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Sample records for renal transplant donors

  1. Urolithiasis in renal transplant donors and recipients: An update.

    PubMed

    Harraz, Ahmed M; Kamal, Ahmed I; Shokeir, Ahmed A

    2016-12-01

    Urolithiasis in the context of renal transplant is a quite rare event that requires keeping a higher index of suspicion and vigilance. Donors with incidentally discovered asymptomatic renal stones "donor gifted lithiasis" are potentially considered for donation should they are not recurrent stone formers and in the absence of active biochemical disorders. Stone clearance from the donors can be done before donation using shock wave lithotripsy and/or flexible ureteroscopy. Ex vivo ureteroscopy at time of transplant is equally feasible and safe. A variety of anatomical, metabolic and surgical factors contribute to de novo lithiasis after transplantation. Diagnosis is challenging as the transplanted kidney is denervated and the presentation is consequently, atypical. Endourological armamentarium is readily present within the hands of the urologists for adequately addressing the stones and including shock wave lithotripsy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy and flexible ureteroscopy. Whilst all endourological techniques have proven feasibility and safety, they are surgically demanding and requiring high-volume expertise to be adequately performed. The longterm outcome in terms of stone recurrence or the effect on graft survival is favorable. Finally, formidable counselling as well as postoperative monitoring for both donors and recipients is crucial to minimize urolithiasis-related morbidity.

  2. Living donor renal transplantation in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji Yoon; Jung, Joo Hee; Shin, Sung; Kim, Young Hoon; Han, Duck Jong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), autoantibodies directed against phospholipid-binding proteins are associated with cause vascular thrombosis. Patients with APS requiring renal transplantation are at risk of early graft loss due to arterial or venous thrombosis, or thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Here, we report 3 cases of successful renal transplantation in patients with APS. Clinical Findings: A 53-year-old man with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) had experienced bilateral deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the lower extremities 16 years ago and was administered warfarin. However, he frequently experienced recurrent DVT despite of anticoagulation therapy. Before the surgery, APS was confirmed based on positive results lupus anticoagulant in serological tests. A 40-year-old man with polycystic kidney disease and a history recurrent DVT tested positive for lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies. Lastly, a 42-year-old woman with ESRD was diagnosed with APS 7 years ago. She also developed DVT and tested positive for lupus anticoagulant and anti-B2-glycoprotein 1. The anticoagulation protocol was as follows in all cases: Warfarin was stopped 5 days before living donor renal transplantation and intravenous heparin therapy was started. During surgery, bolus heparin injections (3000 U) were administered to prevent arterial or venous thrombosis. Heparin was substituted with warfarin on postoperative day 4. The third patient (42/F) developed clinical rejection indicated by increased serum creatinine levels and donor-specific antibodies (DSA) and received steroid pulse therapy, plasmapheresis, and rituximab. This treatment restored graft function to within the normal range. The latest graft function in all patients was maintained at normal levels in the outpatient clinic. Conclusions: Living donor renal transplantation may be successful in patients with APS following perioperative anticoagulation therapy. However, because of the high risk of

  3. Ethical issues relating to renal transplantation from prediabetic living donor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In Mexico, diabetes mellitus is the main cause of end − stage kidney disease, and some patients may be transplant candidates. Organ supply is limited because of cultural issues. And, there is a lack of standardized clinical guidelines regarding organ donation. These issues highlight the tension surrounding the fact that living donors are being selected despite being prediabetic. This article presents, examines and discusses using the principles of non-maleficience, autonomy, justice and the constitutionally guaranteed right to health, the ethical considerations that arise from considering a prediabetic person as a potential kidney donor. Discussion Diabetes is an absolute contraindication for donating a kidney. However, the transplant protocols most frequently used in Mexico do not consider prediabetes as exclusion criteria. In prediabetic persons there are well known metabolic alterations that may compromise the long − term outcomes of the transplant if such donors are accepted. Even so, many of them are finally included because there are not enough donor candidates. Both, families and hospitals face the need to rapidly accept prediabetic donors before the clinical conditions of the recipient and the evolution of the disease exclude him/her as a transplant candidate; however, when using a kidney potentially damaged by prediabetes, neither the donor’s nor the recipient’s long term health is usually considered. Considering the ethical implication as well as the clinical and epidemiological evidence, we conclude that prediabetic persons are not suitable candidates for kidney donation. This recommendation should be taken into consideration by Mexican health institutions who should rewrite their transplant protocols. Summary We argue that the decision to use a kidney from a living donor known to be pre-diabetic or from those persons with family history of T2DM, obesity, hypertension, or renal failure, should be considered unethical in Mexico

  4. Deceased donor renal transplantation: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, N.; Dineshkumar, T.; Dhanapriya, J.; Sakthirajan, R.; Balasubramaniyan, T.; Srinivasa Prasad, N. D.; Thirumalvalavan, K.; Murugananth, S.; Kawaskar, K.

    2017-01-01

    Deceased donor renal transplantation (DDRT) constitutes less than 5% of all kidney transplantats in India. A retrospective analysis of 173 deceased donor renal transplants performed in a public funded government hospital was done. Mean age of the recipients was 36 years (male:female ratio 2.4:1), and that of the donors was 32.3 years (male:female ratio 6:1). The cold ischemic time was 340 ± 170 minutes. Mean follow-up period was 36 months. Forty one patients died, 75% of them in the first post – transplant year. Sepsis and cardiovascular disease were the most common causes of death. Twenty two percent had acute rejection. There was no significant difference in the incidence in the rate of acute rejection, bacterial, fungal infections and death rate between the cohorts of induction and non induction immunosuppression. The patient and death censored graft survival at 1 year were 80 and 82.6% and at 5 years were 76 and 80% respectively. PMID:28182043

  5. Feasibility of renal transplantation after unroofing of a large renal cyst in an expanded criteria donor

    PubMed Central

    Kanagarajah, Prashanth; Ekwenna, Obi; Ayyathurai, Rajinikanth; Burk, George W.; Ciancio, Gaetano

    2013-01-01

    We present a case in which a deceased donor kidney with a large simple cyst was successfully unroofed and transplanted to a 61-year-old male. The donor was a 62-year-old male with a history of hypertension for 2 years; cerebral vascular accident was the cause of death. A large 8-cm cyst distorting the renal hilum was identified upon the procurement of the deceased donor kidney. Prior to transplantation, the large cyst was unroofed from the allograft; the frozen section confirmed a benign cyst and the transplant was performed. Postoperatively, the serum creatinine level was 1.4 mg/ml at 22-month follow-up and the patient was normotensive. Deceased donor kidneys with giant cysts distorting the renal hilum can be effectively transplanted. PMID:24049388

  6. Deceased donor kidney transplantation from donors with acute renal failure due to rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Mekeel, K L; Moss, A A; Mulligan, D C; Chakkera, H A; Hamawi, K; Mazur, M J; Heilman, R L; Reddy, K S

    2009-07-01

    With the current shortage of solid organs for transplant, the transplant community continues to look for ways to increase the number of organ donors, including extending the criteria for donation. In rhabdomyolysis, the byproducts of skeletal muscle breakdown leak into the circulation resulting in acute renal failure in up to 30% of patients. In nonbrain dead patients, this condition is reversible and most patients recover full renal function. Seven potential donors had rhabdomyolysis with acute renal failure as evidenced by the presence of urine hemoglobin, plasma creatinine kinase levels of greater than five times the normal and elevated creatinine. One donor required dialysis. At our institution, 10 kidneys were transplanted from the seven donors. Two grafts had immediate function, five grafts experienced slow graft function and three grafts had delayed graft function requiring hemodialysis. At a mean of 8.7 months posttransplant (2.4-25.2 months), all patients have good graft function, are off dialysis and have a mean creatinine of 1.3 (0.7-1.8). In conclusion, our experience suggests that rhabdomyolysis with acute renal failure should not be a contraindication for donation, although recipients may experience slow or delayed graft function.

  7. Targeting complement activation in brain-dead donors improves renal function after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Damman, Jeffrey; Hoeger, Simone; Boneschansker, Leo; Theruvath, Ashok; Waldherr, Ruediger; Leuvenink, Henri G; Ploeg, Rutger J; Yard, Benito A; Seelen, Marc A

    2011-05-01

    Kidneys recovered from brain-dead donors have inferior outcomes after transplantation compared to kidneys from living donors. Since complement activation plays an important role in renal transplant related injury, targeting complement activation in brain-dead donors might improve renal function after transplantation. Brain death (BD) was induced in Fisher rats by inflation of an epidurally placed balloon catheter and ventilated for 6h. BD animals were treated with soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) 1h before or 1h after BD. Kidney transplantation was performed and 7 days after transplantation animals were sacrificed. Plasma creatinine and urea were measured at days 0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 after transplantation. Renal function was significantly better at day 1 after transplantation in recipients receiving a sCR1 pre-treated donor kidney compared to recipients of a non-treated donor graft. Also treatment with sCR1, 1h after the diagnosis of BD, resulted in a better renal function after transplantation. Gene expression of IL-6, IL-1beta and TGF-beta were significantly lower in renal allografts recovered from treated donors. This study shows that targeting complement activation, during BD in the donor, leads to an improved renal function after transplantation in the recipient.

  8. Deceased donor renal transplantation and the disruptive effect of commercial transplants: the experience of Oman.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, N; Al-Busaidy, Q; Al-Marhuby, H; Al-Lawati, J; Daar, A S

    2014-01-01

    The Oman Renal Transplantation Program was established in 1988 as a joint venture between Sultan Qaboos University and the Ministry of Health. It began with both living related donor (LRD) and deceased donor (DD) transplants. Over the next nine years, while the LRD programme progressed relatively well, there were only thirteen DD transplants. Two of the DD kidneys were obtained from overseas via an active collaboration with the Euro-transplant organisation, and one DD kidney was obtained from Saudi Arabia within the Gulf Cooperative Council exchange programme. The rest of the DD kidneys were obtained in Oman. The Omani DD programme, although it was a pioneering effort in the Gulf region at the time, was not entirely sustainable. In this paper we focus on the challenges we encountered. Among the major challenges was the absence of resources to establish a dedicated DD programme and particularly the failure to develop a cadre of dedicated transplant coordinators.

  9. Donor kidney adapts to body dimensions of recipient: no influence of donor gender on renal function after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tent, H; Lely, A T; Toering, T J; San Giorgi, M R M; Rook, M; Lems, S P M; Hepkema, B G; Hofker, H S; Ploeg, R J; Homan van der Heide, J J; Navis, G J

    2011-10-01

    Female kidneys and kidneys from small donors have been suggested to perform worse after kidney transplantation. Here, we evaluate the impact of gender and body dimensions on posttransplantation GFR in living donor transplantation. Two hundred and ninety-three donor-recipient pairs, who were transplanted at our center were evaluated. All pairs had detailed renal function measurement ((125) I-iothalamate and (131) I-hippuran) 4 months predonation in the donor and 2.5 months posttransplantation in donor and recipient. For 88 pairs, 5 years of recipient follow-up was available. Delta GFR was calculated as (recipient GFR-donor single kidney GFR). Recipients of both male and female kidneys had similar renal function at early and long term after transplantation. Male recipients had higher ERPF, ΔGFR and ΔERPF at both time points. Kidneys of donors smaller than their recipient had higher ΔGFR and ΔERPF than kidneys of larger donors at both time points (p < 0.05). In multivariate analysis, ΔGFR was predicted by donor/recipient BSA-ratio together with transplantation related factors (R(2) 0.19), irrespective of donor and recipient gender. In conclusion, in living donor transplantation, female kidneys perform as well as male donor kidneys. Kidneys adapt to the recipient's body size and demands, independent of gender, without detrimental effects in renal function and outcome up to mid-long term.

  10. MDCT evaluation of potential living renal donor, prior to laparoscopic donor nephrectomy: What the transplant surgeon wants to know?

    PubMed

    Ghonge, Nitin P; Gadanayak, Satyabrat; Rajakumari, Vijaya

    2014-10-01

    As Laparoscopic Donor Nephrectomy (LDN) offers several advantages for the donor such as lesser post-operative pain, fewer cosmetic concerns and faster recovery time, there is growing global trend towards LDN as compared to open nephrectomy. Comprehensive pre-LDN donor evaluation includes assessment of renal morphology including pelvi-calyceal and vascular system. Apart from donor selection, evaluation of the regional anatomy allows precise surgical planning. Due to limited visualization during laparoscopic renal harvesting, detailed pre-transplant evaluation of regional anatomy, including the renal venous anatomy is of utmost importance. MDCT is the modality of choice for pre-LDN evaluation of potential renal donors. Apart from appropriate scan protocol and post-processing methods, detailed understanding of surgical techniques is essential for the Radiologist for accurate image interpretation during pre-LDN MDCT evaluation of potential renal donors. This review article describes MDCT evaluation of potential living renal donor, prior to LDN with emphasis on scan protocol, post-processing methods and image interpretation. The article laid special emphasis on surgical perspectives of pre-LDN MDCT evaluation and addresses important points which transplant surgeons want to know.

  11. Live Donor Renal Anatomic Asymmetry and Post-Transplant Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Tanriover, Bekir; Fernandez, Sonalis; Campenot, Eric S.; Newhouse, Jeffrey H.; Oyfe, Irina; Mohan, Prince; Sandikci, Burhaneddin; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Wexler, Jennifer J.; Carroll, Maureen A.; Sharif, Sairah; Cohen, David J.; Ratner, Lloyd E.; Hardy, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Relationship between live donor renal anatomic asymmetry and post-transplant recipient function has not been studied extensively. Methods We analyzed 96 live-kidney donors, who had anatomical asymmetry (>10% renal length and/or volume difference calculated from CT angiograms) and their matching recipients. Split function differences (SFD) were quantified with 99mTc-DMSA renography. Implantation biopsies at time-zero were semi-quantitatively scored. A comprehensive model utilizing donor renal volume adjusted to recipient weight (Vol/Wgt), SFD, and biopsy score was used to predict recipient estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at one-year. Primary analysis consisted of a logistic regression model of outcome (odds of developing eGFR>60ml/min/1.73 m2 at one-year), a linear regression model of outcome (predicting recipient eGFR at one-year, using the CKD-EPI formula), and a Monte Carlo simulation based on the linear regression model (N=10,000 iterations). Results In the study cohort, the mean Vol/Wgt and eGFR at one-year were 2.04 ml/kg and 60.4 ml/min/1.73m2, respectively. Volume and split ratios between two donor kidneys were strongly correlated (r=0.79, p-value<0.001). The biopsy scores among SFD categories (<5%, 5–10%, >10%) were not different (p=0.190). On multivariate models, only Vol/Wgt was significantly associated with higher odds of having eGFR>60ml/min/1.73 m2 (OR=8.94, 95% CI 2.47–32.25, p=0.001) and had a strong discriminatory power in predicting the risk of eGFR<60ml/min/1.73m2 at one-year (ROC curve=0.78, 95% CI 0.68–0.89). Conclusion In the presence of donor renal anatomic asymmetry, Vol/Wgt appears to be a major determinant of recipient renal function at one-year post-transplantation. Renography can be replaced with CT volume calculation in estimating split renal function. PMID:25719258

  12. Improved outcomes of renal transplantation from cardiac death donors: a 30-year single center experience.

    PubMed

    Tojimbara, T; Fuchinoue, S; Iwadoh, K; Koyama, I; Sannomiya, A; Kato, Y; Nanmoku, K; Kai, K; Nakajima, I; Toma, H; Teraoka, S

    2007-03-01

    Outcomes of renal transplantation from donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors over 30 years were analyzed. Between 1975 and 2004, 256 renal transplantations from DCD donors were performed. The recipients were divided into four groups according to a time period as follows: 1975-1979 (Group 1; n = 18), 1980-1989 (Group 2; n = 81), 1990-1999 (Group 3; n = 84) and 2000-2004 (Group 4; n = 73). Of the 256 transplanted kidneys from DCD donors, 38 (15%) functioned immediately after transplantation. The incidence of delayed graft function (DGF) was 72%. Warm ischemic time and total ischemic time were 7.4 +/- 9.4 min and 11.9 +/- 5.6 h, respectively. The overall graft survival rates at 1, 5 and 10 years were 80%, 72% and 53%, respectively. Graft survival rates in each group have continually improved over time (5-year graft survival; 23% vs. 64% vs. 74% vs. 91%, respectively). However, there was no significant difference in graft survival rates between the groups of patients who survived with a functioning graft for more than 1 year. A multivariate Cox regression analysis showed acute rejection and donor age to be independently associated with graft outcome. DCD donors are a valuable source of kidneys for transplantation with promising long-term outcomes.

  13. Renal transplantation from living donor parents in two brothers with Alport syndrome. Can asymptomatic female carriers of the Alport gene be accepted as kidney donors?

    PubMed

    Sessa, A; Pietrucci, A; Carozzi, S; Torri Tarelli, L; Tazzari, S; Giordano, F; Meroni, M; Battini, G; Valente, U; Renieri, A

    1995-01-01

    Renal transplantation from living donor parents was performed in two brothers with end-stage renal failure due to Alport syndrome (AS). Two years later, the patient receiving the kidney graft from the mother, obligate carrier of AS, presented persistent microhematuria and proteinuria with normal renal function. The histological study demonstrated ultrastructural glomerular lesions consistent with AS. The authors conclude that: (1) Alport patients should not be deprived of renal transplantation from living donors, since anti-GBM nephritis is a rare complication; (2) an oligosymptomatic female carrier of the Alport gene may be considered as living renal donor, although a longer follow-up is needed in order to draw definitive conclusions.

  14. Outcome of renal transplantation from a donor with polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Migone, Silvia Regina da Cruz; Bentes, Camila Guerreiro; Nunes, Débora Bacellar Cruz; Nunes, Juliana Bacellar Cruz; Pinon, Rodolfo Marcial da Silva; Silva, Thales Xavit Souza E

    2016-01-01

    Faced with the long waiting list for a kidney transplant, the use of donors with expanded criteria, like polycystic kidneys, is an option that aims to increase in a short time the supply of kidneys for transplant. This report of two cases of transplants performed from a donor with polycystic kidneys showed promising results, and the receptors evolved with good renal function, serum creatinine measurements within the normal range and with adequate glomerular filtration rate, evaluated over a period of four years post transplant. This fact confirms that the option of using donors with polycystic kidneys is safe and gives good results. Resumo Diante da longa fila de espera por um transplante renal, a utilização de doadores com critério expandido, a exemplo de rins policísticos, torna-se uma opção que visa aumentar a oferta de rins para transplante a curto prazo. O presente relato de dois casos de transplantes realizados a partir de um doador com rins policísticos apresentou resultado promissor, tendo os receptores evoluído com boa função renal, dosagens de creatinina sérica dentro da faixa de normalidade e com taxa de filtração glomerular adequada, avaliados num período de quatro anos pós-transplante. Isto confirma que a opção da utilização de doadores com rins policísticos é segura e apresenta bons resultados.

  15. Use of computed tomography renal angiography for screening feline renal transplant donors.

    PubMed

    Bouma, Jennifer L; Aronson, Lillian R; Keith, Dennis G; Saunders, H Mark

    2003-01-01

    Preoperative knowledge of the renal vascular anatomy is important for selection of the appropriate feline renal donor. Intravenous urograms (IVUs) have been performed routinely to screen potential donors at the Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (VHUP), but the vascular phase views lack sufficient detail of the renal vascular anatomy. Computed tomography angiography (CTA), which requires a helical computed tomography (CT) scanner, has been found to provide superior renal vascular anatomic information of prospective human renal donors. The specific aims of this study were as follows: 1) develop the CTA technique for the feline patient; and 2) obtain preliminary information on feline renal vessel anatomy in potential renal donors. Ten healthy, potential feline renal donors were anesthetized and imaged using a third-generation helical CT scanner. The time delay between i.v. contrast medium injection and image acquisition, and other parameters of slice collimation, slice interval, pitch, exposure settings, and reconstruction algorithms were varied to maximize contrast medium opacification of the renal vascular anatomy. Optimal CTA acquisition parameters were determined to be: 1) 10-sec delay post-i.v. bolus of iodinated contrast medium; 2) two serially acquired (corresponding to arterial and venous phases) helical scans through the renal vasculature; 3) pitch of 2 (4 mm/sec patient translation, 2 mm slice collimation); and 4) 120-kVp, 160-mA, and 1-sec exposure settings. Retrospective reconstructed CTA transverse images obtained at a 2-mm slice width and a 1-mm slice interval in combination with two-dimensional reformatted images and three-dimensional reconstructed images were qualitatively evaluated for vascular anatomy; vascular anatomy was confirmed at surgery. Four cats had single renal arteries and veins bilaterally; four cats had double renal veins. One cat had a small accessory artery supplying the caudal pole of the left kidney. One cat had a

  16. Organ allocation in pediatric renal transplants: is there an optimal donor?

    PubMed

    Pitt, Susan C; Vachharajani, Neeta; Doyle, Maria B; Lowell, Jeffrey A; Chapman, William C; Anderson, Christopher D; Shenoy, Surendra; Wellen, Jason R

    2013-01-01

    The 2005 revised allocation scheme for pediatric renal transplantation made the decision of whether to transplant an available living-donor (LD) kidney or use a deceased-donor (DD) kidney controversial. The aim of this study was to examine kidney allograft utilization, sensitization, and outcomes of pediatric transplant recipients. Between January 2000 and December 2009, 91 consecutive pediatric kidney recipients (<20 yr) were transplanted. The LD (n = 38) and DD (n = 53) groups were similar in age, gender, dialysis status at transplant, warm ischemia time, and overall patient survival. LD recipients were more likely to be Caucasian (92 vs. 69%), receive older allografts (39 ± 10 vs. 23 ± 9 yr), and have fewer human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatches (3.3 ± 1.6 vs. 4.4 ± 1.5, p < 0.01 for all). Graft survival at one, three, and five yr post-transplant was longer for LD recipients (97%, 91%, 87% vs. DD 89%, 79%, 58%, respectively, p < 0.05). At the time of transplant, 17 (33%) DD recipients had an available LD (mean age 40 yr). A greater proportion of all patients were moderately (PRA 21-79%) sensitized post-transplant (p < 0.05). A multivariable analysis of graft survival indicated that the advantage in LD organs was likely due to fewer HLA mismatched in this group. Nonetheless, LD organs appear to provide optimal outcomes in pediatric renal transplants when considering the risk of becoming sensitized post-transplant complicating later use of the LD kidney.

  17. Late antibody-mediated rejection by de novo donor HLA-DP-specific antibody after renal transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cippà, Pietro E; Gaspert, Ariana; Etter, Christoph; Guenduez, Zehra; Ferrari-Lacraz, Sylvie; Rüsi, Barbara; Fehr, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The role of donor HLA-DP-specific antibodies after renal transplantation is controversial, and only preformed HLA-DP-specific antibodies have been shown to mediate rejection. Here we present a case of late humoral rejection mediated by de novo donor HLA-DP-specific antibodies in a non-sensitized recipient. This unique case demonstrates the pathogenic role of de novo anti-DP antibodies and suggests that HLA-DP matching might be relevant for renal transplantation.

  18. Successful deceased donor renal transplant in a sensitized pediatric recipient with the use of plasmapheresis.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Madhura; Raffaelli, Ryan M; Lind, Curt; Meyers, Kevin E C; Kaplan, Bernard S; Baluarte, Hobart J; Monos, Dimitri

    2008-09-01

    Sensitization following renal transplant is a significant barrier to repeat transplantation in children. We report a successful DD renal transplant, with the use of PP, in an 11-yr-old girl who became highly sensitized following a prior failed transplant. She received PP treatments after failure of high-dose IVIg (Gamimune). We established the effectiveness of PP by attaining a 0% PRA and negative cross-matches after five PP treatments. Subsequently, our patient underwent a second round of scheduled PP. When the PRA was 0%, unacceptable antigens were removed from the UNOS wait list, PP was continued, and a kidney became available within 10 days. The final flow cytometry cross-match with the eventual donor was negative. This success demonstrates that coordination of desensitization by PP and advanced laboratory monitoring techniques with recent policies regarding allocation of organs to pediatric patients provides new opportunities for children awaiting transplantation. Since the transplant, our patient sustained a low-titer increase of anti-HLA antibodies. However, she has had no episodes of acute rejection and has maintained excellent graft function more than 17 months later.

  19. Inferior allograft outcomes in adolescent recipients of renal transplants from ideal deceased donors

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Matthew H; Reese, Peter P; Wood, Alexander; Baluarte, H Jorge; Huverserian, Ari; Naji, Ali; Abt, Peter L

    2013-01-01

    Objective To measure the impact of the Share-35 policy on the allocation of ideal deceased donor kidneys, and to examine the impact of age on outcomes after kidney transplantation using ideal donor kidneys. Summary Background Data In the United States, through Share-35, transplant candidates <18 years of age receive priority for the highest-quality deceased donor kidneys. Adolescent (15 – 18 years) kidney transplant recipients (KTRs), however, may be more susceptible to allograft loss due to elevated rates of acute rejection and a possible increased risk of primary renal disease recurrence. Methods We used registry data to perform a retrospective cohort study of 39,136 KTRs from 1/1/1994 – 12/31/2008. Ideal donors were defined as 2 – 34 years old with creatinine <1.5mg/dL and absence of hypertension, diabetes and hepatitis C. Results After Share-35, the percentage of ideal donor kidneys allocated to pediatric recipients increased from 7 – 16%. In multivariable Cox regression, compared to adolescent KTRs, all age strata except recipients >70 years had a lower risk of allograft failure (p<0.01 for each comparison); results were similar after excluding KTRs with diseases at high risk of recurrence. Adolescent recipients had higher mortality rates than KTRs under 14 years, similar mortality compared to KTRs >18 and <40 years, and lower mortality than KTRs over 40 years. Conclusions The allocation of “ideal donors” to adolescent recipients may not maximize graft utility. Re-evaluation of pediatric allocation priority may offer opportunities to optimize ideal renal allograft survival. PMID:22330037

  20. HLA class I donor-specific triplet antibodies detected after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Varnavidou-Nicolaidou, A; Doxiadis, I I N; Iniotaki-Theodoraki, A; Patargias, T; Stavropoulos-Giokas, C; Kyriakides, G K

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether IgG, non-donor-specific anti-HLA class I antibodies (HLAabI) detected after renal transplantation recognize immunogenic amino acid triplets expressed on the foreign graft. In addition, we sought to evaluate the effect of these antibodies as well as other posttransplant HLAabI on graft outcome. Posttransplant sera from 264 renal recipients were tested for the presence of IgG HLAabI and HLA class II-specific alloantibodies (HLAabII) by ELISA. The HLAMatchmaker computer algorithm was used to define the HLA class I non-donor-specific antibodies, which seem to recognize immunogenic amino acid triplets. Donor-specific triplet antibodies (DSTRab) were detected in 16 of 22 (72.7%) recipients based on at least one HLA-A or -B mismatched antigen with the donor. DSTRab were found either without (n = 7) or with (n = 9) HLA donor-specific antibodies (HLA-DSA). The presence of DSTRab alone in the periphery was associated with acute rejection, whereas the presence of both DSTRab and HLA-DSA was associated with chronic rejection and graft failure.

  1. Donor/Recipient Delta Age: A Possible Risk for Arterial Stenosis in Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pallotti, Giovanni; Donati, Gabriele; Capelli, Irene; Baraldi, Olga; Comai, Giorgia; Agati, Patrizia; Nichelatti, Michele; Cianciolo, Giuseppe; La Manna, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Different arterial wall properties can significantly increase the risk of blood turbulent fluxes leading to complications such as atherosclerosis. Since the mechanical properties of arterial vessels are influenced by age, we investigated, in a retrospective study, the effects on renal artery stenosis of an age difference >15 years between donor and recipient in a cohort of 164 patients undergoing renal transplantation between 1981 and 1991. The age difference between donor and recipient was ≤15 years in 87 patients (53.0%) (Group A) and >15 years in 77 patients (47.0%) (Group B, p = ns). None of the Group A patients developed an anastomotic arterial stenosis, whereas 8/77 Group B patients (10.4%) had an anastomotic arterial stenosis (p < 0.001). This study shows that an age difference >15 years is significantly linked to the risk of developing arterial stenosis after renal transplantation. Indeed, different wall properties can significantly increase the risk of generation of blood turbulent fluxes and involve, in the arterial vessels, the development of complications such as atherosclerosis. PMID:26933444

  2. A Double Blind Randomized Clinical Trial of Remote Ischemic Conditioning in Live Donor Renal Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Michael L; Pattenden, Clare J; Barlow, Adam D; Hunter, James P; Lee, Gwyn; Hosgood, Sarah A

    2015-08-01

    Ischemic conditioning involves the delivery of short cycles of reversible ischemic injury in order to induce protection against subsequent more prolonged ischemia. This randomized controlled trial was designed to determine the safety and efficacy of remote ischemic conditioning (RC) in live donor kidney transplantation.This prospective randomized clinical trial, 80 patients undergoing live donor kidney transplantation were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to either RC or to a control group. RC consisted of cycles of lower limb ischemia induced by an arterial tourniquet cuff placed around the patient's thigh. In the RC treatment group, the cuff was inflated to 200 mm Hg or systolic pressure +25 mm Hg for 4 cycles of 5 min ischemia followed by 5 min reperfusion. In the control group, the blood pressure cuff was inflated to 25 mm Hg. Patients and medical staff were blinded to treatment allocation. The primary end-point was renal function measured by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at 1 and 3 months posttransplant.Donor and recipient demographics were similar in both groups (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in eGFR at 1 month (control 52 ± 14 vs RC 54 ± 17 mL/min; P = 0.686) or 3 months (control 50 ± 14 vs RC 49 ± 18 mL/min; P = 0.678) between the control and RC treatment groups. The RC technique did not cause any serious adverse effects.RC, using the protocol described here, did not improve renal function after live donor kidney transplantation.

  3. Outcomes of Living Donor Liver Transplantation Alone for Patients on Maintenance Renal Replacement Therapy in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, Susumu; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Uemoto, Shinji; Umeshita, Koji; Imamura, Hajime; Soyama, Akihiko; Shimamura, Tsuyoshi; Isaji, Shuji; Ogura, Yasuhiro; Egawa, Hiroto; Kawachi, Shigeyuki; Kasahara, Mureo; Nagano, Hiroaki; Ku, Yonson; Ohdan, Hideki; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Sato, Shuntaro; Inomata, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Because simultaneous liver and kidney transplantation has been limited as a standard practice because of a severe shortage of deceased donors in Japan, living donor (LD) liver transplantation alone (LTA) is indicated in most recipients with maintenance renal replacement therapy (MRRT). Methods A retrospective nationwide survey of LD LTA was performed for liver transplant patients on MRRT. The characteristics of donors and recipients, postoperative complications, survival rate, and causes of death were analyzed. Results In the adult cases (n = 28), the overall survival rate at 1 year and 5 years were 66.1% and 57.3%, respectively. When compared with those adults without MRRT (n = 237), it was significantly worse. In the 7 pediatric cases, the overall survival rate at 1 and 5 years were both 83.3%. Three adult recipients died of nonaneurysm cerebral hemorrhage after 1 year and 1 adult recipient died of acute heart failure after 7 months. In adult recipients with MRRT, graft weight versus standard liver volume, and duration and blood loss in LTA surgery were associated with poor outcomes after LD LTA. Multivariate analysis revealed that MRRT was highest hazard ratio on patient survival after LD LTA. Conclusions Early post-LD LTA mortality was higher in patients with MRRT than in those without MRRT with characteristic causes. Smaller grafts for size and a complicated surgery were associated with poor outcome after LD LTA. Thus, LD LTA in adult patients on MRRT should be carefully treated with meticulous postoperative management and follow-up. PMID:27500264

  4. Adult-to-adult living related donor renal transplantation in Yemen: the first experience.

    PubMed

    El-Nono, Ibrahiem H; Al-Ba'adani, Tawfiq H; Ghilan, Abdulilah M; Asba, Nagieb W Abu; Al-Alimy, Gamil M; Al-Massani, Mokhtar M; Noman, Morshed A; Al-Shargabe, Soliman; Al-Mansour, Mohamed M; Nassar, Mogahed Y

    2007-06-01

    Between May 1998 and June 2006, 31 patients (21 males and 10 females) received a renal allograft from live-related donors at the Urology and Nephrology Center in the Al-Thawra Modern General Hospital Sana'a, Republic of Yemen. The cold ischemia time ranged between 48 and 68 minutes. The immunosuppressive protocol was double therapy (steroids and mycophenolate) in the first 8 cases. The subsequent cases received triple therapy with steroids, cyclosporine and mycophenolate. Episodes of acute rejection were treated with high dose steroids while anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) was also used in cases of vascular or steroid resistant rejection. Primary graft function was achieved in 29 recipients (93.5%). The post-transplant complications, either surgical or medical, were comparable to those reported in the literature. The kidney transplantation program started sporadically in Yemen since 1998. However, a well-established program has been running regularly since the beginning of 2005.

  5. Ex Vivo Removal of Stones in Donor Kidneys by Flexible Ureteroscopy Prior to Renal Transplantation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Na; Zhou, Honglan; Shi, Bo; Wang, Jinguo

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 33 Final Diagnosis: Donation after cardiac death (DCD) Symptoms: None Medication:— Clinical Procedure: Ex vivo removal of stones in donor kidneys by flexible ureteroscop Specialty: Transplantology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Because of the shortage of grafts, many attempts have been made to treat calculi in donor kidneys and have achieved successful management. This case report is the first to present removal of stones from bilateral kidneys from a single donor through flexible ureteroscopy before transplantation. Case Report: The present case report shows the clinical management of bilateral donor kidneys with calculi, which were taken from a 33-year-old man through donation after cardiac death (DCD). Computed tomography showed 2 stones in the right donor kidney and 1 in the left donor kidney. Two stones were removed ex vivo using a flexible ureteroscope before transplantation, and the third one turned out to be a renal papillae calcification, which was left in place without surgical treatment. The bilateral donor kidneys were transplanted to 2 recipients. Conclusions: There is a possibility of increasing the kidney pool by using donor kidneys containing calculi, which should be removed before transplantation. PMID:28255156

  6. Deceased-Donor Apolipoprotein L1 Renal-Risk Variants Have Minimal Effects on Liver Transplant Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dorr, Casey R.; Freedman, Barry I.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Brown, W. Mark; Russell, Gregory B.; Julian, Bruce A.; Pastan, Stephen O.; Gautreaux, Michael D.; Muthusamy, Amutha; Chinnakotla, Srinath; Hauptfeld, Vera; Bray, Robert A.; Kirk, Allan D.; Divers, Jasmin; Israni, Ajay K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) G1 and G2 renal-risk variants, common in populations with recent African ancestry, are strongly associated with non-diabetic nephropathy, end-stage kidney disease, and shorter allograft survival in deceased-donor kidneys (autosomal recessive inheritance). Circulating APOL1 protein is synthesized primarily in the liver and hydrodynamic gene delivery of APOL1 G1 and G2 risk variants has caused hepatic necrosis in a murine model. Methods To evaluate the impact of these variants in liver transplantation, this multicenter study investigated the association of APOL1 G1 and G2 alleles in deceased African American liver donors with allograft survival. Transplant recipients were followed for liver allograft survival using data from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients. Results Of the 639 liver donors evaluated, 247 had no APOL1 risk allele, 300 had 1 risk allele, and 92 had 2 risk alleles. Graft failure assessed at 15 days, 6 months, 1 year and total was not significantly associated with donor APOL1 genotype (p-values = 0.25, 0.19, 0.67 and 0.89, respectively). Conclusions In contrast to kidney transplantation, deceased-donor APOL1 G1 and G2 risk variants do not significantly impact outcomes in liver transplantation. PMID:27054572

  7. Desensitization for renal transplantation: depletion of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies, preservation of memory antibodies, and clinical risks.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Natasha M; Eng, Hooi S; Yu, Raymond; Kireta, Svjetlana; Tsiopelas, Eleni; Bennett, Greg D; Brook, Nicholas R; Gillis, David; Russ, Graeme R; Coates, P Toby

    2011-01-01

    Desensitization protocols reduce donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSA) and enable renal transplantation in patients with a positive complement-dependent cytotoxic cross-match (CDC-CXM). The effect of this treatment on protective antibody and immunoglobulin levels is unknown. Thirteen patients with end-stage renal disease, DSA and positive CDC-CXM underwent desensitization. Sera collected pre- and post-transplantation were analysed for anti-tetanus and anti-pneumococcal antibodies, total immunoglobulin (Ig) levels and IgG subclasses and were compared to healthy controls and contemporaneous renal transplant recipients treated with standard immunosuppression alone. Ten patients developed negative CDC-CXM and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and underwent successful transplantation. Eight recipients achieved good graft function without antibody-mediated or late rejection, BK virus or cytomegalovirus infection. One patient had primary non-function due to recurrent oxalosis, and one patient with immediate graft function died from septicaemia. Seven recipients required post-operative transfusion and three developed septicaemia. DSA remained negative by ELISA at 12 months, but were detectable by Luminex(®) . Anti-tetanus and anti-pneumococcal antibodies, total Ig and IgG subclasses were below the normal range but comparable to levels in renal transplant recipients who had not undergone desensitization. Desensitization protocols effectively reduce DSA and allow successful transplantation. Post-operative bleeding and short-term infectious risk is increased. Protective antibody and serum immunoglobulin levels are relatively preserved.

  8. ABO incompatible renal transplantation following lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Snell, G I; Davis, A K; Menahem, S; Kotecha, S; Whitford, H M; Levvey, B J; Paraskeva, M; Webb, A; Westall, G W; Walker, R G

    2016-11-01

    We present management strategies utilised for the first case of an urgent live-donor ABO incompatible B blood group renal transplant, in a patient with a prior A blood group lung transplant for cystic fibrosis. Three years on, renal function is excellent and stable, whilst lung function has improved.

  9. Renal transplantation with expanded criteria donors: Which is the optimal immunosuppression?

    PubMed Central

    Filiopoulos, Vassilis; Boletis, John N

    2016-01-01

    The growing gap between demand and supply for kidney transplants has led to renewed interest in the use of expanded criteria donor (ECD) kidneys in an effort to increase the donor pool. Although most studies of ECD kidney transplantation confirm lower allograft survival rates and, generally, worse outcomes than standard criteria donor kidneys, recipients of ECD kidneys generally have improved survival compared with wait-listed dialysis patients, thus encouraging the pursuit of this type of kidney transplantation. The relative benefits of transplantation using kidneys from ECDs are dependent on patient characteristics and the waiting time on dialysis. Because of the increased risk of poor graft function, calcineurin inhibitor (CNI)-induced nephrotoxicity, increased incidence of infections, cardiovascular risk, and malignancies, elderly recipients of an ECD kidney transplant are a special population that requires a tailored immunosuppressive regimen. Recipients of ECD kidneys often are excluded from transplant trials and, therefore, the optimal induction and maintenance immunosuppressive regimen for them is not known. Approaches are largely center specific and based upon expert opinion. Some data suggest that antithymocyte globulin might be the preferred induction agent for elderly recipients of ECD kidneys. Maintenance regimens that spare CNIs have been advocated, especially for older recipients of ECD kidneys. CNI-free regimens are not universally accepted due to occasionally high rejection rates. However, reduced CNI exposure and CNI-free regimens based on mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors have shown acceptable outcomes in appropriately selected ECD transplant recipients. PMID:27011908

  10. Longitudinal assessment of renal perfusion and oxygenation in transplant donor-recipient pairs using ASL and BOLD MRI

    PubMed Central

    Niles, David J; Artz, Nathan S; Djamali, Arjang; Sadowski, Elizabeth A; Grist, Thomas M; Fain, Sean B

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess renal function in kidney transplant recipients and their respective donors over two years using arterial spin labeling (ASL) and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI, and to prospectively evaluate the effect of losartan on functional MRI measures in recipients. Materials and Methods The study included 15 matched pairs of renal transplant donors and recipients. ASL and BOLD MRI of the kidneys were performed on donors prior to transplant surgery (baseline) and on both donors and recipients at 3 months, 1 year and 2 years post-transplant. After 3 months, seven of the 15 recipients were prescribed 25–50 mg/day losartan for the remainder of the study. A linear mixed-effects model was used to evaluate perfusion, R2*, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and fractional excretion of sodium (FENa) for changes across time or associated with losartan treatment. Results In donors, cortical perfusion in the remaining kidney decreased by 50 ± 19 ml/min/100g (11.8%) between baseline and 2 years (P < 0.05), while cortical R2* declined modestly by 0.7 ± 0.3 s−1 (5.6%; P < 0.05). In transplanted kidneys, cortical perfusion decreased markedly by 141 ± 21 ml/min/100g (34.2%) between baseline and 2 years (P < 0.001), while medullary R2* declined by 1.5 ± 0.8 s−1 (8.3%; P = 0.06). Single-kidney eGFR increased between baseline and 2 years by 17.7 ± 2.7 ml/min/1.73m2 (40.3%; P < 0.0001) in donors and to 14.6 ± 4.3 ml/min/1.73m2 (33.3%; P < 0.01) in recipients. Cortical perfusion at 1 and 2 years in recipients receiving 25–50 mg/day losartan was 62 ± 24 ml/min/100g higher than recipients not receiving the drug (P < 0.05). No significant effects of losartan were observed for any other markers of renal function. Conclusions The results suggest an important role for non-invasive functional monitoring with ASL and BOLD MRI in kidney transplant recipients and donors, and they indicate a potentially beneficial effect of losartan in recipients. PMID

  11. Ethnic differences in HLA antigens in Chilean donors and recipients: data from the National Renal Transplantation Program.

    PubMed

    Droguett, M A; Beltran, R; Ardiles, R; Raddatz, N; Labraña, C; Arenas, A; Flores, J; Alruiz, P; Mezzano, S; Ardiles, L

    2008-11-01

    To describe HLA antigen distribution, looking for possible markers of renal disease in Mapuche and non-Mapuche people in the renal transplantation program, we reviewed data from 1297 histocompatibility studies of the Chilean national renal transplantation program (421 donors and 876 recipients), performed between 2000 and 2005. Mapuche people were classified according to their family surnames. The most frequent antigens found among the total Chilean population were A2 (48%), A19 (33%), B16 (33%), B35 (26%), DR4 (38%), and DR6 (28%), without significant differences between donors and recipients. Among the 114 individuals (9%) classified as Mapuche, the most frequent antigens were A28 (49%), A2 (44%), B16 (63%), B35 (24%), DR4 (48%), and DR8 (30%), with A28/B16/DR4 as the most common haplotype. In contrast, A28, B16, DR4, and DR8 were significantly more frequent in Mapuche compared with non-Mapuche people. B8 was significantly more frequent in Mapuche recipients than in non-Mapuche recipients and Mapuche donors. The higher frequency of some HLA antigens in Mapuche people was confirmed, possibly corresponding to ethnic markers. The special concentration of B8 among Mapuche recipients might represent a genetic factor predisposing to chronic renal disease in this human group.

  12. Baseline donor chronic renal injury confers the same transplant survival disadvantage for DCD and DBD kidneys.

    PubMed

    Kosmoliaptsis, V; Salji, M; Bardsley, V; Chen, Y; Thiru, S; Griffiths, M H; Copley, H C; Saeb-Parsy, K; Bradley, J A; Torpey, N; Pettigrew, G J

    2015-03-01

    Histological assessment of baseline chronic kidney injury may discriminate kidneys that are suitable for transplantation, but has not been validated for appraisal of donation after circulatory death (DCD) kidneys. 'Time-zero' biopsies for 371 consecutive, solitary, deceased-donor kidneys transplanted at our center between 2006 and 2010 (65.5% DCD, 34.5% donation after brain death [DBD]) were reviewed and baseline chronic degenerative injury scored using Remuzzi's classification. High scores correlated with donor age and extended criteria donors (42% of donors), but the spectrum of scores was similar for DCD and DBD kidneys. Transplant outcomes for kidneys scoring from 0 to 4 were comparable (1 and 3 year graft survival 95% and 92%), but were much poorer for kidneys scoring ≥5, with 1 year graft survival only 73%, and 12.5% suffering primary nonfunction. Critically, high Remuzzi scores conferred the same survival disadvantage for DCD and DBD kidneys. On multi-variable regression analysis, time-zero biopsy score was the only independent predictor for graft survival, whereas one-year graft estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) correlated with donor age and biopsy score. In conclusion, the relationship between severity of chronic kidney injury and transplant outcome is similar for DCD and DBD kidneys. Kidneys with Remuzzi scores of ≤4 can be implanted singly with acceptable results.

  13. The Risk of End-Stage Renal Disease Among Living Donor Liver Transplant Recipients in the United States.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, D S; Ruebner, R L; Abt, P L

    2015-10-01

    Since initiation of model for end-stage liver disease (MELD)-based allocation for liver transplantation, the risk of posttransplant end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has increased. Recent US data have demonstrated comparable, if not superior survival, among recipients of living donor liver transplants (LDLT) when compared to deceased donor liver transplant (DDLT) recipients. However, little is known about the incidence of ESRD post-LDLT. We analyzed linked Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) and US Renal Data System (USRDS) data of first-time liver-alone transplant recipients from February 27, 2002 to March 1, 2011, and restricted the cohort to recipients with a laboratory MELD score ≤25 not on dialysis prior to transplantation, in order to evaluate the incidence of ESRD post-LDLT, and to compare the incidence among LDLT versus DDLT recipients. There were 28 707 DDLT and 1917 LDLT recipients included in the analyses. The 1-, 3- and 5-year unadjusted risk of ESRD was 1.7%, 2.9% and 3.4% in LDLT recipients, compared with 1.5%, 3.0% and 4.8% in DDLT recipients (p > 0.05), respectively. In multivariable competing risk Cox regression models, there was no association between receiving an LDLT and risk of ESRD (sub-hazard ratio: 0.99, 95% CI: 0.77-1.26, p = 0.92). In conclusion, the incidence of ESRD post-LDLT in the United States is low, and there are no significant differences among LDLT and DDLT recipients with MELD scores ≤25 at transplantation.

  14. Screening for hepatitis B virus DNA in serum of organ donors and renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Miédougé, M; Rostaing, L; Mansuy, J M; Sandres-Sauné, K; Boudet, F; Izopet, J

    2003-04-01

    In order to determine the impact of screening potential organ donors for hepatitis B virus DNA using a standardized test, the serum of 145 donor candidates was tested. All of the candidates were negative for hepatitis B virus DNA, but the status of one donor was doubtful for hepatitis B virus surface antigen and seven donors tested positive for hepatitis B virus core antibody without hepatitis B virus surface antigen. Nine transplant recipients tested positive for hepatitis B virus surface antibody; they were given kidneys from the donor with a doubtful hepatitis B virus surface antigen result and from four of the seven donors who tested positive for hepatitis B core antibody. Follow-up revealed no case of hepatitis B transmission. In this study, screening for hepatitis B virus DNA was useful and did not lead to donor organ shortage. Patients with hepatitis B virus surface antibodies can safely be given kidneys from donors who are positive for hepatitis B core antibody but negative for hepatitis B virus DNA.

  15. Two Cases of Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type I-Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis Caused by Living-Donor Renal Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Yasutaka; Matsumura, Mariko; Yaguchi, Hiroaki; Mito, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    In rare instances, recipients of organ transplants from human T-lymphotropic virus type I- (HTLV-I-) positive donors reportedly developed neurologic symptoms due to HTLV-I-associated myelopathy (HAM). We present herein two cases of HAM associated with renal transplantation from HTLV-I seropositive living-donors. The first patient was a 42-year-old woman with chronic renal failure for twelve years and seronegative for HTLV-I. She underwent renal transplantation with her HTLV-I seropositive mother as the donor, and she developed HAM three years after the transplantation. The second patient was a 65-year-old man who had been suffering from diabetic nephropathy. He was seronegative for HTLV-I and underwent renal transplantation one year previously, with his HTLV-I seropositive wife as the donor. He developed HAM eight months after renal transplantation. Both cases showed neurological improvements after the immunomodulating therapies. We tried to shed some light on the understanding of immunological mechanisms of transplantation-associated HAM, focusing on therapeutic strategies based on the immunopathogenesis of the condition.

  16. Two Cases of Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type I-Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis Caused by Living-Donor Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Mariko; Yaguchi, Hiroaki; Mito, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    In rare instances, recipients of organ transplants from human T-lymphotropic virus type I- (HTLV-I-) positive donors reportedly developed neurologic symptoms due to HTLV-I-associated myelopathy (HAM). We present herein two cases of HAM associated with renal transplantation from HTLV-I seropositive living-donors. The first patient was a 42-year-old woman with chronic renal failure for twelve years and seronegative for HTLV-I. She underwent renal transplantation with her HTLV-I seropositive mother as the donor, and she developed HAM three years after the transplantation. The second patient was a 65-year-old man who had been suffering from diabetic nephropathy. He was seronegative for HTLV-I and underwent renal transplantation one year previously, with his HTLV-I seropositive wife as the donor. He developed HAM eight months after renal transplantation. Both cases showed neurological improvements after the immunomodulating therapies. We tried to shed some light on the understanding of immunological mechanisms of transplantation-associated HAM, focusing on therapeutic strategies based on the immunopathogenesis of the condition. PMID:27777805

  17. Pediatric Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Talwalkar, Yeshawant B.; Harner, Marvin H.; Musgrave, James E.; Lawson, Russell K.; Campbell, Robert A.

    1975-01-01

    Thirty-one children received 38 kidney transplants from 22 live and 16 cadaver donors. Among the 31 patients, 25 received one transplant each, 5 received two transplants each and 1 received three transplants. Peritoneal or hemodialysis (or both) was carried out in 22 patients, with an average dialytic maintenance of 12 weeks before transplantation. Posttransplant immunosuppressive therapy included prednisone and azathioprine. Antilymphocyte globulin was administered to 33 recipients as adjunctive immunosuppressive therapy. At present, 23 patients have functioning allografts, 3 are on hemodialysis and 5 are dead. Of 22 live kidney transplants, 18 are presently functioning two months to 14 years after transplantation with an average of 36 months. Of 16 cadaver kidney transplants, 5 are presently functioning 9 to 57 months after transplantation with an average of 32 months. Actuarial live donor allograft survival for one year was 76 percent, for two years was 66 percent and for three years was 64 percent. Cadaver allograft survival was 50 percent, 40 percent and 40 percent, respectively. Complications were urologic and infection related. Of nine recipients with sustained hypertension, in six the condition was due to chronic rejection, while in one it was due to recurrence of the original disease in the allograft. Linear growth was measured in 15 children who were less than 14 years of age at the time of transplantation and in whom allografts survived more than one year. Maximum average linear growth velocity occurred during the first year after transplantation. Our experience indicates pediatric renal transplantation can be successfully used in the treatment of terminal renal failure. PMID:1098288

  18. [Hemolytic anemia caused by graft-versus-host reaction in ABO-nonidentical renal transplants from blood group O donors].

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Díaz Corte, C; Navascués, R A

    2001-01-01

    Acute hemolytic anemia is one of the side effects associated with cyclosporin and tacrolimus therapy, and three mechanisms have been described to account for hemolytic anemia in patients receiving these drugs: drug induced hemolysis, autoimmune hemolysis and alloimmune hemolysis resulting from donor lymphocytes derived from the allograft (passenger lymphocyte syndrome). We report four cases of renal transplant recipients who developed alloimmune hemolytic anemia due to minor ABO incompatibility while under treatment with cyclosporin (two) and tacrolimus (two). The anti-erythrocyte antibodies responsible for hemolysis were of the IgG isotype and showed anti-A or anti-B specificity. These findings suggest that the hemolysis could be related to alloantibodies derived from the clonal development of donor B lymphocytes in the recipients (microchimerism). In summary, hemolytic anemia due to ABO-minor incompatibility occurs infrequently after renal transplantation. Risks are higher for patients A, B or AB blood group receiving an O blood group graft under treatment with cyclosporin or tacrolimus. Follow-up of these patients is warranted for the early detection and optimal management may be achieved by reduction of immunosuppression and change to mycophenolate mofetil.

  19. Post-Transplant Membranous Nephropathy Associated with Chronic Active Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Hepatitis C Infection after Deceased Donor Renal Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Doke, Tomohito; Sato, Waichi; Takahashi, Kazuo; Hayashi, Hiroki; Koide, Sigehisa; Sasaki, Hitomi; Kusaka, Mamoru; Shiroki, Ryoichi; Hoshinaga, Kiyotaka; Takeda, Asami; Yuzawa, Yukio; Hasegawa, Midori

    2016-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman who had undergone deceased donor kidney transplantation twice, at 35 and 43 years of age, presented with renal impairment. She was infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The histology of the graft kidney revealed post-transplant membranous nephropathy (MN) with podocytic infolding and antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). IgG subclass staining showed fine granular deposits of IgG1 and IgG3, but not IgG4, in the glomerular capillary walls. Panel reactive antibody scores for human leukocyte antigen class I and class II were 92.67% and 66.68%, respectively. Thus, this case of post-transplanted MN was considered to be associated with AMR and HCV infection.

  20. A randomized study of intravenous fluid replacement following living-donor renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hatch, D A; Barry, J M; Norman, D J

    1985-12-01

    Fourteen adult recipients of living-donor kidneys preserved with ice-cold intracellular electrolyte solution were randomly assigned to receive either high fluid replacement (total volume of urine output + 30 ml/hr) or low fluid replacement (constant 125 ml/hr) during the first 48 hr after grafting. High replacement recipients had significantly higher fluid intake and urine output than did low replacement recipients. However, net fluid balance at the end of the 48-hr study period was positive for both groups and not significantly different. Fractional excretion of sodium was directly related to urine output in all patients. Serum osmolality, serum sodium concentration, and urine sodium concentration were not significantly different in the treatment groups. Urine osmolality was significantly higher in the low-replacement group at 24 and 36 hr after transplantation. The i.v. replacement of total urinary output is unnecessary in adult recipients of living-donor kidneys preserved with ice-cold intracellular electrolyte solution because such grafts can conserve sodium and water immediately after transplantation.

  1. Renal transplantation in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Akoh, Jacob A

    2011-07-01

    Patients with established renal failure, living in developing countries, face many obstacles including lack of access to transplantation centers, quality and safety issues, and exploittation associated with transplant tourism. This review aims to determine the state and outcome of renal transplantation performed in developing countries and to recommend some solutions. The lack of suitable legislation and infrastructure has prevented growth of deceased donor programs; so, living donors have continued to be the major source of transplantable kidneys. Transplant tourism and commercial kidney transplants are associated with a high incidence of surgical complications, acute rejection and invasive infection, which cause major morbidity and mortality. Developing transplant services worldwide has many benefits - improving the results of transplantation as they would be performed legally, increasing the donor pool, making transplant tourism unnecessary and granting various governments the moral courage to fight unacceptable practices. A private-public partnership underpinned by transparency, public audit and accountability is a prerequisite for effective transplant services in the developing world. Finally, lack of dialysis facilities coupled with better outcomes in patients spending <6 months on dialysis prior to transplantation favor pre-emptive transplantation in developing countries.

  2. Effect of donor pneumoperitoneum on early allograft perfusion following renal transplantation in pediatric patients: an intraoperative Doppler ultrasound study.

    PubMed

    Dave, S; Farhat, W; Pace, K; Navarro, O; Hebert, D; Khoury, A E

    2008-08-01

    Decreased perfusion and trauma during laparoscopic harvesting are proposed causative factors for DGF and rejection in children following renal transplantation with laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (LDN) allograft. We performed a retrospective review of 11 children who underwent LDN transplant and 11 preceding patients who underwent ODN transplant. Intraoperative DUS findings, creatinine values and clearance, time to nadir creatinine and AR episodes were compared. There were no significant differences in the BMI, vascular anatomy, side of nephrectomy, or warm ischemia time in the two groups. Mean follow-up duration was 11.4 and 30.4 months in LDN and ODN groups. DUS showed initial turbulent flow in five of the LDN and four of the ODN group with an average RI of 0.59 and 0.66 in the ODN and LDN groups, respectively (NS). Three patients in the ODN group had an abnormal RI compared to none in the LDN group (p = 0.034). The creatinine values, creatinine clearances (at 24 h, one, four wk and last follow-up) and AR episodes were similar in both groups. Pneumoperitoneum during LDN does not appear to have an adverse impact on early graft reperfusion.

  3. Renal transplantation in infants.

    PubMed Central

    Najarian, J S; Frey, D J; Matas, A J; Gillingham, K J; So, S S; Cook, M; Chavers, B; Mauer, S M; Nevins, T E

    1990-01-01

    The timing of renal transplantation in infants is controversial. Between 1965 and 1989, 79 transplants in 75 infants less than 2 years old were performed: 23 who were 12 months or younger, 52 who were older than 12 months; 63 donors were living related, 1 was living unrelated, and 15 were cadaver donors; 75 were primary transplants and 4 were retransplants. Infants were considered for transplantation when they were on, or about to begin, dialysis. All had intra-abdominal transplants with arterial anastomosis to the distal aorta. Sixty-four per cent are alive with functioning grafts. The most frequent etiologies of renal failure were hypoplasia (32%) and obstructive uropathy (20%); oxalosis was the etiology in 11%. Since 1983 patient survival has been 95% and 91% at 1 and 5 years; graft survival has been 86% and 73% at 1 and 5 years. For cyclosporine immunosuppressed patients, patient survival is 100% at 1 and 5 years; graft survival is 96% and 82% at 1 and 5 years. There was no difference in outcome between infants who were 12 months or younger versus those who were aged 12 to 24 months; similarly there was no difference between infants and older children. Sixteen (21%) patients died: 5 after operation from coagulopathy (1) and infection (4); and 11 late from postsplenectomy sepsis (4), recurrent oxalosis (3), infection (2), and other causes (2). Routine splenectomy is no longer done. There has not been a death from infection in patients transplanted since 1983. Rejection was the most common cause of graft loss (in 15 patients); other causes included death (with function) (7), recurrent oxalosis (3), and technical complications (3). Overall 52% of patients have not had a rejection episode; mean creatinine level in patients with functioning grafts is 0.8 +/- 0.2 mg/dL. Common postoperative problems include fever, atelectasis, and ileus. At the time of their transplants, the infants were small for age; but with a successful transplant, their growth, head

  4. Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... instructions before and after surgery. • Have a compatible blood type. • Have an emotional tie with the recipient. • Not ... test is to find out if the donor's blood type matches the recipient’s blood type. Next, the transplant ...

  5. Donor selection in heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Emani, Sitaramesh; Sai-Sudhakar, Chittoor B.; Higgins, Robert S. D.; Whitson, Bryan A.

    2014-01-01

    There is increased scrutiny on the quality in health care with particular emphasis on institutional heart transplant survival outcomes. An important aspect of successful transplantation is appropriate donor selection. We review the current guidelines as well as areas of controversy in the selection of appropriate hearts as donor organs to ensure optimal outcomes. This decision is paramount to the success of a transplant program as well as recipient survival and graft function post-transplant. PMID:25132976

  6. Donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies after bone-graft transplantation. Impact on a subsequent renal transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mosconi, G; Baraldi, O; Fantinati, C; Panicali, L; Veronesi, M; Cappuccilli, M L; Corsini, S; Zanelli, P; Bassi, A; Buscaroli, A; Feliciangeli, G; Stefoni, S

    2009-05-01

    Immunological evaluation by panel-reactive antibody (PRA) and determination of anti-HLA specificity are important phases in the evaluation of patients awaiting kidney transplantation. The main causes of immunization are previous solid organ transplantation, hemotransfusion, and pregnancy. It is also possible that immunogenicity can be triggered by vascularized tissue grafts. Immune induction by cryopreserved bone prostheses is not yet understood. A 19-year-old patient with osteosarcoma had undergone resection of the left proximal tibia with reconstruction using human bone in 1997. The donor HLA typing was as follows: A3, A29 (19); B44 (12), Bw4; DR13 (6), DR7, DR52, DR53. The patient was subsequently enrolled onto the waiting list for cadaveric donor kidney transplantation due to chronic kidney failure caused by cisplatin toxicity. Pretransplantation immunological screening using the complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) technique revealed a PRA of 63%. IgG antibody specificities were detected against class I and class II donor antigens, specifically anti-A3, B44, DR7 antibodies, using flow cytometry (Tepnel Luminex). Further immunological studies using single HLA specificity analysis (LSA Class I degrees -II degrees , Tepnel-Luminex) showed direct antibodies against all donor antigen specificities. This case showed immune induction after the implantation of bone prosthesis in a kidney transplant candidate, underlining the importance of the availability of HLA typing data of donors of a human prosthesis.

  7. [Renal transplantation without maintenance immunosuppression. Identical twins and kidney transplantation following a successful bone marrow graft].

    PubMed

    Hadi, Riad Abdel; Thomé, Gustavo Gomes; Ribeiro, Adriana Reginato; Manfro, Roberto Ceratti

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation without maintenance immunosuppression has been sporadically reported in the literature. The cases include non-adherent patients who discontinued their immunosuppressive medications, transplantation between identical twins, kidney transplantation after a successful bone marrow graft from the same donor and simultaneous bone marrow and kidney transplantation for the treatment of multiple myeloma with associated renal failure. There are also ongoing clinical trials designed to induce donor specific transplant tolerance with infusion of hematopoietic cells from the same kidney donor. Here we describe two cases of renal transplantation without immunosuppression as examples of situations described above.

  8. Antibodies to HLA-E may account for the non-donor-specific anti-HLA class-Ia antibodies in renal and liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Mepur H; Pham, Tho; Ozawa, Miyuki; Terasaki, Paul I

    2012-01-01

    The non-donor-specific anti-HLA-Ia antibodies correlate significantly with lower graft survival in organ transplant patients. Based on our earlier findings that anti-HLA-E murine monoclonal antibodies (MEM-E/02 and 3D12) reacted with different HLA-Ia alleles and the peptides shared by HLA-E and HLA class, Ia alleles inhibited the HLA-Ia reactivity of the anti-HLA-E antibodies in normal non-alloimmunized males, the possibility of that anti-HLA-E IgG may account for the non-donor-specific anti-HLA-Ia antibodies in the allograft recipients was examined by multiplex-Luminex®-immunoassay. About 73% of renal and 53% of liver transplant patients' sera with high level of anti-HLA-E IgG showed reactivity to different non-donor HLA-Ia alleles. About 50% renal and 52% liver allograft recipients' sera with low level of anti-HLA-E IgG had no reactivity to any HLA-Ia alleles; however, the IgG isolated from the same sera with protein-G columns showed the presence of anti-HLA-E IgG with HLA-Ia reactivity. Furthermore, both recombinant HLA-E and the IgG-free serum containing soluble HLA-E (sHLA-E) inhibited HLA-Ia reactivity of anti-HLA-E murine monoclonal IgG significantly. The data suggest that the HLA-Ia reactivity of the anti-HLA-E antibody accounts for the non-donor-specific anti-HLA-Ia antibodies. It is proposed that the sHLA-E heavy chain, shed in circulation after organ transplantation, may expose cryptic epitopes of HLA-E to elicit anti-HLA-E IgG antibodies, which may cross react with HLA-Ia alleles due to the peptide sequences shared between them. This study provides a new explanation for the presence of non-donor-specific antibodies for non-existing HLA-Ia alleles, frequently observed and correlated with survival in organ transplant recipients.

  9. Disparate rates of acute rejection and donor-specific antibodies among high-immunologic risk renal transplant subgroups receiving antithymocyte globulin induction.

    PubMed

    Patel, Samir J; Suki, Wadi N; Loucks-DeVos, Jennifer; Graviss, Edward A; Nguyen, Duc T; Knight, Richard J; Kuten, Samantha A; Moore, Linda W; Teeter, Larry D; Gaber, Lillian W; Gaber, A Osama

    2016-08-01

    Lymphocyte-depleting induction lowers acute rejection (AR) rates among high-immunologic risk (HIR) renal transplant recipients, including African Americans (AAs), retransplants, and the sensitized. It is unclear whether different HIR subgroups experience similarly low rates of AR. We aimed to describe the incidence of AR and de novo donor-specific antibody (dnDSA) among HIR recipients categorized by age, race, or donor type. All received antithymocyte globulin (ATG) induction and triple maintenance immunosuppression. A total of 464 HIR recipients from 2007 to 2014 were reviewed. AR and dnDSA rates at 1 year for the entire population were 14% and 27%, respectively. AR ranged from 6.7% among living donor (LD) recipients to 30% in younger AA deceased donor (DD) recipients. De novo donor-specific antibody at 1 year ranged from 7% in older non-AA LD recipients to 32% in AAs. AA race remained as an independent risk factor for AR among DD recipients and for dnDSA among all HIR recipients. Development of both AR and dnDSA within the first year was associated with a 54% graft survival at 5 years and was an independent risk factor for graft loss. Despite utilization of recommended immunosuppression for HIR recipients, substantial disparities exist among subgroups, warranting further consideration of individualized immunosuppression in certain HIR subgroups.

  10. Renal transplantation across ABO barrier

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, P. N.; Pokhariyal, S.; Bansal, S.; Jain, S.; Saxena, V.; Sharma, R.; Jain, M.; Jha, P.; Sethi, S. K.; Ghosh, P.; Tewari, A.; Ahlawat, R.; Kher, V.

    2013-01-01

    In India, patients without a compatible blood group donor are usually excluded from renal transplantation. For young patients, it is a difficult therapeutic choice to stay on long-term dialysis. We describe the case of a 19-year-old male patient who had blood group O +ve and had no compatible donor in the family. His mother was B +ve and was willing to donate. The patient had an initial anti-B antibody titer of 1:512 and underwent antibody depletion with plasmapheresis (11 sessions) and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) 100 mg/kg after every plasmapheresis. He also received rituximab 500 mg for 3 days prior to transplant and was induced with basiliximab. At the time of transplant, his anti-B titers were <1:8. Post-operatively, he required four sessions of plasmapheresis and IVIG as his titers rebounded to 1:64. The titers then spontaneously subsided to <1:16 and have stayed at the same level for 6 months post-transplant. The patient continues to have normal renal function with a creatinine of 1.4 mg/dl% and has had no episodes of rejection. PMID:23814422

  11. Clinical and anti-HLA antibody profile of nine renal transplant recipients with failed grafts: donor-specific and non-donor-specific antibody development.

    PubMed

    Rebellato, Lorita M; Ozawa, Miyuki; Verbanac, Kathryn M; Catrou, Paul; Haisch, Carl E; Terasaki, Paul I

    2006-01-01

    predictor of late graft loss via chronic allograft nephropathy, understanding and modifying the antibody response is critical to extending the longevity of transplanted organs. Finally, since the strong sensitization to NDSA will seriously hamper the ability to identify a compatible donor for a future transplant, these data reinforce the importance of minimizing HLA mismatches between the donor and the recipient.

  12. [The kidney transplantation from the ABO-incompatible donors].

    PubMed

    Goriaĭnov, V A; Kaabak, M M; Babenko, N N; Shishlo, L A; Morozova, M M; Ragimov, A A; Dashkova, N G; Salimov, É L

    2012-01-01

    The experience of 28 allotransplantations of ABO-incompatible kidneys was compared with the treatment results of 38 ABO-compatible renal transplantations. The transplanted kidney function, morphological changes of the transplanted kidney and the comparative analysis of actuary survival in both groups showed no significant difference. The results of the study prove the validity of the kidney transplantation from the ABO-incompatible donors.

  13. FGF23 is associated with early post-transplant hypophosphataemia and normalizes faster than iPTH in living donor renal transplant recipients: a longitudinal follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Narayan; Jaiswal, Akhilesh; Agarwal, Vikas; Kumar, Shashi; Chaturvedi, Saurabh; Yadav, Subhash; Gupta, Amit; Sharma, Raj K.; Bhadauria, Dharmendra; Kaul, Anupama

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to longitudinally analyse changes in the levels of serum fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) and associated minerals in patients undergoing renal transplantation. Methods Sixty-three patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who underwent living donor transplantation were recruited. Serum FGF23, iPTH, uric acid, inorganic phosphorous (iP), blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine were measured pre-transplant and at 1 (M1), 3 (M3) and 12 months (M12) post-transplantation. Results FGF23 levels were decreased at M1, M3 and M12 by 93.81, 96.74 and 97.53%, respectively. iPTH levels were decreased by 67.95, 74.95 and 84.9%, respectively. The prevalence of hyperparathyroidism at M1, M3 and M12 post-transplantation was 63.5, 42.9 and 11.1%, respectively. FGF23 and iP levels remained above the normal range in 23 (36.5%) and 17 (27%) patients at M1, 10 (15.9%) and 5 (8%) at M3 and in none at M12 post-transplantation, respectively. A multivariate regression model revealed that, pre-transplant, iP was positively associated with iPTH (P = 0.016) but not with FGF 23; however, post-transplant, iP level was negatively associated with FGF23 (P < 0.001) but not with iPTH. Conclusions Post-transplant FGF23 levels settle faster than those of iPTH. However, 11% of patients continued to have hyperparathyroidism even after 12 months. PMID:27679713

  14. Attitudes of commercial renal transplant recipients toward renal transplantation in India.

    PubMed

    Qunibi, W; Abulrub, D; Shaheen, F; el-Din, A B; Alfurayh, O; Almeshari, K

    1995-08-01

    Renal transplantation offers patients with end-stage renal disease the best opportunity for rehabilitation and long-term survival. However, there is a critical shortage of transplantable kidneys worldwide. This plays well into the hands of transplanters and entrepreneurs involved in commercial renal transplantation, particularly in India. This practice has been condemned by all transplant societies. In our fight against rampant commercialism in renal transplantation, we sought to describe feelings of patients who had received transplants in India, and the difficulties they faced during their stay there. The results show that the two reasons that motivated patients to go to India were lack of living-related donors and the need for prompt transplant. More than half of the patients did not meet their donors. Their experience, however, has been largely positive except for some negative feelings toward the broker and the standard of hospital hygiene. The total cost of the transplant was far less than that in the West but, despite that, some patients felt financially exploited. Communication with them was poor, as most patients did not get adequate pretransplant education and were not informed of possible complications including rejection and graft loss. Furthermore, almost half of the patients were not given medical reports. These results substantiate the impression that CRT in India does not conform to the high standards of renal transplant medicine.

  15. Blood disorders typically associated with renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Chen, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation has become one of the most common surgical procedures performed to replace a diseased kidney with a healthy kidney from a donor. It can help patients with kidney failure live decades longer. However, renal transplantation also faces a risk of developing various blood disorders. The blood disorders typically associated with renal transplantation can be divided into two main categories: (1) Common disorders including post-transplant anemia (PTA), post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), post-transplant erythrocytosis (PTE), and post-transplant cytopenias (PTC, leukopenia/neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and pancytopenia); and (2) Uncommon but serious disorders including hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS), thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), therapy-related myelodysplasia (t-MDS), and therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML). Although many etiological factors involve the development of post-transplant blood disorders, immunosuppressive agents, and viral infections could be the two major contributors to most blood disorders and cause hematological abnormalities and immunodeficiency by suppressing hematopoietic function of bone marrow. Hematological abnormalities and immunodeficiency will result in severe clinical outcomes in renal transplant recipients. Understanding how blood disorders develop will help cure these life-threatening complications. A potential therapeutic strategy against post-transplant blood disorders should focus on tapering immunosuppression or replacing myelotoxic immunosuppressive drugs with lower toxic alternatives, recognizing and treating promptly the etiological virus, bacteria, or protozoan, restoring both hematopoietic function of bone marrow and normal blood counts, and improving kidney graft survival. PMID:25853131

  16. Donor cancer transmission in kidney transplantation: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Xiao, D; Craig, J C; Chapman, J R; Dominguez-Gil, B; Tong, A; Wong, G

    2013-10-01

    Transplantation of any biological material from a donor to a host will carry some inherent risk of disease transmission. Our aims were to summarize the totality of the published evidence about donor cancer transmission among kidney transplant recipients and to determine the cancer-specific survival of these patients. We systematically reviewed all case reports, case series and registry studies that described the outcomes of kidney transplant recipients with donor cancer transmission published to December 2012. A total of 69 studies with 104 donor-transmitted cancer cases were identified. The most common transmitted cancer types were renal cancer (n = 20, 19%), followed by melanoma (n = 18, 17%), lymphoma (n = 15, 14%) and lung cancer (n = 9, 9%). Patients with melanoma and lung cancers had the worst prognosis, with less than 50% of recipients surviving after 24 months from transplantation. Recipients with transmitted renal cancers had the best outcomes, with over 70% of recipients surviving for at least 24 months after transplantation. Overall, the risk of donor transmission of cancer appears low, but there is a high likelihood of reporting bias. Our findings support the current recommendations for rejecting organs from donors with a history of melanoma and lung cancer, but suggest that the use of donor kidneys with a history of small, incidental renal cell cancer may be reasonable.

  17. Donor characteristics can influence overall transplant activities: the Italian experience.

    PubMed

    Bertoni, E; Rosati, A; Zanazzi, M; Becherelli, P; Gallo, M; Salvadori, M

    2004-01-01

    The notable increase in organ donations and transplants in Italy in recent years has lead to the development of an atypical approach to kidney transplantation. All propitious considerations left aside regarding the organ donation rate which has placed Italy among the European leaders, a careful comparative evaluation of the data taken from Italian and international registries demonstrates that renal transplantations in Italy have not shared the same significant growth. The typology of the donors has influenced in a decisive way not only the number of renal transplantations, but also the access to transplant for some age groups and probably even the quality and cost. The overall view which emerges is complex and somewhat contradictory, but we believe that this perspective can furnish solid arguments for choices that need not to be delayed for the living donor transplant, the divulgence of a donation culture in the population, and the criteria for the allocation of the organs.

  18. Impact of Donor Source on the Outcome of Live Donor Kidney Transplantation: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Matter, Yasser Elsayed; Nagib, Ayman M; Lotfy, Omar E; Alsayed, Ahmed Maher; Donia, Ahmed F; Refaie, Ayman F; Akl, Ahmed I; Abbas, Mohamed Hamed; Abuelmagd, Mohammed M; Shaeashaa, Hussein A; Shokeir, Ahmed A

    2016-01-01

    Background Renal transplantation is the ideal method for management of end-stage renal disease. The use of living donors for renal transplantation was critical for early development in the field and preceded the use of cadaveric donors. Most donors are related genetically to the recipients, like a parent, a child, or a sibling of the recipient, but there are an increasing percentage of cases where donors are genetically unrelated like spouses, friends, or altruistic individuals. Donor shortages constitute the major barrier for kidney transplantation, and much effort has been made to increase the supply of living donors. The impact of donor source on the outcome of renal transplantation is not adequately studied in our country. Objectives The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of donor source on the outcome of live donor kidney transplantation. Patients and Methods From March 1976 to December 2013, the number of patients that underwent living renal transplantation sharing at least one HLA haplotype with their donors was 2,485. We divided these patients into two groups: (1) 2,075 kidney transplant recipients (1,554 or 74.9% male and 521 or 25.1% female) for whom the donors were living related, (2) 410 kidney transplant recipients (297 or 72.4% male and 113 or 27.6% female) for whom the donors were living unrelated. All patients received immunosuppressive therapy, consisting of a calcineurin inhibitor, mycophenolate mofetil, or azathioprine and prednisolone. We compared acute rejection and complication rates, as well as long-term graft and patient survival of both groups. Demographic characteristics were compared using the chi-square test. Graft survival and patient survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results The percentages of patients with acute vascular rejection were significantly higher in the unrelated group, while percentages of patients with no rejection were significantly higher in the related group, but there were no significant

  19. Transplanting Kidneys from Deceased Donors With Severe Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Heilman, R L; Smith, M L; Kurian, S M; Huskey, J; Batra, R K; Chakkera, H A; Katariya, N N; Khamash, H; Moss, A; Salomon, D R; Reddy, K S

    2015-08-01

    Our aim was to determine outcomes with transplanting kidneys from deceased donors with acute kidney injury, defined as a donor with terminal serum creatinine ≥2.0 mg/dL, or a donor requiring acute renal replacement therapy. We included all patients who received deceased donor kidney transplant from June 2004 to October 2013. There were 162 AKI donor transplant recipients (21% of deceased donor transplants): 139 in the standard criteria donor (SCD) and 23 in the expanded criteria donor (ECD) cohort. 71% of the AKI donors had stage 3 (severe AKI), based on acute kidney injury network (AKIN) staging. Protocol biopsies were done at 1, 4, and 12 months posttransplant. One and four month formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) biopsies from 48 patients (24 AKI donors, 24 non-AKI) underwent global gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays (96 arrays). DGF was more common in the AKI group but eGFR, graft survival at 1 year and proportion with IF/TA>2 at 1 year were similar for the two groups. At 1 month, there were 898 differentially expressed genes in the AKI group (p-value <0.005; FDR <10%), but by 4 months there were no differences. Transplanting selected kidneys from deceased donors with AKI is safe and has excellent outcomes.

  20. Utilization of elderly donors in living related kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sahin, S; Manga Sahin, G; Turkmen, A; Sever, M S

    2006-03-01

    Kidney transplantation has become the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease. However, its application is limited due to inadequate organ supply, mainly because many dialysis patients do not have suitable living donors. The increasing discrepancy between organ supply and demand has forced many transplant centers to consider using organs procured from marginal donors. The aim of this study was to investigate whether utilization of kidneys from living related elderly donors is safe for the recipients in the long term. We analyzed the clinical results of 296 consecutive recipients of living related renal transplants, among whom 44 recipients received kidneys from donors over 60 years of age. By the end of 12 months, the mean serum creatinine level of the recipients who were transplanted from the older donors was higher (1.55 +/- 0.45 mg/dL) than that from other donors (1.21 +/- 0.3 mg/dL), but the difference was not significant (P = .08). In the long term (60 months), the graft function was similar (1.88 +/- 0.55 vs 1.52 +/- 0.38) for both groups. The similarity in outcomes of ideal versus older donors as shown less in the present series has encouraged us to utilize elderly living donors. We concluded that transplantations performed from the elderly donors yielded similar results to those of conventional donors. The long waiting list for transplantation, the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease, should encourage us to be more flexible about donor selection.

  1. [De novo tumours of renal transplants].

    PubMed

    Hétet, J F; Rigaud, J; Dorel-Le Théo, M; Láuté, F; Karam, G; Blanchet, P

    2007-12-01

    Kidney cancer occurs rarely and late in renal transplants. The lack of grafts and the increasing age of the cadaver donors are likely to result in an increasing number of such cancers. To date, the treatment of choice is the transplant removal. Nevertheless partial nephrectomy may be discussed in selected cases. Ultrasonographic screening should allow detection of low volume tumours suitable for partial nephrectomy. Alternative techniques (radiofrequency, cryoablation) are to be assessed in such patients.

  2. [Tuberculosis after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Korzeniewska, Anna; Dyła, Tomasz; Kosacka, Monika; Jankowska, Renata

    2009-01-01

    Renal transplant recipients carry a relatively high risk of developing tuberculosis (TB). In most cases, active TB is the result of reactivation of a latent infection and is located in the lungs. In these patients, clinical presentation of TB can often be atypical and there is a high risk of dissemination and high mortality rates. Therefore, the use of invasive procedures for proper diagnosis is recommended, as well as anti-tuberculosis therapy instituted whenever there is a strong suspicion of TB on clinical grounds, even without microbiological evidence. The treatment of active TB in renal transplant recipients should be the same as in the general population. To avoid graft rejection, blood levels of calcineurin inhibitors should be monitored closely. Prophylaxis is recommended for high-risk patients.

  3. A randomized trial of basiliximab with three different patterns of cyclosporin A initiation in renal transplant from expanded criteria donors and at high risk of delayed graft function.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Amado; Marcén, Roberto; Valdés, Francisco; Plumed, Jaime Sánchez; Solà, Ricard; Errasti, Pedro; Lauzurica, Ricardo; Pallardó, Luis; Bustamante, Jesús; Amenábar, Juan José; Plaza, Juan José; Gómez, Ernesto; Grinyó, Josep Maria; Rengel, Manuel; Puig, Josep Maria; Sanz, Aurelio; Asensio, Concepción; Andrés, Inés

    2009-01-01

    This study assays therapy with basiliximab and different patterns of cyclosporin A (CsA) initiation in renal transplant (RT) recipients from expanded criteria donors (ECD) and at high risk of delayed graft function (DGF). A multicentre six-month open-label randomized trial with three parallel groups treated with basiliximab plus steroids, mycophenolate mofetil and different patterns of CsA initiation: early within 24 h post-RT at 3 mg/kg/d (Group 1; n = 38), and at 5 mg/kg/d (Group 2; n = 40), or delayed after 7-10 d at 5 mg/kg/d (Group 3; n = 36). There were no differences among groups in six months GFR (43.1 +/- 12, 48.0 +/- 14 and 47.2 +/- 17 mL/min, respectively), DGF (Group 1: 31%, Group 2: 37%, Group 3: 42%), nor biopsy-proven acute rejection, although clinically treated and biopsy-proven acute rejection was significantly higher in Group 3 (25%) vs. Group 1 (5.3%, p < 0.05). At six months no differences were observed in death-censored graft survival or patient survival. Induction therapy with basiliximab and three CsA-ME initiation patterns in RT recipients from ECD and at high risk of DGF presented good renal function and graft survival at six months. Late onset group did not achieve improvement in DGF rate and showed a higher incidence of clinically treated and biopsy-proven acute rejection.

  4. Th-17 Alloimmune Responses in Renal Allograft Biopsies From Recipients of Kidney Transplants Using Extended Criteria Donors During Acute T Cell-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Matignon, M; Aissat, A; Canoui-Poitrine, F; Grondin, C; Pilon, C; Desvaux, D; Saadoun, D; Barathon, Q; Garrido, M; Audard, V; Rémy, P; Lang, P; Cohen, J; Grimbert, P

    2015-10-01

    Although renal transplantation using expanded criteria donors has become a common practice, immune responses related to immunosenescence in those kidney allografts have not been studied yet in humans. We performed a retrospective molecular analysis of the T cell immune response in 43 kidney biopsies from patients with acute T cell-mediated rejection including 25 from recipients engrafted with a kidney from expanded criteria donor and 18 from recipients grafted with optimal kidney allograft. The clinical, transplant and acute T cell-mediated rejection characteristics of both groups were similar at baseline. The expression of RORγt, Il-17 and T-bet mRNA was significantly higher in the elderly than in the optimal group (p = 0.02, p = 0.036, and p = 0.01, respectively). Foxp3 mRNA levels were significantly higher in elderly patients experiencing successful acute T cell-mediated rejection reversal (p = 0.03). The presence of IL-17 mRNA was strongly associated with nonsuccessful reversal in elderly patients (p = 0.008). Patients with mRNA IL17 expression detection and low mRNA Foxp3 expression experienced significantly more treatment failure (87.5%) than patients with no mRNA IL17 expression and/or high mRNA Foxp3 expression (26.7%; p = 0.017). Our study suggests that the Th17 pathway is involved in pathogenesis and prognosis of acute T cell-mediated rejection in recipients of expanded criteria allograft.

  5. Renal transplantation at the Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Transplant Center.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Robert A; Cooper, Matthew; Kraus, Edward; Rabb, Hamid; Samaniego, Milagros; Simpkins, Christopher E; Sonnenday, Christopher J; Ugarte, Richard M; Warren, Daniel S; Zachary, Andrea A

    2003-01-01

    A stagnant supply of transplantable organs in the face of a relentless burgeoning of transplant waiting lists has created a crisis. Necessity continues to be the mother of invention and as the crisis has deepened it has served as a crucible for the development of new ways to think about perennial problems. Our program has taken a 2-pronged approach to increasing the organ supply for our patients. First, through innovations like the laparoscopic donor nephrectomy, ABO-incompatible and positive-crossmatch transplantation protocols, unconventional paired kidney exchanges, and the use of altruistic donors we have more than doubled our utilization of live donor organs. At the same time, we have developed algorithms and interrogative techniques to enhance the intelligent use of kidneys from expanded criteria donors for patients who do not have an available live donor. The laparoscopic nephrectomy has proven to be a safe and effective way of removing a significant barrier to live donation. Our results from 100 ABOi, (+)XM, and PKE transplants are similar to national statistics for compatible live donor transplants, suggesting that existing paradigms of compatibility can be safely expanded. These encouraging early outcomes and the savings they transmit to the health care system have allowed us to obtain insurance coverage for the InKTP programs, setting the stage for further expansion of these opportunities to broaden the options for patients with end-stage renal disease.

  6. Malignant tumours after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fahlenkamp, D; Reinke, P; Kirchner, S; Schnorr, D; Lindeke, A; Loening, S A

    1996-10-01

    In 1243 patients after renal transplantation, 39 malignant tumours were detected in 37 patients. The average latency period between transplantation and tumour disease was 72 months. Tumours included 8 malignant lymphomas, 7 dermatomas and 24 visceral tumours. The patients who developed a tumour had received fewer blood transfusions before transplantation than a tumour-free control group of 60 patients with renal transplants. Rejection crises occurred in a significantly smaller number of tumour patients compared with the control group.

  7. Transplant tourism and the Iranian model of renal transplantation program: ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Ghods, Ahad J; Nasrollahzadeh, Dariush

    2005-12-01

    Currently, the buying and selling of kidneys through "transplant tourism" is occurring at an increasing rate, both in developed and developing countries. Since 1988, Iran has adopted a compensated and regulated living-unrelated donor renal transplant program, and by providing financial incentives to volunteer living donors, has eliminated the renal transplant waiting list. In the Iranian model of renal transplantation program, regulations have been put in place to prevent transplant tourism. Foreigners are not allowed to undergo renal transplantation from Iranian living-unrelated donors. They also are not permitted to volunteer as kidney donors for Iranian patients. A study at the transplant unit of Hashemi Nejad Kidney Hospital in Tehran, Iran, showed that of 1881 renal transplant recipients, 19 (1%) were Afghani or Iraqi refugees, 11 (0.6%) were other foreign nationals, and 18 (0.9%) were Iranian immigrants. Renal transplantations seemed ethically acceptable to all refugees and foreign nationals. However, transplantation of Iranian immigrants who had been residing abroad for years constituted true transplant tourism.

  8. [Pediatric renal transplant in Japan].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Kazuharu

    2010-09-01

    Transplantation is the optimal renal replacement therapy for children with end-stage renal disease. Compared with dialysis, successful transplantation in children and adolescents not only ameliorates uremic symptoms but also allows for significant improvement of delayed growth, sexual maturation, and psychosocial functioning. The child with a well-functioning kidney can enjoy a quality of life that cannot be achieved with dialysis therapy. The 5- and 10-year patient/graft survival rate in transplant recipients are 97.9/88.8% and 96.2%/79.4% based on Japanese Renal Transplant Registry Society data. This article reviews recent reports of pediatric renal transplantation including ABO-incompatible and preemptive renal transplantation in Japan.

  9. Renal allograft tuberculosis with infected lymphocele transmitted from the donor.

    PubMed

    Al-Nesf, Maryam Ali; Al-Ani, Omar Isam; Al-Ani, Ahmed Abdul-Rahman; Rashed, Awad Hamed

    2014-03-01

    Transmission of tuberculosis (TB) from a donor through renal transplantation is a rare incident. We are reporting a 53-year-old Qatari woman diagnosed with renal allograft TB infection. The disease was confirmed by isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from fluid from the lymphocele and demonstration of caseating granuloma in graft biopsy with acid-fast bacilli seen on Ziehl-Neelsen staining. The diagnosis was made quite early post-transplantation. The presence of the granuloma, which is unusual with patients on intensive immunosuppressant medications, suggests that transmission of the infection occurred from the donor rather than from the activation of latent infection. In reviewing the literature, we found ten case reports of TB in transplanted kidney with transmission of TB infection from the donor. The presence of TB in lymphocele in association with the infected transplant by TB, to the best of our knowledge, was reported only once in the literature. Our case had unfavorable outcome and ended by renal allograft nephrectomy and hemodialysis. We are presenting this case of TB infection of renal allograft and lymphocele diagnosed early post-transplantation transmitted from the donor and pertinent review from the literature.

  10. Renal transplantation in infants.

    PubMed

    Jalanko, Hannu; Mattila, Ilkka; Holmberg, Christer

    2016-05-01

    Renal transplantation (RTx) has become an accepted mode of therapy in infants with severe renal failure. The major indications are structural abnormalities of the urinary tract, congenital nephrotic syndrome, polycystic diseases, and neonatal kidney injury. Assessment of these infants needs expertise and time as well as active treatment before RTx to ensure optimal growth and development, and to avoid complications that could lead to permanent neurological defects. RTx can be performed already in infants weighing around 5 kg, but most operations occur in infants with a weight of 10 kg or more. Perioperative management focuses on adequate perfusion of the allograft and avoidance of thrombotic and other surgical complications. Important long-term issues include rejections, infections, graft function, growth, bone health, metabolic problems, neurocognitive development, adherence to medication, pubertal maturation, and quality of life. The overall outcome of infant RTx has dramatically improved, with long-term patient and graft survivals of over 90 and 80 %, respectively.

  11. Anti-human leukocyte antigen DQ antibodies in renal transplantation: Are we underestimating the most frequent donor specific alloantibodies?

    PubMed

    Carta, Paolo; Di Maria, Lorenzo; Caroti, Leonardo; Buti, Elisa; Antognoli, Giulia; Minetti, Enrico Eugenio

    2015-07-01

    The role of anti-human leukocyte antigens DQ region (HLA-DQ) in transplantation is historically less studied than HLA-DR and HLA class I regions, but several studies are demonstrating that anti HLA-DQ antibodies are among the most frequent anti HLA antibodies that develop after transplantation and can have great influence on the developing of humoral rejection and graft loss. In this article we review the gene structure and nomenclature of the HLA-DQ region, the role of anti HLA-DQ antibodies after and before transplantation and briefly the associations of particular HLA-DQ alleles and other diseases.

  12. Preformed donor HLA-DP-specific antibodies mediate acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection following renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jolly, E C; Key, T; Rasheed, H; Morgan, H; Butler, A; Pritchard, N; Taylor, C J; Clatworthy, M R

    2012-10-01

    Donor-specific HLA alloantibodies may cause acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and significantly compromise allograft survival. The clinical relevance of antibodies directed against some HLA class II antigens, particularly HLA-DP, is less clear with conflicting reports on their pathogenicity. We report two patients with high levels of pretransplant donor-specific HLA-DP antibodies who subsequently developed recurrent acute AMR and graft failure. In both cases, there were no other donor-specific HLA alloantibodies, suggesting that the HLA-DP-specific antibodies may be directly pathogenic.

  13. Haemostatic aspects of renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, P J; Schmidt, E B; Knudsen, F; Nielsen, A H; Kristensen, S D; Dyerberg, J; Kornerup, H J

    1988-01-01

    Platelet function and protein C activity and antigen level was studied in 31 renal transplant recipients and 10 healthy controls. The patients were divided into three groups: (I) cyclosporin treated, (II) azathioprine treated, and (III) azathioprine treated patients with chronic rejection. The platelet function in the renal transplant patients was normal and there was no difference between groups I and II. The specific activity of protein C was decreased in patients after renal transplantation and decreasing protein C activity and progressive renal failure was found to be positively correlated in the azathioprine treated groups.

  14. [Multiple complications after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Manrique, J; Rossich, E; Hernández Sierra, A

    2004-01-01

    This is the case of a 32-year-old male patient, diagnosed with end stage renal disease secondary to a focal and segmental glomerulonephritis. After four years of haemodialysis, he received a renal graft from a cadaveric donor. During the following sixteen years, he developped many different complications. In the early post-transplant period, he developed a severe acute tubular necrosis and two episodes of acute rejection took place, both of them with later recovery. Among the outstanding infectious complications were a virus herpes zoster dorsal infection and a Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial pneumonia. Twelve months later, a series of severe digestive complications took place: cholecystitis that required cholecystectomy, pancreatic pseudocyst which required laparotomy because of an abdominal complication, two separate episodes of upper digestive bleeding that finally required gastric surgery, and an hemorrhagic subphrenic abscess that required a second laparotomy. Currently he has developed a calcified chronic pancreatitis. Moreover, metabolic complications must be mentioned carbohydrate intolerance, cataracts and an avascular bone necrosis, all of them closely related to the immunosuppressive therapy. In spite of these multiple complications, he mantains a good renal function and his quality of life is acceptable.

  15. Challenges in renal transplantation in Yemen.

    PubMed

    El-Nono, Ibrahiem H; Telha, Khaled A; Al-Alimy, Gamil M; Ghilan, Abdulilah M; Abu Asba, Nagieb W; Al-Zkri, Abdo M; Al-Adimi, Abdulilah M; Al-Ba'adani, Tawfiq H

    2015-02-16

    Background Renal replacement therapy was first introduced in Yemen in 1978 in the form of hemodialysis. Twenty years later, the first renal transplantation was performed. Kidney transplantations were started in socially and financially challenging circumstances in Yemen in 1998. A structured program was established and has been functioning regularly since 2005. A pediatric transplantation program was started in 2011. Material and Methods This was a prospective study of 181 transplants performed at the Urology and Nephrology Center between May 1998 and 2012. All transplants were from living related donors. The immunosuppressive protocol consisted initially of double therapy with steroid and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). Subsequently, triple therapy with addition of a calcineurin inhibitor was introduced. Primary graft function was achieved in 176 (97.2%) recipients. Results Cold ischemia time was 48-68 min. Episodes of acute rejection in 12 patients were treated with high-dose steroids. Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) was used in cases of vascular or steroid-resistant rejection in 2 patients. The post-transplant complications, either surgical or medical, were comparable to those recorded in the literature. Conclusions Renal transplantation is a good achievement in our country. The patients and graft survival rates are comparable to other reports.

  16. Fecal microbiota transplantation and donor standardization.

    PubMed

    Owens, Casey; Broussard, Elizabeth; Surawicz, Christina

    2013-09-01

    Clostridium difficile diarrhea is a common and severe infectious disease. Antibiotics, which are standard initial treatment, are less effective for treating refractory or recurrent infection. Fecal microbiota transplantation, where healthy donor stool is transplanted into a patient, is an alternative to antibiotic therapy that requires standardization for donors and patients.

  17. Afghan refugees in Iran model renal transplantation program: ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Ghods, A J; Nasrollahzadeh, D; Kazemeini, M

    2005-03-01

    During 23 years of civil war in Afghanistan, there has been a continuous flow of more than 5 million refugees out of the country. Iran has hosted about 40% of all refugees. The majority have resided outside of camps with opportunities to integrate locally, having access to the Iranian labor market and government services, such as dialysis and transplantation. Iran also has adopted a compensated living unrelated donor renal transplantation program in which foreigners can receive transplants from living related donors or volunteer living unrelated donors of the same nationality. In June 2004, among 241 refugees with end-stage kidney disease in Iran, 179 were on hemodialysis and 62 underwent renal transplantation. Nine patients received kidneys from living related donors, 1 from a spouse, 50 from Afghani living unrelated donors, and 1 from a cadaveric donor. No refugee had been used as a kidney donor to an Iranian patient. Transplantation of all Afghan refugees in need and the absence of their use as kidney donors to Iranian patients proffer strong evidence against commercialism and a reason to believe that the Iran Model transplantation is practiced with ethical standards. In the last 2 years since the civil war has ended, returning these patients to Afghanistan has raised important ethical concerns. Repatriation of dialysis patients and transplant recipients may be tantamount to their deaths. It is expected that The Transplantation Society and the World Health Organization will establish links with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugee Offices to provide humanitarian assistance to these patients.

  18. Interventional radiology in living donor liver transplant.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Fan; Ou, Hsin-You; Yu, Chun-Yen; Tsang, Leo Leung-Chit; Huang, Tung-Liang; Chen, Tai-Yi; Hsu, Hsien-Wen; Concerjero, Allan M; Wang, Chih-Chi; Wang, Shih-Ho; Lin, Tsan-Shiun; Liu, Yueh-Wei; Yong, Chee-Chien; Lin, Yu-Hung; Lin, Chih-Che; Chiu, King-Wah; Jawan, Bruno; Eng, Hock-Liew; Chen, Chao-Long

    2014-05-28

    The shortage of deceased donor liver grafts led to the use of living donor liver transplant (LDLT). Patients who undergo LDLT have a higher risk of complications than those who undergo deceased donor liver transplantation (LT). Interventional radiology has acquired a key role in every LT program by treating the majority of vascular and non-vascular post-transplant complications, improving graft and patient survival and avoiding, in the majority of cases, surgical revision and/or re-transplant. The aim of this paper is to review indications, diagnostic modalities, technical considerations, achievements and potential complications of interventional radiology procedures after LDLT.

  19. Factors influencing weight gain after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C P; Gallagher-Lepak, S; Zhu, Y R; Porth, C; Kelber, S; Roza, A M; Adams, M B

    1993-10-01

    Weight gain following renal transplantation occurs frequently but has not been investigated quantitatively. A retrospective chart review of 115 adult renal transplant recipients was used to describe patterns of weight gain during the first 5 years after transplantation. Only 23 subjects (21%) were overweight before their transplant. Sixty-six subjects (57%) experienced a weight gain of greater than or equal to 10%, and 49 subjects (43%) were overweight according to Metropolitan relative weight criteria at 1 year after transplantation. There was an inverse correlation between advancing age and weight gain, with the youngest patients (18-29 years) having a 13.3% weight gain and the oldest patients (age greater than 50 years) having the lowest gain of 8.3% at 1 year (P = 0.047). Black recipients experienced a greater weight gain than whites during the first posttransplant year (14.6% vs. 9.0%; P = 0.043), and maintained or increased this difference over the 5-year period. Men and women experienced comparable weight gain during the first year (9.5% vs. 12.1%), but women continued to gain weight throughout the 5-year study (21.0% total weight gain). The men remained stable after the first year (10.8% total weight gain). Recipients who experienced at least a 10% weight gain also increased their serum cholesterol (mean 261 vs. 219) and triglyceride (mean 277 vs. 159) levels significantly, whereas those without weight gain did not. Weight gain did not correlate with cumulative steroid dose, donor source (living-related versus cadaver), rejection history, pre-existing obesity, the number of months on dialysis before transplantation, or posttransplant renal function. Posttransplant weight gain is related mainly to demographic factors, not to treatment factors associated with the transplant. The average weight gain during the first year after renal transplantation is approximately 10%. This increased weight, coupled with changes in lipid metabolism, may be significant in

  20. New registry and tracking system for renal transplantation in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yuzawa, K; Takahara, S; Kanmochi, T; Takahashi, K; Teraoka, S

    2010-12-01

    Following The Declaration of Istanbul 2008, a registration committees of The Japan Society for Transplantation and The Japanese Society for Clinical Renal Transplantation planned to establish a new registry and tracking system for renal transplant recipients and donors supported by a Health Labor Sciences Research Grant by The Ministry of Health Labour and Welfare. In place of the previous paper-based system, we established the new registry and tracking system, JARTRE (Japan Renal Transplantation Registry), using USB memory in 2009. Recipient and donor data were inputted into the USB memory at the transplantation centers. The memory was reviewed a yearly by committees. The recipient and donor registration included details from both. The tracking is performed centrally 3 months, 1 year, and every year after the operation. The advantages of this system are the ease of input, adequacy of the data, and rapid statistical processing. In 2009, we registered 97.9% of new renal transplantation recipients and donors; in 2008 it was more than 81.9% of all past renal transplantation recipients in Japan.

  1. Kidney Transplantation From a Donor With Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Rossidis, A; Lim, M A; Palmer, M; Levine, M H; Naji, A; Bloom, R D; Abt, P L

    2017-02-01

    In the United States, >100 000 patients are waiting for a kidney transplant. Given the paucity of organs available for transplant, expansion of eligibility criteria for deceased donation is of substantial interest. Sickle cell disease (SCD) is viewed as a contraindication to kidney donation, perhaps because SCD substantially alters renal structure and function and thus has the potential to adversely affect multiple physiological processes of the kidney. To our knowledge, transplantation from a donor with SCD has never been described in the literature. In this paper, we report the successful transplantation of two kidneys from a 37-year-old woman with SCD who died from an intracranial hemorrhage. Nearly 4 mo after transplant, both recipients are doing well and are off dialysis. The extent to which kidneys from donors with SCD can be safely transplanted with acceptable outcomes is unknown; however, this report should provide support for the careful expansion of kidneys from donors with SCD without evidence of renal dysfunction and with normal tissue architecture on preimplantation biopsies.

  2. Cadaveric renal transplantation: the Chennai experience.

    PubMed

    Prabahar, M R; Soundararajan, P

    2008-05-01

    Transplantation of human organs is undoubtedly one of the greatest medical breakthroughs of this century. However, few Indian patients are able to benefit from this medical advance. It is estimated that in India every year over 152,000 people are diagnosed to have end-stage renal failure needing renal transplantation. The Transplantation of Human Organs Act passed by the Indian parliament in 1994 was subsequently ratified by the state legislature of Tamil Nadu in May 1995. It accepted brain death as a form of death and prohibited commerce in organs. The first cadaveric kidney transplant in Sri Ramachandra medical college was performed in 1995 with 68 cadaveric kidney transplants thereafter. The mean age of the donors was 36 +/- 12.8 years. The mean cold ischemia time was 5.6 +/- 3.2 hours. As many as 14 donors displayed acute renal failure (serum creatinine more than 1.2 mg/dL). Immediate graft function was established in 34 patients (50%). Four had graft rupture, two of which were successfully repaired. Postoperatively 12 patients (17.6%) displayed delayed graft function requiring dialysis. During the first year, 18 patients (26.4%) experienced acute rejection episodes, of which 14 were cellular and four vascular rejection types. As many as eight patients were lost to follow-up within one year; the mean follow-up time was 968 +/- 86 days. Patient survival at 1 year was 88.2% and that of the graft 73.5%. The 5-year patient and graft survival rates were 61.7% and 58.8%, respectively. The mean serum creatinine of patients currently followed is 2.2 +/- 0.86 mg/dL. The rate of cadaver kidney transplantation in India is low despite initiatives by our university to promote donation. Creating a positive public attitude, early brain death identification, and certification, prompt consent for organ donation, adequate hospital infrastructure, and support logistics are prerequisites for successful organ transplantation.

  3. Extended Criteria Donors in Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vodkin, Irine; Kuo, Alexander

    2017-05-01

    Mortality rates on the liver transplant waiting list are increasing. The shortage of organs has resulted in higher utilization of extended criteria donors (ECDs), with centers pushing the limits of what is acceptable for transplantation. Donor quality is more appropriately represented as a continuum of risk, and careful selection and matching of ECD grafts with recipients may lead to excellent outcomes. Although there is no precise definition for what constitutes an ECD liver, this review focuses on frequently cited characteristics, including donor age, steatosis, donation after cardiac death, and donors with increased risk of disease transmission.

  4. Renal transplantation in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, S A H; Naqvi, S A A; Zafar, M N

    2002-01-01

    The economic indicators of Pakistan show that the GNP is dollar 70 billion and foreign exchange reserves stand at dollar 8.0 billion and foreign debt at more than dollar 36 billion. Against this backdrop, the government is unlikely to provide state-of-the-art facilities for management of end-stage organ failure. The unequal distribution of wealth leaves more than 40% below the poverty line. Economic solutions are based on temporary fixes where foreign aid and loans keeps the government machinery operational. Many of the basic health measures such as immunization are also foreign funded. Under such a scenario, local philanthropy has come to play a vital role. SIUT developed a model based on self-help--a model based on a community-government partnership, where the doctor plays the pivotal role and the beneficiary is the patient. SIUT acquired funds by developing a community-government partnership. The government fulfills about 40% of the total budget and the rest comes from the community as donations. The scheme has been extremely successful in providing free medical care and renal support to thousands of patients. It has been sustained over the past 15 years through complete transparency, public audit and accountability. These confidence-building means stimulate the community to come forward and donate money, equipment and medicines. The goal of transplantation is to provide organs to all with long-term survival of the graft. The emerging challenges to achieve this goal and efforts that can be made to increase and sustain transplant activity in Pakistan require a concerted effort on the part of the government, society and the medical profession.

  5. Antiphospholipid syndrome in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Thomas D; Crosthwaite, Amy; Chow, Kevin; Finlay, Moira J; Better, Nathan; Hughes, Peter D; Cohney, Solomon J

    2014-04-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) may occur in isolation or in association with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), with the potential to cause renal failure via several distinct pathologies. Renal transplantation in the presence of APS carries a risk of early graft loss from arterial or venous thrombosis, or thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Whilst perioperative anticoagulation reduces the risk of large vessel thrombosis, it may result in significant haemorrhage, and its efficacy in preventing post-transplant TMA is uncertain. Here, we report a patient with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) due to lupus nephritis and APS, in whom allograft TMA developed soon after transplantation despite partial anticoagulation. TMA resolved with plasma exchange-based therapy albeit with some irreversible graft damage and renal impairment. We discuss the differential diagnosis of post-transplant TMA, and current treatment options.

  6. APOL1 genotype and kidney transplantation outcomes from deceased African American donors

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Barry I.; Pastan, Stephen O.; Israni, Ajay K.; Schladt, David; Julian, Bruce A.; Gautreaux, Michael D.; Hauptfeld, Vera; Bray, Robert A.; Gebel, Howard M.; Kirk, Allan D.; Gaston, Robert S.; Rogers, Jeffrey; Farney, Alan C.; Orlando, Giuseppe; Stratta, Robert J.; Mohan, Sumit; Ma, Lijun; Langefeld, Carl D.; Bowden, Donald W.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Palanisamy, Amudha; Reeves-Daniel, Amber M.; Brown, W. Mark; Divers, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Background Two apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) renal-risk variants in donors and African American (AA) recipient race are associated with worse allograft survival in deceased-donor kidney transplantation (DDKT) from AA donors. To detect other factors impacting allograft survival from deceased AA kidney donors, APOL1 renal-risk variants were genotyped in additional AA kidney donors. Methods APOL1 genotypes were linked to outcomes in 478 newly analyzed DDKTs in the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients. Multivariate analyses accounting for recipient age, sex, race, panel reactive antibody level, HLA match, cold ischemia time, donor age, and expanded-criteria donation were performed. These 478 transplantations and 675 DDKTs from a prior report were jointly analyzed. Results Fully-adjusted analyses limited to the new 478 DDKTs replicated shorter renal allograft survival in recipients of APOL1-two-renal-risk-variant kidneys (HR 2.00; p=0.03). Combined analysis of 1153 DDKTs from AA donors revealed donor APOL1 high-risk genotype (HR 2.05; p=3×10−4), older donor age (HR 1.18; p=0.05), and younger recipient age (HR 0.70; p=0.001) adversely impacted allograft survival. Although prolonged allograft survival was seen in many recipients of APOL1-two-renal-risk-variant kidneys, follow-up serum creatinine concentrations were higher than in recipients of zero/one APOL1-renal-risk variant kidneys. A competing risk analysis revealed that APOL1 impacted renal allograft survival, but not recipient survival. Interactions between donor age and APOL1 genotype on renal allograft survival were non-significant. Conclusions Shorter renal allograft survival is reproducibly observed after DDKT from APOL1-two-renal-risk-variant donors. Younger recipient age and older donor age have independent adverse effects on renal allograft survival. PMID:26566060

  7. Multidetector row computed tomography evaluation of potential living laparoscopic renal donors: the story so far.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, Saravanan; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Small, William C; Torres, William E; Mittal, Pardeep K

    2006-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease. Living related kidney donation is the major source of renal grafts due to limited availability of cadaveric kidneys. Open nephrectomy was used to harvest donor kidneys. However, the laparoscopic approach is associated with less postoperative pain and quick recovery. So, most centers now prefer a laparoscopic approach to explant donor kidneys. Laparoscopic approach is technically challenging due to limited operative visibility. Hence, accurate preoperative detection of renal arterial and venous anomalies is imperative to avoid inadvertent vascular injury and bleeding. The preoperative workup of renal donors includes clinical evaluation, laboratory tests, and imaging. Traditionally, the renal donors were evaluated with conventional imaging techniques, which included renal catheter angiography and intravenous urography. However, conventional imaging is invasive, expensive, and less accurate for evaluation of complex renal venous anomalies, small calculi, and diffuse or focal renal parenchymal lesions. The introduction of multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) revolutionized the CT technology by enabling isotropic resolution with faster scan coverage in a single, short breath-hold. Consequently, MDCT has now replaced conventional imaging for comprehensive imaging of potential living renal donors. MDCT is a minimally invasive technique that can accurately detect urolithiasis, renal arterial and venous anomalies, renal parenchymal lesions, and urinary tract anomalies. Renal vascular anomalies detected by MDCT can help the surgeon in planning donor nephrectomy. MDCT with three-dimensional CT angiography enables accurate preoperative renal vascular mapping. This article reviews the role of MDCT in preoperative evaluation of potential laparoscopic renal donors.

  8. Socioeconomic deprivation and barriers to live-donor kidney transplantation: a qualitative study of deceased-donor kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Phillippa K; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Tomson, Charles R V; Owen-Smith, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Socioeconomically deprived individuals with renal disease are less likely to receive a live-donor kidney transplant than less-deprived individuals. This qualitative study aimed to identify reasons for the observed socioeconomic disparity in live-donor kidney transplantation. Design A qualitative study using face-to-face in-depth semistructured interviews. Setting A UK tertiary renal referral hospital and transplant centre. Participants Purposive sampling was used to select deceased-donor transplant recipients from areas of high socioeconomic deprivation (SED) (19 participants), followed by a low SED comparison group (13 participants), aiming for maximum diversity in terms of age, gender, ethnicity, primary renal disease and previous renal replacement therapy. Methods Participants were interviewed following their routine transplant clinic review. Interviews were digitally audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were coded using NVivo software and analysed using the constant comparison method described in Grounded Theory. Results Themes common and distinct to each socioeconomic group emerged. 6 themes appeared to distinguish between individuals from areas of high and low SED. 4 themes were distinct to participants from areas of high SED: (1) Passivity, (2) Disempowerment, (3) Lack of social support and (4) Short-term focus. 2 themes were distinct to the low SED group: (1) Financial concerns and (2) Location of donor. Conclusions Several of the emerging themes from the high SED individuals relate to an individual's lack of confidence and skill in managing their health and healthcare; themes that are in keeping with low levels of patient activation. Inadequate empowerment of socioeconomically deprived individuals by healthcare practitioners was also described. Financial concerns did not emerge as a barrier from interviews with the high SED group. Interventions aiming to redress the observed socioeconomic inequity should be targeted at both

  9. HLA polymorphism in Sudanese renal donors.

    PubMed

    Dafalla, Ameer M; McCloskey, D J; Alemam, Almutaz A; Ibrahim, Amel A; Babikir, Adil M; Gasmelseed, Nagla; El Imam, Mohamed; Mohamedani, Ahmed A; Magzoub, Mubarak M

    2011-07-01

    The main objective of this study is to provide a database for renal transplantation in Sudan and to determine the HLA antigens and haplotype frequencies (HFs) in the study subjects. HLA typing was performed using the complement-dependant lymphocytotoxicity test in 250 unrelated healthy individuals selected as donors in the Sudanese Renal Transplantation Program. Considerable polymorphism was observed at each locus; A2 (0.28), A30 (0.12), A3 (0.09), A24 (0.09), A1 (0.09), and A68 (0.06) were the most frequent antigens in the A locus, while B51 (0.092), B41 (0.081), B39 (0.078), B57 (0.060), B35 (0.068), B 50 (0.053) and B 52 (0.051) were the most common B locus antigens. DR13 (0.444) and DR15 (0.160) showed the highest antigen frequencies (AFs) in the DR locus. In the DQ locus, DQ1 showed the highest gene frequency (0.498), while DQ2 and DQ3 AFs were (0.185) and (0.238), respectively. The most common HLA-A and -B haplotypes in positive linkage disequilibrium were A24, B38; A1, B7; and A3, B52. The common HLA-A and -B HFs in positive linkage disequilibrium in the main three tribe-stocks of the study subjects (Gaalia, Nile Nubian and Johyna) were A24, B38 for Gaalia; A24, B38 and A2, B7 for Johyna; and A2, B64 and A3, B53 for Nile Nubian. These results suggest that both class I and class II polymorphisms of the study subjects depict considerable heterogeneity, which reflects recent admixture of this group with neighboring Arabs and African populations.

  10. Outcomes of shipped live donor kidney transplants compared with traditional living donor kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Treat, Eric G; Miller, Eric T; Kwan, Lorna; Connor, Sarah E; Maliski, Sally L; Hicks, Elisabeth M; Williams, Kristen C; Whitted, Lauren A; Gritsch, Hans A; McGuire, Suzanne M; Mone, Thomas D; Veale, Jeffrey L

    2014-11-01

    The disparity between kidney transplant candidates and donors necessitates innovations to increase organ availability. Transporting kidneys allows for living donors and recipients to undergo surgery with a familiar transplant team, city, friends, and family. The effect of shipping kidneys and prolonged cold ischemia time (CIT) with living donor transplantation outcomes is not clearly known. This retrospective matched (age, gender, race, and year of procedure) cohort study compared allograft outcomes for shipped live donor kidney transplants and nonshipped living donor kidney transplants. Fifty-seven shipped live donor kidneys were transplanted from 31 institutions in 26 cities. The mean shipping distance was 1634 miles (range 123-2811) with mean CIT of 12.1 ± 2.8 h. The incidence of delayed graft function in the shipped cohort was 1.8% (1/57) compared to 0% (0/57) in the nonshipped cohort. The 1-year allograft survival was 98% in both cohorts. There were no significant differences between the mean serum creatinine values or the rates of serum creatinine decline in the immediate postoperative period even after adjusted for gender and differences in recipient and donor BMI. Despite prolonged CITs, outcomes for shipped live donor kidney transplants were similar when compared to matched nonshipped living donor kidney transplants.

  11. Pregnancy in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Karin M; Wu, Danny; Ebcioglu, Zeynep

    2007-12-01

    Women with renal disease face increasing infertility and high-risk pregnancy as they approach end-stage renal disease due to uremia. Renal transplantation has provided these patients the ability to return to a better quality of life, and for a number of women who are of child bearing age with renal disease, it has restored their fertility and provided the opportunity to have children. But, although fertility is restored, pregnancy in these women still harbors risk to the mother, graft, and fetus. Selected patients who have stable graft function can have successful pregnancies under the supervision of a multidisciplinary team involving maternal fetal medicine specialists and transplant nephrologists. Careful observation and management are required to optimize outcome for mother and fetus.

  12. Acute leukaemia following renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Subar, M; Gucalp, R; Benstein, J; Williams, G; Wiernik, P H

    1996-03-01

    Four renal transplant patients on immunosuppressive therapy who presented with acute myeloid leukaemia are described. In two cases, azathioprine may have played an important role as a cofactor in leukaemogenesis. In a third case, the alkylating agent cyclophosphamide may have contributed. All patients were treated for leukaemia with full doses of cytotoxic chemotherapy and, in each case, a functioning renal allograft was preserved throughout the treatment despite attenuation of immunosuppressive therapy. Three patients achieved complete remission. Of the three, one is surviving at 2 years and two expired during the pancytopenic phase of their treatment with no active leukaemia present, and with intact renal function. As increasing expertise in the field of organ transplantation allows patients to survive longer, such patients' exposure to immunosuppressive and potentially leukaemogenic drugs is prolonged. The risk of secondary neoplasia has been previously documented in this population. Two of the four cases reported here suffered from polycystic kidney disease as their underlying condition. While this report suggests that the leukaemias are related to renal transplantation, we cannot rule out an association with the underlying disease which led to the transplant. This report further suggests that the leukaemia that develops in such patients may respond to standard therapy, and that such treatment does not compromise the transplanted kidney.

  13. How deceased donor transplantation is impacting a decline in commercial transplantation-the Tamil Nadu experience.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Georgi; Reddy, Yuvaram N V; Amalorpavanathan, Joseph; Daniel, Dolly; Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir; Shroff, Sunil; Reddy, Yogesh

    2012-04-27

    India with a population of 1.2 billion has a renal transplantation rate of 3.25 per million population. The major cause of chronic kidney disease is hypertension and diabetes. The crude and age-adjusted incidence rates of end-stage renal disease are estimated to be 151 and 232 per million population, respectively, in India. There was a remarkable lack of knowledge in the public about deceased organ donation until a decade ago. However, the role played by the media and nongovernmental organizations in partnership with the government has emphasized and implemented deceased donor transplantation in certain states in India-to mention particularly, the Tamil Nadu model. In the last 2 years, deceased organ donation has reached 1.3 per million population in Tamil Nadu, thereby effectively eliminating commercial transplantation. There is no religious bar for organ donation. A central transplant coordinator appointed by the government oversees legitimate and transparent allocation of deceased organs both in the public and private facilities as per the transplant waiting list. This model also takes care of the poor sections of society by conducting donation and transplantation through government-run public facilities free of cost. In the last 2 years, deceased donor transplantation has been performed through this network procuring organs such as the heart, heart valves, lung, liver, kidneys, cornea, and skin. The infrastructural lack of immunological surveillance-including donor-specific antibody monitoring, human leukocyte antigen typing, and panel reactive antibody except in a few tertiary care centers-prevents allocation according to the immunological status of the recipient. This private-public partnership promoting deceased donor transplantation has effectively eliminated commercialization in transplantation in the state of Tamil Nadu with a population of 72 million which is a model for other regions of South Asia and developing countries.

  14. The Iranian model of living renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi-Mazdeh, Mitra

    2012-09-01

    Organ shortage for transplantation remains a worldwide serious problem for kidney patients with end-stage renal failure, and several countries have tried different models to address this issue. Iran has 20 years of experience with one such model that involves the active role of the government and charity foundations. Patients with a desperate demand for a kidney have given rise to a black market of brokers and other forms of organ commercialism only accessible to those with sufficient financial resources. The current Iranian model has enabled most of the Iranian kidney transplant candidates, irrespective of socioeconomic class, to have access to kidney transplantation. The Iranian government has committed a large budget through funding hospital and staff at the Ministry of Health and Medical Education by supporting the brain death donation (BDD) program or redirecting part of the budget of living unrelated renal donation (LURD) to the BDD program. It has been shown that it did not prevent the development and progression of a BDD program. However, the LURD program is characterized by several controversial procedures (e.g., confrontation of donor and recipient at the end of the evaluation procedure along with some financial interactions) that should be ethically reviewed. Operational weaknesses such as the lack of a registration system and long-term follow-up of the donors are identified as the 'Achilles heel of the model'.

  15. Impact of ABO incompatible kidney transplantation on living donor transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background ABO incompatible kidney transplantation (ABOi-KT) is an important approach for overcoming donor shortages. We evaluated the effect of ABOi-KT on living donor KT. Methods Two nationwide transplantation databases were used. We evaluated the impact of ABOi-KT on overall living donor transplant activity and spousal donation as subgroup analysis. In addition, we compared the clinical outcome between ABOi-KT and ABO compatible KT (ABOc-KT) from spousal donor, and performed a Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to define the risk factors affecting the allograft outcomes. Result The introduction of ABOi-KT increased overall living donor KT by 12.2% and its portion was increased from 0.3% to 21.7% during study period. The ABOi-KT in living unrelated KT was two times higher than that of living related donor KT (17.8 vs.9.8%). Spousal donor was a major portion of living unrelated KT (77.6%) and ABOi-KT increased spousal donation from 10% to 31.5% in living donor KT. In addition, increasing rate ABOi-KT from spousal donor was 10 times higher than that of living related donor. The clinical outcome (incidence of acute rejection, allograft function, and allograft and patient survival rates) of ABOi-KT from spousal donor was comparable to that of ABOc-KT. Neither ABO incompatibility nor spousal donor was associated with acute rejection or allograft failure on multivariate analysis. Conclusions ABOi-KT increased overall living donor KT, and ABOi-KT from spousal donor is rapidly increasing with favorable clinical outcomes. PMID:28323892

  16. [Kidney donors and kidney transplantation in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Giessing, M; Conrad, S; Schönberger, B; Huland, H; Budde, K; Neumayer, H-H; Loening, S A

    2004-08-01

    The likelihood of terminal renal insufficiency escalates with age, increasing the risk of dying as a patient requiring dialysis. In 1999, Eurotransplant initiated the Eurotransplant Senior Programm (ESP), in which the kidneys of old donors (>64 years) are allocated to recipients 64 years and older. Allocation does not take HLA-matching into account and is performed regionally only according to blood-group-compatibility to keep the storage time short. As a consequence of the short ischemic time, and thus reduced non-immunological damage to the anyways susceptible old kidney, graft-function and graft-survival in the ESP are very good. The results of the initial 5 years of this program show that it successfully utilizes more kidneys from old donors and that more old recipients are being transplanted, with a satisfactory graft-function. Increased donor- and/or recipient age require a thorough evaluation to exclude malignant and other diseases. Furthermore, short term controls on the waiting list and following kidney transplantation are prerequisites for successful transplantation in the aged recipient. If this is guaranteed, kidney transplantation in the old recipient-even with old donor organs-is a good alternative to the morbidity of a prolonged dialysis. Nevertheless, the role of HLA-matching should be reconsidered to reduce rejections.

  17. The UNOS Renal Transplant Registry: Review of the Last Decade.

    PubMed

    Andre, Mark; Huang, Edmund; Everly, Matthew; Bunnapradist, Suphamai

    2014-01-01

    Kidney transplantation has become a preferred treatment for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) as transplant recipients enjoy freedom from dialysis and improvement in both quality and quantity of life. More patients are being placed on the transplant waiting list, although the waiting list patients still only represent a very small fraction of ESRD patients. The characteristics of both waitlisted and transplanted patients have changed considerably in the last decade, as the ESRD population has aged and waiting list times have increased. Over the last 10 years, we have witnessed an increasingly severe shortage of kidney donors. Even with increasing efforts of the transplant community to expand the donor pool by including larger numbers of high risk deceased donor transplants, the overall number of kidney transplants has remained relatively stable. Those who do receive transplants, however, benefit from excellent transplant outcomes. The use of paired exchange/chain transplant donors has increased the living donor pool significantly and with outstanding results. Belatacept, a costimulation blockage drug, represents a new class of transplant immunosuppression. It has been used sparingly in the first few years of its approval. Most kidney transplant patients are still maintained on immunosuppressive agents that were approved almost two decades ago. In the next decade, we will certainly continue to deal with an organ shortage as the number of eligible and waitlisted patients is likely to increase. Effective and efficient organ allocation policies will be increasingly necessary to address this scarcity. Optimizing the transplant candidate work-up, improving maintenance of waitlisted patients, and providing optimal post-transplant medical care will be vital to the continued success of kidney transplantation.

  18. Treatment of Autonomous Hyperparathyroidism in Post Renal Transplant Recipients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-07

    Chronic Allograft Nephropathy; Chronic Kidney Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Disordered Mineral Metabolism; End Stage Renal Disease; Hyperparathyroidism; Hypophosphatemia; Kidney Disease; Kidney Transplantation; Post Renal Transplantation

  19. Living donor liver transplantation in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Marwan, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    In Egypt there is no doubt that chronic liver diseases are a major health concern. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevalence among the 15−59 years age group is estimated to be 14.7%. The high prevalence of chronic liver diseases has led to increasing numbers of Egyptian patients suffering from end stage liver disease (ESLD), necessitating liver transplantation (LT). We reviewed the evolution of LT in Egypt and the current status. A single center was chosen as an example to review the survival and mortality rates. To date, deceased donor liver transplantation (DDLT) has not been implemented in any program though Egyptian Parliament approved the law in 2010. Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) seemed to be the only logical choice to save many patients who are in desperate need for LT. By that time, there was increase in number of centers doing LDLT (13 centers) and increase in number of LDLT cases [2,400] with improvement of the results. Donor mortality rate is 1.66 per 1,000 donors; this comprised four donors in the Egyptian series. The exact recipient survival is not accurately known however, and the one-year, three-year and five-year survival were 73.17%, 70.83% and 64.16% respectively in the International Medical Center (IMC) in a series of 145 adult to adult living donor liver transplantation (AALDLT) cases. There was no donor mortality in this series. LDLT are now routinely and successfully performed in Egypt with reasonable donor and recipient outcomes. Organ shortage remains the biggest hurdle facing the increasing need for LT. Although LDLT had reasonable outcomes, it carries considerable risks to healthy donors. For example, it lacks cadaveric back up, and is not feasible for all patients. The initial success in LDLT should drive efforts to increase the people awareness about deceased organ donation in Egypt. PMID:27115003

  20. Living donor liver transplantation in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Amer, Khaled E; Marwan, Ibrahim

    2016-04-01

    In Egypt there is no doubt that chronic liver diseases are a major health concern. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevalence among the 15-59 years age group is estimated to be 14.7%. The high prevalence of chronic liver diseases has led to increasing numbers of Egyptian patients suffering from end stage liver disease (ESLD), necessitating liver transplantation (LT). We reviewed the evolution of LT in Egypt and the current status. A single center was chosen as an example to review the survival and mortality rates. To date, deceased donor liver transplantation (DDLT) has not been implemented in any program though Egyptian Parliament approved the law in 2010. Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) seemed to be the only logical choice to save many patients who are in desperate need for LT. By that time, there was increase in number of centers doing LDLT (13 centers) and increase in number of LDLT cases [2,400] with improvement of the results. Donor mortality rate is 1.66 per 1,000 donors; this comprised four donors in the Egyptian series. The exact recipient survival is not accurately known however, and the one-year, three-year and five-year survival were 73.17%, 70.83% and 64.16% respectively in the International Medical Center (IMC) in a series of 145 adult to adult living donor liver transplantation (AALDLT) cases. There was no donor mortality in this series. LDLT are now routinely and successfully performed in Egypt with reasonable donor and recipient outcomes. Organ shortage remains the biggest hurdle facing the increasing need for LT. Although LDLT had reasonable outcomes, it carries considerable risks to healthy donors. For example, it lacks cadaveric back up, and is not feasible for all patients. The initial success in LDLT should drive efforts to increase the people awareness about deceased organ donation in Egypt.

  1. [Membranous nephritis after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Robles, N R; Gómez Campdera, F; Anaya, F; Niembro, E; Junco, E; Valderrábano, F

    1991-02-01

    8 cases of membranous glomerulonephritis (MG) after renal transplants (RT) are presented; one being a recurrence of the original disease and the other 7 due to a different cause of renal insufficiency. The total incidence of MG after transplantation was 1.63%; 1.39% being the incidence of MG of new cases. Only 1 patient showed decrease of renal function and in this case the MG was accompanied by chronic rejection lesions. There was no sign of neoplasias nor drugs producing MG. As far as chronic infections are concerned, only one patient showed B antigen and it was not observed during the immunofluorescent test in the biopsy. 6 patients had urological complications after the renal transplant (3 cases of urinary fistula; 2 cases of obstructive uropathy; 1 case of short ureter). 2 patients experienced the start of hemodialysis due to focal and segmentary glomerulosclerosis. The beginning of proteinuria commences between 2 and 23 months after the RT (median 13,0 +/- 7,5 moths); with a range of between 2.0 and 12.0 gr/day (median: 6.8 +/- 3,2 Z gr/day), this being nephrotic in 4 cases. Proteinuria improved 1 case, and persisted in the other patients at the same level registered previous to the diagnosis. MG is a non-frequent complication or RT and is usually benign. Patients with post-transplant urologic complications could be considered to have a higher risk of developing a MG "de novo".

  2. Five years renal transplantation data: Single-center experience from Iraq.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ala A; Al-Saedi, Ali J; Al-Mudhaffer, Ali J; Al-Taee, Kais H

    2016-03-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage renal disease. In Iraq, renal transplantation started in 1973 and has continued until now with live donor transplantation, since deceased donor transplant program is not approved as yet. Long-term transplant data are still scarce. The aim of our study is to present data on transplantation and medical follow-up at one year and, survival analysis at one, three and five years. A total of 250 renal transplantations were performed at the Nephrology and Renal Transplantation Center, Baghdad between January 2009 and January 2014. It is a living donor, blood group compatible donor program. All patients received triple immunosuppression (calcineurine inhibitor, mycophenolate mofetil or mycophenolic acid, and steroid). The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine the survival rate. There were 92 live related donors, 143 unrelated donors, and 15 spouse donors. The mean age was 34.07 ± 12.2 years. The one-year graft survival for related and unrelated donor transplants was 98.9% and 91.8%, respectively. Graft survival was lower (82.9%) in recipients with acute rejection episodes. The patient survival at one-year was 94%. The three-year graft and patient survival was 91% and 90%, respectively, and five-year survival for grafts and patients was 87.1% and 88%, respectively. The outcome of the renal transplantation in Iraq is improving. Long-term patient follow-up needs more meticulous attention. The development of renal transplant registry is critical for future planning. Moreover, renal transplantation practice in Iraq needs more social, religious, and governmental support.

  3. Living donor liver transplantation in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Capobianco, Ivan; Panaro, Fabrizio; Di Francesco, Fabrizio; Troisi, Roberto; Sainz-Barriga, Mauricio; Muiesan, Paolo; Königsrainer, Alfred; Testa, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) sparked significant interest in Europe when the first reports of its success from USA and Asia were made public. Many transplant programs initiated LDLT and some of them especially in Germany and Belgium became a point of reference for many patients and important contributors to the advancement of the field. After the initial enthusiasm, most of the European programs stopped performing LDLT and today the overall European activity is concentrated in a few centers and the number of living donor liver transplants is only a single digit fraction of the overall number of liver transplants performed. In this paper we analyse the present European activities and highlight the European contribution to the advancement of the field of LDLT. PMID:27115011

  4. Donor-related issues in hand transplantation.

    PubMed

    McDiarmid, Sue V; Azari, Kodi K

    2011-11-01

    The policies and procedures for solid-organ donation, under the auspices of the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network, currently cannot be applied to hand donation, because a hand allograft is considered a tissue in the United States and is under the jurisdiction of the Food and Drug Administration. Hand transplant centers have developed their own protocols. This article discusses the unique elements of such protocols, including training and education, the consent process, the necessary recipient and donor data, donor management, and operating room procedures. Candidate listing, allocation, and oversight of hand donation in the future are also discussed.

  5. Living unrelated donor kidney transplantation between spouses.

    PubMed

    Haberal, M; Gulay, H; Tokyay, R; Oner, Z; Enunlu, T; Bilgin, N

    1992-01-01

    From November 3, 1975 to November 3, 1990, 874 kidney transplants were performed at out centers. Of these, 675 (77.2%) were from living donors and 199 (22.8%) were from cadaver donors. Five hundred eighty (66.4%) of the living donors were first degree related while 99 (11.3%) were unrelated or second degree related donors, 29 of which were spouses. All donor recipient pairs were ABO-compatible, with the exception of one pair. Donor recipient relations were wife to husband in 25 cases and husband to wife in 4 cases. All were first grafts and started functioning during surgery. In this series, the follow-up for the recipients was 4 to 64 months (mean 33.5 +/- 4.5 months). One-year patient survival and graft survival rates were 92.4% and 81.9%, respectively. Two-year patient survival and graft survival rates were 92.4% and 78.2%, respectively. The single ABO-incompatible case is also doing well, 21 months postoperatively. This study demonstrates that the interspouse kidney transplantation may be used when cadaver organ shortage is a problem. While providing the couple with a better quality of life, interspouse kidney transplantation also enables the couple to share the joy of giving and receiving the "gift of life" from one another.

  6. Paired kidney exchange transplantation: Maximizing the donor pool

    PubMed Central

    Jha, P. K.; Sethi, S.; Bansal, S. B.; Jain, M.; Sharma, R.; Phanish, M. K.; Duggal, R.; Ahlawat, R.; Kher, V.

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, paired kidney exchange (PKE) transplantation has gained popularity worldwide as a viable alternative for end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients who have incompatible or sensitized donors. This study presents our experience with PKE transplantation and compares outcome between PKE and non-PKE renal transplant recipients. Between February 2010 and November 2013, 742 transplants were performed, of which 26 (3.5%) were PKE transplantations. All were two-way exchanges. PKE recipients were significantly older than non-PKE (46.73 ± 9.71 vs. 40.08 ± 13.36 years; P = 0.012) while donor ages were comparable. PKE patients had significantly higher number of HLA mismatches (5.03 ± 1.14 vs. 3.49 ± 1.57; P < 0.0001). After a median follow-up of 20 months (range: 3–47 months), there was no significant difference in patient survival (PKE 96.16% vs. non-PKE 96.65%; P = 0.596) and death censored graft survival (PKE 96.16% vs. non-PKE 96.37%; P = 1). Mean serum creatinine at 1 month and at last follow-up was lower in PKE versus non-PKE group (0.98 ± 0.33 vs. 1.3 ± 0.61 mg/dl; P = 0.008 and 0.96 ± 0.30 vs. 1.27 ± 0.57 mg/dl, P = 0.006, respectively). Biopsy proven acute rejection rate was 11.5% in PKE group and 16.89% in non-PKE patients (P = 0.6). To conclude, paired kidney donation is an excellent way of increasing the donor pool and needs to be promoted to overcome the shortage of suitable kidney in our country. PMID:26664210

  7. Reversal of deafness after renal transplantation in Alport's syndrome.

    PubMed

    McDonald, T J; Zincke, H; Anderson, C F; Ott, N T

    1978-01-01

    Six patients (five men and one woman) with Alport's syndrome underwent successful renal transplantation (four received kidneys from cadaver donors and two received allografts from living, related donors). One patient who had received a cadaver kidney had substantial hearing improvement and the others had stabilization of hearing. Hearing loss in Alport's syndrome is progressive. The reversal of deafness in one of our patients and stabilization in the others made us wonder whether an inherited enzymopathy had been reversed, which then mitigated the deafness.

  8. Expanding the pool of kidney donors: use of kidneys with acute renal dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    de Matos, Ana Cristina Carvalho; Requião-Moura, Lúcio Roberto; Clarizia, Gabriela; Durão, Marcelino de Souza; Tonato, Eduardo José; Chinen, Rogério; de Arruda, Érika Ferraz; Filiponi, Thiago Corsi; Pires, Luciana Mello de Mello Barros; Bertocchi, Ana Paula Fernandes; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Given the shortage of organs transplantation, some strategies have been adopted by the transplant community to increase the supply of organs. One strategy is the use of expanded criteria for donors, that is, donors aged >60 years or 50 and 59 years, and meeting two or more of the following criteria: history of hypertension, terminal serum creatinine >1.5mg/dL, and stroke as the donor´s cause of death. In this review, emphasis was placed on the use of donors with acute renal failure, a condition considered by many as a contraindication for organ acceptance and therefore one of the main causes for kidney discard. Since these are well-selected donors and with no chronic diseases, such as hypertension, renal disease, or diabetes, many studies showed that the use of donors with acute renal failure should be encouraged, because, in general, acute renal dysfunction is reversible. Although most studies demonstrated these grafts have more delayed function, the results of graft and patient survival after transplant are very similar to those with the use of standard donors. Clinical and morphological findings of donors, the use of machine perfusion, and analysis of its parameters, especially intrarenal resistance, are important tools to support decision-making when considering the supply of organs with renal dysfunction. PMID:26154553

  9. [The role of percutaneous renal biopsy in kidney transplant].

    PubMed

    Manfro, R C; Lee, J Y; Lewgoy, J; Edelweiss, M I; Gonçalves, L F; Prompt, C A

    1994-01-01

    Percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) is an useful tool for diagnostic and therapeutic orientation in renal transplantation. PURPOSE--To evaluate the current role of PRB in post-transplant acute renal dysfunction (ARD) of renal allografts. METHODS--Sixty-five renal transplant patients were submitted to 95 valid renal biopsies with no major complications. RESULTS--There was disagreement between the clinical and the pathological diagnosis in 28 occasions (29.5%). In 36 cases (37.9%) the results of the pathological examination led to a modification in patient's management. These modifications were most commonly the avoidance or witholding of a steroid pulse (8 cases); nephrectomy of the renal allograft (8 cases); witholding or decrease of cyclosporine dosage (6 cases); giving a steroid pulse (5 cases) and giving antibiotics to treat acute pyelonephritis in 4 cases. The use of kidneys from cadaveric donors was significantly associated with an increased number of biopsies (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION--These results demonstrate that even though several less invasive procedures are currently employed, renal biopsy is still an indispensable method to the management of ARD in renal transplant patients.

  10. [Towards the development of living donor kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Macher, Marie-Alice

    2016-12-01

    Living donor kidney transplantation has been increasing since 2008. Living donors represent a significant potential for organ transplants, in a context where the needs outstrip the availability of organs from deceased donors. However, patients are still poorly informed regarding the conditions in which these transplants are possible.

  11. European Transplant Registry of Senior Renal Transplant Recipients on Advagraf

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-11

    Graft Failure; Death; Acute Rejection of Renal Transplant; Infections; Bone Disease; Post Transplant Diabetes Mellitus; Quality of Life; HLA Antibody Production; Cardiovascular Risk Factors; Non-HLA Antibody Production

  12. Psychiatric Aspects of Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, S.K.; Pant, V.L.N.

    1985-01-01

    SUMMARY This report pertains to the psychiatric problems in renal transplant recipients and its socio-demographic correlations. 50 male recipient subjects with a post-transplant period ranging from six months to six years were evaluated through tape recorded interviews to study their pre and post-operative emotional reactions. A psychiatric examination was performed by two psychiatrists and a diagnosis given wherever necessary. On examination 46% of cases had identifiable psychiatric problems, mainly Anxiety Neurosis (18%), Depressive Neurosis (18%), Adjustment Reactions (10%). Non-organic (Psychogenic) pain, excessive somatic concern and personality changes were also noticed in some. The psychiatric illness was significantly more amongst unmarried (P < .05) and higher education group (P < .02). Other variables had no significant correlation with the psychiatric illness. None had psychoses or a major depressive disorder. Thus, psychiatric problems are present in particular groups of transplant recipients and are usually neurotic in nature and would require psychiatric help regarding these. PMID:21927072

  13. The Current Role of Endourologic Management of Renal Transplantation Complications

    PubMed Central

    Duty, Brian D.; Conlin, Michael J.; Fuchs, Eugene F.; Barry, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Complications following renal transplantation include ureteral obstruction, urinary leak and fistula, urinary retention, urolithiasis, and vesicoureteral reflux. These complications have traditionally been managed with open surgical correction, but minimally invasive techniques are being utilized frequently. Materials and Methods. A literature review was performed on the use of endourologic techniques for the management of urologic transplant complications. Results. Ureterovesical anastomotic stricture is the most common long-term urologic complication following renal transplantation. Direct vision endoureterotomy is successful in up to 79% of cases. Urinary leak is the most frequent renal transplant complication early in the postoperative period. Up to 62% of patients have been successfully treated with maximal decompression (nephrostomy tube, ureteral stent, and Foley catheter). Excellent outcomes have been reported following transurethral resection of the prostate shortly after transplantation for patients with urinary retention. Vesicoureteral reflux after renal transplant is common. Deflux injection has been shown to resolve reflux in up to 90% of patients with low-grade disease in the absence of high pressure voiding. Donor-gifted and de novo transplant calculi may be managed with shock wave, ureteroscopic, or percutaneous lithotripsy. Conclusions. Recent advances in equipment and technique have allowed many transplant patients with complications to be effectively managed endoscopically. PMID:24023541

  14. Plasma exchange conditioning for ABO-incompatible renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Winters, J L; Gloor, J M; Pineda, A A; Stegall, M D; Moore, S B

    2004-01-01

    The supply of deceased donor kidneys is inadequate to meet demand. To expand the pool of potential donors, ABO-incompatible transplants from living donors have been performed. We present the Mayo Clinic experience with such transplants. Enrollment was open to patients when the only available potential living kidney donor was ABO-incompatible. Conditioning consisted of plasma exchanges followed by intravenous immunoglobulin. Splenectomy was performed at the time of transplant surgery. Post-transplant immunosuppression consisted of anti-T lymphocyte antibody, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone. Isoagglutinin titers and scores were determined before and after each plasma exchange. Transplant outcomes were determined. Twenty-six ABO-incompatible transplants were performed. No hyperacute rejection occurred. Mean patient follow-up was 400 days. Patient and graft survivals at last follow-up were 92 and 85%, respectively. Antibody-mediated rejection occurred in 46% and was apparently reversed in 83% by plasma exchange and increased immunosuppression. The initial plasma exchange reduced immediate spin and AHG hemagglutination reactivity scores by 53.5 and 34.6%, respectively. Over the course of the pretransplant plasma exchanges, the immediate spin and AHG hemagglutination reactivity scores decreased by 96.4 and 68.5%, respectively. At 3 and 12 months, the immediate spin and AHG hemagglutinin reactivity scores and titers were less than those at baseline but greater than or equal to those on the day of transplantation. Despite an increase in scores and titers, antibody-mediated rejection was not present. Pre-transplant plasma exchange conditioning combined with other immunosuppressives can be used to prepare patients for ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation from living donors, but antibody-mediated rejection post-transplant is a common occurrence and allograft survival may be reduced. Controlled clinical trials are needed to identify the optimum

  15. Risks for donors in uterus transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kisu, Iori; Mihara, Makoto; Banno, Kouji; Umene, Kiyoko; Araki, Jun; Hara, Hisako; Suganuma, Nobuhiko; Aoki, Daisuke

    2013-12-01

    Uterus transplantation (UTx) is an alternative to gestational surrogacy and adoption for patients with absolute uterine infertility. Studies have been conducted in animals, and UTx is now within the reach of clinical application in humans. Procedures in humans have been published, but many medical, ethical, and social problems and risks of UTx require discussion prior to widespread clinical application, from the perspectives of donors, recipients, families, and newborns. In this article, we summarize the burdens and risks of UTx, with a focus on donors who provide the uterus.

  16. Bone remodeling after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bellorin-Font, Ezequiel; Rojas, Eudocia; Carlini, Raul G; Suniaga, Orlando; Weisinger, José R

    2003-06-01

    Several studies have indicated that bone alterations after transplantation are heterogeneous. Short-term studies after transplantation have shown that many patients exhibit a pattern consistent with adynamic bone disease. In contrast, patients with long-term renal transplantation show a more heterogeneous picture. Thus, while adynamic bone disease has also been described in these patients, most studies show decreased bone formation and prolonged mineralization lag-time faced with persisting bone resorption, and even clear evidence of generalized or focal osteomalacia in many patients. Thus, the main alterations in bone remodeling are a decrease in bone formation and mineralization up against persistent bone resorption, suggesting defective osteoblast function, decreased osteoblastogenesis, or increased osteoblast death rates. Indeed, recent studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that there is an early decrease in osteoblast number and surfaces, as well as in reduced bone formation rate and delayed mineralization after transplantation. These alterations are associated with an early increase in osteoblast apoptosis that correlates with low levels of serum phosphorus. These changes were more frequently observed in patients with low turnover bone disease. In contrast, PTH seemed to preserve osteoblast survival. The mechanisms of hypophosphatemia in these patients appear to be independent of PTH, suggesting that other phosphaturic factors may play a role. However, further studies are needed to determine the nature of a phosphaturic factor and its relationship to the alterations of bone remodeling after transplantation.

  17. HLA-Mismatched Renal Transplantation without Maintenance Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Tatsuo; Cosimi, A. Benedict; Spitzer, Thomas R.; Tolkoff-Rubin, Nina; Suthanthiran, Manikkam; Saidman, Susan L.; Shaffer, Juanita; Preffer, Frederic I.; Ding, Ruchuang; Sharma, Vijay; Fishman, Jay A.; Dey, Bimalangshu; Ko, Dicken S.C.; Hertl, Martin; Goes, Nelson B.; Wong, Waichi; Williams, Winfred W.; Colvin, Robert B.; Sykes, Megan; Sachs, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Five patients with end-stage renal disease received combined bone marrow and kidney transplants from HLA single-haplotype mismatched living related donors, with the use of a nonmyeloablative preparative regimen. Transient chimerism and reversible capillary leak syndrome developed in all recipients. Irreversible humoral rejection occurred in one patient. In the other four recipients, it was possible to discontinue all immunosuppressive therapy 9 to 14 months after the transplantation, and renal function has remained stable for 2.0 to 5.3 years since transplantation. The T cells from these four recipients, tested in vitro, showed donor-specific unresponsiveness and in specimens from allograft biopsies, obtained after withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy, there were high levels of P3 (FOXP3) messenger RNA (mRNA) but not granzyme B mRNA. PMID:18216355

  18. Renal transplant ultrasound: The nephrologist's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Khai Gene; Coombs, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract One of the principal roles of a nephrologist is to closely monitor renal transplant allograft function and promptly evaluate any dysfunction. Renal transplant sonography has a major role in this assessment process given its ability to easily define renal transplant anatomy and surrounding structures. Abnormalities can be extrarenal or involve vascular, parenchymal and urological components of the graft and these can acutely or chronically influence graft function and survival. Procedural guidance as is required during allograft biopsy, as well as routine surveillance and screening for post transplant complications such as malignancy are also important applications of ultrasound in the management of renal transplant recipients. This article outlines key ultrasound findings and applications in renal transplantation from the clinician's perspective. PMID:28191257

  19. Fungal infection following renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gallis, H A; Berman, R A; Cate, T R; Hamilton, J D; Gunnells, J C; Stickel, D L

    1975-09-01

    Twenty-seven deep fungal infections developed in 22 of 171 patients following renal transplantation. These infections included cryptococcosis (ten), nocardiosis (seven), candidiasis (four), aspergillosis (two), phycomycosis (two), chromomycosis (one), and subcutaneous infection with Phialophora gougeroti (one). Twelve infections occurred in living-related and ten in cadaveric recipients. Nineteen of the 22 patients were male. Infections occurred from 0 to 61 months after transplantation. Complicating non-fungal infections were present concomitantly in 15 patients. Thirteen patients died, eight probably as a result of fungal infection. Appropriate diagnostic procedures yielded a diagnosis in 20 of 27 infections, and therapy was begun in 18 patients. Serologic, culture, and biopsy procedures useful in making rapid diagnoses are advocated in the hope of increasing survival.

  20. Neurocognitive functions in pediatric renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Gulleroglu, K; Baskin, E; Bayrakci, U S; Aydogan, M; Alehan, F; Kantar, A; Karakayali, F; Moray, G; Haberal, M

    2013-01-01

    Neurocognitive dysfunction is one of the major complications of chronic renal failure (CRF). Uremic state during CRF encompasses a wide spectrum of neurobehavioral and neurological disturbances. Recent studies showed that the pathophysiology of neurocognitive dysfunction in CRF is related to plasma levels of uremic solutes. Successful renal transplantation improves renal, metabolic, and endocrine functions and the quality of life. The aim of our study was to determine the state of neurocognitive function in pediatric renal transplant recipients. We prospectively performed a neurological examination and neuropsychological test battery (Bender-Gestalt Test, Cancellation Test, and Visual and Auditory Number Assay Test) in 20 pediatric renal transplant recipients between 6 and 16 years of age. Twenty healthy children and 20 children with CRF were included in the study as the control groups. Mean age of the renal transplant recipients was 13.50 ± 3.40 years old. Mean evaluation time after transplantation was 2.0 ± 0.5 years. Bender-Gestalt Test result was abnormal in 40% of patients. The results of the Cancellation Test and the Visual and Auditory Number Assay Test showed significant decline in pediatric renal transplant patients when compared with the control. We found that neurocognitive dysfunction was frequent in pediatric renal transplantation patients. Awareness of this potential problem may be helpful for early recognition and treatment. Our findings suggest that periodic neurocognitive assessments may be indicated in transplant recipients.

  1. Hyperthyroidism in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Navascués, R A; Baltar, J; Laurés, A S; Ortega, F; Alvarez-Grande, J

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of toxic multinodular goiter with severe symptomatic hyperthyroidism in a female diagnosed 5 months after successful renal transplantation. To our knowledge, this is the first well-documented case of hyperthyroidism in a renal transplant recipient that responded well to methimazole. Special attention should be made to the use of methimazole and the possible interaction with immunosuppressive drugs.

  2. Renal transplantation in children less than 5 years of age.

    PubMed Central

    Rizzoni, G; Malekzadeh, M H; Pennisi, A J; Ettenger, R B; Uittenbogaart, C H; Fine, R N

    1980-01-01

    19 young children (less than 5 years old) have received 31 renal transplants from 4 live relatives and 27 cadaver donors. The 2-year allograft survival rate for the patients receiving their 1st allograft from the 4 live donors was 75 +/- 22% while for the patients receiving their 1st allograft from 15 cadaver donors was 26 +/- 11%. 10 children are currently surviving with functioning allographs (7 cadavers and 3 live relatives); 4 have died and 5 are undergoing dialysis after the loss of at least one allograft. Despite the poor allograft survival rate the fact that 7 children are surviving with cadaver allografts indicates that the lack of a living related donor should not prevent transplants in young children. PMID:7002060

  3. Renal transplantation in patients with HIV.

    PubMed

    Frassetto, Lynda A; Tan-Tam, Clara; Stock, Peter G

    2009-10-01

    HIV infection has been a major global health problem for almost three decades. With the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy in 1996, and the advent of effective prophylaxis and management of opportunistic infections, AIDS mortality has decreased markedly. In developed countries, this once fatal infection is now being treated as a chronic condition. As a result, rates of morbidity and mortality from other medical conditions leading to end-stage liver, kidney and heart disease are steadily increasing in individuals with HIV. Presence of HIV infection used to be viewed as a contraindication to transplantation for multiple reasons: concerns for exacerbation of an already immunocompromised state by administration of additional immunosuppressants; the use of a limited supply of donor organs with unknown long-term outcomes; and, the risk of viral transmission to the surgical and medical staff. This Review examines open questions on kidney transplantation in patients infected with HIV-1 and clinical strategies that have resulted in good outcomes. It also describes the clinical concerns associated with the treatment of renal transplant recipients with HIV.

  4. The Changing Financial Landscape of Renal Transplant Practice: A National Cohort Analysis.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, D A; Schnitzler, M A; Xiao, H; Naik, A S; Segev, D L; Dharnidharka, V R; Brennan, D C; Lentine, K L

    2017-02-01

    Kidney transplantation has become more resource intensive as recipient complexity has increased and average donor quality has diminished over time. A national retrospective cohort study was performed to assess the impact of kidney donor and recipient characteristics on transplant center cost (exclusive of organ acquisition) and Medicare reimbursement. Data from the national transplant registry, University HealthSystem Consortium hospital costs, and Medicare payments for deceased donor (N = 53 862) and living donor (N = 36 715) transplants from 2002 to 2013 were linked and analyzed using multivariate linear regression modeling. Deceased donor kidney transplant costs were correlated with recipient (Expected Post Transplant Survival Score, degree of allosensitization, obesity, cause of renal failure), donor (age, cause of death, donation after cardiac death, terminal creatinine), and transplant (histocompatibility matching) characteristics. Living donor costs rose sharply with higher degrees of allosensitization, and were also associated with obesity, cause of renal failure, recipient work status, and 0-ABDR mismatching. Analysis of Medicare payments for a subsample of 24 809 transplants demonstrated minimal correlation with patient and donor characteristics. In conclusion, the complexity in the landscape of kidney transplantation increases center costs, posing financial disincentives that may reduce organ utilization and limit access for higher-risk populations.

  5. CUBN as a Novel Locus for End-Stage Renal Disease: Insights from Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Reznichenko, Anna; Snieder, Harold; van den Born, Jacob; de Borst, Martin H.; Damman, Jeffrey; van Dijk, Marcory C. R. F.; van Goor, Harry; Hepkema, Bouke G.; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.; Niesing, Jan; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Seelen, Marc; Navis, Gerjan

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex disorder. As genome-wide association studies identified cubilin gene CUBN as a locus for albuminuria, and urinary protein loss is a risk factor for progressive CKD, we tested the hypothesis that common genetic variants in CUBN are associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and proteinuria. First, a total of 1142 patients with ESRD, admitted for renal transplantation, and 1186 donors were genotyped for SNPs rs7918972 and rs1801239 (case-control study). The rs7918972 minor allele frequency (MAF) was higher in ESRD patients comparing to kidney donors, implicating an increased risk for ESRD (OR 1.39, p = 0.0004) in native kidneys. Second, after transplantation recipients were followed for 5.8 [3.8–9.2] years (longitudinal study) documenting ESRD in transplanted kidneys – graft failure (GF). During post-transplant follow-up 92 (9.6%) cases of death-censored GF occurred. Donor rs7918972 MAF, representing genotype of the transplanted kidney, was 16.3% in GF vs 10.7% in cases with functioning graft. Consistently, a multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that donor rs7918972 is a predictor of GF, although statistical significance was not reached (HR 1.53, p = 0.055). There was no association of recipient rs7918972 with GF. Rs1801239 was not associated with ESRD or GF. In line with an association with the outcome, donor rs7918972 was associated with elevated proteinuria levels cross-sectionally at 1 year after transplantation. Thus, we identified CUBN rs7918972 as a novel risk variant for renal function loss in two independent settings: ESRD in native kidneys and GF in transplanted kidneys. PMID:22574174

  6. Live donor transplantation--the incompetent donor: comparative law.

    PubMed

    Wolfman, Samuel; Shaked, Tali

    2008-12-01

    Informed consent of the patient to medical treatment is an essential prerequisite for any invasive medical procedure. However in emergency cases, when the patient is unable to sign a consent form due to unconsciousness or to psychotic state, than the primary medical consideration shall take place. In such a case, in order to save life or even prevent a major medical hazard to the patient, doctors are allowed, in certain cases and in accordance with well accepted medical practice, to perform invasive procedures, major surgery or risky pharmacological treatment, without the explicit consent of the patient. All the above refers to the cases when avoidance of such non-consented treatment may harm severely the health and wellbeing of the patient and there is no doubt that such treatment is for the ultimate benefit of the patient. The question, however, shall arise when such a medical procedure is not necessarily for the benefit of the patient, but rather for the benefit of somebody else. Such is the case in the transplantation area and the question of living donor-donee relationship. This paper shall analyze the legal situation in cases of non competent donors whose consent cannot be considered legal consent given in full understanding and out of free will. It will also compare three legal systems, the Israeli, the American and the traditional Jewish law, with regard to the different approaches to this human problem, where the autonomy of the donor may be sacrificed for the purpose of saving life of another person.

  7. Reduced-intensity bone marrow transplantation from an alternative unrelated donor for myelodysplastic syndrome of first-donor origin.

    PubMed

    Komeno, Yukiko; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Kandabashi, Koji; Kawazu, Masahito; Goyama, Susumu; Takeshita, Masataka; Nannya, Yasuhito; Niino, Miyuki; Nakamoto, Tetsuya; Kurokawa, Mineo; Tsujino, Shiho; Ogawa, Seishi; Aoki, Katsunori; Chiba, Shigeru; Motokura, Toru; Hirai, Hisamaru

    2003-03-01

    A male patient had a relapse of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) 2 years after BMT from a female matched unrelated donor. Conventional cytogenetics, FISH, and short-tandem repeat chimerism analysis proved a relapse of donor origin. He underwent reduced-intensity BMT after a conditioning with fludarabine and busulfan, since he had impaired renal, liver, and pulmonary functions. Chimerism analysis on day 28 after the second BMT showed mixed chimerism of the first and the second donors, which later turned to full second-donor chimerism on day 60. He developed grade II acute GVHD of the skin and cytomegalovirus reactivation, but both were improved with methylprednisolone and ganciclovir, respectively. He remains in complete remission 6 months after the second BMT. Reduced-intensity second BMT from an alternative donor appeared to be a tolerable treatment option for donor-derived leukemia/MDS after the first conventional transplantation.

  8. [Twin pregnancy after renal transplantation: first case reported in Tunisia].

    PubMed

    Skhiri, Habib; Guedri, Yousr; Achour, Abdellatif; Sabra, Aloui; Hadj, Youssef Dorsaf; Bouraoui, Samia; Frih, Ameur; Ben Dhia, Nasr; Sakkouhi, Mohamed; Gahbiche, Mourad; Saad, Hamadi; El May, Mezni

    2005-04-01

    Women with end-stage renal disease or on regular dialysis have low fertility. Renal transplantation restores not only normal renal and endocrine functions but also the reproductive function as well and this conception becomes possible. Pregnancy in transplanted women is at higher risk and necessitates a multidisciplinary follow up. We report the course and out come of two successful pregnancies, the second was the first case of twin pregnancy in Tunisia in a transplanted woman. Our patient is 35 years old had a chronic renal insufficiency, secondary to interstitial nephropathy. After six years of hemodialysis, she had received a renal graft from a living donor (his brother). A double drug immunosuppression was given (Prednisolone - Azathioprine). Two years later, she became pregnant and delivered a normal baby at term, and one year later she had a twin pregnancy that ended successfully and delivered by caesarian section a two babies with different sex. Pregnancy after renal transplantion must be considered as a risk factor for any subsquent pregnancy, and the risk nicreases in case of twin pregnancy.

  9. Donor-specific antibodies accelerate arteriosclerosis after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hill, Gary S; Nochy, Dominique; Bruneval, Patrick; Duong van Huyen, J P; Glotz, Denis; Suberbielle, Caroline; Zuber, Julien; Anglicheau, Dany; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Legendre, Christophe; Loupy, Alexandre

    2011-05-01

    In biopsies of renal allografts, arteriosclerosis is often more severe than expected based on the age of the donor, even without a history of rejection vasculitis. To determine whether preformed donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) may contribute to the severity of arteriosclerosis, we examined protocol biopsies from patients with (n=40) or without (n=59) DSA after excluding those with any evidence of vasculitis. Among DSA-positive patients, arteriosclerosis significantly progressed between month 3 and month 12 after transplant (mean Banff cv score 0.65 ± 0.11 to 1.12 ± 0.10, P=0.014); in contrast, among DSA-negative patients, we did not detect a statistically significant progression during the same timeframe (mean Banff cv score 0.65 ± 0.11 to 0.81 ± 0.10, P=not significant). Available biopsies at later time points supported a rate of progression of arteriosclerosis in DSA-negative patients that was approximately one third that in DSA-positive patients. Accelerated arteriosclerosis was significantly associated with peritubular capillary leukocytic infiltration, glomerulitis, subclinical antibody-mediated rejection, and interstitial inflammation. In conclusion, these data support the hypothesis that donor-specific antibodies dramatically accelerate post-transplant progression of arteriosclerosis.

  10. Physicians attitudes toward living non-related renal transplantation (LNRRT). The Living non-Related Renal Transplant Study Group.

    PubMed

    1993-06-01

    Renal transplantation is considered now the definitive treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Unfortunately, the worldwide shortage of kidneys remains the most important obstacle to transplantation. In developing countries, including those of the Middle East, the shortage is even more dramatic. Despite great efforts to establish and maintain successful transplant centers, the number of kidneys that have been transplanted in the last few years has actually declined. The lack of a dependable kidney source played well into the hands of unscrupulous entrepreneurs who started brokerage of organs for profit. In this practice, patients with ESRD travel to India and other countries to purchase kidneys from living genetically non-related poor donors. Patient care was therefore relegated to the laws of the marketplace and both patients and donors were exploited to maximize profit. Additionally, reported results of this type of transplantation were inferior to those of other types of transplantation. Not unexpectedly, these issues have created intense controversy among transplant physicians and the general public in which moral, ethical and medical issues were debated. To investigate these issues, we conducted a large multicenter study in Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and Egypt. In the first phase of this study, we surveyed 50 institutions regarding their attitude toward LNRRT, of which 22 responded. The results of our survey clearly show that patients with ESRD take the initiative in seeking LNRRT despite physician discouragement and significant financial burden.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Risk factors of arterial hypertension after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Béji, S; Abderrahim, E; Kaaroud, H; Jebali, H; Ben Abdallah, T; El Younsi, F; Ben Moussa, F; Ben Hamida, F; Sfaxi, A; Blah, M; Chebil, M; Ayed, M; Bardi, R; Gorgi, Y; Kheder, A

    2007-10-01

    Arterial hypertension often present after kidney transplantation is of multifactorial origin. The aim of this study was to determine the role of donor and recipient factors in the development of hypertension after renal transplantation. We retrospectively analyzed the data of 280 patients transplanted between 1985 and 2005, who still had functioning grafts at 1 year after transplantation. We recorded donor and recipient parameters. One hundred eighty-seven patients (66.8%) were hypertensive. Upon multivariate analysis of recipient factors, pretransplant hypertension (odds ratio) [OR]: 8.5, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.5 to 16.1); serum creatinine level > 130 micromol/L at 6 months (OR: 2.5, 95% CI: 1.3 to 4,7), male gender (OR: 2.02, 95% CI: 1.2 to 3.4), and chronic rejection (OR: 2.4, 95% CI: 1.2 to 4.7) were independent predisposing factors. Among donor factors, age was significantly associated with arterial hypertension upon univariate analysis. In conclusion, recipient factors, especially pretransplant hypertension, contribute to the disorder in renal transplant patients.

  12. Successful third renal transplantation in a child with an occluded inferior vena cava: A novel technique to use the venous interposition between the transplant renal vein and the infrahepatic inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Masaki; Shishido, Seiichiro; Takahashi, Yusuke; Hamasaki, Yuko; Yoshimura, Hiroshi; Nihei, Hiroshi; Itabashi, Yoshihiro; Kawamura, Takeshi; Aikawa, Atsushi

    2017-03-19

    A girl aged 11 years and 3 months with occlusion of the inferior vena cava had experienced two renal transplant graft failures since birth. The third renal transplant from a live donor was carried out. Preoperative evaluation showed that the arteries from the right common to the right external iliac artery were absent, and the ilio-caval vein was occluded below the level of the renal vein. The donor's renal artery was anastomosed to the aorta. The donor's ovarian and large saphenous veins were used to extend the transplant renal vein to the recipient's patent inferior vena cava. The present report concludes that the extension of a short donor renal vein using other donor veins is a viable therapeutic option for pediatric patients with vascular occlusions.

  13. Donor-associated malignancy in kidney transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Cai-Bin; Gerber, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Skin cancer cells with donor genotype have been identified in allogeneic transplant patients; however, the donor contribution to the recipient’s epithelial malignancy remains to be established. In this issue of the JCI, Verneuil et al. provide the first evidence for donor contribution to the malignant epithelium of skin squamous cell carcinoma in a kidney transplant recipient. This case report may have important implications for cancer research and clinical care of long-surviving kidney transplant patients. PMID:23979157

  14. Low-grade proteinuria and microalbuminuria in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Halimi, Jean-Michel

    2013-07-27

    Nephrotic-range proteinuria has been known for years to be associated with poor renal outcome. Newer evidence indicates that early (1-3 months after transplantation) low-grade proteinuria and microalbuminuria (1) provide information on the graft in terms of donor characteristics and ischemia/reperfusion injury, (2) may occur before the development of donor-specific antibodies, (3) predict the development of diabetes and cardiovascular events, and (4) are associated with reduced long-term graft and patient survivals. Low-grade proteinuria and microalbuminuria are also predictive of diabetes, cardiovascular morbidity, and death in nontransplanted populations, which may help us to understand the pathophysiology of low-grade proteinuria or microalbuminuria in renal transplantation. The impact of immunosuppressive medications, including mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, on graft survival is still discussed, and the effect on proteinuria is crucial to the debate. The fact that chronic allograft rejection may exist as early as 3 months after renal transplantation indicates that optimal management of low-grade proteinuria or microalbuminuria should occur very early after transplantation to improve long-term renal function and the overall outcome of renal transplant recipients. The presence of low-grade proteinuria or microalbuminuria early after transplantation must be taken into account to choose adequate immunosuppressive and antihypertensive medications. Limited information exists regarding the benefit of therapeutic interventions to reduce low-grade proteinuria or microalbuminuria. Whether renin angiotensin blockade results in optimal nephroprotection in patients with low-grade proteinuria or microalbuminuria is not proven, especially in the absence of chronic allograft nephropathy. Observational studies and randomized clinical trials yield conflicting results. Finally, randomized clinical trials are urgently needed.

  15. The renal scan in pregnant renal transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.A.; Ziessman, H.A.; Fahey, F.H.; Collea, J.V.; Alijani, M.R.; Helfrich, G.B.

    1985-05-01

    With the greater frequency of renal transplant surgery, more female pts are becoming pregnant and carrying to term. In the renal allograft blood vessels and ureter may be compressed resulting in impaired renal function and/or, hypertension. Toxemia of pregnancy is seen more frequently than normal. Radionuclide renal scan monitoring may be of significant value in this high risk obstetrical pt. After being maintained during the pregnancy, renal function may also deteriorate in the post partum period. 5 pregnant renal transplant pts who delivered live babies had renal studies with Tc-99m DTPA to assess allograft perfusion and function. No transplanted kidney was lost during or after pregnancy as a result of pregnancy. No congenital anomalies were associated with transplant management. 7 studies were performed on these 5 pts. The 7 scans all showed the uterus/placenta. The bladder was always distorted. The transplanted kidney was rotated to a more vertical position in 3 pts. The radiation dose to the fetus is calculated at 0.024 rad/mCi administered. This study demonstrates the anatomic and physiologic alterations expected in the transplanted kidney during pregnancy when evaluated by renal scan and that the radiation burden may be acceptable in management of these pts.

  16. Defining Long-term Outcomes with Living Donor Liver Transplantation in North America

    PubMed Central

    Olthoff, Kim M.; Smith, Abigail R.; Abecassis, Michael; Baker, Talia; Emond, Jean C.; Berg, Carl L.; Beil, Charlotte A.; Burton, James R.; Fisher, Robert A.; Freise, Christopher E.; Gillespie, Brenda W.; Grant, David R.; Humar, Abhi; Kam, Igal; Merion, Robert M.; Pomfret, Elizabeth A.; Samstein, Benjamin; Shaked, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare long-term survival of living donor liver transplant (LDLT) at experienced transplant centers to outcomes of deceased donor liver transplant (DDLT) and identify key variables impacting patient and graft survival. Summary Background Data The Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study (A2ALL) is a prospective multicenter NIH study comparing outcomes of LDLT and DDLT and associated risks. Methods Mortality and graft failure for 1427 liver recipients (963 LDLT) enrolled in A2ALL transplanted between 1/1/1998 and 1/31/2014 at 12 North American centers with median follow-up 6.7 years were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox models. Results Survival probability at 10 years was 70% for LDLT and 64% for DDLT. Unadjusted survival was higher with LDLT (HR=0.76, p=0.02) but attenuated after adjustment (HR=0.98, p=0.90) as LDLT recipients had lower mean MELD (15.5 vs 20.4) and fewer were transplanted from ICU, inpatient, on dialysis, ventilated, or with ascites. Post-transplant ICU days were less for LDLT. For all recipients female gender and primary sclerosing cholangitis were associated with improved survival, while dialysis and older recipient/donor age were associated with worse survival. Higher MELD score was associated with increased graft failure. Era of transplantation and type of donated lobe did not impact survival in LDLT. Conclusions LDLT provides significant long-term transplant benefit resulting in transplantation at a lower MELD score, decreased death on waitlist, and excellent post-transplant outcomes. Recipient diagnosis, disease severity, renal failure, and ages of recipient and donor should be considered in decision-making regarding timing of transplant and donor options. Clinical Trials ID NCT00096733. PMID:26258315

  17. Preemptive Renal Transplantation-The Best Treatment Option for Terminal Chronic Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Arze Aimaretti, L; Arze, S

    2016-03-01

    Renal transplantation is the best therapeutic option for end-stage chronic renal disease. Assuming that it is more advisable if performed early, we aimed to show the clinical, social, and economic advantages in 70% of our patients who were dialyzed only for a short period. For this purpose, we retrospectively collected data over 28 years in 142 kidney transplants performed in patients with <6 weeks on dialysis. 66% of our patients were 30-60 years old; 98% of the patients had living donors. At transplantation, 64% of our patients had no public support; however, 64% of them returned to work and got health insurance 2 months later. Full rehabilitation was achieved in all cases, including integration to the family, return to full-time work, school and university, sports, and reproduction. Immunosuppression consisted of 3 drugs, including steroids, cyclosporine, and azathioprine or mycophenolate. The cost in the 1st year, including patient and donor evaluation, surgery, immunosuppression, and follow-up, was $13,300 USD versus $22,320 for hemodialysis. We conclude that preemptive renal transplantation with <6 weeks on dialysis is the best therapeutic option for end-stage renal failure, especially in developing countries such as Bolivia, where until last year, full public support for renal replacement therapy was unavailable.

  18. Ethical perspectives on living donor organ transplantation in Asia.

    PubMed

    Concejero, Allan M; Chen, Chao-Long

    2009-12-01

    Live donors are a continuing source of organ grafts for solid organ transplantation in Asia. Ethical issues surrounding the development of living donor organ transplantation in Eastern countries are different from those in Western countries. Donor safety is still the paramount concern in any donor operation. Issues on organ trafficking remain societal concerns in low-income nations. Religion, cultural background, economic prerogatives, and timely legislation contribute to the social acceptance and maturation of organ donation.

  19. State of deceased donor transplantation in India: A model for developing countries around the world.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Georgi; Vijayan, Madhusudan; Gopalakrishnan, Natarajan; Shroff, Sunil; Amalorpavanathan, Joseph; Yuvaraj, Anand; Nair, Sanjeev; Sundarrajan, Saravanan

    2016-06-24

    Renal replacement therapy (RRT) resources are scarce in India, with wide urban-rural and interstate disparities. The burden of end-stage renal disease is expected to increase further due to increasing prevalence of risk factors like diabetes mellitus. Renal transplantation, the best RRT modality, is increasing in popularity, due to improvements made in public education, the deceased donor transplantation (DDT) programme and the availability of free and affordable transplant services in government hospitals and certain non-governmental philanthropic organizations. There are about 120000 haemodialysis patients and 10000 chronic peritoneal dialysis patients in India, the majority of them waiting for a donor kidney. Shortage of organs, lack of transplant facilities and high cost of transplant in private facilities are major barriers for renal transplantation in India. The DDT rate in India is now 0.34 per million population, among the lowest in the world. Infrastructural development in its infancy and road traffic rules not being strictly implemented by the authorities, have led to road traffic accidents being very common in urban and rural India. Many patients are declared brain dead on arrival and can serve as potential organ donors. The DDT programme in the state of Tamil Nadu has met with considerable success and has brought down the incidence of organ trade. Government hospitals in Tamil Nadu, with a population of 72 million, provide free transplantation facilities for the underprivileged. Public private partnership has played an important role in improving organ procurement rates, with the help of trained transplant coordinators in government hospitals. The DDT programmes in the southern states of India (Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Pondicherry) are advancing rapidly with mutual sharing due to public private partnership providing vital organs to needy patients. Various health insurance programmes rolled out by the governments in the southern states are effective in

  20. State of deceased donor transplantation in India: A model for developing countries around the world

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Georgi; Vijayan, Madhusudan; Gopalakrishnan, Natarajan; Shroff, Sunil; Amalorpavanathan, Joseph; Yuvaraj, Anand; Nair, Sanjeev; Sundarrajan, Saravanan

    2016-01-01

    Renal replacement therapy (RRT) resources are scarce in India, with wide urban-rural and interstate disparities. The burden of end-stage renal disease is expected to increase further due to increasing prevalence of risk factors like diabetes mellitus. Renal transplantation, the best RRT modality, is increasing in popularity, due to improvements made in public education, the deceased donor transplantation (DDT) programme and the availability of free and affordable transplant services in government hospitals and certain non-governmental philanthropic organizations. There are about 120000 haemodialysis patients and 10000 chronic peritoneal dialysis patients in India, the majority of them waiting for a donor kidney. Shortage of organs, lack of transplant facilities and high cost of transplant in private facilities are major barriers for renal transplantation in India. The DDT rate in India is now 0.34 per million population, among the lowest in the world. Infrastructural development in its infancy and road traffic rules not being strictly implemented by the authorities, have led to road traffic accidents being very common in urban and rural India. Many patients are declared brain dead on arrival and can serve as potential organ donors. The DDT programme in the state of Tamil Nadu has met with considerable success and has brought down the incidence of organ trade. Government hospitals in Tamil Nadu, with a population of 72 million, provide free transplantation facilities for the underprivileged. Public private partnership has played an important role in improving organ procurement rates, with the help of trained transplant coordinators in government hospitals. The DDT programmes in the southern states of India (Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Pondicherry) are advancing rapidly with mutual sharing due to public private partnership providing vital organs to needy patients. Various health insurance programmes rolled out by the governments in the southern states are effective in

  1. Pneumonia in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, D. M.; Marrie, T. J.; Janigan, D. T.; MacKeen, A. D.; Belitsky, P.; MacDonald, A. S.; Lannon, S. G.; Cohen, A. D.

    1983-01-01

    Between January 1976 and March 1982, 28 episodes of pneumonia occurred in 26 renal transplant patients. The overall mortality rate was 46%. Of the 16 patients with nosocomial pneumonia 9 (56%) died, whereas of the 12 patients with community-acquired pneumonia 4 (33%) died. In all 9 cases of unknown cause the response to empiric treatment was prompt, whereas in 4 of the 10 cases of monomicrobial pneumonia and 8 of the 9 cases of polymicrobial pneumonia the patient died. Cytomegalovirus was the sole cause of the pneumonia in two patients and a contributing cause, along with aerobic gram-negative bacteria, in another five, four of whom also had a fungal infection. Two patients, both of whom survived, had nosocomial Legionnaires' disease. PMID:6342741

  2. Transplantation and differentiation of donor cells in the cloned pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Arata; Tomii, Ryo; Kano, Koichiro; Nagashima, Hiroshi . E-mail: hnagas@isc.meiji.ac.jp

    2006-06-02

    The application of nuclear transfer technology is an interesting approach to investigate stem and progenitor cell transplantation therapy. If stem cells are used as a nuclear donor, donor cells can engraft into cloned animals without histocompatible problems. However, it is still uncertain whether donor cells can engraft to cloned animal and differentiate in vivo. To address this problem, we transplanted donor cells to dermal tissues of cloned pigs developed by using preadipocytes as donor cells. Preadipocytes are adipocytic progenitor which can differentiate to mature adipocytes in vitro. We showed that the donor preadipocytes were successfully transplanted into the cloned pigs without immune rejection and they differentiated into mature adipocytes in vivo 3 weeks after transplantation. In contrast, allogenic control preadipocytes, which can differentiate in vitro, did not differentiate in vivo. These results indicate that donor progenitor cells can differentiate in cloned animal.

  3. The clinical impact of humoral immunity in pediatric renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Abanti; Ozawa, Mikki; Everly, Matthew J; Ettenger, Robert; Dharnidharka, Vikas; Benfield, Mark; Mathias, Robert; Portale, Anthony; McDonald, Ruth; Harmon, William; Kershaw, David; Vehaskari, V Matti; Kamil, Elaine; Baluarte, H Jorge; Warady, Bradley; Li, Li; Sigdel, Tara K; Hsieh, Szu-chuan; Dai, Hong; Naesens, Maarten; Waskerwitz, Janie; Salvatierra, Oscar; Terasaki, Paul I; Sarwal, Minnie M

    2013-03-01

    The development of anti-donor humoral responses after transplantation associates with higher risks for acute rejection and 1-year graft survival in adults, but the influence of humoral immunity on transplant outcomes in children is not well understood. Here, we studied the evolution of humoral immunity in low-risk pediatric patients during the first 2 years after renal transplantation. Using data from 130 pediatric renal transplant patients randomized to steroid-free (SF) or steroid-based (SB) immunosuppression in the NIH-SNSO1 trial, we correlated the presence of serum anti-HLA antibodies to donor HLA antigens (donor-specific antibodies) and serum MHC class 1-related chain A (MICA) antibody with both clinical outcomes and histology identified on protocol biopsies at 0, 6, 12, and 24 months. We detected de novo antibodies after transplant in 24% (23% of SF group and 25% of SB group), most often after the first year. Overall, 22% developed anti-HLA antibodies, of which 6% were donor-specific antibodies, and 6% developed anti-MICA antibody. Presence of these antibodies de novo associated with significantly higher risks for acute rejection (P=0.02), chronic graft injury (P=0.02), and decline in graft function (P=0.02). In summary, antibodies to HLA and MICA antigens appear in approximately 25% of unsensitized pediatric patients, placing them at greater risk for acute and chronic rejection with accelerated loss of graft function. Avoiding steroids does not seem to modify this incidence. Whether serial assessments of these antibodies after transplant could guide individual tailoring of immunosuppression requires additional study.

  4. The Clinical Impact of Humoral Immunity in Pediatric Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Abanti; Ozawa, Mikki; Everly, Matthew J.; Ettenger, Robert; Dharnidharka, Vikas; Benfield, Mark; Mathias, Robert; Portale, Anthony; McDonald, Ruth; Harmon, William; Kershaw, David; Vehaskari, V. Matti; Kamil, Elaine; Baluarte, H. Jorge; Warady, Bradley; Li, Li; Sigdel, Tara K.; Hsieh, Szu-chuan; Dai, Hong; Naesens, Maarten; Waskerwitz, Janie; Salvatierra, Oscar; Terasaki, Paul I.

    2013-01-01

    The development of anti-donor humoral responses after transplantation associates with higher risks for acute rejection and 1-year graft survival in adults, but the influence of humoral immunity on transplant outcomes in children is not well understood. Here, we studied the evolution of humoral immunity in low-risk pediatric patients during the first 2 years after renal transplantation. Using data from 130 pediatric renal transplant patients randomized to steroid-free (SF) or steroid-based (SB) immunosuppression in the NIH-SNSO1 trial, we correlated the presence of serum anti-HLA antibodies to donor HLA antigens (donor-specific antibodies) and serum MHC class 1-related chain A (MICA) antibody with both clinical outcomes and histology identified on protocol biopsies at 0, 6, 12, and 24 months. We detected de novo antibodies after transplant in 24% (23% of SF group and 25% of SB group), most often after the first year. Overall, 22% developed anti-HLA antibodies, of which 6% were donor-specific antibodies, and 6% developed anti-MICA antibody. Presence of these antibodies de novo associated with significantly higher risks for acute rejection (P=0.02), chronic graft injury (P=0.02), and decline in graft function (P=0.02). In summary, antibodies to HLA and MICA antigens appear in approximately 25% of unsensitized pediatric patients, placing them at greater risk for acute and chronic rejection with accelerated loss of graft function. Avoiding steroids does not seem to modify this incidence. Whether serial assessments of these antibodies after transplant could guide individual tailoring of immunosuppression requires additional study. PMID:23449533

  5. The effect of mannitol administration to kidney donor on short-term outcomes of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Esfahani, Hellieh Sadat; Nooraei, Navid; Asgary, Majeed; Hashemian, Mohammad Reza

    2014-11-01

    As the cases of kidney transplant are increasing, the need to apply the factors to increase the success of transplant seems necessary. Mannitol increases the osmotic pressure and urine volume as a protective agent on renal tubules. We aimed to evaluate the effect of mannitol on short-term outcome of kidney transplantation by comparing two groups based on prescribing mannitol to donors. In a randomized clinical trial, 60 kidney recipients were assigned in two groups (30 in each), except that in one group donors received mannitol. They were studied with respect to age, gender, weight, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr), sodium (Na), potassium (K) and arterial blood gas (ABG) before and after surgery, and their pulse rate (PR) and blood pressure (BP) before, during and after surgery. Their urine volume was assessed in the operation room and the first 24 h after surgery. The short-term outcome, including BUN and Cr in the first 10 days after transplant, have been charted. Both the case (mannitol-positive donor patient) and the control (mannitol negative) groups were the same regarding the results gained for pre- and post-operative parameters. Follow-up assessments showed no significant differences in renal function. Based on this, we conclude that mannitol administration to donors does not have a beneficial effect on the prognosis and short-term outcome of transplantation on recipients; therefore, we feel that it should not be advised for kidney donors.

  6. Improved renal ischemia tolerance in females influences kidney transplantation outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Aufhauser, David D.; Wang, Zhonglin; Murken, Douglas R.; Bhatti, Tricia R.; Wang, Yanfeng; Ge, Guanghui; Redfield, Robert R.; Abt, Peter L.; Wang, Liqing; Reese, Peter P.; Hancock, Wayne W.; Levine, Matthew H.

    2016-01-01

    Experimentally, females show an improved ability to recover from ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) compared with males; however, this sex-dependent response is less established in humans. Here, we developed a series of murine renal ischemia and transplant models to investigate sex-specific effects on recovery after IRI. We found that IRI tolerance is profoundly increased in female mice compared with that observed in male mice and discovered an intermediate phenotype after neutering of either sex. Transplantation of adult kidneys from either sex into a recipient of the opposite sex followed by ischemia at a remote time resulted in ischemia recovery that reflected the sex of the recipient, not the donor, revealing that the host sex determines recovery. Likewise, renal IRI was exacerbated in female estrogen receptor α–KO mice, while female mice receiving supplemental estrogen before ischemia were protected. We examined data from the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) to determine whether there is an association between sex and delayed graft function (DGF) in patients who received deceased donor renal transplants. A multivariable logistic regression analysis determined that there was a greater association with DGF in male recipients than in female recipients. Together, our results demonstrate that sex affects renal IRI tolerance in mice and humans and indicate that estrogen administration has potential as a therapeutic intervention to clinically improve ischemia tolerance. PMID:27088798

  7. Improved renal ischemia tolerance in females influences kidney transplantation outcomes.

    PubMed

    Aufhauser, David D; Wang, Zhonglin; Murken, Douglas R; Bhatti, Tricia R; Wang, Yanfeng; Ge, Guanghui; Redfield, Robert R; Abt, Peter L; Wang, Liqing; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Thomasson, Arwin; Reese, Peter P; Hancock, Wayne W; Levine, Matthew H

    2016-05-02

    Experimentally, females show an improved ability to recover from ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) compared with males; however, this sex-dependent response is less established in humans. Here, we developed a series of murine renal ischemia and transplant models to investigate sex-specific effects on recovery after IRI. We found that IRI tolerance is profoundly increased in female mice compared with that observed in male mice and discovered an intermediate phenotype after neutering of either sex. Transplantation of adult kidneys from either sex into a recipient of the opposite sex followed by ischemia at a remote time resulted in ischemia recovery that reflected the sex of the recipient, not the donor, revealing that the host sex determines recovery. Likewise, renal IRI was exacerbated in female estrogen receptor α-KO mice, while female mice receiving supplemental estrogen before ischemia were protected. We examined data from the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) to determine whether there is an association between sex and delayed graft function (DGF) in patients who received deceased donor renal transplants. A multivariable logistic regression analysis determined that there was a greater association with DGF in male recipients than in female recipients. Together, our results demonstrate that sex affects renal IRI tolerance in mice and humans and indicate that estrogen administration has potential as a therapeutic intervention to clinically improve ischemia tolerance.

  8. Liver regeneration after living donor transplantation: adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation cohort study.

    PubMed

    Olthoff, Kim M; Emond, Jean C; Shearon, Tempie H; Everson, Greg; Baker, Talia B; Fisher, Robert A; Freise, Chris E; Gillespie, Brenda W; Everhart, James E

    2015-01-01

    Adult-to-adult living donors and recipients were studied to characterize patterns of liver growth and identify associated factors in a multicenter study. Three hundred and fifty donors and 353 recipients in the Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study (A2ALL) receiving transplants between March 2003 and February 2010 were included. Potential predictors of 3-month liver volume included total and standard liver volumes (TLV and SLV), Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score (in recipients), the remnant and graft size, remnant-to-donor and graft-to-recipient weight ratios (RDWR and GRWR), remnant/TLV, and graft/SLV. Among donors, 3-month absolute growth was 676 ± 251 g (mean ± SD), and percentage reconstitution was 80% ± 13%. Among recipients, GRWR was 1.3% ± 0.4% (8 < 0.8%). Graft weight was 60% ± 13% of SLV. Three-month absolute growth was 549 ± 267 g, and percentage reconstitution was 93% ± 18%. Predictors of greater 3-month liver volume included larger patient size (donors and recipients), larger graft volume (recipients), and larger TLV (donors). Donors with the smallest remnant/TLV ratios had larger than expected growth but also had higher postoperative bilirubin and international normalized ratio at 7 and 30 days. In a combined donor-recipient analysis, donors had smaller 3-month liver volumes than recipients adjusted for patient size, remnant or graft volume, and TLV or SLV (P = 0.004). Recipient graft failure in the first 90 days was predicted by poor graft function at day 7 (HR = 4.50, P = 0.001) but not by GRWR or graft fraction (P > 0.90 for each). Both donors and recipients had rapid yet incomplete restoration of tissue mass in the first 3 months, and this confirmed previous reports. Recipients achieved a greater percentage of expected total volume. Patient size and recipient graft volume significantly influenced 3-month volumes. Importantly, donor liver volume is a

  9. Increasing referral for renal transplant evaluation in recipients of nonrenal solid-organ transplants: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Chandrakantan, Arun; de Mattos, Angelo M; Naftel, David; Crosswy, Apryl; Kirklin, James; Curtis, John J

    2006-07-01

    The use of cyclosporine and tacrolimus therapy in nonrenal (heart, heart/lung, lung, and liver) transplantation has resulted in improved patient and graft survival. Nephrotoxicity is one of the major side effects of tacrolimus and cyclosporine therapy and may lead to ESRD. The trend of referral of nonrenal solid-organ transplant recipients for kidney transplant evaluation at a large multiorgan transplant center was examined. Records of all patients who were referred for renal transplantation at the University of Alabama between January 1, 1993, and June 30, 2004, were reviewed. Eighty (0.96%) of 8318 individuals had previously undergone a nonrenal solid-organ transplant and were included in the study. The majority (72%) of patients had their nonrenal transplants performed at the University of Alabama. Twenty-two patients had their nonrenal transplant performed elsewhere and had fewer data available for analysis. From the period 1993-1996 to 2001-2004, an 11-fold increase in the absolute number of referrals of patients with nonrenal transplants was noted. Of patients who were referred for transplant evaluation, 25 became recipients of kidney transplants with a predominance of living-donor transplants. Referral for kidney transplant evaluation among nonrenal solid-organ transplant recipients is increasing and will exacerbate the existing shortage of deceased-donor kidneys that are available for transplantation. There was a trend for liver transplant recipients compared with other solid-organ recipients to develop ESRD at a greater rate.

  10. Living donor kidney transplantation: "beauty and the beast"!

    PubMed

    Danovitch, Gabriel M

    2013-01-01

    The report by Terasaki and colleagues in 1995 that the outcomes of spousal and biologically unrelated transplants were essentially the same as for 1-haplotype matched living related transplants changed the course of clinical transplantation. This article, entitled metaphorically "Beauty and the Beast", describes the dramatic change in the practice of living donor transplantation that followed. In the ensuing two decades, biologically unrelated living donor transplantation became commonplace in the developed world and reached its apotheosis in cross-country living donor paired exchange programs that have made transplantation accessible to many whose donors were deemed "incompatible". Such exchanges can indeed be thought of as a "thing of beauty". Sadly, the same observation was abused to exploit vulnerable donors, and the "beast" in the form of transplant tourism became a feature of transplantation in the developing world. The responsibility of the transplant community to protect the welfare of living donors and their recipients and the key role of trust in the evaluation of living donors is discussed.

  11. Cortical necrosis in a renal transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Blumhardt, R.; Growcock, G.; Lasher, J.C.

    1983-07-01

    The /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA renogram is a well extabished noninvasive method for evaluating and following transplanted kidneys. The examination is useful in distinguishing rejection from acute tubular necrosis as well as demonstrating several less common complications such as vascular occlusion, urinary extravasation, obstruction, and lymphocele. A previously unreported condition involving a transplant kidney (i.e., renal cortical necrosis) is described which was diagnosed with renal scintigraphy in combination with sonography.

  12. Renal Function and Transplantation in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Sandesh; Foley, David; Djamali, Arjang; Mandelbrot, Didier

    2015-09-01

    Kidney injury is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in liver transplant recipients. Since the introduction of the model for end-stage liver disease for the allocation of organs for liver transplantation in 2002, the heavy weighting of serum creatinine in the model for end-stage liver disease score has significantly increased the incidence of renal dysfunction seen among patients undergoing liver transplantation. As a result, the frequency of simultaneous liver-kidney (SLK) transplantation compared to liver transplantation alone (LTA) has also increased. The decision to perform SLK rather than LTA is an important one because the benefits to the liver transplant recipient receiving a kidney transplant must be balanced with the benefits of using that organ for a patient with end-stage renal disease. However, predicting whether or not a patient with liver failure has reversible kidney disease, and therefore does not also need a kidney transplant, is difficult. The severity and duration of pretransplant renal dysfunction, hepatitis c, diabetes, and other risk factors for kidney disease are associated with an increased risk of posttransplant end-stage renal disease. However, there are currently no clinical findings that accurately predict renal recovery post liver transplant. As a result, the rate of SLK versus LTA differs significantly between transplant centers. To increase consistency across centers, multiple guidelines have been proposed to guide the decision between SLK and LTA, but their poor predictive value has limited their uniform adoption. Nevertheless, adoption of uniform rules for the allocation of kidneys would reduce the variability between centers in rates of SLK transplant.

  13. Successful Pancreas Transplantation From a Deceased Donor Intoxicated With Oral Antidiabetic Agent: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Villar, C; Conget, I; Ferrer-Fàbrega, J; Paredes, D; Ruíz, A; Roque, R; Rull, R; López-Boado, M; Ricart, M J; Garcia, R; Adalia, R

    2015-10-01

    Simultaneous kidney pancreas transplantation (SKP) is a common procedure for the patient with long-term type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) with terminal renal failure. It is unusual to consider the pancreas from a deceased donor who died after an acute intoxication with oral antidiabetic agent (OAA), which would suggest an abnormal functionality of the organ and preclude the potential use of the graft. We present a case of a successful pancreatic transplantation from a donor who died of acute cerebral edema secondary to severe hypoglycemia induced by OAA acute intoxication.

  14. Risk factors for lung diseases after renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pencheva, Ventsislava P.; Petrova, Daniela S.; Genov, Diyan K.; Georgiev, Ognian B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung diseases are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality after renal transplantation. The aim of the study is to define the risk factors for infectious and noninfectious pulmonary complications in kidney transplant patients. Materials and Methods: We prospectively studied 267 patients after renal transplantation. The kidney recipients were followed-up for the development of pulmonary complications for a period of 7 years. Different noninvasive and invasive diagnostic tests were used in cases suspected of lung disease. Results: The risk factors associated with the development of pulmonary complications were diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR] = 4.60; P = 0.001), arterial hypertension (OR = 1.95; P = 0.015), living related donor (OR = 2.69; P = 0.004), therapy for acute graft rejection (OR = 2.06; P = 0.038), immunosuppressive regimens that includes mycophenolate (OR = 2.40; P = 0.011), azathioprine (OR = 2.25; P = 0.023), and tacrolimus (OR = 1.83; P = 0.041). The only factor associated with the lower risk of complications was a positive serology test for Cytomegalovirus of the recipient before transplantation (OR = 0.1412; P = 0.001). Conclusion: The risk factors can be used to identify patients at increased risk for posttransplant lung diseases. Monitoring of higher-risk patients allow timely diagnosis and early adequate treatment and can reduce the morbidity and mortality after renal transplantation. PMID:26958045

  15. Delayed Graft Function 5 Months After Living Donor Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Tim; Pries, Alexandra; Kapischke, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 59 Final Diagnosis: Delayed kidney graft function Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Living donor kidney transplantation Specialty: Transplantology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Delayed graft function is a clinical term to describe the failure of the transplanted kidney to function immediately after transplantation. Case Report: A 59-year-old woman suffered from a rare case of delayed graft function lasting 148 days after unrelated living donor kidney transplantation. Until now, 15 years after transplantation, organ function is still good, with serum creatinine levels about 1.4 to 2.0 mg/dl. Conclusions: Even after prolonged graft dysfunction, good graft function can be achieved. PMID:26915643

  16. Successful living donor liver transplantation for acute liver failure after acetylsalicylic acid overdose.

    PubMed

    Shirota, Tomoki; Ikegami, Toshihiko; Sugiyama, Satoshi; Kubota, Kouji; Shimizu, Akira; Ohno, Yasunari; Mita, Atsuyoshi; Urata, Koichi; Nakazawa, Yuichi; Kobayashi, Akira; Iwaya, Mai; Miyagawa, Shinichi

    2015-04-01

    A 20-year-old woman was admitted to an emergency hospital after ingesting 66 g of acetylsalicylic acid in a suicide attempt. Although she was treated with gastric lavage, oral activated charcoal, and intravenous hydration with sodium bicarbonate, her hepatic and renal function gradually deteriorated and serum amylase levels increased. Steroid pulse therapy, plasma exchange, and continuous hemodiafiltration did not yield any improvement in her hepatic or renal function, and she was transferred to our hospital for living donor liver transplantation. Nine days after drug ingestion, she developed hepatic encephalopathy: thus, we diagnosed the patient with acute liver failure with hepatic coma accompanied by acute pancreatitis due to the overdose of acetylsalicylic acid. Living donor liver transplantation was immediately performed using a left lobe graft from the patient's mother. Following transplantation, the patient's renal and hepatic function and consciousness improved, and she was discharged. In this report, we describe a rare case of acetylsalicylic acid-induced acute liver failure with acute hepatic coma and concomitant acute pancreatitis and acute renal failure, which were treated successfully with emergency living donor liver transplantation.

  17. Use of the inferior epigastric artery to revascularize a lower pole renal artery in renal transplant.

    PubMed

    Young, J S; Rohr, M S

    1995-02-01

    The increasing use of living-related donors has increased the incidence wherein the transplant surgeon is required to use special vascular surgical techniques to transplant kidneys with anomalous arterial anatomy. One of the most commonly encountered arterial anomalies is the presence of a lower pole renal artery. In many cases, this artery can be anastomosed to the main renal artery, and the main renal artery can then be anastomosed into the recipient vessel. However, there are cases where the lower pole renal artery is too distant from the main renal artery to allow an anastomosis to be performed. The lower pole renal artery of the graft must be revascularized to avoid ischemic injury to the ureter. Thus, alternate methods for the revascularization of this vessel must be found. We describe the use of the recipient inferior epigastric artery as an arterial supply for the donor lower pole artery. In our case report, this method provided excellent flow to the lower kidney and was documented by later studies.

  18. Apolipoprotein L1 gene variants in deceased organ donors are associated with renal allograft failure

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Barry I.; Julian, Bruce A.; Pastan, Stephen O.; Israni, Ajay K.; Schladt, David; Gautreaux, Michael D.; Hauptfeld, Vera; Bray, Robert A.; Gebel, Howard M.; Kirk, Allan D.; Gaston, Robert S.; Rogers, Jeffrey; Farney, Alan C.; Orlando, Giuseppe; Stratta, Robert J.; Mohan, Sumit; Ma, Lijun; Langefeld, Carl D.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Adams, Patricia L.; Palanisamy, Amudha; Reeves-Daniel, Amber M.; Divers, Jasmin

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) nephropathy variants in African American deceased kidney donors were associated with shorter renal allograft survival in a prior single-center report. APOL1 G1 and G2 variants were genotyped in newly accrued DNA samples from African American deceased donors of kidneys recovered and/or transplanted in Alabama and North Carolina. APOL1 genotypes and allograft outcomes in subsequent transplants from 55 U.S. centers were linked, adjusting for age, sex and race/ethnicity of recipients, HLA match, cold ischemia time, panel reactive antibody levels, and donor type. For 221 transplantations from kidneys recovered in Alabama, there was a statistical trend toward shorter allograft survival in recipients of two-APOL1-nephropathy-variant kidneys (hazard ratio [HR] 2.71; p=0.06). For all 675 kidneys transplanted from donors at both centers, APOL1 genotype (HR 2.26; p=0.001) and African American recipient race/ethnicity (HR 1.60; p=0.03) were associated with allograft failure. Kidneys from African American deceased donors with two APOL1 nephropathy variants reproducibly associate with higher risk for allograft failure after transplantation. These findings warrant consideration of rapidly genotyping deceased African American kidney donors for APOL1 risk variants at organ recovery and incorporation of results into allocation and informed-consent processes. PMID:25809272

  19. Renal transplantation in a HIV positive patient

    PubMed Central

    Mann, A.; Soundararajan, P.; Shroff, S.

    2009-01-01

    Historically HIV positive patients were considered a contraindication for renal transplant. After the year 1996, with the introduction of HAART the retropositive patients live longer and therefore end stage organ disease is now an increasingly important cause of mortality and morbidity in these patients. Here we report our experience for the first time in India. A forty nine year old hypertensive female from Africa who was diagnosed chronic kidney disease and retropositive status, progressed to end stage renal disease and underwent live related renal transplant at our centre. PMID:20436733

  20. The national marrow donor program 20 years of unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ballen, Karen K; King, Roberta J; Chitphakdithai, Pintip; Bolan, Charles D; Agura, Edward; Hartzman, Robert J; Kernan, Nancy A

    2008-09-01

    In the 20 years since the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) facilitated the first unrelated donor transplant, the organization has grown to include almost 7 million donors, and has facilitated over 30,000 transplants on 6 continents. This remarkable accomplishment has been facilitated by the efforts of over 600 employees, and an extensive international network including 171 transplant centers, 73 donor centers, 24 cord blood banks, 97 bone marrow collection centers, 91 apheresis centers, 26 HLA typing laboratories, and 26 Cooperative Registries. In this article, we review the history of the NMDP, and cite the major trends in patient demographics, graft sources, and conditioning regimens over the last 20 years.

  1. Pediatric live-donor kidney transplantation in Mansoura Urology & Nephrology Center: a 28-year perspective.

    PubMed

    El-Husseini, Amr A; Foda, Mohamed A; Bakr, Mohamed A; Shokeir, Ahmed A; Sobh, Mohamed A; Ghoneim, Mohamed A

    2006-10-01

    Our objective was to evaluate our overall experience in pediatric renal transplantation. Between March 1976 and March 2004, 1,600 live-donor kidney transplantations were carried out in our center; 216 of the patients were 18 years old or younger (mean age 12.9 years). There were 136 male patients and 80 female patients. The commonest causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were renal dysplasia (22%), nephrotic syndrome (20%), hereditary nephritis (16%), and obstructive uropathy (16%). Of the donors, 94% were one-haplotype matched and the rest were identical. Pre-emptive transplantation was performed in 51 (23%) patients. Triple-therapy immunosuppression (prednisone + cyclosporine + azathioprine) was used in 78.2% of transplants. Rejection-free recipients constituted 47.7%. Hypertension (62%) was the commonest complication. A substantial proportion of patients (48%) were short, with height standard deviation score (SDS) less than -1.88. The overall infection rate was high, and the majority (53%) of infections were bacterial. The graft survival at 1 year, 5 years and 10 years were 93.4%, 73.3% and 48.2%, respectively, while the patients' survival at 1, 5 and 10 years were 97.6%, 87.8% and 75.3%, respectively. Despite long-term success results of pediatric renal transplantation in a developing country, there is a risk of significant morbidity.

  2. Platelets in Early Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Renal Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Hsiao-Hsuan; Fan, Ran; Dvorina, Nina; Chiesa-Vottero, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection is a major complication in renal transplantation. The pathologic manifestations of acute antibody-mediated rejection that has progressed to functional impairment of a renal transplant have been defined in clinical biopsy specimens. However, the initial stages of the process are difficult to resolve with the unavoidable variables of clinical studies. We devised a model of renal transplantation to elucidate the initial stages of humoral rejection. Kidneys were orthotopically allografted to immunodeficient mice. After perioperative inflammation subsided, donor-specific alloantibodies were passively transferred to the recipient. Within 1 hour after a single transfer of antibodies, C4d was deposited diffusely on capillaries, and von Willebrand factor released from endothelial cells coated intravascular platelet aggregates. Platelet-transported inflammatory mediators platelet factor 4 and serotonin accumulated in the graft at 100- to 1000-fold higher concentrations compared with other platelet-transported chemokines. Activated platelets that expressed P-selectin attached to vascular endothelium and macrophages. These intragraft inflammatory changes were accompanied by evidence of acute endothelial injury. Repeated transfers of alloantibodies over 1 week sustained high levels of platelet factor 4 and serotonin. Platelet depletion decreased platelet mediators and altered the accumulation of macrophages. These data indicate that platelets augment early inflammation in response to donor-specific antibodies and that platelet-derived mediators may be markers of evolving alloantibody responses. PMID:25145937

  3. Colovesical Fistula After Renal Transplantation: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Imafuku, A; Tanaka, K; Marui, Y; Sawa, N; Ubara, Y; Takaichi, K; Ishii, Y; Tomikawa, S

    2015-09-01

    Colovesical fistula is a relatively rare condition that is primarily related to diverticular disease. There are few reports of colovesical fistula after renal transplantation. We report of a 53-year-old man who was diagnosed with colovesical fistula after recurrent urinary tract infection, 5 months after undergoing cadaveric renal transplantation. Laparoscopic partial resection of the sigmoid colon with the use of the Hartmann procedure was performed. Six months after that surgery, there was no evidence of recurrent urinary tract infection and the patient's renal graft function was preserved. Physicians should keep colovesical fistula in mind as a cause of recurrent urinary tract infection in renal transplant recipients, especially in those with a history of diverticular disease.

  4. [Experience about more than 2000 renal transplantations at the university of Brussels].

    PubMed

    Madhoun, P; Wissing, M; Broeders, N; Ghisdal, L; Hoang, A; Loi, P; Michalsky, D; Bollens, R; Donckier, V; Hooghe, L; Janssen, F; Hall, M; Depierreux, M; Kinnaert, P; Vereerstraeten, P; Abramowicz, D

    2008-01-01

    Since 1965, more than 2000 renal transplantations (including more than 100 living-donor transplantations) have been performed at the University of Brussels. An end-stage renal disease patient candidate to renal transplantation will be therefore followed from his enrolment on the waiting list to the long-term post-transplant period. Improvement in the outcome of renal transplantation is achieved due to better knowledge in many fields of medicine, such as immunology, infectious disease, metabolic diseases (hyperlipemia, diabetes mellitus), pharmacology, use of immunosuppressive regimen, a more adequate cardiovascular prevention and treatment. If the best results were achieved with kidneys from living donors, the graft survival rate at the University of Brussels was nearly 80% for the last period (2000-2006). Unfortunately, renal transplantation cannot cure certain comorbid conditions and even may promote them: infectious diseases, neoplasia, metabolic disorders (e.a diabetes mellitus, hyperlipemia). Many efforts have to be done to develop less toxic and more immune selective therapeutic strategies. Living donation and extension of the pool of cadaveric donors will reduce the length of time spent on the waiting list and will significantly impact on mortality and morbidity after kidney transplantation.

  5. Improvements in kidney transplantation from donors after cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Hoogland, E R Pieter; Snoeijs, Maarten G J; Habets, Margot A W; Brandsma, D Steven; Peutz-Kootstra, Carine J; Christiaans, Maarten H L; van Heurn, L W Ernest

    2013-01-01

    To reduce the growing waiting list for kidney transplantation, we explored the limits of kidney transplantation from donors after cardiac death by liberally accepting marginal donor kidneys for transplantation. As the percentage of primary non-function (PNF) increased, we evaluated our transplantation program and implemented changes to reduce the high percentage of PNF in 2005, followed by a second evaluation over the period 2006-2009. Recipients of a kidney from a donor after cardiac death between 1998 and 2005 were analyzed, with PNF as outcome measure. During the period 2002-2005, the percentage of PNF increased and crossed the upper control limits of 12% which was considered as unacceptably high. After implementation of changes, this percentage was reduced to 5%, without changing the number of kidney transplantations from donors after cardiac death. Continuous monitoring of the quality of care is essential as the boundaries of organ donation and transplantation are sought. Meticulous donor, preservation, and recipient management make extension of the donor potential possible, with good results for the individual recipient. Liberal use of kidneys from donors after cardiac death may contribute to a reduction in the waiting list for kidney transplantation and dialysis associated mortality.

  6. Commercial renal transplantation: A risky venture? A single Canadian centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Anil; Kwan, Kevin G.; Whelan, J. Paul

    2011-01-01

    Background: Canada, akin to other developed nations, faces the growing challenges of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Even with expanded donor criteria for renal transplantation (the treatment of choice for ESRD), the supply of kidneys is outpaced by the escalating demand. Remuneration for kidney donation is proscribed in Canada. Without an option of living-related transplantation (biological or emotional donors), patients often struggle with long waiting lists for deceased donor transplantation. Accordingly, many patients are now opting for more expedient avenues to obtaining a renal transplant. Through commercial organ retrieval programs, from living and deceased donors, patients are travelling outside Canada to have the procedure performed. Methods: Between September 2001 and July 2007, 10 patients (7 males, 3 females) underwent commercial renal transplantation outside Canada. We describe the clinical outcomes of these patients managed postoperatively at our single Canadian transplant centre. Results: Six living unrelated and 4 deceased donor renal transplantations were performed on these 10 patients (mean age 49.5 years). All procedures were performed in developing countries and the postoperative complications were subsequently treated at our centre. The mean post-transplant serum creatinine was 142 μmol/L. The average follow-up time was 29.8 months (range: 3 to 73 months). One patient required a transplant nephrectomy secondary to fungemia and subsequently died. One patient had a failed transplant and has currently resumed hemodialysis. Acute rejection was seen in 5 patients with 3 of these patients requiring re-initiation of hemodialysis. Only 1 patient had an uncomplicated course after surgery. Discussion: Despite the kidney trade being a milieu of corruption and commercialization, and the high risk of unconventional complications, patients returning to Canada after commercial renal transplantation are the new reality. Patients are often arriving without any

  7. [Complications of pediatric renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Cristina; Sandes, Ana Rita; Azevedo, Sara; Stone, Rosário; Almeida, Margarida

    2013-01-01

    Introdução: A transplantação renal é a terapêutica de eleição na criança com doença renal crónica terminal, evidenciando impacto positivo na sobrevida e qualidade de vida dos doentes. Não é, no entanto, isenta de complicações, algumas com importante morbilidade. Os autores pretendem caracterizar o perfil de complicações pós transplantação renal em doentes pediátricos (até 18 anos).Material e Métodos: Análise retrospectiva dos doentes submetidos a transplantação renal e seguidos na Unidade de Nefrologia Pediátrica entre Setembro de 1995 e Agosto de 2010. Dados obtidos dos processos clínicos: características demográficas, etiologia da doença renal crónica terminal, terapêutica de substituição renal, mortalidade e perda de enxertos, complicações cirúrgicas, infecciosas e não infecciosas (rejeição aguda e crónica, recidiva da doença de base, alterações metabólicas e factores de risco cardiovascular). Análise estatística descritiva simples.Resultados: Foram incluídas 78 crianças transplantadas (48,7% sexo masculino), com idade mediana à data da transplantaçãorenal de 12 anos (2 - 18). A maioria fez previamente diálise peritoneal: 49 (62,6%). Cinco doentes (6,4%) foram transplantados sem diálise prévia. A mediana do tempo de seguimento após transplante foi 37,5 meses (1 - 169). As principais etiologias de doença renal crónica terminal foram: uronefropatias (41%) e glomerulopatias (28,2%). As complicações infecciosas ocorreram em 74,4%; infecçõesvirais em 56,4%, sendo a mais prevalente a infecção citomegalovírus (39,7%); infecções bacterianas em 53,8% (na maioria infecções urinárias em doentes urológicos). Outras complicações: 1) factores de risco para doença cardiovascular: hipertensão arterial em 85,9%; dislipidémia em 16,7% e diabetes de novo em 7,7%; 2) episódios de rejeição aguda em 32,1% e nefropatia crónica do enxerto em 17,9%; 3) complicações relacionáveis com a cirurgia em 16

  8. The effect of donor characteristics on survival after unrelated donor transplantation for hematologic malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Kollman, Craig; Spellman, Stephen R.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Hassebroek, Anna; Anasetti, Claudio; Antin, Joseph H.; Champlin, Richard E.; Confer, Dennis L.; DiPersio, John F.; Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo; Hartzman, Robert J.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Hurley, Carolyn K.; Karanes, Chatchada; Maiers, Martin; Mueller, Carlheinz R.; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Setterholm, Michelle; Woolfrey, Ann E.; Yu, Neng

    2016-01-01

    There are >24 million registered adult donors, and the numbers of unrelated donor transplantations are increasing. The optimal strategy for prioritizing among comparably HLA-matched potential donors has not been established. Therefore, the objective of the current analyses was to study the association between donor characteristics (age, sex, parity, cytomegalovirus serostatus, HLA match, and blood group ABO match) and survival after transplantation for hematologic malignancy. The association of donor characteristics with transplantation outcomes was examined using either logistic or Cox regression models, adjusting for patient disease and transplantation characteristics associated with outcomes in 2 independent datasets: 1988 to 2006 (N = 6349; training cohort) and 2007 to 2011 (N = 4690; validation cohort). All donor-recipient pairs had allele-level HLA typing at HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1, which is the current standard for selecting donors. Adjusting for patient disease and transplantation characteristics, survival was better after transplantation of grafts from young donors (aged 18-32 years) who were HLA matched to recipients (P < .001). These findings were validated for transplantations that occurred between 2007 and 2011. For every 10-year increment in donor age, there is a 5.5% increase in the hazard ratio for overall mortality. Increasing HLA disparity was also associated with worsening survival. Donor age and donor-recipient HLA match are important when selecting adult unrelated donors. Other donor characteristics such as sex, parity, and cytomegalovirus serostatus were not associated with survival. The effect of ABO matching on survival is modest and must be studied further before definitive recommendations can be offered. PMID:26527675

  9. Donor chimera model for tolerance induction in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, F; Peppelenbosch, M; Dashty, M

    2013-05-01

    Tolerance induction is the basis of a successful transplantation with the goal being the re-establishment of homeostasis after transplantation. Non-autograft transplantation disrupts this maintenance drastically which would be avoided by administration of a novel procedure. At present, the blood group antigens and the genotypes of the donor and recipient are cross-matched before transplantation combined with a drug regimen that confers general immunosuppression. But the 'specific' unresponsiveness of the recipient to the donor organ, implied by 'tolerance', is not achieved in this process. This article introduces the 'donor chimera model' via the concept of the 'closed transplantation loop' approach for tolerance induction which seeks to limit the use of immunosuppressive therapy after transplantation.

  10. [Cost of a renal transplant: medico-economic analysis of the amount reimbursed by the French national health program to finance renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Sainsaulieu, Yoël; Sambuc, Cléa; Logerot, Hélène; Bongiovanni, Isabelle; Couchoud, Cécile

    2014-07-01

    Successful organ transplantation relies on several ancillary activities such as the identification of a compatible donor, organ allocation and procurement and the coordination of the transplant process. No existing study of the overall costs, in France, of these additional transplantation activities could be identified. This study determines the total additional costs of ancillary transplantation activities by comparing the costs of kidney transplantations with living donors against those using deceased donors. The data used are drawn from the 2013 public healthcare tariff calculations, PMSI recorded activity and transplant activity in 2012 as assessed and reported by the Agence de la biomédecine. The results show that, in 2012, additional transplant costs varied from 13835.44 € to 20050.67 € for a deceased donor and were 13601.66 € for a living donor. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that all the costs covered by National Health Insurance need to be taken into account in the economic impact evaluation of renal transplantation and during the development of this national priority activity.

  11. The Kidney Donor Profile Index (KDPI) of Marginal Donors Allocated by Standardized Pre-Transplant Donor Biopsy Assessment: Distribution and Association with Graft Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gandolfini, I.; Buzio, C.; Zanelli, P.; Palmisano, A.; Cremaschi, E.; Vaglio, A.; Piotti, G.; Melfa, L.; La Manna, G.; Feliciangeli, G.; Cappuccilli, M.; Scolari, M.P.; Capelli, I.; Panicali, L.; Baraldi, O.; Stefoni, S.; Buscaroli, A.; Ridolfi, L.; D'Errico, A.; Cappelli, G.; Bonucchi, D.; Rubbiani, E.; Albertazzi, A.; Mehrotra, A.; Cravedi, P.; Maggiore, U.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-transplant donor biopsy (PTDB)-based marginal-donor allocation systems to single or dual renal transplantation could increase the use of organs with Kidney Donor Profile Index (KDPI) in the highest range (e.g. >80 or >90), whose discard rate approximates 50% in the US. To test this hypothesis, we retrospectively calculated the KDPI and analyzed the outcomes of 442 marginal kidney transplants (340 single transplants: 278 with a PTDB Remuzzi score <4 [median KDPI:87; interquartile range(IQR):78-94] and 62 with a score =4 [median KDPI:87; IQR:76-93]; 102 dual transplants [median KDPI: 93; IQR:86-96]) and 248 single standard transplant controls [median KDPI:36; IQR:18-51]. PTDB-based allocation of marginal grafts led to a limited discard rate of 15% for kidneys with KDPI of 80-90 and of 37% for kidneys with a KDPI of 91-100. Although 1-year eGFRs were significantly lower in recipients of marginal kidneys (-9.3, -17.9, and -18.8ml/min, for dual transplants, single kidneys with PTDB score <4, and =4, respectively; P<0.001), graft survival (median follow-up 3.3 years) was similar between marginal and standard kidney transplants (hazard ratio: 1.20 [95% confidence interval: 0.80 to 1.79; P=0.38]). In conclusion, PTDB-based allocation allows the safe transplantation of kidneys with KDPI in the highest range that may otherwise be discarded. PMID:25155294

  12. Hepatitis C virus infection after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Romero, E; Galindo, P; Bravo, J A; Osorio, J M; Pérez, A; Baca, Y; Ferreira, C; Asensio, C; Osuna, A

    2008-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the main cause of liver disease after renal transplantation. Most patients have seroconverted on dialysis to positive RNA. The viral load increases during immunosuppressive therapy. The risk of developing chronic liver disease is related to the histopathologic findings, duration and severity of the disease, immunosuppression, and transplantation time. Hepatitis C virus infection can predict onset, of proteinuria and diabetes. We studied 868 patients who received renal transplants between (1987 and 2006), of whom 18.7% were seropositive for HCV. We observed a higher rate of HCV-seropositive patients related to the duration of hemodialysis therapy. Of the HCV seropositive patients, 77% had received renal allografts before 1998. There was no difference between the sexes; however, the HCV positive patients were younger. Polymerase chain reaction tests results were positive in 91.6% of the patients with HCV antibodies. The prevalence of diabetes was greater among HCV positive patients, as was as the persistence of proteinuria. Cryoglobulins were positive in 30.8%. The incidence of acute rejection episodes in the first year was similar between groups. Of the HCV-positive patients, 80.2% were treated with cyclosporine, most patients continued this therapy throughout the study. We observed no significant difference in mortality end graft survival rate between the two groups. However, renal function differed significantly at some points during the evolution of the clinical course. Renal transplantation is still the best treatment option in patients with chronic renal disease.

  13. Organ transplantation from donors (cadaveric or living) with a history of malignancy: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Yuan, Jin; Li, Wei; Ye, Qifa

    2014-10-01

    The evolution of organ transplantation has resulted in extended lifespan as well as better life quality of patients with end-stage diseases, which in turn causes an increased demand for organs. The persistent organ shortage requires a careful reconsideration of potential donors (living or cadaveric) that have current or historical malignancies. Donors with low-grade skin tumors, carcinomas in situ of the uterine cervix, and primary central nervous system (CNS) tumors can be considered as potential donors for recipients dying on wait list longing for organ transplantation. Recently, transplant centers have turned to other types of malignancies including low grade renal cell carcinoma, prostate, ureteral, endometrial and breast cancer, and favorable outcomes have been shown in such innovations. When considering donors with a history of malignancy, general biologic behavior of the tumor type, histology and stage at the time of diagnosis, and the length of disease-free interval should be considered (Transplantation 2002;74(12):1657-1663). With the review of literatures, we illustrate the organ utilization from donors with malignancies all around the world since earlier times and give some suggestions for decision making under the circumstance of whether to choose those marginal donors or not on the basis of reviewed literatures.

  14. Assessment of variation in live donor kidney transplantation across transplant centers in the United States1 - 8

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Peter P.; Feldman, Harold I.; Bloom, Roy D.; Abt, Peter L.; Thomasson, Arwin; Shults, Justine; Grossman, Robert; Asch, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Transplant centers vary in the proportion of kidney transplants performed using live donors. Clinical innovations that facilitate live donation may drive this variation. Methods We assembled a cohort of renal transplant candidates at 194 US centers using registry data from 1999 – 2005. We measured magnitude of live donor transplant (LDKTx) through development of a standardized live donor transplant ratio (SLDTR) at each center that accounted for center population differences. We examined associations between center characteristics and the likelihood that individual transplant candidates underwent LDKTx. To identify practices through which centers increase LDKTx, we also examined center characteristics associated with consistently being in the upper three quartiles of SLDTR. Results The cohort comprised 148,168 patients, among whom 34,593 (23.3%) underwent LDKTx. In multivariable logistic regression, candidates had an increased likelihood of undergoing LDKTx at centers with greater use of “unrelated donors” (defined as non-spouses and non-first-degree family members of the recipient; OR 1.31 for highest versus lowest use, p=0.02) and at centers with programs to overcome donor-recipient incompatibility (OR 1.33, p=0.01.) Centers consistently in the upper three SLDTR quartiles were also more likely to use “unrelated” donors (OR 8.30 per tertile of higher use, p<0.01), to have incompatibility programs (OR 4.79, p<0.01), and to use laparoscopic nephrectomy (OR 2.53 per tertile of higher use, p=0.02). Conclusion Differences in center population do not fully account for differences in the use of LDKTx. To maximize opportunities for LDKTx, centers may accept more unrelated donors and adopt programs to overcome biological incompatibility. PMID:21562451

  15. Chronic Renal Transplant Rejection and Possible Anti-Proliferative Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Adnan Bashir; Usman, Muhammad

    2015-11-06

    The global prevalence of renal transplants is increasing with time, and renal transplantation is the only definite treatment for end-stage renal disease. We have limited the acute and late acute rejection of kidney allografts, but the long-term survival of renal tissues still remains a difficult and unanswered question as most of the renal transplants undergo failure within a decade of their transplantation. Among various histopathological changes that signify chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), tubular atrophy, fibrous thickening of the arteries, fibrosis of the kidney interstitium, and glomerulosclerosis are the most important. Moreover, these structural changes are followed by a decline in the kidney function as well. The underlying mechanism that triggers the long-term rejection of renal transplants involves both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. T cells, with their related cytokines, cause tissue damage. In addition, CD 20+ B cells and their antibodies play an important role in the long-term graft rejection. Other risk factors that predispose a recipient to long-term graft rejection include HLA-mismatching, acute episodes of graft rejection, mismatch in donor-recipient age, and smoking. The purpose of this review article is the analyze current literature and find different anti-proliferative agents that can suppress the immune system and can thus contribute to the long-term survival of renal transplants. The findings of this review paper can be helpful in understanding the long-term survival of renal transplants and various ways to improve it.

  16. Chronic Renal Transplant Rejection and Possible Anti-Proliferative Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Usman, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The global prevalence of renal transplants is increasing with time, and renal transplantation is the only definite treatment for end-stage renal disease. We have limited the acute and late acute rejection of kidney allografts, but the long-term survival of renal tissues still remains a difficult and unanswered question as most of the renal transplants undergo failure within a decade of their transplantation. Among various histopathological changes that signify chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), tubular atrophy, fibrous thickening of the arteries, fibrosis of the kidney interstitium, and glomerulosclerosis are the most important. Moreover, these structural changes are followed by a decline in the kidney function as well. The underlying mechanism that triggers the long-term rejection of renal transplants involves both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. T cells, with their related cytokines, cause tissue damage. In addition, CD 20+ B cells and their antibodies play an important role in the long-term graft rejection. Other risk factors that predispose a recipient to long-term graft rejection include HLA-mismatching, acute episodes of graft rejection, mismatch in donor-recipient age, and smoking. The purpose of this review article is the analyze current literature and find different anti-proliferative agents that can suppress the immune system and can thus contribute to the long-term survival of renal transplants. The findings of this review paper can be helpful in understanding the long-term survival of renal transplants and various ways to improve it. PMID:26677426

  17. Renal scans in pregnant transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.A.; Ziessman, H.A.; Fahey, F.H.; Collea, J.V.; Alijani, M.R.; Helfrich, G.B.

    1988-08-01

    This study demonstrates the normal technetium-99m diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid ((/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA) renal scan in pregnant patients with transplanted kidneys. Five pregnant renal transplant patients had seven (/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA renal studies to assess allograft perfusion and function. All scans showed the uteroplacental complex. The bladder was always compressed and distorted. The transplanted kidney was frequently rotated to a more vertical position. In all patients allograft flow and function were maintained. There was calyceal retention on all studies and ureteral retention activity in three of five patients. Using the MIRD formalism, the total radiation absorbed dose to the fetus was calculated to be 271 mrad. This radiation exposure is well within NRCP limits for the fetus of radiation workers and an acceptable low risk in the management of these high risk obstetric patients.

  18. Simultaneous pancreatic-renal transplant scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Shulkin, B.L.; Dafoe, D.C.; Wahl, R.L.

    1986-12-01

    99mTc-DTPA scintigraphy was evaluated in seven patients as a technique to assess perfusion of the transplanted pancreas and kidney. Such scans provide high-quality images of both organs in both the flow phase and later phases. The radionuclide is readily available and its brief effective half-life allows repeated evaluations at short intervals. /sup 131/I-hippuran, the major radiopharmaceutical for renal transplant scintigraphy, does not allow visualization of the transplanted pancreas or evaluation of its blood supply. Although the blood glucose is a gross indicator of the function of the pancreatic allograft, pancreatic scintigraphy with 99mTc-DTPA in one case was capable of detecting graft dysfunction before elevation of the blood glucose occurred. While additional studies will be necessary to determine the predictive value of this test, 99mTc-DTPA is valuable for pancreatic-renal transplant evaluation.

  19. National Marrow Donor Program. HLA Typing for Bone Marrow Transplantation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-30

    event. 3. Immunogenetic Studies: Increase understanding of the immunologic factors important in HSC transplantation. 4. Clinical Research... Immunology , and Transplantation DaSH Data Standards Hackathon DC Donor Center National Marrow Donor Program® N00014-13-1-0039 HLA Typing for Bone...Management Strategy ImmPort Immunology Database and Analysis Portal IND Investigational New Drug IND Improvised Nuclear Device IPR Immunobiology Project

  20. Renal transplantation using external continent urinary diversion.

    PubMed

    Lucon, A M; Sabbaga, E; Ianhez, L E; Chocair, P R; Pestana, J O; Arap, S

    1994-02-01

    A 29-year-old man born with bladder exstrophy presented with end stage renal failure many years after ileal conduit diversion. Bilateral nephrectomy and continent external urinary diversion were performed, and 1.5 months later a cadaveric kidney was grafted into the right iliac fossa. The patient was well at 18 months with a serum creatinine level of 1.2 mg./dl. and he was completely dry with 4 or 5 daily catheterizations. Although followup is still short, renal transplantation with drainage into an external continent urinary diversion permits excellent quality of life and good renal function. Therefore, this alternative is worth consideration whenever other reconstructive alternatives are not possible in candidates for renal transplantation.

  1. Impact of ethnicity, donor status and HLA matching on renal allograft survival: a single center study.

    PubMed

    Chelluri, Lakshmi Kiran; Vasantha, Adavi; Ratnakar, Kamaraju S

    2009-11-01

    The role of histocompatibility testing in renal transplantation is passing through an immense debate on its utility in predicting long-term graft survival. The current study, which includes fifty-one patients with end-stage renal disease, aims at evaluating the impact of the HLA matching in live related donor (LRD) (parents, siblings and near relatives) and live unrelated donor (LURD) transplants on one year graft survival rates, in a single center. Patients were followed-up for one-year after renal transplantation and observed for renal complications inclu-ding infections and rejection. The incidence of acute rejection episodes was found to be lower in LRD transplantation complying with many reports published so far. HLA matching was found to be beneficial in obtaining better graft function and one-year graft survival rate. The current study found that patients from Far East of India have lower graft survival rates as against patients from other regions of the country. India, with its vast racial distribution, has a need to look into the ethnic variation and its impact on allograft survival.

  2. PARACOCCIDIOIDOMYCOSIS IN A RENAL TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT

    PubMed Central

    GÓES, Heliana Freitas de Oliveira; DURÃES, Sandra Maria Barbosa; LIMA, Caren dos Santos; de SOUZA, Mariana Boechat; VILAR, Enoi Aparecida Guedes; DALSTON, Marcos Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is the most common endemic mycosis in Latin America. The etiological agents, which comprise two species, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and P. lutzii, are thermodimorphic fungi that usually affect previously healthy adults. They primarily involve the lungs and then disseminate to other organs. Such mycosis is rare in organ transplant recipients; there have been only three cases reported in literature, until now. We report a case of PCM in a renal transplant recipient with an unusual dermatological presentation. PMID:26910451

  3. Cutaneous histoplasmosis in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Sun, N Z; Augustine, J J; Gerstenblith, M R

    2014-10-01

    Cutaneous histoplasmosis is a rare entity, although it can be seen in a substantial portion of renal transplant recipients with disseminated disease. The prognosis of disseminated disease is worse than isolated cutaneous involvement, and significant delays in diagnosis are reported. We reviewed reports of cutaneous histoplasmosis with and without dissemination in the setting of renal transplantation to examine incidence, timing of diagnosis, clinical features, and prognosis. Remarkable morphologic variability and the non-specific appearance of skin findings suggest that tissue culture is required for definitive diagnosis. Cutaneous lesions represent an easily accessible source for early diagnosis.

  4. Brucellosis in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Ting, I W; Ho, M W; Sung, Y J; Tien, N; Chi, C Y; Ho, H C; Huang, C C

    2013-10-01

    Brucellosis is one of the most common systemic zoonotic diseases transmitted by consumption of unpasteurized dairy products or by occupational contact with infected animals. Brucellosis is rare in renal transplant recipients. Only 3 cases have been reported in the literature. We report a case of brucellosis with hematologic and hepatobiliary complications in a patient 3 years after renal transplantation. The mean time from transplantation to the diagnosis of brucellosis in these 4 reported patients was 5.1 years (range 17 months to 13 years). All patients had fever and constitutional symptoms, and all attained clinical cure after combination antibiotic therapy. Given the small number of patients, further study is needed to identify the characteristics of brucellosis in renal transplant recipients. Drug interactions and acute renal failure developed in our patient during antibiotic treatment. Therefore, we should monitor the levels of immunosuppressive agents frequently. Several studies have shown in vitro susceptibilities of Brucella melitensis to tigecycline. In our patient, fever finally subsided after tigecycline administration. The minimum inhibitory concentration of tigecycline using Etest was 0.094 μg/mL. Tigecycline may be a potential option for treatment of brucellosis in the setting of transplantation.

  5. Donor and recipient genetic variants in NLRP3 associate with early acute rejection following kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dessing, Mark C.; Kers, Jesper; Damman, Jeffrey; Navis, Gerjan J.; Florquin, Sandrine; Leemans, Jaklien C.

    2016-01-01

    NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3) is a member of the inflammasome family and is of special interest in renal disease. Experimental studies have shown that Nlrp3 plays a significant role in the induction of renal damage and dysfunction in acute and chronic renal injury. However, the role of NLRP3 in human renal disease is completely unknown. From a retrospective cohort study, we determined in 1271 matching donor and recipient samples if several NLRP3 single nucelotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were associated with primary non-function (PNF), delayed graft function (DGF), biopsy-proven acute rejection (BPAR) and death-censored graft and patient survival. NLRP3 gain-of-function SNP (rs35829419) in donors was associated with an increased risk of BPAR while NLRP3 loss-of-function SNP (rs6672995) in the recipient was associated with a decreased risk of BPAR in the first year following renal transplantation (HR 1.91, 95% CI 1.38–2.64, P < 0.001 and HR 0.73, 95% CI 0.55–0.97, P = 0.03 resp.). NLRP3 SNPs in both donor and recipient were not associated with PNF, DGF, graft survival or patient survival. We conclude that genetic variants in the NLRP3 gene affect the risk of acute rejection following kidney transplantation. PMID:27819323

  6. Transplantation of a horseshoe kidney from a living donor: Case report, long term outcome and donor safety

    PubMed Central

    Justo-Janeiro, Jaime Manuel; Orozco, Eduardo Prado; Reyes, Francisco J.Roberto Enríquez; de la Rosa Paredes, René; de Lara Cisneros, Luis G.Vázquez; Espinosa, Alfonso Lozano; Naylor, Jesús Mier

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The use of a horseshoe kidney in renal transplant remains controversial, when it is found in the evaluation of a living donor, anatomical, surgical and ethical issues are involved. Presentation of Case An uncomplicated horseshoe kidney was detected in a 51-year-old woman who was the only suitable donor for her 30-year-old son. Kidneys were fused in the inferior pole and no vascular or urinary abnormalities were detected during imaging evaluation. The surgical procedure was approved by the hospital transplant committee. A laparotomy was performed by means of a medial upper incision. The isthmus of the kidney was divided using a harmonic scalpel and the left segment was used; it had 2 arteries too distant to create a common one, thus anastomosed separately. The renal vein was side-to-side anastomosed to the right external iliac vein and a Lich-Gregoir ureteral implant was made. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications in the donor who currently remains asymptomatic. Recipient developed a delayed graft function (DGF), and was discharged on the 12th day after surgery. After 24 months of surgery, renal function has remained stable with a serum creatinine of 128 μmol/L (1.45 mg/dL). Discussion There are 7 reports of a horseshoe kidney from living donors in 8 patients without morbidity and a good long term outcome of all recipients. Conclusion If we anticipate a low operative risk and there is a suitable anatomy, we may consider the use of horseshoe kidneys from living donors a viable alternative. PMID:26299249

  7. Liver transplantation in children using organs from young paediatric donors.

    PubMed

    Herden, Uta; Ganschow, Rainer; Briem-Richter, Andrea; Helmke, Knut; Nashan, Bjoern; Fischer, Lutz

    2011-06-01

    Nowadays, most paediatric liver transplant recipients receive a split or other technical variant graft from adult deceased or live donors, because of a lack of available age- and size matched paediatric donors. Few data are available, especially for liver grafts obtained from very young children (<6 years). We analysed all paediatric liver transplantations between 1989 and 2009. Recipients were divided into five groups (1-5) depending on donor age (<1, ≥1 to <6, ≥6 to <16, ≥16 to <45, ≥45 years). Overall, 413 paediatric liver transplantations from deceased donors were performed; 1- and 5-year graft survival rates were 75%, 80%, 78%, 81%, 74% and 75%, 64%, 70%, 67%, 46%, and 1- and 5-year patient survival rates were 88%, 91%, 90%, 89%, 78% and 88%, 84%, 84%, 83%, 63% for groups 1-5, respectively, without significant difference. Eight children received organs from donors younger than 1 year and 45 children received organs from donors between 1 and 6 years of age. Overall, vascular complications occurred in 13.2% of patients receiving organs from donors younger than 6 years. Analysis of our data revealed that the usage of liver grafts from donors younger than 6 years is a safe procedure. The outcome was comparable with grafts from older donors with excellent graft and patient survival, even for donors younger than 1 year.

  8. The significance of a defect on DMSA scan in children with renal transplants.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, C; Beckett, M; Kiratli, P; Gordon, I; Trompeter, R S; Rees, L

    2003-12-01

    Since December 1995, pediatric renal transplant recipients in our unit have received a DMSA scan as soon as possible post-transplant in order to provide a baseline for comparison in the event of subsequent complications. We retrospectively reviewed the case notes and DMSA scans of the 45 patients who underwent a scan within 9 wk of their transplant to see if pre or peri-transplant factors or post-transplant complications were associated with defects on scanning. Forty percentage of scans had defects. The presence of defects was not associated with potential predisposing factors such as patient or donor age, cadaveric or live donation, cold ischemia time, multiple donor vessels, the use of non-heart beating donors, the mean time to scan, the serum creatinine, or the presence of structural renal tract anomalies predisposing to UTI. However, 87% of patients had complications before the scan, including UTI, rejection, acute tubular necrosis, transplant biopsy and drug toxicity. Children with no clinical complications had a significantly reduced risk of a defect (p = 0.035), while biopsy was associated with the presence of defects (p = 0.0034). Twenty patients had one or more follow up DMSA scans: one patient developed a new focal defect. In conclusion, renal transplant defects are frequently found on DMSA scanning even early after transplantation and are non-specifically associated with many different complications.

  9. Outcomes of pediatric living donor kidney transplantation: A single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bertólez, Sonia; Barrero, Rafael; Fijo, Julia; Alonso, Verónica; Ojha, Devicka; Fernández-Hurtado, Miguel Ángel; Martínez, Jerónimo; León, Eduardo; García-Merino, Francisco

    2017-05-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for children with ESRD offering advantages of improved survival, growth potential, cognitive development, and quality of life. The aim of our study was to compare the outcomes of LDKT vs DDKT performed in children at a single center. Retrospective chart review of pediatric patients who underwent kidney transplantation from 2005 to 2014 was performed. Ninety-one renal transplants were accomplished, and 31 cases (38.27%) were LDKT, and in 96.7% of the cases, the graft was obtained through laparoscopy. Thirty-four receptors weighted <25 kg. LDKT group had statistically significant lower cold ischemia times than DDKT one. Complication rate was 9.67% for LDKT and 18.33% for DDKT. eGFR was better in LDKT. Patient survival rate was 100% for LDKT and 98.3% for DDKT, and graft survival rate was 96.7% for LDKT and 88.33%-80% for DDKT at a year and 5 years. Our program of pediatric kidney transplantation has achieved optimal patient and graft survival rates with low rate of complications. Living donor pediatric kidney transplants have higher patient and better graft survival rates than deceased donor kidney transplants.

  10. Determinants of graft survival in pediatric and adolescent live donor kidney transplant recipients: a single center experience.

    PubMed

    El-Husseini, Amr A; Foda, Mohamed A; Shokeir, Ahmed A; Shehab El-Din, Ahmed B; Sobh, Mohamed A; Ghoneim, Mohamed A

    2005-12-01

    To study the independent determinants of graft survival among pediatric and adolescent live donor kidney transplant recipients. Between March 1976 and March 2004, 1600 live donor kidney transplants were carried out in our center. Of them 284 were 20 yr old or younger (mean age 13.1 yr, ranging from 5 to 20 yr). Evaluation of the possible variables that may affect graft survival were carried out using univariate and multivariate analyses. Studied factors included age, gender, relation between donor and recipient, original kidney disease, ABO blood group, pretransplant blood transfusion, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matching, pretransplant dialysis, height standard deviation score (SDS), pretransplant hypertension, cold ischemia time, number of renal arteries, ureteral anastomosis, time to diuresis, time of transplantation, occurrence of acute tubular necrosis (ATN), primary and secondary immunosuppression, total dose of steroids in the first 3 months, development of acute rejection and post-transplant hypertension. Using univariate analysis, the significant predictors for graft survival were HLA matching, type of primary urinary recontinuity, time to diuresis, ATN, acute rejection and post-transplant hypertension. The multivariate analysis restricted the significance to acute rejection and post-transplant hypertension. The independent determinants of graft survival in live-donor pediatric and adolescent renal transplant recipients are acute rejection and post-transplant hypertension.

  11. Selecting suitable solid organ transplant donors: Reducing the risk of donor-transmitted infections.

    PubMed

    Jr, Christopher S Kovacs; Koval, Christine E; van Duin, David; de Morais, Amanda Guedes; Gonzalez, Blanca E; Avery, Robin K; Mawhorter, Steven D; Brizendine, Kyle D; Cober, Eric D; Miranda, Cyndee; Shrestha, Rabin K; Teixeira, Lucileia; Mossad, Sherif B

    2014-06-24

    Selection of the appropriate donor is essential to a successful allograft recipient outcome for solid organ transplantation. Multiple infectious diseases have been transmitted from the donor to the recipient via transplantation. Donor-transmitted infections cause increased morbidity and mortality to the recipient. In recent years, a series of high-profile transmissions of infections have occurred in organ recipients prompting increased attention on the process of improving the selection of an appropriate donor that balances the shortage of needed allografts with an approach that mitigates the risk of donor-transmitted infection to the recipient. Important advances focused on improving donor screening diagnostics, using previously excluded high-risk donors, and individualizing the selection of allografts to recipients based on their prior infection history are serving to increase the donor pool and improve outcomes after transplant. This article serves to review the relevant literature surrounding this topic and to provide a suggested approach to the selection of an appropriate solid organ transplant donor.

  12. Selecting suitable solid organ transplant donors: Reducing the risk of donor-transmitted infections

    PubMed Central

    Jr, Christopher S Kovacs; Koval, Christine E; van Duin, David; de Morais, Amanda Guedes; Gonzalez, Blanca E; Avery, Robin K; Mawhorter, Steven D; Brizendine, Kyle D; Cober, Eric D; Miranda, Cyndee; Shrestha, Rabin K; Teixeira, Lucileia; Mossad, Sherif B

    2014-01-01

    Selection of the appropriate donor is essential to a successful allograft recipient outcome for solid organ transplantation. Multiple infectious diseases have been transmitted from the donor to the recipient via transplantation. Donor-transmitted infections cause increased morbidity and mortality to the recipient. In recent years, a series of high-profile transmissions of infections have occurred in organ recipients prompting increased attention on the process of improving the selection of an appropriate donor that balances the shortage of needed allografts with an approach that mitigates the risk of donor-transmitted infection to the recipient. Important advances focused on improving donor screening diagnostics, using previously excluded high-risk donors, and individualizing the selection of allografts to recipients based on their prior infection history are serving to increase the donor pool and improve outcomes after transplant. This article serves to review the relevant literature surrounding this topic and to provide a suggested approach to the selection of an appropriate solid organ transplant donor. PMID:25032095

  13. ABO incompatible renal transplant: Transfusion medicine perspective

    PubMed Central

    Makroo, Raj Nath; Nayak, Sweta; Chowdhry, Mohit; Jasuja, Sanjiv; Sagar, Gaurav; Rosamma, N. L.; Thakur, Uday Kumar

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Our study presents an analysis of the trends of ABO antibody titers and the TPE (Therapeutic Plasma Exchange) procedures required pre and post ABO incompatible renal transplant. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty nine patients underwent ABO incompatible renal transplant during the study period. The ABO antibody titers were done using the tube technique and titer reported was the dilution at which 1+ reaction was observed. The baseline titers of anti-A and anti-B antibodies were determined. The titer targeted was ≤8. Patients were subjected to 1 plasma volume exchange with 5% albumin and 2 units of AB group FFP (Fresh Frozen Plasma) in each sitting. TPE procedures post-transplant were decided on the basis of rising antibody titer with/ without graft dysfunction. RESULTS: The average number of TPE procedures required was 4-5 procedures/patient in the pretransplant and 2-3/patient in the post-transplant period. An average titer reduction of 1 serial dilution/procedure was noted for Anti-A and 1.1/procedure for Anti-B. Number of procedures required to reach the target titer was not significantly different for Anti-A and Anti-B (P = 0.98). Outcome of the transplant did not differ significantly by reducing titers to a level less than 8 (P = 0.32). The difference in the Anti-A and Anti-B titers at 14th day post-transplant was found to be clinically significant (P = 0.042). CONCLUSION: With an average of 4-5 TPE procedures pretransplant and 2-3 TPE procedures post transplants, ABO incompatible renal transplantations can be successfully accomplished. PMID:28316440

  14. Kidney transplantation from donors with hepatitis C infection

    PubMed Central

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Corona, Daniela; Sinagra, Nunziata; Giaquinta, Alessia; Zerbo, Domenico; Ekser, Burcin; Giuffrida, Giuseppe; Caglià, Pietro; Gula, Riccardo; Ardita, Vincenzo; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2014-01-01

    The increasing demand for organ donors to supply the increasing number of patients on kidney waiting lists has led to most transplant centers developing protocols that allow safe utilization from donors with special clinical situations which previously were regarded as contraindications. Deceased donors with previous hepatitis C infection may represent a safe resource to expand the donor pool. When allocated to serology-matched recipients, kidney transplantation from donors with hepatitis C may result in an excellent short-term outcome and a significant reduction of time on the waiting list. Special care must be dedicated to the pre-transplant evaluation of potential candidates, particularly with regard to liver functionality and evidence of liver histological damage, such as cirrhosis, that could be a contraindication to transplantation. Pre-transplant antiviral therapy could be useful to reduce the viral load and to improve the long-term results, which may be affected by the progression of liver disease in the recipients. An accurate selection of both donor and recipient is mandatory to achieve a satisfactory long-term outcome. PMID:24659873

  15. Kidney transplantation from donors with hepatitis C infection.

    PubMed

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Corona, Daniela; Sinagra, Nunziata; Giaquinta, Alessia; Zerbo, Domenico; Ekser, Burcin; Giuffrida, Giuseppe; Caglià, Pietro; Gula, Riccardo; Ardita, Vincenzo; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2014-03-21

    The increasing demand for organ donors to supply the increasing number of patients on kidney waiting lists has led to most transplant centers developing protocols that allow safe utilization from donors with special clinical situations which previously were regarded as contraindications. Deceased donors with previous hepatitis C infection may represent a safe resource to expand the donor pool. When allocated to serology-matched recipients, kidney transplantation from donors with hepatitis C may result in an excellent short-term outcome and a significant reduction of time on the waiting list. Special care must be dedicated to the pre-transplant evaluation of potential candidates, particularly with regard to liver functionality and evidence of liver histological damage, such as cirrhosis, that could be a contraindication to transplantation. Pre-transplant antiviral therapy could be useful to reduce the viral load and to improve the long-term results, which may be affected by the progression of liver disease in the recipients. An accurate selection of both donor and recipient is mandatory to achieve a satisfactory long-term outcome.

  16. Transplant tourism and donor-derived parasitic infections.

    PubMed

    Kotton, C N

    2011-01-01

    Transplant tourism, travel with the intent of receiving or donating a transplanted organ, has grown immensely in the past decade but is not without risks. Solid organ donors are potential carriers of infection and rates of infection are high in transplant recipients. Returning transplant recipients should be screened for blood-borne pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV), as well as bacteremia, urinary tract infections, and other endemic pathogens (malaria, tuberculosis, Chagas disease, and so on). Efforts should be made to optimize posttransplantation prophylaxis against infection. Although donor-derived parasitic infections are rare, rates of morbidity and mortality are high. Increases in world travel and migration will likely contribute to increases in donor-derived parasitic infection. Appropriate epidemiological screening and diagnostic testing, including blood smears, serology, and stool assays, may help reduce the risk of such transmission.

  17. Donor-derived myeloid sarcoma in two kidney transplant recipients from a single donor.

    PubMed

    Palanisamy, Amudha; Persad, Paul; Koty, Patrick P; Douglas, Laurie L; Stratta, Robert J; Rogers, Jeffrey; Reeves-Daniel, Amber M; Orlando, Giuseppe; Farney, Alan C; Beaty, Michael W; Pettenati, Mark J; Iskandar, Samy S; Grier, David D; Kaczmorski, Scott A; Doares, William H; Gautreaux, Michael D; Freedman, Barry I; Powell, Bayard L

    2015-01-01

    We report the rare occurrence of donor-derived myeloid sarcoma in two kidney transplant patients who received organs from a single deceased donor. There was no evidence of preexisting hematologic malignancy in the donor at the time of organ recovery. Both recipients developed leukemic involvement that appeared to be limited to the transplanted organ. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and molecular genotyping analyses confirmed that the malignant cells were of donor origin in each patient. Allograft nephrectomy and immediate withdrawal of immunosuppression were performed in both cases; systemic chemotherapy was subsequently administered to one patient. Both recipients were in remission at least one year following the diagnosis of donor-derived myeloid sarcoma. These cases suggest that restoration of the immune system after withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy and allograft nephrectomy may be sufficient to control HLA-mismatched donor-derived myeloid sarcoma without systemic involvement.

  18. Donor-Derived Myeloid Sarcoma in Two Kidney Transplant Recipients from a Single Donor

    PubMed Central

    Palanisamy, Amudha; Persad, Paul; Koty, Patrick P.; Douglas, Laurie L.; Stratta, Robert J.; Rogers, Jeffrey; Reeves-Daniel, Amber M.; Orlando, Giuseppe; Farney, Alan C.; Beaty, Michael W.; Pettenati, Mark J.; Iskandar, Samy S.; Grier, David D.; Kaczmorski, Scott A.; Doares, William H.; Gautreaux, Michael D.; Freedman, Barry I.; Powell, Bayard L.

    2015-01-01

    We report the rare occurrence of donor-derived myeloid sarcoma in two kidney transplant patients who received organs from a single deceased donor. There was no evidence of preexisting hematologic malignancy in the donor at the time of organ recovery. Both recipients developed leukemic involvement that appeared to be limited to the transplanted organ. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and molecular genotyping analyses confirmed that the malignant cells were of donor origin in each patient. Allograft nephrectomy and immediate withdrawal of immunosuppression were performed in both cases; systemic chemotherapy was subsequently administered to one patient. Both recipients were in remission at least one year following the diagnosis of donor-derived myeloid sarcoma. These cases suggest that restoration of the immune system after withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy and allograft nephrectomy may be sufficient to control HLA-mismatched donor-derived myeloid sarcoma without systemic involvement. PMID:25977825

  19. Angiomyolipoma of donor kidney: Successful transplantation and 5-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, N.; Dhanapriya, J.; Sakthirajan, R.; Dineshkumar, T.; Balasubramaniyan, T.; Haris, Md.

    2016-01-01

    Angiomyolipomas (AML) of the kidney are non-encapsulated benign neoplasms with the incidence of 45-80% in patients with tuberous sclerosis and 1-3% in sporadic cases. There are very few case reports in the literature in which kidneys with AML have been used for transplantation. We report here a 27-year-old female patient who received a live related renal transplant from her mother with isolated angiomyolipoma in donor kidney and on follow-up after 5 years, has stable graft function and tumor size. PMID:27051138

  20. Acute pancreatitis, acute hepatitis and acute renal failure favourably resolved in two renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Voiculescu, Mihai; Ionescu, Camelia; Ismail, Gener; Mandache, Eugen; Hortopan, Monica; Constantinescu, Ileana; Iliescu, Olguta

    2003-03-01

    Renal transplantation is often associated with severe complications. Except for acute rejection, infections and toxicity of immunosuppressive treatment are the most frequent problems observed after transplantation. Infections with hepatic viruses (HBV, HDV, HCV, HGV) and cytomegalic virus (CMV) are the main infectious complications after renal transplantation. Cyclosporine toxicity is not unusual for a patient with renal transplantation and is even more frequent for patients with hepatic impairment due to viral infections. The subjects of this report are two renal transplant recipients with acute pancreatitis, severe hepatitis and acute renal failure on graft, receiving immunosuppressive therapy for maintaining renal graft function

  1. Effect of donor age and parent-to-child transplant on living-related donor kidney transplantation: a single center's experience of 236 cases.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jiang; Wang, Changxi; Liang, Xianwei; Chen, Guodong; Huang, Gang; Fu, Qian; Chen, Lizhong

    2015-07-01

    To study the impact of parent-to-child transplant and older donor age on recipients' post-transplant creatinine levels, a total of 236 patients who received living donor kidney transplantation were evaluated for kidney viability based on creatinine (Cr) level. Of the 236 pairings, 113 (48%) were parent-to-child followed by sibling transplants (66, 30%). Recipient Cr levels were significantly higher at 6 months and 3 years post-transplant in the parent-to-child transplants compared to other donor-recipient relationships. In addition, donor age (average age: 44.1 ± 11.5; range: 19-66) contributed to higher recipient post-transplant Cr levels (p < 0.01). Pre-transplant donor and recipient Cr levels tended to result in higher post-transplant Cr levels in recipients (p < 0.05). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the presence of both parent-to-child transplant and older donor significantly increased the risk of elevated post-transplant Cr levels in recipients with an estimated odds ratios ranging from 3.46 (95% CI: 1.71-6.98) at 6 months to 8.04 (3.14-20.56) at 3 years post-transplant. Donor age significantly affected transplant survival as measured by higher recipient post-transplant Cr levels. In addition, parent-to-child transplant pairings, along with older donor age, significantly increased the risk of elevated post-transplant Cr levels in recipients.

  2. Renal transplantation in the Roma ethnicity-do all patients have equal chance for transplantation?

    PubMed

    Basic-Jukic, N; Novosel, D; Juric, I; Kes, P

    2013-11-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities exist in access to kidney transplantation worldwide. The Roma people are often socially deprived, uneducated, and unemployed. We investigated all dialysis centers in Croatia to determine number of Roma people on dialysis as well as their access and reasons for eventual failure to enter the waiting list. There are 9463 registered Roma people in Croatia, however, the estimated number reaches 40,000. Twenty-five Roma patients required renal replacement therapy, giving a prevalence of 830 per million people (pmp), compared with 959 pmp among the general population. Average age at the start of dialysis was 29 vs 67 years; waiting time to kidney transplantation was 48.9 vs 53.5 months; mean age at the time of transplantation was 33.18 vs 48.01 years in Roma versus the general population respectively. One patient received a kidney allograft from a living unrelated spousal donor, and all others from deceased individuals. Patients were followed for 51.5 months (range, 6-240). The most frequent post-transplant complications were urinary tract infections. One patient lost a graft due to severe acute rejection caused by noncompliance. Two young patients were also noncompliant with immunosuppressive medications. One patient died with a functioning graft at 20 years after transplantation due to cardiovascular disease. Among 14 Roma patients currently been treated with hemodialysis in Croatia, 10 are old with clinical contraindications for transplantation; 1 is on the waiting list; 1 left hospitalization for pretransplant evaluation twice; 1 refused evaluation; and 1 is currently being evaluated for the waiting list. The Roma people have excellent access to renal transplantation in Croatia. Many of them refuse evaluation. More efforts should be invested in their education to improve compliance and their post-transplant outcomes.

  3. Non-Heart-Beating Donor Heart Transplantation: Breaking the Taboo

    PubMed Central

    Fatullayev, Javid; Samak, Mostafa; Sabashnikov, Anton; Weymann, Alexander; Mohite, Prashant N.; García-Sáez, Diana; Patil, Nikhil P.; Dohmen, Pascal M.; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Simon, André R.; Zeriouh, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Roughly 60% of hearts offered for transplantation are rejected because of organ dysfunction. Moreover, hearts from circulatory-dead patients have long been thought to be non-amenable for transplantation, unlike other organs. However, tentative surgical attempts inspired by the knowledge obtained from preclinical research to recover those hearts have been performed, finally culminating in clinically successful transplants. In this review we sought to address the major concerns in non-heart-beating donor heart transplantation and highlight recently introduced developments to overcome them. PMID:26174972

  4. Basiliximab induced non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema in two pediatric renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Niamh; Waldron, Mary; O'Connell, Marie; Eustace, Nick; Carson, Kevin; Awan, Atif

    2009-11-01

    We report two cases of non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema as a complication of basiliximab induction therapy in young pediatric renal transplant patients identified following a retrospective review of all pediatric renal transplant cases performed in the National Paediatric Transplant Centre, Childrens University Hospital, Temple Street, Dublin, Ireland. Twenty-eight renal transplantations, of which five were living-related (LRD) and 23 were from deceased donors (DD), were performed in 28 children between 2003 and 2006. In six cases, transplantations were pre-emptive. Immunosuppression was induced pre-operatively using a combination of basiliximab, tacrolimus and methylprednisolone in all patients. Basiliximab induction was initiated 2 h prior to surgery in all cases and, in 26 patients, basiliximab was re-administered on post-operative day 4. Two patients, one LRD and one DD, aged 6 and 11 years, respectively, developed acute non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema within 36 h of surgery. Renal dysplasia was identified as the primary etiological factor for renal failure in both cases. Both children required assisted ventilation for between 4 and 6 days. While both grafts had primary function, the DD transplant patient subsequently developed acute tubular necrosis and was eventually lost within 3 weeks due to thrombotic microangiopathy and severe acute antibody-mediated rejection despite adequate immunosuppression. Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema is a potentially devastating post-operative complication of basiliximab induction therapy in young pediatric patients following renal transplantation. Early recognition and appropriate supportive therapy is vital for patient and, where possible, graft survival.

  5. Anemia in pediatric renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Kausman, Joshua Yehuda; Powell, Harley Robert; Jones, Colin Lindsay

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of anemia in stable pediatric renal transplant recipients and to examine the association of anemia with renal function, immunosuppressants, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, and growth, as well as iron, vitamin B(12), and folate stores. This is a cross-sectional study of the 50 renal transplant recipients currently followed at our center. Patient data were collected regarding hematological parameters, growth, medications, renal function, underlying renal disease, delayed graft function, episodes of rejection, and iron or erythropoietin therapy post transplantation. The mean hemoglobin level (Hb) was 110 g/l and the overall prevalence of anemia was 60%, including 30% who were severely anemic (Hb<100 g/l). There was a high rate of iron deficiency (34%) and serum iron was the parameter of iron metabolism most closely associated with anemia. Hb in patients with low serum iron was 90.7 g/l versus 114.4 g/l in those with normal serum iron ( P<0.01). Both univariate and multiple linear regression determined tacrolimus dose and creatinine clearance to be significant factors associated with anemia. Tacrolimus dose correlated with a 10 g/l reduction in Hb for every increase of tacrolimus dose of 0.054 mg/kg per day ( P=0.001). The dose of mycophenolate was positively correlated with Hb, but this was likely to be confounded by our practice of dose reduction in the setting of anemia. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor use was not associated with anemia. Severely anemic patients tended to be shorter, with a mean Z-score for height of -1.8 compared with -0.9 for those with normal Hb ( P=0.02). Anemia is a significant and common problem in pediatric renal transplant patients. Deteriorating renal function is an important cause, but other factors like iron deficiency and immunosuppression are involved. Definition of iron deficiency is difficult and serum iron may be a valuable indicator. Medication doses

  6. The challenge of doing what is right in renal transplantation: balancing equity and utility.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Aisling E; Maxwell, Alexander P

    2009-01-01

    Arguably the greatest challenge faced by the transplant community is the disparity between the number of persons waiting for a solid organ transplant and the finite supply of donor organs. For renal transplantation the gap between supply and demand has risen annually reflecting the increasing prevalence of end-stage renal disease versus the relatively static deceased donor organ pool. Maximising the benefit from this scarce resource raises difficult ethical issues. For most patients on dialysis therapy a successful transplant offers improved quality and quantity of life, but the absolute gain in survival provided by a donated organ varies greatly depending on recipient factors such as age and co-morbid illnesses. The philosophies of equity (a fair opportunity for everyone in need to receive a transplant) and utility (optimal profit from each organ) are often competing. National allocation schemes and local policies regarding assessment of potential recipients and acceptance of organs are designed to balance these ethical principles in a standardized and socially acceptable manner. The ongoing debate surrounding these issues and modifications to such policies reflect the evolving clinical picture of renal transplantation and the challenge in maintaining equipoise between renal transplant utility and equity.

  7. ABO-incompatible renal transplantation in developing world - crossing the immunological (and mental) barrier.

    PubMed

    Jha, P K; Bansal, S B; Sethi, S K; Jain, M; Sharma, R; Nandwani, A; Phanish, M K; Duggal, R; Tiwari, A K; Ghosh, P; Ahlawat, R; Kher, V

    2016-01-01

    ABO incompatibility has been considered as an important immunological barrier for renal transplantation. With the advent of effective preconditioning protocols, it is now possible to do renal transplants across ABO barrier. We hereby present a single center retrospective analysis of all consecutive ABOi renal transplants performed from November 2011 to August 2014. Preconditioning protocol consisted of rituximab, plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and maintenance immunosuppression consisted of tacrolimus, mycophenolate sodium, and prednisolone. The outcome of these ABOi transplants was compared with all other consecutive ABO-compatible (ABOc) renal transplants performed during same time. Twenty ABOi renal transplants were performed during the study period. Anti-blood group antibody titer varied from 1:2 to 1:512. Patient and graft survival was comparable between ABOi and ABOc groups. Biopsy proven acute rejection rate was 15% in ABOi group, which was similar to ABOc group (16.29%). There were no antibody-mediated rejections in ABOi group. The infection rate was also comparable. We conclude that the short-term outcome of ABOi and ABOc transplants is comparable. ABOi transplants should be promoted in developing countries to expand the donor pool.

  8. ABO-incompatible renal transplantation in developing world – crossing the immunological (and mental) barrier

    PubMed Central

    Jha, P. K.; Bansal, S. B.; Sethi, S. K.; Jain, M.; Sharma, R.; Nandwani, A.; Phanish, M. K.; Duggal, R.; Tiwari, A. K.; Ghosh, P.; Ahlawat, R.; Kher, V.

    2016-01-01

    ABO incompatibility has been considered as an important immunological barrier for renal transplantation. With the advent of effective preconditioning protocols, it is now possible to do renal transplants across ABO barrier. We hereby present a single center retrospective analysis of all consecutive ABOi renal transplants performed from November 2011 to August 2014. Preconditioning protocol consisted of rituximab, plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and maintenance immunosuppression consisted of tacrolimus, mycophenolate sodium, and prednisolone. The outcome of these ABOi transplants was compared with all other consecutive ABO-compatible (ABOc) renal transplants performed during same time. Twenty ABOi renal transplants were performed during the study period. Anti-blood group antibody titer varied from 1:2 to 1:512. Patient and graft survival was comparable between ABOi and ABOc groups. Biopsy proven acute rejection rate was 15% in ABOi group, which was similar to ABOc group (16.29%). There were no antibody-mediated rejections in ABOi group. The infection rate was also comparable. We conclude that the short-term outcome of ABOi and ABOc transplants is comparable. ABOi transplants should be promoted in developing countries to expand the donor pool. PMID:27051135

  9. Hemostatic Parameters according to Renal Function and Time after Transplantation in Brazilian Renal Transplanted Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Ana Paula Lucas; Alpoim, Patrícia Nessralla; de Figueiredo, Roberta Carvalho; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Braga Gomes, Karina; Dusse, Luci Maria SantAna

    2015-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the key for patients with end-stage renal disease, improving quality of life and longer survival. However, kidney transplant triggers an intense inflammatory response and alters the hemostatic system, but the pathophysiological mechanisms of these changes are not completely understood. The aim of this cross-sectional cohort study was to investigate hemostatic biomarkers in Brazilian renal transplanted patients according to renal function and time after transplantation. A total of 159 renal transplanted patients were enrolled and D-Dimer (D-Di), Thrombomodulin (TM), von Willebrand Factor (VWF), and ADAMTS13 plasma levels were assessed by ELISA. An increase of D-Di was observed in patients with higher levels of creatinine. ADAMTS13 levels were associated with creatinine plasma levels and D-Di levels with Glomerular Filtration Rate. These results suggested that D-Di and ADAMTS13 can be promising markers to estimate renal function. ADAMTS13 should be investigated throughout the posttransplant time to clarify the participation of this enzyme in glomerular filtration and acceptance or rejection of the graft in Brazilian transplanted patients. PMID:26229221

  10. Alternative donor transplants for severe aplastic anemia: current experience.

    PubMed

    Bacigalupo, Andrea; Sica, Simona

    2016-04-01

    Patients with acquired severe aplastic anemia (SAA), who lack a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) identical sibling donor (SIB), have two therapeutic options: immunosuppressive therapy with anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) and cyclosporine (CsA), or a transplant from an alternative donor. In these patients, the current guidelines of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) call for a course of ATG + CsA first and transplantation in case of no response. The alternative donor source can be an unrelated donor (UD), a cord blood (CB) unit, or a family mismatched member, in most instances genetically HLA haplo-mismatched (HAPLO). In the present review, we will discuss recent results of transplants from matched UD and SIB donors, with significantly improved outcome, especially with UD in the past decade. We will also be looking at CB transplants, and the problems of limited stem cell dose. Finally HAPLO grafts have been explored in patients lacking or having rejected an unrelated or CB graft: early results seem encouraging, though the procedure should still be considered experimental.

  11. Evaluation of psychiatric issues in renal transplant setting

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, R.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic illnesses can cause wide range of personality and behavioral disorders and require appropriate evaluation. Poor patient compliance with prescribed medications and other aspects of management can affect the outcome towards undesirable situation. The setting of renal transplantation presents a broad spectrum of problems and consequences. People involved (patients, their families or treating physicians) have lifelong commitment with evaluation and implementation of measures towards resolving the issues. Psychiatric evaluation is part of this scenario, which starts with evaluation of organ recipient along with donor and family as whole, right from time of diagnosis of end organ failure to transplant and then lifelong. This review highlights common issues faced at different stages of this lengthy pathway. PMID:26664203

  12. Renal cancer in kidney transplanted patients.

    PubMed

    Frascà, Giovanni M; Sandrini, Silvio; Cosmai, Laura; Porta, Camillo; Asch, William; Santoni, Matteo; Salviani, Chiara; D'Errico, Antonia; Malvi, Deborah; Balestra, Emilio; Gallieni, Maurizio

    2015-12-01

    Renal cancer occurs more frequently in renal transplanted patients than in the general population, affecting native kidneys in 90% of cases and the graft in 10 %. In addition to general risk factors, malignancy susceptibility may be influenced by immunosuppressive therapy, the use of calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) as compared with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, and the length of dialysis treatment. Acquired cystic kidney disease may increase the risk for renal cancer after transplantation, while autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease does not seem to predispose to cancer development. Annual ultrasound evaluation seems appropriate in patients with congenital or acquired cystic disease or even a single cyst in native kidneys, and every 2 years in patients older than 60 years if they were on dialysis for more than 5 years before transplantation. Immunosuppression should be lowered in patients who develop renal cancer, by reduction or withdrawal of CNI. Although more evidence is still needed, it seems reasonable to shift patients from CNI to everolimus or sirolimus if not already treated with one of these drugs, with due caution in subjects with chronic allograft nephropathy.

  13. Recommendations for use of marginal donors in heart transplantation: Brazilian Association of Organs Transplantation guideline.

    PubMed

    Fiorelli, A I; Stolf, N A G; Pego-Fernandes, P M; Oliveira Junior, J L; Santos, R H B; Contreras, C A M; Filho, D D L; Dinkhuysen, J J; Moreira, M C V; Mejia, J A C; Castro, M C R

    2011-01-01

    The high prevalence of heart failure has increased the candidate list for heart transplantation; however, there is a shortage of viable donated organs, which is responsible for the high mortality of patients awaiting a transplantation. Because the marginal donor presents additional risk factors, it is not considered to be an ideal donor. The use of a marginal donor is only justified in situations when the risk of patient death due to heart disease is greater than that offered by the donor. These recommendations sought to expand the supply of donors, consequently increasing the transplant rate. We selected articles based on robust evidence to provide a substratum to develop recommendations for donors who exceed the traditional acceptance criteria. Recipient survival in the immediate postoperative period is intimately linked to allograft quality. Primary allograft failure is responsible for 38% to 40% of immediate deaths after heart transplantation: therefore; marginal donor selection must be more rigorous to not increase the surgical risk. The main donor risk factors with the respective evidence levels are: cancer in the donor (B), female donor (B), donor death due to hemorrhagic stroke (B), donor age above 50 years (relative risk [RR] = 1.5) (B), weight mismatch between donor and recipient < 0.8 (RR = 1.3) (B), ischemia > 240 minutes (RR = 1.2) (B), left ventricular dysfunction with ejection fraction below 45% (B), and use of high doses of vasoactive drugs (dopamine > 15 mg/kg·min) (B). Factors that impact recipient mortality are: age over 50 years (RR = 1.5); allograft harvest at a distance; adult recipient weighing more than 20% of the donor; high doses of vasoactive drugs (dopamine greater than 15 mg/kg·min) and ischemic time >4 hours. The use of a marginal donor is only justified when it is able to increase life expectancy compared with clinical treatment, albeit the outcomes are interior to those using an ideal donor.

  14. ALTERNATIVE DONORS EXTEND TRANSPLANTATION FOR PATIENTS WITH LYMPHOMA WHO LACK AN HLA MATCHED DONOR

    PubMed Central

    Bachanova, Veronika; Burns, Linda J.; Wang, Tao; Carreras, Jeanette; Gale, Robert Peter; Wiernik, Peter H.; Ballen, Karen K.; Wirk, Baldeep; Munker, Reinhold; Rizzieri, David A.; Chen, Yi-Bin; Gibson, John; Akpek, Görgün; Costa, Luciano J.; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Aljurf, Mahmoud D.; Hsu, Jack W.; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Schouten, Harry C.; Bacher, Ulrike; Savani, Bipin N.; Wingard, John R.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Laport, Ginna G.; Montoto, Silvia; Maloney, David G.; Smith, Sonali M.; Brunstein, Claudio; Saber, Wael

    2015-01-01

    Alternative donor transplantation is increasingly used for high risk lymphoma patients. We analyzed 1593 transplant recipients (2000 to 2010) and compared transplant outcomes in recipients of 8/8 allele human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, -B, -C, and DRB1 matched unrelated donors (MUD; n=1176), 7/8 allele HLA-matched unrelated donors (MMUD; n=275) and umbilical cord blood donors (1 or 2 units UCB; n=142). Adjusted 3-year non-relapse mortality of MMUD (44%) was higher as compared to MUD (35%; p=0.004), but similar to UCB recipients (37%; p=0.19), although UCB had lower rates of neutrophil and platelet recovery compared to unrelated donor groups. With a median follow-up of 55 months, 3-year adjusted cumulative incidence of relapse was lower after MMUD compared with MUD (25% vs 33%, p=0.003) but similar between UCB and MUD (30% vs 33%; p=0.48). In multivariate analysis UCB recipients had lower risks of acute and chronic graft versus host disease compared with adult donor groups (UCB vs MUD: HR=0.68, p=0.05; HR=0.35; p<0.001). Adjusted 3-year overall survival was comparable (43% MUD, 37% MMUD and 41% UCB). Data highlight that patients with lymphoma have acceptable survival after alternative donor transplantation. MMUD and UCB can expand the curative potential of allotransplant to patients who lack suitable HLA-matched sibling or MUD. PMID:25402415

  15. Do the outcomes of living donor renal allograft recipients differ with peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis as a bridge renal replacement therapy?

    PubMed

    Prasad, Narayan; Vardhan, Harsh; Baburaj, Vinod P; Bhadauria, Dharmendra; Gupta, Amit; Sharma, Raj K; Kaul, Anupama

    2014-11-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the outcomes of living donor renal transplant recipients using peritoneal dialysis (PD) and hemodialysis (HD) as a bridge modality for renal replacement therapy till renal transplantation. The demographic profiles of the recipients and donors, the patients' native kidney disease (diabetic versus non-diabetic), duration on dialysis, requirement of anti-hypertensive drugs, number of blood transfusions, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatch status, pre- and post-transplant infectious complications, and post-transplant outcomes of patients were compared between the two groups. The demographic features of the study patients were similar in the two groups. The duration of dialysis prior to transplant was significantly longer in the PD group than in the HD group of patients. The anti-hypertensive drug requirement was lower and the hemoglobin level and residual urine volume at the time of transplant were relatively better in the PD patients compared to the HD patients. The number of acute rejection episodes, delayed graft function, surgical complications, glomerular filtration rate at one month and at the last follow-up, were also similar in both groups. The short-term and long-term graft survival was similar in both groups of patients. The one-, two-, five-, and eight-year death-censored graft survival rates of the PD patients were 98, 95, 85, and 73%, respectively, and in the HD group of patients, they were 100, 93, 84, and 79%, respectively. The one-, two-, five-, and eight-year patient survival rates in the PD group were 97, 92, 77, and 66%, respectively, and in the HD group, they were 97, 92, 79, and 69%, respectively. Our study suggests that the outcomes of the living donor renal allograft recipients did not differ between the groups of patients who used PD or HD as renal replacement therapy prior to renal transplantation.

  16. Overview of Pregnancy in Renal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Prasoon

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation offers best hope to women with end-stage renal disease who wish to become pregnant. Pregnancy in a kidney transplant recipient continues to remain challenging due to side effects of immunosuppressive medication, risk of deterioration of allograft function, risk of adverse maternal complications of preeclampsia and hypertension, and risk of adverse fetal outcomes of premature birth, low birth weight, and small for gestational age infants. The factors associated with poor pregnancy outcomes include presence of hypertension, serum creatinine greater than 1.4 mg/dL, and proteinuria. The recommended maintenance immunosuppression in pregnant women is calcineurin inhibitors (tacrolimus/cyclosporine), azathioprine, and low dose prednisone; and it is considered safe. Sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil should be stopped 6 weeks prior to conception. The optimal time to conception continues to remain an area of contention. It is important that counseling for childbearing should start as early as prior to getting a kidney transplant and should be done at every clinic visit after transplant. Breast-feeding is not contraindicated and should not be discouraged. This review will help the physicians in medical optimization and counseling of renal transplant recipients of childbearing age. PMID:28042483

  17. Renal transplantation--the Starzl influence.

    PubMed

    Salvatierra, O

    1988-02-01

    In summary, I have attempted to review with you some of Dr Starzl's numerous clinical and scientific contributions that have cut across the spectrum of the field of renal transplantation. It is thus not surprising that Dr Starzl was elected the first President of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons, singular recognition from his own peers for the many contributions and leadership that he has provided during the formative and developmental years of organ transplantation. In addition, Dr Starzl has been recognized with a number of other prestigious awards, among which was the David M. Hume Memorial Award, the highest honor bestowed by the National Kidney Foundation. Careful analysis of Dr Starzl's work therefore clearly indicates that many of his contributions since 1960 have been uniquely innovative, have provided many firsts, and have reflected the science and technology of transplantation as it is today, in 1987. Thus, it can be truly said that Dr Starzl, the surgeon-scientist, was not only a pioneer but also a leader and subsequently a giant in the field of clinical renal transplantation. He has left a lasting and indelible impact on the field, the Starzl influence, for which all of us, both patient and physician, are extremely grateful. Thank you very much, Dr Starzl.

  18. Alternative donor allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for hemoglobinopathies.

    PubMed

    Alfraih, Feras; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Fitzhugh, Courtney D; Kassim, Adetola A

    2016-04-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) offers a curative therapy for patients with hemoglobinopathies, mainly severe sickle cell disease (SCD) and thalassemia (TM). However, the applicability of HSCT has been limited mainly by donor availability, with a less than 25%-30% of eligible patients having human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling donors. Previous outcomes using alternate donor options have been markedly inferior due to increased regimen-related toxicity, transplant-related mortality, graft failure, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Advances in transplant technology, including high-resolution HLA typing, improved GVHD prophylactic approaches with tolerance induction, and better supportive care over the last decade, are addressing these historical challenges, resulting in increasing donor options. Herein, we review alternate donor HSCT approaches for severe SCD and TM using unrelated donors, umbilical cord blood units, or related haploidentical donors. Though this is an emerging field, early results are promising and in selected patients, this may be the preferred option to mitigate against the age-related morbidity and early mortality associated with these disorders.

  19. Living donor liver transplantation using grafts with hepatic cysts.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Seisuke; Nosaka, Shunsuke; Shigeta, Takanobu; Uchida, Hajime; Hamano, Ikumi; Karaki, Chiaki; Kanazawa, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Akinari; Nakazawa, Atsuko; Kasahara, Mureo

    2012-12-01

    Cystic lesions in the liver are often found through the evaluation of liver donors. Multiple cysts are worrisome, and donor candidates with multiple cysts may be unacceptable as liver donors, especially when their recipients have fibrocystic disease (FCD), which is an inherited disorder. This study reviewed 183 cases of living donor liver transplantation. We collected clinical and radiological data associated with donors with cystic lesions and with donors without cystic lesions, and we evaluated the outcomes of these donors and their recipients. As part of the preoperative radiological assessment of grafts, magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) was performed to evaluate the biliary anatomy of donor candidates with multiple cysts. Thirty-four donors (18.6%) had 1 or more cystic lesions in the liver, and 6 of these donors had multiple cysts (ie, >10). Donors with multiple cysts were older and heavier, and there was a significant relationship between these donors and recipients whose original disease was FCD. During the follow-up (median = 3.1 years), all donors with cystic lesions were found to be doing well without any major postoperative complications. Fifteen recipients who received grafts with cystic lesions (12 left-sided lobes and 3 right-sided lobes) had no complications related to the cystic lesions. In conclusion, donors with cystic lesions may be acceptable as liver donors, although our data are limited mostly to left-sided lobe donation with a short follow-up period. MRC should be preoperatively performed to rule out any biliary anomalies, especially in donor candidates whose recipients have FCD.

  20. Child-to-Adult Liver Transplantation With Donation After Cardiac Death Donors: Three Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liangshuo; Liu, Xuemin; Zhang, Xiaogang; Yu, Liang; Sha, Huanchen; Zhou, Ying; Tian, Min; Shi, Jianhua; Wang, Wanli; Liu, Chang; Guo, Kun; Lv, Yi; Wang, Bo

    2016-02-01

    Development of organ transplantation is restricted by the discrepancy between the lack of donors and increasing number of patients. The outcome of pediatric donors transplanted into adult recipients especially with donation after circulatory death (DCD) pattern has not been well studied. The aim of this paper is to describe our experience of 3 successful DCD donor child-to-adult liver transplantations lately. Three DCD donors were separately 7, 5, and 8 years old. The ratio between donor graft weight and recipient body weight was 1.42%, 1.00%, and 1.33%, respectively. Ratio between the volume of donor liver and the expected liver volume was 0.65, 0.46, and 0.60. Splenectomy was undertaken for the second recipient according to the portal vein pressure (PVP) which was observed during the operation. Two out of 3 of the recipients suffered with acute kidney injury and got recovered after renal replacement therapy. The first recipient also went through early allograft dysfunction and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The hospital course of the third recipient was uneventful. After 1 year of follow-up visit, the first and second recipients maintain good quality of life and liver function. The third patient was followed up for 5 months until now and recovered well. DCD child-to-adult liver transplantation should only be used for comparatively matched donor and recipient. PVP should be monitored during the operation. The short-term efficacy is good, but long-term follow-up and clinical study with large sample evaluation are still needed.

  1. Psychosocial data of potential living donors before living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Walter, Marc; Bronner, Ekkehard; Steinmüller, Thomas; Klapp, Burghard F; Danzer, Gerhard

    2002-02-01

    In view of the scarcity of organ resources for transplantation, donation by living donors is assuming greater significance now that the technical-surgical problems involved have been solved. In the period between December 1999 and December 2000, 47 potential living liver donors were evaluated and a total of 27 hepatic lobes were transplanted at the Virchow-Klinikum of the Charité Hospital in Berlin. The close personal relationships between recipients and donors gives reason to anticipate high levels of psychosocial pressure during the pre-operative evaluation process; this process consists in part in looking into donor motivation, ambivalence and anxiety. The pre-operative psychometric evaluation of 40 potential living donors indicated that most of the potential donors see themselves as 'super-healthy' and tend to adapt to social expectations, while on the other hand those seven potential living donors not accepted for psychosocial reasons were marked by heightened values for anxious depression and pessimism. The results indicate in most cases a great willingness to donate and on the other hand a high level of obvious psychological pressure for a low number of potential donors. For the latter, both the clinical evaluation interview and the psychometric diagnostics used revealed clear-cut feelings of anxiety and ambivalence towards transplantation.

  2. Persistent severe polyuria after renal transplant

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Timothy; Laing, Chris; Ekong, Rosemary; Povey, Sue; Unwin, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Polydipsia and polyuria are common symptoms in patients with diabetes insipidus (DI), which can be due to inadequate vasopressin production (cranial DI) or vasopressin insensitivity (nephrogenic DI). Clinical diagnosis of the subtypes of DI can be tricky. We present a 44-year-old man with a strong family history of DI who had been diagnosed with autosomal dominant nephrogenic DI from infancy. At the age of 40, he had progressed to end-stage renal failure. When he experienced unresolving severe polyuria after renal transplant, further investigations revealed that he was misdiagnosed and that he had a novel mutation causing autosomal dominant cranial DI. PMID:26985366

  3. Effect of TREM-1 blockade and single nucleotide variants in experimental renal injury and kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tammaro, A.; Kers, J.; Emal, D.; Stroo, I.; Teske, G. J. D.; Butter, L. M.; Claessen, N.; Damman, J.; Derive, M.; Navis, G.; Florquin, S.; Leemans, J. C.; Dessing, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Renal ischemia reperfusion (IR)-injury induces activation of innate immune response which sustains renal injury and contributes to the development of delayed graft function (DGF). Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) is a pro-inflammatory evolutionary conserved pattern recognition receptor expressed on a variety of innate immune cells. TREM-1 expression increases following acute and chronic renal injury. However, the function of TREM-1 in renal IR is still unclear. Here, we investigated expression and function of TREM-1 in a murine model of renal IR using different TREM-1 inhibitors: LP17, LR12 and TREM-1 fusion protein. In a human study, we analyzed the association of non-synonymous single nucleotide variants in the TREM1 gene in a cohort comprising 1263 matching donors and recipients with post-transplant outcomes, including DGF. Our findings demonstrated that, following murine IR, renal TREM-1 expression increased due to the influx of Trem1 mRNA expressing cells detected by in situ hybridization. However, TREM-1 interventions by means of LP17, LR12 and TREM-1 fusion protein did not ameliorate IR-induced injury. In the human renal transplant cohort, donor and recipient TREM1 gene variant p.Thr25Ser was not associated with DGF, nor with biopsy-proven rejection or death-censored graft failure. We conclude that TREM-1 does not play a major role during experimental renal IR and after kidney transplantation. PMID:27928159

  4. Geographic Determinants of Access to Pediatric Deceased Donor Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hojun; Potluri, Vishnu; Abt, Peter L.; Shults, Justine; Amaral, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Children receive priority in the allocation of deceased donor kidneys for transplantation in the United States, but because allocation begins locally, geographic differences in population and organ supply may enable variation in pediatric access to transplantation. We assembled a cohort of 3764 individual listings for pediatric kidney transplantation in 2005–2010. For each donor service area, we assigned a category of short (<180 days), medium (181–270 days), or long (>270 days) median waiting time and calculated the ratio of pediatric-quality kidneys to pediatric candidates and the percentage of these kidneys locally diverted to adults. We used multivariable Cox regression analyses to examine the association between donor service area characteristics and time to deceased donor kidney transplantation. The Kaplan–Meier estimate of median waiting time to transplantation was 284 days (95% confidence interval, 263 to 300 days) and varied from 14 to 1313 days across donor service areas. Overall, 29% of pediatric-quality kidneys were locally diverted to adults. Compared with areas with short waiting times, areas with long waiting times had a lower ratio of pediatric-quality kidneys to candidates (3.1 versus 5.9; P<0.001) and more diversions to adults (31% versus 27%; P<0.001). In multivariable regression, a lower kidney to candidate ratio remained associated with longer waiting time (hazard ratio, 0.56 for areas with <2:1 versus reference areas with ≥5:1 kidneys/candidates; P<0.01). Large geographic variation in waiting time for pediatric deceased donor kidney transplantation exists and is highly associated with local supply and demand factors. Future organ allocation policy should address this geographic inequity. PMID:24436470

  5. Donor-derived organ transplant transmission of coccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Dierberg, K.L.; Marr, K.A.; Subramanian, A.; Nace, H.; Desai, N.; Locke, J.E.; Zhang, S.; Diaz, J.; Chamberlain, C.; Neofytos, D.

    2015-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis in solid organ transplant recipients most often occurs as a result of primary infection or reactivation of latent infection. Herein, we report a series of cases of transplant-related transmission of coccidioidomycosis from a single donor from a non-endemic region whose organs were transplanted to 5 different recipients. In all, 3 of the 5 recipients developed evidence of Coccidioides infection, 2 of whom had disseminated disease. The degree of T-cell immunosuppression and timing of antifungal therapy initiation likely contributed to development of disease and disease severity in these recipients. This case series highlights the importance of having a high index of suspicion for Coccidioides infection in solid organ transplant recipients, even if the donor does not have known exposure, given the difficulties of obtaining a detailed and accurate travel history from next-of-kin. PMID:22176496

  6. Donor to recipient sizing in thoracic organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Eberlein, Michael; Reed, Robert M

    2016-03-24

    Donor-to-recipient organ size matching is a critical aspect of thoracic transplantation. In the United States potential recipients for lung transplant and heart transplant are listed with limitations on donor height and weight ranges, respectively. Height is used as a surrogate for lung size and weight is used as a surrogate for heart size. While these measures are important predictors of organ size, they are crude surrogates that fail to incorporate the influence of sex on organ size. Independent of other measures, a man's thoracic organs are approximately 20% larger than a woman's. Lung size can be better estimated using the predicted total lung capacity, which is derived from regression equations correcting for height, sex and age. Similarly, heart size can be better estimated using the predicted heart mass, which adjusts for sex, age, height, and weight. These refined organ sizing measures perform better than current sizing practice for the prediction of outcomes after transplantation, and largely explain the outcome differences observed after sex-mismatch transplantation. An undersized allograft is associated with worse outcomes. In this review we examine current data pertaining to size-matching in thoracic transplantation. We advocate for a change in the thoracic allocation mechanism from a height-or-weight-based strategy to a size-matching process that utilizes refined estimates of organ size. We believe that a size-matching approach based on refined estimates of organ size would optimize outcomes in thoracic transplantation without restricting or precluding patients from thoracic transplantation.

  7. Asymptomatic hyperuricemia following renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bellomo, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating indicating a role for uric acid in the genesis and progression of kidney disease, and a few studies are beginning to show a possible beneficial effect of urate-lowering therapy. Whether this holds true for renal allograft recipients is not clear. In this short review evidence from epidemiological as well as intervention studies is summarized and discussed, with some practical considerations presented at the end. PMID:26167455

  8. Whooping cough in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Garbiras, M; Shabaka, A; Calvo, N; Martin, L; Moreno, M A; Lopez de la Manzanara, V; Sanchez-Fructuoso, A I

    2016-04-01

    Whooping cough is a respiratory infection with a severity that varies with age, immune status, and probably with other factors such as the degree of exposure and the virulence of the organism. The most frequent microorganism responsible for whooping cough is Bordetella pertussis. We present the case of a 62-year-old renal transplant recipient presenting with typical and severe manifestations of whooping cough caused by B. pertussis.

  9. Alimentary tract complications after renal transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, W C; Harris, N; Stein, S; Brooks, M; Jones, R S; Thompson, W M; Stickel, D L; Seigler, H F

    1979-01-01

    A computer analysis of post renal transplantation gastrointestinal problems was performed to identify important associated clinical factors. Thirty-seven per cent of all transplant recipients developed one or more significant problems. Hemorrhage, nondiverticular intestinal perforation, and esophagitis occurred most frequently in hospitalized patients. Pancreatitis, diverticulitis, and gastroduodenal perforation occurred characteristically in long-term survivors with well functioning allografts. Eleven of 32 HLA identical recipients treated with maintenance corticosteroids during stable kidney function developed gastrointestinal disease while only one of 13 HLA identical recipients not given maintenance steroids developed a problem, which strongly suggests a causal role for steroids in the development of late complications. The association of preexisting peptic ulcer and diverticular disease with hemorrhage and perforation supports previous recommendations that documented peptic ulcer disease or diverticulitis should be corrected surgically prior to transplantation. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:384945

  10. Norwegian scabies in a renal transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Sampathkumar, K.; Mahaldar, A. R.; Ramakrishnan, M.; Prabahar, S.

    2010-01-01

    A variety of skin infections are encountered in postrenal transplant setting. Though bacterial and fungal infections are more common, surprises are in store for us sometimes. We describe a patient who underwent renal transplant two years ago, presenting with a painless, mildly pruritic expanding skin rash over abdomen. Histological examination of the skin biopsy showed that stratum corneum had multiple burrows containing larvae and eggs of Sarcoptes scabiei. The patient was treated with ivermectin 12 mg weekly once for 2 doses along with topical 5% permethrin and permethrin soap bath. There was remarkable improvement in the skin lesions with complete resolution in two weeks. Norwegian or crusted scabies is caused by massive infestation with Sarcoptes scabiei var. hominis. It can be rarely encountered in the post-transplant setting, which underscores the importance of early diagnosis and treatment before secondary bacterial infection sets in. PMID:20835323

  11. Cardiovascular disease in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, Emily P; Fellström, Bengt C; Holdaas, Hallvard; Jardine, Alan G

    2010-05-01

    Renal transplant recipients have a markedly increased risk of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with the general population, although considerably lower than that of patients receiving maintenance haemodialysis. CVD in transplant recipients is poorly characterised and differs from the nonrenal population, with a much higher proportion of fatal to nonfatal cardiac events. In addition to traditional ischaemic heart disease risk factors such as age, gender, diabetes and smoking, there are additional factors to consider in this population such as the importance of hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy and uraemic cardiomyopathy. There are factors specific to transplantation such immunosuppressive therapies and graft dysfunction which contribute to this altered risk profile. However, understanding and treatment is limited by the absence of large randomised intervention trials addressing risk factor modification, with the exception of the ALERT study. The approach to managing these patients should begin early and be multifactorial in nature.

  12. Haploidentical transplant with posttransplant cyclophosphamide vs matched unrelated donor transplant for acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei-Jie; Bacigalupo, Andrea A.; Bashey, Asad; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Aljitawi, Omar S.; Armand, Philippe; Antin, Joseph H.; Chen, Junfang; Devine, Steven M.; Fowler, Daniel H.; Luznik, Leo; Nakamura, Ryotaro; O’Donnell, Paul V.; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Pingali, Sai Ravi; Porter, David L.; Riches, Marcie R.; Ringdén, Olle T. H.; Rocha, Vanderson; Vij, Ravi; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Champlin, Richard E.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Fuchs, Ephraim J.; Eapen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    We studied adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after haploidentical (n = 192) and 8/8 HLA-matched unrelated donor (n = 1982) transplantation. Haploidentical recipients received calcineurin inhibitor (CNI), mycophenolate, and posttransplant cyclophosphamide for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis; 104 patients received myeloablative and 88 received reduced intensity conditioning regimens. Matched unrelated donor transplant recipients received CNI with mycophenolate or methotrexate for GVHD prophylaxis; 1245 patients received myeloablative and 737 received reduced intensity conditioning regimens. In the myeloablative setting, day 30 neutrophil recovery was lower after haploidentical compared with matched unrelated donor transplants (90% vs 97%, P = .02). Corresponding rates after reduced intensity conditioning transplants were 93% and 96% (P = .25). In the myeloablative setting, 3-month acute grade 2-4 (16% vs 33%, P < .0001) and 3-year chronic GVHD (30% vs 53%, P < .0001) were lower after haploidentical compared with matched unrelated donor transplants. Similar differences were observed after reduced intensity conditioning transplants, 19% vs 28% (P = .05) and 34% vs 52% (P = .002). Among patients receiving myeloablative regimens, 3-year probabilities of overall survival were 45% (95% CI, 36-54) and 50% (95% CI, 47-53) after haploidentical and matched unrelated donor transplants (P = .38). Corresponding rates after reduced intensity conditioning transplants were 46% (95% CI, 35-56) and 44% (95% CI, 0.40-47) (P = .71). Although statistical power is limited, these data suggests that survival for patients with AML after haploidentical transplantation with posttransplant cyclophosphamide is comparable with matched unrelated donor transplantation. PMID:26130705

  13. Donor lymphocyte infusion after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Luca; Sarina, Barbara; Bramanti, Stefania; Perseghin, Paolo; Mariotti, Jacopo; Morabito, Lucio

    2016-06-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is considered the cornerstone in the treatment of several malignant and not malignant hematological diseases. However, relapse of hematological disease after allo-SCT is considered the most challenging point in the field. The risk can be reduced through optimal patients, donor and disease selection before allo-SCT, but harnessing donor immune system is an appealing way to treat or avoid disease relapse. Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) is a simple and effective therapy after allo-SCT. In this paper, the efficacy of DLI will be analyzed in different hematological diseases, focusing also on their therapeutic or pre-emptive use.

  14. IVIg Treatment Reduces Catalytic Antibody Titers of Renal Transplanted Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mahendra, Ankit; Peyron, Ivan; Dollinger, Cécile; Gilardin, Laurent; Sharma, Meenu; Wootla, Bharath; Padiolleau-Lefevre, Séverine; Friboulet, Alain; Boquet, Didier; Legendre, Christophe; Kaveri, Srinivas V.

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic antibodies are immunoglobulins endowed with enzymatic activity. Catalytic IgG has been reported in several human autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. In particular, low levels of catalytic IgG have been proposed as a prognostic marker for chronic allograft rejection in patients undergoing kidney transplant. Kidney allograft is a treatment of choice for patients with end-stage renal failure. Intravenous immunoglobulins, a therapeutic pool of human IgG, is used in patients with donor-specific antibodies, alone or in conjunction with other immunosuppressive treatments, to desensitize the patients and prevent the development of acute graft rejection. Here, we followed for a period of 24 months the levels of catalytic IgG towards the synthetic peptide Pro-Phe-Arg-methylcoumarinimide in a large cohort of patients undergoing kidney transplantation. Twenty-four percent of the patients received IVIg at the time of transplantation. Our results demonstrate a marked reduction in levels of catalytic antibodies in all patients three months following kidney transplant. The decrease was significantly pronounced in patients receiving adjunct IVIg therapy. The results suggests that prevention of acute graft rejection using intravenous immunoglobulins induces a transient reduction in the levels of catalytic IgG, thus potentially jeopardizing the use of levels of catalytic antibodies as a prognosis marker for chronic allograft nephropathy. PMID:23967092

  15. Flow cytometry crossmatching as a predictor of acute rejection in sensitized recipients of cadaveric renal transplants.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, R W; Osorio, R W; Freise, C E; Lou, C D; Garovoy, M R; Bacchetti, P; Ascher, N L; Melzer, J S; Roberts, J P; Stock, P G

    2000-04-01

    Flow cytometry crossmatching (FCXM) was developed as a more sensitive assay than the standard complement-dependent cytotoxicity crossmatch (CDCXM) for the detection of anti-donor antibodies, that mediate hyperacute rejection and graft loss in the early post-transplant period in renal transplant recipients. The role of FCXM in predicting long-term clinical outcome in renal allograft recipients is unclear. This study examines the role of FCXM in predicting long-term clinical outcome in highly sensitized recipients of cadaveric renal transplants. All patients (n = 100) with peak panel reactive antibody (PRA) levels > 30%, who received cadaveric renal transplants between 1/1/'90 and 12/31/'95 at our institution, were divided into FCXM + and FCXM - groups. The incidence of acute rejection was determined for each group during the first yr after transplant. Graft survival rates at 1, 2, and 3 yr, and creatinine levels were also compared between groups. FCXM + patients experienced a higher incidence of acute rejection during the first yr after transplant (69 vs. 45%), and a higher percentage of FCXM + patients had more than one episode of acute rejection during the first yr after transplant (34 vs. 8%) when compared to FCXM - patients. There was no statistically significant difference in 1-, 2-, or 3-yr graft survival between FCXM + and FCXM - patients (76 vs. 83, 62 vs. 80, 62 vs. 72%, respectively). These results suggest that sensitized FCXM + cadaveric renal transplant recipients have a higher incidence of acute rejection episodes in the first yr after transplant. Given the association of multiple rejection episodes with poor long-term allograft survival, FCXM may be a useful predictor of long-term clinical outcome in this sub-group of renal transplant recipients.

  16. Clinical outcome of pancreas transplantation from marginal donors in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tomimaru, Y; Ito, T; Kawamoto, K; Hama, N; Wada, H; Kobayashi, S; Eguchi, H; Tanemura, M; Mori, M; Doki, Y; Nagano, H

    2014-04-01

    In Japan, absolute shortage of donors still continues even after the law allowing organ transplantation from deceased donors came into force in 1997. With the passage of the waiting period after registration for pancreas transplantation (PTx), both deaths and serious cases of diabetic complications necessitating withdrawal of the registration have undoubtedly increased. Therefore, so-called "marginal donor" (MD) has been considered as a potential solution for shortage of donors in Japan. The aim of the present study is to evaluate feasibility of MD in terms of post-PTx outcomes using data from Japan Organ Transplantation Network. A total of 148 PTx were performed from deceased donors in Japan from 2000 to 2012. MD was defined as follows: (1) >45 years old; (2) hemodynamically unstable at harvest using a high-dose dopamine or more than 2 vasopressors; or (3) non-heart-beating status. Postoperative outcomes after PTx were compared between the MD group and the non-MD group. Among the 148 PTx donors, 108 donors (73.0%) satisfied the criteria of MD. Early graft loss of pancreas graft during 3 months post-transplant was observed in 15 patients (10.1%), and the marginality (MD vs non-MD) was not significantly correlated with the early loss of pancreas graft. The overall patient survival of the MD group (1, 3, 5 years: 94.7%, 94.7%, 94.7%) was not significantly different from that of the non-MD group (1, 3, 5 years: 95.0%, 95.0%, 95.0%). Pancreas graft survival in the MD group (1, 3, 5 years: 80.9%, 73.2%, 66.0%) seemed to be slightly lower than that in the non-MD group (1, 3, 5 years: 92.5%, 85.2%, 77.4%), but no statistically significant differences were found between the 2 groups. These results suggest the feasibility of the use of MD for PTx.

  17. Comparison of renal function after donor and radical nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Gazel, Eymen; Biçer, Sait; Ölçücüoğlu, Erkan; Yığman, Metin; Taştemur, Sedat; Çamtosun, Ahmet; Ceylan, Cavit; Ateş, Can

    2015-04-01

    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is directly proportionate to nephron reserves. In this respect, it is known that the patients who underwent radical nephrectomy due to renal tumor are under high risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the long term. In this study, it was aimed to compare post-operative renal functions of patients who underwent radical nephrectomy due to renal malignancy and who underwent donor nephrectomy as renal donors, to observe whether renal failure process develops or not, and to determine the factors that affect post-operative renal functions. 70 patients who underwent donor nephrectomy as renal donors and 130 patients who underwent radical nephrectomy due to renal tumor were studied. When we divided the groups as those with a GFR of below 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and those with a GFR of above 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2), we observed that GFR values of patients who underwent radical nephrectomy had a significantly stronger tendency to stay below 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) compared to patients who underwent donor nephrectomy (p < 0.001). When we divided the groups as those with a GFR of below 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and those with a GFR of above 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2), we observed that there were no patients in donor nephrectomy group whose GFR values dropped below 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and there was not a statistically significant difference between the groups (p = 0.099). If possible, nephron sparing methods should be preferred for patients to undergo nephrectomy because of the tumor without ignoring oncologic results and it should be remembered that patient's age and pre-operative renal functions may affect post-operative results in donor selection.

  18. Surgical aspects of donor hand recovery for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Banegas, Rodrigo N; Moreno, Rodrigo; Duggal, Anil; Breidenbach, Warren C

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to share our institution's experience in optimizing the suitability of composite donor tissue for use in hand transplantation. The centerpiece of this process includes procurement techniques, preservation and timing issues, and anatomical matching. Recovery of the donor hand must proceed in an efficient, organized, and expedient manner. Proper timing of the donor operation not only ensures the quality of donor tissue and outcome for the hand recipient, but also allows surgeons recovering other organs to obtain high quality tissue for those recipients. Timing remains a critical factor in preserving tissue after removal from the donor. We will also consider the factors of temperature and preservation solution during transport.

  19. [Advantages of living donor kidney transplantation; possibilities in the national transplantation program].

    PubMed

    Petrányi, Gyozo; Gyódi, Eva; Padányi, Agnes; Rajczy, Katalin

    2004-12-05

    The review paper summarizes the advantages of the living donor kidney transplantation aiming that this kind of activity should get more support in Hungary. It is a general phenomenon overall the world, that there is no more possibility to increase the number of cadaver transplantations, and the outcome of them is also worsening because of the accumulation of aged patients with long time period of dialysis treatment. The paper points out the better results of living donor kidney transplantation underlining that the kidney long term survival, in general, is 10% over the cadaver kidney survival with significant less complication. The indication of living related and unrelated donor kidney transplantation is reported and the harmless of donor kidney removal demonstrated. An important part of the review contains the ethical, legal and social issue of the living donation, moreover, its economical benefit. It shows that in certain countries the living donation becomes in the forefront of the transplantation activity, which demonstrates from statistical point of view the overall benefit in comparison to cadaver transplantation. Based on the experience of those countries, which are performing this type of transplantation for a long time ago recommendation is given what should be the methodology to increase the activity in this field of transplantation.

  20. 42 CFR 414.320 - Determination of reasonable charges for physician renal transplantation services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... renal transplantation services. 414.320 Section 414.320 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID....320 Determination of reasonable charges for physician renal transplantation services. (a... 60 days in connection with a renal transplantation, including the usual preoperative...

  1. 42 CFR 414.320 - Determination of reasonable charges for physician renal transplantation services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... renal transplantation services. 414.320 Section 414.320 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... Determination of reasonable charges for physician renal transplantation services. (a) Comprehensive payment for... a renal transplantation, including the usual preoperative and postoperative care, and...

  2. 42 CFR 414.320 - Determination of reasonable charges for physician renal transplantation services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... renal transplantation services. 414.320 Section 414.320 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID....320 Determination of reasonable charges for physician renal transplantation services. (a... 60 days in connection with a renal transplantation, including the usual preoperative...

  3. 42 CFR 414.320 - Determination of reasonable charges for physician renal transplantation services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... renal transplantation services. 414.320 Section 414.320 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... Determination of reasonable charges for physician renal transplantation services. (a) Comprehensive payment for... a renal transplantation, including the usual preoperative and postoperative care, and...

  4. 42 CFR 414.320 - Determination of reasonable charges for physician renal transplantation services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... renal transplantation services. 414.320 Section 414.320 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID....320 Determination of reasonable charges for physician renal transplantation services. (a... 60 days in connection with a renal transplantation, including the usual preoperative...

  5. Donor Derived Second Hematologic Malignancies after Cord Blood Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ballen, Karen K; Cutler, Corey; Yeap, Beow Y; McAfee, Steven L; Dey, Bimalangshu R; Attar, Eyal C; Chen, Yi-Bin; Haspel, Richard L; Liney, Deborah; Koreth, John; Ho, Vincent; Alyea, Edwin P; Soiffer, Robert J; Spitzer, Thomas R; Antin, Joseph H

    2010-01-01

    Double umbilical cord blood transplantation with a reduced intensity regimen is an effective strategy for adult patients without matched donors. However, the risk of second cancers is not yet established. Ninety-eight adults with hematologic malignancies received a double umbilical cord blood transplant. Seventy patients received the reduced intensity regimen of fludarabine 30 mg/m2/day × 6 days, melphalan 100 mg/m2/day × 1 day, and rabbit antithymocyte globulin 1.5 mg/kg/day × 4 days, and 28 patients received an ablative total body radiation containing conditioning regimen. Sixty-three patients received sirolimus-based graft versus host disease prophylaxis and 35 patients received non-sirolimus based graft versus host disease prophylaxis. Median age was 48 (range 19-67) years. Eighteen patients developed a second malignancy at a median of 134 days after transplant. Sixteen patients had lymphoma and two patients had myelodysplasia/myeloproliferative disorder. Sixteen of these second cancers (both MDS/MPD and fourteen of the lymphomas) were donor derived; the origin of the others was not determined. GVHD prophylaxis, HLA matching, primary disease, age, total nucleated cell dose, and CD34+ cell dose were not associated with a higher rate of second malignancy. Second myeloid malignancies of donor origin occur after double umbilical cord blood transplantation, suggesting that a search for donor origin should be performed in all patients with suspected relapse. PMID:20178854

  6. Two consecutive recurrences of crescentic immunoglobulin A nephropathy in a renal transplant recipient

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, N.; Murugananth, S.; Dineshkumar, T.; Dhanapriya, J.; Sakthirajan, R.; Balasubramaniyan, T.

    2016-01-01

    We report a 21-year-old male who developed end-stage renal disease, probably due to immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN), received a renal transplant from his mother, which was lost due to crescentic IgAN after 18 months. Two years later, he received a second transplant from a deceased donor. He developed rapidly progressive graft dysfunction 3 years later. Allograft biopsy revealed crescentic IgAN, which was successfully treated with intravenous steroids and cyclophosphamide. Recurrence of IgAN in two successive allografts in one patient has not been reported previously. PMID:27795636

  7. Ureteral obstruction of renal transplant due to ureteral candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Walzer, Y; Bear, R A

    1983-03-01

    In a diabetic renal transplant recipient a nephrocutaneous fistula developed after percutaneous renal graft biopsy, and ureteral obstruction due to Candida albicans fungus balls was demonstrated. Local irrigation with amphotericin B, systemic antifungal therapy, and rigid blood sugar control led to rapid clearing of the fungal infections. This cause of renal transplant insufficiency should be considered prior to renal biopsy in diabetic patients with yeast forms in the urine.

  8. Acute Rejection in Renal Transplant Patients of a Hospital in Bogota, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    García, P.; Huerfano, M; Rodríguez, M; Caicedo, A; Berrío, F; Gonzalez, C

    2016-01-01

    Background: Renal transplantation is the best treatment for end stage renal disease. Acute graft rejection is one of the main complications and may influence graft survival. Objective: To determine the incidence and features of acute cellular rejection (ACR) episodes confirmed by biopsy. Methods: We studied a cohort of 175 patients who underwent renal transplantation between 2004 and 2012 to determine the cumulative incidence of ACR confirmed by biopsy and to identify the associated risk factors using multivariate analysis. Results: The one-year patient survival was 96.6%; the graft survival was 93.7%. The incidence of ACR within one year was 14.3%, of which 46% were observed within 6 months following transplantation. The most frequently observed ACR type was 1B according to the Banff classification system (42%). A relationship between ACR and receipt of a kidney from expanded criteria donors was observed, both in univariate and adjusted multiple log-binomial regression analyses, but only 6.3% of patients received extended criteria donor kidneys. No other relationships between variables were found. Conclusion: ACR frequency in this study was similar to that of other cohorts reported previously. We need a bigger sample of renal transplants from expanded criteria donors, PRA and DSA test to support the results. PMID:27721962

  9. A decade of experience with renal transplantation in African-Americans.

    PubMed

    Foster, Clarence E; Philosophe, Benjamin; Schweitzer, Eugene J; Colonna, John O; Farney, Alan C; Jarrell, Bruce; Anderson, Leslie; Bartlett, Stephen T

    2002-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the strategies instituted by the authors' center to decrease the time to transplantation and increase the rate of transplantation for African-Americans, consisting of a formal education program concerning the benefits of living organ donation that is oriented to minorities; a laparoscopic living donation program; use of hepatitis C-positive donors in documented positive recipients; and encouraging vaccination for hepatitis B, allowing the use of hepatitis B core Ab-positive donors. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA The national shortage of suitable kidney donor organs has disproportional and adverse effects on African-Americans for several reasons. Type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension, major etiologic factors for end-stage renal disease, are more prevalent in African-Americans than in the general population. Once kidney failure has developed, African-Americans are disadvantaged for the following reasons: this patient cohort has longer median waiting times on the renal transplant list; African-Americans have higher rates of acute rejection, which affects long-term allograft survival; and once they are transplanted, the long-term graft survival rates are lower in this population than in other groups. METHODS From March 1990 to November 2001 the authors' center performed 2,167 renal transplants; 944 were in African-Americans (663 primary cadaver renal transplants and 253 primary Living donor renal transplants). The retransplants consisted of 83 cadaver transplants and 17 living donor transplants. Outcome measures of this retrospective analysis included median waiting time, graft and patient survival rates, and the rate of living donation in African-Americans and comparable non-African-Americans. Where applicable, data are compared to United Network for Organ Sharing national statistics. Statistical analysis employed appropriate SPSS applications. RESULTS One- and 5-year patient survival rates for living donor kidneys were 97.1% and 91.3% for non

  10. Literature review of passenger lymphocyte syndrome following renal transplantation and two case reports.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, L; Ashman, N; Thuraisingham, R; Barber, C; Allard, S; Green, L

    2013-06-01

    Passenger lymphocyte syndrome (PLS) is an immune-mediated hemolysis. It occurs following ABO blood group mismatched solid organ and/or bone marrow transplantation between donor and recipient. We report two cases of PLS occurring after renal transplantation. Both recipients received live related kidney transplants; one from his mother and the other from his brother. The direction of blood group transfer, from donor to recipient, was O Rh D+ to A Rh D+ in both cases. Approximately 12 days after transplantation, both recipients showed a rapid fall in their hemoglobin levels with no identifiable bleeding source. DAT positive hemolysis was confirmed and anti-A antibodies were detected in recipient sera, confirming a diagnosis of PLS. Both cases required blood transfusion support to maintain their hemoglobin and both had good renal outcomes. We have identified 99 PLS cases following renal transplant in the English literature. Previous ABO sensitization, donor blood group O to recipient blood group A or B transfer, and ciclosporin treatment have been identified as risk factors for PLS. Clinical outcomes in general are good; nonetheless, cases of graft failure and deaths have been reported. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are important in at risk individuals.

  11. Living donor liver transplantation in Brazil—current state

    PubMed Central

    Andraus, Wellington; D’Alburquerque, Luiz A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Currently in Brazil, living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) represents 8.5% of liver transplantation (LT), being the majority pediatric one. Up to now, according to Brazilian Organ Transplantation Association (ABTO) annual report, 2,086 procedures have been done nationwide, most of them in southeast and south regions. Based on national centers reports, biliary complication is the most common recipient postoperative complication (14.5–20.6%), followed by hepatic artery thrombosis (3.1–10.7%) and portal vein thrombosis (2.3–9.1%). Patient and graft overall 5-y survival correspond to 76% and 74%, respectively. Regarding the donor, morbidity rate ranges from 12.4% to 28.3%, with a national mortality rate of 0.14%. In conclusion, Brazilian LDLT programs enhance international experience that this is a feasible and safe procedure, as well as an excellent alternative strategy to overcome organs shortage. PMID:27115012

  12. Transplant recipients' conceptions of three key phenomena in transplantation: the organ donation, the organ donor, and the organ transplant.

    PubMed

    Sanner, Margareta A

    2003-08-01

    Thirty-five heart and kidney transplant patients were interviewed on five separate occasions during the first 2 yr after transplantation. The aim was to explore their experiences of phenomena that distinguish the transplantation from other kinds of medical treatment. The selection of informants was designed to permit comparisons between recipients with heart and kidney transplants and with living and necro-transplants. The qualitative analysis of the informants' reactions was focused on three themes; nine categories emerged. The first theme concerned general aspects of the donation and the donor and was differentiated in four categories: joy and sorrow, gratefulness and indebtedness, guilt, and inequity. The second theme related to the donor as a unique individual and included three categories: recognition and identification with the donor, influences of the donor, and relationship to the living donor. The third theme pertained to incorporation of the transplant and included two categories related to the naturalness of having a transplant, and the benevolent transplant. The informants' reactions were discussed in terms of primary and secondary processes. All informants were in an emotionally charged situation after transplantation and warded off anxiety-provoking impulses, most intensively during the first 6 months. Avoidance, suppression, and denial were the most common defence mechanisms, all of which seemed to be supported by the medical context. Other, more constructive strategies are suggested. The recipients' own interpretations of causes to possible personality changes are discussed. There were few differences between heart and necro-kidney patients concerning the reactions to the donation, the donor, and the transplant; the dividing line was more prominent between recipients with living and necro-transplants.

  13. The Kupffer Cell Number Affects the Outcome of Living Donor Liver Transplantation from Elderly Donors

    PubMed Central

    Hidaka, Masaaki; Eguchi, Susumu; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Soyama, Akihiko; Ono, Shinichiro; Adachi, Tomohiko; Natsuda, Koji; Kugiyama, Tota; Hara, Takanobu; Okada, Satomi; Imamura, Hajime; Miuma, Satoshi; Miyaaki, Hisamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Background There have been no previous reports how Kupffer cells affect the outcome of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) with an elderly donor. The aim of this study was to elucidate the influence of Kupffer cells on LDLT. Methods A total of 161 adult recipients underwent LDLT. The graft survival, prognostic factors for survival, and graft failure after LDLT were examined between cases with a young donor (<50, n = 112) and an elderly donor (≥50, N = 49). The Kupffer cells, represented by CD68-positive cell in the graft, were examined in the young and elderly donors. Results In a multivariable analysis, a donor older than 50 years, sepsis, and diabetes mellitus were significant predictors of graft failure after LDLT. The CD68 in younger donors was significantly more expressed than that in elderly donors. The group with a less number of CD68-positive cells in the graft had a significantly poor survival in the elderly donor group and prognostic factor for graft failure. Conclusions The worse outcome of LDLT with elderly donors might be related to the lower number of Kupffer cells in the graft, which can lead to impaired recovery of the liver function and may predispose patients to infectious diseases after LDLT. PMID:27819035

  14. Oral candidiasis in patients with renal transplants

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Gonzalo; de Arriba, Lorenzo; de Andrés, Amado

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Oral candidiasis (OC) is a frequent oral lesion in renal transplant patients (RTPs). Despite the increased prevalence of OC in RTPs, no study has examined related risk factors. The aims of this study were to analyze the prevalence of and risk factors for OC in RTPs compared with age- and gender-matched healthy control group (HC) as well as determine the incidence of OC after transplantation. Study Design: We analyzed the prevalence and risk factors of OC in a group of 500 RTPs (307 men, 193 women, mean age 53.63 years) and 501 HC subjects (314 men, 187 women, mean age 52.25 years). Demographic and pharmacological data were recorded for all subjects. Incident cases of OC were ascertained retrospectively from outpatient clinical records only in the RTP group. Results: The prevalence of OC was 7.4% in RTPs compared with 4.19% in HC (P<0.03). The most frequent type of OC in the two groups was denture stomatitis. Statistical association was found between OC and age, mycophenolate mofetil dose and blood levels, dentures and tobacco. The multiple logistic regression model only chose for denture variable. According to the outpatient clinical records, 24 RTPs suffered OC during the first moth post-transplant. Severe lesions affecting the oral cavity and pharynx appeared in 79% of the OC cases. Conclusions: This study shows a lower prevalence of OC in RTPs than previous reports. Denture stomatitis was the most frequent OC prevalence form described in RTPs. Severe candidiasis is more frequent in the immediate posttransplant period. The presence of denture is an important risk factor of OC. These results emphasise the importance of adequate pre- and post-transplant oral health and denture cleaning and adjustment is recommended for these subjects to prevent this infection. Key words:Oral candidiasis, immunosuppressive therapy, renal transplantation. PMID:23385511

  15. Donor preconditioning with a calcineurin inhibitor improves outcome in rat syngeneic kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shihab, Fuad S; Bennett, William M; Andoh, Takeshi F

    2009-02-15

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) in the early posttransplant period affects immediate graft function and late allograft dysfunction. This study determines the influence of pharmacologic preconditioning with a calcineurin inhibitor on IRI in a syngeneic F344 rat kidney transplant model. Donor rats were pretreated with one dose of cyclosporine (10 mg/kg) or tacrolimus (1 mg/kg) administered at 24 hr or 7 days before being subjected to 2 hr of cold ischemia and then transplanted. Pharmacologic preconditioning significantly improved renal function, as assessed by serum creatinine and inulin clearance, and histologic score versus vehicle-treated rats. There were no differences between cyclosporine and tacrolimus in the measured outcomes. This renoprotective effect, although not complete, was seen with only one dose of calcineurin inhibitor, and the effect was sustained for at least 7 days before IRI. This approach may represent a viable pharmacologic intervention to decrease IRI at the time of organ transplantation.

  16. Preparation for high altitude expedition and changes in cardiopulmonary and biochemical laboratory parameters with ascent to high altitude in transplant patients and live donors.

    PubMed

    Suh, Kyung-Suk; Kim, Taehoon; Yi, Nam-Joon; Hong, Geun

    2015-11-01

    High-altitude climbing has many risks, and transplant recipients should discuss the associated risks and means of preparation with their physicians. This study aimed to help prepare athletic transplant donors and recipients for mountain climbing and was designed to evaluate physical performance and changes in cardiopulmonary and biochemical laboratory parameters of transplant recipients and donors in extreme conditions of high altitude. Ten subjects-six liver transplant recipients, two liver donors, and one kidney transplant recipient and his donor-were selected for this expedition to Island Peak, Himalayas, Nepal. Six healthy subjects joined the group for comparison. Blood samplings, vital signs, and oxygen saturation were evaluated, as was the Lake Louise acute mountain sickness score. All transplant subjects and donors reached the base camp (5150 m), and two liver transplant recipients and a liver donor reached the summit (6189 m). The blood levels of immunosuppressants were well maintained. The serum erythropoietin level was significantly higher in transplant recipients taking tacrolimus. With proper preparation, certain liver transplant patients and donors can tolerate strenuous physical activity and can tolerate high altitude similarly to normal healthy control subjects without significant biochemical laboratory changes in liver and renal function.

  17. Pre-transplant Evaluation of Donor Urinary Biomarkers can Predict Reduced Graft Function After Deceased Donor Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Tai Yeon; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Lee, Yonggu; Ko, Kwang-Pil; Lee, Kyoung-Bun; Lee, Sik; Park, Suk Joo; Park, Jae Berm; Han, Miyeon; Lim, Hye Jin; Ahn, Curie; Yang, Jaeseok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several recipient biomarkers are reported to predict graft dysfunction, but these are not useful in decision making for the acceptance or allocation of deceased donor kidneys; thus, it is necessary to develop donor biomarkers predictive of graft dysfunction. To address this issue, we prospectively enrolled 94 deceased donors and their 109 recipients who underwent transplantation between 2010 and 2013 at 4 Korean transplantation centers. We investigated the predictive values of donor urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), and L-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) for reduced graft function (RGF). We also developed a prediction model of RGF using these donor biomarkers. RGF was defined as delayed or slow graft function. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to generate a prediction model, which was internally validated using a bootstrapping method. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the association of biomarkers with 1-year graft function. Notably, donor urinary NGAL levels were associated with donor AKI (P = 0.014), and donor urinary NGAL and L-FABP were predictive for RGF, with area under the receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUROC) of 0.758 and 0.704 for NGAL and L-FABP, respectively. The best-fit model including donor urinary NGAL, L-FABP, and serum creatinine conveyed a better predictive value for RGF than donor serum creatinine alone (P = 0.02). In addition, we generated a scoring method to predict RGF based on donor urinary NGAL, L-FABP, and serum creatinine levels. Diagnostic performance of the RGF prediction score (AUROC 0.808) was significantly better than that of the DGF calculator (AUROC 0.627) and the kidney donor profile index (AUROC 0.606). Donor urinary L-FABP levels were also predictive of 1-year graft function (P = 0.005). Collectively, these findings suggest donor urinary NGAL and L-FABP to be useful biomarkers for RGF, and support

  18. The Effect of Donor Age on Corneal Transplantation Outcome: Results of the Cornea Donor Study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine whether graft survival over a 5-year follow-up period using corneal tissue from donors older than 65 years of age is similar to graft survival using corneas from younger donors. Design Multi-center prospective, double-masked, controlled clinical trial Participants 1090 subjects undergoing corneal transplantation for a moderate risk condition (principally Fuchs’ dystrophy or pseudophakic corneal edema); 11 subjects with ineligible diagnoses were not included Methods 43 participating eye banks provided corneas from donors in the age range of 12 to 75 with endothelial cell densities of 2300 to 3300 cells/mm2, using a random approach without respect to recipient factors. The 105 participating surgeons at 80 sites were masked to information about the donor cornea including donor age. Surgery and post-operative care were performed according to the surgeons’ usual routines. Subjects were followed for five years. Main Outcome Measures Graft failure, defined as a regraft or a cloudy cornea that was sufficiently opaque as to compromise vision for a minimum of three consecutive months. Results The 5-year cumulative probability of graft survival was 86% in both the <66.0 donor age group and the ≥66.0 donor age group (difference = 0%, upper limit of one-sided 95% confidence interval = 4%). In a statistical model with donor age as a continuous variable, there was not a significant relationship between donor age and outcome (P=0.11). Three graft failures were due to primary donor failure, 8 to uncorrectable refractive error, 48 to graft rejection, 46 to endothelial decompensation (23 of which had a prior, resolved episode of probable or definite graft rejection), and 30 to other causes. The distribution of the causes of graft failure did not differ between donor age groups. Conclusions Five-year graft survival for cornea transplants at moderate risk for failure is similar using corneas from donors ≥ 66.0 years and donors < 66.0 years. Surgeons and

  19. Microhematuria after renal transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Butani, Lavjay; Berg, Gerre; Makker, Sudesh P

    2002-12-01

    The renal transplant (Tx) recipient is at risk for developing various complications including urolithiasis, the only manifestation of which may be hematuria. However, there are no data on the prevalence of microscopic hematuria in renal Tx recipients. The objective of our study was to determine the prevalence of microhematuria in our pediatric Tx patients and to investigate the causes of microhematuria. Records of all pediatric renal Tx recipients followed at our center from September 1999 to September 2000 were retrospectively reviewed; of the 21 patients, seven (33%) had persistent microscopic hematuria that was first noted 2.9 years post-Tx. Patients with and without hematuria had similar baseline characteristics. Only one patient had pre-existing hematuria that continued post-Tx. The etiology of hematuria in the other six patients was: recurrent IgA nephropathy (one patient), CMV nephritis (one patient), and unexplained (four patients). None had renal calculi or hypercalciuria. Three of the four patients with unexplained hematuria have chronic allograft nephropathy, and the fourth (original disease dysplasia) has hypocomplementemia. At their last follow-up, 5.3 years after onset of hematuria, all patients are alive with stable allograft function. In conclusion, microscopic hematuria is not uncommon in pediatric renal Tx recipients. While causes of post-Tx hematuria are diverse, stones are not commonly seen. Whether chronic allograft nephropathy per se can be implicated as a cause of hematuria remains to be determined. Renal biopsies should be considered at the onset of hematuria if proteinuria and/or deterioration in renal function are seen concomitantly, to look for recurrent or de novo glomerulonephritis.

  20. [Kidney donor with severe disseminated intravascular coagulation: transplantation however successful].

    PubMed

    Keeris, Lodewijk M; Bergmans, Dennis C J J; van der Sande, Frank M; Wind, Tineke J; van Suylen, Robert Jan; van Mook, Walther N K A

    2009-01-01

    A 41-year-old male, with no previous medical history, was admitted to our intensive care unit with severe isolated neurotrauma and a Glasgow Coma Scale of E1-M1-V1, mid-dilated unreactive pupils and severe abnormalities on the brain CT-scan. A severe syndrome of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and non-oliguric renal insufficiency developed. Following clinical and neurophysiological examination the patient was declared brain-dead, and the family gave permission for organ donation. The left kidney was transplanted and functioned well immediately. However, in view of the DIC and renal function disorders the right kidney was not considered usable for transplantation elsewhere. Pathological examination revealed many fibrin thrombi in the glomerular capillaries and acute tubular necrosis. This case supports the view that thrombotic microangiopathy in kidneys of patients with DIS, even with renal function impairment, is not an a priori reason for excluding donation.

  1. [New possibilities in kidney transplantation from live unrelated donors].

    PubMed

    Bosković, S

    1990-01-01

    The kidney transplantation, as a method of medical treatment, could not be developed faster in our country for many years. A number of demands for transplantation grows much faster than our modest capability. The similar, but in a rather smaller degree, this problem occurs in some other countries in the world. The main cause is: the organization of corpse collecting and the conservatism of doctors. The latter problem, in the countries of western hemisphere, is surpassed more easily by a doctor codex and a legal obligation that involves doctors actively in this process, which is not the case in our country. The organization of corpse collecting in some states of the USA is highly developed, but however it does not give sufficient number of organs for the cadaveric transplantation. New, additional possibilities are found: the taking of even organs (kidneys) from alive unrelated donors, spouses, which excludes the possibility of greed and gives, only in the USA, about 1.500 additional alive transplantations per year. The complementary medical attitude towards the increasing of number of cadaveric transplantations is: considerably freely taking of kidneys from cadavers without tissue compatibility, only with the compatibility of blood groups of ABO system. Since the immunological criteria, in our country, are very intensified by the Zagreb immunology group, e.g. from 75-100% for alive transplantation, or the minimum of 50% tissue compatibility for cadaveric transplantation, this old-fashioned attitude has considerably lowered the number of transplantations in our country.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Acute cardiac tamponade: an unusual cause of acute renal failure in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Nampoory, Naryanan; Gheith, Osama; Al-Otaibi, Torki; Halim, Medhat; Nair, Prasad; Said, Tarek; Mosaad, Ahmed; Al-Sayed, Zakareya; Alsayed, Ayman; Yagan, Jude

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of slow graft function in a renal transplant recipient caused by uremic acute pericardial effusion with tamponade. Urgent pericardiocentesis was done with an improvement in blood pressure, immediate diuresis, and quick recovery of renal function back to baseline. Pericardial tamponade should be included in consideration of causes of type 1 cardiorenal syndrome in renal transplant recipients.

  3. Alternative donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with post-transplantation cyclophosphamide for nonmalignant disorders

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Orly R.; Chen, Allen R.; Gamper, Christopher; Loeb, David; Zambidis, Elias; Llosa, Nicolas; Huo, Jeffrey; Dezern, Amy E.; Steppan, Diana; Robey, Nancy; Holuba, Mary Jo; Cooke, Kenneth R.; Symons, Heather J.

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic (allo-) hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is curative for many nonmalignant pediatric disorders, including hemoglobinopathies, bone marrow failure syndromes, and immunodeficiencies. There is great success using HLA-matched related donors for these patients; however, the use of alternative donors has been associated with increased graft failure, graft versus host disease (GVHD), and transplant-related mortality (TRM). HSCT using alternative donors with post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PT/Cy) for GVHD prophylaxis has been performed for hematologic malignancies with engraftment, GVHD, and TRM comparable to that seen with HLA-matched related donors. There are limited reports of HSCT in nonmalignant pediatric disorders other than hemoglobinopathies using alternative donors and PT/Cy. We transplanted eleven pediatric patients with life-threatening nonmalignant conditions using reduced intensity conditioning (RIC), alternative donors, and PT/Cy alone or in combination with tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. We observed limited GVHD, no TRM, and successful engraftment sufficient to eliminate manifestations of disease in all patients. Allo-HSCT using alternative donors and PT/Cy shows promise for curing nonmalignant disorders; development of prospective clinical trials to confirm these observations is warranted. PMID:26860634

  4. Renal Transplantation in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Outcome and Prognostic Factors in 50 Cases from a Single Centre

    PubMed Central

    Cairoli, Ernesto; Sanchez-Marcos, Carolina; Espinosa, Gerard; Glucksmann, Constanza; Ercilla, Guadalupe; Oppenheimer, Federico; Cervera, Ricard

    2014-01-01

    Background. End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Objectives. To analyze the outcome and prognostic factors of renal transplantation in patients with ESRD due to SLE from January 1986 to December 2013 in a single center. Results. Fifty renal transplantations were performed in 40 SLE patients (32 female (80%), mean age at transplantation 36 ± 10.4 years). The most frequent lupus nephropathy was type IV (72.2%). Graft failure occurred in a total of 15 (30%) transplantations and the causes of graft failure were chronic allograft nephropathy (n = 12), acute rejection (n = 2), and chronic humoral rejection (1). The death-censored graft survival rates were 93.9% at 1 year, 81.5% at 5 years, and 67.6% at the end of study. The presence of deceased donor allograft (P = 0.007) and positive anti-HCV antibodies (P = 0.001) negatively influence the survival of the renal transplant. The patient survival rate was 91.4% at the end of the study. Recurrence of lupus nephritis in renal allograft was observed in one patient. Conclusion. Renal transplantation is a good alternative for renal replacement therapy in patients with SLE. In our cohort, the presence of anti-HCV antibodies and the type of donor source were related to the development of graft failure. PMID:25013800

  5. Treosulfan-Based Conditioning Regimen in Sibling and Alternative Donor Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Children with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marzollo, Antonio; Calore, Elisabetta; Tumino, Manuela; Pillon, Marta; Gazzola, Maria Vittoria; Destro, Roberta; Colombatti, Raffaella; Marson, Piero; Tison, Tiziana; Colpo, Anna; Mainardi, Chiara; Gabelli, Maria; Boaro, Maria Paola; Rossin, Sara; Strano, Aurora; Quaglia, Nadia; Menzato, Federica; Basso, Giuseppe; Sainati, Laura; Messina, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives Lack of suitable donors and regimen related toxicity are major barriers for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). The aim of the study is the assessment of efficacy and toxicity of Treosulfan-based conditioning regimen for SCD also when alternative donors such as mismatched unrelated donor and haploidentical donor are employed. Methods We report our single-center experience: 11 patients with SCD received HSCT with a Treosulfan/Thiotepa/Fludarabine/Anti-thymoglobulin conditioning regimen between 2010 and 2015. The donor was a matched sibling donor (n= 7), a haploidentical parent (n= 2), a matched unrelated donor (n= 1) or a mismatched unrelated donor (n=1). The haploidentical and mismatched unrelated donor grafts were manipulated by removing TCRαβ and CD19 positive cells. Results All patients survived the procedure and achieved stable engraftment. Stable mixed chimerism was observed in 5/11 patients. Grade III–IV regimen related toxicity was limited to mucositis and no grade III–IV graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) occurred. No SCD manifestation was observed post transplant and cerebral vasculopathy improved in 3/5 evaluable patients. Organ function evaluation showed no pulmonary, cardiac or renal toxicity but gonadal failure occurred in 1/4 evaluable patients. Conclusion Our data suggest that Treosulfan is associated with low toxicity and may be employed also for unrelated and haploidentical donor HSCT. PMID:28293402

  6. ABO-Incompatible Living Donor Kidney Transplantation without Post-Transplant Therapeutic Plasma Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Yabu, J. M.; Fontaine, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Blood group incompatibility remains a significant barrier to kidney transplantation. Approximately one-third of donors are blood group incompatible with their intended recipient. Options for these donor-recipient pairs include blood group incompatible transplantation or kidney paired donation. However, the optimal protocol for blood group incompatible transplantation is unknown. Protocols differ in techniques to remove ABO antibodies, titer targets and immunosuppression regimens. In addition, the mechanisms of graft accommodation to blood group antigens remain poorly understood. We describe a blood group incompatible protocol using pre-transplant therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE), high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab in addition to prednisone, mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus. In this protocol, we do not exclude patients based on a high initial titer and do not implement post-transplant TPE. All 16 patients who underwent this protocol received a living donor transplant with 100 percent patient and graft survival, and no reported episodes of antibody-mediated rejection to date with a median follow-up of 2.6 years (range 0.75 to 4.7 years). We conclude that blood group incompatible transplantation can be achieved without post-transplant TPE. PMID:25739580

  7. Paricalcitol for Secondary Hyperparathyroidism in Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Trillini, Matias; Cortinovis, Monica; Ruggenenti, Piero; Reyes Loaeza, Jorge; Courville, Karen; Ferrer-Siles, Claudia; Prandini, Silvia; Gaspari, Flavio; Cannata, Antonio; Villa, Alessandro; Perna, Annalisa; Gotti, Eliana; Caruso, Maria Rosa; Martinetti, Davide; Perico, Norberto

    2015-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism contributes to post-transplant CKD mineral and bone disorder. Paricalcitol, a selective vitamin D receptor activator, decreased serum parathyroid hormone levels and proteinuria in patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism. This single-center, prospective, randomized, crossover, open-label study compared the effect of 6-month treatment with paricalcitol (1 μg/d for 3 months and then uptitrated to 2 µg/d if tolerated) or nonparicalcitol therapy on serum parathyroid hormone levels (primary outcome), mineral metabolism, and proteinuria in 43 consenting recipients of renal transplants with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Participants were randomized 1:1 according to a computer-generated sequence. Compared with baseline, median (interquartile range) serum parathyroid hormone levels significantly declined on paricalcitol from 115.6 (94.8–152.0) to 63.3 (52.0–79.7) pg/ml (P<0.001) but not on nonparicalcitol therapy. At 6 months, levels significantly differed between treatments (P<0.001 by analysis of covariance). Serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin decreased on paricalcitol therapy only and significantly differed between treatments at 6 months (P<0.001 for all comparisons). At 6 months, urinary deoxypyridinoline-to-creatinine ratio and 24-hour proteinuria level decreased only on paricalcitol (P<0.05). L3 and L4 vertebral mineral bone density, assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorption, significantly improved with paricalcitol at 6 months (P<0.05 for both densities). Paricalcitol was well tolerated. Overall, 6-month paricalcitol supplementation reduced parathyroid hormone levels and proteinuria, attenuated bone remodeling and mineral loss, and reduced eGFR in renal transplant recipients with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Long-term studies are needed to monitor directly measured GFR, ensure that the bone remodeling and mineral effects are sustained, and determine if the reduction in proteinuria improves renal and

  8. [Surgical complications in 479 renal transplantations].

    PubMed

    Borrego, J; Burgos, F J; Galmes, I; Orofino, L; Rodríguez Luna, J M; Marcen, R; Fernández, E; Escudero, A; Ortuño, J

    1994-04-01

    Exposition of results obtained from the review of the surgical complications found in a series of 479 renal transplantations performed between 1978 and 1992 in our centre, although some of them lack clinical relevance. There was fluid accumulation in 69 patients, distributed between 31 perirenal haematoma. 17 lymphocele, 13 urinoma, 5 perirenal abscesses and 3 mixed. 27.7% required no action. Frequency of renal rupture was 18 cases, 9 due to acute rejection and 9 to vascular thrombosis. Incidence of urinary obstruction was 4.8% with 5.8% of urinary fistula. With regard to the surgical wound, 9 infections, 7 haematomas, 1 eventration and 1 necrotizing fasciitis were observed. Vascular complications consisted in 10 arterial thrombosis, 10 venous thrombosis, 5 mixed thrombosis and 31 arterial stenosis. Treatment instituted for the various cases, its evolution, and an statistical study of risk factors are illustrated.

  9. [Pregnancy in patients with renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Chocair, P R; Ianhez, L E; de Paula, F J; Sabbaga, E; Arap, S

    1989-01-01

    From 1969 to 1987, 35 pregnancies occurred in 31 women with renal transplant. Four of them were still pregnant when this study was concluded. There was one ectopic pregnancy. All patients received azathioprine and prednisone. In the majority of patients the glomerular filtration rate increased in a way similar to normal pregnant women. In five cases there was a progressive loss in renal function. In four of them this was attributed to preexistent renal damage. No toxemia occurred. Anemia developed during 11 pregnancies and blood transfusion was required for five women. Four patients had urinary tract infection which was easily controlled with antibiotics. One patient had severe arterial hypertension, secondary to chronic rejection. One patient developed jaundice reverted with reduction in azathioprine doses. One woman died of septicemia secondary to fetal death, during the 6th month of pregnancy. Twenty children were born with no abnormalities, although many of them were underweighted. Two thirds of pregnancies were delivered by cesarean section. No harm to the pelvic allograft occurred in vaginal deliveries. There have been 4 abortions (2 of them were induced with no medical indication). Four pregnancies (26 to 39 gestational weeks) ended in stillborn babies: the mothers had impaired renal function associated with hypertension and proteinuria. One newborn died of pulmonary infection two days after delivery. Another was born with microcephaly and polydactilia and survived 6 years. No breast feeding was allowed.

  10. Artificial corneas versus donor corneas for repeat corneal transplants

    PubMed Central

    Akpek, Esen K; Alkharashi, Majed; Hwang, Frank S; Ng, Sueko M; Lindsley, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals who have failed one or more full thickness penetrating keratoplasties (PKs) may be offered repeat corneal surgery using an artificial or donor cornea. An artificial or prosthetic cornea is known as a keratoprosthesis. Both donor and artificial corneal transplantations involve removal of the diseased and opaque recipient cornea (or the previously failed cornea) and replacement with another donor or prosthetic cornea. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of artificial versus donor corneas in individuals who have had one or more failed donor corneal transplantations. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2013, Issue 10), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to November 2013), EMBASE (January 1980 to November 2013), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to November 2013), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 27 November 2013. Selection criteria Two review authors independently assessed reports from the electronic searches to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or controlled clinical trials (CCTs). We resolved discrepancies by discussion or consultation with a third review author. Data collection and analysis For discussion purposes, we assessed findings from observational cohort studies and non-comparative case series. No data synthesis was performed. Main results We did not identify any RCTs or CCTs comparing artificial corneas with donor corneas for repeat corneal transplantations. Authors

  11. Intravenous Renal Cell Transplantation for Polycystic Kidney Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    improves renal function and structure in other models of renal failure: CKD due to cisplatin-mediated injury (4), diabetic nephropathy (Am J Physiol...cells prevents progression of chronic renal failure in rats with ischemic- diabetic nephropathy . Am J Physiol. Renal. 305:F1804- F1812 6. Mason SB...successful long-term kidney cell engraftment and renal regeneration in diabetic nephropathy and also cell auto-transplants (9). We used adult

  12. Dilemma of HCV Infection in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Ashry Ahmed Gheith, Osama

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus, which usually starts during dialysis therapy, is currently the main cause of chronic liver disease in such population. The majority of patients acquired the disease through intravenous drug use or blood transfusion, with some risk factors identified. In this review we are dealing with the effect of renal transplantation on HCV infection and HCV-related complications after renal transplantation. Moreover, we are discussing the therapeutic options of HCV infection before and after renal transplantation, the best immunosuppressive protocol and lastly graft and patient survival in patients who underwent pretransplant management vs. those who were transplanted without treatment. PMID:21660304

  13. [Impact of the Hospital Coordinator Program on obtaining kidneys for renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Milanés, C L; Almao, R R; Pastor-Leal, J; Martínez, E; Martínez, L; Salgado, O; Fernández, A; Maldonado, G; García-Zozaya, J L; Weisinger, J

    1995-12-01

    Limited organ supply is currently the major obstacle to the transplantation programs around the world. As an alternative to increase the organ donation rate, we undertook a preliminary transplant coordinator program study, during a 6 month period, in five public hospitals, as part of the National Transplant Program of the Centro Nacional de Diálisis y Trasplante. The primary objective of the Transplant Coordinator Program was donor detection and organ procurement, along with education of the community. Forty five predonors were detected, with an average age of 25.8 +/- 1.6 years, of these, 36 were men (80%). None of them was a voluntary donor. The most frequent diagnoses were cranial trauma in 57.8% and stroke in 22.2% Forty two percent (42.3%) of the predonors were detected in the emergency room, 33.3% in intensive care units and 24.4% in the surgery recovery room. The conversion rate of predonors to donors were 29%. The main causes for not conversion of predonors into donors were: family refusal 44%, sepsis 13%, cardiac arrest 13%, and reduced renal function 6%. In conclusion, the Transplant Coordinator Program allows to increase the predonor detection and gives good information for adequate management of donor and public educational campaign about the subject.

  14. Transplantation of Deceased Donor Livers With Elevated Levels of Serum Transaminases at Shiraz Transplant Center

    PubMed Central

    Fakhar, Nasir; Nikeghbalian, Saman; Kazemi, Kourosh; Shamsayeefar, Ali Reza; Gholami, Siavash; Kasraianfard, Amir; Malek-Hosseini, Seyed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background The current organ shortage has prompted the use of marginal organs. We conducted this retrospective study to present our experience with transplanting deceased donor livers with elevated levels of serum transaminases and to explain whether elevated levels of serum transaminases in donors affect allograft function and survival of the recipients. Methods Data of deceased donor livers and patients, who underwent liver transplantation from March 2013 to March 2015 at Shiraz center for organ transplantation, was reviewed. Liver donors with aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and/or alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level of more than 500 IU/l and their related recipients were considered as the case group (n = 24) and the others were considered as the control group (n = 834). Results In the case group, the medians of levels of serum AST and ALT of donors were 834 ± 425 IU/L (range: 250 - 2285) and 507 ± 367 IU/L (range: 100 - 1600), respectively. Recipients were followed for a median of 13.6 ± 9 months (range: 7 - 28.4). Post-transplant complications were acute rejection (n = 5), infection (n = 3), portal vein thrombosis (n = 3), bile duct stricture (n = 1), and hepatic artery stenosis (n = 1). The one-year survival rate of the patients was 91.7%. Demographics, post-transplant complications and one-year survival rates were not significantly different between the two study groups. Conclusions Transplanting deceased donor livers with markedly elevated liver enzymes may be an acceptable choice for expanding the donor pool. PMID:27882068

  15. Successful transplantation of kidneys from elderly circulatory death donors by using microscopic and macroscopic characteristics to guide single or dual implantation.

    PubMed

    Mallon, D H; Riddiough, G E; Summers, D M; Butler, A J; Callaghan, C J; Bradbury, L L; Bardsley, V; Broecker, V; Saeb-Parsy, K; Torpey, N; Bradley, J A; Pettigrew, G J

    2015-11-01

    Most kidneys from potential elderly circulatory death (DCD) donors are declined. We report single center outcomes for kidneys transplanted from DCD donors over 70 years old, using preimplantation biopsy Remuzzi grading to inform implantation as single or dual transplants. Between 2009 and 2012, 43 single transplants and 12 dual transplants were performed from elderly DCD donors. Remuzzi scores were higher for dual than single implants (4.4 vs. 3.4, p < 0.001), indicating more severe baseline injury. Donor and recipient characteristics for both groups were otherwise similar. Early graft loss from renal vein thrombosis occurred in two singly implanted kidneys, and in one dual-implanted kidney; its pair continued to function satisfactorily. Death-censored graft survival at 3 years was comparable for the two groups (single 94%; dual 100%), as was 1 year eGFR. Delayed graft function occurred less frequently in the dual-implant group (25% vs. 65%, p = 0.010). Using this approach, we performed proportionally more kidney transplants from elderly DCD donors (23.4%) than the rest of the United Kingdom (7.3%, p < 0.001), with graft outcomes comparable to those achieved nationally for all deceased-donor kidney transplants. Preimplantation biopsy analysis is associated with acceptable transplant outcomes for elderly DCD kidneys and may increase transplant numbers from an underutilized donor pool.

  16. Summary of the British Transplantation Society UK Guidelines for Living Donor Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Manas, Derek; Burnapp, Lisa; Andrews, Peter Antony

    2016-06-01

    The British Transplantation Society Guidelines for Living Donor Liver Transplantation was published in July 2015 and is the first national guideline in the field of living donor liver transplantation. The guideline aims to review the evidence relating to the evaluation process of both recipient and donor candidates; address the moral and ethical issues surrounding the procedure; outline the technical aspects of the procedure, including the middle hepatic vein controversy and the "small for size syndrome"; review donor and recipient outcomes and complications including donor mortality; and examine evidence relating to the advantages and disadvantages of living donor liver transplantation. In line with previous guidelines published by the BTS, the guideline has used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system to rate the strength of evidence and recommendations. This article summarizes the Statements of Recommendation contained in the guideline, which provide a framework for the delivery of living liver donation in the United Kingdom and may be of wide international interest. It is recommended that the full guideline document is consulted for details of the relevant references and evidence base. This may be accessed at http://www.bts.org.uk/BTS/Guidelines_Standards/Current/BTS/Guidelines_Standards/Current_Guidelines.aspx?hkey=e285ca32-5920-4613-ac08-fa9fd90915b5.

  17. Interventional radiological treatment of renal transplant complications: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Iezzi, Roberto; la Torre, Michele Fabio; Santoro, Marco; Dattesi, Roberta; Nestola, Massimiliano; Posa, Alessandro; Romagnoli, Jacopo; Citterio, Franco; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with chronic renal failure, which produces a dramatic improvement in the quality of life and survival rates, in comparison to long-term dialysis. Nowadays, new imaging modalities allow early diagnosis of complications, and thanks to the recent developments of interventional techniques, surgery may be avoided in most cases. Knowledge in the types of renal transplant complications is fundamental for a correct pre-operative planning. In this article, we described the most common or clinically relevant renal transplant complications and explained their interventional management.

  18. Interventional Radiological Treatment of Renal Transplant Complications: A Pictorial Review

    PubMed Central

    la Torre, Michele Fabio; Santoro, Marco; Dattesi, Roberta; Nestola, Massimiliano; Posa, Alessandro; Romagnoli, Jacopo; Citterio, Franco; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with chronic renal failure, which produces a dramatic improvement in the quality of life and survival rates, in comparison to long-term dialysis. Nowadays, new imaging modalities allow early diagnosis of complications, and thanks to the recent developments of interventional techniques, surgery may be avoided in most cases. Knowledge in the types of renal transplant complications is fundamental for a correct pre-operative planning. In this article, we described the most common or clinically relevant renal transplant complications and explained their interventional management. PMID:25995689

  19. Ascorbic acid against reperfusion injury in human renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Norio, Karri; Wikström, Mårten; Salmela, Kaija; Kyllönen, Lauri; Lindgren, Leena

    2003-08-01

    The cadaveric renal graft is exposed to ischaemic injury during preservation and to oxidative damage during reperfusion. Both these mechanisms are known to cause cell damage, which may impair graft function. Reperfusion injury (RPI) is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Ascorbic acid (AA) is a potent physiological extracellular scavenger of ROS. We perfused 31 renal grafts immediately before implantation with a solution of Euro-Collins containing 0.5 mg/ml of AA to diminish RPI. From every donor, the contralateral kidney served as a control. The control grafts were perfused with the same perfusion as those of the AA group, only without the AA substitution. We assessed the effect of AA by recording serum creatinine, creatinine clearance, initial graft function and early rejections. The incidence of delayed graft function (DGF) was 32% in the AA group, and 29% in the control group. Other parameters were also similar in both groups, except for the length of DGF, which showed a trend towards a shorter duration in the AA group. The pre-operative systemic AA concentration was significantly ( P=0.01) lower in the haemodialysis patients than in those on peritoneal dialysis. In conclusion, this clinical study could not demonstrate significant benefits of AA in renal transplantation.

  20. Genetic diversity through human leukocyte antigen typing in end-stage renal disease patients and prospective donors of North India.

    PubMed

    Chowdhry, Mohit; Makroo, Raj Nath; Kumar, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    As the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is rapidly increasing, the demand for dialysis and transplantation has dramatically increased, which has led to concerns about the availability and equitable allocation of kidneys for transplantation. The distribution of HLA-A, B and DR alleles in 148 renal transplant recipients and 191 live related prospective donors from 2009 to 2010 were analyzed. Allele frequencies and haplotype frequencies were calculated in recipients and donors. The prospective donors were further analyzed on the basis of their relationship to the patients and according to the sex ratio. A significant female preponderance was noted in the prospective donor population, most of whom were either siblings or parents of the recipients. On the contrary, the recipient population predominantly comprised of males. The most frequent HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1 alleles in renal transplant patients were HLA-AFNx0111, AFNx0102, AFNx0101, AFNx0124; HLA-BFNx0135, BFNx0140, BFNx0144, BFNx0115, BFNx0152, and HLA-DRB1FNx0115, DRB1FNx0107, DRB1FNx0113, DRB1FNx0111 respectively. The most frequent HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1 alleles in prospective donors were HLA-AFNx0102, AFNx0111, AFNx0133, AFNx0124; HLA-BFNx0135, BFNx0144, BFNx0140, BFNx0115 and HLA-DRB1FNx0115, DRB1FNx0107, DRB1FNx0111, DRB1FNx0113 respectively. AFNx0111-BFNx0135, AFNx0102-DRB1FNx0115, BFNx0140-DRB1FNx0115 were the most common HLA A-B , HLA A-DR, HLA B-DR haplotypes respectively in renal transplant patients, whereas, AFNx0111-BFNx0135, AFNx0111-DRB1FNx0115, BFNx0144-DRB1FNx0107 were the most common haplotypes in renal donors. In three locus haplotype, HLA-AFNx0102-BFNx0140-DRB1FNx0115 was the most frequent haplotype in patients, whereas, in prospective renal donors HLA-AFNx0133-BFNx0144-DRB1FNx0107 was the most frequent haplotype.

  1. Donor-derived metastatic melanoma in a liver transplant recipient established by DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Muhammad; Eason, James D; Das, Kanak; Sylvestre, Pamela B; Dean, Amanda G; Vanatta, Jason M

    2013-10-01

    Metastatic melanoma is a donor-derived malignancy that has rarely been reported in liver allograft recipients. We present a case of a transmitted donor-derived melanoma to a liver allograft recipient in whom the diagnosis was established by polymerase chain reaction-based DNA fingerprinting. A 52-year-old African-American man underwent a successful orthotropic liver transplant for alcohol-induced cirrhosis. One year after the orthotropic liver transplant, he presented at our institution with diffuse abdominal pain, and a computed tomography scan of the abdomen and chest showed innumerable masses diffusely involving the liver and multiple subcutaneous nodules in the abdominal and chest wall. A liver biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic melanoma. The origin of melanoma was traced to the donor by DNA fingerprinting of the native liver, the donor liver, and the donor gallbladder. Chemotherapy was initiated with temozolomide (75 mg/m² daily) and thalidomide (50 mg daily), to which he responded within 8 weeks with radiologic improvement in metastatic lesions. Tacrolimus was switched to sirolimus because of renal insufficiency as well as reported effectiveness against melanoma. Our patient survived for 9 months after the diagnosis of metastatic melanoma. He ultimately died of brain metastases. Donor-derived metastatic melanoma is a rare cancer with the highest transmission and mortality rates, which requires better recognition. Prompt diagnosis of donor-derived melanoma is critical and can be achieved reliably with polymerase chain reaction-based DNA analysis. Management options after diagnosis include de-escalation of immunosuppression, with or without urgent organ removal or retransplant. The roles of chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and radiotherapy require further study.

  2. Cryptococcal meningitis presenting as sinusitis in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Iyer, S P; Movva, K; Wiebel, M; Chandrasekar, P; Alangaden, G; Carron, M; Tranchida, P; Revankar, S G

    2013-10-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is a relatively common invasive fungal infection in immunocompromised patients, especially in solid organ transplant recipients. Clinical presentation typically includes fever, headache, photophobia, neck stiffness, and/or altered mental status. Unusual presentations may delay diagnosis. Therapy is challenging in renal transplant patients because of the nephrotoxicity associated with amphotericin B, the recommended treatment. We present a case of cryptococcal meningitis in a renal transplant recipient presenting as acute sinusitis with successful treatment using fluconazole as primary therapy.

  3. Haploidentical Related Donor Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for DOCK8 Deficiency Using Post-Transplantation Cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nirali N; Freeman, Alexandra F; Su, Helen; Cole, Kristen; Parta, Mark; Moutsopoulos, Niki M; Baris, Safa; Karakoc-Aydiner, Elif; Hughes, Thomas E; Kong, Heidi H; Holland, Steve M; Hickstein, Dennis D

    2017-03-10

    Dedicator-of-Cytokinesis-8 (DOCK8) deficiency, a primary immunodeficiency disease, can be reversed by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT); however, there are few reports describing the use of alternative donor sources for HSCT in DOCK8 deficiency. We describe HSCT for patients with DOCK8 deficiency who lack a matched related or unrelated donor using bone marrow from haploidentical related donors and post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PT/CY) for GVHD prophylaxis. Seven patients with DOCK8 deficiency (median age 20 years, range 7-25 years) received a haploidentical related donor HSCT. The conditioning regimen included 2 days of low-dose cyclophosphamide, 5 days of fludarabine, three days of busulfan, and 200 cGy TBI. Graft-versus host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis consisted of post-transplant cyclophosphamide (PT/CY) 50 mg/kg/day on days +3 and +4, and tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil starting at day +5. The median times to neutrophil and platelet engraftment were 15 and 19 days, respectively. All patients attained >90% donor engraftment by day +30. Four subjects developed acute GVHD (one with maximum grade 3). No patient developed chronic GVHD. With a median follow-up time of 20.6 months (range 9.5 - 31.7 months), 6 of 7 patients are alive and disease-free. Haploidentical related donor HSCT with PT/CY represents an effective therapeutic approach for patients with DOCK8 deficiency who lack a matched related or unrelated donor.

  4. Hepatitis with Australia antigenemia following renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Aronoff, Alex; Gault, Mathew H.; Huang, Shao-Nan; Lal, Stephan; Wu, Kwang-Tzen; Moinuddin, M.D.; Spence, Leslie; MacLean, Lloyd D.

    1973-01-01

    Over a seven-year period 18 of 125 patients who underwent renal transplantation developed hepatitis. Acute hepatic necrosis occurred in two, chronic aggressive hepatitis progressing to posthepatitic cirrhosis in eight, chronic persistent hepatitis in five, acute hepatitis with recovery in two and cholestatic hepatitis in one. Hepatic failure was the cause of death in four and a major contributing factor in three. Fifteen of the 18 were of blood Group A. After renal transplantation Australia antigen (Au) was present in the blood of 12 of the 15 patients with hepatitis who were tested and in one of 38 patients without clinical evidence of liver disease. Once present, Au persisted in all patients but one. Particles measuring 210 to 250 Å, characteristic of Au, were seen in liver cells by electronmicroscopy in nine of the 10 patients examined who had hepatitis with Australia antigenemia, but they were not seen in the two patients studied with Au-negative hepatitis. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:4566289

  5. Vascular management during live donor nephrectomy: an online survey among transplant surgeons.

    PubMed

    Janki, S; Verver, D; Klop, K W J; Friedman, A L; Peters, T G; Ratner, L E; Ijzermans, J N M; Dor, F J M F

    2015-06-01

    In 2006, a survey from the American Society of Transplant Surgeons disclosed significant and sometimes fatal hemorrhagic events in live donor nephrectomies (LDN) related to failure of clips, leading to the contraindication of the Weck® Hem-o-lok® clip for control of the renal artery during LDN. A survey regarding vascular control techniques, their perceived safety ratings and their failures was sent to 645 European Society for Organ Transplantation members who profiled their profession as "surgeon" and selected "kidney" as organ type. Two hundred forty-three (41%) members responded, of whom 171 (63.3%) independently perform LDN. Their responses were analyzed. For arterial and venous vascular control, the GIA™ and TA™stapler are used most frequently, and were rated the safest. Of the 121 reported hemorrhagic events, slippage and dislodgement of clips occurred at least 58 times, while stapler malfunction occurred at least 40 times. One donor death from hemorrhage related to clip dysfunction was reported. Hemorrhagic complications of LDN with fatal and non-fatal outcomes still occur. Strikingly, many surgeons do not use the vascular closing technique that they consider most safe. Failure of non-transfixion techniques is associated with greater risks for the donor. Control of major vessels in LDN must employ transfixion techniques for optimal donor safety.

  6. Delayed Gastric Emptying after Living Donor Hepatectomy for Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Griesemer, Adam D.; Parsons, Ronald F.; Graham, Jay A.; Emond, Jean C.; Samstein, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Delayed gastric emptying is a significant postoperative complication of living donor hepatectomy for liver transplantation and may require endoscopic or surgical intervention in severe cases. Although the mechanism of posthepatectomy delayed gastric emptying remains unknown, vagal nerve injury during intraoperative dissection and adhesion formation postoperatively between the stomach and cut liver surface are possible explanations. Here, we present the first reported case of delayed gastric emptying following fully laparoscopic hepatectomy for living donor liver transplantation. Additionally, we also present a case in which symptoms developed after open right hepatectomy, but for which dissection for left hepatectomy was first performed. Through our experience and these two specific cases, we favor a neurovascular etiology for delayed gastric emptying after hepatectomy. PMID:25610698

  7. Can deceased donor with recurrent primary brain tumor donate kidneys for transplantation?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Suresh; Modi, Pranjal R.; Pal, Bipin C.; Modi, Jayesh

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation from deceased donors is in its infancy in India. Cadaver organ donation was accepted legally in 1994 by the “Human Organs Transplantation Act.” Marginal donors are now accepted by many centers for kidney transplantation. We report a case of procurement of both kidneys from a young deceased donor having recurrent primary brain tumor, transplanted into two adult recipients with successful outcome. PMID:26941500

  8. New options for the management of hyperparathyroidism after renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Douthat, Walter Guillermo; Chiurchiu, Carlos Raul; Massari, Pablo Ulises

    2012-01-01

    The persistence and severity of hyperparathyroidism (HPT) post-renal transplantation is relatively frequent and primarily associated with the timing and its magnitude in the pre-transplant period and with the presence of parathyroid adenomas. HPT after renal transplantation is clinically manifested with hypercalcemia, hypophosphatemia, bone pain, fractures, and in more serious cases with cardiovascular calcifications that affect the survival. The primary clinical objective for patients with secondary HPT after renal transplantation is to obtain a level of parathyroid hormone (PTH) adequate to the renal transplanted function and to normalize levels of calcium, phosphorus and vitamin D. In many cases during this period, the development of hypercalcemia and/or hypophosphatemia makes it necessary to take different therapeutic measures. The use of vitamin D or its analogues has been extrapolated from the management of pre-transplant HPT obtaining variable outcomes, although its use is limited by its capacity to produce hypercalcemia. Calcimimetics are drugs that have proven be effective in reducing PTH levels in patients with HPT on dialysis and has been effective in reducing up to 50% PTH levels in moderate to severe HPT in post-renal transplantation.When HPT persists after renal transplantation and does not respond to medical treatment, invasive management by percutaneous ethanol injection therapy of parathyroid glands or parathyroidectomy should be considered. The emergence of new methods for the management of HPT expands the availability of therapeutic tools for transplant patients. PMID:24175195

  9. Complications of renal transplantation: evaluation with US and radionuclide imaging.

    PubMed

    Brown, E D; Chen, M Y; Wolfman, N T; Ott, D J; Watson, N E

    2000-01-01

    Following renal transplantation, patients are often evaluated with ultrasonography (US) or radionuclide imaging to assess renal function and the presence of possible complications. Both modalities are inexpensive, noninvasive, and nonnephrotoxic. A basic understanding of the surgical techniques commonly used for renal transplantation is useful when imaging these patients in order to recognize complications and to direct further imaging or intervention. The most frequent complications of renal transplantation include perinephric fluid collections; decreased renal function; and abnormalities of the vasculature, collecting system, and renal parenchyma. Perinephric fluid collections are common following transplantation, and their clinical significance depends on the type, location, size, and growth of the fluid collection, features that are well-evaluated with US. Causes of diminished renal function include acute tubular necrosis, rejection, and toxicity from medications. Radionuclide imaging is the most useful modality for assessing renal function. Vascular complications of transplantation include occlusion or stenosis of the arterial or venous supply, arteriovenous fistulas, and pseudoaneurysms. Although the standard for evaluating these vascular complications is angiography, US is an excellent noninvasive method for screening. Other transplant complications such as abnormalities of the collecting system and renal parenchyma are well-evaluated with both radionuclide imaging and US.

  10. Gut microbiota and renal transplant outcome.

    PubMed

    Ardalan, Mohammadreza; Vahed, Sepideh Zununi

    2017-03-28

    Gaining long-term graft function and patient survival remain a critical challenge following kidney transplantation. Genetic and environmental factors do not completely account for the individual's graft outcome. Recently, it is reported that gut microbial community (microbiota) is associated with complications in kidney allograft recipients, as well. Commensal microbiota plays a significant role in the immunomodulation of transplant recipient responses. Different factors can disrupt the reciprocal interaction between microbiota and the host immune responses and lead to infection and rejection complications in the organ recipient. In this review, we address the relation between microbiota and immune system along with their possible roles in renal graft outcome. We next highlight the beneficial effects of probiotics on the management of kidney diseases and solid organ transplantation. Finally, we reflect on the potential impacts of probiotics on host physiology. Hopefully, a deeper understanding of the function and composition of microbiota can help clinics develop strategies to restore the normal microbiota and facilitate the clinical management of grafts in the forthcoming future.

  11. Donor-derived tuberculosis (TB): isoniazid-resistant TB transmitted from a lung transplant donor with inadequately treated latent infection.

    PubMed

    Jensen, T O; Darley, D R; Goeman, E E; Shaw, K; Marriott, D J; Glanville, A R

    2016-10-01

    Donor-derived tuberculosis (TB) is an increasingly recognized complication of solid organ transplantation. We report a case of isoniazid-resistant pulmonary TB in a lung transplant recipient. The patient acquired the infection from the lung donor who was previously empirically treated with isoniazid for latent TB. The case highlights the caveat that, while adequate treatment of latent TB with isoniazid is presumed, meticulous screening of donors is required.

  12. Pediatric donor cell leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in AML patient from related donor.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Pimentel-Gutiérrez, Helia J; Gallegos-Castorena, Sergio; Paniagua-Padilla, Jenny A; Ortega-de-la-Torre, Citlalli; Sánchez-Zubieta, Fernando; Silva-Cruz, Rocio; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Zepeda-Moreno, Abraham; González-Ramella, Oscar; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a male patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially diagnosed as M5 and with karyotype 46,XY. After induction therapy, he underwent a HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and six years later he relapsed as AML M1 with an abnormal karyotype //47,XX,+10[2]/47,XX,+11[3]/48,XX,+10,+11[2]/46,XX[13]. Based on this, we tested the possibility of donor cell origin by FISH and molecular STR analysis. We found no evidence of Y chromosome presence by FISH and STR analysis consistent with the success of the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from the female donor. FISH studies confirmed trisomies and no evidence of MLL translocation either p53 or ATM deletion. Additionally 28 fusion common leukemia transcripts were evaluated by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay and were not rearranged. STR analysis showed a complete donor chimerism. Thus, donor cell leukemia (DCL) was concluded, being essential the use of cytological and molecular approaches. Pediatric DCL is uncommon, our patient seems to be the sixth case and additionally it presented a late donor cell leukemia appearance. Different extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms have been considered to explain this uncommon finding as well as the implications to the patient.

  13. Living donor liver transplantation in Taiwan-challenges beyond surgery.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Vinod G; Chen, Chao-Long

    2016-04-01

    Taiwan has a high prevalence of hepatitis B and C viral infections, and consequently a high burden of chronic liver diseases. Liver transplantation (LT) began in Taiwan in 1984, and living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) in 1994. Education and collaboration between physicians on a national and international scale were important factors in the development of transplantation in East Asia. Technical innovations in donor hepatectomy, vascular and biliary reconstruction, and interventional radiology, perioperative management of transplant patients and development of associated specialties have enabled achievement of excellent results after both adult and pediatric LDLT. The establishment of rigorous protocols to withstand strict medico-legal scrutiny, combined with technical excellence has contributed to excellent surgical outcomes. The socioeconomic development of Taiwan and the first nationwide hepatitis B vaccination program in the world have also contributed to the decrease in disease burden and improvement of quality of healthcare. This article examines the factors enabling the development of LT in Taiwan, the innovations that have contributed to excellent outcomes, and indicates the future prospects of LDLT in Taiwan.

  14. Donor Hemodynamics as a Predictor of Outcomes After Kidney Transplantation From Donors After Cardiac Death.

    PubMed

    Allen, M B; Billig, E; Reese, P P; Shults, J; Hasz, R; West, S; Abt, P L

    2016-01-01

    Donation after cardiac death is an important source of transplantable organs, but evidence suggests donor warm ischemia contributes to inferior outcomes. Attempts to predict recipient outcome using donor hemodynamic measurements have not yielded statistically significant results. We evaluated novel measures of donor hemodynamics as predictors of delayed graft function and graft failure in a cohort of 1050 kidneys from 566 donors. Hemodynamics were described using regression line slopes, areas under the curve, and time beyond thresholds for systolic blood pressure, oxygen saturation, and shock index (heart rate divided by systolic blood pressure). A logistic generalized estimation equation model showed that area under the curve for systolic blood pressure was predictive of delayed graft function (above median: odds ratio 1.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06-1.90). Multivariable Cox regression demonstrated that slope of oxygen saturation during the first 10 minutes after extubation was associated with graft failure (below median: hazard ratio 1.30, 95% CI 1.03-1.64), with 5-year graft survival of 70.0% (95%CI 64.5%-74.8%) for donors above the median versus 61.4% (95%CI 55.5%-66.7%) for those below the median. Among older donors, increased shock index slope was associated with increased hazard of graft failure. Validation of these findings is necessary to determine the utility of characterizing donor warm ischemia to predict recipient outcome.

  15. Living donor liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma achieves better outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Che

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) at Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital mainly relies on live donor LT (LDLT). Owing to taking the risk of LD, we are obligated to adopt strict selection criteria for HCC patients and optimize the pre-transplant conditions to ensure a high disease-free survival similar to those without HCC, even better than deceased donor LT (DDLT). Better outcomes are attributed to excellent surgical results and optimal patient selection. The hospital mortality of primary and salvage LDLT are lower than 2% in our center. Although Taiwan Health Insurance Policy extended the Milan to University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) criteria in 2006, selection criteria will not be consolidated to take into account only by the morphologic size/number of tumors but also by their biology. The criteria are divided into modifiable image morphology, alpha fetoprotein (AFP), and positron emission tomography (PET) scan with standard uptake value (SUV) and unmodifiable unfavorable pathology such as HCC combined with cholangiocarcinoma (CC), sarcomatoid type, and poor differentiation. Downstaging therapy is necessary for HCC patients beyond criteria to fit all modifiable standards. The upper limit of downstaging treatment seems to be extended by more effective drug eluting transarterial chemoembolization in cases without absolute contraindications. In contrast, the pitfall of unmodifiable tumor pathology should be excluded by the findings of pretransplant core biopsy/resection if possible. More recently, achieving complete tumor necrosis in explanted liver could almost predict no recurrence after transplant. Necrotizing therapy is advised if possible before transplant even the tumor status within criteria to minimize the possibility of tumor recurrence. LDLT with low surgical mortality in experienced centers provides the opportunities of optimizing the pre-transplant tumor conditions and timing of transplant to achieve better

  16. Early Macrophage Infiltration and Sustained Inflammation in Kidneys From Deceased Donors Are Associated With Long-Term Renal Function.

    PubMed

    Guillén-Gómez, E; Dasilva, I; Silva, I; Arce, Y; Facundo, C; Ars, E; Breda, A; Ortiz, A; Guirado, L; Ballarín, J A; Díaz-Encarnación, M M

    2017-03-01

    Kidney transplants from living donors (LDs) have a better outcome than those from deceased donors (DDs). Different factors have been suggested to justify the different outcome. In this study, we analyzed the infiltration and phenotype of monocytes/macrophages and the expression of inflammatory and fibrotic markers in renal biopsy specimens from 94 kidney recipients (60 DDs and 34 LDs) at baseline and 4 months after transplantation. We evaluated their association with medium- and long-term renal function. At baseline, inflammatory gene expression was higher in DDs than in LDs. These results were confirmed by the high number of CD68-positive cells in DD kidneys, which correlated negatively with long-term renal function. Expression of the fibrotic markers vimentin, fibronectin, and α-smooth muscle actin was more elevated in biopsy specimens from DDs at 4 months than in those from LDs. Gene expression of inflammatory and fibrotic markers at 4 months and difference between 4 months and baseline correlated negatively with medium- and long-term renal function in DDs. Multivariate analysis point to transforming growth factor-β1 as the best predictor of long-term renal function in DDs. We conclude that early macrophage infiltration, sustained inflammation, and transforming growth factor-β1 expression, at least for the first 4 months, contribute significantly to the difference in DD and LD transplant outcome.

  17. Lobar lung transplantation from deceased donors: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Eberlein, Michael; Reed, Robert M; Chahla, Mayy; Bolukbas, Servet; Blevins, Amy; Van Raemdonck, Dirk; Stanzi, Alessia; Inci, Ilhan; Marasco, Silvana; Shigemura, Norihisa; Aigner, Clemens; Deuse, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    AIM To systematically review reports on deceased-donor-lobar lung transplantation (ddLLTx) and uniformly describe size matching using the donor-to-recipient predicted-total lung-capacity (pTLC) ratio. METHODS We set out to systematically review reports on ddLLTx and uniformly describe size matching using the donor-to-recipient pTLC ratio and to summarize reported one-year survival data of ddLLTx and conventional-LTx. We searched in PubMed, CINAHL via EBSCO, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews via Wiley (CDSR), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects via Wiley (DARE), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials via Wiley (CENTRAL), Scopus (which includes EMBASE abstracts), and Web of Science for original reports on ddLLTx. RESULTS Nine observational cohort studies reporting on 301 ddLLTx met our inclusion criteria for systematic review of size matching, and eight for describing one-year-survival. The ddLLTx-group was often characterized by high acuity; however there was heterogeneity in transplant indications and pre-operative characteristics between studies. Data to calculate the pTLC ratio was available for 242 ddLLTx (80%). The mean pTLCratio before lobar resection was 1.25 ± 0.3 and the transplanted pTLCratio after lobar resection was 0.76 ± 0.2. One-year survival in the ddLLTx-group ranged from 50%-100%, compared to 72%-88% in the conventional-LTx group. In the largest study ddLLTx (n = 138) was associated with a lower one-year-survival compared to conventional-LTx (n = 539) (65.1% vs 84.1%, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION Further investigations of optimal donor-to-recipient size matching parameters for ddLLTx could improve outcomes of this important surgical option. PMID:28280698

  18. Current techniques for AB0-incompatible living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rummler, Silke; Bauschke, Astrid; Bärthel, Erik; Jütte, Heike; Maier, Katrin; Ziehm, Patrice; Malessa, Christina; Settmacher, Utz

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, it was considered medical malpractice to neglect the blood group system during transplantation. Because there are far more patients waiting for organs than organs available, a variety of attempts have been made to transplant AB0-incompatible (AB0i) grafts. Improvements in AB0i graft survival rates have been achieved with immunosuppression regimens and plasma treatment procedures. Nevertheless, some grafts are rejected early after AB0i living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) due to antibody mediated rejection or later biliary complications that affect the quality of life. Therefore, the AB0i LDLT is an option only for emergency situations, and it requires careful planning. This review compares the treatment possibilities and their effect on the patients’ graft outcome from 2010 to the present. We compared 11 transplant center regimens and their outcomes. The best improvement, next to plasma treatment procedures, has been reached with the prophylactic use of rituximab more than one week before AB0i LDLT. Unfortunately, no standardized treatment protocols are available. Each center treats its patients with its own scheme. Nevertheless, the transplant results are homogeneous. Due to refined treatment strategies, AB0i LDLT is a feasible option today and almost free of severe complications. PMID:27683633

  19. Racial and ethnic disparities in renal transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Churak, Joanne M.

    2005-01-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities exist in renal transplantation. The causes are multifactorial and include but are not limited to racism, socioeconomic status and class, unfavorable geographical location, lack of organ donation by minority groups, and differences in social networks, health beliefs culture and HLA typing. These disparities affect blacks, Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, Alaskan natiives and Asians. Elimination of these disparities is difficult, since many of the causes are intertwined, and it is difficult todiscern attributable disparity risk associated with the various factors. The possible solutions and recommendations are numerous. Since it is difficult to identify which may be successsful, thorough evaluation is required to determine which should be implemented. Some recommendations may not be easily implemented. Those selected for implementation must be continuously monitored for the expected results and effects. PMID:15712778

  20. Hyperinfection strongyloidiasis in renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2014-01-01

    Strongyloidiasis is infection caused by the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis. Chronic uncomplicated strongyloidiasis is known to occur in immunocompetent individuals while hyperinfection and dissemination occurs in selective immunosuppressed hosts particularly those on corticosteroid therapy. We report two cases of hyperinfection strongyloidiasis in renal transplant recipients and document endoscopic and pathological changes in the involved small bowel. One patient presented with features of dehydration and malnutrition while another developed ileal obstruction and strangulation, requiring bowel resection. Oesophagogastroduodenoscopy showed erythematous and thickened duodenal mucosal folds. Histopathological examination of duodenal biopsies revealed S. stercoralis worms, larvae and eggs embedded in mucosa and submucosa. Wet mount stool preparation showed filariform larvae of S. stercoralis in both cases. Patients were managed with anthelmintic therapy (ivermectin/albendazole) and concurrent reduction of immunosuppression. Both patients had uneventful recovery. Complicated strongyloidiasis should be suspected in immunocompromised hosts who present with abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhoea, particularly in endemic areas. PMID:25150235

  1. Hyperammonemia in ornithine transcarbamylase-deficient recipients following living donor liver transplantation from heterozygous carrier donors.

    PubMed

    Rahayatri, Tri Hening; Uchida, Hajime; Sasaki, Kengo; Shigeta, Takanobu; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Kanazawa, Hiroyuki; Mali, Vidyadhar; Fukuda, Akinari; Sakamoto, Seisuke; Kasahara, Mureo

    2017-02-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD) is a urea cycle disorder of X-linked inheritance, affecting the detoxification of excess nitrogen and leading to hyperammonemia (hyper-NH3 ). Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) has been applied for the treatment of OTCD. This case series retrospectively reviewed two OTCD patients who experienced hyper-NH3 following LDLT. The first case was a 5-year-old girl who had onset of OTCD at 2 years of age. Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) enzyme activity was 62% for the donor and 15% for the recipient. The patient suffered from recurrence of hyper-NH3 within 2 months following LDLT. The second case was a 5-year-old girl who had onset of OTCD at 3 years of age. OTC enzyme activity was 42.6% for the donor and 9.7% for the recipient. The patient suffered hyper-NH3 for 12 days starting on the date of surgery. Both of the patients transiently required continuous veno-venous hemodialysis; however, they are currently doing well without intensive medical treatment. The use of asymptomatic OTCD heterozygous donors in LDLT has been accepted with careful examination. However, an OTCD heterozygous carrier donor should be avoided if there is another donor candidate, due to the potentially fatal condition of hyper-NH3 following LDLT.

  2. Prophylactic oral ganciclovir after renal transplantation-dosing and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Filler, G; Lampe, D; von Bredow, M A; Lappenberg-Pelzer, M; Rocher, S; Strehlau, J; Ehrich, J H

    1998-01-01

    Ganciclovir alone or in combination with hyperimmunoglobulin is replacing other treatment modalities for the prophylactic treatment of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections. No dose recommendations are available for oral ganciclovir therapy in children with impaired renal function after renal transplantation of a kidney from a CMV IgG-positive donor. We undertook a pharmacokinetic study in 14 pediatric renal transplant recipients who were CMV IgG negative and had received a graft from a CMV IgG-positive donor. We estimated the daily dosage of oral ganciclovir in relation to the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Oral ganciclovir was administered at a starting dose of 3 x 1 g for children with a weight above 50 kg, 3 x 750 mg for children between 50 and 37.5 kg, and 3 x 500 mg for children between 37.5 and 24 kg. The starting dose was reduced by 50% for GFR values < or = 50 ml/min per 1.73 m2 and by 75% for GFR values < or = 25 ml/min per 1.73 m2. The daily dose was divided into three daily doses unless GFR was < 40 ml/ min per 1.73 m2, when only two daily doses were given. Doses were adjusted according to the measured plasma trough concentrations (c) using the simple formula: c(ganciclovir)(measured)/c(ganciclovir)(desired) = dosage rate(used)/dosage rate(adjusted). Mean stable plasma trough concentration was 0.91 +/- 0.68 microg/ml. The dosage rate, adjusted to a trough concentration of 1.0 microg/ml, correlated with the GFR. The dose per day could be calculated according to a simple equation for a GFR < 100 ml/min per 1.73 m2: dosage per day (mg/kg per day) = GFR. No CMV disease developed in any of the patients during oral ganciclovir, but 1 patient developed an acute rejection episode and a positive pp65 antigen 5 weeks after discontinuation of ganciclovir. The drug was well tolerated and without side effects.

  3. Kidney transplantation in the context of renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Pesavento, Todd E

    2009-12-01

    Kidney transplantation has dramatically evolved from a life-saving yet unproven therapy for patients with renal failure to a mature field that is the preferred treatment for those suffering from ESRD. Patients who receive a transplant experience a 68% lower risk of death compared with those waiting on dialysis for a transplant. This benefit is afforded to all patient subgroups including the elderly (> or =70 yr), and diabetics, who can gain 11 yr of extra life with transplantation. Prolonged transplant wait times result in a higher risk of death but this can be ameliorated with preemptive transplantation. Future challenges will focus on appropriate organ allocation and addressing long-term renal function and comorbid conditions so patients can enjoy the full benefits of transplantation.

  4. Segmental pancreas transplantation from living related and cadaver donors: a clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, D E; Goetz, F C; Rynasiewicz, J J; Baumgartner, D; White, D C; Elick, B A; Najarian, J S

    1981-08-01

    Between July 25, 1978, and January 25, 1981, 20 segmental pancreas transplants from 14 cadaver (cad) and six related (rel) donors were performed. All but two recipients had previously received renal allografts for treatment of end-sage diabetic nephropathy. The grafts were placed intraperitoneally-13 with open ducts, 4 with prolamine-injected ducts, and 3 with silicone rubber-injected ducts. At this writing six patients have functioning grafts (3 silicone, 3 open duct) at less than 1 (cad), 2 (cad), 3 (rel), 15 (cad), 20 (rel), and 31 (cad) months. Five open-duct grafts failed for technical reasons. Two prolamine-injected grafts lost function between 1 and 3 months; biopsy specimens showed severe fibrosis. The others lost function between 2 and 4 months. Three patients died 1 to 3 months after transplantation. Metabolic test results were normal or nearly normal in most recipients with functioning grafts. Splenectomy was required in one related donor; there were no other complications of donation. Technical problems and rejection are impediments to application of pancreas transplantation, but a sustained correction of the metabolic defect has been achieved in a few patients, and the effect on secondary complications are studied.

  5. Management issues in post living donor liver transplant biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Wadhawan, Manav; Kumar, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Biliary complications are common after living donor liver transplant (LDLT) although with advancements in surgical understanding and techniques, the incidence is decreasing. Biliary strictures are more common than leaks. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the first line modality of treatment of post LDLT biliary strictures with a technical success rate of 75%-80%. Most of ERCP failures are successfully treated by percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) and rendezvous technique. A minority of patients may require surgical correction. ERCP for these strictures is technically more challenging than routine as well post deceased donor strictures. Biliary strictures may increase the morbidity of a liver transplant recipient, but the mortality is similar to those with or without strictures. Post transplant strictures are short segment and soft, requiring only a few session of ERCP before complete dilatation. Long-term outcome of patients with biliary stricture is similar to those without stricture. With the introduction of new generation cholangioscopes, ERCP success rate may increase, obviating the need for PTBD and surgery in these patients. PMID:27057304

  6. Alternative donor hematopoietic cell transplantation for Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, Margaret L; DeFor, Todd E; Young, Jo-Anne H; Dusenbery, Kathryn E; Blazar, Bruce R; Slungaard, Arne; Zierhut, Heather; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Wagner, John E

    2015-06-11

    Historically, alternative donor hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Fanconi anemia (FA) patients resulted in excessive morbidity and mortality. To improve outcomes, we made sequential changes to the HCT conditioning regimen. A total of 130 FA patients (median age, 9.0 years; range, 1-48) underwent alternative donor HCT at the University of Minnesota between 1995 and 2012. All patients received cyclophosphamide (CY), single fraction total body irradiation (TBI), and antithymocyte globulin (ATG) with or without fludarabine (FLU), followed by T-cell-depleted bone marrow or unmanipulated umbilical cord blood transplantation. The addition of FLU enhanced engraftment 3-fold. The incidence of grades 2-4 acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease was 20% and 10%, respectively. Severe toxicity was highest in patients >10 years of age or those with a history of opportunistic infections or transfusions before HCT. Mortality was lowest in patients without a history of opportunistic infection or transfusions and who received conditioning with TBI 300 cGy, CY, FLU, and ATG. These patients had a probability of survival of 94% at 5 years. Alternative donor HCT is now associated with excellent survival for patients without prior opportunistic infections or transfusions and should be considered for all FA patients after the onset of marrow failure. These studies were registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00005898, NCT00167206, and NCT00352976.

  7. Alternative donor hematopoietic cell transplantation for Fanconi anemia

    PubMed Central

    DeFor, Todd E.; Young, Jo-Anne H.; Dusenbery, Kathryn E.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Slungaard, Arne; Zierhut, Heather; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Wagner, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, alternative donor hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Fanconi anemia (FA) patients resulted in excessive morbidity and mortality. To improve outcomes, we made sequential changes to the HCT conditioning regimen. A total of 130 FA patients (median age, 9.0 years; range, 1-48) underwent alternative donor HCT at the University of Minnesota between 1995 and 2012. All patients received cyclophosphamide (CY), single fraction total body irradiation (TBI), and antithymocyte globulin (ATG) with or without fludarabine (FLU), followed by T-cell–depleted bone marrow or unmanipulated umbilical cord blood transplantation. The addition of FLU enhanced engraftment 3-fold. The incidence of grades 2-4 acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease was 20% and 10%, respectively. Severe toxicity was highest in patients >10 years of age or those with a history of opportunistic infections or transfusions before HCT. Mortality was lowest in patients without a history of opportunistic infection or transfusions and who received conditioning with TBI 300 cGy, CY, FLU, and ATG. These patients had a probability of survival of 94% at 5 years. Alternative donor HCT is now associated with excellent survival for patients without prior opportunistic infections or transfusions and should be considered for all FA patients after the onset of marrow failure. These studies were registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00005898, NCT00167206, and NCT00352976. PMID:25824692

  8. Non-Chimeric HLA-Identical Renal Transplant Tolerance: Regulatory Immunophenotypic/Genomic Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Leventhal, J.R.; Mathew, J.M.; Salomon, D.R.; Kurian, S.M.; Friedewald, J.J.; Gallon, L.; Konieczna, I.; Tambur, A.R.; charette, j.; Levitsky, J.; Jie, C.; Kanwar, Y. S.; Abecassis, M. M.; Miller, J.

    2015-01-01

    We previously described early results of a non-chimeric operational tolerance protocol in HLA identical living donor renal transplants and now update these results. Recipients given alemtuzumab, tacrolimus/MPA with early sirolimus conversion were multiply infused with donor hematopoietic CD34+ stem cells. Immunosuppression was withdrawn by 24 months. Twelve months later operational tolerance was confirmed by rejection-free transplant biopsies. Five of the first 8 enrollees were initially tolerant one year off immunosuppression. Biopsies of 3 others after total withdrawal showed Banff 1A acute cellular rejection without renal dysfunction. With longer follow-up including 5 year post-transplant biopsies 4 of the 5 tolerant recipients remain without rejection while one developed Banff 1A without renal dysfunction. We now add 7 new subjects (2 operationally tolerant), and demonstrate time-dependent increases of circulating CD4+CD25+++CD127−FOXP3+ Tregs vs. losses of Tregs in non-tolerant subjects (p< 0.001). Gene expression signatures, developed using global RNA expression profiling of sequential whole blood and protocol biopsy samples, were highly associative with operational tolerance as early as 1 year post-transplant. The blood signature was validated by an external ITN data set. Our approach to non-chimeric operational HLA identical tolerance reveals association with Treg immunophenotypes and serial gene expression profiles. PMID:26227106

  9. First Canadian Case Report of Kidney Transplantation From an HIV-Positive Donor to an HIV-Positive Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Ambaraghassi, Georges; Cardinal, Héloïse; Corsilli, Daniel; Fortin, Claude; Fortin, Marie-Chantal; Martel-Laferrière, Valérie; Malaise, Jacques; Pâquet, Michel R.; Rouleau, Danielle

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Kidney transplantation has become standard of care for carefully selected patients living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era. American and European prospective cohort studies have reported similar patient and graft survival compared with HIV-negative kidney transplant recipients. Despite an increased rate of acute rejection, partially due to drug interactions, HIV immunovirologic parameter generally remains under control during immunosuppression. A few cases of kidney transplantation between HIV-infected patients were done in South Africa and showed favorable results. No cases of kidney transplantation from an HIV-positive donor in Canada have previously been reported. Presenting concerns of the patient: A 60-year-old Canadian man with HIV infection presented in 2007 with symptoms compatible with acute renal failure secondary to IgA nephropathy. Chronic kidney disease resulted after the acute episode. Diagnoses: Hemodialysis was started in 2012. The patient was referred for a kidney transplantation evaluation. Interventions: The patient underwent kidney transplantation from an HIV-positive donor in January 2016. The recipient’s antiretroviral regimen consisted of abacavir, lamivudine, and dolutegravir. No drug interactions have been reported between these antiretrovirals and the maintenance immunosuppressive regimen used. Outcomes: The outcome at 7 months post transplantation was excellent, with good graft function and adequate control of HIV replication, in the absence of opportunistic infections at a time when immunosuppression is at its highest intensity. No acute rejection was reported. An episode of bacteremic graft pyelonephritis due to Enterococcus faecalis was successfully treated after transplantation. Novel finding: With careful selection of patient, kidney transplantation between HIV-infected patients is a viable option. The use of antiretroviral

  10. Bone Density and Cortical Structure after Pediatric Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Terpstra, Anniek M.; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Shults, Justine; Zemel, Babette S.; Wetzsteon, Rachel J.; Foster, Bethany J.; Strife, C. Frederic; Foerster, Debbie L.

    2012-01-01

    The impact of renal transplantation on trabecular and cortical bone mineral density (BMD) and cortical structure is unknown. We obtained quantitative computed tomography scans of the tibia in pediatric renal transplant recipients at transplantation and 3, 6, and 12 months; 58 recipients completed at least two visits. We used more than 700 reference participants to generate Z-scores for trabecular BMD, cortical BMD, section modulus (a summary measure of cortical dimensions and strength), and muscle and fat area. At baseline, compared with reference participants, renal transplant recipients had significantly lower mean section modulus and muscle area; trabecular BMD was significantly greater than reference participants only in transplant recipients younger than 13 years. After transplantation, trabecular BMD decreased significantly in association with greater glucocorticoid exposure. Cortical BMD increased significantly in association with greater glucocorticoid exposure and greater decreases in parathyroid hormone levels. Muscle and fat area both increased significantly, but section modulus did not improve. At 12 months, transplantation associated with significantly lower section modulus and greater fat area compared with reference participants. Muscle area and cortical BMD did not differ significantly between transplant recipients and reference participants. Trabecular BMD was no longer significantly elevated in younger recipients and was low in older recipients. Pediatric renal transplant associated with persistent deficits in section modulus, despite recovery of muscle, and low trabecular BMD in older recipients. Future studies should determine the implications of these data on fracture risk and identify strategies to improve bone density and structure. PMID:22282589

  11. Autologous stem cell transplantation versus alternative allogeneic donor transplants in adult acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Claude Gorin, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The availability of alternative sources of stem cells including most recently T-replete haploidentical marrow or peripheral blood, and the increasing use of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), renders feasible an allogeneic transplant to almost all patients with acute leukemia up to 70 years of age. Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for consolidation of complete remission (CR), however, offers in some circumstances an alternative option. Although associated with a higher relapse rate, autologous transplant benefits from a lower non-relapse mortality, the absence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and a better quality of life for long-term survivors. The recent use of intravenous busulfan (IVBU) with high-dose melphalan, better monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD), and maintenance therapy post autografting bring new interest. Few retrospective studies compared the outcome following alternative donor versus autologous transplants for remission consolidation. Genoidentical and phenoidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantations are undisputed gold standards, but there are no data showing the superiority of alternative allogeneic donor over autologous transplantation, at the time of undetectable MRD, in patients with good- and intermediate-1 risk acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1), acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission (CR2), and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL).

  12. [Evolution of living donor kidney transplantation: historic, statistical, national and own experience data].

    PubMed

    Altes Ineva, María Pilar; Alonso Paz, Pastor; Abadia, Harry; Izquierdo Reyes, Laura; Oppenheimer, Federico; Alvarez-Vijande, Ricardo

    2005-01-01

    Despite representing a small percentage of the transplant activity in our country, living donor kidney transplantation is a good alternative for the future because the needs exceed the offer of cadaver donor organs. We present the evolution of living donor kidney transplantation in Spain from the beginning in accordance to the ONT (Organización Nacional de trasplantes), and our current situation in comparison with other countries, as well as data obtained from the experience in our hospital which began in 1965.

  13. Intravenous renal cell transplantation with SAA1-positive cells prevents the progression of chronic renal failure in rats with ischemic-diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Katherine J; Zhang, Jizhong; Han, Ling; Wang, Mingsheng; Zhang, Shaobo; Dominguez, Jesus H

    2013-12-15

    Diabetic nephropathy, the most common cause of progressive chronic renal failure and end-stage renal disease, has now reached global proportions. The only means to rescue diabetic patients on dialysis is renal transplantation, a very effective therapy but severely limited by the availability of donor kidneys. Hence, we tested the role of intravenous renal cell transplantation (IRCT) on obese/diabetic Zucker/SHHF F1 hybrid (ZS) female rats with severe ischemic and diabetic nephropathy. Renal ischemia was produced by bilateral renal clamping of the renal arteries at 10 wk of age, and IRCT with genetically modified normal ZS male tubular cells was given intravenously at 15 and 20 wk of age. Rats were euthanized at 34 wk of age. IRCT with cells expressing serum amyloid A had strong and long-lasting beneficial effects on renal function and structure, including tubules and glomeruli. However, donor cells were found engrafted only in renal tubules 14 wk after the second infusion. The results indicate that IRCT with serum amyloid A-positive cells is effective in preventing the progression of chronic kidney disease in rats with diabetic and ischemic nephropathy.

  14. Selective Embolization of Large Symptomatic Iatrogenic Renal Transplant Arteriovenous Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Barley, Fay L.; Kessel, David Nicholson, Tony; Robertson, Iain

    2006-12-15

    We report on the successful treatment of hypertension by occlusion of a large iatrogenic renal transplant arteriovenous fistula using detachable embolization coils with concomitant flow reduction by occlusion balloon in two patients.

  15. Perioperative Bacterial Infections in Deceased Donor and Living Donor Liver Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Joy; Gomathy, Narasimhan; Rajashekhar, Perumalla; Venugopal, Kota; Olithselvan, Arikichenin; Vivekanandan, Shanmugam; Naresh, Shanmugam; Sujatha, Chandrasekaran; Vijaya, Srinivasan; Jayanthi, Venkataraman; Rela, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Background Deceased donor (DDLT) and living donor (LDLT) liver transplant (LT) is in vogue in several centers in India. Most centers are resorting to LDLT as a preferred surgery due to shortage of deceased donor liver. The risk of infection and its effect on survival in both groups of recipients from the Indian subcontinent are not known. The study was conducted to compare the bacterial infection rates among LDLT and DDLT recipients and their impact on survival at a tertiary referral center. Methods Retrospective data on 67 LT recipients were reviewed. Data on pre-, per-, and postoperative bacterial infection rates and the common isolates were obtained. Results Thirty-five patients had LDLT and 32 had DDLT. The prevalence of pre-operative bacterial infection and the isolates was similar in both groups. The perioperative bacterial infection rates were significantly higher in DDLT recipients (P < 0.01) (relative risk: 1.44 95% confidence interval 1.04–1.9). In both LDLT and DDLT, the common source was urinary tract followed by bloodstream infection. The common bacterial isolates in either transplant were Klebsiella followed by Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas spp. and nonfermenting gram-negative bacteria. Six patients (four LDLT; two DDLT) were treated for tuberculosis. Among the risk factors, cold ischemic time, and duration of stay in the intensive care unit was significantly higher for DDLT (p < 0.01). The death rates were not significantly different in the two groups. However, the odds for death were significantly high at 26.8 (p < 0.05) for postoperative bacterial infection and 1.8 (p < 0.001) for past alcohol. Conclusion Liver transplant recipients are at high-risk for bacterial infection irrespective of type of transplant, more so in DDLT. PMID:25755404

  16. Halo naevi and café au lait macule regression in a renal transplant patient on immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Lolatgis, Helena; Varigos, George; Braue, Anna; Scardamaglia, Laura; Boyapati, Ann; Winship, Ingrid

    2015-11-01

    A case of halo naevi and café au lait macule regression in a renal transplant patient receiving long-term immunosuppressive therapy is described. We propose the direct transfer of an auto-reactive antibody, CD8 T-cells or tumour necrosis factor α from the transplant donor to the recipient as a possible cause. We have also considered insufficient immunosuppressive therapy as a possible mechanism.

  17. Realizing HOPE: The Ethics of Organ Transplantation from HIV infected Donors

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Christine M.; Segev, Dorry; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    The HIV Organ Policy Equity (HOPE) Act now allows transplantation of organs from HIV infected (HIV+) living and deceased donors to HIV+ individuals with end-stage organ disease in the United States. Although clinical experience with such transplants is limited to a small number of HIV+ to HIV+ deceased donor kidney transplants in South Africa, unprecedented HIV+ to HIV+ liver transplants and living donor kidney transplants are also now on the horizon. Initially all HIV+ to HIV+ transplants will occur under research protocols with safeguards and criteria mandated by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Nevertheless, this historic change brings ethical opportunities and challenges. For HIV+ individuals in need of organ transplant, issues of access, risk, and consent must be considered. For potential HIV+ donors, there are additional ethical challenges of privacy, fairness and the right to donate. Careful consideration of the ethical issues involved are critical to the safe and appropriate evaluation of this novel approach to transplantation. PMID:27043422

  18. Methylene blue treatment for resistant shock following renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hershman, Eli; Hadash, Amir; Attias, Ori; Ben-Ari, Josef

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of a 19-year-old female with a history of hyperoxaluria type 1 and renal failure. The patient presented for a second renal transplantation 17 years after her first combined liver and kidney transplantation. Postoperative shock was highly resistant to fluids and required massive pharmacologic hemodynamic support. Vasoplegic shock was the presumed diagnosis, and methylene blue was utilized as a rescue therapy, with a rapid hemodynamic response and no apparent side effects.

  19. [Treating Clostridium difficile infection with faecal transplantation: donor microbiological testing].

    PubMed

    Russello, Giuseppe; Brovarone, Flavia; Bardaro, Marcellino; Carretto, Edoardo

    2014-03-01

    Clostridium difficile associated diseases (CDADs) or C. difficile infections (CDIs) are increasing in incidence, severity and mortality. Among patients with CDIs, those with recurrent disease are less responsive to traditional therapies with commonly used drugs, such as metronidazole and vancomycin. Faecal microbiota transplantation is an old therapeutic procedure that has been recently proposed as a safe and effective treatment for CDI patients non-responsive to antibiotic therapy. In this paper we discuss the microbiological procedures that should be performed on faecal microbiota donors.

  20. [Clinical results of the various replacement therapies for chronic renal failure: haemodialysis and renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Altieri, P; Piredda, G; Murgia, M G; Onano, B; Meloni, F

    2004-01-01

    Results from recent studies have demonstrated that kidney-transplanted patients have better expectation and quality of life than dialysis patients on a waiting list for kidney transplant. Moreover, the scientific literature has conclusively shown that the survival of the patient and of the kidney graft are better in patients who received a kidney from a living donor, than in patients who received a cadaveric kidney. The main factors that may have a negative influence on the kidney transplant are: the recipient's age, diabetes mellitus, smoking and the time spent on dialysis before the transplant. The shortage of cadaveric kidneys and the small number of living kidney transplant are the main obstacles to a more widespread use of kidney transplantation. Kidney transplant from living donors needs to be implemented because it represents the best treatment for patients with kidney failure and it can decrease or even avoid the need for dialysis before kidney transplantation.

  1. Propensity Score-Based Survival Benefit of Simultaneous Liver-Kidney Transplant over Liver Transplant Alone for Recipients with Pre-Transplant Renal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pratima; Shu, Xu; Schaubel, Douglas E.; Sung, Randall S.; Magee, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Survival benefit of simultaneous liver-kidney transplant (SLKT) over liver transplant alone (LTA) is unclear from the current literature. Additionally, the role of donor kidney quality, measured by kidney donor risk index (KDRI), in survival benefit of SLKT is not studied. We compared survival benefit after SLKT and LTA among recipients with similar pre-transplant renal dysfunction using novel methodology, specifically with respect to survival probability and area under the survival curve by dialysis status and KDRI. Methods Data were obtained from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients. The study cohort included patients with pre-LT renal dysfunction who were waitlisted and received either a SLKT (n=1,326) or a LTA (n=4,283) between 3/1/02–12/31/09. Inverse Probability of Treatment Weighted (IPTW) – SLKT and LTA survival curves, along with the 5-year area under the survival curve were computed by dialysis status at transplant. The difference in the area under the curve represents the average additional survival time gained via SLKT over LTA. Results For patients not on dialysis, SLKT resulted in a significant 3.7 month gain in 5-year mean post-transplant survival time. The decrease in mortality rate differs significantly by KDRI, and an estimated 76% of SLKT recipients received a kidney with KDRI sufficiently low for mortality. The mortality decrease for SLKT was concentrated in the first year post-transplant. The difference between SLK and LTA 5-year mean post-transplant survival time was 1.4 months and non-significant for patients not on dialysis. Conclusion The propensity score-adjusted survival among SLKT and LTA recipients was similar for those who were dialysis at LT. Although statistically significant, the survival advantage of SLKT over LTA was of marginal clinical significance among patients not on dialysis; and occurred only if the donor kidney was of sufficient quality. These results should be considered in the ongoing debate regarding the

  2. Acute renal failure in liver transplant patients: Indian study.

    PubMed

    Naik, Pradeep; Premsagar, B; Mallikarjuna, M

    2015-01-01

    The acute renal failure is the frequent medical complication observed in liver transplant patients. The objective of this study was to determine the cause of acute renal failure in post liver transplant patients. A total of 70 patients who underwent (cadaveric 52, live 18) liver transplantation were categorized based on clinical presentation into two groups, namely hepatorenal failure (HRF, n = 29), and Hepatic failure (HF, n = 41). All the patients after the liver transplant had received tacrolimus, mycophenolate and steroids. We analyzed the modification of diet in renal disease, (MDRD) serum urea, creatinine and albumin before and after 5th and 30th day of liver transplant and data was categorized into survivors and non-survivors group. In HRF survivor group, serum creatinine, and urea levels were high and, albumin, MDRD were low in pre- transplant and reached to normal levels on 30th day of post transplant, and 79.3 % of patients in this group showed resumption of normal kidney function. On the contrary in HRF nonsurvivor group, we did not observed any significant difference and 20.7 % of patients showed irreversible changes after the liver transplant. In HF survivor group, 82.9 % of liver failure patients did not show any deviation in serum creatinine, urea, albumin and MDRD, whereas in HF non survivor group, 17.1 % of liver failure patients who had HCV positive before the transplant developed acute renal failure. The levels of creatinine, urea, albumin and MDRD were normal before the transplant and on day 30th, the levels of albumin and MDRD were significantly low whereas serum urea, creatinine levels were high. In conclusion, based on these observations, an diagnosis and treatment of Acute renal failure is important among the liver transplantation cases in the early postoperative period.

  3. Racial Differences in Incident De Novo Donor-Specific Anti-HLA Antibody among Primary Renal Allograft Recipients.

    PubMed

    Everly, Matthew J; Briley, Kimberly P; Haisch, Carl E; Dieplinger, Georg; Bolin, Paul; Kendrick, Scott A; Morgan, Claire; Maldonado, Angela Q; Rebellato, Lorita M

    2017-02-17

    Controversy exists as to whether African American (AA) transplant recipients are at risk for developing de novo donor-specific anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibody (dnDSA). We studied 341 HLA-mismatched, primary renal allograft recipients who were consecutively transplanted between 3/1999 and 12/2010. Sera were collected sequentially pre- and post-transplant and tested for anti-HLA immunoglobulin G (IgG) via single antigen bead assay. Of the 341 transplant patients (225 AA and 116 non-AA), 107 developed dnDSA at a median of 9.2 months post-transplant. AA patients had a 5-year dnDSA incidence of 35%. This was significantly higher than the 5-year dnDSA incidence for non-AA patients (21%). DQ mismatch (risk) and receiving a living-related donor (LRD) transplant (protective) were transplant factors associated with dnDSA. Within the AA patient cohort, HLA-DQ mismatch, not-receiving a LRD transplant, non-adherence, and BK viremia were the most common factors associated with early dnDSA (occurring <24 months post-transplant). Non-adherence and pre-transplant diabetes history were the strong precursors to late dnDSA. Despite the higher rates of dnDSA in the AA cohort, post-dnDSA survival was the same in AA and non-AA patients. This study suggests that DQ matching, increasing LRD transplantation in AA patients, and minimizing under-immunosuppression will be key to preventing dnDSA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Constrictive pericarditis in a renal transplant recipient with tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, P; Kuthe, S; Jha, V; Kohli, H S; Rathi, M; Gupta, K L; Sakhuja, V

    2010-07-01

    Tuberculosis is a common cause of pericarditis in the developing countries and constrictive pericarditis is a serious sequel. There are only three cases of constrictive pericarditis in kidney transplant recipients previously reported in literature. Here, we report a case of constrictive pericarditis developing in a renal transplant recipient while on antituberculous therapy for tuberculous pleural effusion.

  5. Constrictive pericarditis in a renal transplant recipient with tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sreejith, P.; Kuthe, S.; Jha, V.; Kohli, H. S.; Rathi, M.; Gupta, K. L.; Sakhuja, V.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a common cause of pericarditis in the developing countries and constrictive pericarditis is a serious sequel. There are only three cases of constrictive pericarditis in kidney transplant recipients previously reported in literature. Here, we report a case of constrictive pericarditis developing in a renal transplant recipient while on antituberculous therapy for tuberculous pleural effusion. PMID:21072157

  6. 25 years of live related renal transplantation in children: The Buenos Aires experience

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Eduardo; Ferraris, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    The number of pediatric patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) has been steadily growing during the last 10 years all over the world, because of the improvement of medical and surgical treatment of severe urologic malformations and congenital and acquired nephrological disorders. Kidney transplantation (Tx) with a live related donor continues to be the gold standard therapy to treat ESRD in children because of the best final results, the chronic lack of cadaveric donors and the frequent possibility of young patients to have parents or relatives as a source of a potential graft donor. Nowadays almost every pediatric patient can be dialyzed and transplanted, even early in life, if he or she has the possibility of a live related donor. Improvements in pediatric anesthesiology and intensive care have also been very important, in reducing the morbidity and mortality related to Tx procedures. Here we report our experience with Tx for the last 25 years, specially our long experience of live related donor transplantation in children and adolescents with emphasis on technical issues in small children and pediatric patients with severe urologic malformations and bladder dysfunction. We'll make special considerations on the improvement in short and long follow-up with the actual prevention and treatment of graft rejection, due to the new immunosuppressive agents and protocols. PMID:19718302

  7. Effect of a legal initiative on deceased- and living-donor kidney transplantation in Israel.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazi, T; Rahamimov, R; Elhalel, M D; Cohen, J; Mor, E

    2013-05-01

    The severe organ shortage in Israel has prompted many patients to undergo kidney transplantation abroad. In May 2008, the Israeli Knesset approved the Israel Transplant Law prohibiting organ trade and disallowing health insurers to reimburse the cost of illegal transplantation abroad. The aim of this study was to assess the initial effect of the law on kidney transplantations inside and outside the country. The number of kidney transplantations performed inside and outside Israel was compared between the 3-year periods before and after implementation of the transplant law (2006-2008 and 2009-2011). Further analysis compared the number of deceased-donor and live-donor transplantations performed in Israel during the same periods. The results showed that the number of transplants performed abroad dropped significantly, from a median of 143 per year during 2006-2008 to <45 per year during 2009-2011. There was a parallel increase in the number of kidney transplantations from living donors, from a median of 56 transplants per year in 2006-2008 to 78 per year in 2008-2011, with a peak of 117 transplants in 2011. In conclusion, the Israel Transplant Law has dramatically affected kidney transplantation practices in Israel by reducing transplantation tourism and increasing living-donor kidney transplantations.

  8. [Infected solitary renal cyst of the graft in a renal transplant recipient : a case report].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kenichiro; Tsuchiya, Tomohiro; Kondo, Hiromi; Nakane, Keita; Kato, Taku; Seike, Kensaku; Miwa, Kousei; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Yokoi, Sigeaki; Nakano, Masahiro; Deguchi, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    A 59-year-old woman with end-stage renal disease of diabetic nephropathy who had been on maintenance hemodialisis for 4 years, underwent a living-unrelated renal transplantation 6 years ago. She was admitted to our hospital, because of a low grade fever and edema. Ultrasonography revealed the cyst with heterogeneity structure in the upper pole of the transplanted kidney. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a high-intensity cystic mass measuring 68×53 mm. As fever and laboratory data did not improve sufficiently by the treatment with antibiotics, echo-guided puncture and drainage were performed for the abnormal structure in the upper pole of the transplanted kidney. In the culture of the purulent aspirate drained from renal cyst, Escherichia coli was isolated. To our knowledge, this is the first report of infected renal cyst of the graft in a renal transplant recipient in the world.

  9. Late renal dysfunction in adult survivors of bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, C.A.; Cohen, E.P.; Barber-Derus, S.W.; Murray, K.J.; Ash, R.C.; Casper, J.T.; Moulder, J.E. )

    1991-06-01

    Until recently long-term renal toxicity has not been considered a major late complication of bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Late renal dysfunction has been described in a pediatric population status post-BMT which was attributable to the radiation in the preparatory regimen. A thorough review of adults with this type of late renal dysfunction has not previously been described. Fourteen of 103 evaluable adult patients undergoing allogeneic (96) or autologous (7) bone marrow transplantation, predominantly for leukemia and lymphomas, at the Medical College of Wisconsin (Milwaukee, WI) have had a syndrome of renal insufficiency characterized by increased serum creatinine, decreased glomerular filtration rate, anemia, and hypertension. This syndrome developed at a median of 9 months (range, 4.5 to 26 months) posttransplantation in the absence of specific identifiable causes. The cumulative probability of having this renal dysfunction is 20% at 1 year. Renal biopsies performed on seven of these cases showed the endothelium widely separated from the basement membrane, extreme thickening of the glomerular basement membrane, and microthrombi. Previous chemotherapy, antibiotics, and antifungals as well as cyclosporin may add to and possibly potentiate a primary chemoradiation marrow transplant renal injury, but this clinical syndrome is most analogous to clinical and experimental models of radiation nephritis. This late marrow transplant-associated nephritis should be recognized as a potentially limiting factor in the use of some intensive chemoradiation conditioning regimens used for BMT. Some selective attenuation of the radiation to the kidneys may decrease the incidence of this renal dysfunction.

  10. Alternative Donor Transplantation with High-Dose Post-Transplantation Cyclophosphamide for Refractory Severe Aplastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    DeZern, Amy E.; Zahurak, Marianna; Symons, Heather; Cooke, Kenneth; Jones, Richard J.; Brodsky, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    Severe aplastic anemia (SAA) is a life-threatening hematopoietic stem cell disorder that is treated with bone marrow transplantation (BMT) or immunosuppressive therapy (IST). The management of patients with refractory SAA after IST is a major challenge. Alternative donor BMT is the best chance for cure in refractory SAA, but morbidity and mortality from graft failure and complications of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) have limited enthusiasm for this approach. Here, we employed post-transplantation high-dose cyclophosphamide in an effort to safely expand the donor pool in 16 consecutive patients with refractory SAA who did not have a matched sibling donor. Between July 2011 and August 2016, 16 patients underwent allogeneic (allo) BMT for refractory SAA from 13 haploidentical donors and 3 unrelated donors. The nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen consisted of antithymocyte globulin, fludarabine, low-dose cyclophosphamide, and total body irradiation. Post-transplantation cyclophosphamide 50 mg/kg/day i.v. on days +3 and +4 was administered for GVHD prophylaxis. Additionally, patients received mycophenolate mofetil on days +5 through 35 and tacrolimus from day +5 through 1 year. The median age of the patients at the time of transplantation was 30 (range, 11 to 69) years. The median time to neutrophil recovery over 1000 × 103/mm3 for 3 consecutive days was 19 (range, 16 to 27) days, to red cell engraftment was 25 (range, 2 to 58) days, and to last platelet transfusion to keep platelets counts over 50 × 103/mm3 was 27.5 (range, 22 to 108) days. Graft failure, primary or secondary, was not seen in any of the patients. All 16 patients are alive, transfusion independent, and without evidence of clonality. The median follow-up is 21 (range, 3 to 64) months. Two patients had grade 1 or 2 skin-only acute GVHD. These same 2 also had mild chronic GVHD of the skin/mouth requiring systemic steroids. One of these GVHD patients was able to come off all IST by 15 months and the

  11. A comparative study of reduced dose alemtuzumab in matched unrelated donor and related donor reduced intensity transplants.

    PubMed

    Jardine, Laura; Publicover, Amy; Bigley, Venetia; Hale, Geoff; Pearce, Kim; Dickinson, Anne; Jackson, Graham; Collin, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    In vivo T cell depletion with 100 mg alemtuzumab prevents graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in reduced intensity conditioned transplants but is associated with delayed immune reconstitution, a higher risk of infection and relapse. De-escalation studies have shown that a reduced dose of 30 mg is as effective as 100 mg in preventing GVHD in matched related donor (MRD) transplants. Dose reduction in matched unrelated donor (MUD) transplants is feasible but the comparative efficacy of alemtuzumab in this setting is not known and opinions vary widely concerning the optimal level of GVHD prophylaxis that should be achieved. Through retrospective analysis we made an objective comparison of MUD transplants receiving an empirically reduced dose of 60 mg, with MRD transplants receiving a 30 mg dose. We observed proportionate levels of alemtuzumab according to dose but an inverse relationship with body surface area particularly in MRD transplants. MUD transplants experienced more acute and chronic GVHD, higher T cell chimerism, more sustained use of ciclosporin and less need for donor lymphocyte infusion than MRD transplants. Thus, doubling the dose of alemtuzumab to 60 mg did not provide equivalent prevention of GVHD after MUD transplant although there was no difference in non-relapse mortality or survival compared with MRD transplants.

  12. Comparison between psychosocial long-term outcomes of recipients and donors after adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Noma, Shun'ichi; Hayashi, Akiko; Uehara, Minako; Uemoto, Shinji; Murai, Toshiya

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine psychosocial states of recipients and donors several years after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) and to find out the pre-transplant predictors of desirable post-transplant psychosocial states. The recipients and donors of adult-to-adult LDLT at Kyoto University Hospital, Japan, from November 2001 through July 2003 were interviewed and examined by means of questionnaires about anxiety, depression, and quality of life (QOL), and the participants were evaluated by the same test batteries sent by mail three to five yr after LDLT. Twenty-seven pairs of recipients and donors, 13 recipients, and three donors participated in this study. The recipients and the donors had a decline in social QOL. The main predictor of psychosocial states of the recipients was the length of wait for LDLT, and the predictors of the donors were family or support system availability and recipients' depressive states at LDLT. The donors who were spouses of the recipients had better QOL than other donors. It might be better to perform LDLT as soon as possible once LDLT has been judged to be necessary, and the relative who is on close terms with the recipient should be selected as donor.

  13. Reduced-intensity transplantation for lymphomas using haploidentical related donors vs HLA-matched unrelated donors

    PubMed Central

    Kanate, Abraham S.; Mussetti, Alberto; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A.; Ahn, Kwang W.; DiGilio, Alyssa; Beitinjaneh, Amer; Chhabra, Saurabh; Fenske, Timothy S.; Freytes, Cesar; Gale, Robert Peter; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Hertzberg, Mark; Klyuchnikov, Evgeny; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Olsson, Richard; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Rezvani, Andrew; Riches, Marcie; Saad, Ayman; Slavin, Shimon; Smith, Sonali M.; Sureda, Anna; Yared, Jean; Ciurea, Stefan; Armand, Philippe; Salit, Rachel; Bolaños-Meade, Javier

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated 917 adult lymphoma patients who received haploidentical (n = 185) or HLA-matched unrelated donor (URD) transplantation either with (n = 241) or without antithymocyte globulin (ATG; n = 491) following reduced-intensity conditioning regimens. Haploidentical recipients received posttransplant cyclophosphamide-based graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis, whereas URD recipients received calcineurin inhibitor-based prophylaxis. Median follow-up of survivors was 3 years. The 100-day cumulative incidence of grade III-IV acute GVHD on univariate analysis was 8%, 12%, and 17% in the haploidentical, URD without ATG, and URD with ATG groups, respectively (P = .44). Corresponding 1-year rates of chronic GVHD on univariate analysis were 13%, 51%, and 33%, respectively (P < .001). On multivariate analysis, grade III-IV acute GVHD was higher in URD without ATG (P = .001), as well as URD with ATG (P = .01), relative to haploidentical transplants. Similarly, relative to haploidentical transplants, risk of chronic GVHD was higher in URD without ATG and URD with ATG (P < .0001). Cumulative incidence of relapse/progression at 3 years was 36%, 28%, and 36% in the haploidentical, URD without ATG, and URD with ATG groups, respectively (P = .07). Corresponding 3-year overall survival (OS) was 60%, 62%, and 50% in the 3 groups, respectively, with multivariate analysis showing no survival difference between URD without ATG (P = .21) or URD with ATG (P = .16), relative to haploidentical transplants. Multivariate analysis showed no difference between the 3 groups in terms of nonrelapse mortality (NRM), relapse/progression, and progression-free survival (PFS). These data suggest that reduced-intensity conditioning haploidentical transplantation with posttransplant cyclophosphamide does not compromise early survival outcomes compared with matched URD transplantation, and is associated with significantly reduced risk of chronic GVHD. PMID:26670632

  14. Aspergillus thyroiditis in a renal transplant recipient mimicking subacute thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Solak, Y; Atalay, H; Nar, A; Ozbek, O; Turkmen, K; Erekul, S; Turk, S

    2011-04-01

    Fungal pathogens are increasingly encountered after renal transplantation. Aspergillus causes significant morbidity and mortality in transplant patients. Fungal thyroiditis is a rare occurrence owing to unique features of the thyroid gland. Most cases are caused by Aspergillus species and have been described in immunocompromised patients. Presentation may be identical with that of subacute thyroiditis, in which hyperthyroidism features and painful thyroid are the prominent findings. Diagnosis can be ascertained by fine-needle aspiration of thyroid showing branching hyphae of Aspergillus. We describe a renal transplant patient who developed Aspergillus thyroiditis as part of a disseminated infection successfully treated with voriconazole.

  15. RIFLE criteria and hepatic function in the assessment of acute renal failure in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tinti, F; Umbro, I; Meçule, A; Rossi, M; Merli, M; Nofroni, I; Corradini, S Ginanni; Poli, L; Pugliese, F; Ruberto, F; Berloco, P B; Mitterhofer, A P

    2010-05-01

    Renal dysfunction in cirrhotic patients is primary related to disturbances of circulatory function, triggered by portal hypertension with chronic intrarenal vasoconstriction and hypoperfusion. Pretransplant renal function is an important factor implicated in the development of acute renal failure (ARF) after liver transplantation (OLT), but other factors mostly related to liver function seem to influence the development of ARF. The Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative workgroup developed the RIFLE classification to define ARF. We sought to evaluate the incidence of ARF among patients undergoing OLT, to evaluate the association of ARF with pre-OLT renal and hepatic functions, and to evaluate the influence of ARF on chronic kidney disease (CKD) at 1 month post-OLT. Clinical, renal, hepatic function, and donor risk index data of 24 patients who underwent deceased donor OLT were collected before transplantation, in the perioperative period and in the first month post-OLT. ARF occurred in 37.5% of patients with 56% developing the R grade and 44% the I grade; no patient showed the F grade. An association was observed between ARF and a higher Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score and between ARF and a reduced pre-OLT serum albumin. No association was noted between ARF and other pre-OLT parameters. In cirrhotic patients serum creatinine is a bias for renal function assessment and the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula overestimates GFR. Post-OLT CKD was present in 6.7% of patients without ARF and in 44.4% of patients with ARF. The R grade developed more frequently among patients with viral cirrhosis. The association of ARF with MELD and hypoalbuminemia may be the result of a close relationship between renal and hepatic functions among cirrhotic patients. Post-OLT CKD may be the result of unrecognized, preexisting CKD and/or the effects of not fully resolved acute damage to an injured kidney.

  16. Disseminated Mycobacterium haemophilum infection in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Brix, Silke R; Iking-Konert, Christof; Stahl, Rolf A K; Wenzel, Ulrich

    2016-10-31

    Opportunistic infections are a major concern in renal and transplant medicine. We present the case of a renal transplant recipient with a generalised Mycobacterium haemophilum infection after an increase in immunosuppressive therapy and treatment with a tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitor. Infection involved skin and soft tissue, joints and bones, as well as the renal transplant with an interstitial nephritis. Rapid diagnosis using PCR and DNA sequencing allowed early appropriate treatment. Triple antibiotic therapy and reduction in immunosuppression resulted in a slow but sustained recovery. Immunosuppression causes severe opportunistic infections. TNF-α inhibitors are very effective and well tolerated but have an increased susceptibility to infections with mycobacteria. Mycobacterial infections represent a significant clinical risk to transplant recipients because of their aggressive clinical course and the need for complex toxic antibiotic treatments. In these patients, M. haemophilum is a cause of skin infections.

  17. Discontinuation of steroids in ABO-incompatible renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Novosel, Marija Kristina; Bistrup, Claus

    2016-04-01

    A steroid-free protocol for ABO-compatible renal transplantation has been used at our center since 1983. To minimize the adverse effects of steroids, we also developed a steroid sparing protocol for ABO-incompatible renal transplantation in 2008. The present study is a report of our results. A retrospective review of the first 50 ABO-incompatible renal transplantations performed at a single university center. If no immunological events occurred in the post-transplant period, prednisolone tapering was initiated approximately 3 months after transplantation. Forty-three patients completed prednisolone tapering after 289 ± 58 days. Three patients died during follow-up, and four patients lost graft function. None of these adverse events were rejection related. Eleven patients experienced rejections; seven were on prednisolone and four were after weaning from prednisolone. All patients responded well to antirejection treatment. Overall, 1-year rejection rate was 19%. One- and 3-year graft survival was 94% and 91%, respectively. One-year post-transplant median serum creatinine was 123 μmol/L. We found acceptable rejection rates, graft survival, and creatinine levels in patients undergoing ABO-incompatible renal transplantations with a steroid sparing protocol. However, a longer follow-up of a lager cohort is needed before firm conclusions can be made.

  18. [Deceased organ donors, legal regulations governing diagnosis of brain death, overview of donors and liver transplants in the Czech Republic].

    PubMed

    Pokorná, E

    2013-08-01

    The key restriction of transplantation medicine globally, as well as in the Czech Republic, concerns the lack of organs. The number of deceased donors, and thus the availability of organ transplants, has been stagnating in our country. The paper describes current legal regulations governing the dia-gnosis of brain death and primary legal and medical criteria for the contraindication of the deceased for organ explantation, gives an overview of the number of liver transplants, age structure, and diagnosis resulting in brain death of the deceased liver donors in the Czech Republic.

  19. Characteristics of Rural and Urban Cadaveric Organ Transplant Donors and Recipients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, William B.; Lushkov, Gili; Nelson, William A.; Wallace, Amy E.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Health disparities have been found when comparing rural and urban populations. Purpose: To compare characteristics of rural and urban cadaveric transplant donors and recipients. Methods: We used deidentified individual-level data on 55,929 cadaveric transplant donor-recipient exchanges between 2000 and 2003 and examined the relative rates…

  20. Barriers to live donor kidney transplants in the pediatric population: A single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Taormina, Shibany P; Galloway, Matthew P; Jain, Amrish

    2017-03-01

    A decrease in live donor pediatric kidney transplants has occurred in the United States. This study investigates barriers that may influence access to live donor kidney transplants in children. Retrospective chart review was conducted for 91 children (69% male, mean age 11.9 years) who underwent pretransplant workup from 2005 to 2015 at an urban pediatric hospital. Fifty-four percent were African American, 32% Caucasian, 8% Arabic, 3% Hispanic, and 3% Others. Government-sponsored insurance (Medicaid/Medicare) was utilized by 73%, and 54% had dual caregivers. Only nine of 68 kidney transplants were live donor transplants. Live donor transplants (11%) were significantly (P=.008) lower than deceased donor transplants (59%) in African Americans. Private insurance was reported by 56% of live donor recipients and 25% of deceased donor recipients. Among live donor recipients, 78% were from dual caregiver families. Caregiver, health-related, financial, and religious/cultural barriers to live donor transplants were reported, several of which may be amenable to positive intervention.

  1. Summary of the British Transplantation Society guidelines for transplantation from donors after deceased circulatory death.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Peter A; Burnapp, Lisa; Manas, Derek

    2014-02-15

    The second edition of the British Transplantation Society Guidelines for Transplantation from Donors after Deceased Circulatory Death was published in June 2013. The guideline has been extensively revised since the previous edition in 2004 and has used the GRADE system to rate the strength of evidence and recommendations. This article summarizes the Statements of Recommendation contained in the guideline, which provide a framework for transplantation after deceased circulatory death in the U.K. and may be of wide international interest. It is recommended that the full guideline document is consulted for details of the relevant references and evidence base. This may be accessed at: http://www.bts.org.uk/MBR/Clinical/Guidelines/Current/Member/Clinical/Current_Guidelines.aspx.

  2. Treatment of pure red-cell aplasia with cyclosporine in a renal transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Rahsan; Bilen, Yusuf; Keles, Mustafa; Uyanik, Abdullah; Gokbulut, Puren; Aydinli, Bulent

    2013-02-01

    Acquired pure red-cell aplasia is a rare disorder that can be either idiopathic or associated with certain autoimmune diseases, pregnancy, lymphoproliferative disorders, nutritional deficiencies, or medicines. We present a deceased-donor renal transplant patient who developed pure red-cell aplasia associated with mycophenolate mofetil or tacrolimus and was treated with cyclosporine. A 20-year-old woman was transplanted from a deceased donor 1 month earlier and presented to us with symptoms of fatigue, prostration, and palpitation. The results of a laboratory examination revealed anemia. A diagnostic work-up resulted in a diagnosis of pure red-cell aplasia. Mycophenolate mofetil was discontinued. Tacrolimus also was replaced with cyclosporine 2 months after mycophenolate mofetil was halted because of a lack of improvement in anemia. Three months later, her anemia improved with cyclosporine. Starting cyclosporine instead of tacrolimus or mycophenolate mofetil showed good improvement in our patient within 6 months of therapy.

  3. [III Consensus Meeting of the Spanish Society of Liver Transplantation. Hepatitis C, living-donor liver transplantation, quality of liver grafts and of liver transplantation programs].

    PubMed

    2011-10-01

    The constant updating in the field of liver transplant led to the holding of the III Consensus Meeting of the Spanish Liver Transplant Association. Three current topics of great clinical interest were debated during this meeting; transplant in patients with liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis C, live donor liver transplant and the evaluation of the quality of liver grafts. A subject of great interest to Liver Transplant Units was also discussed: the assessment of their quality.

  4. [III Consensus Meeting of the Spanish Society of Liver Transplantation. Hepatitis C, living-donor liver transplantation, quality of liver grafts and of liver transplantation programs].

    PubMed

    Herrero, J Ignacio

    2011-11-01

    The constant updating in the field of liver transplant led to the holding of the III Consensus Meeting of the Spanish Liver Transplant Association. Three current topics of great clinical interest were debated during this meeting; transplant in patients with liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis C, live donor liver transplant and the evaluation of the quality of liver grafts. A subject of great interest to Liver Transplant Units was also discussed: the assessment of their quality.

  5. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Measurement in Renal Transplantation: A Prospective, Longitudinal Study With Protocol Biopsies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juhan; Oh, Young Taik; Joo, Dong Jin; Ma, Bo Gyoung; Lee, A-lan; Lee, Jae Geun; Song, Seung Hwan; Kim, Seung Up; Jung, Dae Chul; Chung, Yong Eun; Kim, Yu Seun

    2015-09-01

    Interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA) is a common cause of kidney allograft loss. Several noninvasive techniques developed to assess tissue fibrosis are widely used to examine the liver. However, relatively few studies have investigated the use of elastographic methods to assess transplanted kidneys. The aim of this study was to explore the clinical implications of the acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) technique in renal transplant patients. A total of 91 patients who underwent living donor renal transplantation between September 2010 and January 2013 were included in this prospective study. Shear wave velocity (SWV) was measured by ARFI at baseline and predetermined time points (1 week and 6 and 12 months after transplantation). Protocol biopsies were performed at 12 months. Instead of reflecting IF/TA, SWVs were found to be related to time elapsed after transplantation. Mean SWV increased continuously during the first postoperative year (P < 0.001). In addition, mixed model analysis showed no correlation existed between SWV and serum creatinine (r = -0.2426, P = 0.0771). There was also no evidence of a relationship between IF/TA and serum creatinine (odds ratio [OR] = 1.220, P = 0.7648). Furthermore, SWV temporal patterns were dependent on the kidney weight to body weight ratio (KW/BW). In patients with a KW/BW < 3.5 g/kg, mean SWV continuously increased for 12 months, whereas it decreased after 6 months in those with a KW/BW ≥ 3.5 g/kg.No significant correlation was observed between SWV and IF/TA or renal dysfunction. However, SWV was found to be related to the time after transplantation. Renal hemodynamics influenced by KW/BW might impact SWV values.

  6. Of kin and kidneys: do kinship networks contribute to racial disparities in living donor kidney transplantation?

    PubMed

    Daw, Jonathan

    2014-03-01

    In the United States, racial disparities in kidney transplantation are large and especially stark for living donor transplants. Medical researchers frequently attribute this to the availability of medically compatible living kidney donors, who are usually kin. This paper evaluates this hypothesis by testing whether African American transplant candidates likely have lesser access to suitable living donors in their kinship networks than white candidates. This paper evaluates this hypothesis using a simulation design. Contrary to prior research on this topic, this simulation analysis concludes that black-white disparities in living donor kidney transplantation are unlikely to be the result of group differences in the availability of suitable donors. Although individual white kin are individually more likely to be suitable donors, African Americans' larger average kinship networks compensate for this difference.

  7. Progressive pulmonary hypertension: another criterion for expeditious renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Yogesh N V; Lunawat, Deepika; Abraham, Georgi; Matthew, Milly; Mullasari, Ajith; Nagarajan, Prethivee; Reddy, Yuvaram N V

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in a cohort of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prior to and following renal transplantation and to identify the possible risk factors. Of the 425 renal transplantations performed between 2001 and 2007, Doppler echocardiographic findings were available in 124. The echocardiographic data, collected both pre- and post-transplant, included the pulmonary artery pressure (PAP), ejection fraction and left ventricular hypertrophy. The data analyzed included age, gender, hypertension, diabetes, smoking status, along with blood urea, creatinine, glomerular filtration rate, hemoglobin, hemodialysis duration, urine albumin, arterio-venous access and body mass index (BMI). Chi-square test was used for discrete variables and ANOVA was used for continuous variables. Of the patients studied, males comprised 72%; the mean age was 43.3 ± 13.02 years; 87% were hypertensive, 30% were diabetic and 4% were smokers. Statistical analysis revealed a significant reduction of the PAP, irrespective of its severity, following renal transplantation (P <0.05). The PAP had no significant correlation with any of the parameters analyzed, with the exception of BMI (P <0.05). Our study suggests that the PAP gets reduced in patients with ESRD after renal transplantation.

  8. Early changes in scores of chronic damage on transplant kidney protocol biopsies reflect donor characteristics, but not future graft function.

    PubMed

    Caplin, Ben; Veighey, Kristin; Mahenderan, Arundathi; Manook, Miriam; Henry, Joanne; Nitsch, Dorothea; Harber, Mark; Dupont, Peter; Wheeler, David C; Jones, Gareth; Fernando, Bimbi; Howie, Alexander J; Veitch, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The amount of irreversible injury on renal allograft biopsy predicts function, but little is known about the early evolution of this damage. In a single-center cohort, we examined the relationship between donor-, recipient-, and transplantation-associated factors and change in a morphometric index of chronic damage (ICD) between protocol biopsies performed at implantation and at 2-3 months. We then investigated whether early delta ICD predicted subsequent biochemical outcomes. We found little evidence to support differences between the study group, who had undergone serial biopsies, and a contemporaneous control group, who had not. In allografts with serial biopsies (n = 162), there was an increase in ICD between implantation (median: 2%, IQR:0-8) and 2-3 months post-transplant (median 8% IQR:4-15; p < 0.0001). Donation from younger or live donors was independently associated with smaller early post-transplant increases in ICD. There was no evidence for a difference in delta ICD between donation after cardiac death vs. donation after brain death, nor association with length of cold ischemia. After adjustment for GFR at the time of the second biopsy, delta ICD after three months did not predict allograft function at one yr. These findings suggest that graft damage develops shortly after transplantation and reflects donor factors, but does not predict future biochemical outcomes.

  9. The impact of meeting donor management goals on the development of delayed graft function in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Malinoski, D J; Patel, M S; Ahmed, O; Daly, M C; Mooney, S; Graybill, C O; Foster, C E; Salim, A

    2013-04-01

    Many organ procurement organizations (OPOs) utilize preset critical care endpoints as donor management goals (DMGs) in order to standardize care and improve outcomes. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of meeting DMGs on delayed graft function (DGF) in renal transplant recipients. All eight OPOs of the United Network for Organ Sharing Region 5 prospectively implemented nine DMGs in every donor after neurologic determination of death (DNDD). "DMGs met" was defined a priori as achieving any seven of the nine DMGs and this was recorded at the time of consent for donation to reflect donor hospital ICU management, 12-18 h later, and prior to organ recovery. Multivariable analyses were performed to identify independent predictors of DGF (dialysis in the first week after transplantation) with a p<0.05. A total of 722 transplanted kidneys from 492 DNDDs were included. A total of 28% developed DGF. DMGs were met at consent in 14%, 12-18 h in 32% and prior to recovery in 38%. DGF was less common when DMGs were met at consent (17% vs. 30%, p=0.007). Independent predictors of DGF were age, Cr and cold ischemia time, while meeting DMGs at consent was significantly protective. The management of potential organ donors prior to consent affects outcomes and should remain a priority in the intensive care unit.

  10. Laboratory Testing of Donors and Stool Samples for Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Woodworth, Michael H; Neish, Emma M; Miller, Nancy S; Dhere, Tanvi; Burd, Eileen M; Carpentieri, Cynthia; Sitchenko, Kaitlin L; Kraft, Colleen S

    2017-04-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation is an efficacious and inexpensive therapy for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection, yet its safety is thought to depend on appropriate fecal donor screening. FDA guidance for regulation of this procedure is in flux, but screening and manufacture of fecal material from asymptomatic donors present many challenges to clinical laboratories. This minireview summarizes FDA regulatory changes, principles of donor selection, and recommended laboratory screening practices for fecal microbiota transplantation.

  11. Successful lung transplant from donor after cardiac death: a potential solution to shortage of thoracic organs.

    PubMed

    McKellar, Stephen H; Durham, Lucian A; Scott, John P; Cassivi, Stephen D

    2010-02-01

    Lung transplant is an effective treatment for patients with end-stage lung disease but is limited because of the shortage of acceptable donor organs. Organ donation after cardiac death is one possible solution to the organ shortage because it could expand the pool of potential donors beyond brain-dead and living donors. We report the preliminary experience of Mayo Clinic with donation after cardiac death, lung procurement, and transplant.

  12. Transplantation of solid organs procured from influenza A H1N1 infected donors.

    PubMed

    Cockbain, Andrew J; Jacob, Matthew; Ecuyer, Clare; Hostert, Lutz; Ahmad, Niaz

    2011-12-01

    Following the influenza A H1N1 (swine flu) pandemic, there remains little evidence informing the safety of transplanting organs from donors suspected or diagnosed with H1N1. Limited guidelines from the major transplant societies leave the use of such organs at the discretion of individual transplant centres, and practice varies considerably both nationally and internationally. We present the largest published series of outcome following transplantation of organs from H1N1 positive donors and demonstrate that these organs can be transplanted safely and with good short-term outcome. We discuss our local policy for treatment of recipients with Oseltamivir.

  13. Oral manifestations of allograft recipients before and after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Gita; Davarmanesh, Mehdy; Azar, Mohammad Reza; Salehipour, Mehdy; Sedaghat, Razieh; Karimi, Fatemeh; Pazhoohi, Neda; Ansari, Elham; Nazhvani, Ali Dehghani

    2014-03-01

    Renal transplantation is considered the best treatment option for patients with end-stage renal disease. In this study, the prevalence of oral lesions was studied in a cohort of renal transplant recipients before and after transplantation. Fifty-nine kidney transplant recipients were examined one week before and four months after transplantation. The information gathered included age, sex, smoking history, duration on dialysis, drugs and their doses. There were 41 males (69.5%) and 18 females (30.5%) with a mean age of 37 years. Before surgery, two patients had non-specific lesions and two other patients had leukoedema. Following transplantation, 24 patients (40.7%) did not have any specific lesion. In six patients, we observed non-specific erythematous lesions (10.2%). Other recorded observations are as follows: Gingival hyperplasia in five patients (8.5%), oral candidiasis of the erythematous type in five patients (8.5%), hairy leukoplakia in four patients (6.8%) and leukoedema in seven patients (11.9%). In our study patients, the prevalence of oral lesions increased after transplantation, although it was lower than that reported in other studies. This could be due to the differences in sample size, differences between Iranian race and other races and different pharmaceutical formulation of the drug produced in Iran.

  14. Renal transplantation promptly restores excretory function but disturbed L-arginine metabolism persists in patients during the early period after surgery.

    PubMed

    Žunić, Gordana; Vučević, Dragana; Tomić, Aleksandar; Drašković-Pavlović, Biljana; Majstorović, Ivana; Spasić, Slavica

    2015-01-30

    The synthesis and whole body metabolism of L-arginine (Arg) are disturbed in renal diseases. Renal transplantation represents the best therapy in the end-stage of these diseases. In the present we compared alterations of plasma Arg and related compounds with renal excretory function in patients with end-stage renal disease, before and after kidney transplantation. Arg, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), citrulline (Cit), glutamine (Gln), ornithine (Orn), phenylalanine (Phe), tyrosine (Tyr), urea, creatinine, albumin, and nitrate were analyzed in patients before, immediately after (0-time) and 1, 2, 3, 7 and 14 days following living donors kidney transplantation. Healthy subjects were controls. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and amino acid molar ratios were calculated. Before transplantation creatinine, urea, Cit, Gln, ADMA, and nitrate were above, while GFR and Arg were below controls, confirming disturbed excretory and metabolic renal functions in patients with renal disease. Renal transplantation promptly normalized creatinine, urea, GFR, Cit, and nitrate. However, regardless of increased molar Phe/Tyr ratios, indicating increased net protein catabolism in peripheral tissues, low Arg and elevated ADMA concentrations persisted throughout the examined period. Alterations of other amino acids also suggest similarly disturbed Arg metabolism in patients after kidney transplantation. In conclusion, renal transplant promptly restored its excretory function, but increased net protein catabolism, disturbed Arg metabolism and endothelial dysfunction in entire body of these patients were not improved throughout the early period after the operation. That has to be considered in their therapy.

  15. HLA Matching Trumps Donor Age: Donor-Recipient Pairing Characteristics That Impact Long-Term Success in Living Donor Kidney Transplantation in the Era of Paired Kidney Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Milner, John; Melcher, Marc L.; Lee, Brian; Veale, Jeff; Ronin, Matthew; D'Alessandro, Tom; Hil, Garet; Fry, Phillip C.; Shannon, Patrick W.

    2016-01-01

    Background We sought to identify donor characteristics influencing long-term graft survival, expressed by a novel measure, kidney life years (KLYs), in living donor kidney transplantation (LDKT). Methods Cox and multiple regression analyses were applied to data from the Scientific Registry for Transplant Research from 1987 to 2015. Dependent variable was KLYs. Results Living donor kidney transplantation (129 273) were performed from 1987 to 2013 in the United States. To allow sufficient time to assess long-term results, outcomes of LDKTs between 1987 and 2001 were analyzed. After excluding cases where a patient died with a functioning graft (8301) or those missing HLA data (9), 40 371 cases were analyzed. Of 18 independent variables, the focus became the 4 variables that were the most statistically and clinically significant in that they are potentially modifiable in donor selection (P <0.0001; ie, HLA match points, donor sex, donor biological sibling and donor age). HLA match points had the strongest relationship with KLYs, was associated with the greatest tendency toward graft longevity on Cox regression, and had the largest increase in KLYs (2.0 year increase per 50 antigen Match Points) based on multiple regression. Conclusions In cases when a patient has multiple potential donors, such as through paired exchange, graft life might be extended when a donor with favorable matching characteristics is selected. PMID:27830179

  16. Follow-up study of renal transplant recipients treated at the Guatemalan Social Security Hospital.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Polo, V; Lou-Meda, R; Castillo, M; Herrera, C; Mollinedo, A

    2004-03-01

    Guatemala is Central America's westernmost country, with a ratio of 500,000 inhabitants per nephrologist. Yearly reports show an average of 150 new end-stage renal disease patients and 40 renal transplants, which are performed at two public health care facilities. The aim of this study was to describe the results of the transplant program at one of these centers (Social Security Hospital of Guatemala). Our program began in 1986, performing an average of 17 transplants per year. Cyclosporine has been used since 1992, and since 2001, C2 has been routinely monitored. Data on 255 patients (of 293) were available for analysis. Male-to-female ratio was 7:1, with 94% having received hemodialysis as their replacement therapy. The mean age at transplant was 35 years and living related donors used in 95%. The average duration of follow-up was 7 years. The mean creatinine and C2 level at most recent visit were 1.36 mg/dL and 864 ng/mL, respectively. A significant reduction in the incidence of acute rejection episodes was seen after the initiation of C2 monitoring (3% vs 1.2%). In general, these results are similar to data in other countries. The number of transplants performed must be increased to meet the current demand, and the cadaveric source of donation is the obvious way to do so. C2 monitoring is an example of technical improvements directed to optimize available resources.

  17. Does Lung Donation by Heart Donors Have an Impact on Survival in Heart Transplant Recipients?

    PubMed

    Xia, Y; Friedmann, P; Bello, R; Goldstein, D; D'Alessandro, D

    2017-02-01

    Lung procurement is increasing during multiorgan recovery and substantially alters the explant process. This study evaluated whether lung donation by a heart donor affects survival in heart transplant recipients. Retrospective analysis of United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) adult heart transplantation data from 1998 to 2012 was performed. Lung donors (LDs) were defined as those having at least one lung procured and transplanted. Non-LDs had neither lung transplanted. Heart transplant recipients who had previous transplants, who had heterotopic transplants, who were waitlisted for other organs or who were temporarily delisted were excluded from the analysis. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression were performed. Of 23 590 heart transplant recipients meeting criteria during the study period, 8638 (36.6%) transplants were from LDs. Donors in the LD group had less history of cigarette use (15.5% vs. 29.5%, p < 0.001). On univariate analysis, LDs were associated with improved patient survival (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, LDs were not significantly associated with patient survival (adjusted hazard ratio 0.98, 95% confidence interval 0.94-1.03). Analysis of the UNOS registry suggested that donor pulmonary status and lung procurement had no detrimental effect on survival in heart transplant recipients, supporting the present practice of using donor lungs whenever possible.

  18. Surgical issues in lung transplantation: options, donor selection, graft preservation, and airway healing.

    PubMed

    Daly, R C; McGregor, C G

    1997-01-01

    To present an overview of the surgical issues in lung transplantation, including the historical context and the rationale for choosing a particular procedure for a specific patient, we reviewed and summarized the current medical literature and our personal experience. Several surgical options are available, including single lung transplantation; double lung transplantation; heart-lung transplantation; bilateral, sequential single lung transplantation; and (recently) single lobe transplantation. Although single lung transplantation is preferred for maximal use of the available organs, bilateral lung transplantation is necessary for septic lung diseases and may be appropriate for pulmonary hypertension and bullous emphysema. Heart-lung transplantation is performed for Eisenmenger's syndrome and for primary pulmonary hypertension with severe right ventricular failure. General factors for consideration in assessment of compatibility of the donor and potential recipient include ABO blood group, height (the donor should be within +/- 20% of the recipient's height), and length of the lungs (determined on an anteroposterior chest roentgenogram). Graft preservation and minimal duration of ischemia are important. Complications associated with airway healing are related to ischemia of the donor bronchus. We have addressed the issue of donor bronchial ischemia by direct revascularization of the donor bronchial arteries with use of the recipient's internal thoracic artery. Currently, lung transplantation offers a realistic therapeutic option to patients with end-stage pulmonary parenchymal or vascular disease.

  19. A Case Series of Gastrointestinal Tuberculosis in Renal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Cristina; Silva, Hugo; Aguiar, Pedro; Farrajota, Pedro; Almeida, Manuela; Pedroso, Sofia; Martins, La Salete; Dias, Leonídio; Vizcaíno, José Ramón; Castro Henriques, António; Cabrita, António

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a disease relatively frequent in renal transplant patients, presenting a wide variety of clinical manifestations, often involving various organs and potentially fatal. Gastrointestinal tuberculosis, although rare in the general population, is about 50 times more frequent in renal transplant patients. Intestinal tuberculosis has a very difficult investigational approach, requiring a high clinical suspicion for its diagnosis. Therapeutic options may be a problem in the context of an immunosuppressed patient, requiring adjustment of maintenance therapy. The authors report two cases of isolated gastro-intestinal tuberculosis in renal transplant recipients that illustrates the difficulty of making this diagnosis and a brief review of the literature on its clinical presentation, diagnosis, and therapeutic approach. PMID:24558621

  20. Renal artery aneurysm in hand-assisted laparoscopic donor nephrectomy: case report.

    PubMed

    Maciel, R F; Branco, A J; Branco, A W; Guterres, J C; Silva, A E; Ramos, L B; Rost, C; Vieira, C A; Cicogna, P E S; Daudt, C A; Deboni, L M; Vieira, M A; Luz, H A; Vieira, J A

    2003-12-01

    We report a living donor who underwent laparoscopic nephrectomy using a hand-assisted device (HALD). At preoperative arteriography the donor showed a renal artery aneurysm. The patient was a 37-year-old female, 166 cm height, white, weighing 87 kg, HLA identical to the recipient. HALD was indicated due to the better visualization of renal pedicle and greater security in an obese patient. Renal artery aneurysm is a rare condition, with many possible complications. The method proved to be adequate and safe for donor nephrectomy, despite a renal artery aneurysm.

  1. Hispanic/Latino Disparities in Living Donor Kidney Transplantation: Role of a Culturally Competent Transplant Program

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Elisa J.; Lee, Jungwha; Kang, Raymond; Ladner, Daniela P.; Skaro, Anton I.; Holl, Jane L.; French, Dustin D.; Abecassis, Michael M.; Caicedo, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background Hispanic Americans face disparities in access to kidney transplantation, particularly living donor kidney transplantation (LDKT). This study compared characteristics of LDKT recipients before and after implementing the Hispanic Kidney Transplant Program (HKTP) at Northwestern Medicines (NM) and other centers. Methods The NM HKTP, initiated in December 2006, delivers culturally and linguistically competent and congruent care. Program-specific data were used to compare the mean ratios of Hispanic to non-Hispanic white LDKTs between pre-HKTP (2001-2006) and post-HKTP (2008-2013), and to compare the characteristics of NM's adult LDKT patients between pre-HKTP and post-HKTP. The same ratio was calculated for transplant centers in regions with a significant Hispanic population (≥25%) and performing in the top tertile of total LDKT volume in the pre-HKTP period. The number of Hispanic and non-Hispanic white patients added to the waiting list were compared between pre-HKTP (2001-2006) and post-HKTP (2008-2013) as a proxy for increased patient referrals and a pathway by which the HKTP may increase LDKTs. Results The ratio of Hispanic to non-Hispanic white LDKTs significantly increased by 70% after the implementation of NM's HKTP (pre-HKTP mean = 0.20, post-HKTP mean = 0.34; P= 0.001). None of the other transplant centers experienced a similar increase in their ratio of Hispanic to non-Hispanic white LDKTs. The NM waiting list additions grew by 91% among Hispanics, but grew only 4% for non-Hispanic whites. Conclusions These data suggest that the development and implementation of a culturally congruent transplant program can positively affect Hispanic LDKT and thereby reduce Hispanics disparities in LDKT rates. Further studies are needed to prospectively evaluate the generalizability of implementing such culturally competent interventions at other transplant programs. PMID:27500229

  2. The impact of living-unrelated transplant on establishing deceased-donor liver program in Syria.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Bassam

    2014-10-01

    Liver transplant is the criterion standard for patients with end-stage liver disease. Yet there is no liver transplant in Syria. Traveling abroad for a liver transplant is a luxury few Syrians can afford. There is currently an on-going debate whether to start a liver transplant program using living or deceased donors. In 2003, a new law was enacted, authorizing the use of organs from volunteer strangers and deceased donors. Despite the positive aspects of this law (allowing unrelated donors to increase the number of transplants in the country); the negative aspects also were obvious. The poor used the law to sell their organs to the rich, and this model is in violation of the Istanbul Declaration. To better document transplant communities' perceptions on organ donation, an e-mail survey was sent to a nationally representative sample of physicians (n = 115) that showed that 58% of respondents did not support the start of liver transplant from live donors, as they fear a considerable risk for the donor and the recipient. Seventy-one percent of respondents believe that unrelated kidney donation has contributed to tarnishing the reputation of transplant, and 56% believe that a deceased-donor program can run in parallel with unrelated organ donations. The interest in deceased-donor program has been affected negatively by the systematic approach of using poor persons as the source of the organ. This lack of interest has affected starting a liver program that relies on deceased donors; especially the need for kidneys is more than livers. Health authorities in Syria were inclined to initiate a liver transplant program from live donors, despite the risks of serious morbidities and mortality. In conclusion then, paid kidney donation in actual effect is actually a hindrance to establishing a deceased-donor liver program.

  3. Kidney Transplantation as Primary Therapy for End-Stage Renal Disease: A National Kidney Foundation/Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF/KDOQI™) Conference

    PubMed Central

    Abecassis, Michael; Bartlett, Stephen T.; Collins, Allan J.; Davis, Connie L.; Delmonico, Francis L.; Friedewald, John J.; Hays, Rebecca; Howard, Andrew; Jones, Edward; Leichtman, Alan B.; Merion, Robert M.; Metzger, Robert A.; Pradel, Francoise; Schweitzer, Eugene J.; Velez, Ruben L.; Gaston, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Kidney transplantation is the most desired and cost-effective modality of renal replacement therapy for patients with irreversible chronic kidney failure (end-stage renal disease, stage 5 chronic kidney disease). Despite emerging evidence that the best outcomes accrue to patients who receive a transplant early in the course of renal replacement therapy, only 2.5% of incident patients with end-stage renal disease undergo transplantation as their initial modality of treatment, a figure largely unchanged for at least a decade. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: The National Kidney Foundation convened a Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (KDOQI) conference in Washington, DC, March 19 through 20, 2007, to examine the issue. Fifty-two participants representing transplant centers, dialysis providers, and payers were divided into three work groups to address the impact of early transplantation on the chronic kidney disease paradigm, educational needs of patients and professionals, and finances of renal replacement therapy. Results: Participants explored the benefits of early transplantation on costs and outcomes, identified current barriers (at multiple levels) that impede access to early transplantation, and recommended specific interventions to overcome those barriers. Conclusions: With implementation of early education, referral to a transplant center coincident with creation of vascular access, timely transplant evaluation, and identification of potential living donors, early transplantation can be an option for substantially more patients with chronic kidney disease. PMID:18256371

  4. Management of children after renal transplantation: highlights for general pediatricians

    PubMed Central

    Giglia, Lucy; Chan, Howard; Chan, Anthony K.

    2012-01-01

    The number of children undergoing successful renal transplantations has been increasing steadily and as a result; general pediatricians are now more likely to encounter children with a kidney allograft in their practice. Although the medical care immediately after transplantation is mostly provided by transplant teams, more and more outpatient care will eventually be performed at the patient’s local community. Medical care from general pediatricians is particularly important, especially for children who are residing far from transplant centers. As these children require prolong immunosuppressive therapies and are susceptible to various specific clinical problems, it is imperative for their primary care providers and pediatricians to be knowledgeable about their specific needs and be competent in providing care. This article highlights the roles and common practice related issues that pertain to general pediatricians in the care of pediatric renal allograft recipients. PMID:26835261

  5. Natural history and etiology of hyperuricemia following pediatric renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Edvardsson, V O; Kaiser, B A; Polinsky, M S; Palmer, J A; Quien, R; Baluarte, H J

    1995-02-01

    A retrospective review was conducted to determine the incidence, etiology, natural history and complications of hyperuricemia after pediatric renal transplantation. Of 81 active transplant recipients aged 10.1 +/- 4.8 (mean +/- SD) years being followed by St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, 57 (70%) were males and 59 (73%) Caucasian. Their immunosuppression consisted of azathioprine, cyclosporine A and prednisone. Mean serum uric acid concentrations peaked at 6 months post transplantation (6.2 +/- 2.6 mg/dl), when 39% of the patients had hyperuricemia and 60% were receiving diuretics, and decreased thereafter. At 30 months, 23% of the patients had hyperuricemia and 17% required diuretics. When we compared 42 normouricemic (group A) with 24 hyperuricemic (group B) patients at 18 months post transplantation, we found that patients in group B were older (11.6 +/- 4.2 vs. 8.6 +/- 5.2 years, P = 0.01), had worse renal function (77 +/- 25 vs. 96 +/- 36 ml/min per 1.73 m2, P = 0.03) and required diuretics more frequently (63% vs. 21%, P = 0.001), but had identical blood levels of cyclosporine A (82 +/- 28 vs. 84 +/- 35 ng/ml, P = 0.78). A family history of gout did not affect the prevalence of hyperuricemia after transplantation. Asymptomatic hyperuricemia is common following pediatric renal transplantation and is more likely attributable to reduced renal function and diuretic therapy than to the known hyperuricemic effect of cyclosporine A. Of these variables, only diuretic therapy is readily controllable and should be closely regulated following pediatric renal transplantation.

  6. The Effect of Different Glycaemic States on Renal Transplant Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Depczynski, Barbara; O'Sullivan, Anthony J.; Luxton, Grant; Mangos, George

    2016-01-01

    Background. Optimal glycaemic targets following transplantation are unknown. Understanding the impact of DM and posttransplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) may improve patient and graft survival in transplant recipients. Aim. To determine the perioperative and one-year outcomes after renal transplantation and whether these outcomes are affected by preexisting DM, PTDM, or glycaemia during transplant admission. Method. Adult recipients of renal transplants from a single centre over 5.5 years were retrospectively reviewed. Measured outcomes during transplant admission included glycaemia and complications (infective complications, acute rejection, and return to dialysis) and, at 12 months, glycaemic control and complications (cardiovascular complication, graft failure). Results. Of 148 patients analysed, 29 (19.6%) had DM and 27 (18.2%) developed PTDM. Following transplantation, glucose levels were higher in patients with DM and PTDM. DM patients had a longer hospital stay, had more infections, and were more likely return to dialysis. PTDM patients had increased rates of acute rejection and return to dialysis. At 1 year after transplant, there were more cardiovascular complications in DM patients compared to those without DM. Conclusions. Compared to patients without DM, patients with DM or PTDM are more likely to suffer from complications perioperatively and at 12 months. Perioperative glycaemia is associated with graft function and may be a modifiable risk. PMID:28053992

  7. Allograft and prostatic involvement in a renal transplant recipient with disseminated tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sreejith, P.; Jha, V.; Kohli, H.S.; Rathi, M.; Gupta, K.L.; Sakhuja, V.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a serious opportunistic infection in renal transplant recipients and is disseminated in nature in one-third of patients. Genito urinary tuberculosis is rare in renal transplant recipients. We report a patient presenting 5 years after renal transplantation with disseminated tuberculosis and allograft and prostatic involvement. PMID:20535270

  8. Allograft and prostatic involvement in a renal transplant recipient with disseminated tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, P; Jha, V; Kohli, H S; Rathi, M; Gupta, K L; Sakhuja, V

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a serious opportunistic infection in renal transplant recipients and is disseminated in nature in one-third of patients. Genito urinary tuberculosis is rare in renal transplant recipients. We report a patient presenting 5 years after renal transplantation with disseminated tuberculosis and allograft and prostatic involvement.

  9. Impact of the donor body mass index on the survival of pediatric liver transplant recipients and post-transplant obesity.

    PubMed

    Perito, Emily Rothbaum; Rhee, Sue; Glidden, Dave; Roberts, John Paul; Rosenthal, Philip

    2012-08-01

    In adult liver transplant recipients, the donor body mass index (dBMI) is associated with posttransplant obesity but not with graft or patient survival. Because of the obesity epidemic in the United States and the already limited supply of liver donors, clarifying whether the dBMI affects pediatric outcomes is important. United Network for Organ Sharing data for pediatric liver transplants in the United States (1990-2010) were evaluated. Data on transplants performed between 2004 and 2010 (n = 3788) were used for survival analyses with Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models and for posttransplant obesity analyses with generalized estimating equations. For children receiving adult donor livers, a dBMI of 25 to <35 kg/m(2) was not associated with graft or patient survival in univariate or multivariate analyses. A dBMI ≥ 35 kg/m(2) increased the risk of graft loss [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.54, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.29-5.01, P = 0.007] and death (HR = 3.56, 95% CI = 1.64-7.72, P = 0.001). For pediatric donors, the dBMI was not associated with graft loss or mortality in a univariate or multivariate analysis. An overweight or obese donor was not a risk factor for posttransplant obesity. Overweight and obesity are common among liver transplant donors. This analysis suggests that for adult donors, a body mass index (BMI) of 25 to <35 kg/m(2) should not by itself be a contraindication to liver donation. Severe obesity (BMI ≥ 35 kg/m(2)) in adult donors increased the risk of graft loss and mortality, even after adjustments for recipient, donor, and transplant risk factors. Posttransplant obesity was not associated with the dBMI in this analysis. Further research is needed to clarify the impact of donor obesity on pediatric liver transplant recipients.

  10. Digital processing of histopathological aspects in renal transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Albuquerque Araujo, Arnaldo; de Andrade, Marcos C.; Bambirra, Eduardo A.; dos Santos, A. M. M.

    1993-07-01

    We describe here our initial experience with the digital image processing of histopathological aspects from multiple renal biopsies of transplanted kidney in a patient treated with Cyclosporine (CsA), a powerful immunosupressor drug whose use has improved the chances of a successful vascularized organ transplantation (Tx). Unfortunately, CsA promotes morphological alterations to the glomerular structure of the kidneys. To characterize this process, glomeruli, tufts, and lumen areas distributions are measured. The results are presented in form of graphics.

  11. Percutaneous transluminal dilatation of transplant renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, R. N.; Keown, P. A.; Ulan, R. A.; Stiller, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty has been applied to the treatment of transplant renal artery stenosis in 3 patients, 2 with severe hypertension resistant to medical therapy, and one with graft dysfunction related to the presence of the stenosis in the early post-transplant period. The clinical courses of the patients before and after angioplasty are illustrated and the usefulness of the technique in this difficult situation stressed. PMID:6458031

  12. Donor-derived tuberculosis after solid organ transplantation in two patients and a staff member.

    PubMed

    Bucher, J N; Schoenberg, M B; Freytag, I; Lange, U; Hofmann-Thiel, S; Guba, M O; Werner, J; Eder, A; Schelling, G; Stangl, M

    2016-06-01

    Because of global mobility and migration resulting in a growing diversity of the donor pool, the risk for donor-derived tuberculosis in solid organ transplant recipients becomes more and more relevant, even in countries with a low overall tuberculosis incidence. Here, we describe a case series of donor-derived tuberculosis in 2 of 3 solid organ transplant recipients and one medical staff member in Germany resulting in the death of one recipient. This case series highlights the relevance of this topic to clinicians. It advocates for a better communication between organ procurement organizations and transplant centers regarding donor information and transplant recipient outcome. Furthermore, it underpins the necessity for a standardized critical incident reporting system in the german transplant system to improve short- and long-term recipient's safety, health and survival.

  13. Donor-Derived Coccidioides immitis Endocarditis and Disseminated Infection in the Setting of Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Joanna K.; Giraldeau, Genevieve; Montoya, Jose G.; Deresinski, Stan; Ho, Dora Y.; Pham, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background. Endocarditis is a rare manifestation of infection with Coccidioides. This is the first reported case of donor-derived Coccidioides endocarditis obtained from a heart transplant. Methods. We present a unique case of donor-derived Coccidioides immitis endocarditis and disseminated infection in a heart transplant patient. We also conducted a review of the literature to identify other cases of donor-derived coccidioidomycosis in solid organ transplant recipients and reviewed their clinical characteristics. Results. Fifteen prior cases of donor-derived coccidioidomycosis were identified. A majority of these cases were diagnosed by positive culture (83%). Mortality was high at 58%. Conclusions. Clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for disseminated coccidioidomycosis in patients who received transplants with organs from donors with a history of residing in endemic regions. PMID:27413765

  14. Living donor liver transplantation for inborn errors of metabolism - An underutilized resource in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thomas A; Enns, Gregory M; Esquivel, Carlos O

    2016-09-01

    Inborn metabolic diseases of the liver can be life-threatening disorders that cause debilitating and permanent neurological damage. Symptoms may manifest as early as the neonatal period. Liver transplant replaces the enzymatically deficient liver, allowing for metabolism of toxic metabolites. LDLT for metabolic disorders is rarely performed in the United States as compared to countries such as Japan, where they report >2000 cases performed within the past two decades. Patient and graft survival is comparable to that of the United States, where most of the studies are based on deceased donors. No living donor complications were observed, suggesting that LDLT is as safe and effective as deceased donor transplants performed in the USA. Increased utilization of living donors in the USA will allow for early transplantation to prevent permanent neurological damage in those with severe disease. Pediatric transplant centers should consider utilizing living donors when feasible for children with metabolic disorders of the liver.

  15. Recovery of Native Renal Function in Patients with Hepatorenal Syndrome Following Combined Liver and Kidney Transplant with Mercaptoacetyltriglycine-3 Renogram: Developing a Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Aparici, Carina Mari; Bains, Sukhkarn N.; Carlson, David; Qian, Jesse; Liou, Douglas; Wojciechowski, David; Werner, Jacob; Khan, Sana; Kroll, Cameron; Sandhu, Manreet; Nguyen, Nhan; Hawkins, Randall

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) end up receiving a combined liver and kidney transplant (CKLT) with preservation of native kidneys, specially type 1 HRS since is characterizes by a very rapid deterioration of renal function. Eventually, most of the patients regain renal function, but it is unknown if this is due to the transplanted kidney, the recovery of native renal function, or both. The aim of this study is to evaluate if there is recovery of native renal function in patients with HRS following CKLT. 22 patients (16 men; 6 women) with history of HRS and status post CKLT were studied. Mercapto-acetyltriglycine-3 renograms in the anterior and posterior views with the three kidneys in the field of view were simultaneously acquired. The renograms were analyzed by creating regions of interest around the transplanted and native kidneys. Relative contribution to the renal function, clearance, and effective renal plasma flow for the transplanted and native kidneys were obtained. 1/22 (4.5%) patients presented with a very poor functioning transplanted kidney, in 15/22 (68%) cases the combined native renal function was markedly poorer than the transplanted renal function and in 6/22 (27%) native kidneys showed a contribution to the renal function similar to the transplanted kidney. In conclusion, our series show that around 32% of the HRS patients recovered their native renal function after CKLT. Identification of common factors that affect recovery of native renal function may help to avoid unnecessary renal transplants, significantly reducing morbidity and cost, while facilitating a reallocation of scarce donor resources. PMID:26912978

  16. Recovery of Native Renal Function in Patients with Hepatorenal Syndrome Following Combined Liver and Kidney Transplant with Mercaptoacetyltriglycine-3 Renogram: Developing a Methodology.

    PubMed

    Aparici, Carina Mari; Bains, Sukhkarn N; Carlson, David; Qian, Jesse; Liou, Douglas; Wojciechowski, David; Werner, Jacob; Khan, Sana; Kroll, Cameron; Sandhu, Manreet; Nguyen, Nhan; Hawkins, Randall

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) end up receiving a combined liver and kidney transplant (CKLT) with preservation of native kidneys, specially type 1 HRS since is characterizes by a very rapid deterioration of renal function. Eventually, most of the patients regain renal function, but it is unknown if this is due to the transplanted kidney, the recovery of native renal function, or both. The aim of this study is to evaluate if there is recovery of native renal function in patients with HRS following CKLT. 22 patients (16 men; 6 women) with history of HRS and status post CKLT were studied. Mercapto-acetyltriglycine-3 renograms in the anterior and posterior views with the three kidneys in the field of view were simultaneously acquired. The renograms were analyzed by creating regions of interest around the transplanted and native kidneys. Relative contribution to the renal function, clearance, and effective renal plasma flow for the transplanted and native kidneys were obtained. 1/22 (4.5%) patients presented with a very poor functioning transplanted kidney, in 15/22 (68%) cases the combined native renal function was markedly poorer than the transplanted renal function and in 6/22 (27%) native kidneys showed a contribution to the renal function similar to the transplanted kidney. In conclusion, our series show that around 32% of the HRS patients recovered their native renal function after CKLT. Identification of common factors that affect recovery of native renal function may help to avoid unnecessary renal transplants, significantly reducing morbidity and cost, while facilitating a reallocation of scarce donor resources.

  17. Nonchimeric HLA-Identical Renal Transplant Tolerance: Regulatory Immunophenotypic/Genomic Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, J R; Mathew, J M; Salomon, D R; Kurian, S M; Friedewald, J J; Gallon, L; Konieczna, I; Tambur, A R; Charette, J; Levitsky, J; Jie, C; Kanwar, Y S; Abecassis, M M; Miller, J

    2016-01-01

    We previously described early results of a nonchimeric operational tolerance protocol in human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical living donor renal transplants and now update these results. Recipients given alemtuzumab, tacrolimus/MPA with early sirolimus conversion were multiply infused with donor hematopoietic CD34(+) stem cells. Immunosuppression was withdrawn by 24 months. Twelve months later, operational tolerance was confirmed by rejection-free transplant biopsies. Five of the first eight enrollees were initially tolerant 1 year off immunosuppression. Biopsies of three others after total withdrawal showed Banff 1A acute cellular rejection without renal dysfunction. With longer follow-up including 5-year posttransplant biopsies, four of the five tolerant recipients remain without rejection while one developed Banff 1A without renal dysfunction. We now add seven new subjects (two operationally tolerant), and demonstrate time-dependent increases of circulating CD4(+) CD25(+++) CD127(-) FOXP3(+) Tregs versus losses of Tregs in nontolerant subjects (p < 0.001). Gene expression signatures, developed using global RNA expression profiling of sequential whole blood and protocol biopsy samples, were highly associative with operational tolerance as early as 1 year posttransplant. The blood signature was validated by an external Immune Tolerance Network data set. Our approach to nonchimeric operational HLA-identical tolerance reveals association with Treg immunophenotypes and serial gene expression profiles.

  18. Donor selection in T cell-replete haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: knowns, unknowns, and controversies.

    PubMed

    Ciurea, Stefan O; Champlin, Richard E

    2013-02-01

    Multiple donors are generally available for haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Here we discuss the factors that should be considered when selecting donors for this type of transplantation according to the currently available evidence. Donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSAs) increase the risk of graft failure and should be avoided whenever possible. Strategies to manage recipients with DSAs are discussed. One should choose a full haplotype mismatch rather than a better-matched donor and maximize the dose of infused hematopoietic cells. Donor age and sex are other important factors. Other factors, including predicted natural killer cell alloreactivity and consideration of noninherited maternal alleles, are more controversial. Larger studies are needed to further clarify the role of these factors for donor selection in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  19. Donor research and matching system based on data mining in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Koyuncugil, Ali Serhan; Ozgulbas, Nermin

    2010-06-01

    It is very important to identify the appropriate donor in organ transplantation under the time constraint. Clearly, adequate time must be spent in appropriate donor research in that kind of vital operation. On the other hand, time is very important to search for other alternatives in case of inappropriate donor. However, the possibility for determining the most probable donors as fast as possible has an great importance in using time efficiently. From this point view, the main objective of this paper is developing a system which provides probabilistic prior information in donor transplantation via data mining. While the sytem development process, the basic element is the data of successful organ transplantations. Then, the hidden information and patterns will be discovered from this data. Therefore, this process requires the data mining methods from its definition. In this study, an appropriate donor detection system design based on data mining is suggested.

  20. Renal outcomes of simultaneous liver–kidney transplantation compared to liver transplant alone for candidates with renal dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Todd V.; Lunsford, Keri E.; Vagefi, Parsia A.; Bostrom, Alan; Ma, Michael; Feng, Sandy

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear whether a concomitant kidney transplant grants survival benefit to liver transplant (LT) candidates with renal dysfunction (RD). We retrospectively studied LT candidates without RD (n = 714) and LT candidates with RD who underwent either liver transplant alone (RD-LTA; n = 103) or simultaneous liver–kidney transplant (RD-SLKT; n = 68). RD was defined as renal replacement therapy (RRT) requirement or modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD)-glomerular filtration rate (GFR) <25 mL/min/1.73 m2. RD-LTAs had worse one-yr post-transplant survival compared to RD-SLKTs (79.6% vs. 91.2%, p = 0.05). However, RD-LTA recipients more often had hepatitis C (60.2% vs. 41.2%, p = 0.004) and more severe liver disease (MELD 37.9 ± 8.1 vs. 32.7 ± 9.1, p = 0.0001). Twenty RD-LTA recipients died in the first post-transplant year. Evaluation of the cause and timing of death relative to native renal recovery revealed that only four RD-LTA recipients might have derived survival benefit from RD-SLKT. Overall, 87% of RD-LTA patients recovered renal function within one month of transplant. One yr after RD-LTA or RD-SLKT, serum creatinine (1.5 ± 1.2 mg/dL vs. 1.4 ± 0.5 mg/dL, p = 0.63) and prevalence of stage 4 or 5 chronic kidney disease (CKD; 5.9% vs. 6.8%, p = 0.11) were comparable. Our series provides little evidence that RD-SLKT would have yielded substantial short-term survival benefit to RD-LTA recipients. PMID:25328090

  1. Donor and recipient sex in allogeneic stem cell transplantation: what really matters

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Haesook T.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Woolfrey, Ann E.; St. Martin, Andrew; Chen, Junfang; Saber, Wael; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Armand, Philippe; Eapen, Mary

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether and how recipient-donor sex affects transplantation outcomes of 11,797 patients transplanted between 2008 and 2010. Thirty-seven percent were male recipients with male donors, 21% male recipients with female donors, 25% female recipients with male donors, and 17% female recipients with female donors. In multivariable analyses, male recipients had inferior overall survival and progression-free survival compared to females regardless of donor sex, with an 11% relative increase in the hazard of death (P<0.0001) and a 10% relative increase in the hazard of death or relapse (P<0.0001). The detrimental effect of male recipients varied by donor sex. For male recipients with male donors, there was a 12% relative increase in the subdistribution hazard of relapse compared with female recipients with male donors (P=0.0036) and male recipients with female donors (P=0.0037). For male recipients with female donors, there was a 19% relative increase in the subdistribution hazard of non-relapse mortality compared with male recipients with male donors (P<0.0001) and a 22% relative increase compared with female recipients with male donors (P=0.0003). In addition, male recipients with female donors showed a 21% relative increase in the subdistribution hazard of chronic graft-versus-host disease (P<0.0001) compared with female recipients with male donors. Donor sex had no effect on outcomes for female recipients. Transplantation of grafts from male and female donors was associated with inferior overall survival and progression-free survival in male recipients with differing patterns of failure. Recipient sex is an important prognostic factor independent of donor sex. PMID:27354023

  2. [IV Consensus meeting of the Spanish Society of Liver Transplantation (SETH) 2012. Liver transplant with non-conventional grafts: Split liver transplantation and non-heart beating donors].

    PubMed

    Abradelo, Manuel; Fondevila, Constantino

    2014-03-01

    The disbalance between the number of candidates to liver transplant and the number of liver grafts leads to waiting list mortality. Two potential ways of increasing the number of liver grafts are split liver transplantation and the transplantation of grafts from non-heart beating donors. Both of them were discussed in a consensus meeting of the Spanish Society of Liver Transplantation in October 2012. This paper outlines the conclusions of that meeting.

  3. [Associated factors and clinical implications of post transplant renal anemia].

    PubMed

    Freiberg, Mónica; Chiurchiu, Carlos; Capra, Raúl; Eckhardt, Andrea; De La Fuente, Jorge; Douthat, Walter; De Arteaga, Javier; Massari, Pablo U

    2013-01-01

    A considerable percentage of patients exhibit anemia post kidney transplant. Its origin is multifactorial and the main causes involved depend on the post transplant period considered. We studied in a group of 134 consecutive patients the associated factors and the clinical implications of "late anemia" (6 months post transplant). Multiple regression analysis showed that post transplant oliguria and acute rejection episodes were significantly associated with anemia. Graft survival at 36 months was significantly reduced in the anemic group (83 % versus 96%, p < 0.01). No differences in patients survival or rate of cardiovascular events were observed. We concluded that anemia at 6 months post transplant is independently and significantly associated with events that reduced functioning renal mass and kidney survival.

  4. Menstruation. A hazard in radionuclide renal transplant evaluation.

    PubMed

    Orzel, J A; Jaffers, G J

    1986-06-01

    Serial Tc-99m DTPA studies were performed to evaluate renal transplant blood flow and function in a 34-year-old woman. A hypervascular pelvic mass with increased blood pool activity was intermittently identified. This hypervascular lesion suggested a pathologic condition of the pelvis, and its blood pool simulated bladder activity, confusing interpretation of renal function. This perplexing vascular lesion was the uterus, with varying degrees of blood flow and blood pool activity depending on the timing of the renal study in relation to the menstrual cycle.

  5. Menstruation. A hazard in radionuclide renal transplant evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Orzel, J.A.; Jaffers, G.J.

    1986-06-01

    Serial Tc-99m DTPA studies were performed to evaluate renal transplant blood flow and function in a 34-year-old woman. A hypervascular pelvic mass with increased blood pool activity was intermittently identified. This hypervascular lesion suggested a pathologic condition of the pelvis, and its blood pool simulated bladder activity, confusing interpretation of renal function. This perplexing vascular lesion was the uterus, with varying degrees of blood flow and blood pool activity depending on the timing of the renal study in relation to the menstrual cycle.

  6. Normothermic perfusion machine in liver transplant with cardiac death donor grafts.

    PubMed

    Pavel, Mihai-Calin; Fondevila Campo, Constantino; Calatayud Mizrahi, David; Ferrer Fabrega, Joana; Sanchez Cabus, Santiago; Molina Santos, Víctor; Fuster Obregon, Josep; Garcia-Valdecasas Salgado, Juan Carlos

    2015-10-01

    The increasing difference between the number of patients in waiting lists for liver transplantation and the number of available donors has generated a great interest in the use of non-ideal organs, like grafts obtained from cardiac death donors (DCD). However, the extreme sensibility to ischemia of these livers results in a low utilization rate and a high percentage of post-transplant complications and re-transplantation. Normothermic perfusion machines (NMP) emerged as an alternative that tries to maintain the viability of the organ and even to improve its function. This review focuses on current results of DCD liver transplantation and on the role that NMP may have in this field.

  7. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  8. Living donor liver transplantation for Budd–Chiari syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ara, Cengiz; Akbulut, Sami; Ince, Volkan; Karakas, Serdar; Baskiran, Adil; Yilmaz, Sezai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The aim of the study was to report the detailed surgical techniques of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) in patients with Budd–Chiari syndrome (BCS). Methods: Demographic and surgical techniques characteristics of 39 patients with BCS who underwent LDLT were retrospectively reviewed. Thirty-two of them had native vena cava inferior (VCI) preservation and 6 had retrohepatic VCI resection with venous continuity established by cryopreserved VCI (n = 4) or aortic graft (n = 2). In 1 patient, the anastomosis was established between the graft hepatic vein (HV) and the suprahepatic VCI. For preservation of the native VCI, immediately before the graft implantation, the thickened anterior, and right/left lateral walls of the recipient VCI were resected caudally and cranially until the intact vein wall was reached, and then an anastomosis was created between the (HV) of the graft reconstructed as a circumferential fence and the reconstructed recipient VCI. For resection of the retrohepatic VCI, the anastomosis was created with the same technique in all 6 patients in whom VCI was reformed by using a vascular graft. Results: Post-LT complications developed in 19 of the patients. Complications related to the biliary anastomosis accounted for 12 of these cases, with 11 treated by PTC and/or ERCP, and 1 by hepaticojejunostomy. Two of the 39 patients developed recurrent BCS and were treated by interventional radiological methods. Thirteen patients died and none were related to the BCS recurrence. Conclusion: Favorable outcomes are achievable with LDLT treatment of patients with BCS, which carries important implications for countries with inadequate cadaveric donor pools. PMID:27787368

  9. Exogenous Lipocalin 2 Ameliorates Acute Rejection in a Mouse Model of Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, M. I.; Schwelberger, H. G.; Brendel, K. A.; Feurle, J.; Andrassy, J.; Kotsch, K.; Regele, H.; Pratschke, J.; Maier, H. T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2) is rapidly produced by damaged nephron epithelia and is one of the most promising new markers of renal injury, delayed graft function and acute allograft rejection (AR); however, the functional importance of Lcn2 in renal transplantation is largely unknown. To understand the role of Lcn2 in renal AR, kidneys from Balb/c mice were transplanted into C57Bl/6 mice and vice versa and analyzed for morphological and physiological outcomes of AR at posttransplantation days 3, 5, and 7. The allografts showed a steady increase in intensity of interstitial infiltration, tubulitis and periarterial aggregation of lymphocytes associated with a substantial elevation in serum levels of creatinine, urea and Lcn2. Perioperative administration of recombinant Lcn2:siderophore:Fe complex (rLcn2) to recipients resulted in functional and morphological amelioration of the allograft at day 7 almost as efficiently as daily immunosuppression with cyclosporine A (CsA). No significant differences were observed in various donor–recipient combinations (C57Bl/6 wild‐type and Lcn2−/−, Balb/c donors and recipients). Histochemical analyses of the allografts showed reduced cell death in recipients treated with rLcn2 or CsA. These results demonstrate that Lcn2 plays an important role in reducing the extent of kidney AR and indicate the therapeutic potential of Lcn2 in transplantation. PMID:26595644

  10. Association Between Cytokines and Their Receptor Antagonist Gene Polymorphisms and Clinical Risk Factors and Acute Rejection Following Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Siqing; Xie, Jianfei; Wan, Qiquan

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute rejection (AR) after renal transplantation affects both patient and graft survival. There is growing evidence of the genetic association between cytokine or its receptor antagonist and AR in solid organ transplantation. The objectives of this study were to investigate the role of recipient TNF β, IL-10, IL-1β, and IL-1 receptor antagonist (ra) gene polymorphism, as well as traditional clinical variables such as panel-reactive antibody (PRA) levels, donor type, and HLA mismatches in AR following renal transplantation. Material/Methods TNF β (+252A/G), IL-10 (−592A/C), IL-1β (−511C/T) and IL-1ra (86 bp VNTR) gene polymorphisms were determined in 195 renal allograft recipients with and without AR, using PCR. Both these genotypic variants and clinical risk factors were investigated for correlation with AR within the first year after renal transplantation. Results Patients with increased pre-transplant PRA levels (P<0.001) and donor type (P=0.012) were prone to the development of AR. After adjusting for all variables of P<0.2, a PRA level >10% (OR=4.515, 95% confidence intervals=1.738–11.727, P=0.002) and the receipt of a graft from a donation after cardiac death (DCD) donor (OR=2.437, 95% confidence intervals=1.047–5.673, P=0.039) remained significantly associated with AR in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. No correlation could be found between recipients with an episode and absence of acute rejection and the gene polymorphisms of these cytokines investigated in the present study. Conclusions This study shows that the presence of increased pre-transplant levels of PRA and the receipt of a graft from DCD donor other than cytokine gene polymorphisms are significant risk factors for AR in renal transplantation. To reduce the occurrence of AR, clinicians should take necessary measures to lower the PRA levels and pay more attention to patients who received a graft from a DCD donor. PMID:27913812

  11. Phomopsis bougainvilleicola prepatellar bursitis in a renal transplant recipient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pre-patellar bursitis is typically a monomicrobial bacterial infection. Rarely is a fungal cause identified. We describe a 61 year-old man who had received a renal transplant 21 months prior to presentation whose synovial fluid and surgical specimens grew Phomopsis bougainvilleicola, a pycnidial coe...

  12. Recurrence of Acute Page Kidney in a Renal Transplant Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Zayas, Carlos; Mulloy, Laura; Jagadeesan, Muralidharan

    2016-01-01

    Acute Page Kidney (APK) phenomenon is a rare cause of secondary hypertension, mediated by activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Timely intervention is of great importance to prevent any end organ damage from hypertension. We present a unique case of three episodes of APK in the same renal transplant allograft. PMID:27725836

  13. Recurrence of Acute Page Kidney in a Renal Transplant Allograft.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Rajan; Zayas, Carlos; Mulloy, Laura; Jagadeesan, Muralidharan

    2016-01-01

    Acute Page Kidney (APK) phenomenon is a rare cause of secondary hypertension, mediated by activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Timely intervention is of great importance to prevent any end organ damage from hypertension. We present a unique case of three episodes of APK in the same renal transplant allograft.

  14. Phomopsis bougainvilleicola prepatellar bursitis in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Cariello, Paloma F; Wickes, Brian L; Sutton, Deanna A; Castlebury, Lisa A; Levitz, Stuart M; Finberg, Robert W; Thompson, Elizabeth H; Daly, Jennifer S

    2013-02-01

    Prepatellar bursitis is typically a monomicrobial bacterial infection. A fungal cause is rarely identified. We describe a 61-year-old man who had received a renal transplant 21 months prior to presentation whose synovial fluid and surgical specimens grew Phomopsis bougainvilleicola, a pycnidial coelomycete.

  15. Transplant renal artery stenosis: clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Kayler, Liise K; Zand, Martin S; Muttana, Renu; Chernyak, Victoria; DeBoccardo, Graciela O

    2015-02-01

    Transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) is a well-recognized vascular complication after kidney transplant. It occurs most frequently in the first 6 months after kidney transplant, and is one of the major causes of graft loss and premature death in transplant recipients. Renal hypoperfusion occurring in TRAS results in activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system; patients usually present with worsening or refractory hypertension, fluid retention and often allograft dysfunction. Flash pulmonary edema can develop in patients with critical bilateral renal artery stenosis or renal artery stenosis in a solitary kidney, and this unique clinical entity has been named Pickering Syndrome. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of TRAS can prevent allograft damage and systemic sequelae. Duplex sonography is the most commonly used screening tool, whereas angiography provides the definitive diagnosis. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with stent placement can be performed during angiography if a lesion is identified, and it is generally the first-line therapy for TRAS. However, there is no randomized controlled trial examining the efficacy and safety of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty compared with medical therapy alone or surgical intervention.

  16. Psychological distress in patients presenting for initial renal transplant evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Kristin K; Bonfiglio, Diane B V

    2011-09-01

    The comorbidity of psychological disorders with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) presents challenges for renal transplantation, including increased likelihood of medication noncompliance and poorer quality of life. Estimates of rates and severity of affective and anxiety disorders have varied significantly across studies of renal transplant patients, possibly due in part to variation in the methodology and timing of evaluations. To this point, few researchers have examined the psychological condition of patients who are newly referred for renal transplantation. This study examined rates of psychological distress using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) in a sample of 518 ESRD patients at the specific time point of first contact with the transplant center. In this sample, 15.1% of patients endorsed symptoms consistent with a depressive condition and 7.6% of patients endorsed an anxiety condition. These rates were lower than expected, which may be due to decreased distress in this sample, selection biases, or underreporting of symptoms due to patients' motivation to present themselves positively.

  17. Consensus, Dilemmas, and Challenges in Living Donor Liver Transplantation in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Salvalaggio, Paolo R; Seda Neto, João; Alves, Jefferson Andre; Fonseca, Eduardo A; Carneiro de Albuquerque, Luiz; Andraus, Wellington; Massarollo, Paulo B; Duro Garcia, Valter; Maurette, Rafael J; Ruf, Andrés E; Pacheco-Moreira, Lucio F; Caicedo Rusca, Luis A; Osorio, Veronica Botero; Matamoros, Maria Amalia; Varela-Fascinetto, Gustavo; Jarufe, Nicolas P

    2016-06-01

    We reviewed the history, volume, outcomes, uniqueness, and challenges of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) in Latin America. We used the data from the Latin American and Caribbean Transplant Society, local transplant societies, and opinions from local transplant experts. There are more than 160 active liver transplant teams in Latin America, but only 30 centers have used LDLT in the past 2 years. In 2014, 226 LDLTs were done in the region (8.5% of liver transplant activities). Living donor liver transplantation is mainly restricted to pediatric patients. Adult-to-adult LDLT activities decreased after the implementation of the model for end-stage liver disease score and a concomitant increase on the rate of deceased donors per million population. Posttransplant outcome analysis is not mandatory, transparent or regulated in most countries. More experienced teams have outcomes comparable to international expert centers, but donor and recipient morbidity might be underreported. Latin America lags behind in terms of the number of adult LDLT and the rate of living donor utilization in comparison with other continents with similar donation rates. Local alliances and collaborations with major transplant centers in the developed world will contribute to the development of LDLT in Latin America.

  18. [Applying Mishel's Uncertainty Theory to the Care of a Patient After Living-Donor Kidney Transplantation: A Care Experience].

    PubMed

    Fang, Ting-Nien; Lin, Chiu-Chu

    2016-02-01

    Kidney transplantation greatly benefits end-stage renal disease patients, as they no longer must bear the torment of hemodialysis. However, the effectiveness of living-donor kidney transplantation is often negatively impacted by various complications, which patients may learn to control through related self-care strategies. However, lack of information on these complications and related strategies may lead to feelings of uncertainty and worries over the prognosis. This article discusses a nursing experience with a patient who underwent living-donor kidney transplantation and who suffered from immense uncertainty and prognosis-related worry. Based on the assessment framework of Mishel's uncertainty theory, the authors identified the cause of the subject's uncertainty and offered thorough information regarding post-transplant care. During the period of care, the subject gained self-care knowledge and skills. Furthermore, he learned to apply self-recording, a technique that enabled him to self-monitor the progress of his disease progress, which reduced his sense of insecurity significantly. Ultimately, the subject turned uncertainty into motivation in order to actively participate in his treatment and to maintain optimum health status.

  19. Strongyloides Hyperinfection in a Renal Transplant Patient: Always Be on the Lookout

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, Murtaza; Agudelo Higuita, Nelson Iván

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of a 71-year-old Vietnamese man with chronic kidney disease secondary to adult polycystic kidney disease. He had been a prisoner of war before undergoing a successful cadaveric renal transplant in the United States. He presented to clinic one year after the transplant with gross hematuria, productive cough, intermittent chills, and weight loss. Long standing peripheral eosinophilia of 600–1200/μL triggered further evaluation. A wet mount of stool revealed Strongyloides stercoralis larvae. A computed tomography (CT) of chest showed findings suggestive of extension of the infection to the lungs. The patient was treated with a three-week course of ivermectin with complete resolution of signs, symptoms, peripheral eosinophilia, and the positive IgG serology. Strongyloides infection in renal transplant patient is very rare and often presents with hyperinfection, associated with high mortality rates. The American Transplant Society recommends pretransplant screening with stool examination and Strongyloides stercoralis antibody in recipients and donors from endemic areas or with eosinophilia. It is imperative that healthcare professionals involved in the care of these individuals be cognizant of these recommendations as it is a very preventable and treatable entity. PMID:28316848

  20. Cytomegalovirus infection in renal transplantation: clinical aspects, management and the perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Requião-Moura, Lúcio Roberto; de Matos, Ana Cristina Carvalho; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus infection is one of most frequent infectious complications after renal transplantation, and can be classified as primo-infection, when the transmission occurs through the graft, or reactivation, when the recipient is cytomegalovirus seropositive. After transplantation, cytomegalovirus can appear as an infection, when the patient presents with evidence of viral replication without symptoms or disease, which has two clinical spectra: typical viral syndrome or invasive disease, which is a less common form. Their effects can be classified as direct, while the disease is developed, or indirect, with an increase of acute rejection and chronic allograft dysfunction risks. Diagnosis must be made based on viremia by one of the standardized methods: antigenemia or PCR, which is more sensitive. The risk factors related to infection after transplantation are the serologic matching (positive donor and negative recipient) and anti-lymphocyte antibody drugs. One of the strategies to reduce risk of disease should be chosen for patients at high risk: preemptive treatment or universal prophylaxis. Recent clinical research has described ganciclovir resistance as an emergent problem in management of cytomegalovirus infection. Two types of mutation that cause resistance were described: UL97 (most frequent) and UL54. Today, sophisticated methods of immunologic monitoring to detect specific T-cell clones against cytomegalovirus are used in clinical practice to improve the management of high-risk patients after renal transplantation. PMID:25993081

  1. Risk of antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplant recipients with anti-HLA-C donor-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Aubert, O; Bories, M-C; Suberbielle, C; Snanoudj, R; Anglicheau, D; Rabant, M; Martinez, F; Scemla, A; Legendre, C; Sberro-Soussan, R

    2014-06-01

    Anti-HLA donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) cause acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). However, the clinical relevance of anti-HLA-C antibodies remains unclear. We evaluated the clinical relevance of the presence of anti-HLA-C DSA at day 0 in renal transplant recipients. In this retrospective, case-controlled study, 608 patients who underwent kidney transplantation between August 2008 and March 2012 were screened for the presence of isolated anti-HLA-C DSA at day 0. A total of 22 renal transplant recipients were selected and followed for a period of 1 year. AMR was classified according to the Banff classification. The 22 patients were compared with 88 immunized patients. Acute AMR was diagnosed in six patients (27.3%). The median level of DSA at day 0 was 1179 (530-17,941). The mean fluorescence intensity in the anti-C group was 4966 (978-17,941) in the AMR group and 981 (530-8012) in the group of patients without AMR. Acute AMR was diagnosed less frequently in the 88 immunized individuals (9.1%) than in the DSA anti-C group (p = 0.033). The level of DSA at day 0 was predictive for AMR (p = 0.017). Patients with a high level of pretransplant anti-HLA-C DSAs are likely to develop acute AMR during the first year after transplantation.

  2. A Prospective Study of Renal Transplant Recipients: A Fall in Insulin Secretion Underpins Dysglycemia After Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Langsford, David; Obeyesekere, Varuni; Vogrin, Sara; Teng, Jessie; MacIsaac, Richard J.; Ward, Glenn; Alford, Frank; Dwyer, Karen M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dysglycemia (encompassing impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes mellitus) arising after renal transplantation is common and confers a significant cardiovascular mortality risk. Nonetheless, the pathophysiology of posttransplant dysglycemia is not well described. The aim of this study was to prospectively and comprehensively assess glucose handling in renal transplant recipients from before to 12 months after transplantation to determine the underpinning pathophysiology. Materials and Methods Intravenous and oral glucose tolerance testing was conducted before and at 3 and 12 months posttransplantation. An intravenous glucose tolerance test was also performed on day 7 posttransplantation. We followed up 16 transplant recipients for 3 months and 14 recipients for 12 months. Insulin secretion, resistance and a disposition index (DI (IV)), a measure of β cell responsiveness in the context of prevailing insulin resistance, were also determined. Results At 12 months, 50% of renal transplant recipients had dysglycemia. Dysglycemia was associated with a dramatic fall in DI (IV) and this loss in β cell function was evident as early as 3 months posttransplantation (23.5 pretransplant; 6.4 at 3 months and 12.2 at 12 months posttransplant). Differences in the β cell response to oral glucose challenge were evident pretransplant in those destined to develop dysglycemia posttransplant (2-hour blood glucose level 5.6 mmol/L versus 6.8 mmol/L; P < 0.01). Conclusions Dysglycemia after renal transplantation is common, and the loss of insulin secretion is a major contributor. Subclinical differences in glucose handling are evident pretransplant in those destined to develop dysglycemia potentially heralding a susceptible β cell which under the stressors associated with transplantation fails. PMID:27826600

  3. Sexuality, fertility, and renal transplantation: a survey of survivors.

    PubMed

    Schover, L R; Novick, A C; Steinmuller, D R; Goormastic, M

    1990-01-01

    A questionnaire on sexual function and fertility was completed by 54 men and 36 women, at an average of 3 years after successful renal transplant. Sexual desire increased significantly compared to reports of levels 6 months pretransplant. Men also had improved erectile function and ability to reach noncoital orgasms. About a quarter of men and women remained sexually dysfunctional, however. The frequency of sexual activity and overall sexual satisfaction did not improve significantly. Marital status and satisfaction were in the normal range for this group, except that those who became ill before adulthood were less likely to have married or have had children. Infertility was a major concern for 10% of the sample. Regular menstrual cycles were present in 64% of women under age 50, representing a significant improvement after transplantation. Three men fathered a child and two women became pregnant after transplantation. Most patients wanted more information on sexuality, fertility, and renal disease.

  4. ADPKD: clinical issues before and after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Messa, Piergiorgio; Alfieri, Carlo Maria; Montanari, Emanuele; Ferraresso, Mariano; Cerutti, Roberta

    2016-12-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the first genetic cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the number of these patients who are listed for or receive a kidney transplant (KTx) is continuously increasing over time. Hence, nephrologists are involved not only in the handling of ADPKD patients during the long course of the disease, but also in programming and performing a renal transplant. The handling of all these processes implies the complete awareness of a number of critical points related to the decisions to be taken both before and after the transplant intervention. In the present review, we will briefly deal with the main critical points related to the clinical handling of the patients both before and after KTx.

  5. [Post-renal transplant pregnancy: a project to plan carefully].

    PubMed

    Trubian, Alessandra; Zaza, Gianluca; Rugiu, Carlo; Tomei, Paola; Lupo, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Kidney transplant is the best treatment for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) as it improves the quality of life and reduces the mortality risk for most patients compared with maintenance dialysis. Additionally, evidence from the literature suggests that renal function, endocrine status and libido rapidly improve after kidney transplant, and one in 50 women of childbearing age become pregnant. Therefore, it seems clear that pregnancy after transplant is a great challenge for physicians involved in this field. The available information on pregnancy outcomes is largely derived from case reports and single-center series, which are unlikely to be representative. Moreover, poor results are less likely to be reported. Many of the reports on long-term outcome show the results of past medical, obstetric, and neonatal care, which may be very different from current practice. Attempts are being made to provide more up-to-date, representative data through national transplantation pregnancy registries. A great number of researchers worldwide have analyzed the biological and endocrinological machinery associated with this event. Additionally, several strategies have been introduced to avoid unplanned pregnancies and to minimize maternal and fetal complications in renal transplant recipients. It seems evident that the return to fertility soon after transplant is often associated with unplanned pregnancy, which can expose both mother and fetus to considerable risks. This underpins the necessity to recommend contraceptive counseling and start clinical follow-up in order to early identify possible pregnancy-related risk factors. In general, pregnancy should not be recommended within the first year after kidney transplant because the risk of acute rejection is greatest and immunosuppressive therapy the most aggressive. It should be planned when organ function and immunosuppressive therapy are stabilized and there is no sign of rejection, hypertension, or chronic infection. Additionally

  6. Prevalence and risk factors for early chronic allograft nephropathy in a live related renal transplant program

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Hamid; Mubarak, Muhammed; Aziz, Tahir; Ahmed, Ejaz; Fazal Akhter, Syed; Kazi, Javed; AA Naqvi, Syed; AH Rizvi, Syed

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) is a common cause of delayed allograft failure throughout the world. Its prevalence and risk factors vary depending on a number of factors. There is little information on the prevalence and risk factors for early CAN in live related renal transplant patients. Objectives: We aimed to determine the prevalence and the risk factors of early CAN in our setup. Patients and Methods: The study was conducted at Sindh Institute of Urology & Transplantation (SIUT), Karachi, from 2002 to 2005 on patients who had live related kidney transplantation and underwent at least one allograft biopsy within 18 months of transplantation. The biopsies were performed and prepared in accordance with established indications and guidelines. The Banff 97 classification and its updates were used to diagnose and categorize the biopsy pathology. Patients were divided into two groups depending on the presence or absence of CAN on biopsies. Following parameters were compared among the groups: age, sex, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) match, immunosuppression used, acute rejection (AR) episodes, urinary tract infections (UTIs), viral infections, cyclosporine levels, early and late graft function monitored by serum creatinine. Results: A total of 164 patients fulfilled the study inclusion criteria. The mean age of recipients and donors was relatively young. The majority of the donors were siblings. The overall prevalence of CAN was 25.6% (42/164), between 3 and 18 months post transplantation. The median time to the appearance of CAN was 9 months post-transplant. The prevalence of CAN increased as post-transplant duration increased. In 39 (92.8%) subjects, CAN was detected on the second or subsequent graft biopsy. Only 3 (7.2%) patients showed CAN on the first graft biopsy. The majority of cases belonged to moderate degree or grade II CAN. The mean serum creatinine values were higher in the CAN group at the time of discharge and all times post-transplantation

  7. Pituitary apoplexy precipitating diabetes insipidus after living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Matsusaki, Takashi; Morimatsu, Hiroshi; Matsumi, Junya; Matsuda, Hiroaki; Sato, Tetsufumi; Sato, Kenji; Mizobuchi, Satoshi; Yagi, Takahito; Morita, Kiyoshi

    2011-02-01

    Pituitary apoplexy occurring after surgery is a rare but life-threatening acute clinical condition that follows extensive hemorrhagenous necrosis within a pituitary adenoma. Pituitary apoplexy has been reported to occur spontaneously in the majority of cases or in association with various inducing factors. Reported is a case of pituitary apoplexy complicated by diabetes insipidus following living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). To the best of our knowledge, this has not been previously reported. A 56-year-old woman with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis underwent LDLT from her daughter. The patient also required dopamine support and transfusions because of massive intraoperative bleeding. Postoperatively, her coagulopathy continued, and she underwent a second laparotomy because of unknown bleeding on postoperative day 7, when she needed transfusions and dopamine support to maintain her vital signs. She complained of severe headache, excessive thirst, frequent urination, and diplopia from postoperative day 10. She also had polyuria greater than 300 ml/h and was diagnosed with pituitary apoplexy precipitating diabetes insipidus on postoperative day 13. She was treated conservatively without surgery because of the hormonally inactive status and slight mass effect of her tumor. It is important for anesthesiologists and critical care personnel in LDLT settings to take into consideration this complication as a differential diagnosis.

  8. Donor-Derived Smoldering Multiple Myeloma following a Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for AML

    PubMed Central

    Fiala, Mark; Slade, Michael; Westervelt, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder (PTLD) is one of the most common malignancies complicating solid organ transplantation. In contrast, PTLD accounts for a minority of secondary cancers following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Here we report on a 61-year-old woman who received an ABO-mismatched, HLA-matched unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation from a presumably healthy donor for a diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Eighteen months following her transplant, she developed a monoclonal gammopathy. Bone marrow studies revealed 10% plasma cells, but the patient lacked clinical defining features of multiple myeloma (MM); thus a diagnosis of smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) was established. Cytogenetic and molecular studies of the bone marrow confirmed the plasma cells were donor-derived. The donor lacks a diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, SMM, or MM. PMID:28316846

  9. Molecular characterization of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders of donor origin occurring in liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Capello, Daniela; Rasi, Silvia; Oreste, Pierluigi; Veronese, Silvio; Cerri, Michaela; Ravelli, Erika; Rossi, Davide; Minola, Ernesto; Colosimo, Anna; Gambacorta, Marcello; Muti, Giuliana; Morra, Enrica; Gaidano, Gianluca

    2009-08-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) represent a frequent complication of solid organ transplantation. Although most PTLDs arise from recipient lymphoid cells, a considerable fraction of cases may arise from donor B-cells. In an attempt to clarify the histogenesis and pathogenesis of PTLDs derived from donor B-cells, monoclonal PTLDs occurring in liver transplant recipients were chosen as a model to compare donor (D-PTLDs) versus recipient PTLDs (R-PTLDs). The tumour panel included nine D-PTLDs and six R-PTLDs. D-PTLDs were early-onset, EBV-infected lymphoproliferations classified as polymorphic PTLD (P-PTLD; n = 7) or diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL; n = 2) with tumour localization confined to the hepatic hilum. All R-PTLDs were late-onset DLBCLs and showed extrahepatic localization. A BCL-6(-)/MUM1(+)/CD138(+/-) phenotype, consistent with a post-germinal centre (GC) stage of pre-terminal B-cell differentiation, was observed in all D-PTLDs and in 2/6 R-PTLDs, whereas a BCL6(+)/MUM1(-)/CD138(-) profile, reminiscent of GC B-cells, was detected in 4/6 R-PTLDs. The presence of somatic IGHV hypermutation was observed in 6/9 D-PTLDs and in 4/6 R-PTLDs, suggesting derivation from antigen-experienced B-cells. IGHV4-39 was the IGHV gene most frequently encountered, being rearranged in 3/9 D-PTLDs. Among IGHV-mutated PTLDs, a mutational profile suggesting antigen stimulation and/or selection was observed in 4/6 D-s and in 2/4 R-PTLDs. The presence of ongoing IGHV mutations was detected in 2/4 D-PTLDs. Aberrant SHM was detected in 10/15 (66.7%) PTLDs, including 6/9 D-PTLDs and 4/6 R-PTLDs. Our findings suggest that (i) D-PTLDs show a clinical presentation distinct from R-PTLDs; (ii) immunophenotypic and genetic features of D-PTLDs are consistent with mature, GC-experienced B-cells; (iii) transformed donor-derived B-cells may experience antigen-driven stimulation and selection, and may acquire genetic lesions during neoplastic expansion in the recipient

  10. Risk Factors for Graft Failure and Death following Geriatric Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyungjin; Yu, Hoon; Shin, Eunhye; Kim, Young Hoon; Park, Su-Kil; Jo, Min-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background Population aging is a major health concern in Asian countries and it has affected the age distribution of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). As a consequence, the need for kidney transplantation in the geriatric population has increased, but the shortage of donors is an obstacle for geriatric renal transplantation. The aim of this study was to evaluate risk factors for graft failure and death in geriatric renal transplantation. Methods Kidney transplantations performed in a tertiary hospital in South Korea from May 1995 to December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Recipients younger than 60 years of age or who underwent other organ transplantations were excluded. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to assess patient and graft survival. A Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate risk factors for graft failure and patient death. Results A total of 229 kidney transplantation patients were included. Graft survival at 1, 5, and 10 years were 93.2%, 82.9%, and 61.2% respectively. Patient survival at 1, 5, and 10 years were 94.6%, 86.9%, and 68.8%, respectively. According to the Cox multivariate analysis, ABO incompatibility (hazard ratio [HR] 3.91, p < 0.002), DGF (HR 3.544, p < 0.004), CMV infection (HR 2.244, p < 0.011), and HBV infection (HR 6.349, p < 0.015) were independent risk factors for graft survival. Recipient age (HR 1.128, p < 0.024), ABO incompatibility (HR 3.014, p < 0.025), CMV infection (HR 2.532, p < 0.010), and the number of HLA mismatches (HR 1.425, p < 0.007) were independent risk factors for patient death. Conclusion Kidney transplantation in the geriatric population showed good clinical outcomes. ABO incompatibility, DGF, CMV infection, and HBV infection were risk factors for graft failure and the recipient age, ABO incompatibility, CMV infection, and the number of HLA mismatches were risk factors for patient death in geriatric renal transplantation. PMID:27074003

  11. Invasive filamentous fungal infections associated with renal transplant tourism.

    PubMed

    Shoham, S; Hinestrosa, F; Moore, J; O'Donnell, S; Ruiz, M; Light, J

    2010-08-01

    'Transplant tourism,' the practice of traveling abroad to acquire an organ, has emerged as an issue in kidney transplantation. We treated a patient who developed invasive aspergillosis of the allograft vascular anastomosis after receiving a kidney transplant in Pakistan, prompting us to review the literature of invasive mycoses among commercial organ transplant recipients. We reviewed all published cases of infections in solid organ transplant recipients who bought their organs abroad and analyzed these reports for invasive fungal infections. Including the new case reported here, 19 cases of invasive fungal infections post commercial kidney transplant occurring in 17 patients were analyzed. Infecting organisms were Aspergillus species (12/19; 63%), Zygomycetes (5/19; 26%), and other fungi (2/19; 5%). Invasive mold infections were present at the transplanted graft in 6/17 patients (35%) with graft loss or death in 13/17 (76%) of patients and overall mortality (10/17) 59%. Invasive fungal infections, frequently originating at the graft site, have emerged as a devastating complication of commercial renal transplant and are associated with high rates of graft loss and death.

  12. Usefulness of artificial jump graft to portal vein thrombosis in deceased donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hong Pil; Yang, Jae Do; Bae, Sang In; Hwang, Si Eun; Cho, Baik Hwan; Yu, Hee Chul

    2015-03-01

    Severe portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is often considered a relative contraindication for living donor liver transplantation due to high associated risks and morbidity. Meanwhile, improvement in operative techniques, resulting in higher success rates has removed PVT from the list of contraindications in deceased donor liver transplantation (DDLT). In this report, we describe a surgical technique for DDLT using polytetrafluoroethylene graft from the inferior mesenteric vein for portal inflow in patient with portomesenteric thrombosis.

  13. Clinical outcomes of and patient satisfaction with different incision methods for donor hepatectomy in living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Suh, Suk-Won; Lee, Kwang-Woong; Lee, Jeong-Moo; Choi, YoungRok; Yi, Nam-Joon; Suh, Kyung-Suk

    2015-01-01

    With the decrease in the average donor age and the increase in the proportion of female donors, both donor safety and cosmetic appearance are major concerns for some living donors in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) because a large abdominal incision is needed that may influence the donor's quality of life. In all, 429 donors who underwent donor hepatectomy for LDLT from April 2010 to February 2013 were included in the study. Donors were divided into 3 groups based on the type of incision: conventional inverted L incision (n = 268; the C group), upper midline incision (n = 147; the M group), and transverse incision with laparoscopy (n = 14; the T group). Demographics, perioperative outcomes, postoperative complications for donors and recipients, and questionnaire-derived donor satisfaction with cosmetic appearance were compared. The mean age was lower (P < 0.001), the female ratio was higher (P < 0.001), and the body mass index (BMI) was lower (P = 0.017) in the M and T groups versus the C group. The operation time (P < 0.001) and the hospital stay duration (P = 0.010) were lowest in the M group. The postoperative complications did not differ by the type of incision and also did not show any significant effect in a multivariate analysis (P = 0.867). In the assessment of questionnaire-derived donor satisfaction matched by age (±5 years), sex, graft, height, weight, and BMI, a more satisfactory cosmetic result and more self-confidence were noted in the M and T groups versus the C group. In conclusion, the use of a minimal incision is technically feasible for some donor hepatectomy cases with a favorable safety profile. The patient satisfaction levels were greater with improved cosmetic outcomes in cases of minimal incision versus cases of conventional incision.

  14. Latin American Dialysis and Transplant Registry: Experience and contributions to end-stage renal disease epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Cusumano, Ana Maria; Rosa-Diez, Guillermo Javier; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria Carlota

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, 634387 million people (9% of the world’s population) resided in Latin America (LA), with half of those populating Brazil and Mexico. The LA Dialysis and Transplant Registry was initiated in 1991, with the aim of collecting data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) from the 20 LA-affiliated countries. Since then, the Registry has revealed a trend of increasing prevalence and incidence of end-stage kidney disease on RRT, which is ongoing and is correlated with gross national income, life expectancy at birth, and percentage of population that is older than 65 years. In addition, the rate of kidney transplantation has increased yearly, with > 70% being performed from deceased donors. According to the numbers reported for 2013, the rates of prevalence, incidence and transplantation were (in patients per million population) 669, 149 and 19.4, respectively. Hemodialysis was the treatment of choice (90%), and 43% of the patients undergoing this treatment was located in Brazil; in contrast, peritoneal dialysis prevailed in Costa Rica, El Salvador and Guatemala. To date, the Registry remains the only source of RRT data available to healthcare authorities in many LA countries. It not only serves to promote knowledge regarding epidemiology of end-stage renal disease and the related RRT but also for training of nephrologists and renal researchers, to improve understanding and clinical application of dialysis and transplantation services. In LA, accessibility to RRT is still limited and it remains necessary to develop effective programs that will reduce risk factors, promote early diagnosis and treatment of chronic kidney disease, and strengthen transplantation programs. PMID:27648403

  15. Latin American Dialysis and Transplant Registry: Experience and contributions to end-stage renal disease epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Cusumano, Ana Maria; Rosa-Diez, Guillermo Javier; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria Carlota

    2016-09-06

    In 2015, 634387 million people (9% of the world's population) resided in Latin America (LA), with half of those populating Brazil and Mexico. The LA Dialysis and Transplant Registry was initiated in 1991, with the aim of collecting data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) from the 20 LA-affiliated countries. Since then, the Registry has revealed a trend of increasing prevalence and incidence of end-stage kidney disease on RRT, which is ongoing and is correlated with gross national income, life expectancy at birth, and percentage of population that is older than 65 years. In addition, the rate of kidney transplantation has increased yearly, with > 70% being performed from deceased donors. According to the numbers reported for 2013, the rates of prevalence, incidence and transplantation were (in patients per million population) 669, 149 and 19.4, respectively. Hemodialysis was the treatment of choice (90%), and 43% of the patients undergoing this treatment was located in Brazil; in contrast, peritoneal dialysis prevailed in Costa Rica, El Salvador and Guatemala. To date, the Registry remains the only source of RRT data available to healthcare authorities in many LA countries. It not only serves to promote knowledge regarding epidemiology of end-stage renal disease and the related RRT but also for training of nephrologists and renal researchers, to improve understanding and clinical application of dialysis and transplantation services. In LA, accessibility to RRT is still limited and it remains necessary to develop effective programs that will reduce risk factors, promote early diagnosis and treatment of chronic kidney disease, and strengthen transplantation programs.

  16. Prevalence of abdominal aortic calcifications in older living renal donors and its effect on graft function and histology.

    PubMed

    Wu, En-Haw; Wojciechowski, David; Chandran, Sindhu; Yeh, Benjamin M; Park, Meyeon; Westphalen, Antonio; Wang, Zhen J

    2015-10-01

    We assessed the prevalence of abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) in older living kidney donors and its effect on recipient eGFR and graft histology. A total of 292 consecutive living pairs with donor age ≥50 from 2003 to 2013 were identified (mean age 56; range 50-78; F/M: 1.8). Donor AAC was determined by prenephrectomy unenhanced CT. Recipient eGFR and spot urine protein: creatinine ratios (UPCRs) were recorded. A total of 180 recipients had 6-month protocol biopsies. AAC was present in 40.7% of donors, and they were older (58.6 versus 54.7 years old, P < 0.0001) and more likely to be male (77.6% vs. 37.3%, P = 0.004). There was no significant difference in eGFR or spot UPCR up to 36 months in recipients of allografts from donors with versus without AAC. At 6-month biopsy, there was a higher percentage of allografts with vascular fibrous intimal thickening and arteriolar hyaline thickening from donors with versus without AAC (vascular fibrous intimal thickening: 38.8% vs. 7.1% and arteriolar hyaline thickening: 35.8% vs. 7.1%; P < 0.001 for both). The presence of donor AAC predicts the presence of vascular disease [vascular fibrous intimal thickening (OR: 7.2; CI:2.9-17.9) and arteriolar hyaline thickening (OR:5.7; CI:2.3-14.1)] in allografts at 6 months. Donor AAC is predictive of renal vascular disease and may help to improve the screening of potential donors and inform post-transplant management.

  17. Donor-specific anti-HLA Abs and graft failure in matched unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ciurea, Stefan O; Thall, Peter F; Wang, Xuemei; Wang, Sa A; Hu, Ying; Cano, Pedro; Aung, Fleur; Rondon, Gabriela; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Korbling, Martin; Shpall, Elizabeth J; de Lima, Marcos; Champlin, Richard E; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo

    2011-11-24

    Anti-HLA donor-specific Abs (DSAs) have been reported to be associated with graft failure in mismatched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; however, their role in the development of graft failure in matched unrelated donor (MUD) transplantation remains unclear. We hypothesize that DSAs against a mismatched HLA-DPB1 locus is associated with graft failure in this setting. The presence of anti-HLA Abs before transplantation was determined prospectively in 592 MUD transplantation recipients using mixed-screen beads in a solid-phase fluorescent assay. DSA identification was performed using single-Ag beads containing the corresponding donor's HLA-mismatched Ags. Anti-HLA Abs were detected in 116 patients (19.6%), including 20 patients (3.4%) with anti-DPB1 Abs. Overall, graft failure occurred in 19 of 592 patients (3.2%), including 16 of 584 (2.7%) patients without anti-HLA Abs compared with 3 of 8 (37.5%) patients with DSA (P = .0014). In multivariate analysis, DSAs were the only factor highly associated with graft failure (P = .0001; odds ratio = 21.3). Anti-HLA allosensitization was higher overall in women than in men (30.8% vs 12.1%; P < .0001) and higher in women with 1 (P = .008) and 2 or more pregnancies (P = .0003) than in men. We conclude that the presence of anti-DPB1 DSAs is associated with graft failure in MUD hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  18. Outcomes of Pediatric Kidney Transplantation in Recipients of a Previous Non-Renal Solid Organ Transplant.

    PubMed

    Hamdani, G; Zhang, B; Liu, C; Goebel, J; Zhang, Y; Nehus, E

    2017-03-07

    Children who receive a non-renal solid organ transplant may develop secondary renal failure requiring kidney transplantation. We investigated outcomes of 165 pediatric kidney transplant recipients who previously received a heart, lung, or liver transplant using data from 1988 to 2012 reported to the United Network for Organ Sharing. Patient and allograft survival were compared with 330 matched primary kidney transplant (PKT) recipients. Kidney transplantation after solid organ transplant (KASOT) recipients experienced similar allograft survival: 5- and 10-year graft survival was 78% and 60% in KASOT recipients, compared to 80% and 61% in PKT recipients (p = 0.69). However, KASOT recipients demonstrated worse 10-year patient survival (75% KASOT vs. 97% PKT, p < 0.001). Competing risks analysis indicated that KASOT recipients more often experienced graft loss due to patient death (p < 0.001), whereas allograft failure per se was more common in PKT recipients (p = 0.01). To study more recent outcomes, kidney transplants performed from 2006 to 2012 were separately investigated. Since 2006, KASOT and PKT recipients had similar 5-year graft survival (82% KASOT vs. 83% PKT, p = 0.48), although 5-year patient survival of KASOT recipients remained inferior (90% KASOT vs. 98% PKT, p < 0.001). We conclude that despite decreased patient survival, kidney allograft outcomes in pediatric KASOT recipients are comparable to those of PKT recipients.

  19. Fatal West Nile virus encephalitis in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Cushing, Melissa M; Brat, Daniel J; Mosunjac, Mario I; Hennigar, Randolph A; Jernigan, Daniel B; Lanciotti, Robert; Petersen, Lyle R; Goldsmith, Cynthia; Rollin, Pierre E; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Guarner, Jeannette; Zaki, Sherif R

    2004-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV), a mosquito-transmitted single-stranded RNA flavivirus, causes human disease of variable severity. We report clinical and pathologic findings of fatal encephalitis from the transmission of WNV from an organ donor to a kidney transplant recipient. The patient developed a febrile illness 18 days after transplantation, which progressed to encephalitis. Postmortem examination demonstrated extensive viral encephalopathic changes. Immunohistochemical studies highlighted WNV antigens within neurons, especially in the cerebellum and brainstem. Flavivirus virions were detected ultrastructurally within the cerebellum, and WNV was isolated from the brain and the brainstem. Thus, this case demonstrates the first death in the first solid organ transplant-associated transmission of WNV. Immunosuppression of the transplant recipient might have been responsible for the fulminant viral effects. The pathologic diagnosis helped guide subsequent epidemiologic and laboratory studies.

  20. Results of kidney transplantation in relation to HLA-A, B, DR matching and quality of donor organ.

    PubMed

    Lenhard, V; Dreikorn, K; Röhl, L

    1980-01-01

    The influence of HLA compatibility as well as immediate postoperative function on survival rates was investigated in 203 cadaver kidney transplants. HLA compatibility, especially DR compatibility, improved transplant survival significantly. A direct correlation was found between primary transplant function and long-term results. HLA compatibility and quality of the donor organ had a cumulative effect on kidney transplant survival. Our results are a further indication that besides HLA compatibility, optimal quality of donor organs has crucial significance for the results of transplantation.

  1. Bone disease in patients with long-term renal transplantation and normal renal function.

    PubMed

    Carlini, R G; Rojas, E; Weisinger, J R; Lopez, M; Martinis, R; Arminio, A; Bellorin-Font, E

    2000-07-01

    Renal osteodystrophy may persist during the early years after renal transplantation. However, information on bone status after a successful long-term renal transplantation is limited. We examined biochemical parameters, bone mineral density (BMD), and bone histomorphometry in 25 asymptomatic men with normal renal function after 7.5 +/- 5.7 years of a renal transplantation. Serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, and 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) levels and urinary calcium level and cyclic andenosine monophosphate excretion were within normal range in all patients. Serum intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) level was elevated in 11 subjects (133.6 +/- 78 pg/mL) and normal in the other 14 subjects (47.9 +/- 13.6 pg/mL). Mean BMD at the lumbar spine and femoral neck was low in the entire group. However, it progressively increased as time after transplantation increased, approaching normal values after 10 years. Bone histomorphometric analysis showed bone resorption, osteoid volume, and osteoid surface greater than normal range in the majority of patients. Bone formation rate and mineralization surface were low, and mineralization time was delayed in most patients. These lesions were more severe in patients after 3 to 4 years of transplantation but improved with time and approached normal values after a period of 10 years. PTH values did not correlate with bone histological characteristics or BMD. These results show that the bone alterations observed after long-term renal transplantation consist of a mixed bone disease in which features of high bone turnover coexist with altered bone formation and delayed mineralization. These findings may result from the combined effect of preexisting bone disease and immunosuppressive therapy.

  2. Successful living donor intestinal transplantation in cross-match positive recipients: Initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Roca, Raquel; Tzvetanov, Ivo G; Jeon, Hoonbae; Hetterman, Elisabeth; Oberholzer, Jose; Benedetti, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Sensitized patients tend to have longer waiting times on the deceased donor list and are at increased risk of graft loss from acute or chronic rejection compared to non-sensitized candidates. Desensitization protocols are utilized to decrease the levels of alloantibodies and to convert an initial positive cross-match to prospective donors into a negative crossmatch. These procedures are mostly available in the setting of living donation. Due to the elective nature of the procedure, desensitization protocols can be extended until the desire result is obtained prior to transplantation. We present two cases of successful desensitization protocol applied to living donor intestinal transplant candidates that converted to negative cross-match to their donors. We present two cases of intestinal transplant candidates with a potential living donor to whom they are sensitized. Both cases underwent successful transplantation after desensitization protocol. No evidence of humoral rejection has occurred in either recipient. Living donor intestinal transplantation in sensitized recipients against the prospective donors provides the ability to implement a desensitization protocol to convert to negative cross-match. PMID:26843919

  3. Successful living donor intestinal transplantation in cross-match positive recipients: Initial experience.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Roca, Raquel; Tzvetanov, Ivo G; Jeon, Hoonbae; Hetterman, Elisabeth; Oberholzer, Jose; Benedetti, Enrico

    2016-01-27

    Sensitized patients tend to have longer waiting times on the deceased donor list and are at increased risk of graft loss from acute or chronic rejection compared to non-sensitized candidates. Desensitization protocols are utilized to decrease the levels of alloantibodies and to convert an initial positive cross-match to prospective donors into a negative crossmatch. These procedures are mostly available in the setting of living donation. Due to the elective nature of the procedure, desensitization protocols can be extended until the desire result is obtained prior to transplantation. We present two cases of successful desensitization protocol applied to living donor intestinal transplant candidates that converted to negative cross-match to their donors. We present two cases of intestinal transplant candidates with a potential living donor to whom they are sensitized. Both cases underwent successful transplantation after desensitization protocol. No evidence of humoral rejection has occurred in either recipient. Living donor intestinal transplantation in sensitized recipients against the prospective donors provides the ability to implement a desensitization protocol to convert to negative cross-match.

  4. Donor-derived mycosis fungoides following reduced intensity haematopoietic stem cell transplantation from a matched unrelated donor

    PubMed Central

    Kinsella, Francesca A M; Amel Kashipaz, Mohammad Rasoul; Scarisbrick, Julia; Malladi, Ram

    2017-01-01

    A 46-year-old woman with a history of dasatinib-resistant chronic myeloid leukaemia, clonal evolution and monosomy 7 underwent reduced intensity conditioned in vivo T-cell-depleted allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from a matched unrelated donor. Following the transplantation, she developed recurrent cutaneous graft versus host disease (GvHD), which required treatment with systemic immunosuppression and electrocorporeal photophoresis. Concurrently, she developed a lichenoid rash with granulomatous features suggestive of cutaneous sarcoidosis. Additional treatment with hydroxychloroquine was initially successful, but 2 months later, she developed erythroderma with palpable lymphadenopathy. Repeated histological analysis established a diagnosis of folliculotropic mycosis fungoides stage IVA2, and the malignant clone was confirmed to be of donor origin. A positive response to brentuximab has been shown. This is the first reported case of primary mycosis fungoides after matched unrelated donor HSCT, and in a patient still undergoing treatment for GvHD. PMID:28073814

  5. Viral Infection in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Cukuranovic, Jovana; Ugrenovic, Sladjana; Jovanovic, Ivan; Visnjic, Milan; Stefanovic, Vladisav

    2012-01-01

    Viruses are among the most common causes of opportunistic infection after transplantation. The risk for viral infection is a function of the specific virus encountered, the intensity of immune suppression used to prevent graft rejection, and other host factors governing susceptibility. Although cytomegalovirus is the most common opportunistic pathogen seen in transplant recipients, numerous other viruses have also affected outcomes. In some cases, preventive measures such as pretransplant screening, prophylactic antiviral therapy, or posttransplant viral monitoring may limit the impact of these infections. Recent advances in laboratory monitoring and antiviral therapy have improved outcomes. Studies of viral latency, reactivation, and the cellular effects of viral infection will provide clues for future strategies in prevention and treatment of viral infections. This paper will summarize the major viral infections seen following transplant and discuss strategies for prevention and management of these potential pathogens. PMID:22654630

  6. Current status of pediatric renal transplant pathology.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jan U

    2017-03-01

    Histopathology is still an indispensable tool for the diagnosis of kidney transplant dysfunction in adult and pediatric patients. This review presents consolidated knowledge, recent developments and future prospects on the biopsy procedure, the diagnostic work-up, classification schemes, the histopathology of rejection, including antibody-mediated forms, ABO-incompatible transplants, protocol biopsies, recurrent and de novo disease, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder, infectious complications and drug-induced toxicity. It is acknowledged that frequently the correct diagnosis can only be reached in consensus with clinical, serological, immunogenetical, bacteriological and virological findings. This review shall enhance the understanding of the pediatric nephrologist for the thought processes of nephropathologists with the aim to facilitate teamwork between these specialist groups for the benefit of the patient.

  7. Inflammatory Cutaneous Diseases in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Savoia, Paola; Cavaliere, Giovanni; Zavattaro, Elisa; Veronese, Federica; Fava, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplant recipients frequently suffer from skin infections and malignancies, possibly due to the effects of long-term immunosuppressive therapy. While the relationships between immunosuppression and these pathological conditions have been widely investigated, little is known about the relative incidence and characteristics of inflammatory skin diseases in this type of patient. In this study, we analyze the incidence of a number of inflammatory cutaneous diseases in a cohort of patients who underwent kidney transplantation. Although our study shows a relatively low incidence of these pathologies in transplanted patients—in agreement with the general action of immunosuppressant therapies in reducing inflammation—we scored a different efficacy of the various immunosuppressive regimens on inflammatory and autoimmune skin diseases. This information can be key for designing immunosuppressive regimens and devising accurate follow-up protocols. PMID:27548160

  8. Donor hypernatremia before procurement and early outcomes following pediatric liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kaseje, Neema; McLin, Valerie; Toso, Christian; Poncet, Antoine; Wildhaber, Barbara E

    2015-08-01

    The demand for transplantable organs far outweighs the supply. Recently, efforts have been made to increase the donor pool by adopting extended criteria for livers, including those from hypernatremic donors. Currently, there is no clear evidence that the use of organs from hypernatremic donors has detrimental effects on pediatric liver transplantation (LT) recipients. Our aim was to use the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients database to evaluate the effects of donor hypernatremia on 30-day outcomes in pediatric LT recipients. We performed an analysis of 2325 children who underwent whole or partial LT between 2005 and 2010. First, we sought to determine a donor sodium threshold for increased mortality following pediatric LT. Second, we examined rates of mortality and graft failure at 30 days after LT in patients receiving grafts from hypernatremic donors compared to patients receiving grafts from normonatremic donors. Hypernatremia was defined as a donor sodium level of ≥160 µmol/L. The primary outcome measure was mortality at 30 days after transplant. The secondary outcome measure was graft failure at 30 days after transplant. There was no threshold sodium level for increased 30-day mortality following pediatric LT. Mean recipient ages/weights, Pediatric End-Stage Liver Disease/Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores, and mean cold and warm ischemia times were similar between the 2 study groups. There were no significant differences in mortality rates (3.9% versus 4.5%; P = 0.87) and graft failure rates (2.2% versus 1.9%; P = 1.00) in patients receiving grafts from hypernatremic donors compared to patients receiving grafts from normonatremic donors at 30 days after LT. In conclusion, donor hypernatremia just before procurement does not appear to have negative effects on mortality and graft failure rates at 30 days following pediatric LT.

  9. Survival Benefit with Kidney Transplants from HLA-Incompatible Live Donors

    PubMed Central

    Orandi, B.J.; Luo, X.; Massie, A.B.; Garonzik-Wang, J.M.; Lonze, B.E.; Ahmed, R.; Van Arendonk, K.J.; Stegall, M.D.; Jordan, S.C.; Oberholzer, J.; Dunn, T.B.; Ratner, L.E.; Kapur, S.; Pelletier, R.P.; Roberts, J.P.; Melcher, M.L.; Singh, P.; Sudan, D.L.; Posner, M.P.; El-Amm, J.M.; Shapiro, R.; Cooper, M.; Lipkowitz, G.S.; Rees, M.A.; Marsh, C.L.; Sankari, B.R.; Gerber, D.A.; Nelson, P.W.; Wellen, J.; Bozorgzadeh, A.; Gaber, A.O.; Montgomery, R.A.; Segev, D.L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND A report from a high-volume single center indicated a survival benefit of receiving a kidney transplant from an HLA-incompatible live donor as compared with remaining on the waiting list, whether or not a kidney from a deceased donor was received. The generalizability of that finding is unclear. METHODS In a 22-center study, we estimated the survival benefit for 1025 recipients of kidney transplants from HLA-incompatible live donors who were matched with controls who remained on the waiting list or received a transplant from a deceased donor (waiting-list-or-transplant control group) and controls who remained on the waiting list but did not receive a transplant (waiting-list-only control group). We analyzed the data with and without patients from the highest-volume center in the study. RESULTS Recipients of kidney transplants from incompatible live donors had a higher survival rate than either control group at 1 year (95.0%, vs. 94.0% for the waiting-list-or-transplant control group and 89.6% for the waiting-list-only control group), 3 years (91.7% vs. 83.6% and 72.7%, respectively), 5 years (86.0% vs. 74.4% and 59.2%), and 8 years (76.5% vs. 62.9% and 43.9%) (P<0.001 for all comparisons with the two control groups). The survival benefit was significant at 8 years across all levels of donor-specific antibody: 89.2% for recipients of kidney transplants from incompatible live donors who had a positive Luminex assay for anti-HLA antibody but a negative flow-cytometric cross-match versus 65.0% for the waiting-list-or-transplant control group and 47.1% for the waiting-list-only control group; 76.3% for recipients with a positive flow-cytometric cross-match but a negative cytotoxic cross-match versus 63.3% and 43.0% in the two control groups, respectively; and 71.0% for recipients with a positive cytotoxic cross-match versus 61.5% and 43.7%, respectively. The findings did not change when patients from the highest-volume center were excluded. CONCLUSIONS This

  10. Treatment Options and Strategies for Antibody Mediated Rejection after Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Matthew H.

    2011-01-01

    Antibody mediated rejection is a significant clinical problem encountered in a subset of renal transplant recipients. This type of rejection has a variable pathogenesis from the presence of donor specific antibodies with no overt disease to immediate hyperacute rejection and many variations between. Antibody mediated rejection is more common in human leukocyte antigen sensitized patients. In general, transplant graft survival after antibody mediated rejection is jeopardized, with less than 50% graft survival 5 years after this diagnosis. A variety of agents have been utilized singly and in combinations to treat antibody mediated rejection with differing results and significant research efforts are being placed on developing new targets for intervention. These same agents have been used in desensitization protocols with some success. In this review, we describe the biology of antibody mediated rejection, review the available agents to treat this form of rejection, and highlight areas of ongoing and future research into this difficult clinical problem. PMID:21940179

  11. Respiratory Failure due to Possible Donor-Derived Sporothrix schenckii Infection in a Lung Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Bahr, Nathan C.; Janssen, Katherine; Billings, Joanne; Loor, Gabriel; Green, Jaime S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. De novo and donor-derived invasive fungal infections (IFIs) contribute to morbidity and mortality in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. Reporting of donor-derived IFIs (DDIFIs) to the Organ Procurement Transplant Network has been mandated since 2005. Prior to that time no systematic monitoring of DDIFIs occurred in the United States. Case Presentation. We report a case of primary graft dysfunction in a 49-year-old male lung transplant recipient with diffuse patchy bilateral infiltrates likely related to pulmonary Sporothrix schenckii infection. The organism was isolated from a bronchoalveolar lavage on the second day after transplantation. Clinical and radiographic responses occurred after initiation of amphotericin B lipid formulation. Conclusion. We believe that this was likely a donor-derived infection given the early timing of the Sporothrix isolation after transplant in a bilateral single lung transplant recipient. This is the first case report of sporotrichosis in a lung transplant recipient. Our patient responded well to amphotericin induction therapy followed by maintenance therapy with itraconazole. The implications of donor-derived fungal infections and Sporothrix in transplant recipients are reviewed. Early recognition and management of these fungi are essential in improving outcomes. PMID:26697244

  12. Renal Transplant Immunology in the Last 20 Years: A Revolution Towards Graft and Patient Survival Improvement.

    PubMed

    Sá, Helena; Leal, Rita; Rosa, Manuel Santos

    2016-09-28

    To deride the hope of progress is the ultimate fatuity, the last word in poverty of spirit and meanness of mind. There is no need to be dismayed by the fact that we cannot yet envisage a definitive solution of our problems, a resting-place beyond which we need not try to go. -P.B. Medawar, 1969* [Formula: see text] Thomas E. Starlz, also known as the Father of Clinical Transplantation, once said that organ transplantation was the supreme exception to the rule that most major advances in medicine spring from discoveries in basic science [Starzl T. The mystique of organ transplantation. J Am Coll Surg 2005 Aug;201(2):160-170]. In fact, the first successful identical-twin kidney transplantation performed by Murray's team in December 1954 (Murray J et al. Renal homotransplantations in identical twins. Surg Forum 1955;6:432-436) was the example of an upside down translation medicine: Human clinical transplantation began and researchers tried to understand the underlying immune response and how to control the powerful rejection pathways through experimental models. In the last 20 years, we have witnessed an amazing progress in the knowledge of immunological mechanisms regarding alloimmune response and an outstanding evolution on the identification and characterization of major and minor histocompatibility antigens. This review presents an historical and clinical perspective of those important advances in kidney transplantation immunology in the last 20 years, which contributed to the improvement in patients' quality of life and the survival of end-stage renal patients. In spite of these significant progresses, some areas still need substantial progress, such as the definition of non-invasive biomarkers for acute rejection; the continuous reduction of immunosuppression; the extension of graft survival, and finally the achievement of real graft tolerance extended to HLA mismatch donor: recipient pairs.

  13. Liver transplant with a marginal donor graft containing a hydatid cyst--a case report.

    PubMed

    Eris, C; Akbulut, S; Sakcak, I; Kayaalp, C; Ara, C; Yilmaz, S

    2013-03-01

    Liver transplantation has become the standard treatment for acute failure and end-stage liver disease, but there are fewer donor organs available than patients on the waiting list. The donor pool may be increased by using marginal donor candidates. Some infectious and metabolic diseases have been transmitted to the recipient via marginal donor grafts. Hydatid cyst disease is rarely transmitted to a recipient from the donor graft. A literature search showed only 2 previous cases of liver transplantation using a donor graft that contains a hydatid cyst. We treated a 19-year-old woman who experienced acute on chronic end-stage liver failure secondary to cryptogenic cirrhosis. The liver graft from a 97-year-old marginal cadaveric donor contained a calcified hydatid cyst. No complication was associated with the hydatid cyst at 3 years after transplantation. The present case shows that donor livers with an inactive, calcified hydatid cyst may be used for emergency liver transplantation after considering the location, size, and relation of the cyst to vascular and biliary structures. The cyst may be resected on the back table with a successful treatment outcome.

  14. 21 CFR 1270.21 - Determination of donor suitability for human tissue intended for transplantation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of donor suitability for human..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE INTENDED FOR TRANSPLANTATION Donor Screening and...

  15. 21 CFR 1270.21 - Determination of donor suitability for human tissue intended for transplantation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Determination of donor suitability for human..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE INTENDED FOR TRANSPLANTATION Donor Screening and...

  16. Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Across ABO-Incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chen-Fang; Cheng, Chih-Hsien; Wang, Yu-Chao; Soong, Ruey-Shyang; Wu, Tsung-Han; Chou, Hong-Shiue; Wu, Ting-Jung; Chan, Kun-Ming; Lee, Ching-Song; Lee, Wei-Chen

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of adult ABO-incompatible living donor liver transplantation (LDLT).ABO-incompatible LDLT is an aggressive treatment that crosses the blood-typing barrier for saving lives from liver diseases. Although graft and patient survival have been improved recently by various treatments, the results of adult ABO-incompatible LDLT require further evaluation.Two regimens were designed based on isoagglutinin IgG and IgM titers and the time course of immunological reactions at this institute. When isoagglutinin IgG and IgM titers were ≤64, liver transplantation was directly performed and rituximab (375 mg/m) was administrated on postoperative day 1 (regimen I). When isoagglutinin titers were >64, rituximab (375 mg/m) was administered preoperatively with or without plasmapheresis and boosted on postoperative day 1 (regimen II). Immunosuppression was achieved by administration of mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, and steroids.Forty-six adult ABO-incompatible and 340 ABO-compatible LDLTs were performed from 2006 to 2013. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores for ABO-incompatible recipients ranged from 7 to 40, with a median of 14. The graft-to-recipient weight ratio ranged from 0.61% to 1.61% with a median of 0.91%. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were 81.7%, 75.7%, and 71.0%, respectively, for ABO-incompatible LDLT recipients, compared to 81.0%, 75.2%, and 71.5% for ABO-C recipients (P = 0.912). The biliary complication rate was higher in ABO-incompatible LDLT recipients than in the ABO-compatible recipients (50.0% vs 29.7%, P = 0.009).In the rituximab era, the blood type barrier can be crossed to achieve adult ABO-incompatible LDLT with survival rates comparable to those of ABO-compatible LDLT, but with more biliary complications.

  17. Section 1. Image evaluation of fatty liver in living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Fan; Yu, Chun-Yen; Ou, Hsin-You; Tsang, Leo Leung-Chit; Huang, Tung-Liang; Chen, Tai-Yi; Concejero, Allan; Wang, Chih-Chi; Wang, Shih-Ho; Lin, Tsan-Shiun; Liu, Yueh-Wei; Yang, Chin-Hsiang; Yong, Chee-Chien; Chiu, King-Wah; Jawan, Bruno; Eng, Hock-Liew; Chen, Chao-Long

    2014-04-27

    Preoperative evaluation of donors for living-donor liver transplantation aims to select a suitable donor with optimal graft quality and to ensure donor safety. Hepatic steatosis, a common finding in living liver donors, not only influences the outcome of liver transplantation for the recipient but also affects the recovery of the living donor after partial hepatectomy. Histopathologic analysis is the reference standard to detect and quantify fat in the liver, but it is invasive, and results are vulnerable to sampling error. Imaging can be repeated regularly and allows assessment of the entire liver, thus avoiding sampling error. Selection of appropriate imaging methods demands understanding of their advantages and limitations and the suitable clinical setting. This article describes potential clinical applications for liver fat quantification of imaging methods for fat detection and quantification, with an emphasis on the advantages and limitations of ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging for quantifying liver fat.

  18. Early diagnosis of acute postoperative renal transplant rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Tisdale, P.L.; Collier, B.D.; Kauffman, H.M.; Adams, M.B.; Isitman, A.T.; Hellman, R.S.; Rao, S.A.; Joestgen, T.; Krohn, L.

    1985-05-01

    A prospective evaluation of In-111 labeled autologous platelet scintigraphy for the early diagnosis of acute postoperative renal transplant rejection was undertaken. To date, 28 consecutive patients between 7 and 14 days post-op have been injected with 500..mu..Ci of In-111 platelets followed by imaging at 24 and 48 hours. Activity within the renal transplant exceeding activity in the adjacent iliac vessels was considered to be evidence of rejection, and both chemical evidence and clinical impression of rejection at 5 days after completion of imaging was accepted as proof of ongoing or incipient rejection at the time of scintigraphy. In addition, to visual inspection, independent quantitative analysis compared the area-normalized activity over the transplant with the adjacent iliac vessels (normal <1.0). For 5 patients, positive In-111 scintigraphy was present before convincing clinical evidence of rejection. In-111 platelet scintigraphy is useful not only to confirm the clinical diagnosis of rejection but also to establish the early, pre-clinical diagnosis of incipient acute postoperative renal transplant rejection.

  19. Expression of nestin after renal transplantation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Skwirba, Michael; Zakrzewicz, Anna; Atanasova, Srebrena; Wilker, Sigrid; Fuchs-Moll, Gabriele; Müller, Dieter; Padberg, Winfried; Grau, Veronika

    2014-10-01

    Chronic allograft injury (CAI) limits the long-term success of renal transplantation. Nestin is a marker of progenitor cells, which probably contribute to its pathogenesis. We hypothesize that nestin is induced by ischemia/reperfusion injury and acute rejection, main risk factors for CAI. Syngeneic renal transplantation was performed in Lewis rats and allogeneic transplantation in the Fischer 344 to Lewis strain combination, which results in reversible acute rejection and in CAI in the long-run. The Dark Agouti to Lewis rat strain combination was used to study fatal acute rejection. In untreated kidneys, nestin immunoreactivity was detected in glomeruli and in very few interstitial or microvascular cells. Syngeneic transplantation induced nestin expression within 4 days, which decreased until day 9 and returned to control levels on day 42. Nestin expression was strong during acute rejection and still detected during the pathogenesis of CAI on day 42. Nestin-positive cells were identified as endothelial cells and interstitial fibroblast-like cells co-expressing alpha-smooth muscle actin. A sub-population of them expressed proliferating cell nuclear antigen. In conclusion, nestin is induced in renal grafts by ischemia/reperfusion injury and acute rejection. It is expressed by proliferating myofibroblasts and endothelial cells and probably contributes to the pathogenesis of CAI.

  20. Stored blood--an effective immunosuppressive method for transplantation of kidneys from unrelated donors. An 11-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Galvão, M M; Peixinho, Z F; Mendes, N F; Sabbaga, E

    1997-06-01

    Thirty-seven patients were submitted to kidney transplantation after transfusion at 2-week intervals with 4-week stored blood from their potential donors. All patients and donors were typed for HLA-A-B and DR antigens. The patients were also tested for cytotoxic antibodies against donor antigens before each transfusion. The percentage of panel reactive antibodies (PRA) was determined against a selected panel of 30 cell donors before and after the transfusions. The patients were immunosuppressed with azathioprine and prednisone. Rejection crises were treated with methylprednisolone. The control group consisted of 23 patients who received grafts from an unrelated donor but who did not receive donor-specific pretransplant blood transfusion. The incidence and reversibility of rejection episodes, allograft loss caused by rejection, and patient and graft survival rates were determined for both groups. Non-parametric methods (chi-square and Fisher tests) were used for statistical analysis, with the level of significance set at P < 0.05. The incidence and reversibility of rejection crises during the first 60 post-transplant days did not differ significantly between groups. The actuarial graft and patient survival rates at five years were 56% and 77%, respectively, for the treated group and 39.8% and 57.5% for the control group. Graft loss due to rejection was significantly higher in the untreated group (P = 0.0026) which also required more intense immunosuppression (P = 0.0001). We conclude that transfusions using stored blood have the immunosuppressive effect of fresh blood transfusions without the risk of provoking a widespread formation of antibodies. In addition, this method permits a reduction of the immunosuppressive drugs during the process without impairing the adequate functioning of the renal graft.

  1. Wait List Death and Survival Benefit of Kidney Transplantation among Non-renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Cassuto, James R.; Reese, Peter P.; Sonnad, Seema; Bloom, Roy D.; Levine, Matthew H.; Naji, Ali; Abt, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The disparity between the number of patients waiting for kidney transplantation and the limited supply of kidney allografts has renewed interest in the benefit from kidney transplantation experienced by different groups. This study evaluated kidney transplant survival benefit in prior non-renal transplant recipients (kidney after liver, KALi; lung, KALu; heart, KAH) compared to primary isolated (KA1) or repeat isolated kidney (KA2) transplant. Multivariable Cox regression models were fit using UNOS data for patients wait listed and transplanted from 1995–2008. Compared to KA1, the risk of death on the wait list was lower for KA2 (p<0.001;HR=0.84;CI=0.81–0.88), but substantially higher for KALu (p<0.001;HR=3.80;CI=3.08–4.69), KAH (p<0.001;HR=1.92;CI=1.66–2.22), and KALi (p<0.001;HR=2.69;CI=2.46–2.95). Following kidney transplant, patient survival was greatest for KA1, similar among KA2, KALi, KAH, and inferior for KALu. Compared to the entire wait list, renal transplantation was associated with a survival benefit among all groups except KALu (p=0.017;HR=1.61;CI=1.09–2.38), where post-transplant survival was inferior to the wait list population. Recipients of KA1 kidney transplantation have the greatest post-transplant survival and compared to the overall kidney wait list, the greatest survival benefit. PMID:20977641

  2. Contribution of Large Pig for Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion and Transplantation Studies: The Preclinical Model

    PubMed Central

    Giraud, S.; Favreau, F.; Chatauret, N.; Thuillier, R.; Maiga, S.; Hauet, T.

    2011-01-01

    Animal experimentation is necessary to characterize human diseases and design adequate therapeutic interventions. In renal transplantation research, the limited number of in vitro models involves a crucial role for in vivo models and particularly for the porcine model. Pig and human kidneys are anatomically similar (characterized by multilobular structure in contrast to rodent and dog kidneys unilobular). The human proximity of porcine physiology and immune systems provides a basic knowledge of graft recovery and inflammatory physiopathology through in vivo studies. In addition, pig large body size allows surgical procedures similar to humans, repeated collections of peripheral blood or renal biopsies making pigs ideal for medical training and for the assessment of preclinical technologies. However, its size is also its main drawback implying expensive housing. Nevertheless, pig models are relevant alternatives to primate models, offering promising perspectives with developments of transgenic modulation and marginal donor models facilitating data extrapolation to human conditions. PMID:21403881

  3. Designing fecal microbiota transplant trials that account for differences in donor stool efficacy.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Scott W; Gurry, Thomas; Alm, Eric J

    2017-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation is a highly effective intervention for patients suffering from recurrent Clostridium difficile, a common hospital-acquired infection. Fecal microbiota transplantation's success as a therapy for C. difficile has inspired interest in performing clinical trials that experiment with fecal microbiota transplantation as a therapy for other conditions like inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, diabetes, and Parkinson's disease. Results from clinical trials that use fecal microbiota transplantation to treat inflammatory bowel disease suggest that, for at least one condition beyond C. difficile, most fecal microbiota transplantation donors produce stool that is not efficacious. The optimal strategies for identifying and using efficacious donors have not been investigated. We therefore examined the optimal Bayesian response-adaptive strategy for allocating patients to donors and formulated a computationally tractable myopic heuristic. This heuristic computes the probability that a donor is efficacious by updating prior expectations about the efficacy of fecal microbiota transplantation, the placebo rate, and the fraction of donors that produce efficacious stool. In simulations designed to mimic a recent fecal microbiota transplantation clinical trial, for which traditional power calculations predict [Formula: see text] statistical power, we found that accounting for differences in donor stool efficacy reduced the predicted statistical power to [Formula: see text]. For these simulations, using the heuristic Bayesian allocation strategy more than quadrupled the statistical power to [Formula: see text]. We use the results of similar simulations to make recommendations about the number of patients, the number of donors, and the choice of clinical endpoint that clinical trials should use to optimize their ability to detect if fecal microbiota transplantation is effective for treating a condition.

  4. Paediatric dialysis and renal transplantation in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Garcia, C; Goldani, J; Garcia, V

    1992-01-01

    Renal replacement therapy (RRT) for Brazilian children with uraemia has been utilized since 1970 in the state of Rio Grande do Sul. One hundred and eighty patients receiving this therapy between 1970 and 1988 have been reviewed. The annual acceptance rate of new paediatric patients in this period increased from 0.6 to 6.5 patients per million child population. Glomerulonephritis (36.1%) and pyelonephritis including urological anomalies (31.7%) were the most frequent causes of end-stage renal disease. Outpatient hospital haemodialysis was the primary form of dialytic treatment in patients 5-15 years of age. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis was more often used in patients less than 5 years of age. The survival after 1 year on dialysis was 79.9% for children aged 5-15 years starting dialysis during the period 1985-1988. Fluid overload with congestive heart failure and infection were the main causes of death in children on dialysis. Eighty-four children received 93 grafts; only 14 (15%) were from cadaveric donors. One-year patient and graft survival of first living-related donor transplants were 92.2% and 78.5% respectively during the period 1985-1988. Infection accounted for 43.5% of deaths after transplantation. We conclude that RRT is becoming increasingly successful for children in our region but that greater emphasis upon patient compliance with all forms of RRT and upon cadaver kidney donation is needed.

  5. Urinary tract infection in renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Giessing, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Urinary tract infection (UTI), especially recurrent UTI, is a common problem, occurring in >75% of kidney transplant (KTX) recipients. UTI degrades the health-related quality of life and can impair graft function, potentially reducing graft and patient survival. As urologists are often involved in treating UTI after KTX, previous reports were searched to elucidate underlying causes, risk factors and treatment options, as well as recommendations for prophylaxis of UTI after KTX. Methods Pubmed/Medline was searched and international guidelines and recommendations for prevention and treatment of UTI after KTX were also assessed. Results Most studies on UTI after KTX have a small sample, and are descriptive and retrospective. Many transplant- and recipient-related risk factors have been identified. While asymptomatic bacteriuria is often treated, even though some studies advise against it, symptomatic UTI should be treated empirically after collecting urine for microbiological analysis, to avoid the development of transplant pyelonephritis with a high chance of urosepsis. The duration of treatment has not been determined in studies and recommendations refer to the treatment of complicated UTI in the non-transplant population. Prophylaxis has not been the focus of studies either. Conclusion UTI after KTX is still largely an under-represented field of study, despite many recipients developing UTI after KTX. Prospective studies on this topic are urgently needed. PMID:26558020

  6. C1Q Assay Results in Complement-Dependent Cytotoxicity Crossmatch Negative Renal Transplant Candidates with Donor-Specific Antibodies: High Specificity but Low Sensitivity When Predicting Flow Crossmatch

    PubMed Central

    Castelán, Natalia; de Santiago, Adrián; Arvizu, Adriana; Gonzalez-Tableros, Norma; López, Mayra; Salcedo, Isaac; Vilatobá, Mario; Granados, Julio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the association of positive flow cross match (FXM) and C1q-SAB. Methods. In this observational, cross-sectional, and comparative study, patients included had negative AHG-CDC-XM and donor specific antibodies (DSA) and were tested with FXM. All pretransplant sera were tested with C1q-SAB assay. Results. A total of 50 donor/recipient evaluations were conducted; half of them had at least one C1q+ Ab (n = 26, 52%). Ten patients (20.0%) had DSA C1q+ Ab. Twenty-five (50%) FXMs were positive. Factors associated with a positive FXM were the presence of C1q+ Ab (DSA C1q+ Ab: OR 27, 2.80–259.56, P = 0.004, and no DSA C1q+ Ab: OR 5, 1.27–19.68, P = 0.021) and the DSA LABScreen-SAB MFI (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.06–1.49, P = 0.007). The cutoff point of immunodominant LABScreen SAB DSA-MFI with the greatest sensitivity and specificity to predict FXM was 2,300 (sensitivity: 72% and specificity: 75%). For FXM prediction, DSA C1q+ Ab was the most specific (95.8%, 85–100) and the combination of DSA-MFI > 2,300 and C1q+ Ab was the most sensitive (92.0%, 79.3–100). Conclusions. C1q+ Ab and LABScreen SAB DSA-MFI were significantly associated with FXM. DSA C1q+ Ab was highly specific but with low sensitivity. PMID:27688904

  7. Tracking donor-reactive T cells: evidence for clonal deletion in tolerant kidney transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Heather; DeWolf, Susan; Robins, Harlan; Sprangers, Ben; LoCascio, Samuel A.; Shonts, Brittany A.; Kawai, Tatsuo; Wong, Waichi; Yang, Suxiao; Zuber, Julien; Shen, Yufeng; Sykes, Megan

    2015-01-01

    T cell responses to allogeneic major histocompatibility (MHC) antigens present a formidable barrier to organ transplantation, necessitating long-term immunosuppression to minimize rejection. Chronic rejection and drug-induced morbidities are major limitations that could be overcome by allograft tolerance induction. Tolerance was first intentionally induced in humans via combined kidney and bone marrow transplantation (CKBMT), but the mechanisms of tolerance in these patients are incompletely understood. We now establish an assay to identify donor-reactive T cells and test the role of deletion in tolerance after CKBMT. Using high-throughput sequencing of the TCRB chain CDR3 region, we define a fingerprint of the donor-reactive T cell repertoire prior to transplantation and track those clones post-transplant. We observed post-transplant reductions in donor-reactive T cell clones in three tolerant CKBMT patients; such reductions were not observed in a fourth, non-tolerant, CKBMT patient or in two conventional kidney transplant recipients on standard immunosuppressive regimens. T cell repertoire turnover due to lymphocyte-depleting conditioning only partially accounted for the observed reductions in tolerant patients; in fact, conventional transplant recipients showed expansion of circulating donor-reactive clones, despite extensive repertoire turnover. Moreover, loss of donor-reactive T cell clones more closely associated with tolerance induction than in vitro functional assays. Our analysis supports clonal deletion as a mechanism of allograft tolerance in CKBMT patients. The results validate the significance of donor-reactive T cell cl