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Sample records for renal failure evaluation

  1. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Kidney Failure Kidney failure, also known as renal failure, ... evaluated? How is kidney failure treated? What is kidney (renal) failure? The kidneys are designed to maintain ...

  2. Evaluation of the efficacy of ginger, Arabic gum, and Boswellia in acute and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Mona Fouad; Diaai, Abdalla Ahmed; Ahmed, Fahmy

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Ginger), Arabic gum (AG), and Boswellia on both acute and chronic renal failure (CRF) and the mechanisms underlying their effects. Acute renal failure was induced by 30 min ischemia followed by 24 h reperfusion, while CRF was induced by adenine feeding for 8 weeks. Prophylactic oral administration of ginger, AG, Boswellia, or vehicle (in control groups) was started 3 days before and along with adenine feeding in different groups or 7 days before ischemia-reperfusion. Ginger and AG showed renoprotective effects in both models of renal failure. These protective effects may be attributed at least in part to their anti-inflammatory properties as evident by attenuating serum C-reactive protein levels and antioxidant effects as evident by attenuating lipid peroxidation marker, malondialdehyde levels, and increasing renal superoxide dismutase activity. Ginger was more potent than AG in both models of renal failure. However, Boswellia showed only partial protective effect against both acute renal failure and CRF and it had no antioxidant effects. Finally, we can say that ginger and AG could be beneficial adjuvant therapy in patients with acute renal failure and CRF to prevent disease progression and delay the need for renal replacement therapy.

  3. Evaluation of chronic kidney disease in chronic heart failure: From biomarkers to arterial renal resistances

    PubMed Central

    Iacoviello, Massimo; Leone, Marta; Antoncecchi, Valeria; Ciccone, Marco Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease and its worsening are recurring conditions in chronic heart failure (CHF) which are independently associated with poor patient outcome. The heart and kidney share many pathophysiological mechanisms which can determine dysfunction in each organ. Cardiorenal syndrome is the condition in which these two organs negatively affect each other, therefore an accurate evaluation of renal function in the clinical setting of CHF is essential. This review aims to revise the parameters currently used to evaluate renal dysfunction in CHF with particular reference to the usefulness and the limitations of biomarkers in evaluating glomerular dysfunction and tubular damage. Moreover, it is reported the possible utility of renal arterial resistance index (a parameter associated with abnormalities in renal vascular bed) for a better assesment of kidney disfunction. PMID:25610846

  4. Evaluating and managing neonatal acute renal failure in a resource-poor setting.

    PubMed

    Ogunlesi, Tinuade A; Adekanmbi, Folasade

    2009-03-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is encountered in neonatal care where it may be associated with significant morbidities. Pre-renal failure, which is due to impaired renal tissue perfusion, is the commonest type of ARF. It is amenable to treatment with excellent prognosis following prompt diagnosis and timely institution of appropriate intervention. Unfortunately, ARF in the newborn is usually asymptomatic and it is only suspected when a newborn infant has not been observed to pass urine over several hours or when serum Creatinine is observed to be elevated or rising. In resource-poor settings, it is often difficult to conduct detailed evaluation of suspected cases of newborn ARF due to lack of appropriate equipments and infrastructure. Similarly, therapeutic facilities are sparse and there is heavy reliance on conservative management of cases. Such difficulties encountered in the evaluation and management of newborns with ARF in most parts of the developing world, like Nigeria, where diagnostic and therapeutic facilities are limited are highlighted.

  5. Urinary deoxypyridinoline excretion for the evaluation of bone turnover in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Coen, G; Mantella, D; Calabria, S; Sardella, D; Manni, M; Fassino, V; D'Anello, E; Giustini, M; Taggi, F

    2000-01-01

    The urinary excretion of deoxypyridinoline (DPD) was evaluated in predialysis chronic renal failure (CRF), together with intact PTH and several classic markers of bone turnover in order to assess whether urine free and total DPD excretion are equivalent parameters of bone turnover in CRF, and to evaluate the relationship between urine DPD excretion, PTH and the other bone markers. The study was carried out in 94 patients with different degrees of renal failure due to various kidney diseases. Besides urinary DPD expressed as free DPD, total DPD, free/total DPD, free DPD/Cr and total DPD/Cr, the following determinations were made: intact PTH, bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP), total alkaline phosphatase (AP), osteocalcin (BGP), serum C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type I (ICTP) and hydroxyproline (OHpro). The patients were divided into 3 groups according to the increasing severity of renal failure (Ccr >40, 40-20, <20 ml/min). The ratio free/total DPD decreased (NS) with advancing renal failure, and was inversely correlated with total DPD excretion. While PTH increased progressively to about four times the values observed in the Ccr >40 group, there was a parallel increase only in BGP and ICTP, parameters retained in the serum with decreasing renal function, while AP, BALP, total DPD and OHpro did not change. However, significant correlations between total DPD/Cr and PTH, BALP, BGP and ICTP were also found. In CRF free DPD is an unreliable index of bone turnover due to a probable interference in its production from the peptide-bound DPD. Total DPD or total DPD/Cr are better used. In spite of the significant correlations observed in advanced renal failure between PTH and most of the parameters examined, a resistance of bone tissue to PTH action in CRF must be considered. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  6. Acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2011-10-01

    Acute renal failure (now acute kidney injury) is a common complication of critical illness affecting between 30 and 60% of critically ill patients. The development of a consensus definition (RIFLE--risk, injury, failure, loss, end-stage system) has allowed standardization of reporting and epidemiological work. Multicenter multinational epidemiological studies indicate that sepsis is now the most common cause of acute renal failure in the intensive care unit (ICU) followed by cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury. Unfortunately, our understanding of the pathogenesis of acute renal failure in these settings remains limited. Because of such limited understanding, no reproducibly effective therapies have been developed. In addition the diagnosis of acute renal failure still rests upon the detection of changes in serum creatinine, which only occur if more than 50% of glomerular filtration is lost and are often delayed by more than 24 hours. Such diagnostic delays make the implementation of early therapy nearly impossible. In response to these difficulties, there has been a concerted effort to use proteomics to identify novel early biomarkers of acute renal failure. The identification and study of neutrophil gelatinase- associated lipocalin has been an important step in this field. Another area of active interest and investigation relates to the role of intravenous fluid resuscitation and fluid balance. Data from large observational studies and randomized, controlled trials consistently indicate that a positive fluid balance in patients with acute renal failure represents a major independent risk factor for mortality and provides no protection of renal function. The pendulum is clearly swinging away from a fluid-liberal approach to a fluid-conservative approach in these patients. Finally, there is a growing appreciation that acute renal failure may identify patients who are at increased risk of subsequent chronic renal dysfunction and mortality, opening the way

  7. Lactulose and renal failure.

    PubMed

    Vogt, B; Frey, F J

    1997-01-01

    The introduction of lactulose as a new therapeutic agent for treatment of hepatic encephalopathy was a major breakthrough in this field. It was hypothesized that lactulose might prevent postoperative renal impairment after biliary surgery in patients with obstructive jaundice. The presumable mechanism purported was the diminished endotoxinemia by lactulose. Unfortunately, such a reno-protective effect has not been shown conclusively until now in clinical studies. In chronic renal failure lactulose is known to promote fecal excretion of water, sodium, potassium, amonium, urea, creatinine and protons. Thus, lactulose could be useful for the treatment of chronic renal failure. However, compliance to the therapy represents a major problem.

  8. Hypogonadism and renal failure: An update.

    PubMed

    Thirumavalavan, Nannan; Wilken, Nathan A; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of both hypogonadism and renal failure is increasing. Hypogonadism in men with renal failure carries with it significant morbidity, including anemia and premature cardiovascular disease. It remains unclear whether testosterone therapy can affect the morbidity and mortality associated with renal failure. As such, in this review, we sought to evaluate the current literature addressing hypogonadism and testosterone replacement, specifically in men with renal failure. The articles chosen for this review were selected by performing a broad search using Pubmed, Embase and Scopus including the terms hypogonadism and renal failure from 1990 to the present. This review is based on both primary sources as well as review articles. Hypogonadism in renal failure has a multifactorial etiology, including co-morbid conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, old age and obesity. Renal failure can lead to decreased luteinizing hormone production and decreased prolactin clearance that could impair testosterone production. Given the increasing prevalence of hypogonadism and the potential morbidity associated with hypogonadism in men with renal failure, careful evaluation of serum testosterone would be valuable. Testosterone replacement therapy should be considered in men with symptomatic hypogonadism and renal failure, and may ameliorate some of the morbidity associated with renal failure. Patients with all stages of renal disease are at an increased risk of hypogonadism that could be associated with significant morbidity. Testosterone replacement therapy may reduce some of the morbidity of renal failure, although it carries risk.

  9. Renal denervation and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Michael; Ewen, Sebastian; Kindermann, Ingrid; Linz, Dominik; Ukena, Christian; Mahfoud, Felix

    2014-06-01

    Renal denervation has been developed in order to lower systolic blood pressure in resistant hypertension by a reduction in renal afferent and efferent sympathetic nerve activity. In heart failure sympathetic activation, in particular, renal norepinephrine release is closely associated with morbidity and mortality. Initial studies have shown that renal denervation is able to reduce not only blood pressure but also heart rate, and is associated with a reduction in myocardial hypertrophy, improved glucose tolerance, and ameliorated microalbuminuria. Since some experimental and observational data suggest an antiarrhythmic effect, it is possible that renal denervation might also play a therapeutic role in arrhythmias often occurring in chronic heart failure. The first proof-of-concept studies are planned to evaluate the clinical effect of this pathophysiologically plausible method, which might be able to change clinical practice.

  10. Acute Renal Failure in the Neonate.

    PubMed

    Khan, Owais A; Hageman, Joseph R; Clardy, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) in a neonate is a serious condition that impacts 8% to 24% of hospitalized neonates. There is a need for prompt evaluation and treatment to avoid additional complications. In this review, a neonate was found to have renal failure associated with renal vein thrombosis. There are varying etiologies of ARF. Causes of ARF are typically divided into three subsets: pre-renal, renal or intrinsic, and post-renal. Treatment of ARF varies based on the cause. Renal vein thrombosis is an interesting cause of renal or intrinsic ARF and can be serious, often leading to a need for dialysis.

  11. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and radionuclide imaging in the evaluation of renal transplant failure

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, M.S.; Tanasescu, D.E.; Waxman, A.D.; Crues, J.V. III

    1988-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was compared with radionuclide scintigraphy (RNS) in 16 patients with renal transplants undergoing renal failure to determine which modality could best discriminate between rejection, acute tubular necrosis (ATN), and cyclosporin nephrotoxicity (CN). Although all rejecting transplants had reduced corticomedullary differentiation (CMD) on T1-weighted MR images, four of five cases of ATN had appearances that could not be distinguished from rejection. A normal CMD suggests nonrejection, but diminished CMD is nonspecific. Tc-99m DTPA/I-131 hippuran RNS was superior to MRI in differentiating rejection from ATN. Although ATN and CN have similar RNS patterns, this distinction can usually be made based on the clinical time course. Other potential uses of MRI in the evaluation of the renal transplants are discussed.

  12. Hypothyroid acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Birewar, Sonali; Oppenheimer, Mark; Zawada, Edward T

    2004-03-01

    Muscular disorders and even hypothyroid myopathy with elevated muscle enzymes are commonly seen in hypothyroidism. In this paper, we report a case of acute renal failure in a 35-year old male patient with myalgia. His serum creatinine reached a level of 2.4 mg/dl. Later, his myalgia was found to be due to hypothyroidism with TSH of over 500 uiv/ml. With thyroid replacement therapy, myalgia and his serum creatinine stabilized and subsequently improved. Hypothyroidism, although rare, has been reported as a definite and authentic cause of rhabdomyolysis. As a result, hypothyroidism must be considered in patients presenting with acute renal failure and elevated muscle enzymes.

  13. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... the ureter (s) or a tube connected to an external drainage bag. Both options are used to unblock the ureters in order to allow proper urine flow from the kidneys if this has been identified as the cause for the renal failure. Surgical treatment such as a urinary stent or ...

  14. Renal Failure in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Balofsky, Ari; Fedarau, Maksim

    2016-01-01

    Renal failure during pregnancy affects both mother and fetus, and may be related to preexisting disease or develop secondary to diseases of pregnancy. Causes include hypovolemia, sepsis, shock, preeclampsia, thrombotic microangiopathies, and renal obstruction. Treatment focuses on supportive measures, while pharmacologic treatment is viewed as second-line therapy, and is more useful in mitigating harmful effects than treating the underlying cause. When supportive measures and pharmacotherapy prove inadequate, dialysis may be required, with the goal being to prolong pregnancy until delivery is feasible. Outcomes and recommendations depend primarily on the underlying cause.

  15. Prevalence of systolic hypertension in cats with chronic renal failure at initial evaluation.

    PubMed

    Syme, Harriet M; Barber, Penney J; Markwell, Peter J; Elliott, Jonathan

    2002-06-15

    To determine prevalence of systolic hypertension and associated risk factors in cats with chronic renal failure evaluated in first-opinion practice. Prospective study. 103 cats with chronic renal failure. Systolic arterial blood pressure (SABP) was measured with a noninvasive Doppler technique, and cats that had SABP > 175 mm Hg on 2 occasions or that had SABP > 175 mm Hg and compatible ocular lesions were classified as hypertensive. Information from the history (previous treatment for hyperthyroidism, age), physical examination (sex, body weight), routine plasma biochemical analyses (creatinine, cholesterol, potassium, sodium, chloride, and calcium concentrations), and thyroid status were evaluated as potential risk factors for systolic hypertension. Variables associated with systolic hypertension were evaluated by use of logistic regression. 20 (19.4%; 95% confidence interval, 13 to 28%) cats had systolic hypertension. Plasma potassium concentration was significantly and inversely associated with systolic hypertension. Prevalence of systolic hypertension, although clinically important, was lower than that reported previously. The cause of the inverse association between systolic hypertension and plasma potassium concentration is not yet known.

  16. [Evaluation of growth hormone treatment results in children with chronic renal failure--one center experience].

    PubMed

    Szczepańska, Maria; Broll, Iwona; Dymon, Izabela; Szprynger, Krystyna

    2008-01-01

    The study aimed at the retrospective evaluation of rhGH treatment results in children with chronic renal failure CRF and short stature treated at Dpt. and Clinic of Pediatrics, Dialysis Unit and Ambulatory in Zabrze, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice. Medical records of 21 children at mean age of 11.0 years (7 girls and 14 boys) were analysed. Eleven children remained on renal replacement therapy. The mean dose of rhGH was 1.1 UI/kg/week). Five children are still on rhGH treatment. Mean growth velocity during rhGH treatment was 15.2 cm/ total period of treatment, 6.98 cm/year. Mean SDS of growth at the beginning of treatment was: -3.25, at the end of treatment: -2.76 (p < 0.02). PTH value 123.6 pg/ml, at the end of treatment 241.29 pg/mL (p < 0.05). RhGH treatment in children with CRF gives the opportunity to gain the final height compared to healthy children.

  17. Antibiotic managment in renal failure.

    PubMed

    Winter, R E

    1976-06-01

    This is a brief compilation of the work of many investigators. It includes facts about toxicity and recommendations about antibiotic management in patients with renal failure. As new data are accrued, changes in these recommendations will be necessary.

  18. Re-evaluation and modification of the Stuivenberg Hospital Acute Renal Failure (SHARF) scoring system for the prognosis of acute renal failure: an independent multicentre, prospective study.

    PubMed

    Lins, R L; Elseviers, M M; Daelemans, R; Arnouts, P; Billiouw, J-M; Couttenye, M; Gheuens, E; Rogiers, P; Rutsaert, R; Van der Niepen, P; De Broe, M E

    2004-09-01

    A prognostic scoring system for hospital mortality in acute renal failure (Stuivenberg Hospital Acute Renal Failure, SHARF score) was developed in a single-centre study. The scoring system consists of two scores, for the time of diagnosis of acute renal failure (ARF) and for 48 h later, each originally based on four parameters (age, serum albumin, prothrombin time and heart failure). The scoring system was now tested and adapted in a prospective study. The study involved eight intensive care units. We studied 293 consecutive patients with ARF in 6 months. Their mortality was 50.5%. The causes of ARF were medical in 184 (63%) patients and surgical in 108 (37%). In the latter group, 74 (69%) patients underwent cardiac and 19 (18%) vascular surgery. As the performance of the original SHARF scores was much lower in the multicentre study than in the original single-centre study, we re-analysed the multicentre data to customize the original model for the population studied. The independent variables were the score developed in the original study plus all additonal parameters that were significant on univariate analysis. The new multivariate analysis revealed an additional subset of three parameters for inclusion in the model (serum bilirubin, sepsis and hypotension). For the modified SHARF II score, r(2) was 0.27 at 0 and 0.33 at 48 h, respectively, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) values were 0.82 and 0.83, and the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit P values were 0.19 and 0.05. After customizing and by using two scoring moments, this prediction model for hospital mortality in ARF is useful in different settings for comparing groups of patients and centres, quality assessment and clinical trials. We do not recommend its use for individual patient prognosis.

  19. Experimental supratrigonal cystectomy: II--Evaluation of urinary calculi, infection, and bladder dysfunction in the pathogenesis of renal failure.

    PubMed

    Barros, Milton; Martinelli, Reinaldo; Rocha, Heonir

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of urolithiasis, infection, and bladder dysfunction in the pathogenesis of renal failure in rats subjected to supratrigonal cystectomy. One group of Sprague-Dawley rats was submitted to supratrigonal cystectomy, a second to cystectomy during which a suspension of Proteus mirabilis was injected into the bladder stump, and a third to sham surgery (controls). The animals were sacrificed two months after surgery. Blood pressure and serum urea and creatinine were measured before surgery and at sacrifice when a careful inspection of the urinary tract was performed to determine the presence of hydronephrosis and calculi. Microbiological analyses were performed on urine aspirated from the bladder and on the kidneys. Significant differences were found between values of systolic blood pressure and serum urea and creatinine recorded prior to the surgical procedure and those recorded at sacrifice in each group except the control group. Renal failure was present in all animals subjected to cystectomy. Urinary calculi were documented in 5/10 animals subjected to cystectomy only and in all rats inoculated with P. mirabilis. Hypertension was documented in 43.75% of animals subjected to cystectomy. Pyelonephritis was diagnosed only in animals with urinary calculi, in each of which urine culture was also positive. No cases of renal failure, hypertension, calculi, and/or pyelonephritis were detected in the sham group. The findings of this study indicate that kidney failure in rats subjected to supratrigonal cystectomy is related to the severe bladder dysfunction induced by the surgical procedure.

  20. Evaluation of oxidative stress biomarkers in patients with chronic renal failure: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress is related to several diseases, including chronic renal insufficiency. The disequilibrium in the oxidant-antioxidant balance is the result of several metabolic changes. The majority of studies to-date have evaluated the grade of oxidative stress with a single biomarker, or a very limited number of them. Findings The present study used several important biomarkers to establish a score relating to oxidative stress status (glutathione S-transferase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, reduced and oxidized glutathione, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and hemolysis test). The score of oxidative stress (SOS) was then applied to a group of patients with renal insufficiency not on hemodialysis, and compared to healthy control individuals. The score for patients with chronic renal insufficiency was significantly different from that of the healthy control group (0.62 ± 1.41 vs. -0.05 ± 0.94; p < 0.001). The comparison between patients with chronic renal insufficiency and control individuals showed significant differences with respect to changes in the enzymatic antioxidant systems (glutathione S-transferase, glutathione reductase), non-enzymatic antioxidant system (oxidized glutathione) and oxidizability (hemolysis test) indicating significant oxidative stress associated with chronic renal insufficiency. Conclusions Patients with chronic renal insufficiency not on hemodialysis are susceptible to oxidative stress. The mechanisms that underlie this status are the consequence of changes in glutathione and related enzymes. The SOS scoring system is a useful biochemical parameter to evaluate the influence of oxidative stress on the clinical status of these patients. PMID:20181004

  1. Renal failure in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Mackelaite, Lina; Alsauskas, Zygimantas C; Ranganna, Karthik

    2009-07-01

    Renal failure in cirrhosis poses unique diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Laboratory values and predictive equations grossly overestimate renal function in patients with cirrhosis. Development of renal failure connotes a worse prognosis; mortality is especially high with hepatorenal syndrome. Classification of the causes of renal failure in patients with cirrhosis is provided with more extensive discussion of selected causes. Finally, a suggested diagnostic approach to renal failure in cirrhosis is given.

  2. Renal failure in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Almueilo, Samir H

    2015-01-01

    Renal dysfunction is encountered in 20-25% of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) at the time of diagnosis. There is often a precipitating event. Several biochemical and clinical correlations with renal failure in MM have been reported. Renal failure in MM is associated with worse outcome of the disease. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 64 patients with MM admitted to our institution during the period January 1992 to December 2012. Abnormal renal function was observed in 24 (37.5%) patients and 17 (26.6%) of them had renal failure; 14 of the 17 (82.4%) of patients with renal failure had Stage III MM. Urine Bence- Jones protein was positive in ten (58.8%) patients with renal failure versus ten (21.3%) patients without renal failure (P = 0.004). Potential precipitating factors of renal failure were determined in nine patients. Renal function normalized in 11 patients with simple measures, while six patients required hemodialysis; one remained dialysis dependent till time of death. Early mortality occurred in five (29.4%) patients with renal failure as compared with two (4.3%) patients in the group without renal failure (P = 0.005). In conclusion, renal failure is associated with a higher tumor burden and Bence-Jones proteinuria in patients with MM. It is reversible in the majority of patients; however, early mortality tends to be higher in patients with persistent renal failure.

  3. Design and challenges of the Randomized Evaluation of Normal versus Augmented Level Replacement Therapy (RENAL) Trial: high-dose versus standard-dose hemofiltration in acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Rinaldo; Cass, Alan; Cole, Louise; Finfer, Simon; Gallagher, Martin; Goldsmith, Donna; Myburgh, John; Norton, Robyn; Scheinkestel, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    The optimal dose of renal replacement therapy (RRT) in acute renal failure (ARF) is uncertain. The Randomized Evaluation of Normal versus Augmented Level Replacement Therapy Trial tests the hypothesis that higher dose continuous veno-venous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF) at an effluent rate of 40 ml/kg/h will increase survival compared to CVVHDF at 25 ml/kg/h of effluent dose. This trial is currently randomizing critically ill patients in 35 intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand with a planned sample size of 1,500 patients. This trial will be the largest trial ever conducted on acute blood purification in critically ill patients. A trial of this magnitude and with demanding technical requirements poses design difficulties and challenges in the logistics, conduct, data collection, data analysis and monitoring. Our report will assist in the development of future trials of blood purification in intensive care.

  4. Bumetanide kinetics in renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Pentikaeinen, P.J.P.; Pasternack, A.; Lampainen, E.; Neuvonen, P.J.; Penttilae, A.

    1985-05-01

    To study the effects of renal failure on bumetanide kinetics, the authors administered single intravenous doses of 1.0 mg/3.08 microCi /sup 14/C-bumetanide to six healthy subjects and 22 patients with variable degrees of renal failure. The kinetics of /sup 14/C-bumetanide and total /sup 14/C were adequately described by a two-compartment open model in the control subjects and in the patients. The volume of the central compartment and the distribution t1/2 were of the same order in both groups, whereas the mean (+/- SE) volume at steady state was larger (22.1 +/- 1.6 and 16.9 +/- 1.0 L) and the elimination t1/2 was longer (1.9 +/- 0.2 and 1.4 +/- 0.1 hours) in patients with renal failure than in healthy controls. Bumetanide renal clearance was lower (10 +/- 3 and 90 +/- 13 ml/min) in patients than in subjects and correlated with creatinine clearance (r = 0.784) and log serum creatinine level (r = -0.843), whereas nonrenal clearance was significantly higher in the patients (153 +/- /sup 14/ and 99 +/- 6 ml/min). Bumetanide total plasma clearance did not significantly change. The non-protein-bound, free fraction of bumetanide was higher in patients and correlated with plasma albumin levels (r = -0.777). The kinetics of total /sup 14/C showed similar but greater changes than those of 14C-bumetanide. Thus the most important changes in bumetanide kinetics in patients with renal failure are low renal clearance and a high free fraction, with a consequent increase in nonrenal clearance, volume of distribution, and elimination t1/2.

  5. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the femoral cartilage thickness in patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Ünal, Hilmi Umut; Tok, Fatih; Adıgüzel, Emre; Gezer, Mustafa; Aydın, İbrahim; Yılmaz, Bilge; Oğuz, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effects of chronic renal failure (CRF) on the distal femoral cartilage thickness by using ultrasonography and to determine the relationship between cartilage thickness and certain disease-related parameters. Fifty-seven CRF patients (41 male and 16 female) (mean [SD] age, 44.7 [12.1] years) and 60 healthy controls (41 male and 19 female) (mean [SD] age, 43.5 [13.3] years) were enrolled in this study. Demographic and clinical characteristics were recorded. Cartilage thickness measurements were taken from the medial and lateral condyles, and intercondylar areas of both knees. Groups were similar in terms of age, weight, height, body mass index and gender (all p>0.05). The mean cartilage thickness was found to be less in CRF patients than in controls (statistically significant for medial condyles and intercondylar areas both in right and the left knees [all p<0.05]). Cartilage thickness showed no correlation with eGFR, and with the levels of serum urea, creatinine, calcium, magnesium, phosphor, hemoglobin, uric acid and as well as steroid use (all p>0.05) in CRF patients. In the light of our findings, we imply that patients with CRF have thinner femoral cartilage than healthy controls. This result may support the view that patients with CRF are at increased risk for developing early knee osteoarthritis. Last but not least, clinicians should be aware of the importance of rehabilitation strategies aimed at decreasing onset and progression of knee osteoarthritis in patients with CRF.

  6. Evaluation of serum Resistin in children with chronic renal failure undergoing hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hamshary, Abd El-Hamid Salah; El-Shaaer, Osama Saad; Soliman, Doaa Refaay; El-Mashad, Ghada Mohamed; Hussien, Ahmed Ibraheem

    2016-01-01

    Introduction High serum resistin levels are associated with the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The objectives of this study were to determine the serum concentrations of resistin in children that present with chronic renal failure (CRF) and end stage renal disease (ESRD), in order to examine the impact of hemodialysis (HD) on serum resistin levels, and to determine if a correlation exists between resistin and growth retardation in patients with CRF. Methods This case control study was undertaken in the pediatric hemodialysis unit of the Benha and Menoufia University hospitals from April 2014 to March 2015. The case group consisted of 50 patients with CRF aged from 6–18 years (25 of them under HD and 25 of them under conservative treatment) and 30 healthy children who constituted the control group. Urea, creatinine, and serum resistin were measured before and after the HD session for patients with CRF who are already under HD. Results A highly significant difference was found between the resistin levels in the two groups with mean level of 20.2 ± 7.58 ng/ml in the patient case group as compared to 4.9 ± 1.72 ng/ml in the control group. This highly significant difference found in the resistin level differed according to the Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) stage of progression as patients on regular HD had resistin levels with a mean of 24.6 ± 7.28 ng/ml while the CKD patients under conservative treatment have resistin level mean of 15.6 ± 4.72 ng/ml. there was a highly significant difference in resistin levels before HD (mean = 24.6 ± 7.28) and after hemodialysis (mean = 14.7 ± 5.2). Conclusion Patients with CRF experienced higher than normal resistin levels as compared to the case control group and it was found that patients on HD had more elevated levels of resistin than did those patients who were on conservative treatment. HD treatments were found to be capable of lowering a patient’s resistin levels. A highly significant negative correlation

  7. Therapeutic effects of renal denervation on renal failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutang; Seto, Sai-Wang; Golledge, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    Sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) is increased in both patients and experimental animals with renal failure. The kidney is a richly innervated organ and has both efferent and afferent nerves. Renal denervation shows protective effects against renal failure in both animals and humans. The underlying mechanisms include a decrease in blood pressure, a decrease in renal efferent SNA, a decrease in central SNA and sympathetic outflow, and downregulation of the reninangiotensin system. It has been demonstrated that re-innervation occurs within weeks after renal denervation in animals but that no functional re-innervation occurs in humans for over two years after denervation. Renal denervation might not be renal protective in some situations including bile duct ligation-induced renal failure and ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury. Catheter-based renal denervation has been applied to patients with both early and end stage renal failure and the published results so far suggest that this procedure is safe and effective at decreasing blood pressure. The effectiveness of renal denervation in improving renal function in patients with renal failure needs to be further investigated.

  8. Radiocontrast-Induced Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Misson, Robert T.; Cutler, Ralph E.

    1985-01-01

    Review of the literature concerning contrast-induced renal dysfunction shows that the currently used agents are remarkably safe with careful patient selection. Clinically apparent kidney failure after their use is essentially nonexistent in those without preexistent renal insufficiency. The incidence rises rapidly in those with azotemia from any cause, however, and diabetic persons with nephropathy are perhaps at special risk. Vigorous volume expansion is possibly effective as a preventive measure and may attenuate adverse effects in those in whom postcontrast dysfunction occurs. New agents are becoming available. It is not yet known if these will prove safer or cost-effective. They have some experimentally demonstrated and theoretic advantages over the presently used agents. PMID:4013281

  9. Focus on renal congestion in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Afsar, Baris; Ortiz, Alberto; Covic, Adrian; Solak, Yalcin; Goldsmith, David; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-02-01

    Hospitalizations due to heart failure are increasing steadily despite advances in medicine. Patients hospitalized for worsening heart failure have high mortality in hospital and within the months following discharge. Kidney dysfunction is associated with adverse outcomes in heart failure patients. Recent evidence suggests that both deterioration in kidney function and renal congestion are important prognostic factors in heart failure. Kidney congestion in heart failure results from low cardiac output (forward failure), tubuloglomerular feedback, increased intra-abdominal pressure or increased venous pressure. Regardless of the cause, renal congestion is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in heart failure. The impact on outcomes of renal decongestion strategies that do not compromise renal function should be explored in heart failure. These studies require novel diagnostic markers that identify early renal damage and renal congestion and allow monitoring of treatment responses in order to avoid severe worsening of renal function. In addition, there is an unmet need regarding evidence-based therapeutic management of renal congestion and worsening renal function. In the present review, we summarize the mechanisms, diagnosis, outcomes, prognostic markers and treatment options of renal congestion in heart failure.

  10. Focus on renal congestion in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Afsar, Baris; Ortiz, Alberto; Covic, Adrian; Solak, Yalcin; Goldsmith, David; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Hospitalizations due to heart failure are increasing steadily despite advances in medicine. Patients hospitalized for worsening heart failure have high mortality in hospital and within the months following discharge. Kidney dysfunction is associated with adverse outcomes in heart failure patients. Recent evidence suggests that both deterioration in kidney function and renal congestion are important prognostic factors in heart failure. Kidney congestion in heart failure results from low cardiac output (forward failure), tubuloglomerular feedback, increased intra-abdominal pressure or increased venous pressure. Regardless of the cause, renal congestion is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in heart failure. The impact on outcomes of renal decongestion strategies that do not compromise renal function should be explored in heart failure. These studies require novel diagnostic markers that identify early renal damage and renal congestion and allow monitoring of treatment responses in order to avoid severe worsening of renal function. In addition, there is an unmet need regarding evidence-based therapeutic management of renal congestion and worsening renal function. In the present review, we summarize the mechanisms, diagnosis, outcomes, prognostic markers and treatment options of renal congestion in heart failure. PMID:26798459

  11. Genetics Home Reference: action myoclonus-renal failure syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Epilepsy, progressive myoclonic 4, with or without renal failure ... failure syndrome action myoclonus–renal failure syndrome AMRF epilepsy, progressive myoclonic 4, with or without renal failure ...

  12. Acute renal failure in the newborn.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, Sharon Phillips

    2004-04-01

    Acute renal failure in the newborn is a common problem and is typically classified as prerenal, intrinsic renal disease including vascular insults, and obstructive uropathy. In the newborn, renal failure may have a prenatal onset in congenital diseases such as renal dysplasia with or without obstructive uropathy and in genetic diseases such as autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. Acute renal failure in the newborn is also commonly acquired in the postnatal period because of hypoxic ischemic injury and toxic insults. Nephrotoxic acute renal failure in newborns is usually associated with aminoglycoside antibiotics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications used to close a patent ductus arteriosis. Alterations in renal function occur in approximately 40% of premature newborns who have received indomethacin and such alterations are usually reversible. Renal artery thrombosis and renal vein thrombosis will result in renal failure if bilateral or if either occurs in a solitary kidney. Cortical necrosis is associated with hypoxic/ischemic insults due to perinatal anoxia, placenta abruption and twin-twin or twin-maternal transfusions with resultant activation of the coagulation cascade. As in older children, hospital acquired acute renal failure is newborns is frequently multifactorial in origin. Although the precise incidence and prevalence of acute renal failure in the newborn is unknown, several studies have shown that acute renal failure is common in the neonatal intensive care unit. Recent interesting studies have demonstrated that some newborns may have genetic risks factors for acute renal failure. Once intrinsic renal failure has become established, management of the metabolic complications of acute renal failure continues to involve appropriate management of fluid balance, electrolyte status, acid-base balance, nutrition and the initiation of renal replacement therapy when appropriate. Renal replacement therapy may be provided by peritoneal dialysis

  13. Fluoride-induced chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Lantz, O; Jouvin, M H; De Vernejoul, M C; Druet, P

    1987-08-01

    Renal fluoride toxicity in human beings is difficult to assess in the literature. Although experimental studies and research on methoxyflurane toxicity have shown frank renal damage, observations of renal insufficiency related to chronic fluoride exposure are scarce. We report a case of fluoride intoxication related to potomania of Vichy water, a highly mineralized water containing 8.5 mg/L of fluoride. Features of fluoride osteosclerosis were prominent and end-stage renal failure was present. The young age of the patient, the long duration of high fluoride intake, and the absence of other cause of renal insufficiency suggest a causal relationship between fluoride intoxication and renal failure.

  14. [Early laboratory markers of acute renal failure].

    PubMed

    Miklaszewska, Monika; Pietrzyk, Jacek A; Zachwieja, Katarzyna; Drozdz, Dorota; Sułowicz, Władyław

    2006-01-01

    Acute renal failure is a sudden clinical condition caused by loss of renal ability to maintain homeostasis. Despite significant advances in renal replacement therapy--the mortality rate in ARF patients is still very high--ranging from 20% to 50%. Differential diagnostics, especially between acute prerenal and intrinsic acute renal failure is an extremly important stage in patient evaluation process. In the article--the authors present a short and concise profile of novel, more and less promising for future diagnostic ARF biomarkers: neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL), sodium/hydrogen exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3), human kidney injury molecule-1 (hKIM-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), interleukin 18 (IL-18), urinary cysteine-rich protein (Cyr 61), urinary glutathione-S-transferase (GST), cystatin C, spermidine/spermine N-acetyl transferase (SSAT) and actin) which are recently either in the animal model research stage or during preliminary clinical studies. Extension of research and wideninig of knowledge about the discussed novel, early markers of ARF--would permit for quicker introduction of specifically guided therapy and might improve the prognosis of ARF patients in the near future.

  15. Animal models of acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amrit Pal; Junemann, Anselm; Muthuraman, Arunachalam; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh; Singh, Nirmal; Grover, Kuldeep; Dhawan, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    The animal models are pivotal for understanding the characteristics of acute renal failure (ARF) and development of effective therapy for its optimal management. Since the etiology for induction of renal failure is multifold, therefore, a large number of animal models have been developed to mimic the clinical conditions of renal failure. Glycerol-induced renal failure closely mimics the rhabdomyolysis; ischemia-reperfusion-induced ARF simulate the hemodynamic changes-induced changes in renal functioning; drug-induced such as gentamicin, cisplatin, NSAID, ifosfamide-induced ARF mimics the renal failure due to clinical administration of respective drugs; uranium, potassium dichromate-induced ARF mimics the occupational hazard; S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine-induced ARF simulate contaminated water-induced renal dysfunction; sepsis-induced ARF mimics the infection-induced renal failure and radiocontrast-induced ARF mimics renal failure in patients during use of radiocontrast media at the time of cardiac catheterization. Since each animal model has been created with specific methodology, therefore, it is essential to describe the model in detail and consequently interpret the results in the context of a specific model.

  16. Dyschromatosis Universalis Hereditaria with Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Rojhirunsakool, Salinee; Vachiramon, Vasanop

    2015-01-01

    Dyschromatosis universalis hereditaria (DUH) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited dermatosis which usually appears during childhood and is characterized by dyspigmentation, with both hypopigmented and hyperpigmented macules. We report a case of DUH with unexplained childhood-onset renal failure. The association between DUH and renal failure is yet to be proven by further studies. PMID:25969678

  17. Acute renal failure in Plasmodium malariae infection.

    PubMed

    Neri, S; Pulvirenti, D; Patamia, I; Zoccolo, A; Castellino, P

    2008-04-01

    We report an unusual case of transfusion-transmitted malaria which remained undiagnosed for several months in an Italian woman splenectomised and polytransfused for thalassaemia major. The infecting species was Plasmodium malariae, and the patient developed acute renal failure, severe thrombocytopenia, and hepatic failure. Treatment with chlorochine was followed by a slow, but complete recovery of renal function.

  18. [Acute renal failure due to sulfadiazine crystalluria].

    PubMed

    de la Prada Alvarez, F J; Prados Gallardo, A M; Tugores Vázquez, A; Uriol Rivera, M; Morey Molina, A

    2007-05-01

    Focal necrotizing encephalitis due to Toxoplasma gondii infection represents one of the most common opportunistic infection in patients with the acquired inmunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and the treatment is commonly with a combination sulphadiazine, and pyrimethamine. A major side effect of sulfadiazine therapy is the occurrence of crystallization in the urinary collecting system. We report a patient with AIDS and Toxoplasmic encephalitis treated with sulfadiazine who developed acute renal failure. Renal ultrasound demonstrated echogenic areas within the renal parenchyma, presumed to be sulfa crystals. Renal failure and ultrasound findings resolved rapidly with hydratation and administration of alkali. Patients infected with AIDS frequently have characteristic that increase intratubular crystal precipitation and they require treatment with one or more of the drugs that are associated with crystal-induced renal failure. Controlled alkalinization of the urine and high fluid intake are recommended for prophylaxis of crystalluria. The literature concerning crystalluria and renal failure due to sulfadiazine is reviewed.

  19. Renal replacement therapy for acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Macedo, E; Bouchard, J; Mehta, R L

    2009-09-01

    Renal replacement therapy became a common clinical tool to treat patients with severe acute kidney injury (AKI) since the 1960s. During this time dialytic options have expanded considerably; biocompatible membranes, bicarbonate dialysate and dialysis machines with volumetric ultrafiltration control have improved the treatment for acute kidney injury. Along with advances in methods of intermittent hemodialysis, continuous renal replacement therapies have gained widespread acceptance in the treatment of dialysis-requiring AKI. However, many of the fundamental aspects of the renal replacement treatment such as indication, timing of dialytic intervention, and choice of dialysis modality are still controversial and may influence AKI patient's outcomes. This review outlines current concepts in the use of dialysis techniques for AKI and suggests an approach for selecting the optimal method of renal replacement therapy.

  20. Anemia and Thrombocytopenia in Acute and Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Dorgalaleh, Akbar; Mahmudi, Mohammad; Tabibian, Shadi; Khatib, Zahra Kashani; Tamaddon, Gholam Hossein; Moghaddam, Esmaeil Sanei; Bamedi, Taregh; Alizadeh, Shaban; Moradi, Eshagh

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute renal failure describes as a syndrome by rapid decline in the ability of the kidney to eliminate waste products, regulate acid–base balance, and manage water homeostasis. When this impairment is prolonged and entered chronic phase, erythropoietin secretion by this organ is decreasing and toxic metabolic accumulates and causes hematological changes include decrease of HCT, MCV and RBC and platelet counts. This study evaluates present of anemia and thrombocytopenia in patients with acute and chronic renal failure. Materials and Methods This study conducted on 132 patients with renal impairment and also 179 healthy individuals as two separated control groups. Initially patients with renal problem were tested and after confirmation of impairment, patients were divided in two groups, acute with less than 3 months and chronic with more than 3 months renal failure, based on duration of the disease. Then complete blood count performed for each patient and finally obtained data were analyzed by SPSS software. Results Comparison between 96 patients with acute and 36 patients with chronic renal failure revealed that severity of anemia (HCT, Hb and MCV) between these two groups were statistically high in comparison with control groups (P > 0.05) but thrombocytopenia in patients with chronic renal failure was statistically different from control and the acute ones (P < 0.001). Conclusion It was recommended that in patients with chronic renal failure, to prevent the risk of bleeding, platelet count should be checked periodically. PMID:24505541

  1. Potential molecular therapy for acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Humes, H D

    1993-01-01

    Ischemic and toxic acute renal failure is reversible, due to the ability of renal tubule cells to regenerate and differentiate into a fully functional lining epithelium. Recent data support the thesis that recruitment or activation of macrophages to the area of injury results in local release of growth factors to promote regenerative repair. Because of intrinsic delay in the recruitment of inflammatory cells, the exogenous administration of growth promoters early in the repair phase of acute renal failure enhances renal tubule cell regeneration and accelerates renal functional recovery in animal models of acute renal failure. Molecular therapy for the acceleration of tissue repair in this disease process may be developed in the near future.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of brotizolam in renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Evers, J.; Renner, E.; Bechtel, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    1 Kinetics of brotizolam (0.25 mg) were studied in patients with different degrees of renal failure after single and repeated oral ingestion. Serum levels were analysed by radio-immunoassay. 2 Patients were divided into three groups according to their renal function, i.e. creatinine clearance values of 45-80, 15-45, or less than 15 ml/min. 3 The mean elimination half-life was 6.9-8.15 h, with a considerable variation of the peak concentration and elimination half-life in slight to moderate renal failure. There was no delay in elimination in severe renal failure and there was no drug accumulation. 4 No dose adjustment is necessary for brotizolam in renal failure. PMID:6661376

  3. [Artificial nutrition in acute renal failure].

    PubMed

    Fiaccadori, E; Maggiore, U; Rotelli, C; Parenti, E; Giacosa, R; Cabassi, A; Meschi, T; Borghi, L

    2006-01-01

    Artificial nutrition in course of acute renal failure (ARF) is reviewed, on the basis of recent concepts on epidemiology and prognosis of the syndrome in critically ill patients. The relationships between nutritional status and ARF are evaluated, analyzing the possible role of nutritional status alterations as comorbidities and complications; pathogenetic mechanisms and consequences of hypercatabolism are described, with special regard to the peculiar metabolic derangements which are the hallmark of ARF. The effects of artificial nutrition on mortality and morbility in ARF are illustrated, along with quantitative and qualitative aspects of nutritional support (energy and protein needs, trace elements, vitamins etc). A rational approach to nutritional management of ARF patients is proposed, stressing the potential role of enteral nutrition, as well as the need for a full integration between nutritional support and renal replacement therapies.

  4. Renal failure in cirrhosis: Emerging concepts

    PubMed Central

    Bittencourt, Paulo Lisboa; Farias, Alberto Queiroz; Terra, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Acute renal failure, now termed acute kidney injury (AKI), is frequently found in patients with cirrhosis. The occurrence of AKI, irrespective of the underlying cause, is associated with reduced in-hospital, 3-mo and 1-year survival. Hepatorenal syndrome is associated with the worst outcome among AKI patients with cirrhosis. Several definitions for AKI that have been proposed are outlined and evaluated in this paper. Among these, the International Club for Ascites-AKI criteria substantially strengthen the quality of early diagnosis and intervention according to underlying cause of AKI. PMID:26413223

  5. Renal failure in burn patients: a review.

    PubMed

    Emara, S S; Alzaylai, A A

    2013-03-31

    Burn care providers are usually challenged by multiple complications during the management of acute burns. One of the most common complications worldwide is renal failure. This article reviews the various aspects of renal failure management in burn patients. Two different types of renal failures develop in these patients. The different aetiological factors, incidence, suspected prognosis, ways of diagnosing, as well as prevention methods, and the most accepted treatment modalities are all discussed. A good understanding and an effective assessment of the problem help to reduce both morbidity and mortality in burn management.

  6. Renal failure in burn patients: a review

    PubMed Central

    Emara, S.S.; Alzaylai, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Burn care providers are usually challenged by multiple complications during the management of acute burns. One of the most common complications worldwide is renal failure. This article reviews the various aspects of renal failure management in burn patients. Two different types of renal failures develop in these patients. The different aetiological factors, incidence, suspected prognosis, ways of diagnosing, as well as prevention methods, and the most accepted treatment modalities are all discussed. A good understanding and an effective assessment of the problem help to reduce both morbidity and mortality in burn management. PMID:23966893

  7. Prognostic value of acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II and organ system failure in patients with acute renal failure requiring dialysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, I-Kuan; Wang, Shan-Tair; Chang, Hung-Yu; Lin, Chun-Liang; Kuo, Huey-Liang; Chen, Te-Chuan; Lee, Chih-Hsiung; Chuang, Feng-Rong

    2005-01-01

    Despite advances in modern technology of dialysis, prognosis of patients with acute renal failure (ARF) remains poor. To give the clinicians the most useful information, a model that accurately predicts outcome early in the course of ARF is required. However, because ARF is a heterogeneous syndrome and occurs in patients with diverse etiologies and some coexisting diseases, predicting outcome early is hard. The aim of this study is to evaluate prospectively the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II) and organ system failure (OSF) models, evaluated prior to dialysis, in predicting hospital mortality. From June 2002 to March 2004, ARF patients requiring dialysis at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi, were prospectively recruited for this study. The worst clinical and laboratory data in the 24 hours before initiation of dialysis were prospectively evaluated, and the patients' APACHE II score and OSF number were assessed. A total of 61 patients (40 male and 21 female) were enrolled, of whom 38 (62.3%) died before discharge. By multivariate logistic regression, the APACHE II score (odds ratio 1.3 per increase in one score; P<0.001), or OSF number (odds ratio 1.9 per increase in one OSF; P<0.01) and oliguria (odds ratio 4.2; P=0.04), were found to be statistically significant prognostic factors for hospital mortality. Mortality increased progressively and significantly as OSF number (chi-square for trend; P=0.001) or the APACHE II score (chi-square for trend; P < 0.001) increased. By using Youden's index, the best cut-off value for APACHE II was 24, with 63% sensitivity and 96% specificity. The best cut-off value for OSF number was 2, with a sensitivity of 81.6% and a specificity of 60.9%. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for APACHE II and OSF number were 0.847 (95% confidence interval (CI)=0.752-0.942; P<0.01) and 0.769 (95% CI=0.646-892; P<0.001), respectively, indicating good model discrimination. This study concludes

  8. Prognostic factors in neonatal acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, R L; Campbell, F; Brenbridge, A N

    1984-08-01

    Sixteen infants, 2 to 35 days of age, had acute renal failure, a diagnosis based on serum creatinine concentrations greater than 1.5 mg/dL for at least 24 hours. Eight infants were oliguric (urine flow less than 1.0 mL/kg/h) whereas the remainder were nonoliguric. To determine clinical parameters useful in prognosis, urine flow rate, duration of anuria, peak serum creatinine, urea (BUN) concentration, and nuclide uptake by scintigraphy were correlated with recovery. Nine infants had acute renal failure secondary to perinatal asphyxia, three had acute renal failure as a result of congenital cardiovascular disease, and four had major renal anomalies. Four oliguric patients died: three of renal failure and one of heart failure. All nonoliguric infants survived with mean follow-up serum creatinine concentration of 0.8 +/- 0.5 (SD) mg/dL whereas that of oliguric survivors was 0.6 +/- 0.3 mg/dL. Peak serum creatinine concentration did not differ between those patients who were dying and those recovering. All infants who were dying remained anuric at least four days and revealed no renal uptake of nuclide. Eleven survivors were anuric three days or less, and renal perfusion was detectable by scintigraphy in each case. However, the remaining survivor (with bilateral renal vein thrombosis) recovered after 15 days of anuria despite nonvisualization of kidneys by scintigraphy. In neonates with ischemic acute renal failure, lack of oliguria and the presence of identifiable renal uptake of nuclide suggest a favorable prognosis.

  9. Prognostic factors in neonatal acute renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Chevalier, R.L.; Campbell, F.; Brenbridge, A.N.

    1984-08-01

    Sixteen infants, 2 to 35 days of age, had acute renal failure, a diagnosis based on serum creatinine concentrations greater than 1.5 mg/dL for at least 24 hours. Eight infants were oliguric (urine flow less than 1.0 mL/kg/h) whereas the remainder were nonoliguric. To determine clinical parameters useful in prognosis, urine flow rate, duration of anuria, peak serum creatinine, urea (BUN) concentration, and nuclide uptake by scintigraphy were correlated with recovery. Nine infants had acute renal failure secondary to perinatal asphyxia, three had acute renal failure as a result of congenital cardiovascular disease, and four had major renal anomalies. Four oliguric patients died: three of renal failure and one of heart failure. All nonoliguric infants survived with mean follow-up serum creatinine concentration of 0.8 +/- 0.5 (SD) mg/dL whereas that of oliguric survivors was 0.6 +/- 0.3 mg/dL. Peak serum creatinine concentration did not differ between those patients who were dying and those recovering. All infants who were dying remained anuric at least four days and revealed no renal uptake of nuclide. Eleven survivors were anuric three days or less, and renal perfusion was detectable by scintigraphy in each case. However, the remaining survivor (with bilateral renal vein thrombosis) recovered after 15 days of anuria despite nonvisualization of kidneys by scintigraphy. In neonates with ischemic acute renal failure, lack of oliguria and the presence of identifiable renal uptake of nuclide suggest a favorable prognosis.

  10. CT fluoroscopy-guided renal tumour cutting needle biopsy: retrospective evaluation of diagnostic yield, safety, and risk factors for diagnostic failure.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Toshihiro; Hiraki, Takao; Matsui, Yusuke; Fujiwara, Hiroyasu; Sakurai, Jun; Masaoka, Yoshihisa; Gobara, Hideo; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2017-08-02

    To evaluate retrospectively the diagnostic yield, safety, and risk factors for diagnostic failure of computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy-guided renal tumour biopsy. Biopsies were performed for 208 tumours (mean diameter 2.3 cm; median diameter 2.1 cm; range 0.9-8.5 cm) in 199 patients. One hundred and ninety-nine tumours were ≤4 cm. All 208 initial procedures were divided into diagnostic success and failure groups. Multiple variables related to the patients, lesions, and procedures were assessed to determine the risk factors for diagnostic failure. After performing 208 initial and nine repeat biopsies, 180 malignancies and 15 benign tumours were pathologically diagnosed, whereas 13 were not diagnosed. In 117 procedures, 118 Grade I and one Grade IIIa adverse events (AEs) occurred. Neither Grade ≥IIIb AEs nor tumour seeding were observed within a median follow-up period of 13.7 months. Logistic regression analysis revealed only small tumour size (≤1.5 cm; odds ratio 3.750; 95% confidence interval 1.362-10.326; P = 0.011) to be a significant risk factor for diagnostic failure. CT fluoroscopy-guided renal tumour biopsy is a safe procedure with a high diagnostic yield. A small tumour size (≤1.5 cm) is a significant risk factor for diagnostic failure. • CT fluoroscopy-guided renal tumour biopsy has a high diagnostic yield. • CT fluoroscopy-guided renal tumour biopsy is safe. • Small tumour size (≤1.5 cm) is a risk factor for diagnostic failure.

  11. Sexual dysfunction in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Soffer, O

    1980-12-01

    Sexual dysfunction in end-stage renal disease is a troublesome, multifactorial disorder. Abnormality of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis is but one of the causes leading to the impotence and infertility commonly encountered in chronic renal failure. Short of kidney transplantation, no therapy is available. Though infertility is the rule in end-stage renal disease, successful fatherhood and deliveries have occurred on rare occasions.

  12. Reversible renal failure after treatment with omeprazole.

    PubMed

    Post, A T; Voorhorst, G; Zanen, A L

    2000-08-01

    Omeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor widely used in the treatment of gastro-esophageal reflux disease and peptic ulcer disease. In a 73-year-old man we describe renal failure due to acute interstitial nephritis after use of omeprazol during 4 months. Unexpected renal failure without signs of hydronephrosis should always provoke awareness of drug reaction, omeprazole being one of the possible drugs.

  13. [Chronic renal failure secondary to uterine prolapse].

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Canora, J; Venegas, J L

    2005-01-01

    Acute and chronic renal failure secondary to bilateral severe hydroureteronephrosis is a rare sequela of uterine prolapse. We report a case of neglected complete uterine prolapse in a 72-year-old patient resulting in bilateral hydroureter, hydronephrosis, and chronic renal failure. In an attempt to diminish the ureteral obstruction a vaginal pessary was used to reduce the uterine prolapse. Finally, surgical repair of prolapse by means of a vaginal hysterectomy was performed. In conclusion, all patients presenting with complete uterine prolapse should be screened to exclude urinary tract obstruction. If present, obstructive uropathy should be relieved by the reduction or repair of the prolapse before irreversible renal damage occurs.

  14. Renal Failure Prevalence in Poisoned Patients

    PubMed Central

    Arefi, Mohammad; Taghaddosinejad, Fakhroddin; Salamaty, Peyman; Soroosh, Davood; Ashraf, Hami; Ebrahimi, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Renal failure is an important adverse effect of drug poisoning. Determining the prevalence and etiology of this serious side effect could help us find appropriate strategies for the prevention of renal failure in most affected patients. Objectives: The present study is aimed to identify drugs that induce renal failure and also to find the prevalence of renal failure in patients referred to emergency departments with the chief complaint of drug poisoning, in order to plan better therapeutic strategies to minimize the mortality associated with drug poisoning induced renal failure. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study surveyed 1500 poisoned patients referred to the Emergency Department of Baharloo Hospital in Tehran during 2010. Demographic data including age and gender as well as clinical data including type of medication, duration of hospital stay, and presence of renal failure were recorded. Mann-Whitney U test and chi-squared statistics were used to analyze the results. Results: A total number of 435 patients were poisoned with several drugs, 118 patients were intoxicated with sedative-hypnotic drugs, 279 patients were exposed to opium, and 478 patients were administered to other drugs. The method of intoxication included oral 84.3%, injective 9%, inhalation 4.3% and finally a combination of methods 2.3%. Laboratory results revealed that 134 cases had renal failure and 242 had rhabdomyolysis. The incidence of rhabdomyolysis and renal failure increased significantly with age, and also with time of admission to the hospital. Renal failure was reported in 25.1% of patients exposed to opium, vs. 18.2% of patients poisoned with aluminum phosphide, 16.7% of those with organophosphate, 8% with multiple drugs, 6.7% with alcohol, heavy metals and acids, and 1.7% with sedative hypnotics. Conclusions: Based on the findings of this study, there is a high probability of renal failure for patients poisoned with drugs such as opium, aluminum phosphide

  15. Renal neurohormonal regulation in heart failure decompensation.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Sofia; Agic, Mediha Becirovic; Narfström, Fredrik; Melville, Jacqueline M; Hultström, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Decompensation in heart failure occurs when the heart fails to balance venous return with cardiac output, leading to fluid congestion and contributing to mortality. Decompensated heart failure can cause acute kidney injury (AKI), which further increases mortality. Heart failure activates signaling systems that are deleterious to kidneys such as renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and vasopressin secretion. All three reduce renal blood flow (RBF) and increase tubular sodium reabsorption, which may increase renal oxygen consumption causing AKI through renal tissue hypoxia. Vasopressin contributes to venous congestion through aquaporin-mediated water retention. Additional water retention may be mediated through vasopressin-induced medullary urea transport and hyaluronan but needs further study. In addition, there are several systems that could protect the kidneys and reduce fluid retention such as natriuretic peptides, prostaglandins, and nitric oxide. However, the effect of natriuretic peptides and nitric oxide are blunted in decompensation, partly due to oxidative stress. This review considers how neurohormonal signaling in heart failure drives fluid retention by the kidneys and thus exacerbates decompensation. It further identifies areas where there is limited data, such as signaling systems 20-HETE, purines, endothelin, the role of renal water retention mechanisms for congestion, and renal hypoxia in AKI during heart failure.

  16. Malignancy and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Peces, Ramon

    2003-01-01

    Increased incidence of cancer at various sites is observed in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Certain malignant diseases, such as lymphomas and carcinomas of the kidney, prostate, liver and uterus, show an enhanced prevalence compared with the general population. In particular, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) shows an excess incidence in ESRD patients. A multitude of factors, directly or indirectly associated with the renal disease and the treatment regimens, may contribute to the increased tumor formation in these patients. Patients undergoing renal replacement therapy (RRT) are prone to develop acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD), which may subsequently lead to the development of RCC. In pre-dialysis patients with coexistent renal disease, as in dialysis and transplant patients, the presence of ACKD may predispose to RCC. Previous use of cytotoxic drugs (eg, cyclophosphamide) or a history of analgesic abuse, are additional risk factors for malignancy. Malignancy following renal transplantation is an important medical problem during the follow-up. The most common malignancies are lymphoproliferative disorders (early after transplantation) and skin carcinomas (late after transplantation). Another important confounder for risk of malignancy after renal transplantation is the type of immunosuppression. The type of malignancy is different in various countries and dependent on genetic and environmental factors. Finally, previous cancer treatment in a uremic patient on the transplant waiting list is of great importance in relation to waiting time and post-malignancy screening.

  17. An unusual cause of acute renal failure: renal lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ozaltin, Fatih; Yalçin, Bilgehan; Orhan, Diclehan; Sari, Neriman; Caglar, Melda; Besbas, Nesrin; Bakkaloglu, Aysin

    2004-08-01

    Renal involvement is a common finding in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Acute renal failure at initial presentation due to lymphomatous infiltration of the kidneys has been described infrequently. We report a 17-year-old male who presented with acute renal failure due to massive lymphomatous infiltration of the kidneys, which necessitated hemodialysis. The diagnosis of B-cell NHL was established by tru-cut biopsy of the kidneys and the patient had an excellent response to high-dose chemotherapy with no major complication. The presence of extrarenal involvement in the testes and the retroperitoneal lymph nodes made the diagnosis of primary renal lymphoma debatable. However, considering the delay in diagnosis and the high proliferative rate of B-cell NHL, we might postulate that the disease had originated primarily in the kidneys. We recommend that in NHL cases with severe renal involvement, full-dose chemotherapy should be instituted with meticulous clinical and laboratory follow-up in order to improve clinical and renal failure status rapidly and to avoid further dissemination of NHL.

  18. Acute renal failure following blunt civilian trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Matas, A J; Payne, W D; Simmons, R L; Buselmeier, T J; Kjellstrand, C M

    1977-01-01

    Renal failure developed in 20 patients following blunt civilian trauma. Ten recovered normal renal function; 8 currently survive. Survivors and nonsurvivors did not differ in age, time from trauma to anuria, mean blood urea nitrogen or creatinine level prior to the first or to subsequent dialyses. However, there was an increased incidence of sepsis and liver failure in those who died. When outcome was related to site of injury, patients with closed head injury and/or intra-abdominal injury had a worse prognosis than those with thoracic or extremity injury only. Only 2 patients with perforated bowel survived; both had peritoneal dialysis combined with peritoneal lavage with antibiotic solutions. Mortality in patients with posttraumatic renal failure remains high; however, death is usually a result of associated complications rather than a result of the renal failure. Aggressive management of other complications of the trauma, especially sepsis or potential sepsis, is necessary. We recommend peritoneal dialysis combined with peritoneal antibiotic lavage where there is a potential for posttraumatic intra-abdominal sepsis associated with renal failure. PMID:843128

  19. Encephalopathy in children with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Baluarte, H J; Gruskin, A B; Hiner, L B; Foley, C M; Grover, W D

    1977-01-01

    The progressive encephalopathy observed in 5 children with chronic renal failure was clinically similar to the so-called dialysis encephalopathy of adults, except that it was not related to dialysis therapy. Renal osteodystrophy is more prevalent in children than in adults and often more severe. The attempt to control the crippling deformities of renal osteodystrophy in growing children with renal insufficiency has led to the use of large quantities of aluminum containing antacids. The encephalopathy observed in children with chronic renal failure may be related to the oral ingestion of aluminum containing compounds in the presence of persistent secondary hyperparathyroidism. We suggest that alternative methods for the adequate control of serum phosphorus levels should be sought and indications for parathyroidectomy in children reevaluated. During the past 18 mos we have lowered the dose of aluminum containing compounds to 50 to 100 mg/Kg/day in our patients with progressive renal failure and recommend parathyroidectomy. No new cases of the encephalopathy have occurred.

  20. [Problems with immunosuppressive agents in nephropathies with chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Savoldi, S; Mesiano, P; Rocchietti, M

    2008-01-01

    Immunosuppressive treatment is widely used in transplant patients, who often have chronic renal failure, while its use in nephropathies of native kidneys with chronic renal insufficiency is still limited. In recent years a number of papers have reported advantages of its use also in this setting. A prerequisite for immunosuppression in this condition is accurate renal histology, in order to define the etiology, activity/chronicity index and prognosis. Although clinicians agree on the use of aggressive treatment for secondary nephropathies, the approach to primary forms in the presence of chronic renal failure remains controversial, as does the definition of a ''point of no return'' beyond which treatment could be ineffective or unsafe. Nonrandomized studies found that immunosuppressive drugs such as cyclophosphamide can be useful in membranous nephropathy with renal insufficiency. The use of immunosuppressive drugs in IgA nephropathy in the presence of established renal insufficiency seems to improve renal survival with a limited occurrence of side effects. Since the pharmacokinetics of the current immunosuppressive agents (steroids, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, chlorambucil, mycophenolate mofetil) is modified by renal insufficiency, attention should be paid to reducing drug doses and monitoring toxicity. Immunosuppressive treatment is a critical procedure in patients with chronic renal failure, in whom an increased risk of infection is already present. In conclusion, on the basis of the data of the literature, we can hypothesize that the ''point of no return'' exceeds the threshold generally considered safe by clinicians. Nevertheless, a strict definition of a cutoff value for renal function to establish whether or not a certain treatment should be given is not applicable in clinical practice, where the choice of an immunosuppressive approach must be tailored to the individual patient based on a global evaluation including renal histology, clinical conditions

  1. Vitamin replacement therapy in renal failure patients.

    PubMed

    Makoff, R

    1999-01-01

    Renal failure patients require vitamin replacement therapy that addresses the specialized needs of renal failure. Four factors including restricted diet, uremic toxins, drug-nutrient interactions, and in ESRD, the dialysis process, affect the normal absorption, retention and activity of necessary micronutrients which support all aspects of carbohydrate, protein, lipid and nucleic acid metabolism. Studies have shown that the typical renal failure diet is low in B vitamins, that uremic factors affect folate and pyridoxine activities and that many B vitamins are lost on dialysis at a rate greater than are lost with normal urinary excretion. In addition, retention of vitamin A or inappropriately high supplementation of vitamin C may cause toxicities which exacerbate existing pathologies. Further, emerging research suggests some vitamins such as folic acid and pyridoxine, if provided in higher than normal amounts, may have an impact on reducing the risk of some aspects of renal cardiovascular disease. It is therefore important to supplement some vitamins, and use restraint in the supplementation of others. It is clear that renal failure patients, including predialysis, ESRD and transplant patients need specialized supplementation that meets the requirements of disease and its management.

  2. [Urinary tract infections and chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Sobotová, D

    2011-01-01

    The paper briefly summarizes issues related to urinary tract infections in adults: predispositions and risk factors, classification, assessment of pathogenicity of bacterial agents, the role of bacteriuria and leucocyturia, interpretation of findings, treatment principles and an association with chronic renal failure. Urinary tract infections are the second most frequent infectious disease in the population. They most often affect women of childbearing potential and then seniors of both sexes who have multiple risk factors. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus saprophyticus are the most pathogenic towards urinary tract; they are responsible for 85% and 10-15% of cases of acute uncomplicated urinary infections, respectively. Chronic pyelonephritis, a chronic interstitial nephritis, is the fourth most frequent cause of chronic renal failure. Chronic renal failure is a risk factor for the development of urinary infections due to metabolic disorders resulting in secondary immunodeficiencywith a disorder of all components of immunity. In patients with chronic renal failure, urinary tract infections occur most frequently after kidney transplantation when graft pyelonephritis is a life-threatening complication. Therefore, urinary tract infection prevention with co-trimoxazole once daily over at least 6 months is recommended in renal allograft recipients.

  3. Renal function assessment in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Pérez Calvo, J I; Josa Laorden, C; Giménez López, I

    Renal function is one of the most consistent prognostic determinants in heart failure. The prognostic information it provides is independent of the ejection fraction and functional status. This article reviews the various renal function assessment measures, with special emphasis on the fact that the patient's clinical situation and response to the heart failure treatment should be considered for the correct interpretation of the results. Finally, we review the literature on the performance of tubular damage biomarkers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  4. Differential Response to Low-Dose Dopamine or Low-Dose Nesiritide in Acute Heart Failure With Reduced or Preserved Ejection Fraction: Results From the ROSE AHF Trial (Renal Optimization Strategies Evaluation in Acute Heart Failure).

    PubMed

    Wan, Siu-Hin; Stevens, Susanna R; Borlaug, Barry A; Anstrom, Kevin J; Deswal, Anita; Felker, G Michael; Givertz, Michael M; Bart, Bradley A; Tang, W H Wilson; Redfield, Margaret M; Chen, Horng H

    2016-08-01

    The ROSE AHF trial (Renal Optimization Strategies Evaluation in Acute Heart Failure) found that when compared with placebo, neither low-dose dopamine (2 µg/kg per minute) nor low-dose nesiritide (0.005 μg/kg per minute without bolus) enhanced decongestion or preserved renal function in AHF patients with renal dysfunction. However, there may be differential responses to vasoactive agents in AHF patients with reduced versus preserved ejection fraction (EF). This post hoc analysis examined potential interaction between treatment effect and EF (EF ≤40% versus >40%) on the ROSE AHF end points. ROSE AHF enrolled AHF patients (n=360; any EF) with renal dysfunction. The coprimary end points were cumulative urine volume and the change in serum cystatin-C in 72 hours. The effect of dopamine (interaction P=0.001) and nesiritide (interaction P=0.039) on urine volume varied by EF group. In heart failure with reduced EF, urine volume was higher with active treatment versus placebo, whereas in heart failure with preserved EF, urine volume was lower with active treatment. The effect of dopamine and nesiritide on weight change, sodium excretion, and incidence of AHF treatment failure also varied by EF group (interaction P<0.05 for all). There was no interaction between vasoactive treatment's effect and EF on change in cystatin-C. Compared with placebo, dopamine was associated with improved clinical outcomes in heart failure with reduced EF and worse clinical outcomes in heart failure with preserved EF. With nesiritide, there were no differences in clinical outcomes when compared with placebo in both heart failure with reduced EF and heart failure with preserved EF. In this post hoc analysis of ROSE AHF, the response to vasoactive therapies differed in patients with heart failure with reduced EF and heart failure with preserved EF. Investigations of AHF therapies should assess the potential for differential responses in AHF with preserved versus reduced EF. URL: http

  5. [Ischemic rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure].

    PubMed

    Madrazo Delgado, M; Uña Orejón, R; Redondo Calvo, F J; Criado Jiménez, A

    2007-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a clinical syndrome characterized by the breakdown and later necrosis of skeletal muscle, leading to the release of various intracellular components into the blood stream. The clinical expression of rhabdomyolysis ranges from asymptomatic to severe forms involving multiorgan failure with electrolyte imbalance, respiratory distress syndrome, acute renal failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Diagnosis is based on a finding of elevated serum levels of components that are normally found within the muscle cell, chiefly muscle enzymes and myoglobin. Acute kidney failure, one of the main consequences of rhabdomyolysis, occurs in 4% to 33% of cases. Treatment requires prompt volume replacement with crystalloids. In spite of successful resuscitation and prophylaxis against myoglobulin-induced renal failure, 1 out of every 3 patients develops kidney damage and requires continuous replacement therapy.

  6. Prion protein in patients with renal failure.

    PubMed

    Starke, R; Mackie, I; Drummond, O; MacGregor, I; Harrison, P; Machin, S

    2006-06-01

    We previously found elevated levels of prion protein (PrP(C)) in the blood plasma of 16 patients with renal failure. We studied a further 20 patients with renal failure, and all had a significantly higher PrP(C) concentration than healthy normal subjects (P < 0.0001). Renal dialysis did not remove plasma PrP(C) in these patients. Because dialysis patients receive heparin during dialysis, which could potentially bind to PrP(C), the concentration of PrP(C) was measured in patients receiving heparin for cardiopulmonary bypass and was found to be similar to normal controls. We also studied several other groups with chronic illnesses and found that patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and sickle cell anaemia had normal plasma PrP(C) levels, but that those with beta-thalassaemia had slightly elevated levels of plasma PrP(C). This suggests that the observations in renal failure were not just part of a generalized response to chronic illness or acute phase reaction. The mechanism of elevated plasma PrP(C) levels in renal disease is unknown, but this shows that plasma PrP(C) is not a specific marker of neurological disease or Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

  7. [Giant renal angiomyolipoma with right heart failure].

    PubMed

    Le Huu Nho, R; Renard, S; Maurin, C; Souteyrand, P; Le Treut, Y P

    2014-06-01

    We report the case of a 63-year-old woman presenting a 26cm right renal angiomyolipoma with intratumoral arteriovenous fistula responsible for a high-output right heart failure. A radical surgical treatment after preoperative embolization allowed rapid improvement of cardiac symptoms with an uneventful postoperative course.

  8. Endothelial Dysfunction in Renal Failure: Current Update.

    PubMed

    Radenkovic, Miroslav; Stojanovic, Marko; Prostran, Milica

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is principally characterized by impaired endothelium- dependent transduction mechanisms related to vascular relaxation, as an outcome of decreased release of endothelium-derived relaxing factors, mainly nitric oxide, as well as augmented oxidative stress, increased inflammation and predominance of vascular action produced by endothelium-derived contracting factors. Current data strongly suggest that pathological development of different types of kidney impairment with further progression to renal failure includes notable vascular changes associated with endothelial dysfunction. In accordance, this scientific field represents an advancing area of investigation, involving different biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction linked to renal impairment, as well as clinical findings with new information that can provide a more comprehensive understanding of the role of endothelial dysfunction in kidney disease. With regards to quoted facts, the aim of this article was to review the latest data related to endothelial dysfunction and renal failure by selection of relevant articles released from 2010 to 2015.

  9. Exanthema and acute anuric renal failure.

    PubMed

    Resch, M; Banas, B; Endemann, D; Mack, M; Riegger, G A J; Gröne, H J; Krämer, B K

    2006-05-01

    A 15-year-old girl with a history of Kawasaki disease was admitted to our nephrological department due to acute renal failure. Despite antibiotic therapy because of fever and the symptoms of a pharyngitis in the last few days, the girl showed persisting fever and developed arthralgias, an exanthema and a rising serum creatinine as well as anuria. A wide variety of differential diagnoses has to be thought of because of the history of the Kawasaki disease (symptoms like fever, pharyngitis, exanthema and arthralgia), i.e. hemolytic-uremic syndrome, vasculitis, ascending infection, postinfection glomerulonephritis. In consideration of etiologically unclear "rapidly progressive renal failure" with anuria and thrombocytopenia an immediate renal biopsy was done and revealed a severe drug induced acute interstitial nephritis. Due to this diagnosis we treated the patient with corticosteroids. Within 4 weeks serum creatinine declined to 1.8 mg/dl but did not normalize.

  10. Nutrition disorders during acute renal failure and renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Wiesen, Patricia; Van Overmeire, Lionel; Delanaye, Pierre; Dubois, Bernard; Preiser, Jean-Charles

    2011-03-01

    The physiological and biological modifications related to acute renal failure in critically ill patients, including the current use of continuous renal replacement therapies, have dramatically changed the type and importance of the metabolic and nutrition disturbances observed during treatment of renal failure. This review summarizes the current knowledge and makes recommendations for the daily nutrition management of these patients. The filtration of water-soluble substances of low molecular weight by continuous hemodiafiltration results in significant losses of glucose, amino acids, low-molecular-weight proteins, trace elements, and water-soluble vitamins. The losses of these macronutrients and micronutrients should be compensated for. During continuous renal replacement therapy, the daily recommended energy allowance is between 25 and 35 kcal/kg, with a ratio of 60%-70% carbohydrates to 30%-40% lipids, and between 1.5 and 1.8 g/kg protein. Providing energy 25-35 kcal/kg/d with a carbohydrate/lipid ratio of 60-70/30-40 and protein 1.5-1.8 g/kg/d is recommended during continuous renal replacement therapy. Supplemental vitamin B(1) (100 mg/d), vitamin C (250 mg/d), and selenium (100 mcg/d) are also recommended.

  11. Acute renal failure in dogs after the ingestion of grapes or raisins: a retrospective evaluation of 43 dogs (1992-2002).

    PubMed

    Eubig, Paul A; Brady, Melinda S; Gwaltney-Brant, Sharon M; Khan, Safdar A; Mazzaferro, Elisa M; Morrow, Carla M K

    2005-01-01

    A review of records from the AnTox database of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Animal Poison Control Center identified 43 dogs that developed increased blood urea nitrogen concentration, serum creatinine concentration, or both as well as clinical signs after ingesting grapes, raisins, or both. Clinical findings, laboratory findings, histopathological findings, treatments performed, and outcome were evaluated. All dogs vomited, and lethargy, anorexia, and diarrhea were other common clinical signs. Decreased urine output, ataxia, or weakness were associated with a negative outcome. High calcium x phosphorus product (Ca x P), hyperphosphatemia, and hypercalcemia were present in 95%, 90%, and 62% of the dogs in which these variables were evaluated. Extremely high initial total calcium concentration, peak total calcium concentration, initial Ca x P, and peak Ca x P were negative prognostic indicators. Proximal renal tubular necrosis was the most consistent finding in dogs for which histopathology was evaluated. Fifty-three percent of the 43 dogs survived, with 15 of these 23 having a complete resolution of clinical signs and azotemia. Although the mechanism of renal injury from grapes and raisins remains unclear, the findings of this study contribute to an understanding of the clinical course of acute renal failure that can occur after ingestion of grapes or raisins in dogs.

  12. Growth factors and acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Hirschberg, R; Ding, H

    1998-03-01

    During acute renal injury, there are alterations in the expression of several growth factors and their receptors in the kidney. The increased expression of several growth factors and/or their receptors at sites of nephron injury suggests important contributions to repair. Exogenous administration of some growth factors, such as IGF-I, EGF and HGF, accelerates recovery of renal function in experimental acute renal failure (ARF). In ARF growth factors act through several mechanisms, which may include altered cell cycle regulation and mitogenesis, differentiation of recovered cells, regulation of apoptosis, improved renal hemodynamics, and others. There is evidence for interactions of growth factors with other growth factors as well as with other genes resulting in complex orchestration of biologic events contributing to recovery from ARF.

  13. Canine renal failure syndrome in three dogs.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Won Il; Do, Sun Hee; Jeong, Da Hee; Chung, Jae Yong; Yang, Hai Jie; Yuan, Dong Wei; Hong, Il Hwa; Park, Jin Kyu; Goo, Moon Jung; Jeong, Kyu Shik

    2006-09-01

    Three dead dogs were brought to the College of Veterinary Medicine, Kyungpook National University for study. Clinically, all the dogs showed emaciation, anorexia, depression, hemorrhagic vomiting and diarrhea for 7-10 days before death. All the clinical signs were first noted for about one month after feeding the dogs with commercial diets. At necropsy, all 3 dogs had severe renal damage with the same green-yellowish colored nephroliths in the renal pelvis. They also showed systemic hemorrhage and calcification of several organs, which might have been induced by uremia. Microscopically, necrosis, calcification and calculi were detected in the renal tubules, and especially in the proximal convoluted tubules and collecting ducts of the kidney. These findings were supportive of a mycotoxic effect, and especially on their kidneys. However, the precise cause of the toxic effect in these cases of canine renal failure could not be determined.

  14. [Acute renal failure after intake of mushrooms].

    PubMed

    Rojas Feria, P; González Rodríguez, J D; Canalejo González, D; Sánchez Moreno, A; Cabrera, R; Martín Govantes, J

    2008-01-01

    The picking and consumption of wild mushrooms is a frequent practice in our region and may lead to accidental poisoning when confused with edible mushrooms. We describe the case of a 9-year-old boy who, following the ingestion of a poisonous mushroom, presented with uncontrollable vomiting and subsequent hepatic, haematological and renal failure some hours later. The patient required haemodialysis. The clinical course, laboratory findings and renal histology, which showed tubular necrosis with basal membrane preserved and lymphocytic interstitial infiltrate, confirmed the diagnosis of a severe mixed syndrome. The patient evolved favourably after the poisoning, recovering renal and liver function. In any case of acute renal failure of unknown cause in children, it would be necessary to rule out ingestion of mushrooms, since the patient could benefit from early treatment with haemoperfusion and thus prevent the deterioration of the renal function and other organs. In our patient, haemoperfusion was not carried out due to the lengthy period of latency since the ingestion of the toxic substance until diagnosis.

  15. Chronic renal failure, cachexia, and ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Laviano, A; Krznaric, Z; Sanchez-Lara, K; Preziosa, I; Cascino, A; Rossi Fanelli, F

    2010-01-01

    Protein energy wasting is frequently observed in patients with advanced chronic renal failure and end-stage renal disease. Anorexia and reduced food intake are critical contributing factors and negatively impact on patients' survival. Ghrelin is a prophagic peptide produced by the stomach and acting at the hypothalamic level to increase the activity of orexigenic neurons. In patients with chronic renal disease, plasma levels are increased as a likely effect of reduced renal clearance. Nevertheless, patients' food intake is significantly reduced, suggesting inflammation-mediated resistance of hypothalamic nuclei to peripheral signals. A number of forms of evidence show that ghrelin resistance could be overcome by the administration of exogenous ghrelin. Therefore, ghrelin has been proposed as a potential strategy to improve food intake in chronic renal failure patients with protein energy wasting. Preliminary data are encouraging although larger prospective clinical trials are needed to confirm the results and to identify those patients who are likely to benefit most from the administration of exogenous ghrelin.

  16. Ascending uretero-pyelography in renal failure.

    PubMed

    Kingston, R D; Shah, K J; Dawson-Edwards, P

    1977-09-01

    Ascending uretero-pyelography has been carried out over a period of 13 years in 97 consecutive patients with undiagnosed renal failure. Sixty-nine were in a non-obstructive uropathy group while 26 had ureteric obstructions. There were two failures. Over 60% of examinations were performed under local anaesthesia, each examination taking an average of 20 min. There has been no mortality and two anaesthetic complications have been the only significant morbidity. Ureteric injury, urinary infection and renal function have all been investigated and recorded. Five per cent of patients developed urinary infection following AUP but without any major consequences. No significant ureteric injury occurred and no late sequelae were noted. Neither any reaction to contrast medium nor any further deterioration in renal function was observed; AUP was diagnostic in 46% of patients. In the remainder it ruled out obstructive uropathy and gave useful information about the kidneys, ureters and bladder. In experienced hands and with proper facilities AUP is safe and can be helpful in the diagnosis and management of patients in renal failure.

  17. [Renal failure in patients with liver transplant: incidence and predisposing factors].

    PubMed

    Gerona, S; Laudano, O; Macías, S; San Román, E; Galdame, O; Torres, O; Sorkin, E; Ciardullo, M; de Santibañes, E; Mastai, R

    1997-01-01

    Renal failure is a common finding in patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the incidence, prognostic value of pre, intra and postoperative factors and severity of renal dysfunction in patients who undergo liver transplantation. Therefore, the records of 38 consecutive adult patients were reviewed. Renal failure was defined arbitrarily as an increase in creatinine (> 1.5 mg/dl) and/or blood urea (> 80 mg/dl). Three patients were excluded of the final analysis (1 acute liver failure and 2 with a survival lower than 72 hs.) Twenty one of the 35 patients has renal failure after orthotopic liver transplantation. Six of these episodes developed early, having occurred within the first 6 days. Late renal impairment occurred in 15 patients within the hospitalization (40 +/- 10 days) (Mean +/- SD). In he overall series, liver function, evaluated by Child-Pugh classification, a higher blood-related requirements and cyclosporine levels were observed more in those who experienced renal failure than those who did not (p < 0.05). Early renal failure was related with preoperative (liver function) and intraoperative (blood requirements) factors and several causes (nephrotoxic drugs and graft failure) other than cyclosporine were present in patients who developed late renal impairment. No mortality. No mortality was associated with renal failure. We conclude that renal failure a) is a common finding after liver transplantation, b) the pathogenesis of this complication is multifactorial and, c) in not related with a poor outcome.

  18. Abnormal Carbohydrate Metabolism in Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Rubenfeld, Sheldon; Garber, Alan J.

    1978-01-01

    To delineate the potential role of disordered glucose and glucose-precursor kinetics in the abnormal carbohydrate metabolism of chronic renal failure, alanine and glucose production and utilization and gluconeogenesis from alanine were studied in patients with chronic compensated renal insufficiency and in normal volunteers. With simultaneous primed injection-continuous infusions of radiolabeled alanine and glucose, rates of metabolite turnover and precursor-product interrelationships were calculated from the plateau portion of the appropriate specific activity curves. All subjects were studied in the postabsorption state. In 13 patients with chronic renal failure (creatinine = 10.7±1.2 mg/100 ml; mean±SEM), glucose turnover was found to be 1,035±99.3 μmol/min. This rate was increased 56% (P = 0.003) over that observed in control subjects (664±33.5 μmol/min). Alanine turnover was 474±96.0 μmol/min in azotemic patients. This rate was 191% greater (P = 0.007) than the rate determined in control subjects (163±19.4 μmol/min). Gluconeogenesis from alanine and the percent of glucose production contributed by gluconeogenesis from alanine were increased in patients with chronic renal failure (192% and 169%, respectively) as compared to controls (P < 0.05 for each). Alanine utilization for gluconeogenesis was increased from 40.2±3.86 μmol/min in control subjects to 143±39.0 μmol/min in azotemic patients (P < 0.05). The percent of alanine utilization accounted for by gluconeogenesis was not altered in chronic renal insufficiency. In nondiabetic azotemic subjects, mean fasting glucose and immunoreactive insulin levels were increased 24.3% (P = 0.005) and 130% (P = 0.046), respectively. These results in patients with chronic renal failure demonstrate (a) increased glucose production and utilization, (b) increased gluconeogenesis from alanine, (c) increased alanine production and utilization, and (d) a relative impairment to glucose disposal. We conclude that

  19. Pathogenesis of growth failure in renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, T M; Yi, Z W; Chan, J C

    1994-01-01

    This article reviews our current understanding of the mechanisms of growth failure in chronic renal disease. The neuro-endocrine control of growth hormone secretion and insulin-like growth factor gene expression subject to use of corticosteroids, uremia, and metabolic acidosis are presented. It has been shown in other non-growth hormone deficient conditions such as Turner's syndrome that the use of exogenous growth hormone increases linear growth but also accelerates closure of the growth plate with no significant difference in the final height of such children. An understanding of growth factors is especially important and timely because of the tendency these days to use growth hormone to overcome the growth impairment of children with chronic renal failure.

  20. Fever, jaundice and acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Sam M; Pathak, Neha; Toms, Graham C; Gelding, Susan V; Sivaprakasam, Venkat

    2015-02-01

    Leptospirosis is an uncommon infectious disease that has protean clinical manifestations ranging from an innocuous 'flu-like' illness to potentially life-threatening multi-organ failure. Here we describe a case of Weil's disease that presented on the acute medical take with fever, jaundice and acute renal failure. We highlight the importance of careful history taking at the time of admission and how understanding the epidemiology and pathophysiology of leptospirosis enables a definitive diagnosis to be reached. © 2015 Royal College of Physicians.

  1. Renal amyloidosis. Evaluation by gallium imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.W.; Skinner, M.; Cohen, A.S.; Ngai, S.; Peng, T.T.

    1986-09-01

    A study has been performed to evaluate the efficacy of gallium imaging in the detection of renal amyloidosis. Ten of the 11 patients who had biopsy-proven renal amyloidosis demonstrated marked uptake in both kidneys. One patient revealed moderate gallium uptake in his kidneys. None of the patients had underlying renal or extrarenal pathology other than amyloidosis, which could account for renal gallium uptake (renal infection, neoplasm, hepatic failure or frequent blood transfusions). Four patients also had extrarenal foci of abnormal gallium uptake, suggesting other sites of amyloid deposits. Our data strongly suggest that gallium imaging has a high sensitivity for detection of renal amyloidosis. Its specificity is enhanced significantly by careful review of the clinical history to exclude other known causes of renal gallium uptake. Potentially, gallium imaging may be used to monitor the progress of patients under experimental therapy.

  2. Ceftriaxone and acute renal failure in children.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Zhou, Xuefeng; Yuan, Jiyan; Chen, Guiying; Jiang, Hongliang; Zhang, Wen

    2014-04-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the clinical profile, treatment, and outcome of ceftriaxone-associated postrenal acute renal failure (PARF) in children. We retrospectively studied 31 consecutive cases from 2003 to 2012 for PARF after ceftriaxone treatment. There was no past history of urolithiasis or nephropathy in these children. The average time of ceftriaxone administration before PARF was 5.2 days. The major symptoms apart from anuria included flank pain (>3 years old, 25/25), excessive crying (<3 years, 6/6), and vomiting (19/33). Ultrasound showed mild hydronephrosis (25/31) and ureteric calculi (11/31). Nine children recovered after 1 to 4 days of pharmacotherapy. Twenty-one children who were resistant to pharmacotherapy underwent retrograde ureteral catheterization. After catheterization of their ureters, normal urine flow was observed, and the symptoms subsided immediately. Catheter insertion failed in 1 child who subsequently underwent 3 sessions of hemodialysis before normal urination was restored. Ceftriaxone was verified to be the main component of the calculi in 4 children by tandem mass spectrometric analysis. The recovery was complete in all cases. Ceftriaxone therapy in children may cause PARF. Early diagnosis and prompt pharmacological therapy are important in relieving the condition. Retrograde ureteral catheterization is an effective treatment of those who fail to respond to pharmacotherapy.

  3. Acute Renal Failure in Dengue Infection

    PubMed Central

    Subramanyam, Nambakam Tanuja

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Acute Renal Failure (RF) is a rare but well recognized complication of Dengue Infection (DI). There has been paucity of published data regarding renal involvement in DI. Aim The aim of the present study was to elucidate different clinical presentations, disease outcomes of DI. To study the frequency, severity and predictors of RF in DI. Materials and Methods Patients diagnosed either as Dengue Fever (DF) or Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever/Dengue Shock Syndrome (DHF/DSS) respectively were enrolled for this study. The diagnostic criteria for DI were febrile illness associated with one of the following: 1) detection of dengue-specific IgM capture antibody or Non-Structural Protein1 (NS1) antigen; or 2) a four-fold or greater increase of dengue-specific IgG capture antibody by ELISA and haemoagglutination inhibition assay. Patients were diagnosed as having Acute RF, if serum creatinine was >1.2 mg/dl or who showed improvement by 50% in serum creatinine from the initial value. It is an observational study of medical charts, data of age, gender, and medical history of any underlying diseases in association with the severity of DI of each patient recorded. All of the laboratory results were collected. Parameters that influenced the clinical presentations and outcomes for development of classical DF or DHF/DSS in patients with or without RF were analysed and compared. Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis was carried. The Statistical software namely SAS 9.2, SPSS 15.0, Stata 10.1, Med Calc 9.0.1, Systat 12.0 and R environment ver.2.11.1 were used. Results Most common symptoms were fever followed by headache and pain in abdomen. Among the patients with RF, all patients had recovery. The patients with DHF/DSS were more susceptible to develop renal failure compared to DF group. There were statistically significant higher frequencies of renal failure, haemoconcentration, thrombocytopenia, low serum cholesterol. Patients in the RF group also had significantly

  4. Intrarenal oxygenation in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Norman, Jill T; Fine, Leon G

    2006-10-01

    In chronic renal failure (CRF), renal impairment correlates with tubulointerstitial fibrosis characterized by inflammation, interstitial expansion with accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM), tubular atrophy and vascular obliteration. Tubulointerstitial injury subsequent to glomerular sclerosis may be induced by proteinuria, leakage of glomerular filtrate or injury to the post-glomerular peritubular capillaries (hypoxia). In vivo data in animal models suggest that CRF is associated with hypoxia, with the decline in renal Po2 preceding ECM accumulation. Chronic renal failure is characterized by loss of microvascular profiles but, in the absence of microvascular obliteration, hypoxia can occur by a variety of complementary mechanisms, including anaemia, decreased capillary flow, increased vasoconstriction, increased metabolic demand and increased diffusion distances due to ECM deposition. Hypoxia regulates a wide array of genes, including many fibrogenic factors. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) are the major, but not the sole, transcriptional regulators in the hypoxic response. In CRF, hypoxia may play a role in the sustained inflammatory response. In vitro studies in tubulointerstitial cells suggest that hypoxia can induce profibrogenic changes in proximal tubular epithelial cells and interstitial fibroblasts consistent with changes observed in CRF in vivo. The effect of hypoxia on renal microvascular cells warrants investigation. Hypoxia may play a role in the recruitment, retention and differentiation of circulating progenitor cells to the kidney contributing to the disease process and may also affect intrinsic stem cell populations. Chronic hypoxia in CRF fails to induce a sustained angiogenic response. Therapeutic manipulation of the hypoxic response may be of benefit in slowing progression of CRF. Potential therapies include correction of anaemia, inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system, administration of exogenous pro-angiogenic factors to protect the

  5. Renovascular heart failure: heart failure in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kawarada, Osami; Yasuda, Satoshi; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease presents with a broad spectrum of clinical features, including heart failure as well as hypertension, and renal failure. Although recent randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate renal artery stenting can reduce blood pressure or the number of cardiovascular or renal events more so than medical therapy, increasing attention has been paid to flash pulmonary edema and congestive heart failure associated with atherosclerotic renal artery disease. This clinical entity "renovascular heart failure" is diagnosed retrospectively. Given the increasing global burden of heart failure, this review highlights the background and catheter-based therapeutic aspects for renovascular heart failure.

  6. Obstetric acute renal failure 1956-1987.

    PubMed

    Turney, J H; Ellis, C M; Parsons, F M

    1989-06-01

    A total of 142 women with severe acute renal failure (ARF) resulting from obstetric causes was treated by dialysis at a single centre from 1956 to 1987. One-year survival was 78.6%, which compares favourably with other causes of ARF. Abortion, haemorrhage and preclampsia comprised 95% of cases, with survival being best (82.9%) with abortion. Survival was adversely affected by increasing age. Acute cortical necrosis (12.7% of patients) carried 100% mortality after 6 years. Follow-up of survivors showed normal renal function up to 31 years following ARF; 25-year patient survival was 71.6%. Improvements in obstetric care and the disappearance of illegal abortions have resulted in a dramatic decline in the incidence of obstetric ARF.

  7. Results from the Canadian Renal Failure Registry.

    PubMed

    Posen, G A; Jeffery, J R; Fenton, S S; Arbus, G S

    1990-05-01

    This report encompasses data collected from all Canadian patients starting treatment for end-stage renal failure (ESRF) from 1981 until the end of 1987. Gross mortality showed an initial decline, but has stabilized since 1985. The year of entry into the system did not change the survival rate. There was an increase in the rate of acceptance of new patients between 1982 and 1987. The largest increases were in the older age groups, and resulted in a concomitant increase in the number of registered patients in older age groups. Survival on dialysis by age group declined with age. There was no difference in patient survival on hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. The probability of death for all patients entering the ESRF system remained constant notwithstanding year of entry into the system. It was slightly higher for males than females, much higher for patients with diabetes or renal vascular disease, higher with age, and much higher for patients not undergoing transplant.

  8. Nuclear medicine in acute and chronic renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, R.A.; Byun, K.J.

    1982-07-01

    The diagnostic value of renal scintiscans in patients with acute or chronic renal failure has not been emphasized other than for the estimation of renal size. /sup 131/I OIH, /sup 67/gallium, /sup 99m/TcDTPA, glucoheptonate and DMSA all may be valuable in a variety of specific settings. Acute renal failure due to acute tubular necrosis, hepatorenal syndrome, acute interstitial nephritis, cortical necrosis, renal artery embolism, or acute pyelonephritis may be recognized. Data useful in the diagnosis and management of the patient with obstructive or reflux nephropathy may be obtained. Radionuclide studies in patients with chronic renal failure may help make apparent such causes as renal artery stenosis, chronic pyelonephritis or lymphomatous kidney infiltration. Future correlation of scanning results with renal pathology promises to further expand nuclear medicine's utility in the noninvasive diagnosis of renal disease.

  9. Renal cell therapy is associated with dynamic and individualized responses in patients with acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Humes, H David; Weitzel, William F; Bartlett, Robert H; Swaniker, Fresca C; Paganini, Emil P

    2003-01-01

    Renal cell therapy in conjunction with continuous hemofiltration techniques may provide important cellular metabolic activities to patients with acute renal failure (ARF) and may thereby change the natural history of this disorder. The development of a tissue-engineered bioartificial kidney consisting of a conventional hemofiltration cartridge in series with a renal tubule assist device (RAD) containing 10(9) human renal proximal tubule cells provides an opportunity to evaluate this form of therapy in patients with ARF in the intensive care unit. Nine patients with ARF and multi-organ systems failure (MOSF) have been treated so far with a tissue-engineered kidney in an FDA-approved Phase I/II clinical study currently underway. Acute physiologic parameters and serum cytokine levels were assessed before, during and after treatment with a bioartificial kidney. Use of the RAD in this clinical setting demonstrates maintenance of cell viability and functionality. Cardiovascular stability appears to be maintained during RAD treatment. Human tubule cells in the RAD demonstrated differentiated metabolic and endocrinologic activity. Acute physiologic and plasma cytokine data demonstrate that renal cell therapy is associated with rapid and variable responses in patients with ARF and MOSF. The initial clinical experience with the bioartificial kidney and the RAD suggests that renal tubule cell therapy may provide a dynamic and individualized treatment program as assessed by acute physiologic and biochemical indices. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  10. [Extracorporeal renal replacement therapies in acute renal failure].

    PubMed

    Schaefer, R M; Barenbrock, M; Teschner, M; Bahner, U

    2000-05-15

    The most serious forms of acute renal failure (ARF) are nowadays encountered in the intensive care unit (ICU), where up to 25% of new patients are reported to develop ARF. Lethality rates may reach 50 to 90% when the ARF is part of a multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. A multitude of extracorporeal procedures have been introduced into intensive care medicine. Applied with adequate skills and experience, most of these techniques will suffice to replace excretory renal function. However, because of low efficacy arterio-venous procedures (CAVH and CAVHD) have been abandoned for the veno-venous, pump-driven techniques (CVVH and CVVHD). Up to now, there is no consensus whether continuous or intermittent renal replacement therapy is more advantageous. In many cases, oliguric patients with circulatory instability will be treated by CVVH, even though there is no prospective study to show that in terms of outcome continuous treatment is superior to intermittent hemodialysis. It is equally conceivable to treat such patients with daily, prolonged (intermittent) hemodialysis. Apparently, the dose of replacement therapy, be it continuous filtration (36 to 48 l/24 h) or intermittent hemodialysis (daily 3 to 4 h) with a target BUN of less than 50 mg/dl, is more important than the modality of treatment. Moreover, there is good evidence that the use of biocompatible membranes (no complement- or leukocyte activation) is preferable and that with high-volume hemofiltration bicarbonate-containing replacement fluids should be used. However, despite all the technical advances, we firmly believe that the skills and the experience of those physicians and nurses who actually perform renal replacement therapy in the ICU are more important than the modality of treatment applied.

  11. Management of hepatitis C infection among patients with renal failure.

    PubMed

    Latt, N L; Araz, F; Alachkar, N; Durand, C M; Gurakar, A

    2015-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a rising global public health burden with an estimated 130-150 million infected people worldwide and 350,000 to 500,000 HCV-related deaths each year. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is also a highly prevalent public health issue as the escalating numbers of patients worldwide are developing type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension due to high fat diets and a growing obesity epidemic. The high incidence and prevalence of HCV infection leads to substantial morbidity and mortality among renal dialysis patients. Recommendations are to screen for HCV infection among all patients with renal failure especially prior to initiation of hemodialysis and renal transplant evaluation. HCV-antibody enzyme immunoassay (EIA) followed by confirmation with HCV RNA nucleic acid test (NAT) is recommended for low prevalence regions, but in dialysis centers with a high prevalence of HCV, initial testing with NAT is recommended due to higher false positive EIA rates. Liver biopsy is used to assess of liver disease severity. Transjugular liver biopsy, as an effective and safe technique in patients with ESRD can be considered instead of percutaneous approach. Non-invasive approaches to staging fibrosis, including liver stiffness measurement by transient elastography and panels of serum fibrosis biomarkers, are also widely used. Although difficult to manage, combined pegylated- interferon (PEG IFN) and ribavirin therapy was the only treatment modality available for HCV-positive patients until the recently introduced new direct-acting antiviral agents. However, except boceprevir, there are no currently available data to suggest that these new anti-viral drugs are safe and effective among end-stage renal failure patients. IFN-containing regimens were also associated with high rates of renal graft loss in post-renal transplant patients. Therefore, management of HCV infection in renal failure patients is unique and should be tailored individually with

  12. Renal failure in a patient with postpolio syndrome and a normal creatinine level.

    PubMed

    Leming, Melissa K; Breyer, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Patients with renal failure who are taking trimethoprim have an increased risk of developing hyperkalemia, which can cause muscle weakness. In patients with postpolio syndrome, a normal creatinine level could be abnormally high, renal failure is possible because of lack of creatinine production, and the muscle weakness from resultant hyperkalemia could be more severe because of their underlying condition. This abnormally high creatinine level has been termed from this point relative renal failure. The objective of the study was to review a case in which relative renal failure and hyperkalemia caused muscle weakness that manifested as shortness of breath and confusion with electrocardiographic changes. A dehydrated patient with relative renal failure and postpolio syndrome had taken trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole that caused symptomatic hyperkalemia. The patient presented with muscle weakness, shortness of breath, and confusion, with her postpolio syndrome compounding the situation and likely making the muscle weakness more severe. A patient on trimethoprim with renal failure is at an increased risk of developing hyperkalemia. Patients with postpolio syndrome could have severe muscle weakness from the hyperkalemia and could have renal failure even with a normal creatinine level. This case report will remind treating physicians to evaluate such patients for hyperkalemia if they present with muscle weakness, especially if the patient has renal failure and is on trimethoprim.

  13. Biocompatible hemodialysis membranes for acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Alonso, A; Lau, J; Jaber, B L

    2008-01-23

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Some studies have reported a survival advantage among patients dialyzed with biocompatible membranes (BCM) compared to bioincompatible membranes (BICM). These findings were not consistently observed in subsequent studies. To ascertain whether the use of BCM confers an advantage in either survival or recovery of renal function over the use of BICM in adult patients with ARF requiring intermittent hemodialysis. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, in The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (from 1966), EMBASE (from 1980), the Mexican Index of Latin American Biomedical Journals IMBIOMED (from 1990), the Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database LILACS (from 1982), and reference lists of articles. Search date: January 2007 Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing the use of a BCM with a BICM in patients > 18 years of age with ARF requiring intermittent hemodialysis. Two authors extracted the data independently. Cellulose-derived dialysis membranes were classified as BICM, and synthetic dialyzers were considered as BCM. The main outcomes were all-cause mortality and recovery of renal function by type of dialyzer. We further explored these outcomes according to the flux properties (high-flux or low-flux) of each of these dialyzers. A meta-analysis was conducted by combining data using a random-effects model. Ten studies were included in the primary analysis of mortality, with a total of 1100 patients. None of the pooled risk ratios (RRs) reached statistical significance. The pooled RR for mortality was 0.93 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.81 to 1.07). The overall RR for recovery of renal function, which was inclusive of 1038 patients from nine studies, was 1.09 (95% CI 0.90 to 1.31). The pooled RR for mortality by dialyzer flux property was 1.05 (95% CI 0.81 to 1.37). The pooled RR for recovery of renal function by flux

  14. Biocompatible hemodialysis membranes for acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Alonso, A; Lau, J; Jaber, B L

    2005-04-18

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Some trials have reported a survival advantage among patients dialyzed with biocompatible membranes (BCM) compared to bioincompatible membranes (BICM). These findings were not consistently observed in subsequent studies. To ascertain whether the use of BCM confers an advantage in either survival or recovery of renal function over the use of BICM in adult patients with ARF requiring intermittent hemodialysis. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, in The Cochrane Library - Issue 1, 2004), MEDLINE (1966 to January 2004), EMBASE (1980 to January 2004), the Mexican Index of Latin American Biomedical Journals IMBIOMED (1990 to January 2004), the Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database LILACS (1982 to January 2004), and reference lists of articles. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing the use of a BCM with a BICM in patients > 18 years of age with ARF requiring intermittent hemodialysis. Two authors extracted the data independently. Cellulose-derived dialysis membranes were classified as BICM, and synthetic dialyzers were considered as BCM. The main outcomes were all-cause mortality and recovery of renal function by type of dialyzer. We further explored these outcomes according to the flux properties (high-flux or low-flux) of each of these dialyzers. A meta-analysis was conducted by combining data using a random-effects model. Nine studies were included in the primary analysis of mortality, with a total of 1062 patients. None of the pooled RR's reached statistical significance. The pooled relative risk (RR) for mortality was 0.93 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.81 to 1.07). The overall RR for recovery of renal function, inclusive of 1038 patients from nine studies was 1.09 (95% CI 0.90 to 1.31). The pooled RR for mortality by dialyzer flux property was 1.03 (95% CI 0.82 to 1.30). The RR for recovery of

  15. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  16. Renal failure in fulminant hepatic failure and terminal cirrhosis: a comparison between incidence, types, and prognosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ring-Larsen, H; Palazzo, U

    1981-01-01

    Forty patients with terminal cirrhosis and 40 patients with fulminant hepatic failure-all consecutively admitted-were studied with regard to incidence, types, and prognosis of complicating renal insufficiency. Renal failure was considered present when the serum creatinine was greater than 0.20 mmol/l. Of the patients with cirrhosis 26 (65%) developed renal failure. In 15 the type was functional, in three due to acute tubular necrosis, and in eight indeterminable. Of the patients with fulminant hepatic failure 22 (55%) had renal insufficiency; of these 13 had functional renal failure, five acute tubular necrosis, and in four the type was indeterminable. In both categories of patients, renal failure was equally frequent among patients with or without gastrointestinal bleeding and with or without ascites or diuretic therapy. The biochemical tests of liver function were similar in patients with or without renal failure in both categories. The mean renal blood flow in seven unselected patients with fulminant hepatic failure was reduced in the same order as previously observed in patients with cirrhosis. In terminal cirrhosis the mortality rate was 88% in the presence of renal failure, 71% in its absence (p greater than 0.05), while the same figures in fulminant hepatic failure were 100% and 67% (p less than 0.05). The incidence, relative frequency, and prognosis of renal failure were not different in the two conditions, indicating identical pathophysiological circumstances. PMID:7262632

  17. Nitric oxide protects against ischemic acute renal failure through the suppression of renal endothelin-1 overproduction.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Hayato; Takaoka, Masanori; Kubo, Yasuhiro; Katayama, Tomoaki; Tsutsui, Hidenobu; Takayama, Junji; Matsumura, Yasuo

    2004-11-01

    To elucidate the role of nitric oxide in the pathogenesis of ischemic acute renal failure, we investigated the effects of FK409, a spontaneous nitric oxide donor, and N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a non-selective nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, on ischemia/reperfusion-induced renal injury and endothelin-1 overproduction in post-ischemic kidneys. Ischemic acute renal failure was induced by occlusion of the left renal artery and vein for 45 minutes followed by reperfusion, 2 weeks after contralateral nephrectomy. At 24 hours after reperfusion, renal function in untreated acute renal failure rats markedly decreased and histological examination revealed severe renal damage of the kidney. Increases in renal endothelin-1 contents were evident in the acute renal failure rats at 2 and 24 hours after reperfusion, respectively. Pretreatment with FK409 (1 or 3 mg/kg, intravenously) dose-dependently ameliorated renal injuries and suppressed the elevation of endothelin-1 content induced by ischemia/reperfusion. In contrast, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (1 or 10 mg/kg, intravenously) pretreatment dose-dependently aggravated renal injuries of acute renal failure rats, and the effect is accompanied by further increase in the renal endothelin-1 contents. These results suggest that both exogenous and endogenous nitric oxide have protective effects against ischemia/reperfusion-induced renal dysfunction and tissue damage, probably through the suppression of endothelin-1 overproduction in post-ischemic kidneys.

  18. Intestinal absorption of aluminium in renal failure.

    PubMed

    Drüeke, Tilman B

    2002-01-01

    aluminium absorption-from the methodological difficulties of measuring it accurately to understanding the long-term clinical risks of this metal-should guide us in the safety evaluation of other potentially toxic metals that have been proposed for therapeutic use in patients with renal failure.

  19. Diosgenin attenuates vascular calcification in chronic renal failure rats.

    PubMed

    Manivannan, Jeganathan; Barathkumar, T R; Sivasubramanian, Jeganathan; Arunagiri, Pandian; Raja, Boobalan; Balamurugan, Elumalai

    2013-06-01

    Vascular calcification due to elevated phosphate levels is the major contributor of cardiovascular dysfunction. The oxidative stress and gene expression events modulate the transdifferentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells into osteogenic phenotype. This present study intends to evaluate the dose-dependent effect of diosgenin, an antioxidant on high phosphate induced vascular calcification in adenine-induced chronic renal failure rats. High phosphate environment causes elevated calcium accumulation with related histological changes and alkaline phosphatase activity in aorta. Further it downregulates the activity of enzymatic antioxidants and elevates the level of lipid peroxidative markers. Moreover, the renal failure leads to reduced nitric oxide production. But, treatment with diosgenin at a dose of 10, 20, and 40 mg/kg given via oral gavages causes reversion of all the above events in a dose-dependent manner. The highest dose has shown more potential activity than other two doses, which has the ability to protect the alteration of liver markers and red blood cell antioxidant system without any adverse effects and it does not alter the kidney associated changes too. Finally, the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study strongly supports its ability to protect the macromolecules from oxidative stress. All the above evidences show that diosgenin has overall benefits against renal failure-induced vascular calcification-associated oxidative stress.

  20. Acute renal failure in pregnancy: our experience.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Rohina S; Mishra, Vineet V; Jasani, Anil F; Gumber, Manoj

    2014-03-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a serious medical complication during pregnancy, and, in the post-partum period, is associated with significant maternal morbidity and mortality as well as fetal loss. The objective of our study is to find the etiology and maternal outcome of ARF during pregnancy. The study was conducted at the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of the Institute of Kidney Disease and Research Center, Ahmedabad, India from January 2009 to January 2011. Fifty previously healthy patients who developed ARF, diagnosed on oliguria and serum creatinine >2 mg%, were included in the study. Patients with a known history of renal disease, diabetes and hypertension were excluded from the study. All patients were followed-up for a period of six months. Patient re-cords, demographic data, urine output on admission and preceding history of antepartum hemorrhage (APH), post-partum hemorrhage (PPH), septicemia, operative interventions and retained product of conception were noted and need for dialysis was considered. Patients were thoroughly examined and baseline biochemical investigations and renal and obstetrical ultrasound were performed on each patient and bacterial culture sensitivity on blood, urine or vaginal swabs were performed in selected patients. The age range was 19-38 years (mean 26 ± 3.8). The first trimester, second trimester and puerperal groups comprised of four (8%), 25 (50%) and 21 patients (42%), respectively. Hemorrhage was the etiology for ARF in 15 (30%), APH in ten (20%) and PPH in five (10%) patients. Eleven (22%) patients had lower segment cesarian section (LSCS) while 36 (78%) patients had normal vaginal delivery. In 20 (40%) patients, puerperal sepsis was the etiological factor, while pre-eclampsia, eclampsia and HELLP syndrome accounted for 18 (36%) patients. Two (4%) patients had disseminated intravascular coagulation on presentation while one (2%) patient was diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome. Maternal mortality was 12% (n = 6

  1. Fish gall bladder consumption presenting as acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, A; Karnik, ND; Gupta, VA; Hase, NK

    2015-01-01

    A forty two year old male was admitted with history of anuria and breathlessness following consumption of raw rohu fish gall bladder. He had azotemia and required hemodialysis. His renal failure improved over a period of about four weeks. Incidences have been reported from South East Asian countries associating consumption of raw rohu fish gall bladder with acute renal failure. PMID:26440398

  2. Aluminium in Bone from Patients with Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Victor; Davies, Christine; Goode, Clifford; Ogg, Chisholm; Siddiqui, J.

    1971-01-01

    Some samples of bone from patients with renal failure contained more aluminium than others, and the concentration tended to be highest in patients who had been uraemic or on dialysis longest. The significance of the association of raised concentrations of aluminium in bone with renal failure is discussed. PMID:5123910

  3. From Pre-Existing Renal Failure to Perioperative Renal Protection: The Anesthesiologist’s Dilemmas

    PubMed Central

    Domi, Rudin; Huti, Gentian; Sula, Hektor; Baftiu, Nehat; Kaci, Myzafer; Bodeci, Artan; Pesha, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Context Pre-existing renal dysfunction presents specific features that anesthesiologists must deal with. Anesthesia and renal function are connected and can interfere with each other. Induced hypotension anesthesia and the toxic effects of anesthetic drugs can further deteriorate renal function. Evidence Acquisition Decreased renal function can prolong anesthetic drug effects by decreased elimination of these drugs. Anesthesia can deteriorate renal function and decreased renal function can interfere with drug elimination leading to their prolonged effect. The anesthesiologist must understand all the physiological aspects of the patient, renal protection, and the relationships between anesthetic drugs and renal function. This review article aims to summarize these aspects. Results Perioperative renal failure and renal protection is a crucial moment in clinical practice of every anesthesiologist. Conclusions Good knowledges for renal function remain a hallmark of daily practice of the anesthesiologist, considering renal function as an important determinant factor in anesthesia practice. PMID:27642570

  4. [Postural trauma and rhabdomyolosis causing acute renal failure].

    PubMed

    Vecer, J; Kubátová, H; Soucek, M; Charvát, J; Kvapil, M; Matousovic, K; Martínek, V

    2000-02-01

    Rhabdomyolysis (damage of the muscles of various origin) leads to the efflux of the intracellular fluids in the circulation. The common complication of this status is the renal failure. The early diagnosis and the proper treatment makes the fall of renal function reversible. That is why the possibility of the rhabdomyolysis must be consider. The case report describes the development of renal failure in young, previously healthy men, followed by trauma mechanism after drug and alcohol abuse.

  5. Acute pancreatitis and acute renal failure complicating doxylamine succinate intoxication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang Deok; Lee, Soo Teik

    2002-06-01

    Doxylamine succinate is an antihistaminic drugwith additional hypnotic, anticholinergic and local anesthetic effects first described in 1948. In Korea and many other countries, it is a common-over-the counter medication frequently involved in overdoses. Clinical symtomatology of doxylamine succinate overdose includes somnolence, coma, seizures, mydriasis, tachycardia, psychosis, and rhabdomyolysis. A serious complication may be rhabdomyolysis with subsequent impairment of renal function and acute renal failure. We report a case of acute renal failure and acute pancreatitis complicating a doxylamine succinate intoxication.

  6. Renal Denervation for Chronic Heart Failure: Background and Pathophysiological Rationale

    PubMed Central

    Ewen, Sebastian; Mahfoud, Felix

    2017-01-01

    The activation of the sympathetic nervous system is associated with cardiovascular hospitalizations and death in heart failure. Renal denervation has been shown to effectively reduce sympathetic overdrive in certain patients with uncontrolled hypertension. Pilot trials investigating renal denervation as a potential treatment approach for heart failure were initiated. Heart failure comorbidities like obstructive sleep apnea, metabolic syndrome and arrhythmias could also be targets for renal denervation, because these occurrences are also mediated by the activation of the sympathetic nervous system. Therefore, renal denervation in heart failure is worthy of further investigation, although its effectiveness still has to be proven. Herein, we describe the pathophysiological rationale and the effect of renal denervation on surrogates of the heart failure syndrome. PMID:28154583

  7. Renal Denervation for Chronic Heart Failure: Background and Pathophysiological Rationale.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Michael; Ewen, Sebastian; Mahfoud, Felix

    2017-01-01

    The activation of the sympathetic nervous system is associated with cardiovascular hospitalizations and death in heart failure. Renal denervation has been shown to effectively reduce sympathetic overdrive in certain patients with uncontrolled hypertension. Pilot trials investigating renal denervation as a potential treatment approach for heart failure were initiated. Heart failure comorbidities like obstructive sleep apnea, metabolic syndrome and arrhythmias could also be targets for renal denervation, because these occurrences are also mediated by the activation of the sympathetic nervous system. Therefore, renal denervation in heart failure is worthy of further investigation, although its effectiveness still has to be proven. Herein, we describe the pathophysiological rationale and the effect of renal denervation on surrogates of the heart failure syndrome.

  8. Hypothyroidism and renal function in patients with systolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Merla, Ramanna; Martinez, Juan D; Martinez, Milagros A; Khalife, Wissam; Bionat, Susan; Bionat, Joanne; Barbagelata, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which hypothyroidism affects renal function in patients with heart failure remains incompletely explored, despite the known adverse prognostic implications of renal dysfunction in these patients.In a pilot retrospective study, we evaluated 75 patients (age, >or=18 yr) with left ventricular ejection fractions <0.40. Forty-five patients had normal thyroid function (thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], 0.35-5.5 micro IU/mL) and 30 had hypothyroidism. The group with hypothyroidism was subdivided into 17 patients who had controlled hypothyroidism (TSH, 0.35-5.5 micro IU/mL) and 13 who had uncontrolled hypothyroidism (TSH, >5.5 micro IU/mL). Renal function, measured in terms of glomerular filtration rate, was analyzed once in each patient, and the populations were statistically compared, with P <0.05 conferring statistical significance.Baseline characteristics in all groups were similar. Mean glomerular filtration rate was better in patients with normal thyroid function than those with hypothyroidism (75.45 +/- 31.48 vs 63.95 +/- 21.43 mL/min/1.73 m2; P=0.032). There was no significant difference between patients with controlled hypothyroidism (66.89 +/- 24.18 mL/min/1.73 m2) and those with normal thyroid function (P=0.131). In patients with uncontrolled hypothyroidism, mean glomerular filtration rate (60.2 +/- 17.4 mL/min/1.73 m2) was significantly worse than in patients with normal thyroid function (P=0.015).We found that heart-failure patients with insufficiently treated hypothyroidism have worse renal function than do patients whose thyroid function is normal or whose hypothyroidism is effectively treated. Larger studies will be needed in order to evaluate this conclusion further. We recommend that hypothyroidism in heart-failure patients be strictly controlled, lest it affect prognosis adversely.

  9. Association of systemic hypertension with renal injury in dogs with induced renal failure.

    PubMed

    Finco, Delmar R

    2004-01-01

    Systemic hypertension is hypothesized to cause renal injury to dogs. This study was performed on dogs with surgically induced renal failure to determine whether hypertension was associated with altered renal function or morphology. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), systolic arterial pressure (SAP), and diastolic arterial pressure (DAP) were measured before and after surgery. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urine protein:creatinine ratios (UPC) were measured at 1, 12, 24, 36, and 56-69 weeks after surgery, and renal histology was evaluated terminally. The mean of weekly MAP, SAP, and DAP measurements for each dog over the 1st 26 weeks was used to rank dogs on the basis of MAP, SAP, or DAP values. A statistically significant association was found between systemic arterial pressure ranking and ranked measures of adverse renal responses. When dogs were divided into higher pressure and lower pressure groups on the basis of SAP, group 1 (higher pressure, n = 9) compared with group 2 (lower pressure, n = 10) had significantly lower GFR values at 36 and 56-69 weeks; higher UPC values at 12 and 56-69 weeks; and higher kidney lesion scores for mesangial matrix, tubule damage, and fibrosis. When dogs were divided on MAP and DAP values, group 1 compared with group 2 had significantly lower GFR values at 12, 24, 36, and 56-69 weeks; higher UPC values at 12 and 56-69 weeks; and higher kidney lesion scores for mesangial matrix, tubule damage, fibrosis, and cell infiltrate. These results demonstrate an association between increased systemic arterial pressure and renal injury. Results from this study might apply to dogs with some types of naturally occurring renal failure.

  10. Evaluation of ultrafiltration failure.

    PubMed

    Korbet, S M

    1998-07-01

    The evaluation of ultrafiltration failure is embarked upon when a patient has persistent problems with symptoms and signs of fluid overload. Fluid overload is a common problem in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients and the risk of its occurrence increases with time on dialysis. Although often attributed to changes in peritoneal membrane function (membrane failure), there are a number of potential, and frequently more common factors that can contribute to the failure of adequate fluid removal in patients on PD. Many of the causes of ultrafiltration failure may be apparent after an initial informal evaluation. However, if after this the etiology remains unexplained, a systematic approach to the differential diagnosis of this problem can be utilized with the use of the peritoneal equilibration test. Once a diagnosis is confirmed, a logical therapeutic plan can be formulated.

  11. Chronic renal failure in a patient with bilateral ureterocele.

    PubMed

    Dada, Samuel A; Rafiu, Mojeed O; Olanrewaju, Timothy O

    2015-07-01

    Ureterocele is a congenital anomaly, in which there is mal-development of the caudal segments of the ureter. There is a female preponderance with most cases seen in Caucasians. Among the reported complications of this condition, chronic renal failure occurring in the setting of ureterocele has not been well documented. We report a case of a young girl with bilateral ureterocele presenting with chronic renal failure, whose management presented a diagnostic failure and inadequate treatment.

  12. Systemic sarcoidosis complicated of acute renal failure: about 12 cases.

    PubMed

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Mamlouk, Habiba; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2015-01-01

    The sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatosis affecting most frequently the lungs and the mediastinum. An acute renal failure reveals exceptionally this disease. It's a retrospective study implicating 12 cases of sarcoidosis complicated of acute renal failure. The aim of this study is to determine epidemiological, clinical, biological and histological profile in these cases and then to indicate the interest to consider the diagnosis of sarcoidosis in cases of unexplained renal failure. Extra-renal complications, therapeutic modalities and the outcome were determined in all patients. Our series involved 12 women with an average age of 40 years. Biological investigations showed an abnormal normocalcemia in 7 cases, a hypercalcemia in 5 cases, a hypercalciuria in 10 cases and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia in 7 cases. An acute renal failure was found in all patients with a median creatinin of 520 umol/L. For all patients, the renal echography was normal however, the kidney biopsy showed tubulo-interstitial nephritis. The extra-renal signs highlighting pulmonary interstitial syndrome in 5 cases, a sicca syndrome in 4 cases, mediastinal lymph nodes in 2 cases, a lymphocytic alveolitis in 3 cases, an anterior granulomatous uveitis in 2 cases and a polyarthritis in 5 cases. Five patients benefited of hemodialysis. The treatment consisted of corticosteroid in all cases. The follow up was marked by complete resolution of clinical and biological signs. The diagnosis of renal sarcoidosis must be done quickly to prevent renal failure.

  13. Perirenal effusion in dogs and cats with acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Andrew; O'Brien, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Perirenal fluid accumulation has been described as an ultrasonographic feature of urine leakage, hemorrhage, abscessation, or neoplasia. The purpose of this retrospective study was to report perirenal effusion as an additional ultrasonographic finding in canine and feline patients with acute renal failure. The causes of acute renal failure in 18 patients included nephrotoxicity (4), leptospirosis (3), ureteral obstruction (2), renal lymphoma (2), ureteronephrolithiasis (2), prostatic urethral obstruction (1) and interstitial nephritis and ureteritis (1). An underlying cause was not identified in three patients. The sonographic finding of perirenal fluid was bilateral in 15 patients. Unilateral perirenal fluid was identified ipsilateral to the site of ureteric obstruction in two patients. Large effusions extended into the caudal retroperitoneal space. Additional sonographic findings suggestive of renal parenchymal disease included mild (5), moderate (5) or severe (2) pyelectasia, increased renal echogenicity (11), increased (9) or decreased renal size (2) and ureteral and/or renal calculi (3). There did not appear to be an association between the volume of perirenal fluid and the severity of renal dysfunction. All patients with large effusions underwent euthanasia. Perirenal fluid developing in acute renal failure is thought to be an ultrafiltrate associated with tubular back-leak into the renal interstitium that overwhelms lymphatic drainage within the perirenal and retroperitoneal connective tissues although obstruction to urine flow may also play a role. Localized perirenal retroperitoneal free fluid may be a useful ultrasonographic feature to assist with the characterization of, and determination of prognosis in, patients with suspected renal disease.

  14. A huge bladder calculus causing acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Komeya, Mitsuru; Sahoda, Tamami; Sugiura, Shinpei; Sawada, Takuto; Kitami, Kazuo

    2013-02-01

    A 81-year-old male was referred to our emergency outpatient unit due to acute renal failure. The level of serum creatinine was 276 μmol/l. A CT scan showed bilateral hydronephroureter, large bladder stone (7 cm × 6 cm × 6 cm) and bladder wall thickness. He was diagnosed as post renal failure due to bilateral hydronephroureter. Large bladder stone is thought to be the cause of bilateral hydronephroureter and renal failure. To improve renal failure, we performed open cystolithotomy and urethral catheterization. Three days after the surgery, the level of serum creatinine decreased to 224 μmol/l. He was discharged from our hospital with uneventful course. Bladder calculus is thought to be a rare cause of renal failure. We summarize the characteristics of bladder calculus causing renal failure. We should keep that long-term pyuria and urinary symptom, and repeated urinary tract infection can cause huge bladder calculus and renal failure in mind.

  15. Nitric oxide, malnutrition and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Brunini, Tatiana M C; Moss, Monique B; Siqueira, Mariana A S; Santos, Sérgio F F; Lugon, Jocemir R; Mendes-Ribeiro, Antônio C

    2007-04-01

    The conditionally essential amino acid L-arginine is the substrate for nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, a key second messenger involved in physiological functions including endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation and inhibition of platelet adhesion and aggregation. Extracellular L-arginine transport seems to be essential for the production of NO by the action of NO synthases (NOS), even when the intracellular levels of L-arginine are available in excess (L-arginine paradox). Chronic renal failure (CRF) is a complex clinical condition associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and thrombosis leading to cardiovascular events. Various studies document that markers of malnutrition and inflammation, such as low body mass index (BMI), C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), are strong independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). There is considerable literature demonstrating that a disturbance in the nitric oxide control mechanism plays a role in mediating the haemodynamic and haemostatic disorders present in CRF. Endogenous analogues of L-arginine, ADMA and L-NMMA, which can inhibit NO synthesis and L-arginine transport, are increased whilst L-arginine is reduced in plasma from all stages of CRF patients. In this context, the uptake of L-arginine in blood cells is increased in undialysed CRF patients and in patients treated by CAPD and haemodialysis. In platelets obtained from haemodialysis patients, the activation of L-arginine transport and NO production was limited to well-nourished patients. Impairment in nitric oxide bioactivity, coupled with malnutrition and inflammation, may contribute to increased incidence of atherothrombotic events in CRF. This article summarizes the current knowledge of L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway and malnutrition in CRF and briefly describes possible therapeutic interventions.

  16. Acute renal failure caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Creyghton, W M; Lobatto, S; Weening, J J

    2001-11-01

    We report a 34-year-old male patient without prior medical history who presented with acute renal failure due to acute bacterial pyelonephritis. Both blood and urine cultures grew Klebsiella pneumoniae. Although a kidney biopsy revealed extensive necrosis and no viable glomeruli, renal function recovered to near normal after intermittent hemodialysis and antibiotic therapy. We believe that it is important to include this entity in the differential diagnosis of acute renal failure since proper diagnosis and treatment is essential for recovery of renal function. Furthermore, we would like to draw attention to Klebsiella pneumoniae as an important potential pathogen in such cases, in addition to Escherichia coli.

  17. Defective cellular immunity in renal failure: depression of reactivity of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin by renal failure serum

    PubMed Central

    Newberry, W. Marcus; Sanford, Jay P.

    1971-01-01

    In defining host resistance factors in uremia, experiments were designed to assess the effect of renal failure serum upon the reactivity of normal human lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin in vitro. Normal buffy coat cells were resuspended in sera obtained from normal subjects and from 14 patients with renal failure, then stimulated with phytohemagglutinin M and the cellular response measured by the increase in thymidine or uridine uptake. The mean thymidine uptake by stimulated cells in normal sera was 14,389 ±1695 (SEM) cpm per 2 × 106 lymphocytes. Uridine uptake under the same conditions was 12,540 ±1887 cpm. Compared to these are a mean thymidine uptake of 2740 ±457 cpm and uridine uptake of 3928 ±667 cpm in renal failure sera. Both differences are significant at P<0.01 level. For controls representing “chronic illnesses,” sera from patients with pneumococcal meningitis, cirrhosis of the liver without jaundice, rheumatoid arthritis, and paraplegia with urinary tract infection did not cause suppression. No single drug had been taken by all the renal failure patients; three patients were taking no drugs. The serum from one patient with acute renal failure suppressed thymidine uptake while her serum obtained after recovery from her illness supported a normal lymphocyte response. Improvement of lymphocyte response was also noted in 9 of 10 sera obtained from patients immediately after hemodialysis. These observations plus the inhibition of stimulated cells by normal serum mixed with renal failure serum indicate the presence of a dialyzable inhibitory factor rather than the absence of a supporting factor in the renal failure sera. Lymphocytes preincubated for 24 hr in renal failure serum responded normally when transferred to normal serum and stimulated. Cells stimulated in normal serum and transferred to renal failure serum within the initial 24 hr of incubation demonstrated depressed thymidine uptake. Also, cell survival for 72 hr incubation as judged by

  18. Acute renal failure: definitions, diagnosis, pathogenesis, and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schrier, Robert W.; Wang, Wei; Poole, Brian; Mitra, Amit

    2004-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF), characterized by sudden loss of the ability of the kidneys to excrete wastes, concentrate urine, conserve electrolytes, and maintain fluid balance, is a frequent clinical problem, particularly in the intensive care unit, where it is associated with a mortality of between 50% and 80%. In this review, the epidemiology and pathophysiology of ARF are discussed, including the vascular, tubular, and inflammatory perturbations. The clinical evaluation of ARF and implications for potential future therapies to decrease the high mortality are described. PMID:15232604

  19. An unusual cause of renal failure; Epstein syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Balwani, Manish R; Engineer, Divyesh P; Gumber, Manoj R; Kute, Vivek B; Singh, Rajesh; Patel, Himanshu V; Vanikar, Aruna V; Gera, Dinesh; Shah, Pankaj R; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2016-01-01

    Epstein syndrome constitutes macrothrombocytopenia without neutrophil inclusion bodies along with deafness and renal failure. A diagnosis of Epstein syndrome was made in a 17 year-old-male patient with macrothrombopathic thrombocytopenia, renal failure and sensorineural hearing loss. Our patient is unique as he presented with rapidly progressive renal failure and developed chronic kidney disease in second decade of life with no symptomatic hearing loss or bleeding tendency. Epstein syndrome needs to be differentiated from Alport syndrome which is more common disease with similar clinical presentation. PMID:28197502

  20. Preemptive Renal Transplantation-The Best Treatment Option for Terminal Chronic Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Arze Aimaretti, L; Arze, S

    2016-03-01

    Renal transplantation is the best therapeutic option for end-stage chronic renal disease. Assuming that it is more advisable if performed early, we aimed to show the clinical, social, and economic advantages in 70% of our patients who were dialyzed only for a short period. For this purpose, we retrospectively collected data over 28 years in 142 kidney transplants performed in patients with <6 weeks on dialysis. 66% of our patients were 30-60 years old; 98% of the patients had living donors. At transplantation, 64% of our patients had no public support; however, 64% of them returned to work and got health insurance 2 months later. Full rehabilitation was achieved in all cases, including integration to the family, return to full-time work, school and university, sports, and reproduction. Immunosuppression consisted of 3 drugs, including steroids, cyclosporine, and azathioprine or mycophenolate. The cost in the 1st year, including patient and donor evaluation, surgery, immunosuppression, and follow-up, was $13,300 USD versus $22,320 for hemodialysis. We conclude that preemptive renal transplantation with <6 weeks on dialysis is the best therapeutic option for end-stage renal failure, especially in developing countries such as Bolivia, where until last year, full public support for renal replacement therapy was unavailable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Epidemiology of severe acute renal failure in Metropolitan Santiago].

    PubMed

    Vukusich, Antonio; Alvear, Felipe; Villanueva, Pablo; González, Claudio; Francisco, Olivari; Alvarado, Nelly; Zehnder, Carlos

    2004-11-01

    There is a paucity of information about the epidemiology of acute renal failure in Chile. To perform a prospective multicentric survey of severe acute renal failure in Chile. All patients admitted to ten hospitals in Metropolitan Santiago, during a period of six months with severe acute renal failure, were studied. The criteria for severity was the requirement of renal replacement therapy. All patients information was gathered in special forms and the type of renal replacement therapy and evolution was registeres. One hundred fourteen patients were studied (65 males, age range 18 to 87 years). The calculated incidence of acute renal failure was 1.03 cases per 1000 hospital discharges. The onset was nosocomial in 79 subjects (69%) and community acquired in the rest. Renal failure was oliguric in 64 cases (56%) and in 60% of patients it had two or more causative factors. Sepsis, isolated or combined with other causes, was present in 51 of patients. Other causes included ischemia in 47%, surgery in 26%, exogenous toxicity in 25%, endocenous toxicity in 11%, acute glomerular damage in 6% and obstructive uropathy in 6%. Cardiac surgery was responsible for 47% of post operative cases of acute renal failure. Intermittent conventional hemodialysis, continuous renal replacement techniques and daily prolonged hemodialysis were used in 66%, 29% and 2% of patients, respectively. Overall mortality was 45% and it was higher in oliguric patients. Gender, age, cause or the type of therapy did not influence survival. Nine percent of surviving patients had some degree of kidney dysfunction at discharge. There is still a great space for prevention of severe acute renal failure in Chile, considering the main etiologies found in this study.

  2. Post-renal acute renal failure due to a huge bladder stone.

    PubMed

    Celik, Orcun; Suelozgen, Tufan; Budak, Salih; Ilbey, Yusuf Ozlem

    2014-06-30

    A 63-year old male was referred to our emergency unit due to acute renal failure. The level of serum renal function tests levels, blood urea nitrogen (BUN)/creatinine, were 63 mmol/L/848 μmol/L. CT (Computarised Tomography) scan showed a huge bladder stone (5 cm x 6 cm x 5 cm) with increased bladder wall thickness. Post-renal acute renal failure due to bilateral ureterohydronephrosis was diagnosed. The huge bladder stone was considered to be the cause of ureterohydronephrosis and renal failure. The patient was catheterised and received haemodialysis immediately. He received haemodialysis four times during ten days of hospitalization and the level of serum renal function tests levels (BUN/ creatinine) decreased 18 mmol/L/123 μmol/L. After improvement of renal function, we performed cystoscopy that demonstrated normal prostatic urethra and bladder neck and bilaterally normal ureteral orifices. Bladder wall was roughly trabeculated and Bladder outlet was completely obstructed by a huge bladder stone. After cystoscopy open, cystolithotomy was performed to remove calcium phosphate and magnesium ammonium phosphate stone weighing 200 g removed. Four days after operation the patient was discharged uneventfully and urethral catheter was removed on the seventh day. Post-renal acute renal failure due to large bladder stones is rare in literature. According to the our knowledge; early diagnosis of the stone avoid growth to large size and prevent renal failure.

  3. Obstructive acute renal failure related to amantadine intoxication.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Kentaro; Takeda, Kazuhito; Kimura, Hiroshi; Miura, Shuhei; Maeda, Atsuhiro

    2009-03-01

    We report the case of a 69-year-old woman with seizures and acute renal failure with hyperkalemia. She presented with bladder turgescence and hydronephrosis on admission and was diagnosed as obstructive acute renal failure. Urethral catheterization was performed after a single-session hemodialysis. It resulted in immediate improvement of renal function and consciousness, and subsequent disappearance of seizures. Improvement of serum creatinine level to 0.7 from 10.6 mg/dL was associated with a fall in blood level of amantadine hydrochloride from 4.40 to 0.47 microg/mL. Physicians should be aware of urinary retention in patients treated with amantadine as a first sign of intoxication that could lead if untreated to obstructive acute renal failure. And we recommend to check the overdose symptoms, even those with normal renal function, treated with amantadine.

  4. Acute pancreatitis, acute hepatitis and acute renal failure favourably resolved in two renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Voiculescu, Mihai; Ionescu, Camelia; Ismail, Gener; Mandache, Eugen; Hortopan, Monica; Constantinescu, Ileana; Iliescu, Olguta

    2003-03-01

    Renal transplantation is often associated with severe complications. Except for acute rejection, infections and toxicity of immunosuppressive treatment are the most frequent problems observed after transplantation. Infections with hepatic viruses (HBV, HDV, HCV, HGV) and cytomegalic virus (CMV) are the main infectious complications after renal transplantation. Cyclosporine toxicity is not unusual for a patient with renal transplantation and is even more frequent for patients with hepatic impairment due to viral infections. The subjects of this report are two renal transplant recipients with acute pancreatitis, severe hepatitis and acute renal failure on graft, receiving immunosuppressive therapy for maintaining renal graft function

  5. Treatment of compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure after the Wenchuan earthquake.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xin; Zhang, Kaiwei; Zhong, Gang; Cen, Shiqiang; Huang, Fuguo; Lv, Jingtong; Xiang, Zhou

    2012-04-01

    Compartment syndrome of the thigh is a rare emergency often treated operatively. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of nonoperative treatment for compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. Nonoperative treatment, which primarily involves continuous renal replacement therapy, was performed in 6 patients (3 men and 3 women) who presented with compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure. The mean mangled extremity severity score (MESS) and laboratory data regarding renal function were analyzed before and after treatment, and the clinical outcome was evaluated at 17-month follow-up. Laboratory data regarding renal function showed improvements. All 6 patients survived with the affected lower limbs intact after nonoperative treatment. Follow-up revealed active knee range of motion and increased muscle strength, as well as a recovery of sensation. A positive linear correlation was found between MESS and the time required to achieve a reduction in swelling, as well as the time required for the recovery of sensation and knee range of motion (r>0.8; P<.05). Satisfactory clinical outcomes were obtained in patients with compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure.Urine alkalization, electrolyte and water balance, and continuous renal replacement therapy have played an important role in saving lives and extremities. Nonoperative treatment should be considered in the treatment of compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure.

  6. Treatment of acute renal failure due to myeloma kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Bear, R A; Cole, E H; Lang, A; Johnson, M

    1980-01-01

    Severe renal insufficiency is considered to indicate a poor prognosis in patients with multiple myeloma, their reported median survival being approximately 2 months. In five consecutive patients with severe renal failure secondary to acute myeloma kidney early aggressive therapy, including chemotherapy and peritoneal dialysis, led to a significant improvement in the renal function of four; the fifth patient received a cadaveric renal transplant after 1 year of peritoneal dialysis. After a median follow-up period of 12 months all the patients were alive and had improved renal function. This experience contrasts with that previously reported and suggests that aggressive management may improve the survival of patients with acute renal failure due to myeloma kidney. PMID:7004618

  7. A re-appraisal of volume status and renal function impairment in chronic heart failure: combined effects of pre-renal failure and venous congestion on renal function.

    PubMed

    Sinkeler, Steef J; Damman, Kevin; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Hillege, Hans; Navis, Gerjan

    2012-03-01

    The association between cardiac failure and renal function impairment has gained wide recognition over the last decade. Both structural damage in the form of systemic atherosclerosis and (patho) physiological hemodynamic changes may explain this association. As regards hemodynamic factors, renal impairment in chronic heart failure is traditionally assumed to be mainly due to a decrease in cardiac output and a subsequent decrease in renal perfusion. This will lead to a decrease in glomerular filtration rate and a compensatory increase in tubular sodium retention. The latter is a physiological renal response aimed at retaining fluids in order to increase cardiac filling pressure and thus renal perfusion. In heart failure, however, larger increases in cardiac filling pressure are needed to restore renal perfusion and thus more volume retention. In this concept, in chronic heart failure, an equilibrium exists where a certain degree of congestion is the price to be paid to maintain adequate renal perfusion and function. Recently, this hypothesis was challenged by new studies, wherein it was found that the association between right-sided cardiac filling pressures and renal function is bimodal, with worse renal function at the highest filling pressures, reflecting a severely congested state. Renal hemodynamic studies suggest that congestion negatively affects renal function in particular in patients in whom renal perfusion is also compromised. Thus, an interplay between cardiac forward failure and backward failure is involved in the renal function impairment in the congestive state, presumably along with other factors. Only few data are available on the impact of intervention in volume status on the cardio-renal interaction. Sparse data in cardiac patients as well as evidence from cohorts with primary renal disease suggest that specific targeting of volume overload may be beneficial for long-term outcome, in spite of a certain further decrease in renal function, at least

  8. Radionuclide evaluation of renal function.

    PubMed

    Bueschen, A J; Witten, D M

    1979-06-01

    The renal scintillation camera study and the excretory urogram should be considered to be complementary studies. The renal scintillation camera study provides an accurate evaluation of changes in total, differential, and segmental renal function but affords only a gross assessment of anatomic changes. The excretory urogram provides superior information about renal anatomic changes but only inferior information about functional changes of the kidney. The advantages of a renal scintillation camera study with regard to the patient are that it is done in a state of normal hydration, it requires no bowel preparation, it is not associated with allergic reactions, it provides a low radiation exposure, and it is a noninvasive procedure for differential renal function which requires no ureteral catheters.

  9. Alum irrigation in massive bladder hemorrhage in severe renal failure.

    PubMed

    Modi, K B; Paterson, P J

    1988-09-01

    We report a patient with severe renal failure in whom massive bladder hemorrhage was successfully treated with alum irrigation. There was no substantial potassium or aluminum absorption with alum irrigation.

  10. Acute renal failure associated with a labetalol overdose.

    PubMed Central

    Korzets, A.; Danby, P.; Edmunds, M. E.; Feehally, J.; Walls, J.

    1990-01-01

    A case of acute renal failure in association with a deliberate labetalol overdose is described. The possible pathogenetic mechanisms behind the deterioration in renal function are discussed. Treatment of beta-blockade overdose, with special emphasis on the place of glucagon in such poisoning, is reviewed. PMID:2349173

  11. Yellow jacket envenomation-related acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Chaitanya; Arulneyam, Jayanthi; Remalayam, Bhavith; Adil, Mohammed

    2011-01-01

    We report a 58-year-old man with multiple yellow jacket stings who developed urticaria, renal failure, quadriparesis, rhabdomyolysis in succession. Investigations revealed renal and hepatic dysfunction, proteinuria, demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, acute tubular necrosis and glomerulonephritis. He improved with methylprednisolone, antihypertensives and two sessions of haemodialysis. PMID:25984147

  12. Yellow jacket envenomation-related acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Stalin; Prabhu, Chaitanya; Arulneyam, Jayanthi; Remalayam, Bhavith; Adil, Mohammed

    2011-06-01

    We report a 58-year-old man with multiple yellow jacket stings who developed urticaria, renal failure, quadriparesis, rhabdomyolysis in succession. Investigations revealed renal and hepatic dysfunction, proteinuria, demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, acute tubular necrosis and glomerulonephritis. He improved with methylprednisolone, antihypertensives and two sessions of haemodialysis.

  13. Renal failure due to granulomatous interstitial nephritis after pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    van Dorp, W T; Jie, K; Lobatto, S; Weening, J J; Valentijn, R M

    1987-01-01

    Two patients, who had had pulmonary sarcoidosis, developed renal failure due to sarcoid granulomatous interstitial nephritis after their original pulmonary symptoms had subsided. Treatment with prednisone resulted in almost complete recovery of renal function. Lysozyme and angiotensin-converting enzyme levels and gallium scintigraphy can be of diagnostic value.

  14. Multimodality Renal Failure in a Patient with OEIS Complex

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Jonathan D.; Chao, Stephanie; Hsieh, Michael H.; Lee, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    Omphalocele-exstrophy of the bladder-imperforate anus-spinal defect (OEIS) complex is a rare constellation of clinical abnormalities with wide phenotypic presentation. We describe a case of a preterm neonate with OEIS complex with acute renal failure, and the challenges in diagnosis and management of this patient as renal failure can be a multifactorial process when encountered with this rare complex. PMID:26495176

  15. Serum gastrin in patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Taylor, I L; Sells, R A; McConnell, R B; Dockray, G J

    1980-12-01

    The realisation that circulating gastrin is heterogeneous necessitates a reappraisal of gastrin's role in the increased incidence of duodenal ulcer disease that occurs in chronic renal failure. Radioimmunoassays employing region-specific antisera have been used to examine renal and extrarenal factors controlling serum gastrin concentration in patients with chronic renal failure. The present study has shown that basal serum gastrin concentrations measured with a carboxyl-terminal specific antibody were significantly higher in eight patients with chronic renal failure treated by dietary restriction (388+/-196 pM) than in 14 patients with chronic renal failure treated by haemodialysis (28.7+/-4.6 pM). However, basal gastrin concentrations in both groups of patients were significantly higher than in 25 normal subjects (12.3+/-1.8 pM) and showed significant negative correlations with maximal gastric acid secretion (p < 0.01). Markedly raised basal gastrin concentrations were observed only in chronic renal failure patients who were also achlorhydric. Although the peak postprandial increment in big gastrin concentration in 11 chronic renal failure patients (34.0+/-7.5 pM) was significantly greater (p < 0.05) than in 25 normal subjects (19.5+/-4.6 pM), the little gastrin responses were not significantly different. In addition, clearance of exogenous little gastrin was similar in four chronic failure patients (clearance half time: 8.1+/-0.7 min) and four normal subjects (clearance half time: 6.5+/-1.2 min). These studies suggest that the human kidney is unimportant in the metabolism of little gastrin. As circulating little gastrin is six times more potent than big gastrin in stimulating acid secretion, these studies suggest that the raised gastrin concentrations observed in patients with chronic renal failure have little significance in terms of their increased incidence of duodenal ulcer disease.

  16. Acute renal failure after influenza vaccination: a case report.

    PubMed

    Novati, R; Nebiolo, P E; Galotto, C; Mastaglia, M; Manes, M

    2014-03-01

    A fifty-three years old surgeon had acute renal failure consisting with acute tubulo-interstizial nephropaty twelve days after influenza vaccination; he was on statin therapy since one month. He was given steroidal therapy and fully recovered two weeks apart. This is the fourth case report of acute renal failure after influenza vaccination in patients on statins therapy. The case we describe could account for a underestimated, even if very rare, phenomenon.

  17. [Acute renal failure: a rare presentation of Addison's disease].

    PubMed

    Salhi, Houda

    2016-01-01

    Addison's disease is a rare condition. Its onset of symptoms most often is nonspecific contributing to a diagnostic and therapeutic delay. Acute renal failure can be the first manifestation of this disease. We report the case of a patient with Addison's disease who was initially treated for acute renal failure due to multiple myeloma and whose diagnosis was adjusted thereafter. Patient's condition dramatically improved after treatment with intravenous rehydration; injectable hydrocortisone.

  18. Fetal kidney stem cells ameliorate cisplatin induced acute renal failure and promote renal angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashwani Kumar; Jadhav, Sachin H; Tripathy, Naresh Kumar; Nityanand, Soniya

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether fetal kidney stem cells (fKSC) ameliorate cisplatin induced acute renal failure (ARF) in rats and promote renal angiogenesis. METHODS: The fKSC were isolated from rat fetuses of gestation day 16 and expanded in vitro up to 3rd passage. They were characterized for the expression of mesenchymal and renal progenitor markers by flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry, respectively. The in vitro differentiation of fKSC towards epithelial lineage was evaluated by the treatment with specific induction medium and their angiogenic potential by matrigel induced tube formation assay. To study the effect of fKSC in ARF, fKSC labeled with PKH26 were infused in rats with cisplatin induced ARF and, the blood and renal tissues of the rats were collected at different time points. Blood biochemical parameters were studied to evaluate renal function. Renal tissues were evaluated for renal architecture, renal cell proliferation and angiogenesis by immunohistochemistry, renal cell apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick-end labeling assay and early expression of angiogenic molecules viz. vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) by western blot. RESULTS: The fKSC expressed mesenchymal markers viz. CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90 and CD105 as well as renal progenitor markers viz. Wt1, Pax2 and Six2. They exhibited a potential to form CD31 and Von Willebrand factor expressing capillary-like structures and could be differentiated into cytokeratin (CK)18 and CK19 positive epithelial cells. Administration of fKSC in rats with ARF as compared to administration of saline alone, resulted in a significant improvement in renal function and histology on day 3 (2.33 ± 0.33 vs 3.50 ± 0.34, P < 0.05) and on day 7 (0.83 ± 0.16 vs 2.00 ± 0.25, P < 0.05). The infused PKH26 labeled fKSC were observed to engraft in damaged renal tubules and showed increased proliferation and reduced

  19. Influence of acute renal failure on coronary vasoregulation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kingma, John G; Vincent, Chantal; Rouleau, Jacques R; Kingma, Iris

    2006-05-01

    Impaired renal function is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular events and death, but the pathophysiology is poorly defined. The hypothesis that coronary blood flow regulation and distribution of ventricular blood flow could be compromised during acute renal failure (ARF) was tested. In two separate groups (n = 14 each) of dogs with ARF, (1) coronary autoregulation (pressure-flow relations), vascular reserve (reactive hyperemia), and myocardial blood flow distribution (microspheres) and (2) coronary vessel responses to intracoronary infusion of select endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilators were evaluated. In addition, coronary pressure-flow relations and vascular reserve after inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandin release were evaluated. Under resting conditions, myocardial oxygen consumption increased in dogs with ARF compared with no renal failure (NRF; 11.8 +/- 9.2 versus 5.0 +/- 1.5 ml O(2)/min per 100 g; P = 0.01), and the autoregulatory break point of the coronary pressure-flow relation was shifted to higher diastolic coronary pressures (60 +/- 17 versus 52 +/- 8 mmHg in NRF; P = 0.003); the latter was shifted further rightward after inhibition of both nitric oxide and prostaglandin release. The endocardial/epicardial blood flow ratio was comparable for both groups, suggesting preserved ventricular distribution of blood flow. In dogs with ARF, coronary vascular conductance also was reduced (P = 0.001 versus NRF), but coronary zero-flow pressure was unchanged. Vessel reactivity to each endothelium-dependent/independent compound also was blunted significantly. In conclusion, under resting conditions, coronary vascular tone, reserve, and vessel reactivity are markedly diminished with ARF, suggesting impaired vascular function. Consequently, during ARF, small increases in myocardial oxygen demand would induce subendocardial ischemia as a result of a limited capacity to increase oxygen supply and thereby contribute to higher

  20. Aliskiren-associated acute renal failure with hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Venzin, R M; Cohen, C D; Maggiorini, M; Wüthrich, R P

    2009-03-01

    We report the first case of acute renal failure with hyperkalemia associated with the recently marketed direct renin inhibitor aliskiren. To optimize blood pressure control, the antihypertensive medication of a 76-year-old hypertensive female patient was changed from the angiotensin II receptor antagonist irbesartan to aliskiren. Spironolactone was continued, as serum creatinine and potassium levels were initially normal. Two weeks later the patient presented with acute oliguric renal failure, symptomatic hyperkalemia and metabolic acidosis, necessitating emergency dialytic treatment. Unrecognized pre-existing renal insufficiency (CKD Stage 2 - 3) and the continuation of spironolactone were identified as predisposing risk factors.

  1. [Light chain deposition disease as a cause of renal failure].

    PubMed

    Wohl, P; Chadimová, M; Englis, M; Táborský, P; Rossmann, P; Matl, I

    1998-11-30

    The objective of the paper is to draw attention to a rare cause of rapidly progressing renal failure which developed in the course of four months as a result of light chain deposition disease. The authors submit two case-histories of the disease assessed by renal biopsy after previous clinical and laboratory suspicion of monoclonal gammapathy. In one patient in the sternal punctate plasmacytoma was diagnosed and in the second case it was not possible to detect any type of monoclonal gammapathy or another possible cause of disease. Renal failure was in both cases irreversible and both patients were enlisted in regular haemodialyzation treatment.

  2. [Complex etiology of acute renal failure in a newborn].

    PubMed

    Krzemień, Grazyna; Szmigielska, Agnieszka; Bieroza, Iwona; Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF), which is diagnosed in 3.4-20% of newborns, is polyetiological in most cases. We present a newborn with non-oliguric ARF diagnosed in the first day of life, and caused by asphixia, intrauterine infection (IUI) and nephrotoxic effects of metotrexate treatment during pregnancy. Antibiotics, including netilmicin and vankomycin, were given because of IUI and infected central venous catheter. Dosage of drugs was adjusted to renal failure parameters, but monitoring of their serum levels was not available. It could cause augmented acute tubular necrosis and interstitial nephritis. Analysis of ARF risk factors in newborns helps in early diagnosis of renal damage and in prompt implementation of therapy.

  3. Citrate attenuates vascular calcification in chronic renal failure rats.

    PubMed

    Ou, Yan; Liu, Zengying; Li, Shuiqin; Zhu, Xiaojing; Lin, Yan; Han, Jin; Duan, Zhaoyang; Jia, Lining; Gui, Baosong

    2017-05-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is a major contributor of cardiovascular dysfunction in chronic renal failure (CRF). Citrate binds calcium and inhibits the growth of calcium crystals. This present study intends to evaluate the effect of citrate on VC in adenine-induced CRF rats. The rats were randomly divided into five groups: the control group, the citrate control group, model group, model rats with low-dose treatment of citrate (216 mg/kg) and model rats with high-dose treatment of citrate (746 mg/kg). The rats were euthanized at 5 weeks with their blood and aorta in detection. The results showed that serum level of blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, phosphorus, calcium, and related renal failure function marker were elevated in the model group. Furthermore, the aortic calcium accumulation and alkaline phosphatase activity were significantly increased in the model group compared with control groups. Additionally, hematoxylin-eosin staining results demonstrated that the vascular calcification in aorta is significantly increased in the model group. Finally, the expression of VC-related proteins including bone morphogenetic protein and osteocalcin were increased in the model group, whereas alpha-smooth muscle actin was decreased in the model group compared with the control group. However, treatment with citrate caused a reversal effect of all the above events in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, citrate may attenuate vascular calcification in adenine-induced CRF rats. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Physical Exercise and Patients with Chronic Renal Failure: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhenzhen; Zheng, Kai; Zhang, Haoxiang; Feng, Ji; Wang, Lizhi

    2017-01-01

    Chronic renal failure is a severe clinical problem which has some significant socioeconomic impact worldwide and hemodialysis is an important way to maintain patients' health state, but it seems difficult to get better in short time. Considering these, the aim in our research is to update and evaluate the effects of exercise on the health of patients with chronic renal failure. The databases were used to search for the relevant studies in English or Chinese. And the association between physical exercise and health state of patients with chronic renal failure has been investigated. Random-effect model was used to compare the physical function and capacity in exercise and control groups. Exercise is helpful in ameliorating the situation of blood pressure in patients with renal failure and significantly reduces VO2 in patients with renal failure. The results of subgroup analyses show that, in the age >50, physical activity can significantly reduce blood pressure in patients with renal failure. The activity program containing warm-up, strength, and aerobic exercises has benefits in blood pressure among sick people and improves their maximal oxygen consumption level. These can help patients in physical function and aerobic capacity and may give them further benefits. PMID:28316986

  5. Physical Exercise and Patients with Chronic Renal Failure: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhenzhen; Zheng, Kai; Zhang, Haoxiang; Feng, Ji; Wang, Lizhi; Zhou, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Chronic renal failure is a severe clinical problem which has some significant socioeconomic impact worldwide and hemodialysis is an important way to maintain patients' health state, but it seems difficult to get better in short time. Considering these, the aim in our research is to update and evaluate the effects of exercise on the health of patients with chronic renal failure. The databases were used to search for the relevant studies in English or Chinese. And the association between physical exercise and health state of patients with chronic renal failure has been investigated. Random-effect model was used to compare the physical function and capacity in exercise and control groups. Exercise is helpful in ameliorating the situation of blood pressure in patients with renal failure and significantly reduces VO2 in patients with renal failure. The results of subgroup analyses show that, in the age >50, physical activity can significantly reduce blood pressure in patients with renal failure. The activity program containing warm-up, strength, and aerobic exercises has benefits in blood pressure among sick people and improves their maximal oxygen consumption level. These can help patients in physical function and aerobic capacity and may give them further benefits.

  6. The use of biocompatible dialysis membranes in acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Himmelfarb, J; Hakim, R M

    1997-04-01

    The interactions between blood and the dialysis membrane, aside from solute clearance, can be referred to as biocompatibility. It has increasingly been recognized that significant side effects may occur as a result of interactions of blood with the dialysis membrane itself. The use of unmodified cellulosic hemodialysis membranes results in potent activation of the alternative pathway of complement, and numerous investigators have now carefully defined the membrane characteristics that contribute to complement activation, adsorption, and clearance. Complement-dependent granulocyte activation during hemodialysis causes neutrophil degranulation and protease release, the production of reactive oxygen species, and modulation of granulocyte cell adhesion molecules. Recently, a number of experimental studies in animal models suggest that complement and granulocyte activation during hemodialysis could contribute to the prolongation of acute renal failure. Based on the hypothesis that hemodialysis with complement and granulocyte-activating membranes could contribute to the prolongation of acute renal failure and increased mortality, several recent prospective randomized clinical trials examining the role of membrane biocompatibility in the treatment of acute renal failure have been reported. Although not unanimous in their conclusions, most studies suggest that hemodialysis with more biocompatible membranes in patients with acute renal failure leads to a more rapid return of renal function and a lower morbidity and mortality. Thus, hemodialysis membrane biocompatibility may be an important contributor to the outcome of patients with acute renal failure who require dialysis.

  7. Acute renal failure after ingestion of guaifenesin and dextromethorphan.

    PubMed

    Small, Evan; Sandefur, Benjamin J

    2014-07-01

    Guaifenesin is a common nonprescription medication that has been implicated in drug-induced nephrolithiasis. Dextromethorphan, a nonprescription antitussive found in some guaifenesin-containing preparations, is increasingly recognized as a substance of abuse by many youth and young adults. Renally excreted medications known to have poor solubility in urine have the potential to precipitate when ingested in large quantity, leading to acute obstruction of the ureters and renal failure. We describe the case of a 22-year-old male who developed severe bilateral flank pain, hematuria, and oliguria after an isolated recreational ingestion of guaifenesin and dextromethorphan. The patient was found to have bilateral ureteral obstruction and acute renal failure, suspected to be secondary to precipitation of medication metabolites in the urine. This case highlights the potential for acute renal failure secondary to guaifenesin and dextromethorphan abuse. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Acute Renal Failure after Consumption of Fish Gall Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Yu Yao, Bian

    2014-01-01

    A case of acute renal failure after consumption of fish gall bladder as traditional medical remedy is reported. The patient fully recovered with conservative treatment. The risk of acute kidney failure and even multiple organ dysfunction syndrome following ingestion of fish gall bladder is highlighted. PMID:24829840

  9. Acute bile duct ligation ameliorates ischemic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Jeyarajah, D Rohan; Kielar, Mariusz L; Zhou, Xin J; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Christopher Y

    2003-01-01

    Biliary obstruction affects the renal response to ischemia and also elicits a hepatic cytokine response. Using a murine model, we now test the hypothesis that these hepatic cytokines help determine the outcome of ischemic acute renal failure. C3H/HEN mice were subjected to bile duct ligation 24 h (ABDL) or 7 days (CBDL) prior to induction of acute ischemic renal failure (ARF). Serum creatinine (Scr), cytokine mRNA abundance, and renal histology were studied 24 h after renal ischemia. ABDL prior to ARF resulted in amelioration of renal injury (Scr 0.7 +/- 0.1 mg/dl compared to 2.5 +/- 0.1 mg/dl in sham/ARF group, (mean +/- SE, n = 11/group). CBDL exacerbated renal injury. Increased hepatic mRNA for interleukin-10 (IL10) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1RA) was detected in the ABDL/ARF group but not in the CBDL/ARF group. These data suggest that hepatic production of IL10 and IL1RA in response to ABDL ameliorates ischemic ARF, an effect that is lost after several days of BDL. Our data support the concept that hepatic cytokines modulate renal injury. This adds a new dimension in our understanding of renal injury in the setting of hepatic disease. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  10. Potentials and limitations of microorganisms as renal failure biotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Poonam; Shah, Sapna; Coussa, Razek; Prakash, Satya

    2009-01-01

    Renal insufficiency leads to uremia, a complicated syndrome. It thus becomes vital to reduce waste metabolites and regulate water and electrolytes in kidney failure. The most common treatment of this disease is either dialysis or transplantation. Although these treatments are very effective, they are extremely costly. Recently artificial cells, microencapsulated live bacterial cells, and other cells have been studied to manage renal failure metabolic wastes. The procedure for microencapsulation of biologically active material is well documented and offers many biomedical applications. Microencapsulated bacteria have been documented to efficiently remove urea and several uremic markers such as ammonia, creatinine, uric acid, phosphate, potassium, magnesium, sodium, and chloride. These bacteria also have further potential as biotherapeutic agents because they can be engineered to remove selected unwanted waste. This application has enormous potential for removal of waste metabolites and electrolytes in renal failure as well as other diseases such as liver failure, phenylketonuria, and Crohn’s disease, to name a few. This paper discusses the various options available to date to manage renal failure metabolites and focuses on the potential of using encapsulated live cells as biotherapeutic agents to control renal failure waste metabolites and electrolytes. PMID:19707412

  11. [Reflux and obstructive nephropathy as a cause of renal failure in chronic dialysis children].

    PubMed

    Kałuzyńska, Anna; Jander, Anna; Puczko-Nogal, Barbara; Nowicki, Michał

    2008-01-01

    We carried out a retrospective analysis of medical files to evaluate causes of chronic renal failure in 80 children (M--49, F--31), age 1 month to 20 years) who started renal replacement therapy in the Department of Nephrology and Dialysis of the Polish Mothers Memorial Hospital in the years 1990-2007. In 28 children (35%) reflux and obstructive nephropathy was a cause of renal failure. In 5 children the disease was secondary to the neurogenic bladder. The incidence of these nephropathies in our population was constant in the analyzed years. In our group there were 2 neonates and 7 adolescent who were diagnosed with nephropathy as late as in the endstage phase. Boys with posterior urethral valve required renal replacement therapy earlier (146 +/- 55 months). We conclude that obstructive and reflux nephropathy are still the essential cause of end stage renal disease in children.

  12. Predictive factors for renal failure and a control and treatment algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueira, Denise de Paula; Tavares, José Roberto; Machado, Regimar Carla

    2014-01-01

    Objectives to evaluate the renal function of patients in an intensive care unit, to identify the predisposing factors for the development of renal failure, and to develop an algorithm to help in the control of the disease. Method exploratory, descriptive, prospective study with a quantitative approach. Results a total of 30 patients (75.0%) were diagnosed with kidney failure and the main factors associated with this disease were: advanced age, systemic arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, lung diseases, and antibiotic use. Of these, 23 patients (76.6%) showed a reduction in creatinine clearance in the first 24 hours of hospitalization. Conclusion a decline in renal function was observed in a significant number of subjects, therefore, an algorithm was developed with the aim of helping in the control of renal failure in a practical and functional way. PMID:26107827

  13. [Influence of Shenshuai Capsule on renal tissue apoptosis of rats with chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaohua; Chen, Jing; Fu, Qiang

    2004-03-01

    To explore the influence of Shenshuai Capsule on renal tissue apoptosis of Wistar rats with chronic renal failure. Wistar rats were fed with adenine to establish chronic renal failure model, and then they were divided into three groups separately fed with Shenshuai capsule (high or low dosage) and Niaoduqing. RIA, immunohistochemical method and electron microscopy were used. The parameters of renal function between the treatment group (high dosage) and the Niaoduqing group were significantly different respectively. Shenshuai capsule could inhibit tubular epicyte apoptosis and Fas genetic expression, and improve Bcl-2 genetic expression. Shenshuai capsule could inhibit epicyte apoptosis, and adjust Fas genetic expression. Bcl-2 genetic expression indicated that this may be one of the mechanism to postpone the renal failure by Shunshuai capsule.

  14. Prevalence of anemia and renal insufficiency in non-hospitalized patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Reis, Francisco José Farias Borges dos; Fernandes, André Maurício Souza; Bitencourt, Almir Galvão Vieira; Neves, Flávia Branco Cerqueira Serra; Kuwano, André Yoichi; França, Victor Hugo Pinheiro; Macedo, Cristiano Ricardo Bastos de; Cruz, Cristiano Gonçalves da; Sahade, Viviane; Aras Júnior, Roque

    2009-09-01

    Heart Failure (HF) is a common disease with a high rate of mortality. Anemia and renal failure (RF) are often found in patients with HF associated with higher severity of the heart disease and a worse prognosis. To evaluate the prevalence of anemia and RF, as well as the association between these two conditions, in non-hospitalized patients with HF. Patients treated at the HF Outpatient Clinic of a university hospital were followed from July 2003 to November 2006. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin levels < 13 mg/dl for men and 12 mg/dl for women. Renal function was assessed by the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), calculated by the simplified formula of the MDRD (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease) study. Of the 345 patients included in this study, 26.4% (n = 91) had anemia and 29.6% had moderate to severe renal failure (GFR < 60 ml/min). The association between anemia and a higher prevalence of renal failure was statistically significant (41.8% vs. 25.2%; p = 0.005). The patients at functional class III and IV presented a higher incidence of anemia (39.0% vs. 19.4%; p <0.001) and renal failure (38.2% vs. 24.8%; p = 0.007). No association was observed between anemia or renal failure and history of hypertension, diabetes, systolic function or etiology of HF. The prevalence of anemia and renal failure was high in this population and was associated with the severity of the HF (functional classes III and IV).

  15. Biomarkers of renal injury and function: diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic implications in heart failure.

    PubMed

    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Ruilope, Luis M; Maisel, Alan S; Damman, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    Heart failure guidelines suggest evaluating renal function as a routine work-up in every patient with heart failure. Specifically, it is advised to calculate glomerular filtration rate and determine blood urea nitrogen. The reason for this is that renal impairment and worsening renal function (WRF) are common in heart failure, and strongly associate with poor outcome. Renal function, however, consists of more than glomerular filtration alone, and includes tubulointerstitial damage and albuminuria. For each of these renal entities, different biomarkers exist that have been investigated in heart failure. Hypothetically, and in parallel to data in nephrology, these markers may aid in the diagnosis of renal dysfunction, or for risk stratification, or could help in therapeutic decision-making. However, as reviewed in the present manuscript, while these markers may carry prognostic information (although not always additive to established markers of renal function), their role in predicting WRF is limited at best. More importantly, none of these markers have been evaluated as a therapeutic target nor have their serial values been used to guide therapy. The evidence is most compelling for the oldest-serum creatinine (in combination with glomerular filtration rate)-but even for this biomarker, evidence to guide therapy to improve outcome is circumstantial at best. Although many new renal biomarkers have emerged at the horizon, they have only limited usefulness in clinical practice until thoroughly and prospectively studied. For now, routine measurement of (novel) renal biomarkers can help to determine cardiovascular risk, but there is no role for these biomarkers to change therapy to improve clinical outcome in heart failure.

  16. [Acute renal failure in patients with tumour lysis sindrome].

    PubMed

    Poskurica, Mileta; Petrović, Dejan; Poskurica, Mina

    2016-01-01

    `Hematologic malignancies (leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, et al.), as well as solid tumours (renal, liver, lung, ovarian, etc.), can lead to acute or chronic renal failure.The most common clinical manifestation is acute renal failure within the tumour lysis syndrome (TLS). It is characterized by specific laboratory and clinical criteria in order to prove that kidney disorders result from cytolysis of tumour cells after chemotherapy regimen given, although on significantly fewer occasions it is likely to occur spontaneously or after radiotherapy. Essentially, failure is the disorder of functionally conserved kidney or of kidney with varying degrees of renal insufficiency, which render the kidney impaired and unable to effectively eliminate the end products of massive cytolysis and to correct the resulting disorders: hyperuricemia, hyperkalemia, hypocalcaemia, hyperphosphatemia, and others. The risk of TLS depends on tumour size, proliferative potential of malignant cells, renal function and the presence of accompanying diseases and disorders. Hydration providing adequate diuresis and administration of urinary suppressants (allopurinol, febuxostat) significantly reduce the risk of developing TLS. If prevention of renal impairment isn't possible, the treatment should be supplemented with hemodynamic monitoring and pharmacological support, with the possible application of recombinant urate-oxidase enzyme (rasburicase). Depending on the severity of azotemia and hydroelectrolytic disorders, application of some of the methods of renal replacement therapy may be considered.

  17. Tuberous sclerosis complex with end-stage renal failure.

    PubMed

    Neumann, H P; Brüggen, V; Berger, D P; Herbst, E; Blum, U; Morgenroth, A; Schollmeyer, P; Wetterauer, U

    1995-01-01

    Renal angiomyolipoma is common in the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), the classic features of which are facial angiofibroma, seizures, and mental retardation. We report a family with three affected members demonstrating the wide spectrum of TSC-associated lesions ranging from asymptomatic findings to life-threatening complications. The predominant symptoms of the index patient were hypertension and mild renal insufficiency at age 48, resulting in end-stage renal failure at age 63 due to giant bilateral angiomyolipoma of the kidneys. The two TSC-affected siblings had died years previously, one from pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis and the other during an epileptic state; the latter had situs inversus totalis as another remarkable finding. The diagnosis of TSC may be overlooked if CNS symptoms are absent and if cutaneous lesions are masked by cosmetic procedures, as occurred in the index case. Chronic renal failure due to angiomyolipoma is not widely known to clinical nephrologists, but develops in approximately 15% of TSC patients. Displacement of functional renal parenchyma by abnormal tissue appears to be the major pathogenetic mechanism leading to end-stage renal failure. Angiomyolipomas can be diagnosed from this characteristic sonographic pattern and the demonstration of fatty tissue in CT or MRI. Multiple renal cysts are also common in TSC. Therefore TSC should be considered in the differential diagnosis of polycystic kidney disease.

  18. Review of Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2011-02-01

    Chronic renal failure patients receiving hemodialysis and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis often encounter gastrointestinal troubles over their long treatment period. Helicobacter pylori infection has close association with development of peptic ulcer, gastric cancer and gastric lymphoma, and is thought to be one of the major risk factors for gastrointestinal troubles in dialysis patients. However, it is unclear whether H. pylori infection is directly associated with progression of renal dysfunction and prognosis of chronic renal failure patients. Recent consensus shows that the prevalence of H. pylori infection in chronic renal failure patients is significantly lower than in subjects with normal renal function. In the natural history of H. pylori infection in hemodialysis patients, the prevalence of infection decreases as dialysis periods progressed, in particular within the first four years after the start of treatment. However, the chance of natural eradication becomes rare for patients receiving dialysis treatment for a long time. Moreover, chronic renal failure patients with H. pylori infection have a higher incidence of gastroduodenal diseases, and therefore, are recommended to receive eradication therapies, especially for those receiving treatment for a long time and with higher risks of complication. Intensive endoscopic check-ups for the prevention of gastrointestinal events and the discovery of peptic ulcer and neoplastic diseases at an early phase may be required.

  19. [Acute renal failure and Plasmodium falciparum malaria: a case report].

    PubMed

    Kissou, S A; Cessouma, R; Barro, M; Traoré, H; Nacro, B

    2012-01-01

    Malaria is an endemic disease caused by one of the several Plasmodium species. Severe malaria is mainly due to Plasmodium falciparum in highly endemic areas. Acute renal failure (ARF) is a criterion of malaria severity as defined by WHO. Often observed in adults, particularly in India and Southeast Asia, this complication remains a rare complication of malaria in children. We report a case of oliguric ARF that occurred in a 7-year-old girl a few days after the onset of fever. The vascular obstruction by parasitized erythrocytes often causing tubular necrosis is the primary mechanism of renal failure. As a possible diagnosis, hemolytic uremic syndrome, renal failure and quartan hemoglobinuric nephropathy are other possible causes of renal failure in malaria. Renal biopsy, which was not performed in our patient, would have been a great help, but was not available. The outcome was favorable with recovery of renal function after 3 weeks of diuretic therapy. This development is not always the rule and the prognosis depends on early diagnosis and treatment options.

  20. Renal cystic disease associated with tuberous sclerosis complex: renal failure treated by cadaveric kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, J C; Bernstein, J; Rosenberg, B

    1975-01-01

    Chronic renal failure in patients with tuberous sclerosis may be secondary to diffuse cystic disease, a lesion less common than the better known hamartomatous angiomyolipomas. Uremia, in the case of a nineteen-year old female with end-stage renal disease, was associated with severely atrophic kidneys that contained numerous collapsed and scarred cysts. No hamartomas were present. The patient survived for more than three years following cadaveric renal transplantation.

  1. [Acetaminophen (paracetamol) causing renal failure: report on 3 pediatric cases].

    PubMed

    Le Vaillant, J; Pellerin, L; Brouard, J; Eckart, P

    2013-06-01

    Renal failure secondary to acetaminophen poisoning is rare and occurs in approximately 1-2 % of patients with acetaminophen overdose. The pathophysiology is still being debated, and renal acetaminophen toxicity consists of acute tubular necrosis, without complication if treated promptly. Renal involvement can sometimes occur without prior liver disease, and early renal manifestations usually occur between the 2nd and 7th day after the acute acetaminophen poisoning. While therapy is exclusively symptomatic, sometimes serious metabolic complications can be observed. The monitoring of renal function should therefore be considered as an integral part of the management of children with acute, severe acetaminophen intoxication. We report 3 cases of adolescents who presented with acute renal failure as a result of voluntary drug intoxication with acetaminophen. One of these 3 girls developed severe renal injury without elevated hepatic transaminases. None of the 3 girls' renal function required hemodialysis, but one of the 3 patients had metabolic complications after her acetaminophen poisoning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Renal failure in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Wong, W Y; Elliott-Mills, D; Powars, D

    1996-12-01

    ESRD is a major complication in young adults with sickle cell anemia. As more patients with sickle cell anemia reach the third and fourth decades of life, the incidence of clinically apparent renal insufficiency will increase. As we understand the pathophysiology of renal damage and the effects of various therapies on the sickle renal vasculature, we can tailor specific management without further compromising already impaired renal function. Diagnostic clues must be recognized prior to the onset of irreversible damage, with appropriate intervention initiated at each age group. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is the only available cure for SCA at the present time. The demonstration that several distinct haplotypes of the beta s gene cluster on chromosome 11 influence the clinical expression of sickle cell anemia may be useful in delineating children who are at high risk for severe disease, and hence candidates for such hazardous therapeutic interventions as BMT prior to onset of clinically discernable disease. Current BMT preparative regimens can produce renal cortical and pulmonary toxicity, posing a patient selection problem in those cases in which the vasculopathy of the major organs is at an early stage and might be potentially repairable. Gene therapy without toxic preparative regimens is the ultimate answer. The challenge for the near future is the development of effective early therapeutic intervention during childhood and young adulthood.

  3. Hepatocyte Growth Factor Prevents Acute Renal Failure of Accelerates Renal Regeneration in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaida, Kouichi; Matsumoto, Kunio; Shimazu, Hisaaki; Nakamura, Toshikazu

    1994-05-01

    Although acute renal failure is encountered with administration of nephrotoxic drugs, ischemia, or unilateral nephrectomy, there has been no effective drug which can be used in case of acute renal failure. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a potent hepatotropic factor for liver regeneration and is known to have mitogenic, motogenic, and morphogenic activities for various epithelial cells, including renal tubular cells. Intravenous injection of recombinant human HGF into mice remarkably suppressed increases in blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine caused by administration of cisplatin, a widely used antitumor drug, or HgCl_2, thereby indicating that HGF strongly prevented the onset of acute renal dysfunction. Moreover, exogenous HGF stimulated DNA synthesis of renal tubular cells after renal injuries caused by HgCl_2 administration and unilateral nephrectomy and induced reconstruction of the normal renal tissue structure in vivo. Taken together with our previous finding that expression of HGF was rapidly induced after renal injuries, these results allow us to conclude that HGF may be the long-sought renotropic factor for renal regeneration and may prove to be effective treatment for patients with renal dysfunction, especially that caused by cisplatin.

  4. Cannabinoid hyperemesis acute renal failure: a common sequela of cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Habboushe, Joseph; Sedor, Jennifer

    2014-06-01

    We report the case of a 25-year-old man with an 8-year history of daily marijuana use diagnosed with acute renal failure secondary to cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome. The patient presented with “constant” vomiting for over a day. His symptoms were completely relieved with compulsive hot showering and partially relieved by hot baths, by high ambient room temperature, and transiently after smoking marijuana. The patient was found to have a creatinine of 3.21 and admitted for acute renal failure secondary to cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome. Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS) is a recently described condition affecting long-term marijuana users. We found 5 other case reports of acute renal failure secondary to CHS [1-5], and a total of 55 case reports of CHS. The unique combination of intractable vomiting and constant hot showers seems to put CHS patients at significant risk of severe dehydration and prerenal failure, a common and distinct entity we suggest be termed cannabinoid hyperemesis acute renal failure (CHARF). The characteristics of cannabinoid hyperemesis acute renal failure patients were similar to CHS patients, except a larger portion were over the age of 30 (4 of 6, vs 30%). Evaluating physicians should maintain a high degree of suspicion for this common sequela of CHS.

  5. [Renal dysfunction in heart failure and hypervolumenia : Importance of congestion and backward failure].

    PubMed

    Druml, W

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, renal dysfunction in congestive heart failure (cardiorenal syndrome type 1) has been attributed to reduced cardiac output and low mean arterial perfusion pressure, which elicit a series of neurohumoral activations resulting in increased renal vascular resistance and decreased renal function.During the last decade, several studies have shown that the extent of renal dysfunction is not so closely associated with indices of forward failure-such as the cardiac index or mean arterial pressure-but rather with indicators of congestion, such as left ventricular enddiasystolic pressure or central venous pressure (CVP), which are indicators of backward failure. The impact of backward failure on renal function is not confined to an elevation of CVP, the renal drainage pressure, but includes a broad spectrum of mechanisms. Involved are the organ systems right heart, lung, the liver, the proinflammatory signals originating from the intestines, but also renal interstitial edema (renal compartment syndrome) and the intraabdominal pressure.The therapeutic measures must focus on the modulation of the preload adapted to the specific situation of an individual patient. This includes diuretics aiming at different segments of the tubulus system including antagonists of aldosteron and ADH, extracorporeal fluid elimination by ultrafiltration or peritoneal dialysis.

  6. Acute renal failure in liver transplant patients: Indian study.

    PubMed

    Naik, Pradeep; Premsagar, B; Mallikarjuna, M

    2015-01-01

    The acute renal failure is the frequent medical complication observed in liver transplant patients. The objective of this study was to determine the cause of acute renal failure in post liver transplant patients. A total of 70 patients who underwent (cadaveric 52, live 18) liver transplantation were categorized based on clinical presentation into two groups, namely hepatorenal failure (HRF, n = 29), and Hepatic failure (HF, n = 41). All the patients after the liver transplant had received tacrolimus, mycophenolate and steroids. We analyzed the modification of diet in renal disease, (MDRD) serum urea, creatinine and albumin before and after 5th and 30th day of liver transplant and data was categorized into survivors and non-survivors group. In HRF survivor group, serum creatinine, and urea levels were high and, albumin, MDRD were low in pre- transplant and reached to normal levels on 30th day of post transplant, and 79.3 % of patients in this group showed resumption of normal kidney function. On the contrary in HRF nonsurvivor group, we did not observed any significant difference and 20.7 % of patients showed irreversible changes after the liver transplant. In HF survivor group, 82.9 % of liver failure patients did not show any deviation in serum creatinine, urea, albumin and MDRD, whereas in HF non survivor group, 17.1 % of liver failure patients who had HCV positive before the transplant developed acute renal failure. The levels of creatinine, urea, albumin and MDRD were normal before the transplant and on day 30th, the levels of albumin and MDRD were significantly low whereas serum urea, creatinine levels were high. In conclusion, based on these observations, an diagnosis and treatment of Acute renal failure is important among the liver transplantation cases in the early postoperative period.

  7. Acute renal failure in four cats treated with paromomycin.

    PubMed

    Gookin, J L; Riviere, J E; Gilger, B C; Papich, M G

    1999-12-15

    Acute renal failure was diagnosed in 4 cats receiving paromomycin orally for treatment of infectious enteritis. All 4 cats responded to fluid therapy and recovered normal or near-normal renal function; however, 3 of the cats subsequently became deaf and developed cataracts. Toxicoses were attributed to a combination of an excessive dosage of paromomycin and absorption of the drug across injured intestinal mucosal epithelium. Pharmacokinetic studies are needed to further define the disposition of paromomycin after oral administration to cats.

  8. Nutritional management of patients with acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, D; Lewis, S L

    1997-04-01

    Patients with acute renal failure are at high risk for developing malnutrition. Provision of adequate nutrition support begins with an understanding of the metabolic alterations that occur due to the disease state and renal replacement therapies. Assessment of nutritional requirements and implementation of appropriate feeding modalities can lead to optimal nutritional status and positive patient outcomes. Building collaborative relationships with other health care professionals is crucial to overcoming the barriers that hinder implementation of appropriate nutritional management.

  9. Pyrexia, anaemia and acute renal failure secondary to omeprazole.

    PubMed Central

    Landray, M. J.; Ringrose, T.; Ferner, R. E.; Arnold, I. R.

    1998-01-01

    We present the case of a 77-year-old woman who initially presented with pyrexia of unknown origin, anaemia and mild renal impairment. When her omeprazole was stopped she improved rapidly. When omeprazole was re-started she developed fever and acute renal failure, which again settled quickly on discontinuation of omeprazole. This case demonstrates how drugs can cause severe multisystem disorders that may appear to be infective or inflammatory. Images Figure PMID:9799915

  10. Growth Hormone Therapy in Children with Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Cayir, Atilla; Kosan, Celalettin

    2015-01-01

    Growth is impaired in a chronic renal failure. Anemia, acidosis, reduced intake of calories and protein, decreased synthesis of vitamin D and increased parathyroid hormone levels, hyperphosphatemia, renal osteodystrophy and changes in growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor and the gonadotropin-gonadal axis are implicated in this study. Growth is adversely affected by immunosuppressives and corticosteroids after kidney transplantation. Treating metabolic disorders using the recombinant human growth hormone is an effective option for patients with inadequate growth rates. PMID:25745347

  11. Growth hormone therapy in children with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Cayir, Atilla; Kosan, Celalettin

    2015-02-01

    Growth is impaired in a chronic renal failure. Anemia, acidosis, reduced intake of calories and protein, decreased synthesis of vitamin D and increased parathyroid hormone levels, hyperphosphatemia, renal osteodystrophy and changes in growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor and the gonadotropin-gonadal axis are implicated in this study. Growth is adversely affected by immunosuppressives and corticosteroids after kidney transplantation. Treating metabolic disorders using the recombinant human growth hormone is an effective option for patients with inadequate growth rates.

  12. Acute renal failure caused by lily ingestion in six cats.

    PubMed

    Langston, Cathy E

    2002-01-01

    Acute renal failure was diagnosed in 6 cats that had ingested Easter lily or tiger lily plants. All 6 were treated medically; 2 underwent hemodialysis. Three cats survived the acute episode, and although they had chronic renal failure, they survived for more than 1.5 years. Two cats died despite aggressive medical management, including hemodialysis. One cat was euthanatized shortly after the diagnosis was made. Three of the cats were oliguric or anuric at the time of initial examination, and all 3 died. None of the 3 cats that survived had oliguria or anuria. Various members of the lily family (Liliaceae) can cause nephrotoxicosis in cats, but the toxic principle is not known. Although the prognosis for full recovery of cats with lily toxicosis is poor, long-term survival is possible with supportive care. The prognosis appears to be better for cats with nonoliguric renal failure.

  13. Impact of chronic renal failure on nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Maroni, B J

    1998-01-01

    Evidence indicates that both nephrotic and nonnephrotic chronic renal failure (CRF) patients can activate normal compensatory responses when dietary protein intake is restricted and that their protein and energy requirements are similar to normal subjects. When properly implemented, low-protein diets are safe and the benefits include the amelioration of uremic symptoms and some of their metabolic complications and possibly a reduction in the rate of progression of renal failure. To ensure dietary adequacy and compliance, patients should be monitored when treated with low-protein diets. Recent evidence that the protein intake of patients with progressive CRF declines when they consume unrestricted diets should not be considered as an argument against the use of low-protein diets. Rather, it is a persuasive argument in favor of restricting dietary protein intake to minimize the complications of renal failure.

  14. Renal failure occurs in chronic lithium treatment but is uncommon.

    PubMed

    Bendz, Hans; Schön, Staffan; Attman, Per-Ola; Aurell, Mattias

    2010-02-01

    We sought to establish the prevalence of lithium-induced end-stage renal disease in two regions of Sweden with 2.7 million inhabitants corresponding to about 30% of the Swedish population. Eighteen patients with lithium-induced end-stage renal disease were identified among the 3369 patients in the general lithium-treated population, representing a sixfold increase in prevalence compared with the general population for renal replacement therapy. All lithium-treated patients were older than 46 years at end-stage renal disease with a mean lithium treatment time of 23 years with ten patients having discontinued lithium treatment an average of 10 years before the start of renal replacement therapy. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (defined as plasma creatinine over 150 micromol/l) in the general lithium-treated population was about 1.2% (excluding patients on renal replacement therapy). Compared with lithium-treated patients without renal failure, those with chronic kidney disease were older and most were men but, as groups, their mean serum lithium levels and psychiatric diagnoses did not differ. We found that end-stage renal disease is an uncommon but not rare consequence of long-term lithium treatment and is more prevalent than previously thought. Time on lithium was the only identified risk factor in this study, suggesting that regular monitoring of renal function in these patients is mandatory.

  15. Prophages in enterococcal isolates from renal transplant recipients: renal failure etiologies promote selection of strains.

    PubMed

    Daca, Agnieszka; Jarzembowski, Tomasz; Witkowski, Jacek M; Bryl, Ewa; Rutkowski, Bolesław; Dębska-Ślizień, Alicja

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by commensal bacteria may be fatal for the patients under immunosuppressive therapy. This results also from difficulty in identification of high risk strains. Enterococcal infections are increasingly frequent but despite many studies on virulence traits, the difference between commensal and pathogenic strains remains unclear. Prophages are newly described as important elements in competition between strains during colonization, as well as pathogenicity of the strains. Here we evaluate a difference in presence of pp4, pp1, and pp7 prophages and ASA (aggregation substance) gene expression in enterococcal isolates from renal transplant recipients (RTx) with different etiology of the end-stage renal failure. Prophages sequence was screened by PCR in strains of Enterococcus faecalis isolated from urine and feces of 19 RTx hospitalized at Medical University of Gdansk and 18 healthy volunteers. FLOW-FISH method with use of linear locked nucleic acid (LNA) probe was used to assess the ASA gene expression. Additionally, ability of biofilm formation was screened by crystal violet staining method. Presence of prophages was more frequent in fecal isolates from immunocompromised patients than in isolates from healthy volunteers. Additionally, both composition of prophages and ASA gene expression were related to the etiology of renal disease.

  16. Prophages in Enterococcal Isolates from Renal Transplant Recipients: Renal Failure Etiologies Promote Selection of Strains

    PubMed Central

    Daca, Agnieszka; Witkowski, Jacek M.; Bryl, Ewa; Rutkowski, Bolesław; Dębska-Ślizień, Alicja

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by commensal bacteria may be fatal for the patients under immunosuppressive therapy. This results also from difficulty in identification of high risk strains. Enterococcal infections are increasingly frequent but despite many studies on virulence traits, the difference between commensal and pathogenic strains remains unclear. Prophages are newly described as important elements in competition between strains during colonization, as well as pathogenicity of the strains. Here we evaluate a difference in presence of pp4, pp1, and pp7 prophages and ASA (aggregation substance) gene expression in enterococcal isolates from renal transplant recipients (RTx) with different etiology of the end-stage renal failure. Prophages sequence was screened by PCR in strains of Enterococcus faecalis isolated from urine and feces of 19 RTx hospitalized at Medical University of Gdansk and 18 healthy volunteers. FLOW-FISH method with use of linear locked nucleic acid (LNA) probe was used to assess the ASA gene expression. Additionally, ability of biofilm formation was screened by crystal violet staining method. Presence of prophages was more frequent in fecal isolates from immunocompromised patients than in isolates from healthy volunteers. Additionally, both composition of prophages and ASA gene expression were related to the etiology of renal disease. PMID:25105126

  17. [Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis: prognosis of chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Razukeviciene, Loreta; Kuzminskis, Vytautas; Bumblyte, Inga Arūne

    2003-01-01

    We analyzed 19 patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS): 11 males and 8 females (mean age 38.3 yrs. (SD 16.4), who were under observation for 39.4 months (SD 17.2). At the moment of renal biopsy 73.7% of patients had arterial hypertension, 52.6%--nephrotic proteinuria, 36.9%--chronic renal failure. Global glomerulosclerosis was present in 14 biopsies (73.7%), and intersticial fibrosis--in 13 biopsies (68.4%). The results of analysis showed multiple risk factors for progression of renal failure: initial renal failure (p=0.005), proteinuria (> or =3 g/l) (p=0.005), expressed glomerulosclerosis (p=0.005) and expressed interstitial fibrosis (p=0.034). Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis were found to have a relatively bad long-term prognosis--the renal survival rate in 5 years was 77.8%. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that expressed glomerulosclerosis was risk factor (logrank p=0.016, Breslov p=0.043) associated with end-stage renal disease in 5 years.

  18. Lupus vasculopathy combined with acute renal failure in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chien-Te; Fu, Lin-Shien; Wen, Mei-Chin; Hung, Shein-Chung; Chi, Ching-Shiang

    2003-12-01

    Several risk factors have been associated with the prognosis of lupus nephritis. However, few studies have focused on renal vascular lesions (such as thrombi due to immune complexes) as a prognostic factor in this disease. Here we present a case of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a 12-year-old girl who exhibited acute renal failure and severe hypertension on admission. Renal pathology findings included diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (class IVb) and lupus vasculopathy (LV) with immune complex deposition within glomerular capillaries and the preglomerular arteriolar lumen. Her clinical condition deteriorated rapidly, even after cyclophosphamide and methylprednisolone pulse therapy. It improved after 5 days of plasmapheresis and remained stable for up to 6 months under regular treatment. We suggest that renal biopsy performed early in SLE patients with renal involvement should be studied carefully for the presence of vascular lesions. Additionally, plasmapheresis can be considered in patients with LV refractory to other modalities of therapy.

  19. Cyclical acute renal failure due to bilateral ureteral endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Akçay, A; Altun, B; Usalan, C; Ulusoy, S; Erdem, Y; Yasavul, U; Turgan, C; Caglar, S

    1999-09-01

    Endometriosis is a common disease but ureteral involvement is relatively rare. Ureteric endometriosis is mostly unilateral. Endometriotic ureteral obstruction is a serious event commonly diagnosed late and therefore associated with a major risk of hydronephrotic renal atrophy. We present the cyclical acute renal failure associated with menstruation in a patient who developed severe bilateral ureteral obstruction due to endometriosis. Physicians should be aware of this uncommon but serious manifestation of endometriosis, especially if the clinical presentation is cyclical acute renal dysfunction in a premenopausal woman.

  20. [Goodpasture Syndrome: a Rare Cause of Acute Anuric Renal Failure].

    PubMed

    Bareiss, Dirk; Hopfer, Helmut; Menter, Thomas; Jehle, Andreas; Burkhalter, Felix

    2016-06-08

    We report a case of a 68 year old male who presented with an acute onset of anuric renal failure. Investigations revealed a histologically confirmed “double-positive” anti-GBM disease with initially undetectably high antibody values. An induction therapy with plasma exchange, cyclophosphamide and initially high dose steroids and further maintenance therapy for three months was initiated. The patient remained dialysis-dependent despite partial recovering of renal function. Without pulmonary involvement there were no clues for Goodpasture’s disease. Renal prognosis is unfavourable.

  1. Use of Renal Replacement Therapy in a Neonatal Foal with Postresuscitation Acute Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Wong, D M; Ruby, R E; Eatroff, A; Yaeger, M J

    2017-03-01

    A newborn foal was presented because it was unresponsive and in cardiopulmonary arrest. Aggressive cardiopulmonary cerebral resuscitation was administered to the foal, which revived the foal; however, acute renal failure developed. Fluid retention and azotemia occurred although the foal was alert and able to suckle. A 6-hour renal replacement therapy session using hemodiafiltration and a continuous renal replacement therapy machine was administered to the foal at 3 days of age which lowered the foal's azotemia and facilitated removal of some of the excess body fluid. Despite therapy, the foal developed pulmonary edema and was euthanized. Although the foal in this case did not survive, this report highlights the possibility of developing postresuscitation complications such as acute renal failure and describes the use of renal replacement therapy using hemodiafiltration as a viable option in neonatal foals with acute kidney injury.

  2. [Myoglobinuric renal failure in hyperosmolar diabetic coma (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Rumpf, K W; Kaiser, H; Gröne, H J; Trapp, V E; Meinck, H M; Goebel, H H; Kunze, E; Kreuzer, H; Scheler, F

    1981-05-29

    Acute rhabdomyolysis with myoglobinuric renal failure occurred in a 66-year-old woman who was in hyperosmolar non-ketotic diabetic coma. No previous description of such a case has been found. The clinical picture was characterized by the typical findings of hyperosmolar coma, in addition to excessive serum creatine kinase and myoglobin levels and massive myoglobinuria with acute renal failure. The rhabdomyolysis became fully manifest only under insulin treatment, possibly the result of insulin-induced hypophosphataemia, which seems to be of importance in the causation of the rhabdomyolysis.

  3. Adequacy indices for dialysis in acute renal failure: kinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Debowska, Malgorzata; Lindholm, Bengt; Waniewski, Jacek

    2010-05-01

    Many aspects of the management of renal replacement therapy in acute renal failure (ARF), including the appropriate assessment of dialysis adequacy, remain unresolved, because ARF patients often are not in a metabolic steady state. The aim of this study was to evaluate a system of adequacy indices for dialysis in ARF patients using urea and creatinine kinetic modeling. Kinetic modeling was performed for two different fictitious patients (A and B) with characteristics described by the average parameters for two patient groups and for two blood purification treatments: sustained low efficiency daily dialysis (SLEDD) in Patient A and continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) in Patient B, based on data from a clinical report. Urea and creatinine generation rates were estimated according to the clinical data on the solute concentrations in blood. Then, using estimated generation rates, two hypothetical treatments were simulated, CVVH in Patient A and SLEDD in Patient B. KT/V, fractional solute removal (FSR) and equivalent renal clearance (EKR) were calculated according to the definitions developed for metabolically unstable patients. CVVH appeared as being more effective than SLEDD because KT/V, FSR, and EKR were higher for CVVH than SLEDD in Patients A and B. Creatinine KT/V, FSR, and EKR were lower and well correlated to the respective indices for urea. Urea and creatinine generation rates were overestimated more than twice in Patient A and by 30-40% in Patient B if calculated assuming the metabolically stable state than if estimated by kinetic modeling. Adequacy indices and solute generation rates for ARF patients should be estimated using the definition for unsteady metabolic state. EKR and FSR were higher for urea and creatinine with CVVH than with SLEDD, because of higher K.T and minimized compartmental effects for CVVH.

  4. Uremic encephalopathy and other brain disorders associated with renal failure.

    PubMed

    Seifter, Julian Lawrence; Samuels, Martin A

    2011-04-01

    Kidney failure is one of the leading causes of disability and death and one of the most disabling features of kidney failure and dialysis is encephalopathy. This is probably caused by the accumulation of uremic toxins. Other important causes are related to the underlying disorders that cause kidney failure, particularly hypertension. The clinical manifestations of uremic encephalopathy include mild confusional states to deep coma, often with associated movement disorders, such as asterixis. Most nephrologists consider cognitive impairment to be a major indication for the initiation of renal replacement therapy with dialysis with or without subsequent transplantation. Sleep disorders, including Ekbom's syndrome (restless legs syndrome) are also common in patients with kidney failure. Renal replacement therapies are also associated with particular neurologic complications including acute dialysis encephalopathy and chronic dialysis encephalopathy, formerly known as dialysis dementia. The treatments and prevention of each are discussed. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  5. Preventive strategies of renal failure in the Arab world.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Faissal A M; Al-Khader, Abdullah A

    2005-09-01

    The prevalence of both acute and chronic renal failure is high in the Arab world. Data available on the exact prevalence of various renal diseases are very limited. Nevertheless, the reported prevalence of chronic renal failure is 80 to 120 per million population (pmp) in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and 225 pmp in Egypt. This is in comparison with the reported prevalence of 283 pmp in Europe, 975 pmp in the United States, and 1149 pmp in Japan. Lower prevalence rates reported in this region could be due to underreporting. The economic burden of renal replacement on health care providers is enormous. In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the estimated cost per annum incurred toward maintenance hemodialysis is US 19,400 US dollars and, considering that there are more than 7200 patients on regular dialysis in this country, the total expenditure is enormous. Such large amounts may be beyond the monetary capacity of many countries in this region because of limited financial resources. These figures clearly suggest that there is an urgent need to establish a massive prevention program. The strategy adapted should be innovative and imaginative and should be one that is maximally cost effective. Paradoxically, in the Arab world, we have a good opportunity to reduce the incidence of kidney failure (chronic and acute) substantially by appropriately chosen models. This is because many of the causes of renal failure are eminently preventable. In fact, a rough estimate is that these programs, if successful, can reduce the incidence by as much as 40% (personal communication, Shaheen, 2003). It is worthy of mention that, in the Arab world, the budget for research is about 0.15% of the national domestic product compared with the international average of 1.5%. In this article, we concentrate on some of the main causes of renal failure in the Arab world that we feel can be prevented and suggest ways that can best address this issue.

  6. Pathogenesis and Prevention of Acute Renal Failure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    to other intermediaries that are important. To explore this possibility, fructose- l ,6-diphosphate (FDP), a metabolite in the glycolytic pathway, was...Supported b- this contract. *1. Shapiro JI, Cheung C, Itabashi A , Chan L , Schrier RW: The protective effect of verapamil on renal function after warm and...proximal tubules. Am J Physiol, in press. *8. Shapiro JI, Chan L , Cheung C, Itabashi A , Rossi N, Schrier RW: The effect of ATP depletion in the isolated

  7. Renal cortical thickness and PON1 activity both decrease in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Ak, Gülçin; Ozgönül, Mert; Sözmen, Eser Y; Aslan, S Leyla; Sözmen, Bülent

    2002-01-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with a tendency to atherosclerosis due to the enhanced oxidative stress and insufficient antioxidant enzyme activities such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and paraoxonase (PON 1), together with abnormalities in lipid parameters. We determined the in vitro susceptibility of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to oxidation and PON1 activities in patients with chronic renal insufficiency to see how PON1 affected the progression of the disease and whether hemodialysis influenced these parameters. Thirty-seven patients (21 men, 16 women, mean age 43.9 +/- 16) with CRF were included, 23 were receiving hemodialysis treatment. Exclusion criteria were diabetes mellitus and acute coronary disease. Eighteen healthy subjects (9 men and 9 women, mean age 39.9 +/- 10.5) volunteered to participate as controls. All patients were evaluated by renal ultrasound (USG) and two-dimensional echography, and their lipid profiles, PON1 activity, basal and Cu-induced LDL oxidation were determined. PON1 activities of patients were lower than controls (14.4 +/- 11 vs 30.9 +/- 19 U/L, p < 0.05) while basal ox-LDL levels determined by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) method were higher (0.6 +/- 0.4 vs 0.4+/- 0.2 nmol/mg LDL protein, p<0.01). There was no significant difference between the groups treated with hemodialysis or not. There was a positive correlation between renal cortical thickness and HDL levels (r=0.47, p=0.006) and PON1 activity (r=0.45, p=0.01). Our data showed that HDL cholesterol levels and PON1 activities were both lower in patients, indicating depletion of the protective antioxidant capacity. PON1 activities and phenotypes were no different in patients with coronary disease and others so it does not appear to be a significant indicator of coronary artery disease in patients with CRF.

  8. Frequency of anaemia and renal insufficiency in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad; Jehangir, Waqas; Daood, Muhammad Salman; Khan, Ahmad; Mallick, Nadeem Hayat

    2010-01-01

    Heart Failure (HF) is a common disease with a high mortality rate. Anaemia and renal failure (RF) are often present in patients with HF and associated with worse prognosis. Objective of study was to evaluate the prevalence of anaemia and RF in patients with HF. Patients admitted in Punjab institute of cardiology Lahore with diagnosis of heart failure were enrolled from February, 2008 to December, 2008. Anaemia was defined as haemoglobin levels < 13 mg/dl for men and 12 mg/dl for women. Renal function was assessed by the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), calculated by the simplified formula of the MDRD (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease) study. Of the 276 patients included in this study, 42.03% (116) had anaemia and 38.40% (106) had moderate to severe renal failure (GFR < 60 ml/min). The prevalence of anaemia and renal failure was high in this population and was associated with the severity of the HF (functional classes III and IV).

  9. Comparison of clinical and laboratory parameters in patients with end-stage renal failure in the outcome of chronic glomerulonephritis and patients with end-stage renal failure in the outcome of other diseases.

    PubMed

    Popova, J A; Yadrihinskaya, V N; Krylova, M I; Sleptsovа, S S; Borisovа, N V

    frequent complications of hemodialysis treatments are coagulation disorders. This is due to activation of the coagulation of blood flow in the interaction with a dialysis membrane material vascular prostheses and extracorporeal circuit trunks. In addition, in hemodialysis patients receiving heparin for years, there is depletion of stocks in endothelial cells in tissue factor inhibitor, inhibits the activity of an external blood clotting mechanism. the aim of our study was to evaluate the hemostatic system parameters in patients with end-stage renal failure, depending on the cause of renal failure. to evaluate the hemostatic system parameters in patients with end-stage renal failure, depending on the cause of renal failure and hemodialysis treatment duration conducted a study that included 100 patients observed in the department of chronic hemodialysis and nephrology hospital №1 Republican National Medical Center in the period of 2013-2016. in patients with end-stage renal failure in the outcome of chronic glomerulonephritis, a great expression of activation of blood coagulation confirm increased the mean concentration of fibrinogen, whereas in the group, which included patients with end-stage renal failure in the outcome of other diseases, such is not different from the norm, and a higher rate of hyperfibrinogenemia, identified in 2/3 patients in this group. it was revealed that the state of homeostasis in patients with end-stage renal failure in increasingly characterizes the level of fibrinogen and the activation of the hemostatic markers: soluble fibrin monomer complexes, D-dimers.

  10. Renal concentration defect following nonoliguric acute renal failure in the rat.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R J; Gordon, J A; Kim, J; Peterson, L M; Gross, P A

    1982-04-01

    The mechanism of impaired renal concentrating ability following nonoliguric ischemic acute renal failure was studied in the rat. Fifty min of complete occlusion of the renal artery and vein with contralateral nephrectomy resulted in reversible, nonoliguric acute renal failure. Eight days following induction of acute renal failure, a defect in 30 hr dehydration urine osmolality was present when experimental animals were compared with uninephrectomized controls (1,425 +/- 166 versus 2,267 +/- 127 mOsm/kg water respectively, P less than 0.001). Comparable postdehydration plasma vasopressin levels in experimental and control animals and an impaired hydro-osmotic response to exogenous vasopressin in experimental animals documented a nephrogenic origin of the defect in urine concentration. Lower urinary excretion of prostaglandin E2 in experimental animals and a failure of cyclo-oxygenase inhibition with 10 mg/kg of indomethacin to improve dehydration urine osmolality suggested that prostaglandin E2 antagonism of vasopressin action did not contribute to the concentration defect. Postdehydration inner medullary (papillary) interstitial tonicity was significantly reduced in experimental animals versus controls (870 +/- 85 versus 1,499 +/- 87 mOsm/kg water respectively, P less than 0.001). To determine if this decreased interstitial tonicity was due to vascular mechanisms, papillary plasma flow was measured and found to be equivalent in experimental and control animals. To examine a role for biochemical factors in the renal concentration defect, cyclic nucleotide levels were measured in cytosol and membrane fragments. A decrease in vasopressin and sodium fluoride-stimulated adenylate cyclase was found in outer medullary tissue of experimental animals. In contrast, vasopressin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was comparable in the inner medullary tissue of control and experimental animals. Our study suggests a defect in generation of renal inner medullary interstitial

  11. Acute Respiratory Failure in Renal Transplant Recipients: A Single Intensive Care Unit Experience.

    PubMed

    Ulas, Aydin; Kaplan, Serife; Zeyneloglu, Pinar; Torgay, Adnan; Pirat, Arash; Haberal, Mehmet

    2015-11-01

    Frequency of pulmonary complications after renal transplant has been reported to range from 3% to 17%. The objective of this study was to evaluate renal transplant recipients admitted to an intensive care unit to identify incidence and cause of acute respiratory failure in the postoperative period and compare clinical features and outcomes between those with and without acute respiratory failure. We retrospectively screened the data of 540 consecutive adult renal transplant recipients who received their grafts at a single transplant center and included those patients admitted to an intensive care unit during this period for this study. Acute respiratory failure was defined as severe dyspnea, respiratory distress, decreased oxygen saturation, hypoxemia or hypercapnia on room air, or requirement of noninvasive or invasive mechanical ventilation. Among the 540 adult renal transplant recipients, 55 (10.7%) were admitted to an intensive care unit, including 26 (47.3%) admitted for acute respiratory failure. Median time from transplant to intensive care unit admission was 10 months (range, 0-67 mo). The leading causes of acute respiratory failure were bacterial pneumonia (56%) and cardiogenic pulmonary edema (44%). Mean partial pressure of arterial oxygen to fractional inspired oxygen ratio was 174 ± 59, invasive mechanical ventilation was used in 13 patients (50%), and noninvasive mechanical ventilation was used in 8 patients (31%). The overall mortality was 16.4%. Acute respiratory failure was the reason for intensive care unit admission in almost half of our renal transplant recipients. Main causes of acute respiratory failure were bacterial pneumonia and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Mortality of patients admitted for acute respiratory failure was similar to those without acute respiratory failure.

  12. ESPEN Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition: adult renal failure.

    PubMed

    Cano, N J M; Aparicio, M; Brunori, G; Carrero, J J; Cianciaruso, B; Fiaccadori, E; Lindholm, B; Teplan, V; Fouque, D; Guarnieri, G

    2009-08-01

    Among patients with renal failure, those with ARF and critical illness represent by far the largest group undergoing artificial nutrition. ARF, especially in the ICU, seldom occurs as isolated organ failure but rather is a component of a much more complex metabolic environment, in the setting of the multiple organ failure. Nutritional programs for ARF patients must consider not only the metabolic derangements peculiar to renal failure and with the underlying disease process/associated complications, but also the relevant derangements in nutrient balance due to renal replacement therapies, especially when highly efficient renal replacement therapies (RRT) are used, such as continuous veno-venous hemofiltration (CVVH), or prolonged intermittent modalities such as sustained low-efficiency dialysis (SLED). Finally it is to be taken into account that nutrient requirements can change considerably during the course of illness itself (see also guidelines on PN in intensive care). From a metabolic point of view, patients with CKD or on chronic HD who develop a superimposed acute illness should be considered to be similar to patients with ARF. The same principles in respect of PN should therefore be applied.

  13. Extreme hypernatraemia in association with renal failure following caecocystoplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, W. S.; Thurston, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    A case of extreme hypernatraemia (serum sodium 212 mmol/l) occurring in association with renal failure following a caecocystoplasty procedure is reported. The causative factors in extreme hypernatraemia are reviewed and an unusual reabsorptive mechanism via the transposed intestinal segment is proposed to explain the degree of hypernatraemia present in this case. PMID:6494095

  14. Acute Renal Failure Induced by Chinese Herbal Medication in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Akpan, Effiong Ekong; Ekrikpo, Udeme E.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional herbal medicine is a global phenomenon especially in the resource poor economy where only the very rich can access orthodox care. These herbal products are associated with complications such as acute renal failure and liver damage with a high incidence of mortalities and morbidities. Acute renal failure from the use of herbal remedies is said to account for about 30–35% of all cases of acute renal failure in Africa. Most of the herbal medications are not usually identified, but some common preparation often used in Nigeria includes “holy water” green water leaves, bark of Mangifera indica (mango), shoot of Anacardium occidentale (cashew), Carica papaya (paw-paw) leaves, lime water, Solanum erianthum (Potato tree), and Azadirachta indica (Neem) trees. We report a rare case of a young man who developed acute renal failure two days after ingestion of Chinese herb for “body cleansing” and general wellbeing. He had 4 sessions of haemodialysis and recovered kidney function fully after 18 days of admission. PMID:26199625

  15. Impairment of cardiac function and energetics in experimental renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Raine, A E; Seymour, A M; Roberts, A F; Radda, G K; Ledingham, J G

    1993-01-01

    Cardiac function and energetics in experimental renal failure in the rat (5/6 nephrectomy) have been investigated by means of an isolated perfused working heart preparation and an isometric Langendorff preparation using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR). 4 wk after nephrectomy cardiac output of isolated hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer was significantly lower (P < 0.0001) at all levels of preload and afterload in the renal failure groups than in the pair-fed sham operated control group. In control hearts, cardiac output increased with increases in perfusate calcium from 0.73 to 5.61 mmol/liter whereas uremic hearts failed in high calcium perfusate. Collection of 31P NMR spectra from hearts of renal failure and control animals during 30 min normoxic Langendorff perfusion showed that basal phosphocreatine was reduced by 32% to 4.7 mumol/g wet wt (P < 0.01) and the phosphocreatine to ATP ratio was reduced by 32% (P < 0.01) in uremic hearts. During low flow ischemia, there was a substantial decrease in phosphocreatine in the uremic hearts and an accompanying marked increase in release of inosine into the coronary effluent (14.9 vs 6.1 microM, P < 0.01). We conclude that cardiac function is impaired in experimental renal failure, in association with abnormal cardiac energetics and increased susceptibility to ischemic damage. Disordered myocardial calcium utilization may contribute to these derangements. PMID:8254048

  16. The Effects of Heart Failure on Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Udani, Suneel M; Koyner, Jay L

    2010-01-01

    Summary Heart-kidney interactions have been increasingly recognized by clinicians and researchers involved in the study and treatment of heart failure and kidney disease. A classification system has been developed to categorize the different manifestations of cardiac and renal dysfunction. Recent work has highlighted the significant negative prognostic effect of worsening renal function on outcomes for individuals with heart failure. The etiology of the concomitant cardiac and renal dysfunction remains unclear; however, increasing evidence supports alternatives to the established theory of underfilling, including effects of venous congestion and changes in intra-abdominal pressure. Conventional therapy focuses on blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system with expanding use of direct renin and aldosterone antagonists. Novel therapeutic interventions using extracorporeal therapy and antagonists of the adenosine pathway show promise and require further investigation. PMID:20621250

  17. Head circumference in chronic renal failure from birth.

    PubMed

    Van Dyck, M; Proesmans, W

    2001-12-01

    Chronic renal failure in childhood jeopardizes both growth and development. In children with chronic renal failure from birth, growth in height and weight have been found to be generally poor. Few data on head circumference are available. A cohort of 19 children with chronic renal failure from birth was studied from the early weeks of life to the age of 5 years. There were 18 boys; and 18 patients had congenital renal hypoplasia or hypodysplasia associated with obstructive uropathies. Eight patients received recombinant growth hormone (rhGH) after the age of 2 years. Only 2 patients needed renal replacement therapy before the age of 5 years. Data after transplantation were not included. The following variables were analyzed: body height, body mass index and head circumference. Data were expressed in median values of standard deviations scores (SDS). In the first 3 months of life there was a significant drop in height SDS, body mass index SDS and head circumference SDS. Thereafter, a stable growth velocity was observed for the rest of the study period, except for body mass index SDS. which improved after 36 months. There was a striking difference between patients who needed treatment or not with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH). Patients without rhGH displayed a stable growth after the age of 3 months until 5 years of age. In the remaining 8 patients, rhGH treatment resulted in a significant increase not only in height SDS but also in head circumference SDS. In infants and young children with chronic renal failure from birth, growth in head circumference parallels growth in body height. This applies to all patients and to data before and during rhGH treatment.

  18. Oxalosis presenting as early renal allograft failure.

    PubMed

    Alsuwaida, Abdulkareem; Hayat, Ashik; Alwakeel, Jamal S

    2007-06-01

    Hyperoxaluria can result in the deposition of oxalate in bones, arteries, eyes, heart, nerves, kidneys and other structures when there is a reduction in glomerular filtration rate. Liver and kidney transplantation is curative for patients with Type I primary hyperoxaluria. Here we report a case of recurrent oxalosis in a post-transplant kidney with early graft failure in an adult male.

  19. Peritoneal Dialysis in Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Edelbaum, David N.; Sokol, Albert; Gaynor, Sanford; Rubini, Milton E.

    1968-01-01

    The long-term results of intermittent peritoneal dialysis in long-term treatment of renal disease have yet to equal those of intermittent hemodialysis. However, further exploration and refinement of this technique is justified. Performed in acute stages of disease, both peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis relieve the symptoms of uremia and specifically “buy time” for the patient so that proper medical or surgical therapy may be instituted. In acute situations, peritoneal dialysis is the procedure of choice, and is an important adjunct to more conventional treatment for chronic renal disease. It may be useful sometimes even in chronically hemodialyzed patients—for example, when the hemodialysis cannula for one reason or another is inaccessible because of clots, replacement, or infection. It is especially valuable when the hemorrhagic complications of uremia contraindicate hemodialysis treatment. Its use in chronic uremia remains sharply limited in time, but for brief periods chronic peritoneal dialysis appears to be a reasonably satisfactory means of prolonging life while awaiting homotransplant or decision for maintenance hemodialysis therapy. PMID:5639945

  20. Renal Biopsy Findings in Acute Renal Failure in the Cohort of Patients in the Spanish Registry of Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    López-Gómez, Juan M.; Rivera, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Renal biopsy in acute renal failure of unknown origin provides irreplaceable information for diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. This study analyzed the frequency and clinicopathologic correlations of renal native biopsied acute renal failure in Spain during the period 1994 through 2006. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Acute renal failure was defined as a rapid deterioration of glomerular filtration rate, with or without oligoanuria or rapidly progressive renal insufficiency, including acute-on-chronic renal failure. Patients who were younger than 15 yr were considered children, those between 15 and 65 yr adults, and those >65 elderly. Results: Between 1994 and 2006, data on 14,190 native renal biopsies were collected from 112 renal units in Spain. Of these, 16.1% (2281 biopsies) were diagnosed with acute renal failure. The prevalence of the main clinical syndromes was different in the three age groups: Biopsy-confirmed acute renal failure in children was 5.7%, in adults was 12.5%, and in elderly increased significantly to 32.9%. The prevalence of biopsy-confirmed acute renal failure according to cause was as follows: Vasculitis, 23.3%; acute tubulointerstitial nephritis, 11.3%; and crescentic glomerulonephritis types 1 and 2, 10.1%. The prevalence of the different causes differed significantly according to age group. Conclusions: The Spanish Registry of Glomerulonephritis provides useful information about renal histopathology in biopsy-confirmed acute renal failure. The prevalence of vasculitis and crescentic glomerulonephritis is high, especially in elderly patients. These data obtained from a national large registry highlight the value of renal biopsy in undetermined acute renal failure. PMID:18354075

  1. Insidious rifampin-associated renal failure with light-chain proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Warrington, R J; Hogg, G R; Paraskevas, F; Tse, K S

    1977-07-01

    A patient who was receiving rifampin treatment for tuberculosis developed heterogenous light-chain proteinuria and insidious renal failure after a period of fluid restriction. The renal damage was characterized pathologically by an interstitial nephritis with invasive tubular casts and an associated renal vein thrombosis. The possible role of the light-chain proteinuria in the pathogenesis of the renal failure is discussed.

  2. Potential Therapeutic Strategies of Regenerative Medicine for Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Mata-Miranda, Monica Maribel; Delgado-Macuil, Raul Jacobo; Rojas-Lopez, Marlon; Martinez-Flores, Ricardo; Vazquez-Zapien, Gustavo Jesus

    2017-03-17

    Kidney diseases are a public health problem worldwide; the mortality rate is between 50 and 80%. Available therapies include replacement function by dialysis or transplant, associated with a high morbidity and mortality; kidney transplantation is limited by the shortage of donor organs, immune rejection and lifelong treatment with immunosuppressive. Likewise, none of these treatments compensates all kidney functions. There is a great concern in developing more effective therapies with the ability to replace the wide range of renal functions, so that, new researches on developing therapeutic strategies have focused on regenerative medicine, science that includes artificial creation of tissues and organs, in order to repair or replace a tissue or organ function. The aim of this paper is to review the new advances in regenerative medicine strategies for treatment of renal failure. Generally, regenerative medicine comprises two therapeutic strategies: cell therapy and tissue engineering. Cell therapy techniques depend on cell and tissue culture, with the aim to grow specific cells that will replace morphological structures, tissues and functions. In this area, some investigations that include the use of stem cells have been carried out. Tissue engineering complements cell therapy combining techniques of biological sciences and engineering to create structures and devices as scaffolds, matrices or biocompatible materials, which alone or in combination will give support and facilitate the repair of damaged tissue. Even though there is a great advance in regenerative medicine strategies, we are far from using any of its techniques on health institutions, due to it is necessary to evaluate side effects, biodistribution, dosage, type of administration, vehicle of cell therapy, as well as the evaluation of response time and long-term studies, among other studies.

  3. The prevalence of radiological markers of renal osteodystrophy in patients with chronic renal failure in Enugu.

    PubMed

    Odenigbo, U C; Ijoma, C K; Ulasi, I; Udeh, A C; Ibeh, C C

    2006-12-01

    To study the prevalence of renal osteodystrophy in Chronic renal failure patients in Enugu, using radiological methods. Ninety adult patients (56 male and 34 female) were recruited from the renal clinics of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu over a period of twelve consecutive months. A structured questionnaire was administered and a physical examination carried out at the initial interview. This was followed by other investigations including renal ultrasonography, plain radiographs and laboratory investigations including serum electrolytes, urea and creatinine, calcium and phosphate, total alkaline phosphate and creatinine clearance estimation. There was no obvious relationship between bone pain (a symptom of renal osteodystrophy) and the presence ofradiological features of renal osteodystrophy. The findings of the study showed that renal osteodystrophy, demonstrable by radiography is relatively uncommon, existing in only 3 subjects (3.35%). Among the 3 subjects, 2 showed radiological features of osteitis fibrosa cystica (one male and one female), while the other subject (one female) had radiological features of osteoporosis. All these subjects belonged to group 3 and had been on maintainance haemodialysis for more than 6 months. Other forms of renal osteodystrophy were not demonstrated. Renal osteodystrophy is probably not as common in Nigerian patients as in Caucasians and there may be reasons for this.

  4. The renin-angiotensin system in cats with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Taugner, F; Baatz, G; Nobiling, R

    1996-10-01

    The kidneys of eight male and two female cats with subacute (clinical illness 1-3 months) to chronic (clinical illness > 3 months) renal failure were examined histopathologically, electron microscopically and immunohistochemically. Semiquantitative morphometric data, obtained by measurement of the reninpositive portion of the afferent arteriole (RPP) and evaluation of the juxtaglomerular index (JGI), were compared with data from three healthy control cats. On the basis of the morphometric data, the animals with renal failure could be classified in three groups showing either a stimulated (group A), an unaltered (group B) or an inhibited (group C) renin-angiotensin system. In the three group A cats the JGI and RPP were increased (45.5 +/- 3.5%; 130 microns); in the four group B cats these values were comparable with those of the controls; in the three group C animals the JGI was decreased but the RPP was unaltered (11.7% +/- 3.2%; 56 microns). The increase in kidney renin in animals affected by chronic renal failure (CRF) may have been due to a volume depletion. Prolonged CRF seemed to result in increasing hypertrophy of renal blood vessels, leading to renal hypoxia and increasing preglomerular resistance. Reduced kidney renin status may have been caused by inhibition of renin synthesis in prolonged CRF as a result of renal ischaemia.

  5. Congestive renal failure: the pathophysiology and treatment of renal venous hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ross, Edward A

    2012-12-01

    Longstanding experimental evidence supports the role of renal venous hypertension in causing kidney dysfunction and "congestive renal failure." A focus has been heart failure, in which the cardiorenal syndrome may partly be due to high venous pressure, rather than traditional mechanisms involving low cardiac output. Analogous diseases are intra-abdominal hypertension and renal vein thrombosis. Proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms include reduced transglomerular pressure, elevated renal interstitial pressure, myogenic and neural reflexes, baroreceptor stimulation, activation of sympathetic nervous and renin angiotensin aldosterone systems, and enhanced proinflammatory pathways. Most clinical trials have addressed the underlying condition rather than venous hypertension per se. Interpreting the effects of therapeutic interventions on renal venous congestion are therefore problematic because of such confounders as changes in left ventricular function, cardiac output, and blood pressure. Nevertheless, there is preliminary evidence from small studies of intense medical therapy or extracorporeal ultrafiltration for heart failure that there can be changes to central venous pressure that correlate inversely with renal function, independently from the cardiac index. Larger more rigorous trials are needed to definitively establish under what circumstances conventional pharmacologic or ultrafiltration goals might best be directed toward central venous pressures rather than left ventricular or cardiac output parameters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Treatment of acute renal failure in Germany: a structural analysis].

    PubMed

    Schindler, R; Hutagalung, R; Jörres, A; John, S; Quintel, M I; Brunkhorst, F M; Heering, P

    2014-08-01

    There are no reliable data on the structure and practice of the care of critically ill patients with acute renal failure in Germany. We carried out a detailed survey by sending a questionnaire to 2265 German Intensive Care Units. The questionnaire contained 19 questions regarding renal replacement therapy. 423 German intensive care units participated in the survey. Most of the ICUs are headed interdisciplinary (47%) or by anesthesiologists (30%), with significant differences depending on the size of the clinic, with primarily interdisciplinary management in smaller clinics. The offered type of renal replacement therapy varies significantly, the smaller the house the fewer methods are available. Thus, intermittent dialysis procedures are offered only in 35% of hospitals with up to 400 beds. The indication for the initiation of acute renal replacement therapy in intensive care is provided predominantly (53%) by an anesthesiologist. A nephrologist is only involved in 22% of all intensive care units. The indication is based primarily on a "clinical criteria", but these are poorly defined. Our results demonstrate the need for cross-disciplinary standards for the treatment of acute renal failure in German intensive care units. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. [Ultrastructure of the gastric mucosa in chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Matos-Villalobos, D; Rosa-Arevalo, M

    1975-01-01

    Electromicroscopy (EM) findings of gastric mucosa from four patients with renal failure are reported. In these patients, the renal insufficiency appeared from different etiologies and ligth microscopy showed only corion edema. It was only through the EM studies that we could show great autophagic vacuoles in almost all surface epithelial cells; some of them, containing citoplasmic structure residues. In the four patients we found a remarkable activity of autophagocitosis. The autodestructive celular changes suggest two possibilities: a) the mucosal edema could obstruct a poorer nutrition of the tissues and/or b) It could represent a high flucagon activity.

  8. Acute polyradiculoneuropathy with renal failure: mind the anion gap.

    PubMed

    Alzouebi, M; Sarrigiannis, P G; Hadjivassiliou, M

    2008-07-01

    We describe a 47-year-old male who presented with acute renal failure and later developed bilateral facial weakness, complete ophthalmoplegia, flaccid tetraparesis and diminished sensation in the extremities. Renal biopsy and urine toxicology were consistent with ethylene glycol intoxication. Sequential neurophysiological examinations revealed sensory nerve axonal loss, proximal motor nerve conduction block and a proximodistal type of axonal degeneration. Seven months after ingestion, the patient improved and was able to walk unaided but with residual bilateral facial weakness and distal sensory loss.

  9. Acute myocardial infarction and renal failure following naphtha ingestion.

    PubMed

    Roberge, R J; Crippen, D R; Jayadevappa, D; Kosek, T L

    2001-10-01

    We present a case of a non-Q wave myocardial infarction and acute renal failure following an ingestion of naphtha, a petroleum distillate composed primarily of hydrocarbons. The patient's renal, metabolic, and cardiac status improved over several days with aggressive volume replacement and bicarbonate therapy. Acute cardiotoxic effects of hydrocarbon exposure generally manifest as dysrhythmias, secondary to myocardial sensitization to circulating catecholamines, or, possibly, coronary vasospasm. Ischemia from associated hypotension or direct myocardial toxicity are other potential causes of naphtha-related cardiac injury.

  10. Veno-venous continuous renal replacement therapy for burned patients with acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, R; Ethier, J; Quérin, S; Béroniade, V; Falardeau, P; Leblanc, M

    2000-11-01

    From 1995 to 1998, 12 burned patients with acute renal failure (ARF) were treated by veno-venous continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) at the Burn Unit of Hôtel-Dieu de Montréal. Their mean (+/-SD) age was 51+/-12 years, and the mean burned surface covered 48.6+/-15.8% of total body surface area. All patients were mechanically ventilated and presented evidence of sepsis. The mean delay before occurrence of ARF was 15+/-6 days and ARF was mainly related to sepsis and hypotension. Main reasons for CRRT initiation were azotemia and fluid overload. A total of 15 CRRT modalities were applied (12 continuous veno-venous hemodiafiltration, CVVHDF; two continuous veno-venous hemofiltration, CVVH; and one continuous veno-venous hemodialysis, CVVHD) over 14+/-13 days. For CRRT, nine patients received heparin and three were not anticoagulated. Mean values for dialysate and reinjection flow rates were 1134+/-250 ml/h and 635+/-327 ml/h, respectively. Admission weight was 78.8+/-12.7 kg with a mean weight gain before CRRT initiation of 10.0+/-5.8 kg and a mean weight loss during CRRT of 8.9+/-5.5 kg. Nine patients received enteral plus parenteral nutrition, and three, parenteral nutrition only; the total caloric intake was 31.5+/-7.0 kcal/kg/day and protein intake, 1.8+/-0.4 g/kg/day. The normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR) was evaluated at 2.28+/-0.78 g/kg/day during CRRT. The mortality rate was 50%. The six survivors all recovered normal renal function with four of them requiring intermittent hemodialysis for short periods. In conclusion, veno-venous CRRT is particularly well suited for this selected population allowing smooth fluid removal and aggressive nutritional support.

  11. Mechanisms of renal hyporesponsiveness to BNP in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Egom, Emmanuel E; Feridooni, Tiam; Hotchkiss, Adam; Kruzliak, Peter; Pasumarthi, Kishore B S

    2015-06-01

    The B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), a member of the family of vasoactive peptides, is a potent natriuretic, diuretic, and vasodilatory peptide that contributes to blood pressure and volume homeostasis. These attributes make BNP an ideal drug that could aid in diuresing a fluid-overloaded patient who had poor or worsening renal function. Despite the potential benefits of BNP, accumulating evidence suggests that simply increasing the amount of circulating BNP does not necessarily increase natriuresis in patients with heart failure (HF). Moreover, despite high BNP levels, natriuresis falls when HF progresses from a compensated to a decompensated state, suggesting the emergence of renal resistance to BNP. Although likely multifactorial, several mechanisms have been proposed to explain renal hyporesponsiveness in HF, including, but not limited to, decreased renal BNP availability, down-regulation of natriuretic peptide receptors, and altered BNP intracellular signal transduction pathways. Thus, a better understanding of renal hyporesponsiveness in HF is required to devise strategies to develop novel agents and technologies that directly restore renal BNP efficiency. It is hoped that development of these new therapeutic approaches will serve to limit sodium retention in patients with HF, which may ultimately delay the progression to overt HF.

  12. Acute renal failure in pregnancy in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Randeree, I G; Czarnocki, A; Moodley, J; Seedat, Y K; Naiker, I P

    1995-03-01

    This study compares our experiences of the incidence and etiology of acute renal failure in pregnancy (ARF-P) in patients requiring hemodialysis, a decade after a previous publication from our institution. A retrospective analysis of the hospital records of 42 patients with a diagnosis of ARF-P during a 3-year period from 1990 to 1992 was undertaken [16% of the total number of acute renal failure (ARF) patients needing hemodialysis]. The incidence of ARF-P (expressed relative to all cases of acute renal failure requiring hemodialysis) decreased from 24.6% (1978) to 16% (1992: p = 0.03). Preeclampsia-eclampsia (PE:E) replaced septic abortion as the principal cause of ARF-P. In those patients with PE:E, thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 150 x 10(9)/L) occurred in all, while 33% developed the HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets). Ingestion of herbal toxins was noted mostly in patients with septic abortion. Maternal mortality was 5% and was due to multiorgan failure complicating septic abortion. The perinatal mortality of 55% occurred in women with early gestation, thrombocytopenia, and high serum creatinine levels. Acute renal failure in pregnancy continues to present a challenge in South Africa, a developing country. There were significantly more obstetric than gynecological causes in 1992 (p = 0.0003). This could be attributed to the steady decline in septic abortion since 1978. The main contributor to obstetric-related causes was PE:E. Greater emphasis should therefore be placed on detecting hypertension at antenatal visits.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Hyperkalemia, renal failure, and converting-enzyme inhibition: an overrated connection.

    PubMed

    García, N H; Baigorria, S T; Juncos, L I

    2001-09-01

    Hyperkalemia is widely viewed as a common complication of ACE inhibition in azotemic patients. These renal failure patients are the patients who benefit most from ACE inhibition. Because we could not confirm this notion after a retrospective evaluation of 236 azotemic patients, we studied 2 models of renal mass reduction. In the first, we did a 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx) on rats and studied them 2 weeks after surgery (before chronic renal changes had developed). A second group was studied 16 weeks after Nx, once chronic renal failure was established. Rats in both models were treated with quinapril in drinking water. After baseline evaluation, we challenged them either by a high-K(+) diet or by blocking aldosterone receptors. We found that although quinapril blocked the K(+)-induced increase in aldosterone, serum K(+) levels and K(+) balance were maintained before and during high K(+) intake or during simultaneous spironolactone administration. We conclude that in hemodynamically stable rats with reduced renal mass and renal dysfunction, the administration of an ACE inhibitor does not cause severe hyperkalemia.

  14. Renal protective effects of chronic exercise and antihypertensive therapy in hypertensive rats with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Kohzuki, M; Kamimoto, M; Wu, X M; Xu, H L; Kawamura, T; Mori, N; Nagasaka, M; Kurosawa, H; Minami, N; Kanazawa, M; Saito, T; Yoshida, K

    2001-10-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure are restricted to mild physical activity and tend to a lack of exercise. However, there have been few reports regarding the influence of chronic exercise on the progression of renal disease. Similarly, there are few animal models concerned with the effect of exercise training on improving renal function. Therefore, we assessed the renal effects of moderate chronic treadmill exercise in a remnant kidney model of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) with chronic renal failure. We also assessed the effects of exercise and antihypertensive therapy on renal function. Eight-week-old SHR were subjected to 5/6 nephrectomy by removal of the left kidney and excision of two-thirds of the right kidney. The rats were divided into four groups: (i) no exercise (Non-EX); (ii) moderate exercise with treadmill running (20 m/min, 0 grade incline for 60 min) (EX); (iii) EX with an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, enalapril (2 mg/kg per day, i.p.); and (iv) EX with an angiotensin receptor antagonist, losartan (5 mg/kg per day, i.p.), for 4 weeks. Chronic EX significantly attenuated the increase in proteinuria (P < 0.01) and significantly protected against increases in the index of glomerular sclerosis (IGS). Both enalapril and losartan with EX significantly decreased blood pressure (P < 0.001), and further decreased the IGS. In the stepwise multiple regression analysis, only antihypertensive drug remained in the model as a significant predictor of IGS (P < 0.0001). In contrast, exercise, antihypertensive drug and mean systolic blood pressure (weeks 1-4) remained in the model as a significant predictors of mean proteinuria (weeks 1-4) (all P < 0.0001). These results suggest that exercise does not worsen renal function and has renal-protective effects in this model of rats. Moreover, the antihypertensive therapy has additional renal-protective effects in this model of rats.

  15. Neonatal transient renal failure with renal medullary hyperechogenicity: clinical and laboratory features.

    PubMed

    Makhoul, Imad R; Soudack, Michalle; Smolkin, Tatiana; Sujov, Polo; Epelman, Monica; Eisenstein, Israel; Magen, Daniela; Zelikovic, Israel

    2005-07-01

    Sonographic findings of renal medullary hyperechogenicity have been observed in the neonate in association with severe perinatal renal injury, kidney malformations or nephrocalcinosis, and, rarely, in newborn infants with transient renal failure. The aim of the study was to describe the entity of neonatal transient renal failure with renal medullary hyperechogenicity (NTRFMH). We studied nine term neonates, born between August 1999 and February 2004 in our institution (0.1% of the live born infants), who developed transient renal dysfunction after birth, and in whom renal sonograms showed bilateral medullary hyperechogenicity. Seven of the infants (78%) had anuria until 30-45 hours of age, and two (22%) had oliguria. Peak serum creatinine levels ranged between 0.61 and 1.62 mg/dL (mean: 1.09+/-0.27 mg/dL) at 2-3 days of life. Additional findings included proteinuria in nine infants (100%), uric acid crystalluria in seven (78%), hyperuricemia in four (44%), and hypertension in one (11%). Hyperuricosuria was demonstrated in one out of the seven patients in whom this parameter was determined. Urinary excretion rates of calcium, phosphorus and oxalic acid were normal, as were urinary levels of amino acids and organic acids. Full clinical recovery accompanied by normalization of all laboratory parameters was observed in all infants by 4-6 days of life. Subsequent follow-up showed normal renal function, no urinary abnormalities, and normal renal sonograms in all infants. Our summary of the nine infants with NTRFMH reported on here and a review of 19 cases of this condition reported in the literature reveal a not-so-rare entity of unclear etiology, but excellent prognosis. Physicians caring for neonates should be aware of this benign and transient condition.

  16. Destructive spondyloarthropathy of the cervical spine in patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Leventhal, M R; Freedman, E L; Coburn, J; Delamarter, R

    1997-03-01

    Eleven patients with chronic renal failure and destructive spondyloarthropathy of the cervical spine were evaluated with plain radiographs, flexion-extension views, computed tomography myelogram, or magnetic resonance imaging to determine the results of surgical and nonsurgical treatment. To determine if cervical spine fusion is an effective method of treatment for patients with chronic renal failure and destructive spondyloarthropathy. Several reports have described the pathogenesis and appearance of this condition, but little has been reported about the orthopedic management of destructive spondyloarthropathy of the cervical spine. Three patients had no spinal surgery, three patients had laminectomies alone, three patients had laminectomies with anterior fusions, and two patients had laminectomies with posterior fusions. Radiographs, computed tomography myelograms, and magnetic resonance images were evaluated to determine the results of treatment. Histologic examinations were performed in two patients. Patients with laminectomy alone had no improvement in pain or neurologic function (one died in the immediate postoperative period), one of three patients with anterior fusions had some improvement (one died in the immediate postoperative period), and both of those patients with posterior fusions improved, although both died within a year of surgery from unrelated causes. Even though the osteopenia present in patients with chronic renal failure tends to allow wire pull-out and makes internal fixation of the spine difficult, successful cervical spinal fusion can relieve pain and improve neurologic deficits in selected patients with chronic renal failure and destructive spondyloarthropathy, allowing them to remain more active for longer periods of time.

  17. Renal failure in patients with left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ami M; Adeseun, Gbemisola A; Ahmed, Irfan; Mitter, Nanhi; Rame, J Eduardo; Rudnick, Michael R

    2013-03-01

    Implantable left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are increasingly being used as a bridge to transplantation or as destination therapy in patients with end stage heart failure refractory to conventional medical therapy. A significant number of these patients have associated renal dysfunction before LVAD implantation, which may improve after LVAD placement due to enhanced perfusion. Other patients develop AKI after implantation. LVAD recipients who develop AKI requiring renal replacement therapy in the hospital or who ultimately require long-term outpatient hemodialysis therapy present management challenges with respect to hemodynamics, volume, and dialysis access. This review discusses the mechanics of a continuous-flow LVAD (the HeartMate II), the effects of continuous blood flow on the kidney, renal outcomes of patients after LVAD implantation, dialysis modality selection, vascular access, hemodynamic monitoring during the dialytic procedure, and other issues relevant to caring for these patients.

  18. Advanced glycation end products in renal failure: an overview.

    PubMed

    Noordzij, M J; Lefrandt, J D; Smit, A J

    2008-12-01

    The article aims to present an overview of the existing knowledge on advanced glycation end products (AGE). They are moieties that bind to proteins, but also lipids and nuclear acids. AGE are formed during glycation and oxidative stress. Accumulation of AGE occurs especially in diabetes and chronic renal failure and plays a major pathogenetic role. The deleterious effects of AGE result from cross-linking of proteins and activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products. AGE accumulation can be noninvasively assessed by the skin autofluorescence reader. In diabetics, the skin autofluorescence predicts cardiac mortality and the occurrence of macro- and microvascular complications. In patients on haemodialysis, skin autofluorescence is highly elevated and predicts mortality. After renal transplantation AGE accumulation is lower than during haemodialysis, but still remains elevated and is a strong risk factor for chronic renal transplant dysfunction. Some of the potential methods to intervene with AGE accumulation are discussed in this article.

  19. Treatment of renal failure from diabetic nephropathy with cadaveric homograft

    PubMed Central

    Beaudry, Claude; Laplante, Louis

    1973-01-01

    We report two patients with terminal renal failure secondary to diabetic nephropathy treated with cadaveric kidney transplantation. Neither of these patients had peripheral vascular disease or peripheral neuropathy. There was a proliferative diabetic retinopathy with hemorrhages and exudates in one patient and only background diabetic changes in the ocular fundi of the other; there have been no significant changes in visual acuity or retinopathy in either patient following the transplantation. Both have good kidney function after 8 and 15 months and are completely rehabilitated. The requirement for insulin decreased in both patients during the period of renal insufficiency and increased following transplantation; this seemed to be related to the large dose of steroids given because now that a maintenance level of steroids has been established, both patients require the same dosage of insulin as they did before the onset of renal insufficiency. PMID:4574972

  20. Acid-base balance of cats with chronic renal failure: effect of deterioration in renal function.

    PubMed

    Elliott, J; Syme, H M; Markwell, P J

    2003-06-01

    In a previous cross-sectional study of feline chronic renal failure (CRF), metabolic acidosis was identified in 52.6 per cent of animals with severe renal failure (plasma creatinine concentration >400 micromol/litre). The aim of this longitudinal study was to determine whether metabolic acidosis preceded or accompanied a deterioration in renal function in cats with CRF. Data were analysed from 55 cats with CRF that had been followed longitudinally for at least four months. Twenty-one cases showed deterioration in renal function over the period of the study, as evidenced by significant rises in their plasma creatinine concentrations and decreases in bodyweight. In five of the 21 cases, acidaemia accompanied the deterioration in renal function. Only one of these cats had evidence of metabolic acidosis before renal function deterioration. One other case developed metabolic acidosis without a rise in plasma creatinine concentration. These data suggest that biochemical evidence of metabolic acidosis does not generally occur until late in the course of feline CRF.

  1. Urinary Tuberculosis with Renal Failure: Challenges in Management

    PubMed Central

    Chirmade, Rahul Arun; Baheti, Vidyasagar Hansraj; Tanwar, Harshawardhan Vedpalsingh; Patwardhan, Sujata Kiran; Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction India is the country with the highest burden of TB, an estimated incidence figure of 2.1 million cases of TB for India out of a global incidence of 9 million according to World Health Organization (WHO) statistics for 2013. Renal impairment in these patients is slow and due to continuous infection causing destruction of renal mass. Reconstruction of urinary tract which is frequently required for patients with Urinary TB poses significant challenges. This paper analyses these challenges. Aim To analyse challenges in reconstruction of urinary tract in patients with urinary tuberculosis and renal failure. Materials and Methods Thirty-one patients with renal tuber-culosis were seen from August 2011 to August 2013. We faced major problem in outcomes of surgery in patients with multifocal disease. Results Out of 31 patients 18 patients were males and 13 were females. Total 11 patients had serum creatinine more than 2mg/dl (1.5 mg/dl being upper normal range of our laboratory) at the time of presentation. These patients had simultaneous kidney, ureter and bladder involvement or with bilateral disease. Four of these patients underwent uretero-calicostomy, five patients underwent augmentation cystoplasty with bilateral ureteric reimplantation and two patients underwent ileal conduit as they were having serum creatinine of more than 2.5 mg/dl. All patients who underwent ureterocalicostomy had re stricture and failure of surgery and augmentation cystoplasty had raised creatinine requiring second procedure in the form of percutaneous nephrostomy. Patients with ileal conduit remained stable with overnight bladder drainage at bed time. Conclusion Though renal failure is not considered contrain-dication for augmentation cystoplasty, reconstruction using large segment of bowel predisposes them to metabolic complications and sepsis. Use of short segment of ileal conduit with continued drainage at night in creatinine above 2.5 mg% is reasonable option for augmentation

  2. [Endocrine abnormalities in patients with chronic renal failure - part I].

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Kędzia, Agnieszka; Krupej-Kędzierska, Joanna; Kowalska, Beata; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-05-01

    The kidney plays an important role in synthesis, metabolism and elimination of a plethora of hormones. In subjects with chronic renal failure, particularly at its later stages, these adaptive responses are impaired and some of these alterations are of clinical relevance. Endocrine disturbances which are the most characteristic for chronic renal failure include: secondary and tertiary hyperparathyroidism, hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis dysfunction and impaired growth. The pathogenesis of these complications is complex and multifactorial. This review discusses the most important changes in the function of the parathyroid glands, thyroid and the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor 1 axis in the light of recent developments in this field. This article also tries to give insights into diagnosis and putative therapeutic strategies. © 2015 MEDPRESS.

  3. [Endocrine abnormalities in patients with chronic renal failure - part II].

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Kędzia, Agnieszka; Krupej-Kędzierska, Joanna; Kowalska, Beata; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-05-01

    The kidneys play a crucial role in maintaining homeostasis of fluids and electrolytes, acid-base balance, and volume regulation. In subjects with chronic renal failure, particularly at its later stages, these adaptive responses are impaired and some of these alterations are of clinical relevance. The ways in which chronic renal failure affects function of endocrine organs include impaired secretion of kidney-derived hormones, altered peripheral hormone metabolism, disturbed binding to carrier proteins, accumulation of hormone inhibitors, as well as abnormal target organ responsiveness. Apart from secondary hyperparathyroidism, thyroid dysfunction and impaired growth, reviewed in our previous study, endocrine disturbances that most frequently affect this group of patients include: abnormal functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamicpituitary- gonadal axes, bone loss and gynecomastia. The clinical picture and laboratory findings of these endocrine disturbances depend on the treatment strategy. © 2015 MEDPRESS.

  4. Image diagnosis of parathyroid glands in chronic renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, H.; Tominaga, Y.; Uchida, K.; Yamada, N.; Morimoto, T.; Yasue, M.

    1983-07-01

    Twenty-two out of 31 patients with chronic renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism who underwent parathyroidectomy before operation underwent non-invasive image diagnosis of parathyroid glands by computed tomography (CT), scintigraphy with /sup 201/TlCl and /sup 99m/TcO/sup 4 +/, and/or ultrasonography. CT visualized 39 of 45 parathyroid glands (86.7%), weighing more than 500 mg. Scintigraphy with a subtraction method using a computer performed the diagnosis in 19 of 27 glands (70.4%). Ultrasonography detected 21 of 27 glands (77.8%). Image diagnosis was also useful in the postoperative follow-up study. The non-invasive image diagnosis of parathyroid glands in patients with chronic renal failure is thus valuable for 1) definite diagnosis of secondary hyperparathyroidism, 2) localization, and 3) diagnosis for effectiveness of conservative treatment.

  5. Purtscher-like retinopathy preceding acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Vicente, J L; Castilla Martino, M; Contreras Díaz, M; Rueda Rueda, T; Molina Socola, F E; Muñoz Morales, A; López Herrero, F; Moruno Rodríguez, A; Vizuete Rodríguez, L; Martínez Borrego, A

    2017-07-28

    The case is reported of a 61 year-old woman with Purtscher-like retinopathy associated with acute renal failure. Ophthalmic examination, fluorescein-angiography, and optical coherence tomography were consistent with Purtscher-like retinopathy. Ophthalmic symptoms and signs preceded renal failure. Pancreatitis and other systemic diseases were ruled out. The patient developed a neovascular glaucoma. Purtscher-like retinopathy rarely precedes the associated systemic illness. Early diagnosis based on ophthalmic symptoms may help in the recognition and treatment of the disease, and prevent later complications. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Cardiovascular complications of chronic renal failure - an updated review.

    PubMed

    Roy, G C; Sutradhar, S R; Barua, U K; Datta, N C; Debnath, C R; Hoque, M M; Hossain, A S; Haider, M S; Das, M

    2012-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is frequently associated with CKD, which is important because individuals with CKD are more likely to die from CVD than to develop kidney failure. CVD in CKD is treatable and potentially preventable and CKD appears to be a risk factor for CVD. In order of incidence and frequency systemic hypertension, left ventricular failure, congestive cardiac failure, ischemic heart disease, anaemic heart failure, rhythm disturbances, pericarditis with or without effusion, cardiac tamponade, uraemic cardiomyopathy are various cardiovascular complications encountered in patients with chronic renal failure. A patient may present with one or more complications of cardiovascular system. The survival rate and prognosis to a great extent depends on proper management of these complications. Use of regular dialysis and renal transplant has changed the death pattern in developed countries but it is still a major problem in developing country. The aim of this article is early detection of CKD and proper management of it thereby preventing the major cardiovascular complications.

  7. Tubular cell apoptosis and cidofovir-induced acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Alberto; Justo, Pilar; Sanz, Ana; Melero, Rosa; Caramelo, Carlos; Guerrero, Manuel Fernández; Strutz, Frank; Müller, Gerhard; Barat, Antonio; Egido, Jesus

    2005-01-01

    Cidofovir is an antiviral drug with activity against a wide array of DNA viruses including poxvirus. The therapeutic use of cidofovir is marred by a dose-limiting side effect, nephrotoxicity, leading to proximal tubular cell injury and acute renal failure. Treatment with cidofovir requires the routine use of prophylactic measures. A correct knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of cidofovir toxicity may lead to the development of alternative prophylactic strategies. We recently cared for a patient with irreversible acute renal failure due to cidofovir. Renal biopsy showed tubular cell apoptosis. Cidofovir induced apoptosis in primary cultures of human proximal tubular cells in a temporal (peak apoptosis at 7 days) and concentration (10-40 microg/ml) pattern consistent with that of clinical toxicity. Apoptosis was identified by the presence of hypodiploid cells, by the exposure of annexin V binding sites and by morphological features and was associated with the appearance of active caspase-3 fragments. Cell death was specific as it was also present in a human proximal tubular epithelial cell line (HK-2), but not in a human kidney fibroblast cell line, and was prevented by probenecid. An inhibitor of caspase-3 (DEVD) prevented cidofovir apoptosis. The survival factors present in serum, insulin-like growth factor-1 and hepatocyte growth factor, were also protective. The present data suggest that apoptosis induction is a mechanism contributing to cidofovir nephrotoxicity. The prophylactic administration of factors with survival activity for tubular epithelium should be further explored in cidofovir renal injury.

  8. Long term outcome of treatment of end stage renal failure.

    PubMed

    Henning, P; Tomlinson, L; Rigden, S P; Haycock, G B; Chantler, C

    1988-01-01

    The most common causes of end stage renal failure in 46 children (mean age 11 years, range 4-14) treated between January 1972 and June 1977 were: reflux nephropathy (n = 12), cystinosis (n = 7), focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (n = 6), and Schönlein-Henoch disease (n = 5). The quality of life, degree of renal function, and height attainment of the 31 survivors were assessed in June 1985, when their mean age was 22 years (range 14-27), using hospital records and a questionnaire designed to highlight social and psychological problems. Twenty six patients had a functioning transplanted kidney. Average growth during treatment for all survivors was normal, but most were disappointed with their 'final height'. Though five patients had some form of disabling bone disease, all 31 could walk and 27 could run. Sixteen (67%) were in full or part time employment and nine were living independently. A group of 32 patients with juvenile onset diabetes treated at this hospital for at least five years were also asked to complete the questionnaire and of these, 17 responded. On average, their data could usefully be compared with those of cases of end stage renal failure. More of the diabetics had jobs, but most sexually mature patients with renal disease were concerned about their physical appearance and had not achieved any stable long term sexual relationships. We suggest that a poor body image resulting in low self esteem may be responsible for the deficiency and believe that further study in this group is warranted.

  9. Elimination kinetics of labetalol in severe renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Wood, A. J.; Ferry, D. G.; Bailey, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    1 The pharmacokinetics of intravenously administered labetalol were studied in four patients with severe renal failure and in three normal subjects. 2 A new and sensitive method for the assay of plasma labetalol concentrations using high performance liquid chromatography is described. 3 Labetalol has a relatively large apparent volume of distribution (3.3-7.9 l/kg, two-compartment open model) and a relatively high plasma clearance (0.3-1.6 1 h-1 kg-1). 4 There were no significant differences between the patients with severe renal failure and the controls for any of the pharmacokinetic parameters measured. 5 In the presence of renal functional impairment, no modification of labetalol dosage is required. 6 In another study of 31 patients, glomerular filtration rate was measured at 3-month intervals for 3-18 months. In ten patients there was no change, in ten there was an improvement and in 11 there was deterioration, but in only three was this attributable to treatment. 7 In our experience with over 300 patients, we conclude that labetalol plus diuretic treatment is efficacious and safe in all grades of hypertension including those with all degrees of renal insufficiency. PMID:7093103

  10. [Acute renal failure due to drugs in diabetics patients].

    PubMed

    Kaaroud, Hayet; Boubaker, Karima; Khiari, Karima; Cherif, Lotfi; Beji, Soumaya; Ben Moussa, Fatma; Ben Abfallah, Néjib; Ben Maïz, Hédi

    2004-04-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) in patients with diabetes mellitus is frequent. It is caused by several factors notably drugs. Our retrospective study includes 20 cases of ARF induced by drugs in diabetic patients. Eleven men and 9 women with mean age of 55.2 years (17-71 years) were enrolled in the study. Type 2 diabetes mellitus was found in 18 cases and type 1 in 2 cases. Risk factors found are age more than 70 years in 17 cases, pre-existent renal failure in 17 cases, dehydratation in 6 cases, and drug association in 9 cases. In our study diuretics used solely or in association with other drugs were found to be the essential cause of ARF. ACE was noted in 5 cases, gentamycin in 2 cases, non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs in 1 case, colimycin in 1 case and radiographic contrast media in 4 cases. Symptoms of hypersensitivity are fever in 3 cases, itchiness in 2 case, hepatic dysfunction in 7 case, and hypereosinophilia in 3 cases. Oliguria was observed in 11 patients. Eight patients were dialyzed. Renal function recovery is total in 9 case and partial in 9 others. Two patients having oliguria died. Diuretics are the first cause of drug-induced ARF in diabetic patients. This ARF worsens the renal prognosis for these patients. Oliguria is high risk of mortality.

  11. Feline chronic renal failure: long-term medical management.

    PubMed

    Plotnick, Arnold

    2007-06-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is one of the most common illnesses of geriatric cats. Common clinical signs include polydipsia, polyuria, decreased appetite, weight loss, and vomiting. Although CRF is incurable, it may be possible to delay the progression of the disorder by feeding an appropriate diet and by monitoring and normalizing (if possible) several parameters, including blood pressure, serum phosphorus and potassium levels, parathyroid hormone levels, and proteinuria.

  12. Graves' disease in a dialysis dependent chronic renal failure patient

    PubMed Central

    Nair, C. G.; Jacob, P.; Menon, R.; Babu, M. J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone level may be altered in chronic renal failure patients. Low levels of thyroxine protect the body from excess protein loss by minimizing catabolism. Hyperthyroidism is rarely encountered in end-stage dialysis dependent patients. Less than 10 well-documented cases of Graves' disease (GD) are reported in literature so far. We report a case of GD in a patient on dialysis. PMID:25484538

  13. Acute renal failure requiring dialysis after percutaneous coronary interventions.

    PubMed

    Gruberg, L; Mehran, R; Dangas, G; Mintz, G S; Waksman, R; Kent, K M; Pichard, A D; Satler, L F; Wu, H; Leon, M B

    2001-04-01

    Acute renal failure requiring dialysis is a rare but serious complication after percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI), associated with high in-hospital mortality and poor long-term survival. We have analyzed the incidence, resource utilization, short- and long-term outcomes, and predictors of dialysis after percutaneous coronary interventions. We studied 51 consecutive patients who were not on dialysis on admission and developed acute renal failure that required in-hospital dialysis after PCI in comparison to the 7,690 patients who did not require dialysis after PCI. Patients who required dialysis were older, with a higher incidence of hypertension, diabetes, prior bypass surgery, chronic renal failure, and a significantly lower left ventricular ejection fraction. Despite similar angiographic success, these patients had a higher incidence of in-hospital mortality (27.5% vs. 1.0%, P < 0.0001), non-Q-wave myocardial infarction (45.7% vs. 14.6%, P < 0.0001), vascular and bleeding complications, and longer hospitalization. At 1-year follow-up, mortality (54.5% vs. 6.4%, P < 0.0001), myocardial infarction (4.5% vs. 1.6%, P = 0.006), and event-free survival (38.6% vs. 72.0%, P < 0.0001) were significantly worse in patients who required dialysis compared to patients who did not. Multivariate analysis revealed in-hospital dialysis and an increase in baseline serum creatinine levels as the most important predictors of in-hospital and long-term mortality. Thus, acute renal failure that requires dialysis after percutaneous coronary interventions is associated with very high in-hospital and 1-year mortality rates and a dramatic increase in hospital resource utilization.

  14. A Medical Mystery: Unexplained Renal Failure in Burn Patients.

    PubMed

    Lands, Harrison M; Drake, David B

    2017-01-31

    The objective of this study was to review the investigation that uncovered the medical mystery of burn patients developing unexpected renal failure. The authors examined published and unpublished manuscripts and case reports, as well as conducted personal interviews with primary sources. In the late 1970s, emergence of resistant bacterial strains to the topical antimicrobial silver sulfadiazine occurred at the University of Virginia Medical Center. In the search for an alternative topical antimicrobial with known coverage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Furacin Soluble Dressing was substituted. However, Furacin Soluble Dressing produced an unexpected toxicity syndrome of hyperosmolality, metabolic gap acidosis, hypercalcemia, and ultimately renal failure. In a search for an antimicrobial with an improved spectrum against Pseudomonas, a Federal Drug Administration-approved product was used to treat large surface area burns. An unexpected toxicity syndrome developed which was traced to the polyethylene glycol base of Furacin Soluble Dressing. This substance was absorbed through the burn wounds, metabolized, and resulted in a toxicity syndrome leading to renal failure. The burn community should be cautious when using products that may be approved as nontoxic for small surface area application, as they may have unexpected medical side effects when used with large surface area burns.

  15. Acute renal and hepatic failure associated with allopurinol treatment.

    PubMed

    Fagugli, R M; Gentile, G; Ferrara, G; Brugnano, R

    2008-12-01

    Hyperuricemia is present in about 5% of the population, and allopurinol is frequently used to treat it. The use of this drug can be associated with a number of side effects, indicating allergic reactions, such as skin rash, reversible after its withdrawal. In some cases more severe hypersensitivity reactions may be seen, such as erythema multiforme exudativum, or Steven-Johnson Syndrome (SJS). Reversible clinical hepatotoxicity, as well as acute renal failure, may also develop after allopurinol therapy. We describe here the case of a 74-year-old woman with chronic renal failure who was admitted to hospital after 1 week of sore throat and fever, presenting mucous membrane lesions, widespread blistering of the skin, evolving to flaccid vesicles and bullae, and extensive epidermal detachment associated with acute renal failure and cholestatic jaundice. A diagnosis of allopurinol-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) was established. Allopurinol was discontinued, and intensive care management was required: the patient was successfully treated by using intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), standard hemodialysis, and albumin dialysis (Molecular Adsorbents Recirculating System - MARS, Teraklin AG, Rostock, Germany). Allopurinol-induced TEN is extremely rare, however, the survival rate is extremely low. Clinicians should be aware of this potentially severe adverse effect. This report emphasizes the importance of an aggressive pharmacological and dialysis treatment in the case of TEN.

  16. Epidemiology and importance of renal dysfunction in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Giamouzis, Gregory; Kalogeropoulos, Andreas P; Butler, Javed; Karayannis, Georgios; Georgiopoulou, Vasiliki V; Skoularigis, John; Triposkiadis, Filippos

    2013-12-01

    Renal dysfunction (RD) is a frequent comorbid condition and a major determinant of outcomes in patients with heart failure (HF). It is likely that the etiology of RD in patients with HF is much more complex than we first thought and represents a matrix of independent, albeit interacting, pathophysiological pathways with effects on both the kidney and the heart that share a common denominator: aging and inflammation. Renal dysfunction in HF has been attributed, among others, to biochemical, hormonal, and hemodynamic factors, coupled with pharmacological interventions. Regardless of the cause, the development of RD or worsening renal function is common in patients with HF, and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. There is increasing evidence, however, that transient increases in creatinine in the setting of acute HF are not prognostically important, whereas persistent deterioration does portend a higher mortality in this patient population. In addition, congestion seems to play an important role in the course of renal deterioration, and the combination of congestion and worsening renal function is the most significant clinical prognosticator in HF patients. This review aims to provide an update on the epidemiology and prognostic significance of RD in HF patients, in both the acute and the chronic setting.

  17. Role of adenosine in tubuloglomerular feedback and acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Osswald, H; Vallon, V; Mühlbauer, B

    1996-12-01

    1. Adenosine (ADO) can induce renal vasoconstriction and a fall in glomerular filtration rate. When the rate of ATP hydrolysis prevails over the rate of ATP synthesis the kidney generates ADO at an enhanced rate. 2. Tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) is the vascular response to changes of the NaCl concentration in the tubular fluid at the macula densa segment, which is the result of transepithelial electrolyte reabsorption by the proximal tubule and the loop of Henle. 3. TGF can be inhibited by ADO-A1 receptor antagonists and is potentiated by substances that can elevate extracellular ADO concentrations. These observations led to the hypothesis that ADO is an element of the signal transmission processes in the juxtaglomerular apparatus. 4. Renal ischaemia and nephrotoxic substances can induce acute renal failure (ARF). ADO receptor antagonists have been shown to ameliorate renal function in several different models of ARF in laboratory animals and humans. 5. A number of factors, such as extracellular volume contraction, low NaCl diet, angiotensin II and cyclooxygenase inhibitors enhance to a similar extent: (a) the renal vascular response to endogenous and exogenous ADO; (b) the TGF response of the nephron; and (c) the severity of ARF. All three phenomena are susceptible to antagonism by ADO receptor antagonists. 6. Therefore, we conclude that ADO plays a significant role in normal and pathological states of kidney function.

  18. Selective renal vasodilation and active renal artery perfusion improve renal function in dogs with acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, K; Shimizu, J; Yi, G H; Gu, A; Wang, J; Keren, G; Burkhoff, D

    2001-09-01

    Renal failure is common in heart failure due to renovascular constriction and hypotension. We tested whether selective pharmacological renal artery vasodilation and active renal artery perfusion (ARP) could improve renal function without adverse effects on systemic blood pressure in a canine model of acute heart failure (AHF). AHF was induced by coronary microembolization in 16 adult mongrel dogs. In five dogs, selective intrarenal (IR) papaverine (1, 2, and 4 mg/min) was administered into the left renal artery. In six dogs, ARP was performed in the left renal artery to normalize mean renal arterial pressure followed by administration of IR papaverine (2 mg/min). In five dogs, ARP plus intravenous furosemide was tested. Urine output (UO) and cortical renal blood flow decreased during AHF and were restored by 2 mg/min IR papaverine (UO: baseline 4.2 +/- 0.6, AHF 1.6 +/- 1.3, IR papaverine 5.8 +/- 1.1 ml/15 min; cortical blood flow: baseline 4.3 +/- 0.2, AHF 2.4 +/- 0.6, IR papaverine 4.2 +/- 1.2 ml/min/g) with no significant change in aortic pressure. ARP also increased urine output and cortical renal blood flow (UO: baseline 5.0 +/- 1.1, AHF 0.5 +/- 0.4, ARP 3.8 +/- 3.1 ml/15 min; cortical blood flow: baseline 4.0 +/- 0.5, AHF 2.0 +/- 0.8, ARP 3.52 +/- 1.1 ml/min/g). A combination of these methods in AHF further increased urine output to twice the normal baseline (10.5 +/- 7.5 ml/15 min). Addition of furosemide synergistically increased UO above that achieved with ARP alone (5.5 +/- 2.6 versus 40.3 +/- 24.7 ml/15 min, p = 0.03). In conclusion, ARP and selective renal vasodilation may effectively promote salt and water excretion in the setting of heart failure, particularly when systemic blood pressure is low.

  19. Acute renal failure provoked by toxin from caterpillars of the species Lonomia obliqua.

    PubMed

    Gamborgi, Geni Portela; Metcalf, Elena Brett; Barros, Elvino J G

    2006-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a complication of envenoming by contact with caterpillars of the species Lonomia obliqua. A cohort study was conducted to evaluate development of acute and chronic renal failure (CRF) in patients who been in contact with L. obliqua during the period from 1989 to 2003 in the State of Santa Catarina, southern Brazil. Patients were evaluated in two distinct groups: those prior to 1995, who did not receive specific treatment of any type, and those after this date who were treated with antilonomic serum (SALon). The presence of creatinine > or = 1.5 mg/dl in patients who had no history of previous renal illness was considered to be indicative of acute kidney failure. Of the 2067 patients evaluated, 39 (1.9%) developed ARF. Eleven (32%) of these patients were treated with dialysis and four (10.3%) developed CRF. The seven deaths (4%) occurred in the period before treatment with SALon. Blood coagulation measures (TC, TP, and TTPA), were significantly longer in the group with ARF. All patients with ARF and 67% of the control group presented hematuria. The majority of the patients recovered prior renal function, however, four (10.3%) needed chronic dialysis. Envenoming by L. obliqua can be considered an important risk factor for the development of potentially fatal ARF, as well as for developing CRF.

  20. Bone growth during daily or intermittent calcitriol treatment during renal failure with advanced secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, C P; He, Y Z

    2007-09-01

    Calcitriol is a standard therapy for secondary hyperparathyroidism in chronic renal failure. We evaluated whether the effect of daily or intermittent calcitriol administration is more efficient in enhancing bone growth in renal failure with advanced secondary hyperparathyroidism in weanling 5/6 nephrectomized rats loaded with phosphorus to induce severe secondary hyperparathyroidism. The animals were treated daily or three times weekly with calcitriol for 4 weeks but the total weekly dose of calcitriol was the same. Although calcitriol increased the serum calcium, it did not lower parathyroid hormone (PTH) or improve tibia and body length. Animals with renal failure and advanced secondary hyperparathyroidism had decreased PTH/PTHrP, which was accompanied by an increase in the cyclin kinase inhibitor p57(Kip2). Calcitriol treatment upregulated the PTH/PTHrP receptor but also increased inhibitors of cell proliferation such as p21(Waf1/Cip1), IGFBP3, and FGFR3. Calcitriol also enhanced markers of chondrocyte differentiation, such as IGF1, Vitamin D receptor, FGF23, and bone morphogenetic protein-7. Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappabeta ligand levels improved with calcitriol treatment but without changes in osteoprotegerin suggesting an enhancement of osteo/chondroclastogenesis and mineralization. Overall, both daily and intermittent calcitriol had similar effects on endochondral bone growth in phosphorus-loaded rats with renal failure.

  1. Renal clearance of endogenous creatinine, urea, sodium, and potassium in normal cats and cats with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, E; Akuzawa, M

    1997-07-01

    The renal clearance test was carried out in 6 normal male cats and 12 male cats with chronic renal failure. The average concentrations of creatinine (Cr), urea, sodium (Na), and potassium (K) in the serum of the cats with chronic renal failure were 5.09, 136.7 (mg/100 ml), 143.9 and 3.71 (mEq/l) respectively, and the specific gravity of urine was 1.009. The renal clearances of Cr, urea, Na, and K (ml/min/kg of body weight) were 2.639 +/- 0.217, 1.034 +/- 0.110, 0.024 +/- 0.007 and 0.266 +/- 0.028, respectively in normal cats, and were 0.789 +/- 0.407, 0.358 +/- 0.211, 0.095 +/- 0.084 and 0.872 +/- 0.204 in cats with chronic renal failure. Clearance of Cr and urea was significantly lower in cats with chronic renal failure than in normal cats, while the values of Na and K were significantly higher in cats with chronic renal failure. The glomerular filtration of Cr and urea and the urinary excretion of these 4 substances were significantly higher in cats with chronic renal failure. The tubular reabsorption rates of Na and K were significantly lower in cats with chronic renal failure compared to those in normal cats, but there was no significant difference in urea and creatinine.

  2. Renal involvement in leprosy: evaluation of patients in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Savas; Ozturk, Tulin; Can, Ilkay

    2017-06-01

    Renal involvement in leprosy has previously been described in the literature and can include amyloidosis, glomerulonephritis, nephrosclerosis, tubulointerstitial nephritis, and granulomas. To evaluate renal involvement in Turkish patients with leprosy. In total, 32 patients with lepromatous leprosy but without any co-morbidities and 35 healthy control subjects were evaluated for renal involvement at the Elazig Training and Research Hospital in Turkey. The laboratory tests and radiological results concerning renal function were taken from both the patients' medical records and from current examinations. The levels of creatinine, urea, and leukocyturia in the lepromatous leprosy patients were significantly higher than in the controls (p < 0.001, p < 0.001; p = 0.001, p < 0.01; p = 0.036, p < 0.05, respectively). No significant differences in the proteinuria, hematuria, sodium, or potassium levels were found between the leprosy and control groups (p > 0.05). On ultrasonographic examination, the prevalence of renal cortical cysts and renal cortical echogenicity in the leprosy patients was significantly higher than in the controls (p = 0.020, p < 0.05, respectively). There were no significant differences in terms of nephrolithiasis, parapelvic cysts, or hydronephrosis between the leprosy and control groups (p > 0.05). Evaluating the renal function in all leprosy patients is important to detect abnormalities and to prevent renal failure, which remains a potential cause of death in this disease.

  3. Two cases of cisplatin-induced permanent renal failure following neoadjuvant chemotherapy for esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Tomohiko; Motoyama, Satoru; Komatsuda, Atsushi; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Sato, Yusuke; Yoshino, Kei; Wakita, Akiyuki; Saito, Hajime; Anbai, Akira; Jin, Mario; Minamiya, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We experienced two esophageal cancer patients who developed severe acute renal failure after neoadjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorourasil. Presentation of case After administration of cisplatin, their serum creatinine increased gradually until they required hemodialysis and their renal failure was permanent. In both cases, renal biopsy examination indicated partial recovery of the proximal tubule, but renal function did not recover. After these events, one patient underwent definitive radiotherapy and the other underwent esophagectomy for their esophageal cancers, while continuing dialysis. Both patients are alive without cancer recurrence. Discussion In these two cases of cisplatin-induced renal failure, renal biopsy examination showed only slight disorder of proximal tubules and tendency to recover. Conclusion Although cisplatin-related nephrotoxicity is a well-recognized complication, there have been few reports of renal failure requiring hemodialysis in cancer patients. In this report, we present their clinical courses and the pathological findings of cisplatin-related renal failure. PMID:26851395

  4. Renal replacement therapy for acute renal failure in children: European Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Strazdins, Vladimirs; Harvey, Ben

    2003-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is uncommon in childhood and there is little consensus on the appropriate treatment modality when renal replacement therapy is required. Members of the European Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Working Group have produced the following guidelines in collaboration with nursing staff. Good practice requires early discussion of patients with ARF with pediatric nephrology staff and transfer for investigation and management in those with rapidly deteriorating renal function. Patients with ARF as part of multi-organ failure will be cared for in pediatric intensive care units where there should be access to pediatric nephrology support and advice. The choice of dialysis therapy will therefore depend upon the clinical circumstances, location of the patient, and expertise available. Peritoneal dialysis has generally been the preferred therapy for isolated failure of the kidney and is universally available. Intermittent hemodialysis is frequently used in renal units where nursing expertise is available and hemofiltration is increasingly employed in the intensive care situation. Practical guidelines for and the complications of each therapy are discussed. PMID:14685840

  5. [Aetiology and a clinical picture of chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Zadrazil, J

    2011-01-01

    The term chronic renal failure (CRF) usually means the final stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD) with a decline in glomerular filtration rate (GF) below 0.25 mL/s. CRF is a world-wide serious health and economic issue with an increasing incidence and prevalence. CRF patients are, in comparison to other patients, hospitalized more often and for longer and, despite improvements in care, their quality of life is usually low and morbidity and mortality high. We present an overview of the most important CKD risk factors and the diseases most likely to result in CRF. Diabetic nephropathy, followed by various forms ofischemic renal disease and primary and secondary glomerulopathy, chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease are the leading causes of CRF. We provide a brief overview of other disease states that may result in renal failure. Clinical manifestations of CRF are discussed, mainly cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, haematological and neurological symptoms. Breathlessness is a consequence of hypervolaemia, metabolic acidosis and anaemia. The disease often presents with symptoms, such as headache and visual disturbances, resulting from arterial hypertension. Gastrointestinal symptoms and fatigue, usually caused by anaemia, are frequent. Platelet dysfunction is manifested as an increased bleeding time. Paradoxically, apart form tendency to abnormal bleeding, CRF also tends to be associated with thromboembolic complications. Patients may experience itching, bone, joint and muscle aches, are more prone to infections. They may suffer from insomnia, concentration disorders and apathy. The signs of peripheral mixed sensory-motor neuropathy include paraesthesia, paresis and restless leg syndrome. However, renal failure may also be oligosymptomatic or asymptomatic. Cardiovascular complications are the most frequent cause of morbidity and mortality of CRF patients.

  6. Treatment of severe hypothyroidism in a patient with progressive renal failure leads to significant improvement of renal function.

    PubMed

    van Welsem, M E; Lobatto, S

    2007-06-01

    The case of a 41-year-old patient with end-stage renal failure and diabetes mellitus Type 1 who was being prepared for renal replacement therapy is described. After severe hypothyroidism was diagnosed, thyroid hormone substitution therapy was started. Subsequently, a substantial decline in serum creatinine was observed. Creatinine clearance rose from 19 to 40 ml/min and renal replacement therapy was no longer imminent. Several studies have described the pathophysiology of diminished renal function in hypothyroidism. Few studies or case reports have shown amelioration of end-stage renal failure as seen in our patient. The etiology is presumed to be multifactorial, in which hemodynamic effects and a direct effect of thyroid hormone on the kidney play an important role. Diagnosing signs of hypothyroidism and therapy with thyroid hormone in progressive renal failure could be very important in delaying the need for renal replacement therapy.

  7. Myoglobinuric acute renal failure in phencyclidine overdose: report of observations in eight cases.

    PubMed

    Patel, R; Das, M; Palazzolo, M; Ansari, A; Balasubramaniam, S

    1980-11-01

    Eight cases of myoglobinuric acute renal failure that developed following exposure to phencyclidine were seen in the emergency department of the Martin Luther King Jr. General Hospital during a period of 36 months. All eight survived with complete recovery of renal function. Dialysis was necessary in three patients. Acute renal failure is an uncommon complication of phencyclidine abuse.

  8. Renal Drug Dosage Adjustment According to Estimated Creatinine Clearance in Hospitalized Patients With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Altunbas, Gokhan; Yazc, Mehmet; Solak, Yalcin; Gul, Enes E; Kayrak, Mehmet; Kaya, Zeynettin; Akilli, Hakan; Aribas, Alpay; Gaipov, Abduzhappar; Yazc, Raziye; Ozdemir, Kurtulus

    2016-01-01

    It is of clinical importance to determine creatinine clearance and adjust doses of prescribed drugs accordingly in patients with heart failure to prevent untoward effects. There is a scarcity of studies in the literature investigating this issue particularly in patients with heart failure, in whom many have impaired kidney function. The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of awareness of medication prescription as to creatinine clearance in patients hospitalized with heart failure. Patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of heart failure were retrospectively evaluated. Among screened charts, patients with left ventricular ejection fraction <40% and an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of ≤50 mL/min were included in the analysis. The medications and respective doses prescribed at discharge were recorded. Medications requiring renal dose adjustment were determined and evaluated for appropriate dosing according to eGFR. A total of 388 patients with concomitant heart failure and renal dysfunction were included in the study. The total number of prescribed medications was 2808 and 48.3% (1357 medications) required renal dose adjustment. Of the 1357 medications, 12.6% (171 medications) were found to be inappropriately prescribed according to eGFR. The most common inappropriately prescribed medications were famotidine, metformin, perindopril, and ramipril. A significant portion of medications used in heart failure requires dose adjustment. Our results showed that in a typical cohort of patients with heart failure, many drugs are prescribed at inappropriately high doses according to creatinine clearance. Awareness should be increased among physicians caring for patients with heart failure to prevent adverse events related to medications.

  9. Plasma amino acid profiles in cats with naturally acquired chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, R E; Marks, S L; Cowgill, L D; Kass, P H; Rogers, Q R

    1999-01-01

    To characterize potential changes in preprandial plasma amino acid concentrations in cats with naturally acquired chronic renal failure (CRF), compared with healthy cats, and to assess potential effects of the severity of renal failure on plasma amino acid concentrations in these cats. 62 adult cats. Preprandial plasma amino acid concentrations were evaluated in 38 cats with mild, moderate, or severe CRF and in 24 apparently healthy cats. Effects of severity of renal failure, amount of dietary protein, degree of weight loss, appetite, and body condition on plasma amino acid profiles were evaluated. Cats with various stages of CRF had significantly (P< 0.05) decreased plasma concentrations of o-hydroxyproline, glutamate, proline, glycine, alanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, and arginine, and significantly increased plasma concentrations of asparagine, citrulline, ornithine, 1-methylhistidine, and 3-methylhistidine. Significant (P < 0.05) alterations in amino acid concentrations also were identified when cats with CRF were grouped by appetite or severity of renal disease. Amount of dietary protein, body condition, or degree of weight loss had no significant effect on plasma amino acid concentrations. Compared with those in healthy cats, preprandial plasma amino acid profiles in cats with mild, moderate, or severe CRF are abnormal. Despite frequency of altered plasma amino acid concentrations in cats with CRF, the magnitude of these changes is mild and of little clinical relevance. Short-term use of a commercial protein-restricted diet has no deleterious effects on plasma amino acid concentrations.

  10. Drug metabolism in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Pichette, Vincent; Leblond, François A

    2003-04-01

    Pharmacokinetic studies conducted in patients with CRF demonstrate that the nonrenal clearance of multiple drugs is reduced. Although the mechanism by which this occurs is unclear, several studies have shown that CRF affects the metabolism of drugs by inhibiting key enzymatic systems in the liver, intestine and kidney. The down-regulation of selected isoforms of the hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP450) has been reported secondary to a decrease in gene expression. This is associated with major reductions in metabolism of drugs mediated by CYP450. The main hypothesis to explain the decrease in liver CYP450 activity in CRF appears to be the accumulation of circulating factors which can modulate CYP450 activity. Liver phase II metabolic reactions are also reduced in CRF. On the other hand, intestinal drug disposition is affected in CRF. Increased bioavailability of several drugs has been reported in CRF, reflecting decrease in either intestinal first-pass metabolism or extrusion of drugs (mediated by P-glycoprotein). Indeed, intestinal CYP450 is also down-regulated secondary to reduced gene expression, whereas, decreased intestinal P-glycoprotein activity has been described. Finally, although the kidneys play a major role in the excretion of drugs, it has the capacity to metabolize endogenous and exogenous compounds. CRF will lead to a decrease in the ability of the kidney to metabolize drugs, but the repercussions on the systemic clearance of drugs is still poorly defined, except for selected xenobiotics. In conclusion, reduced drug metabolism should be taken into account when evaluating the pharmacokinetics of drugs in patients with CRF.

  11. Acute renal failure by ingestion of Euphorbia paralias.

    PubMed

    Boubaker, Karima; Ounissi, Mondher; Brahmi, Nozha; Goucha, Rym; Hedri, Hafedh; Abdellah, Taieb Ben; El Younsi, Fethi; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Kheder, Adel

    2013-05-01

    Euphorbia paralias is known in traditional medicine as an anti-inflammatory agent, a purgative and for its local anesthetic property. To the best our knowledge, renal toxicity of this substance has not been previously reported. In this paper, we report the case of a 29-year-old male who developed renal damage following ingestion of Euphorbia paralias. He had been on follow-up for nephrotic syndrome since 1986, although irregularly, with several relapses but each responding well to steroid therapy. A kidney biopsy had not been performed earlier due to refusal by the patient. He was off steroids since April 2008 because the patient developed osteoporosis. He was admitted with general malaise and oliguria to our department in May 2009, following repeated vomiting and watery diarrhea for three days. On examination, he was edematous but had normal vital signs except for a pulse rate of 120/min. Hemoglobin was only 5.5 g/dL but with normal white cell and platelet counts. Blood biochemistry showed evidence of advanced renal failure with a serum creatinine level of 1835 μmol/L and urea at 44.6 mmol/L, sodium of 132 μmol/L and potassium at 4.3 mmol/L. He had features of nephrotic syndrome with severe hypoproteinamia and 24-h urinary protein of 10.45 g. Ultrasonography revealed enlarged kidneys with a reduced echogenecity of the medulla and the papillae. Subsequently, after hemodialysis with blood transfusion, a kidney biopsy was performed that showed focal segmental glomerulosclerosis associated with an acute tubular injury. On intensive interrogation, the patient gave a history of ingesting boiled Euphorbia paralias as a native treatment for edema, ten days prior to the onset of the current illness. A diagnosis of acute renal failure (ARF) resulting from the possible nephrotoxic effect of Euphorbia paralias poisoning was made. He was treated with intermittent hemodialysis and corticosteroids. Serum creatinine values improved after 48 days. At six months following the

  12. Bilateral ureteropelvic junction stenosis causing hydronephrosis and renal failure in an adult cat.

    PubMed

    Foster, Jonathan D; Pinkerton, Marie E

    2012-12-01

    A 3.5-year-old male neutered cat was presented for investigation of renomegaly appreciated during a routine physical examination. Marked renomegaly due to bilateral hydronephrosis was detected and further testing identified International Renal Interest Society stage 2, non-hypertensive, non-proteinuric chronic kidney disease. Ten months later the cat was evaluated for acute lethargy; severe azotemia with oliguria was documented. Medical therapy failed to result in clinical improvement and the cat was euthanased. Necropsy revealed bilateral marked hydronephrosis secondary to a tortuous proximal ureter consistent with proximal ureteropelvic junction stenosis. This is the first report of this disorder leading to progressive renal failure in a cat.

  13. Angiotensin and thromboxane in the enhanced renal adrenergic nerve sensitivity of acute renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Robinette, J B; Conger, J D

    1990-01-01

    The roles of intrarenal angiotensin (A) and thromboxane (TX) in the vascular hypersensitivity to renal nerve stimulation (RNS) and paradoxical vasoconstriction to renal perfusion pressure (RPP) reduction in the autoregulatory range in 1 wk norepinephrine (NE)-induced acute renal failure (ARF) in rats were investigated. Renal blood flow (RBF) responses were determined before and during intrarenal infusion of an AII and TXA2 antagonist. Saralasin or SQ29548 alone partially corrected the slopes of RBF to RNS and RPP reduction in NE-ARF rats (P less than 0.02). Saralasin + SQ29548 normalized the RBF response to RNS. While combined saralasin + SQ29548 eliminated the vasoconstriction to RPP reduction, similar to the effect of renal denervation, appropriate vasodilatation was not restored. Renal vein norepinephrine efflux during RNS was disproportionately increased in NE-ARF (P less than 0.001) and was suppressed by saralasin + SQ29548 infusion (P less than 0.005). It is concluded that the enhanced sensitivity to RNS and paradoxical vasoconstriction to RPP reduction in 1 wk NE-ARF kidneys are the result of intrarenal TX and AII acceleration of neurotransmitter release to adrenergic nerve activity. PMID:2243129

  14. [Thyroxine treatment in acute renal failure (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Straub, E

    1975-11-01

    8 patients suffering from acute renal failure (shock kidney) with anuria extending over 3 to 5 days, were treated with L-thyroxine for 5 to 9 days (5-6 mug per kg body weight per day orally). Diuresis was restored within 34 to 46 hrs. Plasma levels of urea and creatinine decreased earlier and much more rapidly to normal than was to be expected from the natural history of the disease, indicating the prompt and extensive increase of glomerular filtration rate. Polyuria seemed less pronounced and also shortened as compared with the ordinary course of that form of sudden renal insufficiency. Obviously, the well-known diuretic response in the normal individual to high doses of thyroid hormones in not a factor in the induction of diuresis in acute renal failure. The tendency with L-thyroxine treatment to dilate the preglomerular arterial vessel is considered a consequence of the stimulation of sodium reabsorption in the upper nephron. High values of RPF and GFR, regularly observed in hyperthyroidism or after L-thyroxine administration, do not depend on any augmentation of cardiac output or on arterial hypertension, since such symptoms were missed in our patients and, in our view, such an interpretation is excluded by the very existence of the so-called autoregulation of the kidney which leaves RPF (and therefore GFR) independent of systemic blood pressure. The same intrarenal feed-back mechanism, normally adapting the glomerular blood supply to the resorptive capacity of the proximal-tubular epithelium (mediation via the juxta-glomerular apparatus), is responsible for the GFR- and RPF-raising effect of exogenous L-thyroxine in the intact kidney as well as in acute renal failure: both sodium reabsorption and sodium filtration are accelerated.--The special conditions under which L-thyroxine interferes with the pathogenetic process of acute renal failure, the latter being characterised by the critical insufficiency of tubular sodium reabsorption and therefore by

  15. Alterations of the growth plate in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Santos, Fernando; Carbajo-Pérez, Eduardo; Rodríguez, Julián; Fernández-Fuente, Marta; Molinos, Inés; Amil, Benito; García, Enrique

    2005-03-01

    Chronic renal failure modifies the morphology and dynamics of the growth plate (GP) of long bones. In young uremic rats, the height of cartilage columns of GP may vary markedly. The reasons for this variation are unknown, although the severity and duration of renal failure and the type of renal osteodystrophy have been shown to influence the height of GP cartilage. Expansion of GP cartilage is associated with that of the hypertrophic stratum. The interference of uremia with the process of chondrocyte differentiation is suggested by some morphological features. However, analysis by immunohistochemistry and/or in situ hybridization of markers of chondrocyte maturation in the GP of uremic rats has yielded conflicting results. Thus, there have been reported normal and reduced mRNA levels for collagen X, parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor, and matrix metalloproteinase 9, as well as normal mRNA and protein expression for vascular endothelial growth factor and chondromodulin I, peptides related to the control of angiogenesis. In addition, a decreased immunohistochemical signal for growth hormone receptor and low insulin-like growth factor I mRNA in the proliferative zone of uremic GP are supportive of reduced chondrocyte proliferation. Growth hormone treatment improves chondrocyte maturation and activates bone metabolism in the primary spongiosa.

  16. Acute renal failure after a sea anemone sting.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, M; Nishikawa, K; Yuzawa, Y; Kanie, T; Mori, H; Araki, Y; Hotta, N; Matsuo, S

    2000-08-01

    A 27-year-old man suffering from severe swelling and pain in his right arm was referred to our hospital. He showed signs of acute renal failure (ARF) with severe dermatitis of his right arm. Three days before being admitted, he accidentally touched some kind of marine organism with his right hand while snorkeling in the Sulu Sea around Cebu Island. Within a few minutes, he was experiencing severe pain in his right hand. Then his right hand gradually became swollen. The marine creature responsible for this injury was thought to have been a sea anemone, which is a type of coelenterate. Histologic findings of a renal biopsy indicated that acute tubular necrosis (ATN) had caused ARF in this patient's case. Supportive therapies improved renal function of this patient, and steroid pulse therapy attenuated the severe skin discoloration. The ATN was thought to have been caused by the poison from a sea anemone because there were no other conceivable reasons for the patient's condition. This is the first time that a marine envenomation case has been reported in which the sting of a sea anemone has caused ATN without the failure of any other organs.

  17. Anuric renal failure associated with zinc toxicosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Volmer, Petra A; Roberts, Jennifer; Meerdink, Gavin L

    2004-10-01

    The development of anuric renal failure associated with zinc intoxication was detected in a dog following ingestion of an ornamental brass knob from a toilet paper holder. The 3-y-old, male neutered, 15.4 kg Welsh Corgi presented to a local veterinary clinic with a 2-w history of intermittent vomiting, inappetance and lethargy. The dog was transferred to a veterinary teaching hospital where surgery was performed to remove the foreign body. The dogwas euthanized 24 h post-surgery due to the development of anuric renal failure. Whole blood drawn at the time of surgery had a serum zinc concentration of 89.8 ppm (normal 0.7-2.0 ppm). The serum zinc concentration in this dog is the highest reported concentration in the literature. Ingestion of any zinc-containing metal object can potentially result in a severe intravascular hemolysis with subsequent renal impairment. Zinc intoxication should be suspected when hemolysis is accompanied by the finding of a metallic object in the gut.

  18. Urinary infection in patients with chronic renal failure on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Gluhovschi, G; Golea, O; Schiller, A; Arcan, P; Drăgan, I; Nasem, A K; Barbu, N

    1987-01-01

    A group of 37 hemodialyzed patients with chronic renal failure were investigated within a period of 6 months to 9 years. Of these patients five presented quantitatively significant bacteriuria noncorrelated with the causal nephropathy. Of the 9 patients with urologic past history two presented urinary infection. Urinary bacterial immunofluorescence was constantly positive in all the cases in which bacteriuria was significant and, at least in one determination when the germ count was below 10,000/ml. This finding was also supported by the increase of gammaglobulinemia and of the circulating immune complexes in all the cases investigated as well as of the B lymphocytes in one third of cases. Fifty percent of the patients presented T lymphocytopenia with excess of suppressor lymphocytes and deficit of the helper ones. It can, therefore be assumed that in patients with chronic renal failure nondialyzable antigens persist in the renal parenchyma where they stimulate anticorpogenesis but at a low level owing to some immune disturbances present in such patients.

  19. Baseline anemia is not a predictor of all-cause mortality in outpatients with advanced heart failure or severe renal dysfunction. Results from the Norwegian Heart Failure Registry.

    PubMed

    Waldum, Bård; Westheim, Arne S; Sandvik, Leiv; Flønæs, Berit; Grundtvig, Morten; Gullestad, Lars; Hole, Torstein; Os, Ingrid

    2012-01-24

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic impact of anemia in outpatients with chronic heart failure attending specialized heart failure clinics and specifically to investigate its prognostic utility in patients with severe renal dysfunction or advanced heart failure. Anemia is an independent prognostic marker in patients with heart failure. The effect of anemia on mortality decreases with increasing creatinine levels. Multivariate Cox regression analyses were used to investigate the prognostic effect of anemia in 4,144 patients with heart failure from 21 outpatient heart failure clinics in Norway. Severe renal failure was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate ≤45 ml/min/1.73 m(2) and advanced heart failure as New York Heart Association functional classes IIIb and IV. Baseline anemia was present in 24% and was a strong predictor of all-cause mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 1.30, 95% CI: 1.09 to 1.56, p = 0.004). Baseline anemia did not predict mortality in the 752 patients with severe renal dysfunction (adjusted HR: 1.08, 95 % CI: 0.77 to 1.51, p = 0.662) and the 528 patients with advanced heart failure (adjusted HR: 0.87, 95% CI: 0.56 to 1.34, p = 0.542). In the 1,743 patients who attended subsequent visits, sustained anemia independently predicted worse prognosis (adjusted HR: 1.47, 95% CI: 1.10 to 1.94, p = 0.008), whereas transient and new-onset anemia did not. According to our study, baseline anemia was not an independent predictor of all-cause mortality in outpatients with heart failure and accompanied severe renal dysfunction or advanced heart disease. Sustained anemia after optimizing heart failure treatment might imply worse prognosis independently of renal function and New York Heart Association functional class. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Hepatocyte growth factor in renal failure: promise and reality.

    PubMed

    Vargas, G A; Hoeflich, A; Jehle, P M

    2000-04-01

    Can science discover some secrets of Greek mythology? In the case of Prometheus, we can now suppose that his amazing hepatic regeneration was caused by a peptide growth factor called hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Increasing evidence indicates that HGF acts as a multifunctional cytokine on different cell types. This review addresses the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the pleiotropic effects of HGF. HGF binds with high affinity to its specific tyrosine kinase receptor c-met, thereby stimulating not only cell proliferation and differentiation, but also cell migration and tumorigenesis. The three fundamental principles of medicine-prevention, diagnosis, and therapy-may be benefited by the rational use of HGF. In renal tubular cells, HGF induces mitogenic and morphogenetic responses. In animal models of toxic or ischemic acute renal failure, HGF acts in a renotropic and nephroprotective manner. HGF expression is rapidly up-regulated in the remnant kidney of nephrectomized rats, inducing compensatory growth. In a mouse model of chronic renal disease, HGF inhibits the progression of tubulointerstitial fibrosis and kidney dysfunction. Increased HGF mRNA transcripts were detected in mesenchymal and tubular epithelial cells of rejecting kidney. In transplanted patients, elevated HGF levels may indicate renal rejection. When HGF is considered as a therapeutic agent in human medicine, for example, to stimulate kidney regeneration after acute injury, strategies need to be developed to stimulate cell regeneration and differentiation without an induction of tumorigenesis.

  1. Scleroderma renal crisis-like acute renal failure associated with mucopolysaccharide accumulation in renal vessels in a patient with scleromyxedema.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young H; Sahu, Joya; O'Brien, Marie S; D'Agati, Vivette D; Jimenez, Sergio A

    2011-09-01

    Scleromyxedema is a systemic disease characterized by lichenoid papules, nodules, and plaques on the skin and often diffuse skin induration resembling the cutaneous involvement of systemic sclerosis. The systemic involvement affects the musculoskeletal, pulmonary, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and central nervous systems, and the disorder is commonly associated with a paraproteinemia. Involvement of the kidney is rare and not considered a feature of the disease. Here, we describe an unusual case of scleromyxedema complicated by the development of scleroderma renal crisis-like acute renal failure with a marked intimal deposition of mucin, mucopolysaccharides, and hyaluronic acid in the intrarenal vessels.

  2. Probable chronic renal failure caused by Lonomia caterpillar envenomation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Erucism is a skin reaction to envenomation from certain poisonous caterpillar bristles. In Brazil, most reports of erucism provoked by Lonomia caterpillars are from the southern region. Most manifestations of erucism are local and include burning pain, itching, local hyperthermia and, rarely, blisters (benign symptoms with spontaneous regression in a few hours). General symptoms such as nausea and vomiting, headache, fever, myalgia, abdominal pain and conjunctivitis may also occur. Uncommon symptoms include arthritis, coagulation disorders (manifested as bruising and bleeding), intracerebral hemorrhage and acute renal failure, which comprise serious complications. The present study reports the case of 60-year-old patient from Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil, who came into contact with a caterpillar and developed, a few days later, chronic renal disease. PMID:23849585

  3. Unusual Case of Acute Renal Failure Following Multiple Wasp Stings

    PubMed Central

    Rachaiah, Niranjan M; Jayappagowda, Lokesh A; Siddabyrappa, Harsha B; Bharath, Venkatesh K

    2012-01-01

    The wasp stings usually cause local reactions and rarely anaphylaxis. However the multiple wasp stings may cause multisystem involvement. We report a case of acute renal failure (ARF) following multiple wasp stings. A middle aged healthy gentleman presented with pain and swelling of the upper part of the body following multiple wasp stings. After 2 days, he developed progressive decrease in urine output with high colored urine. Physical examination revealed the edematous and tender affected part. On investigating, it was found to have sequential elevations in renal function tests. The markers of muscle injury were grossly elevated and liver enzymes were deranged. These findings suggest multisystem involvement predominantly ARF secondary to rhabdomyolysis. With the initiation of the intense hemodialysis, all the above parameters became normal. Timely intervention of multiple wasp stings causing ARF with multiorgan involvement by hemodialysis not only prevents mortality but also other complications. PMID:22408758

  4. Treatment of chronic renal failure with dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Rampton, D S; Cohen, S L; Crammond, V D; Gibbons, J; Lilburn, M F; Rabet, J Y; Vince, A J; Wager, J D; Wrong, O M

    1984-03-01

    We have tested the hypothesis that dietary fiber, by inhibiting colonic bacterial ammonia generation and increasing fecal nitrogen excretion, might decrease hepatic urea synthesis and thereby reduce plasma urea in patients with chronic renal failure. Six and 8 week courses of two different hemicelluloses, arabinogalactan and ispaghula, reduced mean plasma urea in uremic subjects by 11% and 19% respectively. Ispaghula also reduced the rate of rise of plasma creatinine to zero and, in one formal balance study, increased fecal nitrogen excretion by 39%. Experiments in vitro showed that ispaghula depressed anaerobic fecal bacterial net ammonia generation by 30%, and adsorbed neither urea nor ammonia. The reduction in plasma urea caused by dietary fiber is likely to be due to inhibition of colonic bacterial production of ammonia; such therapy could conceivably alleviate some of the symptoms of uremia and postpone dialysis in patients with endstage renal disease.

  5. Regulation of the renal sympathetic nerves in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Ramchandra, Rohit; Barrett, Carolyn J.

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a serious debilitating condition with poor survival rates and an increasing level of prevalence. HF is associated with an increase in renal norepinephrine (NE) spillover, which is an independent predictor of mortality in HF patients. The excessive sympatho-excitation that is a hallmark of HF has long-term effects that contribute to disease progression. An increase in directly recorded renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) has also been recorded in animal models of HF. This review will focus on the mechanisms controlling sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) to the kidney during normal conditions and alterations in these mechanisms during HF. In particular the roles of afferent reflexes and central mechanisms will be discussed. PMID:26388778

  6. [Acute renal failure in the course of Hashimoto's thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Papalia, Teresa; Greco, Rosita; Mollica, Francesco; Mancuso, Domenico; Bonofiglio, Renzo

    2010-01-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis is the commonest form of autoimmune thyroiditis in the world. It occurs most frequently in women (female/male ratio, 6:1) in the age group between 30 and 60 years. Here we report the case of a 38-year-old Caucasian man who presented with a few days' history of upper limb paresthesias, widespread joint and muscle pain, and headaches. Laboratory findings showed increased CPK, myoglobin and plasma creatinine levels with acute renal failure. Low free T3 and T4 values associated with a high TSH value, the presence of antithyroid globulin and peroxidase autoantibodies pointed to a diagnosis of hypothyroidism with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Treatment with levothyroxine was initiated and within 2 months normalization of renal function, myoglobin, CPK and thyroid hormone levels was observed.

  7. Effect of 2'-phosphophloretin on renal function in chronic renal failure rats.

    PubMed

    Peerce, B E; Weaver, L; Clarke, R D

    2004-07-01

    Hyperhosphatemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism are common and severe complications of chronic renal failure. Therapies to reduce serum phosphate have been shown to reduce serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and slow the progression of renal failure. The effect of the inhibitor of intestinal phosphate absorption, 2'-phosphophloretin (2'-PP), on serum and urine chemistry, renal histology, and cardiac structure in the uremic rat model of renal failure, 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6 NX), was examined. The effect of 2'-PP on serum phosphate, serum PTH, serum total Ca(2+), and ionized Ca(2+), Ca(2+) x P(i) product, urine protein, urine osmolality, and creatinine clearance in 5/6 NX rats was examined. Uremic rats in chronic renal failure were gavaged daily with 25 microM 2'-PP. Over the course of a 5-wk experiment, serum chemistry in untreated uremic rats, 2'-PP-treated uremic rats, and age-matched control rats with normal renal function was determined twice a week. Urine creatinine, urine osmolality, urine phosphate, and urine protein were determined once a week from 24-h collections. 2'-PP reduced serum phosphate 40 +/- 3% compared with a 17% increase in untreated uremic control rats. 2'-PP did not alter total serum Ca(2+). During 5-wk experiments, serum PTH increased 65 +/- 25% in untreated uremic rats and decreased 70 +/- 7% in uremic rats treated with 25 microM 2'-PP. Creatinine clearance decreased 20% in untreated uremic rats compared with a 100% increase in 2'-PP-treated uremic rats. Urine protein decreased and urine osmolality increased in uremic rats treated with 2'-PP. The mechanism of the effect of 2'-PP on serum phosphate was inhibition of intestinal phosphate absorption. 2-PP inhibited intestinal phosphate absorption 50% without altering dietary protein absorption or intestinal Ca(2+) absorption. Over the course of the 5-wk treatment with 2'-PP, uremic animals treated with 2'-PP had a 2-4% weight gain/wk, similar to the weight gain seen in age-matched control rats

  8. HDL Cholesterol Efflux Predicts Graft Failure in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Annema, Wijtske; Dikkers, Arne; Freark de Boer, Jan; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; Sanders, Jan-Stephan F.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2016-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles are involved in the protection against cardiovascular disease by promoting cholesterol efflux, in which accumulated cholesterol is removed from macrophage foam cells. We investigated whether HDL cholesterol efflux capacity is associated with cardiovascular mortality, all-cause mortality, and graft failure in a cohort of renal transplant recipients (n=495, median follow-up 7.0 years). Cholesterol efflux capacity at baseline was quantified using incubation of human macrophage foam cells with apolipoprotein B–depleted plasma. Baseline efflux capacity was not different in deceased patients and survivors (P=0.60 or P=0.50 for cardiovascular or all-cause mortality, respectively), whereas recipients developing graft failure had lower efflux capacity than those with functioning grafts (P<0.001). Kaplan–Meier analysis demonstrated a lower risk for graft failure (P=0.004) but not cardiovascular (P=0.30) or all-cause mortality (P=0.31) with increasing gender-stratified tertiles of efflux capacity. Cox regression analyses adjusted for age and gender showed that efflux capacity was not associated with cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 0.89; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.67 to 1.19; P=0.43). Furthermore, the association between efflux capacity and all-cause mortality (HR, .79; 95% CI, 0.63 to 0.98; P=0.031) disappeared after further adjustment for potential confounders. However, efflux capacity at baseline significantly predicted graft failure (HR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.29 to 0.64; P<0.001) independent of apolipoprotein A-I, HDL cholesterol, or creatinine clearance. In conclusion, this prospective study shows that cholesterol efflux capacity from macrophage foam cells is not associated with cardiovascular or all-cause mortality but is a strong predictor of graft failure independent of plasma HDL cholesterol levels in renal transplant recipients. PMID:26319244

  9. RIFLE criteria and hepatic function in the assessment of acute renal failure in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tinti, F; Umbro, I; Meçule, A; Rossi, M; Merli, M; Nofroni, I; Corradini, S Ginanni; Poli, L; Pugliese, F; Ruberto, F; Berloco, P B; Mitterhofer, A P

    2010-05-01

    Renal dysfunction in cirrhotic patients is primary related to disturbances of circulatory function, triggered by portal hypertension with chronic intrarenal vasoconstriction and hypoperfusion. Pretransplant renal function is an important factor implicated in the development of acute renal failure (ARF) after liver transplantation (OLT), but other factors mostly related to liver function seem to influence the development of ARF. The Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative workgroup developed the RIFLE classification to define ARF. We sought to evaluate the incidence of ARF among patients undergoing OLT, to evaluate the association of ARF with pre-OLT renal and hepatic functions, and to evaluate the influence of ARF on chronic kidney disease (CKD) at 1 month post-OLT. Clinical, renal, hepatic function, and donor risk index data of 24 patients who underwent deceased donor OLT were collected before transplantation, in the perioperative period and in the first month post-OLT. ARF occurred in 37.5% of patients with 56% developing the R grade and 44% the I grade; no patient showed the F grade. An association was observed between ARF and a higher Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score and between ARF and a reduced pre-OLT serum albumin. No association was noted between ARF and other pre-OLT parameters. In cirrhotic patients serum creatinine is a bias for renal function assessment and the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula overestimates GFR. Post-OLT CKD was present in 6.7% of patients without ARF and in 44.4% of patients with ARF. The R grade developed more frequently among patients with viral cirrhosis. The association of ARF with MELD and hypoalbuminemia may be the result of a close relationship between renal and hepatic functions among cirrhotic patients. Post-OLT CKD may be the result of unrecognized, preexisting CKD and/or the effects of not fully resolved acute damage to an injured kidney. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Growth in children with chronic renal failure and after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bakr, Mohamed A; El-Husseini, Amr A; Fouda, Mohamed A; Sallam, Salem A; Fayed, Salah M; Sobh, Mohamed A; Ghoneim, Mohamed A

    2007-01-01

    Growth retardation is a major problem for many children with chronic renal failure (CRF) and transplantation. The aim of this study is to assess the relation between height, glomerular filtration rate (GFR), hormonal alterations in children with CRF on regular haemodialysis (HD), and the impact of functioning graft after kidney transplantation.Thirty-six hemodialysed children were included in the study beside 32 pediatric transplants. Mean duration on HD was 14.72 +/- 7.73 months for the CRF group, while the mean interval after transplantation was 1.97 +/- 0.9 years for the second group. Moreover, twenty healthy children of matched age and sex served as controls. Assessment of growth parameters included height, expressed as standard deviation scores (Ht SDS) for chronological age, serum levels of growth hormone (hGH), and parathormone (PTH). Growth performance was evaluated twice: at the start of the study and one year later. Children with CRF and transplantation had significantly higher levels of both serum hGH and PTH compared to their controls, while CRF children experienced significantly higher serum levels of both hGH and PTH compared to those with functioning graft. Furthermore, analysis of our results by non-parametric Kendall's correlation at the start and one year later revealed negative correlation concerning dialysis duration, serum creatinine, and PTH. On the other hand, positive correlation was achieved for serum calcium and GFR.

  11. PA21, a novel phosphate binder, improves renal osteodystrophy in rats with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Atsushi; Tatemichi, Satoshi; Takeda, Hiroo; Kobayashi, Mamoru

    2017-01-01

    The effects of PA21, a novel iron-based and non-calcium-based phosphate binder, on hyperphosphatemia and its accompanying bone abnormality in chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) were evaluated. Rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure (CRF) were prepared by feeding them an adenine-containing diet for four weeks. They were also freely fed a diet that contained PA21 (0.5, 1.5, and 5%), sevelamer hydrochloride (0.6 and 2%) or lanthanum carbonate hydrate (0.6 and 2%) for four weeks. Blood biochemical parameters were measured and bone histomorphometry was performed for femurs, which were isolated after drug treatment. Serum phosphorus and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels were higher in the CRF rats. Administration of phosphate binders for four weeks decreased serum phosphorus and PTH levels in a dose-dependent manner and there were significant decreases in the AUC0-28 day of these parameters in 5% PA21, 2% sevelamer hydrochloride, and 2% lanthanum carbonate hydrate groups compared with that in the CRF control group. Moreover, osteoid volume improved significantly in 5% of the PA21 group, and fibrosis volume and cortical porosity were ameliorated in 5% PA21, 2% sevelamer hydrochloride, and 2% lanthanum carbonate hydrate groups. These results suggest that PA21 is effective against hyperphosphatemia, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and bone abnormalities in CKD-MBD as sevelamer hydrochloride and lanthanum carbonate hydrate are, and that PA21 is a new potential alternative to phosphate binders.

  12. An unusual case of renal failure due to solitary plasmacytoma: parenchymal invasion of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Ozkok, Abdullah; Elcioglu, Omer Celal; Bakan, Ali; Sasak, Gulsah; Atilgan, Kadir Gokhan; Alisir, Sabahat; Odabas, Ali Riza

    2012-01-01

    Solitary extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP) is a rare plasma cell disorder mostly involving the upper airway; however, retroperitoneal infiltration is very rare. Kidney injury associated with EMP is exceptionally rare with only anecdotal reports. Herein we report a case of retroperitoneal EMP causing renal failure by the way of direct renal parenchymal infiltration. Renal parenchymal invasion should be considered in aggressive and refractory plasma cell dyscrasias with unexplained renal failure.

  13. [Sympathetic nerve activity in chronic renal failure - what are the therapeutic options?].

    PubMed

    Hausberg, M; Tokmak, F

    2013-11-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure are characterized by a tonic elevation of sympathetic tone. This factor largely contributes to their increased cardiovascular risk. The increased sympathetic drive is caused by activiation of renal afferent fibers in the diseased kidneys. Therapeutic options for hypertensive patients with chronic renal failure with respect to their sympathetic overactivity are inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-system and central sympatholytic drugs. The role of catheter-based renal denervation in these patients is currently under investigation.

  14. Plasma renin activity during the development of paracetamol (acetaminophen) induced acute renal failure in man.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, R; James, O F; Roberts, S H; Morley, A R; Robson, V

    1979-04-01

    Plasma renin activity has been measured daily in 36 patients suffering from self poisoning with acetaminophen. In 3 developing porto-systemic encephalopathy terminal renal failure developed with high plasma renin activity. In 2 who developed acute renal failure without porto-systemic encephalopathy, plasma renin activity was noted to rise before serum creatinine and to return to initial levels after 3 or 4 days while renal failure persisted. Six other patients with similar hepatic damage showed comparable rises in renin without developing renal failure. Our findings are consistent with but do not establish a pathogenetic role for renin in acetaminophen-induced acute renal failure. It is suggested that other factors may act with renin to bring about renal failure.

  15. Endotoxaemia and renal failure in cirrhosis and obstructive jaundice.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, S P; Moodie, H; Stamatakis, J D; Kakkar, V V; Williams, R

    1976-01-01

    An investigation into the possible role of endotoxins in the pathogenesis of renal failure in cirrhosis and obstructive jaundice showed the two to be closely related. None of the patients with cirrhosis who had endotoxaemia had other evidence of Gram-negative infection at the time of the study, and the endotoxaemia was therefore probably due to impaired hepatic clearance of toxins normally absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. In contrast, bacteriological evidence of Gram-negative infection was found in most of the patients with obstructive jaundice and endotoxaemia. PMID:795499

  16. Regular short haemodialysis in end-stage renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, A M; Oduro-Dominah, A; Gibbins, J K; Devapal, D; Mitchell, D C

    1975-01-01

    A study was made of thrice weekly haemodialysis of 3-3 1/2 hours' duration using a large surface area dialyser in patients with end-stage renal failure. Body water, potassium, and blood pressure control were satisfactory and comparable with the more widely used long dialysis schedules (6-9 hours thrice weekly). Patient rehabilitation was improved overall and the regimen enabled the dialysis unit to treat more patients despite a reduction in technical and nursing staff. The technique proved inadequate, however, in two patients with an intercurrent infection, and more intensive dialysis in recommended in such cases. PMID:1174885

  17. Glomerular Dynamic Studies of the Pathogenesis of Acute Renal Failure.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-30

    IAD-A174 113 GLOMERULAR DYNAMIC STUDIES OF THE PATHOGENESIS OF ANOTE 1/1 RENAL FAILURE(U) VIRGINIA COMNWEALTH UNIV RICHMOND I D E OKEN 3e JUN 84...8217i1 . d /or 1 Special June 30, 1984 Supported by U.S. ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT COMMAND Fort Detrick, Frederick, Maryland 21701-5012 Contract...values might be underestimated by tubular inulin leakage if measured in the customary fashion.) Nephron filtration fraction was estimated from the

  18. [Peritoneal dialysis for acute renal failure: Rediscovery of an old modality of renal replacement therapy].

    PubMed

    Issad, Belkacem; Rostoker, Guy; Bagnis, Corinne; Deray, Gilbert

    2016-07-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) in adults in the intensive care unit (ICU) often evolves in a context of multiple organ failure, which explains the high mortality rate and increase treatment needs. Among, two modalities of renal replacement therapy, peritoneal dialysis (PD) was the first modality used for the treatment of ARF in the 1950s. Today, while PD is generalized for chronic renal failure treatment, its use in the ICU is limited, particularly, due to the advent of new hemodialysis techniques and the development of continuous replacement therapy. Recently, a renewed interest in the use of PD in patients with ARF has manifested in several emerging countries (Brazil, Vietnam). A systematic review in 2013 showed a similar mortality in ARF patients having PD (58%) and those treated by hemodialysis or hemodiafiltration/hemofiltration (56.1%). In the International society of peritoneal dialysis (ISPD)'s guideline (2013), PD may be used in adult ARF as the other blood extracorporeal epuration technics (recommendation with grade 1B). PD is the preferred method in cardiorenal syndromes, in frailty patients with hemodynamic instability and those lacking vascular access; finally PD is also an option in elderly and patients with bleeding tendency. In industrial countries, high volume automated PD with a flexible catheter (usually Tenckhoff) is advocated. Copyright © 2016 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. The use of complementary and alternative medicine among chronic renal failure patients.

    PubMed

    Akyol, Asiye D; Yildirim, Yasemin; Toker, Emel; Yavuz, Betul

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the factors affecting the use and frequency of use of complementary and alternative medicine among chronic renal failure patients. The use of complementary and alternative medicine in the general population and patients with chronic renal failure has increased significantly. Despite this, there is limited information concerning the use of complementary and alternative medicine among chronic renal failure patients. Cross-sectional survey. The research was carried out at the nephrology and internal medicine outpatient clinics. Two hundred and six chronic renal failure patients admitted to the outpatient clinics were included in the study. Mean outcomes measures were the frequency and type of complementary and alternative medicine use, demographic and disease-related characteristics affecting complementary and alternative medicine use and the reasons for using complementary and alternative medicine. The data were evaluated by Pearson's chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. While 2·9% of the patients had been using complementary and alternative medicine before the renal disease occurred, 25·2% of the patients reported that they had at least once used complementary and alternative medicine methods after the renal disease occurred. A significant difference was found between complementary and alternative medicine usage and age, gender, place of living, occupational status and educational background (p < 0·05). While most of the patients using complementary and alternative medicine (78·3%) stated that they used such methods as a cure for their disease, 46·1% used body-mind techniques. The results of our study showed that one-fourth of the chronic renal failure patients were using complementary and alternative medicine, mainly body-mind techniques. In addition, the study proved that most of the patients do not discuss their complementary and alternative medicine usage with their doctors and nurses. It is essential that nephrology

  20. Effect of Cuscuta chinensis on renal function in ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute renal failure rats.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sun; Lee, Yun Jung; Kim, Eun Ju; Lee, An Sook; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2011-01-01

    The kidneys play a central role in regulating water, ion composition and excretion of metabolic waste products in the urine. Cuscuta chinensis has been known as an important traditional Oriental medicine for the treatment of liver and kidney disorders. Thus, we studied whether an aqueous extract of Cuscuta chinensis (ACC) seeds has an effect on renal function parameters in ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute renal failure (ARF) rats. Administration of 250 mg/kg/day ACC showed that renal functional parameters including urinary excretion rate, osmolality, Na(+), K(+), Cl(-), creatinine clearance, solute-free water reabsorption were significantly recovered in ischemia/reperfusion-induced ARF. Periodic acid Schiff staining showed that administration of ACC improved tubular damage in ischemia/reperfusion-induced ARF. In immunoblot and immunohistological examinations, ischemia/reperfusion-induced ARF decreased the expressions of water channel AQP 2, 3 and sodium potassium pump Na,K-ATPase in the renal medulla. However, administration of ACC markedly incremented AQP 2, 3 and Na,K-ATPase expressions. Therefore, these data indicate that administration of ACC ameliorates regulation of the urine concentration and renal functions in rats with ischemia/reperfusion-induced ARF.

  1. Obstructive uropathy and acute renal failure due to ureteral calculus in renal graft: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lusenti, T.; Fiorini, F.; Barozzi, L.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive uropathy caused by kidney stones is quite rare in transplant kidneys. Clinical case The authors report the case of a patient, previously gastrectomized for gastric carcinoma. He underwent renal transplantation using uretero-ureterostomy, and presented an episode of acute renal failure 7 years after surgery. Ultrasound (US) examination showed no sign of rejection but allowed detection of moderate hydronephrosis in the transplant kidney. Subsequent computed tomography (CT) revealed a kidney stone in the middle ureter at the crossing of the iliac vessels. The patient therefore urgently underwent percutaneous nephrostomy of the graft and recovered diuresis and renal function. The patient was transferred to the Transplant Center where he underwent ureterotomy with removal of the stone and subsequent ureteropyelostomy. Also transureteral resection of the prostate (TURP) was performed due to urinary retention of prostatic origin. Histological examination showed prostate carcinoma, Gleason stage 3, which was treated conservatively using radiotherapy without suspension of the administered low dose of immunotherapy. Discussion Calculosis is one of the least common causes of obstructive uropathy in transplant kidneys. In the described case, US examination performed after onset of renal insufficiency led to subsequent radiological investigation and resulting interventional procedures (nephrostomy and surgical removal of the stone) with complete recovery of pre-existing renal function. PMID:23397045

  2. Combination of tadalafil and diltiazem attenuates renal ischemia reperfusion-induced acute renal failure in rats.

    PubMed

    El-Sisi, Alaa E; Sokar, Samia S; Abu-Risha, Sally E; Ibrahim, Hanaa A

    2016-12-01

    Life threatening conditions characterized by renal ischemia/reperfusion (RIR) such as kidney transplantation, partial nephrectomy, renal artery angioplasty, cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic bypass surgery, continue to be among the most frequent causes of acute renal failure. The current study investigated the possible protective effects of tadalafil alone and in combination with diltiazem in experimentally-induced renal ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats. Possible underlying mechanisms were also investigated such as oxidative stress and inflammation. Rats were divided into sham-operated and I/R-operated groups. Anesthetized rats (urethane 1.3g/kg) were subjected to bilateral ischemia for 30min by occlusion of renal pedicles, then reperfused for 6h. Rats in the vehicle I/R group showed a significant (p˂0.05) increase in kidney malondialdehyde (MDA) content; myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity; TNF-α and IL-1β contents. In addition significant (p˂0.05) increase in intercellular adhesion molecule-1(ICAM-1) content, BUN and creatinine levels, along with significant decrease in kidney superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. In addition, marked diffuse histopathological damage and severe cytoplasmic staining of caspase-3 were detected. Pretreatment with combination of tadalafil (5mg/kg bdwt) and diltiazem (5mg/kg bdwt) resulted in reversal of the increased biochemical parameters investigated. Also, histopathological examination revealed partial return to normal cellular architecture. In conclusion, pretreatment with tadalafil and diltiazem combination protected against RIR injury.

  3. Mechanisms of renal cell repair and regeneration after acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Nony, Paul A; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2003-03-01

    In many cases, acute renal failure (ARF) is the result of proximal tubular cell injury and death and can arise in a variety of clinical situations, especially following renal ischemia and drug or toxicant exposure. Although much research has focused on the cellular events leading to ARF, less emphasis has been placed on the mechanisms of renal cell repair and regeneration, although ARF is reversed in over half of those who acquire it. Studies using in vivo and in vitro models have demonstrated the importance of proliferation, migration, and repair of physiological functions of injured renal proximal tubular cells (RPTC) in the reversal of ARF. Growth factors have been shown to produce migration and proliferation of injured RPTC, although the specific mechanisms through which growth factors promote renal regeneration in vivo are unclear. Recently, interactions between integrins and extracellular matrix proteins such as collagen IV were shown to promote the repair of physiological functions in injured RPTC. Specifically, collagen IV synthesis and deposition following cellular injury restored integrin polarity and promoted repair of mitochondrial function and active Na(+) transport. Furthermore, exogenous collagen IV, but not collagen I, fibronectin, or laminin, promoted the repair of physiological functions without stimulating proliferation. These findings suggest the importance of establishing and/or maintaining collagen IV-integrin interactions in the stimulation of repair of physiological functions following sublethal cellular injury. Furthermore, the pathway that stimulates repair is distinct from that of proliferation and migration and may be a viable target for pharmacological intervention.

  4. Systemic arterial and venous determinants of renal hemodynamics in congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Braam, Branko; Cupples, William A; Joles, Jaap A; Gaillard, Carlo

    2012-03-01

    Heart and kidney interactions are fascinating, in the sense that failure of the one organ strongly affects the function of the other. In this review paper, we analyze how principal driving forces for glomerular filtration and renal blood flow are changed in heart failure. Moreover, renal autoregulation and modulation of neurohumoral factors, which can both have repercussions on renal function, are analyzed. Two paradigms seem to apply. One is that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), and extracellular volume control are the three main determinants of renal function in heart failure. The other is that the classical paradigm to analyze renal dysfunction that is widely applied in nephrology also applies to the pathophysiology of heart failure: pre-renal, intra-renal, and post-renal alterations together determine glomerular filtration. At variance with the classical paradigm is that the most important post-renal factor in heart failure seems renal venous hypertension that, by increasing renal tubular pressure, decreases GFR. When different pharmacological strategies to inhibit the RAS and SNS and to assist renal volume control are considered, there is a painful lack in knowledge about how widely applied drugs affect primary driving forces for ultrafiltration, renal autoregulation, and neurohumoral control. We call for more clinical physiological studies.

  5. [The ultrasonic diagnosis of the changes in the kidneys in renal forms of acute kidney failure].

    PubMed

    Alekseev, V G; Tsvigun, G V; Zaikina, N A

    1993-01-01

    An ultrasonic investigation of the kidneys in patients with renal forms of acute renal failure (32 and 24 with ethylene glycol poisoning and leptospirosis, respectively) recorded in the oligo-anuric phase a specific ultrasonic picture of renal lesion demonstrable as long as full recovery of impaired functions. The picture was characterized by enlargement of the kidneys with good differentiation of the pyramids in enhanced parenchymal echogenicity. Ethylene glycol poisoning is characterized by limited renal mobility and an echo negative halo around them. These signs may appear helpful in the diagnosis of renal forms of acute renal failure.

  6. Predictive Value of Hepatic and Renal Dysfunction Based on the Models for End-Stage Liver Disease in Patients With Heart Failure Evaluated for Heart Transplant.

    PubMed

    Szyguła-Jurkiewicz, B; Nadziakiewicz, P; Zakliczynski, M; Szczurek, W; Chraponski, J; Zembala, M; Gasior, M

    2016-06-01

    The evaluation of prognosis and determination of a long-term treatment strategy is an important element of management in patients with heart failure (HF). The aim of the study was to determine the prognostic value of the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) and its modifications, MELD and serum sodium (MELD-Na) and MELD excluding the international normalized ratio (MELD-XI), as well as other independent risk factors for death during a 4-year follow-up. We analyzed retrospectively 143 patients with advanced HF, evaluated for heart transplant between 2009 and 2011. Patients using warfarin were excluded from the study. The long-term follow-up data were obtained during follow-up visits and/or phone contact with the patients or their families. The age of the patients was 54 (48-59) years and 88.1% of patients were male. Mortality rate during the follow-up period was 49%. The MELD scores (hazard ratio [HR], 1.12; P < .001), as well as serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP; HR, 1.01; P < .01) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP; HR, 1.01; P < .05) levels, were independent risk factors for death. Receiver operator characteristic analysis indicated that a MELD cutoff of 10 (area under the curve [AUC], 0.756; P < .0001], MELD-XI cutoff of 13.0 (AUC, 0.720; P < .0001), MELD-Na cutoff of 13.0 (AUC, 0.813; P < .0001), hs-CRP cutoff of 4.02 (AUC, 0.686; P < .001), and NT-proBNP cutoff of 1055 (AUC, 0.722; P < .001) were the best predictive values as predictors of death. MELD, MELD-Na, and MELD-XI scores are prognostic factors for death during a 4-year follow-up. A high MELD score is an independent prognostic factor for death. NT-proBNP and hs-CRP serum concentrations are other independent factors influencing death. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Renal resistance index and its prognostic significance in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Ennezat, Pierre Vladimir; Maréchaux, Sylvestre; Six-Carpentier, Marie; Pinçon, Claire; Sediri, Ibrahim; Delsart, Pascal; Gras, Marc; Mounier-Véhier, Claire; Gautier, Corinne; Montaigne, David; Jude, Brigitte; Asseman, Philippe; Le Jemtel, Thierry H

    2011-12-01

    Functional renal impairment is a common feature of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). The link between functional renal impairment and HFpEF remains incompletely understood. With hypertension and diabetes as frequent co-morbidities, patients with HFpEF are at risk of developing intra-renal vascular hemodynamic alterations that may lead to functional renal impairment and impact on prognosis. Renal resistive index (RRI) was non-invasively determined by Doppler ultrasonic examination in 90 HFpEF patients and 90 age- and sex-matched hypertensive patients without evidence of heart failure (HF) who served as controls. Clinical, laboratory and cardiac echocardiography data were obtained in HFpEF patients and controls. To investigate its possible clinical relevance, RRI was evaluated as a prognostic index of all-cause mortality and hospitalization for HF. Mean RRI was substantially greater in HFpEF patients than in controls (P < 0.0001), while mean blood pressure, glomerular filtration rate, hemoglobin and serum protein levels were significantly lower in HFpEF patients than in controls. On multivariable analysis, mean RRI was independently associated with HFpEF. In addition, increased mean RRI was an independent predictor of poor outcome [hazard ratio = 1.06 95% confidence interval (1.01-1.10), P = 0.007] and remained significantly associated with the outcome after adjustment for univariate predictors that included low mean blood pressure, low hemoglobin concentration and low glomerular filtration rate. Conclusion. Patients with HFpEF exhibit intra-renal vascular hemodynamic alterations. The severity of intra-renal vascular hemodynamic alterations correlates with a poor outcome.

  8. Association of renal failure with thyroid dysfunction: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Maimoona Mushtaq

    2014-09-01

    Chronic renal failure is often associated with multiple organ co-morbidities, including thyroid dysfunction. This has been associated with poorer prognosis, particularly in patients with end-stage renal disease. This study aimed to examine the relationship between renal failure and thyroid dysfunction in an outpatient setting at the King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Saudi Arabia, from January 2011 to June 2012. Demographic and biochemical data were extracted from medical records. Differences in the levels of thyroid hormones and lipids between the four renal function groups were analyzed using the chi-square test for categorical variables and Kruskal- Wallis test for binomial variables. A total of 486 patients were included in the study population, of whom approximately half were female, and the median (range) age was 61 (17-90) years. According to creatinine measurements, renal function was normal in 48 participants, 290 had mild renal failure, 122 had moderate renal failure and 26 had severe renal failure. No significant relationships were observed between renal failure and cardiac or pulmonary dysfunction. Free triiodothyronine (FT3) levels were significantly reduced (P = 0.005) and both free thyroxin (FT4; P = 0.034) and parathyroid hormone (PTH; P = 0.028) significantly increased with increasing severity of renal failure. Patients with moderate to severe renal failure displayed reduced hemoglobin levels and were significantly more likely to be anemic (P <0.001). Highly significant increases in alkaline phosphatase (P <0.001), uric acid (P <0.001) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (P = 0.014) levels were also observed with increasing renal dysfunction. To conclude, it was observed that renal dysfunction is associated with notable changes to other organ systems, including the thyroid. Further studies may investigate the association of multiple organ co-morbidities with prognosis in patients with chronic renal failure.

  9. Potential Use of Autologous Renal Cells from Diseased Kidneys for the Treatment of Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    George, Sunil K; Abolbashari, Mehran; Jackson, John D; Aboushwareb, Tamer; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs when certain conditions cause the kidneys to gradually lose function. For patients with CKD, renal transplantation is the only treatment option that restores kidney function. In this study, we evaluated primary renal cells obtained from diseased kidneys to determine whether their normal phenotypic and functional characteristics are retained, and could be used for cell therapy. Primary renal cells isolated from both normal kidneys (NK) and diseased kidneys (CKD) showed similar phenotypic characteristics and growth kinetics. The expression levels of renal tubular cell markers, Aquaporin-1 and E-Cadherin, and podocyte-specific markers, WT-1 and Nephrin, were similar in both NK and CKD kidney derived cells. Using fluorescence- activated cell sorting (FACS), specific renal cell populations were identified and included proximal tubular cells (83.1% from NK and 80.3% from CKD kidneys); distal tubular cells (11.03% from NK and 10.9% from CKD kidneys); and podocytes (1.91% from NK and 1.78% from CKD kidneys). Ultra-structural analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed microvilli on the apical surface of cultured cells from NK and CKD samples. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed a similar organization of tight junctions, desmosomes, and other intracellular structures. The Na+ uptake characteristics of NK and CKD derived renal cells were also similar (24.4 mmol/L and 25 mmol/L, respectively) and no significant differences were observed in the protein uptake and transport characteristics of these two cell isolates. These results show that primary renal cells derived from diseased kidneys such as CKD have similar structural and functional characteristics to their counterparts from a normal healthy kidney (NK) when grown in vitro. This study suggests that cells derived from diseased kidney may be used as an autologous cell source for renal cell therapy, particularly in patients with CKD or end

  10. Potential Use of Autologous Renal Cells from Diseased Kidneys for the Treatment of Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    George, Sunil K.; Abolbashari, Mehran; Jackson, John D.; Aboushwareb, Tamer; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs when certain conditions cause the kidneys to gradually lose function. For patients with CKD, renal transplantation is the only treatment option that restores kidney function. In this study, we evaluated primary renal cells obtained from diseased kidneys to determine whether their normal phenotypic and functional characteristics are retained, and could be used for cell therapy. Primary renal cells isolated from both normal kidneys (NK) and diseased kidneys (CKD) showed similar phenotypic characteristics and growth kinetics. The expression levels of renal tubular cell markers, Aquaporin-1 and E-Cadherin, and podocyte-specific markers, WT-1 and Nephrin, were similar in both NK and CKD kidney derived cells. Using fluorescence- activated cell sorting (FACS), specific renal cell populations were identified and included proximal tubular cells (83.1% from NK and 80.3% from CKD kidneys); distal tubular cells (11.03% from NK and 10.9% from CKD kidneys); and podocytes (1.91% from NK and 1.78% from CKD kidneys). Ultra-structural analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed microvilli on the apical surface of cultured cells from NK and CKD samples. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed a similar organization of tight junctions, desmosomes, and other intracellular structures. The Na+ uptake characteristics of NK and CKD derived renal cells were also similar (24.4 mmol/L and 25 mmol/L, respectively) and no significant differences were observed in the protein uptake and transport characteristics of these two cell isolates. These results show that primary renal cells derived from diseased kidneys such as CKD have similar structural and functional characteristics to their counterparts from a normal healthy kidney (NK) when grown in vitro. This study suggests that cells derived from diseased kidney may be used as an autologous cell source for renal cell therapy, particularly in patients with CKD or end

  11. Schistosomal specific nephropathy leading to end-stage renal failure.

    PubMed

    Sobh, M A; Moustafa, F E; el-Housseini, F; Basta, M T; Deelder, A M; Ghoniem, M A

    1987-04-01

    In this study 17 patients, 11 with end-stage renal failure and six with nephrotic syndrome were selected. The selection criteria were presence of active intestinal schistosomiasis and absence of any surgical or other medical disease which could explain the renal disease. When examined by light microscopy, kidney biopsies showed membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in nine, membranous in four, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in two, sclerosing glomerulonephritis in one case, and no changes in another case. Direct immunofluorescence showed IgG deposits in 13 cases, IgM in 10 and different complement components (C3, C1q) in eight cases. Eluates from the kidney biopsies of the 17 schistosomal as well as six control cases were examined by ELISA against schistosoma mansoni adult worm antigen (AWA). This test showed the presence of antibodies against the AWA in 12 out of 17 of the schistosomal cases, and zero out of six of the controls. When examined by direct IFA using sheep anti-circulating anodic antigen/FITC and by indirect IFA using monoclonal antischistosomal CAA IgG3, kidney biopsies of the ELISA positive cases showed granular deposits of circulating anodic antigen (CAA). We conclude that schistosomal specific nephropathy does exist in the clinical settings and can lead to end-stage renal disease, with CAA probably being a major responsible antigen.

  12. Diagnosis of acute renal failure in very preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Choker, G; Gouyon, J B

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to improve the definition of acute renal failure (ARF) in very preterm infants. Twenty-eight newborn infants with gestational age < or =32 weeks were prospectively studied in the first 5 days of life and made up a control group as they did not present risk factors for vasomotor renal insufficiency. Renal insufficiency was defined as an increase in daily serum creatinine concentration above the 99th interval limit obtained in this control group, i.e., 43 micromol/l on day 1 and/or 21 micromol/l on day 2 and/or 14 micromol/l/day on day 3 and/or 22 micromol/l/day on day 4. According to this definition, 20 very preterm infants with ARF were identified. As compared with the control group, the ARF group showed more prolonged oliguric episodes, lower diuresis, insufficient weight loss (in spite of a reduction in water intake) and also more episodes with natremia <130 mEq/l (35 vs. 0%; p <0.05) and/or kalemia >6 mEq/l (40 vs. 11%; p <0.05). Therefore, assessment of daily changes in serum creatinine concentration in very preterm infants allows the diagnosis of clinically significant reduction in glomerular filtration rate.

  13. Case report: acute renal failure after administering intravenous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Graumann, Aaron; Zawada, Edward T

    2010-03-01

    We report the case of an 87-year-old white woman with myasthenia gravis who presented with nausea, shortness of breath, azotemia, and hyperkalemia shortly after completing a course of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). She had been receiving monthly transfusions of IVIG, but this time had received daily infusions for 5 days rather than 1 day. She had received this same dose in the past without incident. Her history was significant for coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, chronic steroid use, and recurrent urinary tract infection. On examination, she was slightly confused, mildly dehydrated, had a grade II systolic ejection murmur along the upper left sternal border, had bilateral and symmetric mild weakness of the upper and lower extremities, and exhibited mild edema of the lower extremities. Before transfer from the emergency room, she was found to have an elevated serum urea nitrogen and creatinine of 55 and 5.8 mg/dL (19.6 mmol/L and 512.7 micromol/L, respectively). Creatinine 8 days earlier was 0.9 mg/dL (79.6 micromol/L). The hospital course of the acute renal failure is presented with a review of the literature on cases of acute renal failure after IVIG.

  14. Acute renal failure in the same hospital ten years apart.

    PubMed

    Chow, Y W; Lim, B B; Hooi, L S

    2007-03-01

    A three month prospective study was carried out in 1994 (8/3/94 - 7/6/94) and late 2004/early 2005 (24/11/2004 - 15/2/2005) among patients with acute renal failure (ARF) (serum creatinine > 0.200 mmol/1). Incidence of ARF had increased from 0.48% (78/16,418) to 1.1% (211/18,697) of admissions between 1994 and 2004. Two thirds of patients were male. Mean age was 57.7 +/- 20.1 years in 1994 and 55.6 +/- 17.8 years in 2004. No difference was noted in causative factors, rate of oliguric ARF (about 10%) and mean peak urea and creatinine. The cause was pre-renal failure in 43.6% in 1994 and 53.5% in 2004. The second commonest cause was sepsis with 41% in 1994 and 37.9% in 2004. One in six patients needed dialysis and peritoneal dialysis was the main dialysis modality (69.2% and 74.3%). Mortality was 56.4% in 1994 and 44.5% in 2004. A quarter of deaths occurred within two days of admission due to severe underlying illness. Mortality among non-oliguric patients decreased from 52.9% in 1994 to 37.0% in 2004 (p = 0.04); for patients from intensive care units it was 78.3% in 1994 and 68.5% in 2004.

  15. Visual evoked potentials and long latency event-related potentials in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S N; Syndulko, K; Rever, B; Kraut, J; Coburn, J; Tourtellotte, W W

    1983-09-01

    We studied auditory event-related potentials elicited in a target detection paradigm (P300) and pattern shift visual evoked potentials (PVEPs) in 22 patients with chronic renal failure and no clinical evidence of cognitive or visual impairment. Thirteen patients were maintained on chronic hemodialysis, and 9 patients were receiving a low-protein diet. Thirty-three percent of patients receiving the low-protein diet and 58% of the dialysis patients had abnormal P300 latencies. Most patients tested had abnormal PVEP. Four hemodialysis patients had elevated serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels, and 9 had normal or slightly elevated values. P300 and PVEP latencies were abnormal in both groups. These observations indicate that elevated PTH levels are not solely responsible for the abnormalities in all patients. P300 and PVEP may be valuable in evaluating neuronal dysfunction in the patient with chronic renal failure.

  16. Intravesical foreign body–induced bladder calculi resulting in obstructive renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Fadi; Clark, Aaron T.D.; Lavallée, Luke Thomas; Roberts, Matthew; Watterson, James

    2008-01-01

    We report the case of a 30-year-old man who presented with obstructive renal failure and urosepsis due to bladder outlet–obstructing bladder calculi that formed around 3 copper wires that were self-inserted into his urinary bladder 15 years previously. We present the evaluation, imaging and management of the unique complications resulting from the self-insertion of an intra-vesical foreign body. Our patient’s case was unique for 2 reasons. First, the length of time (15 yr) from foreign body insertion to presentation is the longest interval reported in the literature. Second, this is the first report of bladder calculi induced by the insertion of a foreign body that resulted in obstructive renal failure. PMID:18953457

  17. [Acute renal failure in a prisoner after hunger strike].

    PubMed

    Gorsane, Imène; Zouaghi, Karim; Goucha, Rim; El Younsi, Fethi; Hedri, Hafedh; Barbouch, Samia; Ben Abdallah, Taïeb; Ben Moussa, Fatma; Ben Maiz, Hedi; Kheder, Adel

    2007-03-01

    Acute renal failure may occur in varied circumstances. It is potentially reversible spontaneously or after specific treatment. It is rare after hunger strike and fewer cases were reported in the literature. The physiopathological mechanisms are varied and remain incompletely known. We report the case of a prisoner having presented an acute renal failure after a hunger strike wich was completely reversible. He's a 29 year old man, without a past medical facts, in July 2004 he was incarcereted in prison. In October 2004 he undertake a hunger strike during one month. In November 2004 he was hospitalized for global dehydration and shock. His physical examination showed blood pressure 60/40 mmHg, weight 59 Kg with a loss of weight about 10 Kg, diuresis 800 cc/day. His biological findings showed urea 100 mmol/l, creatinemia 679 (mo/l, natremia 179 mmol/l, kaliemia 5 mmol/l, glycemia 5.2 mmol/l, albuminemia 35 g/l, calcemia 2.35 mmol/l and biological marques of rhabdomyolysis: CPK at 11 times the normal and LDH two times the normal. His treatment consisted on rehydratation, parenteral then enteral refeeding and psychiatric talks. The evolution was favourable, re-establishment of good hydration state with a gain weight of 7 Kg, normalization of renal function, his creatininemia reached 85 (mol/l in three weeks and normalization of muscles enzymes in one month. Hunger strike continue to pose a problem because of it's frequency in penitentiary structures and its organic disorders which can lead to death. A good psychiatric cares may be undertaked in order to prevent a such bad manifestations.

  18. Renal Failure in Lithium-Treated Bipolar Disorder: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Close, Helen; Reilly, Joe; Mason, James M.; Kripalani, Mukesh; Wilson, Douglas; Main, John; Hungin, A. Pali S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Lithium users are offered routine renal monitoring but few studies have quantified the risk to renal health. The aim of this study was to assess the association between use of lithium carbonate and incidence of renal failure in patients with bipolar disorder. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study using the General Practice Research Database (GPRD) and a nested validation study of lithium exposure and renal failure. A cohort of 6360 participants aged over 18 years had a first recorded diagnosis of bipolar disorder between January 1, 1990 and December 31, 2007. Data were examined from electronic primary care records from 418 general practices across the UK. The primary outcome was the hazard ratio for renal failure in participants exposed to lithium carbonate as compared with non-users of lithium, adjusting for age, gender, co-morbidities, and poly-pharmacy. Results Ever use of lithium was associated with a hazard ratio for renal failure of 2.5 (95% confidence interval 1.6 to 4.0) adjusted for known renal risk factors. Absolute risk was age dependent, with patients of 50 years or older at particular risk of renal failure: Number Needed to Harm (NNH) was 44 (21 to 150). Conclusions Lithium is associated with an increased risk of renal failure, particularly among the older age group. The absolute risk of renal failure associated with lithium use remains small. PMID:24670976

  19. Renal failure in lithium-treated bipolar disorder: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Close, Helen; Reilly, Joe; Mason, James M; Kripalani, Mukesh; Wilson, Douglas; Main, John; Hungin, A Pali S

    2014-01-01

    Lithium users are offered routine renal monitoring but few studies have quantified the risk to renal health. The aim of this study was to assess the association between use of lithium carbonate and incidence of renal failure in patients with bipolar disorder. This was a retrospective cohort study using the General Practice Research Database (GPRD) and a nested validation study of lithium exposure and renal failure. A cohort of 6360 participants aged over 18 years had a first recorded diagnosis of bipolar disorder between January 1, 1990 and December 31, 2007. Data were examined from electronic primary care records from 418 general practices across the UK. The primary outcome was the hazard ratio for renal failure in participants exposed to lithium carbonate as compared with non-users of lithium, adjusting for age, gender, co-morbidities, and poly-pharmacy. Ever use of lithium was associated with a hazard ratio for renal failure of 2.5 (95% confidence interval 1.6 to 4.0) adjusted for known renal risk factors. Absolute risk was age dependent, with patients of 50 years or older at particular risk of renal failure: Number Needed to Harm (NNH) was 44 (21 to 150). Lithium is associated with an increased risk of renal failure, particularly among the older age group. The absolute risk of renal failure associated with lithium use remains small.

  20. Effects of tertatolol in hypertensive patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Beaufils, M; Lantz, B; Paillard, F; Richet, G

    1986-01-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is often associated with hypertension, as a cause or a consequence. We studied the changes in blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), renal function (as measured by creatinine clearance), and plasma renin activity (PRA) in 19 hypertensive patients with CRF before, during and after oral administration once a day for at least 30 days of 5 mg tertatolol, a new beta-blocker. All patients were free of any antihypertensive medication for at least 1 month before administration of tertatolol. The dose of tertatolol given in this study was the same as that commonly used in patients with normal renal function. From day 0 to day 30 of tertatolol, measurements in the supine position were as follows: systolic BP (SBP) decreased from 168.4 +/- 4.6 to 145.3 +/- 4.3 mm Hg (p less than 0.01); diastolic BP (DBP) decreased from 106.1 +/- 2.4 to 87.1 +/- 2.0 mm Hg (p less than 0.01); HR decreased from 77.9 +/- 1.6 to 63.2 +/- 1.7 b.p.m. (p less than 0.01); PRA decreased from 1.816 +/- 0.521 to 1.052 +/- 0.323 ng/ml/h (p less than 0.01). Creatinine clearance remained stable: 37.1 +/- 4.1 versus 37.1 +/- 4.7 ml/min/1.73 m2 (not significant). Similar results (for SBP, DBP, HR and PRA) were obtained in the erect position. It is concluded that tertatolol in hypertensive patients with CRF: significantly lowers BP and HR without excessive bradycardia, significantly lowers PRA, the most important decrease being observed for the highest initial PRA, does not alter renal function, and has a good clinical acceptability.

  1. [Volume assessment in the acute heart and renal failure].

    PubMed

    Vujicić, Bozidar; Ruzić, Alen; Zaputović, Luka; Racki, Sanjin

    2012-10-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important clinical issue, especially in the setting of critical care. It has been shown in multiple studies to be a key independent risk factor for mortality, even after adjustment for demographics and severity of illness. There is wide agreement that a generally applicable classification system is required for AKI which helps to standardize estimation of severity of renal disfunction and to predict outcome associated with this condition. That's how RIFLE (Risk-Injury-Failure-Loss-End-stage renal disease), and AKIN (Acute Kidney Injury Network) classifications for AKI were found in 2004 and 2007, respectively. In the clinical setting of heart failure, a positive fluid balance (often expressed in the literature as weight gain) is used by disease management programs as a marker of heart failure decompensation. Oliguria is defined as urine output less than 0,3 ml/kg/h for at least 24 h. Since any delay in treatment can lead to a dangerous progression of the AKI, early recognition of oliguria appears to be crucial. Critically ill patients with oliguric AKI are at increased risk for fluid imbalance due to widespread systemic inflammation, reduced plasma oncotic pressure and increased capillary leak. These patients are particulary at risk of fluid overload and therefore restrictive strategy of fluid administration should be used. Objective, rapid and accurate volume assessment is important in undiagnosed patients presenting with critical illness, as errors may result in interventions with fatal outcomes. The historical tools such as physical exam, and chest radiography suffer from significant limitations. As gold standard, radioisolopic measurement of volume is impractical in the acute care enviroment. Newer technologies offer the promise of both rapid and accurate bedside estimation of volume status with the potential to improve clinical outcomes. Blood assessment with bioimpendance vector analysis, and bedside ultrasound seem to be

  2. QTc interval in children with chronic renal failure and with renal transplants.

    PubMed

    Butani, Lavjay; Berg, Gerre; Makker, Sudesh P

    2002-01-01

    Prolongation of the QTc interval, a risk factor for cardiac arrhythmias, has been observed in adult hemodialysis patients; there are few data on the QTc interval in children with chronic renal failure (CRF) and following renal transplantation (Tx). The purpose of our study was to determine the QTc interval in children with CRF and post renal Tx. Twenty children with CRF and 16 children with renal Tx who were followed at the University of California, Davis, underwent prospective EKG monitoring. The mean QTc interval in the CRF and post-Tx cohorts was normal at 407.9 ms and 408.2 ms, respectively. None of the children with CRF had QTc prolongation. Two Tx recipients had QTc prolongation; both had cardiac dilatation on echocardiography (ECHO). There was no correlation between the QTc interval and the creatinine clearance in either group. However, a significant correlation was noted between QTc prolongation and cardiac dilatation on ECHO in the Tx group (P=0.02, Fisher's exact test). In conclusion, QTc prolongation is uncommon in children with CRF and following Tx, in the absence of cardiac dilatation. However, caution is still needed before prescribing medications known to cause QTc prolongation.

  3. Feline chronic renal failure: calcium homeostasis in 80 cases diagnosed between 1992 and 1995.

    PubMed

    Barber, P J; Elliott, J

    1998-03-01

    Eighty cats with chronic renal failure (CRF) were evaluated in a prospective study to investigate the prevalence and aetiopathogenesis of renal secondary hyperparathyroidism (RHPTH), using routine plasma biochemistry and assays of parathyroid hormone (PTH), blood ionised calcium and 1,25 dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25[OH]2D3). Hyperparathyroidism was a frequent sequela of CRF, affecting 84 per cent of cats with CRF, the severity and prevalence of RHPTH increasing with the degree of renal dysfunction. Compared with an age-matched control population, plasma concentrations of phosphate and PTH were significantly higher and 1,25(OH)2D3 concentrations were significantly lower in the two groups of cats presenting with clinical signs of CRF. Significant ionised hypocalcaemia was present only in cats with end-stage renal failure. However, a number of cats were hyperparathyroid in the absence of abnormalities in the parameters of calcium homeostasis measured in this study. There was a significant correlation between plasma phosphate and PTH concentrations.

  4. Secondary hyperparathyroidism shortens the action of vecuronium in patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Takita, K; Goda, Y; Kemmotsu, O; Mashio, H; Okuyama, A; Ito, Y; Sakamoto, H; Kawahigashi, H

    1995-05-01

    The authors studied the duration of action of vecuronium in 15 patients with normal renal function and 40 patients with chronic renal failure to evaluate the effect of secondary hyperparathyroidism on the action of vecuronium. The patients were divided into four groups: 15 patients with normal renal function (Group A); nine patients with chronic renal failure who did not need haemodialysis (Group B); 15 anephric patients who did not require parathyroidectomy (Group C); and 16 anephric patients who underwent parathyroidectomy because of severe secondary hyperparathyroidism (Group D). The ratio of the height of the first twitch (T1) to the baseline value before vecuronium administration was measured by an electromyogram. Baseline T1 was obtained after anaesthesia induction with thiamylal iv. The time to 10% recovery of the first twitch (REC 10) after administration of vecuronium 0.12 mg.kg-1 iv was measured in each group. Anaesthesia was maintained with isoflurane and nitrous oxide in oxygen, and supplemented with fentanyl iv. Patients in Group D showed shorter REC 10 (51 +/- 4 min) than those in Groups B (71 +/- 6 min) and C (80 +/- 10 min) (P < 0.05), but similar REC 10 to patients in Group A (37 +/- 4 min). These results suggest that the duration of action of vecuronium in anephric patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism is shorter than in those without secondary hyperparathyroidism.

  5. Renal transplant failure and disenfranchised grief: participants' experiences in the first year post-graft failure--a qualitative longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Gill, Paul; Lowes, Lesley

    2014-09-01

    Renal transplant failure has a devastating impact on patients and their families. However, little research has been conducted in this area, which limits insight and understanding of the transplant failure experience that could subsequently inform clinical practice. To explore participants' experiences of renal transplant failure in the first year post-graft failure. A qualitative, longitudinal study informed by Heideggerian hermeneutics. A purposive sample of 16 participants (8 recipients, 8 'significant others') from a regional renal transplant unit and 3 District General Hospitals in South-West England. Data were collected through a series of three recorded, semi-structured interviews in the first year post-renal transplant failure. Data analysis was informed by a three-step analytical process. Renal transplantation was the treatment of choice and had a transformative effect on the lives of all participants. Graft failure has 2 distinct phases; failing and failed and the transition from one phase to the other is unpredictable, uncertain and stressful. Transplant failure had a devastating impact on all participants, regardless of time since transplantation and resulted in feelings of shock, grief, loss, anger, guilt and depression. Dialysis was disruptive and demanding and served as a constant reminder of transplant failure and lost freedom. Participants grieved the loss of their 'previous life' and 'imagined future' but, beyond the understanding of close family members, these losses appeared unrecognised, particularly by health professionals. Participants used various coping mechanisms to deal with stressors associated with transplant failure. Factors affecting coping and adjusting included improved physical health and social support, which was especially important within the marital dyad. Healthcare services were positively evaluated, although information concerning the prospect of transplant failure and support post-graft failure could be improved. Renal

  6. A retrospective study of continuous renal replacement therapy versus intermittent hemodialysis in severe acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Ji, D; Gong, D; Xie, H; Xu, B; Liu, Y; Li, L

    2001-11-01

    To investigate the efficacy of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) versus intermittent hemodialysis (IHD) in patients with severe acute renal failure (ARF). One hundred and ninety-three severe ARF patients who received renal support between December 1978 and December 1998 were involved in this study. Of them, 101 (52.3%) were treated with CRRT (CRRT group), and 92 (47.7%) with IHD (IHD group). Sixty (59.4%) patients in the CRRT group got through the acute phase of disease and 41 (40.6%) patients did not survive while in the IHD group 59 (64.1%) patients survived and 33 (35.9%) patients did not. No significant difference in survival rate was found between the two groups. 24 of 64 patients (37.5%) in the CRRT group with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) survived, while in the IHD group, 8 out of 44 (27.3%) survived, their survival rate was much lower than that in the CRRT group. Patients in CRRT group were more severely ill, as manifested by lower mean arterial pressure, higher APACHE II score, more dysfunctioned organs and requiring mechanical ventilation and vasopressor support as compared with patients in the IHD group, CRRT was found to improve hemodynamic stability with a better fluid balance and control of biochemical status, increased nutritional intake and a shorter duration of acute renal failure (P < 0.05). CRRT perhaps may be the best choice in the treatment of severe ARF patients, for it can offer several distinct advantages compared to IHD. These may contribute to improving the survival rate of ARF patients, particularly those that are critically ill patients.

  7. A pilot evaluation of the long-term effect of combined therapy with intravenous iron sucrose and erythropoietin in elderly patients with advanced chronic heart failure and cardio-renal anemia syndrome: influence on neurohormonal activation and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Comín-Colet, Josep; Ruiz, Sonia; Cladellas, Mercè; Rizzo, Marcelo; Torres, Adriana; Bruguera, Jordi

    2009-11-01

    The prognosis in elderly patients with advanced chronic heart failure (CHF) and cardio-renal anemia syndrome (CRAS) is ominous, and treatment alternatives in this subset of patients are scarce. To assess the long-term influence of combined therapy with intravenous (IV) iron and erythropoietin (rHuEPO) on hemoglobin (Hb), natriuretic peptides (NT-proBNP), and clinical outcomes in elderly patients with advanced CHF and mild-to-moderate renal dysfunction and anemia (CRAS) who are not candidates for other treatment alternatives, 487 consecutive patients were evaluated. Of them, 65 fulfilling criteria for entering the study were divided into 2 groups and treated in an open-label, nonrandomized fashion: intervention group (27, combined anemia therapy) and control group (38, no treatment for anemia). At baseline, mean age was 74 +/- 8 years, left ventricular ejection fraction was 34.5 +/- 14.1, Hb was 10.9 +/- 0.9 g/dL, creatinine was 1.5 +/- 0.5 mg/dL, NT-proBNP was 4256 +/- 4952 pg/mL, and 100% were in persistent New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class III or IV. At follow-up (15.3 +/- 8.6 months), patients in the intervention group had higher levels of hemoglobin (13.5 +/- 1.5 vs. 11.3 +/- 1.1; P < .0001), lower levels of natural log of NT-proBNP (7.3 +/- 0.8 vs. 8.0 +/- 1.3, P = .016), better NYHA functional class (2.0 +/- 0.6 vs. 3.3 +/- 0.5; P < .001), and lower readmission rate (25.9% vs. 76.3%; P < .001). In the multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, combined therapy was associated with a reduction of the combined end point all-cause mortality or cardiovascular hospitalization (HR 95%CI 0.2 [0.1-0.6]; P < .001). Long-term combined therapy with IV iron and rHuEPO may increase Hb, reduce NT-proBNP, and improve functional capacity and cardiovascular hospitalization in elderly patients with advanced CHF and CRAS with mild to moderate renal dysfunction.

  8. Preoperative evaluation of renal artery in patients with renal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liangsong; Wu, Guangyu; Wang, Jianfeng; Huang, Jiwei; Kong, Wen; Chen, Yonghui; Xue, Wei; Huang, Yiran; Zhang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the feasibility of the noncontrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (NCE-MRA) to evaluate renal arteries before partial nephrectomy (PN). Retrospective analyzed 479 patients who underwent renal surgery between January 2013 and December 2015 with NCE-MRA or computed tomographic angiography (CTA) renal artery image reconstruction preoperative in our department. The renal artery reconstruction score (RARS) was based on the level of artery visualization in a 4-class criterion, and the R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score (R.E.N.A.L), arterial based complexity (ABC) were also analyzed. Of the 479 patients, the overall-lever RARS was 3.62, and the average in 2 groups was no significant difference (NCE-MRA vs CTA, P = 0.072). The performance of NCE-MRA in PN group was similar with CTA. Further comparison demonstrated that the efficiency of NCE-MRA in moderate- or low-degree tumor according to the R.E.N.A.L and ABC complexity less than 3S was equal to CTA. However, high degree (P < 0.001), 3S (P = 0.027), or 3H (P < 0.001) would affect the imaging of renal artery. Intragroup analysis showed that tumor complexity such as max tumor size (r = −o.351, P < 0.001), R.E.N.A.L (r = −0.439, P < 0.001), and ABC (r = −0.619, P < 0.001) were closely correlated with the NCE-MRA performance. The images of 2 sides of the kidney were compared in single person as well, which was meaningful for NCE-MRA patients only (NCE-MRA, P < 0.001; CTA, P = 0.182). The renal artery reconstruction performed by NCE-MRA is feasible and has a similar achievement in the PN potential recipients, with a lower side effect, and meets the requirements for making surgical decision. It has a broad application prospect in clinical practice; however, it still needs to further improve the ability in more complex tumors. PMID:27759632

  9. PA21, a novel phosphate binder, improves renal osteodystrophy in rats with chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Yaguchi, Atsushi; Tatemichi, Satoshi; Takeda, Hiroo; Kobayashi, Mamoru

    2017-01-01

    The effects of PA21, a novel iron-based and non-calcium-based phosphate binder, on hyperphosphatemia and its accompanying bone abnormality in chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) were evaluated. Rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure (CRF) were prepared by feeding them an adenine-containing diet for four weeks. They were also freely fed a diet that contained PA21 (0.5, 1.5, and 5%), sevelamer hydrochloride (0.6 and 2%) or lanthanum carbonate hydrate (0.6 and 2%) for four weeks. Blood biochemical parameters were measured and bone histomorphometry was performed for femurs, which were isolated after drug treatment. Serum phosphorus and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels were higher in the CRF rats. Administration of phosphate binders for four weeks decreased serum phosphorus and PTH levels in a dose-dependent manner and there were significant decreases in the AUC0–28 day of these parameters in 5% PA21, 2% sevelamer hydrochloride, and 2% lanthanum carbonate hydrate groups compared with that in the CRF control group. Moreover, osteoid volume improved significantly in 5% of the PA21 group, and fibrosis volume and cortical porosity were ameliorated in 5% PA21, 2% sevelamer hydrochloride, and 2% lanthanum carbonate hydrate groups. These results suggest that PA21 is effective against hyperphosphatemia, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and bone abnormalities in CKD-MBD as sevelamer hydrochloride and lanthanum carbonate hydrate are, and that PA21 is a new potential alternative to phosphate binders. PMID:28704404

  10. Chronic renal failure with gout: a marker of chronic lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Craswell, P.W.; Price, J.; Boyle, P.D.; Heazlewood, V.J.; Baddeley, H.; Lloyd, H.M.; Thomas, B.J.; Thomas, B.W.

    1984-09-01

    EDTA (calcium disodium edetate) lead mobilization and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) finger bone lead tests were done in 42 patients with chronic renal failure and without persisting lead intoxication. Nineteen of 23 patients with gout and 8 of 19 without gout had positive EDTA lead mobilization tests. Those patients with gout excreted significantly more excess lead chelate than those without gout. In the gout group 17 patients denied any childhood or industrial exposure to lead. They had a greater number of positive tests and excreted significantly more excess lead chelate than 14 patients with neither gout nor lead exposure. These results confirm that gout in the presence of chronic renal failure is a useful marker of chronic lead poisoning. Of 27 patients with positive lead mobilization tests, only 13 had elevated XRF finger bone lead concentrations (sensitivity 48%). Three of 15 patients with negative lead mobilization tests had elevated XRF finger bone lead concentrations (specificity 80%). Although the XRF finger bone lead test is a convenient noninvasive addition to the diagnostic evaluation of patients with chronic renal failure and gout, its application is limited due to the lack of sensitivity of the method.

  11. Growth hormone therapy in calcium-loaded rats with renal failure.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Cheryl P; He, Yu-Zhu

    2004-07-01

    GH increases linear growth in children with chronic renal failure, but the response remains suboptimal in some patients. Some of the factors that may explain the poor response to GH include high doses of calcitriol and exogenous calcium loading to prevent hyperphosphatemia. High doses of exogenous calcium adversely affect chondrocyte proliferation and delay mineralization in the growth plate of rats with renal failure; bone histomorphometric changes in these animals are comparable to adynamic bone. To evaluate GH effects on adynamic bone in renal failure, 48 weanling rats underwent sham nephrectomy (Intact-Control) or 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx). Nx animals were fed a high-calcium diet (Nx-Ca(2+)) to induce adynamic bone. After 4 wk, the Nx-Ca(2+) animals were treated with GH (Nx-Ca(2+) + GH), calcitriol (Nx-Ca(2+) + D), or a combination of GH and calcitriol (Nx-Ca(2+)GH + D) for 2 wk. Serum intact PTH and IGF-I levels did not differ among all nephrectomized groups given high calcium. GH did not increase body length or tibial length at the end of study period. In the proximal tibia, the width of the growth plate and the growth plate architecture did not improve with GH. There was a decline in histone-4 expression, IGF-I protein, IGF binding protein-3, and bone morphogenetic protein-7 staining and a mild increase in IGF-I receptor, GH receptor, and gelatinase B expression in the Nx-Ca(2+) + GH group when compared with the Intact-Control group. Calcitriol blunted some of the mitogenic effects of GH in the growth plate. Thus, there was a poor response to GH therapy in calcium-loaded animals with renal failure.

  12. Reversible dialysis-dependent renal failure due to undiagnosed renovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jha, R; Gude, D; Narayan, G; Mandal, S N; Gupta, P C

    2012-07-01

    Renovascular disease (RVD) can present with resistant hypertension, acute or rapidly progressive renal failure and occasionally nephrotic proteinuria. Revascularization plays an important role in controlling blood pressure and preserving renal function. It is widely believed that delay in revascularization would result in irreversible loss of renal function. However, we report a favorable outcome despite delayed revascularization in two patients of RVD- one presenting with recurrent flash pulmonary edema and other with progressive renal failure. The former's serum creatinine returned to normal despite 3 months of anuria and the latter became dialysis-independent despite 2 months of progressive decline in renal function. Both remain dialysis-free 3 years after surgery.

  13. Polyvinylpyrrolidone induced artefactual prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin times in intravenous drug users with renal failure.

    PubMed

    Kristoffersen, A H; Bjånes, T K; Jordal, S; Leh, S; Leh, F; Svarstad, E

    2016-05-01

    Essentials Prolonged activated partial thromboplastin times (APTT) were found in drug users with renal failure. An oral methadone solution containing polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) had been injected intravenously. Spiking normal plasma with increasing concentrations of PVP resulted in artifically prolonged APTT. APTT prolongation may indicate PVP deposits as underlying cause in patients with renal failure.

  14. Worsening renal function in heart failure: the need for a consensus definition.

    PubMed

    Sheerin, Noella J; Newton, Phillip J; Macdonald, Peter S; Leung, Dominic Y C; Sibbritt, David; Spicer, Stephen Timothy; Johnson, Kay; Krum, Henry; Davidson, Patricia M

    2014-07-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure is a common cause of hospitalisation. This is a period of vulnerability both in altered pathophysiology and also the potential for iatrogenesis due to therapeutic interventions. Renal dysfunction is often associated with heart failure and portends adverse outcomes. Identifying heart failure patients at risk of renal dysfunction is important in preventing progression to chronic kidney disease or worsening renal function, informing adjustment to medication management and potentially preventing adverse events. However, there is no working or consensus definition in international heart failure management guidelines for worsening renal function. In addition, there appears to be no concordance or adaptation of chronic kidney disease guidelines by heart failure guideline development groups for the monitoring of chronic kidney disease in heart failure. Our aim is to encourage the debate for an agreed definition given the prognostic impact of worsening renal function in heart failure. We present the case for the uptake of the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria for acute kidney injury with some minor alterations. This has the potential to inform study design and meta-analysis thereby building the knowledgebase for guideline development. Definition consensus supports data element, clinical registry and electronic algorithm innovation as instruments for quality improvement and clinical research for better patient outcomes. In addition, we recommend all community managed heart failure patients have their baseline renal function classified and routinely monitored in accordance with established renal guidelines to help identify those at increased risk for worsening renal function or progression to chronic kidney disease.

  15. Star fruit (Averrhoa carambola) intoxication: an important cause of consciousness disturbance in patients with renal failure.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chin-Tung; Chen, Yung-Chang; Fang, Ji-Tseng; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2002-05-01

    Star fruit intoxication is a rare cause of consciousness disturbance in patients with renal failure. Most cases in the literature are uremic patients on maintenance dialysis. We present a patient with chronic renal failure, who was not on dialysis program yet, suffered from star fruit intoxication with presentation of consciousness disturbance and successfully managed by a session of hemodialysis.

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of salivary creatinine, urea, and potassium levels to assess dialysis need in renal failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Bagalad, Bhavana S.; Mohankumar, K. P.; Madhushankari, G. S.; Donoghue, Mandana; Kuberappa, Puneeth Horatti

    2017-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of chronic renal failure is increasing because of increase in chronic debilitating diseases and progressing age of population. These patients experience accumulation of metabolic byproducts and electrolyte imbalance, which has harmful effects on their health. Timely hemodialysis at regular intervals is a life-saving procedure for these patients. Salivary diagnostics is increasingly used as an alternative to the traditional methods. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the diagnostic efficacy of saliva in chronic renal failure patients. Materials and Methods: This case–control study included 82 individuals, of which 41 were chronic renal failure patients and 41 were age- and sex-matched controls. Blood and saliva were collected and centrifuged. Serum and supernatant saliva were used for biochemical analysis. Serum and salivary urea, creatinine, sodium, potassium, calcium, and phosphorus were evaluated and correlated in chronic renal failure patients using unpaired t-test, Pearson's correlation coefficient, diagnostic validity tests, and receiver operative curve. Results: When compared to serum; salivary urea, creatinine, sodium, and potassium showed diagnostic accuracy of 93%, 91%, 73%, and 89%, respectively, based on the findings of study. Conclusion: It can be concluded that salivary investigation is a dependable, noninvasive, noninfectious, simple, and quick method for screening the mineral and metabolite values of high-risk patients and monitoring the renal failure patients.

  17. [Early detection, prevention and management of renal failure in liver transplantation].

    PubMed

    Castells, Lluís; Baliellas, Carme; Bilbao, Itxarone; Cantarell, Carme; Cruzado, Josep Maria; Esforzado, Núria; García-Valdecasas, Juan Carlos; Lladó, Laura; Rimola, Antoni; Serón, Daniel; Oppenheimer, Federico

    2014-10-01

    Renal failure is a frequent complication in liver transplant recipients and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. A variety of risk factors for the development of renal failure in the pre- and post-transplantation periods have been described, as well as at the time of surgery. To reduce the negative impact of renal failure in this population, an active approach is required for the identification of those patients with risk factors, the implementation of preventive strategies, and the early detection of progressive deterioration of renal function. Based on published evidence and on clinical experience, this document presents a series of recommendations on monitoring RF in LT recipients, as well as on the prevention and management of acute and chronic renal failure after LT and referral of these patients to the nephrologist. In addition, this document also provides an update of the various immunosuppressive regimens tested in this population for the prevention and control of post-transplantation deterioration of renal function.

  18. Failure of renal dopamine response to salt loading in chronic renal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Casson, I F; Lee, M R; Brownjohn, A M; Parsons, F M; Davison, A M; Will, E J; Clayden, A D

    1983-01-01

    Eight patients with chronic glomerulonephritis and five age-matched normal volunteers were given additional sodium chloride by mouth under conditions of metabolic balance. Whereas in the normal volunteers plasma renin activity was suppressed and urinary excretion of free dopamine increased, in the patients dopamine was not mobilised and plasma renin activity was not completely suppressed. Abnormal retention of sodium and water in glomerulonephritis may be due partly to a failure to mobilise dopamine in the kidney. Specific renal dopamine agonists may be natriuretic and hypotensive in chronic glomerulonephritis. PMID:6402127

  19. Evaluation of plasma concentrations of homocysteine, IL-6, TNF-alpha, hs-CRP, and total antioxidant capacity in patients with end-stage renal failure.

    PubMed

    Babaei, Mahin; Dashti, Nasrin; Lamei, Navid; Abdi, Khosrou; Nazari, Farhad; Abbasian, Sepideh; Gerayeshnejad, Siavash

    2014-01-01

    It has been proved that hyperhomocysteinemia has a high prevalence in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), which may contribute to the high cardiovascular risk in these patients. Cardiovascular disease is the first cause of high mortality rate in ESRD patients. The aim of the present study was to assess five important factors in patients with ESRD (the amount of homocysteine, IL-6, TNF-alpha, hs-CRP, and Total Antioxidant Capacity). These factors were surveyed in ESRD patients to compare with healthy subjects. In a cross-sectional study, we enrolled 80 patients on maintenance hemodialysis and measured the inflammatory and oxidative stress indicators. The plasma samples were assayed for five above mentioned variables using standard protocols. Two-hour post hemodialysis plasma samples were also assayed for TAC. Plasma levels of inflammation markers, IL-6 and hs-CRP, homocysteine were significantly increased in ESRD group versus control group. This increase was also found in TNF-α levels as compared to the controls, but the differences were not statistically significant. Also, the post dialysis samples had significantly lower levels of TAC as compared to predialysis ones.

  20. Massive Hemolysis Causing Renal Failure in Acute Hepatitis E Infection

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Pragya; Malik, Sarthak; Mallick, Bipadabhanjan; Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Surinder S

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute viral hepatitis is usually a self-limiting illness. However, it can lead to complications that can be life-threatening, such as acute liver failure. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in the setting of acute viral hepatitis can lead to a massive hemolysis, manifesting as acute kidney injury and markedly raised bilirubin levels; although cases are rare. Here, we report such a case. The patient had a viral hepatitis E infection and presented with kidney injury requiring dialysis. Examination showed very high mixed hyperbilirubinemia due to massive intravascular hemolysis. The patient experienced a long, protracted course of illness, requiring renal replacement therapy with other supportive management, which led to improvement over a period of four weeks. This case highlights the importance of recognizing associated hemolysis in a patient with viral hepatitis who presents with very high bilirubin levels or associated kidney injury. Such patients will require aggressive supportive care with prompt fluid and electrolyte management. PMID:28097104

  1. Acquired perforating dermatosis in a patient with chronic renal failure*

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Karen de Almeida Pinto; Lima, Lourenço de Azevedo; Guedes, Juliana Chaves Ruiz; Lima, Ricardo Barbosa; D'Acri, Antônio Macedo; Martins, Carlos José

    2016-01-01

    Perforating dermatoses are a group of skin diseases characterized by transepidermal elimination of dermal material. The disease is divided into two groups: the primary group and the secondary group. The classical or primary perforating dermatoses are subdivided into four types according to the eliminated dermal materials: Kyrle disease, perforating reactive collagenosis, elastosis perforans serpiginosa, and perforating folliculitis. The secondary form is known as acquired perforating dermatosis. The term was proposed in 1989 by Rapini to designate the perforating dermatoses affecting adult patients with systemic disease, regardless of the dermal materials eliminated. This report describes a case of the disease with elimination of collagen and elastic fibers in a patient with chronic renal failure. PMID:28300880

  2. Uremic frost: a harbinger of impending renal failure.

    PubMed

    Saardi, Karl M; Schwartz, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Uremic frost is a striking cutaneous finding seen in patients with severe kidney disease. Familiarity with this condition can be a life-saving signal to initiate urgent dialysis. Uremic frost generally occurs at blood urea nitrogen levels of approximately 200 mg/dl, although it may arise with less severe uremia. Recently confirmed urea transporters in the skin may play a role in the development of uremic frost. Alternatively, damage to the cutaneous microvasculature and pilosebaceous units, as seen in chronic kidney disease, could account for the high levels of urea deposited outside the skin. The treatment of uremic frost is largely aimed at correcting the underlying cause of uremia and the other life-threatening conditions associated with renal failure.

  3. Genomic damage in chronic renal failure--potential therapeutic interventions.

    PubMed

    Stopper, Helga; Schupp, Nicole; Klassen, André; Sebekova, Katarina; Heidland, August

    2005-01-01

    In end-stage renal failure, genomic damage is enhanced. This has been shown both in the predialysis and dialysis phase by various biomarkers, such as micronuclei frequency and single cell gel electrophoresis in lymphocytes as well as with 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in leukocytes. There are also data about mitochondrial DNA deletions and chromosomal abnormalities. Genomic damage may be induced by a multitude of toxic factors and mutagens, in particular via enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species. In in vitro studies, incubation of tubular cells with various AGEs (carboxymethyllysine-BSA, AGE-BSA, and methylglyoxal-BSA) and angiotensin II resulted in a marked DNA damage. Coincubation with various antioxidants as well as the angiotensin II receptor blocker, candesartan, suppressed the toxic action. Moreover, an improved uremic state by daily hemodialysis ameliorated the genomic damage in lymphocytes, as compared to patients on conventional hemodialysis.

  4. Chronic renal failure: oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction and wine.

    PubMed

    Caimi, G; Carollo, C; Lo Presti, R

    2004-11-01

    Atherosclerosis development is accelerated in chronic renal failure (CRF) and is the major cause of death in this clinical condition. An increased oxidative stress and an endothelial dysfunction, with their complex interrelationships, are relevant aspects of atherogenesis in CRF patients and might be targets for treatment. Many studies have underlined the cardiovascular protection provided by a moderate wine consumption. This beneficial effect is due to both alcohol and nonalcoholic components of wine including several phenolic molecules such as quercetin and resveratrol. Wine polyphenols have antioxidant properties and favorably influence endothelial function, in particular by stimulating nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation and inhibiting the endothelin-1 pathway. The possible advantage of a moderate wine consumption in CRF patients can be hypothesized and deserves clinical investigation.

  5. Acute renal failure and intravascular hemolysis following henna ingestion.

    PubMed

    Qurashi, Hala E A; Qumqumji, Abbas A A; Zacharia, Yasir

    2013-05-01

    The powder of henna plant (Lawsonia inermis Linn.) is extensively used as a decorative skin paint for nail coloring and as a hair dye. Most reports of henna toxicity have been attributed to adding a synthetic dye para-phenylenediamine (PPD). PPD is marketed as black henna added to natural henna to accentuate the dark color and shorten the application time. PPD toxicity is well known and extensively reported in medical literature. We report a case of a young Saudi male who presented with characteristic features of acute renal failure and intravascular hemolysis following ingestion of henna mixture. Management of PPD poisoning is only supportive and helpful only if instituted early. Diagnosis requires a high degree of clinical suspicion, as the clinical features are quite distinctive.

  6. Predicting renal graft failure using multivariate longitudinal profiles.

    PubMed

    Fieuws, Steffen; Verbeke, Geert; Maes, Bart; Vanrenterghem, Yves

    2008-07-01

    Patients who have undergone renal transplantation are monitored longitudinally at irregular time intervals over 10 years or more. This yields a set of biochemical and physiological markers containing valuable information to anticipate a failure of the graft. A general linear, generalized linear, or nonlinear mixed model is used to describe the longitudinal profile of each marker. To account for the correlation between markers, the univariate mixed models are combined into a multivariate mixed model (MMM) by specifying a joint distribution for the random effects. Due to the high number of markers, a pairwise modeling strategy, where all possible pairs of bivariate mixed models are fitted, is used to obtain parameter estimates for the MMM. These estimates are used in a Bayes rule to obtain, at each point in time, the prognosis for long-term success of the transplant. It is shown that allowing the markers to be correlated can improve this prognosis.

  7. Contemporary evaluation and management of renal trauma.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, Jyoti D; Winer, Andrew G; Johnson, Christina; Weiss, Jeffrey P; Hyacinthe, Llewellyn M

    2016-04-01

    Renal trauma occurs in approximately 1%-5% of all trauma cases. Improvements in imaging and management over the last two decades have caused a shift in the treatment of this clinical condition. A systematic search of PubMed was performed to identify relevant and contemporary articles that referred to the management and evaluation of renal trauma. Computed tomography remains a mainstay of radiological evaluation in hemodynamically stable patients. There is a growing body of literature showing that conservative, non-operative management of renal trauma is safe, even for Grade IV-V renal injuries. If surgical exploration is planned due to other injuries, a conservative approach to the kidney can often be utilized. Follow up imaging may be warranted in certain circumstances. Urinoma, delayed bleeding, and hypertension are complications that require follow up. Appropriate imaging and conservative approaches are a mainstay of current renal trauma management.

  8. [Alterations of teeth and jaws in children with chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Scheutzel, P; Ritter, W

    1989-02-01

    Dental examination of 50 children with chronic renal failure revealed enamel hypoplasia in 26 (52%), retardation of dental age in 18 (36%) and delay of dental eruption in 16 (32%) cases. In comparison to normal children the prevalence of caries was significantly lower. Half of the children showed radiologic changes in the jaw-bones already during preterminal stage of renal insufficiency. The possible role of the dentist concerning early diagnosis of renal failure is discussed.

  9. [Rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure after cocaine overdose: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Rodrigo; Salinas, Mauricio; Rossel, Víctor

    2011-04-01

    Rhabdomyolysis caused by cocaine abuse is multifactorial, involving tissue ischemia secondary to vasoconstriction and cellular damage caused by the drug. Renal failure may or may be not associated to rhabdomyolysis. We report a 41-year-old male admitted with a severe rhabdomyolysis after a cocaine overdose. In spite of a vigorous hydration and alkalization, he developed acute renal failure. Renal function recovered after several weeks of dialysis.

  10. Gastrin concentrations in plasma of cats with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, R E; Marks, S L; Kass, P H; Cowgill, L D

    1998-09-15

    To determine the prevalence of hypergastrinemia in cats with naturally developing chronic renal failure (CRF) and the correlation between gastrin concentration in plasma and severity of CRF. Cohort study. 30 cats with naturally developing CRF and 12 clinically normal control cats. Gastrin concentrations in plasma were determined by double-antibody radioimmunoassay of blood samples obtained from cats after food was withheld 8 hours. Concentrations were compared, using a nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA. 18 cats with CRF had high gastrin concentrations (median, 45 pg/ml; range, < 18 to > 1,333 pg/ml), compared with those for control cats (< 18 pg/ml). Prevalence of hypergastrinemia increased with severity of renal insufficiency. Three of 9 cats with mild CRF, 6 of 11 cats with moderate CRF, and 9 of 10 cats with severe CRF had high gastrin concentrations. Gastrin concentrations were significantly different between control cats and cats with CRF, regardless of disease severity. The potential role of high concentrations of gastrin on gastric hyperacidity, uremic gastritis, bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract, and associated clinical signs of hypergastrinemia (e.g., anorexia and vomiting) may justify use of histamine2-receptor antagonists or proton pump inhibitors to suppress gastric acid secretion in cats with CRF that have these clinical signs.

  11. Diabetes mellitus and renal failure: Prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Nasri, Hamid; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2015-11-01

    Nowadays, diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension are considered as the most common causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In this paper, other than presenting the role of DM in ESRD, glucose metabolism and the management of hyperglycemia in these patients are reviewed. Although in several large studies there was no significant relationship found between tight glycemic control and the survival of ESRD patients, it is recommended that glycemic control be considered as the main therapeutic goal in the treatment of these patients to prevent damage to other organs. Glycemic control is perfect when fasting blood sugar is less than 140 mg/dL, 1-h postprandial blood glucose is less than 200 mg/dL, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is 6-7 in patients with type 1 diabetes and 7-8 in patients with type 2 diabetes. Administration of metformin should be avoided in chronic renal failure (CRF) because of lactic acidosis, the potentially fatal complication of metformin, but glipizide and repaglinide seem to be good choices.

  12. Acute renal failure requiring dialysis--a 5 year series.

    PubMed

    Hooi, L S

    1997-09-01

    A retrospective review of 246 patients with established acute renal failure (ARF) needing dialysis from 1990-1994 is reported from Hospital Sultanah Aminah, Johor Bahru. Peritoneal dialysis was more commonly used than haemodialysis or haemofiltration. Patients on mechanical ventilation in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) who were hypercatabolic and fluid overloaded were treated with haemofiltration. Males outnumbered females by a ratio of 1.5:1. The majority were Malays (61.4%). Most patients were from the district of Johor Bahru, but 41.5% were from other districts in the Johor state. The mean age was 47.1 years (SD 18.2). The ARF was caused by acute tubular necrosis in 55.3%, post-renal obstruction in 22.8%, nephrotoxins in 5.7% and other causes in 16.2%. The proportions of patients referred from the medical, surgical and obstetric and gynaecology units were 50.8%, 45.5% and 3.7% respectively. The mortality rate was 48%. Patients with established ARF should be dialysed early as they tolerate uraemia poorly. Prevention is by prompt treatment of patients with sepsis, avoidance of hypovolaemia and nephrotoxic drugs.

  13. [Parathyroid carcinoma in a patient on hemodialysis for renal failure].

    PubMed

    Diaconescu, M R; Glod, M; Costea, I; Grigorovici, Mirela; Covic, A

    2006-01-01

    Parathyroid carcinoma is a rare endocrine neoplasm with difficult histological diagnostic and unpredictable evolution. More unusual are the cases appearing in the course of end-stage renal disease on maintenance dialysis (22 observations in medical literature). A 46-year-old man suffering of chronic glomerulonephritis and renal failure for 13 years, having been on hemodialysis for three years, complains of asthenia, adynamia, muscle weakness, progressive osteoarticular pains, itching. The preoperative iPTH was 71/ng/ml, seric Ca2+/1.23 mmol/l, seric Ca/2.6/mmoli/l, seric P/2.02 mmol/l. Clinical and ultrasonographical examinations revealed a left "thyroid nodule" of 44 x 37 mm but no images of the parathyroid. Upon surgery, three parathyroid glands (two from the right side and the superior left one) were identified and excised after the frozen section. The fourth gland was not found but the resected "nodule" together with the adjacent thyroid lobe proved a parathyroid carcinoma upon paraffin examination. The clinical course after operation was uneventful. The authors underlined the criteria and difficulties in the pathologic diagnosis of parathyroid carcinoma and also the principles of surgical treatment based on their experience of three cases.

  14. Diabetes mellitus and renal failure: Prevention and management

    PubMed Central

    Nasri, Hamid; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension are considered as the most common causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In this paper, other than presenting the role of DM in ESRD, glucose metabolism and the management of hyperglycemia in these patients are reviewed. Although in several large studies there was no significant relationship found between tight glycemic control and the survival of ESRD patients, it is recommended that glycemic control be considered as the main therapeutic goal in the treatment of these patients to prevent damage to other organs. Glycemic control is perfect when fasting blood sugar is less than 140 mg/dL, 1-h postprandial blood glucose is less than 200 mg/dL, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is 6-7 in patients with type 1 diabetes and 7-8 in patients with type 2 diabetes. Administration of metformin should be avoided in chronic renal failure (CRF) because of lactic acidosis, the potentially fatal complication of metformin, but glipizide and repaglinide seem to be good choices. PMID:26941817

  15. [Morbidity and mortality of acute renal failure in neonatal period (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Simón, J; Mendizábal, S; Zamora, I; Roques, V; Orive, B

    1979-04-01

    A retrospective study of 35 newborn with acute renal failure is presented. The main causes of renal failure were neonatal hypoxia by asfixia or hemorrhagic shock (eight), congenital malformations (two) and hypertonic dehydration (25). Mortality rate was 22% including two neonates with severe congenital malformations. Sepsis was considered as the main complicating factor and often as inducer of renal failure. It was present on 55% of cases and on 75% of the deceased newborn. Cerebral injury was frequent but a follow-up study is necessary to establish the rate of neurologic sequelae. Early diagnosis and treatment of renal failure will decrease complications with improvement in prognosis. Etiological analysis of neonatal renal failure shows the need of a better health education of people and also medical control of pregnancy and perinatal period.

  16. Complications, effects on dialysis dose, and survival of tunneled femoral dialysis catheters in acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Klouche, Kada; Amigues, Laurent; Deleuze, Sebastien; Beraud, Jean-Jacques; Canaud, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Availability of a functional vascular access is a mandatory prerequisite for extracorporeal renal replacement therapy in patients with acute renal failure. The femoral site of insertion commonly is chosen because it is an easy and convenient access. However, an array of complications may substantially alter the quality of treatment, and it appears that catheter-related morbidity and dysfunction are more frequent with the femoral than internal jugular site. This study is designed to evaluate the potential benefits of using soft silicone tunneled catheters ((ST)Caths) at the femoral site. Thirty patients with acute renal failure treated by intermittent hemodialysis (IHD) and/or continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF) were assigned to either twin (ST)Caths or twin polyurethane nontunneled femoral catheters. Time necessary for catheter insertion, catheter-related complications, and catheter lifespan were monitored. Catheter performance during IHD and the effect of catheter type on dialysis dose were evaluated. The time necessary for (ST)Cath insertion was significantly longer. The incidence of vein thrombosis and catheter-related infection was lower, and the ratio of venous return pressure to catheter blood flow was better with an (ST)Cath. Recirculation rates were similar for both types of catheters. Whether treated by using IHD or CVVHDF, patients with an (ST)Cath benefited from a greater delivered dialysis dose. Multivariate analysis confirmed that (ST)Cath use was a determinant factor to optimize dialysis dose delivery. (ST)Cath patency was significantly longer. In patients with acute renal failure, use of an (ST)Cath minimizes catheter-related morbidity and improves dialysis efficiency compared with conventional femoral catheters.

  17. Effects of acute hepatic and renal failure on pharmacokinetics of flunixin meglumine in rats.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Youn-Hwan; Yun, Hyo-In

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of hepatic and renal failure on the pharmacokinetics of flunixin in carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4))- and glycerol-treated rats. After intravenous administration of flunixin (2 mg/kg), the plasma concentration of flunixin was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Both acute hepatic and renal failure resulted in significantly increased area under the curve (AUC), prolonged elimination half-life (t(1/2β)), and reduced total body clearance (Cl(tot)) compared with respective controls (P<0.05). In conclusion, hepatic failure as well as renal failure modified the pharmacokinetics of flunixin.

  18. Homocysteine as a predictive biomarker in early diagnosis of renal failure susceptibility and prognostic diagnosis for end stages renal disease.

    PubMed

    Amin, Hatem K; El-Sayed, Mohamed-I Kotb; Leheta, Ola F

    2016-09-01

    Glomerular filtration rate and/or creatinine are not accurate methods for renal failure prediction. This study tested homocysteine (Hcy) as a predictive and prognostic marker for end stage renal disease (ESRD). In total, 176 subjects were recruited and divided into: healthy normal group (108 subjects); mild-to-moderate impaired renal function group (21 patients); severe impaired renal function group (7 patients); and chronic renal failure group (40 patients) who were on regular hemodialysis. Blood samples were collected, and serum was separated for analysis of total Hcy, creatinine, high sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP), serum albumin, and calcium. Data showed that Hcy level was significantly increased from normal-to-mild impairment then significantly decreases from mild impairment until the patient reaches severe impairment while showing significant elevation in the last stage of chronic renal disease. Creatinine level was increased in all stages of kidney impairment in comparison with control. CRP level was showing significant elevation in the last stage. A significant decrease in both albumin and calcium was occurred in all stages of renal impairment. We conclude Hcy in combination with CRP, creatinine, albumin, and calcium can be used as a prognostic marker for ESRD and an early diagnostic marker for the risk of renal failure.

  19. Prevention and treatment of renal osteodystrophy in children on chronic renal failure: European guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Watson, A.; Edefonti, A.; Fischbach, M.; Rönnholm, K.; Schaefer, F.; Simkova, E.; Stefanidis, C. J.; Strazdins, V.; Vande Walle, J.; Schröder, C.; Zurowska, A.; Ekim, M.

    2005-01-01

    Childhood renal osteodystrophy (ROD) is the consequence of disturbances of the calcium-regulating hormones vitamin D and parathyroid hormone (PTH) as well as of the somatotroph hormone axis associated with local modulation of bone and growth cartilage function. The resulting growth retardation and the potentially rapid onset of ROD in children are different from ROD in adults. The biochemical changes of ROD as well as its prevention and treatment affect calcium and phosphorus homeostasis and are directly associated with the development of cardiovascular disease in pediatric renal patients. The aims of the clinical and biochemical surveillance of pediatric patients with CRF or on dialysis are prevention of hyperphosphatemia, avoidance of hypercalcemia and keeping the calcium phosphorus product below 5 mmol2/l2. The PTH levels should be within the normal range in chronic renal failure (CRF) and up to 2–3 times the upper limit of normal levels in dialysed children. Prevention of ROD is expected to result in improved growth and less vascular calcification. PMID:16247644

  20. Minimizing bone abnormalities in children with renal failure.

    PubMed

    Ziólkowska, Helena

    2006-01-01

    Renal osteodystrophy (ROD), a metabolic bone disease accompanying chronic renal failure (CRF), is a major clinical problem in pediatric nephrology. Growing and rapidly remodeling skeletal systems are particularly susceptible to the metabolic and endocrine disturbances in CRF. The pathogenesis of ROD is complex and multifactorial. Hypocalcemia, phosphate retention, and low levels of 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D(3) related to CRF result in disturbances of bone metabolism and ROD. Delayed diagnosis and treatment of bone lesions might result in severe disability. Based on microscopic findings, renal bone disease is classified into two main categories: high- and low-turnover bone disease. High-turnover bone disease is associated with moderate and severe hyperparathyroidism. Low-turnover bone disease includes osteomalacia and adynamic bone disease. The treatment of ROD involves controlling serum calcium and phosphate levels, and preventing parathyroid gland hyperplasia and extraskeletal calcifications. Serum calcium and phosphorus levels should be kept within the normal range. The calcium-phosphorus product has to be <5 mmol(2)/L(2) (60 mg(2)/dL(2)). Parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels in children with CRF should be within the normal range, but in children with end-stage renal disease PTH levels should be two to three times the upper limit of the normal range. Drug treatment includes intestinal phosphate binding agents and active vitamin D metabolites. Phosphate binders should be administered with each meal. Calcium carbonate is the most widely used intestinal phosphate binder. In children with hypercalcemic episodes, sevelamer, a synthetic phosphate binder, should be introduced. In children with CRF, ergocalciferol (vitamin D(2)), colecalciferol (vitamin D(3)), and calcifediol (25-hydroxyvitamin D(3)) should be used as vitamin D analogs. In children undergoing dialysis, active vitamin D metabolites alfacalcidol (1alpha-hydroxy-vitamin D(3)) and calcitriol (1,25 dihydroxyvitamin

  1. Management of acute renal failure in the elderly. Treatment options.

    PubMed

    Mandal, A K; Baig, M; Koutoubi, Z

    1996-10-01

    Renal changes that occur with aging mainly consist of impairment in the ability to concentrate urine and to conserve sodium and water. These physiological changes increase the risk of volume depletion and the prerenal type of acute renal failure (ARF) in elderly people. Bladder outlet obstruction caused by benign prostatic hypertrophy is a common cause of ARF in elderly men. Another frequent cause of ARF in the elderly is drug-induced nephropathy. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and antibiotics are most often implicated in the development of ARF in the elderly. However, considering the high usage of these drugs, the incidence of drug-induced nephropathy is relatively small. NSAIDs are more likely to cause ARF in patients with congestive heart failure, chronic renal disease (including diabetic nephropathy) or chronic liver disease than in otherwise healthy individuals. NSAID-induced ARF is often of the prerenal type, but may be caused by acute interstitial nephritis (AIN). The presence of heavy proteinuria or nephrotic syndrome differentiates NSAID-induced AIN from AIN caused by other drugs. Antibiotics, especially semisynthetic penicillins, more commonly give rise to AIN associated with peripheral blood eosinophilia and eosinophiluria than NSAIDs. Ciprofloxacin is increasingly reported to cause AIN. Fever commonly accompanies AIN, especially when induced by antibiotics. Aminoglycosides produce ARF by inducing acute tubular necrosis (ATN), which results from the excessive accumulation of myeloid bodies in the tubules. In all cases of ARF it is essential to obtain a good history, to perform a through physical examination, with particular attention to skin turgor, and to measure blood pressure, pulse rate (supine and upright), urinary electrolyte and creatinine levels. Fractional excretion of sodium and the urine:plasma creatinine ratio are reliable indices that distinguish prerenal ARF from ATN. A prompt response to fluid challenge, with an increase in

  2. [Antibiotic dose adjustment in the treatment of MRSA infections in patients with acute renal failure undergoing continuous renal replacement therapies].

    PubMed

    Carcelero, Esther; Soy, Dolors

    2012-05-01

    Acute renal failure is frequent in critically ill patients. In those patients who need renal replacement therapy, continuous techniques are an alternative to intermittent haemodialysis. Critically ill patients often have an infection, which can lead to sepsis and renal failure. An early and adequate antibiotic treatment at correct dosage is extremely important. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a frequent nosocomial pathogen that causes a high rate of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Many antibiotics are easily removed by continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT) leading to a high risk of under dosing and therapeutic failure or resistance breakthrough. The objective of this review is to assess the clinical evidence on the pharmacokinetics and dosage recommendations of the main antibiotic groups used in MRSA treatment in patients treated with CRRT. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Restoration of renal function by a novel prostaglandin EP4 receptor-derived peptide in models of acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Martin; Hou, Xin; Hamel, David; Sanchez, Melanie; Quiniou, Christiane; Honoré, Jean-Claude; Roy, Olivier; Madaan, Ankush; Lubell, William; Varma, Daya R; Mancini, Joseph; Duhamel, François; Peri, Krishna G; Pichette, Vincent; Heveker, Nikolaus; Chemtob, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a serious medical complication characterized by an abrupt and sustained decline in renal function. Despite significant advances in supportive care, there is currently no effective treatment to restore renal function. PGE(2) is a lipid hormone mediator abundantly produced in the kidney, where it acts locally to regulate renal function; several studies suggest that modulating EP(4) receptor activity could improve renal function following kidney injury. An optimized peptidomimetic ligand of EP(4) receptor, THG213.29, was tested for its efficacy to improve renal function (glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and urine output) and histological changes in a model of ARF induced by either cisplatin or renal artery occlusion in Sprague-Dawley rats. THG213.29 modulated PGE(2)-binding dissociation kinetics, indicative of an allosteric binding mode. Consistently, THG213.29 antagonized EP(4)-mediated relaxation of piglet saphenous vein rings, partially inhibited EP(4)-mediated cAMP production, but did not affect Gα(i) activation or β-arrestin recruitment. In vivo, THG213.29 significantly improved renal function and histological changes in cisplatin- and renal artery occlusion-induced ARF models. THG213.29 increased mRNA expression of heme-oxygenase 1, Bcl2, and FGF-2 in renal cortex; correspondingly, in EP(4)-transfected HEK293 cells, THG213.29 augmented FGF-2 and abrogated EP(4)-dependent overexpression of inflammatory IL-6 and of apoptotic death domain-associated protein and BCL2-associated agonist of cell death. Our results demonstrate that THG213.29 represents a novel class of diuretic agent with noncompetitive allosteric modulator effects on EP(4) receptor, resulting in improved renal function and integrity following acute renal failure.

  4. Association of renal tubular damage with cardio-renal anemia syndrome in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Otaki, Yoichiro; Watanabe, Tetsu; Takahashi, Hiroki; Narumi, Taro; Kadowaki, Shinpei; Honda, Yuki; Arimoto, Takanori; Shishido, Tetsuro; Miyamoto, Takuya; Konta, Tsuneo; Kubota, Isao

    2014-05-01

    Cardio-renal anemia syndrome (CRAS) has begun to gather attention as a vicious circle since chronic heart failure (CHF), chronic kidney disease (CKD), and anemia are all able to be caused and exacerbated by each other. However, it remains unclear whether renal tubular damage (RTD), another type of kidney dysfunction, is associated with this vicious circle. The aim of the present study was to assess the association of RTD with CRAS in patients with CHF. We included 300 consecutive patients with CHF. RTD was defined as a urinary β2-microglobulin to creatinine ratio ≥ 300 μg/g. Patients with RTD had lower serum iron and higher levels of high sensitivity C-reactive protein than those without it. Multivariate logistic analysis showed that RTD was closely associated with anemia in patients with CHF, after adjustment for confounding factors. During a median period of 1,098 days, there were 86 cardiac events, including 14 cardiac deaths and 72 re-hospitalizations for worsening heart failure. Net reclassification improvement was significantly improved by addition of RTD to the model including age, New York Heart Association functional class, brain natriuretic peptide, anemia, and CKD. All patients were divided into 3 groups: CRAS+RTD group, CRAS group, and control group. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that CRAS+RTD had the greatest risk in patients with CHF. RTD was associated with normocytic anemia, accompanying iron deficiency and inflammation. RTD added prognostic information to conventional CRAS, suggesting the importance of RTD in cardio-renal anemia interaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The association between chronic renal failure and renal cell carcinoma may differ between black and white Americans

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Jonathan N; Schwartz, Kendra; Chow, Wong-Ho; Ruterbusch, Julie J; Shuch, Brian M; Karami, Sara; Rothman, Nathaniel; Wacholder, Sholom; Graubard, Barry I; Colt, Joanne S; Purdue, Mark P

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In the United States, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) incidence is higher among blacks than among whites. Risk of RCC is elevated among end-stage renal disease patients, although no studies have looked at differences by race in the relationship between chronic renal failure and RCC. Methods We investigated RCC risk in relation to chronic renal failure in a population-based case-control study of blacks and whites in Chicago and Detroit. Data, including information on kidney disease, were collected from interviews with 1,217 RCC cases (361 blacks, 856 whites) and 1,235 controls (523 blacks, 712 whites). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Results Risk of RCC was increased in relation to chronic renal failure (OR 4.7, 95% CI 2.2–10.1) and dialysis (OR 18.0, 95% CI 3.6–91). The association remained after defining exposure as those who had chronic renal failure ≥10 years prior to RCC diagnosis. Chronic renal failure was more strongly associated with RCC among blacks than among whites (OR 8.7, 95% CI 3.3–22.9 and 2.0, 0.7–5.6 respectively; Pinteraction=0.03) and among those without a history of diabetes relative to diabetic subjects (OR 8.3, 95% CI 3.1–22.7 and 1.9, 0.6–5.9 respectively; Pinteraction=0.03). Conclusions These results suggest that chronic renal failure is a strong risk factor for RCC, particularly among black and non-diabetic subjects. Our findings of differences in risk estimates by race, to our knowledge the first such report, require replication. PMID:23179659

  6. Clinical and pathological analysis of IgA nephropathy with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuyuan; Hu, Qinfeng; Shen, Ping; Tang, Li; Yuan, Gang; Zhou, Yongmei; Chai, Huaqi

    2016-10-01

    To investigative clinical and pathological characteristics of IgA nephropathy with chronic renal failure. Clinical and pathological findings from 65 cases of IgA nephropathy with chronic renal failure were reviewed. Pathological characteristics of all the cases were analyzed according to WHO definition and Oxford Classification. Evaluating the severity of pathological lesions by the Katafuchi R semiquantitative scoring system, and analyzing their relationship with clinical indexes of renal function. Of all 65 cases the male and female ratio was 1.4, and the mean age was 37 ± 13 years old. Levels of systolic pressure, mean arterial pressure (MAP), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (Scr), uric acid (UA), album (Alb), serum IgG and 24 h urinary protein were related with eGRF level (p < 0.05, respectively). The most common pathological type was proliferative sclerosis glomerulonephritis (PSGN) and M1S1E0T0 according to WHO definition and Oxford Classification, respectively, and most of the 65 cases had glomerulosclerosis. Simple IgA deposition was the most common immunopathologic type. Of all the cases, 44.6% accompanied with C3 while 4.6% with C1q. Further analysis revealed there were no relationships between severity of pathological lesion and levels of clinical indexes (Scr and eGRF) (p > 0.05). IgA nephropathy with chronic renal failure usually occurred in young adults, and it had severe clinical condition and pathological changes, while there was no significant relationship between them.

  7. Haemodialysis for post-traumatic acute renal failure - factors predicting outcome.

    PubMed

    Machemehl, Thomas; Hsu, Peter; Pahad, Hussein; Williams, Paul; Yilmaz, Tugba H; Vassiliu, Pantelis; Boffard, Kenneth D; Degiannis, Elias; Doll, Dietrich

    2013-07-29

    Post-traumatic acute renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy in an intensive care unit (ICU) is associated with high mortality. To assess indicators of improved survival. This was a retrospective cohort study of 64 consecutive trauma patients (penetrating and blunt trauma and burns) who underwent haemodialysis (HD) over a period of 5 years. Information on pre-hospital and in-hospital resuscitation, trauma scores and physiological scores and daily ICU records were collected. The majority of the patients were dialysed with continuous venovenous haemofiltration in the early years of the study and later with sustained low-efficiency dialysis. Of the 64 patients 47 died, giving an overall mortality rate of 73%. Mortality was highest in the burns patients (84%). Survival in all patients, irrespective of injury, was unrelated to the Revised Trauma Score, Injury Severity Score, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation Score or Trauma Injury Severity Score. The duration of HD did not differ significantly between the three trauma groups, and age was not a significant predictor of survival. Patients who were polyuric at the time of the initiation of HD had a lower mortality rate than those who were oliguric, anuric or normouric, although this did not reach statistical significance (p=0.09). Acute renal failure in trauma patients is associated with a low survival rate. Controversial conclusions have been presented in the literature. In this study, none of the parameters previously reported to affect survival proved to be valid, although the number of patients was comparable with those in other studies. Since understanding of the predictors and course of renal failure in trauma patients is still at an early stage, there is a need for multicentre prospective studies.

  8. Alterations in the growth plate cartilage of rats with renal failure receiving corticosteroid therapy.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Cheryl P; He, Y-Z

    2002-05-01

    Growth retardation is a complication often associated with corticosteroid therapy. Corticosteroids are frequently used in the treatment of children with chronic renal failure. To examine the effects of corticosteroids on the growth plate cartilage in renal failure, selected markers of chondrocyte function and phenotype were evaluated in the proximal tibia of subtotally nephrectomized rats treated with corticosteroid. Serum parathyroid hormone (PTH), urea nitrogen, and creatinine levels were higher in the nephrectomized animals. Weight gain was less in the corticosteroid-treated animals; however, linear growth and tibial length did not differ among the groups after 10 days of corticosteroid therapy. The total width of the growth plate and the width of the proliferative zone were much smaller in corticosteroid-treated nephrectomized (Nx-MP) animals. Type II collagen mRNA expression was lower in animals treated with corticosteroids, and proliferating-cell nuclear antigen staining, histone-4, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)-receptor mRNA expression were further decreased in the Nx-MP group. There was an increase in TUNEL-positive cells in the corticosteroid-treated rats with normal renal function (intact-MP), associated with an increase in Bax and a decrease in Bcl-2 protein expression. In the Nx-MP group, both Bax and Bcl-2 protein staining was much less frequent, and TUNEL-positive cells were lower in number compared with the intact-MP group. Vascular endothelial growth factor expression in the hypertrophic chondrocytes was lower in corticosteroid-treated animals. There was less gelatinase B/matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression in the Nx-MP group, which was not associated with a decrease in tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining in the chondro-osseous junction. Inhibition of chondrocyte proliferation, diminishing of apoptosis, and lower angiogenic activity may contribute to the alterations in growth plate architecture and the significant

  9. Chemoradiation with gemcitabine for cervical cancer in patients with renal failure.

    PubMed

    Cetina, Lucely; Rivera, Lesbia; Candelaria, Myrna; de la Garza, Jaime; Dueñas-González, Alfonso

    2004-09-01

    The prognosis of cervical cancer patients with renal failure secondary to obstructive uropathy is poor. Our objective was to analyze our experience in the management with chemoradiation of untreated cervical cancer patients complicated by obstructive nephropathy and kidney dysfunction. Untreated patients with cervical cancer and renal failure as manifested by raised serum creatinine were treated with pelvic radiotherapy concurrently with weekly gemcitabine at 300 mg/m2. Response, toxicity and renal function pre- and post-therapy were evaluated. Eight FIGO stage IIIB and one IVB patients were treated. Pre-treatment serum creatinine ranged from 1.6 to 18.5 mg/100 ml (median 3.3, mean 6.8) and creatinine clearance varied from 4 to 57 mg/ml/min (median 17, mean 22.1). Four patients had a percutaneous nephrostomy placed and four patients had symptoms from kidney failure. All patient completed chemoradiation. Most patients had grade 3 leukopenia and neutropenia. Dermatitis, colitis and proctitis were common. All patients had improvement in creatinine clearance (pre-therapy 22.78, post-therapy 54.3 mg/ml/min) (p=0.0058) and all but one normalized serum creatinine. Eight (89%) of nine patients achieved complete response and one patient had persistence. At a median follow-up of 11 months (range 6-14), all patients are alive, one with pelvic and another with systemic disease. Ureteral obstruction causing any degree of renal insufficiency should not be a contraindication to receive chemoradiation to attempt cure. In this setting where cisplatin-based therapy is contraindicated, the use of gemcitabine may be considered.

  10. Does the standard vs piggyback surgical technique affect the development of early acute renal failure after orthotopic liver transplantation?

    PubMed

    Cabezuelo, J B; Ramirez, P; Acosta, F; Torres, D; Sansano, T; Pons, J A; Bru, M; Montoya, M; Rios, A; Sánchez Bueno, F; Robles, R; Parrilla, P

    2003-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the surgical technique on postoperative renal function during the first week after liver transplantation (OLT). We performed a retrospective study of 184 consecutive OLT. Criteria for acute renal failure were: serum creatinine >1.5 mg/dL, an increase by 50% in the baseline serum creatinine, or oliguria requiring renal replacement therapy. The distribution of patients according to the surgical technique was: standard (n=84), venovenous bypass (n=20), and piggyback (n=80). Other variables analyzed were: intraoperative requirement for blood products, treatment with adrenergic agonists, intraoperative complications, and postreperfusion syndrome. Univariate analysis showed the following parameters to be significantly related to postoperative renal failure: intraoperative fresh frozen plasma and cryoprecipitate requirements, intraoperative complications, postreperfusion syndrome, need for noradrenaline or dobutamine, standard surgical technique versus piggyback (39% vs 18%, P<.01) and venovenous vs piggyback (50% vs 18%, P<.01). Logistic regression analysis identified the following variables as having independent prognostic value: (1) Standard surgical technique vs piggyback (OR=3.3, P=.01); (2) venovenous vs piggyback (OR=4.7, P=.02); and (3) >20 U cryoprecipitate requirement (OR=1.04, P=.01). In conclusion, compared with the piggyback technique, the standard surgical technique appears to be an independent risk factor for postoperative acute renal failure. When venovenous bypass is used in patients who do not tolerate trial clamping of inferior vena cava, it does not reduce the incidence of postoperative renal failure. Finally, the piggyback technique significantly reduces the probability of acute renal failure after liver transplantation.

  11. Parenteral nutrition in patients with renal failure - Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 17.

    PubMed

    Druml, W; Kierdorf, H P

    2009-11-18

    Partial EN (enteral nutrition) should always be aimed for in patients with renal failure that require nutritional support. Nevertheless PN (parenteral nutrition) may be necessary in renal failure in patient groups with acute or chronic renal failure (ARF or CRF) and additional acute diseases but without extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, or in patients with ARF or CRF with additional acute diseases on extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, haemodialysis therapy (HD), peritoneal dialysis (PD) or continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), or in patients on HD therapy with intradialytic PN. Patients with renal failure who show marked metabolic derangements and changes in nutritional requirements require the use of specifically adapted nutrient solutions. The substrate requirements of acutely ill, non-hypercatabolic patients with CRF correspond to those of patients with ARF who are not receiving any renal replacement patients therapy (utilisation of the administered nutrients has to be monitored carefully). In ARF patients and acutely ill CRF patients on renal replacement therapy, substrate requirements depend on disease severity, type and extent/frequency of extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, nutritional status, underlying disease and complications occurring during the course of the disease. Patients under HD have a higher risk of developing malnutrition. Intradialytic PN (IDPN) should be used if causes of malnutrition cannot be eliminated and other interventions fail. IDPN should only be carried out when modifiable causes of malnutrition are excluded and enhanced oral (like i.e. additional energy drinks) or enteral supply is unsuccessful or cannot be carried out.

  12. Parenteral nutrition in patients with renal failure – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 17

    PubMed Central

    Druml, W.; Kierdorf, H. P.

    2009-01-01

    Partial EN (enteral nutrition) should always be aimed for in patients with renal failure that require nutritional support. Nevertheless PN (parenteral nutrition) may be necessary in renal failure in patient groups with acute or chronic renal failure (ARF or CRF) and additional acute diseases but without extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, or in patients with ARF or CRF with additional acute diseases on extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, haemodialysis therapy (HD), peritoneal dialysis (PD) or continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), or in patients on HD therapy with intradialytic PN. Patients with renal failure who show marked metabolic derangements and changes in nutritional requirements require the use of specifically adapted nutrient solutions. The substrate requirements of acutely ill, non-hypercatabolic patients with CRF correspond to those of patients with ARF who are not receiving any renal replacement patients therapy (utilisation of the administered nutrients has to be monitored carefully). In ARF patients and acutely ill CRF patients on renal replacement therapy, substrate requirements depend on disease severity, type and extent/frequency of extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, nutritional status, underlying disease and complications occurring during the course of the disease. Patients under HD have a higher risk of developing malnutrition. Intradialytic PN (IDPN) should be used if causes of malnutrition cannot be eliminated and other interventions fail. IDPN should only be carried out when modifiable causes of malnutrition are excluded and enhanced oral (like i.e. additional energy drinks) or enteral supply is unsuccessful or cannot be carried out. PMID:20049069

  13. Which diet for which renal failure: making sense of the options.

    PubMed

    Beto, J A

    1995-08-01

    This review describes categories of renal function (normal, renal insufficiency, end-stage renal failure), types of treatment modalities (renal insufficiency management, dialysis, transplantation), and corresponding dietary parameters (protein, energy, fiber, sodium, fluid, potassium, phosphorus, calcium, vitamins, minerals). The focus is directed toward general and nonrenal specialty practitioners, who are encountering a growing number of geriatric patients and patients who have undergone renal transplantation or are in early renal failure. The findings indicate that early intervention may delay or prevent rapid progression of renal disease in some patients, that treatment modalities continue to need individualized dietary support to maintain nutritional status, and that transplant goals should include control of obesity and hyperlipidemia to reduce cardiovascular mortality.

  14. [Dialytic therapy in severely burnt patients with acute renal failure].

    PubMed

    Triolo, G; Mariano, F; Stella, M; Salomone, M; Magliacani, G

    2002-01-01

    Appearance of acute renal failure (ARF) in severely burnt patients (GU) is a serious complication. It has a negative prognostic value and almost always develops in the context of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) induced by sepsis. Over the last 20 years, according to data available, the mortality rate has been reported to reach about 75%. We have analyzed the initial results obtained in GU patients who were admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of the Burns Center in Turin. Out of 105 GU patients admitted between July 1999 and September 2000 (burned surface area (BSA) 23.8%, range 2-95%, mortality rate 13.7%), 7 patients (6.4%) had complications of ARF requiring extracorporeal dialytic therapy (38 HF sessions lasting 4-6 hours, 2 HF + 12 HDF + 1 UF sessions lasting 8-11 hours). Total BSA of 7 GU patients with ARF was 62.5+/-11.3% (mean +/-SEM). Mortality rate was 71.4% which was due to septic shock and MODS. ARF onset was at 28.4+/-8.4 days from admission. Dialytic treatment started at Crs 2.3+/-0.42 mg/dl, and patients were treated for 7.6+/-3.5 days with a weight loss of 1859+/-161 gr/die. Circuit anticoagulation was obtained by minimal amount of heparin (132.2+/-26.5 U/hour) and no hemorrhagic complications were observed. In GU patients with ARF the dialytic treatment with daily long-lasting convective- diffusive techniques permitted us to achieve a survival and dialytic adequacy similar to those reported with continuous renal replacement therapies; however, mortality rate is high and related to septic shock and MODS.

  15. Anaemia and congestive heart failure early post-renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Borrows, Richard; Loucaidou, Marina; Chusney, Gary; Borrows, Sarah; Tromp, Jen Van; Cairns, Tom; Griffith, Megan; Hakim, Nadey; McLean, Adam; Palmer, Andrew; Papalois, Vassilios; Taube, David

    2008-05-01

    Anaemia is common following renal transplantation and is associated with the development of congestive heart failure (CHF). However the prevalence of anaemia in the first year following transplantation and the association between anaemia occurring early and the development of CHF have been understudied. In this study, 132 incident patients undergoing tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil-based renal transplantation were studied for the prevalence of, and risk factors for, anaemia and CHF in the early period post transplantation. Anaemia occurred in 94.5% and 53.1% of patients at 1 week and 12 months, respectively, and was associated with allograft dysfunction, hypoalbuminaemia, higher mycophenolic acid (MPA) levels, bacterial infection and hypoalbuminaemia. The association with hypoalbuminaemia may reflect the presence of chronic inflammation post-transplantation. Of patients displaying haemoglobin <11 g/dl, 41.1% and 29.4% were treated with erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs) at 1 and 12 months respectively. CHF developed in 26 patients beyond 1 month post-transplantation, with echocardiographic left ventricular systolic function preserved in all but one. CHF was associated with anaemia and lower haemoglobin, allograft dysfunction, duration of dialysis and left ventricular hypertrophy on echocardiography prior to transplantation, suggesting the aetiology of CHF may involve the interplay of diastolic cardiac dysfunction, pre-load mismatch and after-load mismatch. Modification of risk factors may improve anaemia management post transplantation. Reducing the prevalence of anaemia may in turn reduce the incidence of CHF-these observations support the need for clinical trials to determine how anaemia management may impact CHF incidence.

  16. Pharmacokinetic profile of the induction dose of propofol in chronic renal failure patients undergoing renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    de Gasperi, A; Mazza, E; Noè, L; Corti, A; Cristalli, A; Prosperi, M; Sabbadini, D; Savi, M C; Vai, S

    1996-01-01

    To define the pharmacokinetic profile of the induction dose of propofol in chronic renal failure patients. Determination of propofol blood concentrations after the bolus dose of 2 mg.kg-1 bw injected in 30 seconds in a peripheral vein in a group of chronic renal failure (CRF) patients and in a group of normal patients (controls). 10 CRF patients (7 males, 3 females, mean age 47 +/- 8 years old, mean body weight 66 +/- 8 kg) candidates to cadaveric renal transplantation and free from major hepatic diseases (study group); 8 ASA I patients (5 males, 3 females), without major cardiorespiratory, hepatic, renal, hematologic or metabolic diseases undergoing minor elective surgical procedures lasting from 50 to 90 minutes (control group). a) propofol blood concentrations by means of HPLC; b) derived pharmacokinetic parameters (calculated by means of Siphar, version 4.0, Societé de informatique médicale, Simed, Paris, 1991); c) cardiovascular parameters (heart rate, central venous pressure, invasive arterial pressure). The decay of propofol whole blood concentrations, distribution, redistribution and elimination half lives were similar in CRF and in control patients. On the contrary, significantly different in CRF patients were propofol blood concentrations from two to ten minutes following the induction dose (lower), the area under concentration- time curve (AUC) (smaller), the mean resident time (longer), the total body clearance (greater), the volumes of distribution at steady state and during the elimination phase (larger). The larger volumes of distribution are closely correlated with the significantly lower albumin concentrations in the uremic patients. An accelerated hepatic biotransformation is one of the possible explanations for the greater total body clearance of propofol in the uraemic patients: in fact an increased glucuronyltrasferase activity and glucuronoconjugation induced by phenols has been demonstrated in uraemia. On the other hand, large volumes of

  17. Ultrasonographic imaging for structural characterization of renal affections and diagnosis of associated chronic renal failure in 10 dogs.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay; Kumar, Adarsh; Varshney, A C

    2011-01-01

    The present study comprises of 10 dogs of either sex with primary indication of azotaemia. All the dogs were subjected to detailed clinical, haematobiochemical, urinalysis, and microbiological examination along with radiographical and ultrasonographical examination. Based on the ultrasonographic structural abnormalities, the different renal affections associated with CRF in majority of dogs were diagnosed. The different affections included "end-stage" kidneys (n = 4), hydronephrosis (n = 1), renomegaly (n = 1), nephritis (n = 1), nephrolithiasis (n = 1), nephrocalcinosis (n = 1), and renal cyst (n = 1). The significant ultrasonographic features in these affections included small kidneys with loss of corticomedullary demarcation ("end-stage" kidneys); increased cortical echogenicity (nephritis); dilation of the renal pelvis, separation of the central renal sinus with anechoic space, atrophy of renal medulla, (hydronephrosis); enlarged kidneys with increased overall echogenicity of renal cortex (renomegaly and associated nephritis); hyperechoic-mineralized structure with shadowing (nephrolithiasis); diffuse, small, multiple hyperechoic structures in the renal parenchyma with distal acoustic shadowing (nephrocalcinosis); small spherical intercortical anechoic structures fluid (renal cysts). In the present study, ultrasound proved to be a quick, convenient, and sensitive modality in detecting alterations in renal size and parenchymal architecture. All the dogs so diagnosed with CRF were rendered conservative medical treatment to control clinical signs of uraemia; maintain adequate fluid, electrolyte, and acid/base balance; provide adequate nutrition; minimize progression of renal failure.

  18. Functional renal failure (FRF) in cirrhosis of the liver and liver carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vesin, P.; Traverso, H.

    1975-01-01

    The term ‘functional renal failure’ has been used to describe the renal failure developing in advanced cirrhosis in which tubular function and structure remain intact. It may develop spontaneously, in which case prognosis is poor, but may be secondary to gastro-intestinal haemorrhage or excessive use of diuretics, in which case correction of the precipitating factor leads to improvement in renal function. It is suggested that the renal failure is due to a reduction in effective circulating plasma volume. PMID:1234327

  19. Parathyroid hormone and growth in children with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Waller, Simon C; Ridout, Deborah; Cantor, Tom; Rees, Lesley

    2005-06-01

    In pediatric chronic renal failure (CRF) optimal parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations that minimize renal osteodystrophy and maximize growth are unknown. The search for optimum concentrations has been complicated as currently used "intact" PTH (iPTH) assays cross-react with long carboxyl-terminal PTH fragments (C-PTH), which antagonize the biologic actions of 1-84 PTH. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between PTH, the 1-84 PTH:C-PTH ratio and growth rate in children with CRF. A total of 162 patients, median (range) age 9.9 years (0.3 to 17.1 years), were recruited: 136 with a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)[96 managed conservatively (CRF group) and 40 transplanted patients], and 26 dialysis patients. Over a median (range) period of 1.1 years (0.5 to 1.7 years), children attended five (three to 15) clinics at which iPTH, cyclase-activating PTH (CAP-PTH), and height were measured. Mean PTH concentrations were within the normal range for both assays for the CRF group and up to twice the upper limit of normal for the dialysis group; CAP-PTH 24.8 pg/mL and 59.9 pg/mL (normal range 5 to 39 pg/mL), iPTH 37.1 pg/mL, and 102.6 pg/mL, respectively (normal range 14 to 66 pg/mL). The patients grew normally (change in height standard deviation score per year (DeltaHtSDS) =-0.01). There was no relationship between PTH concentrations and DeltaHtSDS in any patient group. The 1-84 PTH:C-PTH ratio was lower in dialyzed patients (P= 0.003), with worsening renal function (P= 0.047) and with PTH concentrations outside the normal range (P= 0.01). There was a weak correlation between the 1-84 PTH:C-PTH ratio and the DeltaHtSDS (r= 0.2, P= 0.01). Normal range PTH concentrations are appropriate, allowing normal growth in children with CRF managed conservatively. C-PTH may be of clinical significance.

  20. Analysis of Phase 3 telavancin nosocomial pneumonia data excluding patients with severe renal impairment and acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Torres, A.; Rubinstein, E.; Corey, G. R.; Stryjewski, M. E.; Barriere, S. L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Telavancin is approved in Europe for the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus when other alternatives are not suitable. The approved European prescribing information contraindicates the use of telavancin in patients with severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance <30 mL/min, including patients on haemodialysis) and pre-existing acute renal failure owing to the higher observed mortality in these patients. Data from the ATTAIN studies were reanalysed, excluding patients with these contraindicating conditions at baseline. (At the time of submission of this article, the European marketing authorization of telavancin for the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia was suspended pending evidence of a new European Medicines Agency-approved supplier. Clinigen Healthcare Ltd, Theravance's commercialization partner for telavancin in Europe, is in the process of seeking approval of a new manufacturing source.) Methods A post hoc analysis of data from two Phase 3 ATTAIN trials of telavancin for the treatment of Gram-positive nosocomial pneumonia assessing clinical outcomes and safety. Results The all-treated population for this analysis represented 84.2% (1266/1503) of the ATTAIN all-treated population. The cure rates in the clinically evaluable population were similar in the telavancin (82.5%, 231/280) and vancomycin (81.3%, 243/299) groups [treatment difference (95% CI): 1.3% (−5.0% to 7.6%)], and were consistent with the overall ATTAIN study results. The cure rate was higher in the telavancin than the vancomycin treatment group in microbiologically evaluable patients with only Gram-positive pathogens isolated at baseline [85.0% (130/153) versus 75.2% (109/145), respectively; treatment difference (95% CI): 9.7% (0.6%–18.8%)]. The incidences of adverse events were similar between treatment groups and consistent with the overall findings of the ATTAIN study. Conclusions This analysis demonstrated that in the subset

  1. [Levosimendan as a treatment for acute renal failure associated with cardiogenic shock after hip fracture].

    PubMed

    Hinojosa, Fabiola Quinteros; Revelo, Margarita; Salazar, Alexander; Maggi, Genaro; Schiraldi, Renato; Brogly, Nicolas; Gilsanz, Fernando

    Inotropic drugs are part of the treatment of heart failure; however, inotropic treatment has been largely debated due to the increased incidence of adverse effects and increased mortality. Recently levosimendan, an inotropic positive agent, has been proved to be effective in acute heart failure, reducing the mortality and improving cardiac and renal performance. We report the case of a 75-year-old woman with history of heart and renal failure and hip fracture. Levosimendan was used in preoperative preparation as an adjuvant therapy, to improve cardiac and renal function and to allow surgery. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Levosimendan as a treatment for acute renal failure associated with cardiogenic shock after hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Hinojosa, Fabiola Quinteros; Revelo, Margarita; Salazar, Alexander; Maggi, Genaro; Schiraldi, Renato; Brogly, Nicolas; Gilsanz, Fernando

    Inotropic drugs are part of the treatment of heart failure; however, inotropic treatment has been largely debated due to the increased incidence of adverse effects and increased mortality. Recently levosimendan, an inotropic positive agent, has been proved to be effective in acute heart failure, reducing the mortality and improving cardiac and renal performance. We report the case of a 75-year-old woman with history of heart and renal failure and hip fracture. Levosimendan was used in preoperative preparation as an adjuvant therapy, to improve cardiac and renal function and to allow surgery. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Observations of vitamin A toxicity in three patients with renal failure receiving parenteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Gleghorn, E E; Eisenberg, L D; Hack, S; Parton, P; Merritt, R J

    1986-07-01

    Elevated serum retinol concentrations have been previously reported in patients with renal failure, although overt clinical toxicity has been described only rarely. We present three patients with renal failure receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) who developed biochemical and clinical findings of hypervitaminosis A. Improvement followed deletion of vitamin A from the TPN. These cases demonstrate that patients with renal failure may be at risk for symptomatic vitamin A toxicity if given TPN with standard retinol supplementation. Such patients should be carefully observed clinically and biochemically if supplementation is given.

  4. Acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure in Plasmodium vivax malaria infection, a rare complication

    PubMed Central

    Lakhotia, Manoj; Pahadiya, Hans Raj; Kumar, Harish; Singh, Jagdish; Sangappa, Jainapur Ravi; Choudhary, Prakash Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old male presented with 6 days history of intermittent fever with chills, 2 days history of upper abdomen pain, distension of abdomen, and decreased urine output. He was diagnosed to have Plasmodium vivax malaria, acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure. These constellations of complications in P. vivax infection have never been reported in the past. The patient responded to intravenous chloroquine and supportive treatment. For renal failure, he required hemodialysis. Acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure form an unusual combination in P. vivax infection. PMID:26629455

  5. Advanced Renal Failure in Patients with Sickle Cell Anemia: Clinical Course and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Iluminado A.; Hosten, Adrian O.; Dillard, Martin G.; Castro, Oswaldo L.

    1982-01-01

    Advanced renal failure occurred in nine adult sickle cell disease patients. There were six men and three women with a mean age of 38.6 years. Eight patients had homozygous SS disease, one had sickle cell thalassemia. Three patients had acute renal failure from which they partially recovered. Six developed endstage kidney disease requiring dialysis. Two of these received a kidney transplant, and there was one death in the immediate postoperative period. Angina pectoris, hyperkalemia, and severe anemia complicated chronic dialysis, suggesting that early transplantation should be considered for sickle cell anemia patients with renal failure. PMID:6757451

  6. US and MRI in renal obstruction evaluation.

    PubMed

    Budau, Marina; Onu, Mihaela; Jinga, Viorel; Braticevici, Bogdan; Pop, Tiberiu

    2002-06-01

    To explore the renal obstruction using MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) for anatomical evaluation and Doppler US (Ultra Sound) for functional evaluation. Thirty-two patients with renal obstruction were investigated. The presence of renal obstruction was subsequently established by excretory urography or surgery. US studies were performed using a B&K Medical ultrasound system Panther 2002 equipped with 3 Mhz transducer. MR urography was done with a magnetic resonance imaging system 0.28T, Tomikon R28-Bruker, Germany. All 30 patients presented increased renal vascular resistance as determined by US evaluation (Resistive Index = 0.74 +/- 0.02). The MR urography proved dilated urinary collecting system in only 20 patients of the group. Doppler US has a very good sensitivity in detecting the renal obstruction before the dilatation of the collecting system be installed. Used together these methods (US and MR urography) are important for proving anatomical as well as functional changes in renal obstruction. Both methods could be useful mainly in patients with known intolerance to contrast media.

  7. The impact of sex hormone changes on bone mineral deficit in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Doumouchtsis, Konstantinos K; Perrea, Despoina N; Doumouchtsis, Stergios K

    2009-01-01

    In chronic renal failure several factors affect bone homeostasis leading to the development of renal osteodystrophy. Common calcitropic hormone derangements in renal failure play a central role in bone structure and mineral defects, which in turn accompany osteodystrophy frequently resulting in low bone mineral density (BMD) values. However, patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) suffer from several comorbidities, which may partly account for renal bone disease lesions. Hypogonadism in particular accompanies chronic renal failure frequently and exerts an additive effect on bone loss potential. Sex hormones contribute to the equilibrium of osteotropic hormones and cytokines, exerting a protective action on bone tissue. Estrogens have a regulatory effect on bone metabolism in women with renal failure as well. Hypogonadal ESRD women experience a higher bone turnover and more significant bone mass decrements than ESRD women with relatively normal hormone profile and menstrual habits. Female hemodialysis patients have lower BMD values than male patients on average, probably because of menstrual cycle irregularities. However, hypogonadal ESRD men may also experience bone mineral deficits and the severity of hypogonadism may correlate to their bone mineral status. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) appears to reverse bone mineral loss to some extent in both sexes. In conclusion hypogonadism in renal failure contributes to the bone structure and mineral defects as well as the low-energy fracture risk, reflected in BMD measurements. HRT in ESRD patients should therefore not be overlooked in these patients in the face of their significant comorbidities.

  8. Present status and perspective of the development of a bioartificial kidney for chronic renal failure patients.

    PubMed

    Saito, Akira; Aung, Tun; Sekiguchi, Koji; Sato, Yoshinobu

    2006-08-01

    A bioartificial tubule device was applied for the treatment of 10 acute renal failure and multiple organ failure patients by Humes et al. A bioartificial kidney for chronic renal failure patients, however, has never been applied. In order to develop a bioartificial kidney for preventing and treating long-term complications of maintenance dialysis patients, we have to overcome difficulties such as antithrombogenic issue of hemofilters and development of long functioning tubule devices in the context of economical and easy treatment. Continuous hemofilters should modify with an antithrombogenic material on the inner surfaces of membranes to get more hemocompatible characteristics. We are developing an antithrombogenic continuous hemofilter coating with methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer which will mimic phospholipid layers of human cell membrane on the inner surface of a hemofilter. The transportability of H2O, Na+, and glucose of bioartificial tubule devices using polysulfone hollow fiber modules and porcine proximal tubular epithelial cells LLC-PK1 were evaluated using two kinds of circuits of different medium inside and outside of the cell-attached hollow fiber membrane. Transport of H2O, Na+, and glucose were significantly increased when 2.5 g/dL of albumin was added, and plateaued on the eight day and then decreased thereafter until the 13th day. Transfection of a specific gene into human tubular epithelial cells might be required to keep contact inhibition in order to maintain a confluent monolayer for longer duration.

  9. The effects of new polyherbal Unani formulation AJMAL06 on serum creatinine level in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Muhammad Shakil Ahmad; Saeed, Aftab; Nawaz, Allah; Naveed, Safila; Usmanghani, Khan

    2016-03-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of Unani Ajmal06, an herbal formulation for management of chronic renal failure (CRF). The therapeutic evaluations of three different formulations such as Itrifal Kashneezi, Jawarsih Zarooni Sada medicines were conducted on number 35 CRF patients clinically diagnosed cases of chronic kidney failure. It was found that herbal coded Ajmal06 was effective for the treatment of CRF in 70% of the patients treated. SPSS tests on sign and symptoms indicated the efficacy of Ajmal06 in lowering serum creatinine level in 70% of patients of chronic renal failure. In clinical response of BUN exhibited 75% of patients improved where as in case of fatigue (70%), edema (90%), leg pain (76%) improved these types of conditions with significant p value.

  10. Urinary potassium excretion, renal ammoniagenesis, and risk of graft failure and mortality in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Eisenga, Michele F; Kieneker, Lyanne M; Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S; van den Berg, Else; Deetman, Petronella E; Navis, Gerjan J; Gans, Reinold Ob; Gaillard, Carlo Ajm; Bakker, Stephan Jl; Joosten, Michel M

    2016-12-01

    Renal transplant recipients (RTRs) have commonly been urged to limit their potassium intake during renal insufficiency and may adhere to this principle after transplantation. Importantly, in experimental animal models, low dietary potassium intake induces kidney injury through stimulation of ammoniagenesis. In humans, low potassium intake is an established risk factor for high blood pressure. We hypothesized that low 24-h urinary potassium excretion [UKV; urinary potassium concentration × volume], the gold standard for assessment of dietary potassium intake, represents a risk factor for graft failure and mortality in RTRs. In secondary analyses, we aimed to investigate whether these associations could be explained by ammoniagenesis, plasma potassium, or blood pressure. In a prospective cohort of 705 RTRs, we assessed dietary potassium intake by a single 24-h UKV and food-frequency questionnaires. Cox regression analyses were used to investigate prospective associations with outcome. We included 705 stable RTRs (mean ± SD age: 53 ± 13 y; 57% men) at 5.4 y (IQR: 1.9-12.0 y) after transplantation and 253 kidney donors. Mean ± SD UKV was 73 ± 24 mmol/24 h in RTRs compared with 85 ± 25 mmol/24 h in kidney donors. During follow-up for 3.1 y (IQR: 2.7-3.9 y), 45 RTRs developed graft failure and 83 died. RTRs in the lowest sex-specific tertile of UKV (women, <55 mmol/24 h; men, <65 mmol/24 h) had an increased risk of graft failure (HR: 3.70; 95% CI: 1.64, 8.34) and risk of mortality (HR; 2.66; 95% CI: 1.53, 4.61), independent of potential confounders. In causal path analyses, 24-h urinary ammonia excretion, plasma potassium, and blood pressure did not affect these associations. Our results indicate that low UKV is associated with a higher risk of graft failure and mortality in RTRs. Specific attention for adequate potassium intake after transplantation seems warranted. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02811835. © 2016 American Society for

  11. Vesicoureteral Reflux Detected with 99mTc-DTPA Renal Scintigraphy during Evaluation of Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Manevska, Nevena; Stojanoski, Sinisa; Majstorov, Venjamin; Pop-Gjorcheva, Daniela; Zdraveska, Nikolina; Kuzmanovska, Dafina

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Radionuclide techniques, as direct radionuclide cystography and 99mTc-DMSA scintigraphy, have been used in evaluation of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and reflux nephropathy (RN) in children. Dynamic 99mTc-DTPA scintigraphy is reserved for evaluation of differential renal function and obstruction in children, where hydronephrosis is detected by ultrasonography (US) pre- or postnatally. CASE REPORT: Six year old boy was prenatally diagnosed with bilateral hydronephrosis. Postnatal, severe bilateral VUR was detected by voiding urethrocytography. US and 99mTc-DTPA scintigraphy performed in the first month of life showed small left kidney that participated with 2% in the global renal function. Bilateral cutaneous ureterostomy has been performed in order to obtain good renal drainage and promote optimal renal growth. Twelve months later, classic antireflux procedure was done. Control 99mTc-DTPA scintigraphy, 5 ys after antireflux surgery, revealed persisting radioactivity during the diuretic phase, in the left kidney that indicated antireflux procedure failure with VUR reappearance. CONCLUSION: 99mTc-DTPA scintigraphy is the first method of choice for long-term monitoring of individual kidney function in children with VUR and other congenital urinary tract anomalies. Additionally, it can be used as indirect radionuclide cystography when rising of radioactivity in the kidney region, during the diuretic phase can indicate presence of VUR. PMID:27275347

  12. Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy for Acute Renal Failure in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chang-Yong; Choi, Hyun-Yong; You, Nam-Kyu; Roh, Tae Hoon; Seo, Sook Jin

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) on survival and relevant factors in patients who underwent CRRT after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods We retrospectively reviewed the laboratory, clinical, and radiological data of 29 patients who underwent CRRT among 1,190 TBI patients treated at our institution between April 2011 and June 2015. There were 20 men and 9 women, and the mean age was 60.2 years. The mean initial Glasgow Coma Scale score was 9.2, and the mean injury severity score was 24. Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression were used for analysis of survival and relevant factors. Results The actuarial median survival time of the 29 patients was 163 days (range, 3-317). Among the above 29 patients, 22 died with a median survival time of 8 days (range, 3-55). The causes of death were TBI-related in 8, sepsis due to pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in 4, and multi-organ failure in 10. Among the various factors, urine quantity of more than 500 mL for 24-hours before receiving CRRT was a significant and favorable factor for survival in the multivariate analysis (p=0.026). Conclusion According to our results, we suggest that early intervention with CRRT may be beneficial in the treatment of TBI patients with impending acute renal failure (ARF). To define the therapeutic advantages of early CRRT in the TBI patients with ARF, a well-designed and controlled study with more cases is required. PMID:27857914

  13. Renal sympathetic denervation for treatment of patients with heart failure: summary of the available evidence.

    PubMed

    Nammas, Wail; Koistinen, Juhani; Paana, Tuomas; Karjalainen, Pasi P

    2017-02-10

    Heart failure syndrome results from compensatory mechanisms that operate to restore - back to normal - the systemic perfusion pressure. Sympathetic overactivity plays a pivotal role in heart failure; norepinephrine contributes to maintenance of the systemic blood pressure and increasing preload. Cardiac norepinephrine spillover increases in patients with heart failure; norepinephrine exerts direct toxicity on cardiac myocytes resulting in a decrease of synthetic activity and/or viability. Importantly, cardiac norepinephrine spillover is a powerful predictor of mortality in patients with moderate to severe HF. This provided the rationale for trials that demonstrated survival benefit associated with the use of beta adrenergic blockers in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. Nevertheless, the MOXCON trial demonstrated that rapid uptitration of moxonidine (inhibitor of central sympathetic outflow) in patients with heart failure was associated with excess mortality and morbidity, despite reduction of plasma norepinephrine. Interestingly, renal norepinephrine spillover was the only independent predictor of adverse outcome in patients with heart failure, in multivariable analysis. Recently, renal sympathetic denervation has emerged as a novel approach for control of blood pressure in patients with treatment-resistant hypertension. This article summarizes the available evidence for the effect of renal sympathetic denervation in the setting of heart failure. Key messages Experimental studies supported a beneficial effect of renal sympathetic denervation in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. Clinical studies demonstrated improvement of symptoms, and left ventricular function. In heart failure and preserved ejection fraction, renal sympathetic denervation is associated with improvement of surrogate endpoints.

  14. Pathophysiology of protracted acute renal failure in man

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, S.M.; Myers, B.D.

    1985-10-01

    Postischemic acute renal failure (ARF) induced by cardiac surgery is commonly prolonged and may be irreversible. To examine whether persistence of postischemic, tubular cell injury accounts for delayed recovery from ARF, we studied 10 patients developing protracted (36 +/- 4 d) ARF after cardiac surgery. The differential clearance and excretion dynamics of probe solutes of graded size were determined. Inulin clearance was depressed (5.0 +/- 1.7 ml/min), while the fractional urinary clearance of dextrans (radii 17-30 A) were elevated above unity. Employing a model of conservation of mass, we calculated that 44% of filtered inulin was lost via transtubular backleak. The clearance and fractional backleak of technetium-labeled DTPA ((/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA, radius = 4 A) were identical to those of inulin (radius 15 A). The time at which inulin or DTPA excretion reached a maximum after an intravenous bolus injection was markedly delayed when compared with control subjects with ARF of brief duration, 102 vs. 11 min. Applying a three-compartment model of inulin/DTPA kinetics (which takes backleak into account) revealed the residence time of intravenously administered inulin/DTPA in the compartment occupied by tubular fluid and urine to be markedly prolonged, 20 vs. 6 min in controls, suggesting reduced velocity of tubular fluid flow.

  15. Prognosis of patients with acute renal failure without cardiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gallego, N; Perez-Caballero, C; Gallego, A; Estepa, R; Liano, F; Ortuno, J

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The outcome for children with acute renal failure (ARF) may be poor. However, relatively few published studies have considered prognosis of these patients.
METHODS—We prospectively studied, from 1978 to 1998, 92 such children without heart disease to try to identify risk factors for mortality.
RESULTS—Forty five per cent of children with tumours, shock, and other causes died compared with none of those with a primary urinary tract related problem. ARF did not seem to be the cause of death in any case. Univariate analysis showed that in the non-primary urinary problem group (55 cases), patients with hypotension, high values of BUN or creatinine, or who needed mechanical ventilation or dialysis, had a poor outcome. Multivariate analysis showed that probability of death can be estimated using the following score: −0.02 + 0.28 (hypotension) + 0.19 (ventilation) + 0.27(dialysis) + 0.01(BUN).
CONCLUSIONS—Mortality of patients with ARF was related to aetiology, the need for dialysis and/or ventilator use, hypotension, and BUN values.

 PMID:11207178

  16. Immunosuppression after renal allograft failure: a survey of US practices.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, George P; Gohh, Reginald Y; Morrissey, Paul E; Rodrigue, James R; Mandelbrot, Didier A

    2013-01-01

    Little data exist to guide the management of immunosuppression after renal graft failure. More aggressive tapering of immunosuppressive medications may reduce the risk of infection, but may increase the risk of rejection and sensitization. To document current practices in the US, we emailed a questionnaire to medical and surgical transplant directors as identified by the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS). Emails were sent to 221 programs, of which 93 (42.1%) responded. About 24.7% of respondents reported adjusting immunosuppression according to a standard protocol; 75.3% said practices are physician dependent. The majority said that 80 or 100% of patients are off all immunosuppression one yr after returning to dialysis. The most important factors cited in deciding whether to stop immunosuppression were plans to retransplant (40.2%) and signs and symptoms of rejection (37.0%). When asked which immunosuppressive medications are continued indefinitely, 21.5% responded prednisone and 71.0% said none. Respondents most commonly said they performed graft nephrectomy only if there are signs and symptoms of rejection (47.3%) or if signs and symptoms of rejection fail to respond to steroids (34.4%). In the absence of good data to guide decisions on immunosuppression in patients with failed allografts, practices in the US vary greatly. More data are needed to determine which policies lead to the best outcomes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Effects of lysine-induced acute renal failure in dogs.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, Kentaro; Adachi, Kenji; Sugimoto, Tetsuro; Chiba, Shuichi

    2006-05-01

    This study investigates the effects of lysine-induced acute renal failure. Female dogs received a lysine hydrochloride (lysine) of 4500 mg/kg/day (3.75 ml/kg/hr) for 3 consecutive days. The dogs were observed for clinical signs. Body weights were recorded, food consumption and water consumption calculated, and urinalysis and blood biochemistry were performed daily. Plasma samples for amino acid determinations were obtained from all dogs, which were necropsied on Day 3. Histopathological examinations were done on all test animals. Compound-related findings include the following. Blood biochemistry results showed increases in ammonia, blood urea nitrogen, blood urea nitrogen/creatinine ratio, and creatinine. Urinary changes consisted of increases in urine volume, total protein, albumin, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. In addition, macroscopic findings consisted of pale, congested capsule; microscopic findings consisted of hypertrophy of proximal convoluted tubule (mainly S1 segment), and degeneration/desquamation of urinary tubule (mainly S3 segment with hyaline casts) in the kidney. From these findings, it can be concluded that lysine is nephrotoxic in dogs. Nephrotoxicity of lysine may relate to direct tubular toxicity and to tubular obstruction.

  18. Mechanism underlying renal failure caused by pathogenic Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed

    Jae-Chen, Shin; Young-Joo, Jeon; Seon-Min, Park; Kang Seok, Seo; Jung-Hyun, Shim; Jung-Il, Chae

    2015-03-01

    Candida albicans (C. albicans) is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that commonly causes nosocomial infections. Systemic candidiasis is encountered with increasing frequency in immunocompromised hosts, leading to renal failure that results in severe morbidity and mortality. The present study investigated the mechanisms underlying kidney susceptibility following infection with several C. albicans strains, such as B311 and SC5314. Fungal growth of the highly virulent SC5314 strain was 10(3)-fold higher compared to the nonpathogenic B311 strain in the kidneys. An intravenous challenge of SC5314 in mice, elevated blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatine levels, which resulted in mortality at 8 or 35 days after infection in a dose- and time-dependent manner, whereas all the B311-infected mice had BUN and creatinine levels in the normal range and survived. Whether virulent C. albicans may escape clearance by activating signaling pathways that lead to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β, was investigated. B311 infections significantly elevated TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA expression in the kidneys, whereas the expression in SC5314-infected mice remained unchanged. Furthermore, B311 infection significantly elevated the plasma levels of TNF-α and IL-1β. These results indicated that the less virulent strains of C. albicans induced pro-inflammatory cytokines in mice. These results determined that an impairment of the protective mechanisms occurred in the kidneys with virulent C. albicans infection.

  19. Skeletal muscle metaboreflex in patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Paulo J C; Silva, Leonardo R; Maldamer, Vinicius Z; Cipriano, Gerson; Chiappa, Adriana M G; Schuster, Rodrigo; Boni, Victor H F; Grandi, Tatiani; Wolpat, Andiara; Roseguini, Bruno T; Chiappa, Gaspar R

    2017-03-01

    The sympathetic nervous system is affected in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). This study tested the hypothesis that patients with CRF have an altered skeletal muscle metaboreflex. Twenty patients with CRF and 18 healthy subjects of similar age participated in the study. The muscle metaboreflex was determined based on heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure, calf blood flow and calf vascular resistance (CVR) in response to handgrip exercise. The control of vascular resistance in the calf muscle mediated by the metaboreflex was estimated by subtracting the area under the curve with circulatory occlusion from that without occlusion. Arterial pressure and HR responses during exercise and recovery were similar in two groups of subjects. In the control group, CVR increased during exercise and remained elevated during circulatory occlusion, whereas no significant change was seen in the patients. Thus, the index of the metaboreflex was 7·82 ± 9·57 in the patients versus16·52 ± 14 units in the controls. The findings demonstrate that patients with CRF have a decreased vascular resistance response in the calf during the handgrip exercise, which suggests that CRF condition attenuates this reflex.

  20. Dynamic response of blood vessel in acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Pantovic, Suzana; Rosic, Gvozden; Obradovic, Zdravko; Rankovic, Goran; Stojiljkovic, Nenad; Rosic, Mirko

    2009-01-01

    In this study we postulated that during acute renal failure induced by gentamicin the transient or dynamic response of blood vessels could be affected, and that antioxidants can prevent the changes in dynamic responses of blood vessels. The new approach to ex vivo blood vessel experiments in which not only the end points of vessels response within the time interval is considered, but also dynamics of this response, was used in this paper. Our results confirm the alteration in dynamic response of blood vessels during the change of pressure in gentamicin-treated animals. The beneficial effects of vitamin C administration to gentamicin-treated animals are also confirmed through: lower level of blood urea and creatinine and higher level of potassium. The pressure dynamic responses of isolated blood vessels show a faster pressure change in gentamicin-treated animals (8.07 +/- 1.7 s vs. 5.64 +/- 0.18 s). Vitamin C administration induced slowdown of pressure change back to the control values. The pressure dynamic properties, quantitatively defined by comparative pressure dynamic and total pressure dynamic, confirm the alteration in dynamic response of blood vessels during the change of pressure in gentamicin-treated animals and beneficial effects of vitamin C administration.

  1. Renal failure due to granulomatous interstitial nephritis in native and allograft renal biopsies: experience from a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pallav; Rana, D S; Bhalla, A K; Gupta, Ashwini; Malik, Manish; Gupta, Anurag; Bhargava, Vinant

    2014-10-01

    Granulomatous interstitial nephritis is a rare cause of renal failure in both native and allograft renal biopsies. Drugs and sarcoidosis are the commonest causes of granulomatous interstitial nephritis as reported in Western countries. Unlike the west, tuberculosis is the commonest cause of granulomatous interstitial nephritis in Indian subcontinent. The etiological factors, clinical course, glomerular and tubulointerstitial changes associated with granulomatous interstitial nephritis have been analyzed in the present study along with the outcome in patients with granulomatous interstitial nephritis.

  2. Health status, renal function, and quality of life after multiorgan failure and acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Faulhaber-Walter, Robert; Scholz, Sebastian; Haller, Herrmann; Kielstein, Jan T; Hafer, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Background Critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) in need of renal replacement therapy (RRT) may have a protracted and often incomplete rehabilitation. Their long-term outcome has rarely been investigated. Study design Survivors of the HANnover Dialysis OUTcome (HANDOUT) study were evaluated after 5 years for survival, health status, renal function, and quality of life (QoL). The HANDOUT study had examinded mortality and renal recovery of patients with AKI receiving either standard extendend or intensified dialysis after multi organ failure. Results One hundred fifty-six former HANDOUT participants were analyzed. In-hospital mortality was 56.4%. Five-year survival after AKI/RRT was 40.1% (86.5% if discharged from hospital). Main causes of death were cardiovascular complications and sepsis. A total of 19 survivors presented to the outpatient department of our clinic and had good renal recovery (mean estimated glomerular filtration rate 72.5±30 mL/min/1.73 m2; mean proteinuria 89±84 mg/d). One person required maintenance dialysis. Seventy-nine percent of the patients had a pathological kidney sonomorphology. The Charlson comorbidity score was 2.2±1.4 and adjusted for age 3.3±2.1 years. Numbers of comorbid conditions averaged 2.38±1.72 per patient (heart failure [52%] > chronic kidney disease/myocardial infarction [each 29%]). Median 36-item short form health survey (SF-36™) index was 0.657 (0.69 physical health/0.66 mental health). Quality-adjusted life-years after 5 years were 3.365. Conclusion Mortality after severe AKI is higher than short-term prospective studies show, and morbidity is significant. Kidney recovery as well as general health remains incomplete. Reduction of QoL is minor, and social rehabilitation is very good. Affectivity is heterogeneous, but most patients experience emotional well-being. In summary, AKI in critically ill patients leads to incomplete rehabilitation but acceptable QoL after 5 years. PMID:27284261

  3. Design of the VA/NIH Acute Renal Failure Trial Network (ATN) study: intensive versus conventional renal support in acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Palevsky, Paul M; O’Connor, Theresa; Zhang, Jane Hongyuan; Star, Robert A; Smith, Mark W

    2006-01-01

    The optimal management of renal replacement therapy (RRT) in acute renal failure (ARF) is uncertain. The VA/NIH Acute Renal Failure Trail Network Study (ATN Study) tests the hypothesis that a strategy of intensive RRT will decrease 60-day all-cause mortality in critically ill patients with ARF. Dose separation between the two treatment arms is achieved by increasing the frequency of intermittent hemodialysis (IHD) and sustained low efficiency dialysis (SLED) treatments from three times per week to six times per week, and by increasing continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF) effluent volume from 20 mL/kg/hr to 35 mL/kg/hr. In both treatment arms, subjects convert between IHD and CVVHDF or SLED as hemodynamic status changes over time. This strategy attempts to replicate the conversion between modalities of RRT that occurs in clinical practice. However, in order to implement this strategy, flexible criteria needed to be developed to provide a balance between the need for uniformity of treatment between groups and practitioner discretion regarding modality of RRT to maintain patient safety. In order to address safety and ethical issues similar to those raised by the Office of Human Research Protections in its review of the ARDS Network studies, a survey of practitioner practices was performed and observational data on the management of RRT in comparable critically ill patients with ARF managed outside of the research context is being collected prospectively. These data will help inform the study’s DSMB and site IRB’s of the relationship between the study’s treatment arms and concurrent clinical practice. PMID:16317811

  4. The role of oxygen free radicals in the development of chronic renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Trachtman, H.; Wilson, D.; Rao, P.S. )

    1992-01-01

    This study examined whether there is increased production of oxygen free radicals during chronic renal failure. Rats subjected to 3/4 nephrectomy and sham operated controls were killed after 3 weeks. Lipid extracts of plasma and renal tissue were examined by HPLC and kidney specimens were also analyzed by EPR spectroscopy. The redox capacity of blood was assessed using nitroblue tetrazolium and plasma ascorbate levels were measured with HPLC. There was no detectable renal production of oxygen free radicals in rats with chronic renal failure. Kidney parenchymal content of other oxidants and the oxidant: reductant ratio were similar in control and uremic animals. The plasma redox capacity and ascorbate levels were elevated in uremic rats. The authors conclude that early in the course of chronic renal failure, there is not excessive production of oxygen free radicals. There is accumulation of reductants, primarily ascorbate, in the plasma of uremic animals.

  5. The natural history of renal disease in Australian Aborigines. Part 2. Albuminuria predicts natural death and renal failure.

    PubMed

    Hoy, W E; Wang, Z; VanBuynder, P; Baker, P R; McDonald, S M; Mathews, J D

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the relationship of albuminuria and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) with natural death and renal failure in an Australian Aboriginal community with high rates of renal disease. Study subjects were 825 adults (18+ years, mean 33.6 years) or 88% of adults in a remote community who participated in a health screening program offered between 1990 and 1997. The urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR; g/mol) was used as the renal disease marker. Participants were followed for 1.0 to 9.8 years (mean 5.8 years) until renal failure, death, the start of systematic antihypertensive/renal-protective treatment or June 30, 2000. Sixty-five people reached a terminal end point of renal failure or natural death. Sixteen people developed terminal renal failure, all of whom had an ACR of 34+ at baseline exam. There were 49 other natural deaths, which were also strongly correlated with increasing ACR and decreasing GFR over a wide range. This was observed in people without diabetes and in people with normal and elevated blood pressures. It applied to deaths associated with cardiovascular disease and to deaths without an assigned primary or underlying cardiovascular or renal cause. With adjustment for age, the association with death was more robust with ACR than GFR. When compared with people with an ACR <3.4, the hazard ratio (HR; 95% CI) for nonrenal natural death of persons with an ACR 3.4 to 33 was 3.0 (1.1 to 8.4), with an ACR 34 to 99, it was 5.4 (1.8 to 15.9), and with an ACR 100+, it was 6.5 (2.0 to 21). Regression equations predicted that each tenfold increase in the ACR was associated with a 3.7-fold increase in all-cause natural death: a> 400-fold increase in renal deaths, a 4-fold increase in cardiovascular deaths, and a 2.2-fold increase in nonrenal noncardiovascular deaths. Eighty-four percent of all-cause natural death was associated with pathologic albuminuria. All renal failure develops out of a background of persistent

  6. Pharmacokinetics of ertapenem in critically ill patients with acute renal failure undergoing extended daily dialysis.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Olaf; Hafer, Carsten; Langhoff, Anita; Kaever, Volkhard; Kumar, Vipul; Welte, Tobias; Haller, Hermann; Fliser, Danilo; Kielstein, Jan T

    2009-01-01

    Extended (daily) dialysis (EDD) is an increasingly popular mode of renal replacement therapy in the ICU (intensive care unit) as it combines the advantages of intermittent haemodialysis (IHD) and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), i.e. excellent detoxification accompanied by cardiovascular tolerability. The aim of this study was to evaluate pharmacokinetics (PK) of ertapenem, the newest carbapenem with once-daily dosing, in critically ill patients with anuric acute renal failure (ARF) undergoing EDD. In a single-centre, prospective, open-label study six ICU patients with ARF undergoing EDD were treated with 1 g ertapenem given as a single intravenous dose. EDD was performed using a high-flux dialyzer (polysulphone, 1.3 m(2)). Blood and dialysate flow were 160 mL/min, and the length of treatment was 480 min. Plasma samples were collected at different time-points up to 24 h after medication. Drug concentrations were determined by a validated LC-MS method. Free drug concentrations were estimated using a two-class binding site equation. After a single dose of 1000 mg free ertapenem, protein-unbound plasma concentrations exceeded a MIC(90) value of 2 mg/L for >20 h after dosing. The clearance of the tested dialyzer was 38.5 +/- 14.2 mL/min. In contrast to patients undergoing regular IHD, in which a dose reduction is required, our data suggest that in patients treated with EDD a standard dose of ertapenem (1 g/day), i.e. dose for patients without renal failure, is required to maintain adequate plasma drug levels.

  7. The role of the renal afferent and efferent nerve fibers in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Lindsea C.; May, Clive N.; Yao, Song T.

    2015-01-01

    Renal nerves contain afferent, sensory and efferent, sympathetic nerve fibers. In heart failure (HF) there is an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), which can lead to renal vasoconstriction, increased renin release and sodium retention. These changes are thought to contribute to renal dysfunction, which is predictive of poor outcome in patients with HF. In contrast, the role of the renal afferent nerves remains largely unexplored in HF. This is somewhat surprising as there are multiple triggers in HF that have the potential to increase afferent nerve activity, including increased venous pressure and reduced kidney perfusion. Some of the few studies investigating renal afferents in HF have suggested that at least the sympatho-inhibitory reno-renal reflex is blunted. In experimentally induced HF, renal denervation, both surgical and catheter-based, has been associated with some improvements in renal and cardiac function. It remains unknown whether the effects are due to removal of the efferent renal nerve fibers or afferent renal nerve fibers, or a combination of both. Here, we review the effects of HF on renal efferent and afferent nerve function and critically assess the latest evidence supporting renal denervation as a potential treatment in HF. PMID:26483699

  8. The role of the renal afferent and efferent nerve fibers in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Booth, Lindsea C; May, Clive N; Yao, Song T

    2015-01-01

    Renal nerves contain afferent, sensory and efferent, sympathetic nerve fibers. In heart failure (HF) there is an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), which can lead to renal vasoconstriction, increased renin release and sodium retention. These changes are thought to contribute to renal dysfunction, which is predictive of poor outcome in patients with HF. In contrast, the role of the renal afferent nerves remains largely unexplored in HF. This is somewhat surprising as there are multiple triggers in HF that have the potential to increase afferent nerve activity, including increased venous pressure and reduced kidney perfusion. Some of the few studies investigating renal afferents in HF have suggested that at least the sympatho-inhibitory reno-renal reflex is blunted. In experimentally induced HF, renal denervation, both surgical and catheter-based, has been associated with some improvements in renal and cardiac function. It remains unknown whether the effects are due to removal of the efferent renal nerve fibers or afferent renal nerve fibers, or a combination of both. Here, we review the effects of HF on renal efferent and afferent nerve function and critically assess the latest evidence supporting renal denervation as a potential treatment in HF.

  9. Impact of age at onset for children with renal failure on education and employment transitions.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Helen; Arber, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Previous medical research has shown that children with end-stage renal failure experience delay or underachievement of key markers of transition to adulthood. This article analyses 35 qualitative interviews with end-stage renal failure patients, aged 20-30 years, first diagnosed at 0-19 years of age, to explore how far delayed or underachievement in education and employment is related to their age at onset of end-stage renal failure. This study shows how unpredictable failures of renal replacement therapies, comorbidities and/or side effects of treatment in the early life course often coincided with critical moments for education and employment. Entering school, college, work-related training or employment, and disclosing health status or educational underachievement to an employer, were particularly critical, and those who were ill before puberty became progressively more disadvantaged in terms of successful transition into full-time employment, compared with those first diagnosed after puberty.

  10. Palliative Care for a Mentally Incompetent End Stage Renal Failure Patient: Why Is It Important?

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kwok-Ying; Yip, Terence; Sham, Mau-Kwong; Cheng, Benjamin Hon-Wai; Li, Cho-Wing; Wong, Yim-Chi; Lau, Vikki Wai-Kee

    2015-01-01

    People with intellectual disabilities are among the most disadvantaged groups in society. Here we report a mentally incompetent end stage renal failure (ESRF) patient with frequent emergency visits who made a significant improvement in symptoms control and reduction in casualty visits after introduction of renal palliative care service. Multidisciplinary approach would be useful in this case. PMID:25838954

  11. Acute renal failure secondary to ingestion of ayurvedic medicine containing mercury.

    PubMed

    Sathe, K; Ali, U; Ohri, A

    2013-07-01

    Several traditional medicines contain potentially toxic heavy metals. Heavy metal poisoning is not an uncommon cause of renal damage, although the diagnosis can be easily missed. We report a case of chronic ingestion of an ayurvedic medicine containing mercury in a 2-year-old girl, resulting in anuric renal failure due to acute interstitial nephritis.

  12. [Renoprotective effects of statins under the conditions of acute renal failure, caused by rhabdomyolysis].

    PubMed

    Zamorskiĭ, I I; Zeleniuk, V G

    2014-01-01

    The experiment on white rats was targeted at the examination of influence of statins (atorvastatin, lovastatin, simvastatin) under the conditions of acute renal failure, caused by rhabdomyolysis. Renoprotective effects of statins were demonstrated by reduction of hyperazotemia and proteinuria and improvement of renal excretory function, which correlated with antioxidant properties of drugs.

  13. Isoniazid-induced seizures with secondary rhabdomyolysis and associated acute renal failure in a dog.

    PubMed

    Haburjak, J J; Spangler, W L

    2002-04-01

    Isoniazid-induced seizures resulted in rhabdomyolysis and associated acute renal tubular necrosis in a dog. Rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuric renal failure, although recognised in the dog, are reported infrequently as a consequence of seizures. The clinical presentation of isoniazid toxicity in a dog is described.

  14. Raloxifene attenuates Gas6 and apoptosis in experimental aortic valve disease in renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Abedat, Suzan; Beeri, Ronen; Valitsky, Michael; Daher, Sameh; Kott-Gutkowski, Miriam; Gal-Moscovici, Anca; Sosna, Jacob; Rajamannan, Nalini M.; Lotan, Chaim

    2011-01-01

    Renal failure is associated with aortic valve calcification. Using our rat model of uremia-induced reversible aortic valve calcification, we assessed the role of apoptosis and survival pathways in that disease. We also explored the effects of raloxifene, an estrogen receptor modulator, on valvular calcification. Gene array analysis was performed in aortic valves obtained from three groups of rats (n = 7 rats/group): calcified valves obtained from rats fed with uremic diet, valves after calcification resolution following diet cessation, and control. In addition, four groups of rats (n = 10 rats/group) were used to evaluate the effect of raloxifene in aortic valve calcification: three groups as mentioned above and a fourth group fed with the uremic diet that also received daily raloxifene. Evaluation included imaging, histology, and antigen expression analysis. Gene array results showed that the majority of the altered expressed genes were in diet group valves. Most apoptosis-related genes were changed in a proapoptotic direction in calcified valves. Apoptosis and decreases in several survival pathways were confirmed in calcified valves. Resolution of aortic valve calcification was accompanied by decreased apoptosis and upregulation of survival pathways. Imaging and histology demonstrated that raloxifene significantly decreased aortic valve calcification. In conclusion, downregulation of several survival pathways and apoptosis are involved in the pathogenesis of aortic valve calcification. The beneficial effect of raloxifene in valve calcification is related to apoptosis modulation. This novel observation is important for developing remedies for aortic valve calcification in patients with renal failure. PMID:21335463

  15. Severe catabolic state after an overnight fast in patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Nakaya, Yutaka; Shimohata, Takaaki; Haraguchi, Sayaka; Nakao, Toshiyuki; Minaguchi, Jun; Sumitani, Haruo; Harada, Nagakatsu; Sakaue, Hiroshi

    2011-03-01

    Starvation causes more rapid development of a catabolic state in patients with liver cirrhosis than in normal subjects. Because the kidneys have a gluconeogenic activity similar to that of the liver, we tested whether patients with chronic renal failure develop a catabolic state after an overnight fast. The effect of an overnight fast on diurnal changes in respiratory quotient (RQ) was studied in 12 normal subjects and 12 patients with stable chronic renal failure. Changes in RQ in the early morning after an overnight fast were also studied in 27 patients with chronic renal failure not on dialysis. We also examined the effect on RQ of consuming a light snack in the evening before the measurements. The RQ before breakfast, but not at other times, was significantly lower in patients with renal failure than in normal subjects (0.824 ± 0.051 versus 0.868 ± 0.038, P < 0.05). This indicated that patients with renal failure had higher fat use and developed a catabolic state early in the morning. The RQ before breakfast showed significant inverse correlations with creatinine levels (r = -0.604, P < 0.001). Supplementation with a carbohydrate-rich snack in the evening resulted in a significant increase of 0.07 ± 0.04 (P < 0.05) in mean RQ in the early morning. This suggested that a late evening snack is useful for improving the catabolic state of patients with renal failure. Starvation involving an overnight fast facilitates catabolism of visceral and muscle proteins in renal failure. This suggests that nutritional management of renal failure should focus not only on the contents of a meal, but also on the timing of the meal. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fatal renal failure caused by diethylene glycol in paracetamol elixir: the Bangladesh epidemic.

    PubMed Central

    Hanif, M.; Mobarak, M. R.; Ronan, A.; Rahman, D.; Donovan, J. J.; Bennish, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the cause of a large increase in the number of children with unexplained renal failure. DESIGN--Case-control study. SETTING--Children's hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh. SUBJECTS--Cases were all 339 children with initially unexplained renal failure; controls were 90 children with cause of renal failure identified; all were admitted to hospital during 35 months after January 1990. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Differences between the case and control patients in clinical and histological features and outcome; toxicological examination of 69 bottles of paracetamol from patients and pharmacies. RESULTS--Compared with children with an identified cause for their renal failure, children with initially unexplained renal failure were significantly (P < 0.05) more likely to have hepatomegaly (58% v 33%), oedema (37% v 20%), and hypertension (58% v 23%); to have a higher serum creatinine concentration (mean 519 mumol/l v 347 mumol/l) and lower serum bicarbonate concentration (10.1 mmol/l v 12.4 mmol/l); to have been given a drug for fever (91% v 31%); to have ingested a brand of paracetamol shown to contain diethylene glycol (20% v 0%); and to have died in hospital (70% v 33%). Diethylene glycol was identified in 19 bottles of paracetamol, from 7 of 28 brands tested. In the 12 months after a government ban on the sale of paracetamol elixir, new cases of renal failure decreased by 54%, and cases of unexplained renal failure decreased by 84%. CONCLUSION--Paracetamol elixirs with diethylene glycol as a diluent were responsible for a large outbreak of fatal renal failure in Bangladesh. PMID:7613408

  17. Effect of percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation in patients with severe heart failure.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qiming; Lu, Jing; Wang, Benwen; Ma, Genshan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clinical feasibility and effects of percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation in patients with heart failure. A total of 20 patients with heart failure were enrolled, aged from 47 to 75 years (63±10 years). They were divided into the standard therapy (n = 10), and renal nerve radiofrequency ablation groups (n = 10). There were 15 males and 5 female patients, including 8 ischemic cardiomyopathy, 8 dilated cardiomyopathy, and 8 hypertensive cardiopathy. All of the patients met the criteria of New York Heart Association classes III-IV cardiac function. Patients with diabetes and renal failure were excluded. Percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation was performed on the renal artery wall under X-ray guidance. Serum electrolytes, neurohormones, and 24 h urine volume were recorded 24 h before and after the operation. Echocardiograms were performed to obtain left ventricular ejection fraction at baseline and 6 months. Heart rate, blood pressure, symptoms of dyspnea and edema were also monitored. After renal nerve ablation, 24 h urine volume was increased, while neurohormone levels were decreased compared with those of pre-operation and standard therapy. No obvious change in heart rate or blood pressure was recorded. Symptoms of heart failure were improved in patients after the operation. No complications were recorded in the study. Percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation may be a feasible, safe, and effective treatment for the patients with severe congestive heart failure.

  18. Acute Renal Failure Associated with Lenalidomide Treatment in Multiple Myeloma: A Rare Occurrence?

    PubMed

    Kreiniz, Natalia; Khateeb, Ali; Gino-Moor, Sharon; Polliack, Aaron; Tadmor, Tamar

    2016-06-01

    Renal failure is a frequent complication of multiple myeloma (MM). Recently, the combination of lenalidomide-dexamethasone has become one of the cornerstone regimens for the treatment of MM. Impairment of renal function exacerbation is a rare, but potential, complication of lenalidomide therapy in plasma cell dyscrasias. We present two patients who developed exacerbation of renal function during their first cycle of therapy with lenalidomide. In the first case, we present a 76-year-old-male with MM and impaired renal function, who declined two weeks after initiation of second-line therapy with lenalidomide. His renal functions improved after discontinuation of lenalidomide and with supportive care. In the second case, we describe a 61-year-old woman who was started on lenalidomide for relapsed MM and admitted to intensive care unit three weeks later due to severe renal failure. Despite intensive supportive care, her renal function deteriorated even more and she died. We conclude that renal failure is an uncommon, but serious, potential complication of lenalidomide therapy in plasma cell dyscrasias, particularly MM. Close monitoring of renal function is clearly recommended during this treatment.

  19. The influence of salt intake on the metabolic acidosis of chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Espinel, G H

    1975-01-01

    The influence of dietary salt on the levels of plasma bicarbonate and on the characteristics of bicarbonate reabsorption was studied in experimental chronic renal failure. Chronic renal failure was produced in rats by sequential partial nephrectomies. The control group received a diet constant in salt content throughout the progression of renal failure; the other group (PRNa), at each stage of renal failure, received salt intake reduced in direct proportion to the fall in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). In the steady state, the quantities of urinary sodium closely approximated intake in obth groups of animals. The adaptive increased natriuresis per nephron exhibited by the control animals was prevented in the PRNa animals. The PRNa group had (a) higher plasma bicarbonate levels, (b) increased bicarbonate thresholds, and (c) increased maximal tubular reabsorptive capacity for bicarbonate. As renal failure progresses, dietary salt can become a determining factor of the levels at which plasma bicarbonate is maintained. Proportional reduction of dietary salt results in bicarbonate conservation in rats with experimental progressive renal failure. PMID:1150871

  20. Drug-related acute renal failure in hospitalised patients.

    PubMed

    Iavecchia, Lujan; Cereza García, Gloria; Sabaté Gallego, Mònica; Vidal Guitart, Xavier; Ramos Terrades, Natalia; de la Torre, Judith; Segarra Medrano, Alfons; Agustí Escasany, Antònia

    2015-01-01

    The information available on the incidence and the characteristics of patients with acute renal failure (ARF) related to drugs is scarce. To estimate the incidence of drug-related ARF in hospitalised patients and to compare their characteristics with those of patients with ARF due to other causes. We selected a prospective cohort of patients with ARF during hospital admission (July 2010-July 2011). Information on patients' demographics, medical antecedents, ARF risk factors, ARF severity according to the RIFLE classification and hospital drug administration was collected. We analysed the relationship of drugs with the ARF episodes using Spanish Pharmacovigilance System methods and algorithm. A total of 194 cases had an episode of hospital-acquired ARF. The median age of patients was 72 years [IQR 20]; 60% were men. The ARF incidence during hospitalization was 9.6 per 1,000 admissions. According to the RIFLE classification, a risk of kidney damage or kidney injury was present in 77.8% of cases. In 105 (54.1%) cases, ARF was drug-related; the drugs most frequently involved were diuretics, agents acting on the renin-angiotensin system, immunosuppressants, β-blocking agents, calcium channel blockers, contrast media and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs. Patients with drug-related ARF had more multi-morbidity, fewer ARF risk factors and lower mortality. Half of ARF episodes during hospitalisation were drug related. Patients with drug-related ARF had higher cardiovascular morbidity than those with ARF related to other causes, but they had a lower frequency of ARF risk factors and mortality. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Audiological findings in elderly patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, A R; Bonfioli, F; Garrubba, V; Ghisellini, M; Lamoretti, M P; Nicolai, P; Camerini, C; Maiorca, R

    1990-01-01

    The audiological results of 46 patients (m/f 27/19, mean age; 57.4 +/- 11.1) with chronic renal failure (CRF) undergoing dialysis were compared with those of an age- and gender-matched control group (n = 25). Mean pure tone average from 0.5 to 8 kHz was about 15 dB higher in CRF patients than in control subjects. The ABR parameters of the test group were then contrasted with those recorded in a second control group (n = 47, m/f 26/21, mean age: 56.1 +/- 11.4) matched by age, gender and degree of hearing loss (HL). After assessing the normality of the groups by the usual criteria, using the data of a sample of normal young adults, the ABR were found to be abnormal in 23.9% of the controls and in the 39.13% of the CRF patients. Wave V, I-III, III-V and I-V delays were significantly shorter in the females of the control group; in the CRF group, only the V and the I-V delays were shorter in females. The only age-dependent effect was found in the CRF sample, in which older patients had significantly longer I-III IPLD. The degree of HL influenced the latency of the waves in both groups but only the I-V IPLD was longer in CRF patients with pronounced high tone loss. The most distinguishing feature between the effects of CRF plus ageing and those of normal ageing was the lengthening of the I-III IPLD in the test group. This finding is likely to reflect a subclinical disorder of the VIII nerve function that is a part of the axonal uremic neuropathy.

  2. Bariatric Surgery in Patients with Dialysis-Dependent Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Mozer, Anthony B; Pender, John R; Chapman, William H H; Sippey, Megan E; Pories, Walter J; Spaniolas, Konstantinos

    2015-11-01

    Laparoscopic procedures for the treatment of morbid obesity are commonly offered to patients with comorbidities previously thought to carry prohibitive operative risk. In this study, we reviewed characteristics and perioperative outcomes of patients with dialysis-dependent renal failure (DDRF) who underwent laparoscopic bariatric procedures. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database from 2006 to 2011 was reviewed. Preoperative characteristics and 30-day outcome data of patients who underwent three common laparoscopic procedures were analyzed using ANOVA and Pearson chi-squared tests. One hundred thirty-eight patients (52.5 % female) with DDRF and a median body mass index (BMI) of 45.5 kg/m(2) were identified; 33.8 % (n = 47) underwent laparoscopic banding (LAGB), 48.9 % (n = 68) laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), and 16.5 % (n = 23) laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). No differences were found among groups in age, prevalence of American Society of Anesthesiology IV classification, BMI, weight, gender, prevalence of diabetes, and vascular or neurologic comorbidities. Total operation time and length of hospital stay were significantly different between groups. Mortality was 0.7 %, and overall morbidity was 5.8 %. The case mix reflected a decrease in LAGB procedures from 45.5 to 23.3 % from 2006-2009 to 2010-2011 and an increase in LSG procedures from 9.1 to 24.7 % (p < 0.006). When performed in selected DDRF patients, bariatric surgery is safe. An increase in LSG with a concurrent decline in LAGB procedures was demonstrated over the period of the study.

  3. Cardiac remodeling in rats with renal failure shows interventricular differences.

    PubMed

    Svíglerová, Jitka; Kuncová, Jitka; Nalos, Lukás; Holas, Jaromír; Tonar, Zbynek; Rajdl, Daniel; Stengl, Milan

    2012-09-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with an increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Intensive research revealed a number of alterations in the heart during CRF; however, possible interventricular differences in CRF-induced cardiac remodeling have so far not been addressed. CRF was induced by two-stage surgical 5/6 nephrectomy (NX) in male Wistar rats. Cellular hypertrophy was quantified using immunohistological morphometric analysis. Contraction force and membrane potential were recorded in left and right ventricle papillary muscles with an isometric force transducer and high-resistance glass microelectrodes. Hypertrophy was present in the left ventricle (LV) of NX animals, but not in the right ventricle (RV) of NX animals, as documented by both ventricle/body weight ratios and cellular morphometric analysis of the cross-sectional area of myocytes. The contraction force was reduced in the LV of NX animals but increased in the RV of NX animals compared with sham-operated rats. Rest potentiation of contraction force was relatively more pronounced in the LV of NX rats. Fifty percent substitution of extracellular sodium with lithium significantly increased the contraction force only in the LV of NX animals. Action potential durations were shortened in both ventricles of CRF animals. Cardiac structural and contractile remodeling in CRF shows significant interventricular differences. CRF induces hypertrophy of the LV but not of the RV. LV hypertrophy was associated with a reduction of contraction force, whereas in the RV, the contraction force was enhanced. Partial recovery of contractile function of the LV by rest potentiation or lithium substitution indicates a role of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger in this phenomenon.

  4. Immunoglobulin D Multiple Myeloma With Rapidly Progressing Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Jwalant; Kamal, Jeanne; Eter, Ahmad; El-Sayegh, Suzanne; El-Charabaty, Elie

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin D (IgD) multiple myeloma (MM) is a very rare form of myeloma affecting less than 2% of all myeloma patients. It has a multiorgan involvement with renal failure being the key feature. We present here a case of IgD MM in a 62-year-old white male, smoker with past medical history of hypertension, who presented to emergency department with complaints of lower abdominal pain, constipation and decreased urination. Physical exam was unremarkable. Laboratory investigation showed S.Cr 5.99 mg/dL, hemoglobin 8.7 g/dL and corrected S.Ca 10.6 mg/dL. Urine dipstick showed 100 protein and TP/Cr ratio was 23. Serology was positive for serum free lambda chain level of 8,947.6 mg/L as well with free κ/λ ratio < 0.01. The results of serum and urine electrophoresis and immunofixation were also supportive of diagnosis of IgD MM. IgD level was remarkably elevated (27,300 mg/L) too. CT scan of abdomen/pelvis was negative for obstructive uropathy. Skeletal survey showed a solitary lytic lesion in the iliac crest. His kidney function deteriorated next day requiring hemodialysis. The bone marrow biopsy was positive for plasma cell hypercellularity (70-80%) and flow cytometry showed 8% monoclonal IgD lambda plasma cells. The patient was started on bortezomib and dexamethasone and he underwent bone marrow transplant 6 months later. He is doing well hematologically now but he remains dialysis-dependent. IgD MM is a very rare disease affecting younger population with poor prognosis; patients often end up on hemodialysis despite better control of the hematological component. PMID:26124916

  5. Immunoglobulin D Multiple Myeloma With Rapidly Progressing Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Modi, Jwalant; Kamal, Jeanne; Eter, Ahmad; El-Sayegh, Suzanne; El-Charabaty, Elie

    2015-08-01

    Immunoglobulin D (IgD) multiple myeloma (MM) is a very rare form of myeloma affecting less than 2% of all myeloma patients. It has a multiorgan involvement with renal failure being the key feature. We present here a case of IgD MM in a 62-year-old white male, smoker with past medical history of hypertension, who presented to emergency department with complaints of lower abdominal pain, constipation and decreased urination. Physical exam was unremarkable. Laboratory investigation showed S.Cr 5.99 mg/dL, hemoglobin 8.7 g/dL and corrected S.Ca 10.6 mg/dL. Urine dipstick showed 100 protein and TP/Cr ratio was 23. Serology was positive for serum free lambda chain level of 8,947.6 mg/L as well with free κ/λ ratio < 0.01. The results of serum and urine electrophoresis and immunofixation were also supportive of diagnosis of IgD MM. IgD level was remarkably elevated (27,300 mg/L) too. CT scan of abdomen/pelvis was negative for obstructive uropathy. Skeletal survey showed a solitary lytic lesion in the iliac crest. His kidney function deteriorated next day requiring hemodialysis. The bone marrow biopsy was positive for plasma cell hypercellularity (70-80%) and flow cytometry showed 8% monoclonal IgD lambda plasma cells. The patient was started on bortezomib and dexamethasone and he underwent bone marrow transplant 6 months later. He is doing well hematologically now but he remains dialysis-dependent. IgD MM is a very rare disease affecting younger population with poor prognosis; patients often end up on hemodialysis despite better control of the hematological component.

  6. The renal nerves in chronic heart failure: efferent and afferent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Alicia M; Pellegrino, Peter R; Zucker, Irving H

    2015-01-01

    The function of the renal nerves has been an area of scientific and medical interest for many years. The recent advent of a minimally invasive catheter-based method of renal denervation has renewed excitement in understanding the afferent and efferent actions of the renal nerves in multiple diseases. While hypertension has been the focus of much this work, less attention has been given to the role of the renal nerves in the development of chronic heart failure (CHF). Recent studies from our laboratory and those of others implicate an essential role for the renal nerves in the development and progression of CHF. Using a rabbit tachycardia model of CHF and surgical unilateral renal denervation, we provide evidence for both renal efferent and afferent mechanisms in the pathogenesis of CHF. Renal denervation prevented the decrease in renal blood flow observed in CHF while also preventing increases in Angiotensin-II receptor protein in the microvasculature of the renal cortex. Renal denervation in CHF also reduced physiological markers of autonomic dysfunction including an improvement in arterial baroreflex function, heart rate variability, and decreased resting cardiac sympathetic tone. Taken together, the renal sympathetic nerves are necessary in the pathogenesis of CHF via both efferent and afferent mechanisms. Additional investigation is warranted to fully understand the role of these nerves and their role as a therapeutic target in CHF.

  7. The renal nerves in chronic heart failure: efferent and afferent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Alicia M.; Pellegrino, Peter R.; Zucker, Irving H.

    2015-01-01

    The function of the renal nerves has been an area of scientific and medical interest for many years. The recent advent of a minimally invasive catheter-based method of renal denervation has renewed excitement in understanding the afferent and efferent actions of the renal nerves in multiple diseases. While hypertension has been the focus of much this work, less attention has been given to the role of the renal nerves in the development of chronic heart failure (CHF). Recent studies from our laboratory and those of others implicate an essential role for the renal nerves in the development and progression of CHF. Using a rabbit tachycardia model of CHF and surgical unilateral renal denervation, we provide evidence for both renal efferent and afferent mechanisms in the pathogenesis of CHF. Renal denervation prevented the decrease in renal blood flow observed in CHF while also preventing increases in Angiotensin-II receptor protein in the microvasculature of the renal cortex. Renal denervation in CHF also reduced physiological markers of autonomic dysfunction including an improvement in arterial baroreflex function, heart rate variability, and decreased resting cardiac sympathetic tone. Taken together, the renal sympathetic nerves are necessary in the pathogenesis of CHF via both efferent and afferent mechanisms. Additional investigation is warranted to fully understand the role of these nerves and their role as a therapeutic target in CHF. PMID:26300788

  8. Effect of fluid therapy on prevention of acute renal failure in Bam earthquake crush victims.

    PubMed

    Sagheb, Mohammad Mahdi; Sharifian, Maryam; Roozbeh, Jamshid; Moini, Maryam; Gholami, Khodakaram; Sadeghi, Hossein

    2008-01-01

    At 5:28 a.m. (local time) on December 26, 2003, an earthquake measuring 6.51 on the Richter scale struck the city of Bam in the Kerman Province in southeastern Iran. Among the most important morbid events in survivors were acute renal problems. Clinical findings, laboratory data, and management of the renal victims, all of whom were transferred to Shiraz Hospitals, have been the subject of this analysis. Medical records of twenty patients with acute renal failure admitted to three university hospitals and one community hospital were reviewed. Overall, 801 patients were transferred to Shiraz hospitals, of whom 20 (mean age 36.2 +/- 14.8 years, 15 males) developed acute renal failure with mean duration of 14.5 +/- 9.6 days. Total mortality was 21 (2.6%) and acute renal failure mortality was 3 (15%). Seven patients received standard fluid therapy and 13 patients received variable volume treatment. In total, 79 dialysis sessions were performed in 15 patients (mean 5.2, 3.3 +/- 1 sessions per patients). There was a positive correlation between time spent under rubble and peak serum CK (creatine phosphokinase) level (p = 0.035), acute renal failure duration (p = 0.047), and admission potassium levels (p = 0.033). Serum CK level was positively correlated with acute renal failure duration (p = 0.008). Patients who had received standard treatment had significantly shorter duration of acute renal failure (7.1 versus 9.4 days, p = 0.008) and less need for dialysis (1 versus 6, p = 0.007) than patients who were treated variably. In victims of earthquake, time spent under rubble and peak serum CK level can serve to estimate morbidity, and early standard treatment may decrease renal morbidity.

  9. Acute tubulo-interstitiel nephritis associated with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Dede, Fatih; Yilmaz, Bariş; Ayli, Deniz; Kayataş, Mansur; Atilgan, Gökhan; Caner, Sedat; Akyürek, Nalan; Odabaş, Ali Riza

    2008-01-01

    Renal infiltration in malignant lymphomas may involve the interstitium but rarely causes acute renal failure. In this report, we describe a 59-year-old woman presenting with an acute renal failure due to bilateral diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin's infiltration of the kidneys.

  10. Impact of etiology of chronic renal failure on growth in children.

    PubMed

    Sultana, S; Rahman, M H; Paul, S K; Hossain, M M

    2007-07-01

    A prospective study was carried out in the Department of Pediatrics, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka, Bangladesh, from October, 2001 to October, 2003 to find out the impact of different etiology of chronic renal failure on growth in children. Fifty children of both sexes under 15 years of age with clinical and biochemical evidence of chronic renal failure (CRF) with creatinine clearance (Ccr) of <75 ml/min/1.73m2 were included in the study. On the basis of underlying causes of CRF, the children were divided into congenital (n=30) and acquired (n=20) groups. All patients' height, weight, radiographs of different bones was obtained to evaluate the presence of renal osteodystrophy (ROD) and for assessment of bone age. Serum intact parathormone (iPTH) level was also assayed in all patients. These parameters were evaluated in two groups. CRF children due to congenital anomalies had stunting and wasting in 23 (76.7%) and 20 (66.7%) cases respectively and the difference between two groups was highly significant (P<0.001). Alkaline phosphatase (467.70+/-218.55 U/L) and iPTH (91.43+/-33.42 pg/ml) were also significantly higher in the congenital group (P<0.001 and P<0.05 respectively). Radiographic features of ROD were present in 15 (50%) cases in congenital group in comparison to 4 (20%) in acquired group and the growth zone lesion was the commonest type of ROD in congenital group (66.7%). CRF should be diagnosed as early as possible to maintain growth potential.

  11. Cardio-renal interaction: impact of renal function and anemia on the outcome of chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hisashi; Hiramitsu, Shinya; Miyagishima, Kenji; Mori, Kazumasa; Yoda, Ryuji; Kato, Shigeru; Kato, Yasuchika; Morimoto, Shin-ichiro; Hishida, Hitoshi; Ozaki, Yukio

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of renal function and anemia on the outcome of chronic heart failure (CHF). We targeted 711 consecutive patients who were hospitalized at the Division of Cardiology of Fujita Health University Hospital during a 5-year period. The subjects were divided into four groups according to their estimated glomerular filtration rate (e-GFR) calculated using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formula. Intergroup comparisons were conducted for underlying heart diseases, clinical findings at the time of hospitalization, treatment, and outcome. Moreover, the patients were divided into two groups according to their serum hemoglobin concentration at the time of hospitalization, using 12.0 g/dl as the dividing point, to study the effects of anemia on the outcome. In the group with decreased renal function, the average age was higher, and ischemic heart disease and associated conditions such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus were observed in most of the patients. In addition, the rate of anemia development and the plasma B-type natriuretic peptide concentration were also high. The greater the deterioration in renal function, the poorer the outcome became (P < 0.0001). Chronic heart failure complicated by anemia showed an especially poor outcome (P < 0.0001). As this study showed that renal function and anemia significantly affected the outcome of CHF, it is clear that the preservation of renal function and the management of anemia are important in addition to the conventional treatments for CHF.

  12. Arginase inhibition slows the progression of renal failure in rats with renal ablation.

    PubMed

    Sabbatini, Massimo; Pisani, Antonio; Uccello, Francesco; Fuiano, Giorgio; Alfieri, Raffaele; Cesaro, Antonio; Cianciaruso, Bruno; Andreucci, Vittorio E

    2003-04-01

    Exogenous arginine slows the progression of chronic renal failure (CRF) in remnant rats through a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent mechanism. We tested whether the inhibition of arginase could induce similar results through the increased availability of endogenous arginine. Three groups of remnant rats were studied for 8 wk: 1) untreated rats (REM); 2) remnant rats treated with 1% l-arginine (ARG); and 3) remnant rats administered a Mn(2+)-free diet to inhibit arginase (MNF). Normal rats (NOR) were used as controls. Liver arginase activity was depressed in MNF rats (-35% vs. REM, P < 0.01). No difference in metabolic data was detected among the groups throughout the study; blood pressure was significantly lower in MNF vs. ARG and REM rats after 6 wk (P < 0.001). The glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was greatly depressed in REM rats (-47% vs. NOR, P < 0.03) but was higher in ARG and MNF rats (+40 and +43% vs. REM, respectively, P < 0.05), with comparable changes in renal hemodynamics. Despite the better GFR, proteinuria was decreased in both ARG and MNF rats (-42%, P < 0.05, and -57%, P < 0.01, respectively, vs. REM rats). Arginine plasma levels, significantly reduced in REM rats (-41% vs. NOR, P < 0.01), were partially restored in MNF rats (+38% vs. REM), and urinary nitrite excretion, greatly depressed in REM rats (-76% vs. NOR, P < 0.01), was significantly increased in MNF rats (+209% vs. REM, P < 0.05). At the renal level, arginase activity was only slightly depressed in MNF rats (-18% vs. REM), but intrarenal concentrations of arginine were lower in this latter group (P < 0.05 vs. other groups). Beyond the hemodynamic modifications, MNF rats showed a lower glomerular sclerosis index (P < 0.05 vs. REM and ARG). Inhibition of arginase slows the progression of CRF in remnant rats similarly to arginine-treated rats; the better histological protection in MNF rats, however, suggests that additional factors are involved in these modifications.

  13. Risk Factors for Graft Failure and Death following Geriatric Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyungjin; Yu, Hoon; Shin, Eunhye; Kim, Young Hoon; Park, Su-Kil; Jo, Min-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background Population aging is a major health concern in Asian countries and it has affected the age distribution of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). As a consequence, the need for kidney transplantation in the geriatric population has increased, but the shortage of donors is an obstacle for geriatric renal transplantation. The aim of this study was to evaluate risk factors for graft failure and death in geriatric renal transplantation. Methods Kidney transplantations performed in a tertiary hospital in South Korea from May 1995 to December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Recipients younger than 60 years of age or who underwent other organ transplantations were excluded. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to assess patient and graft survival. A Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate risk factors for graft failure and patient death. Results A total of 229 kidney transplantation patients were included. Graft survival at 1, 5, and 10 years were 93.2%, 82.9%, and 61.2% respectively. Patient survival at 1, 5, and 10 years were 94.6%, 86.9%, and 68.8%, respectively. According to the Cox multivariate analysis, ABO incompatibility (hazard ratio [HR] 3.91, p < 0.002), DGF (HR 3.544, p < 0.004), CMV infection (HR 2.244, p < 0.011), and HBV infection (HR 6.349, p < 0.015) were independent risk factors for graft survival. Recipient age (HR 1.128, p < 0.024), ABO incompatibility (HR 3.014, p < 0.025), CMV infection (HR 2.532, p < 0.010), and the number of HLA mismatches (HR 1.425, p < 0.007) were independent risk factors for patient death. Conclusion Kidney transplantation in the geriatric population showed good clinical outcomes. ABO incompatibility, DGF, CMV infection, and HBV infection were risk factors for graft failure and the recipient age, ABO incompatibility, CMV infection, and the number of HLA mismatches were risk factors for patient death in geriatric renal transplantation. PMID:27074003

  14. Protective effect of crocetin on hemorrhagic shock-induced acute renal failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunbo; Yan, Junling; Xi, Liang; Qian, Zhiyu; Wang, Zhenghong; Yang, Lina

    2012-07-01

    Multiple organ failure is a common outcome of hemorrhagic shock followed by resuscitation, and the kidney is one of the prime target organs involved. The main objective of the study was to evaluate whether crocetin, a natural product from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, has beneficial effects on renal dysfunction caused by hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in rats. Anesthetized rats were bled to reduce mean arterial blood pressure to 35 (SD, 5) mmHg for 60 min and then were resuscitated with their withdrawn shed blood and normal saline. Crocetin was administered via the duodenum at a dose of 50 mg/kg 40 min after hemorrhage. The increase in creatinine and blood urea nitrogen was significantly reduced at 2 h after hemorrhage and resuscitation in crocetin-treated rats. The increases in renal nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin 6 were also attenuated by crocetin. Hemorrhagic shock resulted in a significant elevation in malondialdehyde production and was accompanied by a reduction in total superoxide dismutase activity, activation of nuclear factor κB, and overexpression of inducible nitric oxide synthase. These changes were significantly attenuated by crocetin at 2 h after resuscitation. These results suggested that crocetin blocks inflammatory cascades by inhibiting production of reactive oxygen species and restoring superoxide dismutase activity to ameliorate renal dysfunction caused by hemorrhage shock and resuscitation.

  15. Potential effects of digoxin on long-term renal and clinical outcomes in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Testani, Jeffrey M; Brisco, Meredith A; Tang, W H Wilson; Kimmel, Stephen E; Tiku-Owens, Anjali; Forfia, Paul R; Coca, Steven G

    2013-05-01

    Digitalis glycosides are known to improve the hemodynamic and neurohormonal perturbations that contribute to heart failure (HF)-induced renal dysfunction (RD). The objective of this study was to determine if randomization to digoxin is associated with improvement in renal function (IRF) and to evaluate if patients with digoxin-induced IRF have improved clinical outcomes. Patients in the Digitalis Investigation Group (DIG) dataset with protocol-driven 1-year serum creatinine levels (performed in a central laboratory; n = 980) were studied. IRF was defined as a postrandomization ≥20% increase in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). IRF occurred in 15.5% of the population (mean improvement in eGFR 34.5 ± 15.4%) and was more common in patients randomized to digoxin (adjusted odds ratio 1.6; P = .02). In patients without IRF, digoxin was not associated with reduced death or hospitalization (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.96, 95% CI 0.8-1.2; P = .67). However, in the group with IRF, digoxin was associated with substantially improved hospitalization-free survival (adjusted HR 0.49, 95% CI 0.3-0.8; P = .006; P interaction = .026). In this subset of the DIG trial, digoxin was associated with long-term improvement in kidney function and, in patients demonstrating this favorable renal response, reduction in death or hospitalization. Additional research is necessary to confirm these hypothesis-generating findings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Potential Effects of Digoxin on Long Term Renal and Clinical Outcomes in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Testani, Jeffrey M.; Brisco, Meredith A.; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Kimmel, Stephen E.; Tiku-Owens, Anjali; Forfia, Paul R.; Coca, Steven G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Digitalis glycosides are known to improve the hemodynamic and neurohormonal perturbations that contribute to heart failure (HF) induced renal dysfunction (RD). The objective of this study was to determine if randomization to digoxin is associated with improvement in renal function (IRF) and to evaluate if patients with digoxin induced IRF have improved clinical outcomes. Methods and Results Patients in the Digitalis Investigation Group dataset with protocol driven 12 month serum creatinine levels (performed in a central laboratory, n=980) were studied. IRF was defined as a post randomization ≥ 20% increase in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). IRF occurred in 15.5% of the population (mean improvement in eGFR 34.5 ± 15.4%) and was more common in patients randomized to digoxin (adjusted OR=1.6, p=0.02). In patients without IRF, digoxin was not associated with reduced death or hospitalization (adjusted HR=0.96, 95% CI 0.8–1.2, p=0.67). However, in the group with IRF, digoxin was associated with substantially improved hospitalization free survival (adjusted HR=0.49, 95% CI 0.3–0.8, p=0.006, p interaction=0.026). Conclusions In this subset of the DIG trial, digoxin was associated with long term improvement in kidney function, and in patients demonstrating this favorable renal response, reduction in death or hospitalization. Additional research is necessary to confirm these hypothesis generating findings. PMID:23663810

  17. [Clinical decision-making support systems in renal failure].

    PubMed

    Martínez Bernabé, E; Paluzie-Ávila, G; Terre Ohme, S; Ruiz Poza, D; Parada Aradilla, M A; González Martínez, J; Albertí Valmaña, R; Castellvi Gordo, M

    2014-05-01

    Introducción: Los sistemas de soporte a la toma de decisiones clínicas utilizan característicasindividuales del paciente para generar recomendaciones a los clínicos.Objetivo: Evaluar el impacto de una herramienta de ajuste de fármacos en insuficienciarenal como sistema de soporte en la toma de decisiones clínicas encuanto al grado de aceptación de las intervenciones y el tiempo invertido por elfarmacéutico.Método: Estudio cuasi-experimental del tipo antes y después realizado en dos hospitalescomarcales. La intervención consistía en la incorporación de una alerta automatizadade función renal en la orden médica. Antes de la intervención (2007) semonitorizaron 40 fármacos. Se revisaron las analíticas de pacientes cuyo tratamientocontenía alguno de ellos. En caso de función renal alterada, se insertabauna recomendación de ajuste en la orden médica. Si el médico aceptaba, se considerabaéxito. El tiempo medio empleado fue 1 minuto/analítica consultada y 3minutos/recomendación. En 2008 se incorporó un sistema de recomendación automáticade ajuste según función renal de 100 fármacos con mensajes emergentes.En una fase posterior (2009) se evaluó y comparó el número de intervenciones y elporcentaje de éxito con la herramienta.Resultados: Fase previa: Se validaron 28.234 Ordenes Médicas Electrónicas, correspondientesa un promedio de 205 pacientes hospitalizados/día, y se revisaron 4.035analíticas. Se realizaron 121 intervenciones farmacéuticas (0,43% del total de órdenesmédicas). Se obtuvo éxito en el 33,06% de las intervenciones. El tiempo invertidopor el farmacéutico en consultar analíticas y realizar recomendaciones fue 73,3horas (67,25 horas correspondían a pacientes sin alteración de la función renal y enlos que no se realizó ninguna intervención). Fase posterior: Se validaron 26.584Ordenes Médicas Electrónicas, correspondientes a un promedio de 193 pacienteshospitalizados/día, y se realizaron 1.737 intervenciones

  18. Sleep quality in patients with chronic renal failure: a 3-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Sabbatini, Massimo; Pisani, Antonio; Crispo, Anna; Ragosta, Annalisa; Gallo, Riccardo; Pota, Andrea; Serio, Vittorio; Tripepi, Giovanni; Cianciaruso, Bruno

    2008-03-01

    Despite the high prevalence of sleep disorders in patients with kidney disease, no relationship has been demonstrated between sleep quality and the degree of renal function in cross-sectional studies. A prospective trial was, therefore, started in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) to evaluate whether a link exists between the modifications of these parameters observed during a three-year follow-up period. Sleep quality was determined by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) at baseline and after two and three years (Time 0, 2 and 3, respectively) in 78 patients with various degrees of CRF in association with the main clinical and biochemical variables. The baseline PSQI averaged 6.2+/-3.8 (range: 0-21, with higher values indicating worse sleep quality) and was significantly increased at both Time 2 and 3 (8.8+/-3.7 and 10.2+/-3.5, respectively, P<0.0001 vs baseline), whereas creatinine clearance progressively decreased (45+/-24 vs 41+/-26 and 32+/-20ml/min, at time 0, 2 and 3, respectively, P<0.0001), although an independent association with PSQI could not be demonstrated after adjustment for confounding factors (P=0.90, mixed linear model). Our data suggest that the progression of renal disease is accompanied by a progressive worsening of sleep quality; age is strongly related to both phenomena. PSQI represents an easy tool to use to detect sleep disorders and to more effectively evaluate renal patients; the prevention of sleep disorders by early and appropriate treatments could beneficially influence the course of the disease.

  19. [RENAL CELL CARCINOMA PRESENTING WITH HIGH-OUTPUT HEART FAILURE DUE TO ARTERIOVENOUS FISTULA].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Horiguchi, Akio; Isono, Makoto; Sinchi, Masayuki; Masunaga, Ayako; Ito, Keiichi; Asano, Tomohiko

    2015-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman who has a history of congestive heart failure and atrial fibrillation was admitted to our hospital with the exacerbation of exertional dyspnea and urinary retention due to severe gross hematuria. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a tumor involving the inferior and middle poles of the right kidney with no nodal involvement, or distant metastases, but that was accompanied by markedly proliferated blood vessels around the inferior vena cava and right renal vein, seemingly a result of an arteriovenous fistula. After embolization of the right renal artery, right radical nephrectomy was performed via a thoracoabdominal incision. The histological diagnosis of the tumor was clear cell renal cell carcinoma, G2 > G3, Fuhrman nuclear grade3, pT2a. Although the presence of an arteriovenous fistula was not confirmed histologically, the severely condensed proliferation of the blood vessels in the renal hilum is consistent with the diagnosis of an arteriovenous fistula accompanying renal cell carcinoma. Immediately after the operation, her symptoms of congestive heart failure, including dyspnea, subsided and her serum BNP levels and CTR value returned to normal levels. Two years after the operation, she shows no signs of recurrence or metastasis. To the best of our knowledge, there have been 25 cases of arteriovenous fistulas accompanied by renal cell carcinoma but only a few in which the symptoms were those of severe congestive heart failure. Clinicians should be aware that renal cell carcinoima could be a cause of heart failure.

  20. Appropriate antibiotic dosing in severe sepsis and acute renal failure: factors to consider.

    PubMed

    González de Molina, Francisco Javier; Ferrer, Ricard

    2011-08-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock cause considerable morbidity and mortality. Early appropriate empiric broad-spectrum antibiotics and advanced resuscitation therapy are the cornerstones of treatment for these conditions. In prescribing an antibiotic regimen in septic patients with acute renal failure treated with continuous renal replacement therapy, several factors should be considered: pharmacokinetics, weight, residual renal function, hepatic function, mode of renal replacement therapy (membrane and surface area, sieving coefficient, effluent and dialysate rate, and blood flow rate), severity of illness, microorganism, minimum inhibitory concentration, and others. Studies that determine the serum antibiotic concentrations are very useful in establishing the correct dosage in critical patients.

  1. [Fluoroquinolone induced acute renal failure. General review about a case report with crystalluria due to ciprofloxacin].

    PubMed

    Montagnac, Richard; Briat, Claude; Schillinger, Francis; Sartelet, Hervé; Birembaut, Philippe; Daudon, Michel

    2005-03-01

    A 58 year-old woman developed an acute renal failure very quickly after ingestion of two 500 mg tablets of ciprofloxacin, without any other identifiable risk factor. Renal biopsy was performed. No sign of acute interstitial nephritis was observed but tubular lesions were found, accompanied by deposits of a brown-yellowish substance identified by infrared microscopy as a ciprofloxacin salt. The outcome was favourable. This observation gives the opportunity to remind the different forms of quinolone-induced renal injury and to discuss the possible ways for preventing renal side-effects related to the quinolone use.

  2. On the mechanisms underlying poisoning-induced rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Talaie, Haleh; Emam-Hadi, Mohammad; Panahandeh, Reyhaneh; Hassanian-Moghaddam, Hosein; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT The clinical syndrome of rhabdomyolysis is caused by injury of skeletal muscles resulting in release of intracellular muscle constituents. Drug poisoning is one of the causes of severe rhabdomyolysis. Severe electrolyte disorders and acute renal failure may occur in rhabdomyolysis, leading to life-threatening situations. Early initiation of renal replacement therapy can help improve outcome. In the present retrospective study, medical records of 181 patients suspected of rhabdomyolysis from Loghman-Hakim Hospital in the period of 2004 to 2005 were reviewed. A creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) value of greater than five times normal (>/=975 IU/L) was the basis for confirmation of a rhabdomyolysis diagnosis. An increased serum creatinine level of more than 30% was the basis for acute renal failure diagnosis. Out of 156 patients, 100 were male with an age range of 13 to 78 years. One hundred and two (92%) patients had CPK >975 U/L, and 36 patients (28.6%) had a 30% or more increase in their creatinine level during their admission days. Mean fluid intake was the same in patients with renal failure and those without renal failure. In 8.3% of the cases, multiple drug poisoning was observed. The most common compound overdose associated with rhabdomyolysis was opium. It is concluded that fluid therapy alone is not adequate in the management of acute renal failure in rhabdomyolysis. Therefore, other etiological factors are involved that remain to be elucidated by further studies.

  3. Can the use of low-dose dopamine for treatment of acute renal failure be justified?

    PubMed

    Burton, C J; Tomson, C R

    1999-05-01

    The use of dopamine for the prevention and treatment of acute renal failure is widespread. Its use is based on physiology suggesting selective renal vasodilation when it is infused at low dose. This article reviews the available data on the clinical use of dopamine. When used to prevent acute renal failure in high-risk treatments there is no evidence of benefit of dopamine but, given the low incidence of significant renal failure, the studies are underpowered. In treatment of acute renal failure, the quality of the data is poor. Only in one small randomised trial of moderate acute renal failure in patients with malaria was a clinically significant benefit of dopamine shown. The rest of the data, in the form of case series, showed either no benefit of dopamine or small benefits of little clinical significance. Again, these studies are of insufficient power for conclusions to be drawn as to the overall benefits and risks. We conclude that benefits of dopamine use cannot be ruled out by currently available data but its use cannot be advised until trials examining clinically important endpoints in large numbers of patients have been performed.

  4. Asymptomatic acute pyelonephritis as a cause of acute renal failure in the elderly.

    PubMed Central

    Woodrow, G.; Patel, S.; Berman, P.; Morgan, A. G.; Burden, R. P.

    1993-01-01

    Urinary tract infections in the elderly are common, often asymptomatic and usually benign. We report three patients who presented with acute renal failure due to acute pyelonephritis in the absence of clinical findings of infection or urinary tract obstruction. Blood and urine cultures grew Escherichia coli in two of the patients and in two patients renal biopsy confirmed acute pyogenic pyelonephritis. Antimicrobial therapy and haemodialysis led to improvement, though one patient subsequently died from an unrelated cause. We suggest that acute bacterial pyelonephritis should be considered as a cause of acute renal failure in the elderly. Clinical features of infection may be absent despite bacteraemia. Prompt diagnosis and intervention may avoid chronic renal failure in a group that has a less favourable outcome with long-term dialysis. Images Figure 1 PMID:8497436

  5. Renal sodium avidity in heart failure: from pathophysiology to treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Mullens, Wilfried; Verbrugge, Frederik Hendrik; Nijst, Petra; Tang, Wai Hong Wilson

    2017-02-23

    Increased neurohumoral stimulation resulting in excessive sodium avidity and extracellular volume overload are hallmark features of decompensated heart failure. Especially in case of concomitant renal dysfunction, the kidneys often fail to elicit effective natriuresis. While assessment of renal function is generally performed by measuring serum creatinine-a surrogate for glomerular filtration-, this only represents part of the nephron's function. Alterations in tubular sodium handling are at least equally important in the development of volume overload and congestion. Venous congestion and neurohumoral activation in advanced HF further promote renal sodium and water retention. Interestingly, early on, before clinical signs of heart failure are evident, intrinsic renal derangements already impair natriuresis. This clinical review discusses the importance of heart failure (HF) induced changes in different nephron segments. A better understanding of cardiorenal interactions which ultimately result in sodium avidity in HF might help to treat and prevent congestion in chronic and acute HF.

  6. Early renal failure as a cardiovascular disease: Focus on lipoprotein(a) and prothrombotic state.

    PubMed

    Catena, Cristiana; Colussi, GianLuca; Nait, Francesca; Pezzutto, Francesca; Martinis, Flavia; Sechi, Leonardo A

    2015-07-06

    Patients with renal failure are at increased risk of cardiovascular events even at the earliest stages of disease. In addition to many classic cardiovascular risk factors, many conditions that are commonly identified as emerging risk factors might contribute to occurrence of cardiovascular disease. Changes in circulating levels of many of these emerging risk factors have been demonstrated in patients with early stages of renal failure caused by different types of renal disease and have been associated with detection of cardiovascular complications. However, for most of these factors evidence of benefits of correction on cardiovascular outcome is missing. In this article, we comment on the role of lipoprotein(a) and prothrombotic factors as potential contributors to cardiovascular events in patients with early renal failure.

  7. Diseases causing end-stage renal failure in New South Wales.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, J H; McCarthy, S W; Storey, B G; Roberts, B A; Gallery, E; Mahony, J F

    1975-01-01

    The nature of the original renal disease was determined in 403 consecutive cases of end-stage renal failure, in 317 of which the clinical diagnosis was corroborated by histological examination of the kidney. Five diseases accounted for 20 or more cases--glomerulonephritis (31% of the total), analgesic nephropathy (29%), primary vesicoureteral reflux (8%), essential hypertension (6%), and polycystic kidneys (5%). In only four cases did renal failure result from chronic pyelonephritis without a demonstrable primary cause. Greater use of micturating cystography and cystoscopy and routine urine testing for salicylate are advocated for earlier diagnosis of the major causes of "pyelonephritis". The incidence of end-stage renal failure in people aged 15-55 in New South Wales was estimated to be at least 34 new cases per million of total population each year. PMID:1090338

  8. Development of chronic heart failure in a young woman with hypertension associated with renal artery stenosis with preserved renal function.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Christina; Abdulla, Jawdat

    2014-07-02

    A 33-year-old woman with presumed essential hypertension and symptoms equivalent to New York Heart Association class II was suspected of heart failure and referred to echocardiography. The patient's ECG showed a left bundle branch block. Electrolytes, serum creatinine and estimated-glomerular filtration rate as well as urine test for protein were all normal. The patient had no peripheral oedema. The transthoracic echocardiography confirmed systolic and diastolic dysfunction and an ejection fraction of 25% and left ventricular hypertrophy. Ultrasound of renal arteries and renal CT angiography (renal CTA) revealed a significant stenosis and an aneurysm corresponding to the right renal artery with challenges to traditional interventions. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  9. Effect of Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy on Outcome in Pediatric Acute Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Deep, Akash; Stewart, Claire E; Dhawan, Anil; Douiri, Abdel

    2016-10-01

    To establish the effect of continuous renal replacement therapy on outcome in pediatric acute liver failure. Retrospective cohort study. Sixteen-bed PICU in a university-affiliated tertiary care hospital and specialist liver centre. All children (0-18 yr) admitted to PICU with pediatric acute liver failure between January 2003 and December 2013. Children with pediatric acute liver failure were managed according to a set protocol. The guidelines for continuous renal replacement therapy in pediatric acute liver failure were changed in 2011 following preliminary results to indicate the earlier use of continuous renal replacement therapy for both renal dysfunction and detoxification. Of 165 children admitted with pediatric acute liver failure, 136 met the inclusion criteria and 45 of these received continuous renal replacement therapy prior to transplantation or recovery. Of the children managed with continuous renal replacement therapy, 26 (58%) survived: 19 were successfully bridged to liver transplantation and 7 spontaneously recovered. Cox proportional hazards regression model clearly showed reducing hyperammonemia by 48 hours after initiating continuous renal replacement therapy significantly improved survival (HR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.013-1.073; p = 0.004). On average, for every 10% decrease in ammonia from baseline at 48 hours, the likelihood of survival increased by 50%. Time to initiate continuous renal replacement therapy from PICU admission was lower in survivors compared to nonsurvivors (HR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.916-1.007; p = 0.095). Change in practice to initiate early and high-dose continuous renal replacement therapy led to increased survival with maximum effect being visible in the first 14 days (HR, 3; 95% CI, 1.0-10.3; p = 0.063). Among children with pediatric acute liver failure who did not receive a liver transplant, use of continuous renal replacement therapy significantly improved survival (HR, 4; 95% CI, 1.5-11.6; p = 0.006). Continuous renal replacement

  10. Associations of Conventional Echocardiographic Measures with Incident Heart Failure and Mortality: The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort.

    PubMed

    Dubin, Ruth F; Deo, Rajat; Bansal, Nisha; Anderson, Amanda H; Yang, Peter; Go, Alan S; Keane, Martin; Townsend, Ray; Porter, Anna; Budoff, Matthew; Malik, Shaista; He, Jiang; Rahman, Mahboob; Wright, Jackson; Cappola, Thomas; Kallem, Radhakrishna; Roy, Jason; Sha, Daohang; Shlipak, Michael G

    2017-01-06

    Heart failure is the most frequent cardiac complication of CKD. Left ventricular hypertrophy is common and develops early in CKD, but studies have not adequately evaluated the association of left ventricular mass index with heart failure incidence among men and women with CKD. We evaluated echocardiograms of 2567 participants without self-reported heart failure enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study. Two-dimensional echocardiograms were performed at the year 1 study visit and interpreted at a central core laboratory. Left ventricular mass index was calculated using the linear method, indexed to height(2.7), and analyzed using sex-specific quartiles. The primary outcomes of incident heart failure and all-cause mortality were adjudicated over a median of 6.6 (interquartile range, 5.7-7.6) years. Among 2567 participants, 45% were women, and 54% were nonwhite race; mean (SD) age was 59±11 years old, and mean eGFR was 44±17 ml/min per 1.73 m(2). During a median follow-up period of 6.6 years, 262 participants developed heart failure, and 470 participants died. Compared with participants in the first quartile of left ventricular mass index, those in the highest quartile had higher rates of incident heart failure (hazard ratio, 3.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.96 to 8.02) and mortality (hazard ratio, 1.86; 95% confidence interval, 1.22 to 2.85), even after adjustment for B-type natriuretic peptide, troponin T, mineral metabolism markers, and other cardiovascular disease risk factors. Those in the lowest quartile of ejection fraction had higher rates of incident heart failure (hazard ratio, 3.01; 95% confidence interval, 1.94 to 4.67) but similar mortality rates (hazard ratio, 1.18; 95% confidence interval, 0.89 to 1.57) compared with those in the highest quartile. Diastolic dysfunction was not significantly associated with heart failure or death. Among persons with CKD and without history of cardiovascular disease, left ventricular mass index is

  11. Renal impairment and worsening of renal function in acute heart failure: can new therapies help? The potential role of serelaxin.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Roland E; Mitrovic, Veselin; Hengstenberg, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Renal dysfunction is a frequent finding in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) and an important prognostic factor for adverse outcomes. Worsening of renal function occurs in 30-50% of patients hospitalised for AHF, and is associated with increased mortality, prolonged hospital stay and increased risk of readmission. Likely mechanisms involved in the decrease in renal function include impaired haemodynamics and activation of neurohormonal factors, such as the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, the sympathetic nervous system and the arginine-vasopressin system. Additionally, many drugs currently used to treat AHF have a detrimental effect on renal function. Therefore, pharmacotherapy for AHF should carefully take into account any potential complications related to renal function. Serelaxin, currently in clinical development for the treatment of AHF is a recombinant form of human relaxin-2, identical in structure to the naturally occurring human relaxin-2 peptide hormone that mediates cardiac and renal adaptations during pregnancy. Data from both pre-clinical and clinical studies indicate a potentially beneficial effect of serelaxin on kidney function. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms and impact of impairment of renal function in AHF, and the potential benefits of new therapies, such as serelaxin, in this context.

  12. Broken pump or leaky filter? Renal dysfunction in heart failure a contemporary review.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Colin J; Mark, Partick B; Weir, Robin A P

    2008-08-18

    Renal dysfunction is a frequent and progressive complication of chronic heart failure and is a powerful predictor of cardiovascular mortality. It is intimately associated with cardiovascular disease even in its earliest stages. Although cardiovascular and renal disease share many risk factors, the prognostic implications do not simply reflect widespread atherosclerotic vascular disease as this appears to be as important in those with heart failure secondary to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy as it is in those with coronary artery disease. There may be a role in the progression of heart failure, as the deleterious effects of even "mild" renal impairment seem to be borne out in predicting outcome, in a broad range of heart failure patients including those with heart failure and preserved systolic function. Renal dysfunction is both an indication for, as well as frequently limiting intervention with intensive disease modifying therapy. Although renal impairment is common in heart failure and these patients are at higher risk for adverse events including death, they are under represented in clinical trials.

  13. Acute cardiac tamponade: an unusual cause of acute renal failure in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Nampoory, Naryanan; Gheith, Osama; Al-Otaibi, Torki; Halim, Medhat; Nair, Prasad; Said, Tarek; Mosaad, Ahmed; Al-Sayed, Zakareya; Alsayed, Ayman; Yagan, Jude

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of slow graft function in a renal transplant recipient caused by uremic acute pericardial effusion with tamponade. Urgent pericardiocentesis was done with an improvement in blood pressure, immediate diuresis, and quick recovery of renal function back to baseline. Pericardial tamponade should be included in consideration of causes of type 1 cardiorenal syndrome in renal transplant recipients.

  14. [A case of postoperative recurrent lung cancer with chronic renal failure and respiratory failure successfully treated with gefitinib].

    PubMed

    Takaoka, Kazuhiko; Kimura, Bunpei; Aikawa, Akinori; Tokimitsu, Syouji; Hashizume, Mitsuru; Kidokoro, Tatsuo; Katou, Kan; Takano, Tomoko; Yamagishi, Mitsuo; Uchikado, Mika; Itou, Syuuji; Okano, Yoshinori; Hanawa, Yukie; Yagi, Miyuki

    2005-01-01

    We administered gefitinib to a patient after considering his request to be treated with the drug. Fortunately, he responded favorably to the treatment and did not show signs of serious adverse effects or deterioration of renal functions. The patient was a 69-year-old male who visited an outpatient clinic because of chronic renal failure and was diagnosed with primary lung cancer. He then underwent an operation for lung cancer, but because it had progressed to stage IV the lesion was not completely resected. The patient was unable to receive effective chemotherapy due to the prior chronic renal failure. During best support care, the patient suffered from respiratory failure due to the tumor growth, and his quality of life (QOL) deteriorated. The patient was administered 250 mg of gefitinib orally, which was effective in reducing the tumor, improving his QOL, and prolonging his survival time. With the lack of literature on administering gefitinib to patients with chronic renal failure and evidence supporting the effectiveness of this treatment, the physician in charge should obtain the patient's informed consent before initiating treatment using this anticancer drug.

  15. Drug Dosage in Patients with Renal Failure Optimized by Immediate Concurrent Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Falconnier, Ariane D; Haefeli, Walter E; Schoenenberger, Ronald A; Surber, Christian; Martin-Facklam, Meret

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the impact of immediate concurrent feedback on dose adjustment in patients with renal failure. DESIGN Prospective 12-month study in patients with various degrees of renal failure, with comparison to a retrospective control group. SETTING A 39-bed unit of a university hospital providing primary and tertiary care. PATIENTS Patients with renal failure (estimated creatinine clearance ≤50 mL/min) receiving at least 1 pharmacologically active drug. INTERVENTIONS Education of physicians and immediate concurrent feedback on the ward giving estimated creatinine clearance and dose recommendations for renally eliminated drugs adjusted to individual renal function. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS The percentage of dosage regimens adjusted to renal function and cost assessment of drug therapy were calculated. Overall, 17% of the patients had at least 1 estimated creatinine clearance ≤50 mL/min. In the intervention group, the dose of 81% of renally eliminated drugs was adjusted to renal function, compared with 33% in the control group ( P < .001). The mean difference in cost between standard and adjusted dose of renally eliminated drugs in the intervention and control groups was 5.3 ± 12.3 and 0.75 ± 2.8 Swiss francs (approximately US$3.5 and US$0.5), respectively ( P < .001), accounting for 16.5% and 2.8%, respectively, of daily medication costs of all drugs. CONCLUSIONS The proportion of doses of renally eliminated drugs adjusted to renal function can be substantially increased by immediate concurrent feedback. This saves drug costs and has the potential to prevent adverse drug reactions. PMID:11422633

  16. [The effect of low-protein diet supplemented with ketoacids in patients with chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Molnár, Márta; Szekeresné Izsák, Margit; Nagy, Judit; Figler, Mária

    2009-02-01

    It is known that dietary protein restriction slows the progression of chronic renal disease. If daily protein intake is less than 0.5-0.6 g/kgbw, the diet has to be supplemented with essential aminoacids/ketoacids. In this study the authors evaluate the long-term effect of low-protein diet supplemented with ketoacids on the progression of chronic renal failure, calcium and phosphorus metabolism, nutritional status, the compliance of patients and the permanent dietary education for the compliance. 51 predialysis patients have been treated with ketoacids supplemented low-protein diet during 12-57 months (mean treatment period: 26 months). Serum creatinine raised from 349.72+/-78.04 micromol/l to 460.66+/-206.66 micromol/l (27 micromol/l/year or 2.3 micromol/l/month), glomerular filtration rate (GFR) decreased from 21.52+/-7.84 ml/min to 18.22+/-7.76 ml/min (0.83 ml/min/year or 0.07 ml/min/month). The slope of 1/serum creatinine versus time was 0.0018 by linear regression analysis. Serum parathormon decreased significantly, but serum calcium and phosphorus did not change. Nutritional status of patients did not change significantly during the follow-up period. Protein intake decreased significantly and remained at this lower level during the treatment period. According to results: low-protein diet supplemented with ketoacids was effective in slowing progression of chronic renal failure, decreased PTH, did not change nutritional status. With permanently and good education it was possible to keep patients on low-protein diet for a long period.

  17. Disposition and metabolism of l-propranolol in experimental renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Terao, N.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of uranyl nitrate-induced renal failure on the hepatic metabolism of the levo-isomer of propranolol in rats was investigated. A sensitive and specific high-pressure liquid chromatographic assay method for l-propranolol in serum was developed for pharmacokinetic studies in the rat. The serum clearance of a single intravenous dose of l-propranolol (1.5 mg/kg) in normal rats approached hepatic blood flow rate. Renal failure had no apparent effect on the distribution and elimination of intravenously administered l-propranolol. After oral administration (6 mg/kg), l-propranolol undergoes extensive first-pass metabolism. The systemic availability of oral l-propranolol was 2.5 times higher in renal failure than normal rats. These results suggest that the hepatic first-pass metabolism of l-propranolol is inhibited in renal failure. The effect of experimental renal failure on the pharmacokinetics of l-propranolol in rats was also studied during chronic intravenous and oral administration of the drug. Massive accumulation of serum l-propranolol occurred during multiple oral dosing, probably a result of auto-inhibition of l-propranolol metabolism. The inhibitory effect of renal failure on the hepatic metabolism of l-propranolol was further demonstrated in the perfused rat liver in situ. The results of the heterologous perfusion experiments indicate that the diminished hepatic first-pass effect of l-propranolol in renal failure rats is primarily due to the presence of endogenous metabolic inhibitors(s) in uremic blood.

  18. Potassium channel-mediated vasorelaxation is impaired in experimental renal failure.

    PubMed

    Kalliovalkama, J; Jolma, P; Tolvanen, J P; Kähönen, M; Hutri-Kähönen, N; Saha, H; Tuorila, S; Moilanen, E; Pörsti, I

    1999-10-01

    Chronic renal failure is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and abnormal arterial tone, but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are poorly understood. Therefore, we studied the responses of isolated mesenteric arterial rings from Wistar-Kyoto rats in standard organ chambers 6 wk after subtotal (5/6) nephrectomy or sham operation. Subtotal nephrectomy resulted in a 1.7-fold elevation of plasma urea nitrogen, whereas blood pressure was not significantly affected. Endothelium-mediated relaxations of norepinephrine-precontracted rings to ACh were impaired in renal failure rats. The nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester inhibited relaxations to ACh more effectively in the renal failure group, whereas the cyclooxygenase inhibitor diclofenac did not significantly affect the response in either group. Inhibition of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels by charybdotoxin and apamin attenuated NO synthase- and cyclooxygenase-resistant relaxations to ACh in control but not renal failure rats and abolished the difference between these groups. Endothelium-independent relaxations to isoproterenol and cromakalim, vasodilators acting via beta-adrenoceptors and ATP-sensitive K(+) channels, respectively, were impaired in the renal failure group, whereas relaxations to the NO donor nitroprusside were similar in both groups. In conclusion, endothelium-mediated relaxation in renal failure rats was impaired in the absence and presence of NO synthase and cyclooxygenase inhibition but not with prevented smooth muscle hyperpolarization. Endothelium-independent relaxations to isoproterenol and cromakalim were also attenuated after 5/6 nephrectomy. These results suggest that impaired vasodilatation in experimental renal failure could be attributed to reduced relaxation via arterial K(+) channels.

  19. The management of neonatal acute and chronic renal failure: A review.

    PubMed

    Coulthard, Malcolm G

    2016-11-01

    Most babies with chronic renal failure are identified antenatally, and over half that are treated with peritoneal dialysis receive kidney transplants before school age. Most infants that develop acute renal failure have hypotension following cardiac surgery, or multiple organ failure. Sometimes the falls in glomerular filtration and urine output are physiological and reversible, and sometimes due to kidney injury, but (illogically) it is now common to define them all as having 'acute kidney injury'. Contrary to widespread opinion, careful interpretation of the plasma creatinine concentrations can provide sensitive evidence of early acute renal failure. Conservative management frequently leads to under-nutrition or fluid overload. Acute peritoneal dialysis is often technically fraught in very small patients, and haemotherapies have been limited by vascular access and anticoagulation requirements, the need to blood-prime circuits, and serious limitations in regulating fluid removal. Newer devices, including the Nidus, have been specifically designed to reduce these difficulties.

  20. Pharmacologic strategies to preserve renal function in acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sachin; Taylor, David O

    2015-02-01

    Over a million patients get hospitalized with the diagnosis of acute decompensated heart failure which poses an insurmountable financial burden on the health care system. Heart failure alone incurs over 30 billion dollars with half the cost spent towards acute hospitalizations. Majority of the treatment strategies have focused towards decongesting patients which often comes with the cost of worsening renal function. Renal dysfunction in the setting of acute decompensated heart failure portends worse morbidity and mortality. Recently, there has been a change in the focus with shift towards therapies attempting to conserve renal function. In the past decade, we have witnessed several large randomized controlled trials testing the established as well as emerging therapies in this subset of population with mixed results. This review intends to provide a comprehensive overview of the pharmacologic therapies commonly utilized in the management of acute decompensated heart failure and the body of evidence supporting these strategies.

  1. Insulin is protein-anabolic in chronic renal failure patients.

    PubMed

    Lim, Victoria S; Yarasheski, Kevin E; Crowley, Jan R; Fangman, Jerry; Flanigan, Michael

    2003-09-01

    To examine the protein anabolic actions of insulin in chronic renal failure, the authors measured four sets of whole body leucine fluxes during insulin alone and insulin with amino acid infusion in nine uremic patients before hemodialysis (B-HD). Seven were restudied 8 wk after initiation of maintenance hemodialysis (HD). Six normal subjects served as control (N). All values ( micro mol/kg/h, mean +/- SEM) are presented in the sequence of B-HD, HD, and N, and only P < 0.05 are listed. During Flux 1 (baseline), D (leucine release from body protein degradation) were 114 +/- 7, 126 +/- 4, and 116 +/- 6, respectively. C (leucine oxidation rates) were 18 +/- 2, 17 +/- 2, and 21 +/- 3, respectively. S (leucine disappearance into body protein [index of protein synthesis]) were 96 +/- 6, 107 +/- 4, and 94 +/- 4, respectively, and balances (net leucine flux into protein [values were negative during fasting]) were -18 +/- 2, -17 +/- 2, and -21 +/- 3, respectively. During Flux 2 (low-dose insulin infusion), D were 89 +/- 3, 98 +/- 6, and 94 +/- 5, respectively; C were 12 +/- 1, 11 +/- 2, and 18 +/- 1, respectively (P = 0.02); S were 77 +/- 4, 87 +/- 5, and 76 +/- 5, respectively, and balances were -12 +/- 1, -11 +/- 2, and -18 +/- 1, respectively (P = 0.02). During Flux 3 (high-dose insulin infusion): D were 77 +/- 3, 82 +/- 7, and 84 +/- 5, respectively; C were 9 +/- 1, 8 +/- 1, and 14 +/- 1, respectively (P = 0.005); S were 68 +/- 4, 74 +/- 6, and 70 +/- 5, respectively, and balances were -9 +/- 1, -8 +/- 1, and -14 +/- 1, respectively (P = 0.005). In Flux 4 (insulin infused with amino acids): D were 73 +/- 3, 107 +/- 18, and 85 +/- 7, respectively; C were 35 +/- 4, 29 +/- 5, and 39 +/- 3, respectively; S were 105 +/- 5, 145 +/- 15, and 113 +/- 6, respectively (P = 0.02), and balances were 32 +/- 4, 38 +/- 5, and 27 +/- 3, respectively. These data show that B-HD and HD patients were as sensitive as normal subjects to the protein anabolic actions of insulin. Insulin alone

  2. Cardiovascular and renal effects of carvedilol in dogs with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Uechi, Masami; Sasaki, Takahiro; Ueno, Kouichiro; Yamamoto, Taiji; Ishikawa, Yumi

    2002-06-01

    To determine the acute effects of carvedilol (beta-blocker) on cardiovascular and renal function and its pharmacokinetics in dogs. Fifteen mature mongrel dogs (7-15 kg) of both sexes were used in these experiments. Eight dogs served as controls, and seven dogs served as iatrogenic mitral regurgitation (MR) experimental animals. Carvedilol (0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 mg/kg, P.O.) was administered, and the blood carvedilol concentration was analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The response to isoproterenol or phenylephrine was also evaluated. Isoproterenol (0.025 microg/kg/min) was infused via the saphenous vein for 5 min, and phenylephrine (5 microg/kg) was injected with carvedilol (0.2, 0.4 mg/kg) or placebo for 4 days. The heart rate and arterial blood pressure were measured, and LV fractional shortening was measured by echocardiography. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal plasma flow (RPF) were measured by intravenous infusion of sodium thiosulfate and sodium para-aminohippurate. Carvedilol (0.2 mg/kg) decreased the heart rate, whereas renal function, arterial blood pressure, and left ventricular contractile function were not affected. Carvedilol (0.4 mg/kg) decreased heart rate, blood pressure, and renal function. The tachycardic response to isoproterenol was significantly diminished for 36 hr by 0.4 mg/kg carvedilol. Carvedilol 0.2 mg/kg inhibited this effect for 24 hr. Thus, it is necessary to titrate the dosage of carvedilol, it should be initiated at less than 0.2 mg/kg and titrated up to 0.4 mg/kg for heart failure dogs.

  3. Atrial natriuretic peptide as a preload depressor in acute renal failure secondary to congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Seta, K; Hayashi, T; Sugawara, A; Kasuno, K; Watanabe, S; Sumi, Y; Kijima, Y; Kawaguchi, K; Kotake, C; Seo, T; Toda, T; Kuwahara, T

    1998-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to verify the hypothesis that infusion of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) might lower preload and be beneficial in the treatment of pulmonary congestion even without a diuresis in patients with acute renal failure (ARF) secondary to severe congestive heart failure (CHF). We studied 22 patients with ARF secondary to CHF. The mean age of the patients (14 men and 8 women) was 72 years (range 36 to 85 years). Seven of the patients had dilated cardiomyopathy, ten had ischemic heart disease, and five had valvular heart disease. ANP was infused intravenously and the following data before and 1 hour after the start of ANP infusion were recorded; urinary output, systemic blood pressure (SBP), pulmonary blood pressure (PBP), right atrial pressure (RAP), cardiac index (CI), heart rate (HR), and arterial blood oxygen partial pressure. Diastolic PBP were employed as pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. Urinary output did not change. Mean SBP decreased from 92 to 85 mmHg (p < 0.05), and mean PBP decreased from 34 to 28 mmHg (p < 0.01). Mean RAP decreased from 11 to 9 mmHg (p < 0.01) and diastolic PBP decreased from 25 to 19 mmHg (p < 0.01). HR did not change significantly and CI increased 2.4 to 2.5 mi/min/m2 (p < 0.05). Arterial blood oxygen partial pressure increased significantly from 71 to 82 mmHg (p < 0.05). In conclusion, ANP decreased preload and improved arterial blood oxygen partial pressure, though diuretic response to ANP is attenuated in ARF secondary to CHE. Infusion of ANP will be very beneficial in cases in which dyspnea and pulmonary edema due to elevation of preload are the principal clinical problems.

  4. Acute renal failure with severe loin pain and patchy renal ischemia after anaerobic exercise in patients with or without renal hypouricemia.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Isao

    2002-08-01

    Acute renal failure induced by rhabdomyolysis after strenuous exercise is well known. We describe here a new type of acute renal failure with severe loin pain which develops after anaerobic exercise (ALPE), for example, 200-meter track racing. The patients complained of severe loin pain several hours after exercise and presented at the emergency room. Since our first description 118 cases have been reported. The serum creatinine concentration was 4.7 +/- 2.9 mg/dl (mean +/- SD) at the initial examination and 6.0 +/- 3.0 mg/dl at maximum. Forty-nine of 96 cases whose serum uric acid levels were described revealed renal hypouricemia (51.0%). A specific risk factor is suggested by the fact that acute renal failure recurred after exercise in 20 of 118 cases. The creatine phosphokinase and serum myoglobin concentrations were normal or only slightly elevated, suggesting damaged type 2 muscle fibers. Renal computed tomography scans, performed several hours to 1-2 days after contrast medium administration, revealed multiple wedge-shaped areas of contrast enhancement. Forty-six of 50 cases examined by delayed computed tomography scan revealed bilateral wedge-shaped contrast enhancement. Although less efficient, radioisotopic scans, such as a methylene diphosphonate bone scan, have also been employed to detect patchy accumulation of isotopes in the kidneys (12 of 19 cases). The pathogenesis of ALPE may be patchy vasoconstriction of the renal vessels, because of its wedge-shaped distribution and its reversibility. Such vascular spasm would account for the renal pain. The prognosis was good, although 20 of 109 cases required dialysis treatment. In conclusion, there are two types of exercise-induced acute renal failure: one is the well-known myoglobin-induced acute renal failure, and the other is ALPE that may be nonmyoglobin induced or induced by myolysis of type 2 muscle fibers due to anaerobic exercise. One hundred and eighteen cases of ALPE were collected from the

  5. Anaemia in heart failure: a common interaction with renal insufficiency called the cardio-renal anaemia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Palazzuoli, A; Gallotta, M; Iovine, F; Nuti, R; Silverberg, D S

    2008-02-01

    Although many studies have found a high prevalence of anaemia in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF), few have carefully examined the relationship between the CHF and the prevalence of anaemia and chronic renal insufficiency (CRI). Patients with advanced renal failure, significant anaemia, diffuse atherosclerosis, respiratory disease and more elderly patients have been systematically excluded from the great majority of the randomised clinical trials. Both anaemia and renal insufficiency are very common associated diseases associated with increased mortality, morbidity and rate of hospitalisation in CHF patients. Impaired renal function is associated with adverse outcomes because it represents a marker of coexistent disease and more diffuse atherosclerosis. In patients with CHF, progressive renal dysfunction leads to a decrease in erythropoietin (EPO) levels with reduced erythrocyte production from bone marrow. This may explain the common association between CHF, anaemia and CRI in clinical practice. The normalisation of haemoglobin concentration by EPO in patients with CHF and CRI results in improved exercise capacity by increasing oxygen delivery and improving cardiac function. In this review, we describe the mechanisms linking anaemic status, CRI and CHF, the prognostic relevance of each disease, treatment implications, and potential benefit of EPO administration.

  6. Chronic renal failure and shortened lifespan in COL4A3+/- mice: an animal model for thin basement membrane nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Beirowski, Bogdan; Weber, Manfred; Gross, Oliver

    2006-07-01

    A heterozygous mutation in autosomal Alport genes COL4A3 and COL4A4 can be found in 20 to 50% of individuals with familial benign hematuria and diffuse glomerular basement membrane thinning (thin basement membrane nephropathy [TBMN]). Approximately 1% of humans are heterozygous carriers of mutations in the autosomal Alport genes and at risk for developing renal failure as a result of TBMN. The incidence and pathogenesis of renal failure in heterozygous COL4A3/4 mutation carriers is still unclear and was examined further in this study using COL4A3 knockout mice. In heterozygous COL4A3(+/-) mice lifespan, hematuria and renal function (serum urea and proteinuria) were monitored during a period of 3 yr, and renal tissue was examined by light and electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot. Lifespan of COL4A3(+/-) mice was found to be significantly shorter than in healthy controls (21.7 versus 30.3 mo). Persistent glomerular hematuria was detected starting in week 9; proteinuria of > 0.1 g/L started after 3 mo of life and increased to > 3 g/L after 24 mo. The glomerular basement membrane was significantly thinned (167 versus 200 nm in wild type) in 30-wk-old mice, coinciding with focal glomerulosclerosis, tubulointerstitial fibrosis, and increased levels of TGF-beta and connective tissue growth factor. The renal phenotype in COL4A3(+/-) mice resembled the clinical and histopathologic phenotype of human cases of TBMN with concomitant progression to chronic renal failure. Therefore, the COL4A3(+/-) mouse model will help in the understanding of the pathogenesis of TBMN in humans and in the evaluation of potential therapies.

  7. Iron deficiency anemia in a ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) with concurrent chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kadie M; Wolf, Karen N

    2014-02-15

    A 16-year-old vasectomized male ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) with a history of suspected chronic renal failure was evaluated because of extreme lethargy, hyperpnea, and abscess of the right pectoral scent gland. Examination of the anesthetized patient revealed an impacted right pectoral scent gland with serosanguineous exudate. A CBC and serum biochemical analysis revealed severe anemia, marked azotemia, hyperphosphatemia, and hypocalcemia. Supportive care (including fluid therapy and phosphorus binder administration) was initiated for renal failure; the affected gland was cleaned, and antimicrobials were administered. The patient received 1 blood transfusion, and darbepoetin alfa was administered weekly to stimulate RBC production. Anemia and azotemia persisted. Three months after treatment started, serum iron analysis revealed that iron deficiency was the probable cause for the lack of a consistent regenerative response to darbepoetin injections. Iron dextran injections resulted in a marked regenerative response; however, serum biochemical analysis results after the second injection were consistent with hepatic injury. Hepatic enzyme activities normalized following discontinuation of iron dextran treatment, but the lemur's Hct declined rapidly despite supplementary iron administration PO. The patient developed severe mandibular osteomyelitis and was euthanized because of poor prognosis. Postmortem evaluation of hepatic iron concentration confirmed iron deficiency. The family Lemuridae is considered prone to hemosiderosis and hemochromatosis, which delayed rapid diagnosis and treatment of the lemur's disease. Apparent hepatic injury following iron dextran injections further complicated treatment. Findings for this lemur support the use of species-specific total iron binding capacity and total serum iron and ferritin concentrations in evaluation of an animal with suspected iron deficiency.

  8. Association between left ventricular dysfunction, anemia, and chronic renal failure. Analysis of the Heart Failure Prevalence and Predictors in Turkey (HAPPY) cohort.

    PubMed

    Kepez, A; Mutlu, B; Degertekin, M; Erol, C

    2015-06-01

    Anemia and chronic renal failure (CRF) are frequent comorbidities in patients with heart failure (HF), and they have been reported to be associated with increased mortality and hospitalization rates. HF, anemia, and CRF have been reported to interact with each other forming a vicious cycle termed cardio-renal-anemia syndrome. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association of HF, anemia, and CRF using data from the large-scale"Heart Failure Prevalence and Predictors in Turkey (HAPPY)" study. Among the HAPPY cohort, 3,369 subjects who had either left ventricular dysfunction (LVD) or normal left ventricular function on echocardiography or normal serum NT-proBNP levels were included in this analysis. The prevalence of anemia and CRF was significantly higher in patients with LVD compared with subjects with normal ventricular function (20.7 % vs. 4.0 % and 19.0 % vs. 3.7 %, respectively; p < 0.001 for each). Binary logistic regression analyses for the presence of LVD, anemia, and CRF demonstrated that each one was an independent predictor for the presence of the others. These findings point to the presence of cardio-renal-anemia syndrome and the necessity of treating these comorbidities in patients with HF.

  9. Expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and fibronectin in tubulointerstitial lesions of cats with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Sawashima, K; Mizuno, S; Mizuno-Horikawa, Y; Shimada, A; Kudo, T; Kurosawa, T

    2000-09-01

    To examine renal expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) and fibronectin in cats with tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) for use in predicting progression to renal fibrosis. 19 cats with TIN and 9 cats without nephritis. Serum creatinine and BUN concentrations were measured. Indices for glomerular extra-cellular matrix (ECM), tubular injury (TI), and fibronectin were determined in renal specimens to quantify the extent of injury and fibrotic lesions. Expression of alpha-SMA in renal tissue was immunohistochemically detected, and correlations were evaluated between the alpha-SMA index and other histologic and clinical variables. The alpha-SMA index in tubulointerstitial areas (1.63 +/- 0.78) was significantly higher in cats with TIN, especially in the periglomerular and peritubular areas, than in cats without nephritis (0.20 +/- 0.14). The alpha-SMA index was significantly associated with the TI index (r2 = 0.70), fibronectin index (r2 = 0.95), BUN concentration (r = 0.64), and serum creatinine concentration () = 0.66). Of special interest was that interstitial alpha-SMA expression appeared evident in the kidneys at an early stage of TIN, prior to the onset of ECM deposition. Analysis of results of histologic and clinical examinations revealed that interstitial alpha-SMA expression may have clinical importance and may be a useful early histologic marker for development of chronic renal failure in cats. An immunohistochemical examination for fibrogenic molecules (such as alpha-SMA expression) may provide fundamental information on the pathogenesis of early-stage renal disease and aid clinical management of cats with chronic renal failure, including TIN.

  10. Effect of growth hormone treatment on the adult height of children with chronic renal failure. German Study Group for Growth Hormone Treatment in Chronic Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Haffner, D; Schaefer, F; Nissel, R; Wühl, E; Tönshoff, B; Mehls, O

    2000-09-28

    Growth hormone treatment stimulates growth in short children with chronic renal failure. However, the extent to which this therapy increases final adult height is not known. We followed 38 initially prepubertal children with chronic renal failure treated with growth hormone for a mean of 5.3 years until they reached their final adult height. The mean (+/-SD) age at the start of treatment was 10.4+/-2.2 years, the mean bone age was 7.1+/-2.3 years, and the mean height was 3.1+/-1.2 SD below normal. Fifty matched children with chronic renal failure who were not treated with growth hormone served as controls. The children treated with growth hormone had sustained catch-up growth, whereas the control children had progressive growth failure. The mean final height of the growth hormone-treated children was 165 cm for boys and 156 cm for girls. The mean final adult height of the growth hormone-treated children was 1.6+/-1.2 SD below normal, which was 1.4 SD above their standardized height at base line (P< 0.001). In contrast, the final height of the untreated children (2.1+/-1.2 SD below normal) was 0.6 SD below their standardized height at base line (P<0.001). Although prepubertal bone maturation was accelerated in growth hormone-treated children, treatment was not associated with a shortening of the pubertal growth spurt. The total height gain was positively associated with the initial target-height deficit and the duration of growth hormone therapy and was negatively associated with the percentage of the observation period spent receiving dialysis treatment. Long-term growth hormone treatment of children with chronic renal failure induces persistent catch-up growth, and the majority of patients achieve normal adult height.

  11. Allopurinol Reduces the Lethality Associated with Acute Renal Failure Induced by Crotalus durissus terrificus Snake Venom: Comparison with Probenecid

    PubMed Central

    Frezzatti, Rodrigo; Silveira, Paulo Flavio

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute renal failure is one of the most serious complications of envenoming resulting from Crotalus durissus terrificus bites. This study evaluated the relevance of hyperuricemia and oxidative stress and the effects of allopurinol and probenecid in renal dysfunction caused by direct nephrotoxicity of C. d. terrificus venom. Methodology/Principal Findings Hematocrit, protein, renal function and redox status were assessed in mice. High ratio of oxidized/reduced glutathione and hyperuricemia induced by C. d. terrificus venom were ameliorated by both, allopurinol or probenecid, but only allopurinol significantly reduced the lethality caused by C. d. terrificus venom. The effectiveness of probenecid is compromised probably because it promoted hypercreatinemia and hypocreatinuria and worsed the urinary hypo-osmolality in envenomed mice. In turn, the highest effectiveness of allopurinol might be due to its ability to diminish the intracellular formation of uric acid. Conclusions/Significance Data provide consistent evidences linking uric acid with the acute renal failure induced by C. d. terrificus venom, as well as that this envenoming in mice constitutes an attractive animal model suitable for studying the hyperuricemia and that the allopurinol deserves to be clinically evaluated as an approach complementary to anti-snake venom serotherapy. PMID:21909449

  12. Evaluation of psychiatric issues in renal transplant setting

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, R.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic illnesses can cause wide range of personality and behavioral disorders and require appropriate evaluation. Poor patient compliance with prescribed medications and other aspects of management can affect the outcome towards undesirable situation. The setting of renal transplantation presents a broad spectrum of problems and consequences. People involved (patients, their families or treating physicians) have lifelong commitment with evaluation and implementation of measures towards resolving the issues. Psychiatric evaluation is part of this scenario, which starts with evaluation of organ recipient along with donor and family as whole, right from time of diagnosis of end organ failure to transplant and then lifelong. This review highlights common issues faced at different stages of this lengthy pathway. PMID:26664203

  13. Treatable renal failure found in non-ambulatory Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Motoki, Takahiro; Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Komaki, Hirofumi; Mori-Yoshimura, Madoka; Oya, Yasushi; Takeshita, Eri; Ishiyama, Akihiko; Saito, Takashi; Nakagawa, Eiji; Sugai, Kenji; Murata, Miho; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2015-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive muscular disorder in which respiratory and heart failures are the main causes of death. Intensive intervention in respiratory and cardiac function has dramatically improved the prognosis; however, dysfunction in other multiple organs may emerge in the later stages of the disease. We report the case of four non-ambulatory DMD patients who presented with renal failure. Common findings included decreased fluid intake, use of diuretics, and presence of chronic heart failure. The levels of serum cystatin C (CysC), a marker of kidney function unaffected by reduced muscle mass, were elevated in all four patients. In two patients, renal failure improved by increasing fluid intake, and discontinuing or reducing the dose of diuretics. The findings suggest that non-ambulatory DMD patients are at a risk of reduced kidney perfusion, which potentially leads to prerenal failure. Therefore, in DMD patients, dehydration signs and CysC levels should be monitored.

  14. Statin-associated rhabdomyolysis with acute renal failure complicated by intradialytic NSTEMI: a review of lipid management considerations.

    PubMed

    Kar, Subrata; Chockalingam, Anand

    2013-01-01

    Statins (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors) are associated with myopathy, myalgias, myositis, and rhabdomyolysis. Rhabdoymyolysis is a rare complication and may cause acute renal failure, which may be fatal. In such cases, alternative therapies should be considered. In this review, we attempted to elucidate the lipid management options in patients with rhabdomyolysis and coronary artery disease. We also describe a case report of a patient who developed rhabdomyolysis from dual antilipid therapy followed by acute renal failure and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction. Such a complex case has not been reported in the literature, and lipid management options may include niacin, omega 3-fatty acids, or bile acid sequestrants. Once alternative therapies are initiated, monitoring a patient closely with evaluation for associated adverse events should be performed.

  15. Estimation of liver parameters and oxidative stress in chronic renal failure patients on hemodialysis in Erbil governorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakey, Musher Ismail Salih; Abdoulrahman, Kamaran Kaiani

    2017-09-01

    The present study aims to evaluate iron related parameters in chronic renal failure (CRF) patients on hemodialysis (HD). The study was carried out in Kidney Dialysis Center of Hawler Teaching Hospital in Erbil governorate. This study comprised (76) patients with chronic renal failure on hemodialysis and 41 healthy subjects as a control group of same ages. All hemodialysis patients were taking erythropoietin. The blood samples were taken from the patients before and after the process of hemodialysis for liver parameters and oxidative stress estimations. The results of this study showed lower levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), albumin, total bilirubin, total protein and total antioxidant capacity (TAC), while higher levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), direct bilirubin and malondialdeyhde (MDA) before analysis was seen. Hemodialysis causes increasing in AST, ALT, albumin, total bilirubin, total protein and decreasing in ALP, direct bilirubin MDA and TAC.

  16. [Transfusion-transmitted virus (TTV) and renal failure].

    PubMed

    Tarrass, Faissal; Koenig, Jean Louis; Leroy, Fanny; Mackaya, Léandre; Colomb, Henri

    2006-09-01

    In 1997, a new DNA virus, designated TTV "Transfusion Transmitted Virus", was isolated and seemed to be associated with non A-G post-transfusion hepatitis. The virus infects mainly patients at risk for parenteral exposure and hence, prone to develop chronic liver disease, as well as healthy populations worldwide. Few reports, however, have been published on the epidemiology and potential significance of TTV infection in patients with renal disease. This paper reviews, characterization of the virus, the history of its discovery, taxonomy and identification. Current status of TTV infection in patients with renal diseases are also summarised.

  17. Renovascular acute renal failure precipitated by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for pancreatic stones

    PubMed Central

    Cecere, Nicolas; Goffette, Pierre; Deprez, Pierre; Jadoul, Michel; Morelle, Johann

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) for pancreatic stones is considered a safe and efficient method to facilitate fragmentation and stone removal. We describe the case of a 73-year-old woman with a solitary functioning kidney who presented an acute-onset anuria and renovascular renal failure the day after ESWL. We speculate that vascular calcifications in the area targeted by shock waves played a critical role in renal artery obstruction in the present case. PMID:26251710

  18. [Vegetative regulation of the cardiovascular system in patients with chronic heart failure with chronic renal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, T E; Borovkova, N Iu

    2014-01-01

    This review deals with vegetative regulation of cardiovascular system in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and signs of chronic renal insufficiency. CHF is currently regarded as a disturbance of neurohumoral mechanisms controlling blood circulation. At the same time, both prognosis and outcome of CHF depend on the presence of chronic renal insufficiency whose pathogenesis is poorly understood The authors emphasize the importance of elucidation of common pathogenetic mechanisms of these mutually complicating conditions.

  19. Capillary/myocyte mismatch in the heart in renal failure--a role for erythropoietin?

    PubMed

    Amann, K; Buzello, M; Simonaviciene, A; Miltenberger-Miltenyi, G; Koch, A; Nabokov, A; Gross, M L; Gless, B; Mall, G; Ritz, E

    2000-07-01

    Chronic renal failure is characterized by remodeling of the heart with left ventricular hypertrophy (increasing oxygen demand) and capillary deficit leading to capillary/myocyte mismatch (decreasing oxygen supply). Erythropoietin (Epo) has known angiogenic properties causing endothelial cell activation, migration and sprouting, mediated at least in part via the JAK/STAT (Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription) pathway. In uraemic cardiac hypertrophy the presence of diminished capillary supply implies that capillary growth does not keep pace with development of hypertrophy. To investigate whether this was due to a deficit of the angiogenic hormone Epo we examined whether Epo levels are altered and whether an increase in haematocrit by administration of rhEpo influences capillary supply, i.e. capillary/myocyte mismatch in experimental renal failure. Male Spraque-Dawley rats were either subjected to partial renal ablation or sham operation. Only modest amounts of renal tissue were removed so that the rats were not anemic. Subgroups of rats received either human (rh)Epo alone or in combination with unspecific antihypertensive treatment (dihydralazine plus furosemide) in order to control the Epo induced rise in blood pressure. Capillary supply was measured stereologically as capillary length per volume myocardium using the orientator method. Capillary length density was reduced by approximately 25% after partial renal ablation (3237+/-601 vs 4293+/-501 mm/mm(3) in controls). It was not statistically different in animals with partial renal ablation+rhEpo+antihypertensive treatment (3620+/-828 mm/mm(3)) compared to partial ablation alone. The study shows that lack of Epo does not cause, or contribute to, the deficit of capillary growth in the hypertrophied left ventricle of rats with renal failure. In addition, a rise in haematocrit is not accompanied by beneficial effects on alterations of cardiovascular structure in experimental renal failure.

  20. A magnesium based phosphate binder reduces vascular calcification without affecting bone in chronic renal failure rats.

    PubMed

    Neven, Ellen; De Schutter, Tineke M; Dams, Geert; Gundlach, Kristina; Steppan, Sonja; Büchel, Janine; Passlick-Deetjen, Jutta; D'Haese, Patrick C; Behets, Geert J

    2014-01-01

    The alternative phosphate binder calcium acetate/magnesium carbonate (CaMg) effectively reduces hyperphosphatemia, the most important inducer of vascular calcification, in chronic renal failure (CRF). In this study, the effect of low dose CaMg on vascular calcification and possible effects of CaMg on bone turnover, a persistent clinical controversy, were evaluated in chronic renal failure rats. Adenine-induced CRF rats were treated daily with 185 mg/kg CaMg or vehicle for 5 weeks. The aortic calcium content and area% calcification were measured to evaluate the effect of CaMg. To study the effect of CaMg on bone remodeling, rats underwent 5/6th nephrectomy combined with either a normal phosphorus diet or a high phosphorus diet to differentiate between possible bone effects resulting from either CaMg-induced phosphate deficiency or a direct effect of Mg. Vehicle or CaMg was administered at doses of 185 and 375 mg/kg/day for 8 weeks. Bone histomorphometry was performed. Aortic calcium content was significantly reduced by 185 mg/kg/day CaMg. CaMg ameliorated features of hyperparathyroid bone disease. In CRF rats on a normal phosphorus diet, the highest CaMg dose caused an increase in osteoid area due to phosphate depletion. The high phosphorus diet combined with the highest CaMg dose prevented the phosphate depletion and thus the rise in osteoid area. CaMg had no effect on osteoblast/osteoclast or dynamic bone parameters, and did not alter bone Mg levels. CaMg at doses that reduce vascular calcification did not show any harmful effect on bone turnover.

  1. A Magnesium Based Phosphate Binder Reduces Vascular Calcification without Affecting Bone in Chronic Renal Failure Rats

    PubMed Central

    Neven, Ellen; De Schutter, Tineke M.; Dams, Geert; Gundlach, Kristina; Steppan, Sonja; Büchel, Janine; Passlick-Deetjen, Jutta; D'Haese, Patrick C.; Behets, Geert J.

    2014-01-01

    The alternative phosphate binder calcium acetate/magnesium carbonate (CaMg) effectively reduces hyperphosphatemia, the most important inducer of vascular calcification, in chronic renal failure (CRF). In this study, the effect of low dose CaMg on vascular calcification and possible effects of CaMg on bone turnover, a persistent clinical controversy, were evaluated in chronic renal failure rats. Adenine-induced CRF rats were treated daily with 185 mg/kg CaMg or vehicle for 5 weeks. The aortic calcium content and area% calcification were measured to evaluate the effect of CaMg. To study the effect of CaMg on bone remodeling, rats underwent 5/6th nephrectomy combined with either a normal phosphorus diet or a high phosphorus diet to differentiate between possible bone effects resulting from either CaMg-induced phosphate deficiency or a direct effect of Mg. Vehicle or CaMg was administered at doses of 185 and 375 mg/kg/day for 8 weeks. Bone histomorphometry was performed. Aortic calcium content was significantly reduced by 185 mg/kg/day CaMg. CaMg ameliorated features of hyperparathyroid bone disease. In CRF rats on a normal phosphorus diet, the highest CaMg dose caused an increase in osteoid area due to phosphate depletion. The high phosphorus diet combined with the highest CaMg dose prevented the phosphate depletion and thus the rise in osteoid area. CaMg had no effect on osteoblast/osteoclast or dynamic bone parameters, and did not alter bone Mg levels. CaMg at doses that reduce vascular calcification did not show any harmful effect on bone turnover. PMID:25229549

  2. Ethylene and ammonia traces measurements from the patients' breath with renal failure via LPAS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, C.; Dutu, D. C. A.; Cernat, R.; Matei, C.; Bratu, A. M.; Banita, S.; Dumitras, D. C.

    2011-11-01

    The application of laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) for fast and precise measurements of breath biomarkers has opened up new promises for monitoring and diagnostics in recent years, especially because breath test is a non-invasive method, safe, rapid and acceptable to patients. Our study involved assessment of breath ethylene and breath ammonia levels in patients with renal failure receiving haemodialysis (HD) treatment. Breath samples from healthy subjects and from patients with renal failure were collected using chemically inert aluminized bags and were subsequently analyzed using the LPAS technique. We have found out that the composition of exhaled breath in patients with renal failure contains not only ethylene, but also ammonia and gives valuable information for determining efficacy and endpoint of HD. Analysis of ethylene and ammonia traces from the human breath may provide insight into severity of oxidative stress and metabolic disturbances and may ensure optimal therapy and prevention of pathology at patients on continuous HD.

  3. [Rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure in human influenza A H1N1 mediated infection].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Ornelas-Arroyo, Sofía; Pérez-Bustos, Estela; Sánchez-Zúñiga, Jesús; Uribe-Esquivel, Misael

    2009-01-01

    Rabdomiolysis and acute renal failure secondary to influenza infection are rare. Up to now, few cases have been reported and most of them are primarily among children. Myositis associated to influenza infection is caused by the toxic effect of the virus in the muscular fiber, dysregulation of inflammatory cytokines and a cross reaction between the muscle fiber and the viral particles. We present the case of a 57 year old male with a diagnosis of H1N1 influenza who developed polyuria, oligoanuria, elevation of lactic dehydrogenase, myoglobin, creatinin phosphokinase and an electromyography with a myopathic pattern. The diagnosis of rabdomyolisis and acute renal failure were made, hemodyalisis was started and the patient improved satisfactorily. This is the first report of a patient with radmoyolisis and acute renal failure secondary to A H1N1 influenza treated during the Mexico epidemic.

  4. Hepatitis A complicated with acute renal failure and high hepatocyte growth factor: A case report.

    PubMed

    Oe, Shinji; Shibata, Michihiko; Miyagawa, Koichiro; Honma, Yuichi; Hiura, Masaaki; Abe, Shintaro; Harada, Masaru

    2015-08-28

    A 58-year-old man was admitted to our hospital. Laboratory data showed severe liver injury and that the patient was positive for immunoglobulin M anti-hepatitis A virus (HAV) antibodies. He was also complicated with severe renal dysfunction and had an extremely high level of serum hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Therefore, he was diagnosed with severe acute liver failure with acute renal failure (ARF) caused by HAV infection. Prognosis was expected to be poor because of complications by ARF and high serum HGF. However, liver and renal functions both improved rapidly without intensive treatment, and he was subsequently discharged from our hospital on the 21(st) hospital day. Although complication with ARF and high levels of serum HGF are both important factors predicting poor prognosis in acute liver failure patients, the present case achieved a favorable outcome. Endogenous HGF might play an important role as a regenerative effector in injured livers and kidneys.

  5. Erythrocyte organic phosphates in the anemia of renal failure in childhood.

    PubMed

    Müller-Wiefel, D E; Schärer, K; Fischer, W; Michalk, D

    1978-06-20

    Erythrocyte 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG ) and adenosinetriphosphate (ATP) levels were determined in 43 children with chronic renal failure on conservative treatment (CT), and 12 children on regular hemodialysis (HD) immediately before and after a HD session. The results were compared to non-anemic and anemic controls. In spite of anemia, erythrocyte 2,3-DPG in renal failure was similar to non-anemic controls at normal blood pH, but rose during dialysis as a result of alkalosis. In contrast, ATP levels were high already at a normal blood pH. 2,3-DPG correlated with packed cell volume (PCV) in children with renal failure but at lower concentrations compared to controls. Both organic phosphates in the erythrocytes showed a significant correlation with blood pH. The poor increase of 2,3-DPG, in combination with elevated ATP levels, suggests uremia-induced inhibition of 2,3-DPG synthesis.

  6. Acute renal failure and metabolic acidosis due to oxalic acid intoxication: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Rie; Morita, Seiji; Aoki, Hiromichi; Nakagawa, Yoshihide; Yamamoto, Isotoshi; Inokuchi, Sadaki

    2011-12-20

    Most of the reports of oxalic acid intoxication are in cases of ethylene glycol intoxication. These symptoms are known to be central nerve system manifestations, cardiopulmonary manifestations and acute renal failure. There have been only a few reports of direct oxalic acid intoxication. However, there have been a few recent reports of oxalic acid intoxication due to the ingestion of star fruit and ascorbic acid. We herein report the case of a patient with acute renal failure and metabolic acidosis caused directly by consumption of oxalic acid. During the initial examination by the physician at our hospital, the patient presented with tachypnea, a precordinal burning sensation, nausea and metabolic acidosis. After admission, the patient developed renal failure and anion gap high metabolic acidosis, but did not develop any CNS or cardio-pulmonary manifestations in the clinical course. The patient benefitted symptomatically from hemodialysis.

  7. Renal pathology and urinary protein excretion in a 14-month-old Bernese mountain dog with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Raila, J; Aupperle, H; Raila, G; Schoon, H-A; Schweigert, F J

    2007-04-01

    The renal pathology and urinary protein pattern of a 14-month-old female Bernese mountain dog with chronic renal failure was investigated. Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamid gel electrophoresis and subsequent Western blot analysis of urine showed the presence of heavy and light chains of immunoglobulin, transferrin, albumin, vitamin D-binding protein, transthyretin and retinol-binding protein (RBP), but no excretion of Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP). Histopathological examinations of the kidneys revealed severe membranous glomerulonephritis accompanied by tubular dilatation, tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. The renal expression of megalin, the main endocytic receptor for the re-uptake of proteins in proximal tubules, RBP and THP was reduced or completely absent, indicating severe tubular dysfunction. The identified urinary proteins may be of interest as additional markers for the diagnosis of juvenile nephropathy in Bernese mountain dogs.

  8. Renal disease in scleroderma: an update on evaluation, risk stratification, pathogenesis and management

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Victoria K.; Steen, Virginia D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Renal disease remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in scleroderma. The spectrum of renal complications in systemic sclerosis includes scleroderma renal crisis (SRC), normotensive renal crisis, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies-associated glomerulonephritis, penacillamine-associated renal disease, and reduced renal functional reserves manifested by proteinuria, microalbuminuria, or isolated reduction in glomerular filtration rate. The purpose of this review is to provide a concise and up-to-date review of the evaluation, risk stratification, pathogenesis, and management of scleroderma-associated renal disease. Recent findings Although SRC survival has significantly improved, mortality of this complication remains high outside of specialized centers. Recent data demonstrate strong associations between anti-RNA polymerase III antibodies and SRC. Subclinical renal impairment affects approximately 50% of scleroderma patients and may be associated with other vascular manifestations. Subclinical renal involvement rarely progresses to end-stage renal failure; however, recent studies suggest it may predict mortality in patients with other vasculopathic manifestations. Summary Testing for anti-RNA polymerase III antibodies should be incorporated into clinical care to identify patients at high risk for SRC. Recommendations from European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR), EULAR Scleroderma Trials and Research, and the Scleroderma Clinical Trials Consortium confirm angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors as first-line therapy for SRC, and give recommendations for second-line agents. PMID:22955019

  9. [Clinical analysis of 41 children's urinary calculus and acute renal failure].

    PubMed

    Li, Lu-Ping; Fan, Ying-Zhong; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Sheng-Li

    2013-04-01

    To analyze the treatment of acute renal failure caused by irrational drug use. Data of 41 cases of acute renal failure seen from July 2008 to June 2012 in our hospital were reviewed. Bilateral renal parenchymas diffuse echo was found enhanced by ultrasound in all cases. Calculus image was not found by X-ray. All children had medical history of using cephalosporins or others. Alkalinization of urine and antispasmodic treatment were given to all children immediately, 17 children were treated with hemodialysis and 4 children accepted intraureteral cannula placement. In 24 children who accepted alkalinization of urine and antispasmodic treatment micturition could be restored within 24 hours, in 11 children micturition recovered after only one hemodialysis treatment and 2 children gradually restored micturition after hemodialysis twice, 4 children who accepted intraureteral cannula immediately restored micturition. In all children micturition recovered gradually after a week of treatment. Ultrasound examination showed that 39 children's calculus disappeared totally and renal parenchymas echo recovered to normal. The residual calculi with diameter less than 5 mm were found in 2 children, but they had no symptoms. The children received potassium sodium hydrogen citrate granules per os and were discharged from hospital. Ultrasound showed calculus disappeared totally one month later. Irrational drug use can cause children urolithiasis combined with acute renal failure, while renal dysfunction can reverse by drug withdrawal and early alkalinization of urine, antispasmodic treatment, intraureteral cannula or hemodialysis when necessary, most calculus can be expelled after micturition recovered to normal.

  10. Metabolic and nutritional aspects of acute renal failure in critically ill patients requiring continuous renal replacement therapy.