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Sample records for renal effects evolution

  1. Renal effects evolution in a Chinese population after reduction of cadmium exposure in rice

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xunwei; Liang Yihuai; Jin Taiyi Ye Tingting; Kong Qinghu; Wang Zaijuan; Lei Lijian; Bergdahl, Ingvar A.; Nordberg, Gunnar F.

    2008-10-15

    Cadmium is a well-known nephrotoxic agent with extremely long biological half-time of 10-30 years in human. To investigate the evolution of cadmium-induced renal effects in the population, a number of 148 residents who lived in cadmium-polluted area were followed-up for 3 years after the reduction of cadmium exposure in rice. Urinary cadmium (UCd), {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin (B2M) and albumin (ALB) were analyzed in 1995 and 1998, respectively. The results demonstrated that the changes of renal effects of residents depended on the levels of UCd before inflow of cadmium to human body declined. In cases where UCd were less than 10 {mu}g/g creatinine in 1995, evidence was found indicating significant decreases in proteinuria (i.e., B2M and ALB) 3 years later, whereas, in cases where the excretion of UCd exceeded 10 {mu}g/g creatinine in 1995, progression was observed. The study of dose-response relationships between UCd and B2M or ALB also showed that the cadmium-induced renal dysfunction might be reversible if UCd concentration was low-level before exposure decreasing, otherwise it might be irreversible or aggravated.

  2. Therapeutic effects of renal denervation on renal failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutang; Seto, Sai-Wang; Golledge, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    Sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) is increased in both patients and experimental animals with renal failure. The kidney is a richly innervated organ and has both efferent and afferent nerves. Renal denervation shows protective effects against renal failure in both animals and humans. The underlying mechanisms include a decrease in blood pressure, a decrease in renal efferent SNA, a decrease in central SNA and sympathetic outflow, and downregulation of the reninangiotensin system. It has been demonstrated that re-innervation occurs within weeks after renal denervation in animals but that no functional re-innervation occurs in humans for over two years after denervation. Renal denervation might not be renal protective in some situations including bile duct ligation-induced renal failure and ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury. Catheter-based renal denervation has been applied to patients with both early and end stage renal failure and the published results so far suggest that this procedure is safe and effective at decreasing blood pressure. The effectiveness of renal denervation in improving renal function in patients with renal failure needs to be further investigated.

  3. Renal Protective Effects of Resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Kitada, Munehiro; Koya, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    Resveratrol (3,5,4′-trihydroxystilbene), a natural polyphenolic compound found in grapes and red wine, is reported to have beneficial effects on cardiovascular diseases, including renal diseases. These beneficial effects are thought to be due to this compound's antioxidative properties: resveratrol is known to be a robust scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition to scavenging ROS, resveratrol may have numerous protective effects against age-related disorders, including renal diseases, through the activation of SIRT1. SIRT1, an NAD+-dependent deacetylase, was identified as one of the molecules through which calorie restriction extends the lifespan or delays age-related diseases, and this protein may regulate multiple cellular functions, including apoptosis, mitochondrial biogenesis, inflammation, glucose/lipid metabolism, autophagy, and adaptations to cellular stress, through the deacetylation of target proteins. Previous reports have shown that resveratrol can ameliorate several types of renal injury, such as diabetic nephropathy, drug-induced injury, aldosterone-induced injury, ischemia-reperfusion injury, sepsis-related injury, and unilateral ureteral obstruction, in animal models through its antioxidant effect or SIRT1 activation. Therefore, resveratrol may be a useful supplemental treatment for preventing renal injury. PMID:24379901

  4. Effects of adenosine infusion into renal interstitium on renal hemodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlowska, D.; Granger, J.P.; Knox, F.G.

    1987-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the hemodynamic effects of exogenous adenosine in the interstitium of the rat kidney. Adenosine or its analogues were infused into the renal interstitium by means of chronically implanted capsules. In fusion of adenosine decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) from 0.81 +/- 0.06 to 0.37 +/- 0.06 ml/min while having no effect on renal blood flow (RBF). The metabolically stable analogue, 2-chloradenosine (2-ClAdo), decreased GFR from 0.73 +/- 0.07 to 021 +/- 0.06 ml/min. Interstitial infusion of theophylline, an adenosine receptor antagonist, completely abolished the effects of adenosine and 2-ClAdo on GFR. The distribution of adenosine, when infused into the renal interstitium, was determined using radiolabeled 5'-(N-ethyl)-carboxamidoadenosine (NECA), a metabolically stable adenosine agonist. After continuous infusion, (/sup 3/H)NECA was distributed throughout the kidney. The effects of NECA to reduce GFR were similar to those of adenosine and 2-ClAdo. They conclude that increased levels of adenosine in the renal interstitium markedly decrease GFR without affecting RBF in steady-state conditions. The marked effects of adenosine agonists during their infusion into the renal interstitium and the complete blockade of these effects by theophylline suggest an extracellular action of adenosine.

  5. Metabolic effects of renal denervation.

    PubMed

    Thomopoulos, Costas; Spanoudi, Filio; Kyriazis, Ioannis; Anastasopoulos, Ioannis; Ioannidis, Ioannis

    2013-08-01

    In the present review article we address the issue of the potential effect of renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) on metabolic states associated with resistant hypertension. So far, there is an established pathophysiological background denoting that abnormalities in glucose metabolism especially in obese patients and in those with sleep apnea are constantly accompanied by increased sympathetic firing, as assessed by markers of sympathetic activity. Since resistant hypertension is also characterized by enhanced sympathetic activity, it seems logical and biologically plausible, that RSD might favorably influence impaired glucose metabolism, sleep disorders and increased body adiposity beyond BP lowering. Despite the limited evidence from clinical trials, there are promising data suggesting that RSD indeed ameliorates glucose metabolism-related measures in resistant hypertension. Well-designed randomized trials recruiting a larger number of patients with hypertension, and focused on metabolic parameters, may refine the role of RSD as a potential intervention to treat dysmetabolic states associated with hypertension.

  6. Renal vascular effects of calcium channel blockers in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Benstein, J A; Dworkin, L D

    1990-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that calcium channel blockers have specific effects on renal hemodynamics in patients with hypertension and may also slow the progression of chronic renal failure. When these agents are studied in vitro, their predominant effect is to reverse afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction induced by catecholamines or angiotensin II. Because efferent resistance may remain high, glomerular filtration rate rises while renal blood flow remains low. The effects in vivo are less consistent. In human hypertension, calcium channel blockers lower renal resistance and may raise both renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate. In experimental models of chronic renal disease, calcium channel blockers slow the progression of renal damage; however, variable effects on renal hemodynamics have been found. Other factors implicated in the progression of renal damage, including compensatory renal hypertrophy, platelet aggregation, and calcium deposition, may also be favorably influenced by these agents. Recent studies suggest that calcium channel blockers may have similar protective effects in patients with hypertension and chronic renal disease.

  7. Environmental lead and renal effects in children.

    PubMed

    Verberk, M M; Willems, T E; Verplanke, A J; De Wolff, F A

    1996-01-01

    The effect of lead on five renal-effect parameters was studied in 151 children (i.e., 3-6-y-olds) who resided at different distances from a lead smelter in Baia Mare, Romania. A relationship was found between concentration of lead in blood (mean +/- standard deviation: 342 +/- 224 microgram/l) and the activity of N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase in urine, as demonstrated by a 14% increase of N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase per 100 micrograms/l blood lead that was indicative of renal tubular damage. No relationship was found between blood lead level and the renal-effect parameters albumin, alpha-1-microglobulin, retinol binding protein, or alanine aminopeptidase in urine. Cadmium in blood was not elevated. It is well known that N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase is a sensitive parameter for renal effects, resulting from lead exposure in adults and from diabetes and nephrotoxic medicines in children. This study is the first to demonstrate an effect of environmental lead exposure on renal integrity in children.

  8. The renal effects of NSAIDs in dogs.

    PubMed

    Lomas, Amy L; Grauer, Gregory F

    2015-01-01

    The quality of life for dogs with osteoarthritis can often be improved with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs); however, the number of adverse drug events associated with NSAID use reported to the Federal Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine is higher than that for any other companion animal drug. Of those events, adverse renal reactions are the second most reported. NSAIDs produce pharmacologic effects via inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX), which decreases production of prostanoids. Prostaglandins are synthesized by both the COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes in the healthy kidney and influence renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, renin release, and Na excretion. There are important species differences in the renal expression of COX-1 and COX-2. For example, dogs have higher basal levels of COX-2 expression in the kidney compared with humans. In addition, in dogs with chronic kidney disease, an increase in COX-2 expression occurs and synthesis of prostaglandins shifts to the COX-2 pathway. For those reasons, NSAIDs that target COX-2 may be expected to adversely affect renal function in dogs, especially dogs with chronic kidney disease. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the literature to report the renal effects of NSAIDs in dogs.

  9. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  10. Catheter-Based Radiofrequency Renal Denervation: Location Effects on Renal Norepinephrine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongxing; Hata, Cary; Narciso, Irvin; Hall, Michael E.; Hall, John E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Clinical studies indicate that blood pressure (BP)-lowering effects of radiofrequency (RF) renal denervation (RD) are sustained for up to 2 years, although a recent clinical trial failed to find a major effect compared to sham treatment. In most previous studies, the efficacy of RD has not been assessed. The current study determined whether RD in different regions of the renal artery causes different degrees of RD as assessed with renal norepinephrine (NE) levels. METHODS AND RESULTS Unilateral RD was performed on 14 pigs divided into 3 groups: RD near the ostium, in the main renal artery near the bifurcation, and in extrarenal branches of the renal artery. After 2 weeks post-RD, the pigs were euthanized, renal cortex tissue was collected for NE measurement, and renal arteries were prepared for histological analysis. Renal NE decreased by 12% with RD at the ostium, 45% with RD near the bifurcation in the main renal artery, and 74% when RD was performed in extrarenal artery branches. The number of renal nerves was greatest in extrarenal branches and in the main artery compared to the ostium and the average distance from the lumen was greatest for nerves at the ostium and least at the branches. CONCLUSIONS RF RD lowers renal NE more significantly when performed in branches of the renal artery closer to the kidney. Increased efficacy of RF RD in extrarenal arterial branches may be due to the greater number of nerves in close proximity to the artery lumen in the branches. PMID:25576624

  11. Randomized prospective study of the evolution of renal function depending on the anticalcineurin used.

    PubMed

    Moro, J A; Almenar Bonet, L; Martínez-Dolz, L; Raso, R; Sánchez-Lázaro, I; Agüero, J; Salvador, Antonio

    2008-11-01

    Renal failure is one of the primary medium- to long-term morbidities in heart transplant (HT) recipients. To a great extent, this renal deterioration is associated with calcineurin inhibitors, primarily cyclosporine A (CsA). It has been suggested that tacrolimus provides better renal function in these patients. We assessed the medium-term evolution of renal function depending on the calcineurin inhibitor used after HT. We assessed 40 consecutive HT recipients over one year. Patients were randomized to receive CsA (n = 20) or tacrolimus (n = 20) in combination with mycophenolate mofetil (1 g/12 h) and deflazacort in decreasing dosages. We analyzed demographic variables before HT, creatinine values before and six months after HT and incidence of acute rejection. No demographic, clinical, or analytical differences were observed were between the two groups before HT. Repeated measures analysis of variance of creatinine values showed no significant differences between the two groups (P = .98). Furthermore, no differences were observed in either the incidence of rejection (P = .02) or rejection-free survival (P = .14). There seems to be no difference in efficacy profile and renal tolerability between CsA and tacrolimus therapy during the first months after HT.

  12. Renal protective effects of chronic exercise and antihypertensive therapy in hypertensive rats with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Kohzuki, M; Kamimoto, M; Wu, X M; Xu, H L; Kawamura, T; Mori, N; Nagasaka, M; Kurosawa, H; Minami, N; Kanazawa, M; Saito, T; Yoshida, K

    2001-10-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure are restricted to mild physical activity and tend to a lack of exercise. However, there have been few reports regarding the influence of chronic exercise on the progression of renal disease. Similarly, there are few animal models concerned with the effect of exercise training on improving renal function. Therefore, we assessed the renal effects of moderate chronic treadmill exercise in a remnant kidney model of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) with chronic renal failure. We also assessed the effects of exercise and antihypertensive therapy on renal function. Eight-week-old SHR were subjected to 5/6 nephrectomy by removal of the left kidney and excision of two-thirds of the right kidney. The rats were divided into four groups: (i) no exercise (Non-EX); (ii) moderate exercise with treadmill running (20 m/min, 0 grade incline for 60 min) (EX); (iii) EX with an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, enalapril (2 mg/kg per day, i.p.); and (iv) EX with an angiotensin receptor antagonist, losartan (5 mg/kg per day, i.p.), for 4 weeks. Chronic EX significantly attenuated the increase in proteinuria (P < 0.01) and significantly protected against increases in the index of glomerular sclerosis (IGS). Both enalapril and losartan with EX significantly decreased blood pressure (P < 0.001), and further decreased the IGS. In the stepwise multiple regression analysis, only antihypertensive drug remained in the model as a significant predictor of IGS (P < 0.0001). In contrast, exercise, antihypertensive drug and mean systolic blood pressure (weeks 1-4) remained in the model as a significant predictors of mean proteinuria (weeks 1-4) (all P < 0.0001). These results suggest that exercise does not worsen renal function and has renal-protective effects in this model of rats. Moreover, the antihypertensive therapy has additional renal-protective effects in this model of rats.

  13. Effects of Renal Denervation on Renal Artery Function in Humans: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Doltra, Adelina; Hartmann, Arthur; Stawowy, Philipp; Goubergrits, Leonid; Kuehne, Titus; Wellnhofer, Ernst; Gebker, Rolf; Schneeweis, Christopher; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Esler, Murray; Fleck, Eckart; Kelle, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Aim To study the effects of RD on renal artery wall function non-invasively using magnetic resonance. Methods and Results 32 patients undergoing RD were included. A 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance of the renal arteries was performed before RD and after 6-month. We quantified the vessel sharpness of both renal arteries using a quantitative analysis tool (Soap-Bubble®). In 17 patients we assessed the maximal and minimal cross-sectional area of both arteries, peak velocity, mean flow, and renal artery distensibility. In a subset of patients wall shear stress was assessed with computational flow dynamics. Neither renal artery sharpness nor renal artery distensibility differed significantly. A significant increase in minimal and maximal areas (by 25.3%, p = 0.008, and 24.6%, p = 0.007, respectively), peak velocity (by 16.9%, p = 0.021), and mean flow (by 22.4%, p = 0.007) was observed after RD. Wall shear stress significantly decreased (by 25%, p = 0.029). These effects were observed in blood pressure responders and non-responders. Conclusions RD is not associated with adverse effects at renal artery level, and leads to an increase in cross-sectional areas, velocity and flow and a decrease in wall shear stress. PMID:27003912

  14. Effects of renal perfusion pressure on renal medullary hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chunhua; Hu, Chunyan; Polichnowski, Aaron; Mori, Takefumi; Skelton, Meredith; Ito, Sadayoshi; Cowley, Allen W

    2009-06-01

    Studies were designed to determine the effects of increases of renal perfusion pressure on the production of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and NO(2)(-)+NO(3)(-) within the renal outer medulla. Sprague-Dawley rats were studied with either the renal capsule intact or removed to ascertain the contribution of changes of medullary blood flow and renal interstitial hydrostatic pressure on H(2)O(2) and NO(2)(-)+NO(3)(-) production. Responses to three 30-minute step changes of renal perfusion pressure (from approximately 85 to approximately 115 to approximately 145 mm Hg) were studied using adjustable aortic occluders proximal and distal to the left renal artery. Medullary interstitial H(2)O(2) determined by microdialysis increased at each level of renal perfusion pressure from 640 to 874 to 1593 nmol/L, as did H(2)O(2) urinary excretion rates, and these responses were significantly attenuated by decapsulation. Medullary interstitial NO(2)(-)+NO(3)(-) increased from 9.2 to 13.8 to 16.1 mumol/L, with parallel changes in urine NO(2)(-)+NO(3)(-), but decapsulation did not significantly blunt these responses. Over the range of renal perfusion pressure, medullary blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry) rose approximately 30% and renal interstitial hydrostatic pressure rose from 7.8 to 19.7 cm H(2)O. Renal interstitial hydrostatic pressure and the natriuretic and diuretic responses were significantly attenuated with decapsulation, but medullary blood flow was not affected. The data indicate that pressure-induced increases of H(2)O(2) emanated largely from increased tubular flow rates to the medullary thick-ascending limbs of Henle and NO largely from increased medullary blood flow to the vasa recta. The parallel pressure-induced increases of H(2)O(2) and NO indicate a participation in shaping the "normal" pressure-natriuresis relationship and explain why an imbalance in either would affect the blood pressure salt sensitivity.

  15. Effect of tolazoline on renal function in newborn puppies.

    PubMed

    John, E G; Bhat, R; Assadi, F K; Vidyasagar, D; Fornell, L

    1986-01-01

    Tolazoline is used in pulmonary hypertension and hypoperfusion syndrome during the neonatal period. Some of the side effects of tolazoline are hypotension, bleeding disorders and renal dysfunction. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of hypoxia and tolazoline on renal function in newborn puppies. The data in normal animals administered tolazoline alone did not reveal any statistically significant changes in blood pressure or in renal function. In the hypoxia group changes in renal function were noticed in spite of normal blood pressure. When tolazoline was administered to the hypoxic animals, a marked decrease in blood pressure resulted. Indeed, changes in renal function were more profound in the hypoxic animals receiving tolazoline than in hypoxic animals not receiving tolazoline, even though some of the renal functional values did not reach statistical significance.

  16. [Surgical renal biopsies: technique, effectiveness and complications].

    PubMed

    Pinsach Elías, L; Blasco Casares, F J; Ibarz Servió, L; Valero Milián, J; Areal Calama, J; Bucar Terrades, S; Saladié Roig, J M

    1991-01-01

    Retrospective study made on 140 renal surgical biopsies (RSB) performed throughout the past 4 years in our Unit. The technique's effectiveness and morbidity are emphasized and the surgical technique and type of anaesthesia described. The sample obtained was enough to perform an essay in 100% cases, and a diagnosis was reached in 98.5%. Thirty-nine patients (27.8%) presented complications, 13 (9.2%) of which were directly related to the surgical technique. No case required blood transfusion and no deaths were reported. The type of anaesthesia used was: local plus sedation in 104 (74.2%) cases, rachianaesthesia in 10 (7.1%) and general in 26 (18.5%). The same approach was used in all patients: minimal subcostal lumbotomy, using Wilde's forceps to obtain the samples. It is believed that RSB is a highly effective, low mortality procedure, easy and quick to perform, and suitable for selected patients.

  17. Renal effects of uranium in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Kurttio, Päivi; Auvinen, Anssi; Salonen, Laina; Saha, Heikki; Pekkanen, Juha; Mäkeläinen, Ilona; Väisänen, Sari B; Penttilä, Ilkka M; Komulainen, Hannu

    2002-04-01

    Animal studies and small studies in humans have shown that uranium is nephrotoxic. However, more information about its renal effects in humans following chronic exposure through drinking water is required. We measured uranium concentrations in drinking water and urine in 325 persons who had used drilled wells for drinking water. We measured urine and serum concentrations of calcium, phosphate, glucose, albumin, creatinine, and beta-2-microglobulin to evaluate possible renal effects. The median uranium concentration in drinking water was 28 microg/L (interquartile range 6-135, max. 1,920 microg/L) and in urine 13 ng/mmol creatinine (2-75), resulting in the median daily uranium intake of 39 microg (7-224). Uranium concentration in urine was statistically significantly associated with increased fractional excretion of calcium and phosphate. Increase of uranium in urine by 1 microg/mmol creatinine increased fractional excretion of calcium by 1.5% [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.6-2.3], phosphate by 13% (1.4-25), and glucose excretion by 0.7 micromol/min (-0.4-1.8). Uranium concentrations in drinking water and daily intake of uranium were statistically significantly associated with calcium fractional excretion, but not with phosphate or glucose excretion. Uranium exposure was not associated with creatinine clearance or urinary albumin, which reflect glomerular function. In conclusion, uranium exposure is weakly associated with altered proximal tubulus function without a clear threshold, which suggests that even low uranium concentrations in drinking water can cause nephrotoxic effects. Despite chronic intake of water with high uranium concentration, we observed no effect on glomerular function. The clinical and public health relevance of the findings are not easily established, but our results suggest that the safe concentration of uranium in drinking water may be within the range of the proposed guideline values of 2-30 microg/L.

  18. Renal effects of uranium in drinking water.

    PubMed Central

    Kurttio, Päivi; Auvinen, Anssi; Salonen, Laina; Saha, Heikki; Pekkanen, Juha; Mäkeläinen, Ilona; Väisänen, Sari B; Penttilä, Ilkka M; Komulainen, Hannu

    2002-01-01

    Animal studies and small studies in humans have shown that uranium is nephrotoxic. However, more information about its renal effects in humans following chronic exposure through drinking water is required. We measured uranium concentrations in drinking water and urine in 325 persons who had used drilled wells for drinking water. We measured urine and serum concentrations of calcium, phosphate, glucose, albumin, creatinine, and beta-2-microglobulin to evaluate possible renal effects. The median uranium concentration in drinking water was 28 microg/L (interquartile range 6-135, max. 1,920 microg/L) and in urine 13 ng/mmol creatinine (2-75), resulting in the median daily uranium intake of 39 microg (7-224). Uranium concentration in urine was statistically significantly associated with increased fractional excretion of calcium and phosphate. Increase of uranium in urine by 1 microg/mmol creatinine increased fractional excretion of calcium by 1.5% [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.6-2.3], phosphate by 13% (1.4-25), and glucose excretion by 0.7 micromol/min (-0.4-1.8). Uranium concentrations in drinking water and daily intake of uranium were statistically significantly associated with calcium fractional excretion, but not with phosphate or glucose excretion. Uranium exposure was not associated with creatinine clearance or urinary albumin, which reflect glomerular function. In conclusion, uranium exposure is weakly associated with altered proximal tubulus function without a clear threshold, which suggests that even low uranium concentrations in drinking water can cause nephrotoxic effects. Despite chronic intake of water with high uranium concentration, we observed no effect on glomerular function. The clinical and public health relevance of the findings are not easily established, but our results suggest that the safe concentration of uranium in drinking water may be within the range of the proposed guideline values of 2-30 microg/L. PMID:11940450

  19. Effect of renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of grepafloxacin.

    PubMed

    Efthymiopoulos, C; Bramer, S L; Maroli, A; Gambertoglio, J G

    1997-01-01

    Grepafloxacin is mainly (approximately 90%) excreted by nonrenal mechanisms. The effect of renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of grepafloxacin was evaluated in an open-label study involving 20 adults, 15 of whom had some degree of renal impairment (creatinine clearance 7.5 to 64.0 ml/min). Of these 15, 3 had mild renal impairment, 6 had moderate renal impairment, and 6 had severe renal impairment. Grepafloxacin 400 mg was administered orally once daily for 7 days, and pharmacokinetic parameters were measured on days 1 and 7. The results show that both renal clearance and the amount of grepafloxacin excreted unchanged in urine, on day 1 and day 7, were significantly lower in individuals with severe renal impairment compared with those who were healthy. Renal clearance was 0.50 +/- 0.05 ml/min/kg in healthy individuals vs 0.15 +/- 0.05 ml/min/kg in patients with severe renal impairment on day 1, while the corresponding values on day 7 were 0.46 +/- 0.04 ml/min/kg vs 0.14 +/- 0.08 ml/min/kg, respectively. The percentage of grepafloxacin excreted unchanged in urine on day 1 was 5.1 +/- 3.0 in the healthy individuals and 1.5 +/- 0.7 in those with severe renal impairment. On day 7, the corresponding values were 7.9 +/- 1.9 and 2.9 +/- 2.2. No other significant pharmacokinetic differences occurred between the 2 groups. Accumulation during multiple dose administration did not vary with the degree of renal impairment. We conclude that the pharmacokinetics of grepafloxacin are not significantly different in individuals with varying degrees of renal impairment. Hence, dose adjustment is not necessary during treatment of patients with renal dysfunction.

  20. Effects of radiofrequency ablation on individual renal function: assessment by technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine renal scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Takashi; Sato, Shuhei; Iguchi, Toshihiro; Mimura, Hidefumi; Yasui, Kotaro; Gobara, Hideo; Saika, Takashi; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2006-04-01

    We quantitatively evaluated total and individual renal function by technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine (Tc-99m MAG3) renal scintigraphy before and after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of renal tumors. Eleven patients who underwent Tc-99m MAG3 renal scintigraphy 1 week before and after RFA were evaluated (7 men and 4 women; age range: 23-83 years; mean age: 60.6 years). Five patients had solitary kidneys, and five had normally or minimally functioning contralateral kidneys. One patient had a renal cell carcinoma in the contralateral kidney. One patient with a solitary kidney underwent RFA a second time for a residual tumor. In patients with a solitary kidney, MAG3 clearance decreased after 5 of 6 RFAs, and in patients with a normally functioning contralateral kidney, MAG3 clearance decreased after 4 of 5 RFAs, but no significant differences were observed between before and after treatments. In addition to the total MAG3 clearance, the split MAG3 clearance was evaluated in patients with a normally functioning contralateral kidney. MAG3 clearance decreased in 4 of 5 treated kidneys, while it adversely increased in the contralateral kidneys after 4 of 5 RFAs. No significant differences, however, were observed between before and after treatments. The results of our study revealed no significant differences in sCr, BUN, CCr, or MAG3 clearance between pre- and post-RFA values. These results support data regarding the functional impact and safety of renal RFA in published reports. We evaluated total and individual renal function quantitatively using Tc-99m MAG3 renal scintigraphy before and after treatment. This scintigraphy was very useful in assessing the effects of RFA on renal function.

  1. Effect of increased protein intake on renal acid load and renal hemodynamic responses.

    PubMed

    Teunissen-Beekman, Karianna F M; Dopheide, Janneke; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Bakker, Stephan J L; Brink, Elizabeth J; de Leeuw, Peter W; van Baak, Marleen A

    2016-03-01

    Increased protein intake versus maltodextrin intake for 4 weeks lowers blood pressure. Concerns exist that high-protein diets reduce renal function. Effects of acute and 4-week protein intake versus maltodextrin intake on renal acid load, glomerular filtration rate and related parameters were compared in this study. Seventy-nine overweight individuals with untreated elevated blood pressure and normal kidney function were randomized to consume a mix of protein isolates (60 g/day) or maltodextrin (60 g/day) for 4 weeks in energy balance. Twenty-four-hour urinary potential renal acid load (uPRAL) was compared between groups. A subgroup (maltodextrin N = 27, protein mix N = 25) participated in extra test days investigating fasting levels and postprandial effects of meals supplemented with a moderate protein- or maltodextrin-load on glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow, plasma renin, aldosterone, pH, and bicarbonate. uPRAL was significantly higher in the protein group after 4 weeks (P ≤ 0.001). Postprandial filtration fraction decreased further after the protein-supplemented breakfast than after the maltodextrin-supplemented breakfast after 4 weeks of supplementation (P ≤ 0.001). Fasting and postprandial levels of glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow, renin, aldosterone, angiotensin-converting enzyme, pH and bicarbonate did not differ between groups. In conclusion, 4 weeks on an increased protein diet (25% of energy intake) increased renal acid load, but did not affect renal function. Postprandial changes, except for filtration fraction, also did not differ between groups. These data suggest that a moderate increase in protein intake by consumption of a protein mix for 4 weeks causes no (undesirable) effects on kidney function in overweight and obese individuals with normal kidney function.

  2. Renal effects of immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Izzedine, Hassan; Mateus, Christine; Boutros, Céline; Robert, Caroline; Rouvier, Philippe; Amoura, Zahir; Mathian, Alexis

    2016-12-26

    Recent advances in immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICPI) development have led to major improvements in oncology patient outcomes. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) are two essential immune checkpoint receptors. Ipilimumab and tremelimumab (anti-CTLA-4-blocking antibodies) and pembrolizumab and nivolumab (antibodies targeting PD-1 receptors) have already been approved by US Food and Drug Administration in several malignancies. Two different forms of ICPI-induced renal damage have been identified, including acute (granulomatous) tubulointerstitial nephritis and immune complex glomerulonephritis. The observed acute renal damage can be reversed upon ICPI drug discontinuation and renal function can recover back to normal following the introduction of systemic corticosteroid treatment. Any delay in treating this complication could result in definitive and irreversible renal injury.

  3. Lithium: thyroid effects and altered renal handling.

    PubMed

    Oakley, P W; Dawson, A H; Whyte, I M

    2000-01-01

    Lithium is frequently used in the treatment of bipolar affective disorder, and is widely known to affect thyroid function, most commonly resulting in hypothyroidism and goiter. Less well-known is the association between lithium therapy and hyperthyroidism and the potential for lithium to moderate the effects of thyroxine at a cellular level. Lithium excretion relates principally to glomerular filtration rate and proximal tubule function. Thyroxine, through its effects on tubular function, alters lithium clearance such that thyroid disease may cause retention of lithium and subsequent toxicity. We report 2 cases with lithium toxicity, both of whom were later found to be hyperthyroid. One patient developed thyroid storm following dialysis to remove lithium. The other received antithyroid medication early. Both suffered a protracted multifactorial delirium requiring intensive inpatient care. In addition to altering thyroid function, lithium therapy may mask the signs of hyperthyroidism by inducing cellular unresponsiveness. In some lithium-treated patients with biochemical hyperthyroidism, early antithyroid treatment may be appropriate. Altered renal tubular function induced by hyperthyroidism may result in retention of lithium and systemic toxicity. We propose induction of the proximal tubule sodium hydrogen antiporter as the relevant mechanism.

  4. Acute effects of ethanol on renal folate clearance in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenga, B.H.; McMartin, K.E.

    1986-03-05

    Studies of the renal clearance of folic acid in primates demonstrate net reabsorption of folate by a saturable system. The acute administration of ethanol to rats causes a significant increase in urinary folate excretion. The mechanism for this effect is unknown and thus the effect of acute administration of ethanol on the renal absorption and urinary clearance of folate was studied in rats. Folic acid was administered to male Sprague-Dawley rats via continuous intravenous infusion in doses ranging from 3-75 micromoles/kg and renal clearance relative to inulin was determined. The effects of various dose levels of ethanol on these parameters were then determined. At a dose of 15 micromoles/kg, the renal clearance of folate relative to that of inulin was about 0.65 mg/min. At a plasma ethanol level about 100 mg/dl, the renal clearance of folate was not markedly altered. These results suggests that there is net reabsorption of folate in the rat kidney and that moderate doses of ethanol have little effect on renal effect on renal folate reabsorption.

  5. Renal hemodynamic effects of relaxin in humans.

    PubMed

    Smith, Marie; Davison, John; Conrad, Kirk; Danielson, Lee

    2005-05-01

    Rat studies have convincingly demonstrated the essential role of the ovarian hormone relaxin in mediating gestational renal hemodynamic and osmoregulatory changes in that species. We describe a model in nonpregnant volunteers using exogenous hCG to stimulate the production and release of ovarian relaxin in order to assess renal hemodynamic responses. Women (n = 10) were serially studied +/- hCG stimulation during menstrual cycles with measurement of inulin, PAH, and neutral dextran clearances (to determine glomerular filtration rate [GFR], renal plasma flow [RPF], and glomerular porosity, respectively). Controls were women without ovarian function (n = 6) and men (n = 10). GFR and RPF were increased in the luteal phase compared to the follicular phase (15.3% increase in GFR, P < 0.005; 17.8% increase in RPF, P < 0.05). In controls, GFR and RPF were not significantly different between study occasions. Although exogenous hCG did not stimulate relaxin secretion in women without ovarian function or in men, it did so in normal women, but not into the pregnancy range. In no group were renal hemodynamics augmented by administered hCG. In naturally occurring cycles, increased serum relaxin is associated with augmented renal hemodynamics. As luteal stimulation with hCG failed to yield pregnancy relaxin levels, the use of exogenous relaxin for human administration is needed to further elucidate the renal vasodilatory properties of relaxin.

  6. Effect of Cuscuta chinensis on renal function in ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute renal failure rats.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sun; Lee, Yun Jung; Kim, Eun Ju; Lee, An Sook; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2011-01-01

    The kidneys play a central role in regulating water, ion composition and excretion of metabolic waste products in the urine. Cuscuta chinensis has been known as an important traditional Oriental medicine for the treatment of liver and kidney disorders. Thus, we studied whether an aqueous extract of Cuscuta chinensis (ACC) seeds has an effect on renal function parameters in ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute renal failure (ARF) rats. Administration of 250 mg/kg/day ACC showed that renal functional parameters including urinary excretion rate, osmolality, Na(+), K(+), Cl(-), creatinine clearance, solute-free water reabsorption were significantly recovered in ischemia/reperfusion-induced ARF. Periodic acid Schiff staining showed that administration of ACC improved tubular damage in ischemia/reperfusion-induced ARF. In immunoblot and immunohistological examinations, ischemia/reperfusion-induced ARF decreased the expressions of water channel AQP 2, 3 and sodium potassium pump Na,K-ATPase in the renal medulla. However, administration of ACC markedly incremented AQP 2, 3 and Na,K-ATPase expressions. Therefore, these data indicate that administration of ACC ameliorates regulation of the urine concentration and renal functions in rats with ischemia/reperfusion-induced ARF.

  7. Differential renal function in unilateral renal injury: possible effects of radiopharmaceutical choice. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A. Jr.; Lallone, R.

    1985-01-01

    An abnormal filtration fraction or a significant divergence between a kidney's ability to extract Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and other function parameters, such as the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or the effective renal plasma flow (ERPF, could lead to different estimates of relative or absolute renal function, depending on the radiopharmaceutical administered. To evaluate this possible divergence, the authors measured the relative GFR (I-125 iothalamate), ERPF (I-131 hippurate), and Tc-99m DMSA accumulation in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats with unilateral ureteral obstruction or unilateral ischemia at various times after renal injury. The relative ERPF of the obstructed kidney was significantly greater than the relative GFR at all time periods studied; significant but less dramatic differences were noted comparing DMSA with GFR in obstruction and DMSA and ERPF with GRF in ischemia.

  8. Catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation exerts acute and chronic effects on renal hemodynamics in swine.

    PubMed

    Tsioufis, Costas; Papademetriou, Vasilios; Dimitriadis, Kyriakos; Tsiachris, Dimitris; Thomopoulos, Costas; Park, Euljoon; Hata, Cary; Papalois, Apostolos; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2013-09-30

    We investigated the acute and chronic effects of catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) on renal hemodynamics assessed by average peak velocity (APV), renal blood flow (RBF), renal flow reserve (RFR) and resistive index (RI). Sympathetic overdrive is accompanied by impaired RBF, whereas there is no data on the effects of transcatheter RSD on renal hemodynamic balance. Before and post-RSD (acutely and after 1 month), in 9 farm swines we measured APV by a 0.014-inch Doppler flow wire placed in the stem of the renal artery under baseline and hyperemic conditions, induced by intrarenal dopamine (50 μg/kg). RFR was calculated as the ratio of hyperemic to basal peak velocity, and RI was estimated as (peak systolic velocity-end-diastolic velocity)/peak systolic velocity. RSD was achieved via the lumen of the main renal artery with a specifically designed catheter connected to a radiofrequency generator according to prespecified algorithm. APV and RBF increased acutely post ablation in all animals, compared to APV and RBF before ablation (61.44 ± 32.6 vs 20.44 ± 6.38 cm/s, p<0.001 and 407.4 ± 335.1 vs 161.1 ± 76.6 ml/min, p=0.003; respectively), whereas RFR and RI were reduced (1.51 ± 0.59 vs 2.85 ± 1.33, p<0.001 and 0.67 ± 0.07 vs 0.74 ± 0.07, p=0.005; respectively). One month post ablation APV and RBF compared to APV and RBF before ablation remained significantly higher whereas RFR and RI remained lower as compared to baseline. Catheter-based RSD exerts acute and chronic effects on renal hemodynamics in a large animal model. If confirmed in humans RBF parameters may be used as direct markers of successful RSD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Physical training effects in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Romano, G; Simonella, R; Falleti, E; Bortolotti, N; Deiuri, E; Antonutto, G; De Vita, S; Ferraccioli, G F; Montanaro, D

    2010-01-01

    Several studies demonstrated the benefits of rehabilitation in uraemic patients. This study evaluates physical and psychosocial effects of exercise on renal transplant recipients (RTRs). Eight RTRs were evaluated before and after an exercise training consisting of thirty 40-minute sessions, three times a week, performed with the interval training technique. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) significantly decreased (p<0.04 and <0.008, respectively). Quality of life mean scores (SF-36 test) significantly increased (p<0.000). No differences were recorded for muscle and fat mass, maximal explosive power of the lower limbs, alkaline and acid phosphatase, parathormone (PTH), myoglobin, lipoprotein-A, glomerular filtration rate (GFR), at rest heart rate, and cardiac troponin. IL-6 decreased from 2.8±0.6 to 1.7±0.5 pg/mL (p<0.01). Resting MAP fell from 112±4 to 99±3 mmHg (p<0.02). The metabolic threshold rose from 33±4 to 43±5% (p<0.033). The blood lactate level at peak exercise increased from 5.2±0.9 to 6.2±0.7 mmol/L (p<0.012). The maximum oxygen uptake increased from 1200±210 to 1359±202 mL/min (p<0.05), iso-load oxygen uptake decreased from 1110±190 to 1007±187 mL/min (p<0.034). The maximum working capacity increased from 90±14 to 115±15 watts (p<0.000). This study suggests that an appropriate dose of physical training is a useful, safe and non-pharmacologic contribution to RTR treatment. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Renal effects of continuous negative pressure breathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous negative pressure breathing (CNPB) was utilized to simulate the thoracic vascular distension of zero G in 11 anesthetized rats. The animals underwent renal clearance and micropuncture renal nephron studies before, during, and after CNPB. Four rats were pretreated with a high salt diet and I-M desoxycorticosterone (DOCA) in excess. None of these rats diuresed with CNPB. In contrast, five of the seven remaining rats increased the fraction of the filtered sodium excreted and their urinary flow rate. Potassium excretion increased. End proximal tubular fluid specimen's TF/P inulin ratios were unchanged. Whole kidney and single nephron glomerular filtration rates fell 10%. CNPB, a mechanism for atrial distension, appears to cause in the rat a decrease in distal tubular sodium and water reabsorption. Exogenous mineral-corticoid prevents the diuresis, saluresis, and kaluresis. The adequacy of other nonatrial volume control mechanisms in regulating renal salt and water conservation in opposition to the studied atrial-renal (Henry-Gauer) reflex of thoracic vascular distension is confirmed.

  11. Renal effects of continuous negative pressure breathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous negative pressure breathing (CNPB) was utilized to simulate the thoracic vascular distension of zero G in 11 anesthetized rats. The animals underwent renal clearance and micropuncture renal nephron studies before, during, and after CNPB. Four rats were pretreated with a high salt diet and I-M desoxycorticosterone (DOCA) in excess. None of these rats diuresed with CNPB. In contrast, five of the seven remaining rats increased the fraction of the filtered sodium excreted and their urinary flow rate. Potassium excretion increased. End proximal tubular fluid specimen's TF/P inulin ratios were unchanged. Whole kidney and single nephron glomerular filtration rates fell 10%. CNPB, a mechanism for atrial distension, appears to cause in the rat a decrease in distal tubular sodium and water reabsorption. Exogenous mineral-corticoid prevents the diuresis, saluresis, and kaluresis. The adequacy of other nonatrial volume control mechanisms in regulating renal salt and water conservation in opposition to the studied atrial-renal (Henry-Gauer) reflex of thoracic vascular distension is confirmed.

  12. RENAL EFFECTS OF HEMOGLOBIN INFUSIONS IN DOGS IN HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Paul B.; Hiller, Alma; Van Slyke, Donald D.

    1947-01-01

    The immediate effects of treating hemorrhagic shock in dogs by replacing lost blood with 7 per cent hemoglobin solution were favorable, both on renal function and on general condition. However, subsequent transitory depression of the urea clearance for several days, shown by some of the treated animals, but not by untreated bled controls, indicates sufficient possibility of renal damage by the hemoglobin solution to prevent its recommendation at present as a blood substitute. PMID:19871692

  13. Acute renal toxic effect of amiodarone in rats.

    PubMed

    Morales, Ana Isabel; Barata, Jose Diogo; Bruges, Margarida; Arévalo, Miguel Angel; González de Buitrago, José Manuel; Palma, Patricia; Branco, Patricia; Pérez-Barriocanal, Fernando

    2003-01-01

    Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic drug now more frequently used after a number of years in which the use had been on the decline due to a number of studies which reported side effects such as chronic toxicity, primarily in the lungs, liver and thyroid glands. Additionally, in some patients an increase in serum creatinine was noted, however the effect of amiodarone on renal function had never been closely examined. Thus, the aim of our study was to analyse the effects of amiodarone on renal function in rats. Experiments were carried out in male Wistar rats divided in two experimental groups: 1) a control group, (n=8), 2) a group that received a daily intraperitoneal injection of amiodarone (50 mg/kg body weight) for 6 days (n=5). At the end of the treatment, renal function was measured by clearance creatinine and acute clearance studies. Renal toxicity was evaluated by urinary N-acetyl-glucosamine and alkaline phosphatase. At the end of the experiment, histology studies were done. Rats treated with amiodarone had a higher serum creatinine (182%) and a lower glomerular filtration rate (53%), renal plasma flow (68%) and filtration fraction (62%) than controls. Rats treated with amiodarone also showed an increase in urinary N-acetyl-glucosamine (221%) and alkaline phosphatase (4.151%) excretion which corresponds with tubular alterations showed on electron microscopy. In conclusion our data confirm that amiodarone induces acute renal damage in the rat.

  14. Occupational exposure to lead: effects on renal function

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, C.D.; Hanenson, I.B.; Lerner, S.; Hammond, P.B.; Pesce, A.J.; Pollak, V.E.

    1980-10-01

    Although nephrotoxicity is common following exposure to lead, the dose-response relationship in adults with occupational exposure is not well understood because information is lacking on early nephrotoxic effects. By the time serum urea nitrogen and creatinine levels are elevated, renal damage may be advanced and not fully reversible. Detailed investigations of renal glomerular and tubular function were performed in six adults with occupational exposure to lead. In all patients, the serum creatinine and urea nitrogen concentrations were within the normal range. GFR was decreased in all but two. Glucose reabsorptive capacity (TmG) was decreased in all, and this decrease was disproportionately greater than expected from the reduced GFR in all but one. Normal values for renal plasma flow (RFP) were observed in four of the six, and for rho-aminohippurate (PAH) secretory capacity (TmPAh) in all but one. Bicarbonate reabsorptive capacity (TmHCO3) and urinary excretion of beta2-microglobulin were normal in all. Routine clinical laboratory tests are insensitive for the detection of early renal effects of heavy metal exposure. Measurements of renal tubular reabsorptive capacity for glucose appears to be a sensitive method for the early detection of renal effect of lead.

  15. Genomic architecture and evolution of clear cell renal cell carcinomas defined by multiregion sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Ignacio; Fisher, Rosalie; McGranahan, Nicholas; Matthews, Nicholas; Santos, Claudio R; Martinez, Pierre; Phillimore, Benjamin; Begum, Sharmin; Rabinowitz, Adam; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Gulati, Sakshi; Bates, Paul A; Stamp, Gordon; Pickering, Lisa; Gore, Martin; Nicol, David L; Hazell, Steven; Futreal, P Andrew; Stewart, Aengus; Swanton, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell renal carcinomas (ccRCCs) can display intratumor heterogeneity (ITH). We applied multiregion exome sequencing (M-seq) to resolve the genetic architecture and evolutionary histories of ten ccRCCs. Ultra-deep sequencing identified ITH in all cases. We found that 73–75% of identified ccRCC driver aberrations were subclonal, confounding estimates of driver mutation prevalence. ITH increased with the number of biopsies analyzed, without evidence of saturation in most tumors. Chromosome 3p loss and VHL aberrations were the only ubiquitous events. The proportion of C>T transitions at CpG sites increased during tumor progression. M-seq permits the temporal resolution of ccRCC evolution and refines mutational signatures occurring during tumor development. PMID:24487277

  16. Effect of 2'-phosphophloretin on renal function in chronic renal failure rats.

    PubMed

    Peerce, B E; Weaver, L; Clarke, R D

    2004-07-01

    Hyperhosphatemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism are common and severe complications of chronic renal failure. Therapies to reduce serum phosphate have been shown to reduce serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and slow the progression of renal failure. The effect of the inhibitor of intestinal phosphate absorption, 2'-phosphophloretin (2'-PP), on serum and urine chemistry, renal histology, and cardiac structure in the uremic rat model of renal failure, 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6 NX), was examined. The effect of 2'-PP on serum phosphate, serum PTH, serum total Ca(2+), and ionized Ca(2+), Ca(2+) x P(i) product, urine protein, urine osmolality, and creatinine clearance in 5/6 NX rats was examined. Uremic rats in chronic renal failure were gavaged daily with 25 microM 2'-PP. Over the course of a 5-wk experiment, serum chemistry in untreated uremic rats, 2'-PP-treated uremic rats, and age-matched control rats with normal renal function was determined twice a week. Urine creatinine, urine osmolality, urine phosphate, and urine protein were determined once a week from 24-h collections. 2'-PP reduced serum phosphate 40 +/- 3% compared with a 17% increase in untreated uremic control rats. 2'-PP did not alter total serum Ca(2+). During 5-wk experiments, serum PTH increased 65 +/- 25% in untreated uremic rats and decreased 70 +/- 7% in uremic rats treated with 25 microM 2'-PP. Creatinine clearance decreased 20% in untreated uremic rats compared with a 100% increase in 2'-PP-treated uremic rats. Urine protein decreased and urine osmolality increased in uremic rats treated with 2'-PP. The mechanism of the effect of 2'-PP on serum phosphate was inhibition of intestinal phosphate absorption. 2-PP inhibited intestinal phosphate absorption 50% without altering dietary protein absorption or intestinal Ca(2+) absorption. Over the course of the 5-wk treatment with 2'-PP, uremic animals treated with 2'-PP had a 2-4% weight gain/wk, similar to the weight gain seen in age-matched control rats

  17. Renal effects of continuous negative pressure breathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, M. J.; Discala, V. A.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous negative pressure breathing (CNPB) was utilized to simulate the thoracic vascular distension of zero g or space, in 11 anesthetized rats. The animals underwent renal clearance and micropuncture renal nephron studies before, during, and after CNPB. Rats were pretreated with a high salt diet and I-M desoxycorticosterone (DOCA) in excess. None of these rats diuresed with CNPB. In contrast 5 of the 7 remaining rats increased the fraction of the filtered sodium excreted (C sub Na/GFR, p .05) and their urinary flow rate (V, p .05). Potassium excretion increased (U sub k V, p .05). End proximal tubular fluid specimen's TF/P inulin ratios were unchanged. Whole kidney and single nephron glomerular filtration rates fell 10%. CNPB, a mechanism for atrial distension, appears to cause, in rats, a decrease in distal tubular sodium, water and potassium reabsorption. Exogenous mineral-corticoid prevents the diuresis, saluresis, and kaluresis.

  18. Effects of chronic and acute protein administration on renal function in patients with chronic renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Bilo, H J; Schaap, G H; Blaak, E; Gans, R O; Oe, P L; Donker, A J

    1989-01-01

    In 6 volunteers with normal renal function, we investigated the effects of various kinds of protein (soy, lactoprotein and beef) and various amounts of an intravenously administered amino acid solution on glomerular filtration (GFR) and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF). As for the protein-induced changes in renal function, rises in GFR and ERPF were lowest with soy protein, and highest with beef (baseline GFR, 110 +/- 5; soy, 122 +/- 5; beef, 131 +/- 5 ml/min/1.73 m2; mean +/- SEM). High doses of intravenous amino acids induced a rise in GFR comparable to that after beef (132 +/- 5 ml/min/1.73 m2). In a combined test a liquid mixed meal together with intravenously administered amino acids induced a comparable increase of the GFR (baseline 114 +/- 5 versus 129 +/- 5 ml/min/1.73 m2). When investigating 9 patients with chronic renal insufficiency after 4 weeks of low protein intake (LP) and after 4 weeks of high protein intake (HP), GFR and ERPF rose significantly under baseline conditions (GFR-LP41 +/- 9 versus GFR-HP 45 +/- 9 ml/min/1.73 m2, p less than 0.02; ERPF-LP 169 +/- 39 versus ERPF-HP 180 +/- 40 ml/min/1.73 m2, p less than 0.02; paired Wilcoxon). At the end of both dietary periods a comparable rise in renal function could be induced through acute stimulation (GFR-LP 20 +/- 5, GFR-HP 16 +/- 4; ERPF-LP 23 +/- 7, ERPF-HP 22 +/- 3%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Effect of first myocardial ischemic event on renal function.

    PubMed

    Eijkelkamp, Wouter B A; de Graeff, Pieter A; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; van Dokkum, Richard P E; Gansevoort, Ronald T; de Jong, Paul E; de Zeeuw, Dick; Hillege, Hans L

    2007-07-01

    Effects of cardiovascular dysfunction on renal function have been poorly characterized. Therefore, we investigated the relation between a first ischemic cardiac event and long-term renal function changes in the general population from the PREVEND study. We studied 6,360 subjects with a total follow-up duration of 27.017 subject-years. The estimated mean proportional increase in serum creatinine after a first ischemic cardiac event was 3.1% compared with 0.4% per year of follow-up in subjects without such an event (p = 0.005). This represented a significantly larger decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate after the event in subjects with an event versus the decrease in subjects without a first ischemic cardiac event (2.2 vs 0.5 ml/min/1.73 m(2)/year of follow-up, p = 0.006). In multivariate analysis with adjustment for renal risk factors, this event showed an independent association with serum creatinine change. In conclusion, a first ischemic cardiac event appears to enhance the natural decrease in renal function. Because even mild renal dysfunction should be considered a major cardiovascular risk factor after myocardial infarction, increased renal function loss after an ischemic cardiac event could add to the risk for subsequent cardiovascular morbidity, thus closing a vicious circle.

  20. Recurrent chromosomal gains and heterogeneous driver mutations characterise papillary renal cancer evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kovac, Michal; Navas, Carolina; Horswell, Stuart; Salm, Max; Bardella, Chiara; Rowan, Andrew; Stares, Mark; Castro-Giner, Francesc; Fisher, Rosalie; de Bruin, Elza C.; Kovacova, Monika; Gorman, Maggie; Makino, Seiko; Williams, Jennet; Jaeger, Emma; Jones, Angela; Howarth, Kimberley; Larkin, James; Pickering, Lisa; Gore, Martin; Nicol, David L.; Hazell, Steven; Stamp, Gordon; O’Brien, Tim; Challacombe, Ben; Matthews, Nik; Phillimore, Benjamin; Begum, Sharmin; Rabinowitz, Adam; Varela, Ignacio; Chandra, Ashish; Horsfield, Catherine; Polson, Alexander; Tran, Maxine; Bhatt, Rupesh; Terracciano, Luigi; Eppenberger-Castori, Serenella; Protheroe, Andrew; Maher, Eamonn; El Bahrawy, Mona; Fleming, Stewart; Ratcliffe, Peter; Heinimann, Karl; Swanton, Charles; Tomlinson, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Papillary renal cell carcinoma (pRCC) is an important subtype of kidney cancer with a problematic pathological classification and highly variable clinical behaviour. Here we sequence the genomes or exomes of 31 pRCCs, and in four tumours, multi-region sequencing is undertaken. We identify BAP1, SETD2, ARID2 and Nrf2 pathway genes (KEAP1, NHE2L2 and CUL3) as probable drivers, together with at least eight other possible drivers. However, only ~10% of tumours harbour detectable pathogenic changes in any one driver gene, and where present, the mutations are often predicted to be present within cancer sub-clones. We specifically detect parallel evolution of multiple SETD2 mutations within different sub-regions of the same tumour. By contrast, large copy number gains of chromosomes 7, 12, 16 and 17 are usually early, monoclonal changes in pRCC evolution. The predominance of large copy number variants as the major drivers for pRCC highlights an unusual mode of tumorigenesis that may challenge precision medicine approaches. PMID:25790038

  1. Effects of Treatment of Renal Osteodystrophy on Bone Histology

    PubMed Central

    Malluche, Hartmut H.; Mawad, Hanna; Monier-Faugere, Marie-Claude

    2008-01-01

    Renal osteodystrophy is characterized by abnormalities in bone turnover, mineralization, and bone volume. The effects of treatment modalities for renal osteodystrophy on bone should be analyzed with respect to these abnormalities. The major treatment modalities for renal osteodystrophy include phosphate binders, vitamin D compounds, and calcimimetics. Aluminum-containing phosphate binders have been shown to be toxic to bone secondary to their effects on bone turnover, mineralization, and bone volume. The use of calcium-based phosphate binders has been associated with the development of adynamic bone disease (low bone turnover), bone loss, and worsening of vascular calcifications. New nonaluminum, noncalcium phosphate binders have been developed (sevelamer hydrochloride and lanthanum carbonate). These agents show a potential for improvement in bone turnover and bone volume. Patients with renal osteodystrophy are deficient in calcitriol and often in calcidiol. Calcidiol deficiency has been underappreciated and deserves to be addressed in the treatment of patients with renal osteodystrophy. Calcitriol replacement therapy by daily oral administration is associated with frequent episodes of hypercalcemia and suppression of bone turnover in patients with stages 3 to 5 chronic kidney disease. Pulse oral or intravenous calcitriol administration induces frequent episodes of hypercalcemia or hyperphosphatemia, respectively, and achieves the same degree of correction of bone abnormalities. There are no data on the effects of paricalcitol or doxercalciferol on human bone. Experimental data, however, show that these two analogues and maxacalcitol may control serum parathyroid hormone levels without suppressing bone turnover. Calcimimetics lower parathyroid hormone levels and bone turnover. PMID:18988701

  2. Effects of treatment of renal osteodystrophy on bone histology.

    PubMed

    Malluche, Hartmut H; Mawad, Hanna; Monier-Faugere, Marie-Claude

    2008-11-01

    Renal osteodystrophy is characterized by abnormalities in bone turnover, mineralization, and bone volume. The effects of treatment modalities for renal osteodystrophy on bone should be analyzed with respect to these abnormalities. The major treatment modalities for renal osteodystrophy include phosphate binders, vitamin D compounds, and calcimimetics. Aluminum-containing phosphate binders have been shown to be toxic to bone secondary to their effects on bone turnover, mineralization, and bone volume. The use of calcium-based phosphate binders has been associated with the development of adynamic bone disease (low bone turnover), bone loss, and worsening of vascular calcifications. New nonaluminum, noncalcium phosphate binders have been developed (sevelamer hydrochloride and lanthanum carbonate). These agents show a potential for improvement in bone turnover and bone volume. Patients with renal osteodystrophy are deficient in calcitriol and often in calcidiol. Calcidiol deficiency has been underappreciated and deserves to be addressed in the treatment of patients with renal osteodystrophy. Calcitriol replacement therapy by daily oral administration is associated with frequent episodes of hypercalcemia and suppression of bone turnover in patients with stages 3 to 5 chronic kidney disease. Pulse oral or intravenous calcitriol administration induces frequent episodes of hypercalcemia or hyperphosphatemia, respectively, and achieves the same degree of correction of bone abnormalities. There are no data on the effects of paricalcitol or doxercalciferol on human bone. Experimental data, however, show that these two analogues and maxacalcitol may control serum parathyroid hormone levels without suppressing bone turnover. Calcimimetics lower parathyroid hormone levels and bone turnover.

  3. Evolution of a ureteric stone from the renal pelvis to the ureter on skeletal scintigraphy with CT correlation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pushpender; Kota, Gopi; Mintz, Akiva

    2012-02-01

    Because bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals are excreted into the urine by the kidneys, normal kidneys and bladder are well visualized on skeletal scintigrams leading to incidental detection of urinary tract abnormalities in up to 15% of bone scans. Although the findings pertaining to the urinary tract on skeletal scintigraphy are seldom suggestive of a definitive diagnosis, they are highly specific for renal disease, with fewer than 2% false-positive studies reported. In the presented case, we demonstrate the evolution of a ureteric stone from the renal pelvis into the ureter on sequential skeletal scintigraphy with CT correlation.

  4. Renal dysfunction after total body irradiation: Dose-effect relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Kal, Henk B. . E-mail: H.B.Kal@UMCUtrecht.nl; Kempen-Harteveld, M. Loes van

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: Late complications related to total body irradiation (TBI) as part of the conditioning regimen for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have been increasingly noted. We reviewed and compared the results of treatments with various TBI regimens and tried to derive a dose-effect relationship for the endpoint of late renal dysfunction. The aim was to find the tolerance dose for the kidney when TBI is performed. Methods and Materials: A literature search was performed using PubMed for articles reporting late renal dysfunction. For intercomparison, the various TBI regimens were normalized using the linear-quadratic model, and biologically effective doses (BEDs) were calculated. Results: Eleven reports were found describing the frequency of renal dysfunction after TBI. The frequency of renal dysfunction as a function of the BED was obtained. For BED >16 Gy an increase in the frequency of dysfunction was observed. Conclusions: The tolerance BED for kidney tissue undergoing TBI is about 16 Gy. This BED can be realized with highly fractionated TBI (e.g., 6 x 1.7 Gy or 9 x 1.2 Gy at dose rates >5 cGy/min). To prevent late renal dysfunction, the TBI regimens with BED values >16 Gy (almost all found in published reports) should be applied with appropriate shielding of the kidneys.

  5. The Effects of Heart Failure on Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Udani, Suneel M; Koyner, Jay L

    2010-01-01

    Summary Heart-kidney interactions have been increasingly recognized by clinicians and researchers involved in the study and treatment of heart failure and kidney disease. A classification system has been developed to categorize the different manifestations of cardiac and renal dysfunction. Recent work has highlighted the significant negative prognostic effect of worsening renal function on outcomes for individuals with heart failure. The etiology of the concomitant cardiac and renal dysfunction remains unclear; however, increasing evidence supports alternatives to the established theory of underfilling, including effects of venous congestion and changes in intra-abdominal pressure. Conventional therapy focuses on blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system with expanding use of direct renin and aldosterone antagonists. Novel therapeutic interventions using extracorporeal therapy and antagonists of the adenosine pathway show promise and require further investigation. PMID:20621250

  6. [Ibopamine--acute hemodynamic, renal and neurohumoral effects].

    PubMed

    Wehling, M; Theisen, K

    1991-01-01

    Ibopamine (IP) is a novel dopamine analogue for which beneficial effects have been shown in chronic heart failure. Hemodynamic effects of the substance include an increase in cardiac output and a decrease in the peripheral resistance. Aside from these hemodynamic effects, changes in renal (increased diuresis) and neurohumoral parameters (decreased plasma renin activity, aldosterone, norepinephrine, increased ANF and cGMP) have been found. The renal effects may originate from three independent mechanisms: 1) direct impact of improved hemodynamic parameters on the renal perfusion; 2) the improved cardiac performance results in a reduction of compensatory hormonal adaptations, such as the activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-axis or the sympathetic system; 3) direct effects on the intrarenal hemodynamic and glomerular/tubular functions induced by stimulation of renal dopaminergic receptors. The continued decrease of the plasma renin activity by 35% results in a reduction of the plasma levels of angiotensin II and aldosterone. Additionally, an increase in plasma atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) and its second messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) was observed after ibopamine, which could contribute to the diuretic action of the drug. These findings underline the importance of extrarenal effects of a drug in the treatment of heart failure, this may essentially contribute to the improvement of cardiac performance, independent of positive inotropy.

  7. Effects of water immersion on renal hemodynamics in normal man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, M.; Levinson, R.; Loutzenhiser, R.

    1976-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to delineate the effects of water immersion to the neck (NI) on renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate as assessed by the clearance of p-aminohippuric acid (PAH) and inulin, respectively. Nine normal male subjects were studied on two occasions, control and NI. The conditions of seated posture and time of day were identical. Immersion did not alter either clearance at a time when sodium excretion was increasing markedly. The constancy of PAH clearance during NI suggests that renal blood flow is unaltered and that the natriuresis of NI is mediated independently of alterations in overall renal perfusion. The sluggish decline of a natriuresis during recovery is consistent with the presence of a humoral factor contributing to the encountered natriuresis.

  8. Effects of microgravity on renal stone risk assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pietrzyk, R. A.; Pak, C. Y. C.; Cintron, N. M.; Whitson, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Physiologic changes induced during human exposure to the microgravity environment of space may contribute to an increased potential for renal stone formation. Renal stone risk factors obtained 10 days before flight and immediately after return to earth indicated that calcium oxalate and uric acid stone-forming potential was increased after space flights of 4-10 days. These data describe the need for examining renal stone risk during in-flight phases of space missions. Because of limited availability of space and refrigerated storage on spacecraft, effective methods must be developed for collecting urine samples in-flight and for preserving (or storing) them at temperatures and under conditions commensurate with mission constraints.

  9. [Renal side effects of long-term lithium therapy].

    PubMed

    Ibbeken, C; Becker, J U; Baumgärtel, M W

    2012-01-01

    Lithium is widely used in the treatment of bipolar disorders. Long-term administration of lithium often leads to side effects concerning the subjects: nephrology, endocrinology and surgery. This review emphasizes nephrotoxicity.Lithium treatment may disturb responsiveness to antidiuretic hormone (ADH), causing a nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Furthermore long-term lithium therapy may trigger hyperparathyreoidism with hypercalcemia and chronic interstitial nephritis with development of microcysts. Long-term patients have an increased risk to develop impaired renal function. Lithium-induced endstage renal disease is rare. Termination of lithium treatment may decrease the risk of progression.To ensure security of lithium treatment regular controls of urine osmolarity, lithium-, creatinine- , thyroid stimulating hormone- and calcium-levels are essential. Patients with decreased renal function should be referred to a specialist early.

  10. Beneficial effects of soy protein consumption for renal function.

    PubMed

    Anderson, James W

    2008-01-01

    Alterations in dietary protein intake have an important role in prevention and management of several forms of kidney disease. Using soy protein instead of animal protein reduces development of kidney disease in animals. Reducing protein intake preserves kidney function in persons with early diabetic kidney disease. Our clinical observations led us to the soy-protein hypothesis that "substitution of soy protein for animal protein results in less hyperfiltration and glomerular hypertension with resulting protection from diabetic nephropathy." These components of soy protein may lead to the benefits: specific peptides, amino acids, and isoflavones. Substituting soy protein for animal protein usually decreases hyperfiltration in diabetic subjects and may reduce urine albumin excretion. Limited data are available on effects of soy peptides, isoflavones, and other soy components on renal function on renal function in diabetes. Further studies are required to discern the specific benefits of soy protein and its components on renal function in diabetic subjects.

  11. Effects of water immersion on renal hemodynamics in normal man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, M.; Levinson, R.; Loutzenhiser, R.

    1976-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to delineate the effects of water immersion to the neck (NI) on renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate as assessed by the clearance of p-aminohippuric acid (PAH) and inulin, respectively. Nine normal male subjects were studied on two occasions, control and NI. The conditions of seated posture and time of day were identical. Immersion did not alter either clearance at a time when sodium excretion was increasing markedly. The constancy of PAH clearance during NI suggests that renal blood flow is unaltered and that the natriuresis of NI is mediated independently of alterations in overall renal perfusion. The sluggish decline of a natriuresis during recovery is consistent with the presence of a humoral factor contributing to the encountered natriuresis.

  12. Effects of microgravity on renal stone risk assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pietrzyk, R. A.; Pak, C. Y. C.; Cintron, N. M.; Whitson, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Physiologic changes induced during human exposure to the microgravity environment of space may contribute to an increased potential for renal stone formation. Renal stone risk factors obtained 10 days before flight and immediately after return to earth indicated that calcium oxalate and uric acid stone-forming potential was increased after space flights of 4-10 days. These data describe the need for examining renal stone risk during in-flight phases of space missions. Because of limited availability of space and refrigerated storage on spacecraft, effective methods must be developed for collecting urine samples in-flight and for preserving (or storing) them at temperatures and under conditions commensurate with mission constraints.

  13. Evaluation of the therapeutic effect of percutaneous nephroureterolithotomy by Tc-99m diethylenetiaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) renal scintigraphy--alteration of the renal fraction of blood flow, split-GFR, and renal mean transit time.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, M; Morita, S; Rabito, C A; Umezaki, N; Matsuoka, K; Noda, S; Eto, K; Ohtake, H

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate the therapeutic effects of percutaneous nephroureterolithotomy, the renal function of eleven patients with renal calculi was studied, pre- and post-intervention. Renal function was determined, by renal scintigraphy with the renal agent, Tc-99m diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). In each renal scintigram the renogram curve was analyzed and the following were determined by deconvolution analysis; the renal fraction of blood flow (RFBF), DTPA-glomerular filtration ratio (GFR), and the renal mean transit time (MTT). The successful results in percutaneous nephroureterolithotomy (PNL) was proven using the radionuclide technique in most cases. From these results it can be concluded that renal scintigraphy is an effective procedure to evaluate the effect of PNL for treating renal calculi and secondary hydronephrosis.

  14. Predicting the effects of dietary manipulation in chronic renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    El Nahas, A.M.; Brady, S.A.; Masters-Thomas, A.; Wilkinson, V.; Hilson, A.J.W.; Moorhead, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    It has been suggested that the progressive fall in renal function in some patients with CRF is due to hyperfusion of the remnant nephrons in response to the relatively high protein diet of modern life. The authors attempted to assess this and to see what was the shortest time in which any effect could be demonstrated. In the first phase, 39 patients with CRF had their renal function followed for 6 months on their normal diet and 6 months on a low-protein diet (LPD). The patients on LPD all showed an improvement in the rate of fall of renal function. This was marked in patients with mainly tubular disease, and poor in those with glomerular and vascular disease. In the second phase, 11 of these patients (and 1 other) were started on a high protein diet (HPD) for two weeks, and then switched back to a LPD for 2 weeks. There was no change in GFR during this period, but there were marked changes in ERPF, which correlated well with the changes in renal function in the first phase (r = 0.76, rho < 0.01); 4/4 patients with tubular disease showed a rise in ERPF on HPD and a fall on LPD, while only 4/8 with glomerular or vascular disease responded. In the third phase, they assessed the effect of a single high-protein meal in normal volunteers. This showed that there are major changes in hemodynamics following a meal, such that it is not possible to make any statement about renal function using the single-shot methods. The authors conclude that a 2-week period of HPD followed by LPD allows prediction of the possible beneficial response to diet in CRF; that this is best monitored by ERPF; and that a single meal may invalidate renal function measurement.

  15. Effects of early overnutrition on the renal response to Ang II and expression of RAAS components in rat renal tissue.

    PubMed

    Granado, M; Amor, S; Fernández, N; Carreño-Tarragona, G; Iglesias-Cruz, M C; Martín-Carro, B; Monge, L; García-Villalón, A L

    2017-07-08

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of early overnutrition (EON) on the expression of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) components in renal cortex, renal arteries and renal perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT), as well as the vascular response of renal arteries to Angiotensin II (Ang II). On birth day litters were adjusted to twelve (L12-control) or three (L3-overfed) pups per mother. Half of the animals were sacrificed at weaning (21 days old) and the other half at 5 months of age. Ang II-induced vasoconstriction of renal artery segments increased in young overfed rats and decreased in adult overfed rats. EON decreased the gene expression of angiotensinogen (Agt), Ang II receptors AT1 and AT2 and eNOS in renal arteries of young rats, while it increased the mRNA levels of AT-2 and ET-1 in adult rats. In renal PVAT EON up-regulated the gene expression of COX-2 and TNF-α in young rats and the mRNA levels of renin receptor both in young and in adult rats. On the contrary, Ang II receptors mRNA levels were downregulated at both ages. Renal cortex of overfed rats showed increased gene expression of Agt in adult rats and of AT1 in young rats. However the mRNA levels of AT1 were decreased in the renal cortex of overfed adult rats. EON is associated with alterations in the vascular response of renal arteries to Ang II and changes in the gene expression of RAAS components in renal tissue. Copyright © 2017 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Evolution of maternal effect senescence

    PubMed Central

    Moorad, Jacob A.; Nussey, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Increased maternal age at reproduction is often associated with decreased offspring performance in numerous species of plants and animals (including humans). Current evolutionary theory considers such maternal effect senescence as part of a unified process of reproductive senescence, which is under identical age-specific selective pressures to fertility. We offer a novel theoretical perspective by combining William Hamilton’s evolutionary model for aging with a quantitative genetic model of indirect genetic effects. We demonstrate that fertility and maternal effect senescence are likely to experience different patterns of age-specific selection and thus can evolve to take divergent forms. Applied to neonatal survival, we find that selection for maternal effects is the product of age-specific fertility and Hamilton’s age-specific force of selection for fertility. Population genetic models show that senescence for these maternal effects can evolve in the absence of reproductive or actuarial senescence; this implies that maternal effect aging is a fundamentally distinct demographic manifestation of the evolution of aging. However, brief periods of increasingly beneficial maternal effects can evolve when fertility increases with age faster than cumulative survival declines. This is most likely to occur early in life. Our integration of theory provides a general framework with which to model, measure, and compare the evolutionary determinants of the social manifestations of aging. Extension of our maternal effects model to other ecological and social contexts could provide important insights into the drivers of the astonishing diversity of lifespans and aging patterns observed among species. PMID:26715745

  17. The Spanish Renal Registry: 2013 report and evolution from 2007-2013.

    PubMed

    Martín Escobar, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to show the evolution of renal replacement therapy (RRT) in Spain from 2007 to 2013. Aggregated data and individual patient records were used from participating regional renal disease registries and that National Transplant Organisation registry. The reference population was the official population on January 1st of each year studied. Data on incidence and prevalence were based on aggregated data, while the survival analysis was calculated from individual patient records. The study period was 2007 to 2013 for prevalence, incidence and transplantation, and survival was analysed for 2004-2012. The population covered by the registry was a minimum of 95.3% to 100% of the Spanish population for aggregated data. The EU27 age and gender distributions of the European population for 2005 were used to adjust incidence and prevalence for age and gender. Survival probabilities were calculated for incident patients between the years 2004 and 2013 using the Kaplan-Meier method to calculate unadjusted patient survival probability. The log rank test was applied to compare survival curves according to some risk factors. Cox proportional hazards model was created to study the potential predictors of survival. In 2013, the total number of patients in Spain that started RRT was 5,705 for 95.3% of the total Spanish population, with an unadjusted rate of 127.1pmp. The evolution from 2007 to 2013 showed a gradual decline from 127.4pmp in 2007 to 120.4pmp in 2012, with a small upturn to 127.1 in 2013. The adjusted incidence rate for the year 2013 was 121.5pmp for the total population, 158.7pmp for males and 83.1pmp for females. The most frequent cause of primary renal disease in incident was diabetes mellitus: 20.4% in 2007, which increased to 24.6% in 2013. The percentage of transplant as first RRT increased from 1.7% in 2007 to 4.2% in 2013. The total number of patients in RRT for 95.3% of the population in 2013 was 50,567, with an unadjusted prevalent rate

  18. Acute renal effects of endothelin-A blockade: interspecies differences.

    PubMed

    Cernacek, P; Strmen, J; Levy, M

    1998-01-01

    The acute renal effects of LU135252 (LU), a selective endothelin-A (ETA) receptor antagonist, were studied in conscious rats after i.p. administration of 1-10 mg/kg LU, and in clearance studies in anesthetized dogs during left intrarenal infusion of 0.01-0.1 mg/kg/min. In the rat (n = 12), LU (10 mg/kg i.p.) decreased diuresis (-36%), excretion of Na (-55%) and Cl (-38%) but not of K and creatinine, as measured in 8-h collections in metabolic cages. Excretion of oral NaCl load (5% of body weight) during 4 h decreased from 68 +/- 2% (vehicle) to 50.5 +/- 5% (LU; n = 12, p < 0.01). Blood pressure was not affected. In contrast, left intrarenal LU infusion at 0.01, 0.03 and 0.1 mg/kg/min in the dog (n = 4) had no effect on renal hemodynamics or excretory function, whereas it mildly decreased blood pressure. In addition, intrarenal LU (0.03 mg/kg/ min; n = 6) had no effect on the renal response to volume expansion (7% bw) by 0.9% NaCl i.v. These markedly different effects of acute ETA blockade were observed at similar systemic plasma levels of LU in the two species. It is concluded that in the rat, but not in the dog, acute blockade of ETA receptors can impair renal excretory function, most likely at the tubule level. This interspecies difference in the role of endogenous ET in the regulation of renal function is probably due to a different ET receptor profile and distribution in rat and dog kidneys.

  19. Renal effects of antihypertensive therapy in uninephrectomized diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Gallego, B; Flores, O; López-Novoa, J M; Pérez-Barriocanal, F

    1997-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a major cause of chronic renal failure. The evidence available indicates that renal hemodynamics are altered in clinical and experimental diabetes mellitus. In these circumstances, an increased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is associated with albuminuria and eventually with glomerulosclerosis. We studied the renal and hemodynamic effects of long-term treatment (5 months) using an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (trandolapril, 0.7 mg/g b.w. per day) and a calcium antagonist (verapamil, 20 mg/g b.w. per day), and the combination of the two (veratran) at the same dose, on streptozotocin-diabetic uninephrectomized rats. A moderate degree of hyperglycemia (2-4 g/l) was maintained with daily insulin. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was measured monthly using the tail-cuff method. Determinations were made of urinary protein excretion, creatinine clearance, urinary electrolyte excretion and, at the end of treatment, renal and cardiac hypertrophy. MAP was similar in control and untreated diabetic rats. Trandolapril and veratran reduced MAP whereas verapamil alone had no effect on these animals. All groups showed a slight proteinuria that increased with verapamil treatment. The GFR of diabetic animals was higher than in the control group (mainly the first 2 months), except for veratran group, in which it was similar to the control value. Urinary electrolyte excretion increased in all diabetic groups with no significant differences among them. Veratran induced a protective effect against cardiac hypertrophy. None of the treatments affected renal hypertrophy. It is concluded that in a murine model of diabetes without hypertension or proteinuria, a combination of verapamil and trandolapril prevents hyperfiltration whereas verapamil alone increases proteinuria.

  20. Inflow effect in first-pass cardiac and renal MRI.

    PubMed

    Ivancevic, Marko K; Zimine, Ivan; Foxall, David; Lecoq, Guillaume; Righetti, Alberto; Didier, Dominique; Vallée, Jean-Paul

    2003-09-01

    To estimate the effect of the inflow effect on the arterial input function in vivo in cardiac and renal MR perfusion imaging using fast gradient echo (GRE) sequences and contrast media. The MR exam protocol was designed to acquire images at different phases of the cardiac cycle. The arterial input was thus influenced by various blood flow velocities. It was found that the inflow effect was negligible in the left ventricle of the heart, while it was significantly higher in the aorta for the kidney perfusion measurement. This was principally due to the higher through-the-plane component of the blood flow velocity in the aorta than in the left ventricle. The inflow effect can be neglected in the heart cavity, but should be taken into account in renal perfusion. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. The lunar cycle: effects of full moon on renal colic.

    PubMed

    Molaee Govarchin Ghalae, Hojjat; Zare, Samad; Choopanloo, Maryam; Rahimian, Roya

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate renal colic frequency in different seasons and around full moon. A total of 1481 patients with renal colic were studied retrospectively addressing days of a month both in solar and lunar calendar. The mean age of the patients was 57 ± 13 years. Total admissions in summer was 613; of which 288 (41%), 199 (39%), and 126 (43%) were in years 2002, 2003, and 2004, respectively. The highest frequencies in solar calendar were on days 2 (56), 20 (63), and 27 (59) and the lowest were on days 6 (36), 22 (38), 26 (34), and 31 (31). We did not find any statistically significant association according to solar calendar (P = .3). In lunar calendar, most of the admissions were on day 15 (69) and the lowest rates were on days 1 (25) and 30 (26), which was statistically significant (P = .04). Renal colic frequency is not correlated with solar calendar, but its highest frequency in lunar calendar is in the middle of the month period. Although we found a correlation between full moon effect and renal tide, but this is a new window for further studies.

  2. Effect of Risedronate on Bone in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Pullman, James; Cohen, Hillel W.; Lee, Sally; Shapiro, Craig; Solorzano, Clemencia; Greenstein, Stuart; Glicklich, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Bisphosphonates may prevent or treat the bone loss promoted by the immunosuppressive regimens used in renal transplantation. Risedronate is a commonly used third-generation amino-bisphosphonate, but little is known about its effects on the bone health of renal transplant recipients. We randomly assigned 42 new living-donor kidney recipients to either 35 mg of risedronate weekly or placebo for 12 months. We obtained bone biopsies at the time of renal transplant and after 12 months of protocol treatment. Treatment with risedronate did not affect bone mineral density (BMD) in the overall cohort. In subgroup analyses, it tended to preserve BMD in female participants but did not significantly affect the BMD of male participants. Risedronate did associate with increased osteoid volume and trabecular thickness in male participants, however. There was no evidence for the development of adynamic bone disease. In summary, further study is needed before the use of prophylactic bisphosphonates to attenuate bone loss can be recommended in renal transplant recipients. PMID:22797188

  3. Effects of Cardiopulmonary Bypass on Renal Perfusion, Filtration, and Oxygenation in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lannemyr, Lukas; Bragadottir, Gudrun; Krumbholz, Vitus; Redfors, Bengt; Sellgren, Johan; Ricksten, Sven-Erik

    2017-02-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common complication after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. The authors evaluated the effects of normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass on renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, renal oxygen consumption, and renal oxygen supply/demand relationship, i.e., renal oxygenation (primary outcome) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Eighteen patients with a normal preoperative serum creatinine undergoing cardiac surgery procedures with normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (2.5 l · min · m) were included after informed consent. Systemic and renal hemodynamic variables were measured by pulmonary artery and renal vein catheters before, during, and after cardiopulmonary bypass. Arterial and renal vein blood samples were taken for measurements of renal oxygen delivery and consumption. Renal oxygenation was estimated from the renal oxygen extraction. Urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase was measured before, during, and after cardiopulmonary bypass. Cardiopulmonary bypass induced a renal vasoconstriction and redistribution of blood flow away from the kidneys, which in combination with hemodilution decreased renal oxygen delivery by 20%, while glomerular filtration rate and renal oxygen consumption were unchanged. Thus, renal oxygen extraction increased by 39 to 45%, indicating a renal oxygen supply/demand mismatch during cardiopulmonary bypass. After weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass, renal oxygenation was further impaired due to hemodilution and an increase in renal oxygen consumption, accompanied by a seven-fold increase in the urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase/creatinine ratio. Cardiopulmonary bypass impairs renal oxygenation due to renal vasoconstriction and hemodilution during and after cardiopulmonary bypass, accompanied by increased release of a tubular injury marker.

  4. Effects of insulin and lipid emulsion on renal haemodynamics and renal sodium handling in IDDM patients.

    PubMed

    Pelikánová, T; Smrcková, I; Krízová, J; Stríbrná, J; Lánská, V

    1996-09-01

    To evaluate the role of insulin and hypertriglyceridaemia in the regulation of renal haemodynamics and sodium handling in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), 11 IDDM patients without microalbuminuria and 13 weight-, age-, protein intake- and sex-matched healthy control subjects were studied. Clearances of inulin (Cin), para-amino-hippuric acid (CPAH), sodium (CNa), and lithium (CLi) were measured in four 60-min clearance periods (periods I, II, III and IV) during isoinsulinaemia with lipid emulsion infusion (study 1), a hyperinsulinaemic isoglycaemic clamp with Intralipid infusion (study 2), and during time-controlled isoinsulinaemia (study 3). We found that Cin, CPAH and filtration fraction were comparable in IDDM and control subjects, whereas CNa was decreased in diabetic subjects (2.01 +/- 1.11 vs 3.03 +/- 1.32 ml/min; p < 0.05) due to elevations of proximal tubular fractional and absolute reabsorptions of sodium (p < 0.05). Insulin infusion did not affect Cin, increased CPAH (p < 0.05) and, consequently, lowered the filtration fraction (p < 0.01) in both groups. While acute hyperinsulinaemia resulted in increases in distal tubular fractional and absolute reabsorptions of sodium (p < 0.01) contributing to a fall in CNa (p < 0.01) in control subjects, in diabetic subjects the sodium-retaining effect of insulin was not significant. The lipid emulsion did not alter any of the estimated parameters. We conclude that IDDM without microalbuminuria is associated with a tendency to sodium retention which is not aggravated by insulin when compared to control subjects. Acutely induced hypertriglyceridaemia does not alter renal haemodynamics or renal sodium handling.

  5. Protective effect of EDTA preadministration on renal ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Foglieni, Chiara; Fulgenzi, Alessandro; Ticozzi, Paolo; Pellegatta, Fabio; Sciorati, Clara; Belloni, Daniela; Ferrero, Elisabetta; Ferrero, Maria Elena

    2006-01-01

    Background Chelation therapy with sodium edetate (EDTA) improved renal function and slowed the progression of renal insufficiency in patients subjected to lead intoxication. This study was performed to identify the underlying mechanism of the ability of EDTA treatment to protect kidneys from damage. Methods The effects of EDTA administration were studied in a rat model of acute renal failure induced by 60 minutes ischemia followed or not by 60 minutes reperfusion. Renal ischemic damage was evaluated by histological studies and by functional studies, namely serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels. Treatment with EDTA was performed 30 minutes before the induction of ischemia. Polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) adhesion capability, plasmatic nitric oxide (NO) levels and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) renal expression were studied as well as the EDTA protection from the TNFα-induced vascular leakage in the kidneys. Data was compared by two-way analysis of variance followed by a post hoc test. Results EDTA administration resulted in the preservation of both functional and histological parameters of rat kidneys. PMN obtained from peripheral blood of EDTA-treated ischemized rats, displayed a significant reduction in the expression of the adhesion molecule Mac-1 with respect to controls. NO was significantly increased by EDTA administration and eNOS expression was higher and more diffuse in kidneys of rats treated with EDTA than in the controls. Finally, EDTA administration was able to prevent in vivo the TNFα-induced vascular leakage in the kidneys. Conclusion This data provides evidence that EDTA treatment is able to protect rat kidneys from ischemic damage possibly through the stimulation of NO production. PMID:16536881

  6. Evolution of diuretics and ACE inhibitors, their renal and antihypertensive actions—parallels and contrasts

    PubMed Central

    Lant, Ariel F.

    1987-01-01

    1 The emergence of diuretic drugs and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors ranks amongst the major therapeutic advances of modern medicine. The discovery of these drug groups arose largely by chance, yet each has dramatically influenced the treatment of congestive cardiac failure and arterial hypertension. 2 The central role which diuretics have had in the management of both oedema and hypertension hinges on their ability to induce a net renal excretion of solute and water by selective interference with either active or passive ion transport processes in different segments of the nephron. Irrespective of sites of action, the continued antihypertensive action of diuretics is characterized by a reduction in plasma volume and extracellular fluid (ECF) volume that lasts for as long as the diuretic is given. The mechanism of this effect remains unclear but may involve autoregulatory reactions that leave cardiac output unaltered but maintain a sustained reduction in total peripheral resistance. 3 ACE inhibitors also lower blood pressure by decreasing total peripheral resistance, leaving cardiac output, plasma volume and ECF volume unchanged. The detailed way these haemodynamic changes are achieved remains unknown but inhibition of converting enzyme present not only in the kidney but also in many extrarenal tissue sites, appears important. In both hypertension and cardiac failure, however, the kidney acts as a key target organ for ACE inhibitors. The increased renal vascular resistance and inappropriate renal salt excretion are reversed with enhanced renal blood flow and saluresis. Both angiotensin II (AII) and vasopressin-mediated contraction of glomerular mesangial cells is inhibited, making glomerular filtration more efficient. Reduced aldosterone secondary to blockade of AII formation contributes to saluresis whilst encouraging positive potassium balance. ACE inhibition also impairs breakdown of kinins which may contribute to intrarenal and peripheral

  7. The effects of environmental chemicals on renal function

    PubMed Central

    Kataria, Anglina; Trasande, Leonardo; Trachtman, Howard

    2015-01-01

    The global incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing among individuals of all ages. Despite advances in proteomics, genomics and metabolomics, there remains a lack of safe and effective drugs to reverse or stabilize renal function in patients with glomerular or tubulointerstitial causes of CKD. Consequently, modifiable risk factors that are associated with a progressive decline in kidney function need to be identified. Numerous reports have documented the adverse effects that occur in response to graded exposure to a wide range of environmental chemicals. This Review summarizes the effects of such chemicals on four aspects of cardiorenal function: albuminuria, glomerular filtration rate, blood pressure and serum uric acid concentration. We focus on compounds that individuals are likely to be exposed to as a consequence of normal consumer activities or medical treatment, namely phthalates, bisphenol A, polyfluorinated alkyl acids, dioxins and furans, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls. Environmental exposure to these chemicals during everyday life could have adverse consequences on renal function and might contribute to progressive cumulative renal injury over a lifetime. Regulatory efforts should be made to limit individual exposure to environmental chemicals in an attempt to reduce the incidence of cardiorenal disease. PMID:26100504

  8. Renal effects of naphtha exposure among automotive workers.

    PubMed

    Rocskay, A Z; Robins, T G; Schork, M A; Echeverria, D; Proctor, S P; White, R F

    1993-06-01

    As part of a study on health effects of naphtha exposure, the association between naphtha exposure and urinary excretion of total protein, albumin, beta-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase (beta-NAG), and beta 2-microglobulin was assessed prospectively over 1 year among workers at an automotive plant that used naphtha to calibrate fuel injectors. Participants consisted of 248 workers who provided spot urine samples in June 1988 among whom 181 workers provided specimens again in June 1989. Naphtha air concentrations at the plant ranged from 6 to 790 mg/m3 and the length of exposure ranged from 0.8 to 7.3 years. In both 1988 and 1989, the overall distribution of the four measures of renal function appeared consistent with that of an unexposed population. In cross-sectional analyses, there were no statistically significant associations in the expected direction between cumulative or recent naphtha exposure and the measures of renal function. In longitudinal analyses, the change in beta-NAG was positively associated with the change in recent naphtha exposure (P = .009). The effect of the naphtha exposure during 1 workweek was assessed among 17 workers who provided urine samples Monday preshift, Monday postshift, and Friday postshift. No associations were found. The results of this study do not provide strong evidence of naphtha-associated renal effects at these levels of exposure.

  9. The effects of environmental chemicals on renal function.

    PubMed

    Kataria, Anglina; Trasande, Leonardo; Trachtman, Howard

    2015-10-01

    The global incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing among individuals of all ages. Despite advances in proteomics, genomics and metabolomics, there remains a lack of safe and effective drugs to reverse or stabilize renal function in patients with glomerular or tubulointerstitial causes of CKD. Consequently, modifiable risk factors that are associated with a progressive decline in kidney function need to be identified. Numerous reports have documented the adverse effects that occur in response to graded exposure to a wide range of environmental chemicals. This Review summarizes the effects of such chemicals on four aspects of cardiorenal function: albuminuria, glomerular filtration rate, blood pressure and serum uric acid concentration. We focus on compounds that individuals are likely to be exposed to as a consequence of normal consumer activities or medical treatment, namely phthalates, bisphenol A, polyfluorinated alkyl acids, dioxins and furans, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls. Environmental exposure to these chemicals during everyday life could have adverse consequences on renal function and might contribute to progressive cumulative renal injury over a lifetime. Regulatory efforts should be made to limit individual exposure to environmental chemicals in an attempt to reduce the incidence of cardiorenal disease.

  10. Uncommon side effect of MMF in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Balal, M; Demir, E; Paydas, Saime; Sertdemir, Y; Erken, U

    2005-01-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is a potent immunosuppressive agent used in renal transplantation. Gastrointestinal and hematological side effects are commonly observed, but hepatotoxicity has not been reported. In this study, we assessed MMF-related hepatotoxicity in renal transplant recipients. A total of 124 renal transplantation recipients (RTRs) were evaluated for elevated liver enzymes associated with MMF, and 79 patients were enrolled to the study. Patients used MMF 2 g/day. The patients who had progressive increase in liver enzymes after renal transplantation and their AST, ALT, GGT, ALP, bilirubin levels, hepatitis, cytomegalovirus (CMV), abdominal ultrasonography, duration of hepatotoxicity, and decreased dosage or withdrawal of MMF were recorded. Also, we evaluated their liver enzymes while the patients were on the waiting list. Of the 79 patients, 11 patients (13.9%) had a progressive increase in liver enzymes. The median (min-max) age of the patients with MMF-hepatotoxicity was 29 (19-54) and 72.7% of them were male. None of the patients had hepatitis B or C, CMV infection, or other possible causes for elevated liver enzymes and their abdominal ultrasonography were normal. High liver enzyme levels regressed after the withdrawal (n=6) or reduce dosage (n=5) of MMF. The median time of the increase in liver enzymes was 28 (4-70) days and after 50% reduction or withdrawal of MMF, returned to normal values in 16 (4-210) days. The median levels of ALT in waiting list (I), before (II), and after (III) reduction dosage or withdrawal of MMF were 22.0 (3-22), 222.0 (51-508), and 33.0 (21-64) U/L, respectively (p I-II=0.004,p I-II=0.013, andp II-III=0.005). There were no differences for ALP, GGT, total bilirubin, and direct bilirubin levels. Also, the correlation between recovery time of ALT and persistence time of ALT elevation before adjustment of MMF was significant (r=0.739, p=0.009). Consequently, after renal transplantation, hepatotoxicity can occur due to a

  11. Visualization of serotonin effects on renal vessels of rats.

    PubMed

    Endlich, K; Kühn, R; Steinhausen, M

    1993-02-01

    We studied the effects of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) on glomerular blood flow (GBF) and on renal vessel diameters in the hydronephrotic kidney and in vascular casts of normal kidneys of rats. 5-HT (60 min after local application of 10(-8) mol.liter-1) constricted the arcuate arteries (-10 +/- 2% to -14 +/- 2%, mean +/- SEM), dilated the interlobular arteries (+13 +/- 2%) and afferent arterioles (+17 +/- 3%), and decreased GBF (-44 +/- 5%). In contrast to normal autoregulation, reduction of renal perfusion pressure after local application of 5-HT from 118 +/- 3 mm Hg by 10 and 20 mm Hg reduced GBF by 12 +/- 2% and 23 +/- 3%, respectively. The 5-HT2 antagonist, ritanserin (60 min after local application of 10(-6) mol.liter-1), dilated all preglomerular vessels and increased GBF. In the presence of ritanserin, 5-HT lost nearly all vascular effects. During infusion of 5-HT (5 micrograms.min-1 i.v. for 20 min) vascular reactions were similar to those under local application. After cyclooxygenase inhibition with indomethacin, infusion of 5-HT failed to constrict the arcuate arteries whereas vasodilation of the small preglomerular vessels remained unaffected. Analyzing vascular casts of normal kidneys we observed considerable vascular spasms and an average vasoconstriction of the interlobar arteries of 19 +/- 9% after i.v. infusion of 5-HT. We believe that 5-HT decreases GBF by 5-HT2 receptor-mediated constriction of the large renal vessels which are modulated by the prostaglandin system, whereas 5-HT dilates the small preglomerular vessels, most likely via 5-HT1-like receptors. Furthermore, our data indicate that 5-HT impairs the myogenic component of renal autoregulation in the low pressure range.

  12. Renal effects of atriopeptin (AP) II in conscious SHR

    SciTech Connect

    Smits, J.F.; Debets, J.M.; Struyker-Boudier, H.A.; Daemen, M.J.

    1986-03-05

    Diuresis and natriuresis following APs has been suggested to depend upon increased renal blood flow (RBF). In a previous study, they found that APII infusions in conscious SHR decrease RBF. In this study, they report effects of APII on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal excretory function in conscious SHR. Male SHR were equipped with arterial and venous catheters. Furthermore, a special catheter was implanted into the bladder to allow continuous urine sampling from conscious, freely moving rats. Animals were allowed at least 4 days to recover. In one group of SHR, APII (N=7) or saline (N=7) was infused to quantitate excretion of water, Na/sup +/, and K/sup +/. Two other groups of SHR (N=8 each) were infused with /sup 51/Cr-EDTA and /sup 125/I-PAH. GFR and renal plasma flow (ERPF) were calculated from urine and a mid-time plasma sample during APII or saline infusion. Following changes in infusion rates, urine from the first 5 min was discarded, after which a 10-min collection was made. APII (0.5-4 ..mu..g/kg/min) increased water, Na/sup +/ and K/sup +/ output maximally during 2 ..mu..g/kg/min. ERPF decreased from 10.7 +/- 1.1 ml/min to 7.9 +/- 0.5 ml/min. GFR did not change significantly. Filtration fraction increased from 24 +/- 1% to 33 +/- 2%. Fractional water excretion increased from 0.8 +/- 0.2% to 2.5 +/- 0.7%. Saline infusions did not affect renal function. The results indicate that in conscious SHR, APII causes diuresis and natriuresis which does not depend upon increased GFR, but, rather, upon a primary tubular effect.

  13. Renal handling and acute urinary electrolyte effects of aminoglycoside antibiotics: use of a solitary renal autotransplant in the conscious sheep.

    PubMed

    Bennett, W M; McDougall, J; Potocnik, S; Wright, R D; Whitworth, J A

    1983-01-17

    Renal handling of the aminoglycoside antibiotics gentamicin and tobramycin were studied before and after one hour of constant intravenous infusions adjusted to maintain a concentration of 15 micrograms/mL. A solitary renal autotransplant model in four conscious volume replete 40 Kg sheep was used. This unique surgical preparation allows sampling of renal arterial and renal venous blood as well as urine drained through an exteriorized parotid-ureteral fistula. This surgical preparation has considerable potential in renal pharmacology since it uses a conscious, large animal. Baseline studies in this preparation demonstrated normal, 51CrEDTA and 125 I PAH, clearances which were unaffected by the drugs. Aminoglycoside binding to pooled sheep sera was 11% at physiologic PH, calcium and magnesium concentrations. A-V difference was 1.3 +/- .3 micrograms/mL and extraction by the kidney was 9 +/- 3.2% with no differences between gentamicin and tobramycin. Clearance of gentamicin was 84% and tobramycin 86% of GFR. There was no evidence of tubular injury as evidenced by unchanged urinary beta-2 microglobulin excretion. Serum Na, K, Ca and Mg did not change over the course of the study. Both drugs caused a prompt decrease in absolute and fractional sodium excretion while only gentamicin produced a kaliuresis. Early aminoglycoside effects on electrolyte balance may be an eventual determinant of nephrotoxic potential rather than differences in renal drug handling.

  14. Mechanism of renal effects of intracerebroventricular histamine in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kook, Y J; Kim, K K; Yang, D K; Ahn, D S; Choi, B K

    1988-01-01

    Histamine, when given intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.), has been reported to produce antidiuresis in the rabbit. In this study it was attempted to elucidate the mechanism involved in the effect. Histamine (H), 100 micrograms/kg i.c.v., produced antidiuresis with decreases in renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate in urethane-anesthetized rabbits. With larger doses, a tendency towards increased electrolyte excretion was noted in spite of decreased filtration. In the denervated kidney, marked diuresis and natriuresis were observed following i.c.v. H, whereas the contralateral innervated kidney responded with typical antidiuresis. Reserpinized rabbits also responded with marked natriuresis to i.c.v. H. Diphenhydramine (D), 250 micrograms/kg i.c.v., increased urine flow rate, sodium and potassium excretion, along with increase in renal perfusion. With 750 micrograms/kg i.c.v., marked natriuresis was observed in spite of decreased filtration. When H was given after D (250 micrograms/kg) the antidiuresis was completely abolished, and diuresis became more prominent. Cimetidine, 250 micrograms/kg i.c.v., elicited antidiuresis with decreases in renal hemodynamics, the pretreatment with cimetidine did not influence the antidiuresis by H and no natriuresis was noted. The present study suggests that histamine, given i.c.v., influences renal function in dual ways, i.e., antidiuresis by increasing the sympathetic tone to the kidney and diuresis due to some humoral natriuretic factor, the latter becoming apparent only when the former influence has been removed, and further suggests that H1-receptors might be involved in the nerve-mediated antidiuresis, whereas H2-receptors might mediate the humorally induced natriuresis and diuresis.

  15. Effects of flurbiprofen on renal function in patients with moderate renal insufficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, M D; Greene, P K; Brater, D C; Manatunga, A K; Hall, S D

    1992-01-01

    1. Renal function was assessed in eight patients with chronic renal insufficiency following the administration of flurbiprofen 50 mg as a single dose and after chronic administration of 50 mg four times daily for 8 and 27 days. Diet and fluid intake were controlled. 2. Inulin and creatinine clearances and urinary excretion of sodium were measured at baseline and every 20 min for at least 3 h after dosing. The time of the mean peak concentration of (S)-flurbiprofen was used to guide the analysis of the clearances. Creatinine clearance, urinary excretion of sodium, and serum sodium and potassium were also assessed for 24 h after the dose and on a daily basis. Body weight and blood pressure were measured on a daily basis. 3. Decrements in inulin and creatinine clearances were small and reversible within 3 h of an oral dose of flurbiprofen. Comparison of baseline clearances for the three study periods (first dose and at 8 and 27 days of chronic dosing) revealed a lack of chronic effect on glomerular filtration rate. 4. In contrast, flurbiprofen caused a substantial (73 to 86%) and progressive decrease in the urinary excretion of sodium that reached a nadir within 4-5 h after drug administration. However, comparison of baseline values did not differ, indicating that balance conditions had been re-established. 5. Results of 24 h assessments were in agreement with the clearance study results. Reduced urinary excretion of sodium appeared to be limited to the first few days of flurbiprofen administration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1576067

  16. Lithium isotopes: differential effects on renal function and histology.

    PubMed

    Stoll, P M; Stokes, P E; Okamoto, M

    2001-08-01

    Reduction in renal concentrating ability has been reported in patients undergoing chronic lithium treatment. Prior work has demonstrated differences in physiological effects of the stable lithium isotopes, 6Li and 7Li. Here, we measured the degree of polyuria, polydipsia and kidney histological changes induced in rats by equimolar amounts of 6LiCl, 7LiCl and the commercially available mixture of both isotopes. Rats were given 1.0 mEq/kg of either 6LiCl, 7LiCl or 'nLiCl' (isotope mixture, 93% 7LiCl) by subcutaneous injection twice daily for up to 49 days. Twenty-four-hour urine volume and water intake were measured daily. Kidneys from rats treated for 7 days with 1.5 mEq/kg 6LiCl, 7LiCl and vehicle were examined under light microscopy and histopathologic changes graded on a 4-point scale of severity. All rats showed loss in renal concentrating ability manifested by increasing urine volume and water intake. Peak effects occurred after 9-13 days treatment, then declined to stable levels at two to three times pre-treatment level. Mean peak effect was significantly greater for 6LiCl than for 7LiCl. Chronic effects of 6LiCl (weeks 3-7 of treatment) on polyuria and polydipsia were persistently higher than that of 7LiCl. nLiCl effect was intermediate. Kidneys from rats treated for 7 days with 6LiCl showed more frequently severe lesions in renal tubules than did 7LiCl-treated rats. Our current data and prior studies suggest that elimination or reduction of 6Li from pharmaceutical preparations may merit further evaluation as a possibly less potentially nephrotoxic form of lithium treatment.

  17. [Evolution from Percutaneous nephrolithotomy to Mini-PCNL in supine position on the treatment of complex renal calculi: feasibility study.

    PubMed

    de Fata-Chillón, Fernando Ramón; Gimbernat-Díaz, Helena; Redondo-Redondo, Cristina; Meilán-Hernández, Elisa; Mateo-Martínez, Erika

    2017-06-01

    Mini-PCNL is a potentially less invasive technique than standard percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). We present our experience and results comparing both approaches in large burden complex renal calculi. Prospective non randomized study comparing PCNL (24/26F nephroscope; Group A) and Mini-PCNL (15/18F; Group B) perioperative and postoperative results, in 40 (20 each group) consecutive patients between 2013 and 2014. We analyze demographic data, hemoglobin drop, urine culture, stone characteristics, operative time, puncture, number and size of the tract, disintegration energy sources, nephrostomy placement, hospital stay, stone free rate and Clavien-Dindo complications. Evolution has shown growth for Mini-PNL, with the last 17 consecutive cases performed by this approach. No preoperative differences in laterality, age, gender or ASA were found; but there were differences in BMI (median Group A: 26.35 kg/m2; Median Group B: 33.05 kg/m2, p = 0.008). Median calculi surface area (SA = length × width × π × 0.25) was higher for mini-PNL (6.69 cm2 vs 14.14; p=0.003). The operative time was longer for mini-PNL (120 vs 162.5 min, p = 0.03). Only one case (5%) required transfusion in NLP 24/26F. Mini-PCNL was associated with tubeless technique (55%) (p = 0.022), which explains lower 24 h postoperative pain, after surgery, measured by VAS (p =0.0004). The hospital stay was equivalent (median: 2 days; p=0.8). Both techniques showed efficacy (SFR at 3 months 80%). There were no statistically significant differences between the number and severity of complications between groups (Group A: 15%, 66.7% Clavien II, Group B: 15%; 66.7% Clavien II, p = 1). Mini-NLP can manage kidney stones and even large staghorn calculi without nephrostomy in a high percentage of patients. The technical evolution towards a small caliber approach maintains the effectiveness of the procedure without impacting its safety, with benefits perceived by patients such as less postoperative pain.

  18. Renal Expression of FGF23 in Progressive Renal Disease of Diabetes and the Effect of Ace Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Benigni, Ariela; Corna, Daniela; Tomasoni, Susanna; Rottoli, Daniela; Gaspari, Flavio; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Zoja, Carlamaria

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a phosphaturic hormone mainly produced by bone that acts in the kidney through FGF receptors and Klotho. Here we investigated whether the kidney was an additional source of FGF23 during renal disease using a model of type 2 diabetic nephropathy. Renal expression of FGF23 and Klotho was assessed in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) and control lean rats at 2, 4, 6, 8 months of age. To evaluate whether the renoprotective effect of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor in this model was associated with changes in FGF23 and Klotho, ZDF rats received ramipril from 4, when proteinuric, to 8 months of age. FGF23 mRNA was not detectable in the kidney of lean rats, nor of ZDF rats at 2 months of age. FGF23 became measurable in the kidney of diabetic rats at 4 months and significantly increased thereafter. FGF23 protein localized in proximal and distal tubules. Renal Klotho mRNA and protein decreased during time in ZDF rats. As renal disease progressed, serum phosphate levels increased in parallel with decline of fractional phosphorus excretion. Ramipril limited proteinuria and renal injury, attenuated renal FGF23 upregulation and ameliorated Klotho expression. Ramipril normalized serum phosphate levels and tended to increase fractional phosphorus excretion. These data indicate that during progressive renal disease the kidney is a site of FGF23 production which is limited by ACE inhibition. Interfering pharmacologically with the delicate balance of FGF23 and phosphorus in diabetes may have implications in clinics. PMID:23967103

  19. Acid-base balance of cats with chronic renal failure: effect of deterioration in renal function.

    PubMed

    Elliott, J; Syme, H M; Markwell, P J

    2003-06-01

    In a previous cross-sectional study of feline chronic renal failure (CRF), metabolic acidosis was identified in 52.6 per cent of animals with severe renal failure (plasma creatinine concentration >400 micromol/litre). The aim of this longitudinal study was to determine whether metabolic acidosis preceded or accompanied a deterioration in renal function in cats with CRF. Data were analysed from 55 cats with CRF that had been followed longitudinally for at least four months. Twenty-one cases showed deterioration in renal function over the period of the study, as evidenced by significant rises in their plasma creatinine concentrations and decreases in bodyweight. In five of the 21 cases, acidaemia accompanied the deterioration in renal function. Only one of these cats had evidence of metabolic acidosis before renal function deterioration. One other case developed metabolic acidosis without a rise in plasma creatinine concentration. These data suggest that biochemical evidence of metabolic acidosis does not generally occur until late in the course of feline CRF.

  20. Renal Mass Biopsy to Guide Treatment Decisions for Small Incidental Renal Tumors: A Cost-effectiveness Analysis1

    PubMed Central

    Gervais, Debra A.; Hartman, Rebecca I.; Harisinghani, Mukesh G.; Feldman, Adam S.; Mueller, Peter R.; Gazelle, G. Scott

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness, cost, and cost-effectiveness of using renal mass biopsy to guide treatment decisions for small incidentally detected renal tumors. Materials and Methods: A decision-analytic Markov model was developed to estimate life expectancy and lifetime costs for patients with small (≤4-cm) renal tumors. Two strategies were compared: renal mass biopsy to triage patients to surgery or imaging surveillance and empiric nephron-sparing surgery. The model incorporated biopsy performance, the probability of track seeding with malignant cells, the prevalence and growth of benign and malignant tumors, treatment effectiveness and costs, and patient outcomes. An incremental cost-effectiveness analysis was performed to identify strategy preference under a willingness-to-pay threshold of $75 000 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY). Effects of changes in key parameters on strategy preference were evaluated in sensitivity analysis. Results: Under base-case assumptions, the biopsy strategy yielded a minimally greater quality-adjusted life expectancy (4 days) than did empiric surgery at a lower lifetime cost ($3466), dominating surgery from a cost-effectiveness perspective. Over the majority of parameter ranges tested in one-way sensitivity analysis, the biopsy strategy dominated surgery or was cost-effective relative to surgery based on a $75 000-per-QALY willingness-to-pay threshold. In two-way sensitivity analysis, surgery yielded greater life expectancy when the prevalence of malignancy and propensity for biopsy-negative cancers to metastasize were both higher than expected or when the sensitivity and specificity of biopsy were both lower than expected. Conclusion: The use of biopsy to guide treatment decisions for small incidentally detected renal tumors is cost-effective and can prevent unnecessary surgery in many cases. © RSNA, 2010 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.10092013/-/DC1 PMID

  1. Investigating the effect of aromatherapy in patients with renal colic.

    PubMed

    Ayan, Murat; Tas, Ufuk; Sogut, Erkan; Suren, Mustafa; Gurbuzler, Levent; Koyuncu, Feridun

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the usefulness of rose essential oil as a supplementary and adjunctive therapy for the relief of renal colic, specifically because rose essential oil is soothing and can act as a muscle relaxant. Eighty patients who were diagnosed with renal colic in the emergency room were included in the study, with ages ranging from 19 to 64 years. Half of the patients (n=40) were treated with conventional therapy (diclofenac sodium, 75 mg intramuscularly) plus placebo (physiological serum, 0.9% NaCl), while the other half (n=40) were given aromatherapy (rose essential oil) in addition to conventional therapy. In each patient, the severity of pain was evaluated using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) (0 [no pain] to 10 [very severe pain]). The VAS values prior to the start of therapy, and 10 and 30 minutes after therapy were 8.18 ± 1.36, 5.60 ± 2.02, and 3.75 ± 2.08 for the conventional therapy plus placebo group, while for the conventional therapy plus aromatherapy group, the VAS values were 8.63 ± 1.03, 4.25 ± 1.72, and 1.08 ± 1.07, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the starting VAS values of the two groups, but the VAS values 10 or 30 minutes after the initiation of therapy were statistically lower in the group that received conventional therapy plus aromatherapy. This study demonstrated that rose essential oil therapy in addition to conventional therapy effectively reduces renal colic pain.

  2. Maternal Effects in Molecular Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilke, Claus O.

    2002-02-01

    We introduce a model of molecular evolution in which the fitness of an individual depends both on its own and on the parent's genotype. The model can be solved by means of a nonlinear mapping onto the standard quasispecies model. The dependency on the parental genotypes cancels from the mean fitness, but not from the individual sequence concentrations. For finite populations, the position of the error threshold is very sensitive to the influence from parent genotypes. In addition to biological applications, our model is important for understanding the dynamics of self-replicating computer programs.

  3. Renal Denervation Normalizes Arterial Pressure With No Effect on Glucose Metabolism or Renal Inflammation in Obese Hypertensive Mice.

    PubMed

    Asirvatham-Jeyaraj, Ninitha; Fiege, Jessica K; Han, Ruijun; Foss, Jason; Banek, Christopher T; Burbach, Brandon J; Razzoli, Maria; Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Shimizu, Yoji; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Osborn, John W

    2016-10-01

    Hypertension often occurs in concurrence with obesity and diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as metabolic syndrome. Renal denervation (RDNx) lowers arterial pressure (AP) and improves glucose metabolism in drug-resistant hypertensive patients with high body mass index. In addition, RDNx has been shown to reduce renal inflammation in the mouse model of angiotensin II hypertension. The present study tested the hypothesis that RDNx reduces AP and renal inflammation and improves glucose metabolism in obesity-induced hypertension. Eight-week-old C57BL/6J mice were fed either a low-fat diet (10 kcal%) or a high-fat diet (45 kcal%) for 10 weeks. Body weight, food intake, fasting blood glucose, and glucose metabolism (glucose tolerance test) were measured. In a parallel study, radiotelemeters were implanted in mice for AP measurement. High fat-fed C57BL/6J mice exhibited an inflammatory and metabolic syndrome phenotype, including increased fat mass, increased AP, and hyperglycemia compared with low-fat diet mice. RDNx, but not Sham surgery, normalized AP in high-fat diet mice (115.8±1.5 mm Hg in sham versus 96.6±6.7 mm Hg in RDNx). RDNx had no significant effect on AP in low-fat diet mice. Also, RDNx had no significant effect on glucose metabolism or renal inflammation as measured by the number of CD8, CD4, and T helper cells or levels of inflammatory cytokines in the kidneys. These results indicate that although renal nerves play a role in obesity-induced hypertension, they do not contribute to impaired glucose metabolism or renal inflammation in this model.

  4. Effects of dietary sodium chloride intake on renal function and blood pressure in cats with normal and reduced renal function.

    PubMed

    Buranakarl, Chollada; Mathur, Sheerin; Brown, Scott A

    2004-05-01

    To determine effects of variations in dietary intake of sodium chloride (NaCl) on systemic arterial blood pressure (ABP) in cats with normal and reduced renal function. 21 adult cats (7 with intact kidneys [control cats; group C], 7 with unilateral renal infarction with contralateral nephrectomy [remnant-kidney model; group RK], and 7 with unilateral renal infarction and contralateral renal wrapping and concurrent oral administration of amlodipine [remnant-wrap model; group WA]). All cats were sequentially fed 3 diets that differed only in NaCl content (50, 100, or 200 mg of Na/kg); each diet was fed for 7 days. The ABP was recorded continuously by radiotelemetry, and renal function (glomerular filtration rate [GFR]) was determined on the sixth day of each feeding period. Dietary supplementation with NaCl did not affect ABP, but it increased GFR in groups C and WA. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis was activated in groups RK and WA at the lowest NaCl intake, but supplementation with NaCl suppressed this activation in group WA. The lowest NaCl intake was associated with hypokalemia and a high fractional excretion of potassium that decreased in response to supplementation with NaCl. Arterial baroreceptor resetting was evident after chronic hypertension but was not modified by dietary supplementation with NaCl. Low NaCl intake was associated with inappropriate kaliuresis, reduced GFR, and activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis without evidence of a beneficial effect on ABP. Therefore, this common dietary maneuver could contribute to hypokalemic nephropathy and progressive renal injury in cats.

  5. Effects of the antioxidant drug tempol on renal oxygenation in mice with reduced renal mass.

    PubMed

    Lai, En Yin; Luo, Zaiming; Onozato, Maristela L; Rudolph, Earl H; Solis, Glenn; Jose, Pedro A; Wellstein, Anton; Aslam, Shakil; Quinn, Mark T; Griendling, Kathy; Le, Thu; Li, Ping; Palm, Fredrik; Welch, William J; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2012-07-01

    We tested the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS) contributed to renal hypoxia in C57BL/6 mice with ⅚ surgical reduction of renal mass (RRM). ROS can activate the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP-2) and increase O(2) usage. However, UCP-2 can be inactivated by glutathionylation. Mice were fed normal (NS)- or high-salt (HS) diets, and HS mice received the antioxidant drug tempol or vehicle for 3 mo. Since salt intake did not affect the tubular Na(+) transport per O(2) consumed (T(Na/)Q(O2)), further studies were confined to HS mice. RRM mice had increased excretion of 8-isoprostane F(2α) and H(2)O(2), renal expression of UCP-2 and renal O(2) extraction, and reduced T(Na/)Q(O2) (sham: 20 ± 2 vs. RRM: 10 ± 1 μmol/μmol; P < 0.05) and cortical Po(2) (sham: 43 ± 2, RRM: 29 ± 2 mmHg; P < 0.02). Tempol normalized all these parameters while further increasing compensatory renal growth and glomerular volume. RRM mice had preserved blood pressure, glomeruli, and patchy tubulointerstitial fibrosis. The patterns of protein expression in the renal cortex suggested that RRM kidneys had increased ROS from upregulated p22(phox), NOX-2, and -4 and that ROS-dependent increases in UCP-2 led to hypoxia that activated transforming growth factor-β whereas erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf-2), glutathione peroxidase-1, and glutathione-S-transferase mu-1 were upregulated independently of ROS. We conclude that RRM activated distinct processes: a ROS-dependent activation of UCP-2 leading to inefficient renal O(2) usage and cortical hypoxia that was offset by Nrf-2-dependent glutathionylation. Thus hypoxia in RRM may be the outcome of NADPH oxidase-initiated ROS generation, leading to mitochondrial uncoupling counteracted by defense pathways coordinated by Nrf-2.

  6. Mechanism of glucocorticoid effect on renal transport of phosphate.

    PubMed

    Turner, S T; Kiebzak, G M; Dousa, T P

    1982-11-01

    We explored whether glucocorticoid administration, a known stimulus of renal gluconeogenesis (GNG), could decrease avid inorganic phosphate (Pi) reabsorption in rats stabilized on low-phosphorus diet (LPD). Rats adapted to LPD were injected with the glucocorticoid (GCD) triamcinolone acetonide (1.25 or 2.5 mg.100 g body wt-1.day-1 ip) for 2 days; they showed a profound increase in urinary excretion of Pi during the injection period. In clearance studies GCD increased the clearance and fractional excretion of Pi but did not change the filtered load of Pi. Initial "uphill" Na+-gradient (Nao+ greater than Nai+)-dependent uptake of 32Pi by luminal brush-border membrane (BBM) vesicles prepared from renal cortex of rats treated with GCD was markedly (greater than 40%) decreased compared with control rats; Na+-gradient-dependent uptake of D-[3H]glucose was not diminished. At the "equilibrium" time interval, measured at 120 min, BBM vesicles from control and GCD-treated rats did not differ in the uptake of 32Pi or D-[3H]glucose. With kinetic analysis, BBM from GCD-treated rats showed a marked decrease (-40%) in the maximum velocity (Vmax) of initial Na+-dependent 32Pi uptake, but the apparent affinity of the BBM transport system for Pi (apparent Km = 0.078 mM Pi) was not different from that of controls. Alkaline phosphatase specific activity was much lower (-40%) in BBM from GCD-treated rats compared with controls, but the activities of three other BBM enzymes (maltase, leucine aminopeptidase, and gamma-glutamyl transferase) were not different. The addition of triamcinolone to BBM in vitro had no effect on either Na+-dependent uptake of 32Pi or alkaline phosphatase activity. The rate of GNG from alpha-ketoglutarate was significantly increased in cortical slices from GCD-treated rats adapted to LPD. Also, the NAD+-to-NADH ratio was higher in the renal cortex of GCD-treated rats, although the total content of NAD [NAD+ + NADH] was not different from controls. Renal excretory

  7. Effect of end-stage renal disease on oral health in patients undergoing renal dialysis: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Nalam Radhika; Gautam, Nalam Sai; Rao, Thota Hanumantha; Koganti, Ravichandra; Agarwal, Rohit; Alamanda, Madhavi

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of chronic renal failure on oral health in renal dialysis patients. To assess and improvise awareness of staff regarding oral health care of the patients in hemodialysis unit. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey and oral health examination study were conducted on 206 end-stage chronic renal failure patients (stage V) who were undergoing renal dialysis in Guntur city. The study included the questionnaire form and modified WHO proforma to record their oral health status. Oral examination was done in American Dental Association (ADA) type III method by using mouth mirror and community periodontal index (CPI) probe. Questionnaire survey was conducted among the nursing staff in the hemodialysis unit. Mean age of the study subjects was 46.79 ± 12.78 years; 81.1% were males and 18.9% were females. Candidiasis (8.3%) was the most frequently seen oral mucosal condition in these subjects. Majority of the subjects (44.2%) showed periodontal diseases (CPI score 3: Pocket depth of 4-5 mm). Caries prevalence of 56.3% was seen in this study group. Higher incidence of hepatitis C was significantly associated with higher duration of dialysis. There was very little awareness among the nursing staff regarding dental care. There is greater deterioration of periodontal health among dialysis patients with chronic renal disease. Awareness regarding dental care is very less among patients undergoing renal dialysis. These patients should be monitored carefully to maintain their oral health. Awareness must be increased among dialysis patients and nursing staff about the need for primary prevention of dental diseases.

  8. Effects of polyphenols from grape seeds on renal lithiasis.

    PubMed

    Grases, Felix; Prieto, Rafel M; Fernandez-Cabot, Rafel A; Costa-Bauzá, Antonia; Tur, Fernando; Torres, Jose Juan

    2015-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a complex disease that results from a combination of factors related to both urine composition and kidney morphoanatomy. Development of calcium oxalate monohydrate papillary calculi is linked to initial subepithelial calcification of renal papilla. Progressive tissue calcification depends on preexisting injury and involves reactive oxygen species. Many plant extracts that protect against oxidative stress manifest antilithiasic activity. Our study focused on determining the effects of polyphenols on a lithiasis rat model. Rats were pretreated with polyphenols and grape seed extracts, followed by posterior induction of hyperoxalosis via treatment with ethylene glycol plus NH4Cl. The concentrations of calcium and other elements in kidney were determined, along with histological examination of kidney and 24 h urine analysis. Significant differences were observed in the renal calcium content between the control plus ethylene glycol-treated group and the epicatechin plus ethylene glycol-treated, red grape seed extract plus ethylene glycol-treated, and white grape seed extract plus ethylene glycol-treated groups, with reductions of about 50%. The antioxidant activity of polyphenols extracted from red and white grape seeds may be critical in the prevention of calcium oxalate monohydrate papillary calculus formation, particularly if calculi are induced by lesions caused by cytotoxic compounds with oxidative capacity.

  9. Effects of Polyphenols from Grape Seeds on Renal Lithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Grases, Felix; Prieto, Rafel M.; Fernandez-Cabot, Rafel A.; Costa-Bauzá, Antonia; Tur, Fernando; Torres, Jose Juan

    2015-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a complex disease that results from a combination of factors related to both urine composition and kidney morphoanatomy. Development of calcium oxalate monohydrate papillary calculi is linked to initial subepithelial calcification of renal papilla. Progressive tissue calcification depends on preexisting injury and involves reactive oxygen species. Many plant extracts that protect against oxidative stress manifest antilithiasic activity. Our study focused on determining the effects of polyphenols on a lithiasis rat model. Rats were pretreated with polyphenols and grape seed extracts, followed by posterior induction of hyperoxalosis via treatment with ethylene glycol plus NH4Cl. The concentrations of calcium and other elements in kidney were determined, along with histological examination of kidney and 24 h urine analysis. Significant differences were observed in the renal calcium content between the control plus ethylene glycol-treated group and the epicatechin plus ethylene glycol-treated, red grape seed extract plus ethylene glycol-treated, and white grape seed extract plus ethylene glycol-treated groups, with reductions of about 50%. The antioxidant activity of polyphenols extracted from red and white grape seeds may be critical in the prevention of calcium oxalate monohydrate papillary calculus formation, particularly if calculi are induced by lesions caused by cytotoxic compounds with oxidative capacity. PMID:25883748

  10. Renal effects of Anchomanes difformis crude extract in wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Ataman E, Jacob; Idu, MacDonald

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Anchomanes difformis is a member of the plant family Araceae which is used as a diuretic but also has other medicinal applications. This study investigates the dietary effects of A. difformis on the kidneys of adult wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Sixteen rats were used and were weighed, before and after the experiment. All rats were randomly divided into four groups. All groups were treated with the following regimen for two weeks. The control group (A) was fed on feed mash and water ad libitum throughout the period. The treatment groups B, C, and D received feed mash mixed with crude extract of A. difformis in the following proportions: 25:75(g), 50:50(g), and 75:25(g), respectively. The kidneys of the experimental animals were histologically examined for morphologic changes. Results: Results showed a significant difference (p<0.05) in the kidney weight of the treatment groups compared with the control. Histological examination of the renal tissues also showed considerable lesions such as inflammation, focal cortical and interstitial hemorrhage, and fibrosis in the treated rats compared with the control. Conclusion: The current study results suggest renal toxicity with excessive consumption of A.difformis. PMID:25767753

  11. Effect of Shock Wave Lithotripsy on Renal Hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handa, Rajash K.; Willis, Lynn R.; Evan, Andrew P.; Connors, Bret A.

    2008-09-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) can injure tissue and decrease blood flow in the SWL-treated kidney, both tissue and functional effects being largely localized to the region targeted with shock waves (SWs). A novel method of limiting SWL-induced tissue injury is to employ the "protection" protocol, where the kidney is pretreated with low-energy SWs prior to the application of a standard clinical dose of high-energy SWs. Resistive index measurements of renal vascular resistance/impedance to blood flow during SWL treatment protocols revealed that a standard clinical dose of high-energy SWs did not alter RI during SW application. However, there was an interaction between low- and high-energy SWL treatment phases of the "protection" protocol such that an increase in RI (vasoconstriction) was observed during the later half of SW application, a time when tissue damage is occurring during the standard high-energy SWL protocol. We suggest that renal vasoconstriction may be responsible for reducing the degree of tissue damage that normally results from a standard clinical dose of high-energy SWs.

  12. In vitro effects of nanoparticles on renal cells

    PubMed Central

    L'Azou, Béatrice; Jorly, Joana; On, Dinhill; Sellier, Elisabeth; Moisan, Frédéric; Fleury-Feith, Jocelyne; Cambar, Jean; Brochard, Patrick; Ohayon-Courtès, Céline

    2008-01-01

    Background The ability of nanoparticles to cross the lung-blood barrier suggests that they may translocate to blood and to targets distant from their portal of entry. Nevertheless, nanotoxicity in organs has received little attention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate nanotoxicity in renal cells using in vitro models. Various carbon black (CB) (FW2–13 nm, Printex60-21 nm and LB101-95 nm) and titanium dioxide (TiO2-15 and TiO2-50 nm) nanoparticles were characterized on size by electron microscopy. We evaluated theirs effects on glomerular mesangial (IP15) and epithelial proximal tubular (LLC-PK1) renal cells, using light microscopy, WST-1 assay, immunofluorescence labeling and DCFH-DA for reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay. Results Nanoparticles induced a variety of cell responses. On both IP15 and LLC-PK1 cells, the smallest FW2 NP was found to be the most cytotoxic with classic dose-behavior. For the other NPs tested, different cytotoxic profiles were found, with LLC-PK1 cells being more sensitive than IP15 cells. Exposure to FW2 NPs, evidenced in our experiments as the most cytotoxic particle type, significantly enhanced production of ROS in both IP15 and LLC-PK1 cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy using latex beads indicated that depending on their size, the cells internalized particles, which accumulated in the cell cytoplasm. Additionally using transmission electronic microscope micrographs show nanoparticles inside the cells and trapped in vesicles. Conclusion The present data constitute the first step towards determining in vitro dose effect of manufactured CB and TiO2 NPs in renal cells. Cytotoxicological assays using epithelial tubular and glomerular mesangial cell lines rapidly provide information and demonstrated that NP materials exhibit varying degrees of cytotoxicity. It seems clear that in vitro cellular systems will need to be further developed, standardized and validated (relative to in vivo effects) in order to provide useful screening

  13. Evolution of renal hyperfiltration and arterial stiffness from adolescence into early adulthood in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cherney, David Z I; Sochett, Etienne B

    2011-08-01

    To determine, in a small but carefully physiologically characterized cohort of subjects with uncomplicated type 1 diabetes, the changes in renal hemodynamic function and arterial stiffness that occur over time as the participants transitioned from adolescence into early adulthood. The classical paradigm for type 1 diabetes suggests that glomerular filtration rate (GFR) declines in patients with renal hyperfiltration, but the natural history of peripheral vascular function abnormalities in uncomplicated type 1 diabetes is less well understood, particularly as patients transition from adolescence to early adulthood. Renal hemodynamic function (inulin and p-aminohippuric acid clearance), blood pressure, arterial stiffness (radial augmentation index), albumin excretion, and circulating renin-angiotensin system measures were obtained during clamped euglycemia at baseline and at follow-up 6.8 ± 2.5 years later in 10 patients with hyperfiltration (GFR ≥135 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) and in 8 with normofiltration. Compared with baseline values, GFR (171 ± 20 to 120 ± 15 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) and filtration fraction (FF, 0.24 ± 0.06 to 0.18 ± 0.03) declined in hyperfilterers (ANOVA P ≤ 0.033), and renal vascular resistance increased (0.0678 ± 0.0135 to 0.0783 ± 0.0121 mmHg/L/min, P = 0.017). GFR and FF did not change in normofiltering subjects. In contrast, the radial augmentation index decreased in hyperfiltering (1.2 ± 11.7 to -11.0 ± 7.8%) and normofiltering (14.3 ± 14.0 to 2.5 ± 14.6%) subjects (within-group changes, ANOVA P ≤ 0.030). The decline in circulating aldosterone levels was similar in both groups. During the transition from adolescence to early adulthood, hyperfiltration is not sustained in subjects with type 1 diabetes, whereas GFR remains stable in normofiltering subjects. Our findings suggest early normofiltration may predict stable renal function. In contrast, arterial stiffness decreased in all patients regardless of filtration status, suggesting that

  14. Effect of chronic renal medullary nitric oxide inhibition on blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Mattson, D L; Lu, S; Nakanishi, K; Papanek, P E; Cowley, A W

    1994-05-01

    The effects of chronic nitric oxide inhibition in the renal medulla on renal cortical and medullary blood flow, sodium balance, and blood pressure were evaluated in conscious uninephrectomized Sprague-Dawley rats. During a 5-day renal medullary interstitial infusion of the nitric oxide inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 120 micrograms/h) in saline (0.5 ml/min), renal medullary blood flow was selectively decreased by 30% after 2 h and was maintained at that level for the entire infusion. The decrease in medullary blood flow was associated with sodium retention and increased blood pressure. After the cessation of L-NAME infusion, medullary blood flow returned to control, and the sodium balance became negative as blood pressure returned to baseline. These data indicate that renal medullary nitric oxide plays an important role in the regulation of renal blood flow, sodium excretion, and blood pressure.

  15. Functional consequences of prenatal methylmercury exposure: effects on renal and hepatic responses to trophic stimuli and on renal excretory mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Slotkin, T.A.; Kavlock, R.J.; Cowdery, T.; Orband, L.; Bartolome, M.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of prenatal exposure to methylmercury on the functional development of renal and hepatic response systems was examined in the developing rat. Methylmercury produced an elevation of basal activity of renal ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, an enzyme involved in regulation of cellular maturation) and an eventual relative hypertrophy; liver ODC was reduced and hypertrophy was not evident. In contrast, the reactivity of liver ODC to trophic stimulants (vasopressin, isoproterenol) was markedly enhanced by prenatal methylmercury exposure, whereas renal ODC responses were much less affected (vasopressin) or actually reduced (isoproterenol). Targeted actions of methylmercury on renal excretory function were also prominent, with increased fractional excretions urea and electrolytes and an eventual reduction in glomerular filtration as assessed by creatinine clearance. These studies show that doses of methylmercury ordinarily associated with selective actions on development of neurobehavioral patterns also influence the functional ontogeny of other organ systems; furthermore, the fact that the target tissues are different for prenatal vs postnatal methylmercury exposure, indicates that the functional teratology of methylmercury exhibits critical periods of sensitivity.

  16. Effect of a stable prostacyclin analogue on canine renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed Central

    Tobimatsu, M; Ueda, Y; Toyoda, K; Saito, S; Konomi, K

    1987-01-01

    The effect of OP-41483 (Ono Pharmaceutical Co., Osaka, Japan), a stable prostacyclin analogue, on canine renal allograft rejection was investigated. Administration for 4 days after transplantation significantly increased renal cortical blood flow and urine output when compared with untreated dogs with renal allografts. Serum creatinine levels remained relatively low during postoperative days 1-4. Mean animal survival time was prolonged. Vascular lesions and mononuclear cell infiltration were greatly diminished in biopsy specimens removed on day 4. This stable prostacyclin analogue provided a degree of protection against canine renal allograft rejection. Images Figs. 1A and B. PMID:3545109

  17. Preventive effect of specific antioxidant on oxidative renal cell injury associated with renal crystal formation.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Andrew I; Green, David; Lynch, Alexandria; Choudhury, Muhammad; Eshghi, Majid; Konno, Sensuke

    2013-08-01

    To investigate whether calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), a key element of hyperoxaluria, would induce renal cell injury through oxidative stress and also whether certain antioxidants could prevent chemically induced renal crystal formation in rats. COM-exerted oxidative stress on the kidney epithelial Madin-Darby canine kidney cells was assessed using the lipid peroxidation assay. Glyoxalase I (Gly-I) activity was also determined. Two antioxidants, vitamin C and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), were then tested to determine whether they could abolish such oxidative stress in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Both antioxidants were also tested to determine whether they might prevent or reduce renal crystal formation induced with ethylene glycol (EG) and vitamin D3 (VD3) in Wistar rats. COM (200 μg/mL) demonstrated ∼1.3-fold greater oxidative stress with a significant reduction in cell viability and Gly-I activity compared with controls. However, such adverse events were almost completely prevented with NAC but not with vitamin C. In the animal study, no renal crystals were seen in the sham group. However, numerous crystals, with reduced Gly-I activity and elevated oxidative stress, were found in the EG-VD3 group. However, markedly (>70%) fewer crystals, with full Gly-I activity and diminished oxidative stress, were detected in the EG-VD3+NAC group. COM exerted oxidative stress on Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, leading to cell viability reduction and Gly-I inactivation, with NAC fully preventing such adverse consequences. Similarly, numerous crystals with Gly-I inactivation and elevated oxidative stress seen in the rats (EG-VD3) were also significantly prevented with NAC supplement. Thus, NAC might have clinical implications in preventing oxidative renal cell injury and, ultimately, kidney stone formation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Abnormal regulation of renal kallikrein in experimental diabetes. Effects of insulin on prokallikrein synthesis and activation.

    PubMed Central

    Jaffa, A A; Miller, D H; Bailey, G S; Chao, J; Margolius, H S; Mayfield, R K

    1987-01-01

    The effects of streptozotocin (STZ) diabetes and insulin on regulation of renal kallikrein were studied in the rat. 1 and 2 wk after STZ injection, diabetic rats had reduced renal levels and urinary excretion of active kallikrein. Tissue and urinary prokallikrein levels were unchanged, but the rate of renal prokallikrein synthesis relative to total protein synthesis was reduced 30-45% in diabetic rats. Treatment of diabetic rats with insulin prevented or reversed the fall in tissue level and excretion rate of active kallikrein and normalized prokallikrein synthesis rate. To further examine insulin's effects, nondiabetic rats were treated with escalating insulin doses to produce hyperinsulinemia. In these rats, renal active kallikrein increased. Although renal prokallikrein was not increased significantly by hyperinsulinemia, its synthesis was increased. As this was accompanied by proportionally increased total protein synthesis, relative kallikrein synthesis rate was not changed. Excretion of active kallikrein was unchanged, but prokallikrein excretion was markedly reduced. Therefore, increased tissue active kallikrein seen with hyperinsulinemia can be explained not only by increased synthesis but also by retention and increased activation of renal prokallikrein. These studies show that STZ diabetes produces an impairment in renal kallikrein synthesis and suggest that this disease state also impairs renal prokallikrein activation. The findings also suggest that insulin modulates renal kallikrein production, activation, and excretion. Images PMID:3316279

  19. Effects of a high protein intake on renal acid excretion in bodybuilders.

    PubMed

    Manz, F; Remer, T; Decher-Spliethoff, E; Höhler, M; Kersting, M; Kunz, C; Lausen, B

    1995-03-01

    Bodybuilders often prefer a high protein diet to achieve maximum skeletal muscle hypertrophy. In this study the effect of a high protein diet on renal acid load and renal handling of proton excretion was studied comparing dietary intake and urinary ionograms in 37 male bodybuilders and 20 young male adults. Energy intake (+ 7%), protein intake (128 vs 88 g/d/1.73 m2), and renal net acid excretion (95 vs 64 mmol/d/1.73 m2) were higher in the bodybuilders than in the controls, however, urine-pH was only slightly lower (5.83 vs 6.12). In the bodybuilders renal ammonium excretion was higher at any given value of urine pH than in the controls. In a regression analysis protein intake proved to be an independent factor modulating the ratio between urine-pH and renal ammonium excretion. The concomitant increase of renal net acid excretion and maximum renal acid excretion capacity in periods of high protein intake appears to be a highly effective response of the kidney to a specific food intake leaving a large renal surplus capacity for an additional renal acid load.

  20. Effects of renal function on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of lesinurad in adult volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Gillen, Michael; Valdez, Shakti; Zhou, Dongmei; Kerr, Bradley; Lee, Caroline A; Shen, Zancong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lesinurad is a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor approved for the treatment of gout in combination with a xanthine oxidase inhibitor (XOI) in patients who have not achieved target serum uric acid (sUA) levels with an XOI alone. Most people with gout have chronic kidney disease. The pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of lesinurad were assessed in subjects with impaired renal function. Methods Two Phase I, multicenter, open-label, single-dose studies enrolled subjects with normal renal function (estimated creatinine clearance [eCrCl] >90 mL/min; N=12) or mild (eCrCl 60–89 mL/min; N=8), moderate (eCrCl 30–59 mL/min; N=16), or severe (eCrCl <30 mL/min; N=6) renal impairment. Subjects were given a single oral lesinurad dose of 200 mg (N=24) or 400 mg (N=18). Blood and urine samples were analyzed for plasma lesinurad concentrations and serum and urine uric acid concentrations. Safety was assessed by adverse events and laboratory data. Results Mild, moderate, and severe renal impairment increased lesinurad plasma area under the plasma concentration–time curve by 34%, 54%–65%, and 102%, respectively. Lesinurad plasma Cmax was unaffected by renal function status. Lower renal clearance and urinary excretion of lesinurad were associated with the degree of renal impairment. The sUA-lowering effect of a single dose of lesinurad was similar between mild renal impairment and normal function, reduced in moderate impairment, and greatly diminished in severe impairment. Lesinurad increased urinary urate excretion in normal function and mild renal impairment; the increase was less with moderate or severe renal impairment. Lesinurad was well tolerated by all subjects. Conclusion Lesinurad exposure increased with decreasing renal function; however, the effects of lesinurad on sUA were attenuated in moderate to severe renal impairment. PMID:27843295

  1. Renal Handling of Circulating and Renal-Synthesized Hepcidin and Its Protective Effects against Hemoglobin-Mediated Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    van Swelm, Rachel P L; Wetzels, Jack F M; Verweij, Vivienne G M; Laarakkers, Coby M M; Pertijs, Jeanne C L M; van der Wijst, Jenny; Thévenod, Frank; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Swinkels, Dorine W

    2016-09-01

    Urinary hepcidin may have protective effects against AKI. However, renal handling and the potential protective mechanisms of hepcidin are not fully understood. By measuring hepcidin levels in plasma and urine using mass spectrometry and the kidney using immunohistochemistry after intraperitoneal administration of human hepcidin-25 (hhep25) in C57Bl/6N mice, we showed that circulating hepcidin is filtered by the glomerulus and degraded to smaller isoforms detected in urine but not plasma. Moreover, hepcidin colocalized with the endocytic receptor megalin in proximal tubules, and compared with wild-type mice, megalin-deficient mice showed higher urinary excretion of injected hhep25 and no hepcidin staining in proximal tubules that lack megalin. This indicates that hepcidin is reaborbed in the proximal tubules by megalin dependent endocytosis. Administration of hhep25 concomitant with or 4 hours after a single intravenous dose of hemoglobin abolished hemoglobin-induced upregulation of urinary kidney injury markers (NGAL and KIM-1) and renal Interleukin-6 and Ngal mRNA observed 24 hours after administration but did not affect renal ferroportin expression at this point. Notably, coadministration of hhep25 and hemoglobin but not administration of either alone greatly increased renal mRNA expression of hepcidin-encoding Hamp1 and hepcidin staining in distal tubules. These findings suggest a role for locally synthesized hepcidin in renal protection. Our observations did not support a role for ferroportin in hhep25-mediated protection against hemoglobin-induced early injury, but other mechanisms of cellular iron handling may be involved. In conclusion, our data suggest that both systemically delivered and locally produced hepcidin protect against hemoglobin-induced AKI.

  2. Effects of combined carotid chemoreceptor and atrial receptor stimulation on renal blood flow in anaesthetized dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Kappagoda, C T; Karim, F; Mackay, D

    1983-01-01

    In dogs anaesthetized with chloralose and artificially ventilated, carotid chemoreceptors were stimulated by changing the perfusate of the vascularly isolated carotid bifurcations from arterial to venous blood. Left atrial receptors were stimulated by distending balloons in two pulmonary vein-left atrial junctions and in this left atrial appendage. The left renal blood flow was measured by an electromagnetic flow meter at a constant systemic (renal) arterial pressure in preparations in which heart rate changes were prevented by administration of propranolol hydrochloride (0.5 mg kg-1) and atropine sulphate (0.4 mg kg-1). Muscular movement was prevented by gallamine triethiodide (0.2 mg kg-1). Stimulation of left atrial receptors resulted in a significant increase (P less than 0.001) in renal blood flow of 5.6 +/- 0.88 ml min-1 100 g-1 renal mass from a control of 223 ml min-1 100 g-1 renal mass. The responses were abolished by cooling the cervical vagus nerves to 6-8 degrees C. Stimulation of carotid chemoreceptors, by perfusion of the carotid bifurcations by venous blood, caused a decrease in renal blood flow of 20 +/- 6.9 ml min-1 100 g-1 renal mass from 224 ml min-1 100 g-1 renal mass. Stimulation of left atrial receptors during venous perfusion of carotid chemoreceptors resulted in an increase in renal blood flow of 10.9 +/- 1.82 ml min-1 100 g-1 renal mass from 208 ml min-1 100 g-1 renal mass. These results show that atrial receptors and chemoreceptors can interact in their effects on renal blood flow. PMID:6410054

  3. [Renoprotective effects of statins under the conditions of acute renal failure, caused by rhabdomyolysis].

    PubMed

    Zamorskiĭ, I I; Zeleniuk, V G

    2014-01-01

    The experiment on white rats was targeted at the examination of influence of statins (atorvastatin, lovastatin, simvastatin) under the conditions of acute renal failure, caused by rhabdomyolysis. Renoprotective effects of statins were demonstrated by reduction of hyperazotemia and proteinuria and improvement of renal excretory function, which correlated with antioxidant properties of drugs.

  4. Effect of inhibition of converting enzyme on renal hemodynamics and sodium management in polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, V E; Wilson, D M; Burnett, J C; Johnson, C M; Offord, K P

    1991-10-01

    We compared the tubular transport of sodium and the erythrocyte sodium-lithium countertransport activity in hypertensive patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and in normotensive control subjects. In addition, we assessed the effects of inhibition of converting enzyme on renal hemodynamics and sodium excretion in hypertensive patients with ADPKD to provide information on mechanisms responsible for the increased renal vascular resistance and filtration fraction and the adjustment of the pressure-natriuresis relationship during saline expansion, observed in patients with ADPKD, hypertension, and preserved renal function. In comparison with normotensive control subjects, the hypertensive patients with ADPKD had lower renal plasma flows, higher renal vascular resistances and filtration fractions, and similar proximal and distal fractional reabsorptions of sodium. The administration of enalapril resulted in significant increases in the renal plasma flow and significant reductions in mean arterial pressure, renal vascular resistance, and filtration fraction, but the glomerular filtration rate remained unchanged. Despite the significant reduction in mean arterial pressure during inhibition of converting enzyme, the distal fractional reabsorption of sodium decreased while the total fractional excretion of sodium remained unchanged or increased slightly. No significant differences were detected between the normotensive control subjects and the hypertensive patients with ADPKD in erythrocyte sodium-lithium countertransport activity, plasma renin activity, plasma aldosterone concentration, or atrial natriuretic factor. These results suggest that the renal renin-angiotensin system plays a central role in the alterations in renal hemodynamics and sodium management associated with the development of hypertension in ADPKD.

  5. Item Feature Effects in Evolution Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nehm, Ross H.; Ha, Minsu

    2011-01-01

    Despite concerted efforts by science educators to understand patterns of evolutionary reasoning in science students and teachers, the vast majority of evolution education studies have failed to carefully consider or control for item feature effects in knowledge measurement. Our study explores whether robust contextualization patterns emerge within…

  6. Item Feature Effects in Evolution Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nehm, Ross H.; Ha, Minsu

    2011-01-01

    Despite concerted efforts by science educators to understand patterns of evolutionary reasoning in science students and teachers, the vast majority of evolution education studies have failed to carefully consider or control for item feature effects in knowledge measurement. Our study explores whether robust contextualization patterns emerge within…

  7. Renal and blood pressure effects from environmental cadmium exposure in Thai children

    SciTech Connect

    Swaddiwudhipong, Witaya; Mahasakpan, Pranee; Jeekeeree, Wanpen; Funkhiew, Thippawan; Sanjum, Rungaroon; Apiwatpaiboon, Thitikarn; Phopueng, Ittipol

    2015-01-15

    Very few studies have shown renal and blood pressure effects from environmental cadmium exposure in children. This population study examined associations between urinary cadmium excretion, a good biomarker of long-term cadmium exposure, and renal dysfunctions and blood pressure in environmentally exposed Thai children. Renal functions including urinary excretion of β{sub 2}-microglobulin, calcium (early renal effects), and total protein (late renal effect), and blood pressure were measured in 594 primary school children. Of the children studied, 19.0% had urinary cadmium ≥1 μg/g creatinine. The prevalence of urinary cadmium ≥1 μg/g creatinine was significantly higher in girls and in those consuming rice grown in cadmium-contaminated areas. The geometric mean levels of urinary β{sub 2}-microglobulin, calcium, and total protein significantly increased with increasing tertiles of urinary cadmium. The analysis did not show increased blood pressure with increasing tertiles of urinary cadmium. After adjusting for age, sex, and blood lead levels, the analysis showed significant positive associations between urinary cadmium and urinary β{sub 2}-microglobulin and urinary calcium, but not urinary total protein nor blood pressure. Our findings provide evidence that environmental cadmium exposure can affect renal functions in children. A follow-up study is essential to assess the clinical significance and progress of renal effects in these children. - Highlights: • Few studies show renal effects from environmental cadmium exposure in children. • We report renal and blood pressure effects from cadmium exposure in Thai children. • Urinary β{sub 2}-microglobulin and calcium increased with increasing urinary cadmium. • The study found no association between urinary cadmium levels and blood pressure. • Environmental cadmium exposure can affect renal functions in children.

  8. Protective Effects of Luteolin on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Renal Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Shao-bin; Yan, Hao; Ma, Jing; Sun, Qiang; Shen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background Sepsis can cause serious acute kidney injury in bacterium-infected patients, especially in intensive care patients. Luteolin, a bioactive flavonoid, has renal protection and anti-inflammatory effects. This study aimed to investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of luteolin in attenuating lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced renal injury. Material/Methods ICR mice were treated with LPS (25 mg/kg) with or without luteolin pre-treatment (40 mg/kg for three days). The renal function, histological changes, degree of oxidative stress, and tubular apoptosis in these mice were examined. The effects of luteolin on LPS-induced expression of renal tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), NF-κB, MCP-1, ICAM-1, and cleaved caspase-3 were evaluated. Results LPS resulted in rapid renal damage of mice, increased level of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and serum creatinine (Scr), tubular necrosis, and increased oxidative stress, whereas luteolin pre-treatment could attenuate this renal damage and improve the renal functions significantly. Treatment with LPS increased TNF-α, NF-κB, IL-1β, cleaved caspase-3, MCP-1, and ICAM-1 expression, while these disturbed expressions were reversed by luteolin pre-treatment. Conclusions These results indicate that luteolin ameliorates LPS-mediated nephrotoxicity via improving renal oxidant status, decreasing NF-κB activation and inflammatory and apoptosis factors, and then disturbing the expression of apoptosis-related proteins. PMID:28029146

  9. Effect of chronic alcohol feeding on physiological and molecular parameters of renal thiamin transport.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Veedamali S; Subramanya, Sandeep B; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Said, Hamid M

    2010-07-01

    The renal thiamin reabsorption process plays an important role in regulating thiamin body homeostasis and involves both thiamin transporters-1 and -2 (THTR1 and THTR2). Chronic alcohol use is associated with thiamin deficiency. Although a variety of factors contribute to the development of this deficiency, effects of chronic alcohol use on renal thiamin transport have not been thoroughly examined. We addressed this issue by examining the effect of chronic alcohol feeding of rats with liquid diet on physiological and molecular parameters of renal thiamin transport. Chronic alcohol feeding caused a significant inhibition in carrier-mediated thiamin transport across the renal brush-border membrane and was evident as early as 2 wk after initiation of alcohol feeding. Similarly, thiamin transport across the renal basolateral membrane was significantly inhibited by chronic alcohol feeding. The inhibition in renal thiamin transport was associated with a marked decrease in the level of expression of THTR1 and -2 proteins, mRNAs, and heterogeneous nuclear RNAs. Chronic alcohol feeding also caused a significant reduction in the level of expression of thiamin pyrophosphokinase but not that of the mitochondrial thiamin pyrophosphate transporter. These studies show that chronic alcohol feeding inhibits the entry and exit of thiamin in the polarized renal epithelial cells and that the effect is, at least in part, mediated at the transcriptional level. These findings also suggest that chronic alcohol feeding interferes with the normal homeostasis of thiamin in renal epithelial cells.

  10. Protective effect of Urtica dioica L. on renal ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat.

    PubMed

    Sayhan, Mustafa Burak; Kanter, Mehmet; Oguz, Serhat; Erboga, Mustafa

    2012-12-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury may occur after renal transplantation, thoracoabdominal aortic surgery, and renal artery interventions. This study was designed to investigate the effect of Urtica dioica L. (UD), in I/R induced renal injury. A total of 32 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: control, UD alone, I/R and I/R + UD; each group contain 8 animals. A rat model of renal I/R injury was induced by 45-min occlusion of the bilateral renal pedicles and 24-h reperfusion. In the UD group, 3 days before I/R, UD (2 ml/kg/day intraperitoneal) was administered by gastric gavage. All animals were sacrificed at the end of reperfusion and kidney tissues samples were obtained for histopathological investigation in all groups. To date, no more histopathological changes on intestinal I/R injury in rats by UD treatment have been reported. Renal I/R caused severe histopathological injury including tubular damage, atrophy dilatation, loss of brush border and hydropic epithelial cell degenerations, renal corpuscle atrophy, glomerular shrinkage, markedly focal mononuclear cell infiltrations in the kidney. UD treatment significantly attenuated the severity of intestinal I/R injury and significantly lowered tubulointerstitial damage score than the I/R group. The number of PCNA and TUNEL positive cells in the control and UD alone groups was negligible. When kidney sections were PCNA and TUNEL stained, there was a clear increase in the number of positive cells in the I/R group rats in the renal cortical tissues. However, there is a significant reduction in the activity of PCNA and TUNEL in kidney tissue of renal injury induced by renal I/R with UD therapy. Our results suggest that administration of UD attenuates renal I/R injury. These results suggest that UD treatment has a protective effect against renal damage induced by renal I/R. This protective effect is possibly due to its ability to inhibit I/R induced renal damage, apoptosis and cell proliferation.

  11. Evolution of Technology for Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy: Forty Years of Improvements.

    PubMed

    Ronco, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Continuous arteriovenous hemofiltration (CAVH) was proposed in 1977 as an alternative treatment for acute renal failure in patients in whom peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis was clinically or technically precluded. In the mid-1980s, this technique was extended to infants and children. CAVH presented important advantages in the areas of hemodynamic stability, control of circulating volume, and nutritional support. However, there were serious shortcomings such as the need for arterial cannulation and limited solute clearance. These problems were solved by the introduction of continuous arteriovenous hemodiafiltration (CAVHDF) and continuous arteriovenous hemodialysis (CAVHD) where uremic control could be by increasing countercurrent dialysate flow rates to 1.5 or 2 liters/h as necessary, or by venovenous techniques utilizing a double-lumen central venous catheter for vascular access. Thus, continuous venovenous hemofiltration replaced CAVH because of its improved performance and safety. From the initial adoptive technology, specific machines have been designed to permit safe and reliable performance of the therapy. These new machines have progressively undergone a series of technological steps that have resulted in the highly sophisticated equipment utilized today. A significant number of advances have taken place since the beginning of continuous renal replacement therapy. In particular, there have been successful experiments with high-volume hemofiltration and high-permeability hemofiltration. The additional and combined use of sorbent has also been tested successfully. Progress has been made in the technology as well as the understanding of the pathophysiology of acute kidney injury. Today, new biomaterials and new devices are available and new frontiers are on the horizon. Although improvements have been made, a lot remains to be done. Critical care nephrology is expected to further evolve in the near future, especially in the area of information and

  12. Acute effects of ferumoxytol on regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Cantow, Kathleen; Pohlmann, Andreas; Flemming, Bert; Ferrara, Fabienne; Waiczies, Sonia; Grosenick, Dirk; Niendorf, Thoralf; Seeliger, Erdmann

    2016-01-01

    The superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle ferumoxytol is increasingly used as intravascular contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study details the impact of ferumoxytol on regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation. In 10 anesthetized rats, a single intravenous injection of isotonic saline (used as volume control) was followed by three consecutive injections of ferumoxytol to achieve cumulative doses of 6, 10, and 41 mg Fe/kg body mass. Arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, renal cortical and medullary perfusion and oxygen tension were continuously measured. Regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation was characterized by dedicated interventions: brief periods of suprarenal aortic occlusion, hypoxia, and hyperoxia. None of the three doses of ferumoxytol resulted in significant changes in any of the measured parameters as compared to saline. Ferumoxytol did not significantly alter regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation as studied by aortic occlusion and hypoxia. The only significant effect of ferumoxytol at the highest dose was a blunting of the hyperoxia-induced increase in arterial pressure. Taken together, ferumoxytol has only marginal effects on the regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation. This makes ferumoxytol a prime candidate as contrast agent for renal MRI including the assessment of renal blood volume fraction. PMID:27436132

  13. Comparison of the Protective Effects of Erythropoietin and Melatonin on Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Banaei, Shokofeh; Ahmadiasl, Nasser; Alihemmati, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background Renal ischemia-reperfusion (IR) contributes to the development of acute renal failure (ARF). Oxygen free radicals are considered to be the principal components involved in the pathophysiological tissue alterations observed during renal IR. Objectives In this study, we compared the effects of melatonin (MEL) and erythropoietin (EPO), both known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents, on IR-induced renal injury in rats. Materials and Methods Wistar albino rats were unilaterally nephrectomized and then subjected to 45 minutes of renal pedicle occlusion followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. MEL (10 mg/kg, i.p) and EPO (5000 U/kg, i.p) were administered prior to the onset of ischemia. After 24 hours of reperfusion and following decapitation, blood samples were collected for the determination of the hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (Hct) levels. Additionally, renal samples were taken for histological evaluation. Results Ischemia-reperfusion significantly decreased the observed Hb and Hct values. The histopathological findings in the IR group confirmed that there was an increase in the hyaline cast and thickening of the Bowman capsule basement membrane. Treatment with EPO or MEL significantly increased the Hb and Hct values. In the MEL + IR group, the histopathological changes were lower than those found in the EPO + IR group. Conclusions Treatment with EPO and MEL had a beneficial effect on renal IR injury. The results may also indicate that MEL protects against morphological damage better than EPO in renal IR injury. PMID:27921018

  14. Protective effect of angiotensin II-induced increase in nitric oxide in the renal medullary circulation.

    PubMed

    Zou, A P; Wu, F; Cowley, A W

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the effect of intravenous infusion of subpressor doses of angiotensin (Ang II) on renal medullary blood flow (MBF), medullary partial oxygen pressure (PO2), and nitric oxide (NO) concentration under normal conditions and during reduction of the medullary nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in anesthetized rats. With laser Doppler flowmetry and polarographic measurement of PO2 with microelectrodes, Ang II (5 ng/kg per minute) did not alter renal cortical and medullary blood flows or medullary PO2. N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) was infused into the renal medullary interstitial space at a dose of 1.4 microg/kg per minute, a dose that did not significantly alter basal levels of MBF or PO2. Intravenous infusion of Ang II at the same dose in the presence of L-NAME decreased MBF by 23% and medullary PO2 by 28%, but it had no effect on cortical blood flow or arterial blood pressure. An in vivo microdialysis-oxyhemoglobin NO trapping technique was used in other rats to determine tissue NO concentrations using the same protocol. Ang II infusion increased tissue NO concentrations by 85% in the renal cortex and 150% in the renal medulla. Renal medullary interstitial infusion of L-NAME (1.4 microg/kg per minute) reduced medullary NO concentrations and substantially blocked Ang II-induced increases in NO concentrations in the renal medulla, but not in the renal cortex. Tissue slices of the renal cortex and medulla were studied to determine the effects of Ang II and L-NAME on the nitrite/nitrate production. Ang II stimulated the nitrite/nitrate production predominately in the renal medulla, which was significantly attenuated by L-NAME. We conclude that small elevations of circulating Ang II levels increase medullary NO production and concentrations, which plays an important role in buffering the vasoconstrictor effects of this peptide and in maintaining a constancy of MBF.

  15. Renal arteriography

    MedlinePlus

    Renal angiogram; Angiography - kidney; Renal angiography; Renal artery stenosis - arteriography ... an artery by a blood clot Renal artery stenosis Renal cell cancer Angiomyolipomas (noncancerous tumors of the ...

  16. Antifibrotic effects of KS370G, a caffeamide derivative, in renal ischemia-reperfusion injured mice and renal tubular epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Sung-Ting; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Su, Ming-Jai

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis is a main cause of end-stage renal disease. Clinically, there are no beneficial treatments that can effectively reverse the progressive loss of renal functions. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester is a natural phenolic antifibrotic agent, but rapid decomposition by an esterase leads to its low bioavailability. In this study, we evaluated the effects of KS370G, a caffeic acid phenylethyl amide, on murine renal fibrosis induced by unilateral renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) and in TGF-β1 stimulated renal tubular epithelial cells (NRK52E and HK-2). In the animal model, renal fibrosis was evaluated at 14 days post-operation. Immediately following the operation, KS370G (10 mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage once a day. Our results show that KS370G markedly attenuates collagen deposition and inhibits an IRI-induced increase of fibronectin, vimentin, α-SMA and TGF-β1 expression and plasma TGF-β1 levels in the mouse kidney. Furthermore, KS370G reverses TGF-β1-induced downregulation of E-cadherin and upregulation of α-SMA and also decreases the expression of fibronectin, collagen I and PAI-1 and inhibits TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Smad2/3. These findings show the beneficial effects of KS370G on renal fibrosis in vivo and in vitro with the possible mechanism being the inhibition of the Smad2/3 signaling pathway. PMID:25056456

  17. Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    van der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

    1982-04-01

    In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Furthermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfusion of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion or irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted.

  18. Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

    1982-04-01

    In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Futhermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfuson of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion of irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted.

  19. Effect of Organophosphate Compounds on Renal Function and Transport.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-15

    analysis by serial section electron microscopy. J . Ultrastruct. Res., 43 (1973) 107-132. 5. L. Barajas , AJ. Silverman and J . Muller, Ultrastructure...localization of acetylcholinesterase in the renal nerves. J . Ultrastruct. Res., 49 (1974) 297-311. 6. L. Barajas and P. Wang, Demonstration of...acetylcholinesterase in the adrenergic nerves of the renal glomerular arterioles. J . Ultrastruct. Res., 53 (1975) 244-253. 7. L. Barajas , P. Wang and S. DeSantis

  20. Renal effects of canagliflozin in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Perkovic, Vlado; Jardine, Meg; Vijapurkar, Ujjwala; Meininger, Gary

    2015-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease is commonly associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and may impact the efficacy and safety of glucose-lowering therapies. Canagliflozin, a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, reduces blood glucose levels in patients with T2DM by lowering the renal threshold for glucose, thereby promoting urinary glucose excretion. This review describes the pharmacology, efficacy and safety of canagliflozin according to kidney function in participants with T2DM. Published articles that reported efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics data for canagliflozin in patients with T2DM and impaired renal function, and renal safety data with canagliflozin in various populations of patients with T2DM through May 2015 were included. Early transient reductions in estimated glomerular filtration rate were observed with canagliflozin; these changes generally stabilized or attenuated over time and reversed after discontinuation, suggesting no renal (glomerular or tubular) damage with canagliflozin treatment. Urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratios were reduced with canagliflozin. Canagliflozin was generally well tolerated in patients with normal or mild to moderately impaired renal function, with a modestly higher incidence of renal-related adverse events and volume depletion-related adverse events in patients with moderate renal impairment. Adverse events related to potassium elevations were infrequent with canagliflozin 100 mg regardless of kidney function status; however, patients with moderately impaired kidney function experienced hyperkalemia more frequently with canagliflozin 300 mg compared with patients treated with either canagliflozin 100 mg or placebo. Canagliflozin was not associated with increased cardiovascular risk across studies; however, relatively few events among patients with impaired renal function meant that the analysis was not adequately powered to examine this outcome, and results from separate trials are awaited

  1. Effects of levosimendan on glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow, and renal oxygenation after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass: a randomized placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Bragadottir, Gudrun; Redfors, Bengt; Ricksten, Sven-Erik

    2013-10-01

    Acute kidney injury develops in a large proportion of patients after cardiac surgery because of the low cardiac output syndrome. The inodilator levosimendan increases cardiac output after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, but a detailed analysis of its effects on renal perfusion, glomerular filtration, and renal oxygenation in this group of patients is lacking. We therefore evaluated the effects of levosimendan on renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, renal oxygen consumption, and renal oxygen demand/supply relationship, i.e., renal oxygen extraction, early after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Prospective, placebo-controlled, and randomized trial. Cardiothoracic ICU of a tertiary center. Postcardiac surgery patients (n=30). The patients were randomized to receive levosimendan, 0.1 µg/kg/min after a loading dose of 12 µg/kg (n=15), or placebo (n=15). The experimental procedure started 4-6 hours after surgery in the ICU during propofol sedation and mechanical ventilation. Systemic hemodynamic were evaluated by a pulmonary artery thermodilution catheter. Renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate were measured by the renal vein retrograde thermodilution technique and by renal extraction of Cr-EDTA, respectively. Central venous pressure was kept constant by colloid/crystalloid infusion. Compared to placebo, levosimendan increased cardiac index (22%), stroke volume index (15%), and heart rate (7%) and decreased systemic vascular resistance index (21%), whereas mean arterial pressure was not affected. Levosimendan induced significant increases in renal blood flow (12%, p<0.05) and glomerular filtration rate (21%, p<0.05), decreased renal vascular resistance (18%, p<0.05) but caused no significant changes in filtration fraction, renal oxygen consumption, or renal oxygen extraction, compared to placebo. After cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, levosimendan induces a vasodilation, preferentially of preglomerular resistance

  2. Effect of carotid occlusion and of perfusion pressure on renal function in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Gross, R; Kirchheim, H; Ruffmann, K

    1981-06-01

    We studied the effect of bilateral common carotid occlusion (implanted pneumatic cuffs) on renal blood flow (electromagnetic flowmeter) and renal function (implanted ureteral catheter) in nine chronically instrumented, conscious dogs on a high sodium diet (14 mmol/kg body weight per day). By means of suprarenal aortic constriction (pneumatic cuff) the influence of renal perfusion pressure was investigated. There was no change in renal blood flow or glomerular filtration rate (inulin clearance) with either reflexly increasing (+49.6%) or constant renal perfusion pressure. Carotid occlusion caused an increase of urine output by 80.5% and of sodium excretion by 85.3% due to a fall in fractional sodium reabsorption (-0.9%) when renal perfusion pressure was allowed to rise. Neither an increase of diuresis or sodium excretion nor an antinatriuresis was observed when renal perfusion pressure was kept constant during carotid occlusion. We conclude that, in conscious dogs at rest, the moderate sympathetic activation associated with carotid occlusion is too small to induce renal sympathetic vasoconstriction or antinatriuresis. The "carotid sinus polyuria" is a pressure-diuresis.

  3. Acceptance and effects of a therapeutic renal food in pet cats with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Dale A; Jewell, Dennis E; Leventhal, P S; Brejda, J; Ahle, N W; Schiefelbein, H M; Forrester, S D

    2015-01-01

    Renal foods are used to manage chronic kidney disease (CKD) in dogs and cats, but their effectiveness may be limited by the ability to transition animals to them. In a prospective study, pet cats with previously undiagnosed kidney disease (20 International Renal Interest Society (IRIS) 1, 61 IRIS 2, 14 IRIS 3/4, 33 at risk for CKD) were transitioned to a renal food. Markers of renal function were measured and owners answered questionnaires about their pet over one year. All but eight cats (120/128; 94 per cent) successfully transitioned to the renal food. Most of the time, cats moderately or extremely liked the food (89 per cent), ate at least half (73 per cent) and were moderately or extremely enthusiastic while eating (68 per cent). Cats rarely disliked the food (2 per cent) or refused to eat it (1 per cent). Markers of renal function were unchanged in IRIS 1 and 2 cats and changed little in IRIS 3/4 cats. In all groups, owner-assessed quality of life improved initially and then remained stable. Mean bodyweight did not change in cats with CKD. Most cats with CKD successfully transitioned to the renal food. The results also support previous studies that the renal food can help stabilise cats with CKD.

  4. Ameliorative Effect of Recombinant Human Erythropoietin and Ischemic Preconditioning on Renal Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Elshiekh, Mohammed; Kadkhodaee, Mehri; Seifi, Behjat; Ranjbaran, Mina; Ahghari, Parisa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is one of the most common causes of renal dysfunction. There is increasing evidence about the role of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these injuries and endogenous antioxidants seem to have an important role in decreasing the renal tissue injury. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) and ischemic preconditioning (IPC) on renal IR injury. Materials and Methods: Twenty four male Wistar rats were allocated into four experimental groups: sham-operated, IR, EPO + IR, and IPC + IR. Rats were underwent 50 minutes bilateral ischemia followed by 24 hours reperfusion. Erythropoietin (5000 IU/kg, i.p) was administered 30 minutes before onset of ischemia. Ischemic preconditioning was performed by three cycles of 3 minutes ischemia followed by 3 minutes reperfusion. Plasma concentrations of urea and creatinine were measured. Kidney samples were taken for reactive oxidative species (ROS) measurement including superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, glutathione (GSH) contents, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Results: Compared to the sham group, IR led to renal dysfunction as evidenced by significantly higher plasma urea and creatinine. Treatment with EPO or IPC decreased urea, creatinine, and renal MDA levels and increased SOD activity and GSH contents in the kidney. Conclusions: Pretreatment with EPO and application of IPC significantly ameliorated the renal injury induced by bilateral renal IR. However, both treatments attenuated renal dysfunction and oxidative stress in kidney tissues. There were no significant differences between pretreatment with EPO or application of IPC. PMID:26866008

  5. Renal and blood pressure effects from environmental cadmium exposure in Thai children.

    PubMed

    Swaddiwudhipong, Witaya; Mahasakpan, Pranee; Jeekeeree, Wanpen; Funkhiew, Thippawan; Sanjum, Rungaroon; Apiwatpaiboon, Thitikarn; Phopueng, Ittipol

    2015-01-01

    Very few studies have shown renal and blood pressure effects from environmental cadmium exposure in children. This population study examined associations between urinary cadmium excretion, a good biomarker of long-term cadmium exposure, and renal dysfunctions and blood pressure in environmentally exposed Thai children. Renal functions including urinary excretion of β2-microglobulin, calcium (early renal effects), and total protein (late renal effect), and blood pressure were measured in 594 primary school children. Of the children studied, 19.0% had urinary cadmium ≥ 1 μg/g creatinine. The prevalence of urinary cadmium ≥ 1 μg/g creatinine was significantly higher in girls and in those consuming rice grown in cadmium-contaminated areas. The geometric mean levels of urinary β2-microglobulin, calcium, and total protein significantly increased with increasing tertiles of urinary cadmium. The analysis did not show increased blood pressure with increasing tertiles of urinary cadmium. After adjusting for age, sex, and blood lead levels, the analysis showed significant positive associations between urinary cadmium and urinary β2-microglobulin and urinary calcium, but not urinary total protein nor blood pressure. Our findings provide evidence that environmental cadmium exposure can affect renal functions in children. A follow-up study is essential to assess the clinical significance and progress of renal effects in these children.

  6. Effects of a new dihydropyridine derivative, S12968 (pranedipine), and its stereoisomer, S12967, on renal effects of endothelin-1.

    PubMed

    Montañés, I; Flores, O; Eleno, N; López-Novoa, J M

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess in rats the prevention by two enantiomers of a new dihydropyridine derivative (pranedipine) (called S12967 for the dextrogyre (+) and S12968 for the levogyre (-) molecules) of the renal and cardiovascular effects induced by endothelin-1. The injection of endothelin-1 (1 nmol/kg body weight) induced a sharp and transient decrease in urine flow, sodium and potassium excretion, glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and renal blood flow, a significant increase in renal vascular resistance, and a small but significant increase in arterial pressure. Treatment with S12968 alone (0.3 mg/kg) induced a 2.5-fold increase in urine flow and potassium excretion and a 4.5-fold increase in sodium excretion. Pretreatment with S12968 completely blocked the endothelin-1 induced increase in arterial pressure, did not affect the acute effect of endothelin-1 on urine flow, sodium and potassium excretion, filtration rate, and renal blood flow, but blunted the effect on renal vascular resistance. Administration of S12967 alone (1 mg/kg) did not induce changes in either renal function or arterial pressure. In S12967-treated animals, endothelin-1 also induced a transient increase in arterial pressure nad renal vascular resistance but failed to change renal function in a significant manner. In summary, the above reported experiments show that at the higher, nonhypotensive doses, the levogyre enantiomer (S12968) of a new dihydropyridine derivative (pranedipine) completely prevented the hypertensive effect of endothelin 1, and partially prevented the effect of endothelin-1 on renal vascular resistance. The dextrogyre enantiomer (S12967) had almost no effect on either mean arterial pressure or renal vascular resistance but completely blocked the endothelin-1-induced decrease in urine flow and urinary sodium excretion.

  7. Effects of Renal Denervation Documented in the Austrian National Multicentre Renal Denervation Registry

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Thomas; Steinwender, Clemens; Weber, Thomas; Suppan, Markus; Brussee, Helmut; Koppelstätter, Christian; Kerschbaum, Julia; Watschinger, Bruno; Hohenstein-Scheibenecker, Katharina; Reindl-Schwaighofer, Roman; Sturmberger, Thomas; Kindslehner, Claudia; Weiss, Thomas Werner; Rohla, Miklos; Gruener, Peter; Maister, Petra; Auer, Johann; Dechant, Cornelia; Sykora, Josef; Krismer, Christoph; Glaser, Stefan; Zweiker, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Renal denervation (RDN) is a new procedure for treatment-resistant hypertensive patients. In order to monitor all procedures undergone in Austria, the Austrian Society of Hypertension established the investigator-initiated Austrian Transcatheter Renal Denervation (TREND) Registry. From April 2011 to September 2014, 407 procedures in 14 Austrian centres were recorded. At baseline, office and mean 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) were 171/94 and 151/89 mmHg, respectively, and patients were taking a median of 4 antihypertensive medications. Mean 24-h ABP changes after 2–6 weeks, 3, 6 and 12 months were -11/-6, -8/-4, -8/-5 and -10/-6 mmHg (p<0.05 at all measurements), respectively. The periprocedural complication rate was 2.5%. Incidence of long-term complications during follow-up (median 1 year) was 0.5%. Office BP and ABP responses showed only a weak correlation (Pearson coefficient 0.303). Based on the data from the TREND registry, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in addition to office BP should be used for patient selection as well as for monitoring response to RDN. Furthermore, criteria for optimal patient selection are suggested. PMID:27529426

  8. Effects of benazepril hydrochloride in cats with experimentally induced or spontaneously occurring chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshifumi; Mishina, Mika

    2007-10-01

    We examined effects of an angiotensin converting-enzyme inhibitor, benazepril hydrochloride (BH), on renal hypertension and chronic renal failure (CRF) in cats. For experimental CRF, healthy cats (n=5) underwent 7/8 renal ablation. After renal insufficiency and hypertension were confirmed by blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine, creatinine clearance and telemetric recording of systemic blood pressure, BH was administered orally once daily at 0.9 to 2.0 mg/kg/day for 2 to 3 weeks. Within 2 months after renal ablation, renal failure and hypertension developed as evidenced by significant increases in BUN, serum creatinine and systemic blood pressure (p<0.01 or 0.05) and significantly decreased creatinine clearance accompanied by elevated plasma renin activity, angiotensin I and II, and aldosterone (p<0.01 or 0.05). BH administration corrected systemic hypertension (p<0.05) and significantly reduced angiotensin II and aldosterone (p<0.05). Upon discontinuation of BH, these values returned to the pre-administration levels. Studies on spontaneous CRF enrolled 11 cats with spontaneously occurring CRF. BH was administered orally to 6 cats once daily for 24 weeks at a final dose of 1.0 mg/kg/day, while 5 cats served as control. BH administration reduced serum creatinine and urinary protein concentration in every cat. Results demonstrate that in cats, loss of renal mass leads to activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and associated renal hypertension, and indicate that BH is effective in correcting renal hypertension and may provide renal benefits to cats with CRF.

  9. A re-appraisal of volume status and renal function impairment in chronic heart failure: combined effects of pre-renal failure and venous congestion on renal function.

    PubMed

    Sinkeler, Steef J; Damman, Kevin; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Hillege, Hans; Navis, Gerjan

    2012-03-01

    The association between cardiac failure and renal function impairment has gained wide recognition over the last decade. Both structural damage in the form of systemic atherosclerosis and (patho) physiological hemodynamic changes may explain this association. As regards hemodynamic factors, renal impairment in chronic heart failure is traditionally assumed to be mainly due to a decrease in cardiac output and a subsequent decrease in renal perfusion. This will lead to a decrease in glomerular filtration rate and a compensatory increase in tubular sodium retention. The latter is a physiological renal response aimed at retaining fluids in order to increase cardiac filling pressure and thus renal perfusion. In heart failure, however, larger increases in cardiac filling pressure are needed to restore renal perfusion and thus more volume retention. In this concept, in chronic heart failure, an equilibrium exists where a certain degree of congestion is the price to be paid to maintain adequate renal perfusion and function. Recently, this hypothesis was challenged by new studies, wherein it was found that the association between right-sided cardiac filling pressures and renal function is bimodal, with worse renal function at the highest filling pressures, reflecting a severely congested state. Renal hemodynamic studies suggest that congestion negatively affects renal function in particular in patients in whom renal perfusion is also compromised. Thus, an interplay between cardiac forward failure and backward failure is involved in the renal function impairment in the congestive state, presumably along with other factors. Only few data are available on the impact of intervention in volume status on the cardio-renal interaction. Sparse data in cardiac patients as well as evidence from cohorts with primary renal disease suggest that specific targeting of volume overload may be beneficial for long-term outcome, in spite of a certain further decrease in renal function, at least

  10. The Evolution of Multivariate Maternal Effects

    PubMed Central

    Kuijper, Bram; Johnstone, Rufus A.; Townley, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing interest in predicting the social and ecological contexts that favor the evolution of maternal effects. Most predictions focus, however, on maternal effects that affect only a single character, whereas the evolution of maternal effects is poorly understood in the presence of suites of interacting traits. To overcome this, we simulate the evolution of multivariate maternal effects (captured by the matrix M) in a fluctuating environment. We find that the rate of environmental fluctuations has a substantial effect on the properties of M: in slowly changing environments, offspring are selected to have a multivariate phenotype roughly similar to the maternal phenotype, so that M is characterized by positive dominant eigenvalues; by contrast, rapidly changing environments favor Ms with dominant eigenvalues that are negative, as offspring favor a phenotype which substantially differs from the maternal phenotype. Moreover, when fluctuating selection on one maternal character is temporally delayed relative to selection on other traits, we find a striking pattern of cross-trait maternal effects in which maternal characters influence not only the same character in offspring, but also other offspring characters. Additionally, when selection on one character contains more stochastic noise relative to selection on other traits, large cross-trait maternal effects evolve from those maternal traits that experience the smallest amounts of noise. The presence of these cross-trait maternal effects shows that individual maternal effects cannot be studied in isolation, and that their study in a multivariate context may provide important insights about the nature of past selection. Our results call for more studies that measure multivariate maternal effects in wild populations. PMID:24722346

  11. Renal Side Effects of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Allegaert, Karel; de Hoon, Jan; Debeer, Anne; Gewillig, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like ibuprofen or indomethacin are commonly prescribed drugs to induce pharmacologic closure of a patent ductus arteriosus in preterm neonates. Based on a recently published Cochrane meta-analysis, both drugs are equally effective to induce closure. Drug choice can therefore be based on differences in side effects or pharmaco-economic arguments. The current review quantifies the negative impact of either ibuprofen or indomethacin on renal function, including diuresis, glomerular filtration rate and renal tubular function. Both ibuprofen and indomethacin have a quantifiable impact on renal function. However, compared to ibuprofen, the negative impact of indomethacin is more pronounced. PMID:27713258

  12. Effects of lysine-induced acute renal failure in dogs.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, Kentaro; Adachi, Kenji; Sugimoto, Tetsuro; Chiba, Shuichi

    2006-05-01

    This study investigates the effects of lysine-induced acute renal failure. Female dogs received a lysine hydrochloride (lysine) of 4500 mg/kg/day (3.75 ml/kg/hr) for 3 consecutive days. The dogs were observed for clinical signs. Body weights were recorded, food consumption and water consumption calculated, and urinalysis and blood biochemistry were performed daily. Plasma samples for amino acid determinations were obtained from all dogs, which were necropsied on Day 3. Histopathological examinations were done on all test animals. Compound-related findings include the following. Blood biochemistry results showed increases in ammonia, blood urea nitrogen, blood urea nitrogen/creatinine ratio, and creatinine. Urinary changes consisted of increases in urine volume, total protein, albumin, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. In addition, macroscopic findings consisted of pale, congested capsule; microscopic findings consisted of hypertrophy of proximal convoluted tubule (mainly S1 segment), and degeneration/desquamation of urinary tubule (mainly S3 segment with hyaline casts) in the kidney. From these findings, it can be concluded that lysine is nephrotoxic in dogs. Nephrotoxicity of lysine may relate to direct tubular toxicity and to tubular obstruction.

  13. Non-HLA antibodies to immunogenic epitopes predict the evolution of chronic renal allograft injury.

    PubMed

    Sigdel, Tara K; Li, Li; Tran, Tim Q; Khatri, Purvesh; Naesens, Maarten; Sansanwal, Poonam; Dai, Hong; Hsieh, Szu-chuan; Sarwal, Minnie M

    2012-04-01

    Chronic allograft injury (CAI) results from a humoral response to mismatches in immunogenic epitopes between the donor and recipient. Although alloantibodies against HLA antigens contribute to the pathogenesis of CAI, alloantibodies against non-HLA antigens likely contribute as well. Here, we used high-density protein arrays to identify non-HLA antibodies in CAI and subsequently validated a subset in a cohort of 172 serum samples collected serially post-transplantation. There were 38 de novo non-HLA antibodies that significantly associated with the development of CAI (P<0.01) on protocol post-transplant biopsies, with enrichment of their corresponding antigens in the renal cortex. Baseline levels of preformed antibodies to MIG (also called CXCL9), ITAC (also called CXCL11), IFN-γ, and glial-derived neurotrophic factor positively correlated with histologic injury at 24 months. Measuring levels of these four antibodies could help clinicians predict the development of CAI with >80% sensitivity and 100% specificity. In conclusion, pretransplant serum levels of a defined panel of alloantibodies targeting non-HLA immunogenic antigens associate with histologic CAI in the post-transplant period. Validation in a larger, prospective transplant cohort may lead to a noninvasive method to predict and monitor for CAI.

  14. Regulation of renal hemodynamics after protein feeding: effects of proximal and distal diuretics.

    PubMed

    Woods, L L; Smith, B E; De Young, D R

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of these studies was to compare the effects of proximally and distally acting diuretics on the renal hemodynamic response to protein feeding to determine the importance of the proximal tubule in postprandial renal vasodilation. In chronically instrumented conscious dogs, a meat meal (10 g/kg raw beef) caused glomerular filtration rate (GFR) to increase from 63 +/- 5 to 87 +/- 10 ml/min and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) to increase from 189 +/- 20 to 249 +/- 20 ml/min, while plasma alpha-amino nitrogen levels rose from 4.0 +/- 0.1 to 6.8 +/- 0.4 mg/dl. Administration of amiloride (0.2 mg/kg + 0.003 mg.kg-1.min-1) or potassium canrenoate (1.76 mg/kg + 1.76 mg.kg-1.h-1), diuretics that act in the distal tubule, had no effect on the renal hemodynamic responses to a meat meal. However, the normal renal hemodynamic responses to protein feeding were abolished during administration of a diuretic that acts in the proximal tubule, acetazolamide (20 mg/kg + 20 mg.kg-1.h-1), although plasma alpha-amino nitrogen levels increased after the meat meal in all experiments. These data suggest that normal proximal tubular sodium reabsorptive function is necessary for acute protein-stimulated renal vasodilation and are consistent with the hypothesis that a tubuloglomerular feedback mechanism may mediate postprandial renal vasodilation.

  15. [Spontaneous rupture of a simple renal cyst to the pyelocalyceal system. Evolution from Bosniak I to IIF].

    PubMed

    Hernández Castrillo, Alberto; de Diego Rodríguez, Enrique; Rado Velázquez, Miguel Angel; Lanzas Prieto, José Manuel

    2008-04-01

    To report the spontaneous rupture of a renal cyst into the adjacent pyelocalyceal collecting system. We present the case of a 47 year old woman with a 17 centimeter simple renal cyst (Bosniak I) as well as ipsilateral nephrolithiasis. The patient had a febrile urinary tract infection with flank pain. A subsequent CT scan revealed that this cyst spontaneously ruptured into the renal pelvis. Follow up evaluations showed the former cyst has decreased in size and contain thick and nodular calcifications. At present it is a Bosniak IIF cyst. Simple renal cysts can spontaneously rupture and drain into the adjacent renal collecting system.

  16. Effectiveness of theophylline prophylaxis of renal impairment after coronary angiography in patients with chronic renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Huber, Wolfgang; Schipek, Chrysantha; Ilgmann, Kathrin; Page, Michael; Hennig, Michael; Wacker, Annette; Schweigart, Ursula; Lutilsky, Leopoldo; Valina, Christian; Seyfarth, Melchior; Schömig, Albert; Classen, Meinhard

    2003-05-15

    Contrast media can lead to renal impairment that results in longer hospitalization and increased mortality. Adenosine is a crucial mediator of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN; an increase in serum creatinine of >or=0.5 mg/dl within 48 hours). Therefore, it was the purpose of our study to investigate whether the adenosine antagonist theophylline reduces the incidence of CIN after coronary angiography. We also characterized risk factors for CIN after coronary angiography. One hundred patients with serum creatinine concentrations of >or=1.3 mg/dl randomly received 200 mg IV theophylline or placebo 30 minutes before coronary angiography (amount of contrast medium >or=100 ml). Patients who received theophylline and the controls were comparable with regard to baseline creatinine levels (means +/- SD) (1.65 +/- 0.41 vs 1.72 +/- 0.69 mg/dl) and the amount of contrast medium received (235 +/- 89 vs 261 +/- 139 ml). Theophylline significantly reduced the incidence of CIN (4% vs 20%, p = 0.0138). With placebo, creatinine significantly increased at 12 (1.82 +/- 0.79 mg/dl, p = 0.0057), 24 (1.90 +/- 0.86 mg/dl, p = 0.0001), and 48 hours (1.90 +/- 0.89 mg/dl, p = 0.0007) after administration of contrast medium. With pretreatment with theophylline, mean creatinine only increased 24 hours after contrast medium administration (1.70 +/- 0.40 mg/dl, p = 0.029), but was stable 12 hours (1.65 +/- 0.43 mg/dl, p = 0.99) and 48 hours after contrast medium administration (1.65 +/- 0.41 mg/dl, p = 0.99). The following parameters were significantly associated with contrast-induced renal impairment: Cigarroa quotient >5 (contrast medium [milliters] x serum creatinine/body weight [kg]), elevated troponin T, >300 ml of contrast medium, and emergency angiography. In conclusion, theophylline reduces the incidence of CIN in patients with chronic renal insufficiency undergoing coronary angiography. It should be used especially in patients receiving large amounts of contrast medium, and in

  17. Effect of chronic antioxidant therapy with superoxide dismutase-mimetic drug, tempol, on progression of renal disease in rats with renal mass reduction.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Yasmir; Ferrebuz, Atilio; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Bernardo

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation play a major role in the progression of renal damage and antioxidants are potentially useful therapeutic options in chronic renal disease. We investigated if treatment with tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic that has beneficial effects in several experimental models of hypertension and acute kidney injury, ameliorates the chronic renal damage resulting in renal mass reduction. Rats with surgical 5/6 nephrectomy were randomly assigned to receive no treatment (CRF group, n = 10) or tempol, 1 mmol/l in the drinking water (CRF-tempol group, n = 10). Sham-operated rats (n = 10) served as controls. All rats were followed for 12 weeks post-nephrectomy. Tempol treatment reduced plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and halved the number of superoxide-positive cells in the remnant kidney; however, the number of hydrogen peroxide-positive cells increased and the overall renal oxidative stress (MDA and nitrotyrosine abundance) and inflammation (interstitial p65 NF-kappaB, macrophage and lymphocyte infiltration) were unchanged. Proteinuria, renal function and glomerular and tubulointerstitial damage in the remnant kidney were similar in the CRF and CRF-tempol groups. In conclusion, tempol administration, at the dose used in these studies, decreased plasma MDA and heightened superoxide dismutation in the kidney, but was incapable of reducing renal oxidative stress or improving renal function or structure in the remnant kidney model.

  18. [Correlation between E.N.G. changes and the evolution of the hematic constants in patients under prolonged hemodialysis and renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Teijeira Alvarez, J M

    1974-01-01

    An evolutive study of the E.N.G. on 25 patients affected of chronic renal failure (c.r.f.) in their previous periods and during the dialysis programme was developed. At the same time a large study on various serum changes was carried on. It is observed that the motor conduction velocity (M.C.V.) shows a decreasing evolution during dialysis, which mathematical patters is a branch of an equilateral hyperbola, of equation: (see article) The Na and K evolutive curves are also significatively fitted to the same mathematical pattern. It is observed a direct and inverse lineal correlation between M.C.V. values and those ones of the Na and K respectively, with p less than 0,05 and p less than 0,01. It is not observed any correlation of significatively value with the other serum parameters studied (R.A., Cl, Urea, Total proteins, Hematocrit, Ca, P, Creatinine, fluids and acid-base equilibrium). After a renal transplantation the M.C.V. presents a growing trayectory of the same mathematical pattern described before, reaching normal values about a year post-transplantion. The levels of Sodium serum follow a parallel trayectory than that one of the M.C.V. The recovery of the remainders serum parameters after renal transplantion occour during the first week, except for the hematocrit. It only remains a parallelism between the evolutive changes of M.C.V./Natremia during dialysis stage and after renal transplantion. These results seem to show a close dependence between variation of M.C.V. and Natremia. The hipoxia role over the sodium pump and the consequent variations of Natremia are discussed.

  19. Clinical evolution of chronic renal patients with HIV infection in replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Saracho, Ramón; Martín Escobar, Eduardo; Comas Farnés, Jordi; Arcos, Emma; Mazuecos Blanca, Auxiliadora; Gentil Govantes, Miguel Ángel; Castro de la Nuez, Pablo; Zurriaga, Óscar; Ferrer Alamar, Manuel; Bouzas Caamaño, Encarnación; García Falcón, Teresa; Portolés Pérez, José; Herrero Calvo, José A; Chamorro Jambrina, Carlos; Moina Eguren, Íñigo; Rodrigo de Tomás, María Teresa; Abad Díez, José María; Sánchez Miret, José I; Alvarez Lipe, Rafael; Díaz Tejeiro, Rafael; Moreno Alía, Inmaculada; Torres Guinea, Marta; Huarte Loza, Enma; Artamendi Larrañaga, Marta; Fernández Renedo, Carlos; González Fernández, Raquel; Sánchez Álvarez, Emilio; Alonso de la Torre, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Patients on renal replacement therapy (RRT) infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are a special group with growing interest. In order to study the epidemiological data of HIV+ patients on RRT in Spain, we collected individual information from 2004-2011 (period of use of highly active antiretroviral therapy [HAART] in the Autonomous Communities of Andalusia, Aragon, Asturias, Catalonia, Valencia, Castilla la Mancha, Castilla León, Galicia, Madrid, La Rioja and the Basque Country, comprising 85% of the Spanish population. A total of 271 incident and 209 prevalent patients were analysed. They were compared with the remaining patients on RRT during the same period. The annual incidence was 0.8 patients per one million inhabitants, with a significant increase during the follow-up period. The proportion of prevalent HIV+ patients was 5.1 per 1,000 patients on RRT (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.4-5.8. Although glomerular diseases constituted the majority of cases (42%), diabetic nephropathy was the cause in 14% of patients. The nation-wide totals for these percentages were 13 and 25%, respectively. Compared to the total of patients in treatment, the risk of death was significantly higher in the HIV+ group: hazard ratio (HR) adjusted for age, sex and diabetes was 2.26 (95% CI 1.74 - 2.91). Hepatitis C coinfection increased the risk of death in the HIV+ group (HR 1.77; 95% CI 1.10 - 2.85). The probability of kidney transplantation in HIV+ was only 17% after 7 years, comparing with total RTT patients (HR 0.15; 95% CI: 0.10-0.24). Despite the use of HAART, the incidence of HIV+ patients on dialysis has increased; their mortality still exceeds non-HIV patients, and they have a very low rate of transplantation. It is necessary to further our knowledge of this disease in order to improve results.

  20. Renal effects of nabumetone, a COX-2 antagonist: impairment of function in isolated perfused rat kidneys contrasts with preserved renal function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Reichman, J; Cohen, S; Goldfarb, M; Shina, A; Rosen, S; Brezis, M; Karmeli, F; Heyman, S N

    2001-01-01

    The constitutive cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 enzyme has been considered the physiologically important isoform for prostaglandin synthesis in the normal kidney. It has, therefore, been suggested that selective inhibitors of the 'inducible' isoform (COX-2) may be free from renal adverse effects. We studied the renal effects of the predominantly COX-2 antagonist nabumetone in isolated perfused kidneys. As compared with controls, kidneys removed after in vivo administration of oral nabumetone (15 mg/kg) disclosed altered renal function with reduced glomerular filtration rate, filtration fraction, and urine volume and enhanced hypoxic outer medullary tubular damage. By contrast, renal function and morphology were not affected in vivo by nabumetone or its active metabolite 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid. The latter agent (10-20 mg/kg i.v.) did not significantly alter renal microcirculation, as opposed to a selective substantial reduction in medullary blood flow noted with the nonselective COX inhibitor indomethacin (5 mg/kg i.v.). In a rat model of acute renal failure, induced by concomitant administration of radiocontrast, nitric oxide synthase, and COX inhibitors, the decline in kidney function and the extent of hypoxic medullary damage with oral nabumetone (80 mg/kg) were comparable to a control group, and significantly less than those induced by indomethacin. In rats subjected to daily oral nabumetone for 3 consecutive weeks, renal function and morphology were preserved as well. Both nabumetone and 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid reduced renal parenchymal prostaglandin E2 to the same extent as indomethacin. It is concluded that while nabumetone adversely affects renal function and may intensify hypoxic medullary damage ex vivo, rat kidneys are not affected by this agent in vivo, both in acute and chronic studies. COX selectivity may not explain the renal safety of nabumetone.

  1. Protective effects of icariin on cisplatin-induced acute renal injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Pei; Zhang, Sen; Su, Xinlin; Qiu, Guixing; Wu, Zhihong

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin chemotherapy often causes acute kidney injury in cancer patients. Icariin is a bioactive flavonoid, which has renal protection and anti-inflammation effects. This study investigated the mechanism underlying the attenuation of cisplatin-induced renal injury by icariin. BALB/c mice were treated with cisplatin (15 mg/kg) with or without treatment with icariin (30 or 60 mg/kg for 5 days). Renal function, histological changes, degree of oxidative stress and tubular apoptosis were examined. The effects of icariin on cisplatin-induced expression of renal TNF-α, NF-κB, cleaved caspase-3 and Bcl-2 family proteins were evaluated. Treatment of mice with cisplatin resulted in renal damage, showing an increase in blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels, tubular damage, oxidative stress and apoptosis. These renal changes could be significantly improved by icariin treatment, especially in high dose of icariin group. Examination of molecules involving inflammation and apoptosis of the kidney revealed that treatment of icariin reduced expression of TNF-α, NF-κB, cleaved caspase-3, and Bax, increased the expression of BCL-2. These results indicate that icariin ameliorates the cisplatin-mediated nephrotoxicity via improving renal oxidant status, consequent NF-κB activation and inflammation cascade and apoptosis, and the following disturbed expression of apoptosis related proteins. PMID:26692955

  2. Acute effects of dipyrone on renal function in patients with cirrhosis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zapater, Pedro; Llanos, Lucia; Barquero, Claudia; Bellot, Pablo; Pascual, Sonia; Carnicer, Fernando; Palazón, Jose Maria; Gimenez, Paula; Esteban, Angel; Llorca, Lourdes; Francés, Ruben; Horga, Jose Francisco; Such, Jose

    2015-03-01

    Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in cirrhosis has been associated with impairment of renal function based on its ability to inhibit the renal production of prostaglandins. Renal effects of dipyrone in patients with cirrhosis have not been evaluated. We aimed to assess the renal effect of therapeutic doses of dipyrone used for short periods of time in patients with cirrhosis. Twenty-nine patients with cirrhosis were included in an observer-blind clinical trial. Patients were randomized to receive three times a day oral acetaminophen (500 mg; N = 15) or dipyrone (575 mg; N = 14) for 72 hr. Serum and urine samples were obtained at baseline, 48 and 72 hr, and cystatin C, creatinine, aldosterone, 6-keto-Prostaglandin-F1 alpha and prostaglandin E2 were measured. Cystatin C and creatinine levels remained comparable in patients treated with acetaminophen and dipyrone. Urine and serum prostaglandins concentrations were significantly decreased at 72 hr in patients treated with dipyrone regardless of the status of ascites. One patient with ascites treated with dipyrone required a paracentesis and developed renal insufficiency. We conclude that dipyrone and acetaminophen did not reduce renal function when used for short periods of time (up to 72 hr) in patients with cirrhosis. However, considering that dipyrone lowered renal vasodilator prostaglandins synthesis, acetaminophen appears as the safest choice with respect to kidney function in cirrhosis. © 2014 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  3. Effect of percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation in patients with severe heart failure.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qiming; Lu, Jing; Wang, Benwen; Ma, Genshan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clinical feasibility and effects of percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation in patients with heart failure. A total of 20 patients with heart failure were enrolled, aged from 47 to 75 years (63±10 years). They were divided into the standard therapy (n = 10), and renal nerve radiofrequency ablation groups (n = 10). There were 15 males and 5 female patients, including 8 ischemic cardiomyopathy, 8 dilated cardiomyopathy, and 8 hypertensive cardiopathy. All of the patients met the criteria of New York Heart Association classes III-IV cardiac function. Patients with diabetes and renal failure were excluded. Percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation was performed on the renal artery wall under X-ray guidance. Serum electrolytes, neurohormones, and 24 h urine volume were recorded 24 h before and after the operation. Echocardiograms were performed to obtain left ventricular ejection fraction at baseline and 6 months. Heart rate, blood pressure, symptoms of dyspnea and edema were also monitored. After renal nerve ablation, 24 h urine volume was increased, while neurohormone levels were decreased compared with those of pre-operation and standard therapy. No obvious change in heart rate or blood pressure was recorded. Symptoms of heart failure were improved in patients after the operation. No complications were recorded in the study. Percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation may be a feasible, safe, and effective treatment for the patients with severe congestive heart failure.

  4. Renal hemodynamic effects of nabumetone, sulindac, and placebo in patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Cangiano, J L; Figueroa, J; Palmer, R

    1999-03-01

    We assessed the effects of nabumetone, sulindac, and placebo on renal function and renal excretion of vasodilatory prostaglandins in older female patients (age >50 years) with osteoarthritis and normal renal function. Using a prospective, crossover design, we compared the effects of nabumetone 2000 mg/d and sulindac 400 mg/d with placebo on glomerular filtration rate (GFR), renal plasma flow (RPF), and urinary excretion of prostaglandin E2 and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1alpha in 12 patients. Urinary excretion of vasodilatory prostaglandins was not decreased after 14 days of treatment with either nabumetone or sulindac. Likewise, treatment with nabumetone or sulindac did not significantly alter renal function compared with placebo. There were no differences in mean changes in GFR or RPF from baseline after treatment with nabumetone or sulindac compared with placebo. The mean (+/- SD) changes in GFR from baseline were 0%+/-8% in patients receiving nabumetone, -8%+/-15% in patients receiving sulindac, and -7%+/-15% in patients receiving placebo. The results of this study demonstrate that treatment with nabumetone or sulindac caused no deterioration in renal function in older female patients with osteoarthritis and normal renal function.

  5. Effects of Sugammadex and Neostigmine on Renal Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Isik, Yasemin; Palabiyik, Onur; Cegin, Bilal Muhammed; Goktas, Ugur; Kati, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Background Neostigmine, the currently commonly used agent for reversal of neuromuscular blockade. Sugammadex is a novel and unique compound designed as an antagonist of steroidal neuromuscular blockers. In this study, we evaluated the effects of sugammadex or neostigmine on kidney functions in patients scheduled for elective surgery. Material/Methods Patients scheduled for a surgical procedure under desflurane/opioid anesthesia received an intubating dose rocuronium. Patients were divided into 2 groups receiving either sugammadex or neostigmine atropine to reverse neuromuscular blockade. Cystatin C, creatinine, urea, blood urea nitrogen, sodium, potassium, and calcium levels in the blood and α1microglobulin, β2microglobulin, and microalbumin levels in the urine were measured. Results There was no significant difference between the groups with regard to the demographic data. In the Neostigmine Group, although β2microglobulin and microalbumin were similar, a significant increase was found in the postoperative α1microglobulin and cystatin C values. In the Sugammadex Group, although β2-microglobulin and cystatin C were similar, a significant increase was found in the postoperative α1-microglobulin and microalbumin values. The only significant difference was cystatin C value variation in the Neostigmine Group compared to the Sugammadex Group. Conclusions We believe that the use of more specific and sensitive new-generation markers like cystatin C to evaluate kidney function will provide a better understanding and interpretation of our results. Sugammadex has more tolerable effects on kidney function in patients than does neostigmine. However, when compared to preoperative values, there is a negative alteration of postoperative values. Neostigmine and sugammadex do not cause renal failure but they may affect kidney function. PMID:26963316

  6. Effects of Sugammadex and Neostigmine on Renal Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Isik, Yasemin; Palabiyik, Onur; Cegin, Bilal Muhammed; Goktas, Ugur; Kati, Ismail

    2016-03-10

    Neostigmine, the currently commonly used agent for reversal of neuromuscular blockade. Sugammadex is a novel and unique compound designed as an antagonist of steroidal neuromuscular blockers. In this study, we evaluated the effects of sugammadex or neostigmine on kidney functions in patients scheduled for elective surgery. Patients scheduled for a surgical procedure under desflurane/opioid anesthesia received an intubating dose rocuronium. Patients were divided into 2 groups receiving either sugammadex or neostigmine atropine to reverse neuromuscular blockade. Cystatin C, creatinine, urea, blood urea nitrogen, sodium, potassium, and calcium levels in the blood and α1microglobulin, β2microglobulin, and microalbumin levels in the urine were measured. There was no significant difference between the groups with regard to the demographic data. In the Neostigmine Group, although β2microglobulin and microalbumin were similar, a significant increase was found in the postoperative α1microglobulin and cystatin C values. In the Sugammadex Group, although β2-microglobulin and cystatin C were similar, a significant increase was found in the postoperative α1-microglobulin and microalbumin values. The only significant difference was cystatin C value variation in the Neostigmine Group compared to the Sugammadex Group. We believe that the use of more specific and sensitive new-generation markers like cystatin C to evaluate kidney function will provide a better understanding and interpretation of our results. Sugammadex has more tolerable effects on kidney function in patients than does neostigmine. However, when compared to preoperative values, there is a negative alteration of postoperative values. Neostigmine and sugammadex do not cause renal failure but they may affect kidney function.

  7. Effect of Renal Transplantation in Restless Legs Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kahvecioglu, Serdar; Yildiz, Demet; Buyukkoyuncu, Nilufer; Celik, Huseyin; Tufan, Fatih; Kılıç, Ahmet Kasım; Gul, Bulent; Yildiz, Abdulmecid

    2016-02-01

    Restless legs syndrome is a disorder in which patients have irresistible urge to move legs during rest. Restless legs syndrome seems to be common in end-stage renal disease. After a successful renal transplant, symptoms ameliorate with renal function improvement and restless legs syndrome is seen less in this population. Here, we aimed to investigate restless legs syndrome frequency and associated factors in renal transplant patients. In a cross-sectional study with 193 patients (116 hemodialysis patients, 45 transplant patients, and 32 controls), the presence of restless legs syndrome was assessed using the Restless Legs Syndrome Questionnaire. Medical history, demographic, and laboratory data were collected from the patients' medical records. Patients were questioned about the presence of restless legs syndrome using the Restless Legs Syndrome Questionnaire. Patients were evaluated with Beck Depression Scale for depression and Pittsburgh tests for sleep disturbances. While the rate of restless legs syndrome was similar between transplants and controls, it was significantly greater in hemodialysis patients. Hemodialysis patients and controls had similar depression scores that were higher compared with transplant patients. Pittsburgh score was similar in transplant patients and controls and significantly increased in the hemodialysis patients. The rate of insomnia was significantly higher in the hemodialysis patients compared with the other 2 groups. Logistic regression analysis revealed independent correlates of restless legs syndrome as insomnia, Beck depression score, and being on hemodialysis. Linear regression analysis showed that independent correlates of higher Pittsburgh score were higher depression score, higher age, and presence of restless legs syndrome. The prevalence of restless legs syndrome is significantly lower in transplant patients than it is in patients on maintenance dialysis. In renal transplant patients, restless legs syndrome frequency was

  8. Effects of acute hepatic and renal failure on pharmacokinetics of flunixin meglumine in rats.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Youn-Hwan; Yun, Hyo-In

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of hepatic and renal failure on the pharmacokinetics of flunixin in carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4))- and glycerol-treated rats. After intravenous administration of flunixin (2 mg/kg), the plasma concentration of flunixin was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Both acute hepatic and renal failure resulted in significantly increased area under the curve (AUC), prolonged elimination half-life (t(1/2β)), and reduced total body clearance (Cl(tot)) compared with respective controls (P<0.05). In conclusion, hepatic failure as well as renal failure modified the pharmacokinetics of flunixin.

  9. Pulmonary aspergilloma with renal oxalosis: fatal effect at a distance.

    PubMed

    Vaideeswar, Pradeep; Sakhdeo, Uma M

    2009-05-01

    Some species of the fungus Aspergillus, especially Aspergillus niger, produce oxalic acid as a fermentation byproduct. The acid combines with calcium ions at physiological pH to form insoluble calcium oxalate crystals that are mainly deposited at local sites. This is often seen in the lungs, where the crystals tend to potentiate the destructive capacity of the fungus. In rare instances, there is hyperoxaluria and deposition of the crystals in the renal tubules. We report this rare occurrence in a 59-year-old man with pulmonary aspergilloma and acute renal failure. To the best of our knowledge, this is the fifth case to be reported.

  10. Effects of renal function on the intraosseous concentration and inhibitory effect of prophylactic cefazolin in knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Angthong, C; Krajubngern, P; Tiyapongpattana, W; Pongcharoen, B; Pinsornsak, P; Tammachote, N; Kittisupaluck, W

    2016-12-01

    To compare intraosseous concentrations and inhibitory effects on the growth of Staphylococcus aureus following intravenous administration of 1 or 2 g of the prophylactic cefazolin between patients with decreased renal function vs. intact renal function undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Ten patients (13 knees) with primary knee osteoarthritis were divided into two groups by creatinine clearance (CrCl) level (intact renal function: CrCl ≥75 mg/mL (four knees); decreased renal function: CrCl <75 mg/mL (nine knees)). Subchondral bone samples (proximal tibia and distal femur) were obtained during the procedure and were analyzed for the intraosseous concentration of cefazolin and the inhibitory effects on the growth of S. aureus using high-performance liquid chromatography and agar disc diffusion bioassays. Different levels of renal function showed no significant associations with mean intraosseous concentration and mean inhibitory effects at the proximal tibia and distal femur in patients administered 1 g cefazolin (p>0.05). For patients administered 2 g cefazolin, mean intraosseous concentration in the decreased renal function group was significantly higher at the proximal tibia (p=0.049) and also higher (but not reaching statistical significance) at the distal femur (p=0.073) compared with the intact renal function group. Mean inhibitory effects in the decreased renal function group were significantly lower than the intact renal function group at the proximal tibia (p=0.003) and distal femur (p=0.003). Deceased renal function played a role in the increased intraosseous concentration and decreased inhibitory effects in the groups receiving 2 g cefazolin. An excessive intraosseous concentration showed a negative influence on inhibitory effects on the growth of Staphylococcus aureus.

  11. On Quantum Effects in a Theory of Biological Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Delgado, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    We construct a descriptive toy model that considers quantum effects on biological evolution starting from Chaitin's classical framework. There are smart evolution scenarios in which a quantum world is as favorable as classical worlds for evolution to take place. However, in more natural scenarios, the rate of evolution depends on the degree of entanglement present in quantum organisms with respect to classical organisms. If the entanglement is maximal, classical evolution turns out to be more favorable. PMID:22413059

  12. On quantum effects in a theory of biological evolution.

    PubMed

    Martin-Delgado, M A

    2012-01-01

    We construct a descriptive toy model that considers quantum effects on biological evolution starting from Chaitin's classical framework. There are smart evolution scenarios in which a quantum world is as favorable as classical worlds for evolution to take place. However, in more natural scenarios, the rate of evolution depends on the degree of entanglement present in quantum organisms with respect to classical organisms. If the entanglement is maximal, classical evolution turns out to be more favorable.

  13. Renal Protective Effects of 17β-Estradiol on Mice with Acute Aristolochic Acid Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Shi, Min; Ma, Liang; Zhou, Li; Fu, Ping

    2016-10-18

    Aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN) is a progressive kidney disease caused by a Chinese herb containing aristolochic acid. Excessive death of renal tubular epithelial cells (RTECs) characterized the acute phase of AAN. Therapies for acute AAN were limited, such as steroids and angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs)/angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs). It was interesting that, in acute AAN, female patients showed relative slower progression to renal failure than males. In a previous study, female hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) was found to attenuate renal ischemia-reperfusion injury. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the potential protective role of E2 in acute AAN. Compared with male C57BL/6 mice of acute AAN, lower serum creatinine (SCr) and less renal injury, together with RTEC apoptosis in females, were found. Treatment with E2 in male AAN mice reduced SCr levels and attenuated renal tubular injury and RTEC apoptosis. In the mice kidney tissue and human renal proximal tubule cells (HK-2 cells), E2 both attenuated AA-induced cell apoptosis and downregulated the expression of phosphor-p53 (Ser15), p53, and cleaved-caspase-3. This study highlights that E2 exhibited protective effects on the renal injury of acute AAN in male mice by reducing RTEC apoptosis, which might be related to inhibiting the p53 signaling pathway.

  14. Assessment of glomerular filtration rate and effective renal plasma flow in cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Spino, M.; Chai, R.P.; Isles, A.F.; Balfe, J.W.; Brown, R.G.; Thiessen, J.J.; MacLeod, S.M.

    1985-07-01

    A study was conducted to examine renal function in 10 healthy control subjects and eight patients with cystic fibrosis in stable condition. Sequential bolus injections of /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA and /sup 125/I-OIH were administered to assess glomerular filtration rate and effective renal plasma flow, respectively. Blood was subsequently collected for 3 hours, and urine for 24 hours. Renal clearances of both radioisotope markers were virtually identical in patients and controls. Inasmuch as neither glomerular filtration rate nor effective renal plasma flow was enhanced in patients with cystic fibrosis, increased clearance of drugs in these patients is unlikely to be the result of enhanced glomerular filtration or tubular secretion.

  15. Effect of Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy on Outcome in Pediatric Acute Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Deep, Akash; Stewart, Claire E; Dhawan, Anil; Douiri, Abdel

    2016-10-01

    To establish the effect of continuous renal replacement therapy on outcome in pediatric acute liver failure. Retrospective cohort study. Sixteen-bed PICU in a university-affiliated tertiary care hospital and specialist liver centre. All children (0-18 yr) admitted to PICU with pediatric acute liver failure between January 2003 and December 2013. Children with pediatric acute liver failure were managed according to a set protocol. The guidelines for continuous renal replacement therapy in pediatric acute liver failure were changed in 2011 following preliminary results to indicate the earlier use of continuous renal replacement therapy for both renal dysfunction and detoxification. Of 165 children admitted with pediatric acute liver failure, 136 met the inclusion criteria and 45 of these received continuous renal replacement therapy prior to transplantation or recovery. Of the children managed with continuous renal replacement therapy, 26 (58%) survived: 19 were successfully bridged to liver transplantation and 7 spontaneously recovered. Cox proportional hazards regression model clearly showed reducing hyperammonemia by 48 hours after initiating continuous renal replacement therapy significantly improved survival (HR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.013-1.073; p = 0.004). On average, for every 10% decrease in ammonia from baseline at 48 hours, the likelihood of survival increased by 50%. Time to initiate continuous renal replacement therapy from PICU admission was lower in survivors compared to nonsurvivors (HR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.916-1.007; p = 0.095). Change in practice to initiate early and high-dose continuous renal replacement therapy led to increased survival with maximum effect being visible in the first 14 days (HR, 3; 95% CI, 1.0-10.3; p = 0.063). Among children with pediatric acute liver failure who did not receive a liver transplant, use of continuous renal replacement therapy significantly improved survival (HR, 4; 95% CI, 1.5-11.6; p = 0.006). Continuous renal replacement

  16. Validity and reliability of a novel immunosuppressive adverse effects scoring system in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Meaney, Calvin J; Arabi, Ziad; Venuto, Rocco C; Consiglio, Joseph D; Wilding, Gregory E; Tornatore, Kathleen M

    2014-06-12

    After renal transplantation, many patients experience adverse effects from maintenance immunosuppressive drugs. When these adverse effects occur, patient adherence with immunosuppression may be reduced and impact allograft survival. If these adverse effects could be prospectively monitored in an objective manner and possibly prevented, adherence to immunosuppressive regimens could be optimized and allograft survival improved. Prospective, standardized clinical approaches to assess immunosuppressive adverse effects by health care providers are limited. Therefore, we developed and evaluated the application, reliability and validity of a novel adverse effects scoring system in renal transplant recipients receiving calcineurin inhibitor (cyclosporine or tacrolimus) and mycophenolic acid based immunosuppressive therapy. The scoring system included 18 non-renal adverse effects organized into gastrointestinal, central nervous system and aesthetic domains developed by a multidisciplinary physician group. Nephrologists employed this standardized adverse effect evaluation in stable renal transplant patients using physical exam, review of systems, recent laboratory results, and medication adherence assessment during a clinic visit. Stable renal transplant recipients in two clinical studies were evaluated and received immunosuppressive regimens comprised of either cyclosporine or tacrolimus with mycophenolic acid. Face, content, and construct validity were assessed to document these adverse effect evaluations. Inter-rater reliability was determined using the Kappa statistic and intra-class correlation. A total of 58 renal transplant recipients were assessed using the adverse effects scoring system confirming face validity. Nephrologists (subject matter experts) rated the 18 adverse effects as: 3.1 ± 0.75 out of 4 (maximum) regarding clinical importance to verify content validity. The adverse effects scoring system distinguished 1.75-fold increased gastrointestinal adverse

  17. Validity and reliability of a novel immunosuppressive adverse effects scoring system in renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background After renal transplantation, many patients experience adverse effects from maintenance immunosuppressive drugs. When these adverse effects occur, patient adherence with immunosuppression may be reduced and impact allograft survival. If these adverse effects could be prospectively monitored in an objective manner and possibly prevented, adherence to immunosuppressive regimens could be optimized and allograft survival improved. Prospective, standardized clinical approaches to assess immunosuppressive adverse effects by health care providers are limited. Therefore, we developed and evaluated the application, reliability and validity of a novel adverse effects scoring system in renal transplant recipients receiving calcineurin inhibitor (cyclosporine or tacrolimus) and mycophenolic acid based immunosuppressive therapy. Methods The scoring system included 18 non-renal adverse effects organized into gastrointestinal, central nervous system and aesthetic domains developed by a multidisciplinary physician group. Nephrologists employed this standardized adverse effect evaluation in stable renal transplant patients using physical exam, review of systems, recent laboratory results, and medication adherence assessment during a clinic visit. Stable renal transplant recipients in two clinical studies were evaluated and received immunosuppressive regimens comprised of either cyclosporine or tacrolimus with mycophenolic acid. Face, content, and construct validity were assessed to document these adverse effect evaluations. Inter-rater reliability was determined using the Kappa statistic and intra-class correlation. Results A total of 58 renal transplant recipients were assessed using the adverse effects scoring system confirming face validity. Nephrologists (subject matter experts) rated the 18 adverse effects as: 3.1 ± 0.75 out of 4 (maximum) regarding clinical importance to verify content validity. The adverse effects scoring system distinguished 1.75-fold

  18. Vascular and renal effects of dopamine during extracellular volume expansion: Role of nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Costa, María A; Elesgaray, Rosana; Loria, Analía; Balaszczuk, Ana María; Arranz, Cristina

    2006-02-28

    The aim of the study was to determine the possible role of NO-system activation in vascular and renal effects of the dopaminergic system and the probable interaction between both systems during acute volume expansion in rats. Expanded (10% bw) and non-expanded anaesthetized male Wistar rats were treated with haloperidol, a DA receptor antagonist (3 mg/kg bw, ip). Mean arterial pressure, diuresis, natriuresis, renal plasma flow, glomerular filtration rate, nitrites and nitrates excretion (NOx) were determined. NADPH diaphorase activity was measured using a histochemistry technique in kidney, aorta and renal arteries. NOS activity in kidney and aorta from expanded and non-expanded animals was determined with L-[U14C]-arginine substrate, in basal conditions and after DA (1 microM) administration. The hypotensive effect of L-arg and hypertension induced by L-NAME were not modified by haloperidol. This blocker reverted the increase in diuresis, natriuresis and RPF induced by L-arg in both groups. Dopaminergic blockade induced a decrease in NOx excretion and in NADPH-diaphorase activity in glomeruli, proximal tubule and medullar collecting duct and in endothelium and vascular smooth muscle of renal arteries. DA induced an increase in NOS activity in renal medulla and cortex in both groups, but no changes in the aorta were observed. Our results suggest that renal DA would be associated with the renal response induced by NO during extracellular volume expansion. NO-system activation would be one of the mechanisms involved in renal DA activity during saline load, but NO appears not to be involved in DA vascular effects.

  19. Renal interstitial sclerosis in aging: effects of enalapril and nifedipine.

    PubMed

    Inserra, F; Romano, L A; de Cavanagh, E M; Ercole, L; Ferder, L F; Gomez, R A

    1996-05-01

    The effects of nifedipine and enalapril on age-associated renal interstitial fibrosis were investigated in 60 CF1 female mice. Mice received 20 mg enalapril (ENAL) per L (N = 20), or 40 mg nifedipine (NIF) per L (N = 20) in their drinking water. Control (CONT) mice received tap water ad libitum. The percentages of both interstitial peritubular sclerosis (IPS) in cortex and interstitial medullary sclerosis (IMS) were determined. Kidney tissue was studied using immunological techniques and optical (OM) and electron microscopy (EM) to analyze the expression of renin. alpha-SM-actin and vimentine expression were also evaluated. The results showed that blood pressure levels in ENAL or NIF animals were not different from those of CONT. Renin expression was observed in arcuate vessels (AV) in ENAL animals, whereas no renin staining in AV was found in either NIF or CONT animals. Renin immunoreactivity in the juxtaglomerular apparatus was more intense in ENAL mice, as compared with NIF or CONT animals. Laboratory testing showed the following values: proteinuria (mg/mL): CONT 6.1 +/- 0.6, NIF 11.2 +/- 2.3, and ENAL 1.0 +/- 0.6 (P < 0.05); creatinine: CONT 1.37 +/- 0.24, NIF 0.87 +/- 0.16, and ENAL 0.63 +/- 0.1 (P < 0.01). The percentages of interstitial sclerosis were: %IPS: CONT 18.12 +/- 1.1, NIF 17.40 +/- 0.9, and ENAL 3.42 +/- 1.3 (P < 0.01); %IMS: CONT 23.41 +/- 1.5, NIF 21.80 +/- 1.9, and ENAL 6.12 +/- 1.2 (P < 0.01). Percentages of alpha-SM-actin expression were: CONT 13.10 +/- 1.9, NIF 13.80 +/- 0.2, and ENAL 1.00 +/- 0.1 (P < 0.01). Vimentine staining showed no differences among the groups. It was concluded that enalapril reduces the peritubular and medullar interstitial fibrosis, whereas nifedipine has no effect.

  20. Effect of zinc deficiency on mouse renal interstitial fibrosis in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuli; Liang, Dan; Lian, Xu; Chi, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Xuemei; Zhao, Yue; Ping, Zhang

    2016-12-01

    There is emerging evidence that tubulointerstitial fibrosis is the final common pathway of the majority of chronic progressive renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy (DN). Zinc, an essential dietary element, has been suggested to be important for a number of protein functions during fibrosis in vivo and in vitro. However, the effect of zinc deficiency (ZnD) on renal interstitial fibrosis in DN remains unclear. The present study investigated the effect and the underlying mechanisms of ZnD on renal interstitial fibrosis during DN using an streptozotocin‑induced model of diabetes with immunofluorescence staining and western blot analysis. The present study identified that dietary zinc restriction significantly decreased zinc concentrations in the plasma and mouse kidney. ZnD enhanced albuminuria and extracellular matrix protein expression, associated with diabetic renal interstitial fibrosis by activation of renal interstitial fibroblasts and regulation of the expression of fibrosis‑associated factors, which may be mediated by the activation of fibroblasts via the TGF‑β/Smad signaling pathway. The data indicates that ZnD serves an important role in the pathogenic mechanisms of renal interstitial fibrosis during the development of DN.

  1. Renoprotective Effect of Humic Acid on Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury: An Experimental Study in Rats.

    PubMed

    Akbas, Alpaslan; Silan, Coskun; Gulpinar, Murat Tolga; Sancak, Eyup Burak; Ozkanli, Sidika Seyma; Cakir, Dilek Ulker

    2015-12-01

    Humic acid is an antioxidant molecule used in agriculture and livestock breeding, as well as in medicine. Our aim was to investigate the potential renoprotective effects of humic acid in a renal ischemia reperfusion model. Twenty-one rats were randomly divided into three equal groups. Intraperitoneal serum or humic acid was injected at 1, 12, and 24 h. Non-ischemic group I was evaluated as sham. The left renal artery was clamped in serum (group II) and intraperitoneal humic acid (group III) to subject to left renal ischemic reperfusion procedure. Ischemia and reperfusion time was 60 min for each. Total antioxidant status, total oxidative status, oxidative stress index, and ischemia-modified albumin levels were analyzed biochemically from the serum samples. Kidneys were evaluated histopatologically and immunohistochemically. Biochemical results showed that total oxidative status, ischemia-modified albumin, and oxidative stress index levels were significantly decreased, but total antioxidant status was increased in the humic acid group (III) compared with the ischemia group (II) On histopathological examination, renal tubular dilatation, tubular cell damage and necrosis, dilatation of Bowman's capsule, hyaline casts, and tubular cell spillage were decreased in the humic acid group (III) compared with the ischemia group (II). Immunohistochemical results showed that apoptosis was deteriorated in group III. Renal ischemia reperfusion injury was attenuated by humic acid administration. These observations indicate that humic acid may have a potential therapeutic effect on renal ischemia reperfusion injury by preventing oxidative stress.

  2. Effect of Long-Term, Low-Dose Aspirin Therapy on Renal Graft Function.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hatem; Shaaban, Ahmed; Murtaza, Asam; Howell, Laura E; Ahmed, Aimun

    2017-08-01

    Despite improvements in immunosuppressive protocols for renal transplant, long-term success of renal transplant is still limited by the occurrence of interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. Some studies have shown that aspirin decreases the severity of kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury and the development of tubular atrophy in animal models. This study aimed to assess the effects of aspirin therapy started at the time of transplant on long-term graft function. We compared renal graft function of 82 patients on low-dose aspirin 75 mg once daily who underwent renal transplant between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2010 from a single center with 65 patients not taking aspirin. For each patient, the following measurements were collected: age, sex, creatinine level, type of donor, cold ischemia time, occurrence of acute allograft rejections, number of HLA mismatches, first transplant, intake of statins, number of antihypertensive medications, and number of days posttransplant. Patients were excluded from the study who were on aspirin before transplant or who had coronary artery disease. Multilevel modelling was used to compare renal allograft function, as measured by serum creatinine levels, between patients taking and not taking aspirin after kidney transplant. Aspirin was not significantly associated with creatinine levels (P = .59) after adjusting for other relevant variables. Low-dose aspirin started at the time of transplant has a negligible effect on renal allograft function over the 15-year study period posttransplant.

  3. A randomised controlled trial evaluating renal protective effects of selenium with vitamins A, C, E, verapamil, and losartan against extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy-induced renal injury.

    PubMed

    El-Nahas, Ahmed R; Elsaadany, Mohamed M; Taha, Diaa-Eldin; Elshal, Ahmed M; El-Ghar, Mohamed Abo; Ismail, Amani M; Elsawy, Essam A; Saleh, Hazem H; Wafa, Ehab W; Awadalla, Amira; Barakat, Tamer S; Sheir, Khaled Z

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the protective effects of selenium with vitamins A, C and E (selenium ACE, i.e. antioxidants), verapamil (calcium channel blocker), and losartan (angiotensin receptor blocker) against extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL)-induced renal injury. A randomised controlled trial was conducted between August 2012 and February 2015. Inclusion criteria were adult patients with a single renal stone (<2 cm) suitable for ESWL. Patients with diabetes, hypertension, congenital renal anomalies, moderate or marked hydronephrosis, or preoperative albuminuria (>300 mg/L) were excluded. ESWL was performed using the electromagnetic DoLiS lithotripter. Eligible patients were randomised into one of four groups using sealed closed envelopes: Group1, control; Group 2, selenium ACE; Group 3, losartan; and Group 4, verapamil. Albuminuria and urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (uNGAL) were estimated after 2-4 h and 1 week after ESWL. The primary outcome was differences between albuminuria and uNGAL. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was performed before ESWL, and at 2-4 h and 1 week after ESWL to compare changes in renal perfusion. Of 329 patients assessed for eligibility, the final analysis comprised 160 patients (40 in each group). Losartan was the only medication that showed significantly lower levels of albuminuria after 1 week (P < 0.001). For perfusion changes, there was a statistically significant decrease in the renal perfusion in patients with obstructed kidneys in comparison to before ESWL (P = 0.003). These significant changes were present in the control or antioxidant group, whilst in the losartan and verapamil groups renal perfusion was not significantly decreased. Losartan was found to protect the kidney against ESWL-induced renal injury by significantly decreasing post-ESWL albuminuria. Verapamil and losartan maintained renal perfusion in patients with post-ESWL renal obstruction. © 2016 The Authors BJU International

  4. Adenosine effects on renal function in the rat: role of sodium intake and cytochrome P450.

    PubMed

    Kuczeriszka, Marta; Dobrowolski, Leszek; Walkowska, Agnieszka; Sadowski, Janusz; Kompanowska-Jezierska, Elżbieta

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine (ADO) causes vasodilation in most tissues. In the kidney it can induce vasoconstriction or vasodilation, depending on the prevailing stimulation of A1 or A2 receptors (A1R, A2R). ADO-induced alterations of renal excretion may be secondary to haemodynamic changes, or reflect a direct influence on tubular transport. This whole-kidney study explored renal excretory responses to ADO receptor stimulation as related to renal haemodynamics sodium intake and cytochrome P450 (CYP-450) activity. The effects of ADO or an A2aR agonist (DPMA) on urine flow (V), sodium excretion (UNaV) and total solute excretion were examined in anaesthetized Wistar rats on a low-sodium or high-sodium (HS) diet. Total renal blood flow (RBF; renal artery probe), and outer- and inner-medullary blood flows (OM-BF, IM-BF; laser-Doppler fluxes) were also determined. Consistent opposed effects of ADO and DPMA were only observed with the HS diet. ADO increased V (150%) and UNaV (100%); there were also significant increases in RBF, OM-BF and IM-BF. These changes were prevented by 1-aminobenzotriazol, a CYP-450 inhibitor. In HS rats, DPMA significantly decreased arterial blood pressure and renal excretion. Post-ADO diuresis/natriuresis was in part secondary to renal hyperperfusion; the response was probably mediated by CYP-450-dependent active agents. Selective A2aR stimulation induced systemic vasodilation, major hypotension, and a secondary decrease in renal excretion. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Role of atrial natriuretic factor, hemodynamic changes and renal nerves in the renal effects of intraperitoneal morphine in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Flores, O; Camera, L A; Hergueta, A; Gallego, B; Pérez Barriocanal, F; Gutkowska, J; López Novoa, J M

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of renal nerves and atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in the mechanisms responsible for the diuresis and antinatriuresis induced by morphine in rats in a normal state of hydration. Male Wistar rats weighing 350-400 g were divided into two groups: one group was subjected to bilateral renal denervation, whereas the other consisted of sham-operated controls. The animals were placed in individual metabolic cages, and morphine (1.25, 2.5, 5.0 or 10.0 mg/kg body weight) or vehicle (0.5 ml isotonic saline) was injected intraperitoneally. Urine was collected hourly for 1 h before and 3 h after morphine injection. The lower doses of morphine (1.25 and 2.5 mg/kg body weight) induced a transient increase in urine output (from 1.17+/-0.12 to 2.49+/-0.34 and from 0.78+/-0.08 to 1.71+/-0.18 microl/min, respectively). The diuretic response to these doses was similar in bilaterally denervated rats. Higher doses (5.0 and 10.0 mg/kg body weight) induced a marked but transient reduction in the urinary flow rate during the first hour (from 0.90+/-0.11 to 0.48+/-0.05 and from 1.37+/-0.17 to 0.45+/-0.08 microl/min, respectively), followed by a delayed diuretic effect. The antidiuretic action of morphine was not observed in bilaterally denervated rats. In control rats, morphine induced a dose-dependent decrease in sodium excretion 1 h after administration, an effect that was blunted in the denervated group. The lower morphine doses (1.25 and 2.5 mg/kg body weight) elicited a transient increase in the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in both control (from 1.23+/-0.12 to 1.67+/-0.17 and from 1.28+/-0.14 to 2.41+/-0.18 ml/min) and bilaterally denervated rats (from 1.29+/-0.14 to 1.66+/-0.17 and from 1.18+/-0.22 to 1.72+/-0.19 ml/min), whereas the higher doses (5.0 and 10.0 mg/kg body weight) produced a marked, transient GFR decrease in the controls (from 1.25+/-0.11 to 0.43+/-0.05 and from 1.13+/-0.17 to 0.47+/-0.08 ml/min) and

  6. Cardiovascular and renal effects of chronic exposure to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Abdias; Escudero, Elizabeth; Pando, Jackeline; Sharma, Shailendra; Johnson, Richard J

    2012-12-01

    Over 140 million people live at high altitude, defined as living at an altitude of 2400 m or more above sea level. Subjects living under these conditions are continuously living under hypoxic conditions and, depending on the population, various adaptations have developed. Interestingly, subjects living chronically at high altitude appear to have a decreased frequency of obesity, diabetes and coronary artery disease. However, these benefits on health are balanced by the frequent development of systemic and pulmonary hypertension. Recently, it has been recognized that subjects living at high altitude are at risk for developing high-altitude renal syndrome (HARS), which is a syndrome consisting of polycythemia, hyperuricemia, systemic hypertension and microalbuminuria, but with preserved glomerular filtration rate. More studies should be performed to characterize the mechanisms and etiology of HARS; as such studies may be of benefit not only to the high-altitude population, but also to better understanding of the renal consequences of acute and chronic hypoxia.

  7. Immune checkpoint inhibitors renal side effects and management.

    PubMed

    Rassy, Elie El; Kourie, Hampig R; Rizkallah, Jamale; Karak, Fadi El; Hanna, Colette; Chelala, Dania N; Ghosn, Marwan

    2016-12-01

    The choice of immunotherapy in the treatment of cancer has improved the prognosis of many patients affected by various malignancies. The high expectations foreseen with immunotherapy have led to fast approvals despite the incomplete understanding of the toxicity profiles in the different organs, including the kidneys. The high prevalence of chronic kidney disease in cancer patients complicates the issue further and requires a better knowledge of the renal safety profile to ensure an optimal safe treatment. This review summarizes the present knowledge of renal adverse events secondary to immune checkpoint inhibitors and discusses their pathophysiology, clinical presentation and adequate management. We also advocate the need for a multidisciplinary approach in patients with immune-related toxic adverse events.

  8. Effects of tertatolol in hypertensive patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Beaufils, M; Lantz, B; Paillard, F; Richet, G

    1986-01-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is often associated with hypertension, as a cause or a consequence. We studied the changes in blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), renal function (as measured by creatinine clearance), and plasma renin activity (PRA) in 19 hypertensive patients with CRF before, during and after oral administration once a day for at least 30 days of 5 mg tertatolol, a new beta-blocker. All patients were free of any antihypertensive medication for at least 1 month before administration of tertatolol. The dose of tertatolol given in this study was the same as that commonly used in patients with normal renal function. From day 0 to day 30 of tertatolol, measurements in the supine position were as follows: systolic BP (SBP) decreased from 168.4 +/- 4.6 to 145.3 +/- 4.3 mm Hg (p less than 0.01); diastolic BP (DBP) decreased from 106.1 +/- 2.4 to 87.1 +/- 2.0 mm Hg (p less than 0.01); HR decreased from 77.9 +/- 1.6 to 63.2 +/- 1.7 b.p.m. (p less than 0.01); PRA decreased from 1.816 +/- 0.521 to 1.052 +/- 0.323 ng/ml/h (p less than 0.01). Creatinine clearance remained stable: 37.1 +/- 4.1 versus 37.1 +/- 4.7 ml/min/1.73 m2 (not significant). Similar results (for SBP, DBP, HR and PRA) were obtained in the erect position. It is concluded that tertatolol in hypertensive patients with CRF: significantly lowers BP and HR without excessive bradycardia, significantly lowers PRA, the most important decrease being observed for the highest initial PRA, does not alter renal function, and has a good clinical acceptability.

  9. Effect of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Treatment on Renal Function in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Loffler, Kelly A; Heeley, Emma; Freed, Ruth; Anderson, Craig S; Brockway, Ben; Corbett, Alastair; Chang, Catharina L; Douglas, James A; Ferrier, Katherine; Graham, Neil; Hamilton, Garun S; Hlavac, Michael; McArdle, Nigel; McLachlan, John; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Naughton, Matthew T; Thien, Francis; Young, Alan; Grunstein, Ronald R; Palmer, Lyle J; Woodman, Richard J; Hanly, Patrick J; McEvoy, R Doug

    2017-07-25

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with impaired renal function, but uncertainty exists over whether OSA treatment can influence renal outcomes. To determine the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on renal function in subjects with co-existing OSA and cardiovascular disease. This was a substudy of the international Sleep Apnea and cardioVascular Endpoints (SAVE) trial that randomized 2717 patients with moderate-severe OSA and established coronary or cerebrovascular disease to receive CPAP plus usual care, or usual care alone. Renal function and adverse renal events were compared between CPAP treated (n = 102) and usual care (n = 98) groups. Glomerular filtration rate was estimated at randomization and the end of follow-up; urinary albumin:creatinine ratio was measured at study exit. In 200 substudy participants (mean age 64 years; median 4% oxygen desaturation index, 20 events per hour, mean estimated glomerular filtration rate at baseline 82 mL/min/1.73m2), the median (IQR) change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (mL/min/1.73m2/year) was 1.64 ( 3.45 to 0.740) in the CPAP group and 2.30 ( 4.53 to 0.71) in the usual care group (P = 0.21) after a median period of 4.4 years. There were no between-group differences in end-of-study urinary albumin:creatinine ratio, or the occurrence of serious renal or urinary adverse events during the trial. Level of CPAP adherence did not influence the findings. CPAP treatment of OSA in patients with cardiovascular disease does not alter renal function, nor the occurrence of renal adverse events. Clinical trial registration available at www.clinicaltrials.gov, ID NCT00738179.

  10. Short-Term Effects of Ankaferd Hemostat for Renal Artery Embolization: An Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ozbek, Orhan; Acar, Kadir; Koc, Osman; Saritas, Kadir; Toy, Hatice; Solak, Yalcin; Ozbek, Seda; Kucukapan, Ahmet; Guler, Ibrahim; Gaipov, Abduzhappar; Turk, Suleyman; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celaleddin

    2013-04-15

    Renal artery embolization (RAE) is a minimally invasive therapeutic technique that is utilized in a number of disorders. Ankaferd is a novel hemostatic agent with a new mechanism of action independent of clotting factors. We used Ankaferd for RAE in a sheep model. Seven adult female sheep were included in the study. Selective renal arteriogram using 5-F diagnostic catheter was performed to make sure that each kidney was fed by a single renal artery and the animal had normal renal vasculature. Coaxial 2.7-F microcatheter was advanced to the distal main renal artery. Under fluoroscopic guidance, 2 mL of Ankaferd mixed with 2 mL of nonionic iodinated contrast agent was slowly injected. Fluoroscopy was used to observe the deceleration of flow and stagnation. Control renal angiograms were performed just after embolization. After the procedure, the animals were observed for 1 day and then sacrificed with intravenous sodium thiopental. The technical success was observed in seven of the seven animals.. After embolization procedure, none of the animals died or experienced a major systemic adverse event. On macroscopic examination of the embolized kidneys, thrombus at the level of main renal artery formed after Ankaferd embolization was more compact compared with the thrombi that was not Ankaferd-associated, which was observed elsewhere. Microscopically, majority of the renal tubular cells (80-90 %) were necrotic, and there was epithelial cell damage in a small portion of the cells (10-20 %). RAE was safe and effective in the short-term with Ankaferd in studied animals. Further studies should be conducted to better delineate the embolizing potential of this novel hemostatic agent.

  11. Effect of autologous adipose-derived stem cells in renal cold ischemia and reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y-L; Li, G; Zou, X-F; Chen, X-B; Liu, T; Shen, Z-Y

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on renal cold ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury via intravenous infusion on rats. A renal cold I/R injury rat model was established. Rats were equally randomized into Sham group, Cold I/R group (cold I/R plus culture medium only), and ADSC-treated group (cold I/R plus immediate intrarenal administration of 2 × 10(6) autologous ADSCs, followed by intravenous autologous ADSCs 6 hours after reperfusion). All rats were killed 24 hours after the I/R procedure. Serum creatinine levels were significantly reduced in the ADSC-treated group compared with the Cold I/R group (P < .01). The renal tissue in the ADSC-treated group had well conserved renal architecture compared with the Cold I/R group. The mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor α was significantly lower and Bcl-2 was higher in the ADSC-treated group than in the Cold I/R group (P < .05). Autologous ADSC infusions ameliorated renal damage undergoing cold I/R injury and improved the renal function, partly through inhibiting inflammatory reactions and reducing apoptosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of DMSA loading on the renal handling of technetium-99m in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Provoost, A.P.; Van Aken, M.

    1986-01-01

    The renal handling of technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (99mTc DMSA) was studied in rats treated with high doses of nonradioactive DMSA to inhibit the renal uptake mechanism(s). A static scan was obtained 1 hour after the intravenous (iv) injection of 99mTc DMSA and the radioactivity in kidneys and bladder was calculated as a percentage of the injected amount. Total glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and effective renal plasma flow were also determined. Preloading with DMSA caused a fall in the renal accumulation of 99mTc DMSA together with a small increase in the amount excreted into the urinary bladder. Despite a stable GFR, the total amount of 99mTc DMSA handled by the kidneys (i.e., renal plus bladder activity) was reduced. These findings are compatible with the hypothesis that peritubular uptake and subsequent intracellular fixation are of importance in the renal accumulation of 99mTc DMSA. On the other hand, the radioactivity excreted into the urine probably stems from non-reabsorbed 99mTc DMSA initially filtered by the glomeruli.

  13. Protective effect of artemisia asiatica extract against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyuk Jai; Jeong, Eui Kyun; Kim, Seong Su; Lee, Ji Hwan; Oh, Mi Young; Kang, Ki Sung; Kwan, Hak Cheol; Song, Kyung Il; Eom, Dae Woon; Han, Duck Jong

    2015-04-01

    An extract of Artemisia asiatica was reported to possess antioxidative and cytoprotective actions in various experiments. Ischemia-reperfusion injury remains a major problem in kidney transplant, and the inflammatory response to ischemia-reperfusion injury exacerbates the resultant renal injury. In the present study, we investigated whether an extract of Artemisia asiatica exhibits renoprotective effects against ischemia-reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury in mice. Renal ischemia-reperfusion injury was induced in male C57BL/6 mice by bilateral renal pedicle occlusion for 30 minutes followed by reperfusion for 48 hours. An extract of Artemisia asiatica (100 mg/kg oral) was administered 4 days before ischemia-reperfusion injury. Sham operation and phosphate-buffered saline were used as controls. Blood and renal tissues were evaluated at 48 hours after ischemiareperfusion injury. Treatment with an extract of Artemisia asiatica significantly decreased blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine levels, and kidney tubular injury (P ≤ .05). Western blot showed that an extract of Artemisia asiatica significantly increased the level of heme oxygenase-1 and B-cell lymphoma 2 at 48 hours after ischemia-reperfusion injury and attenuated the level of inducible nitric oxide synthase. An extract of Artemisia asiatica improves acute renal ischemia-reperfusion injury by reducing inflammation and apoptosis. These findings suggest that an extract of Artemisia asiatica is a potential therapeutic agent against acute ischemia-induced renal damage.

  14. Effect of efonidipine and ACE inhibitors on proteinuria in human hypertension with renal impairment.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Koichi; Kumagai, Hiroo; Saruta, Takao

    2003-02-01

    Although several lines of recent studies fail to demonstrate the beneficial action of calcium antagonists, a novel dihydropyridine efonidipine, which possesses dilatory action of both afferent and efferent arterioles and, therefore, shares the renal microvascular action with angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, is reported to exhibit renal protection in experimental animals. The present study evaluated the effect of efonidipine and ACE inhibitors on blood pressure (BP) and proteinuria. Sixty-eight hypertensive patients with renal impairment (serum creatinine, >1.5 mg/dL) or chronic renal parenchymal disease were randomly assigned to efonidipine or ACE inhibitor treatment. Of the 68 patients, 23 were treated with efonidipine and 20 with ACE inhibitors; these patients were analyzed for the 48-week study. Both efonidipine and ACE inhibitors produced a similar degree of reductions in BP (efonidipine, from 161 +/- 2/93 +/- 2 to 142 +/- 5/82 +/- 2 mm Hg; ACE inhibitor, from 163 +/- 3/95 +/- 2 to 141 +/- 5/83 +/- 2 mm Hg), and maintained creatinine clearance for 48 weeks. Proteinuria tended to decrease in both groups, and a significant reduction was observed in proteinuric patients (>1 g/day) (efonidipine, from 2.7 +/- 0.3 to 2.1 +/- 0.3 g/day; ACE inhibitor, from 3.0 +/- 0.4 to 2.0 +/- 0.5 g/day). Of interest, efonidipine decreased proteinuria in proteinuric patients who failed to manifest decreases in systemic BP. Finally, the incidence of adverse effects, including hyperkalemia and cough, was less in the efonidipine-treated group. Both efonidipine and ACE inhibitors preserved renal function in hypertensive patients with renal impairment. The antiproteinuric effect was apparent in patients with greater proteinuria. The beneficial action of efonidipine, along with fewer side effects, may favor the use of this agent in the treatment of hypertension with renal impairment. Copyright 2003 American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd.

  15. Renal protective effects of aliskiren beyond its antihypertensive property in a mouse model of progressive fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gross, Oliver; Girgert, Rainer; Rubel, Diana; Temme, Johanna; Theissen, Stephanie; Müller, Gerhard-Anton

    2011-03-01

    The direct renin inhibitor aliskiren is known to exhibit a strong antihypertensive effect. However, the organoprotective potential of aliskiren beyond its antihypertensive properties is less clear. This study investigates the antifibrotic nephroprotective effects of aliskiren in a nonhypertensive mouse model for progressive renal fibrosis. COL4A3(-/-) mice received aliskiren via osmotic minipumps. Placebo-treated animals served as controls. Therapy was initiated in 6-week-old animals already showing renal damage (proteinuria ~1 g/l, starting renal fibrosis) and lasted for 4 weeks. Six animals were sacrificed after 9.5 weeks; serum urea and proteinuria were measured. Kidneys were further investigated using histological, immunohistological, and western blot techniques. Survival until end-stage renal failure was monitored in the remaining animals. COL4A3(-/-) mice did not develop hypertension. Aliskiren serum levels were in the therapeutic range (288 ± 44 ng/ml). Therapy significantly prolonged lifespan until death from renal failure by 18% compared with placebo-treated controls (78.6 ± 8.2 vs. 66.6 ± 4.9 days, P < 0.05). Similarly, therapy reduced the amount of proteinuria and serum urea. Compared with placebo-treated controls, the accumulation of extracellular matrix and renal scarring and the levels of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) were decreased in treated mice. Despite the late onset of therapy, our results indicate nephroprotective effects of the renin inhibitor aliskiren beyond its antihypertensive property in this animal model of progressive renal fibrosis. In addition to the recognized antihypertensive action of aliskiren, its antifibrotic, antiproteinuric effects demonstrated in the present study indicate that aliskiren may have potential as an important therapeutic option for chronic fibrotic diseases in humans.

  16. Analysis of effects of fixation type on renal function after endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Kouvelos, George N; Boletis, Ioannis; Papa, Nektario; Kallinteri, Amalia; Peroulis, Michalis; Matsagkas, Miltiadis I

    2013-06-01

    To report a prospective nonrandomized study comparing the effects of suprarenal (SR) vs. infrarenal (IR) stent-graft fixation on renal function in patients undergoing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Patients with AAA undergoing elective EVAR between June 2008 and June 2010 were eligible for the comparative study of fixation method on renal function. Patients with impaired renal function [estimated creatinine clearance (eCrCl) <30 mL/min] or a history of renal impairment were not eligible. Renal function was assessed by measuring serum creatinine (SCr) and total proteins and microalbumin in the urine preoperatively, on postoperative day 1, and at 1, 6, and 12 months. The eCrCl was calculated using the Cockcroft-Gault formula. A standard preoperative hydration protocol was followed in all patients, and stent-graft choice was at the operator's discretion. Of 116 patients undergoing elective EVAR in the study period, 16 were ineligible, leaving 100 patients (95 men; median age 74 years) enrolled in the study (49 SR and 51 IR). There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in the prevalence of any risk factor, the baseline SCr and eCrCl values, contrast usage, or procedure duration. At the postoperative measurement, there was no significant deterioration of renal function in either group, although total urinary proteins increased significantly in both groups (IR p=0.01, SR p<0.001). At the 12-month follow-up, patients in the IR group had no significant alteration in any marker vs. baseline, while patients in the SR group had significant alterations in SCr (p=0.001), eCrCl (p<0.001), and microalbumin (p=0.04) in urine. The number of patients with a >20% decrease in eCrCl was not significantly different between the groups. No patient had an adverse renal event. Deterioration in renal function was observed 12 months after EVAR in patients receiving a stent-graft with suprarenal fixation, even though this did

  17. [Side effects analyses in consideration of renal function for S-1-administered patients].

    PubMed

    Iwai, Mina; Kimura, Michio; Yoshimura, Tomoaki; Yasuda, Tadashi

    2011-06-01

    Although many analyses of S-1 side effects are reported, there are no reports where the analyses of side effects were performed in consideration of renal function, which is an important index of medication dose. Therefore, we investigated side effects in consideration of renal function. The subjects were 163 patients administered S-1 at the Department of Surgery of Ogaki Municipal Hospital, between October 2008 and December 2009. The frequency and severity of side effects were high and serious in the groupwhose creatinine clearance was low. A significant difference was observed among 3 groups with regard to thrombocytopenia and dehydration. In conclusion, we think that pharmacists must take renal function into consideration when administering medication, to keepclose medicinal guidance, and to actively observe progress.

  18. Effects of exercise on renal function in patients with moderate impairment of renal function compared to normal men.

    PubMed

    Taverner, D; Craig, K; Mackay, I; Watson, M L

    1991-01-01

    The renal excretory and haemodynamic responses to sustained moderate exertion were investigated in normotensive humans with impaired renal function and normal volunteers. The heart rate increase with exercise was similar in each group. Subjects with impaired renal function showed a significant fall in glomerular filtration rate on exertion, while normals did not. In the presence of renal disease, urine osmolality did not rise with exertion, although it rose markedly in the normal group. Free water clearance became negative after exercise in the normal group only. The diseased kidney is unable to maintain glomerular filtration rate or conserve water under the stress of exertion as well as the normal kidney.

  19. The renal effects of alginates isolated from brown seaweed Sargassum vulgare.

    PubMed

    de Paula Alves Sousa, Alessandra; Barbosa, Paulo Sergio Ferreira; Torres, Márcia Rocha; Martins, Alice Maria Costa; Martins, René Duarte; de Sousa Alves, Renata; de Sousa, Daniel Freire; Alves, Claudênio Diógenes; Costa-Lotufo, Letícia Veras; Monteiro, Helena Serra Azul

    2008-04-01

    Alginates isolated from Sargassum vulgare, present a strong antitumor activity, associated with kidney reversible damage, as analysed by histopathology of treated animals. In the present study, the renal alteration mechanisms of S. vulgare alginates were investigated using the isolated perfused rat kidney and the isolated perfused rat mesenteric blood vessel methods. The results showed that the effects of Sargassum vulgare low viscosity (SVLV) alginate were more potent than those of Sargassum vulgare high viscosity (SVHV) alginate in the isolated rat kidney. The SVLV alginate caused considerable changes in renal physiology, as shown by an increase in parameters such as perfusion pressure, renal vascular resistance, glomerular filtration rate, urinary flow and sodium, potassium and chloride excretion and by reduction of chloride tubular transport. The effects of SVHV were weaker than those of SVLV. The effects of SVLV on kidney could be related to direct vascular action as demonstrated with SVLV alginate on mesenteric blood vessels. In conclusion, the Sargassum vulgare alginate altered the renal function parameters evaluated. S. vulgare low viscosity alginate renal effects were more potent than S. vulgare high viscosity alginate. It is suggested that physicochemical differences between SVHV and SVLV could explain the differences found in the results.

  20. Moderation of dietary sodium potentiates the renal and cardiovascular protective effects of angiotensin receptor blockers.

    PubMed

    Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; Holtkamp, Frank A; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Navis, Gerjan J; Lewis, Julia B; Ritz, Eberhard; de Graeff, Pieter A; de Zeeuw, Dick

    2012-08-01

    Dietary sodium restriction has been shown to enhance the short-term response of blood pressure and albuminuria to angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). Whether this also enhances the long-term renal and cardiovascular protective effects of ARBs is unknown. Here we conducted a post-hoc analysis of the RENAAL and IDNT trials to test this in patients with type 2 diabetic nephropathy randomized to ARB or non-renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (non-RAASi)-based antihypertensive therapy. Treatment effects on renal and cardiovascular outcomes were compared in subgroups based on dietary sodium intake during treatment, measured as the 24-h urinary sodium/creatinine ratio of 1177 patients with available 24-h urinary sodium measurements. ARB compared to non-RAASi-based therapy produced the greatest long-term effects on renal and cardiovascular events in the lowest tertile of sodium intake. Compared to non-RAASi, the trend in risk for renal events was significantly reduced by 43%, not changed, or increased by 37% for each tertile of increased sodium intake, respectively. The trend for cardiovascular events was significantly reduced by 37%, increased by 2% and 25%, respectively. Thus, treatment effects of ARB compared with non-RAASi-based therapy on renal and cardiovascular outcomes were greater in patients with type 2 diabetic nephropathy with lower than higher dietary sodium intake. This underscores the avoidance of excessive sodium intake, particularly in type 2 diabetic patients receiving ARB therapy.

  1. The effect of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on renal function and metabolism in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Matheus Parmegiani; Gomes, Luana Ferreira; Jacob, Maria Helena Vianna Metello; da Rocha Janner, Daiane; Araújo, Alex Sander da Rosa; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Ribeiro, Maria Flávia Marques; Kucharski, Luiz Carlos

    2011-05-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is an endogenous steroid hormone involved in a number of biological actions in humans and rodents, but its effects on renal tissue have not yet been fully understood. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of DHEA treatment on diabetic rats, mainly in relation to renal function and metabolism. Diabetic rats were treated with subcutaneous injections of a 10mg/kg dose of DHEA diluted in oil. Plasma glucose and creatinine, in addition to urine creatinine, were quantified espectophotometrically. Glucose uptake and oxidation were quantified using radioactive glucose, the urinary Transforming Growth Factor β(1) (TGF-β(1)) was assessed by enzyme immunoassay, and the total glutathione in the renal tissue was also measured. The diabetic rats displayed higher levels of glycemia, and DHEA treatment reduced hyperglycemia. Plasmatic creatinine levels were higher in the diabetic rats treated with DHEA, while creatinine clearance was lower. Glucose uptake and oxidation were lower in the renal medulla of the diabetic rats treated with DHEA, and urinary TGF-β(1), as well as total gluthatione levels, were higher in the diabetic rats treated with DHEA. DHEA treatment was not beneficial to renal tissue, since it reduced the glomerular filtration rate and renal medulla metabolism, while increasing the urinary excretion of TGF-β(1) and the compensatory response by the glutathione system, probably due to a mechanism involving a pro-oxidant action or a pro-fibrotic effect of this androgen or its derivatives. In conclusion, this study reports that DHEA treatment may be harmful to renal tissue, but the mechanisms of this action have not yet been fully understood. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of hydrochlorothiazide and indomethacin treatment on renal function in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Jakobsson, B; Berg, U

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of treatment with hydrochlorothiazide and hydrochlorothiazide and indomethacin combined on renal function in four boys, two with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and two with partial nephrogenic diabetes insipidus using the clearances of inulin and para-aminohippuric acid under water diuresis and lithium clearance. Hydrochlorothiazide reduced urine flow and lithium clearance. These effects were further potentiated by addition of indomethacin. No consistent effects on renal plasma flow or glomerular filtration rate were found. It is concluded that treatment with hydrochlorothiazide alone and hydrochlorothiazide and indomethacin combined reduces urine flow in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus by increasing proximal tubular reabsorption of sodium.

  3. Effect of growth hormone treatment on pubertal growth in a boy with cystinosis and growth failure after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Haffner, D; Wühl, E; Nissel, R; Schaefer, F; Mehls, O

    1996-08-01

    Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) has proven effective in improving growth in short prepubertal children with chronic renal failure (CRF) before and after renal transplantation. However, its effect in pubertal patients is still doubtful. We report the case of a boy with nephropathic cystinosis and persistent growth failure despite successful renal transplantation who was treated with rhGH (30 i.u./m2 body surface area/week sc) from early puberty up to final height.

  4. [Longitudinal study of weight and body mass index after renal transplantation during 5 years of evolution].

    PubMed

    Fernández Castillo, Rafael; Fernandez Gallegos, Ruth; Esteban de la Rosa, Rafael Jose; Peña Amaro, María Pilar

    2014-08-01

    Gain weight after transplantation is relatively common, also tends to be multifactorial and can be influenced by glucocorticoids and immunosuppressive medications, delayed graft function and cause serious health complications. Assess changes in weight, degree of obesity and body mass index as well as the effect of immunosuppressive treatment over these 5 years after kidney transplantation. The samples were 119 kidney transplant recipients, 70 men and 49 women, that attended the query post for five years. All patients were measured Pretransplant and post (from 1st year to the 5th year) weight, height and body mass index calculated by the formula weight/size2 relating it to immunosuppressive treatment taking. There is a considerable increase of body mass index, weight and degree of obesity in the first year after transplantation to increase more slowly in the next four years. The type of immunosuppressive treatment influence the weight and degree of obesity that occurs in this period of time. A high prevalence there are overweight and obesity after the transplant especially during the first year. A year patients earn an average of 6.6 kg in weight and an average of 2.5 kg/m2 in their BMI. During treatment should minimize doses of steroids and include dietary treatment and adequate physical exercise. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of renal impairment on distribution of ofloxacin.

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez Navarro, A; Martinez Lanao, J; Sanchez Recio, M M; Domínguez-Gil Hurlé, A; Tabernero Romo, J M; Gomez Sanchez, J C; Terreiro Delgado, M M

    1990-01-01

    A study was made of the plasma and distribution kinetics of ofloxacin administered at a dosage of 400 mg orally to a group of healthy volunteers and a group of patients with renal impairment. Blood and blister fluid samples were taken at programmed times from all individuals included in the study. The analytical techniques for the determination of ofloxacin in both fluids were a plate diffusion method and a high-performance liquid chromatographic technique. The fitting of the experimental data to the kinetic model used was done with the help of the AUTOAN 2 and NONLIN 84 computer programs. In the groups of healthy volunteers, the elimination half-life mean values were found to be 5.1 and 5.9 h in plasma and blister fluid, respectively. The maximum concentration reached in plasma (3.9 micrograms/ml) proved to be slightly higher than that in interstitial tissue fluid (2.8 micrograms/ml). In the patients with renal impairment, the maximum concentrations in both plasma and blister fluid were significantly increased, in the order of 5 to 8 micrograms/ml in the former and 3 to 4 micrograms/ml in interstitial tissue fluid. The parameters seen to undergo an increase as a result of the renal impairment were the area under the curve of the plasma-time levels, the area under the curve of the blister fluid-time levels, and the elimination half-life in plasma and blister fluid. The degree of absorption and the access capacity of the drug to interstitial tissue fluid remained constant. PMID:2334157

  6. Effects of growth hormone administration in pediatric renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Bartosh, S; Kaiser, B; Rezvani, I; Polinsky, M; Schulman, S; Palmer, J; Baluarte, H J

    1992-01-01

    The efficacy of recombinant human growth hormone (rGH) was assessed in five pediatric allograft recipients with severe growth retardation despite successful renal transplants. rGH 0.05 mg/kg per dose was given six times weekly by subcutaneous injection to five prepubertal children (mean age 15.2 +/- 2.0 years) all of whom had bone ages less than or equal to 12 years (10.0 +/- 1.4 years), a height standard deviation score of less than -2.5 (-4.9 +/- 1.5), no evidence of catch-up growth, a calculated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of more than 40 ml/min per 1.73 m2 (51 +/- 6.8 ml/min per 1.73 m2), and stable renal function on alternate-day prednisone (16.7 +/- 2.6 mg/m2 per dose). Growth hormone profiles were abnormal in all children before treatment. rGH administration led to a significant increase in both growth rate (3.5 +/- 1.6 cm/year pre therapy, 8.5 +/- 1.4 cm/year post therapy, P less than 0.001) and percentage of expected growth velocity for bone age (67 +/- 31% pre therapy, 163 +/- 27% post therapy, P less than 0.001) with evidence of true catch-up growth. During the study period, three children had the appearance of secondary sexual characteristics, and one had premature advancement of his bone age. GFR decreased in three children, and in one rGH was discontinued due to a steady rise in serum creatinine. No significant changes were seen in serum calcium, phosphorus, cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, or thyroid function, although a significant increase in alkaline phosphatase was found. In summary, growth-retarded pediatric renal allograft recipients may have abnormal endogenous GH production and respond favorably to rGH.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Effects of aging on renal function and regenerative capacity.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Emaad M; Okusa, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Along with the increase in aging of our population, the proportion of older patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is on the rise as a result of the accumulation of comorbidities as well as biological processes associated with aging. Older patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) comprise an increasing proportion of patients with CKD/ESRD as well. In this review, we will discuss biological processes of aging that predispose patients to AKI and CKD. 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Renoprotective effect of ramulus mori polysaccharides on renal injury in STZ-diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chao; Liang, Tao; He, Qiaoling; Wei, Pingyuan; Zheng, Ni; Xu, Lingyuan

    2013-11-01

    Recently, increasing evidences have suggested that inflammatory stress is markedly occurred in the impaired tissue. Thus, the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice were used to investigate the potential renoprotective effect of ramulus mori polysaccharides (RMP) and to discuss the underlying mechanism. The results from the present study showed that RMP significantly lowered the blood glucose and serum levels of glycosylated protein, cholesterol, urea nitrogen (Urea-N), creatinine (Cr) and 24-hour urine protein, while the albumin content was elevated. Meanwhile, the proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in renal tissue of STZ-lesioned mice were reduced by RMP treatment. Similarly, pathological examination indicated that STZ-induced renal injury was effectively mitigated. In addition, the protein levels of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) in renal tissue were notably decreased. Moreover, the endogenous expressions of phosphorylated-IκB (p-IκB) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) were down-regulated, respectively. Together, these findings revealed that RMP treatment effectively attenuated STZ-induced cytotoxicity in renal tissue, in which RMP-exerted renoprotection was associated with intrarenally debilitating inflammation reaction through blocking the IL-1/NF-κB pathway, thereby maintaining the renal homeostasis.

  9. Effect of felodipine on renal haemodynamics and tubular sodium handling after single-dose cyclosporin infusion in renal transplant recipients treated with azathioprine and prednisolone.

    PubMed

    Madsen, J K; Kornerup, H J; Pedersen, E B

    1995-11-01

    A total of 25 renal transplant recipients, treated solely with prednisolone and azathioprine, were investigated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. The effect of a single oral dose of felodipine 5 mg or placebo on: glomerular filtration rate (GFR); renal plasma flow (RPF); renal vascular resistance (RVR); renal tubular sodium and water handling, measured by the lithium clearance technique; plasma levels of angiotensin II (AngII), aldosterone (Aldo), atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) and arginine vasopressin (AVP); blood pressure (BP), and heart rate (HR) was studied before, during, and after an intravenous infusion of cyclosporin (CyA). Three consecutive clearance periods were performed, each lasting 1 h. During the second period, CyA (0.75 mg kg-1 body weight) was infused. Before infusion of CyA, felodipine caused a significant rise (6.7%) in RPF and lowered RVR, but did not change GFR significantly. The rise in RPF was abolished by infusion of CyA. After infusion, both GFR (7.8%) and RPF (9.4%) were significantly higher and RVR lower after felodipine than after placebo. Proximal tubular output and total sodium excretion were higher on the felodipine day before and after, but not during CyA infusion. In all three periods felodipine reduced both systolic and diastolic BP. In conclusion, a single dose of felodipine increases RPF and decreases blood pressure in renal transplant recipients not treated with CyA. Although some of these changes are abolished by an acute intravenous infusion of CyA, the effects of felodipine are present again also during the 1st hour after the infusion and thereby indicate at least in part some renal protective effect of felodipine. It is suggested that a higher dose of felodipine might also have been preventive against CyA renal side-effects during the acute infusion.

  10. Differences in nephrotoxicity risk and renal effects among anti-viral therapies against hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Koklu, S; Gulsen, M T; Tuna, Y; Koklu, H; Yuksel, O; Demir, M; Guner, R; Dogan, Z; Kucukazman, M; Poyrazoglu, O K; Biyik, M; Ozturk, N A; Aydogan, T; Coban, S; Kocaman, O; Sapmaz, F; Gokturk, S H; Karaca, C; Demirezer, A; Tanoglu, A; Yildirim, B; Altinbas, A; Atak, B M; Cosar, A M; Alkan, E

    2015-02-01

    Results are conflicting with respect to the renal effects of anti-viral agents used for hepatitis B virus infection. To compare short and long-term renal effects in real-life settings and to determine risk factors for renal impairment during treatment. 2221 treatment-naïve patients were enrolled. Among these, 895 (302 lamivudine, 27 telbivudine, 282 entecavir, 273 tenofovir and 11 adefovir initiated patients) had 'repeated measures' of creatinine (baseline, 1st, 6th, 12th and 24th month of treatment). Telbivudine and adefovir groups were excluded from further analysis because of the low number of patients. We calculated the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formula at each time point. Hypophosphataemia was also recorded. Risk factors for renal impairment were analysed. Tenofovir caused a decline in GFR at each time point when compared to baseline levels. However, lamivudine and entecavir did not change GFR. GFR-shifting from ≥90 to 60-89 mL/min/1.73 m(2) was comparable among groups. The proportion of patients whose baseline creatinine increased more than 25% was comparable among all anti-virals. GFR showed a decline in patients who switched from entecavir to tenofovir. One patient with compensated cirrhosis needed to change from tenofovir because of renal safety. Seven and three patients developed transient hypophosphataemia in the tenofovir and lamivudine groups, respectively. Although tenofovir caused a decline in GFR, differences between the anti-viral agents do not appear to be so impressive. In patients with and without renal risk factors at baseline, there is no impact of anti-virals, including tenofovir. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Effect of renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of bupropion and its metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Turpeinen, Miia; Koivuviita, Niina; Tolonen, Ari; Reponen, Petri; Lundgren, Stefan; Miettunen, Jouko; Metsärinne, Kaj; Rane, Anders; Pelkonen, Olavi; Laine, Kari

    2007-01-01

    What is already known about this subject There is an ongoing debate regarding the effect of renal impairment on CYP related metabolic activities. The possible effect of renal impairment on hepatic CYP2B6 activity, or on bupropion pharmacokinetics in renally impaired subjects without dialysis treatment has not yet been investigated. What this study adds Bupropion clearance was found to be significantly decreased in patients with renal impairment. This study provides further evidence for interplay between the role of the kidney and liver in drug disposition, and opens novel lines of research with respect to the regulation of CYP2B6. Aims To investigate the effect of kidney disease on bupropion pharmacokinetics and on cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2B6 activity as measured by bupropion hydroxylation. Methods In an open parallel group study, 17 healthy, nonsmoking subjects and 10 patients with impaired kidney function received a single 150 mg oral dose of sustained release bupropion. Plasma concentrations of bupropion and its metabolites were measured for up to 72 h. Subjects were genotyped for the CYP2B6 SNPs 1459 C>T, 785 A>G and 516 G>T. Results Bupropion AUC was 126% higher (P< 0.0001, 95% CI +72%, +180%), Cmax 86% higher (P = 0.001, 95% CI +40%, +131%), CL/F 63% lower (P = 0.001, 95% CI −29%, −96%), and t1/2 140% longer (P = 0.001, 95% CI +76%, +204%) in renally impaired patients. However, only minor changes were detected in the concentrations of the metabolites. In renally impaired subjects the hydroxybupropion : bupropion AUC ratio was decreased by 66% (P = < 0.0001, 95% CI −19%, −114%) and the hydrobupropion : bupropion AUC ratio by 69% (P = 0.001, 95% CI +8%, −146%) compared with controls. Conclusions The CL/F of bupropion was significantly lower in subjects with renal impairment. Because the principal metabolites of bupropion possess similar pharmacological activity to the parent compound, dosage recommendations for patients with renal impairment cannot be

  12. The role of indomethacin and tezosentan on renal effects induced by Bothrops moojeni Lys49 myotoxin I.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, P S F; Martins, A M C; Alves, R S; Amora, D N; Martins, R D; Toyama, Marcos H; Havt, A; Nascimento, N R F; Rocha, V L C; Menezes, D B; Fonteles, M C; Monteiro, H S A

    2006-06-15

    Renal changes determined by Lys49 myotoxin I (BmTx I), isolated from Bothrops moojeni are well known. The scope of the present study was to investigate the possible mechanisms involved in the production of these effects by using indomethacin (10 microg/mL), a non-selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase, and tezosentan (10 microg/mL), an endothelin antagonist. By means of the method of mesenteric vascular bed, it has been observed that B. moojeni myotoxin (5 microg/mL) affects neither basal perfusion pressure nor phenylephrine-preconstricted vessels. This fact suggests that the increase in renal perfusion pressure and in renal vascular resistance did not occur by a direct effect on renal vasculature. Isolated kidneys from Wistar rats, weighing 240-280 g, were perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution. The infusion of BmTx-I increased perfusion pressure, renal vascular resistance, urinary flow and glomerular filtration rate. Sodium, potassium and chloride tubular transport was reduced after addition of BmTx-I. Indomethacin blocked the effects induced by BmTx-I on perfusion pressure and renal vascular resistance, however, it did not revert the effect on urinary flow and sodium, potassium and chloride tubular transport. The alterations of glomerular filtration rate were inhibited only at 90 min of perfusion. The partial blockade exerted by indomethacin treatment showed that prostaglandins could have been important mediators of BmTx-I renal effects, but the participation of other substances cannot be excluded. The blockage of all renal alterations observed after tezosentan treatment support the hypothesis that endothelin is the major substance involved in the renal pathophysiologic alterations promoted by the Lys49 PLA(2) myotoxin I, isolated from B. moojeni. In conclusion, the rather intense renal effects promoted by B. moojeni myotoxin-I were probably caused by the release of renal endothelin, interfering with the renal parameters studied.

  13. Effect of dietary protein restriction on renal ammonia metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E; Guo, Hui; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2015-06-15

    Dietary protein restriction has multiple benefits in kidney disease. Because protein intake is a major determinant of endogenous acid production, it is important that net acid excretion change in parallel during protein restriction. Ammonia is the primary component of net acid excretion, and inappropriate ammonia excretion can lead to negative nitrogen balance. Accordingly, we examined ammonia excretion in response to protein restriction and then we determined the molecular mechanism of the changes observed. Wild-type C57Bl/6 mice fed a 20% protein diet and then changed to 6% protein developed an 85% reduction in ammonia excretion within 2 days, which persisted during a 10-day study. The expression of multiple proteins involved in renal ammonia metabolism was altered, including the ammonia-generating enzymes phosphate-dependent glutaminase (PDG) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and the ammonia-metabolizing enzyme glutamine synthetase. Rhbg, an ammonia transporter, increased in expression in the inner stripe of outer medullary collecting duct intercalated cell (OMCDis-IC). However, collecting duct-specific Rhbg deletion did not alter the response to protein restriction. Rhcg deletion did not alter ammonia excretion in response to dietary protein restriction. These results indicate 1) dietary protein restriction decreases renal ammonia excretion through coordinated regulation of multiple components of ammonia metabolism; 2) increased Rhbg expression in the OMCDis-IC may indicate a biological role in addition to ammonia transport; and 3) Rhcg expression is not necessary to decrease ammonia excretion during dietary protein restriction.

  14. Effect of dietary protein restriction on renal ammonia metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E.; Guo, Hui; Verlander, Jill W.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary protein restriction has multiple benefits in kidney disease. Because protein intake is a major determinant of endogenous acid production, it is important that net acid excretion change in parallel during protein restriction. Ammonia is the primary component of net acid excretion, and inappropriate ammonia excretion can lead to negative nitrogen balance. Accordingly, we examined ammonia excretion in response to protein restriction and then we determined the molecular mechanism of the changes observed. Wild-type C57Bl/6 mice fed a 20% protein diet and then changed to 6% protein developed an 85% reduction in ammonia excretion within 2 days, which persisted during a 10-day study. The expression of multiple proteins involved in renal ammonia metabolism was altered, including the ammonia-generating enzymes phosphate-dependent glutaminase (PDG) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and the ammonia-metabolizing enzyme glutamine synthetase. Rhbg, an ammonia transporter, increased in expression in the inner stripe of outer medullary collecting duct intercalated cell (OMCDis-IC). However, collecting duct-specific Rhbg deletion did not alter the response to protein restriction. Rhcg deletion did not alter ammonia excretion in response to dietary protein restriction. These results indicate 1) dietary protein restriction decreases renal ammonia excretion through coordinated regulation of multiple components of ammonia metabolism; 2) increased Rhbg expression in the OMCDis-IC may indicate a biological role in addition to ammonia transport; and 3) Rhcg expression is not necessary to decrease ammonia excretion during dietary protein restriction. PMID:25925252

  15. Prenatal programming-effects on blood pressure and renal function.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Eberhard; Amann, Kerstin; Koleganova, Nadezda; Benz, Kerstin

    2011-03-01

    Impaired intrauterine nephrogenesis-most clearly illustrated by low nephron number-is frequently associated with low birthweight and has been recognized as a powerful risk factor for renal disease; it increases the risks of low glomerular filtration rate, of more rapid progression of primary kidney disease, and of increased incidence of chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease. Another important consequence of impaired nephrogenesis is hypertension, which further amplifies the risk of onset and progression of kidney disease. Hypertension is associated with low nephron numbers in white individuals, but the association is not universal and is not seen in individuals of African origin. The derangement of intrauterine kidney development is an example of a more general principle that illustrates the paradigm of plasticity during development-that is, that transcription of the genetic code is modified by epigenetic factors (as has increasingly been documented). This Review outlines the concept of prenatal programming and, in particular, describes its role in kidney disease and hypertension.

  16. Complement activation and effect of eculizumab in scleroderma renal crisis

    PubMed Central

    Devresse, Arnaud; Aydin, Selda; Le Quintrec, Moglie; Demoulin, Nathalie; Stordeur, Patrick; Lambert, Catherine; Gastoldi, Sara; Pirson, Yves; Jadoul, Michel; Morelle, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) is a life-threatening complication of systemic sclerosis characterized by abrupt onset of hypertension, thrombotic microangiopathy, and kidney injury. The mechanisms of the disease remain ill-defined, but a growing body of evidence suggests that activation of the complement system may be involved. Methods: Here, we report the case of a patient presenting with severe SRC and strong evidence of complement activation, both in serum and in the kidney, in the absence of genetic defect of the complement system. Results: Immunofluorescence studies on kidney biopsy showed significant deposits of C1q and C4d in the endothelium of renal arterioles, pointing toward activation of the classical pathway. Because of the dramatic clinical and histological severity, and the lack of response to early treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, calcium channel blockers and plasma exchange, the patient was treated with the specific C5 blocker eculizumab. Contrarily to conventional treatment, eculizumab efficiently blocked C5b-9 deposition ex vivo and maintained hematological remission. Unfortunately, the patient died from heart failure a few weeks later. Postmortem examination of the heart showed diffuse patchy interstitial fibrosis, the typical lesion of systemic sclerosis-related cardiomyopathy, but normal coronary arteries and myocardial microvasculature. Conclusion: SRC may lead to complement system activation through the classical pathway. Early administration of C5 inhibitor eculizumab may have therapeutic potential in patients with life-threatening SRC refractory to conventional treatment using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. PMID:27472742

  17. The Beneficial Effects of Renal Transplantation on Altered Oxidative Status of ESRD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cerrillos-Gutiérrez, José Ignacio; Preciado-Rojas, Priscila; Gómez-Navarro, Benjamín; Sifuentes-Franco, Sonia; Carrillo-Ibarra, Sandra; Andrade-Sierra, Jorge; Rojas-Campos, Enrique; Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso Martín

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplantation (RT), has been considered the best therapeutic option for end stage renal disease (ESRD). Objective. To determine the effect of RT on the evolution of oxidative DNA status. Methods. Prospective cohort (N = 50 receptors of RT); genotoxic damage, 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and DNA repair enzyme, human 8-oxoguanine-DNA-N- glycosylase-1 (hOGG1); and antioxidants, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), were evaluated. Results. Before RT, 8-OHdG were significantly elevated (11.04 ± 0.90 versus 4.73 ± 0.34 ng/mL) compared to healthy controls (p = 0.001), with normalization after 6 months of 4.78 ± 0.34 ng/mL (p < 0.001). The same phenomenon was observed with hOGG1 enzyme before RT with 2.14 ± 0.36 ng/mL (p = 0.01) and decreased significantly at the end of the study to 1.20 ng/mL (p < 0.001) but was higher than controls, 0.51 ± 0.07 ng/mL (p < 0.03). Antioxidant SOD was elevated at 24.09 ± 1.6 IU/mL versus healthy controls (p = 0.001) before RT; however, 6 months after RT it decreased significantly to 16.9 ± 1.6 IU/mL (p = 0.002), without achieving the levels of healthy controls (p = 0.01). The GPx, before RT, was significantly diminished with 24.09 ± 1.6 IU/mL versus healthy controls (39.0 ± 1.58) (p = 0.01), while, in the final results, levels increased significantly to 30.38 ± 3.16 IU/mL (p = 0.001). Discussion. Patients with ESRD have important oxidative damage before RT. The RT significantly reduces oxidative damage and partially regulates the antioxidant enzymes (SOD and GPx). PMID:27547292

  18. Staging of renal cell carcinoma: cost-effectiveness of routine preoperative bone scans

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.J.; Broaddus, S.B.; Leadbetter, G.W. Jr.

    1985-03-01

    The use of bone scans in the evaluation of renal cell carcinoma has become routine in many centers. In a retrospective analysis of 42 patients undergoing radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma, the authors analyzed the cost-effectiveness of routine preoperative bone scans. Although these scans accurately predict metastatic disease to bone, they are not cost-effective as a routine preoperative tool because they do not alter outcome. In selected patients with bone pain and no other positive staging studies, preoperative bone scans may be of value in the decision to perform extirpative surgery.

  19. Chemical Profiles and Protective Effect of Hedyotis diffusa Willd in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Renal Inflammation Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jian-Hong; Liu, Meng-Hua; Zhang, Xu-Lin; He, Jing-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Protective effect of Hedyotis diffusa (H. diffusa) Willd against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced renal inflammation was evaluated by the productions of cytokines and chemokine, and the bioactive constituents of H. diffusa were detected by the ultra-fast liquid chromatography -diode array detector-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (UFLC-DAD-Q-TOF-MS/MS) method. As the results showed, water extract of H. diffusa (equal to 5.0 g/kg body weight) obviously protected renal tissues, significantly suppressed the productions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, as well as significantly promoted the production of IL-10 in serum and renal tissues. According the chemical profiles of H. diffusa, flavonoids, iridoid glycosides and anthraquinones were greatly detected in serum from H. diffusa extract treatment mice. Two main chemotypes, including eight flavonoids and four iridoid glycosides were found in renal tissues from H. diffusa extract treatment mice. The results demonstrated that water extract of H. diffusa had protective effect on renal inflammation, which possibly resulted from the bioactive constituents consisting of flavonoids, iridoids and anthraquinones. PMID:26580602

  20. Effects of salt restriction on renal growth and glomerular injury in rats with remnant kidneys.

    PubMed

    Lax, D S; Benstein, J A; Tolbert, E; Dworkin, L D

    1992-06-01

    Male Munich-Wistar rats underwent right nephrectomy and infarction of two thirds of the left kidney. Rats were randomly assigned to ingest standard chow (REM) or a moderately salt restricted chow (LS). A third group of rats were fed the low salt diet and were injected with an androgen (LSA). Eight weeks after ablation, glomerular volume and glomerular capillary radius were markedly increased in REM. This increase was prevented by the low salt diet, however, the antihypertrophic effect of the diet was overcome by androgen. Values for glomerular volume and capillary radius were similar in LSA and REM. Morphologic studies revealed that approximately 25% of glomeruli were abnormal in REM. Much less injury was observed in salt restricted rats, however, the protective effect of the low salt diet was significantly abrogated when renal growth was stimulated in salt restricted rats by androgen. Micropuncture studies revealed that glomerular pressure was elevated in all three groups and not affected by diet or androgen. Serum cholesterol was also similar in the three groups. These findings indicate that renal and glomerular hypertrophy are correlated with the development of glomerular injury after reduction in renal mass and suggest that dietary salt restriction lessens renal damage, at least in part, by inhibiting compensatory renal growth.

  1. Sirolimus in renal transplant recipients with tuberous sclerosis complex: clinical effectiveness and implications for innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Haidinger, Michael; Hecking, Manfred; Weichhart, Thomas; Poglitsch, Marko; Enkner, Wolfgang; Vonbank, Karin; Prayer, Daniela; Geusau, Alexandra; Oberbauer, Rainer; Zlabinger, Gerhard J; Soleiman, Afschin; Hörl, Walter H; Säemann, Marcus D

    2010-08-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is caused by constitutively activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) resulting in nonmalignant tumours of several organs and consequently renal failure. Recent reports suggest a possible beneficial role of the mTOR-inhibitor (mTOR-I) sirolimus for TSC; however, safety and efficiency of sirolimus in TSC patients after renal transplantation, both as primary immunosuppressant as well as anti-proliferative agent, are still undefined. Moreover, it is currently unknown whether the TSC mutation affects the primary immune response in these patients. In this article, we report on three TSC patients after renal transplantation who have been converted from a calcineurin-inhibitor (CNI)-based immunosuppression to sirolimus. During 2 years of follow-up, renal allograft function was stable or even improved, and no significant sirolimus-associated side-effects were noted. Beneficial effects of sirolimus against TSC were detected in the skin, along with improved spirometric measurements and an arrest of astrocytoma progression. We show that the inflammatory immune response was significantly altered in TSC patients as compared with controls and sirolimus potently affected both inflammatory cytokine production and vascular endothelial growth factor levels in these patients. Larger studies are warranted to further examine the relationship between clinical parameters and the molecular response to mTOR-inhibition in TSC patients after renal transplantation.

  2. Salt-Induced Renal Injury in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats: Effects of Nebivolol

    PubMed Central

    Varagic, Jasmina; Ahmad, Sarfaraz; Brosnihan, K. Bridget; Habibi, Javad; Tilmon, Roger D.; Sowers, James R.; Ferrario, Carlos M.

    2010-01-01

    Background We investigated renal effects of nebivolol, a selective β1-receptor blocker with additional antioxidative ability, in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) where increased salt intake induces oxidative stress and worsens renal function as a result of further activation of the renin-angiotensin and sympathetic nervous systems. Methods Male SHR were given an 8% salt diet (HS; n = 22) for 5 weeks; their age-matched controls (n = 9) received standard chow. Nebivolol was given at a dose of 10 mg/kg/day for 5 weeks in 11 HS rats. Results HS increased blood pressure, plasma renin concentration, urinary protein excretion, and renal nitroxidative stress while decreasing renal blood flow and angiotensin 1–7 receptor (mas) protein expression. There was no change in angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression among the experimental groups. Nebivolol did not alter the salt-induced increase in blood pressure but reduced urinary protein excretion, plasma renin concentration, and nitroxidative stress. Nebivolol also increased neuronal NOS expression while preventing the salt-induced decrease in renal blood flow and mas protein expression. Conclusion Nebivolol prevented salt-induced kidney injury and associated proteinuria in SHR through a blood pressure-independent mechanism. Its protective effects may be related to reduction in oxidative stress, increases in neuronal NOS and restoration of angiotensin II type 1/mas receptor balance. PMID:21042014

  3. Ketorolac: safe and effective analgesia for the management of renal cortical tumors with partial nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Diblasio, Christopher J; Snyder, Mark E; Kattan, Michael W; Russo, Paul

    2004-03-01

    Ketorolac has demonstrated advantages as a supplement to opioid based analgesia in several surgical settings, including donor nephrectomy. To our knowledge there has been no published data to date on the use of ketorolac in patients undergoing partial nephrectomy. We compared analgesia with ketorolac and opioids to analgesia with opioids alone with regard to pain control, postoperative recovery and effects on renal function in patients with renal cortical tumors surgically managed by partial nephrectomy. Records for 154 patients treated with partial nephrectomy for renal cortical tumors were retrospectively analyzed. Clinicopathological variables examined were age, gender, medication use, comorbidity profile, operation side, estimated blood loss, hospital stay, operative duration, American Society of Anesthesiologists class, histopathology results, perioperative transfusion status, ischemia type (warm vs cold vs none), duration of renal artery cross clamping, tumor size and intraparenchymal location, pathological stage and perioperative complications. Postoperative duration to the initiation of solid diet, discontinuation of patient controlled analgesia and overall pain control were assessed. Serum creatinine was measured during the preoperative period, and at 1, 3 or greater and 30 or greater days postoperatively. Patients who received ketorolac demonstrated superior postoperative recovery with an earlier return to solid diet and earlier discontinuation of patient controlled analgesia. Treatment groups were similar with respect to changes in serum creatinine, blood loss, transfusion rates and complication rates. Ketorolac was not associated with an increased risk of acute renal failure. Ketorolac is a safe and effective supplement to opioid based analgesia for pain control after partial nephrectomy.

  4. Prenatal betamethasone exposure alters renal function in immature sheep: sex differences in effects

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Jianli; Valego, Nancy; Carey, Luke; Figueroa, Jorge; Chappell, Mark; Rose, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic glucocorticoids are commonly given to pregnant women when premature delivery threatens. Antenatal administration of clinically relevant doses of betamethasone to pregnant sheep causes sex-specific compromises of renal function and increases in blood pressure in adult offspring. However, it is unclear whether such effects are present in immature lambs. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to determine whether antenatal betamethasone at 80–81 days of gestation increases blood pressure and adversely impacts renal function in adolescent ewes and rams. Prenatal steroid exposure increased blood pressure significantly in the young male (84 ± 2 vs. 74 ± 3 mmHg) and female sheep (88 ± 5 vs. 79 ± 4), but it did not alter basal glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow (RBF), or sodium excretion in either sex. However, antenatal betamethasone exposure blocked increases in RBF (P = 0.001), and enhanced excretion of an acute Na load (P < 0.05) in response to systemic infusions of angiotensin (ANG)-(1–7) at 10 pmol·kg−1·min−1 in males. In females, the natriuretic response to combined ANG-(1–7), and Na load was significantly altered by prenatal betamethasone exposure. These findings indicate that blood pressure is increased in immature animals in response to antenatal steroid exposure and that sex-specific effects on renal function also exist. These changes may reflect greater risk for further loss of renal function with age. PMID:20554936

  5. [Determining the aortic and renal hemodynamic effects of propofol on rabbits using Doppler ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Apan, Alpaslan; Karadeniz Bilgili, M Yasemin; Cağlayan, Fatma

    2004-03-01

    The hemodynamic effects of propofol-fentanyl anesthesia were known to reduce arterial pressure and heart rate. We aimed to determine the effects of propofol-fentanyl anesthesia on renal artery blood flow and aorta by using Doppler ultrasonography on an animal model. The study was conducted on 8 male New Zaeland White strain rabbits. The initial aortic and renal hemodynamic measurements were determined on animals using ketamin anesthesia. Later the right femoral arteries were cannulated for determining arterial blood pressure and pulse oximetry was followed from the ear. Propofol 5-7 mg/kg with fentanyl 1-2 microg/kg was injected via the ear vein. Doppler parameters (RI, RI, Vmax, Vmin) of the renal artery and aorta were determined after the anesthesia. According to the basal measurements, arterial blood pressure and breath rates declined significantly (27% and 53% respectively, p<0.05); however there were no statistical alteration of aortic and renal artery Doppler parameters. Anesthesia induced by propofol-fentanyl did not induce a statistically significant difference in Doppler parameters obtained from the renal artery and aorta. It is clinically important to know that determining the changes in RI and PI during the postoperative period is not related to the propofol-fentanyl anesthesia.

  6. Effect of urinary stone disease and its treatment on renal function.

    PubMed

    Mehmet, Necmettin Mercimek; Ender, Ozden

    2015-05-06

    Urolithiasis is a common disease that affects urinary tract in all age groups. Both in adults and in children, stone size, location, renal anatomy, and other factors, can influence the success of treatment modalities. Recently, there has been a great advancement in technology for minimally invasive management of urinary stones. The epoch of open treatment modalities has passed and currently there are much less invasive treatment approaches, such as percutaneous nephrolithotomy, ureteroscopy, shockwave lithotripsy, and retrograde internal Surgery. Furthermore, advancement in imaging technics ensures substantial knowledge that permit physician to decide the most convenient treatment method for the patient. Thus, effective and rapid treatment of urinary tract stones is substantial for the preservation of the renal function. In this review, the effects of the treatment options for urinary stones on renal function have been reviewed.

  7. Effect of urinary stone disease and its treatment on renal function

    PubMed Central

    Mehmet, Necmettin Mercimek; Ender, Ozden

    2015-01-01

    Urolithiasis is a common disease that affects urinary tract in all age groups. Both in adults and in children, stone size, location, renal anatomy, and other factors, can influence the success of treatment modalities. Recently, there has been a great advancement in technology for minimally invasive management of urinary stones. The epoch of open treatment modalities has passed and currently there are much less invasive treatment approaches, such as percutaneous nephrolithotomy, ureteroscopy, shockwave lithotripsy, and retrograde internal Surgery. Furthermore, advancement in imaging technics ensures substantial knowledge that permit physician to decide the most convenient treatment method for the patient. Thus, effective and rapid treatment of urinary tract stones is substantial for the preservation of the renal function. In this review, the effects of the treatment options for urinary stones on renal function have been reviewed. PMID:25949941

  8. Effect of carbon nanoparticles on renal epithelial cell structure, barrier function, and protein expression

    PubMed Central

    BLAZER-YOST, BONNIE L.; BANGA, AMIRAJ; AMOS, ADAM; CHERNOFF, ELLEN; LAI, XIANYIN; LI, CHENG; MITRA, SOMENATH; WITZMANN, FRANK A.

    2011-01-01

    To assess effects of carbon nanoparticle (CNP) exposure on renal epithelial cells, fullerenes (C60), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) were incubated with a confluent renal epithelial line for 48 h. At low concentrations, CNP-treated cells exhibited significant decreases in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) but no changes in hormone-stimulated ion transport or CNP-induced toxicity or stress responses as measured by lactate dehydrogenase or cytokine release. The changes in TEER, manifested as an inverse relationship with CNP concentration, were mirrored by an inverse correlation between dose and changes in protein expression. Lower, more physiologically relevant, concentrations of CNP have the most profound effects on barrier cell function and protein expression. These results indicate an impact of CNPs on renal epithelial cells at concentrations lower than have been previously studied and suggest caution with regard to increasing CNP levels entering the food chain due to increasing environmental pollution. PMID:21067278

  9. Chronic Treatment with Atrial Natriuretic Peptide in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats: Beneficial Renal Effects and Sex Differences

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Mariana; Caniffi, Carolina; Bouchet, Gonzalo; Costa, María A.; Elesgaray, Rosana; Arranz, Cristina; Tomat, Analía L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic treatment with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on renal function, nitric oxide (NO) system, oxidative stress, collagen content and apoptosis in kidneys of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), as well as sex-related differences in the response to the treatment. Methods 10 week-old male and female SHR were infused with ANP (100 ng/h/rat) or saline (NaCl 0.9%) for 14 days (subcutaneous osmotic pumps). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was recorded and diuresis and natriuresis were determined. After treatment, renal NO synthase (NOS) activity and eNOS expression were evaluated. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), glutathione concentration and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were determined in the kidney. Collagen was identified in renal slices by Sirius red staining and apoptosis by Tunel assay. Results Female SHR showed lower SBP, oxidative stress, collagen content and apoptosis in kidney, and higher renal NOS activity and eNOS protein content, than males. ANP lowered SBP, increased diuresis, natriuresis, renal NOS activity and eNOS expression in both sexes. Renal response to ANP was more marked in females than in males. In kidney, ANP reduced TBARS, renal collagen content and apoptosis, and increased glutathione concentration and activity of GPx and SOD enzymes in both sexes. Conclusions Female SHR exhibited less organ damage than males. Chronic ANP treatment would ameliorate hypertension and end-organ damage in the kidney by reducing oxidative stress, increasing NO-system activity, and diminishing collagen content and apoptosis, in both sexes. PMID:25774801

  10. Augmented renal clearance in critically ill patients: incidence, associated factors and effects on vancomycin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Campassi, María Luz; Gonzalez, María Cecilia; Masevicius, Fabio Daniel; Vazquez, Alejandro Risso; Moseinco, Miriam; Navarro, Noelia Cintia; Previgliano, Luciana; Rubatto, Nahuel Paolo; Benites, Martín Hernán; Estenssoro, Elisa; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2014-01-01

    Objective An augmented renal clearance has been described in some groups of critically ill patients, and it might induce sub-optimal concentrations of drugs eliminated by glomerular filtration, mainly antibiotics. Studies on its occurrence and determinants are lacking. Our goals were to determine the incidence and associated factors of augmented renal clearance and the effects on vancomycin concentrations and dosing in a series of intensive care unit patients. Methods We prospectively studied 363 patients admitted during 1 year to a clinical-surgical intensive care unit. Patients with serum creatinine >1.3mg/dL were excluded. Creatinine clearance was calculated from a 24-hour urine collection. Patients were grouped according to the presence of augmented renal clearance (creatinine clearance >120mL/min/1.73m2), and possible risk factors were analyzed with bivariate and logistic regression analysis. In patients treated with vancomycin, dosage and plasma concentrations were registered. Results Augmented renal clearance was present in 103 patients (28%); they were younger (48±15 versus 65±17 years, p<0.0001), had more frequent obstetric (16 versus 7%, p=0.0006) and trauma admissions (10 versus 3%, p=0.016) and fewer comorbidities. The only independent determinants for the development of augmented renal clearance were age (OR 0.95; p<0.0001; 95%CI 0.93-0.96) and absence of diabetes (OR 0.34; p=0.03; 95%CI 0.12-0.92). Twelve of the 46 patients who received vancomycin had augmented renal clearance and despite higher doses, had lower concentrations. Conclusions In this cohort of critically ill patients, augmented renal clearance was a common finding. Age and absence of diabetes were the only independent determinants. Therefore, younger and previously healthy patients might require larger vancomycin dosing. PMID:24770684

  11. THE EFFECTS OF FENOLDOPAM ON RENAL FUNCTION AND METABOLISM IN AN OVINE MODEL OF SEPTIC SHOCK.

    PubMed

    Post, Emiel Hendrik; Su, Fuhong; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Hosokawa, Koji; Herpain, Antoine; Creteur, Jacques; Vincent, Jean-Louis; De Backer, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The importance of renal perfusion and metabolism in septic acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unclear. Prophylactic administration of the dopaminergic agent, fenoldopam, has been suggested to reduce the occurrence of AKI, but its effects in septic shock are poorly defined. Sepsis was induced in 15 adult female sheep by injecting autologous feces into the abdominal cavity. Two hours later, the animals were randomized to one of three groups: low-dose fenoldopam (1.0 μg/kg/min, n = 5), high-dose fenoldopam (5.0 μg/kg/min, n = 5), or placebo (control, n = 5). A perivascular flow probe was placed around the renal artery and a catheter in the renal vein for measurement of renal blood flow index (RBFI) and oxygen consumption (VO2renI). Metabolism in the renal cortex was evaluated using microdialysis. Serum creatinine was measured 6-hourly and the sublingual microcirculation assessed using sidestream dark-field videomicroscopy. High-dose fenoldopam was associated with a lower RBFI at 18 h (P = 0.032) than in the control group, but VO2renI was maintained by a higher oxygen extraction (P < 0.05 vs. baseline). Sublingual microcirculatory alterations at 18 h were more severe in the high-dose than in the control and low-dose groups (P = 0.021 and P = 0.032). Renal cortex lactate and pyruvate levels increased earlier in the high-dose group than in the other two groups (P < 0.001 vs. baseline). Fenoldopam did not affect creatinine clearance or urine output. In this model of septic shock, fenoldopam did not improve renal blood flow, worsened microcirculatory alterations, and induced metabolic changes that were indicative of increased glycolysis.

  12. Beneficial Effects of Renal Denervation on Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Experimental Pulmonary Artery Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Qingyan, Zhao; Xuejun, Jiang; Yanhong, Tang; Zixuan, Dai; Xiaozhan, Wang; Xule, Wang; Zongwen, Guo; Wei, Hu; Shengbo, Yu; Congxin, Huang

    2015-07-01

    Activation of both the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is closely associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension. We hypothesized that renal denervation decreases renin-angiotensin-aldosterone activity and inhibits the progression of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Twenty-two beagles were randomized into 3 groups. The dogs' pulmonary dynamics were measured before and 8 weeks after injection of 0.1mL/kg dimethylformamide (control dogs) or 2mg/kg dehydromonocrotaline (pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension + renal denervation dogs). Eight weeks after injection, neurohormone levels and pulmonary tissue morphology were measured. Levels of plasma angiotensin II and endothelin-1 were significantly increased after 8 weeks in the pulmonary arterial hypertension dogs and were higher in the lung tissues of these dogs than in those of the control and renal denervation dogs (mean [standard deviation] angiotensin II: 65 [9.8] vs 38 [6.7], 46 [8.1]; endothelin-1: 96 [10.3] vs 54 [6.2], 67 [9.4]; P < .01). Dehydromonocrotaline increased the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (16 [3.4] mmHg vs 33 [7.3] mmHg; P < .01), and renal denervation prevented this increase. Pulmonary smooth muscle cell proliferation was higher in the pulmonary arterial hypertension dogs than in the control and pulmonary arterial hypertension + renal denervation dogs. Renal denervation attenuates pulmonary vascular remodeling and decreases pulmonary arterial pressure in experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension. The effect of renal denervation may contribute to decreased neurohormone levels. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ernst

    1978-01-01

    Traces the history of evolution theory from Lamarck and Darwin to the present. Discusses natural selection in detail. Suggests that, besides biological evolution, there is also a cultural evolution which is more rapid than the former. (MA)

  14. Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ernst

    1978-01-01

    Traces the history of evolution theory from Lamarck and Darwin to the present. Discusses natural selection in detail. Suggests that, besides biological evolution, there is also a cultural evolution which is more rapid than the former. (MA)

  15. Volcanic aerosols: Chemistry, evolution, and effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosols have been the subject of scientific speculation since the 1880s, when the powerful eruption of Krakatoa attracted worldwide attention to the upper atmosphere through spectacular optical displays. The presence of a permanent tenuous dust layer in the lower stratosphere was postulated in the 1920s following studies of the twilight glow. Junge collected the first samples of these 'dust' particles and demonstrated that they were actually composed of sulfates, most likely concentrated sulfuric acid (Junge and Manson, 1961; Junge, 1963). Subsequent research has been spurred by the realization that stratospheric particles can influence the surface climate of earth through their effects on atmospheric radiation. Such aerosols can also influence, through chemical and physical effects, the trace composition of the atmosphere, ozone concentrations, and atmospheric electrical properties. The properties of stratospheric aerosols (both the background particles and those enhanced by volcanic eruptions) were measured in situ by balloon ascents and high altitude aircraft sorties. The aerosols were also observed remotely from the ground and from satellites using both active (lidar) and passive (solar occultation) techniques (remote sensing instruments were carried on aircraft and balloon platforms as well). In connection with the experimental work, models were developed to test theories of particle formation and evolution, to guide measurement strategies, to provide a means of connecting laboratory and field data, and to apply the knowledge gained to answer practical questions about global changes in climate, depletion of the ozone layer, and related environmental problems.

  16. Volcanic aerosols: Chemistry, evolution, and effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turco, Richard

    1991-02-01

    Stratospheric aerosols have been the subject of scientific speculation since the 1880s, when the powerful eruption of Krakatoa attracted worldwide attention to the upper atmosphere through spectacular optical displays. The presence of a permanent tenuous dust layer in the lower stratosphere was postulated in the 1920s following studies of the twilight glow. Junge collected the first samples of these 'dust' particles and demonstrated that they were actually composed of sulfates, most likely concentrated sulfuric acid (Junge and Manson, 1961; Junge, 1963). Subsequent research has been spurred by the realization that stratospheric particles can influence the surface climate of earth through their effects on atmospheric radiation. Such aerosols can also influence, through chemical and physical effects, the trace composition of the atmosphere, ozone concentrations, and atmospheric electrical properties. The properties of stratospheric aerosols (both the background particles and those enhanced by volcanic eruptions) were measured in situ by balloon ascents and high altitude aircraft sorties. The aerosols were also observed remotely from the ground and from satellites using both active (lidar) and passive (solar occultation) techniques (remote sensing instruments were carried on aircraft and balloon platforms as well). In connection with the experimental work, models were developed to test theories of particle formation and evolution, to guide measurement strategies, to provide a means of connecting laboratory and field data, and to apply the knowledge gained to answer practical questions about global changes in climate, depletion of the ozone layer, and related environmental problems.

  17. Protective effects of genetic inhibition of Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 in experimental renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kerroch, Monique; Alfieri, Carlo; Dorison, Aude; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Dussaule, Jean-Claude

    2016-02-16

    Chronic kidney disease is a progressive incurable pathology affecting millions of people. Intensive investigations aim to identify targets for therapy. We have previously demonstrated that abnormal expression of the Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1) is a key factor of renal disease by promoting inflammation and fibrosis. The present study investigates whether blocking the expression of DDR1 after the initiation of renal disease can delay or arrest the progression of this pathology. Severe renal disease was induced by either injecting nephrotoxic serum (NTS) or performing unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice, and the expression of DDR1 was inhibited by administering antisense oligodeoxynucleotides either at 4 or 8 days after NTS (corresponding to early or more established phases of disease, respectively), or at day 2 after ligation. DDR1 antisense administration at day 4 stopped the increase of proteinuria and protected animals against the progression of glomeruloneprhitis, as evidenced by functional, structural and cellular indexes. Antisense administration at day 8 delayed progression -but to a smaller degree- of renal disease. Similar beneficial effects on renal structure and inflammation were observed with the antisense administration of DDR1 after ureteral ligation. Thus, targeting DDR1 can be a promising strategy in the treatment of chronic kidney disease.

  18. Bβ15–42 Attenuates the Effect of Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sörensen, Inga; Rong, Song; Susnik, Nathan; Gueler, Faikah; Shushakova, Nelli; Albrecht, Melanie; Dittrich, Anna-Maria; von Vietinghoff, Sibylle; Becker, Jan Ulrich; Melk, Anette; Bohlmann, Andrea; Reingruber, Sonja; Petzelbauer, Peter; Haller, Hermann

    2011-01-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion contributes to reduced renal allograft survival. The peptide Bβ15–42, a breakdown product of fibrin, attenuates inflammation induced by ischemia-reperfusion in the heart by competitively blocking the binding of leukocytes to endothelial VE-cadherin, but whether it could improve outcomes in renal transplantation is unknown. Here, we tested the ability of Bβ15–42 to ameliorate the effects of renal ischemic injury during allogenic kidney transplantation in mice. In our renal transplantation model (C57BL/6 into BALB/c mice), treatment with Bβ15–42 at the time of allograft reperfusion resulted in significantly improved survival of recipients during the 28-day follow-up (60% versus 10%). Bβ15–42 treatment decreased leukocyte infiltration, expression of endothelial adhesion molecules, and proinflammatory cytokines. Treatment significantly attenuated allogenic T cell activation and reduced cellular rejection. Moreover, Bβ15–42 significantly reduced tubular epithelial damage and apoptosis, which we reproduced in vitro. These data suggest that Bβ15–42 may have therapeutic potential in transplant surgery by protecting grafts from ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:21841063

  19. Protective effects of captopril in diabetic rats exposed to ischemia/reperfusion renal injury.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Amr A; Al-Mulhim, Abdulruhman S; Jresat, Iyad; Morsy, Mohamed A

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the potential protective effects of captopril, the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, in diabetic rats exposed to ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) renal injury. Following successful induction of diabetes, captopril treatment (50 mg/kg/day, p.o.) was applied for 4 weeks, after which bilateral renal ischaemia was induced for 30 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h. Captopril significantly attenuated hyperglycaemia and hypoinsulinaemia in diabetic rats, and significantly reduced the elevations of serum creatinine and aldosterone levels, and renal malondialdehyde, tumour necrosis factor-α and nitric oxide (NO), and prevented the depletion of reduced glutathione caused by I/R in diabetic rats. Histopathological renal tissue damage induced by I/R in diabetic rats was ameliorated by captopril treatment. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that captopril significantly attenuated the reduction of insulin content in pancreatic islet β-cells, and decreased the I/R-induced expression of inducible NO synthase, nuclear factor-κB, Fas ligand and caspase-3, and increased the expression of survivin and heme oxygenase-1 in the kidney tissue of diabetic rats. Captopril represents a potential candidate to reduce the risk of renal injury induced by ischaemia/reperfusion in type 2 diabetes. © 2012 The Authors. JPP © 2012. Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  20. Effects of gender, age, diabetes mellitus and renal and hepatic impairment on tadalafil pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Forgue, S Thomas; Phillips, Diane L; Bedding, Alun W; Payne, Christopher D; Jewell, Hayley; Patterson, Beverley E; Wrishko, Rebecca E; Mitchell, Malcolm I

    2007-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the effects of gender, age, diabetes mellitus, renal and hepatic impairment on tadalafil pharmacokinetics and tolerability. Methods Six single-dose (5, 10 or 20 mg orally) clinical pharmacology studies were conducted in the UK, Belgium, Poland and Germany in healthy male and female subjects, elderly subjects and subjects with diabetes mellitus, renal impairment, end-stage renal failure (ESRF) or hepatic impairment. The gender study also incorporated administration of 10 mg tadalafil daily for 10 days. Results Systemic exposure in the elderly was 25% greater than in young subjects (mean AUC ratio 1.25; 90% confidence interval 0.972, 1.61). The AUC was 19% lower in subjects with diabetes mellitus than in healthy age/gender-matched controls. Pharmacokinetics in female subjects were essentially similar to those in males. Exposure in subjects with mild or moderate renal insufficiency was approximately twice that in healthy subjects. The mean AUC for the major metabolite (total methylcatechol glucuronide) in the presence of ESRF was three times the mean for healthy subjects. Haemodialysis contributed negligibly to elimination of tadalafil or the metabolite. Hepatic impairment had negligible effects on exposure. The most common adverse events in these six studies were headache, back pain and myalgia. A 10-mg dose was not well tolerated by subjects with moderate renal dysfunction in this study. Conclusions No clinically significant effect of gender, age, diabetes mellitus or hepatic impairment on tadalafil pharmacokinetics was observed. Renal insufficiency resulted in increased systemic exposure. Tadalafil was not associated with any serious clinically significant adverse events or study discontinuations due to adverse events. PMID:16869816

  1. Effects of vitamin D on renal fibrosis in diabetic nephropathy model rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yanyan; Lv, Guodong; Yang, Ye; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Rui; Zhu, Jia; Xiao, Lati; Zhu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    This study is to investigate the effects of vitamin D on renal fibrosis in rat diabetic nephropathy models, as well as the changes and interactions in the expressions of renal fibrogenesis- and inflammation-related genes. Rat diabetic nephropathy models were established by high-fat diets, which were subjected to TGF-β1 manipulation, as well as vitamin D treatment. H&E staining, Masson staining, and TEM detection were performed to assess the effects of vitamin D treatment and/or TGF-β1 manipulation on pathological changes in the renal tissues in these rat diabetic nephropathy models. Immunohistology and real-time PCR were used to evaluate the expressions of TGF-β1, MCP-1, CTGF, and VDR. Histological staining and TEM detection showed that, in both TGF-β1 over-expressed and interfered groups, vitamin D administration alleviated the renal fibrosis, compared with the vehicle treatment. Similar results were observed with the immunohistological staining. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that, when TGF-β1 was over-expressed in diabetic nephropathy, the expressions of MCP-1 and CTGF were also up-regulated, which would be decreased by the treatment of vitamin D. On the other hand, when TGF-β1 was interfered in DN, the expressions of MCP-1 and CTGF were relatively down-regulated, which would be further lowered by vitamin D administration. The mRNA expression of VDR was elevated by vitamin D treatment in these diabetic nephropathy models. Active vitamin D3 and lentivirus-mediated TGF-β1 interference could effectively reduce the renal fibrosis and protect the renal function in diabetic nephropathy rat models, which makes a promising therapeutic strategy for the disease.

  2. Protective effects of glycine during hypothermic renal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Mangino, M J; Murphy, M K; Grabau, G G; Anderson, C B

    1991-11-01

    The objective of this investigation was to test the effects of glycine, a cytoprotectant in normothermic in vitro models of renal ischemia, in a model of hypothermic renal preservation injury. This study also probes possible physiological mechanisms of glycine protection during renal hypothermic ischemia-reperfusion injury. Canine kidneys were subjected to 48 h of hypothermic ischemia (4 degrees C) after intravascular flush with cold conventional Collins solution (G. H. Collins, M. B. Bravo-Shugarman, and P. I. Terasaki, Lancet 2: 1219-1223, 1969) and were subsequently revascularized for 1 h. After 1 h of reperfusion, glomerular filtration rate, urine production, and electrolyte excretion were dramatically higher when the Collins flush contained 5 mM glycine, compared with the 0 mM glycine controls. Renal tissue adenine nucleotides and glutathione levels progressively declined with graded cold ischemia times, and glycine had no effect on these levels. However, renal tissue ATP levels (but not glutathione) were significantly higher when kidneys were flushed with glycine, stored for 48 h, and reoxygenated in vitro for 1 h at 37 degrees C, compared with kidneys flushed without glycine. Analysis of CoA esters from ischemic renal tissue indicated altered production of only butyryl CoA after 48 and 72 h of cold ischemia, but no differences were detected in glycine or control kidneys. In conclusion, this study reports dramatic functional preservation with glycine in kidneys subjected to hypothermic ischemia and in vivo reperfusion. The mechanisms of these effects appear not to be attributable to the maintenance of cellular adenine nucleotide or glutathione levels nor to the scavenging of accumulated amphipathic acyl CoA esters.

  3. Renal Protective Effect of Probucol in Rats with Contrast-Induced Nephropathy and its Underlying Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Na; Wei, Ri-bao; Li, Qing-ping; Yang, Xi; Li, Ping; Huang, Meng-jie; Wang, Rui; Cai, Guang-yan; Chen, Xiang-mei

    2015-01-01

    Background Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) refers to acute renal damage that occurs after the use of contrast agents. This study investigated the renal protective effect of probucol in a rat model of contrast-induced nephropathy and the mechanism of its effect. Material/Methods Twenty-eight Wistar rats were randomly divided into the control group, model group, N-acetylcysteine(NAC) group, and probucol group. We used a rat model of iopromide-induced CIN. One day prior to modeling, the rats received gavage. At 24 h after the modeling, blood biochemistry and urine protein were assessed. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured in renal tissue. Kidney sections were created for histopathological examination. Results The model group of rats showed significantly elevated levels of blood creatinine, urea nitrogen, 24-h urine protein, histopathological scores, and parameters of oxidative stress (P<0.05). Both the NAC and probucol groups demonstrated significantly lower Scr, BUN, and urine protein levels compared to the model group (P<0.05), with no significant difference between these 2 groups. The NAC group and the probucol group had significantly lower MDA and higher SOD than the model group at 24 h after modeling (P<0.05). The 8-OHdG-positive tubule of the probucol group and NAC group were significantly lower than those of the model group (p=0.046, P=0.0008), with significant difference between these 2 groups (P=0.024). Conclusions Probucol can effectively reduce kidney damage caused by contrast agent. The underlying mechanism may be that probucol accelerates the recovery of renal function and renal pathology by reducing local renal oxidative stress. PMID:26408630

  4. Effect of captopril on renal hemodynamics and renal prostaglandins in early type II diabetic patients with normo-or microalbuminuria.

    PubMed

    Xiao, X; Gan, P; Yu, M; Li, J; Han, Q

    1996-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of captopril (CPT) on glomerular filtration rate (GFR), effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), filtration fraction (FF), urinary albumin excretion (UAE) and daily urinary excretion of thromboxane B2 (TXB2) and 6-keto- prostaglandin F1a (6-keto-PGF1a) in 29 normotensive non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM) patients without clinically discernible nephropathy. Before treatment, urinary excretion 6-keto-PGF1a was significantly increased (P < 0.05) in 29 NIDDM patients compared with 25 health subjects matched for age and sex. The values of GFR and FF were significantly higher (P < 0.01 and P < 0.005, respectively) in NIDDM than in normal volunters, whereas ERPF was comparable in both groups. Meanwhile we observed that UAE of early NIDDM was increased before treatment. After CPT treatment, GFR, FF, UAE and urinary excretion of 6-keto-PGF1a were significantly reduce (all P < 0.005) compared with those of NIDDM before treatment. These data indicated that CPT is effective in lowering glomerular filtration pressure and ameliorating microalbuminuria in the normotensive early NIDDM.

  5. Protective Effects of Berberine on Renal Injury in Streptozotocin (STZ)-Induced Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiuli; He, Hui; Liang, Dan; Jiang, Yan; Liang, Wei; Chi, Zhi-Hong; Ma, Jianfei

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a serious diabetic complication with renal hypertrophy and expansion of extracellular matrices in renal fibrosis. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of renal tubular epithelial cells may be involved in the main mechanism. Berberine (BBR) has been shown to have antifibrotic effects in liver, kidney and lung. However, the mechanism of cytoprotective effects of BBR in DN is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the curative effects of BBR on tubulointerstitial fibrosis in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice and the high glucose (HG)-induced EMT in NRK 52E cells. We found that BBR treatment attenuated renal fibrosis by activating the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling pathway in the diabetic kidneys. Further revealed that BBR abrogated HG-induced EMT and oxidative stress in relation not only with the activation of Nrf2 and two Nrf2-targeted antioxidative genes (NQO-1 and HO-1), but also with the suppressing the activation of TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway. Importantly, knockdown Nrf2 with siRNA not only abolished the BBR-induced expression of HO-1 and NQO-1 but also removed the inhibitory effect of BBR on HG-induced activation of TGF-β/Smad signaling as well as the anti-fibrosis effects. The data from present study suggest that BBR can ameliorate tubulointerstitial fibrosis in DN by activating Nrf2 pathway and inhibiting TGF-β/Smad/EMT signaling activity. PMID:27529235

  6. Evaluation of patient effective doses in CT urography, intravenous urography and renal scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Hamza, Y; Sulieman, A; Abuderman, A; Alzimami, K; Omer, H

    2015-07-01

    Imaging of the renal system is performed with different techniques depending mainly on clinical symptoms and signs. This study intended to evaluate patient effective doses undergoing renal scintigraphy (technetium-99m-diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid), computed tomography urography (CTU) and intravenous urography (IVU). A total of 60 patients were evaluated using Orbiter 37 Gamma camera single head, dual-slice CT scanner and conventional X-ray machine with computed radiography (CR) processing unit. Patients effective dose were estimated using the administered activity, DosCal software and dose length product value for renal scan, IVU and CTU procedures, respectively. Patients' effective doses during renal scan, CTU and IVU procedures were 0.78 ± 0.18, 2.53 ± 0.94 and 1.81 ± 0.20 mSv, in that order. Patients were exposed to a higher effective dose during CTU compared with other two procedures. Patient doses depend on the size of patient, the type of scanner and the imaging protocol used. Effective doses considered low compared with previous studies.

  7. Effect of cycloheximide on skin and renal radiation tolerance in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Weissberg, J.B.; Moulder, J.E.; Fischer, J.J.; Parcells, V.

    1983-10-01

    The effect of cycloheximide (CHM) on skin and renal radiation tolerance in the rat has been studied. When administered 24 hr prior to a range of single radiation doses to the hind limbs, the drug protected against skin damage. When administered at intervals of 45 min to 100 hr prior to single-dose irradiation of the kidneys, no protection against renal injury, as manifested by blood pressure, urine creatinine level, and lethality, was observed. CHM-induced alteration in the cell cycle may confer radioprotection to a rapidly proliferating cell renewal system such as the skin and exert no radioprotective action in slowly proliferative tissue such as kidney.

  8. Endotoxemia and the effects of dopamine on renal functions of neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Chin, Anthony; O'Conner, Linh Nguyen; Radhakrishnan, Jayant; Fornell, Linda; John, Eunice

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we observed the effects of moderate and high doses of dopamine on the renal functions of neonatal piglets during endotoxic shock. We found that fluid therapy alone was better at maintaining cardiac index and preventing elevation of systemic vascular resistance, than dopamine at 10 and at 20 microg/kg/min. Furthermore, urine output and glomerular filtration rate were reduced by dopamine. Following endotoxin administration dopamine decreased SVR and maintained a CI better than fluid alone. However, in spite of a better CI, greater deterioration in renal functions occurred in the dopamine groups as compared to the fluid group.

  9. Renal colic in adults: NSAIDs and morphine are effective for pain relief.

    PubMed

    2009-10-01

    (1) Renal colic is an acute syndrome involving unilateral flank pain, linked to an obstruction in the upper urinary tract. The pain is often intense. After having considered other diagnoses and checked for signs of complication (fever, oligoanuria), the first step is to control the pain; (2) Which non-invasive treatments have a positive risk-benefit balance in relieving this type of pain? To answer this question, we reviewed the available evidence, based on the standard Prescrire methodology; (3) According to a meta-analysis of 20 trials, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and strong opioid analgesics have comparable efficacy. The most widely studied NSAID is diclofenac, given intramuscularly at a dose of 50 mg or 75 mg. Pethidine is the best-assessed strong opioid, given intramuscularly at a dose of 50 mg to 100 mg, which corresponds to about 5 mg to 10 mg of morphine. Morphine is given intravenously; subcutaneous administration is an alternative although it has not been evaluated in renal colic; (4) In clinical trials, NSAIDs were associated with fewer adverse effects than opioids, which cause vomiting in about 20% of patients (versus about 6% with an NSAID); (5) NSAIDs expose patients to a risk of functional renal impairment, especially in patients with heart failure, renal artery stenosis, dehydration, renal impairment or ongoing treatment with a nephrotoxic drug, and the very elderly. NSAIDs should never be used during pregnancy; (6) According to one trial in 130 patients, the analgesic effect of the morphine and NSAID combination was greater than either agent used alone, in about 10% of patients; (7) Paracetamol has not been evaluated in comparative trials of renal colic, even for moderate pain; (8) Scopolamine is the only antispasmodic to have been evaluated in a comparative trial. Adding scopolamine to morphine did not seem to provide additional efficacy; (9) Other drugs, which have not been adequately tested as of early 2009, have no documented

  10. Effects of taurine and housing density on renal function in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zi-Li; Gao, Yang; Ma, Hai-Tian; Zheng, Liu-Hai; Dai, Bin; Miao, Jin-Feng; Zhang, Yuan-Shu

    This study investigated the putative protective effects of supplemental 2-aminoethane sulfonic acid (taurine) and reduced housing density on renal function in laying hens. We randomly assigned fifteen thousand green-shell laying hens into three groups: a free range group, a low-density caged group, and a high-density caged group. Each group was further divided equally into a control group (C) and a taurine treatment group (T). After 15 d, we analyzed histological changes in kidney cells, inflammatory mediator levels, oxidation and anti-oxidation levels. Experimental data revealed taurine supplementation, and rearing free range or in low-density housing can lessen morphological renal damage, inflammatory mediator levels, and oxidation levels and increase anti-oxidation levels. Our data demonstrate that taurine supplementation and a reduction in housing density can ameliorate renal impairment, increase productivity, enhance health, and promote welfare in laying hens.

  11. Effects of taurine and housing density on renal function in laying hens*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zi-li; Gao, Yang; Ma, Hai-tian; Zheng, Liu-hai; Dai, Bin; Miao, Jin-feng; Zhang, Yuan-shu

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the putative protective effects of supplemental 2-aminoethane sulfonic acid (taurine) and reduced housing density on renal function in laying hens. We randomly assigned fifteen thousand green-shell laying hens into three groups: a free range group, a low-density caged group, and a high-density caged group. Each group was further divided equally into a control group (C) and a taurine treatment group (T). After 15 d, we analyzed histological changes in kidney cells, inflammatory mediator levels, oxidation and anti-oxidation levels. Experimental data revealed taurine supplementation, and rearing free range or in low-density housing can lessen morphological renal damage, inflammatory mediator levels, and oxidation levels and increase anti-oxidation levels. Our data demonstrate that taurine supplementation and a reduction in housing density can ameliorate renal impairment, increase productivity, enhance health, and promote welfare in laying hens. PMID:27921400

  12. Effects of a stable prostacyclin analog on experimental ischemic acute renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Tobimatsu, M; Ueda, Y; Saito, S; Tsumagari, T; Konomi, K

    1988-01-01

    The effect of OP-41483, a stable prostacyclin (PGI2) analog, on ischemic acute renal failure (ARF) was investigated in dogs. Administration of OP-41483 for three days after ischemia significantly increased renal cortical blood flow (RCBF) when compared with dogs treated with the saline vehicle. In the OP-41483-treated group, serum creatinine levels remained relatively low during postoperative days 1-3 and mean survival time was prolonged. Injection of a silicone rubber vascular casting compound (Microfil) revealed increased numbers of visible renal cortical glomeruli and microvessels compared to the saline vehicle group. Histologic sections showed only very limited tubular necrosis, whereas sections of kidneys treated with saline showed extensive tubular necrosis. In conclusion, this stable prostacyclin analog provided a significant degree of protection for the kidneys from ischemic injury and may be useful in a clinical setting. Images Figs. 3A-D. Figs. 4A-D. PMID:3291800

  13. Effects of positive acceleration /+Gz/ on renal function and plasma renin in normal man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, M.; Shubrooks, S. J., Jr.; Fishman, L. M.; Duncan, D. C.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of positive radial centrifugation (+Gz) on plasma resin activity (PRA) and renal function were assessed in 15 normal male subjects under carefully controlled conditions of Na, K, and water intake. Twenty minutes of +2.0 Gz resulted in significant decreases in the mean rate of sodium excretion and creatine clearance and in a doubling of PRA in seven sodium-depleted subjects (10 meq Na intake). In eight sodium-replete subjects (200 mq Na intake), 30 min of +2.0 Gz was also associated with a decrease in the mean rate of sodium excretion. As a consequence of a concurrent decrease in creatine clearance, the fractional excretion of sodium during centrifugation did not differ from control, suggesting that the changes in Na excretion were mediated primarily by renal hemodynamic factors, although enhanced renal tubular sodium reabsorption may also have played a role.

  14. Case report demonstrating effectiveness of sorafenib in multiple lung and bone metastases of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    HOSHI, MANABU; OEBISU, NAOTO; TAKADA, JUN; IWAI, TDASHI; NAKAMURA, HIROAKI

    2015-01-01

    The current study presents the case of a 59-year-old male with advanced-stage renal cell carcinoma and bone metastases in the proximal femur and ilium (cT3aN3M1; stage IV). Resection of the primary renal cell cancer and palliative surgery with a γ-nail for an impending fracture of the right proximal femur were performed, followed by radiotherapy. Sorafenib, a multi-kinase inhibitor that blocks the raf and tyrosine kinases of the vascular endothelial and platelet-derived growth factor receptors, was administered for 9 months, resulting in a marked improvement in the metastatic ilium and a reduction in the extent of the lung metastases. The patient suffered minor adverse effects, including a skin rash and mild diarrhea, but remained alive at the time of follow-up at 36 months post-surgery. Sorafenib demonstrated efficacy against the bone metastasis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PMID:25663922

  15. Effects of positive acceleration /+Gz/ on renal function and plasma renin in normal man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, M.; Shubrooks, S. J., Jr.; Fishman, L. M.; Duncan, D. C.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of positive radial centrifugation (+Gz) on plasma resin activity (PRA) and renal function were assessed in 15 normal male subjects under carefully controlled conditions of Na, K, and water intake. Twenty minutes of +2.0 Gz resulted in significant decreases in the mean rate of sodium excretion and creatine clearance and in a doubling of PRA in seven sodium-depleted subjects (10 meq Na intake). In eight sodium-replete subjects (200 mq Na intake), 30 min of +2.0 Gz was also associated with a decrease in the mean rate of sodium excretion. As a consequence of a concurrent decrease in creatine clearance, the fractional excretion of sodium during centrifugation did not differ from control, suggesting that the changes in Na excretion were mediated primarily by renal hemodynamic factors, although enhanced renal tubular sodium reabsorption may also have played a role.

  16. Antioxidant effect of carnosine treatment on renal oxidative stress in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Yay, A; Akkuş, D; Yapıslar, H; Balcıoglu, E; Sonmez, M F; Ozdamar, S

    2014-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a significant role in the development of diabetic nephropathy. We investigated the effects of an antioxidant, carnosine, on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced renal injury in diabetic rats. We used four groups of eight rats: group 1, control; group 2, carnosine treated; group 3, untreated diabetic; group 4, carnosine treated diabetic. Kidneys were removed and processed, and sections were stained with periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) and subjected to eNOS immunohistochemistry. Examination by light microscopy revealed degenerated glomeruli, thickened basement membrane and glycogen accumulation in the tubules of diabetic kidneys. Carnosine treatment prevented the renal morphological damage caused by diabetes. Moreover, administration of carnosine decreased somewhat the oxidative damage of diabetic nephropathy. Appropriate doses of carnosine might be a useful therapeutic option to reduce oxidative stress and associated renal injury in diabetes mellitus.

  17. The reflex effects of changes in carotid sinus pressure upon renal function in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Karim, F; Poucher, S M; Summerill, R A

    1984-01-01

    In chloralose-anaesthetized and artificially ventilated dogs, the carotid sinuses were vascularly isolated and perfused with arterial blood. Mean aortic pressure was held constant at 100 +/- 2 mmHg (mean +/- S.E. of mean, n = 19) by means of a pressure bottle connected to the aorta. Both vagus nerves were sectioned in the neck and propranolol hydrochloride (0.5 mg kg-1) was administered every 30 min. The left renal blood flow was measured by an electromagnetic flowmeter (wrap-round probe), glomerular filtration rate by creatinine clearance and urinary sodium by flame photometry. Decreasing pressure in the isolated carotid sinuses from 186 +/- 10 to 63 +/- 5 mmHg resulted in significant decreases in renal blood flow from 281 +/- 35 to 177 +/- 30 ml min-1 100 g-1 renal mass; glomerular filtration rate from 40.0 +/- 7.8 to 12.3 +/- 4.4 ml min-1 100 g-1; urine flow from 0.31 +/- 0.05 to 0.12 +/- 0.03 ml min-1 100 g-1 and sodium excretion from 21.7 +/- 7.2 to 8.2 +/- 3.0 mumol min-1 100 g-1. Increasing carotid sinus pressure back to 188 +/- 11 mmHg resulted in increases in all the variables to values not significantly different from their initial values. Tying renal sympathetic nerves at low carotid sinus pressure (73 +/- 11 mmHg) caused an increase in all of the variables. After denervation there was no response to changes in carotid sinus pressure. These results show that changes in carotid sinus pressure can result in significant reflex effects on renal function and that these effects are mediated by renal sympathetic nerves. PMID:6492002

  18. Protective Effects of the Segmental Renal Artery Clamping Technique on Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in db/db Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chao; Zhu, Jundong; Miao, Chenkui; Wang, Shangqian; Zhang, Lei; Li, Pu

    2017-01-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury is inevitable in partial nephrectomy and other kidney surgeries, with a higher incidence in patients with renal insufficiency. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of precise segmental renal artery clamping (SRAC) against renal I/R injury in db/db diabetic mice, compared with conventional renal artery clamping (RAC). Grape seed extract, a powerful free radical scavenger, was administered to diabetic mice for 4 weeks before operation in subgroups (30 mg/kg/d). The unilateral renal pedicle was ligatured, and I/R injury to the contralateral kidney was induced (ischemia for 30 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h). Blood glucose value, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, and urine microalbumin/urine creatinine ratio increased gradually and showed no preoperative statistical differences among six subgroups. These parameters were significantly lower in the SRAC than in the RAC group 24 h postoperatively. Moreover, the nonischemic area in the SRAC group expressed less KIM-1 and TNF-α mRNA and also revealed minor histopathological damage induced by I/R. These findings suggest that SRAC effectively reduces early renal injury induced by I/R and accelerates the recovery of renal function in diabetic mice. Thus, SRAC may be an ideal technique in partial nephrectomy, especially for patients with diabetic nephropathy and other renal insufficiencies. PMID:28299325

  19. Effect of chaetocin on renal cell carcinoma cells and cytokine-induced killer cells.

    PubMed

    Rombo, Roman; Weiher, Hans; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G H

    2016-01-01

    We examined the cytotoxic effects of chaetocin on clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) cells and the possibility to combine the effects of chaetocin with the effects of cytokine-induced killer cells (CIK) assayed by MTT assay and FACS analysis. Chaetocin is a thiodioxopiperazine produced by fungi belonging to the chaetomiaceae family. In 2007, it was first reported that chaetocin shows potent and selective ex vivo anti-cancer activity by inducing reactive oxygen species. CIK cells are generated from CD3+/CD56- T lymphocytes with double negative CD4-/CD8- phenotype that are isolated from human blood. The addition of distinct interleukins and antibodies results in the generation of CIK cells that are able to specifically target and destroy renal carcinoma cells. The results of this research state that the anti-ccRCC activity of chaetocin is weak and does not show a high grade of selectivity on clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells. Although the CIK cells show a high grade of selective anti-ccRCC activity, this effect could not be improved by the addition of chaetocin. So chaetocin seems to be no suitable agent for specific targeting ccRCC cells or for the combination therapy with CIK cells in renal cancer.

  20. Systemic and renal effects of an ETA receptor subtype-specific antagonist in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Schmetterer, Leopold; Dallinger, Susanne; Bobr, Barbara; Selenko, Nicole; Eichler, Hans-Georg; Wolzt, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Endothelins (ETs) might play a pathophysiological role in a variety of vascular diseases. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of BQ-123, a specific ETA receptor antagonist on systemic and renal haemodynamics in healthy subjects. This was done at baseline and during infusion of exogenous ET-1.The study was performed in a balanced, randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind 4 way cross-over design in 10 healthy male subjects. Subjects received co-infusions of ET-1 (2.5 ng kg−1 min−1 for 120 min) or placebo and BQ-123 (15 μg min−1 for 60 min and subsequently 60 μg min−1 for 60 min) or placebo. Renal plasma flow (RPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were assessed by the para-aminohippurate (PAH) and the inulin plasma clearance method, respectively.BQ-123 alone had no renal or systemic haemodynamic effect. ET-1 significantly reduced RPF (−24%, P<0.001) and GFR (−12%, P=0.034). These effects were abolished by co-infusion of either dose of BQ-123 (RPF: P=0.0012; GFR: P=0.020).BQ-123 reversed the renal haemodynamic effects induced by exogenous ET-1 in vivo. This indicates that vasoconstriction in the kidney provoked by ET-1 is predominantly mediated by the ETA receptor subtype. PMID:9692778

  1. Protective effects of low-dose carbon monoxide against renal fibrosis induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Lee, Ji-Yang Sophie; Kwak, Joon Hyeok; He, Yanjuan; Kim, Sung Il; Choi, Mary E

    2008-03-01

    Tubulointerstitial fibrosis is a hallmark of chronic progressive kidney disease leading to end-stage renal failure. An endogenous product of heme oxygenase activity, carbon monoxide (CO), has been shown to exert cytoprotection against tissue injury. Here, we explored the effects of exogenous administration of low-dose CO in an in vivo model of renal fibrosis induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) and examined whether CO can protect against kidney injury. UUO in mice leads to increased extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition and tubulointerstitial fibrosis within 4 to 7 days. Kidneys of mice exposed to low-dose CO, however, had markedly reduced ECM deposition after UUO. Moreover, low-dose CO treatment inhibited the induction of alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) and major ECM proteins, type 1 collagen and fibronectin, in kidneys after UUO. In contrast, these anti-fibrotic effects of CO treatment were abrogated in mice carrying null mutation of Mkk3, suggesting involvement of the MKK3 signaling pathway in mediating the CO effects. Additionally, in vitro CO exposure markedly inhibited TGF-beta(1)-induced expression of alpha-SMA, collagen, and fibronectin in renal proximal tubular epithelial cells. Our findings suggest that low-dose CO exerts protective effects, via the MKK3 pathway, to inhibit development of renal fibrosis in obstructive nephropathy.

  2. Effect of chaetocin on renal cell carcinoma cells and cytokine-induced killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Rombo, Roman; Weiher, Hans; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G.H.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the cytotoxic effects of chaetocin on clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) cells and the possibility to combine the effects of chaetocin with the effects of cytokine-induced killer cells (CIK) assayed by MTT assay and FACS analysis. Chaetocin is a thiodioxopiperazine produced by fungi belonging to the chaetomiaceae family. In 2007, it was first reported that chaetocin shows potent and selective ex vivo anti-cancer activity by inducing reactive oxygen species. CIK cells are generated from CD3+/CD56- T lymphocytes with double negative CD4-/CD8- phenotype that are isolated from human blood. The addition of distinct interleukins and antibodies results in the generation of CIK cells that are able to specifically target and destroy renal carcinoma cells. The results of this research state that the anti-ccRCC activity of chaetocin is weak and does not show a high grade of selectivity on clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells. Although the CIK cells show a high grade of selective anti-ccRCC activity, this effect could not be improved by the addition of chaetocin. So chaetocin seems to be no suitable agent for specific targeting ccRCC cells or for the combination therapy with CIK cells in renal cancer. PMID:27141211

  3. The effect of thymoquinone on the renal functions following ischemia-reperfusion injury in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Hammad, Fayez T; Lubbad, Loay

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of thymoquinone, an antioxidant phytochemical compound found in the plant Nigella sativa, on the alterations in renal functional parameters following warm renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) in the rat. Methods: Wistar rats underwent left renal ischemia for 35 minutes. Group-TQ (n=15) received thymoquinone 10 mg/kg/day (dissolved in a vehicle (corn oil) orally by gavage starting 4 days prior to IRI and continued 6 days thereafter when the hemodynamic and tubular renal functions of the right and left kidneys were measured using clearance techniques. Group-Vx (n=15) underwent similar protocol but received only the vehicle. Results: IRI affected all hemodynamic and tubular parameters in the affected kidney. Thymoquinone attenuated the IRI-related alteration in renal functions so when the left ischemic kidney in Group-TQ and Group-Vx were compared, the left RBF and GFR were significantly higher in Group-TQ (2.02±0.39 vs. 1.27±0.21, P=0.04 and 0.33±0.08 vs. 0.18±0.03, P=0.03, respectively). Thymoquinone also improved left renal FENa (1.59±0.28 vs. 2.40±0.35, P=0.04). In addition, it decreased the gene expressions of KIM-1, NGAL, TNF-α, TGF-β1 and PAI-1 (143±20 vs. 358±49, 16±3 vs. 34±6, (1.1±0.2 vs. 2.8±0.4, 1.6±0.1 vs. 2.8±0.1, and 2.4±0.3 vs. 5.8±1.0, P<0.05 for all). Conclusion: Thymoquinone ameliorated the IRI effect on the hemodynamic and tubular renal functional parameters as well as the expression of some kidney injury markers and pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic cytokines indicating a renoprotective effect of this agent on the IRI-induced renal dysfunction with potential clinical implications. PMID:28078054

  4. Mode of Action: Oxalate Crystal-Induced Renal Tubule Degeneration and Glycolic Acid-Induced Dysmorphogenesis—Renal and Developmental Effects of Ethylene Glycol

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Rick A.; Meek, M E.; Carney, E W.

    2005-10-01

    Ethylene glycol can cause both renal and developmental toxicity, with metabolism playing a key role in the mode of action (MOA) for each form of toxicity. Renal toxicity is ascribed to the terminal metabolite oxalic acid, which precipitates in the kidney in the form of calcium oxalate crystals and is believed to cause physical damage to the renal tubules. The human relevance of the renal toxicity of ethylene glycol is indicated by the similarity between animals and humans of metabolic pathways, the observation of renal oxalate crystals in toxicity studies in experimental animals and human poisonings, and cases of human kidney and bladder stones related to dietary oxalates and oxalate precursors. High-dose gavage exposures to ethylene glycol also cause axial skeletal defects in rodents (but not rabbits), with the intermediary metabolite, glycolic acid, identified as the causative agent. However, the mechanism by which glycolic acid perturbs development has not been investigated sufficiently to develop a plausible hypothesis of mode of action, nor have any cases of ethylene glycol-induced developmental effects been reported in humans. Given this, and the variations in sensitivity between animal species in response, the relevance to humans of ethylene glycol-induced developmental toxicity in animals is unknown at this time.

  5. Effects of tenoxicam on renal function and the disposition of inulin and p-aminohippurate in healthy volunteers and patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Freestone, S; McAuslane, J A; Prescott, L F

    1991-01-01

    1. The effects of tenoxicam on renal function were studied in 10 patients with chronic renal failure (creatinine clearance 46.7 +/- 11.9 ml min-1 1.73 m-2) and eight healthy volunteers. A parallel treatment control group of eight healthy volunteers received placebo. Tenoxicam was given orally in a dose of 40 mg daily for 2 days followed by 20 mg daily for a further 8 days. Renal function was assessed by measurement of the renal clearances of inulin and p-aminohippurate (PAH) using the single injection technique before and during administration of tenoxicam. 2. In the healthy volunteers there were no changes in glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow, or the urinary excretion of N-acetylglucosaminidase and beta 2-microglobulin on the 3rd and 10th days of treatment with tenoxicam. The mean urinary excretion of prostaglandins E2 and 6-keto F1 alpha decreased during treatment but there was great individual variation and the differences were not statistically significant. Tenoxicam had no effect on the half-life, clearance, volume of distribution or urinary recovery of inulin and PAH. 3. There was no significant change in the clearance of inulin and creatinine after treatment with tenoxicam for 10 days in the patients with chronic renal failure. However, in this group there was a significant increase in plasma creatinine on the 3rd and 6th days with a return to pretreatment levels by the 10th day. The administration of tenoxicam for 10 days was associated with a small but significant increase in the plasma half-life and volume of distribution of inulin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1958445

  6. Human effects on estuarine shoreline decadal evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rilo, A.; Freire, P.; Ceia, R.; Mendes, R. N.; Catalão, J.; Taborda, R.

    2012-04-01

    Due to their sheltered conditions and natural resources, estuaries were always attractive to human activities (industrial, agriculture, residential and recreation). Consequently, the complex interactions between anthropogenic and natural drivers increase estuarine shoreline vulnerability to climate changes impacts. The environmental sustainability of these systems depends on a fragile balance between societal development and natural values that can be further disturbed by climate change effects. This challenging task for scientific community, managers and stakeholders can only be accomplished with interdisplinary approaches. In this context, it seems clear that estuarine management plans should incorporate the concept of change into the planning of policy decisions since these natural dynamic areas are often under human pressure and are recognized as sensitive to climate change effects. Therefore, the knowledge about historical evolution of estuarine shoreline is important to provide new insights on the spatial and temporal dimensions of estuarine change. This paper aims to present and discuss shoreline changes due to human intervention in Tagus estuary, located on the west coast of Portugal. Detailed margins cartography, in a 550m fringe (drawn inland from the highest astronomical tide line), was performed based on 2007 orthophotos (spatial resolution of 0.5 m) analysis. Several classification categories were considered, as urbanized areas, industrial, port and airport facilities, agriculture spaces, green areas and natural zones. The estuarine bed (area bellow the highest astronomical tide line) was also mapped (including human occupation, natural habitats, morpho-sedimentary units) based on the geographic information above and LANSAT 7 TM+ images using image processing techniques. Aerial photographs dated from 1944, 1946, 1948, 1955 and 1958 were analyzed for a set of pilot zones in order to fully understand the decadal shoreline change. Estuarine bed presents

  7. The renal effects of SGLT2 inhibitors and a mini-review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Andrianesis, Vasileios; Glykofridi, Spyridoula; Doupis, John

    2016-01-01

    Sodium-glucose linked transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a new and promising class of antidiabetic agents which target renal tubular glucose reabsorption. Their action is based on the blockage of SGLT2 sodium-glucose cotransporters that are located at the luminal membrane of tubular cells of the proximal convoluted tubule, inducing glucosuria. It has been proven that they significantly reduce glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), along with fasting and postprandial plasma glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The glucosuria-induced caloric loss as well as the osmotic diuresis significantly decrease body weight and blood pressure, respectively. Given that SGLT2 inhibitors do not interfere with insulin action and secretion, their efficacy is sustained despite the progressive β-cell failure in T2DM. They are well tolerated, with a low risk of hypoglycemia. Their most frequent adverse events are minor: genital and urinal tract infections. Recently, it was demonstrated that empagliflozin presents a significant cardioprotective effect. Although the SGLT2 inhibitors’ efficacy is affected by renal function, new data have been presented that some SGLT2 inhibitors, even in mild and moderate renal impairment, induce significant HbA1c reduction. Moreover, recent data indicate that SGLT2 inhibition has a beneficial renoprotective effect. The role of this review paper is to explore the current evidence on the renal effects of SGLT2 inhibitors. PMID:28203358

  8. Impaired tubular excretory function as a late renal side effect of chemotherapy in children.

    PubMed

    Kakihara, Toshio; Imai, Chihaya; Hotta, Hiromitsu; Ikarashi, Yukie; Tanaka, Atsushi; Uchiyama, Makoto

    2003-03-01

    Renal drug excretion is variously influenced by nephrotoxic drugs. This study was designed to evaluate renal function as a late renal side effects in children receiving combination chemotherapy for malignancy. Follow-up studies of 30 newly diagnosed patients were performed a median of 12 months after completion of chemotherapy. The glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was measured using sodium thiosulfate. The following were also assessed: urinary high-molecular-weight fraction (urinary albumin/urinary creatinine ratio); para-aminohippurate (PAH) clearance; urinary low-molecular-weight fraction (urinary beta2-microglobulin/urinary creatinine ratio); and routine serum and urinary parameters. Serum and urinary electrolytes were normal in most patients. GFR was low in four patients (13%). Urinary high-molecular-weight fraction was elevated in two patients. Urinary low-molecular-weight fraction was elevated in one patient. PAH clearance was below the referenced normal value in 73% of the patients. This report demonstrates decreased PAH clearance as a late renal side effect of chemotherapy and suggests disturbed function of the organic anion transport system. The unexpected high serum concentration of drugs excreted through the organic anion transport system may induce severe side effects. Elucidation of the mechanism and clinical relevance of decreased PAH clearance is warranted.

  9. Serum metabonomic analysis of protective effects of Curcuma aromatica oil on renal fibrosis rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liangcai; Zhang, Haiyan; Yang, Yunjun; Zheng, Yongquan; Dong, Minjian; Wang, Yaqiang; Bai, Guanghui; Ye, Xinjian; Yan, Zhihan; Gao, Hongchang

    2014-01-01

    Curcuma aromatica oil is a traditional herbal medicine demonstrating protective and anti-fibrosis activities in renal fibrosis patients. However, study of its mechanism of action is challenged by its multiple components and multiple targets that its active agent acts on. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomics combined with clinical chemistry and histopathology examination were performed to evaluate intervening effects of Curcuma aromatica oil on renal interstitial fibrosis rats induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction. The metabolite levels were compared based on integral values of serum 1H NMR spectra from rats on 3, 7, 14, and 28 days after the medicine administration. Time trajectory analysis demonstrated that metabolic profiles of the agent-treated rats were restored to control levels after 7 days of dosage. The results confirmed that the agent would be an effective anti-fibrosis medicine in a time-dependent manner, especially in early renal fibrosis stage. Targeted metabolite analysis showed that the medicine could lower levels of lipid, acetoacetate, glucose, phosphorylcholine/choline, trimethylamine oxide and raise levels of pyruvate, glycine in the serum of the rats. Serum clinical chemistry and kidney histopathology examination dovetailed well with the metabonomics data. The results substantiated that Curcuma aromatica oil administration can ameliorate renal fibrosis symptoms by inhibiting some metabolic pathways, including lipids metabolism, glycolysis and methylamine metabolism, which are dominating targets of the agent working in vivo. This study further strengthens the novel analytical approach for evaluating the effect of traditional herbal medicine and elucidating its molecular mechanism.

  10. The renal effects of SGLT2 inhibitors and a mini-review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Andrianesis, Vasileios; Glykofridi, Spyridoula; Doupis, John

    2016-12-01

    Sodium-glucose linked transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a new and promising class of antidiabetic agents which target renal tubular glucose reabsorption. Their action is based on the blockage of SGLT2 sodium-glucose cotransporters that are located at the luminal membrane of tubular cells of the proximal convoluted tubule, inducing glucosuria. It has been proven that they significantly reduce glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), along with fasting and postprandial plasma glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The glucosuria-induced caloric loss as well as the osmotic diuresis significantly decrease body weight and blood pressure, respectively. Given that SGLT2 inhibitors do not interfere with insulin action and secretion, their efficacy is sustained despite the progressive β-cell failure in T2DM. They are well tolerated, with a low risk of hypoglycemia. Their most frequent adverse events are minor: genital and urinal tract infections. Recently, it was demonstrated that empagliflozin presents a significant cardioprotective effect. Although the SGLT2 inhibitors' efficacy is affected by renal function, new data have been presented that some SGLT2 inhibitors, even in mild and moderate renal impairment, induce significant HbA1c reduction. Moreover, recent data indicate that SGLT2 inhibition has a beneficial renoprotective effect. The role of this review paper is to explore the current evidence on the renal effects of SGLT2 inhibitors.

  11. Acute effect of calcium blocker on renal hemodynamics in diabetic spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Kaizu, K; Ling, Q Y; Uriu, K; Ikeda, M; Eto, S

    1995-01-01

    This study was done to examine the acute effect of a calcium channel blocker on renal hemodynamics in the diabetic spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Streptozotocin was used to induce diabetes, and barnidipine (B) was used as a calcium blocker. Renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were measured by a clearance method with paraaminohypurate (PAH) and inulin, respectively. Rats were divided into two groups: nondiabetic SHR, N-SHR; diabetic SHR, DM-SHR. B increased RBF in N-SHR (7.44 +/- 1.99 versus 8.50 +/- 1.97 mL/min/g.kw) while there was no change in DM-SHR. B reduced renovascular resistance (RVR) in DM-SHR and N-SHR. B increased GFR in N-SHR (1.15 +/- 0.24 versus 1.34 +/- 0.25 mL/min/g.kw), in spite of no changes in DM-SHR. B did not modify filtration fraction (FF) in both groups. These results indicate (1) in SHR, B exerts beneficial effects on hypertensive renal damage by reducing mean arterial pressure (MAP), RVR, RBF, and GFR; (2) in diabetic SHR, B is less effective in restoring renal hyperfiltration in spite of reducing RVR.

  12. Protective effect of oral L-arginine administration on gentamicin-induced renal failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Can, C; Sen, S; Boztok, N; Tuglular, I

    2000-03-03

    We investigated the effects of orally supplemented L-arginine, the substrate of nitric oxide (NO) and N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nitric oxide-synthase inhibitor in gentamicin-induced renal failure. Rats were given gentamicin (100 mg/kg/day s.c.), gentamicin and L-arginine (2 g/l, drinking water), gentamicin and L-NAME (100 mg/l, drinking water) or gentamicin plus L-arginine and L-NAME. After 8 days, the gentamicin group developed marked renal failure, characterized by a significantly decreased creatinine clearance and increased blood creatinine, fractional excretion of sodium, fractional excretion of lithium, urine gamma glutamyl transferase, systolic blood pressure and daily urine volume when compared to controls. Renal histological analysis confirmed tubular necrosis. L-arginine administration caused normalization of these parameters, whereas L-NAME led to aggravation of the failure. Concomitant administration of L-NAME and L-arginine to gentamicin-treated rats caused no significant changes when compared to the rats receiving gentamicin alone. We conclude that L-arginine supplementation has beneficial effects in gentamicin-induced renal failure in rats and that these effects are reversed by the NO-synthase inhibitor, L-NAME.

  13. Examination of the effect of changing to azilsartan from candesartan in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Ishii, T; Yasuda, M; Saito, Y; Mori, Y; Hayashi, T; Uemura, H; Nose, K; Nishioka, T

    2014-01-01

    Azilsartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), was administered to renal transplant recipients to investigate the safety and antihypertensive effect in addition to its ARB-characteristic organ-protective effect. The subjects were 20 patients (18 males, 2 females; baseline serum creatinine 2.39 ± 1.33 mg/dL) responding poorly to candesartan, who suffered albuminuria (>0.3 g/g creatinine) and hypertension (>140/90 mm Hg) following renal transplantation. Three months after candesartan was switched to azilsartan 20 mg/d, blood pressure, creatinine-corrected urinary albumin excretion, urinary L-type acid binding protein, urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguano-sine, serum creatinine, and estimated glomerular filtration rate were evaluated. Thirteen patients received cyclosporine (65.0%) and 7 received tacrolimus (35.0%). Another hypertensive (calcium antagonist) agent was combined in 7 (35.0%). Systolic blood pressure significantly decreased from 139.5 mm Hg (baseline) from 128.7 mm Hg (at 3 months), whereas no significant changes were observed for diastolic blood pressure. The percentage of patients achieving the target level of antihypertensive effect (blood pressure < 130/80 mm Hg) significantly improved from 30.0% (baseline) to 70.0% (at 3 months). No significant changes were observed in renal graft function, oxidative stress marker level, or biochemical examination findings. Sufficient antihypertensive effect was demonstrated soon after switching to azilsartan. However, no significant change was found in renal damage markers. Long-term study must be conducted to confirm the protective effect azilsartan on the transplanted kidney, as found with candesartan. The safety of azilsartan was demonstrated. If the transplanted kidney protection is demonstrated, this drug is expected to contribute to the improved long-term prognosis of renal transplant recipients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of biological sealants and adhesive treatments on matrix metalloproteinase expression during renal injury healing

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Renal injuries are relatively common in cases of abdominal trauma. Adhesives and sealants can be used to repair and preserve damaged organs. Using a rat model, this study explores the activity of different matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) during the healing of renal injuries treated by two biological adhesives (TachoSil and GelitaSpon) and a new synthetic elastic cyanoacrylate (Adhflex). Methods Renal traumatic injuries were experimentally induced in 90 male Wistar rats by a Stiefel Biopsy Punch in the anterior aspect of the left kidney. Animals were divided into five groups: 1, sham non-injured (n = 3); 2, non-treated standard punch injury (n = 6); 3, punch injury treated with TachoSil (n = 27); 4, punch injury treated with GelitaSpon (n = 27); and, 5, punch injury treated with Adhflex (n = 27). Wound healing was evaluated 2, 6, and 18 days after injury by determining the expression of MMPs, and the histopathological evolution of lesions. Findings Histologically, the wound size at 6 days post-injury was larger in Adhflex-treated samples than in the other treatments, but the scarring tissue was similar at 18 days post-injury. Only the MMPs subtypes 1, 2, 8, 9, and 13 were sufficiently expressed to be quantifiable. Both time since injury and treatment type had a significant influence on MMPs expression. Two days after injury, the expression of MMP8 and MMP9 was predominant. MMP2 expression was greater 6 days after injury. The Adhflex-treated group had a significantly higher MMPs expression than the other treatment groups at all healing stages. Conclusions All three sealant treatments induced almost similar expression of MMPs than untreated animals indicating a physiological healing process. Given that all renal trauma injuries must be considered emergencies, both biological and synthetic adhesives, such as Adhflex, should be considered as a treatment options. PMID:28494022

  15. Effect of Renal Embolization with Trisacryl and PAVc

    PubMed Central

    de Assis Barbosa, Leandro; Caldas, Jose Guilherme Mendes Pereira; Conti, Mario Luiz; Malheiros, Denise Maria Avancini Costa; Ramos, Francisco Ferreira

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Evaluate the degree of vascular occlusion, vascular recanalization, and necrosis of the vascular wall caused by polyvinyl alcohol-covered polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) particles compared to trisacryl particles after renal embolization. METHODS Seventy-nine female albino New Zealand rabbits underwent arterial catheterization of the right kidney. Thirty-three animals were embolized with trisacryl particles, thirty-one with PVAc particles, and fifteen were kept as controls. Four animals were excluded (three trisacryl and one PVAc) due to early death. Five subgroups of six animals were created. The animals in the different groups were sacrificed either 48 hours, 5 days, 10 days, 30 days, or 90 days after embolization. The control group was divided into subgroups of three animals each and kept for the same periods of time. The kidneys were dyed with hematoxylin-eosin and Masson’s trichrome and then examined using optical microscopy. RESULTS There were significant differences in the degree of vascular occlusion caused by the trisacryl and the PVAc particles between the five-day and the ten-day groups. Additional differences were noted between the five-day and 48-hour groups in regard to the amount of necrosis. For both findings, the PVAc group members showed adequate tissue reaction (ischemia and volumetric reduction) and less recanalization than those treated with trisacryl. CONCLUSION The use of PVAc as an embolization material exhibited an adequate tissue reaction (ischemia and volumetric reduction), more expressive vascular occlusion and necrosis, and less recanalization than the trisacryl material. PMID:19936185

  16. Effect of chronic accumulation of aluminum on renal function, cortical renal oxidative stress and cortical renal organic anion transport in rats.

    PubMed

    Mahieu, Stella T; Gionotti, Marisa; Millen, Néstor; Elías, María Mónica

    2003-11-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the nephrotoxicity of aluminum lactate administered for 3 months (0.57 mg/100 g bodyweight aluminum, i.p., three times per week) to male Wistar rats. Renal function was studied after 6 weeks of treatment (urine was obtained from rats in metabolic cages) and at the end of the treatment using clearance techniques. Another group of rats was used as kidneys donors at the end of treatment. The renal cortex was separated and homogenized to determine glutathione (GSH) level, glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and lipid peroxidation (LPO) level. Renal cortex slices were also used to study the p-aminohippuric acid (PAH) accumulation during steady-state conditions and the kinetics of uptake process. Clearance results, at the end of the treatment, indicated that renal functions in treated-rats were not different from those measured in control rats, although the renal concentration parameters differ when they were measured in treated rats after 24 h of food and water deprivation. Balances of water and sodium were also modified at both 1.5 and 3 months of treatment. The activity of alkaline phosphatase (AP) relative to inulin excreted in urine was significantly impaired: controls 2.2+/-0.6 IUI/mg, Al-treated 5.1+/-0.5 IU/mg, P<0.05. These data indicated that proximal tubular cells were loosing apical brush border membranes. Data obtained in cortex homogenates indicated that both GSH and GST activity were significantly decreased, and a significant increase of LPO was noted simultaneously in Al-treated rats. Renal accumulation of PAH, estimated as slice-to-medium ratio, decreased significantly in the Al-treated rats: control rats 3.06+/-0.02 ( n=12), Al-treated rats 2.26+/-0.04 ( n=12), P<0.0001. The maximal rate of uptake was also diminished in treated rats, while the apparent affinity remained unchanged. All these results indicate that aluminum accumulation in renal tissue affects cellular metabolism, promotes oxidative stress and

  17. Experimental models of acute renal failure and erythropoietin: what evidence of a direct effect?

    PubMed

    Sturiale, Alessio; Campo, Susanna; Crascì, Eleonora; Aloisi, Carmela; Buemi, Michele

    2007-01-01

    The kidney can achieve a structural and functional recovery after the damage induced by ischemia and reperfusion. This is due to the regeneration of epithelial tubular cells, the intervention of immature cells mainly localized in the medulla, and a small number of bone marrow-derived stem cells. In many instances, however, recovery is delayed or does not occur at all. The mechanisms allowing the renal cells to de-differentiate still need to be clarified in order to find a therapeutic approach that can amplify this ability and then stop the fibroid involution and the progression toward renal failure. Several authors have hypothesized a protective effect of EPO against ischemic and cytotoxic renal damage and observed that patients precociously treated with EPO showed a slower progression of renal failure. EPO has been demonstrated to have proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects in ischemia-reperfusion models in the brain and cell cultures. Moreover, EPO can mobilize stem cells and increase the plasmatic levels and the renal expression of VEGF. These effects seem to be dose-dependent and could be due to the activation of signal transduction systems, like Jak and STAT. In the presence of high doses of exogenous EPO or during the treatment with long-acting EPO-like molecules, non-specific receptors may be activated through a low-affinity link. Further investigations are needed to determine new therapeutic applications for EPO and other analogous hormones. Very long-acting molecules or molecules with cyto-protective but no erythropoietic effect may represent useful tools in the study of the molecular mechanisms underlying EPO's action and may have a rapid and safe therapeutic application.

  18. The effects of valsartan on renal glutathione peroxidase expression in alleviation of cyclosporine nephrotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Raeisi, Sina; Ghorbanihaghjo, Amir; Argani, Hassan; Dastmalchi, Siavoush; Ghasemi, Babollah; Ghazizadeh, Teimour; Rashtchizadeh, Nadereh; Mesgari Abbasi, Mehran; Bargahi, Nasrin; Nemati, Mahboob; Mota, Ali; Vatankhah, Amir Mansour

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Nephrotoxicity as a side effect caused by the immunosuppressive drug, cyclosporine-A (CsA), can be a major problem in transplant medicine. Oxidative stress may play an important role in the CsA-induced nephrotoxicity. It has been shown that the antihypertensive drug, valsartan (Val), has also renoprotective effects but, its molecular mechanism is largely unknown. In the present study, it was aimed to evaluate the Val effect in the alleviation of CsA nephrotoxicity via probable renal glutathione peroxidase (GPx) upregulation and oxidative stress decrease. Methods: Thirty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups based on CsA and/or Val administration: group A (Control, 1 mL/kg/day of olive oil as vehicle), group B (CsA, 30 mg/kg/day), group C (CsA+Val, 30+30 mg/kg/day), and group D (Val, 30 mg/kg/day). After the administration period (six weeks), renal GPx expression was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Plasma levels of GPx and 8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonyl groups (PCG) were measured by spectrophotometer. Plasma levels of urea and creatinine were measured by an autoanalyzer. Results: CsA treatment led to the decrease in renal expression and plasma levels of GPx in comparison to other study groups. Rats received CsA were detected to have significantly (p<0.05) higher plasma 8-OHdG, MDA, PCG, urea, and creatinine levels in comparison to other groups. Plasma urea and creatinine levels were negatively correlated with renal GPx expression and positively correlated with the oxidative stress markers. Conclusion:Administration of Val may result in attenuating the nephrotoxic side effect of CsA via probable renal GPx upregulation, and subsequently oxidative stress decrease. PMID:27853675

  19. Protein and calorie effects on progression of induced chronic renal failure in cats.

    PubMed

    Finco, D R; Brown, S A; Brown, C A; Crowell, W A; Sunvold, G; Cooper, T L

    1998-05-01

    To determine effects of dietary protein and calories on progression of induced chronic renal failure in cats. 28 young adult female cats. Renal mass was reduced surgically, and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was determined. Cats were alloted to 4 groups of 7 with similar mean GFR (1.52 to 1.55 ml/min/kg of body weight). Diets were formulated to provide: low protein and calorie (diet A), low protein and high calorie (diet B), high protein and low calorie (diet C), and high protein and calorie (diet D) intakes. Cats were fed their prescribed diet for 12 months, then blood and urine biochemical variables were measured, after which kidney specimens were examined microscopically. Protein intake by cats of groups C and D (9.0 g/d/kg) was substantially greater than that by cats of groups A and B (5.3 and 5.2 g/d/kg, respectively). Caloric intake by cats of groups B and D (73 and 71 calories/d/kg, respectively) was greater than that by cats of groups A and C (58 and 55 calories/d/kg, respectively). Renal glomerular lesions were mild and not affected by protein, calories or their interactions. Nonglomerular lesions, though mild, were significantly influenced by calorie intake, but not by protein or calorie-protein interactions. The GFR did not decrease in any group. Urine protein-to-creatinine ratio increased significantly in all groups after reduction of renal mass, but values from all groups remained within the reference range (0 to 0.3). Diets replete in protein were not associated with increased severity of glomerular or nonglomerular renal lesions, increased proteinuria, or decreased GFR. Diets replete in calories were not associated with increased severity of glomerular lesions, but were associated with mild increase of nonglomerular lesions. Factors other than protein and calorie intake must be considered potential causes of progression of renal failure in cats. Results raise questions about the practice of restricting quantity of protein in the diet of cats with

  20. Ischemic Postconditioning and Subanesthetic S(+)-Ketamine Infusion: Effects on Renal Function and Histology in Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Resende, Marco A. C.; Pantoja, Alberto V.; Barcellos, Bruno M.; Reis, Eduardo P.; Consolo, Thays D.; Módolo, Renata P.; Domingues, Maria A. C.; Assad, Alexandra R.; Cavalcanti, Ismar L.; Castiglia, Yara M. M.; Módolo, Norma S. P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Ischemic postconditioning (IP) in renal Ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) models improves renal function after IRI. Ketamine affords significant benefits against IRI-induced acute kidney injury (AKI). The present study investigated the effects of IP and IP associated with subanesthetic S(+)-ketamine in ischemia-reperfusion-induced AKI. Methods. Forty-one Wistar rats were randomized into four groups: CG (10), control; KG (10), S(+)-ketamine infusion; IPG (10), IP; and KIPG (11), S(+)-ketamine infusion + IP. All rats underwent right nephrectomy. IRI and IP were induced only in IPG and KIPG by left kidney arterial occlusion for 30 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h. Complete reperfusion was preceded by three cycles of 2 min of reocclusion followed by 2 min of reperfusion. Renal function was assessed by measuring serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). Tubular damage was evaluated by renal histology. Results. Creatinine and BUN were significantly increased. Severe tubular injury was only observed in the groups with IRI (IPG and KIPG), whereas no injury was observed in CG or KG. No significant differences were detected between IPG and KIPG. Conclusions. No synergic effect of the use of subanesthetic S(+)-ketamine and IP on AKI was observed in this rat model. PMID:26413552

  1. Effect of angiotensin II and captopril on renal tubular function in man.

    PubMed Central

    Düsing, R; Moritz, J; Glänzer, K; Kramer, H J

    1985-01-01

    The effects of nonpressor doses of intravenous angiotensin II and of the converting enzyme inhibitor captopril on renal excretory function were investigated in eight healthy volunteers during sustained water diuresis on a constant intake of 150 mmol sodium per day. The angiotensin II-analogue val5-angiotensin II-asp1-beta-amide was infused i.v. at an average dose of 2.6 ng kg-1 min-1 which was the highest dose without a significant effect on arterial blood pressure. This subpressor dose of angiotensin II significantly decreased urine volume, urinary excretion of sodium, chloride and phosphate and distal delivery [(CH2O + CCl)/GFR X 100] in the absence of changes in GFR or distal fractional chloride absorption [CH2O/(CH2O + CCl)]. In a second series of experiments, an oral dose of 50 mg of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril was given to the sodium replete volunteers. In this study, captopril did not affect arterial blood pressure, GFR or any of the determined parameters of renal tubular function. Our results strongly suggest that the nonpressor dose of angiotensin II induced renal retention of sodium chloride via increased absorption in the proximal tubule. Thus, they further support the concept that angiotensin II participates in the regulation of renal sodium chloride excretion by affecting proximal tubular absorptive capacity. However, in the sodium replete stage, angiotensin II is of no major importance in regulating sodium chloride excretion. PMID:3884028

  2. Tumor-promoting phorbol esters effect alkalinization of canine renal proximal tubular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mellas, J.; Hammerman, M.R.

    1986-03-01

    We have demonstrated the presence of specific receptors for tumor-promoting phorbol esters in the plasma membrane of the canine renal proximal tubular cell. These compounds affect proximal tubular metabolism in vitro. For example, we have shown that they inhibit gluconeogenesis in canine renal proximal tubular segments. Tumor-promoting phorbol esters have been shown to effect alkalinization of non-renal cells, by enhancing Na/sup +/-H/sup +/ exchange across the plasma membrane. To determine whether the actions of tumor-promoting phorbol esters in proximal tubular segments might be mediated by a similar process, we incubated suspensions of segments from dog kidney with these compounds and measured changes in intracellular pH using (/sup 14/C)-5,5-dimethoxazoladine-2-4-dione (DMO) and flow dialysis. Incubation of segments with phorbol 12,13 dibutyrate, but not inactive phorbol ester, 4 ..gamma.. phorbol, effected alkalinization of cells within the segments in a concentration-dependent manner. Alkalinization was dependent upon the presence of extracellular (Na/sup +/) > intracellular (Na/sup +/), was prevented by amiloride and was demonstrable in the presence of SITS. Our findings suggest that tumor-promoting esters stimulate the Na/sup +/-H/sup +/ exchanger known to be present in the brush border membrane of the renal proximal tubular cell. It is possible that the stimulation reflects a mechanism by which phorbol esters affect metabolic processes in these cells.

  3. Angiotensin receptors modulate the renal hemodynamic effects of nitric oxide in conscious newborn lambs

    PubMed Central

    Vinturache, Angela E.; Smith, Francine G.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to elucidate the roles of both angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors – type 1 (AT1Rs) and type 2 (AT2Rs) – separately and together in influencing hemodynamic effects of endogenously produced nitric oxide (NO) during postnatal development. In conscious, chronically instrumented lambs aged ~1 week (8 ± 1 days, N = 8) and ~6 weeks (41 ± 2 days, N = 8), systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure (SAP, DAP, MAP) and venous pressure (MVP), renal blood flow (RBF), and renal vascular resistance (RVR) were measured in response to the l‐arginine analog, l‐NAME after pretreatment with either the AT1R antagonist, ZD 7155, the AT2R antagonist, PD 123319, or both antagonists. The increase in SAP, DAP, and MAP by l‐NAME was not altered by either ATR antagonist in either age group. The increase in RBF after l‐NAME was, however, altered by both ATR antagonists in an age‐dependent manner, which was mediated predominantly through AT2Rs in newborn lambs. These findings reveal that there is an age‐dependent interaction between the renin–angiotensin (RAS) and the NO pathway in regulating renal but not systemic hemodynamics through both ATRs, whereas AT2Rs appear to be important in the renal hemodynamic effects of NO early in life. PMID:24872358

  4. [The dose-effect relationship of water fluoride levels and renal damage in children].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Ling; Xia, Tao; Yu, Yao-Yong; Sun, Xian-Zhong; Zhu, Qilong; He, Weihong; Zhang, Ming; Wang, Aiguo

    2005-05-01

    To explore the dose-effect relationship of water fluoride levels and renal damage in children and observe the difference of renal function between high-loaded fluoride people and dental fluorosis people in the same water fluoride level region. 210 children were divided into seven groups in term of drinking water fluoride levels and whether they suffered from dental fluorosis. Fluoride concentrations in urine and serum and activities of urine NAG and gamma-GT were determined. The urine and serum fluoride of high-loaded fluoride people and dental fluorosis people increased compared with control, moreover fluoride contents in urine and serum increased gradually with the increase of fluoride level in drinking water. Urine NAG and gamma-GT activities significantly increased in dental fluorosis people from area of 2.58 mg/L fluoride in drinking water and in those two groups from area of 4.51 mg/L fluoride in drinking water. Moreover, there existed an obvious dose-effect relationship between the drinking water fluoride concentration and NAG and gamma-GT activity. Over 2.0 mg/L fluoride in drinking water can cause renal damage in children, and the damage degree increases with the drinking water fluoride content. Renal damage degree is not related to whether the children suffered from dental fluorosis and mainly due to water fluoride concentration.

  5. Effective immunization against influenza in pediatric renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Edvardsson, V O; Flynn, J T; Deforest, A; Kaiser, B A; Schulman, S L; Bradley, A; Palmer, J; Polinsky, M S; Baluarte, H J

    1996-12-01

    Viral infections such as influenza are an important cause of morbidity following organ transplantation. We evaluated the immunogenicity of a commercially available influenza vaccine in pediatric renal transplant recipients in a two-phase, prospective study. In phase one, 47 transplant patients and seven control subjects with bronchopulmonary dysplasia received influenza vaccine. Sera were collected at the time of vaccination and 6 wk later. In phase two, sera from 18 transplant recipients and 47 healthy adults who had received the same vaccine were collected 6-12 months after vaccination. Antibody titers to the A/Taiwan/1/86 antigen were measured with hemagglutination inhibition assay in both phases of the study. Vaccine was well tolerated in all subjects. No vaccinated patient required hospitalization for complications of influenza infection. Vaccination did not increase the frequency of acute allograft rejection. In phase one, 43 patients (91%) and 5 controls (71%) either seroconverted (developed a fourfold or greater rise in titer), or developed post-vaccination titers > or = 1:160 (p = NS). Among the transplant recipients, non-seroconverters had a higher pre-vaccination geometric mean antibody titer (GMT) than those who seroconverted. Seroconversion developed independently of whether patients received double or triple immunosuppression. In phase two, post-vaccination GMT were similar for patients and control subjects at 11.5 and 8 months post-vaccination, respectively. In our study, influenza vaccination produced equivalent humoral immunity in transplant recipients and normal subjects. Routine influenza vaccination should be performed annually in this high-risk population.

  6. Mars mission effects on Space Station evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askins, Barbara S.; Cook, Stephen G.

    1989-01-01

    The permanently manned Space Station scheduled to be operational in low earth by the mid 1990's, will provide accommodations for science, applications, technology, and commercial users, and will develop enabling capabilities for future missions. A major aspect of the baseline Space Station design is that provisions for evolution to greater capabilities are included in the systems and subsystems designs. User requirements are the basis for conceptual evolution modes or infrastructure to support the paths. Four such modes are discussed in support of a Human to Mars mission, along with some of the near term actions protecting the future of supporting Mars missions on the Space Station. The evolution modes include crew and payload transfer, storage, checkout, assembly, maintenance, repair, and fueling.

  7. The rebirth of interest in renal tubular function.

    PubMed

    Lowenstein, Jerome; Grantham, Jared J

    2016-06-01

    The measurement of glomerular filtration rate by the clearance of inulin or creatinine has evolved over the past 50 years into an estimated value based solely on plasma creatinine concentration. We have examined some of the misconceptions and misunderstandings of the classification of renal disease and its course, which have followed this evolution. Furthermore, renal plasma flow and tubular function, which in the past were estimated by the clearance of the exogenous aryl amine, para-aminohippurate, are no longer measured. Over the past decade, studies in experimental animals with reduced nephron mass and in patients with reduced renal function have identified small gut-derived, protein-bound uremic retention solutes ("uremic toxins") that are poorly filtered but are secreted into the lumen by organic anion transporters (OATs) in the proximal renal tubule. These are not effectively removed by conventional hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. Residual renal function, urine produced in patients with advanced renal failure or undergoing dialysis treatment, may represent, at least in part, secretion of fluid and uremic toxins, such as indoxyl sulfate, mediated by proximal tubule OATs and might serve as a useful survival function. In light of this new evidence of the physiological role of proximal tubule OATs, we suggest that measurement of renal tubular function and renal plasma flow may be of considerable value in understanding and managing chronic kidney disease. Data obtained in normal subjects indicate that renal plasma flow and renal tubular function might be measured by the clearance of the endogenous aryl amine, hippurate.

  8. Effect of prostaglandin E1 on certain renal actions of parathyroid hormone

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Nama P.; DeRubertis, Frederick R.; Michelis, Michael F.; Fusco, Robert D.; Field, James B.; Davis, Bernard B.

    1972-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone increased basal adenyl cyclase activity and that increase was inhibited by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1). Tissue cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) concentrations were increased by parathyroid hormone and that increase was likewise inhibited by PGE1. Both parathyroid hormone and dibutyryl cyclic AMP increased 32P incorporation into renal cortical phospholipids. PGE1 diminished the effect of parathyroid hormone but not dibutyryl cyclic AMP to influence that parameter. PGE1 likewise modulated the effect of parathyroid hormone but not dibutyryl cyclic AMP to decrease fractional phosphate reabsorption by the renal tubule. It is suggested that PGE1 inhibits the effect of parathyroid hormone by decreasing its effect on adenyl cyclase. Such interaction may be important in modulating the intracellular action of parathyroid hormone on kidney cortex. PMID:4344730

  9. Cost-effectiveness of Management Options for Small Renal Mass: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; Chen, Yu-Wei; Leow, Jeffrey J; Levy, Alison C; Chang, Steven L; Gelpi, Francisco-Hammerschmidt

    2016-10-01

    Costs of surgery for small renal masses (SRMs) are high. This study aimed to systematically review and evaluate the cost-effectiveness analyses of management options for SRMs. Six databases were searched from inception to August 2015. Inclusion criteria were full original research, full economic evaluation of management options for SRM, and written in English. Among 776 studies screened, 6 met the inclusion criteria. Ablation was cost-effective versus nephron-sparing surgery. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy was cost-effective versus the open approach. Renal mass biopsy dominated immediate treatment in the United States, but not in Canada. According to the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards, all the studies had relatively good quality. Despite the observed evidence, future research is needed to fill in the knowledge gap. A few suggestions should be kept in mind such as conducting the cost-effectiveness analysis in a variety of countries.

  10. The Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Erythropoietin and Melatonin on Renal Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadiasl, Nasser; Banaei, Shokofeh; Alihemmati, Alireza; Baradaran, Behzad; Azimian, Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Renal ischemia reperfusion (IR) is an important cause of renal dysfunction. It contributes to the development of acute renal failure (ARF). The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of erythropoietin (EPO) and melatonin (MEL), which are known anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agents, in IR-induced renal injury in rats. Methods: Male Wistar Albino rats were unilaterally nephrectomized and subjected to 45 min of renal pedicle occlusion followed by 24 h reperfusion. MEL (10mg/kg, i.p) and EPO (5000U/kg, i.p) were administered prior to ischemia. After 24 h reperfusion, blood samples were collected for the determination of total antioxidant capacity (TAC), malondialdehyde (MDA) and serum creatinine levels. Also, renal samples were taken for Immunohistochemical evaluation of Bcl2 and TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α) expression. Results: Ischemia reperfusion increased creatinine, TAC, MDA levels and TNF-α expression, also, IR decreased Bcl2 expression. Treatment with EPO or MEL decreased creatinine, MDA levels, and increased TAC level. Also, MEL up-regulated Bcl2 expression and down-regulated TNF-α expression compared with EPO. Conclusion: Treatment with EPO and MEL had a curative effect on renal IR injury. These results may indicate that MEL protects against inflammation and apoptosis better than EPO in renal IR injury. PMID:24409409

  11. Expression and Regulatory Effects of Murine Schlafen (Slfn) Genes in Malignant Melanoma and Renal Cell Carcinoma*

    PubMed Central

    Mavrommatis, Evangelos; Arslan, Ahmet Dirim; Sassano, Antonella; Hua, Youjia; Kroczynska, Barbara; Platanias, Leonidas C.

    2013-01-01

    There is emerging evidence that the IFN-inducible family of Slfn genes and proteins play important roles in cell cycle progression and control of cellular proliferation, but the precise functional roles of different Slfn members in the regulation of tumorigenesis remain unclear. In the present study, we undertook a systematic analysis on the expression and functional relevance of different mouse Slfn genes in malignant melanoma and renal cell carcinoma cells. Our studies demonstrate that several mouse Slfn genes are up-regulated in response to IFN treatment of mouse melanoma and renal cell carcinoma cells, including Slfn1, Slfn2, Slfn4, Slfn5, and Slfn8. Our data show that Slfn2 and Slfn3 play essential roles in the control of mouse malignant melanoma cell proliferation and/or anchorage-independent growth, suggesting key and non-overlapping roles for these genes in the control of malignant melanoma tumorigenesis. In renal cell carcinoma cells, in addition to Slfn2 and Slfn3, Slfn5 also exhibits important antineoplastic effects. Altogether, our findings indicate important functions for distinct mouse Slfn genes in the control of tumorigenesis and provide evidence for differential involvement of distinct members of this gene family in controlling tumorigenesis. They also raise the potential of future therapeutic approaches involving modulation of expression of members of this family of genes in malignant melanoma and renal cell carcinoma. PMID:24089532

  12. Expression and regulatory effects of murine Schlafen (Slfn) genes in malignant melanoma and renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mavrommatis, Evangelos; Arslan, Ahmet Dirim; Sassano, Antonella; Hua, Youjia; Kroczynska, Barbara; Platanias, Leonidas C

    2013-11-15

    There is emerging evidence that the IFN-inducible family of Slfn genes and proteins play important roles in cell cycle progression and control of cellular proliferation, but the precise functional roles of different Slfn members in the regulation of tumorigenesis remain unclear. In the present study, we undertook a systematic analysis on the expression and functional relevance of different mouse Slfn genes in malignant melanoma and renal cell carcinoma cells. Our studies demonstrate that several mouse Slfn genes are up-regulated in response to IFN treatment of mouse melanoma and renal cell carcinoma cells, including Slfn1, Slfn2, Slfn4, Slfn5, and Slfn8. Our data show that Slfn2 and Slfn3 play essential roles in the control of mouse malignant melanoma cell proliferation and/or anchorage-independent growth, suggesting key and non-overlapping roles for these genes in the control of malignant melanoma tumorigenesis. In renal cell carcinoma cells, in addition to Slfn2 and Slfn3, Slfn5 also exhibits important antineoplastic effects. Altogether, our findings indicate important functions for distinct mouse Slfn genes in the control of tumorigenesis and provide evidence for differential involvement of distinct members of this gene family in controlling tumorigenesis. They also raise the potential of future therapeutic approaches involving modulation of expression of members of this family of genes in malignant melanoma and renal cell carcinoma.

  13. Protective Effect of Polydeoxyribonucleotide Against Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Jeong, E K; Jang, H J; Kim, S S; Lee, S Y; Oh, M Y; Kim, H J; Eom, D W; Ham, J Y; Han, D J

    2016-05-01

    Polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN) is an A2A receptor agonist that induces vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production during the pathological condition of low tissue perfusion. Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a major problem after renal transplantation. In the present study, we investigated whether PDRN exhibits reno-protective effects against ischemia-reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury in mice. Renal ischemia-reperfusion injury was induced in male C57BL/6 mice by bilateral renal pedicle occlusion for 30 minutes, followed by reperfusion for 48 hours. PDRN (8 mg/kg body weight intraperitoneally) was administered 30 minutes before IRI. Treatment with PDRN significantly decreased neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin levels in the urine, blood urea nitrogen level, and serum creatinine levels as well as kidney tubular injury. Western blotting showed that PDRN significantly increased the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and B-cell lymphoma protein and attenuated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and Bcl-2-associated X protein levels 48 hours after IRI. Our findings suggest that PDRN is a potential therapeutic agent for acute ischemia-induced renal damage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Role of Cell Swelling in Ischemic Renal Damage and the Protective Effect of Hypertonic Solute

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Jorge; DiBona, Donald R.; Beck, Clyde H.; Leaf, Alexander

    1972-01-01

    The failure of blood flow to return to the kidney following a transient period of ischemia has long been recognized. The cause of this “no-reflow” has been investigated in the rat after a transient period of total obstruction of the renal arteries. The vascular pattern of the kidneys as visualized with silicone rubber injection shows a diffuse patchy ischemia throughout the kidney, which persists after release of the obstructed renal artery. Electron microscopic studies of ischemic kidneys showed that all cellular elements were swollen and limiting the available vascular space. Functional studies revealed an increase in plasma urea nitrogen and creatinine after 1 hr or longer ischemic periods. The ischemia, cell swelling, “no-reflow,” and subsequent renal dysfunction occurring after obstruction to the renal arteries were corrected by the administration of hypertonic mannitol, but were unaffected by an equivalent expansion of the extracellular fluid volume either with isotonic saline or isotonic mannitol, showing that the osmotic effect was primary. The hypothesis is presented that ischemic swelling of cells may occlude small blood vessels so that recirculation does not resume even after the initial cause of the ischemia is no longer present; solutes which do not penetrate cell membranes are able to shrink swollen cells, increase the available vascular space and thus permit reflow of blood to the ischemic organ. Images PMID:5007042

  15. The role of cell swelling in ischemic renal damage and the protective effect of hypertonic solute.

    PubMed

    Flores, J; DiBona, D R; Beck, C H; Leaf, A

    1972-01-01

    The failure of blood flow to return to the kidney following a transient period of ischemia has long been recognized. The cause of this "no-reflow" has been investigated in the rat after a transient period of total obstruction of the renal arteries. The vascular pattern of the kidneys as visualized with silicone rubber injection shows a diffuse patchy ischemia throughout the kidney, which persists after release of the obstructed renal artery. Electron microscopic studies of ischemic kidneys showed that all cellular elements were swollen and limiting the available vascular space. Functional studies revealed an increase in plasma urea nitrogen and creatinine after 1 hr or longer ischemic periods. The ischemia, cell swelling, "no-reflow," and subsequent renal dysfunction occurring after obstruction to the renal arteries were corrected by the administration of hypertonic mannitol, but were unaffected by an equivalent expansion of the extracellular fluid volume either with isotonic saline or isotonic mannitol, showing that the osmotic effect was primary. The hypothesis is presented that ischemic swelling of cells may occlude small blood vessels so that recirculation does not resume even after the initial cause of the ischemia is no longer present; solutes which do not penetrate cell membranes are able to shrink swollen cells, increase the available vascular space and thus permit reflow of blood to the ischemic organ.

  16. Renal effects of essential fatty acid deficiency in hydropenic and volume-expanded rats.

    PubMed

    Paixão, Ana D O; Nunes, Flávia A; Léger, Claude; Aléssio, Maria L M

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the effects of essential fatty acid (EFA) on fractional sodium excretion (FE(Na(+))) and renal hemodynamics in rats during hydropenia (H) and acute volume expansion (VE), successively. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal blood flow (RBF) were measured using a blood pressure transducer and a flow probe, respectively, both connected to a flowmeter. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was estimated by inulin clearance. The rats receiving coconut oil as only source of dietary lipids (the EFA-deficient group) presented lower levels of linoleic acid in cortex and medulla and lower body weight than the rats receiving soy oil in place of coconut oil (the control non-EFA-deficient group). During H, the EFA-deficient rats exhibited a lower level of renal vascular resistance resulting in a higher level of RBF and a higher urinary flow (V') and FE(Na(+)), although GFR was lower than in the control group. During VE, the rats of the control group responded with increased MAP, RBF, V' and FE(Na(+)), which were not found in the EFA-deficient group, suggesting an impaired hemodynamic adjustment in EFA deficiency. In conclusion, both experimental conditions revealed that EFA deficiency affects the renal hemodynamics.

  17. Effect of converting enzyme inhibition on the renal haemodynamic responses to noradrenaline infusion in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Arundell, L. A.; Johns, E. J.

    1982-01-01

    1 The renal haemodynamic responses to a close arterial infusion of noradrenaline (29.7-177.9 nmol kg-1 h-1) were measured in rats anaesthetized with pentobarbitone. Systemic blood pressure was unaffected by noradrenaline infusion at this dose level. Renal blood flow was significantly reduced by 16% while glomerular filtration rate remained unchanged. These responses resulted in a rise in filtration fraction of some 10%. 2 In a separate group of animals, noradrenaline infusion in this manner and at similar dose rate increased plasma renin activity approximately 3 fold. 3 Continuous infusion of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, teprotide (3.36 mumol kg-1 h-1), had no measurable effect on systemic blood pressure, renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate or filtration fraction. 4 Infusion of noradrenaline into these animals receiving teprotide caused a significant fall in renal blood flow of 16%. There was a fall in glomerular filtration rate of some 17% which was significantly different from the response observed in the animals not receiving teprotide. There was a consequent small but insignificant fall in filtration fraction. 5 These data show that the regulation of glomerular filtration rate in response to the vasoconstrictor drug, noradrenaline, is partly mediated via the renin-angiotensin system. They provide evidence for a role of intrarenal angiotensin II in regulating glomerular filtration by causing efferent arteriolar vasoconstriction. PMID:6175369

  18. Pharmacological manipulation of arachidonic acid-epoxygenase results in divergent effects on renal damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Stier, Charles T; Chander, Praveen N; Manthati, Vijay L; Falck, John R; Carroll, Mairéad A

    2014-01-01

    Kidney damage is markedly accelerated by high-salt (HS) intake in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are epoxygenase products of arachidonic acid which possess vasodepressor, natriuretic, and anti-inflammatory activities. We examined whether up-regulation (clofibrate) or inhibition [N-methylsulfonyl-6-(2-propargyloxyphenyl)hexanamide (MS-PPOH)] of epoxygenase would alter systolic blood pressure (SBP) and/or renal pathology in SHRSP on HS intake (1% NaCl drinking solution). Three weeks of treatment with clofibrate induced renal cortical protein expression of CYP2C23 and increased urinary excretion of EETs compared with vehicle-treated SHRSP. SBP and urinary protein excretion (UPE) were significantly lowered with clofibrate treatment. Kidneys from vehicle-treated SHRSP, which were on HS intake for 3 weeks, demonstrated focal lesions of vascular fibrinoid degeneration, which were markedly attenuated with clofibrate treatment. In contrast, 2 weeks of treatment with the selective epoxygenase inhibitor, MS-PPOH, increased UPE without significantly altering neither urinary EET levels nor SBP. Kidneys from vehicle-treated SHRSP, which were on HS intake for 11 days, demonstrated occasional mild damage whereas kidneys from MS-PPOH-treated rats exhibited widespread malignant nephrosclerosis. These results suggest that pharmacological manipulation of epoxygenase results in divergent effects on renal damage and that interventions to increase EET levels may provide therapeutic strategies for treating salt-sensitive hypertension and renal damage.

  19. Inhibitory effects of tetradecanoylphorbol acetate and diacylglycerol on erythropoietin production in human renal carcinoma cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Masamichi; Nagakura, Kazuhiko; Ueno, Munehisa; Fisher, J.W. )

    1987-11-01

    A human renal carcinoma from a patient with an erythrocytosis, serially transplanted into athymic nude mice, was grown in primary monolayer cell cultures. After reaching confluency the cultured cells formed multicellular hemicysts (domes) which became more abundant as the cultures approached saturation density. Erythropoietin (Ep) production by this renal carcinoma in culture was only slightly increased at the time of semiconfluency but showed a marked increase in Ep levels in the culture medium after the cultures reached confluency, in parallel with an increase in dome formation. The phorbol ester tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) showed a significant dose-related inhibitory effect on Ep production and dome formation in the renal carcinoma cell cultures, suggesting an important role of protein kinase C, the only known receptor for TPA, in inhibiting the expression of differentiated phenotypes in the renal carcinoma cells. These studies suggest a role of the inositol-lipid second messenger path and protein kinase C in the regulation of Ep production.

  20. Pharmacological manipulation of arachidonic acid-epoxygenase results in divergent effects on renal damage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Stier, Charles T.; Chander, Praveen N.; Manthati, Vijay L.; Falck, John R.; Carroll, Mairéad A.

    2014-01-01

    Kidney damage is markedly accelerated by high-salt (HS) intake in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are epoxygenase products of arachidonic acid which possess vasodepressor, natriuretic, and anti-inflammatory activities. We examined whether up-regulation (clofibrate) or inhibition [N-methylsulfonyl-6-(2-propargyloxyphenyl)hexanamide (MS-PPOH)] of epoxygenase would alter systolic blood pressure (SBP) and/or renal pathology in SHRSP on HS intake (1% NaCl drinking solution). Three weeks of treatment with clofibrate induced renal cortical protein expression of CYP2C23 and increased urinary excretion of EETs compared with vehicle-treated SHRSP. SBP and urinary protein excretion (UPE) were significantly lowered with clofibrate treatment. Kidneys from vehicle-treated SHRSP, which were on HS intake for 3 weeks, demonstrated focal lesions of vascular fibrinoid degeneration, which were markedly attenuated with clofibrate treatment. In contrast, 2 weeks of treatment with the selective epoxygenase inhibitor, MS-PPOH, increased UPE without significantly altering neither urinary EET levels nor SBP. Kidneys from vehicle-treated SHRSP, which were on HS intake for 11 days, demonstrated occasional mild damage whereas kidneys from MS-PPOH-treated rats exhibited widespread malignant nephrosclerosis. These results suggest that pharmacological manipulation of epoxygenase results in divergent effects on renal damage and that interventions to increase EET levels may provide therapeutic strategies for treating salt-sensitive hypertension and renal damage. PMID:25177296

  1. Effects of creatine supplementation on biomarkers of hepatic and renal function in young trained rats.

    PubMed

    Souza, William Marciel; Heck, Thiago Gomes; Wronski, Evanio Castor; Ulbrich, Anderson Zampier; Boff, Everton

    2013-11-01

    Creatine supplementation has been widely used by athletes and young physical exercise practioneers in order of increasing muscle mass and enhancing athletic performance, but their use/overuse may represent a health risk on hepatic and renal impaired function. In this study, we evaluated the effects of 40 days of oral creatine supplementation on hepatic and renal function biomarkers in a young animal model. Wistar rats (5 weeks old) were divided in five groups (n = 7): control (CONTR), oral creatine supplementation (CREAT), moderate exercise training (EXERC), moderate exercise training plus oral creatine supplementation (EXERC + CREAT) and pathological group (positive control for liver and kidney injury) by the administration of rifampicin (RIFAMPICIN). Exercise groups were submitted to 60 min/day of swimming exercise session with a 4% of body weight workload for six weeks. The EXERC + CREAT showed the higher body weight at the end of the training protocol. The CREAT and EXERC + CREAT group showed an increase in hepatic (Aspartate transaminase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase) and renal (urea and creatinine) biomarkers levels (p < 0.05). Our study showed that the oral creatine supplementation promoted hepatic and renal function challenge in young rats submitted to moderate exercise training.

  2. A single mechanism to explain the effect of calcium on renal function.

    PubMed

    Lahera, V; Ruilope, L M; Romero, J C

    1991-07-01

    It is known that calcium induces the formation of potent vasodilators in endothelial cells and vasoconstriction in smooth muscle cells, whereas in the renal parenchyma, it modulates sodium excretion through vascular and tubular mechanisms. Consequently, an increased concentration of calcium in renal circulation may induce a sequence of contrasting hemodynamics and excretory effects depending on the threshold of a particular mechanism that is first being stimulated. In order to identify this sequence of responses and their respective thresholds, we infused into the renal artery of anesthetized dogs progressively increasing doses of calcium gluconate that ranged from 1 to 400 micrograms/kg/min. The administration of 1, 10, and 100 micrograms/kg/min of calcium gluconate was followed by a significant increase in urinary excretion of PGE2 and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha and by a marked diuresis and natriuresis without altering renal blood flow (RBF) or glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Renin release was increased by 80% only during the infusion of the 10 micrograms/kg/min dose. The intrarenal infusion of a 400 micrograms/kg/min dose of calcium produced marked decreases in RBF and GFR, while urine sodium excretion (UNaV), UPGE2V, and U6-keto-PGF1 alpha V continued and were markedly elevated. During all these maneuvers, mean arterial pressure remained unchanged.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Effect of growth hormone on renal and systemic acid-base homeostasis in humans.

    PubMed

    Sicuro, A; Mahlbacher, K; Hulter, H N; Krapf, R

    1998-04-01

    The effects of recombinant human growth hormone (GH, 0.1 U.kg body wt-1.12 h-1) on systemic and renal acid-base homeostasis were investigated in six normal subjects with preexisting sustained chronic metabolic acidosis, induced by NH4Cl administration (4.2 mmol.kg body wt-1.day-1). GH administration increased and maintained plasma bicarbonate concentration from 14.1 +/- 1.4 to 18.6 +/- 1.1 mmol/l (P < 0.001). The GH-induced increase in plasma bicarbonate concentration was the consequence of a significant increase in net acid excretion that was accounted for largely by an increase in renal NH+4 excretion sufficient in magnitude to override a decrease in urinary titratable acid excretion. During GH administration, urinary pH increased and correlated directly and significantly with urinary NH4+ concentration. Urinary net acid excretion rates were not different during the steady-state periods of acidosis and acidosis with GH administration. Glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid activities increased significantly in response to acidosis and were suppressed (glucocorticoid) or decreased to control levels (mineralocorticoid) by GH. The partial correction of metabolic acidosis occurred despite GH-induced renal sodium retention (180 mmol; gain in weight of 1.8 +/- 0.2 kg, P < 0.005) and decreased glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid activities. Thus GH (and/or insulin-like growth factor I) increased plasma bicarbonate concentration and partially corrected metabolic acidosis. This effect was generated in large part by and maintained fully by a renal mechanism (i.e., increased renal NH3 production and NH+4/net acid excretion).

  4. Effect of low dose dexmedetomidine premedication on propofol consumption in geriatric end stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Ergenoglu, Pinar; Akin, Sule; Bali, Cagla; Eker, Hatice Evren; Yalcin Cok, Oya; Aribogan, Anis

    2015-01-01

    Sedation in dialysis dependent end-stage renal disease patients requires caution as a result of performing high doses of sedatives and its complications. Multidrug sedation regimens might be superior and advantage on lesser drug consumption and by the way adverse events which occur easily in end-stage renal disease patients. We evaluated the effects of dexmedetomidine premedication on propofol consumption, sedation levels with Observer's Assessment of Alertness and Sedation scores and the bispectral index and the hemodynamic changes, potential side effects in geriatric patients with end-stage renal disease who underwent hip fracture surgery under spinal anesthesia. In this randomized, controlled, double-blind study 60 elderly patients (age≥65 years) with end-stage renal disease and hip fracture scheduled for anterograde femoral intramedullary nailing were assigned to groups that received either intravenous saline infusion (Group C) or dexmedetomidine 0.5μg/kg/10min infusion for premedication (Group D). All the patients received propofol infusion after the induction of the spinal anesthesia. Total propofol consumption, propofol dose required for targeted sedation levels according to Observer's Assessment of Alertness and Sedation scores and bispectral index levels, recovery times were significantly lower in Group D (p<0.001). The time to reach to Observer's Assessment of Alertness and Sedation score 4 and to achieve bispectral index≤80 was significantly lower in Group C compared with Group D (p<0.001). Adverse events were similar in both groups. Dexmedetomidine premedication lowers intraoperative propofol consumption to maintain targeted level of sedation. Therefore low dose dexmedetomidine premedication in addition to propofol infusion might be an alternative in geriatric patients with end-stage renal disease for sedation. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. [Effect of low dose dexmedetomidine premedication on propofol consumption in geriatric end stage renal disease patients].

    PubMed

    Ergenoglu, Pinar; Akin, Sule; Bali, Cagla; Eker, Hatice Evren; Yalcin Cok, Oya; Aribogan, Anis

    2015-01-01

    Sedation in dialysis dependent end-stage renal disease patients requires caution as a result of performing high doses of sedatives and its complications. Multidrug sedation regimens might be superior and advantage on lesser drug consumption and by the way adverse events which occur easily in end-stage renal disease patients. We evaluated the effects of dexmedetomidine premedication on propofol consumption, sedation levels with Observer's Assessment of Alertness and Sedation scores and the bispectral index and the hemodynamic changes, potential side effects in geriatric patients with end-stage renal disease who underwent hip fracture surgery under spinal anesthesia. In this randomized, controlled, double-blind study 60 elderly patients (age≥65 years) with end-stage renal disease and hip fracture scheduled for anterograde femoral intramedullary nailing were assigned to groups that received either intravenous saline infusion (Group C) or dexmedetomidine 0.5μg/kg/10min infusion for premedication (Group D). All the patients received propofol infusion after the induction of the spinal anesthesia. Total propofol consumption, propofol dose required for targeted sedation levels according to Observer's Assessment of Alertness and Sedation scores and bispectral index levels, recovery times were significantly lower in Group D (p<0.001). The time to reach to Observer's Assessment of Alertness and Sedation score 4 and to achieve bispectral index≤80 was significantly lower in Group C compared with Group D (p<0.001). Adverse events were similar in both groups. Dexmedetomidine premedication lowers intraoperative propofol consumption to maintain targeted level of sedation. Therefore low dose dexmedetomidine premedication in addition to propofol infusion might be an alternative in geriatric patients with end-stage renal disease for sedation. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Dopamine D1 receptor (DRD1) genetic polymorphism: pleiotropic effects on heritable renal traits

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Maple M.; Rana, Brinda K.; Tang, Chih-Min; Shiina, Tetsuo; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Rao, Fangwen; Salem, Rany M.; Waalen, Jill; Ziegler, Michael G.; Insel, Paul A.; O'Connor, Daniel T.

    2009-01-01

    Because dopamine D1 receptors (DRD1) influence renal sodium transport and vascular hemodynamics, we examined whether genetic polymorphisms play a role in renal function. We conducted polymorphism discovery across the DRD1 open reading frame and its 5′-UTR and then performed association studies with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), plasma creatinine (pCr), and fractional excretion of uric acid (FeUA). We used a twin/family group of 428 subjects from 195 families and a replication cohort of 677 patients from the Kaiser health-care organization sampled from the lower percentiles of diastolic blood pressures. Although the coding region lacked common non-synonymous variants, we identified two polymorphisms in the DRD1 5′-UTR (G-94A, A-48G) that occurred with frequencies of 15 and 30%, respectively. In the twin/family study, renal traits were highly heritable, such that DRD1 G-94A significantly associated with eGFR, pCr, and FeUA. Homozygotes for the G-94A minor allele (A/A) exhibited lower eGFR, higher pCr, and lower FeUA. No effects were noted for DRD1 A-48G. Patients in the Kaiser group had similar effects of G-94A on eGFR and pCr. Kidney cells transfected with the -94A variant but not the wild type vectors had increased receptor density. Because the -94A allele is common and may reduce glomerular capillary hydrostatic pressure, G-94A profiling may aid in predicting survival of renal function in patients with progressive renal disease. PMID:19675531

  7. [Effect of percutaneous nephrostolithotomy combined with flexible ureteroscopy on renal function in elderly patients with renal calculi].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhongwei; Zhang, Xiaobo; Chen, Xiong; Dai, Yuanqing; Li, Dongjie; Bai, Yao; Xiao, Xi

    2015-03-01

    To detect the levels of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), cystatin C (Cys-C ) in blood and the level of kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1) in urine in elderly patients with renal calculi at diff erent times, and to explore the eff ect of percutaneous nephrostolithotomy (PCNL) combined with flexible ureteroscopy (FU) on early postoperative renal function. A total of 46 patients with renal calculi were selected, and their blood or urine specimens were collected respectively at preoperative and postoperative 2, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h. The concentrations of NGAL, Cys-C, KIM-1 were detected. The levels of NGAL and Cys-C began to increase respectively at postoperative 2 and 12 h, and reached peak at postoperative 12 to 24 h. There was significant difference in the levels of NGAL and Cys-C between the postoperative 12 and 2 h or between postoperative 48 and 24 h (all P<0.05). The levels of NGAL and Cys-C began to decline and eventually returned to preoperative levels respectively at postoperative 48 and postoperative 72 h. The KIM-1 began to increase at postoperative 2 h and peaked at postoperative 24 h, which was significant difference between the postoperative 24 and 12 h or postoperative 48 and 24 h (both P<0.05). The level of KIM-1 began to decline and eventually returned to preoperative levels at postoperative 48 h. After the combined treatment of percutaneous nephrostolithotomy with flexible ureteroscopy, the concentrations of NGAL, Cys-C and KIM-1 are significantly increased, suggesting injuries on renal function. The time of renal tubular injury and recovery is earlier than that of renal glomerulus.

  8. Pre-terminal renal insufficiency in a patient with enteric hyperoxaluria: effect of medical management on renal function.

    PubMed

    Pipeleers, L; Wissing, K M; Pirson, Y; Cosyns, J P; Geers, C; Tielemans, C

    2012-01-01

    Enteric hyperoxaluria causes tubular deposition calcium oxalate crystals and severe chronic interstitial nephritis. We describe a patient with pre-terminal renal failure due to oxalate nephropathy after ileal resection. Increased oral hydration, low oxalate diet, and oral calcium carbonate and potassium citrate supplements resulted in a significant improvement of renal function. During the three-year follow-up, urinary oxalate concentration was repeatedly reduced below the crystallization threshold and serum creatinine decreased from 4.5 to 1.7 mg/dL. This case illustrates the benefit of combining and optimizing dietary and medical management in enteric hyperoxaluria, even in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease.

  9. Influence of renal insufficiency on the pharmacokinetics of cicletanine and its effects on the urinary excretion of electrolytes and prostanoids.

    PubMed Central

    Ferry, N; Geoffroy, J; Pozet, N; Cuisinaud, G; Benzoni, D; Zech, P Y; Sassard, J

    1988-01-01

    1. The kinetics of a single oral dose (300 mg) of cicletanine a new antihypertensive drug with diuretic properties, and its effects on the urinary excretion of electrolytes and of the major stable metabolites of prostacyclin and thromboxane A2 were studied in patients with normal renal function (n = 6), mild (n = 9) and severe (n = 10) renal insufficiency. 2. In normotensive subjects with normal renal function, cicletanine was rapidly and regularly absorbed, its apparent elimination half-life established around 7 h, and both its renal clearance (0.4 ml min-1) and its cumulative renal excretion (0.85% of the administered dose), were low. Mild renal insufficiency did not significantly alter these parameters, while severe renal impairment reduced the renal clearance and the cumulative urinary excretion of cicletanine and increased its apparent elimination half-life (31 h). However the area under the plasma curve was not changed due to reduced plasma concentrations in these patients. 3. Cicletanine induced a rapid and marked (four fold as a mean) increase in the urinary excretion of water, sodium and potassium which lasted for 6 to 10 h, in subjects with normal renal function. Renal insufficiency did not alter the slope of the calculated plasma concentration-effects curves but reduced the maximum effect observed for water, sodium and potassium. 4. A single oral dose of cicletanine did not change the urinary excretion of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha and thromboxane B2 in the three groups of patients studied, the basal values of which being found to be closely related to the creatinine clearance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3358898

  10. Prophylactic effect of baicalein against renal dysfunction in type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ahad, Amjid; Mujeeb, Mohd; Ahsan, Haseeb; Siddiqui, Waseem Ahmad

    2014-11-01

    Despite a tremendous advancement in the management of diabetes mellitus, diabetic nephropathy (DN) is still a significant problem for many patients with diabetes, because of the inefficacy and associated side effects of pharmacological drugs. There is a demand for new therapeutic drugs which on one hand efficiently prevent the development of DN by targeting several metabolic and inflammatory pathways, and on the other hand, are side-effect free. In recent years, many researchers have suggested that inflammation plays an important role in the development of DN, hence, NF-κB has received much attention. We investigated the nephroptotective effects of baicalein (BAC), a flavonoid, in high fat diet/streptozotocin induced type 2 diabetic Wistar rats. BAC (10 mg/kg bw/day and 20 mg/kg bw/day) treatment was given to the diabetic rats by oral gavage for 16 weeks post induction of diabetes. The effect of BAC was compared to a commercial antidiabetic drug rosiglitazone (RZ, 3 mg/kg bw/day). BAC and RZ treatment significantly lowered food intake, body weight and levels of fasting blood glucose, HbA1c and homeostasis model assessment index (HOMA-IR) in diabetic rats. Both, BAC and RZ restored normal renal function and mitigated renal oxidative stress. BAC and RZ also suppressed the activation of NF-κB, decreased expression of iNOS and TGF-β1, and ameliorated the structural changes in renal tissues. Moreover, BAC also normalized the levels of serum pro-inflammatory cytokines and liver function enzymes. However, rosiglitazone treatment produced liver toxicity as was evident from increased serum levels of liver function enzymes; ALP, SGOT and SGPT. Taken together, BAC treatment preserved renal function by anti-hyperglycemic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Moreover, BAC was found to be more effective as compared to RZ, suggesting the efficacy of BAC in the treatment of DN.

  11. Direct renal effects of a fructose-enriched diet: interaction with high salt intake.

    PubMed

    Ares, Gustavo R; Ortiz, Pablo A

    2015-11-01

    Consumption of fructose has increased during the last 50 years. Excessive fructose consumption has a detrimental effect on mammalian health but the mechanisms remain unclear. In humans, a direct relationship exists between dietary intake of added sugars and increased risk for cardiovascular disease mortality (52). While the causes for this are unclear, we recently showed that fructose provided in the drinking water induces a salt-dependent increase in blood pressure in Sprague-Dawley rats in a matter of days (6). However, little is known about the effects of fructose in renal salt handling and whether combined intake of high fructose and salt can lead to salt-sensitive hypertension before the development of metabolic abnormalities. The long-term (more than 4 wk) adverse effects of fructose intake on renal function are not just due to fructose but are also secondary to alterations in metabolism which may have an impact on renal function. This minireview focuses on the acute effect of fructose intake and its effect on salt regulation, as they affect blood pressure. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Simvastatin improves sepsis-induced mortality and acute kidney injury via renal vascular effects

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Hideo; Yuen, Peter S.T.; Hu, Xuzhen; Zhou, Hua; Star, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs in about half of patients in septic shock and the mortality of AKI with sepsis is extremely high. An effective therapeutic intervention is urgently required. Statins are HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors that also have pleiotropic actions. They have been reported to increase survival of septic or infectious patients. But the effect of simvastatin, a widely used statin, on sepsis-induced AKI is unknown. The effects of simvastatin and TNF-alpha neutralizing antibody were studied in a clinically relevant model of sepsis-induced AKI using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in elderly mice. Simvastatin siginificantly improved CLP-induced mortality and AKI. Simvastatin attenuated CLP-induced tubular damage and reversed CLP-induced reduction of intrarenal microvascular perfusion and renal tubular hypoxia at 24 hours. Simvastatin also restored towards normal CLP-induced renal vascular protein leak and serum TNF-alpha. Neither delayed simvastatin therapy nor TNF-alpha neutralizing antibody improved CLP-induced AKI. Simvastatin improved sepsis-induced AKI by direct effects on the renal vasculature, reversal of tubular hypoxia, and had a systemic anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:16557230

  13. Direct renal effects of a fructose-enriched diet: interaction with high salt intake

    PubMed Central

    Ares, Gustavo R.

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of fructose has increased during the last 50 years. Excessive fructose consumption has a detrimental effect on mammalian health but the mechanisms remain unclear. In humans, a direct relationship exists between dietary intake of added sugars and increased risk for cardiovascular disease mortality (52). While the causes for this are unclear, we recently showed that fructose provided in the drinking water induces a salt-dependent increase in blood pressure in Sprague-Dawley rats in a matter of days (6). However, little is known about the effects of fructose in renal salt handling and whether combined intake of high fructose and salt can lead to salt-sensitive hypertension before the development of metabolic abnormalities. The long-term (more than 4 wk) adverse effects of fructose intake on renal function are not just due to fructose but are also secondary to alterations in metabolism which may have an impact on renal function. This minireview focuses on the acute effect of fructose intake and its effect on salt regulation, as they affect blood pressure. PMID:26447210

  14. Effect of photobiomodulation on ischemia/reperfusion-induced renal damage in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Asghari, Ahmad; Takhtfooladi, Mohammad Ashrafzadeh; Hoseinzadeh, Hesam Aldin

    2016-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate the possible effect of photobiomodulation (PBM) on renal damage induced by ischemia reperfusion (IR) in diabetic rats. Twenty streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were randomly distributed into two groups, containing ten rats each: IR group (G1) and IR + PBM group (G2). After the right nephrectomy, the ischemia was produced in the left kidney for 30 min, followed by the reperfusion for 24 h. Then, a 685-nm laser diode with an output power of 15 mW (spot size = 0.28 cm(2) and energy density = 3.2 J/cm(2)) was employed. PBM was carried out by irradiating the rats over six points on the skin over the left kidney region three times, i.e., immediately after skin suturing and 1 and 2 h after initiating reperfusion for 6 min. At the end of reperfusion period, the rats were anesthetized, and blood samples were collected and used for the estimation of renal function (blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine). Then, the left kidney was harvested for histological and biochemical examination. The serum levels of BUN and creatinine were significantly higher in G1 compared to G2 (P < 0.05). G1 had higher renal malondialdehyde (MDA) levels compared to G2 (P < 0.05). Renal IR in diabetic rats (G1) resulted in a significant decrease in renal tissue glutathione (GSH) (P < 0.05) when compared to laser-treated rats (G2). A significant restoration was observed in the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) (P < 0.05) and catalase (CAT) (P < 0.05) in G2 as compared to G1. The levels of nitric oxide (NO) were increased in G1 in comparison to G2 (P < 0.05). The myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was significantly higher in the renal tissue of G1 than that of G2 (P < 0.05). In addition, specimens from the G1 had a significantly greater histological injury than those from the G2 (P < 0.05). The results of present investigation revealed that PBM attenuated kidney damage induced by renal IR in diabetic rats.

  15. Effect of ramipril on renal function in patients with intermittent claudication

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Simon D; Claridge, Martin W; Wilmink, Antonius BM; Adam, Donald J; Thomas, Mark E; Bradbury, Andrew W

    2008-01-01

    Background The Heart Outcomes Prevention Study (HOPE) demonstrated that ramipril resulted in a blood-pressure-independent 25% reduction in cardiovascular events in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Despite this, general practitioners and vascular surgeons remain reluctant to prescribe ACE inhibitors in this group of patients because of concerns about renal artery stenosis (RAS). We aimed to define the effect of ramipril on renal function in patients with intermittent claudication (IC). Methods and Results Of 132 unselected patients with IC entering the study 78 (59%) were excluded due to: current ACE inhibitor use (38%), renal impairment (serum creatinine above normal range) (15%), known severe RAS (1%) or unwillingness to participate (5%). The remaining 54 patients were titrated to 10 mg ramipril and renal function was monitored at 1, 5, and 12 weeks. Treatment was discontinued during titration in 5 patients due to symptoms (3) or lack of compliance (2). In the remainder, median [IQR] serum creatinine increased (94 [85.8–103.3] to 98 [88.0–106.5] μmol/L, p ≤ 0.001) and median [IQR] GFR decreased (71.5 [64.6–82.3] to 68.7 [59.8–74.7] mL/min per 1.73 m2, p ≤ 0.001) between baseline and 5 weeks. These changes were not considered clinically significant. By 12 weeks these values had returned almost to baseline (Cr 95.5 [88.0–103.25] μmol/L, GFR 71.8 [65.3–77.4] mL/min). No patient had a serum creatinine rise >30%. Conclusion Most of patients with IC and a normal serum creatinine can be safely commenced on ramipril provided they are screened, titrated and monitored as described above. Studies in patients with borderline renal impairment (serum creatinine up to 30% above baseline) are on-going. PMID:18561523

  16. Protection against renal ischaemia/reperfusion injury: A comparative experimental study of the effect of ischaemic preconditioning vs. postconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Shokeir, Ahmed A.; Hussein, Abdelaziz M.; Awadalla, Amira; Samy, Ahmed; Abdelaziz, Azza; Khater, Sheiri; Barakat, Nashwa

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect of ischaemic preconditioning (Ipre) vs. ischaemic postconditioning (Ipost) on renal ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in rats. Materials and methods In all, 120 male Sprague–Dawley rats were classified into four groups of 30 rats each, designated sham, control, Ipre and Ipost. Renal function, including serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine clearance (CrCl), fractional Na excretion (FENa) and renal histopathology were measured at 2, 24 and 48 h after ischaemia. Markers of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde, MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were measured in kidney tissues during the same intervals. Results Ipre caused a significant improvement in renal function, as indicated by a significant decrease in serum creatinine, BUN and FENa, with a significant increase in CrCl. However, Ipost caused no significant improvement in renal function. Morphologically Ipre caused a marked significant improvement in the renal tubular damage score compared to Ipost. Also, Ipre caused a significant decrease in MDA, and significant increase in GSH and SOD when compared to Ipost. Conclusion Ipre is more potent than Ipost for improving the renal injury induced by I/R. Ipre caused a marked improvement in renal function and morphology, while Ipost caused a minimal improvement in morphology only. Moreover, Ipre caused a marked and significant reduction in oxidative stress in kidney tissues, while Ipost caused a minimal reduction. PMID:26558061

  17. Evaluation of renoprotective effect of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae on cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Kuriakose, Gini C; Kurup, Muraleedhara G

    2008-01-01

    Cisplatin is an effective chemotherapeutic agent used in the treatment of a wide array of both pediatric and adult malignancies. Dose-dependent and cumulative nephrotoxicity is the major toxicity of this compound, sometimes requiring a reduction in dose or discontinuation of treatment. Recent evidence has implicated oxidative and nitrosative stress in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (AFA), blue-green algae, is claimed to be a potential antioxidant. The present study was designed to explore the renoprotective potential of AFA against cisplatin-induced oxidative stress and renal dysfunction. The ethanolic extract of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (EEAFA) (25, 50, 100 mg/kg(-1) p.o.) was administered two days before through three days after cisplatin challenge (5 mg/kg(-1) i.p.). Renal injury was assessed by measuring serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine and urea clearance, and serum nitrite levels. Renal oxidative stress was determined by renal TBARS levels, reduced glutathione levels, and enzymatic activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and glutathione transferase (GST). A single dose of cisplatin produced marked renal oxidative and nitrosative stress and significantly deranged renal functions. Chronic EEAFA treatment significantly and dose-dependently restored renal functions, reduced lipid peroxidation, and enhanced reduced glutathione levels, superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities. The results of the present study clearly demonstrate the pivotal role of reactive oxygen species and their relation to renal dysfunction and point to the therapeutic potential of AFA in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

  18. Effect of reduced renal mass on renal ammonia transporter family, Rh C glycoprotein and Rh B glycoprotein, expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Young; Baylis, Chris; Verlander, Jill W; Han, Ki-Hwan; Reungjui, Sirirat; Handlogten, Mary E; Weiner, I David

    2007-10-01

    Kidneys can maintain acid-base homeostasis, despite reduced renal mass, through adaptive changes in net acid excretion, of which ammonia excretion is the predominant component. The present study examines whether these adaptations are associated with changes in the ammonia transporter family members, Rh B glycoprotein (Rhbg) and Rh C glycoprotein (Rhcg). We used normal Sprague-Dawley rats and a 5/6 ablation-infarction model of reduced renal mass; control rats underwent sham operation. After 1 wk, glomerular filtration rate, assessed as creatinine clearance, was decreased, serum bicarbonate was slightly increased, and Na(+) and K(+) were unchanged. Total urinary ammonia excretion was unchanged, but urinary ammonia adjusted for creatinine clearance, an index of per nephron ammonia metabolism, increased significantly. Although reduced renal mass did not alter total Rhcg protein expression, both light microscopy and immunohistochemistry with quantitative morphometric analysis demonstrated hypertrophy of both intercalated cells and principal cells in the cortical and outer medullary collecting duct that was associated with increased apical and basolateral Rhcg polarization. Rhbg expression, analyzed using immunoblot analysis, immunohistochemistry, and measurement of cell-specific expression, was unchanged. We conclude that altered subcellular localization of Rhcg contributes to adaptive changes in single-nephron ammonia metabolism and maintenance of acid-base homeostasis in response to reduced renal mass.

  19. Receptor subtypes Y1 and Y5 are involved in the renal effects of neuropeptide Y

    PubMed Central

    Bischoff, Angela; Avramidis, Prodromos; Erdbrügger, Wilhelm; Münter, Klaus; Michel, Martin C

    1997-01-01

    Systemic infusion of neuropeptide Y (NPY) reduces renal blood flow and can concomitantly increase diuresis, natriuresis and calciuresis in anaesthetized rats. The present study was designed to investigate whether the apparently contradictory NPY effects on renal blood flow and urine formation and composition are mediated by distinct NPY receptor subtypes.NPY and its analogues, peptide YY (PYY), [Leu31, Pro34]NPY and NPY1336, were infused in incremental doses of 0.3, 1 and 3 μg kg−1 min−1 for 45 min each and the results compared to those obtained in vehicle-infused rats. Renal blood flow was monitored in 15 min intervals, while urine excretion and composition were determined in 15 min collection periods. Plasma renin activity and aldosterone concentrations were measured at the end of the final infusion period.Relative to vehicle NPY, PYY and [Leu31, Pro34]NPY dose-dependently reduced renal blood flow and increased diuresis, natriuresis and calciuresis with roughly similar potency; NPY1336 slightly but significantly increased renal blood flow but had no effect on diuresis, natriuresis and calciuresis. None of the peptides significantly affected endogenous creatinine clearance or kaliuresis.Plasma renin activity was significantly reduced by PYY. Quantitatively similar reductions were observed with NPY and [Leu31, Pro34]NPY but failed to reach statistical significance with the given number of experiments. NPY1336 did not reduce plasma renin activity. None of the peptides significantly affected plasma aldosterone concentrations.In another series of experiments infusion of PYY336 (2 μg kg−1 min−1 for 120 min) did not reduce renal blood flow but significantly enhancd diuresis and natriuresis to a similar extent as the NPY 2 μg kg−1 min−1.In a final series of experiments the Y1-selective antagonist, BIBP 3226 (1 or 10 μg kg−1 min−1) dose-dependently antagonized reductions of renal blood flow elicited by bolus injections

  20. Renoprotective effects of a dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor in a mouse model of progressive renal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Takahiro; Oda, Takashi; Matsubara, Hidehito; Watanabe, Atsushi; Takechi, Hanako; Oshima, Naoki; Sakurai, Yutaka; Kumagai, Hiroo

    2017-11-01

    Although the effects of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors beyond their hypoglycemic action have been reported, whether these inhibitors have renoprotective effects in nondiabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD) is unclear. We examined the therapeutic effects of DPP-4 inhibition in mice with unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO), a nondiabetic model of progressive renal fibrosis. After UUO surgery, mice were administered either the DPP-4 inhibitor alogliptin or a vehicle by oral gavage once a day for 10 days. Physiological parameters, degrees of renal fibrosis and inflammation, and molecules related to renal fibrosis and inflammation were then evaluated using sham-operated mice as controls. Positive area of α-smooth muscle actin was significantly smaller and expression of transforming growth factor β messenger RNA was significantly lower in the alogliptin-treated group than in the vehicle-treated group. Renal total collagen content was also significantly lower in the alogliptin-treated group than in the vehicle-treated group. These results suggest that alogliptin exerted renoprotective antifibrotic effects. The positive area of F4/80 was significantly smaller and expression of CD68 messenger RNA was significantly lower in the alogliptin-treated group than in the vehicle-treated group, suggesting an anti-inflammatory action by the DPP-4 inhibitor. Compared to the results for the vehicle-treated group, expression of markers for M1 macrophages tended to be lower in the alogliptin-treated group, and the relative expression of M2 macrophages tended to be higher. These data indicate the various protective effects of DPP-4 inhibition in nondiabetic mice with UUO. DPP-4 inhibitors may therefore be promising therapeutic choices even for nondiabetic CKD patients.

  1. The Effects of Long-Term Chaetomellic Acid A Administration on Renal Function and Oxidative Stress in a Rat Model of Renal Mass Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, António; Oliveira, Maria Manuel; Pires, Carlos André; Colaço, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of chronic treatment with chaetomellic acid A (CAA) on oxidative stress and renal function in a model of renal mass reduction. Methods. Male Wistar rats were subjected to 5/6 nephrectomy (RMR) or sham-operated (SO). One week after surgery, rats have been divided into four experimental groups: RMR: RMR rats without treatment (n = 14); RMR + CAA: RMR rats treated with CAA (n = 13); SO: SO rats without treatment (n = 13); and SO + CAA: SO rats treated with CAA (n = 13). CAA was intraperitoneally administered in a dose of 0.23 µg/Kg three times a week for six months. Results. RMR was accompanied by a significant reduction in catalase and glutathione reductase (GR) activity (p < 0.05) and a decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratio. CAA administration significantly increased catalase and GR activity (p < 0.05) and increased GSH/GSSG ratio, but no significant difference between the treated and nontreated groups was found in this ratio. No significant differences were found between the RMR groups in any of the parameters of renal function. However, CAA administration slightly improves some parameters of renal function. Conclusions. These data suggest that CAA could attenuate 5/6 RMR-induced oxidative stress. PMID:28326323

  2. Effects of intravenous ibandronate injection on renal function in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis at high risk for renal disease--the DIVINE study.

    PubMed

    Miller, Paul D; Ragi-Eis, Sergio; Mautalen, Carlos; Ramirez, Francisco; Jonkanski, Iris

    2011-12-01

    The Designed for intravenous (IV) Ibandronate reNal safety Evaluation (DIVINE) study was a 1-year prospective, randomized, open label, multi-center study that evaluated the renal safety of quarterly (every 3 months) ibandronate IV injection given over 15-30s compared with infusion given over 15 min, and weekly oral alendronate, in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO) at increased risk for renal disease. Both injection and infusion of IV ibandronate showed comparable safety to alendronate, with only small changes in serum creatinine (sCr) for each treatment group, and AEs were generally comparable between groups. All three treatments had similar effects on renal function, measured by change in baseline of the glomerular filtration rate; the ibandronate IV injection group was noninferior to the ibandronate IV infusion and weekly oral alendronate groups at 9 months, with similar results at 1 year. The results of this study demonstrate the profile of IV ibandronate, which allows it to be dosed as an IV injection in the primary care setting without the need for an infusion, even in patients with pre-existing hypertension or diabetes mellitus.

  3. Global effects of interactions on galaxy evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Recent observations of the evolutionary properties of paired and interacting galaxies are reviewed, with special emphasis on their global emission properties and star formation rates. Data at several wavelengths provide strong confirmation of the hypothesis, proposed originally by Larson and Tinsley, that interactions trigger global bursts of star formation in galaxies. The nature and properties of the starbursts, and their overall role in galactic evolution are also discussed.

  4. Brittleness Effect on Rock Fatigue Damage Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejati, Hamid Reza; Ghazvinian, Abdolhadi

    2014-09-01

    The damage evolution mechanism of rocks is one of the most important aspects in studying of rock fatigue behavior. Fatigue damage evolution of three rock types (onyx marble, sandstone and soft limestone) with different brittleness were considered in the present study. Intensive experimental tests were conducted on the chosen rock samples and acoustic emission (AE) sensors were used in some of them to monitor the fracturing process. Experimental tests indicated that brittleness strongly influences damage evolution of rocks in the course of static and dynamic loading. AE monitoring revealed that micro-crack density induced by the applied loads during different stages of the failure processes increases as rock brittleness increases. Also, results of fatigue tests on the three rock types indicated that the rock with the most induced micro-cracks during loading cycles has the least fatigue life. Furthermore, the condition of failure surfaces of the studied rocks samples, subjected to dynamic and static loading, were evaluated and it was concluded that the roughness of failure surfaces is influenced by loading types and rock brittleness. Dynamic failure surfaces were rougher than static ones and low brittle rock demonstrate a smoother failure surface compared to high brittle rock.

  5. Rosiglitazone is effective to improve renal damage in type-1-like diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, K-C; Cherng, Y-G; Chen, L-J; Hsu, C-T; Cheng, J-T

    2014-04-01

    A marked decrease of klotho expression was observed in the kidney of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ rats) showing diabetic nephropathy. It has been documented that klotho is the target gene of PPARγ. However, the effect of PPARγ agonist on klotho expression in kidney of STZ rats remains obscure. Thus, we used rosiglitazone (TZD) as PPARγ agonist to investigate the effect on renal dysfunction in STZ rats. Treatment of TZD reversed the lower levels of PPARγ, klotho, and FGFR1 expressions in kidneys of STZ rats without the correction of hyperglycemia. Also, renal functions and structural defeats were improved by TZD treatment. Taken together, oral administration of TZD may improve STZ-induced diabetic nephropathy due to restoration of the expression of klotho axis through an increase in PPARγ expression without changing blood glucose in rats.

  6. Renal-related adverse effects of intravenous contrast media in computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Leow, Kheng Song; Wu, Yi Wei; Tan, Cher Heng

    2015-01-01

    Renal-related adverse effects of intravascular contrast media (CM) include contrast-induced nephropathy in computed tomography and angiography. While large retrospective studies have been published, the exact pathogenesis of this condition is still unknown. We review the main international guidelines, including the American College of Radiology white paper and the guidelines of European Society of Urogenital Radiology, Royal College of Radiologists and Canadian Association of Radiologists, as well as their references, regarding this subject. We present a simplified, concise approach to renal-related adverse effects of CM, taking into consideration the basis for each recommendation in these published guidelines. This will allow the reader to better understand the rationale behind appropriate patient preparation for cross-sectional imaging. PMID:25917468

  7. The effect of aliskiren on the renal dysfunction following unilateral ureteral obstruction in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Hammad, Fayez T; Lubbad, Loay

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of blocking renin-angiotensin system by direct renin inhibition using aliskiren on the renal dysfunction following reversible unilateral ureteral obstruction (UO). Methods: Wistar rats underwent reversible left UO for 72 hours. Group-Alsk (n=12) received aliskiren (30 mg/kg/day) dissolved in water starting one day before creating UO and continued until the terminal experiment five days post reversal when renal functions were measured using clearance techniques. Group-Vx (n=12) underwent similar protocol but had water only. Gene expression analysis of some markers of kidney injury was measured using PCR technique. Results: In Group-Vx, renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in the left kidney were significantly lower than the right kidney (1.82±0.12 vs. 3.19±0.40, P=0.001 and 0.81±0.08 vs. 1.44±0.09, P=0.004, respectively). However, left fractional excretion of sodium (FENa) was higher than the right FENa (0.80±0.15 vs. 0.55±0.04, P=0.05). Comparing the left obstructed kidney in Group-Alsk vs. Group-Vx, RBF and GFR were higher in Group-Alsk (2.44±0.30 vs. 1.82±0.12, P=0.049 and 1.02±0.11 vs. 0.81±0.08, P=0.07, respectively). The left renal FENa was lower in Group-Alsk but did not reach statistical significance (0.54±0.07 vs. 0.80±0.15, P=0.07). Aliskiren also decreased the gene expressions of NGAL, KIM-1 and p53. Conclusion: Direct renin inhibition by aliskiren appears to have protective effect on the renal dysfunction and on the markers of renal injury following UO indicating a potential clinical benefit of this agent. Further, this data and the previous studies indicate that blocking renin-angiotensin system at any level has a protective effect in obstructive nephropathy. PMID:27570581

  8. Nature vs Nurture: Effects of Learning on Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagrani, Nagina

    In the field of Evolutionary Robotics, the design, development and application of artificial neural networks as controllers have derived their inspiration from biology. Biologists and artificial intelligence researchers are trying to understand the effects of neural network learning during the lifetime of the individuals on evolution of these individuals by qualitative and quantitative analyses. The conclusion of these analyses can help develop optimized artificial neural networks to perform any given task. The purpose of this thesis is to study the effects of learning on evolution. This has been done by applying Temporal Difference Reinforcement Learning methods to the evolution of Artificial Neural Tissue controller. The controller has been assigned the task to collect resources in a designated area in a simulated environment. The performance of the individuals is measured by the amount of resources collected. A comparison has been made between the results obtained by incorporating learning in evolution and evolution alone. The effects of learning parameters: learning rate, training period, discount rate, and policy on evolution have also been studied. It was observed that learning delays the performance of the evolving individuals over the generations. However, the non zero learning rate throughout the evolution process signifies natural selection preferring individuals possessing plasticity.

  9. The effects of blood transfusion on renal functions in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Satoglu, Ismail Safa; Akcay, Serkan; Horoz, Levent; Kaya, Erol; Karakasli, Ahmet; Skiak, Eyad; Basci, Onur

    2015-01-01

    The effects of perioperative blood transfusion on renal functions have been studied in various studies. In this study, we investigated the effects of blood transfusion on postoperative kidney functions in patients who underwent orthopaedic surgeries. Total 136 patients who were operated for several orthopedic pathologies between June 2013 and December 2014 were evaluated. The patients were divided into two groups according to the amounts of blood transfusion. Ninety five patients (69.8%) who were transfused less than 3 units were included in Group 1 and 41 patients (30.2%) who received 3 and more units of blood were included in Group 2. There were no statistical difference between the two groups in terms of preoperative gender, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, chronical renal failure and smoking habbits (P > 0.05). No statistical differences between the groups were seen in terms of postoperative hospital stay, pulmonary and other complications as well as mortality (P > 0.05). When the two groups were compared for blood parameters showing postoperative renal and other system functions, no statistical differences were detected (P > 0.05). Blood transfusion does not have negative effects on postoperative BUN and creatinine levels in patients operated for orthopaedic pathologies.

  10. The effect of indomethacin on systemic and renal hemodynamics in neonatal piglets during experimental endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Nicholas; Beier, Ulf H; Gorla, Sema Rao; Fornell, Linda; Lumpaopong, Adisorn; Radhakrishnan, Jayant; John, Eunice

    2008-08-01

    Systemic and renal hemodynamics are affected by prostaglandin production during endotoxemia. To study indomethacin effects on endotoxinemia in a neonatal piglet model, sixteen 7-10 day old piglets were anesthetized, ventilated, and catheterized. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and urine output were continuously monitored. Endotoxin (0.06 mcg/kg) was injected after baseline measurements. We studied two groups with either endotoxinemia alone (n = 7) or an additional indomethacin infusion (0.2 mg/kg per h, n = 9). HR, MAP, renal blood flow (RBF), systemic and renal vascular resistance (SVR, RVR), cardiac index (CI), and glomerular filtration rate (GFR), were obtained at baseline, at 1, 2 and 3 h. We observed a drop in CI and an increase in SVR and HR within 3 h of endotoxinemia, while MAP remained unchanged. These effects were prevented by indomethacin. RVR was not altered significantly. Endotoxinemia triggered a drop of RBF in both control (P < 0.01) and intervention group (P < 0.05). In the intervention group, drop of GFR, urine volume, and paraaminohippuric acid clearance were apparent signs of nephrotoxicity (P < 0.01, <0.05, and <0.01). In conclusion, indomethacin maintains hemodynamic parameters during endotoxinemia at the expense of nephrotoxicity. We speculate that indomethacin counteracts the renoprotective effect of prostaglandins.

  11. Effects of hypoproteinemia on renal hemodynamics, arterial pressure, and fluid volume

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, R.D. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of long-term hypoproteinemia on renal hemodynamics, arterial pressure, and fluid volume were studied in eight conscious dogs over a 34-day period. Plasma protein concentration (PPC) was decreased by daily plasmapheresis, and the effects of decreasing and increasing sodium intake were measured. By the 12th day of plasmapheresis PPC had decreased to 2.5 g/dl from a control value of 7.2 g/dl, mean arterial pressure had decreased to 78% of control, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was 75.2% of control, and urinary sodium excretion was decreased. By day 18 of plasmapheresis, estimated renal plasma flow (ERPF) was decreased to 60% of control due to the decreased arterial pressure and an increase in renal vascular resistance. GFR and ERPF were determined from the total clearance of (/sup 125/I)iothalamate and (/sup 131/I)iodohippurate. Also, plasma renin activity and plasma aldosterone concentration were both increased, and the relationship between mean arterial pressure and urinary sodium excretion was distinctly shifted to the left along the arterial pressure axis. In contradistinction to acute experiments, chronic hypoproteinemia results in decreases in GFR, ERPF, and urinary sodium excretion and has marked effects on both fluid volume and arterial pressure regulation.

  12. Effect of glycyrrhizic acid on rhein renal penetration: a microdialysis study in rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yinghui; Guan, Jiani; Ma, Xiaoqiong; Zhong, Yicong; Ma, Jianping; Li, Fanzhu

    2015-01-01

    1. Rhein (RH), a primary active component isolated from rhubarb, is effective in protecting against the progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN) progression. Glycyrrhizic acid (GA), an active constituent of liquorice, is also considered to be a protective agent against DN. Here, we evaluated the effect of GA on the renal penetration of RH in rats. 2. Plasma and renal pharmacokinetics were profiled to estimate kidney penetration. After rats were anesthetized, the carotid artery was used for blood collection and a microdialysis probe was inserted into the kidney cortex to collect dialysate samples. 3. When co-administered with GA, the Vss and CL values of RH in plasma increased by 25% and 34%, respectively. The Cmax in kidney dialysates significantly increased 1.3-fold (p<0.05). There was no change in AUC0-∞ in kidney dialysates, but a significant decrease (2×fold) in the plasma was observed. The AUC0-∞kidney/AUC0-∞plasma ratio of RH, representing kidney penetration, increased by 1.4-fold in the group pre-treated with GA compared to the RH alone group. 4. These results demonstrate that GA increases the renal penetration of RH efficiently and may exert a synergistic effect, although the molecular mechanism of interaction requires further investigation.

  13. Effect of fluoridated water on plasma insulin levels and glucose homeostasis in rats with renal deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Maela; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Rigalli, Alfredo

    2011-05-01

    Glucose intolerance in fluorosis areas and when fluoride is administered for the treatment of osteoporosis has been reported. Controlled fluoridation of drinking water is regarded as a safe and effective measure to control dental caries. However, the effect on glucose homeostasis was not studied so far. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the intake of fluoridated water supply on glucose metabolism in rats with normal and deficient renal function. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into eight groups of four rats. Renal insufficiency was induced in four groups (NX) which received drinking water containing 0, 1, 5, and 15 ppm F (NaF) for 60 days. Four groups with simulated surgery acted as controls. There were no differences in plasma glucose concentration after a glucose tolerance test between controls and NX rats and among rats with different intakes of fluoride. However, plasma insulin level increased as a function of fluoride concentration in drinking water, both in controls and in NX rats. It is concluded that the consumption of fluoridated water from water supply did not affect plasma glucose levels even in cases of animals with renal disease. However, a resistance to insulin action was demonstrated.

  14. Effects of continuous and intermittent renal replacement therapies among adult patients with acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Schoenfelder, Tonio; Chen, Xiaoyu; Bleß, Hans-Holger

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dialysis-dependent acute kidney injury (AKI) can be treated using continuous (CRRT) or intermittent renal replacement therapies (IRRT). Although some studies suggest that CRRT may have advantages over IRRT, study findings are inconsistent. This study assessed differences between CRRT and IRRT regarding important clinical outcomes (such as mortality and renal recovery) and cost-effectiveness. Additionally, ethical aspects that are linked to renal replacement therapies in the intensive care setting are considered. Methods: Systematic searches in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library including RCTs, observational studies, and cost-effectiveness studies were performed. Results were pooled using a random effects-model. Results: Forty-nine studies were included. Findings show a higher rate of renal recovery among survivors who initially received CRRT as compared with IRRT. This advantage applies to the analysis of all studies with different observation periods (Relative Risk (RR) 1.10; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) [1.05, 1.16]) and to a selection of studies with observation periods of 90 days (RR 1.07; 95% CI [1.04, 1.09]). Regarding observation periods beyond there are no differences when only two identified studies were analyzed. Patients initially receiving CRRT have higher mortality as compared to IRRT (RR 1.17; 95% CI [1.06, 1.28]). This difference is attributable to observational studies and may have been caused by allocation bias since seriously ill patients more often initially receive CRRT instead of IRRT. CRRT do not significantly differ from IRRT with respect to change of mean arterial pressure, hypotensive episodes, hemodynamic instability, and length of stay. Data on cost-effectiveness is inconsistent. Recent analyzes indicate that initial CRRT is cost-effective compared to initial IRRT due to a reduction of the rate of long-term dialysis dependence. As regards a short time horizon, this cost benefit has not been shown. Conclusion: Findings of

  15. Effects of continuous and intermittent renal replacement therapies among adult patients with acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfelder, Tonio; Chen, Xiaoyu; Bleß, Hans-Holger

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dialysis-dependent acute kidney injury (AKI) can be treated using continuous (CRRT) or intermittent renal replacement therapies (IRRT). Although some studies suggest that CRRT may have advantages over IRRT, study findings are inconsistent. This study assessed differences between CRRT and IRRT regarding important clinical outcomes (such as mortality and renal recovery) and cost-effectiveness. Additionally, ethical aspects that are linked to renal replacement therapies in the intensive care setting are considered. Methods: Systematic searches in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library including RCTs, observational studies, and cost-effectiveness studies were performed. Results were pooled using a random effects-model. Results: Forty-nine studies were included. Findings show a higher rate of renal recovery among survivors who initially received CRRT as compared with IRRT. This advantage applies to the analysis of all studies with different observation periods (Relative Risk (RR) 1.10; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) [1.05, 1.16]) and to a selection of studies with observation periods of 90 days (RR 1.07; 95% CI [1.04, 1.09]). Regarding observation periods beyond there are no differences when only two identified studies were analyzed. Patients initially receiving CRRT have higher mortality as compared to IRRT (RR 1.17; 95% CI [1.06, 1.28]). This difference is attributable to observational studies and may have been caused by allocation bias since seriously ill patients more often initially receive CRRT instead of IRRT. CRRT do not significantly differ from IRRT with respect to change of mean arterial pressure, hypotensive episodes, hemodynamic instability, and length of stay. Data on cost-effectiveness is inconsistent. Recent analyzes indicate that initial CRRT is cost-effective compared to initial IRRT due to a reduction of the rate of long-term dialysis dependence. As regards a short time horizon, this cost benefit has not been shown. Conclusion: Findings of

  16. Glucosamine hydrochloride exerts a protective effect against unilateral ureteral obstruction-induced renal fibrosis by attenuating TGF-β signaling.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinah; Lee, So-Young; Ooshima, Akira; Yang, Kyung-Min; Kang, Jin Muk; Kim, Young-Woong; Kim, Seong-Jin

    2013-11-01

    Renal fibrosis is a common consequence of unilateral ureteral obstruction, which provides a useful model to investigate the pathogenesis of obstructive nephropathy and progressive renal fibrosis. Transforming growth factor (TGF-β1) has been recognized as a key mediator in renal fibrosis by stimulating matrix-producing fibrogenic cells and promoting extracellular matrix deposition. Therefore, considerable efforts have been made to regulate TGF-β signaling for antifibrotic therapy. Here, we investigated the mode of action of glucosamine hydrochloride (GS-HCl) on TGF-β1-induced renal fibrosis. In the obstructed kidneys and TGF-β1-treated renal cells, GS-HCl significantly decreased renal expression of α-smooth muscle actin, collagen I, and fibronectin. By investigating the inhibitory mechanism of GS-HCl on renal fibrosis, we found that GS-HCl suppressed TGF-β signaling by inhibiting N-linked glycosylation of the type II TGF-β receptor (TβRII), leading to an inefficient trafficking of TβRII to the membrane surface. Defective N-glycosylation of TβRII further suppressed the TGF-β1-binding to TβRII, thereby decreasing TGF-β signaling. Notably, GS-HCl treatment significantly reduced TGF-β1-induced up-regulation of Smad2/3 phosphorylation and transcriptional activity in vivo and in vitro. Taken together, GS-HCl-mediated regulation of TGF-β signaling exerted an antifibrotic effect, thereby ameliorating renal fibrosis. Our study suggests that GS-HCl would be a promising agent for therapeutic intervention for preventing TGF-β1-induced renal fibrosis in kidney diseases. Glucosamine-mediated attenuation of TGF-β signaling ameliorates renal fibrosis in vivo TGF-β1-induced fibrogenic action is reduced by glucosamine in vitro N-glycosylation of the type II TGF-β receptor is suppressed by glucosamine Glucosamine-induced defective N-glycosylation of TβRII decreases TGF-β signaling.

  17. Effects of asymmetric dimethylarginine on renal arteries in portal hypertension and cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Segarra, Gloria; Cortina, Belén; Mauricio, María Dolores; Novella, Susana; Lluch, Paloma; Navarrete-Navarro, Javier; Noguera, Inmaculada; Medina, Pascual

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effects of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) in renal arteries from portal hypertensive and cirrhotic rats. METHODS Rat renal arteries from Sham (n = 15), pre-hepatic portal hypertension (PPVL; n = 15) and bile duct ligation and excision-induced cirrhosis (BDL; n = 15) were precontracted with norepinephrine, and additional contractions were induced with ADMA (10-6-10-3 mol/L), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) synthase. Concentration-response curves to acetylcholine (1 × 10-9-3 × 10-6 mol/L) were determined in precontracted renal artery segments with norepinephrine in the absence and in the presence of ADMA. Kidneys were collected to determine the protein expression and activity of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH), an enzyme that catabolizes ADMA. RESULTS In renal arteries precontracted with norepinephrine, ADMA caused endothelium-dependent contractions. The pD2 values to ADMA were similar in the Sham and PPVL groups (4.20 ± 0.08 and 4.11 ± 0.09, P > 0.05, respectively), but were lower than those of the BDL group (4.79 ± 0.16, P < 0.05). Acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation that did not differ, in terms of pD2 and maximal relaxation, among the 3 groups studied. Treatment with ADMA (3 × 10-4 mol/L) inhibited acetylcholine-induced relaxation in the 3 groups, but the inhibition was higher (P < 0.05) in the BDL group compared with that for the Sham and PPVL groups. The mRNA and protein expression of DDAH-1 were similar in kidneys from the three groups. Conversely, DDAH-2 expression was increased (P < 0.05) in PPVL and further enhanced (P < 0.05) in the BDL group. However, renal DDAH activity was significantly decreased in the BDL group. CONCLUSION Cirrhosis increased the inhibitory effect of ADMA on basal- and induced-release of NO in renal arteries, and decreased DDAH activity in the kidney. PMID:28082806

  18. Effect of diuretics on renal tubular transport of calcium and magnesium.

    PubMed

    Alexander, R Todd; Dimke, Henrik

    2017-06-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) and Magnesium (Mg(2+)) reabsorption along the renal tubule is dependent on distinct trans- and paracellular pathways. Our understanding of the molecular machinery involved is increasing. Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) reclamation in kidney is dependent on a diverse array of proteins, which are important for both forming divalent cation-permeable pores and channels, but also for generating the necessary driving forces for Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) transport. Alterations in these molecular constituents can have profound effects on tubular Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) handling. Diuretics are used to treat a large range of clinical conditions, but most commonly for the management of blood pressure and fluid balance. The pharmacological targets of diuretics generally directly facilitate sodium (Na(+)) transport, but also indirectly affect renal Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) handling, i.e., by establishing a prerequisite electrochemical gradient. It is therefore not surprising that substantial alterations in divalent cation handling can be observed following diuretic treatment. The effects of diuretics on renal Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) handling are reviewed in the context of the present understanding of basal molecular mechanisms of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) transport. Acetazolamide, osmotic diuretics, Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE3) inhibitors, and antidiabetic Na(+)/glucose cotransporter type 2 (SGLT) blocking compounds, target the proximal tubule, where paracellular Ca(2+) transport predominates. Loop diuretics and renal outer medullary K(+) (ROMK) inhibitors block thick ascending limb transport, a segment with significant paracellular Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) transport. Thiazides target the distal convoluted tubule; however, their effect on divalent cation transport is not limited to that segment. Finally, potassium-sparing diuretics, which inhibit electrogenic Na(+) transport at distal sites, can also affect divalent cation transport. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Cost-effectiveness analysis of nephron sparing options for the management of small renal masses.

    PubMed

    Chang, Steven L; Cipriano, Lauren E; Harshman, Lauren C; Garber, Alan M; Chung, Benjamin I

    2011-05-01

    A recent increase in the detection of contrast enhancing renal masses 4 cm or smaller suspicious for malignancy has led to the widespread use of nephron sparing options. Limited data exist to help clinicians decide which of these competing nephron sparing therapies is most appropriate. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis to evaluate the relative clinical and economic merits of commonly available nephron sparing strategies for small renal masses. We developed a decision analytic Markov model estimating the costs and health outcomes of treating a healthy 65-year-old patient with an asymptomatic unilateral small renal mass using competing nephron sparing options of immediate intervention (ie open and laparoscopic partial nephrectomy as well as laparoscopic and percutaneous ablation), active surveillance with possible delayed intervention and nonsurgical management with observation. Benefits were measured in quality adjusted life-years. We used a societal perspective, lifetime horizon and willingness to pay threshold of $50,000 per quality adjusted life-year gained. Model results were assessed with sensitivity analyses. In the base case scenario the least costly option was observation and the optimal option was immediate laparoscopic partial nephrectomy, which had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $36,645 per quality adjusted life-year gained compared to surveillance with possible delayed percutaneous ablation. Results were sensitive to age at diagnosis, health status and tumor size. Immediate laparoscopic partial nephrectomy is the preferred nephron sparing option for healthy patients younger than 74 years old with a small renal mass. Surveillance with possible delayed percutaneous ablation is a cost-effective alternative for patients with advanced age or significant comorbidities. Observation maximizes quality adjusted life-years in patients who are poor surgical candidates or with limited life expectancy (less than 3 years). Copyright © 2011

  20. Effects of tolvaptan on systemic and renal hemodynamic function in dogs with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Onogawa, Toshiyuki; Sakamoto, Yuki; Nakamura, Shigeki; Nakayama, Sunao; Fujiki, Hiroyuki; Yamamura, Yoshitaka

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the effects of tolvaptan, a vasopressin V(2)-receptor antagonist, on diuretic response and systemic and renal hemodynamic characteristics in conscious dogs with congestive heart failure (CHF). We also compared these effects with those of furosemide, a loop diuretic. CHF was induced by rapid right-ventricular pacing at 260 beats/min for at least 3 weeks, and maintained with a pacing rate of 220-240 beats/min. CHF dogs were orally given tolvaptan (10 mg/kg), furosemide (10 mg/kg) and vehicle in random order during the stable CHF state. Urine excretion, systemic and renal hemodynamic parameters, and plasma hormone levels were measured over 6-hour periods after drug administration. Tolvaptan induced aquaresis with an increase in free water clearance, resulting in a significant increase in serum sodium concentrations and a decrease in cumulative water balance. Tolvaptan also decreased pulmonary capillary wedge pressure without affecting systemic vascular resistance, glomerular filtration rate or renal blood flow. Tolvaptan tended to increase plasma arginine vasopressin concentrations but did not affect plasma renin activity. In contrast, furosemide induced clear saluresis with increased electrolyte excretion, resulting in decreased pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. However, furosemide also decreased serum potassium concentration and increased plasma arginine vasopressin concentrations and plasma renin activity. Tolvaptan elicited a potent aquaretic response and reduced the cardiac preload without unfavorable effects on systemic or renal hemodynamics, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, or the sympathetic nervous system in CHF dogs. Thus, tolvaptan may offer a novel approach to remove excess water congestion from patients with CHF.

  1. The curative effects of LPN combined LCA in treating with middle and advanced renal cancer.

    PubMed

    Qiu, M-J; Tian, H; Pang, C; Yang, Z-J; Li, C-Q; Xu, L

    2016-01-01

    To discuss the curative effects of laparoscopy partial nephrectomy (LPN) combined with laparoscopy cryoablation (LCA) in treating renal cancer. A total of 58 patients that were diagnosed with phase III-IV renal cancer in the Hospital from February 2013 to October 2014 were enrolled in this study. After obtaining the approval of Ethics Committee of the Hospital as well as the informed consent of the patients and their relatives, the patients were randomly divide into two groups: control group consisted of 24 patients, who were treated with LPN + chemo radiotherapy and the observation group consisted of 34 patients, who were treated with LPN in combination of LCA + chemo radiotherapy. The rate of successful operation was significantly higher in the observation group than in control group and the prevalence of per procedural complications in observation group was significantly lower than that of control group, and these differences had statistical significance (p < 0.05). Glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) after operation and 6-month follow-up in observation group was significantly higher than that in control group, and the level of serum creatinine (sCr) was significantly lower compared to the control group and the differences had statistical significance (p < 0.05). Follow-up survival rate of patients in the observation group was significantly higher than that of control group, recurrence rate and recurrence time of patients in the observation group was significantly lower than those of control group and the difference had statistical significance (p < 0.05). LPN combined LCA therapy was quite effective in treating with middle and advanced renal cancer. Compared with pure LPN therapy, LPN combined LCA therapy could significantly improve the surgical effects, retain the functions of the renal unit and improve the patients' prognosis.

  2. [Adverse effects of low dose exposures to cadmium below renal damage level should be emphasized for human health effect studies].

    PubMed

    Yang, X F; Wu, Y N

    2016-04-01

    Currently, the pollution of heavy metal, including lead, cadmium (Cd) and mercury, was one of the major environmental problems in China. Cd could cause adverse effects on kidney, bone, lung and reproductive system. Most of the past researches focused on renal damage effect, and some evidences suggestedadverse effects on bone, tumor, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and mineral elements, etc, which was occurred at low dose exposures to Cd below renal damage level. An important content of human health effect Studies on exposures to Cd is to follow up the development and consequences of adverse effects after long-term exposure to environmental Cd and then reduction or cessation of its exposure among this population. In this paper, the progress and development trend of long-term environmental exposure to Cd and its health damage effect were reviewed.

  3. [Expression of LIM and SH3 protein 1 in renal clear cell carcinoma and its effects on invasion and migration of renal clear cell carcinoma 786-O cells].

    PubMed

    Jin, B; Gao, L; Li, W; Chen, J C; Wen, R M; Wang, J Q

    2017-03-23

    Objective: To investigate the expression of LIM and SH3 protein 1 (LASP1) in renal cell carcinoma and its significance in the invasion and migration of renal clear cell carcinoma 786-O cell line. Methods: The expression level of LASP1 in 41 cases of renal cell carcinoma tissues and normal renal tissues was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The relationship between the expression level of LASP1 and clinical characteristics was further analyzed. Expression of LASP1 in 10 cases of tumor tissues with or without lymph node metastasis was analyzed by Western blot. Furthermore, small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting LASP1 was constructed and transfected into 786-O cells to downregulate LASP1 expression. The interference effect of LASP1 siRNA on LASP1 protein and the expression of related proteins in epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) pathway were detected by Western blot. The effects of LASP1 knockdown on cell proliferation, migration and invasion and gene expression were then assessed using CCK8 assay, transwell cell migration system and western blot analysis, respectively. Results: The positive rate of LASP1 expression in renal clear cell carcinoma tissues was 90.2% (37/41), which was significantly higher than that in the adjacent tissues (29.3%, P=0.002). The expression of LASP1 in renal cell carcinoma was positively correlated with lymph node metastasis and TNM stage of renal cell carcinoma (P<0.05). The results of Western blot showed that LASP1 (0.696±0.053) was highly expressed in renal cell carcinoma (1.459±0.628), especially in cases with lymph node metastasis (2.692±0.186, P<0.05). The LASP1 siRNA remarkably down-regulated the expression of LASP1 protein in 786-O cells. The abilities of proliferation, invasion and migration of 786-O cells were decreased significantly in the LASP1 siRNA groups.The relative expression of E-cadherin protein in the siRNA group (0.848±0.020) was significantly higher than those in the siRNA-NC group (0.671±0.018) and control

  4. Mild renal hypertension alters run training effects on the frequency response of rat cardiomyocyte mechanics.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Bradley M; Mokelke, Eric A; Thayer, Anne M; Moore, Russell L

    2003-11-01

    We examined the effects of run training on the frequency dependence of cardiomyocyte mechanics and intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) dynamics in rats with mild renal hypertension. Male Fischer 344 rats aged 2-3 mo underwent a sham operation or stenosis of the left renal artery, which increased systolic blood pressure 20-30 mmHg. Half of the rats in each group underwent treadmill run training for >16 wk. Isolated cardiomyocytes were paced at 1.0 and 0.2 Hz in 2 mM external Ca2+ concentration at 29 degrees C. Under these conditions, negative frequency responses, i.e., decreased value with increased frequency, were recorded for peak shortening, shortening velocity, and the integral of the [Ca2+]i transient in both groups. Run training amplified the negative frequency response for the integral of the [Ca2+]i transient in both groups, but it amplified the negative frequency response for the shortening dynamics only in the normotensive sham-operated and not in the hypertensive rats. These results, as well as others for relaxation parameters, suggest that renal hypertension altered the effects of run training on the frequency response for cardiomyocyte contractile apparatus and/or passive mechanical properties, which respond to [Ca2+]i.

  5. Effect of metformin against cisplatin induced acute renal injury in rats: a biochemical and histoarchitectural evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Bidya Dhar; Kuncha, Madhusudana; Putcha, Uday Kumar; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2013-09-01

    Although cisplatin has been a mainstay for cancer therapy, its use is limited mainly because of nephrotoxicity. Accumulating literature suggest the antioxidant and cytoprotective effect of metformin, a first line antidiabetic drug. With this background, we investigated the effect of metformin on the cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity in rats. A single injection of cisplatin (7.5 mg/kg, i.p.) caused marked renal damage, characterized by a significant increase in blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (Cr) and abnormal histo-architecture of kidney. These were accompanied by significant elevation of malondialdehyde (MDA), total reactive oxygen species (tROS) and caspase-3 levels and decreased antioxidant levels. Metformin treatment significantly attenuated the increase in malondialdehyde and tROS generation and restores the decrease in both enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. However metformin treatment did not prevent the cisplatin induced renal injury as there was no significant difference of renal function parameters (BUN and Cr), kidney histopathology as well as caspase-3 activity between cisplatin per se and metformin plus cisplatin treated rats. Histopathology studies revealed that similar glomerular and tubular pathological architecture in both cisplatin per se and cisplatin plus metformin group. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that metformin is not an adjuvant drug to treat nephrotoxicity associated with cisplatin therapy.

  6. Nephroprotective Effect of Ursolic Acid in a Murine Model of Gentamicin-Induced Renal Damage

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Preethi G.; Chamari Nawarathna, Savindika; Kulkarni, Avdhooth; Habeeba, Umma; Reddy C., Sudarshan; Teerthanath, Srinivas; Shenoy, Jnaneshwara P.

    2012-01-01

    The present study evaluates the nephroprotective effects of ursolic acid in a murine model of gentamicin induced renal damage. Wistar albino rats of either sex, weighing 150–200 g were divided into 5 groups; normal saline, gentamicin 80 mg/kg, intraperitoneally for 8 days, ursolic acid at 2, 5, and 10 mg/kg, per oral for 8 days, ursolic acid administered 3 days prior and concurrently with gentamicin for 5 days. Blood urea, serum creatinine, uric acid and blood urea nitrogen analyses and microscopic examination of kidney were performed. Gentamicin treatment caused nephrotoxicity as evidenced by marked elevation in serum urea, serum uric acid, serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (162.33 ± 9.92 mg/dL, 3.13 ± 0.12 mg/dL, 6.85 ± 0.35 mg/dL and 75.86 ± 4.64 mg/dL; resp.) when compared to the saline treated groups. Co-administration of ursolic acid with gentamicin decreased the rise in these parameters in a dose dependent manner. Histopathological analysis revealed epithelial loss with intense granular degeneration in gentamicin treated rats, whereas ursolic acid mitigated the severity of gentamicin-induced renal damage. To conclude, our data suggest that ursolic acid exhibits renoprotective effect in gentamicin induced renal damage and further studies on its mechanis of action are warranted. PMID:22811930

  7. Effects of water uptake on melamine renal stone formation in mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jiao; Li, Daxu; Chan, Yee Kwan; Chen, Yan; Lamb, Jonathan R; Tam, Paul K H; El-Nezami, Hani

    2012-06-01

    Melamine-tainted food can induce kidney stones both in humans and animals and in domestic animals, severe cases caused acute kidney failure and death. Although increasing water intake can ameliorate kidney stone formation, its effect on melamine (Mel)-induced kidney stones has not been studied. We have analysed the effect of restricted ingestion of drinking water on melamine stone formation in mice. They were given melamine and cyanuric acid orally and received drinking water either freely or for a restricted time. Kidney stone formation and renal function were monitored. Mice receiving drinking water for a restricted 10-h period initially lost body weight, which returned to normal within 2 days. No other abnormalities were observed. Ingestion of melamine alone failed to induce kidney stones even under conditions of restricted drinking water. In mice treated with melamine together with cyanuric acid for 3 days, no renal stones were formed when the supply of drinking was normal. However, when drinking water was limited, stone formation was observed and accompanied by high levels of serum urea and creatinine. An increase in urine haemoglobin and glucose levels was also found. The administration resulted in up-regulated tissue osteopontin, kidney injury molecule-1 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin messenger RNA expression and macrophage infiltration. Our results indicate the importance of water intake in the formation of melamine-induced renal stone formation in the mouse and provide new information on the mechanisms of melamine stone formation.

  8. Effect of commonly used vehicles on gastrointestinal, renal, and liver function in rats.

    PubMed

    Pestel, Sabine; Martin, Hans-Juergen; Maier, Gerd-Michael; Guth, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Solubility is often a limiting factor when testing new compounds in animal experiments. Various solubilizing agents may be used, but each have their own pharmacological effects. We investigated the effects of selected vehicles having different chemical characteristics on gastrointestinal, renal, and liver function. Rats were treated orally, intravenously or intraperitoneally and gastric emptying, intestinal transit, renal, and liver function were investigated. Gastrointestinal motility was influenced by hydroxyethylcellulose, hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPbetaCD), HPgammaCD, DMSO, polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG 400), fat emulsion, and the corresponding emulsifier. Liver function was affected by HPbetaCD, HPgammaCD, DMSO, PEG 400, Polysorbate 80, Cremophor RH 40, and fat emulsion. An increase in liver enzymes was observed after PEG 400 and Polysorbate 80. DMSO interfered with clinical chemistry measurements in serum. Urinary function was modified by HPgammaCD, DMSO, PEG 400, and Polysorbate 80, while enhanced urine enzyme excretion was observed after HPbetaCD, HPgammaCD, DMSO, PEG 400, and Polysorbate 80. Most of the investigated vehicles changed gastrointestinal, renal, and/or liver parameters after application of a certain threshold dose for each assay. No "best" vehicle could be identified that may be used in each test system. Thus, vehicles must be selected not only on their chemical characteristics but also on their potential pharmacological activity in a given test system.

  9. Effects of chronic lithium administration on renal acid excretion in humans and rats

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, I. David; Leader, John P.; Bedford, Jennifer J.; Verlander, Jill W.; Ellis, Gaye; Kalita, Priyakshi; Vos, Frederiek; de Jong, Sylvia; Walker, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Lithium therapy's most common side effects affecting the kidney are nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) and chronic kidney disease. Lithium may also induce a distal renal tubular acidosis. This study investigated the effect of chronic lithium exposure on renal acid–base homeostasis, with emphasis on ammonia and citrate excretion. We compared 11 individuals on long‐term lithium therapy with six healthy individuals. Under basal conditions, lithium‐treated individuals excreted significantly more urinary ammonia than did control subjects. Following an acute acid load, urinary ammonia excretion increased approximately twofold above basal rates in both lithium‐treated and control humans. There were no significant differences between lithium‐treated and control subjects in urinary pH or urinary citrate excretion. To elucidate possible mechanisms, rats were randomized to diets containing lithium or regular diet for 6 months. Similar to humans, basal ammonia excretion was significantly higher in lithium‐treated rats; in addition, urinary citrate excretion was also significantly greater. There were no differences in urinary pH. Expression of the critical ammonia transporter, Rhesus C Glycoprotein (Rhcg), was substantially greater in lithium‐treated rats than in control rats. We conclude that chronic lithium exposure increases renal ammonia excretion through mechanisms independent of urinary pH and likely to involve increased collecting duct ammonia secretion via the ammonia transporter, Rhcg. PMID:25501430

  10. Renal protective effects of extracts from guava fruit (Psidium guajava L.) in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Yu; Lin, Chia-Yun; Yin, Mei-Chin

    2012-09-01

    This study analyzed the content of phenolic acids and flavonoids in extracts of guava fruit (Psidium guajava L.), and examined the renal protective effects of guava aqueous extract (GAE) and ethanol extract (GEE) in diabetic mice. GAE had more caffeic acid, myricetin, and quercetin; and GEE had more cinnamic, coumaric and ferulic acids. GAE or GEE at 1 and 2 % was supplied in diet for 12 weeks. GAE or GEE intake at 2 % significantly reduced glucose and blood urea nitrogen levels, increased insulin level in plasma of diabetic mice (p < 0.05). GAE or GEE treatments dose-dependently reserved glutathione content, retained activity of catalase and glutathione peroxidase, and decreased reactive oxygen species, interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-1β levels in kidney (p < 0.05). GAE and GEE treatments at 2 % significantly declined renal N (ε)-(carboxymethyl)lysine, pentosidine and fructose levels (p < 0.05), and suppressed renal activity of aldose reductase (p < 0.05). These findings support that guava fruit could protect kidney against diabetic progression via its anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-glycative effects.

  11. Effect of benazepril on the transdifferentiation of renal tubular epithelial cells from diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    PENG, TAO; WANG, JIE; ZHEN, JUNHUI; HU, ZHAO; YANG, XIANGDONG

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of benazepril on the transdifferentiation of renal tubular epithelial cells from diabetic rats. Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were included in the present study. Eight of the 30 rats were randomly selected and served as the normal control group (N group), while the remaining 22 rats, injected with streptozotocin (STZ), comprised the diabetic rat model. Rats with diabetes were randomly divided into the diabetic (DM group) and benazepril (B group) groups. The total course was conducted over 12 weeks. Blood glucose, body weight, kidney/body weight, 24-h urinary protein, serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen were measured at the start and end of the study. We observed the tubulointerstitial pathological changes, and applied immunohistochemistry and western blotting to detect the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in renal tissue. The levels of blood glucose, kidney/body weight, 24-h urinary protein, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and tubulointerstitial damage index (TII) in the DM group were significantly higher than that in the N group (p<0.01). Except for blood glucose and kidney/body weight, the remaining indices were lower in the B group compared with those in the DM group (p<0.01). Immunohistochemical staining results revealed the expression of α-SMA in renal tubular epithelial cells to be significantly higher in the DM and B groups compared with the control (N) group (p<0.01). Western blot analysis revealed that the expression of α-SMA in diabetic renal tissue increased 3.27-fold compared with that of the N group, while the expression of α-SMA in the B group decreased 45% compared with that in the DM group. In conclusion, benazepril significantly reduced the expression of α-SMA in renal tubular epithelial cells obtained from diabetic rats, inhibited the transdifferentiation of renal tubular epithelial cells and played an important role in kidney protection. PMID:24944793

  12. The effects of stimulating carotid chemoreceptors on renal haemodynamics and function in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Karim, F; Poucher, S M; Summerill, R A

    1987-01-01

    1. Dogs were anaesthetized with chloralose and artificially ventilated. The carotid chemoreceptors were stimulated by changing the perfusion of vascularly isolated carotid sinus regions from arterial to venous blood. The mean carotid sinus pressure and the mean arterial blood pressure were held constant at 124 +/- 3 and 122 +/- 3 mmHg, respectively. Both vagosympathetic trunks were sectioned in the neck and propranolol (17 micrograms kg-1 min-1 I.V.) and gallamine triethiodide (0.2-2.0 mg kg-1 30 min-1 I.V.) were infused. Renal blood flow was measured by an electromagnetic flow probe, glomerular filtration rate by creatinine clearance, sodium excretion by flame photometry and solute excretion by osmometry. 2. In sixteen tests in thirteen dogs perfusion of the carotid sinus regions with venous blood resulted in significant decreases in renal blood flow from 271 +/- 24 to 198 +/- 21 ml min-1 100 g-1 renal mass; glomerular filtration rate from 41.0 +/- 4.8 to 22.1 +/- 3.1 ml min-1 100 g-1; filtration fraction from 0.25 +/- 0.02 to 0.19 +/- 0.02; urine flow from 0.48 +/- 1.0 to 0.21 +/- 0.03 ml min-1 100 g-1; sodium excretion from 18.1 +/- 4.1 to 12.9 +/- 4.2 mumol min-1 100 g-1; and osmolar excretion 327 +/- 42 to 171 +/- 26 mu osmol min-1 100 g-1. The right atrial pressure did not change significantly from 4.6 +/- 1.2 cmH2O. 3. In seven dogs, tying renal sympathetic nerves abolished all the responses except that of sodium excretion which was now reversed; sodium excretion increased from 68 +/- 19 to 116 +/- 38 mumol min-1 100 g-1 without significant change in right atrial pressure from 7.4 +/- 1.9 cmH2O. Crushing the carotid bodies, however, abolished all the responses. 4. The results show that carotid chemoreceptor stimulation can cause significant reflex effects on renal haemodynamics and function which are mediated via renal sympathetic nerves. They also show that the chemoreceptor stimulation can cause natriuresis in the absence of haemodynamic changes, in the

  13. Metabolic and renal adverse effects of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fortuny, Clàudia; Deyà-Martínez, Ángela; Chiappini, Elena; Galli, Luisa; de Martino, Maurizio; Noguera-Julian, Antoni

    2015-05-01

    Worldwide, the benefits of combined antiretroviral (ARV) therapy in morbidity and mortality due to perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus infection are beyond question and outweigh the toxicity these drugs have been associated with in HIV-infected children and adolescents to date. In puberty, abnormal body fat distribution is stigmatizating and leads to low adherence to ARV treatment. The other metabolic comorbidities (mitochondrial toxicity, dyslipidemias, insulin resistance and low bone mineral density) and renal toxicity, albeit nonsymptomatic in most children, are increasingly being reported and potentially put this population at risk for early cardiovascular or cerebrovascular atherosclerotic disease, diabetes, pathologic fractures or premature renal failure in the third and fourth decades of life. Evidence from available studies is limited because of methodological limitations and also because of several HIV-unrelated factors influencing, to some degree, the development of these conditions. Current recommendations for the prevention, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of metabolic and renal adverse effects in HIV-children and adolescents are based on adult studies, observational pediatric studies and experts' consensus. Healthy lifestyle habits (regarding diet, exercise and refraining from toxic substances) and wise use of ARV options are the only preventive tools for the majority of patients. Should abnormal findings arise, switches in one or more ARV drugs have proved useful. Specific therapies are also available for some of these comorbidities, although the experience in the pediatric age is still very scarce. We aim to summarize the epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic aspects of metabolic and renal adverse effects in vertically HIV-infected children and adolescents.

  14. Tips and tricks for a safe and effective image-guided percutaneous renal tumour ablation.

    PubMed

    Mauri, Giovanni; Nicosia, L; Varano, G M; Bonomo, G; Della Vigna, P; Monfardini, L; Orsi, F

    2017-06-01

    Image-guide thermal ablations are nowadays increasingly used to provide a minimally invasive treatment to patients with renal tumours, with reported good clinical results and low complications rate. Different ablative techniques can be applied, each with some advantages and disadvantages according to the clinical situation. Moreover, percutaneous ablation of renal tumours might be complex in cases where there is limited access for image guidance or a close proximity to critical structures, which can be unintentionally injured during treatment. In the present paper we offer an overview of the most commonly used ablative techniques and of the most important manoeuvres that can be applied to enhance the safety and effectiveness of percutaneous image-guided renal ablation. Emphasis is given to the different technical aspects of cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation, and microwave ablation, on the ideal operating room setting, optimal image guidance, application of fusion imaging and virtual navigation, and contrast enhanced ultrasound in the guidance and monitoring of the procedure. Moreover, a series of protective manoeuvre that can be used to avoid damage to surrounding sensitive structures is presented. A selection of cases of image-guided thermal ablation of renal tumours in which the discussed technique were used is presented and illustrated. • Cryoablation, radiofrequency and microwave ablation have different advantages and disadvantages. • US, CT, fusion imaging, and CEUS increase an effective image-guidance. • Different patient positioning and external compression may increase procedure feasibility. • Hydrodissection and gas insufflation are useful to displace surrounding critical structures. • Cold pyeloperfusion can reduce the thermal damage to the collecting system.

  15. Effect of chronic poisoning with aluminum on the renal handling of phosphate in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mahieu, S; Calvo, M L

    1998-01-16

    The effects of aluminum on renal function and phosphate handling were studied using clearance techniques in chronically-intoxicated rats. Rats were given aluminum hydroxide (80 mg/kg b.w., i.p.), three times per week during 6 months. The phosphate tubular transport capacity was evaluated by determining the maximum tubular transport (TmRPi) and the fractional excretion of phosphate (FE% Pi) during the infusion of phosphate solutions with increasing concentrations (0, 9, 18, 33 mM). Parathyroid gland function was studied using indirect methods: calcemia recovery after EDTA administration and the nephrogenic excretion of cAMP as indicative of renal PTH actions, by RIA. The systemic acid base status was determined and food intake and rat growth were controlled in both groups. No changes were observed in the renal function. Pi reabsorption values per ml glomerular filtration rate (TRPi/GFR microg/ml) for different Pi plasmatic concentrations were distributed following a saturation curve compatible with a saturation kinetics. Aluminum increased TmRPi/GFR in treated animals (T) 76+/-4 as compared with control animals (C) 57+/-7 microg/ml, without a statistical modification in the apparent affinity. The FE% Pi and FE% Na were significantly lower in treated animals than in control animals. There were neither systemic variations in the acid-base balance nor in the Ca and Pi concentrations in plasma. The calcemia recovery following a hypocalcemic stimulus and the nephrogenic excretion of cAMP (T: 44+/-4; C: 91+/-7 pmol/min) were diminished. Considering all these facts, it can be postulated that the aluminum renal effect is associated from a decrease in PTH phosphaturic capacity. Nevertheless, other associated factors like minor phosphate intestinal absorption rate may not be disregarded, even though there were no significant intake variations.

  16. Deferasirox effect on renal haemodynamic parameters in patients with transfusion-dependent β thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    Piga, Antonio; Fracchia, Silvia; Lai, Maria E; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Hirschberg, Raimund; Habr, Dany; Wegener, Antje; Bouillaud, Emmanuel; Forni, Gian Luca

    2015-03-01

    Some patients with β thalassaemia experience non-progressive creatinine increases with deferasirox, mostly within normal limits; the mechanisms involved are not fully elucidated. The effects of deferasirox on renal haemodynamics, including glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal plasma flow (RPF), were investigated in a Phase I, open-label study in β thalassaemia major patients with iron overload. Patients received deferasirox 30 mg/kg/d up to Week 8, followed by a 2-week washout period, and extended treatment up to Week 104 with a 4-week washout period. In the short-term study (n = 11), mean GFR and RPF declined from baseline to Week 8 (mean [%] change:-9·2 [-9·5%] and -105·7 ml/min [-17·8%], respectively). A similar pattern was observed during the long-term study (n = 5); mean GFR and RPF decreased up to Week 52 (-19·1 [-17·7%] and -155·6 ml/min [-26·1%]), with similar change at Week 104 (-18·4 [-17·2%] and -115·9 ml/min [-19·6%]). Measures returned to baseline values after each washout. Serum creatinine and creatinine clearance followed a similar pattern. Effects of deferasirox on renal haemodynamics were mild and reversible for up to 2 years of treatment, with no progressive worsening of renal function over time. www.clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00560820. © 2014 The Authors. British Journal of Haematology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Renal and Vascular Effects of Uric Acid Lowering in Normouricemic Patients With Uncomplicated Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lytvyn, Yuliya; Har, Ronnie; Locke, Amy; Lai, Vesta; Fong, Derek; Advani, Andrew; Perkins, Bruce A; Cherney, David Z I

    2017-07-01

    Higher plasma uric acid (PUA) levels are associated with lower glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and higher blood pressure (BP) in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Our aim was to determine the impact of PUA lowering on renal and vascular function in patients with uncomplicated T1D. T1D patients (n = 49) were studied under euglycemic and hyperglycemic conditions at baseline and after PUA lowering with febuxostat (FBX) for 8 weeks. Healthy control subjects were studied under normoglycemic conditions (n = 24). PUA, GFR (inulin), effective renal plasma flow (para-aminohippurate), BP, and hemodynamic responses to an infusion of angiotensin II (assessment of intrarenal renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system [RAAS]) were measured before and after FBX treatment. Arterial stiffness, flow-mediated dilation (FMD), nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (GMD), urinary nitric oxide (NO), and inflammatory markers were measured before and after FBX treatment. Gomez equations were used to estimate arteriolar afferent resistance, efferent resistance (RE), and glomerular hydrostatic pressure (PGLO). FBX had a modest systolic BP-lowering effect in T1D patients (112 ± 10 to 109 ± 9 mmHg, P = 0.049) without impacting arterial stiffness, FMD, GMD, or NO. FBX enhanced the filtration fraction response to hyperglycemia in T1D patients through larger increases in RE, PGLO, and interleukin-18 but without impacting the RAAS. FBX lowered systolic BP and modulated the renal RE responses to hyperglycemia but without impacting the RAAS or NO levels, suggesting that PUA may augment other hemodynamic or inflammatory mechanisms that control the renal response to hyperglycemia at the efferent arteriole. Ongoing outcome trials will determine cardiorenal outcomes of PUA lowering in patients with T1D. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  18. Reduced effect of percutaneous renal denervation on blood pressure in patients with isolated systolic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ewen, Sebastian; Ukena, Christian; Linz, Dominik; Kindermann, Ingrid; Cremers, Bodo; Laufs, Ulrich; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Schmieder, Roland E; Böhm, Michael; Mahfoud, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Renal denervation can reduce blood pressure in certain patients with resistant hypertension. The effect in patients with isolated systolic hypertension (ISH, ≥140/<90 mm Hg) is unknown. This study investigated the effects of renal denervation in 126 patients divided into 63 patients with ISH and 63 patients with combined hypertension (CH, ≥140/≥90 mm Hg) defined as baseline office systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥140 mm Hg despite treatment with ≥3 antihypertensive agents. Renal denervation significantly reduced office SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) at 3, 6, and 12 months by 17/18/17 and 5/4/4 mm Hg in ISH and by 28/27/30 and 13/16/18 mm Hg in CH, respectively. The reduction in SBP and DBP in ISH was lower compared with patients with CH at all observed time points (P<0.05 for SBP/DBP intergroup comparison). The nonresponder rate (change in office SBP <10 mm Hg) after 6 months was 37% in ISH and 21% in CH (P<0.001). Mean 24-hour ambulatory SBP and DBP after 3, 6, and 12 months were significantly reduced by 10/13/15 and 6/6/9 mm Hg in CH, respectively. In patients with ISH the reduction in systolic ambulatory blood pressure was 4/8/7 mm Hg (P=0.032/P<0.001/P=0.009) and 3/4/2 mm Hg (P=0.08/P<0.001/P=0.130) in diastolic ambulatory blood pressure after 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. The ambulatory blood pressure reduction was significantly lower after 3 and 12 months in SBP and after 12 months in ambulatory DBP, respectively. In conclusion, renal denervation reduces office and ambulatory blood pressure in patients with ISH. However, this reduction is less pronounced compared with patients with CH.

  19. Cardiovascular and renal effects of carvedilol in dogs with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Uechi, Masami; Sasaki, Takahiro; Ueno, Kouichiro; Yamamoto, Taiji; Ishikawa, Yumi

    2002-06-01

    To determine the acute effects of carvedilol (beta-blocker) on cardiovascular and renal function and its pharmacokinetics in dogs. Fifteen mature mongrel dogs (7-15 kg) of both sexes were used in these experiments. Eight dogs served as controls, and seven dogs served as iatrogenic mitral regurgitation (MR) experimental animals. Carvedilol (0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 mg/kg, P.O.) was administered, and the blood carvedilol concentration was analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The response to isoproterenol or phenylephrine was also evaluated. Isoproterenol (0.025 microg/kg/min) was infused via the saphenous vein for 5 min, and phenylephrine (5 microg/kg) was injected with carvedilol (0.2, 0.4 mg/kg) or placebo for 4 days. The heart rate and arterial blood pressure were measured, and LV fractional shortening was measured by echocardiography. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal plasma flow (RPF) were measured by intravenous infusion of sodium thiosulfate and sodium para-aminohippurate. Carvedilol (0.2 mg/kg) decreased the heart rate, whereas renal function, arterial blood pressure, and left ventricular contractile function were not affected. Carvedilol (0.4 mg/kg) decreased heart rate, blood pressure, and renal function. The tachycardic response to isoproterenol was significantly diminished for 36 hr by 0.4 mg/kg carvedilol. Carvedilol 0.2 mg/kg inhibited this effect for 24 hr. Thus, it is necessary to titrate the dosage of carvedilol, it should be initiated at less than 0.2 mg/kg and titrated up to 0.4 mg/kg for heart failure dogs.

  20. The Effect of Magnesium Sulfate on Renal Colic Pain Relief; a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jokar, Abolfazl; Cyrus, Ali; Babaei, Maryam; Taheri, Majid; Almasi-Hashiani, Amir; Behzadinia, Ezatollah; Yazdanbakhsh, Arash

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Renal colic can be managed by preventing the contraction movements of ureter muscles. By reducing acetylcholine in the nerve terminals, magnesium sulfate could be effective in this regard. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of magnesium sulfate on acute renal colic pain relief. Method: The present study was a double-blind clinical trial in which the patients suffering from acute renal colic were randomly divided into 2 groups of who either received standard protocol (intravenous infusion of 0.1 mg/Kg morphine sulfate, 30 mg of Ketorolac, and 100 ml normal saline as placebo/15 minutes) or standard protocol plus 15 mg/Kg of intravenous magnesium sulfate 50%/100 ml normal saline/15 minutes. Severity of patients’ pain was measured by visual analogue scale (VAS) at baseline, and 30 and 60 minutes after infusion. The collected data were analyzed using STATA statistical software. Results: 100 cases were randomly allocated to intervention or control group. The two groups were similar in baseline pain score and demographic characteristics. At 30 and 60 minutes, mean pain score was less in the intervention group compared to the control group. Moreover, the difference between the two groups was statistically significant regarding the additional amount of morphine, suggesting that the intervention group needed less additional morphine than the control group. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that Magnesium sulfate can be used as an adjunct drug in treatment of patients suffering from renal colic. It not only alleviates the pain in the patients, but also diminishes the need for pain medications. PMID:28286832

  1. Comparison between the effects of indapamide and hydrochlorothiazide on creatinine clearance in patients with impaired renal function and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Madkour, H; Gadallah, M; Riveline, B; Plante, G E; Massry, S G

    1995-01-01

    The long-term effects of indapamide or hydrochlorothiazide on blood pressure and renal function were examined in patients with impaired renal function and moderate hypertension. Both drugs controlled hypertension and blood pressure remained normal during the 2 years of the study. Despite this comparable control of hypertension, indapamide therapy was associated with a 28.5 +/- 4.4% increase in creatinine clearance while treatment with hydrochlorothiazide was associated with a 17.4 +/- 3.0% decrease in creatinine clearance. The results of the study indicate that indapamide is superior to hydrochlorothiazide in the treatment of patients with impaired renal function and moderate hypertension.

  2. The effect of radiopharmaceutical choice on the determination of relative renal function in rats with unilateral renal obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A.; Lallone, R.

    1984-01-01

    A significant divergence of GFR and ERPF within a single kidney could lead to different estimates of relative renal function depending on which radiopharmaceutical is administered. To address this question, the authors studied adult male Sprague-Dawley rats with unilateral ureteral obstruction by giving each animal an intravenous injection of 10 ..mu..Ci of I-125 iothalamate (GFR), I-131 hippurate (ERPF), and TC-99m DMSA and measuring the 30 minute clearance (renal uptake and urine excretion) of each agent. Normal control animals were sham operated; 25 experimental animals were subjected to permanent unilateral ureteral occlusion and studied at 6 hours, 1, 3, 7 and 14 days. Acute ureteral obstruction impaired the clearance of iothalamate to a much greater degree than OIH or DMSA at 6 hours and 1 day (rho<.005) and 3 days (rho<.05). The decline in DMSA clearance reflected ERPF more closely than GFR. In evaluating renal disease, one should consider the functional parameter reflected by the radiopharmaceutical as well as the underlying disease state.

  3. Acupuncture and somatic nerve stimulation: mechanism underlying effects on cardiovascular and renal activities.

    PubMed

    Yao, T

    1993-01-01

    Acupuncture and acupuncture-like somatic nerve stimulation exert modulatory effects upon cardiovascular and renal activity under different physiological and pathophysiological conditions. It seems that acupuncture facilitates the physiological reflexes in response to changes in internal or external environment. Thus, acupuncture can lower high blood pressure in hypertensives, elevate low blood pressure in hypotensives, and promote urinary sodium excretion during hyperosmotic challenge, etc. Acupuncture effects are thought to be mediated by activation of the small myelinated fibres coming from muscle receptors. Preliminary studies show that different neurotransmitters and neuropeptides are involved in the effects of acupuncture.

  4. The Effects of Local Supralethal Irradiation on Renal Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-05-01

    Doyle W. G. Ewald ARMED FORCES RADIOBIOLOGY RESEARCH INSTITUTE Defense Nuclear Agency Bethesda, Maryland App-oved for public release...USN Director ARMED FORCES RADIOBIOLOGY RESEARCH INSTITUTE Defense Nuclear Agency Bethesda, Maryland Approved for public release; distribution...J. Physiol. 182:561-566, 1955. 3. Avioli, L. V., Lazor , M. Z., Cotlove, E., Brace, K. C. and Andrews, J. R. Early effects of radiation on

  5. Impact of pneumoperitoneum on renal perfusion and excretory function: beneficial effects of nitroglycerine.

    PubMed

    Bishara, Bishara; Karram, Tony; Khatib, Samer; Ramadan, Rawi; Schwartz, Henry; Hoffman, Aaron; Abassi, Zaid

    2009-03-01

    Increased intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) (pneumoperitoneum) during laparoscopic surgery may result in adverse effects on kidney function. The mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have not been fully determined. The present study was designed to: (1) investigate the effects of incremental increases in IAP on renal function in normal rats and (2) evaluate whether the nitric oxide (NO) system is involved in renal dysfunction characterizing pneumoperitoneum. Male rats were organized into two groups. The first group was subjected to IAP of 0 (baseline), 7 or 14 mmHg, over 1 h for each pressure, followed by a deflation period of 60 min (recovery). Two additional groups were pretreated with: (1) non-depressor dose of nitroglycerine (NTG) and (2) nitro-L-arginine-methylester (L-NAME), an NO synthase inhibitor, before applying 14 mmHg for 1 h. Urine flow rate (V), Na+ excretion (U(Na)V), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), renal plasma flow (RPF), and blood pressure were determined throughout the experiments. There were no significant changes in V, U(Na)V, GFR, and RPF during 7 mmHg insufflation. However, significant reductions in these parameters were observed during 14 mmHg: V from 8.49 +/- 0.92 to 6.12 +/- 0.54 microl/min, U(Na)V from 1.29 +/- 0.28 to 0.39 +/- 0.09 microEq/min, and FE(Na) from 0.37 +/- 0.11 to 0.27 +/- 0.04%. These alterations in excretory functions were associated with a considerable decline in GFR from 1.85 +/- 0.09 to 0.88 +/- 0.09 ml/min, p < 0.05, (-46.3 +/- 5.2% from baseline) and RPF from 8.66 +/- 0.62 to 4.33 +/- 0.49 ml/min, p < 0.05, (-51.93 +/- 5.24% from baseline), without a significant change in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP). When the animals were pretreated with NTG, the adverse effects of pneumoperitoneum on V, U(Na)V, GFR, and RPF were substantially improved, suggesting that NO system plays a beneficial counter-regulatory role during laparoscopy. In line with this notion, pretreatment with L-NAME remarkably aggravated pneumoperitoneum

  6. Effects of alpha adrenoceptor blockade on renal nerve stimulation-induced norepinephrine release and vasoconstriction in the dog kidney.

    PubMed

    Hisa, H; Araki, S; Tomura, Y; Hayashi, Y; Satoh, S

    1989-02-01

    Effects of alpha-antagonists on renal norepinephrine (NE) release and vasoconstriction induced by renal nerve stimulation (RNS) were examined in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs. RNS at 1,2 and 3 Hz (1 msec duration, 10-20 V) for 1 min decreased renal blood flow (RBF) and increased both the renal venous NE concentration (NEC) and calculated renal NE efflux (NEE). The RBF responses to 2 and 3 Hz RNS and NEC responses to 1, 2 and 3 Hz RNS during intrarenal arterial infusion of yohimbine (1.0 micrograms/kg/min) were greater than those observed during the control period. The NEE responses to 1 and 2 Hz RNS, but not to 3 Hz RNS, were also potentiated by the yohimbine infusion. Prazosin treatment (0.2 mg/kg i.v.) attenuated the RBF responses. Subsequent infusion of yohimbine potentiated both the NEC and NEE responses to 1, 2 and 3 Hz RNS in this alpha-1 adrenoceptor-blocked state. These results suggest that an alpha-2 adrenoceptor-mediated inhibitory mechanism of neural NE release exists in the dog kidney, which can be activated by endogenously released catecholamines to modulate the neural control of renal hemodynamics. Alpha-1 adrenoceptor-mediated renal vasoconstriction may affect the evaluation of neural NE release by NEE when high-frequency RNS is applied during inhibition of the alpha-2 adrenoceptor-mediated mechanism.

  7. Effect of ureteral access sheath on stone-free rates in patients undergoing ureteroscopic management of renal calculi.

    PubMed

    L'esperance, James O; Ekeruo, Wesley O; Scales, Charles D; Marguet, Charles G; Springhart, W Patrick; Maloney, Michaella E; Albala, David M; Preminger, Glenn M

    2005-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of ureteral access sheaths (UASs) on stone-free rates (SFRs) during ureteroscopic treatment of renal calculi. Several advantages of UASs during flexible ureteroscopy have been documented. However, no study has evaluated their impact on SFRs. We retrospectively reviewed all ureteroscopic cases for the management of renal stones performed at our Stone Center. Data were stratified according to the use or lack of use of the UAS. The groups were stratified by stone location within the kidney. Stone-free status was determined at 2 months postoperatively by either intravenous urography with tomograms or noncontrast renal computed tomography in patients with contrast allergies. A total of 256 ureteroscopic procedures for the removal of renal calculi were performed between 1997 and 2003 (173 with UAS and 83 without). The groups were similar in age, sex, and stone burden. Stents were placed in nearly 80% of patients. The lower renal pole represented the most common presenting location. Stone displacement with a ureteroscopic basket for efficient fragmentation was necessary in 34%. The overall SFR in the UAS group and non-UAS group was 79% and 67%, respectively (P = 0.042). The SFRs were improved for calculi in all portions of the kidney. In addition to facilitating ureteroscopic access, reducing costs, and lowering intrarenal pressures, the results of the current study suggest that UASs improve SFRs during the management of renal calculi. It is now our current practice to use the UAS routinely during ureteroscopic treatment of renal and upper ureteral calculi.

  8. [Effects of alpha-keto acid on the expression of neuropeptide Y in malnutrition rats with chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei-Dong; Deng, Cong; Long, Hai-Bo; Xiao, Wei; Hu, Hai-Yan

    2009-07-01

    To investigate the effects of alpha-keto acid on the expression of neuropeptide Y in malnutrition rats with chronic renal failure. SD rats received 5/6 nephrectomy and were fed with 4% casein to establish models of malnutrition with chronic renal failure. Serum albumin, urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, type-1 insulin like growth factor and body weight of the rats were measured. The rat models were randomized into chronic renal failure group, alpha-keto acid group and normal control group, and after a 4-week treatment as indicated, neuropeptide Y mRNA levels in the hypothalamus were measured by RT-PCR in rats with surgically induced renal failure (two-stage subtotal nephrectomy). The blood neuropeptide Y of the rats were analyzed by radioimmunoassay. Malnutrition occurred in chronic renal failure rats at the end of 10 weeks. Compared with those in the chronic renal failure group, the plasma neuropeptide Y concentrations in alpha-keto acid group were significantly lowered with substantially elevated neuropeptide Y mRNA expression in the hypothalamus. alpha-keto acid capsule can improve malnutrition in rats with renal insufficiency possibly by up-regulating neuropeptide Y mRNA expression in the hypothalamus and reducing the level of blood neuropeptide Y.

  9. Role of ATP-dependent K channels in the effects of erythropoietin in renal ischaemia injury

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Tonguç Utku; Yazihan, Nuray; Dalgic, Aydın; Kaya, Ezgi Ermis; Salman, Bulent; Kocak, Mehtap; Akcil, Ethem

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Erythropoietin (EPO) has cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic effects in pathological conditions, including hypoxia and ischaemia-reperfusion injury. One of the targets to protect against injury is ATP-dependent potassium (KATP) channels. These channels could be involved in EPO induced ischaemic preconditoning like a protective effect. We evaluated the cell cytoprotective effects of EPO in relation to KATP channel activation in the renal tubular cell culture model under hypoxic/normoxic conditions. Methods: Dose and time dependent effects of EPO, KATP channel blocker glibenclamide and KATP channel opener diazoxide on cellular proliferation were evaluated by colorimetric assay MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide] under normoxic and hypoxic conditions in human renal proximal tubular cell line (CRL-2830). Evaluation of the dose and time dependent effects of EPO, glibenclamide and diazoxide on apoptosis was done by caspase-3 activity levels. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1 α) mRNA levels were measured by semi-quantative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT)-PCR. Kir 6.1 protein expresion was evalutaed by Western blot. Results: Glibenclamide treatment decreased the number of living cells in a time and dose dependent manner, whereas EPO and diazoxide treatments increased. Glibenclamide (100 μM) treatment significantly blocked the anti-apoptotic effects of EPO (10 IU/ml) under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. EPO (10 IU/ml) and diazoxide (100 μM) treatments significantly increased (P<0.01) whereas glibenclamide decreased (P<0.05) HIF-1 α mRNA expression. Glibenclamide significantly (P<0.01) decreased EPO induced HIF-1 α mRNA expression when compared with the EPO alone group. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that the cell proliferative, cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic effects of EPO were associated with KATP channels in the renal tubular cell culture model under hypoxic

  10. Renal hemodynamic effect of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibition in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cherney, David Z I; Perkins, Bruce A; Soleymanlou, Nima; Maione, Maria; Lai, Vesta; Lee, Alana; Fagan, Nora M; Woerle, Hans J; Johansen, Odd Erik; Broedl, Uli C; von Eynatten, Maximilian

    2014-02-04

    The primary objective of this mechanistic open-label, stratified clinical trial was to determine the effect of 8 weeks' sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibition with empagliflozin 25 mg QD on renal hyperfiltration in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). Inulin (glomerular filtration rate; GFR) and paraaminohippurate (effective renal plasma flow) clearances were measured in individuals stratified based on having hyperfiltration (T1D-H, GFR ≥ 135 mL/min/1.73m(2), n=27) or normal GFR (T1D-N, GFR 90-134 mL/min/1.73m(2), n=13) at baseline. Renal function and circulating levels of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system mediators and NO were measured under clamped euglycemic (4-6 mmol/L) and hyperglycemic (9-11 mmol/L) conditions at baseline and end of treatment. During clamped euglycemia, hyperfiltration was attenuated by -33 mL/min/1.73m(2) with empagliflozin in T1D-H, (GFR 172±23-139±25 mL/min/1.73 m(2), P<0.01). This effect was accompanied by declines in plasma NO and effective renal plasma flow and an increase in renal vascular resistance (all P<0.01). Similar significant effects on GFR and renal function parameters were observed during clamped hyperglycemia. In T1D-N, GFR, other renal function parameters, and plasma NO were not altered by empagliflozin. Empagliflozin reduced hemoglobin A1c significantly in both groups, despite lower insulin doses in each group (P≤0.04). In conclusion, short-term treatment with the sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor empagliflozin attenuated renal hyperfiltration in subjects with T1D, likely by affecting tubular-glomerular feedback mechanisms. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01392560.

  11. Metabonomic investigation on the protective effects of rosiglitazone and caloric restriction for renal senescence in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingwei; Yan, Shikai; Gao, Xiang; Dai, Weixing; Liu, Senyan; Jin, Huizi; Zhang, Weidong; Mei, Changlin

    2012-10-01

    A liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry based metabonomics approach was applied to investigate the protective effects of rosiglitazone (RGTZ) and caloric restriction (CR) for renal senescence in a rat model. Kidney tissues and serum samples were collected from four groups of rats, including 12- month and 24-month ad libitum fed rats, RGTZ and CR treated 24-month rats. Multivariate data analysis was performed on the mass data of metabonomic profiles to detect the differences among the groups. By metabolite profiling and partial least squares discriminate analysis, 23 renal senescence-related endogenous metabolites were discovered, including phospholipids, carnitine, acetylcarnitine, and creatinine, most of which were related to the oxidative stress and lipid metabolism. Renal senescence is characterized by oxidative stress and changes in lipid metabolism, and RGTZ administration and CR treatment may have similar protective effects for renal senescence via restraining oxidative stress and lipid metabolism.

  12. Effect of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) on renal microvillar enzymes in Cu-deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Saari, J.T.; Reeves, P.G.; Noordewier, B. )

    1989-02-09

    Dietary Cu deficiency produces known defects in the kidney. We studied the effects of Cu deficiency on the activity of five renal microvillar enzymes. Further, because Cu deficiency causes oxidative damage in other tissues, we studied the effect of the hydroxyl radical (OH) scavenger DMSO on observed enzyme changes. Male, weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed, in a 2x2 design, diets deficient in Cu (CuD) or supplemented with Cu (CuS, 5 ppm) and water with or without DMSO (4.75%) for 35 d. CuD rats had lower body weights (BW), hematocrits (Hct), serum ceruloplasmin, liver and kidney Cu and higher heart weights (HW), HW/BW ratios and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) than CuS rats. Cu deficiency increased activities of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and endopeptidase (EP), decreased activities of gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) and aminopeptidase (AMP) and had no effect on alkaline phosphatase (AP). DMSO attenuated effects of Cu deficiency on HW, HW/BW and Hct, but not on BUN. DMSO independently increased ACE and AMP activity, independently decreased AP activity, significantly inhibited the effect of Cu deficiency on GGT activity and had no effect on EP activity. We conclude that, while Cu deficiency has significant effects on several renal microvillar enzymes, OH dose not play a major role in those effects.

  13. Protective effect of naringenin on hepatic and renal dysfunction and oxidative stress in arsenic intoxicated rats.

    PubMed

    Mershiba, Sam Daniel; Dassprakash, M Velayutham; Saraswathy, Sundara Dhakshinamurthy

    2013-05-01

    Arsenic has a long history as a potent human poison, chronic exposure over a period of time may result in the manifestation of toxicity in practically all systems of the body. In the present investigation the efficacy of naringenin (NRG), a naturally occurring citrus flavanone against arsenic-induced hepatotoxic and nephrotoxic manifestations have been studied in rats. Arsenic trioxide was administered orally at the dose of 2 mg/kg/day with or without combination of NRG (20 or 50 mg/kg/day) for 28 days. At the end of the experimental period the hepatic and renal dysfunction was evaluated by histological examination, serum biomarkers and markers of oxidative stress; lipid peroxidation (LPO), reduced glutathione (GSH) and antioxidant enzymes. Arsenic intoxication increased serum bilirubin, urea, uric acid and creatinine levels, additionally enhanced the activities of hepatic marker enzymes aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase and alkaline phosphatase. Also, the hepatic and renal tissues showed a marked elevation in LPO levels with a decrease in GSH content and the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase on arsenic treatment. Simultaneous treatment with NRG restored the activities of serum biomarkers and antioxidant enzymes in the tissues in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the histopathological studies confirmed the protective effect of NRG co-treatment by reducing the pathological changes due to arsenic intoxication in both liver and kidney. Thus, our present study demonstrates that NRG has a potential to protect arsenic-induced oxidative hepatic and renal dysfunction.

  14. The effect of activated charcoal on adenine-induced chronic renal failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Ali, Badreldin H; Alza'abi, Mohamed; Ramkumar, Aishwarya; Al-Lawati, Intisar; Waly, Mostafa I; Beegam, Sumaya; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Brand, Susanne; Schupp, Nicole

    2014-03-01

    Activated charcoal (AC) is a sorbent that has been shown to remove urinary toxins like urea and indoxyl sulfate. Here, the influence of AC on kidney function of rats with experimental chronic renal failure (CRF) is investigated. CRF was induced in rats by feeding adenine (0.75%) for four weeks. As an intervention, AC was added to the feed at concentrations of 10%, 15% or 20%. Adenine treatment impaired kidney function: it lowered creatinine clearance and increased plasma concentrations of creatinine, urea, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and vanin-1. Furthermore, it raised plasma concentrations of the uremic toxins indoxyl sulfate, phosphate and uric acid. Renal morphology was severely damaged and histopathological markers of inflammation and fibrosis were especially increased. In renal homogenates, antioxidant indices, including superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, total antioxidant capacity and reduced glutathione were adversely affected. Most of these changes were significantly ameliorated by dietary administration of AC at a concentration of 20%, while effects induced by lower doses of dietary AC on adenine nephrotoxicity were not statistically significant. The results suggest that charcoal is a useful sorbent agent in dietary adenine-induced CRF in rats and that its usability as a nephroprotective agent in human kidney disease should be studied.

  15. Protective effect of crocetin on hemorrhagic shock-induced acute renal failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunbo; Yan, Junling; Xi, Liang; Qian, Zhiyu; Wang, Zhenghong; Yang, Lina

    2012-07-01

    Multiple organ failure is a common outcome of hemorrhagic shock followed by resuscitation, and the kidney is one of the prime target organs involved. The main objective of the study was to evaluate whether crocetin, a natural product from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, has beneficial effects on renal dysfunction caused by hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in rats. Anesthetized rats were bled to reduce mean arterial blood pressure to 35 (SD, 5) mmHg for 60 min and then were resuscitated with their withdrawn shed blood and normal saline. Crocetin was administered via the duodenum at a dose of 50 mg/kg 40 min after hemorrhage. The increase in creatinine and blood urea nitrogen was significantly reduced at 2 h after hemorrhage and resuscitation in crocetin-treated rats. The increases in renal nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin 6 were also attenuated by crocetin. Hemorrhagic shock resulted in a significant elevation in malondialdehyde production and was accompanied by a reduction in total superoxide dismutase activity, activation of nuclear factor κB, and overexpression of inducible nitric oxide synthase. These changes were significantly attenuated by crocetin at 2 h after resuscitation. These results suggested that crocetin blocks inflammatory cascades by inhibiting production of reactive oxygen species and restoring superoxide dismutase activity to ameliorate renal dysfunction caused by hemorrhage shock and resuscitation.

  16. The effectiveness of flexible ureterorenoscopy for opaque and non-opaque renal stones.

    PubMed

    Tanik, Serhat; Zengin, Kursad; Albayrak, Sebahattin; Atar, Muhittin; Imamoglu, Muhammed Abdurrahim; Bakirtas, Hasan; Gurdal, Mesut

    2015-02-22

    To evaluate the treatment success rate of flexible ureterorenoscopy (URS) for opaque and non-opaque renal stones. Ninety-four patients, who underwent flexible URS for renal stones between October 2012 and January 2014, were included. The patients were divided into two groups according to stone radiolucency. The patients were evaluated with preoperative and postoperative (at the weeks 4) computed tomography. Success of the treatment was defined as stone-free status and residual fragments < 4 mm. Success of the treatment was observed in 79 (84%) patients. Sex, stone size, and stone location were factors affecting treatment success. Seventy-five (79.8%) patients had opaque stones, and 19 (20.2%) had non-opaque stones. The treatment success rates for opaque and non-opaque stones were 86.6% and 73.6%, respectively (P = .167). Flexible URS was a successful modality with acceptable morbidity to treat renal stones. These results show that radiolucent and opaque stones can be effectively treated by flexible URS. 

  17. Concentration of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate in renal hypertrophy. Contrasting effects of early diabetes and unilateral nephrectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Kunjara, S; Sochor, M; Greenbaum, A L; McLean, P

    1986-01-01

    Studies were made of the renal phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PPRibP) content and PPRibP synthetase (EC 2.7.6.1) activity in rats diabetic for 5, 14 or 20 days, or unilaterally nephrectomized (UN) for 5 days, and in doubly lesioned animals. Approximately equal degrees of renal enlargement were found after 5 days diabetes or 5 days UN. In the doubly lesioned animals the increment of growth was additive. Unilateral nephrectomy of 5 days duration, in contrast with diabetes, had no effect on the PPRibP content of the contralateral kidney, nor did it modify the renal PPRibP content when performed on animals diabetic for 5, 14 or 20 days. The activity of PPRibP synthetase was unaffected by diabetes, UN or diabetes +UN. The results pinpoint a stage of nucleotide synthesis which is differentially affected by the two stimuli, in line with evidence for differences in regulation of nucleic acid turnover in the two conditions. PMID:2432888

  18. Renal damage mediated by oxidative stress: a hypothesis of protective effects of red wine.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Ramón; Rivera, Gonzalo

    2002-08-01

    Over the last decade, oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of seemingly unrelated renal diseases. Epidemiological studies have documented an association of moderate wine consumption with a decreased risk of cardiovascular and neurological diseases; however, similar studies in the kidney are still lacking. The kidney is an organ highly vulnerable to damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS), likely due to the abundance of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the composition of renal lipids. ROS are involved in the pathogenic mechanism of conditions such as glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. The health benefits of moderate consumption of red wine can be partly attributed to its antioxidant properties. Indeed, the kidney antioxidant defense system is enhanced after chronic exposure to moderate amounts of wine, a response arising from the combined effects of ethanol and the nonalcoholic components, mainly polyphenols. Polyphenols behave as potent ROS scavengers and metal chelators; ethanol, in turn, modulates the activity of antioxidant enzymes. Therefore, a hypothesis that red wine causes a decreased vulnerability of the kidney to the oxidative challenges could be proposed. This view is partly supported by direct evidences indicating that wine and antioxidants isolated from red wine, as well as other antioxidants, significantly attenuate or prevent the oxidative damage to the kidney. The present hypothesis paper provides a collective body of evidence suggesting a protective role of moderate wine consumption against the production and progression of renal diseases, based on the existing concepts on the pathophysiology of kidney injury mediated by oxidative stress.

  19. Lifetime Cost-Effectiveness of Calcineurin Inhibitor Withdrawal After De Novo Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Earnshaw, Stephanie R.; Graham, Christopher N.; Irish, William D.; Sato, Reiko; Schnitzler, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    After renal transplantation, immunosuppressive regimens associated with high short-term survival rates are not necessarily associated with high long-term survival rates, suggesting that regimens may need to be optimized over time. Calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) withdrawal from a sirolimus-based immunosuppressive regimen may maximize the likelihood of long-term graft and patient survival by minimizing CNI-associated nephrotoxicity. In this study, a lifetime Markov model was created to compare the cost-effectiveness of a sirolimus-based CNI withdrawl regimen (sirolimus plus steroids) with other common CNI-containing regimens in adult de novo renal transplantation patients. Long-term graft survival was estimated by renal function and data from published studies and the US transplant registry, including short- and long-term outcomes, utility weights, and health-state costs were incorporated. Drug costs were based on average daily consumption and wholesale acquisition costs. The model suggests that treatment with sirolimus plus steroids is more efficacious and less costly than regimens consisting of a CNI, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroids; therefore, CNI withdrawal not only shows potential for long-term clinical benefits but also is expected to be cost-saving over a patient's life compared with the most commonly prescribed CNI-containing regimens. PMID:18562571

  20. Protective effects of Ficus racemosa stem bark against doxorubucin-induced renal and testicular toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Urooj, Asna; Karim, Alias A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ficus racemosa Linn. (Moraceae) bark is a rich source of phenolic compounds known to possess potential antioxidant activity offering numerous health benefits. Materials and Methods: The present study evaluated the protective effects of sequential acetone extract of Ficus racemosa bark at two doses (FR250; 250 mg kg-1 and FR500; 500 mg kg-1 p.o.) against doxorubicin-induced renal and testicular toxicity in rats. Results: Doxorubicin administration resulted in significant decrease (P ≤ 0.05) in total protein and glutathione concentrations, while increased (P ≤ 0.05) serum urea, creatinine and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Extract pretreatment restored biochemical parameters toward normalization. FR250 and FR500 decreased serum creatinine levels by 22.5% and 44%, while serum urea levels were decreased by 30.4% and 58.8%, respectively. Extract pretreatment (500 mg kg-1) decreased TBARS and increased glutathione levels in the kidney and testis to control levels. These observations were substantiated by histopathological studies, wherein normal renal and testicular architecture was restored in FR500 group. Conclusion: Doxorubicin exposure results in pronounced oxidative stress, and administration of F. racemosa stem bark extract offers significant renal and testicular protection by inhibiting lipidperoxidation-mediated through scavenging free radicals. PMID:23772108

  1. Potential immunotoxic effects of trichloroethylene-induced IV allergic reaction in renal impairment

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jun-Feng; Feng, Yan-Yan

    2017-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is known to induce allergic contact dermatitis and subsequent occupational medicamentosa-like dermatitis (OMLD) with multi-system injuries, including liver, kidney, and skin injuries. However, the mechanisms underlying immune system dysfunction that result in organ injury have not yet been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we measured the levels of secreted cytokines by effect or T cells in TCE-treated guinea pigs to better understand the contribution of allergic disorders in renal injuries. We immunized guinea pigs with trichloroethylene using the Guinea Pig Maximization Test (GPMT) and scored the inflammation on the guinea pigs’ skin. The kidney function and ultra-structural changes in the kidneys were detected using biochemical methods and electron microscopy. The deposition of cytokines was determined using immunohistochemistry. The sensitization rate was 63.16% in the TCE-sensitized groups. The electron microscopy results showed tubular epithelial cell mitochondrial swelling, vacuolar degeneration, and atrophy of the microvillus in the sensitized groups. A high degree of cytokine deposition was observed in the renal tubular proximal epithelial cells in the TCE-sensitized groups. As observed in this study, the variation in the level of immune system activation not only indicates that TCE can largely magnify the immune reaction but also suggests a potential role of immune dysfunction in renal impairment. PMID:28867961

  2. Early and late renal adverse effects after potentially nephrotoxic treatment for childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    Knijnenburg, Sebastiaan L; Mulder, Renée L; Schouten-Van Meeteren, Antoinette Y N; Bökenkamp, Arend; Blufpand, Hester; van Dulmen-den Broeder, Eline; Veening, Margreet A; Kremer, Leontien C M; Jaspers, Monique W M

    2013-10-08

    Great improvements in diagnostics and treatment for malignant disease in childhood have led to a major increase in survival. However, childhood cancer survivors (CCS) are at great risk for developing adverse effects caused by multimodal treatment for their malignancy. Nephrotoxicity is one of these known (acute) side effects of several treatments, including cisplatin, carboplatin, ifosfamide, radiotherapy and nephrectomy, and can cause glomerular filtration rate impairment, proteinuria, tubulopathy and hypertension. However, evidence about the long-term effects of these treatments on renal function remains inconclusive. To reduce the number of (long-term) nephrotoxic events in CCS, it is important to know the risk of, and risk factors for, early and late renal adverse effects, so that ultimately treatment and screening protocols can be adjusted. To evaluate existing evidence on the effects of potentially nephrotoxic treatment modalities on the prevalence of and associated risk factors for renal dysfunction in survivors treated for childhood cancer with a median or mean survival of at least one year after cessation of treatment, where possible in comparison with healthy controls or CCS treated without potentially nephrotoxic treatment. We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2011), MEDLINE/PubMed (from 1945 to December 2011) and EMBASE/Ovid (from 1980 to December 2011). With the exception of case reports, case series and studies including fewer than 20 participants, we included studies with all study designs that reported on renal function (one year or longer after cessation of treatment) in children and adults who were treated for a paediatric malignancy (aged 18 years or younger at diagnosis) with cisplatin, carboplatin, ifosfamide, radiation including the kidney region and/or a nephrectomy. Two review authors independently performed study selection, risk of bias

  3. Effects of small changes in carotid sinus pressure on renal haemodynamics and function in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Karim, F; Poucher, S M; Summerill, R A

    1989-01-01

    1. In dogs anaesthetized with chloralose and artificially ventilated, the carotid sinuses were vascularly isolated and perfused with arterial blood. Mean aortic pressure was held constant at 111 +/- 2 mmHg (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 18) by means of a pressure bottle connected to the aorta and a Starling resistance. Both vagus nerves were sectioned in the neck and propranolol hydrochloride (1 mg kg-1 h-1) or atenolol (0.5-4 mg kg-1 h-1) was administered. The left and right renal blood flows were measured by electromagnetic flowmeters (wrap-round probes), glomerular filtration rate by creatinine clearance, urinary sodium by flame photometry and solute excretion by osmometry. 2. In six dogs decreasing pressure in the isolated carotid sinuses from 119 +/- 4 to 78 +/- 3 mmHg (n = 9) resulted in significant decreases in renal blood flow by 18 +/- 3% (P less than 0.01), glomerular filtration rate by 41 +/- 9% (P less than 0.01), filtration fraction by 30 +/- 11% (P less than 0.05), urine flow by 46 +/- 6% (P less than 0.001), sodium excretion by 46 +/- 9% (P less than 0.001) and osmolar excretion by 44 +/- 6% (P less than 0.001). Fractional sodium excretion did not change significantly. Increasing carotid sinus pressure back to 120 +/- 4 mmHg (n = 6) resulted in increases in all the variables to values not significantly different from those at initial high carotid pressure. 3. Ligation of left renal nerves at low carotid sinus pressure (83 +/- 3 mmHg, n = 5) caused significant increases in all of the variables in the left kidney. After ligation, changes in carotid sinus pressure produced no effect on the denervated left kidney, but in the three dogs in which the responses of the right kidney were also tested, the usual responses after denervation of the left kidney were seen. 4. The results show that changes in carotid sinus pressure around the normal range can result in significant reflex effects on renal haemodynamics and function and that these effects are mediated solely

  4. Exploring the effect and mechanism of Hibiscus sabdariffa on urinary tract infection and experimental renal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shun-Ting; Lo, Hsin-Yi; Li, Chia-Cheng; Cheng, Lu-Chen; Chou, Pei-Chi; Lee, Yu-Chen; Ho, Tin-Yun; Hsiang, Chien-Yun

    2016-12-24

    Hibiscus sabdariffa Linn., also known as roselle, is used in folk medicine as an anti-inflammatory agent. Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common problem in long-term care facilities. However, effects of roselle on UTI and renal inflammation remained to be analyzed. Here we surveyed the effect of roselle drink on the prevention of UTI in long-term care facilities and analyzed the anti-inflammatory potential of roselle on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced renal inflammation in mice. Survey questionnaires and clinical observation were applied to evaluate the use of roselle and the incidence of UTI in long-term care facilities. Mice were administrated roselle orally for 7 consecutive days and then challenged with LPS. Anti-renal inflammatory effects of roselle were analyzed by microarray and immunohistochemical staining. Clinical observation showed that taking roselle drink in residents with urinary catheters reduced the incidence of UTI in long-term care facilities. Renal inflammation is a key event of UTI. Roselle suppressed LPS-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation in cells and LPS-induced interleukin-1β production in mice a dose-dependent manner. Immunohistochemical staining showed that roselle inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB activation and inflammatory cell infiltration in kidney. Gene expression profiling further showed that roselle suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes and enzyme genes involved in the production of prostaglandin and nitric oxide. In addition, NF-κB was the main transcription factor involved in the regulation of roselle-regulated gene expression in kidney. This is the first report applying clinical observation-guided transcriptomic study to explore the application and mechanism of roselle on UTI. Our findings suggested that roselle drink ameliorated LPS-induced renal inflammation via downregulation of cytokine network, pro-inflammatory product production, and NF-κB pathway. Moreover, this report suggested the

  5. Cardiac and renal protective effects of dexmedetomidine in cardiac surgeries: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ammar, AS; Mahmoud, KM; Kasemy, ZA; Helwa, MA

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiac and renal injuries are common insults after cardiac surgeries that contribute to perioperative morbidity and mortality. Dexmedetomidine has been shown to protect several organs against ischemia/reperfusion-(I/R) induced injury. We performed a randomized controlled trial to assess the effect of dexmedetomidine on cardiac and renal I/R injury in patients undergoing cardiac surgeries. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients scheduled for elective cardiac surgeries were randomized to dexmedetomidine group that received a continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine initiated 5 min before cardiopulmonary bypass (1 μg/kg over 15 min, followed by 0.5 μg/kg/h) until 6 h after surgery, whereas the control group received an equivalent volume of physiological saline. Primary outcome measures included myocardial-specific proteins (troponin-I, creatine kinase-MB), urinary-specific kidney proteins (N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase, alpha-1-microglobulin, glutathione transferase-pi, glutathione transferase alpha), serum proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta), norepinephrine, and cortisol levels. They were measured within 5 min of starting anesthesia (T0), at the end of surgery (T1), 12 h after surgery (T2), 24 h after surgery (T3), 36 h postoperatively (T4), and 48 h postoperatively (T5). Furthermore, creatinine clearance and serum cystatin C were measured before starting surgery as a baseline, and at days 1, 4, 7 after surgery. Results: Dexmedetomidine reduced cardiac and renal injury as evidenced by lower concentration of myocardial-specific proteins, kidney-specific urinary proteins, and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, it caused higher creatinine clearance and lower serum cystatin C. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine provided cardiac and renal protection during cardiac surgery. PMID:27833481

  6. Complications, effects on dialysis dose, and survival of tunneled femoral dialysis catheters in acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Klouche, Kada; Amigues, Laurent; Deleuze, Sebastien; Beraud, Jean-Jacques; Canaud, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Availability of a functional vascular access is a mandatory prerequisite for extracorporeal renal replacement therapy in patients with acute renal failure. The femoral site of insertion commonly is chosen because it is an easy and convenient access. However, an array of complications may substantially alter the quality of treatment, and it appears that catheter-related morbidity and dysfunction are more frequent with the femoral than internal jugular site. This study is designed to evaluate the potential benefits of using soft silicone tunneled catheters ((ST)Caths) at the femoral site. Thirty patients with acute renal failure treated by intermittent hemodialysis (IHD) and/or continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF) were assigned to either twin (ST)Caths or twin polyurethane nontunneled femoral catheters. Time necessary for catheter insertion, catheter-related complications, and catheter lifespan were monitored. Catheter performance during IHD and the effect of catheter type on dialysis dose were evaluated. The time necessary for (ST)Cath insertion was significantly longer. The incidence of vein thrombosis and catheter-related infection was lower, and the ratio of venous return pressure to catheter blood flow was better with an (ST)Cath. Recirculation rates were similar for both types of catheters. Whether treated by using IHD or CVVHDF, patients with an (ST)Cath benefited from a greater delivered dialysis dose. Multivariate analysis confirmed that (ST)Cath use was a determinant factor to optimize dialysis dose delivery. (ST)Cath patency was significantly longer. In patients with acute renal failure, use of an (ST)Cath minimizes catheter-related morbidity and improves dialysis efficiency compared with conventional femoral catheters.

  7. Effect of apelin hormone on renal ischemia/reperfusion induced oxidative damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Bircan, Burak; Çakır, Murat; Kırbağ, Sevda; Gül, Hüseyin Fatih

    2016-08-01

    Apelin is a peptide hormone defined as a ligand for G-protein clamped receptor (APJ) receptor. It is indicated in the literature both apelin and APJ are synthesized on the peripheral tissues including the renal tissues. Which roles does the apelin play on the renal tissue has not been completely illuminated yet. This study is designed to determine the possible protective effect of apelin-13 on the kidney I/R injury. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. In the sham group, right kidneys of the animals were dissected. In the I/R group, right kidney was dissected and ischemia of 45 min was performed, and then reperfusion was applied for 3 h. In the treatment groups, three different doses of apelin were injected at the beginning of the ischemia unlike the I/R group. BUN, Cre, Na, K, Cl, total protein and albumin from serum samples were determined and TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, TAS and TOS parameters were read with ELISA reader. MDA, SOD, CAT and GSH-Px enzyme activations from renal tissues were measured. In comparison with the sham and I/R groups, while the serum BUN, CRE, CI and TNF-α levels showed an increase in the groups on which the apelin-13 was applied, Na, total protein, albumin, TAS levels decreased. Serum TOS level of other groups showed an increase by comparison with the sham group. Our results showed that apelin-13 applied after I/R increased the antioxidant enzyme activity in a dose dependent manner, prevented the lipid oxidation and improved the renal functions.

  8. Effect of active infection on cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of cyclosporine in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Hegazy, S K; Adam, A G; Hamdy, N A; Khalafallah, N M

    2015-06-01

    Infections downregulate cytochrome-P activities and thus may alter drug disposition, especially for drugs with a narrow therapeutic index. Cyclosporine (CyA), still used for the prevention of allograft rejection in renal transplant recipients in Egypt, seems to be affected by these infectious changes, based on random clinical observations. In the present study, the effects of bacterial and fungal infection on CyA metabolism were studied in renal transplant patients and subsequent nephrotoxicity was monitored. Twenty renal transplant patients, diagnosed with fungal or bacterial infection, were recruited from the renal transplantation outpatient clinic in Alexandria University Hospitals. No dose adjustment in CyA was performed at least 1 week before the onset of infection. Exclusion criteria were patients with acute or chronic unstable liver disease, elderly patients, and patients on concomitant drugs affecting CyA metabolism. CyA trough levels and serum creatinine (SCR) concentrations were measured by fluorescence polarization immunoassay and enzymatic assay, respectively, pre-infection, during infection and in many cases, post infection. CyA trough levels and SCR concentrations increased significantly during the infection (P < 0.001, P = 0.002) respectively. Of the patients, 87% experienced a concomitant rise in CyA trough level and SCR concentrations. No significant difference between pre-infection and post-infection levels of CyA trough and SCR was found. CyA trough and SCR levels increased during bacterial and fungal infections and returned to pre-infection levels once the infection was resolved. The data generated stress the importance of monitoring CyA levels during episodes of infection. Our recommendations concerning CyA dose adjustment differ according to severity and duration of infection. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Effects of tempol on altered metabolism and renal vascular responsiveness in fructose-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, Mohammed H; Sattar, Munavvar A; Johns, Edward J

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of tempol (a superoxide dismutase mimetic) on renal vasoconstrictor responses to angiotensin II (Ang II) and adrenergic agonists in fructose-fed Sprague-Dawley rats (a model of metabolic syndrome). Rats were fed 20% fructose in drinking water (F) for 8 weeks. One fructose-fed group received tempol (FT) at 1 mmol·L(-1) in drinking water for 8 weeks or as an infusion (1.5 mg·kg(-1)·min(-1)) intrarenally. At the end of the treatment regimen, the renal responses to noradrenaline, phenylephrine, methoxamine, and Ang II were determined. F rats exhibited hyperinsulinemia, hyperuricemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypertension. Tempol reduced blood glucose and insulin levels (all p < 0.05) in FT rats compared with their untreated counterparts. The vasoconstriction response to all agonists was lower in F rats than in control rats by about 35%-65% (all p < 0.05). Vasoconstrictor responses to noradrenaline, phenylephrine, and methoxamine but not Ang II were about 41%-75% higher in FT rats compared with F rats (all p < 0.05). Acute tempol infusion blunted responses to noradrenaline, methoxamine, and Ang II in control rats by 32%, 33%, and 62%, while it blunted responses to noradrenaline and Ang II in F rats by 26% and 32%, respectively (all p < 0.05), compared with their untreated counterparts. Superoxide radicals play a crucial role in controlling renal vascular responses to adrenergic agonists in insulin-resistant rats. Chronic but not acute tempol treatment enhances renal vascular responsiveness in fructose-fed rats.

  10. Renal effects of L-DOPA in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Grossman, E; Shenkar, A; Peleg, E; Thaler, M; Goldstein, D S

    1999-06-01

    We examined whether low-dose L-DOPA treatment induces natriuresis and diuresis in patients with congestive heart failure who have cardiac decompensation despite treatment with digoxin, a diuretic, and an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and who respond acutely to intravenously infused dopamine. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, 11 patients with severe congestive heart failure received L-DOPA (0.10 g, p.o., t.i.d., for 1 day and then 0.25 g, p.o., t.i.d., for 2 days after a washout period of > or = 1 day), with assessments of plasma and urinary levels of catechols, urinary volume, and sodium content, and clinical and laboratory measures of improvement of congestive heart failure. L-DOPA elicited short-term, dose-related increases in urinary volume and sodium excretion. At the 0.10-g dose, L-DOPA increased plasma L-DOPA levels and urinary L-DOPA excretion by about fivefold, whereas at the 0.25-g dose, L-DOPA increased plasma and urinary L-DOPA by >50-fold. Twenty-four-hour urinary dopamine excretion increased by about fivefold after the low dose of L-DOPA and approximately 50-fold after the high dose. The results demonstrate that oral L-DOPA treatment can produce beneficial natriuretic and diuretic effects in selected patients with congestive heart failure. The bioavailability of oral L-DOPA appears to vary with the dose. These results support findings from previous studies about beneficial cardiac functional effects of L-DOPA in patients with refractory heart failure.

  11. Effects of Endurance and Endurance-strength Exercise on Renal Function in Abdominally Obese Women with Renal Hyperfiltration: A Prospective Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Szulińska, Monika; Skrypnik, Damian; Ratajczak, Marzena; Karolkiewicz, Joanna; Madry, Edyta; Musialik, Katarzyna; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw; Jakubowski, Hieronim; Bogdański, Pawel

    2016-10-01

    Obesity is associated with kidney defects. Physical activity is a key element in the treatment of obesity. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of endurance and endurance-strength training on kidney function in abdominally obese women. Forty-four abdominally obese women were randomized to endurance training or endurance-strength training, three times a week for 3 months. Before and after the intervention, kidney function was assessed by measuring blood creatinine, urine creatinine, and urine albumin levels, and the albumin-to-creatinine ratio and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were calculated. Renal hyperperfusion was present in both groups before the study. Following both types of physical activity, similar modifications of the investigated parameters were observed, but with no significant between-group differences. Both courses of training led to a significant increase in blood creatinine and a subsequent decrease in the GFR. A significant increase in urine creatinine and album levels, though not exceeding the range for microalbuminuria, was not accompanied by any difference in the albumin-to-creatinine ratio after endurance-strength training alone. Three months of either endurance or endurance-strength training has a favorable and comparable effect on renal function in abdominally obese women with renal hyperfiltration. Copyright © 2016 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of MPL 9000 extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy on renal hemodynamics and urine flow: assessment by 99mTc-DTPA renal scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Naito, S; Yoshida, T; Ogata, N; Ichiya, Y; Koga, H; Kotoh, S; Masuda, K; Kumazawa, J

    1995-01-01

    The effect of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) with an MPL9000 lithotriptor on renal hemodynamics and urine flow was investigated by 99mTc-DTPA renal scintigraphy. In the first-pass scintigrams obtained within 1 min after injection of 99mTc-DTPA, there was no significant change in the time to the maximum radioactivity level and the maximum radioactivity ratio at 1 day before ESWL and 1 day or 1 month after ESWL. However, analysis of 30-min scintigrams showed that urinary clearance of radioactivity was delayed in the treated kidney 1 day after ESWL, particularly in the region targeted by shock waves, despite the absence of overt urinary tract obstruction by residual stone fragments. This change was reversible and was no longer noted 1 month after ESWL. These results suggest that ESWL with the MPL9000 lithotriptor induces a focal and temporary decrease in urine flow in the treated kidney, but has little or no effect on renal hemodynamics.

  13. Antagonistic effects of chloroquine on autophagy occurrence potentiate the anticancer effects of everolimus on renal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, A; Santini, D; Zappavigna, S; Lombardi, A; Misso, G; Boccellino, M; Desiderio, V; Vitiello, P P; Di Lorenzo, G; Zoccoli, A; Pantano, F; Caraglia, M

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is an aggressive disease often asymptomatic and weakly chemo-radiosensitive. Currently, new biologic drugs are used among which everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, that has been approved for second-line therapy. Since mTOR is involved in the control of autophagy, its antitumor capacity is often limited. In this view, chloroquine, a 4-alkylamino substituted quinoline family member, is an autophagy inhibitor that blocks the fusion of autophagosomes and lysosomes. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of everolimus alone or in combination with chloroquine on renal cancer cell viability and verified possible synergism. Our results demonstrate that renal cancer cells are differently sensitive to everolimus and chloroquine and the pharmacological combination everolimus/chloroquine was strongly synergistic inducing cell viability inhibition. In details, the pharmacological synergism occurs when chloroquine is administered before everolimus. In addition, we found a flow autophagic block and shift of death mechanisms to apoptosis. This event was associated with decrease of Beclin-1/Bcl-2 complex and parallel reduction of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in combined treatment. At last, we found that the enhancement of apoptosis induced by drug combination occurs through the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic pathway activation, while the extrinsic pathway is involved only partly following its activation by chloroquine. These results provide the basis for new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma after appropriate clinical trial. PMID:25866016

  14. Antagonistic effects of chloroquine on autophagy occurrence potentiate the anticancer effects of everolimus on renal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, A; Santini, D; Zappavigna, S; Lombardi, A; Misso, G; Boccellino, M; Desiderio, V; Vitiello, P P; Di Lorenzo, G; Zoccoli, A; Pantano, F; Caraglia, M

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is an aggressive disease often asymptomatic and weakly chemo-radiosensitive. Currently, new biologic drugs are used among which everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, that has been approved for second-line therapy. Since mTOR is involved in the control of autophagy, its antitumor capacity is often limited. In this view, chloroquine, a 4-alkylamino substituted quinoline family member, is an autophagy inhibitor that blocks the fusion of autophagosomes and lysosomes. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of everolimus alone or in combination with chloroquine on renal cancer cell viability and verified possible synergism. Our results demonstrate that renal cancer cells are differently sensitive to everolimus and chloroquine and the pharmacological combination everolimus/chloroquine was strongly synergistic inducing cell viability inhibition. In details, the pharmacological synergism occurs when chloroquine is administered before everolimus. In addition, we found a flow autophagic block and shift of death mechanisms to apoptosis. This event was associated with decrease of Beclin-1/Bcl(-)2 complex and parallel reduction of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl(-)2 in combined treatment. At last, we found that the enhancement of apoptosis induced by drug combination occurs through the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic pathway activation, while the extrinsic pathway is involved only partly following its activation by chloroquine. These results provide the basis for new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma after appropriate clinical trial.

  15. Effect of renal function on the pharmacokinetics of LCZ696 (sacubitril/valsartan), an angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ayalasomayajula, Surya P; Langenickel, Thomas H; Jordaan, Pierre; Zhou, Wei; Chandra, Priyamvada; Albrecht, Diego; Pal, Parasar; Rajman, Iris; Sunkara, Gangadhar

    2016-09-01

    LCZ696 (sacubitril/valsartan), an angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor, is indicated for chronic heart failure (HF) and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death and hospitalization for HF. Following oral administration, LCZ696 provides systemic exposure to valsartan and sacubitril (a prodrug), and its metabolite sacubitrilat (the active neprilysin inhibitor, formerly named as LBQ657), which is eliminated primarily via renal route. Since renal dysfunction is a common comorbidity in patients with HF, two open-label studies assessing the effect of mild, moderate, and severe renal impairment were conducted. Patients with mild (N = 8; creatinine clearance [CrCl] 50 to ≤80 mL/min), moderate (N = 8; CrCl 30 to <50 mL/min), and severe (N = 6; CrCl <30 mL/min) renal impairment and matching healthy subjects (CrCl >80 mL/min) for each severity group were enrolled to assess the pharmacokinetics of LCZ696 analytes following administration of LCZ696 400 mg once daily (QD) on days 1 and 5. The steady-state Cmax and AUC0-24h of sacubitril and valsartan were unchanged in patients with renal impairment compared with healthy subjects. However, the steady-state Cmax of sacubitrilat was increased by ∼60 % in patients irrespective of degree of renal impairment; half-life increased from 12 h (in healthy subjects) to 21.1, 23.7, and 38.5 h, respectively; and AUC0-24h was increased 2.10-, 2.24-, and 2.70-fold, respectively, in patients with mild, moderate, and severe renal impairment. Renal dysfunction increases exposure to sacubitrilat while not impacting sacubitril and valsartan exposure. LCZ696 was generally well tolerated in patients with renal impairment.

  16. Long-term effects of pediatric extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy on renal function

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Yigit; Yucel, Selcuk

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is a well-known and successful treatment modality. In addition, it can be used in premature infants. ESWL is used to treat kidney and ureter stones in children. However, although it is a preferred noninvasive treatment in that setting, there is debate about its long-term effects on growing kidneys in children. Objectives To investigate the long-term effects of pediatric ESWL on renal function in light of updated literature. Methods PubMed and Medline were searched for studies on ESWL in a pediatric population with keywords including efficacy, child, kidney calculi, ureter calculi, lithotripsy, injury, vascular trauma, and shock waves. The research was limited to the English literature during a period from 1980 to 2014. In total, 3,000 articles were evaluated, but only 151 papers were considered. Only the manuscripts directly related to the reviewed subjects were included in the current study. Results However, the acute effects of ESWL in kidney are well-described. Although there are limited studies on the long-term effects of ESWL in children, there is a widespread opinion that ESWL is not affecting renal functions in the long-term. Conclusion ESWL is a safe, effective, and noninvasive treatment option in children. Although ESWL can cause some acute effects in the kidney, there is no long-term effect on the growing kidneys of children. PMID:24892029

  17. The effects of age and renal and hepatic impairment on the pharmacokinetics of sildenafil citrate

    PubMed Central

    Muirhead, Gary J; Wilner, Keith; Colburn, Wayne; Haug-Pihale, Gertrude; Rouviex, Bernhard

    2002-01-01

    Aims To investigate the effects of age and renal and hepatic impairment on the pharmacokinetics, tolerability and safety of sildenafil (single 50-mg oral dose) and its major circulating N-desmethyl metabolite, UK-103,320. Methods Three open-label, parallel-group studies were conducted. The first study compared sildenafil pharmacokinetics, safety and toleration in 15 healthy young male subjects (mean age 30 years; range 19–45 years) to 15 healthy elderly male subjects (mean age 70 years; range 65–81 years). The second study included eight male volunteers with normal renal function and 16 male volunteers with varying degrees of renal impairment as assessed by measurement of creatinine clearance (CLcr). The third study included 12 male volunteers with normal hepatic function and 12 male volunteers with chronic stable hepatic cirrhosis (Child-Pugh A and B). For all three studies, blood and urine samples were collected predose and at specified intervals up to 48 h postdose for assays of sildenafil and UK-103,320, and measurements of protein binding. Results Significant differences in Cmax and AUC were observed between the young and the elderly subjects for both the parent drug and the metabolite. In the elderly, AUC values were approximately twice as high and Cmax values 60–70% higher than those for young men, while t1/2 values were approximately 1 h longer for sildenafil and 2 h longer for UK-103,320. Due to a significantly smaller unbound fraction of drug in the elderly, free drug concentrations were only approximately 40% higher in the elderly group compared to the young group. In the renal impairment study, significant correlations with CLcr were demonstrated for sildenafil oral clearance (CL/F) and Cmax and UK-103,320 Cmax and AUC. Pairwise comparisons between subjects with normal renal function and those with severe renal impairment (CLcr<30 ml min−1) supported these findings, showing significant increases in Cmax and AUC for both the parent drug and the

  18. Effects of genotype on rates of substitution during experimental evolution.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alex; Seguin, Kimberley

    2015-07-01

    Rates of molecular evolution may vary widely between populations, yet the causes of this variation are still incompletely understood. Genetic differences between populations may make an important contribution to variation in rates of evolution, owing to differences in fitness, population size, mutation rates, or in the distribution of fitness effects (DFEs) of available beneficial mutations. By whole genome sequencing of Escherichia coli populations experimentally evolved in the presence of a quinolone antibiotic, we found that rates of substitution varied by genotype, with evidence for a contribution from a genotype's starting fitness. Subsequent targeted sequencing showed that genotypes with high average substitution rates were more likely to undergo the simultaneous fixation of several mutations, consistent with theoretical models of multiple mutation dynamics. Moreover, patterns of substitution were indicative of epistatic relationships between known resistance mutations. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  19. The role of the renal effects of angiotensin II in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Young, D B; Lohmeier, T E; Hall, J E; Declue, J E; Bengis, R G; Coleman, T G; Guyton, A C

    1980-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system is involved in many forms of clinical and experimental hypertension. Although angiotensin II has powerful vasoconstrictor properties, it is doubtful that any substance can produce sustained hypertension solely by increasing total peripheral resistance. Since the authors have demonstrated previously that alterations in the kidney's ability to excrete sodium can affect long-term arterial blood pressure regulation, they investigated angiotensin's effect on renal function in several experimental models. The results of these studies clearly demonstrate that angiotensin has a powerful direct antinatriuretic effect, the magnitude of which is sufficient to cause marked hypertension at angiotensin concentrations well within the pathophysiological range.

  20. [Cerebrovascular and renal effects of cerebrolysin and dependence on salt intake].

    PubMed

    Sadin, A V; Shtrygol', S Iu

    2001-01-01

    Experiments on rats with occluded common carotid arteries showed that an excess sodium chloride consumption increased the loss of test animals as a result of the maximum decrease in the local cerebral blood flow and sharply pronounced brain swelling. The sodium chloride substitute hyposol (giposol) reduced the extent of cerebral ischemia and brain swelling effect and increased the renal perfusion and diuresis levels. In the test animals receiving a high-Na diet, the efficacy of cerebrolysine was less pronounced. In contrast, hyposol increased the antiischemic, saluretic and antiswelling effects of cerebrolysine under the carotid artery occlusion.

  1. Pleistocene effects on North American songbird evolution

    PubMed Central

    Klicka, J.; Zink, R. M.

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies have used comparisons of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence divergence among populations and species to test existing hypotheses about avian evolution during the Pleistocene epoch. In 1998, Avise and Walker concluded that the Pleistocene was an important time for avian evolution, including the initiation of phylogeographic separations and the completion of speciation events that began in the Pliocene. The study implied that these conclusions conflicted with the study, in 1997, by Klicka and Zink, which concluded that most species pairs previously thought to have originated in the past 250 000 years were much older. The two studies are complementary in the sense that Avise and Walker dealt primarily with phylogeographic (intraspecific) separations. Furthermore, Klicka and Zink concentrated on the inception of divergences whereas the Avise and Walker focused on the timing of the completion of speciation. To accomplish this, Avise and Walker analysed 'phylogroups', geographically coherent subsets of biological species in which mtDNA haplotypes exhibit reciprocal monophyly. The study used the average interphylogroup mtDNA distance (0.027), calibrated at 2% per million years, to conclude that speciation required on average one million years to complete. Hence, speciation events begun in the Late Pliocene would have been completed in the mid- to late Pleistocene. Although we appreciate the extended nature of the speciation process and Avise and Walker's insightful attempt to estimate its duration, we conclude that their value was an overestimate by a factor of two. In particular we question whether phylogroups can be used in the novel evolutionary role that Avise and Walker envisioned, because of the vagaries of taxonomic practices and lack of consensus regarding species concepts. To extend their analysis of intraspecific, phylogeographic separations, we compiled previously analysed and newly available data for divergence times for North American songbird

  2. The protective effect of grape seed procyanidin extract against cadmium-induced renal oxidative damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Zhang, Rong; Li, Wei-min; Niu, Yu-jie; Guo, Hui-cai; Liu, Xue-hui; Hou, Yu-chun; Zhao, Li-juan

    2013-11-01

    As an important environmental pollutant, cadmium (Cd) can lead to serious renal damage. Grape seed procyanidins extract (GSPE), a biological active component of grape seed, has been shown to possess antioxidative effects. Here, we assessed the protective effect of GSPE on Cd-induced renal damage using animal experiment. After 30 days, the oxidative damage of kidney was evaluated through measurement of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidation (GSH-Px) and malondialdehyde (MDA). Since, oxidative stress could lead to apoptosis, the renal apoptosis was measured using flow cytometer. Moreover, the expression of apoptosis-related protein Bax and Bcl-2 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. The results showed that Cd led to the decrease of SOD and GSH-Px activities, and the increase of MDA level, induced renal apoptosis. However, the coadministration of GSPE attenuated Cd-induced lipid peroxidation, and antagonized renal apoptosis, probably associated with the expression of Bax and Bcl-2. These data suggested that GSPE has protective effect against renal oxidative damage induced by Cd, which provide a potential natural chemopreventive agent against Cd-poisoning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Late effects of chemotherapeutic agents on renal function in childhood cancer survivors: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, D

    2017-02-01

    Survival outcomes for childhood cancers have significantly improved. As more children are now surviving into adulthood, knowledge of the long-term effects of childhood cancer treatments has become the focus of research. To determine what is known about the incidence of renal function impairment in childhood cancer survivors and to determine what is known about risk factors for developing renal function impairment following childhood cancer treatment. A comprehensive literature search was preformed to identify studies that investigated renal dysfunction in patients who were diagnosed with childhood cancer and treated with potentially nephrotoxic chemotherapeutic agents. Potentially nephrotoxic chemotherapeutic agents identified in the selection criteria include ifosfamide, cisplatin, carboplatin and methotrexate. 15 papers met the inclusion criteria. Renal function impairment was reported in 15 of 15 studies included in this literature review. The incidence of ifosfamide induced nephrotoxicity varied from 1 to 50 %. This variation may be due to the heterogeneity of reported outcome measurements. Treatment with cisplatin and carboplatin was associated with hypomagnesemia. The prevalence of hypomagnesemia varied from 7 to 29 %. This variation may be due to diversity of treatment protocols. The incidence of renal dysfunction following treatment with methotrexate was reported as 1.8 % and completely reversible. As more childhood cancer survivors are reaching adulthood, a new niche of cancer research has emerged. Researchers are now investigating the late effects due to cytotoxic treatments. Renal function impairment is a potential late effect of treatment with nephrotoxic chemotherapeutic agents including ifosfamide, cisplatin, carboplatin and methotrexate.

  4. Effect of mass gain on stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, R.; Zinnecker, H.

    A fully hydrodynamical treatment is given of the stationary isothermal accretion problem onto a moving gravitating point mass. It is noted that the derivation is purely analytical. It is found that the accretion rate is more than a factor of 50 higher than the accretion rate derived from the partially nonhydrodynamical treatment by Hoyle and Lyttleton (1939) or Bondi and Hoyle (1944). It is thought that his result may have some bearing on the evolutionary tracks of young pre-Main Sequence stars still embedded in their parent protocluster cloud. Also discussed is the work of Federova (1979), who investigated the pre-Main Sequence evolution of degenerate low mass 'stars' with strong accretion of protocluster cloud material. It is suggested that the stars that lie below the Main Sequence in young clusters could strongly accrete matter at the pre-Main Sequence stage. It is also suggested that the observed lack of low mass stars in open galactic clusters (van den Bergh, 1961) compared to the field may derive from the accretion of residual gas preferentially by low mass stars.

  5. Beneficial and harmful effects of L-arginine on renal ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Tomé, L A; Yu, L; de Castro, I; Campos, S B; Seguro, A C

    1999-05-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in acute renal failure (ARF) is not yet completely understood. L-Arginine (L-arg) is protective against different ARF models, while L-arg addition in isolated proximal tubules enhances hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of L-arg on renal ischaemia. In in vivo studies, Wistar rats were subjected to 60 min renal artery clamping, and renal function was evaluated 2 and 15 days after ischaemia. Four groups were studied: (1) control; (2) acute L-arg (50 mg/kg/bw i.v.); (3) L-nitro-arginine-methyl esther (L-NAME; 0.5 mg/kg/bw i.v.); and (4) chronic L-arg (L-arg 0.25% in drinking water/7 days). For the in vitro studies, proximal tubules (PTs), isolated by collagenase digestion and Percoll gradient, were studied from three groups: (1) untreated; (2) L-arg-treated (L-arg 0.25% in drinking water/7 days); and (3) L-NAME-treated rats (3 mg/kg in drinking water/7 days). PTs were kept oxygenated or subjected to 15 min hypoxia (H-15) and 35 min reoxygenation (R-35). In some experiments, additional doses of L-arg and L-NAME were administered. Cell injury was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. NO production was evaluated by NO2-/NO3- measurement (Griess reaction) in both urine and isolation medium. After 2 days, L-arg infusion protected against ischaemia compared with control rats (0.4 vs 0.2 ml/min/100 g, P < 0.001), while neither L-NAME nor chronic L-arg supplementation ameliorated renal function. After 15 days, both acute and chronic L-arg groups showed a higher glomerular filtration rate (0.6 and 0.75 ml/min/100 g) compared with control rats (0.3 ml/min/100 g, P < 0.05) and L-NAME-treated rats (0.2 ml/min/100 g, P < 0.05). Despite similar recovery in both L-arg groups, the mortality rate was 25% in the chronic L-arg group. Tubular function was also better preserved in the acute L-arg group. PTs isolated from L-arg-treated rats were more sensitive to isolation injury. L-Arg addition

  6. The Evolution of Institutional Effectiveness in the Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, Ronald B.

    2011-01-01

    The origins of institutional effectiveness are traced, its evolution within community colleges is described, the use of the term "institutional effectiveness" is analyzed, and a practical, operational definition of the term is presented. The author hopes that this definition and the discussion in this article prove useful to community college…

  7. The Evolution of Institutional Effectiveness in the Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, Ronald B.

    2011-01-01

    The origins of institutional effectiveness are traced, its evolution within community colleges is described, the use of the term "institutional effectiveness" is analyzed, and a practical, operational definition of the term is presented. The author hopes that this definition and the discussion in this article prove useful to community college…

  8. Effect of Proteinuria and Glomerular Filtration Rate on Renal Outcome in Patients with Biopsy-Proven Benign Nephrosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Keiichi; Hoshino, Junichi; Ueno, Toshiharu; Mise, Koki; Hayami, Noriko; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Kawada, Masahiro; Imafuku, Aya; Hiramatsu, Rikako; Hasegawa, Eiko; Yamanouchi, Masayuki; Sawa, Naoki; Fujii, Takeshi; Ohashi, Kenichi; Takaichi, Kenmei; Ubara, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and proteinuria are risk factors for end-stage renal disease (ESRD), of which benign nephrosclerosis is a common cause. However, few biopsy-based studies have assessed these associations. We performed retrospective cohort study of 182 Japanese patients who underwent renal biopsy from June 1985 through March 2014 and who were diagnosed with benign nephrosclerosis. Competing risk regression analyses were used to investigate the effect of eGFR and proteinuria levels at the time of renal biopsy on the risk for renal events (ESRD or a 50% decline in eGFR from baseline). During a median 5.8-year follow-up, 63 (34.6%) patients experienced renal events. The incidence of renal events increased with lower baseline eGFR and greater baseline proteinuria levels. After adjustment for baseline covariates, lower eGFR levels (subhazard ratios [SHRs], 1.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.67, per 10 mL/min/1.73 m2) and higher proteinuria levels (SHR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.23-1.87, per 1.0 g/day) at the time of renal biopsy were associated independently with higher risk for renal events. Lower levels of serum albumin (SHR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.20-3.55 per 1.0 g/dL) were also associated with renal events. Patients with both eGFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m2 and proteinuria ≥0.5 g/day had a 26.7-fold higher risk (95% CI, 3.97-179.4) of renal events than patients with both eGFR ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and proteinuria <0.5 g/day. Reduced eGFR and increased proteinuria as well as lower serum albumin at the time of renal biopsy are independent risk factors for renal events among patients with biopsy-proven benign nephrosclerosis.

  9. Effect of Proteinuria and Glomerular Filtration Rate on Renal Outcome in Patients with Biopsy-Proven Benign Nephrosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sumida, Keiichi; Hoshino, Junichi; Ueno, Toshiharu; Mise, Koki; Hayami, Noriko; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Kawada, Masahiro; Imafuku, Aya; Hiramatsu, Rikako; Hasegawa, Eiko; Yamanouchi, Masayuki; Sawa, Naoki; Fujii, Takeshi; Ohashi, Kenichi; Takaichi, Kenmei; Ubara, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Background Reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and proteinuria are risk factors for end-stage renal disease (ESRD), of which benign nephrosclerosis is a common cause. However, few biopsy-based studies have assessed these associations. Methods We performed retrospective cohort study of 182 Japanese patients who underwent renal biopsy from June 1985 through March 2014 and who were diagnosed with benign nephrosclerosis. Competing risk regression analyses were used to investigate the effect of eGFR and proteinuria levels at the time of renal biopsy on the risk for renal events (ESRD or a 50% decline in eGFR from baseline). Results During a median 5.8-year follow-up, 63 (34.6%) patients experienced renal events. The incidence of renal events increased with lower baseline eGFR and greater baseline proteinuria levels. After adjustment for baseline covariates, lower eGFR levels (subhazard ratios [SHRs], 1.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01–1.67, per 10 mL/min/1.73 m2) and higher proteinuria levels (SHR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.23–1.87, per 1.0 g/day) at the time of renal biopsy were associated independently with higher risk for renal events. Lower levels of serum albumin (SHR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.20–3.55 per 1.0 g/dL) were also associated with renal events. Patients with both eGFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m2 and proteinuria ≥0.5 g/day had a 26.7-fold higher risk (95% CI, 3.97–179.4) of renal events than patients with both eGFR ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and proteinuria <0.5 g/day. Conclusions Reduced eGFR and increased proteinuria as well as lower serum albumin at the time of renal biopsy are independent risk factors for renal events among patients with biopsy-proven benign nephrosclerosis. PMID:26809068

  10. Anti-inflammatory effects of royal jelly on ethylene glycol induced renal inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Zeyneb; Aksoy, Laçine

    2015-01-01

    In this study, anti-inflammatory effects of Royal Jelly were investigated by inducing renal inflammation in rats with the use of ethylene glycol. For this purpose, the calcium oxalate urolithiasis model was obtained by feeding rats with ethylene glycol in drinking water. The rats were divided in five study groups. The 1st group was determined as the control group. The rats in the 2nd group received ethylene glycol (1%) in drinking water. The rats in the 3rd group were daily fed with Royal Jelly by using oral gavage. The 4th group was determined as the preventive group and the rats were fed with ethylene glycol (1%) in drinking water while receiving Royal Jelly via oral gavage. The 5th group was determined as the therapeutic group and received ethylene glycol in drinking water during the first 2 weeks of the study and Royal Jelly via oral gavage during the last 2 weeks of the study. At the end of the study, proinflammatory/anti-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-a, IL-1ß and IL-18 levels in blood and renal tissue samples from the rats used in the application were measured. The results have shown that ethylene glycol does induce inflammation and renal damage. This can cause the formation of reactive oxygen species. Royal Jelly is also considered to have anti-inflammatory effects due to its possible antiradical and antioxidative effects. It can have positive effects on both the prevention of urolithiasis and possible inflammation during the existing urolithiasis and support the medical treatment.

  11. Effect of nitric oxide pathway regulation on water/sodium balance and renal function in a rodent model of acute liver and renal failure.

    PubMed

    Saracyn, Marek; Ząbkowski, Tomasz; Zdanowski, Robert; Brytan, Marek; Patera, Janusz; Nowak, Zbigniew; Kade, Grzegorz; Wańkowicz, Zofia

    2014-09-27

    The pathomechanism of acute hepatorenal syndrome (HRS), a particular form of acute renal failure that occurs in the course of acute liver injury, is still poorly understood. The aim of our study was to estimate the influence of the activation and inhibition of the nitric oxide pathway on the water/sodium balance and development of acute renal failure in the course of HRS. We used male Sprague-Dawley rats in the acute galactosamine (Ga1N) model of HRS. The nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors L-NAME and L-arginine were administered intraperitoneally before and after liver damage. HRS developed in all tested groups. L-NAME increased osmotic clearance and urine volume more effectively before liver injury. Furthermore, administration of L-NAME increased creatinine clearance both before and after Ga1N injection. A double dose of L-NAME did not yield further improvement before Ga1N injection, but improved creatinine clearance after Ga1N intoxication. Injection of L-arginine increased sodium excretion and urine volume, but only after liver injury. Moreover, L-arginine injected after Ga1N caused significant improvement of the creatinine clearance in a dose-dependent manner. Our study shows that inhibition of the nitric oxide pathway improves parameters of water and sodium balance and prevents development of acute renal failure in the course of acute liver injury and liver failure. Activation of the nitric oxide system also has a favorable influence on water/sodium balance and renal failure, but only after liver injury.

  12. [Effect of Paidu Baoshen Pill on renal fibrosis in 5/6 nephrectomized rats].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shui-Hua; Chen, Bang-Ming; Liu, Yong-Fang; Che, Wei-Ping; Wu, Zhao-Dong; Wang, Guo-Bing; Xia, Xiao-Qin; Huang, Hong-En; Wei, Lin; Zhu, Hai-Long; Liu, Gan-Yan

    2015-01-01

    To observe the anti-renal fibrosis effect of Paidu Baoshen Pill (PBP) on 5/6 nephrectomized rats and to explore its mechanism. Totally 50 SD male healthy rats were randomly divided into the normal control group (n = 10), the sham-operation group (n = 10), and the nephrectomy model group (n = 30) according to the proportion of 1:1:3. Rats in the sham-operation group had their renal capsule isolated without nephrectomy. Rats in the nephrectomy model group had their kidneys 5/6 nephrectomized. Then 24 h urine was collected and 24 h urinary protein (24 h UP) detected. Serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatitine (SCr) were also tested. According to the SCr level 30 rats of the model group were further randomly divided into the model group, the PBP group, and the Niaoduqing Granule (NG) group, 10 in each group. Rats in the PBP group and the NG group were respectively administered with PBP (at the daily dose of 1.0 g/kg) and NG (at the daily dose of 3.33 g/kg) by gastrogavage (they were dissolved in distilled water). At the same time, 2 mL distilled water was administered by gastrogavage to rats in the normal control group, the sham-operation group, and the nephrectomy model group, once daily for 4 successive weeks. Mental conditions, activities, hair color, shape of stool, and the body weight were observed during administration. After 4 weeks, urine was collected to detect 24 h UP. Blood was sampled to detect SCr, BUN, transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), type III procollagen (PC III), collagen type IV (Col IV), laminin (LN), and fibronectin (FN). After rats were killed, their left remnant renal tissues were collected for pathological examinations. The protein expression quantity of TGF-β1 and FN was detected by immunohistochemical method. mRNA expression levels of TGF-β1 and FN were detected using real time fluorescent quantitative PCR. There was no statistical difference in the above indices between the normal control group and the sham-operation group

  13. (1)H NMR metabolomics analysis of renal cell carcinoma cells: Effect of VHL inactivation on metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cuperlovic-Culf, Miroslava; Cormier, Kevin; Touaibia, Mohamed; Reyjal, Julie; Robichaud, Sarah; Belbraouet, Mehdi; Turcotte, Sandra

    2016-05-15

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) is an onco-suppressor involved in oxygen and energy-dependent promotion of protein ubiquitination and proteosomal degradation. Loss of function mutations of VHL (VHL-cells) result in organ specific cancers with the best studied example in renal cell carcinomas. VHL has a well-established role in deactivation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) and in regulation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR activity. Cell culture metabolomics analysis was utilized to determined effect of VHL and HIF-1α or HIF-2α on metabolism of renal cell carcinomas (RCC). RCC cells were stably transfected with VHL or shRNA designed to silence HIF-1α or HIF-2α genes. Obtained metabolic data was analysed qualitatively, searching for overall effects on metabolism as well as quantitatively, using methods developed in our group in order to determine specific metabolic changes. Analysis of the effect of VHL and HIF silencing on cellular metabolic footprints and fingerprints provided information about the metabolic pathways affected by VHL through HIF function as well as independently of HIF. Through correlation network analysis as well as statistical analysis of significant metabolic changes we have determined effects of VHL and HIF on energy production, amino acid metabolism, choline metabolism as well as cell regulation and signaling. VHL was shown to influence cellular metabolism through its effect on HIF proteins as well as by affecting activity of other factors. © 2015 UICC.

  14. Effect of cold storage on immediate graft function in an experimental model of renal transplantation in cats.

    PubMed

    Csomos, Rebecca A; Hardie, Robert J; Schmiedt, Chad W; Delaney, Fern A; McAnulty, Jonathan F

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the effect of cold storage (CS) on immediate posttransplantation function of renal autografts in cats. ANIMALS 15 healthy 1-year-old cats. PROCEDURES Cats were assigned to 2 groups and underwent autotransplantation of the left kidney followed by nephrectomy of the right kidney. The left kidney was autotransplanted either immediately (IT group; n = 6) or after being flushed with a cold sucrose phosphate solution and stored on ice while the implant site was prepared (CS group; 9). Serum creatinine and BUN concentrations were monitored daily and autografts were ultrasonographically examined intermittently for 14 days after surgery. RESULTS Mean duration of CS was 24 minutes for the CS group. Posttransplantation serum creatinine and BUN concentrations for the CS group had lower peak values, returned to the respective reference ranges quicker, and were generally significantly lower than those for the IT group. Mean posttransplantation autograft size for the CS group was smaller than that for the IT group. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that immediate posttransplantation function of renal autografts following a short period of CS was better than that of renal autografts that did not undergo CS, which suggested CS protected grafts from ischemic injury and may decrease perioperative complications, speed recovery, and improve the long-term outcome for cats with renal transplants. IMPACT FOR HUMAN MEDICINE Cats metabolize immunosuppressive drugs in a manner similar to humans; therefore, renal transplantation in cats may serve as a desirable model for investigating the effects of renal transplantation in human patients.

  15. Effects of PEG-PLA-nano Artificial Cells Containing Hemoglobin on Kidney Function and Renal Histology in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zun Chang; Chang, Thomas M.S.

    2012-01-01

    This study is to investigate the long-term effects of PEG-PLA nano artificial cells containing hemoglobin (NanoRBC) on renal function and renal histology after 1/3 blood volume top loading in rats. The experimental rats received one of the following infusions: NanoRBC in Ringer lactate, Ringer lactate, stroma-free hemoglobin (SFHB), polyhemoglobin (PolyHb), autologous rat whole blood (rat RBC). Blood samples were taken before infusions and on days 1, 7 and 21 after infusions for biochemistry analysis. Rats were sacrificed on day 21 after infusions and kidneys were excised for histology examination. Infusion of SFHB induced significant decrease in renal function damage evidenced by elevated serum urea, creatinine and uric acid throughout the 21 days. Kidney histology in SFHb infusion group revealed focal tubular necrosis and intraluminal cellular debris in the proximal tubules, whereas the glomeruli were not observed damaged. In all the other groups, NanoRBC, PolyHb, Ringer lactate and rat RBC, there were no abnormalities in renal biochemistry or histology. In conclusion, injection of NanoRBC did not have adverse effects on renal function nor renal histology. PMID:18979292

  16. Effects of age and caloric restriction in the vascular response of renal arteries to endothelin-1 in rats.

    PubMed

    Amor, Sara; García-Villalón, Angel Luis; Rubio, Carmen; Carrascosa, Jose Ma; Monge, Luis; Fernández, Nuria; Martín-Carro, Beatriz; Granado, Miriam

    2017-02-01

    Cardiovascular alterations are the most prevalent cause of impaired physiological function in aged individuals with kidney being one the most affected organs. Aging-induced alterations in renal circulation are associated with a decrease in endothelium-derived relaxing factors such as nitric oxide (NO) and with an increase in contracting factors such as endothelin-1(ET-1). As caloric restriction (CR) exerts beneficial effects preventing some of the aging-induced alterations in cardiovascular system, the aim of this study was to analyze the effects of age and caloric restriction in the vascular response of renal arteries to ET-1 in aged rats. Vascular function was studied in renal arteries from 3-month-old Wistar rats fed ad libitum (3m) and in renal arteries from 8-and 24-month-old Wistar rats fed ad libitum (8m and 24m), or subjected to 20% caloric restriction during their three last months of life (8m-CR and 24m-CR). The contractile response to ET-1 was increased in renal arteries from 8m and 24m compared to 3m rats. ET-1-induced contraction was mediated by ET-A receptors in all experimental groups and also by ET-B receptors in 24m rats. Caloric restriction attenuated the increased contraction to ET-1 in renal arteries from 8m but not from 24m rats possibly through NO release proceeding from ET-B endothelial receptors. In 24m rats, CR did not attenuate the aging-increased response of renal arteries to ET-1, but it prevented the aging-induced increase in iNOS mRNA levels and the aging-induced decrease in eNOS mRNA levels in arterial tissue. In conclusion, aging is associated with an increased response to ET-1 in renal arteries that is prevented by CR in 8m but not in 24m rats.

  17. Renal Effects and Underlying Molecular Mechanisms of Long-Term Salt Content Diets in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Rebeca Caldeira Machado; Vassallo, Paula Frizera; Crajoinas, Renato de Oliveira; Oliveira, Marilene Luzia; Martins, Flávia Letícia; Nogueira, Breno Valentim; Motta-Santos, Daisy; Araújo, Isabella Binotti; Forechi, Ludimila; Girardi, Adriana Castello Costa; Santos, Robson Augusto Souza; Mill, José Geraldo

    2015-01-01

    Several evidences have shown that salt excess is an important determinant of cardiovascular and renal derangement in hypertension. The present study aimed to investigate the renal effects of chronic high or low salt intake in the context of hypertension and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying such effects. To this end, newly weaned male SHR were fed with diets only differing in NaCl content: normal salt (NS: 0.3%), low salt (LS: 0.03%), and high salt diet (HS: 3%) until 7 months of age. Analysis of renal function, morphology, and evaluation of the expression of the main molecular components involved in the renal handling of albumin, including podocyte slit-diaphragm proteins and proximal tubule endocytic receptors were performed. The relationship between diets and the balance of the renal angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and ACE2 enzymes was also examined. HS produced glomerular hypertrophy and decreased ACE2 and nephrin expressions, loss of morphological integrity of the podocyte processes, and increased proteinuria, characterized by loss of albumin and high molecular weight proteins. Conversely, severe hypertension was attenuated and renal dysfunction was prevented by LS since proteinuria was much lower than in the NS SHRs. This was associated with a decrease in kidney ACE/ACE2 protein and activity ratio and increased cubilin renal expression. Taken together, these results suggest that LS attenuates hypertension progression in SHRs and preserves renal function. The mechanisms partially explaining these findings include modulation of the intrarenal ACE/ACE2 balance and the increased cubilin expression. Importantly, HS worsens hypertensive kidney injury and decreases the expression nephrin, a key component of the slit diaphragm. PMID:26495970

  18. Roles of prostaglandins and nitric oxide in the effect of endothelin-1 on renal hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lin, H; Smith, M J; Young, D B

    1996-09-01

    It is known that endothelin-1 stimulates the release of nitric oxide and prostaglandins in various vascular beds. We designed the present study to analyze the roles of prostaglandins and nitric oxide in the effect of endothelin-1 on the regulation of renal hemodynamics and renin release. We used N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and meclofenamic acid to inhibit the production of nitric oxide and prostaglandins, respectively. With a nonfiltering kidney model, renal blood flow was reduced 21% in dogs treated with L-NAME and 18% in dogs treated with meclofenamic acid. Inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandins, however, produced opposite effects on estimated glomerular hydraulic pressure: L-NAME increased glomerular hydraulic pressure from 63.1 +/- 0.9 to 64.6 +/- 1.3 mm Hg (P < .01), and meclofenamic acid reduced glomerular hydraulic pressure from 63.3 +/- 1.4 to 59.8 +/- 1.6 mm Hg (P < .01). Endothelin-1 infusion produced a dose-dependent reduction in renal blood flow after blockade of nitric oxide and prostaglandins. The responses of glomerular hydraulic pressure were different in the two groups during endothelin-1 infusion. Endothelin-1 progressively reduced glomerular hydraulic pressure in a dose-dependent fashion in the meclofenamic acid group. However, endothelin-1 slightly increased glomerular hydraulic pressure until the infusion rate reached 5.0 ng/kg per minute. At that rate, endothelin-1 reduced glomerular hydraulic pressure from 63.3 +/- 1.4 to 47.0 +/- 1.4 mm Hg in the meclofenamic acid group (P < .01), a more than 25% reduction, whereas at the same dose, endothelin-1 reduced glomerular hydraulic pressure only less than 2% in the L-NAME group. In addition, blockade of nitric oxide and prostaglandins did not alter the inhibitory effect of endothelin-1 on renin release in the non-filtering kidney. Therefore, the present study demonstrates that the release of nitric oxide and prostaglandins might modulate the effects of endothelin-1 on the

  19. Effect of respiratory acidosis and respiratory alkalosis on renal transport enzymes.

    PubMed

    Eiam-ong, S; Laski, M E; Kurtzman, N A; Sabatini, S

    1994-09-01

    We studied the effect of respiratory acidosis and respiratory alkalosis on acid-base composition and on microdissected renal adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) enzymes. Rats were subjected to hypercapnia or hypocapnia of 6, 24, and 72 h duration. After 6 h of hypercapnia, collecting tubule (CT) ATPases were not changed. At 24 h, plasma bicarbonate was 35 +/- 1 meq/l (P < 0.01) and CT H-ATPase and H-K-ATPase activities were 90% greater than controls (P < 0.01). By 72 h, plasma bicarbonate was 37 +/- 1 meq/l (P < 0.005 vs. control) and CT enzyme activity had increased even more, averaging approximately 130% of control (P < 0.05). Significant increases in enzyme activities were also observed in the proximal convoluted tubule and medullary thick ascending limb. Plasma aldosterone was three to four times that of control at all three time periods. In hormone-replete adrenalectomized rats, acid-base parameters and ATPase activities were the same as those seen in adrenal intact animals. After 6 h of hypocapnia, plasma bicarbonate was not significantly changed, but H-ATPase and Na-K-ATPase activities were decreased by 35% along the entire nephron (P < 0.05). H-K-ATPase activity in CT also decreased by 35%. At 24 h, plasma bicarbonate was 20.5 +/- 0.5 meq/l (P < 0.05 vs. control) and CT H-ATPase and H-K-ATPase activities were 60% less than control (P < 0.01). By 72 h, plasma bicarbonate was 18.5 +/- 0.5 meq/l (P < 0.05); however, only CT H-ATPase activity continued to fall, averaging 75% less than control (P < 0.005). Hypocapnia had no effect on plasma aldosterone or potassium. These results demonstrate that chronic, but not acute, respiratory acidosis stimulates activity of both renal proton ATPases. By contrast, both acute and chronic respiratory alkalosis decrease the two renal proton pumps. The stimulatory effect of hypercapnia and the inhibitory effect of hypocapnia on the renal ATPases appear to be potassium and aldosterone independent. Although the precise mechanisms

  20. Cardiovascular effects of microgravity: evolution of understanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, H. D.

    1998-01-01

    The understanding of cardiovascular effects of spaceflight has evolved throughout the course of the American manned spaceflight program. Originally descriptive in nature, the present understanding is based on empiric measurements of vascular volume, cardiac output, vascular reflexes, and peripheral and central autonomic control. More detailed understanding of cardiovascular effects has allowed us to separate those symptoms from symptoms caused by musculoskeletal or neurovestibular abnormalities.

  1. Cardiovascular effects of microgravity: evolution of understanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, H. D.

    1998-01-01

    The understanding of cardiovascular effects of spaceflight has evolved throughout the course of the American manned spaceflight program. Originally descriptive in nature, the present understanding is based on empiric measurements of vascular volume, cardiac output, vascular reflexes, and peripheral and central autonomic control. More detailed understanding of cardiovascular effects has allowed us to separate those symptoms from symptoms caused by musculoskeletal or neurovestibular abnormalities.

  2. The effect of aqueous leaf extract of Telfairia occidentalis (Cucurbitaceae) on gentamycin-induced renal damage.

    PubMed

    Maduka, Stephen O; Ugwu, Chidiebere E; Onwudinjo, Oluchi J

    2017-01-01

    Despite the acclaimed beneficial effects of Telfaria occidentalis (TO), it is yet to be established that its aqueous extract is safe in the condition of renal impairment. Thus, the study investigated the effects of TO aqueous leaves extract on gentamycin-induced renal damage. The animals were distributed into five groups. Group A (control) was placed on standard rat feed. Groups B and C received 500 mg/kg and 80 mg/kg of TO and gentamicin for 21 days, respectively. Group D received 500 mg/kg of TO 14 days before 7 days administration of 80 mg/kg of gentamycin. Group E received 80 mg/kg of gentamicin for 14 days before 7 days administration of 500 mg/kg TO. Group F received 500 mg/kg of TO and 80mg/kg of gentamycin concurrently for 21 days. Biochemical and histological examinations were analysed by standard methods. The administration of TO for 7 days after 14 days of gentamycin injection and its concomitant administration with gentamicin for 21 days caused significant reduction (p<0.05) on the relative kidney weight, creatinine and uric acid levels compared to groups C and D. There was a significant decrease (p<0.05) in the mean serum potassium level in group C compared to groups A, B, D, and F. The histological reports showed that the combination of the extract and gentamycin (group F) seems to ameliorate the deleterious effect observed when gentamycin was administered alone. The administration of the extract together with and after the administration of gentamycin reverses renal damage caused by gentamycin.

  3. Effects of "in vivo" administration of baclofen on rat renal tubular function.

    PubMed

    Donato, Verónica; Pisani, Gerardo Bruno; Trumper, Laura; Monasterolo, Liliana Alicia

    2013-09-05

    The effects of the in vivo administration of baclofen on renal tubular transport and aquaporin-2 (AQP2) expression were evaluated. In conscious animals kept in metabolic cages, baclofen (0.01-1mg/kg, s.c.) induced a dose-dependent increment in the urine flow rate (UFR) and in sodium and potassium excretion, associated with an increased osmolal clearance (Closm), a diminished urine to plasma osmolality ratio (Uosm/Posm) and a decrease in AQP2 expression. The above mentioned baclofen effects on functional parameters were corroborated by using conventional renal clearance techniques. Additionally, this model allowed the detection of a diminution in glucose reabsorption. Some experiments were performed with water-deprived or desmopressin-treated rats kept in metabolic cages. Either water deprivation or desmopressin treatment decreased the UFR and increased the Uosm/Posm. Baclofen did not change the Uosm/Posm or AQP2 expression in desmopressin-treated rats; but it increased the UFR and diminished the Uosm/Posm and AQP2 expression in water-deprived animals. These results indicate that in vivo administration of baclofen promotes alterations in proximal tubular transport, since glucose reabsorption was decreased. The distal tubular function was also affected. The increased Closm indicates an alteration in solute reabsorption at the ascending limb of the Henle's loop. The decreased Uosm/Posm and AQP2 expression in controls and in water-deprived, but not in desmopressin-treated rats, lead us to speculate that some effect of baclofen on endogenous vasopressin availability could be responsible for the impaired urine concentrating ability, more than any disturbance in the responsiveness of the renal cells to the hormone.

  4. Effects of grape seed proanthocyanidin extract on renal injury in type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lei; Zhang, Zhaofeng; Dai, Xiaoqian; Ding, Ye; Jiang, Yanfei; Li, Yujie; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Grape seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE) is known to be an effective natural polyphenol capable of removing free radicals in vivo. It has been reported that GSPE has biological functions including antioxidant, anti-cancer, anti-hyperglycemic, anti-radiation, and prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. This study aims to investigate the effects of GSPE on renal injury in type 2 diabetic rats induced with low-dose streptozotocin and a high-carbohydrate/high-fat diet. Rats (n=12 per group) were administered GSPE at either a low (125 mg/kg · bw), medium (250 mg/kg · bw) or high (500 mg/kg · bw) dose, while control rats and diabetes mellitus group rats received no specific treatment. After 16 weeks, GSPE slightly increased body weight and decreased food consumption, water intake and urine volume in rats. Diabetic rats treated with GSPE demonstrated decreased fasting blood glucose, serum insulin, HbA1c and systolic blood pressure (P<0.05). GSPE significantly improved renal function parameters, reduced the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and also increased the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9. Moreover, GSPE (particularly at a dose of 500 mg/kg · bw) increased the activity of antioxidant enzymes and reduced the levels of c-reactive proteins (P<0.01) in serum and the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (P<0.05) in the kidney. These findings suggest that GSPE ameliorates renal injury in type 2 diabetic rats through its antioxidative activity and anti-inflammatory effects.

  5. Effects of intravenous bolus injection of nicorandil on renal artery flow velocity assessed by color Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Yukiko; Kubo, Takashi; Tanabe, Kazumi; Emori, Hiroki; Katayama, Yosuke; Nishiguchi, Tsuyoshi; Taruya, Akira; Kameyama, Takeyoshi; Orii, Makoto; Yamano, Takashi; Kuroi, Akio; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Takemoto, Kazushi; Matsuo, Yoshiki; Ino, Yasushi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Hozumi, Takeshi; Terada, Masaki; Akasaka, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Previous animal studies have shown that a potassium channel opener, nicorandil, provokes vasodilation in renal microvasculature and increases renal blood flow. We conducted a clinical study that aimed to evaluate the effect of nicorandil on renal artery blood flow in comparison with nitroglycerin by using color Doppler ultrasound. The present study enrolled 40 patients with stable coronary artery disease who had no renal arterial stenosis and renal parenchymal disease. The patients received intravenous administration of nicorandil (n=20) or nitroglycerin (n=20). Before and after the administration, renal artery blood flow velocity was measured by color-guided pulsed-wave Doppler. The peak-systolic, end-diastolic, and mean renal artery blood flow velocities before the administration were not different between the nicorandil group and the nitroglycerin group. The peak-systolic (79±15cm/s to 99±21cm/s, p<0.001; and 78±19cm/s to 85±19cm/s, p=0.004), end-diastolic (22±5cm/s to 28±8cm/s, p<0.001; and 24±6cm/s to 26±6cm/s, p=0.005) and mean (41±6cm/s to 49±9cm/s, p<0.001; and 43±9cm/s to 45±9cm/s, p=0.009) renal artery flow velocities increased significantly in either group. The nominal changes in the peak-systolic (20±10cm/s vs. 7±8cm/s, p<0.001), end-diastolic (5±4cm/s vs. 2±3cm/s, p=0.001), and mean (8±5cm/s vs. 2±2cm/s, p<0.001) renal artery blood flow velocities were significantly greater in the nicorandil group compared with the nitroglycerin group. Intravenous nicorandil increased renal artery blood flow velocity in comparison with nitroglycerin. Nicorandil has a significant effect on renal hemodynamics. Copyright © 2016 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Effect of continuous renal replacement therapy on the plasma concentration of imipenem in severe infection patients with acute renal injury].

    PubMed

    Yu, Bin; Liu, Lixia; Xing, Dong; Zhao, Congcong; Hu, Zhenjie

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the extracorporeal clearance rate of imipenem in severe infection patients in the mode of continuous vena-venous hemofiltration (CVVH) during continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), in order to approach if the concentration of imipenem in plasma could achieve effective levels of anti-infection, and to explore the effect of time and anticoagulation measure on imipenem clearance during CRRT treatment. A prospective observational study was conducted. All adult severe infection patients complicating acute kidney injury (AKI) in the Department of Critical Care Medicine of the Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University from March 2013 to September 2014, who were prescribed imipenem as part of their required medical care, and CRRT for treatment of AKI were enrolled. 0.5 g doses of imipenem was administered intravenously every 6 hours or 8 hours according to random number table, and infused over 0.5 hour. The unfractionated heparin was used for anticoagulation in the patients without contraindications, and no anticoagulation strategy was used in the patients with high risk of bleeding. At 24 hours after first time of administration, postfilter venous blood and ultrafiltrate samples were collected at 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 5, 6, and 8 hours after imipenem administration. The concentration of imipenem in above samples was determined with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometer/mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS). A total of 25 patients were enrolled. Thirteen patients received imipenem intravenously every 6 hours, and 12 patients, every 8 hours. The anticoagulation was conducted with heparin in 13 cases, and 12 cases without anticoagulation. The intra-day precision, inter-day precision, matrix effect, and recovery rate in low, medium, and high concentration of plasma and ultrafiltrate, and the stability of samples under different conditions showed a good result, the error of accuracy was controlled in the range of ±15%. With the application of Prismaflex

  7. Effect of dietary counselling on the nutritional status of end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Hajira, Bibi; Manzoor, Maryam; Samiullah, Muhammad; Chawla, Rattan Kaur

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the effect of dietary counselling on the nutritional status of end-stage renal disease patients undergoing maintenance haemodialysis. This study was conducted at the Institute of Kidney Diseases, Peshawar, Pakistan, from November to December 2015, and comprised patients of either gender with protein energy wasting. The nutritional status assessment was based on four categories, including biochemical indicators (haemoglobin, serum albumin and cholesterol), measure of body mass index, reduced body fatness, decreased muscle mass and low protein or energy intake. Energy and nutrients intake of patients before and after counselling were estimated by 24-hour dietary recall method. SPSS 20 was used for data analysis. Of the 100 patients, 74(74%) were males and 26(26%) were females. The overall mean age was 41.45±17.44 years. Dietary counselling was significantly effective in increasing the intake of energy (p=0.010), protein (p=0.003) and fats (p=0.002). There was significant improvement in mid-upper arm circumference (p<0.0001) and tricep fat fold (p<0.0001) after counselling. Statistically significant effect was seen in improving serum cholesterol levels (p=0.039). Dietary counselling was found to be effective in improving the nutritional status and dietary intake of end-stage renal disease patients.

  8. The effect of cyclosporin A on peripheral blood T cell subpopulations in renal allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Sweny, P; Tidman, N

    1982-01-01

    Treatment with cyclosporin A (CyA) produces a reversal of the normal ratio of OKT4+ (inducer type) to OKT84 (suppressor-cytotoxic type) cells so that renal allograft recipients on CyA alone develop a four-fold increase in the absolute number of circulating OKT8 positive cells. Conventional immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisolone reduces both populations of T cells without altering the ratio of OKT4+ to OKT8+ cells. This effect of CyA may help to explain its action as an immunosuppressive agent. PMID:6210475

  9. [Cardiac effects of fenibut in development of experimental chronic renal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Smirnov, A V; Barabanova, T A; Penchul, N A

    2003-01-01

    The effect of fenibut on the mechanical activity of myocardium was studied in vitro and in vivo in rats with experimental chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) in a regime of physiologically alternating load simulating the intact heart function. The administration of fenibut (10 mg/kg) in rats after nephrectomy prevents the development of myocardial hyperfunction (characteristic of the animals with CRI in stage 1). In in vitro experiments on isolated myocardium fenibut also decreased the myocardial hyperfunction and reduced contractility to a control level, which was accompanied by accelerated relaxation in all finite systolic lengths.

  10. Effect of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system on uterine myomas in a renal transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Fong, Y F; Singh, K

    1999-07-01

    The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) has been used in the treatment of both idiopathic menorrhagia and adenomyosis. An electronic search of the on-line medical literature revealed no reports of its use for menorrhagia secondary to uterine myomas. Presented here is the successful treatment of uterine myomas with menorrhagia in a woman with a renal transplant. There was a significant reduction in menorrhagia, dysmenorrhea, and uterine and myoma size with the use of the LNG-IUS. We believe that this system provides an alternative to conventional hysterectomy and gonadotrophin-releasing hormonal analog medical treatment for uterine myomas, with a possibly inhibitory effect on myoma growth.

  11. Effects of acute plasma volume expansion on renal perfusion, filtration, and oxygenation after cardiac surgery: a randomized study on crystalloid vs colloid.

    PubMed

    Skytte Larsson, J; Bragadottir, G; Krumbholz, V; Redfors, B; Sellgren, J; Ricksten, S E

    2015-11-01

    In the present randomized study, we evaluated the differential effects of a colloid and a crystalloid fluid on renal oxygen delivery (RD(O2)), glomerular filtration (GFR), renal oxygen consumption ((RV(O2))), and the renal oxygen supply-demand relationship (i.e., renal oxygenation) after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Thirty patients with normal preoperative renal function, undergoing uncomplicated cardiac surgery, were studied in the intensive care unit in the early postoperative period. Patients were randomized to receive a bolus dose of either a crystalloid (Ringers-acetate 20 ml kg(-1), n=15) or a colloid solution (Venofundin) 10 ml kg(-1), n=15). Systemic haemodynamics were measured via a pulmonary artery catheter. Renal blood flow and GFR were measured by the renal vein retrograde thermodilution technique and by renal extraction of 51Cr-EDTA (=filtration fraction). Arterial and renal vein blood samples were obtained for measurements of renal oxygen delivery (RD(O2)) and RV(O2). Renal oxygenation was estimated from the renal oxygen extraction. Despite an increase in cardiac index and renal blood flow with both fluids, neither of the fluids improved RD(O2), because they both induced haemodilution. The GFR increased in the crystalloid (28%) but not in the colloid group. The crystalloid increased the filtration fraction (24%) and renal oxygen extraction (23%), indicating that the increase in GFR, the major determinant of RV(O2), was not matched by a proportional increase in RD(O2). Neither the colloid nor the crystalloid improved RD(O2) when used for postoperative plasma volume expansion. The crystalloid-induced increase in GFR was associated with impaired renal oxygenation, which was not seen with the colloid. NCT01729364. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Renal and antibacterial effects induced by myotoxin I and II isolated from Bothrops jararacussu venom.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, P S F; Martins, A M C; Havt, A; Toyama, Daniela O; Evangelista, J S A M; Ferreira, D P P; Joazeiro, P P; Beriam, Luis O S; Toyama, Marcos H; Fonteles, M C; Monteiro, H S A

    2005-09-15

    Bothrops jararacussu myotoxin I (BthTx-I; Lys 49) and II (BthTX-II; Asp 49) were purified by ion-exchange chromatography and reverse phase HPLC. In this work we used the isolated perfused rat kidney method to evaluate the renal effects of B. jararacussu myotoxins I (Lys49 PLA2) and II (Asp49 PLA2) and their possible blockage by indomethacin. BthTX-I (5 microg/ml) and BthTX-II (5 microg/ml) increased perfusion pressure (PP; ct120=110.28+/-3.70 mmHg; BthTX I=171.28+/-6.30*mmHg; BthTX II=175.50+/-7.20*mmHg), renal vascular resistance (RVR; ct120=5.49+/-0.54 mmHg/ml.g(-1)min(-1); BthTX I=8.62+/-0.37*mmHg/ml g(-1)min(-1); BthTX II=8.9+/-0.36*mmHg/ml g(-1)min(-1)), urinary flow (UF; ct(120)=0.14+/-0.01ml g(-1)min(-1); BthTX I=0.32+/-0.05*ml g(-1)min(-1); BthTX II=0.37+/-0.01*ml g(-1)min(-1)) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR; ct120=0.72+/-0.10 ml g(-1)min(-1); BthTX I=0.85+/-0.13*ml g(-1)min(-1); BthTX II=1.22+/-0.28*ml g(-1)min(-1)). In contrast decreased the percent of sodium tubular transport (%TNa(+); ct(120)=79,76+/-0.56; BthTX I=62.23+/-4.12*; BthTX II=70.96+/-2.93*) and percent of potassium tubular transport (%TK(+);ct120=66.80+/-3.69; BthTX I=55.76+/-5.57*; BthTX II=50.86+/-6.16*). Indomethacin antagonized the vascular, glomerular and tubular effects promoted by BthTX I and it's partially blocked the effects of BthTX II. In this work also evaluated the antibacterial effects of BthTx-I and BthTx-II against Xanthomonas axonopodis. pv. passiflorae (Gram-negative bacteria) and we observed that both PLA2 showed antibacterial activity. Also we observed that proteins Also we observed that proteins chemically modified with 4-bromophenacyl bromide (rho-BPB) decrease significantly the antibacterial effect of both PLA2. In conclusion, BthTx I and BthTX II caused renal alteration and presented activity antimicrobial. The indomethacin was able to antagonize totally the renal effects induced by BthTx I and partially the effects promoted by BthTx II, suggesting involvement of

  13. Estimation of renal cell carcinoma treatment effects from disease progression modeling

    PubMed Central

    Maitland, Michael L.; Wu, Kehua; Sharma, Manish R.; Jin, Yuyan; Kang, Soonmo Peter; Stadler, Walter M.; Karrison, Theodore G.; Ratain, Mark J.; Bies, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    To improve future drug development efficiency in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), a disease progression model was developed with longitudinal tumor size data from a phase III trial of sorafenib in RCC. The best fit model was externally evaluated on 145 placebo-treated patients in a phase III trial of pazopanib, and incorporated baseline tumor size, a linear disease progression component, and an exponential drug effect parameter. With the model-estimated effect of sorafenib on RCC growth we calculated the power of randomized phase II trials between sorafenib and hypothetical comparators over a range of effects. A hypothetical comparator with 80% greater drug effect than sorafenib would have 82% power (one-sided α = 0.1) with 50 patients per arm. Model-based quantitation of treatment effect with CT imaging offers a scaffold on which to develop new, more efficient, phase II trial endpoints and analytic strategies for RCC. PMID:23443753

  14. Effect of peritoneal dialysis versus hemodialysis on renal anemia in renal in end-stage disease patients: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wan-Ning; Zhang, Wen-Long; Sun, Tao; Ma, Fu-Zhe; Su, Sensen; Xu, Zhong-Gao

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of peritoneal dialysis (PD) and hemodialysis (HD) on renal anemia (RA) in renal disease patients by a meta-analysis. Relevant studies published before June 2015 were searched. Pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was used to evaluate the effect of HD and PD on RA based on five indexes: hemoglobin, ferritin, transferrin saturation index, serum albumin, and parathyroid hormone. Sensitivity analysis and publication bias assessment were conducted to evaluate the stability and reliability of our results. A total of fourteen eligible studies with 1103 cases underwent HD and 625 cases underwent PD were used for this meta-analysis. There were no significant difference for levels of hemoglobin (SMD = -0.23, 95% CI: -0.74 to 0.28), ferritin (SMD = 0.01, 95% CI: -0.59 to 0.62), parathyroid hormone (SMD = 0.11, 95% CI: -1.53 to 1.75) and transferrin saturation index (SMD = -0.06, 95% CI: -0.67 to 0.56) between HD and PD group. However, the content of serum albumin in HD group was much more than that in PD group (SMD = 1.58, 95% CI: 0.35 to 2.81). Neither of the included studies could reverse the pooled side effect and Egger's test demonstrated no publication bias. Both of the two dialysis strategies have a similar effect on RA in renal disease patients.

  15. Renal tubule cell repair following acute renal injury.

    PubMed

    Humes, H D; Lake, E W; Liu, S

    1995-01-01

    Experimental data suggests the recovery of renal function after ischemic or nephrotoxic acute renal failure is due to a replicative repair process dependent upon predominantly paracrine release of growth factors. These growth factors promote renal proximal tubule cell proliferation and a differentiation phase dependent on the interaction between tubule cells and basement membrane. These insights identify the molecular basis of renal repair and ischemic and nephrotoxic acute renal failure, and may lead to potential therapeutic modalities that accelerate renal repair and lessen the morbidity and mortality associated with these renal disease processes. In this regard, there is a prominent vasoconstrictor response of the renal vasculature during the postischemic period of developing acute renal failure. The intravenous administration of pharmacologic doses of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in the postischemic period have proven efficacious by altering renal vascular resistance, so that renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate improve. ANF also appears to protect renal tubular epithelial integrity and holds significant promise as a therapeutic agent in acute renal failure. Of equal or greater promise are the therapeutic interventions targeting the proliferative reparative zone during the postischemic period. The exogenous administration of epidermal growth factor or insulin-like growth factor-1 in the postischemic period have effectively decreased the degree of renal insufficiency as measured by the peak serum creatinine and has hastened renal recovery as measured by the duration of time required to return the baseline serum creatinine values. A similarly efficacious role for hepatocyte growth factor has also been recently demonstrated.

  16. Effect of bicarbonate supplementation on renal function and nutritional indices in predialysis advanced chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jiwon; Kwon, Soon Kil; Kim, Hye-Young

    2014-12-01

    Current practice guidelines recommend alkali therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and metabolic acidosis to prevent complications. This study aims to investigate the effect of oral sodium bicarbonate supplementation on the progression of renal function and nutritional indices in patients with predialysis advanced CKD. Forty patients with predialysis stage 5 CKD(estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR <15mL/min per 1.73m(2)) and 40 patients with stage 4 CKD (eGFR 15 to 30mL/min per 1.73m(2)) who had a total CO2 less than 22mEq/L were assigned into the bicarbonate treatment group or control group for 12 months. In stage 4 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of eGFR during the study between the treatment group and the control group (-2.30±4.49 versus -6.58±6.32mL/min/1.73m(2), p<0.05). However, in stage 5 CKD, there were no significant differences in the change of eGFR during the study between the two groups (-2.10±2.06 versus -3.23±1.95mL/min/1.73 m(2)).There were no significant differences in the changes of nutritional indices such as albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, total lymphocyte count (TLC), and Ondodera's prognostic nutritional index (OPNI) during the study between the two groups. In stage 5 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of TLC and OPNI between the two groups. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that bicarbonate supplementation slows the rate of decline of renal function in stage 4 CKD and improves nutritional indices in stage 5 CKD. Alkali therapy in advanced CKD may have beneficial effect on renal function and malnutrition.

  17. Effect of Bicarbonate Supplementation on Renal Function and Nutritional Indices in Predialysis Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jiwon; Kwon, Soon Kil

    2014-01-01

    Current practice guidelines recommend alkali therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and metabolic acidosis to prevent complications. This study aims to investigate the effect of oral sodium bicarbonate supplementation on the progression of renal function and nutritional indices in patients with predialysis advanced CKD. Forty patients with predialysis stage 5 CKD(estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR <15mL/min per 1.73m2) and 40 patients with stage 4 CKD (eGFR 15 to 30mL/min per 1.73m2) who had a total CO2 less than 22mEq/L were assigned into the bicarbonate treatment group or control group for 12 months. In stage 4 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of eGFR during the study between the treatment group and the control group (-2.30±4.49 versus -6.58±6.32mL/min/1.73m2, p<0.05). However, in stage 5 CKD, there were no significant differences in the change of eGFR during the study between the two groups (-2.10±2.06 versus -3.23±1.95mL/min/1.73 m2).There were no significant differences in the changes of nutritional indices such as albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, total lymphocyte count (TLC), and Ondodera's prognostic nutritional index (OPNI) during the study between the two groups. In stage 5 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of TLC and OPNI between the two groups. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that bicarbonate supplementation slows the rate of decline of renal function in stage 4 CKD and improves nutritional indices in stage 5 CKD. Alkali therapy in advanced CKD may have beneficial effect on renal function and malnutrition. PMID:25606047

  18. In vitro effects of platinum compounds on renal cellular respiration in mice.

    PubMed

    Almarzooqi, Saeeda-S; Alfazari, Ali-S; Abdul-Kader, Hidaya-M; Saraswathiamma, Dhanya; Albawardi, Alia-S; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin are structurally-related compounds, which are commonly used in cancer therapy. Cisplatin (Platinol(®)) has Boxed Warning stating: "Cumulative renal toxicity associated with PLATINOL is severe", while carboplatin and oxaliplatin are less nephrotoxic. These drugs form platinum adducts with cellular DNA. Their bindings to cellular thiols (e.g., glutathione and metallothionein) are known to contribute to drug resistance while thiol depletion augments platinum toxicity. Using phosphorescence oxygen analyzer, this study investigated the effects of platinum drugs on renal cellular respiration (mitochondrial O2 consumption) in the presence and absence of the thiol blocking agent N-ethylmaleimide (used here as a model for thiol depletion). Renal cellular ATP was also determined. Kidney fragments from C57BL/6 mice were incubated at 37 °C in Krebs-Henseleit buffer (gassed with 95% O2:5% CO2) with and without 100 μM platinum drug in the presence and absence of 100 μM N-ethylmaleimide for ≤ 6 h. Platinum drugs alone had no effects on cellular respiration (P ≥ 0.143) or ATP (P ≥ 0.161). N-ethylmaleimide lowered cellular respiration (P ≤ 0.114) and ATP (P = 0.008). The combination of platinum drug and N-ethylmaleimide significantly lowered both cellular respiration (P ≤ 0.006) and ATP (P ≤ 0.003). Incubations with N-ethylmaleimide alone were associated with moderate-to-severe tubular necrosis. Incubations with cisplatin+N-ethylmaleimide vs. cisplatin alone produced similar severities of tubular necrosis. Tubular derangements were more prominent in carboplatin+N-ethylmaleimide vs. carboplatin alone and in oxaliplatin+N-ethylmaleimide vs. oxaliplatin alone. These results demonstrate the adverse events of thiol depletion on platinum-induced nephrotoxicities. The results suggest cellular bioenergetics is a useful surrogate biomarker for assessing drug-induced nephrotoxicities.

  19. Application of pharmacometric approaches to evaluate effect of weight and renal function on pharmacokinetics of alogliptin

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Himanshu; Czerniak, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aims of the study were to characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK) of alogliptin in healthy and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) subjects using a population PK approach and to assess the influence of various covariates on alogliptin exposure. Methods Plasma concentration data collected from two phase 1 studies and one phase 3 study following administration of alogliptin (12.5–400 mg) were used for the PK model development. One‐ and two‐compartment models were evaluated as base structural PK models. The impact of selected covariates was assessed using stepwise forward selection and backward elimination procedures. The predictability and robustness of the final model was evaluated using visual predictive check and bootstrap analyses. The final model was used to perform simulations and guide appropriate dose adjustments. Results A two‐compartment model with first‐order absorption and elimination best described the alogliptin concentration vs. time profiles. Creatinine clearance and weight had a statistically significant effect on the oral clearance (CL/F) of alogliptin. The model predicted a lower CL/F (17%, 35%, 80%) and a higher systemic exposure (56%, 89%, 339%) for subjects with mild, moderate and severe renal impairment, respectively, compared with healthy subjects. Effect of weight on CL/F was not considered clinically relevant. Simulations at different doses of alogliptin support the approved doses of 12.5 mg and 6.25 mg for patients with moderate and severe renal impairment, respectively. Conclusions The PK of alogliptin was well characterized by the model. The analysis suggested an alogliptin dose adjustment for subjects with moderate‐to‐severe renal impairment and no dose adjustments based on weight. PMID:26617339

  20. [The effect of low-protein diet supplemented with ketoacids in patients with chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Molnár, Márta; Szekeresné Izsák, Margit; Nagy, Judit; Figler, Mária

    2009-02-01

    It is known that dietary protein restriction slows the progression of chronic renal disease. If daily protein intake is less than 0.5-0.6 g/kgbw, the diet has to be supplemented with essential aminoacids/ketoacids. In this study the authors evaluate the long-term effect of low-protein diet supplemented with ketoacids on the progression of chronic renal failure, calcium and phosphorus metabolism, nutritional status, the compliance of patients and the permanent dietary education for the compliance. 51 predialysis patients have been treated with ketoacids supplemented low-protein diet during 12-57 months (mean treatment period: 26 months). Serum creatinine raised from 349.72+/-78.04 micromol/l to 460.66+/-206.66 micromol/l (27 micromol/l/year or 2.3 micromol/l/month), glomerular filtration rate (GFR) decreased from 21.52+/-7.84 ml/min to 18.22+/-7.76 ml/min (0.83 ml/min/year or 0.07 ml/min/month). The slope of 1/serum creatinine versus time was 0.0018 by linear regression analysis. Serum parathormon decreased significantly, but serum calcium and phosphorus did not change. Nutritional status of patients did not change significantly during the follow-up period. Protein intake decreased significantly and remained at this lower level during the treatment period. According to results: low-protein diet supplemented with ketoacids was effective in slowing progression of chronic renal failure, decreased PTH, did not change nutritional status. With permanently and good education it was possible to keep patients on low-protein diet for a long period.

  1. [Cost-effectiveness of interventions for end-stage renal disease].

    PubMed

    Arredondo, A; Rangel, R; de Icaza, E

    1998-12-01

    The study reports the cost-effectiveness results of end-stage renal disease (ESDR) patients in Mexico in terms of years of life gained and quality of life and the economic cost with regards to three treatment alternatives that could be considered mutually exclusive: continuous peritoneal ambulatory dialysis (CAPD), hemodialysis (HD) and renal transplant (RT). The economic costs were calculated by using the average cost case-management methodology and further, the probable of life expectancy and the quality of life were cross-sectionally assessed by means of the Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALY) measured by the Rosser Index. The results show that economic costs in US$ of the three treatment alternatives were: CAPD $5,643.07, HD $9,631.60, and RT $3,021.63. The probability of life expectancy for CAPD and RT for the first and third year were: 86.2% and 66.9%, and 89.9% and 79.6%, respectively. The QALY scores for patients were: CAPD 0.8794, HD 0.8640, and RT 0.9783. The intervention with the highest cost-effectiveness coefficient was the renal transplant (3,088.69), followed by the CAPD (6,416.95) and HD (11,147.68). A significant difference was found between the transplanted patients and patients undergoing dialysis. Finally, this study concluded that the RT offers the least expensive alternative and the greatest number of years of life gained as well as providing significant changes in the quality of life of ESRD patients.

  2. Renal accumulation and intrarenal distribution of inorganic mercury in the rabbit: Effect of unilateral nephrectomy and dose of mercuric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Zalups, R.K. )

    1991-06-01

    The effects of unilateral nephrectomy and dose of mercuric chloride on the short-term renal accumulation and intrarenal distribution of inorganic mercury were studied in the rabbit. The renal accumulation of inorganic mercury, on a per gram basis, was increased in uninephrectomized (NPX) rabbits compared with that in sham-operated (SO) rabbits 24 h after the animals received either a nontoxic 2.0 mumol/kg or nephrotoxic 4.0 mumol/kg dose of mercuric chloride. In the NPX rabbits given the 2.0 mumol/kg dose of mercuric chloride, the increased accumulation of inorganic mercury was due to increased accumulation of mercury in the outer stripe of the outer medulla. In the NPX rabbits given the 4.0 mumol/kg dose of mercuric chloride, the increased renal accumulation of mercury appeared to be due to increased accumulation of mercury in both the renal cortex and outer stripe of the outer medulla. Interestingly, no differences in the renal accumulation of inorganic mercury were found between NPX and SO rabbits given a low nontoxic 0.5 mumol/kg dose of mercuric chloride. As the dose of mercuric chloride was increased from 0.5 to 4.0 mumol/kg, the percent of the administered dose of mercury that accumulated in each gram of renal tissue decreased substantially. The findings in the present study indicate that the renal accumulation of inorganic mercury increases after unilateral nephrectomy when certain nontoxic and nephrotoxic doses of mercuric chloride are administered. In addition, they indicate that the percent of the administered dose of mercury that accumulates in the renal tissue of both NPX and SO rabbits decreases as the dose of mercuric chloride is increased.

  3. Diabetes-Induced Decrease in Renal Oxygen Tension: Effects of an Altered Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, Fredrik; Carlsson, Per-Ola; Fasching, Angelica; Hansell, Peter; Liss, Per

    During conditions with experimental diabetes mellitus, it is evident that several alterations in renal oxygen metabolism occur, including increased mitochondrial respiration and increased lactate accumulation in the renal tissue. Consequently, these alterations will contribute to decrease the interstitial pO2, preferentially in the renal medulla of animals with sustained long-term hyperglycemia.

  4. Renal hemodynamic effects of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Zand, Ladan; Torres, Vicente E; Larson, Timothy S; King, Bernard F; Sethi, Sanjeev; Bergstralh, Eric J; Angioi, Andrea; Fervenza, Fernando C

    2016-08-01

    To determine the effect of statins on renal hemodynamics in normal volunteers and those with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease either with mild or moderate renal dysfunction. Thirty-two study subjects were enrolled in this study: 11 normal volunteers, 11 study subjects with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and mild kidney disease and 10 study subjects with ADPKD and moderate kidney disease. Subjects in each group received simvastatin 40 mg once daily for a period of 4 weeks. Renal blood flow was measured based on para-amino-hippurate (PAH) clearance and with the use of a magnetic resonance (MR) scanner at the beginning and following 4 weeks of therapy with statins. At the end of the study, except for the lipid profile, which was significantly lower in all groups, other laboratory results showed no change. Four weeks of therapy with simvastatin resulted in no change in serum creatinine, 24-h urinary protein, sodium, iothalamate clearance, PAH clearance or renal blood flow as measured by MRI or based on PAH clearance. Four weeks of therapy with simvastatin did not change renal blood flow in the study subjects with ADPKD with mild-to-moderate renal dysfunction or in healthy volunteers. NCT02511418. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of nimesulide on oxidative damage inflicted by ischemia-reperfusion on the rat renal tissue.

    PubMed

    Suleyman, Zeynep; Sener, Ebru; Kurt, Nezahat; Comez, Mehmet; Yapanoglu, Turgut

    2015-03-01

    The objective of our study is to research biochemically and histopathologically the effect of nimesulide on oxidative damage inflicted by ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) on the rat renal tissue. Twenty-four albino Wistar type of male rats were used for the experiment. The animals were divided into groups as: renal ischemia-reperfusion control (RIR), nimesulide+renal ischemia-reperfusion of 50 mg/kg (NRIR-50), nimesulide+renal ischemia-reperfusion of 100 mg/kg (NRIR-100), and sham groups (SG). In NRIR-50 and NRIR-100 groups were given nimesulide, and RIR and SG groups were given distilled water, an hour after anesthesia. Groups, except for the SG group, 1-h-ischemia and then 6-h-reperfusion were performed. In the renal tissue of the RIR group in which the malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and 8-hydroxyguanine (8-OHGua) levels were measured, the COX-1 and COX-2 activities were recorded. Nimesulide at 100 mg/kg doses reduced the oxidant parameters more significantly than 50 mg/kg doses; on the other hand, it raised the antioxidant parameters. It has been shown that 100 mg/kg doses of nimesulide prevented the renal I/R damage more significantly than a dose of 50 mg/kg, which shows that nimesulide, in clinics, could be used in the prevention of I/R damage.

  6. The Evolution of Soft Collinear Effective Theory

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Christopher

    2015-02-25

    Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) is an effective field theory of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) for processes where there are energetic, nearly lightlike degrees of freedom interacting with one another via soft radiation. SCET has found many applications in high-energy and nuclear physics, especially in recent years the physics of hadronic jets in e+e-, lepton-hadron, hadron-hadron, and heavy-ion collisions. SCET can be used to factorize multi-scale cross sections in these processes into single-scale hard, collinear, and soft functions, and to evolve these through the renormalization group to resum large logarithms of ratios of the scales that appear in the QCD perturbativemore » expansion, as well as to study properties of nonperturbative effects. We overview the elementary concepts of SCET and describe how they can be applied in high-energy and nuclear physics.« less

  7. The Evolution of Soft Collinear Effective Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Christopher

    2015-02-25

    Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) is an effective field theory of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) for processes where there are energetic, nearly lightlike degrees of freedom interacting with one another via soft radiation. SCET has found many applications in high-energy and nuclear physics, especially in recent years the physics of hadronic jets in e+e-, lepton-hadron, hadron-hadron, and heavy-ion collisions. SCET can be used to factorize multi-scale cross sections in these processes into single-scale hard, collinear, and soft functions, and to evolve these through the renormalization group to resum large logarithms of ratios of the scales that appear in the QCD perturbative expansion, as well as to study properties of nonperturbative effects. We overview the elementary concepts of SCET and describe how they can be applied in high-energy and nuclear physics.

  8. Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Ulmschneider

    When we are looking for intelligent life outside the Earth, there is a fundamental question: Assuming that life has formed on an extraterrestrial planet, will it also develop toward intelligence? As this is hotly debated, we will now describe the development of life on Earth in more detail in order to show that there are good reasons why evolution should culminate in intelligent beings.

  9. Developmental effect of antenatal exposure to betamethasone on renal angiotensin II activity in the young adult sheep

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Jianli; Chappell, Mark C.; Rose, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Antenatal corticosteroids may have long-term effects on renal development which have not been clearly defined. Our objective was to compare the responses to intrarenal infusions of ANG II in two groups of year-old, male sheep: one group exposed to a clinically relevant dose of betamethasone before birth and one not exposed. We wished to test the hypothesis that antenatal steroid exposure would enhance renal responses to ANG II in adult life. Six pairs of male sheep underwent unilateral nephrectomy and renal artery catheter placement. The sheep were infused for 24 h with ANG II or with ANG II accompanied by blockade of the angiotensin type 1 (AT1) or type 2 (AT2) receptor. Baseline mean arterial blood pressure among betamethasone-exposed sheep was higher than in control animals (85.8 ± 2.2 and 78.3 ± 1.0 mmHg, respectively, P = 0.003). Intrarenal infusion of ANG II did not increase systemic blood pressure (P ≥ 0.05) but significantly decreased effective renal plasma flow and increased renal artery resistance (P < 0.05). The decrease in flow and increase in resistance were significantly greater in betamethasone- compared with vehicle-exposed sheep (betamethasone P < 0.05, vehicle P ≥ 0.05). This effect appeared to be mediated by a heightened sensitivity to the AT1 receptor among betamethasone-exposed sheep. Sodium excretion initially decreased in both groups during ANG II infusion; however, a rebound was observed after 24 h. AT1 blockade was followed by a significant rebound after 24 h in both groups. AT2 blockade blunted the 24-h rebound effect among the vehicle-exposed sheep compared with the betamethasone-exposed sheep. In conclusion, antenatal corticosteroid exposure appears to modify renal responsiveness to ANG II by increasing AT1- and decreasing AT2 receptor-mediated actions particularly as related to renal blood flow and sodium excretion. PMID:20071463

  10. Cyclosporine versus tacrolimus: cost-effectiveness analysis for renal transplantation in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Augusto Afonso; Silva, Grazielle Dias; Andrade, Eli Iola Gurgel; Cherchiglia, Mariângela Leal; Costa, Juliana de Oliveira; Almeida, Alessandra Maciel; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the cost-effectiveness of treatment regimens with cyclosporine or tacrolimus, five years after renal transplantation. METHODS This cost-effectiveness analysis was based on historical cohort data obtained between 2000 and 2004 and involved 2,022 patients treated with cyclosporine or tacrolimus, matched 1:1 for gender, age, and type and year of transplantation. Graft survival and the direct costs of medical care obtained from the National Health System (SUS) databases were used as outcome results. RESULTS Most of the patients were women, with a mean age of 36.6 years. The most frequent diagnosis of chronic renal failure was glomerulonephritis/nephritis (27.7%). In five years, the tacrolimus group had an average life expectancy gain of 3.96 years at an annual cost of R$78,360.57 compared with the cyclosporine group with a gain of 4.05 years and an annual cost of R$61,350.44. CONCLUSIONS After matching, the study indicated better survival of patients treated with regimens using tacrolimus. However, regimens containing cyclosporine were more cost-effective. PMID:25741648