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Sample records for renal excretory mechanisms

  1. Relative roles of metabolism and renal excretory mechanisms in xenobiotic elimination by fish

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, J.B. Univ. of Florida, St. Augustine ); Bend, J.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Renal clearance techniques were used to examine the relative contributions of metabolism and renal tubular transport in determining the rates of excretion of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and several of its phase I metabolites by southern flounder, Paralichthys lethostigma. Each compound ({sup 3}H-labeled) was injected at a dose of 2.5 {mu}mole/kg, producing plasma concentrations of 1 to 5 {mu}M. Despite extensive plasma binding, the uncorrected renal clearance of BaP-7,8-dihydrodiol exceeded the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) by more than 20-fold. Phenolic BaP metabolites also showed net secretion. Clearances of all four compounds studied were reduced by probenecid and other organic anion, including the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. HPLC analysis demonstrated that the bulk of the material excreted in the urine was not the parent compound, but sulfate or glucuronide conjugates of its phenolic or dihydrodiol metabolites. Excretion of sulfate conjugates predominated over the first 24 hr, whereas the glucuronide conjugates were the primary excretory products in succeeding days. In vitro, isolated renal tubules transported both glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, but sulfates were the preferred substrates. Isolated tubules were shown to be capable of catalyzing conjugation reactions, producing predominantly glucuronide conjugates. Liver slices produced both types of conjugates. Thus, the rapid excretion of BaP-7,8-dihydrodiol reflected a combination of two processes. First, this metabolite was rapidly converted to its sulfate conjugate, primarily via extrarenal tissues. Second, the sulfate conjugate was preferentially transported to the urine via secretion on the organic anion transport system.

  2. Functional consequences of prenatal methylmercury exposure: effects on renal and hepatic responses to trophic stimuli and on renal excretory mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Slotkin, T.A.; Kavlock, R.J.; Cowdery, T.; Orband, L.; Bartolome, M.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of prenatal exposure to methylmercury on the functional development of renal and hepatic response systems was examined in the developing rat. Methylmercury produced an elevation of basal activity of renal ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, an enzyme involved in regulation of cellular maturation) and an eventual relative hypertrophy; liver ODC was reduced and hypertrophy was not evident. In contrast, the reactivity of liver ODC to trophic stimulants (vasopressin, isoproterenol) was markedly enhanced by prenatal methylmercury exposure, whereas renal ODC responses were much less affected (vasopressin) or actually reduced (isoproterenol). Targeted actions of methylmercury on renal excretory function were also prominent, with increased fractional excretions urea and electrolytes and an eventual reduction in glomerular filtration as assessed by creatinine clearance. These studies show that doses of methylmercury ordinarily associated with selective actions on development of neurobehavioral patterns also influence the functional ontogeny of other organ systems; furthermore, the fact that the target tissues are different for prenatal vs postnatal methylmercury exposure, indicates that the functional teratology of methylmercury exhibits critical periods of sensitivity.

  3. [Capacities of examination of renal function at excretory urography].

    PubMed

    Bosin, V Iu; Zyrianov, V Iu

    2004-01-01

    The study was undertaken to enhance the diagnostic capacities of excretory urography in evaluating renal function, by determining the renal clearance of a contrast medium. The main task of the study was to develop bloodless and rather reliable ways of estimating the volume of the body's distributed contrast medium and its urinary concentration in the patient at urography. Excretory urography was performed in 248 patients aged 12 to 75 years. The specific gravity of excreted urine was determined with a standard laboratory urometer to 0.001 g/cm3. Absoption spectrophotometry was used to determine the serum concentration of contrast medium in 67 patients. The values of concentrations were plotted in the semilogarithmic ordinate system, followed by extrapolation of the initial segment of the plot to the so-called zero point determining the value of the concentration of contrast medium at the moment of its complete distribution in the intercellular space. The derived value was compared with the medium's dose coming into the body, which made it possible to determine the degree of dilution of the substance, i.e. the volume of its distribution in the organism. There was a linear relationship between the concentrations of renally eliminated contrast medium and the specific gravity of excreted urine. The numerical value of the constant reflecting this relationship is equal to 6. There was evidence for that such studies could be made by routine urometry. A high correlation was found between the body mass and the volume of distribution of contrast medium in the intercellular space. The discovery of the above regularities permitted the procedure for measuring the values of two most important physiological renal process (glomerular filtration and trabecular water reabsorption) to be simplified and widely available. The paper outlines the great promises for using excretory urography as a scanning functional test during a primary study and a follow-up of the patient's status.

  4. Comprehensive renal scintillation procedures in spinal cord injury: comparison with excretory urography

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, L.K.; Dubovsky, E.V.; Bueschen, A.J.; Witten, D.M.; Scott, J.W.; Kuhlemeier, K.; Stover, S.L.

    1981-07-01

    A /sup 131/iodine orthoiodohippurate comprehensive renal scintillation procedure was performed and compared to results of excretory urography in 200 spinal cord injury patients. No severe urographic abnormalities were undetected by the comprehensive renal scintillation procedure. Only 1.4 per cent of renal units had greater than minimal pyelocaliectasis or ureterectasis in the presence of a normal radionuclide examination. A relatively large number of abnormalities were detected on the renal scintillation procedure when the excretory urogram was normal. Serial followup will be required to determine the significance of these findings but present data suggest that a comprehensive renal scintillation procedure and a plain film of the kidneys, ureters and bladder may be used for screening upper urinary tract abnormalities in lieu of an excretory urogram. This is particularly advantageous for the spinal cord injury population, since there have been no toxic or allergic reactions reported, no bowel preparation or dehydration is required and there is relatively low radiation exposure.

  5. 99mtechnetium-dimercapto-succinic acid renal scanning and excretory urography in diagnosis of renal scars in children

    SciTech Connect

    McLorie, G.A.; Aliabadi, H.; Churchill, B.M.; Ash, J.M.; Gilday, D.L. )

    1989-09-01

    We compared the ability of excretory urography (without tomography) and 99mtechnetium-dimercapto-succinic acid renal scanning to detect renal scars in 32 children with primary vesicoureteral reflux. These children did not have hydronephrosis, renal failure or urinary tract obstruction. In all cases both studies were conducted within a 10-month period. The findings from both modalities were in agreement for 51 of the 64 renal units evaluated (80%). Evaluation of the excretory urogram indicated 6 cases of diffuse and 2 of focal scarring that were not detected by evaluation of the renal scan. The sensitivity of excretory urography to detect renal scars was 84% and the specificity was 83%. The 99mtechnetium-dimercapto-succinic acid renal scan showed 5 cases of focal renal scarring not detected by excretory urography. The sensitivity of the renal scan to detect renal scars was 77% and the specificity was 75%. We conclude that neither study alone could effectively replace the other for the detection of renal scars, and recommend that both be included in the initial evaluation and followup of patients with renal scars.

  6. Renal ischemic injury affects renal hemodynamics and excretory functions in Sprague Dawley rats: involvement of renal sympathetic tone.

    PubMed

    Salman, Ibrahim M; Sattar, Munavvar A; Abdullah, Nor A; Ameer, Omar Z; Yam, Mun F; Kaur, Gurjeet; Hye Khan, Md Abdul; Johns, Edward J

    2010-01-01

    The role of renal sympathetic nerves in the pathogenesis of ischemic acute renal failure (ARF) and the immediate changes in the renal excretory functions following renal ischemia were investigated. Two groups of male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were anesthetized (pentobarbitone sodium, 60 mg kg(-1) i.p.) and subjected to unilateral renal ischemia by clamping the left renal artery for 30 min followed by reperfusion. In group 1, the renal nerves were electrically stimulated and the responses in the renal blood flow (RBF) and renal vascular resistance (RVR) were recorded, while group 2 was used to study the early changes in the renal functions following renal ischemia. In post-ischemic animals, basal RBF and the renal vasoconstrictor reperfusion to renal nerve stimulation (RNS) were significantly lower (all p < 0.05 vs. control). Mean arterial pressure (MAP), basal RVR, urine flow rate (UFR), absolute and fractional excretions of sodium (U(Na)V and FE(Na)), and potassium (U(K)V and FE(K)) were higher in ARF rats (all p < 0.05 vs. control). Post-ischemic animals showed markedly lower glomerular filtration rate (GFR) (p < 0.05 vs. control). No appreciable differences were observed in urinary sodium to potassium ratio (U(Na)/U(K)) during the early reperfusion phase of renal ischemia (p > 0.05 vs. control). The data suggest an immediate involvement of renal sympathetic nerve action in the pathogenesis of ischemic ARF primarily through altered renal hemodynamics. Diuresis, natriuresis, and kaliuresis due to impaired renal tubular functions are typical responses to renal ischemia and of comparable magnitudes.

  7. Exercise training improves renal excretory responses to acute volume expansion in rats with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hong; Li, Yi-Fan; Zucker, Irving H; Patel, Kaushik P

    2006-12-01

    Experiments were performed to test the postulate that exercise training (ExT) improves the blunted renal excretory response to acute volume expansion (VE), in part, by normalizing the neural component of the volume reflex typically observed in chronic heart failure (HF). Diuretic and natriuretic responses to acute VE were examined in sedentary and ExT groups of rats with either HF or sham-operated controls. Experiments were performed in anesthetized (Inactin) rats 6 wk after coronary ligation surgery. Histological data indicated that there was a 34.9 +/- 3.0% outer and 42.5 +/- 3.2% inner infarct of the myocardium in the HF group. Sham rats had no observable damage to the myocardium. In sedentary rats with HF, VE produced a blunted diuresis (46% of sham) and natriuresis (35% of sham) compared with sham-operated control rats. However, acute VE-induced diuresis and natriuresis in ExT rats with HF were comparable to sham rats and significantly higher than sedentary HF rats. Renal denervation abolished the salutary effects of ExT on renal excretory response to acute VE in HF. Since glomerular filtration rates were not significantly different between the groups, renal hemodynamic changes may not account for the blunted renal responses in rats with HF. Additional experiments confirmed that renal sympathetic nerve activity responses to acute VE were blunted in sedentary HF rats; however, ExT normalized the renal sympathoinhibition in HF rats. These results confirm an impairment of neurally mediated excretory responses to acute VE in rats with HF. ExT restored the blunted excretory responses as well as the renal sympathoinhibitory response to acute VE in HF rats. Thus the beneficial effects of ExT on cardiovascular regulation in HF may be partly due to improvement of the neural component of volume reflex.

  8. Renal parenchymal appearance on /sup 123/iodine-hippurate renoscintigrams and excretory urograms

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, J.B.; Taagehoj-Jensen, F.; Andresen, J.H.; Jorgensen, T.M.; Djurhuus, J.C.; Sorensen, S.S.; Charles, P.

    1985-02-01

    In 61 patients with vesicoureteral reflux renal scar formation was diagnosed by excretory urography and /sup 123/iodine-hippurate scintigrams. Scar formation on the nephrograms was detected in the upper, middle and lower zones of the kidneys on tomography exposures. Scintigraphic detection of scars was performed on the computerized uptake of the parenchymal phase. Maximal time elapse between the 2 investigations was 1 year. Excretory urography revealed 37 kidneys with a total of 74 regional scars. On scintigraphy 57 kidneys were judged to have 102 scars. There were 281 regions judged to be identical on the scintigram and the nephrogram. A true positive ratio (sensitivity) of 0.46 and a true negative ratio (specificity) of 0.90 were noted for the excretory urogram, compared to a sensitivity of 0.64 and a specificity of 0.81 for renography. The study confirms an over-representation of scars judged from scintigrams, which calls for further investigation of scar formation detection.

  9. Attenuation of renal excretory responses to ANG II during inhibition of superoxide dismutase in anesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Md. Abdul Hye; Islam, Mohammed Toriqul; Castillo, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    To examine the functional interaction between superoxide dismutase (SOD) and NADPH oxidase activity, we assessed renal responses to acute intra-arterial infusion of ANG II (0.5 ng·kg−1·min−1) before and during administration of a SOD inhibitor, diethyldithiocarbamate (DETC, 0.5 mg·kg−1·min−1), in enalaprilat-pretreated (33 μg·kg−1·min−1) rats (n = 11). Total (RBF) and regional (cortical, CBF; medullary; MBF) renal blood flows were determined by Transonic and laser-Doppler flowmetry, respectively. Renal cortical and medullary tissue NADPH oxidase activity in vitro was determined using the lucigenin-chemiluminescence method. DETC treatment alone resulted in decreases in RBF, CBF, MBF, glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urine flow (V), and sodium excretion (UNaV) as reported previously. Before DETC, ANG II infusion decreased RBF (−18 ± 3%), CBF (−16 ± 3%), MBF [−5 ± 6%; P = not significant (NS)], GFR (−31 ± 4%), V (−34 ± 2%), and UNaV (−53 ± 3%). During DETC infusion, ANG II also caused similar reductions in RBF (−20 ± 4%), CBF (−19 ± 3%), MBF (−2 ± 2; P = NS), and in GFR (−22 ± 7%), whereas renal excretory responses (V; −12 ± 2%; UNaV; −24 ± 4%) were significantly attenuated compared with those before DETC. In in vitro experiments, ANG II (100 μM) enhanced NADPH oxidase activity both in cortical [13,194 ± 1,651 vs. 20,914 ± 2,769 relative light units (RLU)/mg protein] and in medullary (21,296 ± 2,244 vs. 30,597 ± 4,250 RLU/mg protein) tissue. Application of DETC (1 mM) reduced the basal levels and prevented ANG II-induced increases in NADPH oxidase activity in both tissues. These results demonstrate that renal excretory responses to acute ANG II administration are attenuated during SOD inhibition, which seems related to a downregulation of NADPH oxidase in the deficient condition of SOD activity. PMID:19923406

  10. Renal excretory responses of taurine-depleted rats to hypotonic and hypertonic saline infusion.

    PubMed

    Mozaffari, M S; Warren, B K; Azuma, J; Schaffer, S W

    1998-01-01

    Male Wistar-Kyoto rats were given either tap water (control) or 3% beta-alanine (taurine-depleted) for three weeks. To prepare for the kidney function studies, the animals were then implanted with femoral vessels and bladder catheters. Two days after surgery, each rat was given an intravenous infusion of saline at the rate of 50 microliter/min and urine samples were collected at specific time intervals. An isotonic saline solution (0.9% NaCl) was infused for determination of baseline parameters and was followed by the infusion of a hypotonic saline solution (0.45% NaCl). Two days later, the infusion protocol was repeated in the same animals; however, a hypertonic saline solution (1.8% NaCl) was substituted for the hypotonic saline solution. Renal excretion of fluid and sodium increased in the control, but not taurine-depleted, rats during the hypotonic saline infusion. Interestingly, diuretic and natriuretic responses were similar between the groups during hypertonic saline infusion. The results suggest that taurine-depletion in rats affects renal excretory responses to a hypotonic, but not a hypertonic, saline solution.

  11. Dietary sodium intake modulates renal excretory responses to intrarenal angiotensin (1-7) administration in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Julie; Corbett, Alan; Johns, Edward J

    2013-02-01

    Angiotensin II at the kidney regulates renal hemodynamic and excretory function, but the actions of an alternative metabolite, angiotensin (1-7), are less clear. This study investigated how manipulation of dietary sodium intake influenced the renal hemodynamic and excretory responses to intrarenal administration of angiotensin (1-7). Renal interstitial infusion of angiotensin (1-7) in anesthetized rats fed a normal salt intake had minimal effects on glomerular filtration rate but caused dose-related increases in urine flow and absolute and fractional sodium excretions ranging from 150 to 200%. In rats maintained for 2 wk on a low-sodium diet angiotensin (1-7) increased glomerular filtration rate by some 45%, but the diuretic and natriuretic responses were enhanced compared with those in rats on a normal sodium intake. By contrast, renal interstitial infusion of angiotensin (1-7) in rats maintained on a high-sodium intake had no effect on glomerular filtration rate, whereas the diuresis and natriuresis was markedly attenuated compared with those in rats fed either a normal or low-sodium diet. Plasma renin and angiotensin (1-7) were highest in the rats on the low-sodium diet and depressed in the rats on a high-sodium diet. These findings demonstrate that the renal hemodynamic and excretory responses to locally administered angiotensin (1-7) is dependent on the level of sodium intake and indirectly on the degree of activation of the renin-angiotensin system. The exact way in which angiotensin (1-7) exerts its effects may be dependent on the prevailing levels of angiotensin II and its receptor expression.

  12. Adrenergic mechanisms coordinating circulatory and excretory functions by meditation of renin secretion.

    PubMed

    Branchevsky, L L

    1972-01-01

    Phentolamine-induced blockade of alpha-adrenoreceptors and subsequent beta-adrenoreceptor stimulation by intravenous injection of adrenaline or phenylephrine (Mezaton) in anaesthtized dogs was accompanied by an elevation of plasma renin activitiy in peripheral blood and a reduction of renal excretion of sodium, potassium, and water. On the basis of his findings the author formulates his hypothesis that in extreme haemodynamic shifts, caused by changes in vascular tone, the renin-angiotensin system is the intrarenal mediator of natriuretic reaction, ensuring the coordination of circulatory and excretory functions in the overall regulation of water and electrolyte balance by modification of water and electrolyte excretion.

  13. Early enhancement of fluid transport in rabbit proximal straight tubules after loss of contralateral renal excretory function.

    PubMed Central

    Tabei, K; Levenson, D J; Brenner, B M

    1983-01-01

    To assess the renal functional adaptation to reduced excretory capacity, we studied whole kidney and single nephron function in anesthetized volume-replete rabbits after unilateral (left kidney) nephrectomy (UNX), ureteral obstruction (UO), or ureteroperitoneostomy (UP). At 24 h, despite the absence of measurable hypertrophy of the contralateral (right) kidney, these procedures significantly increased p-aminohippurate clearance (45-54%) and inulin clearance (CIN) (64-110%) compared with sham-operated control animals. In each group, whole kidney sodium reabsorption increased in proportion to the rise in CIN. To determine whether the intrinsic transport capacity of proximal tubule segments is altered by these maneuvers, we measured fluid volume reabsorption rate (Jv) in isolated superficial proximal straight tubule (PST) segments perfused in vitro, comparing each control tubule (obtained by biopsy of the left kidney immediately before an experimental maneuver) with a corresponding tubule segment obtained 24 h or 7 d later from the contralateral kidney. Control tubule Jv in sham-24 h animals averaged 0.48 +/- 0.04 nl/(min X mm). Jv did not change significantly at 24 h or 7 d after sham maneuvers but increased significantly at 24 h after UNX [delta Jv = 0.13 +/- 0.03 nl/(min X mm)], UO [delta Jv = 0.10 +/- 0.04 nl/(min X mm)], and UP [delta Jv = 0.13 +/- 0.04 nl/(min X mm)]. Jv remained increased by similar amounts at 7 d after UNX and UO. To evaluate whether an increase in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) might be the stimulus to this augmentation in Jv values, methylprednisolone (MP) (15 mg/kg per d) was administered daily to sham-operated animals, a maneuver which induced a 73% rise in CIN by day 5. This procedure also produced a significant increase in Jv in PST at 5 d [delta Jv = 0.16 +/- 0.05 nl/(min X mm)]. The increase in Jv evident in each group at 5 or 7 d was paralleled by an equivalent change in tubule cell volume and apparent tubule luminal surface area in

  14. Histological alterations on the structure of the excretory renal system in tench (Tinca tinca) after exposure to 17-alpha-ethynylestradiol.

    PubMed

    Oropesa, A L; Jiménez, B; Fallola, C; Pula, H J; Cuesta, J M; Gómez, L

    2013-12-01

    This study describes the effects of 17-alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2) on the structure of the excretory system of the kidney in tench. Adult male tench were exposed to sub-lethal doses of EE2 (50, 100 and 500 μg/kg b.w.) under semistatic conditions for a period of 30 days. The nephrosomatic index and histology (including a morphometric analysis) of the kidney were examined. Histopathological lesions in the kidney of exposed tench were: dilation of glomerular capillaries and increase in the area of the renal corpuscle, hyaline degeneration in the epithelial cells of the proximal tubules leading to necrotic changes, hemorrhages in the interstitial tissue and deposits of eosinophilic material. These lesions were observed with a greater degree of severity as the exposure doses were increased. These results indicate that long-term exposure to EE2 could produce clear negative effects on the excretory system of the kidney in tench and consequently on their physiological functions.

  15. Dietary creatine supplementation during pregnancy: a study on the effects of creatine supplementation on creatine homeostasis and renal excretory function in spiny mice.

    PubMed

    Ellery, Stacey J; LaRosa, Domenic A; Kett, Michelle M; Della Gatta, Paul A; Snow, Rod J; Walker, David W; Dickinson, Hayley

    2016-08-01

    Recent evidence obtained from a rodent model of birth asphyxia shows that supplementation of the maternal diet with creatine during pregnancy protects the neonate from multi-organ damage. However, the effect of increasing creatine intake on creatine homeostasis and biosynthesis in females, particularly during pregnancy, is unknown. This study assessed the impact of creatine supplementation on creatine homeostasis, body composition, capacity for de novo creatine synthesis and renal excretory function in non-pregnant and pregnant spiny mice. Mid-gestation pregnant and virgin spiny mice were fed normal chow or chow supplemented with 5 % w/w creatine for 18 days. Weight gain, urinary creatine and electrolyte excretion were assessed during supplementation. At post mortem, body composition was assessed by Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, or tissues were collected to assess creatine content and mRNA expression of the creatine synthesising enzymes arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT) and guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) and the creatine transporter (CrT1). Protein expression of AGAT and GAMT was also assessed by Western blot. Key findings of this study include no changes in body weight or composition with creatine supplementation; increased urinary creatine excretion in supplemented spiny mice, with increased sodium (P < 0.001) and chloride (P < 0.05) excretion in pregnant dams after 3 days of supplementation; lowered renal AGAT mRNA (P < 0.001) and protein (P < 0.001) expressions, and lowered CrT1 mRNA expression in the kidney (P < 0.01) and brain (P < 0.001). Creatine supplementation had minimal impact on creatine homeostasis in either non-pregnant or pregnant spiny mice. Increasing maternal dietary creatine consumption could be a useful treatment for birth asphyxia.

  16. Changing indications for excretory urography

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Schreiber, M.H.

    1985-07-19

    Most individuals suspected of having renovascular hypertension, men with benign prostatic enlargement, women with recurrent infections of the urinary tract or urinary stress incontinence, women undergoing hysterectomy, uremic and diabetic patients, and patients with renal transplant or adult polycystic kidney disease should not, as a rule, undergo routine excretory urography (EU). Possible morbidity and mortality and unwarranted cost do not justify the study, since the majority of individuals in any of these situations do not benefit from the information obtained from the study. Excretory urography must be performed selectively, rather than routinely, in such persons. As the authors emphasize, modified EU, often using only two to three films, may be performed under many clinical situations to reduce radiation exposure, toxic effects, and cost to the patient.

  17. Sickle cell disease: renal manifestations and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Karl A.; Hebbel, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) substantially alters renal structure and function, and causes various renal syndromes and diseases. Such diverse renal outcomes reflect the uniquely complex vascular pathobiology of SCD and the propensity of red blood cells to sickle in the renal medulla because of its hypoxic, acidotic, and hyperosmolar conditions. Renal complications and involvement in sickle cell nephropathy (SCN) include altered haemodynamics, hypertrophy, assorted glomerulopathies, chronic kidney disease, acute kidney injury, impaired urinary concentrating ability, distal nephron dysfunction, haematuria, and increased risks of urinary tract infections and renal medullary carcinoma. SCN largely reflects an underlying vasculopathy characterized by cortical hyperperfusion, medullary hypoperfusion, and an increased, stress-induced vasoconstrictive response. Renal involvement is usually more severe in homozygous disease (sickle cell anaemia, HbSS) than in compound heterozygous types of SCD (for example HbSC and HbSβ+-thalassaemia), and is typically mild, albeit prevalent, in the heterozygous state (sickle cell trait, HbAS). Renal involvement contributes substantially to the diminished life expectancy of patients with SCD, accounting for 16–18% of mortality. As improved clinical care promotes survival into adulthood, SCN imposes a growing burden on both individual health and health system costs. This Review addresses the renal manifestations of SCD and focuses on their underlying mechanisms. PMID:25668001

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of Renal Ischemic Conditioning Strategies.

    PubMed

    Kierulf-Lassen, Casper; Nieuwenhuijs-Moeke, Gertrude J; Krogstrup, Nicoline V; Oltean, Mihai; Jespersen, Bente; Dor, Frank J M F

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury is the leading cause of acute kidney injury in a variety of clinical settings such as renal transplantation and hypovolemic and/or septic shock. Strategies to reduce ischemia-reperfusion injury are obviously clinically relevant. Ischemic conditioning is an inherent part of the renal defense mechanism against ischemia and can be triggered by short periods of intermittent ischemia and reperfusion. Understanding the signaling transduction pathways of renal ischemic conditioning can promote further clinical translation and pharmacological advancements in this era. This review summarizes research on the molecular mechanisms underlying both local and remote ischemic pre-, per- and postconditioning of the kidney. The different types of conditioning strategies in the kidney recruit similar powerful pro-survival mechanisms. Likewise, renal ischemic conditioning mobilizes many of the same protective signaling pathways as in other organs, but differences are recognized. PMID:26330099

  19. Lipocalin signaling controls unicellular tube development in the Caenorhabditis elegans excretory system.

    PubMed

    Stone, Craig E; Hall, David H; Sundaram, Meera V

    2009-05-15

    Unicellular tubes or capillaries composed of individual cells with a hollow lumen perform important physiological functions including fluid or gas transport and exchange. These tubes are thought to build intracellular lumina by polarized trafficking of apical membrane components, but the molecular signals that promote luminal growth and luminal connectivity between cells are poorly understood. Here we show that the lipocalin LPR-1 is required for luminal connectivity between two unicellular tubes in the Caenorhabditis elegans excretory (renal) system, the excretory duct cell and pore cell. Lipocalins are a large family of secreted proteins that transport lipophilic cargos and participate in intercellular signaling. lpr-1 is required at a time of rapid luminal growth, it is expressed by the duct, pore and surrounding cells, and it can function cell non-autonomously. These results reveal a novel signaling mechanism that controls unicellular tube formation, and provide a genetic model system for dissecting lipocalin signaling pathways.

  20. Lipocalin signaling controls unicellular tube development in the Caenorhabditis elegans excretory system

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Craig E.; Hall, David H.; Sundaram, Meera V.

    2011-01-01

    Unicellular tubes or capillaries composed of individual cells with a hollow lumen perform important physiological functions including fluid or gas transport and exchange. These tubes are thought to build intracellular lumina by polarized trafficking of apical membrane components, but the molecular signals that promote luminal growth and luminal connectivity between cells are poorly understood. Here we show that the lipocalin LPR-1 is required for luminal connectivity between two unicellular tubes in the Caenorhabditis elegans excretory (renal) system, the excretory duct cell and pore cell. Lipocalins are a large family of secreted proteins that transport lipophilic cargos and participate in intercellular signaling. lpr-1 is required at a time of rapid luminal growth, it is expressed by the duct, pore and surrounding cells, and it can function cell nonautonomously. These results reveal a novel signaling mechanism that controls unicellular tube formation, and provide a genetic model system for dissecting lipocalin signaling pathways. PMID:19269285

  1. Regulation of renal potassium secretion: molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Welling, Paul A

    2013-05-01

    A new understanding of renal potassium balance has emerged as the molecular underpinnings of potassium secretion have become illuminated, highlighting the key roles of apical potassium channels, renal outer medullary potassium channel (ROMK) and Big Potassium (BK), in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron and collecting duct. These channels act as the final-regulated components of the renal potassium secretory machinery. Their activity, number, and driving forces are precisely modulated to ensure potassium excretion matches dietary potassium intake. Recent identification of the underlying regulatory mechanisms at the molecular level provides a new appreciation of the physiology and reveals a molecular insight to explain the paradoxic actions of aldosterone on potassium secretion. Here, we review the current state of knowledge in the field.

  2. Oxidant Mechanisms in Renal Injury and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ratliff, Brian B.; Abdulmahdi, Wasan; Pawar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: A common link between all forms of acute and chronic kidney injuries, regardless of species, is enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) during injury/disease progression. While low levels of ROS and RNS are required for prosurvival signaling, cell proliferation and growth, and vasoreactivity regulation, an imbalance of ROS and RNS generation and elimination leads to inflammation, cell death, tissue damage, and disease/injury progression. Recent Advances: Many aspects of renal oxidative stress still require investigation, including clarification of the mechanisms which prompt ROS/RNS generation and subsequent renal damage. However, we currently have a basic understanding of the major features of oxidative stress pathology and its link to kidney injury/disease, which this review summarizes. Critical Issues: The review summarizes the critical sources of oxidative stress in the kidney during injury/disease, including generation of ROS and RNS from mitochondria, NADPH oxidase, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. The review next summarizes the renal antioxidant systems that protect against oxidative stress, including superoxide dismutase and catalase, the glutathione and thioredoxin systems, and others. Next, we describe how oxidative stress affects kidney function and promotes damage in every nephron segment, including the renal vessels, glomeruli, and tubules. Future Directions: Despite the limited success associated with the application of antioxidants for treatment of kidney injury/disease thus far, preventing the generation and accumulation of ROS and RNS provides an ideal target for potential therapeutic treatments. The review discusses the shortcomings of antioxidant treatments previously used and the potential promise of new ones. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 119–146. PMID:26906267

  3. [Mechanisms of repair after renal injury].

    PubMed

    Menè, P; Polci, R; Festuccia, F

    2003-01-01

    Recovery from kidney injury through repair mechanisms often linked to inflammation is conditioned by nature and severity of the insult. In the assessment of kidney repair, functional recovery should be kept distinct from structural repair: compensatory hypertrophy/function of intact nephrons often masks the inability of the kidney to heal or replace damaged structures. The mechanisms of repair reflect three degrees of injury, differently handled by the kidney. First, repair of DNA damage is accomplished through proofreading DNA polymerases, along with other controls for sequence misalignment / nucleotide replacement. If DNA cannot be repaired, cells carrying mutation(s) are disposed of through apoptosis, which is also critical to clearing damaged kidney cells and infiltrating leukocytes in acute and chronic ischemic, immunological, or chemical damage. A second mechanism of repair is linked to proliferation of surviving cells. At least 5 types of reparative proliferation are known to occur, some of which implicate stem cell immigration from distant reservoirs, followed by in situ differentiation. A third mode of repair could be referred to as structural repair, indeed limited in the human kidney by the absence of postnatal nephrogenesis. Recovery from acute tubular necrosis involves remodelling of the proximal tubule, with a strict requirement for integrity of the basement membrane. Contrary to the current dogma that only acute injury can be repaired, whereas chronic damage leads to irreversible loss of nephrons, evidence is emerging that some degree of renal remodelling occurs even in chronic renal disease, despite the occurrence of stabilized structural changes.

  4. Renal cirsoid arteriovenous malformation masquerading as neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, K; George, D

    1988-12-01

    A woman with renal colic and microscopic hematuria had filling defects in the left renal collecting system detected on excretory urography. A nephrectomy, performed because of suspected malignancy, might have been averted by renal angiography.

  5. A regulatory program for excretory system regeneration in planarians.

    PubMed

    Scimone, M Lucila; Srivastava, Mansi; Bell, George W; Reddien, Peter W

    2011-10-01

    Planarians can regenerate any missing body part, requiring mechanisms for the production of organ systems in the adult, including their prominent tubule-based filtration excretory system called protonephridia. Here, we identify a set of genes, Six1/2-2, POU2/3, hunchback, Eya and Sall, that encode transcription regulatory proteins that are required for planarian protonephridia regeneration. During regeneration, planarian stem cells are induced to form a cell population in regeneration blastemas expressing Six1/2-2, POU2/3, Eya, Sall and Osr that is required for excretory system formation. POU2/3 and Six1/2-2 are essential for these precursor cells to form. Eya, Six1/2-2, Sall, Osr and POU2/3-related genes are required for vertebrate kidney development. We determined that planarian and vertebrate excretory cells express homologous proteins involved in reabsorption and waste modification. Furthermore, we identified novel nephridia genes. Our results identify a transcriptional program and cellular mechanisms for the regeneration of an excretory organ and suggest that metazoan excretory systems are regulated by genetic programs that share a common evolutionary origin.

  6. A regulatory program for excretory system regeneration in planarians

    PubMed Central

    Scimone, M. Lucila; Srivastava, Mansi; Bell, George W.; Reddien, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    Planarians can regenerate any missing body part, requiring mechanisms for the production of organ systems in the adult, including their prominent tubule-based filtration excretory system called protonephridia. Here, we identify a set of genes, Six1/2-2, POU2/3, hunchback, Eya and Sall, that encode transcription regulatory proteins that are required for planarian protonephridia regeneration. During regeneration, planarian stem cells are induced to form a cell population in regeneration blastemas expressing Six1/2-2, POU2/3, Eya, Sall and Osr that is required for excretory system formation. POU2/3 and Six1/2-2 are essential for these precursor cells to form. Eya, Six1/2-2, Sall, Osr and POU2/3-related genes are required for vertebrate kidney development. We determined that planarian and vertebrate excretory cells express homologous proteins involved in reabsorption and waste modification. Furthermore, we identified novel nephridia genes. Our results identify a transcriptional program and cellular mechanisms for the regeneration of an excretory organ and suggest that metazoan excretory systems are regulated by genetic programs that share a common evolutionary origin. PMID:21937596

  7. Renal branching morphogenesis: morphogenetic and signaling mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Blake, Joshua; Rosenblum, Norman D

    2014-12-01

    The human kidney is composed of an arborized network of collecting ducts, calyces and urinary pelvis that facilitate urine excretion and regulate urine composition. The renal collecting system is formed in utero, completed by the 34th week of gestation in humans, and dictates final nephron complement. The renal collecting system arises from the ureteric bud, a derivative of the intermediate-mesoderm derived nephric duct that responds to inductive signals from adjacent tissues via a process termed ureteric induction. The ureteric bud subsequently undergoes a series of iterative branching and remodeling events in a process called renal branching morphogenesis. Altered signaling that disrupts patterning of the nephric duct, ureteric induction, or renal branching morphogenesis leads to varied malformations of the renal collecting system collectively known as congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) and is the most frequently detected congenital renal aberration in infants. Here, we describe critical morphogenetic and cellular events that govern nephric duct specification, ureteric bud induction, renal branching morphogenesis, and cessation of renal branching morphogenesis. We also highlight salient molecular signaling pathways that govern these processes, and the investigative techniques used to interrogate them. PMID:25080023

  8. Mechanisms of hypertension in renal radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Juncos, L.; Cornejo, J.C.; Cejas, H.; Broglia, C. )

    1990-02-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the role played by renal functional and structural changes in the development of radiation-induced hypertension. Four groups of rats were studied: (1) left kidney radiated, (2) sham procedure, (3) uninephrectomy followed 3 weeks later by radiation of the contralateral kidney, and (4) uninephrectomy followed by sham procedure 3 weeks later. All radiated rats became hypertensive at 12 weeks (p less than 0.05) and had higher protein excretion (p less than 0.05). In the presence of an intact contralateral kidney, radiation causes mild-to-moderate histological abnormalities, and therefore, creatinine clearance and water and sodium handling do not change. Plasma renin activity increased in this group (p less than 0.05). Radiated uninephrectomized rats showed decreased creatinine clearance (p less than 0.05), but renin activity remained unchanged. These rats developed severe histological abnormalities in glomeruli, interstitia, tubuli, and vessels resulting in increased sodium and water output. The average of individual tubular and interstitial scores correlated significantly with both water intake and output but not with sodium excretion. These studies suggest that in the presence of an intact kidney, renin is an important determinant in the development or maintenance of radiation hypertension, whereas in the absence of the contralateral kidney, severe histological changes and renal failure are prominent despite increased water intake and output. The more severe glomerular sclerosis and proteinuria in the latter model could be related to diminished renal mass.

  9. Morphogenesis of the human excretory lacrimal system

    PubMed Central

    de la Cuadra-Blanco, C; Peces-Peña, M D; Jáñez-Escalada, L; Mérida-Velasco, J R

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the principal developmental stages in the formation of the excretory lacrimal system in humans and to establish its morphogenetic period. The study was performed using light microscopy on serial sections of 51 human specimens: 33 embryos and 18 fetuses ranging from 8 to 137 mm crown–rump length (CR; 5–16 weeks of development). Three stages were identified in the morphogenesis of the excretory lacrimal system: (1) the formative stage of the lacrimal lamina (Carnegie stages 16–18); (2) the formative stage of the lacrimal cord (Carnegie stages 19–23); and (3) the maturative stage of the excretory lacrimal system, from the 9th week of development onward. A three-dimensional reconstruction of the excretory lacrimal system was performed from serial sections of an embryo at the end of the embryonic period (27 mm CR). PMID:16879594

  10. Morphogenesis of the human excretory lacrimal system.

    PubMed

    de la Cuadra-Blanco, C; Peces-Peña, M D; Jáñez-Escalada, L; Mérida-Velasco, J R

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the principal developmental stages in the formation of the excretory lacrimal system in humans and to establish its morphogenetic period. The study was performed using light microscopy on serial sections of 51 human specimens: 33 embryos and 18 fetuses ranging from 8 to 137 mm crown-rump length (CR; 5-16 weeks of development). Three stages were identified in the morphogenesis of the excretory lacrimal system: (1) the formative stage of the lacrimal lamina (Carnegie stages 16-18); (2) the formative stage of the lacrimal cord (Carnegie stages 19-23); and (3) the maturative stage of the excretory lacrimal system, from the 9th week of development onward. A three-dimensional reconstruction of the excretory lacrimal system was performed from serial sections of an embryo at the end of the embryonic period (27 mm CR).

  11. Excretory/secretory products from in vitro-cultured Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces.

    PubMed

    Virginio, Veridiana G; Monteiro, Karina M; Drumond, Fernanda; de Carvalho, Marcos O; Vargas, Daiani M; Zaha, Arnaldo; Ferreira, Henrique B

    2012-05-01

    Cystic hydatid disease (CHD) is caused by infection with Echinococcus granulosus metacestodes and affects humans and livestock. Proteins secreted or excreted by protoscoleces, pre-adult worms found in the metacestode, are thought to play fundamental roles in the host-parasite relationship. In this work, we performed an LC-MS/MS proteomic analysis of the excretory-secretory products obtained from the first 48 h of an in vitro culture of the protoscoleces. We identified 32 proteins, including 18 that were never detected previously in metacestode proteomic studies. Among the novel identified excretory-secretory products are antigenic proteins, such as EG19 and P-29 and a calpain protease. We also identified other important protoscolex excretory-secretory products, such as thioredoxin peroxidase and 14-3-3 proteins, which are potentially involved in evasion mechanisms adopted by parasites to establish infection. Several intracellular proteins were found in the excretory-secretory products, revealing a set of identified proteins not previously thought to be exposed at the host-parasite interface. Additionally, immunological analyses established the antigenic profiles of the newly identified excretory-secretory products and revealed, for the first time, the in vitro secretion of the B antigen by protoscoleces. Considering that the excretory-secretory products obtained in vitro might reflect the products released and exposed to the host in vivo, our results provide valuable information on parasite survival strategies in adverse host environments and on the molecular mechanisms underpinning CHD immunopathology.

  12. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  13. Functional visualization of the excretory system of adult Schistosoma mansoni by the fluorescent marker resorufin.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Kusel, J R; Thornhill, J

    2002-12-01

    Excretion of metabolic wastes as well as xenobiotics is a major concern of all living organisms, and the Platyhelminthes including Schistosoma mansoni possess the protonephridial excretory system for their survival. Except for some ultra-structural and biochemical information, little is known about the protonephridium of platyhelminths due to a lack of established techniques for exploring the excretory activity. This study describes a new technique to assess the excretory activity of S. mansoni by use of the fluorescent marker resorufin, which is a potential substrate of the drug efflux pump, P-glycoprotein. After simple diffusion into the schistosome body, fluorescent resorufin was concentrated in the excretory tubules by an energy-dependent mechanism and excreted via the nephridiopore. The present technique of labelling functionally the excretory system was applicable to adult worms, but not schistosomula or cercariae. A variety of modulators known to interfere with mammalian P-glycoprotein function perturbed resorufin excretion from male adult schistosomes, including cyclosporin A, Ro11-2933, verapamil, or nifedipine. This technique of labelling the excretory system with fluorescent resorufin has enabled us to study aspects of the physiological function, hitherto unknown, of the protonephridial system of S. mansoni.

  14. Mechanisms mediating renal sympathetic nerve activation in obesity-related hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Leo, S; Weng, C; Yang, X; Wu, Y; Tang, X

    2015-04-01

    Excessive renal sympathetic nerve activation may be one of the mechanisms underlying obesity-related hypertension. Impaired baroreflex sensitivity, adipokine disorders-such as leptin, adiponectin, and resistin-activation of the renin-angiotensin system, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and renal sodium retention present in obesity increase renal sympathetic nerve activity, thus contributing to the development of hypertension. Renal sympathetic denervation reduces both renal sympathetic activity and blood pressure in patients with obesity-related hypertension.

  15. OBESITY-INDUCED HYPERTENSION: INTERACTION OF NEUROHUMORAL AND RENAL MECHANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Hall, John E.; do Carmo, Jussara M.; da Silva, Alexandre A.; Wang, Zhen; Hall, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Excess weight gain, especially when associated with increased visceral adiposity, is a major cause of hypertension, accounting for 65–75% of the risk for human primary (essential) hypertension. Increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption impairs pressure natriuresis and plays an important role in initiating obesity hypertension. The mediators of abnormal kidney function and increased blood pressure during development of obesity hypertension include 1) physical compression of the kidneys by fat in and around the kidneys, 2) activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), and 3) increased sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity. Activation of the RAAS system is likely due, in part, to renal compression as well as SNS activation. However, obesity also causes mineralocorticoid receptor activation independent of aldosterone or angiotensin II. The mechanisms for SNS activation in obesity have not been fully elucidated but appear to require leptin and activation of the brain melanocortin system. With prolonged obesity and development of target organ injury, especially renal injury, obesity-associated hypertension becomes more difficult to control, often requiring multiple antihypertensive drugs and treatment of other risk factors, including dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and diabetes, and inflammation. Unless effective anti-obesity drugs are developed, the impact of obesity on hypertension and related cardiovascular, renal and metabolic disorders is likely to become even more important in the future as the prevalence of obesity continues to increase. PMID:25767285

  16. Obesity-induced hypertension: interaction of neurohumoral and renal mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hall, John E; do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Wang, Zhen; Hall, Michael E

    2015-03-13

    Excess weight gain, especially when associated with increased visceral adiposity, is a major cause of hypertension, accounting for 65% to 75% of the risk for human primary (essential) hypertension. Increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption impairs pressure natriuresis and plays an important role in initiating obesity hypertension. The mediators of abnormal kidney function and increased blood pressure during development of obesity hypertension include (1) physical compression of the kidneys by fat in and around the kidneys, (2) activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and (3) increased sympathetic nervous system activity. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is likely due, in part, to renal compression, as well as sympathetic nervous system activation. However, obesity also causes mineralocorticoid receptor activation independent of aldosterone or angiotensin II. The mechanisms for sympathetic nervous system activation in obesity have not been fully elucidated but may require leptin and activation of the brain melanocortin system. With prolonged obesity and development of target organ injury, especially renal injury, obesity-associated hypertension becomes more difficult to control, often requiring multiple antihypertensive drugs and treatment of other risk factors, including dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus, and inflammation. Unless effective antiobesity drugs are developed, the effect of obesity on hypertension and related cardiovascular, renal and metabolic disorders is likely to become even more important in the future as the prevalence of obesity continues to increase.

  17. [Nle3,d-Phe6 ]-γ2 -melanocyte-stimulating hormone possesses the renal excretory but not the cardiovascular actions of the native γ2 -melanocyte-stimulating hormone in anaesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Cope, Georgina; Flanagan, Evelyn T; Houghton, Belinda L; Walsh, Sarah A; Johns, Edward J; Healy, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    The present study compared the cardiovascular and renal actions of γ(2) -melanocyte-stimulating hormone (γ(2) MSH) with those of the synthetic analogue [Nle(3) ,d-Phe(6) ]-γ(2) MSH (NDP-γ(2) MSH) and explored the effects of high dietary salt intake on the renal actions of NDP-γ(2) MSH. Both peptides were infused systemically (3-1000 nmol/kg) and intrarenally (500 fmol/min) into innervated and renally denervated rats fed either a normal (0.4% NaCl) or high-salt (4% NaCl; HS) diet. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urinary sodium excretion (U(N) (a) V), urinary output (UV) and fractional sodium excretion were determined, as was expression of the melanocortin MC(3) receptor in inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) epithelial cells. Both renal and systemic infusion of γ(2) MSH increased MAP by 23 ± 2% and 54 ± 4%, respectively, but equivalent doses of NDP-γ(2) MSH had no significant pressor effects. Both peptides had similar natriuretic and diuretic effects in rats fed a normal salt diet. However, NDP-γ(2) MSH increased U(N) (a) V and UV by two- to threefold in rats fed the normal salt diet and by six- to sevenfold in rats fed the HS diet. Furthermore, NDP-γ(2) MSH induced a 3.5-fold increase in GFR only in rats fed the HS diet. These renal effects of NDP-γ(2) MSH were not abolished by prior renal denervation. Rats fed the HS diet also exhibited a 4.5-fold increase in MC(3) receptor expression in IMCD epithelial cells. Intrarenal infusion of NDP-γ(2) MSH induced the natriuretic but not the cardiovascular effects exhibited by γ(2) MSH. The renal activities may be attributed to a direct binding of NDP-γ(2) MSH to MC(3) receptors expressed in IMCD cells, leading to a potent natriuretic effect that is independent of renal innervation.

  18. The role of GDNF in patterning the excretory system.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Reena; Jho, Eek-hoon; Kotka, Pille; Wu, Zaiqi; Kholodilov, Nikolai; Burke, Robert; D'Agati, Vivette; Costantini, Frank

    2005-07-01

    Mesenchymal-epithelial interactions are an important source of information for pattern formation during organogenesis. In the developing excretory system, one of the secreted mesenchymal factors thought to play a critical role in patterning the growth and branching of the epithelial ureteric bud is GDNF. We have tested the requirement for GDNF as a paracrine chemoattractive factor by altering its site of expression during excretory system development. Normally, GDNF is secreted by the metanephric mesenchyme and acts via receptors on the Wolffian duct and ureteric bud epithelium. Misexpression of GDNF in the Wolffian duct and ureteric buds resulted in formation of multiple, ectopic buds, which branched independently of the metanephric mesenchyme. This confirmed the ability of GDNF to induce ureter outgrowth and epithelial branching in vivo. However, in mutant mice lacking endogenous GDNF, kidney development was rescued to a substantial degree by GDNF supplied only by the Wolffian duct and ureteric bud. These results indicate that mesenchymal GDNF is not required as a chemoattractive factor to pattern the growth of the ureteric bud within the developing kidney, and that any positional information provided by the mesenchymal expression of GDNF may provide for renal branching morphogenesis is redundant with other signals.

  19. Mechanism of renal concentration of technetium-99m glucoheptonate

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.B.; Blaufox, M.D.

    1985-11-01

    Seventy female Sprague-Dawley rats were studied to determine the mechanism of tubular localization and the effects of commonly encountered changes in hydration and acid-base balance on renal uptake and urinary excretion of technetium-99m glucoheptonate ((/sup 99m/Tc)GHA). The in-vivo protein binding and protein-free plasma clearance of (/sup 99m/Tc)GHA also were quantitated. Kidney uptake of (/sup 99m/Tc)GHA averaged 11% of the injected dose in control animals. This varied slightly among groups but was significantly reduced by probenecid blockade and para-aminohippuric acid (PAH) competition to 4 and 2, respectively. Technetium-99m DMSA was not affected in its renal accumulation by these maneuvers. The total plasma clearance of (/sup 99m/Tc)GHA was lower than iodine-125( SVI)iothalamate but the clearance of the protein free supernate was higher, raising a possibility of some tubular secretion. Hepatic uptake was minimal in all groups averaging less than 1% injected dose. These data demonstrate that renal accumulation of (/sup 99m/Tc)GHA is blocked by probenecid and PAH suggesting that it is actively concentrated in the proximal tubule by enzyme systems similar to those involved in PAH and hippuran transport. It appears that (/sup 99m/Tc)GHA uptake measures a different aspect of kidney function than (/sup 99m/Tc)DMSA.

  20. Renal mechanisms of calcium homeostasis in sheep and goats.

    PubMed

    Herm, G; Muscher-Banse, A S; Breves, G; Schröder, B; Wilkens, M R

    2015-04-01

    In small ruminants, the renal excretion of calcium (Ca) and phosphate (Pi) is not modulated in response to dietary Ca restriction. Although this lack of adaptation was observed in both sheep and goats, differences in renal function between these species cannot be excluded. Recent studies demonstrated that compared with sheep, goats have a greater ability to compensate for challenges to Ca homeostasis, probably due to a more pronounced increase in calcitriol production. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the effect of 1) dietary Ca restriction, 2) administration of calcitriol, and 3) lactation on Ca and Pi transport mechanisms and receptors as well as enzymes involved in vitamin D metabolism in renal tissues of sheep and goats. Whereas RNA expression of renal transient receptor potential vanilloid channel type 5 was unaffected by changes in dietary Ca content, a significant stimulation was observed with administration of calcitriol in both sheep (P < 0.001) and goats (P < 0.01). Calbindin-D28K was downregulated during dietary Ca restriction in goats (P < 0.05). Expression of the sodium/Ca exchanger type 1 was decreased by low Ca intake in sheep (P < 0.05) and upregulated by calcitriol treatment in goats (P < 0.05). A significant reduction in RNA expression of the cytosolic and the basolateral Ca transporting proteins was also demonstrated for lactating goats in comparison to dried-off animals. Species differences were found for vitamin D receptor expression, which was stimulated by calcitriol treatment in sheep (P < 0.01) but not in goats. As expected, expression of 1α-hydroxylase was upregulated by dietary Ca restriction (P < 0.001; P < 0.05) and inhibited by exogenous calcitriol (P < 001; P < 0.05) in both sheep and goats. However, whereas 24-hydroxylase expression was stimulated to the same extent by calcitriol treatment in sheep, irrespective of the diet (P < 0.001), a modulatory effect of dietary Ca supply on 24-hydroxylase induction was

  1. Renal mechanisms of calcium homeostasis in sheep and goats.

    PubMed

    Herm, G; Muscher-Banse, A S; Breves, G; Schröder, B; Wilkens, M R

    2015-04-01

    In small ruminants, the renal excretion of calcium (Ca) and phosphate (Pi) is not modulated in response to dietary Ca restriction. Although this lack of adaptation was observed in both sheep and goats, differences in renal function between these species cannot be excluded. Recent studies demonstrated that compared with sheep, goats have a greater ability to compensate for challenges to Ca homeostasis, probably due to a more pronounced increase in calcitriol production. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the effect of 1) dietary Ca restriction, 2) administration of calcitriol, and 3) lactation on Ca and Pi transport mechanisms and receptors as well as enzymes involved in vitamin D metabolism in renal tissues of sheep and goats. Whereas RNA expression of renal transient receptor potential vanilloid channel type 5 was unaffected by changes in dietary Ca content, a significant stimulation was observed with administration of calcitriol in both sheep (P < 0.001) and goats (P < 0.01). Calbindin-D28K was downregulated during dietary Ca restriction in goats (P < 0.05). Expression of the sodium/Ca exchanger type 1 was decreased by low Ca intake in sheep (P < 0.05) and upregulated by calcitriol treatment in goats (P < 0.05). A significant reduction in RNA expression of the cytosolic and the basolateral Ca transporting proteins was also demonstrated for lactating goats in comparison to dried-off animals. Species differences were found for vitamin D receptor expression, which was stimulated by calcitriol treatment in sheep (P < 0.01) but not in goats. As expected, expression of 1α-hydroxylase was upregulated by dietary Ca restriction (P < 0.001; P < 0.05) and inhibited by exogenous calcitriol (P < 001; P < 0.05) in both sheep and goats. However, whereas 24-hydroxylase expression was stimulated to the same extent by calcitriol treatment in sheep, irrespective of the diet (P < 0.001), a modulatory effect of dietary Ca supply on 24-hydroxylase induction was

  2. The Caenorhabditis elegans Excretory System: A Model for Tubulogenesis, Cell Fate Specification, and Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Meera V; Buechner, Matthew

    2016-05-01

    The excretory system of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a superb model of tubular organogenesis involving a minimum of cells. The system consists of just three unicellular tubes (canal, duct, and pore), a secretory gland, and two associated neurons. Just as in more complex organs, cells of the excretory system must first adopt specific identities and then coordinate diverse processes to form tubes of appropriate topology, shape, connectivity, and physiological function. The unicellular topology of excretory tubes, their varied and sometimes complex shapes, and the dynamic reprogramming of cell identity and remodeling of tube connectivity that occur during larval development are particularly fascinating features of this organ. The physiological roles of the excretory system in osmoregulation and other aspects of the animal's life cycle are only beginning to be explored. The cellular mechanisms and molecular pathways used to build and shape excretory tubes appear similar to those used in both unicellular and multicellular tubes in more complex organs, such as the vertebrate vascular system and kidney, making this simple organ system a useful model for understanding disease processes. PMID:27183565

  3. The Caenorhabditis elegans Excretory System: A Model for Tubulogenesis, Cell Fate Specification, and Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Meera V; Buechner, Matthew

    2016-05-01

    The excretory system of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a superb model of tubular organogenesis involving a minimum of cells. The system consists of just three unicellular tubes (canal, duct, and pore), a secretory gland, and two associated neurons. Just as in more complex organs, cells of the excretory system must first adopt specific identities and then coordinate diverse processes to form tubes of appropriate topology, shape, connectivity, and physiological function. The unicellular topology of excretory tubes, their varied and sometimes complex shapes, and the dynamic reprogramming of cell identity and remodeling of tube connectivity that occur during larval development are particularly fascinating features of this organ. The physiological roles of the excretory system in osmoregulation and other aspects of the animal's life cycle are only beginning to be explored. The cellular mechanisms and molecular pathways used to build and shape excretory tubes appear similar to those used in both unicellular and multicellular tubes in more complex organs, such as the vertebrate vascular system and kidney, making this simple organ system a useful model for understanding disease processes.

  4. Renal effects of methoxyverapamil in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Brown, B; Churchill, P

    1983-05-01

    The purpose of these experiments was to determine the renal effects of methoxyverapamil (D-600). Three groups of rats were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital and given 0, 0.85 or 1.69 nmol/min of methoxyverapamil i.v. Increases in urine flow and Na, K and Ca excretory rates occurred, in an apparently dose-dependent manner. Plasma Na and arterial renin concentration decreased at both doses and, at the higher dose, mean arterial blood pressure and effective renal plasma flow decreased while plasma K increased. Plasma Ca, glomerular filtration rate, filtration fraction and total renal plasma flow were not affected. The findings that methoxyverapamil increased urine flow and electrolyte excretion without changing glomerular filtration rate are consistent with the hypothesis that methoxyverapamil acts directly on tubular reabsorptive mechanisms. These effects, and the effect on plasma renin concentration, could contribute to the beneficial effects of this and other Ca entry antagonists in the treatment of hypertension.

  5. The renal nerves in chronic heart failure: efferent and afferent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Alicia M.; Pellegrino, Peter R.; Zucker, Irving H.

    2015-01-01

    The function of the renal nerves has been an area of scientific and medical interest for many years. The recent advent of a minimally invasive catheter-based method of renal denervation has renewed excitement in understanding the afferent and efferent actions of the renal nerves in multiple diseases. While hypertension has been the focus of much this work, less attention has been given to the role of the renal nerves in the development of chronic heart failure (CHF). Recent studies from our laboratory and those of others implicate an essential role for the renal nerves in the development and progression of CHF. Using a rabbit tachycardia model of CHF and surgical unilateral renal denervation, we provide evidence for both renal efferent and afferent mechanisms in the pathogenesis of CHF. Renal denervation prevented the decrease in renal blood flow observed in CHF while also preventing increases in Angiotensin-II receptor protein in the microvasculature of the renal cortex. Renal denervation in CHF also reduced physiological markers of autonomic dysfunction including an improvement in arterial baroreflex function, heart rate variability, and decreased resting cardiac sympathetic tone. Taken together, the renal sympathetic nerves are necessary in the pathogenesis of CHF via both efferent and afferent mechanisms. Additional investigation is warranted to fully understand the role of these nerves and their role as a therapeutic target in CHF. PMID:26300788

  6. Stem cells and fluid flow drive cyst formation in an invertebrate excretory organ.

    PubMed

    Thi-Kim Vu, Hanh; Rink, Jochen C; McKinney, Sean A; McClain, Melainia; Lakshmanaperumal, Naharajan; Alexander, Richard; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2015-06-09

    Cystic kidney diseases (CKDs) affect millions of people worldwide. The defining pathological features are fluid-filled cysts developing from nephric tubules due to defective flow sensing, cell proliferation and differentiation. The underlying molecular mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood, and the derived excretory systems of established invertebrate models (Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster) are unsuitable to model CKDs. Systematic structure/function comparisons revealed that the combination of ultrafiltration and flow-associated filtrate modification that is central to CKD etiology is remarkably conserved between the planarian excretory system and the vertebrate nephron. Consistently, both RNA-mediated genetic interference (RNAi) of planarian orthologues of human CKD genes and inhibition of tubule flow led to tubular cystogenesis that share many features with vertebrate CKDs, suggesting deep mechanistic conservation. Our results demonstrate a common evolutionary origin of animal excretory systems and establish planarians as a novel and experimentally accessible invertebrate model for the study of human kidney pathologies.

  7. [Renal and extra-renal mechanisms of sodium and water retention in cirrhosis with ascites].

    PubMed

    Peña, J C

    1995-01-01

    In this work we analyze the renal and systemic factors involved in the sodium retention in two conditions: in extracellular volume depletion and in edema forming states, particularly liver cirrhosis with ascitis. In this paper we accept that the volume loss of body fluids stimulates the "effective arterial blood volume" (VAE). This term results from a decrease in the arterial blood volume secondary to a fall in cardiac output or a peripheral arterial vasodilatation. The reduction in the VAE stimulates: the high pressure baroreceptors (carotid sinus and aortic arch); the intrarrenal mechanisms, such as the yuxtaglomerular apparatus and the renin angiotensin aldosterone system; the sympathetic adrenergic system; the non osmotic release of antidiuretic hormone; prostaglandins (PGE1, Tromboxane) and endothelin; and inhibits the atrial natriuretic peptide. We also describe the sodium transport mechanisms along the nephron during physiological conditions and after volume depletion, and in edema formation states, specially hepatic cirrhosis with ascitis. We speculate that the intrarenal mechanisms are more important and persistent than the systemic mechanisms. It is possible that the sodium retention of these states might be the result of direct stimuli of the tubular sodium transport mechanisms in the different segments of the nephron, mediated by the co and counter transports, ATPase activity or by the second messengers cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP. The clonation and structural characterization of the different sodium transports may help us to establish, more precisely, the intracellular tubular mechanisms responsible for the tendency of the body to retain sodium. The amount of information generated in the future may help us to demonstrate, with more precision, the mechanisms responsible for the sodium retention and excretion in normal and pathological conditions, particularly the edema forming states such as cardiac failure, nephrotic syndrome and hepatic cirrhosis with

  8. Genetics of renal hypoplasia: insights into the mechanisms controlling nephron endowment.

    PubMed

    Cain, Jason E; Di Giovanni, Valeria; Smeeton, Joanna; Rosenblum, Norman D

    2010-08-01

    Renal hypoplasia, defined as abnormally small kidneys with normal morphology and reduced nephron number, is a common cause of pediatric renal failure and adult-onset disease. Genetic studies performed in humans and mutant mice have implicated a number of critical genes, in utero environmental factors and molecular mechanisms that regulate nephron endowment and kidney size. Here, we review current knowledge regarding the genetic contributions to renal hypoplasia with particular emphasis on the mechanisms that control nephron endowment in humans and mice.

  9. Serial Radiohippurate Renal Scintiphotography

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthall, Leonard; Greyson, N. David; Martin, Robert H.

    1970-01-01

    The results of serial radiohippurate scintiphotography in 222 patients are analyzed. The findings in various renal diseases are discussed and compared with those obtained from the excretory urogram, BUN, serum creatinine and creatinine clearance. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4aFIG. 4bFIG. 5aFIG. 5b PMID:5536740

  10. Obstructive renal injury: from fluid mechanics to molecular cell biology.

    PubMed

    Ucero, Alvaro C; Gonçalves, Sara; Benito-Martin, Alberto; Santamaría, Beatriz; Ramos, Adrian M; Berzal, Sergio; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto

    2010-04-22

    Urinary tract obstruction is a frequent cause of renal impairment. The physiopathology of obstructive nephropathy has long been viewed as a mere mechanical problem. However, recent advances in cell and systems biology have disclosed a complex physiopathology involving a high number of molecular mediators of injury that lead to cellular processes of apoptotic cell death, cell injury leading to inflammation and resultant fibrosis. Functional studies in animal models of ureteral obstruction using a variety of techniques that include genetically modified animals have disclosed an important role for the renin-angiotensin system, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and other mediators of inflammation in this process. In addition, high throughput techniques such as proteomics and transcriptomics have identified potential biomarkers that may guide clinical decision-making.

  11. Mechanisms of renal tubular defects in old age.

    PubMed Central

    Dontas, A. S.; Marketos, S. G.; Papanayiotou, P.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanisms of renal tubular dysfunction in old age have been examined in twenty-eight clinically healthy elderly subjects without infection, and in fourteen subjects of similar age with laboratory evidence of intrarenal infection. The data were compared with those from thirteen clinically healthy young subjects. Studied were: proximal tubular (Tm(PAH)) and distal tubular (CH2O) activity, minimal and maximal osmolal U/P ratios, maximal osmolal excretion in hydropenia, and GFR levels under standard hydration and under water-loading. The reduction of GFR in old age is evident particularly in men under conditions of standard hydration: it is accentuated in the presence of renal infection. Proximal tubular activity is also significantly lower in elderly men, especially if they have chronic bacteriuria. The reduction is closely related to GFR levels, with identical Tm(PAH):C(in) ratios in all groups. This supports the intact nephron hypothesis for this part of the nephron. Distal tubular activity is depressed in old age in both sexes proportionately more than proximal tubular activity or the GFR. The lower CH2O: GFR ratios imply a selective distal tubular damage. Maximal osmolal U/P ratios in hydropenia are significantly higher in the young (mean 367) than in either the elderly non-infected (mean 279) or the elderly infected subjects (mean 212). Conversely, minimal U/P ratios in water-loading are lower in the young (mean 0.247) than in either elderly group (means 0.418 and 0.668). Osmolal excretion in hydropenia is not different between the groups, but urine flows in water-loading clearly separate them. The data indicate that simple functions of the distal-collecting tubule (e.g. the CH2O), are less affected in old age than are functions involving several medullary structures (as is the maximal U(osm) or U/P ratio). They suggest that the main impairment of the distal tubular cell involves the failure to achieve a proper osmotic gradient between tubular fluid and

  12. Trichloroethylene: mechanisms of renal toxicity and renal cancer and relevance to risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Lock, Edward A; Reed, Celia J

    2006-06-01

    1,1,2-Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an important solvent that is widespread in the environment. We have reviewed carcinogenicity data from seven bioassays with regard to renal injury and renal tumors. We report a consistent but low incidence of renal tubule carcinoma in male rats. Epidemiology studies on workers exposed to TCE (and other chlorinated solvents) indicate a weak association between high-level exposure and renal cancer. There appears to be a threshold below which no renal injury or carcinogenicity is expected to arise. TCE is not acutely nephrotoxic to rats or mice, but subchronic exposure to rats produces a small increase in urinary markers of renal injury. Following chronic exposure, pathological changes (toxic nephrosis and a high incidence of cytomegaly and karyomegaly) were observed. The basis for the chronic renal injury probably involves bioactivation of TCE. Based on the classification by E. A. Lock and G. C. Hard (2004, Crit. Rev. Toxicol. 34, 211-299) of chemicals that induce renal tubule tumors, we found no clear evidence to place TCE in category 1 or 2 (chemicals that directly or indirectly interact with renal DNA), category 4 (direct cytotoxicity and sustained tubule cell regeneration), category 5 (indirect cytotoxicity and sustained tubule cell regeneration associated with alpha2u-globulin accumulation), or category 6 (exacerbation of spontaneous chronic progressive nephropathy). TCE is best placed in category 3, chemicals that undergo conjugation with GSH and subsequent enzymatic activation to a reactive species. The implication for human risk assessment is that TCE should not automatically be judged by linear default methods; benchmark methodology could be used.

  13. A structure-function analysis of ion transport in crustacean gills and excretory organs.

    PubMed

    Freire, Carolina A; Onken, Horst; McNamara, John C

    2008-11-01

    Osmotic and ionic regulation in the Crustacea is mostly accomplished by the multifunctional gills, together with the excretory organs. In addition to their role in gas exchange, the gills constitute organs of active, transepithelial, ion transport, an activity of major importance that underlies many essential physiological functions like osmoregulation, calcium homeostasis, ammonium excretion and extracellular pH regulation. This review focuses on structure-function relationships in crustacean gills and excretory effectors, from the organ to molecular levels of organization. We address the diversity of structural architectures encountered in different crustacean gill types, and in constituent cell types, before examining the physiological mechanisms of Na(+), Cl(-), Ca(2+) and NH(4)(+) transport, and of acid-base equivalents, based on findings obtained over the last two decades employing advanced techniques. The antennal and maxillary glands constitute the principal crustacean excretory organs, which have received less attention in functional studies. We examine the diversity present in antennal and maxillary gland architecture, highlighting the structural similarities between both organ types, and we analyze the functions ascribed to each glandular segment. Emphasis is given to volume and osmoregulatory functions, capacity to produce dilute urine in freshwater crustaceans, and the effect of acclimation salinity on urine volume and composition. The microanatomy and diversity of function ascribed to gills and excretory organs are appraised from an evolutionary perspective, and suggestions made as to future avenues of investigation that may elucidate evolutionary and adaptive trends underpinning the invasion and exploitation of novel habitats.

  14. Distribution kinetics of enoxacin and its metabolite oxoenoxacin in excretory fluids of healthy volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Jaehde, U; Sörgel, F; Naber, K G; Zürcher, J; Schunack, W

    1995-01-01

    The distribution kinetics of enoxacin and its main metabolite oxoenoxacin in excretory fluids was investigated in 11 healthy volunteers. A single intravenous dose of 428 mg of enoxacin was given as a 1-h infusion. Serial samples of plasma, urine, saliva, nasal secretions, tears, and sweat were drawn and analyzed for enoxacin and oxoenoxacin by reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography. Large differences in the concentration-time profiles of the excretory fluids analyzed were observed. Nasal secretions exhibited the highest enoxacin exposure, as assessed by the area under the concentration-time curve. Excretory fluid/plasma area under the concentration-time curve ratios were found to be 1.67 +/- 0.36 for nasal secretions, 0.76 +/- 0.28 for saliva, 0.25 +/- 0.07 for sweat, and 0.23 +/- 0.11 for tears. The elimination half-life of enoxacin from sweat (8.27 +/- 2.63 h) was significantly longer than that for plasma (5.10 +/- 0.46 h). Oxoenoxacin was detected in urine and saliva and exhibited a higher renal clearance and a lower saliva exposure than the parent compound. In contrast to that of the metabolite, distribution of enoxacin in saliva was found to be time and pH dependent. In conclusion, our study revealed considerable differences in the distribution kinetics of enoxacin among various excretory sites. Because of distinct acidic and basic properties, the anionic oxometabolite significantly differs from the zwitterionic parent compound in its distribution characteristics. PMID:8540722

  15. Distribution kinetics of enoxacin and its metabolite oxoenoxacin in excretory fluids of healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Jaehde, U; Sörgel, F; Naber, K G; Zürcher, J; Schunack, W

    1995-09-01

    The distribution kinetics of enoxacin and its main metabolite oxoenoxacin in excretory fluids was investigated in 11 healthy volunteers. A single intravenous dose of 428 mg of enoxacin was given as a 1-h infusion. Serial samples of plasma, urine, saliva, nasal secretions, tears, and sweat were drawn and analyzed for enoxacin and oxoenoxacin by reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography. Large differences in the concentration-time profiles of the excretory fluids analyzed were observed. Nasal secretions exhibited the highest enoxacin exposure, as assessed by the area under the concentration-time curve. Excretory fluid/plasma area under the concentration-time curve ratios were found to be 1.67 +/- 0.36 for nasal secretions, 0.76 +/- 0.28 for saliva, 0.25 +/- 0.07 for sweat, and 0.23 +/- 0.11 for tears. The elimination half-life of enoxacin from sweat (8.27 +/- 2.63 h) was significantly longer than that for plasma (5.10 +/- 0.46 h). Oxoenoxacin was detected in urine and saliva and exhibited a higher renal clearance and a lower saliva exposure than the parent compound. In contrast to that of the metabolite, distribution of enoxacin in saliva was found to be time and pH dependent. In conclusion, our study revealed considerable differences in the distribution kinetics of enoxacin among various excretory sites. Because of distinct acidic and basic properties, the anionic oxometabolite significantly differs from the zwitterionic parent compound in its distribution characteristics.

  16. Renal electrolyte circadian rhythms - Independence from feeding and activity patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore-Ede, M. C.; Herd, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on six unanesthetized chair-acclimatized adult male squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) weighing 600-900 g to determine whether internal synchronization is the result of simple passive dependence of renal excretory rhythms on endogenous rhythms of those variable that influence electrolyte excretion such as dietary intake and muscular activity. Independence of the urinary rhythms from diurnal variations in feeding, drinking, and activity was secured by depriving the animals of food, water, and training them to perform a two-hourly schedule of feeding, drinking, and activity throughout day and night. Results indicate that the internal synchronization which is normally observed between the behavioral and urinary rhythms cannot be explained by any direct dependence of renal function on behavioral patterns. The most probable mechanism for circadian internal synchronization is that the various behavioral and renal rhythms are controlled by potentially independent separate oscillators which are normally kept in synchrony with one another.

  17. Excretion of fluorescent substrates of mammalian multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) in the Schistosoma mansoni excretory system.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Kusel, J R; Thornhill, J

    2004-01-01

    The protonephridium of platyhelminths including Schistosoma mansoni plays a pivotal role in their survival by excretion of metabolic wastes as well as xenobiotics, and can be revealed in the living adult parasite by certain fluorescent compounds which are concentrated in excretory tubules and collecting ducts. To determine the presence of the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) as a possible transporter in protonephridial epithelium, adult schistosomes were exposed to a fluorescent Ca2+ indicator, fluo-3 acetyloxymethyl ester, which is a potential substrate of mammalian MRP. Specific fluorescence related to fluo-3/Ca2+ chelate delineated the whole length of the protonephridial system. Simultaneously, a fluorescent substance was accumulated in the posterior part of collecting ducts and the excretory bladder. Similarly, when other fluorogenic substrates for mammalian MRP such as monoclorobimane, fluorescein diacetate, and 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate were applied to adult schistosomes, these fluorescent markers were observed in the excretory tubules through to the excretory bladder. The excretory system of mechanically-transformed schistosomula was not labelled with any of these 4 fluorescent markers. These findings suggest that the protonephridial epithelium of adult schistosomes, but not schistosomula, might express the homologue of the mammalian MRP transporting organic anionic conjugates with glutathione, glucuronate or sulphate as well as unconjugated amphiphilic organic anions.

  18. The Caenorhabditis elegans HNF4alpha Homolog, NHR-31, mediates excretory tube growth and function through coordinate regulation of the vacuolar ATPase.

    PubMed

    Hahn-Windgassen, Annett; Van Gilst, Marc R

    2009-07-01

    Nuclear receptors of the Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-4 (HNF4) subtype have been linked to a host of developmental and metabolic functions in animals ranging from worms to humans; however, the full spectrum of physiological activities carried out by this nuclear receptor subfamily is far from established. We have found that the Caenorhabditis elegans nuclear receptor NHR-31, a homolog of mammalian HNF4 receptors, is required for controlling the growth and function of the nematode excretory cell, a multi-branched tubular cell that acts as the C. elegans renal system. Larval specific RNAi knockdown of nhr-31 led to significant structural abnormalities along the length of the excretory cell canal, including numerous regions of uncontrolled growth at sites near to and distant from the cell nucleus. nhr-31 RNAi animals were sensitive to acute challenge with ionic stress, implying that the osmoregulatory function of the excretory cell was also compromised. Gene expression profiling revealed a surprisingly specific role for nhr-31 in the control of multiple genes that encode subunits of the vacuolar ATPase (vATPase). RNAi of these vATPase genes resulted in excretory cell defects similar to those observed in nhr-31 RNAi animals, demonstrating that the influence of nhr-31 on excretory cell growth is mediated, at least in part, through coordinate regulation of the vATPase. Sequence analysis revealed a stunning enrichment of HNF4alpha type binding sites in the promoters of both C. elegans and mouse vATPase genes, arguing that coordinate regulation of the vATPase by HNF4 receptors is likely to be conserved in mammals. Our study establishes a new pathway for regulation of excretory cell growth and reveals a novel role for HNF4-type nuclear receptors in the development and function of a renal system.

  19. Morphology of the excretory system of Hysterothylacium haze (Nematoda: Anisakidae: Raphidascaridinae).

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, T; Ogawa, K; Wakabayashi, H

    1989-10-01

    The morphology of the excretory system of Hysterothylacium haze was examined by serial histological sections. The excretory system was H-shaped and glandular, consisting of lateral filaments and a commissure, with the exretory pore opening posterior to the nerve ring. A large excretory nucleus was present in the left filament. The cuticularized excretory duct was confined to the left side of the commissure. The glandular excretory system is rare among the Raphidascaridinae. PMID:2795387

  20. Excretory system of representatives from family Diplozoidae (Monogenea).

    PubMed

    Konstanzová, V; Koubková, B; Kašný, M; Ilgová, J; Dzika, E; Gelnar, M

    2016-04-01

    Diplozoons are representatives of blood-feeding ectoparasites from the family Diplozoidae (Polyopisthocotylea, Monogenea). Although these worms have been the subject of numerous taxonomical, phylogenetic, and ecological studies, the detailed study of their excretory system has remained relatively neglected. Our observations focused on the morphological and ultrastructural features of the excretory apparatus of four diplozoid species: Diplozoon paradoxum, Eudiplozoon nipponicum, Paradiplozoon bliccae, and Paradiplozoon homoion. Observations were obtained using two microscope methods: light microscopy, equipped with differential interference contrast (Nomarski DIC) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The ultrastructure of two basic compartments which forms the excretory apparatus, flame cells with filtration apparatus, and canal cells forming the protonephridial ducts is revealed in this study. A unique consecutive sequence of longitudinal semi-thin sections of the excretory pore of E. nipponicum is visualized there for the first time.

  1. Renal tubular receptor imaging with iodine-131-labeled peanut lectin: pharmacokinetics and renal clearance mechanism in animals

    SciTech Connect

    Boniface, G.R.; Suresh, M.R.; Willans, D.J.; Tam, Y.K.; Shysh, A.; Longenecker, B.M.; Noujaim, A.A.

    1986-05-01

    Intravenously administered peanut lectin (PNA), iodinated with /sup 131/I ((/sup 131/I)PNA), is rapidly cleared from the plasma by the kidneys in dogs (clearance (total body) = 17.52 +/- 8.74 ml/min). Dynamic gamma camera renal scintigraphy demonstrated renal accumulation and excretion phases of the (/sup 131/I)PNA renogram in dogs and rabbits (% injection dose-at-peak = 21.8 +/- 3.3% and 19.6 +/- 4.3%, time-to-peak = 44.6 +/- 4.8 min and 37.2 +/- 6.9 min, respectively). Immunoperoxidase staining of kidney sections, following i.v. administered PNA, demonstrated predominant accumulation by the proximal tubules of mice, rabbits, and dogs. The basement membrane was intensely stained at early times p.i. while intracellular and luminal PNA was evident within 1 hr. Urine analysis confirmed the presence of intact (/sup 131/I)PNA in the bladder contents, while protein degradation products, and a small percentage of the free iodide (less than 5%) were noted within 1 hr p.i. The relative proportion of free iodide increased at later times p.i. (greater than 6 hr). A receptor mediated excretion mechanism is proposed for the clearance of PNA and may be useful for the study of renal tubular function.

  2. The renal concentrating mechanism and the clinical consequences of its loss

    PubMed Central

    Agaba, Emmanuel I.; Rohrscheib, Mark; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H.

    2012-01-01

    The integrity of the renal concentrating mechanism is maintained by the anatomical and functional arrangements of the renal transport mechanisms for solute (sodium, potassium, urea, etc) and water and by the function of the regulatory hormone for renal concentration, vasopressin. The discovery of aquaporins (water channels) in the cell membranes of the renal tubular epithelial cells has elucidated the mechanisms of renal actions of vasopressin. Loss of the concentrating mechanism results in uncontrolled polyuria with low urine osmolality and, if the patient is unable to consume (appropriately) large volumes of water, hypernatremia with dire neurological consequences. Loss of concentrating mechanism can be the consequence of defective secretion of vasopressin from the posterior pituitary gland (congenital or acquired central diabetes insipidus) or poor response of the target organ to vasopressin (congenital or nephrogenic diabetes insipidus). The differentiation between the three major states producing polyuria with low urine osmolality (central diabetes insipidus, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and primary polydipsia) is done by a standardized water deprivation test. Proper diagnosis is essential for the management, which differs between these three conditions. PMID:23293407

  3. Notch and Ras promote sequential steps of excretory tube development in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Abdus-Saboor, Ishmail; Mancuso, Vincent P; Murray, John I; Palozola, Katherine; Norris, Carolyn; Hall, David H; Howell, Kelly; Huang, Kai; Sundaram, Meera V

    2011-08-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases and Notch are crucial for tube formation and branching morphogenesis in many systems, but the specific cellular processes that require signaling are poorly understood. Here we describe sequential roles for Notch and Epidermal growth factor (EGF)-Ras-ERK signaling in the development of epithelial tube cells in the C. elegans excretory (renal-like) organ. This simple organ consists of three tandemly connected unicellular tubes: the excretory canal cell, duct and G1 pore. lin-12 and glp-1/Notch are required to generate the canal cell, which is a source of LIN-3/EGF ligand and physically attaches to the duct during de novo epithelialization and tubulogenesis. Canal cell asymmetry and let-60/Ras signaling influence which of two equivalent precursors will attach to the canal cell. Ras then specifies duct identity, inducing auto-fusion and a permanent epithelial character; the remaining precursor becomes the G1 pore, which eventually loses epithelial character and withdraws from the organ to become a neuroblast. Ras continues to promote subsequent aspects of duct morphogenesis and differentiation, and acts primarily through Raf-ERK and the transcriptional effectors LIN-1/Ets and EOR-1. These results reveal multiple genetically separable roles for Ras signaling in tube development, as well as similarities to Ras-mediated control of branching morphogenesis in more complex organs, including the mammalian kidney. The relative simplicity of the excretory system makes it an attractive model for addressing basic questions about how cells gain or lose epithelial character and organize into tubular networks.

  4. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein expression in the male excretory duct system during development.

    PubMed

    Marcorelles, Pascale; Gillet, Danièle; Friocourt, Gaëlle; Ledé, Françoise; Samaison, Laura; Huguen, Geneviève; Ferec, Claude

    2012-03-01

    Sterility due to bilateral destruction in utero or in early infancy resulting in congenital absence of the vas deferens is the rule in male patients with cystic fibrosis. To understand the developmental pattern of this anomaly, the microscopic morphology of the male excretory system was analyzed during development and the expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein was explored by immunohistochemistry. We observed that cystic fibrosis fetuses had no excretory ducts agenesis or obstruction until 22 weeks of gestation. However, a focal inflammatory pattern and mucinous plugs in the oldest cystic fibrosis case suggested a disruptive mechanism. Immunolabeling of cytoplasmic epithelial cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein was demonstrated in all cystic fibrosis and control cases with a similar pattern of expression of the protein between age-matched controls and cystic fibrosis cases. At midgestation, an apical intensification appeared in both cystic fibrosis and control cases and was stable during the remainder of fetal life. No gradient of intensity could be detected between the different segments of the excretory tract. These findings are different from those reported in adults. The absence of any morphologic anomaly until 22 weeks of gestation, the focal destruction of the epithelial structures during the second trimester, and the chronological pattern of expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator are of interest for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease.

  5. Stem cells and fluid flow drive cyst formation in an invertebrate excretory organ

    PubMed Central

    Thi-Kim Vu, Hanh; Rink, Jochen C; McKinney, Sean A; McClain, Melainia; Lakshmanaperumal, Naharajan; Alexander, Richard; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Cystic kidney diseases (CKDs) affect millions of people worldwide. The defining pathological features are fluid-filled cysts developing from nephric tubules due to defective flow sensing, cell proliferation and differentiation. The underlying molecular mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood, and the derived excretory systems of established invertebrate models (Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster) are unsuitable to model CKDs. Systematic structure/function comparisons revealed that the combination of ultrafiltration and flow-associated filtrate modification that is central to CKD etiology is remarkably conserved between the planarian excretory system and the vertebrate nephron. Consistently, both RNA-mediated genetic interference (RNAi) of planarian orthologues of human CKD genes and inhibition of tubule flow led to tubular cystogenesis that share many features with vertebrate CKDs, suggesting deep mechanistic conservation. Our results demonstrate a common evolutionary origin of animal excretory systems and establish planarians as a novel and experimentally accessible invertebrate model for the study of human kidney pathologies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07405.001 PMID:26057828

  6. Traumatic amputation of the left lower renal pole in children

    SciTech Connect

    Waxman, J.; Belman, A.B.; Kass, E.J.

    1985-07-01

    Four children between 5 and 10 years old suffered traumatic amputation of the left lower renal pole following flank trauma. All patients were evaluated with excretory urography and isotope renography. The renal scan clearly demonstrated failure of perfusion of the lower renal pole and urinary extravasation, and was believed to be more valuable than the standard excretory urogram as a diagnostic tool. All children were managed similarly: delayed (72 to 96 hours) exploration, simple removal of the amputated segment and insertion of a Penrose drain. They all have done well. The patients were normotensive at followup and had excellent function of the remaining portion of the kidney.

  7. The Role of Hydrogen Sulfide in Renal System

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xu; Bian, Jin-Song

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide has gained recognition as the third gaseous signaling molecule after nitric oxide and carbon monoxide. This review surveys the emerging role of H2S in mammalian renal system, with emphasis on both renal physiology and diseases. H2S is produced redundantly by four pathways in kidney, indicating the abundance of this gaseous molecule in the organ. In physiological conditions, H2S was found to regulate the excretory function of the kidney possibly by the inhibitory effect on sodium transporters on renal tubular cells. Likewise, it also influences the release of renin from juxtaglomerular cells and thereby modulates blood pressure. A possible role of H2S as an oxygen sensor has also been discussed, especially at renal medulla. Alternation of H2S level has been implicated in various pathological conditions such as renal ischemia/reperfusion, obstructive nephropathy, diabetic nephropathy, and hypertensive nephropathy. Moreover, H2S donors exhibit broad beneficial effects in renal diseases although a few conflicts need to be resolved. Further research reveals that multiple mechanisms are underlying the protective effects of H2S, including anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation, and anti-apoptosis. In the review, several research directions are also proposed including the role of mitochondrial H2S in renal diseases, H2S delivery to kidney by targeting D-amino acid oxidase/3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (DAO/3-MST) pathway, effect of drug-like H2S donors in kidney diseases and understanding the molecular mechanism of H2S. The completion of the studies in these directions will not only improves our understanding of renal H2S functions but may also be critical to translate H2S to be a new therapy for renal diseases. PMID:27803669

  8. Excretory/secretory products of the carcinogenic liver fluke are endocytosed by human cholangiocytes and drive cell proliferation and IL6 production.

    PubMed

    Chaiyadet, Sujittra; Smout, Michael; Johnson, Michael; Whitchurch, Cynthia; Turnbull, Lynne; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Sotillo, Javier; Loukas, Alex; Sripa, Banchob

    2015-10-01

    Liver fluke infection caused by Opisthorchis viverrini remains a major public health problem in many parts of Asia including Thailand, Lao PDR, Vietnam and Cambodia, where there is a strikingly high incidence of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA - hepatic cancer of the bile duct epithelium). Among other factors, uptake of O. viverrini excretory/secretory products (OvES) by biliary epithelial cells has been postulated to be responsible for chronic inflammation and proliferation of cholangiocytes, but the mechanisms by which cells internalise O. viverrini excretory/secretory products are still unknown. Herein we incubated normal human cholangiocytes (H69), human cholangiocarcinoma cells (KKU-100, KKU-M156) and human colon cancer (Caco-2) cells with O. viverrini excretory/secretory products and analysed the effects of different endocytic inhibitors to address the mechanism of cellular uptake of ES proteins. Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products was internalised preferentially by liver cell lines, and most efficiently/rapidly by H69 cells. There was no evidence for trafficking of ES proteins to cholangiocyte organelles, and most of the fluorescence was detected in the cytoplasm. Pretreatment with clathrin inhibitors significantly reduced the uptake of O. viverrini excretory/secretory products, particularly by H69 cells. Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products induced proliferation of liver cells (H69 and CCA lines) but not intestinal (Caco-2) cells, and proliferation was blocked using inhibitors of the classical endocytic pathways (clathrin and caveolae). Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products drove IL6 secretion by H69 cells but not Caco-2 cells, and cytokine secretion was significantly reduced by endocytosis inhibitors. This the first known study to address the endocytosis of helminth ES proteins by host epithelial cells and sheds light on the pathways by which this parasite causes one of the most devastating forms of cancer in south

  9. Excretory/secretory products of the carcinogenic liver fluke are endocytosed by human cholangiocytes and drive cell proliferation and IL6 production.

    PubMed

    Chaiyadet, Sujittra; Smout, Michael; Johnson, Michael; Whitchurch, Cynthia; Turnbull, Lynne; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Sotillo, Javier; Loukas, Alex; Sripa, Banchob

    2015-10-01

    Liver fluke infection caused by Opisthorchis viverrini remains a major public health problem in many parts of Asia including Thailand, Lao PDR, Vietnam and Cambodia, where there is a strikingly high incidence of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA - hepatic cancer of the bile duct epithelium). Among other factors, uptake of O. viverrini excretory/secretory products (OvES) by biliary epithelial cells has been postulated to be responsible for chronic inflammation and proliferation of cholangiocytes, but the mechanisms by which cells internalise O. viverrini excretory/secretory products are still unknown. Herein we incubated normal human cholangiocytes (H69), human cholangiocarcinoma cells (KKU-100, KKU-M156) and human colon cancer (Caco-2) cells with O. viverrini excretory/secretory products and analysed the effects of different endocytic inhibitors to address the mechanism of cellular uptake of ES proteins. Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products was internalised preferentially by liver cell lines, and most efficiently/rapidly by H69 cells. There was no evidence for trafficking of ES proteins to cholangiocyte organelles, and most of the fluorescence was detected in the cytoplasm. Pretreatment with clathrin inhibitors significantly reduced the uptake of O. viverrini excretory/secretory products, particularly by H69 cells. Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products induced proliferation of liver cells (H69 and CCA lines) but not intestinal (Caco-2) cells, and proliferation was blocked using inhibitors of the classical endocytic pathways (clathrin and caveolae). Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products drove IL6 secretion by H69 cells but not Caco-2 cells, and cytokine secretion was significantly reduced by endocytosis inhibitors. This the first known study to address the endocytosis of helminth ES proteins by host epithelial cells and sheds light on the pathways by which this parasite causes one of the most devastating forms of cancer in south

  10. Macrophage-derived Lipocalin-2 contributes to ischemic resistance mechanisms by protecting from renal injury

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Michaela; Brüne, Bernhard; Hotter, Georgina; Sola, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion injury triggers an inflammatory response associated to infiltrating macrophages which determines the further outcome of disease. Brown Norway rats are known to show endogenous resistance to ischemia-induced renal damage. By contrast, Sprague Dawley rats exhibit a higher susceptibility to ischemic injury. In order to ascertain cytoprotective mechanisms, we focused on the implication of lipocalin-2 protein in main resistance mechanisms in renal ischemia/reperfusion injury by using adoptive macrophage administration, genetically modified ex vivo either to overexpress or to knockdown lipocalin-2. In vitro experiments with bone marrow-derived macrophages both from Brown Norway rats and from Sprague Dawley rats under hypoxic conditions showed endogenous differences regarding cytokine and lipocalin-2 expression profile in the two strains. Most interestingly, we observed that macrophages of the resistant strain express significantly more lipocalin-2. In vivo studies showed that tubular epithelial cell apoptosis and renal injury significantly increased and reparative markers decreased in Brown Norway rats after injection of lipocalin-2-knockdown macrophages, while the administration of lipocalin-2-overexpressing cells significantly decreased Sprague Dawley susceptibility. These data point to a crucial role of macrophage-derived lipocalin-2 in endogenous cytoprotective mechanisms. We conclude that expression of lipocalin-2 in tissue-infiltrating macrophages is pivotal for kidney-intrinsic cytoprotective pathways during ischemia reperfusion injury. PMID:26911537

  11. Mechanisms of renal control of potassium homeostasis in complete aldosterone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Todkar, Abhijeet; Picard, Nicolas; Loffing-Cueni, Dominique; Sorensen, Mads V; Mihailova, Marija; Nesterov, Viatcheslav; Makhanova, Natalia; Korbmacher, Christoph; Wagner, Carsten A; Loffing, Johannes

    2015-02-01

    Aldosterone-independent mechanisms may contribute to K(+) homeostasis. We studied aldosterone synthase knockout (AS(-/-)) mice to define renal control mechanisms of K(+) homeostasis in complete aldosterone deficiency. AS(-/-) mice were normokalemic and tolerated a physiologic dietary K(+) load (2% K(+), 2 days) without signs of illness, except some degree of polyuria. With supraphysiologic K(+) intake (5% K(+)), AS(-/-) mice decompensated and became hyperkalemic. High-K(+) diets induced upregulation of the renal outer medullary K(+) channel in AS(-/-) mice, whereas upregulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) sufficient to increase the electrochemical driving force for K(+) excretion was detected only with a 2% K(+) diet. Phosphorylation of the thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter was consistently lower in AS(-/-) mice than in AS(+/+) mice and was downregulated in mice of both genotypes in response to increased K(+) intake. Inhibition of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor reduced renal creatinine clearance and apical ENaC localization, and caused severe hyperkalemia in AS(-/-) mice. In contrast with the kidney, the distal colon of AS(-/-) mice did not respond to dietary K(+) loading, as indicated by Ussing-type chamber experiments. Thus, renal adaptation to a physiologic, but not supraphysiologic, K(+) load can be achieved in aldosterone deficiency by aldosterone-independent activation of the renal outer medullary K(+) channel and ENaC, to which angiotensin II may contribute. Enhanced urinary flow and reduced activity of the thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter may support renal adaptation by activation of flow-dependent K(+) secretion and increased intratubular availability of Na(+) that can be reabsorbed in exchange for K(+) secreted.

  12. Mechanisms of Renal Control of Potassium Homeostasis in Complete Aldosterone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Todkar, Abhijeet; Picard, Nicolas; Loffing-Cueni, Dominique; Sorensen, Mads V.; Mihailova, Marija; Nesterov, Viatcheslav; Makhanova, Natalia; Korbmacher, Christoph; Wagner, Carsten A.

    2015-01-01

    Aldosterone-independent mechanisms may contribute to K+ homeostasis. We studied aldosterone synthase knockout (AS−/−) mice to define renal control mechanisms of K+ homeostasis in complete aldosterone deficiency. AS−/− mice were normokalemic and tolerated a physiologic dietary K+ load (2% K+, 2 days) without signs of illness, except some degree of polyuria. With supraphysiologic K+ intake (5% K+), AS−/− mice decompensated and became hyperkalemic. High-K+ diets induced upregulation of the renal outer medullary K+ channel in AS−/− mice, whereas upregulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) sufficient to increase the electrochemical driving force for K+ excretion was detected only with a 2% K+ diet. Phosphorylation of the thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter was consistently lower in AS−/− mice than in AS+/+ mice and was downregulated in mice of both genotypes in response to increased K+ intake. Inhibition of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor reduced renal creatinine clearance and apical ENaC localization, and caused severe hyperkalemia in AS−/− mice. In contrast with the kidney, the distal colon of AS−/− mice did not respond to dietary K+ loading, as indicated by Ussing-type chamber experiments. Thus, renal adaptation to a physiologic, but not supraphysiologic, K+ load can be achieved in aldosterone deficiency by aldosterone-independent activation of the renal outer medullary K+ channel and ENaC, to which angiotensin II may contribute. Enhanced urinary flow and reduced activity of the thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter may support renal adaptation by activation of flow-dependent K+ secretion and increased intratubular availability of Na+ that can be reabsorbed in exchange for K+ secreted. PMID:25071088

  13. The renal effects of vanadate exposure: potential biomarkers and oxidative stress as a mechanism of functional renal disorders--preliminary studies.

    PubMed

    Ucibior, Agnieszka; Gołębiowska, Dorota; Adamczyk, Agnieszka; Niedźwiecka, Irmina; Fornal, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    The alterations in the levels/activities of selected biomarkers for detecting kidney toxicity and in the levels of some oxidative stress (OS) markers and elements were studied in male rats to evaluate biochemically the degree of kidney damage, investigate the role of OS in the mechanism of functional renal disorders, reveal potential biomarkers of renal function, and assess the renal mineral changes in the conditions of a 12-week sodium metavanadate (SMV, 0.125 mg V/mL) exposure. The results showed that OS is involved in the mechanism underlying the development of SMV-induced functional renal disturbances. They also suggest that the urinary cystatin C (CysCu) and kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1u) could be the most appropriate to evaluate renal function at the conditions of SMV intoxication when the fluid intake, excreted urinary volume (EUV), body weight (BW), and the urinary creatinine excretion (Creu) decreased. The use of such tests as the urinary lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, γ-glutamyltranspeptidase, and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (LDHu, ALPu, GGTPu, and NAGu) seems not to be valid given their reduced activities. The use of only traditional biomarkers of renal function in these conditions may, in turn, be insufficient because their alterations are greatly influenced by the changes in the fluid intake and/or BW. PMID:24605335

  14. Mechanisms of BK virus infection of renal cells and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Mbianda, Christiane; El-Meanawy, Ashraf; Sorokin, Andrey

    2015-10-01

    BK virus (BKV) causes BKV nephritis in renal transplant patients and contributes significantly to the increase of probability of graft loss. BKV, being latent in the urogenital tract, is likely to be transported with the donor kidney to recipients and following reactivation replicates in the nucleus of renal epithelial tubular cells. BKV daughter viruses are released and enter other renal epithelial cells to spread infection. There are still a lot of unknown factors about the mechanism and kinetics of BKV infection. The treatment of BKV infection, with exception of reduction in immunosuppression which increases the risk of allograft rejection, is almost exclusively limited to application of anti-viral drugs with rather inconsistent results. The shortcomings of anti-viral therapies demand the understanding of early steps of infection of permissive cells by BK virus in hope that adequate interventional therapies preventing infection of cells with BK virus could be developed. This review describes the BKV entry in target human cells, intracellular trafficking pathways of BKV particles and potential therapeutic implications based on understanding of mechanisms of BKV infection of renal cells.

  15. Lymphangioma communicating with the excretory system.

    PubMed

    Pancione, L; Giacomelli, G; Moroni, M; Taraglio, G; Mecozzi, B

    2008-03-01

    Lymphangioma is a rare benign tumor caused by failure in the development of the lymphatic communicating system. The corresponding nomenclature is confusing. In recent years ''renal lymphangiectasia'' is the preferred name. Although this disease may occur in any site of the body, the neck (75%) and axillary area (20%) are the most common sites, and the kidney is occasionally involved. We report a case of lymphangioma communicating with the urinary system in a 61-year-old man diagnosed by CT scan treated with nephrectomy and histological confirmation.

  16. Transplant renal artery stenosis secondary to mechanical compression from polycystic kidney disease: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Linda; Gunaratnam, Lakshman; Sener, Alp

    2013-01-01

    Transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) is a potentially treatable cause of allograft dysfunction, hypertension and graft loss. The mainstay of treatment includes angioplasty and endovascular stenting, although observation and surgery are at times indicated. We present an unusual case of TRAS secondary to mechanical compression from a patient’s enlarged native polycystic kidneys. This was treated with bilateral native nephrectomy and evidence of TRAS improved both clinically and radiographically. Recognition and treatment are important in preventing irreversible complications of TRAS. PMID:23671537

  17. Cellular mechanisms mediating rat renal microvascular constriction by angiotensin II.

    PubMed Central

    Takenaka, T; Suzuki, H; Fujiwara, K; Kanno, Y; Ohno, Y; Hayashi, K; Nagahama, T; Saruta, T

    1997-01-01

    To assess cellular mechanisms mediating afferent (AA) and efferent arteriolar (EA) constriction by angiotensin II (AngII), experiments were performed using isolated perfused hydronephrotic kidneys. In the first series of studies, AngII (0.3 nM) constricted AAs and EAs by 29+/-3 (n = 8, P < 0.01) and 27+/-3% (n = 8, P < 0.01), respectively. Subsequent addition of nifedipine restored AA but not EA diameter. Manganese (8 mM) reversed EA constriction by 65+/-9% (P < 0.01). In the second group, the addition of N-ethylmaleimide (10 microM), a Gi/Go protein antagonist, abolished AngII- induced EA (n = 6) but not AA constriction (n = 6). In the third series of experiments, treatment with 2-nitro-4-carboxyphenyl-N, N-diphenyl-carbamate (200 microM), a phospholipase C inhibitor, blocked both AA and EA constriction by AngII (n = 6 for each). In the fourth group, thapsigargin (1 microM) prevented AngII-induced AA constriction (n = 8) and attenuated EA constriction (8+/-2% decrease in EA diameter at 0.3 nM AngII, n = 8, P < 0.05). Subsequent addition of manganese (8 mM) reversed EA constriction. Our data provide evidence that in AAs, AngII stimulates phospholipase C with subsequent calcium mobilization that is required to activate voltage-dependent calcium channels. Our results suggest that AngII constricts EAs by activating phospholipase C via the Gi protein family, thereby eliciting both calcium mobilization and calcium entry. PMID:9329977

  18. Ultrasound strain elastography in assessment of cortical mechanical behavior in acute renal vein occlusion: in vivo animal model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; He, Wen; Cheng, Ling-Gang; Li, Xiao-Ya; Zhang, Xiou-Ru; Juluru, Krishna; Al Khori, Noor; Coya, Adrienne; Min, Robert

    2015-01-01

    To assess the correlation of quantitative ultrasound strain parameters with the severity of cortical edema in renal vein occlusion, we prospectively performed ultrasound strain elastography on a canine acute renal vein occlusion model prior to and following 10, 20, and 40min of renal vein ligation. Strain and strain relaxation time representing the deformation and relaxation of the renal cortices and reference soft tissue were produced by the external compression with the ultrasound transducer and estimated using commercially available 2-D speckle tracking software. Cortical thickness was additionally measured. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to examine the difference in cortical thickness, strain ratio (mean cortical strain divided by mean reference tissue strain), and strain relaxation time ratio (cortical relaxation time divided by reference tissue relaxation time) prior to and after renal vein ligation. Pearson's correlation coefficient was applied to test the relationship between strain parameters and the time of the renal vein ligation. There was a strong positive correlation between the duration of renal vein ligation and strain (R(2)=0.97) and strain relaxation time (R(2)=0.98) ratios. Significant differences in strain and strain relaxation time ratios were found at all measured timepoints (all P≪.001). Cortical thickness, however, showed no significant difference between timepoints (P=.065). Our result suggest that strain and strain relaxation time ratios may be used as quantitative markers for the assessment of the renal cortical mechanical behavior in subclinical acute renal vein occlusion.

  19. Mineralocorticoid-induced sodium appetite and renal salt retention: evidence for common signaling and effector mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yiling; Vallon, Volker

    2014-01-01

    An increase in renal sodium chloride (salt) retention and an increase in sodium appetite are the body's responses to salt restriction or depletion in order to restore salt balance. Renal salt retention and increased sodium appetite can also be maladaptive and sustain the pathophysiology in conditions like salt-sensitive hypertension and chronic heart failure. Here we review the central role of the mineralocorticoid aldosterone in both the increase in renal salt reabsorption and sodium appetite. We discuss the working hypothesis that aldosterone activates similar signaling and effector mechanisms in the kidney and brain, including the mineralocorticoid receptor, the serum- and glucocorticoid-induced kinase SGK1, the ubiquitin ligase NEDD4-2, and the epithelial sodium channel ENaC. The latter also mediates the gustatory salt sensing in the tongue, which is required for the manifestation of increased salt intake. Effects of aldosterone on both the brain and kidney synergize with the effects of angiotensin II. Thus, mineralocorticoids appear to induce similar molecular pathways in the kidney, brain, and possibly tongue, which could provide opportunities for more effective therapeutic interventions. Inhibition of renal salt reabsorption is compensated by stimulation of salt appetite and vice versa; targeting both mechanisms should be more effective. Inhibiting the arousal to consume salty food may improve a patient's compliance to reducing salt intake. While a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms is needed and will provide new therapeutic options, current pharmacological interventions that target both salt retention and sodium appetite include mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and potentially inhibitors of angiotensin II and ENaC.

  20. Mineralocorticoid-induced sodium appetite and renal salt retention: evidence for common signaling and effector mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yiling; Vallon, Volker

    2014-01-01

    An increase in renal sodium chloride (salt) retention and an increase in sodium appetite are the body's responses to salt restriction or depletion in order to restore salt balance. Renal salt retention and increased sodium appetite can also be maladaptive and sustain the pathophysiology in conditions like salt-sensitive hypertension and chronic heart failure. Here we review the central role of the mineralocorticoid aldosterone in both the increase in renal salt reabsorption and sodium appetite. We discuss the working hypothesis that aldosterone activates similar signaling and effector mechanisms in the kidney and brain, including the mineralocorticoid receptor, the serum- and glucocorticoid-induced kinase SGK1, the ubiquitin ligase NEDD4-2, and the epithelial sodium channel ENaC. The latter also mediates the gustatory salt sensing in the tongue, which is required for the manifestation of increased salt intake. Effects of aldosterone on both the brain and kidney synergize with the effects of angiotensin II. Thus, mineralocorticoids appear to induce similar molecular pathways in the kidney, brain, and possibly tongue, which could provide opportunities for more effective therapeutic interventions. Inhibition of renal salt reabsorption is compensated by stimulation of salt appetite and vice versa; targeting both mechanisms should be more effective. Inhibiting the arousal to consume salty food may improve a patient's compliance to reducing salt intake. While a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms is needed and will provide new therapeutic options, current pharmacological interventions that target both salt retention and sodium appetite include mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and potentially inhibitors of angiotensin II and ENaC. PMID:25376899

  1. Interventional mechanisms of herbs or herbal extracts on renal interstitial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jia; He, Li-qun; Su, Xiao

    2016-05-01

    Renal interstitial fibrosis (RIF) is a common development in chronic renal diseases that can lead to uremia and be life-threatening. The RIF pathology has complicated extracellular and intercellular mechanisms, involving many cells and cytokines, resulting in an incomplete mechanistic understanding of the disease. Finding effective herbs or herbal extracts for prevention and treatment of RIF is crucial because current medical approaches do not reliably slow or reverse RIF. In recent years, many experts have worked to identify herbs or herbal extracts to combat RIF both in vivo and in vitro, with some success. This review attempts to summarize the possible interventional mechanisms of herbs or herbal extracts involved in protecting and reversing RIF. The authors found some herbs and their extracts that may ameliorate renal impairments through anti-inflammation, anti-fibrogenesis and stabilization of extra cellular matrix. Among them, tetramethylpyrazine/ligustrazine, curcumin and polyglucoside of Tripterygium have experimentally shown good potential for improving RIF. However, conclusive evidence is still needed, especially in randomized controlled clinical trials. We expect that herbs or herbal extracts will play an important role in RIF treatment and reversal in the future. PMID:27181123

  2. Interventional mechanisms of herbs or herbal extracts on renal interstitial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jia; He, Li-qun; Su, Xiao

    2016-05-01

    Renal interstitial fibrosis (RIF) is a common development in chronic renal diseases that can lead to uremia and be life-threatening. The RIF pathology has complicated extracellular and intercellular mechanisms, involving many cells and cytokines, resulting in an incomplete mechanistic understanding of the disease. Finding effective herbs or herbal extracts for prevention and treatment of RIF is crucial because current medical approaches do not reliably slow or reverse RIF. In recent years, many experts have worked to identify herbs or herbal extracts to combat RIF both in vivo and in vitro, with some success. This review attempts to summarize the possible interventional mechanisms of herbs or herbal extracts involved in protecting and reversing RIF. The authors found some herbs and their extracts that may ameliorate renal impairments through anti-inflammation, anti-fibrogenesis and stabilization of extra cellular matrix. Among them, tetramethylpyrazine/ligustrazine, curcumin and polyglucoside of Tripterygium have experimentally shown good potential for improving RIF. However, conclusive evidence is still needed, especially in randomized controlled clinical trials. We expect that herbs or herbal extracts will play an important role in RIF treatment and reversal in the future.

  3. Cardiovascular effects of afferent renal nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Stella, A; Weaver, L; Golin, R; Genovesi, S; Zanchetti, A

    1987-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of afferent renal nerves elicits an increase in arterial pressure and heart rate. The hypertensive response is presumably due to the widespread activation of the sympathetic nervous system leading to peripheral vasoconstriction. Interestingly, the kidney does not appear involved in this reflex excitatory response to afferent renal nerve stimulation since changes in vascular conductances and excretory functions are equal in both the innervated and denervated kidney, and secondary to changes in renal perfusion pressure. In addition, no changes in renin release from either kidneys are observed during afferent renal nerve stimulation. It is likely that the electrical stimulation of afferent renal nerves activates other reflexes exerting an inhibitory influence on efferent renal nerve activity. Indeed, neural renorenal reflexes which tonically inhibit renal functions have clearly been demonstrated. Furthermore, preferential inhibition of efferent renal nerve activity by cardiopulmonary and sinoaortic receptors has recently been shown during activation of other visceral afferents.

  4. An ultrastructural study of the cercarial excretory system in Bucephaloides gracilescens and Prosorhynchus squamatus.

    PubMed

    Podvyaznaya, I M; Galaktionov, K V

    2004-06-01

    The ultrastructure of the flame cells, capillaries, collecting tubes, excretory bladder, excretory atrium, caudal vesicle, lateral caudal ducts and excretory pores of cercariae of Bucephaloides gracilescens (Rudolphi, 1819) Hopkins, 1954 and Prosorhynchus squamatus Odhner, 1905 (Digenea: Bucephalidae) is described. Both species are essentially similar except for some details. The terminal parts of the protonephridia have all the structural features that are typical of trematodes. The collecting tubes in the cercarial body are composed of cells that are wrapped around the lumen. The main collecting tubes are joined to the excretory bladder syncytium by septate junctions. Features of P. squamatus excretory bladder epithelium indicate that it is involved in secretory activity, but this is not the case in B. gracilescens. In both species the luminal surface of the excretory bladder epithelium is increased by lamellae, and the basal plasma membrane forms invaginations. In the bladder syncytium of P. squamatus both apical lamellae and basal invaginations are more developed and mitochondria are also more numerous. The excretory atrium is lined by a syncytium with nucleated cytons located in the surrounding parenchyma. The atrium lining is not continuous with the body tegument and possesses specific secretory inclusions and a thick glycocalyx. Septate junctions connect the atrium syncytium to the excretory bladder epithelium at its anterior end and to the syncytial excretory epithelium lining the caudal vesicle and the lateral caudal ducts at its posterior. In the excretory pores the caudal duct syncytium is joined to the tegument by septate desmosomes.

  5. Comparative anatomy of excretory organs in vestimentiferan tube worms (Pogonophora, Obturata).

    PubMed

    Schulze, A

    2001-10-01

    In the past, the excretory systems of only few vestimentiferan species have been examined in detail. This study presents comparative data on eight species on the basis of histological serial sections. Ridgeia piscesae was studied by transmission electron microscopy. All species examined possess a central excretory organ consisting of numerous small branching and intertwined excretory tubules. These are connected to voluminous glandular excretory ducts that lead to the exterior by single or paired excretory pores located at the anterior end of the vestimentum. A comparative analysis shows differences among the species with regard to several features, such as the number of excretory pores, presence/absence of excretory grooves and papillae, position of the excretory organ relative to the brain, and the shape of the excretory ducts. Neither podocytes nor coelomoducts could be detected; therefore, there is no indication of the presence of metanephridia. The vestimentiferan excretory system shows some similarities with the design in Athecanephria (Pogonophora, Perviata) and a general resemblance to the design in sabellid polychaetes, even though in the latter metanephridia are clearly present.

  6. Renal Mechanisms of Association between Fibroblast Growth Factor 1 and Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Maciej; Eales, James; Denniff, Matthew; Myers, Stephen; Chew, Guat Siew; Nelson, Christopher P; Christofidou, Paraskevi; Desai, Aishwarya; Büsst, Cara; Wojnar, Lukasz; Musialik, Katarzyna; Jozwiak, Jacek; Debiec, Radoslaw; Dominiczak, Anna F; Navis, Gerjan; van Gilst, Wiek H; van der Harst, Pim; Samani, Nilesh J; Harrap, Stephen; Bogdanski, Pawel; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Charchar, Fadi J

    2015-12-01

    The fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) gene is expressed primarily in the kidney and may contribute to hypertension. However, the biologic mechanisms underlying the association between FGF1 and BP regulation remain unknown. We report that the major allele of FGF1 single nucleotide polymorphism rs152524 was associated in a dose-dependent manner with systolic BP (P = 9.65 × 10(-5)) and diastolic BP (P = 7.61 × 10(-3)) in a meta-analysis of 14,364 individuals and with renal expression of FGF1 mRNA in 126 human kidneys (P=9.0 × 10(-3)). Next-generation RNA sequencing revealed that upregulated renal expression of FGF1 or of each of the three FGF1 mRNA isoforms individually was associated with higher BP. FGF1-stratified coexpression analysis in two separate collections of human kidneys identified 126 FGF1 partner mRNAs, of which 71 and 63 showed at least nominal association with systolic and diastolic BP, respectively. Of those mRNAs, seven mRNAs in five genes (MME, PTPRO, REN, SLC12A3, and WNK1) had strong prior annotation to BP or hypertension. MME, which encodes an enzyme that degrades circulating natriuretic peptides, showed the strongest differential coexpression with FGF1 between hypertensive and normotensive kidneys. Furthermore, higher level of renal FGF1 expression was associated with lower circulating levels of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides. These findings indicate that FGF1 expression in the kidney is at least under partial genetic control and that renal expression of several FGF1 partner genes involved in the natriuretic peptide catabolism pathway, renin-angiotensin cascade, and sodium handling network may explain the association between FGF1 and BP.

  7. Resistance to sunitinib in renal cell carcinoma: From molecular mechanisms to predictive markers and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Joosten, S C; Hamming, L; Soetekouw, P M; Aarts, M J; Veeck, J; van Engeland, M; Tjan-Heijnen, V C

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of agents that inhibit tumor angiogenesis by targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling has made a significant impact on the survival of patients with metastasized renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Sunitinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor of the VEGF receptor, has become the mainstay of treatment for these patients. Although treatment with sunitinib substantially improved patient outcome, the initial success is overshadowed by the occurrence of resistance. The mechanisms of resistance are poorly understood. Insight into the molecular mechanisms of resistance will help to better understand the biology of RCC and can ultimately aid the development of more effective therapies for patients with this infaust disease. In this review we comprehensively discuss molecular mechanisms of resistance to sunitinib and the involved biological processes, summarize potential biomarkers that predict response and resistance to treatment with sunitinib, and elaborate on future perspectives in the treatment of metastasized RCC. PMID:25446042

  8. Characterization of the effects of erythromycin estolate and erythromycin base on the excretory function of the isolated rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Gaeta, G.B.; Utili, R.; Adinolfi, L.E.; Abernathy, C.O.; Giusti, G.

    1985-09-15

    To investigate the mechanisms of erythromycin cholestasis, the effects of erythromycin estolate (EE) on the excretory function of the isolated perfused rat liver and on liver plasma membrane (LM) preparations were studied and compared to those of erythromycin base (EB) and lauryl sulfate (LS), added alone or in combination. EE (at 125 to 200 microM) caused dose-dependent reductions of bile and perfusate flows, bile acid (BA) excretion, and biliary BA concentration. The alterations of the excretory function were only in part due to the decreased perfusate flow. In contrast, both 200 and 300 microM concentrations of EB elicited similar choleretic responses, which were presumably related to the osmotic activity of the drug excreted in the bile. LS did not affect hepatic excretory functions. However, the simultaneous addition of EB and LS resulted in a rate of bile flow lower than that observed with EB alone. EE, but not EB, increased canalicular permeability to (/sup 14/C)sucrose as measured by bile to plasma (B:P) ratio. Neither drugs altered (/sup 14/C)erythritol B:P ratio. In LM preparations both Na+,K+- and Mg2+-ATPase activities were inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by EE, but not by EB. The data suggest that EE could affect bile flow by inhibiting cotransport of Na+ and BA and by altering LM permeability and support the view that the effect of erythromycins on the liver may be related to their surface activity.

  9. In vivo mechanism study of NGAL in rat renal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Zang, X J; An, S X; Feng, Z; Xia, Y P; Song, Y; Yu, Q

    2014-10-27

    This study aimed to determine the protective effect and mechanism of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in rat kidney on ischemia/reperfusion injury (I/R). The rat I/R model was set up by cutting one kidney and clamping the contralateral renal pedicle for 45 min. Male SD rats were randomly divided into sham-operation, I/R and NGAL groups. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was performed to observe the renal pathological changes in the 3 groups; serum creatinine (Scr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) determined in blood samples taken from the inferior vena cava 24 h after the reperfusion were measured; TUNEL was used to observe the apoptosis of renal tubular epithelial cells; immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate the expressions of Bax and activated caspase-3; Western blotting was used to determine the expression changes in apoptotic proteins Fas and Bcl-2. Compared with the I/R group, Scr and BUN of the NGAL group were 63.400 ± 11.908 vs 121.857 ± 17.151 μM and 14.840 ± 2.868 vs 28.557 ± 6.434 mM, respectively. The number of apoptotic tubular epithelial cells was reduced (7.800 ± 1.924 vs 15.400 ± 3.049); the expression of renal tissue Fas mRNA of the NGAL group was decreased (2.34 ± 0.51 vs 6.84 ± 2.34); the expression of the Bax protein was lower (7.440 ± 1.640 vs 15.456 ± 1.955%); the expression of the CC3 protein was decreased (3.171 ± 0.321 vs 7.291 ± 1.059%), while the expression of the Bcl-2 protein increased (6.91 ± 1.64 vs 5.30 ± 1.48), P < 0.05. NGAL had a protective effect towards the renal tubular epithelial cells in I/R, and the effect might have been associated with the reduction in apoptosis and the altered expression of apoptotic proteins, which would thereby reduce tissue damage and protect the kidney.

  10. Immunomodulatory effects of Trichinella spiralis-derived excretory-secretory antigens.

    PubMed

    Radovic, Ivana; Gruden-Movsesijan, Alisa; Ilic, Natasa; Cvetkovic, Jelena; Mojsilovic, Slavko; Devic, Marija; Sofronic-Milosavljevic, Ljiljana

    2015-03-01

    Helminth-derived products, either released into the circulation during the course of the infection or isolated after in vitro cultivation of the parasite and applied by the injection, are able to suppress the host immune response to autoantigens and allergens, but mechanisms could differ. Prophylactic application of Trichinella spiralis excretory-secretory muscle larvae (ES L1) products ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) with the same success as infection did. However, a shift to the Th2-type response in the periphery and in the central nervous system, accompanied by activation of regulatory mechanisms, had a striking, new feature of increased proportion of unconventional CD4(+)CD25(-)Foxp3(+) regulatory cells both in the periphery and in the central nervous system of animals treated with ES L1 before the induction of EAE.

  11. Systemic response to excretory urography: work in progress

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, H.W.; Katzberg, R.W.; Morris, T.W.; Spataro, R.F.

    1984-04-01

    Ninety-seven patients who were undergoing excretory urography for suspected genitourinary tract abnormalities were continuously monitored for systemic blood pressure and pulse rates before (control) and after rapid intravenous injections of contrast material using a Bard pressure monitor. The authors report the systemic responses observed. Clinically obvious reactions to contrast medium were recorded and compared with the blood pressure and pulse rate responses. The most common response to rapid infusion of contrast medium was a transient hypotension. An increase in systemic pressure had a high association with nausea and vomiting. Significant hypotension was observed in six patients (6%), but no overt clinical manifestations were present.

  12. Excretory urography using dual-energy scanned projection radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Soomer, F.G.; Brody, W.R.; Gross, D.; Macovski, A.; Hall, A.; Pelc, N.

    1981-11-01

    Excretory urograms of 10 patients were obtained using a GE 8800 CT scanner with Scout View which had been modified for dual-kVp scanned projection radiography. Using this system, it is possible to combine images obtained simultaneously at 85 and 135 kVp to create subtraction images from which substances of desired mean atomic number have been removed. This permits improved visualization of the genitourinary system on urograms by (a) eliminating obscuring bowel gas shadows and (b) enhancement of both iodinated contrast media and retroperitoneal fat planes.

  13. Studies on the Mechanism of Oliguria in a Model of Unilateral Acute Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Cox, John W.; Baehler, Richard W.; Sharma, Hari; O'Dorisio, Thomas; Osgood, Richard W.; Stein, Jay H.; Ferris, Thomas F.

    1974-01-01

    To further evaluate the mechanism of the oliguria of acute renal failure, a model was utilized in which intense and prolonged vasoconstriction produced the unilateral cessation of urine flow. The radioactive microsphere method was used to measure total and regional blood flow before and after the intrarenal infusion of norepinephrine, 0.75 μg/kg/min, for 2 h in the dog. In the control kidney, renal blood flow increased 32% 48 h after norepinephrine in association with a fall in the fractional distribution of flow to the outer cortex. In the experimental kidney, total renal blood flow fell from 190 ml/min before norepinephrine to 116 ml/min at 48 h (P < 0.025) with a uniform reduction in cortical blood flow. After the administration of 10% body wt Ringer's solution, there was a marked redistribution of flow to inner cortical nephrons in both the control and experimental kidney. In addition, there was a marked increase in total blood flow in both kidneys. On the experimental side, flow rose to 235 ml/min, a value greater than in either the control period (P < 0.05) or at 48 h after norepinephrine (P < 0.001). However, in spite of this marked increase in blood flow, there was essentially no urine flow from the experimental kidney. In separate studies, the animals were prepared for micropuncture. In all studies, the surface tubules were collapsed, and there was no evidence of tubular obstruction or leakage of filtrate. Over 99% of the 15-μM spheres were extracted in one pass through the experimental kidney. An analysis of the forces affecting filtration suggested that an alteration in the ultrafiltration coefficient may be responsible, at least in part, for the anuria in this model. In this regard, transmission and scanning electron microscopy revealed a marked abnormality in the epithelial structure of the glomerulus. It is suggested that a decrease in glomerular capillary permeability may be present in this model of acute renal failure. Images PMID:4830221

  14. [Change lipid peroxidation as a mechanism of renal disease under heavy metals].

    PubMed

    Mitsiev, A K

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metals are the most dangerous anthropogenic pollutants human environment. With an extensive range of pathological effects of heavy metals lead to the development of irreversible changes in the tissues of living organisms and systems. The main target organ destructive influence of metals are the kidneys, which is associated with the peculiarities of running these bodies physiological functions. There are many mechanisms allowing heavy metals to exercise their pathogenic effects on the body, the most significant of which is the mechanism of activation of free radical oxidation, due to the inherent heavy metals prooxidant activity. On this basis, the main objective of the pilot study was to investigate the influence of lipid peroxidation in the kidney function. To determine the functional state of the kidneys was performed to study the basic processes of urine formation, protein excretion and urine osmolarity. The intensity of lipid peroxidation was judged by the concentration of malondialdehyde and hydroperoxide in the blood of animals. Results of the study revealed that long-term administration of heavy metals in experimental animals leads to the development of a powerful oxidative stress, characterized by an increase in the content of lipid peroxidation products in the blood of animals. The paper found that the activation of lipid peroxidation in the conditions of long-term administration of heavy metals associated with the development of marked disorders of renal function. A strong antioxidant effect of melatonin in long-term poisoning with heavy metal salts reduces the activity of lipid peroxidation, which in turn weakens the pathological effects of xenobiotics on renal function. The findings suggest that the activation of heavy metals, lipid peroxidation is one of the mechanisms leading to the development of pathophysiological changes in the kidneys. PMID:26571810

  15. [Change lipid peroxidation as a mechanism of renal disease under heavy metals].

    PubMed

    Mitsiev, A K

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metals are the most dangerous anthropogenic pollutants human environment. With an extensive range of pathological effects of heavy metals lead to the development of irreversible changes in the tissues of living organisms and systems. The main target organ destructive influence of metals are the kidneys, which is associated with the peculiarities of running these bodies physiological functions. There are many mechanisms allowing heavy metals to exercise their pathogenic effects on the body, the most significant of which is the mechanism of activation of free radical oxidation, due to the inherent heavy metals prooxidant activity. On this basis, the main objective of the pilot study was to investigate the influence of lipid peroxidation in the kidney function. To determine the functional state of the kidneys was performed to study the basic processes of urine formation, protein excretion and urine osmolarity. The intensity of lipid peroxidation was judged by the concentration of malondialdehyde and hydroperoxide in the blood of animals. Results of the study revealed that long-term administration of heavy metals in experimental animals leads to the development of a powerful oxidative stress, characterized by an increase in the content of lipid peroxidation products in the blood of animals. The paper found that the activation of lipid peroxidation in the conditions of long-term administration of heavy metals associated with the development of marked disorders of renal function. A strong antioxidant effect of melatonin in long-term poisoning with heavy metal salts reduces the activity of lipid peroxidation, which in turn weakens the pathological effects of xenobiotics on renal function. The findings suggest that the activation of heavy metals, lipid peroxidation is one of the mechanisms leading to the development of pathophysiological changes in the kidneys.

  16. The renal quantitative scintillation camera study for determination of renal function

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, I.M. Jr.; Boineau, F.G.; Evans, B.B.; Schlegel, J.U.

    1983-03-01

    The renal quantitative scintillation camera study assesses glomerular filtration rate and effective renal plasma flow based upon renal uptake of 99mtechnetium-iron ascorbate and 131iodine-hippuran, respectively. The method was compared to inulin, para-aminohippuric acid and creatinine clearance studies in 7 normal subjects and 9 patients with various degrees of reduced renal function. The reproducibility of the technique was determined in 15 randomly selected pediatric patients. The values of glomerular filtration rate and effective renal plasma flow were not significantly different from those of inulin and para-aminohippuric acid studies. The reproducibility of the technique was comparable to that of inulin and para-aminohippuric acid studies. Patient acceptance of the technique is excellent and the cost is minimal. Renal morphology and excretory dynamics also are demonstrated. The technique is advocated as a clinical measure of renal function.

  17. Imaging in acute renal infection in children

    SciTech Connect

    Sty, J.R.; Wells, R.G.; Starshak, R.J.; Schroeder, B.A.

    1987-03-01

    Infection is the most common disease of the urinary tract in children, and various imaging techniques have been used to verify its presence and location. On retrospective analysis, 50 consecutive children with documented upper urinary tract infection had abnormal findings on renal cortical scintigraphy with 99mTc-glucoheptonate. The infection involved the renal poles only in 38 and the poles plus other renal cortical areas in eight. Four had abnormalities that spared the poles. Renal sonograms were abnormal in 32 of 50 children. Excretory urograms were abnormal in six of 23 children in whom they were obtained. Vesicoureteral reflux was found in 34 of 40 children in whom voiding cystourethrography was performed. These data show the high sensitivity of renal cortical scintigraphy with 99mTc-glucoheptonate in documenting upper urinary tract infection. The location of the abnormalities detected suggests that renal infections spread via an ascending mode and implies that intrarenal reflux is a major contributing factor.

  18. [Coupled evolution of digestive, respiratory, circulatory, and excretory systems: a model investigation].

    PubMed

    Menshutkin, V V; Natochin, Iu V

    2007-01-01

    A model is developed of evolution of an organism with digestive, respiratory, circulatory, and excretory systems at the single system. The model is realized on the basis of the language STELLA 8.0. A balance is found between perfection of each individual physiological system and necessary energy expenditures for survival of the organism as a whole. The model is based on a coupled development of several visceral systems. There is analyzed effect of a change of consumption of substances with food and of oxygen amount on their oxidation, a branching of blood flow to organs, specifically to kidneys, to excrete final products of metabolism from blood. The energy expenditures for circulation are believed to be proportional to blood flow in a given organ. An increase of efficiency of renal excretion from blood of final metabolic products and toxic substances has a favorable effect on inner medium and activity of each cell of an individual, but increases of the organism energy expenditures. Interrelation of these factors under conditions of adaptation to changing environmental conditions determines peculiarities of evolution of each physiological system in an individual.

  19. Grape seed proanthocyanidins prevent DOCA-salt hypertension-induced renal injury and its mechanisms in rats.

    PubMed

    Lan, Chao-Zong; Ding, Ling; Su, Yi-Lin; Guo, Kun; Wang, Li; Kan, Hong-Wei; Ou, Yu-Rong; Gao, Shan

    2015-07-01

    Renal dysfunction is one of the major effects of DOCA (deoxycorticosterone acetate)-salt hypertension and there is an increasing amount of evidence that oxidative stress damages the function of the kidney. Grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPE) have been reported to be potent anti-oxidants and free radical scavengers. The present study sought to investigate the ability of GSPE to prevent renal injury in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats and to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying its protective effects. A total of 54 Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into 7 groups: Sham group (n = 7), UnX-sham group (n = 8), DOCA-salt group (n = 8), GSPE150 group (150 mg kg(-1), n = 7), GSPE240 group (240 mg kg(-1), n = 8), GSPE384 group (384 mg kg(-1), n = 8) and ALM (amlodipine besylate tablets) group (5 mg kg(-1), n = 8), and treated for 4 weeks. Compared to sham group rats, renal injury was observed in DOCA-salt hypertensive group rats as the urine protein, KW/BW (kidney weight/body weight), degree of renal fibrosis, renal MDA (malondialdehyde) and Hyp (hydroxyproline) contents significantly increased (P < 0.01). Moreover, SOD (Superoxide Dismutase) activities decreased in the model group (P < 0.01). In contrast, DOCA-salt hypertensive rats treated with different dose of GSPE or ALM showed a significant improvement of renal injury with decreased urine protein, KW/BW, degree of renal fibrosis, renal total MDA and Hyp contents compared to the untreated group. In addition, SOD activities increased in the treatment group. Since the experimental modeling time was short, kidney damage occurs to a lesser extent. BUN (Blood Urea Nitrogen), Scr (Serum Creatinine) and UA (Uric Acid) contents did not appear significantly changed in all groups. Finally, the activation of JNK and p38 kinases in the kidney was suppressed in rats treated with GSPEs or ALM compared to the untreated group, suggesting that the inhibition of these kinase pathways by GSPE contributes to the improvement

  20. Mechanism of norepinephrine release elicited by renal nerve stimulation, veratridine and potassium chloride in the isolated rat kidney

    SciTech Connect

    el-Din, M.M.; Malik, K.U.

    1987-10-01

    We have investigated the mechanism by which renal nerve stimulation (RNS), veratridine (Vt) and KCl promote release of norepinephrine in the isolated rat kidney perfused with Tyrode's solution and prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)norepinephrine by examining the overflow of tritium elicited by these stimuli during 1) extracellular Ca++ depletion, 2) alterations in extracellular Na+ concentration and 3) administration of tetrodotoxin, amiloride, LiCl and calcium channel blockers. RNS (1-4 Hz), Vt (15-90 nmol) and KCl (150-500 mumol) produced renal vasoconstriction and enhanced the tritium overflow in a frequency- and concentration-dependent manner, respectively. Omission of Ca++ (1.8 mM) from the perfusion fluid abolished the renal vasoconstriction and the increase in tritium overflow elicited by RNA and KCl and substantially reduced that caused by Vt. Lowering the Na+ concentration in the perfusion medium (from 150 to 25 mM) reduced the overflow of tritium and the renal vasoconstriction caused by RNS (2 Hz) or Vt (45 nmol); the increase in tritium overflow in response to these stimuli was positively correlated with extracellular Na+ (25-150 mM). In contrast, KCl-induced tritium overflow was negatively correlated with extracellular Na+ concentration. Tetrodotoxin (0.3 microM) abolished the effect of RNS and Vt, but not that of KCl, to increase overflow of tritium and to produce renal vasoconstriction. Administration of amiloride (180 microM) enhanced the overflow of tritium but attenuated the associated renal vasoconstriction produced by RNS, Vt and KCl. Replacement of NaCl (75 mM) with equimolar concentration of LiCl enhanced the overflow of tritium elicited by RNS, Vt and KCl; the associated renal vasoconstriction remained unaltered.

  1. Phosphate Binding with Sevelamer Preserves Mechanical Competence of Bone Despite Acidosis in Advanced Experimental Renal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jokihaara, Jarkko; Pörsti, Ilkka H.; Sievänen, Harri; Kööbi, Peeter; Kannus, Pekka; Niemelä, Onni; Turner, Russell T.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Järvinen, Teppo L. N.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Phosphate binding with sevelamer can ameliorate detrimental histomorphometric changes of bone in chronic renal insufficiency (CRI). Here we explored the effects of sevelamer-HCl treatment on bone strength and structure in experimental CRI. Methods Forty-eight 8-week-old rats were assigned to surgical 5/6 nephrectomy (CRI) or renal decapsulation (Sham). After 14 weeks of disease progression, the rats were allocated to untreated and sevelamer-treated (3% in chow) groups for 9 weeks. Then the animals were sacrificed, plasma samples collected, and femora excised for structural analysis (biomechanical testing, quantitative computed tomography). Results Sevelamer-HCl significantly reduced blood pH, and final creatinine clearance in the CRI groups ranged 30%-50% of that in the Sham group. Final plasma phosphate increased 2.4- to 2.9-fold, and parathyroid hormone 13- to 21-fold in CRI rats, with no difference between sevelamer-treated and untreated animals. In the femoral midshaft, CRI reduced cortical bone mineral density (-3%) and breaking load (-15%) (p<0.05 for all versus Sham), while sevelamer increased bone mineral density (+2%) and prevented the deleterious changes in bone. In the femoral neck, CRI reduced bone mineral density (-11%) and breaking load (-10%), while sevelamer prevented the decrease in bone mineral density (+6%) so that breaking load did not differ from controls. Conclusions In this model of stage 3–4 CRI, sevelamer-HCl treatment ameliorated the decreases in femoral midshaft and neck mineral density, and restored bone strength despite prevailing acidosis. Therefore, treatment with sevelamer can efficiently preserve mechanical competence of bone in CRI. PMID:27658028

  2. A novel sorbitol transport mechanism in cultured renal papillary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Siebens, A.W.; Spring, K.R. )

    1989-12-01

    The renal papillary epithelial cell line, GRB-PAP1, accumulates sorbitol when grown in a hypertonic (500 mosmol/kgH2O) bathing medium. When the cells are returned to a 300 mosmol/kgH2O medium, they lose their sorbitol rapidly to the bath. Sorbitol movement across the membranes of these cells was investigated by studying the uptake of radioactive sorbitol and related compounds. Sorbitol uptake increased 71-fold when cells grown in 500 mosmol/kgH2O medium were exposed to a 300 mosmol/kgH2O test solution. The magnitude of the permeability increase was proportional to the size of the change in the osmolality of the bathing medium and not the absolute osmolality. Sorbitol uptake was a linear function of medium sorbitol concentration with no sign of saturation at sorbitol concentrations up to 315 mM. Although the permeability of other polyols was increased when the osmolality was reduced, competition between sorbitol and related sugars and polyols could not be demonstrated. Both the increased sorbitol uptake after a decrease in medium osmolality and the decrease to control permeability after return to the original osmolality were complete within 30 s. A wide variety of transport inhibitors and ion substitutions failed to alter the magnitude of the sorbitol permeability increase. The most effective inhibitor was quinidine, 1 mM reducing sorbitol uptake by 73%. The sorbitol permeability increase could also be blocked by reducing the temperature to 0 degrees C. Nonspecific uptake of sorbitol, such as endocytosis, was shown to be of only minor significance. The large increase in sorbitol permeability and subsequent sorbitol efflux enables these cells to withstand large decreases in osmolality without excessive swelling and consequent damage. A similar compensatory mechanism may operate in vivo in the renal papilla during the onset of diuresis.

  3. Excretory urography and computed tomography in the initial evaluation of patients with cervical cancer: are both examinations necessary

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, S.M.; Fishman, E.K.; Rosenshein, N.B.; Gatewood, O.M.B.; Siegelman, S.S.

    1984-11-01

    One hundred ten patients with carcinoma of the cervix were studied to determine if both excretory urography and computed tomography are needed for routine evaluation. Computed tomography gave more information in 25 patients and the excretory urogram was more informative in 10 patients. Thirty-five hydroureters were detected by computed tomography, whereas excretory urography identified 21. It was concluded that routine use of both examinations is not indicated. Excretory urography is currently sufficient in evaluation of stage I and IIA lesions, while computed tomography obviates excretory urography in patients with advanced cervical cancer (IIB-IVB).

  4. Physiological and molecular responses of the goldfish (Carassius auratus) kidney to metabolic acidosis, and potential mechanisms of renal ammonia transport.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Michael J; Wright, Patricia A; Wood, Chris M

    2015-07-01

    Relative to the gills, the mechanisms by which the kidney contributes to ammonia and acid-base homeostasis in fish are poorly understood. Goldfish were exposed to a low pH environment (pH 4.0, 48 h), which induced a characteristic metabolic acidosis and an increase in total plasma [ammonia] but reduced plasma ammonia partial pressure (PNH3). In the kidney tissue, total ammonia, lactate and intracellular pH remained unchanged. The urinary excretion rate of net base under control conditions changed to net acid excretion under low pH, with contributions from both the NH4 (+) (∼30%) and titratable acidity minus bicarbonate (∼70%; TA-HCO3 (-)) components. Inorganic phosphate (Pi), urea and Na(+) excretion rates were also elevated while Cl(-) excretion rates were unchanged. Renal alanine aminotransferase activity increased under acidosis. The increase in renal ammonia excretion was due to significant increases in both the glomerular filtration and the tubular secretion rates of ammonia, with the latter accounting for ∼75% of the increase. There was also a 3.5-fold increase in the mRNA expression of renal Rhcg-b (Rhcg1) mRNA. There was no relationship between ammonia secretion and Na(+) reabsorption. These data indicate that increased renal ammonia secretion during acidosis is probably mediated through Rhesus (Rh) glycoproteins and occurs independently of Na(+) transport, in contrast to branchial and epidermal models of Na(+)-dependent ammonia transport in freshwater fish. Rather, we propose a model of parallel H(+)/NH3 transport as the primary mechanism of renal tubular ammonia secretion that is dependent on renal amino acid catabolism.

  5. [Analysis of possible causes activation a stomach and pancreas excretory and incretory function after completion of space flight on the international space station].

    PubMed

    Afonin, B V

    2013-01-01

    The research excretory and incretory of activity of a stomach and pancreas is carried out at astronauts in the early period after completion of space flights of various duration. It is shown, that the increase of the contents of gastric and pancreatic enzymes and hormones (insulin and C-peptide) in blood reflects increased excretory and incretory activity of organs of gastroduodenal area which arises in weightlessness. The complex of countermeasures, which prevent ingress of subjects, infected by Helicobacter pylori in space flight crew, excluded participation of this microorganism in the mechanism of increase of secretory activity of a stomach. The absence of interrelation between increase of secretory activity of gastroduodenal area organs and space flights' duration has allowed to exclude the hypokinetic mechanism which determined by duration of stay in weightlessness. It was shown that after the end of space flights the increase ofbasal excretory activity of organs of gastroduodenal area occurs simultaneously with increase of a fasting insulin secretion. The changes in gastroduodenal area organs revealed after space flights were are compared to similar changes received in ground-based experiments, simulating hemodynamic reorganization in venous system of abdominal cavity, arising in weightlessness. The conclusion is made, that the basic mechanism of changes of a functional condition of digestive system in space flights, is determined by reorganization venous hemodynamic in abdominal cavity organs reproduced in ground experiments. Increase insulin and C-peptide after space flights are considered as hormonal component of this hemodynamic mechanism.

  6. Renal afferents responsive to chemical and mechanical pelvic stimuli in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Genovesi, S; Pieruzzi, F; Camisasca, P; Golin, R; Zanchetti, A; Stella, A

    1997-05-01

    1. Afferent nerve fibres sensitive to changes in the renal chemical environment have been found in the rat. To verify the existence of these fibres in the rabbit and their response pattern, afferent renal nerve activity was recorded during pelvic perfusions with NaCl solutions at different concentrations. 2. The experiments were carried out in 13 anaesthetized rabbits. Arterial pressure from a femoral catheter and afferent renal nerve activity from the distal stump of a cut renal nerve bundle were recorded. Three catheters were inserted into the renal pelvis to measure pelvic pressure, to allow pelvic perfusions at constant rates and to drain pelvic fluids. 3. After a control period, the pelvis was perfused with physiological saline (0.14 mol/l for 2 min), followed by one of a series of solutions containing increasing concentrations of NaCl (0.5, 0.75, 1.0 and 1.5 mol/l for 2 min). Pelvic perfusion was performed both at a low (0.2 ml/min) and a high (0.8 ml/min) flow rate for each solution tested. 4. In all animals arterial pressure was not modified during pelvic perfusions. Physiological saline did not change afferent renal nerve activity at the low perfusion rate, but it significantly increased afferent renal nerve activity and pelvic pressure at the high rate. Hypertonic NaCl solutions caused progressive increases in afferent renal nerve activity at both perfusion rates, and these effects were larger at the high perfusion rate. 5. These data demonstrate, in the rabbit, the existence of renal afferent nerves sensitive to discrete changes in pelvic ionic or osmotic concentration. The neural response is enhanced when renal mechano- and chemo-receptors are simultaneously activated.

  7. The role of computed tomography in renal trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Federie, M.P.; Kaiser, J.A.; McAninch, J.W.; Jeffery, B.; Mall, J.C.

    1981-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and excretory urography were performed in 15 patients thought to have major renal trauma. In 4 cases, CT demonstrated extravasation of urine not detected by urography, and in all cases parenchymal injuries and extrarenal hematomas were depicted more accurately by CT. CT also proved to be superior to excretory urography in distinguishing relatively minor renal injuries (confusion, incomplete laceration, intrarenal hematoma, small extrarenal hematoma) from major or catastrophic injuries (complete laceration, fracture, shattered kidney), which significantly influenced the choice of surgical or medical therapy. CT also detected concurrent injuries of the spleen, liver, and/or pancrease in 4 cases. The authors feel that CT is valuable in the assessment of major renal trauma.

  8. Nephrolithiasis: Molecular Mechanism of Renal Stone Formation and the Critical Role Played by Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Kanu Priya; Narula, Shifa; Kakkar, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Urinary stone disease is an ailment that has afflicted human kind for many centuries. Nephrolithiasis is a significant clinical problem in everyday practice with a subsequent burden for the health system. Nephrolithiasis remains a chronic disease and our fundamental understanding of the pathogenesis of stones as well as their prevention and cure still remains rudimentary. Regardless of the fact that supersaturation of stone-forming salts in urine is essential, abundance of these salts by itself will not always result in stone formation. The pathogenesis of calcium oxalate stone formation is a multistep process and essentially includes nucleation, crystal growth, crystal aggregation, and crystal retention. Various substances in the body have an effect on one or more of the above stone-forming processes, thereby influencing a person's ability to promote or prevent stone formation. Promoters facilitate the stone formation while inhibitors prevent it. Besides low urine volume and low urine pH, high calcium, sodium, oxalate and urate are also known to promote calcium oxalate stone formation. Many inorganic (citrate, magnesium) and organic substances (nephrocalcin, urinary prothrombin fragment-1, osteopontin) are known to inhibit stone formation. This review presents a comprehensive account of the mechanism of renal stone formation and the role of inhibitors/promoters in calcium oxalate crystallisation. PMID:24151593

  9. Renal arteriography

    MedlinePlus

    Renal angiogram; Angiography - kidney; Renal angiography; Renal artery stenosis - arteriography ... Renal arteriography is often needed to help decide on the best treatment after other tests are done ...

  10. Biological mechanism analysis of acute renal allograft rejection: integrated of mRNA and microRNA expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shi-Ming; Zhao, Xia; Zhao, Xue-Mei; Wang, Xiao-Ying; Li, Shan-Shan; Zhu, Yu-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Renal transplantation is the preferred method for most patients with end-stage renal disease, however, acute renal allograft rejection is still a major risk factor for recipients leading to renal injury. To improve the early diagnosis and treatment of acute rejection, study on the molecular mechanism of it is urgent. Methods: MicroRNA (miRNA) expression profile and mRNA expression profile of acute renal allograft rejection and well-functioning allograft downloaded from ArrayExpress database were applied to identify differentially expressed (DE) miRNAs and DE mRNAs. DE miRNAs targets were predicted by combining five algorithm. By overlapping the DE mRNAs and DE miRNAs targets, common genes were obtained. Differentially co-expressed genes (DCGs) were identified by differential co-expression profile (DCp) and differential co-expression enrichment (DCe) methods in Differentially Co-expressed Genes and Links (DCGL) package. Then, co-expression network of DCGs and the cluster analysis were performed. Functional enrichment analysis for DCGs was undergone. Results: A total of 1270 miRNA targets were predicted and 698 DE mRNAs were obtained. While overlapping miRNA targets and DE mRNAs, 59 common genes were gained. We obtained 103 DCGs and 5 transcription factors (TFs) based on regulatory impact factors (RIF), then built the regulation network of miRNA targets and DE mRNAs. By clustering the co-expression network, 5 modules were obtained. Thereinto, module 1 had the highest degree and module 2 showed the most number of DCGs and common genes. TF CEBPB and several common genes, such as RXRA, BASP1 and AKAP10, were mapped on the co-expression network. C1R showed the highest degree in the network. These genes might be associated with human acute renal allograft rejection. Conclusions: We conducted biological analysis on integration of DE mRNA and DE miRNA in acute renal allograft rejection, displayed gene expression patterns and screened out genes and TFs that may

  11. Molecular Physiology of an Extra-renal Cl- Uptake Mechanism for Body Fluid Cl- Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Fang; Yan, Jia-Jiun; Tseng, Yung-Che; Chen, Ruo-Dong; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2015-01-01

    The development of an ion regulatory mechanism for body fluid homeostasis was an important trait for vertebrates during the evolution from aquatic to terrestrial life. The homeostatic mechanism of Cl- in aquatic fish appears to be similar to that of terrestrial vertebrates; however, the mechanism in non-mammalian vertebrates is poorly understood. Unlike in mammals, in which the kidney plays a central role, in most fish species, the gill is responsible for the maintenance of Cl- homeostasis via Cl- transport uptake mechanisms. Previous studies in zebrafish identified Na+-Cl- cotransporter (NCC) 2b-expressing cells in the gills and skin as the major ionocytes responsible for Cl- uptake, similar to distal convoluted tubular cells in mammalian kidney. However, the mechanism by which basolateral ions exit from NCC cells is still unclear. Of the in situ hybridization signals of twelve members of the clc Cl- channel family, only that of clc-2c exhibited an ionocyte pattern in the gill and embryonic skin. Double in situ hybridization/immunocytochemistry confirmed colocalization of apical NCC2b with basolateral CLC-2c. Acclimation to a low Cl- environment increased mRNA expression of both clc-2c and ncc2b, and also the protein expression of CLC-2c in embryos and adult gills. Loss-of-function of clc-2c resulted in a significant decrease in whole body Cl- content in zebrafish embryos, a phenotype similar to that of ncc2b mutants; this finding suggests a role for CLC-2c in Cl- uptake. Translational knockdown of clc-2c stimulated ncc2b mRNA expression and vice versa, revealing cooperation between these two transporters in the context of zebrafish Cl- homeostasis. Further comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses revealed that zebrafish CLC-2c is a fish-specific isoform that diverged from a kidney-predominant homologue, in the same manner as NCC2b and its counterparts (NCCs). Several lines of molecular and cellular physiological evidences demonstrated the cofunctional role

  12. Mechanisms of Endothelial Dysfunction in Resistance Arteries from Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Luksha, Leanid; Stenvinkel, Peter; Hammarqvist, Folke; Carrero, Juan Jesús; Davidge, Sandra T.; Kublickiene, Karolina

    2012-01-01

    The study focuses on the mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in the uremic milieu. Subcutaneous resistance arteries from 35 end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients and 28 matched controls were studied ex-vivo. Basal and receptor-dependent effects of endothelium-derived factors, expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), prerequisites for myoendothelial gap junctions (MEGJ), and associations between endothelium-dependent responses and plasma levels of endothelial dysfunction markers were assessed. The contribution of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) to endothelium-dependent relaxation was impaired in uremic arteries after stimulation with bradykinin, but not acetylcholine, reflecting the agonist-specific differences. Diminished vasodilator influences of the endothelium on basal tone and enhanced plasma levels of asymmetrical dimethyl L-arginine (ADMA) suggest impairment in NO-mediated regulation of uremic arteries. eNOS expression and contribution of MEGJs to EDHF type responses were unaltered. Plasma levels of ADMA were negatively associated with endothelium-dependent responses in uremic arteries. Preserved responses of smooth muscle to pinacidil and NO-donor indicate alterations within the endothelium and tolerance of vasodilator mechanisms to the uremic retention products at the level of smooth muscle. We conclude that both EDHF and NO pathways that control resistance artery tone are impaired in the uremic milieu. For the first time, we validate the alterations in EDHF type responses linked to kinin receptors in ESRD patients. The association between plasma ADMA concentrations and endothelial function in uremic resistance vasculature may have diagnostic and future therapeutic implications. PMID:22563439

  13. Radionuclide determination of individual kidney function in the treatment of chronic renal obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Belis, J.A.; Belis, T.E.; Lai, J.C.; Goodwin, C.A.; Gabriele, O.F.

    1982-04-01

    Differential radionuclide renal scans can be useful in the management of patients with chronic partial obstruction of 1 kidney. The /sup 99m/Tc diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid perfusion scan can be used to assess glomerular blood flow. The /sup 131/I orthoiodohippurate renal scan provides qualitative functional information from scintigrams and quantitative evaluation of effective renal plasma flow to each kidney, as well as a total excretory index. Sequential /sup 99m/Tc diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and /sup 131/I orthoiodohippurate renal scans were used to assess individual renal function before and after surgical correction of unilateral chronic renal obstruction in 31 patients. The preservation of cortical perfusion on /supb 99m/Tc diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid scans indicated that potential existed for partial recovery of renal function. Effective renal plasma flow and excretory index determined in conjunction with the /sup 131/I orthoiodohippurate scans provided a quantitative assessment of preoperative renal function, an evaluation of the effect of surgery and a sensitive method for long-term evaluation of differential renal function. Correction of ureteropelvic junction obstruction usually resulted in improvement in unilateral renal function. Neither nephrolithotomy nor extended pyelolithotomy diminished renal function in the kidney subjected to an operation and often improved it. Patients with long-standing distal ureteral obstruction had the least improvement in renal function postoperatively.

  14. Molecular mechanisms of renal and extrarenal manifestations caused by inactivation of the electrogenic Na(+)-HCO3 (-) cotransporter NBCe1.

    PubMed

    Seki, George; Horita, Shoko; Suzuki, Masashi; Yamazaki, Osamu; Usui, Tomohiko; Nakamura, Motonobu; Yamada, Hideomi

    2013-10-01

    The electrogenic Na(+)-HCO3 (-) cotransporter NBCe1 plays an essential role in bicarbonate absorption from renal proximal tubules, but also mediates the other biological processes in extrarenal tissues such as bicarbonate secretion from pancreatic ducts, maintenance of tissue homeostasis in eye, enamel maturation in teeth, or local pH regulation in synapses. Homozygous mutation in NBCe1 cause proximal renal tubular acidosis (pRTA) associated with extrarenal manifestations such as short stature, ocular abnormalities, enamel abnormalities, and migraine. Functional analyses of NBCe1 mutants using different expression systems suggest that at least a 50% reduction of the transport activity may be required to induce severe pRTA. In addition to functional impairments, some NBCe1 mutants show trafficking defects. Some of the pRTA-related NBCe1 mutants showing the cytoplasmic retention have been shown to exert a dominant negative effect through hetero-oligomer complexes with wild-type NBCe1 that may explain the occurrence of extrarenal manifestations in the heterozygous carries of NBCe1 mutations. Both NBCe1 knockout (KO) and W516X knockin (KI) mice showed very severe pRTA and reproduced most of the clinical manifestations observed in human pRTA patients. Functional analysis on isolated renal proximal tubules from W516X KI mice directly confirmed the indispensable role of NBCe1 in bicarbonate absorption from this nephron segment. In this review, we will focus on the molecular mechanisms underling the renal and extrarenal manifestations caused by NBCe1 inactivation.

  15. Microscopic anatomy of pycnogonida: II. Digestive system. III. Excretory system.

    PubMed

    Fahrenbach, W H; Arango, Claudia P

    2007-11-01

    The digestive system of several species of sea spiders (Pycnogonida, Arthropoda) was studied by electron microscopy. It is composed of the foregut inside a long proboscis, a midgut and a hindgut. Lips near the three jaws at the tip of the proboscis receive several hundred ductules originating from salivary glands. These previously undetected glands open on the lips, a fluted, projecting ridge at the external hinge line of the jaws, i.e., to the outside of the mouth. This disposition suggests affinities to the chelicerate line. The trigonal esophagus within the proboscis contains a complex, setose filter device, operated by dedicated muscles, that serves to reduce ingested food to subcellular dimensions. The midgut has diverticula into the bases of all legs. Its cells differentiate from the basal layer and contain a bewildering array of secretion droplets, lysosomes and phagosomes. In the absence of a hepatopancreas, the midgut serves both digestive and absorptive functions. The cuticle-lined hindgut lies in the highly reduced, peg-like abdomen. Traditionally, pycnogonids have been claimed to have no excretory organ at all. Such a structure, however, has been located in at least one ammotheid, Nymphopsis spinosissima, in which a simple, but standard, excretory gland has been found in the scape of the chelifore. It consists of an end sac, a straight proximal tubule, a short distal tubule, and a raised nephropore. The end sac is a thin-walled and polygonal chamber, about 150 microm in cross section, suspended in the hemocoel of the appendage, its edges radially tethered to the cuticle at more than half a dozen locations. This wall consists of a filtration basement membrane, 1-4 microm thick, facing the hemocoel, and internally of a continuous carpet of podocytes and their pedicels. The podocytes, measuring maximally 10 by 15 microm, have complex contents, of which a labyrinthine system of connected intracellular channels stands out. These coated cisternae open into a

  16. Distinct regulatory elements mediate similar expression patterns in the excretory cell of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhongying; Fang, Li; Chen, Nansheng; Johnsen, Robert C; Stein, Lincoln; Baillie, David L

    2005-11-18

    Identification of cis-regulatory elements and their binding proteins constitutes an important part of understanding gene function and regulation. It is well accepted that co-expressed genes tend to share transcriptional elements. However, recent findings indicate that co-expression data show poor correlation with co-regulation data even in unicellular yeast. This motivates us to experimentally explore whether it is possible that co-expressed genes are subject to differential regulatory control using the excretory cell of Caenorhabditis elegans as an example. Excretory cell is a functional equivalent of human kidney. Transcriptional regulation of gene expression in the cell is largely unknown. We isolated a 10-bp excretory cell-specific cis-element, Ex-1, from a pgp-12 promoter. The significance of the element has been demonstrated by its capacity of converting an intestine-specific promoter into an excretory cell-specific one. We also isolated a cDNA encoding an Ex-1 binding transcription factor, DCP-66, using a yeast one-hybrid screen. Role of the factor in regulation of pgp-12 expression has been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. Search for occurrence of Ex-1 reveals that only a small portion of excretory cell-specific promoters contain Ex-1. Two other distinct cis-elements isolated from two different promoters can also dictate the excretory cell-specific expression but are independent of regulation by DCP-66. The results indicate that distinct regulatory elements are able to mediate the similar expression patterns.

  17. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Stimulates Dopamine Tubular Transport by Organic Cation Transporters: A Novel Mechanism to Enhance Renal Sodium Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Kouyoumdzian, Nicolás M.; Rukavina Mikusic, Natalia L.; Kravetz, María C.; Lee, Brenda M.; Carranza, Andrea; Del Mauro, Julieta S.; Pandolfo, Marcela; Gironacci, Mariela M.; Gorzalczany, Susana; Toblli, Jorge E.; Fernández, Belisario E.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on organic cation transporters (OCTs) expression and activity, and its consequences on dopamine urinary levels, Na+, K+-ATPase activity and renal function. Male Sprague Dawley rats were infused with isotonic saline solution during 120 minutes and randomized in nine different groups: control, pargyline plus tolcapone (P+T), ANP, dopamine (DA), D-22, DA+D-22, ANP+D-22, ANP+DA and ANP+DA+D-22. Renal functional parameters were determined and urinary dopamine concentration was quantified by HPLC. Expression of OCTs and D1-receptor in membrane preparations from renal cortex tissues were determined by western blot and Na+, K+-ATPase activity was determined using in vitro enzyme assay. 3H-DA renal uptake was determined in vitro. Compared to P+T group, ANP and dopamine infusion increased diuresis, urinary sodium and dopamine excretion significantly. These effects were more pronounced in ANP+DA group and reversed by OCTs blockade by D-22, demonstrating that OCTs are implied in ANP stimulated-DA uptake and transport in renal tissues. The activity of Na+, K+-ATPase exhibited a similar fashion when it was measured in the same experimental groups. Although OCTs and D1-receptor protein expression were not modified by ANP, OCTs-dependent-dopamine tubular uptake was increased by ANP through activation of NPR-A receptor and protein kinase G as signaling pathway. This effect was reflected by an increase in urinary dopamine excretion, natriuresis, diuresis and decreased Na+, K+-ATPase activity. OCTs represent a novel target that links the activity of ANP and dopamine together in a common mechanism to enhance their natriuretic and diuretic effects. PMID:27392042

  18. Trichinella spiralis Excretory-Secretory Products Protect against Polymicrobial Sepsis by Suppressing MyD88 via Mannose Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Du, Linlin; Liu, Lihua; Yu, Yang; Shan, Hui; Li, Leiqing

    2014-01-01

    Trichinella spiralis (T. spiralis) or its excretory-secretory products (TsES) protect hosts from autoimmune diseases, which depend on inducing host T helper (Th) 2 immune response and inhibiting inflammatory factors. Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) evoked by infection. Little is known about the effects of helminths or their excretory-secretory products on sepsis. Here, we investigated the effects of TsES in a mice model of polymicrobial sepsis. TsES improved survival, reduced organ injury, and enhanced bacterial clearance in septic mice. To investigate the molecular mechanism, macrophages from septic patients or the control group were incubated with TsES. TsES reduced sepsis-inducing inflammatory cytokines mediated by Toll-like receptors (TLR) in vitro by suppressing TLR adaptor-transducer myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and nuclear factor- (NF-)-κB. Furthermore, TsES upregulated mannose receptor (MR) expression during sepsis. MR blocking attenuated the effects of TsES on MyD88 and NF-κB expression. In vivo, MR RNAi reduced the survival rate of septic mice treated with TsES, suggesting that TsES-mediated protection against polymicrobial sepsis is dependent on MR. Thus, TsES administration might be a potential therapeutic strategy for treating sepsis. PMID:25054155

  19. Adaptation of the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, to different salinities through an excretory function of the antennal gland.

    PubMed

    Buranajitpirom, Decha; Asuvapongpatana, Somluk; Weerachatyanukul, Wattana; Wongprasert, Kanokpan; Namwong, Wisa; Poltana, Pisit; Withyachumnarnkul, Boonsirm

    2010-06-01

    Black tiger shrimps (Penaeus monodon) are able to survive and can be reared under various salinities, possibly by the cellular adaptation of their excretory system, particularly the antennal gland, which is known to regulate body fluid in crustaceans. We have investigated the morphological and biochemical alterations of the antennal glands in shrimp reared in 7, 15, or 30 ppt seawater. Drastic changes occur in animals reared under 7 ppt conditions. Ultrastructural studies of the antennal gland in shrimps reared in 7 ppt seawater have revealed that podocytic cells in the coelomosacs ramify with more cytoplasmic processes forming the filtration slits, and that the tubular labyrinth cells possess more mitochondria in their basal striation and a wider tubular lumen than those found in the other groups. Many apical cytoplasmic blebs from labyrinth cells have also been seen in the lumen of the labyrinths under 7 ppt conditions, a feature that is not as prominent under the other conditions. The expression and activity of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in the antennal gland are also correlated with the surrounding environment: the lower the salinity, the higher the expression and activity of the enzyme. Immunohistochemistry results have demonstrated the highest staining intensity in the labyrinth cells of shrimps reared under 7 ppt conditions. Our findings thus suggest that one of the adaptation mechanisms of this shrimp to the surrounding salinity is the regulation of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase expression in the antennal gland, in conjunction with subcellular changes in its excretory cells.

  20. On the mechanism of impaired insulin secretion in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Fadda, G Z; Hajjar, S M; Perna, A F; Zhou, X J; Lipson, L G; Massry, S G

    1991-01-01

    It has been suggested that a sustained rise in resting levels of cytosolic calcium [Ca2+]i of pancreatic islets is responsible for impaired insulin secretion in chronic renal failure (CRF). Evidence for such an event is lacking and the mechanisms through which it may affect insulin secretion are not known. Studies were conducted in normal, CRF, and normocalcemic, parathyroidectomized (PTX) CRF rats to answer these questions. Resting levels of [Ca2+]i of islets from CRF rats were higher (P less than 0.01) than in control of CRF-PTX rats. [3H]2-deoxyglucose uptake and cAMP production by islets were not different in the three groups. Insulin content of, and glucose-induced insulin secretion by islets from CRF rats was lower (P less than 0.01) than in control and CRF-PTX rats. In contrast, glyceraldehyde-induced insulin release by CRF islets was normal. Basal ATP content, both glucose-stimulated ATP content and ATP/ADP ratio, net lactic acid output, Vmax of phosphofructokinase-1, and Ca2+ ATPase of islets from CRF rats were lower (P less than 0.02-less than 0.01) than in normal or CRF-PTX animals. Data show that: (a) Glucose but not glyceraldehyde-induced insulin secretion is impaired in CRF; (b) the impairment in glucose-induced insulin release in CRF is due to a defect in the metabolism of glucose; (c) this latter defect is due to reduced ATP content induced partly by high [Ca2+]i of islets; and (d) the high [Ca2+]i in islets of CRF rats is due to augmented PTH-induced calcium entry into cells and decreased calcium extrusion from the islets secondary to reduced activity of the Ca2+ ATPase. Images PMID:1985099

  1. Characterization of excretory/secretory antigen from Toxocara vitulorum larvae.

    PubMed

    Starke-Buzetti, Wilma A; Ferreira, Fabiano P

    2004-10-01

    Toxocara vitulorum is a nematode parasite of the small intestine of cattle and water buffalo, particularly buffalo calves between one and three months of age, causing high morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this research was to characterize the excretory/secretory (ES) antigens of T. vitulorum larvae by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and Western blot (WB), using immune sera and colostrum of buffalo naturally infected by T. vitulorum. The parasitological status of the buffalo calves was also evaluated using sequential fecal examinations. The results showed that the ES antigen revealed eight (190, 150, 110, 90, 64, 56, 48, and 19 kDa) protein bands by SDS-PAGE. The majority of these bands were recognized in the sera and colostrum of infected buffalo with T. vitulorum when analyzed by WB. However, particularly fractions of high molecular weight (190, 150, 110, and 90 kDa) were represented in more prominent bands and persisted in the groups of buffalo calves at the peak of egg output, as well as during the period of rejection of T. vitulorum by the feces of the calves. During the period of post-rejection of the worms (between the day 118 and 210 of age) the serum antibodies did not react with any protein bands. On the other hand, sera from buffalo calves at one day of age (after suckling the colostrum and at the beginning of infection) reacted with the same bands detected in the serum and colostrum of the buffalo cows.

  2. Mechanism of increased renal clearnace of amylase/creatinine in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S G; Ellis, C J; Levitt, M D

    1976-11-25

    We investigated three possible causes of the increased ratio of amylase/creatinine clearance observed in acute pancreatitis. The presence of rapidly cleared isoamylase was excluded by studies of serum and urine, which demonstrated no anomalous isoamylases. In pancreatitis, the ratios (+/-1 S.E.M.) of both pancreatic isoamylase (9.2+/-0.6 per cent) and salivary isoamylase (8.6+/-1.6 per cent) were significantly (P less than 0.01) elevated over respective control values (2.4+/-0.2 and 1.8+/-0.2 per cent). Increased glomerular permeability to amylase was excluded by the demonstration of normal renal clearance of dextrans. We tested tubular reabsorption of protein by measuring the renal clearance of beta2-microglobulin, which is relatively freely filtered at the glomerulus and then avidly reabsorbed by the normal tubule. During acute pancreatitis the ratio of the renal clearance of beta2-microglobulin to that of creatinine was 1.22+/-0.52 per cent, an 80-fold increase over normal (0.015+/-0.002 per cent), with a rapid return toward normal during convalescence. Presumably, this reversible renal tubular defect also reduces amylase reabsorption and accounts for the elevated renal clearance of amylase/creatinine observed in acute pancreatitis.

  3. Renal Response to Volume Expansion: Learning the Experimental Approach in the Context of Integrative Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Robert L.; Dukacz, Stephen A. W.; Stavraky, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experience for upper-level science students that provides a hands-on approach to understanding the basics of experimental physiology. Students design an experiment to determine the relative importance of dilution of plasma proteins in the overall renal excretory response following volume expansion with intravenous saline.…

  4. The diagnostic approach to ectopic ureterocele and the renal duplication complex

    SciTech Connect

    Geringer, A.M.; Berdon, W.E.; Seldin, D.W.; Hensle, T.W.

    1983-03-01

    The child with ectopic ureterocele frequently presents a diagnostic challenge. The use of standard excretory urography combined with newer modalities, such as ultrasonography and radionuclide renal scanning, provides an orderly diagnostic approach to ectopic ureterocele. This integrated approach should ensure the highest yield in a diagnostic sense and aid in assessing upper tract function, thus, helping with the selection of the proper surgical management.

  5. The renal sinus: pathologic spectrum and multimodality imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Rha, Sung Eun; Byun, Jae Young; Jung, Seung Eun; Oh, Soon Nam; Choi, Yeong-Jin; Lee, Ahwon; Lee, Jae Mun

    2004-10-01

    Various pathologic conditions can occur in the renal sinus, primarily originating in the constituents of the renal sinus, and the renal sinus can be secondarily involved by surrounding renal parenchymal and adjacent retroperitoneal lesions. Lipomatosis and cysts are common renal sinus lesions with little clinical significance, but differentiation from other pathologic conditions is important. Renal vascular lesions such as renal artery aneurysm or arteriovenous fistula can mimic other parapelvic or peripelvic lesions at excretory urography, but their vascular nature is evident at color Doppler ultrasonography, contrast material-enhanced computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Although most tumors originating in the renal pelvis are transitional cell carcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma, renal parenchymal tumors such as renal cell carcinoma or benign multilocular cystic nephroma have a tendency to grow into the renal sinus. Rare tumors of mesenchymal origin can develop in the renal sinus, but their imaging findings are nonspecific. The observation of renal sinus fat is important for detecting a small tumor located in that area and determining the exact tumor stage. Multiplanar CT or MR images can allow exact evaluation of the extent of complex renal sinus disease.

  6. Perinatal taurine exposure alters renal potassium excretion mechanisms in adult conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Roysommuti, Sanya; Malila, Pisamai; Lerdweeraphon, Wichaporn; Jirakulsomchok, Dusit; Wyss, J Michael

    2010-08-24

    Perinatal taurine exposure has long-term effects on the arterial pressure and renal function. This study tests its influence on renal potassium excretion in young adult, conscious rats. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed normal rat chow and given water alone (C), 3% beta-alanine in water (taurine depletion, TD) or 3% taurine in water (taurine supplementation, TS), either from conception until delivery (fetal period; TDF or TSF) or from delivery until weaning (lactation period; TDL or TSL). In Experiment 1, male offspring were fed normal rat chow and tap water, while in Experiment 2, beta-alanine and taurine were treated from conception until weaning and then female pups were fed normal rat chow and 5% glucose in drinking water (CG, TDG or TSG) or water alone (CW, TDW or TSW). At 7-8 weeks of age, renal potassium excretion was measured at rest and after an acute saline load (5% of body weight) in conscious, restrained rats. Although all male groups displayed similar renal potassium excretion, TSF rats slightly increased fractional potassium excretion at rest but not in response to saline load, whereas TDF did the opposite. Plasma potassium concentration was only slightly altered by the diet manipulations. In female offspring, none of the perinatal treatments significantly altered renal potassium excretion at rest or after saline load. High sugar intake slightly decreased potassium excretion at rest in TDG and TSG, but only the TDG group displayed a decreased response to saline load. The present data indicates that perinatal taurine exposure only mildly influences renal potassium excretion in adult male and female rats.

  7. Mechanism of vasodilation induced by alpha-human atrial natriuretic polypeptide in rabbit and guinea-pig renal arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, K; Ishimatsu, T; Kuriyama, H

    1986-01-01

    Effects of alpha-human atrial natriuretic polypeptide (alpha-HANP) on electrical and mechanical properties of smooth muscle cells of the guinea-pig and rabbit renal arteries and of the guinea-pig mesenteric artery were investigated. alpha-HANP (up to 10 nM) modified neither the membrane potential nor resistance of smooth muscle cells of the guinea-pig and rabbit renal arteries. In the guinea-pig mesenteric and renal arteries, alpha-HANP (up to 10 nM) had no effect on the amplitude and facilitation (mesenteric artery) or depression (renal artery) of excitatory junction potentials nor on action potentials. In the guinea-pig renal artery, alpha-HANP (up to 10 nM) had no effect on the depolarization induced by noradrenaline (NA) (up to 10 microM) but markedly inhibited NA-induced contraction. alpha-HANP (10 nM) slightly inhibited the K-induced contraction. In the rabbit renal artery, alpha-HANP (10 nM) inhibited the NA-induced contraction and to a lesser extent the K-induced contraction. In the rabbit renal artery, the effects of alpha-HANP on the release of Ca from the cellular storage by two applications of NA, and its re-storage, were investigated in Ca-free solution containing 2 mM-EGTA. When 5 nM-alpha-HANP was applied before and during the first application of 0.5 microM-NA, the contraction was markedly inhibited but the contraction to a second application of 10 microM-NA was potentiated. If the first dose of NA was 10 microM the effect was very small. Under the same experimental procedures, nitroglycerine (10 microM) showed almost the same effects as alpha-HANP on the NA-induced contractions. When both the first (3 mM) and second (10 mM) contractions were evoked by caffeine in Ca-free solution, alpha-HANP (5 nM) and nitroglycerine (10 microM) inhibited both contractions to the same extent. In the rabbit renal artery, applications of alpha-HANP or nitroglycerine increased the amount of guanosine 3',5'-phosphate (cyclic GMP) in a dose-dependent manner. However, a

  8. Metformin Prevents Renal Stone Formation through an Antioxidant Mechanism In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hao; Qin, Zhenbang; Zhang, Changwen; Qi, Shiyong; Yang, Tong; He, Zhen; Yang, Kuo; Liu, Chunyu

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a causal factor and key promoter of urolithiasis associated with renal tubular epithelium cell injury. The present study was designed to investigate the preventive effects of metformin on renal tubular cell injury induced by oxalate and stone formation in a hyperoxaluric rat model. MTT assays were carried out to determine the protection of metformin from oxalate-induced cytotoxicity. The intracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured in vitro. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control group, ethylene glycol (EG) treated group, and EG + metformin treated group. Oxidative stress and crystal formations were evaluated in renal tissues after 8-week treatment. Metformin significantly inhibited the decrease of the viability in MDCK cells and HK-2 cells induced by oxalate. Besides, metformin markedly prevented the increased concentration of MDA and the decreased tendency of SOD in oxalate-induced MDCK cells and HK-2 cells. In vivo, the increased MDA levels and the reduction of SOD activity were detected in the EG treated group compared with controls, while these parameters reversed in the EG + metformin treated group. Kidney crystal formation in the EG + metformin treated group was decreased significantly compared with the EG treated group. Metformin suppressed urinary crystal deposit formation through renal tubular cell protection and antioxidative effects. PMID:27781075

  9. Excretory-secretory products (ESP) from Fasciola hepatica induce tolerogenic properties in myeloid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Falcón, Cristian; Carranza, Franco; Martínez, Fernando F; Knubel, Carolina P; Masih, Diana T; Motrán, Claudia C; Cervi, Laura

    2010-09-15

    Fasciola hepatica is a helminth trematode that migrates through the host tissues until reaching bile ducts where it becomes an adult. During its migration the parasite releases different excretory-secretory products (ESP), which are in contact with the immune system. In this study, we focused on the effect of ESP on the maturation and function of murine bone marrow derived-dendritic cells (DC). We found that the treatment of DC with ESP failed to induce a classical maturation of these cells, since ESP alone did not activate DC to produce any cytokines, although they impaired the ability of DC to be activated by TLR ligands and also their capacity to stimulate an allospecific response. In addition, using an in vitro ovalbumin peptide-restricted priming assay, ESP-treated DC exhibited a capacity to drive Th2 and regulatory T cell (Treg) polarization of CD4(+) cells from DO11.10 transgenic mice. This was characterized by increased IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and TGF-beta production and the expansion of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) cells. Our results support the hypothesis that ESP from F. hepatica modulate the maturation and function of DC as part of a generalized immunosuppressive mechanism that involves a bias towards a Th2 response and Treg development.

  10. Renal Function and Hematology in Rats with Congenital Renal Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Hidenori; Amakasu, Kohei; Tochigi, Yuki; Katayama, Kentaro; Suzuki, Hiroetsu

    2016-01-01

    Renal hypoplasia due to a congenitally reduced number of nephrons progresses to chronic kidney disease and may cause renal anemia, given that the kidneys are a major source of erythropoietin in adults. Hypoplastic kidney (HPK) rats have only about 20% of the normal number of nephrons and develop CKD. This study assessed the renal function and hematologic changes in HPK rats from 70 to 210 d of age. HPK rats demonstrated deterioration of renal excretory function, slightly macrocytic erythropenia at all days examined, age-related increases in splenic hemosiderosis accompanied by a tendency toward increased hemolysis, normal plasma erythropoietin levels associated with increased hepatic and decreased renal erythropoietin production, and maintenance of the response for erythropoietin production to hypoxic conditions, with increased interstitial fibrosis at 140 d of age. These results indicate that increases in splenic hemosiderosis and the membrane fragility of RBC might be associated with erythropenia and that hepatic production of erythropoietin might contribute to maintaining the blood Hgb concentration in HPK rats. PMID:26884405

  11. Indium-111 leukocyte scanning. False-negative study in a renal abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Bedi, D.G.; Fawcett, H.D.; Winsett, M.Z.; Fagan, C.J.

    1986-04-01

    A 33-year-old man had clinical features of a right renal abscess. Results of excretory urography and ultrasonography showed a focal complex mass lesion in the right kidney. An In-111 leukocyte scan failed to detect the right renal abscess, which later was aspirated under CT guidance and explored surgically. The role of In-111 leukocyte imaging in the detection of intra-abdominal abscesses, with limitations of the procedure, is discussed.

  12. Renal denervation in human hypertension: mechanisms, current findings, and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Schlaich, Markus P; Hering, Dagmara; Sobotka, Paul A; Krum, Henry; Esler, Murray D

    2012-06-01

    Denervating the human kidney to improve blood pressure control is an old therapeutic concept first applied on a larger scale by surgeons in the 1920s. With the advent of modern pharmacology and the development of powerful drugs to lower blood pressure, approaches to directly target the sympathetic nerves were more or less abandoned. Over the past 2-3 years, however, we have witnessed enormous renewed interest in novel and minimally invasive device-based approaches to specifically target the renal nerves. The enthusiasm is fueled by promising results from proof-of-concept studies and clinical trials demonstrating convincing blood pressure-lowering effects in the majority of treated patients, and perhaps even more so by observations indicating potential additional benefits relating to common comorbidities of hypertension, such as impaired glucose metabolism, renal impairment, left ventricular hypertrophy, and others. Herein we review the current findings and assess whether these high hopes are justified.

  13. Efficacy of the excretory urogram in the staging of gynecologic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Hillman, B.J.; Clark, R.L.; Babbitt, G.

    1984-11-01

    It is common for patients suspected of having a gynecologic malignancy to be referred for excretory urography as part of their preoperative staging evaluation. This study investigated the efficacy of this practice using prospective and experimental retrospective interpretations of 88 urograms obtained for this clinical indication. The results indicate that excretory urography reliably depicts the ureters in most cases. However, the urogram is quite insensitive in demonstrating the extention of malignancy. The excretory urogram is useful for locating the position of the ureters and demonstrating the presence of obstruction or unsuspected urinary tract abnormalities. Nonetheless, this information also may be obtained by computed tomography, which can more accurately assess the primary mass and indicate the presence of malignant extension.

  14. Granuloma formation around filarial larvae triggered by host responses to an excretory/secretory antigen.

    PubMed

    Dash, Yashodhara; Ramesh, Manish; Kalyanasundaram, Ramaswamy; Munirathinam, Gnanasekar; Shultz, Leonard D; Rajan, T V

    2011-02-01

    In previous studies using a murine model of filarial infection, granuloma formation was found to be a most important host-protective mechanism. We have also shown that in vitro cytoadherence is a surrogate for the formation of antifilarial granulomas in vivo and that it requires "alternatively activated" host cells and a source of antifilarial antibody. We show here that antibodies against L3 excretory/secretory (E/S) products can facilitate in vitro cytoadherence. We generated a set of hybridomas reactive with filarial E/S products and screened them for their ability to mediate in vitro cytoadherence. One clone (no. 1E9) was positive in this assay. We then screened a novel expression library of filarial antigens displayed on the surface of T7 bacteriophage for reactivity with 1E9. Phage expressing two filarial antigens (TCTP and BmALT-2) reacted with 1E9. Immunization of mice showed that the cohort immunized with BmALT-2 cleared a challenge infection with infective Brugia pahangi L3 in an accelerated manner, whereas cohorts immunized with TCTP cleared larvae with the same kinetics as in unimmunized mice. These data confirm that BmALT-2 is the antigenic target of granuloma-mediated killing of B. pahangi L3. Our findings also confirm previous studies that BmALT-2 is a potential vaccine candidate for filarial infection. Our data reinforce the work of others and also provide a possible mechanism by which immune responses to BmALT-2 may provide host protection.

  15. Hyperpolarized 13C urea relaxation mechanism reveals renal changes in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Stokholm Nørlinger, Thomas; Christoffer Hansen, David; Qi, Haiyun; Mose Nielsen, Per; Bonde Bertelsen, Lotte; Henrik Ardenkjaer‐Larsen, Jan; Stødkilde Jørgensen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Our aim was to assess a novel 13C radial fast spin echo golden ratio single shot method for interrogating early renal changes in the diabetic kidney, using hyperpolarized (HP) [13C,15N2]urea as a T2 relaxation based contrast bio‐probe. Methods A novel HP 13C MR contrast experiment was conducted in a group of streptozotocin type‐1 diabetic rat model and age matched controls. Results A significantly different relaxation time (P = 0.004) was found in the diabetic kidney (0.49 ± 0.03 s) compared with the controls (0.64 ± 0.02 s) and secondly, a strong correlation between the blood oxygen saturation level and the relaxation times were observed in the healthy controls. Conclusion HP [13C,15N2]urea apparent T2 mapping may be a useful for interrogating local renal pO2 status and renal tissue alterations. Magn Reson Med, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. Magn Reson Med 75:515–518, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. PMID:26584247

  16. Cavitation microjets as a contributory mechanism for renal calculi disintegration in ESWL.

    PubMed

    Crum, L A

    1988-12-01

    The rarefaction shock wave produced by an extracorporeal shockwave lithotripter can result in liquid failure at numerous discrete sites near the second focus. When the liquid fails, vapor-filled cavities can grow to relatively large sizes and subsequently collapse with enormous violence. This phenomenon, called acoustic cavitation, has been shown to cause severe erosion in materials exposed to cavitation fields. It is proposed in this paper that ESWL devices generate acoustic cavitation in vivo and that the high speed liquid microjets produced during cavitation bubble collapse play an important role in renal calculi disintegration.

  17. Different Modulatory Mechanisms of Renal FXYD12 for Na+-K+-ATPase between Two Closely Related Medakas upon Salinity Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Kai; Kang, Chao-Kai; Hsu, An-Di; Lin, Chia-Hao; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2016-01-01

    Upon salinity challenge, the Na+-K+-ATPase (NKA) of fish kidney plays a crucial role in maintaining ion and water balance. Moreover, the FXYD protein family was found to be a regulator of NKA. Our preliminary results revealed that fxyd12 was highly expressed in the kidneys of the two closely related euryhaline medaka species (Oryzias dancena and O. latipes) from different natural habitats (brackish water and fresh water). In this study, we investigated the expression and association of renal FXYD12 and NKA α-subunit as well as potential functions of FXYD12 in the two medakas. These findings illustrated and compared the regulatory roles of FXYD12 for NKA in kidneys of the two medakas in response to salinity changes. In this study, at the mRNA and/or protein level, the expression patterns were similar for renal FXYD12 and NKA in the two medakas. However, different patterns of NKA activities and different interaction levels between FXYD12 and NKA were found in the kidneys of these two medakas. The results revealed that different strategies were used in the kidneys of the two medaka species upon salinity challenge. On the other hand, gene knockdown experiments demonstrated that the function of O. dancena FXYD12 allowed maintenance of a high level of NKA activity. The results of the present study indicated that the kidneys of the examined euryhaline medakas originating from brackish water and fresh water exhibited different modulatory mechanisms through which renal FXYD12 enhanced NKA activity to maintain internal homeostasis. Our findings broadened the knowledge of expression and functions of FXYD proteins, the modulators of NKA, in vertebrates. PMID:27194950

  18. Renal molecular mechanisms underlying altered Na+ handling and genesis of hypertension during adulthood in prenatally undernourished rats.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Filho, Leucio D; Cabral, Edjair V; Farias, Juliane S; Silva, Paulo A; Muzi-Filho, Humberto; Vieyra, Adalberto; Paixão, Ana D O

    2014-06-14

    In the present study, we investigated the development of hypertension in prenatally undernourished adult rats, including the mechanisms that culminate in dysfunctions of molecular signalling in the kidney. Dams were fed a low-protein multideficient diet throughout gestation with or without α-tocopherol during lactation. The time course of hypertension development followed in male offspring was correlated with alterations in proximal tubule Na+-ATPase activity, expression of angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors, and activity of protein kinases C and A. After the establishment of hypertension, Ang II levels, cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2) and NADPH oxidase subunit expression, lipid peroxidation and macrophage infiltration were examined in renal tissue. Lipid peroxidation in undernourished rats, which was very intense at 60 d, decreased at 90 d and returned to control values by 150 d. During the prehypertensive phase, prenatally undernourished rats exhibited elevated renal Na+-ATPase activity, type 2 Ang II receptor down-regulation and altered protein kinase A:protein kinase C ratio. Stable late hypertension coexisted with highly elevated levels of Ang II-positive cells in the cortical tubulointerstitium, enhanced increase in the expression of p47phox (NADPH oxidase regulatory subunit), marked down-regulation of COX-2 expression, expanded plasma volume and decreased creatinine clearance. These alterations were reduced when the dams were given α-tocopherol during lactation. The offspring of well-nourished dams treated with α-tocopherol exhibited most of the alterations encountered in the offspring of undernourished dams not treated with α-tocopherol. Thus, alterations in proximal tubule Na+ transport, subcellular signalling pathways and reactive oxygen species handling in renal tissue underpin the development of hypertension. PMID:24661554

  19. The mechanism of increased renal clearance of amylase in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, A L; Lee, K H

    1976-09-01

    Amylase isoenzymes, separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, were measures in 25 normal persons (mean amylase to creatinine clearance ratio 3.0%), 15 patients with acute pancreatitis (mean clearance ratio 9.5%, P less than 0.0001), and 6 patients with hyperamylasemia due to common duct stones (mean clearance ratio 4.1%). Two isoamylases (P1, P2) resembling pancreatic isoenzymes and three isoamylases (S1, S2, S3) resembling salivary isoenzymes appeared regularly in normal serum and urine. Salivary amylases predominated in serum, but pancreatic amylases predominated in urine. This finding is consistent with renal clearance of pancreatic amylases exceeding that of salivary amylases under normal conditions. In patients with pancreatitis or common duct stones, essentially all of the increased amylase activity in serum and urine was due to pancreatic isoamylases (P1 and P2) in their normal proportions. No new or altered amylase isoenzymes were detected. The fraction of pancreatic amylases in the serum or urine was identical for the two diseases. Whereas the difference in amylase to creatinine clearance ratios observed between the two groups of patients is not a function of different amylase isoenzymes presented to the kidney, we conclude that the increased amylase clearance in acute pancreatitis is caused by an alteration of renal transfer of amylase, either at the glomerulus or tubule.

  20. [Immunochemical properties of the excretory-secretory antigen of Trichinella spiralis].

    PubMed

    Akibekov, O S; Lider, L A; Odoevskiĭ, I M; Tokpan, S S; Ospanova, A Z

    2015-01-01

    In vitro cultivation of Trichinella spiralis provided data on the structure of somatic and excretory-secretory antigens of T. spiralis larvae, their immunochemical properties were studied. The findings suggest that work should be continued to produce monoclonal antibodies and to develop highly sensitive and specific ELISA test systems for the diagnosis of human and animal trichinosis. PMID:25850317

  1. Bilingual Skills Training Program. Barbering/Cosmetology. Module 8.0: Excretory System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern New Mexico Community Coll., El Rito.

    This module on the excretory system is the eighth (CE 028 308-318) in the barbering/cosmetology course of a bilingual skills training program. (A Vocabulary Development Workbook for modules 6-10 is available as CE 028 313.) The course is designed to furnish theoretical and laboratory experience. Module objectives are for students to develop…

  2. Occurrence of a specific dual symbiosis in the excretory organ of geographically distant Nautiloids populations.

    PubMed

    Pernice, Mathieu; Boucher-Rodoni, Renata

    2012-10-01

    Nautilus is one of the most intriguing of all sea creatures, sharing morphological similarities with the extinct forms of coiled cephalopods that evolved since the Cambrian (542-488 mya). Further, bacterial symbioses found in their excretory organ are of particular interest as they provide a great opportunity to investigate the influence of host-microbe interactions upon the origin and evolution of an innovative nitrogen excretory system. To establish the potential of Nautilus excretory organ as a new symbiotic system, it is, however, necessary to assess the specificity of this symbiosis and whether it is consistent within the different species of present-day Nautiloids. By addressing the phylogeny and distribution of bacterial symbionts in three Nautilus populations separated by more than 6000 km (N. pompilius from Philippines and Vanuatu, and N. macromphalus from New Caledonia), this study confirms the specificity of this dual symbiosis involving the presence of betaproteobacteria and spirochaete symbionts on a very wide geographical area. Overall, this work sheds further light on Nautiloids excretory organ as an innovative system of interaction between bacteria and cephalopods.

  3. [Peculiarities of ultrastructure of excretory system in Bothrioplana semperi (Platyhelminthes, Turbellaria)].

    PubMed

    Kornakova, E E

    2010-01-01

    Ultrastructural study of morphology of cirtocytes and excretory channels was performed in the free living turbellaria Bothrioplana semperi (Turbellaria, Seriata). It has been shown that cirtocytes of this species are formed by two cells--the terminal and the proximal cells of the channel. The fan is composed of two rod rows. The external row goes out from the terminal cell, the internal one is a derivate of the channel proximal cell. Inside each rod of the external row there runs a bundle of microfilaments; it originates in the cytoplasm of the channel proximal cell distal to bases of the external rods. On the internal rod membranes there are noted small electrondense granules disposed separately or fused in the solid layer continuing into a dense "membrane" connecting rods of the external and internal rows. Rare internal leptotrichiae go out from the cirtocyte cavity bottom. External leptotrichiae are absent. The septate desmosome at the level of the terminal cell is absent, but is present in the channel proximal cell at the level of terminal of cilia. The apical surface of the channel cell carries rare short microvilli. The basement membrane of cells of excretory channels forms deep invaginations almost reaching the apical membrane. Epithelium of excretory channels is deprived of cilia. Ultrastructure of cirtocytes and excretory channels of B. semperi is similar to those in representatives of the suborder Proseriata (Seriata). The significance of ultrastructure of the Proseriata cirtocytes, especially of the order of formation of versh, for construction of phylogeny of Platyhelminthes is discussed.

  4. Spontaneous perforation of the ureter diagnosed on technetium 99m DTPA excretory urography

    SciTech Connect

    Barasch, E.; Kashdan, B.; Rathore, A.

    1988-01-01

    A case of nontraumatic rupture of the ureter secondary to a nonopaque calculus is presented. Because of the inherent high image contrast caused by the leak of technetium 99m-DTPA-labeled urine, the technetium 99m-DTPA excretory urogram is seen as an alternative to the intravenous urogram or contrast-enhanced computed tomography in selected cases of suspected ureteral rupture.

  5. Biliary copper excretion by hepatocyte lysosomes in the rat. Major excretory pathway in experimental copper overload.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, J B; Myers, B M; Kost, L J; Kuntz, S M; LaRusso, N F

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that lysosomes are the main source of biliary copper in conditions of hepatic copper overload. We used a rat model of oral copper loading and studied the relationship between the biliary output of copper and lysosomal hydrolases. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given tap water with or without 0.125% copper acetate for up to 36 wk. Copper loading produced a 23-fold increase in the hepatic copper concentration and a 30-65% increase in hepatic lysosomal enzyme activity. Acid phosphatase histochemistry showed that copper-loaded livers contained an increased number of hepatocyte lysosomes; increased copper concentration of these organelles was confirmed directly by both x ray microanalysis and tissue fractionation. The copper-loaded rats showed a 16-fold increase in biliary copper output and a 50-300% increase in biliary lysosomal enzyme output. In the basal state, excretory profiles over time were similar for biliary outputs of lysosomal enzymes and copper in the copper-loaded animals but not in controls. After pharmacologic stimulation of lysosomal exocytosis, biliary outputs of copper and lysosomal hydrolases in the copper-loaded animals remained coupled: injection of colchicine or vinblastine produced an acute rise in the biliary output of both lysosomal enzymes and copper to 150-250% of baseline rates. After these same drugs, control animals showed only the expected increase in lysosomal enzyme output without a corresponding increase in copper output. We conclude that the hepatocyte responds to an increased copper load by sequestering excess copper in an increased number of lysosomes that then empty their contents directly into bile. The results provide direct evidence that exocytosis of lysosomal contents into biliary canaliculi is the major mechanism for biliary copper excretion in hepatic copper overload. Images PMID:2910913

  6. Biliary copper excretion by hepatocyte lysosomes in the rat. Major excretory pathway in experimental copper overload

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, J.B. Jr.; Myers, B.M.; Kost, L.J.; Kuntz, S.M.; LaRusso, N.F.

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that lysosomes are the main source of biliary copper in conditions of hepatic copper overload. We used a rat model of oral copper loading and studied the relationship between the biliary output of copper and lysosomal hydrolases. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given tap water with or without 0.125% copper acetate for up to 36 wk. Copper loading produced a 23-fold increase in the hepatic copper concentration and a 30-65% increase in hepatic lysosomal enzyme activity. Acid phosphatase histochemistry showed that copper-loaded livers contained an increased number of hepatocyte lysosomes; increased copper concentration of these organelles was confirmed directly by both x ray microanalysis and tissue fractionation. The copper-loaded rats showed a 16-fold increase in biliary copper output and a 50-300% increase in biliary lysosomal enzyme output. In the basal state, excretory profiles over time were similar for biliary outputs of lysosomal enzymes and copper in the copper-loaded animals but not in controls. After pharmacologic stimulation of lysosomal exocytosis, biliary outputs of copper and lysosomal hydrolases in the copper-loaded animals remained coupled: injection of colchicine or vinblastine produced an acute rise in the biliary output of both lysosomal enzymes and copper to 150-250% of baseline rates. After these same drugs, control animals showed only the expected increase in lysosomal enzyme output without a corresponding increase in copper output. We conclude that the hepatocyte responds to an increased copper load by sequestering excess copper in an increased number of lysosomes that then empty their contents directly into bile. The results provide direct evidence that exocytosis of lysosomal contents into biliary canaliculi is the major mechanism for biliary copper excretion in hepatic copper overload.

  7. Thrombospondin-1 deficiency causes a shift from fibroproliferative to inflammatory kidney disease and delays onset of renal failure.

    PubMed

    Zeisberg, Michael; Tampe, Björn; LeBleu, Valerie; Tampe, Desiree; Zeisberg, Elisabeth M; Kalluri, Raghu

    2014-10-01

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) is a multifunctional matricellular protein known to promote progression of chronic kidney disease. To gain insight into the underlying mechanisms through which TSP1 accelerates chronic kidney disease, we compared disease progression in Col4a3 knockout (KO) mice, which develop spontaneous kidney failure, with that of Col4a3;Tsp1 double-knockout (DKO) mice. Decline of excretory renal function was significantly delayed in the absence of TSP1. Although Col4a3;Tsp1 DKO mice did progress toward end-stage renal failure, their kidneys exhibited distinct histopathological lesions, compared with creatinine level-matched Col4a3 KO mice. Although kidneys of both Col4a3 KO and Col4a3;Tsp1 DKO mice exhibited a widened tubulointerstitium, predominant lesions in Col4a3 KO kidneys were collagen deposition and fibroblast accumulation, whereas in Col4a3;Tsp1 DKO kidney inflammation was predominant, with less collagen deposition. Altered disease progression correlated with impaired activation of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in vivo and in vitro in the absence of TSP1. In summary, our findings suggest that TSP1 contributes to progression of chronic kidney disease by catalyzing activation of latent TGF-β1, resulting in promotion of a fibroproliferative response over an inflammatory response. Furthermore, the findings suggest that fibroproliferative and inflammatory lesions are independent entities, both of which contribute to decline of renal function.

  8. Structure, mechanism, and substrate profile for Sco3058: the closest bacterial homologue to human renal dipeptidase .

    PubMed

    Cummings, Jennifer A; Nguyen, Tinh T; Fedorov, Alexander A; Kolb, Peter; Xu, Chengfu; Fedorov, Elena V; Shoichet, Brian K; Barondeau, David P; Almo, Steven C; Raushel, Frank M

    2010-01-26

    Human renal dipeptidase, an enzyme associated with glutathione metabolism and the hydrolysis of beta-lactams, is similar in sequence to a cluster of approximately 400 microbial proteins currently annotated as nonspecific dipeptidases within the amidohydrolase superfamily. The closest homologue to the human renal dipeptidase from a fully sequenced microbe is Sco3058 from Streptomyces coelicolor. Dipeptide substrates of Sco3058 were identified by screening a comprehensive series of l-Xaa-l-Xaa, l-Xaa-d-Xaa, and d-Xaa-l-Xaa dipeptide libraries. The substrate specificity profile shows that Sco3058 hydrolyzes a broad range of dipeptides with a marked preference for an l-amino acid at the N-terminus and a d-amino acid at the C-terminus. The best substrate identified was l-Arg-d-Asp (k(cat)/K(m) = 7.6 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)). The three-dimensional structure of Sco3058 was determined in the absence and presence of the inhibitors citrate and a phosphinate mimic of l-Ala-d-Asp. The enzyme folds as a (beta/alpha)(8) barrel, and two zinc ions are bound in the active site. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to probe the importance of specific residues that have direct interactions with the substrate analogues in the active site (Asp-22, His-150, Arg-223, and Asp-320). The solvent viscosity and kinetic effects of D(2)O indicate that substrate binding is relatively sticky and that proton transfers do not occurr during the rate-limiting step. A bell-shaped pH-rate profile for k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) indicated that one group needs to be deprotonated and a second group must be protonated for optimal turnover. Computational docking of high-energy intermediate forms of l/d-Ala-l/d-Ala to the three-dimensional structure of Sco3058 identified the structural determinants for the stereochemical preferences for substrate binding and turnover.

  9. Structure, Mechanism, and Substrate Profile for Sco3058: The Closest Bacterial Homologue to Human Renal Dipeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, J.; Nguyen, T; Fedorov, A; Kolb, P; Xu, C; Fedorov, E; Shoichet, B; Barondeau, D; Almo, S; Raushel, F

    2010-01-01

    Human renal dipeptidase, an enzyme associated with glutathione metabolism and the hydrolysis of {beta}-lactams, is similar in sequence to a cluster of 400 microbial proteins currently annotated as nonspecific dipeptidases within the amidohydrolase superfamily. The closest homologue to the human renal dipeptidase from a fully sequenced microbe is Sco3058 from Streptomyces coelicolor. Dipeptide substrates of Sco3058 were identified by screening a comprehensive series of L-Xaa-L-Xaa, L-Xaa-D-Xaa, and D-Xaa-L-Xaa dipeptide libraries. The substrate specificity profile shows that Sco3058 hydrolyzes a broad range of dipeptides with a marked preference for an l-amino acid at the N-terminus and a d-amino acid at the C-terminus. The best substrate identified was L-Arg-D-Asp (k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 7.6 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). The three-dimensional structure of Sco3058 was determined in the absence and presence of the inhibitors citrate and a phosphinate mimic of L-Ala-D-Asp. The enzyme folds as a ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrel, and two zinc ions are bound in the active site. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to probe the importance of specific residues that have direct interactions with the substrate analogues in the active site (Asp-22, His-150, Arg-223, and Asp-320). The solvent viscosity and kinetic effects of D{sub 2}O indicate that substrate binding is relatively sticky and that proton transfers do not occurr during the rate-limiting step. A bell-shaped pH-rate profile for k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} indicated that one group needs to be deprotonated and a second group must be protonated for optimal turnover. Computational docking of high-energy intermediate forms of L/D-Ala-L/D-Ala to the three-dimensional structure of Sco3058 identified the structural determinants for the stereochemical preferences for substrate binding and turnover.

  10. Interleukin-1 decreases renal sodium reabsorption: possible mechanism of endotoxin-induced natriuresis

    SciTech Connect

    Caverzasio, J.; Rizzoli, R.; Dayer, J.M.; Bonjour, J.P.

    1987-05-01

    Administration of pyrogen or endotoxins such as Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide can elicit a marked increase in urinary sodium excretion. This response occurs without any elevation in the filtered load of sodium and it does not appear to be prostaglandin mediated. The various effects produced by endotoxins appear to have interleukin-1 as a common mediator. In the present work, the authors have studied whether human recombinant interleukin-1..beta.. (hrIL-1) could affect the renal handling of sodium and thus, could be implicated in natriuretic response to pyrogens or endotoxins. They observed that hrIL-1 intravenously injected into conscious rats provokes a marked increase in sodium excretion. This natriuretic response was not associated with any increase in glomerular filtration rate (clearance of (/sup 3/H)inulin), nor was it accompanied by significant changes in the urinary excretion of potassium, calcium, or inorganic phosphate. The only concomitant alteration was a decrease in urinary pH. Pretreatment with indomethacin abolished the effect of hrIL-1 on urinary pH but did not modify the natriuretic response. In conclusion, hrIL-1 elicits a selective decrease in tubular sodium reabsorption, which does not appear to involve a change in prostaglandin synthesis. This observation strongly suggests that interleukin-1 could be a key mediator in endotoxin-induced natriuresis.

  11. Transcriptional regulation of AQP-8, a Caenorhabditis elegans aquaporin exclusively expressed in the excretory system, by the POU homeobox transcription factor CEH-6.

    PubMed

    Mah, Allan K; Armstrong, Kristin R; Chew, Derek S; Chu, Jeffrey S; Tu, Domena K; Johnsen, Robert C; Chen, Nansheng; Chamberlin, Helen M; Baillie, David L

    2007-09-21

    Due to the ever changing environmental conditions in soil, regulation of osmotic homeostasis in the soil-dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is critical. AQP-8 is a C. elegans aquaporin that is expressed in the excretory cell, a renal equivalent tissue, where the protein participates in maintaining water balance. To better understand the regulation of AQP-8, we undertook a promoter analysis to identify the aqp-8 cis-regulatory elements. Using progressive 5' deletions of upstream sequence, we have mapped an essential regulatory region to roughly 300 bp upstream of the translational start site of aqp-8. Analysis of this region revealed a sequence corresponding to a known DNA functional element (octamer motif), which interacts with POU homeobox transcription factors. Phylogenetic footprinting showed that this site is perfectly conserved in four nematode species. The octamer site's function was further confirmed by deletion analyses, mutagenesis, functional studies, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Of the three POU homeobox proteins encoded in the C. elegans genome, CEH-6 is the only member that is expressed in the excretory cell. We show that expression of AQP-8 is regulated by CEH-6 by performing RNA interference experiments. CEH-6's mammalian ortholog, Brn1, is expressed both in the kidney and the central nervous system and binds to the same octamer consensus binding site to drive gene expression. These parallels in transcriptional control between Brn1 and CEH-6 suggest that C. elegans may well be an appropriate model for determining gene-regulatory networks in the developing vertebrate kidney.

  12. Bioprosthetic versus mechanical prostheses for valve replacement in end-stage renal disease patients: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dong Fang; Zhou, Jessie J.; Karagaratnam, Aran; Phan, Steven; Yan, Tristan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) indicated for dialysis are increasingly requiring cardiac valve surgery. The choice of bioprosthetic or mechanic valve prosthesis for such patients requires careful risk assessment. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to assess current evidence available. Methods A comprehensive search from six electronic databases was performed from their inception to February 2015. Results from patients with ESRD undergoing cardiac surgery for bioprosthetic or mechanical valve replacement were identified. Results Sixteen studies with 8,483 patients with ESRD undergoing cardiac valve replacement surgery were included. No evidence of publication bias was detected. Prior angioplasty by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery was significantly higher in the bioprosthetic group compared to the mechanical group (16.0% vs. 12.0%, P=0.04); all other preoperative baseline patient characteristics were similar. There was no significant difference in 30-day mortality or all-cause mortality between the two comparisons. Compared with the mechanical group, the frequency of bleeding (5.2% vs. 6.4%, P=0.04) and risk of thromboembolism (2.7% vs. 12.8%, P=0.02) were significantly lower in the bioprosthetic group. There were similar rates of reoperation and valve endocarditis. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that patients with ESRD undergoing bioprosthetic or mechanical valve replacement had similar mid-long term survival. The bioprosthetic group had lower rates of bleeding and thromboembolism. Further studies are required to differentiate the impact of valve location. The presented results may be applicable for ESRD patients requiring prosthetic valve replacement. PMID:27162649

  13. Mechanisms responsible for postmenopausal hypertension in a rat model: Roles of the renal sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Maranon, Rodrigo O; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2016-02-01

    Hypertension in postmenopausal women is less well controlled than in age-matched men. The aging female SHR is a model of postmenopausal hypertension that is mediated in part by activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and by the renal sympathetic nervous system. In this study, the hypothesis was tested that renal denervation would lower the blood pressure in old female SHR and would attenuate the antihypertensive effects of AT1 receptor antagonism. Retired breeder female SHR were subjected to right uninephrectomy (UNX) and left renal denervation (RD) or UNX and sham, and 2 weeks later, baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP; radiotelemetry) was measured for 4 days, and then rats were treated with angiotensin (AT1) receptor antagonist, losartan (40 mg/kg/day po) for 6 days. Renal denervation reduced MAP in old females compared to sham (172 ± 6 vs. 193 ± 6 mm Hg; P < 0.05). Losartan reduced MAP in both sham and RD rats similarly (numerically and by percentage) (142 ± 10 vs. 161 ± 6 mm Hg; P < 0.05 vs. RD, P < 0.05 vs. baseline). However, female SHR rats remained significantly hypertensive despite both pharmacological intervention and RD. The data suggest that both the renal sympathetic nervous system and the RAS have independent effects to control the blood pressure in old female SHR. Since the denervated rats treated with losartan remained hypertensive, the data also suggest that other mechanisms than the RAS and renal sympathetic nervous system contribute to the hypertension in old female SHR. The data also suggest that multiple mechanisms may mediate the elevated blood pressure in postmenopausal women.

  14. The maintenance and regeneration of the planarian excretory system are regulated by EGFR signaling.

    PubMed

    Rink, Jochen C; Vu, Hanh Thi-Kim; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2011-09-01

    The maintenance of organs and their regeneration in case of injury are crucial to the survival of all animals. High rates of tissue turnover and nearly unlimited regenerative capabilities make planarian flatworms an ideal system with which to investigate these important processes, yet little is known about the cell biology and anatomy of their organs. Here we focus on the planarian excretory system, which consists of internal protonephridial tubules. We find that these assemble into complex branching patterns with a stereotyped succession of cell types along their length. Organ regeneration is likely to originate from a precursor structure arising in the blastema, which undergoes extensive branching morphogenesis. In an RNAi screen of signaling molecules, we identified an EGF receptor (Smed-EGFR-5) as a crucial regulator of branching morphogenesis and maintenance. Overall, our characterization of the planarian protonephridial system establishes a new paradigm for regenerative organogenesis and provides a platform for exploring its functional and evolutionary homologies with vertebrate excretory systems.

  15. Potential role of gene-environment interactions in ion transport mechanisms in the etiology of renal cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deckers, Ivette A. G.; van den Brandt, Piet A.; van Engeland, Manon; van Schooten, Frederik J.; Godschalk, Roger W. L.; Keszei, András P.; Hogervorst, Janneke G. F.; Schouten, Leo J.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the ion transport mechanism (ITM) in renal cell cancer (RCC) etiology using gene-environment interactions between candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and associated environmental factors, including dietary intakes of sodium, potassium and fluid, hypertension and diuretic medication. A literature-based selection of 13 SNPs in ten ITM genes were successfully genotyped in toenail DNA of 3,048 subcohort members and 419 RCC cases from the Netherlands Cohort Study. Diet and lifestyle were measured with baseline questionnaires. Cox regression analyses were conducted for main effects and gene-environment interactions. ADD1_rs4961 was significantly associated with RCC risk, showing a Hazard Ratio (HR) of 1.24 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.01–1.53) for the GT + TT (versus GG) genotype. Four of 65 tested gene-environment interactions were statistically significant. Three of these interactions clustered in SLC9A3_rs4957061, including the ones with fluid and potassium intake, and diuretic medication. For fluid intake, the RCC risk was significantly lower for high versus low intake in participants with the CC genotype (HR(95% CI): 0.47(0.26–0.86)), but not for the CT + TT genotype (P-interaction = 0.002). None of the main genetic effects and gene-environment interactions remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing. Data do not support the general hypothesis that the ITM is a disease mechanism in RCC etiology. PMID:27686058

  16. Perfluorooctanesulfonate Mediates Renal Tubular Cell Apoptosis through PPARgamma Inactivation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Li-Li; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Chang, Chih-Cheng; Lo, Hau-Yin; Juan, Shu-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) are ubiquitously distributed in the environments including stainless pan-coating, raincoat, fire extinguisher, and semiconductor products. The PPAR family has been shown to contribute to the toxic effects of PFCs in thymus, immune and excretory systems. Herein, we demonstrated that perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) caused cell apoptosis through increasing ratio of Bcl-xS/xL, cytosolic cytochrome C, and caspase 3 activation in renal tubular cells (RTCs). In addition, PFOS increased transcription of inflammatory cytokines (i.e., TNFα, ICAM1, and MCP1) by NFκB activation. Conversely, PFOS reduced the mRNA levels of antioxidative enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase, as a result of reduced PPARγ transactivational activity by using reporter and chromatin immuoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. PFOS reduced the protein interaction between PPARγ and PPARγ coactivator-1 alpha (PGC1α) by PPARγ deacetylation through Sirt1 upregulation, of which the binding of PPARγ and PGC1α to a peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE) in the promoter regions of these antioxidative enzymes was alleviated in the ChIP assay. Furthermore, Sirt1 also deacetylated p53 and then increased the binding of p53 to Bax, resulting in increased cytosolic cytochrome C. The effect of PPARγ inactivation by PFOS was validated using the PPARγ antagonist GW9662, whereas the adverse effects of PFOS were prevented by PPARγ overexpression and activators, rosiglitozone and L-carnitine, in RTCs. The in vitro finding of protective effect of L-carnitine was substantiated in vivo using Balb/c mice model subjected to PFOS challenge. Altogether, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for the protective mechanism of L-carnitine in eliminating PFOS-mediated renal injury, at least partially, through PPARγ activation. PMID:27171144

  17. Perfluorooctanesulfonate Mediates Renal Tubular Cell Apoptosis through PPARgamma Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Chang, Chih-Cheng; Lo, Hau-Yin; Juan, Shu-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) are ubiquitously distributed in the environments including stainless pan-coating, raincoat, fire extinguisher, and semiconductor products. The PPAR family has been shown to contribute to the toxic effects of PFCs in thymus, immune and excretory systems. Herein, we demonstrated that perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) caused cell apoptosis through increasing ratio of Bcl-xS/xL, cytosolic cytochrome C, and caspase 3 activation in renal tubular cells (RTCs). In addition, PFOS increased transcription of inflammatory cytokines (i.e., TNFα, ICAM1, and MCP1) by NFκB activation. Conversely, PFOS reduced the mRNA levels of antioxidative enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase, as a result of reduced PPARγ transactivational activity by using reporter and chromatin immuoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. PFOS reduced the protein interaction between PPARγ and PPARγ coactivator-1 alpha (PGC1α) by PPARγ deacetylation through Sirt1 upregulation, of which the binding of PPARγ and PGC1α to a peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE) in the promoter regions of these antioxidative enzymes was alleviated in the ChIP assay. Furthermore, Sirt1 also deacetylated p53 and then increased the binding of p53 to Bax, resulting in increased cytosolic cytochrome C. The effect of PPARγ inactivation by PFOS was validated using the PPARγ antagonist GW9662, whereas the adverse effects of PFOS were prevented by PPARγ overexpression and activators, rosiglitozone and L-carnitine, in RTCs. The in vitro finding of protective effect of L-carnitine was substantiated in vivo using Balb/c mice model subjected to PFOS challenge. Altogether, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for the protective mechanism of L-carnitine in eliminating PFOS-mediated renal injury, at least partially, through PPARγ activation. PMID:27171144

  18. Change of drug excretory pathway by CCl4-induced liver dysfunction in rat.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Hirotoshi; Katoh, Miki; Minami, Keiichi; Nakajima, Miki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2007-08-01

    Liver dysfunction affects the pharmacokinetics of drugs. The liver plays an important role in drug excretion as well as drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics. In the present study, the relationship between changes in the cefmetazole (CMZ) excretory pathway and the degree of liver dysfunction induced by CCl(4) treatment was investigated. CMZ is mainly excreted as an unchanged form in feces in control rats. Depending on the serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), urinary CMZ excretion was increased, whereas fecal CMZ excretion was decreased in rat with liver dysfunction. The AUC of CMZ in rats with severe liver dysfunction was approximately 2-fold higher than that in control rats. Since drug transporters could be involved in drug excretion, changes in the expression of representative hepatic drug transporters in liver dysfunction were investigated by rat DNA microarray. Basolateral solute carrier transporters such as Ntcp, Oct1, and Oatp2 were decreased and basolateral ATP-binding cassette transporters such as Mrp3 and Mrp4 were increased by the CCl(4) treatment. On the other hand, canalicular Mrp2 and Bsep were decreased, but Mdr1 was increased. However, the transporter system for CMZ has not been identified yet. In conclusion, we clarified that the fecal and urinary excretory profiles of CMZ were changed clearly depending on the serum AST and ALT levels in liver dysfunction. The changes in the CMZ excretory pathway might be responsible for the changes in the expression of drug transporters.

  19. Ultrastructure of the excretory organs of Bombus morio (Hymenoptera: Bombini): bee without rectal pads.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Wagner Gonzaga; Fialho, Maria do Carmo Queiroz; Azevedo, Dihego Oliveira; Zanuncio, José Cola; Serrão, José Eduardo

    2014-02-01

    Bumblebees need to keep bodily homeostasis and for that have an efficient system of excretion formed by the Malpighian tubules, ileum, and rectum. We analyzed the excretory organs of Bombus morio, a bee without rectal pads. In addition, we analyzed the rectal epithelium of Melipona quadrifasciata anthidioides which has rectal pads. The Malpighian tubules exhibited two cell types and the ileum four types. However, comparative analysis of the rectum showed that only cells of the anterior region of the rectal epithelium of B. morio are structurally distinct. We suggest that cells of the Malpighian tubules of B. morio have an excretory feature and that cells of ileum have different functions, such as ion absorption and water, organic compound, and protein secretion. In addition, only the anterior region of the rectum of B. morio showed characteristic absorption. We suggest that Malpighian tubules participate in the excretion of solutes and that the ileum and rectal epithelium are responsible for homeostasis of water and solutes, compensating for the absence of rectal papillae. These results contribute to our understanding of the morphophysiology of the excretory organs of bees without rectal pads.

  20. [Present day radiation diagnosis of renal tumors and cysts].

    PubMed

    Vlasov, P V; Kotliarov, P M

    1997-01-01

    The paper discusses the present-day radiation diagnosis of renal bulky formations: tumors and cysts. Based on the study of a great body of clinical data on 708 patients, the authors showed the potentialities of routine X-ray and currently available radiation techniques in the diagnosis of benign and malignant tumors and cysts of the kidney. Based on the data available in the literature and their own findings, the authors concluded that at the earliest stages of their preclinical development, tumors can be today diagnosed by a complete package of up-to-date diagnostic tools. Ultrasonic and computerized tomographies are of the highest informative value in diagnosing tumors and cystic formations. However, in some cases, a diagnosis is made via a routine excretory urography, angiography and needle biopsy. Excretory urography is of limited value for the diagnosis of renal bulky formations and it is used as an auxiliary mainly when a pathological process takes place in the renal hilus area. Angiography retains its significance as a supplementary technique. In the vast majority of cases, an accurate nosological diagnosis can be made on the basis of evaluation of the pattern of blood supply (the presence of abnormal vessels and their topographic features). The paper details the semiotics of a wide range of renal bulky processes by applying all currently available techniques of radiation diagnosis.

  1. Biaxial mechanical properties of the human thoracic and abdominal aorta, common carotid, subclavian, renal and common iliac arteries.

    PubMed

    Kamenskiy, Alexey V; Dzenis, Yuris A; Kazmi, Syed A Jaffar; Pemberton, Mark A; Pipinos, Iraklis I; Phillips, Nick Y; Herber, Kyle; Woodford, Thomas; Bowen, Robert E; Lomneth, Carol S; MacTaggart, Jason N

    2014-11-01

    The biomechanics of large- and medium-sized arteries influence the pathophysiology of arterial disease and the response to therapeutic interventions. However, a comprehensive comparative analysis of human arterial biaxial mechanical properties has not yet been reported. Planar biaxial extension was used to establish the passive mechanical properties of human thoracic (TA, [Formula: see text]) and abdominal (AA, [Formula: see text]) aorta, common carotid (CCA, [Formula: see text]), subclavian (SA, [Formula: see text]), renal (RA, [Formula: see text]) and common iliac (CIA, [Formula: see text]) arteries from 11 deceased subjects ([Formula: see text] years old). Histological evaluation determined the structure of each specimen. Experimental data were used to determine constitutive parameters for a structurally motivated nonlinear anisotropic constitutive model. All arteries demonstrated appreciable anisotropy and large nonlinear deformations. Most CCA, SA, TA, AA and CIA specimens were stiffer longitudinally, while most RAs were stiffer circumferentially. A switch in anisotropy was occasionally demonstrated for all arteries. The CCA was the most compliant, least anisotropic and least frequently diseased of all arteries, while the CIA and AA were the stiffest and the most diseased. The severity of atherosclerosis correlated with age, but was not affected by laterality. Elastin fibers in the aorta, SA and CCA were uniformly and mostly circumferentially distributed throughout the media, while in the RA and CIA, elastin was primarily axially aligned and concentrated in the external elastic lamina. Constitutive modeling provided good fits to the experimental data for most arteries. Biomechanical and architectural features of major arteries differ depending on location and functional environment. A better understanding of localized arterial mechanical properties may support the development of site-specific treatment modalities for arterial disease.

  2. Caenorhabditis elegans as a model to study renal development and disease: sexy cilia.

    PubMed

    Barr, Maureen M

    2005-02-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has no kidney per se, yet "the worm" has proved to be an excellent model to study renal-related issues, including tubulogenesis of the excretory canal, membrane transport and ion channel function, and human genetic diseases including autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The goal of this review is to explain how C. elegans has provided insight into cilia development, cilia function, and human cystic kidney diseases.

  3. High-Dose Estradiol-Replacement Therapy Enhances the Renal Vascular Response to Angiotensin II via an AT2-Receptor Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Safari, Tahereh; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi; Evans, Roger G.; Denton, Kate M.

    2015-01-01

    Physiological levels of estrogen appear to enhance angiotensin type 2 receptor- (AT2R-) mediated vasodilatation. However, the effects of supraphysiological levels of estrogen, analogous to those achieved with high-dose estrogen replacement therapy in postmenopausal women, remain unknown. Therefore, we pretreated ovariectomized rats with a relatively high dose of estrogen (0.5 mg/kg/week) for two weeks. Subsequently, renal hemodynamic responses to intravenous angiotensin II (Ang II, 30–300 ng/kg/min) were tested under anesthesia, while renal perfusion pressure was held constant. The role of AT2R was examined by pretreating groups of rats with PD123319 or its vehicle. Renal blood flow (RBF) decreased in a dose-related manner in response to Ang II. Responses to Ang II were enhanced by pretreatment with estradiol. For example, at 300 ng kg−1 min−1, Ang II reduced RBF by 45.7 ± 1.9% in estradiol-treated rats but only by 27.3 ± 5.1% in vehicle-treated rats. Pretreatment with PD123319 blunted the response of RBF to Ang II in estradiol-treated rats, so that reductions in RBF were similar to those in rats not treated with estradiol. We conclude that supraphysiological levels of estrogen promote AT2R-mediated renal vasoconstriction. This mechanism could potentially contribute to the increased risk of cardiovascular disease associated with hormone replacement therapy using high-dose estrogen. PMID:26681937

  4. Renal mechanisms in the cardiovascular effects of chronic exposure to inorganic mercury in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Carmignani, M; Boscolo, P; Artese, L; Del Rosso, G; Porcelli, G; Felaco, M; Volpe, A R; Giuliano, G

    1992-01-01

    Male weanling Wistar rats received 200 micrograms/ml of mercury (Hg), as HgCl2, in drinking water for 180 days. At the end of the treatment, systemic arterial blood pressure was augmented, cardiac inotropism was reduced, and heart rate was unchanged. Light and electron microscopical studies of the kidney showed a mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis in about 80% of the glomeruli. Tubular cells showed reduction of the acid phosphatase activity, which was related to functional abnormalities of the lysosomes. In the 24 hour urine samples of the Hg exposed rats, there was slight reduction of kallikrein activity, but evident proteinuria was not present in all samples. Plasma renin activity was reduced, that of angiotensin I-converting enzyme was augmented, and plasma aldosterone concentrations were unchanged. Mercury was accumulated mostly in the kidney of the Hg treated animals; and the content of Hg in the heart was higher than in the brain. These data show that chronic exposure to Hg acts on the kidney with complex mechanisms of toxicity; these contribute to modify systemic haemodynamics. Images PMID:1571292

  5. The effects of drugs, ions, and poly-l-lysine on the excretory system of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Kusel, J R; Oliveira, F A; Todd, M; Ronketti, F; Lima, S F; Mattos, A C A; Reis, K T; Coelho, P M Z; Thornhill, J A; Ribeiro, F

    2006-09-01

    We have been able to label the excretory system of cercariae and all forms of schistosomula, immature and adult worms with the highly fluorescent dye resorufin. We have shown that the accumulation of the resorufin into the excretory tubules and collecting ducts of the male adult worm depends on the presence of extracellular calcium and phosphate ions. In the adult male worms, praziquantel (PZQ) prevents this accumulation in RPMI medium and disperses resorufin from tubules which have been prelabelled. Female worms and all other developmental stages are much less affected either by the presence of calcium and phosphate ions, or the disruption caused by PZQ. The male can inhibit the excretory system in paired female. Fluorescent PZQ localises in the posterior gut (intestine) region of the male adult worm, but not in the excretory system, except for the anionic carboxy fluorescein derivative of PZQ, which may be excreted by this route. All stages of the parasite can recover from damage by PZQ treatment in vitro. The excretory system is highly sensitive to damage to the surface membrane and may be involved in vesicle movement and damage repair processes. In vivo the adult parasite does not recover from PZQ treatment, but what is inhibiting recovery is unknown, but likely to be related to immune effector molecules.

  6. Mechanism of chloroform-induced renal toxicity: Non-involvement of hepatic cytochrome P450-dependent metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Cheng; Behr, Melissa; Xie Fang; Lu Shijun; Doret, Meghan; Luo Hongxiu; Yang Weizhu; Aldous, Kenneth; Ding Xinxin; Gu Jun

    2008-02-15

    Chloroform causes hepatic and renal toxicity in a number of species. In vitro studies have indicated that chloroform can be metabolized by P450 enzymes in the kidney to nephrotoxic intermediate, although direct in vivo evidence for the role of renal P450 in the nephrotoxicity has not been reported. This study was to determine whether chloroform renal toxicity persists in a mouse model with a liver-specific deletion of the P450 reductase (Cpr) gene (liver-Cpr-null). Chloroform-induced renal toxicity and chloroform tissue levels were compared between the liver-Cpr-null and wild-type mice at 24 h following differing doses of chloroform. At a chloroform dose of 150 mg/kg, the levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were five times higher in the exposed group than in the vehicle-treated one for the liver-Cpr-null mice, but they were only slightly higher in the exposed group than in the vehicle-treated group for the wild-type mice. Severe lesions were found in the kidney of the liver-Cpr-null mice, while only mild lesions were found in the wild-type mice. At a chloroform dose of 300 mg/kg, severe kidney lesions were observed in both strains, yet the BUN levels were still higher in the liver-Cpr-null than in the wild-type mice. Higher chloroform levels were found in the tissues of the liver-Cpr-null mice. These findings indicated that loss of hepatic P450-dependent chloroform metabolism does not protect against chloroform-induced renal toxicity, suggesting that renal P450 enzymes play an essential role in chloroform renal toxicity.

  7. Development of the excretory system in a polyplacophoran mollusc: stages in metanephridial system development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Two types of excretory systems, protonephridia and metanephridial systems are common among bilaterians. The homology of protonephridia of lophotrochozoan taxa has been widely accepted. In contrast, the homology of metanephridial systems – including coelomic cavities as functional units – among taxa as well as the homology between the two excretory systems is a matter of ongoing discussion. This particularly concerns the molluscan kidneys, which are mostly regarded as being derived convergently to the metanephridia of e.g. annelids because of different ontogenetic origin. A reinvestigation of nephrogenesis in polyplacophorans, which carry many primitive traits within molluscs, could shed light on these questions. Results The metanephridial system of Lepidochitona corrugata develops rapidly in the early juvenile phase. It is formed from a coelomic anlage that soon achieves endothelial organization. The pericardium and heart are formed from the central portion of the anlage. The nephridial components are formed by outgrowth from lateral differentiations of the anlage. Simultaneously with formation of the heart, podocytes appear in the atrial wall of the pericardium. In addition, renopericardial ducts, kidneys and efferent nephroducts, all showing downstream ciliation towards the internal lumen, become differentiated (specimen length: 0.62 mm). Further development consists of elongation of the kidney and reinforcement of filtration and reabsorptive structures. Conclusions During development and in fully formed condition the metanephridial system of Lepidochitona corrugata shares many detailed traits (cellular and overall organization) with the protonephridia of the same species. Accordingly, we suggest a serial homology of various cell types and between the two excretory systems and the organs as a whole. The formation of the metanephridial system varies significantly within Mollusca, thus the mode of formation cannot be used as a homology criterion

  8. In vitro production of Toxocara canis excretory-secretory (TES) antigen.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Divyamol; Jeyathilakan, N; Abdul Basith, S; Senthilkumar, T M A

    2016-09-01

    Toxocara canis is a widespread gastrointestinal nematode parasite of dogs and cause Toxocara larva migrans, an important zoonotic disease in humans on ingestion of infective eggs. Toxocarosis is one of the few human parasitic diseases whose serodiagnosis uses a standardized antigen, T. canis excretory secretory antigen (TES). The present study describes collection of T. canis adult worm, collection and embryonation of T. canis eggs, hatching and separation of T. canis larvae, in vitro maintenance of T. canis second stage larvae for production of TES, concentration of culture fluid TES and yield of TES in correlation with various methods cited in literature. PMID:27605834

  9. Renal handling of amino acid /sup 99m/technetium chelates

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, M.; Banerjee, S.

    1988-09-01

    Four amino acids--alanine, 2,3-diaminopropionic acid, cystine, and cystein--and also one diamine, ethylenediamine, were chelated with /sup 99m/-technetium (/sup 99m/Tc), and their renal excretion patterns were studied in rabbits in the presence and absence of two renal tubular transport inhibitors, probenecid and 2,4-dinitrophenol. From the depression of renal excretion for the first three amino acid chelates, in the presence of the inhibitors, a renal tubular excretory pathway of elimination was suggested for these compounds. The renal excretions of /sup 99m/Tc-cystein and /sup 99m/Tc-ethylenediamine however, remained undepressed under similar experimental conditions. An explanation of these observations was forwarded from the possible chemical structures of these chelates.

  10. Sympatho-renal interactions.

    PubMed

    Zanchetti, A; Stella, A

    1987-10-01

    The renal nerves appear to be involved in the control of cardiovascular homeostasis and volume balance both in physiological and in pathological conditions such as experimental hypertension. Anatomical and electrophysiological evidence suggests that the kidney has a diffuse sensory innervation connected with areas in the brain and spinal cord that are known to regulate cardiovascular functions by both neural and humoral mechanisms. The demonstration of the existence of neural reno-renal reflexes controlling several renal functions indicates that a functional balance between the two kidneys exists and may play an important role in the moment-to-moment control of kidney functions.

  11. Renal perfusion scintiscan

    MedlinePlus

    Renal perfusion scintigraphy; Radionuclide renal perfusion scan; Perfusion scintiscan - renal; Scintiscan - renal perfusion ... supply the kidneys. This is a condition called renal artery stenosis. Significant renal artery stenosis may be ...

  12. An ultrastructural study of excretory system development in the cercariae of Prosorhynchoides gracilescens (Rudolphi, 1819) and Prosorhynchus squamatus Odhner, 1905 (Digenea, Bucephalidae).

    PubMed

    Podvyaznaya, I M; Galaktionov, K V; Irwin, S W B

    2004-08-01

    The ultrastructure of the developing excretory system of Prosorhynchoides gracilescens and Prosorhynchus squamatus cercariae is described. The development pattern was similar in both species. In early embryos the two main collecting tubes were composed of a layer of cells which were wrapped around the lumen. Later, the tubes fused and the excretory epithelium of the fusion zone and that of the lateral caudal ducts became a syncytium. The collecting tubes in the cercarial body retained their cellular organization. As the tails grew, additional excretory pores were formed in the tail stem where thickened portions of the caudal duct epithelium contacted the surface tegument. Following this, the distal portions of the lateral caudal ducts lost contact with the primary excretory pores and progressively degenerated. Excretory atrium development started with differentiation of secretory active cytons peripheral to the fusion zone. These cells gave rise to cytoplasmic extensions that penetrated the fusion zone wall to eventually form a continuous cytoplasmic layer. This layer eventually replaced some of the fusion zone excretory epithelium and became the lining of the excretory atrium. The anterior end of the fusion zone differentiated into an excretory bladder and a short posterior portion gave rise to the caudal vesicle.

  13. Unilateral renal agenesis associated with additional congenital abnormalities of the urinary tract in a Pekingese bitch.

    PubMed

    Agut, A; Fernandez del Palacio, M J; Laredo, F G; Murciano, J; Bayon, A; Soler, M

    2002-01-01

    An eight-month-old Pekingese bitch with urinary incontinence was found to have three congenital anomalies of the urinary tract: left renal agenesis, bilateral ectopic ureters with a left cranial blind-ending ureter, and urinary bladder hypoplasia. The diagnoses were made by retrograde vaginourethrography, excretory urography, ultrasonography and duplex Doppler ultrasonography. Although urological anomalies associated with renal agenesis have been frequently observed, a cranial blind-end ectopic ureter has not, to the authors' knowledge, been described in the bitch. The dog was managed medically with a restricted protein diet because of a compromised unilateral kidney with hydronephrosis and hydroureter.

  14. [Hyperuricemia and renal risk].

    PubMed

    Viazzi, Francesca; Bonino, Barbara; Ratto, Elena; Desideri, Giovambattista; Pontremoli, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed an association between elevated levels of uric acid and conditions correlated to chronic kidney diseases such as hypertension, cardiovascular and cerebral disease, insulin resistance. Several pathogenetic mechanisms at cellular and tissue levels could justify a direct correlation between serum uric acid levels and renal damage. Growing evidence indicating a correlation between urate lowering therapy and renal morbidity could encourage the use of urate lowering therapy in primary or secondary prevention in chronic kidney disease.

  15. Environmental factors responsible for switching on the SO₄²⁻ excretory system in the kidney of seawater eels.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Taro; Takei, Yoshio

    2011-08-01

    Eels are unique in that they maintain lower plasma SO(4)(2-) concentration in SO(4)(2-)-rich (∼30 mM) seawater (SW) than in SO(4)(2-)-poor (<0.3 mM) freshwater (FW), showing drastic changes in SO(4)(2-) regulation between FW and SW. We previously showed that the expression of renal SO(4)(2-) transporter genes, FW-specific Slc13a1 and SW-specific Slc26a6a, changes profoundly after transfer of FW eels to SW, which results in the decrease in plasma SO(4)(2-) concentration after 3 days in SW. In this study, we attempted to identify the environmental factor(s) that trigger the switching of SO(4)(2-) regulation using changes in plasma and urine SO(4)(2-) concentrations and expression of the transporter genes as markers. Transfer of FW eels to 30 mM SO(4)(2-) or transfer of SW eels to SO(4)(2-)-free SW did not change the SO(4)(2-) regulation. Major divalent cations in SW, Mg(2+) (50 mM) and Ca(2+) (10 mM), were also ineffective, but 50 mM NaCl was effective for switching the SO(4)(2-) regulation. Further analyses using choline-Cl and Na-gluconate showed that Cl(-) is a primary factor and Na(+) is permissive for the Cl(-) effect. Since plasma SO(4)(2-) and Cl(-) concentrations were inversely correlated, we injected various solutions into the blood and found that Cl(-) alone triggered the switching from FW to SW-type regulation. Furthermore, the inhibitor of Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC) added to media significantly impaired the expression of SW-specific Slc26a6a in 150 mM NaCl. In summary, it appears that Cl(-) ions in SW are taken up into the circulation via the NCC together with Na(+), and the resultant increase in plasma Cl(-) concentration enhances SO(4)(2-) excretion by the kidney through downregulation of absorptive Slc13a1 and upregulation of excretory Slc26a6a, resulting in low plasma SO(4)(2-) concentration in SW.

  16. [A case of renal hypertension after pyelolithotomy cured by segmental nephrectomy].

    PubMed

    Konishi, T; Pak, K; Takayama, H; Tomoyoshi, T

    1985-12-01

    A case of renal hypertension after pyelolithotomy cured by segmental nephrectomy is reported. The patient, a 39-year-old man had had pyelolithotomy performed by the lumbodorsal approach at another hospital. Two months after operation he started to complain of headache and palpitation. The blood pressure was markedly high when he visited our hospital and peripheral plasma renin activity was also elevated. Urinalysis was normal except for slight proteinuria. The excretory urogram demonstrated cortical scarring in the lower portion of the left kidney. The renal scintigram demonstrated low uptake in this area, suggesting renal infarction. Renal arteriogram showed decreased vascularity in this area. Plasma renin activity was measured on the blood drawn from the renal vein of both sides and the ratio was about 2.4, and renin activity of the segmental renal vein from the left lower portion was elevated. Segmental nephrectomy of the lower pole was performed. The blood pressure three weeks after lower pole resection was estimated to be normal and renin activity returned to an almost normal level. Discussion was made on the cause of renal hypertension after renal surgery. In this case, it was suggested that renal hypertension is caused by subinfraction due to lesions of the dorsal renal artery in surgery for renal calculus. PMID:3832924

  17. Antibody response to Helicobacter pylori excretory antigen and the cross reaction study.

    PubMed

    Sasidharan, S; Uyub, A M

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is recognized as a major case of gastritis and peptic ulcer and a key factor in the development of gastric cancer, gastric lymphoma, and non-ulcerative dyspepsia in man. The detection of antibodies specific for strains of H. pylori has demonstrated the value of serology for providing evidence of infection. The present study was conducted to detect the antigenic proteins of excretory antigen of H. pylori with Western blotting and examine whether anti-H. pylori IgG and IgA antibodies from H. pylori positive patients cross-react with antigens from other common bacterial pathogens. By using SDS-PAGE, 20 different proteins were found in the excretory antigen. By Western blotting and absorption studies, there were indications that anti-H. pylori IgA antibodies directed against 54 kDa, 50 kDa and 27 kDa cross-reacted with antigens from other bacteria, and that H. pylori proteins of 99 kDa, 88 kDa and 81 kDa possibly shared similar epitope with antigens of other pathogens not tested in the absorption studies. The cross-reactivity occurred in this study was not significantly affect the performance of the in-house ELISA.

  18. Development of the excretory system in the polyplacophoran mollusc, Lepidochitona corrugata: the protonephridium.

    PubMed

    Baeumler, Natalie; Haszprunar, Gerhard; Ruthensteiner, Bernhard

    2011-08-01

    A single pair of protonephridia is the typical larval excretory organ of molluscs. Their presence in postlarval developmental stages was discovered only recently. We found that the protonephridia of the polyplacophoran mollusc, Lepidochitona corrugata, achieve their most elaborate differentiation and become largest during the postlarval period. This study describes the protonephridia of L. corrugata using light and electron microscopy and interactive three-dimensional visualization. We focus on the postlarval developmental period, in which the protonephridia consist of three parts: the terminal part with the ultrafiltration sites at the distal end, the voluminous protonephridial kidney, and the efferent nephroduct leading to the nephropore. The ultrafiltration sites show filtration slits between regularly arranged thin pedicles. The ciliary flame originates from both the terminal cell and the duct cells of the terminal portion. The efferent duct also shows ciliation. The most conspicuous structures, the protonephridial kidneys, are voluminous swellings composed of reabsorptive cells ("nephrocytes"). These cells exhibit strong vacuolization and an infolding system increasing the basal surface. The protonephridial kidneys, previously not reported at such a level of organization in molluscs, strikingly resemble (metanephridial) kidneys of adult molluscan excretory systems.

  19. The effect of altered sodium balance upon renal vascular reactivity to angiotensin II and norepinephrine in the dog. Mechanism of variation in angiotensin responses.

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, J A; Cannon, P J

    1978-01-01

    The mechanism whereby the vasoconstrictor response to angiotensin II (AII) is influenced by sodium balance or disease is unclear. To explore this question, the renal vascular responses (RVR) to intrarenal injections of subpressor doses of AII and norepinephrine were studied in dogs with an electromagnetic flowmeter. Acute and chronic sodium depletion increased plasma renin activity (PRA) and blunted the RVR to AII, while acute sodium repletion and chronic sodium excess plus desoxycorticosterone acetate decreased PRA and enhanced the RVR to AII. The magnitude of the RVR to AII was inversely related to PRA. The RVR to norepinephrine was unaffected by sodium balance and was not related to PRA. Inhibition of the conversion of angiotensin I to AII by SQ 20,881 during sodium depletion lowered mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), increased renal blood flow (RBF), and enhanced the RVR to AII but not to norepinephrine. Administration of bradykinin to chronically sodium-depleted dogs also lowered the MABP and increased RBF but had no effect on the RVR to AII. SQ 20,881 had no effect on MABP, RBF, or the RVR to AII in the dogs with chronic sodium excess and desoxycorticosterone acetate. Administration of indomethacin to chronically sodium-depleted dogs lowered RBF but did not influence the RVR to AII. The results indicate that the RVR to AII is selectively influenced by sodium balance and that the magnitude of the response is inversely related to the availability of endogenous AII. The data did not suggest that the variations in the RVR to AII were because of direct effects of sodium on vascular contraction, changes in the number of vascular AII receptors, or the renal prostaglandins. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the vasoconstrictor effect of AII in the renal vasculature is primarily dependent upon the degree to which the AII vascular receptors are occupied by endogenous hormone. PMID:641142

  20. The study on the material basis and the mechanism for anti-renal interstitial fibrosis efficacy of rhubarb through integration of metabonomics and network pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zheng; Sun, Hao; Cai, Xiaojun; Chen, Dahui; Zheng, Xiaoyong

    2015-04-01

    The cooperative material basis of the multi-component and multi-target mechanism of action of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is difficult to elucidate because of the current lack of appropriate techniques and strategies. In this paper, we focus on rhubarb treatment of renal fibrosis. Molecular docking, metabolic pathway enrichment, and network pharmacology methods were used to theoretically determine the interaction between the components of the rhubarb and disease targets related to renal fibrosis. Moreover, the methods of metabolomics, serum pharmacochemistry, histopathology and immunohistochemistry were used for the model group, the sham-operated group and the rhubarb administration group to reveal the active components and mechanisms of rhubarb. Finally, the experimental and theoretical results were integrated and comprehensively analyzed. Results indicated that anthraquinones and flavanols, such as rhein, emodin, catechin, and epicatechin, were the main active components of rhubarb. These active components play synergistic therapeutic efficacies through regulating the abnormal accumulation of the extracellular matrix, controlling the release of inflammatory factors and maintaining the balance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Our study showed that the integration of metabolomics and network pharmacology is a powerful strategy for discovering active components of TCMs and for elucidating their mechanisms.

  1. Epigenetic Regulation of MicroRNAs Controlling CLDN14 Expression as a Mechanism for Renal Calcium Handling

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yongfeng; Himmerkus, Nina; Plain, Allein; Bleich, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The kidney has a major role in extracellular calcium homeostasis. Multiple genetic linkage and association studies identified three tight junction genes from the kidney—claudin-14, -16, and -19—as critical for calcium imbalance diseases. Despite the compelling biologic evidence that the claudin-14/16/19 proteins form a regulated paracellular pathway for calcium reabsorption, approaches to regulate this transport pathway are largely unavailable, hindering the development of therapies to correct calcium transport abnormalities. Here, we report that treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors downregulates renal CLDN14 mRNA and dramatically reduces urinary calcium excretion in mice. Furthermore, treatment of mice with HDAC inhibitors stimulated the transcription of renal microRNA-9 (miR-9) and miR-374 genes, which have been shown to repress the expression of claudin-14, the negative regulator of the paracellular pathway. With renal clearance and tubule perfusion techniques, we showed that HDAC inhibitors transiently increase the paracellular cation conductance in the thick ascending limb. Genetic ablation of claudin-14 or the use of a loop diuretic in mice abrogated HDAC inhibitor-induced hypocalciuria. The genetic mutations in the calcium-sensing receptor from patients with autosomal dominant hypocalcemia (ADH) repressed the transcription of miR-9 and miR-374 genes, and treatment with an HDAC inhibitor rescued the phenotypes of cell and animal models of ADH. Furthermore, systemic treatment of mice with antagomiRs against these miRs relieved claudin-14 gene silencing and caused an ADH-like phenotype. Together, our findings provide proof of concept for a novel therapeutic principle on the basis of epigenetic regulation of renal miRs to treat hypercalciuric diseases. PMID:25071082

  2. An integrated lipidomics and metabolomics reveal nephroprotective effect and biochemical mechanism of Rheum officinale in chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Hao; Vaziri, Nosratola D.; Wei, Feng; Cheng, Xian-Long; Bai, Xu; Zhao, Ying-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is a major public health problem worldwide. Earlier studies have revealed salutary effects of rhubarb extracts in CRF. In this study, we employed lipidomic and metabolomic approaches to identify the plasma biomarkers and to determine the effect of treatment with petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and n-butanol extracts of rhubarb in a rat model of CRF with adenine-induced chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy. In addition, clinical biochemistry, histological evaluation and pro-fibrotic protein expression were analyzed. Significant changes were found between the CRF and control groups representing characteristic phenotypes of rats with CRF. Treatment with the three rhubarb extracts improved renal injury and dysfunction, either fully or partially reversed the plasma metabolites abnormalities and attenuated upregulation of pro-fibrotic proteins including TGF-β1, α-SMA, PAI-1, CTGF, FN and collagen-1. The nephroprotective effect of ethyl acetate extract was better than other extracts. The differential metabolites were closely associated with glycerophospholipid, fatty acid and amino acid metabolisms. The results revealed a strong link between renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis and glycerophospholipid metabolism and L-carnitine metabolism in the development of CRF. Amelioration of CRF with the three rhubarb extracts was associated with the delayed development and/or reversal the disorders in key metabolites associated with adenine-induced CRF. PMID:26903149

  3. A mathematical model of the urine concentrating mechanism in the rat renal medulla. II. Functional implications of three-dimensional architecture.

    PubMed

    Layton, Anita T

    2011-02-01

    In a companion study [Layton AT. A mathematical model of the urine concentrating mechanism in the rat renal medulla. I. Formulation and base-case results. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. (First published November 10, 2010). 10.1152/ajprenal.00203.2010] a region-based mathematical model was formulated for the urine concentrating mechanism in the renal medulla of the rat kidney. In the present study, we investigated model sensitivity to some of the fundamental structural assumptions. An unexpected finding is that the concentrating capability of this region-based model falls short of the capability of models that have radially homogeneous interstitial fluid at each level of only the inner medulla (IM) or of both the outer medulla and IM, but are otherwise analogous to the region-based model. Nonetheless, model results reveal the functional significance of several aspects of tubular segmentation and heterogeneity: 1) the exclusion of ascending thin limbs that reach into the deep IM from the collecting duct clusters in the upper IM promotes urea cycling within the IM; 2) the high urea permeability of the lower IM thin limb segments allows their tubular fluid urea content to equilibrate with the surrounding interstitium; 3) the aquaporin-1-null terminal descending limb segments prevent water entry and maintain the transepithelial NaCl concentration gradient; 4) a higher thick ascending limb Na(+) active transport rate in the inner stripe augments concentrating capability without a corresponding increase in energy expenditure for transport; 5) active Na(+) reabsorption from the collecting duct elevates its tubular fluid urea concentration. Model calculations predict that these aspects of tubular segmentation and heterogeneity promote effective urine concentrating functions.

  4. Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of excretory secretory antigens in humans with fascioliasis.

    PubMed Central

    Espino, A M; Finlay, C M

    1994-01-01

    A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay has been developed for the detection of Fasciola hepatica excretory secretory (ES) antigens in stool specimens of infected humans. The assay uses antibodies against F. hepatica ES antigens. A monoclonal antibody (ES78, mouse immunoglobulin G2a) was used to capture ES antigens, and a rabbit polyclonal antibody, peroxidase conjugate, was used to identify ES antigens. Thirteen of 14 patients with parasitological evidence of fascioliasis had a detectable concentration of ES antigens (more than 15 ng/ml). None of the stool specimens from controls and from patients with parasites other than F. hepatica showed a positive reaction, suggesting the absence of cross-reactions in this assay. When the 14 patients were retested 2 months after treatment, all of the specimens from the 11 parasitologically cured patients were negative by the antigen detection assay while the specimens from the 3 patients with persisting F. hepatica eggs in their stools remained positive. PMID:8126178

  5. Effect of repeated oral administration on taurocholate on hepatic excretory function in the rat.

    PubMed

    Watkins, J B; Klaassen, C D

    1981-07-01

    The effect of repeated administration of taurocholate on bile acid pool size, biliary composition and biliary excretory capacity for bile acids and two xenobiotics was determined. The bile acid pool was increased 50 to 60% by oral administration of sodium taurocholate (300--900 mg/kg, 10 ml/kg) every 12 hr for 2 days to male Sprague-Dawley rats. Bile flow, biliary excretion of bile acids, cholesterol and phospholipid and the concentrations of phospholipid and bile acids in bile were increased in rats treated with 750 mg of taurocholate per kg. No effect was observed on Na+,K+ or Cl- levels. The biliary transport maximum for taurocholate was increased by 30% in rats treated with 750 mg/kg. In contrast, the plasma disappearance and biliary excretion of phenol-3,6-dibromphthalein and ouabain were not affected by taurocholate administration.

  6. Cytogenic effects of diatrizoate and ioxaglate on patients undergoing excretory urography

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, M.E.; Sinues, B. )

    1990-06-01

    Possible cytogenic alterations due to radiologic contrast medium in patients undergoing a common radiologic examination is studied. Two groups of 20 patients each were used. Group I consisted of patients undergoing excretory urography, using sodium and meglumine diatrizoate as contrast. A different agent, sodium and meglumine ioxaglate, was used with group II. Three blood samples were taken from each patient before urography, immediately after urography, and 1 week later. The frequency of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) and chromosomal aberrations (CA) were found to increase significantly in the B samples from both groups, that of group I being higher (P less than .01 compared with P less than .05). Furthermore, these alterations were found to persist in the C samples from group I. No modification of the Proliferating Rate Index (PRI) was found. The osmolarity or other components of the contrast media studied could be involved in the process. The results indicate that ioxaglate produces less cytogenic damage than diatrizoate.

  7. The schistosome excretory system: a key to regulation of metabolism, drug excretion and host interaction.

    PubMed

    Kusel, John R; McVeigh, Paul; Thornhill, Joyce A

    2009-08-01

    There is a gulf between the enormous information content of the various genome projects and the understanding of the life of the parasite in the host. In vitro studies with adult Schistosoma mansoni using several substrates suggest that the excretory system contains both P-glycoproteins and multiresistance proteins. If both these families of protein were active in vivo, they could regulate parasite metabolism and be responsible for the excretion of drugs. During skin penetration, membrane-impermeant molecules of a wide range of molecular weights can be taken into the cercaria and schistosomulum through the nephridiopore, through the surface membrane or through both. We speculate that this uptake process might stimulate novel signalling pathways involved in growth and development.

  8. Thrombospondin-1 Deficiency Causes a Shift from Fibroproliferative to Inflammatory Kidney Disease and Delays Onset of Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Zeisberg, Michael; Tampe, Björn; LeBleu, Valerie; Tampe, Desiree; Zeisberg, Elisabeth M.; Kalluri, Raghu

    2015-01-01

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) is a multifunctional matricellular protein known to promote progression of chronic kidney disease. To gain insight into the underlying mechanisms through which TSP1 accelerates chronic kidney disease, we compared disease progression in Col4a3 knockout (KO) mice, which develop spontaneous kidney failure, with that of Col4a3;Tsp1 double-knockout (DKO) mice. Decline of excretory renal function was significantly delayed in the absence of TSP1. Although Col4a3;Tsp1 DKO mice did progress toward end-stage renal failure, their kidneys exhibited distinct histopathological lesions, compared with creatinine level–matched Col4a3 KO mice. Although kidneys of both Col4a3 KO and Col4a3;Tsp1 DKO mice exhibited a widened tubulointerstitium, predominant lesions in Col4a3 KO kidneys were collagen deposition and fibroblast accumulation, whereas in Col4a3;Tsp1 DKO kidney inflammation was predominant, with less collagen deposition. Altered disease progression correlated with impaired activation of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in vivo and in vitro in the absence of TSP1. In summary, our findings suggest that TSP1 contributes to progression of chronic kidney disease by catalyzing activation of latent TGF-β1, resulting in promotion of a fibroproliferative response over an inflammatory response. Furthermore, the findings suggest that fibroproliferative and inflammatory lesions are independent entities, both of which contribute to decline of renal function. PMID:25111226

  9. Renal trauma: radiological studies - comparison of urography, computed tomography, angiography, and radionuclide studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, E.K.; Sullivan, J.; Frentz, G.

    1985-01-01

    Excretory urography, computed radionuclide urography, angiography, and both conventional and dynamic computed tomography (CT) were compared with regard to accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity in 388 patients with renal trauma. Used as the triage examination, urography established the absence of significant renal injury with an accuracy of 87%, obviating further evaluation. Dynamic CT proved to be the best methods of assessing parenchymal injuries, establishing the correct diagnosis in 129 out of 130 cases compared to 116/130 for conventional CT. Angiography was the procedure of choice for diagnosis and categorization of renal artery injuries, which were diagnosed correctly in all 43 cases. The choice between dynamic CT and angiography as the second examination rests upon careful evaluation of clinical and urographic findings for signs of renal artery injury which would mandate angiographic assessment.

  10. Renal adaptation during hibernation.

    PubMed

    Jani, Alkesh; Martin, Sandra L; Jain, Swati; Keys, Daniel; Edelstein, Charles L

    2013-12-01

    Hibernators periodically undergo profound physiological changes including dramatic reductions in metabolic, heart, and respiratory rates and core body temperature. This review discusses the effect of hypoperfusion and hypothermia observed during hibernation on glomerular filtration and renal plasma flow, as well as specific adaptations in renal architecture, vasculature, the renin-angiotensin system, and upregulation of possible protective mechanisms during the extreme conditions endured by hibernating mammals. Understanding the mechanisms of protection against organ injury during hibernation may provide insights into potential therapies for organ injury during cold storage and reimplantation during transplantation.

  11. Nuclear renal imaging in acute pyelonephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Handmaker, H.

    1982-07-01

    Patients with acute pyelonephritis may present with a spectrum of clinical signs and symptoms. There are few noninvasive diagnostic studies, however, to confirm or exclude this diagnosis. A small number of patients, generally those with severe disease, will demonstrate radiographic changes on excretory urography, but the lack of sensitivity of the IVP in early, acute pyelonephritis is well documented. Several radionuclide techniques have been proposed to assist in the earlier detection of this clinical problem including imaging with Mercury-197 chlormerodrin, Gallium-67 citrate, Technetium-99m glucoheptonate. Technetium-99m DMSA, and, more recently, Indium-111 labeled white blood cells. The success of the renal cortical imaging agents as well as those which localize in infection are described in this report. There appears to be a complimentary role or the cortical imaging agents and the radiopharmaceuticals which localize in bacterial infection. Cortical agents offer the advantage of specific assessment of functioning renal tissue and a convenient, rapid method for following the response to treatment in a noninvasive manner. A pattern is described which may be diagnostic; correlation with Gallium-67 citrate of Indium-111 WBCs may increase the probability of infection as the cause for the cortical abnormality. The measurement of differential renal function using cortical agents provides additional information to assist the clinician in predicting the late effects of infection. Improved sensitivity and specificity, and a reproducible method for following the response to therapy in patients with acute pyelonephritis are the advantages of the techniques described.

  12. Neural regulation of the kidney function in rats with cisplatin induced renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Goulding, Niamh E.; Johns, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is often associated with a disturbed cardiovascular homeostasis. This investigation explored the role of the renal innervation in mediating deranged baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and renal excretory function in cisplatin-induced renal failure. Methods: Rats were either intact or bilaterally renally denervated 4 days prior to receiving cisplatin (5 mg/kg i.p.) and entered a chronic metabolic study for 8 days. At day 8, other groups of rats were prepared for acute measurement of RSNA or renal function with either intact or denervated kidneys. Results: Following the cisplatin challenge, creatinine clearance was 50% lower while fractional sodium excretion and renal cortical and medullary TGF-β1 concentrations were 3–4 fold higher in both intact and renally denervated rats compared to control rats. In cisplatin-treated rats, the maximal gain of the high-pressure baroreflex curve was only 20% that of control rats, but following renal denervation not different from that of renally denervated control rats. Volume expansion reduced RSNA by 50% in control and in cisplatin-treated rats but only following bilateral renal denervation. The volume expansion mediated natriuresis/diuresis was absent in the cisplatin-treated rats but was normalized following renal denervation. Conclusions: Cisplatin-induced renal injury impaired renal function and caused a sympatho-excitation with blunting of high and low pressure baroreflex regulation of RSNA, which was dependent on the renal innervation. It is suggested that in man with CKD there is a dysregulation of the neural control of the kidney mediated by its sensory innervation. PMID:26175693

  13. Neonatal renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Leonardo R; Simpson, Ewurabena A; Lau, Keith K

    2011-12-01

    Neonatal renal vein thrombosis (RVT) continues to pose significant challenges for pediatric hematologists and nephrologists. The precise mechanism for the onset and propagation of renal thrombosis within the neonatal population is unclear, but there is suggestion that acquired and/or inherited thrombophilia traits may increase the risk for renal thromboembolic disease during the newborn period. This review summarizes the most recent studies of neonatal RVT, examining its most common features, the prevalence of acquired and inherited prothrombotic risk factors among these patients, and evaluates their short and long term renal and thrombotic outcomes as they may relate to these risk factors. Although there is some consensus regarding the management of neonatal RVT, the most recent antithrombotic therapy guidelines for the management of childhood thrombosis do not provide a risk-based algorithm for the acute management of RVT among newborns with hereditary prothrombotic disorders. Whereas neonatal RVT is not a condition associated with a high mortality rate, it is associated with significant morbidity due to renal impairment. Recent evidence to evaluate the effects of heparin-based anticoagulation and thrombolytic therapy on the long term renal function of these patients has yielded conflicting results. Long term cohort studies and randomized trials may be helpful to clarify the impact of acute versus prolonged antithrombotic therapy for reducing the morbidity that is associated with neonatal RVT.

  14. Nuclear medicine and complementary modalities in renal trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, B.C. Jr.

    1982-07-01

    The diagnosis of renal trauma for many years was achieved through history, clinical findings, the performance of a survey film of the abdomen, urinalysis, excretory urography, aortography, and selective renal artery arteriography. The development of the scintillation camera and the availability of /sup 99m/Tc, as well as /sup 99m/Tc labeled pharmaceuticals, approximately fifteen years ago has widened this diagnostic horizon. Exquisite new imaging modalities have become available recently. As a result of constantly improving technology, these techniques--including computed tomography, sonography, with real time enhancement, and digital video subtraction angiography--are utilized more and more frequently. The full impact of these newest wonders is not yet realized. Cost-effectiveness, radiation exposure, accumulative drug side-effects, availability of facilities and personnel and professional and technical training have become major considerations.

  15. Novel mechanism of intra‑renal angiotensin II-induced sodium/proton exchanger 3 expression by losartan in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoqin; Liu, Kaishan; Cui, Wei; Huang, Jiongmei; Wang, Weina; Gao, Yuan

    2014-11-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the molecular pharmacodynamic mechanisms of losartan used in the treatment of hypertension. A total of 12 spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were divided randomly into an SHR group treated with saline and LOS group treated with losartan. Six Wistar‑kyoto rats (WKY) were enrolled as the WKY group with saline in the study. The LOS group received 30 mg/kg/day losartan by intragastric injection, while the SHR and WKY were fed the same volume of saline. The dosage was modulated according to the weekly weight. Changes in blood pressure were measured by the indirect tail cuff method. Angiotensin (Ang) II production in the plasma and renal tissue was measured by an immunoradiometric method. Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE)3 and serum and glucocorticoid‑inducible kinase (SGK)1 were assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and western blot analysis. When compared with the WKY group, the blood pressure of the SHR and LOS groups were higher prior to treatment with losartan. Following two weeks, blood pressure was reduced and the trend continued to decrease over the following six weeks. The plasma and renal tissue levels of Ang II in the SHR and LOS groups were significantly higher than those in the WKY group. NHE3 and SGK1 were increased at the mRNA and protein level in the SHR group, and losartan reduced the expression of both of them. The results suggested that in hypertensive rats, the circular and tissue renin angiotensin systems were activated, and the increased Ang II stimulated the expression of NHE3 and SGK1, which was reduced by losartan. Therefore, the effects of losartan in hypertension may be associated with the Ang II‑SGK1‑NHE3 of intra‑renal tissue.

  16. Renal infarction associated with adrenal pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Thewjitcharoen, Yotsapon; Atikankul, Taywin; Sunthornyothin, Sarat

    2013-09-01

    The coexistence of pheochromocytoma and renal artery stenosis had been reported occasionally from the possible mechanism of catecholoamine-induced vasospasm and extrinsic compression of renal artery in some reported cases. However, renal infarction caused by pheochromocytoma is an uncommon phenomenon. Herein, we report an interesting case of adrenal pheochromocytoma associated with renal artery thrombosis, which should be included in the differential diagnosis of pheochromocytoma patients who present with abdominal pain.

  17. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Soon Hyo; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) remains a major cause of secondary hypertension and renal failure. Randomized, prospective trials show that medical treatment should constitute the main therapeutic approach in ARAS. Regardless of intensive treatment and adequate blood pressure control, however, renal and extra-renal complications are not uncommon. Yet, the precise mechanisms, accurate detection, and optimal treatment in ARAS remain elusive. Strategies oriented to early detection and targeting these pathogenic pathways might prevent development of clinical endpoints. Here, we review the results of recent clinical trials, current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms, novel imaging techniques to assess renal damage in ARAS, and treatment options. PMID:25908472

  18. Disruption of Smad7 Promotes ANG II-Mediated Renal Inflammation and Fibrosis via Sp1-TGF-β/Smad3-NF.κB-Dependent Mechanisms in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao R.; Wei, Lihua; Chen, Hai-Yong; Shi, Yong-Jun; Heuchel, Rainer L.; Lan, Hui Y.

    2013-01-01

    Smad7 is an inhibitory Smad and plays a protective role in obstructive and diabetic kidney disease. However, the role and mechanisms of Smad7 in hypertensive nephropathy remains unexplored. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the role and regulatory mechanisms of Smad7 in ANG II-induced hypertensive nephropathy. Smad7 gene knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice received a subcutaneous infusion of ANG II or control saline for 4 weeks via osmotic mini-pumps. ANG II infusion produced equivalent hypertension in Smad7 KO and WT mice; however, Smad7 KO mice exhibited more severe renal functional injury as shown by increased proteinuria and reduced renal function (both p<0.05) when compared with Smad7 WT mice. Enhanced renal injury in Smad7 KO mice was associated with more progressive renal fibrosis with elevated TGF-β/Smad3 signalling. Smad7 KO mice also showed more profound renal inflammation including increased macrophage infiltration, enhanced IL-1β and TNF-α expression, and a marked activation of NF-κB signaling (all p<0.01). Further studies revealed that enhanced ANG II-mediated renal inflammation and fibrosis in Smad7 KO mice were also associated with up-regulation of Sp1 but downregulation of miR-29b expression. Taken together, the present study revealed that enhanced Sp1-TGF-β1/Smad3-NF-κB signaling and loss of miR-29 may be mechanisms by which deletion of Smad7 promotes ANG II-mediated renal fibrosis and inflammation. Thus, Smad7 may play a protective role in ANG II-induced hypertensive kidney disease. PMID:23301086

  19. ZO-2 silencing induces renal hypertrophy through a cell cycle mechanism and the activation of YAP and the mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Calderón, Alaide; Ávila-Flores, Antonia; Ponce, Arturo; López-Bayghen, Esther; Calderón-Salinas, José-Víctor; Luis Reyes, José; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Segovia, José; Angulo, Carla; Ramírez, Leticia; Gallego-Gutiérrez, Helios; Alarcón, Lourdes; Martín-Tapia, Dolores; Bautista-García, Pablo; González-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2016-05-15

    Renal compensatory hypertrophy (RCH) restores normal kidney function after disease or loss of kidney tissue and is characterized by an increase in organ size due to cell enlargement and not to cell proliferation. In MDCK renal epithelial cells, silencing of the tight junction protein zona occludens 2 (ZO-2 KD) induces cell hypertrophy by two mechanisms: prolonging the time that cells spend at the G1 phase of the cell cycle due to an increase in cyclin D1 level, and augmenting the rate of protein synthesis. The latter is triggered by the nuclear accumulation and increased transcriptional activity of Yes-associated protein (YAP), the main target of the Hippo pathway, which results in decreased expression of phosphatase and tensin homologue. This in turn increased the level of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate, which transactivates the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, leading to activation of the kinase S6K1 and increased synthesis of proteins and cell size. In agreement, in a rat model of uninephrectomy, RCH is accompanied by decreased expression of ZO-2 and nuclear expression of YAP. Our results reveal a novel role of ZO-2 as a modulator of cell size.

  20. ZO-2 silencing induces renal hypertrophy through a cell cycle mechanism and the activation of YAP and the mTOR pathway

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Calderón, Alaide; Ávila-Flores, Antonia; Ponce, Arturo; López-Bayghen, Esther; Calderón-Salinas, José-Víctor; Luis Reyes, José; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Segovia, José; Angulo, Carla; Ramírez, Leticia; Gallego-Gutiérrez, Helios; Alarcón, Lourdes; Martín-Tapia, Dolores; Bautista-García, Pablo; González-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2016-01-01

    Renal compensatory hypertrophy (RCH) restores normal kidney function after disease or loss of kidney tissue and is characterized by an increase in organ size due to cell enlargement and not to cell proliferation. In MDCK renal epithelial cells, silencing of the tight junction protein zona occludens 2 (ZO-2 KD) induces cell hypertrophy by two mechanisms: prolonging the time that cells spend at the G1 phase of the cell cycle due to an increase in cyclin D1 level, and augmenting the rate of protein synthesis. The latter is triggered by the nuclear accumulation and increased transcriptional activity of Yes-associated protein (YAP), the main target of the Hippo pathway, which results in decreased expression of phosphatase and tensin homologue. This in turn increased the level of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate, which transactivates the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, leading to activation of the kinase S6K1 and increased synthesis of proteins and cell size. In agreement, in a rat model of uninephrectomy, RCH is accompanied by decreased expression of ZO-2 and nuclear expression of YAP. Our results reveal a novel role of ZO-2 as a modulator of cell size. PMID:27009203

  1. The antihypertensive profile of the angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonist, GR138950, and the influence of potential homeostatic compensatory mechanisms in renal hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ian K; Drew, Geoffrey M

    1998-01-01

    The cardiovascular profile of the angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonist, GR138950, and the influence of potential compensatory homeostatic mechanisms on this profile, were investigated in renal artery ligated hypertensive (RALH) rats.GR138950 caused a marked reduction in blood pressure associated with immediate tachycardia in conscious RALH rats. The antihypertensive action of GR138950 appeared biphasic; an immediate fall in blood pressure, which plateaued within 1 h, and which was followed by a further slow decline that reached maximum between 5–7 h after administration.The tachycardia caused by GR138950 was attenuated by atenolol and was abolished by combined pretreatment with atenolol and atropine methyl nitrate. However, the antihypertensive profile of GR138950 was unchanged by these pretreatments.The resting blood pressure and the antihypertensive effect of GR138950, in RALH rats, were unaffected by the vasopressin V1 receptor antagonist, [β-mercapto-β,β-cyclopentamethylene propionyl1-O-Me-Tyr2,Arg8]-vasopressin. Thus, vasopressinergic mechanisms are not involved in either maintaining blood pressure in RALH rats, or in compensating for the fall in blood pressure caused by GR138950.In anaesthetized RALH rats, GR138950 caused a marked fall in blood pressure that was accompanied by an increase in heart rate along with sustained increases in renal and splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity.In summary, the biphasic fall in blood pressure evoked by GR138950 in RALH rats can not be explained on the basis of changes in autonomic control of the heart, alteration of vasopressin-mediated vasoconstrictor mechanisms or overall suppression of central sympathetic outflow. Rather, increased vasoconstrictor tone might serve to oppose the initial fall in blood pressure. PMID:9863652

  2. [Experience of use of allokin-alfa in the treatment of genitourinary infections complicated by excretory-toxic infertility].

    PubMed

    Akimov, O V; Kostromeev, S A; Dyshkovets, A A

    2013-01-01

    The results of the examination and treatment of 67 patients aged 18 to 45 years are presented. Patients suffered from chronic prostatitis, chronic prostatovesiculitis, chronic uretroprostatitis complicated by excretory-toxic infertility. Pathogens, including sexually transmitted infections (STIs), were identified in all patients. The control group received conventional therapy (causative agents, a-adrenoblockers, enzyme therapy). In the study group, patients received allokin alpha in addition to conventional therapy. The use of allokin-alfa promoted more rapid and complete eradication of STI pathogens, and normalization of the spermogram. The results of this study allow to recommend allokin-alfa for the combined treatment of patients with infectious and inflammatory diseases of the genitourinary system, complicated by excretory-toxic infertility.

  3. Atheroembolic renal disease

    MedlinePlus

    Renal disease - atheroembolic; Cholesterol embolization syndrome; Atheroemboli - renal; Atherosclerotic disease - renal ... disorder of the arteries. It occurs when fat, cholesterol, and other substances build up in the walls ...

  4. Responses of the surface membrane and excretory system of Schistosoma mansoni to damage and to treatment with praziquantel and other biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, F A; Kusel, J R; Ribeiro, F; Coelho, P M Z

    2006-03-01

    Damage to the surface membrane of adult Schistosoma mansoni, and the activity of the excretory system, as shown by resorufin fluorescence, was observed following treatment with praziquantel and incubation with other molecules. Praziquantel treatment induced damage to the surface membrane as measured by the use of a variety of fluorescent compounds. The excretory system of the male worm was inhibited immediately after praziquantel treatment, but fully recovered after culture for 2 h following removal of praziquantel. The excretory system of the female, observed to be minimally active in untreated worm pairs, was often greatly activated in paired females, as shown by intense resorufin labelling, after praziquantel treatment, and this continued during recovery of the male excretory system. In experiments with normal worm pairs, the female could be activated by inhibiting the metabolic rate of the pair by a cooling procedure. The effects on the excretory system of changes in culture conditions (such as changes in pH, concentrations of bacterial lipopolysaccharide, cytokines, reactive oxygen species, compounds which remove cholesterol, such as beta-methyl cyclodextrin, and damaging basic poly-L-lysine) were also assessed. It is concluded that the extensive excretory system of the adult worm is responsive to drug treatment and to certain changes in environmental conditions. Its activity seems to be strongly linked to the integrity of the surface membrane.

  5. Visualizing renal primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Deane, James A; Verghese, Elizabeth; Martelotto, Luciano G; Cain, Jason E; Galtseva, Alya; Rosenblum, Norman D; Watkins, D Neil; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2013-03-01

    Renal primary cilia are microscopic sensory organelles found on the apical surface of epithelial cells of the nephron and collecting duct. They are based upon a microtubular cytoskeleton, bounded by a specialized membrane, and contain an array of proteins that facilitate their assembly, maintenance and function. Cilium-based signalling is important for the control of epithelial differentiation and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various cystic kidney diseases and in renal repair. As such, visualizing renal primary cilia and understanding their composition has become an essential component of many studies of inherited kidney disease and mechanisms of epithelial regeneration. Primary cilia were initially identified in the kidney using electron microscopy and this remains a useful technique for the high resolution examination of these organelles. New reagents and techniques now also allow the structure and composition of primary cilia to be analysed in detail using fluorescence microscopy. Primary cilia can be imaged in situ in sections of kidney, and many renal-derived cell lines produce primary cilia in culture providing a simplified and accessible system in which to investigate these organelles. Here we outline microscopy-based techniques commonly used for studying renal primary cilia.

  6. Histones from Dying Renal Cells Aggravate Kidney Injury via TLR2 and TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Allam, Ramanjaneyulu; Scherbaum, Christina Rebecca; Darisipudi, Murthy Narayana; Mulay, Shrikant R.; Hägele, Holger; Lichtnekert, Julia; Hagemann, Jan Henrik; Rupanagudi, Khader Valli; Ryu, Mi; Schwarzenberger, Claudia; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian; Uhl, Bernd; Reichel, Christoph A.; Krombach, Fritz; Monestier, Marc; Liapis, Helen; Moreth, Kristin; Schaefer, Liliana

    2012-01-01

    In AKI, dying renal cells release intracellular molecules that stimulate immune cells to secrete proinflammatory cytokines, which trigger leukocyte recruitment and renal inflammation. Whether the release of histones, specifically, from dying cells contributes to the inflammation of AKI is unknown. In this study, we found that dying tubular epithelial cells released histones into the extracellular space, which directly interacted with Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 (TLR2) and TLR4 to induce MyD88, NF-κB, and mitogen activated protein kinase signaling. Extracellular histones also had directly toxic effects on renal endothelial cells and tubular epithelial cells in vitro. In addition, direct injection of histones into the renal arteries of mice demonstrated that histones induce leukocyte recruitment, microvascular vascular leakage, renal inflammation, and structural features of AKI in a TLR2/TLR4-dependent manner. Antihistone IgG, which neutralizes the immunostimulatory effects of histones, suppressed intrarenal inflammation, neutrophil infiltration, and tubular cell necrosis and improved excretory renal function. In summary, the release of histones from dying cells aggravates AKI via both its direct toxicity to renal cells and its proinflammatory effects. Because the induction of proinflammatory cytokines in dendritic cells requires TLR2 and TLR4, these results support the concept that renal damage triggers an innate immune response, which contributes to the pathogenesis of AKI. PMID:22677551

  7. The identification of novel potential injury mechanisms and candidate biomarkers in renal allograft rejection by quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Sigdel, Tara K; Salomonis, Nathan; Nicora, Carrie D; Ryu, Soyoung; He, Jintang; Dinh, Van; Orton, Daniel J; Moore, Ronald J; Hsieh, Szu-Chuan; Dai, Hong; Thien-Vu, Minh; Xiao, Wenzhong; Smith, Richard D; Qian, Wei-Jun; Camp, David G; Sarwal, Minnie M

    2014-02-01

    Early transplant dysfunction and failure because of immunological and nonimmunological factors still presents a significant clinical problem for transplant recipients. A critical unmet need is the noninvasive detection and prediction of immune injury such that acute injury can be reversed by proactive immunosuppression titration. In this study, we used iTRAQ -based proteomic discovery and targeted ELISA validation to discover and validate candidate urine protein biomarkers from 262 renal allograft recipients with biopsy-confirmed allograft injury. Urine samples were randomly split into a training set of 108 patients and an independent validation set of 154 patients, which comprised the clinical biopsy-confirmed phenotypes of acute rejection (AR) (n = 74), stable graft (STA) (n = 74), chronic allograft injury (CAI) (n = 58), BK virus nephritis (BKVN) (n = 38), nephrotic syndrome (NS) (n = 8), and healthy, normal control (HC) (n = 10). A total of 389 proteins were measured that displayed differential abundances across urine specimens of the injury types (p < 0.05) with a significant finding that SUMO2 (small ubiquitin-related modifier 2) was identified as a "hub" protein for graft injury irrespective of causation. Sixty-nine urine proteins had differences in abundance (p < 0.01) in AR compared with stable graft, of which 12 proteins were up-regulated in AR with a mean fold increase of 2.8. Nine urine proteins were highly specific for AR because of their significant differences (p < 0.01; fold increase >1.5) from all other transplant categories (HLA class II protein HLA-DRB1, KRT14, HIST1H4B, FGG, ACTB, FGB, FGA, KRT7, DPP4). Increased levels of three of these proteins, fibrinogen beta (FGB; p = 0.04), fibrinogen gamma (FGG; p = 0.03), and HLA DRB1 (p = 0.003) were validated by ELISA in AR using an independent sample set. The fibrinogen proteins further segregated AR from BK virus nephritis (FGB p = 0.03, FGG p = 0.02), a finding that supports the utility of

  8. Development of the Renal Arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, R. Ariel

    2011-01-01

    The kidney is a highly vascularized organ that normally receives a fifth of the cardiac output. The unique spatial arrangement of the kidney vasculature with each nephron is crucial for the regulation of renal blood flow, GFR, urine concentration, and other specialized kidney functions. Thus, the proper and timely assembly of kidney vessels with their respective nephrons is a crucial morphogenetic event leading to the formation of a functioning kidney necessary for independent extrauterine life. Mechanisms that govern the development of the kidney vasculature are poorly understood. In this review, we discuss the anatomical development, embryological origin, lineage relationships, and key regulators of the kidney arterioles and postglomerular circulation. Because renal disease is associated with deterioration of the kidney microvasculature and/or the reenactment of embryonic pathways, understanding the morphogenetic events and processes that maintain the renal vasculature may open new avenues for the preservation of renal structure and function and prevent the progression of renal disease. PMID:22052047

  9. Circadian rhythmic hepatic biliary flow, constituents, concentrations and excretory rates in patients after cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Ho, K J

    1994-01-01

    Twelve adult patients with indwelling common bile duct T-tube were selected for the study of circadian fluctuation of biliary excretion. From the 10th postoperative day on when the enterohepatic circulation was well reestablished a 5 ml bile sample was collected at the end of each 4-h interval for 3 to 4 days for determination of the concentrations of various biliary constituents. This was followed by measurement of bile flow rate by collecting the bile continuously through the T-tube at 4-h intervals for another 3 to 4 days. One quarter of the twelve patients showed no persistent daily fluctuation of all the variables studied. A circadian rhythm was demonstrated by single cosinor rhythmometry in the biliary concentrations of bile acid, cholesterol, phospholipid, bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, and lactate dehydrogenase in the remaining nine patients. Among them six also showed a circadian fluctuation of hepatic bile flow. The lack of synchronization of the rhythm of the concentrations of various biliary constituents with the bile flow rate resulted in undetectability of a circadian rhythm for their excretory rate in the great majority of patients. Those few patients in whom a rhythm remained to be detectable had a much reduced amplitude but the same acrophase. We concluded that bile flow rate played a major role in the circadian rhythm of biliary excretion and might coordinate the fluctuation of the concentrations of various biliary constituents. However, a true circadian rhythm for their concentrations also existed at least in certain subjects.

  10. Effect of polybrominated biphenyls on hepatic excretory function in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Cagen, S Z; Gibson, J E

    1978-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the influence of polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) on hepatic excretory function in developing and adult rats and mice. Prenatal or postnatal dietary exposure to PBBs (50 ppm in diet of pregnant or lactating mother or in diet of rat weanlings) resulted in elevated liver weight in developing rats. In 15-day-old rats that had been treated with PBBs increased liver weight correlated to enhanced ouabain transport from plasma into bile. Liver weight was also elevated in 21, 35, and 49-day-old rats exposed to PBBs, but this effect was not associated with stimulation of ouabain transport in these animals. However, adult rats fed 100 ppm PBBs for two weeks had significantly lower plasma concentrations of sulfobromophthalein (BSP) and increased biliary excretion of BSP, when compared to controls. PBBs-fed adult rats also excreted a greater percentage conjugated BSP (BSP-GSH) into bile. Two week dietary treatment of 100, 150, and 200 ppm PBBs resulted in enhanced initial disappearance of indocyanine green (ICG) from plasma of adult mice. However, dietary doses of 100 and 200 ppm PBBs to adult mice was not associated with enhanced capacity for ouabain excretion. In contrast, treatment with PBBs through the mother's diet (50 ppm) resulted in an almost twofold increase in cumulative ouabain excretion in 15-day-old mice. The results suggest that PBBs stimulate hepatic drug elimination in rats and mice, but the magnitude of the effect is dependent on age and transported compound.

  11. Equine antibody response to larval Parascaris equorum excretory-secretory products.

    PubMed

    Burk, Steffanie V; Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Brewster-Barnes, Tammy; Howe, Daniel K; Carter, Craig N; Bryant, Uneeda K; Rossano, Mary G

    2016-08-15

    Parascaris equorum is an intestinal nematode of foals and young horses that can produce mild to severe pathology. Current diagnosis is limited to detection of patent infections, when parasite eggs are identified during fecal examinations. This study examined the use of larval P. equorum excretory-secretory (ES) products in a western blot test for diagnosis of prepatent equine P. equorum infection. Sera from adult mares negative for patent P. equorum infections, foals prior to consuming colostrum, and P. equorum infected foals were used as controls in this study. Study samples included sera from 18 broodmares prior to parturition and sera from their foals throughout the process of natural infection. Sera from study horses were examined for IgG(T) antibody recognition of ES products. Foals naturally infected with P. equorum possessed IgG(T) antibodies against 19kDa, 22kDa, 26kDa, and 34kDa ES products. However, passive transfer of colostral antibodies from mares was shown to preclude the use of the crude larval ES product-based western blot test for diagnosis of prepatent P. equorum infections in foals. PMID:27514890

  12. In vitro culture of Mesocestoides corti metacestodes and isolation of immunomodulatory excretory-secretory products.

    PubMed

    Vendelova, E; Hrčková, G; Lutz, M B; Brehm, K; Nono Komguep, J

    2016-07-01

    Cestode-mediated diseases hold the interesting feature of persisting metacestode larvae dwelling within the host tissues, in the midst of the immune response. Excretory-secretory (ES) products of the metacestode larval stage modulate the host immune response and modify the outcome of the disease. Therefore, isolation and analysis of axenic metacestode ES products are crucial to study their properties. Here, we report the development of a system for long-term in vitro cultivation of the metacestode of the parasitic cestode Mesocestoides corti (syn. Mesocestoides vogae). Although feeder cells and host serum supported the early growth of the parasite, long-term survival was not dependent on host serum or host-derived factors enabling the collection of parasite released products in serum-free medium. Functionally, these axenic ES products recapitulated M. corti tetrathyridia's ability to inhibit LPS-driven IL-12p70 secretion by dendritic cells. Thus, our new axenic culture system will simplify the identification and characterization of M. corti-derived immunomodulatory factors that will indirectly enable the identification and characterization of corresponding factors in the metacestode larvae of medically relevant cestodes such as Echinococcus multilocularis that are not yet amenable to serum-free cultivation.

  13. Identifying Schistosoma japonicum excretory/secretory proteins and their interactions with host immune system.

    PubMed

    Liao, Qi; Yuan, Xiongying; Xiao, Hui; Liu, Changning; Lv, Zhiyue; Zhao, Yi; Wu, Zhongdao

    2011-01-01

    Schistosoma japonicum is a major infectious agent of schistosomiasis. It has been reported that large number of proteins excreted and secreted by S. japonicum during its life cycle are important for its infection and survival in definitive hosts. These proteins can be used as ideal candidates for vaccines or drug targets. In this work, we analyzed the protein sequences of S. japonicum and found that compared with other proteins in S. japonicum, excretory/secretory (ES) proteins are generally longer, more likely to be stable and enzyme, more likely to contain immune-related binding peptides and more likely to be involved in regulation and metabolism processes. Based on the sequence difference between ES and non-ES proteins, we trained a support vector machine (SVM) with much higher accuracy than existing approaches. Using this SVM, we identified 191 new ES proteins in S. japonicum, and further predicted 7 potential interactions between these ES proteins and human immune proteins. Our results are useful to understand the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis and can serve as a new resource for vaccine or drug targets discovery for anti-schistosome.

  14. Ivermectin disrupts the function of the excretory-secretory apparatus in microfilariae of Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Yovany; Nabhan, Joseph F; Solomon, Jonathan; Mackenzie, Charles D; Geary, Timothy G

    2010-11-16

    Ivermectin (IVM) is a broad-spectrum anthelmintic used in filariasis control programs. By binding to nematode glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls), IVM disrupts neurotransmission processes regulated by GluCl activity. IVM treatment of filarial infections is characterized by an initial dramatic drop in the levels of circulating microfilariae, followed by long-term suppression of their production, but the drug has little direct effect on microfilariae in culture at pharmacologically relevant concentrations. We localized Brugia malayi GluCl expression solely in a muscle structure that surrounds the microfilarial excretory-secretory (ES) vesicle, which suggests that protein release from the ES vesicle is regulated by GluCl activity. Consistent with this hypothesis, exposure to IVM in vitro decreased the amount of protein released from microfilariae. To better understand the scope of IVM effects on protein release by the parasite, three different expression patterns were identified from immunolocalization assays on a representative group of five microfilarial ES products. Patterns of expression suggest that the ES apparatus is the main source of regulated ES product release from microfilariae, as it is the only compartment that appears to be under neuromuscular control. Our results show that IVM treatment of microfilariae results in a marked reduction of protein release from the ES apparatus. Under in vivo conditions, the rapid microfilarial clearance induced by IVM treatment is proposed to result from suppression of the ability of the parasite to secrete proteins that enable evasion of the host immune system.

  15. Deglycosylation of Toxocara excretory-secretory antigens improves the specificity of the serodiagnosis for human toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Roldán, W H; Elefant, G R; Ferreira, A W

    2015-11-01

    Serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis is difficult in tropical areas where other helminthiasis are endemic. Many studies have shown that glycans from helminths may be the responsible for cross-reactions in the immunoassays. In this study, we have evaluated the deglycosylation of the Toxocara canis excretory-secretory (TES) antigens for the detection of IgG antibodies using a panel of 228 serum samples (58 patients with toxocariasis, 75 patients with other helminth infections and 95 healthy individuals) by ELISA and Western blot assays. Our results showed that the deglycosylation of TES antigens resulted in a single fraction of 26 kDa (dTES) and was able to detect IgG antibodies with a sensitivity and specificity of 100% in both above-mentioned assays. The rate of cross-reactions, observed in ELISA with TES (13·3%), was significantly reduced (5·3%) when the dTES antigens were used. Likewise, the cross-reactivity observed with the fractions of 32, 55 and 70 kDa of the TES antigens was totally eliminated when the dTES were used in the Western blot. All these results showed that the deglycosylation of the TES antigens really improves the specificity of the serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis in endemic areas for helminth infections. PMID:26315805

  16. In vitro culture of Parascaris equorum larvae and initial investigation of parasite excretory-secretory products.

    PubMed

    Burk, Steffanie V; Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Brewster-Barnes, Tammy; Bryant, Uneeda K; Howe, Daniel K; Carter, Craig N; Vanzant, Eric S; Harmon, Robert J; Kazacos, Kevin R; Rossano, Mary G

    2014-11-01

    Currently, diagnosis of Parascaris equorum infection in equids is limited to patent infections. The goals of this study were to culture P. equorum larvae in vitro and identify excretory-secretory (ES) products for prepatent diagnostic testing. Parascaris equorum L2/L3 larvae were hatched and cultured for up to 3 weeks for ES product collection. Fifth stage (L5) P. equorum were also cultured for ES product collection. Examination of ES fractions by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and silver stain revealed L2/L3 products ranging from 12-94 kDa and L5 products ranging from 12-189 kDa. Western blot analyses were conducted using polyclonal antibodies produced against P. equorum or Baylisascaris procyonis L2/L3 ES products, sera from rabbits inoculated with B. procyonis or Toxocara canis eggs, and sera from animals naturally infected with P. equorum or T. canis. Western blot results indicated parasite antigens migrating at 19 and 34 kDa may be useful for specifically detecting P. equorum infections. PMID:25209615

  17. Immunodominant antigens in Naegleria fowleri excretory--secretory proteins were potential pathogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Yang, Ae-Hee; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Kim, Daesik; Song, Kyoung-Ju; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2009-11-01

    Naegleria fowleri, a ubiquitous pathogenic free-living amoeba, is the most virulent species and causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in laboratory animals and humans. The parasite secretes various inducing molecules as biological responses, which are thought to be involved in pathophysiological and immunological events during infection. To investigate what molecules of N. fowleri excretory-secretory proteins (ESPs) are related with amoebic pathogenicity, N. fowleri ESPs fractionated by two-dimensional electrophoresis were reacted with N. fowleri infection or immune sera. To identify immunodominant ESPs, six major protein spots were selected and analyzed by N-terminal sequencing. Finally, six proteins, 58, 40, 24, 21, 18, and 16 kDa of molecular weight, were partially cloned and matched with reference proteins as follow: 58 kDa of exendin-3 precursor, 40 kDa of secretory lipase, 24 kDa of cathepsin B-like proteases and cysteine protease, 21 kDa of cathepsin B, 18 kDa of peroxiredoxin, and 16 kDa of thrombin receptor, respectively. These results suggest that N. fowleri ESPs contained important proteins, which may play an important role in the pathogenicity of N. fowleri.

  18. In vitro culture of Mesocestoides corti metacestodes and isolation of immunomodulatory excretory-secretory products.

    PubMed

    Vendelova, E; Hrčková, G; Lutz, M B; Brehm, K; Nono Komguep, J

    2016-07-01

    Cestode-mediated diseases hold the interesting feature of persisting metacestode larvae dwelling within the host tissues, in the midst of the immune response. Excretory-secretory (ES) products of the metacestode larval stage modulate the host immune response and modify the outcome of the disease. Therefore, isolation and analysis of axenic metacestode ES products are crucial to study their properties. Here, we report the development of a system for long-term in vitro cultivation of the metacestode of the parasitic cestode Mesocestoides corti (syn. Mesocestoides vogae). Although feeder cells and host serum supported the early growth of the parasite, long-term survival was not dependent on host serum or host-derived factors enabling the collection of parasite released products in serum-free medium. Functionally, these axenic ES products recapitulated M. corti tetrathyridia's ability to inhibit LPS-driven IL-12p70 secretion by dendritic cells. Thus, our new axenic culture system will simplify the identification and characterization of M. corti-derived immunomodulatory factors that will indirectly enable the identification and characterization of corresponding factors in the metacestode larvae of medically relevant cestodes such as Echinococcus multilocularis that are not yet amenable to serum-free cultivation. PMID:27120409

  19. Filarial excretory-secretory products induce human monocytes to produce lymphangiogenic mediators.

    PubMed

    Weinkopff, Tiffany; Mackenzie, Charles; Eversole, Rob; Lammie, Patrick J

    2014-07-01

    The nematodes Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia spp. infect over 120 million people worldwide, causing lymphedema, elephantiasis and hydrocele, collectively known as lymphatic filariasis. Most infected individuals appear to be asymptomatic, but many exhibit sub-clinical manifestations including the lymphangiectasia that likely contributes to the development of lymphedema and elephantiasis. As adult worm excretory-secretory products (ES) do not directly activate lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC), we investigated the role of monocyte/macrophage-derived soluble factors in the development of filarial lymphatic pathology. We analyzed the production of IL-8, IL-6 and VEGF-A by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from naïve donors following stimulation with filarial ES products. ES-stimulated PBMCs produced significantly more IL-8, IL-6 and VEGF-A compared to cells cultured in medium alone; CD14(+) monocytes appear to be the primary producers of IL-8 and VEGF-A, but not IL-6. Furthermore, IL-8, IL-6 and VEGF-A induced in vitro tubule formation in LEC Matrigel cultures. Matrigel plugs supplemented with IL-8, IL-6, VEGF-A, or with supernatants from ES-stimulated PBMCs and implanted in vivo stimulated lymphangiogenesis. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that monocytes/macrophages exposed to filarial ES products may modulate lymphatic function through the secretion of soluble factors that stimulate the vessel growth associated with the pathogenesis of filarial disease.

  20. Amygdalin blocks the in vitro adhesion and invasion of renal cell carcinoma cells by an integrin-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Juengel, Eva; Afschar, Masud; Makarević, Jasmina; Rutz, Jochen; Tsaur, Igor; Mani, Jens; Nelson, Karen; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2016-03-01

    Information about the natural compound amygdalin, which is employed as an antitumor agent, is sparse and thus its efficacy remains controversial. In this study, to determine whether amygdalin exerts antitumor effects on renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells, its impact on RCC metastatic activity was investigated. The RCC cell lines, Caki-1, KTC-26 and A498, were exposed to amygdalin from apricot kernels, and adhesion to human vascular endothelium, immobilized collagen or fibronectin was investigated. The influence of amygdalin on chemotactic and invasive activity was also determined, as was the influence of amygdalin on surface and total cellular α and β integrin expression, which are involved in metastasis. We noted that amygdalin caused significant reductions in chemotactic activity, invasion and adhesion to endothelium, collagen and fibronectin. Using FACScan analysis, we noted that amygdalin also induced reductions, particularly in integrins α5 and α6, in all three cell lines. Functional blocking of α5 resulted in significantly diminished adhesion of KTC-26 and A498 to collagen and also in decreased chemotactic behavior in all three cell lines. Blocking α6 integrin significantly reduced chemotactic activity in all three cell lines. Thus, we suggest that exposing RCC cells to amygdalin inhibits metastatic spread and is associated with downregulation of α5 and α6 integrins. Therefore, we posit that amygdalin exerts antitumor activity in vitro, and this may be linked to integrin regulation. PMID:26781971

  1. Combined aortic and renal artery surgery. A contemporary experience.

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, M E; Hansen, K J; Craven, T E; Keith, D R; Plonk, G W; Geary, R L; Dean, R H

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: This retrospective study examines results with simultaneous aortic and renal artery repair in 133 consecutive hypertensive patients. These results are compared with consecutive patient groups undergoing aortic reconstruction alone (269 patients) or renal artery reconstruction alone (182 patients). METHODS: From January 1987 through July 1995, 61 women and 72 men (mean age, 62.5 years) underwent combined repair of renal artery and aortic disease (abdominal aortic aneurysm [AAA]: 47 patients; occlusive disease: 86 patients; both: 12 patients). All patients were hypertensive (mean blood pressure: 194/103 mmHg; mean medications: 2.4). Evidenced by serum creatinine levels > or = 2.0 mg/dL, 46 patients (35%) had significant renal dysfunction (mean serum creatinine level: 3.78 mg/dL; range 2.0-10.6 mg/dL, including 7 dialysis-dependent patients). Aortic replacements (29% tube grafts; 71% bifurcated grafts) were combined with unilateral renal artery repair in 47% of patients; 53% had bilateral repair. Preoperative clinical features and perioperative mortality were compared with those groups having isolated aortic and renal repairs. RESULTS: There were seven perioperative deaths (5.3%) after combined repair, which differed significantly from isolated aortic repair (mortality: 0.74%; p = 0.005), but did not reach statistical significance when compared with the isolated renal artery group (mortality: 1.65%; p = 0.145). Risk analysis did not reveal a significant association between preoperative clinical features and mortality in either the combined repair group or the groups undergoing renal repair alone or aortic repair alone. Among survivors in the combined group, a favorable hypertension response was observed in 63%. This differed significantly from the group receiving renal repair alone (90% cured/improved; p < 0.001). Based on a 20% decrease in serum creatinine levels, excretory renal function was improved in 33% of patients with combined repair, including four

  2. Hypertension in children. Increased efficacy of technetium Tc/sup 99m/ succimer in screening for renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, P.R.; Treves, S.; Ingelfinger, J.

    1985-02-01

    Renal scintigraphy with technetium Tc-99m succimer (DMSA) and technetium Tc-99m pentetate (DTPA) was used to study 80 hypertensive pediatric and adolescent patients. Renal abnormalities such as asymmetry of function, size, or shape were identified in 13 patients. Both excretory urography and technetium Tc-99m pentetate studies were successful in detecting 54% of the abnormalities in patients studied; technetium Tc-99m succimer identified 92%. The accuracy of the latter was 96%, with a specificity of 97%. The ability of technetium Tc-99m succimer renal scintigraphy to identify accurately the presence or absence of renal abnormalities warrants its inclusion in the initial examination of pediatric and adolescent patients with hypertension.

  3. Renal organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease in the absence of new treatment modalities has become a strong driver for innovation in nephrology. An increasing understanding of stem cell biology has kindled the prospects of regenerative options for kidney disease. However, the kidney itself is not a regenerative organ, as all the nephrons are formed during embryonic development. Here, we will investigate advances in the molecular genetics of renal organogenesis, including what this can tell us about lineage relationships, and discuss how this may serve to inform us about both the normal processes of renal repair and options for regenerative therapies. PMID:22198432

  4. [Renal disease].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-09-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys. Some of these restrictions modify the intake of proteins, sodium, and phosphorus. Milk and dairy products are sources of these nutrients. This article aims to inform the reader about the benefits including milk and dairy products relying on a scientific and critical view according to the clinical conditions and the stage of renal disease in which the patient is. PMID:27603894

  5. [Renal disease].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-09-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys. Some of these restrictions modify the intake of proteins, sodium, and phosphorus. Milk and dairy products are sources of these nutrients. This article aims to inform the reader about the benefits including milk and dairy products relying on a scientific and critical view according to the clinical conditions and the stage of renal disease in which the patient is.

  6. Renal telocytes contribute to the repair of ischemically injured renal tubules

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liping; Lin, Miao; Li, Long; Wang, Rulin; Zhang, Chao; Qi, Guisheng; Xu, Ming; Rong, Ruiming; Zhu, Tongyu

    2014-01-01

    Telocytes (TCs), a distinct type of interstitial cells, have been identified in many organs via electron microscopy. However, their precise function in organ regeneration remains unknown. This study investigated the paracrine effect of renal TCs on renal tubular epithelial cells (TECs) in vitro, the regenerative function of renal TCs in renal tubules after ischaemia–reperfusion injury (IRI) in vivo and the possible mechanisms involved. In a renal IRI model, transplantation of renal TCs was found to decrease serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels, while renal fibroblasts exerted no such effect. The results of histological injury assessments and the expression levels of cleaved caspase-3 were consistent with a change in kidney function. Our data suggest that the protective effect of TCs against IRI occurs via inflammation-independent mechanisms in vivo. Furthermore, we found that renal TCs could not directly promote the proliferation and anti-apoptosis properties of TECs in vitro. TCs did not display any advantage in paracrine growth factor secretion in vitro compared with renal fibroblasts. These data indicate that renal TCs protect against renal IRI via an inflammation-independent pathway and that growth factors play a significant role in this mechanism. Renal TCs may protect TECs in certain microenvironments while interacting with other cells. PMID:24758589

  7. Drosophila provides rapid modeling of renal development, function, and disease.

    PubMed

    Dow, Julian A T; Romero, Michael F

    2010-12-01

    The evolution of specialized excretory cells is a cornerstone of the metazoan radiation, and the basic tasks performed by Drosophila and human renal systems are similar. The development of the Drosophila renal (Malpighian) tubule is a classic example of branched tubular morphogenesis, allowing study of mesenchymal-to-epithelial transitions, stem cell-mediated regeneration, and the evolution of a glomerular kidney. Tubule function employs conserved transport proteins, such as the Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and V-ATPase, aquaporins, inward rectifier K(+) channels, and organic solute transporters, regulated by cAMP, cGMP, nitric oxide, and calcium. In addition to generation and selective reabsorption of primary urine, the tubule plays roles in metabolism and excretion of xenobiotics, and in innate immunity. The gene expression resource FlyAtlas.org shows that the tubule is an ideal tissue for the modeling of renal diseases, such as nephrolithiasis and Bartter syndrome, or for inborn errors of metabolism. Studies are assisted by uniquely powerful genetic and transgenic resources, the widespread availability of mutant stocks, and low-cost, rapid deployment of new transgenics to allow manipulation of renal function in an organotypic context.

  8. EGFR mediates hyperlipidemia-induced renal injury via regulating inflammation and oxidative stress: the detrimental role and mechanism of EGFR activation

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Qilu; Zou, Chunpeng; Zhong, Peng; Lin, Feng; Li, Weixin; Wang, Lintao; Zhang, Yali; Zheng, Chao; Wang, Yi; Li, Xiaokun; Liang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have implicated inflammation, oxidative stress, and fibrosis as key factors in the development of obesity-induced kidney diseases. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in cancer development. Recently, the EGFR pathway has been increasingly implicated in chronic cardiovascular diseases via regulating inflammation and oxidative stress. However, it is unclear if EGFR is involved in obesity-related kidney injury. Using ApoE−/− and C57BL/6 mice models and two specific EGFR inhibitors, we investigated the potential effects of EGFR inhibition in the treatment of obesity-related nephropathy and found that EGFR inhibition alleviates renal inflammation, oxidative stress and fibrosis. In NRK-52E cells, we also elucidated the mechanism behind hyperlipidemia-induced EGFR activation. We observed that c-Src and EGFR forms a complex, and following PA stimulation, it is the successive phosphorylation, not formation, of the c-Src/EGFR complex that results in the subsequent cascade activation. Second, we found that TLR4 regulates the activation EGFR pathway mainly through the phosphorylation of the c-Src/EGFR complex. These results demonstrate the detrimental role of EGFR in the pathogenesis of obesity-related nephropathy, provide a new understanding of the mechanism behind hyperlipidemia/FFA-induced EGFR activation, and support the use of EGFR inhibitors in the treatment of obesity-induced kidney diseases. PMID:27014908

  9. STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL TRANSFORMATIONS IN THE TUBULAR EPITHELIUM OF THE DOG'S KIDNEY IN CHRONIC BRIGHT'S DISEASE AND THEIR RELATION TO MECHANISMS OF RENAL COMPENSATION AND FAILURE

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Jean; Bloom, Frank; MacDowell, Muriel

    1941-01-01

    1. The wall of the proximal convolution in chronic canine nephritis is composed of various types of epithelial cells which can be recognized as definite structural types from their cytological characteristics. 2. The function of these cell types, as tested by their reaction to the administration of trypan blue, varies with their structural constitution. 3. As a result of the varied cellular content of its wall the abnormal proximal convolution handles trypan blue by mechanisms which differ both quantitatively and qualitatively from those of the normal convolution. 4. A distinguishing characteristic of the decompensated kidney in chronic canine nephritis is the inability of its epithelium to concentrate trypan blue within its cells and to prevent diffusion of the dye from the lumen into the tubule wall. 5. It follows: (a) (from conclusion 3), that it cannot be assumed that the renal mechanisms concerned with other substances are not unaltered and that comparisons of blood and urine concentrations (clearances) have similar significance in the normal and nephritic kidney; (b) (from conclusion 4), that tubular dysfunction may play a part in the ultimate failure of the compensating kidney in all forms of chronic Bright's disease where the tubule walls are similarly affected. PMID:19871063

  10. Application of dendritic cells stimulated with Trichinella spiralis excretory-secretory antigens alleviates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Sofronic-Milosavljevic, L J; Radovic, I; Ilic, N; Majstorovic, I; Cvetkovic, J; Gruden-Movsesijan, A

    2013-06-01

    The parasitic nematode, Trichinella spiralis (T. spiralis), exerts an immunomodulatory effect on the host immune response through excretory-secretory products (ES L1) released from encysted muscle larvae. Our model of combined T. spiralis infection and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in Dark Agouti (DA) rats demonstrated a significant reduction in EAE severity in infected animals. Recently, we have created an immune status characteristic for the live infection by in vivo application of dendritic cells (DCs) stimulated with ES L1 products of T. spiralis muscle larvae. Moreover, these cells were able to ameliorate EAE when applied 7 days before EAE induction. ES L1-stimulated DCs increased production of IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β, and decreased production of IFN-γ and IL-17, both at the systemic level and in target organs. A significant increase in the proportion of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells was found among spleen cells, and CNS infiltrates from DA rats treated with ES L1-stimulated DCs before EAE induction, compared to controls injected with unstimulated DCs. Regulatory T cells, together with elevated levels of IL-10 and TGF-β, are most likely involved in restraining the production of Th1 and Th17 cytokines responsible for autoimmunity and thus are responsible for the beneficial effect of ES L1-educated DCs on the course of EAE. Our results show that ES L1 antigen-stimulated DCs are able not only to provoke, but also to sustain anti-inflammatory and regulatory responses regardless of EAE induction, with subsequent amelioration of EAE, or even protection from the disease.

  11. Assessment of a micropatterned hepatocyte coculture system to generate major human excretory and circulating drug metabolites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendy WeiWei; Khetani, Salman R; Krzyzewski, Stacy; Duignan, David B; Obach, R Scott

    2010-10-01

    Metabolism is one of the important determinants of the overall disposition of drugs, and the profile of metabolites can have an impact on efficacy and safety. Predicting which drug metabolites will be quantitatively predominant in humans has become increasingly important in the research and development of new drugs. In this study, a novel micropatterned hepatocyte coculture system was evaluated for its ability to generate human in vivo metabolites. Twenty-seven compounds of diverse chemical structure and subject to a range of drug biotransformation reactions were assessed for metabolite profiles in the micropatterned coculture system using pooled cryopreserved human hepatocytes. The ability of this system to generate metabolites that are >10% of dose in excreta or >10% of total drug-related material in circulation was assessed and compared to previously reported data obtained in human hepatocyte suspensions, liver S-9 fraction, and liver microsomes. The micropatterned coculture system was incubated for up to 7 days without a change in medium, which offered an ability to generate metabolites for slowly metabolized compounds. The micropatterned coculture system generated 82% of the excretory metabolites that exceed 10% of dose and 75% of the circulating metabolites that exceed 10% of total circulating drug-related material, exceeds the performance of hepatocyte suspension incubations and other in vitro systems. Phase 1 and phase 2 metabolites were generated, as well as metabolites that arise via two or more sequential reactions. These results suggest that this in vitro system offers the highest performance among in vitro metabolism systems to predict major human in vivo metabolites.

  12. The uptake of Texas Red-BSA in the excretory system of schistosomes and its colocalisation with ER60 promoter-induced GFP in transiently transformed adult males.

    PubMed

    Wippersteg, Volker; Ribeiro, Fabio; Liedtke, Stefanie; Kusel, John R; Grevelding, Christoph G

    2003-09-30

    The excretory system of schistosomes has focused some attention during the last years since accumulating evidence suggests that it plays an important role in the host-parasite interaction. Signalling molecules such as phosphatases, but also proteases have been localised in the excretory system. To some extent, however, localisation studies are limited by the fact that sections of fixed specimens are used. In this study, we tested the fluorescent molecules FITC-dextran and Texas Red-BSA for their ability to enter the excretory system of living Schistosoma mansoni males. It is demonstrated that the dyes selectively stain the excretory tubules which are widely distributed along the worm body. This finding was used to investigate whether the staining of worms with Texas Red-BSA can help to localise transgene activity in worms which were transiently transformed by particle bombardment. A vector was used for transformation which contained the green fluorescent protein gene, under the control of the regulatory elements of the cysteine protease ER60 gene. After transformation and staining, confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that ER60-induced green fluorescent protein activity colocalises with Texas Red-BSA in the excretory tubules. The results suggest a role for ER60 during the host-parasite interaction. Furthermore, the colocalisation approach introduced here opens further perspectives to characterise gene-expression profiles in this parasite.

  13. Comprehensive Immunophenotypic Characterization of Adult and Fetal Testes, the Excretory Duct System, and Testicular and Epididymal Appendages.

    PubMed

    Magers, Martin J; Udager, Aaron M; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; French, Diana; Myers, Jeffrey L; Jentzen, Jeffrey M; McHugh, Jonathan B; Heider, Amer; Mehra, Rohit

    2016-08-01

    The immunophenotype of a normal testis and the excretory duct system has not been studied comprehensively in fetal and adult patients without testicular disease or hormonal manipulation so far. In addition, testicular (TA) and epididymal (EA) appendages are frequent paratesticular structures without previously reported comprehensive immunophenotypic studies. Immunohistochemistry for multiple markers, including the androgen receptor (AR), the estrogen receptor (ER), the progesterone receptor (PR), the prostate-specific antigen, the prostate-specific membrane antigen, PAX8, WT1, calretinin, CK7, CK20, OCT4, SALL4, and CD117, was performed on full sections of testicular/paratesticular tissue from a large cohort of adult and fetal autopsy patients. In contrast to adult germ cells (GC), fetal GC strongly express OCT4 and CD117, although the expression of these proteins is lost in the early postnatal period; SALL4, in contrast, is expressed in both fetal and adult GC, with only weak and focal expression in adult patients. Fetal Sertoli cells (SC) express WT1 and calretinin strongly and diffusely, in contrast to adult SC. Both fetal and adult excretory duct systems express CK7 and PAX8 with frequent AR coexpression, and all 3 main segments of the excretory duct system (ductuli efferentes, epididymis, and vas deferens) have unique immunophenotypes. The rete testis also has a unique immunohistochemical expression pattern, which includes strong expression of CK7, PAX8, WT1, calretinin, and AR. Finally, of the adult autopsy patients examined, 80% had a TA, and 60% had an EA; these paratesticular structures occurred at stereotypical locations, demonstrated reproducible morphologic features, and had a unique immunophenotype relative to other studied structures, with strong CK7, PAX8, WT1, AR, ER, and PR coexpression. The testis and the paratestis may be involved by diverse neoplastic and non-neoplastic processes, and knowledge of the immunophenotypic expression spectrum of

  14. Renal papillary necrosis and pyelonephritis accompanying fenoprofen therapy.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; Lange, R K; Kantrow, C M

    1979-10-26

    Renal papillary necrosis occurred after fenoprofen calcium administration in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and urinary tract infection. Possible mechanisms of renal damage may be hypersensitivity, decreased blood flow, and decreased production of a prostaglandin E-like substance.

  15. Renal Toxicities of Targeted Therapies.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Anum; Mirza, Mohsin M; Ganti, Apar Kishor; Tendulkar, Ketki

    2015-12-01

    With the incorporation of targeted therapies in routine cancer therapy, it is imperative that the array of toxicities associated with these agents be well-recognized and managed, especially since these toxicities are distinct from those seen with conventional cytotoxic agents. This review will focus on these renal toxicities from commonly used targeted agents. This review discusses the mechanisms of these side effects and management strategies. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents including the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab, aflibercept (VEGF trap), and anti-VEGF receptor (VEGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) all cause hypertension, whereas some of them result in proteinuria. Monoclonal antibodies against the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family of receptors, such as cetuximab and panitumumab, cause electrolyte imbalances including hypomagnesemia and hypokalemia due to the direct nephrotoxic effect of the drug on renal tubules. Cetuximab may also result in renal tubular acidosis. The TKIs, imatinib and dasatinib, can result in acute or chronic renal failure. Rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, can cause acute renal failure following initiation of therapy because of the onset of acute tumor lysis syndrome. Everolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, can result in proteinuria. Discerning the renal adverse effects resulting from these agents is essential for safe treatment strategies, particularly in those with pre-existing renal disease.

  16. Renal Toxicities of Targeted Therapies.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Anum; Mirza, Mohsin M; Ganti, Apar Kishor; Tendulkar, Ketki

    2015-12-01

    With the incorporation of targeted therapies in routine cancer therapy, it is imperative that the array of toxicities associated with these agents be well-recognized and managed, especially since these toxicities are distinct from those seen with conventional cytotoxic agents. This review will focus on these renal toxicities from commonly used targeted agents. This review discusses the mechanisms of these side effects and management strategies. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents including the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab, aflibercept (VEGF trap), and anti-VEGF receptor (VEGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) all cause hypertension, whereas some of them result in proteinuria. Monoclonal antibodies against the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family of receptors, such as cetuximab and panitumumab, cause electrolyte imbalances including hypomagnesemia and hypokalemia due to the direct nephrotoxic effect of the drug on renal tubules. Cetuximab may also result in renal tubular acidosis. The TKIs, imatinib and dasatinib, can result in acute or chronic renal failure. Rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, can cause acute renal failure following initiation of therapy because of the onset of acute tumor lysis syndrome. Everolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, can result in proteinuria. Discerning the renal adverse effects resulting from these agents is essential for safe treatment strategies, particularly in those with pre-existing renal disease. PMID:25922090

  17. Digitalis pharmacokinetics and therapy with respect to impaired renal function.

    PubMed

    Kramer, P

    1977-01-01

    The various cardiac glycosides differ significantly in their retention as a result of renal failure. In the case of digoxin, digitoxin, and strophanthin the retention is directly related to the normal renal clearance of these cardiac glycosides: Strophanthin has the highest clearance and the most marked prolongation of pharmacological action in renal failure, whereas digitoxin shows the lowest renal clearance and even in uremic patients a total elimination comparable to normal subjects as a result of increased hepatic clearance; digoxin takes an intermediate position. The quantity of a cardiac glycoside and its metabolites excreted by the kidneys depends, besides the renal clearance, on the plasma concentration which increases considerably during the first days after onset of treatment. From the daily dose approximately 90% of strophanthin, 70% of digoxin, 50% of digitoxin plus metabolites are excreted by normal kidneys under steady-state conditions. The efficiency of hemodialysis in the elimination of cardiac glycosides is low (3-5%) if estimated in relation to a single dose injected before dialysis and high (30-50%) if estimated in relation to the excretory capacity of normal kidneys during a period corresponding to the duration of a dialysis. During hemodialysis the plasma concentration of digoxin decreases as rapidly as in patients with normal renal function. Beside the efficiency of dialysis this finding may be explained by the decrease in the apparent volume of distribution of cardiac glycosides in patients with advanced renal failure; a reduced tissue protein binding seems likely to be the main reason for these changes in chronic renal insufficiency. A reduced volume of distribution and a reduced myocardial sensitivity are the main reasons for a very low predictability of the necessary individual maintenance dose of cardiac glycosides from the creatinine clearance. In patients with advanced renal insufficiency the tolerance to cardiac glycosides is reduced

  18. Digitalis pharmacokinetics and therapy with respect to impaired renal function.

    PubMed

    Kramer, P

    1977-01-01

    The various cardiac glycosides differ significantly in their retention as a result of renal failure. In the case of digoxin, digitoxin, and strophanthin the retention is directly related to the normal renal clearance of these cardiac glycosides: Strophanthin has the highest clearance and the most marked prolongation of pharmacological action in renal failure, whereas digitoxin shows the lowest renal clearance and even in uremic patients a total elimination comparable to normal subjects as a result of increased hepatic clearance; digoxin takes an intermediate position. The quantity of a cardiac glycoside and its metabolites excreted by the kidneys depends, besides the renal clearance, on the plasma concentration which increases considerably during the first days after onset of treatment. From the daily dose approximately 90% of strophanthin, 70% of digoxin, 50% of digitoxin plus metabolites are excreted by normal kidneys under steady-state conditions. The efficiency of hemodialysis in the elimination of cardiac glycosides is low (3-5%) if estimated in relation to a single dose injected before dialysis and high (30-50%) if estimated in relation to the excretory capacity of normal kidneys during a period corresponding to the duration of a dialysis. During hemodialysis the plasma concentration of digoxin decreases as rapidly as in patients with normal renal function. Beside the efficiency of dialysis this finding may be explained by the decrease in the apparent volume of distribution of cardiac glycosides in patients with advanced renal failure; a reduced tissue protein binding seems likely to be the main reason for these changes in chronic renal insufficiency. A reduced volume of distribution and a reduced myocardial sensitivity are the main reasons for a very low predictability of the necessary individual maintenance dose of cardiac glycosides from the creatinine clearance. In patients with advanced renal insufficiency the tolerance to cardiac glycosides is reduced

  19. Cellular Responses to Mechanical Stress Selected Contribution: A Three-Dimensional Model for Assessment of in Vitro Toxicity in Balaena Mysticetus Renal Tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; Coate-Li, L.; Linnehan, R. M.; Hammond, T. G.

    2000-01-01

    This study established two- and three-dimensional renal proximal tubular cell cultures of the endangered species bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus), developed SV40-transfected cultures, and cloned the 61-amino acid open reading frame for the metallothionein protein, the primary binding site for heavy metal contamination in mammals. Microgravity research, modulations in mechanical culture conditions (modeled microgravity), and shear stress have spawned innovative approaches to understanding the dynamics of cellular interactions, gene expression, and differentiation in several cellular systems. These investigations have led to the creation of ex vivo tissue models capable of serving as physiological research analogs for three-dimensional cellular interactions. These models are enabling studies in immune function, tissue modeling for basic research, and neoplasia. Three-dimensional cellular models emulate aspects of in vivo cellular architecture and physiology and may facilitate environmental toxicological studies aimed at elucidating biological functions and responses at the cellular level. Marine mammals occupy a significant ecological niche (72% of the Earth's surface is water) in terms of the potential for information on bioaccumulation and transport of terrestrial and marine environmental toxins in high-order vertebrates. Few ex vivo models of marine mammal physiology exist in vitro to accomplish the aforementioned studies. Techniques developed in this investigation, based on previous tissue modeling successes, may serve to facilitate similar research in other marine mammals.

  20. Interactions between P-glycoprotein substrates and other cationic drugs at the hepatic excretory level

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Johan W; Duin, Erik; Steen, Herman; Oosting, Roelof; Roggeveld, Jan; Meijer, Dirk K F

    1998-01-01

    In the present study it was tested whether known P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrates/MDR reversal agents interact with small (type 1) and bulky (type 2) cationic drugs at the level of biliary excretion in the rat isolated perfused liver model (IPRL). The studies were performed with model compounds tri-n-butylmethylammonium (TBuMA) (a relatively small type 1 organic cation), rocuronium (Roc) (a bulky type 2 organic cation) and the classical P-gp substrate doxorubicin (Dox).Inhibitors were given in a 4 fold molar excess to the substrate studied. To minimize an interaction of the substrates at the hepatic uptake level, the competing compounds were added when over 55% to 85% of the administered dose of the model compounds had been removed from the perfusate and taken up by the liver.We found a mutual interaction between TBuMA and procainamidethobromide (PAEB), both type 1 cationic compounds during biliary excretion. Interestingly, type 2 compounds, such as rocuronium, clearly inhibited type 1 cationic drugs as well as Dox secretion into bile, whereas type 1 compounds did not significantly inhibit type 2 drug excretion into bile. The type 1 cations PAEB and TBuMA only moderately inhibited Dox biliary excretion. Dox did not inhibit the biliary excretion of the type 2 agent rocuronium whereas rocuronium reduced Dox biliary excretion by 50% compared to controls.MDR substrates/reversal agents like verapamil, quinine, quinidine and vinblastine strongly reduced both type 1 and type 2 organic cation excretion into bile. Dox secretion into bile was also profoundly reduced by these drugs, vinblastine being the most potent inhibitor in general.The lack of mutual inhibition observed in some combinations of substrates may indicate that major differences in affinity of the substrates for a single excretory system exist. Alternatively, multiple organic cation transport systems with separate substrate specificities may be involved in the biliary excretion of amphiphilic drugs

  1. Molecular identification and characterization of leucine aminopeptidase 2, an excretory-secretory product of Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chuanhuan; Sun, Jiufeng; Li, Xuerong; Wang, Lexun; Hu, Xuchu; Wang, Xiaoyun; Chen, Wenjun; Lv, Xiaoli; Liang, Chi; Li, Wenfang; Huang, Yan; Li, Ran; Wu, Zhongdao; Yu, Xinbing; Xu, Jin

    2012-10-01

    Aminopeptidases serve vital roles in metabolism of hormones, neurotransmission, turnover of proteins and immunological regulations. Leucine aminopeptidases catalyze the hydrolysis of amino-acid residues from the N-terminus of proteins and peptides. In the present study, leucine aminopeptidase 2 (LAP2) gene of Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) was isolated and identified from an adult cDNA library of C. sinensis. Recombinant CsLAP2 was expressed and purified in Escherichia coli BL21. The open reading frame of LAP2 contains 1,560 bp equivalent to 519 amino acids, a similarity analysis showed a relatively low homology with Homo sapiens (19.0 %), Trypanosoma cruzi (18.0 %), Mus musculus (19.3 %), and relatively high homology with Schistosoma mansoni (65.6 %). The optimum condition of rCsLAP2 enzyme activity was investigated using a fluorescent substrate of Leu-MCA at 37 °C and pH 7.5. The K (m) and V (max) values of rCsLAP2 were 18.2 μM and 10.7 μM/min, respectively. CsLAP2 gene expression can be detected at the stages of the adult worm, metacercaria, excysted metacercaria and egg of C. sinensis using real-time PCR, no difference was observed at the stages of the adult worm, metacercaria and egg. However, CsLAP2 showed a higher expression level at the stage of excysted metacercaria than the adult worm (3.90-fold), metacercaria (4.60-fold) and egg (4.59-fold). Histochemistry analysis showed that CsLAP2 was located at the tegument and excretory vesicle of metacercaria, and the tegument and intestine of adult worm. The immune response specific to rCsLAP2 was characterized by a mixed response patterns of Th1 and Th2, indicating a compounded humoral and cellular immune response. The combined results from the present study indicate that CsLAP2 was an important antigen exposed to host immune system, and probably implicated as potential role in interaction with host cells in clonorchiasis.

  2. Integrity of Narrow Epithelial Tubes in the C. elegans Excretory System Requires a Transient Luminal Matrix.

    PubMed

    Gill, Hasreet K; Cohen, Jennifer D; Ayala-Figueroa, Jesus; Forman-Rubinsky, Rachel; Poggioli, Corey; Bickard, Kevin; Parry, Jean M; Pu, Pu; Hall, David H; Sundaram, Meera V

    2016-08-01

    Most epithelial cells secrete a glycoprotein-rich apical extracellular matrix that can have diverse but still poorly understood roles in development and physiology. Zona Pellucida (ZP) domain glycoproteins are common constituents of these matrices, and their loss in humans is associated with a number of diseases. Understanding of the functions, organization and regulation of apical matrices has been hampered by difficulties in imaging them both in vivo and ex vivo. We identified the PAN-Apple, mucin and ZP domain glycoprotein LET-653 as an early and transient apical matrix component that shapes developing epithelia in C. elegans. LET-653 has modest effects on shaping of the vulva and epidermis, but is essential to prevent lumen fragmentation in the very narrow, unicellular excretory duct tube. We were able to image the transient LET-653 matrix by both live confocal imaging and transmission electron microscopy. Structure/function and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching studies revealed that LET-653 exists in two separate luminal matrix pools, a loose fibrillar matrix in the central core of the lumen, to which it binds dynamically via its PAN domains, and an apical-membrane-associated matrix, to which it binds stably via its ZP domain. The PAN domains are both necessary and sufficient to confer a cyclic pattern of duct lumen localization that precedes each molt, while the ZP domain is required for lumen integrity. Ectopic expression of full-length LET-653, but not the PAN domains alone, could expand lumen diameter in the developing gut tube, where LET-653 is not normally expressed. Together, these data support a model in which the PAN domains regulate the ability of the LET-653 ZP domain to interact with other factors at the apical membrane, and this ZP domain interaction promotes expansion and maintenance of lumen diameter. These data identify a transient apical matrix component present prior to cuticle secretion in C. elegans, demonstrate critical roles for

  3. Integrity of Narrow Epithelial Tubes in the C. elegans Excretory System Requires a Transient Luminal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Figueroa, Jesus; Parry, Jean M.; Pu, Pu; Hall, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Most epithelial cells secrete a glycoprotein-rich apical extracellular matrix that can have diverse but still poorly understood roles in development and physiology. Zona Pellucida (ZP) domain glycoproteins are common constituents of these matrices, and their loss in humans is associated with a number of diseases. Understanding of the functions, organization and regulation of apical matrices has been hampered by difficulties in imaging them both in vivo and ex vivo. We identified the PAN-Apple, mucin and ZP domain glycoprotein LET-653 as an early and transient apical matrix component that shapes developing epithelia in C. elegans. LET-653 has modest effects on shaping of the vulva and epidermis, but is essential to prevent lumen fragmentation in the very narrow, unicellular excretory duct tube. We were able to image the transient LET-653 matrix by both live confocal imaging and transmission electron microscopy. Structure/function and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching studies revealed that LET-653 exists in two separate luminal matrix pools, a loose fibrillar matrix in the central core of the lumen, to which it binds dynamically via its PAN domains, and an apical-membrane-associated matrix, to which it binds stably via its ZP domain. The PAN domains are both necessary and sufficient to confer a cyclic pattern of duct lumen localization that precedes each molt, while the ZP domain is required for lumen integrity. Ectopic expression of full-length LET-653, but not the PAN domains alone, could expand lumen diameter in the developing gut tube, where LET-653 is not normally expressed. Together, these data support a model in which the PAN domains regulate the ability of the LET-653 ZP domain to interact with other factors at the apical membrane, and this ZP domain interaction promotes expansion and maintenance of lumen diameter. These data identify a transient apical matrix component present prior to cuticle secretion in C. elegans, demonstrate critical roles for

  4. Integrity of Narrow Epithelial Tubes in the C. elegans Excretory System Requires a Transient Luminal Matrix.

    PubMed

    Gill, Hasreet K; Cohen, Jennifer D; Ayala-Figueroa, Jesus; Forman-Rubinsky, Rachel; Poggioli, Corey; Bickard, Kevin; Parry, Jean M; Pu, Pu; Hall, David H; Sundaram, Meera V

    2016-08-01

    Most epithelial cells secrete a glycoprotein-rich apical extracellular matrix that can have diverse but still poorly understood roles in development and physiology. Zona Pellucida (ZP) domain glycoproteins are common constituents of these matrices, and their loss in humans is associated with a number of diseases. Understanding of the functions, organization and regulation of apical matrices has been hampered by difficulties in imaging them both in vivo and ex vivo. We identified the PAN-Apple, mucin and ZP domain glycoprotein LET-653 as an early and transient apical matrix component that shapes developing epithelia in C. elegans. LET-653 has modest effects on shaping of the vulva and epidermis, but is essential to prevent lumen fragmentation in the very narrow, unicellular excretory duct tube. We were able to image the transient LET-653 matrix by both live confocal imaging and transmission electron microscopy. Structure/function and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching studies revealed that LET-653 exists in two separate luminal matrix pools, a loose fibrillar matrix in the central core of the lumen, to which it binds dynamically via its PAN domains, and an apical-membrane-associated matrix, to which it binds stably via its ZP domain. The PAN domains are both necessary and sufficient to confer a cyclic pattern of duct lumen localization that precedes each molt, while the ZP domain is required for lumen integrity. Ectopic expression of full-length LET-653, but not the PAN domains alone, could expand lumen diameter in the developing gut tube, where LET-653 is not normally expressed. Together, these data support a model in which the PAN domains regulate the ability of the LET-653 ZP domain to interact with other factors at the apical membrane, and this ZP domain interaction promotes expansion and maintenance of lumen diameter. These data identify a transient apical matrix component present prior to cuticle secretion in C. elegans, demonstrate critical roles for

  5. The urinary excretory ratio of nicotinamide catabolites was associated with the conversion ratio of tryptophan to nicotinamide in growing rats fed a niacin-free 20% casein diet.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Katsumi; Imai, Eri; Sano, Mitsue; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Weaning rats were fed a niacin-free 20% casein diet. Twenty-four-h-urine samples were collected, and nicotinamide and its catabolites were measured. A correlation was found between the urinary excretory ratio of nicotinamide catabolites (N(1)-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide + N(1)-methyl-4-pyridone-3-carboxamide)/N(1)-methylnicotinamide and the tryptophan-nicotinamide conversion ratio during growing period of the rats. This indicates the possibility that the conversion ratio can be deduced from the excretory ratio.

  6. Should excretory urography be used as a routine diagnostic procedure in patients with acute ureteric colic: a single center study.

    PubMed

    Samara, Osama A; Haroun, Dina A; Ashour, Do'a Z; Tarawneh, Emad S; Haroun, Azmi A

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to find an accurate, easily available and safe imaging modality as an alternative to intravenous urography for the diagnosis of acute urinary obstruction. This retrospective study included 332 patients, who underwent both excretory urography (EU) preceeded by plain radiograph as well as ultrasonography for evaluation of acute flank pain. There were 198 male and 134 female patients. The presence or absence of urinary stones, level of obstruction, excretion delay on EU and dilated excretory system on either or both techniques were recorded. The sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and accuracy for plain radiograph, ultrasonography, and for both modalities together were measured considering EU as a standard reference. The sensitivity and specificity of combined plain radiograph and ultrasound were 97% and 67%, respectively, with positive and negative predictive values and accuracy rates of 92%, 99%, and 97%, respectively. Our study suggests that the combination of plain radiograph and ultrasonography yields a high sensitivity, negative predictive value, and accuracy in depiction of urinary stones. Thus, EU need not be used as a routine diagnostic procedure in patients with acute obstructive uropathy.

  7. Renal cell carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Renal cancer; Kidney cancer; Hypernephroma; Adenocarcinoma of renal cells; Cancer - kidney ... ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 57. National Cancer Institute: PDQ renal cell cancer treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. ...

  8. Cytokines induce protein kinase A-mediated signalling by a redox-dependent mechanism in rat renal mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Beck, Karl-Friedrich; Euler, Johannes; Eisel, Florian; Beck, Martina; Köhler, Yvette; Sha, Lisa Katharina; von Knethen, Andreas; Longen, Sebastian; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2015-02-01

    Glomerular mesangial cells are smooth muscle cell-like pericytes and are regarded as key players in kidney diseases. In an inflammatory setting, these cells produce high amounts of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and redox mediators such as reactive oxygen species or nitric oxide (NO). The temporal production of ROS, NO and other redox mediators markedly contributes to the final outcome of inflammatory diseases. Recently, we reported that platelet-derived growth factor forced mesangial cells to activate the regulatory subunit of protein kinase A (PKA RI) by a redox-dependent mechanism but independent from changes in cyclic AMP. This prompted us to further analyze the dimerization of PKA RI and activation of PKA-driven signalling in an inflammatory context. Stimulation of rat mesangial cells with interleukin-1β and tumour necrosis factor-α [2 nM] induced the formation of PKA RI heterodimers in a time-dependent manner. PKA RI dimerization was accompanied with the formation of ROS, NO and peroxynitrite as well as a depletion of reduced glutathione. Furthermore, dimerization of PKA RI was paralleled by enhanced activity of PKA as shown by the phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) at serine 157 that was independent of the formation of cyclic AMP. Remarkably, exogenously administered peroxynitrite potently induced dimerization of PKA RI, whereas pharmacologic inhibition of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and scavenging of peroxynitrite reduced PKA RI dimerization and VASP phosphorylation to control levels thus clearly indicating a causal role for endogenously formed peroxynitrite on PKA signalling. Consequently, the treatment of inflammatory diseases with anti-oxidants or NOS inhibitors may alter PKA activity.

  9. Renal morphology and function immediately after extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy

    SciTech Connect

    Kaude, J.V.; Williams, C.M.; Millner, M.R.; Scott, K.N.; Finlayson, B.

    1985-08-01

    The acute effects of extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) on morphology and function of the kidney were evaluated by excretory urography, quantitative radionuclide renography (QRR), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 33 consecutive patients. Excretory urograms demonstrated an enlarged kidney in seven (18%) of 41 treatments and partial or complete obstruction of the ureter by stone fragments after 15 (37%) of 41 treatments. Total effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) was not changed after ESWL, but the percentage ERPF of the treated kidney was decreased by more than 5% in 10 (30%) of 33 cases. QRR images showed partial parenchymal obstruction in 10 (25%) of 41 teated kidneys and total parenchymal obstruction in 9 (22%). MRI disclosed one or more abnormalities in 24 (63%) of 38 treated kidneys. Treated kidneys were normal by all three imaging methods in 26% and abnormal by one or more tests in 74% of cases. The morphologic and functional changes are attributed to renal contusion resulting in edema and extravasation of urine and blood into the interstitial, subcapsular, and perirenal spaces.

  10. Focus on renal congestion in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Afsar, Baris; Ortiz, Alberto; Covic, Adrian; Solak, Yalcin; Goldsmith, David; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-02-01

    Hospitalizations due to heart failure are increasing steadily despite advances in medicine. Patients hospitalized for worsening heart failure have high mortality in hospital and within the months following discharge. Kidney dysfunction is associated with adverse outcomes in heart failure patients. Recent evidence suggests that both deterioration in kidney function and renal congestion are important prognostic factors in heart failure. Kidney congestion in heart failure results from low cardiac output (forward failure), tubuloglomerular feedback, increased intra-abdominal pressure or increased venous pressure. Regardless of the cause, renal congestion is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in heart failure. The impact on outcomes of renal decongestion strategies that do not compromise renal function should be explored in heart failure. These studies require novel diagnostic markers that identify early renal damage and renal congestion and allow monitoring of treatment responses in order to avoid severe worsening of renal function. In addition, there is an unmet need regarding evidence-based therapeutic management of renal congestion and worsening renal function. In the present review, we summarize the mechanisms, diagnosis, outcomes, prognostic markers and treatment options of renal congestion in heart failure.

  11. Renal transepithelial transport of nucleosides.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J A; Vidale, E; Enigbokan, M

    1988-01-01

    Previous work from this and other laboratories has suggested that the mammalian kidney has unique mechanisms for handling purine nucleosides. For example, in humans and in mice, adenosine undergoes net renal reabsorption whereas deoxyadenosine is secreted [Kuttesch and Nelson: Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol. 8, 221 (1982)]. The relationships between these renal transport systems and classical renal organic cation and anion, carbohydrate, and cell membrane nucleoside transport carriers are not established. To investigate possible relationships between such carriers, we have tested effects of selected classical transport inhibitors on the renal clearances of adenosine, deoxyadenosine, 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine (5'-dFUR), and 5-fluorouracil in mice. The secretion of deoxyadenosine and 5'-dFUR, but not the reabsorption of adenosine or 5-fluorouracil, was prevented by the classical nucleoside transport inhibitors, dipyridamole and nitrobenzylthioinosine. Cimetidine, an inhibitor of the organic cation secretory system, also inhibited the secretion of 5'-dFUR, although it did not inhibit deoxyadenosine secretion in earlier studies [Nelson et al.: Biochem. Pharmacol. 32, 2323 (1983)]. The specific inhibitor of glucose renal reabsorption, phloridzin, failed to inhibit the reabsorption of adenosine or the secretion of deoxyadenosine. Failure of the nucleoside transport inhibitors and phloridzin to prevent adenosine reabsorption suggests that adenosine reabsorption may occur via a unique process. On the other hand, inhibition of the net secretion of deoxyadenosine and 5'-dFUR by dipyridamole and nitrobenzylthioinosine implies a role for the carrier that is sensitive to these compounds in the renal secretion (active transport) of these nucleosides.

  12. Compensatory regeneration as a mechanism for renal tubule carcinogenesis of fumonisin B1 in the F344/N/Nctr BR rat.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, P C; Warbritton, A; Voss, K A; Lorentzen, R J; Thurman, J D; Kovach, R M; Bucci, T J

    2001-01-01

    Fumonisin B1(FB1) is a fungal metabolite of Fusarium verticillioides (= F. moniliforme), a fungus that grows on many crops worldwide. Previous studies demonstrated that male BD IX rats consuming diets containing 50 ppm fumonisin B1 developed hepatocellular carcinomas. In our recent studies, diets containing FB1 at 50 ppm or higher concentrations induced renal tubule carcinomas in male F344/N/Nctr BR rats and hepatocellular carcinomas in female B6C3F1/Nctr BR mice. The carcinogenicity of FB1 in rats and mice is not due to DNA damage, as several laboratories have demonstrated that FB1 is not a genotoxin. FB1 induces apoptosis in cells in vitro. Including FB1 in the diets of rats results in increased hepatocellular and renal tubule epithelial cell apoptosis. In studies with F344/N/Nctr BR rats consuming diets containing up to 484 ppm FB1 for 28 days, female rats demonstrated more sensitivity than male rats in the induction of hepatocellular apoptosis and mitosis. Conversely, induction of renal tubule apoptosis and regeneration were more pronounced in male than in female rats. Induction of renal tubule apoptosis and hyperplasia correlated with the incidence of renal tubule carcinomas that developed in the 2-year feeding study with FB1 in the F344/N/Nctr BR rats. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that the induction of renal tubule carcinomas in male rats could be partly due to the continuous compensatory regeneration of renal tubule epithelial cells in response to the induction of apoptosis by fumonisin B1. PMID:11359700

  13. Tumor necrosis factor-α induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition of renal cell carcinoma cells via a nuclear factor kappa B-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sheng-Tang; Sun, Guang-Huan; Hsu, Chih-Ying; Huang, Chang-Shuo; Wu, Yu-Hsin; Wang, Hsiao-Hsien; Sun, Kuang-Hui

    2011-09-01

    Chronic low dose of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) stimulation promotes tumorigenesis by facilitating tumor proliferation and metastasis. The plasma levels of TNF-α are increased in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Furthermore, high-grade clear cell RCC cell lines secrete more TNF-α than low-grade ones, and allow low-grade cell lines' gain of invasive ability. However, the molecular mechanism of TNF-α in mediating progression of RCC cells remains unclear. In the present study, TNF-α induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of RCC cells by repressing E-cadherin, promoting invasiveness and activating matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9 activity. RCC cells underwent promoted growth in vivo following stimulation with TNF-α. In addition, TNF-α induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and Akt in a time-dependent manner, and increased nuclear translocation and promoter activity of NF-κB. To investigate the role of NF-κB activation in TNF-α-induced EMT of RCC, we employed chemical inhibitors (NF-κB activation inhibitor and Bay 11-7082) and transfected dominant-negative (pCMV-IκBαM) and overexpressive (pFLAG-p65) vectors of NF-κB. While overexpression of NF-κB p65 alone could induce E-cadherin loss in RCC, EMT phenotypes and MMP9 expressions induced by TNF-α were not reversed by the inhibitors of NF-κB activation. These results suggest that the TNF-α signaling pathway is involved in the tumorigenesis of RCC. However, NF-κB activation is not crucial for invasion and EMT enhanced by TNF-α in RCC cells.

  14. [A case of Prader-Willi syndrome accompanied with a renal stone].

    PubMed

    Asanuma, H; Nagatsuma, K; Baba, S; Murai, M

    1998-01-01

    Little information is available regarding the correlation between Prader-Willi syndrome and urolithiasis. We report a patient with Prader-Willi syndrome with a renal uric acid (UA) stone. A 23-year-old male patient was admitted to our department with gross hematuria and left flank pain. The blood and urine examination demonstrated hyperuricemia with the presence of UA crystals in the urine. Excretory urography revealed a radiolucent stone (17 x 27 mm) in the left renal pelvis suggesting a UA stone. The stone was removed successfully using extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) combined with medication for UA metabolism. The stone was thought to have formed as a result of overeating associated with Prader-Willi syndrome, and accompanying overproduction of purine.

  15. Importance of caloric intake during renal failure.

    PubMed

    CARTER, F H; PLUMB, R T

    1958-10-01

    Loss of excretory function in acute renal failure results in the retention of catabolites and fluid. In the absence of available carbohydrate, endogenous fat and protein become the main caloric sources. This results in the rapid accumulation of keto acids and nitrogenous wastes. By providing readily available non-nitrogenous calories, protein catabolism is reduced, complete oxidation of fat is obtained and energy is provided to drive potassium into the intracellular compartment. The patient should be encouraged to eat despite his apathy, fear of vomiting and characteristically paranoid mood. Tube or parenteral feeding is complicated by the need to restrict fluid. Numerous small feedings are more successful than large meals. Hard candy and alcohol are often acceptable sources of calories, fat emulsions seldom. Oral hygiene aids feeding, and tranquilizers and anticholinergics are useful. If the patient does not take food by mouth, tube feeding may be carried out. Because of the bleeding tendency so often occurring in uremia, tube feeding may be contraindicated if it causes erosion of the pharynx or esophagus. Intravenous infusion of invert sugar, glucose and alcohol may be necessary if nutrition cannot be accomplished by other means.

  16. Currently available useful immunohistochemical markers of renal pathology for the diagnosis of renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Kanzaki, Go; Shimizu, Akira

    2015-07-01

    Renal allograft dysfunction may be induced by various causes, including alloimmune rejection, viral infection, urinary tract obstruction, calcineurin inhibitor nephrotoxicity and/or recurrent renal disease. In order to determine the underlying cause, a renal biopsy is performed and the renal transplant pathology is diagnosed using the internationally consensus Banff classification. Although a progressive understanding of allograft rejection has provided numerous immunohistochemical markers, only the C4d is regarded to be a sufficiently useful marker for antibody-mediated allograft rejection according to the Banff classification. This review summarizes currently available useful immunohistochemical markers of renal transplant pathology, including C4d, with diagnostic implications for human renal allograft rejection. In particular, we discuss immunohistochemical markers in the following three categories: immunohistochemical markers of renal pathology used to (i) analyze the mechanisms of alloimmune rejection, (ii) monitor cell injury and/or inflammation associated with rejection and (iii) identify renal components in order to improve the diagnosis of rejection. In addition, recent progress in the field of renal transplant pathology includes the development of a new method for assessing molecular pathology using OMICS analyses. As the recent findings of various studies in patients undergoing renal transplantation are very encouraging, novel immunohistochemical markers must be also developed and combined with new technologies for the diagnosis of human renal allograft rejection.

  17. The effect of nifedipine on renal function in normotensive cyclosporin-A-treated renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    McNally, P G; Walls, J; Feehally, J

    1990-01-01

    Intrarenal vasoconstriction is a characteristic feature of CsA nephrotoxicity. The influence of nifedipine, a dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker and potent renal vasodilator, on renal haemodynamics was investigated in 11 cyclosporin A (CsA)- and 9 azathioprine (Aza)-treated normotensive long-term renal allograft recipients. Baseline Cr51-EDTA clearance and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) were similar in both groups. Nifedipine 20 mg twice daily for 28 days significantly increased Cr51-EDTA clearance (+14.8%) in the CsA group; however, ERPF, renal vascular resistance (RVR), and filtration fraction did not change. Nifedipine did not influence renal haemodynamics in the azathioprine group. The increase in Cr51-EDTA clearance in the CsA group did not correlate with baseline renal function, CsA dose or whole blood levels, donor age, duration of graft, or renal functional reserve capacity. This study suggests that nifedipine confers a beneficial effect on renal haemodynamics in long-term CsA-treated renal allograft recipients and appears to improve renal function by a non-haemodynamic mechanism.

  18. The cooperation of FGF receptor and Klotho is involved in excretory canal development and regulation of metabolic homeostasis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Polanska, Urszula M; Edwards, Elisabeth; Fernig, David G; Kinnunen, Tarja K

    2011-02-18

    FGFs have traditionally been associated with cell proliferation, morphogenesis, and development; yet, a subfamily of FGFs (FGF19, -21, and -23) functions as hormones to regulate glucose, lipid, phosphate, and vitamin D metabolism with impact on energy balance and aging. In mammals, Klotho and beta-Klotho are type 1 transmembrane proteins that function as obligatory co-factors for endocrine FGFs to bind to their cognate FGF receptors (FGFRs). Mutations in Klotho/beta-Klotho or fgf19, -21, or -23 are associated with a number of human diseases, including autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets, premature aging disorders, and diabetes. The Caenorhabditis elegans genome contains two paralogues of Klotho/beta-Klotho, klo-1, and klo-2. klo-1 is expressed in the C. elegans excretory canal, which is structurally and functionally paralogous to the vertebrate kidney. KLO-1 associates with EGL-15/FGFR, suggesting a role for KLO-1 in the fluid homeostasis phenotype described previously for egl-15/fgfr mutants. Altered levels of EGL-15/FGFR signaling lead to defects in excretory canal development and function in C. elegans. These results suggest an evolutionarily conserved function for the FGFR-Klotho complex in the development of excretory organs such as the mammalian kidney and the worm excretory canal. These results also suggest an evolutionarily conserved function for the FGFR-Klotho axis in metabolic regulation.

  19. Production and Actions of the Anandamide Metabolite Prostamide E2 in the Renal Medulla

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cao; Xia, Min; Poklis, Justin L.; Lichtman, Aron H.; Abdullah, Rehab A.; Dewey, William L.; Li, Pin-Lan

    2012-01-01

    Medullipin has been proposed to be an antihypertensive lipid hormone released from the renal medulla in response to increased arterial pressure and renal medullary blood flow. Because anandamide (AEA) possesses characteristics of this purported hormone, the present study tested the hypothesis that AEA or one of its metabolites represents medullipin. AEA was demonstrated to be enriched in the kidney medulla compared with cortex. Western blotting and enzymatic analyses of renal cortical and medullary microsomes revealed opposite patterns of enrichment of two AEA-metabolizing enzymes, with fatty acid amide hydrolase higher in the renal cortex and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) higher in the renal medulla. In COX-2 reactions with renal medullary microsomes, prostamide E2, the ethanolamide of prostaglandin E2, was the major product detected. Intramedullarily infused AEA dose-dependently increased urine volume and sodium and potassium excretion (15–60 nmol/kg/min) but had little effect on mean arterial pressure (MAP). The renal excretory effects of AEA were blocked by intravenous infusion of celecoxib (0.1 μg/kg/min), a selective COX-2 inhibitor, suggesting the involvement of a prostamide intermediate. Plasma kinetic analysis revealed longer elimination half-lives for AEA and prostamide E2 compared with prostaglandin E2. Intravenous prostamide E2 reduced MAP and increased renal blood flow (RBF), actions opposite to those of angiotensin II. Coinfusion of prostamide E2 inhibited angiotensin II effects on MAP and RBF. These results suggest that AEA and/or its prostamide metabolites in the renal medulla may represent medullipin and function as a regulator of body fluid and MAP. PMID:22685343

  20. Renal actinomycosis with concomitant renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Dong-Suk; Jang, Won Ik; Jung, Ji Yoon; Chung, Sarah; Choi, Dae Eun; Na, Ki-Ryang; Lee, Kang Wook; Shin, Yong-Tai

    2012-02-01

    Renal actinomycosis is a rare infection caused by fungi of the genus Actinomyces. A 74-year-old male was admitted to our hospital because of gross hematuria with urinary symptoms and intermittent chills. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed thrombosis in the left renal vein and diffuse, heterogeneous enlargement of the left kidney. After nephrectomy, sulfur granules with chronic suppurative inflammation were seen microscopically, and the histopathological diagnosis was renal actinomycosis. Our case is the first report of renal actinomycosis with renal vein thrombosis.

  1. Effect of a 30-day isolation stress on calcium, phosphorus and other excretory products in an unrestrained chimpanzee.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabbot, I. M.; Mcnew, J. J.; Hoshizaki, T.; Sedgwick, C. J.; Adey, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    An unrestrained chimpanzee was studied in an isolation chamber and in his home cage environment. The study consisted of 49 urine collection days (14 days pre-, 5 days post- and 30 days of isolation), and then of 10 days in the home cage. Dietary intake, urine and fecal data were obtained. The effect of isolation on various excretory parameters was studied. Urine samples were analyzed for volume, osmolarity, creatinine, creatine, urea-N, 17-hydroxy corticosteroids, VMA, calcium and inorganic phosphorus. One way analyses of variance performed on the urinary excretion parameters showed all except creatinine excretion to vary significantly during periods of the study. The changes observed in calcium and phosphorus were highly significant. The data suggests that the calcium to phosphorus excretion ratio might serve as a physiological stress indicator of Selye's adaptation syndrome (period of resistance).

  2. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,…

  3. [Comparative analysis of modern combined methods in diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Teodorovich, O V; Ternovoĭ, S K; Vlasova, I S; Zabrodina, N B; Fominykh, E V; Kesov, Ia E

    2006-01-01

    To ascertain the role of multispiral computed tomography (MSCT) in diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to propose optimal diagnostic policy in RCC patients, we examined 63 patients with suspected renal tumor: 37 (59%) males and 26 (41%) females, age 47-77 ages, mean age 54.2+/-1.5 years, duration of the disease from 1 month to 7 years. The following diagnostic methods were imployed: ultrasonography of the kidneys, plain and excretory urography, spiral computed tomography, angiography, MSCT, MRT, thin-needle aspiration biopsy. By the results of a combined examination and operation on the kidney lesion, the diagnosis of RCC was made in 45 (80.3%) patients including stage I in 21 (46.7%), stage II in 9 (20%), stage III in 13 (28.9%), stage IV in 2 (4.5%) patients. Benign renal tumors were detected in 8 (14.2%) patients, giant cysts of the kidneys--in 5 cases, benign renal tumors--in 3 cases, adenoma--in 2 cases, angiomyolipoma--in 1 case. Detected were also renal malformations in 3 cases, a distant retroperitoneal metastasis of RCC in 1 case, adrenal tumors in 6 (9.5%) cases. We suppose that MSCT enables multiplanar and 3-dimentional reconstruction of the images, staging of RCC, planning of surgical treatment. MSCT should be conducted after standard ultrasound examination.

  4. Tenofovir renal toxicity targets mitochondria of renal proximal tubules

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, James J; Hosseini, Seyed H; Hoying-Brandt, Amy; Green, Elgin; Johnson, David M; Russ, Rodney; Tran, Dung; Raper, C Michael; Santoianni, Robert; Lewis, William

    2009-01-01

    Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) is an analog of adenosine monophosphate that inhibits HIV reverse transcriptase in HIV/AIDS. Despite its therapeutic success, renal tubular side effects are reported. The mechanisms and targets of tenofovir toxicity were determined using ‘2 × 2’ factorial protocols, and HIV transgenic (TG) and wild-type (WT) littermate mice with or without TDF (5 weeks). A parallel study used didanosine (ddI) instead of TDF. At termination, heart, kidney, and liver samples were retrieved. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) abundance, and histo- and ultrastructural pathology were analyzed. Laser-capture microdissection (LCM) was used to isolate renal proximal tubules for molecular analyses. Tenofovir increased mtDNA abundance in TG whole kidneys, but not in their hearts or livers. In contrast, ddI decreased mtDNA abundance in the livers of WTs and TGs, but had no effect on their hearts or kidneys. Histological analyses of kidneys showed no disruption of glomeruli or proximal tubules with TDF or ddI treatments. Ultrastructural changes in renal proximal tubules from TDF-treated TGs included an increased number and irregular shape of mitochondria with sparse fragmented cristae. LCM-captured renal proximal tubules from TGs showed decreased mtDNA abundance with tenofovir. The results indicate that tenofovir targets mitochondrial toxicity on the renal proximal tubule in an AIDS model. PMID:19274046

  5. [Molecular aspects of renal desease].

    PubMed

    Nichik, T E; Lin'kova, N S; Kraskovskaia, N A; Dudkov, A V; Khavinson, V Kh

    2014-01-01

    The review considers molecular mechanisms of chronic renal failure and cancer kidney disease. The most important molecules inducing inflammation are cytokines (MCP-1, TNFalpha, IFN-gamma, IL-1,6,8,18), matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2,3,9,14, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) and grow factors (VEGF PDGE FGF). This signal molecules regulate the activity of immune cells and remodeling extracellular matrix (ECM) components taken place in inflammatory reactions, proliferation, apoptosis and also in the differentiation of kidney cells. On the basis of these data nowadays developed new highly selective approaches to diagnosis, prediction, estimation of efficiency of treatment of renal disease and creating of target drugs. PMID:25707263

  6. Renal denervation for resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Manuel de Sousa; Gonçalves, Pedro de Araújo; Oliveira, Eduardo Infante de; Carvalho, Henrique Cyrne de

    2015-02-01

    There is a marked contrast between the high prevalence of hypertension and the low rates of adequate control. A subset of patients with suboptimal blood pressure control have drug-resistant hypertension, in the pathophysiology of which chronic sympathetic hyperactivation is significantly involved. Sympathetic renal denervation has recently emerged as a device-based treatment for resistant hypertension. In this review, the pathophysiological mechanisms linking the sympathetic nervous system and cardiovascular disease are reviewed, focusing on resistant hypertension and the role of sympathetic renal denervation. An update on experimental and clinical results is provided, along with potential future indications for this device-based technique in other cardiovascular diseases.

  7. [Organ replacement therapy - renal replacement therapy in intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Kraus, Daniel; Wanner, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Critically ill patients who are treated in an intensive care unit are at increased risk of developing acute renal failure. Every episode of renal failure decreases life expectancy. However, acute renal failure is no longer an immediate cause of death because renal function can be substituted medically and mechanically, by the use of renal replacement therapy. Hemodialysis and hemofiltration are the 2 fundamental modalities of renal replacement therapy and may be performed intermittently or continuously. The decision for one particular therapy has to be made for each patient individually. Peritoneal dialysis is an alternative treatment for acute renal failure, but is not available for immediate use in most centers. Contrast media and rhabdomyolysis are 2 common causes of toxic renal failure in the intensive care unit. However, they cannot be prevented by hemodialysis. PMID:27631449

  8. Acute renal failure following binge drinking and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Wen, S F; Parthasarathy, R; Iliopoulos, O; Oberley, T D

    1992-09-01

    Two college students who developed reversible acute deterioration in renal function following binge drinking of beer and the use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are reported. Both patients presented with back and flank pain with muscle tenderness, but showed no evidence of overt rhabdomyolysis. The first case had marked renal failure, with a peak serum creatinine reaching 575 mumol/L (6.5 mg/dL), and acute tubular necrosis was documented by renal biopsy. The second case had only modest elevation in serum creatinine, and renal function rapidly improved on rehydration. The contribution of the potential muscle damage associated with alcohol ingestion to the changes in renal function in these two cases is not clear. However, the major mechanism for the acute renal failure was thought to be related to inhibition of renal prostaglandin synthesis in the face of compromised renal hemodynamics secondary to alcohol-induced volume depletion. PMID:1519610

  9. Renal Endometriosis Tends to Be Misdiagnosed as Renal Tumor: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Song, Ri-jin; Xu, Chen; Zhang, Shi-qing; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Renal endometriosis is a rare disease for which the mechanisms of pathogenesis are still unclear. As such, early diagnosis and an appropriate treatment are often delayed because of the tendency to be misdiagnosed as a renal tumor. In October 2013 we performed a radical nephrectomy for a 37-year-old woman with renal endometriosis who was preoperatively misdiagnosed as having a right renal tumor. Avoiding the misdiagnosis of renal endometriosis requires a detailed case history, especially regarding whether the cyclicity of lumbodorsal pain and hematuria correlates with patients' menstrual cycles. Imaging examinations are commonly helpful for localization, whereas relieving symptoms with drugs to create a hypoestrogenic state is useful for clinical diagnosis. However, a final diagnosis for renal endometriosis still must depend on histopathologic examination. PMID:25692445

  10. Renal infarction after aerobics.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, J H; Moinuddin, M; Buchignani, J S; Rockett, J F; Callison, M K

    1984-11-01

    Renal infarction is most frequently due to emboli from the heart or aorta. Other causes include atheromatous disease, renal artery aneurysm, vasculitis, hypotension, hypercoagulable states, aortic dissection, and major trauma. Most renal infarctions are segmental. The extent of disease is dependent upon the size and number of renal vessels involved, coexistent renal disease, and collateral circulation. Flank pain, fever, leukocytosis, hematuria, renal failure, or hypertension may suggest the diagnosis, but these findings are nonspecific and diagnosis will depend not only on history and physical examination, but also on the appropriate imaging tests. The type of treatment is dictated by the etiology of the infarction.

  11. Dynamics of renal electrolyte excretion in growing mice.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Katharina; Ripper, Maria; Tegtmeier, Ines; Humberg, Evelyn; Sterner, Christina; Reichold, Markus; Warth, Richard; Bandulik, Sascha

    2013-01-01

    Genetically modified mice represent important models for elucidating renal pathophysiology, but gene deletions frequently cause severe failure to thrive. In such cases, the analysis of the phenotype is often limited to the first weeks of life when renal excretory function undergoes dramatic physiological changes. Here, we investigated the postnatal dynamics of urinary ion excretion in mice. The profiles of urinary electrolyte excretion of mice were examined from birth until after weaning using an automated ion chromatography system. Postnatally, mice grew about 0.4 g/day, except during two phases with slower weight gain: (i) directly after birth during adaptation to extrauterine conditions (P0-P2) and (ii) during the weaning period (P15-P21), when nutrition changed from mother's milk to solid chow and water. During the first 3 days after birth, remarkable changes in urinary Na(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and phosphate concentrations occurred, whereas K(+) and Cl(-) concentrations hardly changed. From days 4-14 after birth, Na(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), K(+), and Cl(-) concentrations remained relatively stable at low levels. Urinary concentrations of creatinine, NH4(+), phosphate, and sulfate constantly increased from birth until after weaning. Profiles of salt excretion in KCNJ10(-/-) mice exemplified the relevance of age-dependent analysis of urinary excretion. In conclusion, the most critical phases for analysis of renal ion excretion during the first weeks of life are directly after birth and during the weaning period. The age dependence of urinary excretion varies for the different ions. This should be taken into consideration when the renal phenotype of mice is investigated during the first weeks of life. PMID:24296675

  12. TNF induces caspase-dependent inflammation in renal endothelial cells through a Rho- and myosin light chain kinase-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoyan; Guo, Rongqing; Chen, Peili; Wang, Quan; Cunningham, Patrick N

    2009-08-01

    The pathogenesis of LPS-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) requires signaling through tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) receptor 1 (TNFR1), which within the kidney is primarily located in the endothelium. We showed previously that caspase inhibition protected mice against LPS-induced AKI and in parallel significantly inhibited LPS-induced renal inflammation. Therefore we hypothesized that caspase activation amplifies TNF-induced inflammation in renal endothelial cells (ECs). In cultured renal ECs, TNF induced apoptosis through a caspase-8-dependent pathway. TNF caused translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB to the nucleus, resulting in upregulation of inflammatory markers such as adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. However, the broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor Boc-d-fmk reduced NF-kB activation as assessed by gel shift assay, reduced phosphorylation of subunit IkappaBalpha, and significantly inhibited TNF-induced expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 as assessed by both real-time PCR and flow cytometry. Broad-spectrum caspase inhibition markedly inhibited neutrophil adherence to the TNF-activated endothelial monolayer, supporting the functional significance of this effect. Specific inhibitors of caspases-8 and -3, but not of caspase-1, reduced TNF-induced NF-kappaB activation. Caspase inhibition also reduced TNF-induced myosin light chain (MLC)-2 phosphorylation, and activation of upstream regulator RhoA. Consistent with this, MLC kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7 reduced TNF-induced NF-kappaB activation. Thus caspase activation influences NF-kappaB signaling via its affect on cytoskeletal changes occurring through RhoA and MLCK pathways. These cell culture experiments support a role for caspase activation in TNF-induced inflammation in the renal endothelium, a key event in LPS-induced AKI. PMID:19420112

  13. Antioxidant defense mechanisms of endothelial cells and renal tubular epithelial cells in vitro: role of the glutathione redox cycle and catalase.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, S P; Mallett, C; McAteer, J A; Williams, L V

    1992-09-01

    We recently demonstrated that endothelial cells are more susceptible than renal tubular epithelial cells to oxidant injury and that renal tubular epithelial cells with proximal tubular characteristics including porcine proximal tubular epithelial cells, opossum kidney proximal tubular epithelial cells, and normal human kidney cortical epithelial cells are more susceptible to oxidant injury than the distal nephron-derived Madin Darby canine kidney cell line. To determine the basis of this differential response, we evaluated several antioxidant defenses in the five cell lines. Glutathione levels were not significantly different among the five cell lines, but catalase and glutathione reductase levels were significantly (p less than 0.01) lower in endothelial cells compared to all renal tubular epithelial cells. Among renal tubular epithelial cells, Madin Darby canine kidney cells had significantly (p less than 0.05) higher glutathione peroxidase activity. To further evaluate the role of antioxidant defenses in limiting oxidant injury, we determined two responses to oxidant injury (ATP depletion and 51Cr release) when glutathione was depleted with buthionine sulfoxamine and when catalase was inhibited with aminotriazole. Oxidant-induced ATP depletion was accentuated when catalase was inhibited as well as when glutathione was depleted with buthionine sulfoxamine. In contrast, inhibition of catalase had little or no effect on 51Cr release, whereas glutathione depletion resulted in accentuated 51Cr release. We conclude that the increased susceptibility of endothelial cells to oxidant injury as compared with epithelial cells is associated with lower antioxidant defenses. Disruption of the glutathione redox cycle results in accentuated ATP depletion and lytic injury, whereas inhibition of catalase results in accentuated ATP depletion with little effect on lytic injury.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. A Review on Renal Toxicity Profile of Common Abusive Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Varun Parkash; Singh, Nirmal

    2013-01-01

    Drug abuse has become a major social problem of the modern world and majority of these abusive drugs or their metabolites are excreted through the kidneys and, thus, the renal complications of these drugs are very common. Morphine, heroin, cocaine, nicotine and alcohol are the most commonly abused drugs, and their use is associated with various types of renal toxicity. The renal complications include a wide range of glomerular, interstitial and vascular diseases leading to acute or chronic renal failure. The present review discusses the renal toxicity profile and possible mechanisms of commonly abused drugs including morphine, heroin, cocaine, nicotine, caffeine and alcohol. PMID:23946695

  15. Renal vein thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kidneys. Possible Complications Complications may include: Acute renal failure (especially if thrombosis occurs in a dehydrated child) ... Saunders; 2012:chap 34. Read More Acute kidney failure Arteriogram Blood ... embolus Renal Tumor Update Date 5/19/2015 Updated by: ...

  16. Renal papillary necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your provider. Alternative Names Necrosis - renal papillae; Renal medullary necrosis Images Kidney anatomy Kidney - blood and urine flow References Ruggenenti P, Cravedi P, Remuzzi G. Microvascular and macrovascular diseases of the kidney. In: Taal MW, Chertow GM, ...

  17. Renal arteries (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A renal angiogram is a test used to examine the blood vessels of the kidneys. The test is performed ... main vessel of the pelvis, up to the renal artery that leads into the kidney. Contrast medium ...

  18. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... renal function using ureteral stenting, nephrostomy, surgery or dialysis. What is kidney (renal) failure? How is kidney ... as a urinary stent or kidney stone removal. Dialysis , including hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis: These procedures remove ...

  19. Serum antibody isotype responses of Fasciola-infected sheep and cattle to excretory and secretory products of Fasciola species.

    PubMed

    Phiri, I K; Phiri, A M; Harrison, L J S

    2006-11-01

    This study investigated the immunoglobulin isotype responses of sheep and cattle chronically infected with Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica to adult F. hepatica excretory/secretory products (Fh-ES) or F. gigantica excretory/secretory products (Fg-ES), respectively. An antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Ab-ELISA) was used to determine serum antibody (total Ig, IgG(1), IgM, IgG(2) and IgA) responses. At necropsy, the mean number of flukes recovered was lower in cattle than in sheep. All F. hepatica and F. gigantica infected sheep and cattle showed an increased total Ig levels from 3 to 4 weeks post-infection (wpi). Among isotypes IgG(1) was most dominant while IgM was the earliest (2 wpi) to be detected in both sheep and cattle infected with both F. hepatica and F. gigantica animals. IgG(2) response was early (2 wpi) in sheep infected by F. hepatica but there was no response in sheep infected with F. gigantica. There was a late and strong IgG(2) response in cattle infected with both flukes. The IgA isotype showed an early and a clear biphasic response in sheep with F. hepatica but was less pronounced in F. gigantica infected sheep. While IgA response to Fh-ES was noticed 5 wpi in F. hepatica infected cattle, it appeared much later (21 wpi) in those infected with F. gigantica. The dominance of IgG(1) isotype in infected sheep and cattle suggest an associated Th2 response. This early response to adult Fasciola spp. ES antigen suggests an early exposure to the antigen presumably through the cross-reacting ES products of juvenile flukes. There is clearly difference in IgG(2) isotype response in cattle (resistant) compared to sheep (susceptible). The late IgG(2) response in cattle may suggest late Th1 involvement in bovine cellular responses to adult Fh-ES/Fg-ES.

  20. Renal tubular secretion of pramipexole.

    PubMed

    Knop, Jana; Hoier, Eva; Ebner, Thomas; Fromm, Martin F; Müller, Fabian

    2015-11-15

    The dopamine agonist pramipexole is cleared predominantly by the kidney with a major contribution of active renal secretion. Previously the organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) was shown to be involved in the uptake of pramipexole by renal tubular cells, while the mechanism underlying efflux into tubular lumen remains unclear. Cimetidine, a potent inhibitor of multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins 1 (MATE1) and 2-K (MATE2-K), decreases renal pramipexole clearance in humans. We hypothesized that, in addition to OCT2, pramipexole may be a substrate of MATE-mediated transport. Pramipexole uptake was investigated using MDCK or HEK cells overexpressing OCT2, MATE1 or MATE2-K and the respective vector controls (Co). Transcellular pramipexole transport was investigated in MDCK cells single- or double-transfected with OCT2 and/or MATE1 and in Co cells, separating a basal from an apical compartment in a model for renal tubular secretion. Pramipexole uptake was 1.6-, 1.1-, or 1.6-folds in cells overexpressing OCT2, MATE1 or MATE2-K, respectively as compared to Co cells (p<0.05). In transcellular transport experiments, intracellular pramipexole accumulation was 1.7-folds in MDCK-OCT2 (p<0.001), and transcellular pramipexole transport was 2.2- and 4.0-folds in MDCK-MATE1 and MDCK-OCT2-MATE1 cells as compared to Co cells (p<0.001). Transcellular pramipexole transport was pH dependent and inhibited by cimetidine with IC50 values of 12μM and 5.5μM in MATE1 and OCT2-MATE1 cells, respectively. Taken together, coordinate activity of OCT2-mediated uptake and MATE-mediated efflux determines pramipexole renal secretion. Reduced OCT2 or MATE transport activity due to genetic variation or drug-drug interactions may affect pramipexole renal secretion.

  1. Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tao; Guo, Jin-he; Teng, Gao-jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a group of metabolic diseases of multiple etiologies. Although great progress has been made, researchers are still working on the pathogenesis of T2DM and how to best use the treatments available. Aside from several novel pharmacological approaches, catheter-based sympathetic renal denervation (RDN) has gained a significant role in resistant hypertension, as well as improvements in glycemic control in T2DM. In this article, we will summarize herein the role sympathetic activation plays in the progression of T2DM and review the recent clinical RDN experience in glucose metabolism. We performed systematic review in online databases, including PubMed, EmBase, and Web of Science, from inception until 2015. Studies were included if a statistical relationship was investigated between RDN and T2DM. The quality of each included study was assessed by Newcastle–Ottawa scale score. To synthesize these studies, a random-effects model or a fixed-effects model was applied as appropriate. Then, we calculated heterogeneity, performed sensitivity analysis, tested publication bias, and did meta-regression analysis. Finally, we identified 4 eligible articles. In most studies, RDN achieved via novel catheter-based approach using radiofrequency energy has gained a significant role in resistant hypertension, as well as improvements in glycemic control in T2DM. But the DREAMS-Study showed that RDN did not change median insulin sensitivity nor systemic sympathetic activity. Firstly, the current published studies lacked a proper control group, along with the sample capacity was small. Also, data obtained in the subgroups of diabetic patients were not separately analyzed and the follow-up period was very short. In addition, a reduction in blood pressure accounts for the improvements in glucose metabolism and insulin resistance cannot be excluded. If the favorable result of better glucose metabolism is confirmed in large-scale, randomized studies

  2. PROGRESSIVE RENAL VASCULAR PROLIFERATION AND INJURY IN OBESE ZUCKER RATS

    PubMed Central

    Iliescu, Radu; Chade, Alejandro R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Obesity, an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease, may induce renal injury by promoting inflammation. Inflammatory cytokines can induce neovascularization in different organs, including the kidneys. However, whether obesity triggers renal neovascularization and, if so, its effect on renal function has never been investigated. Methods Blood pressure, proteinuria and glomerular-filtration-rate (GFR) were measured in-vivo. Renal microvascular (MV) architecture was studied by 3D micro-CT in lean and obese Zucker rats (LZR and OZR, n=7/group) at 12, 22, and 32 weeks of age. Renal inflammation was assessed by quantifying interleukin (IL)-6, tumor-necrosis-factor (TNF)-alpha, and ED-1 expression, as renal fibrosis in trichrome-stained cross-sections. Results Mild inflammation and lower GFR was only observed in younger OZR, without renal fibrosis or changes in MV density. Interestingly, renal MV density increased in OZR at 32 weeks of age, accompanied by pronounced increase in renal IL-6 and TNF-alpha, ED-1+ cells, proteinuria, decreased GFR, and fibrosis. Conclusion This study shows increased renal cortical vascularization in experimental obesity, suggesting neovascularization as an evolving process as obesity progresses. Increased renal vascularization, possibly triggered by inflammation, may reflect an initially compensatory mechanism in obesity. However, increased inflammation and inflammatory-induced neovascularization may further promote renal injury as obesity advances. PMID:20536738

  3. [Mean elimination time of the impulse radiotracer (131I-hippurate) as a marker of renal function].

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, M

    1990-01-01

    A possibility of assessment of renal excretory function using mean time of the impulse tracer (131I-hippurate) dose elimination has been shown on the basis of theoretical analysis of hippurate kinetics. Such an index was calculated during classic hippurate renography from time/activity curve over precordium. Other traces and different regions of monitoring might also be employed. The mean time of tracer elimination obtained in this manner only indirectly reflects the hippurate clearance, yet can be easily achieved. Moreover, this entity is not influenced by errors related to quantitative measurements of radioactivity and to hypothetical assumptions, which are common for more sophisticated isotope clearance methods. The enlisted characteristics seem to predispose the proposed method of renal function evaluation for application in screening isotope tests. PMID:2135901

  4. Cardio-renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gnanaraj, Joseph; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Cardio-renal syndrome is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. The purpose of this article is to highlight the interaction between the cardiovascular system and the renal system and how their interaction results in the complex syndrome of cardio-renal dysfunction. Additionally, we outline the available therapeutic strategies to manage this complex syndrome. PMID:27635229

  5. Cardio-renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gnanaraj, Joseph; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Cardio-renal syndrome is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. The purpose of this article is to highlight the interaction between the cardiovascular system and the renal system and how their interaction results in the complex syndrome of cardio-renal dysfunction. Additionally, we outline the available therapeutic strategies to manage this complex syndrome.

  6. [Idiopathic renal arteriovenous fistula].

    PubMed

    Bennani, S; Ait Bolbarod, A; el Mrini, M; Kadiri, R; Benjelloun, S

    1996-06-01

    The authors report a case of idiopathic renal arteriovenous fistula. The diagnosis was established angiographically in a 24 year old man presenting gross hematuria. Embolization of the fistula was performed. Efficiency of this treatment was appreciated clinically and by duplex renal ultrasonography. The characteristics of renal arteriovenous fistulas are reviewed. PMID:8763700

  7. CXCL16 regulates renal injury and fibrosis in experimental renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiheng; Jin, Xiaogao; He, Liqun; Wang, Yanlin

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that inflammation plays a critical role in the initiation and progression of hypertensive kidney disease, including renal artery stenosis. However, the signaling mechanisms underlying the induction of inflammation are poorly understood. We found that CXCL16 was induced in the kidney in a murine model of renal artery stenosis. To determine whether CXCL16 is involved in renal injury and fibrosis, wild-type and CXCL16 knockout mice were subjected to renal artery stenosis induced by placing a cuff on the left renal artery. Wild-type and CXCL16 knockout mice had comparable blood pressure at baseline. Renal artery stenosis caused an increase in blood pressure that was similar between wild-type and CXCL16 knockout mice. CXCL16 knockout mice were protected from RAS-induced renal injury and fibrosis. CXCL16 deficiency suppressed bone marrow-derived fibroblast accumulation and myofibroblast formation in the stenotic kidneys, which was associated with less expression of extracellular matrix proteins. Furthermore, CXCL16 deficiency inhibited infiltration of F4/80(+) macrophages and CD3(+) T cells in the stenotic kidneys compared with those of wild-type mice. Taken together, our results indicate that CXCL16 plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of renal artery stenosis-induced renal injury and fibrosis through regulation of bone marrow-derived fibroblast accumulation and macrophage and T-cell infiltration.

  8. Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis and Calcium Nephrolithiasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moe, Orson W.; Fuster, Daniel G.; Xie, Xiao-Song

    2008-09-01

    Calcium stones are commonly encountered in patients with congenital distal renal tubular acidosis, a disease of renal acidification caused by mutations in either the vacuolar H+-ATPase (B1 or a4 subunit), anion exchanger-1, or carbonic anhydrase II. Based on the existing database, we present two hypotheses. First, heterozygotes with mutations in B1 subunit of H+-ATPase are not normal but may harbor biochemical abnormalities such as renal acidification defects, hypercalciuria, and hypocitraturia which can predispose them to kidney stone formation. Second, we propose at least two mechanisms by which mutant B1 subunit can impair H+-ATPase: defective pump assembly and defective pump activity.

  9. Functional aspects of silent ureteral stones investigated with MAG-3 renal scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To investigate functional aspects of silent ureteral stones with special focus on obstruction and its relationship to renal anatomy. The present study is the first investigation of renal excretory function in patients with silent ureteral stones. Methods Patients with primarily asymptomatic ureteral stones underwent a mercapto-acetyltriglycine (MAG-3) renal scintigraphy prior to treatment, in addition to anatomic evaluation of renal units and serum creatinine levels. The primary outcome measure was the presence or absence of obstruction. Secondary outcome measures were kidney anatomy, grade of hydronephrosis, location of stones, stone size, and serum creatinine levels. Results During a ten-year period, 14 patients (median age 52.6 years; range 37.3 to 80.7 years) were included in the study. The relative frequency of primarily asymptomatic ureteral stones among all patients treated for ureteral stones in the study period was 0.7%. Eleven renal units showed some degree of hydronephrosis while 3 kidneys were not dilated. On the MAG-3 scan, 7 patients had an obstruction of the ureter, 5 had no obstruction, and 2 had dysfunction of the kidney. A statistically significant correlation was established between the grade of obstruction and stone size (p = 0.02). Conclusions At the time of presentation, only 64.3% of the patients revealed an obstruction in the stone-bearing renal unit. The degree of hydronephrosis and renal function were very diverse in this subgroup of patients with ureteral stones. The onset of ureterolithiasis and the chronological sequence of obstruction remain unclear in patients who have never experienced symptoms due to their stones. PMID:24397735

  10. Vampire bat, shrew, and bear: comparative physiology and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Singer, Michael A

    2002-06-01

    In the typical mammal, energy flux, protein metabolism, and renal excretory processes constitute a set of closely linked and quantitatively matched functions. However, this matching has limits, and these limits become apparent when animals adapt to unusual circumstances. The vampire bat and shrew have an extremely high protein intake, and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is not commensurate with the large urea load to be excreted. The vampire bat is chronically azotemic (blood urea concentration 27-57 mmol/l); yet there is no information as to how this animal has adjusted to such an azotemic internal environment. A high protein intake should also lead to chronic glomerular hyperfiltration; yet neither animal appears to develop progressive renal failure. The American black bear, on the other hand, has adapted to a prolonged period without intake or urine output. Despite continued amino acid catabolism with urea production, this mammal is able to completely salvage and reutilize urea nitrogen for protein synthesis, although the signals that initiate this metabolic adaptation are not known. The vampire bat, shrew, and bear are natural models adapted to circumstances analogous to chronic renal failure. Unraveling these adaptations could lead to new interventions for the prevention/treatment of chronic renal failure. PMID:12010738

  11. Renal infarction resulting from traumatic renal artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sik; Kim, Won; Jin, Gong Yong; Na, Ki Ryang; Yun, Il Yong; Park, Sung Kwang

    2008-06-01

    Renal artery dissection may be caused by iatrogenic injury, trauma, underlying arterial diseases such as fibromuscular disease, atherosclerotic disease, or connective tissue disease. Radiological imaging may be helpful in detecting renal artery pathology, such as renal artery dissection. For patients with acute, isolated renal artery dissection, surgical treatment, endovascular management, or medical treatment have been considered effective measures to preserve renal function. We report a case of renal infarction that came about as a consequence of renal artery dissection.

  12. Sonic hedgehog protein regulates fibroblast growth factor 8 expression in metanephric explant culture from BALB/c mice: Possible mechanisms associated with renal morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xing; Hou, Xiao-Ming; Fan, You-Fei; Jin, Yu-Ting; Wang, Yu-Lin

    2016-01-01

    The sonic hedgehog (SHH) morphogen regulates cell differentiation and controls a number of genes during renal morphogenesis. To date, the effects of SHH on fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) in embryonic kidney development remain unclear. In the present study, explants of BALB/c mouse embryonic kidney tissues were used to investigate the role of exogenous SHH on Fgf8 and Fgf10 expression levels ex vivo. Ureteric bud branches and epithelial metanephric derivatives were used to determine the renal morphogenesis with Dolichos biflorus agglutinin or hematoxylineosin staining. mRNA expression levels were determined using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, while the protein expression levels were examined using immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. During the initial stages of metanephric development, low levels of SHH, Fgf8, and Fgf10 expression were observed, which were found to increase significantly during more advanced stages of metanephric development. In addition, exogenous SHH protein treatment increased the number of ureteric bud branches and enhanced the formation of nephrons. Exogenous SHH reduced the Fgf8 mRNA and protein expression levels, whereas cyclopamine (an SHH-smoothened receptor inhibitor) interfered with SHH-mediated downregulation of Fgf8 expression. By contrast, exogenous SHH protein was not found to modulate Fgf10 mRNA and protein expression levels. In conclusion, these results indicate that the modulatory effects of SHH on BALB/c mouse metanephric explant cultures may involve the regulation of Fgf8 expression but not Fgf10 expression, which provides evidence for the functional role of Fgf proteins in renal morphogenesis. PMID:27510750

  13. Sonic hedgehog protein regulates fibroblast growth factor 8 expression in metanephric explant culture from BALB/c mice: Possible mechanisms associated with renal morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Hou, Xiao-Ming; Fan, You-Fei; Jin, Yu-Ting; Wang, Yu-Lin

    2016-10-01

    The sonic hedgehog (SHH) morphogen regulates cell differentiation and controls a number of genes during renal morphogenesis. To date, the effects of SHH on fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) in embryonic kidney development remain unclear. In the present study, explants of BALB/c mouse embryonic kidney tissues were used to investigate the role of exogenous SHH on Fgf8 and Fgf10 expression levels ex vivo. Ureteric bud branches and epithelial metanephric derivatives were used to determine the renal morphogenesis with Dolichos biflorus agglutinin or hematoxylin‑eosin staining. mRNA expression levels were determined using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction, while the protein expression levels were examined using immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. During the initial stages of metanephric development, low levels of SHH, Fgf8, and Fgf10 expression were observed, which were found to increase significantly during more advanced stages of metanephric development. In addition, exogenous SHH protein treatment increased the number of ureteric bud branches and enhanced the formation of nephrons. Exogenous SHH reduced the Fgf8 mRNA and protein expression levels, whereas cyclopamine (an SHH‑smoothened receptor inhibitor) interfered with SHH‑mediated downregulation of Fgf8 expression. By contrast, exogenous SHH protein was not found to modulate Fgf10 mRNA and protein expression levels. In conclusion, these results indicate that the modulatory effects of SHH on BALB/c mouse metanephric explant cultures may involve the regulation of Fgf8 expression but not Fgf10 expression, which provides evidence for the functional role of Fgf proteins in renal morphogenesis. PMID:27510750

  14. Postpartum renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Rubens, D; Sterns, R H; Segal, A J

    1985-01-01

    Renal vein thrombosis in adults is usually a complication of the nephrotic syndrome. Rarely, it has been reported in nonnephrotic women postpartum. The thrombosis may be a complication of the hypercoagulable state associated with both the nephrotic syndrome and pregnancy. Two postpartum patients with renal vein thrombosis and no prior history of renal disease are reported here. Neither patient had heavy proteinuria. In both cases, pyelonephritis was suspected clinically and the diagnosis of renal vein thrombosis was first suggested and confirmed by radiologic examination. Renal vein thrombosis should be considered in women presenting postpartum with flank pain.

  15. The mannose receptor binds Trichuris muris excretory/secretory proteins but is not essential for protective immunity

    PubMed Central

    deSchoolmeester, Matthew L; Martinez-Pomares, Luisa; Gordon, Siamon; Else, Kathryn J

    2009-01-01

    Trichuris muris is a natural mouse model of the human gastrointestinal nematode parasite Trichuris trichiura and it is well established that a T helper type 2-dominated immune response is required for worm expulsion. Macrophages accumulate in the large intestine of mice during infection and these cells are known to express the mannose receptor (MR), which may act as a pattern recognition receptor. The data presented here show for the first time that T. muris excretory/secretory products (E/S) induce bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) to produce several cytokines and have MR-binding activity. Using alternatively activated BMDM from MR knockout mice it is shown that the production of interleukin-6 partially depends on the MR. Infection of MR knockout mice with T. muris reveals that this receptor is not necessary for the expulsion of the parasite because MR knockout mice expel parasites with the same kinetics as wild-type animals and have similar cytokine responses in the mesenteric lymph nodes. Furthermore, despite acting to reduce serum levels of proinflammatory mediators, absence of the MR does not lead to increased gut inflammation after T. muris infection when assessed by macrophage influx, goblet cell hyperplasia and crypt depth. This work suggests that, despite binding components of T. muris E/S, the MR is not critically involved in the generation of the immune response to this parasite. PMID:18624733

  16. iTRAQ-based comparative proteomic analysis of excretory-secretory proteins of schistosomula and adult worms of Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaodan; Fu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Min; Han, Yanhui; Han, Hongxiao; Han, Qian; Lu, Ke; Hong, Yang; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2016-04-14

    Schistosomiasis remains a serious public health problem with 200 million people infected and 779 million people at risk worldwide. The schistosomulum and adult worm are two stages of the complex lifecycle of Schistosoma japonicum and excretory/secretory proteins (ESPs) play a major role in host-parasite interactions. In this study, iTRAQ-coupled LC-MS/MS was used to investigate the proteome of ESPs obtained from schistosomula and adult worms of S. japonicum, and 298 differential ESPs were identified. Bioinformatics analysis of differential ESPs in the two developmental stages showed that 161 ESPs upregulated in schistosomula were associated with stress responses, carbohydrate metabolism and protein degradation, whereas ESPs upregulated in adult worms were mainly related to immunoregulation and purine metabolism. Recombinant heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx), two differential proteins identified in this study, were expressed. Further studies showed that rSjHSP70 and rSjTPx stimulated macrophages expressing high levels of the anti-inflammatory factors TGF-β, IL-10 and Arg-1, and suppressed the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and iNOS in LPS-induced macrophages. This study provides new insights into the survival and development of schistosomes in the final host and helps identify vaccine candidates or new diagnostic reagents for schistosomiasis.

  17. Excretory-secretory products from Paragonimus westermani increase nitric oxide production in microglia in PKC-dependent and -independent manners.

    PubMed

    Jin, Youngnam; Choi, In Young; Kim, Chunsook; Hong, Suyoung; Kim, Won-Ki

    2009-10-01

    Excretory-secretory products (ESP) from helminthic parasites may play pivotal roles in the immune regulation in hosts. Previously, we reported that ESP produced from Paragonimus westermani induced morphological activation of microglial cells and markedly stimulated nitric oxide (NO) production via activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). In the present study, we investigated the role of protein kinase C and protein kinase A in MAPKs-dependent NO production by ESP. We found that treatment with protein kinase C inhibitor Go6976 strongly inhibited the phosphorylation of p38 and JNK, but not ERK, of MAPKs and decreased the production of NO in ESP-stimulated microglial cells. Inhibition of ERK, p38 or PKC decreased the ESP-induced activation of NF-kappaB, an important transcription factor for iNOS expression. Furthermore, ESP increased the level of p-CREB in microglial cells. However, adenylyl cyclase activator (forskolin), adenylyl cyclase inhibitor (SQ22536), cAMP analogue (db-cAMP) or protein kinase A inhibitor (H89) was not able to change iNOS expression and NO production in ESP-treated microglial cells. It implies that the cAMP-PKA-CREB pathway is not implicated in the ESP-evoked NO production in microglial cells. Thus, our results indicate that ESP stimulates microglial expression of iNOS via both PKC-dependent and -independent MAPKs phosphorylation and NF-kappaB activation.

  18. Macrophageal/microglial cell activation and cerebral injury induced by excretory-secretory products secreted by Paragonimus westermani.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Chul; Cho, Geum-Sil; Kwon, Jae Hyun; Shin, Myeong Heon; Lim, Ji Hyae; Kim, Won-Ki

    2006-02-01

    Cerebral paragonimiasis causes various neurological disorders including seizures, visual impairment and hemiplegia. The excretory-secretory product (ESP) released by Paragonimus westermani has a cysteine protease activity and plays important roles in its migration in the host tissue and modulation of host immune responses. To gain more insight into the pathogenesis of ESP in the brain, we investigated the inflammatory reaction and cerebral injury following microinjection of ESP into rat striatum. The size of injury was maximally observed 3 days after microinjection of ESP and then declined to control levels as astrocytes have repopulated the injury. ED1-positive monocytes and microglia were confluently found inside the injury. The mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) occurred as early as 9h after ESP injection and then declined to control levels within 1 day. The iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine largely decreased the expression of iNOS but did not reduce the size of lesion caused by ESP. Interestingly, however, heat inactivation of ESP caused a decrease of injury formation with no altered expression of iNOS. The data indicate that ESP produces brain tissue injury by recruiting activated monocytes/microglia via heat-labile protease activity.

  19. Proteomic Analysis of Excretory-Secretory Products of Mesocestoides corti Metacestodes Reveals Potential Suppressors of Dendritic Cell Functions

    PubMed Central

    Vendelova, Emilia; Camargo de Lima, Jeferson; Lorenzatto, Karina Rodrigues; Monteiro, Karina Mariante; Mueller, Thomas; Veepaschit, Jyotishman; Grimm, Clemens; Brehm, Klaus; Hrčková, Gabriela; Lutz, Manfred B.; Ferreira, Henrique B.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidences have assigned a central role to parasite-derived proteins in immunomodulation. Here, we report on the proteomic identification and characterization of immunomodulatory excretory-secretory (ES) products from the metacestode larva (tetrathyridium) of the tapeworm Mesocestoides corti (syn. M. vogae). We demonstrate that ES products but not larval homogenates inhibit the stimuli-driven release of the pro-inflammatory, Th1-inducing cytokine IL-12p70 by murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). Within the ES fraction, we biochemically narrowed down the immunosuppressive activity to glycoproteins since active components were lipid-free, but sensitive to heat- and carbohydrate-treatment. Finally, using bioassay-guided chromatographic analyses assisted by comparative proteomics of active and inactive fractions of the ES products, we defined a comprehensive list of candidate proteins released by M. corti tetrathyridia as potential suppressors of DC functions. Our study provides a comprehensive library of somatic and ES products and highlight some candidate parasite factors that might drive the subversion of DC functions to facilitate the persistence of M. corti tetrathyridia in their hosts. PMID:27736880

  20. Quantification of mesenchymal stem cell growth rates through secretory and excretory biomolecules in conditioned media via Fresnel reflection.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Harith; Thambiratnam, Kavintheran; Zulkifli, Ahmad Z; Lawrence, Anthony; Jasim, Ali A; Kunasekaran, Wijenthiran; Musa, Sabri; Gnanasegaran, Nareshwaran; Vasanthan, Punitha; Jayaraman, Pukana; Kasim, Noor H A; Govindasamy, Vijayendran; Shahrir, Mohammad S; Harun, Sulaiman W

    2013-09-30

    An efficient and low cost optical method for directly measuring the concentration of homogenous biological solutes is proposed and demonstrated. The proposed system operates by Fresnel reflection, with a flat-cleaved single-mode fiber serving as the sensor probe. A laser provides a 12.9 dBm sensor signal at 1,550 nm, while a computer-controlled optical power meter measures the power of the signal returned by the probe. Three different mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) lines were obtained, sub-cultured and trypsinized daily over 9 days. Counts were measured using a haemocytometer and the conditioned media (CM) was collected daily and stored at -80 °C. MSCs release excretory biomolecules proportional to their growth rate into the CM, which changes the refractive index of the latter. The sensor is capable of detecting changes in the number of stem cells via correlation to the change in the refractive index of the CM, with the measured power loss decreasing approximately 0.4 dB in the CM sample per average 1,000 cells in the MSC subculture. The proposed system is highly cost-effective, simple to deploy, operate, and maintain, is non-destructive, and allows reliable real-time measurement of various stem cell proliferation parameters.

  1. Schistosome infection is associated with enhanced whole-blood IL-10 secretion in response to cercarial excretory/secretory products.

    PubMed

    Turner, J D; Meurs, L; Dool, P; Bourke, C D; Mbow, M; Dièye, T N; Mboup, S; Polman, K; Mountford, A P

    2013-01-01

    Infection of the human host by schistosome parasites follows exposure of skin to free-swimming cercariae and is aided by the release of excretory/secretory (E/S) material, which is rich in proteases and glycoconjugates. This material provides the initial stimulus to cells of the innate immune system. The study presented here is the first to examine human innate/early immune responsiveness to cercarial E/S in subjects from an area co-endemic for Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium. We report that in infected participants, stimulation of whole-blood cultures with cercarial E/S material (termed 0-3 hRP) caused the early (within 24 h) release of greater quantities of regulatory IL-10, compared with uninfected controls. Elevated levels of IL-10 but not pro-inflammatory TNFα or IL-8 were most evident in participants co-infected with S. mansoni and S. haematobium and were accompanied by a higher 0-3 h RP-specific IL-10: TNFα ratio. We also report that glycosylated components within 0-3 h RP appear to be important factors in the stimulation of IL-8, TNFα and IL-10 production by whole-blood cells.

  2. Effects of excretory/secretory products from Anisakis simplex (Nematoda) on immune gene expression in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Bahlool, Qusay Z M; Skovgaard, Alf; Kania, Per W; Buchmann, Kurt

    2013-09-01

    Excretory/secretory (ES) products are molecules produced by parasitic nematodes, including larval Anisakis simplex, a parasite occurring in numerous marine fish hosts. The effects of these substances on host physiology have not been fully described. The present work elucidates the influence of ES substances on the fish immune system by measuring immune gene expression in spleen and liver of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) injected intraperitoneally with ES products isolated from A. simplex third stage larvae. The overall gene expression profile of exposed fish showed a generalized down-regulation of the immune genes tested, suggesting a role of ES proteins in immunomodulation. We also tested the enzymatic activity of the ES proteins and found that lipase, esterase/lipase, valine and cysteine arylamidases, naphthol-AS-BI-phosphohydrolase and α-galactosidase activities were present in the ES solution. This type of hydrolytic enzyme activity may play a role in nematode penetration of host tissue. In addition, based on the notion that A. simplex ES products may have an immune-depressive effect (by minimizing immune gene expression) it could also be suggested that worm enzymes directly target host immune molecules which would add to a decreased host immune response and increased worm survival.

  3. Excretory/secretory antigens from Dirofilaria immitis adult worms interact with the host fibrinolytic system involving the vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    González-Miguel, Javier; Morchón, Rodrigo; Mellado, Isabel; Carretón, Elena; Montoya-Alonso, José Alberto; Simón, Fernando

    2012-02-01

    Dirofilaria immitis is the causative agent of canine and feline heartworm disease. The parasite can survive for long periods of time (7 years or more) in the circulatory system of immunocompetent reservoirs, producing usually a chronic inflammatory vascular disease. In addition, the simultaneous death of groups of adult worms can trigger an acute disease characterized by the exacerbation of inflammatory reactions and the emergence of serious thromboembolic events. In the context of the D. immitis/host relationships, the aim of this study was to investigate the interaction between the excretory/secretory antigens from D. immitis adult worms (DiES) and the fibrinolytic system of the host. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay we showed that DiES extract is able to bind plasminogen and generate plasmin, although this fact requires the presence of the tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). Moreover, we established that DiES extract enhances t-PA expression in cultured vascular endothelial cells. Additionally, 10 plasminogen-binding proteins from DiES extract were identified by mass spectrometry (HSP60, actin-1/3, actin, actin 4, transglutaminase, GAPDH, Ov87, LOAG_14743, galectin and P22U). The data suggest that DiES antigens interact with the environment of the parasite regulating the activation of the fibrinolytic system of the host with involvement of the vascular endothelium in the process.

  4. Brugia malayi soluble and excretory-secretory proteins attenuate development of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes in mice.

    PubMed

    Amdare, N; Khatri, V; Yadav, R S P; Tarnekar, A; Goswami, K; Reddy, M V R

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the modulation of the host-immune system by pathogens-like filarial parasites offers an alternate approach to prevent autoimmune diseases. In this study, we have shown that treatment with filarial proteins prior to or after the clinical onset of streptozotocin-induced type-1 diabetes (T1D) can ameliorate the severity of disease in BALB/c mice. Pre-treatment with Brugia malayi adult soluble (Bm A S) or microfilarial excretory-secretory (Bm mf ES) or microfilarial soluble (Bm mf S) antigens followed by induction of diabetes led to lowering of fasting blood glucose levels with as many as 57.5-62.5% of mice remaining nondiabetic. These proteins were more effective when they were used to treat the mice with established T1D as 62.5-71.5% of the mice turned to be nondiabetic. Histopathological examination of pancreas of treated mice showed minor inflammatory changes in pancreatic islet cell architecture. The therapeutic effect was found to be associated with the decreased production of cytokines TNF-α & IFN-γ and increased production of IL-10 in the culture supernatants of splenocytes of treated mice. A switch in the production of anti-insulin antibodies from IgG2a to IgG1 isotype was also seen. Together these results provide a proof towards utilizing the filarial derived proteins as novel anti-diabetic therapeutics.

  5. Quantification of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Growth Rates through Secretory and Excretory Biomolecules in Conditioned Media via Fresnel Reflection

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Harith; Thambiratnam, Kavintheran; Zulkifli, Ahmad Z.; Lawrence, Anthony; Jasim, Ali A.; Kunasekaran, Wijenthiran; Musa, Sabri; Gnanasegaran, Nareshwaran; Vasanthan, Punitha; Jayaraman, Pukana; Kasim, Noor H. A.; Govindasamy, Vijayendran; Shahrir, Mohammad S.; Harun, Sulaiman W.

    2013-01-01

    An efficient and low cost optical method for directly measuring the concentration of homogenous biological solutes is proposed and demonstrated. The proposed system operates by Fresnel reflection, with a flat-cleaved single-mode fiber serving as the sensor probe. A laser provides a 12.9 dBm sensor signal at 1,550 nm, while a computer-controlled optical power meter measures the power of the signal returned by the probe. Three different mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) lines were obtained, sub-cultured and trypsinized daily over 9 days. Counts were measured using a haemocytometer and the conditioned media (CM) was collected daily and stored at −80 °C. MSCs release excretory biomolecules proportional to their growth rate into the CM, which changes the refractive index of the latter. The sensor is capable of detecting changes in the number of stem cells via correlation to the change in the refractive index of the CM, with the measured power loss decreasing approximately 0.4 dB in the CM sample per average 1,000 cells in the MSC subculture. The proposed system is highly cost-effective, simple to deploy, operate, and maintain, is non-destructive, and allows reliable real-time measurement of various stem cell proliferation parameters. PMID:24084118

  6. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR)

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J.; Laclette, Juan P.; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest. PMID:25989346

  7. Glycans expressed on Trichinella spiralis excretory-secretory antigens are important for anti-inflamatory immune response polarization.

    PubMed

    Cvetkovic, Jelena; Ilic, Natasa; Sofronic-Milosavljevic, Ljiljana; Gruden-Movsesijan, Alisa

    2014-12-01

    Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae excretory-secretory antigens (ES L1) are most likely responsible for the induction of immune response during infection by this parasitic. The antigens bear carbohydrate structures that may contribute to immune system activation resulting in a Th2/anti-inflammatory immune response. We show that T. spiralis glycans affect the expression and the production of IL-4 and IL-10 in vivo. Alteration of carbohydrate structures on ES L1 altered dendritic cell (DC) maturation. Periodate treatment of ES L1 led to the reduction in both ERK and p38 phosphorylation which may be the cause of reduced IL-10 and IL-12p70 production. In vitro priming of naïve T cells with DCs stimulated with native and periodate-treated ES L1 emphasized the importance of intact glycans for IL-10 production. We conclude that T. spiralis glycans affect the anti-inflammatory environment and can interfere with the development of inflammatory diseases.

  8. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR).

    PubMed

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J; Laclette, Juan P; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-05-19

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest.

  9. The application of mass spectrometry to identify immunogenic components of excretory/secretory products from adult Dictyocaulus viviparus.

    PubMed

    Matthews, J B; Davidson, A J; Beynon, R J

    2004-01-01

    Proteomics has come to the forefront in the post-genomic era. The ability to compare and identify proteins expressed in a particular cell type under specific physiological or pathological states requires a range of technologies, including separation of complex protein or peptide mixtures, densitometry-based or isotope-coded methods for comparison of multiple proteomes, and mass spectrometric methods for identification of individual low abundance proteins. Although an emergent technology, thus far, proteomics has provided new perspectives on many problems in biomedical science. In parasitology, proteomics has been used to answer specific biological questions relating to survival and development, and also to identify candidates for vaccines. Here, we describe an ongoing research programme in which proteomics is being used to identify potential vaccine candidates for the bovine lungworm, Dictyocaulus viviparus. This work is focusing on antibody responses to the adult parasite excretory/secretory (ES) products, with selection of candidate antigens based on differential screening with serum from immune versus non-immune animals to simplify the proteome and the ensuing analytical challenges. Thus far, we have identified seven candidate proteins using this strategy. Of these, one protein showed significant identity to a previously cloned gene from D. viviparus, whilst the other six proteins have shown no significant identities. Isolation of further peptide sequences is now warranted to facilitate cloning of the genes encoding these antigens.

  10. Salivary duct carcinoma (cribriform salivary carcinoma of excretory ducts). A clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical study of 12 cases.

    PubMed

    Brandwein, M S; Jagirdar, J; Patil, J; Biller, H; Kaneko, M

    1990-05-15

    Salivary duct carcinoma (cribriform salivary carcinoma of the excretory ducts [CSCED]) is an uncommon malignant tumor which occurs predominantly in men (83% in this series; mean age, 61 years) and most often in the parotid gland (92% in this series). The outcome is unfavorable for most patients; of 11 of 12 patients with follow-up, 45% had local recurrence, 54% had distant metastasis, and 45% were dead of disease within 10 years of diagnosis (mean, 3 years). Metastases to lymph nodes were common (72%). Immunohistochemical studies on paraffin-embedded tissue revealed that most tumors reacted with antibodies known to mark adenocarcinoma: B72.3 (11 of 11) and Lewis Y (ten of ten). High and low molecular weight cytokeratins were present in most tumors (nine of ten and seven of nine cases, respectively), supporting the concept that these adenocarcinomas were of ductal origin. Parotid ducts adjacent to CSCED expressed B72.3 in six of nine cases studied, but parotid ducts from normal tissue (adjacent to benign mixed tumors or enlarged periparotid lymph nodes) rarely expressed this marker (one of 17 cases). The detection of B72.3 diffusely in parotid ducts, especially those with atypia, may imply the presence of malignant tumor nearby, which could be useful in evaluating limited tissue from the parotid. However, further studies are necessary to confirm the significance of this finding.

  11. Renal Ablation Update

    PubMed Central

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity–focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  12. Evaluation of the potency of telaprevir and its metabolites as inhibitors of renal organic cation transporters, a potential mechanism for the elevation of serum creatinine.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Tomohisa; Kito, Tomoko; Inoue, Katsuhisa; Masuda, Satohiro; Inui, Ken-ichi; Matsubara, Kazuo; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Hisanaga, Noriko; Adachi, Yasuhisa; Suzuki, Masayuki; Yamada, Ichimaro; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Telaprevir-based triple therapy is a highly effective treatment for chronic hepatitis C. However, adverse reactions include reversible and dose-dependent elevation of serum creatinine levels. We speculated that this effect reflects inhibition of the renal organic cation transporters hOCT2, hMATE1, and hMATE2-K by telaprevir or its metabolites (VRT-127394 and VRT-0922061). Telaprevir, VRT-127394, and VRT-0922061 showed negligible or weak effects on hOCT2 at concentrations of ≥20 µM, but inhibited hMATE1 by 35, 38, and 53% and hMATE2-K by 47, 45, and 61% at 100 µM, respectively. Telaprevir or its metabolites (10 µM) did not affect basal-to-apical transport of MPP(+) across monolayers of hOCT2-hMATE1 double-transfected MDCKII cells, whereas pyrimethamine, a potent inhibitor of hMATE1, markedly inhibited MPP(+) transport. Taken together, inhibition of hOCT2, hMATE1, and hMATE2-K is unlikely to be clinically relevant because unbound plasma concentrations of telaprevir and its metabolites reach only 2 µM following oral administration of a dose of 750 mg telaprevir. Hence, elevated serum creatinine during telaprevir therapy may not be related to direct inhibition of renal organic cation transporters.

  13. Hibiscus sabdariffa polyphenols alleviate insulin resistance and renal epithelial to mesenchymal transition: a novel action mechanism mediated by type 4 dipeptidyl peptidase.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chiung-Huei; Yang, Yi-Sun; Chan, Kuei-Chuan; Wang, Chau-Jong; Chen, Mu-Lin; Huang, Chien-Ning

    2014-10-01

    The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is important in renal fibrosis. Ser307 phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1 (S307)) is a hallmark of insulin resistance. We report that polyphenol extracts of Hibiscus sabdariffa (HPE) ameliorate diabetic nephropathy and EMT. Recently it has been observed that type 4 dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP-4) inhibitor linagliptin is effective for treating type 2 diabetes and albuminuria. We investigated if DPP-4 and insulin resistance are involved in renal EMT and explored the role of HPE. In high glucose-stimulated tubular cells, HPE, like linagliptin, inhibited DPP-4 activation, thereby regulating vimentin (EMT marker) and IRS-1 (S307). IRS-1 knockdown revealed its essential role in mediating downstream EMT. In type 2 diabetic rats, pIRS-1 (S307) abundantly surrounds the tubular region, with increased vimentin in kidney. Both the expressions were reduced by HPE. In conclusion, HPE exerts effects similar to those of linagliptin, which improves insulin resistance and EMT, and could be an adjuvant to prevent diabetic nephropathy.

  14. Role of renal sensory nerves in physiological and pathophysiological conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Whether activation of afferent renal nerves contributes to the regulation of arterial pressure and sodium balance has been long overlooked. In normotensive rats, activating renal mechanosensory nerves decrease efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity (ERSNA) and increase urinary sodium excretion, an inhibitory renorenal reflex. There is an interaction between efferent and afferent renal nerves, whereby increases in ERSNA increase afferent renal nerve activity (ARNA), leading to decreases in ERSNA by activation of the renorenal reflexes to maintain low ERSNA to minimize sodium retention. High-sodium diet enhances the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves, while low dietary sodium reduces the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves, thus producing physiologically appropriate responses to maintain sodium balance. Increased renal ANG II reduces the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves in physiological and pathophysiological conditions, including hypertension, congestive heart failure, and ischemia-induced acute renal failure. Impairment of inhibitory renorenal reflexes in these pathological states would contribute to the hypertension and sodium retention. When the inhibitory renorenal reflexes are suppressed, excitatory reflexes may prevail. Renal denervation reduces arterial pressure in experimental hypertension and in treatment-resistant hypertensive patients. The fall in arterial pressure is associated with a fall in muscle sympathetic nerve activity, suggesting that increased ARNA contributes to increased arterial pressure in these patients. Although removal of both renal sympathetic and afferent renal sensory nerves most likely contributes to the arterial pressure reduction initially, additional mechanisms may be involved in long-term arterial pressure reduction since sympathetic and sensory nerves reinnervate renal tissue in a similar time-dependent fashion following renal denervation. PMID:25411364

  15. Challenges and intriguing problems in comparative renal physiology.

    PubMed

    Dantzler, William H

    2005-02-01

    The comparative approach has proved important many times in understanding renal function and continues to offer possible approaches to unsolved problems today, in three general areas. (1) Quantification of glomerular ultrafiltration. In contrast to the complex capillary network in the mammalian glomerulus, the glomerulus of the superficial loopless (reptilian-type) avian nephrons consists of a single capillary loop. This structure, in an avian species where it can be approached directly, should for the first time permit accurate determinations of the pressure profiles and the capillary area involved in glomerular ultrafiltration in an animal with high arterial pressure. (2) Fluid reabsorption by proximal renal tubules. In some reptilian proximal renal tubules, isolated and perfused in vitro, isosmotic fluid reabsorption can occur at control rates when lithium replaces sodium or when some other substance replaces sodium or chloride or both in the perfusate and bathing medium simultaneously. Reabsorption at the control rates, regardless of the composition of the perfusate and bathing medium, can be at least partially inhibited by cold and cyanide, but not by blockers of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase. It is also independent of the buffer system used, but it is reduced about 20% by removal of colloid from the peritubular fluid. During the substitutions, the surface area of the proximal tubule cells increases dramatically and might permit some insignificant force to be more effective in the reabsorptive process. Understanding the process involved in this, apparently unique coupling of solute and fluid transport, certainly would be very valuable in understanding coupled transport of solutes and water across epithelia in general. (3) Urate secretion by proximal renal tubules. Urate is the major excretory end product of nitrogen metabolism in birds, most reptiles, and a few amphibians. It undergoes net secretion by the renal tubules. It has been possible to learn much about the

  16. Race and mortality after acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Waikar, Sushrut S; Curhan, Gary C; Ayanian, John Z; Chertow, Glenn M

    2007-10-01

    Black patients receiving dialysis for end-stage renal disease in the United States have lower mortality rates than white patients. Whether racial differences exist in mortality after acute renal failure is not known. We studied acute renal failure in patients hospitalized between 2000 and 2003 using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and found that black patients had an 18% (95% confidence interval [CI] 16 to 21%) lower odds of death than white patients after adjusting for age, sex, comorbidity, and the need for mechanical ventilation. Similarly, among those with acute renal failure requiring dialysis, black patients had a 16% (95% CI 10 to 22%) lower odds of death than white patients. In stratified analyses of patients with acute renal failure, black patients had significantly lower adjusted odds of death than white patients in settings of coronary artery bypass grafting, cardiac catheterization, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, pneumonia, sepsis, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Black patients were more likely than white patients to be treated in hospitals that care for a larger number of patients with acute renal failure, and black patients had lower in-hospital mortality than white patients in all four quartiles of hospital volume. In conclusion, in-hospital mortality is lower for black patients with acute renal failure than white patients. Future studies should assess the reasons for this difference. PMID:17855647

  17. Severe antenatally diagnosed renal disorders: background, prognosis and practical approach.

    PubMed

    Aulbert, Wiebke; Kemper, Markus J

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays most renal disorders, especially urinary tract malformations and renal cystic disease, are diagnosed antenatally. In cases of severe bilateral disease, intrauterine renal dysfunction may lead to renal oligohydramnios (ROH), resulting in pulmonary hypoplasia which affects perinatal mortality and morbidity as well as the long-term outcome. However, some infants may only have mild pulmonary and renal disease, and advances in postnatal and dialysis treatment have resulted in improved short- and long-term outcome even in those infants with severe ROH. Here, we review the current state of knowledge and clinical experience of patients presenting antenatally with severe bilateral renal disorders and ROH. By addressing underlying mechanisms, intrauterine tools of diagnosis and treatment as well as published outcome data, we hope to improve antenatal counselling and postnatal care. KEY SUMMARY POINTS: 1. Nowadays most renal disorders are diagnosed antenatally, especially urinary tract malformations and renal cystic disease. 2. Severe kidney dysfunction may lead to renal oligohydramnios, which can cause pulmonary hypoplasia and is a risk factor of perinatal mortality and postnatal renal outcome. However, as considerable clinical heterogeneity is present, outcome predictions need to be treated with caution. 3. Advances in postnatal and dialysis treatment have resulted in improved short- and long-term outcomes even in infants with severe renal oligohydramnios. 4. A multidisciplinary approach with specialist input is required when counselling a family with an ROH-affected fetus as the decision-making process is very challenging. PMID:26081158

  18. Recurrent renal giant leiomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Öziş, Salih Erpulat; Gülpınar, Kamil; Şahlı, Zafer; Konak, Baha Burak; Keskin, Mete; Özdemir, Süleyman; Ataoğlu, Ömür

    2016-01-01

    Primary renal leiomyosarcomas are rare, aggressive tumors. They constitute 1-2% of adult malignant renal tumors. Although leiomyosarcomas are the most common histological type (50-60%) of renal sarcomas, information on renal leiomyosarcoma is limited. Local or systemic recurrences are common. The radiological appearance of renal leiomyosarcomas is not specific, therefore renal leiomyosarcoma cannot be distinguished from renal cell carcinoma by imaging methods in all patients. A 74-year-old female patient presented to our clinic complaining of a palpable mass on the right side of her abdomen in November 2012. The abdominal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass, 25 × 24 × 23 cm in size. Her past medical history revealed that she has undergone right radical nephrectomy in 2007, due to a 11 × 12 × 13 cm renal mass that was then reported as renal cell carcinoma on abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, but the pathological diagnosis was low-grade renal leiomyosarcoma. The most recent follow-up of the patient was in 2011, with no signs of local recurrence or distant metastases within this four-year period. The patient underwent laparotomy on November 2012, and a 35 cm retroperitoneal mass was excised. The pathological examination of the mass was reported as high-grade leiomyosarcoma. The formation of this giant retroperitoneal mass in 1 year can be explained by the transformation of the lesion's pathology from low-grade to a high-grade tumor. PMID:27436926

  19. Mesoscale Nanoparticles Selectively Target the Renal Proximal Tubule Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ryan M.; Shah, Janki; Ng, Brandon D.; Minton, Denise R.; Gudas, Lorraine J.; Park, Christopher Y.; Heller, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    We synthesized “mesoscale” nanoparticles, approximately 400 nm in diameter, which unexpectedly localized selectively in renal proximal tubules and up to 7 times more efficiently in the kidney than other organs. Although nanoparticles typically localize in the liver and spleen, modulating their size and opsonization potential allowed for stable targeting of the kidneys through a new proposed uptake mechanism. Applying this kidney targeting strategy, we anticipate use in the treatment of renal disease and the study of renal physiology. PMID:25811353

  20. Mechanism of cis- and trans-substrate interactions at the tetraethylammonium/H+ exchanger of rabbit renal brush-border membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, S.H.; Wunz, T.M.

    1988-12-25

    The kinetic basis for trans-effects of intravesicular substrates on the uptake of the organic cation, tetraethylammonium (TEA), into rabbit renal brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) was studied. Preloading BBMV with 1, 2, or 4 mM TEA stimulated the initial rate of uptake and the total net accumulation of 0.1 mM (TH)TEA. The stimulatory effect of intravesicular TEA on the initial rate of uptake was a saturable function of the trans-TEA concentration, with a half-maximal effect noted at an intravesicular concentration of 0.28 mM. A 1 mM trans-concentration of TEA increased the Jmax of (TH)TEA uptake (from 4.3 to 6.8 nmol.mg-1.min-1) without affecting the apparent Kt. An outwardly directed H+ gradient also increased Jmax (to 10.7 nmol.mg-1.min-1), although the addition of an outwardly directed TEA gradient did not produce further increases in the rate of TEA uptake. External H+ acted as a competitive inhibitor of TEA uptake, and an increase in external (H+) (from 32 nM to 100 nM) produced an increase in the apparent Kt for TEA transport (from 0.12 to 0.26 mM) without affecting the Jmax. The results suggested that TEA and H+ compete for a common site or set of mutually exclusive sites on the cytoplasmic and luminal aspects of TEA/H+ exchanger in the renal brush border, and that these sites have a similar affinity for TEA.

  1. Therapeutic efficiency of continuous renal replacement therapy--experience of a single Romanian center.

    PubMed

    Voiculescu, M; Ionescu, Camelia; Ismail, G; Roşu, Mihaela; Szigeti, A; Iliescu, Olguţa

    2003-01-01

    We studied 24 patients with acute renal failure (ARF) or acutization of chronic renal failure (CRF) caused by a variety of different disorders. A rapid decline in renal excretory function, fluid, electrolyte, and divalent ion disturbances determined us to initiate continuous renal replacement: continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVHF) - 28 procedures in 15 patients and continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF) - 11 procedures in 11 patients. The mean duration of CVVHF was 21.6+/-6.9 h, with a mean blood flow rate of 116.9+/-16.4 ml/min and an ultrafiltration rate of 6.4+/-4.6 ml/min. The serum creatinine level decreased from 12.6 to 8.3 mg% and the concentration of urea from 237 to 166 mg%. The mean duration of hemodiafiltration was 24+/-8.5 h, with a mean blood flow rate of 134+/-15.2 ml/min, a mean dialysate flow of 35+/-7 ml/min and a mean ultrafiltration rate of 5.6+/-2.1 ml/min. The serum creatinine level decreased from 11.6 to 6.36 mg% and the concentration of urea from 236 to 137 mg%. Survival rate was 79.2% (19/24 patients). The complete recover of renal function was achieved in 5 patients, partial recover in 5 patients and 9 patients were included in chronic dialysis. In 8/24 (30%) patients we encountered complications, such as hypotension in 2 cases, bleeding disorders in 5 cases or diselectrolithemias in 2 cases. As a consequence, continuous renal replacement therapy is efficient, having an acceptable rate of adverse effects in patients with ARF or acutization of CRF.

  2. Therapeutic efficiency of continuous renal replacement therapy--experience of a single Romanian center.

    PubMed

    Voiculescu, M; Ionescu, Camelia; Ismail, G; Roşu, Mihaela; Szigeti, A; Iliescu, Olguţa

    2004-01-01

    We have studied 24 patients with acute renal failure (ARF) or acutization of chronic renal failure (CRF) caused by a variety of different disorders. A rapid decline in renal excretory function, fluid, electrolyte, and divalent ion disturbances determined us to initiate continuous renal replacement: continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVHF)--28 procedures in 15 patients and continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF)--11 procedures in 11 patients. Mean duration of CVVHF was 21.6+/-6.9 h, with a mean blood flow rate of 116.9+/-16.4 ml/min and an ultrafiltration rate of 6.4+/-4.6 ml/min. Serum creatinine level decreased from 12.6 to 8.3 mg% and the concentration of urea from 237 to 166 mg%. Mean duration of hemodiafiltration was 24+/-8.5 h, with mean blood flow rate of 134+/-15.2 ml/min, mean dialysate flow of 35+/-7 ml/min and mean ultrafiltration rate of 5.6+/-2.1 ml/min. Serum creatinine level decreased from 11.6 to 6.36 mg% and the concentration of urea from 236 to 137 mg%. Survival rate was 79.2% (19/24 patients). Complete recover of renal function was achieved in 5 patients, partial recover in 5 patients and 9 patients were included in chronic dialysis. In 8/24 (30%) patients we encountered complications, such as hypotension in 2 cases, bleeding disorders in 5 cases or diselectrolithemias in 2 cases. As a consequence, continuous renal replacement therapy is efficient, having an acceptable rate of adverse effects in patients with ARF or acutization of CRF.

  3. Presurgical Pulmonary Evaluation in Renal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sahni, Sonu; Molmenti, Ernesto; Bhaskaran, Madhu C.; Ali, Nicole; Basu, Amit; Talwar, Arunabh

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) due to various mechanisms are prone to significant pulmonary comorbidities. With the improvements in renal replacement therapy (RRT), patients with CRF are now expected to live longer, and thus may develop complications in the lung from these processes. The preferred treatment of CRF is kidney transplantation and patients who are selected to undergo transplant must have a thorough preoperative pulmonary evaluation to assess pulmonary status and to determine risk of postoperative pulmonary complications. A MEDLINE®/PubMed® search was performed to identify all articles outlining the course of pre-surgical pulmonary evaluation with an emphasis on patients with CRF who have been selected for renal transplant. Literature review concluded that in addition to generic pre-surgical evaluation, renal transplant patients must also undergo a full cardiopulmonary and sleep evaluation to investigate possible existing pulmonary pathologies. Presence of any risk factor should then be aggressively managed or treated prior to surgery. PMID:25599047

  4. Prospective radionuclide renal function evaluation and its correlation with radiological findings in patients with Kock pouch urinary diversion

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.K.; Chang, L.S.; Chen, M.T.; Yeh, S.H. )

    1991-05-01

    In an attempt to understand better the status of renal function after Kock pouch urinary diversion we conducted a prospective evaluation of renal function in 25 patients using the radionuclide 131iodine-hippurate. Studies were done before, and at 1 month and every 6 months for 30 months postoperatively. The radionuclide results were then compared to excretory urography and contrast study of the reservoir. Our renal function study included the determination of individual and total effective renal plasma flow (ml. per minute), the time to maximal radioactivity over the kidney (peak time in minutes) and a renogram. The mean total (both kidneys) effective renal plasma flow rates before (25 patients) and at month 1 (19), month 6 (14), month 12 (12), month 18 (6), month 24 (6) and month 30 (7) after operation were 385.5 +/- 112.2, 310.5 +/- 109.9, 362.7 +/- 69.2, 442.0 +/- 97.5, 468.2 +/- 82.5, 405.7 +/- 70.6 and 414.0 +/- 65.1, respectively. A comparison of individual and total effective renal plasma flow before and after operation revealed that only the change of the flow at each or both sides of the kidney before and at 1 month after the operation reached statistically significant differences, respectively (p less than 0.05, paired t test). Postoperatively 5 of 6 patients with hydronephrosis had abnormal peak time and a third segment on the renogram was performed on the corresponding side of the kidney. No reflux was noted on contrast study of the reservoir of any patient followed for up to 30 months. In conclusion, the radionuclide renal function evaluation showed a significant decrease of renal function 1 month after Kock pouch diversion, then it resumed and remained stable (neither improved nor deteriorated) for 30 months. Also the abnormal peak time and third segment on the renogram usually implicated a dilated upper urinary tract.

  5. Identification and characterization of an immunogenic antigen, enolase 2, among excretory/secretory antigens (ESA) of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Xue, Jun-Xin; Liu, Ying-Chun; Li, Tao; Han, Xian-Gan; Wang, Shao-Hui; Chen, Yong-Jun; Qi, Jingjing; Yu, Sheng-Qing; Wang, Quan

    2016-11-01

    An immunogenic protein, enolase 2, was identified among the secreted excretory/secretory antigens (ESAs) from Toxoplasma gondii strain RH using immunoproteomics based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Enolase 2 was cloned, sequenced, and heterologously expressed. BLAST analysis revealed 75-96% similarity with enolases from other parasites. Immunoblotting demonstrated good immunoreactivity of recombinant T. gondii enolase (Tg-enolase 2) to T. gondii-infected animal serum. Purified Tg-enolase 2 was found to catalyze dehydration of 2-phospho-d-glycerate to phosphoenolpyruvate. In vitro studies revealed maximal activity at pH 7.5 and 37 °C, and activity was inhibited by K(+), Ni(2+), Al(3+), Na(+), Cu(2+) and Cr(3+). A monoclonal antibody against Tg-enolase 2 was prepared, 1D6, with the isotype IgG2a/κ. Western blotting revealed that 1D6 reacts with Tg-enolase 2 and native enolase 2, present among T. gondii ESAs. The indirect immunofluorescence assays showed that enolase 2 could be specifically detected on the growing T. gondii tachyzoites. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed the surface and intracellular locations of enolase 2 on T. gondii cells. In conclusion, our results clearly show that the enzymatic activity of T. gondii enolase 2 is ion dependent and that it could be influenced by environmental factors. We also provide evidence that enolase 2 is an important immunogenic protein of ESAs from T. gondii and that it is a surface-exposed protein with strong antigenicity and immunogenicity. Our findings indicate that enolase 2 could play important roles in metabolism, immunogenicity and pathogenicity and that it may serve as a novel drug target and candidate vaccine against T. gondii infection. PMID:27450536

  6. Characterization of the DMAE-modified juvenile excretory-secretory protein Juv-p120 of Litomosoides sigmodontis.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Ulrike; Hirzmann, Jörg; Hintz, Martin; Beck, Ewald; Geyer, Rudolf; Hobom, Gerd; Taubert, Anja; Zahner, Horst

    2011-04-01

    Juv-p120 is an excretory-secretory 160 kDa glycoprotein of juvenile female Litomosoides sigmodontis and exhibits features typical for mucins. 50% of its molecular mass is attributed to posttranslational modifications with the unusual substituent dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE). By that Juv-p120 corresponds to the surface proteins of the microfilarial sheath, Shp3 and Shp3a. The secreted protein consists of 697 amino acids, organized in two different domains of repeat elements separated by a stretch of polar residues. The N-terminal domain shows fourteen P/S/T/F-rich repeat elements highly modified with phospho-DMAE substituted O-glycans confering a negative charge to the protein. The C-terminal domain is extremely rich in glutamine (35%) and leucine (25%) in less organized repeats and may play a role in oligomerization of Juv-p120 monomers. A protein family with a similar Q/L-rich region and conserved core promoter region was identified in Brugia malayi by homology screening and in Wuchereria bancrofti and Loa loa by database similarity search. One of the Q/L-rich proteins in each genus has an extended S/T-rich region and due to this feature is supposed to be a putative Juv-p120 ortholog. The corresponding modification of Juv-p120 and the microfilarial sheath surface antigens Shp3/3a explains the appearance of anti-sheath antibodies before the release of microfilariae. The function of Juv-p120 is unknown. PMID:21241743

  7. Transcriptome Profiles of the Protoscoleces of Echinococcus granulosus Reveal that Excretory-Secretory Products Are Essential to Metabolic Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Wei; Shen, Yujuan; Han, Xiuming; Wang, Ying; Liu, Hua; Jiang, Yanyan; Zhang, Yumei; Wang, Yanjuan; Xu, Yuxin; Cao, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Background Cystic hydatid disease (CHD) is caused by the larval stages of the cestode and affects humans and domestic animals worldwide. Protoscoleces (PSCs) are one component of the larval stages that can interact with both definitive and intermediate hosts. Previous genomic and transcriptomic data have provided an overall snapshot of the genomics of the growth and development of this parasite. However, our understanding of how PSCs subvert the immune response of hosts and maintains metabolic adaptation remains unclear. In this study, we used Roche 454 sequencing technology and in silico secretome analysis to explore the transcriptome profiles of the PSCs from E. granulosus and elucidate the potential functions of the excretory-secretory proteins (ESPs) released by the parasite. Methodology/Principal Findings A large number of nonredundant sequences as unigenes were generated (26,514), of which 22,910 (86.4%) were mapped to the newly published E. granulosus genome and 17,705 (66.8%) were distributed within the coding sequence (CDS) regions. Of the 2,280 ESPs predicted from the transcriptome, 138 ESPs were inferred to be involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates, while 124 ESPs were inferred to be involved in the metabolism of protein. Eleven ESPs were identified as intracellular enzymes that regulate glycolysis/gluconeogenesis (GL/GN) pathways, while a further 44 antigenic proteins, 25 molecular chaperones and four proteases were highly represented. Many proteins were also found to be significantly enriched in development-related signaling pathways, such as the TGF-β receptor pathways and insulin pathways. Conclusions/Significance This study provides valuable information on the metabolic adaptation of parasites to their hosts that can be used to aid the development of novel intervention targets for hydatid treatment and control. PMID:25500817

  8. New diagnostic antigens for early trichinellosis: the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis intestinal infective larvae.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ge Ge; Liu, Ruo Dan; Wang, Zhong Quan; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Li; Liu, Xiao Lin; Liu, Chun Yin; Zhang, Xi; Cui, Jing

    2015-12-01

    The excretory-secretory (ES) antigens from Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae (ML) are the most commonly used diagnostic antigens for trichinellosis, but anti-Trichinella IgG antibodies cannot be detected until 2-3 weeks after infection; there is an obvious window period between Trichinella infection and antibody positivity. Intestinal infective larvae (IIL) are the first invasive stage during Trichinella infection, and their ES antigens are firstly exposed to the immune system and might be the early diagnostic markers of trichinellosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the early diagnostic values of IIL ES antigens for trichinellosis. The IIL were collected from intestines of infected mice at 6 h postinfection (hpi), and IIL ES antigens were prepared by incubation for 18 h. Anti-Trichinella IgG antibodies in mice infected with 100 ML were detectable by ELISA with IIL ES antigens as soon as 10 days postinfection (dpi), but ELISA with ML ES antigens did not permit detection of infected mice before 12 dpi. When the sera of patients with trichinellosis at 19 dpi were assayed, the sensitivity (100 %) of ELISA with IIL ES antigens was evidently higher than 75 % of ELISA with ML ES antigens (P < 0.05) The specificity (96.86 %) of ELISA with IIL ES antigens was also higher than 89.31 % of ELISA with ML ES antigens (P < 0.05). The IIL ES antigens provided a new source of diagnostic antigens and could be considered as a potential early diagnostic antigen for trichinellosis.

  9. Proteomic identification of potential Clonorchis sinensis excretory/secretory products capable of binding and activating human hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyun; Hu, Fengyu; Hu, Xuchu; Chen, Wenjun; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2014-08-01

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence demonstrated that Clonorchis sinensis is an important risk factor of hepatic fibrosis and cholangiocarcinoma. C. sinensis excretory/secretory products (CsESPs) are protein complex including proteases, antioxidant enzymes, and metabolic enzymes, which may contribute to pathogenesis of liver fluke-associated hepatobiliary diseases. However, potential CsESP candidates involved into hepatic fibrosis and cholangiocarcinoma still remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we performed proteomic identification of CsESP candidates capable of binding and activating human hepatic stellate cell line LX-2. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the interaction of CsESPs with LX-2 cell membrane. LX-2 cells could be stimulated by CsESPs from 24 h post incubation (p < 0.05). Specifically, 50 μg/ml of CsESPs showed the strongest effect on cell proliferation in methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay which could also be demonstrated by flow cytometry analysis (p < 0.01). Furthermore, expression level of human type III collagen in LX-2 cells treated with CsESPs was significantly higher than that in control cells measured by molecular beacon and semiquantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR approaches (p < 0.01). Finally, CsESPs before and after incubation with LX-2 cells were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) analysis and matrix associated laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry analysis. Nine proteins with abundance change above threefold were Rho GTPase-activating protein, mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit Va, α-enolase, phospholipase C, interleukin-15, insect-derived growth factor, cytochrome c oxidase subunit VI, DNAH1 protein, and kinesin light chain. Taken together, we identified potential CsESP candidates capable of binding and activating human hepatic stellate cells, providing more direct evidences that are previously unknown to accelerate strategies

  10. [Rupture of simple renal cyst after minimal renal injury].

    PubMed

    Fernández Férnandez, A; Mayayo Dehesa, T; Rodríguez Luna, J M; Platas Sancho, A; Gómez Aguinaga, M A; Castaño Llaneza, C; Berenguer Sánchez, A

    1989-01-01

    A case is presented of minimum renal trauma, leading to a retroperitoneal hematoma as a consequence of a simple renal cyst rupture as well as an artery contained therein. The etiopathogenicity of this phenomenon is commented. The different clinical manifestations of renal trauma are highlighted, as well as the suspicion of previous renal pathology when a large renal lesion is found secondary to minimum renal trauma. The approach of the renal pediculum must be the first step in the surgical treatment of renal trauma.

  11. Renal pelvis or ureter cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Transitional cell cancer of the renal pelvis or ureter; Kidney cancer - renal pelvis; Ureter cancer ... Cancer can grow in the urine collection system, but it is uncommon. Renal pelvis and ureter cancers ...

  12. Melatonin ameliorates oxidative stress, inflammation, proteinuria, and progression of renal damage in rats with renal mass reduction.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Yasmir; Ferrebuz, Atilio; Romero, Freddy; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Bernardo

    2008-02-01

    The progressive deterioration of renal function and structure resulting from renal mass reduction are mediated by a variety of mechanisms, including oxidative stress and inflammation. Melatonin, the major product of the pineal gland, has potent_antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and its production is impaired in chronic renal failure. We therefore investigated if melatonin treatment would modify the course of chronic renal failure in the remnant kidney model. We studied rats followed 12 wk after renal ablation untreated (Nx group, n = 7) and treated with melatonin administered in the drinking water (10 mg/100 ml) (Nx + MEL group, n = 8). Sham-operated rats (n = 10) were used as controls. Melatonin administration increased 13-15 times the endogenous hormone levels. Rats in the Nx + MEL group had reduced oxidative stress (malondialdehyde levels in plasma and in the remnant kidney as well as nitrotyrosine renal abundance) and renal inflammation (p65 nuclear factor-kappaB-positive renal interstitial cells and infiltration of lymphocytes and macrophages). Collagen, alpha-smooth muscle actin, and transforming growth factor-beta renal abundance were all increased in the remnant kidney of the untreated rats and were reduced significantly by melatonin treatment. Deterioration of renal function (plasma creatinine and proteinuria) and structure (glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial damage) resulting from renal ablation were ameliorated significantly with melatonin treatment. In conclusion, melatonin administration improves the course of chronic renal failure in rats with renal mass reduction. Further studies are necessary to define the potential usefulness of this treatment in other animal models and in patients with chronic renal disease.

  13. Jade-1, a candidate renal tumor suppressor that promotes apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mina I; Foy, Rebecca L; Chitalia, Vipul C; Zhao, Jin; Panchenko, Maria V; Wang, Hongmei; Cohen, Herbert T

    2005-08-01

    Medical therapies are lacking for advanced renal cancer, so there is a great need to understand its pathogenesis. Most renal cancers have defects in the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor pVHL. The mechanism by which pVHL protein functions in renal tumor suppression remains unclear. Jade-1 is a short-lived, kidney-enriched transcription factor that is stabilized by direct interaction with pVHL. Loss of Jade-1 stabilization by pVHL correlates with renal cancer risk, making the relationship between Jade-1 and renal cancer compelling. We report that Jade-1 expression was barely detectable in all tested renal cancer cell lines, regardless of VHL status. Strikingly, proteasome inhibitor treatment increased endogenous Jade-1 expression up to 10-fold. Jade-1 inhibited renal cancer cell growth, colony formation, and tumor formation in nude mice. Intriguingly, Jade-1 also affected the pattern of cell growth in monolayer culture and 3D culture. Jade-1 increased apoptosis by 40-50% and decreased levels of antiapoptotic Bcl-2. Antisense Jade-1-expressing cells confirmed these results. Therefore, Jade-1 may suppress renal cancer cell growth in part by increasing apoptosis. Jade-1 may represent a proapoptotic barrier to proliferation that must be overcome generally in renal cancer, perhaps initially by pVHL inactivation and subsequently by increased proteasomal activity. Therefore, Jade-1 may be a renal tumor suppressor.

  14. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis: current status.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon Hyo; Lerman, Lilach O

    2015-05-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) remains a major cause of secondary hypertension and kidney failure. Randomized prospective trials show that medical treatment should constitute the main therapeutic approach in ARAS. Regardless of intensive treatment and adequate blood pressure control, however, renal and extrarenal complications are not uncommon. Yet, the precise mechanisms, accurate detection, and optimal treatment in ARAS remain elusive. Strategies oriented to early detection and targeting these pathogenic pathways might prevent development of clinical end points. Here, we review the results of recent clinical trials, current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms, novel imaging techniques to assess kidney damage in ARAS, and treatment options. PMID:25908472

  15. Current status of ablative therapies for renal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mues, Adam C.; Landman, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    The increase in detection of small (≤ 4 cm) renal cortical neoplasms has made nephron-sparing surgery the new standard of care for T1a renal lesions. Advances in minimally invasive surgery have improved the surgical approach to these lesions to include laparoscopic partial nephrectomy and renal ablative therapies. In this review, we discuss the indications, outcomes, and potential complications of the commonly used ablative modalities in urologic practice. We will expand on renal cryoablation and review the mechanism of action, surgical approaches, and evidence based medicine using this modality. PMID:19955677

  16. [Heavy metal poisoning and renal injury in children].

    PubMed

    Rong, Li-Ping; Xu, Yuan-Yuan; Jiang, Xiao-Yun

    2014-04-01

    Along with global environmental pollution resulting from economic development, heavy metal poisoning in children has become an increasingly serious health problem in the world. It can lead to renal injury, which tends to be misdiagnosed due to the lack of obvious or specific early clinical manifestations in children. Early prevention, diagnosis and intervention are valuable for the recovery of renal function and children's good health and growth. This paper reviews the mechanism of renal injury caused by heavy metal poisoning in children, as well as the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and prevention and treatment of renal injury caused by lead, mercury, cadmium, and chromium.

  17. Interactions between the sympathetic nervous system and atrial natriuretic factor in the control of renal functions.

    PubMed

    Genovesi, S; Protasoni, G; Assi, C; Golin, R; Stella, A; Zanchetti, A

    1990-08-01

    We studied neural influences on the renal actions of atrial peptides in anaesthetized cats by comparing the response to atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) infusion in the innervated kidney and in the contralateral surgically denervated kidney. During ANF infusion arterial pressure decreased, the heart rate did not change and blood flow to both kidneys increased slightly. Vascular conductances became slightly but significantly higher in the denervated kidneys than in the controls. In both kidneys, the glomerular filtration rate increased transiently and significantly. Inhibition of renin release was more prompt and larger in the innervated than in the denervated kidneys. ANF infusion caused a significant increase in sodium and water excretion from both the innervated and denervated kidneys. However, the diuretic and natriuretic effect in the innervated kidneys, although proportionally greater than that in the denervated kidneys, was of shorter duration and subsided after 20 min of ANF infusion. Efferent renal nerve activity did not change during the initial 10 min of ANF infusion but thereafter increased progressively and significantly. We conclude that the effects of atrial peptides on renin release and excretory functions are influenced by renal nerve activity.

  18. [A comparative study of excretory and sensory apparatus of two cercariae of Diplodiscus parasites of European and African Amphibians (Trematoda, Diploidiscidae) (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bayssade-Dufour, C; Albaret, J L; Grabda-Kazubska, B; Kulo, S D

    1978-01-01

    The comparative study of the excretory system provides new data on the number of flame cells of two cercariae of Diplodiscus from Poland and Togo but does not allow to distinguish them. On the other hand, the comparison of the superficial sensory apparatus shows significant differences. The cercariae from Togo differ from these of Poland by a much lower number of all the cephalic papillae and papillae of cycle Cv, a higher number of acetabular papillae, and the presence of 9 to 12 pairs of dorsal papillae in the median part of the tail. Therefore the African Diplodicus is not D. subclavatus. We identify it as D. fischthalicus. PMID:754617

  19. [Bilateral renal infarction after discontinuation of anticoagulant therapy].

    PubMed

    Lavoignet, Charles-Éric; Le Borgne, Pierrick; Ugé, Sarah; Veneziano, Rinaldo; Brunhuber, Claudia; Kam, Claire; Bilbault, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    Acute renal infarction is an uncommon and often under diagnosed condition mostly because of misleading symptoms. Accurate data regarding clinical presentation, laboratory tests, diagnostic and treatment are lacking. Detection is often delayed or missed because of non-specific clinical presentation. The mechanisms of acute renal infarction are various, mainly embolic or thrombotic. Abdominal CT scan remains the most valuable exam to confirm the diagnosis. Therapeutic guidelines for the treatment of renal embolism have not been well established. The standard treatment strategy includes anticoagulation with or without thrombolysis. Despite the uncertainty regarding management, the renal outcome remains favorable. Some patients do develop some degree of renal insufficiency during the acute episode. We report here the case of a 73-year-old woman with bilateral acute renal infarction after discontinuation of anticoagulant therapy.

  20. Bilateral renal lymphoangiomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Raed, Alqahtani; Sultan, Alkhateeb; Bader, Al-Mutairi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Renal lymphangiomatosis is a rare congenital benign disease of renal lymphatic system, here we are presenting a very rare form of disease which is bilateral form. Presentation of the case A young adult presented to our clinic after being referred from primary care clinic with intermittent bilateral flank pain and no other symptoms after extensive radiological investigations diagnosis has been made and confirmed by radiological finding of disease. Active treatment usually preserved for complex cases and for the complications of the disease but in our patient as needed analgesia worked well in controlling his intermittent pain and his wish not to pursue any intervention. The vague presentation with initial imaging rising suspicion of renal tumor or complex renal cyst might cause psychological street on the patient, which our patient had, but reassurance after extensive radiological work up relive that's stress. Discussion Although it is very rare disease to be bilateral but wide variety of other differential diagnoses make importance of disease recognition and accurate diagnosis is the key. Conclusion Renal lymphangiomatosis is a rare benign disease of renal lymphatic, which usually affect one side, but bilateral form is very rare form, which may raise the suspicions of genetic form of renal malignancy. Accurate diagnosis requires work up to role out malignant and other renal tumor, which require active surgical management. PMID:26719997

  1. Renal neurohormonal regulation in heart failure decompensation.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Sofia; Agic, Mediha Becirovic; Narfström, Fredrik; Melville, Jacqueline M; Hultström, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Decompensation in heart failure occurs when the heart fails to balance venous return with cardiac output, leading to fluid congestion and contributing to mortality. Decompensated heart failure can cause acute kidney injury (AKI), which further increases mortality. Heart failure activates signaling systems that are deleterious to kidneys such as renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and vasopressin secretion. All three reduce renal blood flow (RBF) and increase tubular sodium reabsorption, which may increase renal oxygen consumption causing AKI through renal tissue hypoxia. Vasopressin contributes to venous congestion through aquaporin-mediated water retention. Additional water retention may be mediated through vasopressin-induced medullary urea transport and hyaluronan but needs further study. In addition, there are several systems that could protect the kidneys and reduce fluid retention such as natriuretic peptides, prostaglandins, and nitric oxide. However, the effect of natriuretic peptides and nitric oxide are blunted in decompensation, partly due to oxidative stress. This review considers how neurohormonal signaling in heart failure drives fluid retention by the kidneys and thus exacerbates decompensation. It further identifies areas where there is limited data, such as signaling systems 20-HETE, purines, endothelin, the role of renal water retention mechanisms for congestion, and renal hypoxia in AKI during heart failure.

  2. Autophagy activation attenuates renal ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya-Li; Cui, Li-Yan; Yang, Shuo

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury is a leading cause of acute kidney injury (AKI), which is a common clinical complication but lacks effective therapies. This study investigated the role of autophagy in renal I/R injury and explored potential mechanisms in an established rat renal I/R injury model. Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: Sham, I/R, I/R pretreated with 3-methyladenine (3-MA, autophagy inhibitor), or I/R pretreated with rapamycin (autophagy activator). All rats were subjected to clamping of the left renal pedicle for 45 min after right nephrectomy, followed by 24 h of reperfusion. The Sham group underwent the surgical procedure without ischemia. 3-MA and rapamycin were injected 15 min before ischemia. Renal function was indicated by blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine. Tissue samples from the kidneys were scored histopathologically. Autophagy was indicated by light chain 3 (LC3), Beclin-1, and p62 levels and the number of autophagic vacuoles. Apoptosis was evaluated by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) method and expression of caspase-3. Autophagy was activated after renal I/R injury. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA before I/R aggravated renal injury, with worsened renal function, higher renal tissue injury scores, and more tubular apoptosis. In contrast, rapamycin pretreatment ameliorated renal injury, with improved renal function, lower renal tissue injury scores, and inhibited apoptosis based on fewer TUNEL-positive cells and lower caspase-3 expression. Our results demonstrate that autophagy could be activated during I/R injury and play a protective role in renal I/R injury. The mechanisms were involved in the regulation of several autophagy and apoptosis-related genes. Furthermore, autophagy activator may be a promising therapy for I/R injury and AKI in the future. PMID:25898836

  3. Statins and progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    Buemi, Michele; Senatore, Massimino; Corica, Francesco; Aloisi, Carmela; Romeo, Adolfo; Cavallaro, Emanuela; Floccari, Fulvio; Tramontana, Domenico; Frisina, Nicola

    2002-01-01

    Thanks to the administration of hypocholesterolemic drugs, important advances have been made in the treatment of patients with progressive renal disease. In vitro and in vivo findings demonstrate that statins, the inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase, can provide protection against kidney diseases characterized by inflammation and/or enhanced proliferation of epithelial cells occurring in rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis, or by increased proliferation of mesangial cells occurring in IgA nephropathy. Many of the beneficial effects obtained occur independent of reduced cholesterol levels because statins can directly inhibit the proliferation of different cell types (e.g., mesangial, renal tubular, and vascular smooth muscle cells), and can also modulate the inflammatory response, thus inhibiting macrophage recruitment and activation, as well as fibrosis. The mechanisms underlying the action of statins are not yet well understood, although recent data in the literature indicate that they can directly affect the proliferation/apoptosis balance, the down-regulation of inflammatory chemokines, and the cytogenic messages mediated by the GTPases Ras superfamily. Therefore, as well as reducing serum lipids, statins and other lipid-lowering agents may directly influence intracellular signaling pathways involved in the prenylation of low molecular weight proteins that play a crucial role in cell signal transduction and cell activation. Statins appear to have important potential in the treatment of progressive renal disease, although further studies are required to confirm this in humans.

  4. Use of cloned excretory/secretory low-molecular-weight proteins of Cooperia oncophora in a serological assay.

    PubMed Central

    Poot, J; Kooyman, F N; Dop, P Y; Schallig, H D; Eysker, M; Cornelissen, A W

    1997-01-01

    The potential of Cooperia oncophora excretory/secretory (ES) proteins as antigens in a serological assay which aims to establish exposure levels in cattle was assessed. ES proteins were analyzed by one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. The N-terminal domains of two ES proteins were sequenced, and the corresponding cDNAs were cloned. Two cDNAs, designated CoES14.0 and CoES14.2, were expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant proteins were tested in an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in which crude worm antigen (CWA) was used as a reference standard. In total, 67 reference serum samples were used: 27 negative serum samples, 29 C. oncophora-specific serum samples, 7 Dictyocaulus viviparus-specific serum samples, and 4 Ostertagia ostertagi-specific serum samples. This showed respective sensitivities and specificities of 17 and 84%, 0 and 100%, and 100 and 100% by the ELISAs with the three different types of proteins (CWA, CoES14.0, and CoES14.2, respectively). Since the CoES14.2 ELISA had the best sensitivity and specificity with reference sera, its specificity was further validated in an antigen inhibition ELISA. In this assay CoES14.2 and CWA preparations of C. oncophora, Cooperia curticei, O. ostertagi, Nematodirus helvetianus, Fasciola hepatica, D. viviparus, Haemonchus placei, and Trichostrongylus colubriformus were used as competitor antigens. This experiment showed that only the homologous antigens C. oncophora CWA and CoEs14.2 resulted in 100% inhibition. The CWA preparations of all other nematodes did not affect the ELISA, even if concentrations of 250 times the 50% inhibitory concentration of C. oncophora CWA were used. These results indicate that CoES14.2 does not share cross-reactive epitopes with heterologous CWAs. Finally, we tested the CoES14.2 ELISA with sequential serum samples from naturally infected groups of animals. The optical density values that were obtained correlated well with

  5. Characterization of excretory-secretory products from protoscoleces of Echinococcus granulosus and evaluation of their potential for immunodiagnosis of human cystic echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Carmena, D; Martínez, J; Benito, A; Guisantes, J A

    2004-09-01

    This study describes, for the first time, the characterization of excretory-secretory antigens (ES-Ag) from Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces, evaluating their usefulness in the immunodiagnosis of human cystic echinococcosis. ES-Ag were obtained from the first 50 h maintenance of protoscoleces in vitro. This preparation contained over 20 major protein components which could be distinguished by 1-dimensional SDS-PAGE with apparent masses between 9 and 300 kDa. The culture of of protoscoleces from liver produced a greater variety of excretory-secretory protein components than those from lung. Determination of enzymatic activities of secreted proteins revealed the presence of phosphatases, lipases and glucosidases, but no proteases. These findings were compared to those obtained from somatic extracts of protoscoleces and hydatid cyst fluid products. Immunochemical characterization was performed by immunoblotting with sera from individuals infected by cystic echinococcosis (n = 15), non-hydatidic parasitoses (n = 19), various liver diseases (n = 24), lung neoplasia (n = 16), and healthy donors (n = 18). Antigens with apparent masses of 89, 74, 47/50, 32, and 20 kDa showed specificity for immunodiagnosis of human hydatidosis. The 89 and 74 kDa components corresponded to antigens not yet described in E. granulosus, whereas proteins of 41-43 kDa and 91-95 kDa were recognized by the majority of the non-hydatid sera studied.

  6. Renal autotransplantation: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Stewart, B H; Banowsky, L H; Hewitt, C B; Straffon, R A

    1976-01-01

    Autotransplantation, with or without an extracorporeal renal operation, has been done 39 times in 37 patients. Indications for the procedure included severe ureteral injury in 4 patients, failed supravesical diversion in 2, renal carcinoma in a solitary kidney in 1, renovascular hypertension in 1 and donor arterial reconstruction before renal transplantation in 29. Success was obtained in all but 2 procedures, both of which involved previously operated kidneys with severe inflammation and adhesions involving the renal pelvis and pedicle. Based on our experience and a review of currently available literature we believe that renal autotransplantation and extracorporeal reconstruction can provide the best solution for patients with severe renovascular and ureteral disease not correctable by conventional operative techniques. The technique can be of particular value in removing centrally located tumors in solitary kidneys and in preparing donor kidneys with abnormal arteries for renal transplantation. The role of autotransplantation in the management of advanced renal trauma and calculus disease is less clear. A long-term comparison of patients treated by extracorporeal nephrolithotomy versus conventional lithotomy techniques will be necessary before a conclusion is reached in these disease categories.

  7. Renal autotransplantation: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Stewart, B H; Banowsky, L H; Hewitt, C B; Straffon, R A

    1977-09-01

    Autotransplantation, with or without an extracorporeal renal operation, has been done 39 times in 37 patients. Indications for the procedure included several ureteral injury in 4 patients, failed supravesical diversion in 2, renal carcinoma in a solitary kidney in 1, renovascular hypertension in 1 and donor arterial reconstruction before renal transplantation in 29. Success was obtained in all but 2 procedures, both of which involved previously operated kidneys with severe inflammation and adhesions involving the renal pelvis and pedicle. Based on our experience and a review of currently available literature we believe that renal autotransplantation and extracorporeal reconstruction can provide the best solution for patients with severe renovascular and ureteral disease not correctable by conventional operative techniques. The technique can be of particular value in removing centrally located tumors in solitary kidneys and in preparing donor kidneys with abnormal arteries for renal transplantation. The role of autotransplantation in the management of advanced renal trauma and calculus disease is less clear. A long-term comparison of patients treated by extracorporeal nephrolithotomy versus conventional lithotomy techniques will be necessary before a conclusion is reached in these disease categories.

  8. [Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis].

    PubMed

    Sauguet, A; Honton, B

    2014-12-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis can cause ischaemic nephropathy and arterial hypertension. Renal artery stenosis (RAS) continues to be a problem for clinicians, with no clear consensus on how to investigate and assess the clinical significance of stenotic lesions and manage the findings. RAS caused by fibromuscular dysplasia is probably commoner than previously appreciated, should be actively looked for in younger hypertensive patients and can be managed successfully with angioplasty. Atheromatous RAS is associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular events and increased cardiovascular mortality, and is likely to be seen with increasing frequency. Many patients with RAS may be managed effectively with medical therapy for several years without endovascular stenting, as demonstrated by randomized, prospective trials including the cardiovascular outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial, the Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) trial. These trials share the limitation of excluding subsets of patients with high-risk clinical presentations, including episodic pulmonary edema and rapidly progressing renal failure and hypertension. Blood pressure control and medication adjustment may become more difficult with declining renal function and may prevent the use of angiotensin receptor blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The objective of this review is to evaluate the current management of RAS for cardiologists in the context of recent randomized clinical trials. There is now interest in looking more closely at patient selection for intervention, with focus on intervening only in patients with the highest-risk presentations such as flash pulmonary edema, rapidly declining renal function and severe resistant hypertension. PMID:25450992

  9. Cadmium and renal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Il'yasova, Dora; Schwartz, Gary G. . E-mail: gschwart@wfubmc.edu

    2005-09-01

    Background: Rates of renal cancer have increased steadily during the past two decades, and these increases are not explicable solely by advances in imaging modalities. Cadmium, a widespread environmental pollutant, is a carcinogen that accumulates in the kidney cortex and is a cause of end-stage renal disease. Several observations suggest that cadmium may be a cause of renal cancer. Methods: We performed a systematic review of the literature on cadmium and renal cancer using MEDLINE for the years 1966-2003. We reviewed seven epidemiological and eleven clinical studies. Results: Despite different methodologies, three large epidemiologic studies indicate that occupational exposure to cadmium is associated with increased risk renal cancer, with odds ratios varying from 1.2 to 5.0. Six of seven studies that compared the cadmium content of kidneys from patients with kidney cancer to that of patients without kidney cancer found lower concentrations of cadmium in renal cancer tissues. Conclusions: Exposure to cadmium appears to be associated with renal cancer, although this conclusion is tempered by the inability of studies to assess cumulative cadmium exposure from all sources including smoking and diet. The paradoxical findings of lower cadmium content in kidney tissues from patients with renal cancer may be caused by dilution of cadmium in rapidly dividing cells. This and other methodological problems limit the interpretation of studies of cadmium in clinical samples. Whether cadmium is a cause of renal cancer may be answered more definitively by future studies that employ biomarkers of cadmium exposure, such as cadmium levels in blood and urine.

  10. Midterm renal functions following acute renal infarction.

    PubMed

    Ongun, Sakir; Bozkurt, Ozan; Demir, Omer; Cimen, Sertac; Aslan, Guven

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore clinical features of renal infarction (RI) that may have a role in diagnosis and treatment in our patient cohort and provide data on midterm renal functions. Medical records of patients with diagnosis of acute RI, established by contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT) and at least 1 year follow-up data, who were hospitalized in our clinic between 1998 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed; including descriptive data, clinical signs and symptoms, etiologic factors, laboratory findings, and prescribed treatments. Patients with solitary infarct were treated with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) only, whereas patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) or multiple or global infarct were treated with anticoagulants. Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) referring to renal functions was determined by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formula. Twenty-seven renal units of 23 patients with acute RI were identified. The mean age was 59.7 ± 15.7 years. Fourteen patients (60.8%) with RI had atrial fibrillation (AF) as an etiologic factor of which four had concomitant mesenteric ischemia at diagnosis. At presentation, 20 patients (86.9%) had elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), 18 patients (78.2%) had leukocytosis, and 16 patients (69.5%) had microscopic hematuria. Two patients with concomitant mesenteric ischemia and AF passed away during follow up. Mean eGFR was 70.8 ± 23.2 mL/min/1.73 m(2) at admission and increased to 82.3 ± 23.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2) at 1 year follow up. RI should be considered in patients with persistent flank or abdominal pain, particularly if they are at high risk of thromboembolism. Antiplatelet and/or anticoagulant drugs are both effective treatment options according to the amplitude of the infarct for preserving kidney functions.

  11. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Aggravates Renal Injury through Cytokines and Direct Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Songhui; Hu, Lijuan; Zhong, Lin; Guo, Yannan; Dong, Liqun; Jia, Ruizhen; Wang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between renal injury and reinfection that is caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and to analyze the mechanism of renal injury. Rats were repeatedly infected with RSV on days 4, 8, 14, and 28, then sacrificed and examined on day 56 after the primary infection. Renal injury was examined by transmission electron microscopy and histopathology. The F protein of RSV was detected in the renal tissue by indirect immunofluorescence. Proteinuria and urinary glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), serum levels of albumin, urea nitrogen, and creatinine, secretion of cytokines, T lymphocyte population and subsets, and dendritic cell (DC) activation state were examined. The results showed that renal injury was more serious in the reinfection group than in the primary infection group. At a higher infection dose, 6 × 106 PFU, the renal injury was more severe, accompanied by higher levels of proteinuria and urinary GAGs excretion, and lower levels of serum albumin. Podocyte foot effacement was more extensive, and hyperplasia of mesangial cells and proliferation of mesangial matrix were observed. The maturation state of DCs was specific, compared with the primary infection. There was also a decrease in the ratio of CD4+ to CD8+ T lymphocytes, due to an increase in the percentage of CD8+ T lymphocytes and a decrease in the percentage of CD4+ T lymphocytes, and a dramatic increase in the levels of IL-6 and IL-17. In terms of the different reinfection times, the day 14 reinfection group yielded the most serious renal injury and the most significant change in immune function. RSV F protein was still expressed in the glomeruli 56 days after RSV infection. Altogether, these results reveal that RSV infection could aggravate renal injury, which might be due to direct renal injury caused by RSV and the inflammatory lesions caused by the anti-virus response induced by RSV. PMID:27747195

  12. Renal scintigraphy in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Reid; Daniel, Gregory B

    2014-01-01

    Renal scintigraphy is performed commonly in dogs and cats and has been used in a variety of other species. In a 2012 survey of the members of the Society of Veterinary Nuclear Medicine, 95% of the respondents indicated they perform renal scintigraphy in their practice. Renal scintigraphy is primarily used to assess renal function and to evaluate postrenal obstruction. This article reviews how renal scintigraphy is used in veterinary medicine and describes the methods of analysis. Species variation is also discussed.

  13. Complete renal recovery from severe acute renal failure after thrombolysis of bilateral renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ramadoss, Suresh; Jones, Robert G; Foggensteiner, Lukas; Willis, Andrew P; Duddy, Martin J

    2012-10-01

    A previously healthy young man presented with acute renal failure due to extensive spontaneous deep vein thrombosis, including the inferior vena cava (IVC) and both renal veins. The patient was treated with selectively delivered thrombolytic therapy over a 7-day-period, which resulted in renal vein patency and complete recovery of renal function. A stent was placed over a segment stenosis of the IVC. No thrombophilic factors were identified. Bilateral renal vein thrombosis in young fit individuals is an unusual cause of acute renal failure. Thrombolytic therapy, even with delay, can completely restore renal function.

  14. Renal Autoregulation in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carlström, Mattias; Wilcox, Christopher S.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Intrarenal autoregulatory mechanisms maintain renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) independent of renal perfusion pressure (RPP) over a defined range (80–180 mmHg). Such autoregulation is mediated largely by the myogenic and the macula densa-tubuloglomerular feedback (MD-TGF) responses that regulate preglomerular vasomotor tone primarily of the afferent arteriole. Differences in response times allow separation of these mechanisms in the time and frequency domains. Mechanotransduction initiating the myogenic response requires a sensing mechanism activated by stretch of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and coupled to intracellular signaling pathways eliciting plasma membrane depolarization and a rise in cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). Proposed mechanosensors include epithelial sodium channels (ENaC), integrins, and/or transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Increased [Ca2+]i occurs predominantly by Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-operated Ca2+ channels (VOCC). Increased [Ca2+]i activates inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3R) and ryanodine receptors (RyR) to mobilize Ca2+ from sarcoplasmic reticular stores. Myogenic vasoconstriction is sustained by increased Ca2+ sensitivity, mediated by protein kinase C and Rho/Rho-kinase that favors a positive balance between myosin light-chain kinase and phosphatase. Increased RPP activates MD-TGF by transducing a signal of epithelial MD salt reabsorption to adjust afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction. A combination of vascular and tubular mechanisms, novel to the kidney, provides for high autoregulatory efficiency that maintains RBF and GFR, stabilizes sodium excretion, and buffers transmission of RPP to sensitive glomerular capillaries, thereby protecting against hypertensive barotrauma. A unique aspect of the myogenic response in the renal vasculature is modulation of its strength and speed by the MD-TGF and by a connecting tubule glomerular feedback (CT-GF) mechanism

  15. Renal autoregulation in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Carlström, Mattias; Wilcox, Christopher S; Arendshorst, William J

    2015-04-01

    Intrarenal autoregulatory mechanisms maintain renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) independent of renal perfusion pressure (RPP) over a defined range (80-180 mmHg). Such autoregulation is mediated largely by the myogenic and the macula densa-tubuloglomerular feedback (MD-TGF) responses that regulate preglomerular vasomotor tone primarily of the afferent arteriole. Differences in response times allow separation of these mechanisms in the time and frequency domains. Mechanotransduction initiating the myogenic response requires a sensing mechanism activated by stretch of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and coupled to intracellular signaling pathways eliciting plasma membrane depolarization and a rise in cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). Proposed mechanosensors include epithelial sodium channels (ENaC), integrins, and/or transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Increased [Ca(2+)]i occurs predominantly by Ca(2+) influx through L-type voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels (VOCC). Increased [Ca(2+)]i activates inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3R) and ryanodine receptors (RyR) to mobilize Ca(2+) from sarcoplasmic reticular stores. Myogenic vasoconstriction is sustained by increased Ca(2+) sensitivity, mediated by protein kinase C and Rho/Rho-kinase that favors a positive balance between myosin light-chain kinase and phosphatase. Increased RPP activates MD-TGF by transducing a signal of epithelial MD salt reabsorption to adjust afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction. A combination of vascular and tubular mechanisms, novel to the kidney, provides for high autoregulatory efficiency that maintains RBF and GFR, stabilizes sodium excretion, and buffers transmission of RPP to sensitive glomerular capillaries, thereby protecting against hypertensive barotrauma. A unique aspect of the myogenic response in the renal vasculature is modulation of its strength and speed by the MD-TGF and by a connecting tubule glomerular feedback (CT

  16. Apoptotic tubular cell death during acute renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Wever, P C; Aten, J; Rentenaar, R J; Hack, C E; Koopman, G; Weening, J J; ten Berge, I J

    1998-01-01

    Tubular cells are important targets during acute renal allograft rejection and induction of apoptosis might be a mechanism of tubular cell destruction. Susceptibility to induction of apoptosis is regulated by the homologous Bcl-2 and Bax proteins. Expression of Bcl-2 and Bax is regulated by p53, which down-regulates expression of Bcl-2, while simultaneously up-regulating expression of Bax. We studied apoptotic tubular cell death in 10 renal allograft biopsies from transplant recipients with acute rejection by in situ end-labelling and the DNA-binding fluorochrome propidium iodide. Tubular expression of p53, Bcl-2 and Bax was studies by immunohistochemistry. Five renal allograft biopsies from transplant recipients with uncomplicated clinical course and histologically normal renal tissue present in nephrectomy specimens from 4 patients with renal adenocarcinoma served as control specimens. Apoptotic cells and apoptotic bodies were detected in tubular epithelia and tubular lumina in 9 out of 10 acute rejection biopsies. In control renal tissue, apoptotic cells were detected in 1 biopsy only. Compared to control renal tissue, acute renal allograft rejection was, furthermore, associated with a shift in the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax in favour of Bax in tubular epithelia and increased expression of p53 in tubular nuclei. These observations demonstrate that apoptosis contributes in part to tubular cell destruction during acute renal allograft rejection. In accordance, the shift in the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax in favour of Bax indicates increased susceptibility of tubular epithelia to induction of apoptosis. The expression of p53 in tubular nuclei during acute renal allograft rejection indicates the presence of damaged DNA, which can be important in initiation of part of the observed apoptosis. These findings elucidate part of the mechanisms controlling apoptotic tubular cell death during acute renal allograft rejection.

  17. Symmetrical ilial pseudofractures: A complication of chronic renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, C.N. Jr.

    1982-08-01

    A patient with chronic renal failure and progressive symmetrical ilial pseudofractures (Looser zones, Milkman's syndrome) is presented. The literature is reviewed in light of the findings in this patient, and possible mechanisms of pseudofracture formation are discussed.

  18. Renal Mitochondrial Cytopathies

    PubMed Central

    Emma, Francesco; Montini, Giovanni; Salviati, Leonardo; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Renal diseases in mitochondrial cytopathies are a group of rare diseases that are characterized by frequent multisystemic involvement and extreme variability of phenotype. Most frequently patients present a tubular defect that is consistent with complete De Toni-Debré-Fanconi syndrome in most severe forms. More rarely, patients present with chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, cystic renal diseases, or primary glomerular involvement. In recent years, two clearly defined entities, namely 3243 A > G tRNALEU mutations and coenzyme Q10 biosynthesis defects, have been described. The latter group is particularly important because it represents the only treatable renal mitochondrial defect. In this paper, the physiopathologic bases of mitochondrial cytopathies, the diagnostic approaches, and main characteristics of related renal diseases are summarized. PMID:21811680

  19. 'Transcollateral' Renal Angioplasty for a Completely Occluded Renal Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Subash; Chadha, Davinder S. Swamy, Ajay

    2011-02-15

    Percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty with stenting has been effective in the control of hypertension, renal function, and pulmonary edema caused by atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis. However, the role of the procedure has not been fully established in the context of chronic total occlusion of renal artery. We report the successful use of this procedure in 57-year-old male patient who reported for evaluation of a recent episode of accelerated hypertension. A renal angiogram in this patient showed ostial stenosis of the right renal artery, which was filling by way of the collateral artery. Renal angioplasty for chronic total occlusion of right renal artery was successfully performed in a retrograde fashion through a collateral artery, thereby leading to improvement of renal function and blood pressure control.

  20. Laparoscopic retroperitoneal renal cystectomy.

    PubMed

    Munch, L C; Gill, I S; McRoberts, J W

    1994-01-01

    Laparoscopic manipulation of retroperitoneal organs is usually performed by the transperitoneal approach primarily because of the ease of access by way of the pneumoperitoneum. However, difficulty in adequately accessing structures that are surrounded by bowel, liver, spleen or postoperative adhesions makes this approach suboptimal in certain cases. We describe the use of the retroperitoneal laparoscopic approach to the upper pole of a kidney for marsupialization of a symptomatic, recurrent, complex renal cyst. An algorithm for current management of symptomatic renal cysts is discussed.

  1. Therapeutic challenges in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Penticuff, Justin C; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a malignancy that in advanced disease, is highly resistant to systemic therapies. Elucidation of the angiogenesis pathways and their intrinsic signaling interactions with the genetic and metabolic disturbances within renal cell carcinoma variants has ushered in the era of “targeted therapies”. Advanced surgical interventions and novel drugs targeting VEGF and mTOR, have improved patient survival and prolonged clinically stable-disease states. This review discusses the current understanding of diagnostic challenges and the mechanism-based clinical evidence on therapeutic management of advanced RCC. PMID:26309897

  2. Modeling renal progenitors - defining the niche.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, Shunsuke; Perantoni, Alan O

    2016-01-01

    Significant recent advances in methodologies for the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells to renal progenitors as well as the definition of niche conditions for sustaining those progenitors have dramatically enhanced our understanding of their biology and developmental programing, prerequisites for establishing viable approaches to renal regeneration. In this article, we review the evolution of culture techniques and models for the study of metanephric development, describe the signaling mechanisms likely to be driving progenitor self-renewal, and discuss current efforts to generate de novo functional tissues, providing in depth protocols and niche conditions for the stabilization of the nephronic Six2+progenitor. PMID:26856661

  3. Fructokinase activity mediates dehydration-induced renal injury

    PubMed Central

    Roncal Jimenez, Carlos A; Ishimoto, Takuji; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Rivard, Christopher J; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Ejaz, A. Ahsan; Cicerchi, Christina; Inaba, Shinichiro; Le, MyPhuong; Miyazaki, Makoto; Glaser, Jason; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; González, Marvin A; Aragón, Aurora; Wesseling, Catharina; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Johnson, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    The epidemic of chronic kidney disease in Nicaragua (Mesoamerican nephropathy) has been linked with recurrent dehydration. Here we tested whether recurrent dehydration may cause renal injury by activation of the polyol pathway, resulting in the generation of endogenous fructose in the kidney that might subsequently induce renal injury via metabolism by fructokinase. Wild-type and fructokinase-deficient mice were subjected to recurrent heat-induced dehydration. One group of each genotype was provided water throughout the day and the other group was hydrated at night, after the dehydration. Both groups received the same total hydration in 24 h. Wild-type mice that received delayed hydration developed renal injury, with elevated serum creatinine, increased urinary NGAL, proximal tubular injury, and renal inflammation and fibrosis. This was associated with activation of the polyol pathway, with increased renal cortical sorbitol and fructose levels. Fructokinase-knockout mice with delayed hydration were protected from renal injury. Thus, recurrent dehydration can induce renal injury via a fructokinase-dependent mechanism, likely from the generation of endogenous fructose via the polyol pathway. Access to sufficient water during the dehydration period can protect mice from developing renal injury. These studies provide a potential mechanism for Mesoamerican nephropathy. PMID:24336030

  4. Renal acid-base metabolism after ischemia.

    PubMed

    Holloway, J C; Phifer, T; Henderson, R; Welbourne, T C

    1986-05-01

    The response of the kidney to ischemia-induced cellular acidosis was followed over the immediate one hr post-ischemia reflow period. Clearance and extraction experiments as well as measurement of cortical intracellular pH (pHi) were performed on Inactin-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. Arteriovenous concentration differences and para-aminohippurate extraction were obtained by cannulating the left renal vein. Base production was monitored as bicarbonate released into the renal vein and urine; net base production was related to the renal handling of glutamine and ammonia as well as to renal oxygen consumption and pHi. After a 15 min control period, the left renal artery was snared for one-half hr followed by release and four consecutive 15 min reflow periods. During the control period, cortical cell pHi measured by [14C]-5,5-Dimethyl-2,4-Oxazolidinedione distribution was 7.07 +/- 0.08, and Q-O2 was 14.1 +/- 2.2 micromoles/min; neither net glutamine utilization nor net bicarbonate generation occurred. After 30 min of ischemia, renal tissue pH fell to 6.6 +/- 0.15. However, within 45 min of reflow, cortical cell pH returned and exceeded the control value, 7.33 +/- 0.06 vs. 7.15 +/- 0.08. This increase in pHi was associated with a significant rise in cellular metabolic rate, Q-O2 increased to 20.3 +/- 6.4 micromoles/min. Corresponding with cellular alkalosis was a net production of bicarbonate and a net ammonia uptake and glutamine release; urinary acidification was abolished. These results are consistent with a nonexcretory renal metabolic base generating mechanism governing cellular acid base homeostasis following ischemia. PMID:3723929

  5. [NEPHROPROTECTIVE PROPERTIES OF 5-HT3 RECEPTOR BLOCKER RU-63 IN EXPERIMENTAL ACUTE RENAL FAILURE UNDER HYPERGRAVITY CONDITIONS].

    PubMed

    Zaitseva, E N; Dubishchev, A V; Yakovlev, D S; Anisimova, V A

    2016-01-01

    The effective diuretic dose of 5-HT3 receptor blocker RU-63 (1 mg/kg) was found in experiments on white rats. It is established that the diuretic and saluretic effects of compound RU-63 increase on the background of impact of the gravitational factor. Compound RU-63 (1 mg/kg, subcutaneously) administered daily under hypergravity conditions (3 g in the direction of centrifugal force toward the kidneys) in animals with model ischemic acute renal failure increased excretory function of kidneys, glomerular filtration rate, and creatininuresis (on average by 180%; p < 0.05), and decreased serum creatinine, urinary excretion of protein, lactate dehydrogenase, and g-glutamyl transferase (on average by 49%; p < 0.05) as compared to the untreated control. Under similar conditions, the diuretic hydrochlorothiazide (in a dose of 20 mg/kg, intragastric) produced a more pronounced creatininuretic action than that of RU-63 (by 358%; p < 0.05). PMID:27455574

  6. Renal effects of anti-gravity suit inflation in man in relation to cardiovascular and hormonal changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geelen, G.; Kravik, S. E.; Hadj-Aissa, A.; Vincent, M.; Sem-Jacobsen, C. W.; Greenleaf, J.; Gharib, C.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that inflation for 3 hr of an antigravity suit that covered the legs and abdomen of normal standing subjects results in significant increases in urine flow, osmolar and free water clearances, total and fractional sodium excretion, and potassium excretion, while glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow are transiently increased. Such changes in kidney function are the consequence of the increase in thoracic blood volume induced by inflation which also results in an immediate increase in blood pressure and reflex bradycardia, together with a progressive lowering of plasma renin activity and aldosterone. The changes in kidney excretory patterns brought about by suit inflation appear to be similar in nature and magnitude to those observed during water immersion or in the early phase of bed rest, situations known to result in a headward redistribution of blood.

  7. Spontaneous renal artery dissection with renal infarction.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Sophie; Leray-Moraguès, Hélène; Chenine, Leila; Canaud, Ludovic; Vernhet-Kovacsik, Hélène; Canaud, Bernard

    2012-06-01

    Spontaneous renal artery dissection (SRAD) is a rare entity, which often presents diagnostic difficulties because of its non-specific clinical presentation. We report six cases complicated with renal infarction, occurring in middle-aged male patients without risk factors, illustrating the difficulty and delay for diagnosing SRAD. Ultrasound and Doppler imaging were not sensitive enough to confirm the diagnosis, and contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography was used to correct the diagnosis and allow the clinicians to propose appropriate treatment. We conclude that considering the urgency in diagnosing and treating SRAD, contrast enhanced abdominal tomography and/or abdominal magnetic resonance imaging should be proposed as soon as a suspicion of SRAD is evoked by the clinical presentation.

  8. Comparative renal anatomy of exotic species.

    PubMed

    Holz, Peter H; Raidal, Shane R

    2006-01-01

    All living organisms consume nutrients that are required for the production of both tissue and energy. The waste products of this process include nitrogenous materials and inorganic salts. They are removed from the body by excretory organs, which in vertebrate shave developed into kidneys and into salt glands in some birds and reptiles. Many invertebrates use a series of excretory organs called nephridia to perform the same function. Even though they perform similar functions, there is no evolutionary connection between invertebrate nephridia and vertebrate kidneys. Both evolved independently.

  9. Renal stem cells: fact or science fiction?

    PubMed

    McCampbell, Kristen K; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2012-06-01

    The kidney is widely regarded as an organ without regenerative abilities. However, in recent years this dogma has been challenged on the basis of observations of kidney recovery following acute injury, and the identification of renal populations that demonstrate stem cell characteristics in various species. It is currently speculated that the human kidney can regenerate in some contexts, but the mechanisms of renal regeneration remain poorly understood. Numerous controversies surround the potency, behaviour and origins of the cell types that are proposed to perform kidney regeneration. The present review explores the current understanding of renal stem cells and kidney regeneration events, and examines the future challenges in using these insights to create new clinical treatments for kidney disease.

  10. [Tubulo-interstitial renal complications of myeloma].

    PubMed

    Le Goas, F; Mougenot, B; Mignon, F; Ronco, P

    1993-02-01

    Tubulo-interstitial lesions are the main causes of renal failure in patients with myeloma, and they sometimes reveal this tumour. They are mainly found in large tumoral mass myelomas and are characterized by tubular lesions and specific casts of unexplained physiopathology. Symptomatic and aetiological treatments must be instituted at an early stage to obtain the recovery, at least partial, of renal function, as observed in more than 50% of the cases. The persistence of renal failure carries a sombre prognosis, which emphasizes the importance of a preventive treatment that is too often omitted. Functional tubular disorders are frequent but seldom result in Fanconi's syndrome. A better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the nephrotoxicity of monoclonal immunoglobulins should permit to reduce the incidence of tubular lesions in myelomas.

  11. Mitochondrial Sirtuin 3 and Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Perico, Luca; Morigi, Marina; Benigni, Ariela

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles whose functions are tightly regulated at multiple levels to maintain proper cellular homeostasis. Mitochondrial Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3), which belongs to an evolutionary conserved family of NAD+-dependent deacetylases, is a key regulator of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, ATP production, and fatty acid β-oxidation, and it exerts an antioxidant activity. Changes in SIRT3 expression are critical in the pathophysiology of several diseases, such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, cancer, and aging. In experimental acute kidney injury (AKI), impairment of renal function and development of tubular injury are associated with SIRT3 reduction and mitochondrial dysfunction in proximal tubuli. SIRT3-deficient mice are more susceptible to AKI and die. Pharmacological manipulations able to increase SIRT3 preserve mitochondrial integrity, markedly limit renal injury, and accelerate functional recovery. This review highlights all the selective rescue mechanisms that point to the key role of SIRT3 as a new therapeutic target for curing renal diseases. PMID:27362524

  12. Epidemiologic aspects of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Joseph K; Lipworth, Loren; Tarone, Robert E

    2006-10-01

    Renal cell cancer accounts for 2% of all new cancer cases worldwide. Incidence rates have been rising steadily around the world. In the United States, the rates have been rapidly increasing among black Americans, whose incidence rate has now surpassed that of white Americans. Cigarette smoking and obesity are the most consistently established causal risk factors, accounting for more than 20% and 30% of renal cell cancers, respectively. Hypertension, rather than antihypertensive drugs, appears to influence renal cell cancer development, although the mechanism is unknown. Analgesics have not been convincingly linked with renal cell cancer risk. In general, there appears to be a protective effect of fruit and vegetable consumption, although no particular component of diet has been clearly implicated. There are sporadic and inconsistent reports of occupations or occupational exposures being associated with this cancer. Epidemiologic studies are needed to identify reasons for the increasing incidence of renal cell cancer, with particular focus on why the incidence rate for black Americans has risen to significantly surpass that of white Americans.

  13. Why does atorvastatin inhibit renal crystal retention?

    PubMed

    Tsujihata, Masao; Yoshioka, Iwao; Tsujimura, Akira; Nonomura, Norio; Okuyama, Akihiko

    2011-10-01

    Recently, we reported that atorvastatin prevents renal tubular cell injury by oxalate and inhibits renal crystal retention. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which atorvastatin inhibits renal crystal retention. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were separated into four experimental groups, and the ethylene glycol model of hyperoxaluria and the atorvastatin treatment model were analyzed. To clarify the mechanism by which atorvastatin inhibits renal crystal retention, the removed kidneys were used for the quantitative analysis of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. The subunits of the NADPH oxidase system were evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. Furthermore, the level of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in kidney tissue was compared in each group. Atorvastatin treatment increased the SOD and catalase level compared with the stone-forming control group. Atorvastatin treatment decreased the expression of NOX-1 mRNA. Furthermore, the level of TGF-β was suppressed by atorvastatin treatment. We found that atorvastatin have inhibited calcium oxalate (CaOX) urolithiasis formation. We hypothesize that the mechanism of action of atorvastatin involves inhibiting TGF-β and NADPH oxidase, and increasing the SOD and catalase level. We believe that atorvastatin will be helpful in the treatment of CaOX urolithiasis.

  14. Hydrogen sulfide in renal physiology, disease and transplantation--the smell of renal protection.

    PubMed

    Koning, Anne M; Frenay, Anne-Roos S; Leuvenink, Henri G D; van Goor, Harry

    2015-04-30

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the third gasotransmitter, next to nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, is a key mediator in physiology and disease. It is involved in homeostatic functions, such as blood pressure control, electrolyte balance and apoptosis, and regulates pathological mechanisms, including oxidative stress and inflammation. Besides, it is believed to serve as an oxygen sensor under ischemic conditions. The kidney plays a decisive role in many of these processes, indicating an interplay between H2S and renal (patho)physiology. In this review we focus on the (protective) functions of H2S in the kidney. We first discuss endogenous renal H2S production and signaling and elaborate on its regulatory functions in renal physiology. Next, we present data on the role of aberrant H2S levels in the onset and progression of renal disease and suggest the use of H2S metabolites as biomarkers. Finally, we describe that exogenous H2S can protect the kidney against various forms of injury and conclude that modulation of renal H2S levels holds promise for renal patients in the future.

  15. Dysfunction of fibroblasts of extrarenal origin underlies renal fibrosis and renal anemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Asada, Nariaki; Takase, Masayuki; Nakamura, Jin; Oguchi, Akiko; Asada, Misako; Suzuki, Norio; Yamamura, Ken-ichi; Nagoshi, Narihito; Shibata, Shinsuke; Rao, Tata Nageswara; Fehling, Hans Joerg; Fukatsu, Atsushi; Minegishi, Naoko; Kita, Toru; Kimura, Takeshi; Okano, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yanagita, Motoko

    2011-10-01

    In chronic kidney disease, fibroblast dysfunction causes renal fibrosis and renal anemia. Renal fibrosis is mediated by the accumulation of myofibroblasts, whereas renal anemia is mediated by the reduced production of fibroblast-derived erythropoietin, a hormone that stimulates erythropoiesis. Despite their importance in chronic kidney disease, the origin and regulatory mechanism of fibroblasts remain unclear. Here, we have demonstrated that the majority of erythropoietin-producing fibroblasts in the healthy kidney originate from myelin protein zero-Cre (P0-Cre) lineage-labeled extrarenal cells, which enter the embryonic kidney at E13.5. In the diseased kidney, P0-Cre lineage-labeled fibroblasts, but not fibroblasts derived from injured tubular epithelial cells through epithelial-mesenchymal transition, transdifferentiated into myofibroblasts and predominantly contributed to fibrosis, with concomitant loss of erythropoietin production. We further demonstrated that attenuated erythropoietin production in transdifferentiated myofibroblasts was restored by the administration of neuroprotective agents, such as dexamethasone and neurotrophins. Moreover, the in vivo administration of tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, restored attenuated erythropoietin production as well as fibrosis in a mouse model of kidney fibrosis. These findings reveal the pathophysiological roles of P0-Cre lineage-labeled fibroblasts in the kidney and clarify the link between renal fibrosis and renal anemia.

  16. Purification and chromium-excretory function of low-molecular-weight, chromium-binding substances from dog liver.

    PubMed

    Wada, O; Wu, G Y; Yamamoto, A; Manabe, S; Ono, T

    1983-10-01

    From liver of dogs injected iv with potassium dichromate (38 mg/kg body wt), a low-molecular-weight chromium-binding substance (LMCr) was purified into two subfractions, LMCr I and LMCr II, which differ in physical and chemical properties. LMCr I was identified to be an anionic, organic chromium compound with a molecular weight of 1500. It contained glutamic acid, glycine, and cysteine as the predominant amino acids and firmly bound chromium in a ratio of one chromium(III) to one molecule of LMCr I. LMCr II was isolated in crystalline form and demonstrated to be a water-soluble, inorganic chromium(III) complex consisting of Na2HPO4 . 7H2O and Na2HPO4 . 2H2O. Although its crystallization reduced the chromium content, it had a maximum chromium-binding capacity as much as one chromium per one phosphorus in water. The mixture of LMCr I and LMCr II as approximated to be the natural composition showed a lower acute toxicity as measured by lethality in mice and had higher rates of urinary excretion and renal clearance in rabbits, accompanied by lower rates of renal tubular reabsorption and retention in kidney and liver than potassium dichromate(VI) and chromium(III) chloride. Pretreatment with chromium-free LMCr II remarkably reduced the mortality rates of mice acutely poisoned with chromium chloride. These results indicate that LMCr plays an important role in the detoxification and excretion of chromium in mammals. PMID:6617615

  17. [Treatment of periodontitis associated with cyclosporin-induced severe gingival hyperplasia with regular mechanical plaque removal in a patient with renal transplantation (Case report)].

    PubMed

    Keglevich, Tibor; Windisch, Péter; Gera, István

    2002-02-01

    A clinical case of a middle-aged kidney transplanted woman is presented. The woman has been taking Cyclosporin-A for over 13 years and has had advanced periodontitis and severe gingival swellings and gingival inflammation. The kidney transplant patient was treated and followed up for approx. four years. The treatment protocol included very thorough mechanical scaling and root planing, oral hygienic instructions and the regular professional maintenance program resulted in complete remission of the gingival overgrowth and stabilization of the periodontal condition. The gingival and periodontal conditions showed a continuing improvement over the time despite of the continuous CSA administration.

  18. Transforming Growth Factor Beta and Excess Burden of Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    August, Phyllis; Sharma, Vijay; Ding, Ruchuang; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Suthanthiran, Manikkam

    2009-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is more frequent in African Americans (blacks) compared to whites. Because renal fibrosis is a correlate of progressive renal failure and a dominant feature of ESRD, and because transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) can induce fibrosis and renal insufficiency, we hypothesized that TGF-β1 hyperexpression is more frequent in blacks compared to whites. We measured circulating levels of TGF-β1 in black and white patients with ESRD, hypertension, and in normal patients. We demonstrated that circulating levels of TGF-β1 are higher in black ESRD patients, hypertensive patients, and normal control patients compared to their white counterparts. Our preliminary genetic analyses suggest that TGF-β1 DNA polymorphisms are different in blacks and whites. Our observations of hyperexpression of TGF-β1 in blacks suggest a mechanism for the increased prevalence of renal failure and hypertensive target organ damage in this population. PMID:19768163

  19. 15-Deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J{sub 2} induces renal epithelial cell death through NF-{kappa}B-dependent and MAPK-independent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Dae Sik; Kwon, Chae Hwa; Park, Ji Yeon; Kim, Jae Ho; Woo, Jae Suk; Jung, Jin Sup; Kim, Yong Keun . E-mail: kim430@pusan.ac.kr

    2006-11-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) ligand 15d-PGJ{sub 2} induces cell death in renal proximal tubular cells. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) remains unidentified. The present study was undertaken to examine the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitogen-activated protein kinase, and NF-{kappa}B in opossum kidney (OK) cell death induced by 15d-PGJ{sub 2}. Treatment of OK cells with 15d-PGJ{sub 2} resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent cell death, which was largely attributed to apoptosis. 15d-PGJ{sub 2} increased ROS production and the effect was inhibited by catalase and N-acetylcysteine. The 15d-PGJ{sub 2}-induced cell death was also prevented by these antioxidants, suggesting that the cell death was associated with ROS generation. The PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 did not prevent the 15d-PGJ{sub 2}-induced cell death. 15d-PGJ{sub 2} caused a transient activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). However, inhibitors (PD98059 and U0126) of MEK, an ERK upstream kinase, did not alter the 15d-PGJ{sub 2}-induced cell death. Transfection with constitutively active MEK and dominant-negative MEK had no effect on the cell death. 15d-PGJ{sub 2} inhibited the NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity, which was accompanied by an inhibition of nuclear translocation of the NF-{kappa}B subunit p65 and impairment in DNA binding. Inhibition of NF-{kappa}B with a NF-{kappa}B specific inhibitor pyrrolidinecarbodithioate and transfection with I{kappa}B{alpha} (S32A/36A) caused cell death. These results suggest that the 5d-PGJ{sub 2}-induced OK cell death was associated with ROS production and NF-{kappa}B inhibition, but not with MAPK activation.

  20. Cardiovascular risk and mortality in end-stage renal disease patients undergoing dialysis: sleep study, pulmonary function, respiratory mechanics, upper airway collapsibility, autonomic nervous activity, depression, anxiety, stress and quality of life: a prospective, double blind, randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one of the most serious public health problems. The increasing prevalence of CKD in developed and developing countries has led to a global epidemic. The hypothesis proposed is that patients undergoing dialysis would experience a marked negative influence on physiological variables of sleep and autonomic nervous system activity, compromising quality of life. Methods/Design A prospective, consecutive, double blind, randomized controlled clinical trial is proposed to address the effect of dialysis on sleep, pulmonary function, respiratory mechanics, upper airway collapsibility, autonomic nervous activity, depression, anxiety, stress and quality of life in patients with CKD. The measurement protocol will include body weight (kg); height (cm); body mass index calculated as weight/height2; circumferences (cm) of the neck, waist, and hip; heart and respiratory rates; blood pressures; Mallampati index; tonsil index; heart rate variability; maximum ventilatory pressures; negative expiratory pressure test, and polysomnography (sleep study), as well as the administration of specific questionnaires addressing sleep apnea, excessive daytime sleepiness, depression, anxiety, stress, and quality of life. Discussion CKD is a major public health problem worldwide, and its incidence has increased in part by the increased life expectancy and increasing number of cases of diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Sleep disorders are common in patients with renal insufficiency. Our hypothesis is that the weather weight gain due to volume overload observed during interdialytic period will influence the degree of collapsibility of the upper airway due to narrowing and predispose to upper airway occlusion during sleep, and to investigate the negative influences of haemodialysis in the physiological variables of sleep, and autonomic nervous system, and respiratory mechanics and thereby compromise the quality of life of patients. Trial registration The

  1. Nox and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Holterman, Chet E; Read, Naomi C; Kennedy, Chris R J

    2015-04-01

    Since the first demonstration of Nox enzyme expression in the kidney in the early 1990s and the subsequent identification of Nox4, or RENOX, a decade later, it has become apparent that the Nox family of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating enzymes plays an integral role in the normal physiological function of the kidney. As our knowledge of Nox expression patterns and functions in various structures and specialized cell types within the kidney grows, so does the realization that Nox-derived oxidative stress contributes significantly to a wide variety of renal pathologies through their ability to modify lipids and proteins, damage DNA and activate transcriptional programmes. Diverse studies demonstrate key roles for Nox-derived ROS in kidney fibrosis, particularly in settings of chronic renal disease such as diabetic nephropathy. As the most abundant Nox family member in the kidney, much emphasis has been placed on the role of Nox4 in this setting. However, an ever growing body of work continues to uncover key roles for other Nox family members, not only in diabetic kidney disease, but in a diverse array of renal pathological conditions. The objective of the present review is to highlight the latest novel developments in renal Nox biology with an emphasis not only on diabetic nephropathy but many of the other renal disease contexts where oxidative stress is implicated.

  2. Renal disease in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Rafael Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Chronic renal disease represents a problem of public health in Colombia. Its prevalence has increased in last decade, with a prevalence of 44.7 patients per million (ppm) in 1993 to 294.6 ppm in 2004, considering that only 56.2% of the population has access to the health. This increase complies with the implementation of Law 100 of 1993, offering greater coverage of health services to the Colombian population. The cost of these pathologies is equivalent to the 2.49% of the budget for health of the nation. The three most common causes of renal failure are diabetes mellitus (DM; 30%), arterial hypertension (30%), and glomerulonephritis (7.85%). In incident patients, the DM accounts for 32.9%. The rate of global mortality is 15.8%, 17.4% in hemodialysis and 15.1% in peritoneal dialysis. In 2004, 467 renal transplants were made, 381 of deceased donor with an incidence of 10.3 ppm. The excessive cost of these pathologies can cause the nation's health care system to collapse if preventative steps are not taken. In December of 2004, the Colombian Association of Nephrology with the participation of the Latin American Society of Nephrology and Arterial Hypertension wrote the "Declaration of Bogotá," committing the state's scientific societies and promotional health companies to develop a model of attention for renal health that, in addition to implementing national registries, continues to manage renal disease. PMID:17162422

  3. [The focal renal lesions].

    PubMed

    Tuma, Jan

    2013-06-01

    The focal renal lesions are altogether common. Most frequently are found Columna Bertini hypertrophies (so called pseudotumors) and simple renal cysts. The role of sonography in the practice is to distinguish pseudotumors from real renal tumors, and simple renal cysts from complex cysts. The differentiation of complex renal cysts is possible with the help of the CEUS (= contrast enhanced ultrasound) and other imaging modalities such as CT or MRI. In these cases, the CEUS imaging agent has clear advantages over CT and MRI, because it is composed of gas bubbles, which are only slightly smaller than red blood cells and remains exclusively intravascularly while the CT and MRI contrast agents diffuse into the interstitial space without any real perfusion. The real tumors can be differentiated from certain focal non-tumorous changes based on the ultrasound and clinic. The further differentiation of individual kidney tumors and metastases using ultrasound, MRI, CT and CEUS is only partly possible. In all uncertain or unclear cases, therefore, an open or ultrasound-guided biopsy is useful.

  4. Can renal infarction occur after renal cyst aspiration? Case report.

    PubMed

    Emre, Habib; Soyoral, Yasemin Usul; Tanik, Serhat; Gecit, Ilhan; Begenik, Huseyin; Pirincci, Necip; Erkoc, Reha

    2011-01-01

    Renal infarction (RI) is a rarely seen disorder, and the diagnosis is often missed. The two major causes of RI are thromboemboli originhating from a thrombus in the heart or aorta, and in-situ thrombosis of a renal artery. We report a case of RI that developed due to renal artery and vein thrombosis, as confirmed by pathological evaluation of the nephrectomy material, three weeks after renal cyst aspiration.

  5. Renal alterations in feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cats: a natural model of lentivirus-induced renal disease changes.

    PubMed

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy. PMID:23170163

  6. Renal Alterations in Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)-Infected Cats: A Natural Model of Lentivirus-Induced Renal Disease Changes

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy. PMID:23170163

  7. Induction of Sca-1 via activation of STAT3 system in the duct cells of the mouse submandibular gland by ligation of the main excretory duct.

    PubMed

    Purwanti, Nunuk; Karabasil, Mileva Ratko; Matsuo, Shinsuke; Chen, Gang; Javkhlan, Purevjav; Azlina, Ahmad; Hasegawa, Takahiro; Yao, Chenjuan; Akamatsu, Tetsuya; Hosoi, Kazuo

    2011-11-01

    To examine the very initial step that takes place immediately after tissue injury and is linked to tissue regeneration, we employed the submandibular gland (SMG), which was injured by ligation of its main excretory duct (MED). Ligation of the MED of the SMG in mice induced the expression of Sca-1, a protein marker of hematopoietic stem cells. In the normal gland, a low level of Sca-1 was expressed, which was localized predominantly in the excretory duct cells. At 1 day after ligation, Sca-1 expression increased prominently in almost all of cells in the duct system, but not in the acinar cells. The level of Sca-1 mRNA had begun to increase at 6 h after ligation and continuously rose thereafter until it reached a plateau, which occurred ∼12 h after ligation. STAT3 phosphorylated at its tyrosine-705 (p-STAT3) in the ligated gland increased immediately after ligation, and it was localized in the nuclei of all duct cells. The results of an EMSA revealed the specific binding of a nuclear extract to the sequence of the γ-interferon activation site (GAS) present in the Sca-1 promoter and confirmed that such binding increased after ligation. Thus the present study suggests that STAT3, having been phosphorylated following MED ligation, was transferred to the nucleus, where it bound to the GAS element in the promoter of Sca-1 gene, resulting in promotion of Sca-1 gene expression. Actual prevention of STAT3 phosphorylation reduced the ligation-induced Sca-1 elevation.

  8. Excretory products of the cestode, Schistocephalus solidus, modulate in vitro responses of leukocytes from its specific host, the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus).

    PubMed

    Scharsack, Jörn Peter; Gossens, Anabel; Franke, Frederik; Kurtz, Joachim

    2013-12-01

    Helminth parasites have evolved remarkable strategies to manipulate the immune system of their hosts. During infections of three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) with the cestode Schistocephalus solidus prominent immunological changes occur, presumably due to manipulative activity of the parasite. We hypothesise that excretory/secretory products of the parasite are involved in the manipulation of the stickleback's immune system and that this may depend on the individual parasite and its origin. We therefore produced S. solidus conditioned cell culture media (SSCM) with parasites from different origins (Norway, Spain and Germany) and exposed head kidney leukocytes (HKL) from un-infected sticklebacks in cell cultures to SSCM. After in vitro culture, HKL were subjected to differential cell counts (granulocytes/lymphocytes) by means of flow cytometry. Leukocyte sub-populations were analysed for cell viability and changes in cell morphology. The respiratory burst activity was measured with a luminescence assay. Exposure of HKL to SSCM induced an up-regulation of respiratory burst activity after already 1 h, which was still elevated at 24 h, but which was in some cases significantly down-regulated after 96 h. Respiratory burst was positively correlated with the number of live granulocytes in the culture, suggesting that the respiratory burst activity was changed by SSCM effects on granulocyte viability. After 1 h and 24 h of HKL culture, no lymphocyte responses to SSCM were detectable, but after 96 h lymphocyte viability was significantly decreased with SSCM from Spanish S. solidus. In these cultures, residual lymphocytes increased in size, suggesting that cell death and activation might have occurred in parallel. The highest respiratory burst activity was induced by SSCM from Spanish parasites, in particular when they were grown in sympatric sticklebacks. The in vitro HKL responses to SSCM depended on the individual parasite and its population of origin

  9. Stage-specific excretory-secretory small heat shock proteins from the parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti--putative links to host's intestinal mucosal defense system.

    PubMed

    Younis, Abuelhassan Elshazly; Geisinger, Frank; Ajonina-Ekoti, Irene; Soblik, Hanns; Steen, Hanno; Mitreva, Makedonka; Erttmann, Klaus D; Perbandt, Markus; Liebau, Eva; Brattig, Norbert W

    2011-09-01

    In a search for molecules involved in the interaction between intestinal nematodes and mammalian mucosal host cells, we performed MS to identify excretory-secretory proteins from Strongyloides ratti. In the excretory-secretory proteins of the parasitic female stage, we detected, in addition to other peptides, peptides homologous with the Caenorhabditis elegans heat shock protein (HSP)-17, named Sra-HSP-17.1 (∼ 19 kDa) and Sra-HSP-17.2 (∼ 18 kDa), with 49% amino acid identity. The full-length cDNAs (483 bp and 474 bp, respectively) were identified, and the genomic organization was analyzed. To allow further characterization, the proteins were recombinantly expressed and purified. Profiling of transcription by quantitative real-time-PCR and of protein by ELISA in various developmental stages revealed parasitic female-specific expression. Sequence analyses of both the DNA and amino acid sequences showed that the two proteins share a conserved α-crystallin domain and variable N-terminals. The Sra-HSP-17s showed the highest homology with the deduced small HSP sequence of the human pathogen Strongyloides stercoralis. We observed strong immunogenicity of both proteins, leading to strong IgG responses following infection of rats. Flow cytometric analysis indicated the binding of Sra-HSP-17s to the monocyte-macrophage lineage but not to peripheral lymphocytes or neutrophils. A rat intestinal epithelial cell line showed dose-dependent binding to Sra-HSP-17.1, but not to Sra-HSP-17.2. Exposed monocytes released interleukin-10 but not tumor necrosis factor-α in response to Sra-HSP-17s, suggesting the possible involvement of secreted female proteins in host immune responses.

  10. Comparative assay of glutathione S-transferase (GSTs) activity of excretory-secretory materials and somatic extract of Fasciola spp parasites.

    PubMed

    Alirahmi, Heshmatollah; Farahnak, Ali; Golmohamadi, Taghi; Esharghian, Mohammad Reza

    2010-01-01

    Fascioliasis is a worldwide parasitic disease in human and domestic animals. The causative agents of fascioliasis are Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica. In the recent years, fasciola resistance to drugs has been reported in the many of publications. Fasciola spp has detoxification system including GST enzyme which may be responsible for its resistance. Therefore , the aim of the study was to assay of GST enzyme activity in fasciola parasites. Fasciola gigantica and Fasciola hepatica helminths were collected from abattoir as a live and cultured in buffer media for 4 h at 37 °C. Excretory-Secretory products were collected and stored in -80◦C. F. gigantica and Fasciola hepatica were homogenized with homogenizing buffer in a glass homogenizer to prepare of somatic extract. Suspension was then centrifuged and supernatant was stored at -80°C. In order to assay the enzyme activity, excretory-secretory and somatic extracts in the form of cocktails (potassium phosphate buffer, reduced glutathione and 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene substrates) were prepared and their absorbance recorded for 5 minutes at 340 nm. The total and specific GST activity of F. gigantica somatic and ES products were obtained as 2916.00, 272.01 micromole/minute and 1.33, 1.70 micromole/minute/mg protein, respectively. Fasciola hepatica also showed 2705.00, 276.86 micromole/minute and 1.33, 1.52 micromole/minute/mg protein, respectively. These results are important for analysis of parasite survival / resistance to drugs which use for treatment of fascioliasis.

  11. The dental management of troublesome twos: renal tubular acidosis and rampant caries

    PubMed Central

    B, Sandhyarani; Huddar, Dayanand; Patil, Anil; Sankeshwari, Banashree

    2013-01-01

    Renal tubular acidosis is a group of disorders in which there is metabolic acidosis due to defect in renal tubular acidification mechanism to maintain normal plasma bicarbonate and blood pH. Irrespective of organ system involved, oral cavity often reflects the disease occurring anywhere in the body. Thus congenital chronic renal diseases, causing acid–base disturbances affects development and structure of the teeth. Chronic renal tubular acidosis causes enamel defects, dental caries, oral candidiasis, angular cheilitis, etc. We hereby present an unusual case report of a 4-year-old boy suffering from renal tubular acidosis associated with rampant caries, whose full mouth rehabilitation has been done. PMID:23667245

  12. Effects of cytokines on potassium channels in renal tubular epithelia.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Komagiri, You; Kubokawa, Manabu

    2012-02-01

    Renal tubular potassium (K(+)) channels play important roles in the formation of cell-negative potential, K(+) recycling, K(+) secretion, and cell volume regulation. In addition to these physiological roles, it was reported that changes in the activity of renal tubular K(+) channels were involved in exacerbation of renal cell injury during ischemia and endotoxemia. Because ischemia and endotoxemia stimulate production of cytokines in immune cells and renal tubular cells, it is possible that cytokines would affect K(+) channel activity. Although the regulatory mechanisms of renal tubular K(+) channels have extensively been studied, little information is available about the effects of cytokines on these K(+) channels. The first report was that tumor necrosis factor acutely stimulated the single channel activity of the 70 pS K(+) channel in the rat thick ascending limb through activation of tyrosine phosphatase. Recently, it was also reported that interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) modulated the activity of the 40 pS K(+) channel in cultured human proximal tubule cells. IFN-γ exhibited a delayed suppression and an acute stimulation of K(+) channel activity, whereas IL-1β acutely suppressed the channel activity. Furthermore, these cytokines suppressed gene expression of the renal outer medullary potassium channel. The renal tubular K(+) channels are functionally coupled to the coexisting transporters. Therefore, the effects of cytokines on renal tubular transporter activity should also be taken into account, when interpreting their effects on K(+) channel activity. PMID:22042037

  13. Renal injury, nephrolithiasis and Nigella sativa: A mini review

    PubMed Central

    Hayatdavoudi, Parichehr; Khajavi Rad, Abolfazl; Rajaei, Ziba; Hadjzadeh, Mousa AL-Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The incidence and prevalence of kidney stone is increasing worldwide. After the first recurrence the risk of subsequent relapses is higher and the time period between relapses is shortened. Urinary stones can be severely painful and make a huge economic burden. The stone disease may increase the vulnerability of patients to other diseases such as renal failure. Medicinal herbs are rich sources of antioxidants which are increasingly consumed globally for their safety, efficacy and low price. Nigella sativa is a spice plant that is widely used for prevention and treatment of many ailments in Muslim countries and worldwide. This review aims at investigation of the effects of Nigella sativa on renal injury and stone formation. Materials and Methods: The scientific resources including PubMed, Scopus, and Google scholar were searched using key words such as: nephrolithiasis, urolithiasis, kidney/renal stone, renal injury, renal failure, urinary retention and black seed, black cumin, Nigella sativa and thymoquinone. Results: N. sativa and its main component, thymoquinone showed positive effects in prevention or curing kidney stones and renal failure through various mechanism such as antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-eicosanoid and immunomodulatory effects. The putative candidate in many cases has been claimed to be thymoquinone but it seems that at least in part, particularly in kidney stones, the herbal melanin plays a role which requires further investigation to prove. Conclusion: N. sativa and its components are beneficial in prevention and curing of renal diseases including nephrolithiasis and renal damages. PMID:27247917

  14. Renal effects of continuous negative pressure breathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous negative pressure breathing (CNPB) was utilized to simulate the thoracic vascular distension of zero G in 11 anesthetized rats. The animals underwent renal clearance and micropuncture renal nephron studies before, during, and after CNPB. Four rats were pretreated with a high salt diet and I-M desoxycorticosterone (DOCA) in excess. None of these rats diuresed with CNPB. In contrast, five of the seven remaining rats increased the fraction of the filtered sodium excreted and their urinary flow rate. Potassium excretion increased. End proximal tubular fluid specimen's TF/P inulin ratios were unchanged. Whole kidney and single nephron glomerular filtration rates fell 10%. CNPB, a mechanism for atrial distension, appears to cause in the rat a decrease in distal tubular sodium and water reabsorption. Exogenous mineral-corticoid prevents the diuresis, saluresis, and kaluresis. The adequacy of other nonatrial volume control mechanisms in regulating renal salt and water conservation in opposition to the studied atrial-renal (Henry-Gauer) reflex of thoracic vascular distension is confirmed.

  15. Renal (Kidney) Manifestations in TSC

    MedlinePlus

    ... PKD1 genes, severe kidney disease can develop in infancy or early childhood and renal failure most often ... of renal angiomyolipoma and TSC is in its infancy and we will have further information in a ...

  16. [Management of renal stones].

    PubMed

    Lechevallier, E; Traxer, O; Saussine, C

    2008-12-01

    The management of renal stones needs a recent and good quality imaging. Contrast medium injection is optional. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is the most common treatment of renal stones. ESWL is indicated as first line treatment for less than 1.5cm stones. The stone-free (SF) rate at 3 months of ESWL is 70-80%. Results of ESWL for stones with more than 1000UH density or located in the lower calyx are poor. Flexible ureteroscopy (URS) is indicated in case of ESWL failure or for hyperdense, 1-2cm stones. The SF rate of flexible is 80%. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is indicated for complex or more than 2cm stones. Asymptomatic and non infected stones, especially if located in the lower calyx, do not need urological treatment but must be followed up. In all cases, renal stones needs a metabolic evaluation and treatment, and annual follow-up.

  17. Renal denervation and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schlaich, Markus P; Krum, Henry; Sobotka, Paul A; Esler, Murray D

    2011-06-01

    Essential hypertension remains one of the biggest challenges in medicine with an enormous impact on both individual and society levels. With the exception of relatively rare monogenetic forms of hypertension, there is now general agreement that the condition is multifactorial in nature and hence requires therapeutic approaches targeting several aspects of the underlying pathophysiology. Accordingly, all major guidelines promote a combination of lifestyle interventions and combination pharmacotherapy to reach target blood pressure (BP) levels in order to reduce overall cardiovascular risk in affected patients. Although this approach works for many, it fails in a considerable number of patients for various reasons including drug-intolerance, noncompliance, physician inertia, and others, leaving them at unacceptably high cardiovascular risk. The quest for additional therapeutic approaches to safely and effectively manage hypertension continues and expands to the reappraisal of older concepts such as renal denervation. Based on the robust preclinical and clinical data surrounding the role of renal sympathetic nerves in various aspects of BP control very recent efforts have led to the development of a novel catheter-based approach using radiofrequency (RF) energy to selectively target and disrupt the renal nerves. The available evidence from the limited number of uncontrolled hypertensive patients in whom renal denervation has been performed are auspicious and indicate that the procedure has a favorable safety profile and is associated with a substantial and presumably sustained BP reduction. Although promising, a myriad of questions are far from being conclusively answered and require our concerted research efforts to explore the full potential and possible risks of this approach. Here we briefly review the science surrounding renal denervation, summarize the current data on safety and efficacy of renal nerve ablation, and discuss some of the open questions that need

  18. Renal Failure in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Balofsky, Ari; Fedarau, Maksim

    2016-01-01

    Renal failure during pregnancy affects both mother and fetus, and may be related to preexisting disease or develop secondary to diseases of pregnancy. Causes include hypovolemia, sepsis, shock, preeclampsia, thrombotic microangiopathies, and renal obstruction. Treatment focuses on supportive measures, while pharmacologic treatment is viewed as second-line therapy, and is more useful in mitigating harmful effects than treating the underlying cause. When supportive measures and pharmacotherapy prove inadequate, dialysis may be required, with the goal being to prolong pregnancy until delivery is feasible. Outcomes and recommendations depend primarily on the underlying cause.

  19. Losartan attenuates renal interstitial fibrosis and tubular cell apoptosis in a rat model of obstructive nephropathy.

    PubMed

    He, Ping; Li, Detian; Zhang, Beiru

    2014-08-01

    Ureteral obstruction leads to renal injury and progresses to irreversible renal fibrosis, with tubular cell atrophy and apoptosis. There is conflicting evidence concerning whether losartan (an angiotensin II type I receptor antagonist) mitigates renal interstitial fibrosis and renal tubular epithelial cell apoptosis following unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in animal models. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of losartan on renal tubular cell apoptosis and renal fibrosis in a rat model of UUO. The rats were subjected to UUO by ureteral ligation and were treated with dimethyl sulfoxide (control) or losartan. The controls underwent sham surgery. The renal tissues were collected 3, 5, 7 and 14 days after surgery for measurement of various indicators of renal fibrosis. UUO increased the expression levels of α‑smooth muscle actin and collagen I, and the extent of renal tubular fibrosis and apoptosis in a time‑dependent manner. Losartan treatment partially attenuated these responses. Progression of renal interstitial fibrosis was accompanied by phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and altered the expression levels of two apoptosis‑related proteins (Bax and Bcl2). Losartan treatment also partially attenuated these responses. The results indicated that losartan attenuated renal fibrosis and renal tubular cell apoptosis in a rat model of UUO. This effect appeared to be mediated by partial blockage of STAT3 phosphorylation.

  20. End Stage and Chronic Kidney Disease: Associations with Renal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Paul

    2012-01-01

    There is a well known association between end stage renal disease and the development of kidney cancer in the native kidney of patients requiring renal replacement therapy. There is now emerging evidence that lesser degrees of renal insufficiency (chronic kidney disease, CKD) are also associated with an increased likelihood of cancer in general and kidney cancer in particular. Nephropathological changes are commonly observed in the non-tumor bearing portions of kidney resected at the time of partial and radical nephrectomy (RN). In addition, patients with renal cancer are more likely to have CKD at the time of diagnosis and treatment than the general population. The exact mechanism by which renal insufficiency transforms normal kidney cells into tumor cells is not known. Possible mechanisms include uremic immune inhibition or increased exposure to circulating toxins not adequately cleared by the kidneys. Surgeons managing kidney tumors must have an increased awareness of their patient’s renal functional status as they plan their resection. Kidney sparing approaches, including partial nephrectomy (PN) or active surveillance in older and morbidly ill patients, can prevent CKD or delay the further decline in renal function which is well documented with RN. Despite emerging evidence that PN provides equivalent local tumor control to RN while at the same time preventing CKD, this operation remains under utilized in the United States and abroad. Increased awareness of the bi directional relationship between kidney function and kidney cancer is essential in the contemporary management of kidney cancer. PMID:22649783

  1. Physiology of the Renal Interstitium

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Long overlooked as the virtual compartment and then strictly characterized through descriptive morphologic analysis, the renal interstitium has finally been associated with function. With identification of interstitial renin- and erythropoietin-producing cells, the most prominent endocrine functions of the kidney have now been attributed to the renal interstitium. This article reviews the functional role of renal interstitium. PMID:25813241

  2. p66Shc regulates renal vascular tone in hypertension-induced nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Bradley; Palygin, Oleg; Rufanova, Victoriya A; Chong, Andrew; Lazar, Jozef; Jacob, Howard J; Mattson, David; Roman, Richard J; Williams, Jan M; Cowley, Allen W; Geurts, Aron M; Staruschenko, Alexander; Imig, John D; Sorokin, Andrey

    2016-07-01

    Renal preglomerular arterioles regulate vascular tone to ensure a large pressure gradient over short distances, a function that is extremely important for maintaining renal microcirculation. Regulation of renal microvascular tone is impaired in salt-sensitive (SS) hypertension-induced nephropathy, but the molecular mechanisms contributing to this impairment remain elusive. Here, we assessed the contribution of the SH2 adaptor protein p66Shc (encoded by Shc1) in regulating renal vascular tone and the development of renal vascular dysfunction associated with hypertension-induced nephropathy. We generated a panel of mutant rat strains in which specific modifications of Shc1 were introduced into the Dahl SS rats. In SS rats, overexpression of p66Shc was linked to increased renal damage. Conversely, deletion of p66Shc from these rats restored the myogenic responsiveness of renal preglomerular arterioles ex vivo and promoted cellular contraction in primary vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) that were isolated from renal vessels. In primary SMCs, p66Shc restricted the activation of transient receptor potential cation channels to attenuate cytosolic Ca2+ influx, implicating a mechanism by which overexpression of p66Shc impairs renal vascular reactivity. These results establish the adaptor protein p66Shc as a regulator of renal vascular tone and a driver of impaired renal vascular function in hypertension-induced nephropathy. PMID:27270176

  3. p66Shc regulates renal vascular tone in hypertension-induced nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Bradley; Palygin, Oleg; Rufanova, Victoriya A.; Lazar, Jozef; Jacob, Howard J.; Mattson, David; Roman, Richard J.; Williams, Jan M.; Cowley, Allen W.; Geurts, Aron M.; Imig, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Renal preglomerular arterioles regulate vascular tone to ensure a large pressure gradient over short distances, a function that is extremely important for maintaining renal microcirculation. Regulation of renal microvascular tone is impaired in salt-sensitive (SS) hypertension–induced nephropathy, but the molecular mechanisms contributing to this impairment remain elusive. Here, we assessed the contribution of the SH2 adaptor protein p66Shc (encoded by Shc1) in regulating renal vascular tone and the development of renal vascular dysfunction associated with hypertension-induced nephropathy. We generated a panel of mutant rat strains in which specific modifications of Shc1 were introduced into the Dahl SS rats. In SS rats, overexpression of p66Shc was linked to increased renal damage. Conversely, deletion of p66Shc from these rats restored the myogenic responsiveness of renal preglomerular arterioles ex vivo and promoted cellular contraction in primary vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) that were isolated from renal vessels. In primary SMCs, p66Shc restricted the activation of transient receptor potential cation channels to attenuate cytosolic Ca2+ influx, implicating a mechanism by which overexpression of p66Shc impairs renal vascular reactivity. These results establish the adaptor protein p66Shc as a regulator of renal vascular tone and a driver of impaired renal vascular function in hypertension-induced nephropathy. PMID:27270176

  4. Renal histology of mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome (Kawasaki disease).

    PubMed

    Salcedo, J R; Greenberg, L; Kapur, S

    1988-01-01

    Renal involvement is well described in patients with mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome (MCLNS), or Kawasaki disease and is manifested by mild azotemia, hematuria, pyuria or cylinduria, and more often, proteinuria. Renal morphology during the acute stages of the illness has never been reported. In this paper we describe the renal histopathologic changes in a child with MCLNS. The glomerular histopathologic findings suggest immune complex damage to the kidney as a possible mechanism of nephrotoxicity in MCLNS. Presence of kidney lesions, which speak in favor of the injurious role of immune complexes in MLCNS may be relevant to the understanding of the pathogenesis of the vascular lesions that are characteristic of this disease.

  5. [Renal markers and predictors, and renal and cardiovascular risk factors].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Andrade, C

    2002-01-01

    prediction. And also, its possible association nexuses, its injuring mechanisms, and the characterization of the new "emergent" renal and cardiovascular risk's markers and factors. 4. The impact on the possibility to treat the end stage renal disease with effective and prolonged procedures, by hemodialisis or kidney transplantation, has been occurred. The affected population's survival with the adequacy renal-sustitution treatment, and the possibility of indefinite duration of its treatment, has also impacted on the public health, and its resources, in an evident way. Simultaneously to increase of the incidence in the population, the electivity for the treatment has been enlarged and extended increasing it exponentially. These facts are documented here, and are defined the characteristics of the factors and markers of risk, of renal and cardiovascular diseases. The defined factors are valued to mark, so far as with the well-known evidence is possible, the prediction and the progression of the renal and cardiovascular functional deterioration: The hypertension, cardiovascular remodeling, the arterial stiffness, the heart rate, the sympathetic activation, the modification of the physiological response of the target organ to the overcharge, the metabolic syndrome, the obesity, the insulin resistance, the altered lipid profile, and metabolism of the fatty acids, the salt-sensibility, the decrease of the renal functional reserve, the glomerular hyperfiltration, the absence of the arterial pressure nocturnal descent, the abnormal excretion of proteins for the urine, the phenomenon induced by dysfunctions of the clotting, superoxide production, growth factors, the production of chronic inflammation and its markers, the factors of the glomerulosclerosis progression, the hyperuricemic status, the endothelial dysfunction and others, are evaluated. As well as their association among them and with other factors of risk not changeable like the age, and in turn, with other acquired

  6. Vitamin D Receptor Signaling in Renal and Cardiovascular Protection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan Chun

    2013-01-01

    The high prevalence of vitamin D-deficiency in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is believed to be an important risk factor for the cardio-renal syndrome commonly seen in this patient population. African Americans suffer disproportionally high incidence of renal and cardiovascular disease with poor disease outcome, which may be partly attributed to their low vitamin D status in part due to low subcutaneous photo-production of vitamin D. Mounting evidence from animal and clinical studies has demonstrated beneficial effects of vitamin D therapy on the renal and cardiovascular systems, and the underlying reno- and cardio-protective mechanisms of vitamin D receptor (VDR)-mediated signaling are under intense investigations. In this article, I will review our most recent understanding of the renal protective mechanism of the podocyte VDR signaling against diabetic nephropathy and the anti-atherosclerotic role of macrophage VDR signaling in the regulation of atherosclerosis. PMID:24119849

  7. Management of Renal Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Nalbant, Ismail; Can Sener, Nevzat; Firat, Hacer; Yeşil, Süleyman; Zengin, Kürşad; Yalcınkaya, Fatih; Imamoglu, Abdurrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Renal cysts have a high prevalence in the general population, and their estimated incidence increases with age. Renal cyst aspiration (usually with sclerotherapy) or open/laparoscopic decortication is a generally effective and safe method in the treatment of symptomatic simple renal cysts. The success rates of laparoscopic decortication and percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy were compared to assist in the decision making for the procedure. Methods: A total of 184 patients with symptomatic simple renal cysts were treated with either laparoscopic decortication in 149 cases or percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy in 35 cases. The follow-up period was approximately 35 months, and the symptomatic and radiologic success rates of the 2 techniques were compared retrospectively. Results: Laparoscopic decortication was found to have high success rates, a low recurrence rate, and minimal morbidity. Percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy is an outpatient procedure with a minimally higher recurrence rate. Conclusion: When a symptomatic cyst is encountered and treatment of the cyst is indicated, laparoscopic decortication is a more efficient method that offers better results than percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy. PMID:25848184

  8. Ablative therapies for renal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Rajan; Leveillee, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Owing to an increased use of diagnostic imaging for evaluating patients with other abdominal conditions, incidentally discovered kidney masses now account for a majority of renal tumors. Renal ablative therapy is assuming a more important role in patients with borderline renal impairment. Renal ablation uses heat or cold to bring about cell death. Radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation are two such procedures, and 5-year results are now emerging from both modalities. Renal biopsy at the time of ablation is extremely important in order to establish tissue diagnosis. Real-time temperature monitoring at the time of radiofrequency ablation is very useful to ensure adequacy of ablation. PMID:21789083

  9. [Renal abnormalities in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Samia, Barbouch; Hazgui, Faiçal; Abdelghani, Khaoula Ben; Hamida, Fethi Ben; Goucha, Rym; Hedri, Hafedh; Taarit, Chokri Ben; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Kheder, Adel

    2012-07-01

    We will study the epidemiologic, clinical, biological, therapeutic, prognostic characteristics and predictive factors of development of nephropathy in ankylosing spondylitis patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical record of 32 cases with renal involvement among 212 cases of ankylosing spondylitis followed in our service during the period spread out between 1978 and 2006. The renal involvement occurred in all patients a mean of 12 years after the clinical onset of the rheumatic disease. Thirty-two patients presented one or more signs of renal involvement: microscopic hematuria in 22 patients, proteinuria in 23 patients, nephrotic syndrome in 11 patients and decreased renal function in 24 patients (75%). Secondary renal amyloidosis (13 patients), which corresponds to a prevalence of 6,1% and tubulointerstitial nephropathy (7 patients) were the most common cause of renal involvement in ankylosing spondylitis followed by IgA nephropathy (4 patients). Seventeen patients evolved to the end stage renal disease after an average time of 29.8 ± 46 months. The average follow-up of the patients was 4,4 years. By comparing the 32 patients presenting a SPA and renal disease to 88 with SPA and without nephropathy, we detected the predictive factors of occurred of nephropathy: tobacco, intense inflammatory syndrome, sacroileite stage 3 or 4 and presence of column bamboo. The finding of 75% of the patients presented a renal failure at the time of the diagnosis of renal involvement suggests that evidence of renal abnormality involvement should be actively sought in this disease. PMID:22520483

  10. [Renal abnormalities in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Samia, Barbouch; Hazgui, Faiçal; Abdelghani, Khaoula Ben; Hamida, Fethi Ben; Goucha, Rym; Hedri, Hafedh; Taarit, Chokri Ben; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Kheder, Adel

    2012-07-01

    We will study the epidemiologic, clinical, biological, therapeutic, prognostic characteristics and predictive factors of development of nephropathy in ankylosing spondylitis patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical record of 32 cases with renal involvement among 212 cases of ankylosing spondylitis followed in our service during the period spread out between 1978 and 2006. The renal involvement occurred in all patients a mean of 12 years after the clinical onset of the rheumatic disease. Thirty-two patients presented one or more signs of renal involvement: microscopic hematuria in 22 patients, proteinuria in 23 patients, nephrotic syndrome in 11 patients and decreased renal function in 24 patients (75%). Secondary renal amyloidosis (13 patients), which corresponds to a prevalence of 6,1% and tubulointerstitial nephropathy (7 patients) were the most common cause of renal involvement in ankylosing spondylitis followed by IgA nephropathy (4 patients). Seventeen patients evolved to the end stage renal disease after an average time of 29.8 ± 46 months. The average follow-up of the patients was 4,4 years. By comparing the 32 patients presenting a SPA and renal disease to 88 with SPA and without nephropathy, we detected the predictive factors of occurred of nephropathy: tobacco, intense inflammatory syndrome, sacroileite stage 3 or 4 and presence of column bamboo. The finding of 75% of the patients presented a renal failure at the time of the diagnosis of renal involvement suggests that evidence of renal abnormality involvement should be actively sought in this disease.

  11. Hemostatic Parameters according to Renal Function and Time after Transplantation in Brazilian Renal Transplanted Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Ana Paula Lucas; Alpoim, Patrícia Nessralla; de Figueiredo, Roberta Carvalho; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Braga Gomes, Karina; Dusse, Luci Maria SantAna

    2015-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the key for patients with end-stage renal disease, improving quality of life and longer survival. However, kidney transplant triggers an intense inflammatory response and alters the hemostatic system, but the pathophysiological mechanisms of these changes are not completely understood. The aim of this cross-sectional cohort study was to investigate hemostatic biomarkers in Brazilian renal transplanted patients according to renal function and time after transplantation. A total of 159 renal transplanted patients were enrolled and D-Dimer (D-Di), Thrombomodulin (TM), von Willebrand Factor (VWF), and ADAMTS13 plasma levels were assessed by ELISA. An increase of D-Di was observed in patients with higher levels of creatinine. ADAMTS13 levels were associated with creatinine plasma levels and D-Di levels with Glomerular Filtration Rate. These results suggested that D-Di and ADAMTS13 can be promising markers to estimate renal function. ADAMTS13 should be investigated throughout the posttransplant time to clarify the participation of this enzyme in glomerular filtration and acceptance or rejection of the graft in Brazilian transplanted patients. PMID:26229221

  12. Transarterial embolization for serious renal hemorrhage following renal biopsy.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dan; Liu, Guihua; Sun, Xiangzhou; Zhuang, Wenquan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Guo, Wenbo; Yang, Jianyong; Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of percutaneous transarterial embolization for the treatment of serious renal hemorrhage after renal biopsy. Nine patients with renal hemorrhage had frank pain and gross hematuria as main symptoms after renal biopsy. Intrarenal arterial injuries and perinephric hematoma were confirmed by angiography in all cases. The arterial injuries led to two types of renal hemorrhage, Type I: severe renal injure or intrarenal renal artery rupture (n=5), with contrast medium spilling out of the artery and spreading into renal pelvis or kidney capsule in angiography; Type II, pseudo aneurysm or potential risk of intrarenal artery injure (n=4), where contrast medium that spilled out of intraartery was retained in the parenchyma as little spots less than 5 mm in diameter in angiography. Transcatheter superselective intrarenal artery embolization was performed with coils or microcoils (Type I intrarenal artery injure) and polyvinyl alcohol particles (Type II injure). The intrarenal arterial injuries were occluded successfully in all patients. Light or mild back or abdominal pain in the side of the embolized kidney was found in three patients following embolization procedures and disappeared 3 days later. Serum creatinine and perinephric hematoma were stable, and gross hematuresis stopped immediately (n=4) or 3-5 days (n=3) after embolization. In conclusions, transcatheter superselective intrarenal artery embolization as a minimally invasive therapy is safe and effective for treatment of serious renal hemorrhage following percutaneous renal biopsy.

  13. Computational Biology: Modeling Chronic Renal Allograft Injury.

    PubMed

    Stegall, Mark D; Borrows, Richard

    2015-01-01

    New approaches are needed to develop more effective interventions to prevent long-term rejection of organ allografts. Computational biology provides a powerful tool to assess the large amount of complex data that is generated in longitudinal studies in this area. This manuscript outlines how our two groups are using mathematical modeling to analyze predictors of graft loss using both clinical and experimental data and how we plan to expand this approach to investigate specific mechanisms of chronic renal allograft injury.

  14. The role of renal denervation in the treatment of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Sobotka, Paul A; Krum, Henry; Böhm, Michael; Francis, Darrel P; Schlaich, Markus P

    2012-06-01

    The heart and kidney interact in terms of hemodynamics and neurohumoral regulatory mechanisms, and this helps to maintain circulatory homeostasis under normal conditions. However, the normal regulatory mechanisms become inappropriate in the setting of congestive heart failure (CHF), and significant renal dysfunction often develops in CHF patients. Activation of renal sympathetic efferent nerves causes renin release, sodium and water retention, and reduced renal blood flow, all hallmarks of the renal manifestations of CHF. An increase in plasma levels of angiotensin II that is mediated in part by renal sympathetic activation has an effect on the central nervous system to further increase global sympathetic tone. Renal sympathetic activity can be assessed clinically by renal norepinephrine spillover, and an increase in renal norepinephrine spillover in CHF predicts reduced survival. In addition to efferent sympathetic activation, activation of renal sensory nerves in CHF may cause a reflex increase in sympathetic tone that contributes to elevated peripheral vascular resistance and vascular remodeling as well as left ventricular remodeling and dysfunction. In animal models of heart failure, surgical renal denervation has been shown to improve both renal and ventricular function. Although surgical renal denervation has long been known to lower blood pressure and improve survival in patients with hypertension, the invasive nature of this approach and its associated complications has limited its appeal. However, a novel catheter-based device has recently been introduced that specifically interrupts both efferent and afferent renal nerves, and there is significant interest in the use of this device to treat both hypertension and CHF. Several ongoing clinical trials are investigating the safety and efficacy of renal denervation in patients with CHF. PMID:22392370

  15. Acute effects of ethanol on renal folate clearance in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenga, B.H.; McMartin, K.E.

    1986-03-05

    Studies of the renal clearance of folic acid in primates demonstrate net reabsorption of folate by a saturable system. The acute administration of ethanol to rats causes a significant increase in urinary folate excretion. The mechanism for this effect is unknown and thus the effect of acute administration of ethanol on the renal absorption and urinary clearance of folate was studied in rats. Folic acid was administered to male Sprague-Dawley rats via continuous intravenous infusion in doses ranging from 3-75 micromoles/kg and renal clearance relative to inulin was determined. The effects of various dose levels of ethanol on these parameters were then determined. At a dose of 15 micromoles/kg, the renal clearance of folate relative to that of inulin was about 0.65 mg/min. At a plasma ethanol level about 100 mg/dl, the renal clearance of folate was not markedly altered. These results suggests that there is net reabsorption of folate in the rat kidney and that moderate doses of ethanol have little effect on renal effect on renal folate reabsorption.

  16. Tuberous sclerosis complex with end-stage renal failure.

    PubMed

    Neumann, H P; Brüggen, V; Berger, D P; Herbst, E; Blum, U; Morgenroth, A; Schollmeyer, P; Wetterauer, U

    1995-01-01

    Renal angiomyolipoma is common in the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), the classic features of which are facial angiofibroma, seizures, and mental retardation. We report a family with three affected members demonstrating the wide spectrum of TSC-associated lesions ranging from asymptomatic findings to life-threatening complications. The predominant symptoms of the index patient were hypertension and mild renal insufficiency at age 48, resulting in end-stage renal failure at age 63 due to giant bilateral angiomyolipoma of the kidneys. The two TSC-affected siblings had died years previously, one from pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis and the other during an epileptic state; the latter had situs inversus totalis as another remarkable finding. The diagnosis of TSC may be overlooked if CNS symptoms are absent and if cutaneous lesions are masked by cosmetic procedures, as occurred in the index case. Chronic renal failure due to angiomyolipoma is not widely known to clinical nephrologists, but develops in approximately 15% of TSC patients. Displacement of functional renal parenchyma by abnormal tissue appears to be the major pathogenetic mechanism leading to end-stage renal failure. Angiomyolipomas can be diagnosed from this characteristic sonographic pattern and the demonstration of fatty tissue in CT or MRI. Multiple renal cysts are also common in TSC. Therefore TSC should be considered in the differential diagnosis of polycystic kidney disease.

  17. Heparanase expression and glycosaminoglycans profile in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Batista, Lucas Teixeira E Aguiar; Matos, Leandro Luongo; Machado, Leopoldo Ruiz; Suarez, Eloah Rabello; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell; Martins, João Roberto Maciel; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Pompeo, Antonio Carlos Lima; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva

    2012-11-01

    A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of renal cell carcinogenesis could contribute to a decrease in the mortality rate of this disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the glycosaminoglycans profile and heparanase expression in renal cell carcinoma. The study included 24 patients submitted to nephrectomy with confirmed pathological diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma. The majority of the samples (87.5%) were classified in the initial stage of renal cell carcinoma (clinical stages I and II). Heparanase messenger ribonucleic acid expression was evaluated by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and sulfated glycosaminoglycans were identified and quantified by agarose gel electrophoresis of renal cell carcinoma samples or non-neoplastic tissues obtained from the same patients (control group). The sulfated glycosaminoglycans and hyaluronic acid were analyzed in urine samples of the patients before and after surgery. The data showed a significant statistical increase in chondroitin sulfate, and a decrease in heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate present in neoplastic tissues compared with non-neoplastic tissues. Higher heparanase messenger ribonucleic acid expression in the neoplastic tissues was also shown, compared with the non-neoplastic tissues. The urine glycosaminoglycans profile showed no significant difference between renal cell carcinoma and control samples. Extracellular matrix changes observed in the present study clarify that heparanase is possibly involved with heparan sulfate turnover, and that heparanase and the glycosaminoglycans can modulate initial events of renal cell carcinoma development.

  18. VITAMIN D: ROLES IN RENAL AND CARDIOVASCULAR PROTECTION

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan Chun

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Great progress has been made in recent years in understanding the expanding roles of the vitamin D endocrine system beyond calcemic regulation, including pathophysiological actions in the kidney and the cardiovascular system. The purpose of this review is to update the recent advance regarding the effects of vitamin D and its analogs on the renal and cardiovascular system. Recent findings Vitamin D-deficiency is not only widely associated with chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease in humans, but may also accelerate the disease progression. Dysregulation of vitamin D metabolism caused by renal insufficiency contributes to the low vitamin D status. Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated impressive therapeutic outcome with low-calcemic vitamin D analogs in renal and cardiovascular disease. The mechanism underlying the renal and cardiovascular protection involves regulation of multiple signaling pathways by vitamin D including NF-κB, Wnt/β-catenin and the renin-angiotensin system. Summary The renal and cardiovascular protective activity of vitamin D revealed in recent studies has profound clinical implications. Nutritional correction of vitamin D-deficiency and treatment with vitamin D analogs could be therapeutic options for renal and cardiovascular problems. New vitamin D analogs with better renal and cardiovascular therapeutic efficacy are highly desired. More randomized trials are needed to address these issues. PMID:22143249

  19. Does Lower Limb Exercise Worsen Renal Artery Hemodynamics in Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; Xu, Zaipin; Deng, Xiaoyan; Liu, Ming; Liu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Renal artery stenosis (RAS) and renal complications emerge in some patients after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) to treat abdominal aorta aneurysm (AAA). The mechanisms for the causes of these problems are not clear. We hypothesized that for EVAR patients, lower limb exercise could negatively influence the physiology of the renal artery and the renal function, by decreasing the blood flow velocity and changing the hemodynamics in the renal arteries. To evaluate this hypothesis, pre- and post-operative models of the abdominal aorta were reconstructed based on CT images. The hemodynamic environment was numerically simulated under rest and lower limb exercise conditions. The results revealed that in the renal arteries, lower limb exercise decreased the wall shear stress (WSS), increased the oscillatory shear index (OSI) and increased the relative residence time (RRT). EVAR further enhanced these effects. Because these parameters are related to artery stenosis and atherosclerosis, this preliminary study concluded that lower limb exercise may increase the potential risk of inducing renal artery stenosis and renal complications for AAA patients. This finding could help elucidate the mechanism of renal artery stenosis and renal complications after EVAR and warn us to reconsider the management and nursing care of AAA patients. PMID:25946196

  20. Renal tubular HIF-2α expression requires VHL inactivation and causes fibrosis and cysts.

    PubMed

    Schietke, Ruth E; Hackenbeck, Thomas; Tran, Maxine; Günther, Regina; Klanke, Bernd; Warnecke, Christina L; Knaup, Karl X; Shukla, Deepa; Rosenberger, Christian; Koesters, Robert; Bachmann, Sebastian; Betz, Peter; Schley, Gunnar; Schödel, Johannes; Willam, Carsten; Winkler, Thomas; Amann, Kerstin; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Maxwell, Patrick; Wiesener, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    The Hypoxia-inducible transcription Factor (HIF) represents an important adaptive mechanism under hypoxia, whereas sustained activation may also have deleterious effects. HIF activity is determined by the oxygen regulated α-subunits HIF-1α or HIF-2α. Both are regulated by oxygen dependent degradation, which is controlled by the tumor suppressor "von Hippel-Lindau" (VHL), the gatekeeper of renal tubular growth control. HIF appears to play a particular role for the kidney, where renal EPO production, organ preservation from ischemia-reperfusion injury and renal tumorigenesis are prominent examples. Whereas HIF-1α is inducible in physiological renal mouse, rat and human tubular epithelia, HIF-2α is never detected in these cells, in any species. In contrast, distinct early lesions of biallelic VHL inactivation in kidneys of the hereditary VHL syndrome show strong HIF-2α expression. Furthermore, knockout of VHL in the mouse tubular apparatus enables HIF-2α expression. Continuous transgenic expression of HIF-2α by the Ksp-Cadherin promotor leads to renal fibrosis and insufficiency, next to multiple renal cysts. In conclusion, VHL appears to specifically repress HIF-2α in renal epithelia. Unphysiological expression of HIF-2α in tubular epithelia has deleterious effects. Our data are compatible with dedifferentiation of renal epithelial cells by sustained HIF-2α expression. However, HIF-2α overexpression alone is insufficient to induce tumors. Thus, our data bear implications for renal tumorigenesis, epithelial differentiation and renal repair mechanisms. PMID:22299048

  1. Renal Medullary Interstitial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Reena; Hao, Chuan-Ming; Breyer, Matthew D.

    2007-04-01

    Renal medullary interstitial cells (RMICs) are specialized fibroblast-like cells that reside in the renal medulla among the vasa recta, the thin limbs of Henle's loop, and medullary collecting ducts. These cells are characterized by abundant lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. The lipid droplets are composed of triglycerides, cholesterol esters and free long-chain fatty acids, including arachidonic acid. RMICs are also a major site of cyclooxygenase2 (COX-2) expression, and thus a major site of COX-2 derived prostanoid biosynthesis. RMICs are also a potential target of hormones such as angiotensin II and endothelin. The RMIC COX-2 expression and the abundance of lipid droplets change with salt and water intake. These properties of RMICs are consistent with an important role of these cells in modulating physiologic and pathologic processes of the kidney.

  2. Renal stones in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Norma; DasGupta, Ranan

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of renal stones during pregnancy is a complex problem. Risks to the fetus from ionising radiation and interventional procedures need to be balanced with optimising clinical care for the mother. Management of such patients requires a clear understanding of available options, with a multidisciplinary team approach. In this review, we discuss the role of different diagnostic tests including ultrasound, magnetic resonance urography, and computerized tomography. We also provide an update on recent developments in the treatment of renal stones during pregnancy. Expectant management remains first-line treatment. Where definitive treatment of the stone is required, new evidence suggests that ureteroscopic stone removal may be equally safe, and possibly better than traditional temporising procedures. PMID:27512433

  3. Molecular Pathophysiology of Renal Tubular Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, P.C.B; Miranda, D.M; Oliveira, E.A; Silva, A.C. Simões e

    2009-01-01

    Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) is characterized by metabolic acidosis due to renal impaired acid excretion. Hyperchloremic acidosis with normal anion gap and normal or minimally affected glomerular filtration rate defines this disorder. RTA can also present with hypokalemia, medullary nephrocalcinosis and nephrolitiasis, as well as growth retardation and rickets in children, or short stature and osteomalacia in adults. In the past decade, remarkable progress has been made in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of RTA and the fundamental molecular physiology of renal tubular transport processes. This review summarizes hereditary diseases caused by mutations in genes encoding transporter or channel proteins operating along the renal tubule. Review of the molecular basis of hereditary tubulopathies reveals various loss-of-function or gain-of-function mutations in genes encoding cotransporter, exchanger, or channel proteins, which are located in the luminal, basolateral, or endosomal membranes of the tubular cell or in paracellular tight junctions. These gene mutations result in a variety of functional defects in transporter/channel proteins, including decreased activity, impaired gating, defective trafficking, impaired endocytosis and degradation, or defective assembly of channel subunits. Further molecular studies of inherited tubular transport disorders may shed more light on the molecular pathophysiology of these diseases and may significantly improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying renal salt homeostasis, urinary mineral excretion, and blood pressure regulation in health and disease. The identification of the molecular defects in inherited tubulopathies may provide a basis for future design of targeted therapeutic interventions and, possibly, strategies for gene therapy of these complex disorders. PMID:19721811

  4. Renal Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Zaccaria; Romagnoli, Stefano; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    During the last few years, due to medical and surgical evolution, patients with increasingly severe diseases causing multiorgan dysfunction are frequently admitted to intensive care units. Therapeutic options, when organ failure occurs, are frequently nonspecific and mostly directed towards supporting vital function. In these scenarios, the kidneys are almost always involved and, therefore, renal replacement therapies have become a common routine practice in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. Recent technological improvement has led to the production of safe, versatile and efficient dialysis machines. In addition, emerging evidence may allow better individualization of treatment with tailored prescription depending on the patients’ clinical picture (e.g. sepsis, fluid overload, pediatric). The aim of the present review is to give a general overview of current practice in renal replacement therapies for critically ill patients. The main clinical aspects, including dose prescription, modality of dialysis delivery, anticoagulation strategies and timing will be addressed. In addition, some technical issues on physical principles governing blood purification, filters characteristics, and vascular access, will be covered. Finally, a section on current standard nomenclature of renal replacement therapy is devoted to clarify the “Tower of Babel” of critical care nephrology. PMID:26918174

  5. Renal Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Zaccaria; Romagnoli, Stefano; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    During the last few years, due to medical and surgical evolution, patients with increasingly severe diseases causing multiorgan dysfunction are frequently admitted to intensive care units. Therapeutic options, when organ failure occurs, are frequently nonspecific and mostly directed towards supporting vital function. In these scenarios, the kidneys are almost always involved and, therefore, renal replacement therapies have become a common routine practice in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. Recent technological improvement has led to the production of safe, versatile and efficient dialysis machines. In addition, emerging evidence may allow better individualization of treatment with tailored prescription depending on the patients' clinical picture (e.g. sepsis, fluid overload, pediatric). The aim of the present review is to give a general overview of current practice in renal replacement therapies for critically ill patients. The main clinical aspects, including dose prescription, modality of dialysis delivery, anticoagulation strategies and timing will be addressed. In addition, some technical issues on physical principles governing blood purification, filters characteristics, and vascular access, will be covered. Finally, a section on current standard nomenclature of renal replacement therapy is devoted to clarify the "Tower of Babel" of critical care nephrology. PMID:26918174

  6. Epidemiologic characteristics and risk factors for renal cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lipworth, Loren; Tarone, Robert E; Lund, Lars; McLaughlin, Joseph K

    2009-01-01

    Incidence rates of renal cell cancer, which accounts for 85% of kidney cancers, have been rising in the United States and in most European countries for several decades. Family history is associated with a two- to four-fold increase in risk, but the major forms of inherited predisposition together account for less than 4% of renal cell cancers. Cigarette smoking, obesity, and hypertension are the most consistently established risk factors. Analgesics have not been convincingly linked with renal cell cancer risk. A reduced risk of renal cell cancer among statin users has been hypothesized but has not been adequately studied. A possible protective effect of fruit and vegetable consumption is the only moderately consistently reported dietary finding, and, with the exception of a positive association with parity, evidence for a role of hormonal or reproductive factors in the etiology of renal cell cancer in humans is limited. A recent hypothesis that moderate levels of alcohol consumption may be protective for renal cell cancer is not strongly supported by epidemiologic results, which are inconsistent with respect to the categories of alcohol consumption and the amount of alcohol intake reportedly associated with decreased risk. For occupational factors, the weight of the evidence does not provide consistent support for the hypotheses that renal cell cancer may be caused by asbestos, gasoline, or trichloroethylene exposure. The established determinants of renal cell cancer, cigarette smoking, obesity, and hypertension, account for less than half of these cancers. Novel epidemiologic approaches, including evaluation of gene–environment interactions and epigenetic mechanisms of inherited and acquired increased risk, are needed to explain the increasing incidence of renal cell cancer. PMID:20865085

  7. Epidemiologic characteristics and risk factors for renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Lipworth, Loren; Tarone, Robert E; Lund, Lars; McLaughlin, Joseph K

    2009-08-09

    Incidence rates of renal cell cancer, which accounts for 85% of kidney cancers, have been rising in the United States and in most European countries for several decades. Family history is associated with a two- to four-fold increase in risk, but the major forms of inherited predisposition together account for less than 4% of renal cell cancers. Cigarette smoking, obesity, and hypertension are the most consistently established risk factors. Analgesics have not been convincingly linked with renal cell cancer risk. A reduced risk of renal cell cancer among statin users has been hypothesized but has not been adequately studied. A possible protective effect of fruit and vegetable consumption is the only moderately consistently reported dietary finding, and, with the exception of a positive association with parity, evidence for a role of hormonal or reproductive factors in the etiology of renal cell cancer in humans is limited. A recent hypothesis that moderate levels of alcohol consumption may be protective for renal cell cancer is not strongly supported by epidemiologic results, which are inconsistent with respect to the categories of alcohol consumption and the amount of alcohol intake reportedly associated with decreased risk. For occupational factors, the weight of the evidence does not provide consistent support for the hypotheses that renal cell cancer may be caused by asbestos, gasoline, or trichloroethylene exposure. The established determinants of renal cell cancer, cigarette smoking, obesity, and hypertension, account for less than half of these cancers. Novel epidemiologic approaches, including evaluation of gene-environment interactions and epigenetic mechanisms of inherited and acquired increased risk, are needed to explain the increasing incidence of renal cell cancer.

  8. [Pulmonary-renal crosstalk in the critically ill patient].

    PubMed

    Donoso F, Alejandro; Arriagada S, Daniela; Cruces R, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in the development of renal replacement therapy, mortality of acute renal failure remains high, especially when occurring simultaneously with distant organic failure as it is in the case of the acute respiratory distress syndrome. In this update, birideccional deleterious relationship between lung and kidney on the setting of organ dysfunction is reviewed, which presents important clinical aspects of knowing. Specifically, the renal effects of acute respiratory distress syndrome and the use of positive-pressure mechanical ventilation are discussed, being ventilator induced lung injury one of the most common models for studying the lung-kidney crosstalk. The role of renal failure induced by mechanical ventilation (ventilator-induced kidney injury) in the pathogenesis of acute renal failure is emphasized. We also analyze the impact of the acute renal failure in the lung, recognizing an increase in pulmonary vascular permeability, inflammation, and alteration of sodium and water channels in the alveolar epithelial. This conceptual model can be the basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies to use in patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

  9. [Mitochondria and oxidative stress participation in renal inflammatory process].

    PubMed

    Manucha, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The apoptosis and renal fibrosis are processes inherent to the chronic kidney disease, and consequently a clear deregulation of the mitochondrial respiratory mechanism has been described in patients with chronic renal disease associated to an increase of the oxidative stress. The injured tubular cells linked to the interstitial macrophages and myofibroblasts produce cytokines and growth factors that encourage an inflammatory condition, inducing the apoptosis of the tubular cells and enabling the accumulation of the extracellular matrix. The angiotensin II has a central role in the renal fibrogenesis leading to a rapid progression of the chronic kidney disease. The growing levels of the angiotensin II induce pro-inflammatory cytokines, the activation of NF-kB, adhesion molecules,chemokines, growth factors, and oxidative stress. The current evidence suggests that the angiotensin II increases the mitochondrial oxidative stress, regulates the induction of the apoptosis and conditions the inflammatory process. Therefore the mitochondria and the oxidative stress would play a determinant role in the renal inflammatory process. Finally, this review summarizes our present knowledge regarding the possible mechanisms that would contribute to the apoptosis conditioned by inflammation and/or oxidative stress during the chronic renal disease. Additionally, a new concept of the anti-inflammatory tools is proposed to regulate the mitochondrial oxidative stress that would directly affect the inflammatory process and apoptosis. This concept could have positive consequences on the treatment of renal inflammatory pathologies and related diseases.

  10. [Pulmonary-renal crosstalk in the critically ill patient].

    PubMed

    Donoso F, Alejandro; Arriagada S, Daniela; Cruces R, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in the development of renal replacement therapy, mortality of acute renal failure remains high, especially when occurring simultaneously with distant organic failure as it is in the case of the acute respiratory distress syndrome. In this update, birideccional deleterious relationship between lung and kidney on the setting of organ dysfunction is reviewed, which presents important clinical aspects of knowing. Specifically, the renal effects of acute respiratory distress syndrome and the use of positive-pressure mechanical ventilation are discussed, being ventilator induced lung injury one of the most common models for studying the lung-kidney crosstalk. The role of renal failure induced by mechanical ventilation (ventilator-induced kidney injury) in the pathogenesis of acute renal failure is emphasized. We also analyze the impact of the acute renal failure in the lung, recognizing an increase in pulmonary vascular permeability, inflammation, and alteration of sodium and water channels in the alveolar epithelial. This conceptual model can be the basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies to use in patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. PMID:26338439

  11. Renal erythropoietin-producing cells in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Souma, Tomokazu; Suzuki, Norio; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) is an indispensable erythropoietic hormone primarily produced from renal Epo-producing cells (REPs). Epo production in REPs is tightly regulated in a hypoxia-inducible manner to maintain tissue oxygen homeostasis. Insufficient Epo production by REPs causes renal anemia and anemia associated with chronic disorders. Recent studies have broadened our understanding of REPs from prototypic hypoxia-responsive cells to dynamic fibrogenic cells. In chronic kidney disease, REPs are the major source of scar-forming myofibroblasts and actively produce fibrogenic molecules, including inflammatory cytokines. Notably, myofibroblast-transformed REPs (MF-REPs) recover their original physiological properties after resolution of the disease insults, suggesting that renal anemia and fibrosis could be reversible to some extent. Therefore, understanding the plasticity of REPs will lead to the development of novel targeted therapeutics for both renal fibrosis and anemia. This review summarizes the regulatory mechanisms how hypoxia-inducible Epo gene expression is attained in health and disease conditions. PMID:26089800

  12. Cell cycle regulation: repair and regeneration in acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Price, Peter M; Megyesi, Judit; Safirstein, Robert L

    2003-09-01

    Research into mechanisms of acute renal failure has begun to reveal molecular targets for possible therapeutic intervention. Much useful knowledge into the causes and prevention of this syndrome has been gained by the study of animal models. Most recently, investigation of the effects on acute renal failure of selected gene knock-outs in mice has contributed to our recognition of many previously unappreciated molecular pathways. Particularly, experiments have revealed the protective nature of 2 highly induced genes whose functions are to inhibit and control the cell cycle after acute renal failure. By use of these models we have started to understand the role of increased cell cycle activity after renal stress and the role of proteins induced by these stresses that limit this proliferation.

  13. Cell cycle regulation: repair and regeneration in acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Price, Peter M; Megyesi, Judit; Saf Irstein, Robert L

    2004-08-01

    Research into mechanisms of acute renal failure has begun to reveal molecular targets for possible therapeutic intervention. Much useful knowledge into the causes and prevention of this syndrome has been gained by the study of animal models. Most recently, investigation of the effects on acute renal failure of selected gene knock-outs in mice has contributed to our recognition of many previously unappreciated molecular pathways. Particularly, experiments have revealed the protective nature of two highly induced genes whose functions are to inhibit and control the cell cycle after acute renal failure. By use of these models we have started to understand the role of increased cell cycle activity after renal stress, and the role of proteins induced by these stresses that limit this proliferation.

  14. [The acute renal and cerebral toxicity of lithium: a cerebro-renal syndrome? A case report].

    PubMed

    Prencipe, M; Cicchella, A; Del Giudice, A; Di Giorgio, A; Scarlatella, A; Vergura, M; Aucella, F

    2013-01-01

    This descriptive report describes the case of a 50 year-old woman with bipolar disorder, whose maintenance therapy comprised risperidone, sodium valproato and lithium carbonate without any past occurrence of toxicity. Her past medical history was significant for hypertension, cardiopathy and obesity. She presented with a 1-week history of fever, increasing confusion and slurred speech. At presentation, the patient was somnolent. Laboratory investigations revealed a serum creatinine of 3,6 mg/dl, BUN 45 mg/dl serum lithium 3,0 mEq/L with polyuria defined as more than 3 litres a day. EEG and ECG were abnormal. CT brain scanning and lumbar puncture were negative for brain haemorrage or infection. Lithium toxicity causes impairment of renal concentration and encephalopathy due to lithium recirculation, a mechanism responsible for the so-called cerebro-renal syndrome, where dialysis plays an important role in treatment.The patient was treated with continous veno-venous haemodiafiltration (CVVHDF) over 35 hours with gradual improvement of her general condition and efficacy of renal concentration. Our case highlights a few important points. Lithium nefrotoxicity and neurotoxicity can cause a cerebro-renal syndrome even when serum lithium levels are not particularly raised (2,5-3,5 mEq/L). Haemodialysis is the treatment of choice to reduce the molecular mechanisms of lithium-related changes in urinary concentration and reinstate dopaminergic activity in the brain.

  15. Renal implications of arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ruilope, L M

    1997-03-01

    Renal vascular damage caused by arterial hypertension participates in alterations of the systemic vascular function and structure. Nephrosclerosis seems to run in parallel with the systemic atherosclerosis that accounts for the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality seen in hypertensive patients. Parameters indicating the existence of an alteration in renal function (increased serum creatinine, proteinuria and microalbuminuria) are independent predictors for an increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Hence, parameters of renal function must be considered in any stratification of cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients.

  16. Multiple oncocytomas and renal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Velasquez, G.; Glass, T.A.; D'Souza, V.J.; Formanek, A.G.

    1984-01-01

    Renal oncocytoma, although rare, is being diagnosed more frequently, and criteria to differentiate it from other tumors have been described. Multiple oncocytomas have been reported, but an association between multiple oncocytomas and renal carcinoma in the same kidney has not been described. The authors report a case with two oncocytomas and a renal carcinoma in the right kidney as well as a right adrenal adenoma.

  17. Roles of estrogen and progesterone in modulating renal nerve function in the rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Graceli, J.B.; Cicilini, M.A.; Bissoli, N.S.; Abreu, G.R.; Moysés, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance of extracellular Na+ and Cl- concentrations in mammals depends, at least in part, on renal function. It has been shown that neural and endocrine mechanisms regulate extracellular fluid volume and transport of electrolytes along nephrons. Studies of sex hormones and renal nerves suggested that sex hormones modulate renal function, although this relationship is not well understood in the kidney. To better understand the role of these hormones on the effects that renal nerves have on Na+ and Cl- reabsorption, we studied the effects of renal denervation and oophorectomy in female rats. Oophorectomized (OVX) rats received 17β-estradiol benzoate (OVE, 2.0 mg·kg-1·day-1, sc) and progesterone (OVP, 1.7 mg·kg-1·day-1, sc). We assessed Na+ and Cl- fractional excretion (FENa+ and FECl-, respectively) and renal and plasma catecholamine release concentrations. FENa+, FECl-, water intake, urinary flow, and renal and plasma catecholamine release levels increased in OVX vs control rats. These effects were reversed by 17β-estradiol benzoate but not by progesterone. Renal denervation did not alter FENa+, FECl-, water intake, or urinary flow values vs controls. However, the renal catecholamine release level was decreased in the OVP (236.6±36.1 ng/g) and denervated rat groups (D: 102.1±15.7; ODE: 108.7±23.2; ODP: 101.1±22.1 ng/g). Furthermore, combining OVX + D (OD: 111.9±25.4) decreased renal catecholamine release levels compared to either treatment alone. OVE normalized and OVP reduced renal catecholamine release levels, and the effects on plasma catecholamine release levels were reversed by ODE and ODP replacement in OD. These data suggest that progesterone may influence catecholamine release levels by renal innervation and that there are complex interactions among renal nerves, estrogen, and progesterone in the modulation of renal function. PMID:23828583

  18. Ancylostoma ceylanicum Excretory-Secretory Protein 2 Adopts a Netrin-Like Fold and Defines a Novel Family of Nematode Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    K Kucera; L Harrison; M Cappello; Y Modis

    2011-12-31

    Hookworms are human parasites that have devastating effects on global health, particularly in underdeveloped countries. Ancylostoma ceylanicum infects humans and animals, making it a useful model organism to study disease pathogenesis. A. ceylanicum excretory-secretory protein 2 (AceES-2), a highly immunoreactive molecule secreted by adult worms at the site of intestinal attachment, is partially protective when administered as a mucosal vaccine against hookworm anemia. The crystal structure of AceES-2 determined at 1.75 {angstrom} resolution shows that it adopts a netrin-like fold similar to that found in tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases (TIMPs) and in complement factors C3 and C5. However, recombinant AceES-2 does not significantly inhibit the 10 most abundant human matrix metalloproteases or complement-mediated cell lysis. The presence of a highly acidic surface on AceES-2 suggests that it may function as a cytokine decoy receptor. Several small nematode proteins that have been annotated as TIMPs or netrin-domain-containing proteins display sequence homology in structurally important regions of AceES-2's netrin-likefold. Together, our results suggest that AceES-2 defines a novel family of nematode netrin-like proteins, which may function to modulate the host immune response to hookworm and other parasites.

  19. Characterization and cloning of metallo-proteinase in the excretory/secretory products of the infective-stage larva of Trichinella spiralis.

    PubMed

    Lun, H M; Mak, C H; Ko, R C

    2003-05-01

    Inhibitor sensitivity assays using azocaesin and FTC-caesin as substrates showed that the excretory/secretory (E/S) products of the infective-stage larvae of Trichinella spiralis contained serine, metallo-, cysteine and aspartic proteinases. The activity of the metallo-proteinase was zinc ion dependent (within a range of ZnSO(4) concentrations). Gelatin-substrate gel electrophoresis revealed two bands of molecular mass 48 and 58 kDa which were sensitive to the metallo-proteinase inhibitor EDTA. The former peptide was probably a cleavage product of the latter. The authenticity of the 58 kDa metallo-proteinase as an E/S product was confirmed by immunoprecipitation. Using PCR and RACE reactions, a complete nucleotide sequence of the metallo-proteinase gene was obtained. It comprised 2,223 bp with an open reading frame encoding 604 amino acid residues. The 3' untranslated region consisted of 352 bp, including a polyadenylation signal AATAA. A consensus catalytic zinc-binding motif was present. The conserved domains suggest that the cloned metallo-proteinase belongs to the astacin family and occurs as a single copy gene with 11 introns and 10 exons. Cluster analysis showed that the sequence of the metallo-proteinase gene of T. spiralis resembles those of Caenorhabdites elegans and Strongyloides stercoralis. PMID:12743801

  20. Preliminary study of the presence of antibodies against excretory-secretory antigens from protoscoleces of Echinococcus granulosus in dogs with intestinal echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Carmena, David; Benito, Aitziber; Martínez, Jorge; Guisantes, Jorge A

    2005-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the antibody response against excretory-secretory antigens (ES-Ag) from Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces, using sera from dogs infected with E. granulosus and other helminths. ES-Ag were obtained from the first 50 h maintenance of protoscoleces in vitro. Immunochemical characterization was performed by immunoblotting with sera from dogs naturally infected with E. granulosus (n = 12), sera from dogs infected with helminths other than E. granulosus (n = 30), and helminth-free dog sera (n = 20). These findings were compared to those obtained from a somatic extract of protoscoleces (S-Ag). ES-Ag only showed four cross-reacting proteins of 65, 61, 54, and 45-46 kDa. Antigens with apparent masses of 89 and 50 kDa in ES-Ag and of 130 and 67 kDa in S-Ag were identified by sera of dogs infected with E. granulosus only, whereas a protein of 41-43 kDa was recognised by the majority of the sera from dogs with non-echinococcal infection. Employing ELISA to study the same sera, S-Ag revealed higher immunoreactivity than ES-Ag, but also showed higher cross-reactivity levels when sera from dogs with non-echinococcal infection were assayed in immunoblotting.

  1. Ancylostoma ceylanicum excretory-secretory protein 2 adopts a netrin-like fold and defines a novel family of nematode proteins.

    PubMed

    Kucera, Kaury; Harrison, Lisa M; Cappello, Michael; Modis, Yorgo

    2011-04-22

    Hookworms are human parasites that have devastating effects on global health, particularly in underdeveloped countries. Ancylostoma ceylanicum infects humans and animals, making it a useful model organism to study disease pathogenesis. A. ceylanicum excretory-secretory protein 2 (AceES-2), a highly immunoreactive molecule secreted by adult worms at the site of intestinal attachment, is partially protective when administered as a mucosal vaccine against hookworm anemia. The crystal structure of AceES-2 determined at 1.75 Å resolution shows that it adopts a netrin-like fold similar to that found in tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases (TIMPs) and in complement factors C3 and C5. However, recombinant AceES-2 does not significantly inhibit the 10 most abundant human matrix metalloproteases or complement-mediated cell lysis. The presence of a highly acidic surface on AceES-2 suggests that it may function as a cytokine decoy receptor. Several small nematode proteins that have been annotated as TIMPs or netrin-domain-containing proteins display sequence homology in structurally important regions of AceES-2's netrin-like fold. Together, our results suggest that AceES-2 defines a novel family of nematode netrin-like proteins, which may function to modulate the host immune response to hookworm and other parasites.

  2. The Nkx5/HMX homeodomain protein MLS-2 is required for proper tube cell shape in the C. elegans excretory system.

    PubMed

    Abdus-Saboor, Ishmail; Stone, Craig E; Murray, John I; Sundaram, Meera V

    2012-06-15

    Cells perform wide varieties of functions that are facilitated, in part, by adopting unique shapes. Many of the genes and pathways that promote cell fate specification have been elucidated. However, relatively few transcription factors have been identified that promote shape acquisition after fate specification. Here we show that the Nkx5/HMX homeodomain protein MLS-2 is required for cellular elongation and shape maintenance of two tubular epithelial cells in the C. elegans excretory system, the duct and pore cells. The Nkx5/HMX family is highly conserved from sea urchins to humans, with known roles in neuronal and glial development. MLS-2 is expressed in the duct and pore, and defects in mls-2 mutants first arise when the duct and pore normally adopt unique shapes. MLS-2 cooperates with the EGF-Ras-ERK pathway to turn on the LIN-48/Ovo transcription factor in the duct cell during morphogenesis. These results reveal a novel interaction between the Nkx5/HMX family and the EGF-Ras pathway and implicate a transcription factor, MLS-2, as a regulator of cell shape.

  3. Differences in the gene expression profiles of haemocytes from schistosome-susceptible and -resistant biomphalaria glabrata exposed to Schistosoma mansoni excretory-secretory products.

    PubMed

    Zahoor, Zahida; Lockyer, Anne E; Davies, Angela J; Kirk, Ruth S; Emery, Aidan M; Rollinson, David; Jones, Catherine S; Noble, Leslie R; Walker, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    During its life cycle, the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni uses the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata as an intermediate host to reproduce asexually generating cercariae for infection of the human definitive host. Following invasion of the snail, the parasite develops from a miracidium to a mother sporocyst and releases excretory-secretory products (ESPs) that likely influence the outcome of host infection. To better understand molecular interactions between these ESPs and the host snail defence system, we determined gene expression profiles of haemocytes from S. mansoni-resistant or -susceptible strains of B. glabrata exposed in vitro to S. mansoni ESPs (20 μg/ml) for 1 h, using a 5K B. glabrata cDNA microarray. Ninety-eight genes were found differentially expressed between haemocytes from the two snail strains, 57 resistant specific and 41 susceptible specific, 60 of which had no known homologue in GenBank. Known differentially expressed resistant-snail genes included the nuclear factor kappa B subunit Relish, elongation factor 1α, 40S ribosomal protein S9, and matrilin; known susceptible-snail specific genes included cathepsins D and L, and theromacin. Comparative analysis with other gene expression studies revealed 38 of the 98 identified genes to be uniquely differentially expressed in haemocytes in the presence of ESPs, thus identifying for the first time schistosome ESPs as important molecules that influence global snail host-defence cell gene expression profiles. Such immunomodulation may benefit the schistosome, enabling its survival and successful development in the snail host.

  4. Proteomic Analysis of the Excretory and Secretory Proteins of Haemonchus contortus (HcESP) Binding to Goat PBMCs In Vivo Revealed Stage-Specific Binding Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Gadahi, Javaid Ali; Wang, Shuai; Bo, Gao; Ehsan, Muhammad; Yan, RuoFeng; Song, XiaoKai; Xu, LiXin; Li, XiangRui

    2016-01-01

    Haemonchus contortus is a parasitic gastrointestinal nematode, and its excretory and secretory products (HcESPs) interact extensively with the host cells. In this study, we report the interaction of proteins from HcESPs at different developmental stages to goat peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vivo using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 407 HcESPs that interacted with goat PBMCs at different time points were identified from a H. contortus protein database using SEQUEST searches. The L4 and L5 stages of H. contortus represented a higher proportion of the identified proteins compared with the early and late adult stages. Both stage-specific interacting proteins and proteins that were common to multiple stages were identified. Forty-seven interacting proteins were shared among all stages. The gene ontology (GO) distributions of the identified goat PBMC-interacting proteins were nearly identical among all developmental stages, with high representation of binding and catalytic activity. Cellular, metabolic and single-organism processes were also annotated as major biological processes, but interestingly, more proteins were annotated as localization processes at the L5 stage than at the L4 and adult stages. Based on the clustering of homologous proteins, we improved the functional annotations of un-annotated proteins identified at different developmental stages. Some unnamed H. contortus ATP-binding cassette proteins, including ADP-ribosylation factor and P-glycoprotein-9, were identified by STRING protein clustering analysis. PMID:27467391

  5. Proteomic Analysis of the Excretory and Secretory Proteins of Haemonchus contortus (HcESP) Binding to Goat PBMCs In Vivo Revealed Stage-Specific Binding Profiles.

    PubMed

    Gadahi, Javaid Ali; Wang, Shuai; Bo, Gao; Ehsan, Muhammad; Yan, RuoFeng; Song, XiaoKai; Xu, LiXin; Li, XiangRui

    2016-01-01

    Haemonchus contortus is a parasitic gastrointestinal nematode, and its excretory and secretory products (HcESPs) interact extensively with the host cells. In this study, we report the interaction of proteins from HcESPs at different developmental stages to goat peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vivo using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 407 HcESPs that interacted with goat PBMCs at different time points were identified from a H. contortus protein database using SEQUEST searches. The L4 and L5 stages of H. contortus represented a higher proportion of the identified proteins compared with the early and late adult stages. Both stage-specific interacting proteins and proteins that were common to multiple stages were identified. Forty-seven interacting proteins were shared among all stages. The gene ontology (GO) distributions of the identified goat PBMC-interacting proteins were nearly identical among all developmental stages, with high representation of binding and catalytic activity. Cellular, metabolic and single-organism processes were also annotated as major biological processes, but interestingly, more proteins were annotated as localization processes at the L5 stage than at the L4 and adult stages. Based on the clustering of homologous proteins, we improved the functional annotations of un-annotated proteins identified at different developmental stages. Some unnamed H. contortus ATP-binding cassette proteins, including ADP-ribosylation factor and P-glycoprotein-9, were identified by STRING protein clustering analysis. PMID:27467391

  6. Cyclosporine A-Induced Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Craig; Campbell, Eric; McMorrow, Tara; Ryan, Michael P.

    2005-01-01

    Cyclosporine A, which has been the foremost immunosuppressive agent since the early 1980’s, significantly improves the success of organ transplantation. However, common complications of cyclosporine A therapy, such as severe renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis, limit the drug’s clinical use. Although the exact mechanisms driving cyclosporine A-induced tubulointerstitial fibrosis remain elusive, we hypothesized that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) may play a major role. We investigated this in vitro by treating human proximal tubular cells with cyclosporine A. Morphological changes were observed after cyclosporine A treatment, including cell elongation (with a large degree of detachment), cytoskeletal rearrangement, and junctional disruption. In addition, expression of the myofibroblast-specific marker α-smooth muscle actin was detected in treated cells. These observations are consistent with events described during EMT. Using Affymetrix gene microarrays, we identified 128 genes that were differentially regulated in renal tubular cells after cyclosporine A treatment, including known profibrotic factors, oncogenes, and transcriptional regulators. Cyclosporine A induced a dose-dependent increase in transforming growth factor-β secretion from proximal tubular cells. Subsequent functional studies revealed that protein kinase C-β isoforms play a key role in cyclosporine A-induced effects. These findings provide novel insights into cyclosporine A-induced renal fibrosis and the molecular mechanisms underlying EMT, events that may be relevant in other disease states. PMID:16049326

  7. [Fibromuscular dysplasia of renal arteries].

    PubMed

    Plouin, Pierre-François; Fiquet, Béatrice; Bobrie, Guillaume; Jeunemaître, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia is non-atherosclerotic, non-inflammatory disease of the medium caliber arteries causing segmental stenosis, and sometimes aneurysm and/or dissection. Renal involvement is either asymptomatic or revealed by hypertension, rarely acute complications (renal infarction/hemorrhage). Cross-sectional imaging or angiography differentiates multifocal fibromuscular dysplasia (pearl necklace appearance) and focal fibromuscular dysplasia (tubular stenosis). Several differential diagnoses are to be mentioned. Carotid and vertebral involvement are possible. Smoking cessation must be encouraged. Selected patients benefit from renal revascularization. The best indications are recent or resistant hypertension, and progressive renal atrophy. Angioplasty without stent revascularization is the technique of choice in purely stenotic forms. PMID:26968476

  8. Development and characterization of a novel mAb against bilitranslocase - a new biomarker of renal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Montanic, Sendi; Terdoslavich, Michela; Rajcevic, Uros; De Leo, Luigina; Bonin, Serena; Serbec, Vladka Curin; Passamonti, Sabina

    2013-01-01

    Background Bilitranslocase (TC 2.A.65.1.1) is a bilirubin-specific membrane transporter, found on absorptive (stomach and intestine) and excretory (kidney and liver) epithelia and in vascular endothelium. Polyclonal antibodies have been raised in rabbits in the past, using a synthetic peptide corresponding to AA65-77 of rat liver bilitranslocase, as an antigen. Affinity-purified antibodies from immune sera have been found to inhibit various membrane transport functions, including the bilirubin uptake into human hepatocytes and the uptake of some flavonoids into human vascular endothelial cells. It was described by means of immunohistochemistry using polyclonal antibodies that bilitranslocase expression is severely down-regulated in clear cell renal carcinoma. The aim of our work was development and characterization of high-affinity, specific mAbs against bilitranslocase, which can be used as a potential diagnostic tool in renal cell carcinoma as well as in a wide variety of biological assays on different human tissues. Materials and methods Mice were immunized with a multi-antigen peptide corresponding to segment 65–75 of predicted primary structure of the bilitranslocase protein. By a sequence of cloning, immune- and functional tests, we aimed at obtaining a specific monoclonal antibody which recognizes a 37 kDa membrane protein, and influences the transport activity of bilitranslocase. Results On the basis of previous results, specific IgM monoclonal antibodies were produced in BALB/c mice, in order to further improve and extend the immunological approach to the study of bilitranslocase in renal cancer cells as well as to develop its potential diagnostics use. Conclusions In this article we show an immunological approach, based on newly developed monoclonal antibodies, to a detailed biochemical and functional characterization of a protein whose gene and protein structure is still unknown. We were able to demonstrate our novel mAb as a tumor marker candidate of

  9. Uptake of trimethoprim by renal cortex.

    PubMed

    Cacini, W; Myre, S A

    1985-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mechanisms involved in the uptake of the urinary antibacterial drug trimethoprim by incubated slices of rat renal cortex. Concentration-dependent studies of the uptake process demonstrated that a saturable component was involved. The results of inhibitor studies as well as the time-course pattern support the conclusion that at least two processes are involved in the uptake of trimethoprim. These include active transport via the organic cation system, accounting for about 40% of the total uptake, and a second component that continues to operate under conditions of inhibited cellular metabolism. Chromatographic examination of post-incubation bathing medium and slice extracts failed to demonstrate renal cortex metabolism of trimethoprim. PMID:4052093

  10. Renal effects of continuous negative pressure breathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, M. J.; Discala, V. A.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous negative pressure breathing (CNPB) was utilized to simulate the thoracic vascular distension of zero g or space, in 11 anesthetized rats. The animals underwent renal clearance and micropuncture renal nephron studies before, during, and after CNPB. Rats were pretreated with a high salt diet and I-M desoxycorticosterone (DOCA) in excess. None of these rats diuresed with CNPB. In contrast 5 of the 7 remaining rats increased the fraction of the filtered sodium excreted (C sub Na/GFR, p .05) and their urinary flow rate (V, p .05). Potassium excretion increased (U sub k V, p .05). End proximal tubular fluid specimen's TF/P inulin ratios were unchanged. Whole kidney and single nephron glomerular filtration rates fell 10%. CNPB, a mechanism for atrial distension, appears to cause, in rats, a decrease in distal tubular sodium, water and potassium reabsorption. Exogenous mineral-corticoid prevents the diuresis, saluresis, and kaluresis.

  11. Roles and Regulation of Renal K Channels.

    PubMed

    Welling, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    More than two dozen types of potassium channels, with different biophysical and regulatory properties, are expressed in the kidney, influencing renal function in many important ways. Recently, a confluence of discoveries in areas from human genetics to physiology, cell biology, and biophysics has cast light on the special function of five different potassium channels in the distal nephron, encoded by the genes KCNJ1, KCNJ10, KCNJ16, KCNMA1, and KCNN3. Research aimed at understanding how these channels work in health and go awry in disease has transformed our understanding of potassium balance and provided new insights into mechanisms of renal sodium handling and the maintenance of blood pressure. This review focuses on recent advances in this rapidly evolving field. PMID:26654186

  12. The renal scan in pregnant renal transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.A.; Ziessman, H.A.; Fahey, F.H.; Collea, J.V.; Alijani, M.R.; Helfrich, G.B.

    1985-05-01

    With the greater frequency of renal transplant surgery, more female pts are becoming pregnant and carrying to term. In the renal allograft blood vessels and ureter may be compressed resulting in impaired renal function and/or, hypertension. Toxemia of pregnancy is seen more frequently than normal. Radionuclide renal scan monitoring may be of significant value in this high risk obstetrical pt. After being maintained during the pregnancy, renal function may also deteriorate in the post partum period. 5 pregnant renal transplant pts who delivered live babies had renal studies with Tc-99m DTPA to assess allograft perfusion and function. No transplanted kidney was lost during or after pregnancy as a result of pregnancy. No congenital anomalies were associated with transplant management. 7 studies were performed on these 5 pts. The 7 scans all showed the uterus/placenta. The bladder was always distorted. The transplanted kidney was rotated to a more vertical position in 3 pts. The radiation dose to the fetus is calculated at 0.024 rad/mCi administered. This study demonstrates the anatomic and physiologic alterations expected in the transplanted kidney during pregnancy when evaluated by renal scan and that the radiation burden may be acceptable in management of these pts.

  13. Persistent Increase in Blood Pressure After Renal Nerve Stimulation in Accessory Renal Arteries After Sympathetic Renal Denervation.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Mark R; Hoogerwaard, Annemiek F; Gal, Pim; Adiyaman, Ahmet; Smit, Jaap Jan J; Delnoy, Peter Paul H M; Ramdat Misier, Anand R; van Hasselt, Boudewijn A A M; Heeg, Jan-Evert; le Polain de Waroux, Jean-Benoit; Lau, Elizabeth O Y; Staessen, Jan A; Persu, Alexandre; Elvan, Arif

    2016-06-01

    Blood pressure response to renal denervation is highly variable, and the proportion of responders is disappointing. This may be partly because of accessory renal arteries too small for denervation, causing incomplete ablation. Renal nerve stimulation before and after renal denervation is a promising approach to assess completeness of renal denervation and may predict blood pressure response to renal denervation. The objective of the current study was to assess renal nerve stimulation-induced blood pressure increase before and after renal sympathetic denervation in main and accessory renal arteries of anaesthetized patients with drug-resistant hypertension. The study included 21 patients. Nine patients had at least 1 accessory renal artery in which renal denervation was not feasible. Renal nerve stimulation was performed in the main arteries of all patients and in accessory renal arteries of 6 of 9 patients with accessory arteries, both before and after renal sympathetic denervation. Renal nerve stimulation before renal denervation elicited a substantial increase in systolic blood pressure, both in main (25.6±2.9 mm Hg; P<0.001) and accessory (24.3±7.4 mm Hg; P=0.047) renal arteries. After renal denervation, renal nerve stimulation-induced systolic blood pressure increase was blunted in the main renal arteries (Δ systolic blood pressure, 8.6±3.7 mm Hg; P=0.020), but not in the nondenervated renal accessory renal arteries (Δ systolic blood pressure, 27.1±7.6 mm Hg; P=0.917). This residual source of renal sympathetic tone may result in persistent hypertension after ablation and partly account for the large response variability.

  14. Effects of intraruminal sodium chloride infusion on rumen and renal nitrogen and electrolyte dynamics in sheep.

    PubMed

    Godwin, I R; Williams, V J

    1986-09-01

    1. Sheep were given 800 g low-protein roughage/d at 2 h intervals and infused intraruminally with 0,500, 750, 1000, 1250, 1500 or 2000 mmol sodium chloride/d in 436 ml water. The digestibility of various food fractions and rumen ammonia, volatile fatty acids (VFA) and liquid turnover rate were measured, along with renal haemodynamics and the renal excretory patterns of nitrogen and electrolytes. Ad lib. food intake was determined during the infusion of 0 and 2000 mmol NaCl/d. 2. Infusion of NaCl up to 750 mmol/d had virtually no effect on the indices measured, except water intake and water excretion. Infusion of greater amounts caused a step-wise decrease in the digestibility of organic matter (OM) and N. Rumen liquid turnover rate was increased substantially and rumen NH3 and VFA concentrations were decreased. Ad lib. food intake was not different when either 0 or 2000 mmol NaCl/d were infused into the rumen. 3. The glomerular filtration rate and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) were substantially increased after the infusion of 1250 mmol or more NaCl/d. Extracellular fluid volume was also increased. The renal excretion of urea and uric acid + allantoin (URAL) were decreased at the higher infusion rates but the fractional excretions of both these substances were enhanced. The excretion of sodium, chloride, calcium and magnesium were markedly increased with increasing salt infusion. 4. The results suggest that high NaCl inputs into the rumen increase the rumen turnover rate, which in turn decreases the digestibility of OM, particularly N. This causes lower rumen NH3 and VFA concentrations. Plasma urea and URAL concentrations are also decreased and this causes lower renal excretion of these substances despite a much higher fractional excretion resulting from the greatly enhanced urine flow rate. 5. When roughages low in N are given, NaCl intake should be kept below 20 mmol/kg body-weight per d to prevent a decline in the digestibility of the food and any

  15. Mechanotransduction in the renal tubule

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yi; Satlin, Lisa M.; Wang, Tong; Weinstein, Alan M.

    2010-01-01

    The role of mechanical forces in the regulation of glomerulotubular balance in the proximal tubule (PT) and Ca2+ signaling in the distal nephron was first recognized a decade ago, when it was proposed that the microvilli in the PT and the primary cilium in the cortical collecting duct (CCD) acted as sensors of local tubular flow. In this review, we present a summary of the theoretical models and experiments that have been conducted to elucidate the structure and function of these unique apical structures in the modulation of Na+, HCO3−, and water reabsorption in the PT and Ca2+ signaling in the CCD. We also contrast the mechanotransduction mechanisms in renal epithelium with those in other cells in which fluid shear stresses have been recognized to play a key role in initiating intracellular signaling, most notably endothelial cells, hair cells in the inner ear, and bone cells. In each case, small hydrodynamic forces need to be greatly amplified before they can be sensed by the cell's intracellular cytoskeleton to enable the cell to regulate its membrane transporters or stretch-activated ion channels in maintaining homeostasis in response to changing flow conditions. PMID:20810611

  16. Early diagnosis of renal disease and renal failure.

    PubMed

    Lees, George E

    2004-07-01

    The main goal of early diagnosis of renal disease and renal failure in dogs and cats is to enable timely application of therapeutic interventions that may slow or halt disease progression. Strategies for early diagnosis of renal disease use urine tests that detect proteinuria that is a manifestation of altered glomerular permselectivity or impaired urine-concentrating ability as well blood tests to evaluate plasma creatinine concentration. Animals with progressive renal disease should be carefully investigated and treated appropriately. Animals with mild, possibly nonprogressive, renal disease should be monitored adequately to detect any worsening trends,which should lead to further investigation and treatment even if the increments of change are small. PMID:15223206

  17. Renal metabolism of calcitonin

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, R.E.; Hjelle, J.T.; Mahoney, C.; Deftos, L.J.; Lisker, W.; Kato, P.; Rabkin, R.

    1988-04-01

    The kidneys account for approximately two-thirds of the metabolism of calcitonin, but relatively little is known regarding the details thereof. To further characterize this process, we examined the renal handling and metabolism of human calcitonin (hCT) by the isolated perfused rat kidney. We also studied the degradation of radiolabeled salmon calcitonin (sCT) by subcellular fractions prepared from isolated rabbit proximal tubules. The total renal (organ) clearance of immunoreactive hCT by the isolated kidney was 1.96 +/- 0.18 ml/min. This was independent of the perfusate total calcium concentration from 5.5 to 10.2 mg/dl. Total renal clearance exceeded the glomerular filtration rate (GFR, 0.68 +/- 0.05 ml/min), indicating filtration-independent removal. Urinary calcitonin clearance as a fraction of GFR averaged 2.6%. Gel filtration chromatography of medium from isolated kidneys perfused with /sup 125/I-labeled sCT showed the principal degradation products to be low molecular weight forms eluting with monoiodotyrosine. Intermediate size products were not detected. In the subcellular fractionation experiments, when carried out at pH 5.0, calcitonin hydrolysis exclusively followed the activities of the lysosomal enzyme N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase. Typically, at pH 7.5, 42% of total degradation occurred in the region of the brush-border enzyme alanyl aminopeptidase and 29% occurred in the region of the cytosolic enzyme phosphoglucomutase. Although 9% of the calcitonin-degrading activity was associated with basolateral membrane fractions, most of this activity could be accounted for by the presence of brush-border membranes.

  18. Renal failure in Yemen.

    PubMed

    Al-Rohani, M

    2004-01-01

    Renal failure remains a serious cause of mortality in Yemen. Our region has 1.25 million population and our hospital is the central hospital, which has a nephrology department and performs dialysis for the region. Between January 1998 and December 2002, we admitted 547 patients; including children, with acute renal failure (ARF) and chronic renal failure (CRF). CRF was observed in 400 patients, an incidence of 64 per million per year and a prevalence of 320 per million. ARF occurred in 147 persons with an incidence of 23.5 per million per year and a prevalence of 117.5 patients per million. Of all patients, 72% were adults (age range, 20-60 years) with a male preponderance. As a tropical country, malaria (27.9%), diarrhea (13.6%), and other infectious diseases were the main causes. Next most common were obstructive diseases causing CRF and ARF (26.8% and 12.9%, respectively), mainly urolithiasis, Schistosomiasis, and prostatic enlargement. However the cause of CRF in 57.5% of patients was unknown as most persons presented late with end-stage disease (64.7%), requiring immediate intervention. Other causes, such as hepatorenal syndrome, snake bite, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension, showed low occurrence rates. Patients presented to the hospital mostly in severe uremia and without a clear history of prior medications. The major findings were vomiting, acidosis, and hypertension with serum creatinine values ranging between 2.8-45 mg/dL (mean value, 13.4 mg/dL). Anemia was observed in 80.4% of CRF versus 62.6% of ARF patients. Hypertension prevalence was 65.5% among CRF patients, of whom 25% were in hypertensive crisis, whereas among ARF the prevalence was only 26.5%. PMID:15350475

  19. Pregnancy outcomes in a patient with Sjögren's disease with renal involvement

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Abhishek; O'Donoghue, Keelin; Mahmood, Uzma; Banerjee, Debasish

    2013-01-01

    Background: Maternal and fetal outcome in pregnancy with renal failure is unpredictable, where each condition can adversely affect the other. We present a case of steroid sensitive Sjögren's nephritis worsened by pregnancy, demonstrated over the course of multiple pregnancies and investigated the aetiology. Case: A 28-year-old nullipara with a diagnosis of primary Sjögren's syndrome presented with a deterioration of renal function. A diagnosis of secondary tubulo-interstitial nephritis was made on renal biopsy. Her first pregnancy ended in the second trimester with a decision to deliver a female infant at 27 weeks due to worsening maternal renal function. Renal function improved immediately. A second pregnancy ended in a first trimester miscarriage. The third and fourth pregnancies delivered male infants at 35 and 34 weeks, with worsening renal function in each pregnancy, reaching end stage. Repeat biopsy showed extensive glomerulosclerosis and male cells were identified. Conclusions: This case of Sjögren's syndrome with renal disease demonstrated the increased risk of fetal and maternal adverse pregnancy outcomes. Renal function worsened in each pregnancy and progressed to end-stage renal disease. Fetal microchimerism offers an interesting mechanism for our patient's renal failure and its apparent relationship to her pregnancies.

  20. Risks and benefits of citrate anticoagulation for continuous renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Shum, H P; Yan, W W; Chan, T M

    2015-04-01

    Heparin, despite its significant side-effects, is the most commonly used anticoagulant for continuous renal replacement therapy in critical care setting. In recent years, citrate has gained much popularity by improving continuous renal replacement therapy circuit survival and decreasing blood transfusion requirements. However, its complex metabolic consequences warrant modification in the design of the citrate-based continuous renal replacement therapy protocol. With thorough understanding of the therapeutic mechanism of citrate, a simple and practicable protocol can be devised. Citrate-based continuous renal replacement therapy can be safely and widely used in the clinical setting with appropriate clinical staff training.

  1. International Study of Health Care Organization and Financing of renal services in England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tricia; Roderick, Paul

    2007-12-01

    In England and Wales, the quantity and quality of renal services have improved significantly in the last decade. While acceptance rates for renal replacement therapy appear low by international standards, they are now commensurate with many other northern European countries. The major growth in renal services has been in hemodialysis, especially at satellite units. Health care is predominantly publicly funded through a tax-based National Health Service, and such funding has increased in the last 10 years. Improvements in health outcomes in England and Wales are expected to continue due to the recent implementation of standards, initiatives, and monitoring mechanisms for renal transplantation, vascular access, and patient transport. PMID:17653861

  2. Effect of Intravascular Iodinated Contrast Media on Natural Course of End-Stage Renal Disease Progression in Hemodialysis Patients: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Janousek, Radim; Krajina, Antonin; Peregrin, Jan H.; Dusilova-Sulkova, Sylvie; Renc, Ondrej; Hajek, Jan; Dvorak, Kamil; Fixa, Petr; Cermakova, Eva

    2010-02-15

    We evaluated the impact of intravascular iodinated contrast medium on residual diuresis in hemodialyzed patients. Two groups of clinically stable hemodialyzed patients with residual diuresis minimally 500 ml of urine per day were studied. The patients from the first group were given iso-osmolal contrast agent iodixanol (Visipaque, GE Healthcare, United Kingdom) in concentration of iodine 320 mg/ml with osmolality 290 mOsm/kg of water during the endovascular procedure. The second control group was followed without contrast medium administered. Residual diuresis and residual renal excretory capacity expressed as 24-h calculated creatinine clearance were evaluated in the both groups after 6 months. The evaluated group included 42 patients who were given 99.3 ml of iodixanol in average (range, 60-180 ml). The control group included 45 patients. There was no statistically significant difference found between both groups in daily volume of urine (P = 0.855) and calculated clearance of creatinine (P = 0.573). We can conclude that residual diuresis is not significantly influenced by intravascular administration of iso-osmolal iodinated contrast agent (iodixanol) in range of volume from 60 to 180 ml in comparison to natural course of urinary output and residual renal function during end-stage renal disease. This result can help the nephrologist to decide which imaging method/contrast medium to use in dialyzed patients in current practice.

  3. Renal calculus disease.

    PubMed

    Schulsinger, D A; Sosa, R E

    1998-03-01

    We have seen an explosion in technical innovations for the management of urolithiasis. Today, the endourologist possesses an assortment of minimally invasive tools to treat renal stones. Most patients receive fast, safe and effective treatment in the outpatient setting. Despite the many technical advances, however, anatomical malformations and complex stones still provide significant challenges in diagnosis, access to a targeted stone, fragmentation, and clearance of the resulting fragments. This review examines a variety of urinary stone presentations and treatment strategies for cost-effective management.

  4. Ifosfamide induced renal rickets.

    PubMed

    Lionel, Arul P; Chinnaswamy, Girish; John, Rikki R; Mathai, Sarah

    2014-09-01

    Ifosfamide is commonly used as a chemotherapeutic agent in children. The authors report a 4-y-old boy who developed proximal renal tubulopathy with florid rickets a year after completion of ifosfamide therapy for Ewing's sarcoma. After initiation of treatment, there was complete healing of rickets and he did not need supplements beyond 18 mo. Growth monitoring and musculoskeletal system examination is important in all children who have received ifosfamide therapy. Routine monitoring for nephrotoxicity during and after ifosfamide therapy helps in early identification and intervention. PMID:23912821

  5. Tubular shear stress and phenotype of renal proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Essig, Marie; Friedlander, Gérard

    2003-06-01

    Phenotypic alterations resulting from flow-induced mechanical strains is a growing field of research in many cell types such as vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, chondrocytes, and osteocytes. Because renal mass reduction is followed by a dramatic increase in GFR in the remaining nephron, modulation of tubular cell phenotype by flow-induced mechanical strains could be one of the events initiating the deleterious pathways that lead to the destruction of renal parenchyma after renal mass reduction. This study demonstrates that increased flow induced, in vitro and in vivo, a reinforcement of the apical domain of actin cytoskeleton and an inhibition of plasminogen activator expression. These effects of flow on plasminogen activator expression were prevented by blocking the reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and were associated with an increase in a shear-stress responsive element binding activity. These results confirm that tubular flow affects the phenotype of renal epithelial cells and suggest that flow-induced mechanical strains could be one determinant of tubulointerstitial lesions during the progression of renal diseases. PMID:12761236

  6. [Renal oncocytoma: 2 clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, M; Boschi, L; Zamboni, W; Mandrioli, M

    1990-05-31

    Renal oncocytoma is an uncommon benign neoplasm of tubular epithelial origin. It usually occurs as single mass and clinically may be confused with renal cell carcinoma. Angiographic, CT and ultrasound studies may suggest the diagnosis but they are not pathognomonic. The clinical, diagnostic and anatomopathological features of two cases are presented and discussed.

  7. Polyhydramnios and acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, D. V.; Kelly, Moira B.; Pryor, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Acute renal failure secondary to ureteric obstruction is described in a primigravida with twin gestation and polyhydramnios. Relief of the obstruction occurred on drainage of the liquor and return to normal renal function following delivery. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:7022419

  8. Heterogeneity of bilateral renal agenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, N.

    1977-01-01

    Bilateral and unilateral renal agenesis may be expressions of single dominant gene. Chromosome abnormalities may be present and the renal agenesis may be part of a syndrome of multiple abnormalities. Apparently normal relatives of affected individuals should be screened by intravenous pyelography before genetic counselling given. PMID:844022

  9. Renal response to environmental toxins.

    PubMed

    Finn, W F

    1977-10-01

    Several characteristics of normal renal function increase the risk to the kidney of damage by environmental toxins. Due to the magnitude of renal blood flow the total amount of noxious substance delivered may be disproportionately high. Furthermore, the capacity to concentrate substances within the kidney by processes of filtration, reabsorption and secretion has the potential to increase the toxicity of agents which would otherwise not lead to tissue injury. Unfortunately, there are few tests of renal function which are able to detect early functional abnormalities and which, at the same time, are suited for screening purposes by virtue of their simplicity, cost and safety. Furthermore, interpretation of the tests is complicated by adaptive changes in renal function which occur with aging and in response to other disease processes. Environmental agents produce a wide spectrum of renal dysfunction. Acute renal damage follows exposure to glycols, organic solvents, heavy metals, diagnostic and therapeutic agents and a variety of miscellaneous substances. Chronic renal disease may take the form of isolated tubular defects as seen with cadmium, interstitial nephritis due to the ingestion of lead, or vascular damage induced by external radiation. Some forms of glomerulonephritis may also be related to environmental toxins as are certain tumors of the urinary tract. In a somewhat different fashion, patients whose renal function is limited by the presence of pre-existing disease may manifest toxicity from substances ordinarily excreted in the urine. Particular problems exist with the patients on dialysis, as they are at considerable risk to alterations in the environment.

  10. Contemporary Renal Cell Cancer Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Wong-Ho; Devesa, Susan S.

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed renal cell cancer incidence patterns in the United States and reviewed recent epidemiologic evidence with regard to environmental and host genetic determinants of renal cell cancer risk. Renal cell cancer incidence rates continued to rise among all racial/ethnic groups in the United States, across all age groups, and for all tumor sizes, with the most rapid increases for localized stage disease and small tumors. Recent cohort studies confirmed the association of smoking, excess body weight, and hypertension with an elevated risk of renal cell cancer, and suggested that these factors can be modified to reduce the risk. There is increasing evidence for an inverse association between renal cell cancer risk and physical activity and moderate intake of alcohol. Occupational exposure to TCE has been positively associated with renal cell cancer risk in several recent studies, but its link with somatic mutations of the VHL gene has not been confirmed. Studies of genetic polymorphisms in relation to renal cell cancer risk have produced mixed results, but genome-wide association studies with larger sample size and a more comprehensive approach are underway. Few epidemiologic studies have evaluated risk factors by subtypes of renal cell cancer defined by somatic mutations and other tumor markers. PMID:18836333

  11. Renal systems biology of patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tsalik, Ephraim L; Willig, Laurel K; Rice, Brandon J; van Velkinburgh, Jennifer C; Mohney, Robert P; McDunn, Jonathan E; Dinwiddie, Darrell L; Miller, Neil A; Mayer, Eric S; Glickman, Seth W; Jaehne, Anja K; Glew, Robert H; Sopori, Mohan L; Otero, Ronny M; Harrod, Kevin S; Cairns, Charles B; Fowler, Vance G; Rivers, Emanuel P; Woods, Christopher W; Kingsmore, Stephen F; Langley, Raymond J

    2015-10-01

    A systems biology approach was used to comprehensively examine the impact of renal disease and hemodialysis (HD) on patient response during critical illness. To achieve this, we examined the metabolome, proteome, and transcriptome of 150 patients with critical illness, stratified by renal function. Quantification of plasma metabolites indicated greater change as renal function declined, with the greatest derangements in patients receiving chronic HD. Specifically, 6 uremic retention molecules, 17 other protein catabolites, 7 modified nucleosides, and 7 pentose phosphate sugars increased as renal function declined, consistent with decreased excretion or increased catabolism of amino acids and ribonucleotides. Similarly, the proteome showed increased levels of low-molecular-weight proteins and acute-phase reactants. The transcriptome revealed a broad-based decrease in mRNA levels among patients on HD. Systems integration revealed an unrecognized association between plasma RNASE1 and several RNA catabolites and modified nucleosides. Further, allantoin, N1-methyl-4-pyridone-3-carboxamide, and N-acetylaspartate were inversely correlated with the majority of significantly downregulated genes. Thus, renal function broadly affected the plasma metabolome, proteome, and peripheral blood transcriptome during critical illness; changes were not effectively mitigated by hemodialysis. These studies allude to several novel mechanisms whereby renal dysfunction contributes to critical illness.

  12. Renal systems biology of patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tsalik, Ephraim L.; Willig, Laurel K.; Rice, Brandon J.; van Velkinburgh, Jennifer C.; Mohney, Robert P.; McDunn, Jonathan; Dinwiddie, Darrell L.; Miller, Neil A.; Mayer, Eric; Glickman, Seth W.; Jaehne, Anja K.; Glew, Robert H.; Sopori, Mohan L.; Otero, Ronny M.; Harrod, Kevin S.; Cairns, Charles B.; Fowler, Vance G.; Rivers, Emanuel P.; Woods, Christopher W.; Kingsmore, Stephen F.; Langley, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    A systems biology approach was used to comprehensively examine the impact of renal disease and hemodialysis (HD) on patient response during critical illness. To achieve this we examined the metabolome, proteome, and transcriptome of 150 patients with critical illness, stratified by renal function. Quantification of plasma metabolites indicated greater change as renal function declined, with the greatest derangements in patients receiving chronic HD. Specifically, 6 uremic retention molecules, 17 other protein catabolites, 7 modified nucleosides, and 7 pentose phosphate sugars increased as renal function declined, consistent with decreased excretion or increased catabolism of amino acids and ribonucleotides. Similarly, the proteome showed increased levels of low-molecular weight proteins and acute phase reactants. The transcriptome revealed a broad-based decrease in mRNA levels among patients on HD. Systems integration revealed an unrecognized association between plasma RNASE1 and several RNA catabolites and modified nucleosides. Further, allantoin, N1-methyl-4-pyridone-3-carboxamide, and n-acetylaspartate were inversely correlated with the majority of significantly down-regulated genes. Thus, renal function broadly affected the plasma metabolome, proteome, and peripheral blood transcriptome during critical illness; changes not effectively mitigated by hemodialysis. These studies allude to several novel mechanisms whereby renal dysfunction contributes to critical illness. PMID:25993322

  13. Renal systems biology of patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tsalik, Ephraim L; Willig, Laurel K; Rice, Brandon J; van Velkinburgh, Jennifer C; Mohney, Robert P; McDunn, Jonathan E; Dinwiddie, Darrell L; Miller, Neil A; Mayer, Eric S; Glickman, Seth W; Jaehne, Anja K; Glew, Robert H; Sopori, Mohan L; Otero, Ronny M; Harrod, Kevin S; Cairns, Charles B; Fowler, Vance G; Rivers, Emanuel P; Woods, Christopher W; Kingsmore, Stephen F; Langley, Raymond J

    2015-10-01

    A systems biology approach was used to comprehensively examine the impact of renal disease and hemodialysis (HD) on patient response during critical illness. To achieve this, we examined the metabolome, proteome, and transcriptome of 150 patients with critical illness, stratified by renal function. Quantification of plasma metabolites indicated greater change as renal function declined, with the greatest derangements in patients receiving chronic HD. Specifically, 6 uremic retention molecules, 17 other protein catabolites, 7 modified nucleosides, and 7 pentose phosphate sugars increased as renal function declined, consistent with decreased excretion or increased catabolism of amino acids and ribonucleotides. Similarly, the proteome showed increased levels of low-molecular-weight proteins and acute-phase reactants. The transcriptome revealed a broad-based decrease in mRNA levels among patients on HD. Systems integration revealed an unrecognized association between plasma RNASE1 and several RNA catabolites and modified nucleosides. Further, allantoin, N1-methyl-4-pyridone-3-carboxamide, and N-acetylaspartate were inversely correlated with the majority of significantly downregulated genes. Thus, renal function broadly affected the plasma metabolome, proteome, and peripheral blood transcriptome during critical illness; changes were not effectively mitigated by hemodialysis. These studies allude to several novel mechanisms whereby renal dysfunction contributes to critical illness. PMID:25993322

  14. Brazilian red propolis attenuates hypertension and renal damage in 5/6 renal ablation model.

    PubMed

    Teles, Flávio; da Silva, Tarcilo Machado; da Cruz Júnior, Francisco Pessoa; Honorato, Vitor Hugo; de Oliveira Costa, Henrique; Barbosa, Ana Paula Fernandes; de Oliveira, Sabrina Gomes; Porfírio, Zenaldo; Libório, Alexandre Braga; Borges, Raquel Lerner; Fanelli, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenic role of inflammation and oxidative stress in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is well known. Anti-inflammatories and antioxidant drugs has demonstrated significant renoprotection in experimental nephropathies. Moreover, the inclusion of natural antioxidants derived from food and herbal extracts (such as polyphenols, curcumin and lycopene) as an adjuvant therapy for slowing CKD progression has been largely tested. Brazilian propolis is a honeybee product, whose anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antioxidant effects have been widely shown in models of sepsis, cancer, skin irritation and liver fibrosis. Furthermore, previous studies demonstrated that this compound promotes vasodilation and reduces hypertension. However, potential renoprotective effects of propolis in CKD have never been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a subtype of Brazilian propolis, the Red Propolis (RP), in the 5/6 renal ablation model (Nx). Adult male Wistar rats underwent Nx and were divided into untreated (Nx) and RP-treated (Nx+RP) groups, after 30 days of surgery; when rats already exhibited marked hypertension and proteinuria. Animals were observed for 90 days from the surgery day, when Nx+RP group showed significant reduction of hypertension, proteinuria, serum creatinine retention, glomerulosclerosis, renal macrophage infiltration and oxidative stress, compared to age-matched untreated Nx rats, which worsened progressively over time. In conclusion, RP treatment attenuated hypertension and structural renal damage in Nx model. Reduction of renal inflammation and oxidative stress could be a plausible mechanism to explain this renoprotection. PMID:25607548

  15. Brazilian Red Propolis Attenuates Hypertension and Renal Damage in 5/6 Renal Ablation Model

    PubMed Central

    Teles, Flávio; da Silva, Tarcilo Machado; da Cruz Júnior, Francisco Pessoa; Honorato, Vitor Hugo; de Oliveira Costa, Henrique; Barbosa, Ana Paula Fernandes; de Oliveira, Sabrina Gomes; Porfírio, Zenaldo; Libório, Alexandre Braga; Borges, Raquel Lerner; Fanelli, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenic role of inflammation and oxidative stress in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is well known. Anti-inflammatories and antioxidant drugs has demonstrated significant renoprotection in experimental nephropathies. Moreover, the inclusion of natural antioxidants derived from food and herbal extracts (such as polyphenols, curcumin and lycopene) as an adjuvant therapy for slowing CKD progression has been largely tested. Brazilian propolis is a honeybee product, whose anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antioxidant effects have been widely shown in models of sepsis, cancer, skin irritation and liver fibrosis. Furthermore, previous studies demonstrated that this compound promotes vasodilation and reduces hypertension. However, potential renoprotective effects of propolis in CKD have never been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a subtype of Brazilian propolis, the Red Propolis (RP), in the 5/6 renal ablation model (Nx). Adult male Wistar rats underwent Nx and were divided into untreated (Nx) and RP-treated (Nx+RP) groups, after 30 days of surgery; when rats already exhibited marked hypertension and proteinuria. Animals were observed for 90 days from the surgery day, when Nx+RP group showed significant reduction of hypertension, proteinuria, serum creatinine retention, glomerulosclerosis, renal macrophage infiltration and oxidative stress, compared to age-matched untreated Nx rats, which worsened progressively over time. In conclusion, RP treatment attenuated hypertension and structural renal damage in Nx model. Reduction of renal inflammation and oxidative stress could be a plausible mechanism to explain this renoprotection. PMID:25607548

  16. Renal biopsy: methods and interpretation.

    PubMed

    Vaden, Shelly L

    2004-07-01

    Renal biopsy most often is indicated in the management of dogs and cats with glomerular disease or acute renal failure. Renal biopsy can readily be performed in dogs and cats via either percutaneous or surgical methods. Care should be taken to ensure that proper technique is used. When proper technique is employed and patient factors are properly addressed, renal biopsy is a relatively safe procedure that minimally affects renal function. Patients should be monitored during the post biopsy period for severe hemorrhage, the most common complication. Accurate diagnosis of glomerular disease, and therefore, accurate treatment planning,requires that the biopsy specimens not only be evaluated by light microscopy using special stains but by electron and immunofluorescent microscopy. PMID:15223207

  17. Renal Denervation: Where to Now?

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Neil J; Mauri, Laura

    2015-12-01

    Resistant hypertension remains a growing problem worldwide. Renal sympathetic denervation was thought to be a new method for the treatment for resistant hypertension. Early studies demonstrated a marked benefit in patients who underwent renal denervation procedures, but the pivotal SYMPLICITY 3-HTN trial, the only sham-controlled randomized trial performed, did not show a benefit for patients treated with the procedure compared to sham. There is still much to learn about the physiology and anatomy of renal sympathetic pathways as well as careful attention to medication adherence in order to understand the role of renal sympathetic denervation in treating hypertensive patients. While renal denervation technology remains available in clinical practice outside of the USA, we expect further development of this technology in the upcoming years and the continued evaluation of this technology in patients with hypertension as well as other disease states to fully understand its role. PMID:26482759

  18. Occupation and renal cell cancer in Central and Eastern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Julia E; Charbotel, Barbara; Moore, Lee E; Karami, Sara; Zaridze, David G; Matveev, Vsevolod; Janout, Vladimir; Kollárová, Helena; Foretova, Lenka; Bencko, Vladimir; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Mates, Dana; Ferro, Gilles; Chow, Wong-Ho; Rothman, Nathaniel; Stewart, Patricia; Brennan, Paul; Boffetta, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Objective Central and Eastern Europe has among the highest rates of renal cell cancer worldwide. Few studies have been conducted in these areas to investigate the possible role of occupational exposures in renal cell cancer etiology. The purpose of this study was to examine the association of renal cell cancer with employment in specific occupations and industries. Methods From 1999–2003, we conducted a hospital-based case-control study in seven areas of the Czech Republic, Poland, Romania and Russia. A detailed occupational history was collected from renal cell cancer cases and controls, together with information on potential confounders. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of cancer risk were calculated for having ever been employed in selected jobs and industries, with follow-up analyses examining duration of employment. Results A total of 992 histologically confirmed incident renal cell cancer cases and 1,465 controls were included in the analysis. An increased risk of renal cell cancer was observed for workers in agricultural labor and animal husbandry (OR=1.43, 95% CI 1.05, 1.93), particularly among women employed as general farm workers (OR=2.73, 95% CI 1.05, 7.13). Risk gradients for agricultural work increased with longer employment. An overall increased risk of renal cell cancer was seen among architects and engineers (OR=1.89, 95% CI 1.35, 2.65), and mechanical engineers (OR=1.71, 95% CI 1.03, 2.84). Conclusions Our data suggest an association between renal cell cancer and agricultural work, particularly among female workers. PMID:19737732

  19. Renal transplantation in infants.

    PubMed

    Jalanko, Hannu; Mattila, Ilkka; Holmberg, Christer

    2016-05-01

    Renal transplantation (RTx) has become an accepted mode of therapy in infants with severe renal failure. The major indications are structural abnormalities of the urinary tract, congenital nephrotic syndrome, polycystic diseases, and neonatal kidney injury. Assessment of these infants needs expertise and time as well as active treatment before RTx to ensure optimal growth and development, and to avoid complications that could lead to permanent neurological defects. RTx can be performed already in infants weighing around 5 kg, but most operations occur in infants with a weight of 10 kg or more. Perioperative management focuses on adequate perfusion of the allograft and avoidance of thrombotic and other surgical complications. Important long-term issues include rejections, infections, graft function, growth, bone health, metabolic problems, neurocognitive development, adherence to medication, pubertal maturation, and quality of life. The overall outcome of infant RTx has dramatically improved, with long-term patient and graft survivals of over 90 and 80 %, respectively. PMID:26115617

  20. Fetal dexamethasone exposure accelerates development of renal function: relationship to dose, cell differentiation and growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, T A; Seidler, F J; Kavlock, R J; Gray, J A

    1992-02-01

    Fetal exposure to high doses of glucocorticoids slows cellular development and impairs organ performance, in association with growth retardation. Nevertheless, low doses of glucocorticoids may enhance cell differentiation and accelerate specific functions. The current study examined this apparent paradox in the developing rat kidney, using doses of dexamethasone that span the threshold for growth impairment: 0.05 or 0.2 mg/kg given on gestational days 17, 18 and 19. At the lower dose, which did not significantly retard body growth, the postnatal development of tubular reabsorptive capabilities for sodium, potassium, osmotic particles, water and urea was accelerated. These effects were less notable at the higher dose, which caused initial body growth impairment. The selectivity toward promotion of tubular function was evidenced by the absence of effect of either dose of dexamethasone on development of glomerular filtration rate. Because of the wide spectrum of dexamethasone's effects on tubular function, we also assessed fetal kidney adenylate cyclase as a means of detecting altered cell differentiation in the prenatal period during which dexamethasone was given. Either glucocorticoid dose increased the total adenylate cyclase catalytic activity (assessed with forskolin). Thus, the net effect of fetal dexamethasone exposure on development of renal excretory capabilities probably represents the summation of promoted cell differentiation and slowed development consequent to growth retardation. At low dose levels, the former effect predominates, leading to enhanced functional development, whereas higher doses that interfere with general growth and development can offset the direct promotional effect.

  1. Renal responses to plasma volume expansion and hyperosmolality in fasting seal pups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Rudy M.; Wade, Charles E.; Costa, Daniel P.; Ortiz, C. Leo

    2002-01-01

    Renal responses were quantified in northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) pups during their postweaning fast to examine their excretory capabilities. Pups were infused with either isotonic (0.9%; n = 8; Iso) or hypertonic (16.7%; n = 7; Hyper) saline via an indwelling catheter such that each pup received 3 mmol NaCl/kg. Diuresis after the infusions was similar in magnitude between the two treatments. Osmotic clearance increased by 37% in Iso and 252% in Hyper. Free water clearance was reduced 3.4-fold in Hyper but was not significantly altered in Iso. Glomerular filtration rate increased 71% in the 24-h period after Hyper, but no net change occurred during the same time after Iso. Natriuresis increased 3.6-fold in Iso and 5.3-fold in Hyper. Iso decreased plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) and cortisol acutely, whereas Hyper increased plasma and excreted AVP and cortisol. Iso was accompanied by the retention of water and electrolytes, whereas the Hyper load was excreted within 24 h. Natriuresis is attributed to increased filtration and is independent of an increase in atrial natriuretic peptide and decreases in ANG II and aldosterone. Fasting pups appear to have well-developed kidneys capable of both extreme conservation and excretion of Na(+).

  2. Acute renal failure complicating muscle crush injury.

    PubMed

    Abassi, Z A; Hoffman, A; Better, O S

    1998-09-01

    Extensive skeletal muscle injury, whether caused by mechanical crush or by extreme physical exertion, is incompatible with life, unless treated early and vigorously. The immediate cause of morbidity is leakiness of the sarcolemmal membrane to cardiotoxic or nephrotoxic cations and metabolites (K, PO4, myoglobin and urate) of the sarcoplasma, and rapid massive uptake by the muscles of extracellular fluid, sodium and calcium, leading to profound hypovolemic and hyocalcemic shock. Casualties who survive the early steep of hyperkalemia and arterial hypotension are susceptible to myoglubinuric acute renal failure owing mainly to the combination of renal vasoconstriction, nephrotoxicity, and tubular obstruction by myoglobin plugs and urate. Management includes immediate (prehospital) intravenous volume replacement followed by mannitol-alkaline diuresis. The alkali regimen ameliorates the acidosis associated with shock and the hyperkalemia, and protects against the nephrotoxicity of myoglobin and urate by alkalinization of the urine. Mannitol, through its impermeant hyperoncotic properties, decompresses and mobilizes muscle edema and promotes renal tubular flow, thus flushing myoglobin plugs and enhancing urinary elimination of nephrotoxic metabolites. With this regimen and when necessary also with the use of dialysis, a substantial salvage of lives, limbs, and kidney function has been achieved recently compared with invariable mortality for casualties who were buried for 3 to 4 hours or more in the early 1940s (World War 2).

  3. Emerging role of gasotransmitters in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Snijder, P M; van den Berg, E; Whiteman, M; Bakker, S J L; Leuvenink, H G D; van Goor, H

    2013-12-01

    Once patients with kidney disease progress to end-stage renal failure, transplantation is the preferred option of treatment resulting in improved quality of life and reduced mortality compared to dialysis. Although 1-year survival has improved considerably, graft and patient survival in the long term have not been concurrent, and therefore new tools to improve long-term graft and patient survival are warranted. Over the past decades, the gasotransmitters nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) have emerged as potent cytoprotective mediators in various diseases. All three gasotransmitters are endogenously produced messenger molecules that possess vasodilatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties by influencing an array of intracellular signaling processes. Although many regulatory functions of gasotransmitters have overlapping actions, differences have also been reported. In addition, crosstalk between NO, CO and H2S results in synergistic regulatory effects. Endogenous and exogenous manipulation of gasotransmitter levels modulates several processes involved in renal transplantation. This review focuses on mechanisms of gas-mediated cytoprotection and complex interactions between gasotransmitters in renal transplantation.

  4. Biomarkers for renal transplantation: where are we?

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Fangmin; Dai, Qiaoding; Gong, Weihua

    2013-01-01

    Although surgical techniques, post-transplant care medicine, and immunosuppressants have been greatly improved, permanent acceptance of renal allograft remains a clinical challenge owing to the appearance of various influencing factors. To predict graft dysfunction, development of noninvasive biomarkers is becoming a highlighted research topic in the field of renal transplantation, which provides a possibility for physicians to give preemptive rescue treatment. From the viewpoint of diagnostic techniques, repetitive sampling is prerequisite to identify applicable biomarkers in the clinic. Early biomarkers can be used to dynamically monitor renal graft status and accurately predict transplant outcome independent of various confounders. This review highlights recent studies on the predictive value of biomarkers and methods to quantify biomarkers for monitoring kidney transplant. It is important to analyze and compare different biomarkers for living, and nonliving donors. Analysis of identified clinically relevant biomarkers will advance our understanding of distinct molecular and cellular mechanisms of transplantation and provide insight into developing novel potential approaches to induce transplant tolerance. PMID:24124388

  5. Detection of occupational lead nephropathy using early renal markers.

    PubMed

    Kumar, B D; Krishnaswamy, K

    1995-01-01

    Automotive use of leaded gasoline continues to be an important source of occupational exposure to lead in India and other countries. The present study assessed the renal function and markers of early renal damage of 22 mechanics at three automobile garages. Urinary N-acetyl-3-D-glucosaminidase activity and beta-2-microglobulin levels were significantly increased in auto garage mechanics with blood leads of 30-69 micrograms/dL. A significant correlation was observed between blood lead levels and urinary N-acetyl-3-D-glucosaminidase activity but not with urine beta-2-microglobulin levels. A marginal impairment in creatinine clearance was not statistically significant. Urinary N-acetyl-3-D-glucosaminidase activity offers a sensitive monitor of blood lead and renal tubular injury.

  6. Regulation of Renal Hemodynamics and Function by RGS2.

    PubMed

    Osei-Owusu, Patrick; Owens, Elizabeth A; Jie, Li; Reis, Janaina S; Forrester, Steven J; Kawai, Tatsuo; Eguchi, Satoru; Singh, Harpreet; Blumer, Kendall J

    2015-01-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling 2 (RGS2) controls G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling by acting as a GTPase-activating protein for heterotrimeric G proteins. Certain Rgs2 gene mutations have been linked to human hypertension. Renal RGS2 deficiency is sufficient to cause hypertension in mice; however, the pathological mechanisms are unknown. Here we determined how the loss of RGS2 affects renal function. We examined renal hemodynamics and tubular function by monitoring renal blood flow (RBF), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) expression and localization, and pressure natriuresis in wild type (WT) and RGS2 null (RGS2-/-) mice. Pressure natriuresis was determined by stepwise increases in renal perfusion pressure (RPP) and blood flow, or by systemic blockade of nitric oxide synthase with L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME). Baseline GFR was markedly decreased in RGS2-/- mice compared to WT controls (5.0 ± 0.8 vs. 2.5 ± 0.1 μl/min/g body weight, p<0.01). RBF was reduced (35.4 ± 3.6 vs. 29.1 ± 2.1 μl/min/g body weight, p=0.08) while renal vascular resistance (RVR; 2.1 ± 0.2 vs. 3.0 ± 0.2 mmHg/μl/min/g body weight, p<0.01) was elevated in RGS2-/- compared to WT mice. RGS2 deficiency caused decreased sensitivity and magnitude of changes in RVR and RBF after a step increase in RPP. The acute pressure-natriuresis curve was shifted rightward in RGS2-/- relative to WT mice. Sodium excretion rate following increased RPP by L-NAME was markedly decreased in RGS2-/- mice and accompanied by increased translocation of ENaC to the luminal wall. We conclude that RGS2 deficiency impairs renal function and autoregulation by increasing renal vascular resistance and reducing renal blood flow. These changes impair renal sodium handling by favoring sodium retention. The findings provide a new line of evidence for renal dysfunction as a primary cause of hypertension. PMID:26193676

  7. Regulation of Renal Hemodynamics and Function by RGS2

    PubMed Central

    Osei-Owusu, Patrick; Owens, Elizabeth A.; Jie, Li; Reis, Janaina S.; Forrester, Steven J.; Kawai, Tatsuo; Eguchi, Satoru; Singh, Harpreet; Blumer, Kendall J.

    2015-01-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling 2 (RGS2) controls G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling by acting as a GTPase-activating protein for heterotrimeric G proteins. Certain Rgs2 gene mutations have been linked to human hypertension. Renal RGS2 deficiency is sufficient to cause hypertension in mice; however, the pathological mechanisms are unknown. Here we determined how the loss of RGS2 affects renal function. We examined renal hemodynamics and tubular function by monitoring renal blood flow (RBF), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) expression and localization, and pressure natriuresis in wild type (WT) and RGS2 null (RGS2-/-) mice. Pressure natriuresis was determined by stepwise increases in renal perfusion pressure (RPP) and blood flow, or by systemic blockade of nitric oxide synthase with L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME). Baseline GFR was markedly decreased in RGS2-/- mice compared to WT controls (5.0 ± 0.8 vs. 2.5 ± 0.1 μl/min/g body weight, p<0.01). RBF was reduced (35.4 ± 3.6 vs. 29.1 ± 2.1 μl/min/g body weight, p=0.08) while renal vascular resistance (RVR; 2.1 ± 0.2 vs. 3.0 ± 0.2 mmHg/μl/min/g body weight, p<0.01) was elevated in RGS2-/- compared to WT mice. RGS2 deficiency caused decreased sensitivity and magnitude of changes in RVR and RBF after a step increase in RPP. The acute pressure–natriuresis curve was shifted rightward in RGS2-/- relative to WT mice. Sodium excretion rate following increased RPP by L-NAME was markedly decreased in RGS2-/- mice and accompanied by increased translocation of ENaC to the luminal wall. We conclude that RGS2 deficiency impairs renal function and autoregulation by increasing renal vascular resistance and reducing renal blood flow. These changes impair renal sodium handling by favoring sodium retention. The findings provide a new line of evidence for renal dysfunction as a primary cause of hypertension. PMID:26193676

  8. Molecular Characterization of Severin from Clonorchis sinensis Excretory/Secretory Products and Its Potential Anti-apoptotic Role in Hepatocarcinoma PLC Cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Lei; Wang, Xiaoyun; Liang, Pei; Chen, Wenjun; Bian, Meng; Ren, Mengyu; Lin, Jinsi; Liang, Chi; Xu, Jin; Wu, Zhongdao; Li, Xuerong; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2013-01-01

    Background Clonorchiasis, caused by the infection of Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis), is a kind of neglected tropical disease, but it is highly related to cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It has been well known that the excretory/secretory products of C. sinensis (CsESPs) play key roles in clonorchiasis associated carcinoma. From genome and transcriptome of C. sinensis, we identified one component of CsESPs, severin (Csseverin), which had three putative gelsolin domains. Its homologues are supposed to play a vital role in apoptosis resistance of tumour cell. Methodology/Principal Findings There was significant similarity in tertiary structures between human gelsolin and Csseverin by bioinformatics analysis. We identified that Csseverin expressed at life stage of adult worm, metacercaria and egg by the method of quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting. Csseverin distributed in vitellarium and intrauterine eggs of adult worm and tegument of metacercaria by immunofluorence assay. We obtained recombinant Csseverin (rCsseverin) and confirmed that rCsseverin could bind with calciumion in circular dichroism spectrum analysis. It was demonstrated that rCsseverin was of the capability of actin binding by gel overlay assay and immunocytochemistry. Both Annexin V/PI assay and mitochondrial membrane potential assay of human hepatocarcinoma cell line PLC showed apoptosis resistance after incubation with different concentrations of rCsseverin. Morphological analysis, apoptosis-associated changes of mitochondrial membrane potential and Annexin V/PI apoptosis assay showed that co-incubation of PLC cells with rCsseverin in vitro led to an inhibition of apoptosis induced by serum-starved for 24 h. Conclusions/Significance Collectively, the molecular properties of Csseverin, a molecule of CsESPs, were characterized in our study. rCsseverin could cause obvious apoptotic inhibition in human HCC cell line. Csseverin might exacerbate the process of HCC

  9. Differences in the gene expression profiles of haemocytes from schistosome-susceptible and -resistant biomphalaria glabrata exposed to Schistosoma mansoni excretory-secretory products.

    PubMed

    Zahoor, Zahida; Lockyer, Anne E; Davies, Angela J; Kirk, Ruth S; Emery, Aidan M; Rollinson, David; Jones, Catherine S; Noble, Leslie R; Walker, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    During its life cycle, the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni uses the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata as an intermediate host to reproduce asexually generating cercariae for infection of the human definitive host. Following invasion of the snail, the parasite develops from a miracidium to a mother sporocyst and releases excretory-secretory products (ESPs) that likely influence the outcome of host infection. To better understand molecular interactions between these ESPs and the host snail defence system, we determined gene expression profiles of haemocytes from S. mansoni-resistant or -susceptible strains of B. glabrata exposed in vitro to S. mansoni ESPs (20 μg/ml) for 1 h, using a 5K B. glabrata cDNA microarray. Ninety-eight genes were found differentially expressed between haemocytes from the two snail strains, 57 resistant specific and 41 susceptible specific, 60 of which had no known homologue in GenBank. Known differentially expressed resistant-snail genes included the nuclear factor kappa B subunit Relish, elongation factor 1α, 40S ribosomal protein S9, and matrilin; known susceptible-snail specific genes included cathepsins D and L, and theromacin. Comparative analysis with other gene expression studies revealed 38 of the 98 identified genes to be uniquely differentially expressed in haemocytes in the presence of ESPs, thus identifying for the first time schistosome ESPs as important molecules that influence global snail host-defence cell gene expression profiles. Such immunomodulation may benefit the schistosome, enabling its survival and successful development in the snail host. PMID:24663063

  10. Larval excretory-secretory products from the parasite Schistosoma mansoni modulate HSP70 protein expression in defence cells of its snail host, Biomphalaria glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Zahoor, Zahida; Davies, Angela J.; Kirk, Ruth S.; Rollinson, David

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs) following cellular stress is a response shared by many organisms. Amongst the HSP family, the ∼70 kDa HSPs are the most evolutionarily conserved with intracellular chaperone and extracellular immunoregulatory functions. This study focused on the effects of larval excretory-secretory products (ESPs) from the parasite Schistosoma mansoni on HSP70 protein expression levels in haemocytes (defence cells) from its snail intermediate host Biomphalaria glabrata. S. mansoni larval stage ESPs are known to interfere with haemocyte physiology and behaviour. Haemocytes from two different B. glabrata strains, one which is susceptible to S. mansoni infection and one which is resistant, both showed reduced HSP70 protein levels following 1 h challenge with S. mansoni ESPs when compared to unchallenged controls; however, the reduction observed in the resistant strain was less marked. The decline in intracellular HSP70 protein persisted for at least 5 h in resistant snail haemocytes only. Furthermore, in schistosome-susceptible snails infected by S. mansoni for 35 days, haemocytes possessed approximately 70% less HSP70. The proteasome inhibitor, MG132, partially restored HSP70 protein levels in ESP-challenged haemocytes, demonstrating that the decrease in HSP70 was in part due to intracellular degradation. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathway appears to regulate HSP70 protein expression in these cells, as the mitogen-activated protein-ERK kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor, U0126, significantly reduced HSP70 protein