles, which serve as ratiometric indicators of tissue oxygen tension. Applying these techniques to a window-chamber tumor model illustrates the role of fluctuations in hemoglobin saturation in driving changes in tissue oxygenation, the two being significantly correlated (r = 0.77). Finally, a green-fluorescence-protein reporter for hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) provides an endpoint for hypoxic stress in the tumor, which is used to demonstrate a significant association between tumor hypoxia dynamics and HIF-1 activity in an in vivo demonstration of the technique.

  18. Spontaneous retroperitoneal renal hemorrhage: imaging and angiographic findings in five patients.

    PubMed

    Baekelandt, M; Leyman, P; Wynant, H; Stockx, L; Van Steenberge, R; D'Haenens, P

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe one case and report four other of pathologically proven spontaneous retroperitoneal renal hemorrhage due to a ruptured hemorrhagic cyst (2 cases), a renal cell carcinoma, an angiomyolipoma, and a tubular adenoma. The contribution of US, CT, and angiography to the diagnosis is discussed and the recent literature is reviewed.

  19. Renal arteriography

    MedlinePlus

    Renal angiogram; Angiography - kidney; Renal angiography; Renal artery stenosis - arteriography ... Renal arteriography is often needed to help decide on the best treatment after other tests are done ...

  20. Calcium dynamics underlying the myogenic response of the renal afferent arteriole

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Aurélie

    2013-01-01

    The renal afferent arteriole reacts to an elevation in blood pressure with an increase in muscle tone and a decrease in luminal diameter. This effect, known as the myogenic response, is believed to stabilize glomerular filtration and to protect the glomerulus from systolic blood pressure increases, especially in hypertension. To study the mechanisms underlying the myogenic response, we developed a mathematical model of intracellular Ca2+ signaling in an afferent arteriole smooth muscle cell. The model represents detailed transmembrane ionic transport, intracellular Ca2+ dynamics, the kinetics of myosin light chain phosphorylation, and the mechanical behavior of the cell. It assumes that the myogenic response is initiated by pressure-induced changes in the activity of nonselective cation channels. Our model predicts spontaneous vasomotion at physiological luminal pressures and KCl- and diltiazem-induced diameter changes comparable to experimental findings. The time-periodic oscillations stem from the dynamic exchange of Ca2+ between the cytosol and the sarcoplasmic reticulum, coupled to the stimulation of Ca2+-activated potassium (KCa) and chloride (ClCa) channels, and the modulation of voltage-activated L-type channels; blocking sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pumps, ryanodine receptors (RyR), KCa, ClCa, or L-type channels abolishes these oscillations. Our results indicate that the profile of the myogenic response is also strongly dependent on the conductance of ClCa and L-type channels, as well as the activity of plasmalemmal Ca2+ pumps. Furthermore, inhibition of KCa is not necessary to induce myogenic contraction. Lastly, our model suggests that the kinetic behavior of L-type channels results in myogenic kinetics that are substantially faster during constriction than during dilation, consistent with in vitro observations (Loutzenhiser R, Bidani A, Chilton L. Circ. Res. 90: 1316–1324, 2002). PMID:24173354

  1. Dynamic changes of early-stage aortic lipid deposition in chronic renal failure rats and effects of decorin gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    MA, HONG-BO; WANG, RONG; YU, KE-ZHOU; YU, CHE

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the association between lipid metabolism and the atherosclerosis in early-stage chronic renal failure at the molecular level and to explore the efficacy of decorin on chronic renal failure. Sprague Dawley rats receiving 5/6 nephrectomy and Sham surgery were divided into control and experimental groups. Sprague Dawley rats receiving 5/6 nephrectomy were divided into control and experimental groups, and the experimental group was further subdivided into rats receiving treatment with fibroblasts (FBs) transfected either with empty vector and with a decorin (DCN) gene. The dynamic levels of triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (T-Ch) and total phospholipid (T-PL) were detected on the 10th, 30th and 60th days. The body weight, blood lipid levels, renal function and renal tissue were observed after four weeks, and transforming growth factor-βl and protein expression was detected by immunohistochemistry. In total, 4 weeks after treatment, the DCN expression in the renal tissue of rats treated with DCN-transfected FBs was significantly increased compared to that in the control rats. The results showed that the levels of the three lipids in the aortic arches were slightly elevated on the 10th day compared with those in the control group, and the TG level was significantly increased on the 30th day. The levels of T-Ch, TG and T-PL in the aortic arches were significantly elevated on the 60th day. The TG and T-Ch levels in the plasma and aortic tissues of Sprague Dawley rats receiving 5/6 nephrectomy without any treatment and after receiving treatment with FBs transfected with empty vector were significantly increased compared with those in the control group. The increased T-Ch and decreased T-PL levels in the erythrocyte membrane increased the rigidity of the erythrocyte and decreased erythrocyte deformability. In conclusion, highly expressed DCN mitigated renal fibrosis and thus delayed renal failure as well as mitigating the

  2. Dynamic infrared imaging for skin cancer screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godoy, Sebastián E.; Ramirez, David A.; Myers, Stephen A.; von Winckel, Greg; Krishna, Sanchita; Berwick, Marianne; Padilla, R. Steven; Sen, Pradeep; Krishna, Sanjay

    2015-05-01

    Dynamic thermal imaging (DTI) with infrared cameras is a non-invasive technique with the ability to detect the most common types of skin cancer. We discuss and propose a standardized analysis method for DTI of actual patient data, which achieves high levels of sensitivity and specificity by judiciously selecting pixels with the same initial temperature. This process compensates the intrinsic limitations of the cooling unit and is the key enabling tool in the DTI data analysis. We have extensively tested the methodology on human subjects using thermal infrared image sequences from a pilot study conducted jointly with the University of New Mexico Dermatology Clinic in Albuquerque, New Mexico (ClinicalTrials ID number NCT02154451). All individuals were adult subjects who were scheduled for biopsy or adult volunteers with clinically diagnosed benign condition. The sample size was 102 subjects for the present study. Statistically significant results were obtained that allowed us to distinguish between benign and malignant skin conditions. The sensitivity and specificity was 95% (with a 95% confidence interval of [87.8% 100.0%]) and 83% (with a 95% confidence interval of [73.4% 92.5%]), respectively, and with an area under the curve of 95%. Our results lead us to conclude that the DTI approach in conjunction with the judicious selection of pixels has the potential to provide a fast, accurate, non-contact, and non-invasive way to screen for common types of skin cancer. As such, it has the potential to significantly reduce the number of biopsies performed on suspicious lesions.

  3. Renal infarction after aerobics.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, J H; Moinuddin, M; Buchignani, J S; Rockett, J F; Callison, M K

    1984-11-01

    Renal infarction is most frequently due to emboli from the heart or aorta. Other causes include atheromatous disease, renal artery aneurysm, vasculitis, hypotension, hypercoagulable states, aortic dissection, and major trauma. Most renal infarctions are segmental. The extent of disease is dependent upon the size and number of renal vessels involved, coexistent renal disease, and collateral circulation. Flank pain, fever, leukocytosis, hematuria, renal failure, or hypertension may suggest the diagnosis, but these findings are nonspecific and diagnosis will depend not only on history and physical examination, but also on the appropriate imaging tests. The type of treatment is dictated by the etiology of the infarction.

  4. Imaging complex nutrient dynamics in mycelial networks.

    PubMed

    Fricker, M D; Lee, J A; Bebber, D P; Tlalka, M; Hynes, J; Darrah, P R; Watkinson, S C; Boddy, L

    2008-08-01

    Transport networks are vital components of multi-cellular organisms, distributing nutrients and removing waste products. Animal cardiovascular and respiratory systems, and plant vasculature, are branching trees whose architecture is thought to determine universal scaling laws in these organisms. In contrast, the transport systems of many multi-cellular fungi do not fit into this conceptual framework, as they have evolved to explore a patchy environment in search of new resources, rather than ramify through a three-dimensional organism. These fungi grow as a foraging mycelium, formed by the branching and fusion of threadlike hyphae, that gives rise to a complex network. To function efficiently, the mycelial network must both transport nutrients between spatially separated source and sink regions and also maintain its integrity in the face of continuous attack by mycophagous insects or random damage. Here we review the development of novel imaging approaches and software tools that we have used to characterise nutrient transport and network formation in foraging mycelia over a range of spatial scales. On a millimetre scale, we have used a combination of time-lapse confocal imaging and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to quantify the rate of diffusive transport through the unique vacuole system in individual hyphae. These data then form the basis of a simulation model to predict the impact of such diffusion-based movement on a scale of several millimetres. On a centimetre scale, we have used novel photon-counting scintillation imaging techniques to visualize radiolabel movement in small microcosms. This approach has revealed novel N-transport phenomena, including rapid, preferential N-resource allocation to C-rich sinks, induction of simultaneous bi-directional transport, abrupt switching between different pre-existing transport routes, and a strong pulsatile component to transport in some species. Analysis of the pulsatile transport component using Fourier

  5. Dynamic flat panel detector versus image intensifier in cardiac imaging: dose and image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vano, E.; Geiger, B.; Schreiner, A.; Back, C.; Beissel, J.

    2005-12-01

    The practical aspects of the dosimetric and imaging performance of a digital x-ray system for cardiology procedures were evaluated. The system was configured with an image intensifier (II) and later upgraded to a dynamic flat panel detector (FD). Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) to phantoms of 16, 20, 24 and 28 cm of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and the image quality of a test object were measured. Images were evaluated directly on the monitor and with numerical methods (noise and signal-to-noise ratio). Information contained in the DICOM header for dosimetry audit purposes was also tested. ESAK values per frame (or kerma rate) for the most commonly used cine and fluoroscopy modes for different PMMA thicknesses and for field sizes of 17 and 23 cm for II, and 20 and 25 cm for FD, produced similar results in the evaluated system with both technologies, ranging between 19 and 589 µGy/frame (cine) and 5 and 95 mGy min-1 (fluoroscopy). Image quality for these dose settings was better for the FD version. The 'study dosimetric report' is comprehensive, and its numerical content is sufficiently accurate. There is potential in the future to set those systems with dynamic FD to lower doses than are possible in the current II versions, especially for digital cine runs, or to benefit from improved image quality.

  6. BK Nephritis and Venous Thrombosis in Renal Transplant Recipient Detected by 111In Leukocyte Imaging.

    PubMed

    Pucar, Darko; Klein, Kandace; Corley, James; Williams, Hadyn T

    2015-07-01

    Three months after deceased donor kidney transplant, a patient who presented with proteinuric renal dysfunction and fever of undetermined origin was found to have BK viruria by quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. An ¹¹¹In leukocyte scan showed increased renal transplant uptake consistent with nephritis and linear uptake in the knee. Venous duplex ultrasound revealed acute occlusive thrombosis in the superficial right lesser saphenous vein in the area of increased radiolabeled leukocyte uptake. This ¹¹¹In leukocyte scan performed for fever of undetermined origin demonstrated findings of BK nephritis in a renal transplant patient and associated acute venous thrombosis related to leukocyte colonization.

  7. Real-time extended dynamic range imaging in shearography

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, Roger M.; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Osten, Wolfgang

    2008-10-20

    Extended dynamic range (EDR) imaging is a postprocessing technique commonly associated with photography. Multiple images of a scene are recorded by the camera using different shutter settings and are merged into a single higher dynamic range image. Speckle interferometry and holography techniques require a well-modulated intensity signal to extract the phase information, and of these techniques shearography is most sensitive to different object surface reflectivities as it uses self-referencing from a sheared image. In this paper the authors demonstrate real-time EDR imaging in shearography and present experimental results from a difficult surface reflectivity sample: a wooden panel painting containing gold and dark earth color paint.

  8. [Magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of renal neoplasms : MRI - histopathological comparison].

    PubMed

    Dombrovskií, V I

    2000-01-01

    The study evaluates the diagnostic of the MRI in the discovery and characterizing renal neoplasms. The principle of the comparative study of MRI, other diagnostic modalities and histopathological data was applied by the author, using a large pool statistically significant clinical material (419 cases). Renal cell carcinoma--the most wide-spread renal parenchyma's tumor, was selected as a morphological model (302 cases). As a result of this investigation, the MRI semiotics of renal cell carcinoma was more precisely defined and detailed and this method's high level of sensitivity (98.4%) was detected, concerning the detection of such a type of pathology. The MRI data reliably reflect (r > 0.8; P < 0.05) the true morphological structure of the tumor's growth, the secondary tumor's tissue alterations and its interaction with surrounding anatomical formations. Thus, MRI is appreciated as a method of choice for oncological urology.

  9. Fluid dynamic modelling of renal pelvic pressure during endoscopic stone removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oratis, Alexandros; Subasic, John; Bird, James; Eisner, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic kidney stone removal procedures are known to increase internal pressure in the renal pelvis, the kidney's urinary collecting system. High renal pelvic pressure incites systemic absorption of irrigation fluid, which can increase the risk of postoperative fever and sepsis or the unwanted absorption of electrolytes. Urologists choose the appropriate surgical procedure based on patient history and kidney stone size. However, no study has been conducted to compare the pressure profiles of each procedure, nor is there a precise sense of how the renal pelvic pressure scales with various operational parameters. Here we develop physical models for the flow rates and renal pelvic pressure for various procedures. We show that the results of our models are consistent with existing urological data on each procedure and that the models can predict pressure profiles where data is unavailable.

  10. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, J.; Bilheux, H.; Kang, M.; Voisin, S.; Cheng, C.; Horita, J.; Perfect, E.

    2011-12-01

    In situ quantification of soil-plant water fluxes have not been fully successful due to a lack of non-destructive techniques capable of revealing roots or water fluxes at relevant spatial scales. Neutron imaging is a unique non-invasive tool that can assess sub-millimeter scale material properties and transport in situ, and which has been successfully applied to characterize soil and plant water status. Here, we have applied neutron radiography and tomography to quantify water transport through individual maize roots in response to internal plant demand. Zea mays seedlings were grown for 10 days in Flint silica sand within 2.6 cm diameter Al chambers. Using a reactor-based neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (HFIR), water fluxes were tracked through the maize soil-root systems by collecting consecutive neutron radiographs over a 12 h period following irrigation with D2O. D has a much lower neutron attenuation than H, thus D2O displacement of existing H2O within the plant vascular system, or influx of D2O into previously dry tissue or soil is readily tracked by changes in image intensity through time. Plant water release and uptake was regulated by periodically cycling on a high-intensity grow light. From each maize replicate, selected regions of interest (ROI) were delineated around individual roots, root free soil, stem and leaf segments. Changes in ROI were tracked through time to reveal patterns of water flux. The hydration of root and stem tissue cycled in response to illumination; root water content often increased during darkness, then decreased with illumination as water was transported from the root into the stem. Relative root-shoot hydration through time illustrates the balance between demand, storage capacity and uptake, which varies depending on root characteristics and its localized soil environment. The dynamic transport of water between soil, individual roots, stems and leaves was readily visualized and quantified illustrating the value

  11. 3D element imaging using NSECT for the detection of renal cancer: a simulation study in MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viana, R. S.; Agasthya, G. A.; Yoriyaz, H.; Kapadia, A. J.

    2013-09-01

    This work describes a simulation study investigating the application of neutron stimulated emission computed tomography (NSECT) for noninvasive 3D imaging of renal cancer in vivo. Using MCNP5 simulations, we describe a method of diagnosing renal cancer in the body by mapping the 3D distribution of elements present in tumors using the NSECT technique. A human phantom containing the kidneys and other major organs was modeled in MCNP5. The element composition of each organ was based on values reported in literature. The two kidneys were modeled to contain elements reported in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and healthy kidney tissue. Simulated NSECT scans were executed to determine the 3D element distribution of the phantom body. Elements specific to RCC and healthy kidney tissue were then analyzed to identify the locations of the diseased and healthy kidneys and generate tomographic images of the tumor. The extent of the RCC lesion inside the kidney was determined using 3D volume rendering. A similar procedure was used to generate images of each individual organ in the body. Six isotopes were studied in this work—32S, 12C, 23Na, 14N, 31P and 39K. The results demonstrated that through a single NSECT scan performed in vivo, it is possible to identify the location of the kidneys and other organs within the body, determine the extent of the tumor within the organ, and to quantify the differences between cancer and healthy tissue-related isotopes with p ≤ 0.05. All of the images demonstrated appropriate concentration changes between the organs, with some discrepancy observed in 31P, 39K and 23Na. The discrepancies were likely due to the low concentration of the elements in the tissue that were below the current detection sensitivity of the NSECT technique.

  12. Is There Hope for Renal Growth on Imaging Studies Following Ureteral Reimplant for Boys With Fetal Hydronephrosis and Urinary Reflux?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Reflux nephropathy is thought to be the etiology for renal maldevelopment. We present two boys with fetal hydronephrosis and sterile vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). There was lack of renal growth of the refluxing renal units on surveillance renal ultrasound. Parents elected to undergo open ureteral reimplants. Post-surgical ultrasounds demonstrated improved renal growth. PMID:26793522

  13. Dynamic contrast-enhanced 3D photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Philip; Kosik, Ivan; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a hybrid imaging modality that integrates the strengths from both optical imaging and acoustic imaging while simultaneously overcoming many of their respective weaknesses. In previous work, we reported on a real-time 3D PAI system comprised of a 32-element hemispherical array of transducers. Using the system, we demonstrated the ability to capture photoacoustic data, reconstruct a 3D photoacoustic image, and display select slices of the 3D image every 1.4 s, where each 3D image resulted from a single laser pulse. The present study aimed to exploit the rapid imaging speed of an upgraded 3D PAI system by evaluating its ability to perform dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging. The contrast dynamics can provide rich datasets that contain insight into perfusion, pharmacokinetics and physiology. We captured a series of 3D PA images of a flow phantom before and during injection of piglet and rabbit blood. Principal component analysis was utilized to classify the data according to its spatiotemporal information. The results suggested that this technique can be used to separate a sequence of 3D PA images into a series of images representative of main features according to spatiotemporal flow dynamics.

  14. New Magnetic Resonance Imaging Index for Renal Fibrosis Assessment: A Comparison between Diffusion-Weighted Imaging and T1 Mapping with Histological Validation.

    PubMed

    Friedli, I; Crowe, L A; Berchtold, L; Moll, S; Hadaya, K; de Perrot, T; Vesin, C; Martin, P-Y; de Seigneux, S; Vallée, J-P

    2016-01-01

    A need exists to noninvasively assess renal interstitial fibrosis, a common process to all kidney diseases and predictive of renal prognosis. In this translational study, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) T1 mapping and a new segmented Diffusion-Weighted Imaging (DWI) technique, for Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC), were first compared to renal fibrosis in two well-controlled animal models to assess detection limits. Validation against biopsy was then performed in 33 kidney allograft recipients (KARs). Predictive MRI indices, ΔT1 and ΔADC (defined as the cortico-medullary differences), were compared to histology. In rats, both T1 and ADC correlated well with fibrosis and inflammation showing a difference between normal and diseased kidneys. In KARs, MRI indices were not sensitive to interstitial inflammation. By contrast, ΔADC outperformed ΔT1 with a stronger negative correlation to fibrosis (R(2) = 0.64 against R(2) = 0.29 p < 0.001). ΔADC tends to negative values in KARs harboring cortical fibrosis of more than 40%. Using a discriminant analysis method, the ΔADC, as a marker to detect such level of fibrosis or higher, led to a specificity and sensitivity of 100% and 71%, respectively. This new index has potential for noninvasive assessment of fibrosis in the clinical setting. PMID:27439482

  15. New Magnetic Resonance Imaging Index for Renal Fibrosis Assessment: A Comparison between Diffusion-Weighted Imaging and T1 Mapping with Histological Validation

    PubMed Central

    Friedli, I.; Crowe, L. A.; Berchtold, L.; Moll, S.; Hadaya, K.; de Perrot, T.; Vesin, C.; Martin, P.-Y.; de Seigneux, S.; Vallée, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    A need exists to noninvasively assess renal interstitial fibrosis, a common process to all kidney diseases and predictive of renal prognosis. In this translational study, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) T1 mapping and a new segmented Diffusion-Weighted Imaging (DWI) technique, for Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC), were first compared to renal fibrosis in two well-controlled animal models to assess detection limits. Validation against biopsy was then performed in 33 kidney allograft recipients (KARs). Predictive MRI indices, ΔT1 and ΔADC (defined as the cortico-medullary differences), were compared to histology. In rats, both T1 and ADC correlated well with fibrosis and inflammation showing a difference between normal and diseased kidneys. In KARs, MRI indices were not sensitive to interstitial inflammation. By contrast, ΔADC outperformed ΔT1 with a stronger negative correlation to fibrosis (R2 = 0.64 against R2 = 0.29 p < 0.001). ΔADC tends to negative values in KARs harboring cortical fibrosis of more than 40%. Using a discriminant analysis method, the ΔADC, as a marker to detect such level of fibrosis or higher, led to a specificity and sensitivity of 100% and 71%, respectively. This new index has potential for noninvasive assessment of fibrosis in the clinical setting. PMID:27439482

  16. Phase Preserving Dynamic Range Compression of Aeromagnetic Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovesi, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Geoscientific images with a high dynamic range, such as aeromagnetic images, are difficult to present in a manner that facilitates interpretation. The data values may range over 20000 nanoteslas or more but a computer monitor is typically designed to present input data constrained to 8 bit values. Standard photographic high dynamic range tonemapping algorithms may be unsuitable, or inapplicable to such data because they are have been developed on the basis of statistics of natural images, feature types found in natural images, and models of the human visual system. These algorithms may also require image segmentation and/or decomposition of the image into base and detail layers but these operations may have no meaning for geoscientific images. For geological and geophysical data high dynamic range images are often dealt with via histogram equalization. The problem with this approach is that the contrast stretch or compression applied to data values depends on how frequently the data values occur in the image and not on the magnitude of any data features themselves. This can lead to inappropriate distortions in the output. Other approaches include use of the Automatic Gain Control algorithm developed by Rajagopalan, or the tilt derivative. A difficulty with these approaches is that the signal can be over-normalized and perception of the overall variations in the signal can be lost. To overcome these problems a method is presented that compresses the dynamic range of an image while preserving local features. It makes no assumptions about the formation of the image, the feature types it contains, or its range of values. Thus, unlike algorithms designed for photographic images, this algorithm can be applied to a wide range of scientific images. The method is based on extracting local phase and amplitude values across the image using monogenic filters. The dynamic range of the image can then be reduced by applying a range reducing function to the amplitude values, for

  17. High Dynamic Range Processing for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sukerkar, Preeti A.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To minimize feature loss in T1- and T2-weighted MRI by merging multiple MR images acquired at different TR and TE to generate an image with increased dynamic range. Materials and Methods High Dynamic Range (HDR) processing techniques from the field of photography were applied to a series of acquired MR images. Specifically, a method to parameterize the algorithm for MRI data was developed and tested. T1- and T2-weighted images of a number of contrast agent phantoms and a live mouse were acquired with varying TR and TE parameters. The images were computationally merged to produce HDR-MR images. All acquisitions were performed on a 7.05 T Bruker PharmaScan with a multi-echo spin echo pulse sequence. Results HDR-MRI delineated bright and dark features that were either saturated or indistinguishable from background in standard T1- and T2-weighted MRI. The increased dynamic range preserved intensity gradation over a larger range of T1 and T2 in phantoms and revealed more anatomical features in vivo. Conclusions We have developed and tested a method to apply HDR processing to MR images. The increased dynamic range of HDR-MR images as compared to standard T1- and T2-weighted images minimizes feature loss caused by magnetization recovery or low SNR. PMID:24250788

  18. Infection dynamics of two renal myxozoans in hatchery reared fry and juvenile Atlantic cod Gadus morhua L.

    PubMed

    Holzer, A S; Stewart, S; Tildesley, A; Wootten, R; Sommerville, C

    2010-09-01

    In order to study the infection dynamics of 2 renal myxozoans, Zschokkella hildae Auerbach, 1910 and Gadimyxa atlantica Køie, Karlsbakk and Nylund, 2007 in cultured Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua L. aged 3-19 months, a specific single-round PCR assay and a double-label in situ hybridization protocol were developed. The results demonstrated that the 2 myxozoans show spatial separation of their development with regard to spore formation inside the renal tubules versus the collecting ducts and ureters, as well as temporal separation with Z. hildae proliferating and developing spores only once the G. atlantica infection decreases, despite the presence of both myxozoans in the smallest fry studied. These results strongly suggest within-host competition of the 2 myxozoans with potential suppression of Z. hildae by G. atlantica until G. morhua acquires immunity against G. atlantica. The quantification of the G. atlantica infection inside the renal tubules before and after a 29-day experimental growth performance study using fry from hatcheries with differing filtration systems showed that the intensity of infection with G. atlantica seems to be controlled if prolonged exposure to the myxozoan transmission stages takes place from hatching onwards. Surprisingly, growth rates in the trial were inversely affected suggesting that G. atlantica does not negatively influence cod fry growth performance.

  19. [Magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of benign renal parenchymal epithelial tumors: MRI -- pathomorphological comparison].

    PubMed

    Dombrovskiĭ, V I

    2001-01-01

    The study evaluates the MRI diagnostic value in the discovery and characterization of the benign epithelial renal parenchyma's neoplasms. Among more than 700 patients with renal tumors, which underwent MRI, 27 histopathologicaly verified cases of adenoma (10), malignant adenoma (11) and oncocytoma (6) were selected and the retrospective analysis of these 3 groups was performed. The 30 patients with small renal cell carcinoma were accepted as a control group. The benign tumor's MRI semiotics is described in general and in the particular for each nosological form. The author considers that MRI data reliably reflect the true morphological structure of the neoplasm's growth, concerning the secondary tumor's tissue alterations (r = 0.89), the presence (r = 0.92) and safety (r = 0.81) of pseudocapsula. At the same time, the specific MRI criteria for the different types of benign and small malignant tumors were not found.

  20. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob

    2013-05-01

    We investigate non-destructive measurements of ultra-cold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. In particular, we pursue applications to dynamically controlled ultracold atoms. The dependence of the Faraday signal on laser detuning, atomic density and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. In particular the destructivity per measurement is extremely low and we illustrate this by imaging the same cloud up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration. Adding dynamic changes to system parameters, we demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. The method can be implemented particularly easily in standard imaging systems by the insertion of an extra polarizing beam splitter. These results are steps towards quantum state engineering using feedback control of ultracold atoms.

  1. Renal ablation using magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound: Magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology assessment

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Maythem; Krug, Roland; Do, Loi; Hetts, Steven W; Wilson, Mark W

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To use magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRg-HIFU), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathology for noninvasively ablating, quantifying and characterizing ablated renal tissue. METHODS: Six anesthetized/mechanically-ventilated pigs underwent single/double renal sonication (n = 24) using a 3T-MRg-HIFU (1.1 MHz frequency and 3000J-4400J energies). T2-weighted fast spin echo (T2-W), perfusion saturation recovery gradient echo and contrast enhanced (CE) T1-weighted (T1-W) sequences were used for treatment planning, temperature monitoring, lesion visualization, characterization and quantification, respectively. Histopathology was conducted in excised kidneys to quantify and characterize cellular and vascular changes. Paired Student’s t-test was used and a P-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Ablated renal parenchyma could not be differentiated from normal parenchyma on T2-W or non-CE T1-W sequences. Ablated renal lesions were visible as hypoenhanced regions on perfusion and CE T1-W MRI sequences, suggesting perfusion deficits and necrosis. Volumes of ablated parenchyma on CE T1-W images in vivo (0.12-0.36 cm3 for single sonication 3000J, 0.50-0.84 cm3, for double 3000J, 0.75-0.78 cm3 for single 4400J and 0.12-2.65 cm3 for double 4400J) and at postmortem (0.23-0.52 cm3, 0.25-0.82 cm3, 0.45-0.68 cm3 and 0.29-1.80 cm3, respectively) were comparable. The ablated volumes on 3000J and 4400J double sonication were significantly larger than single (P < 0.01), thus, the volume and depth of ablated tissue depends on the applied energy and number of sonication. Macroscopic and microscopic examinations confirmed the locations and presence of coagulation necrosis, vascular damage and interstitial hemorrhage, respectively. CONCLUSION: Contrast enhanced MRI provides assessment of MRg-HIFU renal ablation. Histopathology demonstrated coagulation necrosis, vascular damage and confirmed the volume of damage seen on MRI

  2. Imaging the molecular dynamics of dissociative electron attachment to water

    SciTech Connect

    Adaniya, Hidihito; Rudek, B.; Osipov, Timur; Haxton, Dan; Weber, Thorsten; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C.W.; Belkacem, Ali

    2009-10-19

    Momentum imaging experiments on dissociative electron attachment to the water molecule are combined with ab initio theoretical calculations of the angular dependence of the quantum mechanical amplitude for electron attachment to provide a detailed picture of the molecular dynamics of dissociation attachment via the two lowest energy Feshbach resonances. The combination of momentum imaging experiments and theory can reveal dissociation dynamics for which the axial recoil approximation breaks down and thus provides a powerful reaction microscope for DEA to polyatomics.

  3. Effects of exercise and excitement on mesenteric and renal dynamics in conscious, unrestrained baboons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatner, S. F.

    1978-01-01

    Radiotelemetry was used to measure arterial pressure and mesenteric and renal blood flows from nine unrestrained, conscious baboons during periods of rest, moderate exercise, and extreme excitement. A description of the experiments hardware is presented, including artificial depressants phenylcyclidine hydrochloride, 0.5-1.0 mg/kg, and pentobarbital sodium, 15 mg/kg, and an ultrasonic telemetry flow meter. Results showed rising heart rate and arterial pressure coupled with a reduction of mesenteric and renal flows as the level of exercise was increased. These findings are compared with mesenteric and renal flows somewhat above control level, but relatively stable heart rate and arterial pressure, postprandially. Attention is given to a quantitative analysis of the experimental results.

  4. Imaging of vascular dynamics within the foot using dynamic diffuse optical tomography to diagnose peripheral arterial disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, M. A.; Kim, H. K.; Hoi, J. W.; Kim, I.; Dayal, R.; Shrikande, G.; Hielscher, A. H.

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is the narrowing of the functional area of the artery generally due to atherosclerosis. It affects between 8-12 million people in the United States and if untreated this can lead to ulceration, gangrene and ultimately amputation. The current diagnostic method for PAD is the ankle-brachial index (ABI). The ABI is a ratio of the patient's systolic blood pressure in the foot to that of the brachial artery in the arm, a ratio below 0.9 is indicative of affected vasculature. However, this method is ineffective in patients with calcified arteries (diabetic and end-stage renal failure patients), which falsely elevates the ABI recording resulting in a false negative reading. In this paper we present our results in a pilot study to deduce optical tomography's ability to detect poor blood perfusion in the foot. We performed an IRB approved 30 patient study, where we imaged the feet of the enrolled patients during a five stage dynamic imaging sequence. The patients were split up into three groups: 10 healthy subjects, 10 PAD patients and 10 PAD patients with diabetes and they were imaged while applying a pressure cuff to their thigh. Differences in the magnitude of blood pooling in the foot and rate at which the blood pools in the foot are all indicative of arterial disease.

  5. Optical imaging of fast, dynamic neurophysiological function.

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, D. M.; Carter, K. M.; Yao, X.; George, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    Fast evoked responses were imaged from rat dorsal medulla and whisker barrel cortex. To investigate the biophysical mechanisms involved, fast optical responses associated with isolated crustacean nerve stimulation were recorded using birefringence and scattered light. Such studies allow optimization of non-invasive imaging techniques being developed for use in humans.

  6. Remote histology learning from static versus dynamic microscopic images.

    PubMed

    Mione, Sylvia; Valcke, Martin; Cornelissen, Maria

    2016-05-01

    Histology is the study of microscopic structures in normal tissue sections. Curriculum redesign in medicine has led to a decrease in the use of optical microscopes during practical classes. Other imaging solutions have been implemented to facilitate remote learning. With advancements in imaging technologies, learning material can now be digitized. Digitized microscopy images can be presented in either a static or dynamic format. This study of remote histology education identifies whether dynamic pictures are superior to static images for the acquisition of histological knowledge. Test results of two cohorts of second-year Bachelor in Medicine students at Ghent University were analyzed in two consecutive academic years: Cohort 1 (n = 190) and Cohort 2 (n = 174). Students in Cohort 1 worked with static images whereas students in Cohort 2 were presented with dynamic images. ANCOVA was applied to study differences in microscopy performance scores between the two cohorts, taking into account any possible initial differences in prior knowledge. The results show that practical histology scores are significantly higher with dynamic images as compared to static images (F (1,361) = 15.14, P < 0.01), regardless of student's gender and performance level. Several reasons for this finding can be explained in accordance with cognitivist learning theory. Since the findings suggest that knowledge construction with dynamic pictures is stronger as compared to static images, dynamic images should be introduced in a remote setting for microscopy education. Further implementation within a larger electronic learning management system needs to be explored in future research. Anat Sci Educ 9: 222-230. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  7. 4D Clinical Imaging for Dynamic CAD

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Frederick

    2013-01-01

    A basic 4D imaging system to capture the jaw motion has been developed that produces high resolution 3D surface data. Fluorescent microspheres are brushed onto the areas of the upper and the lower arches to be imaged, producing a high-contrast random optical pattern. A hand-held imaging device operated at about 10 cm from the mouth captures time-based perspective images of the fluorescent areas. Each set of images, containing both upper and the lower arch data, is converted to a 3d point mesh using photogrammetry, thereby providing an instantaneous relative jaw position. Eight 3d positions per second are captured. Using one of the 3d frames as a reference, incremental transforms are derived to express the free body motion of the mandible. Conventional 3d models of the dentition are directly registered to the reference frame, allowing them to be animated using the derived transforms. PMID:24082882

  8. Design of a dynamic dual-foveated imaging system.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaoyu; Chang, Jun; Zhang, Yunqiang; Wang, Xi; Zhang, Bochuan; Gao, Lei; Xiao, Liping

    2015-10-01

    A new kind of dynamic dual-foveated imaging system in the infrared band is designed and optimized in this paper. Dual-foveated imaging refers to the variation in spatial resolution at the two selected fields across the image. Such variable resolution imaging system is suitable for a variety of applications including monitoring, recognition, and remote operation of unmanned aerial vehicle. In this system, a transmissive spatial light modulator (SLM) is used as an active optical element which is located near the image plane instead of pupil plane creatively in order to divide the two selected fields. PMID:26480118

  9. Dynamic Ultrasound Imaging Applications to Quantify Musculoskeletal Function

    PubMed Central

    Sikdar, Siddhartha; Wei, Qi; Cortes, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging methods have led to new capability to study muscle and tendon motion in vivo. Direct measurements of muscle and tendon kinematics using imaging may lead to improved understanding of musculoskeletal function. This review presents quantitative ultrasound methods for muscle dynamics that can be used to assess in vivo musculoskeletal function when integrated with other conventional biomechanical measurements. PMID:24949846

  10. Analysis of dynamic brain imaging data.

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, P P; Pesaran, B

    1999-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques for probing brain function, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, intrinsic and extrinsic contrast optical imaging, and magnetoencephalography, generate large data sets with complex content. In this paper we develop appropriate techniques for analysis and visualization of such imaging data to separate the signal from the noise and characterize the signal. The techniques developed fall into the general category of multivariate time series analysis, and in particular we extensively use the multitaper framework of spectral analysis. We develop specific protocols for the analysis of fMRI, optical imaging, and MEG data, and illustrate the techniques by applications to real data sets generated by these imaging modalities. In general, the analysis protocols involve two distinct stages: "noise" characterization and suppression, and "signal" characterization and visualization. An important general conclusion of our study is the utility of a frequency-based representation, with short, moving analysis windows to account for nonstationarity in the data. Of particular note are 1) the development of a decomposition technique (space-frequency singular value decomposition) that is shown to be a useful means of characterizing the image data, and 2) the development of an algorithm, based on multitaper methods, for the removal of approximately periodic physiological artifacts arising from cardiac and respiratory sources. PMID:9929474

  11. Color transfer between high-dynamic-range images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristova, Hristina; Cozot, Rémi; Le Meur, Olivier; Bouatouch, Kadi

    2015-09-01

    Color transfer methods alter the look of a source image with regards to a reference image. So far, the proposed color transfer methods have been limited to low-dynamic-range (LDR) images. Unlike LDR images, which are display-dependent, high-dynamic-range (HDR) images contain real physical values of the world luminance and are able to capture high luminance variations and finest details of real world scenes. Therefore, there exists a strong discrepancy between the two types of images. In this paper, we bridge the gap between the color transfer domain and the HDR imagery by introducing HDR extensions to LDR color transfer methods. We tackle the main issues of applying a color transfer between two HDR images. First, to address the nature of light and color distributions in the context of HDR imagery, we carry out modifications of traditional color spaces. Furthermore, we ensure high precision in the quantization of the dynamic range for histogram computations. As image clustering (based on light and colors) proved to be an important aspect of color transfer, we analyze it and adapt it to the HDR domain. Our framework has been applied to several state-of-the-art color transfer methods. Qualitative experiments have shown that results obtained with the proposed adaptation approach exhibit less artifacts and are visually more pleasing than results obtained when straightforwardly applying existing color transfer methods to HDR images.

  12. Accelerating Dynamic Cardiac MR Imaging Using Structured Sparse Representation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Nian; Wang, Shengru; Zhu, Shasha

    2013-01-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) has produced promising results on dynamic cardiac MR imaging by exploiting the sparsity in image series. In this paper, we propose a new method to improve the CS reconstruction for dynamic cardiac MRI based on the theory of structured sparse representation. The proposed method user the PCA subdictionaries for adaptive sparse representation and suppresses the sparse coding noise to obtain good reconstructions. An accelerated iterative shrinkage algorithm is used to solve the optimization problem and achieve a fast convergence rate. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method improves the reconstruction quality of dynamic cardiac cine MRI over the state-of-the-art CS method. PMID:24454528

  13. Estimation of pressure gradients at renal artery stenoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Peter J.; Cebral, Juan R.; Weaver, Ashley; Lutz, Robert J.; Vasbinder, G. Boudewijn C.

    2003-05-01

    Atherosclerotic disease of the renal artery can reduce the blood flow leading to renovascular hypertension and ischemic nephopathy. The kidney responds to a decrease in blood flow by activation of the renin-angiotensin system that increases blood pressure and can result in severe hypertension. Percutaneous translumenal angioplasty (PTA) may be indicated for treatment of renovascular hypertension (RVH). However, direct measurement of renal artery caliber and degree of stenosis has only moderate specificity for detection of RVH. A confounding factor in assessment of the proximal renal artery is that diffuse atherosclerotic disease of the distal branches of the renal artery can produce the same effect on blood-flow as atherosclerotic disease of the proximal renal artery. A methodology is proposed for estimation of pressure gradients at renal artery stenoses from magnetic resonance imaging that could improve the evaluation of renal artery disease. In the proposed methodology, pressure gradients are estimated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Realistic CFD models are constructed from images of vessel shape and measurements of blood-flow rates which are available from magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and phase-contrast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging respectively. CFD measurement of renal artery pressure gradients has been validated in a physical flow-through model.

  14. Differential uptake of Tc-99m DMSA and Tc-99m EC in renal tubular disorders: Report of two cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Reddy Gorla, Arun Kumar; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Sood, Ashwani; Bhattacharya, Anish; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2014-01-01

    Tc-99m DMSA and Tc-99m EC studies are invaluable functional imaging modalities for renal structural and functional assessment. Normally, the relative renal function estimated by the two methods correlates well with each other. We here present two patients with renal tubular acidosis who showed impaired/altered DMSA uptake with normal EC renal dynamic study depicting the pitfall of DMSA imaging in tubular disorders. The two presented cases also depict distinct pattern of Tc-99m DMSA scintigraphic findings in patients with proximal and distal renal tubular acidosis, thus highlighting the factors affecting DMSA kinetics. PMID:25210282

  15. Differential uptake of Tc-99m DMSA and Tc-99m EC in renal tubular disorders: Report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Reddy Gorla, Arun Kumar; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Sood, Ashwani; Bhattacharya, Anish; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2014-07-01

    Tc-99m DMSA and Tc-99m EC studies are invaluable functional imaging modalities for renal structural and functional assessment. Normally, the relative renal function estimated by the two methods correlates well with each other. We here present two patients with renal tubular acidosis who showed impaired/altered DMSA uptake with normal EC renal dynamic study depicting the pitfall of DMSA imaging in tubular disorders. The two presented cases also depict distinct pattern of Tc-99m DMSA scintigraphic findings in patients with proximal and distal renal tubular acidosis, thus highlighting the factors affecting DMSA kinetics.

  16. Dynamic Granularity for X-Ray Imaging Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissel, Matthias; Bigman, Verle H.; Edens, Aaron D.; Schollmeier, Marius; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathon E.; Porter, John L.

    2013-10-01

    Dynamic range and spatial resolution are correlated, because imaging units such as pixels or film grains can cover a wider dynamic range if they are larger, so that they can contain more electrons in a well or fluorescence centers in a grain. However, for systems that are subject to low photon flux, statistical noise influences the spatial resolution. Statistical noise is important for many experiments that rely on single shot X-ray imaging diagnostics. Detectors face a limited photon flux and often also a limited detection probability, where photons of higher energy may just penetrate the detector. The effective spatial resolution depends on detector efficiency, incident photon flux, detector cell size (grain/pixel), and the detector's inherent noise. We describe the combined influences with a ``dynamic granularity'' function, based on measurements of the grain size dependent distinguishability of grey levels. The dynamic granularity is unique to each imaging system, but allows us to quantify the performance of different detectors in a system. We have characterized a fast microchannel plate imaging detector and imaging plate with respect to dynamic granularity on the 6.151 keV crystal imaging system at the Z-Beamlet laser. Sandia Natl. Labs is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Dept. of Energy's Natl. Nucl. Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  17. Undersampled dynamic magnetic resonance imaging using kernel principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; Ying, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) is a promising approach to accelerate dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Most existing CS methods employ linear sparsifying transforms. The recent developments in non-linear or kernel-based sparse representations have been shown to outperform the linear transforms. In this paper, we present an iterative non-linear CS dynamic MRI reconstruction framework that uses the kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) to exploit the sparseness of the dynamic image sequence in the feature space. Specifically, we apply KPCA to represent the temporal profiles of each spatial location and reconstruct the images through a modified pre-image problem. The underlying optimization algorithm is based on variable splitting and fixed-point iteration method. Simulation results show that the proposed method outperforms conventional CS method in terms of aliasing artifact reduction and kinetic information preservation. PMID:25570262

  18. Unsupervised analysis of small animal dynamic Cerenkov luminescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Antonello E.; Boschi, Federico

    2011-12-01

    Clustering analysis (CA) and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to dynamic Cerenkov luminescence images (dCLI). In order to investigate the performances of the proposed approaches, two distinct dynamic data sets obtained by injecting mice with 32P-ATP and 18F-FDG were acquired using the IVIS 200 optical imager. The k-means clustering algorithm has been applied to dCLI and was implemented using interactive data language 8.1. We show that cluster analysis allows us to obtain good agreement between the clustered and the corresponding emission regions like the bladder, the liver, and the tumor. We also show a good correspondence between the time activity curves of the different regions obtained by using CA and manual region of interest analysis on dCLIT and PCA images. We conclude that CA provides an automatic unsupervised method for the analysis of preclinical dynamic Cerenkov luminescence image data.

  19. Evaluation in the baboon model of (99m)Tc-biguanide as a tracer for renal imaging.

    PubMed

    Neves, M; Dormehl, I; Kilian, E; Louw, W; Lalaoui, K; Pedroso de Lima, J J

    2000-08-01

    Studies in various animal species have recently shown that (99m)Tc-BIG has practical and dosimetric benefits for renal imaging that could probably make it a good alternative to (99m)Tc-2, 3-dimercaptosuccinic acid ((99m)Tc-DMSA). In this study, using the baboon experimental model, the biodistribution of (99m)Tc-BIG and (99m)Tc-DMSA are compared. It is demonstrated that early good contrast imaging and more favourable dosimetry is possible with (99m)Tc-BIG compared to (99m)Tc-DMSA, confirming the quoted previous findings with small animals. Time-activity curves for kidneys and other organs support these findings, and MIRDOSE software provided the dosimetry.

  20. Recurrent renal giant leiomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Öziş, Salih Erpulat; Gülpınar, Kamil; Şahlı, Zafer; Konak, Baha Burak; Keskin, Mete; Özdemir, Süleyman; Ataoğlu, Ömür

    2016-01-01

    Primary renal leiomyosarcomas are rare, aggressive tumors. They constitute 1-2% of adult malignant renal tumors. Although leiomyosarcomas are the most common histological type (50-60%) of renal sarcomas, information on renal leiomyosarcoma is limited. Local or systemic recurrences are common. The radiological appearance of renal leiomyosarcomas is not specific, therefore renal leiomyosarcoma cannot be distinguished from renal cell carcinoma by imaging methods in all patients. A 74-year-old female patient presented to our clinic complaining of a palpable mass on the right side of her abdomen in November 2012. The abdominal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass, 25 × 24 × 23 cm in size. Her past medical history revealed that she has undergone right radical nephrectomy in 2007, due to a 11 × 12 × 13 cm renal mass that was then reported as renal cell carcinoma on abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, but the pathological diagnosis was low-grade renal leiomyosarcoma. The most recent follow-up of the patient was in 2011, with no signs of local recurrence or distant metastases within this four-year period. The patient underwent laparotomy on November 2012, and a 35 cm retroperitoneal mass was excised. The pathological examination of the mass was reported as high-grade leiomyosarcoma. The formation of this giant retroperitoneal mass in 1 year can be explained by the transformation of the lesion's pathology from low-grade to a high-grade tumor. PMID:27436926

  1. High dynamic range infrared radiometry and imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coon, Darryl D.; Karunasiri, R. P. G.; Bandara, K. M. S. V.

    1988-01-01

    The use is described of cryogenically cooled, extrinsic silicon infrared detectors in an unconventional mode of operation which offers an unusually large dynamic range. The system performs intensity-to-frequency conversion at the focal plane via simple circuits with very low power consumption. The incident IR intensity controls the repetition rate of short duration output pulses over a pulse rate dynamic range of about 10(6). Theory indicates the possibility of monotonic and approx. linear response over the full dynamic range. A comparison between the theoretical and the experimental results shows that the model provides a reasonably good description of experimental data. Some measurements of survivability with a very intense IR source were made on these devices and found to be very encouraging. Evidence continues to indicate that some variations in interpulse time intervals are deterministic rather than probabilistic.

  2. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul L.; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew J.; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2013-08-01

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit is found to be identical to other conventional dispersive imaging techniques. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density, and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, spatially resolved images of the same cloud can be acquired up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This demonstrates that the method is a useful tool for the characterization of static and dynamically changing properties of ultracold atomic clouds.

  3. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms.

    PubMed

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul L; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew J; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F

    2013-08-01

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit is found to be identical to other conventional dispersive imaging techniques. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density, and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, spatially resolved images of the same cloud can be acquired up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This demonstrates that the method is a useful tool for the characterization of static and dynamically changing properties of ultracold atomic clouds. PMID:24007051

  4. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul L.; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew J.; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2013-08-15

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit is found to be identical to other conventional dispersive imaging techniques. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density, and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, spatially resolved images of the same cloud can be acquired up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This demonstrates that the method is a useful tool for the characterization of static and dynamically changing properties of ultracold atomic clouds.

  5. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms.

    PubMed

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul L; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew J; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F

    2013-08-01

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit is found to be identical to other conventional dispersive imaging techniques. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density, and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, spatially resolved images of the same cloud can be acquired up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This demonstrates that the method is a useful tool for the characterization of static and dynamically changing properties of ultracold atomic clouds.

  6. New technique for enhancement of high dynamic range infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Wang, Xin-sai; Xu, Hualiang; He, Ming; Li, Mingming

    2012-10-01

    A Bilateral Filter (BF) and Multi-scale Retinex (MSR) based infrared image enhancement algorithm is proposed in this paper. It's known that the MSR algorithm derived from vision theory can achieve dynamic range compression and tonal rendition effectively but suffers from `halo' phenomena caused by the existence of "sharp" edges in infrared images. Research shows that bilateral filter has the property of separating image details from strong edges. Therefore, we process detail components containing strong edges in MSR algorithm with bilateral filter to achieve dynamic range compression, detail enhancement and avoid `halo' artifacts at the same time. The performance of proposed algorithm is then validated by experiments with three real infrared images and compared with other two infrared images enhancement algorithms.

  7. Efficient sinogram smoothing for dynamic neuroreceptor PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaochuan; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Ye, James; Mukherjee, J.; Chen, Chin-Tu

    1997-05-01

    We have developed image-restoration techniques applicable to dynamic positron emission tomography that improve the visual quality and quantitative accuracy of neuroreceptor images. Starting wit data from a study of dopamine D-2 receptors in rhesus monkey striata using selective radioligands such as fallypride, we performed a novel effective 3D smoothing of the dynamic sinogram at a much lower computational cost than a truly 3D, adaptive smoothing. The processed sinogram was then input to a standard filtered back-projection algorithm and the resulting images were sharper and less noisy than images reconstructed from the unprocessed sinogram. Simulations were performed and the radioligand binding curves extracted from the restored images were found to be smoother and more accurate than those extracted form the unprocessed reconstructions. Comparison was also made to reconstructions from sinograms processed by the principal component analysis/projection onto convex sets algorithm.

  8. Ultrasonic Imaging of Subsurface Objects Using Photorefractive Dynamic Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, Vance Albert; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Watson, Scott Marshall

    2001-07-01

    The INEEL has developed a photorefractive ultrasonic imaging technology that records both phase and amplitude of ultrasonic waves on the surface of solids. Phase locked dynamic holography provides full field images of these waves scattered from subsurface defects in solids, and these data are compared with theoretical predictions. Laser light reflected by a vibrating surface is imaged into a photorefractive material where it is mixed in a heterodyne technique with a reference wave. This demodulates the data and provides an image of the ultrasonic waves in either 2 wave or 4 wave mixing mode. These data images are recorded at video frame rates and show phase locked traveling or resonant acoustic waves. This technique can be used over a broad range of ultrasonic frequencies. Acoustic frequencies from 2 kHz to 10 MHz have been imaged, and a point measuring (non-imaging) version of the system has measured picometer amplitudes at 1 GHz.

  9. Ultrasonic imaging of subsurface objects using photorefractive dynamic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deason, Vance A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.; Watson, Scott M.

    2001-11-01

    The INEEL has developed a photorefractive ultrasonic imaging technology that records both phase and amplitude of ultrasonic waves on the surface of solids. Phase locked dynamic holography provides full field images of these waves scattered from subsurface defects in solids, and these data are compared with theoretical predictions. Laser light reflected by a vibrating surface is imaged into a photorefractive material where it is mixed in a heterodyne technique with a reference wave. This demodulates the data and provides an image of the ultrasonic waves in either 2 wave or 4 wave mixing mode. These data images are recorded at video frame rates and show phase locked traveling or resonant acoustic waves. This technique can be used over a broad range of ultrasonic frequencies. Acoustic frequencies from 2 kHz to 10 MHz have been imaged, and a point measuring (non-imaging) version of the system has measured picometer amplitudes at 1 Ghz.

  10. Renal Medullary and Cortical Correlates in Fibrosis, Epithelial Mass, Microvascularity, and Microanatomy Using Whole Slide Image Analysis Morphometry.

    PubMed

    Farris, Alton B; Ellis, Carla L; Rogers, Thomas E; Lawson, Diane; Cohen, Cynthia; Rosen, Seymour

    2016-01-01

    Renal tubulointerstitial injury often leads to interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA). IF/TA is typically assessed in the renal cortex and can be objectively quantitated with computerized image analysis (IA). However, the human medulla accounts for a substantial proportion of the nephron; therefore, medullary scarring will have important cortical consequences and may parallel overall chronic renal injury. Trichrome, periodic acid-Schiff (PAS), and collagen III immunohistochemistry (IHC) were visually examined and quantitated on scanned whole slide images (WSIs) (N = 67 cases). When tuned to measure fibrosis, IA of trichrome and Trichrome-PAS (T-P) WSIs correlated for all anatomic compartments (among cortex, medulla, and entire tissue, r = 0.84 to 0.89, P all <0.0001); and collagen III deposition correlated between compartments (r = 0.69 to 0.89, P <0.0001 to 0.0002); however, trichrome and T-P measures did not correlate with collagen deposition, suggesting heterogeneous contributions to extracellular matrix deposition. Epithelial cell mass (EPCM) correlated between cortex and medulla when measured with cytokeratin IHC and with the trichrome red portion (r = 0.85 and 0.66, respectively, all P < 0.0001). Visual assessment also correlated between compartments for fibrosis and EPCM. Correlations were found between increasing medullary inner stripe (IS) width and fibrosis in all of the tissue and the medulla by trichrome morphometry (r = 0.56, P < 0.0001, and r = 0.48, P = 0.00008, respectively). Weak correlations were found between increasing IS width and decreasing visual assessment of all tissue EPCM. Microvessel density (MVD) and microvessel area (MVA) measured using a MVD algorithm applied to CD34 IHC correlated significantly between all compartments (r = 0.76 to 0.87 for MVD and 0.71 to 0.87 for MVA, P all < 0.0001). Overall, these findings demonstrate the interrelatedness of the cortex and medulla and the importance of considering the renal parenchyma

  11. Renal Medullary and Cortical Correlates in Fibrosis, Epithelial Mass, Microvascularity, and Microanatomy Using Whole Slide Image Analysis Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Alton B.; Ellis, Carla L.; Rogers, Thomas E.; Lawson, Diane; Cohen, Cynthia; Rosen, Seymour

    2016-01-01

    Renal tubulointerstitial injury often leads to interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA). IF/TA is typically assessed in the renal cortex and can be objectively quantitated with computerized image analysis (IA). However, the human medulla accounts for a substantial proportion of the nephron; therefore, medullary scarring will have important cortical consequences and may parallel overall chronic renal injury. Trichrome, periodic acid–Schiff (PAS), and collagen III immunohistochemistry (IHC) were visually examined and quantitated on scanned whole slide images (WSIs) (N = 67 cases). When tuned to measure fibrosis, IA of trichrome and Trichrome-PAS (T-P) WSIs correlated for all anatomic compartments (among cortex, medulla, and entire tissue, r = 0.84 to 0.89, P all <0.0001); and collagen III deposition correlated between compartments (r = 0.69 to 0.89, P <0.0001 to 0.0002); however, trichrome and T-P measures did not correlate with collagen deposition, suggesting heterogeneous contributions to extracellular matrix deposition. Epithelial cell mass (EPCM) correlated between cortex and medulla when measured with cytokeratin IHC and with the trichrome red portion (r = 0.85 and 0.66, respectively, all P < 0.0001). Visual assessment also correlated between compartments for fibrosis and EPCM. Correlations were found between increasing medullary inner stripe (IS) width and fibrosis in all of the tissue and the medulla by trichrome morphometry (r = 0.56, P < 0.0001, and r = 0.48, P = 0.00008, respectively). Weak correlations were found between increasing IS width and decreasing visual assessment of all tissue EPCM. Microvessel density (MVD) and microvessel area (MVA) measured using a MVD algorithm applied to CD34 IHC correlated significantly between all compartments (r = 0.76 to 0.87 for MVD and 0.71 to 0.87 for MVA, P all < 0.0001). Overall, these findings demonstrate the interrelatedness of the cortex and medulla and the importance of considering the renal

  12. Advances in fluorescence labeling strategies for dynamic cellular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Kevin M; Palmer, Amy E

    2014-01-01

    Synergistic advances in optical physics, probe design, molecular biology, labeling techniques and computational analysis have propelled fluorescence imaging into new realms of spatiotemporal resolution and sensitivity. This review aims to discuss advances in fluorescent probes and live-cell labeling strategies, two areas that remain pivotal for future advances in imaging technology. Fluorescent protein– and bio-orthogonal–based methods for protein and RNA imaging are discussed as well as emerging bioengineering techniques that enable their expression at specific genomic loci (for example, CRISPR and TALENs). Important attributes that contribute to the success of each technique are emphasized, providing a guideline for future advances in dynamic live-cell imaging. PMID:24937069

  13. Imaging protein dynamics in live mitotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ferenz, Nick P.; Ma, Nan; Lee, Wei-Lih; Wadsworth, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    To ensure that genetic material is accurately segregated during mitosis, eukaryotic cells assemble a mitotic spindle, a dynamic structure composed of microtubules and associated regulatory, structural and motor proteins. Although much has been learned in the past decades from direct observations of live cells expressing fluorescently tagged spindle proteins, a complete understanding of spindle assembly requires a detailed analysis of the dynamic behavior of component parts. Proteins tagged with conventional fluorophores, however, make such an analysis difficult because all of the molecules are uniformly fluorescent. To alleviate this problem, we have tagged proteins with a photoactivatable variant of GFP (PA-GFP), thereby allowing one to follow the behavior of a subset of tagged molecules in the cell. Here, we describe methods to tag and express proteins with PA-GFP, locally photoactivate the recombinant protein and record the dynamic behavior of the photoactivated molecules in live cells. We provide examples of photoactivable proteins in mammalian and yeast cells to illustrate the power of this approach to examine the dynamics of spindle formation and function in diverse cells. PMID:20085816

  14. Dynamic epigenetic changes to VHL occur with sunitinib in metastatic clear cell renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Grant D.; Powles, Thomas; Van Neste, Christophe; Meynert, Alison; O'Mahony, Fiach; Laird, Alexander; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Trooskens, Geert; Van Criekinge, Wim; De Meyer, Tim; Harrison, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Genetic intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) hinders biomarker development in metastatic clear cell renal cancer (mccRCC). Epigenetic relative to genetic ITH or the presence of consistent epigenetic changes following targeted therapy in mccRCC have not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to determine methylome/genetic ITH and to evaluate specific epigenetic and genetic changes associated with sunitinib therapy. Patients and methods Multi-region DNA sampling performed on sequential frozen pairs of primary tumor tissue from 14 metastatic ccRCC patients, in the Upfront Sunitinib (SU011248) Therapy Followed by Surgery in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cancer: a Pilot Phase II Study (SuMR; ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01024205), at presentation (biopsy) and after 3-cycles of 50mg sunitinib (nephrectomy). Untreated biopsy and nephrectomy samples before and after renal artery ligation were controls. Ion Proton sequencing of 48 key ccRCC genes, and MethylCap-seq DNA methylation analysis was performed, data was analysed using the statistical computing environment R. Results Unsupervised hierarchical clustering revealed complete methylome clustering of biopsy and three nephrectomy samples for each patient (14/14 patients). For mutational status, untreated biopsy and all treated nephrectomy samples clustered together in 8/13 (61.5%) patients. The only methylation target significantly altered following sunitinib therapy was VHL promoter region 7896829 which was hypermethylated with treatment (FDR=0.077, P<0.001) and consistent for all patients (pre-treatment 50% patients had VHL mutations, 14% patients VHL hypermethylation). Renal artery ligation did not affect this result. No significant differences in driver or private mutation count was found with sunitinib treatment. Conclusions Demonstration of relative methylome homogeneity and consistent VHL hypermethylation, after sunitinib, may overcome the hurdle of ITH present at other molecular levels for

  15. Unsupervised Deconvolution of Dynamic Imaging Reveals Intratumor Vascular Heterogeneity and Repopulation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Choyke, Peter L.; Wang, Niya; Clarke, Robert; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Wang, Ge; Wang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    With the existence of biologically distinctive malignant cells originated within the same tumor, intratumor functional heterogeneity is present in many cancers and is often manifested by the intermingled vascular compartments with distinct pharmacokinetics. However, intratumor vascular heterogeneity cannot be resolved directly by most in vivo dynamic imaging. We developed multi-tissue compartment modeling (MTCM), a completely unsupervised method of deconvoluting dynamic imaging series from heterogeneous tumors that can improve vascular characterization in many biological contexts. Applying MTCM to dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of breast cancers revealed characteristic intratumor vascular heterogeneity and therapeutic responses that were otherwise undetectable. MTCM is readily applicable to other dynamic imaging modalities for studying intratumor functional and phenotypic heterogeneity, together with a variety of foreseeable applications in the clinic. PMID:25379705

  16. Ship dynamics for maritime ISAR imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2008-02-01

    Demand is increasing for imaging ships at sea. Conventional SAR fails because the ships are usually in motion, both with a forward velocity, and other linear and angular motions that accompany sea travel. Because the target itself is moving, this becomes an Inverse- SAR, or ISAR problem. Developing useful ISAR techniques and algorithms is considerably aided by first understanding the nature and characteristics of ship motion. Consequently, a brief study of some principles of naval architecture sheds useful light on this problem. We attempt to do so here. Ship motions are analyzed for their impact on range-Doppler imaging using Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR). A framework for analysis is developed, and limitations of simple ISAR systems are discussed.

  17. Dynamic imaging model and parameter optimization for a star tracker.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jinyun; Jiang, Jie; Zhang, Guangjun

    2016-03-21

    Under dynamic conditions, star spots move across the image plane of a star tracker and form a smeared star image. This smearing effect increases errors in star position estimation and degrades attitude accuracy. First, an analytical energy distribution model of a smeared star spot is established based on a line segment spread function because the dynamic imaging process of a star tracker is equivalent to the static imaging process of linear light sources. The proposed model, which has a clear physical meaning, explicitly reflects the key parameters of the imaging process, including incident flux, exposure time, velocity of a star spot in an image plane, and Gaussian radius. Furthermore, an analytical expression of the centroiding error of the smeared star spot is derived using the proposed model. An accurate and comprehensive evaluation of centroiding accuracy is obtained based on the expression. Moreover, analytical solutions of the optimal parameters are derived to achieve the best performance in centroid estimation. Finally, we perform numerical simulations and a night sky experiment to validate the correctness of the dynamic imaging model, the centroiding error expression, and the optimal parameters.

  18. Effects of intraruminal sodium chloride infusion on rumen and renal nitrogen and electrolyte dynamics in sheep.

    PubMed

    Godwin, I R; Williams, V J

    1986-09-01

    1. Sheep were given 800 g low-protein roughage/d at 2 h intervals and infused intraruminally with 0,500, 750, 1000, 1250, 1500 or 2000 mmol sodium chloride/d in 436 ml water. The digestibility of various food fractions and rumen ammonia, volatile fatty acids (VFA) and liquid turnover rate were measured, along with renal haemodynamics and the renal excretory patterns of nitrogen and electrolytes. Ad lib. food intake was determined during the infusion of 0 and 2000 mmol NaCl/d. 2. Infusion of NaCl up to 750 mmol/d had virtually no effect on the indices measured, except water intake and water excretion. Infusion of greater amounts caused a step-wise decrease in the digestibility of organic matter (OM) and N. Rumen liquid turnover rate was increased substantially and rumen NH3 and VFA concentrations were decreased. Ad lib. food intake was not different when either 0 or 2000 mmol NaCl/d were infused into the rumen. 3. The glomerular filtration rate and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) were substantially increased after the infusion of 1250 mmol or more NaCl/d. Extracellular fluid volume was also increased. The renal excretion of urea and uric acid + allantoin (URAL) were decreased at the higher infusion rates but the fractional excretions of both these substances were enhanced. The excretion of sodium, chloride, calcium and magnesium were markedly increased with increasing salt infusion. 4. The results suggest that high NaCl inputs into the rumen increase the rumen turnover rate, which in turn decreases the digestibility of OM, particularly N. This causes lower rumen NH3 and VFA concentrations. Plasma urea and URAL concentrations are also decreased and this causes lower renal excretion of these substances despite a much higher fractional excretion resulting from the greatly enhanced urine flow rate. 5. When roughages low in N are given, NaCl intake should be kept below 20 mmol/kg body-weight per d to prevent a decline in the digestibility of the food and any

  19. High Dynamic Range Digital Imaging of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Brian A.; Chalmers, Alan; Debattista, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    The ability to capture engineering imagery with a wide degree of dynamic range during rocket launches is critical for post launch processing and analysis [USC03, NNC86]. Rocket launches often present an extreme range of lightness, particularly during night launches. Night launches present a two-fold problem: capturing detail of the vehicle and scene that is masked by darkness, while also capturing detail in the engine plume.

  20. New visualization method for high dynamic range images in low dynamic range devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun-Hyung; Kim, Hoon; Ko, Sung-Jea

    2011-10-01

    Various tone reproduction operators have been proposed to display high dynamic range images on low dynamic range (LDR) devices. The gradient domain operator is a good candidate due to its capability of reducing the dynamic range and avoiding common artifacts including halos and loss of image details. However the gradient domain operator requires high computational complexity and often introduces low-frequency artifacts such as reversal of contrast between distant image patches. In order to solve these problems we present a new gradient domain tone reproduction method which adopts an energy functional with two terms one for preserving global contrast and the other for enhancing image details. In the proposed method the LDR image is obtained by minimizing the proposed energy functional through a numerical method. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method can not only achieve the significantly reduced computational complexity but also exhibit better visual quality as compared with conventional algorithms.

  1. Quantitative imaging of heterogeneous dynamics in drying and aging paints

    PubMed Central

    van der Kooij, Hanne M.; Fokkink, Remco; van der Gucht, Jasper; Sprakel, Joris

    2016-01-01

    Drying and aging paint dispersions display a wealth of complex phenomena that make their study fascinating yet challenging. To meet the growing demand for sustainable, high-quality paints, it is essential to unravel the microscopic mechanisms underlying these phenomena. Visualising the governing dynamics is, however, intrinsically difficult because the dynamics are typically heterogeneous and span a wide range of time scales. Moreover, the high turbidity of paints precludes conventional imaging techniques from reaching deep inside the paint. To address these challenges, we apply a scattering technique, Laser Speckle Imaging, as a versatile and quantitative tool to elucidate the internal dynamics, with microscopic resolution and spanning seven decades of time. We present a toolbox of data analysis and image processing methods that allows a tailored investigation of virtually any turbid dispersion, regardless of the geometry and substrate. Using these tools we watch a variety of paints dry and age with unprecedented detail. PMID:27682840

  2. Computerized image analysis of cell-cell interactions in human renal tissue by using multi-channel immunoflourescent confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yahui; Jiang, Yulei; Liarski, Vladimir M.; Kaverina, Natalya; Clark, Marcus R.; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2012-03-01

    Analysis of interactions between B and T cells in tubulointerstitial inflammation is important for understanding human lupus nephritis. We developed a computer technique to perform this analysis, and compared it with manual analysis. Multi-channel immunoflourescent-microscopy images were acquired from 207 regions of interest in 40 renal tissue sections of 19 patients diagnosed with lupus nephritis. Fresh-frozen renal tissue sections were stained with combinations of immunoflourescent antibodies to membrane proteins and counter-stained with a cell nuclear marker. Manual delineation of the antibodies was considered as the reference standard. We first segmented cell nuclei and cell membrane markers, and then determined corresponding cell types based on the distances between cell nuclei and specific cell-membrane marker combinations. Subsequently, the distribution of the shortest distance from T cell nuclei to B cell nuclei was obtained and used as a surrogate indicator of cell-cell interactions. The computer and manual analyses results were concordant. The average absolute difference was 1.1+/-1.2% between the computer and manual analysis results in the number of cell-cell distances of 3 μm or less as a percentage of the total number of cell-cell distances. Our computerized analysis of cell-cell distances could be used as a surrogate for quantifying cell-cell interactions as either an automated and quantitative analysis or for independent confirmation of manual analysis.

  3. State-selected imaging studies of formic acid photodissociation dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Cunshun; Yang Xueming; Zhang Cuimei

    2010-04-21

    The photodissociation dynamics of formic acid have been studied using the velocity map ion imaging at the UV region. The measurements were made with resonance enhancement multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy and dc slicing ion imaging. The OH REMPI spectrum from the photodissociation of formic acid at 244 nm has been recorded. The spectrum shows low rotational excitation (N{<=}4). By fixing the probe laser at the specific rotational transitions, the resulting OH images from various dissociation wavelengths have been accumulated. The translational energy distributions derived from the OH images imply that about half of the available energies go to the photofragments internal excitation. The dissociation dynamics of formic acid were also discussed in view of the recent theoretical calculations.

  4. High-resolution dynamic speech imaging with deformation estimation.

    PubMed

    Maojing Fu; Barlaz, Marissa S; Shosted, Ryan K; Zhi-Pei Liang; Sutton, Bradley P

    2015-08-01

    Dynamic speech magnetic resonance imaging (DSMRI) is a promising technique for visualizing articulatory motion in real time. However, many existing applications of DSMRI have been limited by slow imaging speed and the lack of quantitative motion analysis. In this paper, we present a novel DS-MRI technique to simultaneously estimate dynamic image sequence of speech and the associated deformation field. Extending on our previous Partial Separability (PS) model-based methods, the proposed technique visualizes both speech motion and deformation with a spatial resolution of 2.2 × 2.2 mm(2) and a nominal frame rate of 100 fps. Also, the technique enables direct analysis of articulatory motion through the deformation fields. Effectiveness of the method is systematically examined via in vivo experiments. Utilizing the obtained high-resolution images and deformation fields, we also performed a phonetics study on Brazilian Portuguese to show the method's practical utility. PMID:26736572

  5. SYSTEMATIC DE-SATURATION OF IMAGES FROM THE ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY IN THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R. A.; Torre, G.; Piana, M. E-mail: torre@dima.unige.it

    2014-10-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images of solar flares provided by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) are often affected by saturation effects in their core, physically most interesting, region. We introduce an image reconstruction procedure that allows recovering information in the primary saturation domain using the secondary images produced by the diffraction fringes as input data. Such a procedure is based on standard image-processing tools like correlation, convolution, and back-projection. Its effectiveness is tested in the case of AIA/SDO observations of the 2013 July 8 flaring event.

  6. Pulse sequence for dynamic volumetric imaging of hyperpolarized metabolic products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Charles H.; Chen, Albert P.; Lustig, Michael; Hargreaves, Brian A.; Lupo, Janine; Xu, Duan; Kurhanewicz, John; Hurd, Ralph E.; Pauly, John M.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2008-07-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization and dissolution of a 13C-labeled substrate enables the dynamic imaging of cellular metabolism. Spectroscopic information is typically acquired, making the acquisition of dynamic volumetric data a challenge. To enable rapid volumetric imaging, a spectral-spatial excitation pulse was designed to excite a single line of the carbon spectrum. With only a single resonance present in the signal, an echo-planar readout trajectory could be used to resolve spatial information, giving full volume coverage of 32 × 32 × 16 voxels every 3.5 s. This high frame rate was used to measure the different lactate dynamics in different tissues in a normal rat model and a mouse model of prostate cancer.

  7. ESPR uroradiology task force and ESUR Paediatric Work Group--Imaging recommendations in paediatric uroradiology, part VI: childhood renal biopsy and imaging of neonatal and infant genital tract. Minutes from the task force session at the annual ESPR Meeting 2012 in Athens on childhood renal biopsy and imaging neonatal genitalia.

    PubMed

    Riccabona, Michael; Lobo, Maria Luisa; Willi, Ulrich; Avni, Fred; Damasio, Beatrice; Ording-Mueller, Lil-Sofie; Blickman, Johan; Darge, Kassa; Papadopoulou, Frederika; Vivier, Pierre-Hugues

    2014-04-01

    The European Society of Paediatric Radiology Uroradiology Task Force and the ESUR Paediatric Work Group jointly publish guidelines for paediatric urogenital imaging. Two yet unaddressed topics involving patient safety and imaging load are addressed in this paper: renal biopsy in childhood and imaging of the neonatal genital tract, particularly in girls. Based on our thorough review of literature and variable practice in multiple centers, procedural recommendations are proposed on how to perform renal biopsy in children and how to approach the genital tract in (female) neonates. These are statements by consensus due to lack of sufficient evidence-based data. The procedural recommendation on renal biopsy in childhood aims at improving patient safety and reducing the number of unsuccessful passes and/or biopsy-related complications. The recommendation for an imaging algorithm in the assessment of the neonatal genital tract focuses on the potential of ultrasonography to reduce the need for more invasive or radiating imaging, however, with additional fluoroscopy or MRI to be used in selected cases. Adherence to these recommendations will allow comparable data and evidence to be generated for future adaptation of imaging strategies in paediatric uroradiology.

  8. Dynamic imaging of preimplantation embryos in the murine oviduct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Jason C.; Wang, Shang; Larina, Irina V.

    2015-03-01

    Studying the dynamic events involved in early preimplantation embryo development during their transport from the ovary to the uterus is of great significance to improve the understanding of infertility, and eventually to help reduce the infertility rate. The mouse is a widely used mammalian model in reproductive biology, however, dynamic imaging studies of mouse preimplantation embryos have been very limited due to the lack of proper imaging tools for such analysis. Here, we introduce an innovative approach, which can potentially be used for three-dimensional imaging and tracking of murine oocytes with optical coherence tomography (OCT) as they exit the ovary and migrate through the oviduct to the uterus. The imaging is performed with spectral-domain OCT system operating at 70 kHz A-scan rate. The preimplantation embryos and surrounding cumulus cells can be clearly visualized. Results from our experiments indicate that OCT has great potential for dynamic imaging of the oviduct and oocyte tracking, which provides the foundation for future investigations aimed at understanding dynamic events during preimplantation stages in normal development as well as in mouse models of infertility.

  9. Using surface deformation to image reservoir dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, D.W.; Karasaki, K.; Doughty, C.

    2000-02-01

    The inversion of surface deformation data such as tilt, displacement, or strain provides a noninvasive method for monitoring subsurface volume change. Reservoir volume change is related directly to processes such as pressure variations induced by injection and withdrawal. The inversion procedure is illustrated by an application to tiltmeter data from the Hijiori test site in Japan. An inversion of surface tilt data allows one to image flow processes in a fractured granodiorite. Approximately 650 barrels of water, injected 2 km below the surface, produces a peak surface tilt of the order of 0.8 microradians. The authors find that the pattern of volume change in the granodiorite is very asymmetrical, elongated in a north-northwesterly direction, and the maximum volume change is offset by more than 0.7 km to the east of the pumping well. The inversion of a suite of leveling data from the Wilmington oil field in Long Beach, California, images large-scale reservoir volume changes in 12 one- to two-year increments from 1976 to 1996. The influence of various production strategies is seen in the reservoir volume changes. In particular, a steam flood in fault block 2 in the northwest portion of the field produced a sudden decrease in reservoir volume.

  10. Evaluation of a novel laparoscopic camera for characterization of renal ischemia in a porcine model using digital light processing (DLP) hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olweny, Ephrem O.; Tan, Yung K.; Faddegon, Stephen; Jackson, Neil; Wehner, Eleanor F.; Best, Sara L.; Park, Samuel K.; Thapa, Abhas; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A.; Zuzak, Karel J.

    2012-03-01

    Digital light processing hyperspectral imaging (DLP® HSI) was adapted for use during laparoscopic surgery by coupling a conventional laparoscopic light guide with a DLP-based Agile Light source (OL 490, Optronic Laboratories, Orlando, FL), incorporating a 0° laparoscope, and a customized digital CCD camera (DVC, Austin, TX). The system was used to characterize renal ischemia in a porcine model.

  11. Dynamic "inline" images: context-sensitive retrieval and integration of images into Web documents.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Charles E

    2008-09-01

    Integrating relevant images into web-based information resources adds value for research and education. This work sought to evaluate the feasibility of using "Web 2.0" technologies to dynamically retrieve and integrate pertinent images into a radiology web site. An online radiology reference of 1,178 textual web documents was selected as the set of target documents. The ARRS GoldMiner image search engine, which incorporated 176,386 images from 228 peer-reviewed journals, retrieved images on demand and integrated them into the documents. At least one image was retrieved in real-time for display as an "inline" image gallery for 87% of the web documents. Each thumbnail image was linked to the full-size image at its original web site. Review of 20 randomly selected Collaborative Hypertext of Radiology documents found that 69 of 72 displayed images (96%) were relevant to the target document. Users could click on the "More" link to search the image collection more comprehensively and, from there, link to the full text of the article. A gallery of relevant radiology images can be inserted easily into web pages on any web server. Indexing by concepts and keywords allows context-aware image retrieval, and searching by document title and subject metadata yields excellent results. These techniques allow web developers to incorporate easily a context-sensitive image gallery into their documents.

  12. Dynamic differential imaging of intrinsic optical responses in the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xin-Cheng; Li, Yang-Guo; Liu, Lei; Amthor, Frank

    2010-02-01

    High resolution monitoring of stimulus-evoked retinal neural activities is important for understanding retinal neural mechanisms, and for diagnosis of retinal disease and evaluation of treatment. Fast intrinsic optical signals (IOSs), which have the time courses comparable to retinal electrophysiological responses, hold the promise for high resolution imaging of retinal neural activities. However, application of fast IOS imaging has been hindered by contamination of slow, high magnitude, optical responses associated with transient hemodynamic and metabolic changes. We recently demonstrated the feasibility of separating fast IOSs from slow optical responses by combined dynamic differential imaging and high frequency flicker stimulation.

  13. Dynamic magneto-optical imaging of superconducting thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Frederick S.; Pan, Alexey V.; Wilson, Stephen; Golovchanskiy, Igor A.; Fedoseev, Sergey A.; Rozenfeld, Anatoly

    2016-03-01

    We present a novel method for analysis of superconducting thin films using dynamic magneto-optical imaging, revealing hallmarks of flux penetration with temporal resolution around 1 ms (in the present work) or better. This method involves investigation of transient field and dynamic current distributions, which are calculated by an inversion procedure on the Biot-Savart Law, which we show to be valid under dynamic conditions. We compare and discuss the flux front penetration speed and evolution of current distribution in high quality YBa2Cu3O{}7-δ thin films with that of samples deliberately damaged in such a way as to reduce critical current density without causing macroscopic damage.

  14. Dynamic 3D computed tomography scanner for vascular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mark K.; Holdsworth, David W.; Fenster, Aaron

    2000-04-01

    A 3D dynamic computed-tomography (CT) scanner was developed for imaging objects undergoing periodic motion. The scanner system has high spatial and sufficient temporal resolution to produce quantitative tomographic/volume images of objects such as excised arterial samples perfused under physiological pressure conditions and enables the measurements of the local dynamic elastic modulus (Edyn) of the arteries in the axial and longitudinal directions. The system was comprised of a high resolution modified x-ray image intensifier (XRII) based computed tomographic system and a computer-controlled cardiac flow simulator. A standard NTSC CCD camera with a macro lens was coupled to the electro-optically zoomed XRII to acquire dynamic volumetric images. Through prospective cardiac gating and computer synchronized control, a time-resolved sequence of 20 mm thick high resolution volume images of porcine aortic specimens during one simulated cardiac cycle were obtained. Performance evaluation of the scanners illustrated that tomographic images can be obtained with resolution as high as 3.2 mm-1 with only a 9% decrease in the resolution for objects moving at velocities of 1 cm/s in 2D mode and static spatial resolution of 3.55 mm-1 with only a 14% decrease in the resolution in 3D mode for objects moving at a velocity of 10 cm/s. Application of the system for imaging of intact excised arterial specimens under simulated physiological flow/pressure conditions enabled measurements of the Edyn of the arteries with a precision of +/- kPa for the 3D scanner. Evaluation of the Edyn in the axial and longitudinal direction produced values of 428 +/- 35 kPa and 728 +/- 71 kPa, demonstrating the isotropic and homogeneous viscoelastic nature of the vascular specimens. These values obtained from the Dynamic CT systems were not statistically different (p less than 0.05) from the values obtained by standard uniaxial tensile testing and volumetric measurements.

  15. Dynamic reprogramming of DNA methylation in SETD2-deregulated renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tiedemann, Rochelle L.; Hlady, Ryan A.; Hanavan, Paul D.; Lake, Douglas F.; Tibes, Raoul; Lee, Jeong-Heon; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Ho, Thai H.; Robertson, Keith D.

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) harbor frequent mutations in epigenetic modifiers including SETD2, the H3K36me3 writer. We profiled DNA methylation (5mC) across the genome in cell line-based models of SETD2 inactivation and SETD2 mutant primary tumors because 5mC has been linked to H3K36me3 and is therapeutically targetable. SETD2 depleted cell line models (long-term and acute) exhibited a DNA hypermethylation phenotype coinciding with ectopic gains in H3K36me3 centered across intergenic regions adjacent to low expressing genes, which became upregulated upon dysregulation of the epigenome. Poised enhancers of developmental genes were prominent hypermethylation targets. SETD2 mutant primary ccRCCs, papillary renal cell carcinomas, and lung adenocarcinomas all demonstrated a DNA hypermethylation phenotype that segregated tumors by SETD2 genotype and advanced grade. These findings collectively demonstrate that SETD2 mutations drive tumorigenesis by coordinated disruption of the epigenome and transcriptome,and they have important implications for future therapeutic strategies targeting chromatin regulator mutant tumors. PMID:26646321

  16. Automatic image segmentation by dynamic region growth and multiresolution merging.

    PubMed

    Ugarriza, Luis Garcia; Saber, Eli; Vantaram, Sreenath Rao; Amuso, Vincent; Shaw, Mark; Bhaskar, Ranjit

    2009-10-01

    Image segmentation is a fundamental task in many computer vision applications. In this paper, we propose a new unsupervised color image segmentation algorithm, which exploits the information obtained from detecting edges in color images in the CIE L *a *b * color space. To this effect, by using a color gradient detection technique, pixels without edges are clustered and labeled individually to identify some initial portion of the input image content. Elements that contain higher gradient densities are included by the dynamic generation of clusters as the algorithm progresses. Texture modeling is performed by color quantization and local entropy computation of the quantized image. The obtained texture and color information along with a region growth map consisting of all fully grown regions are used to perform a unique multiresolution merging procedure to blend regions with similar characteristics. Experimental results obtained in comparison to published segmentation techniques demonstrate the performance advantages of the proposed method. PMID:19535323

  17. Dynamic x-ray imaging of laser-driven nanoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennel, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    A major promise of current x-ray science at free electron lasers is the realization of unprecedented imaging capabilities for resolving the structure and ultrafast dynamics of matter with nanometer spatial and femtosecond temporal resolution or even below via single-shot x-ray diffraction. Laser-driven atomic clusters and nanoparticles provide an ideal platform for developing and demonstrating the required technology to extract the ultrafast transient spatiotemporal dynamics from the diffraction images. In this talk, the perspectives and challenges of dynamic x-ray imaging will be discussed using complete self-consistent microscopic electromagnetic simulations of IR pump x-ray probe imaging for the example of clusters. The results of the microscopic particle-in-cell simulations (MicPIC) enable the simulation-assisted reconstruction of corresponding experimental data. This capability is demonstrated by converting recently measured LCLS data into a ultrahigh resolution movie of laser-induced plasma expansion. Finally, routes towards reaching attosecond time resolution in the visualization of complex dynamical processes in matter by x-ray diffraction will be discussed.

  18. Image findings of monomorphic non-hogdkin lymphoproliferative disorder in a post renal transplant patient diagnosed with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Rajasekar, Thirugnanam; Shibu, Deepu; Radhakrishnan, Edathurthy Kalarikal; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2014-07-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a heterogeneous group of lymphoid proliferations caused by immunosuppression after solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. PTLD is categorized by early lesion, polymorphic PTLD and monomorphic PTLD. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG-PET/CT) scans have clinical significance in the evaluation of PTLD following renal transplantation. We report imaging findings of a monomorphic non-Hodgkin lymphoma, post renal transplant seen on FDG PET/CT in a 32-year-old lactating woman. Whole body FDG- ET/CT demonstrated uptake in right external iliac and inguinal lymph nodes.

  19. Image findings of monomorphic non-hogdkin lymphoproliferative disorder in a post renal transplant patient diagnosed with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Rajasekar, Thirugnanam; Shibu, Deepu; Radhakrishnan, Edathurthy Kalarikal; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2014-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a heterogeneous group of lymphoid proliferations caused by immunosuppression after solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. PTLD is categorized by early lesion, polymorphic PTLD and monomorphic PTLD. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG-PET/CT) scans have clinical significance in the evaluation of PTLD following renal transplantation. We report imaging findings of a monomorphic non-Hodgkin lymphoma, post renal transplant seen on FDG PET/CT in a 32-year-old lactating woman. Whole body FDG- ET/CT demonstrated uptake in right external iliac and inguinal lymph nodes. PMID:25210292

  20. Segmentation and volumetric measurement of renal cysts and parenchyma from MR images of polycystic kidneys using multi-spectral analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, K. T.; Commean, P. K.; Brunsden, B. S.; Baumgarten, D. A.; King, B. F., Jr.; Wetzel, L. H.; Kenney, P. J.; Chapman, A. B.; Torres, V. E.; Grantham, J. J.; Guay-Woodford, L. M.; Tao, C.; Miller, J. P.; Meyers, C. M.; Bennett, W. M.

    2008-03-01

    For segmentation and volume measurement of renal cysts and parenchyma from kidney MR images in subjects with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), a semi-automated, multi-spectral anaylsis (MSA) method was developed and applied to T1- and T2-weighted MR images. In this method, renal cysts and parenchyma were characterized and segmented for their characteristic T1 and T2 signal intensity differences. The performance of the MSA segmentation method was tested on ADPKD phantoms and patients. Segmented renal cysts and parenchyma volumes were measured and compared with reference standard measurements by fluid displacement method in the phantoms and stereology and region-based thresholding methods in patients, respectively. As results, renal cysts and parenchyma were segmented successfully with the MSA method. The volume measurements obtained with MSA were in good agreement with the measurements by other segmentation methods for both phantoms and subjects. The MSA method, however, was more time-consuming than the other segmentation methods because it required pre-segmentation, image registration and tissue classification-determination steps.

  1. Reverse halo sign on chest imaging in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Stewart, J I; D'Alonzo, G E; Ciccolella, D E; Patel, N B; Durra, H; Clauss, H E

    2014-02-01

    Without proper treatment, the mortality of pulmonary mucormycosis is nearly 100%. Although the diagnosis is often made histologically, it can be suspected when patients have a reverse halo sign on computed tomography (CT) of the chest, along with the right clinical findings. We describe the case of a woman 7 months post renal transplant who presented with fevers, malaise, and chest pain. Her chest CT revealed a round, focal area of ground-glass attenuation surrounded by a complete rim of consolidation in the left upper lobe, consistent with the reverse halo sign. Pulmonary mucormycosis was diagnosed by transbronchial lung biopsy. She was successfully treated with combined medical and surgical therapies. In the context of this case, we provide a brief review of the diagnosis of pulmonary mucormycosis, with a focus on radiographic and pathologic findings. PMID:24289813

  2. Automatic dynamic range adjustment for ultrasound B-mode imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeonhwa; Kang, Jinbum; Yoo, Yangmo

    2015-02-01

    In medical ultrasound imaging, dynamic range (DR) is defined as the difference between the maximum and minimum values of the displayed signal to display and it is one of the most essential parameters that determine its image quality. Typically, DR is given with a fixed value and adjusted manually by operators, which leads to low clinical productivity and high user dependency. Furthermore, in 3D ultrasound imaging, DR values are unable to be adjusted during 3D data acquisition. A histogram matching method, which equalizes the histogram of an input image based on that from a reference image, can be applied to determine the DR value. However, it could be lead to an over contrasted image. In this paper, a new Automatic Dynamic Range Adjustment (ADRA) method is presented that adaptively adjusts the DR value by manipulating input images similar to a reference image. The proposed ADRA method uses the distance ratio between the log average and each extreme value of a reference image. To evaluate the performance of the ADRA method, the similarity between the reference and input images was measured by computing a correlation coefficient (CC). In in vivo experiments, the CC values were increased by applying the ADRA method from 0.6872 to 0.9870 and from 0.9274 to 0.9939 for kidney and liver data, respectively, compared to the fixed DR case. In addition, the proposed ADRA method showed to outperform the histogram matching method with in vivo liver and kidney data. When using 3D abdominal data with 70 frames, while the CC value from the ADRA method is slightly increased (i.e., 0.6%), the proposed method showed improved image quality in the c-plane compared to its fixed counterpart, which suffered from a shadow artifact. These results indicate that the proposed method can enhance image quality in 2D and 3D ultrasound B-mode imaging by improving the similarity between the reference and input images while eliminating unnecessary manual interaction by the user.

  3. Phase correlation imaging (PCI) for cell dynamics investigation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lihong; Gannavarpu, Rajshekhar; Wang, Ru; Bhaduri, Basanta; Sridharan, Shamira; Mir, Mustafa A.; Chakraborty, Arindam; Prasanth, Supriya G.; Millet, Larry; Gillette, Martha U.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    We present a new method, referred to as phase correlation imaging (PCI), to study cell dynamics and function through temporal phase correlation analysis. PCI offers label-free, high-performance, simple-design, as well as suitability for operation in a conventional microscopy setting. PCI works without the need for controlled or synchronized photoactivation and sophisticated acquisition schemes, and only involves taking a sequence of phase images. The PCI image incorporates information on the phase fluctuations induced by both Brownian motion and deterministic motion of intracellular transport across large scales. We employed spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) recently developed in our laboratory to experimentally measure quantitative phase information which renders the thickness and refractive index of cellular components without adding contrast agents. The acquisition process is repeated to obtain time-lapse phase images. We calculate the correlation time at each pixel for acquired time-lapse phase images and obtain the correlation time map in space. By temporal correlation analysis, PCI reveals cell dynamics information, which is complementary to quantitative phase imaging itself.

  4. SIMA: Python software for analysis of dynamic fluorescence imaging data

    PubMed Central

    Kaifosh, Patrick; Zaremba, Jeffrey D.; Danielson, Nathan B.; Losonczy, Attila

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging is a powerful method for monitoring dynamic signals in the nervous system. However, analysis of dynamic fluorescence imaging data remains burdensome, in part due to the shortage of available software tools. To address this need, we have developed SIMA, an open source Python package that facilitates common analysis tasks related to fluorescence imaging. Functionality of this package includes correction of motion artifacts occurring during in vivo imaging with laser-scanning microscopy, segmentation of imaged fields into regions of interest (ROIs), and extraction of signals from the segmented ROIs. We have also developed a graphical user interface (GUI) for manual editing of the automatically segmented ROIs and automated registration of ROIs across multiple imaging datasets. This software has been designed with flexibility in mind to allow for future extension with different analysis methods and potential integration with other packages. Software, documentation, and source code for the SIMA package and ROI Buddy GUI are freely available at http://www.losonczylab.org/sima/. PMID:25295002

  5. SIMA: Python software for analysis of dynamic fluorescence imaging data.

    PubMed

    Kaifosh, Patrick; Zaremba, Jeffrey D; Danielson, Nathan B; Losonczy, Attila

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging is a powerful method for monitoring dynamic signals in the nervous system. However, analysis of dynamic fluorescence imaging data remains burdensome, in part due to the shortage of available software tools. To address this need, we have developed SIMA, an open source Python package that facilitates common analysis tasks related to fluorescence imaging. Functionality of this package includes correction of motion artifacts occurring during in vivo imaging with laser-scanning microscopy, segmentation of imaged fields into regions of interest (ROIs), and extraction of signals from the segmented ROIs. We have also developed a graphical user interface (GUI) for manual editing of the automatically segmented ROIs and automated registration of ROIs across multiple imaging datasets. This software has been designed with flexibility in mind to allow for future extension with different analysis methods and potential integration with other packages. Software, documentation, and source code for the SIMA package and ROI Buddy GUI are freely available at http://www.losonczylab.org/sima/.

  6. Imaging Anisotropic Nanoplasma Dynamics in Superfluid Helium Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacellar, Camila; Chatterley, Adam; Lackner, Florian; Pemmaraju, Sri; Tanyag, Rico; Bernando, Charles; Verma, Deepak; O'Connell, Sean; Osipiv, Timur; Ray, Dipanwita; Ferguson, Kenneth; Gorkhover, Tais; Swiggers, Michele; Bucher, Maximilian; Vilesov, Andrey; Bostedt, Christoph; Gessner, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of strong-field induced nanoplasmas inside superfluid helium droplets are studied using single-shot, single-particle femtosecond time-resolved X-ray coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Intense (~ 1015 W/ cm2, ~ 50 fs) 800 nm laser pulses are employed to initiate nanoplasma formation in sub-micron (200 nm - 600 nm) sized helium droplets. The dynamics of the nanoplasma formation and subsequent droplet evolution are probed by x-rays pulses (~ 100 fs, 600 eV) that are delayed with respect to the near-infrared (NIR) pulses by 10's of femtoseconds to hundreds of picoseconds. Pump-probe time-delay dependent effects in the CDI patterns reveal distinct dynamics evolving on multiple timescales. Very fast (<100 fs) appearing features are possibly indicative of electronic dynamics, while slower (>= 1 ps) dynamics are likely associated with structural changes correlated to nuclear motion including droplet disintegration. In particular, the CDI images exhibit strong indications for anisotropic dynamics governed by the NIR polarization axis, providing previously inaccessible insight into the mechanisms of nanoplasma formation and evolution.

  7. Enhanced dynamic electron paramagnetic resonance imaging of in vivo physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redler, Gage

    It is well established that low oxygen concentration (hypoxia) in tumors strongly affects their malignant state and resistance to therapy. The importance of tumor oxygenation status has led to increased interest in the development of robust oxygen imaging modalities. One such method is electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI). EPRI has provided a non-invasive, quantitative imaging modality with sensitivity deep in tissues, capable of investigating static oxygen concentration (pO2) in vivo and has helped to corroborate the correlation between chronic states of hypoxia and tumor malignancy. However, when studying the complicated physiology of a living animal, the situation tends to be inherently dynamic. It has been found that in certain tumor regions there may exist steady states of hypoxia, or chronic hypoxia, whereas in other regions there may exist transient states of hypoxia, or acute hypoxia. It has been postulated that the negative prognostic implications associated with hypoxic tumors may be amplified for acutely hypoxic tumors. However, controversial data and a current lack in methods with the capability to noninvasively image tumor pO2 in vivo with sufficient spatial, temporal, and pO 2 resolution preclude definitive conclusions on the relationships between the different forms of hypoxia and the differences in their clinical implications. A particularly promising oxygen imaging modality that can help to study both chronic and acute hypoxia and elucidate important physiological and clinical differences is rapid Dynamic EPRI. The focus of this work is the development of methods enabling Dynamic EPRI of in vivo physiology as well as its potential applications. This work describes methods which enhance various aspects of EPRI in order to establish a more robust Dynamic EPRI capable of noninvasively studying and quantifying acute hypoxia in vivo. These enhancements are achieved through improvements that span from methods for the acquisition of individual

  8. Disentangling mode-specific reaction dynamics from overlapped images.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shannon Shiuan; Wu, Yen-Tien; Liu, Kopin

    2007-01-14

    The hydrogen abstraction reaction between atomic chlorine and C-H stretch-excited CHD(3) was studied under crossed-beam conditions. Prior to collisions, an infrared (IR) laser was used to pump up a fraction of CHD(3) to nu(1) = 1. A time-sliced velocity imaging technique was exploited to image the recoil velocity distribution of the state-selected product CD(3)(nu = 0). For energetic reasons, the IR-on image shows severely overlapped features arising from both the excited and the un-pumped ground-state reagents. A novel threshold method was then developed to directly determine the fraction of IR-excited CHD(3) reagents, which in turn enables us to disentangle the state-selected dynamics from the overlapped images. The results reveal significant differences from previous experimental reports.

  9. Segmentation of bionano images for understanding cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mukewar, Pushkar; Wang, Geoffrey; Henning, Peter; Bao, Gang; Wang, May

    2004-01-01

    The use of quantum dots (QDs) and molecular beacons (MBs) is a recent advance in the field of nanotechnology. These techniques have enabled us to detect a single molecule in a cell, which helps in understanding the dynamics of a cell. The success of these techniques depends on the accurate and efficient analysis of the imaging data these techniques produce. The processing involves--segmentation of the particles, colocalisation and their tracking over multiple frames in 2D and 3D space. In this paper we have used the active contour models: snakes and their variation--GVF (gradient vector field) snakes for segmentation of nano(QD) and cell(MB) images. The results of segmentation have been used to measure the degree of colocalisation for quantum dot images and the gene expression values for molecular beacon images.

  10. A new method using multiphoton imaging and morphometric analysis for differentiating chromophobe renal cell carcinoma and oncocytoma kidney tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Binlin; Mukherjee, Sushmita; Jain, Manu

    2016-03-01

    Distinguishing chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (chRCC) from oncocytoma on hematoxylin and eosin images may be difficult and require time-consuming ancillary procedures. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM), an optical imaging modality, was used to rapidly generate sub-cellular histological resolution images from formalin-fixed unstained tissue sections from chRCC and oncocytoma.Tissues were excited using 780nm wavelength and emission signals (including second harmonic generation and autofluorescence) were collected in different channels between 390 nm and 650 nm. Granular structure in the cell cytoplasm was observed in both chRCC and oncocytoma. Quantitative morphometric analysis was conducted to distinguish chRCC and oncocytoma. To perform the analysis, cytoplasm and granules in tumor cells were segmented from the images. Their area and fluorescence intensity were found in different channels. Multiple features were measured to quantify the morphological and fluorescence properties. Linear support vector machine (SVM) was used for classification. Re-substitution validation, cross validation and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were implemented to evaluate the efficacy of the SVM classifier. A wrapper feature algorithm was used to select the optimal features which provided the best predictive performance in separating the two tissue types (classes). Statistical measures such as sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and area under curve (AUC) of ROC were calculated to evaluate the efficacy of the classification. Over 80% accuracy was achieved as the predictive performance. This method, if validated on a larger and more diverse sample set, may serve as an automated rapid diagnostic tool to differentiate between chRCC and oncocytoma. An advantage of such automated methods are that they are free from investigator bias and variability.

  11. A Review of Digital Image Correlation Applied to Structura Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niezrecki, Christopher; Avitabile, Peter; Warren, Christopher; Pingle, Pawan; Helfrick, Mark

    2010-05-01

    A significant amount of interest exists in performing non-contacting, full-field surface velocity measurement. For many years traditional non-contacting surface velocity measurements have been made by using scanning Doppler laser vibrometry, shearography, pulsed laser interferometry, pulsed holography, or an electronic speckle pattern interferometer (ESPI). Three dimensional (3D) digital image correlation (DIC) methods utilize the alignment of a stereo pair of images to obtain full-field geometry data, in three dimensions. Information about the change in geometry of an object over time can be found by comparing a sequence of images and virtual strain gages (or position sensors) can be created over the entire visible surface of the object of interest. Digital imaging techniques were first developed in the 1980s but the technology has only recently been exploited in industry and research due to the advances of digital cameras and personal computers. The use of DIC for structural dynamic measurement has only very recently been investigated. Within this paper, the advantages and limits of using DIC for dynamic measurement are reviewed. Several examples of using DIC for dynamic measurement are presented on several vibrating and rotating structures.

  12. High signal intensity in dentate nucleus and globus pallidus on unenhanced T1‐weighted MR images in three patients with impaired renal function and vascular calcification

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Sebastiano; Schroeder, Christophe; Froehlich, Johannes M.; Pasch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium‐based contrast agents (primarily those with linear chelates) are associated with a dose‐dependent signal hyperintensity in the dentate nucleus and the globus pallidus on unenhanced T1‐weighted MRI following administration to selected patients with normal renal function. The accumulation of gadolinium has also been reported in the skin, heart, liver, lung, and kidney of patients with impaired renal function suffering from nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Here we report on three patients with impaired renal function and vascular calcification (two with confirmed NSF) whose unenhanced T1‐weighted MRIs showed conspicuous high signal intensity in the dentate nucleus and the globus pallidus after they had been exposed to relatively low doses of linear gadolinium‐based contrast agents (0.27, 0.45, and 0.68 mmol/kg). Signal ratios between dentate nucleus and pons and between globus pallidus and thalamus were comparable with previously reported measurements in subjects without renal impairment. Of note, all three analysed patients suffered from transient signs of neurological disorders of undetermined cause. In conclusion, the exposure to 0.27‐0.68 mmol/kg of linear gadolinium‐based contrast agent was associated with probable gadolinium accumulation in the brain of three patients suffering from impaired renal function and vascular calcification. © 2016 The Authors. Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26929131

  13. High signal intensity in dentate nucleus and globus pallidus on unenhanced T1-weighted MR images in three patients with impaired renal function and vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Sebastiano; Schroeder, Christophe; Froehlich, Johannes M; Pasch, Andreas; Thoeny, Harriet C

    2016-05-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (primarily those with linear chelates) are associated with a dose-dependent signal hyperintensity in the dentate nucleus and the globus pallidus on unenhanced T1-weighted MRI following administration to selected patients with normal renal function. The accumulation of gadolinium has also been reported in the skin, heart, liver, lung, and kidney of patients with impaired renal function suffering from nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Here we report on three patients with impaired renal function and vascular calcification (two with confirmed NSF) whose unenhanced T1-weighted MRIs showed conspicuous high signal intensity in the dentate nucleus and the globus pallidus after they had been exposed to relatively low doses of linear gadolinium-based contrast agents (0.27, 0.45, and 0.68 mmol/kg). Signal ratios between dentate nucleus and pons and between globus pallidus and thalamus were comparable with previously reported measurements in subjects without renal impairment. Of note, all three analysed patients suffered from transient signs of neurological disorders of undetermined cause. In conclusion, the exposure to 0.27-0.68 mmol/kg of linear gadolinium-based contrast agent was associated with probable gadolinium accumulation in the brain of three patients suffering from impaired renal function and vascular calcification. © 2016 The Authors. Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26929131

  14. Analysis of mitochondrial dynamics and functions using imaging approaches

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Kasturi; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria are organelles that have been primarily known as the ‘power house of the cell’. However, recent advances in the field have revealed that mitochondria are also involved in many other cellular activities like lipid modifications, redox balance, calcium balance and even control cell death. These multifunctional organelles are motile and highly dynamic in shapes and forms; the dynamism is brought about by the mitochondria's ability to undergo fission and fusion with each other. Therefore it is very important to be able to image mitochondrial shape changes to relate to the variety of cellular functions these organelles have to accomplish. The protocols mentioned here will enable researchers to perform steady state and time lapse imaging of mitochondria in live cells by using confocal microscopy. High resolution 3D imaging of mitochondria will not only be helpful in understanding mitochondrial structure in detail but also could be used to analyze their structural relationships with other organelles in the cell. FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching) studies can be performed to understand mitochondrial dynamics or dynamics of any mitochondrial molecule within the organelle. Microirradiation assay can be performed to study functional continuity between mitochondria. Protocol for measuring mitochondrial potential has also been included in this chapter. In conclusion, the protocols described here will aid the understanding of mitochondrial structure-function relationship. PMID:20235105

  15. High dynamic range image display with halo and clipping prevention.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Gabriele; Marsi, Stefano; Ramponi, Giovanni

    2011-05-01

    The dynamic range of an image is defined as the ratio between the highest and the lowest luminance level. In a high dynamic range (HDR) image, this value exceeds the capabilities of conventional display devices; as a consequence, dedicated visualization techniques are required. In particular, it is possible to process an HDR image in order to reduce its dynamic range without producing a significant change in the visual sensation experienced by the observer. In this paper, we propose a dynamic range reduction algorithm that produces high-quality results with a low computational cost and a limited number of parameters. The algorithm belongs to the category of methods based upon the Retinex theory of vision and was specifically designed in order to prevent the formation of common artifacts, such as halos around the sharp edges and clipping of the highlights, that often affect methods of this kind. After a detailed analysis of the state of the art, we shall describe the method and compare the results and performance with those of two techniques recently proposed in the literature and one commercial software. PMID:21078576

  16. Kalman filter techniques for accelerated Cartesian dynamic cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xue; Salerno, Michael; Kramer, Christopher M; Meyer, Craig H

    2013-05-01

    In dynamic MRI, spatial and temporal parallel imaging can be exploited to reduce scan time. Real-time reconstruction enables immediate visualization during the scan. Commonly used view-sharing techniques suffer from limited temporal resolution, and many of the more advanced reconstruction methods are either retrospective, time-consuming, or both. A Kalman filter model capable of real-time reconstruction can be used to increase the spatial and temporal resolution in dynamic MRI reconstruction. The original study describing the use of the Kalman filter in dynamic MRI was limited to non-Cartesian trajectories because of a limitation intrinsic to the dynamic model used in that study. Here the limitation is overcome, and the model is applied to the more commonly used Cartesian trajectory with fast reconstruction. Furthermore, a combination of the Kalman filter model with Cartesian parallel imaging is presented to further increase the spatial and temporal resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. Simulations and experiments were conducted to demonstrate that the Kalman filter model can increase the temporal resolution of the image series compared with view-sharing techniques and decrease the spatial aliasing compared with TGRAPPA. The method requires relatively little computation, and thus is suitable for real-time reconstruction.

  17. Dynamic Biodistribution of Extracellular Vesicles In Vivo Using a Multimodal Imaging Reporter

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Charles P.; Mardini, Osama; Ericsson, Maria; Prabhakar, Shilpa; Maguire, Casey; Chen, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are nano-sized vesicles released by normal and diseased cells as a novel form of intercellular communication, and can serve as an effective therapeutic vehicle for genes and drugs. Yet, much remains unknown about the in vivo properties of EVs such as tissue distribution, and blood levels and urine clearance - important parameters that will define their therapeutic effectiveness and potential toxicity. Here we combined Gaussia luciferase and metabolic biotinylation to create a sensitive EV reporter (EV-GlucB) for multimodal imaging in vivo, as well as monitoring of EV levels in the organs and biofluids ex vivo after administration of EVs. Bioluminescence and fluorescence-mediated tomography imaging on mice displayed a predominant localization of intravenously administered EVs in the spleen followed by the liver. Monitoring EV signal in the organs, blood and urine further revealed that the EVs first undergo a rapid distribution phase followed by a longer elimination phase via hepatic and renal routes within six hours, which are both faster than previously reported using dye-labeled EVs. Moreover, we demonstrate systemically injected EVs can be delivered to tumor sites within an hour following injection. Altogether, we show the EVs are dynamically processed in vivo with accurate spatiotemporal resolution, and target a number of normal organs as well as tumors with implications for disease pathology and therapeutic design. PMID:24383518

  18. Diagnosis and management of renal angioma.

    PubMed Central

    Abercrombie, J F; Holmes, S A; Ball, A J

    1992-01-01

    Five patients with symptomatic renal angiomata are described. All presented with heavy haematuria and unilateral ureteric obstruction without evidence of a mass distorting the renal architecture. Renal angiomata are most easily diagnosed by selective renal angiography. They may be treated by intraarterial embolization, avoiding the need for major ablative surgery. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:1433042

  19. Dynamic Studies of Lung Fluid Clearance with Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kitchen, Marcus J.; Williams, Ivan; Irvine, Sarah C.; Morgan, Michael J.; Paganin, David M.; Lewis, Rob A.; Pavlov, Konstantin; Hooper, Stuart B.; Wallace, Megan J.; Siu, Karen K. W.; Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2007-01-19

    Clearance of liquid from the airways at birth is a poorly understood process, partly due to the difficulties of observing and measuring the distribution of air within the lung. Imaging dynamic processes within the lung in vivo with high contrast and spatial resolution is therefore a major challenge. However, phase contrast X-ray imaging is able to exploit inhaled air as a contrast agent, rendering the lungs of small animals visible due to the large changes in the refractive index at air/tissue interfaces. In concert with the high spatial resolution afforded by X-ray imaging systems (<100 {mu}m), propagation-based phase contrast imaging is ideal for studying lung development. To this end we have utilized intense, monochromatic synchrotron radiation, together with a fast readout CCD camera, to study fluid clearance from the lungs of rabbit pups at birth. Local rates of fluid clearance have been measured from the dynamic sequences using a single image phase retrieval algorithm.

  20. Single-molecule imaging studies of protein dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zareh, Shannon Kian G.

    2011-12-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is a powerful method for studying biological events. The work of this thesis primarily focuses on single molecule studies of the dynamics of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and other fluorescent-labeled proteins by utilizing Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and imaging. The single molecule experiments of this thesis covered three broad topics. First, the adsorption mechanisms of proteins onto hydrophobic and hydrophilic fused silica surfaces were imaged and reversible and irreversible adsorption mechanisms were observed. The second topic covered a new technique for measuring the diffusion coefficient of Brownian diffusing proteins, in particular GFP, in solution via a single image. The corresponding experiments showed a relationship between the intensity profile width and the diffusion coefficient of the diffusing molecules. The third topic covered an in vivo experiment involving imaging and quantifying prokaryotic cell metabolism protein dynamics inside the Bacillus subtilis bacteria, in which a helical diffusion pattern for the protein was observed. These topics are presented in the chronological order of the experiments conducted.

  1. High Dynamic Range Beam Imaging with Two Simultaneously Sampling CCDs

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, Pavel; Douglas, David R.; Legg, Robert A.; Tennant, Christopher D.

    2013-05-01

    Transverse beam profile measurement with sufficiently high dynamic range (HDR) is a key diagnostic to measure the beam halo, understand its sources and evolution. In this contribution we describe our initial experience with the HDR imaging of the electron beam at the JLab FEL. On contrary to HDR measurements made with wire scanners in counting mode, which provide only two or three 1D projections of transverse beam distribution, imaging allows to measure the distribution itself. That is especially important for non-equilibrium beams in the LINACs. The measurements were made by means of simultaneous imaging with two CCD sensors with different exposure time. Two images are combined then numerically in to one HDR image. The system works as an online tool providing HDR images at 4 Hz. An optically polished YAG:Ce crystal with the thickness of 100 {micro}m was used for the measurements. When tested with a laser beam images with the DR of about 10{sup 5} were obtained. With the electron beam the DR was somewhat smaller due to the limitations in the time structure of the tune-up beam macro pulse.

  2. High Dynamic Range Beam Imaging with Two Simultaneously Sampling CCDs

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, Pavel E.; Douglas, David R.

    2013-06-01

    Transverse beam profile measurement with sufficiently high dynamic range (HDR) is a key diagnostic to measure the beam halo, understand its sources and evolution. In this contribution we describe our initial experience with the HDR imaging of the electron beam at the JLab FEL. On contrary to HDR measurements made with wire scanners in counting mode, which provide only two or three 1D projections of transverse beam distribution, imaging allows to measure the distribution itself. That is especially important for non-equilibrium beams in the LINACs. The measurements were made by means of simultaneous imaging with two CCD sensors with different exposure time. Two images are combined then numerically in to one HDR image. The system works as an online tool providing HDR images at 4 Hz. An optically polished YAG:Ce crystal with the thickness of 100 {micro}m was used for the measurements. When tested with a laser beam images with the DR of about 10{sup 5} were obtained. With the electron beam the DR was somewhat smaller due to the limitations in the time structure of the tune-up beam macro pulse.

  3. Live imaging of microtubule dynamics in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Schätzle, Philipp; Kapitein, Lukas C; Hoogenraad, Casper C

    2016-01-01

    The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton plays an active role during different phases of neuronal development and is an essential structure for stable neuronal morphology. MTs determine axon formation, control polarized cargo trafficking, and regulate the dynamics of dendritic spines, the major sites of excitatory synaptic input. Defects in MT function have been linked to various neurological and neurodegenerative diseases and recent studies highlight neuronal MTs as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. Thus, understanding MT dynamics and its regulation is of central importance to study many aspects of neuronal function. The dynamics of MT in neurons can be studied by visualizing fluorescently tagged MT plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs). Tracking of +TIP trajectories allows analyzing the speeds and directionality of MT growth in axons and dendrites. Numerous labs now use +TIP to track growing MTs in dissociated neuron cultures. This chapter provides detailed methods for live imaging of MT dynamics in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. We describe protocols for culturing and transducing organotypic slices and imaging MT dynamics by spinning disk confocal microscopy. PMID:26794510

  4. High Speed Optical Tomography System for Imaging Dynamic Transparent Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMackin, Lenore; Hugo, Ronald J.; Pierson, R. E.; Truman, C. R.

    1997-11-01

    We describe the design and operation of a high speed optical tomography system for measuring two-dimensional images of a dynamic phase object at a rate of 5 kHz. Data from a set of eight Hartmann wavefront sensors is back-projected to produce phase images showing the details of the inner structure of a heated air flow. The tomographic reconstructions have a spatial resolution of approximately 2.0 mm and can measure temperature variations across the flow with an accuracy of about 0.7 C. Series of animated reconstructions at different downstream locations illustrate the development of flow structure and the effect of acoustic flow forcing.

  5. Dynamic fluorescence lifetime imaging based on acousto-optic deflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wei; Peng, Xiao; Qi, Jing; Gao, Jian; Fan, Shunping; Wang, Qi; Qu, Junle; Niu, Hanben

    2014-11-01

    We report a dynamic fluorescence lifetime imaging (D-FLIM) system that is based on a pair of acousto-optic deflectors for the random regions of interest (ROI) study in the sample. The two-dimensional acousto-optic deflector devices are used to rapidly scan the femtosecond excitation laser beam across the sample, providing specific random access to the ROI. Our experimental results using standard fluorescent dyes in live cancer cells demonstrate that the D-FLIM system can dynamically monitor the changing process of the microenvironment in the ROI in live biological samples.

  6. Multifractal analysis of dynamic infrared imaging of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimova, E.; Audit, B.; Roux, S. G.; Khalil, A.; Argoul, F.; Naimark, O.; Arneodo, A.

    2013-12-01

    The wavelet transform modulus maxima (WTMM) method was used in a multifractal analysis of skin breast temperature time-series recorded using dynamic infrared (IR) thermography. Multifractal scaling was found for healthy breasts as the signature of a continuous change in the shape of the probability density function (pdf) of temperature fluctuations across time scales from \\sim0.3 to 3 s. In contrast, temperature time-series from breasts with malignant tumors showed homogeneous monofractal temperature fluctuations statistics. These results highlight dynamic IR imaging as a very valuable non-invasive technique for preliminary screening in asymptomatic women to identify those with risk of breast cancer.

  7. NMR imaging of fluid dynamics in reservoir core.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, B A; Yamanashi, W S

    1988-01-01

    A medical NMR imaging instrument has been modified to image water and oil in reservoir rocks by the construction of a new receiving coil. Both oil and water inside the core produced readily detectable proton NMR signals, while the rock matrix produced no signal. Because of similar T2 NMR relaxation times, the water was doped with a paramagnetic ion, Mn+2, to reduce its T2 relaxation time. This procedure enhanced the separation between the oil and water phases in the resulting images. Sequential measurements, as water imbibed into one end and oil was expelled from the other end of a core plug, produced a series of images which showed the dynamics of the fluids. For water-wet Berea Sandstone a flood front was readily observed, but some of the oil was apparently left behind in small, isolated pockets which were larger than individual pores. After several additional pore volumes of water flowed through the plug the NMR image indicated a homogeneous distribution of oil. The amount of residual oil, as determined from the ratio of NMR intensities, closely approximated the residual oil saturation of fully flooded Berea samples measured by Dean-Stark extraction. A Berea sandstone core treated to make it partially oil-wet, did not show a definitive flood front, but appeared to channel the water around the perimeter of the core plug. The relative ease with which these images were made indicates that NMR imaging can be a useful technique to follow the dynamics of oil and water through a core plug for a variety of production processes.

  8. Miscellaneous cancers (lung, thyroid, renal cancer, myeloma, and neuroendocrine tumors): role of SPECT and PET in imaging bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Chua, Sue; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath; Cook, Gary J R

    2009-11-01

    In this review, we assess the current role of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) in the imaging of skeletal metastatic disease from a miscellaneous group of malignancies, including lung, thyroid, and renal carcinomas; multiple myeloma; and neuroendocrine tumors, and consider how recent advances may enhance their effectiveness in this area. Bone scintigraphy using technetium-labeled diphosphonates has long been the mainstay of functional imaging of bony metastases, but is of limited value in myeloma and aggressive osteolytic metastases, and has the limitation of relatively poor specificity. SPECT, as a tomographic imaging technique, produces three-dimensional images of tracer distribution from multiplanar images. Its application to bone scintigrams greatly aids accurate anatomic localization and sensitivity in detection of foci of tracer uptake. SPECT can equally be applied to scintigrams using radiotracers, which are specific for particular groups of tumors, such as somatostatin analogs for neuroendocrine tumors. The advent of combined SPECT/computed tomography (CT) systems has further enhanced the accuracy of SPECT in all these malignancies. PET uses positron-emitting radiotracers and achieves a higher spatial resolution than single-photon imaging. Its high resolution and coverage of the entire body have made it a highly effective technique for the evaluation of skeletal metastatic disease, particularly when combined with CT. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG)-PET/CT now forms part of routine staging for many carcinomas, such as non-small-cell lung carcinomas, and may obviate the need for routine staging scintigraphy in these patients. As uptake of the most common PET radiotracer, (18)F-FDG, is dependent on the increased cellular metabolism of most tumors, it may enable earlier detection of metastatic foci than bone scintigraphy, which relies on detecting an osteoblastic response. Another significant

  9. A generic framework to simulate realistic lung, liver and renal pathologies in CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Justin; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-11-01

    Realistic three-dimensional (3D) mathematical models of subtle lesions are essential for many computed tomography (CT) studies focused on performance evaluation and optimization. In this paper, we develop a generic mathematical framework that describes the 3D size, shape, contrast, and contrast-profile characteristics of a lesion, as well as a method to create lesion models based on CT data of real lesions. Further, we implemented a technique to insert the lesion models into CT images in order to create hybrid CT datasets. This framework was used to create a library of realistic lesion models and corresponding hybrid CT images. The goodness of fit of the models was assessed using the coefficient of determination (R2) and the visual appearance of the hybrid images was assessed with an observer study using images of both real and simulated lesions and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis. The average R2 of the lesion models was 0.80, implying that the models provide a good fit to real lesion data. The area under the ROC curve was 0.55, implying that the observers could not readily distinguish between real and simulated lesions. Therefore, we conclude that the lesion-modeling framework presented in this paper can be used to create realistic lesion models and hybrid CT images. These models could be instrumental in performance evaluation and optimization of novel CT systems.

  10. Dynamics Explorer 1 SOI images of the Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keating, G. M.; Bressette, W. E.; Chen, C.; Pitts, M. C.; Craven, J.

    1988-01-01

    The Dynamics Explorer (DE) satellite carries an Auroral Imaging Package which contains filters designed for performing backscatter ultraviolet measurements to measure total column ozone in the Earth's middle and lower atmosphere. Measurements are obtained at 317.5 mm (to measure ozone absorption) and 360 nm (to measure scene reflectivity). In October 1985 and 1986, measurements were obtained near apogee of the Antarctic ozone hole. The only other high spatial resolution measurements were obtained from the Nimbus 7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) experiment. In October 1987, the Dynamics Explorer apogee had precessed into the Northern Hemisphere preventing measurements of the ozone hole. However, measurements should be obtained from DE of the ozone hole in both 1988 and 1989. Considering that the Nimbus 7 TOMS instrument has long exceeded its expected lifetime, the DE Spin Scan Ozone Imager (SOI) experiment could easily play a crucial role in studies of the ozone hole over the next few years.

  11. Image Quality of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wachter, R.; Schou, Jesper; Rabello-Soares, M. C.; Miles, J. W.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Bush, R. I.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the imaging quality of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) as measured during the ground calibration of the instrument. We describe the calibration techniques and report our results for the final configuration of HMI. We present the distortion, modulation transfer function, stray light,image shifts introduced by moving parts of the instrument, best focus, field curvature, and the relative alignment of the two cameras. We investigate the gain and linearity of the cameras, and present the measured flat field.

  12. Dynamic stimulus enhancement with Gabor-based filtered images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkus, Alan R.; Poteet, Miriam J.; Pantle, Allan J.

    2008-04-01

    In an empirical study, observers gave ratings of their ability to detect a military target in filtered images of natural scenes. The purpose of the study was twofold. First, the absolute value of the convolution images generated with oriented Gabor filters of different scales and orientations, and pairs of filters (corner filters), provided brightness images which were evaluated as saliency maps of potential target locations. The generation of the saliency maps with oriented Gabor filters was modeled after the second-order processing of texture in the visual system. Second, two methods of presentation of the saliency maps were compared. With the flicker presentation method, a saliency map was flickered on and off at a 2-Hz rate and superimposed upon the image of the original scene. The flicker presentation method was designed to take advantage of the known properties of the magnocellular pathway of the visual system. A second method (toggle presentation) used simply for comparison, required observers to switch back and forth between the saliency image and the image of the original scene. Primary results were that (1) saliency images produced with corner filters were rated higher than those produced with simple Gabor filters, and (2) ratings obtained with the flicker method were higher than those obtained with the toggle method, with the greatest advantage for filters tuned to lower spatial frequencies. The second result suggests that the flicker presentation method holds considerable promise as a new technique for combining information (dynamic image fusion) from two or more independently obtained (e.g., multi-spectral) or processed images.

  13. Hybrid bright-field and hologram imaging of cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Hyeokjun; Lee, Jaehyun; Doh, Junsang; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-01-01

    Volumetric observation is essential for understanding the details of complex biological phenomena. In this study, a bright-field microscope, which provides information on a specific 2D plane, and a holographic microscope, which provides information spread over 3D volumes, are integrated to acquire two complementary images simultaneously. The developed system was successfully applied to capture distinct T-cell adhesion dynamics on inflamed endothelial layers, including capture, rolling, crawling, transendothelial migration, and subendothelial migration.

  14. Hybrid bright-field and hologram imaging of cell dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Hyeokjun; Lee, Jaehyun; Doh, Junsang; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-09-01

    Volumetric observation is essential for understanding the details of complex biological phenomena. In this study, a bright-field microscope, which provides information on a specific 2D plane, and a holographic microscope, which provides information spread over 3D volumes, are integrated to acquire two complementary images simultaneously. The developed system was successfully applied to capture distinct T-cell adhesion dynamics on inflamed endothelial layers, including capture, rolling, crawling, transendothelial migration, and subendothelial migration.

  15. Hybrid bright-field and hologram imaging of cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Hyeokjun; Lee, Jaehyun; Doh, Junsang; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-01-01

    Volumetric observation is essential for understanding the details of complex biological phenomena. In this study, a bright-field microscope, which provides information on a specific 2D plane, and a holographic microscope, which provides information spread over 3D volumes, are integrated to acquire two complementary images simultaneously. The developed system was successfully applied to capture distinct T-cell adhesion dynamics on inflamed endothelial layers, including capture, rolling, crawling, transendothelial migration, and subendothelial migration. PMID:27640337

  16. Linear dynamic range enhancement in a CMOS imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A CMOS imager with increased linear dynamic range but without degradation in noise, responsivity, linearity, fixed-pattern noise, or photometric calibration comprises a linear calibrated dual gain pixel in which the gain is reduced after a pre-defined threshold level by switching in an additional capacitance. The pixel may include a novel on-pixel latch circuit that is used to switch in the additional capacitance.

  17. Hybrid bright-field and hologram imaging of cell dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Hyeokjun; Lee, Jaehyun; Doh, Junsang; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-01-01

    Volumetric observation is essential for understanding the details of complex biological phenomena. In this study, a bright-field microscope, which provides information on a specific 2D plane, and a holographic microscope, which provides information spread over 3D volumes, are integrated to acquire two complementary images simultaneously. The developed system was successfully applied to capture distinct T-cell adhesion dynamics on inflamed endothelial layers, including capture, rolling, crawling, transendothelial migration, and subendothelial migration. PMID:27640337

  18. Cascaded image analysis for dynamic crack detection in material testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, U.; Maas, H.-G.

    Concrete probes in civil engineering material testing often show fissures or hairline-cracks. These cracks develop dynamically. Starting at a width of a few microns, they usually cannot be detected visually or in an image of a camera imaging the whole probe. Conventional image analysis techniques will detect fissures only if they show a width in the order of one pixel. To be able to detect and measure fissures with a width of a fraction of a pixel at an early stage of their development, a cascaded image analysis approach has been developed, implemented and tested. The basic idea of the approach is to detect discontinuities in dense surface deformation vector fields. These deformation vector fields between consecutive stereo image pairs, which are generated by cross correlation or least squares matching, show a precision in the order of 1/50 pixel. Hairline-cracks can be detected and measured by applying edge detection techniques such as a Sobel operator to the results of the image matching process. Cracks will show up as linear discontinuities in the deformation vector field and can be vectorized by edge chaining. In practical tests of the method, cracks with a width of 1/20 pixel could be detected, and their width could be determined at a precision of 1/50 pixel.

  19. Emergency department imaging protocol for suspected acute renal colic: re-evaluating our service

    PubMed Central

    Patatas, K; Panditaratne, N; Wah, T M; Weston, M J; Irving, H C

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The objective of our study is to determine the positive rate for urolithiasis in male and female patients, and evaluate whether there has been any change at our institution in the use and outcome of unenhanced multidetector CT (CT KUB) performed in the emergency department (ER) for patients presenting with suspected acute renal colic. Methods A retrospective review of all 1357 consecutive cases between August 2007 and August 2009 admitted to the ER and investigated with CT KUB. Results The positive rate for urolithiasis was 47.5% and the rate of other significant findings was 10%. Female patients had a significantly lower positive rate than male patients (26.8% vs 61.6%, p<0.001). Urological intervention was required in 37% and these patients had a larger average stone size. In young female patients with a significantly sized ureteric calculus (>4 mm), the presence of hydronephrosis vs no hydronephrosis was 83% vs 17%, respectively. Among them, only three patients required ureteroscopy for stone removal. Conclusion Contrary to other studies there has been no “indication creep” in the use of CT KUB at our institution. However, the young female patient presenting with suspected urolithiasis presents a particular diagnostic problem, and the significant percentage of negative examinations in females implies that an improvement in current practice is needed. The indiscriminate use of CT KUB in all female patients with flank pain should be avoided, and it is suggested that they should be initially evaluated with ultrasound to detect the presence of hydronephrosis. PMID:22496069

  20. Probabilistic anti-aliasing methods for dynamic variable resolution images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panerai, Francesco M.; Juday, Richard D.

    1996-11-01

    We have attained initial function of a real-time acuity- based video transformation. It matches the transmitted local resolution of video images to the eccentrically-varying acuity of the viewer's human visual system. In previous variable resolution imagery, a variable blockiness produces disturbing aliasing effects. We show how probabilistic methods can be useful to perform anti-aliasing on the variable resolution images, so that smoothing interpolation need not be done to defeat the aliasing. Especially when used in dynamic imaging, the methods consistently reduce the high frequency artifacts perceived by the human eye. The effectiveness of these techniques have been demonstrated with the NASA/Texas Instrument Programmable Remapper, which is able to apply the anti-aliasing methods on the fly on the low bandwidth, acuity-based video signal Video imagery will be shown to demonstrate the technique.

  1. Dynamic phase imaging and processing of moving biological organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creath, Katherine; Goldstein, Goldie

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes recent advances in developing a new, novel interference Linnik microscope system and presents images and data of live biological samples. The specially designed optical system enables instantaneous 4-dimensional video measurements of dynamic motions within and among live cells without the need for contrast agents. "Label-free" measurements of biological objects in reflection using harmless light levels are possible without the need for scanning and vibration isolation. This instrument utilizes a pixelated phase mask enabling simultaneous measurement of multiple interference patterns taking advantage of the polarization properties of light enabling phase image movies in real time at video rates to track dynamic motions and volumetric changes. Optical thickness data are derived from phase images after processing to remove the background surface shape to quantify changes in cell position and volume. Data from a number of different pond organisms will be presented, as will measurements of human breast cancer cells with the addition of various agents that break down the cells. These data highlight examples of the image processing involved and the monitoring of different biological processes.

  2. Motion artifact reduction in breast dynamic infrared imaging.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Valentina; Knaflitz, Marco; Molinari, Filippo

    2009-03-01

    Dynamic infrared imaging is a promising technique in breast oncology. In this paper, a quantum well infrared photodetector infrared camera is used to acquire a sequence of consecutive thermal images of the patient's breast for 10 s. Information on the local blood perfusion is obtained from the spectral analysis of the time series at each image pixel. Due to respiratory and motion artifacts, the direct comparison of the temperature values that a pixel assumes along the sequence becomes difficult. In fact, the small temperature changes due to blood perfusion, of the order of 10-50 mK, which constitute the signal of interest in the time domain, are superimposed onto large temperature fluctuations due to the subject's motion, which represent noise. To improve the time series S/N, and as a consequence, enhance the specificity and sensitivity of the dynamic infrared examination, it is important to realign the thermal images of the acquisition sequence, thus reducing motion artifacts. In a previous study, we demonstrated that a registration algorithm based on fiducial points is suitable to both clinical applications and research, when associated with a proper set of skin markers. In this paper, we quantitatively evaluate the performance of different marker sets by means of a model that allows for estimating the S/N increment due to registration, and we conclude that a 12-marker set is a good compromise between motion artifact reduction and the time required to prepare the patient.

  3. Growth dynamics of the renal and suprarenal arteries in human foetuses.

    PubMed

    Kuczera, Bartłomiej; Kuczera, Małgorzata; Gielecki, Jerzy S

    2003-11-01

    The kidneys and suprarenal cortex are of common embryonic origin. The suprarenal gland and kidney have a common pathway in angiogenesis. Each of the organs is of key importance for intrauterine and individual development, yet they vary greatly in growth dynamics throughout pregnancy. The authors compared the arterial supply of these organs quantitatively in respect to foetal age and sex.

  4. A Wide Dynamic Range Tapped Linear Array Image Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washkurak, William D.; Chamberlain, Savvas G.; Prince, N. Daryl

    1988-08-01

    Detectors for acousto-optic signal processing applications require fast transient response as well as wide dynamic range. There are two major choices of detectors: conductive or integration mode. Conductive mode detectors have an initial transient period before they reach then' i equilibrium state. The duration of 1 his period is dependent on light level as well as detector capacitance. At low light levels a conductive mode detector is very slow; response time is typically on the order of milliseconds. Generally. to obtain fast transient response an integrating mode detector is preferred. With integrating mode detectors. the dynamic range is determined by the charge storage capability of the tran-sport shift registers and the noise level of the image sensor. The conventional net hod used to improve dynamic range is to increase the shift register charge storage capability. To achieve a dynamic range of fifty thousand assuming two hundred noise equivalent electrons, a charge storage capability of ten million electrons would be required. In order to accommodate this amount of charge. unrealistic shift registers widths would be required. Therefore, with an integrating mode detector it is difficult to achieve a dynamic range of over four orders of magnitude of input light intensity. Another alternative is to solve the problem at the photodetector aml not the shift, register. DALSA's wide dynamic range detector utilizes an optimized, ion implant doped, profiled MOSFET photodetector specifically designed for wide dynamic range. When this new detector operates at high speed and at low light levels the photons are collected and stored in an integrating fashion. However. at bright light levels where transient periods are short, the detector switches into a conductive mode. The light intensity is logarithmically compressed into small charge packets, easily carried by the CCD shift register. As a result of the logarithmic conversion, dynamic ranges of over six orders of

  5. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging for Noninvasive Evaluation of Renal Parenchyma Elasticity: Preliminary Findings

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui-Xiong; Peng, Ai; Zhang, Yi-Feng; Liu, Lin-Na

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic value of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) to test the elasticity of renal parenchyma by measuring the shear wave velocity (SWV) which might be used to detect chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods 327 healthy volunteers and 64 CKD patients were enrolled in the study. The potential influencing factors and measurement reproducibility were evaluated in the healthy volunteers. Correlations between SWV and laboratory tests were analyzed in CKD patients.?Receiver-operating characteristic curve (ROC) analyses were performed to assess the diagnostic performance of ARFI. Results The SWV of healthy volunteers correlated significantly to age (r = −0.22, P<0.001, n = 327) and differed significantly between men and women (2.06±0.48 m/s vs. 2.2±0.52 m/s, P = 0.018, n = 327). However, it did not correlate significantly to height, weight, body mass index, waistline, kidney dimension and the depth for SWV measurement (n = 30). Inter- and intraobserver agreement expressed as intraclass coefficient correlation were 0.64 (95% CI: 0.13 to 0.82, P = 0.011) and 0.6 (95% CI: 0.31 to 0.81, P = 0.001) (n = 40). The mean SWV in healthy volunteers was 2.15±0.51 m/s, while was 1.81±0.43 m/s, 1.79±0.29 m/s, 1.81±0.44 m/s, 1.64±0.55 m/s, and 1.36±0.17 m/s for stage 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 in CKD patients respectively. The SWV was significantly higher for healthy volunteers compared with each stage in CKD patients. ARFI could not predict the different stages of CKD except stage 5. In CKD patients, SWV correlated to e-GFR (r = 0.3, P = 0.018), to urea nitrogen (r =  −0.3, P = 0.016), and to creatinine (r =  −0.41, P = 0.001). ROC analyses indicated that the area under the ROC curve was 0.752 (95% CI: 0.704 to 0.797) (P<0.001). The cut-off value for predicting CKD was 1.88 m/s (sensitivity 71.87% and specificity 69.69%). Conclusion ARFI may be a potentially useful tool in detecting CKD. PMID

  6. A semi-automated “blanket” method for renal segmentation from non-contrast T1-weighted MR images

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jeremy C.; Wake, Nicole; Seah, Jas-mine; Botterill, Elissa; Farquharson, Shawna; Mikheev, Artem; Lim, Ruth P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the precision and accuracy of a new semi-automated method for kidney segmentation from single-breath-hold non-contrast MRI. Materials and methods The user draws approximate kidney contours on every tenth slice, focusing on separating adjacent organs from the kidney. The program then performs a sequence of fully automatic steps: contour filling, interpolation, non-uniformity correction, sampling of representative parenchyma signal, and 3D binary morphology. Three independent observers applied the method to images of 40 kidneys ranging in volume from 94.6 to 254.5 cm3. Manually constructed reference masks were used to assess accuracy. Results The volume errors for the three readers were: 4.4 % ± 3.0 %, 2.9 % ± 2.3 %, and 3.1 % ± 2.7 %. The relative discrepancy across readers was 2.5 % ± 2.1 %. The interactive processing time on average was 1.5 min per kidney. Conclusions Pending further validation, the semi-automated method could be applied for monitoring of renal status using non-contrast MRI. PMID:26516082

  7. Dynamic and data-driven classification for polarimetric SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlmann, S.; Kiranyaz, S.; Ince, T.; Gabbouj, M.

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, we introduce dynamic and scalable Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) terrain classification based on the Collective Network of Binary Classifiers (CNBC). The CNBC framework is primarily adapted to maximize the SAR classification accuracy on dynamically varying databases where variations do occur in any time in terms of (new) images, classes, features and users' relevance feedback. Whenever a "change" occurs, the CNBC dynamically and "optimally" adapts itself to the change by means of its topology and the underlying evolutionary method MD PSO. Thanks to its "Divide and Conquer" type approach, the CNBC can also support varying and large set of (PolSAR) features among which it optimally selects, weighs and fuses the most discriminative ones for a particular class. Each SAR terrain class is discriminated by a dedicated Network of Binary Classifiers (NBC), which encapsulates a set of evolutionary Binary Classifiers (BCs) discriminating the class with a distinctive feature set. Moreover, with each incremental evolution session, new classes/features can be introduced which signals the CNBC to create new corresponding NBCs and BCs within to adapt and scale dynamically to the change. This can in turn be a significant advantage when the current CNBC is used to classify multiple SAR images with similar terrain classes since no or only minimal (incremental) evolution sessions are needed to adapt it to a new classification problem while using the previously acquired knowledge. We demonstrate our proposed classification approach over several medium and highresolution NASA/JPL AIRSAR images applying various polarimetric decompositions. We evaluate and compare the computational complexity and classification accuracy against static Neural Network classifiers. As CNBC classification accuracy can compete and even surpass them, the computational complexity of CNBC is significantly lower as the CNBC body supports high parallelization making it applicable to grid

  8. Bayesian model of dynamic image stabilization in the visual system.

    PubMed

    Burak, Yoram; Rokni, Uri; Meister, Markus; Sompolinsky, Haim

    2010-11-01

    Humans can resolve the fine details of visual stimuli although the image projected on the retina is constantly drifting relative to the photoreceptor array. Here we demonstrate that the brain must take this drift into account when performing high acuity visual tasks. Further, we propose a decoding strategy for interpreting the spikes emitted by the retina, which takes into account the ambiguity caused by retinal noise and the unknown trajectory of the projected image on the retina. A main difficulty, addressed in our proposal, is the exponentially large number of possible stimuli, which renders the ideal Bayesian solution to the problem computationally intractable. In contrast, the strategy that we propose suggests a realistic implementation in the visual cortex. The implementation involves two populations of cells, one that tracks the position of the image and another that represents a stabilized estimate of the image itself. Spikes from the retina are dynamically routed to the two populations and are interpreted in a probabilistic manner. We consider the architecture of neural circuitry that could implement this strategy and its performance under measured statistics of human fixational eye motion. A salient prediction is that in high acuity tasks, fixed features within the visual scene are beneficial because they provide information about the drifting position of the image. Therefore, complete elimination of peripheral features in the visual scene should degrade performance on high acuity tasks involving very small stimuli.

  9. Dynamic full-field infrared imaging with multiple synchrotron beams

    PubMed Central

    Stavitski, Eli; Smith, Randy J.; Bourassa, Megan W.; Acerbo, Alvin S.; Carr, G. L.; Miller, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Microspectroscopic imaging in the infrared (IR) spectral region allows for the examination of spatially resolved chemical composition on the microscale. More than a decade ago, it was demonstrated that diffraction limited spatial resolution can be achieved when an apertured, single pixel IR microscope is coupled to the high brightness of a synchrotron light source. Nowadays, many IR microscopes are equipped with multi-pixel Focal Plane Array (FPA) detectors, which dramatically improve data acquisition times for imaging large areas. Recently, progress been made toward efficiently coupling synchrotron IR beamlines to multi-pixel detectors, but they utilize expensive and highly customized optical schemes. Here we demonstrate the development and application of a simple optical configuration that can be implemented on most existing synchrotron IR beamlines in order to achieve full-field IR imaging with diffraction-limited spatial resolution. Specifically, the synchrotron radiation fan is extracted from the bending magnet and split into four beams that are combined on the sample, allowing it to fill a large section of the FPA. With this optical configuration, we are able to oversample an image by more than a factor of two, even at the shortest wavelengths, making image restoration through deconvolution algorithms possible. High chemical sensitivity, rapid acquisition times, and superior signal-to-noise characteristics of the instrument are demonstrated. The unique characteristics of this setup enabled the real time study of heterogeneous chemical dynamics with diffraction-limited spatial resolution for the first time. PMID:23458231

  10. Ablative therapies for renal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Rajan; Leveillee, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Owing to an increased use of diagnostic imaging for evaluating patients with other abdominal conditions, incidentally discovered kidney masses now account for a majority of renal tumors. Renal ablative therapy is assuming a more important role in patients with borderline renal impairment. Renal ablation uses heat or cold to bring about cell death. Radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation are two such procedures, and 5-year results are now emerging from both modalities. Renal biopsy at the time of ablation is extremely important in order to establish tissue diagnosis. Real-time temperature monitoring at the time of radiofrequency ablation is very useful to ensure adequacy of ablation. PMID:21789083

  11. Global Auroral Imaging for the Dynamics Explorer Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, L. A.

    1998-01-01

    The two Dynamics Explorer spacecraft, DE-1 and DE-2, were launched on August 3, 1981, into polar coplanar orbits at different altitudes for the purpose of studying interactive processes within the atmosphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere system. The DE-1 spacecraft (high-altitude mission) used an elliptical orbit that was selected to allow: (1) measurements extending from the hot magnetospheric plasma through the plasmasphere to the cool ionosphere; (2) global auroral imaging, wave measurements in the heart of the magnetosphere, and crossing of auroral field lines at several earth radii; and (3) measurements for significant periods of time along a magnetic field flux tube. The orbit of Dynamics Explorer 1 offered an opportunity to obtain global images of Earth's dayglow and auroral luminosities and to acquire consecutive images of the entire auroral oval during the growth, onset, expansion, and recovery phases of substorms. The University of Iowa's Spin-scan Auroral Imaging (SAI) instrument, was on-board DE-1. SAI was activated in orbit and placed in routine operation on September 23, 1981, and has provided outstanding new contributions in the fields of auroral, magnetospheric and geocoronal physics, introduced a powerful tool for the study of global atmospheric ozone, and initiated the first search from space for marine bioluminescence on the surface of the global ocean. The SAI instrumentation consists of three imaging photometers, two for visible wavelengths and the third for vacuum-ultraviolet wavelengths equipped with primary catoptric optics with superpolished mirror surfaces. The primary focusing element is an off-axis section of a parabolic mirror that is used to provide an optical path completely free of support structures for the mirrors.

  12. Femtosecond electron imaging of defect-modulated phonon dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremons, Daniel R.; Plemmons, Dayne A.; Flannigan, David J.

    2016-04-01

    Precise manipulation and control of coherent lattice oscillations via nanostructuring and phonon-wave interference has the potential to significantly impact a broad array of technologies and research areas. Resolving the dynamics of individual phonons in defect-laden materials presents an enormous challenge, however, owing to the interdependent nanoscale and ultrafast spatiotemporal scales. Here we report direct, real-space imaging of the emergence and evolution of acoustic phonons at individual defects in crystalline WSe2 and Ge. Via bright-field imaging with an ultrafast electron microscope, we are able to image the sub-picosecond nucleation and the launch of wavefronts at step edges and resolve dispersion behaviours during propagation and scattering. We discover that the appearance of speed-of-sound (for example, 6 nm ps-1) wavefronts are influenced by spatially varying nanoscale strain fields, taking on the appearance of static bend contours during propagation. These observations provide unprecedented insight into the roles played by individual atomic and nanoscale features on acoustic-phonon dynamics.

  13. Femtosecond electron imaging of defect-modulated phonon dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cremons, Daniel R; Plemmons, Dayne A; Flannigan, David J

    2016-01-01

    Precise manipulation and control of coherent lattice oscillations via nanostructuring and phonon-wave interference has the potential to significantly impact a broad array of technologies and research areas. Resolving the dynamics of individual phonons in defect-laden materials presents an enormous challenge, however, owing to the interdependent nanoscale and ultrafast spatiotemporal scales. Here we report direct, real-space imaging of the emergence and evolution of acoustic phonons at individual defects in crystalline WSe2 and Ge. Via bright-field imaging with an ultrafast electron microscope, we are able to image the sub-picosecond nucleation and the launch of wavefronts at step edges and resolve dispersion behaviours during propagation and scattering. We discover that the appearance of speed-of-sound (for example, 6 nm ps(-1)) wavefronts are influenced by spatially varying nanoscale strain fields, taking on the appearance of static bend contours during propagation. These observations provide unprecedented insight into the roles played by individual atomic and nanoscale features on acoustic-phonon dynamics. PMID:27079790

  14. Dynamic phase imaging utilizing a 4-dimensional microscope system.

    PubMed

    Creath, Katherine

    2011-02-21

    This paper describes a new, novel interference Linnik microscope system and presents images and data of live biological samples. The specially designed optical system enables instantaneous 4-dimensional video measurements of dynamic motions within and among live cells without the need for contrast agents. This "label-free", vibration insensitive imaging system enables measurement of biological objects in reflection using harmless light levels with a variety of magnifications and wavelengths with fields of view from several hundred microns up to a millimeter. At the core of the instrument is a phase measurement camera (PMC) enabling simultaneous measurement of multiple interference patterns utilizing a pixelated phase mask taking advantage of the polarization properties of light. Utilizing this technology enables the creation of phase image movies in real time at video rates so that dynamic motions and volumetric changes can be tracked. Objects are placed on a reflective surface in liquid under a coverslip. Phase values are converted to optical thickness data enabling volumetric, motion and morphological studies. Data from a number of different organisms such as flagellates and rotifers will be presented, as will measurements of human breast cancer cells with the addition of various agents that break down the cells. These data highlight examples of monitoring different biological processes and motions. PMID:24357901

  15. Femtosecond electron imaging of defect-modulated phonon dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cremons, Daniel R.; Plemmons, Dayne A.; Flannigan, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Precise manipulation and control of coherent lattice oscillations via nanostructuring and phonon-wave interference has the potential to significantly impact a broad array of technologies and research areas. Resolving the dynamics of individual phonons in defect-laden materials presents an enormous challenge, however, owing to the interdependent nanoscale and ultrafast spatiotemporal scales. Here we report direct, real-space imaging of the emergence and evolution of acoustic phonons at individual defects in crystalline WSe2 and Ge. Via bright-field imaging with an ultrafast electron microscope, we are able to image the sub-picosecond nucleation and the launch of wavefronts at step edges and resolve dispersion behaviours during propagation and scattering. We discover that the appearance of speed-of-sound (for example, 6 nm ps−1) wavefronts are influenced by spatially varying nanoscale strain fields, taking on the appearance of static bend contours during propagation. These observations provide unprecedented insight into the roles played by individual atomic and nanoscale features on acoustic-phonon dynamics. PMID:27079790

  16. Dynamic phase imaging utilizing a 4-dimensional microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creath, Katherine

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes a new, novel interference Linnik microscope system and presents images and data of live biological samples. The specially designed optical system enables instantaneous 4-dimensional video measurements of dynamic motions within and among live cells without the need for contrast agents. This "label-free", vibration insensitive imaging system enables measurement of biological objects in reflection using harmless light levels with a variety of magnifications and wavelengths with fields of view from several hundred microns up to a millimeter. At the core of the instrument is a phase measurement camera (PMC) enabling simultaneous measurement of multiple interference patterns utilizing a pixelated phase mask taking advantage of the polarization properties of light. Utilizing this technology enables the creation of phase image movies in real time at video rates so that dynamic motions and volumetric changes can be tracked. Objects are placed on a reflective surface in liquid under a coverslip. Phase values are converted to optical thickness data enabling volumetric, motion and morphological studies. Data from a number of different organisms such as flagellates and rotifers will be presented, as will measurements of human breast cancer cells with the addition of various agents that break down the cells. These data highlight examples of monitoring different biological processes and motions.

  17. Fast regional readout CMOS Image Sensor for dynamic MLC tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zin, H.; Harris, E.; Osmond, J.; Evans, P.

    2014-03-01

    Advanced radiotherapy techniques such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) require verification of the complex beam delivery including tracking of multileaf collimators (MLC) and monitoring the dose rate. This work explores the feasibility of a prototype Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor Image Sensor (CIS) for tracking these complex treatments by utilising fast, region of interest (ROI) read out functionality. An automatic edge tracking algorithm was used to locate the MLC leaves edges moving at various speeds (from a moving triangle field shape) and imaged with various sensor frame rates. The CIS demonstrates successful edge detection of the dynamic MLC motion within accuracy of 1.0 mm. This demonstrates the feasibility of the sensor to verify treatment delivery involving dynamic MLC up to ~400 frames per second (equivalent to the linac pulse rate), which is superior to any current techniques such as using electronic portal imaging devices (EPID). CIS provides the basis to an essential real-time verification tool, useful in accessing accurate delivery of complex high energy radiation to the tumour and ultimately to achieve better cure rates for cancer patients.

  18. Live cell imaging of septin dynamics in Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Baumann, S; Zander, S; Weidtkamp-Peters, S; Feldbrügge, M

    2016-01-01

    Septins are highly conserved cytoskeletal proteins involved in a variety of biological processes such as cell polarization and cytokinesis. In humans, functional defects in these proteins have been linked to cancer and neuronal diseases. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in studying the structure of septin subunits and the formation of defined heteromeric building blocks. These are assembled into higher-order structures at distinct subcellular sites. An important microscopic approach in studying septin assembly and dynamics is the use of septins tagged with fluorescent proteins. This revealed, eg, that septins form rings during cytokinesis and that septins build extended filaments partially colocalizing with actin cables and microtubules. Here, we describe extensive live cell imaging of septins in the model microorganism Ustilago maydis. We present techniques to study dynamic localization of protein and septin mRNA on shuttling endosomes as well as colocalization of proteins at these highly motile units. Moreover, FLIM-FRET experiments for analyzing local protein interactions are presented. Importantly, these imaging approaches transfer well to other fungal and animal model systems for in vivo analysis of septin dynamics. PMID:27473908

  19. Bilateral renal lymphoangiomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Raed, Alqahtani; Sultan, Alkhateeb; Bader, Al-Mutairi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Renal lymphangiomatosis is a rare congenital benign disease of renal lymphatic system, here we are presenting a very rare form of disease which is bilateral form. Presentation of the case A young adult presented to our clinic after being referred from primary care clinic with intermittent bilateral flank pain and no other symptoms after extensive radiological investigations diagnosis has been made and confirmed by radiological finding of disease. Active treatment usually preserved for complex cases and for the complications of the disease but in our patient as needed analgesia worked well in controlling his intermittent pain and his wish not to pursue any intervention. The vague presentation with initial imaging rising suspicion of renal tumor or complex renal cyst might cause psychological street on the patient, which our patient had, but reassurance after extensive radiological work up relive that's stress. Discussion Although it is very rare disease to be bilateral but wide variety of other differential diagnoses make importance of disease recognition and accurate diagnosis is the key. Conclusion Renal lymphangiomatosis is a rare benign disease of renal lymphatic, which usually affect one side, but bilateral form is very rare form, which may raise the suspicions of genetic form of renal malignancy. Accurate diagnosis requires work up to role out malignant and other renal tumor, which require active surgical management. PMID:26719997

  20. Dynamic speckle image segmentation using self-organizing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pra, Ana L. Dai; Meschino, Gustavo J.; Guzmán, Marcelo N.; Scandurra, Adriana G.; González, Mariela A.; Weber, Christian; Trivi, Marcelo; Rabal, Héctor; Passoni, Lucía I.

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work is to build a computational model able to automatically identify, after training, dynamic speckle pattern regions with similar properties. The process is carried out using a set of descriptors applied to the intensity variations with time in every pixel of a speckle image sequence. An image obtained by projecting a self-organized map is converted into regions of similar activity that can be easily distinguished. We propose a general procedure that could be applied to numerous situations. As examples we show different situations: (a) an activity test in a simplified situation; (b) a non-biological example and (c) biological active specimens. The results obtained are encouraging; they significantly improve upon those obtained using a single descriptor and will eventually permit automatic quantitative assessment.

  1. Tracking ultrafast relaxation dynamics of furan by femtosecond photoelectron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuzhu; Knopp, Gregor; Qin, Chaochao; Gerber, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast internal conversion dynamics of furan has been studied by femtosecond photoelectron imaging (PEI) coupled with photofragmentation (PF) spectroscopy. Photoelectron imaging of single-color multi-photon ionization and two-color pump-probe ionization are obtained and analyzed. Photoelectron bands are assigned to the related states. The time evolution of the photoelectron signal by pump-probe ionization can be well described by a biexponential decay: two rapid relaxation pathways with time constants of ∼15 fs and 85 (±11) fs. The rapid relaxation is ascribed to the ultrafast internal conversion (IC) from the S2 state to the vibrationally hot S1 state. The second relaxation process is attributed to the redistributions and depopulation of secondarily populated high vibronic S1 state and the formation of α-carbene and β-carbene by H immigration. Additionally, the transient characteristics of the fragment ions are also measured and discussed as a complementary understanding.

  2. Imaging intracellular protein dynamics by spinning disk confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stehbens, Samantha; Pemble, Hayley; Murrow, Lindsay; Wittmann, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    The palette of fluorescent proteins has grown exponentially over the last decade, and as a result live imaging of cells expressing fluorescently tagged proteins is becoming more and more main stream. Spinning disk confocal microscopy (SDC) is a high speed optical sectioning technique, and a method of choice to observe and analyze intracellular fluorescent protein dynamics at high spatial and temporal resolution. In an SDC system, a rapidly rotating pinhole disk generates thousands of points of light that scan the specimen simultaneously, which allows direct capture of the confocal image with low noise scientific grade cooled charged-coupled device (CCD) cameras, and can achieve frame rates of up 1000 frames per second. In this chapter we describe important components of a state-of-the-art spinning disk system optimized for live cell microscopy, and provide a rationale for specific design choices. We also give guidelines how other imaging techniques such as total internal reflection (TIRF) microscopy or spatially controlled photoactivation can be coupled with SDC imaging, and provide a short protocol on how to generate cell lines stably expressing fluorescently tagged proteins by lentivirus-mediated transduction. PMID:22264541

  3. Application of DIRI dynamic infrared imaging in reconstructive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlowski, Marek; Wang, Chengpu; Jin, Feng; Salvitti, Matthew; Tenorio, Xavier

    2006-04-01

    We have developed the BioScanIR System based on QWIP (Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector). Data collected by this sensor are processed using the DIRI (Dynamic Infrared Imaging) algorithms. The combination of DIRI data processing methods with the unique characteristics of the QWIP sensor permit the creation of a new imaging modality capable of detecting minute changes in temperature at the surface of the tissue and organs associated with blood perfusion due to certain diseases such as cancer, vascular disease and diabetes. The BioScanIR System has been successfully applied in reconstructive surgery to localize donor flap feeding vessels (perforators) during the pre-surgical planning stage. The device is also used in post-surgical monitoring of skin flap perfusion. Since the BioScanIR is mobile; it can be moved to the bedside for such monitoring. In comparison to other modalities, the BioScanIR can localize perforators in a single, 20 seconds scan with definitive results available in minutes. The algorithms used include (FFT) Fast Fourier Transformation, motion artifact correction, spectral analysis and thermal image scaling. The BioScanIR is completely non-invasive and non-toxic, requires no exogenous contrast agents and is free of ionizing radiation. In addition to reconstructive surgery applications, the BioScanIR has shown promise as a useful functional imaging modality in neurosurgery, drug discovery in pre-clinical animal models, wound healing and peripheral vascular disease management.

  4. Motion-compensated compressed sensing for dynamic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, Rajagopalan; Kim, Yookyung; Nadar, Mariappan S.; Bilgin, Ali

    2010-08-01

    The recently introduced Compressed Sensing (CS) theory explains how sparse or compressible signals can be reconstructed from far fewer samples than what was previously believed possible. The CS theory has attracted significant attention for applications such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) where long acquisition times have been problematic. This is especially true for dynamic MRI applications where high spatio-temporal resolution is needed. For example, in cardiac cine MRI, it is desirable to acquire the whole cardiac volume within a single breath-hold in order to avoid artifacts due to respiratory motion. Conventional MRI techniques do not allow reconstruction of high resolution image sequences from such limited amount of data. Vaswani et al. recently proposed an extension of the CS framework to problems with partially known support (i.e. sparsity pattern). In their work, the problem of recursive reconstruction of time sequences of sparse signals was considered. Under the assumption that the support of the signal changes slowly over time, they proposed using the support of the previous frame as the "known" part of the support for the current frame. While this approach works well for image sequences with little or no motion, motion causes significant change in support between adjacent frames. In this paper, we illustrate how motion estimation and compensation techniques can be used to reconstruct more accurate estimates of support for image sequences with substantial motion (such as cardiac MRI). Experimental results using phantoms as well as real MRI data sets illustrate the improved performance of the proposed technique.

  5. Dynamic digital image analysis: emerging technology for particle characterization.

    PubMed

    Rabinski, G; Thomas, D

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of applying dynamic imaging analysis technology to particle characterization has been evaluated for application in the water sector. A system has been developed which captures in-situ images of suspended particles in a flowing sample stream and analyzes these images in real time to determine particle size and concentration. The technology can measure samples having a wide range of particle sizes (approximately 1.5 to 1,000 microm equivalent circular diameter) and concentrations (<1 to >1 million/ml). The system also provides magnified images of particles for visual analysis of properties such as size, shape and grayscale level. There are no sample preparation requirements and statistically accurate results are produced in less than three minutes per sample. The overall system architecture is described. The major design challenges in developing a practical system include obtaining adequate contrast for the range of particle materials found in typical water samples and achieving this under operating conditions permitting an adequate sample processing rate for real time feedback of results. Performance of the instrument is reported in reference to industry accepted particle standards and applications as an analytical tool for the water industries are considered.

  6. Dynamic Imaging of Individual Remyelination Profiles in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bodini, Benedetta; Veronese, Mattia; García‐Lorenzo, Daniel; Battaglini, Marco; Poirion, Emilie; Chardain, Audrey; Freeman, Léorah; Louapre, Céline; Tchikviladze, Maya; Papeix, Caroline; Dollé, Frédéric; Zalc, Bernard; Lubetzki, Catherine; Bottlaender, Michel; Turkheimer, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Background Quantitative in vivo imaging of myelin loss and repair in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is essential to understand the pathogenesis of the disease and to evaluate promyelinating therapies. Selectively binding myelin in the central nervous system white matter, Pittsburgh compound B ([11C]PiB) can be used as a positron emission tomography (PET) tracer to explore myelin dynamics in MS. Methods Patients with active relapsing‐remitting MS (n = 20) and healthy controls (n = 8) were included in a longitudinal trial combining PET with [11C]PiB and magnetic resonance imaging. Voxel‐wise maps of [11C]PiB distribution volume ratio, reflecting myelin content, were derived. Three dynamic indices were calculated for each patient: the global index of myelin content change; the index of demyelination; and the index of remyelination. Results At baseline, there was a progressive reduction in [11C]PiB binding from the normal‐appearing white matter to MS lesions, reflecting a decline in myelin content. White matter lesions were characterized by a centripetal decrease in the tracer binding at the voxel level. During follow‐up, high between‐patient variability was found for all indices of myelin content change. Dynamic remyelination was inversely correlated with clinical disability (p = 0.006 and beta‐coefficient = –0.67 with the Expanded Disability Status Scale; p = 0.003 and beta‐coefficient = –0.68 with the MS Severity Scale), whereas no significant clinical correlation was found for the demyelination index. Interpretation [11C]PiB PET allows quantification of myelin dynamics in MS and enables stratification of patients depending on their individual remyelination potential, which significantly correlates with clinical disability. This technique should be considered to assess novel promyelinating drugs. Ann Neurol 2016;79:726–738 PMID:26891452

  7. Dynamic Image Analysis for Dynamic Scattering Modes in a Nematic Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaya, Tomoyuki; Takeda, Takahiro; Orihara, Hiroshi

    1999-12-01

    We have investigated the pattern fluctuation in a highly developed electro-hydrodynamic convection (EHC) by dynamic analyses of spatial Fourier coefficients of images. We measured the power spectrum and the two-time correlation function of spatial Fourier coefficients of images in the two turbulent states of EHC: the dynamic scattering mode (DSM)1 and DSM2 states. It was found that in the DSM1 state both the power spectrum and the correlation time show spatial anisotropy and have a characteristic peak at a wave number corresponding to the thickness of the cell in the rubbing direction. The peaks of the power spectrum and the correlation time decrease as the applied electric field is raised, and vanish entirely when the system undergoes the transition from DSM1 to DSM2. In the DSM2 state, there is no anisotropy in both the power spectrum and the correlation time.

  8. Autofluorescence dynamics during reperfusion following long-term renal ischemia in a rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, R N; Pivetti, C D; Matthews, D L; Troppmann, C; Demos, S G

    2008-02-08

    Optical properties of near-surface kidney tissue were monitored in order to assess response during reperfusion to long (20 minutes) versus prolonged (150 minutes) ischemia in an in vivo rat model. Specifically, autofluorescence images of the exposed surfaces of both the normal and the ischemic kidneys were acquired during both injury and reperfusion alternately under 355 nm and 266 nm excitations. The temporal profile of the emission of the injured kidney during the reperfusion phase under 355 nm excitation was normalized to that under 266 nm as a means to account for changes in tissue optical properties independent of ischemia as well as changes in the illumination/collection geometrical parameters in future clinical implementation of this technique using a hand-held probe. The scattered excitation light signal was also evaluated as a reference signal and found to be inadequate. Characteristic time constants were extracted using fit to a relaxation model and found to have larger mean values following 150 minutes of injury. The mean values were then compared with the outcome of a chronic survival study where the control kidney had been removed. Rat kidneys exhibiting longer time constants were much more likely to fail. This may lead to a method to assess kidney viability and predict its ability to recover in the initial period following transplantation or resuscitation.

  9. Autofluorescence dynamics during reperfusion following long-term renal ischemia in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Rajesh N.; Pivetti, Christopher D.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Troppmann, Christoph; Demos, Stavros G.

    2008-02-01

    Optical properties of near-surface kidney tissue were monitored in order to assess response during reperfusion to long (20 minutes) versus prolonged (150 minutes) ischemia in an in vivo rat model. Specifically, autofluorescence images of the exposed surfaces of both the normal and the ischemic kidneys were acquired during both injury and reperfusion alternately under 355 nm and 266 nm excitations. The temporal profile of the emission of the injured kidney during the reperfusion phase under 355 nm excitation was normalized to that under 266 nm as a means to account for changes in tissue optical properties independent of ischemia as well as changes in the illumination/collection geometrical parameters in future clinical implementation of this technique using a hand-held probe. The scattered excitation light signal was also evaluated as a reference signal and found to be inadequate. Characteristic time constants were extracted using a fit to a relaxation model and found to have larger mean values following 150 minutes of injury. The mean values were then compared with the outcome of a chronic survival study where the control kidney had been removed. Rat kidneys exhibiting longer time constants were much more likely to fail. This may lead to a method to assess kidney viability and predict its ability to recover in the initial period following transplantation or resuscitation.

  10. Defining myocardial tissue abnormalities in end-stage renal failure with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using native T1 mapping.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Elaine; Talle, Mohammed A; Mangion, Kenneth; Bell, Elizabeth; Rauhalammi, Samuli M; Roditi, Giles; McComb, Christie; Radjenovic, Aleksandra; Welsh, Paul; Woodward, Rosemary; Struthers, Allan D; Jardine, Alan G; Patel, Rajan K; Berry, Colin; Mark, Patrick B

    2016-10-01

    Noninvasive quantification of myocardial fibrosis in end-stage renal disease is challenging. Gadolinium contrast agents previously used for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are contraindicated because of an association with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. In other populations, increased myocardial native T1 times on cardiac MRI have been shown to be a surrogate marker of myocardial fibrosis. We applied this method to 33 incident hemodialysis patients and 28 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers who underwent MRI at 3.0T. Native T1 relaxation times and feature tracking-derived global longitudinal strain as potential markers of fibrosis were compared and associated with cardiac biomarkers. Left ventricular mass indices were higher in the hemodialysis than the control group. Global, Septal and midseptal T1 times were all significantly higher in the hemodialysis group (global T1 hemodialysis 1171 ± 27 ms vs. 1154 ± 32 ms; septal T1 hemodialysis 1184 ± 29 ms vs. 1163 ± 30 ms; and midseptal T1 hemodialysis 1184 ± 34 ms vs. 1161 ± 29 ms). In the hemodialysis group, T1 times correlated with left ventricular mass indices. Septal T1 times correlated with troponin and electrocardiogram-corrected QT interval. The peak global longitudinal strain was significantly reduced in the hemodialysis group (hemodialysis -17.7±5.3% vs. -21.8±6.2%). For hemodialysis patients, the peak global longitudinal strain significantly correlated with left ventricular mass indices (R = 0.426), and a trend was seen for correlation with galectin-3, a biomarker of cardiac fibrosis. Thus, cardiac tissue properties of hemodialysis patients consistent with myocardial fibrosis can be determined noninvasively and associated with multiple structural and functional abnormalities.

  11. Mutual information as a measure of image quality for 3D dynamic lung imaging with EIT

    PubMed Central

    Crabb, M G; Davidson, J L; Little, R; Wright, P; Morgan, A R; Miller, C A; Naish, J H; Parker, G J M; Kikinis, R; McCann, H; Lionheart, W R B

    2014-01-01

    We report on a pilot study of dynamic lung electrical impedance tomography (EIT) at the University of Manchester. Low-noise EIT data at 100 frames per second (fps) were obtained from healthy male subjects during controlled breathing, followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) subsequently used for spatial validation of the EIT reconstruction. The torso surface in the MR image and electrode positions obtained using MRI fiducial markers informed the construction of a 3D finite element model extruded along the caudal-distal axis of the subject. Small changes in the boundary that occur during respiration were accounted for by incorporating the sensitivity with respect to boundary shape into a robust temporal difference reconstruction algorithm. EIT and MRI images were co-registered using the open source medical imaging software, 3D Slicer. A quantitative comparison of quality of different EIT reconstructions was achieved through calculation of the mutual information with a lung-segmented MR image. EIT reconstructions using a linear shape correction algorithm reduced boundary image artefacts, yielding better contrast of the lungs, and had 10% greater mutual information compared with a standard linear EIT reconstruction. PMID:24710978

  12. Stable Small Animal Mechanical Ventilation for Dynamic Lung Imaging to Support Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Rick E.; Lamm, W. J.

    2011-11-08

    Pulmonary computational fluid dynamics models require 3D images to be acquired over multiple points in the dynamic breathing cycle, with no breath holds or changes in ventilatory mechanics. With small animals, these requirements result in long imaging times ({approx}90 minutes), over which lung mechanics, such as compliance, can gradually change if not carefully monitored and controlled. These changes, caused by derecruitment of parenchymal tissue, are manifested as an upward drift in peak inspiratory pressure or by changes in the pressure waveform and/or lung volume over the course of the experiment. We demonstrate highly repeatable mechanical ventilation in anesthetized rats over a long duration for pulmonary CT imaging throughout the dynamic breathing cycle. We describe significant updates to a basic commercial ventilator that was acquired for these experiments. Key to achieving consistent results was the implementation of periodic deep breaths, or sighs, of extended duration to maintain lung recruitment. In addition, continuous monitoring of breath-to-breath pressure and volume waveforms and long-term trends in peak inspiratory pressure and flow provide diagnostics of changes in breathing mechanics.

  13. Automatic Generation of Wide Dynamic Range Image without Pseudo-Edge Using Integration of Multi-Steps Exposure Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migiyama, Go; Sugimura, Atsuhiko; Osa, Atsushi; Miike, Hidetoshi

    Recently, digital cameras are offering technical advantages rapidly. However, the shot image is different from the sight image generated when that scenery is seen with the naked eye. There are blown-out highlights and crushed blacks in the image that photographed the scenery of wide dynamic range. The problems are hardly generated in the sight image. These are contributory cause of difference between the shot image and the sight image. Blown-out highlights and crushed blacks are caused by the difference of dynamic range between the image sensor installed in a digital camera such as CCD and CMOS and the human visual system. Dynamic range of the shot image is narrower than dynamic range of the sight image. In order to solve the problem, we propose an automatic method to decide an effective exposure range in superposition of edges. We integrate multi-step exposure images using the method. In addition, we try to erase pseudo-edges using the process to blend exposure values. Afterwards, we get a pseudo wide dynamic range image automatically.

  14. Ultrafast image-based dynamic light scattering for nanoparticle sizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wu; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Lili; Cai, Xiaoshu

    2015-11-01

    An ultrafast sizing method for nanoparticles is proposed, called as UIDLS (Ultrafast Image-based Dynamic Light Scattering). This method makes use of the intensity fluctuation of scattered light from nanoparticles in Brownian motion, which is similar to the conventional DLS method. The difference in the experimental system is that the scattered light by nanoparticles is received by an image sensor instead of a photomultiplier tube. A novel data processing algorithm is proposed to directly get correlation coefficient between two images at a certain time interval (from microseconds to milliseconds) by employing a two-dimensional image correlation algorithm. This coefficient has been proved to be a monotonic function of the particle diameter. Samples of standard latex particles (79/100/352/482/948 nm) were measured for validation of the proposed method. The measurement accuracy of higher than 90% was found with standard deviations less than 3%. A sample of nanosilver particle with nominal size of 20 ± 2 nm and a sample of polymethyl methacrylate emulsion with unknown size were also tested using UIDLS method. The measured results were 23.2 ± 3.0 nm and 246.1 ± 6.3 nm, respectively, which is substantially consistent with the transmission electron microscope results. Since the time for acquisition of two successive images has been reduced to less than 1 ms and the data processing time in about 10 ms, the total measuring time can be dramatically reduced from hundreds seconds to tens of milliseconds, which provides the potential for real-time and in situ nanoparticle sizing.

  15. Ultrafast image-based dynamic light scattering for nanoparticle sizing

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Wu; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Lili; Cai, Xiaoshu

    2015-11-15

    An ultrafast sizing method for nanoparticles is proposed, called as UIDLS (Ultrafast Image-based Dynamic Light Scattering). This method makes use of the intensity fluctuation of scattered light from nanoparticles in Brownian motion, which is similar to the conventional DLS method. The difference in the experimental system is that the scattered light by nanoparticles is received by an image sensor instead of a photomultiplier tube. A novel data processing algorithm is proposed to directly get correlation coefficient between two images at a certain time interval (from microseconds to milliseconds) by employing a two-dimensional image correlation algorithm. This coefficient has been proved to be a monotonic function of the particle diameter. Samples of standard latex particles (79/100/352/482/948 nm) were measured for validation of the proposed method. The measurement accuracy of higher than 90% was found with standard deviations less than 3%. A sample of nanosilver particle with nominal size of 20 ± 2 nm and a sample of polymethyl methacrylate emulsion with unknown size were also tested using UIDLS method. The measured results were 23.2 ± 3.0 nm and 246.1 ± 6.3 nm, respectively, which is substantially consistent with the transmission electron microscope results. Since the time for acquisition of two successive images has been reduced to less than 1 ms and the data processing time in about 10 ms, the total measuring time can be dramatically reduced from hundreds seconds to tens of milliseconds, which provides the potential for real-time and in situ nanoparticle sizing.

  16. Ultrafast image-based dynamic light scattering for nanoparticle sizing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wu; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Lili; Cai, Xiaoshu

    2015-11-01

    An ultrafast sizing method for nanoparticles is proposed, called as UIDLS (Ultrafast Image-based Dynamic Light Scattering). This method makes use of the intensity fluctuation of scattered light from nanoparticles in Brownian motion, which is similar to the conventional DLS method. The difference in the experimental system is that the scattered light by nanoparticles is received by an image sensor instead of a photomultiplier tube. A novel data processing algorithm is proposed to directly get correlation coefficient between two images at a certain time interval (from microseconds to milliseconds) by employing a two-dimensional image correlation algorithm. This coefficient has been proved to be a monotonic function of the particle diameter. Samples of standard latex particles (79/100/352/482/948 nm) were measured for validation of the proposed method. The measurement accuracy of higher than 90% was found with standard deviations less than 3%. A sample of nanosilver particle with nominal size of 20 ± 2 nm and a sample of polymethyl methacrylate emulsion with unknown size were also tested using UIDLS method. The measured results were 23.2 ± 3.0 nm and 246.1 ± 6.3 nm, respectively, which is substantially consistent with the transmission electron microscope results. Since the time for acquisition of two successive images has been reduced to less than 1 ms and the data processing time in about 10 ms, the total measuring time can be dramatically reduced from hundreds seconds to tens of milliseconds, which provides the potential for real-time and in situ nanoparticle sizing. PMID:26628172

  17. Aircraft path planning for optimal imaging using dynamic cost functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Gordon; Chaudhry, Haseeb; Kochersberger, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    Unmanned aircraft development has accelerated with recent technological improvements in sensing and communications, which has resulted in an "applications lag" for how these aircraft can best be utilized. The aircraft are becoming smaller, more maneuverable and have longer endurance to perform sensing and sampling missions, but operating them aggressively to exploit these capabilities has not been a primary focus in unmanned systems development. This paper addresses a means of aerial vehicle path planning to provide a realistic optimal path in acquiring imagery for structure from motion (SfM) reconstructions and performing radiation surveys. This method will allow SfM reconstructions to occur accurately and with minimal flight time so that the reconstructions can be executed efficiently. An assumption is made that we have 3D point cloud data available prior to the flight. A discrete set of scan lines are proposed for the given area that are scored based on visibility of the scene. Our approach finds a time-efficient path and calculates trajectories between scan lines and over obstacles encountered along those scan lines. Aircraft dynamics are incorporated into the path planning algorithm as dynamic cost functions to create optimal imaging paths in minimum time. Simulations of the path planning algorithm are shown for an urban environment. We also present our approach for image-based terrain mapping, which is able to efficiently perform a 3D reconstruction of a large area without the use of GPS data.

  18. Simultaneous reconstruction and segmentation for dynamic SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Martin; Rossmanith, Carolin; Zhang, Xiaoqun

    2016-10-01

    This work deals with the reconstruction of dynamic images that incorporate characteristic dynamics in certain subregions, as arising for the kinetics of many tracers in emission tomography (SPECT, PET). We make use of a basis function approach for the unknown tracer concentration by assuming that the region of interest can be divided into subregions with spatially constant concentration curves. Applying a regularised variational framework reminiscent of the Chan-Vese model for image segmentation we simultaneously reconstruct both the labelling functions of the subregions as well as the subconcentrations within each region. Our particular focus is on applications in SPECT with the Poisson noise model, resulting in a Kullback-Leibler data fidelity in the variational approach. We present a detailed analysis of the proposed variational model and prove existence of minimisers as well as error estimates. The latter apply to a more general class of problems and generalise existing results in literature since we deal with a nonlinear forward operator and a nonquadratic data fidelity. A computational algorithm based on alternating minimisation and splitting techniques is developed for the solution of the problem and tested on appropriately designed synthetic data sets. For those we compare the results to those of standard EM reconstructions and investigate the effects of Poisson noise in the data.

  19. Automatic vessel removal in gliomas from dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Emblem, Kyrre E; Due-Tonnessen, Paulina; Hald, John K; Bjornerud, Atle

    2009-05-01

    The presence of macroscopic vessels within the tumor region is a potential confounding factor in MR-based dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-enhanced glioma grading. In order to distinguish between such vessels and the elevated cerebral blood volume (CBV) of brain tumors, we propose a vessel segmentation technique based on clustering of multiple parameters derived from the dynamic contrast-enhanced first-pass curve. A total of 77 adult patients with histologically-confirmed gliomas were imaged at 1.5T and glioma regions-of-interest (ROIs) were derived from the conventional MR images by a neuroradiologist. The diagnostic accuracy of applying vessel exclusion by segmentation of glioma ROIs with vessels included was assessed using a histogram analysis method and compared to glioma ROIs with vessels included. For all measures of diagnostic efficacy investigated, the highest values were observed when the glioma diagnosis was based on vessel segmentation in combination with an initial mean transit time (MTT) mask. Our results suggest that vessel segmentation based on DSC parameters may improve the diagnostic efficacy of glioma grading. The proposed vessel segmentation is attractive because it provides a mask that covers all pixels affected by the intravascular susceptibility effect. PMID:19253390

  20. An Endothelial Planar Cell Model for Imaging Immunological Synapse Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Roberta; Carman, Christopher V

    2015-12-24

    Adaptive immunity is regulated by dynamic interactions between T cells and antigen presenting cells ('APCs') referred to as 'immunological synapses'. Within these intimate cell-cell interfaces discrete sub-cellular clusters of MHC/Ag-TCR, F-actin, adhesion and signaling molecules form and remodel rapidly. These dynamics are thought to be critical determinants of both the efficiency and quality of the immune responses that develop and therefore of protective versus pathologic immunity. Current understanding of immunological synapses with physiologic APCs is limited by the inadequacy of the obtainable imaging resolution. Though artificial substrate models (e.g., planar lipid bilayers) offer excellent resolution and have been extremely valuable tools, they are inherently non-physiologic and oversimplified. Vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells have emerged as an important peripheral tissue (or stromal) compartment of 'semi-professional APCs'. These APCs (which express most of the molecular machinery of professional APCs) have the unique feature of forming virtually planar cell surface and are readily transfectable (e.g., with fluorescent protein reporters). Herein a basic approach to implement endothelial cells as a novel and physiologic 'planar cellular APC model' for improved imaging and interrogation of fundamental antigenic signaling processes will be described.

  1. Probing peroxisome dynamics and biogenesis by fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Jauregui, Miluska; Kim, Peter K

    2014-03-03

    Peroxisomes are the most recently discovered classical organelles, and only lately have their diverse functions been truly recognized. Peroxisomes are highly dynamic structures, changing both morphologically and in number in response to both extracellular and intracellular signals. This metabolic organelle came to prominence due to the many genetic disorders caused by defects in its biogenesis or enzymatic functions. There is now growing evidence that suggests peroxisomes are involved in lipid biosynthesis, innate immunity, redox homeostasis, and metabolite scavenging, among other functions. Therefore, it is important to have available suitable methods and techniques to visualize and quantify peroxisomes in response to various cellular signals. This unit includes a number of protocols that will enable researchers to image, qualify, and quantify peroxisome numbers and morphology-with both steady-state and time-lapse imaging using mammalian cells. The use of photoactivatable fluorescent proteins to detect and measure peroxisome biogenesis is also described. Altogether, the protocols described here will facilitate understanding of the dynamic changes that peroxisomes undergo in response to various cellular signals.

  2. Probing Endoplasmic Reticulum Dynamics using Fluorescence Imaging and Photobleaching Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Lindsey; Snapp, Erik

    2013-01-01

    This UNIT describes approaches and tools for studying the dynamics and organization of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes and proteins in living cells using commercially available widefield and confocal laser scanning microscopes (CLSM). It has been long appreciated that the ER plays a number of key roles in secretory protein biogenesis, calcium regulation, and lipid synthesis. However, study of these processes has been often restricted to biochemical assays that average the behaviors of millions of lysed cells or to imaging static fixed cells. Now, with new fluorescent protein reporter tools, highly sensitive commercial microscopes, and photobleaching techniques, it is possible to interrogate the behaviors of ER proteins, membranes, and stress pathways in single cells with exquisite spatial and temporal resolution. The ER presents a unique set of imaging challenges including the high mobility of ER membranes, a diverse range of dynamic ER structures, and the influence of post-translational modifications on fluorescent protein reporters. Solutions to these challenges are described and considerations for performing photobleaching assays, especially Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP) and Fluorescence Loss in Photobleaching (FLIP) for ER proteins will be discussed. In addition, ER reporters and ER-specific pharmacologic compounds are presented with a focus on misfolded secretory protein stress and the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). PMID:24510787

  3. Noninvasive cardiac risk stratification of diabetic and nondiabetic uremic renal allograft candidates using dipyridamole-thallium-201 imaging and radionuclide ventriculography

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.A.; Rimmer, J.; Haisch, C. )

    1989-11-01

    The ability of noninvasive risk stratification using dipyridamole-thallium-201 (Tl-201) imaging and radionuclide ventriculography to predict perioperative and long-term cardiac events (myocardial infarction or cardiac death) was evaluated in 36 uremic diabetic and 29 nondiabetic candidates for renal allograft surgery. Of the 35 patients who underwent renal allograft surgery 8 +/- 7 months after the study, none had transient Tl-201 defects (although 13 had depressed left ventricular ejection fraction) and none developed perioperative cardiac events. During a mean follow-up of 23 +/- 11 months, 6 (9%) patients developed cardiac events. Logistic regression analysis was used to compare the predictive value of clinical data (including age, sex, diabetes, chest pain history, allograft recipient) and radionuclide data. Presence of transient Tl-201 defect and left ventricular ejection fraction were the only significant predictors of future cardiac events (p less than 0.01). No other patient variables, including diabetes or receiving a renal allograft, had either univariate or multivariate predictive value. All 3 patients with transient Tl-201 defects had cardiac events compared with only 3 of 62 (5%) patients without transient Tl-201 defect (p less than 0.0001). Mean left ventricular ejection fraction was lower in patients with cardiac events (44 +/- 13%) compared with patients without cardiac events (57 +/- 9%, p less than 0.005). Overall, 5 of 6 patients with cardiac events had either transient Tl-201 defects or depressed left ventricular ejection fraction. Dipyridamole-Tl-201 imaging and radionuclide ventriculography may be helpful in identifying uremic candidates for renal allograft surgery who are at low risk for perioperative and long-term cardiac events.

  4. Motion analysis of knee joint using dynamic volume images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haneishi, Hideaki; Kohno, Takahiro; Suzuki, Masahiko; Moriya, Hideshige; Mori, Sin-ichiro; Endo, Masahiro

    2006-03-01

    Acquisition and analysis of three-dimensional movement of knee joint is desired in orthopedic surgery. We have developed two methods to obtain dynamic volume images of knee joint. One is a 2D/3D registration method combining a bi-plane dynamic X-ray fluoroscopy and a static three-dimensional CT, the other is a method using so-called 4D-CT that uses a cone-beam and a wide 2D detector. In this paper, we present two analyses of knee joint movement obtained by these methods: (1) transition of the nearest points between femur and tibia (2) principal component analysis (PCA) of six parameters representing the three dimensional movement of knee. As a preprocessing for the analysis, at first the femur and tibia regions are extracted from volume data at each time frame and then the registration of the tibia between different frames by an affine transformation consisting of rotation and translation are performed. The same transformation is applied femur as well. Using those image data, the movement of femur relative to tibia can be analyzed. Six movement parameters of femur consisting of three translation parameters and three rotation parameters are obtained from those images. In the analysis (1), axis of each bone is first found and then the flexion angle of the knee joint is calculated. For each flexion angle, the minimum distance between femur and tibia and the location giving the minimum distance are found in both lateral condyle and medial condyle. As a result, it was observed that the movement of lateral condyle is larger than medial condyle. In the analysis (2), it was found that the movement of the knee can be represented by the first three principal components with precision of 99.58% and those three components seem to strongly relate to three major movements of femur in the knee bend known in orthopedic surgery.

  5. Dynamic Imaging of Surface Motion with a Stereo Borescope

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Berninger, Stuart Baker

    2008-12-11

    A new stereo borescope has been investigated that would provide a time-resolved calibrated method of recording the motion and deformation of a three-dimensional (3-D) surface during explosively driven dynamic shock experiments at the Nevada Test Site. In these experiments, geometries would likely prove to be incompatible with conventional direct optical systems. Single line-of-sight borescopes lack adequate depth-of-field for quantitative imaging of the 3-D surface. To improve depth-of-field and provide time resolution, a stereo borescope has been fabricated for use with a nine-frame framing camera. At one end, stereo optics couple light from the dynamic surface into a pair of flexible 1-mm-diameter correlated fiber-optic bundles. At the other end, small-format lenses (~3 mm) interface with the framing camera, which is set up to simultaneously record the separate-perspective views. All nine frames could be recorded in a period as short as 1.8 μs, and spatial resolution is optimized to 11 line-pairs per mm. To achieve pseudo 3-D depth perception, photogrammetric analysis has been demonstrated with commercial software from ADAM technology (Australia). This paper presents the results from time-resolved stereo images of dynamic surfaces collected in a series of high-explosives experiments at the National Security Technologies, LLC, “Boom Box” in Santa Barbara, CA. Experience with the stereo borescope has suggested other potentially useful stereoscopic applications, such as stereo viewing of moving surfaces on the interiors of engines and the heating of moving components, and the viewing material deposition on interior surfaces during machine operations and fabrication processes.

  6. Two-photon imaging and analysis of neural network dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lütcke, Henry; Helmchen, Fritjof

    2011-08-01

    The glow of a starry night sky, the smell of a freshly brewed cup of coffee or the sound of ocean waves breaking on the beach are representations of the physical world that have been created by the dynamic interactions of thousands of neurons in our brains. How the brain mediates perceptions, creates thoughts, stores memories and initiates actions remains one of the most profound puzzles in biology, if not all of science. A key to a mechanistic understanding of how the nervous system works is the ability to measure and analyze the dynamics of neuronal networks in the living organism in the context of sensory stimulation and behavior. Dynamic brain properties have been fairly well characterized on the microscopic level of individual neurons and on the macroscopic level of whole brain areas largely with the help of various electrophysiological techniques. However, our understanding of the mesoscopic level comprising local populations of hundreds to thousands of neurons (so-called 'microcircuits') remains comparably poor. Predominantly, this has been due to the technical difficulties involved in recording from large networks of neurons with single-cell spatial resolution and near-millisecond temporal resolution in the brain of living animals. In recent years, two-photon microscopy has emerged as a technique which meets many of these requirements and thus has become the method of choice for the interrogation of local neural circuits. Here, we review the state-of-research in the field of two-photon imaging of neuronal populations, covering the topics of microscope technology, suitable fluorescent indicator dyes, staining techniques, and in particular analysis techniques for extracting relevant information from the fluorescence data. We expect that functional analysis of neural networks using two-photon imaging will help to decipher fundamental operational principles of neural microcircuits.

  7. Measurements of granular flow dynamics with high speed digital images

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.

    1994-12-31

    The flow of granular materials is common to many industrial processes. This dissertation suggests and validates image processing algorithms applied to high speed digital images to measure the dynamics (velocity, temperature and volume fraction) of dry granular solids flowing down an inclined chute under the action of gravity. Glass and acrylic particles have been used as granular solids in the experiment. One technique utilizes block matching for spatially averaged velocity measurements of the glass particles. This technique is compared with the velocity measurement using an optic probe which is a conventional granular flow velocity measurement device. The other technique for measuring the velocities of individual acrylic particles is developed with correspondence using a Hopfield network. This technique first locates the positions of particles with pattern recognition techniques, followed by a clustering technique, which produces point patterns. Also, several techniques are compared for particle recognition: synthetic discriminant function (SDF), minimum average correlation energy (MACE) filter, modified minimum average correlation energy (MMACE) filter and variance normalized correlation. The author proposes an MMACE filter which improves generalization of the MACE filter by adjusting the amount of averaged spectrum of training images in the spectrum whitening stages of the MACE filter. Variance normalized correlation is applied to measure the velocity and temperature of flowing glass particles down the inclined chute. The measurements are taken for the steady and wavy flow and qualitatively compared with a theoretical model of granular flow.

  8. Global auroral imaging instrumentation for the Dynamics Explorer Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, L. A.; Craven, J. D.; Ackerson, K. L.; English, M. R.; Eather, R. H.; Carovillano, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    The instrumentation for obtaining global images of the auroral oval from the high-altitude spacecraft of the Dynamics Explorer Mission is described. It is noted that the three spin-scan auroral imaging photometers are expected to be able to effectively view the dim emissions from earth in the presence of strong stray light sources near their fields-of-view along the sunlit portion of the spacecraft orbit. A special optical design that includes an off-axis parabolic mirror as the focusing element and super-reflecting mirror surfaces is used to minimize the effects of stray light. The rotation of the spacecraft and an instrument scanning mirror provide the two-dimensional array of pixels making up an image frame. It is pointed out that the full width of the fields-of-view of the photometers corresponding to a single pixel is 0.29 deg and that the angular dimensions of a typical full frame are 30 deg x 30 deg and span 14,400 pixels.

  9. Patient-adaptive lesion metabolism analysis by dynamic PET images.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Liu, Huafeng; Shi, Pengcheng

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic PET imaging provides important spatial-temporal information for metabolism analysis of organs and tissues, and generates a great reference for clinical diagnosis and pharmacokinetic analysis. Due to poor statistical properties of the measurement data in low count dynamic PET acquisition and disturbances from surrounding tissues, identifying small lesions inside the human body is still a challenging issue. The uncertainties in estimating the arterial input function will also limit the accuracy and reliability of the metabolism analysis of lesions. Furthermore, the sizes of the patients and the motions during PET acquisition will yield mismatch against general purpose reconstruction system matrix, this will also affect the quantitative accuracy of metabolism analyses of lesions. In this paper, we present a dynamic PET metabolism analysis framework by defining a patient adaptive system matrix to improve the lesion metabolism analysis. Both patient size information and potential small lesions are incorporated by simulations of phantoms of different sizes and individual point source responses. The new framework improves the quantitative accuracy of lesion metabolism analysis, and makes the lesion identification more precisely. The requirement of accurate input functions is also reduced. Experiments are conducted on Monte Carlo simulated data set for quantitative analysis and validation, and on real patient scans for assessment of clinical potential. PMID:23286175

  10. Development of a dynamic flow imaging phantom for dynamic contrast-enhanced CT

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, B.; Keller, H.; Coolens, C.

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) studies with modeling of blood flow and tissue perfusion are becoming more prevalent in the clinic, with advances in wide volume CT scanners allowing the imaging of an entire organ with sub-second image frequency and sub-millimeter accuracy. Wide-spread implementation of perfusion DCE-CT, however, is pending fundamental validation of the quantitative parameters that result from dynamic contrast imaging and perfusion modeling. Therefore, the goal of this work was to design and construct a novel dynamic flow imaging phantom capable of producing typical clinical time-attenuation curves (TACs) with the purpose of developing a framework for the quantification and validation of DCE-CT measurements and kinetic modeling under realistic flow conditions. Methods: The phantom is based on a simple two-compartment model and was printed using a 3D printer. Initial analysis of the phantom involved simple flow measurements and progressed to DCE-CT experiments in order to test the phantoms range and reproducibility. The phantom was then utilized to generate realistic input TACs. A phantom prediction model was developed to compute the input and output TACs based on a given set of five experimental (control) parameters: pump flow rate, injection pump flow rate, injection contrast concentration, and both control valve positions. The prediction model is then inversely applied to determine the control parameters necessary to generate a set of desired input and output TACs. A protocol was developed and performed using the phantom to investigate image noise, partial volume effects and CT number accuracy under realistic flow conditionsResults: This phantom and its surrounding flow system are capable of creating a wide range of physiologically relevant TACs, which are reproducible with minimal error between experiments ({sigma}/{mu} < 5% for all metrics investigated). The dynamic flow phantom was capable of producing input and output TACs using

  11. Renal perfusion scintiscan

    MedlinePlus

    Renal perfusion scintigraphy; Radionuclide renal perfusion scan; Perfusion scintiscan - renal; Scintiscan - renal perfusion ... supply the kidneys. This is a condition called renal artery stenosis. Significant renal artery stenosis may be ...

  12. High Dynamic Velocity Range Particle Image Velocimetry Using Multiple Pulse Separation Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Persoons, Tim; O’Donovan, Tadhg S.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic velocity range of particle image velocimetry (PIV) is determined by the maximum and minimum resolvable particle displacement. Various techniques have extended the dynamic range, however flows with a wide velocity range (e.g., impinging jets) still challenge PIV algorithms. A new technique is presented to increase the dynamic velocity range by over an order of magnitude. The multiple pulse separation (MPS) technique (i) records series of double-frame exposures with different pulse separations, (ii) processes the fields using conventional multi-grid algorithms, and (iii) yields a composite velocity field with a locally optimized pulse separation. A robust criterion determines the local optimum pulse separation, accounting for correlation strength and measurement uncertainty. Validation experiments are performed in an impinging jet flow, using laser-Doppler velocimetry as reference measurement. The precision of mean flow and turbulence quantities is significantly improved compared to conventional PIV, due to the increase in dynamic range. In a wide range of applications, MPS PIV is a robust approach to increase the dynamic velocity range without restricting the vector evaluation methods. PMID:22346564

  13. Ineffectiveness of dipyridamole SPECT thallium imaging as a screening technique for coronary artery disease in patients with end-stage renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Marwick, T.H.; Steinmuller, D.R.; Underwood, D.A.; Hobbs, R.E.; Go, R.T.; Swift, C.; Braun, W.E. )

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy of dipyridamole single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) thallium as a screening test for coronary artery disease (CAD), was studied in 45 patients with end-stage renal failure undergoing evaluation for renal transplantation. Coronary arteriography, dipyridamole SPECT thallium imaging and clinical follow-up were performed in all patients. Nineteen patients (42%) had an obstruction of 50% or more in at least one coronary artery. Fourteen patients had a positive thallium scan, but 7 of these were false-positives (sensitivity 37%, specificity 73%). The sensitivity was considerably lower than that quoted for non-ESRF patients in the literature, and significantly lower than a control group of 19 patients without ESRF having comparable severity and distribution of CAD. Five of the 6 patients who died of cardiac causes over a mean follow-up period of 25 months had normal thallium imaging, but all had significant coronary artery disease at cardiac catheterization. Dipyridamole SPECT thallium imaging has not proved a useful screening test for angiographically significant CAD, and does not predict cardiac prognosis in this population.

  14. The rotational dynamics of Titan from Cassini RADAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meriggiola, Rachele; Iess, Luciano; Stiles, Bryan. W.; Lunine, Jonathan. I.; Mitri, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Between 2004 and 2009 the RADAR instrument of the Cassini mission provided 31 SAR images of Titan. We tracked the position of 160 surface landmarks as a function of time in order to monitor the rotational dynamics of Titan. We generated and processed RADAR observables using a least squares fit to determine the updated values of the rotational parameters. We provide a new rotational model of Titan, which includes updated values for spin pole location, spin rate, precession and nutation terms. The estimated pole location is compatible with the occupancy of a Cassini state 1. We found a synchronous value of the spin rate (22.57693 deg/day), compatible at a 3-σ level with IAU predictions. The estimated obliquity is equal to 0.31°, incompatible with the assumption of a rigid body with fully-damped pole and a moment of inertia factor of 0.34, as determined by gravity measurements.

  15. System of acquisition and processing of images of dynamic speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, F.; >C Torres,

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we show the design and implementation of a system to capture and analysis of dynamic speckle. The device consists of a USB camera, an isolated system lights for imaging, a laser pointer 633 nm 10 mw as coherent light source, a diffuser and a laptop for processing video. The equipment enables the acquisition and storage of video, also calculated of different descriptors of statistical analysis (vector global accumulation of activity, activity matrix accumulation, cross-correlation vector, autocorrelation coefficient, matrix Fujji etc.). The equipment is designed so that it can be taken directly to the site where the sample for biological study and is currently being used in research projects within the group.

  16. Tunneling in a self-consistent dynamic image potential

    SciTech Connect

    Rudberg, B.G.R. ); Jonson, M. Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1501 )

    1991-04-15

    We have calculated the self-consistent effective potential for an electron tunneling through a square barrier while interacting with surface plasmons. This potential reduces to the classical image potential in the static limit. In the opposite limit, when the velocity'' of the tunneling electron is large, it reduces to the unperturbed square-barrier potential. For a wide variety of parameters the dynamic effects on the transmission coefficient {ital T}={vert bar}{ital t}{sup 2}{vert bar} can, for instance, be related to the Buettiker-Landauer traversal time for tunneling, given by {tau}{sup BL}={h bar}{vert bar}{ital d} ln{ital t}/{ital dV}{vert bar}.

  17. Imaging the Dynamics of Endocytosis in Live Mammalian Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Weigert, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    In mammalian cells, endocytosis plays a pivotal role in regulating several basic cellular functions. Up to now, the dynamics and the organization of the endocytic pathways have been primarily investigated in reductionist model systems such as cell and organ cultures. Although these experimental models have been fully successful in unraveling the endocytic machinery at a molecular level, our understanding of the regulation and the role of endocytosis in vivo has been limited. Recently, advancements in intravital microscopy have made it possible to extend imaging in live animals to subcellular structures, thus revealing new aspects of the molecular machineries regulating membrane trafficking that were not previously appreciated in vitro. Here, we focus on the use of intravital microscopy to study endocytosis in vivo, and discuss how this approach will allow addressing two fundamental questions: (1) how endocytic processes are organized in mammalian tissues, and (2) how they contribute to organ physiopathology. PMID:24691962

  18. Image sensor with high dynamic range linear output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Designs and operational methods to increase the dynamic range of image sensors and APS devices in particular by achieving more than one integration times for each pixel thereof. An APS system with more than one column-parallel signal chains for readout are described for maintaining a high frame rate in readout. Each active pixel is sampled for multiple times during a single frame readout, thus resulting in multiple integration times. The operation methods can also be used to obtain multiple integration times for each pixel with an APS design having a single column-parallel signal chain for readout. Furthermore, analog-to-digital conversion of high speed and high resolution can be implemented.

  19. Cadmium and renal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Il'yasova, Dora; Schwartz, Gary G. . E-mail: gschwart@wfubmc.edu

    2005-09-01

    Background: Rates of renal cancer have increased steadily during the past two decades, and these increases are not explicable solely by advances in imaging modalities. Cadmium, a widespread environmental pollutant, is a carcinogen that accumulates in the kidney cortex and is a cause of end-stage renal disease. Several observations suggest that cadmium may be a cause of renal cancer. Methods: We performed a systematic review of the literature on cadmium and renal cancer using MEDLINE for the years 1966-2003. We reviewed seven epidemiological and eleven clinical studies. Results: Despite different methodologies, three large epidemiologic studies indicate that occupational exposure to cadmium is associated with increased risk renal cancer, with odds ratios varying from 1.2 to 5.0. Six of seven studies that compared the cadmium content of kidneys from patients with kidney cancer to that of patients without kidney cancer found lower concentrations of cadmium in renal cancer tissues. Conclusions: Exposure to cadmium appears to be associated with renal cancer, although this conclusion is tempered by the inability of studies to assess cumulative cadmium exposure from all sources including smoking and diet. The paradoxical findings of lower cadmium content in kidney tissues from patients with renal cancer may be caused by dilution of cadmium in rapidly dividing cells. This and other methodological problems limit the interpretation of studies of cadmium in clinical samples. Whether cadmium is a cause of renal cancer may be answered more definitively by future studies that employ biomarkers of cadmium exposure, such as cadmium levels in blood and urine.

  20. Polyhydramnios and acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, D. V.; Kelly, Moira B.; Pryor, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Acute renal failure secondary to ureteric obstruction is described in a primigravida with twin gestation and polyhydramnios. Relief of the obstruction occurred on drainage of the liquor and return to normal renal function following delivery. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:7022419

  1. Increasing Linear Dynamic Range of a CMOS Image Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata

    2007-01-01

    A generic design and a corresponding operating sequence have been developed for increasing the linear-response dynamic range of a complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor. The design provides for linear calibrated dual-gain pixels that operate at high gain at a low signal level and at low gain at a signal level above a preset threshold. Unlike most prior designs for increasing dynamic range of an image sensor, this design does not entail any increase in noise (including fixed-pattern noise), decrease in responsivity or linearity, or degradation of photometric calibration. The figure is a simplified schematic diagram showing the circuit of one pixel and pertinent parts of its column readout circuitry. The conventional part of the pixel circuit includes a photodiode having a small capacitance, CD. The unconventional part includes an additional larger capacitance, CL, that can be connected to the photodiode via a transfer gate controlled in part by a latch. In the high-gain mode, the signal labeled TSR in the figure is held low through the latch, which also helps to adapt the gain on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Light must be coupled to the pixel through a microlens or by back illumination in order to obtain a high effective fill factor; this is necessary to ensure high quantum efficiency, a loss of which would minimize the efficacy of the dynamic- range-enhancement scheme. Once the level of illumination of the pixel exceeds the threshold, TSR is turned on, causing the transfer gate to conduct, thereby adding CL to the pixel capacitance. The added capacitance reduces the conversion gain, and increases the pixel electron-handling capacity, thereby providing an extension of the dynamic range. By use of an array of comparators also at the bottom of the column, photocharge voltages on sampling capacitors in each column are compared with a reference voltage to determine whether it is necessary to switch from the high-gain to the low-gain mode. Depending upon

  2. Imaging cellular dynamics in vivo with multicolor fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Robert M.

    2005-04-01

    The new field of in vivo cell biology is being developed with multi-colored fluorescent proteins. With the use of fluorescent proteins, the behavior of individual cells can be visualized in the living animal. An example of the new cell biology is dual-color fluorescence imaging using red fluorescent protein (RFP)-expressing tumors transplanted in green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing transgenic mice. These models show with great clarity the details of the tumor-stroma cell-cell interaction especially tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, stromal fibroblasts and macrophages. Another example is the color-coding of cells with RFP or GFP such that both cell types and their interaction can be simultaneously visualized in vivo. Stem cells can also be visualized and tracked in vivo with fluorescent proteins. Mice, in which the regulatory elements of the stem-cell marker nestin drive GFP expression, can be used to visualize hair follicle stem cells including their ability to form hair follicles as well as blood vessels. Dual-color cells expressing GFP in the nucleus and RFP in the cytoplasm enable real-time visualization of nuclear-cytoplasm dynamics including cell cycle events and apoptosis. Dual-color cells also enable the in vivo imaging of cell and nuclear deformation as well as trafficking in capillaries in living animals. Multiple-color labeling of cells will enable multiple events to be simultaneously visualized in vivo including cell-cell interaction, gene expression, ion fluxes, protein and organelle trafficking, chromosome dynamics and numerous other processes currently still studied in vitro.

  3. Follow-up (99m)Tc EC renal dynamic scintigraphy and DMSA-III SPECT/CT in unmasking a masqueraded case of Horseshoe kidney.

    PubMed

    Jain, T K; Basher, R K; Mittal, B R; Bhatia, A; Rao, K L N

    2015-01-01

    Hydronephrosis is a common finding in urinary tract outflow obstruction. Chronically obstructed hydronephrotic system may be associated with parenchymal changes. Ultrasound, intravenous urography, micturating cysto-urethrogram and scintigraphy are commonly performed to evaluate the cause of obstruction. In childhood, pelviureteric junction obstruction is a common cause of the hydronephrosis. Hydronephrosis can also be present in horseshoe kidneys due to poor drainage. However, a large sized hydronephrotic cavity may obscure the finding of horseshoe kidney. A case was reported, and it was diagnosed as horseshoe kidney on follow-up renal dynamic scan and confirmed with the help of dimercaptosuccinic acid SPECT/CT.

  4. Dynamic chest image analysis: model-based pulmonary perfusion analysis with pyramid images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jianming; Haapanen, Arto; Jaervi, Timo; Kiuru, Aaro J.; Kormano, Martti; Svedstrom, Erkki; Virkki, Raimo

    1998-07-01

    The aim of the study 'Dynamic Chest Image Analysis' is to develop computer analysis and visualization methods for showing focal and general abnormalities of lung ventilation and perfusion based on a sequence of digital chest fluoroscopy frames collected at different phases of the respiratory/cardiac cycles in a short period of time. We have proposed a framework for ventilation study with an explicit ventilation model based on pyramid images. In this paper, we extend the framework to pulmonary perfusion study. A perfusion model and the truncated pyramid are introduced. The perfusion model aims at extracting accurate, geographic perfusion parameters, and the truncated pyramid helps in understanding perfusion at multiple resolutions and speeding up the convergence process in optimization. Three cases are included to illustrate the experimental results.

  5. Learning dynamic hybrid Markov random field for image labeling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Quan; Zhu, Jun; Liu, Wenyu

    2013-06-01

    Using shape information has gained increasing concerns in the task of image labeling. In this paper, we present a dynamic hybrid Markov random field (DHMRF), which explicitly captures middle-level object shape and low-level visual appearance (e.g., texture and color) for image labeling. Each node in DHMRF is described by either a deformable template or an appearance model as visual prototype. On the other hand, the edges encode two types of intersections: co-occurrence and spatial layered context, with respect to the labels and prototypes of connected nodes. To learn the DHMRF model, an iterative algorithm is designed to automatically select the most informative features and estimate model parameters. The algorithm achieves high computational efficiency since a branch-and-bound schema is introduced to estimate model parameters. Compared with previous methods, which usually employ implicit shape cues, our DHMRF model seamlessly integrates color, texture, and shape cues to inference labeling output, and thus produces more accurate and reliable results. Extensive experiments validate its superiority over other state-of-the-art methods in terms of recognition accuracy and implementation efficiency on: 1) the MSRC 21-class dataset, and 2) the lotus hill institute 15-class dataset.

  6. High dynamic range coherent imaging using compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    He, Kuan; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Cossairt, Oliver

    2015-11-30

    In both lensless Fourier transform holography (FTH) and coherent diffraction imaging (CDI), a beamstop is used to block strong intensities which exceed the limited dynamic range of the sensor, causing a loss in low-frequency information, making high quality reconstructions difficult or even impossible. In this paper, we show that an image can be recovered from high-frequencies alone, thereby overcoming the beamstop problem in both FTH and CDI. The only requirement is that the object is sparse in a known basis, a common property of most natural and manmade signals. The reconstruction method relies on compressed sensing (CS) techniques, which ensure signal recovery from incomplete measurements. Specifically, in FTH, we perform compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction of captured holograms and show that this method is applicable not only to standard FTH, but also multiple or extended reference FTH. For CDI, we propose a new phase retrieval procedure, which combines Fienup's hybrid input-output (HIO) method and CS. Both numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are shown to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed CS-based reconstructions in dealing with missing data in both FTH and CDI. PMID:26698723

  7. High dynamic range coherent imaging using compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    He, Kuan; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Cossairt, Oliver

    2015-11-30

    In both lensless Fourier transform holography (FTH) and coherent diffraction imaging (CDI), a beamstop is used to block strong intensities which exceed the limited dynamic range of the sensor, causing a loss in low-frequency information, making high quality reconstructions difficult or even impossible. In this paper, we show that an image can be recovered from high-frequencies alone, thereby overcoming the beamstop problem in both FTH and CDI. The only requirement is that the object is sparse in a known basis, a common property of most natural and manmade signals. The reconstruction method relies on compressed sensing (CS) techniques, which ensure signal recovery from incomplete measurements. Specifically, in FTH, we perform compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction of captured holograms and show that this method is applicable not only to standard FTH, but also multiple or extended reference FTH. For CDI, we propose a new phase retrieval procedure, which combines Fienup's hybrid input-output (HIO) method and CS. Both numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are shown to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed CS-based reconstructions in dealing with missing data in both FTH and CDI.

  8. Ultrafast dynamics. Four-dimensional imaging of carrier interface dynamics in p-n junctions.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Ebrahim; Scarborough, Timothy D; Tang, Jau; Zewail, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of charge transfer at interfaces are fundamental to the understanding of many processes, including light conversion to chemical energy. Here, we report imaging of charge carrier excitation, transport, and recombination in a silicon p-n junction, where the interface is well defined on the nanoscale. The recorded images elucidate the spatiotemporal behavior of carrier density after optical excitation. We show that carrier separation in the p-n junction extends far beyond the depletion layer, contrary to the expected results from the widely accepted drift-diffusion model, and that localization of carrier density across the junction takes place for up to tens of nanoseconds, depending on the laser fluence. The observations reveal a ballistic-type motion, and we provide a model that accounts for the spatiotemporal density localization across the junction. PMID:25574020

  9. Live cell imaging of phosphoinositide dynamics during Legionella infection.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stephen; Hilbi, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The "accidental" pathogen Legionella pneumophila replicates intracellularly in a distinct compartment, the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). To form this specific pathogen vacuole, the bacteria translocate via the Icm/Dot type IV secretion system approximately 300 different effector proteins into the host cell. Several of these secreted effectors anchor to the cytoplasmic face of the LCV membrane by binding to phosphoinositide (PI) lipids. L. pneumophila thus largely controls the localization of secreted bacterial effectors and the recruitment of host factors to the LCV through the modulation of the vacuole membrane PI pattern. The LCV PI pattern and its dynamics can be studied in real-time using fluorescently labeled protein probes stably produced by the soil amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. In this chapter, we describe a protocol to (1) construct and handle amoeba model systems as a tool for observing PIs in live cell imaging, (2) capture rapid changes in membrane PI patterning during uptake events, and (3) observe the dynamics of LCV PIs over the course of a Legionella infection.

  10. [Fibromuscular dysplasia of renal arteries].

    PubMed

    Plouin, Pierre-François; Fiquet, Béatrice; Bobrie, Guillaume; Jeunemaître, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia is non-atherosclerotic, non-inflammatory disease of the medium caliber arteries causing segmental stenosis, and sometimes aneurysm and/or dissection. Renal involvement is either asymptomatic or revealed by hypertension, rarely acute complications (renal infarction/hemorrhage). Cross-sectional imaging or angiography differentiates multifocal fibromuscular dysplasia (pearl necklace appearance) and focal fibromuscular dysplasia (tubular stenosis). Several differential diagnoses are to be mentioned. Carotid and vertebral involvement are possible. Smoking cessation must be encouraged. Selected patients benefit from renal revascularization. The best indications are recent or resistant hypertension, and progressive renal atrophy. Angioplasty without stent revascularization is the technique of choice in purely stenotic forms. PMID:26968476

  11. Automated Movement Correction for Dynamic PET/CT Images: Evaluation with Phantom and Patient Data

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hu; Wong, Koon-Pong; Wardak, Mirwais; Dahlbom, Magnus; Kepe, Vladimir; Barrio, Jorge R.; Nelson, Linda D.; Small, Gary W.; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Head movement during a dynamic brain PET/CT imaging results in mismatch between CT and dynamic PET images. It can cause artifacts in CT-based attenuation corrected PET images, thus affecting both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the dynamic PET images and the derived parametric images. In this study, we developed an automated retrospective image-based movement correction (MC) procedure. The MC method first registered the CT image to each dynamic PET frames, then re-reconstructed the PET frames with CT-based attenuation correction, and finally re-aligned all the PET frames to the same position. We evaluated the MC method's performance on the Hoffman phantom and dynamic FDDNP and FDG PET/CT images of patients with neurodegenerative disease or with poor compliance. Dynamic FDDNP PET/CT images (65 min) were obtained from 12 patients and dynamic FDG PET/CT images (60 min) were obtained from 6 patients. Logan analysis with cerebellum as the reference region was used to generate regional distribution volume ratio (DVR) for FDDNP scan before and after MC. For FDG studies, the image derived input function was used to generate parametric image of FDG uptake constant (Ki) before and after MC. Phantom study showed high accuracy of registration between PET and CT and improved PET images after MC. In patient study, head movement was observed in all subjects, especially in late PET frames with an average displacement of 6.92 mm. The z-direction translation (average maximum = 5.32 mm) and x-axis rotation (average maximum = 5.19 degrees) occurred most frequently. Image artifacts were significantly diminished after MC. There were significant differences (P<0.05) in the FDDNP DVR and FDG Ki values in the parietal and temporal regions after MC. In conclusion, MC applied to dynamic brain FDDNP and FDG PET/CT scans could improve the qualitative and quantitative aspects of images of both tracers. PMID:25111700

  12. Maximum-Intensity-Projection Imaging for Dynamic Analysis of Mental Sweating by Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saigusa, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Akihiro; Ohmi, Masato; Ohnishi, Makoto; Kuwabara, Mitsuo; Haruna, Masamitsu

    2008-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) shows great potential for microscopic observation of human sweating dynamics. It should be a key technology in the development of new techniques for the study of dynamic physiology. In this study, the dynamic motion of eccrin sweat glands is visualized by three-dimensional (3-D) OCT imaging, and a novel 3-D image construction method, using maximum intensity projection (MIP) of B-mode OCT images, is proposed for in vivo dynamic analysis of mental sweating on human fingertips. Time-sequential MIP-OCT images with a frame spacing of 1.4 s provide quantitative analysis of the sweating dynamics, which in turn leads to the evaluation of the activity of the sympathetic nerve. Dynamic changes in the microstructure of eccrin sweat glands can be clearly observed in the 3-D images constructed by volume rendering.

  13. IgG4-related tubulointerstitial nephritis associated with only lymphadenopathy and without elevated serum IgG4 or renal imaging abnormalities: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Xi; Wang, Lihua; Wang, Chen; Gao, Lifang; Yao, Shulei; Wu, Liran; Zhang, Xiaoqin

    2015-01-01

    IgG4-related tubulointerstitial nephritis (IgG4-TIN) is the most common renal manifestation of IgG4-related kidney disease (IgG4-RKD) and may cause acute or chronic renal dysfunction. Imaging often shows heterogeneous densities in the kidneys, such as a mass or multiple nodules. Serology usually demonstrates high levels of serum IgG4 and total IgG. Most patients have other organs involvement by IgG4 related disease. Although lymphadenopathy is frequently observed in patients with IgG4-TIN, it is rarely presented as the only extrarenal lesion. Herein, we present a rare case of IgG4-TIN associated with only lymphadenopathy and without elevated serum IgG4 or renal imaging abnormalities. A 61-year-old Chinese man was admitted to our hospital with seven months history of generalized lymphadenopathy and five months history of renal dysfunction. His renal imaging was normal. He had no current or previous clinical, radiographic, and/or histologic evidence of other organ involvement except for the lymphadenopathy. Renal biopsy indicated plasma cell-rich TIN with an increased number of IgG4-positive plasma cells and storiform fibrosis. Repeated lymph nodes biopsy revealed IgG4-related lymphadenopathy. However, he did not have elevated serum IgG4 or total IgG levels. Oral prednisone therapy improved his renal function and lymphadenopathy. These findings supported our final diagnosis of IgG4-TIN. Clinicians should be aware of this condition and steroid therapy should be considered for such patients. An early diagnosis and appropriate therapy can induce remission and preserve renal function. PMID:26770608

  14. Renal manifestations of tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    O'Hagan, A R; Ellsworth, R; Secic, M; Rothner, A D; Brouhard, B H

    1996-10-01

    Patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) are at increased risk of renal disease, predominantly angiomyolipomas and renal cysts. We retrospectively reviewed clinical data of 71 patients diagnosed with TSC. Progression of renal lesions was noted. TSC patients with renal lesions were compared with TSC patients without renal disease. Fifteen of 38 patients had renal abnormalities by imaging at presentation. Six of 9 with initially normal kidneys subsequently developed new lesions. Although not of statistical significance, there was a trend toward increased retinal hamartomas, cardiac rhabdomyomas, and skin lesions in those patients who also had renal abnormalities. Renal disease should be considered and sought in all patients with TSC, both at initial presentation and subsequently, since renal disease is a very significant cause of morbidity and mortality.

  15. Assessment of Renal Function in Patients with Unilateral Ureteral Obstruction Using Whole-Organ Perfusion Imaging with 320-Detector Row Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Juan; Feng, You-Zhen; Xian, Zhao-Hui; Yang, Wen-Cai; Mo, Xu-Kai

    2015-01-01

    Background Obstructed nephropathy is a common complication of several disease processes. Accurate evaluation of the functional status of the obstructed kidney is important to achieve a good outcome. The purpose of this study was to investigate renal cortical and medullary perfusion changes associated with unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) using whole-organ perfusion imaging with 320-detector row computed tomography (CT). Methodology/Principle Findings Sixty-four patients with UUO underwent whole-organ CT perfusion imaging. Patients were divided into 3 groups, mild, moderate, and severe, based on hydronephrosis severity. Twenty sex- and age-matched patients without renal disease, who referred to abdominal CT, were chosen as control subjects. Mean cortical and medullary perfusion parameters of obstructed and contralateral kidneys were compared, and mean perfusion ratios between obstructed and contralateral kidneys were calculated and compared. Mean cortical or medullary blood flow (BF) and blood volume (BV) of the obstructed kidneys in the moderate UUO and BF, BV, and clearance (CL) in the severe UUO were significantly lower than those of the contralateral kidneys (p < 0.05). The mean cortical or medullary BF of the obstructed kidney in the moderate UUO, and BF, BV, and CL in the severe UUO were significantly lower than those of the kidneys in control subjects (p < 0.05). Mean cortical or medullary BF of the non-obstructed kidneys in the severe UUO were statistically greater than that of normal kidneys in control subjects (p < 0.05). An inverse correlation was observed between cortical and medullary perfusion ratios and grades of hydronephosis (p < 0.01). Conclusions/Significance Perfusion measurements of the whole kidney can be obtained with 320-detector row CT, and estimated perfusion ratios have potential for quantitatively evaluating UUO renal injury grades. PMID:25874690

  16. Real-time dynamic PC image generation techniques for high performance and high dynamic range fidelity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunfield, Dennis H.; Trimble, Darian E.; Fronckowiak, Thomas, Jr.; Ballard, Gary; Morris, Joesph

    2008-04-01

    AMRDEC has developed and implemented new techniques for rendering real-time 32-bit floating point energy-conserved dynamic scenes using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) Personal Computer (PC) based hardware and high performance nVidia Graphics Processing Units (GPU). The AMRDEC IGStudio rendering framework with the real-time Joint Scientific Image Generator (JSIG) core has been integrated into numerous AMRDEC Hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) facilities, successfully replacing the lower fidelity legacy SGI hardware and software. JSIG uses high dynamic range unnormalized radiometric 32-bit floating point rendering through the use of GPU frame buffer objects (FBOs). A high performance nested zoom anti-aliasing (NZAA) technique was developed to address performance and geometric errors of past zoom anti-aliasing (ZAA) implementations. The NZAA capability for multi-object and occluded object representations includes: cluster ZAA, object ZAA, sub-object ZAA, and point source generation for unresolved objects. This technique has an optimal 128x128 pixel asymmetrical field-of-view zoom. The current NZAA capability supports up to 8 objects in real-time with a near future capability of increasing to a theoretical 128 objects in real-time. JSIG performs other dynamic entity effects which are applied in vertex and fragment shaders. These effects include floating point dynamic signature application, dynamic model ablation heating models, and per-material thermal emissivity rolloff interpolated on a per-pixel zoomed window basis. JSIG additionally performs full scene per-pixel effects in a post render process. These effects include real-time convolutions, optical scene corrections, per-frame calibrations, and energy distribution blur used to compensate for projector element energy limitations.

  17. Quantitative Imaging of Chemical Composition in Single Cells by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry: Cisplatin Affects Calcium Stores in Renal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Subhash

    2010-01-01

    A detailed protocol for quantitative single cell mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) analysis is described in this chapter with examples of the treatment of cells with anticancer drug, cisplatin. Cisplatin, cis-diamminedichloridoplatinum (ii) (CDDP), is widely used for the treatment of many malignancies, including testicular, ovarian, bladder, cervical, head and neck, and small cell and non-small cell lung cancers. The possibility of renal injury by cisplatin treatment is a major dose-limiting factor in this cancer therapy. At present, the mechanisms of cisplatin-induced renal cytotoxicity are poorly understood. In this work, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used for investigating cisplatin-induced alterations in intracellular chemical composition in a well established model (LLC-PK1 cell line) for studying renal injury. The cells were cryogenically prepared by the sandwich freeze-fracture method for subcellular imaging analysis of chemical composition (total concentrations of K+, Na+ and Ca2+) in individual cells. The single cell analysis of these diffusible ions necessitates the use of reliable cryogenic sample preparations for SIMS. The sandwich freeze-fracture method offers a simple approach for cryogenically preserving diffusible ions and molecules inside the cells for SIMS analysis. A CAMECA IMS 3f SIMS ion microscope instrument capable of producing chemical images of single cells with 500 nm spatial resolution was used in the study. In cisplatin treated cells, SIMS imaging showed the presence of detectable amount of platinum at mass 195, as 195Pt+ secondary ions in individual cells. SIMS observations also revealed that individual cells differed in their response to cisplatin. While the chemical composition of some cells was unaffected by cisplatin, others showed a reduction in cytoplasmic calcium stores that was not associated with changes in their intracellular K or Na concentrations. Another population of cells displayed an increased in cytoplasmic

  18. Serial Radiohippurate Renal Scintiphotography

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthall, Leonard; Greyson, N. David; Martin, Robert H.

    1970-01-01

    The results of serial radiohippurate scintiphotography in 222 patients are analyzed. The findings in various renal diseases are discussed and compared with those obtained from the excretory urogram, BUN, serum creatinine and creatinine clearance. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4aFIG. 4bFIG. 5aFIG. 5b PMID:5536740

  19. Spontaneous renal artery dissection with renal infarction.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Sophie; Leray-Moraguès, Hélène; Chenine, Leila; Canaud, Ludovic; Vernhet-Kovacsik, Hélène; Canaud, Bernard

    2012-06-01

    Spontaneous renal artery dissection (SRAD) is a rare entity, which often presents diagnostic difficulties because of its non-specific clinical presentation. We report six cases complicated with renal infarction, occurring in middle-aged male patients without risk factors, illustrating the difficulty and delay for diagnosing SRAD. Ultrasound and Doppler imaging were not sensitive enough to confirm the diagnosis, and contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography was used to correct the diagnosis and allow the clinicians to propose appropriate treatment. We conclude that considering the urgency in diagnosing and treating SRAD, contrast enhanced abdominal tomography and/or abdominal magnetic resonance imaging should be proposed as soon as a suspicion of SRAD is evoked by the clinical presentation.

  20. Dynamics and particle image velocimetry measurements of miniaturized thermoacoustic refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gendy, Husam El-Deen Mohamad

    This research deals with the design and characterization of the dynamics of miniaturized thermoacoustic refrigerators (in the audible frequency range ˜ 4000 Hz) using a random array of cotton wool as the stack and a commercial piezoelectric loudspeaker as the acoustic driver. Also of primary interest is the optimization of the refrigerator by investigating the factors affecting its performance such as the stack configuration, the acoustic drive ratio, the acoustic pressure and the mean pressure in the refrigerator. Experimental measurements of cooling power, and stray heat leaks were conducted. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) was used to study the acoustic flow field in the refrigerator and to correlate measurements using PIV to the characteristic acoustic measurements. A temperature difference between the refrigerator's cold and hot heat exchangers of 13°C was obtained under optimized experimental conditions. Air at atmospheric pressure was used as the working gas, and an electric power to the acoustic driver of 2 W produced 159 dB of sound, which pumped heat by the stack. Higher sound levels would raise the performance. Results showed that the cotton stack performs well at atmospheric pressure rather than higher mean pressures where nonlinear and viscous losses affect its performance. PIV measurements, such as imaged velocity fields and gas flows, showed an excellent correlation with the acoustic pressure measurements in the refrigerator. Extreme care was taken, by investigating different PIV parameters, to fulfill the conditions that distinguish between the oscillating first-order velocity field, such as the acoustic particle velocity, and the second-order nonoscillating (steady state) fields, such as acoustic streaming. Results also showed that Rayleigh streaming, produced by and superimposed on, the oscillating particle velocity, is one of the effects affecting the performance of the refrigerator, where the time it takes the streaming to be in the

  1. [The focal renal lesions].

    PubMed

    Tuma, Jan

    2013-06-01

    The focal renal lesions are altogether common. Most frequently are found Columna Bertini hypertrophies (so called pseudotumors) and simple renal cysts. The role of sonography in the practice is to distinguish pseudotumors from real renal tumors, and simple renal cysts from complex cysts. The differentiation of complex renal cysts is possible with the help of the CEUS (= contrast enhanced ultrasound) and other imaging modalities such as CT or MRI. In these cases, the CEUS imaging agent has clear advantages over CT and MRI, because it is composed of gas bubbles, which are only slightly smaller than red blood cells and remains exclusively intravascularly while the CT and MRI contrast agents diffuse into the interstitial space without any real perfusion. The real tumors can be differentiated from certain focal non-tumorous changes based on the ultrasound and clinic. The further differentiation of individual kidney tumors and metastases using ultrasound, MRI, CT and CEUS is only partly possible. In all uncertain or unclear cases, therefore, an open or ultrasound-guided biopsy is useful.

  2. Maximum intensity projection imaging for dynamic analysis of mental sweating by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saigusa, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ohmi, Masato; Ohnishi, Makoto; Kuwabara, Mitsuo; Haruna, Masamitsu

    2009-02-01

    A novel 3-D image construction method with maximum intensity projection (MIP) of B-mode OCT images is proposed for in vivo dynamic analysis of mental sweating on human fingertips. Time-sequential MIP-OCT images with the frame spacing as short as 1.4 sec provide us quantitative analysis of the sweating dynamics to evaluate of activity of sympathetic nerve. Dynamic changes in the microstructure of eccrin sweat glands can be clearly observed in the 3-D images constructed by volume rendering.

  3. High-Resolution Dynamic Speech Imaging with Joint Low-Rank and Sparsity Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Maojing; Zhao, Bo; Carignan, Christopher; Shosted, Ryan K.; Perry, Jamie L.; Kuehn, David P.; Liang, Zhi-Pei; Sutton, Bradley P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To enable dynamic speech imaging with high spatiotemporal resolution and full-vocal-tract spatial coverage, leveraging recent advances in sparse sampling. Methods An imaging method is developed to enable high-speed dynamic speech imaging exploiting low-rank and sparsity of the dynamic images of articulatory motion during speech. The proposed method includes: a) a novel data acquisition strategy that collects navigators with high temporal frame rate, and b) an image reconstruction method that derives temporal subspaces from navigators and reconstructs high-resolution images from sparsely sampled data with joint low-rank and sparsity constraints. Results The proposed method has been systematically evaluated and validated through several dynamic speech experiments. A nominal imaging speed of 102 frames per second (fps) was achieved for a single-slice imaging protocol with a spatial resolution of 2.2 × 2.2 × 6.5 mm3. An eight-slice imaging protocol covering the entire vocal tract achieved a nominal imaging speed of 12.8 fps with the identical spatial resolution. The effectiveness of the proposed method and its practical utility was also demonstrated in a phonetic investigation. Conclusion High spatiotemporal resolution with full-vocal-tract spatial coverage can be achieved for dynamic speech imaging experiments with low-rank and sparsity constraints. PMID:24912452

  4. From seismic images to plate dynamics: Towards the full inverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnis, M.; Ratnaswamy, V.; Stadler, G.; Ghattas, O.; Alisic, L.

    2014-12-01

    Three-dimensional seismic images of slabs and other mantle structures provide a first order constraint on the forces driving plate motions. Previous attempts to invert for plate motions from seismic images have blurry slabs that do not act as stress guides. Using forward models, we describe characteristics needed to capture the coupling between mantle structures and plates. In forward models, we capitalized on advances in adaptive mesh refinement and scalable solvers to simulate global mantle flow and plate motions, with plate margins resolved down to 1 km. Cold thermal anomalies within the lower mantle are coupled into oceanic plates through narrow high-viscosity slabs, altering the velocity of oceanic plates. Back-arc extension and slab rollback are emergent consequences of slab descent in the upper mantle. The forward models require the solution of a highly ill-conditioned non-linear Stokes equation. Based on a realistic rheological model with yielding and strain rate weakening from dislocation creep, we formulate inverse problems casted as PDE-constrained optimization problems and derive adjoints of the nonlinear Stokes and incompressibility equations. An inexact-Gauss Newton method is used to infer the rheological parameters while quantifying the uncertainty using the Hessian at the maximum a posteriori (MAP) point. Through 2-D numerical experiments we demonstrate that when the temperature field is known from seismic images, we can recover all of these properties to varying levels of certainty: strength of plate boundaries, yield stress and strain rate exponent in the upper mantle. When the system becomes more unconstrained (when all three mechanical properties are unknown), there can be tradeoffs depending on how well the data approximates the realistic dynamics. As plate boundaries become weaker beyond a limiting value, the uncertainty of the inferred parameters increases due to insensitivity of plate motion to plate coupling. Using the inverse of the

  5. A large renal pelvic diverticulum, presenting incomplete excretion during tc-99m MAG-3 scintigraphy and tracer accumulation on tc-99m DMSA scintigraphy; a case report.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Bulent; Erselcan, Taner; Ozdemir, Semra; Hasbek, Zekiye; Tosun, H Bayram; Topaktas, Seher

    2004-12-01

    This case report illustrates the dynamic and static renal scintigraphic images of a patient with an unusual large diverticulum of the renal pelvis. The initial diagnosis by intravenous pyelography (IVP) and ultrasonographic (US) examination was a renal pelvic diverticulum of the left kidney, and the patient was referred to the nuclear medicine department for exploration of the effect of the pelvic diverticulum on renal functions. We performed dynamic renal scintigraphy with technetium-99m (Tc-99m) labeled mercaptoacetyl triglycine (MAG-3) and static renal scintigraphy with Tc-99m labeled dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). In dynamic renal scintigraphy, bilaterally normal concentration function was observed. While right kidney excretion function was normal, an incomplete excretion pattern was seen on the left side. Complete urinary flow obstruction occurred approximately at the 10th minute of the acquisition, which did not seem to respond to the i.v. furosemide application. However, when only the renal cortex was included in the region of interest, the obstructive pattern disappeared. In static renal scintigraphy, a large renal pelvic diverticulum localized antero-medially was clearly visualized in the left-anterior oblique projection, most probably due to accumulation of radiopharmaceutical inside it. This case showed that a renal pelvic diverticulum should be thought of when an incomplete excretion pattern is seen on dynamic renal scintigraphy. Using only a cortical region of interest may also help to distinguish other types of obstructive pattern from diverticulum. Additionally, Tc-99m DMSA scintigraphy may show diverticulum localization with antero-oblique projections in addition to routine projections.

  6. Reversible watermarking based on invariant image classification and dynamical error histogram shifting.

    PubMed

    Pan, W; Coatrieux, G; Cuppens, N; Cuppens, F; Roux, Ch

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we present a novel reversible watermarking scheme. Its originality stands in identifying parts of the image that can be watermarked additively with the most adapted lossless modulation between: Pixel Histogram Shifting (PHS) or Dynamical Error Histogram Shifting (DEHS). This classification process makes use of a reference image derived from the image itself, a prediction of it, which has the property to be invariant to the watermark addition. In that way, watermark embedded and reader remain synchronized through this image of reference. DEHS is also an original contribution of this work. It shifts predict-errors between the image and its reference image taking care of the local specificities of the image, thus dynamically. Conducted experiments, on different medical image test sets issued from different modalities and some natural images, show that our method can insert more data with lower distortion than the most recent and efficient methods of the literature.

  7. Distal airways in humans: dynamic hyperpolarized 3He MR imaging--feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tooker, Angela C.; Hong, Kwan Soo; McKinstry, Erin L.; Costello, Philip; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic hyperpolarized helium 3 (3He) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the human airways is achieved by using a fast gradient-echo pulse sequence during inhalation. The resulting dynamic images show differential contrast enhancement of both distal airways and the lung periphery, unlike static hyperpolarized 3He MR images on which only the lung periphery is seen. With this technique, up to seventh-generation airway branching can be visualized. Copyright RSNA, 2003.

  8. The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Title, A. M.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Schrijver, C. J.; Aia Team

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly AIA on SDO will provide revolutionary coverage of the entire visible solar hemisphere observed from photospheric to coronal temperatures at 1-arcsecond resolution with a characteristic cadence of 10 seconds for each channel The AIA comprises four dual normal-incidence telescopes that enable it to cycle through a set of EUV channels centered on strong emission lines of iron ranging from Fe IX through XXIII and helium 304A plus two UV channels near 1600A and a broad band visible channel Combined with the vector- magnetic imagery from SDO HMI the AIA observations will significantly further our understanding of the dynamics of the magnetic field in the solar atmosphere and heliosphere both in quiescent and eruptive stages The comprehensive thermal coverage of the corona will open new avenues of study for coronal energetics and seismology which will benefit from the excellent calibration against the SDO EVE spectral irradiance measurements The AIA data will be easily accessible on the web with a time delay that is expected to be of the order of 15 minutes to 1 hour Users will be able to browse the data through summary web pages that are complemented by a comprehensive metadata catalog Data analysis will be supported through the freely available SolarSoft libraries and through modules in a flexible evolving pipeline data-analysis system to be operated at the AIA-HMI Joint Science Operations Center We plan to incorporate feature recognition software automated movie making coronal field modeling

  9. Photodissociation dynamics of OCS near 214 nm using ion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Wallace, Colin J.; McBane, George C.; North, Simon W.

    2016-07-01

    The OCS photodissociation dynamics of the dominant S(1D2) channel near 214 nm have been studied using velocity map ion imaging. We report a CO vibrational branching ratio of 0.79:0.21 for v = 0:v = 1, indicating substantially higher vibrational excitation than that observed at slightly longer wavelengths. The CO rotational distribution is bimodal for both v = 0 and v = 1, although the bimodality is less pronounced than at longer wavelengths. Vector correlations, including rotational alignment, indicate that absorption to both the 21A' (A) and 11A″ (B) states is important in the lower-j part of the rotational distribution, while only 21A' state absorption contributes to the upper part; this conclusion is consistent with work at longer wavelengths. Classical trajectory calculations including surface hopping reproduce the measured CO rotational distributions and their dependence on wavelength well, though they underestimate the v = 1 population. The calculations indicate that the higher-j peak in the rotational distribution arises from molecules that begin on the 21A' state but make nonadiabatic transitions to the 11A' (X) state during the dissociation, while the lower-j peak arises from direct photodissociation on either the 21A' or the 11A″ states, as found in previous work.

  10. Photodissociation dynamics of OCS near 214 nm using ion imaging.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Wallace, Colin J; McBane, George C; North, Simon W

    2016-07-14

    The OCS photodissociation dynamics of the dominant S((1)D2) channel near 214 nm have been studied using velocity map ion imaging. We report a CO vibrational branching ratio of 0.79:0.21 for v = 0:v = 1, indicating substantially higher vibrational excitation than that observed at slightly longer wavelengths. The CO rotational distribution is bimodal for both v = 0 and v = 1, although the bimodality is less pronounced than at longer wavelengths. Vector correlations, including rotational alignment, indicate that absorption to both the 2(1)A' (A) and 1(1)A″ (B) states is important in the lower-j part of the rotational distribution, while only 2(1)A' state absorption contributes to the upper part; this conclusion is consistent with work at longer wavelengths. Classical trajectory calculations including surface hopping reproduce the measured CO rotational distributions and their dependence on wavelength well, though they underestimate the v = 1 population. The calculations indicate that the higher-j peak in the rotational distribution arises from molecules that begin on the 2(1)A' state but make nonadiabatic transitions to the 1(1)A' (X) state during the dissociation, while the lower-j peak arises from direct photodissociation on either the 2(1)A' or the 1(1)A″ states, as found in previous work. PMID:27421408

  11. IMAGING THE BRAIN AS SCHIZOPHRENIA DEVELOPS: DYNAMIC & GENETIC BRAIN MAPS.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Paul; Rapoport, Judith L; Cannon, Tyrone D; Toga, Arthur W

    2002-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic, debilitating psychiatric disorder that affects 0.2-2% of the population worldwide. Often striking without warning in the late teens or early twenties, its symptoms include auditory and visual hallucinations, psychotic outbreaks, bizarre or disordered thinking, depression and social withdrawal. To combat the disease, new antipsychotic drugs are emerging; these atypical neuroleptics target dopamine and serotonin pathways in the brain, offering increased therapeutic efficacy with fewer side effects. Despite their moderate success in controlling some patients' symptoms, little is known about the causes of schizophrenia, and what triggers the disease. Its peculiar age of onset raises key questions: What physical changes occur in the brain as a patient develops schizophrenia? Do these deficits spread in the brain, and can they be opposed? How do they relate to psychotic symptoms? As risk for the disease is genetically transmitted, do a patient's relatives exhibit similar brain changes? Recent advances in brain imaging and genetics provide exciting insight on these questions. Neuroimaging can now chart the emergence and progression of deficits in the brain, providing an exceptionally sharp scalpel to dissect the effects of genetic risk, environmental triggers, and susceptibility genes. Visualizing the dynamics of the disease, these techniques also offer new strategies to evaluate drugs that combat the unrelenting symptoms of schizophrenia.

  12. Build 4-dimensional myocardial model for dynamic CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yixun; Liu, Songtao; Lardo, Albert C.; Schuleri, Karl; Nacif, Marcelo S.; Bluemke, David A.; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua

    2013-03-01

    4D (3D + time) model is valuable in comprehensive assessment of cardiac functions. Usually, the generation of the 4D myocardial models involves myocardium segmentation, mesh generation and non-rigid registration (to build mesh node correspondence). In this paper, we present a method to simultaneously perform the above tasks. This method begins from a triangular surface model of the myocardium at the first phase of a cardiac cycle. Then, the myocardial surface is simulated as a linear elastic membrane, and evolves toward the next phase governed by an energy function while maintaining the mesh quality. Our preliminary experiments performed on dynamic CT images of the dog demonstrated the effectiveness of this method on both segmentation and mesh generation. The minimum average surface distance between the segmentation results of the proposed method and the ground truth can reach 0.72 +/- 0.55 mm, and the mesh quality measured by the aspect ratio of the triangle was less than 11.57 +/- 1.18.

  13. Use of computational fluid dynamics in the design of dynamic contrast enhanced imaging phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariharan, Prasanna; Freed, Melanie; Myers, Matthew R.

    2013-09-01

    Phantoms for dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging modalities such as DCE computed tomography (DCE-CT) and DCE magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) are valuable tools for evaluating and comparing imaging systems. It is important for the contrast-agent distribution within the phantom to possess a time dependence that replicates a curve observed clinically, known as the ‘tumor-enhancement curve’. It is also important for the concentration field within the lesion to be as uniform as possible. This study demonstrates how computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be applied to achieve these goals within design constraints. The distribution of the contrast agent within the simulated phantoms was investigated in relation to the influence of three factors of the phantom design. First, the interaction between the inlets and the uniformity of the contrast agent within the phantom was modeled. Second, pumps were programmed using a variety of schemes and the resultant dynamic uptake curves were compared to tumor-enhancement curves obtained from clinical data. Third, the effectiveness of pulsing the inlet flow rate to produce faster equilibration of the contrast-agent distribution was quantified. The models employed a spherical lesion and design constraints (lesion diameter, inlet-tube size and orientation, contrast-agent flow rates and fluid properties) taken from a recently published DCE-MRI phantom study. For DCE-MRI in breast cancer detection, where the target tumor-enhancement curve varies on the scale of hundreds of seconds, optimizing the number of inlet tubes and their orientation was found to be adequate for attaining concentration uniformity and reproducing the target tumor-enhancement curve. For DCE-CT in liver tumor detection, where the tumor-enhancement curve varies on a scale of tens of seconds, the use of an iterated inlet condition (programmed into the pump) enabled the phantom to reproduce the target tumor-enhancement curve within a few per cent beyond about

  14. Interventional Management of Vascular Renal Transplant Complications.

    PubMed

    Kolli, Kanti Pallav; LaBerge, Jeanne M

    2016-09-01

    Renal transplantation is the therapy of choice in patients with end stage renal disease. Although transplant rejection remains the most common complication after renal transplantation, vascular anatomical complications occur in 1%-23% of renal transplant recipients. Interventional radiologists play an important role in the management of these complications. This review discusses the role of image-guided interventions within the context of multidisciplinary patient management. Particular emphasis is given to anatomical considerations unique to this patient population, techniques used for image-guided interventions, and outcomes of image-guided interventions. PMID:27641457

  15. Detectability of perfusion defect in five-dimensional gated-dynamic cardiac SPECT images

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Yang, Yongyi; King, Michael A.; Wernick, Miles N.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In previous work, the authors developed and demonstrated the concept of an image reconstruction procedure aimed to unify gated and dynamic nuclear cardiac imaging, which the authors have termed five-dimensional (5D) SPECT. Gated imaging permits the clinician to evaluate wall motion and, through the use of stress and rest scans, allows perfusion defects to be observed. Dynamic imaging depicts kinetics in the myocardium, which can be used to evaluate perfusion, but traditional dynamic images are motionless and do not depict wall motion. In this article, the authors investigate the degree to which perfusion defects can be detected from the dynamic information conveyed by 5D images, a problem that is particularly challenging in the absence of multiple fast camera rotations. Methods: The authors first demonstrate the usefulness of dynamic reconstructed images for perfusion detection by using linear discriminant analyses (Fisher linear discriminant analysis and principal component analysis) and a numerical channelized Hotelling observer. The authors then derive three types of discriminant metrics for characterizing the temporal kinetic information in reconstructed dynamic images for differentiating perfusion defects from normal cardiac perfusion, which are the Fisher linear discriminant map, temporal derivative map, and kinetic parametric images. Results: Results are based on the NURBS-based cardiac-torso phantom with simulation of Tc99m-teboroxime as the imaging agent. The derived metric maps and quantitative contrast-to-noise ratio results demonstrate that the reconstructed dynamic images could yield higher detectability of the perfusion defect than conventional gated reconstruction while providing wall motion information simultaneously. Conclusions: The proposed metrics can be used to produce new types of visualizations, showing wall motion and perfusion information, that may potentially be useful for clinical evaluation. Since 5D imaging permits wall motion

  16. Snap-shot multispectral imaging of vascular dynamics in a mouse window-chamber model.

    PubMed

    Hendargo, Hansford C; Zhao, Yulin; Allenby, Taylor; Palmer, Gregory M

    2015-07-15

    Understanding tumor vascular dynamics through parameters such as blood flow and oxygenation can yield insight into tumor biology and therapeutic response. Hyperspectral microscopy enables optical detection of hemoglobin saturation or blood velocity by either acquiring multiple images that are spectrally distinct or by rapid acquisition at a single wavelength over time. However, the serial acquisition of spectral images over time prevents the ability to monitor rapid changes in vascular dynamics and cannot monitor concurrent changes in oxygenation and flow rate. Here, we introduce snap shot-multispectral imaging (SS-MSI) for use in imaging the microvasculature in mouse dorsal-window chambers. By spatially multiplexing spectral information into a single-image capture, simultaneous acquisition of dynamic hemoglobin saturation and blood flow over time is achieved down to the capillary level and provides an improved optical tool for monitoring rapid in vivo vascular dynamics. PMID:26176452

  17. [Management of renal stones].

    PubMed

    Lechevallier, E; Traxer, O; Saussine, C

    2008-12-01

    The management of renal stones needs a recent and good quality imaging. Contrast medium injection is optional. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is the most common treatment of renal stones. ESWL is indicated as first line treatment for less than 1.5cm stones. The stone-free (SF) rate at 3 months of ESWL is 70-80%. Results of ESWL for stones with more than 1000UH density or located in the lower calyx are poor. Flexible ureteroscopy (URS) is indicated in case of ESWL failure or for hyperdense, 1-2cm stones. The SF rate of flexible is 80%. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is indicated for complex or more than 2cm stones. Asymptomatic and non infected stones, especially if located in the lower calyx, do not need urological treatment but must be followed up. In all cases, renal stones needs a metabolic evaluation and treatment, and annual follow-up.

  18. Video Imaging System Particularly Suited for Dynamic Gear Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broughton, Howard (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A digital video imaging system that captures the image of a single tooth of interest of a rotating gear is disclosed. The video imaging system detects the complete rotation of the gear and divide that rotation into discrete time intervals so that each tooth of interest of the gear is precisely determined when it is at a desired location that is illuminated in unison with a digital video camera so as to record a single digital image for each tooth. The digital images are available to provide instantaneous analysis of the tooth of interest, or to be stored and later provide images that yield a history that may be used to predict gear failure, such as gear fatigue. The imaging system is completely automated by a controlling program so that it may run for several days acquiring images without supervision from the user.

  19. Laplace field microscopy for label-free imaging of dynamic biological structures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taewoo; Popescu, Gabriel

    2011-12-01

    We present Laplace field microscopy as a method for generating intrinsic contrast of transparent specimens. This technique uses a spatial light modulator to perform the Laplacian of the field in the Fourier plane of a microscope image. The resulting image incorporates phase information and thus renders high contrast images from phase objects. We demonstrate the potential of the method by imaging index-matched beads, unlabeled tissue slices, and dynamic live cells.

  20. A case report of retroaortic left renal vein with tumor thrombus of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Hideo; Kuroda, Kenji; Kosaka, Takeo; Ito, Keiichi; Hayakawa, Masamichi; Asano, Tomohiko

    2011-06-01

    A 75-year-old woman was referred to our department for evaluation of a left renal tumor. Computed tomography and other imaging studies demonstrated a left renal mass and tumor extension into the left renal vein passing caudally behind the aorta. We clinically diagnosed the tumor as renal cell carcinoma (RCC) associated with a retroaortic left renal vein thrombus, and performed a radical nephrectomy. Pathological examination of the surgical specimen showed a grade 2, clear cell carcinoma with a renal vein thrombus and negative surgical margin. Retroaortic left renal vein is a rare anomaly with a prevalence of 1.8-2.4%. RCC associated with a retroaortic left renal vein thrombus is rarer still. To our knowledge, this is only the third case report to describe an RCC associated with a tumor thrombus in the retroaortic left renal vein.

  1. The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Title, Alan M.; AIA Team

    2006-06-01

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on SDO will provide revolutionary coverage of the entire visible solar hemisphere, observed from photospheric to coronal temperatures, at 1-arcsecond resolution, with a characteristic cadence of 10 seconds for each channel. The AIA comprises four dual normal-incidence telescopes that enable it to cycle through a set of EUV channels centered on strong emission lines of iron (ranging from Fe IX through XXIII) and helium (304A), plus two UV channels near 1600A and a broad band visible channel. Combined with the (vector-)magnetic imagery from SDO/HMI, the AIA observations will significantly further our understanding of the dynamics of the magnetic field in the solar atmosphere and heliosphere, both in quiescent and eruptive stages. The comprehensive thermal coverage of the corona will open new avenues of study for coronal energetics and seismology, which will benefit from the excellent calibration against the SDO/EVE spectral irradiance measurements. The AIA data will be easily accessible on the web, with a time delay that is expected to be of the order of 15 minutes to 1 hour. Users will be able to browse the data through summary web pages that are complemented by a comprehensive metadata catalog. Data analysis will be supported through the freely available SolarSoft libraries and through modules in a flexible, evolving pipeline data analysis system to be operated at the AIA-HMI Joint Science Operations Center. We plan to incorporate feature recognition software, automated movie making, coronal field modeling, and other supporting analysis software. We invite the broad ILWS community to contact us with ideas to collaborate on any aspect of the AIA Investigation. Details on the AIA instrument, the Science Investigation, and related news can be found at http://aia.lmsal.com.

  2. ATMOSPHERIC DYNAMICS OF BROWN DWARFS AND DIRECTLY IMAGED GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Showman, Adam P.; Kaspi, Yohai

    2013-10-20

    A variety of observations provide evidence for vigorous motion in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and directly imaged giant planets. Motivated by these observations, we examine the dynamical regime of the circulation in the atmospheres and interiors of these objects. Brown dwarfs rotate rapidly, and for plausible wind speeds, the flow at large scales will be rotationally dominated. We present three-dimensional, global, numerical simulations of convection in the interior, which demonstrate that at large scales, the convection aligns in the direction parallel to the rotation axis. Convection occurs more efficiently at high latitudes than low latitudes, leading to systematic equator-to-pole temperature differences that may reach ∼1 K near the top of the convection zone. The interaction of convection with the overlying, stably stratified atmosphere will generate a wealth of atmospheric waves, and we argue that, as in the stratospheres of planets in the solar system, the interaction of these waves with the mean flow will cause a significant atmospheric circulation at regional to global scales. At large scales, this should consist of stratified turbulence (possibly organizing into coherent structures such as vortices and jets) and an accompanying overturning circulation. We present an approximate analytic theory of this circulation, which predicts characteristic horizontal temperature variations of several to ∼50 K, horizontal wind speeds of ∼10-300 m s{sup –1}, and vertical velocities that advect air over a scale height in ∼10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} s. This vertical mixing may help to explain the chemical disequilibrium observed on some brown dwarfs. Moreover, the implied large-scale organization of temperature perturbations and vertical velocities suggests that near the L/T transition, patchy clouds can form near the photosphere, helping to explain recent observations of brown-dwarf variability in the near-IR.

  3. Quantitative analysis of rib movement based on dynamic chest bone images: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, R.; Sanada, S.; Oda, M.; Mitsutaka, M.; Suzuki, K.; Sakuta, K.; Kawashima, H.

    2014-03-01

    Rib movement during respiration is one of the diagnostic criteria in pulmonary impairments. In general, the rib movement is assessed in fluoroscopy. However, the shadows of lung vessels and bronchi overlapping ribs prevent accurate quantitative analysis of rib movement. Recently, an image-processing technique for separating bones from soft tissue in static chest radiographs, called "bone suppression technique", has been developed. Our purpose in this study was to evaluate the usefulness of dynamic bone images created by the bone suppression technique in quantitative analysis of rib movement. Dynamic chest radiographs of 10 patients were obtained using a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD). Bone suppression technique based on a massive-training artificial neural network (MTANN) was applied to the dynamic chest images to create bone images. Velocity vectors were measured in local areas on the dynamic bone images, which formed a map. The velocity maps obtained with bone and original images for scoliosis and normal cases were compared to assess the advantages of bone images. With dynamic bone images, we were able to quantify and distinguish movements of ribs from those of other lung structures accurately. Limited rib movements of scoliosis patients appeared as reduced rib velocity vectors. Vector maps in all normal cases exhibited left-right symmetric distributions, whereas those in abnormal cases showed nonuniform distributions. In conclusion, dynamic bone images were useful for accurate quantitative analysis of rib movements: Limited rib movements were indicated as a reduction of rib movement and left-right asymmetric distribution on vector maps. Thus, dynamic bone images can be a new diagnostic tool for quantitative analysis of rib movements without additional radiation dose.

  4. Seeing is believing: on the use of image databases for visually exploring plant organelle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mano, Shoji; Miwa, Tomoki; Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi; Mimura, Tetsuro; Nishimura, Mikio

    2009-12-01

    Organelle dynamics vary dramatically depending on cell type, developmental stage and environmental stimuli, so that various parameters, such as size, number and behavior, are required for the description of the dynamics of each organelle. Imaging techniques are superior to other techniques for describing organelle dynamics because these parameters are visually exhibited. Therefore, as the results can be seen immediately, investigators can more easily grasp organelle dynamics. At present, imaging techniques are emerging as fundamental tools in plant organelle research, and the development of new methodologies to visualize organelles and the improvement of analytical tools and equipment have allowed the large-scale generation of image and movie data. Accordingly, image databases that accumulate information on organelle dynamics are an increasingly indispensable part of modern plant organelle research. In addition, image databases are potentially rich data sources for computational analyses, as image and movie data reposited in the databases contain valuable and significant information, such as size, number, length and velocity. Computational analytical tools support image-based data mining, such as segmentation, quantification and statistical analyses, to extract biologically meaningful information from each database and combine them to construct models. In this review, we outline the image databases that are dedicated to plant organelle research and present their potential as resources for image-based computational analyses.

  5. Bayer patterned high dynamic range image reconstruction using adaptive weighting function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hee; Lee, Suk Ho; Song, Ki Sun; Kang, Moon Gi

    2014-12-01

    It is not easy to acquire a desired high dynamic range (HDR) image directly from a camera due to the limited dynamic range of most image sensors. Therefore, generally, a post-process called HDR image reconstruction is used, which reconstructs an HDR image from a set of differently exposed images to overcome the limited dynamic range. However, conventional HDR image reconstruction methods suffer from noise factors and ghost artifacts. This is due to the fact that the input images taken with a short exposure time contain much noise in the dark regions, which contributes to increased noise in the corresponding dark regions of the reconstructed HDR image. Furthermore, since input images are acquired at different times, the images contain different motion information, which results in ghost artifacts. In this paper, we propose an HDR image reconstruction method which reduces the impact of the noise factors and prevents ghost artifacts. To reduce the influence of the noise factors, the weighting function, which determines the contribution of a certain input image to the reconstructed HDR image, is designed to adapt to the exposure time and local motions. Furthermore, the weighting function is designed to exclude ghosting regions by considering the differences of the luminance and the chrominance values between several input images. Unlike conventional methods, which generally work on a color image processed by the image processing module (IPM), the proposed method works directly on the Bayer raw image. This allows for a linear camera response function and also improves the efficiency in hardware implementation. Experimental results show that the proposed method can reconstruct high-quality Bayer patterned HDR images while being robust against ghost artifacts and noise factors.

  6. Dynamic imaging with high resolution time-of-flight pet camera - TOFPET I

    SciTech Connect

    Mullani, N.A.; Bristow, D.; Gaeta, J.; Gould, K.L.; Hartz, R.K.; Philipe, E.A.; Wong, W.H.; Yerian, K.

    1984-02-01

    One of the major design goals of the TOFPET I positron camera was to produce a high resolution whole body positron camera capable of dynamically imaging an organ such as the heart. TOFPET I is now nearing completion and preliminary images have been obtained to assess its dynamic and three dimensional imaging capabilities. Multiple gated images of the uptake of Rubidium in the dog heart and three dimensional surface displays of the distribution of the Rubidium-82 in the myocardium have been generated to demonstrate the three dimensional imaging properties. Fast dynamic images of the first pass of a bolus of radio-tracer through the heart have been collected with 4 second integration time and 50% gating (2 second equivalent integration time) with 18 mCi of Rb-82.

  7. Percutaneous RF Thermal Ablation of Renal Tumors: Is US Guidance Really Less Favorable Than Other Imaging Guidance Techniques?

    SciTech Connect

    Veltri, Andrea Garetto, Irene; Pagano, Eva; Tosetti, Irene; Sacchetto, Paola Fava, Cesare

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare our experience with ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA) of renal tumors with results of CT-guided and MRI-guided series in the current literature. Of 90 consecutive renal tumors treated with RFA in 71 patients, 87 lesions were ablated under US guidance. We performed a retrospective analysis of clinical outcome and safety. Results were then compared to published case series where CT and MRI guidances were used exclusively. In our series we had a major complication rate of 4.6%, whereas in CT- and MRI-based series it was 0-12% (mean, 2.2%) and 0-8.3% (mean, 4.1%), respectively. During follow-up (1-68 months; mean, 24 months) technical effectiveness was 89.7%, while it was between 89.5% and 96% in CT-guided series and between 91.7% and 100% in MRI-guided series. The size of successfully treated lesions (28 mm) was lower than that of partially-ablated lesions (36 mm; p = 0.004) and only central lesion location proved to be a negative prognostic factor (p = 0.009); in CT-guided series, positive prognostic factors were exophytic growth and size {<=}3 cm. 'Tumor-specific' 2-year survival was 92% in our series, 90-96% in CT-guided series, and not reported in MRI-guided series. In conclusion, despite common beliefs, US guidance in RFA of renal tumors is not less favorable than other guidance techniques. Thus the interventional radiologist can choose his or her preferred technique taking into account personal experience and available equipment.

  8. Visualizing renal primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Deane, James A; Verghese, Elizabeth; Martelotto, Luciano G; Cain, Jason E; Galtseva, Alya; Rosenblum, Norman D; Watkins, D Neil; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2013-03-01

    Renal primary cilia are microscopic sensory organelles found on the apical surface of epithelial cells of the nephron and collecting duct. They are based upon a microtubular cytoskeleton, bounded by a specialized membrane, and contain an array of proteins that facilitate their assembly, maintenance and function. Cilium-based signalling is important for the control of epithelial differentiation and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various cystic kidney diseases and in renal repair. As such, visualizing renal primary cilia and understanding their composition has become an essential component of many studies of inherited kidney disease and mechanisms of epithelial regeneration. Primary cilia were initially identified in the kidney using electron microscopy and this remains a useful technique for the high resolution examination of these organelles. New reagents and techniques now also allow the structure and composition of primary cilia to be analysed in detail using fluorescence microscopy. Primary cilia can be imaged in situ in sections of kidney, and many renal-derived cell lines produce primary cilia in culture providing a simplified and accessible system in which to investigate these organelles. Here we outline microscopy-based techniques commonly used for studying renal primary cilia.

  9. Nonrigid registration and classification of the kidneys in 3D dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Ghafourian, Pegah; Sharma, Puneet; Salman, Khalil; Martin, Diego; Fei, Baowei

    2012-02-01

    We have applied image analysis methods in the assessment of human kidney perfusion based on 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI data. This approach consists of 3D non-rigid image registration of the kidneys and fuzzy C-mean classification of kidney tissues. The proposed registration method reduced motion artifacts in the dynamic images and improved the analysis of kidney compartments (cortex, medulla, and cavities). The dynamic intensity curves show the successive transition of the contrast agent through kidney compartments. The proposed method for motion correction and kidney compartment classification may be used to improve the validity and usefulness of further model-based pharmacokinetic analysis of kidney function.

  10. Renal applications of dual-energy CT.

    PubMed

    Kaza, Ravi K; Platt, Joel F

    2016-06-01

    Dual-energy CT is being increasingly used for abdominal imaging due to its incremental benefit of material characterization without significant increase in radiation dose. Knowledge of the different dual-energy CT acquisition techniques and image processing algorithms is essential to optimize imaging protocols and understand potential limitations while using dual-energy CT renal imaging such as urinary calculi characterization, assessment of renal masses and in CT urography. This review article provides an overview of the current dual-energy CT techniques and use of dual-energy CT in renal imaging.

  11. Acute torsion of a retroperitoneal renal transplant mimicking renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Winter, Thomas C; Clarke, Andrea Lynn; Campsen, Jeffrey

    2013-09-01

    When imaging a renal transplant, the combination of absent flow in the main renal vein and reversed diastolic flow in the intrarenal arteries is considered highly suggestive of renal vein thrombosis. We present a case of torsion of a transplant kidney presenting with identical findings. Renal transplant torsion in general is a rare entity, previously described only in intraperitoneally placed organs; this case is the first that we are aware of with torsion occurring in a retroperitoneally placed graft.

  12. Exploring the elusive link between subclinical fibrosis and clinical events in end-stage renal disease: does cardiac magnetic resonance imaging hold the key?

    PubMed

    Shroff, Gautam R; Raggi, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    Extensive myocardial fibrosis is known to occur in patients undergoing dialysis due to a variety of mechanisms not necessarily restricted to coronary artery disease. Fibrosis may predispose to reentry arrhythmias and long-term myocardial dysfunction, and sudden death and congestive heart failure are the most frequent causes of death in patients undergoing renal replacement therapy. Despite the high accuracy of magnetic resonance for imaging of myocardial fibrosis, its use has been restricted by the risk of inducing nephrogenic systemic sclerosis with the injection of gadolinium. The development of new sequences that allow the detection and quantifying of the severity of extracellular myocardial fibrosis offers a chance to study the pathogenesis of this condition and identify potential interventions to retard or reverse it. Whether these will lead to an improved outcome needs to be prospectively tested. PMID:27633865

  13. Exploring the elusive link between subclinical fibrosis and clinical events in end-stage renal disease: does cardiac magnetic resonance imaging hold the key?

    PubMed

    Shroff, Gautam R; Raggi, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    Extensive myocardial fibrosis is known to occur in patients undergoing dialysis due to a variety of mechanisms not necessarily restricted to coronary artery disease. Fibrosis may predispose to reentry arrhythmias and long-term myocardial dysfunction, and sudden death and congestive heart failure are the most frequent causes of death in patients undergoing renal replacement therapy. Despite the high accuracy of magnetic resonance for imaging of myocardial fibrosis, its use has been restricted by the risk of inducing nephrogenic systemic sclerosis with the injection of gadolinium. The development of new sequences that allow the detection and quantifying of the severity of extracellular myocardial fibrosis offers a chance to study the pathogenesis of this condition and identify potential interventions to retard or reverse it. Whether these will lead to an improved outcome needs to be prospectively tested.

  14. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Soon Hyo; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) remains a major cause of secondary hypertension and renal failure. Randomized, prospective trials show that medical treatment should constitute the main therapeutic approach in ARAS. Regardless of intensive treatment and adequate blood pressure control, however, renal and extra-renal complications are not uncommon. Yet, the precise mechanisms, accurate detection, and optimal treatment in ARAS remain elusive. Strategies oriented to early detection and targeting these pathogenic pathways might prevent development of clinical endpoints. Here, we review the results of recent clinical trials, current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms, novel imaging techniques to assess renal damage in ARAS, and treatment options. PMID:25908472

  15. Unusual renal tumour: multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Palmeiro, Marta Morna; Niza, João Luz; Loureiro, Ana Luisa; Conceição e Silva, João Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma (MCRCC) is a rare presentation of renal cell carcinoma. Most patients are asymptomatic and frequently MCRCCs are detected incidentally. MCRCCs have good prognosis because of their low malignant potential. We report a case of a 39-year-old woman who presented with mild right flank pain and normal laboratory data. On imaging examinations, a Bosniak III cystic lesion was detected in the lower third of the right kidney. She underwent right partial nephrectomy and histopathology showed a multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma Fuhrman grade 1. In this article, we also present a review of the literature on MCRCC, highlight the correlation of the pathological and imaging characteristics of these low aggressive renal lesions, and underscore the importance of their recognition to prevent unnecessary radical surgery. PMID:26957035

  16. Acquisition and Analysis of Dynamic Responses of a Historic Pedestrian Bridge using Video Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Byrne, Michael; Ghosh, Bidisha; Schoefs, Franck; O'Donnell, Deirdre; Wright, Robert; Pakrashi, Vikram

    2015-07-01

    Video based tracking is capable of analysing bridge vibrations that are characterised by large amplitudes and low frequencies. This paper presents the use of video images and associated image processing techniques to obtain the dynamic response of a pedestrian suspension bridge in Cork, Ireland. This historic structure is one of the four suspension bridges in Ireland and is notable for its dynamic nature. A video camera is mounted on the river-bank and the dynamic responses of the bridge have been measured from the video images. The dynamic response is assessed without the need of a reflector on the bridge and in the presence of various forms of luminous complexities in the video image scenes. Vertical deformations of the bridge were measured in this regard. The video image tracking for the measurement of dynamic responses of the bridge were based on correlating patches in time-lagged scenes in video images and utilisinga zero mean normalisedcross correlation (ZNCC) metric. The bridge was excited by designed pedestrian movement and by individual cyclists traversing the bridge. The time series data of dynamic displacement responses of the bridge were analysedto obtain the frequency domain response. Frequencies obtained from video analysis were checked against accelerometer data from the bridge obtained while carrying out the same set of experiments used for video image based recognition.

  17. Acquisition and Analysis of Dynamic Responses of a Historic Pedestrian Bridge using Video Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Byrne, Michael; Ghosh, Bidisha; Schoefs, Franck; O'Donnell, Deirdre; Wright, Robert; Pakrashi, Vikram

    2015-07-01

    Video based tracking is capable of analysing bridge vibrations that are characterised by large amplitudes and low frequencies. This paper presents the use of video images and associated image processing techniques to obtain the dynamic response of a pedestrian suspension bridge in Cork, Ireland. This historic structure is one of the four suspension bridges in Ireland and is notable for its dynamic nature. A video camera is mounted on the river-bank and the dynamic responses of the bridge have been measured from the video images. The dynamic response is assessed without the need of a reflector on the bridge and in the presence of various forms of luminous complexities in the video image scenes. Vertical deformations of the bridge were measured in this regard. The video image tracking for the measurement of dynamic responses of the bridge were based on correlating patches in time-lagged scenes in video images and utilisinga zero mean normalised cross correlation (ZNCC) metric. The bridge was excited by designed pedestrian movement and by individual cyclists traversing the bridge. The time series data of dynamic displacement responses of the bridge were analysedto obtain the frequency domain response. Frequencies obtained from video analysis were checked against accelerometer data from the bridge obtained while carrying out the same set of experiments used for video image based recognition.

  18. Single grating x-ray imaging for dynamic biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Kaye S.; Paganin, David M.; Parsons, David W.; Donnelley, Martin; Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Siu, Karen K. W.

    2012-07-01

    Biomedical studies are already benefiting from the excellent contrast offered by phase contrast x-ray imaging, but live imaging work presents several challenges. Living samples make it particularly difficult to achieve high resolution, sensitive phase contrast images, as exposures must be short and cannot be repeated. We therefore present a single-exposure, high-flux method of differential phase contrast imaging [1, 2, 3] in the context of imaging live airways for Cystic Fibrosis (CF) treatment assessment [4]. The CF study seeks to non-invasively observe the liquid lining the airways, which should increase in depth in response to effective treatments. Both high spatial resolution and sensitivity are required in order to track micron size changes in a liquid that is not easily differentiated from the tissue on which it lies. Our imaging method achieves these goals by using a single attenuation grating or grid as a reference pattern, and analyzing how the sample deforms the pattern to quantitatively retrieve the phase depth of the sample. The deformations are mapped at each pixel in the image using local cross-correlations comparing each 'sample and pattern' image with a reference 'pattern only' image taken before the sample is introduced. This produces a differential phase image, which may be integrated to give the sample phase depth.

  19. In vivo optical imaging and dynamic contrast methods for biomedical research

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Amoozegar, Cyrus B.; Wang, Tracy; McCaslin, Addason F. H.; Bouchard, Matthew B.; Mansfield, James; Levenson, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of optical imaging methods commonly applied to basic research applications. Optical imaging is well suited for non-clinical use, since it can exploit an enormous range of endogenous and exogenous forms of contrast that provide information about the structure and function of tissues ranging from single cells to entire organisms. An additional benefit of optical imaging that is often under-exploited is its ability to acquire data at high speeds; a feature that enables it to not only observe static distributions of contrast, but to probe and characterize dynamic events related to physiology, disease progression and acute interventions in real time. The benefits and limitations of in vivo optical imaging for biomedical research applications are described, followed by a perspective on future applications of optical imaging for basic research centred on a recently introduced real-time imaging technique called dynamic contrast-enhanced small animal molecular imaging (DyCE). PMID:22006910

  20. Precision-Cut Kidney Slices as a Tool to Understand the Dynamics of Extracellular Matrix Remodeling in Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Genovese, Federica; Kàrpàti, Zsolt S.; Nielsen, Signe H.; Karsdal, Morten A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to set up an ex vivo model for renal interstitial fibrosis in order to investigate the extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover profile in the fibrotic kidney. We induced kidney fibrosis in fourteen 12-week-old male Sprague Dawley rats by unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) surgery of the right ureter. The left kidney (contralateral) was used as internal control. Six rats were sham operated and used as the control group. Rats were terminated two weeks after the surgery; the kidneys were excised and precision-cut kidney slices (PCKSs) were cultured for five days in serum-free medium. Markers of collagen type I formation (P1NP), collagen type I and III degradation (C1M and C3M), and α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) were measured in the PCKS supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. P1NP, C1M, C3M, and α-SMA were increased up to 2- to 13-fold in supernatants of tissue slices from the UUO-ligated kidneys compared with the contralateral kidneys (P < 0.001) and with the kidneys of sham-operated animals (P < 0.0001). The markers could also reflect the level of fibrosis in different animals. The UUO PCKS ex vivo model provides a valuable translational tool for investigating the extracellular matrix remodeling associated with renal interstitial fibrosis. PMID:27257368

  1. Atheroembolic renal disease

    MedlinePlus

    Renal disease - atheroembolic; Cholesterol embolization syndrome; Atheroemboli - renal; Atherosclerotic disease - renal ... disorder of the arteries. It occurs when fat, cholesterol, and other substances build up in the walls ...

  2. Imaging characteristic analysis of metastatic spine lesions from breast, prostate, lung, and renal cell carcinomas for surgical planning: Osteolytic versus osteoblastic

    PubMed Central

    Reddington, Justin A.; Mendez, Gustavo A.; Ching, Alex; Kubicky, Charlotte Dai; Klimo, Paul; Ragel, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgeons treating metastatic spine disease can use computed tomography (CT) imaging to determine whether lesions are osteolytic, osteoblastic, or mixed. This enables treatment that considers the structural integrity of the vertebral body (VB), which is impaired with lytic lesions but not blastic lesions. The authors analyzed CT imaging characteristics of spine metastasis from breast, lung, prostate, and renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) to determine the metastasis patterns of each of these common tumors. Methods: The authors identified patients with metastatic spine disease treated during a 3-year period. Variables studied included age, sex, and cancer type. Lesions from breast, lung, prostate, and RCC primary lesions were selected for imaging analysis. Results: Sixty-six patients were identified: 17 had breast metastasis, 14 prostate, 18 lung, and 17 RCC. Breast cancer metastasis involved 33% of VBs with 56%, 20%, and 24% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. Prostate cancer metastasis involved 35% of VBs with 14%, 62%, and 24% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. Lung cancer metastasis involved 13% of VBs with 64%, 33%, and 3% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. RCC metastasis involved 11% of VBs with 91%, 7%, and 2% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed lesions, respectively. Conclusions: To improve surgical planning, we advocate the use of CT prior to surgery to evaluate whether spine metastases are osteolytic or osteoblastic. In cases of osteolytic lesions, the concern is of segmental instability requiring reconstruction and the risk for screw pull out should instrumentation be considered. In cases of osteoblastic lesions, surgeons should consider debulking dense bone. PMID:27274410

  3. Contrast enhanced ultrasound in the evaluation and percutaneous treatment of hepatic and renal tumors.

    PubMed

    Meloni, Maria Franca; Smolock, Amanda; Cantisani, Vito; Bezzi, Mario; D'Ambrosio, Ferdinando; Proiti, Maria; Lee, Fred; Aiani, Luca; Calliada, Fabrizio; Ferraioli, Giovanna

    2015-09-01

    Image-guided percutaneous ablation techniques are increasingly being used for the treatment of malignant tumors of the liver and kidney. Contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is a real-time dynamic imaging technique that plays an important role in the pre-, intra-, and post-procedural management of these patients. This review will focus on the role of CEUS in the evaluation of patients undergoing treatment with percutaneous ablation for hepatic or renal tumors.

  4. Reproducibility of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Prospective Analysis on Intra- and Interobserver and Scan-Rescan Performance of Pharmacokinetic Parameters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyi; Su, Zihua; Ye, Huiyi; Xu, Xiao; Sun, Zhipeng; Li, Lu; Duan, Feixue; Song, Yuanyuan; Lambrou, Tryphon; Ma, Lin

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the intra- and interobserver as well as scan-rescan reproducibility of quantitative parameters of renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). A total of 21 patients with clear cell RCCs (17 men, 4 woman; age 37-69 years, mean age 54.6 years, mean size, 5.0 ± 2.2 cm) were prospectively recruited from September 2012 to November 2012. Patients underwent paired DCE-MRI studies on a 3.0 T MR system with an interval of 48 to 72 hours. The extended-Tofts model and population-based arterial input function were used to calculate kinetic parameters. Three observers defined the 2-dimensional whole-tumor region of interest at the slice with the maximum diameter of the RCC. Intraobserver and scan-rescan differences were assessed using paired t tests, whereas interobserver differences using two-way analysis of variance. Intra- and interobserver reproducibility and scan-rescan reproducibility were evaluated using within-subject coefficient of variation (wCoV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). There were no significant intra-, interobserver, or scan-rescan differences in parameters (all P > 0.05). All ICCs for intra- and interobserver agreements were >0.75 (P < 0.05), whereas the scan-rescan agreement was moderate to good; V(e) (0.764, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.378-0.925) and K(ep) (0.906, 95% CI: 0.710-0.972) had higher ICC than K(trans) (0.686; 95% CI: 0.212-0.898) and V(p) (0.657; 95% CI: 0.164-0.888). In intra- and interobserver variability analyses, all parameters except V(p) had low wCoV values. K(trans) and V(e) had slightly lower intraobserver wCoV (1.2% and 0.9%) compared with K(ep) (3.7%), whereas all 3 of these parameters had similar interobserver wCoV values (2.5%, 3.1%, and 2.9%, respectively). Regarding scan-rescan variability, K(trans) and K(ep) showed slightly higher variation (15.6% and 15.4%) than V(e) (10.1%). V(p) had the largest

  5. Some applications of nonlinear diffusion to processing of dynamic evolution images

    SciTech Connect

    Goltsov, Alexey N.; Nikishov, Sergey A.

    1997-05-15

    Model nonlinear diffusion equation with the most simple Landau-Ginzburg free energy functional was applied to locate boundaries between meaningful regions of low-level images. The method is oriented to processing images of objects that are a result of dynamic evolution: images of different organs and tissues obtained by radiography and NMR methods, electron microscope images of morphogenesis fields, etc. In the methods developed by us, parameters of the nonlinear diffusion model are chosen on the basis of the preliminary treatment of the images. The parameters of the Landau-Ginzburg free energy functional are extracted from the structure factor of the images. Owing to such a choice of the model parameters, the image to be processed is located in the vicinity of the steady-state of the diffusion equation. The suggested method allows one to separate distinct structures having specific space characteristics from the whole image. The method was applied to processing X-ray images of the lung.

  6. System for renal movement elimination and renal diagnosis supported by vague knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jens; Hiltner, Jens; Fathi, Madjid; Reusch, Bernd; Stattaus, Joerg; Hacklaender, Thomas

    2000-06-01

    For the analysis of renal function, sequences of 90 magnet resonance images of the abdominal region showing both kidneys are taken in intervals of two seconds after a contrast medium was applied. Respiration of the patients during the acquisition of the images leads to organ movements throughout the series. These displacements are corrected by using an extended cepstral technique. To minimize registration errors caused by inhomogeneous movements of organs and tissues during respiration, the cepstrum-relevant part of the images is limited to small regions of interest around both kidneys. Even organ movements of sub-pixel range can be detected. After correction, the kidneys are the same position throughout the sequence. The regions of interest marked in one image are projected to all other images. To archive diagnostic results, dynamic contrast medium evaluations for different tissues of the kidneys are computed with signal-intensity-time graphs. Using a-priori knowledge about parameters of the SIT-graph for a whole kidney and about organ shape and structure, pixels of the kidney-segment are divided into the three classes renal cortex, medulla and pelvis. As a result, precise graphs can be computed for each tissue. The evaluation of the system is in progress, time save is more than one hour per patient.

  7. Image communication scheme based on dynamic visual cryptography and computer generated holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palevicius, Paulius; Ragulskis, Minvydas

    2015-01-01

    Computer generated holograms are often exploited to implement optical encryption schemes. This paper proposes the integration of dynamic visual cryptography (an optical technique based on the interplay of visual cryptography and time-averaging geometric moiré) with Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm. A stochastic moiré grating is used to embed the secret into a single cover image. The secret can be visually decoded by a naked eye if only the amplitude of harmonic oscillations corresponds to an accurately preselected value. The proposed visual image encryption scheme is based on computer generated holography, optical time-averaging moiré and principles of dynamic visual cryptography. Dynamic visual cryptography is used both for the initial encryption of the secret image and for the final decryption. Phase data of the encrypted image are computed by using Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm. The optical image is decrypted using the computationally reconstructed field of amplitudes.

  8. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Kidney Injury: Present Status

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hai Ying; Chen, Tian Wu; Zhang, Xiao Ming

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of hospitalization that is characterized by a sudden loss of renal excretory function and associated with the subsequent development of chronic kidney disease, poor prognosis, and increased mortality. Although the pathophysiology of renal functional impairment in the setting of AKI remains poorly understood, previous studies have identified changes in renal hemodynamics, perfusion, and oxygenation as key factors in the development and progression of AKI. The early assessment of these changes remains a challenge. Many established approaches are not applicable to humans because of their invasiveness. Functional renal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging offers an alternative assessment tool that could be used to evaluate renal morphology and function noninvasively and simultaneously. Thus, the purpose of this review is to illustrate the principle, application, and role of the techniques of functional renal MR imaging, including blood oxygen level-dependent imaging, arterial spin labeling, and diffusion-weighted MR imaging, in the management of AKI. The use of gadolinium in MR imaging may exacerbate renal impairment and cause nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. Therefore, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging will not be discussed in this paper. PMID:26925411

  9. Raman and FTIR imaging of dynamic polymer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobiak, John Peter

    This work aims to expand the applications of Raman and infrared imaging in materials science and engineering. Recent developments in spectroscopic imaging technology have led to relatively fast image acquisition rates, enabling the in situ analysis of various engineering processes. A brief review of spectroscopic imaging principles and existing applications is provided as background before three novel applications are set forth. First, the effectiveness of FTIR imaging for modeling polymer dissolution behavior was examined in a series of binary poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) systems. The dissolution behavior was influenced by polymer conformation as well as the solvent characteristics. The results indicate that chemistry alone is a poor predictor of dissolution rate. Rather, the diffusion coefficients of both the polymer and solvent have a foremost impact on the dissolution process. One major complication in modeling diffusion-related process by FTIR imaging is the precise determination of component locations in a series of images. This issue is addressed through the introduction of a new position-reporting technique based on hypothesis testing. A rudimentary drug release system, consisting of a poly (ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) film and a nicotine solution, was used to illustrate the importance of precisely reporting the nicotine diffusion front position. The new reporting method provided an inherent level of certainty to the position report. This method was applied to qualitatively assess the uptake of nicotine from solutions containing different solubilizing agents, which were capable of either promoting or inhibiting nicotine uptake. Finally, Raman mapping and Raman line imaging were used to classify individual carbon nanotubes that were dispersed on a substrate. Individual nanotubes displayed a range of spectral characteristics, indicating that the bulk sample was a mixture of materials with different graphitic domain sizes. The results from images acquired

  10. Estimation of vessel diameter and blood flow dynamics from laser speckle images

    PubMed Central

    Postnov, Dmitry D.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Laser speckle imaging is a rapidly developing method to study changes of blood velocity in the vascular networks. However, to assess blood flow and vascular responses it is crucial to measure vessel diameter in addition to blood velocity dynamics. We suggest an algorithm that allows for dynamical masking of a vessel position and measurements of it’s diameter from laser speckle images. This approach demonstrates high reliability and stability. PMID:27446704

  11. Recent advances in photorefractivity of poly(4-diphenylaminostyrene) composites: Wavelength dependence and dynamic holographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimura, Sho; Kinashi, Kenji; Sakai, Wataru; Tsutsumi, Naoto

    2014-08-01

    To expand upon our previous report [Appl. Phys. Express 5, 064101 (2012) 064101], we provide here the modified poly(4-diphenylaminostyrene) (PDAS)-based photorefractive (PR) device on the basis of wavelength dependency, and demonstrate dynamic holographic images by using the PDAS-based PR device under the obtained appropriate conditions. The PR devices containing the triphenylamine unit have potential application to dynamic holographic images, which will be useful for real-time holographic displays.

  12. Multiparametric MRI of solid renal masses: pearls and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthy, N K; Moosavi, B; McInnes, M D F; Flood, T A; Schieda, N

    2015-03-01

    Functional imaging [diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE)] techniques combined with T2-weighted (T2W) and chemical-shift imaging (CSI), with or without urography, constitutes a comprehensive multiparametric (MP) MRI protocol of the kidneys. MP-MRI of the kidneys can be performed in a time-efficient manner. Breath-hold sequences and parallel imaging should be used to reduce examination time and improve image quality. Increased T2 signal intensity (SI) in a solid renal nodule is specific for renal cell carcinoma (RCC); whereas, low T2 SI can be seen in RCC, angiomyolipoma (AML), and haemorrhagic cysts. Low b-value DWI can replace conventional fat-suppressed T2W. DWI can be performed free-breathing (FB) with two b-values to reduce acquisition time without compromising imaging quality. RCC demonstrates restricted diffusion; however, restricted diffusion is commonly seen in AML and in chronic haemorrhage. CSI must be performed using the correct echo combination at 3 T or T2* effects can mimic intra-lesional fat. Two-dimensional (2D)-CSI has better image quality compared to three-dimensional (3D)-CSI, but volume averaging in small lesions can simulate intra-lesional fat using 2D techniques. SI decrease on CSI is present in both AML and clear cell RCC. Verification of internal enhancement with MRI can be challenging and is improved with image subtraction. Subtraction imaging is prone to errors related to spatial misregistration, which is ameliorated with expiratory phase imaging. SI ratios can be used to confirm subtle internal enhancement and enhancement curves are predictive of RCC subtype. MR urography using conventional extracellular gadolinium must account for T2* effects; however, gadoxetic acid enhanced urography is an alternative. The purpose of this review it to highlight important technical and interpretive pearls and pitfalls encountered with MP-MRI of solid renal masses.

  13. Remote Histology Learning from Static versus Dynamic Microscopic Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mione, Sylvia; Valcke, Martin; Cornelissen, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Histology is the study of microscopic structures in normal tissue sections. Curriculum redesign in medicine has led to a decrease in the use of optical microscopes during practical classes. Other imaging solutions have been implemented to facilitate remote learning. With advancements in imaging technologies, learning material can now be digitized.…

  14. Perfusion thallium imaging of type I diabetes patients with end stage renal disease: Comparison of oral and intravenous dipyridamole administration

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreau, R.J.; Strony, J.T.; duCret, R.P.; Kuni, C.C.; Wang, Y.; Wilson, R.F.; Schwartz, J.S.; Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R. )

    1990-04-01

    Eighty patients with type I diabetes and end stage renal disease were prospectively evaluated for coronary artery disease with dipyridamole-thallium-201 scintigraphy and quantitative coronary angiography. Forty patients received dipyridamole orally, and 40 received it intravenously. The prevalence of coronary artery disease was 53%. There were no significant differences in the accuracy of the two dipyridamole tests (sensitivity = 85%, specificity = 85%, accuracy = 85% for the oral group; sensitivity = 86%, specificity = 72%, accuracy = 79% for the intravenous group). Combining the 80 patients into a single group gave a sensitivity of 86%, a specificity of 79%, and an accuracy of 83% for the detection of coronary disease. Although the accuracy of this test in this patient population was similar to that previously reported for other groups, the prevalence of disease was high and resulted in a low predictive value of a negative test (83%).

  15. High dynamic range compression and detail enhancement of infrared images in the gradient domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feifei; Xie, Wei; Ma, Guorui; Qin, Qianqing

    2014-11-01

    To find the trade-off between providing an accurate perception of the global scene and improving the visibility of details without excessively distorting radiometric infrared information, a novel gradient-domain-based visualization method for high dynamic range infrared images is proposed in this study. The proposed method adopts an energy function which includes a data constraint term and a gradient constraint term. In the data constraint term, the classical histogram projection method is used to perform the initial dynamic range compression to obtain the desired pixel values and preserve the global contrast. In the gradient constraint term, the moment matching method is adopted to obtain the normalized image; then a gradient gain factor function is designed to adjust the magnitudes of the normalized image gradients and obtain the desired gradient field. Lastly, the low dynamic range image is solved from the proposed energy function. The final image is obtained by linearly mapping the low dynamic range image to the 8-bit display range. The effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method are analyzed using the infrared images obtained from different operating conditions. Compared with other well-established methods, our method shows a significant performance in terms of dynamic range compression, while enhancing the details and avoiding the common artifacts, such as halo, gradient reversal, hazy or saturation.

  16. Zebrafish nephrogenesis involves dynamic spatiotemporal expression changes in renal progenitors and essential signals from retinoic acid and irx3b

    PubMed Central

    Wingert, Rebecca A.; Davidson, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    Kidney nephrons are comprised of proximal and distal tubule segments that perform unique roles in excretion. The developmental pathways that establish nephron segment identities from renal progenitors are poorly understood. Here, we used the zebrafish pronephros to study nephron segmentation. We found that zebrafish nephron progenitors undergo elaborate spatiotemporal expression changes of many genes before adopting a segment fate. Initially, two domains of nephron progenitors are established, then are subdivided and demarcate individual nephron segments. Using genetic and chemical genetic models of retinoic acid (RA) deficiency, we discovered that RA modulates rostral progenitor formation. To delineate downstream pathways, we knocked down the irx3b transcription factor and found it regulates proximal tubule segment size and distal segment differentiation. Our results suggest a model whereby RA patterns the early field of nephron progenitors, with subsequent factors like irx3b acting to refine later progenitor subdomains and ensure activation of segment-specific gene programs. PMID:21761484

  17. Visual sensitivity correlated tone reproduction for low dynamic range images in the compression field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Geun-Young; Lee, Sung-Hak; Kwon, Hyuk-Ju; Sohng, Kyu-Ik

    2014-11-01

    An image toning method for low dynamic range image compression is presented. The proposed method inserts tone mapping into JPEG baseline instead of postprocessing. First, an image is decomposed into detail, base, and surrounding components in terms of the discrete cosine transform coefficients. Subsequently, a luminance-adaptive tone mapping based on the human visual sensitivity properties is applied. In addition, compensation modules are added to enhance the visually sensitive factors, such as saturation, sharpness, and gamma. A comparative study confirms that the transmitted compression images have good image quality.

  18. Radionuclide renography predicts functional changes in patients with renal artery involvement by Takayasu's arteritis

    SciTech Connect

    Cuocolo, A.; McCarthy, K.E.; Sandrock, D.; Miller, D.L.; Neumann, R.D. )

    1989-01-01

    Renovascular hypertension is a major complication of Takayasu's arteritis, which contributes to the high mortality associated with the disease. We studied 5 patients affected by different degrees of Takayasu's arteritis to assess the usefulness of radionuclide renography in evaluating renal perfusion and function, and to predict changes induced by the disease before and after therapeutic interventions. Computer-assisted dynamic renal imaging with Tc-99m diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DPTA) and I-131 orthoiodohippurate (OIH), and renal arteriography were concurrently performed in all patients. Two patients with hemodynamically insignificant renal artery stenosis showed normal perfusion and function by renography. Three patients had significant renal artery stenosis and functional changes on renography. Subsequently, two of these patients had successful therapy (one had bilateral renal artery bypass grafts, and the other had renal artery angioplasty), and both showed functional improvement at renography. Our results demonstrate that radionuclide renography is valuable in the assessment of functional changes induced by Takayasu's arteritis as well as for determining the response to therapeutic interventions.

  19. Dynamic Image Forces Near a Metal Surface and the Point-Charge Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabovich, A. M.; Voitenko, A. I.

    2012-01-01

    The problem of charge motion governed by image force attraction near a plane metal surface is considered and solved self-consistently. The temporal dispersion of metal dielectric permittivity makes the image forces dynamic and, hence, finite, contrary to the results of the conventional approach. Therefore, the maximal attainable velocity turns out…

  20. Dynamic testing of rotary structures using phase-locked infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bales, Maurice J.

    1994-03-01

    This paper will discuss the process and rationale involved with dynamic, phase-locked, IR imaging using the TIP Workstation as a platform. This technique can be applied to most rotating structures including tires, wheels, gears and propellers. Actual IR and visual images of tires will be presented.

  1. Temporal resolved x-ray penumbral imaging technique using heuristic image reconstruction procedure and wide dynamic range x-ray streak camera

    SciTech Connect

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Izawa, Yasukazu; Nozaki, Shinya; Chen, Yen-wei

    2004-10-01

    Temporal resolved x-ray penumbral imaging has been developed using an image reconstruction procedure of the heuristic method and a wide dynamic range x-ray streak camera (XSC). Reconstruction procedure of the penumbral imaging is inherently intolerant to noise, a reconstructed image is strongly distorted by artifacts caused by noise in a penumbral image. Statistical fluctuation in the number of detected photon is the dominant source of noise in an x-ray image, however acceptable brightness of an image is limited by dynamic range of an XSC. The wide dynamic range XSC was used to obtain penumbral images bright enough to be reconstructed. Additionally, the heuristic method was introduced in the penumbral image reconstruction procedure. Distortion of reconstructed images is sufficiently suppressed by these improvements. Density profiles of laser driven brominated plastic and tin plasma were measured with this technique.

  2. A porphyrin-PEG polymer with rapid renal clearance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haoyuan; Hernandez, Reinier; Geng, Jumin; Sun, Haotian; Song, Wentao; Chen, Feng; Graves, Stephen A; Nickles, Robert J; Cheng, Chong; Cai, Weibo; Lovell, Jonathan F

    2016-01-01

    Tetracarboxylic porphyrins and polyethylene glycol (PEG) diamines were crosslinked in conditions that gave rise to a water-soluble porphyrin polyamide. Using PEG linkers 2 kDa or larger prevented fluorescence self-quenching. This networked porphyrin mesh was retained during dialysis with membranes with a 100 kDa pore size, yet passed through the membrane when centrifugal filtration was applied. Following intravenous administration, the porphyrin mesh, but not the free porphyrin, was rapidly cleared via renal excretion. The process could be monitored by fluorescence analysis of collected urine, with minimal background due to the large Stokes shift of the porphyrin (230 nm separating excitation and emission peaks). In a rhabdomyolysis mouse model of renal failure, porphyrin mesh urinary clearance was significantly impaired. This led to slower accumulation in the bladder, which could be visualized non-invasively via fluorescence imaging. Without further modification, the porphyrin mesh was chelated with (64)Cu for dynamic whole body positron emission tomography imaging of renal clearance. Together, these data show that small porphyrin-PEG polymers can serve as effective multimodal markers of renal function. PMID:26517562

  3. A porphyrin-PEG polymer with rapid renal clearance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haoyuan; Hernandez, Reinier; Geng, Jumin; Sun, Haotian; Song, Wentao; Chen, Feng; Graves, Stephen A; Nickles, Robert J; Cheng, Chong; Cai, Weibo; Lovell, Jonathan F

    2016-01-01

    Tetracarboxylic porphyrins and polyethylene glycol (PEG) diamines were crosslinked in conditions that gave rise to a water-soluble porphyrin polyamide. Using PEG linkers 2 kDa or larger prevented fluorescence self-quenching. This networked porphyrin mesh was retained during dialysis with membranes with a 100 kDa pore size, yet passed through the membrane when centrifugal filtration was applied. Following intravenous administration, the porphyrin mesh, but not the free porphyrin, was rapidly cleared via renal excretion. The process could be monitored by fluorescence analysis of collected urine, with minimal background due to the large Stokes shift of the porphyrin (230 nm separating excitation and emission peaks). In a rhabdomyolysis mouse model of renal failure, porphyrin mesh urinary clearance was significantly impaired. This led to slower accumulation in the bladder, which could be visualized non-invasively via fluorescence imaging. Without further modification, the porphyrin mesh was chelated with (64)Cu for dynamic whole body positron emission tomography imaging of renal clearance. Together, these data show that small porphyrin-PEG polymers can serve as effective multimodal markers of renal function.

  4. Impact of dynamical scattering on quantitative contrast for aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope images.

    PubMed

    Wen, C; Smith, David J

    2016-10-01

    Aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope images taken under optimum-defocus conditions or processed offline can correctly reflect the projected crystal structure with atomic resolution. However, dynamical scattering, which will seriously influence image contrast, is still unavoidable. Here, the multislice image simulation approach was used to quantify the impact of dynamical scattering on the contrast of aberration-corrected images for a 3C-SiC specimen with changes in atomic occupancy and thickness. Optimum-defocus images with different spherical aberration (CS) coefficients, and structure images restored by deconvolution processing, were studied. The results show that atomic-column positions and the atomic occupancy for SiC 'dumbbells' can be determined by analysis of image contrast profiles only below a certain thickness limit. This limit is larger for optimum-defocus and restored structure images with negative CS coefficient than those with positive CS coefficient. The image contrast of C (or Si) atomic columns with specific atomic occupancy changes differently with increasing crystal thickness. Furthermore, contrast peaks for C atomic columns overlapping with neighboring peaks of Si atomic columns with varied Si atomic occupancy, which is enhanced with increasing crystal thickness, can be neglected in restored structure images, but the effect is substantial in optimum-defocus images.

  5. Patient-adaptive reconstruction and acquisition in dynamic imaging with sensitivity encoding (PARADISE).

    PubMed

    Sharif, Behzad; Derbyshire, J Andrew; Faranesh, Anthony Z; Bresler, Yoram

    2010-08-01

    MRI of the human heart without explicit cardiac synchronization promises to extend the applicability of cardiac MR to a larger patient population and potentially expand its diagnostic capabilities. However, conventional nongated imaging techniques typically suffer from low image quality or inadequate spatio-temporal resolution and fidelity. Patient-Adaptive Reconstruction and Acquisition in Dynamic Imaging with Sensitivity Encoding (PARADISE) is a highly accelerated nongated dynamic imaging method that enables artifact-free imaging with high spatio-temporal resolutions by utilizing novel computational techniques to optimize the imaging process. In addition to using parallel imaging, the method gains acceleration from a physiologically driven spatio-temporal support model; hence, it is doubly accelerated. The support model is patient adaptive, i.e., its geometry depends on dynamics of the imaged slice, e.g., subject's heart rate and heart location within the slice. The proposed method is also doubly adaptive as it adapts both the acquisition and reconstruction schemes. Based on the theory of time-sequential sampling, the proposed framework explicitly accounts for speed limitations of gradient encoding and provides performance guarantees on achievable image quality. The presented in-vivo results demonstrate the effectiveness and feasibility of the PARADISE method for high-resolution nongated cardiac MRI during short breath-hold. PMID:20665794

  6. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced CT Characterization of Xp11.2 Translocation/TFE3 Gene Fusions versus Papillary Renal Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    He, Jian; Zhou, Kefeng; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Gutian; Li, Xiaogong; Guo, Hongqian; Gan, Weidong; Zhou, Zhengyang; Liu, Tian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the differences of CT characteristics between renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) associated with Xp11.2 translocation/TFE3 gene fusions (Xp11.2 RCCs) and papillary cell renal cell carcinomas (PRCCs). Methods. CT images and clinical records of 64 patients (25 Xp11.2 RCCs, 15 type 1 and 24 type 2 PRCCs) were analyzed and compared retrospectively. Results. Xp11.2 RCC more frequently affected young (30.7 ± 8.7 years) women (16/25, 64%) with gross hematuria (12/25, 48%), while PRCC more frequently involved middle-aged (54.8 ± 11.1 years) men (28/39, 71.8%) asymptomatically. Xp11.2 RCC tended to be heterogeneous density with some showing circular calcification. Lesion sizes of Xp11.2 RCC (5.4 ± 2.2 cm) and type 2 PRCC (5.7 ± 2.5 cm) were significantly larger than that of type 1 PRCC (3.8 ± 1.8 cm). Xp11.2 RCC contained more cystic components (22/25, 88%) than type 1 PRCC (all solid) and type 2 PRCC (9/24, 36.0%). Type 1 PRCC (13/15, 86.7%) and Xp11.2 RCC (21/25, 84.0%) showed more clear boundary than type 2 PRCC (12/24, 50.0%). Conclusion. CT features including diameter, boundary, attenuation, nature, and circular calcification of the tumor, combined with demographic information and symptoms, may be useful to differentiate Xp11.2 RCC from different subtypes of PRCC. PMID:26636097

  7. Multiple-viewing-zone integral imaging using a dynamic barrier array for three-dimensional displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Heejin; Min, Sung-Wook; Jung, Sungyong; Park, Jae-Hyeung; Lee, Byoungho

    2003-04-01

    In spite of many advantages of integral imaging, the viewing zone in which an observer can see three-dimensional images is limited within a narrow range. Here, we propose a novel method to increase the number of viewing zones by using a dynamic barrier array. We prove our idea by fabricating and locating the dynamic barrier array between a lens array and a display panel. By tilting the barrier array, it is possible to distribute images for each viewing zone. Thus, the number of viewing zones can be increased with an increment of the states of the barrier array tilt.

  8. Chronic imaging of cortical sensory map dynamics using a genetically encoded calcium indicator.

    PubMed

    Minderer, Matthias; Liu, Wenrui; Sumanovski, Lazar T; Kügler, Sebastian; Helmchen, Fritjof; Margolis, David J

    2012-01-01

    In vivo optical imaging can reveal the dynamics of large-scale cortical activity, but methods for chronic recording are limited. Here we present a technique for long-term investigation of cortical map dynamics using wide-field ratiometric fluorescence imaging of the genetically encoded calcium indicator (GECI) Yellow Cameleon 3.60. We find that wide-field GECI signals report sensory-evoked activity in anaesthetized mouse somatosensory cortex with high sensitivity and spatiotemporal precision, and furthermore, can be measured repeatedly in separate imaging sessions over multiple weeks. This method opens new possibilities for the longitudinal study of stability and plasticity of cortical sensory representations.

  9. Role of BK virus infection in end-stage renal disease patients waiting for kidney transplantation--viral replication dynamics from pre- to post-transplant.

    PubMed

    Mitterhofer, Anna Paola; Tinti, Francesca; Pietropaolo, Valeria; Umbro, Ilaria; Anzivino, Elena; Bellizzi, Anna; Zavatto, Assunta; Poli, Luca; Berloco, Pasquale Bartolomeo; Taliani, Gloria

    2014-03-01

    We report the prevalence of BK virus (BKV) infection before renal transplantation and the dynamics of BKV viremia from pre- to post-transplantation. We assessed 60 kidney transplanted patients from a single cohort in Italy, treated with identical immunosuppressive therapy, for BK viremia at pre-transplantation, 12 h, and three and six months post-transplantation. Polymerase chain reaction showed that the prevalence of plasma BKV replication--considered a marker of infection--was 20% in pre-transplant patients. All pre-transplant-positive patients remained positive post-transplant, whereas the majority of pre-transplant-negative patients remained negative. Viremia dynamics classification revealed three clusters of patients: Cluster A++, pre-transplant-positive patients (20%) who tested positive at least once post-transplant; Cluster B-+, pre-transplant-negative patients (28%) who tested positive at least once post-transplant; and Cluster C- -, pre-transplant-negative patients (52%) who remained negative throughout. These clusters presented significant differences related to the prevalence of substantially positive patients with high plasma viral load (>10(3) copies/mL) in cluster A, but not in donors' or grafts' characteristics. We suggest that pre-transplant viral status should be considered as an additional risk factor for post-transplant BKV replication. Therefore, pre-transplant BKV infection screening in kidney transplant patients should be performed for improving planning of personalized immunosuppressant schemes and specific post-transplant surveillance.

  10. 4D PET iterative deconvolution with spatiotemporal regularization for quantitative dynamic PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Reilhac, Anthonin; Charil, Arnaud; Wimberley, Catriona; Angelis, Georgios; Hamze, Hasar; Callaghan, Paul; Garcia, Marie-Paule; Boisson, Frederic; Ryder, Will; Meikle, Steven R; Gregoire, Marie-Claude

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative measurements in dynamic PET imaging are usually limited by the poor counting statistics particularly in short dynamic frames and by the low spatial resolution of the detection system, resulting in partial volume effects (PVEs). In this work, we present a fast and easy to implement method for the restoration of dynamic PET images that have suffered from both PVE and noise degradation. It is based on a weighted least squares iterative deconvolution approach of the dynamic PET image with spatial and temporal regularization. Using simulated dynamic [(11)C] Raclopride PET data with controlled biological variations in the striata between scans, we showed that the restoration method provides images which exhibit less noise and better contrast between emitting structures than the original images. In addition, the method is able to recover the true time activity curve in the striata region with an error below 3% while it was underestimated by more than 20% without correction. As a result, the method improves the accuracy and reduces the variability of the kinetic parameter estimates calculated from the corrected images. More importantly it increases the accuracy (from less than 66% to more than 95%) of measured biological variations as well as their statistical detectivity. PMID:26080302

  11. A cross sectional study of renal involvement in tuberous sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, J A; Oliver, K; Mueller, R F; Sampson, J

    1996-01-01

    Renal disease is a frequent manifestation of tuberous sclerosis (TSC) and yet little is known about its true prevalence or natural history. We reviewed the notes of 139 people with TSC, who had presented without renal symptoms, but who had been investigated by renal ultrasound. Information on the frequency, type, and symptomatology of renal involvement was retrieved. The prevalence of renal involvement was 61%. Angiomyolipomas were detected in 49%, renal cysts in 32%, and renal carcinoma in 2.2%. The prevalence of angiomyolipoma was positively correlated with age, compatible with a two hit aetiology. Renal cysts were the commoner lesion in young children, and their prevalence did not appear to be age related. Renal investigation in people with TSC had been inconsistent and limited. We suggest guidelines for renal investigation in those with TSC. Images PMID:8782048

  12. Intrinsically high-Q dynamic AFM imaging in liquid with a significantly extended needle tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Tajik, Arash; Wang, Ning; Yu, Min-Feng

    2012-06-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) probe with a long and rigid needle tip was fabricated and studied for high Q factor dynamic (tapping mode) AFM imaging of samples submersed in liquid. The extended needle tip over a regular commercially available tapping-mode AFM cantilever was sufficiently long to keep the AFM cantilever from submersed in liquid, which significantly minimized the hydrodynamic damping involved in dynamic AFM imaging of samples in liquid. Dynamic AFM imaging of samples in liquid at an intrinsic Q factor of over 100 and an operational frequency of over 200 kHz was demonstrated. The method has the potential to be extended to acquire viscoelastic material properties and provide truly gentle imaging of soft biological samples in physiological environments.

  13. Dynamic Multiscale Boundary Conditions for 4D CT Images of Healthy and Emphysematous Rat

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Rick E.; Carson, James P.; Thomas, Mathew; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2013-06-14

    Changes in the shape of the lung during breathing determine the movement of airways and alveoli, and thus impact airflow dynamics. Modeling airflow dynamics in health and disease is a key goal for predictive multiscale models of respiration. Past efforts to model changes in lung shape during breathing have measured shape at multiple breath-holds. However, breath-holds do not capture hysteretic differences between inspiration and expiration resulting from the additional energy required for inspiration. Alternatively, imaging dynamically – without breath-holds – allows measurement of hysteretic differences. In this study, we acquire multiple micro-CT images per breath (4DCT) in live rats, and from these images we develop, for the first time, dynamic volume maps. These maps show changes in local volume across the entire lung throughout the breathing cycle and accurately predict the global pressure-volume (PV) hysteresis.

  14. Renal organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease in the absence of new treatment modalities has become a strong driver for innovation in nephrology. An increasing understanding of stem cell biology has kindled the prospects of regenerative options for kidney disease. However, the kidney itself is not a regenerative organ, as all the nephrons are formed during embryonic development. Here, we will investigate advances in the molecular genetics of renal organogenesis, including what this can tell us about lineage relationships, and discuss how this may serve to inform us about both the normal processes of renal repair and options for regenerative therapies. PMID:22198432

  15. [Renal disease].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-09-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys. Some of these restrictions modify the intake of proteins, sodium, and phosphorus. Milk and dairy products are sources of these nutrients. This article aims to inform the reader about the benefits including milk and dairy products relying on a scientific and critical view according to the clinical conditions and the stage of renal disease in which the patient is. PMID:27603894

  16. [Renal disease].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-09-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys. Some of these restrictions modify the intake of proteins, sodium, and phosphorus. Milk and dairy products are sources of these nutrients. This article aims to inform the reader about the benefits including milk and dairy products relying on a scientific and critical view according to the clinical conditions and the stage of renal disease in which the patient is.

  17. Bioluminescent system for dynamic imaging of cell and animal behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Hara-Miyauchi, Chikako; Tsuji, Osahiko; Hanyu, Aki; Okada, Seiji; Yasuda, Akimasa; Fukano, Takashi; Akazawa, Chihiro; Nakamura, Masaya; Imamura, Takeshi; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Okano, Hirotaka James; and others

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We combined a yellow variant of GFP and firefly luciferase to make ffLuc-cp156. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 showed improved photon yield in cultured cells and transgenic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely-moving animals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled tracking real-time drug delivery in conscious animals. -- Abstract: The current utility of bioluminescence imaging is constrained by a low photon yield that limits temporal sensitivity. Here, we describe an imaging method that uses a chemiluminescent/fluorescent protein, ffLuc-cp156, which consists of a yellow variant of Aequorea GFP and firefly luciferase. We report an improvement in photon yield by over three orders of magnitude over current bioluminescent systems. We imaged cellular movement at high resolution including neuronal growth cones and microglial cell protrusions. Transgenic ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely moving animals, which may provide a reliable assay for drug distribution in behaving animals for pre-clinical studies.

  18. Atomically resolved real-space imaging of hot electron dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lock, D.; Rusimova, K. R.; Pan, T. L.; Palmer, R. E.; Sloan, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of hot electrons are central to understanding the properties of many electronic devices. But their ultra-short lifetime, typically 100 fs or less, and correspondingly short transport length-scale in the nanometre range constrain real-space investigations. Here we report variable temperature and voltage measurements of the nonlocal manipulation of adsorbed molecules on the Si(111)-7 × 7 surface in the scanning tunnelling microscope. The range of the nonlocal effect increases with temperature and, at constant temperature, is invariant over a wide range of electron energies. The measurements probe, in real space, the underlying hot electron dynamics on the 10 nm scale and are well described by a two-dimensional diffusive model with a single decay channel, consistent with 2-photon photo-emission (2PPE) measurements of the real time dynamics. PMID:26387703

  19. Atomically resolved real-space imaging of hot electron dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lock, D; Rusimova, K R; Pan, T L; Palmer, R E; Sloan, P A

    2015-09-21

    The dynamics of hot electrons are central to understanding the properties of many electronic devices. But their ultra-short lifetime, typically 100 fs or less, and correspondingly short transport length-scale in the nanometre range constrain real-space investigations. Here we report variable temperature and voltage measurements of the nonlocal manipulation of adsorbed molecules on the Si(111)-7 × 7 surface in the scanning tunnelling microscope. The range of the nonlocal effect increases with temperature and, at constant temperature, is invariant over a wide range of electron energies. The measurements probe, in real space, the underlying hot electron dynamics on the 10 nm scale and are well described by a two-dimensional diffusive model with a single decay channel, consistent with 2-photon photo-emission (2PPE) measurements of the real time dynamics.

  20. Infrared imaging - A validation technique for computational fluid dynamics codes used in STOVL applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, R. R.; Mahan, J. R.; Smith, M. H.; Gelhausen, P. A.; Van Dalsem, W. R.

    1991-01-01

    The need for a validation technique for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes in STOVL applications has led to research efforts to apply infrared thermal imaging techniques to visualize gaseous flow fields. Specifically, a heated, free-jet test facility was constructed. The gaseous flow field of the jet exhaust was characterized using an infrared imaging technique in the 2 to 5.6 micron wavelength band as well as conventional pitot tube and thermocouple methods. These infrared images are compared to computer-generated images using the equations of radiative exchange based on the temperature distribution in the jet exhaust measured with the thermocouple traverses. Temperature and velocity measurement techniques, infrared imaging, and the computer model of the infrared imaging technique are presented and discussed. From the study, it is concluded that infrared imaging techniques coupled with the radiative exchange equations applied to CFD models are a valid method to qualitatively verify CFD codes used in STOVL applications.

  1. Imaging the anterior eye with dynamic-focus swept-source optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Johnny P.; Li, Yan; Tang, Maolong; Liu, Liang; Pechauer, Alex D.; Huang, David; Liu, Gangjun

    2015-12-01

    A custom-built dynamic-focus swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system with a central wavelength of 1310 nm was used to image the anterior eye from the cornea to the lens. An electrically tunable lens was utilized to dynamically control the positions of focusing planes over the imaging range of 10 mm. The B-scan images were acquired consecutively at the same position but with different focus settings. The B-scan images were then registered and averaged after filtering the out-of-focus regions using a Gaussian window. By fusing images obtained at different depth focus locations, high-resolution and high signal-strength images were obtained over the entire imaging depth. In vivo imaging of human anterior segment was demonstrated. The performance of the system was compared with two commercial OCT systems. The human eye ciliary body was better visualized with the dynamic-focusing SS-OCT system than using the commercial 840 and 1310 nm OCT systems. The sulcus-to-sulcus distance was measured, and the result agreed with that acquired with ultrasound biomicroscopy.

  2. Image processing analysis of vortex dynamics of lobed jets from three-dimensional diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastase, Ilinca; Meslem, Amina; El Hassan, Mouhammad

    2011-12-01

    The passive control of jet flows with the aim to enhance mixing and entrainment is of wide practical interest. Our purpose here is to develop new air diffusers for heating ventilating air conditioning systems by using lobed geometry nozzles, in order to ameliorate the users' thermal comfort. Two turbulent six-lobed air jets, issued from a lobed tubular nozzle and an innovative hemispherical lobed nozzle, were studied experimentally. It was shown that the proposed innovative concept of a lobed jet, which can be easily integrated in air diffusion devices, is very efficient regarding induction capability. A vortical dynamics analysis for the two jets is performed using a new method of image processing, namely dynamic mode decomposition. A validation of this method is also proposed suggesting that the dynamical mode decomposition (DMD) image processing method succeeds in capturing the most dominant frequencies of the flow dynamics, which in our case are related to the quite special dynamics of the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices.

  3. Spectrum of gallium-67 renal activity in patients with no evidence of renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, J.E.; Van Nostrand, D.; Howard, W.H. III; Kyle, R.W.

    1984-05-01

    Thirty-seven gallium-67 images were reviewed retrospectively to determine relative renal gallium activity (RGA) in patients with no evidence of renal disease. Twenty-four patients were classified as having no evidence of renal disease (NRD). RGA was identified in 50.0% (12/24) of patients in the NRD group. The authors conclude that the presence of RGA neither suggests nor rules out renal disease. Altered nonrenal biological factors (such as saturation of iron-binding capacity) may decrease soft-tissue gallium accumulation while activity in the kidney remains unchanged. The latter provides renal images with better signal-to-noise ratio. Current imaging equipment may allow renal visualization in these patients.

  4. Hepatocellular carcinoma: conventional MRI findings including gadolinium-enhanced dynamic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ito, Katsuyoshi

    2006-05-01

    A great variety of MR pulse sequences for hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) are now available. In this article, we reviewed the current MR imaging techniques that are routinely used for hepatic imaging, and described the optimization of these sequences as well as the utility and characteristics of each sequence for the accurate diagnosis of HCCs. Then, we reviewed various MR imaging findings of advanced and early HCCs with emphasis on signal intensity and hemodynamic patterns. Finally, we described the value of multi-arterial-phase contrast-enhanced dynamic MR imaging of the whole liver with excellent temporal resolution for evaluating transitional hemodynamics of hepatic lesions during the six arterial phases.

  5. Image analysis tools to quantify cell shape and protein dynamics near the leading edge.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Gillian L; Watanabe, Naoki; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2013-01-01

    We present a set of flexible image analysis tools to analyze dynamics of cell shape and protein concentrations near the leading edge of cells adhered to glass coverslips. Plugins for ImageJ streamline common analyses of microscopic images of cells, including the calculation of leading edge speeds, total and average intensities of fluorescent markers, and retrograde flow rate measurements of fluorescent single-molecule speckles. We also provide automated calculations of auto- and cross-correlation functions between velocity and intensity measurements. The application of the methods is illustrated on images of XTC cells.

  6. Dynamic, gated and high resolution imaging with the ECAT III

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.J.; Phelps, M.E.; Huang, S.; Collard, P.E.; Bidaut, L.M.; Schwab, R.L.; Ricci, A.R.

    1986-02-01

    The ECAT III was designed primarily with a view towards imaging the heart. The gantry both rotates about the vertical axis and tilts about the horizontal axis to allow the optimum imaging angle of the heart. The patient opening is 65 cm in diameter to allow these motions. The system allows six TTL inputs to allow the user to insert additional information into the data stream (i.e. R wave gate from EKG, respiratory gate, signal start of injection, time of blood sample, etc.). The 512 narrow detectors (5.6 mm) per ring and their close packing (.5 mm) in conjunction with the natural spatial resolution limits of annihilation coincidence detection allow the system to image without the requirement of a scanning motion. This eliminates the problem of artefacts caused by inconsistent data due to asynchrony between the scanning motion of a PET system and the cardiac and/or the respiratory cycle. In this work, the authors present initial experience with the ECAT III in imaging phantoms, animals and man.

  7. Dynamic Speckle Imaging with Low-Cost Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannoni, Maurizio; Trivi, Marcelo; Arizaga, Ricardo; Rabal, Hector; Molesini, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Light from a rough sample surface illuminated with a laser consists of a speckle pattern. If the surface evolves with time, the pattern becomes dynamic, following the activity of the sample. This phenomenon is used both in research and in industry to monitor processes and systems that change with time. The measuring equipment generally includes…

  8. 4D rotational x-ray imaging of wrist joint dynamic motion

    SciTech Connect

    Carelsen, Bart; Bakker, Niels H.; Strackee, Simon D.; Boon, Sjirk N.; Maas, Mario; Sabczynski, Joerg; Grimbergen, Cornelis A.; Streekstra, Geert J.

    2005-09-15

    Current methods for imaging joint motion are limited to either two-dimensional (2D) video fluoroscopy, or to animated motions from a series of static three-dimensional (3D) images. 3D movement patterns can be detected from biplane fluoroscopy images matched with computed tomography images. This involves several x-ray modalities and sophisticated 2D to 3D matching for the complex wrist joint. We present a method for the acquisition of dynamic 3D images of a moving joint. In our method a 3D-rotational x-ray (3D-RX) system is used to image a cyclically moving joint. The cyclic motion is synchronized to the x-ray acquisition to yield multiple sets of projection images, which are reconstructed to a series of time resolved 3D images, i.e., four-dimensional rotational x ray (4D-RX). To investigate the obtained image quality parameters the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function (PSF) via the edge spread function and the contrast to noise ratio between air and phantom were determined on reconstructions of a bullet and rod phantom, using 4D-RX as well as stationary 3D-RX images. The CNR in volume reconstructions based on 251 projection images in the static situation and on 41 and 34 projection images of a moving phantom were 6.9, 3.0, and 2.9, respectively. The average FWHM of the PSF of these same images was, respectively, 1.1, 1.7, and 2.2 mm orthogonal to the motion and parallel to direction of motion 0.6, 0.7, and 1.0 mm. The main deterioration of 4D-RX images compared to 3D-RX images is due to the low number of projection images used and not to the motion of the object. Using 41 projection images seems the best setting for the current system. Experiments on a postmortem wrist show the feasibility of the method for imaging 3D dynamic joint motion. We expect that 4D-RX will pave the way to improved assessment of joint disorders by detection of 3D dynamic motion patterns in joints.

  9. Revealing glacier flow and surge dynamics from animated satellite image sequences: examples from the Karakoram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, F.

    2015-04-01

    Although animated images are very popular on the Internet, they have so far found only limited use for glaciological applications. With long time-series of satellite images becoming increasingly available and glaciers being well recognized for their rapid changes and variable flow dynamics, animated sequences of multiple satellite images reveal glacier dynamics in a time-lapse mode, making the otherwise slow changes of glacier movement visible and understandable for a wide public. For this study animated image sequences were created from freely available image quick-looks of orthorectified Landsat scenes for four regions in the central Karakoram mountain range. The animations play automatically in a web-browser and might help to demonstrate glacier flow dynamics for educational purposes. The animations revealed highly complex patterns of glacier flow and surge dynamics over a 15-year time period (1998-2013). In contrast to other regions, surging glaciers in the Karakoram are often small (around 10 km2), steep, debris free, and advance for several years at comparably low annual rates (a few hundred m a-1). The advance periods of individual glaciers are generally out of phase, indicating a limited climatic control on their dynamics. On the other hand, nearly all other glaciers in the region are either stable or slightly advancing, indicating balanced or even positive mass budgets over the past few years to decades.

  10. A robust state-space kinetics-guided framework for dynamic PET image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tong, S; Alessio, A M; Kinahan, P E; Liu, H; Shi, P

    2011-04-21

    Dynamic PET image reconstruction is a challenging issue due to the low SNR and the large quantity of spatio-temporal data. We propose a robust state-space image reconstruction (SSIR) framework for activity reconstruction in dynamic PET. Unlike statistically-based frame-by-frame methods, tracer kinetic modeling is incorporated to provide physiological guidance for the reconstruction, harnessing the temporal information of the dynamic data. Dynamic reconstruction is formulated in a state-space representation, where a compartmental model describes the kinetic processes in a continuous-time system equation, and the imaging data are expressed in a discrete measurement equation. Tracer activity concentrations are treated as the state variables, and are estimated from the dynamic data. Sampled-data H(∞) filtering is adopted for robust estimation. H(∞) filtering makes no assumptions on the system and measurement statistics, and guarantees bounded estimation error for finite-energy disturbances, leading to robust performance for dynamic data with low SNR and/or errors. This alternative reconstruction approach could help us to deal with unpredictable situations in imaging (e.g. data corruption from failed detector blocks) or inaccurate noise models. Experiments on synthetic phantom and patient PET data are performed to demonstrate feasibility of the SSIR framework, and to explore its potential advantages over frame-by-frame statistical reconstruction approaches.

  11. Rapid 3D dynamic arterial spin labeling with a sparse model-based image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li; Fielden, Samuel W; Feng, Xue; Wintermark, Max; Mugler, John P; Meyer, Craig H

    2015-11-01

    Dynamic arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI measures the perfusion bolus at multiple observation times and yields accurate estimates of cerebral blood flow in the presence of variations in arterial transit time. ASL has intrinsically low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and is sensitive to motion, so that extensive signal averaging is typically required, leading to long scan times for dynamic ASL. The goal of this study was to develop an accelerated dynamic ASL method with improved SNR and robustness to motion using a model-based image reconstruction that exploits the inherent sparsity of dynamic ASL data. The first component of this method is a single-shot 3D turbo spin echo spiral pulse sequence accelerated using a combination of parallel imaging and compressed sensing. This pulse sequence was then incorporated into a dynamic pseudo continuous ASL acquisition acquired at multiple observation times, and the resulting images were jointly reconstructed enforcing a model of potential perfusion time courses. Performance of the technique was verified using a numerical phantom and it was validated on normal volunteers on a 3-Tesla scanner. In simulation, a spatial sparsity constraint improved SNR and reduced estimation errors. Combined with a model-based sparsity constraint, the proposed method further improved SNR, reduced estimation error and suppressed motion artifacts. Experimentally, the proposed method resulted in significant improvements, with scan times as short as 20s per time point. These results suggest that the model-based image reconstruction enables rapid dynamic ASL with improved accuracy and robustness.

  12. Characterization of time-enhancement curves of benign and malignant prostate tissue at dynamic MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Rouvière, Olivier; Raudrant, Anne; Ecochard, René; Colin-Pangaud, Catherine; Pasquiou, Carole; Bouvier, Raymonde; Maréchal, Jean Marie; Lyonnet, Denis

    2003-05-01

    Our objectives were to determine time-enhancement curves of prostate cancer, peripheral zone, and adenoma at gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging, and to determine if a high-spatial/low-temporal dynamic imaging could be accurate in depicting prostate cancer, or if a higher temporal resolution (and a lower spatial resolution) should be favored. Thirty-nine patients with prostate cancer underwent MR imaging before radical prostatectomy by using T1- and T2-weighted axial images and a single-slice dynamic gadolinium-enhanced sequence (40 images; one image per 6 s; injection of 20 ml at 2 ml/s). After analysis of the pathologic specimens, four region-of-interest (ROI) cursors (cancer, peripheral zone, adenoma, and muscle) were retrospectively placed on dynamic images. Time-enhancement curves of the ROIs were obtained. The theoretical accuracy of a 30-s dynamic multislice MR sequence in depicting cancer within peripheral zone and adenoma (ROC curves) was calculated from these curves. On average, prostate cancer enhanced more and earlier than peripheral zone and adenoma, but there were great interindividual variations. For start delays ranging from 12 to 84 s, the areas under the ROC curves ranged from 0.602 to 0.698 for the depiction of cancer within adenoma and from 0.614 to 0.827 for the depiction of cancer within peripheral zone. The best results were obtained with a 36-s start delay. In conclusion, we found a 30-s scanning window which seems to allow a good depiction of cancer within peripheral zone. Because of largely overlapping enhancement patterns, cancer will probably not be depicted within adenoma by dynamic imaging, at least by using low temporal resolution.

  13. Analyzing Movements of Tennis Players by Dynamic Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazaki, Shunpei; Yamamoto, Osami

    Recently, we can easily obtain a fast computer and a digital video camera as their prices go down. In this paper, we describe a method and a system for analyzing performance of tennis players of a given singles tennis game. We assume that a movie of the game has been shot by a digital video camera which is fixed at a place such that the camera could film whole area of the tennis court and the two players, and that we have the sequence of the images in the computer. Using the positions of the players and the ball detected by techniques of image processing and partially by human assistance, we analyzed the game by defining an evaluation function. We made a prototype of a tennis-player-evaluation system by implementing the method. The system appropriately evaluated performances of players of some sample tennis games, although the evaluation function cannot analyze the player's tactics enough.

  14. Imaging the dynamics of free-electron Landau states.

    PubMed

    Schattschneider, P; Schachinger, Th; Stöger-Pollach, M; Löffler, S; Steiger-Thirsfeld, A; Bliokh, K Y; Nori, Franco

    2014-08-08

    Landau levels and states of electrons in a magnetic field are fundamental quantum entities underlying the quantum Hall and related effects in condensed matter physics. However, the real-space properties and observation of Landau wave functions remain elusive. Here we report the real-space observation of Landau states and the internal rotational dynamics of free electrons. States with different quantum numbers are produced using nanometre-sized electron vortex beams, with a radius chosen to match the waist of the Landau states, in a quasi-uniform magnetic field. Scanning the beams along the propagation direction, we reconstruct the rotational dynamics of the Landau wave functions with angular frequency ~100 GHz. We observe that Landau modes with different azimuthal quantum numbers belong to three classes, which are characterized by rotations with zero, Larmor and cyclotron frequencies, respectively. This is in sharp contrast to the uniform cyclotron rotation of classical electrons, and in perfect agreement with recent theoretical predictions.

  15. Dynamic holographic imaging of the beating human heart

    PubMed

    Hunziker; Smith; Scherrer-Crosbie; Liel-Cohen; Levine; Nesbitt; Benton; Picard

    1999-02-01

    Background--Currently, the reporting and archiving of echocardiographic data suffer from the difficulty of representing heart motion on printable 2-dimensional (2D) media. Methods and Results--We studied the capability of holography to integrate motion into 2D echocardiographic prints. Images of normal human hearts and of a variety of mitral valve function abnormalities (mitral valve prolapse, systolic anterior motion of the mitral leaflets, and obstruction of the mitral valve by a myxoma) were acquired digitally on standard echocardiographic machines. Images were processed into a data format suitable for holographic printing. Angularly multiplexed holograms were then printed on a prototype holographic "laser" printer, with integration of time in vertical parallax, so that heart motion became visible when the hologram was tilted up and down. The resulting holograms displayed the anatomy with the same resolution as the original acquisition and allowed detailed study of valve motion with side-by-side comparison of normal and abnormal findings. Comparison of standard echocardiographic measurements in original echo frames and corresponding hologram views showed an excellent correlation of both methods (P<0.0001, r2=0.979, mean bias=2.76 mm). In this feasibility study, both 2D and 3D holographic images were produced. The equipment needed to view these holograms consists of only a simple point-light source. Conclusions--Holographic representation of myocardial and valve motion from echocardiographic data is feasible and allows the printing on a 2D medium of the complete heart cycle. Combined with the recent development of online holographic printing, this novel technique has the potential to improve reporting, visualization, and archiving of echocardiographic imaging.

  16. Dynamic Approaches for Facial Recognition Using Digital Image Speckle Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafailovich-Sokolov, Sara; Guan, E.; Afriat, Isablle; Rafailovich, Miriam; Sokolov, Jonathan; Clark, Richard

    2004-03-01

    Digital image analysis techniques have been extensively used in facial recognition. To date, most static facial characterization techniques, which are usually based on Fourier transform techniques, are sensitive to lighting, shadows, or modification of appearance by makeup, natural aging or surgery. In this study we have demonstrated that it is possible to uniquely identify faces by analyzing the natural motion of facial features with Digital Image Speckle Correlation (DISC). Human skin has a natural pattern produced by the texture of the skin pores, which is easily visible with conventional digital cameras of resolution greater than 4 mega pixels. Hence the application of the DISC method to the analysis of facial motion appears to be very straightforward. Here we demonstrate that the vector diagrams produced by this method for facial images are directly correlated to the underlying muscle structure which is unique for an individual and is not affected by lighting or make-up. Furthermore, we will show that this method can also be used for medical diagnosis in early detection of facial paralysis and other forms of skin disorders.

  17. High-Dynamic-Range CT Reconstruction Based on Varying Tube-Voltage Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    For complicated structural components characterized by wide X-ray attenuation ranges, the conventional computed tomography (CT) imaging using a single tube-voltage at each rotation angle cannot obtain all structural information. This limitation results in a shortage of CT information, because the effective thickness of the components along the direction of X-ray penetration exceeds the limitation of the dynamic range of the X-ray imaging system. To address this problem, high-dynamic-range CT (HDR-CT) reconstruction is proposed. For this new method, the tube’s voltage is adjusted several times to match the corresponding effective thickness about the local information from an object. Then, HDR fusion and HDR-CT are applied to obtain the full reconstruction information. An accompanying experiment demonstrates that this new technology can extend the dynamic range of X-ray imaging systems and provide the complete internal structures of complicated structural components. PMID:26544723

  18. Extended-resolution structured illumination imaging of endocytic and cytoskeletal dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dong; Shao, Lin; Chen, Bi-Chang; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Mingshu; Moses, Brian; Milkie, Daniel E.; Beach, Jordan R.; Hammer, John A.; Pasham, Mithun; Kirchhausen, Tomas; Baird, Michelle A.; Davidson, Michael W.; Xu, Pingyong; Betzig, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is distinct among nanoscale imaging tools in its ability to image protein dynamics in living cells. Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) stands out in this regard because of its high speed and low illumination intensities, but typically offers only a twofold resolution gain. We extended the resolution of live-cell SIM through two approaches: ultrahigh numerical aperture SIM at 84-nanometer lateral resolution for more than 100 multicolor frames, and nonlinear SIM with patterned activation at 45- to 62-nanometer resolution for approximately 20 to 40 frames. We applied these approaches to image dynamics near the plasma membrane of spatially resolved assemblies of clathrin and caveolin, Rab5a in early endosomes, and a-actinin, often in relationship to cortical actin. In addition, we examined mitochondria, actin, and the Golgi apparatus dynamics in three dimensions. PMID:26315442

  19. A high-throughput imaging system to quantitatively analyze the growth dynamics of plant seedlings.

    PubMed

    Men, Yongfan; Yu, Qiang; Chen, Zitian; Wang, Jianbin; Huang, Yanyi; Guo, Hongwei

    2012-08-01

    Most current methods for analyzing the growth rate of plant seedlings are limited to low-throughput experimental configurations. We have developed an automatic system to investigate the dynamics of the growth of hypocotyls using Arabidopsis as model. This system is able to capture time-lapse infrared images of 24 seedlings automatically, with a spatial resolution of 2 μm per pixel and temporal interval of 5 min. Seedling length is rapidly calculated using automated geometric image-processing algorithms. With this high-throughput platform, we have investigated the genotype dependent difference of growth patterns, as well as the response to plant hormone - ethylene. Our analyses suggest that cytoskeleton function is not required in ethylene-induced hypocotyl inhibition. This novel integrative method can be applied to large-scale dynamic screening of plants, as well as any other image-based biological studies related to dynamic growth.

  20. Myocardial border detection by branch-and-bound dynamic programming in magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Yeh, J Y; Fu, J C; Wu, C C; Lin, H M; Chai, J W

    2005-07-01

    Dynamic programming (DP) is a mathematical technique for making optimal decisions on the sequencing of interrelated problems. It has been used widely to detect borders in magnetic resonance images (MRI). MRI is noninvasive and generates clear images; however, it is impractical for manual measurement of the huge number of images generated by dynamic organs such as those of the cardiovascular system. A fast and effective algorithm is essential for on-line implementation of MRI-based computer aided measurement and diagnosis. In this paper, a branch-and-bound dynamic programming technique is applied to detect the endocardial borders of the left ventricular. The proposed branch-and-bound method drastically reduces the computational time required in conventional exhaustive search methods. Statistical tests are conducted to verify the CPU time performance of the branch-and-bound technique in comparison to the conventional exhaustive search method.

  1. Note: Dynamic strain field mapping with synchrotron X-ray digital image correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, L.; Fan, D.; Luo, S. N.; Bie, B. X.; Ran, X. X.; Qi, M. L.; Parab, N.; Sun, J. Z.; Liao, H. J.; Hudspeth, M. C.; Claus, B.; Fezzaa, K.; Sun, T.; Chen, W.; Gong, X. L.

    2014-07-15

    We present a dynamic strain field mapping method based on synchrotron X-ray digital image correlation (XDIC). Synchrotron X-ray sources are advantageous for imaging with exceptional spatial and temporal resolutions, and X-ray speckles can be produced either from surface roughness or internal inhomogeneities. Combining speckled X-ray imaging with DIC allows one to map strain fields with high resolutions. Based on experiments on void growth in Al and deformation of a granular material during Kolsky bar/gas gun loading at the Advanced Photon Source beamline 32ID, we demonstrate the feasibility of dynamic XDIC. XDIC is particularly useful for dynamic, in-volume, measurements on opaque materials under high strain-rate, large, deformation.

  2. Dynamic Light Scattering Microscopy. A Novel Optical Technique to Image Submicroscopic Motions. I: Theory

    PubMed Central

    Dzakpasu, Rhonda; Axelrod, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    The theoretical basis of an optical microscope technique to image dynamically scattered light fluctuation decay rates (dynamic light scattering microscopy) is developed. It is shown that relative motions between scattering centers even smaller than the optical resolution of the microscope are sufficient to produce significant phase variations resulting in interference intensity fluctuations in the image plane. The timescale and time dependence for the temporal autocorrelation function of these intensity fluctuations is derived. The spatial correlation distance, which reports the average distance between constructive and destructive interference in the image plane, is calculated and compared with the pixel size, and the distance dependence of the spatial correlation function is derived. The accompanying article in this issue describes an experimental implementation of dynamic light scattering microscopy. PMID:15298930

  3. ASFNR recommendations for clinical performance of MR dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion imaging of the brain.

    PubMed

    Welker, K; Boxerman, J; Kalnin, A; Kaufmann, T; Shiroishi, M; Wintermark, M

    2015-06-01

    MR perfusion imaging is becoming an increasingly common means of evaluating a variety of cerebral pathologies, including tumors and ischemia. In particular, there has been great interest in the use of MR perfusion imaging for both assessing brain tumor grade and for monitoring for tumor recurrence in previously treated patients. Of the various techniques devised for evaluating cerebral perfusion imaging, the dynamic susceptibility contrast method has been employed most widely among clinical MR imaging practitioners. However, when implementing DSC MR perfusion imaging in a contemporary radiology practice, a neuroradiologist is confronted with a large number of decisions. These include choices surrounding appropriate patient selection, scan-acquisition parameters, data-postprocessing methods, image interpretation, and reporting. Throughout the imaging literature, there is conflicting advice on these issues. In an effort to provide guidance to neuroradiologists struggling to implement DSC perfusion imaging in their MR imaging practice, the Clinical Practice Committee of the American Society of Functional Neuroradiology has provided the following recommendations. This guidance is based on review of the literature coupled with the practice experience of the authors. While the ASFNR acknowledges that alternate means of carrying out DSC perfusion imaging may yield clinically acceptable results, the following recommendations should provide a framework for achieving routine success in this complicated-but-rewarding aspect of neuroradiology MR imaging practice.

  4. Two-dimensional locally focused MRI: applications to dynamic and spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Lian; Cao, Yue; Levin, David N.

    1996-04-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance images have uniform spatial resolution across the entire field of view. We recently described a method of creating MR images with user-specified spatial resolution along one dimension of the field of view. This paper presents the 2D generalization of this technique which allows the user to specify arbitrary spatial resolution in arbitrary 2D regions. These images are reconstructed from signals which sparsely sample the k-space representation of the image. Therefore, locally focused images can be acquired in less time than that required by Fourier imaging with uniformly high resolution. In this paper we show how to increase the temporal resolution of dynamic imaging (e.g. interventional imaging) by using high resolution in areas of expected change and lower resolution elsewhere. Alternatively, by matching the local spatial resolution to the expected edge content of the image, it is possible to avoid the localized truncation artifacts which mark Fourier images reconstructed from the same number of signals. For example, we show how proton spectroscopic images of the head may be improved by using high resolution in the neighborhood of scalp lipids which might otherwise cause truncation artifacts.

  5. Effects of renal lymphatic occlusion and venous constriction on renal function.

    PubMed Central

    Stolarczyk, J.; Carone, F. A.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of renal lymphatic occlusion or increased lymph flow due to renal vein constriction on renal function were investigated in rats. In each experiment, the renal lymphatics or vein of the left kidney were occluded or constricted and the right kidney served as a control. Occlusion of renal lymphatics caused renal enlargement, no change in glomerular filtration rate, a marked increase in urine flow and solute excretion without any change in urine osmolality, and enhanced urinary loss of urea, potassium, sodium and ammonium. Urea concentrations in medullary and papillary tissues were significantly elevated. Renal vein constriction caused renal enlargement and a marked drop in glomerular filtration rate, urine volume, urine osmolality and solute excretion. tissue concentrations of urea and potassium were decreased in the medulla and papilla and total tissue solute was significantly decreased in the papilla. The data indicate that in the rat, renal lymphatic occlusion traps urea in the medulla and induces a urea diuresis resulting in a large flow of normally concentrated urine. On the other hand, increased lymph flow secondary to renal vein constriction decreases medullary urea and potassium concentrations and papillary osmolality. These changes and the reduced glomerular filtration rate result in a small flow if dilute urine. Thus both renal lymphatic occlusion and enhanced lymph flow have a significant effect on renal function. Images Fig 1 PMID:1122006

  6. Preoperative evaluation of renal artery in patients with renal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liangsong; Wu, Guangyu; Wang, Jianfeng; Huang, Jiwei; Kong, Wen; Chen, Yonghui; Xue, Wei; Huang, Yiran; Zhang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the feasibility of the noncontrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (NCE-MRA) to evaluate renal arteries before partial nephrectomy (PN). Retrospective analyzed 479 patients who underwent renal surgery between January 2013 and December 2015 with NCE-MRA or computed tomographic angiography (CTA) renal artery image reconstruction preoperative in our department. The renal artery reconstruction score (RARS) was based on the level of artery visualization in a 4-class criterion, and the R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score (R.E.N.A.L), arterial based complexity (ABC) were also analyzed. Of the 479 patients, the overall-lever RARS was 3.62, and the average in 2 groups was no significant difference (NCE-MRA vs CTA, P = 0.072). The performance of NCE-MRA in PN group was similar with CTA. Further comparison demonstrated that the efficiency of NCE-MRA in moderate- or low-degree tumor according to the R.E.N.A.L and ABC complexity less than 3S was equal to CTA. However, high degree (P < 0.001), 3S (P = 0.027), or 3H (P < 0.001) would affect the imaging of renal artery. Intragroup analysis showed that tumor complexity such as max tumor size (r = −o.351, P < 0.001), R.E.N.A.L (r = −0.439, P < 0.001), and ABC (r = −0.619, P < 0.001) were closely correlated with the NCE-MRA performance. The images of 2 sides of the kidney were compared in single person as well, which was meaningful for NCE-MRA patients only (NCE-MRA, P < 0.001; CTA, P = 0.182). The renal artery reconstruction performed by NCE-MRA is feasible and has a similar achievement in the PN potential recipients, with a lower side effect, and meets the requirements for making surgical decision. It has a broad application prospect in clinical practice; however, it still needs to further improve the ability in more complex tumors. PMID:27759632

  7. Development of High Speed Interferometry Imaging and Analysis Techniques for Compressible Dynamic Stall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Carr, L. W.; Wilder, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    The development of a high-speed, phase-locked, realtime, point diffraction interferometry system for quantitative imaging unsteady separated flows is described. The system enables recording of up to 224 interferograms of the dynamic stall flow over an oscillating airfoil using a drum camera at rates of up to 40 KHz controlled by custom designed electronic interlocking circuitry. Several thousand interferograms of the flow have been obtained using this system. A comprehensive image analysis package has been developed for automatic processing of this large number of images. The software has been specifically tuned to address the special characteristics of airfoil flow interferograms. Examples of images obtained using the standard and the high-speed interferometry techniques are presented along with a demonstration of the image processing routine's ability to resolve the fine details present in these images.

  8. The role of renal biopsy in small renal masses.

    PubMed

    Burruni, Rodolfo; Lhermitte, Benoit; Cerantola, Yannick; Tawadros, Thomas; Meuwly, Jean-Yves; Berthold, Dominik; Jichlinski, Patrice; Valerio, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Renal biopsy is being increasingly proposed as a diagnostic tool to characterize small renal masses (SRM). Indeed, the wide adoption of imaging in the diagnostic workup of many diseases had led to a substantial increased incidence of SRM (diameter ≤4 cm). While modern ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have high sensitivity for detecting SRM, none is able to accurately and reliably characterize them in terms of histological features. This is currently of key importance in guiding clinical decision-making in some situations, and in these cases renal biopsy should be considered. In this review, we aim to summarize the technique, diagnostic performance, and predicting factors of nondiagnostic biopsy, as well as the future perspectives.

  9. The role of renal biopsy in small renal masses

    PubMed Central

    Burruni, Rodolfo; Lhermitte, Benoit; Cerantola, Yannick; Tawadros, Thomas; Meuwly, Jean-Yves; Berthold, Dominik; Jichlinski, Patrice; Valerio, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Renal biopsy is being increasingly proposed as a diagnostic tool to characterize small renal masses (SRM). Indeed, the wide adoption of imaging in the diagnostic workup of many diseases had led to a substantial increased incidence of SRM (diameter ≤4 cm). While modern ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have high sensitivity for detecting SRM, none is able to accurately and reliably characterize them in terms of histological features. This is currently of key importance in guiding clinical decision-making in some situations, and in these cases renal biopsy should be considered. In this review, we aim to summarize the technique, diagnostic performance, and predicting factors of nondiagnostic biopsy, as well as the future perspectives. PMID:26858784

  10. Tubulocystic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Great Imitator

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Indraneel; Yadav, Sher Singh; Tomar, Vinay; Yadav, Suresh; Talreja, Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (TCRC) is a rare renal tumor. Patients are usually asymptomatic; it is usually detected incidentally, during imaging studies for Bosniak type III and type IV renal cysts. These tumors rarely metastasize. The role of targeted therapy in such rare tumors is still controversial. We report a case of TCRC initially presented as a Bosniak type II renal cyst and was discovered ultimately to be a metastatic disease. This type of presentation might broaden our understanding of this rare disease. PMID:27601972

  11. Managing Complications Following Nephron-Sparing Procedures for Renal Masses.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Aguirre, Adrian J; Durack, Jeremy C

    2016-09-01

    Small renal malignancies are commonly treated with nephron-sparing procedures including partial nephrectomy and percutaneous ablation. Although these procedures offer faster patient recovery and preserve renal function, a variety of complications can occur. Here, we review vascular and nonvascular complications associated with nephron-sparing renal mass treatments and discuss options for minimally invasive image-guided management. PMID:27641453

  12. EpiTools: An Open-Source Image Analysis Toolkit for Quantifying Epithelial Growth Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Heller, Davide; Hoppe, Andreas; Restrepo, Simon; Gatti, Lorenzo; Tournier, Alexander L; Tapon, Nicolas; Basler, Konrad; Mao, Yanlan

    2016-01-11

    Epithelia grow and undergo extensive rearrangements to achieve their final size and shape. Imaging the dynamics of tissue growth and morphogenesis is now possible with advances in time-lapse microscopy, but a true understanding of their complexities is limited by automated image analysis tools to extract quantitative data. To overcome such limitations, we have designed a new open-source image analysis toolkit called EpiTools. It provides user-friendly graphical user interfaces for accurately segmenting and tracking the contours of cell membrane signals obtained from 4D confocal imaging. It is designed for a broad audience, especially biologists with no computer-science background. Quantitative data extraction is integrated into a larger bioimaging platform, Icy, to increase the visibility and usability of our tools. We demonstrate the usefulness of EpiTools by analyzing Drosophila wing imaginal disc growth, revealing previously overlooked properties of this dynamic tissue, such as the patterns of cellular rearrangements.

  13. EpiTools: An Open-Source Image Analysis Toolkit for Quantifying Epithelial Growth Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Davide; Hoppe, Andreas; Restrepo, Simon; Gatti, Lorenzo; Tournier, Alexander L.; Tapon, Nicolas; Basler, Konrad; Mao, Yanlan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Epithelia grow and undergo extensive rearrangements to achieve their final size and shape. Imaging the dynamics of tissue growth and morphogenesis is now possible with advances in time-lapse microscopy, but a true understanding of their complexities is limited by automated image analysis tools to extract quantitative data. To overcome such limitations, we have designed a new open-source image analysis toolkit called EpiTools. It provides user-friendly graphical user interfaces for accurately segmenting and tracking the contours of cell membrane signals obtained from 4D confocal imaging. It is designed for a broad audience, especially biologists with no computer-science background. Quantitative data extraction is integrated into a larger bioimaging platform, Icy, to increase the visibility and usability of our tools. We demonstrate the usefulness of EpiTools by analyzing Drosophila wing imaginal disc growth, revealing previously overlooked properties of this dynamic tissue, such as the patterns of cellular rearrangements. PMID:26766446

  14. EpiTools: An Open-Source Image Analysis Toolkit for Quantifying Epithelial Growth Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Heller, Davide; Hoppe, Andreas; Restrepo, Simon; Gatti, Lorenzo; Tournier, Alexander L; Tapon, Nicolas; Basler, Konrad; Mao, Yanlan

    2016-01-11

    Epithelia grow and undergo extensive rearrangements to achieve their final size and shape. Imaging the dynamics of tissue growth and morphogenesis is now possible with advances in time-lapse microscopy, but a true understanding of their complexities is limited by automated image analysis tools to extract quantitative data. To overcome such limitations, we have designed a new open-source image analysis toolkit called EpiTools. It provides user-friendly graphical user interfaces for accurately segmenting and tracking the contours of cell membrane signals obtained from 4D confocal imaging. It is designed for a broad audience, especially biologists with no computer-science background. Quantitative data extraction is integrated into a larger bioimaging platform, Icy, to increase the visibility and usability of our tools. We demonstrate the usefulness of EpiTools by analyzing Drosophila wing imaginal disc growth, revealing previously overlooked properties of this dynamic tissue, such as the patterns of cellular rearrangements. PMID:26766446

  15. High dynamic range infrared images detail enhancement based on local edge preserving filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qiong; Wang, Yuehuan; Bai, Kun

    2016-07-01

    In the field of infrared (IR) image processing, displaying a high dynamic range (HDR) image on a low dynamic range display equipment with a natural visual effect, clear details on local areas and less artifacts is an important issue. In this paper, we present a new approach to display HDR IR images with contrast enhancement. First, the local edge-preserving filter (LEPF) is utilized to separate the image into a base layer and detail layer(s). After the filtering procedure, we use an adaptive Gamma transformation to adjust the gray distribution of the base layer, and stretch the detail layer based on a human visual effect principle. Then, we recombine the detail layer and base layer to obtain the enhance output. Finally, we adjust the luminance of output by applying multiple exposure fusion method. The experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method can provide a significant performance in terms of enhancing details and less artifacts than the state of the arts.

  16. Chromatic adaptation-based tone reproduction for high-dynamic-range imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joohyun; Jeon, Gwanggil; Jeong, Jechang

    2009-10-01

    We present an adaptive tone reproduction algorithm for displaying high-dynamic-range (HDR) images on conventional low-dynamic-range (LDR) display devices. The proposed algorithm consists of an adaptive tone reproduction operator and chromatic adaptation. The algorithm for dynamic range reduction relies on suitable tone reproduction functions that depend on histogram-based parameter estimation to adjust luminance according to global and local features. Instead of relying only on reduction of dynamic range, this chromatic adaption technique also preserves chromatic appearance and color consistency across scene and display environments. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm achieves good subjective quality while preserving image details. Furthermore, the proposed algorithm is simple and practical for implementation.

  17. Minimally Invasive Treatment of Small Renal Tumors: Trends in Renal Cancer Diagnosis and Management

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, David J. Railton, Nicholas J.

    2010-10-15

    Renal cell carcinoma is a common malignancy causing significant mortality. In recent years abdominal imaging, often for alternate symptomatology, has led the trend toward the detection and confirmation of smaller renal tumors. This has permitted the greater use of localized and nephron-sparing techniques including partial nephrectomy and image-guided ablation. This article aims to review the current role of image-guided biopsy and ablation in the management of small renal tumors. The natural history of renal cell carcinoma, the role of renal biopsy, the principles and procedural considerations of thermal energy ablation, and the oncological outcomes of these minimally invasive treatments are discussed and illustrated with cases from the authors' institution. Image-guided ablation, in particular, has changed the treatment paradigm and, by virtue of its increasingly evident efficacy and low morbidity, now favors the treatment of smaller tumors in patients previously unfit for surgery.

  18. Context-dependent JPEG backward-compatible high-dynamic range image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, Pavel; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2013-10-01

    High-dynamic range (HDR) imaging is expected, together with ultrahigh definition and high-frame rate video, to become a technology that may change photo, TV, and film industries. Many cameras and displays capable of capturing and rendering both HDR images and video are already available in the market. The popularity and full-public adoption of HDR content is, however, hindered by the lack of standards in evaluation of quality, file formats, and compression, as well as large legacy base of low-dynamic range (LDR) displays that are unable to render HDR. To facilitate the wide spread of HDR usage, the backward compatibility of HDR with commonly used legacy technologies for storage, rendering, and compression of video and images are necessary. Although many tone-mapping algorithms are developed for generating viewable LDR content from HDR, there is no consensus of which algorithm to use and under which conditions. We, via a series of subjective evaluations, demonstrate the dependency of the perceptual quality of the tone-mapped LDR images on the context: environmental factors, display parameters, and image content itself. Based on the results of subjective tests, it proposes to extend JPEG file format, the most popular image format, in a backward compatible manner to deal with HDR images also. An architecture to achieve such backward compatibility with JPEG is proposed. A simple implementation of lossy compression demonstrates the efficiency of the proposed architecture compared with the state-of-the-art HDR image compression.

  19. Simultaneous and spectroscopic redox molecular imaging of multiple free radical intermediates using dynamic nuclear polarization-magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Fuminori; Ito, Shinji; Yasukawa, Keiji; Kobayashi, Ryoma; Utsumi, Hideo

    2014-08-01

    Redox reactions that generate free radical intermediates are essential to metabolic processes. However, their intermediates can produce reactive oxygen species, which may promote diseases related to oxidative stress. We report here the use of dynamic nuclear polarization-magnetic resonance imaging (DNP-MRI) to conduct redox molecular imaging. Using DNP-MRI, we obtained simultaneous images of free radical intermediates generated from the coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), flavin mononucleotide (FMN), and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) involved in the mitochondrial electron transport chain as well as the radicals derived from vitamins E and K1. Each of these free radicals was imaged in real time in a phantom comprising a mixture of free radicals localized in either lipophilic or aqueous environments. Changing the frequency of electron spin resonance (ESR) irradiation also allowed each of the radical species to be distinguished in the spectroscopic images. This study is the first to report the spectroscopic DNP-MRI imaging of free radical intermediates that are derived from endogenous species involved in metabolic processes.

  20. Live Imaging of Intracellular Dynamics During Meiotic Maturation in Mouse Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shuhei; Sakakibara, Yogo; Kitajima, Tomoya S

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence live imaging is a powerful approach to study intracellular dynamics during cellular events such as cell division. By applying automated confocal live imaging to mouse oocytes, in which meiotic maturation can be induced in vitro after the introduction of fluorescent proteins through microinjection, the meiotic dynamics of intracellular structures, such as chromosomes, can be monitored at high resolution. A combination of this method with approaches for the perturbation of specific proteins opens up opportunities for understanding the molecular and intracellular basis of mammalian meiosis. PMID:27557586

  1. Using dynamic interferometric synthetic aperature radar (InSAR) to image fast-moving surface waves

    DOEpatents

    Vincent, Paul

    2005-06-28

    A new differential technique and system for imaging dynamic (fast moving) surface waves using Dynamic Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is introduced. This differential technique and system can sample the fast-moving surface displacement waves from a plurality of moving platform positions in either a repeat-pass single-antenna or a single-pass mode having a single-antenna dual-phase receiver or having dual physically separate antennas, and reconstruct a plurality of phase differentials from a plurality of platform positions to produce a series of desired interferometric images of the fast moving waves.

  2. Imaging Ultra-fast Molecular Dynamics in Free Electron Laser Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. Z.; Jiang, Y. H.

    The free electron laser (FEL) provides the coherent, brilliant and ultrashort light pulse in short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet and X-ray) regimes, opening up possibilities to study ultra-fast molecular dynamics in photo-induced chemical reactions with new methodologies. In this chapter, we introduce the time-resolved pump-probe experiments on gas-phase targets with FEL facilities to image the nuclear and electronic motions in molecular reactions, which serve as a benchmark for further FEL applications like coherent diffraction imaging and coherent control of functional dynamics in complex molecular reactions.

  3. Fast Imaging Technique to Study Drop Impact Dynamics of Non-Newtonian Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qin; Peters, Ivo; Wilken, Sam; Brown, Eric; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    In the field of fluid mechanics, many dynamical processes not only occur over a very short time interval but also require high spatial resolution for detailed observation, scenarios that make it challenging to observe with conventional imaging systems. One of these is the drop impact of liquids, which usually happens within one tenth of millisecond. To tackle this challenge, a fast imaging technique is introduced that combines a high-speed camera (capable of up to one million frames per second) with a macro lens with long working distance to bring the spatial resolution of the image down to 10 µm/pixel. The imaging technique enables precise measurement of relevant fluid dynamic quantities, such as the flow field, the spreading distance and the splashing speed, from analysis of the recorded video. To demonstrate the capabilities of this visualization system, the impact dynamics when droplets of non-Newtonian fluids impinge on a flat hard surface are characterized. Two situations are considered: for oxidized liquid metal droplets we focus on the spreading behavior, and for densely packed suspensions we determine the onset of splashing. More generally, the combination of high temporal and spatial imaging resolution introduced here offers advantages for studying fast dynamics across a wide range of microscale phenomena. PMID:24637404

  4. Fast imaging technique to study drop impact dynamics of non-Newtonian fluids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qin; Peters, Ivo; Wilken, Sam; Brown, Eric; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    In the field of fluid mechanics, many dynamical processes not only occur over a very short time interval but also require high spatial resolution for detailed observation, scenarios that make it challenging to observe with conventional imaging systems. One of these is the drop impact of liquids, which usually happens within one tenth of millisecond. To tackle this challenge, a fast imaging technique is introduced that combines a high-speed camera (capable of up to one million frames per second) with a macro lens with long working distance to bring the spatial resolution of the image down to 10 µm/pixel. The imaging technique enables precise measurement of relevant fluid dynamic quantities, such as the flow field, the spreading distance and the splashing speed, from analysis of the recorded video. To demonstrate the capabilities of this visualization system, the impact dynamics when droplets of non-Newtonian fluids impinge on a flat hard surface are characterized. Two situations are considered: for oxidized liquid metal droplets we focus on the spreading behavior, and for densely packed suspensions we determine the onset of splashing. More generally, the combination of high temporal and spatial imaging resolution introduced here offers advantages for studying fast dynamics across a wide range of microscale phenomena.

  5. Dynamic contrast-enhanced optical imaging of in vivo organ function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoozegar, Cyrus B.; Wang, Tracy; Bouchard, Matthew B.; McCaslin, Addason F. H.; Blaner, William S.; Levenson, Richard M.; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.

    2012-09-01

    Conventional approaches to optical small animal molecular imaging suffer from poor resolution, limited sensitivity, and unreliable quantitation, often reducing their utility in practice. We previously demonstrated that the in vivo dynamics of an injected contrast agent could be exploited to provide high-contrast anatomical registration, owing to the temporal differences in each organ's response to the circulating fluorophore. This study extends this approach to explore whether dynamic contrast-enhanced optical imaging (DyCE) can allow noninvasive, in vivo assessment of organ function by quantifying the differing cellular uptake or wash-out dynamics of an agent in healthy and damaged organs. Specifically, we used DyCE to visualize and measure the organ-specific uptake dynamics of indocyanine green before and after induction of transient liver damage. DyCE imaging was performed longitudinally over nine days, and blood samples collected at each imaging session were analyzed for alanine aminotransferase (ALT), a liver enzyme assessed clinically as a measure of liver damage. We show that changes in DyCE-derived dynamics of liver and kidney dye uptake caused by liver damage correlate linearly with ALT concentrations, with an r2 value of 0.91. Our results demonstrate that DyCE can provide quantitative, in vivo, longitudinal measures of organ function with inexpensive and simple data acquisition.

  6. Volumetric imaging of fast biological dynamics in deep tissue via wavefront engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingjie; Tang, Jianyong; Cui, Meng

    2016-03-01

    To reveal fast biological dynamics in deep tissue, we combine two wavefront engineering methods that were developed in our laboratory, namely optical phase-locked ultrasound lens (OPLUL) based volumetric imaging and iterative multiphoton adaptive compensation technique (IMPACT). OPLUL is used to generate oscillating defocusing wavefront for fast axial scanning, and IMPACT is used to compensate the wavefront distortions for deep tissue imaging. We show its promising applications in neuroscience and immunology.

  7. A digital-signal-processor-based optical tomographic system for dynamic imaging of joint diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasker, Joseph M.

    Over the last decade, optical tomography (OT) has emerged as viable biomedical imaging modality. Various imaging systems have been developed that are employed in preclinical as well as clinical studies, mostly targeting breast imaging, brain imaging, and cancer related studies. Of particular interest are so-called dynamic imaging studies where one attempts to image changes in optical properties and/or physiological parameters as they occur during a system perturbation. To successfully perform dynamic imaging studies, great effort is put towards system development that offers increasingly enhanced signal-to-noise performance at ever shorter data acquisition times, thus capturing high fidelity tomographic data within narrower time periods. Towards this goal, I have developed in this thesis a dynamic optical tomography system that is, unlike currently available analog instrumentation, based on digital data acquisition and filtering techniques. At the core of this instrument is a digital signal processor (DSP) that collects, collates, and processes the digitized data set. Complementary protocols between the DSP and a complex programmable logic device synchronizes the sampling process and organizes data flow. Instrument control is implemented through a comprehensive graphical user interface which integrates automated calibration, data acquisition, and signal post-processing. Real-time data is generated at frame rates as high as 140 Hz. An extensive dynamic range (˜190 dB) accommodates a wide scope of measurement geometries and tissue types. Performance analysis demonstrates very low system noise (˜1 pW rms noise equivalent power), excellent signal precision (˜0.04%--0.2%) and long term system stability (˜1% over 40 min). Experiments on tissue phantoms validate spatial and temporal accuracy of the system. As a potential new application of dynamic optical imaging I present the first application of this method to use vascular hemodynamics as a means of characterizing

  8. TH-A-18C-10: Dynamic Intensity Weighted Region of Interest Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, E; Pan, X; Pelizzari, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: For image guidance tasks full image quality is not required throughout the entire image. With dynamic filtration of the kV imaging beam the noise properties of the CT image can be locally controlled, providing a high quality image around the target volume with a lower quality surrounding region while providing substantial dose sparing to the patient as well as reduced scatter fluence on the detector. Methods: A dynamic collimation device with 3mm copper blades has been designed to mount in place of the bowtie filter on the On-Board Imager (Varian Medical Systems). The beam intensity is reduced by 95% behind the copper filters and the aperture is controlled dynamically to conformally illuminate a given ROI during a standard cone-beam CT scan. A data correction framework to account for the physical effects of the collimator prior to reconstruction was developed. Furthermore, to determine the dose savings and scatter reduction a monte carlo model was built in BEAMnrc with specifics from the Varian Monte Carlo Data Package. The MC model was validated with Gafchromic film. Results: The reconstructed image shows image quality comparable to a standard scan in the specified ROI, with higher noise and streaks in the outer region but still sufficient information for alignment to high contrast structures. The monte carlo modeling showed that the scatter-to-primary ratio was reduced from 1.26 for an unfiltered scan to 0.45 for an intensity weighted scan, suggesting that image quality may be improved in the inner ROI. Dose in the inner region was reduced 10–15% due to reduced scatter and by as much as 75% in the outer region. Conclusion: Dynamic intensity-weighted ROI imaging allows reduction of imaging dose to sensitive organs away from the target region while providing images that retain their utility for patient setup and procedure guidance. Funding was provided in part by Varian Medical Systems and NIH Grants 1RO1CA120540, T32EB002103, S10 RR021039 and P30 CA

  9. The renal quantitative scintillation camera study for determination of renal function

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, I.M. Jr.; Boineau, F.G.; Evans, B.B.; Schlegel, J.U.

    1983-03-01

    The renal quantitative scintillation camera study assesses glomerular filtration rate and effective renal plasma flow based upon renal uptake of 99mtechnetium-iron ascorbate and 131iodine-hippuran, respectively. The method was compared to inulin, para-aminohippuric acid and creatinine clearance studies in 7 normal subjects and 9 patients with various degrees of reduced renal function. The reproducibility of the technique was determined in 15 randomly selected pediatric patients. The values of glomerular filtration rate and effective renal plasma flow were not significantly different from those of inulin and para-aminohippuric acid studies. The reproducibility of the technique was comparable to that of inulin and para-aminohippuric acid studies. Patient acceptance of the technique is excellent and the cost is minimal. Renal morphology and excretory dynamics also are demonstrated. The technique is advocated as a clinical measure of renal function.

  10. Renal and adrenal tumors: Pathology, radiology, ultrasonography, therapy, immunology

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, E.; Leder, L.D.

    1987-01-01

    Aspects as diverse as radiology, pathology, urology, pediatrics and immunology have been brought together in one book. The most up-do-date methods of tumor diagnosis by CT, NMR, and ultrasound are covered, as are methods of catheter embolization and radiation techniques in case of primarily inoperable tumors. Contents: Pathology of Renal and Adrenal Neoplasms; Ultrasound Diagnosis of Renal and Pararenal Tumors; Computed-Body-Tomography of Renal Carcinoma and Perirenal Masses; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Renal Mass Lesions; I-125 Embolotherapy of Renal Tumors; Adrenal Mass Lesions in Infants and Children; Computed Tomography of the Adrenal Glands; Scintigraphic Studies of Renal and Adrenal Function; Surgical Management of Renal Cell Carcinoma; Operative Therapy of Nephroblastoma; Nonoperative Treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma; Prenatal Wilms' Tumor; Congenital Neuroblastoma; Nonsurgical Management of Wilms' Tumor; Immunologic Aspects of Malignant Renal Disease.

  11. [THE DYNAMICS OF THE MORBIDITY RATE OF HEMORRHAGIC FEVER WITH RENAL SYNDROME IN THE POPULATION OF THE CITY OF NABEREZHNYE CHELNY].

    PubMed

    Leont'ev, V V

    2015-01-01

    In the article there are considered the environmental and biological prerequisites for the dynamics of hemorrnagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) morbidity rate in the population of the city of Naberezhnye Chelny and the municipal districts located in the north-eastern part of the Republic of Tatarstan, a subdivision of Russian Federation. The territory of the Republic of Tatarstan is included into the body of Volga Federal District of the Russian Federation and is located within the boundaries in coniferous taiga and temperate forests, forest-steppe and steppe geographical areas. The endowment of large forests as well as weather and climatic conditions play an important role in the activity and rhythmicity of this natural focal viral infection, the virus carriers of which are mouse-like rodents. The virus belongs to the family Bunyaviridae and is a representative of the genus Hantavirus. On the base of the epidemiological and clinical data of State Autonomous Healthcare Institution "Naberezhno-Chelninskaya Infectious Diseases Hospital" there was performed the analysis of seasonal and the long-term HFRS morbidity rate from 2008 to 2012 with consideration of age and gender cohorts during the period from 2008 to 2012. There were shown both the seasonal character of the development of infectious disease and its unstable rhythmicity in the long-term dynamics. The most number of cases was observed in the summer-autumn period. 84,32% out of all disease cases were occurred in the male population, adults' morbidity rate was averagely 28 times more than the children's morbidity rate, which was due to the more frequent stay in the foci of the virus circulation. In the long-term dynamics the fever development is indirectly related with the weather and climate conditions of the whole region that influence on biology and the dynamics of rodents' population. So 2010 was differed by anomalously hot summer that led to a significant reduction in the number of the disease cases

  12. Fast dynamic electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oxygen imaging using low-rank tensors.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, Anthony G; Redler, Gage; Clifford, Bryan; Liang, Zhi-Pei; Halpern, Howard J; Epel, Boris

    2016-09-01

    Hypoxic tumors are resistant to radiotherapy, motivating the development of tools to image local oxygen concentrations. It is generally believed that stable or chronic hypoxia is the source of resistance, but more recent work suggests a role for transient hypoxia. Conventional EPR imaging (EPRI) is capable of imaging tissue pO2in vivo, with high pO2 resolution and 1mm spatial resolution but low imaging speed (10min temporal resolution for T1-based pO2 mapping), which makes it difficult to investigate the oxygen changes, e.g., transient hypoxia. Here we describe a new imaging method which accelerates dynamic EPR oxygen imaging, allowing 3D imaging at 2 frames per minute, fast enough to image transient hypoxia at the "speed limit" of observed pO2 change. The method centers on a low-rank tensor model that decouples the tradeoff between imaging speed, spatial coverage/resolution, and number of inversion times (pO2 accuracy). We present a specialized sparse sampling strategy and image reconstruction algorithm for use with this model. The quality and utility of the method is demonstrated in simulations and in vivo experiments in tumor bearing mice. PMID:27498337

  13. Fast dynamic electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oxygen imaging using low-rank tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulou, Anthony G.; Redler, Gage; Clifford, Bryan; Liang, Zhi-Pei; Halpern, Howard J.; Epel, Boris

    2016-09-01

    Hypoxic tumors are resistant to radiotherapy, motivating the development of tools to image local oxygen concentrations. It is generally believed that stable or chronic hypoxia is the source of resistance, but more recent work suggests a role for transient hypoxia. Conventional EPR imaging (EPRI) is capable of imaging tissue pO2in vivo, with high pO2 resolution and 1 mm spatial resolution but low imaging speed (10 min temporal resolution for T1-based pO2 mapping), which makes it difficult to investigate the oxygen changes, e.g., transient hypoxia. Here we describe a new imaging method which accelerates dynamic EPR oxygen imaging, allowing 3D imaging at 2 frames per minute, fast enough to image transient hypoxia at the "speed limit" of observed pO2 change. The method centers on a low-rank tensor model that decouples the tradeoff between imaging speed, spatial coverage/resolution, and number of inversion times (pO2 accuracy). We present a specialized sparse sampling strategy and image reconstruction algorithm for use with this model. The quality and utility of the method is demonstrated in simulations and in vivo experiments in tumor bearing mice.

  14. Speckle reduction in optical coherence tomography images via dynamic infinite-impulse-response filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jun; Park, Sangshik; Chung, Jung-Ho

    2014-03-01

    A temporal filtering method based on an infinite-impulse-response filter is presented to reduce speckle in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. This method works in a recursive way, linearly combining the current B-scan image frame with a previously filtered one to generate a newly filtered image. Thus, it performs with less computational complexity and time, compared to the finite-impulse-response filter based approach that typically averages multiple stored frames. To achieve speckle noise reduction while avoiding image blurring caused by sample motion, the filter coefficient is dynamically determined, depending on the parameters related to motion detection and image quality. We used the mean-squared error (MSE) between two successive frames as a criterion to detect sample motion and changed the filter coefficient when the MSE exceeded a certain threshold to prevent image blurring. The optimal coefficient and motion detection threshold were chosen for achieving robust and unblurred images in our testbed configuration. In this study, we analyzed the algorithm with OCT images acquired by a swept-source OCT system we built and also examined that the method operated in real-time even via CPU processing. Results in our and conventional schemes are compared by using various image quality metrics and by observing images. We found that the performance of speckle reduction was quite promising and simultaneously the fine details of sample structures were preserved even with sample motion.

  15. A systematic desaturation method for images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the Solar Dynamics Observatory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torre, Gabriele; Schwartz, Richard; Piana, Michele; Massone, Anna Maria; Benvenuto, Federico

    2016-05-01

    The fine spatial resolution of the SDO AIA CCD's is often destroyed by the charge in saturated pixels overflowing into a swath of neighboring cells during fast rising solar flares. Automated exposure control can only mitigate this issue to a degree and it has other deleterious effects. Our method addresses the desaturation problem for AIA images as an image reconstruction problem in which the information content of the diffraction fringes, generated by the interaction between the incoming radiation and the hardware of the spacecraft, is exploited to recover the true image intensities within the primary saturated core of the image. This methodology takes advantage of some well defined techniques like cross-correlation and the Expectation Maximization method to invert the direct relation between the diffraction fringes intensities and the true flux intensities. During this talk a complete overview on the structure of the method will be provided, besides some reliability tests obtained by its application against synthetic and real data.

  16. A Giant Intra Abdominal Mass Mimicking Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Rare Presentation of Renal Angiomyolipoma.

    PubMed

    Haque, M E; Rahman, M A; Kaisar, I; Islam, M F; Salam, M A

    2016-07-01

    Angiomyolipoma (AML) is a benign tumor commonly found in kidney than extra renal sites. Most of the small renal angiomyolipomas are diagnosed incidentally on ultrasound and other imaging studies. Some renal AMLs present clinically when become very big, giant renal angiomyolipoma. Although almost all cases are benign, a relatively rare variant of epitheloid angiomyolipoma has got malignant potential and can even metastasize. Ultrasonography, CT and MRI scan are usually used for diagnosis of angiomyolipoma with high level of accuracy; even though some lesions may be confused as renal cell carcinoma on imaging studies. Here, a 48 year old man presented with a large intra-abdominal mass preoperatively diagnosed as a case of right renal cell carcinoma and radical nephrectomy was performed. Histopathology revealed epitheloid angiomyolipoma (EAML). PMID:27612907

  17. Isolated renal hydatid presenting as a complex renal lesion followed by spontaneous hydatiduria.

    PubMed

    Bhaya, Anil; Shinde, Archana P

    2015-07-28

    Echinococcosis is a zoonotic disease. Liver is the most common site of involvement. Renal involvement is seen in 2% to 3% of patients. Computed tomography findings in renal hydatid typically include: a cyst with thick or calcified wall, unilocular cyst with detached membrane, a multiloculated cyst with mixed internal density and daughter cysts with lower density than maternal matrix. Rarely type IV hydatid cysts may mimic hypovascular renal cell carcinoma. We report a case of previously asymptomatic middle aged female who presented with mild intermittent pain and a complex renal lesion on imaging which was considered to be a hypovascular renal carcinoma or urothelial neoplasm. However, by serendipity, the patient had spontaneous hydatiduria and later was definitively diagnosed and stented. Hydatid disease should always be considered amongst the top differential diagnosis of an isolated "complex" renal lesion which remains indeterminate on imaging. PMID:26217457

  18. HYPR: constrained reconstruction for enhanced SNR in dynamic medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistretta, C.; Wieben, O.; Velikina, J.; Wu, Y.; Johnson, K.; Korosec, F.; Unal, O.; Chen, G.; Fain, S.; Christian, B.; Nalcioglu, O.; Kruger, R. A.; Block, W.; Samsonov, A.; Speidel, M.; Van Lysel, M.; Rowley, H.; Supanich, M.; Turski, P.; Wu, Yan; Holmes, J.; Kecskemeti, S.; Moran, C.; O'Halloran, R.; Keith, L.; Alexander, A.; Brodsky, E.; Lee, J. E.; Hall, T.; Zagzebski, J.

    2008-03-01

    During the last eight years our group has developed radial acquisitions with angular undersampling factors of several hundred that accelerate MRI in selected applications. As with all previous acceleration techniques, SNR typically falls as least as fast as the inverse square root of the undersampling factor. This limits the SNR available to support the small voxels that these methods can image over short time intervals in applications like time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA). Instead of processing each time interval independently, we have developed constrained reconstruction methods that exploit the significant correlation between temporal sampling points. A broad class of methods, termed HighlY Constrained Back PRojection (HYPR), generalizes this concept to other modalities and sampling dimensions.

  19. Imaging the Dynamics of Individual Viruses in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfain, Aaron; Garmann, Rees; Lahini, Yoav; Manoharan, Vinothan

    We have developed optical microscopy techniques that can detect and track individual, unlabeled viruses at thousands of frames per second. We use these techniques to study fast, dynamic processes in the life cycles of bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria). I will describe experiments that capture the ejection of double stranded DNA from bacteriophage λ. During the 1-2 second ejection, the DNA genome transitions from a compact, highly ordered spool within the capsid into an extended random coil in solution. By quantifying the amount of light scattered from a single λ phage as its DNA ejects, we measure the amount of DNA remaining in the virus capsid as a function of time. Measuring small fluctuations in the rate of ejection may uncover clues about the complex conformational rearrangements that the DNA undergoes while escaping the capsid. Funded in part by the NSF GRFP.

  20. Ultrafast laser-driven proton sources and dynamic proton imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nickles, Peter V.; Schnuerer, Matthias; Sokollik, Thomas; Ter-Avetisyan, Sargis; Sandner, Wolfgang; Amin, Munib; Toncian, Toma; Willi, Oswald; Andreev, Alexander

    2008-07-15

    Ion bursts, accelerated by an ultrafast (40 fs) laser-assisted target normal sheath acceleration mechanism, can be adjusted so as to deliver a nearly pure proton beam. Such laser-driven proton bursts have predominantly a low transverse emittance and a broad kinetic spectrum suitable for continuous probing of the temporal evolution of spatially extended electric fields that arise after laser irradiation of thin foils. Fields with a strength of up to 10{sup 10} V/m were measured with a new streaklike proton deflectometry setup. The data show the temporal and spatial evolution of electric fields that are due to target charge-up and ion-front expansion following intense laser-target interaction at intensities of 10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}. Measurement of the field evolution is important to gain further insight into lateral electron-transport processes and the influence of field dynamics on ion beam properties.

  1. DEEP HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING IN NGC 6397: STELLAR DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Heyl, J. S.; Richer, H.; Woodley, K. A.; Anderson, J.; Dotter, A.; Kalirai, J.; Fahlman, G.; Stetson, P.; Hurley, J.; Rich, R. M.; Shara, M.; Zurek, D.

    2012-12-10

    Multi-epoch observations with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope provide a unique and comprehensive probe of stellar dynamics within NGC 6397. We are able to confront analytic models of the globular cluster with the observed stellar proper motions. The measured proper motions probe well along the main sequence from 0.8 to below 0.1 M{sub Sun} as well as white dwarfs younger than 1 Gyr. The observed field lies just beyond the half-light radius where standard models of globular cluster dynamics (e.g., based on a lowered Maxwellian phase-space distribution) make very robust predictions for the stellar proper motions as a function of mass. The observed proper motions show no evidence for anisotropy in the velocity distribution; furthermore, the observations agree in detail with a straightforward model of the stellar distribution function. We do not find any evidence that the young white dwarfs have received a natal kick in contradiction with earlier results. Using the observed proper motions of the main-sequence stars, we obtain a kinematic estimate of the distance to NGC 6397 of 2.2{sup +0.5}{sub -0.7} kpc and a mass of the cluster of 1.1 {+-} 0.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} at the photometric distance of 2.53 kpc. One of the main-sequence stars appears to travel on a trajectory that will escape the cluster, yielding an estimate of the evaporation timescale, over which the number of stars in the cluster decreases by a factor of e, of about 3 Gyr. The proper motions of the youngest white dwarfs appear to resemble those of the most massive main-sequence stars, providing the first direct constraint on the relaxation time of the stars in a globular cluster of greater than or about 0.7 Gyr.

  2. Estimation of Beef Marbling Standard Number Based on Dynamic Ultrasound Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Osamu; Nabeoka, Natsuko; Miyajima, Tsuneharu; Hashimoto, Daisuke; Okushi, Masaaki

    Up to the present time, estimation of Beef Marbling Standard (BMS) number based on ultrasound echo imaging of live beef cattle has been studied. However, previous attempts to establish the objective and high accurate estimation method have not been satisfactory. Our previous work showed that estimation of BMS number was achieved by neural network modeling with non-linear mapping ablity. This paper reports a significant improvement of the estimation method based on dynamic ultrasound image. The proposed method consists of four processes: the extraction of dynamic and static texture features, frequency analysis, principal component analysis, and the estimation of BMS number by neural network. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed method, the experiments were conducted with or without dynamic image information. The number of target regions was set to 1 or 2, and two groups of samples, Case 1 and Case 2, were used for the experiments. Case 1 and Case 2 included 18 and 27 samples, which were measured at Saga Livestock Experiment Station and Nagasaki Agricultural and Forestry Technical Development Center, respectively. The image analysis was performed using only Case 1 or using the mixed group of Case 1 and 2. The experimental results with Case 1 showed the correlation coefficient of the estimated and the actual BMS number was improved from r=0.55 to r=0.79 by adding dynamic image information. Moreover, the correlation coefficient was further raised to r=0.84 with the number of target region increased from 1 to 2. Similarly, as for the mixed group of Case 1 and 2, the correlation coefficients were r=0.77, r=0.76, and r=0.88, respectively. These results suggested that a high estimation accuracy was achieved by adding dynamic image information and increasing target region.

  3. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Investigation for the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Philip Hanby; Schou, Jesper; Bush, R. I.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Bogart, R. S.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Liu, Y.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Zhao, J.; Title, A. M.; Schrijver, C. J.; Tarbell, T. D.; Tomczyk, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument and investigation as a part of the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is designed to study convection-zone dynamics and the solar dynamo, the origin and evolution of sunspots, active regions, and complexes of activity, the sources and drivers of solar magnetic activity and disturbances, links between the internal processes and dynamics of the corona and heliosphere, and precursors of solar disturbances for space-weather forecasts. A brief overview of the instrument, investigation objectives, and standard data products is presented.

  4. Renal radiopharmaceuticals--an update

    SciTech Connect

    Chervu, L.R.; Blaufox, M.D.

    1982-07-01

    Noninvasive radionuclide procedures in the evaluation of renal disease have been accepted increasingly as effective and valuable alternatives to older clinical methods. The development of suitable radiopharmaceuticals labeled with high photon intensity radionuclides and with /sup 99m/Tc in particular has stimulated this modality during the last few years. Currently several nearly ideal agents are available for anatomical and functional studies of kidney imparting very low absorbed radiation doses. These include /sup 99m/Tc-GHA and /sup 99m/Tc-DMSA for renal morphology and differential function evaluation, /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA for GFR and /sup 123/I orthoiodohippurate for ERPF measurements. A suitable agent as a replacement for the latter labeled with /sup 99m/Tc is actively being sought. Computer-assisted processing of dynamic renal function studies enables the observer to obtain a wealth of information related to the renal extraction, uptake, parenchymal transit and pelvic transit parameters of the agent administered into the bloodstream. Each of these parameters either globally or differentially contributes to a detailed evaluation of renal disease states. Several of these procedures have been validated against classical techniques clinically but more detailed information is being sought with the recently introduced radiopharmaceuticals. With the detailed validation and increasing recognition of the clinical utility of several of the radionuclidic procedures at many centers, it is hoped that radionuclide assessment of renal disorders ultimately will be made available routinely at all medical facilities.

  5. Segmentation of uterine fibroid ultrasound images using a dynamic statistical shape model in HIFU therapy.

    PubMed

    Ni, Bo; He, Fazhi; Yuan, ZhiYong

    2015-12-01

    Segmenting the lesion areas from ultrasound (US) images is an important step in the intra-operative planning of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). However, accurate segmentation remains a challenge due to intensity inhomogeneity, blurry boundaries in HIFU US images and the deformation of uterine fibroids caused by patient's breathing or external force. This paper presents a novel dynamic statistical shape model (SSM)-based segmentation method to accurately and efficiently segment the target region in HIFU US images of uterine fibroids. For accurately learning the prior shape information of lesion boundary fluctuations in the training set, the dynamic properties of stochastic differential equation and Fokker-Planck equation are incorporated into SSM (referred to as SF-SSM). Then, a new observation model of lesion areas (named to RPFM) in HIFU US images is developed to describe the features of the lesion areas and provide a likelihood probability to the prior shape given by SF-SSM. SF-SSM and RPFM are integrated into active contour model to improve the accuracy and robustness of segmentation in HIFU US images. We compare the proposed method with four well-known US segmentation methods to demonstrate its superiority. The experimental results in clinical HIFU US images validate the high accuracy and robustness of our approach, even when the quality of the images is unsatisfactory, indicating its potential for practical application in HIFU therapy.

  6. The performance of MLEM for dynamic imaging from simulated few-view, multi-pinhole SPECT.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dan; Wolf, Paul; Clough, Anne V; Schmidt, Taly Gilat

    2013-02-01

    Stationary small-animal SPECT systems are being developed for rapid dynamic imaging from limited angular views. This paper quantified, through simulations, the performance of Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM) for reconstructing a time-activity curve (TAC) with uptake duration of a few seconds from a stationary, three-camera multi-pinhole SPECT system. The study also quantified the benefits of a heuristic method of initializing the reconstruction with a prior image reconstructed from a conventional number of views, for example from data acquired during the late-study portion of the dynamic TAC. We refer to MLEM reconstruction initialized by a prior-image initial guess (IG) as MLEM ig . The effect of the prior-image initial guess on the depiction of contrast between two regions of a static phantom was quantified over a range of angular sampling schemes. A TAC was modeled from the experimentally measured uptake of (99m) Tc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) in the rat lung. The resulting time series of simulated images was quantitatively analyzed with respect to the accuracy of the estimated exponential washin and washout parameters. In both static and dynamic phantom studies, the prior-image initial guess improved the spatial depiction of the phantom, for example improved definition of the cylinder boundaries and more accurate quantification of relative contrast between cylinders. For example in the dynamic study, there was ~50% error in relative contrast for MLEM reconstructions compared to ~25-30% error for MLEM ig . In the static phantom study, the benefits of the initial guess decreased as the number of views increased. The prior-image initial guess introduced an additive offset in the reconstructed dynamic images, likely due to biases introduced by the prior image. MLEM initialized with a uniform initial guess yielded images that faithfully reproduced the time dependence of the simulated TAC; there were no statistically significant

  7. The performance of MLEM for dynamic imaging from simulated few-view, multi-pinhole SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dan; Wolf, Paul; Clough, Anne V.; Schmidt, Taly Gilat

    2013-01-01

    Stationary small-animal SPECT systems are being developed for rapid dynamic imaging from limited angular views. This paper quantified, through simulations, the performance of Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM) for reconstructing a time-activity curve (TAC) with uptake duration of a few seconds from a stationary, three-camera multi-pinhole SPECT system. The study also quantified the benefits of a heuristic method of initializing the reconstruction with a prior image reconstructed from a conventional number of views, for example from data acquired during the late-study portion of the dynamic TAC. We refer to MLEM reconstruction initialized by a prior-image initial guess (IG) as MLEMig. The effect of the prior-image initial guess on the depiction of contrast between two regions of a static phantom was quantified over a range of angular sampling schemes. A TAC was modeled from the experimentally measured uptake of 99mTc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) in the rat lung. The resulting time series of simulated images was quantitatively analyzed with respect to the accuracy of the estimated exponential washin and washout parameters. In both static and dynamic phantom studies, the prior-image initial guess improved the spatial depiction of the phantom, for example improved definition of the cylinder boundaries and more accurate quantification of relative contrast between cylinders. For example in the dynamic study, there was ~50% error in relative contrast for MLEM reconstructions compared to ~25-30% error for MLEMig. In the static phantom study, the benefits of the initial guess decreased as the number of views increased. The prior-image initial guess introduced an additive offset in the reconstructed dynamic images, likely due to biases introduced by the prior image. MLEM initialized with a uniform initial guess yielded images that faithfully reproduced the time dependence of the simulated TAC; there were no statistically significant differences in

  8. Fourier-processed images of dynamic lung function from list-mode data

    SciTech Connect

    Zubal, I.G.; Rowe, R.W.; Bizais, Y.; Susskind, H.; Bennett, G.W.; Brill, A.B.

    1983-01-01

    Time and volume correlated amplitude and phase images are computed from nuclear medical ventilation studies and for dynamic transmission scans of the lungs. This is made possible by a hardware interface and data acquisition system, developed in-house, allowing camera events and multiple ancillary physiological signals (including lung volume) to be acquired simultaneously in list mode. The first harmonic amplitude and phase images are constructed on an event by event basis. These are computed for both equal time and equal lung volume increments. Time and volume correlated Fourier images for ventilation studies have shown details and functional structures not usually seen in conventional imaging techniques. Processed transmission scans show similar results compared to ventilation images.

  9. Full-direct method for imaging pharmacokinetic parameters in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guanglei; Pu, Huangsheng; He, Wei; Liu, Fei; Luo, Jianwen; Bai, Jing

    2015-02-01

    Images of pharmacokinetic parameters (also known as parametric images) in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) can provide three-dimensional metabolic information for biological studies and drug development. However, the ill-posed nature of FMT and the high temporal variation of fluorophore concentration together make it difficult to obtain accurate parametric images in small animals in vivo. In this letter, we present a method to directly reconstruct the parametric images from the boundary measurements based on hybrid FMT/X-ray computed tomography (XCT) system. This method can not only utilize structural priors obtained from the XCT system to mitigate the ill-posedness of FMT but also make full use of the temporal correlations of boundary measurements to model the high temporal variation of fluorophore concentration. The results of numerical simulation and mouse experiment demonstrate that the proposed method leads to significant improvements in the reconstruction quality of parametric images.

  10. Full-direct method for imaging pharmacokinetic parameters in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guanglei; Pu, Huangsheng; Liu, Fei; Bai, Jing; He, Wei; Luo, Jianwen

    2015-02-23

    Images of pharmacokinetic parameters (also known as parametric images) in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) can provide three-dimensional metabolic information for biological studies and drug development. However, the ill-posed nature of FMT and the high temporal variation of fluorophore concentration together make it difficult to obtain accurate parametric images in small animals in vivo. In this letter, we present a method to directly reconstruct the parametric images from the boundary measurements based on hybrid FMT/X-ray computed tomography (XCT) system. This method can not only utilize structural priors obtained from the XCT system to mitigate the ill-posedness of FMT but also make full use of the temporal correlations of boundary measurements to model the high temporal variation of fluorophore concentration. The results of numerical simulation and mouse experiment demonstrate that the proposed method leads to significant improvements in the reconstruction quality of parametric images.

  11. Imaging electron dynamics with time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova-Gorelova, Daria; Küpper, Jochen; Santra, Robin

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically study how time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy can be applied for imaging coherent electron dynamics in molecules. We consider a process in which a pump pulse triggers coherent electronic dynamics in a molecule by creating a valence electron hole. An ultrashort extreme ultraviolet probe pulse creates a second electron hole in the molecule. Information about the electron dynamics is accessed by analyzing angular distributions of photoemission probabilities at a fixed photoelectron energy. We demonstrate that a rigorous theoretical analysis, which takes into account the indistinguishability of transitions induced by the ultrashort, broadband probe pulse and electron hole correlation effects, is necessary for the interpretation of time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectra. We show how a Fourier analysis of time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectra from a molecule can be applied to follow its electron dynamics by considering photoelectron distributions from an indole molecular cation with coherent electron dynamics.

  12. Renal metastases from osteogenic sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ayres, R.; Curry, N.S.; Gordon, L.; Bradford, B.F.

    1985-01-01

    A clinically and radiographically unsuspected ossified renal metastasis from a primary osteogenic sarcoma was identified by computed tomography (CT) and radionuclide bone scan. These imaging modalities play an important adjunctive role in the evaluation and follow-up of patients with primary osteogenic sarcoma.

  13. HUBBLE IMAGES REVEAL A YOUNG STAR'S DYNAMIC DISK AND JETS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images of HH 30 show changes over only a five-year period in the disk and jets of this newborn star, which is about half a million years old. The pictures were taken between 1995 and 2000 with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 aboard NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Astronomers are interested in the disk because it is probably similar to the one from which the Sun and the planets in our solar system formed. Hubble reveals an edge-on disk (located at the bottom of the images), which appears as a flattened cloud of dust split into two halves by a dark lane. The disk blocks light from the central star. All that is visible is the reflection of the star's light by dust above and below the plane of the disk. The disk's diameter is 450 astronomical units (one astronomical unit equals the Earth-Sun distance). Shadows billions of miles in size can be seen moving across the disk. In 1995 and 2000, the left and right sides of the disk were about the same brightness, but in 1998 the right side was brighter. These patterns may be caused by bright spots on the star or variations in the disk near the star. The dust cloud near the top of these frames is illuminated by the star and reflects changes in its brightness. The star's magnetic field plays a major role in forming the jets (located above and below the disk), which look like streams of water from a fire hose. The powerful magnetic field creates the jets by channeling gas from the disk along the magnetic poles above and below the star. The gaps between the compact knots of gas seen in the jet above the disk indicate that this is a sporadic process. By tracking the motion of these knots over time, astronomers have measured the jet's speed at between 200,000 to 600,000 miles per hour (160,000 and 960,000 kilometers per hour). Oddly, the jet below the disk is moving twice as fast as the one above it. Credits: NASA, Alan Watson (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico), Karl Stapelfeldt (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), John

  14. Renal cell carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Renal cancer; Kidney cancer; Hypernephroma; Adenocarcinoma of renal cells; Cancer - kidney ... ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 57. National Cancer Institute: PDQ renal cell cancer treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. ...

  15. [Renal function study assessed by 99mTc-DMSA renal scintigraphy before and after PNL].

    PubMed

    Sakurai, M; Hioki, T; Okuno, T; Sugimura, Y; Yamakawa, K; Yanagawa, M; Tajima, K; Tochigi, H; Kawamura, J

    1990-01-01

    99mTc-DMSA renal scintigraphy was carried out in 54 patients with unilateral renal stones before and after PNL. Four to 8 weeks after PNL the DMSA renal uptake significantly decreased to 17.2 +/- 6.0% from 18.2 +/- 6.7% before PNL. DMSA renal uptake did not change in the contralateral side. Since in some patients changes in the DMSA renal uptake of 5-7% were observed after PNL not only in the PNL side but also in the contralateral side, the renal function was assessed by the formula: DMSA renal uptake in the PNL side/DMSA renal uptake in the contralateral side, and the change of this ratio was evaluated in 44 patients, in whom the renal DMSA uptake in the PNL side was less than two times that in the contralateral side. The DMSA renal uptake ratio decreased to 95.6 +/- 8.7% from the base line 4-8 weeks after PNL. This change was statistically significant. Some functional risks such as massive bleeding with PNL, the fever after PNL and the number of nephrostomy tract did not affect the decrease in the renal function. In 29 patients in whom renal function was reevaluated one year after PNL, the DMSA renal uptake ratio significantly decreased to 94.2 +/- 9.6% from the base line 4-8 weeks after PNL. But the ratio significantly improved to 99.6 +/- 11.6% about one year after PNL. In two patients with a cold area on the renal image, the renal function of the operated side still remained at about 80% levels from the base line even one year after PNL.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. High-resolution full-field optical coherence tomography using high dynamic range image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong-Hoï, A.; Claveau, R.; Montgomery, P. C.; Serio, B.; Uhring, W.; Anstotz, F.; Flury, M.

    2016-04-01

    Full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT) based on white-light interference microscopy, is an emerging noninvasive imaging technique for characterizing biological tissue or optical scattering media with micrometer resolution. Tomographic images can be obtained by analyzing a sequence of interferograms acquired with a camera. This is achieved by scanning an interferometric microscope objectives along the optical axis and performing appropriate signal processing for fringe envelope extraction, leading to three-dimensional imaging over depth. However, noise contained in the images can hide some important details or induce errors in the size of these details. To firstly reduce temporal and spatial noise from the camera, it is possible to apply basic image post processing methods such as image averaging, dark frame subtraction or flat field division. It has been demonstrate that this can improve the quality of microscopy images by enhancing the signal to noise ratio. In addition, the dynamic range of images can be enhanced to improve the contrast by combining images acquired with different exposure times or light intensity. This can be made possible by applying a hybrid high dynamic range (HDR) technique, which is proposed in this paper. High resolution tomographic analysis is thus performed using a combination of the above-mentioned image processing techniques. As a result, the lateral resolution of the system can be improved so as to approach the diffraction limit of the microscope as well as to increase the power of detection, thus enabling new sub-diffraction sized structures contained in a transparent layer, initially hidden by the noise, to be detected.

  17. Defragmented image based autostereoscopic 3D displays with dynamic eye tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Kyu; Yoon, Ki-Hyuk; Yoon, Seon Kyu; Ju, Heongkyu

    2015-12-01

    We studied defragmented image based autostereoscopic 3D displays with dynamic eye tracking. Specifically, we examined the impact of parallax barrier (PB) angular orientation on their image quality. The 3D display system required fine adjustment of PB angular orientation with respect to a display panel. This was critical for both image color balancing and minimizing image resolution mismatch between horizontal and vertical directions. For evaluating uniformity of image brightness, we applied optical ray tracing simulations. The simulations took effects of PB orientation misalignment into account. The simulation results were then compared with recorded experimental data. Our optimal simulated system produced significantly enhanced image uniformity at around sweet spots in viewing zones. However this was contradicted by real experimental results. We offer quantitative treatment of illuminance uniformity of view images to estimate misalignment of PB orientation, which could account for brightness non-uniformity observed experimentally. Our study also shows that slight imperfection in the adjustment of PB orientation due to practical restrictions of adjustment accuracy can induce substantial non-uniformity of view images' brightness. We find that image brightness non-uniformity critically depends on misalignment of PB angular orientation, for example, as slight as ≤ 0.01 ° in our system. This reveals that reducing misalignment of PB angular orientation from the order of 10-2 to 10-3 degrees can greatly improve the brightness uniformity.

  18. Dynamic and Inherent B0 Correction for DTI Using Stimulated Echo Spiral Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Avram, Alexandru V.; Guidon, Arnaud; Truong, Trong-Kha; Liu, Chunlei; Song, Allen W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To present a novel technique for high-resolution stimulated echo (STE) diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with self-navigated interleaved spirals (SNAILS) readout trajectories that can inherently and dynamically correct for image artifacts due to spatial and temporal variations in the static magnetic field (B0) resulting from eddy currents, tissue susceptibilities, subject/physiological motion, and hardware instabilities. Methods The Hahn spin echo formed by the first two 90° radio-frequency pulses is balanced to consecutively acquire two additional images with different echo times (TE) and generate an inherent field map, while the diffusion-prepared STE signal remains unaffected. For every diffusion-encoding direction, an intrinsically registered field map is estimated dynamically and used to effectively and inherently correct for off-resonance artifacts in the reconstruction of the corresponding diffusion-weighted image (DWI). Results After correction with the dynamically acquired field maps, local blurring artifacts are specifically removed from individual STE DWIs and the estimated diffusion tensors have significantly improved spatial accuracy and larger fractional anisotropy. Conclusion Combined with the SNAILS acquisition scheme, our new method provides an integrated high-resolution short-TE DTI solution with inherent and dynamic correction for both motion-induced phase errors and off-resonance effects. PMID:23630029

  19. Method and apparatus of high dynamic range image sensor with individual pixel reset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A wide dynamic range image sensor provides individual pixel reset to vary the integration time of individual pixels. The integration time of each pixel is controlled by column and row reset control signals which activate a logical reset transistor only when both signals coincide for a given pixel.

  20. Using optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging in the evaluation of airway dynamics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabari, Margit V.; Kelly, Vanessa J.; Applegate, Matthew B.; Chee, Chunmin; Tan, Khay M.; Hariri, Lida P.; Harris, R. Scott; Winkler, Tilo; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease resulting in periodic attacks of coughing and wheezing due to temporarily constricted and clogged airways. The pathophysiology of asthma and the process of airway narrowing are not completely understood. Appropriate in vivo imaging modality with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to dynamically assess the behavior of airways is missing. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) enables real-time evaluation of the airways during dynamic and static breathing maneuvers. Our aim was to visualize the structure and function of airways in healthy and Methacholine (MCh) challenged lung. Sheep (n=3) were anesthetized, mechanically ventilated and imaged with OCT in 4 dependent and 4 independent airways both pre- and post-MCh administration. The OCT system employed a 2.4 Fr (0.8 mm diameter) catheter and acquired circumferential cross-sectional images in excess of 100 frames per second during dynamic tidal breathing, 20 second static breath-holds at end-inspiration and expiration pressure, and in a response to a single deep inhalation. Markedly different airway behavior was found in dependent versus non-dependent airway segments before and after MCh injection. OCT is a non-ionizing light-based imaging modality, which may provide valuable insight into the complex dynamic behavior of airway structure and function in the normal and asthmatic lung.