Science.gov

Sample records for renal insufficiency

  1. [Travel and renal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Lavelle, O; Berland, Y

    1997-01-01

    Traveling can be dangerous for subjects with kidney insufficiency. Water loss or septic episodes can further increase renal dysfunction. Poor diet can lead to hyperkaliemia. Immunosuppression not only enhances the risk of infection but also complicates administration of live vaccines. Some antimalarial drugs are contraindicated (e.g. mefloquine) and others must be used with precaution. Prior to departure persons requiring hemodialysis should book sessions at centers listed in specialized guidebooks. In addition to infection, risks for hemodialysis patients include thrombosis of the arteriovenous fistula in case of dehydration or hypotension. In subjects with transplanted kidney, the risk of rejection can be enhanced either by poor compliance with immunodepressor treatment or by vaccination-induced antigenic stimulation. Pre-travel evaluation is necessary to determine metabolic, nutritional, and immune status. Subjects with kidney insufficiency and transplanted kidneys should be informed of the dangers and appropriate action in case of trouble.

  2. Cardiovascular therapy in patients with renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Ruilope, Luis M; Segura, Julian

    2002-12-01

    Chronic renal failure and arterial hypertension run in parallel. New goal blood pressure levels have been established in 130/85 mmHg and 125/75 mmHg depending on the level of proteinuria being below or above 1 g/day. New and lower threshold BP (>130/85 mmHg) to initiate pharmacologic therapy are required in the presence of renal failure in order to facilitate the strict BP control that is required. Renal insufficiency is accompanied since its initial stages by a marked increase in cardiovascular risk and serum creatinine, its estimated clearance and the presence of proteinuria are very powerful predictors of a bad cardiovascular outcome. Hence, the need to consider that both renal and cardiovascular protection are obtained with such a strict BP control which, otherwise seems to require blockade of angiotensin II effects when proteinuria above 1g/day is present. Prevention of renal failure related to elevated blood pressure requires of strict blood pressure control, usually obtained with combination of two or more antihypertensive agents, one of them capable of blocking angiotensin II. Besides this, strict control of associated cardiovascular risk factors is also required.

  3. Renal insufficiency associated with excessive lead exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, B C; Beattie, A D; Moore, M R; Goldberg, A; Reid, A G

    1977-01-01

    Water lead concentrations were measured in 970 households throughout Scotland. Blood lead concentrations were measured in 283 people living in houses with water lead levels of over 0-48 mumol/l (100 mug/l). A highly significant correlation was found between lead concentrations in water and blood. Raised blood lead concentrations were associated with renal insufficiency, reflected in raised serum urea concentrations, and with hyperuricaemia, although there was no evidence of clinical disease in any of the affected people. This is further evidence that excessive lead in domestic water supplies has a harmful effect on the community's health. PMID:837171

  4. Renal insufficiency in neonates after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Asfour, B; Bruker, B; Kehl, H G; Fründ, S; Scheld, H H

    1996-07-01

    Renal failure after cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is well understood for infants, children and adults. The perioperative risk factors after CPB for immature kidneys in newborns are not well known. This retrospective study investigates perioperative risk factors for renal insufficiency in neonates. I) Preoperative: Age; weight, performed angiography, amount of dye used in angiography, renal disease and creatinine. II) Intraoperative: Duration of operation, duration of MAP < 40 mmHg, use of deep hypothermia, in-out fluid balance, duration of CPB, duration of circulatory arrest and cross-clamp time. III) Postoperative: Creatinine, use of catecholamines, use of nitroglycerine (NG) or phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDI) and additional antibiotics. From Jan. 1990 to Dec. 1994 50 neonates underwent cardiac surgery using CPB (n = 23 transposition of the great arteries; n = 4 pulmonary atresia; n = 6 critical pulmonary stenosis; n = 5 hypoplastic left heart syndrome; n = 3 Ebstein's anomaly; n = 2 interrupted arch with hypoplastic left ventricle; n = 2 single ventricle; n = 1 each: double outlet right ventricle, tricuspid atresia, critical aortic stenosis, rhabdo-myosarkoma, corrected transposition of the great arteries.) Thirty-one patients entered the study. Depending on the postoperative creatinine level two groups (group I: creatinine <1 mg/dl and group II: >1 mg/dl) were created. The diureses between the two groups did not differ. Comparing the patients of group I vs. group II, patients of group I were younger (mean age: 7.7 d. vs. 11.4 d), lighter (mean weight: 3260 g vs. 3430 g), less had angiography (44% vs. 77%), received more dye (mean amount: 14 ml vs. 7 ml), the duration of MAP < 40 mmHg while on CPB was longer (mean duration 3 min vs. 21 min), more patients were operated on using deep hypothermia (55% vs. 27%), the postoperative in-out-fluid balance was more positive (mean balance +413 ml vs. +221 ml), received postop. more frequently high

  5. Treatment of osteoporosis in renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Schipper, Lydia G; Fleuren, Hanneke W H A; van den Bergh, Joop P W; Meinardi, Johan R; Veldman, Bart A J; Kramers, Cornelis

    2015-08-01

    Patients with osteoporosis often have chronic kidney disease (CKD). CKD is associated with bone and mineral disturbances, renal osteodystrophy, which like osteoporosis leads to a higher risk of fractures. Bisphosphonates are first-line therapy for osteoporosis; however, these are contra-indicated in patients with a GFR <30 ml/min. In this article, we have reviewed the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis in moderate to severe renal failure from data of clinical trials. Results have shown that osteoporosis patients and severe CKD with no signs of renal osteodystrophy, oral bisphosphonates (risedronate) seem to be a safe choice. Renal function and PTH should subsequently be monitored strictly. Denosumab, with regularly monitoring of calcium and adequate vitamin D levels or raloxifene are a possible second choice. In any case, one should be certain that there is no adynamic bone before treatment can be started. If there is any doubt, bone biopsies should be taken. PMID:25630310

  6. Aluminium toxicity in chronic renal insufficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Savory, J.; Bertholf, R.L.; Wills, M.R.

    1985-08-01

    Aluminium is a ubiquitous element in the environment and has been demonstrated to be toxic, especially in individuals with impaired renal function. Not much is known about the biochemistry of aluminium and the mechanisms of its toxic effects. Most of the interest in aluminium has been in the clinical setting of the hemodialysis unit. Here aluminium toxicity occurs due to contamination of dialysis solutions, and treatment of the patients with aluminium-containing phosphate binding gels. Aluminium has been shown to be the major contributor to the dialysis encephalopathy syndrome and an osteomalacic component of dialysis osteodystrophy. Other clinical disturbances associated with aluminium toxicity are a microcytic anemia and metastatic extraskeletal calcification. Aluminium overload can be treated effectively by chelation therapy with desferrioxamine and hemodialysis. Aluminium is readily transferred from the dialysate to the patient's -bloodstream during hemodialysis. Once transferred, the aluminium is tightly bound to non-dialysable plasma constituents. Very low concentrations of dialysate aluminium in the range of 10-15 micrograms/l are recommended to guard against toxic effects. Very few studies have been directed towards the separation of the various plasma species which bind eluminium. Gel filtration chromatography has been used to identify five major fractions, one of which is of low molecular weight and the others appear to be protein-aluminium complexes. Recommendations on aluminium monitoring have been published and provide safe and toxic concentrations. Also, the frequency of monitoring has been addressed. Major problems exist with the analytical methods for measuring aluminium which result from inaccurate techniques and contamination difficulties. 136 references.

  7. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy for urolithiasis with renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, V; Biyani, C S; al-Awadi, K

    1995-01-01

    Management of urolithiasis with renal insufficiency poses a multidimensional nephrourological situation. Sixty-two patients of potentially reversible calculus obstructive nephropathy and azotemia were treated with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) on the Sieman's Lithostar. These patients were treated under sedoanalgesia after the initial therapeutic ureteral stenting. Satisfactory fragmentation was achieved in all the patients. The incidence of major complications was 3.2% with an 85% stone-free rate at 6 months. Pre- and post-ESWL hemodialysis was required in 14 and 3 patients, respectively. All patients had variable levels of improvement in the renal function. Proper selection of cases is mandatory for satisfactory outcome. The combination of ureteral stenting followed by phased ESWL represents an attractive alternative to traditional surgical management of stones with renal insufficiency.

  8. Hypercalcemia, hypertension and acute renal insufficiency in an immobilized adolescent.

    PubMed

    Karpati, R M; Mak, R H; Lemley, K V

    1991-01-01

    Immobilization hypercalcemia was initially described by Albright in 1941, and has most often been noted in adolescent males, presumably because their high rates of skeletal growth increase the likelihood that alterations in the equilibrium between bone deposition and resorption will have clinically apparent effects. The etiology of immobilization hypercalcemia is controversial, but is thought to result from normal levels of PTH acting with increased activity in the abnormal environment of immobilized bone. We describe a patient, immobilized following the resection of a large, locally invasive tumor, who developed hypercalcemia in conjunction with renal insufficiency and hypertension. The pathophysiology of immobilization hypercalcemia is discussed, as are the potential contributions of renal feedback mechanisms to the patient's hypertension and renal insufficiency. PMID:1777905

  9. Economic evaluation of benazepril in chronic renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    van Hout, B A; Simeon, G P; McDonnell, J; Mann, J F

    1997-12-01

    A prospective, randomized, double-blind trial recently demonstrated that treating patients with chronic renal insufficiency with benazepril significantly decelerates the rate of progression of the disease. We tested the hypothesis that preventative treatment with the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor benazepril in patients with chronic renal insufficiency is cost-effective. A Markov chain model was used that considered regular treatment, hemodialysis, continuous ambulant peritoneal dialysis, transplantation, rejection and death. Clinical trial data were used to estimate the effects of benazepril treatment and to estimate the duration until renal replacement therapy was needed. Epidemiologic parameters were derived on the basis of Dutch registries of renal diseases, costs are estimated by updating former estimates, literature review and expert opinion. We found that preventative treatment with benazepril decreased the percentage of patients who died or developed end-stage renal disease. Total costs per patient are expected to decrease in three years with more than $4,000 US per patient. Extrapolated to ten years, the savings are estimated at $23,500 US per patient. Benazepril treatment is not only an effective treatment in patients with chronic renal failure. By increasing the years spent without dialysis, it is also a cost-effective treatment. PMID:9407447

  10. Did Ugo Foscolo suffer from chronic renal insufficiency?

    PubMed

    Stamatiou, Konstantinos; Sgouridou, Maria; Christopoulos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Ugo Foscolo, was an Italian poet whose works rank among the masterpieces of Italian literature. Talented and well educated in philosophy, classics, and Italian literature, Foscolo gave literary expression to his ideological aspirations and to the numerous amorous experiences in odes, sonnets, plays, poems and an epistolary novel. Concurrent with his rich literary output, Foscolo's correspondence represents a unique perspective from which to monitor his literary and political views and investigate aspects of his everyday life. Among other interesting information, one can find elements of Foscolo's medical history which is generally unknown. Based on his testimonies we suggest that he suffered of longstanding bladder outlet obstruction presumably due to urethral stricture. In the present article we investigate the possibility that chronic bladder outlet obstruction and the consequent renal insufficiency was attributed to the death of Ugo Foscolo. PMID:26885466

  11. Effect of renal insufficiency on stone recurrence in patients with urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ho Won; Seo, Sung Phil; Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Yong-June; Yun, Seok-Joong; Lee, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2014-08-01

    The study was designed to assess the relationship between glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urinary stone-forming constituents, and to assess the effect of renal insufficiency on stone recurrence risk in first stone formers (SF). Baseline serum creatinine levels were obtained, and renal insufficiency was defined as creatinine clearance ≤60 mL/min (Cockroft-Gault). This retrospective case-control study consists of 342 first SF; 171 SF with normal renal function were selected with 1:1 propensity scores matched to 171 SF with renal insufficiency. Urinary metabolic evaluation was compared to renal function. GFR was positively correlated with urinary calcium, uric acid, and citrate excretion. Subjects with renal insufficiency had significantly lower urinary calcium, uric acid, and citrate excretion than those with normal renal function, but not urine volume. With regard to urinary metabolic abnormalities, similar results were obtained. SF with renal insufficiency had lower calcium oxalate supersaturation indexes and stone recurrence rates than SF with normal renal function. Kaplan-Meier curves showed similar results. In conclusion, GFR correlates positively with urinary excretion of stone-forming constituents in SF. This finding implies that renal insufficiency is not a risk factor for stone recurrence. PMID:25120325

  12. Effect of renal insufficiency on stone recurrence in patients with urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ho Won; Seo, Sung Phil; Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Yong-June; Yun, Seok-Joong; Lee, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2014-08-01

    The study was designed to assess the relationship between glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urinary stone-forming constituents, and to assess the effect of renal insufficiency on stone recurrence risk in first stone formers (SF). Baseline serum creatinine levels were obtained, and renal insufficiency was defined as creatinine clearance ≤60 mL/min (Cockroft-Gault). This retrospective case-control study consists of 342 first SF; 171 SF with normal renal function were selected with 1:1 propensity scores matched to 171 SF with renal insufficiency. Urinary metabolic evaluation was compared to renal function. GFR was positively correlated with urinary calcium, uric acid, and citrate excretion. Subjects with renal insufficiency had significantly lower urinary calcium, uric acid, and citrate excretion than those with normal renal function, but not urine volume. With regard to urinary metabolic abnormalities, similar results were obtained. SF with renal insufficiency had lower calcium oxalate supersaturation indexes and stone recurrence rates than SF with normal renal function. Kaplan-Meier curves showed similar results. In conclusion, GFR correlates positively with urinary excretion of stone-forming constituents in SF. This finding implies that renal insufficiency is not a risk factor for stone recurrence.

  13. ["Occult" renal insufficiency due to evaluating renal function using only serum creatinine].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fresnedo, G; de Francisco, A L M; Rodrigo, E; Piñera, C; Herráez, I; Ruiz, J C; Arias, M

    2002-01-01

    Timely referral to nephrologists depends on identification of renal failure. Most primary care physicians and specialists rely on serum creatinine as the standard test for determination of renal function. Creatinine clearance requires 24 hours urine collection with many pitfalls and wrong results. We compare serum creatinine and the Cockcroft-Gault (C-G) equation as measure of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The study included 1,053 outpatients with serum creatinine lower than 2.5 mg/dl referred to our nephrological laboratory for serum creatinine and GFR determination using the C-G formula. Patients were grouped into two groups: normal renal function (serum creatinine < 1.3 mg/dl) and "incipient" abnormal renal function (serum creatinine 1.3-2.5 mg/dl). In the group of females with normal creatinine 22% (60-70 y), 35% (70-80 y) and 57% (> 80 y) had GFR values below 50 ml/min. In the group of males 11.3% (70-80 y) and 33.3% (> 80 y) also had GFR reduction in spite of normal serum creatinine. A severe renal insufficiency with creatinine clearance lower than 30 ml/min was observed in the group with "incipient" renal failure based on serum creatinine: 22.7%, 40% and 82.9% for females and 6%, 22.7% and 57% for male (60-70 y; 70-80 y; and > 80 y respectively). In order to improve management and prevention of renal failure appropriate measurements of renal function other than serum creatinine should be emphasize.

  14. Chronic renal insufficiency from cortical necrosis induced by arsenic poisoning.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, R E; Hudson, J B; Rao, R N; Sobel, R E

    1978-08-01

    A 39-year-old man had anuria and azotemia and was found to be suffering from acute arsenic poisoning. After two peritoneal dialyses, partial renal function returned, and the patient has survived for five years without dialysis. Renal cortical necrosis was demonstrated by renal biopsy and renal calcification. We suggest that arsenic be added to the list of substances capable of causing renal cortical necrosis and recommend consideration of this complication in cases of arsenical poisoning.

  15. Effect of chronic renal insufficiency on hepatic and renal udp-glucuronyltransferases in rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuanhui; Ritter, Joseph K; Krieg, Richard J; Rege, Bhaskar; Karnes, Thomas H; Sarkar, Mohamadi A

    2006-04-01

    Significant evidence exists regarding altered CYP450 enzymes in chronic renal insufficiency (CRI), although none exists for the phase II enzymes. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of CRI on hepatic and renal UDP-glucuronyltransferase (UGT) enzymes. Three groups of rats were included: CRI induced by the 5/6th nephrectomy model, control, and control pair-fed (CPF) rats. UGT activities were determined in liver and kidney microsomes by the 3- and 17-glucuronidation of beta-estradiol (E2-3G and E2-17G), glucuronidation of 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MUG), and 3-glucuronidation of morphine (M3G). UGT isoforms responsible for these catalytic activities were screened using recombinant rat UGT1A1, UGT1A2, UGT1A3, UGT1A7, UGT2B2, UGT2B3, and UGT2B8. UGT protein levels were examined by Western blot analysis using polyclonal antibodies. There was no significant difference between CRI and CPF rats in hepatic and/or renal E2-3G (UGT1A1), E2-17G (UGT2B3), 4-MUG (UGT1A6), and M3G (UGT2B1) formation. Formation of E2-17G and 4-MUG in the liver and E2-3G and 4-MUG in the kidney was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) in CPF and CRI rats compared with control rats. The down-regulated glucuronidation activities were accompanied by corresponding reductions in protein content of specific UGT isoforms. These results suggest that CRI does not seem to influence the protein levels or catalytic activity of most of the major hepatic or renal UGT enzymes. The observed down-regulation of hepatic and renal UGTs in CRI and CPF rats could be caused by restricted food intake in these groups of rats.

  16. [Cerebro-oculo-hepato-renal syndrome (Arima's syndrome) with slowly progressive renal insufficiency and epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Kubota, M; Shinozaki, M; Ishizaki, A; Kurata, K

    1991-11-01

    We reported an additional case of Arima's syndrome with slowly progressive renal insufficiency and epilepsy. The patient is a 20-year-old man whose parents are consanguineous. He had a history of mild asphyxia at birth, and unexplained tachypnea developed during the neonatal period. But it disappeared later, and he have had no respiratory problem since then. Physical examination on admission at the age of 19 years revealed bilateral blephaloptosis, narrow palate, searching nystagmoid movement, absence of light reflex, muscle hypotonia and wasting of extremities. Funduscopic study showed optic hypoplasia, choroid coloboma and narrowing of vessels. Head CT scan showed agenesis of cerebellar vermis and hypoplasia of brainstem. CT scan and echography of the kidney disclosed the bilateral multiple cysts. Liver was hyperechoic in echographic study; this finding is consistent with fatty change. EEG showed dysrhythmic slow wave activity with sporadic spike and wave complex. Compared with previously reported cases, the present case has the following features: (1) slowly progressive renal insufficiency, (2) generalized tonic clonic convulsion developing from the age of 11 months, (3) ABR abnormalities including the right-sided shortening of wave I-II interpeak latency and bilateral ill-defined wave V. Slow progress of renal failure in our case may reflect the mild pathological process of the kidney with sparing functional nephrons. It shows the diversity of the kidney pathology in Arima's syndrome. Epilepsy is a less common association in the syndrome, whereas EEG abnormalities were reported. ABR abnormalities may reflect the morphological alteration of the brainstem structure including auditory pathway. In our case it is uncertain whether the neonatal tachypnea was due to birth asphyxia or brainstem malformation responsible for abnormal respiration as suggested in Joubert's syndrome. PMID:1760207

  17. Renal clearance of pancreatic and salivary amylase relative to creatinine in patients with chronic renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Keogh, J B; McGeeney, K F; Drury, M I; Counihan, T B; O'Donnell, M D

    1978-12-01

    Pancreatic and salivary amylase/creatinine clearance ratios in patients with various degrees of renal impairment were compared with those obtained for control subjects. In chronic renal insufficiency (mean GFR 30 ml/min +/- 15 SD; n = 13) the clearance ratios for pancreatic (mean 3.5 +/- 1.85 SD) and salivary (mean 2.3 +/- 1.3 SD) amylase were significantly higher (P less than 0.05) than those in controls. Corresponding control values (n = 26) were 2.64 +/- 0.86 (pancreatic) and 1.64 +/- 0.95 (salivary). Three patients showed values above the normal limit. In the diabetic group (mean GFR 41 ml/min +/- 22 SD; n = 10) salivary amylase/creatinine clearance ratios (mean 2.36 +/- 1.55 SD) were significantly higher than in controls (P less than 0.05). Three patients showed raised values. Pancreatic amylase clearance was raised in only one of these patients. Three patients with terminal disease (mean GFR 10 ml/min) showed markedly raised (two- to threefold) clearance ratios for both salivary and pancreatic amylase. Of a total of 26 patients, eight had increased total amylase/creatinine clearance ratios. Pancreatic amylase/creatinine clearance was increased in seven patients, while nine patients showed raised salivary amylase/creatinine ratios. Patients with raised clearance ratios did not have clinical evidence of pancreatitis. We suggest that, in the presence of impaired renal function, a high amylase/creatinine clearance ratio need not be indicative of pancreatic disease.

  18. [Hypocalcemia Induced by Denosumab in Patients with Renal Insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kota; Shimizu, Risa; Endo, Iwao; Miyamoto, Shingo; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Denosumab is a monoclonal antibody that can be administrated subcutaneously. Although it is not recommended to adjust the dosages for patients with impaired renal function, hypocalcemia has been reported in patients with renal impairment; therefore, it should be administered cautiously. We retrospectively investigated the serum concentrations of calcium after denosumab administration. The results indicated that after continuous administration to patients with a Ccr<40mL/min, serum calcium levels decreased. Grade 2 or above hypocalcemia was detected in 75% of the patients studied. From these results, it is recommended that serum concentrations of calcium be closely monitored in continuous administration of denosu- mab to patients with renal impairment. PMID:27431632

  19. Placental Insufficiency Associated with Loss of Cited1 Causes Renal Medullary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Sparrow, Duncan B.; Boyle, Scott C.; Sams, Rebecca S.; Mazuruk, Bogdan; Zhang, Li; Moeckel, Gilbert W.; Dunwoodie, Sally L.; de Caestecker, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that placental insufficiency affects embryonic patterning of the kidney and leads to a decreased number of functioning nephrons in adulthood; however, there is circumstantial evidence that placental insufficiency may also affect renal medullary growth, which could account for cases of unexplained renal medullary dysplasia and for abnormalities in renal function among infants who had experienced intrauterine growth retardation. We observed that mice with late gestational placental insufficiency associated with genetic loss of Cited1 expression in the placenta had renal medullary dysplasia. This was not caused by lower urinary tract obstruction or by defects in branching of the ureteric bud during early nephrogenesis but was associated with decreased tissue oxygenation and increased apoptosis in the expanding renal medulla. Loss of placental Cited1 was required for Cited1 mutants to develop renal dysplasia, and this was not dependent on alterations in embryonic Cited1 expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that renal medullary dysplasia in Cited1 mutant mice is a direct consequence of decreased tissue oxygenation resulting from placental insufficiency. PMID:19297558

  20. [Osteoporosis, estrogens, and bone metabolism. Implications for chronic renal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Díaz López, J B; Rodríguez Rodríguez, A; Ramos, B; Caramelo, C; Rodríguez García, M; Cannata Andía, J B

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between estrogens, bone metabolism and osteoporosis is well known. Chronic renal failure in women is associated with menstrual disorders, lower bone mineral density and increased risk of fractures. However, most studies on renal osteodystrophy have not taken into account the role of oestrogen deficiency, its interaction, and the possible benefits of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in uremic women. According to these limitations and the actual evidence of benefits and risks of HRT, we conclude that: a) Osteoporosis must be evaluated as a part of renal osteodystrophy; b) HRT would be considered in women with climateric symptoms and osteoporosis, and should not be used for prevention of cardiovascular disease, and c) Clearly we need to do more studies related to osteoporosis and estrogens in CRF, but right now we have to try to optimize bone turnover in our uremic patients.

  1. Amylase-creatinine clearance ratios and serum amylase isoenzymes in moderate renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Banks, P A; Sidi, S; Gelman, M L; Lee, K H; Warshaw, A L

    1979-12-01

    Both the amylase-creatinine clearance ratio (normal 1.55%) and proportion of pancreatic isoamylase in serum (normal 41.0%) increase in acute pancreatitis, and are therefore useful measurements to support that diagnosis. Whether renal insufficiency interferes with the accuracy and specificity of these tests has been debated. Our study indicates that even moderate renal insufficiency (creatinine clearance 30.5 ml/minute) raises the amylase-creatinine clearance ratio (3.23%) close enough to values characteristic of acute pancreatitis (4.41%) to cause potential diagnostic confusion. The fraction of pancreatic isoamylase in serum is also increased (69.9%), but not to the levels of acute pancreatitis (91.0%). We therefore caution against the use of the amylase-creatinine clearance ratio for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis in patients with moderate renal insufficiency.

  2. Effects of flurbiprofen on renal function in patients with moderate renal insufficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, M D; Greene, P K; Brater, D C; Manatunga, A K; Hall, S D

    1992-01-01

    1. Renal function was assessed in eight patients with chronic renal insufficiency following the administration of flurbiprofen 50 mg as a single dose and after chronic administration of 50 mg four times daily for 8 and 27 days. Diet and fluid intake were controlled. 2. Inulin and creatinine clearances and urinary excretion of sodium were measured at baseline and every 20 min for at least 3 h after dosing. The time of the mean peak concentration of (S)-flurbiprofen was used to guide the analysis of the clearances. Creatinine clearance, urinary excretion of sodium, and serum sodium and potassium were also assessed for 24 h after the dose and on a daily basis. Body weight and blood pressure were measured on a daily basis. 3. Decrements in inulin and creatinine clearances were small and reversible within 3 h of an oral dose of flurbiprofen. Comparison of baseline clearances for the three study periods (first dose and at 8 and 27 days of chronic dosing) revealed a lack of chronic effect on glomerular filtration rate. 4. In contrast, flurbiprofen caused a substantial (73 to 86%) and progressive decrease in the urinary excretion of sodium that reached a nadir within 4-5 h after drug administration. However, comparison of baseline values did not differ, indicating that balance conditions had been re-established. 5. Results of 24 h assessments were in agreement with the clearance study results. Reduced urinary excretion of sodium appeared to be limited to the first few days of flurbiprofen administration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1576067

  3. Serum amylase determinations and amylase to creatinine clearance ratios in patients with chronic renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, F J; Harter, H R; Alpers, D H

    1976-10-01

    Patients with severe chronic renal failure may have significant hyperamylasemia in the absence of clinical symptoms or signs of acute pancreatitis. Amylase to creatinine clearance (CA/CC) ratios were usually elevated in patients with chronic renal failure and were not helpful in evaluating the possibility of acute pancreatitis. The mean amylase to creatinine clearance ratio for the controls with normal renal function was 1.24 +/- 0.13. In patients with chronic renal failure, it was 3.17 +/- 0.42 (P less than 0.001). Serum amylase isoenzyme patterns revealed no difference in salivary to pancreatic isoenzyme ratios between normals (1.04 +/- 0.12) and patients with severe renal insufficiency without evidence of pancreatic disease (1.07 +/- 0.13). The isoenzymes were helpful in excluding the diagnosis of pancreatic in 1 renal failure patient whose hyperamylasemia was primarily salivary in origin and in confirming the diagnosis in another who had only a pancreatic band.

  4. Effect of renal insufficiency on the active transport of calcium by the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Baerg, Richard D.; Kimberg, Daniel V.; Gershon, Elaine

    1970-01-01

    The intestinal absorption of calcium is often depressed in patients with chronic renal insufficiency. Furthermore, the malabsorption of calcium and the osteodystrophy which occur in association with chronic renal disease are often “resistant” to vitamin D; the basis for this resistance remains uncertain however. Recent studies by others have emphasized the role of an abnormality in the metabolism of vitamin D in accounting for the alterations in the calcium absorption and the apparent vitamin D-resistance which accompany the uremic syndrome. The present studies with an experimentally uremic animal model demonstrate a defect in the active transport of calcium by duodenal gut sacs in vitro. This abnormality is not due to the semistarvation associated with renal insufficiency and cannot be corrected by the administration of physiologic amounts of vitamin D3: it is reversed by massive doses of the vitamin. Neither the metabolism of vitamin D3 nor the levels of calcium binding protein activity in the duodenal mucosa are affected by renal insufficiency under the conditions employed in the present studies. The results of the present studies strongly suggest that in addition to the recently proposed mechanism involving an interference with the metabolism of vitamin D renal insufficiency also affects the cellular mechanisms for calcium transport in a manner which, while opposite in direction to that of vitamin D, is independent of a direct interaction with the vitamin or its metabolites. PMID:5422027

  5. Sirolimus conversion efficacy for graft function improvement and histopathology in renal recipients with mild to moderate renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Joo, Dong Jin; Yang, Chul Woo; Jeong, Hyeon Joo; Lim, Beom Jin; Huh, Kyu Ha; Chung, Byung Ha; Choi, Yeong Jin; Kang, Shin-Wook; Kim, Yu Seun

    2014-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate whether sirolimus (SRL) conversion effectively improves renal function and histopathology in calcineurin inhibitor (CNI)-treated renal recipients with mild to moderate renal insufficiency. SRL conversion from CNI was performed in patients who underwent kidney transplantation from 6 months to 5 yr prior to screening. Forty-five patients were enrolled. The effect of SRL conversion on graft function was evaluated, and protocol biopsies were performed preconversion and 1 yr after conversion. Overall graft function after SRL conversion gradually improved, and the improvement in renal function was closely associated with the shorter duration of CNI exposure. When we divided the patients by the duration of CNI exposure, the patients with less than 1 yr of CNI exposure demonstrated significant improvement, but patients with a greater than 1 yr CNI exposure did not exhibit significant improvement. In contrast, protocol biopsies demonstrated no significant improvements in the modified "ah" score or other Banff scores after SRL conversion. Furthermore, the duration of CNI treatment prior to SRL conversion was not associated with histological findings 1 yr after SRL conversion. SRL conversion improved graft function in renal recipients with mild to moderate renal insufficiency, but this effect is not accompanied by histological improvement.

  6. Uremic Leontiasis Ossea in a Patient With Chronic Renal Insufficiency Demonstrated on Bone Scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Han, Yeon-Hee; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong; Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung-Hee

    2016-08-01

    A 37-year-old woman with chronic renal insufficiency underwent bone scintigraphy to evaluate renal osteodystrophy (ROD). Markedly increased uptakes were shown in the maxilla and the mandible, which suggested extensive maxillary and mandibular hypertrophy. CT image revealed that diffuse bony thickening and ground-glass appearance in the skull, maxilla, and mandible with poor distinction of the corticomedullary junction. Whole-body bone scintigraphy images also demonstrated various skeletal characteristics of ROD. This case emphasizes the utility of bone scintigraphy for the surveillance of the whole body in ROD. PMID:27276201

  7. Prevalence of renal insufficiency in elderly cancer patients in a tertiary cancer center

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Lucíola de Barros; Antunes, Yuri Philippe Pimentel Vieira; Bugano, Diogo Diniz Gomes; Karnakis, Theodora; del Giglio, Auro; Kaliks, Rafael Aliosha

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence of abnormal glomerular filtration rate in elderly patients with solid tumors. Methods A retrospective study with patients aged >65 years diagnosed with solid tumors between January 2007 and December 2011 in a cancer center. The following data were collected: sex, age, serum creatinine at the time of diagnosis and type of tumor. Renal function was calculated using abbreviated Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formulae and then staged in accordance with the clinical practice guidelines published by the Working Group of the National Kidney Foundation. Results A total of 666 patients were included and 60% were male. The median age was 74.2 years (range: 65 to 99 years). The most prevalent diagnosis in the study population were colorectal (24%), prostate (20%), breast (16%) and lung cancer (16%). The prevalence of elevated serum creatinine (>1.0mg/dL) was 30%. However, when patients were assessed using abbreviated MDRD formulae, 66% had abnormal renal function, stratified as follows: 45% with stage 2, 18% with stage 3, 3% with stage 4 and 0.3% with stage 5. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this was the first study to estimate the frequency of renal insufficiency in elderly cancer patients in Brazil. The prevalence of abnormal renal function among our cohort was high. As suspected, the absolute creatinine level does underestimate renal function impairment and should not be used as predictor of chemotherapy metabolism, excretion and consequent toxicity. PMID:25295449

  8. [Cerebral malaria with renal insufficiency in a 5 months pregnant woman. The use of prostaglandines for delivery (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Thonnier, C; Bruneu, A; Valmary, J; Capdevielle, P; Delprat, J

    1979-01-01

    Report of a typical case of cerebral malaria with coma during 3 days, pneumopathy and renal insufficiency with failure of concentration. The delivery of a dead foetus has been started by prostaglandines.

  9. Blockade of the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Glutamate Receptor Ameliorates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Renal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ho-Shiang; Ma, Ming-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation in rat kidney reduces renal perfusion and ultrafiltration. Hypoperfusion-induced ischemia is the most frequent cause of functional insufficiency in the endotoxemic kidney. Here, we used non-hypotensive rat model of lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia to examine whether NMDA receptor hyperfunction contributes to acute kidney injury. Lipopolysaccharide-induced renal damage via increased enzymuria and hemodynamic impairments were ameliorated by co-treatment with the NMDA receptor blocker, MK-801. The NMDA receptor NR1 subunit in the rat kidney mainly co-localized with serine racemase, an enzyme responsible for synthesizing the NMDA receptor co-agonist, D-serine. The NMDA receptor hyperfunction in lipopolysaccharide-treated kidneys was demonstrated by NR1 and serine racemase upregulation, particularly in renal tubules, and by increased D-serine levels. Lipopolysaccharide also induced cell damage in cultured tubular cell lines and primary rat proximal tubular cells. This damage was mitigated by MK-801 and by small interfering RNA targeting NR1. Lipopolysaccharide increased cytokine release in tubular cell lines via toll-like receptor 4. The release of interleukin-1β from these cells are the most abundant. An interleukin-1 receptor antagonist not only attenuated cell death but also abolished lipopolysaccharide-induced NR1 and serine racemase upregulation and increases in D-serine secretion, suggesting that interleukin-1β-mediated NMDA receptor hyperfunction participates in lipopolysaccharide-induced tubular damage. The results of this study indicate NMDA receptor hyperfunction via cytokine effect participates in lipopolysaccharide-induced renal insufficiency. Blockade of NMDA receptors may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of sepsis-associated renal failure. PMID:26133372

  10. Renal outcome in adults with renal insufficiency and irregular asymmetric kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Neild, Guy H; Thomson, Gill; Nitsch, Dorothea; Woolfson, Robin G; Connolly, John O; Woodhouse, Christopher RJ

    2004-01-01

    Background The commonest cause of end-stage renal failure (ESRF) in children and young adults is congenital malformation of the kidney and urinary tract. In this retrospective review, we examine whether progression to ESRF can be predicted and whether treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) can delay or prevent this. Methods We reviewed 78 patients with asymmetric irregular kidneys as a consequence of either primary vesico-ureteric reflux or renal dysplasia (Group 1, n = 44), or abnormal bladder function (Group 2, n = 34). Patients (median age 24 years) had an estimated GFR (eGFR) < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 with at least 5 years of follow up (median 143 months). 48 patients received ACEI. We explored potential prognostic factors that affect the time to ESRF using Cox-regression analyses. Results At start, mean (SE) creatinine was 189 (8) μmol/l, mean eGFR 41 (1) ml/min 1.73 m2, mean proteinuria 144 (14) mg/mmol creatinine (1.7 g/24 hrs). Of 78 patients, 36 (46%) developed ESRF, but none of 19 with proteinuria less than 50 mg/mmol and only two of 18 patients with eGFR above 50 ml/min did so. Renal outcome between Groups 1 and 2 appeared similar with no evidence for a difference. A benefit in favour of treatment with ACEI was observed above an eGFR of 40 ml/min (p = 0.024). Conclusion The similar outcome of the two groups supports the nephrological nature of progressive renal failure in young men born with abnormal bladders. There is a watershed GFR of 40–50 ml/min at which ACEI treatment can be successful at improving renal outcome. PMID:15462683

  11. THE KOLFF-MERRILL ARTIFICIAL KIDNEY—Clinical Application in Acute Renal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Christopher C.

    1955-01-01

    Acute renal insufficiency is often called “lower nephron nephrosis.” Its recognition, its prognostic significance, and its therapy by conservative measures are receiving increasing clinical emphasis. The mortality rate in this complicated syndrome still remains unduly high. One method of therapy of anuric patients whose lives are in jeopardy because of fulminating uremia or critical potassium intoxication is use of an artificial kidney to “purify” the blood stream by means of extracorporeal dialysis. The author describes clinical (and laboratory) experience with ten such dialyzed patients, eight of whom presented the classical picture of acute renal insufficiency. Four died, one from unrecognized coronary occlusion, another from antecedent, overwhelming peritonitis. Two other patients with chronic kidney disorders received no benefit from dialysis and died of renal disease. Good biochemical and clinical response was brought about in six cases of lower nephron nephrosis. Presumably, these six patients would have died had they not been subjected to artificial dialysis. Imagesp294-a PMID:14364283

  12. Simplification of antibiotic dose adjustments in renal insufficiency: the DREM system.

    PubMed

    Maderazo, E G; Sun, H; Jay, G T

    1992-09-26

    Many clinicians, unassisted by reference books, are unable to make the required dose adjustment of antibiotics needed when a patient has renal insufficiency. We describe the DREM (dosing in renopathy by easy-to-use multipliers) system, which simplifies the understanding and the process of dose adjustment. DREM is a two-step process: Cockcroft and Gault estimation of creatinine clearance (CLcr) from age, sex, and serum creatinine and calculation of the adjusted dose or dosing interval by multipliers. If the normal dose is multiplied by the dose multiplier (CLcr/100) and the dosing interval by the interval multiplier (100/CLcr), the adjusted dose and interval, respectively, are obtained. Theoretical trough concentrations calculated with the DREM system correlated closely (r = 0.9) with actual concentrations obtained from doses calculated by the Hull and Sarubbi method in 23 patients. With DREM, gentamicin or tobramycin trough concentrations above 2 micrograms/ml were less likely to occur. The DREM system is a simple and easily remembered method for dose adjustments of certain anti-infective agents in renal insufficiency. Dose estimates with this method are reasonably accurate and compare favourably with other standard methods of correction.

  13. Prognostic Value of Pre-operative Renal Insufficiency in Urothelial Carcinoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jian; Zhao, Xiaokun; Zhong, Zhaohui; Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Xuan; Xu, Ran

    2016-01-01

    The effect of pre-operative renal insufficiency on urothelial carcinoma (UC) prognosis has been investigated by numerous studies. While the majority report worse UC outcomes in patients with renal insufficiency, the results between the studies differed wildly. To enable us to better estimate the prognostic value of renal insufficiency on UC, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis based on the published literature. A total of 16 studies which involved 5,232 patients with UC, investigated the relationship between pre-operative renal insufficiency and disease prognosis. Estimates of combined hazard ratio (HR) for bladder urothelial carcinoma recurrence, cancer-specific survival (CSS) and overall survival (OS) were 1.65 (95% CI, 1.11–2.19), 1.59 (95% CI, 1.14–2.05) and 1.45 (95% CI, 1.19–1.71), respectively; and for upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma recurrence, CSS and OS were 2.27 (95% CI, 1.42–3.12), 1.02 (95% CI, 0.47–1.57) and 1.52 (95% CI, 1.05–1.99), respectively. Our results indicate that UC patients with pre-operative renal insufficiency tend to have higher recurrence rates and poorer survival compared to those with clinically normal renal function, thus renal function should be closely monitored in these patients. The impact of intervention for renal insufficiency on the prognosis of UC needs to be further studied. PMID:27725745

  14. Correlation of Preoperative Renal Insufficiency With Mortality and Morbidity After Aortic Valve Replacement: A Propensity Score Matching Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Tsai, Feng-Chun; Chen, Yung-Chang; Lee, Hsiu-An; Chen, Shao-Wei; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Lin, Pyng-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Preoperative end-stage renal disease carries a high mortality and morbidity risk after aortic valve replacement (AVR), but the effect of renal insufficiency remains to be clarified. Through propensity score analysis, we compared the preoperative demographics, perioperative profiles, and outcomes between patients with and without renal insufficiency. From August 2005 to November 2014, 770 adult patients underwent AVR in a single institution. Patients were classified according to their estimated glomerular infiltration rate (eGFR) as renal insufficiency (eGFR: 30–89 mL/min/1.73 m2) or normal (eGFR, ≥90 mL/min/1.73 m2). Propensity scoring was performed with a 1:1 ratio, resulting in a matched cohort of 88 patients per group. Demographics, comorbidities, and surgical procedures were well balanced between the 2 groups, except for diabetes mellitus and eGFR. Patients with renal insufficiency had higher in-hospital mortality (19.3% versus 3.4%, P < 0.001), a greater need for postoperative hemodialysis (14.8% versus 3.1%, P = 0.009), and prolonged intubation times (>72 hour; 25% versus 9.1%, P = .008), intensive care unit stays (8.9 ± 9.9 versus 4.9 ± 7.5 days, P = .046), and hospital stays (35.3 ± 31.7 versus 24.1 ± 20.3 days, P = .008), compared with those with normal renal function. Multivariate analysis confirmed that preoperative renal insufficiency was an in-hospital mortality predictor (odds ratio, 2.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.343–4.043; P = .003), as were prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass time, intraaortic balloon pump support, and postoperative hemodialysis. The 1-year survival significantly differed between the 2 groups including (normal 87.5% versus renal insufficiency 67.9%, P < .001) or excluding in-hospital mortality (normal 90.7% versus renal insufficiency 82.1%, P = .05). Patients with preoperative renal insufficiency who underwent AVR had higher in-hospital mortality rates and

  15. Higher serum total bilirubin concentration is associated with lower risk of renal insufficiency in an adult population

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ang-Tse; Wang, Ya-Yu; Lin, Shih-Yi; Liang, Jiin-Tsae; Sheu, Wayne Huey-Herng; Song, Yuh-Min; Chang, Wen-Dau

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic inflammation is proposed to play a central role in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and serum bilirubin has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated the association between serum total bilirubin (Tb) concentration and renal function in an adult population. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study and collected anthropometric measurements, fasting blood tests, lifestyle habits and medical history of 3876 subjects attending a health examination. Renal insufficiency was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 calculated by using the CKD-EPI equation. Results: Serum Tb concentrations were higher in subjects without renal insufficiency than in those with renal insufficiency. Multivariable linear regression analysis showed that Tb concentration was positively associated with eGFR after adjusting for important CKD risk factors (P=0.04). Multivariable logistic regression analysis also revealed that higher Tb concentration (each increment of 1.71 μmol/L) (0.1 mg/dL) was associated with a reduced risk of renal insufficiency: odds ratios were 0.94 (P=0.005) for men and 0.90 (P=0.015) for women, respectively. When subjects were divided into quartiles of serum Tb, multivariable-adjusted odds ratios for renal insufficiency comparing the fourth to the first Tb quartile were 0.49 (P=0.001) for men and 0.35 (P=0.003) for women. A stepwise exclusion of subjects, first those with possible liver disease and second, those with CKD stage 4 and 5, showed consistent results. Conclusion: Higher serum Tb concentration was associated with lower risk of renal insufficiency, regardless of other conventional CKD risk factors. PMID:26770557

  16. Role of Soluble ST2 as a Prognostic Marker in Patients with Acute Heart Failure and Renal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to assess the relationship between serum concentrations of the soluble ST2 (sST2) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and investigate the role of sST2 as a prognosticator in patients hospitalized with acute heart failure (HF) and renal insufficiency. sST2 was measured at admission and discharge in 66 patients hospitalized with acute decompensated HF and renal insufficiency (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] < 90 mL/min/1.73 m2) using a high sensitivity immunoassay. BNP was sampled at the same time and compared to sST2. Demographical, biochemical, and echocardiographic data were also obtained during hospitalization.There were positive correlations between sST2 and BNP levels at admission (r = 0.330, P = 0.007) and at discharge (r = 0.320, P = 0.009) in overall patients. However, there was no correlation between them at each timepoint in patients with severe renal insufficiency (eGFR < 30 mL/min/1.73 m2, n = 17). sST2 level was not changed with the degree of renal function, even though BNP level was much higher in patients with severe renal insufficiency. During 3 month follow-up, 9 (13.6%) died and 16 (24.2%) were readmitted due to HF aggravation.On multivariate analysis, sST2 at discharge was independently associated with death or HF readmission during 3 months after discharge (hazard ratio, 1.038; 95% confidence interval, 1.011-1.066, P = 0.006). In conclusion, sST2 is not affected by renal function compared with BNP in acute HF patients. The measurement of predischarge sST2 can be helpful in predicting short-term outcomes in acute decompensated HF patients with renal insufficiency. PMID:25931787

  17. Association of Chronic Renal Insufficiency With In-Hospital Outcomes After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Tanush; Paul, Neha; Kolte, Dhaval; Harikrishnan, Prakash; Khera, Sahil; Aronow, Wilbert S; Mujib, Marjan; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Sule, Sachin; Jain, Diwakar; Ahmed, Ali; Cooper, Howard A; Frishman, William H; Bhatt, Deepak L; Fonarow, Gregg C; Panza, Julio A

    2015-01-01

    Background The association of chronic renal insufficiency with outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the current era of drug-eluting stents and modern antithrombotic therapy has not been well characterized. Methods and Results We queried the 2007–2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases to identify all patients aged ≥18 years who underwent PCI. Multivariable logistic regression was used to compare in-hospital outcomes among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and those without CKD or ESRD. Of 3 187 404 patients who underwent PCI, 89% had no CKD/ESRD; 8.6% had CKD; and 2.4% had ESRD. Compared to patients with no CKD/ESRD, patients with CKD and patients with ESRD had higher in-hospital mortality (1.4% versus 2.7% versus 4.4%, respectively; adjusted odds ratio for CKD 1.15, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.19, P<0.001; adjusted odds ratio for ESRD 2.29, 95% CI 2.19 to 2.40, P<0.001), higher incidence of postprocedure hemorrhage (3.5% versus 5.4% versus 6.0%, respectively; adjusted odds ratio for CKD 1.21, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.23, P<0.001; adjusted odds ratio for ESRD 1.27, 95% CI 1.23 to 1.32, P<0.001), longer average length of stay (2.9 days versus 5.0 days versus 6.4 days, respectively; P<0.001), and higher average total hospital charges ($60 526 versus $77 324 versus $97 102, respectively; P<0.001). Similar results were seen in subgroups of patients undergoing PCI for acute coronary syndrome or stable ischemic heart disease. Conclusions In patients undergoing PCI, chronic renal insufficiency is associated with higher in-hospital mortality, higher postprocedure hemorrhage, longer average length of stay, and higher average hospital charges. PMID:26080814

  18. Phosphate Binding with Sevelamer Preserves Mechanical Competence of Bone Despite Acidosis in Advanced Experimental Renal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jokihaara, Jarkko; Pörsti, Ilkka H.; Sievänen, Harri; Kööbi, Peeter; Kannus, Pekka; Niemelä, Onni; Turner, Russell T.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Järvinen, Teppo L. N.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Phosphate binding with sevelamer can ameliorate detrimental histomorphometric changes of bone in chronic renal insufficiency (CRI). Here we explored the effects of sevelamer-HCl treatment on bone strength and structure in experimental CRI. Methods Forty-eight 8-week-old rats were assigned to surgical 5/6 nephrectomy (CRI) or renal decapsulation (Sham). After 14 weeks of disease progression, the rats were allocated to untreated and sevelamer-treated (3% in chow) groups for 9 weeks. Then the animals were sacrificed, plasma samples collected, and femora excised for structural analysis (biomechanical testing, quantitative computed tomography). Results Sevelamer-HCl significantly reduced blood pH, and final creatinine clearance in the CRI groups ranged 30%-50% of that in the Sham group. Final plasma phosphate increased 2.4- to 2.9-fold, and parathyroid hormone 13- to 21-fold in CRI rats, with no difference between sevelamer-treated and untreated animals. In the femoral midshaft, CRI reduced cortical bone mineral density (-3%) and breaking load (-15%) (p<0.05 for all versus Sham), while sevelamer increased bone mineral density (+2%) and prevented the deleterious changes in bone. In the femoral neck, CRI reduced bone mineral density (-11%) and breaking load (-10%), while sevelamer prevented the decrease in bone mineral density (+6%) so that breaking load did not differ from controls. Conclusions In this model of stage 3–4 CRI, sevelamer-HCl treatment ameliorated the decreases in femoral midshaft and neck mineral density, and restored bone strength despite prevailing acidosis. Therefore, treatment with sevelamer can efficiently preserve mechanical competence of bone in CRI. PMID:27658028

  19. Efficacy and Toxicity of Mammalian Target Rapamycin Inhibitors in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma with Renal Insufficiency: The Korean Cancer Study Group GU 14-08

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Hyang; Kim, Joo Hoon; Lee, Ji Young; Kim, Hyo Song; Heo, Su Jin; Kim, Ji Hyung; Kim, Ho Young; Rha, Sun Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of mammalian target rapamycin inhibitors in Korean patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) with chronic renal insufficiency not requiring dialysis. Materials and Methods Korean patients with mRCC and chronic renal insufficiency not requiring dialysis treated with everolimus or temsirolimus between January 2008 and December 2014 were included. Patient characteristics, clinical outcomes, and toxicities were evaluated. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) durations were evaluated according to the degree of renal impairment. Results Eighteen patients were considered eligible for the study (median age, 59 years). The median glomerular filtration rate was 51.5 mL/min/1.73 m2. The best response was partial response in six patients and stable disease in 11 patients. The median PFS and OS durations were 8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 0 to 20.4) and 32 months (95% CI, 27.5 to 36.5), respectively. The most common non-hematologic and grade 3/4 adverse events included stomatitis, fatigue, flu-like symptoms, and anorexia as well as elevated creatinine level. Conclusion Mammalian target rapamycin inhibitors were efficacious and did not increase toxicity in Korean patients with mRCC and chronic renal insufficiency not requiring dialysis. PMID:26875195

  20. Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study (CRIC): Overview and Summary of Selected Findings

    PubMed Central

    Denker, Matthew; Boyle, Suzanne; Anderson, Amanda H.; Appel, Lawrence J.; Chen, Jing; Fink, Jeffrey C.; Flack, John; Go, Alan S.; Horwitz, Edward; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Kusek, John W.; Lash, James P.; Navaneethan, Sankar; Ojo, Akinlolu O.; Rahman, Mahboob; Steigerwalt, Susan P.; Townsend, Raymond R.

    2015-01-01

    The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study is a United States multicenter, prospective study of racially and ethnically diverse patients with CKD. Although the original aims of the study were to identify novel predictors of CKD progression and to elucidate the risk and manifestations of cardiovascular disease among nearly 4000 individuals with CKD, the CRIC Study has evolved into a national resource for investigation of a broad spectrum of CKD-related topics. The study has produced >90 published scientific articles, promoted many young investigative careers in nephrology, and fostered international collaborations focused on understanding the global burden of CKD. The third phase of the CRIC Study will complete enrollment of 1500 additional study participants in 2015 and is designed to answer questions regarding morbidity and mortality in mild-to-moderate CKD and to assess the burden of CKD in older persons. This review highlights some of the salient findings of the CRIC Study in the areas of race and ethnicity, CKD progression, CKD and cognition, and cardiovascular disease outcomes; it also outlines the ongoing and forthcoming opportunities for the global nephrology community to enhance its understanding of CKD and related complications through the study. PMID:26265715

  1. Depressive Symptomatology in Children and Adolescents with Chronic Renal Insufficiency Undergoing Chronic Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Edith G.; Loza, Reyner; Vargas, Horacio; Jara, Mercedes F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a descriptive study, using the Birleson Scale to determine the frequency of depressive symptomatology in children and adolescents with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) undergoing hemodialysis (HD) and chronic peritoneal dialysis (CPD). There were 67 patients (40 female and 27 male) with a mean age of 14.76 ± 2.71 years, duration of illness ≥3 months, 43 (64.18%) patients with CPD and 24 (35.82%) undergoing HD. The frequency of high occurrence, low occurrence, and absence of depressive symptomatology was 10.45% (n = 7), 43.28% (n = 29), and 46.27% (n = 31), respectively; all of the seven (100%) patients with high occurrence of depressive symptomatology were female (P = 0.04), and none of these (0%) had a friend to confide in (P = 0.03). Depressive symptomatology in patients with CPD was associated with a lower weekly Kt/V compared to those without depressive symptomatology (2.15 ± 0.68 versus 2.52 ± 0.65; P = 0.01). There was no association with patient age, caregiver, time and dialysis type, anemia, bone disease, nutritional or financial status, origin, schooling, or employment. PMID:21941654

  2. NSS for an RCC in a patient with renal insufficiency after heart transplant because of right ventricular tumor

    PubMed Central

    Życzkowski, Marcin; Nowakowski, Krzysztof; Bryniarski, Piotr; Paradysz, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the immunosuppressive therapy on the development of neoplasms has become the object of an ever increasing interest for clinicians all over the world. The literature on neoplasms development in the course of therapy following transplants has confirmed a considerable increase in the incidence of neoplasms of the skin and lymph nodes. Organ neoplasms developing in patients after transplants are characterized by increased progression, poor cellular diversification and a more unfavorable prognosis than in the general population The aim of the study is to present the case of a nephron–sparing surgery of a renal tumor (NSS) without any intraoperative ischaemia in a 55–year–old female patient with an orthotopic heart transplant and renal insufficiency following a prolonged immune suppression. It is estimated that the patients at the highest risk of neoplasm development are those in the first months after transplant, especially heart transplant. They require maximum doses of immunosuppressive drugs. In the case of patients with initial renal insufficiency the duration of ischaemia of the organ operated on should be minimized, and if possible, surgery should be conducted without clamping the renal pedicle. The surgical treatment of RCC (renal cell carcinoma) in transplant patients does not require any reduction in the amount of the immunosuppressive drugs. PMID:24578985

  3. NSS for an RCC in a patient with renal insufficiency after heart transplant because of right ventricular tumor.

    PubMed

    Prokopowicz, Grzegorz; Zyczkowski, Marcin; Nowakowski, Krzysztof; Bryniarski, Piotr; Paradysz, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the immunosuppressive therapy on the development of neoplasms has become the object of an ever increasing interest for clinicians all over the world. The literature on neoplasms development in the course of therapy following transplants has confirmed a considerable increase in the incidence of neoplasms of the skin and lymph nodes. Organ neoplasms developing in patients after transplants are characterized by increased progression, poor cellular diversification and a more unfavorable prognosis than in the general population The aim of the study is to present the case of a nephron-sparing surgery of a renal tumor (NSS) without any intraoperative ischaemia in a 55-year-old female patient with an orthotopic heart transplant and renal insufficiency following a prolonged immune suppression. It is estimated that the patients at the highest risk of neoplasm development are those in the first months after transplant, especially heart transplant. They require maximum doses of immunosuppressive drugs. In the case of patients with initial renal insufficiency the duration of ischaemia of the organ operated on should be minimized, and if possible, surgery should be conducted without clamping the renal pedicle. The surgical treatment of RCC (renal cell carcinoma) in transplant patients does not require any reduction in the amount of the immunosuppressive drugs.

  4. Diuretics, calciuria and secondary hyperparathyroidism in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Isakova, Tamara; Anderson, Cheryl A. M.; Leonard, Mary B.; Xie, Dawei; Gutiérrez, Orlando M.; Rosen, Leigh K.; Theurer, Jacquie; Bellovich, Keith; Steigerwalt, Susan P.; Tang, Ignatius; Anderson, Amanda Hyre; Townsend, Raymond R.; He, Jiang; Feldman, Harold I.; Wolf, Myles

    2011-01-01

    Background. Secondary hyperparathyroidism is a common complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD) that is associated with bone disease, cardiovascular disease and death. Pathophysiological factors that maintain secondary hyperparathyroidism in advanced CKD are well-known, but early mechanisms of the disease that can be targeted for its primary prevention are poorly understood. Diuretics are widely used to control volume status and blood pressure in CKD patients but are also known to have important effects on renal calcium handling, which we hypothesized could alter the risk of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Methods. We examined the relationship of diuretic treatment with urinary calcium excretion, parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels and prevalence of secondary hyperparathyroidism (PTH ≥ 65 pg/mL) in a cross-sectional study of 3616 CKD patients in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort. Results. Compared with no diuretics, treatment with loop diuretics was independently associated with higher adjusted urinary calcium (55.0 versus 39.6 mg/day; P < 0.001), higher adjusted PTH [67.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 65.2–70.7 pg/mL, versus 52.8, 95% CI 51.1–54.6 pg/mL, P < 0.001] and greater odds of secondary hyperparathyroidism (odds ratio 2.1; 95% CI 1.7–2.6). Thiazide monotherapy was associated with lower calciuria (25.5 versus 39.6 mg/day; P < 0.001) but only modestly lower PTH levels (50.0, 95% CI 47.8–52.3, versus 520.8, 95% CI 51.1–54.6 pg/mL, P = 0.04) compared with no diuretics. However, coadministration of thiazide and loop diuretics was associated with blunted urinary calcium (30.3 versus 55.0 mg/day; P <0.001) and odds of hyperparathyroidism (odds ratio 1.3 versus 2.1; P for interaction = 0.05) compared with loop diuretics alone. Conclusions. Loop diuretic use was associated with greater calciuria, PTH levels and odds of secondary hyperparathyroidism compared to no treatment. These associations were attenuated in patients who were coadministered

  5. Estimating GFR Among Participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Amanda Hyre; Yang, Wei; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Joffe, Marshall M.; Leonard, Mary B.; Xie, Dawei; Chen, Jing; Greene, Tom; Jaar, Bernard G.; Kao, Patricia; Kusek, John W.; Landis, J. Richard; Lash, James P.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Weir, Matthew R.; Feldman, Harold I.

    2012-01-01

    Background Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is considered the best measure of kidney function, but repeated assessment is not feasible in most research studies. Study Design Cross-sectional study of 1,433 participants from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study (i.e., the GFR subcohort) to derive an internal GFR estimating equation using a split sample approach. Setting & Participants Adults from 7 US metropolitan areas with mild to moderate chronic kidney disease; 48% had diabetes and 37% were black. Index Test CRIC GFR estimating equation Reference Test or Outcome Urinary 125I-iothalamate clearance testing (measured GFR) Other Measurements Laboratory measures including serum creatinine and cystatin C, and anthropometrics Results In the validation dataset, the model that included serum creatinine, serum cystatin C, age, gender, and race was the most parsimonious and similarly predictive of mGFR compared to a model additionally including bioelectrical impedance analysis phase angle, CRIC clinical center, and 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion. Specifically, the root mean square errors for the separate model were 0.207 vs. 0.202, respectively. The performance of the CRIC GFR estimating equation was most accurate among the subgroups of younger participants, men, non-blacks, non-Hispanics, those without diabetes, those with body mass index <30 kg/m2, those with higher 24-hour urine creatinine excretion, those with lower levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and those with higher mGFR. Limitations Urinary clearance of 125I-iothalamate is an imperfect measure of true GFR; cystatin C is not standardized to certified reference material; lack of external validation; small sample sizes limit analyses of subgroup-specific predictors. Conclusions The CRIC GFR estimating equation predicts measured GFR accurately in the CRIC cohort using serum creatinine and cystatin C, age, gender, and race. Its performance was best among younger and healthier

  6. Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study: Baseline Characteristics and Associations with Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Go, Alan S.; Appel, Lawrence J.; He, Jiang; Ojo, Akinlolu; Rahman, Mahboob; Townsend, Raymond R.; Xie, Dawei; Cifelli, Denise; Cohan, Janet; Fink, Jeffrey C.; Fischer, Michael J.; Gadegbeku, Crystal; Hamm, L. Lee; Kusek, John W.; Landis, J. Richard; Narva, Andrew; Robinson, Nancy; Teal, Valerie; Feldman, Harold I.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study was established to examine risk factors for the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with CKD. We examined baseline demographic and clinical characteristics. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Seven clinical centers recruited adults who were aged 21 to 74 yr and had CKD using age-based estimated GFR (eGFR) inclusion criteria. At baseline, blood and urine specimens were collected and information regarding health behaviors, diet, quality of life, and functional status was obtained. GFR was measured using radiolabeled iothalamate in one third of participants. Results: A total of 3612 participants were enrolled with mean age ± SD of 58.2 ± 11.0 yr; 46% were women, and 47% had diabetes. Overall, 45% were non-Hispanic white, 46% were non-Hispanic black, and 5% were Hispanic. Eighty-six percent reported hypertension, 22% coronary disease, and 10% heart failure. Mean body mass index was 32.1 ± 7.9 kg/m2, and 47% had a BP >130/80 mmHg. Mean eGFR was 43.4 ± 13.5 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and median (interquartile range) protein excretion was 0.17 g/24 h (0.07 to 0.81 g/24 h). Lower eGFR was associated with older age, lower socioeconomic and educational level, cigarette smoking, self-reported CVD, peripheral arterial disease, and elevated BP. Conclusions: Lower level of eGFR was associated with a greater burden of CVD as well as lower socioeconomic and educational status. Long-term follow-up of participants will provide critical insights into the epidemiology of CKD and its relationship to adverse outcomes. PMID:19541818

  7. Cardiovascular Disease Among Hispanics and Non-Hispanics in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Ricardo, Ana C.; Fischer, Michael J.; Lora, Claudia M.; Budoff, Matthew; Keane, Martin G.; Kusek, John W.; Martinez, Monica; Nessel, Lisa; Stamos, Thomas; Ojo, Akinlolu; Rahman, Mahboob; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Yang, Wei; Feldman, Harold I.; Go, Alan S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Hispanics are the largest minority group in the United States. The leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is cardiovascular disease (CVD), yet little is known about its prevalence among Hispanics with CKD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We conducted cross-sectional analyses of prevalent self-reported clinical and subclinical measures of CVD among 497 Hispanics, 1638 non-Hispanic Caucasians, and 1650 non-Hispanic African Americans, aged 21 to 74 years, with mild-to-moderate CKD at enrollment in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) and Hispanic CRIC (HCRIC) studies. Measures of subclinical CVD included left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), coronary artery calcification (CAC), and ankle-brachial index. Results Self-reported coronary heart disease (CHD) was lower in Hispanics compared with non-Hispanic Caucasians (18% versus 23%, P = 0.02). Compared with non-Hispanic Caucasians, Hispanics had a lower prevalence of CAC >100 (41% versus 34%, P = 0.03) and CAC >400 (26% versus 19%, P = 0.02). However, after adjusting for sociodemographic factors, these differences were no longer significant. In adjusted analyses, Hispanics had a higher odds of LVH compared with non-Hispanic Caucasians (odds ratio 1.97, 95% confidence interval, 1.22 to 3.17, P = 0.005), and a higher odds of CAC >400 compared with non-Hispanic African Americans (odds ratio, 2.49, 95% confidence interval, 1.11 to 5.58, P = 0.03). Hispanic ethnicity was not independently associated with any other CVD measures. Conclusions Prevalent LVH was more common among Hispanics than non-Hispanic Caucasians, and elevated CAC score was more common among Hispanics than non-Hispanic African Americans. Understanding reasons for these racial/ethnic differences and their association with long-term clinical outcomes is needed. PMID:21896829

  8. Increasing Use of Vitamin D Supplementation in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Laura H.; White, Matthew T.; Shults, Justine; Anderson, Cheryl A. M.; Feldman, Harold I.; Wolf, Myles; Reese, Peter P.; Denburg, Michelle R.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Lo, Joan C.; Cappola, Anne R.; Carlow, Dean; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Steigerwalt, Susan; Leonard, Mary B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study examined rates and determinants of vitamin D supplementation among Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) participants and determined the association between dose and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) level. The 2010 Institute of Medicine Report noted a significant increase in vitamin D supplementation in the general population, but use in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is unknown. Methods CRIC is a multicenter prospective observational cohort study of 3,939 participants with a median baseline age of 60 and an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 42.1 mL/minute per 1.73 m2. Of the cohort, 54.9% was male, 42.1% were Black, and 48.4% were diabetic. Multivariable logistic generalized estimating equations were used to examine determinants of supplementation use assessed annually between 2003 and 2011. Cross-sectional linear regression models, based on a subset of 1,155 participants, assessed associations between supplement dose and 25(OH)D level, measured by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Results The proportion of participants reporting supplement use increased (P < .0001), from 10% at baseline to 44% at 7-year follow-up visits. This was largely due to initiation of products containing only ergocalciferol or cholecalciferol. The odds of supplementation were greater in older, female, non-Black, married participants with greater education and lower body mass index. Among participants taking supplementation, dose was positively associated with 25(OH)D level, adjusted for race, season, diabetes, dietary intake, eGFR, and proteinuria. Only 3.8% of non-Black and 16.5% of Black participants taking a supplement were deficient (<20 ng/mL), whereas 22.7% of non-Black and 62.4% of Black participants not reporting supplement use were deficient. Conclusions Vitamin D supplementation rates rose significantly among CRIC participants over 7 years of follow-up and were associated with greater serum 25(OH

  9. CERTIFY: prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in patients with severe renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Bauersachs, R; Schellong, S M; Haas, S; Tebbe, U; Gerlach, H-E; Abletshauser, C; Sieder, C; Melzer, N; Bramlage, P; Riess, H

    2011-06-01

    Patients with severe renal insufficiency (sRI) have been suggested to be at an increased risk of bleeding with low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWH). We aimed at assessing the benefits and risks of certoparin in comparison to unfractionated heparin (UFH) in these patients. In this subgroup analysis of the CERTIFY trial, acutely ill, non-surgical patients ≥70 years received certoparin 3,000U aXa o.d. or UFH 5,000 IU t.i.d. One hundred eighty-nine patients had a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) ≤30 ml/min/1.73 m2, 3,050 patients served as controls. Patients with sRI had a mean age of 85.9 ± 6.6 years (controls 78.4 ± 6.0) and were treated for a mean of 9.3 ± 3.7 days (9.9 ± 4.3). Thromboembolic event rates were comparable (4.55 vs. 4.21%; OR1.08; 95%CI 0.5-2.37) but bleeding was increased in sRI (9.52 vs. 3.54%; OR2.87; 95%CI 1.70-4.83). The incidence of the combined end-point of proximal DVT, symptomatic non-fatal PE and VTE related death was 6.49% with certoparin and 2.60% with UFH (OR2.60; 95%CI 0.49-13.85). There was a decrease in total bleeding with certoparin (OR0.33; 95%CI 0.11-0.97), which was non-significant in patients with GFR >30 ml/min/1.73 m2. In two multivariable regression models certoparin and immobilisation <10 days were associated with less bleeding while a GFR ≤30 ml/min/1.73 m2 was associated with increased bleeding. A total of 11.3% of certoparin- and 18.5% of UFH-treated patients experienced serious adverse events (14.8 in patients with a GFR ≤30 vs. 5.6% vs. >30 ml/min/1.73 m2). In conclusion, certoparin 3,000U anti Xa o.d. was as efficacious as 5,000 IU UFH t.i.d. in patients with sRI but had a reduced risk of bleeding.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of ceftriaxone in patients with renal and liver insufficiency and correlations with a physiologic nonlinear protein binding model.

    PubMed

    Stoeckel, K; Koup, J R

    1984-10-19

    In patients with normal hepatic and renal function, between 30 and 60 percent of administered ceftriaxone is eliminated by nonrenal (biliary) mechanisms. Substantial nonrenal elimination reduces the need for dose adjustments in mild and moderate renal impairment. Minor increases in the biologic half-life (12 hours versus normal of 8 hours) of ceftriaxone have been seen in (functionally) anephric patients with normal extrarenal clearance mechanisms. Anephric patients with decreased nonrenal elimination (additional liver damage) showed a greater increase in biologic half-lives (greater than 15 hours). In patients with various degrees of liver insufficiency (alcoholic fatty liver and cirrhosis with and without ascites), only those with ascites showed significant changes in total drug clearance and volume of distribution. However, these changes in patients with ascites were such that they did not demonstrate significantly different biologic half-lives (9.7 hours versus normal of 8 hours). Simulations of observed concentration versus time data support a physiologic disposition model whereby ceftriaxone, like other cephalosporins, distributes only in plasma and in the extravascular-extracellular (interstitial) fluid and ceftriaxone is saturably bound to albumin in both spaces. All observations in normal subjects and patients were in good agreement with the physiologic disposition model predictions. The consequences of the nonlinear binding behavior of ceftriaxone are such that they favor the administration of ceftriaxone in a large single dose rather than in divided doses. No major drug accumulation is expected in patients with renal or hepatic insufficiency, but anephric patients with a decrease of more than 80 percent in nonrenal elimination will require dose adjustments.

  11. The effect of renal insufficiency and hemodialysis on the pharmacokinetics of nalmefene.

    PubMed

    Matzke, G R; Frye, R F; Alexander, A C; Reynolds, R; Dixon, R; Johnston, J; Rault, R M

    1996-02-01

    The disposition of nalmefene, an opioid antagonist intended for the reversal of opioid-induced respiratory depression, and its primary metabolite nalmefene glucuronide, were characterized in adult volunteers with normal renal function and in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The effect of hemodialysis on the elimination of nalmefene and nalmefene glucuronide also was assessed. Participants with normal renal function received a single intravenous dose of 2 mg, and patients with ESRD received two separate doses of 1 mg nalmefene hydrochloride. Terminal elimination half-life (t1/2) of both nalmefene and nalmefene glucuronide was prolonged in patients with ESRD compared with that in participants with normal renal function. The steady-state volume of distribution (Vdss) of nalmefene was significantly higher and total body clearance lower in patients with ESRD than in participants with normal renal function. Hemodialysis clearance of nalmefene was approximately 3.3% of total body clearance. Although the hemodialysis clearance of nalmefene glucuronide was 179.3 +/- 24.1 mL/min and its t1/2 was significantly reduced during dialysis to 5.2 +/- 2.3 hours, a dramatic rebound of nalmefene glucuronide concentrations of 75.7% was observed 7.7 +/- 5.4 hours after the end of hemodialysis. Thus, hemodialysis does not result in clinically significant alterations in the disposition of nalmefene or its primary metabolite, nalmefene glucuronide. These data suggest that there is no pharmacokinetic basis for modification of the initial dosage, but maintenance doses, if needed, should be administered less frequently due to the prolonged elimination of the active moiety, nalmefene.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of imipenem-cilastatin in patients with renal insufficiency undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Somani, P; Freimer, E H; Gross, M L; Higgins, J T

    1988-01-01

    In six patients with end-stage renal disease, a single bolus of imipenem-cilastatin (500 mg each) was given either intravenously or intraperitoneally in a randomized crossover protocol such that each patient received the drug by both routes at a 2- to 3-week interval. Drug levels in plasma and the peritoneal dialysis fluid were analyzed at frequent intervals, and various pharmacokinetic variables were calculated for a one-compartment open model. Data obtained in the present study suggest that while no significant difference in peak plasma levels or volume of distribution were noted, the following variables were significantly different for imipenem as compared with cilastatin: elimination half-life, total plasma clearance, area under the concentration-time curve, and percent drug excretion in the peritoneal dialysis fluid. The elimination half-life of imipenem (3.28 h) or cilastatin (8.84 h) in our patients was in the same range as observed in patients with minimal renal function undergoing hemodialysis. The dose of imipenem-cilastatin should be reduced appropriately in patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing peritoneal dialysis. PMID:3377464

  13. [Aorto-caval fistula as a results of abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture imitating acute renal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Zaniewski, Maciej; Ludyga, Tomasz; Kazibudzki, Marek; Kowalewska-Twardela, Teresa

    2002-01-01

    Aorto-caval fistula (ACF) is a rare complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm. It occurs in 1-6% of cases. The classic diagnostic signs of an ACF (pulsatile abdominal mass with bruit and right ventricular failure) are present only in a half of the patients. The most common diagnostic imaging procedures like ultrasound and computed tomography often are not sufficient enough. This leads to the delay in diagnosis, which has a great impact on the results of operation. We report a case of a patient, who was treated before admission to the Clinic because of azotemia and oliguria suggesting renal failure.

  14. Management of gout: a 57-year-old man with a history of podagra, hyperuricemia, and mild renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Shmerling, Robert H

    2012-11-28

    Gout is an ancient disease. Despite significant advances in the understanding of its risk factors, etiology, pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment, millions of people with gout experience repeated attacks of acute arthritis and other complications. The incidence of gout is increasing, most likely reflecting increasing rates of obesity and other lifestyle factors, including diet. Comorbid conditions that often accompany gout, including chronic kidney disease and diabetes mellitus, present challenges for the management of gout. Using the case of Mr R, a 57-year-old man with a history of podagra, hyperuricemia, and mild renal insufficiency, the diagnosis and treatment of gout are discussed. For those with moderate to severe gout, urate-lowering treatment can eliminate acute attacks of arthritis and prevent complications. In the near future, it is likely that new risk factors for gout will be identified and new ways of preventing and managing this common disease will become available.

  15. Retinopathy and the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease (from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study).

    PubMed

    Grunwald, Juan E; Pistilli, Maxwell; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Maguire, Maureen; Daniel, Ebenezer; Whittock-Martin, Revell; Parker-Ostroff, Candace; Mohler, Emile; Lo, Joan C; Townsend, Raymond R; Gadegbeku, Crystal Ann; Lash, James Phillip; Fink, Jeffrey Craig; Rahman, Mahboob; Feldman, Harold; Kusek, John W; Xie, Dawei

    2015-11-15

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience other diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to assess whether retinopathy predicts future CVD events in a subgroup of the participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. In this ancillary investigation, 2,605 participants of the CRIC study were invited to participate, and nonmydriatic fundus photographs were obtained in 1,936 subjects. Using standard protocols, presence and severity of retinopathy (diabetic, hypertensive, or other) and vessel diameter caliber were assessed at a central photograph reading center by trained graders masked to study participant's information. Patients with a self-reported history of cardiovascular disease were excluded. Incident CVD events were adjudicated using medical records. Kidney function measurements, traditional and nontraditional risk factors, for CVD were obtained. Presence and severity of retinopathy were associated with increased risk of development of any CVD in this population of CKD patients, and these associations persisted after adjustment for traditional risk factors for CVD. We also found a direct relation between increased venular diameter and risk of development of CVD; however, the relation was not statistically significant after adjustment for traditional risk factors. In conclusion, the presence of retinopathy was associated with future CVD events, suggesting that retinovascular pathology may be indicative of macrovascular disease even after adjustment for renal dysfunction and traditional CVD risk factors. Assessment of retinal morphology may be valuable in assessing risk of CVD in patients with CKD, both clinically and in research settings.

  16. [Efficacy of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis in treatment of children with end-stage renal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Sahapozova, E; Ruso, B; Kuzmanovska, D; Tasić, V; Ristoska-Bojkoviska, N

    1998-01-01

    Three children (2 girls and 1 boy) with end-stage renal failure were put in program of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis in the period of 2.5 years (January 1995-September 1997). The age of the children at the treatment onset was 5-12 years. One of three children died due to cardiovascular failure after six-month treatment. Two out of three children had a total of 8 episodes of peritonitis in the period of 37 months during the treatment with peritoneal dialysis. The incidence of peritonitis occurrence in our patients was one episode in 4 patients/months. Most frequent cause for peritonitis occurrence was Staphylococcus aureus in 50% of isolated bacteria. Obtained results in peritoneal equilibration test revealed that the transport and ultrafiltration rate of peritoneal membrane decreased after recurrent peritonitis episodes.

  17. [Bone disorders in children with chronic renal insufficiency exposed to high ingestion of aluminum].

    PubMed

    Gordillo-Paniagua, G; Valencia-Mayoral, P; Mercado, L; Medina-Mercado, M

    1990-05-01

    Bone disorders in 28 children with chronic renal failure exposed to aluminum intoxication were studied. All of the children were in the dialysis program. Aluminum blood levels were higher than normal in all of the children and without any correlation to the magnitude of hypocalcemia or with the increase of the parathormone, which were found in different amounts in all of the children. All of the children had various degrees of skeletal retardation and only one had pathological fractures. The bone biopsy showed hypocellular marrow, decreased osteoclastic activity in the majority of the cases same as trabecular mineralization, although the amount of osteoid was lacking in the trabeculae in the majority of the cases. The deposit of aluminum was detected in a great number of them. It is concluded that osteodystrophy recognizes a number of factors as may be hypocalcemia due to a decrease in the production of 1,25-cholecalciferol, an increase in the parathyroid hormone and the deposit of aluminum, coming mainly from water, in the trabeculae which interfere with the incorporation of calcium in the formation of new bone.

  18. Assessment of glomerular filtration rate in transplant recipients with severe renal insufficiency by Nankivell, Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD), and Cockroft-Gault equations.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, E; Fernández-Fresnedo, G; Ruiz, J C; Piñera, C; Heras, M; de Francisco, A L M; Sanz de Castro, S; Cotorruelo, J G; Zubimendi, J A; Arias, M

    2003-08-01

    Measurement of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is time consuming and cumbersome. Several formulas have been developed to predict creatinine clearance (CrCl) or GFR using serum creatinine (Cr) concentrations and demographic characteristics. However, few studies have been performed to discern the best formula to estimate GFR in kidney transplantation. In this study, Cockroft-Gault (CG), Nankivell, and Levey (MDRD) formulas were tested to predict GFR in 125 cadaveric renal transplant patients with severe renal insufficiency (GFR less than 30 mL/min per 1.73 m2). The GFR was estimated as the average Cr and urea clearances. The mean GFR estimated by averaged Cr and urea clearances (22.18+/-5.23 mL/min per 1.73 m2) was significantly different from the mean values yielded by the MDRD formula (20.42+/-6.65 mL/min per 1.73 m2, P=.000), the Nankivell formula (30.14+/-11.98 mL/min per 1.73 m2, P=.000), and the CG formula (29.42+/-8.64 mL/min per 1.73 m2, P=.000). The MDRD formula showed a better correlation (R=0.741, P=.000) than the CG (R=0.698, P=.000) and the Nankivell formulas (R=0.685, P=.000). Analysis of differences using the Bland-Altmann method demonstrated that MDRD gave the lowest bias (MDRD: -1.65+/-4.4 mL/min per 1.73 m2; CG: 7.33+/-6.24 mL/min per 1.73 m2; Nankivell: 8.05+/-9.23 mL/min per 1.73 m2) and narrower limits of agreement (Nankivell: -10.41-26.51 mL/min per 1.73 m2; CG: -5.15-19.81 mL/min per 1.73 m2; MDRD: -10.61-7.31 mL/min per 1.73 m2). In transplant patients with severe renal insufficiency, the MDRD equation seems better than the other formulas to estimate GFR.

  19. [Cardiovascular impact of end-stage renal insufficiency in children undergoing hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Aggoun, Y; Niaudet, P; Laffont, A; Sidi, D; Kachaner, J; Bonnet, D

    2000-08-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy and arterial dysfunction have been described in end-stage renal disease (ESDR) in adults. The incremental elastic modulus (Einc), is a marker of vascular wall material stiffness and an independant predictor of cardiovascular mortality in adults with ESRD on hemodialysis. The relationship between arterial changes and the heart is unknown in the children with ESRD in the same conditions. Using a high-resolution vascular ultrasound and a computerized system of measurement (Iotec), we assessed noninvasively 10 ESRD patients (mean +/- SD, age, 11.5 +/- 4 years; blood pressure [BP], 120 +/- 10/63 +/- 4 mmHg) and 10 age-, sex-, and BP-matched controls (mean +/- SD, age, 11 +/- 4 years; BP, 114 +/- 8/58 +/- 8 mmHg). The systolic and diastolic diameter of the common carotid artery (CCA), the thickness of the wall (intima-media thickness, IMT), the cross sectional compliance (CSC), the cross sectional distensibility (CSD) and the (Einc) were determined. CSC and CSD were evaluated at the same level of pressure. The CCA pressure waveform was obtained by applanation tonometry to assess the reflected wave by the augmentation index (AI). Further the left ventricular mass index was assessed. The flow mediated dilation (FMD) (endothelium-dependent function) and the vasodilation induced by glyceryl-trinitrate (GTNMD) (GTN, an endothelium-independent dilator) were evaluated at the brachial artery site. Compared to control subjects, ESRD patients have mechanical artery dysfunction with lower CSC and CSD (0.11 +/- 0.04 vs 0.18 +/- 0.05 mm2.mmHg-1; p < 0.01; 0.43 +/- 0.10 vs 0.82 +/- 0.20 mmHg-1.10(-2); p < 0.001) and higher Einc (2.60 +/- 1.00 vs 1.40 +/- 0.30 mmHg.10(3); p < 0.001). Furthermore an earlier return of the reflected pulse wave (AI -0.24 +/- 0.08 vs -0.58 +/- 0.06; p < 0.005) is correlated to LV mass index (r = 0.55, P < 0.01) that is significantly increased (134 +/- 63 vs 69 +/- 25 g/m2; p < 0.005). These patients have an impaired FMD (4 +/- 2 vs 7

  20. Use of sofosbuvir-based direct-acting antiviral therapy for hepatitis C viral infection in patients with severe renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Hundemer, Gregory L; Sise, Meghan E; Wisocky, Jessica; Ufere, Nneka; Friedman, Lawrence S; Corey, Kathleen E; Chung, Raymond T

    2015-01-01

    Sofosbuvir-based direct-acting antiviral therapy revolutionized the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, sofosbuvir use is not approved for patients with severe renal insufficiency (estimated glomerular filtration (eGFR) rate below 30 ml/min) or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) based on concerns raised during premarket animal testing over hepatobiliary and cardiovascular toxicity in this population. We report the first published data on use of sofosbuvir-based regimens in patients with severe renal insufficiency and ESRD, focusing on clinical efficacy and safety. Six patients were treated with full dose sofosbuvir; three received sofosbuvir and simeprevir, two received sofosbuvir and ribavirin, and one received sofosbuvir, ribavirin, and interferon. Three of the patients had cirrhosis. On-treatment viral suppression was 100% and sustained virological response (SVR) rate at 12 weeks was 67%. One patient had to discontinue antiviral therapy early due to side effects. No hepatobiliary or cardiovascular toxicity was reported.

  1. Indispensable but insufficient role of renal D-amino acid oxidase in chiral inversion of NG-nitro-D-arginine.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yan-Fei; Li, Xin; Hao, Bin; Gong, Nian; Sun, Wen-Qiang; Konno, Ryuichi; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2010-06-01

    Unidirectionally chiral inversion of N(G)-nitro-D-arginine (D-NNA) to its L-enantiomer (L-NNA) occurred in rats, and it was blocked markedly (ca. 80%) by renal vascular ligation, and entirely (100%) by the D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) inhibitor sodium benzoate, suggesting that renal DAO is essential for the inversion. However, the doses of sodium benzoate administrated were extremely high (e.g., 400 mg/kg) due to its low potency. It is thus possible that sodium benzoate-mediated blockade of D-NNA inversion might be due to its nonspecific (or non-DAO-related) effects. In addition, after D-NNA was incubated with the pure enzyme of DAO in vitro without tissue homogenates, L-NNA was not produced, even though D-NNA was disposed. We propose that this occurred because D-NNA was first converted to its corresponding alpha-keto acid by DAO and then to L-NNA by transaminase(s); however, there was no direct evidence for this process. The goal of this study is to further elucidate the process of D-NNA chiral inversion both in vivo and in in vitro tissue homogenates by comparing mutant ddY/DAO(-/-) mice that lack DAO activity entirely compared to normal ddY/DAO(+/+) mice and Swiss mice. Furthermore, the ability to produce L-NNA from D-NNA-corresponding alpha-keto acids (N(G)-nitroguanidino-2-oxopentanoic acid) produced by porcine kidney-derived DAO (pkDAO) was also studied in the DAO inhibitor-pretreated rats. We found that D-NNA chiral inversion occurred in Swiss mice and ddY/DAO(+/+) mice both in vivo and in in vitro kidney homogenates, but not in ddY/DAO(-/-) mice, correlated to their DAO activities. The alpha-keto acid (N(G)-nitro-guanidino-2-oxopentanoic acid) from D-NNA was able to produce L-NNA, and subsequent vasoconstriction and pressor responses. These results indicate that the role of renal DAO is indispensible but insufficient for chiral inversion of D-NNA and other neutral and polar D-amino acids, and unidentified aminotransferase(s) are involved in a subsequent

  2. Indispensable but insufficient role of renal D-amino acid oxidase in chiral inversion of NG-nitro-D-arginine.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yan-Fei; Li, Xin; Hao, Bin; Gong, Nian; Sun, Wen-Qiang; Konno, Ryuichi; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2010-06-01

    Unidirectionally chiral inversion of N(G)-nitro-D-arginine (D-NNA) to its L-enantiomer (L-NNA) occurred in rats, and it was blocked markedly (ca. 80%) by renal vascular ligation, and entirely (100%) by the D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) inhibitor sodium benzoate, suggesting that renal DAO is essential for the inversion. However, the doses of sodium benzoate administrated were extremely high (e.g., 400 mg/kg) due to its low potency. It is thus possible that sodium benzoate-mediated blockade of D-NNA inversion might be due to its nonspecific (or non-DAO-related) effects. In addition, after D-NNA was incubated with the pure enzyme of DAO in vitro without tissue homogenates, L-NNA was not produced, even though D-NNA was disposed. We propose that this occurred because D-NNA was first converted to its corresponding alpha-keto acid by DAO and then to L-NNA by transaminase(s); however, there was no direct evidence for this process. The goal of this study is to further elucidate the process of D-NNA chiral inversion both in vivo and in in vitro tissue homogenates by comparing mutant ddY/DAO(-/-) mice that lack DAO activity entirely compared to normal ddY/DAO(+/+) mice and Swiss mice. Furthermore, the ability to produce L-NNA from D-NNA-corresponding alpha-keto acids (N(G)-nitroguanidino-2-oxopentanoic acid) produced by porcine kidney-derived DAO (pkDAO) was also studied in the DAO inhibitor-pretreated rats. We found that D-NNA chiral inversion occurred in Swiss mice and ddY/DAO(+/+) mice both in vivo and in in vitro kidney homogenates, but not in ddY/DAO(-/-) mice, correlated to their DAO activities. The alpha-keto acid (N(G)-nitro-guanidino-2-oxopentanoic acid) from D-NNA was able to produce L-NNA, and subsequent vasoconstriction and pressor responses. These results indicate that the role of renal DAO is indispensible but insufficient for chiral inversion of D-NNA and other neutral and polar D-amino acids, and unidentified aminotransferase(s) are involved in a subsequent

  3. Thoracic combined spinal epidural anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a geriatric patient with ischemic heart disease and renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Nandita; Gupta, Sunana; Sharma, Atul; Dar, Mohd Reidwan

    2015-01-01

    Older people undergoing any surgery have a higher incidence of morbidity and mortality, resulting from a decline in physiological reserves, associated comorbidities, polypharmacy, cognitive dysfunction, and frailty. Most of the clinical trials comparing regional versus general anesthesia in elderly have failed to establish superiority of any single technique. However, the ideal approach in elderly is to be least invasive, thus minimizing alterations in homeostasis. The goal of anesthetic management in laparoscopic procedures includes management of pneumoperitoneum, achieving an adequate level of sensory blockade without any respiratory compromise, management of shoulder tip pain, provision of adequate postoperative pain relief, and early ambulation. Regional anesthesia fulfills all the aforementioned criteria and aids in quick recovery and thus has been suggested to be a suitable alternative to general anesthesia for laparoscopic surgeries, particularly in patients who are at high risk while under general anesthesia or for patients unwilling to undergo general anesthesia. In conclusion, we report results of successful management with thoracic combined spinal epidural for laparoscopic cholecystectomy of a geriatric patient with ischemic heart disease with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and renal insufficiency.

  4. Thoracic combined spinal epidural anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a geriatric patient with ischemic heart disease and renal insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Nandita; Gupta, Sunana; Sharma, Atul; Dar, Mohd Reidwan

    2015-01-01

    Older people undergoing any surgery have a higher incidence of morbidity and mortality, resulting from a decline in physiological reserves, associated comorbidities, polypharmacy, cognitive dysfunction, and frailty. Most of the clinical trials comparing regional versus general anesthesia in elderly have failed to establish superiority of any single technique. However, the ideal approach in elderly is to be least invasive, thus minimizing alterations in homeostasis. The goal of anesthetic management in laparoscopic procedures includes management of pneumoperitoneum, achieving an adequate level of sensory blockade without any respiratory compromise, management of shoulder tip pain, provision of adequate postoperative pain relief, and early ambulation. Regional anesthesia fulfills all the aforementioned criteria and aids in quick recovery and thus has been suggested to be a suitable alternative to general anesthesia for laparoscopic surgeries, particularly in patients who are at high risk while under general anesthesia or for patients unwilling to undergo general anesthesia. In conclusion, we report results of successful management with thoracic combined spinal epidural for laparoscopic cholecystectomy of a geriatric patient with ischemic heart disease with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and renal insufficiency. PMID:26664202

  5. Predictors of ertapenem therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in hospitalized adults: the importance of renal insufficiency and urinary pH.

    PubMed

    Cunha, B A; Giuga, J; Gerson, S

    2016-04-01

    In hospitalized adults acute uncomplicated cystitis (AUC) and catheter associated bacteriuria (CAB) may be treated with oral antibiotics. With AUC or CAB due to extended spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL) + Gram negative bacilli (GNB) physicians often use intravenous therapy, e.g., ertapenem. We reviewed our recent experience in hospitalized adults with AUC and CAB treated with ertapenem. Therapeutic efficacy of ertapenem was assessed by decreased pyuria/bacteriuria, and elimination of the uropathogen. The effectiveness of ertapenem in the presence of renal insufficiency (CrCl < 50 ml/min) and acid and alkaline urinary pH were evaluated. In addition, rapidity of eradication of bacteriuria was assessed by time to negative urine cultures (TTNC). In those with an acid urinary pH ertapenem was highly effective in eliminating bacteriuria (TTNC < 3 days). TTNC was prolonged ( >3 days) in patients with decreased renal function and alkaline urinary pH. We reviewed 45 hospitalized adults with AUC or CAB to determine if renal insufficiency and or alkaline urinary pH affected ertapenem efficacy. In the 33 adult hospitalized patients with AUC and 12 with CAB, we found that ertapenem was consistently effective in eliminating the GNB bacteriuria. In hospitalized adults, the presence of renal insufficiency and acid urine, bacteriuria was eliminated in < 3 days. However, in those with renal insufficiency and an alkaline urine pH, the rapidity of cure, i.e., time to negative cultures (TTNC) was prolonged, i.e., > 3 days which has not been previously reported. PMID:26873378

  6. Predictors of ertapenem therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in hospitalized adults: the importance of renal insufficiency and urinary pH.

    PubMed

    Cunha, B A; Giuga, J; Gerson, S

    2016-04-01

    In hospitalized adults acute uncomplicated cystitis (AUC) and catheter associated bacteriuria (CAB) may be treated with oral antibiotics. With AUC or CAB due to extended spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL) + Gram negative bacilli (GNB) physicians often use intravenous therapy, e.g., ertapenem. We reviewed our recent experience in hospitalized adults with AUC and CAB treated with ertapenem. Therapeutic efficacy of ertapenem was assessed by decreased pyuria/bacteriuria, and elimination of the uropathogen. The effectiveness of ertapenem in the presence of renal insufficiency (CrCl < 50 ml/min) and acid and alkaline urinary pH were evaluated. In addition, rapidity of eradication of bacteriuria was assessed by time to negative urine cultures (TTNC). In those with an acid urinary pH ertapenem was highly effective in eliminating bacteriuria (TTNC < 3 days). TTNC was prolonged ( >3 days) in patients with decreased renal function and alkaline urinary pH. We reviewed 45 hospitalized adults with AUC or CAB to determine if renal insufficiency and or alkaline urinary pH affected ertapenem efficacy. In the 33 adult hospitalized patients with AUC and 12 with CAB, we found that ertapenem was consistently effective in eliminating the GNB bacteriuria. In hospitalized adults, the presence of renal insufficiency and acid urine, bacteriuria was eliminated in < 3 days. However, in those with renal insufficiency and an alkaline urine pH, the rapidity of cure, i.e., time to negative cultures (TTNC) was prolonged, i.e., > 3 days which has not been previously reported.

  7. [Study on the pathogenetic factors of the progression of renal insufficiency, with special reference to the effects of dietary protein intake].

    PubMed

    Tsugawa, Y

    1990-06-01

    The effects of dietary protein intake on the progression of renal insufficiency were studied in daunomycin (DMC) induced nephrotic rats (DMC rats) and also patients with chronic renal diseases. In the first study, the author examined which treatment among enalapril (E) and indomethacin (I) and dietary protein restriction was the most effective to prevent proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis, and then the effect of dietary protein restriction on renal content of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in DMC rats. These rats were divided into four groups as follows: group PL and group PH were isocaloric diets containing either 5% or 24% protein, respectively and group PE and PI were given orally E (100 mg/l drinking water) or I (50 mg/l drinking water) with diets of 24% protein, respectively. In group PL, urinary protein excretion (U-Protein) rates and renal damage index were significantly lower than those in other three groups. In group PE, renal damage index was significantly improved although U-Protein showed no reduction in contrast with these in group PH. Renal MDA in group PL was lower than that in group PH was significantly lower than that in group PL. In this study dietary protein restriction was the most effective treatment for the prevention of progressive renal insufficiency. In the second study, patients with chronic renal diseases were divided into two groups according to their Ccr: group I; Ccr greater than or equal to 60 ml/min, group II; Ccr less than 60 ml/min. All patients orally received diets of high protein (1.4 g/kgBW) and subsequently of low protein (0.7 g/kgBW). Ccr, U-Protein, serum MDA and serum SOD were estimated at the end of each dietary period. In group I, Ccr was significantly lower on low protein diet than that on high protein diet, although these were no significant changes in Ccr in group II. The low protein diet caused a significant decrease in U-Protein in both groups. Serum MDA in group I was significantly lower on low

  8. Candidate Gene Association Study of Coronary Artery Calcification in Chronic Kidney Disease: Findings from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Jane F; Matthews, Gregory J; Townsend, Raymond R; Raj, Dominic S; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Budoff, Matthew; Fischer, Michael J; Rosas, Sylvia E; Kanthety, Radhika; Rahman, Mahboob; Master, Stephen R; Qasim, Atif; Li, Mingyao; Mehta, Nehal N.; Shen, Haiqing; Mitchell, Braxton D; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; Shuldiner, Alan R; Ho, Weang Kee; Young, Robin; Rasheed, Asif; Danesh, John; He, Jiang; Kusek, John W; Ojo, Akinlolu O; Flack, John; Go, Alan S; Gadegbeku, Crystal A; Wright, Jackson T; Saleheen, Danish; Feldman, Harold I; Rader, Daniel J; Foulkes, Andrea S; Reilly, Muredach P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To identify loci for coronary artery calcification (CAC) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Background CKD is associated with increased CAC and subsequent coronary heart disease (CHD) but the mechanisms remain poorly defined. Genetic studies of CAC in CKD may provide a useful strategy for identifying novel pathways in CHD. Methods We performed a candidate gene study (~2,100 genes; ~50,000 SNPs) of CAC within the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study (n=1,509; 57% European, 43% African ancestry). SNPs with preliminary evidence of association with CAC in CRIC were examined for association with CAC in PennCAC (n=2,560) and Amish Family Calcification Study (AFCS; n=784) samples. SNPs with suggestive replication were further analyzed for association with myocardial infarction (MI) in the Pakistan Risk of Myocardial Infarction study (PROMIS) (n=14,885). Results Of 268 SNPs reaching P <5×10−4 for CAC in CRIC, 28 SNPs in 23 loci had nominal support (P <0.05 and in same direction) for CAC in PennCAC or AFCS. Besides chr9p21 and COL4A1, known loci for CHD, these included SNPs having reported GWAS association with hypertension (e.g., ATP2B1). In PROMIS, four of the 23 suggestive CAC loci (chr9p21, COL4A1, ATP2B1 and ABCA4) had significant associations with MI consistent with their direction of effect on CAC. Conclusions We identified several loci associated with CAC in CKD that also relate to MI in a general population sample. CKD imparts a high risk of CHD and may provide a useful setting for discovery of novel CHD genes and pathways. PMID:23727086

  9. Recruitment of Hispanics into an observational study of chronic kidney disease: the Hispanic Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study experience.

    PubMed

    Lora, Claudia M; Ricardo, Ana C; Brecklin, Carolyn S; Fischer, Michael J; Rosman, Robert T; Carmona, Eunice; Lopez, Amada; Balaram, Manjunath; Nessel, Lisa; Tao, Kaixiang Kelvin; Xie, Dawei; Kusek, John W; Go, Alan S; Lash, James P

    2012-11-01

    Despite the large burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Hispanics, this population has been underrepresented in research studies. We describe the recruitment strategies employed by the Hispanic Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study, which led to the successful enrollment of a large population of Hispanic adults with CKD into a prospective observational cohort study. Recruitment efforts by bilingual staff focused on community clinics with Hispanic providers in high-density Hispanic neighborhoods in Chicago, academic medical centers, and private nephrology practices. Methods of publicizing the study included church meetings, local Hispanic print media, Spanish television and radio stations, and local health fairs. From October 2005 to July 2008, we recruited 327 Hispanics aged 21-74 years with mild-to-moderate CKD as determined by age-specific estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Of 716 individuals completing a screening visit, 49% did not meet eGFR inclusion criteria and 46% completed a baseline visit. The mean age at enrollment was 57.1 and 67.1% of participants were male. Approximately 75% of enrolled individuals were Mexican American, 15% Puerto Rican, and 10% had other Latin American ancestry. Eighty two percent of participants were Spanish-speakers. Community-based and academic primary care clinics yielded the highest percentage of participants screened (45.9% and 22.4%) and enrolled (38.2% and 24.5%). However, academic and community-based specialty clinics achieved the highest enrollment yield from individuals screened (61.9% to 71.4%). A strategy focused on primary care and nephrology clinics and the use of bilingual recruiters allowed us to overcome barriers to the recruitment of Hispanics with CKD.

  10. Utility of radioisotopic filtration markers in chronic renal insufficiency: Simultaneous comparison of sup 125 I-iothalamate, sup 169 Yb-DTPA, sup 99m Tc-DTPA, and inulin. The Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study

    SciTech Connect

    Perrone, R.D.; Steinman, T.I.; Beck, G.J.; Skibinski, C.I.; Royal, H.D.; Lawlor, M.; Hunsicker, L.G. )

    1990-09-01

    Assessment of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) with inulin is cumbersome and time-consuming. Radioisotopic filtration markers have been studied as filtration markers because they can be used without continuous intravenous (IV) infusion and because analysis is relatively simple. Although the clearances of 99mTc-DTPA, 169Yb-DTPA, and 125I-iothalamate have each been compared with inulin, rarely has the comparability of radioisotopic filtration markers been directly evaluated in the same subject. To this purpose, we determined the renal clearance of inulin administered by continuous infusion and the above radioisotopic filtration markers administered as bolus injections, simultaneously in four subjects with normal renal function and 16 subjects with renal insufficiency. Subjects were studied twice in order to assess within-study and between-study variability. Unlabeled iothalamate was infused during the second half of each study to assess its effect on clearances. We found that renal clearance of 125I-iothalamate and 169Yb-DTPA significantly exceeded clearance of inulin in patients with renal insufficiency, but only by several mL.min-1.1.73m-2. Overestimation of inulin clearance by radioisotopic filtration markers was found in all normal subjects. No differences between markers were found in the coefficient of variation of clearances either between periods on a given study day (within-day variability) or between the two study days (between-day variability). The true test variability between days did not correlate with within-test variability. We conclude that the renal clearance of 99mTc-DTPA, 169Yb-DTPA, or 125I-iothalamate administered as a single IV or subcutaneous injection can be used to accurately measure GFR in subjects with renal insufficiency; use of the single injection technique may overestimate GFR in normal subjects.

  11. Hypertension Awareness, Treatment, and Control in Adults With CKD: Results From the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Muntner, Paul; Anderson, Amanda; Charleston, Jeanne; Chen, Zhen; Ford, Virginia; Makos, Gail; O’Connor, Andrew; Perumal, Kalyani; Rahman, Mahboob; Steigerwalt, Susan; Teal, Valerie; Townsend, Raymond; Weir, Matthew; Wright, Jackson T

    2010-01-01

    Background A low rate of blood pressure control has been reported among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). These data were derived from population-based samples with a low rate of CKD awareness. Study Design Cross-sectional Setting & Participants Data from the baseline visit of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study (n=3612) were analyzed. Participants with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 20 to 70 ml/min/1.73m2 were identified from physician offices and review of laboratory databases. Outcomes Prevalence and awareness of hypertension, treatment patterns, control rates and factors associated with hypertension control. Measurements Following a standardized protocol, blood pressure was measured three times by trained staff and hypertension was defined as systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mmHg and/or self-reported antihypertensive medication use. Patients’ awareness and treatment of hypertension were defined using self-report and two levels of hypertension control were evaluated: systolic/diastolic blood pressure <140/90 mmHg and <130/80 mmHg. Results The prevalence of hypertension was 85.7%, and 98.9% of CRIC participants were aware of this diagnosis, 98.3% were treated with medications while 67.1% and 46.1% had their hypertension controlled to <140/90 mmHg and <130/80 mmHg, respectively. Of CRIC participants with hypertension, 15%, 25%, 26% and 32% were taking one, two, three and four or more antihypertensive medications, respectively. After multivariable adjustment, older patients, blacks, those with higher urinary albumin excretion were less likely while participants taking ACE-inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers were more likely to have controlled their hypertension to <140/90 mmHg and <130/80 mmHg. Limitations Data were derived from a single study visit. Conclusions Despite almost universal hypertension awareness and treatment in this cohort of patients with CKD, rates of

  12. CKD in Hispanics: Baseline Characteristics From the CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) and Hispanic-CRIC Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Michael J.; Go, Alan; Lora, Claudia M.; Ackerson, Lynn; Cohan, Janet; Kusek, John; Mercado, Alejandro; Ojo, Akinlolu; Ricardo, Ana C.; Rosen, Leigh; Tao, Kelvin; Xie, Dawei; Feldman, Harold; Lash, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known regarding chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Hispanics. We compared baseline characteristics of Hispanic participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) and Hispanic-CRIC (H-CRIC) Studies with non-Hispanic CRIC participants. Study Design Cross-sectional analysis Setting and Participants Participants were aged 21–74 years with CKD using age-based glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at enrollment into the CRIC/H-CRIC Studies. H-CRIC included Hispanics recruited at the University of Illinois from 2005–2008 while CRIC included Hispanics and non-Hispanics recruited at seven clinical centers from 2003–2007. Factor Race/ethnicity Outcomes Blood pressure, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) use, CKD-associated complications Measurements Demographic characteristics, laboratory data, blood pressure, and medications were assessed using standard techniques and protocols Results Among H-CRIC/ CRIC participants, 497 were Hispanic, 1650 non-Hispanic Black, and 1638 non-Hispanic White. Low income and educational attainment were nearly twice as prevalent in Hispanics compared with non-Hispanics (p<0.01). Hispanics had self-reported diabetes (67%) more frequently than non-Hispanic Blacks (51%) and Whites (40%) (p<0.01). Blood pressure > 130/80 mmHg was more common in Hispanics (62%) compared with Blacks (57%) and Whites (35%) (p<0.05), and abnormalities in hematologic, metabolic, and bone metabolism parameters were more prevalent in Hispanics (p<0.05), even after stratifying by entry eGFR. Hispanics had the lowest receipt of ACE inhibitor/ARB among high-risk subgroups, including participants with diabetes, proteinuria, and blood pressure > 130/80 mmHg. Mean eGFR (ml/min/m2) was lower in Hispanics (39.6) than in Blacks (43.7) and Whites (46.2), while median proteinuria was higher in Hispanics (0.72 g/d) than in Blacks (0.24 g/d) and Whites (0.12 g/d) (p<0.01). Limitations Generalizability; observed

  13. The calcimimetic compound NPS R-568 suppresses parathyroid cell proliferation in rats with renal insufficiency. Control of parathyroid cell growth via a calcium receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Wada, M; Furuya, Y; Sakiyama, J; Kobayashi, N; Miyata, S; Ishii, H; Nagano, N

    1997-01-01

    Parathyroid (PT) cell hyperplasia is a common consequence of chronic renal insufficiency (CRI). NPS R-568 is a phenylalkylamine compound that acts as an agonist (calcimimetic) at the cell surface calcium receptor (CaR). To test the hypothesis that the CaR plays a role in PT hyperplasia in CRI, we tested the effect of NPS R-568 on PT cell proliferation in rats with renal insufficiency. Rats were subjected to 5/6 nephrectomy and then infused intraperitoneally with 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label S-phase cells. Two groups of nephrectomized rats received NPS R-568 by gavage twice daily for 4 d (1.5 and 15 mg/kg body wt). On day 5, the number of BrdU-positive PT cells of vehicle-treated nephrectomized rats was 2.6-fold greater than that of the sham-operated control. Low and high doses of NPS R-568 reduced the number of BrdU-positive PT cells by 20 and 50%, respectively. No changes in staining, however, were observed in ileal epithelial cells (CaR-negative) or in thyroidal C-cells (CaR-positive). Furthermore, the effect of NPS R-568 could not be explained by changes in serum 1,25(OH)2D3 or phosphorus. These results indicate that NPS R-568 suppresses PT cell proliferation in rats with renal insufficiency, and lend support to the linkage between the CaR and PT hyperplasia in CRI. PMID:9399943

  14. A comparison of continuous renal replacement therapy to intermittent dialysis in the management of renal insufficiency in the acutely III surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Waldrop, Jimmy; Ciraulo, David L; Milner, Timothy P; Gregori, Douglas; Kendrick, Aaron S; Richart, Charles M; Maxwell, Robert A; Barker, Donald E

    2005-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) occurs in 10 per cent to 23 per cent of intensive care unit patients with mortality ranging from 50 per cent to 90 per cent. ARF is characterized by an acute decline in renal function as measured by urine output (UOP), serum creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). Causes may be prerenal, intrarenal, or postrenal. Treatment consists of renal replacement therapy (RRT), either intermittent (ID) or continuous (CRRT). Indications for initiation of dialysis include oliguria, acidemia, azotemia, hyperkalemia, uremic complications, or significant edema. Overall, the literature comparing CRRT to ID is poor. No studies of only surgical/trauma patients have been published. We hypothesize that renal function and hemodynamic stability in trauma/ surgical critical care patients are better preserved by CRRT than by ID. We performed a retrospective review of trauma/surgical critical care patients requiring renal supportive therapy. Thirty patients received CRRT and 27 patients received ID. The study was controlled for severity of illness and demographics. Outcomes assessed were survival, renal function, acid-base balance, hemodynamic stability, and oxygenation/ventilation parameters. Populations were similar across demographics and severity of illness. Renal function, measured by creatinine clearance, was statistically greater with CRRT (P = 0.035). There was better control of azotemia with CRRT: BUN was lower (P = 0.000) and creatinine was lower (P = 0.000). Mean arterial blood pressure was greater (P = 0.021) with CRRT. No difference in oxygenation/ventilation parameters or pH was found between groups. CRRT results in an enhancement of renal function with improved creatinine clearance at the time of dialysis discontinuation. CRRT provides better control of azotemia while preserving hemodynamic stability in patients undergoing renal replacement therapy. Prospective randomized controlled studies and larger sample sizes are needed to further evaluate

  15. Drug dosing in patients with renal insufficiency in a hospital setting using electronic prescribing and automated reporting of estimated glomerular filtration rate.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Anita L; Henriksen, Daniel P; Marinakis, Christianna; Hellebek, Annemarie; Birn, Henrik; Nybo, Mads; Søndergaard, Jens; Nymark, Anita; Pedersen, Court

    2014-05-01

    In patients with impaired renal function, drug dose adjustment is often required. Non-adherence to clinical prescribing recommendations may result in severe adverse events. In previous studies, the prevalence rate of non-adherence to recommended dosing has been reported to be 19-67%. Using the clinical support system Renbase(®) as reference, we investigated the use and dosing of drugs in patients with impaired renal function in a university hospital setting using electronic prescription and automatic reporting of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). In all, 232 patients with an eGFR in the range of 10-49 ml/min./1.73 m(2) were included. We identified 436 episodes with administration of renal risk drugs (prescribed to 183 patients): 410 drugs required dose adjustment according to the eGFR and 26 should be avoided. In total, the use or dosing of 66 (15%) of the 436 renal risk drugs was not in agreement with recommendations in Renbase(®) . This reflects less disagreement with expert guidelines than reported previously, indicating a possible beneficial effect of electronic prescribing and reporting of eGFR. However, we also found that disagreement to some extent reflected inappropriate drug use. We conclude that despite implementation of electronic prescribing and automated reporting of eGFR, patients with renal insufficiency may still be exposed to inappropriate drug use, with potential increased risk of adverse effects. Initiatives to reduce medication errors such as the use of electronic decision support systems should be explored.

  16. Convergence Insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Terms Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Convergence Insufficiency En Español Read in Chinese What is convergence insufficiency? Convergence insufficiency is the ...

  17. [Data collection about the case management of end-stage renal insufficiency. Feasibility study. Nephrology Epidemiologic and information Network (REIN)].

    PubMed

    Stengel, B; Landais, P

    1999-01-01

    End-stage renal failure (ESRD) is an important public health issue, because of both the increasing number of patients requiring renal replacement therapy and the cost of treatment. The need for a reliable data system, capable of describing the patient care network as a whole, including dialysis or transplantation, has often been reiterated. The Direction Générale de la Santé (the French Department of Health) commissioned INSERM (the National Institute of Health and Medical Research) to "study the feasibility of different scenarios of data collection about ESRD patient care in order to meet the priority needs of health care administration, physicians, and researchers". Analysis of these needs allowed the goals to be defined: to provide an accurate picture of ESRD patient care in order to guide and evaluate health care policy, to inform clinicians, and to provide a tool for more focused special studies in renal research issues. Three scenarios were studied: the first would use data systems of both the government and the National Health Insurance system for planning health care services, upon EfG (The French Transplant Agency) network to evaluate transplantation, and upon a few regional registries for epidemiology and research; the second is based on repeated cross-sectional surveys; the third would rely upon the organization of an information system, the Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (REIN). Regional centers and a national coordinating office would register and follow-up ESRD patients, principally to evaluate health care supply and quality. The REIN database would also be a resource for research. The advantage of the first scenario is its low cost; its principal drawback is that evaluations will not be possible in the regions without registries. The second suggestion is inadequate. The last project would fulfil the goals that were defined. The REIN data system would be a true public health project of interest to all the participants and institutions

  18. Phytochemical screening, and assessment of ameliorating effect of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Gmelina arborea on drug induced hepatic and renal insufficiency in rats.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Ogbonnaya Enyinnaya; Mbuh, Awah Francis; Emmanuel, Mounmbegna Philippe

    2012-04-01

    Phytochemical screening of stem bark and leaves of Gmelina arborea; and effect of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Gmelina arborea stembark on hepatic and renal insufficiency in rats was assessed in this study. Phytochemical screening was carried out on the air-dried leaf, oven-dried leaf, air-dried stembark and oven-dried stembark samples. Sixty five (65) wister albino rats, (50.7-117.5 g) were divided into thirteen groups of five animals each. Three groups serve as Controls and were administered Cisplatin (5mg/kg b.w; i.p), Paracetamol (200mg/kg b.w; i.p) and Normal saline (0.002 ml/kg b.w; oral). Other groups were administered, either, cisplatin and extracts (1g/kg b.w; oral); Paracetamol and extracts (1g/kg b.w; oral); extracts alone; or drugs and combination of extracts. Animals were starved, 24 hours prior to sacrifice and sacrificed on the 9th day after commencement of treatment. Phytochemical screening results show the presence of alkaloid, flavonoid, tannin, saponin, cyanogenic glycoside, phytate, and carbohydrate. Saponin and carbohydrate were shown to be much higher in concentration than other phytochemicals. The percentage composition of cyanogenic glycoside and phytate were highest in air-dried stembark and oven-dried leaf samples, respectively. All the Gmelina arborea extracts and extract mixture administered to both paracetamol and cisplatin treated animals, significantly, lowers both the activities of the SGOT and SGPT, and the levels of serum creatinine and urea. When administered alone, the aqueous and ethanolic extracts show little or no sign of toxicity. Thus Gmelina arborea extracts may have ameliorating effect on hepatic and renal insufficiency caused by paracetamol and cisplatin respectively, and any inherent toxicity may be reduced or eliminated through adequate heat treatment. PMID:22459477

  19. [Quality of life in chronic renal insufficiency: the effect of disease development and various method of therapy].

    PubMed

    Trbojević, J; Zivković, M

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of development and way of treatment of chronic renal failure on patient's life style. Health related quality of life aspects were studied in 47 persons (26 males and 21 females), age range from 21 to 76 years. They were classified in six groups: early (clearance of creatinine more than 50 ml/min-2 males, 3 females, age 25-65), overt (clearance of creatinine between 20 and 50 ml/min-4 males, 5 females, age 28-67) and final (clearance of creatinine less than 20 ml/min-6 males, 4 females, age 27-76) stage of the disease, on haemodialysis (6 males, 4 females, age 21-67), treated with recombinant human erythropoietin and haemodialysis (4 males, 4 females, age 30-65), and after transplantation (4 males, 1 females, age 28-57). Life style has been determined by an original questionnaire consisting of 37 questions divided in five groups: personal data, socio-demographic characteristics, health status, personal life and subjective evaluation of patient's current status. Sixteen life quality variables were investigated: marital status, family relations, working status, working ability, sleep, physical activities, appetite, wound healing, hobby, sports, friendships, sexual activity, mood, travelling, housework and happiness. The results have shown that the progression of the disease has negative influence on all life functions, with statistically significant differences between the early and overt stage patients concerning physical activities, appetite, travelling and sexual activity. Significant improvements were demonstrated in social activities and working ability after transplantation compared with patients in end-stage renal disease and those undergoing haemodialysis, while haemodialysis showed positive influence only on appetite. Combination of haemodialysis and erythropoietin treatment demonstrated significant improvements in working ability, appetite, travelling, wound healing and physical abilities compared with all

  20. Prevalence and Prognostic Significance of Apparent Treatment Resistant Hypertension in Chronic Kidney Disease: Report From the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, George; Xie, Dawei; Chen, Hsiang-Yu; Anderson, Amanda H; Appel, Lawrence J; Bodana, Shirisha; Brecklin, Carolyn S; Drawz, Paul; Flack, John M; Miller, Edgar R; Steigerwalt, Susan P; Townsend, Raymond R; Weir, Matthew R; Wright, Jackson T; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-02-01

    The association between apparent treatment resistant hypertension (ATRH) and clinical outcomes is not well studied in chronic kidney disease. We analyzed data on 3367 hypertensive participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) to determine prevalence, associations, and clinical outcomes of ATRH in nondialysis chronic kidney disease patients. ATRH was defined as blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg on ≥3 antihypertensives, or use of ≥4 antihypertensives with blood pressure at goal at baseline visit. Prevalence of ATRH was 40.4%. Older age, male sex, black race, diabetes mellitus, and higher body mass index were independently associated with higher odds of having ATRH. Participants with ATRH had a higher risk of clinical events than participants without ATRH-composite of myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, congestive heart failure (CHF), and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.38 [1.22-1.56]); renal events (1.28 [1.11-1.46]); CHF (1.66 [1.38-2.00]); and all-cause mortality (1.24 [1.06-1.45]). The subset of participants with ATRH and blood pressure at goal on ≥4 medications also had higher risk for composite of myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, CHF, and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], (1.30 [1.12-1.51]) and CHF (1.59 [1.28-1.99]) than those without ATRH. ATRH was associated with significantly higher risk for CHF and renal events only among those with estimated glomerular filtration rate ≥30 mL/min per 1.73 m(2). Our findings show that ATRH is common and associated with high risk of adverse outcomes in a cohort of patients with chronic kidney disease. This underscores the need for early identification and management of patients with ATRH and chronic kidney disease.

  1. Urine Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Death in CKD: Results From the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kathleen D.; Yang, Wei; Go, Alan S.; Anderson, Amanda H.; Feldman, Harold I.; Fischer, Michael J.; He, Jiang; Kallem, Radhakrishna R.; Kusek, John W.; Master, Stephen R.; Miller, Edgar R.; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Steigerwalt, Susan; Tao, Kaixiang; Weir, Matthew R.; Hsu, Chi-yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease is common and associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Currently, markers of renal tubular injury are not used routinely to describe kidney health and little is known about risk of cardiovascular events and death associated with these biomarkers independent of glomerular filtration—based markers (such as serum creatinine or albuminuria). Study Design Cohort study, Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study. Setting & Participants 3386 participants with estimated glomerular filtration rate of 20-70 mL/min/1.73 m2 enrolled from June 2003 through August 2008. Predictor Urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) concentration. Outcomes Adjudicated heart failure event, ischemic atherosclerotic event (myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke or peripheral artery disease) and death through March 2011. Measurements Urine NGAL concentration measured at baseline with a two-step assay using chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay technology on an ARCHITECT i2000SR (Abbott Laboratories). Results There were 428 heart failure events (during 16383 person-years of follow-up), 361 ischemic atherosclerotic events (during 16584 person-years of follow-up) and 522 deaths (during 18214 person-years of follow-up). In Cox regression models adjusted for estimated glomerular filtration rate, albuminuria, demographics, traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors and cardiac medications, higher urine NGAL levels remained independently associated with ischemic atherosclerotic events (adjusted HR for the highest [>49.5 ng/ml] vs. lowest [≤6.9 ng/ml] quintile, 1.83 [95% CI, 1.20-2.81]; HR, per 0.1-unit increase in log urine NGAL, 1.012 [95% CI, 1.001-1.023]), but not heart failure events or deaths. Limitations Urine NGAL was measured only once. Conclusions Among patients with chronic kidney disease, urine levels of NGAL, a marker of renal tubular injury, were independently associated with future ischemic atherosclerotic

  2. Nadroparine calcium or enoxaparine in acute coronary syndrome patients suffering renal insufficiency: The nadroparin versus enoxaparin (NaVe) study design

    PubMed Central

    Gurfinkel, Enrique P; Perel, Cecilia; Pombo, Gonzalo

    2004-01-01

    In the general population, mild renal impairment is associated with increases risk for coronary artery disease and stroke, suggesting that cardiovascular disease begins to develop early in the natural history of renal dysfunction. Patients with renal failure are known to be at increased risk of death following acute myocardial infarction or congestive heart failure. In such sense, anticoagulation in addition to antiplatelet inhibitor drugs became the standard of care, particularly, among high risk unstable angina patients associated with a scarce side effects. The Nadroparin calcium Versus Enoxaparin (NaVe) Study will evaluate in a head to head basis the anti Xa activity reached by nadroparine or enoxaparine, both low molecular weight heparins, in patients at high risk for ischemic episodes, and renal insufficiency to eventually be undergone to angiographic diagnosis studies, and in consequence proposing the best anticoagulant strategies for these patients before being invasively treated. Patients will be randomly assigned to one of the two groups: Group 1: thirty patients will be given with subcutaneous enoxaparine injections into the abdominal wall in a dose of 0,85 mg/kg every 12 hours for a maximum of 48 hours. A saline infusion dose will be given in between. Total number of injections: 6. Group 2:Thirty patients will be receiving subcutaneous injections into the abdominal wall in a doses of 30% less in relationship with his / her body weight every 8 hours for a maximum of 48 hours. In order to achieve the goal of the study, the antiXa activity will be measure using venous blood samples taken as follows: Group 1:*Within 3rd and 4 hour of the second doses of HBPM for enoxaparine.*Within 11 th and 12 th hour next to fourth doses of enoxaparine. Group 2: *Within 3rd and 4 th hour next to 3rd doses of HBPM for the nadroparine.*Within 7th and 8th hour next to 4th doses HBPM for the nadroparine. The primary end point is to analyze during the in-hospital stay phase

  3. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  4. Time-updated systolic blood pressure and the progression of chronic kidney disease: Findings from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Amanda H; Yang, Wei; Townsend, Raymond R; Pan, Qiang; Chertow, Glenn M; Kusek, John W; Charleston, Jeanne; He, Jiang; Kallem, RadhaKrishna; Lash, James P; Miller, Edgar R; Rahman, Mahboob; Steigerwalt, Susan; Weir, Matthew; Wright, Jackson T; Feldman, Harold I

    2015-01-01

    Background Blood pressure (BP) is often inadequately controlled in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Previous reports of the longitudinal association between achieved level of BP and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have not incorporated time-updated BP with appropriate adjustment for known confounders. Objective To assess the association between baseline and time-updated systolic BP (SBP) with the progression of CKD. Design Observational, prospective cohort study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00304148) Setting Seven US clinical centers Patients Participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study (N=3,708) followed for a median (25th, 75th percentiles) of 5.7 (4.6, 6.7) years Measurements The mean of three seated SBP measurements were used as the visit-specific SBP. SBP was time-updated as the mean of that visit and all prior visits. Outcomes were ESRD and the composite renal endpoint of ESRD (dialysis or transplantation) or halving of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Analyses investigating baseline and time-updated SBP utilized traditional Cox proportional hazards models and marginal structural models, respectively. Results SBP was ≥130 mmHg at all study visits in 19.2% of participants, and ≥140 mmHg in 10.6%. The hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) for ESRD among participants with SBP 130–139 mmHg, compared to SBP <120 mmHg, was 1.46 (1.13–1.88) using only baseline data, and was 2.37 (1.48–3.80) using all available time-updated data. Among those with SBP ≥140 mmHg, corresponding hazard ratios were 1.46 (1.18–1.88) and 3.37 (2.26–5.03), respectively. Limitations SBP was measured once annually, and the CRIC Study cohort is not a random sample. Conclusions Among participants in the CRIC Study, time-updated SBP over 130 mmHg was more strongly associated with progression of CKD than analyses based on baseline SBP. Funding The CRIC Study is funded under cooperative agreements from the National Institute of

  5. A Multicentre Prospective Evaluation of the Impact of Renal Insufficiency on In-hospital and Long-term Mortality of Patients with Acute ST-elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Hu, Dayi; Shi, Xubo; Li, Li; Yang, Jingang; Song, Li; Ma, Changsheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Numerous previous studies have shown that renal insufficiency (RI) in patients with acute coronary syndrome is associated with poor cardiovascular outcomes. These studies do not well address the impact of RI on the long-term outcome of patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in China. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of admission RI and inhospital and long-term mortality of patients with acute STEMI. Methods: This was a multicenter, observational, prospective-cohort study. 718 consecutive patients were admitted to 19 hospitals in Beijing within 24 hours of onset of STEMI, between January 1,2006 and December 31,2006. Estimation of glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the modified abbreviated modification of diet in renal disease equation-based on the Chinese chronic kidney disease patients. The patients were categorized according to eGFR, as normal renal dysfunction (eGFR ≥ 90 ml∙min-1∙1.73 m-2), mild RI (60 ml∙min-1∙1.73 m-2 ≤ eGFR < 90 ml∙min-1∙1.73 m-2) and moderate or severe RI (eGFR < 60 ml∙min-1∙1.73 m-2). The association between RI and inhospital and 6-year mortality of was evaluated. Results: Seven hundred and eighteen patients with STEMI were evaluated. There were 551 men and 167 women with a mean age of 61.0 ± 13.0 years. Two hundred and eighty patients (39.0%) had RI, in which 61 patients (8.5%) reached the level of moderate or severe RI. Patients with RI were more often female, elderly, hypertensive, and more patients had heart failure and stroke with higher killip class. Patients with RI were less likely to present with chest pain. The inhospital mortality (1.4% vs. 5.9% vs. 22.9%, P < 0.001), 6-year all-cause mortality (9.5% vs. 19.8 vs. 45.2%, P < 0.001) and 6-year cardiac mortality (2.9% vs. 12.2% vs. 23.8%, P < 0.001) were markedly increased in patients with RI. After adjusting for other confounding factors, classification of admission renal function

  6. Plant Protein Intake Is Associated with Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and Serum Bicarbonate in Patients with CKD: The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Scialla, Julia J.; Appel, Lawrence J; Wolf, Myles; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoming; Sozio, Stephen M.; Miller, Edgar R.; Bazzano, Lydia A.; Cuevas, Magdalena; Glenn, Melanie J.; Lustigova, Eva; Kallem, Radhakrishna R.; Porter, Anna C.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Weir, Matthew R.; Anderson, Cheryl A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Protein from plant, as opposed to animal, sources may be preferred in chronic kidney disease (CKD), due to lower bioavailability of phosphate and lower nonvolatile acid load. Study Design Observational cross-sectional study. Setting & Participants 2938 participants with chronic kidney disease and information on dietary intake at the baseline visit in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study. Predictors Percentage of total protein from plant sources (% plant protein) was determined by scoring individual food items from the National Cancer Institute Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ). Outcomes Metabolic parameters, including serum phosphate, bicarbonate (HCO3), potassium, and albumin, plasma fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), and parathyroid hormone (PTH), and hemoglobin. Measurements We modeled the association between % plant protein and metabolic parameters using linear regression. Models were adjusted for age, sex, race, diabetes, body mass index, eGFR, income, smoking, total energy intake, total protein intake, 24 hour urinary sodium, use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers and use of diuretics. Results Higher % plant protein was associated with lower FGF23 (p=0.05) and higher HCO3 (p=0.01), but not with serum phosphate or PTH (p=0.9 and 0.5, respectively). Higher % plant protein was not associated with higher serum potassium (p=0.2), lower serum albumin (p=0.2) or lower hemoglobin (p=0.3). The associations of % plant protein with FGF23 and HCO3 did not differ by diabetes status, sex, race, CKD stage (2/3 vs. 4/5) or total protein intake (≤ 0.8 g/kg/d vs. >0.8 g/kg/d) (p-interaction > 0.10 for each). Limitations Cross-sectional study; Determination of % plant protein using the DHQ has not been validated. Conclusions Consumption of a higher percentage of protein from plant sources may lower FGF23 and raise HCO3 in patients with CKD. PMID:22480598

  7. Adrenal Insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... What is adrenal insufficiency? Did you know? The adrenal glands, located on top of the kidneys, make hormones ... body functions. The outer layer (cortex) of the adrenal glands makes three types of steroid hormones. In adrenal ...

  8. Placental insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... mother is as healthy as possible during the pregnancy. Smoking, alcohol, and other recreational drugs can interfere with the baby's growth. Avoiding these substances may help prevent placental insufficiency and other pregnancy complications.

  9. Adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Li-Ng, Melissa; Kennedy, Laurence

    2012-10-01

    Adrenocortical insufficiency may arise through primary failure of the adrenal glands or due to lack of ACTH stimulation as a result of pituitary or hypothalamic dysfunction. Prolonged administration of exogenous steroids will suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and hence cortisol secretion. We review briefly the causes, investigation, and treatment of adrenal insufficiency, and highlight aspects of particular relevance to patients with adrenal tumors.

  10. Factors Associated With Depressive Symptoms and Use of Antidepressant Medications Among Participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) and Hispanic-CRIC Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Michael J.; Xie, Dawei; Jordan, Neil; Kop, Willem J.; Krousel-Wood, Marie; Tamura, Manjula Kurella; Kusek, John W.; Ford, Virginia; Rosen, Leigh K.; Strauss, Louise; Teal, Valerie L.; Yaffe, Kristine; Powe, Neil R.; Lash, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Depressive symptoms are correlated with poor health outcomes in adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The prevalence, severity, and treatment of depressive symptoms and potential risk factors, including level of kidney function, in diverse populations with CKD have not been well studied. Study Design Cross-sectional analysis Settings and Participants Participants at enrollment into the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) and Hispanic-CRIC (H-CRIC) Studies. CRIC enrolled Hispanics and non-Hispanics at seven centers from 2003-2007, and H-CRIC enrolled Hispanics at the University of Illinois from 2005-2008. Measurement Depressive symptoms measured by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) Predictors Demographic and clinical factors Outcomes Elevated depressive symptoms (BDI >= 11) and antidepressant medication use Results Among 3853 participants, 28.5% had evidence of elevated depressive symptoms and 18.2% were using antidepressant medications; 30.8% of persons with elevated depressive symptoms were using antidepressants. The prevalence of elevated depressive symptoms varied by level of kidney function: 25.2% among participants with eGFR ≥ 60 ml/min/1.73m2, and 35.1% of those with eGFR < 30 ml/min/1.73m2. Lower eGFR (OR per 10 ml/min/1.73m2 decrease, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.03-1.16), Hispanic ethnicity (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.12-2.45), and non-Hispanic black race (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.17-1.74) were each associated with increased odds of elevated depressive symptoms after controlling for other factors. In regression analyses incorporating BDI score, while female sex was associated with a greater odds of antidepressant use, Hispanic ethnicity, non-Hispanic black race, and higher levels of urine albumin were associated with decreased odds of antidepressant use (p<0.05 for each). Limitations Absence of clinical diagnosis of depression and use of non-pharmacologic treatments Conclusions Although elevated depressive symptoms were common in individuals with CKD, use of

  11. Relating circulating thyroid hormone concentrations to serum interleukins-6 and -10 in association with non-thyroidal illnesses including chronic renal insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Abo-Zenah, Hamdy A; Shoeb, Sabry A; Sabry, Alaa A; Ismail, Hesham A

    2008-01-01

    Background Because of the possible role of cytokines including interleukins (IL) in systemic non-thyroidal illnesses' (NTI) pathogenesis and consequently the frequently associated alterations in thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations constituting the euthyroid sick syndrome (ESS), we aimed in this research to elucidate the possible relation between IL-6 & IL-10 and any documented ESS in a cohort of patients with NTI. Methods Sixty patients and twenty healthy volunteers were recruited. The patients were subdivided into three subgroups depending on their underlying NTI and included 20 patients with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI), congestive heart failure (CHF), and ICU patients with myocardial infarction (MI). Determination of the circulating serum levels of IL-6 and IL-10, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), as well as total T4 and T3 was carried out. Results In the whole group of patients, we detected a significantly lower T3 and T4 levels compared to control subjects (0.938 ± 0.477 vs 1.345 ± 0.44 nmol/L, p = 0.001 and 47.9 ± 28.41 vs 108 ± 19.49 nmol/L, p < 0.0001 respectively) while the TSH level was normal (1.08+0.518 μIU/L). Further, IL-6 was substantially higher above controls' levels (105.18 ± 72.01 vs 3.35 ± 1.18 ng/L, p < 0.00001) and correlated negatively with both T3 and T4 (r = -0.620, p < 0.0001 & -0.267, p < 0.001, respectively). Similarly was IL-10 level (74.13 ± 52.99 vs 2.64 ± 0.92 ng/ml, p < 0.00001) that correlated negatively with T3 (r = -0.512, p < 0.0001) but not T4. Interestingly, both interleukins correlated positively (r = 0.770, p = <0.001). Moreover, IL-6 (R2 = 0.338, p = 0.001) and not IL-10 was a predictor of low T3 levels with only a borderline significance for T4 (R2 = 0.082, p = 0.071). By subgroup analysis, the proportion of patients with subnormal T3, T4, and TSH levels was highest in the MI patients (70%, 70%, and 72%, respectively) who displayed the greatest IL-6 and IL-10 concentrations (192.5 ± 45.1 ng/L & 122.95 ± 46

  12. Hypertriglyceridemia Is Independently Associated with Renal, but Not Retinal Complications in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of the Renal Insufficiency And Cardiovascular Events (RIACE) Italian Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Penno, Giuseppe; Solini, Anna; Zoppini, Giacomo; Fondelli, Cecilia; Trevisan, Roberto; Vedovato, Monica; Gruden, Gabriella; Lamacchia, Olga; Pontiroli, Antonio E.; Arosio, Maura; Orsi, Emanuela; Pugliese, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Objective Atherogenic dyslipidemia seems to play a major role in microvascular complications and in residual microvascular risk after statin therapy, which reduces triglycerides up to 40%. We assessed whether raised TG levels are associated with an increased burden from microvascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods Subjects from the Renal Insufficiency And Cardiovascular Events (RIACE) Italian Multicentre Study (n=15,773) were divided in 4 groups depending on whether they had plasma triglycerides below (NTG, 67.8%) or above (HTG, 32.2%) 1.7 mmol/L and were (42.4%) or not on (57.6%) statin therapy. Estimated GFR (eGFR) was calculated from serum creatinine, albuminuria was measured by immunonephelometry or immunoturbidimetry, and retinopathy was evaluated by fundus examination. Results HTG subjects, either with or without statin, had higher prevalence of albuminuria, reduced eGFR and chronic kidney disease (CKD), especially the albuminuric forms, but not of retinopathy, than NTG subjects. In contrast, cardiovascular disease and advanced DR were more prevalent in subjects on statin than in those not, independently of triglyceride levels. Logistic regression analysis confirmed that HTG, without or with statin, was independently associated with micro and macroalbuminuria, mildly to severely reduced eGFR, and all CKD phenotypes, but not with retinopathy. The adjusted odd ratios for CKD increased linearly for every 0.26 mmol/L increase (approximately one decile) in triglyceride levels. The increase was higher with increasing severity of albuminuria, eGFR loss and CKD phenotype as well as in subjects receiving than in those not receiving statin treatment. Conclusions Triglycerides are associated with CKD, but not retinopathy in subjects with type 2 diabetes, independently of statin treatment. These data point to a possible role of hypertriglyceridemia in the development of CKD, though it remains to be demonstrated that diabetic individuals might

  13. Renal Insufficiency and Early Bystander CPR Predict In-Hospital Outcomes in Cardiac Arrest Patients Undergoing Mild Therapeutic Hypothermia and Cardiac Catheterization: Return of Spontaneous Circulation, Cooling, and Catheterization Registry (ROSCCC Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Chelvanathan, Anjala; Allen, David; Bews, Hilary; Ducas, John; Minhas, Kunal; Ravandi, Amir; Jassal, Davinder S.; Hussain, Farrukh

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients are a critically ill patient population with high mortality. Combining mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) with early coronary intervention may improve outcomes in this population. The aim of this study was to evaluate predictors of mortality in OHCA patients undergoing MTH with and without cardiac catheterization. Design. A retrospective cohort of OHCA patients who underwent MTH with catheterization (MTH + C) and without catheterization (MTH + NC) between 2006 and 2011 was analyzed at a single tertiary care centre. Predictors of in-hospital mortality and neurologic outcome were determined. Results. The study population included 176 patients who underwent MTH for OHCA. A total of 66 patients underwent cardiac catheterization (MTH + C) and 110 patients did not undergo cardiac catheterization (MTH + NC). Immediate bystander CPR occurred in approximately half of the total population. In the MTH + C and MTH + NC groups, the in-hospital mortality was 48% and 78%, respectively. The only independent predictor of in-hospital mortality for patients with MTH + C, after multivariate analysis, was baseline renal insufficiency (OR = 8.2, 95% CI 1.8–47.1, and p = 0.009). Conclusion. Despite early cardiac catheterization, renal insufficiency and the absence of immediate CPR are potent predictors of death and poor neurologic outcome in patients with OHCA. PMID:26885436

  14. Prevalence of renal insufficiency in hospitalised patients with venous thromboembolic events: a retrospective analysis based on 6,725 VTE patients.

    PubMed

    Böttger, Björn; Wehling, Martin; Bauersachs, Rupert M; Amann, Steffen; Schuchert, Andreas; Reinhold, Christian; Kümpers, Philipp; Wilke, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Renal impairment (RI) is an important factor in the selection of anticoagulant therapy in venous thromboembolic event (VTE) patients. In particular, the risk of bleeding events is higher for VTE patients with a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) below 30 mL/min. The aim of this study was to collect data on the prevalence of RI in hospitalised VTE patients in Germany. Furthermore, we investigated how renal function changed during inpatient treatment. We conducted a retrospective chart review in six German hospitals. All patients with a VTE diagnosis who were treated as inpatients from 2007-2011 were included. Patients were categorised according to their renal function. RI was estimated from serum creatinine values. Persistent RI was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of <30 mL/min over at least 72 hours. Renal function could be determined for 5,710 VTE patients. Of these 21.4% had an eGFR>90 mL/min, 38.1% had an eGFR of 60-89 mL/min, 17.3% had an eGFR of 45-59 mL/min, 12.5% had an eGFR of 30-44 mL/min, 7.2% had an eGFR of 15-29 mL/min and 3.6% of the VTE patients had end-stage renal disease. Persistent severe RI was observed in 74.8% of patients with an eGFR <30 mL/min. Overall, 40.6% of the VTE patients investigated had an eGFR <60 mL/min; 10.8% had an eGFR <30 mL/min. Almost three quarters of RI-VTE patients suffered from persistent severe RI. These results suggest that more than one in ten VTE patients is exposed to a high risk of accumulating anticoagulants; most of these RI patients also face an increased risk of mortality.

  15. [Evaluation of the cost of treatment for terminal chronic renal insufficiency. Thoughts on the value of this type of study and the role of the nephrologist].

    PubMed

    Pollini, J; Soutif, C; Barnouin, F; Briat, C; Meulders, Q; Teissier, M

    1998-01-01

    To assess the cost of end stage renal failure treatment was the target of studies we achieved during the last ten years. We showed how much the global cost was favourably influenced by the number of available therapeutic methods. In a recent study, reported here, we followed a new methodology more often used today in our public hospitals. The comparison of analytical accountancy data with computerized medical informations as given by identification of Diagnosis Related Groups probably allows better assessment of "real cost". But is this approach really useful for nephrologists? These frequently asked questions cannot be performed without the participation of physicians. The question remains whether or not these studies will contribute to improve the quality of care and to allow some saving. We also hope sharing with readers of "Nephrologie" these kinds of considerations as well as our opinions and doubts.

  16. A combination of Chinese herbs, Astragalus membranaceus var. mongholicus and Angelica sinensis, improved renal microvascular insufficiency in 5/6 nephrectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Jinye; Meng, Liqiang; Li, Shen; Qu, Lei; Li, Xiaomei

    2009-01-01

    Chronic renal ischemia and hypoxia in the tubulointerstitium are involved in the mechanisms of progressive chronic kidney disease. Previous studies showed that the decoction of a combination of two Chinese herbs, Astragalus membmnaceus var. mongholicus and Angelica sinensis (A & A) has antifibrotic effects through multiple pathways in different animal models. In this study, remnant kidney model was employed to investigate whether A & A affect the expression of VEGF, the density of the renal microvasculature and thus alleviate the renal injury. Rats were divided randomly into four groups: sham group (N-31), 5/6 Nx group (5/ 6 nephrectomy, N=43), A & A treated group (A & A group, N=40, A & A 12 g/kg/d po), enalapril treated group (Ena group, N=56, enalapril 4 mg/kg/d po). Rats from each group were sacrificed at the 2th, 4th, 8th and 12th weeks respectively after surgery and treatment The 24 h urinary protein excretion, serum creatinine (Scr) and urea were measured. The collagen IV (COL-IV), fibronectin (FN), aminopeptidase P (APP) and VEGF were stained using immunohistochemistry. The COL-IV, FN and APP were semi-quantitatively analyzed. Peritubular capillary density in the cortical interstitial area was quantified. The level of VEGF was assayed by ELISA. The results revealed that Scr, urea and urinary protein excretion remained constant at each time point in sham group. Compared to sham group, 5/6 Nx group was shown severe glomerulosclerosis, tubulointerstitial lesions and vascular damage, as well as higher level of Scr from the 2nd week (72.3 +/- 5.2 vs. 48.6 +/- 2.6 micromol/L P < 0.05) to the 12th week (71.9 +/- 8.0 vs. 55.7 +/- 4.5 micromol/L P < 0.05). Although there was no significant difference in Scr level after treatment of enalapril or A & A (P > 0.05), kidney damage was alleviated at the 8th and the 12th week in the two treatment groups (P < 0.05, vs. 5/6 Nx group). The urinary protein excretion of 5/6 Nx group was significantly increased from the 4th week

  17. The relationship between calcium, phosphorus, and sodium intake, race, and blood pressure in children with renal insufficiency: a report of the Growth Failure in Children with Renal Diseases (GFRD) Study.

    PubMed

    Trachtman, H; Chan, J C; Boyle, R; Farina, D; Baluarte, H J; Chinchilli, V M; Dresner, I G; Feld, L G

    1995-07-01

    Nutritional data compiled during the Growth Failure in Children with Renal Diseases Clinical Trial were analyzed to determine the relationship between the dietary intake of divalent minerals and sodium, nutritional status, and serum calcium, phosphorus, and parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations and blood pressure in black versus white children. One hundred eighteen patients are included in this report; 25 were black (21%) and 93 were white (79%). Although more of the blacks were male, the age distribution, midarm circumference, midarm muscle circumference, blood pressure, and serum calcium, phosphorus, and PTH concentrations were comparable in the two groups. Phosphorus intake was within the recommended daily allowance in both groups; in contrast, calcium intake was inadequate in all patients: 81% of the recommended daily allowance in whites, and 74% in blacks. Sixteen children were noted to be hypertensive during the observation period; six patients were receiving a variety of antihypertensive medications, including diuretics in two children. Linear regression analysis revealed that systolic and diastolic blood pressures were directly related to calcium and phosphorus intake in black patients. In white children, only dietary phosphorus intake and diastolic blood pressure were directly related. There was no relationship between sodium intake or GFR and blood pressure in the white or black children. PTH levels were directly correlated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure in all children. The correlations between PTH and blood pressure were stronger in white versus black patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. [Sodium transport in chronic renal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Noé, D

    1985-03-24

    From an analysis of the literature covering the problem of sodium contribution in uraemic patients subjected to both conservative treatment and maintenance dialysis, it has been shown that excessive reduction in dietary sodium intake can be harmful unless it is justified by severe hypertension or oedema since it aggravates the state of uraemia. In these cases, the addition of a minimum controlled amount of hyposodic salt to an otherwise salt free diet is undoubtedly useful. The hyposodic salt, "Misura" manufactured by the company "Plasmon" was used in the dietary treatment of a series of patients subjected to mild restriction in dietary salt intake. Misura was well tolerated and well accepted thanks to its pleasing taste.

  19. Increased plasma serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid concentrations are associated with impaired systolic and late diastolic forward flows during cardiac cycle and elevated resistive index at popliteal artery and renal insufficiency in type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria.

    PubMed

    Saito, Jun; Suzuki, Eiji; Tajima, Yoshitaka; Takami, Kazuhisa; Horikawa, Yukio; Takeda, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Although lower extremity arterial disease is frequently accompanied by diabetes mellitus, the association of circulating biomarkers with flow components during the cardiac cycle in lower-leg arteries has yet to be fully elucidated. We enrolled 165 type 2 diabetic patients with normal ankle-brachial index (ABI 1.0-1.4), comprising 106 normoalbuminuric and 59 microalbuminuric patients, and 40 age-matched nondiabetic subjects consecutively admitted to our hospital. Serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) level and plasma von Willebrand factor ristocetin cofactor activity (VWF) and vasoconstrictor serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA) concentrations were measured. An automatic device was used to measure ABI and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). Flow components during the cardiac cycle, total flow volume, and resistive index at popliteal artery were evaluated using gated magnetic resonance imaging. Although estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), early diastolic flow reversal, heart rate, and ABI were similar between the groups, diabetic patients had higher log hsCRP (p<0.001), VWF (p<0.001), 5-HIAA (p=0.002), resistive index (p<0.001) and baPWV (p<0.001) and lower systolic (p=0.026) and late diastolic (p<0.001) forward flows and total flow volume (p<0.001) than nondiabetic subjects. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that 5-HIAA in microalbuminuric patients showed higher associations with systolic and late diastolic forward flows during the cardiac cycle, total flow volume and resistive index at popliteal artery, and eGFR compared to normoalbuminuric patients. In microalbuminuric patients, 5-HIAA was a significant independent determinant among these factors. Thus, increased plasma 5-HIAA levels are involved in the pathogenesis of impaired blood flow in lower extremities and renal insufficiency in diabetic patients with microalbuminuria.

  20. Isolated glucocorticoid insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Werder, E A; Haller, R; Vetter, W; Zachmann, M; Siebenmann, R

    1975-07-01

    Two cases of isolated glucocorticoid insufficiency or congenital adrenocortical unresponsiveness to ACTH-a variant of adrenocortical failure without mineralocorticoid insufficiency-are presented. Familial incidence was present only in case 1 since two of the siblings died after convulsions, possible related to hypoglycemia. The pathology specimens of one sibling were available for review showing complete lack of the fascicular zone and degenerative changes in the adrenals and evidence of increased ACTH secretion in the pituitary. In the patients who were given substitution therapy with hydrocortisone, studies of plasma renin and aldosterone revealed impairment of plasma aldosterone response to salt restriction, orthostatism and furosemide-induced diuresis combined with postural change. We conclude that in some cases of isolated glucocorticoid insufficiency, impairment of mineralocorticoid function may gradually develop, which is in contrast to the assumption of a congenital defect in the action of ACTH.

  1. Venous insufficiency at work.

    PubMed

    Hobson, J

    1997-07-01

    Chronic venous disease of the lower limbs is one of the most common conditions affecting humankind. It has been postulated that certain workplace conditions may be risk factors for venous insufficiency and varicose veins in particular. This paper examines the evidence for a link between occupation and the prevalence of venous disease. It also reviews recent French research carried out to estimate the prevalence of chronic venous insufficiency in a working population; work and nonwork risk factor and the cost to industry from this condition are also examined. PMID:9242155

  2. Pelvic Insufficiency Fractures

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic insufficiency fractures may occur in the absence of trauma or as a result of low-energy trauma in osteoporotic bone. With a growing geriatric population, the incidence of pelvic insufficiency fracture has increased over the last 3 decades and will continue to do so. These fractures can cause considerable pain, loss of independence, and economic burden to both the patient and the health care system. While many of these injuries are identified and treated based on plain radiographs, some remain difficult to diagnose. The role of advanced imaging in these cases is discussed. In addition to treating the fracture, medical comorbidities contributing to osteoporosis should be identified and corrected. Specific attention has been given to 25-OH serum vitamin D screening and repletion. Treatment generally consists of providing pain control and assisting patients with mobilization while allowing weight bearing as tolerated. In those unable to do so, invasive techniques such as sacroplasty as well as internal fixation may be beneficial. The role of operative fixation in insufficiency fractures is also discussed. PMID:26246940

  3. [Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI)].

    PubMed

    Renner, R; Simon, J

    2009-10-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is an important and frequent disease for dermatologists, phlebologists and general practitioners. There are various hypotheses for the ethiopathology in CVI, e. g. hormone receptors and impairments concerning the venous contraction or relaxation of the vessel wall and the venous valves might play an important role. At the moment, colour doppler-duplex sonography seems to be the diagnostic method of choice. Modern therapeutic options include compression systems alone or in combination with topical or systemic treatment including minimal invasive methods like endovenous laser or radiofrequency obliteration or foam sclerotherapy. PMID:19826982

  4. Renal arteriography

    MedlinePlus

    Renal angiogram; Angiography - kidney; Renal angiography; Renal artery stenosis - arteriography ... Renal arteriography is often needed to help decide on the best treatment after other tests are done ...

  5. Adrenal insufficiency: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Munver, Ravi; Volfson, Ilya A

    2006-01-01

    Adrenal insufficiency is a disorder characterized by hypoactive adrenal glands resulting in insufficient production of the hormones cortisol and aldosterone by the adrenal cortex. This disorder may develop as a primary failure of the adrenal cortex or be secondary to an abnormality of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Patients with adrenal insufficiency often are asymptomatic or they may present with fatigue, muscle weakness, weight loss, low blood pressure, and sometimes darkening of the skin. The presentation of adrenal insufficiency varies dramatically and poses a major diagnostic dilemma. This review focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of primary and secondary adrenal insufficiency.

  6. Primary Ovarian Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Laven, Joop S E

    2016-07-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI), also known as premature ovarian failure or premature menopause, is defined as cessation of menstruation before the expected age of menopause. Potential etiologies for POI can be divided into genetic, autoimmune, and iatrogenic categories. This review will try to summarize the genetic basis of POI focusing on recent data that are available using newer genetic techniques such as genome-wide association studies, whole-exome sequencing (WES), or next-generation sequencing techniques. By using these techniques, many genes have arisen that play some role in the pathophysiology of POI. Some of them have been replicated in other studies; however, the majority has not been proven yet to be unequivocally causative through functional validation studies. Elucidating the genetic and molecular basis of POI is of paramount importance not only in understanding ovarian physiology but also in providing genetic counseling and fertility guidance. Once additional variants are detected, it might become possible to predict the age of (premature) menopause in women at risk for POI. Women having certain perturbations of POI can be offered the option of oocyte cryopreservation, with later thawing and use in assisted reproductive technology at an appropriate age. PMID:27513024

  7. Adrenal insufficiency presenting as hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Seung Won; Kim, Tong Yoon; Lee, Sangmin; Jeong, Jeong Yeon; Shim, Hojoon; Han, Yu min; Choi, Kyu Eun; Shin, Seok Joon; Yoon, Hye Eun

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal insufficiency is an uncommon cause of hypercalcemia and not easily considered as an etiology of adrenal insufficiency in clinical practice, as not all cases of adrenal insufficiency manifest as hypercalcemia. We report a case of secondary adrenal insufficiency presenting as hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury in a 66-year-old female. The patient was admitted to the emergency department with general weakness and poor oral intake. Hypercalcemia (11.5 mg/dL) and moderate renal dysfunction (serum creatinine 4.9 mg/dL) were shown in her initial laboratory findings. Studies for malignancy and hyperparathyroidism showed negative results. Basal cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone levels and adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test confirmed the diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency. With the administration of oral hydrocortisone, hypercalcemia was dramatically resolved within 3 days. This case shows that adrenal insufficiency may manifest as hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury, which implicates that adrenal insufficiency should be considered a cause of hypercalcemia in clinical practice. PMID:27536162

  8. [Adrenal mass and adrenal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Martínez Albaladejo, M; García López, B; Serrano Corredor, S; Alguacil García, G

    1996-12-01

    Primary adrenal insufficiency is a non frequent disease, that is declared in young adults and in the most of the cases is produced from an autoimmune mechanism or a tuberculous disease. The incidence of these forms in the different geographic areas is dependent of degree of irradication of the tuberculosis. We report the case of a patient with latent chronic adrenal insufficiency of tuberculous origin who was affected for an addisonian crisis during an intercurrent infectious disease, which permitted the diagnosis of the addisonian crisis, and Mal of Pott was moreover detected. Evolution with corticosteroid and specific treatment was very favorable.

  9. [Travel and chronic respiratory insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Bonnet, D; Marotel, C; Miltgen, J; N'Guyen, G; Cuguilliere, A; L'Her, P

    1997-01-01

    Changes in climate, altitude and lifestyle during travel confronts patients presenting chronic respiratory insufficiency with special problems. A major challenge is related to high altitude during air travel. To limit risks, a preflight examination is necessary to ascertain respiratory status. Patients requiring oxygen therapy must ensure availability both during the flight and at the destination. Patients with asthma or chronic bronchitis must bring along a sufficient supply of usual inhalers. All patients should carry a doctor's letter describing their condition and listing medications. Using these elementary precautions, patients with chronic respiratory insufficiency can safely enjoy sightseeing and outdoor leisure activities.

  10. Vitamin D Insufficiency: Disease or No Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Karen E; Jones, Andrea N; Lindstrom, Mary J; Davis, Lisa A; Engelke, Jean A; Shafer, Martin M

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency (VDI) is widely reported. In patients with normal PTH, the diagnosis rests on increases in fractional calcium absorption (FCA) when 25(OH)D increases above 30 ng/ml. However, estimates of increased FCA after correction of VDI vary dramatically, depending on study methods. We used a dual stable calcium isotope to clarify the impact of vitamin D repletion on FCA in postmenopausal women with VDI. We hypothesized that FCA would increase with vitamin D repletion. We studied postmenopausal women with VDI [25(OH)D = 16–24 ng/ml] and an estimated calcium intake ≤1100 mg daily. Exclusion criteria included hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, renal insufficiency, nephrolithiasis, gastrointestinal disorders, osteomalacia, prior adult fragility fracture, baseline T-score < −3.0, and use of medications known to interfere with vitamin D or calcium metabolism. Each woman underwent inpatient FCA studies before and after correction of VDI. We used ergocalciferol 50,000 IU/d for 15 days to achieve vitamin D repletion. During each study, women consumed their typical diet. They ingested 44Ca orally with breakfast and received 42Ca intravenously. We collected urine for 24 h and measured its calcium isotope content by mass spectrometry. Eighteen women completed the study; all but two had normal PTH. During the first and second FCA studies, their mean 25(OH)D level was 22 ± 4 and 64 ± 21 ng/ml, respectively (p < 0.001). Subjects' average FCA was 24 ± 7% initially and 27 ± 6% after vitamin D repletion (p = 0.04). Thus, FCA increased by 3 ± 1% with correction of VDI. Postmenopausal women with VDI experience small FCA increments with vitamin D therapy. In existing literature, this small change in FCA does not associate with lower fracture rates or consistently higher bone mass. Future studies should ascertain whether small FCA increments favorably affect the skeleton. PMID:18302509

  11. Insufficiency fractures of the sacrum

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, K.L.; Beabout, J.W.; Swee, R.G.

    1985-07-01

    Insufficiency stress fractures may occur in the sacrum after radiation therapy or secondary to postmenopausal or steroid-induced osteoporosis. These fractures are often either overlooked or confused both clinically and radiographically with metastatic disease. Findings on plain films and conventional tomograms are often subtle. Radionuclide bone scans show a characteristic distribution of increased uptake. Computed tomography is the definitive technique for demonstrating the fractures.

  12. Renal parenchymal histopathology predicts life-threatening chronic kidney disease as a result of radical nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Sejima, Takehiro; Honda, Masashi; Takenaka, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    The preoperative prediction of post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency plays an important role in the decision-making process regarding renal surgery options. Furthermore, the prediction of both postoperative renal insufficiency and postoperative cardiovascular disease occurrence, which is suggested to be an adverse consequence caused by renal insufficiency, contributes to the preoperative policy decision as well as the precise informed consent for a renal cell carcinoma patient. Preoperative nomograms for the prediction of post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency, calculated using patient backgrounds, are advocated. The use of these nomograms together with other types of nomograms predicting oncological outcome is beneficial. Post-radical nephrectomy attending physicians can predict renal insufficiency based on the normal renal parenchymal pathology in addition to preoperative patient characteristics. It is suggested that a high level of global glomerulosclerosis in nephrectomized normal renal parenchyma is closely associated with severe renal insufficiency. Some studies showed that post-radical nephrectomy severe renal insufficiency might have an association with increased mortality as a result of cardiovascular disease. Therefore, such pathophysiology should be recognized as life-threatening, surgically-related chronic kidney disease. On the contrary, the investigation of the prediction of mild post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency, which is not related to adverse consequences in the postoperative long-term period, is also promising because the prediction of mild renal insufficiency might be the basis for the substitution of radical nephrectomy for nephron-sparing surgery in technically difficult or compromised cases. The deterioration of quality of life caused by post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency should be investigated in conjunction with life-threatening matters.

  13. Parasites and chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi Manesh, Reza; Hosseini Safa, Ahmad; Sharafi, Seyedeh Maryam; Jafari, Rasool; Bahadoran, Mehran; Yousefi, Morteza; Nasri, Hamid; Yousofi Darani, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Suppression of the human immune system results in an increase in susceptibility to infection by various infectious agents. Conditions such as AIDS, organ transplantation and chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) are the most important cause of insufficient immune response against infections. Long term renal disorders result in uremia, which can suppress human immune system. Parasitic infections are one of the most important factors indicating the public health problems of the societies. These infections can be more hostile and life threatening in susceptible individuals than in the normal people. In these patients some parasitic infections such as blastocystiosis, cryptosporidiosis and toxoplasmosis have been reported to be more prevalent. This review aimed to give an overview about parasitic infections in patients with renal disorders. PMID:25610885

  14. Convergence insufficiency and vision therapy.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Mary Lou

    2014-06-01

    There is no standard meaning of the term "vision therapy", and for this reason it is often a controversial topic between some members of the ophthalmic and optometric community. Most pediatric ophthalmologists avoid using the term because it is nonspecific. Convergence Insufficiency (CI) is a binocular visual problem that causes problems and symptoms with near fixation. There is consensus among eye care professionals that convergence therapy is effective in treating CI. Convergence therapy is not effective in treating learning disabilities, but can sometimes relieve symptoms that might be a barrier to reading.

  15. Renal failure associated with laxative abuse.

    PubMed

    Copeland, P M

    1994-01-01

    Eating disorder patients often abuse laxatives in an attempt to purge excess food. Laxative abuse can cause hypokalemia and volume depletion. Hypokalemia, in turn, can lead to rhabdomyolysis. Laxative-induced hypokalemia and volume depletion have been previously reported to cause renal insufficiency, but not severe enough to require hemodialysis. A 27-year-old woman with a long history of laxative abuse presented with severe renal failure associated with hypokalemia and volume depletion. She required acute hemodialysis for worsening acidosis (pH 7.05) despite assisted ventilation. A prior episode of hypokalemic rhabdomyolysis at age 23 had resulted in only mild renal insufficiency. Her later episode of severe renal failure was linked to profound volume depletion (blood urea nitrogen 135 mg/dl). This patient calls attention to a potentially life-threatening complication of laxative abuse and indicates that volume depletion can exacerbate laxative-associated renal failure. PMID:7531354

  16. Renal interventions during endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Davies, Mark G

    2013-12-01

    Renal insufficiency is a risk factor for mortality and morbidity during endovascular aneurysm repair. Multiple changes in practice have occurred to mitigate renal injury and renal dysfunction. Transrenal fixation does carry an increased risk of a decline in renal function in the medium term. Renal stenting for athero-occlusive disease during endovascular aneurysm repair needs careful consideration, as indications have changed and there are unexpected consequences with early vessel occlusion. The growing number of renal interventions during complex endovascular aneurysm repair with the advent of chimney snorkel/periscope techniques and the introduction of fenestrated grafts has shown the resilience of the intervention with relatively low renal issues (approximately 10%), but has also illustrated the need for additional device development.

  17. Early origin of adult renal disease.

    PubMed

    Maringhini, Silvio; Corrado, Ciro; Maringhini, Guido; Cusumano, Rosa; Azzolina, Vitalba; Leone, Francesco

    2010-10-01

    Observational studies in humans and experimental studies in animals have clearly shown that renal failure may start early in life. 'Fetal programming' is regulated by adaptations occurring in uterus including maternal nutrition, placental blood supply, and epigenetic changes. Low birth weight predisposes to hypertension and renal insufficiency. Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract, adverse postnatal events, wrong nutritional habits may produce renal damage that will become clinically relevant in adulthood. Prevention should start early in children at risk of renal disease. PMID:20822331

  18. Clinical aspects of cervical insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Lotgering, Frederik K

    2007-06-01

    Fetal loss is a painful experience. A history of second or early third trimester fetal loss, after painless dilatation of the cervix, prolapse or rupture of the membranes, and expulsion of a live fetus despite minimal uterine activity, is characteristic for cervical insufficiency. In such cases the risk of recurrence is high, and a policy of prophylactic cerclage may be safer than one of serial cervical length measurements followed by cerclage, tocolysis and bed rest in case of cervical shortening or dilatation. In low risk cases, however, prophylactic cerclage is not useful. There is a need for more basic knowledge of cervical ripening, objective assessment of cervical visco-elastic properties, and randomized controlled trials of technical aspects of cervical cerclage (e.g. suturing technique).

  19. [Atherosclerotic renal artery disease diagnosis update].

    PubMed

    Meier, Pascal; Haesler, Erik; Teta, Daniel; Qanadli, Salah Dine; Burnier, Michel

    2009-02-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease represents a cause of which little is known but not a cause to be neglected for hypertension and renal insufficiency. Even though its occurrence remains badly defined, atherosclerotic renal artery disease is constantly on the rise due to the aging population, the never prevailing hypertension and diabetes mellitus. This review aims to give a clinical profile of patients presenting with atherosclerotic renal artery disease and to discuss, in the light of study results, which diagnostic evaluation should be used considering the sequence and the benefit and risk of each in order to initiate a personalized treatment. Patients affected by atherosclerotic renal artery disease are likely to have more complications and more extensive target-organ damage than patients without renal artery stenosis. The evolution of the atherosclerotic renal artery disease is in general slow and progressive. Nevertheless, certain clinical cases manifest themselves with the onset of acute renal failure bought upon by the administration of blockers of the rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, or by some other causes responsible for a sudden drop in renal plasma flow (e.g., thrombosis of the renal artery). The relationship between atherosclerotic renal artery disease and atherosclerosis is complex, and mediators implicated in the pathophysiology of renovascular disease may also contribute to the progression of cardiovascular damage. An early assumption of the atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis is warranted to determine the adapted treatment (i.e., medical treatment, revascularisation...) just as the assumption and the correction of the more general cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:18809367

  20. Pregnancy in women with renal disease. Yes or no?

    PubMed Central

    Edipidis, K

    2011-01-01

    Women with renal disease who conceive and continue pregnancy, are at significant risk for adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Although advances in antenatal and neonatal care continue to improve these outcomes, the risks remain proportionate to the degree of underlying renal dysfunction. The aim of this article, is to examine the impact of varying degrees of renal insufficiency on pregnancy outcome, in women with chronic renal disease and to provide if possible, useful conclusions whether and when, a woman with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), should decide to get pregnant. This article, reviews briefly the normal physiological changes of renal function during pregnancy, and make an attempt to clarify the nature and severity of the risks, in the settings of chronic renal insufficiency and end stage renal disease, including dialysis patients and transplant recipients. PMID:21897751

  1. Renal perfusion scintiscan

    MedlinePlus

    Renal perfusion scintigraphy; Radionuclide renal perfusion scan; Perfusion scintiscan - renal; Scintiscan - renal perfusion ... supply the kidneys. This is a condition called renal artery stenosis. Significant renal artery stenosis may be ...

  2. [Adrenal insufficiency in cirrhotic patients].

    PubMed

    Orozco, Federico; Anders, María; Mella, José; Antinucci, Florencia; Pagano, Patricia; Esteban, Paula; Cartier, Mariano; Romero, Gustavo; Francini, Bettina; Mastai, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Relative adrenal insufficiency (RAI) is a common finding in cirrhotic patients with severe sepsis, and increased mortality. Its significance is unknown in stable conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of RAI in stable cirrhotic patients at different stages of the disease. Also, the impact of RAI on the survival was evaluated and basal cortisol levels between plasma and saliva was correlated in control subjects and cirrhotic patients. Forty seven ambulatory patients and 16 control subjects were studied. RAI was defined as a serum cortisol increase of less than 9 υg/dl from baseline after the stimulation with 250 mg of synthetic ACTH. Twenty two had Child-Pugh = 8 and 25 = 9. The prevalence of RAI in patients with stable cirrhosis was 22%. A higher incidence of RAI was observed in patients with a Child-Pugh = 9 (8/32) than in those with = 8 (3/13, p < 0.05). A correlation between salivary cortisol and basal plasma cortisol (r = 0.6, p < 0.0004) was observed. Finally, survival at 1 year (97%) and 3 years (91%) was significantly higher without RAI than those who developed this complication (79% and 51%, p < 0.05, respectively). In summary, the prevalence of RAI is frequent in patients with stable cirrhosis and that it is related to the severity of liver diseaseand increased mortality. PMID:27576278

  3. Velopharyngeal insufficiency: diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Shprintzen, Robert J.; Marrinan, Eileen

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of Review Journal articles relevant to the diagnosis and treatment of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) were reviewed. All articles ascertained by PubMed search were included. Recent Findings Articles reported on the application of magnetic resonance scanning, reliability tests of the International Working Group diagnostic protocol, the use of nasometry, and techniques designed to assess the function of the velopharyngeal mechanism. Treatment papers focused on outcomes in small samples of cases and complication rates from pharyngeal flap. One paper discussed ineffective speech therapy procedures. Summary There were relatively few papers this past year. Those that were published were hindered by small and heterogeneous sample sizes, and occasionally by inappropriate methods for assessing outcomes. None of the findings will have a major impact on the current state-of-the-art for diagnosis of VPI. The speech therapy paper has a very important message that should be taken to heart by all clinicians involved in the management of children with clefts and craniofacial disorders. PMID:19448542

  4. Update on Primary Ovarian Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hewlett, Meghan; Mahalingaiah, Shruthi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review Despite an incidence of one percent among women under the age of forty, primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is still poorly understood. As the variable etiology and presentation of POI complicate its management, a standard regimen for treatment remains to be established. However, emerging research has provided new insight on current mainstays of treatment as well as novel management approaches and therapeutic interventions. Recent findings Recent clinical trials in women with POI indicate that the widely-used regimen of transdermal estradiol and medroxyprogesterone acetate restores bone mineral density (BMD) to a level equal to women with normal ovarian function. Further research verifies that compounded bioidentical hormones and androgen supplementation are inadequate in treating POI and lowering risk for long-term sequelae. Additionally, assessing changes in bone turnover markers may be useful for monitoring BMD. Alternative therapies such as acupuncture, DHEA, and buproprion may be effective in treating the effects of estrogen deficiency at some level, but require further investigation. Summary Recent updates show promise in improving management methods and reducing risk of long-term sequelae. Additional research that expands upon the most current literature is critical in order to achieve an evidence-based standard of best practice. PMID:26512773

  5. Maldigestion from pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Pongprasobchai, Supot

    2013-12-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) is one of the long-term consequences of chronic pancreatitis (CP). Majority of patients with PEI were undiagnosed or undertreated. Inadequately treated or subclinical severe PEI causes malnutrition and may pose the patients at risk of premature atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. Indication of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) is patients with severe PEI, as indicated by the presence of steatorrhea, diarrhea, weight loss, fecal fat > 7 g/day, (13) C-mixed triglyceride breath test < 29%, fecal elastase < 100 ug/g stool, imaging or endoscopic findings of pancreatic ductal dilatation or calculi, and eight endosonographic criteria of CP. The mainstay treatment of PEI is PERT. Dietary fat restriction is unnecessary. PERT with lipase > 40,000 U per meal is recommended. Enteric-coating may be preferred to conventional enzymes because of the availability of high-dose preparations and no need of acid suppression co-therapy. Administration of enzymes with meals is proven to be the most effective regimen. Response to PERT should be measured by the improvement of patients' symptoms, nutritional status, and, in selected cases, by fecal fat or (13) C-mixed triglyceride breath test. Patients unresponsive to PERT should be checked for compliance, increase the dose of lipase to 90,000 units/meal or co-therapy with proton pump inhibitor. In patient with previous gastrointestinal surgery that may interfere enzyme-food mixing, opening the capsules and administering the enzyme granules with meals. Finally, search for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome and other causes of small bowel malabsorption. PMID:24251713

  6. [Diagnosis and therapy of cervical insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Matijević, Ratko; Grgić, Ozren; Klobucar, Ante

    2003-01-01

    Cervical insufficiency is one of the risk factors for late spontaneous miscarriage and preterm labor. As cervical insufficiency can reoccur in the every subsequent pregnancy, there is a need for precise diagnostic modality and therapeutic procedure in order to reduce perinatal mortality and morbidity. Traditionally, the diagnosis of cervical insufficiency was made based on the patient's history. In this cases the intervention in the form of the cervical cerclage, was not found to be useful, i.e. perinatal mortality and morbidity remained unchanged. It is a similar situation in cervical insufficiency suspected based on hysterosalpingography and clinical examination. Recently, ultrasound, or more precisely transvaginal cervical assessment--cervicometry, was introduced in order to assess the morphological changes indicative for cervical insufficiency. In this literature review, we analyzed ultrasound based markers of cervical insufficiency, with their specificity, sensitivity, positive and negative predictive value, as well as usefulness of cervical cerclage in such cases.

  7. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency following esophagectomy.

    PubMed

    Huddy, J R; Macharg, F M S; Lawn, A M; Preston, S R

    2013-08-01

    Weight loss following esophagectomy is a management challenge for all patients. It is multifactorial with contributing factors including loss of gastric reservoir, rapid small bowel transit, malabsorption, and adjuvant chemotherapy. The development of a postoperative malabsorption syndrome, as a result of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI), is recognized in a subgroup of patients following gastrectomy. This has not previously been documented following esophageal resection. EPI can result in symptoms of flatulence, diarrhea, steatorrhea, vitamin deficiencies, and weight loss. It therefore has the potential to pose a significant level of morbidity in postoperative patients. There is some evidence that patients with proven EPI (fecal elastase-1 < 200 μg/g) may benefit from a trial of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT). We observed symptoms compatible with EPI in a subgroup of patients following esophagectomy. We hypothesized that this was contributing to malabsorption and malnutrition in these patients. To investigate this, fecal elastase-1 was measured in postoperative patients, and in those with proven EPI, a trial of PERT was commenced in combination with specialist dietary education. At routine postoperative follow-up, which included assessment by a specialist dietitian, those patients with symptoms suggestive of malabsorption were given the opportunity to have their fecal elastase-1 measured. PERT was then offered to patients with fecal elastase-1 less than 200 μg/g (EPI) as well as those in the 200-500 μg/g range (mild EPI) with more severe symptoms. Fecal elastase-1 was measured in 63 patients between June 2009 and January 2011 at a median of 4 months (range 1-42) following surgery. Ten patients had fecal elastase-1 less than 200 μg/g, and all had failed to maintain preoperative weight. All accepted a trial of PERT. Nine (90%) had symptomatic improvement, and seven (70%) increased their weight. Thirty-nine patients had a fecal elastase-1 in

  8. Renal medullary ''rings'': possible CT manifestation of hypercalcemia

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, N.S.; Gordon, L.; Gobien, R.P.; Lott, M.

    1984-01-01

    Bilateral dense rings in the renal medulla were found on noncontrasted computed tomography in a patient with marked hypercalcemia and suspected primary hyperparathyroidism. The rings were not present on plain radiographs and were obscured on contrasted scans, and may represent occult nephrocalcinosis. Associated findings--renal insufficiency induced by hypercalcemia and interstitial nephritis--may be reversible with early recognition of this CT finding.

  9. Acroangiodermatitis secondary to chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Benjamin; Xia, Yang; Cho, Sunghun; Lewis, Felisa S; Lewis, Felicia S

    2010-11-01

    Acroangiodermatitis (AAD) is a benign uncommon vasoproliferative disorder that affects the lower extremities. It appears to be a reactive phenomenon related to severe chronic Venous insufficiency and stasis of the lower extremities. The clinical presentation of this condition often is similar to Kaposi sarcoma. We report a case of AAD in a patient with severe hypertension and chronic venous insufficiency. PMID:21214123

  10. 33 CFR 125.29 - Insufficient information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Insufficient information. 125.29... VESSELS § 125.29 Insufficient information. (a)(1) If, in the judgment of the Commandant, an application does not contain sufficient information to enable him to satisfy himself that the character and...

  11. 33 CFR 125.29 - Insufficient information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Insufficient information. 125.29... VESSELS § 125.29 Insufficient information. (a)(1) If, in the judgment of the Commandant, an application does not contain sufficient information to enable him to satisfy himself that the character and...

  12. Neurosarcoidosis-associated central diabetes insipidus masked by adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Non, Lemuel; Brito, Daniel; Anastasopoulou, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is an infrequent complication of neurosarcoidosis (NS). Its presentation may be masked by adrenal insufficiency (AI) and uncovered by subsequent steroid replacement. A 45-year-old woman with a history of NS presented 2 weeks after abrupt cessation of prednisone with nausea, vomiting, decreased oral intake and confusion. She was diagnosed with secondary AI and intravenous hydrocortisone was promptly begun. Over the next few days, however, the patient developed severe thirst and polyuria exceeding 6 L of urine per day, accompanied by hypernatraemia and hypo-osmolar urine. She was presumed to have CDI due to NS, and intranasal desmopressin was administered. This eventually normalised her urine output and serum sodium. The patient was discharged improved on intranasal desmopressin and oral prednisone. AI may mask the manifestation of CDI because low serum cortisol impairs renal-free water clearance. Steroid replacement reverses this process and unmasks an underlying CDI.

  13. Cervical insufficiency and cervical cerclage.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard; Gagnon, Robert; Delisle, Marie-France; Gagnon, Robert; Bujold, Emmanuel; Basso, Melanie; Bos, Hayley; Brown, Richard; Cooper, Stephanie; Crane, Joan; Davies, Gregory; Gouin, Katy; Menticoglou, Savas; Mundle, William; Pylypjuk, Christy; Roggensack, Anne; Sanderson, Frank; Senikas, Vyta

    2013-12-01

    Objectif : La présente directive clinique a pour but de fournir un cadre de référence que les cliniciens pourront utiliser pour identifier les femmes qui sont exposées aux plus grands risques de connaître une insuffisance cervicale, ainsi que pour déterminer les circonstances en présence desquelles la mise en place d’un cerclage pourrait s’avérer souhaitable. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans PubMed ou MEDLINE, CINAHL et The Cochrane Library en 2012 au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé (p. ex. « uterine cervical incompetence ») et de mots clés appropriés (p. ex. « cervical insufficiency », « cerclage », « Shirodkar », « cerclage », « MacDonald », « cerclage », « abdominal », « cervical length », « mid-trimester pregnancy loss »). Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs et aux études observationnelles. Aucune restriction n’a été appliquée en matière de date ou de langue. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et intégrées à la directive clinique jusqu’en janvier 2011. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d’organismes s’intéressant à l’évaluation des technologies dans le domaine de la santé et d’organismes connexes, dans des collections de directives cliniques, dans des registres d’essais cliniques et auprès de sociétés de spécialité médicale nationales et internationales. Valeurs : La qualité des résultats est évaluée au moyen des critères décrits dans le rapport du Groupe d’étude canadien sur les soins de santé préventifs (Tableau). Recommandations 1. Les femmes qui sont enceintes ou qui planifient connaître une grossesse devraient faire l’objet d’une évaluation visant les facteurs de

  14. Hyperkalemic paralysis in primary adrenal insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Ajay; Pandya, Himanshu V.; Dave, Nikhil; Sapre, Chinmaye M.; Chaudhary, Sneha

    2014-01-01

    Hyperkalemic paralysis due to Addison's disease is rare, and potentially life-threatening entity presenting with flaccid motor weakness. This case under discussion highlights Hyperkalemic paralysis as initial symptomatic manifestation of primary adrenal insufficiency. PMID:25136192

  15. [Membranous nephropathy associated to autoimmune thyroiditis, chronic pancreatitis and suprarrenal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Merino, J L; Fernández Lucas, M; Teruel, J L; Valer, P; Moreira, V; Arambarri, M; Ortuño, J

    2004-01-01

    A 33 year old female was admitted to the hospital to study aedema and bocio, A nephrotic syndrome was diagnosed and the renal biopsy demonstrated membranous glomerulonephritis, stage II. She was also diagnosed of Hashimoto's autoinmmune thyroiditis: TSH (41.5 uUl/ml), T4 (0.07 ng/dl), antithyroglobuline (1/2560) and antimicrosome (1/6400). Four year latter she was diagnosed of autoinmmune pancreatitis, without evidence of diabetes mellitus or exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Eight years latter she was diagnosed of primary autoimmune suprarrenal insufficiency: basal cortisol: 2.7 mcg/dl, post ACTH estimulated cortisol: 5.6 mcg/dl, antinuclear antibody (1/160) and antiparietal (1/320). We present a pluriglandular autoimmune syndrome with membranous glomerulonephritis, thyroiditis, pancreatitis and suprarrenal insufficiency. To the best of our knowledge this complex syndrome has not been previously described.

  16. A case of human intramuscular adrenal gland transplantation as a cure for chronic adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Grodstein, E; Hardy, M A; Goldstein, M J

    2010-02-01

    Intramuscular endocrine gland transplantation has been well described as it pertains to parathyroid autotransplantation; however, transplantation of the adrenal gland is less well characterized. While adrenal autotransplantation in the setting of Cushing's disease has been described, intramuscular adrenal allotransplantation as a cure for adrenal insufficiency to our knowledge has not been previously carried out. Current treatment for adrenal insufficiency leaves patients without diurnal variation in cortisol release and susceptible to the detrimental effects of chronic hypercortisolism. We describe here the case of a 5-year-old girl with renal failure who had adrenal insufficiency following fulminant meningococcemia that led to requirements for both stress-dose steroid and mineralocorticoid replacement. Ten months after the onset of her disease, she received a simultaneous renal and adrenal gland transplant from her mother. The adrenal gland allograft was morselized into 1 mm(3) segments and implanted into three 2 cm pockets created in her rectus abdominis muscle. Three years after surgery, her allograft remains fully functional, responding well to adrenocorticotropin hormone stimulation and the patient does not require any steroid or mineral-corticoid supplementation. We believe this case represents the first description of successful functional intramuscular adrenal allograft transplantation with long-term follow up as a cure for adrenal insufficiency.

  17. Atheroembolic renal disease

    MedlinePlus

    Renal disease - atheroembolic; Cholesterol embolization syndrome; Atheroemboli - renal; Atherosclerotic disease - renal ... disorder of the arteries. It occurs when fat, cholesterol, and other substances build up in the walls ...

  18. [Post-denervation renal artery stenosis - a matter of concern?].

    PubMed

    Cordeanu, M; Gaertner, S; Prinz, É; Bronner, F; Jahn, C; Hannedouche, T; Stephan, D

    2015-06-01

    Renal denervation, an invasive technique indicated in resistant hypertension patients insufficiently controlled by antihypertensive drugs, has a good safety profile. However, an increasing number of post-denervation renal artery stenosis cases has recently been reported. We describe the case of a 49-year-old woman with resistant hypertension who was referred to our university hypertension center for renal sympathetic denervation. Her daily treatment included six antihypertensive drugs. CT angiography prior to denervation showed no renal artery stenosis or vessel wall lesions. A standard renal denervation procedure using the St Jude protocol was performed. After an initial improvement in blood pressure profile, she presented with a blood pressure impairment at 3 months after renal denervation leading to the diagnosis of a severe right renal artery stenosis. PMID:26047879

  19. Diagnosis and management of adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Bancos, Irina; Hahner, Stefanie; Tomlinson, Jeremy; Arlt, Wiebke

    2015-03-01

    Adrenal insufficiency continues to be a challenge for patients, their physicians, and researchers. During the past decade, long-term studies have shown increased mortality and morbidity and impaired quality of life in patients with adrenal insufficiency. These findings might, at least partially, be due to the failure of glucocorticoid replacement therapy to closely resemble physiological diurnal secretion of cortisol. The potential effect of newly developed glucocorticoid drugs is a focus of research, as are the mechanisms potentially underlying increased morbidity and mortality. Adrenal crisis remains a threat to lives, and awareness and preventative measures now receive increasing attention. Awareness should be raised in medical teams and patients about adrenal insufficiency and management of adrenal crisis to improve clinical outcome.

  20. Current indications for renal biopsy: a questionnaire-based survey.

    PubMed

    Fuiano, G; Mazza, G; Comi, N; Caglioti, A; De Nicola, L; Iodice, C; Andreucci, M; Andreucci, V E

    2000-03-01

    Indications for renal biopsy are still ill defined. We recently sent a detailed questionnaire to 360 nephrologists in different areas of the world with the aim of providing information on this critical issue by evaluating the replies. The questionnaire was organized in four sections that included questions on renal biopsy indications in patients with normal renal function, renal insufficiency, and a transplanted kidney. In addition, the questions included methods applied to each renal biopsy procedure and to specimen processing. We received 166 replies; North Europe (50 replies), South Europe (47 replies), North America (31 replies), Australia and New Zealand (24 replies), and other countries (14 replies). In patients with normal renal function, primary indications for renal biopsy were microhematuria associated with proteinuria, particularly greater than 1 g/d of protein. In chronic renal insufficiency, kidney dimension was the major parameter considered before renal biopsy, whereas the presence of diabetes or serological abnormalities was not considered critical. In the course of acute renal failure (ARF) of unknown origin, 20% of the respondents would perform renal biopsy in the early stages, 26% after 1 week of nonrecovery, and 40% after 4 weeks. In a transplanted kidney, the majority of nephrologists would perform a renal biopsy in the case of graft failure after surgery, ARF after initial good function, slow progressive deterioration of renal function, and onset of nephrotic proteinuria. The last section provided comprehensive information on the technical aspects of renal biopsy. This survey represents the first attempt to provide a reliable consensus that can be used in developing guidelines on the use of kidney biopsy. PMID:10692270

  1. Hypertension and renal artery stenosis: a complex clinical scenario.

    PubMed

    Jaff, M R

    2000-10-01

    Hypertension remains the most common reason for patients to visit physicians in the United States. Although awareness of hypertension among patients continues to increase, adequate control of hypertension remains poor. In addition, as the population of patients with hypertension ages, atherosclerosis becomes increasingly prevalent. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis is the most common secondary cause of hypertension and can cause hypertension to be difficult to control. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis may also result in chronic renal insufficiency. The physician must be aware of the clinical scenarios in which renal artery stenosis may occur, methods of diagnosis, and indications for intervention.

  2. Insufficiency fractures of the tibial plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Manco, L.G.; Schneider, R.; Pavlov, H.

    1983-06-01

    An insufficiency fracture of the tibial plateau may be the cause of knee pain in patients with osteoporosis. The diagnosis is usually not suspected until a bone scan is done, as initial radiographs are often negative or inconclusive and clinical findings are nonspecific and may simulate osteoarthritis or spontaneous osteonecrosis. In five of 165 patients referred for bone scans due to nontraumatic knee pain, a characteristic pattern of intense augmented uptake of radionuclide confined to the tibial plateau led to a presumptive diagnosis of insufficiency fracture, later confirmed on radiographs.

  3. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy during pancreatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Berry, Amy J

    2014-06-01

    Pancreatic stimulation and therefore digestion is a tightly controlled and hormonally mediated process. Any alterations affecting any of the systematic steps for successful digestion and absorption to occur will impair appropriate pancreatic enzymatic secretion, entry into the bowel lumen, functionality once inside the lumen, and thus appropriate mixing with foods and nutrients. Many causes of pancreatic insufficiency may require the initiation of pancreatic enzyme therapy, including but not limited to cystic fibrosis, pancreatic cancer, acute and chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic surgery. This purpose of this article is to help clarify the conditions that cause pancreatic insufficiency, how to determine if the patient is malabsorbing, and the best use of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy for treatment in these conditions. The first step in determining if pancreatic enzyme therapy is appropriate is to determine if the patient is malabsorbing specifically due to pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. An overview of the methods used to determine pancreatic insufficiency is provided, as well as appropriate treatment methods. Recent Food and Drug Administration regulations require a more thorough process, including randomized controlled trials to prove the safety and efficacy of pancreatic enzymes, to approve them for use. The studies used to verify efficacy also are examined. Last, dosing guidelines and some unconventional ways to administer pancreatic enzymes, such as during enteral feedings, are reviewed.

  4. Genetics of primary ovarian insufficiency: a review.

    PubMed

    Fortuño, Cristina; Labarta, Elena

    2014-12-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency is one of the main causes of female infertility owing to an abnormal ovarian reserve. Its relevance has increased in more recent years due to the fact that age of motherhood is being delayed in developed countries, with the risk of having either primary ovarian insufficiency or less chances of pregnancy when women consider the option of having their first baby. Several exogenous factors can lead to this event, such us viral infections, metabolomic dysfunction, autoimmune diseases, and environmental or iatrogenic factors, although in most cases the mechanism that leads to the disorder is unknown. Genetic factors represent the most commonly identified cause and the impact of sex chromosome abnormalities (e.g., Turner syndrome or X structural abnormalities), autosomal and X-linked mutations on the genesis of primary ovarian insufficiency has also been well described. Yet in most cases, the genetic origin remains unknown and there are multiple candidate genes. This review aims to collect all the genetic abnormalities and genes associated with syndromic and non syndromic primary ovarian insufficiency that have been published in the literature to date using the candidate-gene approach and a genome-wide analysis.

  5. Renal organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease in the absence of new treatment modalities has become a strong driver for innovation in nephrology. An increasing understanding of stem cell biology has kindled the prospects of regenerative options for kidney disease. However, the kidney itself is not a regenerative organ, as all the nephrons are formed during embryonic development. Here, we will investigate advances in the molecular genetics of renal organogenesis, including what this can tell us about lineage relationships, and discuss how this may serve to inform us about both the normal processes of renal repair and options for regenerative therapies. PMID:22198432

  6. [Renal disease].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-09-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys. Some of these restrictions modify the intake of proteins, sodium, and phosphorus. Milk and dairy products are sources of these nutrients. This article aims to inform the reader about the benefits including milk and dairy products relying on a scientific and critical view according to the clinical conditions and the stage of renal disease in which the patient is. PMID:27603894

  7. [Renal disease].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-09-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys. Some of these restrictions modify the intake of proteins, sodium, and phosphorus. Milk and dairy products are sources of these nutrients. This article aims to inform the reader about the benefits including milk and dairy products relying on a scientific and critical view according to the clinical conditions and the stage of renal disease in which the patient is.

  8. Radiocontrast-induced renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Misson, R.T.; Cutler, R.E.

    1985-05-01

    Review of the literature concerning contrast-induced renal dysfunction shows that the currently used agents are remarkably safe with careful patient selection. Clinically apparent kidney failure after their use is essentially nonexistent in those without preexistent renal insufficiency. The incidence rises rapidly in those with azotemia from any cause, however, and diabetic persons with nephropathy are perhaps at special risk. Vigorous volume expansion is possibly effective as a preventive measure and may attenuate adverse effects in those in whom postcontrast dysfunction occurs. New agents are becoming available. It is not yet known if these will prove safer or cost-effective. They have some experimentally demonstrated and theoretical advantages over the presently used agents. 58 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  9. Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty of Dysplastic Stenoses of the Renal Artery: Results on 70 Adults

    SciTech Connect

    Fraissinette, Bruno de; Garcier, Jean Marc; Dieu, Valerie; Mofid, Reza; Ravel, Anne; Boire, Jean Yves; Boyer, Louis

    2003-02-15

    Purpose: Retrospective analysis of the dilatation (PTRA) of renal arterial dysplastic stenosis (RADS). Methods: Seventy patients suffering from hypertension (87RADS) were treated at our institution for medial (83%) or non-classified fibrodysplasias (17%). Four patients suffered from renal insufficiency. Two endoprostheses were implanted. We evaluated blood pressure with the USCSRH criteria and renal insufficiency with the Martin criteria. Results: Ninety-five percent technical success and 87.9% clinical success for blood pressure were obtained, with worse results for patients older than 57 years or with a history of hypertension greater than 9 years. Results were better when the RADS was responsible for an ipsilateral renal atrophy or for poorly controlled hypertension. No renal insufficiency worsened during the follow-up. Conclusion: PTRA is a first-line treatment for renovascular hypertension caused by RADS. The results were encouraging despite a high average age of the subjects and frequent associated extrarenal vascular lesions.

  10. [Bilateral renal infarction after discontinuation of anticoagulant therapy].

    PubMed

    Lavoignet, Charles-Éric; Le Borgne, Pierrick; Ugé, Sarah; Veneziano, Rinaldo; Brunhuber, Claudia; Kam, Claire; Bilbault, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    Acute renal infarction is an uncommon and often under diagnosed condition mostly because of misleading symptoms. Accurate data regarding clinical presentation, laboratory tests, diagnostic and treatment are lacking. Detection is often delayed or missed because of non-specific clinical presentation. The mechanisms of acute renal infarction are various, mainly embolic or thrombotic. Abdominal CT scan remains the most valuable exam to confirm the diagnosis. Therapeutic guidelines for the treatment of renal embolism have not been well established. The standard treatment strategy includes anticoagulation with or without thrombolysis. Despite the uncertainty regarding management, the renal outcome remains favorable. Some patients do develop some degree of renal insufficiency during the acute episode. We report here the case of a 73-year-old woman with bilateral acute renal infarction after discontinuation of anticoagulant therapy.

  11. Allgrove Syndrome: Adrenal Insufficiency with Hypertensive Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Aftab, Sommayya; Manzoor, Jaida; Talat, Nabila; Khan, Hafiz Sajid; Subhanie, Maroof; Khalid, Nauman Abbas

    2016-09-01

    Allgrove syndrome or triple-Asyndrome is a rare familial multisystem autosomal recessive disorder. It is characterised by triad of alacrima, achalasia and adrenal insufficiency due to adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) resistance. If it is associated with autonomic dysfunction, it is termed as 4-Asyndrome. This syndrome is caused by a mutation in the Achalasia - Addisonism - Alacrima (AAAS) gene on chromosome 12q13 encoding the nuclear pore protein ALADIN. A5-year boy presented with history of fits and altered sensorium for one day. He also had increased pigmentation of body and persistent vomiting since six months of age. Laboratory investigations and imaging revealed alacrimia, achalasia and adrenal insufficiency due to ACTH resistance. He had episodes of hypertensive crises, for which he was thoroughly investigated and it was found to be due to autonomic instability. Based on clinical findings and investigations he was diagnosed as case of Allgrove syndrome or 4-Asyndrome with autonomic dysfunction. PMID:27671188

  12. Chronic Heroin Dependence Leading to Adrenal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Opioids have been the mainstay for pain relief and palliation over a long period of time. They are commonly abused by drug addicts and such dependence usually imparts severe physiologic effects on multiple organ systems. The negative impact of opioids on the endocrine system is poorly understood and often underestimated. We describe a patient who developed severe suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis leading to secondary adrenal insufficiency due to long standing abuse of opioids. PMID:25221675

  13. High Fat High Cholesterol Diet (Western Diet) Aggravates Atherosclerosis, Hyperglycemia and Renal Failure in Nephrectomized LDL Receptor Knockout Mice: Role of Intestine Derived Lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Siddhartha S; Righi, Samuel; Krieg, Richard; Kang, Le; Carl, Daniel; Wang, Jing; Massey, H Davis; Sica, Domenic A; Gehr, Todd W B; Ghosh, Shobha

    2015-01-01

    A high fat meal, frequently known as western diet (WD), exacerbates atherosclerosis and diabetes. Both these diseases are frequently associated with renal failure. Recent studies have shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) leaks into the circulation from the intestine in the setting of renal failure and after WD. However, it is not clear how renal function and associated disorders are affected by LPS. This study demonstrates that circulatory LPS exacerbates renal insufficiency, atherosclerosis and glucose intolerance. Renal insufficiency was induced by 2/3 nephrectomy in LDL receptor knockout mice. Nx animals were given normal diet (Nx) or WD (Nx+WD). The controls were sham operated animals on normal diet (control) and WD (WD). To verify if LPS plays a role in exaggerating renal insufficiency, polymyxin (PM), a known LPS antagonist, and curcumin (CU), a compound known to ameliorate chronic kidney disease (CKD), was given to Nx animals on western diet (Nx+WD+PM and Nx+WD+CU, respectively). Compared to control, all other groups displayed increased circulatory LPS. The Nx+WD cohort had the highest levels of LPS. Nx group had significant renal insufficiency and glucose intolerance but not atherosclerosis. WD had intense atherosclerosis and glucose intolerance but it did not show signs of renal insufficiency. Compared to other groups, Nx+WD had significantly higher cytokine expression, macrophage infiltration in the kidney, renal insufficiency, glucose intolerance and atherosclerosis. PM treatment blunted the expression of cytokines, deterioration of renal function and associated disorders, albeit not to the levels of Nx, and was significantly inferior to CU. PM is a non-absorbable antibiotic with LPS binding properties, hence its beneficial effect can only be due to its effect within the GI tract. We conclude that LPS may not cause renal insufficiency but can exaggerate kidney failure and associated disorders following renal insufficiency.

  14. High Fat High Cholesterol Diet (Western Diet) Aggravates Atherosclerosis, Hyperglycemia and Renal Failure in Nephrectomized LDL Receptor Knockout Mice: Role of Intestine Derived Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Siddhartha S.; Righi, Samuel; Krieg, Richard; Kang, Le; Carl, Daniel; Wang, Jing; Massey, H. Davis; Sica, Domenic A.; Gehr, Todd W. B.; Ghosh, Shobha

    2015-01-01

    A high fat meal, frequently known as western diet (WD), exacerbates atherosclerosis and diabetes. Both these diseases are frequently associated with renal failure. Recent studies have shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) leaks into the circulation from the intestine in the setting of renal failure and after WD. However, it is not clear how renal function and associated disorders are affected by LPS. This study demonstrates that circulatory LPS exacerbates renal insufficiency, atherosclerosis and glucose intolerance. Renal insufficiency was induced by 2/3 nephrectomy in LDL receptor knockout mice. Nx animals were given normal diet (Nx) or WD (Nx+WD). The controls were sham operated animals on normal diet (control) and WD (WD). To verify if LPS plays a role in exaggerating renal insufficiency, polymyxin (PM), a known LPS antagonist, and curcumin (CU), a compound known to ameliorate chronic kidney disease (CKD), was given to Nx animals on western diet (Nx+WD+PM and Nx+WD+CU, respectively). Compared to control, all other groups displayed increased circulatory LPS. The Nx+WD cohort had the highest levels of LPS. Nx group had significant renal insufficiency and glucose intolerance but not atherosclerosis. WD had intense atherosclerosis and glucose intolerance but it did not show signs of renal insufficiency. Compared to other groups, Nx+WD had significantly higher cytokine expression, macrophage infiltration in the kidney, renal insufficiency, glucose intolerance and atherosclerosis. PM treatment blunted the expression of cytokines, deterioration of renal function and associated disorders, albeit not to the levels of Nx, and was significantly inferior to CU. PM is a non-absorbable antibiotic with LPS binding properties, hence its beneficial effect can only be due to its effect within the GI tract. We conclude that LPS may not cause renal insufficiency but can exaggerate kidney failure and associated disorders following renal insufficiency. PMID:26580567

  15. Genetics of Cleft Palate and Velopharyngeal Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Walter M; Lanier, Steve T; Purnell, Chad A; Gosain, Arun K

    2015-03-01

    Velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) can occur in the setting of an unrepaired or repaired cleft lip and palate. The rate of VPI has been documented as high as 33% in some studies with higher rates of recurrences following surgery associated with genetic syndromes such as 22q11.2 deletions. The primary cause of VPI in these groups is still identified as the anatomic abnormalities of the velum. In this review, the anatomy and physiology of the velum are discussed along with genetic mutations associated with VPI. PMID:27617110

  16. Genetics of Cleft Palate and Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Walter M.; Lanier, Steve T.; Purnell, Chad A.; Gosain, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    Velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) can occur in the setting of an unrepaired or repaired cleft lip and palate. The rate of VPI has been documented as high as 33% in some studies with higher rates of recurrences following surgery associated with genetic syndromes such as 22q11.2 deletions. The primary cause of VPI in these groups is still identified as the anatomic abnormalities of the velum. In this review, the anatomy and physiology of the velum are discussed along with genetic mutations associated with VPI. PMID:27617110

  17. Genetics of Cleft Palate and Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Walter M.; Lanier, Steve T.; Purnell, Chad A.; Gosain, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    Velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) can occur in the setting of an unrepaired or repaired cleft lip and palate. The rate of VPI has been documented as high as 33% in some studies with higher rates of recurrences following surgery associated with genetic syndromes such as 22q11.2 deletions. The primary cause of VPI in these groups is still identified as the anatomic abnormalities of the velum. In this review, the anatomy and physiology of the velum are discussed along with genetic mutations associated with VPI.

  18. Renal cell carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Renal cancer; Kidney cancer; Hypernephroma; Adenocarcinoma of renal cells; Cancer - kidney ... ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 57. National Cancer Institute: PDQ renal cell cancer treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. ...

  19. Importance of monitoring renal function in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Aapro, Matti; Launay-Vacher, Vincent

    2012-05-01

    Monitoring renal function in patients with solid tumors and hematologic malignancies is vital to the safe administration of therapeutic agents. Renal impairment is frequent in elderly patients (i.e., age ≥ 65) with cancer, despite normal serum creatinine levels in most patients. Because serum creatinine levels do not accurately reflect clearance rates, renal function should be estimated by calculation (either Cockcroft-Gault or abbreviated Modification of Diet in Renal Disease [aMDRD] equations) or by measuring creatinine clearance using a 24-h urine collection. Additionally, patients with cancer often have preexisting comorbidities or other risk factors that increase the probability of renal impairment before receiving potentially nephrotoxic therapies. Patient age, preexisting renal dysfunction, and chronic comorbidities (e.g., diabetes, kidney disease, hypertension, and cardiac insufficiency) all contribute to the risk of renal impairment. Furthermore, both cancer and its therapies may lead to renal impairment. A number of cancer therapy agents are nephrotoxic, including chemotherapy agents, molecular targeted agents, pain management agents, radiopharmaceuticals, contrast agents used in radiology, and antiresorptive agents, and contrast agents used in radiology are nephrotoxic as well. Undetected decreases in clearance rates by the kidneys can greatly increase exposure to treatment agents, possibly decreasing the safety of treatment and exacerbating renal impairment. In conclusion, all cancer patients, not only those receiving potentially nephrotoxic agents, require renal monitoring.

  20. The chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zamboni, P; Galeotti, R

    2010-12-01

    Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) is a syndrome characterized by stenosies of the internal jugular and/or azygous veins (IJVs-AZ) with opening of collaterals and insufficient drainage proved by reduced cerebral blood flow and increased mean transit time in cerebral MRI perfusional study. The present review is aimed to give a comprehensive overview of the actual status of the art of the diagnosis and treatment of this condition. As far as the origin of venous narrowing is concerned, phlebographic studies of the IJVs and AZ systems demonstrated that venous stenoses were likely to be truncular venous malformations; mostly, they are intraluminal defects such as malformed valve, septa webs. CCSVI condition has been found to be strongly associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), a disabling neurodegenerative and demyelinating disease considered autoimmune in nature. In several epidemiological observations performed at different latitudes on patients with different genetic backgrounds, the prevalence of CCSVI in MS ranges from 56% to 100%. To the contrary, by using venous MR and/or different Doppler protocols, CCSVI was not detected with the same prevalence. Two pilot studies demonstrated the safety and feasibility in Day Surgery of the endovascular treatment of CCSVI by means of balloon angioplasty (PTA). It determines a significant reduction of postoperative venous pressure. Restenosis rate was found out elevated in the IJVs, but negligible in the AZ. However, PTA seems to positively influence clinical and QoL parameters of the associated MS and warrants further randomized control trials.

  1. [Acute adrenal insufficiency in the newborn].

    PubMed

    Limal, J-M; Bouhours-Nouet, N; Rouleau, S; Gatelais, F; Coutant, R

    2006-10-01

    Neonatal acute adrenal insufficiency is a rare condition. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia with 21-hydroxylase defect appears to be the most frequent cause, but the neonatal screening has improved its potential severe outcome. The other causes and the various clinical presentations have been exposed, with a special reference to the salt-wasting syndrome. Among them, the severity of X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) deserves special attention. Two other causes of adrenal hypoplasia have been recently discovered, i.e. a mutation of the SF-1 gene and the syndrome IMAGe. Adrenal insufficiency secondary to ACTH deficiency is often unrecognised despite the risk of severe seizures and hypoglycaemia with brain damage. Finally, the hormonal diagnostic testing and the main therapeutic approach by corticosteroids have been indicated. The aim of this work is to focus the attention of paediatricians who examine a newborn because the risk of delayed diagnosis and fatal outcome may be limited if the clinical symptoms are soon recognized. PMID:16962294

  2. Identification and treatment of APS renal involvement.

    PubMed

    Tektonidou, M G

    2014-10-01

    Renal involvement in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), either primary or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-related APS, includes renal artery stenosis or thrombosis, renal infarction, renal vein thrombosis and a small-vessel vaso-occlusive nephropathy defined as "antiphospholipid antibody (aPL)-associated nephropathy." aPL-associated nephropathy is characterized by acute lesions, thrombotic microangiopathy, and chronic lesions such as fibrous intimal hyperplasia, organizing thrombi with or without recanalization, fibrous occlusions of arteries or arterioles and focal cortical atrophy. Systemic hypertension, hematuria, proteinuria (ranging from mild to nephrotic level) and renal insufficiency represent the major clinical manifestations associated with aPL-associated nephropathy. Similar renal histologic and clinical characteristics have been described among all different groups of patients with positive aPL (primary APS, SLE-related APS, catastrophic APS and SLE/non-APS with positive aPL). In patients with aPL-associated nephropathy lesions in the absence of other causes associated with similar histological characteristics, aPL testing needs to be considered.

  3. /sup 97/Ru-DMSA for delayed renal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Oster, Z.H.; Som, P.; Gil, M.C.

    1981-10-01

    Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) was labeled with /sup 97/Ru both with and without the addition of SnCl-2H/sub 2/O. The tin-containing preparation was found to induce higher cortical deposition of /sup 97/Ru-DMSA than the tin-free preparation. Visualization of the renal cortex was excellent 4 to 48 hours after injection in normal dogs and in dogs with renal insufficiency. It is concluded that /sup 97/Ru-(SN/sup 2 +/)-DMSA is a potentially useful renal imaging agent when delayed scintigraphy is necessary because of decompensation of the kidneys.

  4. /sup 97/Ru-DMSA for delayed renal imaging. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Oster, Z.H.; Som, P.; Gil, M.C.; Goldman, A.G.; Fairchild, R.G.; Meinken, G.E.; Srivastava, S.C.; Atkins, H.L.; Richards, P.; Brill, A.B.

    1981-01-01

    Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) was labeled with /sup 97/Ru both with and without the addition of SnCl.2H/sub 2/O. The tin-containing preparation was found to induce higher cortical deposition of /sup 97/Ru-DMSA than the tin-free preparation. Visualization of the renal cortex was excellent 4 to 48 hours after injection in normal dogs with renal insufficiency. It is concluded that /sup 97/Ru-(Sn+/sup 2/)-DMSA is a potentially useful renal imaging agent when delayed scintigraphy is necessary because of decompensaton of the kidneys.

  5. End Stage and Chronic Kidney Disease: Associations with Renal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Paul

    2012-01-01

    There is a well known association between end stage renal disease and the development of kidney cancer in the native kidney of patients requiring renal replacement therapy. There is now emerging evidence that lesser degrees of renal insufficiency (chronic kidney disease, CKD) are also associated with an increased likelihood of cancer in general and kidney cancer in particular. Nephropathological changes are commonly observed in the non-tumor bearing portions of kidney resected at the time of partial and radical nephrectomy (RN). In addition, patients with renal cancer are more likely to have CKD at the time of diagnosis and treatment than the general population. The exact mechanism by which renal insufficiency transforms normal kidney cells into tumor cells is not known. Possible mechanisms include uremic immune inhibition or increased exposure to circulating toxins not adequately cleared by the kidneys. Surgeons managing kidney tumors must have an increased awareness of their patient’s renal functional status as they plan their resection. Kidney sparing approaches, including partial nephrectomy (PN) or active surveillance in older and morbidly ill patients, can prevent CKD or delay the further decline in renal function which is well documented with RN. Despite emerging evidence that PN provides equivalent local tumor control to RN while at the same time preventing CKD, this operation remains under utilized in the United States and abroad. Increased awareness of the bi directional relationship between kidney function and kidney cancer is essential in the contemporary management of kidney cancer. PMID:22649783

  6. Calcaneal Insufficiency Fracture after Ipsilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Min; Shin, Sung Jin; Kang, Byoung Youl

    2016-01-01

    Insufficiency fracture of the calcaneus is a rare entity. In the absence of trauma, evaluating a painful ankle in an elderly patient can be difficult and also it might be overlook the insufficiency fracture. We experienced a case of insufficiency calcaneus fracture that occurred after ipsilateral total knee arthroplasty. Here, we report our case with a review of literatures. PMID:26981521

  7. 29 CFR 541.2 - Job titles insufficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Job titles insufficient. 541.2 Section 541.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS DEFINING AND... General Regulations § 541.2 Job titles insufficient. A job title alone is insufficient to establish...

  8. 29 CFR 541.2 - Job titles insufficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Job titles insufficient. 541.2 Section 541.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS DEFINING AND... General Regulations § 541.2 Job titles insufficient. A job title alone is insufficient to establish...

  9. 29 CFR 541.2 - Job titles insufficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Job titles insufficient. 541.2 Section 541.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS DEFINING AND... General Regulations § 541.2 Job titles insufficient. A job title alone is insufficient to establish...

  10. 29 CFR 541.2 - Job titles insufficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Job titles insufficient. 541.2 Section 541.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS DEFINING AND... General Regulations § 541.2 Job titles insufficient. A job title alone is insufficient to establish...

  11. 29 CFR 541.2 - Job titles insufficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Job titles insufficient. 541.2 Section 541.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS DEFINING AND... General Regulations § 541.2 Job titles insufficient. A job title alone is insufficient to establish...

  12. Transforming Growth Factor Beta and Excess Burden of Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    August, Phyllis; Sharma, Vijay; Ding, Ruchuang; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Suthanthiran, Manikkam

    2009-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is more frequent in African Americans (blacks) compared to whites. Because renal fibrosis is a correlate of progressive renal failure and a dominant feature of ESRD, and because transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) can induce fibrosis and renal insufficiency, we hypothesized that TGF-β1 hyperexpression is more frequent in blacks compared to whites. We measured circulating levels of TGF-β1 in black and white patients with ESRD, hypertension, and in normal patients. We demonstrated that circulating levels of TGF-β1 are higher in black ESRD patients, hypertensive patients, and normal control patients compared to their white counterparts. Our preliminary genetic analyses suggest that TGF-β1 DNA polymorphisms are different in blacks and whites. Our observations of hyperexpression of TGF-β1 in blacks suggest a mechanism for the increased prevalence of renal failure and hypertensive target organ damage in this population. PMID:19768163

  13. [Transcranial electrostimulation in chronic cerebral vascular insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Voropaev, A A; Mochalov, A D

    2006-01-01

    The method of transcranial electrostimulation (TCES) has been used for treatment of 68 patients with chronic cerebral vascular insufficiency, stages I and II. A treatment course included 7 daily procedures. The influence of TCES was evaluated clinically, by EEG, transcranial ultrasonic Doppler study and hemodynamic indices in arteries and veins as well as by expression of trait and state anxiety. All the parameters were compared to those of the control group which was treated using conventional methods. TCES resulted in normalization of cerebral vascular reactivity, a decrease of venous circulation disturbances, positive influence on cerebral blood flow and EEG parameters, that corresponded to global improvement of the patients' state, regress of cephalgic syndrome and reduction of trait and state anxiety. The method is simple and safety and can be recommended for wide application including outpatient setting.

  14. [Transcranial electrostimulation in chronic cerebral vascular insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Voropaev, A A; Mochalov, A D

    2006-01-01

    The method of transcranial electrostimulation (TCES) has been used for treatment of 68 patients with chronic cerebral vascular insufficiency, stages I and II. A treatment course included 7 daily procedures. The influence of TCES was evaluated clinically, by EEG, transcranial ultrasonic Doppler study and hemodynamic indices in arteries and veins as well as by expression of trait and state anxiety. All the parameters were compared to those of the control group which was treated using conventional methods. TCES resulted in normalization of cerebral vascular reactivity, a decrease of venous circulation disturbances, positive influence on cerebral blood flow and EEG parameters, that corresponded to global improvement of the patients' state, regress of cephalgic syndrome and reduction of trait and state anxiety. The method is simple and safety and can be recommended for wide application including outpatient setting. PMID:16768222

  15. Cardiovascular Disease and Primary Ovarian Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wellons, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the number-one killer of women. Women with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) may be more burdened by cardiovascular disease, such as myocardial infarction and stroke, as compared with women with normal menopause. The increased burden may be mediated by a worsening of cardiovascular risk factors, such as lipids, corresponding with the loss of ovarian function. In contrast, the increased burden may be caused by factors that precede and potentially contribute to both CVD events and ovarian decline, such as X-chromosome abnormalities and smoking. Regardless of the cause, women with POI may serve as an important population to target for CVD screening and prevention strategies. These strategies should include the use of CVD risk stratification tools to identify women that may benefit from lifestyle modification and pharmacological therapy to prevent CVD. Sex steroid therapy for the sole purpose of CVD prevention in women with POI cannot be recommended, based on a lack of evidence. PMID:21969267

  16. Gloriosa superba ingestion: Hair loss and acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Khanam, P. S.; Sangeetha, B.; Kumar, B. V.; Kiran, U.; Priyadarshini, P. I.; Ram, R.; Sridhar, M. S.; Kumar, V. S.

    2015-01-01

    Gloriosa superba is a plant that grows wild in several parts of South India. Tubers of this plant contain several alkaloids. Acute intoxication following the ingestion of G. superba results in gastrointestinal and haematological abnormalities, hepatic and renal insufficiency, cardiotoxicity and hair loss. We present a case with typical features of G superba toxicity. PMID:26060369

  17. Daytime mechanical ventilation in chronic respiratory insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Schönhofer, B; Geibel, M; Sonneborn, M; Haidl, P; Köhler, D

    1997-12-01

    Chronic respiratory insufficiency (CRI) is associated with nocturnal hypoventilation. Treatment with noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) performed overnight relieves symptoms of hypoventilation and improves daytime blood gases in CRI. In order to test whether the efficacy of NIMV depends on it being applied during sleep, we conducted a prospective case-controlled study comparing daytime mechanical ventilation (dMV) in awake patients with nocturnal mechanical ventilation (nMV) given in equal quantities. We enrolled 34 clinically stable patients (age 56.1+/-12.1 yrs, 20 females, 14 males) with CRI due to restrictive lung and chest wall disorders and neuromuscular disease. Using a prospective case-control design, matched subjects were allocated alternately to dMV and nMV. After 1 month of NIMV there was considerable symptomatic improvement in both dMV and nMV patients. There were no significant differences between groups in the improvement in daytime arterial carbon dioxide tension (Pa,CO2) (dMV from 7.5+/-0.6 to 5.7+/-0.6 kPa; nMV from 7.2+/-0.5 to 5.8+/-0.5 kPa, p<0.0001) and during the unassisted spontaneous night-time ventilation in terms of transcutaneous Pa,CO2 (dMV from 8.4+/-1.2 to 6.6+/-0.7 kPa; nMV from 8.2+/-1.2 to 6.8+/-0.5 kPa, p<0.0001). We conclude that in many respects, when compared to nocturnal mechanical ventilation, daytime mechanical ventilation in awake patients is equally effective at reversing chronic respiratory insufficiency. Since long-term safety issues were not addressed in this study, we recommend that nocturnal mechanical ventilation should remain the modality of choice for noninvasive mechanical ventilation.

  18. Renal actinomycosis with concomitant renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Dong-Suk; Jang, Won Ik; Jung, Ji Yoon; Chung, Sarah; Choi, Dae Eun; Na, Ki-Ryang; Lee, Kang Wook; Shin, Yong-Tai

    2012-02-01

    Renal actinomycosis is a rare infection caused by fungi of the genus Actinomyces. A 74-year-old male was admitted to our hospital because of gross hematuria with urinary symptoms and intermittent chills. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed thrombosis in the left renal vein and diffuse, heterogeneous enlargement of the left kidney. After nephrectomy, sulfur granules with chronic suppurative inflammation were seen microscopically, and the histopathological diagnosis was renal actinomycosis. Our case is the first report of renal actinomycosis with renal vein thrombosis.

  19. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,…

  20. Non-surgical interventions for convergence insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Scheiman, Mitchell; Gwiazda, Jane; Li, Tianjing

    2014-01-01

    Background Convergence insufficiency is a common eye muscle co-ordination problem in which the eyes have a strong tendency to drift outward (exophoria) when reading or doing close work. Symptoms may include eye strain, headaches, double vision, print moving on the page, frequent loss of place when reading, inability to concentrate, and short attention span. Objectives To systematically assess and synthesize evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effectiveness of non-surgical interventions for convergence insufficiency. Search strategy We searched The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com) and ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) on 7 October 2010. We manually searched reference lists and optometric journals. Selection criteria We included RCTs examining any form of non-surgical intervention against placebo, no treatment, sham treatment, or each other. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed eligibility, risk of bias, and extracted data. We performed meta-analyses when appropriate. Main results We included six trials (three in children, three in adults) with a total of 475 participants. We graded four trials at low risk of bias. Evidence from one trial (graded at low risk of bias) suggests that base-in prism reading glasses was no more effective than placebo reading glasses in improving clinical signs or symptoms in children. Evidence from one trial (graded at high risk of bias) suggests that base-in prism glasses using a progressive addition lens design was more effective than progressive addition lens alone in decreasing symptoms in adults. At three weeks of therapy, the mean difference in Convergence Insufficiency Symptoms Survey (CISS) score was −10.24 points (95% confidence interval (CI) −15.45 to −5.03). Evidence from two trials (graded at low risk of bias) suggests that outpatient (or office-based as used in the

  1. Premature ovarian insufficiency: Pathogenesis and management

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, Anna J.

    2015-01-01

    The term premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) describes a continuum of declining ovarian function in a young woman, resulting in an earlier than average menopause. It is a term that reflects the variable nature of the condition and is substantially less emotive than the formerly used “premature ovarian failure” which signaled a single event in time. Contrary to the decline in the age of menarche seen over the last 3-4 decades there has been no similar change in the age of menopause. In developed nations, the average age for cessation of menstrual cycles is 50-52 years. The age is younger among women from developing nations. Much has been written about POI despite a lack of good data on the incidence of this condition. It is believed that 1% of women under the age of 40 years and 0.1% under the age of 30 years will develop POI. Research is increasingly providing information about the pathogenesis and treatments are being developed to better preserve ovarian function during cancer treatment and to improve fertility options. This narrative review summarizes the current literature to provide an approach to best practice management of POI. PMID:26903753

  2. Premature ovarian insufficiency and neurological function.

    PubMed

    Soni, M; Hogervorst, E

    2014-09-01

    Premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) involves loss of ovarian function before age 40. POI has been associated with neurological dysfunction and an increased risk of dementia, perhaps due to depletion in estrogen levels. The present review discusses the effects of POI caused by genetic disorder, natural premature menopause, surgical menopause, breast cancer treatment and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist treatment. Overall, data suggest an increased risk of neurological disorder where POI is due to premature menopause or induced from surgery. This increased risk appears to be most apparent on domains of global cognitive and verbal memory tests. Where POI is caused by genetic disorder, observed cognitive deficiencies may be more likely to have a genetic basis rather than being due to the effects of sex steroids on the brain. Findings related to loss of cognitive function after chemotherapy or GnRH treatments are mixed. There are also discrepant data related to use of hormone therapy after POI (particularly after surgical menopause). After surgery, hormone treatment appears to be most beneficial if initiated close to the average natural age of menopause.

  3. Sacral Insufficiency Fractures Mimicking Lumbar Spine Pathology

    PubMed Central

    K. L., Kalra; Acharya, Shankar; Chahal, Rupinder

    2016-01-01

    Sacral insufficiency fractures (SIFs) are a common cause of back pain in the elderly. SIFs mimic the symptoms of lumbar spine pathology and so are commonly missed or underdiagnosed. Here we present four cases of missed SIFs that were subsequently identified and treated. One patient was treated as mechanical lower back ache, another patient underwent root block and two patients underwent surgery for lumbar canal stenosis. None experienced relief of their symptoms after these procedures. Retrospective analysis of X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging data revealed SIFs that were confirmed by computed tomography scans. All four patients were treated for underlying osteoporosis. Two patients who underwent surgery were treated conservatively and other two were treated by sacroplasty involving injection of cement into the fracture. Sacroplasty produced immediate pain relief and early mobilization compared to the conservative group. SIFs should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of an elderly patient presenting with low back symptoms. Sacroplasty can be considered for immediate pain relief and rapid mobilization. PMID:27340538

  4. Sacral Insufficiency Fractures Mimicking Lumbar Spine Pathology.

    PubMed

    Sudhir, G; K L, Kalra; Acharya, Shankar; Chahal, Rupinder

    2016-06-01

    Sacral insufficiency fractures (SIFs) are a common cause of back pain in the elderly. SIFs mimic the symptoms of lumbar spine pathology and so are commonly missed or underdiagnosed. Here we present four cases of missed SIFs that were subsequently identified and treated. One patient was treated as mechanical lower back ache, another patient underwent root block and two patients underwent surgery for lumbar canal stenosis. None experienced relief of their symptoms after these procedures. Retrospective analysis of X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging data revealed SIFs that were confirmed by computed tomography scans. All four patients were treated for underlying osteoporosis. Two patients who underwent surgery were treated conservatively and other two were treated by sacroplasty involving injection of cement into the fracture. Sacroplasty produced immediate pain relief and early mobilization compared to the conservative group. SIFs should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of an elderly patient presenting with low back symptoms. Sacroplasty can be considered for immediate pain relief and rapid mobilization. PMID:27340538

  5. Adrenal insufficiency in patients with decompensated cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannis, Apostolos KA; Nakouti, Theodora; Pipili, Chrysoula; Cholongitas, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal reserve depletion and overstimulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis are causes for adrenal insufficiency (AI) in critically ill individuals. Cirrhosis is a predisposing condition for AI in cirrhotics as well. Both stable cirrhotics and liver transplant patients (early and later after transplantation) have been reported to present AI. The mechanisms leading to reduced cortisol production in cirrhotics are the combination of low cholesterol levels (the primary source of cortisol), the increased cytokines production that overstimulate and exhaust HPA axis and the destruction of adrenal glands due to coagulopathy. AI has been recorded in 10%-82% cirrhotics depending on the test used to evaluate adrenal function and in 9%-83% stable cirrhotics. The similarity of those proportions support the assumption that AI is an endogenous characteristic of liver disease. However, the lack of a gold standard method for AI assessment and the limitation of precise thresholds in cirrhotics make difficult the recording of the real prevalence of AI. This review aims to summarize the present data over AI in stable, critically ill cirrhotics and liver transplant recipients. Moreover, it provides information about the current knowledge in the used diagnostic tools and the possible effectiveness of corticosteroids administration in critically ill cirrhotics with AI. PMID:26052400

  6. Renal failure in fulminant hepatic failure and terminal cirrhosis: a comparison between incidence, types, and prognosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ring-Larsen, H; Palazzo, U

    1981-01-01

    Forty patients with terminal cirrhosis and 40 patients with fulminant hepatic failure-all consecutively admitted-were studied with regard to incidence, types, and prognosis of complicating renal insufficiency. Renal failure was considered present when the serum creatinine was greater than 0.20 mmol/l. Of the patients with cirrhosis 26 (65%) developed renal failure. In 15 the type was functional, in three due to acute tubular necrosis, and in eight indeterminable. Of the patients with fulminant hepatic failure 22 (55%) had renal insufficiency; of these 13 had functional renal failure, five acute tubular necrosis, and in four the type was indeterminable. In both categories of patients, renal failure was equally frequent among patients with or without gastrointestinal bleeding and with or without ascites or diuretic therapy. The biochemical tests of liver function were similar in patients with or without renal failure in both categories. The mean renal blood flow in seven unselected patients with fulminant hepatic failure was reduced in the same order as previously observed in patients with cirrhosis. In terminal cirrhosis the mortality rate was 88% in the presence of renal failure, 71% in its absence (p greater than 0.05), while the same figures in fulminant hepatic failure were 100% and 67% (p less than 0.05). The incidence, relative frequency, and prognosis of renal failure were not different in the two conditions, indicating identical pathophysiological circumstances. PMID:7262632

  7. Renal tubular HIF-2α expression requires VHL inactivation and causes fibrosis and cysts.

    PubMed

    Schietke, Ruth E; Hackenbeck, Thomas; Tran, Maxine; Günther, Regina; Klanke, Bernd; Warnecke, Christina L; Knaup, Karl X; Shukla, Deepa; Rosenberger, Christian; Koesters, Robert; Bachmann, Sebastian; Betz, Peter; Schley, Gunnar; Schödel, Johannes; Willam, Carsten; Winkler, Thomas; Amann, Kerstin; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Maxwell, Patrick; Wiesener, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    The Hypoxia-inducible transcription Factor (HIF) represents an important adaptive mechanism under hypoxia, whereas sustained activation may also have deleterious effects. HIF activity is determined by the oxygen regulated α-subunits HIF-1α or HIF-2α. Both are regulated by oxygen dependent degradation, which is controlled by the tumor suppressor "von Hippel-Lindau" (VHL), the gatekeeper of renal tubular growth control. HIF appears to play a particular role for the kidney, where renal EPO production, organ preservation from ischemia-reperfusion injury and renal tumorigenesis are prominent examples. Whereas HIF-1α is inducible in physiological renal mouse, rat and human tubular epithelia, HIF-2α is never detected in these cells, in any species. In contrast, distinct early lesions of biallelic VHL inactivation in kidneys of the hereditary VHL syndrome show strong HIF-2α expression. Furthermore, knockout of VHL in the mouse tubular apparatus enables HIF-2α expression. Continuous transgenic expression of HIF-2α by the Ksp-Cadherin promotor leads to renal fibrosis and insufficiency, next to multiple renal cysts. In conclusion, VHL appears to specifically repress HIF-2α in renal epithelia. Unphysiological expression of HIF-2α in tubular epithelia has deleterious effects. Our data are compatible with dedifferentiation of renal epithelial cells by sustained HIF-2α expression. However, HIF-2α overexpression alone is insufficient to induce tumors. Thus, our data bear implications for renal tumorigenesis, epithelial differentiation and renal repair mechanisms. PMID:22299048

  8. Convergence Insufficiency, Accommodative Insufficiency, Visual Symptoms, and Astigmatism in Tohono O'odham Students

    PubMed Central

    Twelker, J. Daniel; Miller, Joseph M.; Campus, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To determine rate of convergence insufficiency (CI) and accommodative insufficiency (AI) and assess the relation between CI, AI, visual symptoms, and astigmatism in school-age children. Methods. 3rd–8th-grade students completed the Convergence Insufficiency Symptom Survey (CISS) and binocular vision testing with correction if prescribed. Students were categorized by astigmatism magnitude (no/low: <1.00 D, moderate: 1.00 D to <3.00 D, and high: ≥3.00 D), presence/absence of clinical signs of CI and AI, and presence of symptoms. Analyses determine rate of clinical CI and AI and symptomatic CI and AI and assessed the relation between CI, AI, visual symptoms, and astigmatism. Results. In the sample of 484 students (11.67 ± 1.81 years of age), rate of symptomatic CI was 6.2% and symptomatic AI 18.2%. AI was more common in students with CI than without CI. Students with AI only (p = 0.02) and with CI and AI (p = 0.001) had higher symptom scores than students with neither CI nor AI. Moderate and high astigmats were not at increased risk for CI or AI. Conclusions. With-the-rule astigmats are not at increased risk for CI or AI. High comorbidity rates of CI and AI and higher symptoms scores with AI suggest that research is needed to determine symptomatology specific to CI. PMID:27525112

  9. Renal Failure Secondary to Thrombotic Complications of Suprarenal Inferior Vena Cava Filter in Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Magne, Nicolas; Frenay, Marc; Bruneton, Jean-Noel

    2001-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate renal function before and after suprarenal inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placement.Methods: We describe, in a personal series of 13 consecutive cases (all of them stage IV cancer patients, one LGM filter, one Antheor filter, 11 Greenfield filters) in our institution, two cases of fatal renal vein thrombosis after placement of a suprarenal filter. Evaluation of renal function was based on serum urea (in mmol/L; normal 3.30-6.60), serum creatinine (in {mu}mol/L; normal <115.1), and calculation of serum creatinine clearance. Results and conclusion: This study suggests that in advanced-stage cancer patients who have a single functional kidney, renal functional insufficiency, or previous renal vein thrombosis, IVC filter placement above the renal veins may not be appropriate. Suprarenal filter placement should be performed only after analysis of predicted survival, after detailed discussions with the patient, and most importantly after renal function evaluation.

  10. Current Concepts in the Diagnosis and Classification of Renal Dysfunction in Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Mindikoglu, Ayse L.; Weir, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Renal dysfunction is one of the most common complications of cirrhosis with high morbidity and mortality. Summary In subjects with cirrhosis, renal dysfunction can present either as a direct consequence of cirrhosis (e.g. hepatorenal syndrome Type I and Type II) or secondary to etiologies other than cirrhosis (chronic kidney disease due to diabetic nephropathy, prerenal azotemia). Or, patients with cirrhosis may have renal dysfunction resulting directly from cirrhosis; and an underlying chronic kidney disease. Key Messages Given the challenges in the differential diagnosis of renal dysfunction and insufficient accuracy of serum creatinine and creatinine-based glomerular filtration rate estimating equations in cirrhosis, there is an urgent need for more accurate biomarkers of renal dysfunction in this population. This review will discuss novel concepts for the diagnosis and classification of renal dysfunction in cirrhosis to overcome at least some of the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Additionally, a new classification will be proposed for renal dysfunction in cirrhosis. PMID:24107793

  11. Lithium-induced renal disease: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Jorkasky, D K; Amsterdam, J D; Oler, J; Braden, G; Alvis, R; Geheb, M; Cox, M

    1988-12-01

    Considerable controversy exists as to whether lithium maintenance therapy is associated with the development of renal insufficiency. In 1980 we initiated a prospective study of renal function in manic-depressive patients beginning lithium therapy. None of the patients had evidence of pre-existing renal disease. Sixty-five patients were entered, and 51 and 18 patients completed 1 and 3 years of follow-up, respectively. Lithium doses were titrated to the lowest level consistent with control of psychiatric symptoms; there were no episodes of overt lithium intoxication. Serum creatinine levels in all patients, and endogenous creatinine clearance in women, remained stable over the course of the study. In contrast, creatinine clearances (mean +/- SEM, ml/min/1.73 m2) in men significantly decreased over both 1 year (110 +/- 4 to 95 +/- 5, n = 21, p = 0.0126) and 3 years (107 +/- 4 to 80 +/- 11, n = 8, p = 0.0385) of evaluation. Although all patients demonstrated a mild reduction in renal concentrating ability after initiation of lithium, the decrease was not progressive over the course of the study. Quantitative urinary protein excretion did not change, and repeated urinalyses did not reveal any evidence of renal disease. Thus, lithium therapy appears to result in modestly reduced rates of glomerular filtration, as measured by endogenous creatinine clearance, in men receiving lithium maintenance therapy for manic-depressive illness. Whether this reduction is progressive and leads to clinically significant renal insufficiency requires further investigation. PMID:3243040

  12. Inflammatory mediators in mastitis and lactation insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Ingman, Wendy V; Glynn, Danielle J; Hutchinson, Mark R

    2014-07-01

    Mastitis is a common inflammatory disease during lactation that causes reduced milk supply. A growing body of evidence challenges the central role of pathogenic bacteria in mastitis, with disease severity associated with markers of inflammation rather than infection. Inflammation in the mammary gland may be triggered by microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) as well as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) binding to pattern recognition receptors such as the toll-like receptors (TLRs) on the surface of mammary epithelial cells and local immune cell populations. Activation of the TLR4 signalling pathway and downstream nuclear factor kappa B (NFkB) is critical to mediating local mammary gland inflammation and systemic immune responses in mouse models of mastitis. However, activation of NFkB also induces epithelial cell apoptosis and reduced milk protein synthesis, suggesting that inflammatory mediators activated during mastitis promote partial involution. Perturbed milk flow, maternal stress and genetic predisposition are significant risk factors for mastitis, and could lead to a heightened TLR4-mediated inflammatory response, resulting in increased susceptibility and severity of mastitis disease in the context of low MAMP abundance. Therefore, heightened host inflammatory signalling may act in concert with pathogenic or commensal bacterial species to cause both the inflammation associated with mastitis and lactation insufficiency. Here, we present an alternate paradigm to the widely held notion that breast inflammation is driven principally by infectious bacterial pathogens, and suggest there may be other therapeutic strategies, apart from the currently utilised antimicrobial agents, that could be employed to prevent and treat mastitis in women.

  13. Vitamin D insufficiency in internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Haney, E M; Stadler, D; Bliziotes, M M

    2005-01-01

    Medical residents may be vulnerable to low vitamin D status because of long work hours and lack of sun exposure. We conducted a prospective cohort study to measure serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations among internal medicine residents, document seasonal variation in vitamin D status, and assess risk factors for inadequate vitamin D stores. Dietary intake of calcium and vitamin D, lifestyle characteristics, and serum concentrations of 25(OH)-vitamin D and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) were measured in 35 resident volunteers before and after the winter season. A total of 63-69% of medical residents consumed <400 IU/day of vitamin D; 61-67% consumed <1000 mg/day of calcium. Twenty-five (74%) had lower serum 25(OH)-vitamin D concentrations and 23 (68%) had higher serum iPTH in the spring than in the fall. Nine (26%) residents had serum concentrations of 25(OH)-vitamin D of <20 ng/mL in the fall; and sixteen (47%) in the spring. Seven residents (20%) had serum concentrations of 25(OH)-vitamin D of <20 ng/mL at both time-periods; Eighteen residents (51.4%) had 25(OH)-vitamin D levels of <20 ng/mL for at least one of the time-periods. Medical residents are at risk for hypovitaminosis D, particularly during the winter months and should be aware of the need to supplement their vitamin D stores. Insufficient vitamin D status and inadequate vitamin D intake may have long-term implications for bone health in these individuals. Increased educational efforts to promote healthy dietary and lifestyle choices that allow attainment and maintenance of skeletal health are appropriate in this population. PMID:15478001

  14. Renal infarction after aerobics.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, J H; Moinuddin, M; Buchignani, J S; Rockett, J F; Callison, M K

    1984-11-01

    Renal infarction is most frequently due to emboli from the heart or aorta. Other causes include atheromatous disease, renal artery aneurysm, vasculitis, hypotension, hypercoagulable states, aortic dissection, and major trauma. Most renal infarctions are segmental. The extent of disease is dependent upon the size and number of renal vessels involved, coexistent renal disease, and collateral circulation. Flank pain, fever, leukocytosis, hematuria, renal failure, or hypertension may suggest the diagnosis, but these findings are nonspecific and diagnosis will depend not only on history and physical examination, but also on the appropriate imaging tests. The type of treatment is dictated by the etiology of the infarction.

  15. Lanthanum carbonate stimulates bone formation in a rat model of renal insufficiency with low bone turnover.

    PubMed

    Fumoto, Toshio; Ito, Masako; Ikeda, Kyoji

    2014-09-01

    Control of phosphate is important in the management of chronic kidney disease with mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD), for which lanthanum carbonate, a non-calcium phosphate-binding agent, has recently been introduced; however, it remains to be determined whether it has any beneficial or deleterious effect on bone remodeling. In the present study, the effects of lanthanum carbonate were examined in an animal model that mimics low turnover bone disease in CKD, i.e., thyroparathyroidectomized (TPTX) and 5/6 nephrectomized (NX) rats undergoing a constant infusion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and thyroxine injections (TPTX-PTH-5/6NX). Bone histomorphometry at the second lumbar vertebra and tibial metaphysis revealed that both bone formation and resorption were markedly suppressed in the TPTX-PTH-5/6NX model compared with the sham-operated control group, and treatment with lanthanum carbonate was associated with the stimulation of bone formation but not an acceleration of bone resorption. Lanthanum treatment caused a robust stimulation of bone formation with an activation of osteoblasts on the endosteal surface of femoral diaphysis, leading to an increase in cortical bone volume. Thus, lanthanum carbonate has the potential to stimulate bone formation in cases of CKD-MBD with suppressed bone turnover.

  16. Lanthanum carbonate stimulates bone formation in a rat model of renal insufficiency with low bone turnover.

    PubMed

    Fumoto, Toshio; Ito, Masako; Ikeda, Kyoji

    2014-09-01

    Control of phosphate is important in the management of chronic kidney disease with mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD), for which lanthanum carbonate, a non-calcium phosphate-binding agent, has recently been introduced; however, it remains to be determined whether it has any beneficial or deleterious effect on bone remodeling. In the present study, the effects of lanthanum carbonate were examined in an animal model that mimics low turnover bone disease in CKD, i.e., thyroparathyroidectomized (TPTX) and 5/6 nephrectomized (NX) rats undergoing a constant infusion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and thyroxine injections (TPTX-PTH-5/6NX). Bone histomorphometry at the second lumbar vertebra and tibial metaphysis revealed that both bone formation and resorption were markedly suppressed in the TPTX-PTH-5/6NX model compared with the sham-operated control group, and treatment with lanthanum carbonate was associated with the stimulation of bone formation but not an acceleration of bone resorption. Lanthanum treatment caused a robust stimulation of bone formation with an activation of osteoblasts on the endosteal surface of femoral diaphysis, leading to an increase in cortical bone volume. Thus, lanthanum carbonate has the potential to stimulate bone formation in cases of CKD-MBD with suppressed bone turnover. PMID:24126694

  17. Renal vein thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kidneys. Possible Complications Complications may include: Acute renal failure (especially if thrombosis occurs in a dehydrated child) ... Saunders; 2012:chap 34. Read More Acute kidney failure Arteriogram Blood ... embolus Renal Tumor Update Date 5/19/2015 Updated by: ...

  18. Renal papillary necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your provider. Alternative Names Necrosis - renal papillae; Renal medullary necrosis Images Kidney anatomy Kidney - blood and urine flow References Ruggenenti P, Cravedi P, Remuzzi G. Microvascular and macrovascular diseases of the kidney. In: Taal MW, Chertow GM, ...

  19. Renal arteries (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A renal angiogram is a test used to examine the blood vessels of the kidneys. The test is performed ... main vessel of the pelvis, up to the renal artery that leads into the kidney. Contrast medium ...

  20. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... renal function using ureteral stenting, nephrostomy, surgery or dialysis. What is kidney (renal) failure? How is kidney ... as a urinary stent or kidney stone removal. Dialysis , including hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis: These procedures remove ...

  1. Renal erythropoietin-producing cells in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Souma, Tomokazu; Suzuki, Norio; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) is an indispensable erythropoietic hormone primarily produced from renal Epo-producing cells (REPs). Epo production in REPs is tightly regulated in a hypoxia-inducible manner to maintain tissue oxygen homeostasis. Insufficient Epo production by REPs causes renal anemia and anemia associated with chronic disorders. Recent studies have broadened our understanding of REPs from prototypic hypoxia-responsive cells to dynamic fibrogenic cells. In chronic kidney disease, REPs are the major source of scar-forming myofibroblasts and actively produce fibrogenic molecules, including inflammatory cytokines. Notably, myofibroblast-transformed REPs (MF-REPs) recover their original physiological properties after resolution of the disease insults, suggesting that renal anemia and fibrosis could be reversible to some extent. Therefore, understanding the plasticity of REPs will lead to the development of novel targeted therapeutics for both renal fibrosis and anemia. This review summarizes the regulatory mechanisms how hypoxia-inducible Epo gene expression is attained in health and disease conditions. PMID:26089800

  2. [Renal angiomyolipoma: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Arima, K; Kise, H; Yamashita, A; Yanagawa, M; Tochigi, H; Kawamura, J; Horiuchi, E; Sugimura, Y

    1995-09-01

    In 10 years the diagnosis of renal angiomyolipoma (RAML) was made in 14 patients (male-to female ratio 1:3.7) at our institution; 1 case was associated with tuberous sclerosis (TS) and 1 case had regional lymph node involvement. A statistical study was done on data taken from 739 cases of RAML in the Japanese literature, including our cases. The male to female ratio was 1 to 3. Twenty eight percent of the cases were associated with TS. The ratio of bilateral cases to the unilateral one was 1 to 3. The main clinical signs were flank pain, abdominal mass, hematuria and fever elevation. Recently the ratio of nephrectomy has decreased to 30%. The percentage of detecting the fat component by ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging were 88.1%, 86.5% and 80.8% respectively. The percentages of visualizing hypervascularity, aneurysms, absence of arterio-venous shunt and onion peel appearance by selective renal angiography were 77.3%, 71.4%, 48.1% and 4.9% respectively. Small (less than 3 cm), asymptomatic, simple lesions with adipose component may be observed annually by CT and US until more experiences is gained with surveillance of these patients. Embolization was useful for emergency cases or pre-treatment of nephron sparing surgery, but insufficient by itself. As there still remain problems in the diagnosis of RAML, especially in the case of very small tumors, in the case with almost no adipose component and in the case associated with renal cell carcinoma, the diagnosis of RAML should be made synthetically including angiography. PMID:7484542

  3. Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tao; Guo, Jin-he; Teng, Gao-jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a group of metabolic diseases of multiple etiologies. Although great progress has been made, researchers are still working on the pathogenesis of T2DM and how to best use the treatments available. Aside from several novel pharmacological approaches, catheter-based sympathetic renal denervation (RDN) has gained a significant role in resistant hypertension, as well as improvements in glycemic control in T2DM. In this article, we will summarize herein the role sympathetic activation plays in the progression of T2DM and review the recent clinical RDN experience in glucose metabolism. We performed systematic review in online databases, including PubMed, EmBase, and Web of Science, from inception until 2015. Studies were included if a statistical relationship was investigated between RDN and T2DM. The quality of each included study was assessed by Newcastle–Ottawa scale score. To synthesize these studies, a random-effects model or a fixed-effects model was applied as appropriate. Then, we calculated heterogeneity, performed sensitivity analysis, tested publication bias, and did meta-regression analysis. Finally, we identified 4 eligible articles. In most studies, RDN achieved via novel catheter-based approach using radiofrequency energy has gained a significant role in resistant hypertension, as well as improvements in glycemic control in T2DM. But the DREAMS-Study showed that RDN did not change median insulin sensitivity nor systemic sympathetic activity. Firstly, the current published studies lacked a proper control group, along with the sample capacity was small. Also, data obtained in the subgroups of diabetic patients were not separately analyzed and the follow-up period was very short. In addition, a reduction in blood pressure accounts for the improvements in glucose metabolism and insulin resistance cannot be excluded. If the favorable result of better glucose metabolism is confirmed in large-scale, randomized studies

  4. Cardio-renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gnanaraj, Joseph; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Cardio-renal syndrome is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. The purpose of this article is to highlight the interaction between the cardiovascular system and the renal system and how their interaction results in the complex syndrome of cardio-renal dysfunction. Additionally, we outline the available therapeutic strategies to manage this complex syndrome. PMID:27635229

  5. Cardio-renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gnanaraj, Joseph; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Cardio-renal syndrome is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. The purpose of this article is to highlight the interaction between the cardiovascular system and the renal system and how their interaction results in the complex syndrome of cardio-renal dysfunction. Additionally, we outline the available therapeutic strategies to manage this complex syndrome.

  6. [Idiopathic renal arteriovenous fistula].

    PubMed

    Bennani, S; Ait Bolbarod, A; el Mrini, M; Kadiri, R; Benjelloun, S

    1996-06-01

    The authors report a case of idiopathic renal arteriovenous fistula. The diagnosis was established angiographically in a 24 year old man presenting gross hematuria. Embolization of the fistula was performed. Efficiency of this treatment was appreciated clinically and by duplex renal ultrasonography. The characteristics of renal arteriovenous fistulas are reviewed. PMID:8763700

  7. [THERAPY OF TRANSIENT LACTASE INSUFFICIENCY OF CHILDREN IN PECTORAL AGE].

    PubMed

    Marushko, Yu V; Iovitsa, T V

    2015-01-01

    Thus, we have discovered that the children of the first half-year of life have different degrees of severity of transient lactase insufficiency basing on the results of hydrogen respiratory test. It was set that the starting dose of enzyme lactase must depend on the degree of severity of displays of transient lactase insufficiency, taking into account the indexes of hydrogen respiratory test.

  8. Generating Multiple Answers for a Word Problem with Insufficient Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinda, Shigehiro

    2012-01-01

    In mathematics learning, word problems always include sufficient information; however, in everyday situations, people sometimes encounter problems with insufficient information. Previous studies suggest that people cannot successfully handle word problems with insufficient information because they believe a word problem has only one answer and…

  9. 26 CFR 7.465-4 - Insufficient records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insufficient records. 7.465-4 Section 7.465-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF 1976 § 7.465-4 Insufficient records....

  10. 21 CFR 316.36 - Insufficient quantities of orphan drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insufficient quantities of orphan drugs. 316.36... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ORPHAN DRUGS Orphan-drug Exclusive Approval § 316.36 Insufficient quantities of orphan drugs. (a) Under section 527 of the act, whenever the Director has reason to believe...

  11. Renal infarction resulting from traumatic renal artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sik; Kim, Won; Jin, Gong Yong; Na, Ki Ryang; Yun, Il Yong; Park, Sung Kwang

    2008-06-01

    Renal artery dissection may be caused by iatrogenic injury, trauma, underlying arterial diseases such as fibromuscular disease, atherosclerotic disease, or connective tissue disease. Radiological imaging may be helpful in detecting renal artery pathology, such as renal artery dissection. For patients with acute, isolated renal artery dissection, surgical treatment, endovascular management, or medical treatment have been considered effective measures to preserve renal function. We report a case of renal infarction that came about as a consequence of renal artery dissection.

  12. Postpartum renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Rubens, D; Sterns, R H; Segal, A J

    1985-01-01

    Renal vein thrombosis in adults is usually a complication of the nephrotic syndrome. Rarely, it has been reported in nonnephrotic women postpartum. The thrombosis may be a complication of the hypercoagulable state associated with both the nephrotic syndrome and pregnancy. Two postpartum patients with renal vein thrombosis and no prior history of renal disease are reported here. Neither patient had heavy proteinuria. In both cases, pyelonephritis was suspected clinically and the diagnosis of renal vein thrombosis was first suggested and confirmed by radiologic examination. Renal vein thrombosis should be considered in women presenting postpartum with flank pain.

  13. Renal artery stenosis presenting as crescendo angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Tami, L F; McElderry, M W; al-Adli, N M; Rubin, M; Condos, W R

    1995-07-01

    The coexistence of different clinical syndromes due to atherosclerosis in different organs is not rare and emphasizes the diffuse nature of this vascular process. Although renovascular disease may cause hypertension and/or renal insufficiency, it may also occur in the absence of the usual clinical markers that suggest renovascular hypertension. We report a patient with stable coronary anatomy who presented with crescendo angina pectoris. Diagnosis of renovascular hypertension was made by screening renal angiography at the time of the cardiac catheterization. Renal artery stenting resulted in stabilization of the coronary syndrome and obviated the need for further coronary intervention. To our knowledge, this is the first case of renovascular hypertension precipitating an unstable coronary syndrome in a patient with documented stable coronary anatomy. Review of the literature supports that patients undergoing cardiac catheterization are a high risk population for renovascular disease, particularly in the presence of other predictive factors such as documented coronary artery disease, older age, female gender, congestive heart failure, peripheral vascular disease, renal insufficiency, and smoking. Firm recommendations for routine screening renal angiography in patients undergoing peripheral or coronary angiography will need further studies.

  14. Renal Structure in Normoalbuminuric and Albuminuric Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Impaired Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Ekinci, Elif I.; Jerums, George; Skene, Alison; Crammer, Paul; Power, David; Cheong, Karey Y.; Panagiotopoulos, Sianna; McNeil, Karen; Baker, Scott T.; Fioretto, Paola; MacIsaac, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The structural basis of normoalbuminuric renal insufficiency in patients with type 2 diabetes remains to be elucidated. We compared renal biopsy findings in patients with type 2 diabetes and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and measured GFR of <60 mL/min/1.73 m2, associated with either normo-, micro-, or macroalbuminuria. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In patients with normo- (n = 8) or microalbuminuria (n = 6), renal biopsies were performed according to a research protocol. In patients with macroalbuminuria (n = 17), biopsies were performed according to clinical indication. Findings were categorized according to the Fioretto classification: category 1 (C1), normal/near normal; category 2 (C2), typical diabetic nephropathy (DN) with predominantly glomerular changes; and category 3 (C3), atypical with disproportionately severe interstitial/tubular/vascular damage and with no/mild diabetic glomerular changes. RESULTS In our study population (mean eGFR 35 mL/min/1.73 m2), typical glomerular changes (C2) of DN were observed in 22 of 23 subjects with micro- or macroalbuminuria compared with 3 of 8 subjects with normoalbuminuria (P = 0.002). By contrast, predominantly interstitial or vascular changes (C3) were seen in only 1 of 23 subjects with micro- or macroalbuminuria compared with 3 of 8 normoalbuminuric subjects (P = 0.08). Mesangial area increased progressively from normal controls to patients with type 2 diabetes and normo-, micro-, and macroalbuminuria. Varying degrees of arteriosclerosis, although not necessarily the predominant pattern, were seen in seven of eight subjects with normoalbuminuria. CONCLUSIONS Typical renal structural changes of DN were observed in patients with type 2 diabetes and elevated albuminuria. By contrast, in normoalbuminuric renal insufficiency, these changes were seen less frequently, likely reflecting greater contributions from aging, hypertension, and arteriosclerosis. PMID:23835690

  15. Tuberous sclerosis complex with end-stage renal failure.

    PubMed

    Neumann, H P; Brüggen, V; Berger, D P; Herbst, E; Blum, U; Morgenroth, A; Schollmeyer, P; Wetterauer, U

    1995-01-01

    Renal angiomyolipoma is common in the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), the classic features of which are facial angiofibroma, seizures, and mental retardation. We report a family with three affected members demonstrating the wide spectrum of TSC-associated lesions ranging from asymptomatic findings to life-threatening complications. The predominant symptoms of the index patient were hypertension and mild renal insufficiency at age 48, resulting in end-stage renal failure at age 63 due to giant bilateral angiomyolipoma of the kidneys. The two TSC-affected siblings had died years previously, one from pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis and the other during an epileptic state; the latter had situs inversus totalis as another remarkable finding. The diagnosis of TSC may be overlooked if CNS symptoms are absent and if cutaneous lesions are masked by cosmetic procedures, as occurred in the index case. Chronic renal failure due to angiomyolipoma is not widely known to clinical nephrologists, but develops in approximately 15% of TSC patients. Displacement of functional renal parenchyma by abnormal tissue appears to be the major pathogenetic mechanism leading to end-stage renal failure. Angiomyolipomas can be diagnosed from this characteristic sonographic pattern and the demonstration of fatty tissue in CT or MRI. Multiple renal cysts are also common in TSC. Therefore TSC should be considered in the differential diagnosis of polycystic kidney disease.

  16. Renal involvement in the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS)-APS nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tektonidou, Maria G

    2009-06-01

    Although the kidney represents a major target organ in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), renal involvement in APS was poorly recognized until recently. The most well-recognized renal manifestations of APS are the renal artery thrombosis/stenosis, renal infarction, hypertension, renal vein thrombosis, end-stage renal disease, increased allograft vascular thrombosis, some types of glomerular disease, and a small-vessel vaso-occlusive nephropathy, recently defined as APS nephropathy. APS nephropathy was first described in primary APS patients, characterized by acute thrombotic lesions in glomeruli and/or arterioles (thrombotic microangiopathy) and chronic vascular lesions such as fibrous intimal hyperplasia of arterioles and interlobular arteries, organized thrombi with or without recanalization, and fibrous arterial and arteriolar occlusions or focal cortical atrophy. APS nephropathy was also detected in further studies including patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-related APS and SLE/non-APS patients with positive antiphospholipid antibodies, independently of lupus nephritis. The same histologic lesions, especially thrombotic mictroangiopathy, were also observed in patients with catastrophic APS. The most frequent clinical and laboratory characteristics of APS nephropathy in all the above groups of patients are hypertension (often severe), proteinuria (ranging from mild to nephrotic range), hematuria, and acute or chronic renal insufficiency.

  17. [Acute renal failure in patients with tumour lysis sindrome].

    PubMed

    Poskurica, Mileta; Petrović, Dejan; Poskurica, Mina

    2016-01-01

    `Hematologic malignancies (leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, et al.), as well as solid tumours (renal, liver, lung, ovarian, etc.), can lead to acute or chronic renal failure.The most common clinical manifestation is acute renal failure within the tumour lysis syndrome (TLS). It is characterized by specific laboratory and clinical criteria in order to prove that kidney disorders result from cytolysis of tumour cells after chemotherapy regimen given, although on significantly fewer occasions it is likely to occur spontaneously or after radiotherapy. Essentially, failure is the disorder of functionally conserved kidney or of kidney with varying degrees of renal insufficiency, which render the kidney impaired and unable to effectively eliminate the end products of massive cytolysis and to correct the resulting disorders: hyperuricemia, hyperkalemia, hypocalcaemia, hyperphosphatemia, and others. The risk of TLS depends on tumour size, proliferative potential of malignant cells, renal function and the presence of accompanying diseases and disorders. Hydration providing adequate diuresis and administration of urinary suppressants (allopurinol, febuxostat) significantly reduce the risk of developing TLS. If prevention of renal impairment isn't possible, the treatment should be supplemented with hemodynamic monitoring and pharmacological support, with the possible application of recombinant urate-oxidase enzyme (rasburicase). Depending on the severity of azotemia and hydroelectrolytic disorders, application of some of the methods of renal replacement therapy may be considered. PMID:27483573

  18. VITAMIN D: ROLES IN RENAL AND CARDIOVASCULAR PROTECTION

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan Chun

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Great progress has been made in recent years in understanding the expanding roles of the vitamin D endocrine system beyond calcemic regulation, including pathophysiological actions in the kidney and the cardiovascular system. The purpose of this review is to update the recent advance regarding the effects of vitamin D and its analogs on the renal and cardiovascular system. Recent findings Vitamin D-deficiency is not only widely associated with chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease in humans, but may also accelerate the disease progression. Dysregulation of vitamin D metabolism caused by renal insufficiency contributes to the low vitamin D status. Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated impressive therapeutic outcome with low-calcemic vitamin D analogs in renal and cardiovascular disease. The mechanism underlying the renal and cardiovascular protection involves regulation of multiple signaling pathways by vitamin D including NF-κB, Wnt/β-catenin and the renin-angiotensin system. Summary The renal and cardiovascular protective activity of vitamin D revealed in recent studies has profound clinical implications. Nutritional correction of vitamin D-deficiency and treatment with vitamin D analogs could be therapeutic options for renal and cardiovascular problems. New vitamin D analogs with better renal and cardiovascular therapeutic efficacy are highly desired. More randomized trials are needed to address these issues. PMID:22143249

  19. Rare presentations of cytomegalovirus infection in renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Ardalan, Mohammadreza

    2012-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus is the most common viral infection after kidney transplantation. Clinical presentations of cytomegalovirus infection range from asymptomatic infection to organ-specific involvement. Most symptomatic infections manifest as fever and cytopenia. The gastrointestinal tract is the most common site of tissue-invasive infection, often presenting as diarrhea or gastrointestinal bleeding. Gastrointestinal obstruction, perforation, thrombosis of large gastrointestinal veins, splenic artery thrombosis, and pancreatitis are rare gastrointestinal presentations of cytomegalovirus infection. Renal-allograft ureteral stricture and skin involvement are other rare presentations of cytomegalovirus infection. hemophagocytic syndrome, thrombotic microangiopathy, adrenal insufficiency, and renal allograft artery stenosis are other rare symptoms of cytomegalovirus infection.

  20. [Polyarteritis nodosa with renal agenesis and immunosuppressive treatment].

    PubMed

    Alcocer, J; Fraga, A; Gudiño, J; Lavalle, C

    1976-01-01

    A case of a 44 years old man with the unique combination of polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) and the congenital absence of a kidney is presented. The clinical picture consisted of fever, general symptoms, hypertermia, peripheric neuropathy, subcutaneous nodules and renal damage. Laboratory findings included increased WBC, telescoped urinary sediment, renal insufficiency, positive rheumatoid factor, policlonal gammopathy and positive Australia antigen. A review of the pertinent literature and the etiopathogenic role of Australia antigen in PAN is discussed. Efficacy of immunosuppressive therapy was evident in this case. PMID:13359

  1. Acute kidney injury in the perioperative period and in intensive care units (excluding renal replacement therapies).

    PubMed

    Ichai, Carole; Vinsonneau, Christophe; Souweine, Bertrand; Armando, Fabien; Canet, Emmanuel; Clec'h, Christophe; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Darmon, Michaël; Duranteau, Jacques; Gaillot, Théophille; Garnier, Arnaud; Jacob, Laurent; Joannes-Boyau, Olivier; Juillard, Laurent; Journois, Didier; Lautrette, Alexandre; Muller, Laurent; Legrand, Matthieu; Lerolle, Nicolas; Rimmelé, Thomas; Rondeau, Eric; Tamion, Fabienne; Walrave, Yannick; Velly, Lionel

    2016-12-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a syndrome that has progressed a great deal over the last 20 years. The decrease in urine output and the increase in classical renal biomarkers, such as blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine, have largely been used as surrogate markers for decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR), which defines AKI. However, using such markers of GFR as criteria for diagnosing AKI has several limits including the difficult diagnosis of non-organic AKI, also called "functional renal insufficiency" or "pre-renal insufficiency". This situation is characterized by an oliguria and an increase in creatininemia as a consequence of a reduction in renal blood flow related to systemic haemodynamic abnormalities. In this situation, "renal insufficiency" seems rather inappropriate as kidney function is not impaired. On the contrary, the kidney delivers an appropriate response aiming to recover optimal systemic physiological haemodynamic conditions. Considering the kidney as insufficient is erroneous because this suggests that it does not work correctly, whereas the opposite is occurring, because the kidney is healthy even in a threatening situation. With current definitions of AKI, normalization of volaemia is needed before defining AKI in order to avoid this pitfall. PMID:27230984

  2. Acute kidney injury in the perioperative period and in intensive care units (excluding renal replacement therapies).

    PubMed

    Ichai, Carole; Vinsonneau, Christophe; Souweine, Bertrand; Armando, Fabien; Canet, Emmanuel; Clec'h, Christophe; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Darmon, Michaël; Duranteau, Jacques; Gaillot, Théophille; Garnier, Arnaud; Jacob, Laurent; Joannes-Boyau, Olivier; Juillard, Laurent; Journois, Didier; Lautrette, Alexandre; Muller, Laurent; Legrand, Matthieu; Lerolle, Nicolas; Rimmelé, Thomas; Rondeau, Eric; Tamion, Fabienne; Walrave, Yannick; Velly, Lionel

    2016-12-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a syndrome that has progressed a great deal over the last 20 years. The decrease in urine output and the increase in classical renal biomarkers, such as blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine, have largely been used as surrogate markers for decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR), which defines AKI. However, using such markers of GFR as criteria for diagnosing AKI has several limits including the difficult diagnosis of non-organic AKI, also called "functional renal insufficiency" or "pre-renal insufficiency". This situation is characterized by an oliguria and an increase in creatininemia as a consequence of a reduction in renal blood flow related to systemic haemodynamic abnormalities. In this situation, "renal insufficiency" seems rather inappropriate as kidney function is not impaired. On the contrary, the kidney delivers an appropriate response aiming to recover optimal systemic physiological haemodynamic conditions. Considering the kidney as insufficient is erroneous because this suggests that it does not work correctly, whereas the opposite is occurring, because the kidney is healthy even in a threatening situation. With current definitions of AKI, normalization of volaemia is needed before defining AKI in order to avoid this pitfall.

  3. Recurrent renal giant leiomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Öziş, Salih Erpulat; Gülpınar, Kamil; Şahlı, Zafer; Konak, Baha Burak; Keskin, Mete; Özdemir, Süleyman; Ataoğlu, Ömür

    2016-01-01

    Primary renal leiomyosarcomas are rare, aggressive tumors. They constitute 1-2% of adult malignant renal tumors. Although leiomyosarcomas are the most common histological type (50-60%) of renal sarcomas, information on renal leiomyosarcoma is limited. Local or systemic recurrences are common. The radiological appearance of renal leiomyosarcomas is not specific, therefore renal leiomyosarcoma cannot be distinguished from renal cell carcinoma by imaging methods in all patients. A 74-year-old female patient presented to our clinic complaining of a palpable mass on the right side of her abdomen in November 2012. The abdominal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass, 25 × 24 × 23 cm in size. Her past medical history revealed that she has undergone right radical nephrectomy in 2007, due to a 11 × 12 × 13 cm renal mass that was then reported as renal cell carcinoma on abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, but the pathological diagnosis was low-grade renal leiomyosarcoma. The most recent follow-up of the patient was in 2011, with no signs of local recurrence or distant metastases within this four-year period. The patient underwent laparotomy on November 2012, and a 35 cm retroperitoneal mass was excised. The pathological examination of the mass was reported as high-grade leiomyosarcoma. The formation of this giant retroperitoneal mass in 1 year can be explained by the transformation of the lesion's pathology from low-grade to a high-grade tumor. PMID:27436926

  4. [Vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency:its clinical significance and treatment].

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Ryo

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency, a medical condition in which vitamin D store is decreased, is the most frequent cause of decreased action of vitamin D. Severer form vitamin D deficiency can cause hypocalcemia and rickets/osteomalacia. Milder form vitamin D insufficiency also harms bone health via secondary hyperparathyroidism, the increase in fracture risk, and poor responses to anti-osteoporotic medications. Diagnosis can only be made by measuring serum 25(OH)D, which is not currently covered by the Japanese health insurance policy. In Japan, the guideline for the diagnosis vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency is in the process of drafting. According to the current provisional guideline draft that was made in public, vitamin D deficiency would be defined by serum 25(OH)D level less than 20 ng/mL whereas vitamin D insufficiency would refer to the state in which serum 25(OH)D level is between 20 and 30 ng/mL.

  5. Digitalis pharmacokinetics and therapy with respect to impaired renal function.

    PubMed

    Kramer, P

    1977-01-01

    The various cardiac glycosides differ significantly in their retention as a result of renal failure. In the case of digoxin, digitoxin, and strophanthin the retention is directly related to the normal renal clearance of these cardiac glycosides: Strophanthin has the highest clearance and the most marked prolongation of pharmacological action in renal failure, whereas digitoxin shows the lowest renal clearance and even in uremic patients a total elimination comparable to normal subjects as a result of increased hepatic clearance; digoxin takes an intermediate position. The quantity of a cardiac glycoside and its metabolites excreted by the kidneys depends, besides the renal clearance, on the plasma concentration which increases considerably during the first days after onset of treatment. From the daily dose approximately 90% of strophanthin, 70% of digoxin, 50% of digitoxin plus metabolites are excreted by normal kidneys under steady-state conditions. The efficiency of hemodialysis in the elimination of cardiac glycosides is low (3-5%) if estimated in relation to a single dose injected before dialysis and high (30-50%) if estimated in relation to the excretory capacity of normal kidneys during a period corresponding to the duration of a dialysis. During hemodialysis the plasma concentration of digoxin decreases as rapidly as in patients with normal renal function. Beside the efficiency of dialysis this finding may be explained by the decrease in the apparent volume of distribution of cardiac glycosides in patients with advanced renal failure; a reduced tissue protein binding seems likely to be the main reason for these changes in chronic renal insufficiency. A reduced volume of distribution and a reduced myocardial sensitivity are the main reasons for a very low predictability of the necessary individual maintenance dose of cardiac glycosides from the creatinine clearance. In patients with advanced renal insufficiency the tolerance to cardiac glycosides is reduced

  6. Digitalis pharmacokinetics and therapy with respect to impaired renal function.

    PubMed

    Kramer, P

    1977-01-01

    The various cardiac glycosides differ significantly in their retention as a result of renal failure. In the case of digoxin, digitoxin, and strophanthin the retention is directly related to the normal renal clearance of these cardiac glycosides: Strophanthin has the highest clearance and the most marked prolongation of pharmacological action in renal failure, whereas digitoxin shows the lowest renal clearance and even in uremic patients a total elimination comparable to normal subjects as a result of increased hepatic clearance; digoxin takes an intermediate position. The quantity of a cardiac glycoside and its metabolites excreted by the kidneys depends, besides the renal clearance, on the plasma concentration which increases considerably during the first days after onset of treatment. From the daily dose approximately 90% of strophanthin, 70% of digoxin, 50% of digitoxin plus metabolites are excreted by normal kidneys under steady-state conditions. The efficiency of hemodialysis in the elimination of cardiac glycosides is low (3-5%) if estimated in relation to a single dose injected before dialysis and high (30-50%) if estimated in relation to the excretory capacity of normal kidneys during a period corresponding to the duration of a dialysis. During hemodialysis the plasma concentration of digoxin decreases as rapidly as in patients with normal renal function. Beside the efficiency of dialysis this finding may be explained by the decrease in the apparent volume of distribution of cardiac glycosides in patients with advanced renal failure; a reduced tissue protein binding seems likely to be the main reason for these changes in chronic renal insufficiency. A reduced volume of distribution and a reduced myocardial sensitivity are the main reasons for a very low predictability of the necessary individual maintenance dose of cardiac glycosides from the creatinine clearance. In patients with advanced renal insufficiency the tolerance to cardiac glycosides is reduced

  7. [THERAPY OF TRANSIENT LACTASE INSUFFICIENCY OF CHILDREN IN PECTORAL AGE].

    PubMed

    Marushko, Yu V; Iovitsa, T V

    2015-01-01

    Thus, we have discovered that the children of the first half-year of life have different degrees of severity of transient lactase insufficiency basing on the results of hydrogen respiratory test. It was set that the starting dose of enzyme lactase must depend on the degree of severity of displays of transient lactase insufficiency, taking into account the indexes of hydrogen respiratory test. PMID:26118050

  8. THE PRODUCTION OF PARTIAL LIVER INSUFFICIENCY IN RABBITS.

    PubMed

    McMaster, P D; Drury, D R

    1929-04-30

    A rapid and simple method for the production of marked liver insufficiency in rabbits has been described. The necessary operation can be carried out by an unassisted operator in a few minutes. The method should further the study of liver physiology. The changes as concerns blood sugar, urea formation, and uric acid metabolism would appear to be the same in the rabbit suffering from hepatic insufficiency as in the dog.

  9. Late diagnosis of chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Sesso, R; Belasco, A G; Ajzen, H

    1996-11-01

    A comparison was made between patients with a late diagnosis of chronic renal failure (1 month or less before starting dialysis, N = 96) and those with an early diagnosis (6 months or more, N = 45) in terms of the following aspects: referral characteristics during the pre-dialysis phase, demographic details and patient biochemistry prior to maintenance dialysis. Information was obtained by surveying consecutive patients with primary renal disease admitted to a university dialysis unit in São Paulo. Fifty-three percent of all patients surveyed had a late diagnosis. These patients had a lower median duration of symptoms (2 vs 6 months, P < 0.01) and were less likely to be referred for dialysis by a nephrologist (9% vs 51%, P < 0.001) than early diagnosis patients. In the early diagnosis group, 7 patients (16%) had follow-up care for less than 6 months and 11 (24%) did not receive any follow-up; 21 patients (47%) did not follow a low-protein diet. At the start of dialysis, patients with a late diagnosis had higher blood pressure and a higher rate of pulmonary infections (19% vs 4%, P = 0.03). Mean concentrations of BUN, serum creatinine and potassium were significantly higher and mean blood hematocrit was lower for the late diagnosis group. After 3 months of dialysis, the mortality rate was higher in the late than in the early diagnosis group (22.9% vs 6.7%, P = 0.02). Late diagnosis of chronic renal failure and lack of adequate follow-up care, prior to the start of dialysis, are common. Interventions to promote early diagnosis of chronic renal failure and to improve compliance with regular nephrological follow-up can be important to reduce the morbidity and the mortality of patients with chronic renal insufficiency. PMID:9196548

  10. [Rupture of simple renal cyst after minimal renal injury].

    PubMed

    Fernández Férnandez, A; Mayayo Dehesa, T; Rodríguez Luna, J M; Platas Sancho, A; Gómez Aguinaga, M A; Castaño Llaneza, C; Berenguer Sánchez, A

    1989-01-01

    A case is presented of minimum renal trauma, leading to a retroperitoneal hematoma as a consequence of a simple renal cyst rupture as well as an artery contained therein. The etiopathogenicity of this phenomenon is commented. The different clinical manifestations of renal trauma are highlighted, as well as the suspicion of previous renal pathology when a large renal lesion is found secondary to minimum renal trauma. The approach of the renal pediculum must be the first step in the surgical treatment of renal trauma.

  11. Renal pelvis or ureter cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Transitional cell cancer of the renal pelvis or ureter; Kidney cancer - renal pelvis; Ureter cancer ... Cancer can grow in the urine collection system, but it is uncommon. Renal pelvis and ureter cancers ...

  12. Atherosclerotic ischemic renal disease. Diagnosis and prevalence in an hypertensive and/or uremic elderly population

    PubMed Central

    Coen, Giorgio; Calabria, Santo; Lai, Silvia; Moscaritolo, Eleonora; Nofroni, Italo; Ronga, Giuseppe; Rossi, Michele; Ventroni, Guido; Sardella, Daniela; Ferrannini, Michele; Zaccaria, Alvaro; Cianci, Rosario

    2003-01-01

    Background Atherosclerotic ischemic renal disease is a frequent cause of end-stage renal failure leading to dialysis among the elderly; Its prevalence is inferred from autopsy or retrospective arteriographic studies. This study has been conducted on 269 subjects over 50 with hypertension and/or CRF, unrelated to other known causes of renal disease. Methods All 269 patients were studied either by color-flow duplex sonography (n = 238) or by renal scintigraphy (n = 224), and 199 of the 269 patients were evaluated using both of these techniques. 40 patients, found to have renal artery stenosis (RAS), were subjected to 3D-contrast enhancement Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) and/or Selective Angiography (SA). An additional 23 cases, negative both to scintigraphy and to ultrasound study, underwent renal angiography (MRA and/or SA). Results Color-duplex sonography, carried out in 238 patients, revealed 49 cases of RAS. MR or SA was carried out in 35 of these 49 patients, and confirmed the diagnosis in 33. Color-duplex sonography showed a PPV value of 94.3% and NPV of 87.0% while renal scintigraphy, carried out in 224 patients, had a PPV of 72.2% and a NPV of 29.4%. Patients with RAS showed a higher degree of renal insufficiency compared to non stenotic patients while there were no differences in proteinuria. RAS, based on color-duplex sonography studies, was present in 11% of patients in the age group 50–59, 18% in the 60–69 and 23% at age 70 and above. Conclusions A relatively large percentage of the elderly population with renal insufficiency and/or hypertension is affected by RAS and is at risk of developing end-stage renal failure. Color-duplex ultrasonography is a valid routine method of investigation of population at risk for renal artery stenosis. PMID:12622875

  13. Renal structure and hypertension in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gabow, P A; Chapman, A B; Johnson, A M; Tangel, D J; Duley, I T; Kaehny, W D; Manco-Johnson, M; Schrier, R W

    1990-12-01

    Hypertension has been reported to occur in 50 to 75 percent of subjects with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) prior to the onset of marked renal insufficiency but concurrent with cystic deformation of the renal parenchyma. The present study was undertaken to examine whether the renal structural abnormalities are greater in hypertensive (HBP) versus normotensive (NBP) male and female patients with ADPKD who were matched within gender groups for age, body surface area, serum creatinine concentration (males HBP 1.2 +/- 0.02 vs. NBP 1.1 +/- 0.03 mg/dl. NS: females HBP 0.9 +/- 0.03 vs. NBP 0.9 +/- 0.02 mg/dl, NS) and creatinine clearance (males HBP 100 +/- 3 vs. NBP 108 +/- 3 ml/min/1.73 m2, NS: females HBP 97 +/- 3 vs. NBP 96 +/- 2 ml/min/1.73 m2, NS). Renal volume was significantly greater in the HBP compared to the NBP group (males HBP 624 +/- 47 vs. NBP 390 +/- 43 cm3, P less than 0.0005; females HBP 446 +/- 32 vs. NBP 338 +/- 24 cm3, P less than 0.002). Since increased renal volume is due to increased cysts, the results indicate that the early high incidence of hypertension in ADPKD correlates with the renal structural abnormalities in this disorder.

  14. The lack of a functional p21(WAF1/CIP1) gene ameliorates progression to chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Megyesi, J; Price, P M; Tamayo, E; Safirstein, R L

    1999-09-14

    Partial renal ablation leads to progressive renal insufficiency and is a model of chronic renal failure from diverse causes. We find that mice develop functional and morphologic characteristics of chronic renal failure after partial renal ablation, including glomerular sclerosis, systemic hypertension, and reduced glomerular filtration. However, we now report that littermates with a homozygous deletion of the gene for the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21(WAF1/CIP1), do not develop chronic renal failure after ablation. The markedly different reactions of the p21(+/+) and p21(-/-) animals was not because of differences in glomerular number or degree of renal growth but rather because of the presence or absence of a normal p21 gene. Although the reaction to the stress of renal ablation is both hyperplastic and hypertrophic in the presence of a functional p21 gene, it would appear that the absence of the p21 gene may induce a more hyperplastic reaction because proliferating-cell nuclear antigen expression, a marker of cell-cycle progression, in the renal epithelium of the remnant kidney was more than five times greater in the p21(-/-) mice than in the p21(+/+) animals. Because p21 is a potent inhibitor of the cell cycle, we speculate that p21 regulates the balance between hyperplasia and hypertrophy after renal ablation. We propose that this change in response inhibits the development of chronic renal failure. These studies suggest that controlling p21 function may ameliorate or even prevent progressive end-stage renal disease.

  15. NSAID nephrotoxicity revisited: acute renal failure due to parenteral ketorolac.

    PubMed

    Perazella, M A; Buller, G K

    1993-12-01

    The success of ketorolac as a nonnarcotic analgesic is likely to propagate its widespread use to control moderate to severe postoperative pain. Indeed, of the patients treated with ketorolac and described in the medical literature, nearly 90% had had a major surgical procedure. Since any such procedure may be associated with significant third-spacing of the fluid and result in renal hypoperfusion, care must be taken in administering ketorolac. Close attention to urine output and parameters of renal function must be maintained. Moreover, postoperative ketorolac therapy should be avoided in patients who have conditions that predispose to NSAID nephrotoxicity (as in our Case 1). Likewise, in nonsurgical patients the same degree of caution should be used with ketorolac as with any oral NSAID. Finally, since ketorolac is excreted almost entirely by the kidney, either elderly patients or patients with underlying renal insufficiency must have an adjustment of the dosing interval, or this medication should be avoided in such patients altogether.

  16. Bilateral renal lymphoangiomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Raed, Alqahtani; Sultan, Alkhateeb; Bader, Al-Mutairi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Renal lymphangiomatosis is a rare congenital benign disease of renal lymphatic system, here we are presenting a very rare form of disease which is bilateral form. Presentation of the case A young adult presented to our clinic after being referred from primary care clinic with intermittent bilateral flank pain and no other symptoms after extensive radiological investigations diagnosis has been made and confirmed by radiological finding of disease. Active treatment usually preserved for complex cases and for the complications of the disease but in our patient as needed analgesia worked well in controlling his intermittent pain and his wish not to pursue any intervention. The vague presentation with initial imaging rising suspicion of renal tumor or complex renal cyst might cause psychological street on the patient, which our patient had, but reassurance after extensive radiological work up relive that's stress. Discussion Although it is very rare disease to be bilateral but wide variety of other differential diagnoses make importance of disease recognition and accurate diagnosis is the key. Conclusion Renal lymphangiomatosis is a rare benign disease of renal lymphatic, which usually affect one side, but bilateral form is very rare form, which may raise the suspicions of genetic form of renal malignancy. Accurate diagnosis requires work up to role out malignant and other renal tumor, which require active surgical management. PMID:26719997

  17. Sacral insufficiency fractures: a case of mistaken identity

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Mathew J; Tucker, Laura J

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sacral insufficiency fractures are an important cause of lower back pain in the elderly. Clinically and radiologically, they must be distinguished from osseous metastases, which frequently coexist. To date, no case report has comprehensively explored the full range of diagnostic hurdles and potential pitfalls. Case presentation We report the case of a 70-year-old Caucasian female who presented to our services with a short history of progressive back pain without any history of trauma. A prior history of breast cancer was noted. Bone scintigraphy was initially reported as consistent with metastatic sacral deposits. Further characterization with magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography revealed bilateral insufficiency fractures of the sacral alar. The patient responded well to conservative management. Conclusion To avoid misdiagnosis, particularly in those who are also at risk of osseous metastases, sacral insufficiency fractures must always be considered as a cause of lower back pain. PMID:24940083

  18. Severe Psychotic Disorder as the Main Manifestation of Adrenal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Farah, Julia de Lima; Lauand, Carolina Villar; Chequi, Lucas; Fortunato, Enrico; Pasqualino, Felipe; Bignotto, Luis Henrique; Batista, Rafael Loch; Aprahamian, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of severe psychotic disorder as the only manifestation of primary adrenal insufficiency. A 63-year-old man presented with psychotic symptoms without any prior psychiatric history. During the clinical and laboratorial investigation, exams revealed a normovolemic hyponatremia. The patient showed no other clinical signs or symptoms compatible with adrenal insufficiency but displayed very high ACTH and low serum cortisol concentrations. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed no significant changes, including the pituitary gland. The patient was initially treated with intravenous corticosteroids, resulting in rapid remission of the psychotic symptoms. The association between adrenal insufficiency and neuropsychiatric symptoms is rare but these symptoms can often be the first clinical presentation of the disease. PMID:25954562

  19. Doppler ultrasound study and venous mapping in chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    García Carriazo, M; Gómez de las Heras, C; Mármol Vázquez, P; Ramos Solís, M F

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency of the lower limbs is very prevalent. In recent decades, Doppler ultrasound has become the method of choice to study this condition, and it is considered essential when surgery is indicated. This article aims to establish a method for the examination, including venous mapping and preoperative marking. To this end, we review the venous anatomy of the lower limbs and the pathophysiology of chronic venous insufficiency and explain the basic hemodynamic concepts and the terminology required to elaborate a radiological report that will enable appropriate treatment planning and communication with other specialists. We briefly explain the CHIVA (the acronym for the French term "cure conservatrice et hémodynamique de l'insuffisance veineuse en ambulatoire"=conservative hemodynamic treatment for chronic venous insufficiency) strategy, a minimally invasive surgical strategy that aims to restore correct venous hemodynamics without resecting the saphenous vein.

  20. An unusual cause of gross hematuria and renal dysfunction in a young male

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, M.; Ramachandran, R.; Kohli, H. S.; Nada, R.; Jha, V.; Sakhuja, V.

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease (MIDD) is an uncommon disease with a peak incidence between the 5th and 6th decades of life. It is characterized by non-fibrillar, Congo red negative deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulins in various organs, including in the kidneys. MIDD can be of three types depending on the composition of the deposits, and includes light chain deposition disease (LCDD), heavy chain deposition disease and light and heavy chain deposition disease, of which LCDD is the most common. Renal involvement is a universal finding in MIDD, and is in the form of renal insufficiency, microscopic hematuria and nephrotic range proteinuria. Gross hematuria is a rare occurrence. Renal biopsy usually shows nodular sclerosing glomerulopathy on light microscopy and diffuse linear staining of glomerular and tubular basement membrane on immunofluorescence microscopy. We report a young male who presented with rapidly progressive renal failure and gross hematuria and was diagnosed as LCDD with nodular glomerulopathy and crescents on renal biopsy. PMID:24049277

  1. Statins in the prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with renal failure.

    PubMed

    Buemi, Michele; Floccari, Fulvio; Nostro, Lorena; Campo, Susanna; Caccamo, Chiara; Sturiale, Alessio; Aloisi, Carmela; Giacobbe, Maria Stella; Frisina, Nicola

    2007-03-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are among the most widely used hypolypemizing drugs with a pleiotropic activity. Numerous clinical trials have demonstrated that statins can have a significant effect in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases in the general population. In patients with renal failure, this drug preserves the hypolypemizing efficacy found in the general population without increasing their unwanted side-effects. The re-analysis of data from epidemiological studies conducted on the general population has confirmed that statins provide cardiovascular protection also in subjects with renal failure. These data have been partly confirmed by the findings made by 4D (Die Deutsche Diabetes Dialyse Studie) and Alert studies, conducted on diabetic patients on dialysis and patients with renal transplants, respectively. The results of other studies, such as AURORA, SHARP, REnal and Vascular End stage Disease, and ESPLANADE, clearly indicate that statins prevent cardiovascular disease in patients with renal insufficiency, just as they do in the general population.

  2. Pubic and sacral insufficiency fractures: clinical course and radiologic findings

    SciTech Connect

    De Smet, A.A.; Neff, J.R.

    1985-09-01

    Distinctive vertical insufficiency fractures of the pelvis were found in nine osteopenic patients. Each patient had subacute pelvic pain without antecedent trauma. The sacral fractures healed fairly quickly, but the pubic fractures often had a protracted course. All nine patients had skeletal demineralization due to metabolic bone disease, radiation therapy, or multiple myeloma. Recognition of the association between public and sacral insufficiently fractures should aid in recognizing the diffuse nature of the skeletal disease so that unnecessary biopsy of the fracture sites can be avoided. Plain films, tomographic scans, and radionuclide bone scans are reviewed.

  3. A clinical and immunological study of adrenocortical insufficiency (Addison's disease)

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, W. J.; Stewart, A. G.; Scarth, Laura

    1967-01-01

    Fifty-one patients with adrenocortical insufficiency were subdivided into three groups according to the nature of their adrenal disease; twelve patients with idiopathic, twenty-three patients with probable idiopathic and sixteen patients with tuberculous adrenal insufficiency. The importance of objective confirmation of a clinical diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency is stressed and the difficulties of classification of many patients with adult onset adrenal insufficiency are discussed. Idiopathic and probable idiopathic adrenal insufficiency had a sex ratio that was predominantly female (2·5:1) with a mean age of onset of 33 years. Antibodies to adrenal cortex were detected by the methods of immunofluorescence and complement fixation. They were detected in the serum of 80% (20:25) of the females with idiopathic or probable idiopathic adrenal insufficiency and in only 10% (1:10) of the males. The titre of the adrenal antibody was low (≤32) as tested either by immunofluorescence or complement fixation. The serum of only one patient with tuberculous adrenal insufficiency reacted with adrenal tissue in the complement fixation test but the immunofluorescence method showed that this serum reacted with the vascular endothelium and not the secretory cells. No correlation was observed between the duration of the clinical illness and the presence, or absence, or titre of the adrenal antibody. Adrenal antibody was not detected in the sera of fifty-one control subjects matched for age and sex. Four of sixty-nine patients with lymphadenoid goitre, one out of ninety-three patients with diabetes mellitus and none of 230 patients with thyrotoxicosis, primary hypothyroidism or pernicious anaemia had antibody in the serum specific for adrenocortical secretory cells. There is a clinical and immunological overlap between idiopathic adrenal insufficiency and other diseases associated with autoimmune phenomena— thyroid disease, atrophic gastritis and hypoparathyroidism. It is

  4. Renal autotransplantation: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Stewart, B H; Banowsky, L H; Hewitt, C B; Straffon, R A

    1976-01-01

    Autotransplantation, with or without an extracorporeal renal operation, has been done 39 times in 37 patients. Indications for the procedure included severe ureteral injury in 4 patients, failed supravesical diversion in 2, renal carcinoma in a solitary kidney in 1, renovascular hypertension in 1 and donor arterial reconstruction before renal transplantation in 29. Success was obtained in all but 2 procedures, both of which involved previously operated kidneys with severe inflammation and adhesions involving the renal pelvis and pedicle. Based on our experience and a review of currently available literature we believe that renal autotransplantation and extracorporeal reconstruction can provide the best solution for patients with severe renovascular and ureteral disease not correctable by conventional operative techniques. The technique can be of particular value in removing centrally located tumors in solitary kidneys and in preparing donor kidneys with abnormal arteries for renal transplantation. The role of autotransplantation in the management of advanced renal trauma and calculus disease is less clear. A long-term comparison of patients treated by extracorporeal nephrolithotomy versus conventional lithotomy techniques will be necessary before a conclusion is reached in these disease categories.

  5. Renal autotransplantation: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Stewart, B H; Banowsky, L H; Hewitt, C B; Straffon, R A

    1977-09-01

    Autotransplantation, with or without an extracorporeal renal operation, has been done 39 times in 37 patients. Indications for the procedure included several ureteral injury in 4 patients, failed supravesical diversion in 2, renal carcinoma in a solitary kidney in 1, renovascular hypertension in 1 and donor arterial reconstruction before renal transplantation in 29. Success was obtained in all but 2 procedures, both of which involved previously operated kidneys with severe inflammation and adhesions involving the renal pelvis and pedicle. Based on our experience and a review of currently available literature we believe that renal autotransplantation and extracorporeal reconstruction can provide the best solution for patients with severe renovascular and ureteral disease not correctable by conventional operative techniques. The technique can be of particular value in removing centrally located tumors in solitary kidneys and in preparing donor kidneys with abnormal arteries for renal transplantation. The role of autotransplantation in the management of advanced renal trauma and calculus disease is less clear. A long-term comparison of patients treated by extracorporeal nephrolithotomy versus conventional lithotomy techniques will be necessary before a conclusion is reached in these disease categories.

  6. [Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis].

    PubMed

    Sauguet, A; Honton, B

    2014-12-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis can cause ischaemic nephropathy and arterial hypertension. Renal artery stenosis (RAS) continues to be a problem for clinicians, with no clear consensus on how to investigate and assess the clinical significance of stenotic lesions and manage the findings. RAS caused by fibromuscular dysplasia is probably commoner than previously appreciated, should be actively looked for in younger hypertensive patients and can be managed successfully with angioplasty. Atheromatous RAS is associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular events and increased cardiovascular mortality, and is likely to be seen with increasing frequency. Many patients with RAS may be managed effectively with medical therapy for several years without endovascular stenting, as demonstrated by randomized, prospective trials including the cardiovascular outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial, the Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) trial. These trials share the limitation of excluding subsets of patients with high-risk clinical presentations, including episodic pulmonary edema and rapidly progressing renal failure and hypertension. Blood pressure control and medication adjustment may become more difficult with declining renal function and may prevent the use of angiotensin receptor blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The objective of this review is to evaluate the current management of RAS for cardiologists in the context of recent randomized clinical trials. There is now interest in looking more closely at patient selection for intervention, with focus on intervening only in patients with the highest-risk presentations such as flash pulmonary edema, rapidly declining renal function and severe resistant hypertension. PMID:25450992

  7. Cadmium and renal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Il'yasova, Dora; Schwartz, Gary G. . E-mail: gschwart@wfubmc.edu

    2005-09-01

    Background: Rates of renal cancer have increased steadily during the past two decades, and these increases are not explicable solely by advances in imaging modalities. Cadmium, a widespread environmental pollutant, is a carcinogen that accumulates in the kidney cortex and is a cause of end-stage renal disease. Several observations suggest that cadmium may be a cause of renal cancer. Methods: We performed a systematic review of the literature on cadmium and renal cancer using MEDLINE for the years 1966-2003. We reviewed seven epidemiological and eleven clinical studies. Results: Despite different methodologies, three large epidemiologic studies indicate that occupational exposure to cadmium is associated with increased risk renal cancer, with odds ratios varying from 1.2 to 5.0. Six of seven studies that compared the cadmium content of kidneys from patients with kidney cancer to that of patients without kidney cancer found lower concentrations of cadmium in renal cancer tissues. Conclusions: Exposure to cadmium appears to be associated with renal cancer, although this conclusion is tempered by the inability of studies to assess cumulative cadmium exposure from all sources including smoking and diet. The paradoxical findings of lower cadmium content in kidney tissues from patients with renal cancer may be caused by dilution of cadmium in rapidly dividing cells. This and other methodological problems limit the interpretation of studies of cadmium in clinical samples. Whether cadmium is a cause of renal cancer may be answered more definitively by future studies that employ biomarkers of cadmium exposure, such as cadmium levels in blood and urine.

  8. Midterm renal functions following acute renal infarction.

    PubMed

    Ongun, Sakir; Bozkurt, Ozan; Demir, Omer; Cimen, Sertac; Aslan, Guven

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore clinical features of renal infarction (RI) that may have a role in diagnosis and treatment in our patient cohort and provide data on midterm renal functions. Medical records of patients with diagnosis of acute RI, established by contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT) and at least 1 year follow-up data, who were hospitalized in our clinic between 1998 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed; including descriptive data, clinical signs and symptoms, etiologic factors, laboratory findings, and prescribed treatments. Patients with solitary infarct were treated with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) only, whereas patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) or multiple or global infarct were treated with anticoagulants. Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) referring to renal functions was determined by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formula. Twenty-seven renal units of 23 patients with acute RI were identified. The mean age was 59.7 ± 15.7 years. Fourteen patients (60.8%) with RI had atrial fibrillation (AF) as an etiologic factor of which four had concomitant mesenteric ischemia at diagnosis. At presentation, 20 patients (86.9%) had elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), 18 patients (78.2%) had leukocytosis, and 16 patients (69.5%) had microscopic hematuria. Two patients with concomitant mesenteric ischemia and AF passed away during follow up. Mean eGFR was 70.8 ± 23.2 mL/min/1.73 m(2) at admission and increased to 82.3 ± 23.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2) at 1 year follow up. RI should be considered in patients with persistent flank or abdominal pain, particularly if they are at high risk of thromboembolism. Antiplatelet and/or anticoagulant drugs are both effective treatment options according to the amplitude of the infarct for preserving kidney functions.

  9. Sympatho-renal interactions.

    PubMed

    Zanchetti, A; Stella, A

    1987-10-01

    The renal nerves appear to be involved in the control of cardiovascular homeostasis and volume balance both in physiological and in pathological conditions such as experimental hypertension. Anatomical and electrophysiological evidence suggests that the kidney has a diffuse sensory innervation connected with areas in the brain and spinal cord that are known to regulate cardiovascular functions by both neural and humoral mechanisms. The demonstration of the existence of neural reno-renal reflexes controlling several renal functions indicates that a functional balance between the two kidneys exists and may play an important role in the moment-to-moment control of kidney functions.

  10. Gastrointestinal function in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Ravelli, A M

    1995-12-01

    Feeding problems, anorexia and vomiting are common in infants and children with chronic renal failure (CRF), and play a major role in the growth failure often found in this condition. However, the gastroenterological and nutritional aspects of CRF in children have received little attention, hence therapeutic interventions are usually empirical and often ineffective. Gastritis, duodenitis and peptic ulcer are often found in adults with CRF on regular haemodialysis and following renal transplantation. Despite persistent hypergastrinaemia, gastric acid secretion is decreased rather than increased in most of these patients, and active peptic disease appears to be promoted by the removal of the acid output inhibition (neutralisation of gastric acid by ammonia) that follows active treatment. Helicobacter pylori, on the other hand, does not seem to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of peptic disease in CRF. Gastro-oesophageal reflux has been found in about 70% of infants and children with CRF suffering from vomiting and feeding problems, and thus appears to be a major problem in these patients. In a number of symptomatic patients with CRF, gastric dysrhythmias and delayed gastric emptying have also been found; hence there appears to be a complex disorder of gastrointestinal motility in CRF. Serum levels of several polypeptide hormones involved in the modulation of gastrointestinal motility [e.g. gastrin, cholecystokinin (CCK), neurotensin] and the regulation of hunger and satiety (e.g. glucagon, CCK) are significantly raised as a consequence of renal insufficiency, and can be reverted to normal by renal transplantation. Furthermore, several other humoral abnormalities (e.g. hypercalcaemia, hypokalaemia, acidosis, etc.) are not uncommon in CRF. By directly affecting the smooth muscle of the gut or stimulating particular areas within the central nervous system, all these humoral alterations may well play a major role in the gastrointestinal dysmotility, anorexia

  11. [Respiratory insufficiency in mucoviscidosis. Pathophysiologic aspects of conservative drug therapy].

    PubMed

    Storm, W

    1989-01-01

    The compensated chronic respiratory acidosis in a girl with cystic fibrosis changed into a mixed respiratory acidosis and metabolic alkalosis under the influence of therapeutic measures. As a consequence respiratory insufficiency worsened. Conservative management of the alkalosis alone both improved hypoxemia and hypercapnia without needing artificial ventilation.

  12. Thyroid insufficiency in developing rat brain: A genomic analysis.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid Insufficiency in the Developing Rat Brain: A Genomic Analysis. JE Royland and ME Gilbert, Neurotox. Div., U.S. EPA, RTP, NC, USA. Endocrine disruption (ED) is an area of major concern in environmental neurotoxicity. Severe deficits in thyroid hormone (TH) levels have bee...

  13. A case of chronic adrenocortical insufficiency with iatrogenic anasarca.

    PubMed

    Parlapiano, C; Campana, E; Pantone, P; Giovanniello, T; Borgia, M C

    2000-01-01

    The decrease in active hormones that characterizes chronic adrenal insufficiency results in hypovolemia. In some patients, residual adrenal function, mineralocorticoid therapy, and concomitant heart or liver failure, or both, can paradoxically provoke edema. The case report that follows describes a patient with iatrogenically induced anasarca resulting from the unhappy confluence of usually appropriate therapy and coexisting medical conditions. PMID:11010057

  14. 11 CFR 9036.3 - Submission errors and insufficient documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... supporting documentation. Contributions, other than those defined in 11 CFR 9034.3 or in the form of money... resubmission in accordance with 11 CFR 9036.5 and 9036.6. Insufficient documentation or submission errors... statements, or documentation required by 11 CFR 9034.2....

  15. 11 CFR 9036.3 - Submission errors and insufficient documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... supporting documentation. Contributions, other than those defined in 11 CFR 9034.3 or in the form of money... resubmission in accordance with 11 CFR 9036.5 and 9036.6. Insufficient documentation or submission errors... statements, or documentation required by 11 CFR 9034.2....

  16. 26 CFR 20.2043-1 - Transfers for insufficient consideration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Transfers for insufficient consideration. 20.2043-1 Section 20.2043-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Gross...

  17. 26 CFR 20.2043-1 - Transfers for insufficient consideration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Transfers for insufficient consideration. 20.2043-1 Section 20.2043-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Gross...

  18. 26 CFR 20.2043-1 - Transfers for insufficient consideration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Transfers for insufficient consideration. 20.2043-1 Section 20.2043-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Gross...

  19. 26 CFR 20.2043-1 - Transfers for insufficient consideration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transfers for insufficient consideration. 20.2043-1 Section 20.2043-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Gross...

  20. 26 CFR 20.2043-1 - Transfers for insufficient consideration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Transfers for insufficient consideration. 20.2043-1 Section 20.2043-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Gross...

  1. Cell populations can use aneuploidy to survive telomerase insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Caroline; Ausiannikava, Darya; Le Bihan, Thierry; Granneman, Sander; Makovets, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase maintains ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, telomeres. Telomerase loss results in replicative senescence and a switch to recombination-dependent telomere maintenance. Telomerase insufficiency in humans leads to telomere syndromes associated with premature ageing and cancer predisposition. Here we use yeast to show that the survival of telomerase insufficiency differs from the survival of telomerase loss and occurs through aneuploidy. In yeast grown at elevated temperatures, telomerase activity becomes limiting: haploid cell populations senesce and generate aneuploid survivors—near diploids monosomic for chromosome VIII. This aneuploidy results in increased levels of the telomerase components TLC1, Est1 and Est3, and is accompanied by decreased abundance of ribosomal proteins. We propose that aneuploidy suppresses telomerase insufficiency through redistribution of cellular resources away from ribosome synthesis towards production of telomerase components and other non-ribosomal proteins. The aneuploidy-induced re-balance of the proteome via modulation of ribosome biogenesis may be a general adaptive response to overcome functional insufficiencies. PMID:26489519

  2. Scintigraphic demonstration of lower extremity periostitis secondary to venous insufficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Gensburg, R.S.; Kawashima, A.; Sandler, C.M.

    1988-07-01

    The scintigraphic findings on bone imaging in two patients with extensive lower extremity periostitis secondary to venous insufficiency are presented. One of these patients had bilateral disease. The use of (/sup 67/Ga)citrate scanning in an attempt to exclude concurrent osteomyelitis is also addressed.

  3. Common genetic determinants of vitamin D insufficiency: the sunlight consortium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Vitamin D is crucial for maintaining musculoskeletal health. Recently, vitamin D insufficiency has been linked to a number of extraskeletal disorders, including diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. Determinants of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH D) include sun exposure an...

  4. Renal scintigraphy in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Reid; Daniel, Gregory B

    2014-01-01

    Renal scintigraphy is performed commonly in dogs and cats and has been used in a variety of other species. In a 2012 survey of the members of the Society of Veterinary Nuclear Medicine, 95% of the respondents indicated they perform renal scintigraphy in their practice. Renal scintigraphy is primarily used to assess renal function and to evaluate postrenal obstruction. This article reviews how renal scintigraphy is used in veterinary medicine and describes the methods of analysis. Species variation is also discussed.

  5. Complete renal recovery from severe acute renal failure after thrombolysis of bilateral renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ramadoss, Suresh; Jones, Robert G; Foggensteiner, Lukas; Willis, Andrew P; Duddy, Martin J

    2012-10-01

    A previously healthy young man presented with acute renal failure due to extensive spontaneous deep vein thrombosis, including the inferior vena cava (IVC) and both renal veins. The patient was treated with selectively delivered thrombolytic therapy over a 7-day-period, which resulted in renal vein patency and complete recovery of renal function. A stent was placed over a segment stenosis of the IVC. No thrombophilic factors were identified. Bilateral renal vein thrombosis in young fit individuals is an unusual cause of acute renal failure. Thrombolytic therapy, even with delay, can completely restore renal function.

  6. Renal Mitochondrial Cytopathies

    PubMed Central

    Emma, Francesco; Montini, Giovanni; Salviati, Leonardo; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Renal diseases in mitochondrial cytopathies are a group of rare diseases that are characterized by frequent multisystemic involvement and extreme variability of phenotype. Most frequently patients present a tubular defect that is consistent with complete De Toni-Debré-Fanconi syndrome in most severe forms. More rarely, patients present with chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, cystic renal diseases, or primary glomerular involvement. In recent years, two clearly defined entities, namely 3243 A > G tRNALEU mutations and coenzyme Q10 biosynthesis defects, have been described. The latter group is particularly important because it represents the only treatable renal mitochondrial defect. In this paper, the physiopathologic bases of mitochondrial cytopathies, the diagnostic approaches, and main characteristics of related renal diseases are summarized. PMID:21811680

  7. The effect of celiprolol on glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow in patients with chronic renal impairment and healthy volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Robson, R A; Bridgman, P G; Wells, J E; Bailey, R R; Lynn, K L

    1992-01-01

    A double-blind, placebo controlled study investigated the effects of celiprolol, 200 mg daily for 7 days, on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and estimated renal blood flow (ERBF) in eight healthy volunteers and eight patients with chronic renal insufficiency. In healthy volunteers the mean difference in GFR was 4.8 ml min-1 (95% CI -8.2 to 17.7 ml min-1) and the mean difference in ERBF was 49.8 ml min-1 (95% CI -47.5 to 147 ml min-1) after celiprolol. In patients with chronic renal insufficiency the mean difference in GFR was -2.1 ml min-1 (95% CI -64.6 to 65.8 ml min-1). The study had sufficient power to detect a 15% change in GFR for normals and 10% for patients, and for ERBF, changes of 14% and 23% were detectable. Celiprolol at a dose of 200 mg daily for 7 days can be used in patients with chronic renal insufficiency without adversely affecting GFR or ERBF. PMID:1349496

  8. 'Transcollateral' Renal Angioplasty for a Completely Occluded Renal Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Subash; Chadha, Davinder S. Swamy, Ajay

    2011-02-15

    Percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty with stenting has been effective in the control of hypertension, renal function, and pulmonary edema caused by atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis. However, the role of the procedure has not been fully established in the context of chronic total occlusion of renal artery. We report the successful use of this procedure in 57-year-old male patient who reported for evaluation of a recent episode of accelerated hypertension. A renal angiogram in this patient showed ostial stenosis of the right renal artery, which was filling by way of the collateral artery. Renal angioplasty for chronic total occlusion of right renal artery was successfully performed in a retrograde fashion through a collateral artery, thereby leading to improvement of renal function and blood pressure control.

  9. [Hyperuricemia and renal risk].

    PubMed

    Viazzi, Francesca; Bonino, Barbara; Ratto, Elena; Desideri, Giovambattista; Pontremoli, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed an association between elevated levels of uric acid and conditions correlated to chronic kidney diseases such as hypertension, cardiovascular and cerebral disease, insulin resistance. Several pathogenetic mechanisms at cellular and tissue levels could justify a direct correlation between serum uric acid levels and renal damage. Growing evidence indicating a correlation between urate lowering therapy and renal morbidity could encourage the use of urate lowering therapy in primary or secondary prevention in chronic kidney disease.

  10. Laparoscopic retroperitoneal renal cystectomy.

    PubMed

    Munch, L C; Gill, I S; McRoberts, J W

    1994-01-01

    Laparoscopic manipulation of retroperitoneal organs is usually performed by the transperitoneal approach primarily because of the ease of access by way of the pneumoperitoneum. However, difficulty in adequately accessing structures that are surrounded by bowel, liver, spleen or postoperative adhesions makes this approach suboptimal in certain cases. We describe the use of the retroperitoneal laparoscopic approach to the upper pole of a kidney for marsupialization of a symptomatic, recurrent, complex renal cyst. An algorithm for current management of symptomatic renal cysts is discussed.

  11. Neonatal renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Leonardo R; Simpson, Ewurabena A; Lau, Keith K

    2011-12-01

    Neonatal renal vein thrombosis (RVT) continues to pose significant challenges for pediatric hematologists and nephrologists. The precise mechanism for the onset and propagation of renal thrombosis within the neonatal population is unclear, but there is suggestion that acquired and/or inherited thrombophilia traits may increase the risk for renal thromboembolic disease during the newborn period. This review summarizes the most recent studies of neonatal RVT, examining its most common features, the prevalence of acquired and inherited prothrombotic risk factors among these patients, and evaluates their short and long term renal and thrombotic outcomes as they may relate to these risk factors. Although there is some consensus regarding the management of neonatal RVT, the most recent antithrombotic therapy guidelines for the management of childhood thrombosis do not provide a risk-based algorithm for the acute management of RVT among newborns with hereditary prothrombotic disorders. Whereas neonatal RVT is not a condition associated with a high mortality rate, it is associated with significant morbidity due to renal impairment. Recent evidence to evaluate the effects of heparin-based anticoagulation and thrombolytic therapy on the long term renal function of these patients has yielded conflicting results. Long term cohort studies and randomized trials may be helpful to clarify the impact of acute versus prolonged antithrombotic therapy for reducing the morbidity that is associated with neonatal RVT.

  12. Stenting and Medical Therapy for Atherosclerotic Renal-Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Christopher J.; Murphy, Timothy P.; Cutlip, Donald E.; Jamerson, Kenneth; Henrich, William; Reid, Diane M.; Cohen, David J.; Matsumoto, Alan H.; Steffes, Michael; Jaff, Michael R.; Prince, Martin R.; Lewis, Eldrin F.; Tuttle, Katherine R.; Shapiro, Joseph I.; Rundback, John H.; Massaro, Joseph M.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Dworkin, Lance D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Atherosclerotic renal-artery stenosis is a common problem in the elderly. Despite two randomized trials that did not show a benefit of renal-artery stenting with respect to kidney function, the usefulness of stenting for the prevention of major adverse renal and cardiovascular events is uncertain. METHODS We randomly assigned 947 participants who had atherosclerotic renal-artery stenosis and either systolic hypertension while taking two or more antihypertensive drugs or chronic kidney disease to medical therapy plus renal-artery stenting or medical therapy alone. Participants were followed for the occurrence of adverse cardiovascular and renal events (a composite end point of death from cardiovascular or renal causes, myocar-dial infarction, stroke, hospitalization for congestive heart failure, progressive renal insufficiency, or the need for renal-replacement therapy). RESULTS Over a median follow-up period of 43 months (interquartile range, 31 to 55), the rate of the primary composite end point did not differ significantly between participants who underwent stenting in addition to receiving medical therapy and those who received medical therapy alone (35.1% and 35.8%, respectively; hazard ratio with stenting, 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.76 to 1.17; P = 0.58). There were also no significant differences between the treatment groups in the rates of the individual components of the primary end point or in all-cause mortality. During follow-up, there was a consistent modest difference in systolic blood pressure favoring the stent group (−2.3 mm Hg; 95% CI, −4.4 to −0.2; P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS Renal-artery stenting did not confer a significant benefit with respect to the prevention of clinical events when added to comprehensive, multifactorial medical therapy in people with atherosclerotic renal-artery stenosis and hypertension or chronic kidney disease. (Funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and others; Clinical

  13. Spontaneous renal artery dissection with renal infarction.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Sophie; Leray-Moraguès, Hélène; Chenine, Leila; Canaud, Ludovic; Vernhet-Kovacsik, Hélène; Canaud, Bernard

    2012-06-01

    Spontaneous renal artery dissection (SRAD) is a rare entity, which often presents diagnostic difficulties because of its non-specific clinical presentation. We report six cases complicated with renal infarction, occurring in middle-aged male patients without risk factors, illustrating the difficulty and delay for diagnosing SRAD. Ultrasound and Doppler imaging were not sensitive enough to confirm the diagnosis, and contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography was used to correct the diagnosis and allow the clinicians to propose appropriate treatment. We conclude that considering the urgency in diagnosing and treating SRAD, contrast enhanced abdominal tomography and/or abdominal magnetic resonance imaging should be proposed as soon as a suspicion of SRAD is evoked by the clinical presentation.

  14. Quick and Easy Screening for Vitamin D Insufficiency in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Deschasaux, Mélanie; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Andreeva, Valentina A.; Sutton, Angela; Charnaux, Nathalie; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle; Latino-Martel, Paule; Druesne-Pecollo, Nathalie; Szabo de Edelenyi, Fabien; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Ezzedine, Khaled; Touvier, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Vitamin D is essential regarding several health outcomes. Prevention of insufficiency (25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration ≤20 ng/mL) generally entails blood testing and/or supplementation, strategies that should target at-risk individuals because blood testing is costly, and unwarranted supplementation could result in vitamin D overload with unknown long-term consequences. Our objective was to develop a simple score (Vitamin D Insufficiency Prediction score, VDIP) for identifying adults at risk of vitamin D insufficiency. Subjects were 1557 non–vitamin D-supplemented middle-aged adults from the SU.VI.MAX cohort. Scoring points corresponded to the rounded odds ratio for each individual-level characteristic associated with vitamin D insufficiency in a multivariable logistic regression model. Receiver operating characteristic curve (area under curve), sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were computed. External validation was performed in an independent cohort (NutriNet-Santé, N = 781). For female sex, overweight, low physical activity, winter season, moderate sun exposure, and very fair or dark skin 1.5 points were attributed; 2 points for latitude ≥48°N and spring season; 2.5 points for obesity and late winter; 3 points for low sun exposure. Points were then summed up for each participant. The VDIP score had an AUC = 0.70 ± 0.01 (validation: 0.67 ± 0.02). With a score of 7 or more, 70% of the participants were vitamin D-insufficient (80% in those with a score ≥9), sensitivity/specificity were 0.67/0.63, and positive and negative predictive values were 0.70/0.59. The VDIP score performed well in identifying middle-aged adults at risk of vitamin D insufficiency (score ≥7, moderate risk; score≥9, high risk), using only simple individual-level characteristics easily assessable in day-to-day clinical practice. Implementation of this simple and costless score could thus obviate unwarranted

  15. Rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure after gardening.

    PubMed

    Vucicevic, Zeljko

    2015-01-01

    Acute nontraumatic exertional rhabdomyolysis may arise when the energy supply to muscle is insufficient to meet demands, particularly in physically untrained individuals. We report on a psychiatric patient who developed large bruises and hemorrhagic blisters on both hands and arms, rhabdomyolysis of both forearm muscles with a moderate compartment syndrome, and consecutive acute renal failure following excessive work in the garden. Although specifically asked, the patient denied any hard physical work or gardening, and heteroanamnestic data were not available. The diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis was easy to establish, but until reliable anamnestic data were obtained, the etiology remained uncertain. Four days after arrival, the patient recalled working hard in the garden. The etiology of rhabdomyolysis was finally reached, and the importance of anamnestic data was once more confirmed. PMID:25954536

  16. Rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure after gardening.

    PubMed

    Vucicevic, Zeljko

    2015-01-01

    Acute nontraumatic exertional rhabdomyolysis may arise when the energy supply to muscle is insufficient to meet demands, particularly in physically untrained individuals. We report on a psychiatric patient who developed large bruises and hemorrhagic blisters on both hands and arms, rhabdomyolysis of both forearm muscles with a moderate compartment syndrome, and consecutive acute renal failure following excessive work in the garden. Although specifically asked, the patient denied any hard physical work or gardening, and heteroanamnestic data were not available. The diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis was easy to establish, but until reliable anamnestic data were obtained, the etiology remained uncertain. Four days after arrival, the patient recalled working hard in the garden. The etiology of rhabdomyolysis was finally reached, and the importance of anamnestic data was once more confirmed.

  17. Rhabdomyolysis and Acute Renal Failure after Gardening

    PubMed Central

    Vucicevic, Zeljko

    2015-01-01

    Acute nontraumatic exertional rhabdomyolysis may arise when the energy supply to muscle is insufficient to meet demands, particularly in physically untrained individuals. We report on a psychiatric patient who developed large bruises and hemorrhagic blisters on both hands and arms, rhabdomyolysis of both forearm muscles with a moderate compartment syndrome, and consecutive acute renal failure following excessive work in the garden. Although specifically asked, the patient denied any hard physical work or gardening, and heteroanamnestic data were not available. The diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis was easy to establish, but until reliable anamnestic data were obtained, the etiology remained uncertain. Four days after arrival, the patient recalled working hard in the garden. The etiology of rhabdomyolysis was finally reached, and the importance of anamnestic data was once more confirmed. PMID:25954536

  18. Epidemic renal disease of unknown etiology in the Zuni Indians

    SciTech Connect

    Hoy, W.E.; Megill, D.M.; Hughson, M.D.

    1987-06-01

    An epidemic of renal disease is occurring among the Zuni Indians in western New Mexico. In 1985, 1.6% of Zunis had clinically recognized renal disease and 1% had renal insufficiency. The incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in 1984 and 1985 was 14 times the rate for US whites, and three times the rates of other Indians in ESRD network 6. One third of the cases of renal disease and ESRD is due to type 2 diabetes, but the etiology of disease in most of the remainder is unknown. Affected subjects range from early childhood to old age. Early signs are hematuria, mild to moderate proteinuria, normal BP, and low total hemolytic complement, normal or low C3 and C4 levels, in about 40% of the cases. The clinical course varies from benign to rapidly progressive renal failure. Biopsies usually reflect an immune-complex mediated mesangiopathic glomerulonephritis, with IgA, IgG, IgM, and C3 variably present in the mesangium. In some cases, there is a very strong familial pattern suggesting autosomal dominant inheritance or a marked communal exposure effect. This may be a genetic disease educed by the consanguinity in the ethnically homogeneous Zuni population. Mesangiopathic renal disease is common in some Oriental populations, and this phenomenon may reflect the American Indians' Oriental ancestry. This disease may also be due to toxic exposures related to jewelry-making, potting, Zuni water, Zuni salt, or herbal or other products used for medicinal or religious purposes. This epidemic is causing much morbidity and generating huge costs for ESRD treatment. Further study is needed to better understand its etiology.

  19. Conservative surgical management of mitral insufficiency: an alternative approach.

    PubMed

    Gregori Junior, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Mitral valve insufficiency is frequently the result of elongated or ruptured chordae tendineae. Several techniques have been described for its correction. However, when there is a severe elongation or rupture of the chordae, the most widely accepted treatment option has been valve replacement. The best long-term outcomes observed in conservative surgeries led us to choose this procedure rather than the correction of mitral valve insufficiency. We described three techniques for correction of mitral prolapse due to elongated and/or ruptured chordae tendineae. In addition, we developed mold pre built bovine pericardial chords (Braile-Gregori prosthesis) for chordae replacement. Finally, since 1987, the rigid prosthetic semicircular ring (Gregori-Braile ring) has been consistently used in our centre for correction of the posterior dilation of mitral annulus preferably in its portion close to the posteromedial commissure. PMID:22996984

  20. “Petrified Ears” in Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Soumik; Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Ghosh, Sujoy; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2016-01-01

    Petrification of the auricle, a rarely encountered clinical entity usually results from ectopic calcification of the auricular cartilages and manifests as rigid ear. The underlying pathogenesis remains ambiguous with several proposed hypotheses till date. Auricular calcification may be the sole cutaneous marker of underlying endocrinopathy at times. Adrenal insufficiency is the most common endocrinological disorder to be associated with such stiff ears and it has been described in both primary as well as secondary forms of the disease. We present here a 30-year-old man whose clinical condition deteriorated following levothyroxine supplementation and the presence of “petrified ears” ultimately provided a clue to the diagnosis of associated secondary adrenal insufficiency. PMID:27042511

  1. Adrenal insufficiency in a child with MELAS syndrome.

    PubMed

    Afroze, Bushra; Amjad, Nida; Ibrahim, Shahnaz H; Humayun, Khadija Nuzhat; Yakob, Yusnita

    2014-11-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) are established subgroups of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy. m.3243A>G a common point mutation is detected in tRNA in majority of patients with MELAS phenotype whereas m.8344A>G point mutation in tRNA is observed, in MERRF phenotype. Adrenal insufficiency has not been reported in mitochondrial disease, except in Kearns-Sayre Syndrome (KSS), which is a mitochondrial deletion syndrome. We report an unusual presentation in a five year old boy who presented with clinical phenotype of MELAS and was found to have m.8344A>G mutation in tRNA. Addison disease was identified due to hyperpigmentation of lips and gums present from early childhood. This is the first report describing adrenal insufficiency in a child with MELAS phenotype.

  2. Vertebrobasilar insufficiency revealed by xenon-133 inhalation SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Delecluse, F.; Voordecker, P.; Raftopoulos, C.

    1989-07-01

    A study of cerebral and cerebellar blood flow reactivity to acetazolamide by xenon-133-inhalation single photon emission computed tomography (/sup 133/Xe SPECT) was carried out in a patient with bouts of transient basilar ischemia, whose neurological examination, computed tomographic scan, and auditory evoked potentials were normal. Though the patient was symptom-free at the time of the study, /sup 133/Xe SPECT demonstrated vertebrobasilar insufficiency by showing an impaired vasodilatory response in both the occipital lobes and the right cerebellar hemisphere. Three weeks later, the patient suffered an extensive stroke in these same areas. We therefore suggest that this method could be of great value in the assessment of vertebrobasilar insufficiency.

  3. An endocrinologist's view on relative adrenocortical insufficiency in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Imrich, Richard; Vlcek, Miroslav; Aldag, Jean C; Kerlik, Jana; Radikova, Zofia; Rovensky, Jozef; Vigas, Milan; Masi, Alfonse T

    2010-04-01

    The concept of relative adrenal insufficiency (RAI) has been originally introduced to describe a situation in which critically ill patients, without any prior risk or evidence for adrenal insufficiency, have total serum cortisol levels inadequate for the severity of patients' illness. The concept provided a framework for other disease states, in which higher than normal adrenal function could be expected, such as in chronic inflammation. An intense research in RAI field highlighted some new methodological aspects that significantly improved assessment of adrenal function in chronic illness. Measurement of salivary cortisol may provide additional information on locally available cortisol in target tissues. Low levels of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEAS) for given age and gender were confirmed as a simple and reliable indicator of decreased adrenal function, even in subjects with normal baseline cortisol or normal corticotropin-stimulated cortisol response. Combined lower DHEAS and lower baseline cortisol levels could be an example of hypocompetence of adrenocortical function, yet clinically not apparent. PMID:20398019

  4. [Venous insufficiency in the pregnant woman. Rheological correction by troxerutin].

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, G; Lacombe, C

    1991-02-25

    We realized a double-blind randomized study in 26 pregnant with clinical symptoms of lower limbs venous insufficiency. Both groups were similar and received either (n = 12) troxerutine (4 g/day) or placebo (n = 14), during 30 days. Evaluation at J0 and J30 was both clinical and rheological by mean of Myrenne aggregometer. After blood shear rate of 600 s-1, two parameters were determined: M after roughly stopping shear rate, M1 after diminishing to shear rate of 3 s-1. Results exhibited steady values in patients receiving troxerutine while a significant increasing values in patients receiving placebo for the two parameters M and M1. That result in erythrocyte antiaggregating action of troxerutine, hence lowering viscosity action, in venous insufficiency during pregnancy.

  5. Reversion of Severe Mitral Insufficiency in Peripartum Cardiomyopathy Using Levosimendan

    PubMed Central

    Nieto Estrada, Victor H.; Molano Franco, Daniel L.; Valencia Moreno, Albert Alexander; Rojas Gambasica, Jose A.; Jaller Bornacelli, Yamil E.; Martinez Del Valle, Anacaona

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic peripartum cardiomyopathy presenting with heart failure is a true diagnostic and treatment challenge. Goal oriented clinical management aims at the relapse of left ventricular systolic dysfunction. A 35-year-old patient on her 12th day post-delivery presents progressive signs of heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiography showed severe mitral insufficiency, mild left ventricular dysfunction, mild tricuspid insufficiency, severe pulmonary hypertension, and right atrial enlargement. With wet and cold heart failure signs, the patient was a candidate for inodilator cardiovascular support and volume depletion therapy. As the patient presented a persistent tachycardia at rest, levosimendan was chosen over dobutamine. Levosimendan was administered at a dose of 0.2 µg/kg/min during a period of 24 hours. After inodilator therapy, the patient’s signs and symptoms of heart failure began to decrease, showing improvement of dyspnea, mitral murmur grade went from IV/IV to II/IV, filling pressures and systemic and pulmonary resistance indexes decreased, arterial blood gases improved, and an echocardiography performed 72 h later showed non-dilated cardiomyopathy, mild cardiac contractile dysfunction, mild mitral insufficiency, type I diastolic dysfunction and improvement of pulmonary hypertension. Cardiovascular function in peripartum cardiomyopathy tends to go back to normality in 23-41% of the cases, but in a large group of patients, severe ventricle dysfunction remains months after initial symptoms. This article describes the diagnostic process of a patient with peripartum cardiomyopathy and a successful reversion of a severe case of mitral insufficiency using levosimendan as a new therapeutic strategy in this clinical context. PMID:26566415

  6. Single coronary artery anomaly causing ischemic mitral insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Ay, Yasin; Aydın, Cemalettin; Ay, Nuray Kahraman; Inan, Bekir; Başel, Halil; Zeybek, Rahmi

    2014-05-01

    Single coronary artery anomaly is rarely seen, and although it can present with sudden death, chest pain, arrhythmia, myocardial infarction, or congestive heart failure, it can also be asymptomatic. We describe the case of a 58-year-old man with single coronary artery anomaly in whom the coronary artery stemmed from the left coronary sinus and caused ischemic mitral insufficiency due to left anterior descending artery stenosis. He underwent successful mitral valve repair and coronary bypass. PMID:24771737

  7. Reversion of Severe Mitral Insufficiency in Peripartum Cardiomyopathy Using Levosimendan.

    PubMed

    Nieto Estrada, Victor H; Molano Franco, Daniel L; Valencia Moreno, Albert Alexander; Rojas Gambasica, Jose A; Jaller Bornacelli, Yamil E; Martinez Del Valle, Anacaona

    2015-12-01

    Idiopathic peripartum cardiomyopathy presenting with heart failure is a true diagnostic and treatment challenge. Goal oriented clinical management aims at the relapse of left ventricular systolic dysfunction. A 35-year-old patient on her 12th day post-delivery presents progressive signs of heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiography showed severe mitral insufficiency, mild left ventricular dysfunction, mild tricuspid insufficiency, severe pulmonary hypertension, and right atrial enlargement. With wet and cold heart failure signs, the patient was a candidate for inodilator cardiovascular support and volume depletion therapy. As the patient presented a persistent tachycardia at rest, levosimendan was chosen over dobutamine. Levosimendan was administered at a dose of 0.2 µg/kg/min during a period of 24 hours. After inodilator therapy, the patient's signs and symptoms of heart failure began to decrease, showing improvement of dyspnea, mitral murmur grade went from IV/IV to II/IV, filling pressures and systemic and pulmonary resistance indexes decreased, arterial blood gases improved, and an echocardiography performed 72 h later showed non-dilated cardiomyopathy, mild cardiac contractile dysfunction, mild mitral insufficiency, type I diastolic dysfunction and improvement of pulmonary hypertension. Cardiovascular function in peripartum cardiomyopathy tends to go back to normality in 23-41% of the cases, but in a large group of patients, severe ventricle dysfunction remains months after initial symptoms. This article describes the diagnostic process of a patient with peripartum cardiomyopathy and a successful reversion of a severe case of mitral insufficiency using levosimendan as a new therapeutic strategy in this clinical context. PMID:26566415

  8. Iatrogenic velopharyngeal insufficiency caused by neonatal nasogastric feeding tube.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Aron Z; Ward, Robert F; DeRowe, Ari; April, Max M

    2014-08-01

    Complications from a prolonged nasogastric tube intubation, though seldom reported, are well described. Herein we describe the first two reported cases of velopharyngeal insufficiency secondary to velopharyngeal scarring and immobility from repetitive nasogastric tube insertions and prolonged use. Differing only in location, the proposed pathophysiologic mechanism of injury is identical to that of the nasogastric tube syndrome, a rare and serious, well described entity consisting of bilateral vocal fold paralysis due to pressure-induced ulceration of the posterior cricoarytenoid musculature.

  9. Insufficient Evidence of Purported Lunar Effect on Pollination in Ephedra.

    PubMed

    Margot, Jean-Luc

    2015-10-01

    It has been suggested that the timing of pollination in Ephedra foeminea coincides with the full moon in July. The implication is that the plant can detect the full moon through light or gravity and that this trait is an evolutionary adaptation that aids the navigation by pollinating insects. Here we show that there are insufficient data to make such a claim, and we predict that pollinations of E. foeminea do not in general coincide with the full moon. PMID:26316347

  10. Insufficient Evidence of Purported Lunar Effect on Pollination in Ephedra.

    PubMed

    Margot, Jean-Luc

    2015-10-01

    It has been suggested that the timing of pollination in Ephedra foeminea coincides with the full moon in July. The implication is that the plant can detect the full moon through light or gravity and that this trait is an evolutionary adaptation that aids the navigation by pollinating insects. Here we show that there are insufficient data to make such a claim, and we predict that pollinations of E. foeminea do not in general coincide with the full moon.

  11. Relationship between Clinical Signs and Symptoms of Convergence Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bade, Annette; Boas, Mark; Gallaway, Michael; Mitchell, G. Lynn; Scheiman, Mitchell; Kulp, Marjean T.; Cotter, Susan A.; Rouse, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The percentage of children who are symptomatic has been shown to increase with the number of signs of convergence insufficiency (CI). Our goal was to investigate whether there is a relationship between the severity of the clinical signs of CI and symptom level reported in children with 3-sign symptomatic CI. Methods The Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial (CITT) enrolled 221 children with symptomatic CI from ages 9 to 17 years. Inclusion criteria included the following three signs of CI: (1) exophoria at near at least 4Δ greater than at distance, (2) insufficient positive fusional vergence (PFV) at near, and (3) a receded near point of convergence (NPC) of ≥ 6cm break. The relationships between the severity of each sign of CI (mild, moderate and severe) and the level of symptoms as measured by the Convergence Insufficiency Symptom Survey (CISS) at baseline were evaluated. Results Mean CISS scores were not significantly different between mild, moderate or severe exophoria (p=0.60), PFV blur (p=0.99), Sheard's criterion (p=0.89) or NPC break (p=0.84). There was also no difference in the frequency of subjects scoring at mild, moderate or severe levels on the CISS and the severity of each sign of CI. Correlations between individual clinical signs and the CISS score were very low and not statistically significant. Conclusions Among symptomatic children with a CISS score ≥ 16 and three clinical signs of CI, there is no further association between the severity of the clinical signs and their level of symptoms. PMID:23958713

  12. Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency among patients with prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Trump, Donald L.; Chadha, Manpreet K.; Sunga, Annette Y.; Fakih, Marwan G.; Ashraf, Umeer; Silliman, Carrie G.; Hollis, Bruce W.; Nesline, Mary K.; Tian, Lili; Tan, Wei; Johnson, Candace S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the frequency of vitamin D deficiency among men with prostate cancer, as considerable epidemiological, in vitro, in vivo and clinical data support an association between vitamin D deficiency and prostate cancer outcome. Patients, subjects and methods The study included 120 ambulatory men with recurrent prostate cancer and 50 with clinically localized prostate cancer who were evaluated and serum samples assayed for 25-OH vitamin D levels. Then 100 controls (both sexes), matched for age and season of serum sample, were chosen from a prospective serum banking protocol. The relationship between age, body mass index, disease stage, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, season and previous therapy on vitamin D status were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results The mean 25-OH vitamin D level was 25.9 ng/mL in those with recurrent disease, 27.5 ng/mL in men with clinically localized prostate cancer and 24.5 ng/mL in controls. The frequency of vitamin D deficiency (< 20 ng/mL) and insufficiency (20–31 ng/mL) was 40% and 32% in men with recurrent prostate; 28% had vitamin D levels that were normal (32–100 ng/mL). Among men with localized prostate cancer, 18% were deficient, 50% were insufficient and 32% were normal. Among controls, 31% were deficient, 40% were insufficient and 29% were normal. Metastatic disease (P = 0.005) and season of blood sampling (winter/spring; P = 0.01) were associated with vitamin D deficiency in patients with prostate cancer, while age, race, performance status and body mass index were not. Conclusions Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency were common among men with prostate cancer and apparently normal controls in the western New York region. PMID:19426195

  13. Vitamin D insufficiency in preadolescent African-American children.

    PubMed

    Rajakumar, Kumaravel; Fernstrom, John D; Janosky, Janine E; Greenspan, Susan L

    2005-10-01

    To determine the proportion of vitamin D insufficiency in 6- to 10-year-old preadolescent African-American children residing in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and to estimate their therapeutic response to vitamin D 400 IU/day for 1-month, an open-label pre- and post-comparison of vitamin D status following vitamin D 400 IU daily for 1 month during winter and early spring was conducted. Outcomes included serum calcium, phosphorus, albumin, 25 hydroxyvitamin D [25 (OH) D], 1, 25 dihydroxyvitamin D [1, 25 (OH) (2) D], parathyroid hormone (PTH), and markers of bone turnover (serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and urine n-telopeptide crosslinked collagen type 1 [NTX]). Dietary intake of vitamin D was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire. Forty-one of the 42 enrolled subjects (mean age: 8.9 +/- 1.2 yrs [SD]) were analyzed, and 20/41 (49%) were vitamin D insufficient. Vitamin D insufficient group had a suggestive trend of being older (9.2 +/- 1.0 years vs. 8.5 +/- 1.3 years, p = 0.06) and more pubertally advanced (Tanner II: 7/20 vs. Tanner II: 1/21, p = 0.02). Mean dietary intake of vitamin D was 277 ( 146 IU/day (n = 41). Adequate intake for vitamin D (200 IU/day) was not met in 16/41 (39%); however, the dietary intake of vitamin D was not significantly different between the vitamin D insufficient and vitamin D sufficient groups.

  14. Prolonged adrenal insufficiency after unilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kulshreshtha, Bindu; Arora, Arpita; Aggarwal, Anshita; Bhardwaj, Minakshi

    2015-01-01

    The contralateral healthy adrenal in patients undergoing unilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing's is known to be suppressed temporarily and forms the basis of peri and postoperative steroids. We present four cases of Cushing's who had prolonged adrenal insufficiency with continued requirement for steroids for periods ranging 1-4 years after unilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing's. We further review literature regarding the recovery of the hypothalamo pituitary adrenal axis postsurgery in patients with Cushing's syndrome.

  15. Injectable silk foams for the treatment of cervical insufficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Eric P.

    Preterm birth is the leading cause of neonatal mortality, resulting in over 4,000 deaths each year. A significant risk factor for preterm birth is cervical insufficiency, the weakening and subsequent deformation of cervical tissue. Cervical insufficiency is both detectable and treatable but current treatments are lacking. The most common approach requires multiple invasive procedures. This work investigates the injection of silk foams, a minimally-invasive method for supporting cervical tissue. Silk offers many advantages for use as a biomaterial including strength, versatility, and biocompatibility. Injectable silk foams will minimize patient discomfort while also providing more targeted and personalized treatment. A battery of mechanical testing was undertaken to determine silk foam response under physiologically relevant loading and environmental conditions. Mechanical testing was paired with analysis of foam morphology and structure that illustrated the effects of injection on pore geometry and size. Biological response to silk foams was evaluated using an in vitro degradation study and subcutaneous in vivo implantation in a mouse model. Results showed that foams exceeded the mechanical requirements for stiffening cervical tissue, although the current injection process limits foam size. Injection was shown to cause measurable but localized foam deformation. This work indicates that silk foams are a feasible treatment option for cervical insufficiency but challenges remain with foam delivery.

  16. Impact of placental insufficiency on fetal skeletal muscle growth.

    PubMed

    Brown, Laura D; Hay, William W

    2016-11-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) caused by placental insufficiency is one of the most common and complex problems in perinatology, with no known cure. In pregnancies affected by placental insufficiency, a poorly functioning placenta restricts nutrient supply to the fetus and prevents normal fetal growth. Among other significant deficits in organ development, the IUGR fetus characteristically has less lean body and skeletal muscle mass than their appropriately-grown counterparts. Reduced skeletal muscle growth is not fully compensated after birth, as individuals who were born small for gestational age (SGA) from IUGR have persistent reductions in muscle mass and strength into adulthood. The consequences of restricted muscle growth and accelerated postnatal "catch-up" growth in the form of adiposity may contribute to the increased later life risk for visceral adiposity, peripheral insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease in individuals who were formerly IUGR. This review will discuss how an insufficient placenta results in impaired fetal skeletal muscle growth and how lifelong reductions in muscle mass might contribute to increased metabolic disease risk in this vulnerable population.

  17. Five-year treatment of chronic venous insufficiency with O-(β-hydroxyethyl)-rutosides: Safety aspects

    PubMed Central

    Stuard, S; Cesarone, Maria Rosaria; Belcaro, Gianni; Dugall, Mark; Ledda, Andrea; Cacchio, Marisa; Ricci, Andrea; Ippolito, Edmondo; Di Renzo, Andrea; Grossi, Maria Giovanna

    2008-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), and related signs and symptoms of venous and diabetic microangiopathy, can be effectively treated with O-(β-hydroxyethyl)-rutosides (HR). The aim of the present independent registry study was to evaluate HR in a long-term (five-year) period of administration that examined the tolerability and safety of HR. Patients with severe CVI and venous microangiopathy were included in the registry. Subjects who completed five years of treatment were considered in the analysis. Blood parameters, liver and renal function tests, microalbuminuria (in diabetic patients) and cholesterol levels were evaluated to assess the effects of HR treatment. Four groups were studied – group A (98 patients) received oral HR (1500 mg per day), group B (87 diabetic patients with CVI) was treated with 2 g of HR per day, group C (90 controls, including 42 diabetic patients) had no pharmacological treatment and group D (113 patients, including 48 diabetic patients) used elastic stockings. No significant negative changes in blood parameters were recorded at two and five years. Decreases in microalbuminuria and total cholesterol, and an increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were observed in HR-treated patients, particularly in diabetic patients. Minimal (nonsignificant) variations were observed in the groups that did not use HR. In conclusion, HR treatment is safe, and some positive effects from HR on cholesterol levels and microalbuminuria (in diabetic patients) that were previously observed may suggest potential new clinical applications. PMID:22477419

  18. Visualizing renal primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Deane, James A; Verghese, Elizabeth; Martelotto, Luciano G; Cain, Jason E; Galtseva, Alya; Rosenblum, Norman D; Watkins, D Neil; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2013-03-01

    Renal primary cilia are microscopic sensory organelles found on the apical surface of epithelial cells of the nephron and collecting duct. They are based upon a microtubular cytoskeleton, bounded by a specialized membrane, and contain an array of proteins that facilitate their assembly, maintenance and function. Cilium-based signalling is important for the control of epithelial differentiation and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various cystic kidney diseases and in renal repair. As such, visualizing renal primary cilia and understanding their composition has become an essential component of many studies of inherited kidney disease and mechanisms of epithelial regeneration. Primary cilia were initially identified in the kidney using electron microscopy and this remains a useful technique for the high resolution examination of these organelles. New reagents and techniques now also allow the structure and composition of primary cilia to be analysed in detail using fluorescence microscopy. Primary cilia can be imaged in situ in sections of kidney, and many renal-derived cell lines produce primary cilia in culture providing a simplified and accessible system in which to investigate these organelles. Here we outline microscopy-based techniques commonly used for studying renal primary cilia.

  19. Nox and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Holterman, Chet E; Read, Naomi C; Kennedy, Chris R J

    2015-04-01

    Since the first demonstration of Nox enzyme expression in the kidney in the early 1990s and the subsequent identification of Nox4, or RENOX, a decade later, it has become apparent that the Nox family of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating enzymes plays an integral role in the normal physiological function of the kidney. As our knowledge of Nox expression patterns and functions in various structures and specialized cell types within the kidney grows, so does the realization that Nox-derived oxidative stress contributes significantly to a wide variety of renal pathologies through their ability to modify lipids and proteins, damage DNA and activate transcriptional programmes. Diverse studies demonstrate key roles for Nox-derived ROS in kidney fibrosis, particularly in settings of chronic renal disease such as diabetic nephropathy. As the most abundant Nox family member in the kidney, much emphasis has been placed on the role of Nox4 in this setting. However, an ever growing body of work continues to uncover key roles for other Nox family members, not only in diabetic kidney disease, but in a diverse array of renal pathological conditions. The objective of the present review is to highlight the latest novel developments in renal Nox biology with an emphasis not only on diabetic nephropathy but many of the other renal disease contexts where oxidative stress is implicated.

  20. Renal disease in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Rafael Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Chronic renal disease represents a problem of public health in Colombia. Its prevalence has increased in last decade, with a prevalence of 44.7 patients per million (ppm) in 1993 to 294.6 ppm in 2004, considering that only 56.2% of the population has access to the health. This increase complies with the implementation of Law 100 of 1993, offering greater coverage of health services to the Colombian population. The cost of these pathologies is equivalent to the 2.49% of the budget for health of the nation. The three most common causes of renal failure are diabetes mellitus (DM; 30%), arterial hypertension (30%), and glomerulonephritis (7.85%). In incident patients, the DM accounts for 32.9%. The rate of global mortality is 15.8%, 17.4% in hemodialysis and 15.1% in peritoneal dialysis. In 2004, 467 renal transplants were made, 381 of deceased donor with an incidence of 10.3 ppm. The excessive cost of these pathologies can cause the nation's health care system to collapse if preventative steps are not taken. In December of 2004, the Colombian Association of Nephrology with the participation of the Latin American Society of Nephrology and Arterial Hypertension wrote the "Declaration of Bogotá," committing the state's scientific societies and promotional health companies to develop a model of attention for renal health that, in addition to implementing national registries, continues to manage renal disease. PMID:17162422

  1. [The focal renal lesions].

    PubMed

    Tuma, Jan

    2013-06-01

    The focal renal lesions are altogether common. Most frequently are found Columna Bertini hypertrophies (so called pseudotumors) and simple renal cysts. The role of sonography in the practice is to distinguish pseudotumors from real renal tumors, and simple renal cysts from complex cysts. The differentiation of complex renal cysts is possible with the help of the CEUS (= contrast enhanced ultrasound) and other imaging modalities such as CT or MRI. In these cases, the CEUS imaging agent has clear advantages over CT and MRI, because it is composed of gas bubbles, which are only slightly smaller than red blood cells and remains exclusively intravascularly while the CT and MRI contrast agents diffuse into the interstitial space without any real perfusion. The real tumors can be differentiated from certain focal non-tumorous changes based on the ultrasound and clinic. The further differentiation of individual kidney tumors and metastases using ultrasound, MRI, CT and CEUS is only partly possible. In all uncertain or unclear cases, therefore, an open or ultrasound-guided biopsy is useful.

  2. Can renal infarction occur after renal cyst aspiration? Case report.

    PubMed

    Emre, Habib; Soyoral, Yasemin Usul; Tanik, Serhat; Gecit, Ilhan; Begenik, Huseyin; Pirincci, Necip; Erkoc, Reha

    2011-01-01

    Renal infarction (RI) is a rarely seen disorder, and the diagnosis is often missed. The two major causes of RI are thromboemboli originhating from a thrombus in the heart or aorta, and in-situ thrombosis of a renal artery. We report a case of RI that developed due to renal artery and vein thrombosis, as confirmed by pathological evaluation of the nephrectomy material, three weeks after renal cyst aspiration.

  3. Renal (Kidney) Manifestations in TSC

    MedlinePlus

    ... PKD1 genes, severe kidney disease can develop in infancy or early childhood and renal failure most often ... of renal angiomyolipoma and TSC is in its infancy and we will have further information in a ...

  4. [Management of renal stones].

    PubMed

    Lechevallier, E; Traxer, O; Saussine, C

    2008-12-01

    The management of renal stones needs a recent and good quality imaging. Contrast medium injection is optional. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is the most common treatment of renal stones. ESWL is indicated as first line treatment for less than 1.5cm stones. The stone-free (SF) rate at 3 months of ESWL is 70-80%. Results of ESWL for stones with more than 1000UH density or located in the lower calyx are poor. Flexible ureteroscopy (URS) is indicated in case of ESWL failure or for hyperdense, 1-2cm stones. The SF rate of flexible is 80%. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is indicated for complex or more than 2cm stones. Asymptomatic and non infected stones, especially if located in the lower calyx, do not need urological treatment but must be followed up. In all cases, renal stones needs a metabolic evaluation and treatment, and annual follow-up.

  5. Renal denervation and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schlaich, Markus P; Krum, Henry; Sobotka, Paul A; Esler, Murray D

    2011-06-01

    Essential hypertension remains one of the biggest challenges in medicine with an enormous impact on both individual and society levels. With the exception of relatively rare monogenetic forms of hypertension, there is now general agreement that the condition is multifactorial in nature and hence requires therapeutic approaches targeting several aspects of the underlying pathophysiology. Accordingly, all major guidelines promote a combination of lifestyle interventions and combination pharmacotherapy to reach target blood pressure (BP) levels in order to reduce overall cardiovascular risk in affected patients. Although this approach works for many, it fails in a considerable number of patients for various reasons including drug-intolerance, noncompliance, physician inertia, and others, leaving them at unacceptably high cardiovascular risk. The quest for additional therapeutic approaches to safely and effectively manage hypertension continues and expands to the reappraisal of older concepts such as renal denervation. Based on the robust preclinical and clinical data surrounding the role of renal sympathetic nerves in various aspects of BP control very recent efforts have led to the development of a novel catheter-based approach using radiofrequency (RF) energy to selectively target and disrupt the renal nerves. The available evidence from the limited number of uncontrolled hypertensive patients in whom renal denervation has been performed are auspicious and indicate that the procedure has a favorable safety profile and is associated with a substantial and presumably sustained BP reduction. Although promising, a myriad of questions are far from being conclusively answered and require our concerted research efforts to explore the full potential and possible risks of this approach. Here we briefly review the science surrounding renal denervation, summarize the current data on safety and efficacy of renal nerve ablation, and discuss some of the open questions that need

  6. Renal adaptation during hibernation.

    PubMed

    Jani, Alkesh; Martin, Sandra L; Jain, Swati; Keys, Daniel; Edelstein, Charles L

    2013-12-01

    Hibernators periodically undergo profound physiological changes including dramatic reductions in metabolic, heart, and respiratory rates and core body temperature. This review discusses the effect of hypoperfusion and hypothermia observed during hibernation on glomerular filtration and renal plasma flow, as well as specific adaptations in renal architecture, vasculature, the renin-angiotensin system, and upregulation of possible protective mechanisms during the extreme conditions endured by hibernating mammals. Understanding the mechanisms of protection against organ injury during hibernation may provide insights into potential therapies for organ injury during cold storage and reimplantation during transplantation.

  7. Renal Failure in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Balofsky, Ari; Fedarau, Maksim

    2016-01-01

    Renal failure during pregnancy affects both mother and fetus, and may be related to preexisting disease or develop secondary to diseases of pregnancy. Causes include hypovolemia, sepsis, shock, preeclampsia, thrombotic microangiopathies, and renal obstruction. Treatment focuses on supportive measures, while pharmacologic treatment is viewed as second-line therapy, and is more useful in mitigating harmful effects than treating the underlying cause. When supportive measures and pharmacotherapy prove inadequate, dialysis may be required, with the goal being to prolong pregnancy until delivery is feasible. Outcomes and recommendations depend primarily on the underlying cause.

  8. Physiology of the Renal Interstitium

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Long overlooked as the virtual compartment and then strictly characterized through descriptive morphologic analysis, the renal interstitium has finally been associated with function. With identification of interstitial renin- and erythropoietin-producing cells, the most prominent endocrine functions of the kidney have now been attributed to the renal interstitium. This article reviews the functional role of renal interstitium. PMID:25813241

  9. The Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial: Design, Methods, and Baseline Data

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective This report describes the design and methodology of the Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial (CITT), the first large-scale, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial evaluating treatments for convergence insufficiency (CI) in children. We also report the clinical and demographic characteristics of patients. Methods We prospectively randomized children 9 to 17 years of age to one of four treatment groups: 1) home-based pencil push-ups, 2) home-based computer vergence/accommodative therapy and pencil push-ups, 3) office-based vergence/accommodative therapy with home reinforcement, 4) office-based placebo therapy. Outcome data on the Convergence Insufficiency Symptom Survey (CISS) score (primary outcome), near point of convergence (NPC), and positive fusional vergence were collected after 12 weeks of active treatment and again at 6 and 12 months post-treatment. Results The CITT enrolled 221 children with symptomatic CI with a mean age of 12.0 years (SD = +2.3). The clinical profile of the cohort at baseline was 9Δ exophoria at near (+/− 4.4) and 2Δ exophoria (+/−2.8) at distance, CISS score = 30 (+/−9.0), NPC = 14 cm (+/− 7.5), and near positive fusional vergence break = 13 Δ (+/− 4.6). There were no statistically significant nor clinically relevant differences between treatment groups with respect to baseline characteristics (p > 0.05). Conclusion Hallmark features of the study design include formal definitions of conditions and outcomes, standardized diagnostic and treatment protocols, a placebo treatment arm, masked outcome examinations, and the CISS score outcome measure. The baseline data reported herein define the clinical profile of those enrolled into the CITT. PMID:18300086

  10. Oxalate Nephropathy Complicating Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass: An Underrecognized Cause of Irreversible Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, Samih H.; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Said, Samar M.; Stokes, Michael B.; Largoza, Maria V.; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Markowitz, Glen S.

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: The most common bariatric surgery is Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), which has been associated with hyperoxaluria and nephrolithiasis. We report a novel association of RYGB with renal insufficiency as a result of oxalate nephropathy. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Eleven cases of oxalate nephropathy after RYGB were identified from the Renal Pathology Laboratory of Columbia University. The clinical features, pathologic findings, and outcomes are described. Results: Patients were predominantly white (72.7%) with a mean age of 61.3 yr. Indications for RYGB included morbid obesity (eight patients) and reconstruction after total gastrectomy for gastric cancer (three patients). All 11 patients had a history of hypertension, and 9 were diabetic. Patients presented with acute renal failure, often superimposed on mild chronic renal insufficiency (n = 7), at a median of 12 mo after RYGB. The mean creatinine at baseline, at discovery of acute renal failure, and at biopsy was 1.5, 5.0, and 6.5 mg/dl, respectively. Renal biopsies revealed diffuse tubular degenerative changes, abundant tubular calcium oxalate deposits, and varying degrees of tubulointerstitial scarring. In addition, seven biopsies had underlying diabetic glomerulosclerosis and two had glomerulosclerosis attributable to obesity and hypertension. Eight of 11 patients rapidly progressed to ESRD and required hemodialysis at a mean of 3.2 wk after renal biopsy. The remaining three patients were left with significant chronic kidney disease. Conclusions: Oxalate nephropathy is an underrecognized complication of RYGB and typically results in rapid progression to ESRD. Patients with pre-existing renal disease may be at higher risk for this complication. PMID:18701613

  11. [THE MECHANISMS OF ISCHEMIC MITRAL VALVE INSUFFICIENCY FORMATION].

    PubMed

    Rudenko, S A

    2015-07-01

    In clinic in the period from 2012 to 2014 in 142 patients were performed interventions on the mitral valve for coronary heart disease and ischemic mitral valve insufficiency (MVI). The majority of patients were able to work, its witness for social-economic significance of problem. The main reason of the ischemic MVI arised were the dilatation of mitral valve fibrousing and substitution of papillar muscles for left ventricle remodelling. Symmetrical deformation of mitral valve arised in most cases after anterior-septal myocardium infarction, left ventricle global remodelling and apical substitution of papillar muscles; asymmetrical ones--after posterior myocardial infarction for local left ventricle papillar muscles. PMID:26591216

  12. A patient with concurrent primary hyperaldosteronism and adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Francisco; Jackson, Thomas W; Isales, Carlos M

    2004-12-01

    A 73-year-old man with history of longstanding primary hyperaldosteronism developed adrenal insufficiency after he ruptured an abdominal aortic aneurysm and had a prolonged hypotensive episode. The patient presented as a diagnostic dilemma with recurrent hypotensive episodes and hypokalemia. A cosyntropin (Cortrosyn) stimulation test demonstrated a blunted cortisol response while at the same time having a suppressed plasma renin activity level and an elevated plasma aldosterone value. Diagnosis of Addison disease and concurrent primary hyperaldosteronism resulted in the patient's being treated with an unusual combination of prednisone and spironolactone followed by marked improvement in his symptoms.

  13. Skeletal Dysplasias That Cause Thoracic Insufficiency in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    İpek, Mehmet Sah; Akgul Ozmen, Cihan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Skeletal dysplasias are a heterogeneous group of conditions associated with various abnormalities of the skeleton. Some of them are perinatally lethal and can be diagnosed at birth. Lethality is usually due to thoracic underdevelopment and lung hypoplasia. A correct diagnosis and typing of the skeletal disorder is essential for the prognosis as is genetic counseling of the family. A retrospective review of 12 cases of clinico-radiologic diagnosis of skeletal dysplasia, leading to thoracic insufficiency, was conducted. We aimed to make differential diagnosis with special emphasis on radiological findings, and to emphasize the importance of parental counseling. PMID:27057899

  14. Prevalence of Vitamin D Insufficiency in Qatar: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Badawi, Alaa; Arora, Paul; Sadoun, Eman; Al-Thani, Al-Anoud; Thani, Mohamed H. Al

    2012-01-01

    Qatar has a high burden of chronic diseases including obesity, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Low serum vitamin D levels have been implicated in the development and progression of a range of these chronic conditions. The prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency in the general population of Qatar has still not been investigated. The aim of this study was to carry out a systematic review of published studies documenting the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency in the Qatari population. A search strategy was developed for online databases (PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, Embase and Embase Classic) between 1980 to the last week of August 2012, and bibliographies of the included studies were further searched for additional reports. Search terms used were QATAR and VITAMIN D. Studies reporting the serum levels of vitamin D in several Qatari sub-populations were identified. Weighted-average vitamin D serum levels and prevalence of low vitamin D status (<75 nmol/L) were calculated. Subgroup analysis was carried out by age. The quality of each study was evaluated according to four criteria: national representativeness, representation of males and females, the sample size, and the sampling protocol. A total of 16 relevant publications were identified, and 8 of these (reporting from 7 unique studies) met our inclusion and exclusion criteria with a total number of 1,699 Qatari subjects. The pooled sample size weighted-average vitamin D concentration (±SD) was 45.3±14.3 nmol/L (95% CI: 44.6-46.0; range 29.2-66.9 nmol/L). The weighted-average prevalence of low vitamin D status was 90.4% (95% CI: 90.1-91.0; range 83%-91%). Age was inversely correlated with vitamin D levels and directly with its insufficiency/deficiency prevalence. There have only been a few studies on the prevalence of low vitamin D in Qatar a very high prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency in Qatar that increases with age has been suggested. The present report

  15. New Directions for the Treatment of Adrenal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Babot, Gerard; Hadjidemetriou, Irene; King, Peter James; Guasti, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal disease, whether primary, caused by defects in the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis, or secondary, caused by defects outside the HPA axis, usually results in adrenal insufficiency, which requires lifelong daily replacement of corticosteroids. However, this kind of therapy is far from ideal as physiological demand for steroids varies considerably throughout the day and increases during periods of stress. The development of alternative curative strategies is therefore needed. In this review, we describe the latest technologies aimed at either isolating or generating de novo cells that could be used for novel, regenerative medicine application in the adrenocortical field. PMID:25999916

  16. [CORRECTION OF ENTERAL INSUFFICIENCY SYNDROME IN PATIENTS, SUFFERING DIFFUSE PERITONITIS].

    PubMed

    Ioffe, I V; Lesnoy, V V

    2016-02-01

    The results of treatment of 65 patients, suffering diffuse peritonitis, were analyzed. For the abdominal cavity sanation and intestinal decontamination the adopted selective bacteriophages (polyvalent pyobacteriophage, intesti-bacteriophage, and the coliproteus one) were applied. The abdominal cavity state was estimated while doing a programmed relaparotomy. Bacteriologic investigation of exudate, excreted along nasointestinal probe, and of peritoneal exudate was conducted. The intestinal motor-evacuation function restoration was estimated in accordance to data of ultrasonographic investigation. Application of the procedure proposed have promoted earlier restoration of intestinal motor and the barrier functions, and elimination of enteral insufficiency syndrome.

  17. Acute renal toxicity after ingestion of Lava light liquid.

    PubMed

    Erickson, T B; Aks, S E; Zabaneh, R; Reid, R

    1996-06-01

    A 65-year-old man with a history of alcohol abuse and seizure disorder presented to the emergency department with altered mental status, increased anion gap acidosis, phenytoin toxicity, and acute kidney failure. The patient had ingested the liquid contents of a Lava light, which contained chlorinated paraffin, polyethylene glycol (molecular weight 200), kerosene, and micro-crystalline wax. Gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometry of the patient's blood produced results consistent with the same analysis of the Lava light contents. After 3 days of declining mental status and worsening kidney function, the patient required hemodialysis. After a prolonged hospitalization, the patient was discharged home with residual renal insufficiency. Although multifactorial, the associated renal toxicity was most probably related to the low molecular weight polyethylene glycol content of the lamp's liquid contents. PMID:8644972

  18. Serial Radiohippurate Renal Scintiphotography

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthall, Leonard; Greyson, N. David; Martin, Robert H.

    1970-01-01

    The results of serial radiohippurate scintiphotography in 222 patients are analyzed. The findings in various renal diseases are discussed and compared with those obtained from the excretory urogram, BUN, serum creatinine and creatinine clearance. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4aFIG. 4bFIG. 5aFIG. 5b PMID:5536740

  19. Management of Renal Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Nalbant, Ismail; Can Sener, Nevzat; Firat, Hacer; Yeşil, Süleyman; Zengin, Kürşad; Yalcınkaya, Fatih; Imamoglu, Abdurrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Renal cysts have a high prevalence in the general population, and their estimated incidence increases with age. Renal cyst aspiration (usually with sclerotherapy) or open/laparoscopic decortication is a generally effective and safe method in the treatment of symptomatic simple renal cysts. The success rates of laparoscopic decortication and percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy were compared to assist in the decision making for the procedure. Methods: A total of 184 patients with symptomatic simple renal cysts were treated with either laparoscopic decortication in 149 cases or percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy in 35 cases. The follow-up period was approximately 35 months, and the symptomatic and radiologic success rates of the 2 techniques were compared retrospectively. Results: Laparoscopic decortication was found to have high success rates, a low recurrence rate, and minimal morbidity. Percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy is an outpatient procedure with a minimally higher recurrence rate. Conclusion: When a symptomatic cyst is encountered and treatment of the cyst is indicated, laparoscopic decortication is a more efficient method that offers better results than percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy. PMID:25848184

  20. Renal artery stenosis: Up-date on diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Thomas; Macharzina, Roland; Rastan, Aljoscha; Beschorner, Ulrich; Noory, Elias

    2014-01-01

    Significant renal artery stenosis (RAS) can cause or result in deterioration of arterial hypertension and may promote the development of renal insufficiency. The activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system results in structural heart disease and may impact patient survival. Technical improvements of diagnostic and interventional endovascular tools have led to a more widespread use of endoluminal renal artery revascularization and extension of the indications for this type of therapy during the past two decades. Whereas balloon angioplasty is still the method of choice for the treatment of fibromuscular dysplasia, stent implantation is indicated in ostial atherosclerotic RAS. However, none of the so far published or presented randomized controlled trials could prove a beneficial outcome of RAS revascularization compared to medical management. As a result of these negative trials including the largest published trial to date, the ASTRAL trial, referrals to endovascular renal artery revascularization have declined and, moreover, reimbursement of these procedures has become a matter of debate. Crucial for a clinical benefit following revascularization of RAS is proper patient selection, revascularization being only indicated after proof of hemodynamic relevance of RAS. This article summarizes the appropriate diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected RAS, discusses the limitations of the results published so far and their impact on the indication for RAS revascularization.

  1. Abdominal thromboses of splanchnic, renal and ovarian veins.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, Valerio; Martinelli, Ida

    2012-09-01

    Thromboses of abdominal veins outside the iliac-caval axis are rare but clinically relevant. Early deaths after splanchnic vein thrombosis occur in 5-30% of cases. Sequelae can be liver failure or bowel infarction after splanchnic vein thrombosis, renal insufficiency after renal vein thrombosis, ovarian infarction after ovarian vein thrombosis. Local cancer or infections are rare in Budd-Chiari syndrome, and common for other sites. Inherited thrombophilia is detected in 30-50% of patients. Myeloproliferative neoplasms are the main cause of splanchnic vein thrombosis: 20-50% of patients have an overt myeloproliferative neoplasm and/or carry the molecular marker JAK2 V617F. Renal vein thrombosis is closely related to nephrotic syndrome; finally, ovarian vein thrombosis can complicate puerperium. Heparin is used for acute treatment, sometimes in conjunction with systemic or local thrombolysis. Vitamin K-antagonists are recommended for 3-6 months, and long-term in patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome, unprovoked splanchnic vein thrombosis, or renal vein thrombosis with a permanent prothrombotic state such as nephrotic syndrome.

  2. [Role of angioplasty in the treatment of renal artery stenosis].

    PubMed

    Armero, S; Bonello, L; Paganelli, F; Barragan, P; Roquebert, P-O; Commeau, P

    2011-12-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis is frequent and is associated with a high incidence of morbidity and mortality, with a strong correlation with coronary artery disease, (Kalra et al., 2005; Cheung et al., 2002; Guo et al., 2007 [1-3]). The atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis is an independent predictive factor of death (Conlon et al., 1998 [4]). The treatment of this lesion does not have strong evidence. A lot of studies in this area suggest the angioplasty is superior in a big majority between surgery, and angioplasty with stent is superior between balloon angioplasty, but some studies fail to prove the superiority of angioplasty versus medical treatment. These studies have sadly a lot of mistakes and nowadays we don't know what is the treatment for our patients in a lot of cases. The angioplasty is indicated when there is a failure of antihypertensive medications for control of blood pressure, when it is associated with a renal insufficiency quickly progressive or when there is a lesion on each renal artery. Other studies must be organized for prove the superiority of angioplasty when there is a real stenosis, maybe with the use of fractional flow reserve.

  3. Urinary sodium and chloride during renal salt retention.

    PubMed

    Sherman, R A; Eisinger, R P

    1983-09-01

    One hundred ten episodes of renal salt retention (urinary sodium and/or chloride less than 10 mEq/L) were studied retrospectively to determine the significance of discordance of urinary sodium from chloride. In 16 episodes the urinary sodium exceeded chloride by at least 15 mEq/L. This disparity was associated with the necessity for urinary excretion of substantial quantities of poorly reabsorbed anions (penicillin, ketones, or diatrizoate), a rapidly falling serum bicarbonate level (due to resolving metabolic or developing respiratory alkalosis), or substantial renal insufficiency (serum creatinine greater than 3 mg/dL). In 14 of 110 episodes, urinary chloride exceeded urinary sodium by at least 15 mEq/L. These patients were more often oliguric and had a higher mean serum chloride than patients without this dissociation. In patients with oliguria, hyponatremia, or metabolic alkalosis, measurement of urinary sodium or chloride alone will, in a substantial number of cases, fail to detect renal salt retention. When evidence is sought for renal salt retention, both urinary sodium and chloride should be determined. PMID:6613992

  4. Ablative therapies for renal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Rajan; Leveillee, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Owing to an increased use of diagnostic imaging for evaluating patients with other abdominal conditions, incidentally discovered kidney masses now account for a majority of renal tumors. Renal ablative therapy is assuming a more important role in patients with borderline renal impairment. Renal ablation uses heat or cold to bring about cell death. Radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation are two such procedures, and 5-year results are now emerging from both modalities. Renal biopsy at the time of ablation is extremely important in order to establish tissue diagnosis. Real-time temperature monitoring at the time of radiofrequency ablation is very useful to ensure adequacy of ablation. PMID:21789083

  5. Mifepristone Accelerates HPA Axis Recovery in Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Cohan, Pejman

    2016-01-01

    Context. Transient secondary adrenal insufficiency (SAI) is an expected complication following successful adenomectomy of ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas or unilateral adrenalectomy for cortisol-secreting adrenal adenomas. To date, no pharmacological therapy has been shown to hasten recovery of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in this clinical scenario. Case Description. A 33-year-old woman underwent uncomplicated unilateral adrenalectomy for a 3.7 cm cortisol-secreting adrenal adenoma. Postoperatively, she developed SAI and was placed on hydrocortisone 15 mg/day, given in divided doses. In the ensuing six years, the patient's HPA axis failed to recover and she remained corticosteroid-dependent. Quarterly biochemical testing (after withholding hydrocortisone for 18 hours) consistently yielded undetectable serum cortisol and subnormal plasma ACTH levels. While she was on hydrocortisone 15 mg/day, mifepristone was initiated and gradually titrated to a maintenance dose of 600 mg/day after 5 months. Rapid recovery of the HPA axis was subsequently noted with ACTH rising into the supranormal range at 4 months followed by a subsequent rise in cortisol levels into the normal range. After 6 months, the dose of hydrocortisone and mifepristone was lowered and both were ultimately stopped after 8 months. The HPA axis remains normal after an additional 16 months of follow-up. Conclusion. Mifepristone successfully restored the HPA axis in a woman with prolonged secondary adrenal insufficiency (SAI) after adrenalectomy for Cushing's syndrome (CS).

  6. Primary symptomatic adrenal insufficiency induced by megestrol acetate.

    PubMed

    Delitala, A P; Fanciulli, G; Maioli, M; Piga, G; Delitala, G

    2013-01-01

    Megestrol acetate (MA) is a progestational agent for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer and endometrial cancer. MA has also been used to promote weight gain in malnourished elderly patients, in patients with immunodeficiency virus and in cancer-induced cachexia. In addition to thromboembolic disease, MA may induce hyperglycaemia, osteoporosis, suppression of the gonadal axis, and Cushing's syndrome. MA has also been shown to cause symptomatic suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis owing to its intrinsic glucocorticoid-like effect. Three additional patients are presented who developed symptomatic adrenal insufficiency while they were receiving 160-320 mg MA daily. The patients were treated with cortisone acetate supplements, had clear evidence of HPA-axis suppression but recovered fully after MA was discontinued. Patients receiving MA might have an inadequate adrenal response during stressful conditions, possibly because 160-320 mg MA daily may not provide adequate protection to prevent the symptoms of adrenal insufficiency. The adverse MA effect on the HPA axis is probably not well recognised in clinical practice, and clinicians need an increased awareness of the endocrine complications secondary to MA treatment.

  7. The Soft Palate Friendly Speech Bulb for Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kahlon, Monaliza; Gupta, Shilpa; Dhingra, Parvinder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Velopharyngeal insufficiency is an anatomic defect of the soft palate making palatopharyngeal sphincter incomplete. It is an important concern to address in patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate. Speech aid prosthesis or speech bulbs are best choice in cases where surgically repaired soft palate is too short to contact pharyngeal walls during function but these prosthesis have been associated with inadequate marginal closure, ulcerations and patient discomfort. Here is a case report of untreated bilateral cleft lip and palate associated with palatal insufficiency treated by means of palate friendly innovative speech bulb. This modified speech bulb is a combination of hard acrylic and soft lining material. The hard self-curing acrylic resin covers only the hard palate area and a permanent soft silicone lining material covering the soft palate area. A claw-shaped wire component was extended backwards from acrylic and was embedded in soft silicone to aid in retention and approximation of two materials. The advantage of adding the soft lining material in posterior area helped in covering the adequate superior extension and margins for maximal pharyngeal activity. This also improved the hypernasality, speech, comfort and overall patient acceptance. PMID:27790589

  8. Mifepristone Accelerates HPA Axis Recovery in Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Cohan, Pejman

    2016-01-01

    Context. Transient secondary adrenal insufficiency (SAI) is an expected complication following successful adenomectomy of ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas or unilateral adrenalectomy for cortisol-secreting adrenal adenomas. To date, no pharmacological therapy has been shown to hasten recovery of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in this clinical scenario. Case Description. A 33-year-old woman underwent uncomplicated unilateral adrenalectomy for a 3.7 cm cortisol-secreting adrenal adenoma. Postoperatively, she developed SAI and was placed on hydrocortisone 15 mg/day, given in divided doses. In the ensuing six years, the patient's HPA axis failed to recover and she remained corticosteroid-dependent. Quarterly biochemical testing (after withholding hydrocortisone for 18 hours) consistently yielded undetectable serum cortisol and subnormal plasma ACTH levels. While she was on hydrocortisone 15 mg/day, mifepristone was initiated and gradually titrated to a maintenance dose of 600 mg/day after 5 months. Rapid recovery of the HPA axis was subsequently noted with ACTH rising into the supranormal range at 4 months followed by a subsequent rise in cortisol levels into the normal range. After 6 months, the dose of hydrocortisone and mifepristone was lowered and both were ultimately stopped after 8 months. The HPA axis remains normal after an additional 16 months of follow-up. Conclusion. Mifepristone successfully restored the HPA axis in a woman with prolonged secondary adrenal insufficiency (SAI) after adrenalectomy for Cushing's syndrome (CS). PMID:27516913

  9. Adrenal insufficiency and adrenal replacement therapy. Current status in Spain.

    PubMed

    Aulinas, Anna; Casanueva, Felipe; Goñi, Fernando; Monereo, Susana; Moreno, Basilio; Picó, Antonio; Puig-Domingo, Manel; Salvador, Javier; Tinahones, Francisco J; Webb, Susan M

    2013-03-01

    Adrenal insufficiency (AI) is a rare endocrine disease, associated to increased mortality if left untreated. It can be due to a primary failure of the adrenal glands (primary AI) or malfunctioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) (secondary AI). The lack of data on incidence/prevalence of adrenal insufficiency in Spain complicates any evaluation of the magnitude of the problem in our country. Initial symptoms are non-specific, so often there is a delay in diagnosis. Current therapy with available glucocorticoids is associated with decreased quality of life in patients with treated AI, as well as with increased mortality and morbidity, probably related to both over-treatment and lack of hydrocortisone, associated with non-physiological peaks and troughs of the drug over the 24 hours. The availability of a new drug with a modified dual release (immediate and retarded), that requires one only daily dose, improves and simplifies the treatment, increases compliance as well as quality of life, morbidity and possibly mortality. This revision deals with the knowledge on the situation both globally and in Spain, prior to the availability of this new drug.

  10. Adolescent Premature Ovarian Insufficiency Following Human Papillomavirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Harvey Rodrick Grenville

    2014-01-01

    Three young women who developed premature ovarian insufficiency following quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination presented to a general practitioner in rural New South Wales, Australia. The unrelated girls were aged 16, 16, and 18 years at diagnosis. Each had received HPV vaccinations prior to the onset of ovarian decline. Vaccinations had been administered in different regions of the state of New South Wales and the 3 girls lived in different towns in that state. Each had been prescribed the oral contraceptive pill to treat menstrual cycle abnormalities prior to investigation and diagnosis. Vaccine research does not present an ovary histology report of tested rats but does present a testicular histology report. Enduring ovarian capacity and duration of function following vaccination is unresearched in preclinical studies, clinical and postlicensure studies. Postmarketing surveillance does not accurately represent diagnoses in adverse event notifications and can neither represent unnotified cases nor compare incident statistics with vaccine course administration rates. The potential significance of a case series of adolescents with idiopathic premature ovarian insufficiency following HPV vaccination presenting to a general practice warrants further research. Preservation of reproductive health is a primary concern in the recipient target group. Since this group includes all prepubertal and pubertal young women, demonstration of ongoing, uncompromised safety for the ovary is urgently required. This matter needs to be resolved for the purposes of population health and public vaccine confidence. PMID:26425627

  11. Hypophosphatemia and recovery of post-hepatectomy liver insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Karanicolas, Paul J.; Zih, Francis S. W.; Cheng, Eva; Wong, Julia; Hanna, Sherif; Coburn, Natalie G.; Law, Calvin H. L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypophosphatemia (HP) is frequent following liver resection, and thought to represent use of phosphate during liver regeneration. We sought to evaluate the association of post-hepatectomy HP with liver insufficiency and recovery. Methods Liver resections were retrospectively reviewed from 2009 to 2012 at a single institution. We explored the relationship between HP (defined as serum phosphate ≤0.65 mmol/L), occurrence of initial liver insufficiency (ILI) [bilirubin >50 µmol/L, international normalized ratio (INR) >1.7 within 72 hours of surgery] and in-hospital recovery of ILI. Secondary outcomes included 30-day post-operative major morbidity (Clavien grade 3 and 4 complications), mortality, and re-admission. Results Among 402 patients, 223 (55.5%) experienced HP and 64 (15.9%) met our definition of ILI, of which 53 (82.8%) recovered. Length of stay, 30-day post-operative major morbidity, mortality, and re-admission were similar between patients with and without HP. Among patients with ILI, 44 (68.8%) experienced HP. Following ILI, patients with HP recovered more often than those with NP (90.9% vs. 65.0%; P=0.03). Conclusions In patients who experience post-hepatectomy ILI, HP is associated with improved recovery, potentially indicating more efficient liver regeneration. Further studies should explore the usefulness of post-hepatectomy HP as an early prognostic factor of recovery from ILI. PMID:27275463

  12. Mifepristone Accelerates HPA Axis Recovery in Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Context. Transient secondary adrenal insufficiency (SAI) is an expected complication following successful adenomectomy of ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas or unilateral adrenalectomy for cortisol-secreting adrenal adenomas. To date, no pharmacological therapy has been shown to hasten recovery of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in this clinical scenario. Case Description. A 33-year-old woman underwent uncomplicated unilateral adrenalectomy for a 3.7 cm cortisol-secreting adrenal adenoma. Postoperatively, she developed SAI and was placed on hydrocortisone 15 mg/day, given in divided doses. In the ensuing six years, the patient's HPA axis failed to recover and she remained corticosteroid-dependent. Quarterly biochemical testing (after withholding hydrocortisone for 18 hours) consistently yielded undetectable serum cortisol and subnormal plasma ACTH levels. While she was on hydrocortisone 15 mg/day, mifepristone was initiated and gradually titrated to a maintenance dose of 600 mg/day after 5 months. Rapid recovery of the HPA axis was subsequently noted with ACTH rising into the supranormal range at 4 months followed by a subsequent rise in cortisol levels into the normal range. After 6 months, the dose of hydrocortisone and mifepristone was lowered and both were ultimately stopped after 8 months. The HPA axis remains normal after an additional 16 months of follow-up. Conclusion. Mifepristone successfully restored the HPA axis in a woman with prolonged secondary adrenal insufficiency (SAI) after adrenalectomy for Cushing's syndrome (CS). PMID:27516913

  13. [Renal abnormalities in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Samia, Barbouch; Hazgui, Faiçal; Abdelghani, Khaoula Ben; Hamida, Fethi Ben; Goucha, Rym; Hedri, Hafedh; Taarit, Chokri Ben; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Kheder, Adel

    2012-07-01

    We will study the epidemiologic, clinical, biological, therapeutic, prognostic characteristics and predictive factors of development of nephropathy in ankylosing spondylitis patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical record of 32 cases with renal involvement among 212 cases of ankylosing spondylitis followed in our service during the period spread out between 1978 and 2006. The renal involvement occurred in all patients a mean of 12 years after the clinical onset of the rheumatic disease. Thirty-two patients presented one or more signs of renal involvement: microscopic hematuria in 22 patients, proteinuria in 23 patients, nephrotic syndrome in 11 patients and decreased renal function in 24 patients (75%). Secondary renal amyloidosis (13 patients), which corresponds to a prevalence of 6,1% and tubulointerstitial nephropathy (7 patients) were the most common cause of renal involvement in ankylosing spondylitis followed by IgA nephropathy (4 patients). Seventeen patients evolved to the end stage renal disease after an average time of 29.8 ± 46 months. The average follow-up of the patients was 4,4 years. By comparing the 32 patients presenting a SPA and renal disease to 88 with SPA and without nephropathy, we detected the predictive factors of occurred of nephropathy: tobacco, intense inflammatory syndrome, sacroileite stage 3 or 4 and presence of column bamboo. The finding of 75% of the patients presented a renal failure at the time of the diagnosis of renal involvement suggests that evidence of renal abnormality involvement should be actively sought in this disease. PMID:22520483

  14. [Renal abnormalities in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Samia, Barbouch; Hazgui, Faiçal; Abdelghani, Khaoula Ben; Hamida, Fethi Ben; Goucha, Rym; Hedri, Hafedh; Taarit, Chokri Ben; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Kheder, Adel

    2012-07-01

    We will study the epidemiologic, clinical, biological, therapeutic, prognostic characteristics and predictive factors of development of nephropathy in ankylosing spondylitis patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical record of 32 cases with renal involvement among 212 cases of ankylosing spondylitis followed in our service during the period spread out between 1978 and 2006. The renal involvement occurred in all patients a mean of 12 years after the clinical onset of the rheumatic disease. Thirty-two patients presented one or more signs of renal involvement: microscopic hematuria in 22 patients, proteinuria in 23 patients, nephrotic syndrome in 11 patients and decreased renal function in 24 patients (75%). Secondary renal amyloidosis (13 patients), which corresponds to a prevalence of 6,1% and tubulointerstitial nephropathy (7 patients) were the most common cause of renal involvement in ankylosing spondylitis followed by IgA nephropathy (4 patients). Seventeen patients evolved to the end stage renal disease after an average time of 29.8 ± 46 months. The average follow-up of the patients was 4,4 years. By comparing the 32 patients presenting a SPA and renal disease to 88 with SPA and without nephropathy, we detected the predictive factors of occurred of nephropathy: tobacco, intense inflammatory syndrome, sacroileite stage 3 or 4 and presence of column bamboo. The finding of 75% of the patients presented a renal failure at the time of the diagnosis of renal involvement suggests that evidence of renal abnormality involvement should be actively sought in this disease.

  15. Transduction of interleukin-10 through renal artery attenuates vascular neointimal proliferation and infiltration of immune cells in rat renal allograft.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jingxin; Li, Xueyi; Meng, Dan; Liang, Qiujuan; Wang, Xinhong; Wang, Li; Wang, Rui; Xiang, Meng; Chen, Sifeng

    2016-08-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal failure. Although acute rejection is not a major issue anymore, chronic rejection, especially vascular rejection, is still a major factor that might lead to allograft dysfunction on the long term. The role of the local immune-regulating cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) in chronic renal allograft is unclear. Many clinical observations showed that local IL-10 level was negatively related to kidney allograft function. It is unknown this negative relationship was the result of immunostimulatory property or insufficient immunosuppression property of local IL-10. We performed ex vivo transduction before transplantation through artery of the renal allograft using adeno-associated viral vectors carrying IL-10 gene. Twelve weeks after transplantation, we found intrarenal IL-10 gene transduction significantly inhibited arterial neointimal proliferation, the number of occluded intrarenal artery, interstitial fibrosis, peritubular capillary congestion and glomerular inflammation in renal allografts compared to control allografts receiving PBS or vectors carrying YFP. IL-10 transduction increased serum IL-10 level at 4 weeks but not at 8 and 12 weeks. Renal IL-10 level increased while serum creatinine decreased significantly in IL-10 group at 12 weeks compared to PBS or YFP controls. Immunohistochemical staining showed unchanged total T cells (CD3) and B cells (CD45R/B220), decreased cytotoxic T cells (CD8), macrophages (CD68) and increased CD4+ and FoxP3+ cells in IL-10 group. In summary, intrarenal IL-10 inhibited the allograft rejection while modulated immune response.

  16. Hormone Treatment Restores Bone Density for Young Women with Menopause-Like Condition (Primary Ovarian Insufficiency)

    MedlinePlus

    ... determine the effects of hormone treatment on bone mineral density of women with primary ovarian insufficiency. Researchers ... insufficiency (POI) led to increases in their bone mineral density, restoring levels to normal. The study was ...

  17. Transarterial embolization for serious renal hemorrhage following renal biopsy.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dan; Liu, Guihua; Sun, Xiangzhou; Zhuang, Wenquan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Guo, Wenbo; Yang, Jianyong; Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of percutaneous transarterial embolization for the treatment of serious renal hemorrhage after renal biopsy. Nine patients with renal hemorrhage had frank pain and gross hematuria as main symptoms after renal biopsy. Intrarenal arterial injuries and perinephric hematoma were confirmed by angiography in all cases. The arterial injuries led to two types of renal hemorrhage, Type I: severe renal injure or intrarenal renal artery rupture (n=5), with contrast medium spilling out of the artery and spreading into renal pelvis or kidney capsule in angiography; Type II, pseudo aneurysm or potential risk of intrarenal artery injure (n=4), where contrast medium that spilled out of intraartery was retained in the parenchyma as little spots less than 5 mm in diameter in angiography. Transcatheter superselective intrarenal artery embolization was performed with coils or microcoils (Type I intrarenal artery injure) and polyvinyl alcohol particles (Type II injure). The intrarenal arterial injuries were occluded successfully in all patients. Light or mild back or abdominal pain in the side of the embolized kidney was found in three patients following embolization procedures and disappeared 3 days later. Serum creatinine and perinephric hematoma were stable, and gross hematuresis stopped immediately (n=4) or 3-5 days (n=3) after embolization. In conclusions, transcatheter superselective intrarenal artery embolization as a minimally invasive therapy is safe and effective for treatment of serious renal hemorrhage following percutaneous renal biopsy.

  18. The renal effects of vanadate exposure: potential biomarkers and oxidative stress as a mechanism of functional renal disorders--preliminary studies.

    PubMed

    Ucibior, Agnieszka; Gołębiowska, Dorota; Adamczyk, Agnieszka; Niedźwiecka, Irmina; Fornal, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    The alterations in the levels/activities of selected biomarkers for detecting kidney toxicity and in the levels of some oxidative stress (OS) markers and elements were studied in male rats to evaluate biochemically the degree of kidney damage, investigate the role of OS in the mechanism of functional renal disorders, reveal potential biomarkers of renal function, and assess the renal mineral changes in the conditions of a 12-week sodium metavanadate (SMV, 0.125 mg V/mL) exposure. The results showed that OS is involved in the mechanism underlying the development of SMV-induced functional renal disturbances. They also suggest that the urinary cystatin C (CysCu) and kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1u) could be the most appropriate to evaluate renal function at the conditions of SMV intoxication when the fluid intake, excreted urinary volume (EUV), body weight (BW), and the urinary creatinine excretion (Creu) decreased. The use of such tests as the urinary lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, γ-glutamyltranspeptidase, and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (LDHu, ALPu, GGTPu, and NAGu) seems not to be valid given their reduced activities. The use of only traditional biomarkers of renal function in these conditions may, in turn, be insufficient because their alterations are greatly influenced by the changes in the fluid intake and/or BW. PMID:24605335

  19. Risk factors for coronary artery calcium among patients with chronic kidney disease (from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study).

    PubMed

    He, Jiang; Reilly, Muredach; Yang, Wei; Chen, Jing; Go, Alan S; Lash, James P; Rahman, Mahboob; DeFilippi, Chris; Gadegbeku, Crystal; Kanthety, Radhika; Tao, Kaixiang; Hamm, L Lee; Ojo, Akinlolu; Townsend, Ray; Budoff, Matthew

    2012-12-15

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We examined the cross-sectional association between novel risk factors and coronary artery calcium (CAC) measured using electron beam computed tomography or multidetector computed tomography among 2,018 patients with CKD. Using the total Agatston scores, the participants were classified as having no (0), moderate (>0-100), or high (>100) CAC. After adjustment for age, gender, race, study sites, cigarette smoking, previous cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and diabetes, the use of lipid-lowering drugs, body mass index, waist circumference, and cystatin C, several novel risk factors were significantly associated with high CAC. For example, the odds ratios of high CAC associated with 1 SD greater level of risk factors were 1.20 (95% confidence interval 1.04 to 1.38) for serum calcium, 1.21 (95% confidence interval 1.04 to 1.41) for serum phosphate, 0.83 (95% confidence interval 0.71 to 0.97) for log (total parathyroid hormone), 1.21 (95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.43) for log (homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance), and 1.23 (95% confidence interval 1.04 to 1.45) for hemoglobin A1c. Additionally, the multivariate-adjusted odds ratio for 1 SD greater level of cystatin C was 1.31 (95% confidence interval 1.14 to 1.50). Serum high-sensitive C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and homocysteine were not statistically significantly associated with high CAC. In conclusion, these data indicate that abnormal calcium and phosphate metabolism, insulin resistance, and declining kidney function are associated with the prevalence of high CAC, independent of the traditional risk factors in patients with CKD. Additional studies are warranted to examine the causal effect of these risk factors on CAC in patients with CKD.

  20. Review of mitral valve insufficiency: repair or replacement.

    PubMed

    Madesis, Athanasios; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Kesisis, George; Tsiouda, Theodora; Beleveslis, Thomas; Koletas, Alexander; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-03-01

    Mitral valve (MV) dysfunction is the second-most common clinically significant form of valvular defect in adults. MV regurgitation occurs with the increasing frequency of degenerative changes of the aging process. Moreover, other causes of clinically significant MV regurgitation include cardiac ischemia, infective endocarditis and rhematic disease more frequently in less developed countries. Recent evidence suggests that the best outcomes after repair of severe degenerative mitral regurgitation (MR) are achieved in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic patients, who are selected for surgery soon after diagnosis on the basis of echocardiography. This review will focus on the surgical management of mitral insufficiency according to its aetiology today and will give insight to some of the perspectives that lay in the future. PMID:24672698

  1. Megace Mystery: A Case of Central Adrenal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Kunal; Weiss, Irene; Goldberg, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Megestrol acetate (MA) is a synthetic progestin with both antineoplastic and orexigenic properties. In addition to its effects on the progesterone receptor, MA also binds the glucocorticoid receptor. Some patients receiving MA therapy have been reported to develop clinical features of glucocorticoid excess, while others have experienced the clinical syndrome of cortisol deficiency—either following withdrawal of MA therapy or during active treatment. We describe a patient who presented with clinical and biochemical features of central adrenal insufficiency. Pituitary function was otherwise essentially normal, and the etiology of the isolated ACTH suppression was initially unclear. The use of an exogenous glucocorticoid was suspected but was initially denied by the patient; ultimately, the culprit medication was uncovered when a synthetic steroid screen revealed the presence of MA. The patient's symptoms improved after she was switched to hydrocortisone. Clinicians should be aware of the potential effects of MA on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. PMID:26770843

  2. Enzyme replacement therapy for pancreatic insufficiency: present and future

    PubMed Central

    Fieker, Aaron; Philpott, Jessica; Armand, Martine

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is currently the mainstay of treatment for nutrient malabsorption secondary to pancreatic insufficiency. This treatment is safe and has few side effects. Data demonstrate efficacy in reducing steatorrhea and fat malabsorption. Effective therapy has been limited by the ability to replicate the physiologic process of enzyme delivery to the appropriate site, in general the duodenum, at the appropriate time. The challenges include enzyme destruction in the stomach, lack of adequate mixing with the chyme in the duodenum, and failing to deliver and activate at the appropriate time. Treatment is begun when clinically significant malabsorption occurs resulting in steatorrhea and weight loss. Treatment failure is addressed in a sequential fashion. Current research is aimed at studying new enzymes and delivery systems to improve the efficiency of action in the duodenum along with developing better means to monitor therapy. PMID:21753892

  3. Stasis papillomatosis with cardiac complications and vein insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Zubilewicz, Tomasz; Brzozowski, Wojciech; Orlicz-Szczesna, Grazyna; Ilzecki, Marek; Wawrzycki, Bartlomiej; Podhorecka, Monika; Dybiec, Ewa; Krupski, Witold; Pietrzak, Aldona

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 73-year-old man with massive swelling of the lower extremities, with a chronic and rather uncommon form of stasis dermatitis - stasis papillomatosis. The patient was also diagnosed with severe heart failure, including dilated cardiomyopathy, hypothyroidism that required a substantial dose of exogenous tyrosine, microcytic and megaloblastic anemia, iron deficiency, and type 2 diabetes. The cause of stasis dermatitis lesions is not completely understood. It may be caused by the allergic reaction to some epidermal protein antigen formation or chronic damage to the dermal-epidermal barrier that makes the skin more sensitive to irritants or trauma. It has, however, been suggested that the term stasis dermatitis should be used to refer only to cases caused by chronic venous insufficiency, which belongs to a group of lifestyle diseases and affects both women and men more and more frequently. PMID:26228826

  4. Review of mitral valve insufficiency: repair or replacement

    PubMed Central

    Madesis, Athanasios; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Kesisis, George; Tsiouda, Theodora; Beleveslis, Thomas; Koletas, Alexander; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Mitral valve (MV) dysfunction is the second-most common clinically significant form of valvular defect in adults. MV regurgitation occurs with the increasing frequency of degenerative changes of the aging process. Moreover, other causes of clinically significant MV regurgitation include cardiac ischemia, infective endocarditis and rhematic disease more frequently in less developed countries. Recent evidence suggests that the best outcomes after repair of severe degenerative mitral regurgitation (MR) are achieved in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic patients, who are selected for surgery soon after diagnosis on the basis of echocardiography. This review will focus on the surgical management of mitral insufficiency according to its aetiology today and will give insight to some of the perspectives that lay in the future. PMID:24672698

  5. Uncertainties in endocrine substitution therapy for central endocrine insufficiencies: hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Persani, Luca; Bonomi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    In patients with primary hypothyroidism (PH), L-T4 replacement therapy can safely be adjusted to the individual needs by testing serum thyrotropin (TSH) concentration exclusively. Central hypothyrodism (CeH) is a particular hypothyroid condition due to an insufficient stimulation by TSH of an otherwise normal thyroid gland. CeH is about 1000-fold rarer than PH and raises several challenges for clinicians, mainly because they cannot rely on the systematic use of the reflex TSH strategy for diagnosis or therapy monitoring. Therefore, L-T4 replacement in CeH should rely on the combined evaluation of several biochemical and clinical parameters in order to overcome the lack of accuracy of the single index. The management of CeH replacement is further complicated by the frequent combination with other pituitary deficiencies and their treatment.

  6. Disease-Modifying Drug Possibly Linked to Placental Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Salahudheen, Sultan M.; Begam, Muzibunnisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) such as interferon (IFN)-β and glatiramer acetate are often prescribed to slow disability progression in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, adverse pregnancy outcomes have been reported with these medications. We report the rare occurrence of severe placental complications in a 30-year-old pregnant woman with MS who continued to take IFN-β during her first trimester. She presented at the Tawam Hospital, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates, in 2013 with early-onset fetal growth restriction. At 30 gestational weeks, she developed severe pre-eclampsia. The baby was delivered via emergency Caesarean section and was discharged at the age of two months. Continuation of IFN-β during pregnancy may have contributed to the development of placental insufficiency in this patient. Increased education regarding the risks of DMDs for pregnant patients with MS is very important to ensure successful pregnancy outcomes. PMID:27606121

  7. Evidence of motor neuron involvement in chronic respiratory insufficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Valli, G; Barbieri, S; Sergi, P; Fayoumi, Z; Berardinelli, P

    1984-01-01

    Nineteen patients with chronic respiratory insufficiency, mean age 61.4 +/- 12.2, have been investigated with pulmonary function tests, clinical neurological examination and neurophysiological methods including motor and sensory conduction studies and needle electromyography. None of them had conditions known to affect the peripheral nervous system such as diabetes, alcoholism, or uraemia. The motor and sensory conduction studies showed only a reduced mean amplitude of the ulnar nerve SAP and of the compound muscle action potential of the APB and EDB muscles. The EMG was abnormal in 94.7% of the cases and showed an increased percentage of polyphasic potentials and a reduced recruitment pattern of motor units firing at high frequency. The data seem to support the hypothesis of an involvement of motor neurons in this condition although the evidence for a neuropathy is lacking. PMID:6094730

  8. Disease-Modifying Drug Possibly Linked to Placental Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Salahudheen, Sultan M.; Begam, Muzibunnisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) such as interferon (IFN)-β and glatiramer acetate are often prescribed to slow disability progression in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, adverse pregnancy outcomes have been reported with these medications. We report the rare occurrence of severe placental complications in a 30-year-old pregnant woman with MS who continued to take IFN-β during her first trimester. She presented at the Tawam Hospital, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates, in 2013 with early-onset fetal growth restriction. At 30 gestational weeks, she developed severe pre-eclampsia. The baby was delivered via emergency Caesarean section and was discharged at the age of two months. Continuation of IFN-β during pregnancy may have contributed to the development of placental insufficiency in this patient. Increased education regarding the risks of DMDs for pregnant patients with MS is very important to ensure successful pregnancy outcomes.

  9. Iatrogenic aortic insufficiency following mitral valve replacement: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kolakalapudi, Pavani; Chaudhry, Sadaf; Omar, Bassam

    2015-06-01

    We report a 28-year-old white female who suffered significant aortic insufficiency (AI) following mitral valve (MV) replacement for endocarditis. The patient had history of rheumatoid arthritis and presented to our emergency department with a 3-month history of dyspnea, orthopnea, fevers and weight loss, worsening over 2 weeks, for which she took intermittent acetaminophen. On admission, vital signs revealed blood pressure of 99/70 mm Hg, heart rate of 120 beats/minute, and temperature of 98.8 °F; her weight was 100 lbs. Physical exam revealed a thin and pale female. Cardiac auscultation revealed regular tachycardic rhythm with a third heart sound, and a short early systolic murmur at the left lower sternal border without radiation. Lungs revealed right lower lobe rhonchi. Initial pertinent laboratory evaluation revealed hemoglobin 9.6 g/dL and white blood cell count 17,500/μL. Renal function was normal, and hepatic enzymes were mildly elevated. Chest radiogram revealed right lower lobe infiltrate. Blood cultures revealed Enterococcus faecalis. Two-dimensional echocardiogram revealed large multilobed vegetation attached to the anterior MV leaflet with severe mitral regurgitation (MR), otherwise normal left ventricular systolic function. She was started on appropriate antibiotics and underwent MV replacement with 25-mm On-X prosthesis. She was noted post-operatively to have prominent systolic and diastolic murmurs. Repeat echocardiogram revealed normal mitral prosthesis function, with new moderately severe AI. Transesophageal echocardiogram revealed AI originating from a tethered non-coronary cusp, due to a suture preventing proper cusp mobility. The patient declined further surgery. She recovered slowly and was discharged to inpatient rehabilitation 4 weeks later. This case highlights the importance of vigilance to this potential serious complication of valve surgery with regard to diagnosis and treatment to prevent long-term adverse consequences. PMID:25883714

  10. Iatrogenic Aortic Insufficiency Following Mitral Valve Replacement: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kolakalapudi, Pavani; Chaudhry, Sadaf; Omar, Bassam

    2015-01-01

    We report a 28-year-old white female who suffered significant aortic insufficiency (AI) following mitral valve (MV) replacement for endocarditis. The patient had history of rheumatoid arthritis and presented to our emergency department with a 3-month history of dyspnea, orthopnea, fevers and weight loss, worsening over 2 weeks, for which she took intermittent acetaminophen. On admission, vital signs revealed blood pressure of 99/70 mm Hg, heart rate of 120 beats/minute, and temperature of 98.8 °F; her weight was 100 lbs. Physical exam revealed a thin and pale female. Cardiac auscultation revealed regular tachycardic rhythm with a third heart sound, and a short early systolic murmur at the left lower sternal border without radiation. Lungs revealed right lower lobe rhonchi. Initial pertinent laboratory evaluation revealed hemoglobin 9.6 g/dL and white blood cell count 17,500/μL. Renal function was normal, and hepatic enzymes were mildly elevated. Chest radiogram revealed right lower lobe infiltrate. Blood cultures revealed Enterococcus faecalis. Two-dimensional echocardiogram revealed large multilobed vegetation attached to the anterior MV leaflet with severe mitral regurgitation (MR), otherwise normal left ventricular systolic function. She was started on appropriate antibiotics and underwent MV replacement with 25-mm On-X prosthesis. She was noted post-operatively to have prominent systolic and diastolic murmurs. Repeat echocardiogram revealed normal mitral prosthesis function, with new moderately severe AI. Transesophageal echocardiogram revealed AI originating from a tethered non-coronary cusp, due to a suture preventing proper cusp mobility. The patient declined further surgery. She recovered slowly and was discharged to inpatient rehabilitation 4 weeks later. This case highlights the importance of vigilance to this potential serious complication of valve surgery with regard to diagnosis and treatment to prevent long-term adverse consequences. PMID:25883714

  11. Laparoscopic Cerclage as a Treatment Option for Cervical Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bolla, D.; Raio, L.; Imboden, S.; Mueller, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The traditional surgical treatment for cervical insufficiency is vaginal placement of a cervical cerclage. However, in a small number of cases a vaginal approach is not possible. A transabdominal approach can become an option for these patients. Laparoscopic cervical cerclage is associated with good pregnancy outcomes but comes at the cost of a higher risk of serious surgical complications. The aim of the present study was to evaluate intraoperative and long-term pregnancy outcomes after laparoscopic cervical cerclage, performed either as an interval procedure or during early pregnancy, using a new device with a blunt grasper and a flexible tip. Methods: All women who underwent laparoscopic cervical cerclage for cervical insufficiency in our institution using the Goldfinger® device (Ethicon Endo Surgery, Somerville, NJ, USA) between January 2008 and March 2014 were included in the study. Data were collected from the patientsʼ medical records and included complications during and after the above-described procedure. Results: Eighteen women were included in the study. Of these, six were pregnant at the time of laparoscopic cervical cerclage. Mean duration of surgery was 55 ± 10 minutes. No serious intraoperative or postoperative complications occurred. All patients were discharged at 2.6 ± 0.9 days after surgery. One pregnancy ended in a miscarriage at 12 weeks of gestation. All other pregnancies ended at term (> 37 weeks of gestation) with good perinatal and maternal outcomes. Summary: Performing a laparoscopic cervical cerclage using a blunt grasper device with a flexible tip does not increase intraoperative complications, particularly in early pregnancy. We believe that use of this device, which is characterized by increased maneuverability, could be an important option to avoid intraoperative complications if surgical access is limited due to the anatomical situation. However, because of the small sample size, further studies are needed

  12. Validity of the Convergence Insufficiency Symptom Survey: A Confirmatory Study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The objectives of the present study were to evaluate whether investigator bias influenced the Convergence Insufficiency Symptom Survey (CISS) scores of children with normal binocular vision (NBV) in our original validation study, reevaluate the usefulness of the cut-off score of 16, and reexamine the validity of the CISS. Methods Six clinical sites participating in the Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial (CITT) enrolled 46 children 9 - <18 years with NBV. Examiners masked to the child’s binocular vision status administered the CISS. The mean CISS score was compared to that from the children with NBV in the original, unmasked CISS study and also to that of the 221 symptomatic CI children enrolled in the CITT. Results The mean (±SD) CISS score for 46 subjects with NBV was 10.4 (±8.1). This was comparable to that from our prior unmasked NBV study (mean = 8.1(± 6.2); p = 0.11), but was significantly different from that of the CITT CI group (mean = 29.8 ± 9.0; p < 0.001). Eighty-three percent of these NBV subjects scored less than 16 on the CISS, which is not statistically different from the 87.5% found in the original unmasked study (p = 0.49). Conclusions Examiner bias did not affect the CISS scores for subjects with NBV in our prior study. The CISS continues to be a valid instrument for quantifying symptoms in 9 to <18 year-old children and these results confirm the validity of a cut-point of ≥ 16 in distinguishing children with symptomatic CI from those with NBV. PMID:19289977

  13. Update on adrenal insufficiency in patients with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Trifan, Anca; Chiriac, Stefan; Stanciu, Carol

    2013-01-28

    Liver cirrhosis is a major cause of mortality worldwide, often with severe sepsis as the terminal event. Over the last two decades, several studies have reported that in septic patients the adrenal glands respond inappropriately to stimulation, and that the treatment with corticosteroids decreases mortality in such patients. Both cirrhosis and septic shock share many hemodynamic abnormalities such as hyperdynamic circulatory failure, decreased peripheral vascular resistance, increased cardiac output, hypo-responsiveness to vasopressors, increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines [interleukine(IL)-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha] and it has, consequently, been reported that adrenal insufficiency (AI) is common in critically ill cirrhotic patients. AI may also be present in patients with stable cirrhosis without sepsis and in those undergoing liver transplantation. The term hepato-adrenal syndrome defines AI in patients with advanced liver disease with sepsis and/or other complications, and it suggests that it could be a feature of liver disease per se, with a different pathogenesis from that of septic shock. Relative AI is the term given to inadequate cortisol response to stress. More recently, another term is used, namely "critical illness related corticosteroid insufficiency" to define "an inadequate cellular corticosteroid activity for the severity of the patient's illness". The mechanisms of AI in liver cirrhosis are not completely understood, although decreased levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high levels of proinflammatory cytokines and circulatory endotoxin have been suggested. The prevalence of AI in cirrhotic patients varies widely according to the stage of the liver disease (compensated or decompensated, with or without sepsis), the diagnostic criteria defining AI and the methodology used. The effects of corticosteroid therapy on cirrhotic patients with septic shock and AI are controversial. This review aims to summarize the

  14. Renal Medullary Interstitial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Reena; Hao, Chuan-Ming; Breyer, Matthew D.

    2007-04-01

    Renal medullary interstitial cells (RMICs) are specialized fibroblast-like cells that reside in the renal medulla among the vasa recta, the thin limbs of Henle's loop, and medullary collecting ducts. These cells are characterized by abundant lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. The lipid droplets are composed of triglycerides, cholesterol esters and free long-chain fatty acids, including arachidonic acid. RMICs are also a major site of cyclooxygenase2 (COX-2) expression, and thus a major site of COX-2 derived prostanoid biosynthesis. RMICs are also a potential target of hormones such as angiotensin II and endothelin. The RMIC COX-2 expression and the abundance of lipid droplets change with salt and water intake. These properties of RMICs are consistent with an important role of these cells in modulating physiologic and pathologic processes of the kidney.

  15. Renal stones in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Norma; DasGupta, Ranan

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of renal stones during pregnancy is a complex problem. Risks to the fetus from ionising radiation and interventional procedures need to be balanced with optimising clinical care for the mother. Management of such patients requires a clear understanding of available options, with a multidisciplinary team approach. In this review, we discuss the role of different diagnostic tests including ultrasound, magnetic resonance urography, and computerized tomography. We also provide an update on recent developments in the treatment of renal stones during pregnancy. Expectant management remains first-line treatment. Where definitive treatment of the stone is required, new evidence suggests that ureteroscopic stone removal may be equally safe, and possibly better than traditional temporising procedures. PMID:27512433

  16. Renal Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Zaccaria; Romagnoli, Stefano; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    During the last few years, due to medical and surgical evolution, patients with increasingly severe diseases causing multiorgan dysfunction are frequently admitted to intensive care units. Therapeutic options, when organ failure occurs, are frequently nonspecific and mostly directed towards supporting vital function. In these scenarios, the kidneys are almost always involved and, therefore, renal replacement therapies have become a common routine practice in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. Recent technological improvement has led to the production of safe, versatile and efficient dialysis machines. In addition, emerging evidence may allow better individualization of treatment with tailored prescription depending on the patients’ clinical picture (e.g. sepsis, fluid overload, pediatric). The aim of the present review is to give a general overview of current practice in renal replacement therapies for critically ill patients. The main clinical aspects, including dose prescription, modality of dialysis delivery, anticoagulation strategies and timing will be addressed. In addition, some technical issues on physical principles governing blood purification, filters characteristics, and vascular access, will be covered. Finally, a section on current standard nomenclature of renal replacement therapy is devoted to clarify the “Tower of Babel” of critical care nephrology. PMID:26918174

  17. Renal Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Zaccaria; Romagnoli, Stefano; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    During the last few years, due to medical and surgical evolution, patients with increasingly severe diseases causing multiorgan dysfunction are frequently admitted to intensive care units. Therapeutic options, when organ failure occurs, are frequently nonspecific and mostly directed towards supporting vital function. In these scenarios, the kidneys are almost always involved and, therefore, renal replacement therapies have become a common routine practice in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. Recent technological improvement has led to the production of safe, versatile and efficient dialysis machines. In addition, emerging evidence may allow better individualization of treatment with tailored prescription depending on the patients' clinical picture (e.g. sepsis, fluid overload, pediatric). The aim of the present review is to give a general overview of current practice in renal replacement therapies for critically ill patients. The main clinical aspects, including dose prescription, modality of dialysis delivery, anticoagulation strategies and timing will be addressed. In addition, some technical issues on physical principles governing blood purification, filters characteristics, and vascular access, will be covered. Finally, a section on current standard nomenclature of renal replacement therapy is devoted to clarify the "Tower of Babel" of critical care nephrology. PMID:26918174

  18. Paraneoplastic (non-metastatic) adrenal insufficiency preceded the onset of primary lung cancer by 12 weeks.

    PubMed

    Shantha, Ghanshyam Palamaner Subash; Kumar, Anita A; Jeyachandran, Vijay; Rajamanickam, Deepan; Bhaskar, Emmanuel; Paniker, Vinod K; Abraham, Georgi

    2009-01-01

    Clinically evident adrenal insufficiency associated with lung cancer is a rare entity. Among reported cases, adrenal insufficiency has occurred with or succeeded the primary lung cancer. Adrenal insufficiency has also been secondary to metastasis to the adrenal gland. The present report concerns a 61-year-old man, a chronic smoker, who presented to us with symptomatic adrenal insufficiency. He had no evidence of lung cancer during this visit. The primary lung cancer was only identified 12 weeks later. Additionally, his adrenals showed no evidence of metastasis. Hence his adrenal insufficiency had been a paraneoplastic manifestation of the lung cancer, and it had also preceded the primary by 12 weeks.

  19. Paraneoplastic (non-metastatic) adrenal insufficiency preceded the onset of primary lung cancer by 12 weeks

    PubMed Central

    Shantha, Ghanshyam Palamaner Subash; Kumar, Anita A; Jeyachandran, Vijay; Rajamanickam, Deepan; Bhaskar, Emmanuel; Paniker, Vinod K; Abraham, Georgi

    2009-01-01

    Clinically evident adrenal insufficiency associated with lung cancer is a rare entity. Among reported cases, adrenal insufficiency has occurred with or succeeded the primary lung cancer. Adrenal insufficiency has also been secondary to metastasis to the adrenal gland. The present report concerns a 61-year-old man, a chronic smoker, who presented to us with symptomatic adrenal insufficiency. He had no evidence of lung cancer during this visit. The primary lung cancer was only identified 12 weeks later. Additionally, his adrenals showed no evidence of metastasis. Hence his adrenal insufficiency had been a paraneoplastic manifestation of the lung cancer, and it had also preceded the primary by 12 weeks. PMID:21686682

  20. Renal implications of arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ruilope, L M

    1997-03-01

    Renal vascular damage caused by arterial hypertension participates in alterations of the systemic vascular function and structure. Nephrosclerosis seems to run in parallel with the systemic atherosclerosis that accounts for the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality seen in hypertensive patients. Parameters indicating the existence of an alteration in renal function (increased serum creatinine, proteinuria and microalbuminuria) are independent predictors for an increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Hence, parameters of renal function must be considered in any stratification of cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients.

  1. Multiple oncocytomas and renal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Velasquez, G.; Glass, T.A.; D'Souza, V.J.; Formanek, A.G.

    1984-01-01

    Renal oncocytoma, although rare, is being diagnosed more frequently, and criteria to differentiate it from other tumors have been described. Multiple oncocytomas have been reported, but an association between multiple oncocytomas and renal carcinoma in the same kidney has not been described. The authors report a case with two oncocytomas and a renal carcinoma in the right kidney as well as a right adrenal adenoma.

  2. [Fibromuscular dysplasia of renal arteries].

    PubMed

    Plouin, Pierre-François; Fiquet, Béatrice; Bobrie, Guillaume; Jeunemaître, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia is non-atherosclerotic, non-inflammatory disease of the medium caliber arteries causing segmental stenosis, and sometimes aneurysm and/or dissection. Renal involvement is either asymptomatic or revealed by hypertension, rarely acute complications (renal infarction/hemorrhage). Cross-sectional imaging or angiography differentiates multifocal fibromuscular dysplasia (pearl necklace appearance) and focal fibromuscular dysplasia (tubular stenosis). Several differential diagnoses are to be mentioned. Carotid and vertebral involvement are possible. Smoking cessation must be encouraged. Selected patients benefit from renal revascularization. The best indications are recent or resistant hypertension, and progressive renal atrophy. Angioplasty without stent revascularization is the technique of choice in purely stenotic forms. PMID:26968476

  3. Improvement in Academic Behaviors Following Successful Treatment of Convergence Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Borsting, Eric; Mitchell, G. Lynn; Kulp, Marjean Taylor; Scheiman, Mitchell; Amster, Deborah M.; Cotter, Susan; Coulter, Rachael A; Fecho, Gregory; Gallaway, Michael F.; Granet, David; Hertle, Richard; Rodena, Jacqueline; Yamada, Tomohiko

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether treatment of symptomatic convergence insufficiency (CI) has an effect on Academic Behavior Survey (ABS) scores. Methods The ABS is a 6-item survey developed by the Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial (CITT) Group that quantifies the frequency of adverse school behaviors and parental concern about school performance on an ordinal scale from 0 (never) to 4 (always) with total scores ranging from 0 to 24. The ABS was administered at baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment to the parents of 218 children ages 9-17 years with symptomatic CI, who were enrolled in the CITT and randomized into: 1) home-based pencil push-ups (HBPP); 2) home-based computer vergence/accommodative therapy and pencil push-ups (HBCVAT+); 3) office-based vergence/accommodative therapy with home reinforcement (OBVAT); and 4) office-based placebo therapy with home reinforcement (OBPT). Participants were classified as successful (n=42), improved (n=60), or non-responder (n=116) at the completion of 12 weeks of treatment using a composite measure of the symptom score, near point of convergence, and positive fusional vergence. Analysis of covariance methods were used to compare the mean change in ABS between response to treatment groups while controlling for the ABS score at baseline. Results The mean ABS score for the entire group at baseline was 12.85 (SD=6.3). The mean ABS score decreased (improved) in those categorized as successful, improved, and non-responder by 4.0, 2.9, and 1.3 points, respectively. The improvement in the ABS score was significantly related to treatment outcome (p<0.0001), with the ABS score being significantly lower (better) for children who were successful or improved after treatment as compared to children who were non-responders (p=0.002 and 0.043, respectively). Conclusions A successful or improved outcome after CI treatment was associated with a reduction in the frequency of adverse academic behaviors and parental concern associated

  4. Symptoms in Children with Convergence Insufficiency: Before and After Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Barnhardt, Carmen; Cotter, Susan A.; Mitchell, G. Lynn; Scheiman, Mitchell; Kulp, Marjean T.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate symptom patterns and evaluate the relationship between patient characteristics and symptom severity before and after treatment for symptomatic children with convergence insufficiency (CI). Methods In a randomized clinical trial, the Convergence Insufficiency Symptom Survey (CISS) was administered pre- and post-treatment to 221 children 9 to <18 years with symptomatic CI. Frequency of symptom type was determined at baseline, mean change in performance-related versus eye-related symptoms for treatment responders was compared, and the relationship between patient characteristics and symptom severity at baseline for the entire cohort and after treatment for those who responded to treatment, was determined. Results At baseline, the score for performance-related symptoms was greater than that for eye-related symptoms (mean response of 2.3 vs. 1.8, p<0.001) regardless age, sex, race/ethnicity, or presence of parent-reported ADHD. Symptom severity increased with age for both the overall and eye-related subscale scores (p=0.048, p=0.022, respectively). Children with parent-reported ADHD were more symptomatic (p=0.005) than those without parent-reported ADHD because of a higher performance-related score (p<0.001). A significant and equal improvement (p<0.01) for the performance-related and eye-related symptoms was found in treatment responders. Girls had significantly lower performance-related symptoms than boys (p=0.014) and African-American children reported less eye-related symptoms than White children (p=0.022). Children without parent-reported ADHD had significantly less symptoms overall and less eye-related symptoms than children with parent-reported ADHD (p=0.019, p=0.011, respectively). Conclusions Because of a high frequency of both performance- and eye-related symptoms, clinicians should perform a targeted history that addresses both types of symptoms to help identify children with symptomatic CI. Future study regarding the relationship of CI

  5. Renal cirsoid arteriovenous malformation masquerading as neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, K; George, D

    1988-12-01

    A woman with renal colic and microscopic hematuria had filling defects in the left renal collecting system detected on excretory urography. A nephrectomy, performed because of suspected malignancy, might have been averted by renal angiography.

  6. The renal scan in pregnant renal transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.A.; Ziessman, H.A.; Fahey, F.H.; Collea, J.V.; Alijani, M.R.; Helfrich, G.B.

    1985-05-01

    With the greater frequency of renal transplant surgery, more female pts are becoming pregnant and carrying to term. In the renal allograft blood vessels and ureter may be compressed resulting in impaired renal function and/or, hypertension. Toxemia of pregnancy is seen more frequently than normal. Radionuclide renal scan monitoring may be of significant value in this high risk obstetrical pt. After being maintained during the pregnancy, renal function may also deteriorate in the post partum period. 5 pregnant renal transplant pts who delivered live babies had renal studies with Tc-99m DTPA to assess allograft perfusion and function. No transplanted kidney was lost during or after pregnancy as a result of pregnancy. No congenital anomalies were associated with transplant management. 7 studies were performed on these 5 pts. The 7 scans all showed the uterus/placenta. The bladder was always distorted. The transplanted kidney was rotated to a more vertical position in 3 pts. The radiation dose to the fetus is calculated at 0.024 rad/mCi administered. This study demonstrates the anatomic and physiologic alterations expected in the transplanted kidney during pregnancy when evaluated by renal scan and that the radiation burden may be acceptable in management of these pts.

  7. Persistent Increase in Blood Pressure After Renal Nerve Stimulation in Accessory Renal Arteries After Sympathetic Renal Denervation.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Mark R; Hoogerwaard, Annemiek F; Gal, Pim; Adiyaman, Ahmet; Smit, Jaap Jan J; Delnoy, Peter Paul H M; Ramdat Misier, Anand R; van Hasselt, Boudewijn A A M; Heeg, Jan-Evert; le Polain de Waroux, Jean-Benoit; Lau, Elizabeth O Y; Staessen, Jan A; Persu, Alexandre; Elvan, Arif

    2016-06-01

    Blood pressure response to renal denervation is highly variable, and the proportion of responders is disappointing. This may be partly because of accessory renal arteries too small for denervation, causing incomplete ablation. Renal nerve stimulation before and after renal denervation is a promising approach to assess completeness of renal denervation and may predict blood pressure response to renal denervation. The objective of the current study was to assess renal nerve stimulation-induced blood pressure increase before and after renal sympathetic denervation in main and accessory renal arteries of anaesthetized patients with drug-resistant hypertension. The study included 21 patients. Nine patients had at least 1 accessory renal artery in which renal denervation was not feasible. Renal nerve stimulation was performed in the main arteries of all patients and in accessory renal arteries of 6 of 9 patients with accessory arteries, both before and after renal sympathetic denervation. Renal nerve stimulation before renal denervation elicited a substantial increase in systolic blood pressure, both in main (25.6±2.9 mm Hg; P<0.001) and accessory (24.3±7.4 mm Hg; P=0.047) renal arteries. After renal denervation, renal nerve stimulation-induced systolic blood pressure increase was blunted in the main renal arteries (Δ systolic blood pressure, 8.6±3.7 mm Hg; P=0.020), but not in the nondenervated renal accessory renal arteries (Δ systolic blood pressure, 27.1±7.6 mm Hg; P=0.917). This residual source of renal sympathetic tone may result in persistent hypertension after ablation and partly account for the large response variability.

  8. Inadvertent arterial injury secondary to treatment of venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Nitecki, Samy S; Bass, Arie

    2007-01-01

    Arterial injury during treatment of varicose veins is a rare but devastating complication that can lead to leg amputation. Approximately 6,000 patients were treated by either surgery (4,800 patients treated by ligation, stripping, and stub avulsion) or ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy (USGS) (1,200 patients) in the last 7 years for venous insufficiency at three medical centers. Six patients (0.1%) sustained inadvertent arterial injury. The incidence of arterial injury during surgery was 0.06% (3 of 4,800) and was of a mechanical nature amenable to repair. None of these patients had tissue loss. The injury during USGS (0.25%, 3 of 1,200) was of a chemical and irreversible nature. All three patients suffered tissue loss. In our experience, the incidence of arterial injuries during USGS is four times higher than during traditional surgery and carries a much higher risk of tissue loss. Although experience, technical skill, and awareness of this complication help reduce the incidence of arterial injury during surgery, they seem to offer no protection during USGS. Careful mapping of the arterial venous communications and avoidance of high-risk zones will help prevent this complication.

  9. Shunt insufficiency due to knot formation in the peritoneal catheter.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Gábor; Nagy, Andrea; Pataki, István; Bognar, László; Novák, László

    2013-07-30

    The authors report a rare case of the peripheral obstruction of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Premature baby was operated on hydrocephalus due to germinal matrix bleeding. After two months of implantation of venticuloperitoneal shunt peripheral insufficiency of the system was emerged. During the shunt revision extensive knot formation became visible. We simply cut the catheter above the knot and the working shunt was replaced into the abdominal cavity. The postoperative course was uneventful and the baby was free of complaints for more than one year. The pathomechanism of knot formation is not clear thus the discovery of the problem during the operation is an unexpected event. In our opinion tight knot cannot be spontaneously formed intraabdominally. Loose knots can be developed and can reduce the capacity of liquor flow. We think that the knot tightens during pulling out. Longer peritoneal catheters can precipitate multiple looping and/or axial torquations and increase the peripheral resistance of the shunt. In such cases when the pulling out is challenged conversion to laparotomy is suggested.

  10. Insufficient treatment of severe depression in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chavarro, Velina S.; Mealy, Maureen A.; Simpson, Alexandra; Lacheta, Anna; Pache, Florence; Ruprecht, Klemens; Gold, Stefan M.; Brandt, Alexander Ulrich; Levy, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate depression frequency, severity, current treatment, and interactions with somatic symptoms among patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD). Methods: In this dual-center observational study, we included 71 patients diagnosed with NMOSD according to the International Panel for NMO Diagnosis 2015 criteria. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was classified into severe, moderate, or minimal/no depressive state category. We used the Fatigue Severity Scale to evaluate fatigue. Scores from the Brief Pain Inventory and the PainDETECT Questionnaire were normalized to estimate neuropathic pain. Psychotropic, pain, and immunosuppressant medications were tabulated by established classes. Results: Twenty-eight percent of patients with NMOSD (n = 20) had BDI scores indicative of moderate or severe depression; 48% of patients (n = 34) endorsed significant levels of neuropathic pain. Severity of depression was moderately associated with neuropathic pain (r = 0.341, p < 0.004) but this relationship was confounded by levels of fatigue. Furthermore, only 40% of patients with moderate or severe depressive symptoms received antidepressant medical treatment. Fifty percent of those treated reported persistent moderate to severe depressive symptoms under treatment. Conclusions: Moderate and severe depression in patients with NMOSD is associated with neuropathic pain and fatigue and is insufficiently treated. These results are consistent across 2 research centers and continents. Future research needs to address how depression can be effectively managed and treated in NMOSD. PMID:27800532

  11. Frontal Bone Insufficiency in Gsk3β Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Szabo-Rogers, Heather; Yakob, Wardati; Liu, Karen J.

    2016-01-01

    The development of the mammalian skull is a complex process that requires multiple tissue interactions and a balance of growth and differentiation. Disrupting this balance can lead to changes in the shape and size of skull bones, which can have serious clinical implications. For example, insufficient ossification of the bony elements leads to enlarged anterior fontanelles and reduced mechanical protection of the brain. In this report, we find that loss of Gsk3β leads to a fully penetrant reduction of frontal bone size and subsequent enlarged frontal fontanelle. In the absence of Gsk3β the frontal bone primordium undergoes increased cell death and reduced proliferation with a concomitant increase in Fgfr2-IIIc and Twist1 expression. This leads to a smaller condensation and premature differentiation. This phenotype appears to be Wnt-independent and is not rescued by decreasing the genetic dose of β-catenin/Ctnnb1. Taken together, our work defines a novel role for Gsk3β in skull development. PMID:26886780

  12. Is trichloroacetic acid an insufficient sample quencher of redox reactions?

    PubMed

    Curbo, Sophie; Reiser, Kathrin; Rundlöf, Anna-Klara; Karlsson, Anna; Lundberg, Mathias

    2013-03-01

    The global protein thiol pool has been reported to play a major role in the defense against oxidative stress as a redox buffer similar to glutathione. The present study uses a novel method to visualize cellular changes of the global protein thiol pool in response to induced oxidative stress. Unexpectedly, the results showed an uneven distribution of protein thiols in resting cells with no apparent change in their level or distribution in response to diamide as has been reported previously. Further analysis revealed that thiol pool oxidation is artificially high due to insufficient activity of the widely used sample quencher trichloroacetic acid (TCA). This suggests that previously published articles based on TCA as a quencher should be interpreted with caution as TCA could have caused similar artifacts. Overall, the results presented here question the major role for the global thiol pool in the defense against oxidative stress. Instead our hypothesis is that the fraction of proteins involved in response to oxidative stress is much smaller than previously anticipated in support of a fine-tuned cell signaling by redox regulation.

  13. Frontal Bone Insufficiency in Gsk3β Mutant Mice.

    PubMed

    Szabo-Rogers, Heather; Yakob, Wardati; Liu, Karen J

    2016-01-01

    The development of the mammalian skull is a complex process that requires multiple tissue interactions and a balance of growth and differentiation. Disrupting this balance can lead to changes in the shape and size of skull bones, which can have serious clinical implications. For example, insufficient ossification of the bony elements leads to enlarged anterior fontanelles and reduced mechanical protection of the brain. In this report, we find that loss of Gsk3β leads to a fully penetrant reduction of frontal bone size and subsequent enlarged frontal fontanelle. In the absence of Gsk3β the frontal bone primordium undergoes increased cell death and reduced proliferation with a concomitant increase in Fgfr2-IIIc and Twist1 expression. This leads to a smaller condensation and premature differentiation. This phenotype appears to be Wnt-independent and is not rescued by decreasing the genetic dose of β-catenin/Ctnnb1. Taken together, our work defines a novel role for Gsk3β in skull development. PMID:26886780

  14. Importance of nutritional management in diseases with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Ockenga, Johann

    2009-12-01

    Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) resulting from conditions such as chronic pancreatitis (CP), acute pancreatitis (AP) and upper gastrointestinal (GI) surgery increases risk for malnutrition and metabolic problems. Poor nutrition is associated with more complications and higher mortality. Therefore, effective nutritional management should be a high priority in these patients. In CP, poor nutrition has been shown to significantly affect quality of life and functional status. Clinical study data show that dietary counselling combined with pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is effective in improving nutritional status and is therefore recommended in these patients. In AP, early enteral nutrition reduces complications and mortality. However, EPI persists in many cases after the resolution of AP; these patients remain at increased risk for malnutrition and require further nutritional support. In patients undergoing surgery, preoperative weight loss is a risk factor for postoperative morbidity and mortality; outcomes can be improved considerably by preoperative screening to identify high-risk patients and by providing appropriate perioperative nutritional support. Pre- and perioperative enteral nutrition are cost-effective interventions that can improve outcomes in patients undergoing GI surgery. In all of these patient populations, nutritional management, including risk assessment and individualized nutritional support, is a key component of an effective multimodal therapeutic approach.

  15. Cervical insufficiency: re-evaluating the prophylactic cervical cerclage.

    PubMed

    Abenhaim, Haim A; Tulandi, Togas

    2009-06-01

    Historically, placement of a cervical cerclage was based almost entirely on the obstetrical history. Over the past two decades however, we have recognised that history alone may not be the only indication for cerclage but rather, complementing the obstetrical history with ultrasonographic and biochemical findings may better identify those women who may benefit most from the placement of a cervical cerclage. Review of the literature appears to suggest that the best approach towards the management of a cervical insufficiency is to first categorise women as being either high risk of low risk-based on obstetrical history. Although women with an obstetrical history of at least three 2nd trimester losses are likely to benefit from a prophylactic cerclage than those without this history may better be managed with progesterone and serial cervical length measurements. This approach can in turn be used to identify those women with early cervical shortening that may require an emergency cerclage. Although randomised controlled trials are still lacking, recent studies suggests that this approach may be more effective especially when combined with markers of intra-amniotic inflammation. As for the prophylactic cerclage itself, with the abdominal cerclage being less invasive given the possibility of a laparoscopic placement, it may prove to be a more effective alternative to the conventionally placed McDonald cerclage. This however, remains to be evaluated more carefully.

  16. Results and Complications of 1104 Surgeries for Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hirschberg, Jenő

    2012-01-01

    Velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) means that the velopharyngeal closure is inadequate or disturbed. VPI may be organic or functional, congenital or acquired and is caused by structural alterations or paresis. The symptoms are primarily to be found in speech (hypernasality), more rarely in swallowing and hearing. The management types are as follows: speech therapy, surgery, speech bulb, and others. Surgery is indicated if the symptoms of VPI cannot be improved by speech therapy. Among the operative methods, velopharyngoplasty constitutes the basis of the surgery. The pharyngeal flap was incorporated and survived in 98.1% of the cases, hyperrhinophony disappeared or became minimal in 90% after surgery in our material (1104 cases). The speech results seemed to be the same with superiorly or inferiorly based pharyngeal flap. The Furlow technique, push-back procedure, the sphincteroplasty, and the augmentation were indicated by us if the VP gap was less than 7 mm; these methods may also be used as secondary operation. We observed among 1104 various surgeries severe hemorrhage in 5 cases, aspiration in 2 cases, significant nasal obstruction in 68 patients, OSAS in 5 cases; tracheotomy was necessary in 2 cases. Although the complication rate is rare, it must always be considered that this is not a life-saving but a speech-correcting operation. A tailor-made superiorly based pharyngeal flap is suggested today, possibly in the age of 5 years. PMID:23724266

  17. Sodium nitrite: the "cure" for nitric oxide insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Deepa K; Bryan, Nathan S

    2012-11-01

    This process of "curing" food is a long practice that dates back thousands of years long before refrigeration or food safety regulations. Today food safety and mass manufacturing are dependent upon safe and effective means to cure and preserve foods including meats. Nitrite remains the most effective curing agent to prevent food spoilage and bacterial contamination. Despite decades of rigorous research on its safety and efficacy as a curing agent, it is still regarded by many as a toxic undesirable food additive. However, research within the biomedical science community has revealed enormous therapeutic benefits of nitrite that is currently being developed as novel therapies for conditions associated with nitric oxide (NO) insufficiency. Much of the same biochemistry that has been understood for decades in the meat industry has been rediscovered in human physiology. This review will highlight the fundamental biochemistry of nitrite in human physiology and highlight the risk benefit evaluation surrounding nitrite in food and meat products. Foods or diets enriched with nitrite can have profound positive health benefits.

  18. Impact of feline AIM on the susceptibility of cats to renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Sugisawa, Ryoichi; Hiramoto, Emiri; Matsuoka, Shigeru; Iwai, Satomi; Takai, Ryosuke; Yamazaki, Tomoko; Mori, Nobuko; Okada, Yuki; Takeda, Naoki; Yamamura, Ken-ichi; Arai, Toshiro; Arai, Satoko; Miyazaki, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Renal failure is one of the most important social problems for its incurability and high costs for patients’ health care. Through clarification of the underlying mechanism for the high susceptibility of cats to renal disease, we here demonstrates that the effective dissociation of serum AIM protein from IgM is necessary for the recovery from acute kidney injury (AKI). In cats, the AIM-IgM binding affinity is 1000-fold higher than that in mice, which is caused by the unique positively-charged amino-acid cluster present in feline AIM. Hence, feline AIM does not dissociate from IgM during AKI, abolishing its translocation into urine. This results in inefficient clearance of lumen-obstructing necrotic cell debris at proximal tubules, thereby impairing AKI recovery. Accordingly, mice whose AIM is replaced by feline AIM exhibit higher mortality by AKI than in wild-type mice. Recombinant AIM administration into the mice improves their renal function and survival. As insufficient recovery from AKI predisposes patients to chronic, end-stage renal disease, feline AIM may be involved crucially in the high mortality of cats due to renal disease. Our findings could be the basis of the development of novel AKI therapies targeting AIM-IgM dissociation, and may support renal function in cats and prolong their lives. PMID:27731392

  19. Early diagnosis of renal disease and renal failure.

    PubMed

    Lees, George E

    2004-07-01

    The main goal of early diagnosis of renal disease and renal failure in dogs and cats is to enable timely application of therapeutic interventions that may slow or halt disease progression. Strategies for early diagnosis of renal disease use urine tests that detect proteinuria that is a manifestation of altered glomerular permselectivity or impaired urine-concentrating ability as well blood tests to evaluate plasma creatinine concentration. Animals with progressive renal disease should be carefully investigated and treated appropriately. Animals with mild, possibly nonprogressive, renal disease should be monitored adequately to detect any worsening trends,which should lead to further investigation and treatment even if the increments of change are small. PMID:15223206

  20. Renal metabolism of calcitonin

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, R.E.; Hjelle, J.T.; Mahoney, C.; Deftos, L.J.; Lisker, W.; Kato, P.; Rabkin, R.

    1988-04-01

    The kidneys account for approximately two-thirds of the metabolism of calcitonin, but relatively little is known regarding the details thereof. To further characterize this process, we examined the renal handling and metabolism of human calcitonin (hCT) by the isolated perfused rat kidney. We also studied the degradation of radiolabeled salmon calcitonin (sCT) by subcellular fractions prepared from isolated rabbit proximal tubules. The total renal (organ) clearance of immunoreactive hCT by the isolated kidney was 1.96 +/- 0.18 ml/min. This was independent of the perfusate total calcium concentration from 5.5 to 10.2 mg/dl. Total renal clearance exceeded the glomerular filtration rate (GFR, 0.68 +/- 0.05 ml/min), indicating filtration-independent removal. Urinary calcitonin clearance as a fraction of GFR averaged 2.6%. Gel filtration chromatography of medium from isolated kidneys perfused with /sup 125/I-labeled sCT showed the principal degradation products to be low molecular weight forms eluting with monoiodotyrosine. Intermediate size products were not detected. In the subcellular fractionation experiments, when carried out at pH 5.0, calcitonin hydrolysis exclusively followed the activities of the lysosomal enzyme N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase. Typically, at pH 7.5, 42% of total degradation occurred in the region of the brush-border enzyme alanyl aminopeptidase and 29% occurred in the region of the cytosolic enzyme phosphoglucomutase. Although 9% of the calcitonin-degrading activity was associated with basolateral membrane fractions, most of this activity could be accounted for by the presence of brush-border membranes.

  1. Renal failure in Yemen.

    PubMed

    Al-Rohani, M

    2004-01-01

    Renal failure remains a serious cause of mortality in Yemen. Our region has 1.25 million population and our hospital is the central hospital, which has a nephrology department and performs dialysis for the region. Between January 1998 and December 2002, we admitted 547 patients; including children, with acute renal failure (ARF) and chronic renal failure (CRF). CRF was observed in 400 patients, an incidence of 64 per million per year and a prevalence of 320 per million. ARF occurred in 147 persons with an incidence of 23.5 per million per year and a prevalence of 117.5 patients per million. Of all patients, 72% were adults (age range, 20-60 years) with a male preponderance. As a tropical country, malaria (27.9%), diarrhea (13.6%), and other infectious diseases were the main causes. Next most common were obstructive diseases causing CRF and ARF (26.8% and 12.9%, respectively), mainly urolithiasis, Schistosomiasis, and prostatic enlargement. However the cause of CRF in 57.5% of patients was unknown as most persons presented late with end-stage disease (64.7%), requiring immediate intervention. Other causes, such as hepatorenal syndrome, snake bite, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension, showed low occurrence rates. Patients presented to the hospital mostly in severe uremia and without a clear history of prior medications. The major findings were vomiting, acidosis, and hypertension with serum creatinine values ranging between 2.8-45 mg/dL (mean value, 13.4 mg/dL). Anemia was observed in 80.4% of CRF versus 62.6% of ARF patients. Hypertension prevalence was 65.5% among CRF patients, of whom 25% were in hypertensive crisis, whereas among ARF the prevalence was only 26.5%. PMID:15350475

  2. Renal calculus disease.

    PubMed

    Schulsinger, D A; Sosa, R E

    1998-03-01

    We have seen an explosion in technical innovations for the management of urolithiasis. Today, the endourologist possesses an assortment of minimally invasive tools to treat renal stones. Most patients receive fast, safe and effective treatment in the outpatient setting. Despite the many technical advances, however, anatomical malformations and complex stones still provide significant challenges in diagnosis, access to a targeted stone, fragmentation, and clearance of the resulting fragments. This review examines a variety of urinary stone presentations and treatment strategies for cost-effective management.

  3. Ifosfamide induced renal rickets.

    PubMed

    Lionel, Arul P; Chinnaswamy, Girish; John, Rikki R; Mathai, Sarah

    2014-09-01

    Ifosfamide is commonly used as a chemotherapeutic agent in children. The authors report a 4-y-old boy who developed proximal renal tubulopathy with florid rickets a year after completion of ifosfamide therapy for Ewing's sarcoma. After initiation of treatment, there was complete healing of rickets and he did not need supplements beyond 18 mo. Growth monitoring and musculoskeletal system examination is important in all children who have received ifosfamide therapy. Routine monitoring for nephrotoxicity during and after ifosfamide therapy helps in early identification and intervention. PMID:23912821

  4. Transperitoneal repair of a juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm and co-existent horseshoe kidney with division of the renal isthmus.

    PubMed

    Hajibandeh, Shahin; Hajibandeh, Shahab; Johnpulle, Michelle; Perricone, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    The co-existence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and horseshoe kidney (HSK) is rare. We report a 67-year-old man with an expanding juxtarenal AAA associated with a HSK. The aneurysm had a severely angulated neck and contained a significant amount of mural thrombus. The isthmus of HSK closely lied over the aneurysm, making its exposure extremely difficult. The aneurysm was successfully repaired using transperitoneal approach with division of the renal isthmus and without any need for the renal artery reconstruction. Despite the potential complications, particularly renal insufficiency, associated with division of the renal isthmus and suprarenal cross-clamping of the abdominal aorta, in our case, post-operative period was uneventful and the patient's recovery was satisfactory. PMID:26511935

  5. Clinical and experimental use of probiotic formulations for management of end-stage renal disease: an update.

    PubMed

    Di Cerbo, Alessandro; Pezzuto, Federica; Palmieri, Lucia; Rottigni, Valentina; Iannitti, Tommaso; Palmieri, Beniamino

    2013-12-01

    Nowadays kidney transplantation and dialysis are the only available therapies for end-stage renal disease management. They imply a considerable increase in plasma concentration of uremic wastes including creatinine, urea and uric acid. These invasive procedures impose high social costs that prevent many low-income countries from adequately treating the patients affected by renal insufficiency. For years, many studies on uremic waste removal through the gut lumen have been published with conflicting results. More recently, microencapsulation of probiotic bacteria has been performed by different research groups. This evidence has opened a new perspective on therapeutic modification of gut bacterial flora in the context of renal disease. This review gives an overview of the experimental and clinical use of probiotic formulations in the context of end-stage renal disease. PMID:23584675

  6. [Renal oncocytoma: 2 clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, M; Boschi, L; Zamboni, W; Mandrioli, M

    1990-05-31

    Renal oncocytoma is an uncommon benign neoplasm of tubular epithelial origin. It usually occurs as single mass and clinically may be confused with renal cell carcinoma. Angiographic, CT and ultrasound studies may suggest the diagnosis but they are not pathognomonic. The clinical, diagnostic and anatomopathological features of two cases are presented and discussed.

  7. Polyhydramnios and acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, D. V.; Kelly, Moira B.; Pryor, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Acute renal failure secondary to ureteric obstruction is described in a primigravida with twin gestation and polyhydramnios. Relief of the obstruction occurred on drainage of the liquor and return to normal renal function following delivery. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:7022419

  8. Heterogeneity of bilateral renal agenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, N.

    1977-01-01

    Bilateral and unilateral renal agenesis may be expressions of single dominant gene. Chromosome abnormalities may be present and the renal agenesis may be part of a syndrome of multiple abnormalities. Apparently normal relatives of affected individuals should be screened by intravenous pyelography before genetic counselling given. PMID:844022

  9. Renal response to environmental toxins.

    PubMed

    Finn, W F

    1977-10-01

    Several characteristics of normal renal function increase the risk to the kidney of damage by environmental toxins. Due to the magnitude of renal blood flow the total amount of noxious substance delivered may be disproportionately high. Furthermore, the capacity to concentrate substances within the kidney by processes of filtration, reabsorption and secretion has the potential to increase the toxicity of agents which would otherwise not lead to tissue injury. Unfortunately, there are few tests of renal function which are able to detect early functional abnormalities and which, at the same time, are suited for screening purposes by virtue of their simplicity, cost and safety. Furthermore, interpretation of the tests is complicated by adaptive changes in renal function which occur with aging and in response to other disease processes. Environmental agents produce a wide spectrum of renal dysfunction. Acute renal damage follows exposure to glycols, organic solvents, heavy metals, diagnostic and therapeutic agents and a variety of miscellaneous substances. Chronic renal disease may take the form of isolated tubular defects as seen with cadmium, interstitial nephritis due to the ingestion of lead, or vascular damage induced by external radiation. Some forms of glomerulonephritis may also be related to environmental toxins as are certain tumors of the urinary tract. In a somewhat different fashion, patients whose renal function is limited by the presence of pre-existing disease may manifest toxicity from substances ordinarily excreted in the urine. Particular problems exist with the patients on dialysis, as they are at considerable risk to alterations in the environment.

  10. Contemporary Renal Cell Cancer Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Wong-Ho; Devesa, Susan S.

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed renal cell cancer incidence patterns in the United States and reviewed recent epidemiologic evidence with regard to environmental and host genetic determinants of renal cell cancer risk. Renal cell cancer incidence rates continued to rise among all racial/ethnic groups in the United States, across all age groups, and for all tumor sizes, with the most rapid increases for localized stage disease and small tumors. Recent cohort studies confirmed the association of smoking, excess body weight, and hypertension with an elevated risk of renal cell cancer, and suggested that these factors can be modified to reduce the risk. There is increasing evidence for an inverse association between renal cell cancer risk and physical activity and moderate intake of alcohol. Occupational exposure to TCE has been positively associated with renal cell cancer risk in several recent studies, but its link with somatic mutations of the VHL gene has not been confirmed. Studies of genetic polymorphisms in relation to renal cell cancer risk have produced mixed results, but genome-wide association studies with larger sample size and a more comprehensive approach are underway. Few epidemiologic studies have evaluated risk factors by subtypes of renal cell cancer defined by somatic mutations and other tumor markers. PMID:18836333

  11. Angiographic Findings and Embolotherapy in Renal Arterial Trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Sofocleous, Constantinos T. Hinrichs, Clay; Hubbi, Basil; Brountzos, Elias; Kaul, Sanjeev; Kannarkat, George; Bahramipour, Philip; Barone, Alison; Contractor, Daniel G.; Shah, Tanmaya

    2005-01-15

    from 1 month to 7 years (mean 31 months). No procedure-related or delayed onset of renal insufficiency occurred.Conclusion In hemodynamically stable and controlled patients selective and superselective embolization is a safe and effective method for the management of renal vascular injury.

  12. Development of the Renal Arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, R. Ariel

    2011-01-01

    The kidney is a highly vascularized organ that normally receives a fifth of the cardiac output. The unique spatial arrangement of the kidney vasculature with each nephron is crucial for the regulation of renal blood flow, GFR, urine concentration, and other specialized kidney functions. Thus, the proper and timely assembly of kidney vessels with their respective nephrons is a crucial morphogenetic event leading to the formation of a functioning kidney necessary for independent extrauterine life. Mechanisms that govern the development of the kidney vasculature are poorly understood. In this review, we discuss the anatomical development, embryological origin, lineage relationships, and key regulators of the kidney arterioles and postglomerular circulation. Because renal disease is associated with deterioration of the kidney microvasculature and/or the reenactment of embryonic pathways, understanding the morphogenetic events and processes that maintain the renal vasculature may open new avenues for the preservation of renal structure and function and prevent the progression of renal disease. PMID:22052047

  13. Renal biopsy: methods and interpretation.

    PubMed

    Vaden, Shelly L

    2004-07-01

    Renal biopsy most often is indicated in the management of dogs and cats with glomerular disease or acute renal failure. Renal biopsy can readily be performed in dogs and cats via either percutaneous or surgical methods. Care should be taken to ensure that proper technique is used. When proper technique is employed and patient factors are properly addressed, renal biopsy is a relatively safe procedure that minimally affects renal function. Patients should be monitored during the post biopsy period for severe hemorrhage, the most common complication. Accurate diagnosis of glomerular disease, and therefore, accurate treatment planning,requires that the biopsy specimens not only be evaluated by light microscopy using special stains but by electron and immunofluorescent microscopy. PMID:15223207

  14. Renal Denervation: Where to Now?

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Neil J; Mauri, Laura

    2015-12-01

    Resistant hypertension remains a growing problem worldwide. Renal sympathetic denervation was thought to be a new method for the treatment for resistant hypertension. Early studies demonstrated a marked benefit in patients who underwent renal denervation procedures, but the pivotal SYMPLICITY 3-HTN trial, the only sham-controlled randomized trial performed, did not show a benefit for patients treated with the procedure compared to sham. There is still much to learn about the physiology and anatomy of renal sympathetic pathways as well as careful attention to medication adherence in order to understand the role of renal sympathetic denervation in treating hypertensive patients. While renal denervation technology remains available in clinical practice outside of the USA, we expect further development of this technology in the upcoming years and the continued evaluation of this technology in patients with hypertension as well as other disease states to fully understand its role. PMID:26482759

  15. Occurrence of mitral valve insufficiency in clinically healthy Beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Vörös, Károly; Szilvási, Viktória; Manczur, Ferenc; Máthé, Ákos; Reiczigel, Jenő; Nolte, Ingo; Hungerbühler, Stephan

    2015-12-01

    Chronic degenerative valve disease (CDVD) is the most common cardiac disease in dogs, usually resulting in mitral valve insufficiency (MVI). The goal of this study was to investigate the occurrence of MVI in clinically healthy Beagle populations. A total of 79 adult healthy Beagles (41 females and 38 males; age: 5.6 ± 2.7 years, range 1.4 to 11.7 years) were examined. The diagnosis of MVI was based on the detection of a systolic murmur heard above the mitral valve, and was confirmed by colour flow Doppler (CFD) echocardiography. Systolic mitral valve murmurs were detected in 20/79 dogs (25.3%), of them 11 males and 9 females with no statistically significant gender difference (P = 0.6059). The strength of the murmur on the semi-quantitative 0/6 scale yielded intensity grade 1/6 in 10 dogs, grade 2/6 in 4 dogs, and grade 3/6 in 6 dogs. Mild to moderate MVI was detected by CFD in all these 20 dogs with systolic murmurs. Of them, 17 dogs had mild and 3 demonstrated moderate MVI, showing 10-30% and 30-50% regurgitant jets compared to the size of the left atrium, respectively. The age of dogs with MVI was 7.1 ± 2.3 years, which was significantly different from that of dogs without MVI (5.1 ± 2.7 years, P = 0.0029). No significant differences in body weight (P = 0.1724) were found between dogs with MVI (13.8 ± 2.8 kg) and those without MVI (12.8 ± 3.0 kg). Mitral valve disease causing MVI is relatively common in Beagle dogs, just like in other small breed dogs reported in the literature. PMID:26599093

  16. Cortisol levels in central adrenal insufficiency: light and shade.

    PubMed

    De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Soliman, Ashraf; Yassin, Mohamed; Garofalo, Piernicola

    2015-03-01

    Evaluating children or adolescents with central adrenal insufficiency (CAI) is a difficult task in clinical practice, especially in subjects with hypothalamic-pituitary diseases and partial ACTH deficiency, or in those with recent pituitary surgery or brain irradiation when the adrenal cortex may still be responsive to stress. In 2008, a meta-analysis reported a three-step approach for evaluating patients at risk for CAI with no acute illness. In particular, the authors recommended the evaluation of morning cortisol, a low dose ACTH test (LDST) and the "gold standard" insulin tolerance test or metyrapone test if the low LDCT was not diagnostic. Cortisol and ACTH secretion exhibit significant fluctuation throughout the day. The reference ranges supplied by labs are so wide that they only flag up extremely low cortisol levels. Interpreting the results correctly can be difficult for a physician without an experience in adrenal dysfunctions. The lack of uniformity in these cut-off levels could in part be attributed to differences in study populations, variability of dynainic tests, the use of different serum cortisol assays and dissimilar cut-off peak serum cortisol response indicative of a normal axis response and the difference in the clinical context in which the studies were done. Therefore, Laboratories have to advertise the need to establish reference values for given populations, both for basal or stimulated hormone levels. Failure to apply this rule may elicit false-positive and more critically, false-negative results. LDST (1 pg synthetic ACTH as iv bolus with measurement of serum cortisol) has been proposed as a sensitive test for the diagnosis of CAl. However, the advantage of LDST compared with the high dose test may be offset by the technical difficulties inherent to dilution of 250 pg ampoules. Clinical judgment remains imperative especially regarding the use of glucocorticoid supplementation during extreme stress. PMID:25962205

  17. The role of perforators in chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, T F

    2010-02-01

    The treatment of incompetent calf perforating veins (ICPVs) has been ascribed an important role in the therapeutic strategy for reducing superficial venous hypertension in patients with advanced chronic venous insufficiency (C4-C6). Since the open approach to ligation of ICPVs was developed by Linton over 70 years ago, there has been an evolution toward less invasive techniques with lower morbidity. This paper will review the evidence for interruption of ICPVs through a series of systematic analyses of (1) subfascial endoscopic perforating surgery (SEPS) and (2) percutaneous thermal ablation techniques (PAPS). The effectiveness and morbidity of each approach will be discussed as well as the strength of evidence supporting that technique. While there are numerous case series that suggest that SEPS is beneficial for ulcer healing and for the prevention of ulcer recurrence, the sole two RCTs that have compared either open division or SEPS for ICPVs have failed to show a statistical advantage for ICPV ablation. The results of these studies are clouded by the inclusion of patients who received concomitant treatment of their great saphenous vein (GSV). The evidence for PAPS is based on a few (n = 5) case series in peer-reviewed journals, which are limited by small patient populations, limited follow-up, and a focus on surrogate outcomes (occlusion of the perforator) rather than clinical or functional outcomes. Moreover, most of these series were carried out in patients with mild disease. Sclerotherapy of ICPVs, by either liquid or foam, shows promise, but requires greater evidence. Our current approach for limbs with C4-C6 disease is to treat the GSV first and limit treatment of ICPVs to those with high volume flow and large-diameter ICPVs. [corrected

  18. Update on adrenal insufficiency in patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Trifan, Anca; Chiriac, Stefan; Stanciu, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a major cause of mortality worldwide, often with severe sepsis as the terminal event. Over the last two decades, several studies have reported that in septic patients the adrenal glands respond inappropriately to stimulation, and that the treatment with corticosteroids decreases mortality in such patients. Both cirrhosis and septic shock share many hemodynamic abnormalities such as hyperdynamic circulatory failure, decreased peripheral vascular resistance, increased cardiac output, hypo-responsiveness to vasopressors, increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines [interleukine(IL)-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha] and it has, consequently, been reported that adrenal insufficiency (AI) is common in critically ill cirrhotic patients. AI may also be present in patients with stable cirrhosis without sepsis and in those undergoing liver transplantation. The term hepato-adrenal syndrome defines AI in patients with advanced liver disease with sepsis and/or other complications, and it suggests that it could be a feature of liver disease per se, with a different pathogenesis from that of septic shock. Relative AI is the term given to inadequate cortisol response to stress. More recently, another term is used, namely “critical illness related corticosteroid insufficiency” to define “an inadequate cellular corticosteroid activity for the severity of the patient’s illness”. The mechanisms of AI in liver cirrhosis are not completely understood, although decreased levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high levels of proinflammatory cytokines and circulatory endotoxin have been suggested. The prevalence of AI in cirrhotic patients varies widely according to the stage of the liver disease (compensated or decompensated, with or without sepsis), the diagnostic criteria defining AI and the methodology used. The effects of corticosteroid therapy on cirrhotic patients with septic shock and AI are controversial. This review aims to summarize

  19. Screening for Vitamin D Insufficiency in Pediatric Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Esbenshade, Adam J.; Sopfe, Jenna; Zhao, Zhiguo; Li, Zeda; Campbell, Kristin; Simmons, Jill H.; Friedman, Debra L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Corticosteroids increase risk for decreased bone mineral density, which can be worsened by vitamin D insufficiency (VDI) or deficiency (VDD). Procedure In the Vanderbilt cancer survivorship clinic, we obtained screening total 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels (VDL) in 171 cancer survivors <23 years old who were treated with prolonged corticosteroids for their cancer, and compared this group to a control group of 97 healthy pediatric patients. Results VDD was diagnosed in 15.8% and VDI in 34.5% of cancer survivors and VDD/VDI combined was associated with body mass index (BMI) >85th percentile (Odds ratio (OR) = 5.4; p<0.001), older age (OR = 2.2; p=0.012), non-Caucasian or Hispanic race (OR = 4.5 p = 0.008) and summer versus winter season (OR= 0.12, p<0.001). In multivariable analysis, VDI/VDD prevalence did not differ from the control group (VDI/VDD (43.3%). In the combined survivor/control group multivariable analysis, cancer diagnosis did not increase VDI/VDD risk, but significant associations persisted with elevated BMI (p <0.001), age (p=0.004), non-Caucasian or Hispanic race (p<0.001), and seasonality (p<0.001). Conclusion VDD/VDI is equally common in pediatric cancer survivors treated with corticosteroids and healthy children. The impact of VDD/VDI in cancer survivors may be greater due to risk for impaired bone health superimposed on that conferred from corticosteroid exposure. Thus, screening VDLs should be obtained in pediatric cancer survivors treated with corticosteroids, particularly in those with elevated BMI, older age, or non-Caucasian race. Prospective studies evaluating the impact of interventions to minimize VDD/VDI on long-term bone health in survivors are required. PMID:24194420

  20. Renal transplantation in infants.

    PubMed

    Jalanko, Hannu; Mattila, Ilkka; Holmberg, Christer

    2016-05-01

    Renal transplantation (RTx) has become an accepted mode of therapy in infants with severe renal failure. The major indications are structural abnormalities of the urinary tract, congenital nephrotic syndrome, polycystic diseases, and neonatal kidney injury. Assessment of these infants needs expertise and time as well as active treatment before RTx to ensure optimal growth and development, and to avoid complications that could lead to permanent neurological defects. RTx can be performed already in infants weighing around 5 kg, but most operations occur in infants with a weight of 10 kg or more. Perioperative management focuses on adequate perfusion of the allograft and avoidance of thrombotic and other surgical complications. Important long-term issues include rejections, infections, graft function, growth, bone health, metabolic problems, neurocognitive development, adherence to medication, pubertal maturation, and quality of life. The overall outcome of infant RTx has dramatically improved, with long-term patient and graft survivals of over 90 and 80 %, respectively. PMID:26115617

  1. Reversible Fetal Renal Impairment following Angiotensin Receptor Blocking Treatment during Third Trimester of Pregnancy: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Saar, Tal; Levitt, Lorinne

    2016-01-01

    Background. Late pregnancy usage of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) may cause severe oligohydramnios due to fetal renal impairment. Affected neonates will often suffer from fatal, renal, and respiratory failure. Case. A 39-year-old multigravida admitted due to anhydramnios secondary to valsartan (ARB) exposure at 30 weeks' gestation. Following secession of treatment amniotic fluid volume returned to normal. Delivery was induced at 34 weeks' gestation following premature rupture of membranes and maternal fever. During the two-year follow-up, no signs of renal insufficiency were noted. Conclusions. This description of reversible fetal renal damage due to ARB intake during pregnancy is the first to show no adverse renal function in a two-year follow-up period. This case may help clinicians counsel patients with pregnancies complicated by exposure to these drugs. PMID:27672462

  2. Reversible Fetal Renal Impairment following Angiotensin Receptor Blocking Treatment during Third Trimester of Pregnancy: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Saar, Tal; Levitt, Lorinne; Amsalem, Hagai

    2016-01-01

    Background. Late pregnancy usage of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) may cause severe oligohydramnios due to fetal renal impairment. Affected neonates will often suffer from fatal, renal, and respiratory failure. Case. A 39-year-old multigravida admitted due to anhydramnios secondary to valsartan (ARB) exposure at 30 weeks' gestation. Following secession of treatment amniotic fluid volume returned to normal. Delivery was induced at 34 weeks' gestation following premature rupture of membranes and maternal fever. During the two-year follow-up, no signs of renal insufficiency were noted. Conclusions. This description of reversible fetal renal damage due to ARB intake during pregnancy is the first to show no adverse renal function in a two-year follow-up period. This case may help clinicians counsel patients with pregnancies complicated by exposure to these drugs. PMID:27672462

  3. Reversible Fetal Renal Impairment following Angiotensin Receptor Blocking Treatment during Third Trimester of Pregnancy: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Saar, Tal; Levitt, Lorinne

    2016-01-01

    Background. Late pregnancy usage of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) may cause severe oligohydramnios due to fetal renal impairment. Affected neonates will often suffer from fatal, renal, and respiratory failure. Case. A 39-year-old multigravida admitted due to anhydramnios secondary to valsartan (ARB) exposure at 30 weeks' gestation. Following secession of treatment amniotic fluid volume returned to normal. Delivery was induced at 34 weeks' gestation following premature rupture of membranes and maternal fever. During the two-year follow-up, no signs of renal insufficiency were noted. Conclusions. This description of reversible fetal renal damage due to ARB intake during pregnancy is the first to show no adverse renal function in a two-year follow-up period. This case may help clinicians counsel patients with pregnancies complicated by exposure to these drugs.

  4. Contribution of Glottic Insufficiency to Perceived Breathiness in Classically Trained Singers.

    PubMed

    Graham, Ellen; Angadi, Vrushali; Sloggy, Joanna; Stemple, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    Breathiness in the singing voice is problematic for classical singers. Voice students and singing teachers typically attribute breathiness to breath management issues and breathing technique. The present study sought to determine whether glottic insufficiency may also contribute to breathiness in a singer's voice. Studies have revealed a relationship between insufficient vocal fold closure and inefficiency in the speaking voice. However, the effect of insufficient vocal fold closure on vocal efficiency in singers has yet to be determined. Two groups of voice students identified with and without breathiness issues underwent aerodynamic and acoustic voice assessment as well as laryngeal stroboscopy of the vocal folds to quantify the prevalence of insufficient vocal fold closure, also known as glottic insufficiency. These assessments revealed four groups: 1) those with glottic insufficiency and no perceived voice breathiness; 2) those with glottic sufficiency and perceived voice breathiness; 3) those with glottic insufficiency and perceived breathiness; and 4) those with glottic sufficiency and no perceived breathiness. Results suggest that previously undiscovered glottal insufficiency is common in young singers, particularly women, though the correlation with identified breathiness was not statistically significant. Acoustic and aerodynamic measures including noise-to-harmonics ratio, maximum phonation time, airflow rate, subglottal pressure, and laryngeal airway resistance were most sensitive to glottic insufficiency. PMID:27575295

  5. Bedtime procrastination: A self-regulation perspective on sleep insufficiency in the general population.

    PubMed

    Kroese, Floor M; Evers, Catharine; Adriaanse, Marieke A; de Ridder, Denise Td

    2016-05-01

    Getting insufficient sleep has serious consequences in terms of mental and physical health. The current study is the first to approach insufficient sleep from a self-regulation perspective by investigating the phenomenon of bedtime procrastination: going to bed later than intended, without having external reasons for doing so. Data from a representative sample of Dutch adults (N = 2431) revealed that a large proportion of the general population experiences getting insufficient sleep and regularly goes to bed later than they would like to. Most importantly, a relationship between self-regulation and experienced insufficient sleep was found, which was mediated by bedtime procrastination. PMID:24997168

  6. Bedtime procrastination: A self-regulation perspective on sleep insufficiency in the general population.

    PubMed

    Kroese, Floor M; Evers, Catharine; Adriaanse, Marieke A; de Ridder, Denise Td

    2016-05-01

    Getting insufficient sleep has serious consequences in terms of mental and physical health. The current study is the first to approach insufficient sleep from a self-regulation perspective by investigating the phenomenon of bedtime procrastination: going to bed later than intended, without having external reasons for doing so. Data from a representative sample of Dutch adults (N = 2431) revealed that a large proportion of the general population experiences getting insufficient sleep and regularly goes to bed later than they would like to. Most importantly, a relationship between self-regulation and experienced insufficient sleep was found, which was mediated by bedtime procrastination.

  7. Renal histology and immunopathology in distal renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Feest, T G; Lockwood, C M; Morley, A R; Uff, J S

    1978-11-01

    Renal biospy studies are reported from 10 patients with distal renal tubular acidosis (DRTA). On the biopsies from 6 patients who had associated immunological abnormalities immunofluorescent studies for immunoglobulins, complement, and fibrin were performed. Interstitial cellular infiltration and fibrosis were common findings in patients with and without immunological abnormalities, and were usually associated with nephrocalcinosis and/or recurrent urinary infection. No immune deposits were demonstrated in association with the renal tubules. This study shows that DRTA in immunologically abnormal patients is not caused by tubular deposition of antibody or immune complexes. The possibility of cell mediated immune damage is discussed.

  8. Spontaneous renal artery dissection complicating with renal infarction.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Su, Jung-Tsung; Hu, Sung-Yuan; Chao, Chih-Chung; Tsan, Yu-Tse; Lin, Tzu-Chieh

    2010-12-01

    Spontaneous renal artery dissection (SRAD) is a rare entity. We reported a 30-year-old healthy man presenting with sudden onset of left flank pain. Abdominal plain film and sonography were unremarkable. The contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomographic (CT) scan demonstrated a dissecting intimal flap of the left distal renal artery (RA) complicating infarction. Selective angiography of the renal artery disclosed a long dissection of left distal RA with a patent true lumen and occlusion of left accessory RA. Conservative treatment with control of blood pressure and antiplatelet agent was prescribed. The patient was discharged with an uneventful condition on day 5.

  9. Renal Involvement in Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome: Retrospective Analysis of 160 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cavazzana, Ilaria; Nuzzo, Monica; Vianelli, Monica; Napodano, Pietro; Scaini, Patrizia; Tincani, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, clinicopathologic features, and outcome of renal involvement in a large cohort of patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS). Design, setting, participants, & measurements: We retrospectively examined medical records of 160 patients with a diagnosis of PAPS of two general hospitals of northern Italy between 1985 and 2008. Results: There were 140 women and 20 men. Mean age was 35 ± 12 yr. PAPS was characterized by thrombotic events in 41.2%, fetal loss in 39.4%, and both in 19.4%. Signs of renal abnormalities were present in 14 (8.7%) patients. All patients had proteinuria, in the nephrotic range in five; four patients had moderate chronic renal insufficiency, and one had end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Two patients presented with acute renal failure and one with nephritic syndrome. Ten patients underwent a renal biopsy, which showed a membranous glomerulonephritis in four, proliferative glomerulonephritis in two, thrombotic microangiopathy in two, and vascular lesions consistent with chronic antiphospholipid antibodies nephropathy in two. Patients with renal involvement were older (41.8 versus 34.3 years; P = 0.0269), more frequently lupus anticoagulant positive (92.3 versus 48.9%; P = 0.0068), and had hypocomplementemia (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Renal abnormalities are present in approximately 9% of patients with PAPS. In addition to APS nephropathy, the prevailing picture is membranous nephropathy. Outcome and long-term follow-up usually are good. Not all of the clinical manifestations of PAPS can be ascribed to thrombotic mechanisms. The heterogeneity of renal involvement confirms the presence of a continuum between systemic lupus erythematosus and PAPS. PMID:20430943

  10. Genes involved in the pathogenesis of premature ovarian insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Orlandini, C; Regini, C; Vellucci, F L; Petraglia, F; Luisi, S

    2015-10-01

    Premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) is defined by the presence of primary or secondary amenorrhea, for at least 4 months, before the age of 40 years associated with follicle stimulating homone levels in menopausal range, exciding 40 UI/L. The diagnosis is confirmed by two blood sample at least 1 month to measure the level of FSH (over 40 UI/L) and level of estradiol (below 50 pmol/L). Ovarian follicular dysfunction and/or depletion of functional primordial follicles characterized this pathology. Abnormal bleeding patterns also include oligomenrrhea and polimenorrhea; because of these irregular menstrual cycles during adolescence, diagnosis could be difficult in young women. Excluding the cases in which an etiopathogenetic agent could be identified, such as in case of chemio- and radiotherapy or extensive surgery, women with autoimmune diseases and/or infections, the etiology of POI remains idiopathic. An important genetic component exists, supported by both a frequent recurring familiar event (20-30%) and the association with other different genetic disorders in particular the X chromosome defects and the implication of some different genes with significant functions in ovarian development. For most of the women the diagnosis of POI is unexpected because of there are no obvious signs or symptoms that precede the cessation of periods with a normal menstrual history, age of menarche and fertility prior to the onset of menopause. The diagnosis of POI has a deleterious psychological impact on the emotional sphere of the women affected: anger, depression, anxiety and sadness are common and the fact that the diagnosis coincides with infertility needs a psychological support. Oral hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) administration is not recommended as first choice of treatment because of the higher hormones concentration with respect to the real hormones necessity of the patients and transdermal HRT may be preferred in women with coagulation disturbances to relief

  11. Renal Toxicities of Targeted Therapies.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Anum; Mirza, Mohsin M; Ganti, Apar Kishor; Tendulkar, Ketki

    2015-12-01

    With the incorporation of targeted therapies in routine cancer therapy, it is imperative that the array of toxicities associated with these agents be well-recognized and managed, especially since these toxicities are distinct from those seen with conventional cytotoxic agents. This review will focus on these renal toxicities from commonly used targeted agents. This review discusses the mechanisms of these side effects and management strategies. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents including the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab, aflibercept (VEGF trap), and anti-VEGF receptor (VEGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) all cause hypertension, whereas some of them result in proteinuria. Monoclonal antibodies against the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family of receptors, such as cetuximab and panitumumab, cause electrolyte imbalances including hypomagnesemia and hypokalemia due to the direct nephrotoxic effect of the drug on renal tubules. Cetuximab may also result in renal tubular acidosis. The TKIs, imatinib and dasatinib, can result in acute or chronic renal failure. Rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, can cause acute renal failure following initiation of therapy because of the onset of acute tumor lysis syndrome. Everolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, can result in proteinuria. Discerning the renal adverse effects resulting from these agents is essential for safe treatment strategies, particularly in those with pre-existing renal disease.

  12. Wegener's granulomatosis with renal involvement: patient survival and correlations between initial renal function, renal histology, therapy and renal outcome.

    PubMed

    Andrassy, K; Erb, A; Koderisch, J; Waldherr, R; Ritz, E

    1991-04-01

    Patient survival and renal outcome were followed in 25 patients with biopsy confirmed Wegener's granulomatosis and renal involvement. Fourteen out of 25 patients required dialysis on admission, 11/25 patients did not. All patients were treated with a novel protocol comprising methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. The median follow-up observation was 36 months (12-113 months). With the exception of 1 patient (who died from causes not related to Wegener's granulomatosis) all patients are alive. Among the patients initially requiring dialysis (n = 14) 4 are in terminal renal failure after 0, 7, 21 and 38 months respectively. In the nondialysis group (n = 11) only 1 patient subsequently required chronic dialysis 30 months after clinical admission. Renal failure was due to non-compliance with immunosuppressive therapy in at least 2 patients. Percentage of obsolescent glomeruli and the degree of tubulointerstitial lesions, but not active glomerular lesions (crescents, necroses) predicted renal outcome. The major cause of renal functional impairment was relapse of Wegener's granulomatosis usually within 2 years after clinical remission. Therefore prolonged treatment with cyclophosphamide for at least 2 years after clinical remission is recommended. Two patients with initially negative immunohistology had a second renal biopsy which revealed de novo appearance of mesangial IgA deposits.

  13. Renal Toxicities of Targeted Therapies.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Anum; Mirza, Mohsin M; Ganti, Apar Kishor; Tendulkar, Ketki

    2015-12-01

    With the incorporation of targeted therapies in routine cancer therapy, it is imperative that the array of toxicities associated with these agents be well-recognized and managed, especially since these toxicities are distinct from those seen with conventional cytotoxic agents. This review will focus on these renal toxicities from commonly used targeted agents. This review discusses the mechanisms of these side effects and management strategies. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents including the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab, aflibercept (VEGF trap), and anti-VEGF receptor (VEGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) all cause hypertension, whereas some of them result in proteinuria. Monoclonal antibodies against the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family of receptors, such as cetuximab and panitumumab, cause electrolyte imbalances including hypomagnesemia and hypokalemia due to the direct nephrotoxic effect of the drug on renal tubules. Cetuximab may also result in renal tubular acidosis. The TKIs, imatinib and dasatinib, can result in acute or chronic renal failure. Rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, can cause acute renal failure following initiation of therapy because of the onset of acute tumor lysis syndrome. Everolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, can result in proteinuria. Discerning the renal adverse effects resulting from these agents is essential for safe treatment strategies, particularly in those with pre-existing renal disease. PMID:25922090

  14. Angio-embolization of a renal pseudoaneurysm complicating a percutaneous renal biopsy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rafik, Hicham; Azizi, Mounia; El Kabbaj, Driss; Benyahia, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    We report the treatment of a bleeding renal pseudoaneurysm by angio-embolization. A 21 years old woman developed macroscopic haematuria following renal biopsy. Renal angio-scan showed a 1.4 cm renal pseudoaneurysm in the left kidney. The presence of pseudoaneurysm was confirmed by selective renal angiography. Successful embolization was performed using gelatine sponge particles.

  15. Angio-embolization of a renal pseudoaneurysm complicating a percutaneous renal biopsy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Rafik, Hicham; Azizi, Mounia; Kabbaj, Driss El; Benyahia, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    We report the treatment of a bleeding renal pseudoaneurysm by angio-embolization. A 21 years old woman developed macroscopic haematuria following renal biopsy. Renal angio-scan showed a 1.4 cm renal pseudoaneurysm in the left kidney. The presence of pseudoaneurysm was confirmed by selective renal angiography. Successful embolization was performed using gelatine sponge particles. PMID:26958141

  16. Successful management of neonatal renal venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Piscitelli, Antonio; Galiano, Rossella; Piccolo, Vincenzo; Concolino, Daniela; Strisciuglio, Pietro

    2014-10-01

    Renal vein thrombosis is the most common vascular condition involving the newborn kidney and it can result in severe renal damage. We report a newborn with renal vein thrombosis treated with continuous infusion of unfractionated heparin who had normal total renal function after 3 years of follow up, despite reduction of the functional contribution of the affected kidney.

  17. Diagnosis and management of renal angioma.

    PubMed Central

    Abercrombie, J F; Holmes, S A; Ball, A J

    1992-01-01

    Five patients with symptomatic renal angiomata are described. All presented with heavy haematuria and unilateral ureteric obstruction without evidence of a mass distorting the renal architecture. Renal angiomata are most easily diagnosed by selective renal angiography. They may be treated by intraarterial embolization, avoiding the need for major ablative surgery. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:1433042

  18. Hyperparathyroidism of Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Noah K; Ananthakrishnan, Shubha; Campbell, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Renal hyperparathyroidism (rHPT) is a common complication of chronic kidney disease characterized by elevated parathyroid hormone levels secondary to derangements in the homeostasis of calcium, phosphate, and vitamin D. Patients with rHPT experience increased rates of cardiovascular problems and bone disease. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend that screening and management of rHPT be initiated for all patients with chronic kidney disease stage 3 (estimated glomerular filtration rate, < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2). Since the 1990s, improving medical management with vitamin D analogs, phosphate binders, and calcimimetic drugs has expanded the treatment options for patients with rHPT, but some patients still require a parathyroidectomy to mitigate the sequelae of this challenging disease. PMID:27479950

  19. Renal Ablation Update

    PubMed Central

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity–focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  20. Renal complications in multiple myeloma and related disorders: Survivorship care plan of the IMF Nurse Leadership Board

    PubMed Central

    Faiman, Beth; Tariman, Joseph D.; Mangan, Patricia A.; Spong, Jacy

    2012-01-01

    Kidney dysfunction is a common clinical feature of symptomatic multiple myeloma. Some degree of renal insufficiency or renal failure is present at diagnosis or will occur during the course of the disease, and which, if not reversed, will adversely effect overall survival and quality of life. Chronic insults to the kidneys from other illnesses, treatment, or multiple myeloma itself can further damage renal function and increase the risk for additional complications, such as anemia. Patients with multiple myeloma who have light chain (Bence Jones protein) proteinuria may experience renal failure or progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and require dialysis due to light chain cast nephropathy. Kidney failure in patients with presumed multiple myeloma may also result from amyloidosis, light chain deposition disease, or acute tubular necrosis caused by nephrotoxic agents; therefore identification of patients at risk for kidney damage is essential. The International Myeloma Foundation’s Nurse Leadership Board have developed these practice recommendations for screening for renal function, identifying positive and negative contributing risk and environmental factors, selecting appropriate therapies and supportive care measures to decrease progression to ESRD and dialysis, and reducing and managing renal complications in patients with multiple myeloma. PMID:21816711

  1. Book Review: Chemistry in Theatre. Insufficiency, Phallacy or Both

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, Christiaan; Djerassi, Carl

    2012-11-01

    This book deals with the question of what role a play, or the theatre, can fulfill as an educational or pedagogic tool in the broad scope of science learning and education. The book contains the texts of two of the author's recent plays, viz. Insufficiency and Phallacy. Carl Djerassi is a writer and an emeritus professor of chemistry at Stanford University. He has published short stories, poetry, some novels and several "science-in-theatre" plays. Almost one fifth of this slim booklet is occupied by Djerassi's preface that is, in its own right, a most useful essay worth reading by any student of the exact sciences. Djerassi's point is that most of the modern science plays have a didactic component, and aim to illustrate - through the medium of theatre - what science or scientists are all about. To make such plays available to a broad audience, he advocates the production of readable books written in play format. The strong point of such plays is the dialogue format - as was already very well known by forerunners like Galileo Galilei with his Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems, published in 1632. Djerassi does not tell what his characters do, but he emphasises how and why they do some specific thing. Insufficiency is about the chemistry of champagne bubbles (coined bubbleology, i.e., the science of champagne or beer bubbles), in a scientific academic context dealing with tenure and fashion. The story clearly shows how the life of a young tenure-seeking scientist develops under the strong interlock of forced - but also of voluntary - overwork that leads to tenure (in turn accompanied by an increase in material security). But it also mentions the self-imposed and seemingly unescapable treadmill of success and scientific achievement that comes with tenure. The play also deals with fashion in science via the simplistically coined term bubbleology, and the author shows that the actual implications of this "science" actually even reach to cosmology. The

  2. Book Review: Chemistry in Theatre. Insufficiency, Phallacy or Both

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, Christiaan; Djerassi, Carl

    2012-11-01

    This book deals with the question of what role a play, or the theatre, can fulfill as an educational or pedagogic tool in the broad scope of science learning and education. The book contains the texts of two of the author's recent plays, viz. Insufficiency and Phallacy. Carl Djerassi is a writer and an emeritus professor of chemistry at Stanford University. He has published short stories, poetry, some novels and several "science-in-theatre" plays. Almost one fifth of this slim booklet is occupied by Djerassi's preface that is, in its own right, a most useful essay worth reading by any student of the exact sciences. Djerassi's point is that most of the modern science plays have a didactic component, and aim to illustrate - through the medium of theatre - what science or scientists are all about. To make such plays available to a broad audience, he advocates the production of readable books written in play format. The strong point of such plays is the dialogue format - as was already very well known by forerunners like Galileo Galilei with his Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems, published in 1632. Djerassi does not tell what his characters do, but he emphasises how and why they do some specific thing. Insufficiency is about the chemistry of champagne bubbles (coined bubbleology, i.e., the science of champagne or beer bubbles), in a scientific academic context dealing with tenure and fashion. The story clearly shows how the life of a young tenure-seeking scientist develops under the strong interlock of forced - but also of voluntary - overwork that leads to tenure (in turn accompanied by an increase in material security). But it also mentions the self-imposed and seemingly unescapable treadmill of success and scientific achievement that comes with tenure. The play also deals with fashion in science via the simplistically coined term bubbleology, and the author shows that the actual implications of this "science" actually even reach to cosmology. The

  3. Renal rickets-practical approach

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Manisha; Sahay, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Rickets/osteomalacia is an important problem in a tropical country. Many cases are due to poor vitamin D intake or calcium deficient diets and can be corrected by administration of calcium and vitamin D. However, some cases are refractory to vitamin D therapy and are related to renal defects. These include rickets of renal tubular acidosis (RTA), hypophosphatemic rickets, and vitamin D dependent rickets (VDDR). The latter is due to impaired action of 1α-hydroxylase in renal tubule. These varieties need proper diagnosis and specific treatment. PMID:24251212

  4. Renal Cancer in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    González León, Tania; Morera Pérez, Maricela

    2016-01-01

    The increase of the aging population corresponds with the rise of renal cancer in elderly patients. The distinction between functional and chronological age, quality of life, and survival estimate are important issues, among others, that should be considered in the management of renal cancer in elderly patients. We made this review with the purpose of synthesizing the most updated criteria regarding indications and outcomes of the different therapeutic options in the management of elderly patients with renal cancer, beginning from the physiologic considerations that characterize them, their capacity to tolerate different therapeutic possibilities, and the prognosis of the patients' risks and comorbidity assessment.

  5. Unusual renal tumour: multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Palmeiro, Marta Morna; Niza, João Luz; Loureiro, Ana Luisa; Conceição e Silva, João Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma (MCRCC) is a rare presentation of renal cell carcinoma. Most patients are asymptomatic and frequently MCRCCs are detected incidentally. MCRCCs have good prognosis because of their low malignant potential. We report a case of a 39-year-old woman who presented with mild right flank pain and normal laboratory data. On imaging examinations, a Bosniak III cystic lesion was detected in the lower third of the right kidney. She underwent right partial nephrectomy and histopathology showed a multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma Fuhrman grade 1. In this article, we also present a review of the literature on MCRCC, highlight the correlation of the pathological and imaging characteristics of these low aggressive renal lesions, and underscore the importance of their recognition to prevent unnecessary radical surgery. PMID:26957035

  6. Renal Histologic Parameters Influencing Postoperative Renal Function in Renal Cell Carcinoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Myoung Ju; Lim, Beom Jin; Choi, Kyu Hun; Kim, Yon Hee

    2013-01-01

    Background Pre-existing non-neoplastic renal diseases or lesions may influence patient renal function after tumor removal. However, its description is often neglected or omitted in pathologic reports. To determine the incidence and clinical significance of non-neoplastic lesions, we retrospectively examined renal tissues obtained during 85 radical nephrectomies for renal cell carcinoma. Methods One paraffin-embedded tissue block from each case containing a sufficient amount of non-tumorous renal parenchyma was cut and processed with hematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid-Schiff methods. Non-neoplastic lesions of each histological compartment were semi-quantitatively and quantitatively evaluated. Results Among the various histologic lesions found, tubular atrophy, arterial intimal thickening, and glomerulosclerosis were the most common (94.1%, 91.8%, and 88.2%, respectively). Glomerulosclerosis correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate at the time of surgery, as well as at 1- and 5-years post-surgery (p=.0071), but tubulointerstitial fibrosis or arterial fibrous intimal thickening did not. Post-hoc analysis revealed that glomerulosclerosis of more than 20% predicted post-operative renal function. However, its significance disappeared when gender and age were considered. Conclusions In conclusion, non-neoplastic lesions, especially with regard to glomerulosclerosis percentage, should be described in pathology reports to provide additional information on renal function decline. PMID:24421849

  7. [Spontaneous renal artery dissection with renal infarction: a case report].

    PubMed

    Oki, Takashi; Adachi, Hiroyuki; Tahara, Hideo; Kino, Sigeo

    2011-11-01

    A 58-year-old woman visited our hospital with nausea and right flank pain. At first abdominal ultrasonography was performed, suggesting a right renal infarction. Computed tomography (CT) study of the abdomen with intravenous contrast was performed to determine the cause of the symptoms. The scan revealed poor enhancement in the lower half of the right kidney. She was diagnosed with a right renal infarction. She was initially treated with anticoagulant therapy, but 5 days later, she complained of nausea. This time, CT demonstrated exacerbation of a right renal infarction with renal artery dissection. Based on this finding, we performed a right nephrectomy. The result of pathology was segmental arterial mediolysis. She was discharged 12 days after the surgery and is doing well at 6 months after discharge. Spontaneous renal artery dissection is a rare disease. It constitutes approximately 0.05% of arteriographic dissections. In addition, spontaneous renal artery dissection shows nonspecific symptoms. Together, these two factors may cause a delay in diagnosis.

  8. 75 FR 45114 - Determination of Insufficient Assets To Satisfy Claims Against Financial Institution in Receivership

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... CORPORATION Determination of Insufficient Assets To Satisfy Claims Against Financial Institution in... determined that insufficient assets exist in the receivership of Downey Savings and Loan Association, F.A... Agent at (972) 761-8677. Written correspondence may also be mailed to FDIC as Receiver of Downey...

  9. Genetics of primary ovarian insufficiency: new developments and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yingying; Jiao, Xue; Simpson, Joe Leigh; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is characterized by marked heterogeneity, but with a significant genetic contribution. Identifying exact causative genes has been challenging, with many discoveries not replicated. It is timely to take stock of the field, outlining the progress made, framing the controversies and anticipating future directions in elucidating the genetics of POI. METHODS A search for original articles published up to May 2015 was performed using PubMed and Google Scholar, identifying studies on the genetic etiology of POI. Studies were included if chromosomal analysis, candidate gene screening and a genome-wide study were conducted. Articles identified were restricted to English language full-text papers. RESULTS Chromosomal abnormalities have long been recognized as a frequent cause of POI, with a currently estimated prevalence of 10–13%. Using the traditional karyotype methodology, monosomy X, mosaicism, X chromosome deletions and rearrangements, X-autosome translocations, and isochromosomes have been detected. Based on candidate gene studies, single gene perturbations unequivocally having a deleterious effect in at least one population include Bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15), Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1), and Fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) premutation on the X chromosome; Growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9), Folliculogenesis specific bHLH transcription factor (FIGLA), Newborn ovary homeobox gene (NOBOX), Nuclear receptor subfamily 5, group A, member 1 (NR5A1) and Nanos homolog 3 (NANOS3) seem likely as well, but mostly being found in no more than 1–2% of a single population studied. Whole genome approaches have utilized genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to reveal loci not predicted on the basis of a candidate gene, but it remains difficult to locate causative genes and susceptible loci were not always replicated. Cytogenomic methods (array CGH) have identified other regions of interest

  10. Urea distribution in renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Blackmore, D. J.; Elder, W. J.; Bowden, C. H.

    1963-01-01

    An assessment of intracellular urea removed during haemodialysis has been made from urea extraction and plasma urea estimations. An apparent wide variation in the movement of intracellular urea in patients with acute renal failure from obstetric and traumatic causes and with chronic renal failure is reported. A method for the estimation of red cell water urea is presented. In two patients with chronic renal failure the red cell urea level was much higher than would have been expected from the plasma urea level before dialysis. In two obstetric patients there was no such discrepancy. The conclusion is drawn that research should be directed to variations of intracellular metabolism in renal failure before a more rational approach can be made to its management. PMID:16811009

  11. The renal mononuclear phagocytic system.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Peter J; Rees, Andrew J; Griffin, Matthew D; Hughes, Jeremy; Kurts, Christian; Duffield, Jeremy

    2012-02-01

    The renal mononuclear phagocytic system, conventionally composed of macrophages (Mø) and dendritic cells (DCs), plays a central role in health and disease of the kidney. Overlapping definitions of renal DCs and Mø, stemming from historically separate research tracks and the lack of experimental tools to specifically study the roles of these cells in vivo, have generated confusion and controversy, however, regarding their immunologic function in the kidney. This brief review provides an appraisal of the current state of knowledge of the renal mononuclear phagocytic system interpreted from the perspective of immunologic function. Physical characteristics, ontogeny, and known functions of the main subsets of renal mononuclear phagocytes as they relate to homeostasis, surveillance against injury and infection, and immune-mediated inflammatory injury and repair within the kidney are described. Gaps and inconsistencies in current knowledge are used to create a roadmap of key questions to be answered in future research. PMID:22135312

  12. Mucormycosis (zygomycosis) of renal allograft.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Krishan L; Joshi, Kusum; Kohli, Harbir S; Jha, Vivekanand; Sakhuja, Vinay

    2012-12-01

    Fungal infection is relatively common among renal transplant recipients from developing countries. Mucormycosis, also known as zygomycosis, is one of the most serious fungal infections in these patients. The most common of presentation is rhino-cerebral. Isolated involvement of a renal allograft is very rare. A thorough search of literature and our medical records yielded a total of 24 cases with mucormycosis of the transplanted kidney. There was an association with cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and anti-rejection treatment in these patients and most of these transplants were performed in the developing countries from unrelated donors. The outcome was very poor with an early mortality in 13 (54.5%) patients. Renal allograft mucormycosis is a relatively rare and potentially fatal complication following renal transplantation. Early diagnosis, graft nephrectomy and appropriate antifungal therapy may result in an improved prognosis for these patients.

  13. Renal infarction complicating fibromuscular dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Gavalas, M; Meisner, R; Labropoulos, N; Gasparis, A; Tassiopoulos, A

    2014-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory vascular disease that most commonly affects the renal and extracranial carotid arteries. We present 3 cases of renal infarction complicating renal artery FMD in 42-, 43-, and 46-year-old females and provide a comprehensive review of the literature on this topic. In our patients, oral anticoagulation therapy was used to treat all cases of infarction, and percutaneous angioplasty was used nonemergently in one case to treat refractory hypertension. All patients remained stable at 1-year follow-up. This is consistent with outcomes in previously published reports where conservative medical management was comparable to surgical and interventional therapies. Demographic differences may also exist in patients with renal infarction and FMD. A higher prevalence of males and a younger age at presentation have been found in these patients when compared to the general population with FMD.

  14. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  15. Primary carcinoma of renal calyx.

    PubMed

    Williams, Phillip A; Mai, Kien T

    2013-10-01

    Renal calyx carcinoma (RCXC) may mimic collecting duct carcinoma (CDC) or urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the renal pelvis. RCXC is distinguished from CDC and UC of the renal pelvis as having the tumor epicenter in the renal calyx, with limited involvement of the surrounding renal pelvis surface urothelium. In this study, we summarize our experience with this entity. Ten cases of RCXC, including 9 cases with urothelial differentiation (RCXC-UC) and 1 case with salivary gland-type differentiation (RCXC-SC), were identified. Ten consecutive cases of UC were selected for comparison, with extensive renal pelvis involvement and with secondary renal parenchymal invasion. Two cases of collecting duct carcinoma (CDC) were also examined. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed on representative tissue blocks for PAX8, PAX2, CK5, CK7, CK20, p63, GATA3, AMACR, RCC, CD10, vimentin, S100, and MSA. The 10 cases of RCXC (M:F=4:6, ages: 62-91 years, mean: 76) presented with renal masses of 3-6cm. Ureteroscopic studies and renal pelvic washings showed atypical/malignant cells in three cases. Seven patients were treated with nephrectomy followed by radiation±chemotherapy, and all cases developed metastases to lymph nodes or liver/lung/bone. In all 7 cases with nephrectomy, there was extensive renal parenchymal involvement with infiltrating borders and diffuse spread along collecting ducts. Six RCXC-UC contained focal squamous differentiation. The RCXC-SC displayed features of adenoid cystic and basaloid features. In situ UC, with or without papillary components, was identified in the calyces in all 7 nephrectomy cases with remaining renal pelvis harboring small tumor burden in 5 cases, and no tumor in another 2 cases. Of the three cases without nephrectomy, no tumor in the renal pelvis could be visualized with endoscopy, however one case was associated with UC of the urinary bladder. Of 10 control UC cases, tumor was limited to the tip of renal papilla in 7 cases, extensive in 3

  16. Renal protection in cardiovascular surgery

    PubMed Central

    Di Tomasso, Nora; Monaco, Fabrizio; Landoni, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the most relevant complications after major surgery and is a predictor of mortality. In Western countries, patients at risk of developing AKI are mainly those undergoing cardiovascular surgical procedures. In this category of patients, AKI depends on a multifactorial etiology, including low ejection fraction, use of contrast media, hemodynamic instability, cardiopulmonary bypass, and bleeding. Despite a growing body of literature, the treatment of renal failure remains mainly supportive (e.g. hemodynamic stability, fluid management, and avoidance of further damage); therefore, the management of patients at risk of AKI should aim at prevention of renal damage. Thus, the present narrative review analyzes the pathophysiology underlying AKI (specifically in high-risk patients), the preoperative risk factors that predispose to renal damage, early biomarkers related to AKI, and the strategies employed for perioperative renal protection. The most recent scientific evidence has been considered, and whenever conflicting data were encountered possible suggestions are provided. PMID:26998249

  17. From Pre-Existing Renal Failure to Perioperative Renal Protection: The Anesthesiologist’s Dilemmas

    PubMed Central

    Domi, Rudin; Huti, Gentian; Sula, Hektor; Baftiu, Nehat; Kaci, Myzafer; Bodeci, Artan; Pesha, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Context Pre-existing renal dysfunction presents specific features that anesthesiologists must deal with. Anesthesia and renal function are connected and can interfere with each other. Induced hypotension anesthesia and the toxic effects of anesthetic drugs can further deteriorate renal function. Evidence Acquisition Decreased renal function can prolong anesthetic drug effects by decreased elimination of these drugs. Anesthesia can deteriorate renal function and decreased renal function can interfere with drug elimination leading to their prolonged effect. The anesthesiologist must understand all the physiological aspects of the patient, renal protection, and the relationships between anesthetic drugs and renal function. This review article aims to summarize these aspects. Results Perioperative renal failure and renal protection is a crucial moment in clinical practice of every anesthesiologist. Conclusions Good knowledges for renal function remain a hallmark of daily practice of the anesthesiologist, considering renal function as an important determinant factor in anesthesia practice. PMID:27642570

  18. Endovenous laser ablation as a treatment for postsurgical recurrent saphenous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Anchala, Praveen R; Wickman, Christopher; Chen, Richard; Faundeen, Tonya; Pearce, William; Narducy, Lisa; Resnick, Scott A

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety and efficacy of endovenous laser ablation as a treatment for recurrent symptomatic saphenous insufficiency occurring after saphenous vein ligation and stripping. A single-center retrospective review of patients who received endovenous laser ablation as a treatment for recurrent symptomatic saphenous insufficiency after ligation and stripping between November 2003 and October 2006 was performed. Fifty-six insufficient saphenous systems were identified in 38 patients. Follow-up consisted of a clinical examination in all patients as well as selective lower-extremity duplex ultrasound as clinically indicated. All 38 patients demonstrated complete closure of the insufficient saphenous vein by clinical examination and/or duplex ultrasound evaluation. Preoperative symptoms resolved after treatment in all 38 patients. No major complications were identified. Endovenous laser ablation of recurrent symptomatic saphenous venous insufficiency is a safe and effective treatment in patients who develop recurrent symptoms after saphenous vein ligation and stripping. PMID:20035329

  19. Cervical insufficiency following cesarean delivery after prolonged second stage of labor: experiences of two cases.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shinsuke; Tomimatsu, Takuji; Kanagawa, Takeshi; Sawada, Kenjiro; Tsutsui, Tateki; Kimura, Tadashi

    2010-04-01

    Cervical insufficiency is a known risk factor for preterm birth and miscarriage. The etiology of cervical insufficiency has not been fully recognized and the association between it and prior cesarean delivery is unknown. We experienced two similar characteristic cases of cervical insufficiency following term cesarean delivery. Interestingly, both cesarean sections were uneventfully performed after the prolonged second stage of labor. Our experience and recent literature strongly support the idea that an unintentional incision into the uterine cervix during a previous cesarean section may cause cervical insufficiency in subsequent pregnancies. It is important for obstetricians to take into account the possible occurrence of cervical insufficiency depending on the circumstances of previous deliveries. Our report highlights the need to alert obstetricians to take more care with their cesarean section technique.

  20. [The influence of severe iodine insufficiency on the character of intellectual deficit].

    PubMed

    Semenova, N B; Manchuk, V T

    2007-01-01

    To study mental deficit in 60 children living in the areas with marked insufficiency of iodine in the soil, water and air, pupils of 3-4 grades of secondary schools in the western regions of Tyva Republic, where researchers of the State Medical Research Institute, Siberian Department of Russian Academy of Sciences, had discovered the hotbed of severe iodine insufficiency in 1997, were examined. Authors also studied 175 children who lived in the same social and economic conditions in the areas with light and moderate degree of iodine insufficiency. Impairments of memory, mental ability, intellectual function and visual motor coordination were found in the structure of mental deficit caused by the severe iodine insufficiency. In children from areas with light and moderate iodine insufficiency these disturbances were more subtle. Disturbances of analytical synthetic function and logical thinking were determined in the intellectual sphere. Processes suggesting between sensory integration disturbances were found in the perceptual sphere. PMID:18379506

  1. Metoclopramide and renal vascular resistance.

    PubMed

    Manara, A R; Bolsin, S; Monk, C R; Hartnell, G; Harris, R A

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the effect of i.v. metoclopramide on renal vascular resistance in nine healthy volunteers. Peak systolic and end-diastolic frequencies were measured using duplex Doppler ultrasound of a renal interlobar artery, before and after the administration of i.v. metoclopramide 10 mg, and the resistance index derived. There was no significant change in mean arterial pressure or resistance index following metoclopramide.

  2. Renal Ammonia Metabolism and Transport

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, I. David; Verlander, Jill W.

    2015-01-01

    Renal ammonia metabolism and transport mediates a central role in acid-base homeostasis. In contrast to most renal solutes, the majority of renal ammonia excretion derives from intrarenal production, not from glomerular filtration. Renal ammoniagenesis predominantly results from glutamine metabolism, which produces 2 NH4+ and 2 HCO3− for each glutamine metabolized. The proximal tubule is the primary site for ammoniagenesis, but there is evidence for ammoniagenesis by most renal epithelial cells. Ammonia produced in the kidney is either excreted into the urine or returned to the systemic circulation through the renal veins. Ammonia excreted in the urine promotes acid excretion; ammonia returned to the systemic circulation is metabolized in the liver in a HCO3−-consuming process, resulting in no net benefit to acid-base homeostasis. Highly regulated ammonia transport by renal epithelial cells determines the proportion of ammonia excreted in the urine versus returned to the systemic circulation. The traditional paradigm of ammonia transport involving passive NH3 diffusion, protonation in the lumen and NH4+ trapping due to an inability to cross plasma membranes is being replaced by the recognition of limited plasma membrane NH3 permeability in combination with the presence of specific NH3-transporting and NH4+-transporting proteins in specific renal epithelial cells. Ammonia production and transport are regulated by a variety of factors, including extracellular pH and K+, and by several hormones, such as mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and angiotensin II. This coordinated process of regulated ammonia production and transport is critical for the effective maintenance of acid-base homeostasis. PMID:23720285

  3. Renal response to environmental toxics

    PubMed Central

    Finn, William F.

    1977-01-01

    Several characteristics of normal renal function increase the risk to the kidney of damage by environmental toxins. Due to the magnitude of renal blood flow the total amount of noxious substance delivered may be disproportionately high. Furthermore, the capacity to concentrate substances within the kidney by processes of filtration, reabsorption and secretion has the potential to increase the toxicity of agents which would otherwise not lead to tissue injury. Unfortunately, there are few tests of renal function which are able to detect early functional abnormalities and which, at the same time, are suited for screening purposes by virtue of their simplicity, cost and safety. Furthermore, interpretation of the tests is complicated by adaptive changes in renal function which occur with aging and in response to other disease processes. Environmental agents produce a wide spectrum of renal dysfunction. Acute renal damage follows exposure to glycols, organic solvents, heavy metals, diagnostic and therapeutic agents and a variety of miscellaneous substances. Chronic renal disease may take the form of isolated tubular defects as seen with cadmium, interstitial nephritis due to the ingestion of lead, or vascular damage induced by external radiation. Some forms of glomerulonephritis may also be related to environmental toxins as are certain tumors of the urinary tract. In a somewhat different fashion, patients whose renal function is limited by the presence of pre-existing disease may manifest toxicity from substances ordinarily excreted in the urine. Particular problems exist with the patients on dialysis, as they are at considerable risk to alterations in the environment. PMID:598348

  4. Metoclopramide and renal vascular resistance.

    PubMed

    Manara, A R; Bolsin, S; Monk, C R; Hartnell, G; Harris, R A

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the effect of i.v. metoclopramide on renal vascular resistance in nine healthy volunteers. Peak systolic and end-diastolic frequencies were measured using duplex Doppler ultrasound of a renal interlobar artery, before and after the administration of i.v. metoclopramide 10 mg, and the resistance index derived. There was no significant change in mean arterial pressure or resistance index following metoclopramide. PMID:1997046

  5. Treatment of Autonomous Hyperparathyroidism in Post Renal Transplant Recipients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-23

    Chronic Allograft Nephropathy; Chronic Kidney Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Disordered Mineral Metabolism; End Stage Renal Disease; Hyperparathyroidism; Hypophosphatemia; Kidney Disease; Kidney Transplantation; Post Renal Transplantation

  6. Preoperative evaluation of renal artery in patients with renal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liangsong; Wu, Guangyu; Wang, Jianfeng; Huang, Jiwei; Kong, Wen; Chen, Yonghui; Xue, Wei; Huang, Yiran; Zhang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the feasibility of the noncontrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (NCE-MRA) to evaluate renal arteries before partial nephrectomy (PN). Retrospective analyzed 479 patients who underwent renal surgery between January 2013 and December 2015 with NCE-MRA or computed tomographic angiography (CTA) renal artery image reconstruction preoperative in our department. The renal artery reconstruction score (RARS) was based on the level of artery visualization in a 4-class criterion, and the R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score (R.E.N.A.L), arterial based complexity (ABC) were also analyzed. Of the 479 patients, the overall-lever RARS was 3.62, and the average in 2 groups was no significant difference (NCE-MRA vs CTA, P = 0.072). The performance of NCE-MRA in PN group was similar with CTA. Further comparison demonstrated that the efficiency of NCE-MRA in moderate- or low-degree tumor according to the R.E.N.A.L and ABC complexity less than 3S was equal to CTA. However, high degree (P < 0.001), 3S (P = 0.027), or 3H (P < 0.001) would affect the imaging of renal artery. Intragroup analysis showed that tumor complexity such as max tumor size (r = −o.351, P < 0.001), R.E.N.A.L (r = −0.439, P < 0.001), and ABC (r = −0.619, P < 0.001) were closely correlated with the NCE-MRA performance. The images of 2 sides of the kidney were compared in single person as well, which was meaningful for NCE-MRA patients only (NCE-MRA, P < 0.001; CTA, P = 0.182). The renal artery reconstruction performed by NCE-MRA is feasible and has a similar achievement in the PN potential recipients, with a lower side effect, and meets the requirements for making surgical decision. It has a broad application prospect in clinical practice; however, it still needs to further improve the ability in more complex tumors. PMID:27759632

  7. Impact of insufficient sleep on total daily energy expenditure, food intake, and weight gain.

    PubMed

    Markwald, Rachel R; Melanson, Edward L; Smith, Mark R; Higgins, Janine; Perreault, Leigh; Eckel, Robert H; Wright, Kenneth P

    2013-04-01

    Insufficient sleep is associated with obesity, yet little is known about how repeated nights of insufficient sleep influence energy expenditure and balance. We studied 16 adults in a 14- to 15-d-long inpatient study and quantified effects of 5 d of insufficient sleep, equivalent to a work week, on energy expenditure and energy intake compared with adequate sleep. We found that insufficient sleep increased total daily energy expenditure by ∼5%; however, energy intake--especially at night after dinner--was in excess of energy needed to maintain energy balance. Insufficient sleep led to 0.82 ± 0.47 kg (±SD) weight gain despite changes in hunger and satiety hormones ghrelin and leptin, and peptide YY, which signaled excess energy stores. Insufficient sleep delayed circadian melatonin phase and also led to an earlier circadian phase of wake time. Sex differences showed women, not men, maintained weight during adequate sleep, whereas insufficient sleep reduced dietary restraint and led to weight gain in women. Our findings suggest that increased food intake during insufficient sleep is a physiological adaptation to provide energy needed to sustain additional wakefulness; yet when food is easily accessible, intake surpasses that needed. We also found that transitioning from an insufficient to adequate/recovery sleep schedule decreased energy intake, especially of fats and carbohydrates, and led to -0.03 ± 0.50 kg weight loss. These findings provide evidence that sleep plays a key role in energy metabolism. Importantly, they demonstrate physiological and behavioral mechanisms by which insufficient sleep may contribute to overweight and obesity.

  8. Impact of insufficient sleep on total daily energy expenditure, food intake, and weight gain

    PubMed Central

    Markwald, Rachel R.; Melanson, Edward L.; Smith, Mark R.; Higgins, Janine; Perreault, Leigh; Eckel, Robert H.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2013-01-01

    Insufficient sleep is associated with obesity, yet little is known about how repeated nights of insufficient sleep influence energy expenditure and balance. We studied 16 adults in a 14- to 15-d-long inpatient study and quantified effects of 5 d of insufficient sleep, equivalent to a work week, on energy expenditure and energy intake compared with adequate sleep. We found that insufficient sleep increased total daily energy expenditure by ∼5%; however, energy intake—especially at night after dinner—was in excess of energy needed to maintain energy balance. Insufficient sleep led to 0.82 ± 0.47 kg (±SD) weight gain despite changes in hunger and satiety hormones ghrelin and leptin, and peptide YY, which signaled excess energy stores. Insufficient sleep delayed circadian melatonin phase and also led to an earlier circadian phase of wake time. Sex differences showed women, not men, maintained weight during adequate sleep, whereas insufficient sleep reduced dietary restraint and led to weight gain in women. Our findings suggest that increased food intake during insufficient sleep is a physiological adaptation to provide energy needed to sustain additional wakefulness; yet when food is easily accessible, intake surpasses that needed. We also found that transitioning from an insufficient to adequate/recovery sleep schedule decreased energy intake, especially of fats and carbohydrates, and led to −0.03 ± 0.50 kg weight loss. These findings provide evidence that sleep plays a key role in energy metabolism. Importantly, they demonstrate physiological and behavioral mechanisms by which insufficient sleep may contribute to overweight and obesity. PMID:23479616

  9. The role of maternal nutrition, metabolic function and the placenta in developmental programming of renal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Richter, V F I; Briffa, J F; Moritz, K M; Wlodek, M E; Hryciw, D H

    2016-01-01

    The intrauterine environment is critical for the development of the foetus. Barker and colleagues were the first to identify that adverse perturbations during foetal development are associated with an increased risk of developing diseases in adulthood, including cardiorenal disease. Specifically for the kidney, perturbations in utero can lead to nephron deficits and renal dysfunction by a number of mechanisms. Altered programming of nephron number is associated with an increased risk of developing kidney disease via glomerular hypertrophy and reduced vasodilative capacity of the renal blood vessels; both of which would contribute to hypertension in adulthood, with males being more susceptible to disease outcomes. Additionally, alterations in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) such as an upregulation or downregulation of specific receptors, depending on the nature of the insult, have also been implicated in the development of renal dysfunction. Sex-specific differences in the expression of the RAS during late gestation and in the early postnatal environment have also been identified. Extensive research has demonstrated that both uteroplacental insufficiency and maternal malnutrition alter renal development in utero. Equally, exposure to maternal diabetes and maternal obesity during development are also associated with an increased risk of developing renal disease, however, the mechanism behind this association is poorly understood. Therefore, identifying the link between an adverse intrauterine environment and the programmed kidney disease risk in adulthood may facilitate the development of strategies to alleviate the epidemics of cardiorenal disease worldwide, in addition to understanding why males are more susceptible to adult-onset cardiovascular diseases.

  10. A Meta-Analysis of Renal Function After Adult Cardiac Surgery With Pulsatile Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Nam, Myung Ji; Lim, Choon Hak; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Yong Hwi; Choi, Hyuk; Son, Ho Sung; Lim, Hae Ja; Sun, Kyung

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine whether pulsatile perfusion during cardiac surgery has a lesser effect on renal dysfunction than nonpulsatile perfusion after cardiac surgery in randomized controlled trials. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were used to identify available articles published before April 25, 2014. Meta-analysis was conducted to determine the effects of pulsatile perfusion on postoperative renal functions, as determined by creatinine clearance (CrCl), serum creatinine (Cr), urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), and the incidences of acute renal insufficiency (ARI) and acute renal failure (ARF). Nine studies involving 674 patients that received pulsatile perfusion and 698 patients that received nonpulsatile perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were considered in the meta-analysis. Stratified analysis was performed according to effective pulsatility or unclear pulsatility of the pulsatile perfusion method in the presence of heterogeneity. NGAL levels were not significantly different between the pulsatile and nonpulsatile groups. However, patients in the pulsatile group had a significantly higher CrCl and lower Cr levels when the analysis was restricted to studies on effective pulsatile flow (P < 0.00001, respectively). The incidence of ARI was significantly lower in the pulsatile group (P < 0.00001), but incidences of ARF were similar. In conclusion, the meta-analysis suggests that the use of pulsatile flow during CPB results in better postoperative renal function.

  11. Renal transepithelial transport of nucleosides.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J A; Vidale, E; Enigbokan, M

    1988-01-01

    Previous work from this and other laboratories has suggested that the mammalian kidney has unique mechanisms for handling purine nucleosides. For example, in humans and in mice, adenosine undergoes net renal reabsorption whereas deoxyadenosine is secreted [Kuttesch and Nelson: Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol. 8, 221 (1982)]. The relationships between these renal transport systems and classical renal organic cation and anion, carbohydrate, and cell membrane nucleoside transport carriers are not established. To investigate possible relationships between such carriers, we have tested effects of selected classical transport inhibitors on the renal clearances of adenosine, deoxyadenosine, 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine (5'-dFUR), and 5-fluorouracil in mice. The secretion of deoxyadenosine and 5'-dFUR, but not the reabsorption of adenosine or 5-fluorouracil, was prevented by the classical nucleoside transport inhibitors, dipyridamole and nitrobenzylthioinosine. Cimetidine, an inhibitor of the organic cation secretory system, also inhibited the secretion of 5'-dFUR, although it did not inhibit deoxyadenosine secretion in earlier studies [Nelson et al.: Biochem. Pharmacol. 32, 2323 (1983)]. The specific inhibitor of glucose renal reabsorption, phloridzin, failed to inhibit the reabsorption of adenosine or the secretion of deoxyadenosine. Failure of the nucleoside transport inhibitors and phloridzin to prevent adenosine reabsorption suggests that adenosine reabsorption may occur via a unique process. On the other hand, inhibition of the net secretion of deoxyadenosine and 5'-dFUR by dipyridamole and nitrobenzylthioinosine implies a role for the carrier that is sensitive to these compounds in the renal secretion (active transport) of these nucleosides.

  12. Renal radiopharmaceuticals--an update

    SciTech Connect

    Chervu, L.R.; Blaufox, M.D.

    1982-07-01

    Noninvasive radionuclide procedures in the evaluation of renal disease have been accepted increasingly as effective and valuable alternatives to older clinical methods. The development of suitable radiopharmaceuticals labeled with high photon intensity radionuclides and with /sup 99m/Tc in particular has stimulated this modality during the last few years. Currently several nearly ideal agents are available for anatomical and functional studies of kidney imparting very low absorbed radiation doses. These include /sup 99m/Tc-GHA and /sup 99m/Tc-DMSA for renal morphology and differential function evaluation, /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA for GFR and /sup 123/I orthoiodohippurate for ERPF measurements. A suitable agent as a replacement for the latter labeled with /sup 99m/Tc is actively being sought. Computer-assisted processing of dynamic renal function studies enables the observer to obtain a wealth of information related to the renal extraction, uptake, parenchymal transit and pelvic transit parameters of the agent administered into the bloodstream. Each of these parameters either globally or differentially contributes to a detailed evaluation of renal disease states. Several of these procedures have been validated against classical techniques clinically but more detailed information is being sought with the recently introduced radiopharmaceuticals. With the detailed validation and increasing recognition of the clinical utility of several of the radionuclidic procedures at many centers, it is hoped that radionuclide assessment of renal disorders ultimately will be made available routinely at all medical facilities.

  13. Renal ischemic injury affects renal hemodynamics and excretory functions in Sprague Dawley rats: involvement of renal sympathetic tone.

    PubMed

    Salman, Ibrahim M; Sattar, Munavvar A; Abdullah, Nor A; Ameer, Omar Z; Yam, Mun F; Kaur, Gurjeet; Hye Khan, Md Abdul; Johns, Edward J

    2010-01-01

    The role of renal sympathetic nerves in the pathogenesis of ischemic acute renal failure (ARF) and the immediate changes in the renal excretory functions following renal ischemia were investigated. Two groups of male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were anesthetized (pentobarbitone sodium, 60 mg kg(-1) i.p.) and subjected to unilateral renal ischemia by clamping the left renal artery for 30 min followed by reperfusion. In group 1, the renal nerves were electrically stimulated and the responses in the renal blood flow (RBF) and renal vascular resistance (RVR) were recorded, while group 2 was used to study the early changes in the renal functions following renal ischemia. In post-ischemic animals, basal RBF and the renal vasoconstrictor reperfusion to renal nerve stimulation (RNS) were significantly lower (all p < 0.05 vs. control). Mean arterial pressure (MAP), basal RVR, urine flow rate (UFR), absolute and fractional excretions of sodium (U(Na)V and FE(Na)), and potassium (U(K)V and FE(K)) were higher in ARF rats (all p < 0.05 vs. control). Post-ischemic animals showed markedly lower glomerular filtration rate (GFR) (p < 0.05 vs. control). No appreciable differences were observed in urinary sodium to potassium ratio (U(Na)/U(K)) during the early reperfusion phase of renal ischemia (p > 0.05 vs. control). The data suggest an immediate involvement of renal sympathetic nerve action in the pathogenesis of ischemic ARF primarily through altered renal hemodynamics. Diuresis, natriuresis, and kaliuresis due to impaired renal tubular functions are typical responses to renal ischemia and of comparable magnitudes.

  14. Renal artery injury during robot-assisted renal surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Won; Yoon, Young Eun; Kim, Dae Keun; Park, Sung Yul; Moon, Hong Sang; Lee, Tchun Yong

    2010-07-01

    Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) is becoming the standard of care for incidentally diagnosed, small renal tumors. With its seven degrees of freedom and three-dimensional vision, the DaVinci robotic surgical system has been used to assist in LPNs. The main disadvantage of robot-assisted surgery, however, is the lack of tactile feedback. We present a case of renal artery injury during robot-assisted renal surgery. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy (RPN) was planned for 47-year-old man with a 3.5-cm right renal mass. After standard bowel mobilization, renal hilar dissection was performed. In the attempt to complete the dissection posteriorly, however, there was sudden profuse bleeding. The intraperitoneal pressure immediately increased to 20 mm Hg, and an additional suction device was inserted through the 5-mm liver retractor port. On inspection, there was an injury at the takeoff of the posterior segmental artery. A decision was made to convert to robot-assisted laparoscopic radical nephrectomy. The main renal artery and renal vein were controlled with Hem-o-Lok clips. The estimated blood loss was 2,000 mL. Four units of packed red blood cells were transfused intraoperatively. The post-transfusion hemoglobin level was 12.6 g/dL. There were no other perioperative complications. The surgeon should keep in mind that the robotic arms are very powerful and can easily injure major vessels because of lack of tactile feedback. A competent and experienced tableside surgeon is very important in robot-assisted surgery because the unsterile console surgeon cannot immediately react to intraoperative complications.

  15. Leptospirosis Presenting with Rapidly Progressing Acute Renal Failure and Conjugated Hyperbilirubinemia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Pothuri, Pallavi; Ahuja, Keerat; Kumar, Viki; Lal, Sham; Tumarinson, Taisiya; Mahmood, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Unexplained renal insufficiency combined with hepatic failure is a common problem encountered by clinicians. As with many disease processes involving multi-organ systems, reversible causes are usually not readily identifiable, and for many patients their health deteriorates rapidly. We present a rare cause of acute renal failure and hyperbilirubinemia occurring simultaneously, with leptospirosis presenting as Weil's disease. CASE REPORT A 53-year-old male presented to our clinic with complaints of anuria over the past two days. His symptoms started with dark urine, severe cramps in the thighs, and chills. The patient was a visitor to the United States from Guyana. Positive physical examination findings included mild tachycardia and hypotension, scleral icterus, and tenderness over abdomen, costovertebral angles, and thighs. The patient had a high white blood cell count, thrombocytopenia, renal/hepatic insufficiency, and an urinary tract infection (UTI). The patient was initially treated under the suspicion of acute kidney injury secondary to rhabdomyolysis and pyelonephritis. The patient continued to deteriorate with decreasing platelet counts, worsening renal function, hyperbilirubinemia, and respiratory distress, with no improvement with hemodialysis. Broad-spectrum antibiotics were administered, including doxycycline, due to a high suspicion of leptospirosis. The patient's condition drastically improved after initiation of doxycycline. On subsequent days, the patient's Leptospira antibody results were available, showing titers of more than 1:3200. Hemodialysis was discontinued as the patient started producing urine with improved kidney function. CONCLUSIONS As world travel becomes more economically feasible, we will continue to encounter foreign endemic diseases. Leptospirosis presenting as Weil's disease is a common cause of renal and hyperbilirubinemia in endemic areas. Often, as was the case for our patient where the time from presentation to acute

  16. Pathophysiology and management of progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    Brown, S A; Crowell, W A; Brown, C A; Barsanti, J A; Finco, D R

    1997-09-01

    Recently, the hypothesis that all renal diseases are inherently progressive and self-perpetuating has focused attention on adaptive changes in renal structure and function that occur whenever renal function is reduced. These glomerular adaptations to renal disease include increases in filtration rate, capillary pressure and size, and are referred to as glomerular hyperfiltration, glomerular hypertension and glomerular hypertrophy, respectively. Extrarenal changes, such as dietary phosphate excess, systemic hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, acidosis and hyperparathyroidism occur in animals with renal disease and may be contributors to progression of renal disease. Emphasis in the management of companion animals with renal disease has shifted to identifying, understanding and controlling those processes that play a role in the progression from early to end-stage renal failure. Advances made by veterinary nephrologists in the past 15 years permit resolution of old controversies, formulation of new hypotheses and discussion of unresolved issues about the nature of progressive renal disease in dogs and cats. PMID:9308397

  17. Renal manifestations of tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    O'Hagan, A R; Ellsworth, R; Secic, M; Rothner, A D; Brouhard, B H

    1996-10-01

    Patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) are at increased risk of renal disease, predominantly angiomyolipomas and renal cysts. We retrospectively reviewed clinical data of 71 patients diagnosed with TSC. Progression of renal lesions was noted. TSC patients with renal lesions were compared with TSC patients without renal disease. Fifteen of 38 patients had renal abnormalities by imaging at presentation. Six of 9 with initially normal kidneys subsequently developed new lesions. Although not of statistical significance, there was a trend toward increased retinal hamartomas, cardiac rhabdomyomas, and skin lesions in those patients who also had renal abnormalities. Renal disease should be considered and sought in all patients with TSC, both at initial presentation and subsequently, since renal disease is a very significant cause of morbidity and mortality.

  18. Renal failure in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Almueilo, Samir H

    2015-01-01

    Renal dysfunction is encountered in 20-25% of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) at the time of diagnosis. There is often a precipitating event. Several biochemical and clinical correlations with renal failure in MM have been reported. Renal failure in MM is associated with worse outcome of the disease. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 64 patients with MM admitted to our institution during the period January 1992 to December 2012. Abnormal renal function was observed in 24 (37.5%) patients and 17 (26.6%) of them had renal failure; 14 of the 17 (82.4%) of patients with renal failure had Stage III MM. Urine Bence- Jones protein was positive in ten (58.8%) patients with renal failure versus ten (21.3%) patients without renal failure (P = 0.004). Potential precipitating factors of renal failure were determined in nine patients. Renal function normalized in 11 patients with simple measures, while six patients required hemodialysis; one remained dialysis dependent till time of death. Early mortality occurred in five (29.4%) patients with renal failure as compared with two (4.3%) patients in the group without renal failure (P = 0.005). In conclusion, renal failure is associated with a higher tumor burden and Bence-Jones proteinuria in patients with MM. It is reversible in the majority of patients; however, early mortality tends to be higher in patients with persistent renal failure.

  19. Halo naevi and café au lait macule regression in a renal transplant patient on immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Lolatgis, Helena; Varigos, George; Braue, Anna; Scardamaglia, Laura; Boyapati, Ann; Winship, Ingrid

    2015-11-01

    A case of halo naevi and café au lait macule regression in a renal transplant patient receiving long-term immunosuppressive therapy is described. We propose the direct transfer of an auto-reactive antibody, CD8 T-cells or tumour necrosis factor α from the transplant donor to the recipient as a possible cause. We have also considered insufficient immunosuppressive therapy as a possible mechanism.

  20. Corticosteroid Treatment Influences TA-Proteinuria and Renal Survival in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sarcina, Cristina; Tinelli, Carmine; Ferrario, Francesca; Visciano, Bianca; Pani, Antonello; De Silvestri, Annalisa; De Simone, Ilaria; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Terraneo, Veronica; Furiani, Silvia; Santagostino, Gaia; Corghi, Enzo; Pozzi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The clinical course of IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and its outcome are extremely variable. Proteinuria at baseline has been considered one of the most important risk factors. More recently, mean proteinuria of follow-up (time-average proteinuria: TAp) was described as a stronger marker of renal survival, suggesting to consider it as a marker of disease activity and response to treatment. We evaluated predictors of renal survival in IgAN patients with different degrees of renal dysfunction and histological lesions, focusing on the role of the therapy in influencing TAp. We performed a retrospective analysis of three prospective, randomized, clinical trials enrolling 325 IgAN patients from 1989 to 2005. Patients were divided into 5 categories according to TAp. The primary endpoint of the 100% increase of serum creatinine occurred in 54 patients (16.6%) and renal survival was much better in groups having lower TAp. The median follow up was 66.6 months (range 12 to 144). The primary endpoint of the 100% increase of serum creatinine occurred in 54 patients (16,6%) and renal survival was much better in groups having lower TA proteinuria. At univariate analysis plasma creatinine and 24h proteinuria, systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure during follow-up and treatment with either steroid (CS) or steroid plus azathioprine (CS+A) were the main factors associated with lower TAp and renal survival. At multivariate analysis, female gender, treatment with S or S+A, lower baseline proteinuria and SBP during follow-up remained as the only variables independently influencing TAp. In conclusion, TA-proteinuria is confirmed as one of the best outcome indicators, also in patients with a severe renal insufficiency. A 6-month course of corticosteroids seems the most effective therapy to reduce TAp. PMID:27416024

  1. [Renal transplantation: ethical issues].

    PubMed

    Mamzer-Bruneel, Marie-France; Laforêt, Emmanuelle Grand; Kreis, Henri; Thervet, Éric; Martinez, Frank; Snanoudj, Renaud; Hervé, Christian; Legendre, Christophe

    2012-12-01

    One of the most significant advances in medicine during the last 50 years is the development of organ transplantation. In the context of chronic kidney diseases, renal transplantation offers patients a better clinical outcome than other treatment options. However, the benefits of organ transplantation have not been maximized due to an inadequate supply of organs for transplantation. Despite the establishment of elaborate legal rules for organs procurement, both on deceased and living donors in numerous countries, ethical concerns remain. Most of them are consequences of the strategies implemented or proposed to address the so-called organ shortage. The involvement of society in these complex problems is crucial as numerous questions emerge: could actual state of organ procurement change? Is it possible and/or realistic to increase the number of organs, with respects to living donors or deceased persons? Is the shortage an indicator to limit the use of kidney transplantation? How do we maintain efficiency and justice, in this context. PMID:23168353

  2. [Peritoneal dialysis in a patient with right hemiparesis, lupus nephritis, significant insufficiency of arteries of aortic arch and celiac disease: case report].

    PubMed

    Altabas, Karmela; Crne, Natasa; Franjić, Björn Dario; Pavlović, Drasko; Josipović, Josipa

    2012-10-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a method of choice in patients in whom there are difficulties concerning creation of AV fistula. A 38-year old female patient came to our hospital because of a need of making an AV fistula. She had end-stage renal insufficiency of unknown origin. She had a right hemiparesis with a contracture of the right fist and epilepsy because of the stroke she suffered in 1993. After doing the diagnostics, we have found that patient had lupus nephritis, occlusion of brachiocephalic trunk, right and left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery. We also diagnosed celiac disease and a significant anemia. It was not possible to form an AV fistula, as it was not possible to do an assisted PD. Because of the right hemiparesis and contracture of the right fist, the possibility of performing PD independently was questionable. Despite the handicap, the patient had strong motivation and she managed to master the technique of PD independently. Even though it was estimated that she had a high risk score for applying anesthesia (ASA IV), the insertion of the peritoneal catheter went without complications. Because of the comorbidity, especially because of the significant stenosis and occlusions of the arteries of aortic arch, the kidney transplantation will not be performed. In the last fifteen months, the patient is performing PD independently, without any infectious complications, she is feeling well and is satisfied with the quality of her life. The consequences of the renal insufficiency are under control, systemic lupus erythematosus is, with a low dose of corticosteroids, in a steady state, malnutrition is corrected, but there is still hypoalbuminemia noted.

  3. Vascular and Renal Hemodynamic Changes after Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Christian; Janka, Rolf; Schmid, Axel; Titze, Stephanie; Ditting, Tilmann; Sobotka, Paul A.; Veelken, Roland; Uder, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Renal denervation (RDN) has been shown to be effective in reducing BP in treatment-resistant hypertension. Measurement of the renal and sympathetic activity revealed a decrease in sympathetic drive to the kidney and small resistance vessels after RDN. However, the consequences on renal perfusion and renal vascular resistance (RVR), as well as central hemodynamics, are unknown. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Nineteen patients with treatment-resistant hypertension (office BP≥140/90 mmHg, despite at least three antihypertensive drugs [including a diuretic], and diagnosis confirmed by 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring) underwent RDN between January and October 2011. Renal perfusion and RVR were noninvasively assessed by magnetic resonance imaging with arterial spin labeling, and renal function was assessed by estimating GFR before (day −1), after (day +1), and again after 3 months of RDN. Central hemodynamics was assessed using pulse wave analysis at day −1 and after 6 months of RDN. Results Peripheral office BP (systolic, 158±26 versus 142±23 mmHg, P=0.002; diastolic, 83±13 versus 76±9 mmHg, P=0.02) and mean systolic 24-hour ambulatory BP (159±17 versus 152±17 mmHg, P=0.02) were significantly reduced 6 months after RDN. Renal perfusion was not statistically different between day −1 and day +1 (256.8 [interquartile range (IQR), 241–278] versus 263.4 [IQR, 252–277] ml/min per 100 g; P=0.17) as well as after 3 months (256.8 [IQR, 241–278] versus 261.2 [IQR, 240–285] ml/min per 100 g; P=0.27) after RDN. RVR dropped (432.1 [IQR, 359–525] versus 390.6 [IQR, 338–461] AU; P=0.02), whereas renal function was not statistically different at any time point. Central systolic BP (145±31 versus 131±28 mmHg; P=0.009), diastolic BP (85±18 versus 80±14 mmHg; P=0.03), and central pulse pressure (61±18 versus 52±18 mmHg; P=0.02) were significantly reduced 6 months after RDN. Central augmentation index (24±8

  4. Effects of adenosine infusion into renal interstitium on renal hemodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlowska, D.; Granger, J.P.; Knox, F.G.

    1987-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the hemodynamic effects of exogenous adenosine in the interstitium of the rat kidney. Adenosine or its analogues were infused into the renal interstitium by means of chronically implanted capsules. In fusion of adenosine decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) from 0.81 +/- 0.06 to 0.37 +/- 0.06 ml/min while having no effect on renal blood flow (RBF). The metabolically stable analogue, 2-chloradenosine (2-ClAdo), decreased GFR from 0.73 +/- 0.07 to 021 +/- 0.06 ml/min. Interstitial infusion of theophylline, an adenosine receptor antagonist, completely abolished the effects of adenosine and 2-ClAdo on GFR. The distribution of adenosine, when infused into the renal interstitium, was determined using radiolabeled 5'-(N-ethyl)-carboxamidoadenosine (NECA), a metabolically stable adenosine agonist. After continuous infusion, (/sup 3/H)NECA was distributed throughout the kidney. The effects of NECA to reduce GFR were similar to those of adenosine and 2-ClAdo. They conclude that increased levels of adenosine in the renal interstitium markedly decrease GFR without affecting RBF in steady-state conditions. The marked effects of adenosine agonists during their infusion into the renal interstitium and the complete blockade of these effects by theophylline suggest an extracellular action of adenosine.

  5. Renal Function and Hematology in Rats with Congenital Renal Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Hidenori; Amakasu, Kohei; Tochigi, Yuki; Katayama, Kentaro; Suzuki, Hiroetsu

    2016-01-01

    Renal hypoplasia due to a congenitally reduced number of nephrons progresses to chronic kidney disease and may cause renal anemia, given that the kidneys are a major source of erythropoietin in adults. Hypoplastic kidney (HPK) rats have only about 20% of the normal number of nephrons and develop CKD. This study assessed the renal function and hematologic changes in HPK rats from 70 to 210 d of age. HPK rats demonstrated deterioration of renal excretory function, slightly macrocytic erythropenia at all days examined, age-related increases in splenic hemosiderosis accompanied by a tendency toward increased hemolysis, normal plasma erythropoietin levels associated with increased hepatic and decreased renal erythropoietin production, and maintenance of the response for erythropoietin production to hypoxic conditions, with increased interstitial fibrosis at 140 d of age. These results indicate that increases in splenic hemosiderosis and the membrane fragility of RBC might be associated with erythropenia and that hepatic production of erythropoietin might contribute to maintaining the blood Hgb concentration in HPK rats. PMID:26884405

  6. Nutrition disorders during acute renal failure and renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Wiesen, Patricia; Van Overmeire, Lionel; Delanaye, Pierre; Dubois, Bernard; Preiser, Jean-Charles

    2011-03-01

    The physiological and biological modifications related to acute renal failure in critically ill patients, including the current use of continuous renal replacement therapies, have dramatically changed the type and importance of the metabolic and nutrition disturbances observed during treatment of renal failure. This review summarizes the current knowledge and makes recommendations for the daily nutrition management of these patients. The filtration of water-soluble substances of low molecular weight by continuous hemodiafiltration results in significant losses of glucose, amino acids, low-molecular-weight proteins, trace elements, and water-soluble vitamins. The losses of these macronutrients and micronutrients should be compensated for. During continuous renal replacement therapy, the daily recommended energy allowance is between 25 and 35 kcal/kg, with a ratio of 60%-70% carbohydrates to 30%-40% lipids, and between 1.5 and 1.8 g/kg protein. Providing energy 25-35 kcal/kg/d with a carbohydrate/lipid ratio of 60-70/30-40 and protein 1.5-1.8 g/kg/d is recommended during continuous renal replacement therapy. Supplemental vitamin B(1) (100 mg/d), vitamin C (250 mg/d), and selenium (100 mcg/d) are also recommended.

  7. Tenofovir renal toxicity targets mitochondria of renal proximal tubules

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, James J; Hosseini, Seyed H; Hoying-Brandt, Amy; Green, Elgin; Johnson, David M; Russ, Rodney; Tran, Dung; Raper, C Michael; Santoianni, Robert; Lewis, William

    2009-01-01

    Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) is an analog of adenosine monophosphate that inhibits HIV reverse transcriptase in HIV/AIDS. Despite its therapeutic success, renal tubular side effects are reported. The mechanisms and targets of tenofovir toxicity were determined using ‘2 × 2’ factorial protocols, and HIV transgenic (TG) and wild-type (WT) littermate mice with or without TDF (5 weeks). A parallel study used didanosine (ddI) instead of TDF. At termination, heart, kidney, and liver samples were retrieved. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) abundance, and histo- and ultrastructural pathology were analyzed. Laser-capture microdissection (LCM) was used to isolate renal proximal tubules for molecular analyses. Tenofovir increased mtDNA abundance in TG whole kidneys, but not in their hearts or livers. In contrast, ddI decreased mtDNA abundance in the livers of WTs and TGs, but had no effect on their hearts or kidneys. Histological analyses of kidneys showed no disruption of glomeruli or proximal tubules with TDF or ddI treatments. Ultrastructural changes in renal proximal tubules from TDF-treated TGs included an increased number and irregular shape of mitochondria with sparse fragmented cristae. LCM-captured renal proximal tubules from TGs showed decreased mtDNA abundance with tenofovir. The results indicate that tenofovir targets mitochondrial toxicity on the renal proximal tubule in an AIDS model. PMID:19274046

  8. Food insufficiency and women's mental health: findings from a 3-year panel of welfare recipients.

    PubMed

    Heflin, Colleen M; Siefert, Kristine; Williams, David R

    2005-11-01

    Household food insufficiency is a significant problem in the United States, and has been associated with poor outcomes on mental health indicators among low-income women. However, it is difficult to disentangle the mental health consequences of household food insufficiency from poverty and other shared risk factors. Drawing on theories of the social production of health and disease, research evidence linking food insufficiency with poor mental health, and high rates of food insufficiency among welfare recipients, we examined whether a change in household food insufficiency is associated with a change in women's self-reported mental health in a sample of current and recent welfare recipients over a 3-year period of time, controlling for common risk factors. Data were obtained from a prospective survey of women who were welfare recipients in an urban Michigan county in February 1997 (n=753). We estimated fixed effect models for changes in mental health status that make use of information on household food insufficiency gathered in the fall of 1997, 1998, and 1999. The relationship between household food insufficiency and respondents' meeting the diagnostic screening criteria for major depression remained highly significant even when controlling for factors known to confer increased risk of depression and time invariant unobserved heterogeneity. These findings add to growing evidence that household food insufficiency has potentially serious consequences for low-income women's mental health. If confirmed by further research, they suggest that the public health burden of depression in welfare recipients and other low-income women could be reduced by policy-level interventions to reduce their exposure to household food insufficiency.

  9. Geographic distribution of insufficient sleep across the United States: a county-level hotspot analysis☆

    PubMed Central

    Grandner, Michael A.; Smith, Tony E.; Jackson, Nicholas; Jackson, Tara; Burgard, Sarah; Branas, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Insufficient sleep is associated with cardiometabolic risk and neurocognitive impairment. Determinants of insufficient sleep include many social and environmental factors. Assessment of geographic hot/coldspots may uncover novel risk groups and/or targets for public health intervention. The aim of this study was to discern geographic patterns in the first data set to include county-level sleep data. Methods The 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System was used. Insufficient sleep was assessed with a survey item and dichotomized. Data from n = 2231 counties were available. Tests for significant spatial concentrations of high/low levels of insufficient sleep (hotspots/coldspots) used the Getis-Ord G* statistic of local spatial concentration, chosen due to the nature of missing data. Results Eighty-four counties were hotspots, with high levels of insufficient sleep (P < .01), and 45 were coldspots, with low insufficient sleep (P < .01). Hotspots were found in Alabama (1 county), Arkansas (1), Georgia (1), Illinois (1), Kentucky (25), Louisiana (1), Missouri (4), Ohio (7), Tennessee (12), Texas (9), Virginia (6), and West Virginia (16). Coldspots were found in Alabama (1 county), Georgia (2), Illinois (6), Iowa (6), Michigan (2), Minnesota (1), North Carolina (1), Texas (7), Virginia (12), and Wisconsin (6). Several contiguous hotspots and coldspots were evident. Notably, the 17 counties with the highest levels of insufficient sleep were found in a contiguous set at the intersection of Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia (all P < .0002). Conclusions Geographic distribution of insufficient sleep in the United States is uneven. Some areas (most notably parts of Appalachia) experience disproportionately high amounts of insufficient sleep and may be targets of intervention. Further investigation of determinants of geographic variability needs to be explored, which would enhance the utility of these data for development of public health

  10. Antihypertensive agents and renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Vergoulas, G

    2007-01-01

    Advances in the field of kidney transplantation have led to a significant increase in the life of renal allograft with 1 - year graft survival rates of 93% to 99%.This increase in early graft survival has made it possible to observe the long-term morbidities that accompany renal transplantation. Studies correlating the reduction of arterial blood pressure with patient and graft survival as well as the risk of cardiovascular disease do not exist. The recommendations come from the general population and from comparative studies of hypertensive and normotensive kidney graft recipients. It is known that in the general population hypertension is a risk factor for chronic kidney disease but at the same time a risk factor for death, ischaemic heart disease, chronic heart failure and left ventricular hypertrophy. We must always have in mind that there are many similarities between a kidney graft recipient and a patient with chronic kidney disease. Renal transplant recipients represent a patient population with a very high risk for development of cardiovascular disease which has been identified as the leading cause of death in these patients1. Of 18,482 deaths among renal allograft recipients, 38% had functioning renal allografts 2, 3. Successful renal transplantation (Rt) can result in partial regression of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) if it is associated with hypertension (HTN) remission or if HTN is controlled by medications. Frequently post transplant HTN is associated with failure of LVH to regress. Transplant clinicians must choose antihypertensive agents that will provide their patients with maximum benefit from renal allograft and cardiovascular perspective. The target must always be long term patient and graft survival and acceptable quality of life. The antihypertensive drugs usually used after kidney transplantation are diuretics, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers and β – blockers. Most

  11. Gerota versus Zuckerkandl: the renal fascia revisited.

    PubMed

    Chesbrough, R M; Burkhard, T K; Martinez, A J; Burks, D D

    1989-12-01

    In the medical literature, Gerota fascia is frequently used as a general term to describe both the anterior and posterior pararenal fascia. However, Zuckerkandl's name is also often used to describe either the anterior or posterior fascia. To resolve this confusion, the authors reviewed the original works by Gerota and Zuckerkandl. In 1883, Zuckerkandl described the posterior renal fascia but did not recognize the presence of the anterior renal fascia. In 1895, Gerota documented the presence of the anterior renal fascia and clearly assigned Zuckerkandl's name to the posterior renal fascia. Thus, the terms Zuckerkandl fascia and posterior renal fascia are synonymous, as are Gerota fascia and anterior renal fascia.

  12. Renal infarction secondary to ketamine abuse.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Li; Chen, Jin-Li; Cha, Tai-Lung; Wu, Sheng-Tang; Tang, Shou-Hung; Tsao, Chih-Wei; Meng, En

    2013-07-01

    Renal infarction is an uncommon condition that resulted from inadequate perfusion of the kidney and is easily missed diagnosed due to its nonspecific clinical presentations. Major risk factors for renal infarction are atrial fibrillation, previous embolism, and ischemic and valvular heart disease. Progressive decrease in renal function or even death can occur if renal infarction is not diagnosed accurately and promptly. Ketamine abuse may cause variable urinary tract injury. However, renal infarction caused by ketamine abuse has never been reported. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of renal infarction following nasal insufflation of ketamine.

  13. Multiple variations of the right renal vessels.

    PubMed

    Nayak, B S

    2008-06-01

    Multiple variations of the right renal and testicular vessels were found during routine dissection in a 65-year-old male cadaver. The cadaver was healthy and did not have any other anomalies. The variations found were: presence of three right renal arteries, origin of the right inferior suprarenal artery from the middle right renal artery, two right renal veins, origin of the right testicular artery from the inferior right renal artery and the termination of the right testicular vein into the right renal vein. A sound knowledge of vascular variations in relation to the right kidney and right suprarenal gland is important in kidney transplantation and suprarenal surgery.

  14. [A simple method for management and treatment results of pregnant women with isthmo-cervical insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Kotzbach, R; Makarewicz, I

    1994-09-01

    A simple way of management of patients treated for isthmo-cervical insufficiency in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Medical Academy in Bydgoszcz in the years 1980-1990 was subjected to own assessment. During this period the treatment was given to 684 pregnant patients with diagnosed isthmo-cervical insufficiency, laying a circumferential suture onto the cervix after Hervet, between 17 and 33 weeks of pregnancy. The accepted management after the procedure was limited to bed rest and administration of analgesic and spasmolytic drugs. Positive results of the established treatment were found in 95.4% of the patients with diagnosed isthmo-cervical insufficiency which made possible its routine introduction.

  15. ACOG Practice Bulletin No.142: Cerclage for the management of cervical insufficiency.

    PubMed

    2014-02-01

    The inability of the uterine cervix to retain a pregnancy in the second trimester is referred to as cervical insufficiency. Controversy exists in the medical literature pertaining to issues of pathophysiology, screening, diagnosis, and management of cervical insufficiency. The purpose of this document is to provide a review of current evidence of cervical insufficiency, including screening of asymptomatic at-risk women, and to offer guidelines on the use of cerclage for management. The diagnosis and management of other cervical issues during pregnancy, such as short cervical length, are discussed more in-depth in other publications of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

  16. [Muscular fatigue in chronic respiratory insufficiency. Physiopathologic considerations and therapeutic strategies].

    PubMed

    De Luca, L; Chiummariello, A; Vuillemier, P L; Scala, R

    1988-01-01

    The Authors has performed a careful exam of the pattern of chronic airways insufficiency in children. They dwell on the reasons which determinate the increase of the inspiratory muscular load and of difficulty of inspiratory muscles. Continuing that exam, the chronic anoxia of muscular cells (a bioptic study) is correlated with functional troubles of muscular fibre. In addition to that the Authors subdivide several different illness of lung in children according to the different mechanism of respiratory insufficiency. They conclude with the exam of strategy to use to obtain the diminution of the muscular load and of respiratory insufficiency. PMID:3072531

  17. Genetics Home Reference: action myoclonus-renal failure syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Action Myoclonus - Renal Failure Syndrome Genetic Testing Registry: Epilepsy, progressive myoclonic 4, with or without renal failure ... failure syndrome action myoclonus–renal failure syndrome AMRF epilepsy, progressive myoclonic 4, with or without renal failure ...

  18. The role of renal biopsy in small renal masses.

    PubMed

    Burruni, Rodolfo; Lhermitte, Benoit; Cerantola, Yannick; Tawadros, Thomas; Meuwly, Jean-Yves; Berthold, Dominik; Jichlinski, Patrice; Valerio, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Renal biopsy is being increasingly proposed as a diagnostic tool to characterize small renal masses (SRM). Indeed, the wide adoption of imaging in the diagnostic workup of many diseases had led to a substantial increased incidence of SRM (diameter ≤4 cm). While modern ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have high sensitivity for detecting SRM, none is able to accurately and reliably characterize them in terms of histological features. This is currently of key importance in guiding clinical decision-making in some situations, and in these cases renal biopsy should be considered. In this review, we aim to summarize the technique, diagnostic performance, and predicting factors of nondiagnostic biopsy, as well as the future perspectives.

  19. The role of renal biopsy in small renal masses

    PubMed Central

    Burruni, Rodolfo; Lhermitte, Benoit; Cerantola, Yannick; Tawadros, Thomas; Meuwly, Jean-Yves; Berthold, Dominik; Jichlinski, Patrice; Valerio, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Renal biopsy is being increasingly proposed as a diagnostic tool to characterize small renal masses (SRM). Indeed, the wide adoption of imaging in the diagnostic workup of many diseases had led to a substantial increased incidence of SRM (diameter ≤4 cm). While modern ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have high sensitivity for detecting SRM, none is able to accurately and reliably characterize them in terms of histological features. This is currently of key importance in guiding clinical decision-making in some situations, and in these cases renal biopsy should be considered. In this review, we aim to summarize the technique, diagnostic performance, and predicting factors of nondiagnostic biopsy, as well as the future perspectives. PMID:26858784

  20. [Phlebography in chronic venous insufficiency of the lower extremities. Technic and value of different tests].

    PubMed

    Genevois, A; Bolot, J E; Michel, C

    1988-01-01

    Remainder of the various phlebographic procedures in chronic venous insufficiency of the lower extremities: peripheral phlebography, popliteal phlebography, femoral phlebography, varicography. The techniques and the informations they provide are presented for each one of these examinations. PMID:3043478

  1. Developmental Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency Impairs Visual Contrast Sensitivity in Adult Male Offspring.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Severe thyroid hormone (TH) insufficiency during early development results in alterations in brain structure and function. Many environmental agents produce subtle alterations in TH status, but the dose-response relationships for such effects are unclear. We have previously demon...

  2. Sternal insufficiency fracture related to steroid-induced osteoporosis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jessica J.; Drew, Brian; Stern, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis often results in fractures, deformity and disability. A rare but potentially challenging complication of osteoporosis is a sternal insufficiency fracture. This case report details a steroid-induced osteoporotic male who suffered a sternal insufficiency fracture after minimal trauma. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate management resulted in favourable outcome for the fracture, though a sequalae involving a myocardial infarction ensued with his osteoporosis and complex health history. The purpose of this case report is to heighten awareness around distinct characteristics of sternal fractures in osteoporotic patients. Discussion focuses on the incidence, mechanism, associated factors and diagnostic challenge of sternal insufficiency fractures. This case report highlights the role primary contact practitioners can play in recognition and management of sternal insufficiency fractures related to osteoporosis. PMID:23482849

  3. [Phlebography in chronic venous insufficiency of the lower extremities. Technic and value of different tests].

    PubMed

    Genevois, A; Bolot, J E; Michel, C

    1988-01-01

    Remainder of the various phlebographic procedures in chronic venous insufficiency of the lower extremities: peripheral phlebography, popliteal phlebography, femoral phlebography, varicography. The techniques and the informations they provide are presented for each one of these examinations.

  4. 21 CFR 516.36 - Insufficient quantities of MUMS-designated drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.36 Insufficient quantities...

  5. 21 CFR 516.36 - Insufficient quantities of MUMS-designated drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.36 Insufficient quantities...

  6. 21 CFR 516.36 - Insufficient quantities of MUMS-designated drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.36 Insufficient quantities...

  7. [Radiocardiographic assessment of the effect of digoxin on heart conduction insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Völkner, E; Stoll, W; Günzel, K; Kühnert, H; Lauterbach, H

    1978-03-15

    On 29 patients with heart insufficiency radiocardiographical investigations in rest and under stress were carried out before and after treatment with digoxin. Here it was shown that in existing functional insufficiency the determination of the stroke volume and of the minute volume in rest after digitalisation did not result in a remarkable change, but in obstructive insufficiency an improvement of the pump function of the heart began already under conditions of rest. Only in stress also in patients with functional insufficiency a significant increase of the heart-time volume and the stroke volume after application of glycoside was proved. An exacter information about the effect of glycoside was given by the temporary volume function particularly under stress. PMID:645154

  8. A Case of Rathke's Cleft Cyst Associated with Transient Central Adrenal Insufficiency and Masked Diabetes Insipidus.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Masahiro; Chin, Rina; Niitsu, Yoshihiro; Sekine, Tetsuo; Niwa, Arisa; Miyake, Atsuko; Inoshita, Naoko; Kawamura, Mitsunobu; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Hirata, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman admitted to our hospital because of headache, poor appetite, malaise, weight loss, and vomiting was found to have central adrenal insufficiency and thyrotoxicosis due to silent thyroiditis. Polyuria developed after replacement with glucocorticoid (masked diabetes insipidus), which was controlled with nasal administration of desmopressin. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a large cystic pituitary mass (18 × 18 × 12 mm) extending suprasellarly to the optic chiasm. Transsphenoidal surgery revealed that the pituitary tumor was Rathke's cleft cyst. Following surgery, replacement with neither glucocorticoid nor desmopressin was needed any more. Therefore, it is suggested that Rathke's cleft cyst is responsible for the masked diabetes insipidus and the central insufficiency. Furthermore, it is speculated that thyrotoxicosis with painless thyroiditis might induce changes from subclinical adrenal insufficiency to transiently overt insufficiency.

  9. Thyroid function and metabolic state in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Spector, D A; Davis, P J; Helderman, J H; Bell, B; Utiger, R D

    1976-12-01

    Thirty-eight patients with chronic renal insufficiency who were in a dialysis program underwent studies of thyroid function and metabolic status. Mean values for serum total and free thyroxine (T4) concentrations and thyroxine-binding globulin capacity were within normal limits. Although mean serum total triiodothyronine (T3) concentration was normal, 43% of the group had low serum T3 and 54% had low serum free T3 concentrations. Serum thyrotrophin (TSH) concentrations were normal in all but four subjects who had very slight elevations. Metabolic status was assessed by various metabolic tests; mean values for each of these tests were normal, and the clinical index scores indicated that all patients were euthyroid. Results of metabolic testing were similar in patients with low and those with normal serum T3 concentrations. Low serum T3 measurements did not accurately reflect metabolic state in patients with chronic renal failure, whereas serum free T4 and TSH concentrations were reliable indicators of thyroid state.

  10. Paraneoplastic Cough and Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A case of patient with intractable cough due to renal cell carcinoma is reported. The discussion reviews the literature regarding this unusual paraneoplastic manifestation of renal malignancy. PMID:27445553

  11. General Information about Renal Cell Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Renal Cell Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Renal Cell Cancer Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  12. Paraneoplastic Cough and Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A case of patient with intractable cough due to renal cell carcinoma is reported. The discussion reviews the literature regarding this unusual paraneoplastic manifestation of renal malignancy. PMID:27445553

  13. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer This page lists cancer drugs ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Afinitor (Everolimus) Aldesleukin Avastin (Bevacizumab) ...

  14. Cardiovascular effects of afferent renal nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Stella, A; Weaver, L; Golin, R; Genovesi, S; Zanchetti, A

    1987-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of afferent renal nerves elicits an increase in arterial pressure and heart rate. The hypertensive response is presumably due to the widespread activation of the sympathetic nervous system leading to peripheral vasoconstriction. Interestingly, the kidney does not appear involved in this reflex excitatory response to afferent renal nerve stimulation since changes in vascular conductances and excretory functions are equal in both the innervated and denervated kidney, and secondary to changes in renal perfusion pressure. In addition, no changes in renin release from either kidneys are observed during afferent renal nerve stimulation. It is likely that the electrical stimulation of afferent renal nerves activates other reflexes exerting an inhibitory influence on efferent renal nerve activity. Indeed, neural renorenal reflexes which tonically inhibit renal functions have clearly been demonstrated. Furthermore, preferential inhibition of efferent renal nerve activity by cardiopulmonary and sinoaortic receptors has recently been shown during activation of other visceral afferents.

  15. Complex renal vascular variation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tanyeli, Ercan; Uzel, Mehmet; Soyluoğlu, Ali Ihsan

    2006-09-01

    As the number of renal surgical interventions increase a better understanding of the anatomy of renal arteries and their branches gain in importance. Here we describe a common trunk from the right side of the aorta ramifying into suprarenal and two renal hilar arteries in a 40-year-old male cadaver detected during dissections performed in a routine gross anatomy course. The suprarenal branch is divided into several smaller branches to supply blood to the suprarenal gland. The superior renal hilar artery gave rise to the right testicular artery and an additional suprarenal artery. The inferior renal hilar artery gave rise to one more additional suprarenal artery. The superior renal hilar artery crossed the inferior renal hilar artery. On the same side renal veins were also doubled. For better outcome interesting variations such as in this case should be kept in mind before and during any interventions involving this region.

  16. Renal drainage after percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Arun K; Herati, Amin; Okeke, Zeph; Smith, Arthur D

    2009-10-01

    Exit strategy after percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is an area of continuing innovation to improve postoperative morbidity and operative outcomes for patients. The two important components of an exit strategy after PCNL are hemostasis and renal drainage. We review the different techniques of renal drainage after PCNL-ie, nephrostomy tube, ureteral stents, and totally tubeless strategy with critical discussion of available evidence for and against each of these techniques. We conclude that the optimal renal drainage method depends on patient characteristics and the operative course; hence, it should be individualized. To simplify this, we group patients undergoing PCNL as routine, problematic, and complicated, based on increasing complexity of the procedure and procedural complications. In routine PCNLs, we favor placement of an ureteral stent or a small-bore nephrostomy tube. In problematic and complicated PCNLs, we think the evidence directs toward placement of a nephrostomy tube, small bore being an option in problematic PCNLs.

  17. Future challenges in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Whalen, H; Clancy, M; Jardine, A

    2012-02-01

    There is a worldwide increase in the incidence of end-stage renal disease. Renal transplantation has been shown to be cost effective, prolong survival and provide a better quality of life in comparison to dialysis. Consequently, there has been a steady increase in demand for organs leading to a shortage of available kidneys, and an increase in transplant waiting lists. Renal transplantation is therefore an expanding field with a number of unique future challenges to address. This article outlines strategies that may be employed to expand organ supply in order to meet increased demand. The ethical issues surrounding this are also summarized. Furthermore, we highlight techniques with the potential to minimize peri-transplant injury to the kidney on its journey from donor to recipient. Current and potential future management strategies to optimize graft and patient survival are also discussed. PMID:22361673

  18. Renal involvement in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Abensur, Hugo; Reis, Marlene Antônia Dos

    2016-06-01

    Every cell in the human body has globotriaosylceramide accumulation (Gb3) in Fabry disease due to the mutation in gene of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. It is a disease linked to sex. The main clinical features are: cutaneous angiokeratomas; acroparestesias and early strokes; decreased sweating and heat intolerance; ocular changes; myocardial hypertrophy, arrhythmias; gastrointestinal disorders and renal involvement. Renal involvement occurs due to Gb3 accumulation in all types of renal cells. Therefore, patients may present glomerular and tubular function disorders. Podocytes are particularly affected, with pedicels effacement and development of proteinuria. The diagnosis is made by detection of reduced plasma or leukocyte α-galactosidase activity and genetic study for detecting the α-galactosidase gene mutation. Treatment with enzyme replacement contributes to delay the progression of kidney disease, especially if initiated early. PMID:27438980

  19. Lethal Progressive Thoracic Insufficiency in a Neonate Due to Jarcho Levin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bhutia, Euden; Maria, Arti; Verma, Arushi; Sethi, Sidharth Kumar

    2014-01-01

    A rare case of Jarcho Levin syndrome (JLS) presenting as a lethal progressive respiratory insufficiency in early neonatal period is reported. The neonate had classical features of this syndrome including vertebral segmentation defects, typical costo-vertebral fusion defects and scoliosis resulting in small thoracic volume and limited chest expansion; all consistent with a clinical diagnosis of JLS with thoracic insufficiency. In addition, our case had a rare association of dextrocardia and acyanotic congenital heart disease. PMID:24741543

  20. Lethal progressive thoracic insufficiency in a neonate due to jarcho levin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bhutia, Euden; Maria, Arti; Verma, Arushi; Sethi, Sidharth Kumar

    2014-01-01

    A rare case of Jarcho Levin syndrome (JLS) presenting as a lethal progressive respiratory insufficiency in early neonatal period is reported. The neonate had classical features of this syndrome including vertebral segmentation defects, typical costo-vertebral fusion defects and scoliosis resulting in small thoracic volume and limited chest expansion; all consistent with a clinical diagnosis of JLS with thoracic insufficiency. In addition, our case had a rare association of dextrocardia and acyanotic congenital heart disease.