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Sample records for renal transplant donors

  1. Exchange donor renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Jin; Kim, Myoung Soo; Park, Kiil

    2013-01-01

    Nearly 20 years of experience at Severance Hospital has shown that utilizing exchange donors increases the donor pool safely, with outcomes comparable to living related donor grafts. The exchange donor program is invaluable for incompatible donor-recipient pairs to consecutively proceed to transplantation. Recently, newer desensitization protocols have been devised to approach incompatible donor-recipient pairs, but not without risks. These desensitization protocols may be an alternative when confronting the limitations in the exchange program. Therefore, the exchange program and the desensitization protocols should be complementary, not competing strategies and centers should weigh the merits and limitations of each protocol in each incompatible donor-recipient pair to select the optimal method for a safe and successful transplantation.

  2. Exchange-donor renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Huh, Kyu Ha; Kim, Hyun Jung; Jeon, Kyung Ock; Kiml, Beom Seok; Kim, Yu Seun; Park, Kill

    2009-01-01

    Exchange-donor programs may prevent the current loss of many suitable living donors. Both incompatible donor-recipient pairs--with ABO incompatibility or positive cross-matches--and compatible pairs who wish to locate more suitable donors should be encouraged to participate in exchange-donor programs. Advantages and limitations of exchange-donor programs must be carefully explained to prevent interfamilial conflict. Exchange-donor programs may relieve shortages of donor organs and offer good posttransplant outcomes. Therefore, this program should be widely implemented.

  3. The role of laparoscopic donor nephrectomy in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Eng, Mary

    2010-04-01

    Renal transplantation is an effective treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease. Unfortunately, the number of patients waiting for transplantation greatly exceeds the number of suitable organs. Use of live kidney donors can increase the donor pool. Historically, donor nephrectomy was performed as an open technique. Its associated prolonged convalescence and long-term morbidity was likely a disincentive to donate. Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy, however, has been shown to have fewer long-term complications without compromising graft function. Since its inception, there has been an increase in the number of live donor renal transplantations performed.

  4. Urolithiasis in renal transplant donors and recipients: An update.

    PubMed

    Harraz, Ahmed M; Kamal, Ahmed I; Shokeir, Ahmed A

    2016-12-01

    Urolithiasis in the context of renal transplant is a quite rare event that requires keeping a higher index of suspicion and vigilance. Donors with incidentally discovered asymptomatic renal stones "donor gifted lithiasis" are potentially considered for donation should they are not recurrent stone formers and in the absence of active biochemical disorders. Stone clearance from the donors can be done before donation using shock wave lithotripsy and/or flexible ureteroscopy. Ex vivo ureteroscopy at time of transplant is equally feasible and safe. A variety of anatomical, metabolic and surgical factors contribute to de novo lithiasis after transplantation. Diagnosis is challenging as the transplanted kidney is denervated and the presentation is consequently, atypical. Endourological armamentarium is readily present within the hands of the urologists for adequately addressing the stones and including shock wave lithotripsy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy and flexible ureteroscopy. Whilst all endourological techniques have proven feasibility and safety, they are surgically demanding and requiring high-volume expertise to be adequately performed. The longterm outcome in terms of stone recurrence or the effect on graft survival is favorable. Finally, formidable counselling as well as postoperative monitoring for both donors and recipients is crucial to minimize urolithiasis-related morbidity.

  5. Living donor renal transplantation in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji Yoon; Jung, Joo Hee; Shin, Sung; Kim, Young Hoon; Han, Duck Jong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), autoantibodies directed against phospholipid-binding proteins are associated with cause vascular thrombosis. Patients with APS requiring renal transplantation are at risk of early graft loss due to arterial or venous thrombosis, or thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Here, we report 3 cases of successful renal transplantation in patients with APS. Clinical Findings: A 53-year-old man with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) had experienced bilateral deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the lower extremities 16 years ago and was administered warfarin. However, he frequently experienced recurrent DVT despite of anticoagulation therapy. Before the surgery, APS was confirmed based on positive results lupus anticoagulant in serological tests. A 40-year-old man with polycystic kidney disease and a history recurrent DVT tested positive for lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies. Lastly, a 42-year-old woman with ESRD was diagnosed with APS 7 years ago. She also developed DVT and tested positive for lupus anticoagulant and anti-B2-glycoprotein 1. The anticoagulation protocol was as follows in all cases: Warfarin was stopped 5 days before living donor renal transplantation and intravenous heparin therapy was started. During surgery, bolus heparin injections (3000 U) were administered to prevent arterial or venous thrombosis. Heparin was substituted with warfarin on postoperative day 4. The third patient (42/F) developed clinical rejection indicated by increased serum creatinine levels and donor-specific antibodies (DSA) and received steroid pulse therapy, plasmapheresis, and rituximab. This treatment restored graft function to within the normal range. The latest graft function in all patients was maintained at normal levels in the outpatient clinic. Conclusions: Living donor renal transplantation may be successful in patients with APS following perioperative anticoagulation therapy. However, because of the high risk of

  6. Ethical issues relating to renal transplantation from prediabetic living donor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In Mexico, diabetes mellitus is the main cause of end − stage kidney disease, and some patients may be transplant candidates. Organ supply is limited because of cultural issues. And, there is a lack of standardized clinical guidelines regarding organ donation. These issues highlight the tension surrounding the fact that living donors are being selected despite being prediabetic. This article presents, examines and discusses using the principles of non-maleficience, autonomy, justice and the constitutionally guaranteed right to health, the ethical considerations that arise from considering a prediabetic person as a potential kidney donor. Discussion Diabetes is an absolute contraindication for donating a kidney. However, the transplant protocols most frequently used in Mexico do not consider prediabetes as exclusion criteria. In prediabetic persons there are well known metabolic alterations that may compromise the long − term outcomes of the transplant if such donors are accepted. Even so, many of them are finally included because there are not enough donor candidates. Both, families and hospitals face the need to rapidly accept prediabetic donors before the clinical conditions of the recipient and the evolution of the disease exclude him/her as a transplant candidate; however, when using a kidney potentially damaged by prediabetes, neither the donor’s nor the recipient’s long term health is usually considered. Considering the ethical implication as well as the clinical and epidemiological evidence, we conclude that prediabetic persons are not suitable candidates for kidney donation. This recommendation should be taken into consideration by Mexican health institutions who should rewrite their transplant protocols. Summary We argue that the decision to use a kidney from a living donor known to be pre-diabetic or from those persons with family history of T2DM, obesity, hypertension, or renal failure, should be considered unethical in Mexico

  7. Deceased donor renal transplantation: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, N.; Dineshkumar, T.; Dhanapriya, J.; Sakthirajan, R.; Balasubramaniyan, T.; Srinivasa Prasad, N. D.; Thirumalvalavan, K.; Murugananth, S.; Kawaskar, K.

    2017-01-01

    Deceased donor renal transplantation (DDRT) constitutes less than 5% of all kidney transplantats in India. A retrospective analysis of 173 deceased donor renal transplants performed in a public funded government hospital was done. Mean age of the recipients was 36 years (male:female ratio 2.4:1), and that of the donors was 32.3 years (male:female ratio 6:1). The cold ischemic time was 340 ± 170 minutes. Mean follow-up period was 36 months. Forty one patients died, 75% of them in the first post – transplant year. Sepsis and cardiovascular disease were the most common causes of death. Twenty two percent had acute rejection. There was no significant difference in the incidence in the rate of acute rejection, bacterial, fungal infections and death rate between the cohorts of induction and non induction immunosuppression. The patient and death censored graft survival at 1 year were 80 and 82.6% and at 5 years were 76 and 80% respectively. PMID:28182043

  8. [Why renal transplant from living donors gives better results than cadaver renal transplant?].

    PubMed

    Guirado, L; Vela, E; Clèries, M; Díaz, J M; Facundo, C; García-Maset, R

    2008-01-01

    According to literature, patient and graft survival is better in living donor renal transplants (LRT) than in cadaver renal transplants (CRT). To study factors that determine the best results in LRT related to those of CRT, found in univariate studies. Renal transplants (RT) done in Catalonia during the 1990-2004 period, performed in patients over 17 years (135 LRT and 3.831 CRT), have been analyzed (retransplants were not included). The data come from the Renal Patients Transplant Registry (RMRC). Student's t-test and chi2 test have been used for mean and for proportions comparisons, respectively. To analyze univariate and multivariate survival, actuarial method and Cox regression have been used, respectively. Estimated creatinine clearance has been studied and its data have been showed through Selwood modified Analysis. As it happens with other great RT patients series, the RMRC analysis, globally and without any adjustment, shows that patient and graft survival in LRT is better than that obtained with CRT. When we studied which variables explain these results, we found that main factors were smaller recipient age and the short time on dialysis. The great influence of both factors has been published in a large number of papers, explaining the differences obtained on the transplanted renal patient survival. Once adjusted the analysis by the different factors that influence the survival of the patient and the graft, there are no differences in the obtained results, since the best outcomes of the TRV are due to factors like the smaller recipient age and the advanced TR.

  9. Outcome of Kidney Transplantation From Living Donors With Multiple Renal Arteries Versus Single Renal Artery.

    PubMed

    Taghizadeh Afshari, Ali; Mohammadi Fallah, Mohammad Reza; Alizadeh, Mansour; Makhdoomi, Khadijeh; Rahimi, Ezatollah; Vossoghian, Sara

    2016-03-01

    Receiving a kidney transplant from donors with multiple renal arteries (MRAs) is suggested to be associated with higher risk of vascular and urologic complications and poor allograft outcomes compared to the donors with single renal artery (SRA). We evaluated survival rates in the recipients from donors with MRAs compared to those from donors with SRA. In a retrospective study on 115 kidney allograft recipients, demographic characteristics and the outcomes of kidney transplantation were compared between the recipients from donors with MRAs compared to those from donors with SRA. These included acute tubular necrosis, acute allograft rejection, hypertension, vascular complications, urologic complications, kidney function indicators, and allograft survival at 1 year. There was no significant difference in the recipients' age, sex distribution, and weight, donors' age, donor-recipient familial relation, urologic complications, and duration of hospitalization between the two groups. However, MRA was significantly associated with a higher likelihood of right-side kidney donation, longer warm and cold ischemia times, and lower glomerular filtration rate and higher serum creatinine concentrations at discharge and 12 months after transplantation, as compared to SRA transplants. No significant difference was seen in late complications including hypertension and renal artery stenosis. One-year graft survival was slightly poorer in the MRA group than the SRA group. Our results demonstrate that kidney allografts with MRAs are associated with risks but have acceptable outcomes during the 1st year after transplantation, as compared to SRA kidney allografts.

  10. Feasibility of renal transplantation after unroofing of a large renal cyst in an expanded criteria donor

    PubMed Central

    Kanagarajah, Prashanth; Ekwenna, Obi; Ayyathurai, Rajinikanth; Burk, George W.; Ciancio, Gaetano

    2013-01-01

    We present a case in which a deceased donor kidney with a large simple cyst was successfully unroofed and transplanted to a 61-year-old male. The donor was a 62-year-old male with a history of hypertension for 2 years; cerebral vascular accident was the cause of death. A large 8-cm cyst distorting the renal hilum was identified upon the procurement of the deceased donor kidney. Prior to transplantation, the large cyst was unroofed from the allograft; the frozen section confirmed a benign cyst and the transplant was performed. Postoperatively, the serum creatinine level was 1.4 mg/ml at 22-month follow-up and the patient was normotensive. Deceased donor kidneys with giant cysts distorting the renal hilum can be effectively transplanted. PMID:24049388

  11. Deceased donor kidney transplantation from donors with acute renal failure due to rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Mekeel, K L; Moss, A A; Mulligan, D C; Chakkera, H A; Hamawi, K; Mazur, M J; Heilman, R L; Reddy, K S

    2009-07-01

    With the current shortage of solid organs for transplant, the transplant community continues to look for ways to increase the number of organ donors, including extending the criteria for donation. In rhabdomyolysis, the byproducts of skeletal muscle breakdown leak into the circulation resulting in acute renal failure in up to 30% of patients. In nonbrain dead patients, this condition is reversible and most patients recover full renal function. Seven potential donors had rhabdomyolysis with acute renal failure as evidenced by the presence of urine hemoglobin, plasma creatinine kinase levels of greater than five times the normal and elevated creatinine. One donor required dialysis. At our institution, 10 kidneys were transplanted from the seven donors. Two grafts had immediate function, five grafts experienced slow graft function and three grafts had delayed graft function requiring hemodialysis. At a mean of 8.7 months posttransplant (2.4-25.2 months), all patients have good graft function, are off dialysis and have a mean creatinine of 1.3 (0.7-1.8). In conclusion, our experience suggests that rhabdomyolysis with acute renal failure should not be a contraindication for donation, although recipients may experience slow or delayed graft function.

  12. Targeting complement activation in brain-dead donors improves renal function after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Damman, Jeffrey; Hoeger, Simone; Boneschansker, Leo; Theruvath, Ashok; Waldherr, Ruediger; Leuvenink, Henri G; Ploeg, Rutger J; Yard, Benito A; Seelen, Marc A

    2011-05-01

    Kidneys recovered from brain-dead donors have inferior outcomes after transplantation compared to kidneys from living donors. Since complement activation plays an important role in renal transplant related injury, targeting complement activation in brain-dead donors might improve renal function after transplantation. Brain death (BD) was induced in Fisher rats by inflation of an epidurally placed balloon catheter and ventilated for 6h. BD animals were treated with soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) 1h before or 1h after BD. Kidney transplantation was performed and 7 days after transplantation animals were sacrificed. Plasma creatinine and urea were measured at days 0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 after transplantation. Renal function was significantly better at day 1 after transplantation in recipients receiving a sCR1 pre-treated donor kidney compared to recipients of a non-treated donor graft. Also treatment with sCR1, 1h after the diagnosis of BD, resulted in a better renal function after transplantation. Gene expression of IL-6, IL-1beta and TGF-beta were significantly lower in renal allografts recovered from treated donors. This study shows that targeting complement activation, during BD in the donor, leads to an improved renal function after transplantation in the recipient.

  13. Deceased donor renal transplantation and the disruptive effect of commercial transplants: the experience of Oman.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, N; Al-Busaidy, Q; Al-Marhuby, H; Al-Lawati, J; Daar, A S

    2014-01-01

    The Oman Renal Transplantation Program was established in 1988 as a joint venture between Sultan Qaboos University and the Ministry of Health. It began with both living related donor (LRD) and deceased donor (DD) transplants. Over the next nine years, while the LRD programme progressed relatively well, there were only thirteen DD transplants. Two of the DD kidneys were obtained from overseas via an active collaboration with the Euro-transplant organisation, and one DD kidney was obtained from Saudi Arabia within the Gulf Cooperative Council exchange programme. The rest of the DD kidneys were obtained in Oman. The Omani DD programme, although it was a pioneering effort in the Gulf region at the time, was not entirely sustainable. In this paper we focus on the challenges we encountered. Among the major challenges was the absence of resources to establish a dedicated DD programme and particularly the failure to develop a cadre of dedicated transplant coordinators.

  14. Donor kidney adapts to body dimensions of recipient: no influence of donor gender on renal function after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tent, H; Lely, A T; Toering, T J; San Giorgi, M R M; Rook, M; Lems, S P M; Hepkema, B G; Hofker, H S; Ploeg, R J; Homan van der Heide, J J; Navis, G J

    2011-10-01

    Female kidneys and kidneys from small donors have been suggested to perform worse after kidney transplantation. Here, we evaluate the impact of gender and body dimensions on posttransplantation GFR in living donor transplantation. Two hundred and ninety-three donor-recipient pairs, who were transplanted at our center were evaluated. All pairs had detailed renal function measurement ((125) I-iothalamate and (131) I-hippuran) 4 months predonation in the donor and 2.5 months posttransplantation in donor and recipient. For 88 pairs, 5 years of recipient follow-up was available. Delta GFR was calculated as (recipient GFR-donor single kidney GFR). Recipients of both male and female kidneys had similar renal function at early and long term after transplantation. Male recipients had higher ERPF, ΔGFR and ΔERPF at both time points. Kidneys of donors smaller than their recipient had higher ΔGFR and ΔERPF than kidneys of larger donors at both time points (p < 0.05). In multivariate analysis, ΔGFR was predicted by donor/recipient BSA-ratio together with transplantation related factors (R(2) 0.19), irrespective of donor and recipient gender. In conclusion, in living donor transplantation, female kidneys perform as well as male donor kidneys. Kidneys adapt to the recipient's body size and demands, independent of gender, without detrimental effects in renal function and outcome up to mid-long term.

  15. Influence of donor age on renal graft function in first seven post transplant days.

    PubMed

    Imamovic, Semir; Ljuca, Farid; Imamovic, Goran; Iljazagic Halilovic, Fatima; Krdzalic, Alisa; Hasukic, Sefik; Mesic, Deso; Zerem, Enver

    2010-02-01

    Increasing gap between demand and availability of human kidneys for transplantation has forced a re-evaluation of the limits on donor age acceptability. The present study included 74 patients who underwent kidney transplantation in University Clinical Centre Tuzla. In an observational cohort study we assessed impact of donor age on post transplant renal function by analyzing following parameters: 24 hour urine output, creatinine clearance (Cr Cl) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Depending on donor age recipients were allocated in to two groups. Group I included patients who received renal graft from donors age up to 55 years, and Group II encountered recipients who received renal graft from donors older than 55 years. Our goal was to determine whether donor age over 55 years significantly diminishes renal graft function in first seven post transplant days. No statistically significant difference was found between Group I and II regarding 24 hour urine output. From second to fifth postoperative day creatinine clearance values were higher in the group of patients who received kidney from donors older than 55 years (47+/-19, 1 vs. 44, 4+/-20, 8). On the fifth, sixth and seventh post operative day GFR was significantly higher in patients who received renal graft from donors age up to 55 years (p<0, 0161). Our data showed no significant difference in observed variables between the two groups, thus indicating that utilization of renal grafts from donors' age > 55 years is acceptable and may considerably expand the donor pool.

  16. Outcome of single pediatric deceased donor renal transplantation to adult kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Friedersdorff, Frank; Fuller, Tom Florian; Werthemann, Peter; Cash, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    In times of organ shortage more kidneys were transplanted in 'expanded criteria kidney' programs. This study examines the outcome of adult kidney recipients from pediatric donors. This single-center retrospective analysis evaluated eight adult patients who received a kidney from a deceased pediatric donor (age 5-17) between 06/2000 and 09/2011. The median donor age was 14 years (range 5-17). The median recipient age was 49 years (range 25-57). The median cold ischemia time was 13.3 h (range 4.3-20.1), while the median warm ischemia time was 53 min (range 42-60). The median follow-up was 35.8 months (range 7-142). Acute rejection was observed in 50.0% of cases. The median HLA mismatch was 2.0. The median 1-year creatinine level was 0.95 mg/dl, the uncensored 1-year graft survival was 75.0% and the 3-year graft survival 62.5%, respectively. No recipient died within the follow-up period. As severe surgical complications, one stenosis of the renal artery and one lymphocele needing surgical revision were observed. Renal transplantation of a deceased single pediatric donor to an adult recipient can be performed safely and shows a good outcome. Wherever feasible, single pediatric kidney transplantation can double the number of recipients over an 'en-bloc' transplantation. The price for a single pediatric kidney transplant may be a higher vascular complication rate and a higher rejection risk. Despite the higher risks, transplantation of a single pediatric donor kidney should be performed when accomplishable. 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Early postoperative spectral Doppler parameters of renal transplants: the effect of donor and recipient factors.

    PubMed

    Wang, H-K; Chiou, S-Y; Lai, Y-C; Cheng, H-Y; Lin, N-C; Loong, C-C; Chiou, H-J; Chou, Y-H; Chang, C-Y

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the donor and recipient factors related to the spectral Doppler parameters of the transplant kidney in the early posttransplantation period. This retrospective study included 76 patients who underwent renal transplantation assessed using Doppler ultrasonography (US) on the first postoperative day. We compared spectral Doppler parameters (peak systolic velocity [PSV] and resistive index [RI]) of the segmental artery of the transplant kidney according to the type of renal transplant, level of serum creatinine (SCr) of donor prior to organ donation, and donor/recipient age. RI was significantly higher in deceased-donor kidney transplantation (DDKT) as compared with living-donor kidney transplantation (LDKT; 0.73 ± 0.10 vs 0.66 ± 0.11; P = .007). In the DDKT recipients, multivariate analysis showed donor SCr was the only factor affecting PSV (P = .023), whereas recipient age was the only factor affecting RI (P = .035). In the LDKT recipients, multivariate analysis showed recipient age was the only factor affecting both PSV (P = .009) and RI (P = .018). Spectral Doppler parameters in the early posttransplantation period are related to the type of renal transplant, donor renal function, and recipient age. These factors should be taken into consideration when interpreting the results of spectral Doppler US. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. MDCT evaluation of potential living renal donor, prior to laparoscopic donor nephrectomy: What the transplant surgeon wants to know?

    PubMed

    Ghonge, Nitin P; Gadanayak, Satyabrat; Rajakumari, Vijaya

    2014-10-01

    As Laparoscopic Donor Nephrectomy (LDN) offers several advantages for the donor such as lesser post-operative pain, fewer cosmetic concerns and faster recovery time, there is growing global trend towards LDN as compared to open nephrectomy. Comprehensive pre-LDN donor evaluation includes assessment of renal morphology including pelvi-calyceal and vascular system. Apart from donor selection, evaluation of the regional anatomy allows precise surgical planning. Due to limited visualization during laparoscopic renal harvesting, detailed pre-transplant evaluation of regional anatomy, including the renal venous anatomy is of utmost importance. MDCT is the modality of choice for pre-LDN evaluation of potential renal donors. Apart from appropriate scan protocol and post-processing methods, detailed understanding of surgical techniques is essential for the Radiologist for accurate image interpretation during pre-LDN MDCT evaluation of potential renal donors. This review article describes MDCT evaluation of potential living renal donor, prior to LDN with emphasis on scan protocol, post-processing methods and image interpretation. The article laid special emphasis on surgical perspectives of pre-LDN MDCT evaluation and addresses important points which transplant surgeons want to know.

  19. Live Donor Renal Anatomic Asymmetry and Post-Transplant Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Tanriover, Bekir; Fernandez, Sonalis; Campenot, Eric S.; Newhouse, Jeffrey H.; Oyfe, Irina; Mohan, Prince; Sandikci, Burhaneddin; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Wexler, Jennifer J.; Carroll, Maureen A.; Sharif, Sairah; Cohen, David J.; Ratner, Lloyd E.; Hardy, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Relationship between live donor renal anatomic asymmetry and post-transplant recipient function has not been studied extensively. Methods We analyzed 96 live-kidney donors, who had anatomical asymmetry (>10% renal length and/or volume difference calculated from CT angiograms) and their matching recipients. Split function differences (SFD) were quantified with 99mTc-DMSA renography. Implantation biopsies at time-zero were semi-quantitatively scored. A comprehensive model utilizing donor renal volume adjusted to recipient weight (Vol/Wgt), SFD, and biopsy score was used to predict recipient estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at one-year. Primary analysis consisted of a logistic regression model of outcome (odds of developing eGFR>60ml/min/1.73 m2 at one-year), a linear regression model of outcome (predicting recipient eGFR at one-year, using the CKD-EPI formula), and a Monte Carlo simulation based on the linear regression model (N=10,000 iterations). Results In the study cohort, the mean Vol/Wgt and eGFR at one-year were 2.04 ml/kg and 60.4 ml/min/1.73m2, respectively. Volume and split ratios between two donor kidneys were strongly correlated (r=0.79, p-value<0.001). The biopsy scores among SFD categories (<5%, 5–10%, >10%) were not different (p=0.190). On multivariate models, only Vol/Wgt was significantly associated with higher odds of having eGFR>60ml/min/1.73 m2 (OR=8.94, 95% CI 2.47–32.25, p=0.001) and had a strong discriminatory power in predicting the risk of eGFR<60ml/min/1.73m2 at one-year (ROC curve=0.78, 95% CI 0.68–0.89). Conclusion In the presence of donor renal anatomic asymmetry, Vol/Wgt appears to be a major determinant of recipient renal function at one-year post-transplantation. Renography can be replaced with CT volume calculation in estimating split renal function. PMID:25719258

  20. Identification of patients at risk for renal impairment after living donor kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kaltenborn, Alexander; Nolte, Almut; Schwager, Ysabell; Littbarski, Simon A; Emmanouilidis, Nikos; Arelin, Viktor; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Schrem, Harald

    2016-12-01

    Outcome after living donor kidney transplantation is highly relevant, since recipient and donor were exposed to notable harm. Reliable identification of risk factors is necessary. Three hundred sixty-six living donor kidney transplants were included in this observational retrospective study. Relevant risk factors for renal impairment 1 year after transplantation and delayed graft function were identified with univariable and multivariable binary logistic regression and ordinal regression analysis. Eighty-four patients (26.6 %) suffered from renal impairment KDIGO stage ≥4 1 year post-transplant; median estimated glomerular filtration rate was 35.3 ml/min. In multivariable ordinal regression, male recipient sex (p < 0.001), recipient body mass index (p = 0.006), donor age (p = 0.002) and high percentages of panel reactive antibodies (p = 0.021) were revealed as independent risk factors for higher KDIGO stages. After adjustment for post-transplant data, recipient male sex (p < 0.001), donor age (p = 0.026) and decreased early renal function at the first post-transplant outpatient visit (p < 0.001) were identified as independent risk factors. Delayed graft function was independently associated with long stay on the waiting list (p = 0.011), high donor body mass index (p = 0.043), prolonged warm ischemic time (p = 0.016) and the presence of preformed donor-specific antibodies (p = 0.043). Broadening the donor pool with non-blood related donors seems to be legitimate, although with respect to careful medical selection, since donor age in combination with male recipient sex were shown to be risk factors for decreased graft function. Warm ischemic time and waiting time need to be kept as short as possible to avoid delayed graft function. Transplantation across HLA and ABO borders did not affect outcome significantly.

  1. Better the donor you know? A qualitative study of renal patients' views on 'altruistic' live-donor kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Phillippa K; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; de Salis, Isabel; Tomson, Charles; Owen-Smith, Amanda

    2016-02-01

    In the UK there is a short-fall between individuals requiring a renal transplant and kidneys available for transplantation. Non-directed 'altruistic' living kidney donation has emerged as a strategy for bridging this gap between supply and demand, with the number increasing each year. This study aimed to explore the views of potential recipients towards non-directed 'altruistic' live-donor kidney transplantation. Semi-structured interviews with 32 UK deceased-donor kidney transplant recipients were performed. Interviews explored willingness to consider directed and non-directed live-donor kidney transplants (LDKTs). Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and transcripts were analysed using the constant comparison method described in Grounded Theory. For those not willing to accept a non-directed 'altruistic' LDKT, the following themes were identified: i) Prioritising other recipients above self; ii) Fear of acquiring an unknown donor's characteristics, and iii) Concern for the donor - unnecessary risk. For those willing to accept a non-directed 'altruistic' LDKT the following themes were identified: iv) Prioritising known above unknown persons, v) Belief that they are as deserving as other potential recipients, and vi) Advantages of a LDKT. Drawing on 'gift exchange theory', this study contributes to our understanding of the experience of the intended recipient of a gift. The anonymity of the donor-recipient appears to be seen as a benefit of non-directed 'altruistic' live-donor transplants, freeing recipients from the obligations of the gift. However, those who feel unworthy of the 'gifted transplant' are concerned about the donor and by the lack of opportunity for direct reciprocity. Highlighting the 'reciprocal benefits' reported by donors may allow individuals whose preference is a live-donor transplant to accept one if offered. These insights provide the transplant community with targets for intervention, through which the concerns of potential

  2. Right renal vein extension with cryopreserved external iliac artery allografts in living-donor kidney transplantations.

    PubMed

    Puche-Sanz, Ignacio; Pascual-Geler, Manrique; Vázquez-Alonso, Fernando; Hernández-Vidaña, Adoración María; Flores-Martín, José Francisco; Espejo-Maldonado, Eduardo; Cózar-Olmo, José Manuel

    2013-12-01

    A short right renal vein remains a challenge for renal transplant surgery, especially in the living donor. Our objective was to report on a new technique to solve this problem. We describe our experience with the use of cryopreserved iliac artery grafts for right renal vein extension. Two renal grafts from living donors with a short right renal vein were subjected to an extension with a cryopreserved external iliac artery allograft. There were no perioperative or postoperative complications. There were also no changes in ischemia times. The renal implantation was performed easily and conveniently using our standard technique. For the first and second procedures, at 3 and 3.5 years after surgery, respectively, both vascular grafts maintain good patency, and the renal function of both recipients is optimal. Tissue-banked cryopreserved cadaveric vessels can be a useful tool in renal transplant surgery. The use of a cryopreserved iliac artery for renal vein extension is a simple and effective new technique that can be added to the pool of surgical solutions for a short renal vein in living-donor kidney transplantation. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the use of such grafts for this purpose has been described. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The utilization and advantages of an exchange donor program in living donor renal transplantation: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Kim, H S; Kwon, O J; Kang, C M

    2012-01-01

    The availability of donors is a major limiting factor in living donor renal transplantation. Approximately one third of patients with end-stage renal disease have willing potential living donors who are blood type or cross-match incompatible. The living donor kidney exchange has become an efficient solution for recipients in this situation. We analyzed the outcome and advantages of an exchange donor program compared with ABO-incompatible transplantation and desensitized protocol transplantation for highly sensitized patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 152 exchange donor cases from 1991 to 2010. We analyzed the risk factors, outcomes, matching factors, complication rates, and acute rejection rates of this program compared with other alternative strategies. In our center, 22% of total living donor kidney transplantations were performed through an exchange program and an expanded donor pool. The graft survival, complication, and acute rejection rates were not significantly different compared with the alternatives. The severe complication rates were lower than with the alternatives and the immunosuppressant protocol and preoperative preparation were simpler. Blood type O recipients who registered in the exchange program showed no significant differences from the living related groups (P = .45), which were similar to the proportions for other ABO types. Upon multivariate analysis, an acute rejection episode and use of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) were significant factors associated with graft survival (P = .015 and P = .007; odds ratio [OR] 5.968 and 7.324; 95% confidence interval [CI] .003-.533 and .098-.690). Although exchange donor programs are not the sole solution, they show several advantages, such as the prescription of standard immunosuppression, simple preoperative preparation, low cost, and modest rates of severe complications compared with ABO-incompatible transplantation or desensitized protocols. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All

  4. Major influence of renal function on hyperlipidemia after living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Qi; Wang, Kai; Lu, Di; Guo, Hai-Jun; Jiang, Wen-Shi; He, Xiang-Xiang; Xu, Xiao; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of renal and graft function on post-transplant hyperlipidemia (PTHL) in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). METHODS: A total of 115 adult patients undergoing LDLT from January 2007 to May 2009 at a single center were enrolled. Data were collected and analyzed by the China Liver Transplant Registry retrospectively. PTHL was defined as serum triglycerides ≥ 150 mg/dL or serum cholesterol ≥ 200 mg/dL or the need for pharmacologic treatment at the sixth month after LDLT. Early renal dysfunction (ERD) was defined as serum creatinine ≥ 2 mg/dL and/or the need for renal replacement therapy in the first post-transplant week. RESULTS: In 115 eligible patients, the incidence of PTHL was 24.3%. Recipients with PTHL showed a higher incidence of post-transplant cardiovascular events compared to those without PTHL (17.9% vs 4.6%, P = 0.037). Serum creatinine showed significant positive correlations with total serum triglycerides, both at post-transplant month 1 and 3 (P < 0.01). Patients with ERD had much higher pre-transplant serum creatinine levels (P < 0.001) and longer duration of pre-transplant renal insufficiency (P < 0.001) than those without ERD. Pre-transplant serum creatinine, graft-to-recipient weight ratio, graft volume/standard liver volume ratio, body mass index (BMI) and ERD were identified as risk factors for PTHL by univariate analysis. Furthermore, ERD [odds ratio (OR) = 9.593, P < 0.001] and BMI (OR = 6.358, P = 0.002) were identified as independent risk factors for PTHL by multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: Renal function is closely associated with the development of PTHL in LDLT. Post-transplant renal dysfunction, which mainly results from pre-transplant renal insufficiency, contributes to PTHL. PMID:23323005

  5. Improved outcomes of renal transplantation from cardiac death donors: a 30-year single center experience.

    PubMed

    Tojimbara, T; Fuchinoue, S; Iwadoh, K; Koyama, I; Sannomiya, A; Kato, Y; Nanmoku, K; Kai, K; Nakajima, I; Toma, H; Teraoka, S

    2007-03-01

    Outcomes of renal transplantation from donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors over 30 years were analyzed. Between 1975 and 2004, 256 renal transplantations from DCD donors were performed. The recipients were divided into four groups according to a time period as follows: 1975-1979 (Group 1; n = 18), 1980-1989 (Group 2; n = 81), 1990-1999 (Group 3; n = 84) and 2000-2004 (Group 4; n = 73). Of the 256 transplanted kidneys from DCD donors, 38 (15%) functioned immediately after transplantation. The incidence of delayed graft function (DGF) was 72%. Warm ischemic time and total ischemic time were 7.4 +/- 9.4 min and 11.9 +/- 5.6 h, respectively. The overall graft survival rates at 1, 5 and 10 years were 80%, 72% and 53%, respectively. Graft survival rates in each group have continually improved over time (5-year graft survival; 23% vs. 64% vs. 74% vs. 91%, respectively). However, there was no significant difference in graft survival rates between the groups of patients who survived with a functioning graft for more than 1 year. A multivariate Cox regression analysis showed acute rejection and donor age to be independently associated with graft outcome. DCD donors are a valuable source of kidneys for transplantation with promising long-term outcomes.

  6. Renal transplantation from living donor parents in two brothers with Alport syndrome. Can asymptomatic female carriers of the Alport gene be accepted as kidney donors?

    PubMed

    Sessa, A; Pietrucci, A; Carozzi, S; Torri Tarelli, L; Tazzari, S; Giordano, F; Meroni, M; Battini, G; Valente, U; Renieri, A

    1995-01-01

    Renal transplantation from living donor parents was performed in two brothers with end-stage renal failure due to Alport syndrome (AS). Two years later, the patient receiving the kidney graft from the mother, obligate carrier of AS, presented persistent microhematuria and proteinuria with normal renal function. The histological study demonstrated ultrastructural glomerular lesions consistent with AS. The authors conclude that: (1) Alport patients should not be deprived of renal transplantation from living donors, since anti-GBM nephritis is a rare complication; (2) an oligosymptomatic female carrier of the Alport gene may be considered as living renal donor, although a longer follow-up is needed in order to draw definitive conclusions.

  7. A lack of living donor renal transplantation for Asian children represents an opportunity to improve pediatric healthcare.

    PubMed

    Fernandez y Garcia, Erik; Lau, Keith K

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between pediatric primary care practitioners and families provides an early opportunity to address ethnic/racial pediatric subspecialty health care disparities. Living donor pediatric renal transplantation is safe and more effective than deceased donor renal transplantation. The purpose of this study is to identify groups of children who may be less likely to receive living donor renal transplantation, as the first step in assisting pediatric clinicians to increase living donor renal transplantation. We employed a retrospective cohort design. We analyzed data from the medical records of 80 children receiving renal transplantation over 20 years in a large pediatric medical center. The proportions of children receiving a living donor renal allograft differed by ethnicity/race (P = .04). Specifically, children of Asian ethnicity/ race were significantly less likely than children of White ethnicity/race to receive a living donor renal allograft (P = .01). There were no significant differences in age at transplantation or wait time for deceased donor transplantation. We discuss the possible reasons for the discrepancy and potential directions for family-centered pediatric practice, policy, and research to address this potential pediatric healthcare disparity.

  8. 'It's a regional thing': financial impact of renal transplantation on live donors.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Pam; Holewa, Hamish

    2012-01-01

    There has been no research exploring the financial impact on the live renal donor in terms of testing, hospitalisation and surgery for kidney removal (known as nephrectomy). The only mention of financial issues in relation to live renal transplantation is the recipients' concerns in relation to monetary payment for the gift of a kidney and the recipients' desire to pay for the costs associated with the nephrectomy. The discussion in this article posits a new direction in live renal donor research; that of understanding the financial impact of live renal donation on the donor to inform health policy and supportive care service delivery. The findings have specific relevance for live renal donors living in rural and remote locations of Australia. The findings are presented from the first interview (time 1: T1) of a set of four times (time 1 to time 4: T1-T4) from a longitudinal study that explored the experience of live renal donors who were undergoing kidney removal (nephrectomy) at the Renal Transplantation Unit at the Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. A qualitative methodological approach was used that involved semi-structured interviews with prospective living kidney donors (n=20). The resulting data were analysed using the qualitative research methods of coding and thematic analysis. The findings indicate that live renal donors in non-metropolitan areas report significant financial concerns in relation to testing, hospitalisation and surgery for nephrectomy. These include the fact that bulk billing (no cost to the patient for practitioner's service) is not always available, that individuals have to pay up-front and that free testing at local public hospitals is not available in some areas. In addition, non-metropolitan donors have to fund the extra cost of travel and accommodation when relocating for the nephrectomy to the specialist metropolitan hospital. Live renal transplantation is an important new direction in medical care that has excellent

  9. Renal Transplantation Using Stone-bearing Deceased Donor Kidneys-Experience of a Transplant Center in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuan-Bao; Zhao, Liang; Han, Ming; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Zhou, Jian; Yuan, Xiao-Peng; Wang, Chang-Xi

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of transplantation of deceased donor stone-bearing kidneys. A total of 32 patients who received renal transplantation at our center from July 2011 to June 2016 were included. Eight recipients received kidneys with incidental renal stone(s) (stone group). Twenty-four recipients received kidneys without renal stones (non-stone group). The transplantation outcomes of the 2 groups were compared. There was 1 case of postoperative urinary tract infection in the stone group, and 2 cases in the non-stone group. No ureteral obstruction or hydronephrosis occurred in either group. No significant difference was found in the incidence of complications, serum creatinine level, and estimated glomerular filtration rate between the groups (all, P >.05). No deaths occurred in either group during the follow-up period. One recipient had postoperative calculi recurrence, and 4 recipients had residual calculi before transplantation. However, these patients had no symptomatic nephrolithiasis or obstruction, and their renal functions were normal. Transplantation of deceased donor stone-bearing kidneys can achieve comparable outcomes of deceased donor non-stone-bearing kidneys. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Kidney transplantation: the use of living donors with renal artery lesions.

    PubMed

    Nahas, W C; Lucon, A M; Mazzucchi, E; Scafuri, A G; Neto, E D; Ianhez, L E; Arap, S

    1998-10-01

    A shortage of organs for transplantation has forced surgeons to optimize the use of marginal organs, such as kidneys with arterial disease. We present a retrospective study of the outcome of donors with renal artery disease and recipients of kidneys from living related and unrelated donors. Kidneys with vascular abnormalities from healthy living donors were grafted into 11 recipients. These kidney transplants comprised 1.8% of those performed at our institution. The vascular abnormalities were aneurysms in 3 cases, atherosclerotic lesions in 4 and fibromuscular dysplasia in 4. After nephrectomy all abnormalities were corrected under hypothermic conditions during bench surgery except in 3 cases of ostial atherosclerotic plaque, which was left in the donors. The renal artery was anastomosed to the external iliac artery in 5 cases and to the internal iliac artery in 6. The ureter was reimplanted using an extravesical technique. All patients had immediate diuresis and no delayed post-transplant graft dysfunction was observed. One patient died of an unrelated cause and 3 had post-transplant graft function loss due to acute vasculopathy in 1, post-diarrhea with acute arterial thrombosis in 1 and recurrence of the hemolytic-uremic syndrome in 1. All remaining patients are well with median serum creatinine of 1.4 mg./dl. (normal 0.4 to 1.4). All donors are well and normotensive with normal renal function. The use of kidneys with arterial disease from living donors with unilateral disease is safe. Complete informed consent regarding the risks and benefits by donor and recipient is mandatory.

  11. Outcome of renal transplantation from a donor with polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Migone, Silvia Regina da Cruz; Bentes, Camila Guerreiro; Nunes, Débora Bacellar Cruz; Nunes, Juliana Bacellar Cruz; Pinon, Rodolfo Marcial da Silva; Silva, Thales Xavit Souza E

    2016-01-01

    Faced with the long waiting list for a kidney transplant, the use of donors with expanded criteria, like polycystic kidneys, is an option that aims to increase in a short time the supply of kidneys for transplant. This report of two cases of transplants performed from a donor with polycystic kidneys showed promising results, and the receptors evolved with good renal function, serum creatinine measurements within the normal range and with adequate glomerular filtration rate, evaluated over a period of four years post transplant. This fact confirms that the option of using donors with polycystic kidneys is safe and gives good results. Resumo Diante da longa fila de espera por um transplante renal, a utilização de doadores com critério expandido, a exemplo de rins policísticos, torna-se uma opção que visa aumentar a oferta de rins para transplante a curto prazo. O presente relato de dois casos de transplantes realizados a partir de um doador com rins policísticos apresentou resultado promissor, tendo os receptores evoluído com boa função renal, dosagens de creatinina sérica dentro da faixa de normalidade e com taxa de filtração glomerular adequada, avaliados num período de quatro anos pós-transplante. Isto confirma que a opção da utilização de doadores com rins policísticos é segura e apresenta bons resultados.

  12. The impact of donor-specific antibodies on graft outcome in pediatric renal transplantation from deceased donors.

    PubMed

    Piątosa, Barbara; Kwiatkowska, Aneta; Rubik, Jacek; Jarmużek, Wioletta; Kluge, Przemysław; Grenda, Ryszard

    2011-01-01

    Despite prospective crossmatching and modern immunosuppression, early acute rejection is still present in cadaveric renal transplantation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of preformed anti-donor antibodies, detected by 2 solid-phase techniques, and to analyze their impact on early renal allograft outcome. Flow crossmatch detecting the presence of anti-donor IgG and IgM antibodies was performed in pre-transplant sera of 279 patients with negative cytotoxic crossmatch. Screening for IgG antibodies detected by bead-based multiplex technique was performed in sera of 69 patients from the FCXM group. The incidence of early biopsy-proven rejection and graft failure within 3 months after transplantation was analyzed. Anti-donor IgG antibodies were detected in 33 patients (11.8%) by flow crossmatch and in 10 patients by multiplex (14.5%). IgM antibodies were detected in 23 patients (8.2%). All multiplex-positive sera were also positive for IgG by flow crossmatch, but in 18 cases no antibodies were found by multiplex technique. Biopsy-proven acute rejection within 3 months after transplantation was observed in 16 patients, and 5 allografts were lost due to immunological reasons. Presence of IgG antibodies was found to have no effect on early outcome, while the presence of IgM antibodies was associated with significantly higher rejection rate and immune-related graft failure. Anti-donor IgG antibodies detected by bead-based and cell-based technique have no impact on biopsy-proven rejection rate or graft failure. Anti-donor IgM detected by flow crossmatch have significant impact on early transplantation outcome.

  13. Early renal failure after domino liver transplantation using organs from donors with primary hyperoxaluria type 1.

    PubMed

    Saner, Fuat H; Treckmann, Juergen; Pratschke, Johann; Arbogast, Helmut; Rahmel, Axel; Vester, Udo; Paul, Andreas

    2010-10-15

    Organ shortage is responsible for high mortality rates of patients awaiting liver transplantation (LT). Domino transplantation has had reported success in patients with metabolic disorders. Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is a rare metabolic disorder. There are a few case reports that suggest that PH1 livers originating from donors that have undergone combined liver-kidney transplantation can be successfully used for domino transplantation. In the last decade, five patients received a domino liver transplant from patients with PH1 in the EUROTRANSPLANT region. In this study, we report the clinical course and outcome of these five patients who were received a domino graft transplant. All patients, with the exception of one, suffered from multifocal hepatocellular carcinoma and underwent domino LT from patients undergoing combined liver-kidney transplantation for PH1. Within the first 4 weeks, all the domino recipients developed dialysis-dependent kidney failure despite good liver function. Four of the five patients died. The only survivor underwent retransplantation due to hepatic artery thrombosis. Twenty months after transplantation, this patient is doing well and has had no recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma. Domino LT using donors with PH1 results in early renal failure and cannot be recommended for transplantation unless preventive strategies have been identified.

  14. Substantial variation in the acceptance of medically complex live kidney donors across US renal transplant centers

    PubMed Central

    Reese, PP; Feldman, HI; McBride, MA; Anderson, K; Asch, DA; Bloom, RD

    2008-01-01

    Concern exists about accepting live kidney donation from “medically complex donors” -those with risk factors for future kidney disease. This study’s aim was to examine variation in complex kidney donor use across United States (US) transplant centers. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of live kidney donors using Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network data. Donors with hypertension, obesity, or estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 ml/minute/1.73m2 were considered medically complex. Among 9319 donors, 2254 (24.2%) were complex: 1194 (12.8%) were obese, 956 (10.3%) hypertensive, and 392 (4.2%) had low eGFR. The mean proportion of medically complex donors at a center was 24% (range 0 – 65%.) In multivariate analysis, donor characteristics associated with medical complexity included spousal relationship to the recipient (OR 1.29, CI 1.06-1.56, p<0.01), low education (OR 1.19, CI 1.04-1.37, p=0.01), older age (OR 1.01 per year, CI 1.01-1.02, p<0.01), and non-US citizenship (OR 0.70, CI 0.51-0.97, p=0.01). Renal transplant centers with the highest transplant volume (OR 1.26, CI 1.02-1.57, p=0.03), and with a higher proportion of (living donation)/(all kidney transplants) (OR 1.97, CI 1.23-3.16, p<0.01) were more likely to use medically complex donors. Though controversial, the use of medically complex donors is widespread and varies widely across centers. PMID:18727695

  15. Use of computed tomography renal angiography for screening feline renal transplant donors.

    PubMed

    Bouma, Jennifer L; Aronson, Lillian R; Keith, Dennis G; Saunders, H Mark

    2003-01-01

    Preoperative knowledge of the renal vascular anatomy is important for selection of the appropriate feline renal donor. Intravenous urograms (IVUs) have been performed routinely to screen potential donors at the Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (VHUP), but the vascular phase views lack sufficient detail of the renal vascular anatomy. Computed tomography angiography (CTA), which requires a helical computed tomography (CT) scanner, has been found to provide superior renal vascular anatomic information of prospective human renal donors. The specific aims of this study were as follows: 1) develop the CTA technique for the feline patient; and 2) obtain preliminary information on feline renal vessel anatomy in potential renal donors. Ten healthy, potential feline renal donors were anesthetized and imaged using a third-generation helical CT scanner. The time delay between i.v. contrast medium injection and image acquisition, and other parameters of slice collimation, slice interval, pitch, exposure settings, and reconstruction algorithms were varied to maximize contrast medium opacification of the renal vascular anatomy. Optimal CTA acquisition parameters were determined to be: 1) 10-sec delay post-i.v. bolus of iodinated contrast medium; 2) two serially acquired (corresponding to arterial and venous phases) helical scans through the renal vasculature; 3) pitch of 2 (4 mm/sec patient translation, 2 mm slice collimation); and 4) 120-kVp, 160-mA, and 1-sec exposure settings. Retrospective reconstructed CTA transverse images obtained at a 2-mm slice width and a 1-mm slice interval in combination with two-dimensional reformatted images and three-dimensional reconstructed images were qualitatively evaluated for vascular anatomy; vascular anatomy was confirmed at surgery. Four cats had single renal arteries and veins bilaterally; four cats had double renal veins. One cat had a small accessory artery supplying the caudal pole of the left kidney. One cat had a

  16. Organ allocation in pediatric renal transplants: is there an optimal donor?

    PubMed

    Pitt, Susan C; Vachharajani, Neeta; Doyle, Maria B; Lowell, Jeffrey A; Chapman, William C; Anderson, Christopher D; Shenoy, Surendra; Wellen, Jason R

    2013-01-01

    The 2005 revised allocation scheme for pediatric renal transplantation made the decision of whether to transplant an available living-donor (LD) kidney or use a deceased-donor (DD) kidney controversial. The aim of this study was to examine kidney allograft utilization, sensitization, and outcomes of pediatric transplant recipients. Between January 2000 and December 2009, 91 consecutive pediatric kidney recipients (<20 yr) were transplanted. The LD (n = 38) and DD (n = 53) groups were similar in age, gender, dialysis status at transplant, warm ischemia time, and overall patient survival. LD recipients were more likely to be Caucasian (92 vs. 69%), receive older allografts (39 ± 10 vs. 23 ± 9 yr), and have fewer human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatches (3.3 ± 1.6 vs. 4.4 ± 1.5, p < 0.01 for all). Graft survival at one, three, and five yr post-transplant was longer for LD recipients (97%, 91%, 87% vs. DD 89%, 79%, 58%, respectively, p < 0.05). At the time of transplant, 17 (33%) DD recipients had an available LD (mean age 40 yr). A greater proportion of all patients were moderately (PRA 21-79%) sensitized post-transplant (p < 0.05). A multivariable analysis of graft survival indicated that the advantage in LD organs was likely due to fewer HLA mismatched in this group. Nonetheless, LD organs appear to provide optimal outcomes in pediatric renal transplants when considering the risk of becoming sensitized post-transplant complicating later use of the LD kidney. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Renal transplantation across the donor-specific antibody barrier: Graft outcome and cancer risk after desensitization therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ching-Yao; Lee, Chih-Yuan; Yeh, Chi-Chuan; Tsai, Meng-Kun

    2016-06-01

    Desensitization regimens including use of intravenous immune globulin and rituximab have been reported to overcome renal transplant hyperacute rejection. A retrospective case-control study was performed to assess the results and complications of renal transplantation with desensitization therapy for donor-specific antibody (DSA) in a transplant center in Asia, where donor exchange was usually not allowed. Between January 2007 and December 2013, 22 patients with DSA received live-donor renal transplantation after desensitization (DSA group). During the same period, the DSA group was compared to the NSA group (152 renal transplants) who had no specific antibody to the donors (66 from deceased donors and 86 from living relatives). Rejection, renal function, graft and patient survival rates, infection, and cancer incidence were reviewed and analyzed from medical records. The DSA group (46.8%) had significantly higher acute rejection rates than the NSA group (13.7%) at the 1-year follow-up. The estimated renal function, 5-year graft, and patient survival rates were comparable between the groups. The DSA group (19.6%) had significantly higher 5-year de novo cancer incidence than the NSA group (8.5%; p = 0.028); three patients of the DSA group developed urothelial carcinoma 17.0 ± 3.0 months after transplantation. By using stepwise Cox regression analysis, desensitization therapy was identified as the sole independent risk factor for post-transplant urothelial carcinoma. When compared to renal transplantation without DSA, desensitization therapy for DSA resulted in equivalent renal transplant outcome but potentially increased risk of urothelial carcinoma after transplantation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Inferior allograft outcomes in adolescent recipients of renal transplants from ideal deceased donors.

    PubMed

    Levine, Matthew H; Reese, Peter P; Wood, Alexander; Baluarte, Jorge H; Huverserian, Ari; Naji, Ali; Abt, Peter L

    2012-03-01

    To measure the impact of the Share-35 policy on the allocation of ideal deceased donor kidneys and to examine the impact of age on outcomes after kidney transplantation using ideal donor kidneys. In the United States, through Share-35, transplant candidates aged 18 years or younger receive priority for the highest-quality deceased donor kidneys. Adolescent (15-18 years) kidney transplant recipients (KTRs), however, may be more susceptible to allograft loss due to elevated rates of acute rejection and a possible increased risk of primary renal disease recurrence. We used registry data to perform a retrospective cohort study of 39,136 KTRs from January 1, 1994, to December 31, 2008. Ideal donors were defined as 2 to 34 years old with creatinine <1.5 mg/dL and absence of hypertension, diabetes, and hepatitis C. After Share-35, the percentage of ideal donor kidneys allocated to pediatric recipients increased from 7% to 16%. In multivariable Cox regression, compared with adolescent KTRs, all age strata except recipients older than 70 years had a lower risk of allograft failure (P < 0.01 for each comparison); results were similar after excluding KTRs with diseases at high risk of recurrence. Adolescent recipients had higher mortality rates than KTRs younger than 14 years, similar mortality compared with that of KTRs older than 18 and younger than 40 years, and lower mortality than KTRs older than 40 years. The allocation of "ideal donors" to adolescent recipients may not maximize graft utility. Reevaluation of pediatric allocation priority may offer opportunities to optimize ideal renal allograft survival.

  19. Successful deceased donor renal transplant in a sensitized pediatric recipient with the use of plasmapheresis.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Madhura; Raffaelli, Ryan M; Lind, Curt; Meyers, Kevin E C; Kaplan, Bernard S; Baluarte, Hobart J; Monos, Dimitri

    2008-09-01

    Sensitization following renal transplant is a significant barrier to repeat transplantation in children. We report a successful DD renal transplant, with the use of PP, in an 11-yr-old girl who became highly sensitized following a prior failed transplant. She received PP treatments after failure of high-dose IVIg (Gamimune). We established the effectiveness of PP by attaining a 0% PRA and negative cross-matches after five PP treatments. Subsequently, our patient underwent a second round of scheduled PP. When the PRA was 0%, unacceptable antigens were removed from the UNOS wait list, PP was continued, and a kidney became available within 10 days. The final flow cytometry cross-match with the eventual donor was negative. This success demonstrates that coordination of desensitization by PP and advanced laboratory monitoring techniques with recent policies regarding allocation of organs to pediatric patients provides new opportunities for children awaiting transplantation. Since the transplant, our patient sustained a low-titer increase of anti-HLA antibodies. However, she has had no episodes of acute rejection and has maintained excellent graft function more than 17 months later.

  20. Inferior allograft outcomes in adolescent recipients of renal transplants from ideal deceased donors

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Matthew H; Reese, Peter P; Wood, Alexander; Baluarte, H Jorge; Huverserian, Ari; Naji, Ali; Abt, Peter L

    2013-01-01

    Objective To measure the impact of the Share-35 policy on the allocation of ideal deceased donor kidneys, and to examine the impact of age on outcomes after kidney transplantation using ideal donor kidneys. Summary Background Data In the United States, through Share-35, transplant candidates <18 years of age receive priority for the highest-quality deceased donor kidneys. Adolescent (15 – 18 years) kidney transplant recipients (KTRs), however, may be more susceptible to allograft loss due to elevated rates of acute rejection and a possible increased risk of primary renal disease recurrence. Methods We used registry data to perform a retrospective cohort study of 39,136 KTRs from 1/1/1994 – 12/31/2008. Ideal donors were defined as 2 – 34 years old with creatinine <1.5mg/dL and absence of hypertension, diabetes and hepatitis C. Results After Share-35, the percentage of ideal donor kidneys allocated to pediatric recipients increased from 7 – 16%. In multivariable Cox regression, compared to adolescent KTRs, all age strata except recipients >70 years had a lower risk of allograft failure (p<0.01 for each comparison); results were similar after excluding KTRs with diseases at high risk of recurrence. Adolescent recipients had higher mortality rates than KTRs under 14 years, similar mortality compared to KTRs >18 and <40 years, and lower mortality than KTRs over 40 years. Conclusions The allocation of “ideal donors” to adolescent recipients may not maximize graft utility. Re-evaluation of pediatric allocation priority may offer opportunities to optimize ideal renal allograft survival. PMID:22330037

  1. The use of the inferior epigastric artery for accessory lower polar artery revascularization in live donor renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    El-Sherbiny, M; Abou-Elela, A; Morsy, A; Salah, M; Foda, A

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the surgical technique and outcomes of live donor renal allografts with multiple arteries in which the lower polar artery was anastomosed to the inferior epigastric artery after declamping. Between 1988 and 2004, 477 consecutive live donor renal transplants were performed, including 429 with single and 48 with multiple arteries. Anastomosis of the lower polar artery to the inferior epigastric artery was used for 15 grafts with multiple arteries. Successful revascularization of all areas of the transplanted graft was confirmed by Doppler ultrasonography in most patients and radionuclide renal scanning +/- MRA in some patients. In live donor renal transplantation with multiple arteries, the anastomosis of the lower polar artery to the inferior epigastric artery after declamping avoids prolongation of the ischemia time that occurs with other surgical and microsurgical techniques of intracorporeal and ex vivo surgeries.

  2. Donor/Recipient Delta Age: A Possible Risk for Arterial Stenosis in Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pallotti, Giovanni; Donati, Gabriele; Capelli, Irene; Baraldi, Olga; Comai, Giorgia; Agati, Patrizia; Nichelatti, Michele; Cianciolo, Giuseppe; La Manna, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Different arterial wall properties can significantly increase the risk of blood turbulent fluxes leading to complications such as atherosclerosis. Since the mechanical properties of arterial vessels are influenced by age, we investigated, in a retrospective study, the effects on renal artery stenosis of an age difference >15 years between donor and recipient in a cohort of 164 patients undergoing renal transplantation between 1981 and 1991. The age difference between donor and recipient was ≤15 years in 87 patients (53.0%) (Group A) and >15 years in 77 patients (47.0%) (Group B, p = ns). None of the Group A patients developed an anastomotic arterial stenosis, whereas 8/77 Group B patients (10.4%) had an anastomotic arterial stenosis (p < 0.001). This study shows that an age difference >15 years is significantly linked to the risk of developing arterial stenosis after renal transplantation. Indeed, different wall properties can significantly increase the risk of generation of blood turbulent fluxes and involve, in the arterial vessels, the development of complications such as atherosclerosis. PMID:26933444

  3. A Double Blind Randomized Clinical Trial of Remote Ischemic Conditioning in Live Donor Renal Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Michael L; Pattenden, Clare J; Barlow, Adam D; Hunter, James P; Lee, Gwyn; Hosgood, Sarah A

    2015-08-01

    Ischemic conditioning involves the delivery of short cycles of reversible ischemic injury in order to induce protection against subsequent more prolonged ischemia. This randomized controlled trial was designed to determine the safety and efficacy of remote ischemic conditioning (RC) in live donor kidney transplantation.This prospective randomized clinical trial, 80 patients undergoing live donor kidney transplantation were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to either RC or to a control group. RC consisted of cycles of lower limb ischemia induced by an arterial tourniquet cuff placed around the patient's thigh. In the RC treatment group, the cuff was inflated to 200 mm Hg or systolic pressure +25 mm Hg for 4 cycles of 5 min ischemia followed by 5 min reperfusion. In the control group, the blood pressure cuff was inflated to 25 mm Hg. Patients and medical staff were blinded to treatment allocation. The primary end-point was renal function measured by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at 1 and 3 months posttransplant.Donor and recipient demographics were similar in both groups (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in eGFR at 1 month (control 52 ± 14 vs RC 54 ± 17 mL/min; P = 0.686) or 3 months (control 50 ± 14 vs RC 49 ± 18 mL/min; P = 0.678) between the control and RC treatment groups. The RC technique did not cause any serious adverse effects.RC, using the protocol described here, did not improve renal function after live donor kidney transplantation.

  4. Outcomes of Living Donor Liver Transplantation Alone for Patients on Maintenance Renal Replacement Therapy in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, Susumu; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Uemoto, Shinji; Umeshita, Koji; Imamura, Hajime; Soyama, Akihiko; Shimamura, Tsuyoshi; Isaji, Shuji; Ogura, Yasuhiro; Egawa, Hiroto; Kawachi, Shigeyuki; Kasahara, Mureo; Nagano, Hiroaki; Ku, Yonson; Ohdan, Hideki; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Sato, Shuntaro; Inomata, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Because simultaneous liver and kidney transplantation has been limited as a standard practice because of a severe shortage of deceased donors in Japan, living donor (LD) liver transplantation alone (LTA) is indicated in most recipients with maintenance renal replacement therapy (MRRT). Methods A retrospective nationwide survey of LD LTA was performed for liver transplant patients on MRRT. The characteristics of donors and recipients, postoperative complications, survival rate, and causes of death were analyzed. Results In the adult cases (n = 28), the overall survival rate at 1 year and 5 years were 66.1% and 57.3%, respectively. When compared with those adults without MRRT (n = 237), it was significantly worse. In the 7 pediatric cases, the overall survival rate at 1 and 5 years were both 83.3%. Three adult recipients died of nonaneurysm cerebral hemorrhage after 1 year and 1 adult recipient died of acute heart failure after 7 months. In adult recipients with MRRT, graft weight versus standard liver volume, and duration and blood loss in LTA surgery were associated with poor outcomes after LD LTA. Multivariate analysis revealed that MRRT was highest hazard ratio on patient survival after LD LTA. Conclusions Early post-LD LTA mortality was higher in patients with MRRT than in those without MRRT with characteristic causes. Smaller grafts for size and a complicated surgery were associated with poor outcome after LD LTA. Thus, LD LTA in adult patients on MRRT should be carefully treated with meticulous postoperative management and follow-up. PMID:27500264

  5. The role of the altruistic unbalanced chain in exchange living donor renal transplantation: single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Ahn, B K; Kwon, O J; Kang, C M

    2012-01-01

    The exchange donor program in renal transplantation is an efficient solution for recipients with a blood type or crossmatch-incompatible donor. However, this program has some difficulties to define unacceptable human leukocyte antigen matches, deteriorating clinical potential recipient condition, and withdrawal of donor consent. We analyzed the outcomes of exchange donor renal transplantation through the altruistic unbalanced chain. Among 152 cases of exchange donor renal transplantation from 1991 to 2010 in our hospital, we performed 58 procedures through altruistic unbalanced chains. We compared their outcomes with the direct and balanced chain group. We analyzed retrospectively whether this program expanded the donor pool, seeking better immunologic, size, and age matching. The graft survival and acute rejection rates did not differ significantly in the two groups. Of 152 cases, 58 (38.2%) renal transplantations were performed through an unbalanced chain. Seventeen waiting list recipients were transplanted through an altruistic unbalanced chain. In blood type O recipients (n = 32), the causes of registration in the exchange program were ABO incompatibility (93.3%), and positive crossmatch (6.7%). Nine altruistic blood type O donors and 9 (28.1%) type O recipients underwent transplantations through this chain. We suggest the altruistic unbalanced chain may expand the donor pool with advantages for difficult-to-match pairs. The disadvantages of type O recipients may be overcome through the use of an unbalanced chain. The altruistic unbalanced exchange transplantation program can help easy-to-match subjects, shortening the waiting periods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Successful renal transplantation from a brain-dead deceased donor with head injury, disseminated intravascular coagulation and deranged renal functions.

    PubMed

    Ghuge, P P; Kute, V B; Vanikar, A V; Gumber, M R; Gera, D N; Patel, H V; Shah, P R; Modi, P R; Shah, V R; Trivedi, H L

    2013-11-01

    Deceased donors (DDs) with the brain death due to head injury are the major source of organs for transplantation. The incidence of post-head injury disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) ranges from 24% to 50%. Many centers do not accept organs from donors with DIC due to increased risk of primary graft non-function and/or high chances of morbidity/mortality. We performed two successful renal transplants from a DD with head injury with DIC and deranged renal function. One of the recipients developed transient thrombocytopenia, but there was no evidence of DIC or delayed graft functions in either of the recipients. Over a follow-up of 1 month, both are doing well with stable graft function and hematological profile. Thus, a carefully selected DD with severe DIC even with deranged renal function is not a contraindication for organ donation if other risk factors for primary non-function are excluded. This approach will also help in overcoming organ shortage.

  7. Adult-to-adult living related donor renal transplantation in Yemen: the first experience.

    PubMed

    El-Nono, Ibrahiem H; Al-Ba'adani, Tawfiq H; Ghilan, Abdulilah M; Asba, Nagieb W Abu; Al-Alimy, Gamil M; Al-Massani, Mokhtar M; Noman, Morshed A; Al-Shargabe, Soliman; Al-Mansour, Mohamed M; Nassar, Mogahed Y

    2007-06-01

    Between May 1998 and June 2006, 31 patients (21 males and 10 females) received a renal allograft from live-related donors at the Urology and Nephrology Center in the Al-Thawra Modern General Hospital Sana'a, Republic of Yemen. The cold ischemia time ranged between 48 and 68 minutes. The immunosuppressive protocol was double therapy (steroids and mycophenolate) in the first 8 cases. The subsequent cases received triple therapy with steroids, cyclosporine and mycophenolate. Episodes of acute rejection were treated with high dose steroids while anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) was also used in cases of vascular or steroid resistant rejection. Primary graft function was achieved in 29 recipients (93.5%). The post-transplant complications, either surgical or medical, were comparable to those reported in the literature. The kidney transplantation program started sporadically in Yemen since 1998. However, a well-established program has been running regularly since the beginning of 2005.

  8. Perioperative Desensitization Improves Outcomes Among Crossmatch Positive Recipients of Deceased Donor Renal Transplants.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Amit; King, Anne; Kumar, Dhiren; Behnke, Martha; McDougan, Felecia; Kimball, Pamela M

    2016-06-01

    Graft failure due to chronic rejection is greater among renal transplant patients with donor-specific antibody (DSA) than among DSA-free patients. For patients dependent on deceased donor transplantation, preoperative desensitization to eliminate DSAs may be impractical. We speculated that perioperative desensitization might eliminate preexisting DSAs and prevent de novo DSAs and improve graft outcomes. We report that brief perioperative desensitization using either intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) or plasmapheresis/IVIG (PP/IVIG) treatment improves clinical outcomes among patients with positive crossmatches. Immediately following deceased donor transplantation, 235 renal recipients were assigned points for PRA and flow crossmatches (FCXM): delayed graft function (DGF) ≤ 1 point received standard therapy; 2 points received high-dose IVIG; and ≥3 points received PP/IVIG. The DSAs were serially monitored by single antigen bead luminex for 1 year. Five-year clinical outcomes were determined from the chart review. All desensitized patients had preoperatively positive FCXM with DSA. Rejection was more common (P < .05) among desensitized than nonsensitized groups. However, overall graft survivals were similar between the groups (P = not significant) and superior to historic untreated patients (P < .05). Treatment with PP/IVIG more effectively eliminated preexisting DSAs (67% vs 33%, P < 0.05) than IVIG, but neither regimen prevented de novo formation of DSA (20%, P = not significant). Graft survival was >90% in all desensitizated patients with DSA elimination as well as PP/IVIG patients with residual DSA. In contrast, IVIG patients with persistent DSA had poorer graft survival (45%, P < .05). Preemptive perioperative desensitization improved overall graft survival of sensitized patients compared to historic untreated patients. Plasmapheresis/IVIG had greater impact on DSA eradication and graft survival than IVIG alone. © 2016, NATCO.

  9. Renal mass dosing and graft function in children transplanted from pediatric donors.

    PubMed

    de Petris, L; Faraggiana, Tullio; Rizzoni, Gianfranco

    2002-06-01

    It has been suggested that "renal mass dosing" may affect graft evolution. Between 1993 and 1999, 43 children, aged 4-17 years, received 43 pediatric cadaveric grafts. The ratio between graft volume (calculated by ultrasound within the first 24 h from transplantation, by ellipsoid formula) and the recipient's body surface area (BSA) ranged between 14.1 and 110 ml/m(2). Three groups were identified: group 1, 14-29 ml/m(2) (13 patients); group 2, 30-39 ml/m(2) (16 patients); group 3, 40-110 ml/m(2) (14 patients). As a consequence of the different renal volume increments in the three groups during the first year after transplant, no differences in the absolute renal volume were observed at the end of follow-up. The average follow-up was 38 months (range 12-80). In the 37 routine graft biopsies, performed on average 13 months after transplantation and with more than five glomeruli, maximum mean glomerular diameters were mostly above normal values. There were no significant differences among the three groups. At the end of follow-up, the three groups did not differ in microalbuminuria, proteinuria, glomerular function or in incidence of hypertension. From this retrospective study, we conclude that the very wide range of renal mass dosing did not cause differences in medium-term graft evolution. A longer follow-up will be necessary to ascertain the possible influence of disproportion between pediatric donors and recipients, on a long-term graft outcome.

  10. Evaluation of oxidant and antioxidant status in living donor renal allograft transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Sharma, Ujjawal; Sharma, Ashish; Kenwar, Deepesh B; Singh, Sarbpreet; Prasad, Rajendra; Minz, Mukut

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the oxidant and antioxidant status in living donor renal allograft transplant recipients. Ninety-two renal transplant recipients with mean age of 34.75 ± 11.22 years were included in the present study. Venous samples of the recipients were drawn: before the transplant (baseline), 5 min after reperfusion, and 2 weeks after transplant. Samples were processed for the measurement of markers of oxidant and antioxidant status viz. malondialdehyde, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, reduced glutathione, ascorbic acid, and total antioxidant system. The mean baseline levels of reduced glutathione, ascorbic acid, and total antioxidant system were 1.61 ± 0.84 mg/g hemoglobin, 3.64 ± 1.49 mg/dL, and 1.42 ± 0.14 mmol/L which decreased at 5 min after reperfusion to 1.32 ± 0.72 (p = 0.010), 2.96 ± 1.25 (p = 0.002), and 1.36 ± 0.12 (p = 0.042), respectively. The malondialdehyde levels increased from a baseline value of 3.11 ± 1.02 µmol/mL to 3.32 ± 1.09 at 5 min after reperfusion (p = 0.344) and 4.01 ± 1.21 (p = 0.000) at 2 weeks. Glutathione peroxidase level decreased from 68.59 ± 32.79 units/g hemoglobin (baseline) to 63.65 ± 32.92 at 5 min after reperfusion (p = 0.530) and increased significantly at 2 weeks to 86.38 ± 37.18 (p = 0.00). There was no significant change in the catalase level. In living donor renal transplantation, oxidative stress starts after reperfusion and is reflected by fall in antioxidant factors and enzymes in the early period. Over the next 2 weeks, there is increased oxidative stress and simultaneous strengthening of antioxidant system which is implied by increase in malondialdehyde and improvement in the markers of antioxidant status.

  11. Donor-specific alloreactive T cells can be quantified from whole blood, and may predict cellular rejection after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michaela; Leyking, Sarah; Schäfer, Marco; Elsäßer, Julia; Janssen, Martin; Mihm, Janine; van Bentum, Kai; Fliser, Danilo; Sester, Martina; Sester, Urban

    2017-07-01

    Preformed cellular alloreactivity can exist prior to transplantation and may contribute to rejection. Here, we used a rapid flow-cytometric whole-blood assay to characterize the extent of alloreactive T cells among 1491 stimulatory reactions from 61 renal transplant candidates and 75 controls. The role of preformed donor-specific alloreactive T cells in cellular rejection was prospectively analyzed in 21 renal transplant recipients. Alloreactive CD8(+) T cells were more frequent than respective CD4(+) T cells, and these levels were stable over time. CD8(+) T cells were effector-memory T cells largely negative for expression of CD27, CD62L, and CCR7, and were susceptible to steroid and calcineurin inhibitor inhibition. Alloreactivity was more frequent in samples with higher number of HLA mismatches. Moreover, the percentage of individuals with alloreactive T cells was higher in transplant candidates than in controls. Among transplant candidates, 5/61 exhibited alloreactive CD8(+) T cells against most stimulators, 23/61 toward a limited number of stimulators, and 33/61 did not show any alloreactivity. Among 21 renal transplant recipients followed prospectively, one had donor-specific preformed T-cell alloreactivity. She was the only patient who developed cellular rejection posttransplantation. In conclusion, donor-specific alloreactive T cells may be rapidly quantified from whole blood, and may predict cellular rejection after transplantation. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Ex Vivo Removal of Stones in Donor Kidneys by Flexible Ureteroscopy Prior to Renal Transplantation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Na; Zhou, Honglan; Shi, Bo; Wang, Jinguo

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 33 Final Diagnosis: Donation after cardiac death (DCD) Symptoms: None Medication:— Clinical Procedure: Ex vivo removal of stones in donor kidneys by flexible ureteroscop Specialty: Transplantology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Because of the shortage of grafts, many attempts have been made to treat calculi in donor kidneys and have achieved successful management. This case report is the first to present removal of stones from bilateral kidneys from a single donor through flexible ureteroscopy before transplantation. Case Report: The present case report shows the clinical management of bilateral donor kidneys with calculi, which were taken from a 33-year-old man through donation after cardiac death (DCD). Computed tomography showed 2 stones in the right donor kidney and 1 in the left donor kidney. Two stones were removed ex vivo using a flexible ureteroscope before transplantation, and the third one turned out to be a renal papillae calcification, which was left in place without surgical treatment. The bilateral donor kidneys were transplanted to 2 recipients. Conclusions: There is a possibility of increasing the kidney pool by using donor kidneys containing calculi, which should be removed before transplantation. PMID:28255156

  13. Living donor kidney transplantation preceding pancreas transplantation reduces mortality in type 1 diabetics with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kaku, K; Kitada, H; Noguchi, H; Kurihara, K; Kawanami, S; Nakamura, U; Tanaka, M

    2015-04-01

    Simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK) is a definitive treatment for type 1 diabetics with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Because of the shortage of deceased donors in Japan, the mortality rate during the waiting period is high. We evaluated mortality risk in patients with type 1 diabetes waiting for SPK, and the benefit of living-donor kidney transplantation (LDK) preceding pancreas transplantation, which may reduce mortality in patients awaiting SPK. This retrospective study included 71 patients with type 1 diabetes. Twenty-six patients underwent SPK, 15 underwent LDK, and 30 were waiting for SPK. Their cumulative patient and graft survival rates were retrospectively evaluated. Risk factors contributing to mortality in patients with type 1 diabetes awaiting SPK were evaluated with the use of a Cox proportional hazards model. The 5-year cumulative patient survival rates in the SPK and LDK groups were 100% and 93.3%, respectively (P = .19), and 5-year kidney graft survival rates were 95.7% and 100% (P = .46), respectively. The cumulative survival rate in patients awaiting SPK was 77.7% at 5 years after registration. Duration of dialysis was the only factor significantly associated with patient and graft survivals according to both univariate and multivariate analyses. Patient and graft survival rates were similar in the SPK and LDK groups, but the survival rate of patients awaiting SPK decreased over time. Duration of dialysis was an independent risk factor for patient and graft survival. LDK preceding pancreas transplantation may be an effective therapeutic option for patients with type 1 diabetes and ESRD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Donor-specific HLA antibodies and graft function in children after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, Jenni; Peräsaari, Juha; Lauronen, Jouni; Qvist, Erik; Valta, Helena; Pakarinen, Mikko; Merenmies, Jussi; Jalanko, Hannu

    2012-06-01

    The presence of circulating donor-specific human leukocyte antigen antibodies (HLA-DSA) has been associated with chronic antibody-mediated rejection, leading to progressive graft dysfunction and poor graft survival.The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and significance of HLA-DSA in paediatric renal transplantation(RTx) patients. A total of 294 post-transplant serum samples from 123 RTx patients were retrospectively analysed for HLA antibodies. Positive samples were further tested for HLADSA by a Luminex Single Antigen bead assay. The antibody findings were correlated to measured glomerular filtration rate(GFR) and clinical outcome. HLA antibodies were detected in half of the routine samples (140/294) taken 1 month to 10 years after RTx, and 40% (62/140) of these were HLA-DSA. Overall, one-third(42/123) of the patients had HLA-DSA, which mostly(65%) reacted against class II antigens. Detection of HLADSA was not associated with poor GFR at the time of sampling, and no exceptional deterioration of GFR after the HLA-DSA detection was noted in individual patients regardless of the antibody level. The presence of HLA-DSA in the first 2 years posttransplantation was not associated with poorer graft function later on. Detection of HLA antibodies is common in children after RTx, and this finding, as such, does not predict any deterioration of graft function.

  15. Deceased-Donor Apolipoprotein L1 Renal-Risk Variants Have Minimal Effects on Liver Transplant Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dorr, Casey R.; Freedman, Barry I.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Brown, W. Mark; Russell, Gregory B.; Julian, Bruce A.; Pastan, Stephen O.; Gautreaux, Michael D.; Muthusamy, Amutha; Chinnakotla, Srinath; Hauptfeld, Vera; Bray, Robert A.; Kirk, Allan D.; Divers, Jasmin; Israni, Ajay K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) G1 and G2 renal-risk variants, common in populations with recent African ancestry, are strongly associated with non-diabetic nephropathy, end-stage kidney disease, and shorter allograft survival in deceased-donor kidneys (autosomal recessive inheritance). Circulating APOL1 protein is synthesized primarily in the liver and hydrodynamic gene delivery of APOL1 G1 and G2 risk variants has caused hepatic necrosis in a murine model. Methods To evaluate the impact of these variants in liver transplantation, this multicenter study investigated the association of APOL1 G1 and G2 alleles in deceased African American liver donors with allograft survival. Transplant recipients were followed for liver allograft survival using data from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients. Results Of the 639 liver donors evaluated, 247 had no APOL1 risk allele, 300 had 1 risk allele, and 92 had 2 risk alleles. Graft failure assessed at 15 days, 6 months, 1 year and total was not significantly associated with donor APOL1 genotype (p-values = 0.25, 0.19, 0.67 and 0.89, respectively). Conclusions In contrast to kidney transplantation, deceased-donor APOL1 G1 and G2 risk variants do not significantly impact outcomes in liver transplantation. PMID:27054572

  16. Factors affecting eGFR 5-year post-deceased donor renal transplant: analysis and predictive model.

    PubMed

    Elbadri, Abdalla; Traynor, Carol; Veitch, John T; O'Kelly, Patrick; Magee, Colm; Denton, Mark; O'Sheaghdha, Conall; Conlon, Peter J

    2015-04-01

    Long-term survival of renal allografts has improved over the last 20 years. However, less is known about current expectations for long-term allograft function as determined by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). The aim of this study was to investigate factors which affect graft function at 5 years' post-renal transplantation. The statistically significant factors were then used to construct a predictive model for expected eGFR at five years' post-transplant. We retrospectively reviewed all adult patients who received a renal transplant in the Republic of Ireland between 1990 and 2004. Data collected included era of transplantation (1990-1994, 1995-1999, 2000-2004), donor and recipient age and gender, number of human leucocyte antigen mismatches, cold ischemia time (CIT), number of prior renal transplants, immunosuppressive regimen used and acute rejection episodes. Estimated GFR was calculated at 5 years after transplantation from patient data using the Modified Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation. Consecutive sampling was used to divide the study population into two equal unbiased groups of 489 patients. The first group (derivation cohort) was used to construct a predictive model for eGFR five years' post-transplantation, the second (validation cohort) to test this model. Nine hundred and seventy eight patients were analyzed. The median age at transplantation was 43 years (range 18-78) and 620 (63.4%) were male. One hundred and seventy five patients (17.9%) had received a prior renal transplant. Improved eGFR at five years' post-transplantation was associated with tacrolimus-based combination immunosuppression, younger donor age, male recipient, absence of cytomegalovirus disease and absence of acute rejection episodes as independently significant factors (p < 0.05). The predictive model developed using these factors showed good correlation between predicted and actual median eGFR at five years. The model explained 20% of eGFR variability. The

  17. Donor acute kidney injury and short-term graft outcome in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Johannes; Rebhan, Dirk; Heller, Katharina; Velden, Joachim; Hilgers, Karl F; Wullich, Bernd; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Amann, Kerstin U

    2014-10-01

    With increased waiting times for kidney transplantation, marginal organs from expanded criteria donors (ECD) are increasingly offered for allocation. In addition to ECD status, donors may have suffered from acute kidney injury (AKI) prior to organ procurement. In this retrospective cohort study, we studied short-term allograft function in 517 kidney transplants performed between the years 2008-2014. Recipients of allografts from deceased organ donors were categorized as standard criteria donors (SCD) or ECD with or without AKI defined by RIFLE criteria. Of 382 deceased donations, 174 (45.5%) were classified as ECD and 63 (16.5%) fulfilled AKI criteria. Donor creatinine on hospital admission was similar, whereas creatinine before organ procurement differed (p < 0.001). Despite these differences, serum creatinine and eGFR at discharge and after one yr showed only minor differences between kidneys with or without AKI. In multivariate linear regression analyses, donor AKI was not a predictor of one-yr allograft function. Given the poor prognosis of dialysis patients and the increase in waiting time, kidneys from SCD and ECD donors with AKI should be allocated for transplantation. In case of ECD donors with AKI, recipients should be informed about the possibility of permanent non-function or early graft loss. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Successful unintentional ABO-incompatible renal transplantation: Blood group A1B donor into an A2B recipient.

    PubMed

    Fadeyi, Emmanuel A; Stratta, Robert J; Farney, Alan C; Pomper, Gregory J

    2014-05-01

    To report a successful unintentional transplantation of a deceased donor kidney from an "incompatible" A1B donor into a recipient who was blood group A2B with unsuspected preformed anti-A1 antibodies. The donor and recipient were both typed for ABO antigens. The recipient was tested for ABO and non-ABO antibodies. The recipient was typed for HLA class I and class II antigens, including HLA antibody screen. The T-and B-flow cytometry crossmatch test was performed using standard protocol. The donor-recipient pair was a complete six-antigen human leukocyte antigen mismatch, but final T- and B-flow cytometry cross-match tests were compatible. The recipient was a 65-year-old woman with a medical history of end-stage renal disease secondary to diabetic nephropathy who underwent kidney transplantation from a 46-year-old brain-dead standard criteria donor. The recipient's RBCs were negative with A1 lectin, and the recipient was thus typed as an A2 subgroup. Anti-A1 could be demonstrated in the recipient's plasma. The donor's RBCs were positive with A1 lectin, thereby conferring an A1 blood type. It is safe to transplant across the A1/A2 blood group barrier provided that the preformed antibodies are not reactive at 37°C and with anti-human globulin.

  19. Dyslipidemia and weight gain secondary to lifestyle changes in living renal transplant donors.

    PubMed

    Demir, E; Balal, M; Paydas, S; Sertdemir, Y; Erken, U

    2005-12-01

    We evaluated renal function, lipid profile, body weight, and physical activity of living donors in long-term follow-up after nephrectomy. A total of 121 living donors were compared with 81 healthy subjects with normal renal function and no history of any surgery or disease. Before and after donor nephrectomies, we recorded age, body weight, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, serum creatinine, creatinine clearance, lipids, and serum glucose levels of the donors. Preoperative (baseline) and postoperative (last visit) physical activities of donors and controls were evaluated through the Modified Baecke Questionnaire (occupational activities, sports activities, leisure-time activities). There were no differences between donors and controls for age (P = .772), gender (P = .927), and follow-up period (P = .564). According to baseline levels, blood pressure and serum creatinine were increased and creatinine clearance was decreased (P < .001 for all). The mean increases in body weight (P = .012), LDL (P = .004), and triglyceride (P < .001) were higher in donors than in controls. But the mean decrease in HDL was not different between controls and donors (P = .057). Indices of sports and total activities were lower in donors than in controls on the last visit (P < .001). Indices of occupational and leisure-time activities were similar on the last visit in donors and in controls (P = .126, P = .083). The alterations in total cholesterol and total activity showed significant negative correlations in donors (r = -.581, P < .001). Also, the alterations in total cholesterol and body weight showed a significant correlation (r = .25, P = .02). We followed donors together with serum lipid levels, body weight, and total physical activities as well as blood pressure and renal function tests.

  20. Renal transplantation with expanded criteria donors: Which is the optimal immunosuppression?

    PubMed Central

    Filiopoulos, Vassilis; Boletis, John N

    2016-01-01

    The growing gap between demand and supply for kidney transplants has led to renewed interest in the use of expanded criteria donor (ECD) kidneys in an effort to increase the donor pool. Although most studies of ECD kidney transplantation confirm lower allograft survival rates and, generally, worse outcomes than standard criteria donor kidneys, recipients of ECD kidneys generally have improved survival compared with wait-listed dialysis patients, thus encouraging the pursuit of this type of kidney transplantation. The relative benefits of transplantation using kidneys from ECDs are dependent on patient characteristics and the waiting time on dialysis. Because of the increased risk of poor graft function, calcineurin inhibitor (CNI)-induced nephrotoxicity, increased incidence of infections, cardiovascular risk, and malignancies, elderly recipients of an ECD kidney transplant are a special population that requires a tailored immunosuppressive regimen. Recipients of ECD kidneys often are excluded from transplant trials and, therefore, the optimal induction and maintenance immunosuppressive regimen for them is not known. Approaches are largely center specific and based upon expert opinion. Some data suggest that antithymocyte globulin might be the preferred induction agent for elderly recipients of ECD kidneys. Maintenance regimens that spare CNIs have been advocated, especially for older recipients of ECD kidneys. CNI-free regimens are not universally accepted due to occasionally high rejection rates. However, reduced CNI exposure and CNI-free regimens based on mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors have shown acceptable outcomes in appropriately selected ECD transplant recipients. PMID:27011908

  1. Longitudinal assessment of renal perfusion and oxygenation in transplant donor-recipient pairs using ASL and BOLD MRI

    PubMed Central

    Niles, David J; Artz, Nathan S; Djamali, Arjang; Sadowski, Elizabeth A; Grist, Thomas M; Fain, Sean B

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess renal function in kidney transplant recipients and their respective donors over two years using arterial spin labeling (ASL) and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI, and to prospectively evaluate the effect of losartan on functional MRI measures in recipients. Materials and Methods The study included 15 matched pairs of renal transplant donors and recipients. ASL and BOLD MRI of the kidneys were performed on donors prior to transplant surgery (baseline) and on both donors and recipients at 3 months, 1 year and 2 years post-transplant. After 3 months, seven of the 15 recipients were prescribed 25–50 mg/day losartan for the remainder of the study. A linear mixed-effects model was used to evaluate perfusion, R2*, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and fractional excretion of sodium (FENa) for changes across time or associated with losartan treatment. Results In donors, cortical perfusion in the remaining kidney decreased by 50 ± 19 ml/min/100g (11.8%) between baseline and 2 years (P < 0.05), while cortical R2* declined modestly by 0.7 ± 0.3 s−1 (5.6%; P < 0.05). In transplanted kidneys, cortical perfusion decreased markedly by 141 ± 21 ml/min/100g (34.2%) between baseline and 2 years (P < 0.001), while medullary R2* declined by 1.5 ± 0.8 s−1 (8.3%; P = 0.06). Single-kidney eGFR increased between baseline and 2 years by 17.7 ± 2.7 ml/min/1.73m2 (40.3%; P < 0.0001) in donors and to 14.6 ± 4.3 ml/min/1.73m2 (33.3%; P < 0.01) in recipients. Cortical perfusion at 1 and 2 years in recipients receiving 25–50 mg/day losartan was 62 ± 24 ml/min/100g higher than recipients not receiving the drug (P < 0.05). No significant effects of losartan were observed for any other markers of renal function. Conclusions The results suggest an important role for non-invasive functional monitoring with ASL and BOLD MRI in kidney transplant recipients and donors, and they indicate a potentially beneficial effect of losartan in recipients. PMID

  2. Ethnic differences in HLA antigens in Chilean donors and recipients: data from the National Renal Transplantation Program.

    PubMed

    Droguett, M A; Beltran, R; Ardiles, R; Raddatz, N; Labraña, C; Arenas, A; Flores, J; Alruiz, P; Mezzano, S; Ardiles, L

    2008-11-01

    To describe HLA antigen distribution, looking for possible markers of renal disease in Mapuche and non-Mapuche people in the renal transplantation program, we reviewed data from 1297 histocompatibility studies of the Chilean national renal transplantation program (421 donors and 876 recipients), performed between 2000 and 2005. Mapuche people were classified according to their family surnames. The most frequent antigens found among the total Chilean population were A2 (48%), A19 (33%), B16 (33%), B35 (26%), DR4 (38%), and DR6 (28%), without significant differences between donors and recipients. Among the 114 individuals (9%) classified as Mapuche, the most frequent antigens were A28 (49%), A2 (44%), B16 (63%), B35 (24%), DR4 (48%), and DR8 (30%), with A28/B16/DR4 as the most common haplotype. In contrast, A28, B16, DR4, and DR8 were significantly more frequent in Mapuche compared with non-Mapuche people. B8 was significantly more frequent in Mapuche recipients than in non-Mapuche recipients and Mapuche donors. The higher frequency of some HLA antigens in Mapuche people was confirmed, possibly corresponding to ethnic markers. The special concentration of B8 among Mapuche recipients might represent a genetic factor predisposing to chronic renal disease in this human group.

  3. Characteristics of long-term live-donor pediatric renal transplant survivors: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    El-Husseini, Amr A; Foda, Mohamed A; Osman, Yasser M; Sobh, Mohamed A

    2006-05-01

    To study the characteristics and the predictors of survival observed in our pediatric live-donor renal transplant recipients with an allograft that functioned for more than 10 yr. One hundred fifteen children underwent renal transplantation between 1976 and 1995. Of these, 30 had functioning allografts for more than 10 yr (range, 11-18). The patients included 18 males and 12 females, with a mean age at transplantation of 13 yr (range, 5-18). Characteristics of the patients, data on graft survival, and determinants of outcome were obtained by reviewing all medical charts. At most recent follow-up (January 2005), the mean daily dose of azathioprine was 1.2 mg/kg (range, 1-2) and that of prednisone was 0.16 mg/kg (range, 0.1-0.2). Mean creatinine clearance was 72 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) (range, 45-112). Acute rejection occurred in 14 (47%) patients. Seven patients had one episode, five had two episodes, and two had three episodes of acute rejection. Three patients (10%) developed malignancy. A substantial proportion of patients (44%) were short, with a height standard deviation score (SDS) less than -1.88, which is below the third percentile for age and gender. One quarter of the patients, more commonly the females, were obese. Other complications included osteoporosis in 16 (53%) patients, avascular bone necrosis in four (13%), post-transplantation diabetes mellitus in three (10%), and hypertension in 18 (60%). Twelve (40%) patients were married and 27% had children post-transplantation. The independent determinants of long-term graft survival were acute rejection and post-transplant hypertension. Despite good renal function, long-term pediatric renal transplant survivors are at risk of significant morbidity. The determinants of long-term graft survival are acute rejection and post-transplant hypertension.

  4. Prognostic utility of preimplantation kidney biopsy from deceased older donors in first year post-transplant renal function.

    PubMed

    Amenábar, Juan J; Camacho, Jhon A; Gómez-Larrambe, Nerea; Visus, Teresa; Pijoan, José I; González del Tánago, Jaime; Zárraga, Sofía; García-Olaverri, Jorge; Gaínza, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    Preimplantation renal biopsy provides potentially valuable information about post-transplant renal function. To assess the prognostic value of preimplantation kidney biopsy from older donors in determining 1-year post-transplant estimated glomerular filtration rate MDRD-4 (eGFR). We evaluated a cohort of 124 renal transplant recipients from deceased donors ≥60 years old, performed at our center between March 2008 and May 2012. Biopsies were assessed by applying the score proposed by O'Valle et al. The overall score was stratified into 3 levels: 0-3, 4-5 and 6-8 points. Kidneys scoring > 8 points were discarded. A total of 77% of the donors were ≥70 years. One year post-transplant, mean eGFR (SD) was lower in transplant recipients with 6-8 points (38.5 [14.1] mL/min/1.73m(2)) than in the group scoring 4-5 points (46.3 [15.7] [p=0.03]) and the group scoring 0-3 (49.6 [12.5] [P=.04]). Seven patients (19%) had eGFR <30mL/min/1.73m(2) 1 year post-transplant in group 6-8 vs. 8 (14%) in group 4-5 and none in group 0-3. In the logistic regression, OR (95% IC), to determine patients with 1-year post-transplant eGFR (<30mL/min/1.73m(2)), delayed graft function (6.3 [1.9-21.3]) and acute rejection (5.8 [1.1-31]), were significant. The adjusted OR of biopsy score group 6-8 vs. 0-5, was 2.2 (0.7-7.3). Allografts with higher pathologic score in preimplantation renal biopsy were associated with a worse 1-year post-transplant eGFR. Delayed graft function and acute rejection were significant risk factors for 1-year post-transplant low eGFR. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Baseline donor chronic renal injury confers the same transplant survival disadvantage for DCD and DBD kidneys.

    PubMed

    Kosmoliaptsis, V; Salji, M; Bardsley, V; Chen, Y; Thiru, S; Griffiths, M H; Copley, H C; Saeb-Parsy, K; Bradley, J A; Torpey, N; Pettigrew, G J

    2015-03-01

    Histological assessment of baseline chronic kidney injury may discriminate kidneys that are suitable for transplantation, but has not been validated for appraisal of donation after circulatory death (DCD) kidneys. 'Time-zero' biopsies for 371 consecutive, solitary, deceased-donor kidneys transplanted at our center between 2006 and 2010 (65.5% DCD, 34.5% donation after brain death [DBD]) were reviewed and baseline chronic degenerative injury scored using Remuzzi's classification. High scores correlated with donor age and extended criteria donors (42% of donors), but the spectrum of scores was similar for DCD and DBD kidneys. Transplant outcomes for kidneys scoring from 0 to 4 were comparable (1 and 3 year graft survival 95% and 92%), but were much poorer for kidneys scoring ≥5, with 1 year graft survival only 73%, and 12.5% suffering primary nonfunction. Critically, high Remuzzi scores conferred the same survival disadvantage for DCD and DBD kidneys. On multi-variable regression analysis, time-zero biopsy score was the only independent predictor for graft survival, whereas one-year graft estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) correlated with donor age and biopsy score. In conclusion, the relationship between severity of chronic kidney injury and transplant outcome is similar for DCD and DBD kidneys. Kidneys with Remuzzi scores of ≤4 can be implanted singly with acceptable results.

  6. CYP3A5 polymorphism effect on cyclosporine pharmacokinetics in living donor renal transplant recipients: analysis by population pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Song, Joohan; Kim, Myeong Gyu; Choi, Boyoon; Han, Na Young; Yun, Hwi-Yeol; Yoon, Jeong-Hyun; Oh, Jung Mi

    2012-09-01

    Cyclosporine is often used to prevent allograft rejection in renal transplant recipients. However, cyclosporine has a narrow therapeutic window and large variability in its pharmacokinetics. Individual characteristics and genetic polymorphisms can cause the variation. Hence, it is important to determine the cause(s) of the variation in cyclosporine pharmacokinetics. To our knowledge, this is the first reported population pharmacokinetic study of cyclosporine in living donor renal transplant recipients that considered the genetic polymorphism as a covariate. To build a population pharmacokinetic model of cyclosporine in living donor renal transplant recipients and identify covariates including CYP3A5*3, ABCB1 genetic polymorphisms that affect cyclosporine pharmacokinetic parameters. Clinical characteristics and cyclosporine concentration data for 69 patients who received cyclosporine-based immunosuppressive therapy after living donor renal transplantation were collected retrospectively for up to 400 postoperative days. CYP3A5*1/*3 and ABCB1C1236T, G2677T/A, C3435T geno-typing was performed. A population pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted using a NONMEM program. After building the final model, 1000 bootstrappings were performed to validate the final model. In total, 2034 blood samples were collected. A 1-compartment open model with first-order absorption and elimination was chosen to describe the pharmacokinetics of cyclosporine. A population pharmacokinetic analysis showed that postoperative days, sex, and CYP3A5 genotype significantly affected the pharmacokinetics of cyclosporine. The final estimate of mean clearance was 56 L/h, and the mean volume of distribution was 4650 L. The interindividual variability for these parameters was 22.98% and 51.48%, respectively. Using the present model to calculate the dose of cyclosporine with CYP3A5 genotyping can be possible for the patients whose cyclosporine concentration is not within the therapeutic range even with

  7. Renal transplant patients treated with total lymphoid irradiation show specific unresponsiveness to donor antigens the mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR)

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, D.; Saper, V.; Strober, S.

    1987-06-01

    A group of 25 cadaveric renal transplant recipients received total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) before transplantation, rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin on alternate days for 10 days after transplantation, and low dose prednisone (5 to 10 mg/day) as the sole maintenance immunosuppressive therapy. Allograft function and the mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR) were monitored serially. After 18 to 30 mo, nine patients were selected on the basis of a return of the MLR such that the mean stimulation index to a panel of normal stimulator cells was greater than or equal to 5, a stable serum creatinine level which was less than or equal to 2 mg/dl, and a history of no more than one rejection episode. The MLR of these patients' post-transplant peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBML) against cryopreserved donor cells was compared with that against cryopreserved normal third-party cells. In control experiments, the MLR of cryopreserved pre-TLI recipient PBML or fresh normal PBML were tested against the same panel of donor and third-party stimulator cells. Seven of the nine recipients showed a pattern of specific unresponsiveness to the donor cells more than 18 mo after transplantation. Preliminary attempts to identify antigen specific suppressor cells were unsuccessful. The pattern of unresponsiveness may indicate a state of specific immune tolerance to the allogeneic graft.

  8. Desensitization for renal transplantation: depletion of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies, preservation of memory antibodies, and clinical risks.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Natasha M; Eng, Hooi S; Yu, Raymond; Kireta, Svjetlana; Tsiopelas, Eleni; Bennett, Greg D; Brook, Nicholas R; Gillis, David; Russ, Graeme R; Coates, P Toby

    2011-01-01

    Desensitization protocols reduce donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSA) and enable renal transplantation in patients with a positive complement-dependent cytotoxic cross-match (CDC-CXM). The effect of this treatment on protective antibody and immunoglobulin levels is unknown. Thirteen patients with end-stage renal disease, DSA and positive CDC-CXM underwent desensitization. Sera collected pre- and post-transplantation were analysed for anti-tetanus and anti-pneumococcal antibodies, total immunoglobulin (Ig) levels and IgG subclasses and were compared to healthy controls and contemporaneous renal transplant recipients treated with standard immunosuppression alone. Ten patients developed negative CDC-CXM and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and underwent successful transplantation. Eight recipients achieved good graft function without antibody-mediated or late rejection, BK virus or cytomegalovirus infection. One patient had primary non-function due to recurrent oxalosis, and one patient with immediate graft function died from septicaemia. Seven recipients required post-operative transfusion and three developed septicaemia. DSA remained negative by ELISA at 12 months, but were detectable by Luminex(®) . Anti-tetanus and anti-pneumococcal antibodies, total Ig and IgG subclasses were below the normal range but comparable to levels in renal transplant recipients who had not undergone desensitization. Desensitization protocols effectively reduce DSA and allow successful transplantation. Post-operative bleeding and short-term infectious risk is increased. Protective antibody and serum immunoglobulin levels are relatively preserved. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 European Society for Organ Transplantation.

  9. The Risk of End-Stage Renal Disease Among Living Donor Liver Transplant Recipients in the United States.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, D S; Ruebner, R L; Abt, P L

    2015-10-01

    Since initiation of model for end-stage liver disease (MELD)-based allocation for liver transplantation, the risk of posttransplant end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has increased. Recent US data have demonstrated comparable, if not superior survival, among recipients of living donor liver transplants (LDLT) when compared to deceased donor liver transplant (DDLT) recipients. However, little is known about the incidence of ESRD post-LDLT. We analyzed linked Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) and US Renal Data System (USRDS) data of first-time liver-alone transplant recipients from February 27, 2002 to March 1, 2011, and restricted the cohort to recipients with a laboratory MELD score ≤25 not on dialysis prior to transplantation, in order to evaluate the incidence of ESRD post-LDLT, and to compare the incidence among LDLT versus DDLT recipients. There were 28 707 DDLT and 1917 LDLT recipients included in the analyses. The 1-, 3- and 5-year unadjusted risk of ESRD was 1.7%, 2.9% and 3.4% in LDLT recipients, compared with 1.5%, 3.0% and 4.8% in DDLT recipients (p > 0.05), respectively. In multivariable competing risk Cox regression models, there was no association between receiving an LDLT and risk of ESRD (sub-hazard ratio: 0.99, 95% CI: 0.77-1.26, p = 0.92). In conclusion, the incidence of ESRD post-LDLT in the United States is low, and there are no significant differences among LDLT and DDLT recipients with MELD scores ≤25 at transplantation.

  10. Screening for hepatitis B virus DNA in serum of organ donors and renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Miédougé, M; Rostaing, L; Mansuy, J M; Sandres-Sauné, K; Boudet, F; Izopet, J

    2003-04-01

    In order to determine the impact of screening potential organ donors for hepatitis B virus DNA using a standardized test, the serum of 145 donor candidates was tested. All of the candidates were negative for hepatitis B virus DNA, but the status of one donor was doubtful for hepatitis B virus surface antigen and seven donors tested positive for hepatitis B virus core antibody without hepatitis B virus surface antigen. Nine transplant recipients tested positive for hepatitis B virus surface antibody; they were given kidneys from the donor with a doubtful hepatitis B virus surface antigen result and from four of the seven donors who tested positive for hepatitis B core antibody. Follow-up revealed no case of hepatitis B transmission. In this study, screening for hepatitis B virus DNA was useful and did not lead to donor organ shortage. Patients with hepatitis B virus surface antibodies can safely be given kidneys from donors who are positive for hepatitis B core antibody but negative for hepatitis B virus DNA.

  11. Survival of cadaveric renal transplant grafts from young donors and in young recipients.

    PubMed

    Arbus, G S; Rochon, J; Thompson, D

    1991-01-01

    Evidence from multicenter registries has suggested that cadaveric renal graft survival is poorer when either the recipient or the donor is very young. We therefore analyzed our results from a single pediatric center. There was a significant correlation between greater recipient age and improved cadaveric graft (P = 0.002) and patient (P = 0.0009) survival. The age of the donor also appeared important, particularly in very young children, but became less so as donor age rose. Forty-four percent of recipients under 3 years old who received cadaveric kidneys from donors less than 4 years old lost their grafts as a result of renal thrombosis, ischemia, or technical problems, compared with only 3% of recipients over 9 years of age, whose grafts came from donors who were also over 9 years. The 1-year first cadaveric graft survival rates for these two age groups were 33% and 82% respectively. Our experience confirms the poor findings reported in very young recipients and with very young donors.

  12. Behaviour of Non-Donor Specific Antibodies during Rapid Re-Synthesis of Donor Specific HLA Antibodies after Antibody Incompatible Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Nithya S.; Zehnder, Daniel; Daga, Sunil; Lowe, Dave; Lam, F. T.; Kashi, Habib; Tan, Lam Chin; Imray, Christopher; Hamer, Rizwan; Briggs, David; Raymond, Neil; Higgins, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Background HLA directed antibodies play an important role in acute and chronic allograft rejection. During viral infection of a patient with HLA antibodies, the HLA antibody levels may rise even though there is no new immunization with antigen. However it is not known whether the converse occurs, and whether changes on non-donor specific antibodies are associated with any outcomes following HLA antibody incompatible renal transplantation. Methods 55 patients, 31 women and 24 men, who underwent HLAi renal transplant in our center from September 2005 to September 2010 were included in the studies. We analysed the data using two different approaches, based on; i) DSA levels and ii) rejection episode post transplant. HLA antibody levels were measured during the early post transplant period and corresponding CMV, VZV and Anti-HBs IgG antibody levels and blood group IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies were quantified. Results Despite a significant DSA antibody rise no significant non-donor specific HLA antibody, viral or blood group antibody rise was found. In rejection episode analyses, multiple logistic regression modelling showed that change in the DSA was significantly associated with rejection (p = 0.002), even when adjusted for other antibody levels. No other antibody levels were predictive of rejection. Increase in DSA from pre treatment to a post transplant peak of 1000 was equivalent to an increased chance of rejection with an odds ratio of 1.47 (1.08, 2.00). Conclusion In spite of increases or decreases in the DSA levels, there were no changes in the viral or the blood group antibodies in these patients. Thus the DSA rise is specific in contrast to the viral, blood group or third party antibodies post transplantation. Increases in the DSA post transplant in comparison to pre-treatment are strongly associated with occurrence of rejection. PMID:23922659

  13. Behaviour of non-donor specific antibodies during rapid re-synthesis of donor specific HLA antibodies after antibody incompatible renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Nithya S; Zehnder, Daniel; Daga, Sunil; Lowe, Dave; Lam, F T; Kashi, Habib; Tan, Lam Chin; Imray, Christopher; Hamer, Rizwan; Briggs, David; Raymond, Neil; Higgins, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    HLA directed antibodies play an important role in acute and chronic allograft rejection. During viral infection of a patient with HLA antibodies, the HLA antibody levels may rise even though there is no new immunization with antigen. However it is not known whether the converse occurs, and whether changes on non-donor specific antibodies are associated with any outcomes following HLA antibody incompatible renal transplantation. 55 patients, 31 women and 24 men, who underwent HLAi renal transplant in our center from September 2005 to September 2010 were included in the studies. We analysed the data using two different approaches, based on; i) DSA levels and ii) rejection episode post transplant. HLA antibody levels were measured during the early post transplant period and corresponding CMV, VZV and Anti-HBs IgG antibody levels and blood group IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies were quantified. Despite a significant DSA antibody rise no significant non-donor specific HLA antibody, viral or blood group antibody rise was found. In rejection episode analyses, multiple logistic regression modelling showed that change in the DSA was significantly associated with rejection (p = 0.002), even when adjusted for other antibody levels. No other antibody levels were predictive of rejection. Increase in DSA from pre treatment to a post transplant peak of 1000 was equivalent to an increased chance of rejection with an odds ratio of 1.47 (1.08, 2.00). In spite of increases or decreases in the DSA levels, there were no changes in the viral or the blood group antibodies in these patients. Thus the DSA rise is specific in contrast to the viral, blood group or third party antibodies post transplantation. Increases in the DSA post transplant in comparison to pre-treatment are strongly associated with occurrence of rejection.

  14. Two Cases of Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type I-Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis Caused by Living-Donor Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Mariko; Yaguchi, Hiroaki; Mito, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    In rare instances, recipients of organ transplants from human T-lymphotropic virus type I- (HTLV-I-) positive donors reportedly developed neurologic symptoms due to HTLV-I-associated myelopathy (HAM). We present herein two cases of HAM associated with renal transplantation from HTLV-I seropositive living-donors. The first patient was a 42-year-old woman with chronic renal failure for twelve years and seronegative for HTLV-I. She underwent renal transplantation with her HTLV-I seropositive mother as the donor, and she developed HAM three years after the transplantation. The second patient was a 65-year-old man who had been suffering from diabetic nephropathy. He was seronegative for HTLV-I and underwent renal transplantation one year previously, with his HTLV-I seropositive wife as the donor. He developed HAM eight months after renal transplantation. Both cases showed neurological improvements after the immunomodulating therapies. We tried to shed some light on the understanding of immunological mechanisms of transplantation-associated HAM, focusing on therapeutic strategies based on the immunopathogenesis of the condition. PMID:27777805

  15. Two Cases of Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type I-Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis Caused by Living-Donor Renal Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Yasutaka; Matsumura, Mariko; Yaguchi, Hiroaki; Mito, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    In rare instances, recipients of organ transplants from human T-lymphotropic virus type I- (HTLV-I-) positive donors reportedly developed neurologic symptoms due to HTLV-I-associated myelopathy (HAM). We present herein two cases of HAM associated with renal transplantation from HTLV-I seropositive living-donors. The first patient was a 42-year-old woman with chronic renal failure for twelve years and seronegative for HTLV-I. She underwent renal transplantation with her HTLV-I seropositive mother as the donor, and she developed HAM three years after the transplantation. The second patient was a 65-year-old man who had been suffering from diabetic nephropathy. He was seronegative for HTLV-I and underwent renal transplantation one year previously, with his HTLV-I seropositive wife as the donor. He developed HAM eight months after renal transplantation. Both cases showed neurological improvements after the immunomodulating therapies. We tried to shed some light on the understanding of immunological mechanisms of transplantation-associated HAM, focusing on therapeutic strategies based on the immunopathogenesis of the condition.

  16. Prophylaxis and treatment of Chagas disease in renal transplant donor and recipient: case report.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, A M; Troncoso, P; Sainz, M; Vilches, S

    2010-01-01

    Chagas disease is a prevalent zoonosis in Latin America, caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by Triatoma infestans. Part of the infectious cycle consists of chronic subclinical parasitemia, causing in the long term end-organ damage. Amastigotes have been isolated from various organs including native and allograft renal parenchyma; thus, transplantation plus immunosuppression therapy is another mode of disease transmission and reactivation. Herein, we report 2 successful kidney transplantations cases in which either infection or reactivation was averted using prophylactic nitroderivates.

  17. Successful Second Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation From a Sibling Donor for Relapse of Myelodysplastic Syndrome in a Recipient of a Renal Transplant From His Mother: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, M; Tsukada, N; Chikai, H; Tasaki, M; Saito, K; Nakagawa, Y; Takahashi, K; Suzuki, K

    2016-11-01

    There have been few reports on allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients who have previously undergone solid organ transplantation. The clinical course of such patients is not yet well recognized. Therefore, appropriate immunosuppressive prophylaxis for the rejection of a solid organ graft or for graft-versus-host disease has not yet been established. We present the case of a successful allogeneic stem cell transplantation in a patient who relapsed after a first allogeneic stem cell transplantation for myelodysplastic syndrome and who had previously undergone renal transplantation. The prophylaxis in this case for graft-versus-host disease and rejection of the transplanted kidney was mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus. No hyperacute rejection of the transplanted kidney was observed. However, the patient's renal function deteriorated after the cessation of the mycophenolate mofetil and the reduction of the tacrolimus. This deterioration seemed to be due to rejection with humoral immunity of donor lymphocytes, and we were able to control it by resuming the mycophenolate mofetil and local graft irradiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A Prospective Randomized, Comparative Trial of High-Dose Mizoribine Versus Mycophenolate Mofetil in Combination With Tacrolimus and Basiliximab for Living Donor Renal Transplant: A Multicenter Trial.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hideki; Takahara, Shiro; Amada, Noritoshi; Tomikawa, Shinji; Chikaraishi, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Kota; Uchida, Kazuhiro; Akiyama, Takahiro; Tanabe, Kazunari; Toma, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    Our objectives were to compare the clinical outcomes of mizoribine (12 mg/kg/d) and mycophenolate mofetil (2000 mg/d) in combination with tacrolimus, basiliximab, and corticosteroids. We enrolled 83 recipients of living-donor renal transplant (performed between 2008 and 2013) in this study. This prospective multi-institutional randomized comparative study compared mizoribine (n = 41) and mycophenolate mofetil (n = 42) in combination with tacrolimus, basiliximab, and corticosteroids for living-donor renal transplant recipients. We compared the acute rejection and graft survival rates and adverse event rates within 1 year of renal transplant between the 2 groups using intention-to-treat analyses. During the 1-year observation period, patient and graft survival rates were 100%. The acute rejection rate was 17.1% in the mizoribine group and 19% in the mycophenolate mofetil group. The incidence rate of cytomegalovirus infection seropositivity (recipient and donor with positive cytomegalovirus antibody status) was higher in the mycophenolate mofetil group than in the mizoribine group, although the difference in these rates was not statistically significant. The incidence of leukopenia was higher in the mizoribine group than in the mycophenolate mofetil group. High-dose mizoribine at 12 mg/kg/day was a safe and efficacious immunosuppressive alternative to mycophenolate mofetil in living-donor renal transplant recipients. Leukopenia should be closely monitored in the initial period of insufficient kidney function after renal transplant.

  19. A Prospective Randomized, Comparative Trial of High-Dose Mizoribine Versus Mycophenolate Mofetil in Combination With Tacrolimus and Basiliximab for Living Donor Renal Transplant: A Multicenter Trial.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hideki; Takahara, Shiro; Amada, Noritoshi; Tomikawa, Shinji; Chikaraishi, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Kota; Uchida, Kazuhiro; Akiyama, Takahiro; Tanabe, Kazunari; Toma, Hiroshi

    2016-05-17

    Our objectives were to compare the clinical outcomes of mizoribine (12 mg/kg/d) and mycophenolate mofetil (2000 mg/d) in combination with tacrolimus, basiliximab, and corticosteroids. We enrolled 83 recipients of living-donor renal transplant (performed between 2008 and 2013) in this study. This prospective multi-institutional randomized comparative study compared mizoribine (n = 41) and mycophenolate mofetil (n = 42) in combination with tacrolimus, basiliximab, and corticosteroids for living-donor renal transplant recipients. We compared the acute rejection and graft survival rates and adverse event rates within 1 year of renal transplant between the 2 groups using intention-to-treat analyses. During the 1-year observation period, patient and graft survival rates were 100%. The acute rejection rate was 17.1% in the mizoribine group and 19% in the mycophenolate mofetil group. The incidence rate of cytomegalovirus infection seropositivity (recipient and donor with positive cytomegalovirus antibody status) was higher in the mycophenolate mofetil group than in the mizoribine group, although the difference in these rates was not statistically significant. The incidence of leukopenia was higher in the mizoribine group than in the mycophenolate mofetil group. High-dose mizoribine at 12 mg/kg/day was a safe and efficacious immunosuppressive alternative to mycophenolate mofetil in living-donor renal transplant recipients. Leukopenia should be closely monitored in the initial period of insufficient kidney function after renal transplant.

  20. [Hemolytic anemia caused by graft-versus-host reaction in ABO-nonidentical renal transplants from blood group O donors].

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Díaz Corte, C; Navascués, R A

    2001-01-01

    Acute hemolytic anemia is one of the side effects associated with cyclosporin and tacrolimus therapy, and three mechanisms have been described to account for hemolytic anemia in patients receiving these drugs: drug induced hemolysis, autoimmune hemolysis and alloimmune hemolysis resulting from donor lymphocytes derived from the allograft (passenger lymphocyte syndrome). We report four cases of renal transplant recipients who developed alloimmune hemolytic anemia due to minor ABO incompatibility while under treatment with cyclosporin (two) and tacrolimus (two). The anti-erythrocyte antibodies responsible for hemolysis were of the IgG isotype and showed anti-A or anti-B specificity. These findings suggest that the hemolysis could be related to alloantibodies derived from the clonal development of donor B lymphocytes in the recipients (microchimerism). In summary, hemolytic anemia due to ABO-minor incompatibility occurs infrequently after renal transplantation. Risks are higher for patients A, B or AB blood group receiving an O blood group graft under treatment with cyclosporin or tacrolimus. Follow-up of these patients is warranted for the early detection and optimal management may be achieved by reduction of immunosuppression and change to mycophenolate mofetil.

  1. Post-Transplant Membranous Nephropathy Associated with Chronic Active Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Hepatitis C Infection after Deceased Donor Renal Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Doke, Tomohito; Sato, Waichi; Takahashi, Kazuo; Hayashi, Hiroki; Koide, Sigehisa; Sasaki, Hitomi; Kusaka, Mamoru; Shiroki, Ryoichi; Hoshinaga, Kiyotaka; Takeda, Asami; Yuzawa, Yukio; Hasegawa, Midori

    2016-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman who had undergone deceased donor kidney transplantation twice, at 35 and 43 years of age, presented with renal impairment. She was infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The histology of the graft kidney revealed post-transplant membranous nephropathy (MN) with podocytic infolding and antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). IgG subclass staining showed fine granular deposits of IgG1 and IgG3, but not IgG4, in the glomerular capillary walls. Panel reactive antibody scores for human leukocyte antigen class I and class II were 92.67% and 66.68%, respectively. Thus, this case of post-transplanted MN was considered to be associated with AMR and HCV infection.

  2. A randomized study of intravenous fluid replacement following living-donor renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hatch, D A; Barry, J M; Norman, D J

    1985-12-01

    Fourteen adult recipients of living-donor kidneys preserved with ice-cold intracellular electrolyte solution were randomly assigned to receive either high fluid replacement (total volume of urine output + 30 ml/hr) or low fluid replacement (constant 125 ml/hr) during the first 48 hr after grafting. High replacement recipients had significantly higher fluid intake and urine output than did low replacement recipients. However, net fluid balance at the end of the 48-hr study period was positive for both groups and not significantly different. Fractional excretion of sodium was directly related to urine output in all patients. Serum osmolality, serum sodium concentration, and urine sodium concentration were not significantly different in the treatment groups. Urine osmolality was significantly higher in the low-replacement group at 24 and 36 hr after transplantation. The i.v. replacement of total urinary output is unnecessary in adult recipients of living-donor kidneys preserved with ice-cold intracellular electrolyte solution because such grafts can conserve sodium and water immediately after transplantation.

  3. The 4-week serum creatinine level predicts long-term renal dysfunction after adult living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y-H; Lin, C-C; Wang, C-C; Wang, S-H; Liu, Y-W; Yong, C-C; Lin, T-L; Li, W-F; Concejero, A M; Chen, C-L

    2012-04-01

    Recipients after liver transplantation. (OLT) often experience renal dysfunction. Acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) after OLT occur among 20% to 50% and 30% to 90% of recipients, respectively; 2% to 5% of them deteriorate into end-stage renal disease each year. Since the predictable factors for CKD have not been well identified. We sought to investigate the incidence and predictors of CKD at 5 years after OLT. Between August 2002 and December 2005, we enrolled 77 patients who underwent adult living donor OLT with over 2 years of follow-up. The strategies to prevent renal dysfunction included induction with basiliximab to delay the use of tacrolimus: addition of mycophenolate mofetil to reduce the tacrolimus dosage; avoidance of the calcineurin inhibitor using sirolimus or administration of an angiotensin II receptor antagonist. The clinical variables were reviewed for analysis. The mean follow-up was 76 ± 14 months. The incidence of AKI (over 50% increase level of creatinine) was 29%. Ten (13.0%) patients developed CKD (creatinine > 2 mg/dL). One (1.3%) subject developed end-stage renal disease requiring hemodialysis. Upon multivariate analysis the development of CKD was significantly associated with the posttransplant 4-week creatinine level: 0.92 ± 0.23 versus 1.37 ± 0.93 mg/dL (P = .008). The 4-week creatinine value was predictive of the occurence of CKD over 5 years after OLT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Renal transplantation in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Akoh, Jacob A

    2011-07-01

    Patients with established renal failure, living in developing countries, face many obstacles including lack of access to transplantation centers, quality and safety issues, and exploittation associated with transplant tourism. This review aims to determine the state and outcome of renal transplantation performed in developing countries and to recommend some solutions. The lack of suitable legislation and infrastructure has prevented growth of deceased donor programs; so, living donors have continued to be the major source of transplantable kidneys. Transplant tourism and commercial kidney transplants are associated with a high incidence of surgical complications, acute rejection and invasive infection, which cause major morbidity and mortality. Developing transplant services worldwide has many benefits - improving the results of transplantation as they would be performed legally, increasing the donor pool, making transplant tourism unnecessary and granting various governments the moral courage to fight unacceptable practices. A private-public partnership underpinned by transparency, public audit and accountability is a prerequisite for effective transplant services in the developing world. Finally, lack of dialysis facilities coupled with better outcomes in patients spending <6 months on dialysis prior to transplantation favor pre-emptive transplantation in developing countries.

  5. To be or not to be a living donor: questionnaire to parents of children who have undergone renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kärrfelt, H M; Berg, U B; Lindblad, F I; Tydén, G E

    1998-04-15

    Between 1981 and 1994, 67 transplantations were performed in 59 children below 16 years of age at Huddinge University Hospital. In most of the cases, one of the parents was the donor. The aim of this study was to evaluate how the transplantation influenced the parents. One hundred sixteen individual questionnaires were sent out to the donor parents and to the parents who for different reasons had not been donors. Of special interest was to investigate the emotional reactions, the social consequences, the relationship to the child, and the parents' attitudes toward donation. Thirty-five donors and 41 nondonors replied. The majority of both donors and nondonors were satisfied with the medical information. The nondonors expressed more stress and anxiety before the transplantation. More than half of the donors experienced the operation as more painful than they had expected. Despite this fact, the nondonors showed significantly more psychosomatic/psychiatric symptoms than the donors after the operation. The donors reported an improved relation to the recipient child after the transplantation to a greater extent than the nondonors. Half of the donors reported an improved self-esteem after the donation. None of the donors regretted their donation and all of them would do the same again. This study indicates that ethical and psychological risks in parental kidney donation should not be regarded as a major obstacle. However, irrespective of the parents being a donor or not, they wanted more psychosocial support both before, during, and after the transplantation.

  6. Effect of donor pneumoperitoneum on early allograft perfusion following renal transplantation in pediatric patients: an intraoperative Doppler ultrasound study.

    PubMed

    Dave, S; Farhat, W; Pace, K; Navarro, O; Hebert, D; Khoury, A E

    2008-08-01

    Decreased perfusion and trauma during laparoscopic harvesting are proposed causative factors for DGF and rejection in children following renal transplantation with laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (LDN) allograft. We performed a retrospective review of 11 children who underwent LDN transplant and 11 preceding patients who underwent ODN transplant. Intraoperative DUS findings, creatinine values and clearance, time to nadir creatinine and AR episodes were compared. There were no significant differences in the BMI, vascular anatomy, side of nephrectomy, or warm ischemia time in the two groups. Mean follow-up duration was 11.4 and 30.4 months in LDN and ODN groups. DUS showed initial turbulent flow in five of the LDN and four of the ODN group with an average RI of 0.59 and 0.66 in the ODN and LDN groups, respectively (NS). Three patients in the ODN group had an abnormal RI compared to none in the LDN group (p = 0.034). The creatinine values, creatinine clearances (at 24 h, one, four wk and last follow-up) and AR episodes were similar in both groups. Pneumoperitoneum during LDN does not appear to have an adverse impact on early graft reperfusion.

  7. Renal transplantation in infants.

    PubMed Central

    Najarian, J S; Frey, D J; Matas, A J; Gillingham, K J; So, S S; Cook, M; Chavers, B; Mauer, S M; Nevins, T E

    1990-01-01

    The timing of renal transplantation in infants is controversial. Between 1965 and 1989, 79 transplants in 75 infants less than 2 years old were performed: 23 who were 12 months or younger, 52 who were older than 12 months; 63 donors were living related, 1 was living unrelated, and 15 were cadaver donors; 75 were primary transplants and 4 were retransplants. Infants were considered for transplantation when they were on, or about to begin, dialysis. All had intra-abdominal transplants with arterial anastomosis to the distal aorta. Sixty-four per cent are alive with functioning grafts. The most frequent etiologies of renal failure were hypoplasia (32%) and obstructive uropathy (20%); oxalosis was the etiology in 11%. Since 1983 patient survival has been 95% and 91% at 1 and 5 years; graft survival has been 86% and 73% at 1 and 5 years. For cyclosporine immunosuppressed patients, patient survival is 100% at 1 and 5 years; graft survival is 96% and 82% at 1 and 5 years. There was no difference in outcome between infants who were 12 months or younger versus those who were aged 12 to 24 months; similarly there was no difference between infants and older children. Sixteen (21%) patients died: 5 after operation from coagulopathy (1) and infection (4); and 11 late from postsplenectomy sepsis (4), recurrent oxalosis (3), infection (2), and other causes (2). Routine splenectomy is no longer done. There has not been a death from infection in patients transplanted since 1983. Rejection was the most common cause of graft loss (in 15 patients); other causes included death (with function) (7), recurrent oxalosis (3), and technical complications (3). Overall 52% of patients have not had a rejection episode; mean creatinine level in patients with functioning grafts is 0.8 +/- 0.2 mg/dL. Common postoperative problems include fever, atelectasis, and ileus. At the time of their transplants, the infants were small for age; but with a successful transplant, their growth, head

  8. Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... instructions before and after surgery. • Have a compatible blood type. • Have an emotional tie with the recipient. • Not ... test is to find out if the donor's blood type matches the recipient’s blood type. Next, the transplant ...

  9. [Challenges in renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Thuret, R; Kleinclauss, F; Terrier, N; Karam, G; Timsit, M O

    2016-11-01

    To describe kidney transplantation surgical techniques and to propose strategies in high-risk recipients. Relevant publications were identified through Medline (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/) and Embase (http://www.embase.com/) database using the following keywords, alone or in association, "renal transplantation; peripheral arterial disease; obesity; third and fourth transplantation; robotic-assisted kidney transplant; anticoagulant therapy; dual kidney transplant". Articles were selected according to methods, language of publication and relevance. The reference lists were used to identify additional historical studies of interest. Both prospective and retrospective series, in French and English, as well as review articles and case-reports were selected. A total of 1949 articles were analyzed for arterial disease and anticoagulant therapy, 1083 for obesity, 663 for dual kidney transplants, 458 for third and subsequent procedures and 84 for robotic-assisted kidney transplantation. After careful selection, 304 publications were eligible for our review. Surgical assessment of future recipients is a pivotal step to anticipate technical difficulties, to interrupt clopidogrel or direct oral anticoagulants and to propose a revascularization procedure when necessary. Lack of data regarding obese recipients does not allow us to conclude about best surgical care or optimal timing but suggest that an early global management of obesity in chronic kidney disease patients is mandatory to improve access to a successful transplantation. In neurologic bladder and congenital anomalies, urodynamics and bladder function must be assessed prior to the onset of oliguria to intend an early treatment. Urinary diversion may be performed prior to or after transplantation with similar survival outcome and comparable rates of infections. Because of a rigorous selection of donors, the French dual kidney transplant program provides satisfactory outcomes, but fails in convincing surgical

  10. The experiences of adults who are on dialysis and waiting for a renal transplant from a deceased donor: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Burns, Tania; Fernandez, Ritin; Stephens, Moira

    2015-03-12

    Kidney transplantation has been recognized as the best renal replacement therapy option for people with end stage renal disease. With an estimated 170,000 people waiting for a kidney transplant around the world and a limited supply of donor organs, the waiting time is often prolonged for many years. The aim of this review was to examine the existing evidence of patients' experiences of living on dialysis and waiting for a renal transplant from a deceased donor. This review considered studies that included adult patients aged 18 years and over who had been on dialysis (hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis) for up to 15 years and who were waiting for a renal transplant from a deceased donor. Types of intervention(s)/phenomena of interest: The phenomena of interest were the experiences of adults waiting for a renal transplant from a deceased donor and more specifically, the impact of waiting on their lifestyle and day to day living. Types of studies: This review considered studies that focused on qualitative data including, but not limited to, designs such as phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, action research and feminist research. Types of outcomes: This review considered studies that included the experiences of people who were waiting on dialysis for a kidney transplant from a deceased donor. The search strategy aimed to find both published and unpublished studies through electronic databases, reference list searches and the World Wide Web. Extensive searches were undertaken of the CINAHL, Embase, Medline and PsychInfo databases of published literature, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the Virginia Henderson International Nursing Library, OpenGrey and the New York Academy of Medicine databases of unpublished literature. Each study was assessed for methodological quality by two independent reviewers using the Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument checklist. Disagreements between the reviewers were resolved

  11. Dual kidneys from marginal adult donors as a source for cadaveric renal transplantation in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bunnapradist, Suphamai; Gritsch, H Albin; Peng, Alice; Jordan, Stanley C; Cho, Yong W

    2003-04-01

    The current organ shortage has led to the utilization of double kidney transplants from marginal adult donors, but outcomes data are limited. The United Network for Organ Sharing registry database was used to compare the outcomes of 403 dual adult kidney transplantations (DKT) and 11,033 single kidney transplantations (SKT) from 1997 to 2000. Graft and patient survival and the effect of multiple risk factors were evaluated. It was found that DKT patients were older, less sensitized, and received grafts from older, more mismatched donors with longer cold ischemia times. There was also a greater percentage of donors with a history of diabetes or hypertension and African-American recipients and donors in the DKT group. Graft survival was inferior in the DKT group, with a 7% lower graft survival rate at 1 yr. There was a higher incidence of primary nonfunction in the DKT group, although the incidence of delayed graft function, early rejection treatment, and graft thrombosis did not differ. Multivariate analysis was used to identify African-American recipient ethnicity and retransplant as risk factors for graft loss. Graft survival was comparable in DKT and SKT with donors over 55 yr of age. DKT resulted in inferior graft outcomes compared with SKT. When compared with SKT with donors over 55 yr of age, DKT resulted in similar graft outcomes. These otherwise discarded kidneys should be cautiously considered as a source of marginal donors.

  12. Longitudinal Assessment of Renal Perfusion and Oxygenation in Transplant Donor-Recipient Pairs Using Arterial Spin Labeling and Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Niles, David J; Artz, Nathan S; Djamali, Arjang; Sadowski, Elizabeth A; Grist, Thomas M; Fain, Sean B

    2016-02-01

    The aims of this study were to assess renal function in kidney transplant recipients and their respective donors over 2 years using arterial spin labeling (ASL) and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to prospectively evaluate the effect of losartan on functional MRI measures in recipients. The study included 15 matched pairs of renal transplant donors and recipients. Arterial spin labeling and BOLD MRI of the kidneys were performed on donors before transplant surgery (baseline) and on both donors and recipients at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years after transplant. After 3 months, 7 of the 15 recipients were prescribed 25 to 50 mg/d losartan for the remainder of the study. A linear mixed-effects model was used to evaluate perfusion, R2*, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and fractional excretion of sodium for changes across time or associated with losartan treatment. In donors, cortical perfusion in the remaining kidney decreased by 50 ± 19 mL/min per 100 g (11.8%) between baseline and 2 years (P < 0.05), while cortical R2* declined modestly by 0.7 ± 0.3 s-1 (5.6%; P < 0.05). In transplanted kidneys, cortical perfusion decreased markedly by 141 ± 21 mL/min per 100 g (34.2%) between baseline and 2 years (P < 0.001), while medullary R2* declined by 1.5 ± 0.8 s-1 (8.3%; P = 0.06). Single-kidney estimated glomerular filtration rate increased between baseline and 2 years by 17.7 ± 2.7 mL/min per 1.73 m (40.3%; P < 0.0001) in donors and to 14.6 ± 4.3 mL/min per 1.73 m (33.3%; P < 0.01) in recipients. Cortical perfusion at 1 and 2 years in recipients receiving 25 to 50 mg/d losartan was 62 ± 24 mL/min per 100 g higher than recipients not receiving the drug (P < 0.05). No significant effects of losartan were observed for any other markers of renal function. The results suggest an important role for noninvasive functional monitoring with ASL and BOLD MRI in kidney transplant recipients and donors, and they indicate a potentially

  13. Donor selection in heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Emani, Sitaramesh; Sai-Sudhakar, Chittoor B.; Higgins, Robert S. D.; Whitson, Bryan A.

    2014-01-01

    There is increased scrutiny on the quality in health care with particular emphasis on institutional heart transplant survival outcomes. An important aspect of successful transplantation is appropriate donor selection. We review the current guidelines as well as areas of controversy in the selection of appropriate hearts as donor organs to ensure optimal outcomes. This decision is paramount to the success of a transplant program as well as recipient survival and graft function post-transplant. PMID:25132976

  14. Impact of immunosuppression treatment on the improvement in graft survival after deceased donor renal transplantation: a long-term cohort study.

    PubMed

    González-Molina, Miguel; Burgos, Dolores; Cabello, Mercedes; Ruiz-Esteban, Pedro; Rodríguez, Manuel A; Gutiérrez, Cristina; López, Verónica; Baena, Víctor; Hernández, Domingo

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed graft half-life and attrition rates in 1045 adult deceased donor kidney transplants from 1986-2001, with follow-up to 2011, grouped in two periods (1986-95 vs. 1996-01) according to immunosuppression. The Kaplan-Meier curve showed a significant increase in graft survival during 1996-2001. The uncensored real graft half-life was 10.25 years in 1986-95 and the actuarial was 14.58 years in 1996-2001 (P<0.001). The attrition rates showed a significantly greater graft loss in 1986-95, even excluding the first year from the analysis. The decline in renal function was significantly less pronounced in 1996-2001, indicating better preservation of renal function, despite the increase in donor age and stroke as the cause of donor death. The parsimonious Cox multivariate model showed donor age, acute rejection, panel reactive antibody, cold ischemia time and delayed graft function were significantly associated with a higher risk of graft loss. In contrast, the risk of graft loss fell by 21% in 1996-2001 compared with 1986-95. A similar reduction (25%) was observed when MMF treatment was entered into the multivariate model instead of study period. Long-term graft survival improved significantly in 1996-2001 compared to 1986-1995 despite older donor age. Modern immunosuppression could have contributed to the improved kidney transplant outcome.

  15. Hepatitis C and renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Susan M

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C is a widespread problem, and the prevalence is higher in patients on hemodialysis than in the general population. In addition, hepatitis C reduces survival in dialysis patients and renal-transplant recipients. Kidney transplantation offers a survival advantage to those patients with chronic hepatitis C infection faced with the alternative of remaining on dialysis. Kidney transplantation should therefore be considered the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage renal disease and hepatitis C infection. However, these patients need to be chosen appropriately, and there are no well-established guidelines for the workup or selection of these of these patients. Liver biopsy is an essential tool to determine the degree of fibrosis in these patients and also will prove useful in the management of the patients after transplantation. Transplantation of kidneys from hepatitis C-positive donors to hepatitis C-positive recipients has been shown to be safe and confers a significant advantage in terms of waiting time in this population where death on the waiting list is significant. Treatment prior to transplantation should be considered by the hepatology team, although it is often more difficult to treat given the constraints of a patient in renal failure. Although interferon treatment in hepatitis C-positive kidney-transplant candidates is recommended, treatment posttransplant remains controversial. Simultaneous kidney/liver transplantation should be considered for those candidates with evidence of portal hypertension or decompensated cirrhosis. © 2012 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  16. [Daclizumab in combination with mycophenolate mofetil and a late introduction of Tacrolimus at low doses, as a therapeutic approach in the elderly renal transplant donor-recipients pairs in kidney transplant].

    PubMed

    Gentil, M A; Osuna, A; Capdevilla, L; Cantarell, C; Pereira, P; Mazuecos, A; González Molina, M

    2008-01-01

    Nowadays, it is more frequent the use of kidneys from older donors in the renal transplantation. Moreover, it is also increasing the age of the recipients due to the ageing of the population treated with hemodialysis. This makes that recipients become older more commonly. This situation raises specific problems in the renal graft and in the recipient as well. In this manuscript we present the results of a multicenter study that analyzed an immunosuppressive strategy specifically designed to elderly renal transplant donor-recipients. Patients > or =50 years were transplanted from donors > or =55 years. Immunosuppressive strategy consisted of daclizumab (2 doses of 1mg/Kg) in combination with steroids, mycophenolate mofetil (2g/daily during the first 45 days and then adjusted according to local practice) and Tacrolimus. Tacrolimus was introduced between 5 and 7 day post-transplantation, adjusting the predose levels between 4-8 ng/mL. Mean follow-up was 12 months. A total of 133 patients were included in the study. Mean age of recipients and donors was 61.3+/-6.2 years and 64.4+/-5.3, respectively. 42.9% of patients needed dialysis during the first week (median 4 days). Between first month and first year, serum creatinine improved from 2.0+/-1.0 mg/dl to 1.5+/-0.4 mg/dl. Similar improvements were observed when creatinine clearance (Cockroft-Gault) was calculated. The survival of patient and renal graft at 12 months was 97.7% and 96.1%, respectively. The acute rejection rate was 13.5%. Security profile was good, as expected. The Daclizumab and mycophenolate mofetil regimen with a late introduction of Tacrolimus at low doses is a good alternative in the elderly renal transplant recipients with a low immunologic risk.

  17. Immunogenicity of Class I HLA but not preformed low MFI donor specific antibodies correlates with outcomes after first renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lobashevsky, A; Goggins, W; Rosner, K; Taber, T

    2017-06-17

    The role of low levels of circulating donor specific antibodies (DSA) producing negative flow cytometry cross match is not completely defined. The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical significance of preexisting low levels of class I DSAs in flow cytometry cross match (FC CM) negative first kidney transplant recipients (KTRs). All of the KTRs (n=41) had low levels of anti-class I antibodies only. The kidney transplant outcome was evaluated by the development of a deleterious effect (DE) in recipients in the study cohort (Group 1: DE+, Group 2: DE-). Positivity for DE was determined based on the following criteria: biopsy proven transplant glomerulopathy (TG), de novo development of DSAs, increasing MFI values for preexisting DSAs, and the development of biopsy proven AMR. Anti-HLA antibodies were tested using single antigen Luminex technology. The HLAMatchmaker computer algorithm was used for the immunogenicity analysis of antibody verified (AbVer) mismatched eplets (MME) at the HLA-A and B loci. The results of this study showed that the number of AbVer MME is larger (P=0.03) in the group of KTR who developed DE. We also demonstrated that the number of AbVer MME is a strong predictor of post-transplant DE. These results indicate that persistent weakly reactive DSA is not a significant risk factor for the development of post-transplant DE and that recipients with such antibodies can be successfully transplanted. Immunogenicity of AbVer MME at HLA-A and B loci is strong predictor of post-transplant increases of the MFI values of preexisting or de novo developed DSA in the FC CM negative first KTR. Avoiding of transplants with more than eleven Class I AbVer MMEs may be the optimal approach to reduce the risk of kidney graft failure. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. [Renal transplantation without maintenance immunosuppression. Identical twins and kidney transplantation following a successful bone marrow graft].

    PubMed

    Hadi, Riad Abdel; Thomé, Gustavo Gomes; Ribeiro, Adriana Reginato; Manfro, Roberto Ceratti

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation without maintenance immunosuppression has been sporadically reported in the literature. The cases include non-adherent patients who discontinued their immunosuppressive medications, transplantation between identical twins, kidney transplantation after a successful bone marrow graft from the same donor and simultaneous bone marrow and kidney transplantation for the treatment of multiple myeloma with associated renal failure. There are also ongoing clinical trials designed to induce donor specific transplant tolerance with infusion of hematopoietic cells from the same kidney donor. Here we describe two cases of renal transplantation without immunosuppression as examples of situations described above.

  19. Pregnancy in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Bouattar, T; Hakim, H; Rhou, H; Benamar, L; Bayahia, R; Ouzeddoun, N

    2009-06-01

    Renal transplantation with a well-functioning graft leads to a rapid restoration of endocrine and sexual functions. The aim of this study was to examine our experience with pregnancies among renal transplant patients, particularly with regard to their impact on graft function. We analyzed 10 pregnancies in 7 renal transplant recipients for long-term graft outcomes in terms of clinical and biological data. The mean patient age was 28.5 +/- 4 years. They all received a living donor kidney. The time between transplantation and the onset of pregnancy was 33.4 +/- 23.2 months. Regarding the immunosuppressive therapy, all patients received steroids and cyclosporine; 4 patients received in addition azathioprine and 2 received mycophenolate mofetil that was changed at 1 month before conception to azathioprine. There was no significant difference between the serum creatinine before and during pregnancy. We did not observe any acute rejection episode. Pregnancy complications were preclampsia in 1 case, hypertension in 1 case, urinary tract infection in 2 cases, and anemia in 80% of patients during the third trimester. Premature rupture of membranes occurred in 1 case and preterm delivery in 2 cases. Two cases of neonatal death were registered. Cesarean section was performed in 50% of cases. The follow-up revealed 2 cases of chronic rejection. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary for pregnancy which generally occurs at 2 years after kidney transplantation.

  20. Antibodies to HLA-E may account for the non-donor-specific anti-HLA class-Ia antibodies in renal and liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Mepur H; Pham, Tho; Ozawa, Miyuki; Terasaki, Paul I

    2012-01-01

    The non-donor-specific anti-HLA-Ia antibodies correlate significantly with lower graft survival in organ transplant patients. Based on our earlier findings that anti-HLA-E murine monoclonal antibodies (MEM-E/02 and 3D12) reacted with different HLA-Ia alleles and the peptides shared by HLA-E and HLA class, Ia alleles inhibited the HLA-Ia reactivity of the anti-HLA-E antibodies in normal non-alloimmunized males, the possibility of that anti-HLA-E IgG may account for the non-donor-specific anti-HLA-Ia antibodies in the allograft recipients was examined by multiplex-Luminex®-immunoassay. About 73% of renal and 53% of liver transplant patients' sera with high level of anti-HLA-E IgG showed reactivity to different non-donor HLA-Ia alleles. About 50% renal and 52% liver allograft recipients' sera with low level of anti-HLA-E IgG had no reactivity to any HLA-Ia alleles; however, the IgG isolated from the same sera with protein-G columns showed the presence of anti-HLA-E IgG with HLA-Ia reactivity. Furthermore, both recombinant HLA-E and the IgG-free serum containing soluble HLA-E (sHLA-E) inhibited HLA-Ia reactivity of anti-HLA-E murine monoclonal IgG significantly. The data suggest that the HLA-Ia reactivity of the anti-HLA-E antibody accounts for the non-donor-specific anti-HLA-Ia antibodies. It is proposed that the sHLA-E heavy chain, shed in circulation after organ transplantation, may expose cryptic epitopes of HLA-E to elicit anti-HLA-E IgG antibodies, which may cross react with HLA-Ia alleles due to the peptide sequences shared between them. This study provides a new explanation for the presence of non-donor-specific antibodies for non-existing HLA-Ia alleles, frequently observed and correlated with survival in organ transplant recipients.

  1. Disparate rates of acute rejection and donor-specific antibodies among high-immunologic risk renal transplant subgroups receiving antithymocyte globulin induction.

    PubMed

    Patel, Samir J; Suki, Wadi N; Loucks-DeVos, Jennifer; Graviss, Edward A; Nguyen, Duc T; Knight, Richard J; Kuten, Samantha A; Moore, Linda W; Teeter, Larry D; Gaber, Lillian W; Gaber, A Osama

    2016-08-01

    Lymphocyte-depleting induction lowers acute rejection (AR) rates among high-immunologic risk (HIR) renal transplant recipients, including African Americans (AAs), retransplants, and the sensitized. It is unclear whether different HIR subgroups experience similarly low rates of AR. We aimed to describe the incidence of AR and de novo donor-specific antibody (dnDSA) among HIR recipients categorized by age, race, or donor type. All received antithymocyte globulin (ATG) induction and triple maintenance immunosuppression. A total of 464 HIR recipients from 2007 to 2014 were reviewed. AR and dnDSA rates at 1 year for the entire population were 14% and 27%, respectively. AR ranged from 6.7% among living donor (LD) recipients to 30% in younger AA deceased donor (DD) recipients. De novo donor-specific antibody at 1 year ranged from 7% in older non-AA LD recipients to 32% in AAs. AA race remained as an independent risk factor for AR among DD recipients and for dnDSA among all HIR recipients. Development of both AR and dnDSA within the first year was associated with a 54% graft survival at 5 years and was an independent risk factor for graft loss. Despite utilization of recommended immunosuppression for HIR recipients, substantial disparities exist among subgroups, warranting further consideration of individualized immunosuppression in certain HIR subgroups.

  2. Renal transplantation across ABO barrier

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, P. N.; Pokhariyal, S.; Bansal, S.; Jain, S.; Saxena, V.; Sharma, R.; Jain, M.; Jha, P.; Sethi, S. K.; Ghosh, P.; Tewari, A.; Ahlawat, R.; Kher, V.

    2013-01-01

    In India, patients without a compatible blood group donor are usually excluded from renal transplantation. For young patients, it is a difficult therapeutic choice to stay on long-term dialysis. We describe the case of a 19-year-old male patient who had blood group O +ve and had no compatible donor in the family. His mother was B +ve and was willing to donate. The patient had an initial anti-B antibody titer of 1:512 and underwent antibody depletion with plasmapheresis (11 sessions) and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) 100 mg/kg after every plasmapheresis. He also received rituximab 500 mg for 3 days prior to transplant and was induced with basiliximab. At the time of transplant, his anti-B titers were <1:8. Post-operatively, he required four sessions of plasmapheresis and IVIG as his titers rebounded to 1:64. The titers then spontaneously subsided to <1:16 and have stayed at the same level for 6 months post-transplant. The patient continues to have normal renal function with a creatinine of 1.4 mg/dl% and has had no episodes of rejection. PMID:23814422

  3. Two successful lung transplantations from a dialysis-dependent donor.

    PubMed

    Shlomi, Dekel; Shitrit, David; Bendayan, Daniele; Sahar, Gidon; Saute, Milton; Kramer, Mordechai R

    2006-03-01

    The shortage of organs for lung transplantation has led to the growing use of "marginal" donors. Although patients on hemodialysis are still excluded as lung transplant donors because of the possible effects of renal failure on the lungs, recent data suggest that they may be suitable in selected cases. This article describes the successful transplantation of two lungs from a single donor who had been receiving long-term hemodialysis treatment. In the absence of other causes of pulmonary diseases, such as smoking or lung infection, lungs from dialysis-dependent patients may be acceptable for lung transplantation.

  4. [Deceased Donor Kidney Transplantation from a Liver Transplantation Recipient].

    PubMed

    Koike, Shuhei; Kobayashi, Takashi; Okada, Yoshiyuki; Shibuya, Shinsuke; Sakai, Kaoru; Tanaka, Yukari; Akamatsu, Shusuke; Negoro, Hiromitsu; Terada, Naoki; Yamasaki, Toshinari; Matsui, Yoshiyuki; Inoue, Takahiro; Kamba, Tomomi; Umeya, Yumi; Kaido, Toshimi; Ogawa, Osamu

    2016-10-01

    We report a 40-year-old man with end-stage renal disease due to IgA nephropathy who underwent deceased donor kidney transplantation. The donor was diagnosed to be brain-dead due to cerebral hemorrhage after her second liver transplantation for non-viral liver cirrhosis. Intraoperative 1-hour biopsy of the graft kidney revealed moderate global glomerular sclerosis (22%) and interstitial fibrosis (40%) consistent with underlying nephrosclerosis or calcineurin inhibitor nephrotoxicity. Although hemodialysis was needed until the graft began functioning several days after the kidney transplantation, the postoperative clinical course thereafter was uneventful and the graft functioned well with stable serum creatinine levels around 2.4 mg/dl at 6 monthspos toperatively.

  5. Donor cancer transmission in kidney transplantation: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Xiao, D; Craig, J C; Chapman, J R; Dominguez-Gil, B; Tong, A; Wong, G

    2013-10-01

    Transplantation of any biological material from a donor to a host will carry some inherent risk of disease transmission. Our aims were to summarize the totality of the published evidence about donor cancer transmission among kidney transplant recipients and to determine the cancer-specific survival of these patients. We systematically reviewed all case reports, case series and registry studies that described the outcomes of kidney transplant recipients with donor cancer transmission published to December 2012. A total of 69 studies with 104 donor-transmitted cancer cases were identified. The most common transmitted cancer types were renal cancer (n = 20, 19%), followed by melanoma (n = 18, 17%), lymphoma (n = 15, 14%) and lung cancer (n = 9, 9%). Patients with melanoma and lung cancers had the worst prognosis, with less than 50% of recipients surviving after 24 months from transplantation. Recipients with transmitted renal cancers had the best outcomes, with over 70% of recipients surviving for at least 24 months after transplantation. Overall, the risk of donor transmission of cancer appears low, but there is a high likelihood of reporting bias. Our findings support the current recommendations for rejecting organs from donors with a history of melanoma and lung cancer, but suggest that the use of donor kidneys with a history of small, incidental renal cell cancer may be reasonable. © Copyright 2013 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  6. [The kidney transplantation from the ABO-incompatible donors].

    PubMed

    Goriaĭnov, V A; Kaabak, M M; Babenko, N N; Shishlo, L A; Morozova, M M; Ragimov, A A; Dashkova, N G; Salimov, É L

    2012-01-01

    The experience of 28 allotransplantations of ABO-incompatible kidneys was compared with the treatment results of 38 ABO-compatible renal transplantations. The transplanted kidney function, morphological changes of the transplanted kidney and the comparative analysis of actuary survival in both groups showed no significant difference. The results of the study prove the validity of the kidney transplantation from the ABO-incompatible donors.

  7. FGF23 is associated with early post-transplant hypophosphataemia and normalizes faster than iPTH in living donor renal transplant recipients: a longitudinal follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Narayan; Jaiswal, Akhilesh; Agarwal, Vikas; Kumar, Shashi; Chaturvedi, Saurabh; Yadav, Subhash; Gupta, Amit; Sharma, Raj K.; Bhadauria, Dharmendra; Kaul, Anupama

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to longitudinally analyse changes in the levels of serum fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) and associated minerals in patients undergoing renal transplantation. Methods Sixty-three patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who underwent living donor transplantation were recruited. Serum FGF23, iPTH, uric acid, inorganic phosphorous (iP), blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine were measured pre-transplant and at 1 (M1), 3 (M3) and 12 months (M12) post-transplantation. Results FGF23 levels were decreased at M1, M3 and M12 by 93.81, 96.74 and 97.53%, respectively. iPTH levels were decreased by 67.95, 74.95 and 84.9%, respectively. The prevalence of hyperparathyroidism at M1, M3 and M12 post-transplantation was 63.5, 42.9 and 11.1%, respectively. FGF23 and iP levels remained above the normal range in 23 (36.5%) and 17 (27%) patients at M1, 10 (15.9%) and 5 (8%) at M3 and in none at M12 post-transplantation, respectively. A multivariate regression model revealed that, pre-transplant, iP was positively associated with iPTH (P = 0.016) but not with FGF 23; however, post-transplant, iP level was negatively associated with FGF23 (P < 0.001) but not with iPTH. Conclusions Post-transplant FGF23 levels settle faster than those of iPTH. However, 11% of patients continued to have hyperparathyroidism even after 12 months. PMID:27679713

  8. Donor phosphorus levels and recipient outcomes in living-donor kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Peter C; Saha, Sharmeela; Gomes, Amanda M; Padiyar, Aparna; Bodziak, Kenneth A; Poggio, Emilio D; Hricik, Donald E; Augustine, Joshua J

    2011-05-01

    In living-donor kidney transplantation, various donor factors, including gender, age, and baseline kidney function, predict allograft function and recipient outcomes after transplantation. Because higher phosphorus is predictive of vascular injury in healthy adults, the effect of donor phosphorus levels on recipient renal function after transplantation was investigated. Phosphorus levels in 241 living donors were analyzed from a 7-year period, and recipient renal function and acute rejection at 1 year posttransplantation were examined controlling for other influencing factors, including multiple donor variables, HLA matching, and acute rejection. Female and African-American donors had significantly higher phosphorus levels predonation. By multivariable analysis, higher donor phosphorus correlated with higher recipient serum creatinine (slope=0.087, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.004 to 0.169, P=0.041) and lower recipient estimated GFR (slope=-4.321, 95% CI: -8.165 to -0.476, P=0.028) at 12 months. Higher donor phosphorus also displayed an independent correlation with biopsy-proven acute rejection and delayed or slow graft function after transplantation. In a cohort of living kidney donors, higher donor phosphorus correlated with female gender and African-American ethnicity and was an independent risk factor for early allograft dysfunction after living-donor kidney transplantation. Copyright © 2011 by the American Society of Nephrology

  9. Attitudes of commercial renal transplant recipients toward renal transplantation in India.

    PubMed

    Qunibi, W; Abulrub, D; Shaheen, F; el-Din, A B; Alfurayh, O; Almeshari, K

    1995-08-01

    Renal transplantation offers patients with end-stage renal disease the best opportunity for rehabilitation and long-term survival. However, there is a critical shortage of transplantable kidneys worldwide. This plays well into the hands of transplanters and entrepreneurs involved in commercial renal transplantation, particularly in India. This practice has been condemned by all transplant societies. In our fight against rampant commercialism in renal transplantation, we sought to describe feelings of patients who had received transplants in India, and the difficulties they faced during their stay there. The results show that the two reasons that motivated patients to go to India were lack of living-related donors and the need for prompt transplant. More than half of the patients did not meet their donors. Their experience, however, has been largely positive except for some negative feelings toward the broker and the standard of hospital hygiene. The total cost of the transplant was far less than that in the West but, despite that, some patients felt financially exploited. Communication with them was poor, as most patients did not get adequate pretransplant education and were not informed of possible complications including rejection and graft loss. Furthermore, almost half of the patients were not given medical reports. These results substantiate the impression that CRT in India does not conform to the high standards of renal transplant medicine.

  10. Blood disorders typically associated with renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Chen, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation has become one of the most common surgical procedures performed to replace a diseased kidney with a healthy kidney from a donor. It can help patients with kidney failure live decades longer. However, renal transplantation also faces a risk of developing various blood disorders. The blood disorders typically associated with renal transplantation can be divided into two main categories: (1) Common disorders including post-transplant anemia (PTA), post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), post-transplant erythrocytosis (PTE), and post-transplant cytopenias (PTC, leukopenia/neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and pancytopenia); and (2) Uncommon but serious disorders including hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS), thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), therapy-related myelodysplasia (t-MDS), and therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML). Although many etiological factors involve the development of post-transplant blood disorders, immunosuppressive agents, and viral infections could be the two major contributors to most blood disorders and cause hematological abnormalities and immunodeficiency by suppressing hematopoietic function of bone marrow. Hematological abnormalities and immunodeficiency will result in severe clinical outcomes in renal transplant recipients. Understanding how blood disorders develop will help cure these life-threatening complications. A potential therapeutic strategy against post-transplant blood disorders should focus on tapering immunosuppression or replacing myelotoxic immunosuppressive drugs with lower toxic alternatives, recognizing and treating promptly the etiological virus, bacteria, or protozoan, restoring both hematopoietic function of bone marrow and normal blood counts, and improving kidney graft survival. PMID:25853131

  11. Donor characteristics can influence overall transplant activities: the Italian experience.

    PubMed

    Bertoni, E; Rosati, A; Zanazzi, M; Becherelli, P; Gallo, M; Salvadori, M

    2004-01-01

    The notable increase in organ donations and transplants in Italy in recent years has lead to the development of an atypical approach to kidney transplantation. All propitious considerations left aside regarding the organ donation rate which has placed Italy among the European leaders, a careful comparative evaluation of the data taken from Italian and international registries demonstrates that renal transplantations in Italy have not shared the same significant growth. The typology of the donors has influenced in a decisive way not only the number of renal transplantations, but also the access to transplant for some age groups and probably even the quality and cost. The overall view which emerges is complex and somewhat contradictory, but we believe that this perspective can furnish solid arguments for choices that need not to be delayed for the living donor transplant, the divulgence of a donation culture in the population, and the criteria for the allocation of the organs.

  12. Impact of Donor Source on the Outcome of Live Donor Kidney Transplantation: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Matter, Yasser Elsayed; Nagib, Ayman M; Lotfy, Omar E; Alsayed, Ahmed Maher; Donia, Ahmed F; Refaie, Ayman F; Akl, Ahmed I; Abbas, Mohamed Hamed; Abuelmagd, Mohammed M; Shaeashaa, Hussein A; Shokeir, Ahmed A

    2016-01-01

    Background Renal transplantation is the ideal method for management of end-stage renal disease. The use of living donors for renal transplantation was critical for early development in the field and preceded the use of cadaveric donors. Most donors are related genetically to the recipients, like a parent, a child, or a sibling of the recipient, but there are an increasing percentage of cases where donors are genetically unrelated like spouses, friends, or altruistic individuals. Donor shortages constitute the major barrier for kidney transplantation, and much effort has been made to increase the supply of living donors. The impact of donor source on the outcome of renal transplantation is not adequately studied in our country. Objectives The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of donor source on the outcome of live donor kidney transplantation. Patients and Methods From March 1976 to December 2013, the number of patients that underwent living renal transplantation sharing at least one HLA haplotype with their donors was 2,485. We divided these patients into two groups: (1) 2,075 kidney transplant recipients (1,554 or 74.9% male and 521 or 25.1% female) for whom the donors were living related, (2) 410 kidney transplant recipients (297 or 72.4% male and 113 or 27.6% female) for whom the donors were living unrelated. All patients received immunosuppressive therapy, consisting of a calcineurin inhibitor, mycophenolate mofetil, or azathioprine and prednisolone. We compared acute rejection and complication rates, as well as long-term graft and patient survival of both groups. Demographic characteristics were compared using the chi-square test. Graft survival and patient survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results The percentages of patients with acute vascular rejection were significantly higher in the unrelated group, while percentages of patients with no rejection were significantly higher in the related group, but there were no significant

  13. Transplanting Kidneys from Deceased Donors With Severe Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Heilman, R L; Smith, M L; Kurian, S M; Huskey, J; Batra, R K; Chakkera, H A; Katariya, N N; Khamash, H; Moss, A; Salomon, D R; Reddy, K S

    2015-08-01

    Our aim was to determine outcomes with transplanting kidneys from deceased donors with acute kidney injury, defined as a donor with terminal serum creatinine ≥2.0 mg/dL, or a donor requiring acute renal replacement therapy. We included all patients who received deceased donor kidney transplant from June 2004 to October 2013. There were 162 AKI donor transplant recipients (21% of deceased donor transplants): 139 in the standard criteria donor (SCD) and 23 in the expanded criteria donor (ECD) cohort. 71% of the AKI donors had stage 3 (severe AKI), based on acute kidney injury network (AKIN) staging. Protocol biopsies were done at 1, 4, and 12 months posttransplant. One and four month formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) biopsies from 48 patients (24 AKI donors, 24 non-AKI) underwent global gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays (96 arrays). DGF was more common in the AKI group but eGFR, graft survival at 1 year and proportion with IF/TA>2 at 1 year were similar for the two groups. At 1 month, there were 898 differentially expressed genes in the AKI group (p-value <0.005; FDR <10%), but by 4 months there were no differences. Transplanting selected kidneys from deceased donors with AKI is safe and has excellent outcomes.

  14. Utilization of elderly donors in living related kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sahin, S; Manga Sahin, G; Turkmen, A; Sever, M S

    2006-03-01

    Kidney transplantation has become the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease. However, its application is limited due to inadequate organ supply, mainly because many dialysis patients do not have suitable living donors. The increasing discrepancy between organ supply and demand has forced many transplant centers to consider using organs procured from marginal donors. The aim of this study was to investigate whether utilization of kidneys from living related elderly donors is safe for the recipients in the long term. We analyzed the clinical results of 296 consecutive recipients of living related renal transplants, among whom 44 recipients received kidneys from donors over 60 years of age. By the end of 12 months, the mean serum creatinine level of the recipients who were transplanted from the older donors was higher (1.55 +/- 0.45 mg/dL) than that from other donors (1.21 +/- 0.3 mg/dL), but the difference was not significant (P = .08). In the long term (60 months), the graft function was similar (1.88 +/- 0.55 vs 1.52 +/- 0.38) for both groups. The similarity in outcomes of ideal versus older donors as shown less in the present series has encouraged us to utilize elderly living donors. We concluded that transplantations performed from the elderly donors yielded similar results to those of conventional donors. The long waiting list for transplantation, the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease, should encourage us to be more flexible about donor selection.

  15. Renal transplantation in Mapuche people.

    PubMed

    Ardiles, R; Beltrán, R; Jerez, V; Droguett, M A; Mezzano, S; Ardiles, L

    2008-04-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated higher concentrations of some histocompatibility antigens in Mapuche people compared with non-Mapuche Chileans in the renal transplantation program. With the aim of evaluating whether those antigenic differences might induce differences in the outcomes of renal transplantation among patients belonging to that ethnic group, we reviewed HLA studies and at least 6 months follow-up of all patients with a first kidney transplant between 1980 and 2006. The 248 patients had a mean age of 37.6 years, 40% were females, and 48% had living related donors. The mean kidney follow-up was 90 months and patient follow-up was 106 months. Thirty-nine patients (16%) were classified as Mapuche, according to their surnames, including 16 women with overall mean age of 34.5 years, and 14 had been transplanted from a living related donor. Mapuche patients received organs with better HLA matching expressed as number of identities (3.4 +/- 0.1 versus 2.8 +/- 0.1 among non-Mapuche; P < .05), and the proportion receiving organs with > or = 3 compatibilities was significantly higher (Mapuche 38% versus non-Mapuche 22%; P < .05). Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed nonsignificant differences in kidney survival: 86% at 5 years and 68% at 10 years in Mapuche; and 83% and 65%, respectively, for non-Mapuche. Patient survival rates were 97% at 5 years and 86% at 10 years in the Mapuche group versus 91% and 79%, respectively, in the non-Mapuche group; both results were not significantly different. Our results showed similar outcomes of kidney and patient survivals among Mapuche people even when they received organs with better HLA matches.

  16. [De novo tumours of renal transplants].

    PubMed

    Hétet, J F; Rigaud, J; Dorel-Le Théo, M; Láuté, F; Karam, G; Blanchet, P

    2007-12-01

    Kidney cancer occurs rarely and late in renal transplants. The lack of grafts and the increasing age of the cadaver donors are likely to result in an increasing number of such cancers. To date, the treatment of choice is the transplant removal. Nevertheless partial nephrectomy may be discussed in selected cases. Ultrasonographic screening should allow detection of low volume tumours suitable for partial nephrectomy. Alternative techniques (radiofrequency, cryoablation) are to be assessed in such patients.

  17. [Tuberculosis after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Korzeniewska, Anna; Dyła, Tomasz; Kosacka, Monika; Jankowska, Renata

    2009-01-01

    Renal transplant recipients carry a relatively high risk of developing tuberculosis (TB). In most cases, active TB is the result of reactivation of a latent infection and is located in the lungs. In these patients, clinical presentation of TB can often be atypical and there is a high risk of dissemination and high mortality rates. Therefore, the use of invasive procedures for proper diagnosis is recommended, as well as anti-tuberculosis therapy instituted whenever there is a strong suspicion of TB on clinical grounds, even without microbiological evidence. The treatment of active TB in renal transplant recipients should be the same as in the general population. To avoid graft rejection, blood levels of calcineurin inhibitors should be monitored closely. Prophylaxis is recommended for high-risk patients.

  18. A randomized trial of basiliximab with three different patterns of cyclosporin A initiation in renal transplant from expanded criteria donors and at high risk of delayed graft function.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Amado; Marcén, Roberto; Valdés, Francisco; Plumed, Jaime Sánchez; Solà, Ricard; Errasti, Pedro; Lauzurica, Ricardo; Pallardó, Luis; Bustamante, Jesús; Amenábar, Juan José; Plaza, Juan José; Gómez, Ernesto; Grinyó, Josep Maria; Rengel, Manuel; Puig, Josep Maria; Sanz, Aurelio; Asensio, Concepción; Andrés, Inés

    2009-01-01

    This study assays therapy with basiliximab and different patterns of cyclosporin A (CsA) initiation in renal transplant (RT) recipients from expanded criteria donors (ECD) and at high risk of delayed graft function (DGF). A multicentre six-month open-label randomized trial with three parallel groups treated with basiliximab plus steroids, mycophenolate mofetil and different patterns of CsA initiation: early within 24 h post-RT at 3 mg/kg/d (Group 1; n = 38), and at 5 mg/kg/d (Group 2; n = 40), or delayed after 7-10 d at 5 mg/kg/d (Group 3; n = 36). There were no differences among groups in six months GFR (43.1 +/- 12, 48.0 +/- 14 and 47.2 +/- 17 mL/min, respectively), DGF (Group 1: 31%, Group 2: 37%, Group 3: 42%), nor biopsy-proven acute rejection, although clinically treated and biopsy-proven acute rejection was significantly higher in Group 3 (25%) vs. Group 1 (5.3%, p < 0.05). At six months no differences were observed in death-censored graft survival or patient survival. Induction therapy with basiliximab and three CsA-ME initiation patterns in RT recipients from ECD and at high risk of DGF presented good renal function and graft survival at six months. Late onset group did not achieve improvement in DGF rate and showed a higher incidence of clinically treated and biopsy-proven acute rejection.

  19. Exchange living-donor kidney transplantation: diminution of donor organ shortage.

    PubMed

    Park, K; Lee, J H; Huh, K H; Kim, S I; Kim, Y S

    2004-12-01

    To alleviate the organ shortage, the use of more living donors is strongly recommended world wide. A living donor exchange (swap) program was launched in Korea. After the success of a direct swap program between two families, we have developed the swap-around program to expand the donor pool by enrolling many kinds of unrelated donors. Herein, we report our results of a living donor exchange program. This retrospectively review of 978 recipients of kidney transplants from living donors, included analysis of donor-recipient relationships, mode of donor recruitment, episodes of acute rejection, and 5-year patient/graft survivals. Transplantation was performed in 101 patients (10.3%) by way of the swap program. The proportion of swap patients among the number of unrelated donor renal transplants has been increasing from 4.2% to 46.6%. The incidence of acute rejection and 5-year patient/graft survival rates were comparable between the groups. We have achieved some success in reducing the organ shortage with a swap program in addition to our current unrelated living donor programs without jeopardizing graft survival. Potentially exchangeable donors should undergo strict medical evaluation by physicians and social evaluation by social workers and coordinators as a pre-requisite for kidney transplantation. Expanding the swap around program to a regional or national pool could be an option to reduce the organ donor shortage in the future.

  20. Th-17 Alloimmune Responses in Renal Allograft Biopsies From Recipients of Kidney Transplants Using Extended Criteria Donors During Acute T Cell-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Matignon, M; Aissat, A; Canoui-Poitrine, F; Grondin, C; Pilon, C; Desvaux, D; Saadoun, D; Barathon, Q; Garrido, M; Audard, V; Rémy, P; Lang, P; Cohen, J; Grimbert, P

    2015-10-01

    Although renal transplantation using expanded criteria donors has become a common practice, immune responses related to immunosenescence in those kidney allografts have not been studied yet in humans. We performed a retrospective molecular analysis of the T cell immune response in 43 kidney biopsies from patients with acute T cell-mediated rejection including 25 from recipients engrafted with a kidney from expanded criteria donor and 18 from recipients grafted with optimal kidney allograft. The clinical, transplant and acute T cell-mediated rejection characteristics of both groups were similar at baseline. The expression of RORγt, Il-17 and T-bet mRNA was significantly higher in the elderly than in the optimal group (p = 0.02, p = 0.036, and p = 0.01, respectively). Foxp3 mRNA levels were significantly higher in elderly patients experiencing successful acute T cell-mediated rejection reversal (p = 0.03). The presence of IL-17 mRNA was strongly associated with nonsuccessful reversal in elderly patients (p = 0.008). Patients with mRNA IL17 expression detection and low mRNA Foxp3 expression experienced significantly more treatment failure (87.5%) than patients with no mRNA IL17 expression and/or high mRNA Foxp3 expression (26.7%; p = 0.017). Our study suggests that the Th17 pathway is involved in pathogenesis and prognosis of acute T cell-mediated rejection in recipients of expanded criteria allograft.

  1. Renal transplantation at the Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Transplant Center.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Robert A; Cooper, Matthew; Kraus, Edward; Rabb, Hamid; Samaniego, Milagros; Simpkins, Christopher E; Sonnenday, Christopher J; Ugarte, Richard M; Warren, Daniel S; Zachary, Andrea A

    2003-01-01

    A stagnant supply of transplantable organs in the face of a relentless burgeoning of transplant waiting lists has created a crisis. Necessity continues to be the mother of invention and as the crisis has deepened it has served as a crucible for the development of new ways to think about perennial problems. Our program has taken a 2-pronged approach to increasing the organ supply for our patients. First, through innovations like the laparoscopic donor nephrectomy, ABO-incompatible and positive-crossmatch transplantation protocols, unconventional paired kidney exchanges, and the use of altruistic donors we have more than doubled our utilization of live donor organs. At the same time, we have developed algorithms and interrogative techniques to enhance the intelligent use of kidneys from expanded criteria donors for patients who do not have an available live donor. The laparoscopic nephrectomy has proven to be a safe and effective way of removing a significant barrier to live donation. Our results from 100 ABOi, (+)XM, and PKE transplants are similar to national statistics for compatible live donor transplants, suggesting that existing paradigms of compatibility can be safely expanded. These encouraging early outcomes and the savings they transmit to the health care system have allowed us to obtain insurance coverage for the InKTP programs, setting the stage for further expansion of these opportunities to broaden the options for patients with end-stage renal disease.

  2. [Pediatric renal transplantation in Toulouse (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Juskiewenski, S; Barthe, P; Vaysse, P; Bouissou, F; Guitard, J; Bacque, P; Moscovivi, J; Cao-Van, C

    1980-01-01

    The regional group of renal transplantation in Toulouse includes a medico-surgical team which participates to all the activities of this group. Dialysis and transplantation are covered in a center organized for the care of children. This branch is part of the Regional Hospital. From 15 years old on patients are moved from the pediatric branch to the medico-surgical center taking care of adults. Both teams within the regional hospital share the responsability of taking off kidneys from cadaveric donors and collaborate to France-Transplant and Euro-Transplant. Since the pediatric center in charge of renal failure has opened, 32 children underwent chronic hemodialysis. Some of these patients are presently treated in the center for adults. Fourteen children were grafted and seven are at this moment waiting to receive transplantation. The average number of transplantations per year is from 1 to 4. These fourteen children underwent renal transplantation with kidneys from cadaveric donors. Only one has been provided by Toulouse. Diuresis resumed immediately in 8 cases, later in 5. An extremely acute reject was observed in one case and transplantectomy had to be performed 10 days after transplantation. Eight children presented acute reversible reject which, for 4 of them, evoluated towards chronicle reject. Eight children presented a chronicle reject: 4 of them are again in dialysis. Altogether 8 kidneys are functioning (seven years in the longest case). Five children resumed chronic dialysis. One patient died of acute pancreatitis. He underwent a portocaval shunt for type I glycogenosis which ended in a hyperuricemic nephropathy evoluating towards renal failure forcing a transplantation. The rehabilitation of transplanted children was always satisfactory.

  3. Effective use of kidneys for transplantation from asystolic donors.

    PubMed

    Gerstenkorn, Clemens; Papalois, Vassilios E; Hakim, Nadey

    2005-01-01

    Severe organ shortage for transplantation is an increasing problem because the number of traditional heart-beating cadaveric donors is declining. Ways need to be found to expand the donor pool without commercializing organ transplantation, especially from unrelated live donors, and to maintain high medical standards of these procedures and their follow-up. Kidneys from asystolic or nonheart-beating donors (NHBDs) are a valuable source of organs, which can be of excellent quality, with good long-term function after transplantation. This organ source is widely underused at the moment; even so, there is increased popularity during the last few years in different countries. In addition, the rate of discarding viable kidneys from these NHBDs is still too high. Logistical and legal aspects are other important issues that need to be addressed to promote these NHBD programs more effectively. Waiting lists for renal transplantation could be significantly reduced in the future.

  4. Malignant tumours after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fahlenkamp, D; Reinke, P; Kirchner, S; Schnorr, D; Lindeke, A; Loening, S A

    1996-10-01

    In 1243 patients after renal transplantation, 39 malignant tumours were detected in 37 patients. The average latency period between transplantation and tumour disease was 72 months. Tumours included 8 malignant lymphomas, 7 dermatomas and 24 visceral tumours. The patients who developed a tumour had received fewer blood transfusions before transplantation than a tumour-free control group of 60 patients with renal transplants. Rejection crises occurred in a significantly smaller number of tumour patients compared with the control group.

  5. Transplant tourism and the Iranian model of renal transplantation program: ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Ghods, Ahad J; Nasrollahzadeh, Dariush

    2005-12-01

    Currently, the buying and selling of kidneys through "transplant tourism" is occurring at an increasing rate, both in developed and developing countries. Since 1988, Iran has adopted a compensated and regulated living-unrelated donor renal transplant program, and by providing financial incentives to volunteer living donors, has eliminated the renal transplant waiting list. In the Iranian model of renal transplantation program, regulations have been put in place to prevent transplant tourism. Foreigners are not allowed to undergo renal transplantation from Iranian living-unrelated donors. They also are not permitted to volunteer as kidney donors for Iranian patients. A study at the transplant unit of Hashemi Nejad Kidney Hospital in Tehran, Iran, showed that of 1881 renal transplant recipients, 19 (1%) were Afghani or Iraqi refugees, 11 (0.6%) were other foreign nationals, and 18 (0.9%) were Iranian immigrants. Renal transplantations seemed ethically acceptable to all refugees and foreign nationals. However, transplantation of Iranian immigrants who had been residing abroad for years constituted true transplant tourism.

  6. Renal allograft tuberculosis with infected lymphocele transmitted from the donor.

    PubMed

    Al-Nesf, Maryam Ali; Al-Ani, Omar Isam; Al-Ani, Ahmed Abdul-Rahman; Rashed, Awad Hamed

    2014-03-01

    Transmission of tuberculosis (TB) from a donor through renal transplantation is a rare incident. We are reporting a 53-year-old Qatari woman diagnosed with renal allograft TB infection. The disease was confirmed by isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from fluid from the lymphocele and demonstration of caseating granuloma in graft biopsy with acid-fast bacilli seen on Ziehl-Neelsen staining. The diagnosis was made quite early post-transplantation. The presence of the granuloma, which is unusual with patients on intensive immunosuppressant medications, suggests that transmission of the infection occurred from the donor rather than from the activation of latent infection. In reviewing the literature, we found ten case reports of TB in transplanted kidney with transmission of TB infection from the donor. The presence of TB in lymphocele in association with the infected transplant by TB, to the best of our knowledge, was reported only once in the literature. Our case had unfavorable outcome and ended by renal allograft nephrectomy and hemodialysis. We are presenting this case of TB infection of renal allograft and lymphocele diagnosed early post-transplantation transmitted from the donor and pertinent review from the literature.

  7. [Pediatric renal transplant in Japan].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Kazuharu

    2010-09-01

    Transplantation is the optimal renal replacement therapy for children with end-stage renal disease. Compared with dialysis, successful transplantation in children and adolescents not only ameliorates uremic symptoms but also allows for significant improvement of delayed growth, sexual maturation, and psychosocial functioning. The child with a well-functioning kidney can enjoy a quality of life that cannot be achieved with dialysis therapy. The 5- and 10-year patient/graft survival rate in transplant recipients are 97.9/88.8% and 96.2%/79.4% based on Japanese Renal Transplant Registry Society data. This article reviews recent reports of pediatric renal transplantation including ABO-incompatible and preemptive renal transplantation in Japan.

  8. Optimized donor management and organ preservation before kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mundt, Heiko M; Yard, Benito A; Krämer, Bernhard K; Benck, Urs; Schnülle, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Kidney transplantation is a major medical improvement for patients with end-stage renal disease, but organ shortage limits its widespread use. As a consequence, the proportion of grafts procured from extended criteria donors (ECD) has increased considerably, but this comes along with increased rates of delayed graft function (DGF) and a higher incidence of immune-mediated rejection that limits organ and patient survival. Furthermore, most grafts are derived from brain dead organ donors, but the unphysiological state of brain death is associated with significant metabolic, hemodynamic, and pro-inflammatory changes, which further compromise patient and graft survival. Thus, donor interventions to preserve graft quality are fundamental to improve long-term transplantation outcome, but interventions must not harm other potentially transplantable grafts. Several donor pretreatment strategies have provided encouraging results in animal models, but evidence from human studies is sparse, as most clinical evidence is derived from single-center or nonrandomized trials. Furthermore, ethical matters have to be considered especially concerning consent from donors, donor families, and transplant recipients to research in the field of donor treatment. This review provides an overview of clinically proven and promising preclinical strategies of donor treatment to optimize long-term results after kidney transplantation. © 2015 Steunstichting ESOT.

  9. Renal transplantation in infants.

    PubMed

    Jalanko, Hannu; Mattila, Ilkka; Holmberg, Christer

    2016-05-01

    Renal transplantation (RTx) has become an accepted mode of therapy in infants with severe renal failure. The major indications are structural abnormalities of the urinary tract, congenital nephrotic syndrome, polycystic diseases, and neonatal kidney injury. Assessment of these infants needs expertise and time as well as active treatment before RTx to ensure optimal growth and development, and to avoid complications that could lead to permanent neurological defects. RTx can be performed already in infants weighing around 5 kg, but most operations occur in infants with a weight of 10 kg or more. Perioperative management focuses on adequate perfusion of the allograft and avoidance of thrombotic and other surgical complications. Important long-term issues include rejections, infections, graft function, growth, bone health, metabolic problems, neurocognitive development, adherence to medication, pubertal maturation, and quality of life. The overall outcome of infant RTx has dramatically improved, with long-term patient and graft survivals of over 90 and 80 %, respectively.

  10. Lung and renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Caetano Mota, Patrícia; Vaz, Ana Paula; Castro Ferreira, Inês; Bustorff, Manuela; Damas, Carla

    2009-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the most common type of solid organ transplantation and kidney transplant recipients are susceptible to pulmonary complications of immunosuppressive therapy, which are a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. To evaluate patients admitted to the Renal Transplant Unit (RTU) of Hospital de S. João with respiratory disease. We performed a retrospective study of all patients admitted to RTU with respiratory disease during a period of 12 months. Thirty-six patients were included. Mean age 55.2 (+/-13.4) years; 61.1% male. Immunosuppressive agents most frequently used were prednisolone and mycophenolate mofetil associated with ciclosporin (38.9%) or tacrolimus (22.2%) or rapamycin (13.9%). Thirty-one patients (86.1%) presented infectious respiratory disease. In this group the main diagnoses were 23 (74.2%) pneumonias, 5 (16.1%) opportunistic infections, 2 (6.5%) tracheobronchitis, and 1 case (3.2%) of lung abscesses. Microbiological agent was identified in 7 cases (22.6%). Five patients (13.9%) presented rapamycin-induced lung disease. Fibreoptic bronchoscopy was performed in 15 patients (41.7%), diagnostic in 10 cases (66.7%). Mean hospital stay was 17.1 (+/-18.5) days and no related death was observed. Respiratory infections were the main complications in these patients. Drug-induced lung disease implies recognition of its features and a rigorous monitoring of drug serum levels. A more invasive diagnostic approach was determinant in the choice of an early and more specific therapy.

  11. Anti-human leukocyte antigen DQ antibodies in renal transplantation: Are we underestimating the most frequent donor specific alloantibodies?

    PubMed

    Carta, Paolo; Di Maria, Lorenzo; Caroti, Leonardo; Buti, Elisa; Antognoli, Giulia; Minetti, Enrico Eugenio

    2015-07-01

    The role of anti-human leukocyte antigens DQ region (HLA-DQ) in transplantation is historically less studied than HLA-DR and HLA class I regions, but several studies are demonstrating that anti HLA-DQ antibodies are among the most frequent anti HLA antibodies that develop after transplantation and can have great influence on the developing of humoral rejection and graft loss. In this article we review the gene structure and nomenclature of the HLA-DQ region, the role of anti HLA-DQ antibodies after and before transplantation and briefly the associations of particular HLA-DQ alleles and other diseases.

  12. [Multiple complications after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Manrique, J; Rossich, E; Hernández Sierra, A

    2004-01-01

    This is the case of a 32-year-old male patient, diagnosed with end stage renal disease secondary to a focal and segmental glomerulonephritis. After four years of haemodialysis, he received a renal graft from a cadaveric donor. During the following sixteen years, he developped many different complications. In the early post-transplant period, he developed a severe acute tubular necrosis and two episodes of acute rejection took place, both of them with later recovery. Among the outstanding infectious complications were a virus herpes zoster dorsal infection and a Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial pneumonia. Twelve months later, a series of severe digestive complications took place: cholecystitis that required cholecystectomy, pancreatic pseudocyst which required laparotomy because of an abdominal complication, two separate episodes of upper digestive bleeding that finally required gastric surgery, and an hemorrhagic subphrenic abscess that required a second laparotomy. Currently he has developed a calcified chronic pancreatitis. Moreover, metabolic complications must be mentioned carbohydrate intolerance, cataracts and an avascular bone necrosis, all of them closely related to the immunosuppressive therapy. In spite of these multiple complications, he mantains a good renal function and his quality of life is acceptable.

  13. Haemostatic aspects of renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, P J; Schmidt, E B; Knudsen, F; Nielsen, A H; Kristensen, S D; Dyerberg, J; Kornerup, H J

    1988-01-01

    Platelet function and protein C activity and antigen level was studied in 31 renal transplant recipients and 10 healthy controls. The patients were divided into three groups: (I) cyclosporin treated, (II) azathioprine treated, and (III) azathioprine treated patients with chronic rejection. The platelet function in the renal transplant patients was normal and there was no difference between groups I and II. The specific activity of protein C was decreased in patients after renal transplantation and decreasing protein C activity and progressive renal failure was found to be positively correlated in the azathioprine treated groups.

  14. Bone mineral density of extremities is associated with coronary calcification and biopsy-verified vascular calcification in living-donor renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhimin; Sun, Jia; Haarhaus, Mathias; Barany, Peter; Wennberg, Lars; Ripsweden, Jonaz; Brismar, Torkel B; Lindholm, Bengt; Wernerson, Annika; Söderberg, Magnus; Stenvinkel, Peter; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid

    2016-12-02

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) mineral and bone disorders (CKD-MBD) may lead to low bone mineral density (BMD) and vascular calcification (VC), but links to the latter are unclear. Here we investigated associations between BMD, coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores, and histological signs of VC in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing living-donor kidney transplantation (LD-Rtx). In 66 ESRD patients (median age 45 years, 68% males), BMD (by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, DXA), CAC score (by computed tomography, CT; n = 54), and degree of VC score (graded by histological examination of epigastric artery specimens collected at LD-Rtx; n = 55) were assessed at the time of LD-Rtx. Of the patients, 26% had osteopenia and 7% had osteoporosis. Of those undergoing artery biopsy, 16% had extensive VC, and of those undergoing CT 28% had high CAC score (>100 Agatston units). CAC scores correlated with BMD of legs and pelvis. BMDs of leg and pelvic sub-regions were significantly lower in patients with extensive VC. In multivariate regression analysis adjusted for age and gender, lower BMD of leg sub-region was associated with CAC score >100 AUs and extensive VC, and patients with extensive VC had significantly higher CAC score. Both high CAC and extensive VC were independently predicted by low BMD of legs. Low BMD has the potential to identify ESRD patients at risk of vascular calcification.

  15. [Percutaneous endourologic treatment of obstructive ureteral lithiasis in renal transplant].

    PubMed

    de Fata Chillón, F Ramón; Núñez Mora, C; García Mediero, J M; Alonso Dorrego, J M; Hidalgo Togores, L; de la Peña Barthel, J J

    2003-01-01

    Donor graft lithiasis is a unusual complication of renal transplantation, however, it is associated to a high morbidity. This pathology is due to several causes such us: metabolic factors, infectious disease, drugs, foreign bodies or transferred in the donor graft. The objective of the treatment is to remove the lithiasis without damaging the renal unit. We report the successful percutaneous anterograde treatment of an ureteral obstructive hard calculi, in renal allograft.

  16. Challenges in renal transplantation in Yemen.

    PubMed

    El-Nono, Ibrahiem H; Telha, Khaled A; Al-Alimy, Gamil M; Ghilan, Abdulilah M; Abu Asba, Nagieb W; Al-Zkri, Abdo M; Al-Adimi, Abdulilah M; Al-Ba'adani, Tawfiq H

    2015-02-16

    Background Renal replacement therapy was first introduced in Yemen in 1978 in the form of hemodialysis. Twenty years later, the first renal transplantation was performed. Kidney transplantations were started in socially and financially challenging circumstances in Yemen in 1998. A structured program was established and has been functioning regularly since 2005. A pediatric transplantation program was started in 2011. Material and Methods This was a prospective study of 181 transplants performed at the Urology and Nephrology Center between May 1998 and 2012. All transplants were from living related donors. The immunosuppressive protocol consisted initially of double therapy with steroid and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). Subsequently, triple therapy with addition of a calcineurin inhibitor was introduced. Primary graft function was achieved in 176 (97.2%) recipients. Results Cold ischemia time was 48-68 min. Episodes of acute rejection in 12 patients were treated with high-dose steroids. Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) was used in cases of vascular or steroid-resistant rejection in 2 patients. The post-transplant complications, either surgical or medical, were comparable to those recorded in the literature. Conclusions Renal transplantation is a good achievement in our country. The patients and graft survival rates are comparable to other reports.

  17. Afghan refugees in Iran model renal transplantation program: ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Ghods, A J; Nasrollahzadeh, D; Kazemeini, M

    2005-03-01

    During 23 years of civil war in Afghanistan, there has been a continuous flow of more than 5 million refugees out of the country. Iran has hosted about 40% of all refugees. The majority have resided outside of camps with opportunities to integrate locally, having access to the Iranian labor market and government services, such as dialysis and transplantation. Iran also has adopted a compensated living unrelated donor renal transplantation program in which foreigners can receive transplants from living related donors or volunteer living unrelated donors of the same nationality. In June 2004, among 241 refugees with end-stage kidney disease in Iran, 179 were on hemodialysis and 62 underwent renal transplantation. Nine patients received kidneys from living related donors, 1 from a spouse, 50 from Afghani living unrelated donors, and 1 from a cadaveric donor. No refugee had been used as a kidney donor to an Iranian patient. Transplantation of all Afghan refugees in need and the absence of their use as kidney donors to Iranian patients proffer strong evidence against commercialism and a reason to believe that the Iran Model transplantation is practiced with ethical standards. In the last 2 years since the civil war has ended, returning these patients to Afghanistan has raised important ethical concerns. Repatriation of dialysis patients and transplant recipients may be tantamount to their deaths. It is expected that The Transplantation Society and the World Health Organization will establish links with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugee Offices to provide humanitarian assistance to these patients.

  18. Fecal microbiota transplantation and donor standardization.

    PubMed

    Owens, Casey; Broussard, Elizabeth; Surawicz, Christina

    2013-09-01

    Clostridium difficile diarrhea is a common and severe infectious disease. Antibiotics, which are standard initial treatment, are less effective for treating refractory or recurrent infection. Fecal microbiota transplantation, where healthy donor stool is transplanted into a patient, is an alternative to antibiotic therapy that requires standardization for donors and patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Relationship among C1q-fixing de novo donor specific antibodies, C4d deposition and renal outcome in transplant glomerulopathy.

    PubMed

    Messina, Maria; Ariaudo, Claudia; Praticò Barbato, Loredana; Beltramo, Silvia; Mazzucco, Gianna; Amoroso, Antonio; Ranghino, Andrea; Cantaluppi, Vincenzo; Fop, Fabrizio; Segoloni, Giuseppe Paolo; Biancone, Luigi

    2015-09-01

    The C1q-binding properties of donor specific antibodies (DSA) may be related to antibody-mediated rejection and poor outcome. We retrospectively studied 35 kidney transplant recipients with transplant glomerulopathy (TG) and de novo DSA (dnDSA). C1q dnDSA were measured in the serum stored at renal biopsy and the association among C1q-fixing dnDSA, C4d deposition and graft loss was examined. Of the 35 patients with dnDSA and TG, 15 (42.9%) had C1q-positive dnDSA and 20 (57.1%) had C1q-negative dnDSA. Ten out of 15 patients with C1q-positive dnDSA (66.6%) and 5 with C1q-negative dnDSA (25%) had C4d positive staining renal biopsies (P=0.02), being the C1q-negative dnDSA/C4d-negative TG 42.9% of the total. The C1q-positive dnDSA group has significantly higher IgG DSA Class II MFI than the C1q-negative dnDSA group (P=0.004). Patients with C4d deposits have significantly higher IgG DSA MFI for both Class I and Class II than those without C4d deposits (P=0.02). We found a trend toward higher graft loss in the C1q-positive dnDSA group (60%) versus the C1q-negative dnDSA group (40%) without a statistical significance (P=0.31). Our study provides further characterization of TG associated with dnDSA. The major part of dnDSA-associated TG was C1q-negative and the presence of C1q-fixing dnDSA did not significantly correlate with graft outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Interventional radiology in living donor liver transplant.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Fan; Ou, Hsin-You; Yu, Chun-Yen; Tsang, Leo Leung-Chit; Huang, Tung-Liang; Chen, Tai-Yi; Hsu, Hsien-Wen; Concerjero, Allan M; Wang, Chih-Chi; Wang, Shih-Ho; Lin, Tsan-Shiun; Liu, Yueh-Wei; Yong, Chee-Chien; Lin, Yu-Hung; Lin, Chih-Che; Chiu, King-Wah; Jawan, Bruno; Eng, Hock-Liew; Chen, Chao-Long

    2014-05-28

    The shortage of deceased donor liver grafts led to the use of living donor liver transplant (LDLT). Patients who undergo LDLT have a higher risk of complications than those who undergo deceased donor liver transplantation (LT). Interventional radiology has acquired a key role in every LT program by treating the majority of vascular and non-vascular post-transplant complications, improving graft and patient survival and avoiding, in the majority of cases, surgical revision and/or re-transplant. The aim of this paper is to review indications, diagnostic modalities, technical considerations, achievements and potential complications of interventional radiology procedures after LDLT.

  1. Successful ABO-Incompatible Renal Transplantation:  Blood Group A1B Donor Into A2B Recipient With Anti-A1 Isoagglutinins.

    PubMed

    Fadeyi, Emmanuel A; Stratta, Robert J; Farney, Alan C; Pomper, Gregory J

    2016-08-01

    Transplantation of the blood group A2B in a recipient was successfully performed in the setting of receiving a deceased donor kidney from an "incompatible" A1B donor. The donor and recipient were both typed for ABO blood group, including ABO genotyping. The donor and recipient were tested for ABO, non-ABO, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. The donor and recipient were typed for HLA antigens, including T- and B-flow cytometry crossmatch tests. The recipient's RBCs were negative with A1 lectin, and immunoglobulin G anti-A1 was demonstrated in the recipient's plasma. The donor-recipient pair was a four-antigen HLA mismatch, but final T- and B-flow cytometry crossmatch tests were compatible. The transplant procedure was uneventful; the patient experienced immediate graft function with no episodes of rejection or readmissions more than 2 years later. It may be safe to transplant across the A1/A2 blood group AB mismatch barrier in the setting of low titer anti-A1 isoagglutinins without the need for pretransplant desensitization even if the antibody produced reacts with anti-human globulin. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Bone disease after renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Malluche, Hartmut H.; Monier-Faugere, Marie-Claude; Herberth, Johann

    2015-01-01

    In light of greatly improved long-term patient and graft survival after renal transplantation, improving other clinical outcomes such as risk of fracture and cardiovascular disease is of paramount importance. After renal transplantation, a large percentage of patients lose bone. This loss of bone results from a combination of factors that include pre-existing renal osteodystrophy, immunosuppressive therapy, and the effects of chronically reduced renal function after transplantation. In addition to low bone volume, histological abnormalities include decreased bone turnover and defective mineralization. Low bone volume and low bone turnover were recently shown to be associated with cardiovascular calcifications, highlighting specific challenges for medical therapy and the need to prevent low bone turnover in the pretransplant patient. This Review discusses changes in bone histology and mineral metabolism that are associated with renal transplantation and the effects of these changes on clinical outcomes such as fractures and cardiovascular calcifications. Therapeutic modalities are evaluated based on our understanding of bone histology. PMID:19918255

  3. Modern renal transplantation: present challenges and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Galliford, J; Game, D S

    2009-02-01

    Renal transplantation offers patients with end stage renal failure improved survival and quality of life compared with dialysis. Although more transplants are being performed in the UK and elsewhere, the size of the renal transplant waiting list is increasing at a faster rate. Live donor transplantation between antibody compatible and incompatible pairs is one of the short term solutions to this; it may also be a sensible long term strategy since it affords better outcomes. Following successful transplantation, balancing the chronic and often deleterious effects of immunosuppression with chronic immune damage poses the key clinical challenge for transplant physicians today. Research efforts worldwide are focused towards immunological tolerance of transplanted organs with two main questions: first, how can we induce tolerance; and second, how can we test that it is operational? Immunosuppressive protocols vary greatly between transplant units, which may be reflected in differing patient and allograft survival.

  4. Exchange living-donor kidney transplantation: merits and limitations.

    PubMed

    Huh, Kyu Ha; Kim, Myoung Soo; Ju, Man Ki; Chang, Hye Kyung; Ahn, Hyung Joon; Lee, Su Hyung; Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Soon Il; Kim, Yu Seun; Park, Kiil

    2008-08-15

    The shortage of donor organs is one of the major barriers to transplantation worldwide. After the success of the direct exchange donor (swap) program in Korea since 1991, we have developed a swap-around program. However, reports on the long-term outcomes of exchange donor programs are scarce. From September 1995 to September 2006, we performed 1193 cases of renal transplantation, including 398 cases from living-unrelated donors. The living-unrelated donors included 129 exchange donors and 269 nonexchange donors. We compared the outcomes of the exchange program with that of the nonexchange program, and examined the merits and limitations of the exchange program. The reasons for the exchange program were ABO incompatibility (n=84, 65.1%), human leukocyte antigen mismatching beyond our criteria (n=39, 30.2%), or positive lymphocyte crossmatch (n=6, 4.7%). The overall 10-year graft survival (86.3%) of exchange transplantation was comparable with that of nonexchange (82.3%) or one- haplotype matched living-related (81.2%) transplantation (P=0.2994). In multivariate analysis, exchange versus nonexchange donors did not affect graft survival. The proportion of blood-type O donors was much lower in the exchange group (29.5%) than in the nonexchange group (42.4%; P=0.026). Blood-type O kidneys were preferentially allocated to blood-type O recipients (78.9%) in the exchange group as compared with the nonexchange group (54.4%; P=0.007). We achieved excellent outcomes by using a donor exchange program as an option to reduce the donor organ shortage. However, the exchange donor program has no added benefit for blood-type O recipients.

  5. Renal transplant NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Velchik, M.G.; Kressel, H.; Thickman, D.; Alavi, A.

    1985-05-01

    The preliminary results of NMR evaluation of renal transplants (Txs) are reported including correlation with nuclear medicine (NM) and ultrasound (US). Thirteen Txs (8 cadaver (Cd), 5 living related doner (LRD) in 13 patients (6M, 7F) ranging in age from 25-47 (x 35) were evaluated by NM (32), NMR (15) and US (5). Clinical diagnoses included: rejection (8), ATN (2), infarction (1), and normal (2). Of the 8 patients with rejection (5) Cd; 3 LRD) pathologic proof was obtained in 3. An experimental 0.12 T resistive magnet (GE) was used with a partial saturation technique with repetition time (TR) of 143 and 286 msec to provide T1 weighting. T2 weighted information was obtained with a spin echo technique with echo times (TE) of 20, 40, 60 and 80 msec. The NMR appearance of normal Txs consisted of a uniform signal intensity (Tx> pelvic musculature), well-defined internal architecture with good cortical medullary differentiation and normal appearing vessels. The NMR appearance of abnormal transplants consisted of a heterogeneous or overall decrease in signal intensity (kidney muscle) with poor cortical medullary differentiation with or without a halo of decreased signal intensity. Although NMR was able to differentiate normal from abnormal, it was unable to clearly discriminate between ATN and rejection. Advantages of NMR included the ability to demonstrate regional anatomy, vasculature, post operative fluid collections and hematomas, and associated avascular necrosis of the hips.

  6. Association between Reperfusion Renal Allograft Biopsy Findings and Transplant Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Sumit; Campenot, Eric; Chiles, Mariana C; Santoriello, Dominick; Bland, Eric; Crew, R John; Rosenstiel, Paul; Dube, Geoffrey; Batal, Ibrahim; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Sandoval, P Rodrigo; Guarrera, James; Stokes, M Barry; D'Agati, Vivette; Cohen, David J; Ratner, Lloyd E; Markowitz, Glen

    2017-07-06

    Biopsy findings at the time of procurement of deceased donor kidneys remain the most common reason cited for kidney discard. To determine the value of renal allograft histology in predicting outcomes, we evaluated the significance of histologic findings, read by experienced renal pathologists, in 975 postreperfusion biopsy specimens collected from 2005 to 2009 after living donor (n=427) or deceased donor (n=548) renal transplant. We evaluated specimens for the degree of glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy, and vascular disease; specimens with a score of 0 or 1 (scale, 0-3) for each parameter were considered optimal. Overall, 66.3% of living donor kidneys and 50.7% of deceased donor kidneys received an optimal histology score (P<0.001). Irrespective of donor status, suboptimal kidneys came from older donors with a higher incidence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and obesity and a higher mean kidney donor risk index (all P<0.001). Death-censored outcomes after transplant differed significantly between optimal and suboptimal kidneys only in the deceased donor transplants (P=0.02). Regardless of histologic classification, outcomes with deceased donor kidneys were inferior to outcomes with living donor kidneys. However, 73.2% of deceased donor kidneys with suboptimal histology remained functional at 5 years. Our findings suggest that histologic findings on postreperfusion biopsy associate with outcomes after deceased donor but not living donor renal transplants, thus donor death and organ preservation-related factors may be of greater prognostic importance. Discarding donated kidneys on the basis of histologic factors may be inappropriate and merits further study. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  7. New registry and tracking system for renal transplantation in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yuzawa, K; Takahara, S; Kanmochi, T; Takahashi, K; Teraoka, S

    2010-12-01

    Following The Declaration of Istanbul 2008, a registration committees of The Japan Society for Transplantation and The Japanese Society for Clinical Renal Transplantation planned to establish a new registry and tracking system for renal transplant recipients and donors supported by a Health Labor Sciences Research Grant by The Ministry of Health Labour and Welfare. In place of the previous paper-based system, we established the new registry and tracking system, JARTRE (Japan Renal Transplantation Registry), using USB memory in 2009. Recipient and donor data were inputted into the USB memory at the transplantation centers. The memory was reviewed a yearly by committees. The recipient and donor registration included details from both. The tracking is performed centrally 3 months, 1 year, and every year after the operation. The advantages of this system are the ease of input, adequacy of the data, and rapid statistical processing. In 2009, we registered 97.9% of new renal transplantation recipients and donors; in 2008 it was more than 81.9% of all past renal transplantation recipients in Japan.

  8. Factors influencing weight gain after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C P; Gallagher-Lepak, S; Zhu, Y R; Porth, C; Kelber, S; Roza, A M; Adams, M B

    1993-10-01

    Weight gain following renal transplantation occurs frequently but has not been investigated quantitatively. A retrospective chart review of 115 adult renal transplant recipients was used to describe patterns of weight gain during the first 5 years after transplantation. Only 23 subjects (21%) were overweight before their transplant. Sixty-six subjects (57%) experienced a weight gain of greater than or equal to 10%, and 49 subjects (43%) were overweight according to Metropolitan relative weight criteria at 1 year after transplantation. There was an inverse correlation between advancing age and weight gain, with the youngest patients (18-29 years) having a 13.3% weight gain and the oldest patients (age greater than 50 years) having the lowest gain of 8.3% at 1 year (P = 0.047). Black recipients experienced a greater weight gain than whites during the first posttransplant year (14.6% vs. 9.0%; P = 0.043), and maintained or increased this difference over the 5-year period. Men and women experienced comparable weight gain during the first year (9.5% vs. 12.1%), but women continued to gain weight throughout the 5-year study (21.0% total weight gain). The men remained stable after the first year (10.8% total weight gain). Recipients who experienced at least a 10% weight gain also increased their serum cholesterol (mean 261 vs. 219) and triglyceride (mean 277 vs. 159) levels significantly, whereas those without weight gain did not. Weight gain did not correlate with cumulative steroid dose, donor source (living-related versus cadaver), rejection history, pre-existing obesity, the number of months on dialysis before transplantation, or posttransplant renal function. Posttransplant weight gain is related mainly to demographic factors, not to treatment factors associated with the transplant. The average weight gain during the first year after renal transplantation is approximately 10%. This increased weight, coupled with changes in lipid metabolism, may be significant in

  9. Kidney Transplantation From a Donor With Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Rossidis, A; Lim, M A; Palmer, M; Levine, M H; Naji, A; Bloom, R D; Abt, P L

    2017-02-01

    In the United States, >100 000 patients are waiting for a kidney transplant. Given the paucity of organs available for transplant, expansion of eligibility criteria for deceased donation is of substantial interest. Sickle cell disease (SCD) is viewed as a contraindication to kidney donation, perhaps because SCD substantially alters renal structure and function and thus has the potential to adversely affect multiple physiological processes of the kidney. To our knowledge, transplantation from a donor with SCD has never been described in the literature. In this paper, we report the successful transplantation of two kidneys from a 37-year-old woman with SCD who died from an intracranial hemorrhage. Nearly 4 mo after transplant, both recipients are doing well and are off dialysis. The extent to which kidneys from donors with SCD can be safely transplanted with acceptable outcomes is unknown; however, this report should provide support for the careful expansion of kidneys from donors with SCD without evidence of renal dysfunction and with normal tissue architecture on preimplantation biopsies.

  10. Cadaveric renal transplantation: the Chennai experience.

    PubMed

    Prabahar, M R; Soundararajan, P

    2008-05-01

    Transplantation of human organs is undoubtedly one of the greatest medical breakthroughs of this century. However, few Indian patients are able to benefit from this medical advance. It is estimated that in India every year over 152,000 people are diagnosed to have end-stage renal failure needing renal transplantation. The Transplantation of Human Organs Act passed by the Indian parliament in 1994 was subsequently ratified by the state legislature of Tamil Nadu in May 1995. It accepted brain death as a form of death and prohibited commerce in organs. The first cadaveric kidney transplant in Sri Ramachandra medical college was performed in 1995 with 68 cadaveric kidney transplants thereafter. The mean age of the donors was 36 +/- 12.8 years. The mean cold ischemia time was 5.6 +/- 3.2 hours. As many as 14 donors displayed acute renal failure (serum creatinine more than 1.2 mg/dL). Immediate graft function was established in 34 patients (50%). Four had graft rupture, two of which were successfully repaired. Postoperatively 12 patients (17.6%) displayed delayed graft function requiring dialysis. During the first year, 18 patients (26.4%) experienced acute rejection episodes, of which 14 were cellular and four vascular rejection types. As many as eight patients were lost to follow-up within one year; the mean follow-up time was 968 +/- 86 days. Patient survival at 1 year was 88.2% and that of the graft 73.5%. The 5-year patient and graft survival rates were 61.7% and 58.8%, respectively. The mean serum creatinine of patients currently followed is 2.2 +/- 0.86 mg/dL. The rate of cadaver kidney transplantation in India is low despite initiatives by our university to promote donation. Creating a positive public attitude, early brain death identification, and certification, prompt consent for organ donation, adequate hospital infrastructure, and support logistics are prerequisites for successful organ transplantation.

  11. Fatal Apophysomyces elegans infection transmitted by deceased donor renal allografts.

    PubMed

    Alexander, B D; Schell, W A; Siston, A M; Rao, C Y; Bower, W A; Balajee, S A; Howell, D N; Moore, Z S; Noble-Wang, J; Rhyne, J A; Fleischauer, A T; Maillard, J M; Kuehnert, M; Vikraman, D; Collins, B H; Marroquin, C E; Park, B J

    2010-09-01

    Two patients developed renal mucormycosis following transplantation of kidneys from the same donor, a near-drowning victim in a motor vehicle crash. Genotypically, indistinguishable strains of Apophysomyces elegans were recovered from both recipients. We investigated the source of the infection including review of medical records, environmental sampling at possible locations of contamination and query for additional cases at other centers. Histopathology of the explanted kidneys revealed extensive vascular invasion by aseptate, fungal hyphae with relative sparing of the renal capsules suggesting a vascular route of contamination. Disseminated infection in the donor could not be definitively established. A. elegans was not recovered from the same lots of reagents used for organ recovery or environmental samples and no other organ transplant-related cases were identified. This investigation suggests either isolated contamination of the organs during recovery or undiagnosed disseminated donor infection following a near-drowning event. Although no changes to current organ recovery or transplant procedures are recommended, public health officials and transplant physicians should consider the possibility of mucormycosis transmitted via organs in the future, particularly for near-drowning events. Attention to aseptic technique during organ recovery and processing is re-emphasized. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  12. Donor origin of BKV replication after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Corinna; Raggub, Lubna; Linnenweber-Held, Silvia; Adams, Ortwin; Schwarz, Anke; Heim, Albert

    2014-02-01

    BK virus associated nephropathy (BKVN) leads to renal allograft dysfunction and loss. However, it is still unclear whether BKV replication in the transplant recipient is a result of reactivation in the recipient's native kidneys or whether BKV originates from the donor kidney. Urine of 249 donor/recipient pairs was investigated for the presence of BKV-DNA by qPCR before living transplantation (Tx) and consecutively after Tx. In BKV positive samples, the VP1 typing region (TR) and, in case of the presence of sufficient amount of DNA, the complete VP1 gene, the NCCR and a fragment of the Large T-antigen were sequenced and compared between donors and corresponding recipients before and after Tx. In 20 pairs, sequencing of the BKV TR succeeded in donors and corresponding recipients after Tx. The derived sequences were completely identical in donor and post-Tx recipient samples. For comparison, identical TR sequences were detected in only 24% of 1068 randomly assembled pairs. This difference was statistically highly significant (p<0.0001, Fisher's exact test). Furthermore, all VP1, Large T-antigen and NCCR BKV sequences were also identical between donors and corresponding post-Tx recipients. In two of the 20 donor/recipient pairs, VP1 TR sequencing was also successful from the recipient before Tx. In both cases the sequence differed from the sequence detected in donor and recipient after Tx giving further evidence that recipient BKV was replaced by donor BKV after Tx. Our study for the first time provides evidence of BKV donor origin in renal transplant recipients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The first two cadaveric renal transplantations in Blida, Algeria.

    PubMed

    Si-ahmed, E M

    2011-11-01

    Currently, living related donor renal transplantation is the most common source for transplantation in Algeria. To develop cadaveric organ donation, the Blida Transplantation Team (BTT) started a local education program and campaign. On March 31, 2010, we procured and transplanted 2 kidneys from a 17-year-old brain-dead donor. The BTT is conscious that the local initiative must be followed nationally, with the help of the health authorities. There is an urgent need to promote brain-dead donors and cadaveric organ retriveal throughout the country. It will also be necessary to create national waiting lists for candidates not only for renal, but also for other organ transplantations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Extended Criteria Donors in Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vodkin, Irine; Kuo, Alexander

    2017-05-01

    Mortality rates on the liver transplant waiting list are increasing. The shortage of organs has resulted in higher utilization of extended criteria donors (ECDs), with centers pushing the limits of what is acceptable for transplantation. Donor quality is more appropriately represented as a continuum of risk, and careful selection and matching of ECD grafts with recipients may lead to excellent outcomes. Although there is no precise definition for what constitutes an ECD liver, this review focuses on frequently cited characteristics, including donor age, steatosis, donation after cardiac death, and donors with increased risk of disease transmission.

  15. Historical perspective of living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, See Ching; Fan, Sheung Tat

    2008-01-01

    Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) has gone through its formative years and established as a legitimate treatment when a deceased donor liver graft is not timely or simply not available at all. Nevertheless, LDLT is characterized by its technical complexity and ethical controversy. These are the consequences of a single organ having to serve two subjects, the donor and the recipient, instantaneously. The transplant community has a common ground on assuring donor safety while achieving predictable recipient success. With this background, a reflection of the development of LDLT may be appropriate to direct future research and patient-care efforts on this life-saving treatment alternative. PMID:18176956

  16. The Living Kidney Donor Evaluation: Focus on Renal Issues

    PubMed Central

    Kher, Ajay; Mandelbrot, Didier A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Living kidney donor evaluations and follow-up have previously been addressed mostly by transplant physicians and surgeons. However, this area is significantly informed by basic principles of renal physiology and is of increasing clinical interest to general nephrologists. The general nephrology community is increasingly involved in evaluating the suitability of potential donors and in following them after donation when questions are raised about low GFR, hypertension, and other renal concerns. This article focuses on some of the most central and common issues that arise in evaluating potential donors and attempts to provide guidance on the basis of our review of the living donor literature, extrapolations from the general nephrology literature, and our own clinical experience. PMID:22223615

  17. The living kidney donor evaluation: focus on renal issues.

    PubMed

    Kher, Ajay; Mandelbrot, Didier A

    2012-02-01

    Living kidney donor evaluations and follow-up have previously been addressed mostly by transplant physicians and surgeons. However, this area is significantly informed by basic principles of renal physiology and is of increasing clinical interest to general nephrologists. The general nephrology community is increasingly involved in evaluating the suitability of potential donors and in following them after donation when questions are raised about low GFR, hypertension, and other renal concerns. This article focuses on some of the most central and common issues that arise in evaluating potential donors and attempts to provide guidance on the basis of our review of the living donor literature, extrapolations from the general nephrology literature, and our own clinical experience.

  18. Renal transplantation in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, S A H; Naqvi, S A A; Zafar, M N

    2002-01-01

    The economic indicators of Pakistan show that the GNP is dollar 70 billion and foreign exchange reserves stand at dollar 8.0 billion and foreign debt at more than dollar 36 billion. Against this backdrop, the government is unlikely to provide state-of-the-art facilities for management of end-stage organ failure. The unequal distribution of wealth leaves more than 40% below the poverty line. Economic solutions are based on temporary fixes where foreign aid and loans keeps the government machinery operational. Many of the basic health measures such as immunization are also foreign funded. Under such a scenario, local philanthropy has come to play a vital role. SIUT developed a model based on self-help--a model based on a community-government partnership, where the doctor plays the pivotal role and the beneficiary is the patient. SIUT acquired funds by developing a community-government partnership. The government fulfills about 40% of the total budget and the rest comes from the community as donations. The scheme has been extremely successful in providing free medical care and renal support to thousands of patients. It has been sustained over the past 15 years through complete transparency, public audit and accountability. These confidence-building means stimulate the community to come forward and donate money, equipment and medicines. The goal of transplantation is to provide organs to all with long-term survival of the graft. The emerging challenges to achieve this goal and efforts that can be made to increase and sustain transplant activity in Pakistan require a concerted effort on the part of the government, society and the medical profession.

  19. [Psychiatric problems in organ transplants: examples on the renal transplants from living relatives in Japan].

    PubMed

    Haruki, Shigekazu

    2005-11-01

    There has been an increase of the renal transplants from living relatives, making over 80% of all renal transplants thus leaving under 17% of them from cadaveric. As for living donors, anxiety and fear of physical vulnerability, possible complications/disabilities, and death/dying, triggered by the hospitalization; a sense of guilt and/or self-blame, or seeking for rewards/compensation, triggered by the transplant; and introjection, probiosis, regression, often presented post transplant. Depression is one of the significant problems among donors after failed transplant, but also even after successful renal transplant. It is called "paradoxical depression". As for recipients, anxiety, guilt feeling, anger are very common psychological issues before the operation. There are number of young adults who present marked anger and short temper, aggression and acting-out behavior as their defense mechanisms.

  20. Living donor liver transplantation in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Testa, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Living donor liver transplant (LDLT) accounts for a small volume of the transplants in the USA. Due to the current liver allocation system based on the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD), LDLT has a unique role in providing life-saving transplantation for patients with low MELD scores and significant complications from portal hypertension, as well as select patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Donor safety is paramount and has been a topic of much discussion in the transplant community as well as the general media. The donor risk appears to be low overall, with a favorable long-term quality of life. The latest trend has been a gradual shift from right-lobe grafts to left-lobe grafts to reduce donor risk, provided that the left lobe can provide adequate liver volume for the recipient. PMID:27115007

  1. Effect of intraoperative transesophageal Doppler-guided fluid therapy versus central venous pressure-guided fluid therapy on renal allograft outcome in patients undergoing living donor renal transplant surgery: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Divya; Sahu, Sandeep; Chandra, Abhilash; Tiwari, Tanmay; Kumar, Sanjay; Singh, P K

    2015-12-01

    Transesophageal Doppler (TED)-guided intraoperative fluid therapy has shown to noninvasively optimize intravascular volume and reduce postoperative morbidity. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of Doppler-guided intraoperative fluid administration and central venous pressure (CVP)-guided fluid therapy on renal allograft outcome and postoperative complications. A prospective nonrandomized active controlled study was conducted on end-stage renal disease patients scheduled for living donor renal transplant surgery. 110 patients received intraoperative fluid guided by corrected flow time (FTc) and variation in stroke volume values obtained by continuous TED monitoring. Data of 104 patients in whom intraoperative fluid administration was guided by CVP values were retrospectively obtained for a control. The amount of intraoperative fluid given in the study group (12.20 ± 4.24 ml/kg/h) was significantly lower than in the controls (22.21 ± 4.67 ml/kg/h). The amount of colloid used was also significantly less and fewer recipients were seen to require colloid (69 vs 85%). The mean arterial pressures were comparable throughout. CVP reached was 7.18 ± 3.17 mmHg in the study group. It was significantly higher in the controls (13.42 ± 3.12 mmHg). The postoperative graft function and rate of dysfunction were comparable. Side-effects like postoperative dyspnoea (4.8 vs 0%) and tissue edema (9.6 vs 2.7%) were higher in the controls. FTc-guided intraoperative fluid therapy achieved the same rate of immediate graft function as CVP-guided fluid therapy but used a significantly less amount of fluid. The incidence of postoperative complications related to fluid overload was also reduced. The use of TED may replace invasive central line insertions in the future.

  2. Antiphospholipid syndrome in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Thomas D; Crosthwaite, Amy; Chow, Kevin; Finlay, Moira J; Better, Nathan; Hughes, Peter D; Cohney, Solomon J

    2014-04-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) may occur in isolation or in association with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), with the potential to cause renal failure via several distinct pathologies. Renal transplantation in the presence of APS carries a risk of early graft loss from arterial or venous thrombosis, or thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Whilst perioperative anticoagulation reduces the risk of large vessel thrombosis, it may result in significant haemorrhage, and its efficacy in preventing post-transplant TMA is uncertain. Here, we report a patient with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) due to lupus nephritis and APS, in whom allograft TMA developed soon after transplantation despite partial anticoagulation. TMA resolved with plasma exchange-based therapy albeit with some irreversible graft damage and renal impairment. We discuss the differential diagnosis of post-transplant TMA, and current treatment options.

  3. Multidetector row computed tomography evaluation of potential living laparoscopic renal donors: the story so far.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, Saravanan; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Small, William C; Torres, William E; Mittal, Pardeep K

    2006-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease. Living related kidney donation is the major source of renal grafts due to limited availability of cadaveric kidneys. Open nephrectomy was used to harvest donor kidneys. However, the laparoscopic approach is associated with less postoperative pain and quick recovery. So, most centers now prefer a laparoscopic approach to explant donor kidneys. Laparoscopic approach is technically challenging due to limited operative visibility. Hence, accurate preoperative detection of renal arterial and venous anomalies is imperative to avoid inadvertent vascular injury and bleeding. The preoperative workup of renal donors includes clinical evaluation, laboratory tests, and imaging. Traditionally, the renal donors were evaluated with conventional imaging techniques, which included renal catheter angiography and intravenous urography. However, conventional imaging is invasive, expensive, and less accurate for evaluation of complex renal venous anomalies, small calculi, and diffuse or focal renal parenchymal lesions. The introduction of multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) revolutionized the CT technology by enabling isotropic resolution with faster scan coverage in a single, short breath-hold. Consequently, MDCT has now replaced conventional imaging for comprehensive imaging of potential living renal donors. MDCT is a minimally invasive technique that can accurately detect urolithiasis, renal arterial and venous anomalies, renal parenchymal lesions, and urinary tract anomalies. Renal vascular anomalies detected by MDCT can help the surgeon in planning donor nephrectomy. MDCT with three-dimensional CT angiography enables accurate preoperative renal vascular mapping. This article reviews the role of MDCT in preoperative evaluation of potential laparoscopic renal donors.

  4. APOL1 genotype and kidney transplantation outcomes from deceased African American donors

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Barry I.; Pastan, Stephen O.; Israni, Ajay K.; Schladt, David; Julian, Bruce A.; Gautreaux, Michael D.; Hauptfeld, Vera; Bray, Robert A.; Gebel, Howard M.; Kirk, Allan D.; Gaston, Robert S.; Rogers, Jeffrey; Farney, Alan C.; Orlando, Giuseppe; Stratta, Robert J.; Mohan, Sumit; Ma, Lijun; Langefeld, Carl D.; Bowden, Donald W.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Palanisamy, Amudha; Reeves-Daniel, Amber M.; Brown, W. Mark; Divers, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Background Two apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) renal-risk variants in donors and African American (AA) recipient race are associated with worse allograft survival in deceased-donor kidney transplantation (DDKT) from AA donors. To detect other factors impacting allograft survival from deceased AA kidney donors, APOL1 renal-risk variants were genotyped in additional AA kidney donors. Methods APOL1 genotypes were linked to outcomes in 478 newly analyzed DDKTs in the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients. Multivariate analyses accounting for recipient age, sex, race, panel reactive antibody level, HLA match, cold ischemia time, donor age, and expanded-criteria donation were performed. These 478 transplantations and 675 DDKTs from a prior report were jointly analyzed. Results Fully-adjusted analyses limited to the new 478 DDKTs replicated shorter renal allograft survival in recipients of APOL1-two-renal-risk-variant kidneys (HR 2.00; p=0.03). Combined analysis of 1153 DDKTs from AA donors revealed donor APOL1 high-risk genotype (HR 2.05; p=3×10−4), older donor age (HR 1.18; p=0.05), and younger recipient age (HR 0.70; p=0.001) adversely impacted allograft survival. Although prolonged allograft survival was seen in many recipients of APOL1-two-renal-risk-variant kidneys, follow-up serum creatinine concentrations were higher than in recipients of zero/one APOL1-renal-risk variant kidneys. A competing risk analysis revealed that APOL1 impacted renal allograft survival, but not recipient survival. Interactions between donor age and APOL1 genotype on renal allograft survival were non-significant. Conclusions Shorter renal allograft survival is reproducibly observed after DDKT from APOL1-two-renal-risk-variant donors. Younger recipient age and older donor age have independent adverse effects on renal allograft survival. PMID:26566060

  5. APOL1 Genotype and Kidney Transplantation Outcomes From Deceased African American Donors.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Barry I; Pastan, Stephen O; Israni, Ajay K; Schladt, David; Julian, Bruce A; Gautreaux, Michael D; Hauptfeld, Vera; Bray, Robert A; Gebel, Howard M; Kirk, Allan D; Gaston, Robert S; Rogers, Jeffrey; Farney, Alan C; Orlando, Giuseppe; Stratta, Robert J; Mohan, Sumit; Ma, Lijun; Langefeld, Carl D; Bowden, Donald W; Hicks, Pamela J; Palmer, Nicholette D; Palanisamy, Amudha; Reeves-Daniel, Amber M; Brown, W Mark; Divers, Jasmin

    2016-01-01

    Two apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) renal-risk variants in donors and African American (AA) recipient race are associated with worse allograft survival in deceased-donor kidney transplantation (DDKT) from AA donors. To detect other factors impacting allograft survival from deceased AA kidney donors, APOL1 renal-risk variants were genotyped in additional AA kidney donors. The APOL1 genotypes were linked to outcomes in 478 newly analyzed DDKTs in the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients. Multivariate analyses accounting for recipient age, sex, race, panel-reactive antibody level, HLA match, cold ischemia time, donor age, and expanded criteria donation were performed. These 478 transplantations and 675 DDKTs from a prior report were jointly analyzed. Fully adjusted analyses limited to the new 478 DDKTs replicated shorter renal allograft survival in recipients of APOL1 2-renal-risk-variant kidneys (hazard ratio [HR], 2.00; P = 0.03). Combined analysis of 1153 DDKTs from AA donors revealed donor APOL1 high-risk genotype (HR, 2.05; P = 3 × 10), older donor age (HR, 1.18; P = 0.05), and younger recipient age (HR, 0.70; P = 0.001) adversely impacted allograft survival. Although prolonged allograft survival was seen in many recipients of APOL1 2-renal-risk-variant kidneys, follow-up serum creatinine concentrations were higher than that in recipients of 0/1 APOL1 renal-risk-variant kidneys. A competing risk analysis revealed that APOL1 impacted renal allograft survival, but not recipient survival. Interactions between donor age and APOL1 genotype on renal allograft survival were nonsignificant. Shorter renal allograft survival is reproducibly observed after DDKT from APOL1 2-renal-risk-variant donors. Younger recipient age and older donor age have independent adverse effects on renal allograft survival.

  6. Uterus transplantation from a deceased donor.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Omer; Akar, Munire Erman; Erdogan, Okan; Ozkan, Ozlenen; Hadimioglu, Necmiye

    2013-12-01

    To demonstrate the technique for uterus retrieval and transplantation from a multiorgan donor. Video presentation of our case report. The video uses animation to demonstrate the technique. Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval was obtained. University hospital. A 21-year-old woman with complete müllerian agenesis. Uterus allotransplantation has been performed from a deceased donor. Acquirement of cyclic menstrual function. This video demonstrates the technique for uterus retrieval, perfusion, and transplantation. The recipient patient has been monitored regularly for vascular flow, immunosuppression, and infection control since the operation. Uterus transplantation requires extensive evaluation of the recipient and donor by an experienced multidisciplinary transplantation team both pre- and postoperatively. It has major risks related to surgery, immunosuppression, and pregnancy. Uterus transplantation might be considered promising only after the birth of a near-term healthy baby. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Socioeconomic deprivation and barriers to live-donor kidney transplantation: a qualitative study of deceased-donor kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Phillippa K; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Tomson, Charles R V; Owen-Smith, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Socioeconomically deprived individuals with renal disease are less likely to receive a live-donor kidney transplant than less-deprived individuals. This qualitative study aimed to identify reasons for the observed socioeconomic disparity in live-donor kidney transplantation. Design A qualitative study using face-to-face in-depth semistructured interviews. Setting A UK tertiary renal referral hospital and transplant centre. Participants Purposive sampling was used to select deceased-donor transplant recipients from areas of high socioeconomic deprivation (SED) (19 participants), followed by a low SED comparison group (13 participants), aiming for maximum diversity in terms of age, gender, ethnicity, primary renal disease and previous renal replacement therapy. Methods Participants were interviewed following their routine transplant clinic review. Interviews were digitally audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were coded using NVivo software and analysed using the constant comparison method described in Grounded Theory. Results Themes common and distinct to each socioeconomic group emerged. 6 themes appeared to distinguish between individuals from areas of high and low SED. 4 themes were distinct to participants from areas of high SED: (1) Passivity, (2) Disempowerment, (3) Lack of social support and (4) Short-term focus. 2 themes were distinct to the low SED group: (1) Financial concerns and (2) Location of donor. Conclusions Several of the emerging themes from the high SED individuals relate to an individual's lack of confidence and skill in managing their health and healthcare; themes that are in keeping with low levels of patient activation. Inadequate empowerment of socioeconomically deprived individuals by healthcare practitioners was also described. Financial concerns did not emerge as a barrier from interviews with the high SED group. Interventions aiming to redress the observed socioeconomic inequity should be targeted at both

  8. Impact of donor mismatches at individual HLA-A, -B, -C, -DR, and -DQ loci on the development of HLA-specific antibodies in patients listed for repeat renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kosmoliaptsis, Vasilios; Gjorgjimajkoska, Olivera; Sharples, Linda D; Chaudhry, Afzal N; Chatzizacharias, Nikolaos; Peacock, Sarah; Torpey, Nicholas; Bolton, Eleanor M; Taylor, Craig J; Bradley, J Andrew

    2014-11-01

    We have analyzed the relationship between donor mismatches at each HLA locus and development of HLA locus-specific antibodies in patients listed for repeat transplantation. HLA antibody screening was undertaken using single-antigen beads in 131 kidney transplant recipients returning to the transplant waiting list following first graft failure. The number of HLA mismatches and the calculated reaction frequency of antibody reactivity against 10,000 consecutive deceased organ donors were determined for each HLA locus. Two-thirds of patients awaiting repeat transplantation were sensitized (calculated reaction frequency over 15%) and half were highly sensitized (calculated reaction frequency of 85% and greater). Antibody levels peaked after re-listing for repeat transplantation, were independent of graft nephrectomy and were associated with length of time on the waiting list (odds ratio 8.4) and with maintenance on dual immunosuppression (odds ratio 0.2). Sensitization was independently associated with increasing number of donor HLA mismatches (odds ratio 1.4). All mismatched HLA loci contributed to the development of HLA locus-specific antibodies (HLA-A: odds ratio 3.2, HLA-B: odds ratio 3.4, HLA-C: odds ratio 2.5, HLA-DRB1: odds ratio 3.5, HLA-DRB3/4/5: odds ratio 3.9, and HLA-DQ: odds ratio 3.0 (all significant)). Thus, the risk of allosensitization following failure of a first renal transplant increases incrementally with the number of mismatches at all HLA loci assessed. Maintenance of re-listed patients on dual immunosuppression was associated with a reduced risk of sensitization.

  9. Outcomes of shipped live donor kidney transplants compared with traditional living donor kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Treat, Eric G; Miller, Eric T; Kwan, Lorna; Connor, Sarah E; Maliski, Sally L; Hicks, Elisabeth M; Williams, Kristen C; Whitted, Lauren A; Gritsch, Hans A; McGuire, Suzanne M; Mone, Thomas D; Veale, Jeffrey L

    2014-11-01

    The disparity between kidney transplant candidates and donors necessitates innovations to increase organ availability. Transporting kidneys allows for living donors and recipients to undergo surgery with a familiar transplant team, city, friends, and family. The effect of shipping kidneys and prolonged cold ischemia time (CIT) with living donor transplantation outcomes is not clearly known. This retrospective matched (age, gender, race, and year of procedure) cohort study compared allograft outcomes for shipped live donor kidney transplants and nonshipped living donor kidney transplants. Fifty-seven shipped live donor kidneys were transplanted from 31 institutions in 26 cities. The mean shipping distance was 1634 miles (range 123-2811) with mean CIT of 12.1 ± 2.8 h. The incidence of delayed graft function in the shipped cohort was 1.8% (1/57) compared to 0% (0/57) in the nonshipped cohort. The 1-year allograft survival was 98% in both cohorts. There were no significant differences between the mean serum creatinine values or the rates of serum creatinine decline in the immediate postoperative period even after adjusted for gender and differences in recipient and donor BMI. Despite prolonged CITs, outcomes for shipped live donor kidney transplants were similar when compared to matched nonshipped living donor kidney transplants.

  10. Hepatitis B in renal transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Marinaki, Smaragdi; Kolovou, Kyriaki; Sakellariou, Stratigoula; Boletis, John N; Delladetsima, Ioanna K

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) poses a significant challenge for both dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients despite its decreasing rates, especially in developed countries. The best preventive method is vaccination. Patients with chronic renal disease should ideally be vaccinated prior to dialysis, otherwise, reinforced vaccination practices and close antibody titer monitoring should be applied while on dialysis. HBV infected dialysis patients who are renal transplant candidates must be thoroughly examined by HBV-DNA, and liver enzyme testing and by liver biopsy. When needed, one must consider treating patients with tenofovir or entecavir rather than lamivudine. Depending on the cirrhosis stage, dialysis patients are eligible transplant recipients for either a combined kidney-liver procedure in the case of decompensated cirrhosis or a lone kidney transplantation since even compensated cirrhosis after sustained viral responders is no longer considered an absolute contraindication. Nucleoside analogues have led to improved transplantation outcomes with both long-term patient and graft survival rates nearing those of HBsAg(-) recipients. Moreover, in the cases of immunized HBsAg(-) potential recipients with concurrent prophylaxis, we are enabled today to safely use renal grafts from both HBsAg(+) and HBsAg(-)/anti-HBc(+) donors. In so doing, we avoid unnecessary organ discarding. Universal prophylaxis with entecavir is recommended in HBV kidney recipients and should start perioperatively. One of the most important issues in HBV(+) kidney transplantation is the duration of antiviral prophylaxis. In the absence of robust data, it seems that prophylactic treatment may be discontinued in selected stable, low-risk recipients during maintenance immunosuppression and should be reintroduced when the immune status is altered. All immunosuppressive agents in kidney transplantation can be used in HBV(+) recipients. Immunosuppression is intimately associated with increased

  11. Clinical Operational Tolerance After Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Orlando, Giuseppe; Hematti, Peiman; Stratta, Robert J.; Burke, George W.; Di Cocco, Pierpaolo; Pisani, Francesco; Soker, Shay; Wood, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    In solid organ transplantation, the achievement of an immunosuppression (IS)-free state [also referred to as clinical operational tolerance (COT)] represents the ultimate goal. Although COT is feasible and safe in selected cases after liver transplantation, it is an exceptional finding after other types of solid organ transplantation. In the field of renal transplantation (RT), approximately 100 cases of COT have been reported to date, mainly in patients who were not compliant with their immunosuppressive regimens or in individuals who had previously received a bone marrow transplant for hematological disorders. On the basis of promising results obtained in animal models, several tolerogenic protocols have been attempted in humans, but most have failed to achieve robust and stable COT after RT. Molecule-based regimens have been largely ineffective, whereas cell-based regimens have provided some encouraging results. In these latter regimens, apart from standard IS, patients usually receive perioperative infusion of donor bone marrow–derived stem cells, which are able to interact with the immune cells of the host and mitigate their response to engraftment. Unfortunately, most renal transplant patients who developed acute rejection—occurring either during the weaning protocol or after complete withdrawal of IS—eventually lost their grafts. Currently, the immune monitoring necessary for predicting the presence and persistence of donor-specific unresponsiveness is not available. Overall, the present review will provide a conceptual framework for COT and conclude that stable and robust COT after RT remains an elusive goal and that the different strategies attempted to date are not yet reproducibly safe or effective. PMID:21107102

  12. Pregnancy in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Karin M; Wu, Danny; Ebcioglu, Zeynep

    2007-12-01

    Women with renal disease face increasing infertility and high-risk pregnancy as they approach end-stage renal disease due to uremia. Renal transplantation has provided these patients the ability to return to a better quality of life, and for a number of women who are of child bearing age with renal disease, it has restored their fertility and provided the opportunity to have children. But, although fertility is restored, pregnancy in these women still harbors risk to the mother, graft, and fetus. Selected patients who have stable graft function can have successful pregnancies under the supervision of a multidisciplinary team involving maternal fetal medicine specialists and transplant nephrologists. Careful observation and management are required to optimize outcome for mother and fetus.

  13. Acute leukaemia following renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Subar, M; Gucalp, R; Benstein, J; Williams, G; Wiernik, P H

    1996-03-01

    Four renal transplant patients on immunosuppressive therapy who presented with acute myeloid leukaemia are described. In two cases, azathioprine may have played an important role as a cofactor in leukaemogenesis. In a third case, the alkylating agent cyclophosphamide may have contributed. All patients were treated for leukaemia with full doses of cytotoxic chemotherapy and, in each case, a functioning renal allograft was preserved throughout the treatment despite attenuation of immunosuppressive therapy. Three patients achieved complete remission. Of the three, one is surviving at 2 years and two expired during the pancytopenic phase of their treatment with no active leukaemia present, and with intact renal function. As increasing expertise in the field of organ transplantation allows patients to survive longer, such patients' exposure to immunosuppressive and potentially leukaemogenic drugs is prolonged. The risk of secondary neoplasia has been previously documented in this population. Two of the four cases reported here suffered from polycystic kidney disease as their underlying condition. While this report suggests that the leukaemias are related to renal transplantation, we cannot rule out an association with the underlying disease which led to the transplant. This report further suggests that the leukaemia that develops in such patients may respond to standard therapy, and that such treatment does not compromise the transplanted kidney.

  14. How deceased donor transplantation is impacting a decline in commercial transplantation-the Tamil Nadu experience.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Georgi; Reddy, Yuvaram N V; Amalorpavanathan, Joseph; Daniel, Dolly; Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir; Shroff, Sunil; Reddy, Yogesh

    2012-04-27

    India with a population of 1.2 billion has a renal transplantation rate of 3.25 per million population. The major cause of chronic kidney disease is hypertension and diabetes. The crude and age-adjusted incidence rates of end-stage renal disease are estimated to be 151 and 232 per million population, respectively, in India. There was a remarkable lack of knowledge in the public about deceased organ donation until a decade ago. However, the role played by the media and nongovernmental organizations in partnership with the government has emphasized and implemented deceased donor transplantation in certain states in India-to mention particularly, the Tamil Nadu model. In the last 2 years, deceased organ donation has reached 1.3 per million population in Tamil Nadu, thereby effectively eliminating commercial transplantation. There is no religious bar for organ donation. A central transplant coordinator appointed by the government oversees legitimate and transparent allocation of deceased organs both in the public and private facilities as per the transplant waiting list. This model also takes care of the poor sections of society by conducting donation and transplantation through government-run public facilities free of cost. In the last 2 years, deceased donor transplantation has been performed through this network procuring organs such as the heart, heart valves, lung, liver, kidneys, cornea, and skin. The infrastructural lack of immunological surveillance-including donor-specific antibody monitoring, human leukocyte antigen typing, and panel reactive antibody except in a few tertiary care centers-prevents allocation according to the immunological status of the recipient. This private-public partnership promoting deceased donor transplantation has effectively eliminated commercialization in transplantation in the state of Tamil Nadu with a population of 72 million which is a model for other regions of South Asia and developing countries.

  15. The Iranian model of living renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi-Mazdeh, Mitra

    2012-09-01

    Organ shortage for transplantation remains a worldwide serious problem for kidney patients with end-stage renal failure, and several countries have tried different models to address this issue. Iran has 20 years of experience with one such model that involves the active role of the government and charity foundations. Patients with a desperate demand for a kidney have given rise to a black market of brokers and other forms of organ commercialism only accessible to those with sufficient financial resources. The current Iranian model has enabled most of the Iranian kidney transplant candidates, irrespective of socioeconomic class, to have access to kidney transplantation. The Iranian government has committed a large budget through funding hospital and staff at the Ministry of Health and Medical Education by supporting the brain death donation (BDD) program or redirecting part of the budget of living unrelated renal donation (LURD) to the BDD program. It has been shown that it did not prevent the development and progression of a BDD program. However, the LURD program is characterized by several controversial procedures (e.g., confrontation of donor and recipient at the end of the evaluation procedure along with some financial interactions) that should be ethically reviewed. Operational weaknesses such as the lack of a registration system and long-term follow-up of the donors are identified as the 'Achilles heel of the model'.

  16. Impact of ABO incompatible kidney transplantation on living donor transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background ABO incompatible kidney transplantation (ABOi-KT) is an important approach for overcoming donor shortages. We evaluated the effect of ABOi-KT on living donor KT. Methods Two nationwide transplantation databases were used. We evaluated the impact of ABOi-KT on overall living donor transplant activity and spousal donation as subgroup analysis. In addition, we compared the clinical outcome between ABOi-KT and ABO compatible KT (ABOc-KT) from spousal donor, and performed a Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to define the risk factors affecting the allograft outcomes. Result The introduction of ABOi-KT increased overall living donor KT by 12.2% and its portion was increased from 0.3% to 21.7% during study period. The ABOi-KT in living unrelated KT was two times higher than that of living related donor KT (17.8 vs.9.8%). Spousal donor was a major portion of living unrelated KT (77.6%) and ABOi-KT increased spousal donation from 10% to 31.5% in living donor KT. In addition, increasing rate ABOi-KT from spousal donor was 10 times higher than that of living related donor. The clinical outcome (incidence of acute rejection, allograft function, and allograft and patient survival rates) of ABOi-KT from spousal donor was comparable to that of ABOc-KT. Neither ABO incompatibility nor spousal donor was associated with acute rejection or allograft failure on multivariate analysis. Conclusions ABOi-KT increased overall living donor KT, and ABOi-KT from spousal donor is rapidly increasing with favorable clinical outcomes. PMID:28323892

  17. The Impact of Repeated Mismatches in Kidney Transplantations Performed After Non-Renal Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Côté, J M; Zhang, X; Dahhou, M; Sapir-Picchadze, R; Foster, B; Cardinal, H

    2017-09-11

    The aim of this study was to determine whether kidney transplantations performed after previous non-renal solid organ transplants are associated with worse graft survival when there are repeated HLA mismatches (RMM) with the previous donor(s). We performed a retrospective cohort study using data from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients. Our cohort comprised 6, 624 kidney transplantations performed between January 1(st) 1990 and January 1(st) , 2015. All patients had previously received one or more non-renal solid organ transplants. RMM were observed in 35.3% of kidney transplantations and 3, 012 grafts were lost over a median follow-up of 5.4 years. In multivariate Cox regression analyses, we found no association between overall graft survival and either RMM in class 1 (hazard ratio (HR): 0.97, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.89-1.07) or class 2 (HR: 0.95, 95% CI 0.85- 1.06). Results were similar for the associations between RMM, death-censored graft survival and patient survival. Our results suggest that the presence of RMM with previous donor(s) does not have an important impact on allograft survival in kidney transplant recipients who have previously received a non-renal solid organ transplant. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. The UNOS Renal Transplant Registry: Review of the Last Decade.

    PubMed

    Andre, Mark; Huang, Edmund; Everly, Matthew; Bunnapradist, Suphamai

    2014-01-01

    Kidney transplantation has become a preferred treatment for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) as transplant recipients enjoy freedom from dialysis and improvement in both quality and quantity of life. More patients are being placed on the transplant waiting list, although the waiting list patients still only represent a very small fraction of ESRD patients. The characteristics of both waitlisted and transplanted patients have changed considerably in the last decade, as the ESRD population has aged and waiting list times have increased. Over the last 10 years, we have witnessed an increasingly severe shortage of kidney donors. Even with increasing efforts of the transplant community to expand the donor pool by including larger numbers of high risk deceased donor transplants, the overall number of kidney transplants has remained relatively stable. Those who do receive transplants, however, benefit from excellent transplant outcomes. The use of paired exchange/chain transplant donors has increased the living donor pool significantly and with outstanding results. Belatacept, a costimulation blockage drug, represents a new class of transplant immunosuppression. It has been used sparingly in the first few years of its approval. Most kidney transplant patients are still maintained on immunosuppressive agents that were approved almost two decades ago. In the next decade, we will certainly continue to deal with an organ shortage as the number of eligible and waitlisted patients is likely to increase. Effective and efficient organ allocation policies will be increasingly necessary to address this scarcity. Optimizing the transplant candidate work-up, improving maintenance of waitlisted patients, and providing optimal post-transplant medical care will be vital to the continued success of kidney transplantation.

  19. [Kidney donors and kidney transplantation in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Giessing, M; Conrad, S; Schönberger, B; Huland, H; Budde, K; Neumayer, H-H; Loening, S A

    2004-08-01

    The likelihood of terminal renal insufficiency escalates with age, increasing the risk of dying as a patient requiring dialysis. In 1999, Eurotransplant initiated the Eurotransplant Senior Programm (ESP), in which the kidneys of old donors (>64 years) are allocated to recipients 64 years and older. Allocation does not take HLA-matching into account and is performed regionally only according to blood-group-compatibility to keep the storage time short. As a consequence of the short ischemic time, and thus reduced non-immunological damage to the anyways susceptible old kidney, graft-function and graft-survival in the ESP are very good. The results of the initial 5 years of this program show that it successfully utilizes more kidneys from old donors and that more old recipients are being transplanted, with a satisfactory graft-function. Increased donor- and/or recipient age require a thorough evaluation to exclude malignant and other diseases. Furthermore, short term controls on the waiting list and following kidney transplantation are prerequisites for successful transplantation in the aged recipient. If this is guaranteed, kidney transplantation in the old recipient-even with old donor organs-is a good alternative to the morbidity of a prolonged dialysis. Nevertheless, the role of HLA-matching should be reconsidered to reduce rejections.

  20. Living donor liver transplantation in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Marwan, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    In Egypt there is no doubt that chronic liver diseases are a major health concern. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevalence among the 15−59 years age group is estimated to be 14.7%. The high prevalence of chronic liver diseases has led to increasing numbers of Egyptian patients suffering from end stage liver disease (ESLD), necessitating liver transplantation (LT). We reviewed the evolution of LT in Egypt and the current status. A single center was chosen as an example to review the survival and mortality rates. To date, deceased donor liver transplantation (DDLT) has not been implemented in any program though Egyptian Parliament approved the law in 2010. Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) seemed to be the only logical choice to save many patients who are in desperate need for LT. By that time, there was increase in number of centers doing LDLT (13 centers) and increase in number of LDLT cases [2,400] with improvement of the results. Donor mortality rate is 1.66 per 1,000 donors; this comprised four donors in the Egyptian series. The exact recipient survival is not accurately known however, and the one-year, three-year and five-year survival were 73.17%, 70.83% and 64.16% respectively in the International Medical Center (IMC) in a series of 145 adult to adult living donor liver transplantation (AALDLT) cases. There was no donor mortality in this series. LDLT are now routinely and successfully performed in Egypt with reasonable donor and recipient outcomes. Organ shortage remains the biggest hurdle facing the increasing need for LT. Although LDLT had reasonable outcomes, it carries considerable risks to healthy donors. For example, it lacks cadaveric back up, and is not feasible for all patients. The initial success in LDLT should drive efforts to increase the people awareness about deceased organ donation in Egypt. PMID:27115003

  1. Living donor liver transplantation in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Amer, Khaled E; Marwan, Ibrahim

    2016-04-01

    In Egypt there is no doubt that chronic liver diseases are a major health concern. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevalence among the 15-59 years age group is estimated to be 14.7%. The high prevalence of chronic liver diseases has led to increasing numbers of Egyptian patients suffering from end stage liver disease (ESLD), necessitating liver transplantation (LT). We reviewed the evolution of LT in Egypt and the current status. A single center was chosen as an example to review the survival and mortality rates. To date, deceased donor liver transplantation (DDLT) has not been implemented in any program though Egyptian Parliament approved the law in 2010. Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) seemed to be the only logical choice to save many patients who are in desperate need for LT. By that time, there was increase in number of centers doing LDLT (13 centers) and increase in number of LDLT cases [2,400] with improvement of the results. Donor mortality rate is 1.66 per 1,000 donors; this comprised four donors in the Egyptian series. The exact recipient survival is not accurately known however, and the one-year, three-year and five-year survival were 73.17%, 70.83% and 64.16% respectively in the International Medical Center (IMC) in a series of 145 adult to adult living donor liver transplantation (AALDLT) cases. There was no donor mortality in this series. LDLT are now routinely and successfully performed in Egypt with reasonable donor and recipient outcomes. Organ shortage remains the biggest hurdle facing the increasing need for LT. Although LDLT had reasonable outcomes, it carries considerable risks to healthy donors. For example, it lacks cadaveric back up, and is not feasible for all patients. The initial success in LDLT should drive efforts to increase the people awareness about deceased organ donation in Egypt.

  2. Treatment of Autonomous Hyperparathyroidism in Post Renal Transplant Recipients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-07

    Chronic Allograft Nephropathy; Chronic Kidney Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Disordered Mineral Metabolism; End Stage Renal Disease; Hyperparathyroidism; Hypophosphatemia; Kidney Disease; Kidney Transplantation; Post Renal Transplantation

  3. Five years renal transplantation data: Single-center experience from Iraq.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ala A; Al-Saedi, Ali J; Al-Mudhaffer, Ali J; Al-Taee, Kais H

    2016-03-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage renal disease. In Iraq, renal transplantation started in 1973 and has continued until now with live donor transplantation, since deceased donor transplant program is not approved as yet. Long-term transplant data are still scarce. The aim of our study is to present data on transplantation and medical follow-up at one year and, survival analysis at one, three and five years. A total of 250 renal transplantations were performed at the Nephrology and Renal Transplantation Center, Baghdad between January 2009 and January 2014. It is a living donor, blood group compatible donor program. All patients received triple immunosuppression (calcineurine inhibitor, mycophenolate mofetil or mycophenolic acid, and steroid). The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine the survival rate. There were 92 live related donors, 143 unrelated donors, and 15 spouse donors. The mean age was 34.07 ± 12.2 years. The one-year graft survival for related and unrelated donor transplants was 98.9% and 91.8%, respectively. Graft survival was lower (82.9%) in recipients with acute rejection episodes. The patient survival at one-year was 94%. The three-year graft and patient survival was 91% and 90%, respectively, and five-year survival for grafts and patients was 87.1% and 88%, respectively. The outcome of the renal transplantation in Iraq is improving. Long-term patient follow-up needs more meticulous attention. The development of renal transplant registry is critical for future planning. Moreover, renal transplantation practice in Iraq needs more social, religious, and governmental support.

  4. [Membranous nephritis after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Robles, N R; Gómez Campdera, F; Anaya, F; Niembro, E; Junco, E; Valderrábano, F

    1991-02-01

    8 cases of membranous glomerulonephritis (MG) after renal transplants (RT) are presented; one being a recurrence of the original disease and the other 7 due to a different cause of renal insufficiency. The total incidence of MG after transplantation was 1.63%; 1.39% being the incidence of MG of new cases. Only 1 patient showed decrease of renal function and in this case the MG was accompanied by chronic rejection lesions. There was no sign of neoplasias nor drugs producing MG. As far as chronic infections are concerned, only one patient showed B antigen and it was not observed during the immunofluorescent test in the biopsy. 6 patients had urological complications after the renal transplant (3 cases of urinary fistula; 2 cases of obstructive uropathy; 1 case of short ureter). 2 patients experienced the start of hemodialysis due to focal and segmentary glomerulosclerosis. The beginning of proteinuria commences between 2 and 23 months after the RT (median 13,0 +/- 7,5 moths); with a range of between 2.0 and 12.0 gr/day (median: 6.8 +/- 3,2 Z gr/day), this being nephrotic in 4 cases. Proteinuria improved 1 case, and persisted in the other patients at the same level registered previous to the diagnosis. MG is a non-frequent complication or RT and is usually benign. Patients with post-transplant urologic complications could be considered to have a higher risk of developing a MG "de novo".

  5. Donor Considerations in Fecal Microbiota Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Danielle; Park, K T

    2017-03-01

    Tremendous acceleration has been made in understanding the gut microbiota in the past decade and, with it, further understanding of the pathologic role of dysbiosis and the use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) as therapy. FMT has been studied in many disease states including the most common indication of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), though many questions regarding stool donor selection remain. Though traditionally, one donor has provided stool for one patient, research is underway to explore many donor selection considerations from the use of pooled donor stool to selection of a high diversity donor. It is well-known that dietary intake shapes the gut microbiota and the potential implications of this on FMT donor selection are being explored. Though further high-quality research is needed, optimizing the fecal microbiota inoculum holds great promise.

  6. Living donor liver transplantation in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Capobianco, Ivan; Panaro, Fabrizio; Di Francesco, Fabrizio; Troisi, Roberto; Sainz-Barriga, Mauricio; Muiesan, Paolo; Königsrainer, Alfred; Testa, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) sparked significant interest in Europe when the first reports of its success from USA and Asia were made public. Many transplant programs initiated LDLT and some of them especially in Germany and Belgium became a point of reference for many patients and important contributors to the advancement of the field. After the initial enthusiasm, most of the European programs stopped performing LDLT and today the overall European activity is concentrated in a few centers and the number of living donor liver transplants is only a single digit fraction of the overall number of liver transplants performed. In this paper we analyse the present European activities and highlight the European contribution to the advancement of the field of LDLT. PMID:27115011

  7. Donor-related issues in hand transplantation.

    PubMed

    McDiarmid, Sue V; Azari, Kodi K

    2011-11-01

    The policies and procedures for solid-organ donation, under the auspices of the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network, currently cannot be applied to hand donation, because a hand allograft is considered a tissue in the United States and is under the jurisdiction of the Food and Drug Administration. Hand transplant centers have developed their own protocols. This article discusses the unique elements of such protocols, including training and education, the consent process, the necessary recipient and donor data, donor management, and operating room procedures. Candidate listing, allocation, and oversight of hand donation in the future are also discussed.

  8. [Ethical aspects of living-donor kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Casares, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Living donor kidney transplantation is considered an established treatment for end-stage renal failure and is accepted in different transplant forums, nationally and internationally, while ensuring the safety of the donation, the information, the motivation and caring, the free consent and the absence profit. the living donor nephrectomy is not extent of risks so a good assessment of the donor's health status and psychosocial situation must be performed to evaluate if the benefits to donor and recipient outweigh the risks assumed. Information and Consent: to be considered ethically acceptable, the donor must be able to give his free consent to the donation after understanding the information provided, accepting the risks and benefits of organ donation, knowing the treatment alternatives for the recipient and the long-term consequences of his decision The absence of profit: offering or receiving money for an organ or other human tissue violates the principles of justice and equity and it is considered ethically and legally unacceptable it is important to make a good psychosocial assessment to identify whether the motivation is altruistic or not and, in other terms, to detect any kind of coercion (ex, in the family). Living donation must not be offered in desperate family situations so it is important to assess family relationships to rule out the absence of freedom in donor's choice.The Role of Health Care Ethics Committees: there exists a normative in our country that regulates living donation and establishes that the hospital ethics committees should participate in the process of living donation in all cases. Their job is to assess the process and develop a report on the donor free consent to donation. The responsible person of the living transplant program should provide the documentation necessary to the committee. An interview with the potential donor can be required in some cases.

  9. Rejection is a strong graft survival predictor in live donor pediatric renal transplantation using cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroids: 5-year outcomes in a single Mexican center.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Mier, G; Enriquez-De Los Santos, H; Méndez-López, M T; Avila-Pardo, S F; Budar-Fernandez, L F; Gonzalez-Velazquez, F

    2013-05-01

    Long-term graft function and survival are of particular importance in children assuming that they have a longer transplantation life span than most adults. Because acute rejection episodes (ARE) continue to have a serious impact on graft loss, we analyzed the effects of ARE on 5-year survival and function in our population. Fifty-seven living donor kidney transplant recipients (34 males) younger than 18 years of age (13.5 ± 2.6 years; range, 5-17) were follow up for at feast 12 months using cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroid therapy with or without induction treatment between February 2003 and December 2010. ARE incidence during the first 12 months following transplantation was 14%. One-, 3- and 5-year serum creatinine values were 1.24 ± 0.39, 2.16 ± 2.39, and 1.76 ± 0.9 mg/dL, respectively. Mean calculated creatinine clearances (Schwartz) at 1, 3, and 5 years were 82.5 ± 24.8, 64.7 ± 24.1, and 67 ± 27.5 mL/min*1.73 m(2), respectively. Patient/graft survival rates were 96/85%, 90/72%, and 88/65% at 1, 3, and 5 years, respectively. Patients who experienced an ARE within 12 months following transplantation displayed a reduced 5-year graft survival rate (37.5%) versus those who did not (78%; P = .005). Patients who did not have an ARE during 60 months had a higher graft survival rate (76%) than those who had ARE (33%; P = .001). Patient without basiliximab induction showed a lower 5-year graft survival rate (61% vs 100%; P = not significant [NS]). ARE is an important risk factor for graft loss in the pediatric kidney transplant population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Ethics and kidney transplants with living donors].

    PubMed

    Mamzer Bruneel, Marie-France

    2016-12-01

    The ethical debate surrounding transplant practices questions our societies. International recommendations set out numerous precautions which must be taken to ensure that donors act with their free will. While in most countries, including France, organ donation is a voluntary and non-commercial act, a black market exists in the world resulting in the trafficking of organs and tragic transplant tourism. Copyright © 2016. Publié par Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. Living unrelated donor kidney transplantation between spouses.

    PubMed

    Haberal, M; Gulay, H; Tokyay, R; Oner, Z; Enunlu, T; Bilgin, N

    1992-01-01

    From November 3, 1975 to November 3, 1990, 874 kidney transplants were performed at out centers. Of these, 675 (77.2%) were from living donors and 199 (22.8%) were from cadaver donors. Five hundred eighty (66.4%) of the living donors were first degree related while 99 (11.3%) were unrelated or second degree related donors, 29 of which were spouses. All donor recipient pairs were ABO-compatible, with the exception of one pair. Donor recipient relations were wife to husband in 25 cases and husband to wife in 4 cases. All were first grafts and started functioning during surgery. In this series, the follow-up for the recipients was 4 to 64 months (mean 33.5 +/- 4.5 months). One-year patient survival and graft survival rates were 92.4% and 81.9%, respectively. Two-year patient survival and graft survival rates were 92.4% and 78.2%, respectively. The single ABO-incompatible case is also doing well, 21 months postoperatively. This study demonstrates that the interspouse kidney transplantation may be used when cadaver organ shortage is a problem. While providing the couple with a better quality of life, interspouse kidney transplantation also enables the couple to share the joy of giving and receiving the "gift of life" from one another.

  12. Which Donor for Uterus Transplants: Brain-Dead Donor or Living Donor? A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Lavoué, Vincent; Vigneau, Cécile; Duros, Solène; Boudjema, Karim; Levêque, Jean; Piver, Pascal; Aubard, Yves; Gauthier, Tristan

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate and compare the pros and cons of using living donors or brain-dead donors in uterus transplantation programs, 2 years after the first worldwide live birth after uterus transplantation. The Medline database and the Central Cochrane Library were used to locate uterine transplantation studies carried out in human or nonhuman primates. All types of articles (case reports, original studies, meta-analyses, reviews) in English or French were considered for inclusion. Overall, 92 articles were screened and 44 were retained for review. Proof of concept for human uterine transplantation was demonstrated in 2014 with a living donor. Compared with a brain-dead donor strategy, a living donor strategy offers greater possibilities for planning surgery and also decreases cold ischemia time, potentially translating into a higher success rate. However, this approach poses ethical problems, given that the donor is exposed to surgery risks but does not derive any direct benefit. A brain-dead donor strategy is more acceptable from an ethical viewpoint, but its feasibility is currently unproven, potentially owing to a lack of compatible donors, and is associated with a longer cold ischemia time and a potentially higher rejection rate. The systematic review demonstrates that uterine transplantation is a major surgical innovation for the treatment of absolute uterine factor infertility. Living and brain-dead donor strategies are not mutually exclusive and, in view of the current scarcity of uterine grafts and the anticipated future rise in demand, both will probably be necessary.

  13. Characteristics of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies and outcome in renal transplant patients treated with a standardized induction regimen.

    PubMed

    Zecher, Daniel; Bach, Christian; Staudner, Christoph; Böger, Carsten A; Bergler, Tobias; Banas, Bernhard; Spriewald, Bernd M

    2017-04-01

    Pre-transplant donor-specific anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies (DSA) have been associated with antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and early kidney allograft loss. Uncertainties remain regarding the general applicability of these findings and the optimal induction therapy in DSA-positive patients. Pre-transplant sera from 174 patients receiving a crossmatch-negative kidney transplant were retrospectively analysed for DSA using Luminex technology. DSA with mean-fluorescence intensity (MFI) values above 500 were considered positive. All recipients received basiliximab induction and tacrolimus-based maintenance immunosuppression. DSA were monitored post-transplantation in patients with pre-transplant DSA. Antibody results were correlated with the incidence of rejection and graft loss. In total, 61/174 patients had pre-transplant DSA. We found a strong correlation between the presence of DSA against class I and II HLA and DSA MFI greater than 10 000. Both DSA patterns independently predicted an increased risk of early AMR (odds ratio 4.24 and 4.75, respectively, P < 0.05). The risk for AMR in patients with intermediate MFI (3000-10 000) gradually increased with increasing MFI but group sizes were too small to allow for final conclusions. The risk for AMR was comparable to nonsensitized patients in patients with only class I or II HLA-DSA or MFI below 3000. 5-year allograft survival was lowest in patients with simultaneous presence of class I and II HLA-DSA and MFI above 10 000 (45%) but was comparable between patients with only HLA class I or II or no DSA (90.0, 90.0 and 88.1%, respectively). AMR was the only independent predictor of graft loss. Undetectable DSA 14 days post-transplant predicted excellent long-term outcome. . The favourable outcome in the majority of DSA-positive patients despite non-depleting antibody induction and the poor outcome in patients with class I and II HLA-DSA and high DSA strength call for a differentiated therapeutic

  14. Attitudes toward live donor kidney transplantation and its commercialization.

    PubMed

    Mazaris, Evangelos M; Crane, Jeremy S; Warrens, Anthony N; Smith, Glenn; Tekkis, Paris; Papalois, Vassilios E

    2011-01-01

    Development of live donor kidney transplantation (LDKT) programs has intensified debate regarding acceptability of certain donor categories and potential commercialization. Concerning these issues, we surveyed the views of medical and nursing staff caring for patients with renal failure and renal transplant recipients and donors. Participants were recruited from a tertiary transplant unit and invited to complete an anonymous questionnaire. Four hundred and sixty-four participants completed the questionnaire (42% response). One hundred and sixty-eight (36.2%) were health care professionals and 296 (63.8%) patients; 85.6% of participants were willing to donate to their children, 80.2% to siblings, 80.8% to parents, 72% to a non-blood-related relative or friend, and 15.3% to a stranger. If participants had hypothetical renal failure, they were prepared to accept a kidney from a parent (79.5%), sibling (78.7%), child (56.3%), a non-blood-related relative or friend (79.3%), or stranger (54.1%). Regarding commercialization, responders' attitudes were that the donor should not accept financial reward (29.1%), be compensated for expenses only (60.6%), or should receive a direct financial reward (10.1%). For non-directed donation, 23.5%, 55.6%, and 20.7% were not in support of reward, compensation only, and financial reward, respectively. While live kidney donation was accepted by the majority of individuals surveyed, only the minority approved of commercialization. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. A Carrel patch technique for renal transplantation in cats.

    PubMed

    Budgeon, Casey; Hardie, Robert J; McAnulty, Jonathan F

    2017-08-31

    To evaluate the feasibility of a Carrel patch method in feline renal transplantation. Descriptive case series. Nine healthy donor cats and 9 client recipient cats with chronic renal failure. Renal transplantation was performed in 9 cats with chronic renal failure after collection of a donor's left kidney with a Carrel patch technique. A patch of donor aortic wall was removed with either 2 or 1 renal artery (ies) (n = 1 and 8 cats, respectively) central to the patch, with a cuff of tissue (≤1 mm) protruding from the base of the vessels. The Carrel patch was implanted in recipient cats with an end-to-side artery-to-aorta anastomosis, in a simple-continuous pattern of 9-0 nylon. The renal vein and ureter were implanted as previously described. All donors and recipients survived surgery without vascular complication. The Carrel patch is a novel approach allowing the harvest of kidneys with multiple renal arteries. The technique also simplified the implant procedure, potentially decreasing the risks of bleeding and thrombosis. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  16. [Lung re-transplantation using lobes from living-donors].

    PubMed

    Oto, Takahiro

    2013-07-01

    Although the demand of organ re-transplantation has increased, the organ shortage from brain-dead donor raises an ethical controversy about the fairness of organ allocation for re-transplantation. Living donor lobar lung transplantation has become an alternative therapeutic option to brain-dead donor lung transplantation for not only pediatric but also adult patients. Lung re-transplantation using lobes from living donors have the potential to alleviate the ethical problems. This review focused on indications, surgical techniques, perioperative care and postoperative follow-up of living donor lobar lung re-transplantation.

  17. Increasing the Rate of Living Donor Kidney Transplantation in Ontario: Donor- and Recipient-Identified Barriers and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Getchell, Leah E.; McKenzie, Susan Q.; Sontrop, Jessica M.; Hayward, Jade S.; McCallum, Megan K.; Garg, Amit X.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of Review: To hear from living kidney donors and recipients about what they perceive are the barriers to living donor kidney transplantation, and how patients can develop and lead innovative solutions to increase the rate and enhance the experiences of living donor kidney transplantation in Ontario. Sources of Information: A one-day patient-led workshop on March 10th, 2016 in Toronto, Ontario. Methods: Participants who were previously engaged in priority-setting exercises were invited to the meeting by patient lead, Sue McKenzie. This included primarily past kidney donors, kidney transplant recipients, as well as researchers, and representatives from renal and transplant health care organizations across Ontario. Key Findings: Four main barriers were identified: lack of education for patients and families, lack of public awareness about living donor kidney transplantation, financial costs incurred by donors, and health care system-level inefficiencies. Several novel solutions were proposed, including the development of a peer network to support and educate patients and families with kidney failure to pursue living donor kidney transplantation; consistent reimbursement policies to cover donors’ out-of-pocket expenses; and partnering with the paramedical and insurance industry to improve the efficiency of the donor and recipient evaluation process. Limitations: While there was a diversity of experience in the room from both donors and recipients, it does not provide a complete picture of the living kidney donation process for all Ontario donors and recipients. The discussion was provincially focused, and as such, some of the solutions suggested may already be in practice or unfeasible in other provinces. Implications: The creation of a patient-led provincial council was suggested as an important next step to advance the development and implementation of solutions to overcome patient-identified barriers to living donor kidney transplantation. PMID:28491334

  18. Expanding the pool of kidney donors: use of kidneys with acute renal dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    de Matos, Ana Cristina Carvalho; Requião-Moura, Lúcio Roberto; Clarizia, Gabriela; Durão, Marcelino de Souza; Tonato, Eduardo José; Chinen, Rogério; de Arruda, Érika Ferraz; Filiponi, Thiago Corsi; Pires, Luciana Mello de Mello Barros; Bertocchi, Ana Paula Fernandes; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Given the shortage of organs transplantation, some strategies have been adopted by the transplant community to increase the supply of organs. One strategy is the use of expanded criteria for donors, that is, donors aged >60 years or 50 and 59 years, and meeting two or more of the following criteria: history of hypertension, terminal serum creatinine >1.5mg/dL, and stroke as the donor´s cause of death. In this review, emphasis was placed on the use of donors with acute renal failure, a condition considered by many as a contraindication for organ acceptance and therefore one of the main causes for kidney discard. Since these are well-selected donors and with no chronic diseases, such as hypertension, renal disease, or diabetes, many studies showed that the use of donors with acute renal failure should be encouraged, because, in general, acute renal dysfunction is reversible. Although most studies demonstrated these grafts have more delayed function, the results of graft and patient survival after transplant are very similar to those with the use of standard donors. Clinical and morphological findings of donors, the use of machine perfusion, and analysis of its parameters, especially intrarenal resistance, are important tools to support decision-making when considering the supply of organs with renal dysfunction. PMID:26154553

  19. Reversal of deafness after renal transplantation in Alport's syndrome.

    PubMed

    McDonald, T J; Zincke, H; Anderson, C F; Ott, N T

    1978-01-01

    Six patients (five men and one woman) with Alport's syndrome underwent successful renal transplantation (four received kidneys from cadaver donors and two received allografts from living, related donors). One patient who had received a cadaver kidney had substantial hearing improvement and the others had stabilization of hearing. Hearing loss in Alport's syndrome is progressive. The reversal of deafness in one of our patients and stabilization in the others made us wonder whether an inherited enzymopathy had been reversed, which then mitigated the deafness.

  20. Paired kidney exchange transplantation: Maximizing the donor pool

    PubMed Central

    Jha, P. K.; Sethi, S.; Bansal, S. B.; Jain, M.; Sharma, R.; Phanish, M. K.; Duggal, R.; Ahlawat, R.; Kher, V.

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, paired kidney exchange (PKE) transplantation has gained popularity worldwide as a viable alternative for end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients who have incompatible or sensitized donors. This study presents our experience with PKE transplantation and compares outcome between PKE and non-PKE renal transplant recipients. Between February 2010 and November 2013, 742 transplants were performed, of which 26 (3.5%) were PKE transplantations. All were two-way exchanges. PKE recipients were significantly older than non-PKE (46.73 ± 9.71 vs. 40.08 ± 13.36 years; P = 0.012) while donor ages were comparable. PKE patients had significantly higher number of HLA mismatches (5.03 ± 1.14 vs. 3.49 ± 1.57; P < 0.0001). After a median follow-up of 20 months (range: 3–47 months), there was no significant difference in patient survival (PKE 96.16% vs. non-PKE 96.65%; P = 0.596) and death censored graft survival (PKE 96.16% vs. non-PKE 96.37%; P = 1). Mean serum creatinine at 1 month and at last follow-up was lower in PKE versus non-PKE group (0.98 ± 0.33 vs. 1.3 ± 0.61 mg/dl; P = 0.008 and 0.96 ± 0.30 vs. 1.27 ± 0.57 mg/dl, P = 0.006, respectively). Biopsy proven acute rejection rate was 11.5% in PKE group and 16.89% in non-PKE patients (P = 0.6). To conclude, paired kidney donation is an excellent way of increasing the donor pool and needs to be promoted to overcome the shortage of suitable kidney in our country. PMID:26664210

  1. [The role of percutaneous renal biopsy in kidney transplant].

    PubMed

    Manfro, R C; Lee, J Y; Lewgoy, J; Edelweiss, M I; Gonçalves, L F; Prompt, C A

    1994-01-01

    Percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) is an useful tool for diagnostic and therapeutic orientation in renal transplantation. PURPOSE--To evaluate the current role of PRB in post-transplant acute renal dysfunction (ARD) of renal allografts. METHODS--Sixty-five renal transplant patients were submitted to 95 valid renal biopsies with no major complications. RESULTS--There was disagreement between the clinical and the pathological diagnosis in 28 occasions (29.5%). In 36 cases (37.9%) the results of the pathological examination led to a modification in patient's management. These modifications were most commonly the avoidance or witholding of a steroid pulse (8 cases); nephrectomy of the renal allograft (8 cases); witholding or decrease of cyclosporine dosage (6 cases); giving a steroid pulse (5 cases) and giving antibiotics to treat acute pyelonephritis in 4 cases. The use of kidneys from cadaveric donors was significantly associated with an increased number of biopsies (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION--These results demonstrate that even though several less invasive procedures are currently employed, renal biopsy is still an indispensable method to the management of ARD in renal transplant patients.

  2. [Towards the development of living donor kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Macher, Marie-Alice

    2016-12-01

    Living donor kidney transplantation has been increasing since 2008. Living donors represent a significant potential for organ transplants, in a context where the needs outstrip the availability of organs from deceased donors. However, patients are still poorly informed regarding the conditions in which these transplants are possible.

  3. Dream anxiety in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Yazla, Ece; Ozkurt, Sultan; Musmul, Ahmet

    2015-06-01

    Although low quality of sleep has been reported in kidney transplant patients with functioning allografts, there are no previous studies investigating the dreams of these patients. We aimed to investigate the differences in dream anxiety level between renal transplant patients and healthy control subjects. We also planned to compare depression and anxiety symptoms, sleep quality and sleepiness level between these two groups. Twenty-two living-donor renal transplant recipients followed at an outpatient nephrology clinic and 22 healthy controls were enrolled in this observational cross-sectional study. Sociodemographic Data Collection Form, and the Van Dream Anxiety Scale (VDAS), the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories were used for the assessment of the necessary features. Hemoglobin (Hb), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr) and glucose levels were measured. There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of dream anxiety (p = 0.45), depression (p = 0.76), sleep quality (p = 0.8), insomnia severity (p = 0.08) and Hb (p = 0.11) and glucose levels (p = 0.14). Although, BUN (p = 0.00) and creatinine (p = 0.00) levels differed significantly between the two groups, both parameters were found to be within their normal range. In our study, chronic renal failure patients with a successful kidney transplant were found to be able to completely return to normal in terms of metabolic parameters, sleep quality and mood. Similar levels of dream anxiety are also consistent with these findings.

  4. European Transplant Registry of Senior Renal Transplant Recipients on Advagraf

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-11

    Graft Failure; Death; Acute Rejection of Renal Transplant; Infections; Bone Disease; Post Transplant Diabetes Mellitus; Quality of Life; HLA Antibody Production; Cardiovascular Risk Factors; Non-HLA Antibody Production

  5. The Current Role of Endourologic Management of Renal Transplantation Complications

    PubMed Central

    Duty, Brian D.; Conlin, Michael J.; Fuchs, Eugene F.; Barry, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Complications following renal transplantation include ureteral obstruction, urinary leak and fistula, urinary retention, urolithiasis, and vesicoureteral reflux. These complications have traditionally been managed with open surgical correction, but minimally invasive techniques are being utilized frequently. Materials and Methods. A literature review was performed on the use of endourologic techniques for the management of urologic transplant complications. Results. Ureterovesical anastomotic stricture is the most common long-term urologic complication following renal transplantation. Direct vision endoureterotomy is successful in up to 79% of cases. Urinary leak is the most frequent renal transplant complication early in the postoperative period. Up to 62% of patients have been successfully treated with maximal decompression (nephrostomy tube, ureteral stent, and Foley catheter). Excellent outcomes have been reported following transurethral resection of the prostate shortly after transplantation for patients with urinary retention. Vesicoureteral reflux after renal transplant is common. Deflux injection has been shown to resolve reflux in up to 90% of patients with low-grade disease in the absence of high pressure voiding. Donor-gifted and de novo transplant calculi may be managed with shock wave, ureteroscopic, or percutaneous lithotripsy. Conclusions. Recent advances in equipment and technique have allowed many transplant patients with complications to be effectively managed endoscopically. PMID:24023541

  6. Deceased donor transplantation in the elderly--are we creating false hope?

    PubMed

    Stevens, Kathryn K; Woo, Y Mun; Clancy, Marc; McClure, John D; Fox, Jonathan G; Geddes, Colin C

    2011-07-01

    Increasing numbers of older patients are developing established renal failure and considering kidney transplant as a renal replacement therapy (RRT) option. The probability of older patients actually receiving a deceased donor kidney transplant is unclear, preventing informed choice about pursuing the option of transplantation. We sought to analyse our RRT population to determine the probability of receiving a deceased donor kidney transplant in patients commencing RRT categorized by age and for whom there was no suitable living kidney donor. Patients commencing dialysis in our centre between 1992 and 2009 were identified. Time to listing on the deceased donor transplant waiting list and time to first deceased donor transplant were determined by Kaplan-Meier analysis for patients, categorized by age, with censoring at the date of first living donor kidney transplant, death or last dialysis. One-thousand-five-hundred-and-thirteen patients were categorized into groups by age in years [1: <35 (n = 134), 2: 35-49.9 (n = 207), 3: 50-64.9 (n = 415), 4: >65-74.9 (n = 438) and 5: ≥ 75 (n = 319)]. The probability of being listed for deceased donor transplant within 1 year of commencing RRT was 75, 54, 27, 4 and 0.8% in Groups 1-5, respectively. If listed, the probability of receiving a deceased donor transplant within 5 years of starting RRT was 81, 48, 26, 8 and 0% in Groups 1-5, respectively. In Groups 1-4, 93% (n = 63), 87% (n = 65), 76% (n = 45) and 100% (n = 7) of the patients, respectively, who received a deceased donor transplant were alive and off dialysis 1 year after transplant. The reason patients who were listed did not receive a transplant was usually death on the waiting list. The likelihood of being listed for transplant falls with increasing age at the time of starting RRT. Even for patients listed for transplant, the probability of older patients actually receiving a transplant is much lower than for younger patients, with only 8% of listed patients aged

  7. Are octogenarians with end stage renal disease candidates for renal transplantation?

    PubMed

    Lønning, Kjersti; Midtvedt, Karsten; Leivestad, Torbjørn; Reisæter, Anna V; Line, Pål-Dag; Hartmann, Anders; Heldal, Kristian

    2016-07-28

    Elderly patients are the fastest growing group in need of renal transplantation. This study puts focus on renal transplant recipients in their eightieth year or older at time of engraftment. Is there evidence to support an absolute upper age limit for renal transplantation? Recipients in their eightieth year or older, transplanted between 1983 and 2015, were included. Data were retrieved from the Norwegian Renal Registry in the end of October 2015. Graft and patient survival were compared to recipients aged 70-79 years at transplantation. 47 patients older than 79 years were transplanted in the defined period. Median age 80.1 years, 81 % were male. Median time on dialysis prior to transplantation was 18.5 months. All patients received an allograft from a deceased donor (median donor age 61.8 years). In the death censored graft survival model, there was no statistical difference between the groups. We found improved patient and graft survival after introduction of mycophenolate mofetil and induction with basiliximab. Patients transplanted before 2000 had increased risk of death compared to those transplanted after 2000; HR 3.2 (95% CI 1.2-8.7). Median uncensored graft survival for patients transplanted after the year 2000 was 5.0 year (95% CI 2.4-7.6). Median patient survival was 5.0 years (3.1-6.9) and five year patient survival was 55 %. Age by itself should not be an absolute contraindication against renal transplantation. An estimated five years survival rate of 55 % post-engraftment for an 80 years old patient is in our opinion more than acceptable.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially.

  8. Plasma exchange conditioning for ABO-incompatible renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Winters, J L; Gloor, J M; Pineda, A A; Stegall, M D; Moore, S B

    2004-01-01

    The supply of deceased donor kidneys is inadequate to meet demand. To expand the pool of potential donors, ABO-incompatible transplants from living donors have been performed. We present the Mayo Clinic experience with such transplants. Enrollment was open to patients when the only available potential living kidney donor was ABO-incompatible. Conditioning consisted of plasma exchanges followed by intravenous immunoglobulin. Splenectomy was performed at the time of transplant surgery. Post-transplant immunosuppression consisted of anti-T lymphocyte antibody, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone. Isoagglutinin titers and scores were determined before and after each plasma exchange. Transplant outcomes were determined. Twenty-six ABO-incompatible transplants were performed. No hyperacute rejection occurred. Mean patient follow-up was 400 days. Patient and graft survivals at last follow-up were 92 and 85%, respectively. Antibody-mediated rejection occurred in 46% and was apparently reversed in 83% by plasma exchange and increased immunosuppression. The initial plasma exchange reduced immediate spin and AHG hemagglutination reactivity scores by 53.5 and 34.6%, respectively. Over the course of the pretransplant plasma exchanges, the immediate spin and AHG hemagglutination reactivity scores decreased by 96.4 and 68.5%, respectively. At 3 and 12 months, the immediate spin and AHG hemagglutinin reactivity scores and titers were less than those at baseline but greater than or equal to those on the day of transplantation. Despite an increase in scores and titers, antibody-mediated rejection was not present. Pre-transplant plasma exchange conditioning combined with other immunosuppressives can be used to prepare patients for ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation from living donors, but antibody-mediated rejection post-transplant is a common occurrence and allograft survival may be reduced. Controlled clinical trials are needed to identify the optimum

  9. The effect of donor age on survival after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Izbicki, Gabriel; Shitrit, David; Aravot, Dan; Fink, Gershon; Saute, Milton; Idelman, Leonid; Bakal, Ilana; Sulkes, Jaqueline; Kramer, Mordechai R

    2002-06-01

    Historically, donor age above 55 years has been considered to be a relative contraindication for organ transplantation. The shortage of organs for transplantation has led to the expansion of the donor pool by accepling older donors. To compare the 1 year follow-up in patients after lung transplantation from older donors (> 50 years old) and in patients after transplantation from younger donors (< or = 50 years). The study group comprised all adult patients who underwent lung transplantation at the Rabin Medical Center between May 1997 and August 2001. Donors were classified into two groups according to their age: < or = 50 years (n = 20) and > 50 years (n = 9). Survival, number and total days of hospitalization, development of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome, and pulmonary function tests, were examined 1 year after transplantation. We performed 29 lung transplantations in our center during the observed period. Donor age had no statistically significant impact on 1 year survival after lung transplantation. There was no statistically significant effect on lung function parameters, the incidence of hospitalization or the incidence of bronchiolitis obliterans between both donor age groups at 1 year after transplantation. Donor age did not influence survival or important secondary end-points 1 year after lung transplantation By liberalizing donor criteria of age up to 65 years, we can expand the donor pool, while assessing other possible mechanisms to increase donor availability.

  10. Deceased donor organ transplantation with expanded criteria donors: a single-center experience from India.

    PubMed

    Goplani, K R; Firoz, A; Ramakrishana, P; Shah, P R; Gumber, M R; Patel, H V; Vanikar, A V; Trivedi, H L

    2010-01-01

    Deceased donor organ transplantation (DDOT) accounts for <4% of renal transplants in India. Many volunteers come forth for organ donation with increasing awareness; unfortunately, the majority are marginal donors, but their rejection would hamper the DDOT program. Judicious use of marginal organs is a challenge for developing countries. We performed 29 renal transplants from 21 expanded criteria donors (ECD) out of 115 DDOT between January 2006 to April 2009-10 dual (DKT) and 19 single (SKT). Fourteen donors had hypertension, a cerebrovascular accident as the cause of death, 9 had both, and 4 had diabetes. Mean donor age was 70.3 +/- 8.9 years. Decisions on the procedure were based upon frozen section biopsy in 13 of 21 donors. Mean DKT donor age was 76 +/- 9.7 years versu 64 +/- 5.7 years of SKT donors. The native kidney diseases were chronic glomerulonephritis (n = 14), diabetic nephropathy (n = 7), tubulointerstitial nephritis (n = 4) and polycystic kidney disease, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, lupus nephritis and patchy cortical necrosis, (n = 1 each). Mean recipient age of DKT versus SKT was 43.5 versus 42.3 years. All recipients received rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin, followed by steroid, mycophenolate mofetil/calcinueurin inhibitor. Over a mean follow-up of 341 days, the mean serum creatinine (SCr) of 25/29 patients was 1.60 mg/dL (range, 1.0-2.6). The mean SCr of SKT patients was 1.59 +/- 0.63 mg/dL and of DKT, 1.62 +/- 0.48 mg/dL. Ten patients had delayed graft function and 11 had biopsy proven acute tubular necrosis. Seven (24%) patients had rejection (grade 3 Banff update '05, type IA; 4, type 2A); 6 responded to antirejection; 1 graft was lost at 7 months due to chronic rejection. Three (10.3%) patients were lost, 1 each due to AMI, sepsis, and CMV disease. In the circumstances of organ shortage, DDOT with expanded criteria donor is a feasible option.

  11. Elderly living donor kidney transplantation allows worthwhile outcomes: The Japan Academic Consortium of Kidney Transplantation study.

    PubMed

    Okumi, Masayoshi; Unagami, Kohei; Kakuta, Yoichi; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Takagi, Toshio; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2017-09-14

    To compare transplant outcomes among elderly (aged ≥60 years) and non-elderly recipients, and to evaluate the acceptability of elderly living donor kidney transplantation in practice after consideration of living donor type. We included 830 adult patients with living donor kidney transplantation between 2000 and 2011 in this retrospective cohort study. We compared death-censored graft survival, patient survival, biopsy-proven rejection, complications, and renal function in elderly (n = 119) and non-elderly recipients (n = 278). There was no significant difference in 10-year death-censored graft survival (P = 0.980). Corresponding patient survival rates in the elderly and non-elderly groups were 84.1% and 98.1%, respectively (hazard ratio 6.15, 95% confidence interval 2.12-17.82, P < 0.001). Elderly patients had more complications and chronic T-cell-mediated rejection. Factors associated with death in elderly recipients with functioning grafts were residual advanced recipient age (hazard ratio 1.39), decreased hemoglobin (hazard ratio 4.10), hepatitis B virus (hazard ratio 7.89), hepatitis C virus (hazard ratio 13.12) and elevated alanine aminotransferase (hazard ratio 1.13). Elderly living donor kidney transplantation seems to provide adequate acceptable outcomes. However, physicians should be cautious when evaluating elderly patients with hepatitis, and further studies are required to improve long-term outcomes. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  12. Risks for donors in uterus transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kisu, Iori; Mihara, Makoto; Banno, Kouji; Umene, Kiyoko; Araki, Jun; Hara, Hisako; Suganuma, Nobuhiko; Aoki, Daisuke

    2013-12-01

    Uterus transplantation (UTx) is an alternative to gestational surrogacy and adoption for patients with absolute uterine infertility. Studies have been conducted in animals, and UTx is now within the reach of clinical application in humans. Procedures in humans have been published, but many medical, ethical, and social problems and risks of UTx require discussion prior to widespread clinical application, from the perspectives of donors, recipients, families, and newborns. In this article, we summarize the burdens and risks of UTx, with a focus on donors who provide the uterus.

  13. Bone remodeling after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bellorin-Font, Ezequiel; Rojas, Eudocia; Carlini, Raul G; Suniaga, Orlando; Weisinger, José R

    2003-06-01

    Several studies have indicated that bone alterations after transplantation are heterogeneous. Short-term studies after transplantation have shown that many patients exhibit a pattern consistent with adynamic bone disease. In contrast, patients with long-term renal transplantation show a more heterogeneous picture. Thus, while adynamic bone disease has also been described in these patients, most studies show decreased bone formation and prolonged mineralization lag-time faced with persisting bone resorption, and even clear evidence of generalized or focal osteomalacia in many patients. Thus, the main alterations in bone remodeling are a decrease in bone formation and mineralization up against persistent bone resorption, suggesting defective osteoblast function, decreased osteoblastogenesis, or increased osteoblast death rates. Indeed, recent studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that there is an early decrease in osteoblast number and surfaces, as well as in reduced bone formation rate and delayed mineralization after transplantation. These alterations are associated with an early increase in osteoblast apoptosis that correlates with low levels of serum phosphorus. These changes were more frequently observed in patients with low turnover bone disease. In contrast, PTH seemed to preserve osteoblast survival. The mechanisms of hypophosphatemia in these patients appear to be independent of PTH, suggesting that other phosphaturic factors may play a role. However, further studies are needed to determine the nature of a phosphaturic factor and its relationship to the alterations of bone remodeling after transplantation.

  14. HLA-Mismatched Renal Transplantation without Maintenance Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Tatsuo; Cosimi, A. Benedict; Spitzer, Thomas R.; Tolkoff-Rubin, Nina; Suthanthiran, Manikkam; Saidman, Susan L.; Shaffer, Juanita; Preffer, Frederic I.; Ding, Ruchuang; Sharma, Vijay; Fishman, Jay A.; Dey, Bimalangshu; Ko, Dicken S.C.; Hertl, Martin; Goes, Nelson B.; Wong, Waichi; Williams, Winfred W.; Colvin, Robert B.; Sykes, Megan; Sachs, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Five patients with end-stage renal disease received combined bone marrow and kidney transplants from HLA single-haplotype mismatched living related donors, with the use of a nonmyeloablative preparative regimen. Transient chimerism and reversible capillary leak syndrome developed in all recipients. Irreversible humoral rejection occurred in one patient. In the other four recipients, it was possible to discontinue all immunosuppressive therapy 9 to 14 months after the transplantation, and renal function has remained stable for 2.0 to 5.3 years since transplantation. The T cells from these four recipients, tested in vitro, showed donor-specific unresponsiveness and in specimens from allograft biopsies, obtained after withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy, there were high levels of P3 (FOXP3) messenger RNA (mRNA) but not granzyme B mRNA. PMID:18216355

  15. The UK National Registry of ABO and HLA Antibody Incompatible Renal Transplantation: Pretransplant Factors Associated With Outcome in 879 Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Pankhurst, Laura; Hudson, Alex; Mumford, Lisa; Willicombe, Michelle; Galliford, Jack; Shaw, Olivia; Thuraisingham, Raj; Puliatti, Carmelo; Talbot, David; Griffin, Sian; Torpey, Nicholas; Ball, Simon; Clark, Brendan; Briggs, David; Fuggle, Susan V.; Higgins, Robert M.

    2017-01-01

    Background ABO and HLA antibody incompatible (HLAi) renal transplants (AIT) now comprise around 10% of living donor kidney transplants. However, the relationship between pretransplant factors and medium-term outcomes are not fully understood, especially in relation to factors that may vary between centers. Methods The comprehensive national registry of AIT in the United Kingdom was investigated to describe the donor, recipient and transplant characteristics of AIT. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to compare survival of AIT to all other compatible kidney transplants performed in the United Kingdom. Cox proportional hazards regression modeling was used to determine which pretransplant factors were associated with transplant survival in HLAi and ABOi separately. The primary outcome was transplant survival, taking account of death and graft failure. Results For 522 HLAi and 357 ABO incompatible (ABOi) transplants, 5-year transplant survival rates were 71% (95% confidence interval [CI], 66-75%) for HLAi and 83% (95% CI, 78-87%) for ABOi, compared with 88% (95% CI, 87-89%) for 7290 standard living donor transplants, and 78% (95% CI, 77-79%) for 15 322 standard deceased donor transplants (P < 0.0001). Increased chance of transplant loss in HLAi was associated with increasing number of donor specific HLA antibodies, center performing the transplant, antibody level at the time of transplant, and an interaction between donor age and dialysis status. In ABOi, transplant loss was associated with no use of IVIg, cytomegalovirus seronegative recipient, 000 HLA donor-recipient mismatch; and increasing recipient age. Conclusions Results of AIT were acceptable, certainly in the context of a choice between living donor AIT and an antibody compatible deceased donor transplant. Several factors were associated with increased chance of transplant loss, and these can lead to testable hypotheses for further improving therapy. PMID:28706984

  16. The UK National Registry of ABO and HLA Antibody Incompatible Renal Transplantation: Pretransplant Factors Associated With Outcome in 879 Transplants.

    PubMed

    Pankhurst, Laura; Hudson, Alex; Mumford, Lisa; Willicombe, Michelle; Galliford, Jack; Shaw, Olivia; Thuraisingham, Raj; Puliatti, Carmelo; Talbot, David; Griffin, Sian; Torpey, Nicholas; Ball, Simon; Clark, Brendan; Briggs, David; Fuggle, Susan V; Higgins, Robert M

    2017-07-01

    ABO and HLA antibody incompatible (HLAi) renal transplants (AIT) now comprise around 10% of living donor kidney transplants. However, the relationship between pretransplant factors and medium-term outcomes are not fully understood, especially in relation to factors that may vary between centers. The comprehensive national registry of AIT in the United Kingdom was investigated to describe the donor, recipient and transplant characteristics of AIT. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to compare survival of AIT to all other compatible kidney transplants performed in the United Kingdom. Cox proportional hazards regression modeling was used to determine which pretransplant factors were associated with transplant survival in HLAi and ABOi separately. The primary outcome was transplant survival, taking account of death and graft failure. For 522 HLAi and 357 ABO incompatible (ABOi) transplants, 5-year transplant survival rates were 71% (95% confidence interval [CI], 66-75%) for HLAi and 83% (95% CI, 78-87%) for ABOi, compared with 88% (95% CI, 87-89%) for 7290 standard living donor transplants, and 78% (95% CI, 77-79%) for 15 322 standard deceased donor transplants (P < 0.0001). Increased chance of transplant loss in HLAi was associated with increasing number of donor specific HLA antibodies, center performing the transplant, antibody level at the time of transplant, and an interaction between donor age and dialysis status. In ABOi, transplant loss was associated with no use of IVIg, cytomegalovirus seronegative recipient, 000 HLA donor-recipient mismatch; and increasing recipient age. Results of AIT were acceptable, certainly in the context of a choice between living donor AIT and an antibody compatible deceased donor transplant. Several factors were associated with increased chance of transplant loss, and these can lead to testable hypotheses for further improving therapy.

  17. Renal transplant ultrasound: The nephrologist's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Khai Gene; Coombs, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract One of the principal roles of a nephrologist is to closely monitor renal transplant allograft function and promptly evaluate any dysfunction. Renal transplant sonography has a major role in this assessment process given its ability to easily define renal transplant anatomy and surrounding structures. Abnormalities can be extrarenal or involve vascular, parenchymal and urological components of the graft and these can acutely or chronically influence graft function and survival. Procedural guidance as is required during allograft biopsy, as well as routine surveillance and screening for post transplant complications such as malignancy are also important applications of ultrasound in the management of renal transplant recipients. This article outlines key ultrasound findings and applications in renal transplantation from the clinician's perspective. PMID:28191257

  18. [Serum soluble HLA-G, soluble CD30 is correlated to the time after transplantation in renal transplant recipients].

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhankui; Xu, Cuixiang; Duan, Wanli; Yang, Jiangcun; Tian, Puxun

    2017-07-01

    Objective To investigate the expressions of serum soluble human leukocyte antigen G (sHLA-G) and soluble CD30 (sCD30) in renal transplant recipients at different time after transplantation, and explore the relationship between the expressions of serum sHLA-G, sCD30 and the time after renal transplantation. Methods Eleven kidney transplant recipients and 10 healthy donors were selected, in which the dynamic changes of serum sHLA-G and sCD30 were detected by ELISA before transplantation and 1 year after transplantation; 33 kidney transplant recipients with normal renal graft were selected and divided into three groups: 1-5 years, 5-10 years and 10 years post-transplantation. The expressions of serum sHLA-G and sCD30 in the recipients were tested over one year after transplantation. Results The level of serum sHLA-G before transplantation was not significantly different from that of the control group. There was no significant difference between pre-transplantation, 1 week and 1 month after transplantation. Serum sHLA-G level of renal transplant recipients at 3 months after transplantation was higher than that 1 month after transplantation. There was no significant change in serum sHLA-G level among 3, 6 and 12 months after transplantation. The level of serum sHLA-G in the group of transplant time >10 years was significantly higher than that in the group of transplant time ≤5 years. The serum sHLA-G level was significantly associated with the time after renal transplantation. The level of serum sCD30 before transplantation was higher than that in the control group and decreased in 1 week after transplantation. There were no significant differences in sCD30 level between 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after transplantation, and similarly, there were also no significant differences between the groups of transplant time ≤5 years, 5-10 years and 10 years after transplantation. The level of sCD30 was significantly associated with the time within 1 month after renal

  19. Risk factors of post renal transplant anaemia among Sudanese patients, a study in three renal transplant centres

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is a relative lack of recent information about late post kidney transplantation anaemia (PTA), especially in the developing countries; data are scarce about the prevalence and risk factors of PTA. Sudan was a leading country in Africa and Arab world in kidney transplantation. The first kidney transplantation in Sudan was in 1973. Methods This is a cross-sectional hospital analytic study enrolling all kidney transplanted recipients following in the transplant referral clinics at Ahmed Gassim, Selma and Ibn Sina Hospitals, Khartoum/Sudan, in the period from 1/8/2010 to 1/9/2010, clinical and laboratory data were obtained from 114 patients, anaemia was defined as Hb levels of < 13 g/dl for male patients and < 12 g/dl for female patients, exclusion criteria were pregnancy, below 18 years old patients, multiple organ transplantation, and patients with less than one year from the transplantation. Results The study showed that 39.5% of the patients were anaemic. Univariate analysis showed that late PTA is significantly associated with not using Erythropoietin (EPO) in the pre-transplant period (p = < 0.001), history of rejection (p = 0.003), longer time from transplantation (p = 0.015), and eGFR (p < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis showed that eGFR (p = < 0.001) and not use of EPO in the pre transplant period (p < 0.001) are strong predictors of PTA. The use of Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/Angiotensin receptors blockers (ACEI/ARB), immunosuppressive treatments, presence or absence of co-morbidities, donor type and donor age are not significantly associated with late PTA. Conclusion The study concluded that late PTA is common and under recognized. Risk factors for late PTA include renal dysfunction, history of rejection, longer duration of transplantation and not using EPO in the pre-transplant period. Renal dysfunction and not using EPO in the pre-transplant period are major predictors of late PTA. PMID:21827693

  20. Clinical risk stratification of paediatric renal transplant recipients using C1q and C3d fixing of de novo donor-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jon Jin; Shaw, Olivia; Martin, Chloe; Michaelides, George; Balasubramaniam, Ramnath; Sebire, Neil J; Mamode, Nizam; Dorling, Anthony; Vaughan, Robert; Marks, Stephen D

    2017-09-16

    We have previously shown that children who developed de novo donor-specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies (DSA) had greater decline in allograft function. We hypothesised that patients with complement-activating DSA would have poorer renal allograft outcomes. A total of 75 children developed DSA in the original study. The first positive DSA sample was subsequently tested for C1q and C3d fixing. The primary event was defined as 50% reduction from baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate and was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier estimator. Of 65 patients tested, 32 (49%) and 23 (35%) tested positive for C1q and C3d fixing, respectively. Of the 32 C1q-positive (c1q+) patients, 13 (41%) did not show concomitant C3d fixing. The mean fluorescence intensity values of the original immunoglobulin G DSA correlated poorly with complement-fixing positivity (C1q: adjusted R (2) 0.072; C3d: adjusted R (2) 0.11; p < 0.05). C1q+ antibodies were associated with acute tubulitis [0.75 ± 0.18 (C1q+) vs. 0.25 ± 0.08 (C1q-) episodes per patient (mean ± standard error of the mean; p < 0.05] but not with worse long-term renal allograft dysfunction (median time to primary event 5.9 (C1q+) vs. 6.4 (C1q-) years; hazard ratio (HR) 0.74; 95% confidence ratio (CI) 0.30-1.81; p = 0.58]. C3d-positive (C3d+) antibodies were associated with positive C4d histological staining [47% (C3d+) vs. 20% (C3d-); p = 0.04] and with significantly worse long-term allograft dysfunction [median time to primary event: 5.6 (C3d+) vs. 6.5 (C3d-) years; HR 0.38; 95% CI 0.15-0.97; p = 0.04]. Assessment of C3d fixing as part of prospective HLA monitoring can potentially aid stratification of patients at the highest risk of long-term renal allograft dysfunction.

  1. Fungal infection following renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gallis, H A; Berman, R A; Cate, T R; Hamilton, J D; Gunnells, J C; Stickel, D L

    1975-09-01

    Twenty-seven deep fungal infections developed in 22 of 171 patients following renal transplantation. These infections included cryptococcosis (ten), nocardiosis (seven), candidiasis (four), aspergillosis (two), phycomycosis (two), chromomycosis (one), and subcutaneous infection with Phialophora gougeroti (one). Twelve infections occurred in living-related and ten in cadaveric recipients. Nineteen of the 22 patients were male. Infections occurred from 0 to 61 months after transplantation. Complicating non-fungal infections were present concomitantly in 15 patients. Thirteen patients died, eight probably as a result of fungal infection. Appropriate diagnostic procedures yielded a diagnosis in 20 of 27 infections, and therapy was begun in 18 patients. Serologic, culture, and biopsy procedures useful in making rapid diagnoses are advocated in the hope of increasing survival.

  2. Renal transplantation in children less than 5 years of age.

    PubMed Central

    Rizzoni, G; Malekzadeh, M H; Pennisi, A J; Ettenger, R B; Uittenbogaart, C H; Fine, R N

    1980-01-01

    19 young children (less than 5 years old) have received 31 renal transplants from 4 live relatives and 27 cadaver donors. The 2-year allograft survival rate for the patients receiving their 1st allograft from the 4 live donors was 75 +/- 22% while for the patients receiving their 1st allograft from 15 cadaver donors was 26 +/- 11%. 10 children are currently surviving with functioning allographs (7 cadavers and 3 live relatives); 4 have died and 5 are undergoing dialysis after the loss of at least one allograft. Despite the poor allograft survival rate the fact that 7 children are surviving with cadaver allografts indicates that the lack of a living related donor should not prevent transplants in young children. PMID:7002060

  3. Renal transplantation in patients with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Frassetto, Lynda A.; Tan-Tam, Clara; Stock, Peter G.

    2010-01-01

    HIV infection has been a major global health problem for almost three decades. With the introduction of highly active anti-retroviral therapy in 1996, and the advent of effective prophylaxis and management of opportunistic infections, AIDS mortality has decreased markedly. In developed countries, this once fatal infection is now being treated as a chronic condition. As a result, rate of morbidity and mortality from other medical conditions leading to end-stage liver, kidney and heart disease is steadily increasing in individuals with HIV. Presence of HIV infection used to be viewed as a contraindication to transplantation for multiple reasons:,concerns for exacerbation of an already immunocompromised state by administration of additional immunosuppressants; the use of a limited supply of donor organs with unknown long-term outcomes; and, the risk of viral transmission to the surgical and medical staff. This Review examines open questions on kidney transplantation in patients infected with HIV-1 and clinical strategies that have resulted in good outcomes. It also describes the clinical concerns associated with the treatment of renal transplant recipients with HIV. PMID:19776780

  4. Renal transplantation in patients with HIV.

    PubMed

    Frassetto, Lynda A; Tan-Tam, Clara; Stock, Peter G

    2009-10-01

    HIV infection has been a major global health problem for almost three decades. With the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy in 1996, and the advent of effective prophylaxis and management of opportunistic infections, AIDS mortality has decreased markedly. In developed countries, this once fatal infection is now being treated as a chronic condition. As a result, rates of morbidity and mortality from other medical conditions leading to end-stage liver, kidney and heart disease are steadily increasing in individuals with HIV. Presence of HIV infection used to be viewed as a contraindication to transplantation for multiple reasons: concerns for exacerbation of an already immunocompromised state by administration of additional immunosuppressants; the use of a limited supply of donor organs with unknown long-term outcomes; and, the risk of viral transmission to the surgical and medical staff. This Review examines open questions on kidney transplantation in patients infected with HIV-1 and clinical strategies that have resulted in good outcomes. It also describes the clinical concerns associated with the treatment of renal transplant recipients with HIV.

  5. Maximizing growth in children after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cochat, Pierre; Harambat, Jérôme

    2009-12-27

    Achieving normal height in children after renal transplantation is a crucial issue for both quality of life and self-esteem. The management of growth retardation in renal transplant recipients includes adequate nutritional intake, correction of acidosis, optimal drug compliance, limited calcineurin inhibitor nephrotoxicity, steroid-sparing strategies, and sometimes recombinant human growth hormone.

  6. Neurocognitive functions in pediatric renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Gulleroglu, K; Baskin, E; Bayrakci, U S; Aydogan, M; Alehan, F; Kantar, A; Karakayali, F; Moray, G; Haberal, M

    2013-01-01

    Neurocognitive dysfunction is one of the major complications of chronic renal failure (CRF). Uremic state during CRF encompasses a wide spectrum of neurobehavioral and neurological disturbances. Recent studies showed that the pathophysiology of neurocognitive dysfunction in CRF is related to plasma levels of uremic solutes. Successful renal transplantation improves renal, metabolic, and endocrine functions and the quality of life. The aim of our study was to determine the state of neurocognitive function in pediatric renal transplant recipients. We prospectively performed a neurological examination and neuropsychological test battery (Bender-Gestalt Test, Cancellation Test, and Visual and Auditory Number Assay Test) in 20 pediatric renal transplant recipients between 6 and 16 years of age. Twenty healthy children and 20 children with CRF were included in the study as the control groups. Mean age of the renal transplant recipients was 13.50 ± 3.40 years old. Mean evaluation time after transplantation was 2.0 ± 0.5 years. Bender-Gestalt Test result was abnormal in 40% of patients. The results of the Cancellation Test and the Visual and Auditory Number Assay Test showed significant decline in pediatric renal transplant patients when compared with the control. We found that neurocognitive dysfunction was frequent in pediatric renal transplantation patients. Awareness of this potential problem may be helpful for early recognition and treatment. Our findings suggest that periodic neurocognitive assessments may be indicated in transplant recipients.

  7. Hyperthyroidism in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Navascués, R A; Baltar, J; Laurés, A S; Ortega, F; Alvarez-Grande, J

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of toxic multinodular goiter with severe symptomatic hyperthyroidism in a female diagnosed 5 months after successful renal transplantation. To our knowledge, this is the first well-documented case of hyperthyroidism in a renal transplant recipient that responded well to methimazole. Special attention should be made to the use of methimazole and the possible interaction with immunosuppressive drugs.

  8. Dual kidney transplants from adult marginal donors successfully expand the limited deceased donor organ pool.

    PubMed

    Stratta, Robert J; Farney, Alan C; Orlando, Giuseppe; Farooq, Umar; Al-Shraideh, Yousef; Palanisamy, Amudha; Reeves-Daniel, Amber; Doares, William; Kaczmorski, Scott; Gautreaux, Michael D; Iskandar, Samy S; Hairston, Gloria; Brim, Elizabeth; Mangus, Margaret; El-Hennawy, Hany; Khan, Muhammad; Rogers, Jeffrey

    2016-04-01

    The need to expand the organ donor pool remains a formidable challenge in kidney transplantation (KT). The use of expanded criteria donors (ECDs) represents one approach, but kidney discard rates are high because of concerns regarding overall quality. Dual KT (DKT) may reduce organ discard and optimize the use of kidneys from marginal donors. We conducted a single-center retrospective review of outcomes in adult recipients of DKTs from adult marginal deceased donors (DD) defined by limited renal functional capacity. If the calculated creatinine clearance in an adult DD was <65 mL/min, then the kidneys were transplanted as a DKT. Over 11.5 yr, 72 DKTS were performed including 45 from ECDs, 17 from donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors, and 10 from standard criteria donors (SCD). Mean adult DD and recipient ages were both 60 yr, including 29 DDs and 26 recipients ≥65 yr of age. Mean pre-DKT waiting and dialysis vintage times were 12 months and 25 months, respectively. Actual patient and graft survival rates were 84.7% and 70.8%, respectively, with a mean follow-up of 58 months. One yr and death-censored graft survival rates were 90% and 80%, respectively. Outcomes did not differ by DD category, recipient age, or presence of delayed graft function (DGF). Eleven patients died at a mean of 32 months post-DKT (eight with functioning grafts) and 13 other patients experienced graft losses at a mean of 33 months. The incidence of DGF was 25%; there were two cases (2.8%) of primary non-function. Mean length of initial hospital stay was 7.2 d. Mean serum creatinine and glomerular filtration rate levels at 12 and 24 months were 1.5 and 53 and 1.5 mg/dL and 51 mL/min/1.73 m(2) , respectively. DKT graft survival and function were superior to concurrent single ECD and similar to concurrent SCD KTs. Two patients underwent successful kidney retransplantation, so the dialysis-free rate in surviving patients was 87%. The proportion of total renal function transplanted from

  9. The Changing Financial Landscape of Renal Transplant Practice: A National Cohort Analysis.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, D A; Schnitzler, M A; Xiao, H; Naik, A S; Segev, D L; Dharnidharka, V R; Brennan, D C; Lentine, K L

    2017-02-01

    Kidney transplantation has become more resource intensive as recipient complexity has increased and average donor quality has diminished over time. A national retrospective cohort study was performed to assess the impact of kidney donor and recipient characteristics on transplant center cost (exclusive of organ acquisition) and Medicare reimbursement. Data from the national transplant registry, University HealthSystem Consortium hospital costs, and Medicare payments for deceased donor (N = 53 862) and living donor (N = 36 715) transplants from 2002 to 2013 were linked and analyzed using multivariate linear regression modeling. Deceased donor kidney transplant costs were correlated with recipient (Expected Post Transplant Survival Score, degree of allosensitization, obesity, cause of renal failure), donor (age, cause of death, donation after cardiac death, terminal creatinine), and transplant (histocompatibility matching) characteristics. Living donor costs rose sharply with higher degrees of allosensitization, and were also associated with obesity, cause of renal failure, recipient work status, and 0-ABDR mismatching. Analysis of Medicare payments for a subsample of 24 809 transplants demonstrated minimal correlation with patient and donor characteristics. In conclusion, the complexity in the landscape of kidney transplantation increases center costs, posing financial disincentives that may reduce organ utilization and limit access for higher-risk populations.

  10. Cyclosporine nephrotoxicity and early posttransplant hyperkalemia in living-donor renal recipients: report of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Pavleska-Kuzmanovska, Svetlana; Popov, Zivko; Ivanovski, Ognen; Ristovska, Vesna; Masin-Spasovska, Jelka; Rambabova-Busljetic, Irena; Ivanovski, Ninoslav

    2014-10-01

    Hyperkalemia is an electrolyte disorder that may occur during the first few months after a renal transplant, in patients undergoing cyclosporine immunosuppression. We present our experience with cyclosporine-associated hyperkalemia in living-donor renal transplant recipients, with isolated clinically relevant hyperkalemia soon after surgery. We report 4 living-donor renal recipients with hyperkalemia soon after transplant. Severe unexpected hyperkalemia (7.5- 9.4 mmol/L) was noted in our patients 12, 20, 22, and 34 days after transplant. The C2 cyclosporine concentration was within recommended range or slightly greater than 1200 ng/mL. The hypertonic glucose/insulin treatment along with potassium diet was without results. A reduction in daily cyclosporine dosages, along with 1- to 2-week administration of fludrocortisone was effective. The patients became normokalemic taking a standard, triple-drug immunosuppression protocol, and were discharged home with normal renal function. There were no repeat episodes of hyperkalemia in any of the patients during 12 months of follow-up. Cyclosporine should be considered a cause of hyperkalemia in renal transplant recipients. Successful treatment with fludrocortisone confirms that transitional pseudohypoaldosteronism has a potential nephrotoxic effect of cyclosporine. We recommend close monitoring of the cyclosporine concentration and administering fludrocortisone when treating hyperkalemia in renal transplant recipients.

  11. CUBN as a Novel Locus for End-Stage Renal Disease: Insights from Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Reznichenko, Anna; Snieder, Harold; van den Born, Jacob; de Borst, Martin H.; Damman, Jeffrey; van Dijk, Marcory C. R. F.; van Goor, Harry; Hepkema, Bouke G.; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.; Niesing, Jan; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Seelen, Marc; Navis, Gerjan

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex disorder. As genome-wide association studies identified cubilin gene CUBN as a locus for albuminuria, and urinary protein loss is a risk factor for progressive CKD, we tested the hypothesis that common genetic variants in CUBN are associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and proteinuria. First, a total of 1142 patients with ESRD, admitted for renal transplantation, and 1186 donors were genotyped for SNPs rs7918972 and rs1801239 (case-control study). The rs7918972 minor allele frequency (MAF) was higher in ESRD patients comparing to kidney donors, implicating an increased risk for ESRD (OR 1.39, p = 0.0004) in native kidneys. Second, after transplantation recipients were followed for 5.8 [3.8–9.2] years (longitudinal study) documenting ESRD in transplanted kidneys – graft failure (GF). During post-transplant follow-up 92 (9.6%) cases of death-censored GF occurred. Donor rs7918972 MAF, representing genotype of the transplanted kidney, was 16.3% in GF vs 10.7% in cases with functioning graft. Consistently, a multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that donor rs7918972 is a predictor of GF, although statistical significance was not reached (HR 1.53, p = 0.055). There was no association of recipient rs7918972 with GF. Rs1801239 was not associated with ESRD or GF. In line with an association with the outcome, donor rs7918972 was associated with elevated proteinuria levels cross-sectionally at 1 year after transplantation. Thus, we identified CUBN rs7918972 as a novel risk variant for renal function loss in two independent settings: ESRD in native kidneys and GF in transplanted kidneys. PMID:22574174

  12. Growth in pediatric renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, A; Phadke, K

    2007-04-01

    One of the fundamental challenges in managing pediatric renal transplant recipient is to ensure normal growth and development. The goal of renal transplant is not just to prolong life but to optimize quality of life. Short stature during childhood may be associated with academic underachievement and development of comorbidities such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, learning disability, and mood disorders. The most important factors affecting growth are use of corticosteroids, allograft function, and age and height deficit at the time of transplant. Aggressive conservative management of chronic renal failure and early use of growth hormone therapy will help in optimizing height at time of transplant. Early transplant, steroid minimization or withdrawal, and growth hormone therapy will help in achieving normal adult height in a majority of renal post transplant population. Steroid avoidance to achieve good growth still needs to be validated.

  13. Live donor transplantation--the incompetent donor: comparative law.

    PubMed

    Wolfman, Samuel; Shaked, Tali

    2008-12-01

    Informed consent of the patient to medical treatment is an essential prerequisite for any invasive medical procedure. However in emergency cases, when the patient is unable to sign a consent form due to unconsciousness or to psychotic state, than the primary medical consideration shall take place. In such a case, in order to save life or even prevent a major medical hazard to the patient, doctors are allowed, in certain cases and in accordance with well accepted medical practice, to perform invasive procedures, major surgery or risky pharmacological treatment, without the explicit consent of the patient. All the above refers to the cases when avoidance of such non-consented treatment may harm severely the health and wellbeing of the patient and there is no doubt that such treatment is for the ultimate benefit of the patient. The question, however, shall arise when such a medical procedure is not necessarily for the benefit of the patient, but rather for the benefit of somebody else. Such is the case in the transplantation area and the question of living donor-donee relationship. This paper shall analyze the legal situation in cases of non competent donors whose consent cannot be considered legal consent given in full understanding and out of free will. It will also compare three legal systems, the Israeli, the American and the traditional Jewish law, with regard to the different approaches to this human problem, where the autonomy of the donor may be sacrificed for the purpose of saving life of another person.

  14. Reduced-intensity bone marrow transplantation from an alternative unrelated donor for myelodysplastic syndrome of first-donor origin.

    PubMed

    Komeno, Yukiko; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Kandabashi, Koji; Kawazu, Masahito; Goyama, Susumu; Takeshita, Masataka; Nannya, Yasuhito; Niino, Miyuki; Nakamoto, Tetsuya; Kurokawa, Mineo; Tsujino, Shiho; Ogawa, Seishi; Aoki, Katsunori; Chiba, Shigeru; Motokura, Toru; Hirai, Hisamaru

    2003-03-01

    A male patient had a relapse of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) 2 years after BMT from a female matched unrelated donor. Conventional cytogenetics, FISH, and short-tandem repeat chimerism analysis proved a relapse of donor origin. He underwent reduced-intensity BMT after a conditioning with fludarabine and busulfan, since he had impaired renal, liver, and pulmonary functions. Chimerism analysis on day 28 after the second BMT showed mixed chimerism of the first and the second donors, which later turned to full second-donor chimerism on day 60. He developed grade II acute GVHD of the skin and cytomegalovirus reactivation, but both were improved with methylprednisolone and ganciclovir, respectively. He remains in complete remission 6 months after the second BMT. Reduced-intensity second BMT from an alternative donor appeared to be a tolerable treatment option for donor-derived leukemia/MDS after the first conventional transplantation.

  15. [Twin pregnancy after renal transplantation: first case reported in Tunisia].

    PubMed

    Skhiri, Habib; Guedri, Yousr; Achour, Abdellatif; Sabra, Aloui; Hadj, Youssef Dorsaf; Bouraoui, Samia; Frih, Ameur; Ben Dhia, Nasr; Sakkouhi, Mohamed; Gahbiche, Mourad; Saad, Hamadi; El May, Mezni

    2005-04-01

    Women with end-stage renal disease or on regular dialysis have low fertility. Renal transplantation restores not only normal renal and endocrine functions but also the reproductive function as well and this conception becomes possible. Pregnancy in transplanted women is at higher risk and necessitates a multidisciplinary follow up. We report the course and out come of two successful pregnancies, the second was the first case of twin pregnancy in Tunisia in a transplanted woman. Our patient is 35 years old had a chronic renal insufficiency, secondary to interstitial nephropathy. After six years of hemodialysis, she had received a renal graft from a living donor (his brother). A double drug immunosuppression was given (Prednisolone - Azathioprine). Two years later, she became pregnant and delivered a normal baby at term, and one year later she had a twin pregnancy that ended successfully and delivered by caesarian section a two babies with different sex. Pregnancy after renal transplantion must be considered as a risk factor for any subsquent pregnancy, and the risk nicreases in case of twin pregnancy.

  16. [Survival in renal transplant recipients in Colombia, 2008-2012].

    PubMed

    Osorio-Arango, Karime; Beltrán-Durán, Mauricio; Arias-Murillo, Yazmín; Prieto, Franklyn; Robayo, Adriana

    2017-06-01

    The Red Nacional de Donación y Trasplantes of the Colombian Instituto Nacional de Salud reported that in 2014, 1,059 organ transplants were performed, of which 761 were kidney transplants, and 643 (84.5%) of these were from cadaveric organ donors. To describe the socio-demographic characteristics of patients who received renal transplants, as well as their outcomes in terms of survival. National kidney transplants were analyzed through an observational retrospective cohort study. Overall survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The survival curves by sex, age, type of donor, type of insurance, and time on the waiting list were compared utilizing the log rank hypothesis and a Cox regression. A total of 3,980 patients were included, of whom 338 died according to the Registry of Affiliates. The median follow-up time was 49 months, overall survival was 6.35 years (95% CI: 6.30 to 6.40), the one-year survival following transplantation was 97.2%, the three-year survival, 93.2%, and the five-year survival, 90.8%. The survival rate was higher in patients under 50 years of age, receptors of living donor transplants, and with less than six months on the waiting list. The results obtained serve as the basis for future studies with strict monitoring of survival among kidney transplant recipients in Colombia.

  17. Donor-specific antibodies accelerate arteriosclerosis after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hill, Gary S; Nochy, Dominique; Bruneval, Patrick; Duong van Huyen, J P; Glotz, Denis; Suberbielle, Caroline; Zuber, Julien; Anglicheau, Dany; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Legendre, Christophe; Loupy, Alexandre

    2011-05-01

    In biopsies of renal allografts, arteriosclerosis is often more severe than expected based on the age of the donor, even without a history of rejection vasculitis. To determine whether preformed donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) may contribute to the severity of arteriosclerosis, we examined protocol biopsies from patients with (n=40) or without (n=59) DSA after excluding those with any evidence of vasculitis. Among DSA-positive patients, arteriosclerosis significantly progressed between month 3 and month 12 after transplant (mean Banff cv score 0.65 ± 0.11 to 1.12 ± 0.10, P=0.014); in contrast, among DSA-negative patients, we did not detect a statistically significant progression during the same timeframe (mean Banff cv score 0.65 ± 0.11 to 0.81 ± 0.10, P=not significant). Available biopsies at later time points supported a rate of progression of arteriosclerosis in DSA-negative patients that was approximately one third that in DSA-positive patients. Accelerated arteriosclerosis was significantly associated with peritubular capillary leukocytic infiltration, glomerulitis, subclinical antibody-mediated rejection, and interstitial inflammation. In conclusion, these data support the hypothesis that donor-specific antibodies dramatically accelerate post-transplant progression of arteriosclerosis.

  18. Physicians attitudes toward living non-related renal transplantation (LNRRT). The Living non-Related Renal Transplant Study Group.

    PubMed

    1993-06-01

    Renal transplantation is considered now the definitive treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Unfortunately, the worldwide shortage of kidneys remains the most important obstacle to transplantation. In developing countries, including those of the Middle East, the shortage is even more dramatic. Despite great efforts to establish and maintain successful transplant centers, the number of kidneys that have been transplanted in the last few years has actually declined. The lack of a dependable kidney source played well into the hands of unscrupulous entrepreneurs who started brokerage of organs for profit. In this practice, patients with ESRD travel to India and other countries to purchase kidneys from living genetically non-related poor donors. Patient care was therefore relegated to the laws of the marketplace and both patients and donors were exploited to maximize profit. Additionally, reported results of this type of transplantation were inferior to those of other types of transplantation. Not unexpectedly, these issues have created intense controversy among transplant physicians and the general public in which moral, ethical and medical issues were debated. To investigate these issues, we conducted a large multicenter study in Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and Egypt. In the first phase of this study, we surveyed 50 institutions regarding their attitude toward LNRRT, of which 22 responded. The results of our survey clearly show that patients with ESRD take the initiative in seeking LNRRT despite physician discouragement and significant financial burden.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Risk factors of arterial hypertension after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Béji, S; Abderrahim, E; Kaaroud, H; Jebali, H; Ben Abdallah, T; El Younsi, F; Ben Moussa, F; Ben Hamida, F; Sfaxi, A; Blah, M; Chebil, M; Ayed, M; Bardi, R; Gorgi, Y; Kheder, A

    2007-10-01

    Arterial hypertension often present after kidney transplantation is of multifactorial origin. The aim of this study was to determine the role of donor and recipient factors in the development of hypertension after renal transplantation. We retrospectively analyzed the data of 280 patients transplanted between 1985 and 2005, who still had functioning grafts at 1 year after transplantation. We recorded donor and recipient parameters. One hundred eighty-seven patients (66.8%) were hypertensive. Upon multivariate analysis of recipient factors, pretransplant hypertension (odds ratio) [OR]: 8.5, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.5 to 16.1); serum creatinine level > 130 micromol/L at 6 months (OR: 2.5, 95% CI: 1.3 to 4,7), male gender (OR: 2.02, 95% CI: 1.2 to 3.4), and chronic rejection (OR: 2.4, 95% CI: 1.2 to 4.7) were independent predisposing factors. Among donor factors, age was significantly associated with arterial hypertension upon univariate analysis. In conclusion, recipient factors, especially pretransplant hypertension, contribute to the disorder in renal transplant patients.

  20. Successful third renal transplantation in a child with an occluded inferior vena cava: A novel technique to use the venous interposition between the transplant renal vein and the infrahepatic inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Masaki; Shishido, Seiichiro; Takahashi, Yusuke; Hamasaki, Yuko; Yoshimura, Hiroshi; Nihei, Hiroshi; Itabashi, Yoshihiro; Kawamura, Takeshi; Aikawa, Atsushi

    2017-03-19

    A girl aged 11 years and 3 months with occlusion of the inferior vena cava had experienced two renal transplant graft failures since birth. The third renal transplant from a live donor was carried out. Preoperative evaluation showed that the arteries from the right common to the right external iliac artery were absent, and the ilio-caval vein was occluded below the level of the renal vein. The donor's renal artery was anastomosed to the aorta. The donor's ovarian and large saphenous veins were used to extend the transplant renal vein to the recipient's patent inferior vena cava. The present report concludes that the extension of a short donor renal vein using other donor veins is a viable therapeutic option for pediatric patients with vascular occlusions.

  1. Hepatic vein reconstruction in living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Elola-Olaso, A Moreno; Gonzalez, E Moreno; Diaz, J C Meneu; Garcia García, I; Usera, M Abradelo; Romero, J; Perez-Saborido, B; Fraile, M; Manrique, A

    2005-11-01

    Living donor liver transplantation has emerged as a response to the cadaveric graft shortage, especially for adult recipients. Both right and left liver grafts are widely used, although some technical problems remain unresolved. Herein we describe our technique for reconstruction of the venous outflow in living donor liver transplantation. From April 1986 to September 2004, 1012 liver transplantations were performed including 30 living donor liver transplantations between April 1995 and September 2004. We have selected the first 28 cases to ensure a mean follow-up of 21.07 +/- 13.11 months. We transplanted 18 right lobe grafts, 7 left lobe grafts, and 3 left lateral segment grafts. A surgical technique is described herein. No venous outflow obstruction developed among living donor liver transplantation recipients. We recommend reconstruction of the hepatic veins in living donor liver transplantation including joining together the three hepatic veins in the recipient to avoid venous outflow obstruction.

  2. Multicenter evaluation of efficacy and safety of low-dose versus high-dose valganciclovir for prevention of cytomegalovirus disease in donor and recipient positive (D+/R+) renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Heldenbrand, Seth; Li, Chenghui; Cross, Rosemary P; DePiero, Kelly A; Dick, Travis B; Ferguson, Kara; Kim, Miae; Newkirk, Erin; Park, Jeong M; Sudaria-Kerr, Janice; Tichy, Eric M; Ueda, Kimi R; Weng, Renee; Wisniewski, Jesse; Gabardi, Steven

    2016-12-01

    The cytomegalovirus (CMV) donor-positive/recipient-positive (D+/R+) population is the largest proportion of renal transplant recipients (RTR). Guidelines for prevention of CMV in the intermediate-risk D+/R+ population include prophylaxis with valganciclovir (VGCV) 900 mg/day for 3 months. This study is the first head-to-head analysis, to our knowledge, comparing the efficacy and safety CMV prophylaxis of VGCV 450 vs 900 mg/day for 3 months in D+/R+ RTR. A multicenter, retrospective analysis evaluated 478 adult RTR between January 2008 and October 2011. Study participants received VGCV 450 mg/day (Group 1; n=398) or 900 mg/day (Group 2; n=89)×3 months for CMV prophylaxis. All VGCV was adjusted for renal function. All groups included in this study received study-approved induction and maintenance immunosuppression regimens. The primary endpoint was incidence of CMV disease at 12 months. The rates of graft loss, patient survival, T-cell and/or antibody-mediated rejection, hematological adverse events, opportunistic infections, and early VGCV discontinuation were evaluated. Patient demographics were comparable, but had significant differences in ethnicity and donor type between the groups. The occurrence of CMV disease at 12 months was similar between the groups (3.5% vs 3.4%; P=1.000). Log-rank test found no statistically significant difference in the time to development of CMV between the 2 groups (P=.939). © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Hypertensive encephalopathy complicating transplant renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    McGonigle, R. J.; Bewick, M.; Trafford, J. A.; Parsons, V.

    1984-01-01

    A 26-year-old female diabetic patient developed hypertensive encephalopathy with gross neurological abnormalities complicating renal artery stenosis of her transplant kidney. The elevated blood pressure was unresponsive to medical treatment. Surgical correction of the stenoses in the renal artery cured the hypertension and renal failure and led to the patient's complete recovery. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6377286

  4. Donor-associated malignancy in kidney transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Cai-Bin; Gerber, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Skin cancer cells with donor genotype have been identified in allogeneic transplant patients; however, the donor contribution to the recipient’s epithelial malignancy remains to be established. In this issue of the JCI, Verneuil et al. provide the first evidence for donor contribution to the malignant epithelium of skin squamous cell carcinoma in a kidney transplant recipient. This case report may have important implications for cancer research and clinical care of long-surviving kidney transplant patients. PMID:23979157

  5. Living Donor Kidney Transplantation: Improving Education Outside of Transplant Centers about Live Donor Transplantation--Recommendations from a Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Waterman, Amy D; Morgievich, Marie; Cohen, David J; Butt, Zeeshan; Chakkera, Harini A; Lindower, Carrie; Hays, Rebecca E; Hiller, Janet M; Lentine, Krista L; Matas, Arthur J; Poggio, Emilio D; Rees, Michael A; Rodrigue, James R; LaPointe Rudow, Dianne

    2015-09-04

    Living donor kidney transplantation (LDKT) offers better quality of life and clinical outcomes, including patient survival, compared with remaining on dialysis or receiving a deceased donor kidney transplant. Although LDKT education within transplant centers for both potential recipients and living donors is very important, outreach and education to kidney patients in settings other than transplant centers and to the general public is also critical to increase access to this highly beneficial treatment. In June 2014, the American Society of Transplantation's Live Donor Community of Practice, with the support of 10 additional sponsors, convened a consensus conference to determine best practices in LDKT, including a workgroup focused on developing a set of recommendations for optimizing outreach and LDKT education outside of transplant centers. Members of this workgroup performed a structured literature review, conducted teleconference meetings, and met in person at the 2-day conference. Their efforts resulted in consensus around the following recommendations. First, preemptive transplantation should be promoted through increased LDKT education by primary care physicians and community nephrologists. Second, dialysis providers should be trained to educate their own patients about LDKT and deceased donor kidney transplantation. Third, partnerships between community organizations, organ procurement organizations, religious organizations, and transplant centers should be fostered to support transplantation. Fourth, use of technology should be improved or expanded to better educate kidney patients and their support networks. Fifth, LDKT education and outreach should be improved for kidney patients in rural areas. Finally, a consensus-driven, evidence-based public message about LDKT should be developed. Discussion of the effect and potential for implementation around each recommendation is featured, particularly regarding reducing racial and socioeconomic disparities in

  6. Gift exchange and organ donation: donor and recipient experiences of live related kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gill, Paul; Lowes, Lesley

    2008-11-01

    Live transplantation presents many stressors for donors and recipients, yet a holistic understanding of the process, from both perspectives, is limited. Gift exchange is a theory governed by the principles of giving, receiving and reciprocating and has many similarities with the process of organ transplantation. It may therefore provide a framework for understanding donor and recipient experiences of live kidney transplantation. However, the relevance of this theory to live kidney transplantation has not previously been properly explored. To gain a theoretical understanding of the live transplantation experience from the perspectives of donors and recipients. A phenomenological, longitudinal study. All donors and their recipients undergoing live kidney transplantation in a regional renal transplant centre in South-West England (between July 2003 and February 2004) were invited to participate in this study. Of this cohort, 11 families (n=55%) volunteered to participate. Data were collected through a series of 3 recorded, semi-structured interviews with donors and recipients. Interviews were conducted pre transplant and at 3 and 10 months post transplant. Data were analysed using a process of thematic content analysis. Findings were also considered within a theoretical framework of gift exchange. All donors initially made an instantaneous, voluntary decision to donate and found the decision relatively easy to make. In contrast, recipients found accepting the donors' offer arduous, because of concern for their wellbeing. They were only able to accept the transplant after discussing the matter with their donor and establishing that it was something that they wanted to do. Recipients' lives were transformed by a successful transplant and they were subsequently very grateful to the donors for donating. Donors derived immense personal satisfaction from this outcome and it helped to confirm to them that what they had done had been worthwhile. The transplant did not have a

  7. Defining Long-term Outcomes with Living Donor Liver Transplantation in North America

    PubMed Central

    Olthoff, Kim M.; Smith, Abigail R.; Abecassis, Michael; Baker, Talia; Emond, Jean C.; Berg, Carl L.; Beil, Charlotte A.; Burton, James R.; Fisher, Robert A.; Freise, Christopher E.; Gillespie, Brenda W.; Grant, David R.; Humar, Abhi; Kam, Igal; Merion, Robert M.; Pomfret, Elizabeth A.; Samstein, Benjamin; Shaked, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare long-term survival of living donor liver transplant (LDLT) at experienced transplant centers to outcomes of deceased donor liver transplant (DDLT) and identify key variables impacting patient and graft survival. Summary Background Data The Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study (A2ALL) is a prospective multicenter NIH study comparing outcomes of LDLT and DDLT and associated risks. Methods Mortality and graft failure for 1427 liver recipients (963 LDLT) enrolled in A2ALL transplanted between 1/1/1998 and 1/31/2014 at 12 North American centers with median follow-up 6.7 years were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox models. Results Survival probability at 10 years was 70% for LDLT and 64% for DDLT. Unadjusted survival was higher with LDLT (HR=0.76, p=0.02) but attenuated after adjustment (HR=0.98, p=0.90) as LDLT recipients had lower mean MELD (15.5 vs 20.4) and fewer were transplanted from ICU, inpatient, on dialysis, ventilated, or with ascites. Post-transplant ICU days were less for LDLT. For all recipients female gender and primary sclerosing cholangitis were associated with improved survival, while dialysis and older recipient/donor age were associated with worse survival. Higher MELD score was associated with increased graft failure. Era of transplantation and type of donated lobe did not impact survival in LDLT. Conclusions LDLT provides significant long-term transplant benefit resulting in transplantation at a lower MELD score, decreased death on waitlist, and excellent post-transplant outcomes. Recipient diagnosis, disease severity, renal failure, and ages of recipient and donor should be considered in decision-making regarding timing of transplant and donor options. Clinical Trials ID NCT00096733. PMID:26258315

  8. Low-grade proteinuria and microalbuminuria in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Halimi, Jean-Michel

    2013-07-27

    Nephrotic-range proteinuria has been known for years to be associated with poor renal outcome. Newer evidence indicates that early (1-3 months after transplantation) low-grade proteinuria and microalbuminuria (1) provide information on the graft in terms of donor characteristics and ischemia/reperfusion injury, (2) may occur before the development of donor-specific antibodies, (3) predict the development of diabetes and cardiovascular events, and (4) are associated with reduced long-term graft and patient survivals. Low-grade proteinuria and microalbuminuria are also predictive of diabetes, cardiovascular morbidity, and death in nontransplanted populations, which may help us to understand the pathophysiology of low-grade proteinuria or microalbuminuria in renal transplantation. The impact of immunosuppressive medications, including mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, on graft survival is still discussed, and the effect on proteinuria is crucial to the debate. The fact that chronic allograft rejection may exist as early as 3 months after renal transplantation indicates that optimal management of low-grade proteinuria or microalbuminuria should occur very early after transplantation to improve long-term renal function and the overall outcome of renal transplant recipients. The presence of low-grade proteinuria or microalbuminuria early after transplantation must be taken into account to choose adequate immunosuppressive and antihypertensive medications. Limited information exists regarding the benefit of therapeutic interventions to reduce low-grade proteinuria or microalbuminuria. Whether renin angiotensin blockade results in optimal nephroprotection in patients with low-grade proteinuria or microalbuminuria is not proven, especially in the absence of chronic allograft nephropathy. Observational studies and randomized clinical trials yield conflicting results. Finally, randomized clinical trials are urgently needed.

  9. Preemptive Renal Transplantation-The Best Treatment Option for Terminal Chronic Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Arze Aimaretti, L; Arze, S

    2016-03-01

    Renal transplantation is the best therapeutic option for end-stage chronic renal disease. Assuming that it is more advisable if performed early, we aimed to show the clinical, social, and economic advantages in 70% of our patients who were dialyzed only for a short period. For this purpose, we retrospectively collected data over 28 years in 142 kidney transplants performed in patients with <6 weeks on dialysis. 66% of our patients were 30-60 years old; 98% of the patients had living donors. At transplantation, 64% of our patients had no public support; however, 64% of them returned to work and got health insurance 2 months later. Full rehabilitation was achieved in all cases, including integration to the family, return to full-time work, school and university, sports, and reproduction. Immunosuppression consisted of 3 drugs, including steroids, cyclosporine, and azathioprine or mycophenolate. The cost in the 1st year, including patient and donor evaluation, surgery, immunosuppression, and follow-up, was $13,300 USD versus $22,320 for hemodialysis. We conclude that preemptive renal transplantation with <6 weeks on dialysis is the best therapeutic option for end-stage renal failure, especially in developing countries such as Bolivia, where until last year, full public support for renal replacement therapy was unavailable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The renal scan in pregnant renal transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.A.; Ziessman, H.A.; Fahey, F.H.; Collea, J.V.; Alijani, M.R.; Helfrich, G.B.

    1985-05-01

    With the greater frequency of renal transplant surgery, more female pts are becoming pregnant and carrying to term. In the renal allograft blood vessels and ureter may be compressed resulting in impaired renal function and/or, hypertension. Toxemia of pregnancy is seen more frequently than normal. Radionuclide renal scan monitoring may be of significant value in this high risk obstetrical pt. After being maintained during the pregnancy, renal function may also deteriorate in the post partum period. 5 pregnant renal transplant pts who delivered live babies had renal studies with Tc-99m DTPA to assess allograft perfusion and function. No transplanted kidney was lost during or after pregnancy as a result of pregnancy. No congenital anomalies were associated with transplant management. 7 studies were performed on these 5 pts. The 7 scans all showed the uterus/placenta. The bladder was always distorted. The transplanted kidney was rotated to a more vertical position in 3 pts. The radiation dose to the fetus is calculated at 0.024 rad/mCi administered. This study demonstrates the anatomic and physiologic alterations expected in the transplanted kidney during pregnancy when evaluated by renal scan and that the radiation burden may be acceptable in management of these pts.

  11. Red Kidney: Kidney Transplant From a Deceased Donor Who Received Massive Blood Transfusion During Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    PubMed

    Bell, Richard; Hanif, Faisal; Prasad, Padmini; Ahmad, Niaz

    2016-06-01

    Here, we present a case of a deceased-donor kidney transplant. The brain-dead donor had received a massive blood transfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass, which lead to hemolysis, hemoglobinuria, acute kidney injury, and renal replacement therapy. The kidney appeared red after in situ flush. Postoperatively, the recipient developed delayed graft function. Protocol biopsy during the postoperative period revealed the widespread deposition of heme pigment in the renal tubules. Massive blood transfusion and cardiopulmonary bypass surgery are associated with hemolysis and heme pigment deposition in the renal tubules, which subsequently lead to acute kidney injury. Kidneys from such donors appear red and, while this does not preclude transplant, are likely to develop delayed graft function.

  12. Ethical perspectives on living donor organ transplantation in Asia.

    PubMed

    Concejero, Allan M; Chen, Chao-Long

    2009-12-01

    Live donors are a continuing source of organ grafts for solid organ transplantation in Asia. Ethical issues surrounding the development of living donor organ transplantation in Eastern countries are different from those in Western countries. Donor safety is still the paramount concern in any donor operation. Issues on organ trafficking remain societal concerns in low-income nations. Religion, cultural background, economic prerogatives, and timely legislation contribute to the social acceptance and maturation of organ donation.

  13. State of deceased donor transplantation in India: A model for developing countries around the world.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Georgi; Vijayan, Madhusudan; Gopalakrishnan, Natarajan; Shroff, Sunil; Amalorpavanathan, Joseph; Yuvaraj, Anand; Nair, Sanjeev; Sundarrajan, Saravanan

    2016-06-24

    Renal replacement therapy (RRT) resources are scarce in India, with wide urban-rural and interstate disparities. The burden of end-stage renal disease is expected to increase further due to increasing prevalence of risk factors like diabetes mellitus. Renal transplantation, the best RRT modality, is increasing in popularity, due to improvements made in public education, the deceased donor transplantation (DDT) programme and the availability of free and affordable transplant services in government hospitals and certain non-governmental philanthropic organizations. There are about 120000 haemodialysis patients and 10000 chronic peritoneal dialysis patients in India, the majority of them waiting for a donor kidney. Shortage of organs, lack of transplant facilities and high cost of transplant in private facilities are major barriers for renal transplantation in India. The DDT rate in India is now 0.34 per million population, among the lowest in the world. Infrastructural development in its infancy and road traffic rules not being strictly implemented by the authorities, have led to road traffic accidents being very common in urban and rural India. Many patients are declared brain dead on arrival and can serve as potential organ donors. The DDT programme in the state of Tamil Nadu has met with considerable success and has brought down the incidence of organ trade. Government hospitals in Tamil Nadu, with a population of 72 million, provide free transplantation facilities for the underprivileged. Public private partnership has played an important role in improving organ procurement rates, with the help of trained transplant coordinators in government hospitals. The DDT programmes in the southern states of India (Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Pondicherry) are advancing rapidly with mutual sharing due to public private partnership providing vital organs to needy patients. Various health insurance programmes rolled out by the governments in the southern states are effective in

  14. State of deceased donor transplantation in India: A model for developing countries around the world

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Georgi; Vijayan, Madhusudan; Gopalakrishnan, Natarajan; Shroff, Sunil; Amalorpavanathan, Joseph; Yuvaraj, Anand; Nair, Sanjeev; Sundarrajan, Saravanan

    2016-01-01

    Renal replacement therapy (RRT) resources are scarce in India, with wide urban-rural and interstate disparities. The burden of end-stage renal disease is expected to increase further due to increasing prevalence of risk factors like diabetes mellitus. Renal transplantation, the best RRT modality, is increasing in popularity, due to improvements made in public education, the deceased donor transplantation (DDT) programme and the availability of free and affordable transplant services in government hospitals and certain non-governmental philanthropic organizations. There are about 120000 haemodialysis patients and 10000 chronic peritoneal dialysis patients in India, the majority of them waiting for a donor kidney. Shortage of organs, lack of transplant facilities and high cost of transplant in private facilities are major barriers for renal transplantation in India. The DDT rate in India is now 0.34 per million population, among the lowest in the world. Infrastructural development in its infancy and road traffic rules not being strictly implemented by the authorities, have led to road traffic accidents being very common in urban and rural India. Many patients are declared brain dead on arrival and can serve as potential organ donors. The DDT programme in the state of Tamil Nadu has met with considerable success and has brought down the incidence of organ trade. Government hospitals in Tamil Nadu, with a population of 72 million, provide free transplantation facilities for the underprivileged. Public private partnership has played an important role in improving organ procurement rates, with the help of trained transplant coordinators in government hospitals. The DDT programmes in the southern states of India (Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Pondicherry) are advancing rapidly with mutual sharing due to public private partnership providing vital organs to needy patients. Various health insurance programmes rolled out by the governments in the southern states are effective in

  15. Kidney transplant chains amplify benefit of nondirected donors.

    PubMed

    Melcher, Marc L; Veale, Jeffrey L; Javaid, Basit; Leeser, David B; Davis, Connie L; Hil, Garet; Milner, John E

    2013-02-01

    Despite the potential for altruistic nondirected donors (NDDs) to trigger multiple transplants through nonsimultaneous transplant chains, concerns exist that these chains siphon NDDs from the deceased donor wait list and that donors within chains might not donate after their partner receives a transplant. To determine the number of transplantations NDDs trigger through chains. Retrospective review of large, multicenter living donor-recipient database. Fifty-seven US transplant centers contributing donor-recipient pairs to the database. The NDDs initiating chain transplantation. Number of transplants per NDD. Seventy-seven NDDs enabled 373 transplantations during 46 months starting February 2008. Mean chain length initiated by NDDs was 4.8 transplants (median, 3; range, 1-30). The 40 blood type O NDDs triggered a mean chain length of 6.0 (median, 4; range, 2-30). During the interval, 66 of 77 chains were closed to the wait list, 4 of 77 were ongoing, and 7 of 77 were broken because bridge donors became unavailable. No chains were broken in the last 15 months, and every recipient whose incompatible donor donated received a kidney. One hundred thirty-three blood type O recipients were transplanted. This large series demonstrates that NDDs trigger almost 5 transplants on average, more if the NDD is blood type O. There were more blood type O recipients than blood type O NDDs participating. The benefits of transplanting 373 patients and enabling others without living donors to advance outweigh the risk of broken chains that is decreasing with experience. Even 66 patients on the wait list without living donors underwent transplantation with living-donor grafts at the end of these chains.

  16. Pneumonia in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, D. M.; Marrie, T. J.; Janigan, D. T.; MacKeen, A. D.; Belitsky, P.; MacDonald, A. S.; Lannon, S. G.; Cohen, A. D.

    1983-01-01

    Between January 1976 and March 1982, 28 episodes of pneumonia occurred in 26 renal transplant patients. The overall mortality rate was 46%. Of the 16 patients with nosocomial pneumonia 9 (56%) died, whereas of the 12 patients with community-acquired pneumonia 4 (33%) died. In all 9 cases of unknown cause the response to empiric treatment was prompt, whereas in 4 of the 10 cases of monomicrobial pneumonia and 8 of the 9 cases of polymicrobial pneumonia the patient died. Cytomegalovirus was the sole cause of the pneumonia in two patients and a contributing cause, along with aerobic gram-negative bacteria, in another five, four of whom also had a fungal infection. Two patients, both of whom survived, had nosocomial Legionnaires' disease. PMID:6342741

  17. Sequential renal and bone marrow transplants in a child with Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Carol L; Primack, William A; Hipps, John; Kasow, Kimberly A

    2016-02-01

    FA is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by small stature and renal abnormalities. FA can lead to progressive bone marrow failure, myelodysplastic syndrome, or acute leukemia. Using a multidisciplinary team approach, we managed a 3-yr-old boy with FA who simultaneously developed renal and hematopoietic failure. Because renal function was insufficient to support the conditioning regimen for HCT, we performed a deceased donor renal transplant in December 2012 prior to HCT with the known risk of graft-versus-graft rejection of the donor kidney. Seven months later he underwent allogeneic HCT. He obtained myeloid engraftment on day +11 and peripheral blood chimerism demonstrated all donor by day +21. He developed asymptomatic CMV reactivation and despite antirejection medications, mild skin graft-versus-host disease. He has maintained excellent renal function and remains transfusion independent with full hematopoietic recovery. He has not experienced any renal rejection episodes nor developed donor-specific antibodies toward his renal donor. Peripheral blood chimerism remains completely HCT donor. He is clinically well, now greater than two and a half yr after renal transplant and two yr after HCT. The continuing close collaboration between the Pediatric Nephrology and Bone Marrow Transplant teams is a major factor in this successful outcome.

  18. The Cost and Utility of Renal Transplantation in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Bavanandan, Sunita; Yap, Yok-Chin; Ahmad, Ghazali; Wong, Hin-Seng; Azmi, Soraya; Goh, Adrian

    2015-11-01

    Kidney transplantation is the optimal therapy for the majority of patients with end-stage renal disease. However, the cost and health outcomes of transplantation have not been assessed in a middle-income nation with a low volume of transplantation, such as Malaysia. This study used microcosting methods to determine the cost and health outcomes of living and deceased donor kidney transplantation in adult and pediatric recipients. The perspective used was from the Ministry of Health Malaysia. Cost-effectiveness measures were cost per life year (LY) and cost per quality-adjusted LYs. The time horizon was the lifetime of the transplant recipient from transplant to death. Records of 206 KT recipients (118 adults and 88 children) were obtained for microcosting. In adults, discounted cost per LY was US $8609(Malaysian Ringgit [RM]29 482) and US $13 209(RM45 234) for living-donor kidney transplant (LKT) and deceased donor kidney transplant (DKT), respectively, whereas in children, it was US $10 485(RM35 905) and US $14 985(RM51 317), respectively. Cost per quality-adjusted LY in adults was US $8826 (RM30 224) for LKT and US $13 592(RM46 546) for DKT. Total lifetime discounted costs of adult transplants were US $119 702 (RM409 921) for LKT, US $147 152 (RM503 922) for DKT. Total costs for pediatric transplants were US $154 841(RM530 252) and US $159 313(RM545 566) for the 2 categories respectively. Both LKT and DKT are economically favorable for Malaysian adult and pediatric patients with ESRD and result in improvement in quality of life.

  19. The Cost and Utility of Renal Transplantation in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Bavanandan, Sunita; Yap, Yok-Chin; Ahmad, Ghazali; Wong, Hin-Seng; Azmi, Soraya; Goh, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Background Kidney transplantation is the optimal therapy for the majority of patients with end-stage renal disease. However, the cost and health outcomes of transplantation have not been assessed in a middle-income nation with a low volume of transplantation, such as Malaysia. Aim and Methods This study used microcosting methods to determine the cost and health outcomes of living and deceased donor kidney transplantation in adult and pediatric recipients. The perspective used was from the Ministry of Health Malaysia. Cost-effectiveness measures were cost per life year (LY) and cost per quality-adjusted LYs. The time horizon was the lifetime of the transplant recipient from transplant to death. Results Records of 206 KT recipients (118 adults and 88 children) were obtained for microcosting. In adults, discounted cost per LY was US $8609(Malaysian Ringgit [RM]29 482) and US $13 209(RM45 234) for living-donor kidney transplant (LKT) and deceased donor kidney transplant (DKT), respectively, whereas in children, it was US $10 485(RM35 905) and US $14 985(RM51 317), respectively. Cost per quality-adjusted LY in adults was US $8826 (RM30 224) for LKT and US $13 592(RM46 546) for DKT. Total lifetime discounted costs of adult transplants were US $119 702 (RM409 921) for LKT, US $147 152 (RM503 922) for DKT. Total costs for pediatric transplants were US $154 841(RM530 252) and US $159 313(RM545 566) for the 2 categories respectively. Conclusions Both LKT and DKT are economically favorable for Malaysian adult and pediatric patients with ESRD and result in improvement in quality of life. PMID:27500211

  20. Transplantation and differentiation of donor cells in the cloned pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Arata; Tomii, Ryo; Kano, Koichiro; Nagashima, Hiroshi . E-mail: hnagas@isc.meiji.ac.jp

    2006-06-02

    The application of nuclear transfer technology is an interesting approach to investigate stem and progenitor cell transplantation therapy. If stem cells are used as a nuclear donor, donor cells can engraft into cloned animals without histocompatible problems. However, it is still uncertain whether donor cells can engraft to cloned animal and differentiate in vivo. To address this problem, we transplanted donor cells to dermal tissues of cloned pigs developed by using preadipocytes as donor cells. Preadipocytes are adipocytic progenitor which can differentiate to mature adipocytes in vitro. We showed that the donor preadipocytes were successfully transplanted into the cloned pigs without immune rejection and they differentiated into mature adipocytes in vivo 3 weeks after transplantation. In contrast, allogenic control preadipocytes, which can differentiate in vitro, did not differentiate in vivo. These results indicate that donor progenitor cells can differentiate in cloned animal.

  1. The clinical impact of humoral immunity in pediatric renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Abanti; Ozawa, Mikki; Everly, Matthew J; Ettenger, Robert; Dharnidharka, Vikas; Benfield, Mark; Mathias, Robert; Portale, Anthony; McDonald, Ruth; Harmon, William; Kershaw, David; Vehaskari, V Matti; Kamil, Elaine; Baluarte, H Jorge; Warady, Bradley; Li, Li; Sigdel, Tara K; Hsieh, Szu-chuan; Dai, Hong; Naesens, Maarten; Waskerwitz, Janie; Salvatierra, Oscar; Terasaki, Paul I; Sarwal, Minnie M

    2013-03-01

    The development of anti-donor humoral responses after transplantation associates with higher risks for acute rejection and 1-year graft survival in adults, but the influence of humoral immunity on transplant outcomes in children is not well understood. Here, we studied the evolution of humoral immunity in low-risk pediatric patients during the first 2 years after renal transplantation. Using data from 130 pediatric renal transplant patients randomized to steroid-free (SF) or steroid-based (SB) immunosuppression in the NIH-SNSO1 trial, we correlated the presence of serum anti-HLA antibodies to donor HLA antigens (donor-specific antibodies) and serum MHC class 1-related chain A (MICA) antibody with both clinical outcomes and histology identified on protocol biopsies at 0, 6, 12, and 24 months. We detected de novo antibodies after transplant in 24% (23% of SF group and 25% of SB group), most often after the first year. Overall, 22% developed anti-HLA antibodies, of which 6% were donor-specific antibodies, and 6% developed anti-MICA antibody. Presence of these antibodies de novo associated with significantly higher risks for acute rejection (P=0.02), chronic graft injury (P=0.02), and decline in graft function (P=0.02). In summary, antibodies to HLA and MICA antigens appear in approximately 25% of unsensitized pediatric patients, placing them at greater risk for acute and chronic rejection with accelerated loss of graft function. Avoiding steroids does not seem to modify this incidence. Whether serial assessments of these antibodies after transplant could guide individual tailoring of immunosuppression requires additional study.

  2. The Clinical Impact of Humoral Immunity in Pediatric Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Abanti; Ozawa, Mikki; Everly, Matthew J.; Ettenger, Robert; Dharnidharka, Vikas; Benfield, Mark; Mathias, Robert; Portale, Anthony; McDonald, Ruth; Harmon, William; Kershaw, David; Vehaskari, V. Matti; Kamil, Elaine; Baluarte, H. Jorge; Warady, Bradley; Li, Li; Sigdel, Tara K.; Hsieh, Szu-chuan; Dai, Hong; Naesens, Maarten; Waskerwitz, Janie; Salvatierra, Oscar; Terasaki, Paul I.

    2013-01-01

    The development of anti-donor humoral responses after transplantation associates with higher risks for acute rejection and 1-year graft survival in adults, but the influence of humoral immunity on transplant outcomes in children is not well understood. Here, we studied the evolution of humoral immunity in low-risk pediatric patients during the first 2 years after renal transplantation. Using data from 130 pediatric renal transplant patients randomized to steroid-free (SF) or steroid-based (SB) immunosuppression in the NIH-SNSO1 trial, we correlated the presence of serum anti-HLA antibodies to donor HLA antigens (donor-specific antibodies) and serum MHC class 1-related chain A (MICA) antibody with both clinical outcomes and histology identified on protocol biopsies at 0, 6, 12, and 24 months. We detected de novo antibodies after transplant in 24% (23% of SF group and 25% of SB group), most often after the first year. Overall, 22% developed anti-HLA antibodies, of which 6% were donor-specific antibodies, and 6% developed anti-MICA antibody. Presence of these antibodies de novo associated with significantly higher risks for acute rejection (P=0.02), chronic graft injury (P=0.02), and decline in graft function (P=0.02). In summary, antibodies to HLA and MICA antigens appear in approximately 25% of unsensitized pediatric patients, placing them at greater risk for acute and chronic rejection with accelerated loss of graft function. Avoiding steroids does not seem to modify this incidence. Whether serial assessments of these antibodies after transplant could guide individual tailoring of immunosuppression requires additional study. PMID:23449533

  3. Colon Biopsy Findings of Renal Transplant Patients.

    PubMed

    Taştepe, Firdevs Zeynep; Özgün, Gonca; Özdemir, Binnaz Handan; Tepeoğlu, Merih; Haberal, Mehmet

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate colonic pathologies in renal transplant recipients. Patients with colon biopsies were selected from 1816 renal transplant recipients from January 1990 to December 2012 at Baskent University Hospital (Ankara, Turkey). Demographic and clinical findings with colon biopsies were examined. There were 84 patients who had colon biopsies after renal transplant. There were 57 male and 27 female patients (median age at renal transplant was 33 y). Chronic diarrhea was the most common clinical finding at the time of colon biopsy. The median interval from renal transplant to first colon biopsy was 48.1 ± 47.5 months. On microscopic evaluation, there were no pathologic changes in 17 patients. The remaining 67 patients had colitis (38 patients), polyps (17 patients), cytomegalovirus colitis (8 patients), and amyloidosis (4 patients). The mean interval between transplant and the diagnosis of colitis was 49.08 ± 42.6 months, amyloidosis was 47.5 ± 79.28 months, cytomegalovirus colitis was 5 ± 3.5 months, and polyps was 77.65 ± 58.8 months. There was a statistically significant difference between biopsy diagnosis and the time interval between transplant and colon biopsy (P < .01). Among 84 renal transplant recipients with colonic biopsies, 40 patients never had acute rejection episodes and 44 patients had at least 1 acute rejection episode. Seven of 8 patients with cytomegalovirus colitis, 19 of 38 with colitis, 3 of 4 with amyloidosis, and 5 of 17 with polyps had acute rejection episodes. In our report on colonic manifestations in renal transplant recipients, the most common colonic lesion was noninfectious colitis. Cytomegalovirus colitis is an important infection that affects immunosuppressed individuals, such as transplant recipients. Cytomegalovirus must be kept in mind, and thorough sectioning and immunohistochemical sta ining should be used if necessary in the presence of any clinical or histologic suspicion for infective colitis.

  4. The effect of mannitol administration to kidney donor on short-term outcomes of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Esfahani, Hellieh Sadat; Nooraei, Navid; Asgary, Majeed; Hashemian, Mohammad Reza

    2014-11-01

    As the cases of kidney transplant are increasing, the need to apply the factors to increase the success of transplant seems necessary. Mannitol increases the osmotic pressure and urine volume as a protective agent on renal tubules. We aimed to evaluate the effect of mannitol on short-term outcome of kidney transplantation by comparing two groups based on prescribing mannitol to donors. In a randomized clinical trial, 60 kidney recipients were assigned in two groups (30 in each), except that in one group donors received mannitol. They were studied with respect to age, gender, weight, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr), sodium (Na), potassium (K) and arterial blood gas (ABG) before and after surgery, and their pulse rate (PR) and blood pressure (BP) before, during and after surgery. Their urine volume was assessed in the operation room and the first 24 h after surgery. The short-term outcome, including BUN and Cr in the first 10 days after transplant, have been charted. Both the case (mannitol-positive donor patient) and the control (mannitol negative) groups were the same regarding the results gained for pre- and post-operative parameters. Follow-up assessments showed no significant differences in renal function. Based on this, we conclude that mannitol administration to donors does not have a beneficial effect on the prognosis and short-term outcome of transplantation on recipients; therefore, we feel that it should not be advised for kidney donors.

  5. Improved renal ischemia tolerance in females influences kidney transplantation outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Aufhauser, David D.; Wang, Zhonglin; Murken, Douglas R.; Bhatti, Tricia R.; Wang, Yanfeng; Ge, Guanghui; Redfield, Robert R.; Abt, Peter L.; Wang, Liqing; Reese, Peter P.; Hancock, Wayne W.; Levine, Matthew H.

    2016-01-01

    Experimentally, females show an improved ability to recover from ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) compared with males; however, this sex-dependent response is less established in humans. Here, we developed a series of murine renal ischemia and transplant models to investigate sex-specific effects on recovery after IRI. We found that IRI tolerance is profoundly increased in female mice compared with that observed in male mice and discovered an intermediate phenotype after neutering of either sex. Transplantation of adult kidneys from either sex into a recipient of the opposite sex followed by ischemia at a remote time resulted in ischemia recovery that reflected the sex of the recipient, not the donor, revealing that the host sex determines recovery. Likewise, renal IRI was exacerbated in female estrogen receptor α–KO mice, while female mice receiving supplemental estrogen before ischemia were protected. We examined data from the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) to determine whether there is an association between sex and delayed graft function (DGF) in patients who received deceased donor renal transplants. A multivariable logistic regression analysis determined that there was a greater association with DGF in male recipients than in female recipients. Together, our results demonstrate that sex affects renal IRI tolerance in mice and humans and indicate that estrogen administration has potential as a therapeutic intervention to clinically improve ischemia tolerance. PMID:27088798

  6. Improved renal ischemia tolerance in females influences kidney transplantation outcomes.

    PubMed

    Aufhauser, David D; Wang, Zhonglin; Murken, Douglas R; Bhatti, Tricia R; Wang, Yanfeng; Ge, Guanghui; Redfield, Robert R; Abt, Peter L; Wang, Liqing; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Thomasson, Arwin; Reese, Peter P; Hancock, Wayne W; Levine, Matthew H

    2016-05-02

    Experimentally, females show an improved ability to recover from ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) compared with males; however, this sex-dependent response is less established in humans. Here, we developed a series of murine renal ischemia and transplant models to investigate sex-specific effects on recovery after IRI. We found that IRI tolerance is profoundly increased in female mice compared with that observed in male mice and discovered an intermediate phenotype after neutering of either sex. Transplantation of adult kidneys from either sex into a recipient of the opposite sex followed by ischemia at a remote time resulted in ischemia recovery that reflected the sex of the recipient, not the donor, revealing that the host sex determines recovery. Likewise, renal IRI was exacerbated in female estrogen receptor α-KO mice, while female mice receiving supplemental estrogen before ischemia were protected. We examined data from the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) to determine whether there is an association between sex and delayed graft function (DGF) in patients who received deceased donor renal transplants. A multivariable logistic regression analysis determined that there was a greater association with DGF in male recipients than in female recipients. Together, our results demonstrate that sex affects renal IRI tolerance in mice and humans and indicate that estrogen administration has potential as a therapeutic intervention to clinically improve ischemia tolerance.

  7. Liver regeneration after living donor transplantation: adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation cohort study.

    PubMed

    Olthoff, Kim M; Emond, Jean C; Shearon, Tempie H; Everson, Greg; Baker, Talia B; Fisher, Robert A; Freise, Chris E; Gillespie, Brenda W; Everhart, James E

    2015-01-01

    Adult-to-adult living donors and recipients were studied to characterize patterns of liver growth and identify associated factors in a multicenter study. Three hundred and fifty donors and 353 recipients in the Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study (A2ALL) receiving transplants between March 2003 and February 2010 were included. Potential predictors of 3-month liver volume included total and standard liver volumes (TLV and SLV), Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score (in recipients), the remnant and graft size, remnant-to-donor and graft-to-recipient weight ratios (RDWR and GRWR), remnant/TLV, and graft/SLV. Among donors, 3-month absolute growth was 676 ± 251 g (mean ± SD), and percentage reconstitution was 80% ± 13%. Among recipients, GRWR was 1.3% ± 0.4% (8 < 0.8%). Graft weight was 60% ± 13% of SLV. Three-month absolute growth was 549 ± 267 g, and percentage reconstitution was 93% ± 18%. Predictors of greater 3-month liver volume included larger patient size (donors and recipients), larger graft volume (recipients), and larger TLV (donors). Donors with the smallest remnant/TLV ratios had larger than expected growth but also had higher postoperative bilirubin and international normalized ratio at 7 and 30 days. In a combined donor-recipient analysis, donors had smaller 3-month liver volumes than recipients adjusted for patient size, remnant or graft volume, and TLV or SLV (P = 0.004). Recipient graft failure in the first 90 days was predicted by poor graft function at day 7 (HR = 4.50, P = 0.001) but not by GRWR or graft fraction (P > 0.90 for each). Both donors and recipients had rapid yet incomplete restoration of tissue mass in the first 3 months, and this confirmed previous reports. Recipients achieved a greater percentage of expected total volume. Patient size and recipient graft volume significantly influenced 3-month volumes. Importantly, donor liver volume is a

  8. Pancreas Transplantation From Living Donors: A Single Center Experience of 20 Cases.

    PubMed

    Choi, J Y; Jung, J H; Kwon, H; Shin, S; Kim, Y H; Han, D J

    2016-08-01

    Living donor pancreas transplantation (LDPT) has several advantages over deceased donor pancreas transplantation (DDPT), including better HLA matching, shorter ischemic time, and shorter waiting time. It remains an attractive option for diabetes mellitus (DM) patients with end stage renal disease. We reviewed 20 cases of LDPT performed in Asan Medical Center between October 1992 and March 2015. Six cases (30%) were pancreas transplantation alone (PTA), and the rest (70%) were simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation (SPK). Relations of donor and recipient were parents in 7 (35%), siblings in 6 (30%), spouse in 6 (30%), and cousin in 1 (5%). Graft survival in SPK at 1, 3, 5, and 10 years was 91.7%, 83.3%, 83.3%, and 83.3%, respectively, and that in PTA recipients was 50%, 33.3%, 16.7%, and 16.7%, respectively (p = 0.005). Causes of graft failure in SPK were thrombosis (one case), and rejection (one case), whereas those in PTA were noncompliance (two cases), thrombosis (one case), reflux pancreatitis (one case), and chronic rejection (one case). In terms of pancreas exocrine drainage, two grafts (25%) maintained their function in bladder drainage, while all grafts maintained in enteric drainage p < 0.05). Seven (35%) donors experienced minor pancreatic juice leakage and one underwent reoperation due to postoperative hematoma. Most donors maintained normoglycemia and normal renal function. However, two donors developed DM (at 1 and 90 months postdonation), and were treated with oral hypoglycemic agents. Graft survival in PTA recipients was poorer than in SPK due to poor compliance and bladder drainage-related problems. The surgical and metabolic complication rates of donors can be minimized by applying strict donor criteria. Therefore, LDPT with enteric drainage is an acceptable treatment for SPK. © Copyright 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  9. Increasing referral for renal transplant evaluation in recipients of nonrenal solid-organ transplants: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Chandrakantan, Arun; de Mattos, Angelo M; Naftel, David; Crosswy, Apryl; Kirklin, James; Curtis, John J

    2006-07-01

    The use of cyclosporine and tacrolimus therapy in nonrenal (heart, heart/lung, lung, and liver) transplantation has resulted in improved patient and graft survival. Nephrotoxicity is one of the major side effects of tacrolimus and cyclosporine therapy and may lead to ESRD. The trend of referral of nonrenal solid-organ transplant recipients for kidney transplant evaluation at a large multiorgan transplant center was examined. Records of all patients who were referred for renal transplantation at the University of Alabama between January 1, 1993, and June 30, 2004, were reviewed. Eighty (0.96%) of 8318 individuals had previously undergone a nonrenal solid-organ transplant and were included in the study. The majority (72%) of patients had their nonrenal transplants performed at the University of Alabama. Twenty-two patients had their nonrenal transplant performed elsewhere and had fewer data available for analysis. From the period 1993-1996 to 2001-2004, an 11-fold increase in the absolute number of referrals of patients with nonrenal transplants was noted. Of patients who were referred for transplant evaluation, 25 became recipients of kidney transplants with a predominance of living-donor transplants. Referral for kidney transplant evaluation among nonrenal solid-organ transplant recipients is increasing and will exacerbate the existing shortage of deceased-donor kidneys that are available for transplantation. There was a trend for liver transplant recipients compared with other solid-organ recipients to develop ESRD at a greater rate.

  10. Diabetes mellitus: a risk factor for delayed graft function after deceased donor kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Parekh, J; Bostrom, A; Feng, S

    2010-02-01

    Early graft function is a major determinant of long-term outcomes after renal transplantation. Recently, recipient diabetes was identified as a risk factor for poor initial graft function in living donor renal transplantation. To further explore this association, we performed a paired analysis of deceased donor renal transplants from January 1994 to December 2005. A total of 25,523 transplant pairs were analyzed via conditional logistic regression. Diabetic recipients were older (53.16 vs. 46.75 years, p < 0.01), had a lower average panel reactive antibody (12% vs. 15%, p < 0.01) and fewer prior transplants (0.07 vs. 0.12, p < 0.01). Recipient diabetes, age, male gender, African American race, elevated peak panel reactive antibody and increased cold ischemia time were independent risk factors for delayed graft function. Specifically, diabetic recipients had increased risk of DGF on univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR] 1.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23-1.42, p < 0.01). Multivariable analysis confirmed this association but the risk differed by recipient gender; with diabetes having a greater effect in women (OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.45-1.91, p < 0.01) compared to men (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.15-1.43, p < 0.01). It is unknown whether the deleterious impact of recipient diabetes on graft function after renal transplantation results from perioperative hyperglycemia or the chronic sequelae of diabetes.

  11. Living donor kidney transplantation: "beauty and the beast"!

    PubMed

    Danovitch, Gabriel M

    2013-01-01

    The report by Terasaki and colleagues in 1995 that the outcomes of spousal and biologically unrelated transplants were essentially the same as for 1-haplotype matched living related transplants changed the course of clinical transplantation. This article, entitled metaphorically "Beauty and the Beast", describes the dramatic change in the practice of living donor transplantation that followed. In the ensuing two decades, biologically unrelated living donor transplantation became commonplace in the developed world and reached its apotheosis in cross-country living donor paired exchange programs that have made transplantation accessible to many whose donors were deemed "incompatible". Such exchanges can indeed be thought of as a "thing of beauty". Sadly, the same observation was abused to exploit vulnerable donors, and the "beast" in the form of transplant tourism became a feature of transplantation in the developing world. The responsibility of the transplant community to protect the welfare of living donors and their recipients and the key role of trust in the evaluation of living donors is discussed.

  12. Alemtuzumab induction in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hanaway, Michael J; Woodle, E Steve; Mulgaonkar, Shamkant; Peddi, V Ram; Kaufman, Dixon B; First, M Roy; Croy, Richard; Holman, John

    2011-05-19

    There are few comparisons of antibody induction therapy allowing early glucocorticoid withdrawal in renal-transplant recipients. The purpose of the present study was to compare induction therapy involving alemtuzumab with the most commonly used induction regimens in patient populations at either high immunologic risk or low immunologic risk. In this prospective study, we randomly assigned patients to receive alemtuzumab or conventional induction therapy (basiliximab or rabbit antithymocyte globulin). Patients were stratified according to acute rejection risk, with a high risk defined by a repeat transplant, a peak or current value of panel-reactive antibodies of 20% or more, or black race. The 139 high-risk patients received alemtuzumab (one dose of 30 mg, in 70 patients) or rabbit antithymocyte globulin (a total of 6 mg per kilogram of body weight given over 4 days, in 69 patients). The 335 low-risk patients received alemtuzumab (one dose of 30 mg, in 164 patients) or basiliximab (a total of 40 mg over 4 days, in 171 patients). All patients received tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil and underwent a 5-day glucocorticoid taper in a regimen of early steroid withdrawal. The primary end point was biopsy-confirmed acute rejection at 6 months and 12 months. Patients were followed for 3 years for safety and efficacy end points. The rate of biopsy-confirmed acute rejection was significantly lower in the alemtuzumab group than in the conventional-therapy group at both 6 months (3% vs. 15%, P<0.001) and 12 months (5% vs. 17%, P<0.001). At 3 years, the rate of biopsy-confirmed acute rejection in low-risk patients was lower with alemtuzumab than with basiliximab (10% vs. 22%, P=0.003), but among high-risk patients, no significant difference was seen between alemtuzumab and rabbit antithymocyte globulin (18% vs. 15%, P=0.63). Adverse-event rates were similar among all four treatment groups. By the first year after transplantation, biopsy-confirmed acute rejection was less

  13. Cortical necrosis in a renal transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Blumhardt, R.; Growcock, G.; Lasher, J.C.

    1983-07-01

    The /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA renogram is a well extabished noninvasive method for evaluating and following transplanted kidneys. The examination is useful in distinguishing rejection from acute tubular necrosis as well as demonstrating several less common complications such as vascular occlusion, urinary extravasation, obstruction, and lymphocele. A previously unreported condition involving a transplant kidney (i.e., renal cortical necrosis) is described which was diagnosed with renal scintigraphy in combination with sonography.

  14. Living donor kidney transplantation: medical, legal, and ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Paramesh, Anil S; Killackey, Mary T; Zhang, Rubin; Alper, Brent; Slakey, Douglas P; Florman, Sander S

    2007-12-01

    The use of living donor kidneys has dramatically increased the number and success of kidney transplants across the world. But questions remain regarding the subjection of a healthy individual to surgery for the benefit of another. Donors do have medical and financial risks. The stigma of organ brokering remains today, with evidence of commercial transplantation in other countries. Here in the US, we are exposed to advertising for donors using the media. In the hope of increasing living donations, we run the risk of stretching altruism too far. In this manuscript, we highlight and discuss some of the current controversies surrounding living donor kidney transplantation across the world.

  15. Renal Function and Transplantation in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Sandesh; Foley, David; Djamali, Arjang; Mandelbrot, Didier

    2015-09-01

    Kidney injury is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in liver transplant recipients. Since the introduction of the model for end-stage liver disease for the allocation of organs for liver transplantation in 2002, the heavy weighting of serum creatinine in the model for end-stage liver disease score has significantly increased the incidence of renal dysfunction seen among patients undergoing liver transplantation. As a result, the frequency of simultaneous liver-kidney (SLK) transplantation compared to liver transplantation alone (LTA) has also increased. The decision to perform SLK rather than LTA is an important one because the benefits to the liver transplant recipient receiving a kidney transplant must be balanced with the benefits of using that organ for a patient with end-stage renal disease. However, predicting whether or not a patient with liver failure has reversible kidney disease, and therefore does not also need a kidney transplant, is difficult. The severity and duration of pretransplant renal dysfunction, hepatitis c, diabetes, and other risk factors for kidney disease are associated with an increased risk of posttransplant end-stage renal disease. However, there are currently no clinical findings that accurately predict renal recovery post liver transplant. As a result, the rate of SLK versus LTA differs significantly between transplant centers. To increase consistency across centers, multiple guidelines have been proposed to guide the decision between SLK and LTA, but their poor predictive value has limited their uniform adoption. Nevertheless, adoption of uniform rules for the allocation of kidneys would reduce the variability between centers in rates of SLK transplant.

  16. Evaluation of renal function in a specific population of living kidney donors.

    PubMed

    de Souza Rodrigues, Thalyta; Amorim de Albuquerque, Ana Letícia; de Oliveira Cosme, Fillipe Agra; de Oliveira, José Ayrton Macedo Guimarães; Magalhães, Indalécio; Teles, Flávio; Pedrosa, André Falcão

    2017-06-01

    The increase in candidates for kidney transplant has led to growth in the number of living donor transplants. Therefore, studies that adequately evaluate the possible long-term consequences of elective transplant nephrectomy are needed. To evaluate the possible long-term adverse effects of transplant nephrectomy on the renal function of living kidney donors. A cross-sectional study. Thirty-three living kidney donors registered in the transplant programme of a centre in Alagoas, Brazil. Demographic characteristics, anthropometric measures, clinical data and biomarkers (creatinine, eGFR, microalbuminuria, cholesterol and triglycerides) were measured. Creatinine clearance was calculated using the Cockcroft-Gault and Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formulae. Of the 33 individuals, 63.63% were female, and the median age was 45 years. Additionally, 24.24% of these individuals had altered blood pressure, 39.39% had altered abdominal circumference (AC) and 36.36% were obese, with a body mass index ≥30. Furthermore, 33.33% of these individuals had elevated triglyceride levels. The average eGFR was 97.33 (33.03-175.9) ml/min/1.73 m(2) (CG) and 84.14 (29.4-131) ml/min/1.73 m(2) (MDRD). The microalbuminuria level was altered in 12.12% patients. Kidney donation is unquestionably a safe procedure. However, a better understanding of the long-term consequences of living donor kidney transplantation is still needed. This knowledge may have important implications for the follow-up of these patients. Our study has demonstrated a non-negligible presence of an early marker of glomerular injury and a decrease in the GFR of some patients, thereby reinforcing the proposal for long-term follow-up of living kidney donors. © 2017 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  17. Localized cecal zygomycosis following renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Echo, A; Hovsepian, R V; Shen, G K

    2005-06-01

    Zygomycosis occurs as an opportunistic infection following organ transplantation and immunosuppressive therapy. Gastrointestinal zygomycosis is an exceedingly rare and usually fatal presentation of this infection. We discuss the case of a renal transplant recipient who survived cecal perforation from zygomycosis. The successful treatment consisted of aggressive surgical resection, intensive course of antifungal therapy, and rapid withdrawal of anti-rejection medications.

  18. Effect of Risedronate on Bone in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Pullman, James; Cohen, Hillel W.; Lee, Sally; Shapiro, Craig; Solorzano, Clemencia; Greenstein, Stuart; Glicklich, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Bisphosphonates may prevent or treat the bone loss promoted by the immunosuppressive regimens used in renal transplantation. Risedronate is a commonly used third-generation amino-bisphosphonate, but little is known about its effects on the bone health of renal transplant recipients. We randomly assigned 42 new living-donor kidney recipients to either 35 mg of risedronate weekly or placebo for 12 months. We obtained bone biopsies at the time of renal transplant and after 12 months of protocol treatment. Treatment with risedronate did not affect bone mineral density (BMD) in the overall cohort. In subgroup analyses, it tended to preserve BMD in female participants but did not significantly affect the BMD of male participants. Risedronate did associate with increased osteoid volume and trabecular thickness in male participants, however. There was no evidence for the development of adynamic bone disease. In summary, further study is needed before the use of prophylactic bisphosphonates to attenuate bone loss can be recommended in renal transplant recipients. PMID:22797188

  19. Successful Pancreas Transplantation From a Deceased Donor Intoxicated With Oral Antidiabetic Agent: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Villar, C; Conget, I; Ferrer-Fàbrega, J; Paredes, D; Ruíz, A; Roque, R; Rull, R; López-Boado, M; Ricart, M J; Garcia, R; Adalia, R

    2015-10-01

    Simultaneous kidney pancreas transplantation (SKP) is a common procedure for the patient with long-term type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) with terminal renal failure. It is unusual to consider the pancreas from a deceased donor who died after an acute intoxication with oral antidiabetic agent (OAA), which would suggest an abnormal functionality of the organ and preclude the potential use of the graft. We present a case of a successful pancreatic transplantation from a donor who died of acute cerebral edema secondary to severe hypoglycemia induced by OAA acute intoxication.

  20. Comparative study between kidney transplantation with deceased donor expanded criteria and donor standard criteria in a single center in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mota, Luana Soriano; Oliveira, Claudia Maria Costa de; Pinheiro, Francisco Martho Leal; Santos, Larissa Costa de Oliveira; Nóbrega, Danilo Gonçalves; Fernandes, Paula Fbc; Costa, Alda Angélica de Melo; Silva, Sônia Leite da

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplants with expanded criteria donor have been associated with improved patient survival compared to those who remain on dialysis. To compare renal function and survival of the kidney graft of deceased donor with expanded criteria and standard criteria over a year in a single transplant center. 255 kidney transplant recipients with deceased donor were included in the study between the years 2011 to 2013 and they were separated into two groups according to the type of donor (expanded criteria donor - ECD - and standard criteria donor - SCD). 231 deceased donor transplants (90.6%) were performed with standard criteria donor (SCD) and 24 (9.4%) with expanded criteria donor (ECD). There was no difference in the prevalence of delayed graft function - DGF - (62.9% vs. 70.8%; p = 0.44). Expanded criteria donor group had lower glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at the end of the 1st year (56.8 ± 26.9 vs. 76.9 ± 23.7; p = 0.001). Patient survival was significantly lower in the ECD group, but the graft survival was not different after death-censored analysis. The ECD group was associated with significantly lower levels of GFR during the first year of transplant and a lower patient survival at the 1st year when compared to the SCD. A aceitação dos rins com critério expandido de doação tem sido associada com melhor sobrevida do paciente em comparação àqueles que permanecem em terapia dialítica. Comparar a função renal e a sobrevida do enxerto renal de doador falecido critério expandido com os de doador falecido critério padrão ao longo de um ano em um único centro de transplantes. Foram incluídos 255 receptores de transplante renal com doador falecido, realizados entre os anos de 2011 a 2013, sendo divididos em dois grupos segundo o tipo de doador (critério expandido - DCE - ou padrão -DCP). Foram avaliados 231 receptores com doador critério ideal (90,6%) e 24 com doador critério expandido (9,4%). Não houve diferença na prevalência de fun

  1. Alternative allogeneic donor sources for transplantation for childhood diseases: unrelated cord blood and haploidentical family donors.

    PubMed

    Cairo, Mitchell S; Rocha, Vanderson; Gluckman, Eliane; Hale, Gregory; Wagner, John

    2008-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation has been demonstrated to be curative in a wide variety of pediatric malignant and nonmalignant diseases, and can be traced back over 50 years ago to the original report of Thomas et al. HLA matched sibling donors have been the gold standard for pediatric recipients requiring allogeneic donors for both nonmalignant and malignant conditions. However, only 25% of potential pediatric recipients possesses an HLA-matched sibling donor, and the frequency is even less in those with genetic nonmalignant conditions because of genetically affected other siblings within the family. Therefore, 75% to 90% of potential pediatric recipients require alternative allogeneic donor cells for treatment of their underlying conditions. Potential alternative allogeneic donor sources include unrelated cord blood donors, unrelated adult donors, and haploidentical family donors. In this article we review the experience of both unrelated cord blood donor and haploidentical family donor transplants in selected pediatric malignant and nonmalignant conditions.

  2. Risk factors for lung diseases after renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pencheva, Ventsislava P.; Petrova, Daniela S.; Genov, Diyan K.; Georgiev, Ognian B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung diseases are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality after renal transplantation. The aim of the study is to define the risk factors for infectious and noninfectious pulmonary complications in kidney transplant patients. Materials and Methods: We prospectively studied 267 patients after renal transplantation. The kidney recipients were followed-up for the development of pulmonary complications for a period of 7 years. Different noninvasive and invasive diagnostic tests were used in cases suspected of lung disease. Results: The risk factors associated with the development of pulmonary complications were diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR] = 4.60; P = 0.001), arterial hypertension (OR = 1.95; P = 0.015), living related donor (OR = 2.69; P = 0.004), therapy for acute graft rejection (OR = 2.06; P = 0.038), immunosuppressive regimens that includes mycophenolate (OR = 2.40; P = 0.011), azathioprine (OR = 2.25; P = 0.023), and tacrolimus (OR = 1.83; P = 0.041). The only factor associated with the lower risk of complications was a positive serology test for Cytomegalovirus of the recipient before transplantation (OR = 0.1412; P = 0.001). Conclusion: The risk factors can be used to identify patients at increased risk for posttransplant lung diseases. Monitoring of higher-risk patients allow timely diagnosis and early adequate treatment and can reduce the morbidity and mortality after renal transplantation. PMID:26958045

  3. Delayed Graft Function 5 Months After Living Donor Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Tim; Pries, Alexandra; Kapischke, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 59 Final Diagnosis: Delayed kidney graft function Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Living donor kidney transplantation Specialty: Transplantology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Delayed graft function is a clinical term to describe the failure of the transplanted kidney to function immediately after transplantation. Case Report: A 59-year-old woman suffered from a rare case of delayed graft function lasting 148 days after unrelated living donor kidney transplantation. Until now, 15 years after transplantation, organ function is still good, with serum creatinine levels about 1.4 to 2.0 mg/dl. Conclusions: Even after prolonged graft dysfunction, good graft function can be achieved. PMID:26915643

  4. Preemptive living-donor kidney transplantation: clinical course and outcome.

    PubMed

    el-Agroudy, Amgad E; Donia, Ahmed F; Bakr, Mohamed A; Foda, Mohamed A; Ghoneim, Mohamed A

    2004-05-15

    Dialysis is not only associated with morbidity, it is also expensive. In developing countries, preemptive renal transplantation (Tx) may be a cost-effective option, offering an additional benefit to conventional renal Tx. Between March 1976 and March 2001, 1,279 first living-donor Txs were performed in our center. The 82 patients (6.4%) who underwent Tx without prior dialysis were compared with 1,197 patients who had been dialyzed before Tx. The dialysis-dependent group received more blood transfusions (65% vs. 30%) before Tx. Actuarial graft and patient survival at 5 years was comparable in both groups (P =0.2 and P =0.8, respectively). The incidence of acute and chronic rejection was not different between the two groups. Mortality rate was also similar in the two groups. The main cause of death with a functioning graft was cardiovascular in the preemptive Tx group and chronic liver disease and infection in the control group. In the context of a developing country, preemptive Tx offers comparable patient and graft survival to conventional renal Tx and eliminates the complications, inconvenience, and cost of dialysis.

  5. Successful living donor liver transplantation for acute liver failure after acetylsalicylic acid overdose.

    PubMed

    Shirota, Tomoki; Ikegami, Toshihiko; Sugiyama, Satoshi; Kubota, Kouji; Shimizu, Akira; Ohno, Yasunari; Mita, Atsuyoshi; Urata, Koichi; Nakazawa, Yuichi; Kobayashi, Akira; Iwaya, Mai; Miyagawa, Shinichi

    2015-04-01

    A 20-year-old woman was admitted to an emergency hospital after ingesting 66 g of acetylsalicylic acid in a suicide attempt. Although she was treated with gastric lavage, oral activated charcoal, and intravenous hydration with sodium bicarbonate, her hepatic and renal function gradually deteriorated and serum amylase levels increased. Steroid pulse therapy, plasma exchange, and continuous hemodiafiltration did not yield any improvement in her hepatic or renal function, and she was transferred to our hospital for living donor liver transplantation. Nine days after drug ingestion, she developed hepatic encephalopathy: thus, we diagnosed the patient with acute liver failure with hepatic coma accompanied by acute pancreatitis due to the overdose of acetylsalicylic acid. Living donor liver transplantation was immediately performed using a left lobe graft from the patient's mother. Following transplantation, the patient's renal and hepatic function and consciousness improved, and she was discharged. In this report, we describe a rare case of acetylsalicylic acid-induced acute liver failure with acute hepatic coma and concomitant acute pancreatitis and acute renal failure, which were treated successfully with emergency living donor liver transplantation.

  6. Use of the inferior epigastric artery to revascularize a lower pole renal artery in renal transplant.

    PubMed

    Young, J S; Rohr, M S

    1995-02-01

    The increasing use of living-related donors has increased the incidence wherein the transplant surgeon is required to use special vascular surgical techniques to transplant kidneys with anomalous arterial anatomy. One of the most commonly encountered arterial anomalies is the presence of a lower pole renal artery. In many cases, this artery can be anastomosed to the main renal artery, and the main renal artery can then be anastomosed into the recipient vessel. However, there are cases where the lower pole renal artery is too distant from the main renal artery to allow an anastomosis to be performed. The lower pole renal artery of the graft must be revascularized to avoid ischemic injury to the ureter. Thus, alternate methods for the revascularization of this vessel must be found. We describe the use of the recipient inferior epigastric artery as an arterial supply for the donor lower pole artery. In our case report, this method provided excellent flow to the lower kidney and was documented by later studies.

  7. Apolipoprotein L1 gene variants in deceased organ donors are associated with renal allograft failure

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Barry I.; Julian, Bruce A.; Pastan, Stephen O.; Israni, Ajay K.; Schladt, David; Gautreaux, Michael D.; Hauptfeld, Vera; Bray, Robert A.; Gebel, Howard M.; Kirk, Allan D.; Gaston, Robert S.; Rogers, Jeffrey; Farney, Alan C.; Orlando, Giuseppe; Stratta, Robert J.; Mohan, Sumit; Ma, Lijun; Langefeld, Carl D.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Adams, Patricia L.; Palanisamy, Amudha; Reeves-Daniel, Amber M.; Divers, Jasmin

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) nephropathy variants in African American deceased kidney donors were associated with shorter renal allograft survival in a prior single-center report. APOL1 G1 and G2 variants were genotyped in newly accrued DNA samples from African American deceased donors of kidneys recovered and/or transplanted in Alabama and North Carolina. APOL1 genotypes and allograft outcomes in subsequent transplants from 55 U.S. centers were linked, adjusting for age, sex and race/ethnicity of recipients, HLA match, cold ischemia time, panel reactive antibody levels, and donor type. For 221 transplantations from kidneys recovered in Alabama, there was a statistical trend toward shorter allograft survival in recipients of two-APOL1-nephropathy-variant kidneys (hazard ratio [HR] 2.71; p=0.06). For all 675 kidneys transplanted from donors at both centers, APOL1 genotype (HR 2.26; p=0.001) and African American recipient race/ethnicity (HR 1.60; p=0.03) were associated with allograft failure. Kidneys from African American deceased donors with two APOL1 nephropathy variants reproducibly associate with higher risk for allograft failure after transplantation. These findings warrant consideration of rapidly genotyping deceased African American kidney donors for APOL1 risk variants at organ recovery and incorporation of results into allocation and informed-consent processes. PMID:25809272

  8. Do we need a different organ allocation system for kidney transplants using donors after circulatory death?

    PubMed

    Benaragama, Shanka K; Tymkewycz, Teressa; John, Biku J; Davenport, Andrew; Lindsey, Ben; Nicol, David; Olsburgh, Jonathon; Drage, Martin; Mamode, Nizam; Calder, Francis; Taylor, John; Koffman, Geoff; Kessaris, Nicos; Morsy, Mohamed; Cacciola, Roberto; Puliatti, Carmelo; Fernadez-Diaz, Susana; Syed, Asim; Hakim, Nadey; Papalois, Vassilios; Fernando, Bimbi S

    2014-05-22

    There is no national policy for allocation of kidneys from Donation after circulatory death (DCD) donors in the UK. Allocation is geographical and based on individual/regional centre policies. We have evaluated the short term outcomes of paired kidneys from DCD donors subject to this allocation policy. Retrospective analysis of paired renal transplants from DCD's from 2002 to 2010 in London. Cold ischemia time (CIT), recipient risk factors, delayed graft function (DGF), 3 and 12 month creatinine) were compared. Complete data was available on 129 paired kidneys.115 pairs were transplanted in the same centre and 14 pairs transplanted in different centres. There was a significant increase in CIT in kidneys transplanted second when both kidneys were accepted by the same centre (15.5 ± 4.1 vs 20.5 ± 5.8 hrs p<0.0001 and at different centres (15.8 ± 5.3 vs. 25.2 ± 5.5 hrs p=0.0008). DGF rates were increased in the second implant following sequential transplantation (p=0.05). Paired study sequential transplantation of kidneys from DCD donors results in a significant increase in CIT for the second kidney, with an increased risk of DGF. Sequential transplantation from a DCD donor should be avoided either by the availability of resources to undertake simultaneous procedures or the allocation of kidneys to 2 separate centres.

  9. Logistical Factors Influencing Cold Ischemia Times in Deceased Donor Kidney Transplants.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sussie; Bradbury, Lisa; Boal, Matthew; Blackmur, James P; Watson, Christopher J E; Taylor, Craig J; Forsythe, John L R; Johnson, Rachel; Marson, Lorna P

    2016-02-01

    Prolonged cold ischemia time (CIT) is associated with a significant risk of short- and long-term graft failure in deceased donor kidney transplants across the world. The aim of this prospective longitudinal study was to determine the importance of logistical factors on CIT. Data on 1763 transplants were collected prospectively over 14 months from personnel in 16 transplant centers, 19 histocompatibility and immunogenetics laboratories, transport providers, and National Health Service Blood and Transplant. The overall mean CIT was 13.8 hours, with significant center variation (P < 0.0001). Factors that significantly reduced CIT were donation after circulatory death (P = 0.03), shorter transport time (P = 0.0002), use of virtual crossmatch (XM) (P < 0.0001), and use of donor blood for pretransplant XM (P < 0.0001). The CIT for transplants that went ahead with a virtual XM was 3 hours shorter than those requiring a pretransplant XM (P < 0.0001). There was a mean delay of 3 hours in starting transplants despite organ, recipient, and pretransplant XM result being ready, suggesting that theater access contributes significantly to increased CIT. This study identifies logistical factors relating to donor, transport, crossmatching, recipient, and theater that impact significantly on CIT in deceased donor renal transplantation, some of which are modifiable; attention should be focussed on addressing all of these.

  10. Market competition influences renal transplantation risk and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Adler, Joel T; Sethi, Rosh K V; Yeh, Heidi; Markmann, James F; Nguyen, Louis L

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of market competition on patient mortality and graft failure after kidney transplantation. Kidneys are initially allocated within 58 donation service areas (DSAs), which have varying numbers of transplant centers. Market competition is generally considered beneficial. The Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients database was queried and the Herfindahl-Hirschman index (HHI), a measure of market competition, was calculated for each DSA from 2003 to 2012. Receipt of low-quality kidneys (Kidney Donor Profile Index ≥ 85) was modeled with multivariable logistic regression, and Cox proportional hazards models were created for graft failure and patient mortality. A total of 127,355 adult renal transplants were performed. DSAs were categorized as 7 no (HHI = 1), 17 low (HHI = 0.52-0.97), 17 medium (HHI = 0.33-0.51), or 17 high (HHI = 0.09-0.32) competition. For deceased donor kidney transplantation, increasing market competition was significantly associated with mortality [hazard ratio (HR): 1.11, P = 0.01], graft failure (HR: 1.18, P = 0.0001), and greater use of low-quality kidneys (odds ratio = 1.39, P < 0.0001). This was not true for living donor kidney transplantation (mortality HR: 0.94, P = 0.48; graft failure HR: 0.99, P = 0.89). Competition was associated with longer waitlists (P = 0.04) but not with the number of transplants per capita in a DSA (P = 0.21). Increasing market competition is associated with increased patient mortality and graft failure and the use of riskier kidneys. These results may represent more aggressive transplantation and tolerance of greater risk for patients who otherwise have poor alternatives. Market competition should be better studied to ensure optimal outcomes.

  11. The national marrow donor program 20 years of unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ballen, Karen K; King, Roberta J; Chitphakdithai, Pintip; Bolan, Charles D; Agura, Edward; Hartzman, Robert J; Kernan, Nancy A

    2008-09-01

    In the 20 years since the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) facilitated the first unrelated donor transplant, the organization has grown to include almost 7 million donors, and has facilitated over 30,000 transplants on 6 continents. This remarkable accomplishment has been facilitated by the efforts of over 600 employees, and an extensive international network including 171 transplant centers, 73 donor centers, 24 cord blood banks, 97 bone marrow collection centers, 91 apheresis centers, 26 HLA typing laboratories, and 26 Cooperative Registries. In this article, we review the history of the NMDP, and cite the major trends in patient demographics, graft sources, and conditioning regimens over the last 20 years.

  12. Renal transplantation in a HIV positive patient

    PubMed Central

    Mann, A.; Soundararajan, P.; Shroff, S.

    2009-01-01

    Historically HIV positive patients were considered a contraindication for renal transplant. After the year 1996, with the introduction of HAART the retropositive patients live longer and therefore end stage organ disease is now an increasingly important cause of mortality and morbidity in these patients. Here we report our experience for the first time in India. A forty nine year old hypertensive female from Africa who was diagnosed chronic kidney disease and retropositive status, progressed to end stage renal disease and underwent live related renal transplant at our centre. PMID:20436733

  13. Platelets in Early Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Renal Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Hsiao-Hsuan; Fan, Ran; Dvorina, Nina; Chiesa-Vottero, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection is a major complication in renal transplantation. The pathologic manifestations of acute antibody-mediated rejection that has progressed to functional impairment of a renal transplant have been defined in clinical biopsy specimens. However, the initial stages of the process are difficult to resolve with the unavoidable variables of clinical studies. We devised a model of renal transplantation to elucidate the initial stages of humoral rejection. Kidneys were orthotopically allografted to immunodeficient mice. After perioperative inflammation subsided, donor-specific alloantibodies were passively transferred to the recipient. Within 1 hour after a single transfer of antibodies, C4d was deposited diffusely on capillaries, and von Willebrand factor released from endothelial cells coated intravascular platelet aggregates. Platelet-transported inflammatory mediators platelet factor 4 and serotonin accumulated in the graft at 100- to 1000-fold higher concentrations compared with other platelet-transported chemokines. Activated platelets that expressed P-selectin attached to vascular endothelium and macrophages. These intragraft inflammatory changes were accompanied by evidence of acute endothelial injury. Repeated transfers of alloantibodies over 1 week sustained high levels of platelet factor 4 and serotonin. Platelet depletion decreased platelet mediators and altered the accumulation of macrophages. These data indicate that platelets augment early inflammation in response to donor-specific antibodies and that platelet-derived mediators may be markers of evolving alloantibody responses. PMID:25145937

  14. Pediatric live-donor kidney transplantation in Mansoura Urology & Nephrology Center: a 28-year perspective.

    PubMed

    El-Husseini, Amr A; Foda, Mohamed A; Bakr, Mohamed A; Shokeir, Ahmed A; Sobh, Mohamed A; Ghoneim, Mohamed A

    2006-10-01

    Our objective was to evaluate our overall experience in pediatric renal transplantation. Between March 1976 and March 2004, 1,600 live-donor kidney transplantations were carried out in our center; 216 of the patients were 18 years old or younger (mean age 12.9 years). There were 136 male patients and 80 female patients. The commonest causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were renal dysplasia (22%), nephrotic syndrome (20%), hereditary nephritis (16%), and obstructive uropathy (16%). Of the donors, 94% were one-haplotype matched and the rest were identical. Pre-emptive transplantation was performed in 51 (23%) patients. Triple-therapy immunosuppression (prednisone + cyclosporine + azathioprine) was used in 78.2% of transplants. Rejection-free recipients constituted 47.7%. Hypertension (62%) was the commonest complication. A substantial proportion of patients (48%) were short, with height standard deviation score (SDS) less than -1.88. The overall infection rate was high, and the majority (53%) of infections were bacterial. The graft survival at 1 year, 5 years and 10 years were 93.4%, 73.3% and 48.2%, respectively, while the patients' survival at 1, 5 and 10 years were 97.6%, 87.8% and 75.3%, respectively. Despite long-term success results of pediatric renal transplantation in a developing country, there is a risk of significant morbidity.

  15. The case for using living non-related donors to alleviate the world wide shortage of cadaver kidneys for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Daar, A S

    1991-07-01

    There continues to be a shortage of kidneys for transplantation even in countries with developed cadaver donor programmes. It is becoming clearer that cadaver donation will probably never satisfy the demand for kidneys, and living donor transplants are bound to play an important role in transplantation, more so in developing countries. Living non-related donation played a significant role in the early days of clinical renal transplantation, but fell into disrepute partly because of the activities of a few individuals and a few transplant centers that profited from commerce in human organs. However, it has always been recognised that living non-related donor (LNRD) renal transplantation per se was ethically acceptable. With the improvement in the results of renal transplantation, the persistent shortage has led to a reassessment of LNRD transplantation. Evidence indicates that both the public and the profession are in favour of this source of donation, although many transplant units are still reluctant to use it. However, more and more units, in both the developed and the developing world, are now performing such transplants. Where this is done ethically, the results appear to be excellent. We strongly believe that spouses, distant relatives and genetically non-related individuals who have an enduring relationship should be permitted to donate.

  16. Colovesical Fistula After Renal Transplantation: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Imafuku, A; Tanaka, K; Marui, Y; Sawa, N; Ubara, Y; Takaichi, K; Ishii, Y; Tomikawa, S

    2015-09-01

    Colovesical fistula is a relatively rare condition that is primarily related to diverticular disease. There are few reports of colovesical fistula after renal transplantation. We report of a 53-year-old man who was diagnosed with colovesical fistula after recurrent urinary tract infection, 5 months after undergoing cadaveric renal transplantation. Laparoscopic partial resection of the sigmoid colon with the use of the Hartmann procedure was performed. Six months after that surgery, there was no evidence of recurrent urinary tract infection and the patient's renal graft function was preserved. Physicians should keep colovesical fistula in mind as a cause of recurrent urinary tract infection in renal transplant recipients, especially in those with a history of diverticular disease.

  17. Renal Transplant Ureteral Stenosis: Treatment by Self-Expanding Metallic Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Cantasdemir, Murat; Kantarci, Fatih; Numan, Furuzan; Mihmanli, Ismail; Kalender, Betul

    2003-02-15

    We report the use of a metallic stent in a transplant ureteral stenosis. A 28-year-old man with chronic renal failure due to chronic pyelonephritis, who received a living-donor renal transplant, presented with transplant ureteral stenosis. The stenosis was unresponsive to balloon dilation and was treated by antegrade placement of a self-expanding Memotherm stent. The stentedureter stayed patent for 3 years. It may be reasonable to treat post-transplant ureteral stenosis resistant to balloon dilation with self-expanding metallic stents. However, long-term follow-up is required to evaluate the efficacy of this treatment.

  18. Improvements in kidney transplantation from donors after cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Hoogland, E R Pieter; Snoeijs, Maarten G J; Habets, Margot A W; Brandsma, D Steven; Peutz-Kootstra, Carine J; Christiaans, Maarten H L; van Heurn, L W Ernest

    2013-01-01

    To reduce the growing waiting list for kidney transplantation, we explored the limits of kidney transplantation from donors after cardiac death by liberally accepting marginal donor kidneys for transplantation. As the percentage of primary non-function (PNF) increased, we evaluated our transplantation program and implemented changes to reduce the high percentage of PNF in 2005, followed by a second evaluation over the period 2006-2009. Recipients of a kidney from a donor after cardiac death between 1998 and 2005 were analyzed, with PNF as outcome measure. During the period 2002-2005, the percentage of PNF increased and crossed the upper control limits of 12% which was considered as unacceptably high. After implementation of changes, this percentage was reduced to 5%, without changing the number of kidney transplantations from donors after cardiac death. Continuous monitoring of the quality of care is essential as the boundaries of organ donation and transplantation are sought. Meticulous donor, preservation, and recipient management make extension of the donor potential possible, with good results for the individual recipient. Liberal use of kidneys from donors after cardiac death may contribute to a reduction in the waiting list for kidney transplantation and dialysis associated mortality.

  19. [Experience about more than 2000 renal transplantations at the university of Brussels].

    PubMed

    Madhoun, P; Wissing, M; Broeders, N; Ghisdal, L; Hoang, A; Loi, P; Michalsky, D; Bollens, R; Donckier, V; Hooghe, L; Janssen, F; Hall, M; Depierreux, M; Kinnaert, P; Vereerstraeten, P; Abramowicz, D

    2008-01-01

    Since 1965, more than 2000 renal transplantations (including more than 100 living-donor transplantations) have been performed at the University of Brussels. An end-stage renal disease patient candidate to renal transplantation will be therefore followed from his enrolment on the waiting list to the long-term post-transplant period. Improvement in the outcome of renal transplantation is achieved due to better knowledge in many fields of medicine, such as immunology, infectious disease, metabolic diseases (hyperlipemia, diabetes mellitus), pharmacology, use of immunosuppressive regimen, a more adequate cardiovascular prevention and treatment. If the best results were achieved with kidneys from living donors, the graft survival rate at the University of Brussels was nearly 80% for the last period (2000-2006). Unfortunately, renal transplantation cannot cure certain comorbid conditions and even may promote them: infectious diseases, neoplasia, metabolic disorders (e.a diabetes mellitus, hyperlipemia). Many efforts have to be done to develop less toxic and more immune selective therapeutic strategies. Living donation and extension of the pool of cadaveric donors will reduce the length of time spent on the waiting list and will significantly impact on mortality and morbidity after kidney transplantation.

  20. Commercial renal transplantation: A risky venture? A single Canadian centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Anil; Kwan, Kevin G.; Whelan, J. Paul

    2011-01-01

    Background: Canada, akin to other developed nations, faces the growing challenges of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Even with expanded donor criteria for renal transplantation (the treatment of choice for ESRD), the supply of kidneys is outpaced by the escalating demand. Remuneration for kidney donation is proscribed in Canada. Without an option of living-related transplantation (biological or emotional donors), patients often struggle with long waiting lists for deceased donor transplantation. Accordingly, many patients are now opting for more expedient avenues to obtaining a renal transplant. Through commercial organ retrieval programs, from living and deceased donors, patients are travelling outside Canada to have the procedure performed. Methods: Between September 2001 and July 2007, 10 patients (7 males, 3 females) underwent commercial renal transplantation outside Canada. We describe the clinical outcomes of these patients managed postoperatively at our single Canadian transplant centre. Results: Six living unrelated and 4 deceased donor renal transplantations were performed on these 10 patients (mean age 49.5 years). All procedures were performed in developing countries and the postoperative complications were subsequently treated at our centre. The mean post-transplant serum creatinine was 142 μmol/L. The average follow-up time was 29.8 months (range: 3 to 73 months). One patient required a transplant nephrectomy secondary to fungemia and subsequently died. One patient had a failed transplant and has currently resumed hemodialysis. Acute rejection was seen in 5 patients with 3 of these patients requiring re-initiation of hemodialysis. Only 1 patient had an uncomplicated course after surgery. Discussion: Despite the kidney trade being a milieu of corruption and commercialization, and the high risk of unconventional complications, patients returning to Canada after commercial renal transplantation are the new reality. Patients are often arriving without any

  1. Risk Factors for Hypertension After Living Donor Kidney Transplantation in Korea: A Multivariate Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, H; Kim, H S; Baek, C H; Shin, E H; Cho, H J; Han, D J; Park, S K

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplantation hypertension is very common and is associated with cardiovascular complications and poor graft survival in kidney transplant recipients. This study aimed to identify risk factors for hypertension after living donor kidney transplantation. We retrospectively analyzed patients who underwent renal transplantation between January 2009 and April 2012. Hypertension was defined as the use of antihypertensive medications at 12 months post-transplantation. Student t test and chi-squared test were performed for univariate analysis. Logistic regression analysis was performed for multivariate analysis. Five-hundred thirty-nine patients were enrolled in the analyses. The rate of antihypertensive medication use was 67% at 12 months. In multivariate analysis, male gender (odds ratio [OR], 2.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.55-4.61), pretransplantation hypertension (OR, 4.65; 95% CI, 2.14-10.11), donor hypertension (OR, 3.23; 95% CI, 1.05-9.96), high body mass index (BMI; OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.12-1.29), and use of cyclosporine (OR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.28-3.27) were associated with post-transplantation hypertension. These data show that male recipient, hypertension before transplantation, donor hypertension, high BMI, and cyclosporine use were independent factors associated with hypertension. It would be useful to predict and prevention the hypertension after kidney transplantation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of donor characteristics on survival after unrelated donor transplantation for hematologic malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Kollman, Craig; Spellman, Stephen R.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Hassebroek, Anna; Anasetti, Claudio; Antin, Joseph H.; Champlin, Richard E.; Confer, Dennis L.; DiPersio, John F.; Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo; Hartzman, Robert J.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Hurley, Carolyn K.; Karanes, Chatchada; Maiers, Martin; Mueller, Carlheinz R.; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Setterholm, Michelle; Woolfrey, Ann E.; Yu, Neng

    2016-01-01

    There are >24 million registered adult donors, and the numbers of unrelated donor transplantations are increasing. The optimal strategy for prioritizing among comparably HLA-matched potential donors has not been established. Therefore, the objective of the current analyses was to study the association between donor characteristics (age, sex, parity, cytomegalovirus serostatus, HLA match, and blood group ABO match) and survival after transplantation for hematologic malignancy. The association of donor characteristics with transplantation outcomes was examined using either logistic or Cox regression models, adjusting for patient disease and transplantation characteristics associated with outcomes in 2 independent datasets: 1988 to 2006 (N = 6349; training cohort) and 2007 to 2011 (N = 4690; validation cohort). All donor-recipient pairs had allele-level HLA typing at HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1, which is the current standard for selecting donors. Adjusting for patient disease and transplantation characteristics, survival was better after transplantation of grafts from young donors (aged 18-32 years) who were HLA matched to recipients (P < .001). These findings were validated for transplantations that occurred between 2007 and 2011. For every 10-year increment in donor age, there is a 5.5% increase in the hazard ratio for overall mortality. Increasing HLA disparity was also associated with worsening survival. Donor age and donor-recipient HLA match are important when selecting adult unrelated donors. Other donor characteristics such as sex, parity, and cytomegalovirus serostatus were not associated with survival. The effect of ABO matching on survival is modest and must be studied further before definitive recommendations can be offered. PMID:26527675

  3. [Complications of pediatric renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Cristina; Sandes, Ana Rita; Azevedo, Sara; Stone, Rosário; Almeida, Margarida

    2013-01-01

    Introdução: A transplantação renal é a terapêutica de eleição na criança com doença renal crónica terminal, evidenciando impacto positivo na sobrevida e qualidade de vida dos doentes. Não é, no entanto, isenta de complicações, algumas com importante morbilidade. Os autores pretendem caracterizar o perfil de complicações pós transplantação renal em doentes pediátricos (até 18 anos).Material e Métodos: Análise retrospectiva dos doentes submetidos a transplantação renal e seguidos na Unidade de Nefrologia Pediátrica entre Setembro de 1995 e Agosto de 2010. Dados obtidos dos processos clínicos: características demográficas, etiologia da doença renal crónica terminal, terapêutica de substituição renal, mortalidade e perda de enxertos, complicações cirúrgicas, infecciosas e não infecciosas (rejeição aguda e crónica, recidiva da doença de base, alterações metabólicas e factores de risco cardiovascular). Análise estatística descritiva simples.Resultados: Foram incluídas 78 crianças transplantadas (48,7% sexo masculino), com idade mediana à data da transplantaçãorenal de 12 anos (2 - 18). A maioria fez previamente diálise peritoneal: 49 (62,6%). Cinco doentes (6,4%) foram transplantados sem diálise prévia. A mediana do tempo de seguimento após transplante foi 37,5 meses (1 - 169). As principais etiologias de doença renal crónica terminal foram: uronefropatias (41%) e glomerulopatias (28,2%). As complicações infecciosas ocorreram em 74,4%; infecçõesvirais em 56,4%, sendo a mais prevalente a infecção citomegalovírus (39,7%); infecções bacterianas em 53,8% (na maioria infecções urinárias em doentes urológicos). Outras complicações: 1) factores de risco para doença cardiovascular: hipertensão arterial em 85,9%; dislipidémia em 16,7% e diabetes de novo em 7,7%; 2) episódios de rejeição aguda em 32,1% e nefropatia crónica do enxerto em 17,9%; 3) complicações relacionáveis com a cirurgia em 16

  4. Donor chimera model for tolerance induction in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, F; Peppelenbosch, M; Dashty, M

    2013-05-01

    Tolerance induction is the basis of a successful transplantation with the goal being the re-establishment of homeostasis after transplantation. Non-autograft transplantation disrupts this maintenance drastically which would be avoided by administration of a novel procedure. At present, the blood group antigens and the genotypes of the donor and recipient are cross-matched before transplantation combined with a drug regimen that confers general immunosuppression. But the 'specific' unresponsiveness of the recipient to the donor organ, implied by 'tolerance', is not achieved in this process. This article introduces the 'donor chimera model' via the concept of the 'closed transplantation loop' approach for tolerance induction which seeks to limit the use of immunosuppressive therapy after transplantation.

  5. [Renal transplantation and Bourneville's tuberous sclerosis].

    PubMed

    De Paepe, J P; Michel, L; Pirson, Y; Squifflet, J P; Alexandre, G

    1987-01-01

    A kidney transplantation was performed in July 1981 on a 29 year old woman who presented the signs of tuberous sclerosis and suffered from chronic renal failure. The frequency and the genetic transmission of Bourneville's disease are explained. The signs of the disease are exposed with special emphasis on the renal lesions. Only the patients with minor neurological symptoms can survive. These patients are able to develop chronic renal failure. This occurs either when the kidneys are destructed by renal cysts or tumors, or when a bilateral nephrectomy must be performed for bleeding or tumoral compression. A kidney transplantation can give them an opportunity to live almost normally. When nephrectomy is not performed, a regularly follow-up is necessary because the unknown future of the renal lesions in place.

  6. [Cost of a renal transplant: medico-economic analysis of the amount reimbursed by the French national health program to finance renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Sainsaulieu, Yoël; Sambuc, Cléa; Logerot, Hélène; Bongiovanni, Isabelle; Couchoud, Cécile

    2014-07-01

    Successful organ transplantation relies on several ancillary activities such as the identification of a compatible donor, organ allocation and procurement and the coordination of the transplant process. No existing study of the overall costs, in France, of these additional transplantation activities could be identified. This study determines the total additional costs of ancillary transplantation activities by comparing the costs of kidney transplantations with living donors against those using deceased donors. The data used are drawn from the 2013 public healthcare tariff calculations, PMSI recorded activity and transplant activity in 2012 as assessed and reported by the Agence de la biomédecine. The results show that, in 2012, additional transplant costs varied from 13835.44 € to 20050.67 € for a deceased donor and were 13601.66 € for a living donor. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that all the costs covered by National Health Insurance need to be taken into account in the economic impact evaluation of renal transplantation and during the development of this national priority activity. Copyright © 2014 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. The Kidney Donor Profile Index (KDPI) of Marginal Donors Allocated by Standardized Pre-Transplant Donor Biopsy Assessment: Distribution and Association with Graft Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gandolfini, I.; Buzio, C.; Zanelli, P.; Palmisano, A.; Cremaschi, E.; Vaglio, A.; Piotti, G.; Melfa, L.; La Manna, G.; Feliciangeli, G.; Cappuccilli, M.; Scolari, M.P.; Capelli, I.; Panicali, L.; Baraldi, O.; Stefoni, S.; Buscaroli, A.; Ridolfi, L.; D'Errico, A.; Cappelli, G.; Bonucchi, D.; Rubbiani, E.; Albertazzi, A.; Mehrotra, A.; Cravedi, P.; Maggiore, U.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-transplant donor biopsy (PTDB)-based marginal-donor allocation systems to single or dual renal transplantation could increase the use of organs with Kidney Donor Profile Index (KDPI) in the highest range (e.g. >80 or >90), whose discard rate approximates 50% in the US. To test this hypothesis, we retrospectively calculated the KDPI and analyzed the outcomes of 442 marginal kidney transplants (340 single transplants: 278 with a PTDB Remuzzi score <4 [median KDPI:87; interquartile range(IQR):78-94] and 62 with a score =4 [median KDPI:87; IQR:76-93]; 102 dual transplants [median KDPI: 93; IQR:86-96]) and 248 single standard transplant controls [median KDPI:36; IQR:18-51]. PTDB-based allocation of marginal grafts led to a limited discard rate of 15% for kidneys with KDPI of 80-90 and of 37% for kidneys with a KDPI of 91-100. Although 1-year eGFRs were significantly lower in recipients of marginal kidneys (-9.3, -17.9, and -18.8ml/min, for dual transplants, single kidneys with PTDB score <4, and =4, respectively; P<0.001), graft survival (median follow-up 3.3 years) was similar between marginal and standard kidney transplants (hazard ratio: 1.20 [95% confidence interval: 0.80 to 1.79; P=0.38]). In conclusion, PTDB-based allocation allows the safe transplantation of kidneys with KDPI in the highest range that may otherwise be discarded. PMID:25155294

  8. Pregnancy outcome in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Kuvacić, I; Sprem, M; Skrablin, S; Kalafatić, D; Bubić-Filipi, L; Milici D

    2000-09-01

    To correlate pregnancy outcome with complications in pregnancy and transplantation-to-pregnancy interval in renal transplant recipients in Croatia. Data on 23 pregnancies after prepregnancy stabilization of blood pressure and normalization of graft function were retrospectively analyzed. The mean interval between transplantation and conception was 3.1 years. Primary renal disease was chronic glomerulonephritis in 7, chronic pyelonephritis in 7 and agenesis of right kidney and stenosis of left renal artery in 1 patient. There were 10 term and 5 preterm deliveries, 6 induced and 2 spontaneous abortions. The mean gestational age was 38.1 weeks and the mean newborn birthweight was 3015 g. The prematurity rate was 21.7%. Patients with arterial hypertension in pregnancy, elevated serum creatinine level and bacteriuria, as well as those with conception occurring less than 2 years after transplantation, had a higher rate of therapeutic and spontaneous abortions, preterm deliveries and low birth weight infants. The interval between transplantation and conception, as well as allograft function during pregnancy, seem to be of great importance for successful obstetric outcome in renal transplant patients.

  9. Hepatitis C virus infection after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Romero, E; Galindo, P; Bravo, J A; Osorio, J M; Pérez, A; Baca, Y; Ferreira, C; Asensio, C; Osuna, A

    2008-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the main cause of liver disease after renal transplantation. Most patients have seroconverted on dialysis to positive RNA. The viral load increases during immunosuppressive therapy. The risk of developing chronic liver disease is related to the histopathologic findings, duration and severity of the disease, immunosuppression, and transplantation time. Hepatitis C virus infection can predict onset, of proteinuria and diabetes. We studied 868 patients who received renal transplants between (1987 and 2006), of whom 18.7% were seropositive for HCV. We observed a higher rate of HCV-seropositive patients related to the duration of hemodialysis therapy. Of the HCV seropositive patients, 77% had received renal allografts before 1998. There was no difference between the sexes; however, the HCV positive patients were younger. Polymerase chain reaction tests results were positive in 91.6% of the patients with HCV antibodies. The prevalence of diabetes was greater among HCV positive patients, as was as the persistence of proteinuria. Cryoglobulins were positive in 30.8%. The incidence of acute rejection episodes in the first year was similar between groups. Of the HCV-positive patients, 80.2% were treated with cyclosporine, most patients continued this therapy throughout the study. We observed no significant difference in mortality end graft survival rate between the two groups. However, renal function differed significantly at some points during the evolution of the clinical course. Renal transplantation is still the best treatment option in patients with chronic renal disease.

  10. Organ transplantation from donors (cadaveric or living) with a history of malignancy: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Yuan, Jin; Li, Wei; Ye, Qifa

    2014-10-01

    The evolution of organ transplantation has resulted in extended lifespan as well as better life quality of patients with end-stage diseases, which in turn causes an increased demand for organs. The persistent organ shortage requires a careful reconsideration of potential donors (living or cadaveric) that have current or historical malignancies. Donors with low-grade skin tumors, carcinomas in situ of the uterine cervix, and primary central nervous system (CNS) tumors can be considered as potential donors for recipients dying on wait list longing for organ transplantation. Recently, transplant centers have turned to other types of malignancies including low grade renal cell carcinoma, prostate, ureteral, endometrial and breast cancer, and favorable outcomes have been shown in such innovations. When considering donors with a history of malignancy, general biologic behavior of the tumor type, histology and stage at the time of diagnosis, and the length of disease-free interval should be considered (Transplantation 2002;74(12):1657-1663). With the review of literatures, we illustrate the organ utilization from donors with malignancies all around the world since earlier times and give some suggestions for decision making under the circumstance of whether to choose those marginal donors or not on the basis of reviewed literatures.

  11. Living Donor Liver Transplant is a Transparent Activity in India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Subash

    2013-03-01

    Living donor liver transplant (LDLT) has progressed rapidly in India with at least two major centers performing over 200 transplants annually. There have been concerns regarding donor safety as donor deaths have been reported worldwide. In India, there is a possible underreporting of donor complications and mortality leading to the allegation that LDLT is a clandestine activity. Deceased donor liver transplantation activity may be less transparent as there are no national guidelines for retrieval and allocation of organs. LDLT is for a named person and as the activity can only be conducted in major hospitals with involvement of over 100 medical personnel in each operation, it cannot be a clandestine operation. Government regulations require licensing of hospitals following inspection by senior doctors and reporting of transplant activity periodically. About 2500 living donor liver transplants have been conducted in India and there have been 7 donor deaths reported in India. Rather than not being transparent, donor morbidity and mortality has received excessive media attention. Most liver transplant activity in India is well organized with clearance from hepatologists and anesthetists. Unrelated donation needs to be cleared from a State appointed Authorization Committee. Foreigners cannot be transplanted without State clearance and approval of the concerned embassy. The donor risk is discussed and the success of the recipient operation is also explained to all patients. The ever-increasing popularity of the operation in spite of the high cost and the requirement for donation from a family member suggests that many patients are living healthy life after transplantation. Overall LDLT is a transparent activity in India.

  12. Assessment of variation in live donor kidney transplantation across transplant centers in the United States1 - 8

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Peter P.; Feldman, Harold I.; Bloom, Roy D.; Abt, Peter L.; Thomasson, Arwin; Shults, Justine; Grossman, Robert; Asch, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Transplant centers vary in the proportion of kidney transplants performed using live donors. Clinical innovations that facilitate live donation may drive this variation. Methods We assembled a cohort of renal transplant candidates at 194 US centers using registry data from 1999 – 2005. We measured magnitude of live donor transplant (LDKTx) through development of a standardized live donor transplant ratio (SLDTR) at each center that accounted for center population differences. We examined associations between center characteristics and the likelihood that individual transplant candidates underwent LDKTx. To identify practices through which centers increase LDKTx, we also examined center characteristics associated with consistently being in the upper three quartiles of SLDTR. Results The cohort comprised 148,168 patients, among whom 34,593 (23.3%) underwent LDKTx. In multivariable logistic regression, candidates had an increased likelihood of undergoing LDKTx at centers with greater use of “unrelated donors” (defined as non-spouses and non-first-degree family members of the recipient; OR 1.31 for highest versus lowest use, p=0.02) and at centers with programs to overcome donor-recipient incompatibility (OR 1.33, p=0.01.) Centers consistently in the upper three SLDTR quartiles were also more likely to use “unrelated” donors (OR 8.30 per tertile of higher use, p<0.01), to have incompatibility programs (OR 4.79, p<0.01), and to use laparoscopic nephrectomy (OR 2.53 per tertile of higher use, p=0.02). Conclusion Differences in center population do not fully account for differences in the use of LDKTx. To maximize opportunities for LDKTx, centers may accept more unrelated donors and adopt programs to overcome biological incompatibility. PMID:21562451

  13. Urological complications in ureteric stenting live related renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Hafiz Shahzad; Khan, Mohammad Usman; Hussain, Imran; Hyder, Imran

    2011-01-01

    To determine the frequency and types of post-transplant urological complications in live-related kidney transplantation with reference to the impact of JJ ureteric stent. Case series. Shaikh Zayed Postgraduate Medical Institute and National Institute of Kidney Diseases, Lahore, from June 2006 to July 2010. Consecutive renal transplantations, donors being alive were relatives, reterospectively reviewed. All patients underwent extravesical ureteroneocystostomy and all, except one were stented. From the retrieved clinical records, the frequency and types of various minor and major urological complications and their management was studied. All the complications were managed according to standard guidelines. The overall incidence of urological complications among transplant recipients was 11.9%, observed in 12 patients. The complications were urinary leakage in 2 (2%) and clot retention, ureterovesical junction obstruction and wound infection in one (1%) patient each. Urinary tract infection was observed in 7 (6.9%) patients. Urinary tract infection was the most common urologic complication in the studied cases. The technique of stented extravesical ureteronecystostomy had a low rate of urological complications in this series. Other factors which may reduce the urological complications are preserving adventitia, fat and blood supply of ureter by delicate dissection during donor nephrectomy and prevent kinking and twisting of ureter are important factors in reducing the post-transplant urological complications.

  14. Chronic Renal Transplant Rejection and Possible Anti-Proliferative Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Usman, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The global prevalence of renal transplants is increasing with time, and renal transplantation is the only definite treatment for end-stage renal disease. We have limited the acute and late acute rejection of kidney allografts, but the long-term survival of renal tissues still remains a difficult and unanswered question as most of the renal transplants undergo failure within a decade of their transplantation. Among various histopathological changes that signify chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), tubular atrophy, fibrous thickening of the arteries, fibrosis of the kidney interstitium, and glomerulosclerosis are the most important. Moreover, these structural changes are followed by a decline in the kidney function as well. The underlying mechanism that triggers the long-term rejection of renal transplants involves both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. T cells, with their related cytokines, cause tissue damage. In addition, CD 20+ B cells and their antibodies play an important role in the long-term graft rejection. Other risk factors that predispose a recipient to long-term graft rejection include HLA-mismatching, acute episodes of graft rejection, mismatch in donor-recipient age, and smoking. The purpose of this review article is the analyze current literature and find different anti-proliferative agents that can suppress the immune system and can thus contribute to the long-term survival of renal transplants. The findings of this review paper can be helpful in understanding the long-term survival of renal transplants and various ways to improve it. PMID:26677426

  15. Donor Selection for Adult- to- Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation: Well Begun is Half Done

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Amit; Ashworth, April; Behnke, Martha; Cotterell, Adrian; Posner, Marc; Fisher, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Donor selection criteria for adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation vary with the medical center of evaluation. Living donor evaluation utilizes considerable resources and the non-maturation of potential into actual donors may sometimes prove fatal for patients with end stage liver disease. On the contrary, a thorough donor evaluation process is mandatory to ensure safe outcomes in otherwise healthy donors. We aimed to study the reasons for non-maturation of potential right lobe liver donors at our transplant center. Methods A retrospective data analysis of all potential living liver donors evaluated at our center from 1998 to 2010 was done. Results Overall 324 donors were evaluated for 219 potential recipients and 171 (52.7%) donors were disqualified. Common reasons for donor non-maturation included: (1) Donor reluctance, 21% (2) >10% macro-vesicular steatosis, 16% (3) assisted donor withdrawal, 14% (4) inadequate remnant liver volume, 13% (5) psychosocial issues, 7% and thrombophilia, 7%. Ten donors (6%) were turned down due to anatomical variations (8 biliary and 2 arterial anomalies). Donors older than 50 years and those with BMI over 25 were less likely to be accepted for donation. Conclusions We conclude that donor reluctance, hepatic steatosis and assisted donor withdrawal are major reasons for non-maturation of potential into actual donors. Anatomical variations and underlying medical conditions were not a major cause of donor rejection. A system in practice to recognize these factors early in the course of donor evaluation to improve the efficiency of the selection process and ensure donor safety is proposed. PMID:23128999

  16. Renal scans in pregnant transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.A.; Ziessman, H.A.; Fahey, F.H.; Collea, J.V.; Alijani, M.R.; Helfrich, G.B.

    1988-08-01

    This study demonstrates the normal technetium-99m diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid ((/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA) renal scan in pregnant patients with transplanted kidneys. Five pregnant renal transplant patients had seven (/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA renal studies to assess allograft perfusion and function. All scans showed the uteroplacental complex. The bladder was always compressed and distorted. The transplanted kidney was frequently rotated to a more vertical position. In all patients allograft flow and function were maintained. There was calyceal retention on all studies and ureteral retention activity in three of five patients. Using the MIRD formalism, the total radiation absorbed dose to the fetus was calculated to be 271 mrad. This radiation exposure is well within NRCP limits for the fetus of radiation workers and an acceptable low risk in the management of these high risk obstetric patients.

  17. Simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) transplantation from controlled non-heart-beating donors (NHBDs).

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, A M; Odorico, J S; Knechtle, S J; Becker, Y T; Hoffmann, R M; Kalayoglu, M; Sollinger, H W

    2000-01-01

    From January 1993 through June 1999, 18 simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplants (SPKs) were performed from controlled non-heart-beating donors (NHBDs) and 339 SPKs were performed from heart-beating donors (HBDs). No difference in donor characteristics was noted except for warm ischemic time, which was 14.8 min (range 4-46 min) for NHBDs. Following transplantation, no difference in pancreatic function was noted; however, a higher rate of enteric conversions was seen in pancreas transplants from NHBDs (32% vs. 13%; p < 0.01). Hemodialysis for acute tubular necrosis (ATN) was higher in kidney transplants from NHBDs (22.2% vs. 4.1%; p = 0.009) as was discharge serum creatinine (1.7 mg/dl vs. 1.5 mg/dl; p < 0.05). Also, the number of patients remaining rejection free was lower for NHBDs and approached significance (33.3% vs. 50.1%; p = 0.07). However, no difference in patient survival (100% vs. 95.4%) or pancreatic (87.4% vs. 86.5%) and renal (86.3% vs. 86.3%) allograft survival was noted during the study period. Our results indicate that SPK transplantation from controlled NHBDs is a viable method for increasing the number of pancreas and kidney transplants available for transplantation.

  18. Heart transplantation using allografts from older donors: Multicenter study results.

    PubMed

    Roig, Eulàlia; Almenar, Luís; Crespo-Leiro, Marisa; Segovia, Javier; Mirabet, Sònia; Delgado, Juan; Pérez-Villa, Felix; Luís Lambert, Jose; Teresa Blasco, M; Muñiz, Javier

    2015-06-01

    The lengthy waiting time for heart transplantation is associated with high mortality. To increase the number of donors, new strategies have emerged, including the use of hearts from donors ≥50 years old. However, this practice remains controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate outcomes of patients receiving heart transplants from older donors. We retrospectively analyzed 2,102 consecutive heart transplants in 8 Spanish hospitals from 1998 to 2010. Acute and overall mortality were compared in patients with grafts from donors ≥50 years old versus grafts from younger donors. There were 1,758 (84%) transplanted grafts from donors < 50 years old (Group I) and 344 (16%) from donors ≥50 years old (Group II). Group I had more male donors than Group II (71% vs. 57%, p = 0.0001). The incidence of cardiovascular risk factors was higher in older donors. There were no differences in acute mortality or acute rejection episodes between the 2 groups. Global mortality was higher in Group II (rate ratio, 1.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.18-1.67; p = 0.001) than in Group I. After adjusting for donor cause of death, donor smoking history, recipient age, induction therapy, and cyclosporine therapy, the differences lost significance. Group II had a higher incidence of coronary allograft vasculopathy at 5 years (rate ratio, 1.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-2.27; p = 0.001). There were no differences in acute and overall mortality after adjusting for confounding factors. However, there was a midterm increased risk of coronary allograft vasculopathy with the use of older donors. Careful selection of recipients and close monitoring of coronary allograft vasculopathy are warranted in these patients. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Proportion of glomerulosclerosis in procurement wedge renal biopsy cannot alone discriminate for acceptance of marginal donors.

    PubMed

    Pokorná, E; Vítko, S; Chadimová, M; Schück, O; Ekberg, H

    2000-01-15

    The shortage of available kidneys for renal transplantation could be addressed, to some extent, by expanding the criteria for acceptance of marginal donors. The study of these criteria is limited by the selection of grafts actually retrieved and transplanted, therefore reduced to a study of risk factors. We have evaluated the potential of procurement renal biopies as an instrument for acceptance or refusal of donor kidneys for transplantation. This was a prospective study of a consecutive series of 200 donors. Biopsies were performed by wedge technique at the donor operation and were evaluated for proportion of glomerulosclerosis, vascular and tubular changes, and interstitial fibrosis. The study included 387 renal grafts with a representative biopsy, transplanted, and followed-up for survival and functional evaluation; 24 hr creatinine clearance at 1 and 3 weeks, and 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Factors associated with initial graft function included cold ischemia time, number of DR mismatches, tubular changes, although donor age showed the strongest correlation with short- and long-term level of graft function. DR mismatches and retransplantation appeared to be the only significant risk factors for graft loss. The proportion of glomerulosclerosis (mean 8%, range 0-48%) correlated with graft function in the simple regression analysis. However, when age was taken into account glomerulosclerosis did not correlate significantly with graft function. Furthermore, glomerulosclerosis as high as 25% or more had an acceptable 3-year graft survival rate of 74.7%. Procurement biopsy provides only limited information for the decision whether or not to accept a kidney donor.

  20. Renal vein extension using gonadal vein: a useful strategy for right kidney living donor harvested using laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Troncoso, P; Guzman, S; Domínguez, J; Ortiz, A M

    2009-01-01

    Vascular management of the right renal vein during laparoscopic living donor nephrectomy is still an unsolved problem. This short vessel has limited the use of right kidneys. However, the right kidney should be harvested in some instances. Based on experience in open donor nephrectomy, our unit has used the donor gonadal vein to obtain a longer renal vein in this setting. Four consecutive living related donors with the indication for laparoscopic right nephrectomy underwent this procedure. Three donors were females and the overall average age was 48.5 years. The renal vein was controlled with a 30-mm stapler and we included 5-6 cm of the ipsilateral gonadal vein during the harvest. The donor kidney was perfused and renal vessels prepared under cold conditions. The gonadal vein was opened longitudinally and sutured to the donor right renal vein as a wide tube in 3 cases and as a spiral tube in 1 case with 6-0 monofilament suture. This procedure extended the bench work between 25 to 40 minutes permitting an 2.5- to 3.5-cm extension of the donor vein. The transplantations were performed in the usual mode and the vein enlargement enormously facilitated the implantation surgery. All recipients displayed immediate graft function; no complications were observed with this strategy. Vein extension with the gonadal vein was a simple, safe method to enlarge the renal vein among right living donor kidneys procured using laparoscopy.

  1. Simultaneous pancreatic-renal transplant scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Shulkin, B.L.; Dafoe, D.C.; Wahl, R.L.

    1986-12-01

    99mTc-DTPA scintigraphy was evaluated in seven patients as a technique to assess perfusion of the transplanted pancreas and kidney. Such scans provide high-quality images of both organs in both the flow phase and later phases. The radionuclide is readily available and its brief effective half-life allows repeated evaluations at short intervals. /sup 131/I-hippuran, the major radiopharmaceutical for renal transplant scintigraphy, does not allow visualization of the transplanted pancreas or evaluation of its blood supply. Although the blood glucose is a gross indicator of the function of the pancreatic allograft, pancreatic scintigraphy with 99mTc-DTPA in one case was capable of detecting graft dysfunction before elevation of the blood glucose occurred. While additional studies will be necessary to determine the predictive value of this test, 99mTc-DTPA is valuable for pancreatic-renal transplant evaluation.

  2. Why we use the donor left kidney in live related transplantation.

    PubMed

    Satyapal, K S; Kalideen, J M; Singh, B; Haffejee, A A; Robbs, J V

    2003-02-01

    In addition to the superior graft survival afforded by live related transplantation, this option has assumed an important role in the management of endstage renal failure in centres confronted with a scarcity of cadaveric kidneys. In pursuing this option, it is imperative that the donor has minimal morbidity. An ongoing dilemma is which side the kidney should be harvested from. This study reviews the anatomical basis for selecting the left kidney and the impact on outcome for patient and donor. A database comprising cadaveric and clinical subsets was analysed. The total sample size analysed was 1 244 kidney pairs (305 cadaveric; 939 clinical (61 live related left kidney transplants harvested by the extraperitoneal approach)). Additional renal arteries (ARAs): Right first, second = 18.6%, 4.7%; left first, second = 27.6%, 4.4%. Additional renal veins (ARV): Right first, second = 26%, 3.3%; left first only = 2.6%. Length of renal vein (cm): Right 2.4 +/- 0.7, left 5.9 +/- 1.5. Other venous variations encountered were on the left side only (renal collar 0.3%, retro-aortic vein 0.5%). In the live related transplant series 24.6% ARAs were encountered (first 19.7%, second 4.9%). The postoperative course and outcome of both donor and recipient were not associated with increased morbidity. While greater length of the left renal vein (LRV) afforded easier technical manipulation, it is interesting to note that its length is shorter than that reported in the literature. ARVs are infrequent on the left and when encountered the smaller calibre vessel may be ligated with impunity due to rich intrarenal anastomosis. In selecting the donor kidney the surgeon has to balance the prospect of fewer ARAs on the right against the benefit of a longer LRV. The solution to this dilemma can only arise from a randomised clinical study. In our practice, consistent use of the left kidney has not affected clinical outcome.

  3. Surveillance renal transplant biopsies and subclinical rejection at three months post-transplant in pediatric recipients.

    PubMed

    Hymes, Leonard C; Greenbaum, Laurence; Amaral, Sandra G; Warshaw, Barry L

    2007-08-01

    Subclinical acute rejection (SCR) has been increasingly recognized in adult renal transplant recipients with the advent of surveillance biopsies. However, in children, surveillance biopsies are not routinely performed at most centers. Therefore, the incidence, predisposing factors, treatment, and clinical outcomes of SCR remain unclear in children. From August 2004 to December 2005, we performed 36 protocol biopsies at three months post-transplantation. All patients had received induction therapy with basiliximab and were maintained on prednisone, MMF, and tacrolimus. Sixteen cases of SCR were detected by biopsy (44%). Age, gender, race, donor source, or serum creatinine did not discriminate between children with SCR and those with normal biopsies. All cases of SCR were treated with high doses of methylprednisolone. At one yr post-transplant, renal function was similar in children with SCR to those with normal surveillance biopsies (p = 0.62). Because of the high incidence of SCR, the maintenance dose of MMF was increased by 50% in 20 children transplanted after December 2005. This resulted in a significant decline in the incidence of SCR from 44 to 15% (p < 0.05). However, the incidence of polyomavirus (BK) viremia also increased significantly in these children (p < 0.005). A high incidence of SCR was found on surveillance biopsies at three months post-transplant and could not be predicted by age, gender, race, donor source, or serum creatinine. The occurrence of SCR declined significantly by increasing the dose of MMF, but resulted in an increase in BK viremia. We conclude that surveillance biopsies provide valuable information in the management of pediatric renal transplant recipients. Increasing immunosuppression to avoid SCR should be weighed against the risk for infection.

  4. Renal transplantation using external continent urinary diversion.

    PubMed

    Lucon, A M; Sabbaga, E; Ianhez, L E; Chocair, P R; Pestana, J O; Arap, S

    1994-02-01

    A 29-year-old man born with bladder exstrophy presented with end stage renal failure many years after ileal conduit diversion. Bilateral nephrectomy and continent external urinary diversion were performed, and 1.5 months later a cadaveric kidney was grafted into the right iliac fossa. The patient was well at 18 months with a serum creatinine level of 1.2 mg./dl. and he was completely dry with 4 or 5 daily catheterizations. Although followup is still short, renal transplantation with drainage into an external continent urinary diversion permits excellent quality of life and good renal function. Therefore, this alternative is worth consideration whenever other reconstructive alternatives are not possible in candidates for renal transplantation.

  5. PARACOCCIDIOIDOMYCOSIS IN A RENAL TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT

    PubMed Central

    GÓES, Heliana Freitas de Oliveira; DURÃES, Sandra Maria Barbosa; LIMA, Caren dos Santos; de SOUZA, Mariana Boechat; VILAR, Enoi Aparecida Guedes; DALSTON, Marcos Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is the most common endemic mycosis in Latin America. The etiological agents, which comprise two species, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and P. lutzii, are thermodimorphic fungi that usually affect previously healthy adults. They primarily involve the lungs and then disseminate to other organs. Such mycosis is rare in organ transplant recipients; there have been only three cases reported in literature, until now. We report a case of PCM in a renal transplant recipient with an unusual dermatological presentation. PMID:26910451

  6. PARACOCCIDIOIDOMYCOSIS IN A RENAL TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT.

    PubMed

    Góes, Heliana Freitas de Oliveira; Durães, Sandra Maria Barbosa; Lima, Caren dos Santos; Souza, Mariana Boechat de; Vilar, Enoi Aparecida Guedes; Dalston, Marcos Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is the most common endemic mycosis in Latin America. The etiological agents, which comprise two species, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and P. lutzii, are thermodimorphic fungi that usually affect previously healthy adults. They primarily involve the lungs and then disseminate to other organs. Such mycosis is rare in organ transplant recipients; there have been only three cases reported in literature, until now. We report a case of PCM in a renal transplant recipient with an unusual dermatological presentation.

  7. Cutaneous histoplasmosis in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Sun, N Z; Augustine, J J; Gerstenblith, M R

    2014-10-01

    Cutaneous histoplasmosis is a rare entity, although it can be seen in a substantial portion of renal transplant recipients with disseminated disease. The prognosis of disseminated disease is worse than isolated cutaneous involvement, and significant delays in diagnosis are reported. We reviewed reports of cutaneous histoplasmosis with and without dissemination in the setting of renal transplantation to examine incidence, timing of diagnosis, clinical features, and prognosis. Remarkable morphologic variability and the non-specific appearance of skin findings suggest that tissue culture is required for definitive diagnosis. Cutaneous lesions represent an easily accessible source for early diagnosis.

  8. Brucellosis in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Ting, I W; Ho, M W; Sung, Y J; Tien, N; Chi, C Y; Ho, H C; Huang, C C

    2013-10-01

    Brucellosis is one of the most common systemic zoonotic diseases transmitted by consumption of unpasteurized dairy products or by occupational contact with infected animals. Brucellosis is rare in renal transplant recipients. Only 3 cases have been reported in the literature. We report a case of brucellosis with hematologic and hepatobiliary complications in a patient 3 years after renal transplantation. The mean time from transplantation to the diagnosis of brucellosis in these 4 reported patients was 5.1 years (range 17 months to 13 years). All patients had fever and constitutional symptoms, and all attained clinical cure after combination antibiotic therapy. Given the small number of patients, further study is needed to identify the characteristics of brucellosis in renal transplant recipients. Drug interactions and acute renal failure developed in our patient during antibiotic treatment. Therefore, we should monitor the levels of immunosuppressive agents frequently. Several studies have shown in vitro susceptibilities of Brucella melitensis to tigecycline. In our patient, fever finally subsided after tigecycline administration. The minimum inhibitory concentration of tigecycline using Etest was 0.094 μg/mL. Tigecycline may be a potential option for treatment of brucellosis in the setting of transplantation.

  9. En bloc kidney transplantation from pediatric cadaveric donors to adult recipients.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Reza; Arab, Davood; Taghavi, Rahim; Gholamrezaie, Hamid Reza; Yazdani, Mohammad; Simforoosh, Nasser; Tabibi, Ali

    2006-01-01

    The shortage of cadaveric donors for kidney transplantation has led to the expansion of the criteria used for donor selection, such as the use of pediatric cadaveric donors. In this study we reviewed our results of en bloc kidney transplantation of pediatric cadaveric donors to adults. From May 2001 to May 2005, 245 cadaveric kidney transplants have been performed in our hospitals. Seven of these were en bloc kidney transplantations in adult recipients from marginal pediatric donors (age < 5 years, donor weight < 15 kg, high creatinine clearance, or kidney length < 8 cm). We reviewed their records. Follow-up (range, 3 to 24 months) included ultrasonography, dimercaptosuccinic acid renal scintigraphy, and magnetic resonance imaging. Serum levels of creatinine ranged between 0.8 m/dL to 1.9 mg/dL during the follow-up period. One patient died of myocardial infarction 3 months postoperatively. One-year graft and patient survivals were both 85.7%. Complications included acute tubular necrosis in 1 patient (managed by conservative therapy and dialysis for 2 weeks), renal vein thrombosis in 1 (treated by anticoagulation), and subcutaneous hematoma in 1. There were no urologic complications. Median size of the grafts was 7.2 cm preoperatively that reached 9.6 cm, 3 months postoperatively (P = .018). Twelve months following operation, the median size of the grafts reached 11 cm (P = .045). En bloc pediatric kidney transplantation is a safe and suitable alternative for adult recipients. One-year graft and patient survivals are acceptable and complication rate is low.

  10. Donor and recipient genetic variants in NLRP3 associate with early acute rejection following kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dessing, Mark C; Kers, Jesper; Damman, Jeffrey; Navis, Gerjan J; Florquin, Sandrine; Leemans, Jaklien C

    2016-11-07

    NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3) is a member of the inflammasome family and is of special interest in renal disease. Experimental studies have shown that Nlrp3 plays a significant role in the induction of renal damage and dysfunction in acute and chronic renal injury. However, the role of NLRP3 in human renal disease is completely unknown. From a retrospective cohort study, we determined in 1271 matching donor and recipient samples if several NLRP3 single nucelotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were associated with primary non-function (PNF), delayed graft function (DGF), biopsy-proven acute rejection (BPAR) and death-censored graft and patient survival. NLRP3 gain-of-function SNP (rs35829419) in donors was associated with an increased risk of BPAR while NLRP3 loss-of-function SNP (rs6672995) in the recipient was associated with a decreased risk of BPAR in the first year following renal transplantation (HR 1.91, 95% CI 1.38-2.64, P < 0.001 and HR 0.73, 95% CI 0.55-0.97, P = 0.03 resp.). NLRP3 SNPs in both donor and recipient were not associated with PNF, DGF, graft survival or patient survival. We conclude that genetic variants in the NLRP3 gene affect the risk of acute rejection following kidney transplantation.

  11. Donor and recipient genetic variants in NLRP3 associate with early acute rejection following kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dessing, Mark C.; Kers, Jesper; Damman, Jeffrey; Navis, Gerjan J.; Florquin, Sandrine; Leemans, Jaklien C.

    2016-01-01

    NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3) is a member of the inflammasome family and is of special interest in renal disease. Experimental studies have shown that Nlrp3 plays a significant role in the induction of renal damage and dysfunction in acute and chronic renal injury. However, the role of NLRP3 in human renal disease is completely unknown. From a retrospective cohort study, we determined in 1271 matching donor and recipient samples if several NLRP3 single nucelotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were associated with primary non-function (PNF), delayed graft function (DGF), biopsy-proven acute rejection (BPAR) and death-censored graft and patient survival. NLRP3 gain-of-function SNP (rs35829419) in donors was associated with an increased risk of BPAR while NLRP3 loss-of-function SNP (rs6672995) in the recipient was associated with a decreased risk of BPAR in the first year following renal transplantation (HR 1.91, 95% CI 1.38–2.64, P < 0.001 and HR 0.73, 95% CI 0.55–0.97, P = 0.03 resp.). NLRP3 SNPs in both donor and recipient were not associated with PNF, DGF, graft survival or patient survival. We conclude that genetic variants in the NLRP3 gene affect the risk of acute rejection following kidney transplantation. PMID:27819323

  12. Transplantation of a horseshoe kidney from a living donor: Case report, long term outcome and donor safety

    PubMed Central

    Justo-Janeiro, Jaime Manuel; Orozco, Eduardo Prado; Reyes, Francisco J.Roberto Enríquez; de la Rosa Paredes, René; de Lara Cisneros, Luis G.Vázquez; Espinosa, Alfonso Lozano; Naylor, Jesús Mier

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The use of a horseshoe kidney in renal transplant remains controversial, when it is found in the evaluation of a living donor, anatomical, surgical and ethical issues are involved. Presentation of Case An uncomplicated horseshoe kidney was detected in a 51-year-old woman who was the only suitable donor for her 30-year-old son. Kidneys were fused in the inferior pole and no vascular or urinary abnormalities were detected during imaging evaluation. The surgical procedure was approved by the hospital transplant committee. A laparotomy was performed by means of a medial upper incision. The isthmus of the kidney was divided using a harmonic scalpel and the left segment was used; it had 2 arteries too distant to create a common one, thus anastomosed separately. The renal vein was side-to-side anastomosed to the right external iliac vein and a Lich-Gregoir ureteral implant was made. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications in the donor who currently remains asymptomatic. Recipient developed a delayed graft function (DGF), and was discharged on the 12th day after surgery. After 24 months of surgery, renal function has remained stable with a serum creatinine of 128 μmol/L (1.45 mg/dL). Discussion There are 7 reports of a horseshoe kidney from living donors in 8 patients without morbidity and a good long term outcome of all recipients. Conclusion If we anticipate a low operative risk and there is a suitable anatomy, we may consider the use of horseshoe kidneys from living donors a viable alternative. PMID:26299249

  13. Transplantation of a horseshoe kidney from a living donor: Case report, long term outcome and donor safety.

    PubMed

    Justo-Janeiro, Jaime Manuel; Orozco, Eduardo Prado; Reyes, Francisco J Roberto Enríquez; de la Rosa Paredes, René; de Lara Cisneros, Luis G Vázquez; Espinosa, Alfonso Lozano; Naylor, Jesús Mier

    2015-01-01

    The use of a horseshoe kidney in renal transplant remains controversial, when it is found in the evaluation of a living donor, anatomical, surgical and ethical issues are involved. An uncomplicated horseshoe kidney was detected in a 51-year-old woman who was the only suitable donor for her 30-year-old son. Kidneys were fused in the inferior pole and no vascular or urinary abnormalities were detected during imaging evaluation. The surgical procedure was approved by the hospital transplant committee. A laparotomy was performed by means of a medial upper incision. The isthmus of the kidney was divided using a harmonic scalpel and the left segment was used; it had 2 arteries too distant to create a common one, thus anastomosed separately. The renal vein was side-to-side anastomosed to the right external iliac vein and a Lich-Gregoir ureteral implant was made. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications in the donor who currently remains asymptomatic. Recipient developed a delayed graft function (DGF), and was discharged on the 12th day after surgery. After 24 months of surgery, renal function has remained stable with a serum creatinine of 128μmol/L (1.45mg/dL). There are 7 reports of a horseshoe kidney from living donors in 8 patients without morbidity and a good long term outcome of all recipients. If we anticipate a low operative risk and there is a suitable anatomy, we may consider the use of horseshoe kidneys from living donors a viable alternative. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Liver transplantation in children using organs from young paediatric donors.

    PubMed

    Herden, Uta; Ganschow, Rainer; Briem-Richter, Andrea; Helmke, Knut; Nashan, Bjoern; Fischer, Lutz

    2011-06-01

    Nowadays, most paediatric liver transplant recipients receive a split or other technical variant graft from adult deceased or live donors, because of a lack of available age- and size matched paediatric donors. Few data are available, especially for liver grafts obtained from very young children (<6 years). We analysed all paediatric liver transplantations between 1989 and 2009. Recipients were divided into five groups (1-5) depending on donor age (<1, ≥1 to <6, ≥6 to <16, ≥16 to <45, ≥45 years). Overall, 413 paediatric liver transplantations from deceased donors were performed; 1- and 5-year graft survival rates were 75%, 80%, 78%, 81%, 74% and 75%, 64%, 70%, 67%, 46%, and 1- and 5-year patient survival rates were 88%, 91%, 90%, 89%, 78% and 88%, 84%, 84%, 83%, 63% for groups 1-5, respectively, without significant difference. Eight children received organs from donors younger than 1 year and 45 children received organs from donors between 1 and 6 years of age. Overall, vascular complications occurred in 13.2% of patients receiving organs from donors younger than 6 years. Analysis of our data revealed that the usage of liver grafts from donors younger than 6 years is a safe procedure. The outcome was comparable with grafts from older donors with excellent graft and patient survival, even for donors younger than 1 year.

  15. Does daily urine output really matter in renal transplantation?

    PubMed

    Tillou, Xavier; Lee-Bion, Adrien; Hurault de Ligny, Bruno; Orczyk, Clément; Le Gal, Sophie; Desmonts, Alexis; Bensadoun, Henri; Doerfler, Arnaud

    2013-12-27

    Our objective was to clarify the clinical outcome of renal transplantation based on residual daily urine output (RDUO). We retrospectively analyzed a prospective database of 276 patients who underwent renal transplantation (Tx) between January 2008 and December 2012. Patients had pre-transplantation daily urine output measurement of 24-h proteinuria and were clinically re-evaluated the day before transplantation. We included patients with no daily urine output and those with residual daily urine output. Real bladder capacity was not measured. We excluded patients with a history of lower urinary tract malformation, those treated by trans-ileal conduit or enterocystoplasty, and those with early graft thrombosis or graft primary non-function. Sex ratio, age at Tx, pre-Tx MHC antibodies levels, donor age, and cold ischemia duration were not significantly different between the 2 groups. Dialysis duration was longer in group I (p<0.001). The dialysis duration was correlated with the volume of residual urine output (r=0.12, p<0.0001). We found 14 (19.4%) urological complications in Group I (11 urinary leaks and 3 urethral stenosis) and 13 (6.4%) in Group II (5 urinary leaks and 8 stenosis). This difference was significant (p=0.0013 and relative risk [RR]=2.2). Absence of residual daily urine output was a risk factor of post-transplantation urinary leak (p<0.0001: RR=2.95). At 3 years, graft survival was 74.7% and 94.6%, respectively, in Group I and II (p=0.003). The absence of residual daily urine output seems to be a major risk factor for urological complications. Taking into account recipient residual daily urine output should modify surgical strategy during renal transplantation.

  16. The significance of a defect on DMSA scan in children with renal transplants.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, C; Beckett, M; Kiratli, P; Gordon, I; Trompeter, R S; Rees, L

    2003-12-01

    Since December 1995, pediatric renal transplant recipients in our unit have received a DMSA scan as soon as possible post-transplant in order to provide a baseline for comparison in the event of subsequent complications. We retrospectively reviewed the case notes and DMSA scans of the 45 patients who underwent a scan within 9 wk of their transplant to see if pre or peri-transplant factors or post-transplant complications were associated with defects on scanning. Forty percentage of scans had defects. The presence of defects was not associated with potential predisposing factors such as patient or donor age, cadaveric or live donation, cold ischemia time, multiple donor vessels, the use of non-heart beating donors, the mean time to scan, the serum creatinine, or the presence of structural renal tract anomalies predisposing to UTI. However, 87% of patients had complications before the scan, including UTI, rejection, acute tubular necrosis, transplant biopsy and drug toxicity. Children with no clinical complications had a significantly reduced risk of a defect (p = 0.035), while biopsy was associated with the presence of defects (p = 0.0034). Twenty patients had one or more follow up DMSA scans: one patient developed a new focal defect. In conclusion, renal transplant defects are frequently found on DMSA scanning even early after transplantation and are non-specifically associated with many different complications.

  17. Open heart surgery after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Mitsuhiro; Miyamoto, Yuji; Mitsuno, Masataka; Tanaka, Hiroe; Ryomoto, Masaaki; Fukui, Shinya; Tsujiya, Noriko; Kajiyama, Tetsuya; Nojima, Michio

    2014-09-01

    to evaluate the strategy for open heart surgery after renal transplantation performed in a single institution in Japan. we reviewed 6 open heart surgeries after renal transplantation in 5 patients, performed between January 1992 and December 2012. The patients were 3 men and 2 women with a mean age of 60 ± 11 years (range 46-68 years). They had old myocardial infarction and unstable angina, aortic and mitral stenosis, left arterial myxoma, aortic stenosis, and native valve endocarditis followed by prosthetic valve endocarditis. Operative procedures included coronary artery bypass grafting, double-valve replacement, resection of left arterial myxoma, 2 aortic valve replacements, and a double-valve replacement. Renal protection consisted of steroid cover (hydrocortisone 100-500 mg or methylprednisolone 1000 mg) and intravenous immunosuppressant infusion (cyclosporine 30-40 mg day(-1) or tacrolimus 1.0 mg day(-1)). 5 cases were uneventful and good renal graft function was maintained at discharge (serum creatinine 2.1 ± 0.5 mg dL(-1)). There was one operative death after emergency double-valve replacement for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-associated prosthetic valve endocarditis. Although the endocarditis improved after valve replacement, the patient died of postoperative pneumonia on postoperative day 45. careful perioperative management can allow successful open heart surgery after renal transplantation. However, severe complications, especially methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection, may cause renal graft loss. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  18. Outcomes of pediatric living donor kidney transplantation: A single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bertólez, Sonia; Barrero, Rafael; Fijo, Julia; Alonso, Verónica; Ojha, Devicka; Fernández-Hurtado, Miguel Ángel; Martínez, Jerónimo; León, Eduardo; García-Merino, Francisco

    2017-05-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for children with ESRD offering advantages of improved survival, growth potential, cognitive development, and quality of life. The aim of our study was to compare the outcomes of LDKT vs DDKT performed in children at a single center. Retrospective chart review of pediatric patients who underwent kidney transplantation from 2005 to 2014 was performed. Ninety-one renal transplants were accomplished, and 31 cases (38.27%) were LDKT, and in 96.7% of the cases, the graft was obtained through laparoscopy. Thirty-four receptors weighted <25 kg. LDKT group had statistically significant lower cold ischemia times than DDKT one. Complication rate was 9.67% for LDKT and 18.33% for DDKT. eGFR was better in LDKT. Patient survival rate was 100% for LDKT and 98.3% for DDKT, and graft survival rate was 96.7% for LDKT and 88.33%-80% for DDKT at a year and 5 years. Our program of pediatric kidney transplantation has achieved optimal patient and graft survival rates with low rate of complications. Living donor pediatric kidney transplants have higher patient and better graft survival rates than deceased donor kidney transplants.

  19. Selecting suitable solid organ transplant donors: Reducing the risk of donor-transmitted infections.

    PubMed

    Jr, Christopher S Kovacs; Koval, Christine E; van Duin, David; de Morais, Amanda Guedes; Gonzalez, Blanca E; Avery, Robin K; Mawhorter, Steven D; Brizendine, Kyle D; Cober, Eric D; Miranda, Cyndee; Shrestha, Rabin K; Teixeira, Lucileia; Mossad, Sherif B

    2014-06-24

    Selection of the appropriate donor is essential to a successful allograft recipient outcome for solid organ transplantation. Multiple infectious diseases have been transmitted from the donor to the recipient via transplantation. Donor-transmitted infections cause increased morbidity and mortality to the recipient. In recent years, a series of high-profile transmissions of infections have occurred in organ recipients prompting increased attention on the process of improving the selection of an appropriate donor that balances the shortage of needed allografts with an approach that mitigates the risk of donor-transmitted infection to the recipient. Important advances focused on improving donor screening diagnostics, using previously excluded high-risk donors, and individualizing the selection of allografts to recipients based on their prior infection history are serving to increase the donor pool and improve outcomes after transplant. This article serves to review the relevant literature surrounding this topic and to provide a suggested approach to the selection of an appropriate solid organ transplant donor.

  20. Selecting suitable solid organ transplant donors: Reducing the risk of donor-transmitted infections

    PubMed Central

    Jr, Christopher S Kovacs; Koval, Christine E; van Duin, David; de Morais, Amanda Guedes; Gonzalez, Blanca E; Avery, Robin K; Mawhorter, Steven D; Brizendine, Kyle D; Cober, Eric D; Miranda, Cyndee; Shrestha, Rabin K; Teixeira, Lucileia; Mossad, Sherif B

    2014-01-01

    Selection of the appropriate donor is essential to a successful allograft recipient outcome for solid organ transplantation. Multiple infectious diseases have been transmitted from the donor to the recipient via transplantation. Donor-transmitted infections cause increased morbidity and mortality to the recipient. In recent years, a series of high-profile transmissions of infections have occurred in organ recipients prompting increased attention on the process of improving the selection of an appropriate donor that balances the shortage of needed allografts with an approach that mitigates the risk of donor-transmitted infection to the recipient. Important advances focused on improving donor screening diagnostics, using previously excluded high-risk donors, and individualizing the selection of allografts to recipients based on their prior infection history are serving to increase the donor pool and improve outcomes after transplant. This article serves to review the relevant literature surrounding this topic and to provide a suggested approach to the selection of an appropriate solid organ transplant donor. PMID:25032095

  1. Determinants of graft survival in pediatric and adolescent live donor kidney transplant recipients: a single center experience.

    PubMed

    El-Husseini, Amr A; Foda, Mohamed A; Shokeir, Ahmed A; Shehab El-Din, Ahmed B; Sobh, Mohamed A; Ghoneim, Mohamed A

    2005-12-01

    To study the independent determinants of graft survival among pediatric and adolescent live donor kidney transplant recipients. Between March 1976 and March 2004, 1600 live donor kidney transplants were carried out in our center. Of them 284 were 20 yr old or younger (mean age 13.1 yr, ranging from 5 to 20 yr). Evaluation of the possible variables that may affect graft survival were carried out using univariate and multivariate analyses. Studied factors included age, gender, relation between donor and recipient, original kidney disease, ABO blood group, pretransplant blood transfusion, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matching, pretransplant dialysis, height standard deviation score (SDS), pretransplant hypertension, cold ischemia time, number of renal arteries, ureteral anastomosis, time to diuresis, time of transplantation, occurrence of acute tubular necrosis (ATN), primary and secondary immunosuppression, total dose of steroids in the first 3 months, development of acute rejection and post-transplant hypertension. Using univariate analysis, the significant predictors for graft survival were HLA matching, type of primary urinary recontinuity, time to diuresis, ATN, acute rejection and post-transplant hypertension. The multivariate analysis restricted the significance to acute rejection and post-transplant hypertension. The independent determinants of graft survival in live-donor pediatric and adolescent renal transplant recipients are acute rejection and post-transplant hypertension.

  2. Perspectives on communication issues among transplant and procurement professionals, transplant recipients, and donor families.

    PubMed

    Politoski, G; Coolican, M; Casey, K

    1996-06-01

    Communication among professionals, donor families, and transplant recipients is a controversial topic. Traditionally, transplant and procurement professionals have made the decision about the type and frequency of information that a donor family and transplant recipient receive regarding one another, and relationships that might develop as a result. Information obtained through questionnaires demonstrated inconsistency in addressing donor family and transplant recipient needs for initial and follow-up information and communication-not only between clinical transplant and procurement donation coordinators, but within organizations involved in the care and support of these people. This wide variance regarding communication among all disciplines demonstrated a need for standardization of practice guidelines. Guidelines are being developed through collaboration of the major organizations involved in the care of donor families and transplant recipients to standardize communication practices throughout the United States.

  3. [Preventive renal transplantation: considerations and future plans].

    PubMed

    Segoloni, G P

    2008-01-01

    A kidney transplant before the start of dialysis or after only a short period of dialysis is acknowledged as the best therapeutic option for the uremic patient. However, the number of patients in Italy waiting for a kidney is stable (around 6,400 at the latest report) and the annual number of transplants is not increasing (a slight decrease is forecast for 2007). Opening the deceased-donor waiting list to patients who are not yet on dialysis remains a matter of debate and has been possible only in Tuscany thanks to the high rate of kidney procurement in this region. As far as the Piedmont region is concerned, the balance between performed transplants and new candidates for transplantation is stable, with a mean waiting time of nearly 2 years. Taking into account also the current decline in donations, the possibility of placing pre-dialytic patients on the waiting list requires further evaluation. Nevertheless, some strategies may be within reach. Above all, the use of kidneys from living donors, which represents the ideal condition for preventive transplantation, should be extended. For patients lacking a suitable living donor, a program of earlier admission to waiting lists should be activated.

  4. Sweet and sour after renal transplantation: a qualitative study about the positive and negative consequences of renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schipper, Karen; Abma, Tineke A; Koops, Carina; Bakker, Ineke; Sanderman, Robbert; Schroevers, Maya J

    2014-09-01

    This qualitative study investigated the renal patients' experience of positive and negative consequences of transplantation, as well as the strategies they use to adapt to the transplantation. A qualitative design (30 participants in total), using individual interviews (18 participants) and two focus groups (12 participants in total), was used. The results showed that patients experienced a wide range of positive and negative emotions, in particular, guilt, gratefulness, and fear, partly as a result of their normative persuasions. Normative persuasions may transform inherent positive emotions into negative emotions and subsequent maladaptive behaviour. Not only physical limitations but also physical improvements were found to be related to the experience of negative emotions. Finally, the results indicated that patients mainly used adaptive coping strategies to adjust to life after transplantation, such as looking for opportunities, setting different priorities, making own choices, trying to maintain control, taking good care of oneself, and appreciating other things in life. This study offers several new insights regarding the range of experiences of renal patients after transplantation. Health professionals are invited to pay more attention to the full range of positive and negative experiences following transplantation, including the existence of normative persuasions. Health professionals may assist renal patients by helping them to recognize and acknowledge both positive and negative emotions and to encourage the use of more beneficial coping strategies. What is already known on this subject? The quality of life (QoL) of renal patients significantly improves after transplantation but the post-transplant QoL is lower compared with the QoL in healthy populations. Patients on dialysis and those who have received a donor kidney tend to use mainly emotion-focused coping strategies. What does this study add? This study offers several new insights regarding

  5. Long-term evaluation of neuromyopathy in live donor FMF amyloidotic kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Sherif, Ali M; Refaie, Ayman F; Sheashaa, Hussein A; El-Tantawy, Abd-Elhalim; Sobh, Mohamed A

    2004-01-01

    Neuromyopathy was reported to be a problem among live donor familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) amyloid kidney transplant recipients. We aimed to address this issue on a long-term basis. 14 FMF amyloid live donor kidney transplant recipients with a mean post-transplant follow-up period of 82.43 +/- 50.1 months in comparison to a control group of 19 non-amyloid renal transplant patients were subjected to thorough neurological examination, laboratory and electrophysiologic studies. Both groups were comparable with regard to mean serum creatinine levels cyclosporine doses (p > 0.05), however trough cyclosporine levels were significantly lower in the amyloidotics than the controls (p = 0.04). Serum creatine phosphokinase was comparable in both groups (p = 0.59). The amyloid patients showed significantly increased polyphasic motor unit potentials and abnormal interference patterns in the biceps brachii muscle (p = 0.03) and the abductor polices brevis muscle (p = 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed a significant level for biceps myopathy in amyloidotics (p = 0.001). Both groups attained no difference with regard to median nerve conduction velocity. Electrophysiologically evidenced neuromyopathy is more liable to occur in long-term live donor FMF amyloidotic kidney transplant recipients than in the other non-amyloidotic kidney transplant recipients even with no clinical manifestations or high creatine phosphokinase levels. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  6. ABO incompatible renal transplant: Transfusion medicine perspective

    PubMed Central

    Makroo, Raj Nath; Nayak, Sweta; Chowdhry, Mohit; Jasuja, Sanjiv; Sagar, Gaurav; Rosamma, N. L.; Thakur, Uday Kumar

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Our study presents an analysis of the trends of ABO antibody titers and the TPE (Therapeutic Plasma Exchange) procedures required pre and post ABO incompatible renal transplant. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty nine patients underwent ABO incompatible renal transplant during the study period. The ABO antibody titers were done using the tube technique and titer reported was the dilution at which 1+ reaction was observed. The baseline titers of anti-A and anti-B antibodies were determined. The titer targeted was ≤8. Patients were subjected to 1 plasma volume exchange with 5% albumin and 2 units of AB group FFP (Fresh Frozen Plasma) in each sitting. TPE procedures post-transplant were decided on the basis of rising antibody titer with/ without graft dysfunction. RESULTS: The average number of TPE procedures required was 4-5 procedures/patient in the pretransplant and 2-3/patient in the post-transplant period. An average titer reduction of 1 serial dilution/procedure was noted for Anti-A and 1.1/procedure for Anti-B. Number of procedures required to reach the target titer was not significantly different for Anti-A and Anti-B (P = 0.98). Outcome of the transplant did not differ significantly by reducing titers to a level less than 8 (P = 0.32). The difference in the Anti-A and Anti-B titers at 14th day post-transplant was found to be clinically significant (P = 0.042). CONCLUSION: With an average of 4-5 TPE procedures pretransplant and 2-3 TPE procedures post transplants, ABO incompatible renal transplantations can be successfully accomplished. PMID:28316440

  7. Kidney transplantation from donors with hepatitis C infection

    PubMed Central

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Corona, Daniela; Sinagra, Nunziata; Giaquinta, Alessia; Zerbo, Domenico; Ekser, Burcin; Giuffrida, Giuseppe; Caglià, Pietro; Gula, Riccardo; Ardita, Vincenzo; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2014-01-01

    The increasing demand for organ donors to supply the increasing number of patients on kidney waiting lists has led to most transplant centers developing protocols that allow safe utilization from donors with special clinical situations which previously were regarded as contraindications. Deceased donors with previous hepatitis C infection may represent a safe resource to expand the donor pool. When allocated to serology-matched recipients, kidney transplantation from donors with hepatitis C may result in an excellent short-term outcome and a significant reduction of time on the waiting list. Special care must be dedicated to the pre-transplant evaluation of potential candidates, particularly with regard to liver functionality and evidence of liver histological damage, such as cirrhosis, that could be a contraindication to transplantation. Pre-transplant antiviral therapy could be useful to reduce the viral load and to improve the long-term results, which may be affected by the progression of liver disease in the recipients. An accurate selection of both donor and recipient is mandatory to achieve a satisfactory long-term outcome. PMID:24659873

  8. Kidney transplantation from donors with hepatitis C infection.

    PubMed

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Corona, Daniela; Sinagra, Nunziata; Giaquinta, Alessia; Zerbo, Domenico; Ekser, Burcin; Giuffrida, Giuseppe; Caglià, Pietro; Gula, Riccardo; Ardita, Vincenzo; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2014-03-21

    The increasing demand for organ donors to supply the increasing number of patients on kidney waiting lists has led to most transplant centers developing protocols that allow safe utilization from donors with special clinical situations which previously were regarded as contraindications. Deceased donors with previous hepatitis C infection may represent a safe resource to expand the donor pool. When allocated to serology-matched recipients, kidney transplantation from donors with hepatitis C may result in an excellent short-term outcome and a significant reduction of time on the waiting list. Special care must be dedicated to the pre-transplant evaluation of potential candidates, particularly with regard to liver functionality and evidence of liver histological damage, such as cirrhosis, that could be a contraindication to transplantation. Pre-transplant antiviral therapy could be useful to reduce the viral load and to improve the long-term results, which may be affected by the progression of liver disease in the recipients. An accurate selection of both donor and recipient is mandatory to achieve a satisfactory long-term outcome.

  9. Second Unrelated Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Primary Graft Failure

    PubMed Central

    Schriber, Jeffrey; Agovi, Manza-A.; Ho, Vincent; Ballen, Karen K.; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Gupta, Vikas; Maziarz, Richard T.; Hale, Gregory A.; Litzow, Mark R.; Logan, Brent; Bornhauser, Martin; Giller, Roger H.; Isola, Luis; Marks, David I.; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Pasquini, Marcelo C.

    2010-01-01

    Failure to engraft donor cells is a devastating complication after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We describe the results of 122 patients reported to the National Marrow Donor Program between 1990 and 2005, who received a second unrelated donor HCT after failing to achieve an absolute neutrophil count of ≥ 500/ μL without recurrent disease. Patients were transplanted for leukemia (n=83), myelodysplastic disorders (n=16), severe aplastic anemia (n=20) and other diseases (n=3). The median age was 29 years. Twenty-four patients received second grafts from a different unrelated donor. Among 98 patients who received a second graft from the same donor, 28 received products that were previously collected and cryopreserved for the first transplantation. One-year overall survival after second transplant was 11% with 10 patients alive at last follow up. We observed no differences between patients who received grafts from the same or different donors, or in those who received fresh or cryopreserved product. The outcomes after a second allogeneic HCT for primary graft failure are dismal. Identifying risk factors for primary graft failure can decrease the incidence of this complication. Further studies are needed to test whether early recognition and hastened procurement of alternative grafts can improve transplant outcomes for primary graft failure. PMID:20172038

  10. Predicting patient survival after deceased donor kidney transplantation using flexible parametric modelling.

    PubMed

    Li, Bernadette; Cairns, John A; Robb, Matthew L; Johnson, Rachel J; Watson, Christopher J E; Forsythe, John L; Oniscu, Gabriel C; Ravanan, Rommel; Dudley, Christopher; Roderick, Paul; Metcalfe, Wendy; Tomson, Charles R; Bradley, J Andrew

    2016-05-25

    The influence of donor and recipient factors on outcomes following kidney transplantation is commonly analysed using Cox regression models, but this approach is not useful for predicting long-term survival beyond observed data. We demonstrate the application of a flexible parametric approach to fit a model that can be extrapolated for the purpose of predicting mean patient survival. The primary motivation for this analysis is to develop a predictive model to estimate post-transplant survival based on individual patient characteristics to inform the design of alternative approaches to allocating deceased donor kidneys to those on the transplant waiting list in the United Kingdom. We analysed data from over 12,000 recipients of deceased donor kidney or combined kidney and pancreas transplants between 2003 and 2012. We fitted a flexible parametric model incorporating restricted cubic splines to characterise the baseline hazard function and explored a range of covariates including recipient, donor and transplant-related factors. Multivariable analysis showed the risk of death increased with recipient and donor age, diabetic nephropathy as the recipient's primary renal diagnosis and donor hypertension. The risk of death was lower in female recipients, patients with polycystic kidney disease and recipients of pre-emptive transplants. The final model was used to extrapolate survival curves in order to calculate mean survival times for patients with specific characteristics. The use of flexible parametric modelling techniques allowed us to address some of the limitations of both the Cox regression approach and of standard parametric models when the goal is to predict long-term survival.

  11. Transplant tourism and donor-derived parasitic infections.

    PubMed

    Kotton, C N

    2011-01-01

    Transplant tourism, travel with the intent of receiving or donating a transplanted organ, has grown immensely in the past decade but is not without risks. Solid organ donors are potential carriers of infection and rates of infection are high in transplant recipients. Returning transplant recipients should be screened for blood-borne pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV), as well as bacteremia, urinary tract infections, and other endemic pathogens (malaria, tuberculosis, Chagas disease, and so on). Efforts should be made to optimize posttransplantation prophylaxis against infection. Although donor-derived parasitic infections are rare, rates of morbidity and mortality are high. Increases in world travel and migration will likely contribute to increases in donor-derived parasitic infection. Appropriate epidemiological screening and diagnostic testing, including blood smears, serology, and stool assays, may help reduce the risk of such transmission.

  12. Hypophosphatemia in cats after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Paster, Erin R; Mehl, Margo L; Kass, Philip H; Gregory, Clare R

    2009-12-01

    To report the prevalence of hypophosphatemia after renal transplantation in a historical cohort of cats. Case series. Cats (n=86) that received a renal allograft. Medical records (January 200-June 2006) were reviewed. Signalment, clinical signs, pre- and postoperative diet, pre- and postoperative clinicopathologic variables, renal histopathology, and outcome were retrieved. Prevalence, onset, duration, treatment and associated clinical signs of hypophosphatemia were recorded. A chi(2) test was used to compare hemolysis frequency between cats with normal serum phosphorus concentration or a single spurious low serum phosphorus concentration for <24 hours duration (group 1) and confirmed hypophosphatemia for >24 hours (group 2). A Cox proportional hazards model was used to evaluate the effects of hypophosphatemia on survival while controlling for other potentially confounding variables (age, sex, weight, body condition score, and pre- and 24 hours postoperative clinicopathologic variables). Eighty-six cats (mean age, 7.7 years) were identified. Hypophosphatemia occurred in 32 cats (37%), with a median onset of 2 days and median duration of 4 days. Treatment was initiated in 48 (56%) of hypophosphatemic cats. Survival and hemolysis frequency was not significantly different between groups, and no risk factors were identified. Hypophosphatemia occurs in cats after renal transplantation and does not affect survival. The clinical importance of hypophosphatemia in renal transplant recipients remains unknown.

  13. Growth and endocrine function after renal transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Rees, L; Greene, S A; Adlard, P; Jones, J; Haycock, G B; Rigden, S P; Preece, M; Chantler, C

    1988-01-01

    Longitudinal height data and physical development were assessed in 45 boys and 34 girls after renal transplantation. All children received alternate day steroids and either azathioprine or cyclosporin A for immunosuppression. There was a significant increase in growth velocity after transplantation in prepubertal children. Growth velocity declined at the expected age of the normal pubertal growth spurt, however, with delay in the appearance of secondary sexual characteristics. Overnight hormone profiles in 17 adolescent subjects with short stature or maturational delay, or both, showed blunting of growth hormone and gonadotrophin pulsatility. It is likely that long term steroid treatment after renal transplantation induces the clinical and endocrine picture of delayed puberty. Failure of growth to accelerate at this time is a cause of short stature, which may have an effect on adult height. PMID:3060022

  14. Correction of base deficits in deceased organ donors: effects on immediate renal allograft function.

    PubMed

    Shen, G K; Recicar, J F; Hovsepian, R V; Salisbury, J A; Niles, P A

    2004-11-01

    Fluid status in the brain-dead donor is often difficult to assess. We hypothesized that using base deficit as a measure of tissue perfusion will facilitate fluid management in these donors, thereby improving renal allograft function. Consecutive donors over a 12-month period were prospectively studied. In Group I, resuscitation was based on maintaining normal blood pressure and urine output. In Group II, additional parameters of resuscitation included the correction of base deficit. Immediate renal allograft function was examined in the 48 recipients. Delayed graft function occurred in 48% of Group I, and in 19% of Group II recipients. Creatinine clearance on day 7, calculated by the Cockroft-Gault formula, was 29 +/- 6 mL/min in Group I versus 41 +/- 8 mL/min in Group II. We conclude that correcting base deficit is an extremely useful approach to expedite organ recovery and potentially improve function of transplanted kidneys.

  15. Donor-Derived Myeloid Sarcoma in Two Kidney Transplant Recipients from a Single Donor

    PubMed Central

    Palanisamy, Amudha; Persad, Paul; Koty, Patrick P.; Douglas, Laurie L.; Stratta, Robert J.; Rogers, Jeffrey; Reeves-Daniel, Amber M.; Orlando, Giuseppe; Farney, Alan C.; Beaty, Michael W.; Pettenati, Mark J.; Iskandar, Samy S.; Grier, David D.; Kaczmorski, Scott A.; Doares, William H.; Gautreaux, Michael D.; Freedman, Barry I.; Powell, Bayard L.

    2015-01-01

    We report the rare occurrence of donor-derived myeloid sarcoma in two kidney transplant patients who received organs from a single deceased donor. There was no evidence of preexisting hematologic malignancy in the donor at the time of organ recovery. Both recipients developed leukemic involvement that appeared to be limited to the transplanted organ. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and molecular genotyping analyses confirmed that the malignant cells were of donor origin in each patient. Allograft nephrectomy and immediate withdrawal of immunosuppression were performed in both cases; systemic chemotherapy was subsequently administered to one patient. Both recipients were in remission at least one year following the diagnosis of donor-derived myeloid sarcoma. These cases suggest that restoration of the immune system after withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy and allograft nephrectomy may be sufficient to control HLA-mismatched donor-derived myeloid sarcoma without systemic involvement. PMID:25977825

  16. Donor-derived myeloid sarcoma in two kidney transplant recipients from a single donor.

    PubMed

    Palanisamy, Amudha; Persad, Paul; Koty, Patrick P; Douglas, Laurie L; Stratta, Robert J; Rogers, Jeffrey; Reeves-Daniel, Amber M; Orlando, Giuseppe; Farney, Alan C; Beaty, Michael W; Pettenati, Mark J; Iskandar, Samy S; Grier, David D; Kaczmorski, Scott A; Doares, William H; Gautreaux, Michael D; Freedman, Barry I; Powell, Bayard L

    2015-01-01

    We report the rare occurrence of donor-derived myeloid sarcoma in two kidney transplant patients who received organs from a single deceased donor. There was no evidence of preexisting hematologic malignancy in the donor at the time of organ recovery. Both recipients developed leukemic involvement that appeared to be limited to the transplanted organ. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and molecular genotyping analyses confirmed that the malignant cells were of donor origin in each patient. Allograft nephrectomy and immediate withdrawal of immunosuppression were performed in both cases; systemic chemotherapy was subsequently administered to one patient. Both recipients were in remission at least one year following the diagnosis of donor-derived myeloid sarcoma. These cases suggest that restoration of the immune system after withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy and allograft nephrectomy may be sufficient to control HLA-mismatched donor-derived myeloid sarcoma without systemic involvement.

  17. Evaluation of renal vascular anatomy in live renal donors: Role of multi detector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Vaidehi Kumudchandra; Patel, Alpeshkumar Shakerlal; Sutariya, Harsh Chandrakant; Gandhi, Shruti Pradipkumar

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of renal vascular variations is important in renal donors to avoid vascular complications during surgery. Venous variations, mainly resulting from the errors of the embryological development, are frequently observed. This retrospective cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the renal vascular variants with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography to provide valuable information for surgery and its correlations with surgical findings. A total of 200 patients underwent MDCT angiography as a routine work up for live renal donors. The number, course, and drainage patterns of the renal veins were retrospectively observed from the scans. Anomalies of renal veins and inferior vena cava (IVC) were recorded and classified. Multiplanar reformations (MPRs), maximum intensity projections, and volume rendering were used for analysis. The results obtained were correlated surgically. In the present study, out of 200 healthy donors, the standard pattern of drainage of renal veins was observed in only 67% of donors on the right side and 92% of donors on the left side. Supernumerary renal veins in the form of dual and triple renal veins were seen on the right side in about 32.5% of donors (dual right renal veins in 30.5% cases and triple right renal veins in 2.5% cases). Variations on the left side were classified into four groups: supernumerary, retro-aortic, circumaortic, and plexiform left renal veins in 1%, 2.5%, 4%, 0.5%, cases respectively. Developmental variations in renal veins can be easily detected on computed tomography scan, which can go unnoticed and can pose a fatal threat during major surgeries such as donor nephrectomies in otherwise healthy donors if undiagnosed.

  18. Outcome predictors in African-American deceased-donor renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kristian L; El-Amm, Jose M; Doshi, Mona D; Singh, Atul; Cincotta, Elizabeth; Morawski, Katherina; Losanoff, Julian E; West, Miguel S; Gruber, Scott A

    2009-01-01

    The relative importance of donor and recipient risk factors in predicting outcomes in African-American (AA) renal allograft recipients receiving contemporary immunosuppression, including early steroid withdrawal, has not been previously examined. We assessed the impact of 21 risk factors on five primary outcomes in 132 deceased-donor AA renal allograft recipients transplanted from July 2001 to August 2006 with follow-up 6-67 (mean 35 +/- 17) months by univariate and multivariate analysis. Thymoglobulin or basiliximab was given for induction, and mycophenolate mofetil with either tacrolimus or sirolimus (SRL) +/- prednisone for maintenance. Non-compliance accounted for 26% of graft loss (GL) and 19% of acute rejection (AR) episodes, and was more prevalent in patients who were HCV+ and those on prednisone. Delayed graft function remained a significant predictor of GL, but not via increased AR, and donor ethnicity emerged as an important predictor of patient death. De novo use of SRL resulted in increased AR, and only increased recipient age significantly predicted new-onset diabetes mellitus. Our preliminary results suggest the need for improvements in patient education, pre-transplant psychosocial assessment, and late post-transplant psychosocial support and can be utilized to help guide donor/recipient selection and tailor immunosuppressive management to optimize outcomes in this challenging group of patients.

  19. Pulmonary artery patch for an inadequate donor atrial cuff in the absence of donor pericardium in lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Seiichiro; Yamane, Masaomi; Miyoshi, Kentaroh; Kurosaki, Takeshi; Otani, Shinji; Miyoshi, Shinichiro; Oto, Takahiro

    2017-03-01

    In cadaveric lung transplantation (LTx), a donor lung with an inadequate donor left atrial cuff is considered a "surgically marginal donor lung". The donor pericardium is commonly applied to reconstruct the inadequate donor left atrial cuff; however, in some cases, the donor pericardium is inadvertently removed during the lung procurement. We devised an alternative technique for reconstruction to overcome the absence of pericardium in a donor lung with an inadequate atrial cuff, using a patch of the donor pulmonary artery (PA) in single lung transplantation. In a recent case of lung transplantation in which the donor pericardium had been removed, we harvested a segment of the right PA distal to the main PA of the donor and used a PA patch to repair the inadequate donor left atrial cuff. No vascular complications were encountered in the recipient, who remains in good health after the transplantation.

  20. Angiomyolipoma of donor kidney: Successful transplantation and 5-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, N.; Dhanapriya, J.; Sakthirajan, R.; Dineshkumar, T.; Balasubramaniyan, T.; Haris, Md.

    2016-01-01

    Angiomyolipomas (AML) of the kidney are non-encapsulated benign neoplasms with the incidence of 45-80% in patients with tuberous sclerosis and 1-3% in sporadic cases. There are very few case reports in the literature in which kidneys with AML have been used for transplantation. We report here a 27-year-old female patient who received a live related renal transplant from her mother with isolated angiomyolipoma in donor kidney and on follow-up after 5 years, has stable graft function and tumor size. PMID:27051138

  1. [Lung transplantation with uncontrolled non-heart-beating donors. Transplantation. Donor prognostic factor and immediate evolution post transplant].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Diego A; Del Río, Francisco; Fuentes, Manuel E; Naranjo, Sara; Moradiellos, Javier; Gómez, David; Rubio, Juan José; Calvo, Elpidio; Varela, Andrés

    2011-08-01

    Uncontrolled donation after cardiac death (DACD) has become an alternative to lung transplantation with encephalic-death donation. The main objective of this study is to describe the incidence of clinically relevant events in the period of thirty days after lung transplant with uncontrolled DACD and the influence of factors depending on the donor and donation process as well. Historical cohort study of 33 lung transplant receivers at Hospital Puerta de Hierro and Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla with 32 DACD from Hospital Clínico San Carlos from 2002 to 2008. We studied surgical and medical complications, primary graft dysfunction, acute rejection, pneumonia and mortality. We made an evaluation of the donor characteristics and donation procedure times (minutes). Median age of recipients was 50.5 years (interquartile range, 38.5-58). There were 28 males and 5 females. Cumulative incidence of events in the first month was: pneumonia 10 (31.3%); primary graft dysfunction 15 (46.9%); rejection 12 (37.5%); mortality 4 (12.1%); medical complications 25 (78.1%); and surgical complications 18 (56.3%). Median time of cardiac arrest was higher in those who presented pneumonia (15 vs. 7.5; p = 0.027). Median time of cold ischemia was higher in those who presented surgical complications and mortality (436 vs. 343.5; p = 0.04; 505 vs. 410; p = 0.033, respectively), and median of total ischemia times were longer in the recipients who died (828 vs. 695; p = 0.036). Uncontrolled DACD are a valid alternative for expanding the donor pool in order to mitigate the current shortage of lungs that are valid for transplantation. The incidence of complications is comparable with published data in the literature. Copyright © 2010 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of donor age and parent-to-child transplant on living-related donor kidney transplantation: a single center's experience of 236 cases.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jiang; Wang, Changxi; Liang, Xianwei; Chen, Guodong; Huang, Gang; Fu, Qian; Chen, Lizhong

    2015-07-01

    To study the impact of parent-to-child transplant and older donor age on recipients' post-transplant creatinine levels, a total of 236 patients who received living donor kidney transplantation were evaluated for kidney viability based on creatinine (Cr) level. Of the 236 pairings, 113 (48%) were parent-to-child followed by sibling transplants (66, 30%). Recipient Cr levels were significantly higher at 6 months and 3 years post-transplant in the parent-to-child transplants compared to other donor-recipient relationships. In addition, donor age (average age: 44.1 ± 11.5; range: 19-66) contributed to higher recipient post-transplant Cr levels (p < 0.01). Pre-transplant donor and recipient Cr levels tended to result in higher post-transplant Cr levels in recipients (p < 0.05). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the presence of both parent-to-child transplant and older donor significantly increased the risk of elevated post-transplant Cr levels in recipients with an estimated odds ratios ranging from 3.46 (95% CI: 1.71-6.98) at 6 months to 8.04 (3.14-20.56) at 3 years post-transplant. Donor age significantly affected transplant survival as measured by higher recipient post-transplant Cr levels. In addition, parent-to-child transplant pairings, along with older donor age, significantly increased the risk of elevated post-transplant Cr levels in recipients.

  3. Acute pancreatitis, acute hepatitis and acute renal failure favourably resolved in two renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Voiculescu, Mihai; Ionescu, Camelia; Ismail, Gener; Mandache, Eugen; Hortopan, Monica; Constantinescu, Ileana; Iliescu, Olguta

    2003-03-01

    Renal transplantation is often associated with severe complications. Except for acute rejection, infections and toxicity of immunosuppressive treatment are the most frequent problems observed after transplantation. Infections with hepatic viruses (HBV, HDV, HCV, HGV) and cytomegalic virus (CMV) are the main infectious complications after renal transplantation. Cyclosporine toxicity is not unusual for a patient with renal transplantation and is even more frequent for patients with hepatic impairment due to viral infections. The subjects of this report are two renal transplant recipients with acute pancreatitis, severe hepatitis and acute renal failure on graft, receiving immunosuppressive therapy for maintaining renal graft function

  4. Epstein-Barr virus and renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Le, Jade; Durand, Christine M; Agha, Irfan; Brennan, Daniel C

    2017-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a gamma herpesvirus associated with diseases ranging from asymptomatic viremia to post-transplant malignancies in kidney transplant recipients. EBV specifically is associated with post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), in kidney transplant recipients, with increased risk in EBV seronegative patients with EBV seropositive donors on intensified immunosuppression. The diagnosis of PTLD relies on clinical suspicion plus tissue biopsy with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing of blood currently used for risk determination in high-risk recipients. Therapeutic strategies for PTLD include reduction of immunosuppression, chemotherapy and rituximab, and consideration of sirolimus-based immunosuppression. Antivirals such as ganciclovir are used to prevent reactivation of cytomegalovirus and other herpes viruses but are not onco-therapeutic. Radiation therapy or surgery is indicated for bulky, disseminated or recalcitrant disease. Prognosis varies depending on the type of malignancy identified and stage of disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Living unrelated donor kidney transplantation--a fourteen-year experience.

    PubMed

    Ignjatović, Ljiljana; Jovanović, Dragan; Kronja, Goran; Dujić, Aleksandar; Marić, Mihailo; Ignjatović, Dragan; Hrvacević, Rajko; Kovacević, Zoran; Petrović, Milija; Elaković, Dejan; Marenović, Tomislav; Lukić, Zoran; Trkuljić, Miroljub; Stanković, Bratislav; Maksić, Doko; Butorajac, Josip; Colić, Miodrag; Drasković-Pavlović, Biljana; Kapulica-Kuljić, Nada; Drasković, Nada; Misović, Sidor; Stijelja, Borislav; Milović, Novak; Tosevski, Perica; Filipović, Nikola; Romić, Predrag; Jevtić, Miodrag; Drasković, Miroljub; Vavić, Neven; Rabrenović, Violeta; Paunić, Zoran; Radojević, Milorad; Bjelanović, Zoran; Tomić, Aleksandar; Aleksić, Predrag; Kosević, Branko; Mocović, Dejan; Bancević, Vladimir; Magić, Zvonko; Vojvodić, Danilo; Balint, Bela; Ostojić, Gordana; Tukić, Ljiljana; Murgić, Jadranka; Pervulov, Svetozar; Rusović, Sinisa; Sjenicić, Goran; Vesna, Bućan; Milavić-Vujković, Merica; Jandrić, Dusan; Raicević, Ranko; Mijusković, Mirjana; Obrencević, Katarina; Pilcević, Dejan; Cukić, Zoran; Petrović, Marijana; Petrović, Milica; Tadić, Jelena; Terzić, Brankica; Karan, Zeljko; Bokonjić, Dubravko; Dobrić, Silva; Antunović, Mirjana; Bokun, Radmila; Dimitrijević, Jovan; Vukomanović-Djurdjević, Biserka

    2010-12-01

    In countries without a national organization for retrieval and distribution of organs of the deceased donors, problem of organ shortage is still not resolved. In order to increase the number of kidney transplantations we started with the program of living unrelated - spousal donors. The aim of this study was to compare treatment outcome and renal graft function in patients receiving the graft from spousal and those receiving ghe graft from living related donors. We retrospectively identified 14 patients who received renal allograft from spousal donors between 1996 and 2009 (group I). The control group consisted of 14 patients who got graft from related donor retrieved from the database and matched than with respect to sex, age, kidney disease, immunological and viral pretransplant status, the initial method of the end stage renal disease treatment and ABO compatibility. In the follow-up period of 41 +/- 38 months we recorded immunosuppressive therapy, surgical complications, episodes of acute rejection, CMV infection and graft function, assessed by serum creatinine levels at the beginning and in the end of the follow-up period. All patients had pretransplant negative cross-match. In ABO incompatible patients pretransplant isoagglutinine titer was zero. The patients with a spousal donor had worse HLA matching. There were no significant differences between the groups in surgical, infective, immunological complications and graft function. Two patients from the group I returned to hemodialysis after 82 and 22 months due to serious comorbidities. In spite of the worse HLA matching, graft survival and function of renal grafts from spousal donors were as good as those retrieved from related donors.

  6. Outcome of 200 Pediatric Living Donor Liver Transplantation in India.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Neelam; Karkra, Sakshi; Rastogi, Amit; Dhaliwal, Maninder S; Raghunathan, Veena; Goyal, Deepak; Goja, Sanjay; Bhangui, Prashant; Vohra, Vijay; Piplani, Tarun; Sharma, Vivek; Gautam, Dheeraj; Baijal, S S; Soin, A S

    2017-08-24

    To describe our experience of pediatric living donor liver transplantation from India over a period of 12 year. A retrospective analysis of 200 living donor liver transplantation in children (18 years or younger) was done for demographic features, indications, donor and graft profile and outcome. Between September 2004 and July 2016, 200 liver transplants were performed on 197 children. Fifty transplants were done in initial 6 years and 150 in next 6 years. All donors (51% mothers) were discharged with a mean stay of 7 days. The leading indications of liver transplants were cholestatic liver disease (46%) followed by metabolic liver disease (33%) and acute liver failure /acute on chronic liver failure (28.5%). Biliary leakage (8.5%), biliary stricture (9%), hepatic artery thrombosis (4.5%) and portal vein thrombosis (4%) were the most common surgical complications; all could be managed by surgical or interventional radiological measures, except in one child who died. Sepsis, acute rejection and CMV hepatitis in first 6 months were seen in 14.5%, 25% and 17% cases, respectively. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease was seen in only 1.5%. Re-transplant rate was 1.5%. The overall 1 year survival rate was 94% and 5 year actuarial survival was 87% with no statistically significant difference between children weight < 10 kg vs. > 10 kg. Outcome in acute liver failure did not differ significantly between those with acute on chronic liver failure vs. those with chronic liver disease. Advances in medical and surgical techniques associated with multidisciplinary teams including skilled pediatric liver transplant surgeons, anesthetists, dedicated pediatric hepatologists, pediatric intensivists, interventional radiologists and pathologists resulted in an excellent outcome of living related liver transplants in children. Low age and weight of the baby does not seem to be a contraindication for liver transplantation as outcome were comparable in our experience.

  7. Outcome analysis of donor gender in heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Al-Khaldi, Abdulaziz; Oyer, Phillip E; Robbins, Robert C

    2006-04-01

    Several studies have shown a detrimental effect of female donor gender on the survival of solid-organ transplant recipients, including heart, kidney and liver. We evaluated our own experience in heart transplantation in the cyclosporine era, since 1980, to determine the effect of donor gender on survival. We retrospectively reviewed 869 consecutive patients who underwent primary heart transplantation at Stanford University Medical Center between December 1980 and March 2004. Actuarial life-table data were calculated for survival and freedom from rejection and compared between groups. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis was used to identify predictors of reduced long-term survival. One-year mortality in male recipients who received a female donor heart (24%) was higher than in male recipients who received male donor heart (13%) (p = 0.009). Actuarial survival rates for male recipients at 1, 5 and 10 years were 86%, 69% and 50% (with male donor), and 76%, 59% and 45% (with female donor) (p = 0.01), respectively. Donor gender had no effect on long-term survival in male recipients < 45 years of age and female recipients. Female donor gender was identified as an independent risk factor for death by multivariate analysis, with an odds ratio of 2.3 (95% confidence interval 1.5 to 3.4, p < 0.001). In heart transplantation the detrimental effect of female donor gender on recipient survival is significant but limited to male recipients > 45 years of age. These findings should be considered in the process of donor-recipient matching.

  8. Renal transplantation in the Roma ethnicity-do all patients have equal chance for transplantation?

    PubMed

    Basic-Jukic, N; Novosel, D; Juric, I; Kes, P

    2013-11-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities exist in access to kidney transplantation worldwide. The Roma people are often socially deprived, uneducated, and unemployed. We investigated all dialysis centers in Croatia to determine number of Roma people on dialysis as well as their access and reasons for eventual failure to enter the waiting list. There are 9463 registered Roma people in Croatia, however, the estimated number reaches 40,000. Twenty-five Roma patients required renal replacement therapy, giving a prevalence of 830 per million people (pmp), compared with 959 pmp among the general population. Average age at the start of dialysis was 29 vs 67 years; waiting time to kidney transplantation was 48.9 vs 53.5 months; mean age at the time of transplantation was 33.18 vs 48.01 years in Roma versus the general population respectively. One patient received a kidney allograft from a living unrelated spousal donor, and all others from deceased individuals. Patients were followed for 51.5 months (range, 6-240). The most frequent post-transplant complications were urinary tract infections. One patient lost a graft due to severe acute rejection caused by noncompliance. Two young patients were also noncompliant with immunosuppressive medications. One patient died with a functioning graft at 20 years after transplantation due to cardiovascular disease. Among 14 Roma patients currently been treated with hemodialysis in Croatia, 10 are old with clinical contraindications for transplantation; 1 is on the waiting list; 1 left hospitalization for pretransplant evaluation twice; 1 refused evaluation; and 1 is currently being evaluated for the waiting list. The Roma people have excellent access to renal transplantation in Croatia. Many of them refuse evaluation. More efforts should be invested in their education to improve compliance and their post-transplant outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Non-Heart-Beating Donor Heart Transplantation: Breaking the Taboo

    PubMed Central

    Fatullayev, Javid; Samak, Mostafa; Sabashnikov, Anton; Weymann, Alexander; Mohite, Prashant N.; García-Sáez, Diana; Patil, Nikhil P.; Dohmen, Pascal M.; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Simon, André R.; Zeriouh, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Roughly 60% of hearts offered for transplantation are rejected because of organ dysfunction. Moreover, hearts from circulatory-dead patients have long been thought to be non-amenable for transplantation, unlike other organs. However, tentative surgical attempts inspired by the knowledge obtained from preclinical research to recover those hearts have been performed, finally culminating in clinically successful transplants. In this review we sought to address the major concerns in non-heart-beating donor heart transplantation and highlight recently introduced developments to overcome them. PMID:26174972

  10. Basiliximab induced non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema in two pediatric renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Niamh; Waldron, Mary; O'Connell, Marie; Eustace, Nick; Carson, Kevin; Awan, Atif

    2009-11-01

    We report two cases of non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema as a complication of basiliximab induction therapy in young pediatric renal transplant patients identified following a retrospective review of all pediatric renal transplant cases performed in the National Paediatric Transplant Centre, Childrens University Hospital, Temple Street, Dublin, Ireland. Twenty-eight renal transplantations, of which five were living-related (LRD) and 23 were from deceased donors (DD), were performed in 28 children between 2003 and 2006. In six cases, transplantations were pre-emptive. Immunosuppression was induced pre-operatively using a combination of basiliximab, tacrolimus and methylprednisolone in all patients. Basiliximab induction was initiated 2 h prior to surgery in all cases and, in 26 patients, basiliximab was re-administered on post-operative day 4. Two patients, one LRD and one DD, aged 6 and 11 years, respectively, developed acute non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema within 36 h of surgery. Renal dysplasia was identified as the primary etiological factor for renal failure in both cases. Both children required assisted ventilation for between 4 and 6 days. While both grafts had primary function, the DD transplant patient subsequently developed acute tubular necrosis and was eventually lost within 3 weeks due to thrombotic microangiopathy and severe acute antibody-mediated rejection despite adequate immunosuppression. Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema is a potentially devastating post-operative complication of basiliximab induction therapy in young pediatric patients following renal transplantation. Early recognition and appropriate supportive therapy is vital for patient and, where possible, graft survival.

  11. Replicative senescence in kidney aging, renal disease, and renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Naesens, Maarten

    2011-01-01

    Cellular or replicative senescence is classically seen as the key element of aging. In renal disease and after kidney transplantation, there is increasing evidence that replicative senescence pathways (p53 and p16) play a central role in disease progression and graft outcome, independent of chronological age. In this review, we summarize the current concepts in the molecular mechanisms of cellular senescence, and correlate these theories with the available literature on aging of native kidneys, kidney diseases, and outcome of renal allografts. Recent data illustrate the complex biology of senescence in vivo, and disprove the concept that senescence is an intrinsic injury process with immanent deleterious consequences. Senescence acts as a homeostatic mechanism that can even limit renal fibrosis, at least in animal studies. In a human setting, it remains to be investigated whether cellular senescence plays an active or a bystander role in fibrogenesis and atrophy of renal tissue.

  12. The challenge of doing what is right in renal transplantation: balancing equity and utility.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Aisling E; Maxwell, Alexander P

    2009-01-01

    Arguably the greatest challenge faced by the transplant community is the disparity between the number of persons waiting for a solid organ transplant and the finite supply of donor organs. For renal transplantation the gap between supply and demand has risen annually reflecting the increasing prevalence of end-stage renal disease versus the relatively static deceased donor organ pool. Maximising the benefit from this scarce resource raises difficult ethical issues. For most patients on dialysis therapy a successful transplant offers improved quality and quantity of life, but the absolute gain in survival provided by a donated organ varies greatly depending on recipient factors such as age and co-morbid illnesses. The philosophies of equity (a fair opportunity for everyone in need to receive a transplant) and utility (optimal profit from each organ) are often competing. National allocation schemes and local policies regarding assessment of potential recipients and acceptance of organs are designed to balance these ethical principles in a standardized and socially acceptable manner. The ongoing debate surrounding these issues and modifications to such policies reflect the evolving clinical picture of renal transplantation and the challenge in maintaining equipoise between renal transplant utility and equity.

  13. Anemia in pediatric renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Kausman, Joshua Yehuda; Powell, Harley Robert; Jones, Colin Lindsay

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of anemia in stable pediatric renal transplant recipients and to examine the association of anemia with renal function, immunosuppressants, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, and growth, as well as iron, vitamin B(12), and folate stores. This is a cross-sectional study of the 50 renal transplant recipients currently followed at our center. Patient data were collected regarding hematological parameters, growth, medications, renal function, underlying renal disease, delayed graft function, episodes of rejection, and iron or erythropoietin therapy post transplantation. The mean hemoglobin level (Hb) was 110 g/l and the overall prevalence of anemia was 60%, including 30% who were severely anemic (Hb<100 g/l). There was a high rate of iron deficiency (34%) and serum iron was the parameter of iron metabolism most closely associated with anemia. Hb in patients with low serum iron was 90.7 g/l versus 114.4 g/l in those with normal serum iron ( P<0.01). Both univariate and multiple linear regression determined tacrolimus dose and creatinine clearance to be significant factors associated with anemia. Tacrolimus dose correlated with a 10 g/l reduction in Hb for every increase of tacrolimus dose of 0.054 mg/kg per day ( P=0.001). The dose of mycophenolate was positively correlated with Hb, but this was likely to be confounded by our practice of dose reduction in the setting of anemia. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor use was not associated with anemia. Severely anemic patients tended to be shorter, with a mean Z-score for height of -1.8 compared with -0.9 for those with normal Hb ( P=0.02). Anemia is a significant and common problem in pediatric renal transplant patients. Deteriorating renal function is an important cause, but other factors like iron deficiency and immunosuppression are involved. Definition of iron deficiency is difficult and serum iron may be a valuable indicator. Medication doses

  14. Alternative donor transplants for severe aplastic anemia: current experience.

    PubMed

    Bacigalupo, Andrea; Sica, Simona

    2016-04-01

    Patients with acquired severe aplastic anemia (SAA), who lack a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) identical sibling donor (SIB), have two therapeutic options: immunosuppressive therapy with anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) and cyclosporine (CsA), or a transplant from an alternative donor. In these patients, the current guidelines of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) call for a course of ATG + CsA first and transplantation in case of no response. The alternative donor source can be an unrelated donor (UD), a cord blood (CB) unit, or a family mismatched member, in most instances genetically HLA haplo-mismatched (HAPLO). In the present review, we will discuss recent results of transplants from matched UD and SIB donors, with significantly improved outcome, especially with UD in the past decade. We will also be looking at CB transplants, and the problems of limited stem cell dose. Finally HAPLO grafts have been explored in patients lacking or having rejected an unrelated or CB graft: early results seem encouraging, though the procedure should still be considered experimental.

  15. ABO-incompatible renal transplantation in developing world - crossing the immunological (and mental) barrier.

    PubMed

    Jha, P K; Bansal, S B; Sethi, S K; Jain, M; Sharma, R; Nandwani, A; Phanish, M K; Duggal, R; Tiwari, A K; Ghosh, P; Ahlawat, R; Kher, V

    2016-01-01

    ABO incompatibility has been considered as an important immunological barrier for renal transplantation. With the advent of effective preconditioning protocols, it is now possible to do renal transplants across ABO barrier. We hereby present a single center retrospective analysis of all consecutive ABOi renal transplants performed from November 2011 to August 2014. Preconditioning protocol consisted of rituximab, plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and maintenance immunosuppression consisted of tacrolimus, mycophenolate sodium, and prednisolone. The outcome of these ABOi transplants was compared with all other consecutive ABO-compatible (ABOc) renal transplants performed during same time. Twenty ABOi renal transplants were performed during the study period. Anti-blood group antibody titer varied from 1:2 to 1:512. Patient and graft survival was comparable between ABOi and ABOc groups. Biopsy proven acute rejection rate was 15% in ABOi group, which was similar to ABOc group (16.29%). There were no antibody-mediated rejections in ABOi group. The infection rate was also comparable. We conclude that the short-term outcome of ABOi and ABOc transplants is comparable. ABOi transplants should be promoted in developing countries to expand the donor pool.

  16. ABO-incompatible renal transplantation in developing world – crossing the immunological (and mental) barrier

    PubMed Central

    Jha, P. K.; Bansal, S. B.; Sethi, S. K.; Jain, M.; Sharma, R.; Nandwani, A.; Phanish, M. K.; Duggal, R.; Tiwari, A. K.; Ghosh, P.; Ahlawat, R.; Kher, V.

    2016-01-01

    ABO incompatibility has been considered as an important immunological barrier for renal transplantation. With the advent of effective preconditioning protocols, it is now possible to do renal transplants across ABO barrier. We hereby present a single center retrospective analysis of all consecutive ABOi renal transplants performed from November 2011 to August 2014. Preconditioning protocol consisted of rituximab, plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and maintenance immunosuppression consisted of tacrolimus, mycophenolate sodium, and prednisolone. The outcome of these ABOi transplants was compared with all other consecutive ABO-compatible (ABOc) renal transplants performed during same time. Twenty ABOi renal transplants were performed during the study period. Anti-blood group antibody titer varied from 1:2 to 1:512. Patient and graft survival was comparable between ABOi and ABOc groups. Biopsy proven acute rejection rate was 15% in ABOi group, which was similar to ABOc group (16.29%). There were no antibody-mediated rejections in ABOi group. The infection rate was also comparable. We conclude that the short-term outcome of ABOi and ABOc transplants is comparable. ABOi transplants should be promoted in developing countries to expand the donor pool. PMID:27051135

  17. Evaluation of psychiatric issues in renal transplant setting

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, R.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic illnesses can cause wide range of personality and behavioral disorders and require appropriate evaluation. Poor patient compliance with prescribed medications and other aspects of management can affect the outcome towards undesirable situation. The setting of renal transplantation presents a broad spectrum of problems and consequences. People involved (patients, their families or treating physicians) have lifelong commitment with evaluation and implementation of measures towards resolving the issues. Psychiatric evaluation is part of this scenario, which starts with evaluation of organ recipient along with donor and family as whole, right from time of diagnosis of end organ failure to transplant and then lifelong. This review highlights common issues faced at different stages of this lengthy pathway. PMID:26664203

  18. Hemostatic Parameters according to Renal Function and Time after Transplantation in Brazilian Renal Transplanted Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Ana Paula Lucas; Alpoim, Patrícia Nessralla; de Figueiredo, Roberta Carvalho; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Braga Gomes, Karina; Dusse, Luci Maria SantAna

    2015-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the key for patients with end-stage renal disease, improving quality of life and longer survival. However, kidney transplant triggers an intense inflammatory response and alters the hemostatic system, but the pathophysiological mechanisms of these changes are not completely understood. The aim of this cross-sectional cohort study was to investigate hemostatic biomarkers in Brazilian renal transplanted patients according to renal function and time after transplantation. A total of 159 renal transplanted patients were enrolled and D-Dimer (D-Di), Thrombomodulin (TM), von Willebrand Factor (VWF), and ADAMTS13 plasma levels were assessed by ELISA. An increase of D-Di was observed in patients with higher levels of creatinine. ADAMTS13 levels were associated with creatinine plasma levels and D-Di levels with Glomerular Filtration Rate. These results suggested that D-Di and ADAMTS13 can be promising markers to estimate renal function. ADAMTS13 should be investigated throughout the posttransplant time to clarify the participation of this enzyme in glomerular filtration and acceptance or rejection of the graft in Brazilian transplanted patients. PMID:26229221

  19. Use of small donors (<28 kg) for pancreas transplantation.

    PubMed

    Illanes, H G; Quarin, C M; Maurette, R; Sánchez, N G; Reniero, L; Casadei, D H

    2009-01-01

    Small donors have long been considered a potential source of organs for simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK) and pancreas transplantation alone (PTA). Our aim was to analyze our experience with SPK and PTA using small donors weighing <28 kg. Between September 2006 and October 2008, we performed 68 SPK, 3 PTA, and 3 pancreas after kidney transplantations (PAK). All recipients were adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus, including 8 who received small donor organs (<28 kg): 6 SPK and 2 PTA. We used 3 graft combinations for SPK: pancreas and single kidney; pancreas and en bloc kidneys; and en bloc dual kidney-pancreas. In contrast, we used conventional grafts for PTA. Mean weight among donors was 20.82 kg (range, 9.6-27 kg). We observed neither delayed graft function nor mortality. At a follow-up of approximately 281 days, all patients were free of insulin and dialysis treatments. Kidneys and pancreas from donors weighing <28 kg can be used in adult type 1 diabetic patients with excellent results. These small pediatric donors enabled us to enlarge the number of transplantations by 10.81%.

  20. Your Path to Transplant: a randomized controlled trial of a tailored computer education intervention to increase living donor kidney transplant.

    PubMed

    Waterman, Amy D; Robbins, Mark L; Paiva, Andrea L; Peipert, John D; Kynard-Amerson, Crystal S; Goalby, Christina J; Davis, LaShara A; Thein, Jessica L; Schenk, Emily A; Baldwin, Kari A; Skelton, Stacy L; Amoyal, Nicole R; Brick, Leslie A

    2014-10-14

    Because of the deceased donor organ shortage, more kidney patients are considering whether to receive kidneys from family and friends, a process called living donor kidney transplantation (LDKT). Although Blacks and Hispanics are 3.4 and 1.5 times more likely, respectively, to develop end stage renal disease (ESRD) than Whites, they are less likely to receive LDKTs. To address this disparity, a new randomized controlled trial (RCT) will assess whether Black, Hispanic, and White transplant patients' knowledge, readiness to pursue LDKT, and receipt of LDKTs can be increased when they participate in the Your Path to Transplant (YPT) computer-tailored intervention. Nine hundred Black, Hispanic, and White ESRD patients presenting for transplant evaluation at University of California, Los Angeles Kidney and Pancreas Transplant Program (UCLA-KPTP) will be randomly assigned to one of two education conditions, YPT or Usual Care Control Education (UC). As they undergo transplant evaluation, patients in the YPT condition will receive individually-tailored telephonic coaching sessions, feedback reports, video and print transplant education resources, and assistance with reducing any known socioeconomic barriers to LDKT. Patients receiving UC will only receive transplant education provided by UCLA-KPTP. Changes in transplant knowledge, readiness, pros and cons, and self-efficacy to pursue LDKT will be assessed prior to presenting at the transplant center (baseline), during transplant evaluation, and 4- and 8-months post-baseline, while completion of transplant evaluation and receipt of LDKTs will be assessed at 18-months post-baseline. The RCT will determine, compared to UC, whether Black, Hispanic, and White patients receiving YPT increase in their readiness to pursue LDKT and transplant knowledge, and become more likely to complete transplant medical evaluation and pursue LDKT. It will also examine how known patient, family, and healthcare system barriers to LDKT act alone

  1. Renal Allograft Outcome After Simultaneous Heart and Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Grupper, Avishay; Grupper, Ayelet; Daly, Richard C; Pereira, Naveen L; Hathcock, Matthew A; Kremers, Walter K; Cosio, Fernando G; Edwards, Brooks S; Kushwaha, Sudhir S

    2017-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease frequently accompanies end-stage heart failure and may result in consideration of simultaneous heart and kidney transplantation (SHKT). In recent years, there has been a significant increase in SHKT. This single-center cohort consisted of 35 patients who underwent SHKT during 1996 to 2015. The aim of this study was to review factors that may predict better long-term outcome after SKHT. Thirteen patients (37%) had delayed graft function (DGF) after transplant (defined as the need for dialysis during the first 7 days after transplant), which was significantly associated with mechanical circulatory support device therapy and high right ventricular systolic pressure before transplant. Most of the recipients had glomerular filtration rate (GFR) ≥50 ml/min/1.73 m(2) at 1 and 3 years after transplant (21 of 26 [81%] and 20 of 21 [95%], respectively). Higher donor age was associated with reduced 1-year GFR (p = 0.017), and higher recipient pretransplant body mass index was associated with reduced 3-year GFR (p = 0.008). There was a significant association between DGF and reduced median GFR at 1 and 3 years after transplant (p <0.005). Patient survival rates at 6 months, 1, and 3 years after transplant were 97%, 91%, and 86% respectively. In conclusions, our data support good outcomes after SHKT. Mechanical circulatory support device therapy and pulmonary hypertension before transplant are associated with DGF, which is a risk factor for poor long-term renal allograft function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Living Donor Kidney Transplantation: Improving Education Outside of Transplant Centers about Live Donor Transplantation—Recommendations from a Consensus Conference

    PubMed Central

    Morgievich, Marie; Cohen, David J.; Butt, Zeeshan; Chakkera, Harini A.; Lindower, Carrie; Hays, Rebecca E.; Hiller, Janet M.; Lentine, Krista L.; Matas, Arthur J.; Poggio, Emilio D.; Rees, Michael A.; Rodrigue, James R.; LaPointe Rudow, Dianne

    2015-01-01

    Living donor kidney transplantation (LDKT) offers better quality of life and clinical outcomes, including patient survival, compared with remaining on dialysis or receiving a deceased donor kidney transplant. Although LDKT education within transplant centers for both potential recipients and living donors is very important, outreach and education to kidney patients in settings other than transplant centers and to the general public is also critical to increase access to this highly beneficial treatment. In June 2014, the American Society of Transplantation’s Live Donor Community of Practice, with the support of 10 additional sponsors, convened a consensus conference to determine best practices in LDKT, including a workgroup focused on developing a set of recommendations for optimizing outreach and LDKT education outside of transplant centers. Members of this workgroup performed a structured literature review, conducted teleconference meetings, and met in person at the 2-day conference. Their efforts resulted in consensus around the following recommendations. First, preemptive transplantation should be promoted through increased LDKT education by primary care physicians and community nephrologists. Second, dialysis providers should be trained to educate their own patients about LDKT and deceased donor kidney transplantation. Third, partnerships between community organizations, organ procurement organizations, religious organizations, and transplant centers should be fostered to support transplantation. Fourth, use of technology should be improved or expanded to better educate kidney patients and their support networks. Fifth, LDKT education and outreach should be improved for kidney patients in rural areas. Finally, a consensus-driven, evidence-based public message about LDKT should be developed. Discussion of the effect and potential for implementation around each recommendation is featured, particularly regarding reducing racial and socioeconomic disparities in

  3. Recommendations for use of marginal donors in heart transplantation: Brazilian Association of Organs Transplantation guideline.

    PubMed

    Fiorelli, A I; Stolf, N A G; Pego-Fernandes, P M; Oliveira Junior, J L; Santos, R H B; Contreras, C A M; Filho, D D L; Dinkhuysen, J J; Moreira, M C V; Mejia, J A C; Castro, M C R

    2011-01-01

    The high prevalence of heart failure has increased the candidate list for heart transplantation; however, there is a shortage of viable donated organs, which is responsible for the high mortality of patients awaiting a transplantation. Because the marginal donor presents additional risk factors, it is not considered to be an ideal donor. The use of a marginal donor is only justified in situations when the risk of patient death due to heart disease is greater than that offered by the donor. These recommendations sought to expand the supply of donors, consequently increasing the transplant rate. We selected articles based on robust evidence to provide a substratum to develop recommendations for donors who exceed the traditional acceptance criteria. Recipient survival in the immediate postoperative period is intimately linked to allograft quality. Primary allograft failure is responsible for 38% to 40% of immediate deaths after heart transplantation: therefore; marginal donor selection must be more rigorous to not increase the surgical risk. The main donor risk factors with the respective evidence levels are: cancer in the donor (B), female donor (B), donor death due to hemorrhagic stroke (B), donor age above 50 years (relative risk [RR] = 1.5) (B), weight mismatch between donor and recipient < 0.8 (RR = 1.3) (B), ischemia > 240 minutes (RR = 1.2) (B), left ventricular dysfunction with ejection fraction below 45% (B), and use of high doses of vasoactive drugs (dopamine > 15 mg/kg·min) (B). Factors that impact recipient mortality are: age over 50 years (RR = 1.5); allograft harvest at a distance; adult recipient weighing more than 20% of the donor; high doses of vasoactive drugs (dopamine greater than 15 mg/kg·min) and ischemic time >4 hours. The use of a marginal donor is only justified when it is able to increase life expectancy compared with clinical treatment, albeit the outcomes are interior to those using an ideal donor.

  4. Alternative donors extend transplantation for patients with lymphoma who lack an HLA matched donor.

    PubMed

    Bachanova, V; Burns, L J; Wang, T; Carreras, J; Gale, R P; Wiernik, P H; Ballen, K K; Wirk, B; Munker, R; Rizzieri, D A; Chen, Y-B; Gibson, J; Akpek, G; Costa, L J; Kamble, R T; Aljurf, M D; Hsu, J W; Cairo, M S; Schouten, H C; Bacher, U; Savani, B N; Wingard, J R; Lazarus, H M; Laport, G G; Montoto, S; Maloney, D G; Smith, S M; Brunstein, C; Saber, W

    2015-02-01

    Alternative donor transplantation is increasingly used for high-risk lymphoma patients. We analyzed 1593 transplant recipients (2000-2010) and compared transplant outcomes in recipients of 8/8 allele HLA-A, -B, -C and DRB1 matched unrelated donors (MUDs; n=1176), 7/8 allele HLA mismatched unrelated donors (MMUDs; n=275) and umbilical cord blood donors (1 or 2 units UCB; n=142). Adjusted 3-year non-relapse mortality of MMUD (44%) was higher as compared with MUD (35%; P=0.004), but similar to UCB recipients (37%; P=0.19), although UCB had lower rates of neutrophil and platelet recovery compared with unrelated donor groups. With a median follow-up of 55 months, 3-year adjusted cumulative incidence of relapse was lower after MMUD compared with MUD (25% vs 33%, P=0.003) but similar between UCB and MUD (30% vs 33%; P=0.48). In multivariate analysis, UCB recipients had lower risks of acute and chronic GVHD compared with adult donor groups (UCB vs MUD: hazard ratio (HR)=0.68, P=0.05; HR=0.35; P<0.001). Adjusted 3-year OS was comparable (43% MUD, 37% MMUD and 41% UCB). These data highlight the observation that patients with lymphoma have acceptable survival after alternative donor transplantation. MMUD and UCB can extend the curative potential of allotransplant to patients who lack suitable HLA matched sibling or MUD.

  5. ALTERNATIVE DONORS EXTEND TRANSPLANTATION FOR PATIENTS WITH LYMPHOMA WHO LACK AN HLA MATCHED DONOR

    PubMed Central

    Bachanova, Veronika; Burns, Linda J.; Wang, Tao; Carreras, Jeanette; Gale, Robert Peter; Wiernik, Peter H.; Ballen, Karen K.; Wirk, Baldeep; Munker, Reinhold; Rizzieri, David A.; Chen, Yi-Bin; Gibson, John; Akpek, Görgün; Costa, Luciano J.; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Aljurf, Mahmoud D.; Hsu, Jack W.; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Schouten, Harry C.; Bacher, Ulrike; Savani, Bipin N.; Wingard, John R.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Laport, Ginna G.; Montoto, Silvia; Maloney, David G.; Smith, Sonali M.; Brunstein, Claudio; Saber, Wael

    2015-01-01

    Alternative donor transplantation is increasingly used for high risk lymphoma patients. We analyzed 1593 transplant recipients (2000 to 2010) and compared transplant outcomes in recipients of 8/8 allele human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, -B, -C, and DRB1 matched unrelated donors (MUD; n=1176), 7/8 allele HLA-matched unrelated donors (MMUD; n=275) and umbilical cord blood donors (1 or 2 units UCB; n=142). Adjusted 3-year non-relapse mortality of MMUD (44%) was higher as compared to MUD (35%; p=0.004), but similar to UCB recipients (37%; p=0.19), although UCB had lower rates of neutrophil and platelet recovery compared to unrelated donor groups. With a median follow-up of 55 months, 3-year adjusted cumulative incidence of relapse was lower after MMUD compared with MUD (25% vs 33%, p=0.003) but similar between UCB and MUD (30% vs 33%; p=0.48). In multivariate analysis UCB recipients had lower risks of acute and chronic graft versus host disease compared with adult donor groups (UCB vs MUD: HR=0.68, p=0.05; HR=0.35; p<0.001). Adjusted 3-year overall survival was comparable (43% MUD, 37% MMUD and 41% UCB). Data highlight that patients with lymphoma have acceptable survival after alternative donor transplantation. MMUD and UCB can expand the curative potential of allotransplant to patients who lack suitable HLA-matched sibling or MUD. PMID:25402415

  6. Do the outcomes of living donor renal allograft recipients differ with peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis as a bridge renal replacement therapy?

    PubMed

    Prasad, Narayan; Vardhan, Harsh; Baburaj, Vinod P; Bhadauria, Dharmendra; Gupta, Amit; Sharma, Raj K; Kaul, Anupama

    2014-11-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the outcomes of living donor renal transplant recipients using peritoneal dialysis (PD) and hemodialysis (HD) as a bridge modality for renal replacement therapy till renal transplantation. The demographic profiles of the recipients and donors, the patients' native kidney disease (diabetic versus non-diabetic), duration on dialysis, requirement of anti-hypertensive drugs, number of blood transfusions, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatch status, pre- and post-transplant infectious complications, and post-transplant outcomes of patients were compared between the two groups. The demographic features of the study patients were similar in the two groups. The duration of dialysis prior to transplant was significantly longer in the PD group than in the HD group of patients. The anti-hypertensive drug requirement was lower and the hemoglobin level and residual urine volume at the time of transplant were relatively better in the PD patients compared to the HD patients. The number of acute rejection episodes, delayed graft function, surgical complications, glomerular filtration rate at one month and at the last follow-up, were also similar in both groups. The short-term and long-term graft survival was similar in both groups of patients. The one-, two-, five-, and eight-year death-censored graft survival rates of the PD patients were 98, 95, 85, and 73%, respectively, and in the HD group of patients, they were 100, 93, 84, and 79%, respectively. The one-, two-, five-, and eight-year patient survival rates in the PD group were 97, 92, 77, and 66%, respectively, and in the HD group, they were 97, 92, 79, and 69%, respectively. Our study suggests that the outcomes of the living donor renal allograft recipients did not differ between the groups of patients who used PD or HD as renal replacement therapy prior to renal transplantation.

  7. Renal cancer in kidney transplanted patients.

    PubMed

    Frascà, Giovanni M; Sandrini, Silvio; Cosmai, Laura; Porta, Camillo; Asch, William; Santoni, Matteo; Salviani, Chiara; D'Errico, Antonia; Malvi, Deborah; Balestra, Emilio; Gallieni, Maurizio

    2015-12-01

    Renal cancer occurs more frequently in renal transplanted patients than in the general population, affecting native kidneys in 90% of cases and the graft in 10 %. In addition to general risk factors, malignancy susceptibility may be influenced by immunosuppressive therapy, the use of calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) as compared with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, and the length of dialysis treatment. Acquired cystic kidney disease may increase the risk for renal cancer after transplantation, while autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease does not seem to predispose to cancer development. Annual ultrasound evaluation seems appropriate in patients with congenital or acquired cystic disease or even a single cyst in native kidneys, and every 2 years in patients older than 60 years if they were on dialysis for more than 5 years before transplantation. Immunosuppression should be lowered in patients who develop renal cancer, by reduction or withdrawal of CNI. Although more evidence is still needed, it seems reasonable to shift patients from CNI to everolimus or sirolimus if not already treated with one of these drugs, with due caution in subjects with chronic allograft nephropathy.

  8. Deficiency of C4 from donor or recipient mouse fails to prevent renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Zhou, Wuding; Farrar, Conrad A; Hargreaves, Roseanna E G; Sheerin, Neil S; Sacks, Steven H

    2006-04-01

    Complement effector products generated in the transplanted kidney are known to mediate transplant rejection, but which of the three main activation pathways of complement trigger this response is unclear. Here we assessed the role of the classical and lectin pathways by studying the common component C4 in mouse kidney transplant rejection. We transplanted wild-type or C4-null H-2(b) donor kidneys into H-2(k) or H-2(d) recipients, or vice-versa, to assess the roles of donor kidney and recipient expression of complement. Intragraft C4 gene expression rose substantially during rejection. However, we found no significant association between graft acceptance and the presence of C4 in either the donor kidney or recipient mouse. At the time of rejection, we found no significant differences in alloantibody response in the different groups. Tubular deposition of C3 to C9 occurred regardless of the absence or presence of C4 in either the donor or recipient mouse, indicating that C4 was dispensable for complement activation at this site. These data suggest that complement activation and renal allograft rejection are independent of the classical and lectin pathways in these models, implying that in the absence of these pathways the alternative pathway is the main trigger for complement-mediated rejection.

  9. Alternative donor allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for hemoglobinopathies.

    PubMed

    Alfraih, Feras; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Fitzhugh, Courtney D; Kassim, Adetola A

    2016-04-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) offers a curative therapy for patients with hemoglobinopathies, mainly severe sickle cell disease (SCD) and thalassemia (TM). However, the applicability of HSCT has been limited mainly by donor availability, with a less than 25%-30% of eligible patients having human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling donors. Previous outcomes using alternate donor options have been markedly inferior due to increased regimen-related toxicity, transplant-related mortality, graft failure, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Advances in transplant technology, including high-resolution HLA typing, improved GVHD prophylactic approaches with tolerance induction, and better supportive care over the last decade, are addressing these historical challenges, resulting in increasing donor options. Herein, we review alternate donor HSCT approaches for severe SCD and TM using unrelated donors, umbilical cord blood units, or related haploidentical donors. Though this is an emerging field, early results are promising and in selected patients, this may be the preferred option to mitigate against the age-related morbidity and early mortality associated with these disorders.

  10. Living donor liver transplantation using grafts with hepatic cysts.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Seisuke; Nosaka, Shunsuke; Shigeta, Takanobu; Uchida, Hajime; Hamano, Ikumi; Karaki, Chiaki; Kanazawa, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Akinari; Nakazawa, Atsuko; Kasahara, Mureo

    2012-12-01

    Cystic lesions in the liver are often found through the evaluation of liver donors. Multiple cysts are worrisome, and donor candidates with multiple cysts may be unacceptable as liver donors, especially when their recipients have fibrocystic disease (FCD), which is an inherited disorder. This study reviewed 183 cases of living donor liver transplantation. We collected clinical and radiological data associated with donors with cystic lesions and with donors without cystic lesions, and we evaluated the outcomes of these donors and their recipients. As part of the preoperative radiological assessment of grafts, magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) was performed to evaluate the biliary anatomy of donor candidates with multiple cysts. Thirty-four donors (18.6%) had 1 or more cystic lesions in the liver, and 6 of these donors had multiple cysts (ie, >10). Donors with multiple cysts were older and heavier, and there was a significant relationship between these donors and recipients whose original disease was FCD. During the follow-up (median = 3.1 years), all donors with cystic lesions were found to be doing well without any major postoperative complications. Fifteen recipients who received grafts with cystic lesions (12 left-sided lobes and 3 right-sided lobes) had no complications related to the cystic lesions. In conclusion, donors with cystic lesions may be acceptable as liver donors, although our data are limited mostly to left-sided lobe donation with a short follow-up period. MRC should be preoperatively performed to rule out any biliary anomalies, especially in donor candidates whose recipients have FCD.

  11. Renal transplantation--the Starzl influence.

    PubMed

    Salvatierra, O

    1988-02-01

    In summary, I have attempted to review with you some of Dr Starzl's numerous clinical and scientific contributions that have cut across the spectrum of the field of renal transplantation. It is thus not surprising that Dr Starzl was elected the first President of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons, singular recognition from his own peers for the many contributions and leadership that he has provided during the formative and developmental years of organ transplantation. In addition, Dr Starzl has been recognized with a number of other prestigious awards, among which was the David M. Hume Memorial Award, the highest honor bestowed by the National Kidney Foundation. Careful analysis of Dr Starzl's work therefore clearly indicates that many of his contributions since 1960 have been uniquely innovative, have provided many firsts, and have reflected the science and technology of transplantation as it is today, in 1987. Thus, it can be truly said that Dr Starzl, the surgeon-scientist, was not only a pioneer but also a leader and subsequently a giant in the field of clinical renal transplantation. He has left a lasting and indelible impact on the field, the Starzl influence, for which all of us, both patient and physician, are extremely grateful. Thank you very much, Dr Starzl.

  12. Nosocomial Legionnaires' disease following renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wilczek, H; Kallings, I; Nyström, B; Hoffner, S

    1987-06-01

    A cluster of five cases of Legionnaires' disease in renal transplant patients is described. They were treated with erythromycin and rifampicin, and all five survived. Two of them had rejected their grafts prior to their Legionella pneumonia; two rejected their transplants after reduction of immunosuppressive therapy to combat the infection. L pneumophila was present in the water distribution system of the hospital. Eradication measures included flushing the water pipes to the transplantation ward with hot and hyperchlorinated water, raising the warm water temperature to 60 degrees C, and installing ultraviolet (UV) irradiation units on the warm and cold water pipes to the ward. These measures were successful in that no new cases of legionellosis occurred after wards. L pneumophila could subsequently not be demonstrated by culture in plastic shower hoses supplied with UV-irradiated water. L pneumophila could be demonstrated by direct fluorescent antibody technique, but nonspecific reactions cannot be excluded. A higher prevalence of elevated L pneumophila antibody titers was observed in patients nursed for more than four weeks in the hospital than in patients with a shorter hospital stay, in hospital staff members, or in the general population. It seems that, with appropriate control measures, transplantation activities need not be discontinued in the presence of a minor cluster of Legionnaires' disease in renal transplant patients.

  13. Overview of Pregnancy in Renal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Prasoon

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation offers best hope to women with end-stage renal disease who wish to become pregnant. Pregnancy in a kidney transplant recipient continues to remain challenging due to side effects of immunosuppressive medication, risk of deterioration of allograft function, risk of adverse maternal complications of preeclampsia and hypertension, and risk of adverse fetal outcomes of premature birth, low birth weight, and small for gestational age infants. The factors associated with poor pregnancy outcomes include presence of hypertension, serum creatinine greater than 1.4 mg/dL, and proteinuria. The recommended maintenance immunosuppression in pregnant women is calcineurin inhibitors (tacrolimus/cyclosporine), azathioprine, and low dose prednisone; and it is considered safe. Sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil should be stopped 6 weeks prior to conception. The optimal time to conception continues to remain an area of contention. It is important that counseling for childbearing should start as early as prior to getting a kidney transplant and should be done at every clinic visit after transplant. Breast-feeding is not contraindicated and should not be discouraged. This review will help the physicians in medical optimization and counseling of renal transplant recipients of childbearing age. PMID:28042483

  14. Do we need a different organ allocation system for kidney transplants using donors after circulatory death?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is no national policy for allocation of kidneys from Donation after circulatory death (DCD) donors in the UK. Allocation is geographical and based on individual/regional centre policies. We have evaluated the short term outcomes of paired kidneys from DCD donors subject to this allocation policy. Methods Retrospective analysis of paired renal transplants from DCD’s from 2002 to 2010 in London. Cold ischemia time (CIT), recipient risk factors, delayed graft function (DGF), 3 and 12 month creatinine) were compared. Results Complete data was available on 129 paired kidneys.115 pairs were transplanted in the same centre and 14 pairs transplanted in different centres. There was a significant increase in CIT in kidneys transplanted second when both kidneys were accepted by the same centre (15.5 ± 4.1 vs 20.5 ± 5.8 hrs p < 0.0001 and at different centres (15.8 ± 5.3 vs. 25.2 ± 5.5 hrs p = 0.0008). DGF rates were increased in the second implant following sequential transplantation (p = 0.05). Conclusions Paired study sequential transplantation of kidneys from DCD donors results in a significant increase in CIT for the second kidney, with an increased risk of DGF. Sequential transplantation from a DCD donor should be avoided either by the availability of resources to undertake simultaneous procedures or the allocation of kidneys to 2 separate centres. PMID:24885114

  15. Child-to-Adult Liver Transplantation With Donation After Cardiac Death Donors: Three Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liangshuo; Liu, Xuemin; Zhang, Xiaogang; Yu, Liang; Sha, Huanchen; Zhou, Ying; Tian, Min; Shi, Jianhua; Wang, Wanli; Liu, Chang; Guo, Kun; Lv, Yi; Wang, Bo

    2016-02-01

    Development of organ transplantation is restricted by the discrepancy between the lack of donors and increasing number of patients. The outcome of pediatric donors transplanted into adult recipients especially with donation after circulatory death (DCD) pattern has not been well studied. The aim of this paper is to describe our experience of 3 successful DCD donor child-to-adult liver transplantations lately. Three DCD donors were separately 7, 5, and 8 years old. The ratio between donor graft weight and recipient body weight was 1.42%, 1.00%, and 1.33%, respectively. Ratio between the volume of donor liver and the expected liver volume was 0.65, 0.46, and 0.60. Splenectomy was undertaken for the second recipient according to the portal vein pressure (PVP) which was observed during the operation. Two out of 3 of the recipients suffered with acute kidney injury and got recovered after renal replacement therapy. The first recipient also went through early allograft dysfunction and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The hospital course of the third recipient was uneventful. After 1 year of follow-up visit, the first and second recipients maintain good quality of life and liver function. The third patient was followed up for 5 months until now and recovered well. DCD child-to-adult liver transplantation should only be used for comparatively matched donor and recipient. PVP should be monitored during the operation. The short-term efficacy is good, but long-term follow-up and clinical study with large sample evaluation are still needed.

  16. Psychosocial data of potential living donors before living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Walter, Marc; Bronner, Ekkehard; Steinmüller, Thomas; Klapp, Burghard F; Danzer, Gerhard

    2002-02-01

    In view of the scarcity of organ resources for transplantation, donation by living donors is assuming greater significance now that the technical-surgical problems involved have been solved. In the period between December 1999 and December 2000, 47 potential living liver donors were evaluated and a total of 27 hepatic lobes were transplanted at the Virchow-Klinikum of the Charité Hospital in Berlin. The close personal relationships between recipients and donors gives reason to anticipate high levels of psychosocial pressure during the pre-operative evaluation process; this process consists in part in looking into donor motivation, ambivalence and anxiety. The pre-operative psychometric evaluation of 40 potential living donors indicated that most of the potential donors see themselves as 'super-healthy' and tend to adapt to social expectations, while on the other hand those seven potential living donors not accepted for psychosocial reasons were marked by heightened values for anxious depression and pessimism. The results indicate in most cases a great willingness to donate and on the other hand a high level of obvious psychological pressure for a low number of potential donors. For the latter, both the clinical evaluation interview and the psychometric diagnostics used revealed clear-cut feelings of anxiety and ambivalence towards transplantation.

  17. Persistent severe polyuria after renal transplant

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Timothy; Laing, Chris; Ekong, Rosemary; Povey, Sue; Unwin, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Polydipsia and polyuria are common symptoms in patients with diabetes insipidus (DI), which can be due to inadequate vasopressin production (cranial DI) or vasopressin insensitivity (nephrogenic DI). Clinical diagnosis of the subtypes of DI can be tricky. We present a 44-year-old man with a strong family history of DI who had been diagnosed with autosomal dominant nephrogenic DI from infancy. At the age of 40, he had progressed to end-stage renal failure. When he experienced unresolving severe polyuria after renal transplant, further investigations revealed that he was misdiagnosed and that he had a novel mutation causing autosomal dominant cranial DI. PMID:26985366

  18. Radiation therapy for renal transplant rejection reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Peeples, W.J.; Wombolt, D.G.; El-Mahdi, A.M.; Turalba, C.I.

    1982-01-01

    Forty-four renal transplant patients were given radiation therapy for severe rejection phenomena. The 29 patients who had only one course of irradiation had a 52.3% successful function rate. Fifteen patients received from two to four courses of irradiation with an ultimate 60% rate of sustained function. Fifty patients who received only steroid and other medical management but no irradiation had a 60% rate of successful renal function. In the irradiation group, no patient whose creatinine level did not respond to radiation therapy maintained a functioning kidney. The data indicate that the overall successful function rate is maintained by radiation therapy in patients who show severe allograft rejection phenomena.

  19. Geographic Determinants of Access to Pediatric Deceased Donor Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hojun; Potluri, Vishnu; Abt, Peter L.; Shults, Justine; Amaral, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Children receive priority in the allocation of deceased donor kidneys for transplantation in the United States, but because allocation begins locally, geographic differences in population and organ supply may enable variation in pediatric access to transplantation. We assembled a cohort of 3764 individual listings for pediatric kidney transplantation in 2005–2010. For each donor service area, we assigned a category of short (<180 days), medium (181–270 days), or long (>270 days) median waiting time and calculated the ratio of pediatric-quality kidneys to pediatric candidates and the percentage of these kidneys locally diverted to adults. We used multivariable Cox regression analyses to examine the association between donor service area characteristics and time to deceased donor kidney transplantation. The Kaplan–Meier estimate of median waiting time to transplantation was 284 days (95% confidence interval, 263 to 300 days) and varied from 14 to 1313 days across donor service areas. Overall, 29% of pediatric-quality kidneys were locally diverted to adults. Compared with areas with short waiting times, areas with long waiting times had a lower ratio of pediatric-quality kidneys to candidates (3.1 versus 5.9; P<0.001) and more diversions to adults (31% versus 27%; P<0.001). In multivariable regression, a lower kidney to candidate ratio remained associated with longer waiting time (hazard ratio, 0.56 for areas with <2:1 versus reference areas with ≥5:1 kidneys/candidates; P<0.01). Large geographic variation in waiting time for pediatric deceased donor kidney transplantation exists and is highly associated with local supply and demand factors. Future organ allocation policy should address this geographic inequity. PMID:24436470

  20. Effect of TREM-1 blockade and single nucleotide variants in experimental renal injury and kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tammaro, A.; Kers, J.; Emal, D.; Stroo, I.; Teske, G. J. D.; Butter, L. M.; Claessen, N.; Damman, J.; Derive, M.; Navis, G.; Florquin, S.; Leemans, J. C.; Dessing, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Renal ischemia reperfusion (IR)-injury induces activation of innate immune response which sustains renal injury and contributes to the development of delayed graft function (DGF). Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) is a pro-inflammatory evolutionary conserved pattern recognition receptor expressed on a variety of innate immune cells. TREM-1 expression increases following acute and chronic renal injury. However, the function of TREM-1 in renal IR is still unclear. Here, we investigated expression and function of TREM-1 in a murine model of renal IR using different TREM-1 inhibitors: LP17, LR12 and TREM-1 fusion protein. In a human study, we analyzed the association of non-synonymous single nucleotide variants in the TREM1 gene in a cohort comprising 1263 matching donors and recipients with post-transplant outcomes, including DGF. Our findings demonstrated that, following murine IR, renal TREM-1 expression increased due to the influx of Trem1 mRNA expressing cells detected by in situ hybridization. However, TREM-1 interventions by means of LP17, LR12 and TREM-1 fusion protein did not ameliorate IR-induced injury. In the human renal transplant cohort, donor and recipient TREM1 gene variant p.Thr25Ser was not associated with DGF, nor with biopsy-proven rejection or death-censored graft failure. We conclude that TREM-1 does not play a major role during experimental renal IR and after kidney transplantation. PMID:27928159

  1. Donor-derived organ transplant transmission of coccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Dierberg, K.L.; Marr, K.A.; Subramanian, A.; Nace, H.; Desai, N.; Locke, J.E.; Zhang, S.; Diaz, J.; Chamberlain, C.; Neofytos, D.

    2015-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis in solid organ transplant recipients most often occurs as a result of primary infection or reactivation of latent infection. Herein, we report a series of cases of transplant-related transmission of coccidioidomycosis from a single donor from a non-endemic region whose organs were transplanted to 5 different recipients. In all, 3 of the 5 recipients developed evidence of Coccidioides infection, 2 of whom had disseminated disease. The degree of T-cell immunosuppression and timing of antifungal therapy initiation likely contributed to development of disease and disease severity in these recipients. This case series highlights the importance of having a high index of suspicion for Coccidioides infection in solid organ transplant recipients, even if the donor does not have known exposure, given the difficulties of obtaining a detailed and accurate travel history from next-of-kin. PMID:22176496

  2. Effect of donor/recipient body weight mismatch on patient and graft outcome in living-donor kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    el-Agroudy, Amgad E; Hassan, Nabil A; Bakr, Mohamed A; Foda, Mohamed A; Shokeir, Ahmed A; Shehab el-Dein, Ahmed B

    2003-01-01

    There have been conflicting reports showing that kidneys from small donors may be at risk for graft loss if they are transplanted into large recipients. The aim of this work was to examine the donor/recipient body weight ratio (D/RBWR) on patient and graft outcome. During the period from January 1990 to January 2002, 856 kidney transplants were performed. Of these, 776 kidney transplant recipients were selected after exclusion of pediatric, second transplant patients and those with a body mass index of 35. All patients achieved a minimum follow-up of 1-year. According to D/RBWR, patients were divided into 3 groups: low (0.9), medium (0.91-1.2) and high (1.2). Data were collected on graft function, acute and chronic rejection, post-transplant complications, and 1- and 5-year graft and patient survival. There was a statistically significant increase in the incidence of chronic rejection, post-transplant hypertension and diabetes mellitus in the low group. The incidence and frequency of acute rejection episodes were nearly the same in the 3 groups. Graft function, estimated by serum creatinine at 1 year, was significantly lower in the low group. The 5-year graft and patient survival was 71, 80, 88 and 81, 85 and 92%, in the low, medium and high groups, respectively. We conclude that a low D/RBWR may contribute to inferior long-term renal allograft survival. The hyperfiltration hypothesis due to low nephron mass in the low D/RBWR group may explain these findings.

  3. Donor to recipient sizing in thoracic organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Eberlein, Michael; Reed, Robert M

    2016-03-24

    Donor-to-recipient organ size matching is a critical aspect of thoracic transplantation. In the United States potential recipients for lung transplant and heart transplant are listed with limitations on donor height and weight ranges, respectively. Height is used as a surrogate for lung size and weight is used as a surrogate for heart size. While these measures are important predictors of organ size, they are crude surrogates that fail to incorporate the influence of sex on organ size. Independent of other measures, a man's thoracic organs are approximately 20% larger than a woman's. Lung size can be better estimated using the predicted total lung capacity, which is derived from regression equations correcting for height, sex and age. Similarly, heart size can be better estimated using the predicted heart mass, which adjusts for sex, age, height, and weight. These refined organ sizing measures perform better than current sizing practice for the prediction of outcomes after transplantation, and largely explain the outcome differences observed after sex-mismatch transplantation. An undersized allograft is associated with worse outcomes. In this review we examine current data pertaining to size-matching in thoracic transplantation. We advocate for a change in the thoracic allocation mechanism from a height-or-weight-based strategy to a size-matching process that utilizes refined estimates of organ size. We believe that a size-matching approach based on refined estimates of organ size would optimize outcomes in thoracic transplantation without restricting or precluding patients from thoracic transplantation.

  4. Role of apheresis and dialysis in pediatric living donor liver transplantation: a single center retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Sanada, Yukihiro; Mizuta, Koichi; Urahashi, Taizen; Ihara, Yoshiyuki; Wakiya, Taiichi; Okada, Noriki; Yamada, Naoya; Koinuma, Toshitaka; Koyama, Kansuke; Tanaka, Shinichiro; Misawa, Kazuhide; Wada, Masahiko; Nunomiya, Shin; Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Kawarasaki, Hideo

    2012-08-01

    In the field of pediatric living donor liver transplantation, the indications for apheresis and dialysis, and its efficacy and safety are still a matter of debate. In this study, we performed a retrospective investigation of these aspects, and considered its roles. Between January 2008 and December 2010, 73 living donor liver transplantations were performed in our department. Twenty seven courses of apheresis and dialysis were performed for 19 of those patients (19/73; 26.0%). The indications were ABO incompatible-liver transplantation in 11 courses, fluid management in seven, acute liver failure in three, renal replacement therapy in two, endotoxin removal in two, cytokine removal in one, and liver allograft dysfunction in one. Sixteen courses of apheresis and dialysis were performed prior to liver transplantation for 14 patients. The median IgM antibody titers before and after apheresis for ABO blood type-incompatible liver transplantation was 128 and eight, respectively (P < 0.05). Eleven courses of apheresis and dialysis were performed post liver transplantation for 10 patients. The median PaO2/FiO2 ratio before and after dialysis for fluid overload was 159 and 339, respectively (P < 0.05). No bleeding or technical complications attributable to apheresis and dialysis occurred. The 1-year survival rate of the patients was 100%. Apheresis and dialysis in pediatric living donor liver transplantation are effective for antibody removal in ABO-incompatible liver transplantation, and fluid management for acute respiratory failure. © 2012 The Authors. Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis © 2012 International Society for Apheresis.

  5. [Living donors for kidney transplantation: ethical and legal challenges].

    PubMed

    Mamzer-Bruneel, Marie-France; Fournier, Catherine; Legendre, Christophe

    2010-05-01

    Living donor kidney transplantation has developed very heterogeneously worldwide despite excellent results and without taking into account the context of global organ shortage. Such a heterogeneity highlights persistent ethical issues, whereas organ trafficking is emerging as an organized transplant tourism reinforcing the need for strong national legal frameworks. Despite its powerful regulation system, which ensures standardization, transparency and accountability of support for donation, France remains reluctant to enlarge the circle of legal donors, whereas it would be the first step to give a greater role to living organ donation.

  6. Medical community preferences concerning adult living related donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Castaing, Denis; Azoulay, Daniel; Danet, Colette; Thoraval, Laurence; Tanguy Des Deserts, Catherine; Saliba, Faouzi; Samuel, Didier; Adam, René

    2006-02-01

    To assess acceptance and acceptable estimated mortality levels for right lobe adult-to-adult living related liver transplantation for the medical and allied professions. A paper questionnaire was sent to the physicians practicing with the French Graft Agency (Etablissement Français des Greffes) and to all nurses and ancillary staff of the Paul Brousse Hospital Hepatobiliary Center. Responses were received from surgeons: 38/73; internists specialized in hepatology: 44/120; nurses: 98/100; health care assistants: 45/86; others: 17/20. Acceptance of living donor transplantation is above average for all professional categories and indications may be extended including patients with cancer. Acceptable mortality for the donor was 4%, except among internists (0.7%). Currently, the real risk of mortality for the donor (1%) is lower. Acceptable mortality for the recipient was between 15 and 20%. Acceptance of adult living donor liver transplantation among health care professionals is clearly above average. Thus the psychological involvement of transplantation teams, which is very strong in such situations, should not hamper the development of this type of transplantation.

  7. Asymptomatic hyperuricemia following renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bellomo, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating indicating a role for uric acid in the genesis and progression of kidney disease, and a few studies are beginning to show a possible beneficial effect of urate-lowering therapy. Whether this holds true for renal allograft recipients is not clear. In this short review evidence from epidemiological as well as intervention studies is summarized and discussed, with some practical considerations presented at the end. PMID:26167455

  8. [Vascular bench surgery in renal transplant].

    PubMed

    Casolino, V; Paraluppi, G; Manolitsi, O; Fontana, I; Antonucci, A; Tommasi, G V; Arcuri, V; Valente, U

    1997-03-01

    The development in the number of patients for renal transplants has not been matched to the kidneys supplied. On this subject the authors think that this chronic deficit could be improved by making use of all the organs by using a series of technical means during bench surgery; which enable optimisation of use of kidneys with vascular abnormalities or those injured upon removal. The authors report their experience of 450 renal transplants operated between January 1981 and December 1985 and of the evolution vascular bench surgical techniques which enable use of a considerable number of kidneys which would otherwise have been discarded. Moreover, it helped the implant, shortened surgery time without prolonging hot ischemia, and did not increase the number of complications.

  9. [Gastrointestinal stromal tumor and renal transplant].

    PubMed

    Seculini Patiño, Carina E; Tabares, Aldo H; Laborie, Maria V; Diller, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) accounts for nearly 1% of all gastrointestinal tumors. Its association with renal transplantation is not frequent. Approximately 95% of GIST show staining for CD177. DOG1 is a recently described monoclonal antibody that shows positivity even in the absence of CD177 staining. The diagnosis of GIST should be pursued because of the availability of very effective treatments with tyrosine-kinase inhibitors. Herein, we describe the case of a woman with renal transplant who presented a small bowel GIST and weak positivity for CD177, treated initially with surgery. Tumor recurrence was documented 3 years later and histopatology showed loss of CD177 staining and positivity for DOG1. She was treated with imatimib without further recurrence after five years of follow up.

  10. Validation of Donor-Specific Tolerance of Intestinal Transplant by a Secondary Heart Transplantation Model.

    PubMed

    Pengcheng, Wang; Xiaosong, Li; Xiaofeng, Li; Zhongzhi, Li

    2017-02-01

    It is well accepted that survival after a second organ transplant without immunosuppressive agents indicates tolerance for the first transplant. To validate donor-specific tolerance, we established a rat model with a secondary heart transplant after intestinal transplant, which has so far not been described in the literature. We transplanted intestine from Fischer F344 rats to Lewis rats orthotopically. Lewis rats received tacrolimus pretreatment before transplant and a 14-day course of rapamycin 1 month after transplant. At 120 days after primary intestinal transplant, hearts from 6 F344 rats (group A) or 6 Brown Norway rats (group B) were transplanted to Lewis rats that had survived intestinal transplant and without additional immunosuppressive agents. We analyzed survival data, histologic changes, cells positive for the ED1 macrophage marker in transplanted hearts, and 3 lymphocyte levels in both groups. Thirty days after secondary heart transplant, group A hearts were continuously beating; however, group B hearts stopped beating at around 10 days after transplant (8.5 ± 1.5 d; P < .05). Our histologic study showed that both groups had muscle damage and cellular infiltration in hearts that were distinctly different from normal hearts, with ED1-positive cells counted in both groups (85 ± 16 in group A, 116 ± 28 in group B; P > .05). Fluorescence-activated cell sorting showed that CD4/CD25-positive regulatory T cell, CTLA4/CD4/CD25-positive regulatory T cell, and Natural killer T-cell levels were significantly higher level in group A versus B (P < .05). The donor-specific tolerance that we observed was possibly a state of "clinical tolerance" rather than "immunologic tolerance." Our rat model is a feasible and reliable model to study donor-specific tolerance. The higher levels of lymphocytic T cells shown in intestinal transplant recipients were associated with longer allograft survival, possibly contributing to donor-specific tolerance.

  11. Whooping cough in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Garbiras, M; Shabaka, A; Calvo, N; Martin, L; Moreno, M A; Lopez de la Manzanara, V; Sanchez-Fructuoso, A I

    2016-04-01

    Whooping cough is a respiratory infection with a severity that varies with age, immune status, and probably with other factors such as the degree of exposure and the virulence of the organism. The most frequent microorganism responsible for whooping cough is Bordetella pertussis. We present the case of a 62-year-old renal transplant recipient presenting with typical and severe manifestations of whooping cough caused by B. pertussis.

  12. De Novo Malignant Neoplasms in Renal Transplant Patients.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz Akçay, Eda; Tepeoğlu, Merih; Özdemir, Binnaz Handan; Deniz, Ebru; Börcek, Pelin; Haberal, Mehmet

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of posttransplant malignancy in kidney transplant patients and investigate the clinical and histopathologic features of these patients. We retrospectively reviewed information on donor and recipient characteristics, patient and graft survival, and cancer incidence after transplant for 867 kidney transplant patients. Patients with neoplasms prior to transplant were excluded. A follow-up study estimated cancer incidence after transplant. Neoplasms were diagnosed in 59 patients (6.8%), 41 men and 18 women; 22 (37.3%) had skin tumors, 19 (32.2%) had solid tumors, 10 (16.9%) had posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders, and 8 (13.6%) had Kaposi sarcoma. The mean age at the time of malignant tumor diagnosis was 42.7 ± 13.6 years, and statistically significant differences were found between tumor groups (P < .01). The average latency period between transplant and diagnosis of malignant tumors was 99.8 ± 56.9 months for solid tumors, 78.4 ± 52 months for skin tumors, 64.5 ± 48.8 months for posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders, and 13.5 ± 8.8 months for Kaposi sarcoma, with significant difference found between tumor groups (P < .01). Ten patients (16.9%) had more than 1 malignant tumor. Eighteen patients died, with a mean time to death of 31.5 ± 22.8 months after tumor diagnosis. A significant positive association was found between survival and the number of tumors (P = .001); 5-year survival after tumor diagnosis was 81% and 40% for patients with 1 malignant tumor and patients with more than 1 malignant tumor, respectively. Malignancy is a common cause of death after renal transplant. Early detection and treatment of posttransplant malignancies is an important challenge. Screening these patients for malignancies posttransplant is crucial, and efforts should be directed to define effective immunosuppressive protocols that are associated with a lower incidence of malignancy.

  13. The International Liver Transplantation Society Living Donor Liver Transplant Recipient Guideline.

    PubMed

    Miller, Charles M; Quintini, Cristiano; Dhawan, Anil; Durand, Francois; Heimbach, Julie K; Kim-Schluger, Hyung Leona; Kyrana, Eirini; Lee, Sung-Gyu; Lerut, Jan; Lo, Chung-Mau; Pomfret, Elizabeth Anne

    2017-05-01

    Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) has been increasingly embraced around the world as an important strategy to address the shortage of deceased donor livers. The aim of this guideline, approved by the International Liver Transplantation Society (ILTS), is to provide a collection of expert opinions, consensus, and best practices surrounding LDLT. Recommendations were developed from an analysis of the National Library of Medicine living donor transplantation indexed literature using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Writing was guided by the ILTS Policy on the Development and Use of Practice Guidelines (www.ilts.org). Intended for use by physicians, these recommendations support specific approaches to the diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive aspects of care of living donor liver transplant recipients.

  14. Donor safety in living donor liver transplantation: a single-center analysis of 300 cases.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jianyong; Yan, Lunan; Wang, Wentao

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the safety to donors of living-donor liver transplantation. This study included 300 consecutive living liver tissue donors who underwent operations at our center from July 2002 to December 2012. We evaluated the safety of donors with regard to three aspects complications were recorded prospectively and stratified by grade according to Clavien's classification, and the data were compared in two stages (the first 5 years' experience (pre-January 2008) and the latter 5 years' experience (post-January 2008); laboratory tests such as liver function and blood biochemistry were performed; and the health-related quality of life was evaluated. There was no donor mortality at our center, and the overall morbidity rate was 25.3%. Most of the complications of living donors were either grade I or II. There were significantly fewer complications in the latter period of our study than in the initial period (19.9% vs 32.6%, P<0.001), and biliary complications were the most common complications, with an incidence of 9%. All of the liver dysfunction was temporary; however, the post-operative suppression of platelet count lasted for years. Although within the normal range, eight years after operation, 22 donors showed lower platelet levels (189 × 10(9)/L) compared with the pre-operative levels (267 × 10(9)/L) (P<0.05). A total of 98.4% of donors had returned to their previous levels of social activity and work, and 99.2% of donors would donate again if it was required and feasible. With the exception of two donors who experienced grade III complications (whose recipients died) and a few cases of abdominal discomfort, fatigue, chronic pain and scar itching, none of the living donors were affected by physical problems. With careful donor selection and specialized patient care, low morbidity rates and satisfactory long-term recovery can be achieved after hepatectomy for living-donor liver transplantation.

  15. Use of HCV+ Donors Does Not Affect HCV Clearance With Directly Acting Antiviral Therapy But Shortens the Wait Time to Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sawinski, Deirdre; Patel, Nikunjkumar; Appolo, Brenda; Bloom, Roy

    2017-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is prevalent in the renal transplant population but direct acting antiviral agents (DAA) provide an effective cure of HCV infection without risk of allograft rejection. We report our experience treating 43 renal transplant recipients with 4 different DAA regimens. One hundred percent achieved a sustained viral response by 12 weeks after therapy, and DAA regimens were well tolerated. Recipients transplanted with a HCV+ donor responded equally well to DAA therapy those transplanted with a kidney from an HCV- donor, but recipients of HCV+ organs experienced significantly shorter wait times to transplantation, 485 days (interquartile range, 228-783) versus 969 days (interquartile range, 452-2008; P = 0.02). On this basis, we advocate for a strategy of early posttransplant HCV eradication to facilitate use of HCV+ organs whenever possible. Additional studies are needed to identify the optimal DAA regimen for kidney transplant recipients, accounting for efficacy, timing relative to transplant, posttransplant clinical outcomes, and cost.

  16. Alimentary tract complications after renal transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, W C; Harris, N; Stein, S; Brooks, M; Jones, R S; Thompson, W M; Stickel, D L; Seigler, H F

    1979-01-01

    A computer analysis of post renal transplantation gastrointestinal problems was performed to identify important associated clinical factors. Thirty-seven per cent of all transplant recipients developed one or more significant problems. Hemorrhage, nondiverticular intestinal perforation, and esophagitis occurred most frequently in hospitalized patients. Pancreatitis, diverticulitis, and gastroduodenal perforation occurred characteristically in long-term survivors with well functioning allografts. Eleven of 32 HLA identical recipients treated with maintenance corticosteroids during stable kidney function developed gastrointestinal disease while only one of 13 HLA identical recipients not given maintenance steroids developed a problem, which strongly suggests a causal role for steroids in the development of late complications. The association of preexisting peptic ulcer and diverticular disease with hemorrhage and perforation supports previous recommendations that documented peptic ulcer disease or diverticulitis should be corrected surgically prior to transplantation. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:384945

  17. Norwegian scabies in a renal transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Sampathkumar, K.; Mahaldar, A. R.; Ramakrishnan, M.; Prabahar, S.

    2010-01-01

    A variety of skin infections are encountered in postrenal transplant setting. Though bacterial and fungal infections are more common, surprises are in store for us sometimes. We describe a patient who underwent renal transplant two years ago, presenting with a painless, mildly pruritic expanding skin rash over abdomen. Histological examination of the skin biopsy showed that stratum corneum had multiple burrows containing larvae and eggs of Sarcoptes scabiei. The patient was treated with ivermectin 12 mg weekly once for 2 doses along with topical 5% permethrin and permethrin soap bath. There was remarkable improvement in the skin lesions with complete resolution in two weeks. Norwegian or crusted scabies is caused by massive infestation with Sarcoptes scabiei var. hominis. It can be rarely encountered in the post-transplant setting, which underscores the importance of early diagnosis and treatment before secondary bacterial infection sets in. PMID:20835323

  18. Cardiovascular disease in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, Emily P; Fellström, Bengt C; Holdaas, Hallvard; Jardine, Alan G

    2010-05-01

    Renal transplant recipients have a markedly increased risk of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with the general population, although considerably lower than that of patients receiving maintenance haemodialysis. CVD in transplant recipients is poorly characterised and differs from the nonrenal population, with a much higher proportion of fatal to nonfatal cardiac events. In addition to traditional ischaemic heart disease risk factors such as age, gender, diabetes and smoking, there are additional factors to consider in this population such as the importance of hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy and uraemic cardiomyopathy. There are factors specific to transplantation such immunosuppressive therapies and graft dysfunction which contribute to this altered risk profile. However, understanding and treatment is limited by the absence of large randomised intervention trials addressing risk factor modification, with the exception of the ALERT study. The approach to managing these patients should begin early and be multifactorial in nature.

  19. Immature CD4⁺ dendritic cells conditioned with donor kidney antigen prolong renal allograft survival in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Xu, Lin; Li, Heng; Huang, Zheng-Yu; Zhang, Sheng-Ping; Miao, Bin; Na, Ning

    2012-07-01

    Allogeneic transplant rejection is currently a major problem encountered during organ transplantation. The dendritic cell (DC) is the most effective powerful known professional antigen-presenting cell, and recent studies have found that DCs can also induce immune tolerance, and avoid or reduce the degree of transplant rejection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of transfused immature CD4(+) DCs on renal allografts in the rat model. In this study, we induced CD4(+) immature DCs from rat bone marrow cells by a cytokine cocktail. The immature CD4(+) DCs were identified by morphological analysis and then the suppressive activity of these cells conditioned with donor kidney antigen was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Immature CD4(+) DCs