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Sample records for renal transplantation role

  1. Emerging role of gasotransmitters in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Snijder, P M; van den Berg, E; Whiteman, M; Bakker, S J L; Leuvenink, H G D; van Goor, H

    2013-12-01

    Once patients with kidney disease progress to end-stage renal failure, transplantation is the preferred option of treatment resulting in improved quality of life and reduced mortality compared to dialysis. Although 1-year survival has improved considerably, graft and patient survival in the long term have not been concurrent, and therefore new tools to improve long-term graft and patient survival are warranted. Over the past decades, the gasotransmitters nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) have emerged as potent cytoprotective mediators in various diseases. All three gasotransmitters are endogenously produced messenger molecules that possess vasodilatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties by influencing an array of intracellular signaling processes. Although many regulatory functions of gasotransmitters have overlapping actions, differences have also been reported. In addition, crosstalk between NO, CO and H2S results in synergistic regulatory effects. Endogenous and exogenous manipulation of gasotransmitter levels modulates several processes involved in renal transplantation. This review focuses on mechanisms of gas-mediated cytoprotection and complex interactions between gasotransmitters in renal transplantation.

  2. Clinical role of the renal transplant biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Winfred W.; Taheri, Diana; Tolkoff-Rubin, Nina; Colvin, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous needle core biopsy is the definitive procedure by which essential diagnostic and prognostic information on acute and chronic renal allograft dysfunction is obtained. The diagnostic value of the information so obtained has endured for over three decades and has proven crucially important in shaping strategies for therapeutic intervention. This Review provides a broad outline of the utility of performing kidney graft biopsies after transplantation, highlighting the relevance of biopsy findings in the immediate and early post-transplant period (from days to weeks after implantation), the first post-transplant year, and the late period (beyond the first year). We focus on how biopsy findings change over time, and the wide variety of pathological features that characterize the major clinical diagnoses facing the clinician. This article also includes a discussion of acute cellular and humoral rejection, the toxic effects of calcineurin inhibitors, and the widely varying etiologies and characteristics of chronic lesions. Emerging technologies based on gene expression analyses and proteomics, the in situ detection of functionally relevant molecules, and new bioinformatic approaches that hold the promise of improving diagnostic precision and developing new, refined molecular pathways for therapeutic intervention are also presented. PMID:22231130

  3. Roles of mTOR complexes in the kidney: implications for renal disease and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fantus, Daniel; Rogers, Natasha M; Grahammer, Florian; Huber, Tobias B; Thomson, Angus W

    2016-10-01

    The mTOR pathway has a central role in the regulation of cell metabolism, growth and proliferation. Studies involving selective gene targeting of mTOR complexes (mTORC1 and mTORC2) in renal cell populations and/or pharmacologic mTOR inhibition have revealed important roles of mTOR in podocyte homeostasis and tubular transport. Important advances have also been made in understanding the role of mTOR in renal injury, polycystic kidney disease and glomerular diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. Novel insights into the roles of mTORC1 and mTORC2 in the regulation of immune cell homeostasis and function are helping to improve understanding of the complex effects of mTOR targeting on immune responses, including those that impact both de novo renal disease and renal allograft outcomes. Extensive experience in clinical renal transplantation has resulted in successful conversion of patients from calcineurin inhibitors to mTOR inhibitors at various times post-transplantation, with excellent long-term graft function. Widespread use of this practice has, however, been limited owing to mTOR-inhibitor- related toxicities. Unique attributes of mTOR inhibitors include reduced rates of squamous cell carcinoma and cytomegalovirus infection compared to other regimens. As understanding of the mechanisms by which mTORC1 and mTORC2 drive the pathogenesis of renal disease progresses, clinical studies of mTOR pathway targeting will enable testing of evolving hypotheses. PMID:27477490

  4. BK Viremia among Iranian Renal Transplant Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Jozpanahi, Manizheh; Ramezani, Amitis; Ossareh, Shahrzad; Banifazl, Mohammad; Bavand, Anahita; Mamishi, Setareh; Aghakhani, Arezoo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary infection with BK virus (BKV) is occurred during childhood and usually asymptomatic, but after initial infection, BKV may persist lifelong in the kidney and genitourinary tract. Reactivation may occur in individuals with compromised immunity such as renal transplant recipients. Due to the role of BKV in BK virus-associated nephropathy (BKVAN) and potentially renal allograft rejection, the detection of BKV in renal transplant candidates is very important. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of BK viremia in end stage renal disease cases who were candidates for renal transplantation. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 50 cases with end stage renal disease who were candidates for renal transplantation were recruited from the main dialysis unit in Tehran, Iran. Presence of BK viremia was determined in plasma samples of cases using real time PCR. Results: A total of 50 renal transplant candidates with mean age 37.8±13 yr were enrolled in the study. Fifty two percent of subjects were male. Forty six (92%) of them were under HD and 4 (8%) were on PD. BK virus was not detected in any plasma samples of renal transplant candidates. Conclusion: This study showed absence of BK viremia in our renal transplant candidates. However, due to the important role of BKV in BKVAN and renal graft failure and rejection, further studies involving larger number of cases are required to elucidate the rate of the BKV in renal transplant candidates. PMID:27799969

  5. Interventional Management of Vascular Renal Transplant Complications.

    PubMed

    Kolli, Kanti Pallav; LaBerge, Jeanne M

    2016-09-01

    Renal transplantation is the therapy of choice in patients with end stage renal disease. Although transplant rejection remains the most common complication after renal transplantation, vascular anatomical complications occur in 1%-23% of renal transplant recipients. Interventional radiologists play an important role in the management of these complications. This review discusses the role of image-guided interventions within the context of multidisciplinary patient management. Particular emphasis is given to anatomical considerations unique to this patient population, techniques used for image-guided interventions, and outcomes of image-guided interventions. PMID:27641457

  6. Promoting Access to Renal Transplantation: The Role of Social Support Networks in Completing Pre-transplant Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Leroi S.; Keogh, Joseph H.; Epstein, Arnold M.; Ayanian, John Z.

    2008-01-01

    Background Completing pre-transplant evaluations may be a greater barrier to renal transplantation for blacks with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) than for whites. Objective To determine whether social support networks facilitate completing the pre-transplant evaluation and reduce racial disparities in this aspect of care. Design, Setting, and Participants We surveyed 742 black and white ESRD patients in four regional networks 9 months after they initiated dialysis in 1996 and 1997. Patients reported instrumental support networks (number of friends or family to help with daily activities), emotional support networks (number of friends or family available for counsel on personal problems) and dialysis center support (support from dialysis center staff and patients). The completion of pre-transplant evaluations, including preoperative risk stratification and testing, was determined by medical record reviews. Outcome Measurement Complete renal pre-transplant evaluations. Results Compared to patients with low levels of instrumental support, those with high levels were more likely to have complete evaluations (25% versus 46%, respectively, p < .001). In adjusted analyses, high levels of instrumental support were associated with higher rates of complete evaluations among black women (p < .05), white women (p < .05), and white men (p < .05), but not black men. Among black men, but not other groups, private insurance was a significant predictor of complete evaluations. Conclusions Instrumental support networks may facilitate completing renal pre-transplant evaluations. Clinical interventions that supplement instrumental support should be evaluated to improve access to renal transplantation. Access to supplemental insurance may also promote complete evaluations for black patients. PMID:18478302

  7. Current status of renal transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Suranyi, M. G.; Hall, B. M.

    1990-01-01

    The success rate of renal transplantation has improved considerably during the past decade, with substantial improvements in both graft and patient survival. The quality of graft function, however, and not graft survival alone is increasingly determining the standards by which transplantation outcome is being judged. As the demand for kidney transplants continues to rise and transplants are being offered to an ever-increasing number of patients, organs are being sought from new supply pools and efforts are being made to use current resources more efficiently. Improvements in clinical management have allowed short-term complications such as infection and rejection to be better prevented or better diagnosed and treated. Fundamental advances in the understanding of the immunologic processes underlying both allograft rejection and acceptance and the introduction of new immunosuppressive agents have allowed a better use of drug therapy and have moved the goal of acquired transplant tolerance closer to attainment. With improved initial transplant success rates, the long-term transplantation outcome is becoming more important. The role of tissue matching in preventing chronic rejection is becoming more appreciated, and the long-term risks of malignancy, arteriosclerosis, and chronic rejection are being better recognized and managed. PMID:2191502

  8. The role of transplant-related stressors and social support in the development of anxiety among renal transplant recipients: the direct and buffering effects.

    PubMed

    Pisanti, Renato; Poli, Luca; Lombardo, Caterina; Bennardi, Linda; Giordanengo, Luca; Berloco, Pasquale Bartolomeo; Violani, Cristiano

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have shown a relevant presence of anxiety feelings among renal transplant patients. This study examines the impact of transplant-related stress and social support on anxiety. Two hypotheses were examined: H1: High transplant-related stressors and low social support are related to high anxiety (additive hypothesis); H2: Social support moderates the detrimental impact of transplant-related stressors on anxiety (buffer hypothesis). One hundred and four kidney transplant recipients (54% male), with a mean age of 50.8 (SD = 12.6), volunteered to participate in a cross-sectional study that included a face-to-face interview and several self-administered scales. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that higher transplant-related stressors are associated with higher levels of anxiety (F change (2, 92) = 17.4, p < .001, ∆R(2) = 24%), but, contrary to our prediction, social support was not directly related with anxiety. However, social support has a moderating effect on the relationship between high transplant-related stressors and anxiety (F change (1, 91) = 5.2, p < .05, ∆R(2) = 3%). The results are consistent with the hypothesis that social support has a buffering role on the patients' distress following renal transplantation and suggest that their psychological well-being could benefit from enhancing the perception of social support in post-operative care.

  9. Antihypertensive treatment in renal transplant patients--is there a role for ACE inhibitors?

    PubMed

    Hausberg, M; Kosch, M; Hohage, H; Suwelack, B; Barenbrock, M; Kisters, K; Rahn, K H

    2001-01-01

    During the past two decades great progress was achieved with regards to short-term kidney graft survival. However, long-term graft survival did not improve similarly. Many factors contribute to chronic graft nephropathy eventually resulting in late graft loss, among these arterial hypertension is of major importance. In patients with chronic renal disease of diabetic and non-diabetic origin, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors have been convincingly shown to slow the progression of renal failure. The achieved nephroprotection correlates with the reduction of proteinuria by ACE inhibitor treatment. Also in renal transplant patients, ACE inhibitors have been shown unequivocally to reduce urinary protein excretion. The prevention of hyperfiltration, particular in the context of a reduced number of functional nephrons in patients with chronic graft nephropathy, could be important to prolong graft survival after renal transplantation. Moreover, ACE inhibitors may exert beneficial effects on immunologic processes contributing to chronic graft nephropathy. Many studies published in the last decade show convincingly that ACE inhibitors are safe and effective for the treatment of hypertension in renal allograft recipients. However, no data exist so far showing that ACE inhibitors are superior to other antihypertensive drugs in renal transplant patients and that they prolong graft survival. Studies investigating this issue are warranted. Apart from effects on the graft, ACE inhibitors may improve alterations of the cardiovascular system generally observed in renal transplant patients, such as structural alterations of large arteries, left ventricular hypertrophy, disturbed mechanical vessel wall properties and endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors could reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in kidney transplant patients.

  10. [Renal transplantation: ethical issues].

    PubMed

    Mamzer-Bruneel, Marie-France; Laforêt, Emmanuelle Grand; Kreis, Henri; Thervet, Éric; Martinez, Frank; Snanoudj, Renaud; Hervé, Christian; Legendre, Christophe

    2012-12-01

    One of the most significant advances in medicine during the last 50 years is the development of organ transplantation. In the context of chronic kidney diseases, renal transplantation offers patients a better clinical outcome than other treatment options. However, the benefits of organ transplantation have not been maximized due to an inadequate supply of organs for transplantation. Despite the establishment of elaborate legal rules for organs procurement, both on deceased and living donors in numerous countries, ethical concerns remain. Most of them are consequences of the strategies implemented or proposed to address the so-called organ shortage. The involvement of society in these complex problems is crucial as numerous questions emerge: could actual state of organ procurement change? Is it possible and/or realistic to increase the number of organs, with respects to living donors or deceased persons? Is the shortage an indicator to limit the use of kidney transplantation? How do we maintain efficiency and justice, in this context. PMID:23168353

  11. Renal transplantation in infants.

    PubMed

    Jalanko, Hannu; Mattila, Ilkka; Holmberg, Christer

    2016-05-01

    Renal transplantation (RTx) has become an accepted mode of therapy in infants with severe renal failure. The major indications are structural abnormalities of the urinary tract, congenital nephrotic syndrome, polycystic diseases, and neonatal kidney injury. Assessment of these infants needs expertise and time as well as active treatment before RTx to ensure optimal growth and development, and to avoid complications that could lead to permanent neurological defects. RTx can be performed already in infants weighing around 5 kg, but most operations occur in infants with a weight of 10 kg or more. Perioperative management focuses on adequate perfusion of the allograft and avoidance of thrombotic and other surgical complications. Important long-term issues include rejections, infections, graft function, growth, bone health, metabolic problems, neurocognitive development, adherence to medication, pubertal maturation, and quality of life. The overall outcome of infant RTx has dramatically improved, with long-term patient and graft survivals of over 90 and 80 %, respectively. PMID:26115617

  12. Future challenges in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Whalen, H; Clancy, M; Jardine, A

    2012-02-01

    There is a worldwide increase in the incidence of end-stage renal disease. Renal transplantation has been shown to be cost effective, prolong survival and provide a better quality of life in comparison to dialysis. Consequently, there has been a steady increase in demand for organs leading to a shortage of available kidneys, and an increase in transplant waiting lists. Renal transplantation is therefore an expanding field with a number of unique future challenges to address. This article outlines strategies that may be employed to expand organ supply in order to meet increased demand. The ethical issues surrounding this are also summarized. Furthermore, we highlight techniques with the potential to minimize peri-transplant injury to the kidney on its journey from donor to recipient. Current and potential future management strategies to optimize graft and patient survival are also discussed. PMID:22361673

  13. Antihypertensive agents and renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Vergoulas, G

    2007-01-01

    Advances in the field of kidney transplantation have led to a significant increase in the life of renal allograft with 1 - year graft survival rates of 93% to 99%.This increase in early graft survival has made it possible to observe the long-term morbidities that accompany renal transplantation. Studies correlating the reduction of arterial blood pressure with patient and graft survival as well as the risk of cardiovascular disease do not exist. The recommendations come from the general population and from comparative studies of hypertensive and normotensive kidney graft recipients. It is known that in the general population hypertension is a risk factor for chronic kidney disease but at the same time a risk factor for death, ischaemic heart disease, chronic heart failure and left ventricular hypertrophy. We must always have in mind that there are many similarities between a kidney graft recipient and a patient with chronic kidney disease. Renal transplant recipients represent a patient population with a very high risk for development of cardiovascular disease which has been identified as the leading cause of death in these patients1. Of 18,482 deaths among renal allograft recipients, 38% had functioning renal allografts 2, 3. Successful renal transplantation (Rt) can result in partial regression of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) if it is associated with hypertension (HTN) remission or if HTN is controlled by medications. Frequently post transplant HTN is associated with failure of LVH to regress. Transplant clinicians must choose antihypertensive agents that will provide their patients with maximum benefit from renal allograft and cardiovascular perspective. The target must always be long term patient and graft survival and acceptable quality of life. The antihypertensive drugs usually used after kidney transplantation are diuretics, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers and β – blockers. Most

  14. Role of BK virus infection in end-stage renal disease patients waiting for kidney transplantation--viral replication dynamics from pre- to post-transplant.

    PubMed

    Mitterhofer, Anna Paola; Tinti, Francesca; Pietropaolo, Valeria; Umbro, Ilaria; Anzivino, Elena; Bellizzi, Anna; Zavatto, Assunta; Poli, Luca; Berloco, Pasquale Bartolomeo; Taliani, Gloria

    2014-03-01

    We report the prevalence of BK virus (BKV) infection before renal transplantation and the dynamics of BKV viremia from pre- to post-transplantation. We assessed 60 kidney transplanted patients from a single cohort in Italy, treated with identical immunosuppressive therapy, for BK viremia at pre-transplantation, 12 h, and three and six months post-transplantation. Polymerase chain reaction showed that the prevalence of plasma BKV replication--considered a marker of infection--was 20% in pre-transplant patients. All pre-transplant-positive patients remained positive post-transplant, whereas the majority of pre-transplant-negative patients remained negative. Viremia dynamics classification revealed three clusters of patients: Cluster A++, pre-transplant-positive patients (20%) who tested positive at least once post-transplant; Cluster B-+, pre-transplant-negative patients (28%) who tested positive at least once post-transplant; and Cluster C- -, pre-transplant-negative patients (52%) who remained negative throughout. These clusters presented significant differences related to the prevalence of substantially positive patients with high plasma viral load (>10(3) copies/mL) in cluster A, but not in donors' or grafts' characteristics. We suggest that pre-transplant viral status should be considered as an additional risk factor for post-transplant BKV replication. Therefore, pre-transplant BKV infection screening in kidney transplant patients should be performed for improving planning of personalized immunosuppressant schemes and specific post-transplant surveillance.

  15. Interventional Management of Nonvascular Renal Transplant Complications.

    PubMed

    Kolli, Kanti Pallav; LaBerge, Jeanne M

    2016-09-01

    Nonvascular complications represent a significant source of morbidity following renal transplantation and can be seen in up to 20% of patients. Postoperative problems include urinary tract obstruction or leakage and the development of peritransplant fluid collections. Interventional radiologists play a key role in the management of these patients. Image-guided interventions are used to identify the underlying anatomical problem, relieve immediate symptoms, and allow planning for long-term resolution. In this article, we review the urinary tract anatomy relevant to renal transplantation, procedural techniques for image-guided urinary tract interventions and interventions on peritransplant fluid collections, and expected outcomes following image-guided interventions. PMID:27641456

  16. Malignancy in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Penn, I

    1996-01-01

    Immunosuppressed organ allograft recipients have a 3-4 fold increased risk of developing cancer, but the chance of developing certain malignancies is increased several hundredfold. With the exception of skin cancers, most of the common neoplasms seen in the general population are not increased in incidence in organ allograft recipients. Instead, there is a higher frequency of relatively rare tumors including lymphomas, Kaposi's sarcoma, other sarcomas, vulvar and perineal carcinomas, renal and hepatobiliary carcinomas. Tumors appear after a relatively short time post-transplantation. The earliest is Kaposi's sarcoma, which appears after an average of 22 months post-transplantation, and the latest are vulvar and perineal carcinomas, which present after an average of 113 months post-transplantation. Unusual features of lymphomas are: (a) high incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas; (b) high frequency of Epstein-Barr virus-related lesions; (c) frequent involvement of extra-nodal sites; (d) marked predilection for the brain; and (e) frequent allograft involvement. Skin cancers also present unusual features: (a) remarkably high frequency of Kaposi's sarcoma; (b) reversal of the ratio of basal to squamous cell carcinomas seen in the general population; (c) young age of the patients; and (d) high incidence of multiple tumors, which occur in 43% of patients. Vulvar and perineal cancers occur at a much younger age than in the general population. Probably, multiple factors play a role in the etiology of the cancers. Immunodeficiency per se and infection with oncogenic viruses may be major influences. Other factors possibly playing a role include direct damage to DNA by various immunosuppressive agents; possibly synergistic effects of these treatments with carcinogens; and genetic factors influencing susceptibility or resistance to development of malignancy. PMID:18417907

  17. Treatment of Autonomous Hyperparathyroidism in Post Renal Transplant Recipients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-23

    Chronic Allograft Nephropathy; Chronic Kidney Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Disordered Mineral Metabolism; End Stage Renal Disease; Hyperparathyroidism; Hypophosphatemia; Kidney Disease; Kidney Transplantation; Post Renal Transplantation

  18. Renal transplantation program in Cuba.

    PubMed

    Marmol, A S; Perez, A R; Munoz, L C; Arce, S B

    2009-10-01

    Kidney transplantation has been performed in Cuba since 1970. In 1979, compatible living-related donors were introduced into our renal transplantation program. There are 43 hospitals distributed around the country with a multidisciplinary group that attends cadaveric donors with encephalic death. The donor rate in Cuba oscillates between 15 and 18 per million; 90% of them are from cadaveric donors. This program includes 47 dialysis centers throughout the country with 2300 patients as supported by a National Coordinating Center at The Nephrology Institute. Cuba is one of the first countries in our region with this experience.

  19. European Transplant Registry of Senior Renal Transplant Recipients on Advagraf

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-11

    Graft Failure; Death; Acute Rejection of Renal Transplant; Infections; Bone Disease; Post Transplant Diabetes Mellitus; Quality of Life; HLA Antibody Production; Cardiovascular Risk Factors; Non-HLA Antibody Production

  20. Steroid withdrawal in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Grenda, Ryszard

    2013-11-01

    Over the last decade, steroid minimization became one of the major goals in pediatric renal transplantation. Different protocols have been used by individual centers and multicenter study groups, including early and late steroid withdrawal or even complete avoidance. The timing of steroid withdrawal determines if antibodies are used, as avoidance and early withdrawal require antibody induction, while late withdrawal typically does not. A monoclonal antibody was used in most protocols during an early steroid withdrawal together with tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil in low immunological risk patients. Polyclonal induction was reported as effective in high-risk patients. Cyclosporine A and mycophenolate mofetil were used in late steroid withdrawal with no induction. All described protocols were effective in terms of preventing acute rejection and preserving renal graft function. There was no superiority of any specific protocol in terms of clinical benefits of steroid withdrawal. Pre-puberty determined growth benefit while other clinical advantages, including better control of glycemia, lipids, and blood pressure, were age independent. It is not clear whether the steroid withdrawal increases the risk of recurrence of primary glomerular diseases post-transplant, however it cannot be excluded. There is no evidence to date for a higher risk of anti-HLA production in steroid-free children after renal transplantation. Key summary points--Current strategies to minimize the steroid-related adverse effects in pediatric renal graft recipients include steroid withdrawal, early or late after transplantation, or complete steroid avoidance--Early steroid withdrawal or avoidance is generally used following the induction therapy with mono- or polyclonal antibodies, while in late steroid withdrawal induction therapy was generally not used- Elimination of steroids (early or late) does not increase the risk of acute rejection and does not deteriorate long-term renal graft function

  1. Challenges in pediatric renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Peruzzi, Licia; Amore, Alessandro; Coppo, Rosanna

    2014-01-01

    Transplantation in children is the best option to treat renal failure. Over the last 25 years the improvements in therapy have dramatically reduced the risk of early acute rejection and graft loss, however the long term results in terms of graft survival and morbidity still require search for new immunosuppressive regimens. Tolerance of the graft and minimization of side effects are the challenges for improving the outcome of children with a grafted kidney. Notwithstanding the difficulties in settling in children large multicenter trials to derive statistically useful data, many important contributions in the last years brought important modifications in the immunosuppressive therapy, including minimization protocols of steroids and calcineurin inhibitors and new induction drugs. New methods for diagnosis of anti HLA antibodies and some new protocols to improve both chance and outcome of transplantation in immunized subjects represent area of ongoing research of extreme interest for children. PMID:25540732

  2. Testicular function after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Handelsman, D J; Ralec, V L; Tiller, D J; Horvath, J S; Turtle, J R

    1981-05-01

    Gonadal function was assessed in seventeen adult male renal transplant recipients, with well established good homograft function, for a mean of 4.9 years. Patients were assessed clinically and by measurement of basal concentrations of FSH, LH, prolactin, testosterone and oestradiol, FSH and LH responses to bolus injections of LHRH and semen analysis. Retrospectively all had symptoms consistent with marked hypogonadism prior to transplantation but in nine out of sixteen this was reversed with transplantation. Residual hypogonadism was evident in seven of sixteen patients and correlated with duration of haemodialysis longer than 1 year (P less than 0.01). Even among patients with clinically normal gonadal function, defects in the hypothalamic--pituitary--testicular axis remained. Elevated basal serum FSH, excessive FSH responses to LHRH and lowered basal serum testosterone were found. In the group with residual hypogonadism more marked changes, including elevated basal LH and excessive LH responses to LHRH, were also found. Fertility was recorded in two men on three occasions since transplantation. Sperm counts were normal in five and abnormal in four patients. Testicular volume and sperm density were inversely correlated with basal and stimulated FSH and LH levels.

  3. Neurocognitive functions in pediatric renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Gulleroglu, K; Baskin, E; Bayrakci, U S; Aydogan, M; Alehan, F; Kantar, A; Karakayali, F; Moray, G; Haberal, M

    2013-01-01

    Neurocognitive dysfunction is one of the major complications of chronic renal failure (CRF). Uremic state during CRF encompasses a wide spectrum of neurobehavioral and neurological disturbances. Recent studies showed that the pathophysiology of neurocognitive dysfunction in CRF is related to plasma levels of uremic solutes. Successful renal transplantation improves renal, metabolic, and endocrine functions and the quality of life. The aim of our study was to determine the state of neurocognitive function in pediatric renal transplant recipients. We prospectively performed a neurological examination and neuropsychological test battery (Bender-Gestalt Test, Cancellation Test, and Visual and Auditory Number Assay Test) in 20 pediatric renal transplant recipients between 6 and 16 years of age. Twenty healthy children and 20 children with CRF were included in the study as the control groups. Mean age of the renal transplant recipients was 13.50 ± 3.40 years old. Mean evaluation time after transplantation was 2.0 ± 0.5 years. Bender-Gestalt Test result was abnormal in 40% of patients. The results of the Cancellation Test and the Visual and Auditory Number Assay Test showed significant decline in pediatric renal transplant patients when compared with the control. We found that neurocognitive dysfunction was frequent in pediatric renal transplantation patients. Awareness of this potential problem may be helpful for early recognition and treatment. Our findings suggest that periodic neurocognitive assessments may be indicated in transplant recipients. PMID:24314945

  4. Coronary artery calcification in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Sylvia E; Mensah, Korlei; Weinstein, Rachel B; Bellamy, Scarlett L; Rader, Daniel J

    2005-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in renal transplant recipients. Although renal transplant recipients frequently undergo cardiac functional tests prior to surgery, coronary atherosclerosis can remain undetected. Coronary artery calcification (CAC), an early marker of atherosclerosis can be quantified using EBCT. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent and characteristics of CAC at the time of renal transplantation. We evaluated 79 consecutive incident asymptomatic renal transplant recipients. Patients were mostly White (62%), male (54%) and had a deceased donor renal transplant (61%). The mean age was 47 (12.1) years. Sixty-five percentage of subjects had CAC. The mean CAC score was 331.5 (562.4) with a median of 43.3. Older age, presence of diabetes, not having a preemptive transplant, deceased donor transplantation and hypercholesterolemia were significantly associated with presence of CAC univariately. Median CAC scores were significantly increased in subjects with diabetes (127.8 vs. 28.9, p=0.05), exposed to dialysis (102.9 vs. 3.7, p<0.001) and deceased donor recipients (169.7 vs. 7.5, p=0.02). Using multiple logistic regression, age and time on dialysis were significantly associated with the presence of CAC at the time of transplant. In summary, CAC is prevalent in patients undergoing kidney transplant. CAC may be a method to identify renal transplant recipients at increased risk for future cardiovascular events. PMID:15996243

  5. Changing of the guard? A glance at the surgical representation in the Canadian renal transplantation community

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Tom; Bjazevic, Jennifer; Patel, Premal; Koulack, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Renal transplant is the gold standard treatment for end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and the prevalence of both ESRD and renal transplant has been steadily increasing over the past decade. However, involvement of urology in renal transplant has been declining. We examine the current state of urology involvement in renal transplant programs across Canada. Methods: A telephone survey of all surgical transplant centres in Canada was performed. Information regarding the number of transplant surgeons, their individual training background, and their involvement in specific procedures, including open and laparoscopic living donor nephrectomy, deceased donor nephrectomy, and recipient renal transplant were collected. Results: There are 59 Canadian transplant surgeons, including 27 (46%) who completed a urology residency and 32 (54%) with a general surgery background. With regards to procedures performed, 58 (98%) perform recipient renal transplant surgery, 36 (61%) perform laparoscopic donor nephrectomy, and 17 (29%) perform open donor nephrectomy. There was no significant difference in the number of surgeons that perform renal recipient surgery, laparoscopic or open donor nephrectomies, and deceased donor nephrectomies between surgeons of the two different training backgrounds. Conclusions: The role of urology in Canadian renal transplant has declined significantly over the past decade. Given the medical and surgical complexity of renal transplant, along with the growing need for renal transplants, a multidisciplinary team approach is imperative. Strong urology involvement with the transplant team is crucial for optimal care of these complex patients. PMID:26858788

  6. Unusual presentation post renal transplant lymphocele.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Pratim; Biswas, Sumanta; Sen, Sutapa; Chowdhury, Sheuli

    2014-08-01

    Retroperitoneal lymphocele is one of the common complications following renal transplantation, and usually present with persistent lymphatic drain in immediate post transplant period or perigraft collection in post transplant routine ultrasound. In this case report, we present a renal transplant recipient who presented with acute urinary retention and right sided lower limb swelling mimicking deep vein thrombosis (DVT), due to a large lymphocele behind the bladder compressing bladder neck and common iliac vessels, approximately 2 months after renal transplant. Though lymphocele is not uncommon post transplant complication, the presentation of lymphocele after 2 months post transplant with pressure effect of this type is uncommon. In this case, pressure on common iliac vessels mimicking DVT and on bladder neck, leading to acute retention of urine and leading to hydronephrotic graft; which occurred in CNI (Cyclosporine) based regimen is extremely rare.

  7. Demodicosis in Renal Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Chovatiya, R J; Colegio, O R

    2016-02-01

    Solid organ transplant recipients have an increased incidence of skin infections resulting from immunosuppression. Common pathogens include herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Gram-positive bacteria and dermatophytes; however, the contribution of multicellular parasitic organisms to dermatologic disease in this population remains less studied. Demodex folliculorum and brevis are commensal mites that reside on human skin. Proliferation of Demodex mites, or demodicosis, is associated with rosacea and rosacea-like disorders, particularly in immunocompromised populations, although their ability to cause disease is still the subject of debate. We present a case series of four renal transplant recipients with the singular chief complaint of acne rosacea who we diagnosed with demodicosis. Although one of the four patients showed complete resolution following initial antiparasitic therapy, the other three required subsequent antibacterial treatment to fully resolve their lesions. We suggest that demodicosis may be more prevalent than once thought in solid organ transplant recipients and showed that Demodex-associated acne rosacea can be effectively treated in this population. PMID:26431451

  8. The renal scan in pregnant renal transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.A.; Ziessman, H.A.; Fahey, F.H.; Collea, J.V.; Alijani, M.R.; Helfrich, G.B.

    1985-05-01

    With the greater frequency of renal transplant surgery, more female pts are becoming pregnant and carrying to term. In the renal allograft blood vessels and ureter may be compressed resulting in impaired renal function and/or, hypertension. Toxemia of pregnancy is seen more frequently than normal. Radionuclide renal scan monitoring may be of significant value in this high risk obstetrical pt. After being maintained during the pregnancy, renal function may also deteriorate in the post partum period. 5 pregnant renal transplant pts who delivered live babies had renal studies with Tc-99m DTPA to assess allograft perfusion and function. No transplanted kidney was lost during or after pregnancy as a result of pregnancy. No congenital anomalies were associated with transplant management. 7 studies were performed on these 5 pts. The 7 scans all showed the uterus/placenta. The bladder was always distorted. The transplanted kidney was rotated to a more vertical position in 3 pts. The radiation dose to the fetus is calculated at 0.024 rad/mCi administered. This study demonstrates the anatomic and physiologic alterations expected in the transplanted kidney during pregnancy when evaluated by renal scan and that the radiation burden may be acceptable in management of these pts.

  9. Recipient's unemployment restricts access to renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Gurprataap S; Khattak, Muhammad; Pavlakis, Martha; Woodward, Robert; Hanto, Douglas W; Wasilewski, Marcy A; Dimitri, Noelle; Goldfarb-Rumyantzev, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Equitable distribution of a scarce resource such as kidneys for transplantation can be a challenging task for transplant centers. In this study, we evaluated the association between recipient's employment status and access to renal transplantation in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We used data from the United States Renal Data System (USRDS). The primary variable of interest was employment status at ESRD onset. Two outcomes were analyzed in Cox model: (i) being placed on the waiting list for renal transplantation or being transplanted (whichever occurred first); and (ii) first transplant in patients who were placed on the waiting list. We analyzed 429 409 patients (age of ESRD onset 64.2 ± 15.2 yr, 55.0% males, 65.1% White). Compared with patients who were unemployed, patients working full time were more likely to be placed on the waiting list/transplanted (HR 2.24, p < 0.001) and to receive a transplant once on the waiting list (HR 1.65, p < 0.001). Results indicate that recipient's employment status is strongly associated with access to renal transplantation, with unemployed and partially employed patients at a disadvantage. Adding insurance status to the model reduces the effect size, but the association still remains significant, indicating additional contribution from other factors.

  10. Recipient's unemployment restricts access to renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Gurprataap S; Khattak, Muhammad; Pavlakis, Martha; Woodward, Robert; Hanto, Douglas W; Wasilewski, Marcy A; Dimitri, Noelle; Goldfarb-Rumyantzev, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Equitable distribution of a scarce resource such as kidneys for transplantation can be a challenging task for transplant centers. In this study, we evaluated the association between recipient's employment status and access to renal transplantation in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We used data from the United States Renal Data System (USRDS). The primary variable of interest was employment status at ESRD onset. Two outcomes were analyzed in Cox model: (i) being placed on the waiting list for renal transplantation or being transplanted (whichever occurred first); and (ii) first transplant in patients who were placed on the waiting list. We analyzed 429 409 patients (age of ESRD onset 64.2 ± 15.2 yr, 55.0% males, 65.1% White). Compared with patients who were unemployed, patients working full time were more likely to be placed on the waiting list/transplanted (HR 2.24, p < 0.001) and to receive a transplant once on the waiting list (HR 1.65, p < 0.001). Results indicate that recipient's employment status is strongly associated with access to renal transplantation, with unemployed and partially employed patients at a disadvantage. Adding insurance status to the model reduces the effect size, but the association still remains significant, indicating additional contribution from other factors. PMID:23808849

  11. Preserved Renal Function in Kidney Transplantation over a Thrombosed Aortobifemoral Bypass Graft: The Role of Retrograde Flow and Early Thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Pampa-Saico, Saúl; Jiménez-Alvaro, Sara; Caravaca-Fontán, Fernando; Fernández-Rodríguez, Ana; Rivera-Gorrín, Maite; Sánchez, Juan; Chinchilla, Antonio; Marcén, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Aortobifemoral bypass (ABFB) thrombosis is not uncommon, and when the artery of a renal graft is implanted on a bypass the risk of graft loss is high. We report the case of a 48-year-old woman with a previous history of ABFB under antiplatelet therapy and a kidney allograft implanted on the vascular prosthesis, who presented with acute limb ischemia and severe renal impairment. Imaging techniques revealed a complete thrombosis of the proximal left arm of the ABFB. However, a faint retrograde flow over the graft was observed thanks to the recanalization of distal left bypass by collateral native arteries. This unusual situation not previously reported in a kidney transplant setting, together with an early diagnosis, allowed graft survival until an early local thrombolysis resolved the problem. Two years later, renal function remains normal. PMID:27579209

  12. Preserved Renal Function in Kidney Transplantation over a Thrombosed Aortobifemoral Bypass Graft: The Role of Retrograde Flow and Early Thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Alvaro, Sara; Fernández-Rodríguez, Ana; Rivera-Gorrín, Maite; Sánchez, Juan; Chinchilla, Antonio; Marcén, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Aortobifemoral bypass (ABFB) thrombosis is not uncommon, and when the artery of a renal graft is implanted on a bypass the risk of graft loss is high. We report the case of a 48-year-old woman with a previous history of ABFB under antiplatelet therapy and a kidney allograft implanted on the vascular prosthesis, who presented with acute limb ischemia and severe renal impairment. Imaging techniques revealed a complete thrombosis of the proximal left arm of the ABFB. However, a faint retrograde flow over the graft was observed thanks to the recanalization of distal left bypass by collateral native arteries. This unusual situation not previously reported in a kidney transplant setting, together with an early diagnosis, allowed graft survival until an early local thrombolysis resolved the problem. Two years later, renal function remains normal. PMID:27579209

  13. Effect of nifedipine on renal transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, M L; Dennis, M J; Beckingham, I J; Smith, S J

    1993-10-01

    The effect of early nifedipine therapy on acute renal allograft rejection was studied in 170 adult cadaveric transplant recipients. Acute rejection occurring in the first 3 months after transplantation was diagnosed by Tru-cut biopsy and the severity of each rejection episode assessed histologically. The incidence of acute rejection was significantly lower in patients treated with nifedipine (29 of 80; 36 per cent) than in controls (52 of 90; 58 per cent) (P < 0.01) and there was a higher proportion of histologically mild rejection episodes in the former group (P < 0.01). Multivariate analysis confirmed that nifedipine exerted a significant independent effect on the incidence of early acute rejection. Other factors identified in the multivariate model as influencing rejection were human leucocyte antigen (HLA) matching at the DR locus, blood level of cyclosporin during the first week, HLA matching at the B locus, donor age and donor sex. The 1-year graft survival rate was 88.6 per cent in patients given nifedipine and 63.8 per cent in controls (P < 0.02). These data suggest that nifedipine therapy has a useful role in human renal transplantation.

  14. The Iranian model of living renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi-Mazdeh, Mitra

    2012-09-01

    Organ shortage for transplantation remains a worldwide serious problem for kidney patients with end-stage renal failure, and several countries have tried different models to address this issue. Iran has 20 years of experience with one such model that involves the active role of the government and charity foundations. Patients with a desperate demand for a kidney have given rise to a black market of brokers and other forms of organ commercialism only accessible to those with sufficient financial resources. The current Iranian model has enabled most of the Iranian kidney transplant candidates, irrespective of socioeconomic class, to have access to kidney transplantation. The Iranian government has committed a large budget through funding hospital and staff at the Ministry of Health and Medical Education by supporting the brain death donation (BDD) program or redirecting part of the budget of living unrelated renal donation (LURD) to the BDD program. It has been shown that it did not prevent the development and progression of a BDD program. However, the LURD program is characterized by several controversial procedures (e.g., confrontation of donor and recipient at the end of the evaluation procedure along with some financial interactions) that should be ethically reviewed. Operational weaknesses such as the lack of a registration system and long-term follow-up of the donors are identified as the 'Achilles heel of the model'. PMID:22673884

  15. [Mineral and bone disorders in renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Bacchetta, Justine; Lafage-Proust, Marie-Hélène; Chapurlat, Roland

    2013-12-01

    The deregulation of bone and mineral metabolism during chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a daily challenge for physicians, its management aiming at decreasing the risk of both fractures and vascular calcifications. Renal transplantation in the context of CKD, with pre-existing renal osteodystrophy as well as nutritional impairment, chronic inflammation, hypogonadism and corticosteroids exposure, represents a major risk factor for bone impairment in the post-transplant period. The aim of this review is therefore to provide an update on the pathophysiology of mineral and bone disorders after renal transplantation. PMID:24176653

  16. Presurgical Pulmonary Evaluation in Renal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sahni, Sonu; Molmenti, Ernesto; Bhaskaran, Madhu C.; Ali, Nicole; Basu, Amit; Talwar, Arunabh

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) due to various mechanisms are prone to significant pulmonary comorbidities. With the improvements in renal replacement therapy (RRT), patients with CRF are now expected to live longer, and thus may develop complications in the lung from these processes. The preferred treatment of CRF is kidney transplantation and patients who are selected to undergo transplant must have a thorough preoperative pulmonary evaluation to assess pulmonary status and to determine risk of postoperative pulmonary complications. A MEDLINE®/PubMed® search was performed to identify all articles outlining the course of pre-surgical pulmonary evaluation with an emphasis on patients with CRF who have been selected for renal transplant. Literature review concluded that in addition to generic pre-surgical evaluation, renal transplant patients must also undergo a full cardiopulmonary and sleep evaluation to investigate possible existing pulmonary pathologies. Presence of any risk factor should then be aggressively managed or treated prior to surgery. PMID:25599047

  17. Asymptomatic hyperuricemia following renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bellomo, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating indicating a role for uric acid in the genesis and progression of kidney disease, and a few studies are beginning to show a possible beneficial effect of urate-lowering therapy. Whether this holds true for renal allograft recipients is not clear. In this short review evidence from epidemiological as well as intervention studies is summarized and discussed, with some practical considerations presented at the end. PMID:26167455

  18. Implications of the Kidd blood group system in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rourk, A; Squires, J E

    2012-01-01

    The association of the Kidd blood group system with hemolytic transfusion reactions and hemolytic disease of the newborn is well known. The Kidd antigens, which are localized to the HUT/UT-B urea transport protein, are found on red blood cells and the endothelial cells of the blood vessels of the medulla of the kidney. Recently it has been suggested that these antigens might play a role as minor histocompatibility antigens in renal transplantation. In the current case, the appearance of an anti-Jk(b) 10 years after renal transplantation associated with early renal allograft rejection further supports the potential importance of these antigens in renal transplantation and allograft rejection. PMID:23286555

  19. Anesthesia for parturient with renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Beena K; Shah, Veena R; Bhosale, Guruprasad

    2012-01-01

    Management of successful pregnancy after renal transplantation is a unique challenge to nephrologist, obstetrician, and anesthesiologist, as these patients have altered physiology and are immune-compromised. We present the anesthetic management of three postrenal transplant patients scheduled for cesarean section. While conducting such cases, cardiovascular status, hematological status, and function of transplanted kidney should be assessed thoroughly. Side effects of immunosuppressant drugs and their interaction with anesthetic agents should be taken into consideration. Main goal of anesthetic management is to maintain optimum perfusion pressure of renal allograft to preserve its function. PMID:23225940

  20. Intraarterial digital subtraction angiography of renal transplants

    SciTech Connect

    Picus, D.; Neeley, J.P.; McClennan, B.L.; Weyman, P.J.; Heiken, J.P.

    1985-07-01

    Twenty-four intraarterial digital subtraction angiography (IA-DSA) studies were performed in 23 renal transplant recipients for evaluation of possible postoperative complications. Ten patients had normal studies. Five patients had minimal (<50%) narrowing at the renal artery anastomosis and five had more severe stenoses. Three patients had vascular occlusions. IA-DSA results correlated well with findings at surgery and/or conventional angiography. The major advantage of IA-DSA is the small amount of contrast material needed to perform the study. IA-DSA is particularly well suited to the evaluation of vascular problems in renal transplant patients.

  1. Tumors after renal and cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Penn, I

    1993-04-01

    Organ transplant recipients treated with immunosuppressive therapy are prone to develop malignancies particularly squamous cell carcinomas of the skin, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, Kaposi's sarcomas, carcinomas of the vulva and perineum, in situ carcinomas of the uterine cervix, renal carcinomas, hepatomas, and various sarcomas. The earliest tumors to appear are the Kaposi's sarcoma at an average of 21 months after transplantation, and the latest are carcinomas of the vulva and perineum, at an average of 112 months after transplantation. The tumors that develop in cardiac allograft recipients compared with renal transplant recipients are predominantly non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and more rarely, skin, uterine cervical and vulvar tumors. Major factors accounting for these differences are the intensity of immunosuppressive therapy given to the cardiac patients and the much longer follow-up of the renal allograft recipients. PMID:8468275

  2. Cervical Carcinoma in a Renal Transplant Recipient: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tuncer, Hasan Aykut; Kirnap, Mahir; Dursun, Polat; Ayhan, Ali; Moray, Gokhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2016-02-01

    A range of cancer types, at increased rates, is described in renal transplant recipients receiving immunosuppression. Aside from immunodeficiency, heightened medical surveillance for cancer, lifestyle, and other risk factors all play a role. Although the relation between cancer risk and degree of immunodeficiency might not be linear, and might be different for a wide range of cancer subtypes, human papillomavirus-related cancers in long-term transplant recipients may suggest the role of even modest immunosuppression, when present long enough. High-risk human papillomavirus types are recognized as the cause of cancer of the cervix. We report a 49-year-old female renal transplant recipient diagnosed with cervical squamous cell carcinoma, 5 years after the transplant. Based on this patient, we highlight difficulties in surgical approach and the importance of close clinical follow-up including regular gynecologic screening for cervical premalignant and malignant lesions.

  3. [Complications of pediatric renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Cristina; Sandes, Ana Rita; Azevedo, Sara; Stone, Rosário; Almeida, Margarida

    2013-01-01

    Introdução: A transplantação renal é a terapêutica de eleição na criança com doença renal crónica terminal, evidenciando impacto positivo na sobrevida e qualidade de vida dos doentes. Não é, no entanto, isenta de complicações, algumas com importante morbilidade. Os autores pretendem caracterizar o perfil de complicações pós transplantação renal em doentes pediátricos (até 18 anos).Material e Métodos: Análise retrospectiva dos doentes submetidos a transplantação renal e seguidos na Unidade de Nefrologia Pediátrica entre Setembro de 1995 e Agosto de 2010. Dados obtidos dos processos clínicos: características demográficas, etiologia da doença renal crónica terminal, terapêutica de substituição renal, mortalidade e perda de enxertos, complicações cirúrgicas, infecciosas e não infecciosas (rejeição aguda e crónica, recidiva da doença de base, alterações metabólicas e factores de risco cardiovascular). Análise estatística descritiva simples.Resultados: Foram incluídas 78 crianças transplantadas (48,7% sexo masculino), com idade mediana à data da transplantaçãorenal de 12 anos (2 - 18). A maioria fez previamente diálise peritoneal: 49 (62,6%). Cinco doentes (6,4%) foram transplantados sem diálise prévia. A mediana do tempo de seguimento após transplante foi 37,5 meses (1 - 169). As principais etiologias de doença renal crónica terminal foram: uronefropatias (41%) e glomerulopatias (28,2%). As complicações infecciosas ocorreram em 74,4%; infecçõesvirais em 56,4%, sendo a mais prevalente a infecção citomegalovírus (39,7%); infecções bacterianas em 53,8% (na maioria infecções urinárias em doentes urológicos). Outras complicações: 1) factores de risco para doença cardiovascular: hipertensão arterial em 85,9%; dislipidémia em 16,7% e diabetes de novo em 7,7%; 2) episódios de rejeição aguda em 32,1% e nefropatia crónica do enxerto em 17,9%; 3) complicações relacionáveis com a cirurgia em 16

  4. [Pediatric renal transplantation in Toulouse (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Juskiewenski, S; Barthe, P; Vaysse, P; Bouissou, F; Guitard, J; Bacque, P; Moscovivi, J; Cao-Van, C

    1980-01-01

    The regional group of renal transplantation in Toulouse includes a medico-surgical team which participates to all the activities of this group. Dialysis and transplantation are covered in a center organized for the care of children. This branch is part of the Regional Hospital. From 15 years old on patients are moved from the pediatric branch to the medico-surgical center taking care of adults. Both teams within the regional hospital share the responsability of taking off kidneys from cadaveric donors and collaborate to France-Transplant and Euro-Transplant. Since the pediatric center in charge of renal failure has opened, 32 children underwent chronic hemodialysis. Some of these patients are presently treated in the center for adults. Fourteen children were grafted and seven are at this moment waiting to receive transplantation. The average number of transplantations per year is from 1 to 4. These fourteen children underwent renal transplantation with kidneys from cadaveric donors. Only one has been provided by Toulouse. Diuresis resumed immediately in 8 cases, later in 5. An extremely acute reject was observed in one case and transplantectomy had to be performed 10 days after transplantation. Eight children presented acute reversible reject which, for 4 of them, evoluated towards chronicle reject. Eight children presented a chronicle reject: 4 of them are again in dialysis. Altogether 8 kidneys are functioning (seven years in the longest case). Five children resumed chronic dialysis. One patient died of acute pancreatitis. He underwent a portocaval shunt for type I glycogenosis which ended in a hyperuricemic nephropathy evoluating towards renal failure forcing a transplantation. The rehabilitation of transplanted children was always satisfactory. PMID:7006837

  5. Challenges in renal transplantation in Yemen.

    PubMed

    El-Nono, Ibrahiem H; Telha, Khaled A; Al-Alimy, Gamil M; Ghilan, Abdulilah M; Abu Asba, Nagieb W; Al-Zkri, Abdo M; Al-Adimi, Abdulilah M; Al-Ba'adani, Tawfiq H

    2015-02-16

    Background Renal replacement therapy was first introduced in Yemen in 1978 in the form of hemodialysis. Twenty years later, the first renal transplantation was performed. Kidney transplantations were started in socially and financially challenging circumstances in Yemen in 1998. A structured program was established and has been functioning regularly since 2005. A pediatric transplantation program was started in 2011. Material and Methods This was a prospective study of 181 transplants performed at the Urology and Nephrology Center between May 1998 and 2012. All transplants were from living related donors. The immunosuppressive protocol consisted initially of double therapy with steroid and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). Subsequently, triple therapy with addition of a calcineurin inhibitor was introduced. Primary graft function was achieved in 176 (97.2%) recipients. Results Cold ischemia time was 48-68 min. Episodes of acute rejection in 12 patients were treated with high-dose steroids. Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) was used in cases of vascular or steroid-resistant rejection in 2 patients. The post-transplant complications, either surgical or medical, were comparable to those recorded in the literature. Conclusions Renal transplantation is a good achievement in our country. The patients and graft survival rates are comparable to other reports.

  6. Management of children after renal transplantation: highlights for general pediatricians

    PubMed Central

    Giglia, Lucy; Chan, Howard; Chan, Anthony K.

    2012-01-01

    The number of children undergoing successful renal transplantations has been increasing steadily and as a result; general pediatricians are now more likely to encounter children with a kidney allograft in their practice. Although the medical care immediately after transplantation is mostly provided by transplant teams, more and more outpatient care will eventually be performed at the patient’s local community. Medical care from general pediatricians is particularly important, especially for children who are residing far from transplant centers. As these children require prolong immunosuppressive therapies and are susceptible to various specific clinical problems, it is imperative for their primary care providers and pediatricians to be knowledgeable about their specific needs and be competent in providing care. This article highlights the roles and common practice related issues that pertain to general pediatricians in the care of pediatric renal allograft recipients. PMID:26835261

  7. FSGS Recurrence in Adults after Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rudnicki, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Recurrence of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) in the allograft occurs in 30–50% of patients, and it is associated with poor renal allograft survival. Major risk factors for recurrence are younger age at diagnosis, rapid progression to end-stage renal disease, white race, and the loss of previous allografts due to recurrence. Recent data support the hypothesis that circulating permeability factors play a crucial role in podocyte injury and progression of FSGS. Due to lack of controlled trials, the management of recurrent FSGS is inconsistent and highly empirical. Prophylactic and perioperative treatment with plasmapheresis and high-dose (intravenous) cyclosporine represent the main cornerstones of immunosuppressive therapy. In recent years, therapy with rituximab has shown promising results. Despite evidence of activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in recurrent FSGS and its association with progression, only limited data exist on the renoprotective role of RAS blockade in this setting. Further well designed studies are needed on pathogenesis risk factors and therapeutical options in FSGS and its recurrence after transplantation. PMID:27144163

  8. BK virus nephropathy in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Jamboti, Jagadish S

    2016-08-01

    BK virus nephropathy (BKVN) occurs in up to 10% of renal transplant recipients and can result in graft loss. The reactivation of BK virus in renal transplant recipients is largely asymptomatic, and routine surveillance especially in the first 12-24 months after transplant is necessary for early recognition and intervention. Reduced immunosuppression and anti-viral treatment in the early stages may be effective in stopping BK virus replication. Urinary decoy cells, although highly specific, lack sensitivity to diagnose BKVN. Transplant biopsy remains the gold standard to diagnose BKVN, good surrogate markers for surveillance using quantitative urinary decoy cells, urinary SV40 T immunochemical staining or polyoma virus-Haufen bodies are offered by recent studies. Advanced BKVN results in severe tubulo-interstitial damage and graft failure. Retransplantation after BKVN is associated with good outcomes. Newer treatment modalities are emerging.

  9. Anaesthesia for renal transplant surgery: an update.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Sebastian; Jungwirth, Bettina

    2012-12-01

    Although the overall outcome of patients undergoing renal transplant surgery has improved in recent years, delayed graft function and myocardial infarction remain common and severe postoperative complications. This review article provides an update on anaesthesia for renal transplant surgery in order to optimise perioperative therapy and improve the outcome of these patients. In particular, the characteristics of this high-risk population and the recommendations for preoperative 'work-up' are summarised. Care for the living donor, commonly used drugs and their potential nephrotoxic properties are discussed. Finally, the current knowledge about volume therapy, optimised haemodynamic management and postoperative care is described.

  10. Brucellosis in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Ting, I W; Ho, M W; Sung, Y J; Tien, N; Chi, C Y; Ho, H C; Huang, C C

    2013-10-01

    Brucellosis is one of the most common systemic zoonotic diseases transmitted by consumption of unpasteurized dairy products or by occupational contact with infected animals. Brucellosis is rare in renal transplant recipients. Only 3 cases have been reported in the literature. We report a case of brucellosis with hematologic and hepatobiliary complications in a patient 3 years after renal transplantation. The mean time from transplantation to the diagnosis of brucellosis in these 4 reported patients was 5.1 years (range 17 months to 13 years). All patients had fever and constitutional symptoms, and all attained clinical cure after combination antibiotic therapy. Given the small number of patients, further study is needed to identify the characteristics of brucellosis in renal transplant recipients. Drug interactions and acute renal failure developed in our patient during antibiotic treatment. Therefore, we should monitor the levels of immunosuppressive agents frequently. Several studies have shown in vitro susceptibilities of Brucella melitensis to tigecycline. In our patient, fever finally subsided after tigecycline administration. The minimum inhibitory concentration of tigecycline using Etest was 0.094 μg/mL. Tigecycline may be a potential option for treatment of brucellosis in the setting of transplantation.

  11. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysmectomy in Renal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jebara, Victor A.; Fabiani, Jean-Noël; Moulonguet-Deloris, L.; Acar, Christophe; Debauchez, Mathieu; Chachques, J.C.; Glotz, Denis; Duboust, Alain; Langanay, Thierry; Carpentier, Alain

    1990-01-01

    Because renal transplantation is allowing an increased number of patients to survive for prolonged periods, abdominal aortic aneurysms can be expected to occur with growing frequency in these patients. Surgical management of such cases involves the provision of allograft protection. To date, the literature contains 15 reports of abdominal aortic aneurysms in renal allograft recipients. We describe a 16th case and discuss the management of these patients. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1990;17:240-4) Images PMID:15227179

  12. Biomarkers for renal transplantation: where are we?

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Fangmin; Dai, Qiaoding; Gong, Weihua

    2013-01-01

    Although surgical techniques, post-transplant care medicine, and immunosuppressants have been greatly improved, permanent acceptance of renal allograft remains a clinical challenge owing to the appearance of various influencing factors. To predict graft dysfunction, development of noninvasive biomarkers is becoming a highlighted research topic in the field of renal transplantation, which provides a possibility for physicians to give preemptive rescue treatment. From the viewpoint of diagnostic techniques, repetitive sampling is prerequisite to identify applicable biomarkers in the clinic. Early biomarkers can be used to dynamically monitor renal graft status and accurately predict transplant outcome independent of various confounders. This review highlights recent studies on the predictive value of biomarkers and methods to quantify biomarkers for monitoring kidney transplant. It is important to analyze and compare different biomarkers for living, and nonliving donors. Analysis of identified clinically relevant biomarkers will advance our understanding of distinct molecular and cellular mechanisms of transplantation and provide insight into developing novel potential approaches to induce transplant tolerance. PMID:24124388

  13. Adipocytokines in renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Kristof; Nagaraju, Shankar Prasad; Rhee, Connie M.; Mathe, Zoltan; Molnar, Miklos Z.

    2016-01-01

    In the last two decades, perceptions about the role of body fat have changed. Adipocytes modulate endocrine and immune homeostasis by synthesizing hundreds of hormones, known as adipocytokines. Many studies have been investigating the influences and effects of these adipocytokines and suggest that they are modulated by the nutritional and immunologic milieu. Kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) are a unique and relevant population in which the function of adipocytokines can be examined, given their altered nutritional and immune status and subsequent dysregulation of adipocytokine metabolism. In this review, we summarize the recent findings about four specific adipocytokines and their respective roles in KTRs. We decided to evaluate the most widely described adipocytokines, including leptin, adiponectin, visfatin and resistin. Increasing evidence suggests that these adipocytokines may lead to cardiovascular events and metabolic changes in the general population and may also increase mortality and graft loss rate in KTRs. In addition, we present findings on the interrelationship between serum adipocytokine levels and nutritional and immunologic status, and mechanisms by which adipocytokines modulate morbidity and outcomes in KTRs. PMID:27274819

  14. Bacillary angiomatosis in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Cline, M S; Cummings, O W; Goldman, M; Filo, R S; Pescovitz, M D

    1999-01-27

    A case of bacillary angiomatosis infection presenting as a skin nodule in a renal transplant recipient was found. The patient was taking cyclosporine, prednisone, and mycophenolate mofetil at the time of presentation. The bacillary angiomatosis responded to 6 months of therapy with oral erythromycin.

  15. Characterization of post transplantation lymphoma in feline renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Durham, A C; Mariano, A D; Holmes, E S; Aronson, L

    2014-01-01

    The development of malignant neoplasia following solid organ transplantation and immunosuppression is well recognized in man. Post-transplantation malignant tumours include non-melanoma skin cancers, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Kaposi's sarcoma and many of these cancers have a known or suspected viral cause. A similar increased incidence of cancer is seen in cats that have received a renal transplant and lymphoma is the predominant neoplasm in this population. This study examines a population of cats that received renal transplants at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine and subsequently developed neoplasia. From 1998 to 2010, 111 cats were transplanted and 25 cats developed cancer (22.5%). Fourteen of the 25 cats were diagnosed with lymphoma (56%), making it the most common tumour in this patient population. The median interval between transplantation and diagnosis of lymphoma was 617 days and the median survival time (MST) following the diagnosis of lymphoma was 2 days. Tissues from seven of these cats were available for histopathological review as either samples collected at necropsy examination (n = 5) or biopsy submissions (n = 2). Five of these cats had multiorgan involvement with sites including the liver, spleen, peripheral and mesenteric lymph nodes, small intestine, urinary bladder, heart, mesenteric fat and body wall. Four of the cats with multiorgan disease had involvement of the renal allograft two of which also had lymphoma of the native kidney. All lymphomas were classified as mid to high grade, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, which is also the most common lymphoma subtype in human cases of post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders.

  16. The Role of Host Factors and Bacterial Virulence Genes in the Development of Pyelonephritis Caused by Escherichia coli in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Siliano, Priscila Reina; Rocha, Lillian Andrade; Osmar Medina-Pestana, José

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the role of host factors and bacterial virulence genes in the development of pyelonephritis caused by Escherichia coli in renal transplant (Tx) recipients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: A total of 328 E. coli isolates from cases of cystitis (Cys; n = 239) or pyelonephritis (PN; n = 89), with 169 from renal Tx recipients, were subjected to molecular analyses to identify P-fimbria subunits (PapC, PapG II, and PapGIII), G- and M-fimbriae, and aerobactin. The presence of antibiotic resistance was also determined. Parameters such as gender, age, immunosuppression regimens, causes of ESRD, kidney donor, intraoperative anastomosis, use of double J stent, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMZ) prophylaxis, and time after Tx were evaluated. Results: A multivariate analysis showed a significant association between PN and renal Tx. In renal Tx recipients, the risk of occurrence of PN was significantly higher among males and for those no longer receiving TMP/SMZ prophylaxis. E. coli strains isolated from PN presented a lower prevalence of papGIII and lower rates of resistance to pipemidic acid. Although papGII was more prevalent in PN than in Cys, it was not independently associated with PN. Conclusions: These findings suggested that renal Tx increases the risk for PN, and the male sex represented a host factor independently associated with risk, whereas the prophylaxis with TMP/SMZ was protective. The lack of papGIII and low resistance to first-generation quinolones were bacterial-independent risk factors for PN in Tx. PMID:20448070

  17. Abdominal aortic aneurysmectomy in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed Central

    Lacombe, M

    1986-01-01

    Five patients who had undergone renal transplantation 3 months to 23 years ago were operated on successfully for an abdominal aortic aneurysm. In the first case, dating from 1973, the kidney was protected by general hypothermia. In the remaining patients, no measure was used to protect the kidney. Only one patient showed a moderate increase of blood creatinine in the postoperative period; renal function returned to normal in 15 days. All five patients have normal renal function 6 months to 11 years after aortic repair. Results obtained in this series show that protection of the transplant during aortic surgery is not necessary, provided adequate surgical technique is used. Such a technique is described in detail. Its use simplifies surgical treatment of such lesions and avoids the complex procedures employed in the seven previously published cases. Images FIGS. 1A and B. FIGS. 2A and B. FIGS. 3A and B. FIGS. 4A and B. FIGS. 5A and B. PMID:3510592

  18. Cadaveric renal transplantation: the Chennai experience.

    PubMed

    Prabahar, M R; Soundararajan, P

    2008-05-01

    Transplantation of human organs is undoubtedly one of the greatest medical breakthroughs of this century. However, few Indian patients are able to benefit from this medical advance. It is estimated that in India every year over 152,000 people are diagnosed to have end-stage renal failure needing renal transplantation. The Transplantation of Human Organs Act passed by the Indian parliament in 1994 was subsequently ratified by the state legislature of Tamil Nadu in May 1995. It accepted brain death as a form of death and prohibited commerce in organs. The first cadaveric kidney transplant in Sri Ramachandra medical college was performed in 1995 with 68 cadaveric kidney transplants thereafter. The mean age of the donors was 36 +/- 12.8 years. The mean cold ischemia time was 5.6 +/- 3.2 hours. As many as 14 donors displayed acute renal failure (serum creatinine more than 1.2 mg/dL). Immediate graft function was established in 34 patients (50%). Four had graft rupture, two of which were successfully repaired. Postoperatively 12 patients (17.6%) displayed delayed graft function requiring dialysis. During the first year, 18 patients (26.4%) experienced acute rejection episodes, of which 14 were cellular and four vascular rejection types. As many as eight patients were lost to follow-up within one year; the mean follow-up time was 968 +/- 86 days. Patient survival at 1 year was 88.2% and that of the graft 73.5%. The 5-year patient and graft survival rates were 61.7% and 58.8%, respectively. The mean serum creatinine of patients currently followed is 2.2 +/- 0.86 mg/dL. The rate of cadaver kidney transplantation in India is low despite initiatives by our university to promote donation. Creating a positive public attitude, early brain death identification, and certification, prompt consent for organ donation, adequate hospital infrastructure, and support logistics are prerequisites for successful organ transplantation.

  19. Hemostatic Parameters according to Renal Function and Time after Transplantation in Brazilian Renal Transplanted Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Ana Paula Lucas; Alpoim, Patrícia Nessralla; de Figueiredo, Roberta Carvalho; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Braga Gomes, Karina; Dusse, Luci Maria SantAna

    2015-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the key for patients with end-stage renal disease, improving quality of life and longer survival. However, kidney transplant triggers an intense inflammatory response and alters the hemostatic system, but the pathophysiological mechanisms of these changes are not completely understood. The aim of this cross-sectional cohort study was to investigate hemostatic biomarkers in Brazilian renal transplanted patients according to renal function and time after transplantation. A total of 159 renal transplanted patients were enrolled and D-Dimer (D-Di), Thrombomodulin (TM), von Willebrand Factor (VWF), and ADAMTS13 plasma levels were assessed by ELISA. An increase of D-Di was observed in patients with higher levels of creatinine. ADAMTS13 levels were associated with creatinine plasma levels and D-Di levels with Glomerular Filtration Rate. These results suggested that D-Di and ADAMTS13 can be promising markers to estimate renal function. ADAMTS13 should be investigated throughout the posttransplant time to clarify the participation of this enzyme in glomerular filtration and acceptance or rejection of the graft in Brazilian transplanted patients. PMID:26229221

  20. Renal cancer in kidney transplanted patients.

    PubMed

    Frascà, Giovanni M; Sandrini, Silvio; Cosmai, Laura; Porta, Camillo; Asch, William; Santoni, Matteo; Salviani, Chiara; D'Errico, Antonia; Malvi, Deborah; Balestra, Emilio; Gallieni, Maurizio

    2015-12-01

    Renal cancer occurs more frequently in renal transplanted patients than in the general population, affecting native kidneys in 90% of cases and the graft in 10 %. In addition to general risk factors, malignancy susceptibility may be influenced by immunosuppressive therapy, the use of calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) as compared with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, and the length of dialysis treatment. Acquired cystic kidney disease may increase the risk for renal cancer after transplantation, while autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease does not seem to predispose to cancer development. Annual ultrasound evaluation seems appropriate in patients with congenital or acquired cystic disease or even a single cyst in native kidneys, and every 2 years in patients older than 60 years if they were on dialysis for more than 5 years before transplantation. Immunosuppression should be lowered in patients who develop renal cancer, by reduction or withdrawal of CNI. Although more evidence is still needed, it seems reasonable to shift patients from CNI to everolimus or sirolimus if not already treated with one of these drugs, with due caution in subjects with chronic allograft nephropathy.

  1. RACIAL DISPARITIES IN ACCESS TO RENAL TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Arnold M.; Ayanian, John Z.; Keogh, Joseph H.; Noonan, Susan J.; Armistead, Nancy; Cleary, Paul D.; Weissman, Joel S.; David-Kasdan, Jo Ann; Carlson, Diane; Fuller, Jerry; Marsh, Douglas; Conti, Rena M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite abundant evidence of racial disparities in the use of surgical procedures, it is uncertain whether these disparities reflect racial differences in clinical appropriateness or overuse or under-use of care. Methods We performed a literature review and used an expert panel to develop criteria for determining the appropriateness of renal transplantation for patients with end-stage renal disease. Using data from five states and the District of Columbia on patients who had started to undergo dialysis in 1996 or 1997, we selected a random sample of 1518 patients (age range, 18 to 54 years), stratified according to race and sex. We classified the appropriateness of patients as candidates for transplantation and analyzed data on rates of referral to a transplantation center for evaluation, placement on a waiting list, and receipt of a transplant according to race. Results Black patients were less likely than white patients to be rated as appropriate candidates for transplantation according to appropriateness criteria based on expert opinion (71 blacks [9.0 percent] vs. 152 whites [20.9 percent]) and were more likely to have had incomplete evaluations (368 [46.5 percent] vs. 282 [38.8 percent], P<0.001 for the overall chi-square). Among patients considered to be appropriate candidates for transplantation, blacks were less likely than whites to be referred for evaluation, according to the chart review (90.1 percent vs. 98.0 percent, P=0.008), to be placed on a waiting list (71.0 percent vs. 86.7 percent, P=0.007), or to undergo transplantation (16.9 percent vs. 52.0 percent, P<0.001). Among patients classified as inappropriate candidates, whites were more likely than blacks to be referred for evaluation (57.8 percent vs. 38.4 percent), to be placed on a waiting list (30.9 percent vs. 17.4 percent), and to undergo transplantation (10.3 percent vs. 2.2 percent, P<0.001 for all three comparisons). Conclusions Racial disparities in rates of renal

  2. Challenges of valve surgeries in post-renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Tanveer; Kishore, Kolkebaile Sadanand; Maheshwarappa, Nandakumar Neralakere; Pasarad, Ashwini Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation remains a mainstay of therapy for the end-stage renal disease. Cardiac disease has a high prevalence in this patient population. Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death among kidney transplantation patients. The cardiac disease accounts for 43% of all-cause mortality among dialysis patients and for ≈38% of all-cause mortality after transplantation. In this article, we review the factors and outcomes associated with valve surgeries in renal transplant recipients and evaluate the strategy for open heart surgery after renal transplantation performed.

  3. Challenges of valve surgeries in post-renal transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Tanveer; Kishore, Kolkebaile Sadanand; Maheshwarappa, Nandakumar Neralakere; Pasarad, Ashwini Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation remains a mainstay of therapy for the end-stage renal disease. Cardiac disease has a high prevalence in this patient population. Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death among kidney transplantation patients. The cardiac disease accounts for 43% of all-cause mortality among dialysis patients and for ≈38% of all-cause mortality after transplantation. In this article, we review the factors and outcomes associated with valve surgeries in renal transplant recipients and evaluate the strategy for open heart surgery after renal transplantation performed. PMID:26440255

  4. Renal transplantation--the Starzl influence.

    PubMed

    Salvatierra, O

    1988-02-01

    In summary, I have attempted to review with you some of Dr Starzl's numerous clinical and scientific contributions that have cut across the spectrum of the field of renal transplantation. It is thus not surprising that Dr Starzl was elected the first President of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons, singular recognition from his own peers for the many contributions and leadership that he has provided during the formative and developmental years of organ transplantation. In addition, Dr Starzl has been recognized with a number of other prestigious awards, among which was the David M. Hume Memorial Award, the highest honor bestowed by the National Kidney Foundation. Careful analysis of Dr Starzl's work therefore clearly indicates that many of his contributions since 1960 have been uniquely innovative, have provided many firsts, and have reflected the science and technology of transplantation as it is today, in 1987. Thus, it can be truly said that Dr Starzl, the surgeon-scientist, was not only a pioneer but also a leader and subsequently a giant in the field of clinical renal transplantation. He has left a lasting and indelible impact on the field, the Starzl influence, for which all of us, both patient and physician, are extremely grateful. Thank you very much, Dr Starzl.

  5. Urinary tract infections in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Alangaden, George

    2007-11-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infectious complication after renal transplantation. Although Escherichia coli remains the most common cause of UTI, Enterococcus spp and drug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae have emerged as important uropathogens in these patients. As a result, symptomatic UTIs warrant pathogen-specific antibiotic therapy guided by culture and susceptibility data. In the early transplant period, prophylaxis of UTI with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is generally effective. Until the natural history and optimal management of asymptomatic bacteruria are better defined, therapy of asymptomatic bacteruria is generally unnecessary. PMID:17999883

  6. [Cytomegalovirus infection in peptic ulcer in renal transplant recipient: a case report].

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Shin; Ikeda, Tetsuhiro; Shimamoto, Kenji; Tanji, Nozomu; Ohoka, Hiroji; Yokoyama, Masayoshi

    2004-09-01

    Gastroduodenal ulcers in renal transplant recipients are usually originated from excessive acid secretion or infection of Helicobacter pyroli. Herein, we report a case of cytomegalovirus (CMV)--induced gastric ulcer following cadaveric renal transplantation. The patient was a 48-year-old man with chronic renal failure and received cadaveric renal transplantation. A month later, he had epigastralgia without CMV-positive antigenemia and received gastrointestinal fiberscopy. Endoscopically, gastric ulcer was identified. Histological findings revealed conspicious nuclear enlargement of the non-epithelial cells in the ulcer bed, which indicated CMV infection. The patient was treated with ganciclovir for 2 weeks and the symptom was relieved. He discharged with a good renal function on day 75 posttransplant. CMV infection plays an important role in gastric ulcer after renal transplantation. Antigenemia assay dose not seem feasible for the detection of CMV-induced gastric ulcer. PMID:15508703

  7. Tregs and kidney: From diabetic nephropathy to renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dousdampanis, Periklis; Trigka, Kostantina; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-09-24

    Kidney transplantation is recognised as the most effective treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Kidney transplantation continues to face several challenges including long-term graft and patient survival, and the side effects of immunosuppressive therapy. The tendency in kidney transplantation is to avoid the side effects of immunosuppresants and induce immune tolerance. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) contribute to self-tolerance, tolerance to alloantigen and transplant tolerance, mainly by suppressing the activation and function of reactive effector T-cells. Additionally, Tregs are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes, which is the leading cause of ESRD, suggesting that these cells play a role both in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease and the induction of transplant tolerance. Several strategies to achieve immunological tolerance to grafts have been tested experimentally, and include combinations of co-stimulatory blockade pathways, T-cell depletion, in vivo Treg-induction and/or infusion of ex-vivo expanded Tregs. However, a successful regimen that induces transplant tolerance is not yet available for clinical application. This review brings together certain key studies on the role of Tregs in ESRD, diabetes and kidney transplantation, only to emphasize that many more studies are needed to elucidate the clinical significance and the therapeutic applications of Tregs. PMID:27683634

  8. Tregs and kidney: From diabetic nephropathy to renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dousdampanis, Periklis; Trigka, Kostantina; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-09-24

    Kidney transplantation is recognised as the most effective treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Kidney transplantation continues to face several challenges including long-term graft and patient survival, and the side effects of immunosuppressive therapy. The tendency in kidney transplantation is to avoid the side effects of immunosuppresants and induce immune tolerance. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) contribute to self-tolerance, tolerance to alloantigen and transplant tolerance, mainly by suppressing the activation and function of reactive effector T-cells. Additionally, Tregs are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes, which is the leading cause of ESRD, suggesting that these cells play a role both in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease and the induction of transplant tolerance. Several strategies to achieve immunological tolerance to grafts have been tested experimentally, and include combinations of co-stimulatory blockade pathways, T-cell depletion, in vivo Treg-induction and/or infusion of ex-vivo expanded Tregs. However, a successful regimen that induces transplant tolerance is not yet available for clinical application. This review brings together certain key studies on the role of Tregs in ESRD, diabetes and kidney transplantation, only to emphasize that many more studies are needed to elucidate the clinical significance and the therapeutic applications of Tregs.

  9. Tregs and kidney: From diabetic nephropathy to renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dousdampanis, Periklis; Trigka, Kostantina; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is recognised as the most effective treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Kidney transplantation continues to face several challenges including long-term graft and patient survival, and the side effects of immunosuppressive therapy. The tendency in kidney transplantation is to avoid the side effects of immunosuppresants and induce immune tolerance. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) contribute to self-tolerance, tolerance to alloantigen and transplant tolerance, mainly by suppressing the activation and function of reactive effector T-cells. Additionally, Tregs are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes, which is the leading cause of ESRD, suggesting that these cells play a role both in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease and the induction of transplant tolerance. Several strategies to achieve immunological tolerance to grafts have been tested experimentally, and include combinations of co-stimulatory blockade pathways, T-cell depletion, in vivo Treg-induction and/or infusion of ex-vivo expanded Tregs. However, a successful regimen that induces transplant tolerance is not yet available for clinical application. This review brings together certain key studies on the role of Tregs in ESRD, diabetes and kidney transplantation, only to emphasize that many more studies are needed to elucidate the clinical significance and the therapeutic applications of Tregs. PMID:27683634

  10. Tregs and kidney: From diabetic nephropathy to renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dousdampanis, Periklis; Trigka, Kostantina; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is recognised as the most effective treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Kidney transplantation continues to face several challenges including long-term graft and patient survival, and the side effects of immunosuppressive therapy. The tendency in kidney transplantation is to avoid the side effects of immunosuppresants and induce immune tolerance. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) contribute to self-tolerance, tolerance to alloantigen and transplant tolerance, mainly by suppressing the activation and function of reactive effector T-cells. Additionally, Tregs are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes, which is the leading cause of ESRD, suggesting that these cells play a role both in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease and the induction of transplant tolerance. Several strategies to achieve immunological tolerance to grafts have been tested experimentally, and include combinations of co-stimulatory blockade pathways, T-cell depletion, in vivo Treg-induction and/or infusion of ex-vivo expanded Tregs. However, a successful regimen that induces transplant tolerance is not yet available for clinical application. This review brings together certain key studies on the role of Tregs in ESRD, diabetes and kidney transplantation, only to emphasize that many more studies are needed to elucidate the clinical significance and the therapeutic applications of Tregs.

  11. Parasitic infection in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Valar, C; Keitel, E; Dal Prá, R L; Gnatta, D; Santos, A F; Bianco, P D; Sukiennik, T C T; Pegas, K L; Bittar, A E; Oliveira, K T; Garcia, V D

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of symptomatic parasitic infections in adult renal transplant recipients. We retrospectively analyzed a sample of 657 adult renal transplant recipients performed from January 2001 to December 2005 for immunosuppression protocol, clinical manifestations, parasite diagnosis, treatments, and outcomes. The prevalence of symptomatic parasitosis infections was 2.4% (16/657). None of the infected patients received cyclosporine in their immunosuppression protocol. Most of the infections were caused by Strongyloids stercoralis (n = 11), followed by Giardia lamblia (n = 3), Toxoplasma gondii (n = 1), and Trypanosoma cruzi: (n = 1). Strongyloides stercoralis was the most frequent agent, causing three cases of hyperinfection including one fatal case. With the new immunosuppressive regimes there must be a suspicion of parasitic infection to avoid the diagnostic delay that can be fatal. Strategies, including empiric treatment for S. stercoralis, must be considered. PMID:17362759

  12. Whooping cough in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Garbiras, M; Shabaka, A; Calvo, N; Martin, L; Moreno, M A; Lopez de la Manzanara, V; Sanchez-Fructuoso, A I

    2016-04-01

    Whooping cough is a respiratory infection with a severity that varies with age, immune status, and probably with other factors such as the degree of exposure and the virulence of the organism. The most frequent microorganism responsible for whooping cough is Bordetella pertussis. We present the case of a 62-year-old renal transplant recipient presenting with typical and severe manifestations of whooping cough caused by B. pertussis.

  13. Donor transmission of melanoma following renal transplant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kathryn T; Olszanski, Anthony; Farma, Jeffrey M

    2012-01-01

    Donor transmission of melanoma is one of the more common and lethal of recipient malignancies, often presenting with systemic disease. Although some patients may receive durable remission of melanoma following explantation of the allograft and withdrawal of immunosuppression, donor transmission of melanoma is fatal in most patients. Here we present a case of a 44-year-old male who developed metastatic melanoma following renal transplant.

  14. Whooping cough in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Garbiras, M; Shabaka, A; Calvo, N; Martin, L; Moreno, M A; Lopez de la Manzanara, V; Sanchez-Fructuoso, A I

    2016-04-01

    Whooping cough is a respiratory infection with a severity that varies with age, immune status, and probably with other factors such as the degree of exposure and the virulence of the organism. The most frequent microorganism responsible for whooping cough is Bordetella pertussis. We present the case of a 62-year-old renal transplant recipient presenting with typical and severe manifestations of whooping cough caused by B. pertussis. PMID:26808962

  15. Norwegian scabies in a renal transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, K; Mahaldar, A R; Ramakrishnan, M; Prabahar, S

    2010-04-01

    A variety of skin infections are encountered in postrenal transplant setting. Though bacterial and fungal infections are more common, surprises are in store for us sometimes. We describe a patient who underwent renal transplant two years ago, presenting with a painless, mildly pruritic expanding skin rash over abdomen. Histological examination of the skin biopsy showed that stratum corneum had multiple burrows containing larvae and eggs of Sarcoptes scabiei. The patient was treated with ivermectin 12 mg weekly once for 2 doses along with topical 5% permethrin and permethrin soap bath. There was remarkable improvement in the skin lesions with complete resolution in two weeks. Norwegian or crusted scabies is caused by massive infestation with Sarcoptes scabiei var. hominis. It can be rarely encountered in the post-transplant setting, which underscores the importance of early diagnosis and treatment before secondary bacterial infection sets in. PMID:20835323

  16. [In-patient education after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Schmid-Mohler, Gabriela; Albiez, Thomas; Schäfer-Keller, Petra; Fehr, Thomas; Biotti, Beatrice; Spirig, Rebecca

    2011-10-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease who receive a kidney through transplantation enter a new phase in their illness trajectory. The question emerged which knowledge and skills are essential for a safe self-management immediately after the transplantation. The aim of this project was to develop an evidence-based in-patient education programme for renal transplant recipients. A participative action research approach was chosen. An interprofessional group, led by an advanced practice nurse, initiated the project. Based on a systematic literature review and on qualitative interviews with both patients and experts, an in-patient educational programme was developed and implemented. The main elements of the programme focused on taking medications appropriately and on the observation and interpretation of symptoms. The content of the programme was documented in a brochure for patients. The structure of the programme was documented in a guideline with a standardised procedure. The procedure was based on patients' needs and preferences, and therefore provides tailored education. Besides the support received in gaining relevant knowledge, patients are supported in developing practical skills, problem solving, and decision making. An initial evaluation revealed that patients with cognitive impairment have special needs for education that exceeds what exists in the developed programme. As the programme is revised, additional contents on psychosocial issues will be included and the programme will be planned along the clinical pathway. Furthermore, it should begin during the pre-transplant period and continue in a longterm follow-up. PMID:21964935

  17. Changes in leucocyte migration after renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M. G. M.; Eddleston, A. L. W. F.; Dominguez, J. A.; Evans, D. B.; Bewick, M.; Williams, Roger

    1969-01-01

    The leucocyte migration test, an in-vitro measure of cellular immunity, has been used to follow the changes in cell-mediated hypersensitivity to kidney and histocompatibility antigens in three patients after renal transplantation. Inhibition of leucocyte migration, indicating strong sensitization to the antigens used, occurred in each patient, starting five to seven days after transplantation. Satisfactory renal function had not been established in any of the patients at this time. In one case inhibition of leucocyte migration persisted almost continuously until the 24th day and was associated with poor renal function proved histologically to be due to rejection. Treatment with increased dosage of prednisone was associated with a rapid reversion to normal of the migration index and improvement in renal function. Later, inhibition of migration occurred again, and shortly afterwards the graft ceased to function. In the other two cases the migration index became normal without alteration in immunosuppressive therapy and a satisfactory diuresis followed. It is suggested that this simple test should prove useful in the specific diagnosis of rejection and in control of immunosuppressive therapy. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:4899455

  18. Acute torsion of a retroperitoneal renal transplant mimicking renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Winter, Thomas C; Clarke, Andrea Lynn; Campsen, Jeffrey

    2013-09-01

    When imaging a renal transplant, the combination of absent flow in the main renal vein and reversed diastolic flow in the intrarenal arteries is considered highly suggestive of renal vein thrombosis. We present a case of torsion of a transplant kidney presenting with identical findings. Renal transplant torsion in general is a rare entity, previously described only in intraperitoneally placed organs; this case is the first that we are aware of with torsion occurring in a retroperitoneally placed graft.

  19. Chronic Renal Transplant Rejection and Possible Anti-Proliferative Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Usman, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The global prevalence of renal transplants is increasing with time, and renal transplantation is the only definite treatment for end-stage renal disease. We have limited the acute and late acute rejection of kidney allografts, but the long-term survival of renal tissues still remains a difficult and unanswered question as most of the renal transplants undergo failure within a decade of their transplantation. Among various histopathological changes that signify chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), tubular atrophy, fibrous thickening of the arteries, fibrosis of the kidney interstitium, and glomerulosclerosis are the most important. Moreover, these structural changes are followed by a decline in the kidney function as well. The underlying mechanism that triggers the long-term rejection of renal transplants involves both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. T cells, with their related cytokines, cause tissue damage. In addition, CD 20+ B cells and their antibodies play an important role in the long-term graft rejection. Other risk factors that predispose a recipient to long-term graft rejection include HLA-mismatching, acute episodes of graft rejection, mismatch in donor-recipient age, and smoking. The purpose of this review article is the analyze current literature and find different anti-proliferative agents that can suppress the immune system and can thus contribute to the long-term survival of renal transplants. The findings of this review paper can be helpful in understanding the long-term survival of renal transplants and various ways to improve it. PMID:26677426

  20. Targeting complement activation in brain-dead donors improves renal function after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Damman, Jeffrey; Hoeger, Simone; Boneschansker, Leo; Theruvath, Ashok; Waldherr, Ruediger; Leuvenink, Henri G; Ploeg, Rutger J; Yard, Benito A; Seelen, Marc A

    2011-05-01

    Kidneys recovered from brain-dead donors have inferior outcomes after transplantation compared to kidneys from living donors. Since complement activation plays an important role in renal transplant related injury, targeting complement activation in brain-dead donors might improve renal function after transplantation. Brain death (BD) was induced in Fisher rats by inflation of an epidurally placed balloon catheter and ventilated for 6h. BD animals were treated with soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) 1h before or 1h after BD. Kidney transplantation was performed and 7 days after transplantation animals were sacrificed. Plasma creatinine and urea were measured at days 0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 after transplantation. Renal function was significantly better at day 1 after transplantation in recipients receiving a sCR1 pre-treated donor kidney compared to recipients of a non-treated donor graft. Also treatment with sCR1, 1h after the diagnosis of BD, resulted in a better renal function after transplantation. Gene expression of IL-6, IL-1beta and TGF-beta were significantly lower in renal allografts recovered from treated donors. This study shows that targeting complement activation, during BD in the donor, leads to an improved renal function after transplantation in the recipient.

  1. 42 CFR 414.320 - Determination of reasonable charges for physician renal transplantation services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... renal transplantation services. 414.320 Section 414.320 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... Determination of reasonable charges for physician renal transplantation services. (a) Comprehensive payment for... a renal transplantation, including the usual preoperative and postoperative care, and...

  2. Renal function in pediatric liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    McDiarmid, S V

    1996-01-01

    Actuarial five-year patient survivals after pediatric orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) of 75 to 80% are now commonplace. However, renal dysfunction after pediatric OLT remains a serious complication and maybe broadly divided into four categories. The first is pre-existing renal disease in association with liver disease. This includes tyrosinemia with Fanconi syndrome, congenital cystic disease of the liver with associated polycystic disease of the kidney, Alagille's syndrome and primary hyperoxaluria. Second is hepatorenal syndrome. Resolution is dependent on successful OLT, although short-term dialysis may be required. Children with renal failure prior to transplantation have a significantly increased mortality. Third is peri- and early post-transplant renal impairment. The four major influences on early renal function after OLT are: (i) pretransplant renal function; (ii) early liver graft function; (iii) induction therapy with cyclosporine and tacrolimus; (iv) use of other nephrotoxic drugs. Fourth is long-term nephrotoxicity of cyclosporine and tacrolimus (FK-506). Both of these essential immunosuppressives carry the risk of long-term irreversible toxicity. In one study children, treated with cyclosporine, surviving > one year after OLT, 73% had a true GFR < 77 ml/min/1.73 m2. Children treated for > or = 24 months had a significantly lower GFR than those treated from 12 to 24 months. Half the children with a GFR < or = 50 ml/min/1.73 m2 had hypertension. Another study showed that 46% of pediatric OLT patients had a > or = 20% decrease in GFR over two to four years. FK-506 nephrotoxicity is comparable to that of cyclosporine. In a randomized control trial comparing FK-506 and cyclosporine, there was a 52% decrease in GFR over the first year in the FK-506 group, which was not significantly different to that of the cyclosporine group. In 60% of patients converted from cyclosporine to FK-506 one study showed a 50% or more drop in GFR. Both FK-506 and

  3. Oral candidiasis in patients with renal transplants

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Gonzalo; de Arriba, Lorenzo; de Andrés, Amado

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Oral candidiasis (OC) is a frequent oral lesion in renal transplant patients (RTPs). Despite the increased prevalence of OC in RTPs, no study has examined related risk factors. The aims of this study were to analyze the prevalence of and risk factors for OC in RTPs compared with age- and gender-matched healthy control group (HC) as well as determine the incidence of OC after transplantation. Study Design: We analyzed the prevalence and risk factors of OC in a group of 500 RTPs (307 men, 193 women, mean age 53.63 years) and 501 HC subjects (314 men, 187 women, mean age 52.25 years). Demographic and pharmacological data were recorded for all subjects. Incident cases of OC were ascertained retrospectively from outpatient clinical records only in the RTP group. Results: The prevalence of OC was 7.4% in RTPs compared with 4.19% in HC (P<0.03). The most frequent type of OC in the two groups was denture stomatitis. Statistical association was found between OC and age, mycophenolate mofetil dose and blood levels, dentures and tobacco. The multiple logistic regression model only chose for denture variable. According to the outpatient clinical records, 24 RTPs suffered OC during the first moth post-transplant. Severe lesions affecting the oral cavity and pharynx appeared in 79% of the OC cases. Conclusions: This study shows a lower prevalence of OC in RTPs than previous reports. Denture stomatitis was the most frequent OC prevalence form described in RTPs. Severe candidiasis is more frequent in the immediate posttransplant period. The presence of denture is an important risk factor of OC. These results emphasise the importance of adequate pre- and post-transplant oral health and denture cleaning and adjustment is recommended for these subjects to prevent this infection. Key words:Oral candidiasis, immunosuppressive therapy, renal transplantation. PMID:23385511

  4. Cerebral trypanosomiasis in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Cicora, F; Escurra, V; Bibolini, J; Petroni, J; González, I; Roberti, J

    2014-10-01

    Chagas disease is a lifelong, systemic, parasitic infection caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The main form of disease transmission is vector borne, but vertical transmission, such as by organ transplantation from a chronically infected donor, is also possible. The brain tumor-like form can occur years after infection and has been described in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and in a very few cases in transplant recipients. We describe the case of a kidney transplant patient who was human immunodeficiency virus negative and infected with T. cruzi, and developed cerebral trypanosomiasis that was successfully treated with benznidazole at 7 mg/kg/day for 60 days. The risk of Chagas disease transmission should not be underestimated in renal transplant patients, even in non-endemic areas. Chagas disease can present as a tumor-like brain lesion, very difficult to differentiate from other opportunistic infectious or neoplastic processes. Frequent monitoring for T. cruzi infection is essential to promptly implement treatment, which, in our patient, proved to be effective and safe.

  5. Dilemma of HCV Infection in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Ashry Ahmed Gheith, Osama

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus, which usually starts during dialysis therapy, is currently the main cause of chronic liver disease in such population. The majority of patients acquired the disease through intravenous drug use or blood transfusion, with some risk factors identified. In this review we are dealing with the effect of renal transplantation on HCV infection and HCV-related complications after renal transplantation. Moreover, we are discussing the therapeutic options of HCV infection before and after renal transplantation, the best immunosuppressive protocol and lastly graft and patient survival in patients who underwent pretransplant management vs. those who were transplanted without treatment. PMID:21660304

  6. Repair of Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm Anastomosed to Donor Renal Artery in a Renal Transplant Patient

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Hiroshi; Kin, Keiwa; Maeda, Shuusaku

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a successful repair of an internal iliac artery aneurysm in a renal transplant patient. At renal transplantation, the main renal artery and accessory renal artery had been anastomosed to the right internal iliac artery and right external iliac artery, respectively. The patient underwent resection and graft replacement of the iliac artery aneurysm with reattachment of the main renal artery to the right external iliac artery through a midline laparotomy with repeated topical cold perfusion for renal protection. The postoperative course was uneventful, and no evidence of renal function impairment was present at discharge. PMID:27738467

  7. Renal Function and Genetic Polymorphisms in Pediatric Heart Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Feingold, Brian; Brooks, Maria M; Zeevi, Adriana; Ohmann, Erin L.; Burckart, Gilbert J.; Ferrell, Robert E.; Chinnock, Richard; Canter, Charles; Addonizio, Linda; Bernstein, Daniel; Kirklin, James K.; Naftel, David C.; Webber, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Common genetic variations influence rejection, infection, drug metabolism, and side effect profiles after pediatric heart transplantation. Reports in adults suggest that genetic background may influence post-transplant renal function. In this multicenter study we investigated the association of genetic polymorphisms (GP) in a panel of candidate genes on renal function in 453 pediatric heart transplant recipients. Methods We performed genotyping for functional GPs in 19 candidate genes. Renal function was determined annually after transplantation by calculation of glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Mixed effects and Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess recipient characteristics and the effect of GPs on longitudinal eGFR and time to eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73m2. Results Mean age at transplantation was 6.2 ± 6.1 years and mean follow-up was 5.1 ± 2.5 years. Older age at transplant and black race were independently associated with post-transplant renal dysfunction. In univariate analyses, FASL (C-843T) T allele (p=0.014) and HO-1 (A326G) G allele (p=0.0017) were associated with decreased renal function. After adjusting for age and race, these associations were attenuated [FASL (p=0.075), HO-1 (p=0.053)]. We found no associations of other GPs, including GPs in TGFβ1, CYP3A5, ABCB1, and ACE, with post-transplant renal function. Conclusions In this multicenter, large sample of pediatric heart transplant recipients we found no strong associations between GPs in 19 candidate genes and post-transplant renal function. Our findings contradict reported associations of CYP3A5 and TGFβ1 with renal function and suggest that genotyping for these GPs will not facilitate individualized immunosuppression for the purpose of protecting renal function after pediatric heart transplantation. PMID:22789135

  8. De Novo Glomerular Diseases after Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, Gabriella; Glassock, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Glomerular diseases developing in the kidney allograft are more often recurrences of the original disease affecting the native kidneys. However, in an undefined number of cases de novo, glomerular diseases unrelated to the original disease in the native kidneys can develop in the transplanted kidney. The clinical presentation and histologic features of de novo diseases are often similar to those features observed in patients with primary or secondary GN in the native kidneys. However, in transplanted kidneys, the glomerular, vascular, and tubulointerstitial changes are often intertwined with structural abnormalities already present at the time of transplant or caused by antibody- or cell-mediated allograft rejection, immunosuppressive drugs, or superimposed infection (most often of a viral nature). The pathophysiology of de novo glomerular diseases is quite variable. In rare cases of de novo minimal change disease, circulating factors increasing the glomerular permeability likely participate. Maladaptive hemodynamic changes and tissue fibrosis caused by calcineurin inhibitors or other factors may be involved in the pathogenesis of de novo FSGS. The exposure of cryptic podocyte antigens may favor the development of de novo membranous nephropathy. Many cases of de novo membranoproliferative GN are related to hepatitis C virus infection. Patients with Alport syndrome lacking antigenic epitopes in their glomerular basement membrane may develop antibodies against these glomerular basement membrane antigens expressed in the transplanted kidney. Infection may cause acute GN to have a heterogeneous clinical presentation and outcome. De novo pauci-immune GN in renal transplant is rare. Preexisting or acquired intolerance to glucose may, in the long term, cause diabetic nephropathy. The prognosis of de novo diseases depends on the type of GN, the severity of lesions caused by the alloimmune response, or the efficacy of immunosuppressive therapy. In most cases, the management

  9. Cryptococcal meningitis presenting as sinusitis in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Iyer, S P; Movva, K; Wiebel, M; Chandrasekar, P; Alangaden, G; Carron, M; Tranchida, P; Revankar, S G

    2013-10-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is a relatively common invasive fungal infection in immunocompromised patients, especially in solid organ transplant recipients. Clinical presentation typically includes fever, headache, photophobia, neck stiffness, and/or altered mental status. Unusual presentations may delay diagnosis. Therapy is challenging in renal transplant patients because of the nephrotoxicity associated with amphotericin B, the recommended treatment. We present a case of cryptococcal meningitis in a renal transplant recipient presenting as acute sinusitis with successful treatment using fluconazole as primary therapy.

  10. Torque teno virus among dialysis and renal-transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Angélica Yukari; Okubo, Patrícia; Saito, Patricia Keiko; Yamakawa, Roger Haruki; Watanabe, Maria Angélica Ehara; Veríssimo da Silva Junior, Waldir; Borelli, Sueli Donizete; Bedendo, João

    2015-03-01

    Patients who undergo dialysis treatment or a renal transplant have a high risk of blood-borne viral infections, including the Torque teno virus (TTV). This study identified the presence of TTV and its genome groups in blood samples from 118 patients in dialysis and 50 renal-transplant recipients. The research was conducted in a hospital in the city of Maringá, state of Paraná. The viral DNA, obtained from whole blood, was identified by using two nested Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR). The frequencies of TTV were 17% and 36% in dialysis patients using the methodology proposed by Nishizawa et al . (1997) and Devalle and Niel (2004) , respectively, and 10% and 54% among renal-transplant patients. There was no statistically significant association between the frequency of the pathogen and the variables: gender, time in dialysis, time since transplant, blood transfusions, and the concomitant presence of hepatitis B, for either the dialysis patients or the renal-transplant recipients. Among dialysis patients and renal-transplant recipients, genogroup 5 was predominant (48% and 66% respectively), followed by genogroup 4 (37% and 48%) and genogroup 1 (23% and 25%). Genogroup 2 was present in both groups of patients. Some patients had several genogroups, but 46% of the dialysis patients and 51% of the renal-transplant recipients had only a single genogroup. This study showed a high prevalence of TTV in dialysis patients and renal-transplant recipients.

  11. Torque teno virus among dialysis and renal-transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Angélica Yukari; Okubo, Patrícia; Saito, Patricia Keiko; Yamakawa, Roger Haruki; Watanabe, Maria Angélica Ehara; Veríssimo da Silva, Waldir; Borelli, Sueli Donizete; Bedendo, João

    2015-01-01

    Patients who undergo dialysis treatment or a renal transplant have a high risk of blood-borne viral infections, including the Torque teno virus (TTV). This study identified the presence of TTV and its genome groups in blood samples from 118 patients in dialysis and 50 renal-transplant recipients. The research was conducted in a hospital in the city of Maringá, state of Paraná. The viral DNA, obtained from whole blood, was identified by using two nested Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR). The frequencies of TTV were 17% and 36% in dialysis patients using the methodology proposed by Nishizawa et al . (1997) and Devalle and Niel (2004) , respectively, and 10% and 54% among renal-transplant patients. There was no statistically significant association between the frequency of the pathogen and the variables: gender, time in dialysis, time since transplant, blood transfusions, and the concomitant presence of hepatitis B, for either the dialysis patients or the renal-transplant recipients. Among dialysis patients and renal-transplant recipients, genogroup 5 was predominant (48% and 66% respectively), followed by genogroup 4 (37% and 48%) and genogroup 1 (23% and 25%). Genogroup 2 was present in both groups of patients. Some patients had several genogroups, but 46% of the dialysis patients and 51% of the renal-transplant recipients had only a single genogroup. This study showed a high prevalence of TTV in dialysis patients and renal-transplant recipients. PMID:26221122

  12. IMPROVING RESULTS OF PEDIATRIC RENAL TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Ron; Tzakis, Andreas; Scantlebury, Velma; Jordan, Mark; Vivas, Carlos; Ellis, Demtrius; Gilboa, Nisan; Irish, William; Hopp, Laszlo; Reyes, Jorge; Hakala, Thomas R.; Simmons, Richard L.; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Outcome after renal transplantation in children has been variable. We undertook a retrospective study of our experience over the past five years. STUDY DESIGN From January 1, 1988, to October 15, 1992, 60 renal transplantations were performed upon 59 children at the Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh. Twenty-eight (47 percent) of the kidneys were from cadaveric donors, and 32 (53 percent) were from living donors. The recipients ranged in age from 0.8 to 17.4 years, with a mean of 9.8 ± 4.8 years. Forty-six (77 percent) recipients were undergoing a first transplant, while 14 (23 percent) received a second or third transplant. Eight (13 percent) of the patients were sensitized, with a panel reactive antibody of more than 40 percent. Eleven of the 14 patients undergoing retransplantation and seven of the eight patients who were sensitized received kidneys from cadaveric donors. Thirty-three (55 percent) patients received cyclosporine-based immunosuppression, and 27 (45 percent) received FK506 as the primary immunosuppressive agent. RESULTS The median follow-up period was 36 months, with a range of six to 63 months. The one- and four-year actuarial patient survival rate was 100 and 98 percent. The one- and four-year actuarial graft survival rate was 98 and 83 percent. For living donor recipients, the one- and four-year actuarial patient survival rate was 100 and 100 percent; for cadaveric recipients, it was 100 and 96 percent. Corresponding one- and four-year actuarial graft survival rates were 100 and 95 percent for the living donor recipients and 96 and 69 percent for the cadaveric recipients. Patients on cyclosporine had a one- and four-year patient survival rate of 100 and 97 percent, and patients on FK506 had a one- and three-year patient survival rate of 100 and 100 percent. Corresponding one- and four-year actuarial graft survival rates were 100 and 85 percent in the cyclosporine group, while one- and three-year actuarial graft survival rates were

  13. New options for the management of hyperparathyroidism after renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Douthat, Walter Guillermo; Chiurchiu, Carlos Raul; Massari, Pablo Ulises

    2012-01-01

    The persistence and severity of hyperparathyroidism (HPT) post-renal transplantation is relatively frequent and primarily associated with the timing and its magnitude in the pre-transplant period and with the presence of parathyroid adenomas. HPT after renal transplantation is clinically manifested with hypercalcemia, hypophosphatemia, bone pain, fractures, and in more serious cases with cardiovascular calcifications that affect the survival. The primary clinical objective for patients with secondary HPT after renal transplantation is to obtain a level of parathyroid hormone (PTH) adequate to the renal transplanted function and to normalize levels of calcium, phosphorus and vitamin D. In many cases during this period, the development of hypercalcemia and/or hypophosphatemia makes it necessary to take different therapeutic measures. The use of vitamin D or its analogues has been extrapolated from the management of pre-transplant HPT obtaining variable outcomes, although its use is limited by its capacity to produce hypercalcemia. Calcimimetics are drugs that have proven be effective in reducing PTH levels in patients with HPT on dialysis and has been effective in reducing up to 50% PTH levels in moderate to severe HPT in post-renal transplantation.When HPT persists after renal transplantation and does not respond to medical treatment, invasive management by percutaneous ethanol injection therapy of parathyroid glands or parathyroidectomy should be considered. The emergence of new methods for the management of HPT expands the availability of therapeutic tools for transplant patients. PMID:24175195

  14. Urological complications in pediatric renal transplantation: management and prevention.

    PubMed

    Zaontz, M R; Hatch, D A; Firlit, C F

    1988-11-01

    From 1973 through 1986, 166 consecutive renal transplants were performed in 143 patients. Urological complications included ureteral leakage/obstruction/necrosis, urinary tract infection, pyelonephritis, pelvic lymphocele, pelvic abscess, pelvic hematoma, infected hydrocele, bladder calculus, labial edema, renal artery/segmental stenosis, hydronephrosis, urinary incontinence, renal allograft malrotation and kidney rupture. Management options and preventive measures to avoid some of these dilemmas are highlighted.

  15. Cardiovascular risk factors following renal transplant

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Jill; Smith, Alice C

    2015-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the gold-standard treatment for many patients with end-stage renal disease. Renal transplant recipients (RTRs) remain at an increased risk of fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular (CV) events compared to the general population, although rates are lower than those patients on maintenance haemodialysis. Death with a functioning graft is most commonly due to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and therefore this remains an important therapeutic target to prevent graft failure. Conventional CV risk factors such as diabetes, hypertension and renal dysfunction remain a major influence on CVD in RTRs. However it is now recognised that the morbidity and mortality from CVD are not entirely accounted for by these traditional risk-factors. Immunosuppression medications exert a deleterious effect on many of these well-recognised contributors to CVD and are known to exacerbate the probability of developing diabetes, graft dysfunction and hypertension which can all lead on to CVD. Non-traditional CV risk factors such as inflammation and anaemia have been strongly linked to increased CV events in RTRs and should be considered alongside those which are classified as conventional. This review summarises what is known about risk-factors for CVD in RTRs and how, through identification of those which are modifiable, outcomes can be improved. The overall CV risk in RTRs is likely to be multifactorial and a complex interaction between the multiple traditional and non-traditional factors; further studies are required to determine how these may be modified to enhance survival and quality of life in this unique population. PMID:26722646

  16. Kaposi's sarcoma in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Zmonarski, Sławomir C; Boratyńska, Maria; Puziewicz-Zmonarska, Anna; Kazimierczak, Krzysztof; Klinger, Marian

    2005-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a spindle-shaped vascular cell tumor that occurs in the skin, lymphoid, respiratory and gastrointestinal tissues. It may resemble aggressive malignant neoplasm in HIV-related or in post-transplant types but classic form may behave as benign, potentially controllable and reversible hyperplasia. KS lesions from the onset are dispersed and multicentric. KS probability increases in solid organ transplant recipients (approximately 3/1000 patients). KS occurrence is associated with: type and dose of immunosuppression, chronic stimulation by foreign allograft antigens, viral infections (Herpes virus 8), anti rejection and induction therapy, etc. 90% of KS cases appear as dark blue or purplish macular lesions that may form nodular tumors. Histological picture shows networks of spindle shaped cells and vascular spaces surrounded by an endothelial cell layer. There is no uniform schema of KS treatment in renal transplant recipients. Immunosuppression must be reduced to the lowest levels which preserve allograft function. CsA should be converted to mofetil mycophenolate or mTOR-inhibitors. After conversion to MMF regression of KS was observed, although low therapeutic MMF doses seem to be appropriate. Sirolimus seems to inhibit the growth of established vascularized tumors and this effect is best realized with relatively low immunosuppressive doses of drug. PMID:16218035

  17. Relationship of renal transplantation to hypertension in end-stage renal failure.

    PubMed

    Sreepada, T K; Gupta, S K; Butt, K M; Kountz, S L; Friedman, E A

    1978-08-01

    The relationship of renal transplantation to new onset or persistence of previously established hypertension was analyzed in 164 transplant recipients in whom the renal allograft functioned for six months or longer. Of the 164, thirty-seven (23%) had normal blood pressure and 127 (77%) were hypertensive prior to transplantation. Following transplantation 83 patients (51%) were normotensive; high blood pressure was found in 81 (49%). Posttransplant hypertension could not be correlated with the recipient's original renal disease, age, sex, renal donor source, donor age, or maintenance dose of prednisone. More normotensive paients had undergone prior binephrectomy when compared with the hypertensive group (P less than .05). Mean serum creatinine levels was higher (2.0 mg/dl) in hypertensives than in normotensives (1.54 mg/dl) (P greater than .05). Selective renal veins' renin measurements in patients with severe hypertension were not helpful in predicting the beneficial effects of either bilateral nephrectomy or surgical correction of transplant renal artery stenosis.

  18. Renal transplantation between HIV-positive donors and recipients justified.

    PubMed

    Muller, Elmi; Barday, Zunaid; Mendelson, Marc; Kahn, Delawir

    2012-03-02

    HIV infection was previously an absolute contraindication to renal transplantation. However, with the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), renal transplantation using HIV-negative donor kidneys has successfully been employed for HIV-infected patients with end-stage renal failure. In resource-limited countries, places on dialysis programmes are severely restricted; HIV-infected patients, like many others with co-morbidity, are often denied treatment. Kidneys (and other organs) from HIV-infected deceased donors are discarded. The transplantation of HIV-positive donor kidneys to HIV-infected recipients is now a viable alternative to chronic dialysis or transplantation of HIV-negative donor kidneys. This significantly increases the pool of donor kidneys to the advantage of HIV-positive and -negative patients. Arguments are presented that led to our initiation of renal transplantation from HIV-positive deceased donors to HIV-positive recipients at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town.

  19. [Percutaneous Nephrolithotripsy for Renal Transplant Lithiasis: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Oida, Takeshi; Kanemitsu, Toshiyuki; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Fujimoto, Nobumasa; Koide, Takuo

    2016-02-01

    A 54-year-old man was introduced to our hospital for follow-up examinations after renal transplantation. At the initial visit, a 25 mm renal transplant stone was noted, which had enlarged to 32 mm at an examination 1 year later. We first attempted transurethral lithotripsy (TUL), but failed due to ureteral stricture. However, we could completely remove the stone in 2 sessions of percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PNL). The incidence of urinary lithiasis after renal transplantation ranges from 0.17-1.8%, for which PNL and TUL are frequently used. Although considered to be accompanied with risks of bleeding, bowel injury, and renal dysfunction, PNL is effective for urinary lithiasis after renal transplantation. TUL is less invasive, but access may be difficult when the ureter has an unusual course or ureteral stricture exists, as in our patient. PMID:27018408

  20. Endovascular repair of a transplant renal artery anastomotic pseudoaneurysm using the snorkel technique.

    PubMed

    Che, Haijie; Men, Changping; Yang, Mu; Zhang, Juwen; Chen, Ping; Yong, Jun

    2014-10-01

    Renal artery pseudoaneurysms after renal transplantation are extremely uncommon and are able to cause severe complications such as aneurysm rupture or renal allograft loss. Treatment often leads to transplant nephrectomy. We successfully treated a transplant renal artery pseudoaneurysm with covered stents, which resulted in well-preserved renal function.

  1. Radiographical resolution of renal lymphangiomatosis following cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Slater, Rick C; Iheagwara, Uzoma; Chen, Mang L

    2014-04-01

    Renal lymphangiomatosis is a disease characterized by abnormal formation of perirenal lymphatic vessels that fail to communicate with other retroperitoneal lymphatics; as a result, perirenal lymphatics dilate and form cysts. While typically an asymptomatic incidental finding, renal lymphangiomatosis rarely presents as flank or abdominal pain, ascites, impaired renal function, hypertension, hematuria, or proteinuria. Here we present the first known case of renal lymphangiomatosis found to spontaneously resolve following cardiac transplantation.

  2. An outbreak of chickenpox in adult renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Shahbazian, Heshmatollah; Ehsanpour, Ali

    2007-06-01

    Infection with the varicella-zoster virus, the etiologic agent of chickenpox and herpes zoster, is more serious in immunosuppressed renal transplant recipients than it is in the general population. Chickenpox is a rare infection in adult renal transplant recipients; however, it is significant owing to the severity of its clinical features and its associated high mortality rate. To date, there are no reported outbreaks of primary varicella-zoster virus infection in adult renal transplant recipients. Here, we report 3 patients with chickenpox who presented to our center between May 2006 and June 2006.

  3. Racial and ethnic disparities in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Churak, Joanne M

    2005-02-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities exist in renal transplantation. The causes are multifactorial and include but are not limited to racism, socioeconomic status and class, unfavorable geographical location, lack of organ donation by minority groups, and differences in social networks, health beliefs culture and HLA typing. These disparities affect blacks, Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, Alaskan natiives and Asians. Elimination of these disparities is difficult, since many of the causes are intertwined, and it is difficult todiscern attributable disparity risk associated with the various factors. The possible solutions and recommendations are numerous. Since it is difficult to identify which may be successsful, thorough evaluation is required to determine which should be implemented. Some recommendations may not be easily implemented. Those selected for implementation must be continuously monitored for the expected results and effects.

  4. Multi-State Survival Analysis in Renal Transplantation Recipients

    PubMed Central

    MIRZAEE, Moghaddameh; MOHAMMAD, Kazem; MAHMOODI, Mahmood; ZERAATI, Hojjat; EBADZADEH, Mohammad-Reza; ETMINAN, Abbas; FAZELI, Faramarz; DEHGHANI FIROUZABADI, Mohammad Hasan; SATTARY, Hossein; HAGHPARAST, Mahdiyeh; RAHIMI FOROUSHANI, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Renal transplantation is a therapy for end-stage renal disease. During the study of recipients’ survival after renal transplantation, there are some events as intermediate events that not only affect the recipients’ survival but also events which are affected by various factors. The aim of this study was to handle these intermediate events in order to identify factors that affect recipients’ survival by using multi-state models. Methods This retrospective cohort study included 405 renal transplant patients from Afzalipour Hospital, Kerman, Iran, from 2004 to 2010. The survival time of these recipients was determined after transplantation and the effect of various factors on the death hazard with and without renal allograft failure and hazard of renal allograft failure was studied by using multi-state models. Results During 4.06 years (median) of follow-up; 28 (6.9%) recipients died and allograft failure occurred in 51 (12.6%) recipients. Based on the results of multi-state model, receiving a living kidney transplantation decreased the hazard of renal allograft failure (HR=0.38; 95% CI: 0.17- 0.87), pre-transplant hypertension (HR=2.94; 95% CI: 1.54- 5.63) and serum creatinine levels >1.6 upon discharge from the hospital (HR=7.38; 95% CI: 3.87- 7.08) increased the hazard of renal allograft failure. Receiving living kidney transplantation decreased the hazard of death directly (HR=0.18; 95% CI: 0.04- 0.93). Conclusion It was concluded that the effect of donor type, pre-transplant hypertension and having serum creatinine >1.6 upon discharge from the hospital was significant on hazard of renal allograft failure. The only variable that had a direct significant effect on hazard of death was donor type. PMID:25988091

  5. Bone density and cortical structure after pediatric renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Terpstra, Anniek M; Kalkwarf, Heidi J; Shults, Justine; Zemel, Babette S; Wetzsteon, Rachel J; Foster, Bethany J; Strife, C Frederic; Foerster, Debbie L; Leonard, Mary B

    2012-04-01

    The impact of renal transplantation on trabecular and cortical bone mineral density (BMD) and cortical structure is unknown. We obtained quantitative computed tomography scans of the tibia in pediatric renal transplant recipients at transplantation and 3, 6, and 12 months; 58 recipients completed at least two visits. We used more than 700 reference participants to generate Z-scores for trabecular BMD, cortical BMD, section modulus (a summary measure of cortical dimensions and strength), and muscle and fat area. At baseline, compared with reference participants, renal transplant recipients had significantly lower mean section modulus and muscle area; trabecular BMD was significantly greater than reference participants only in transplant recipients younger than 13 years. After transplantation, trabecular BMD decreased significantly in association with greater glucocorticoid exposure. Cortical BMD increased significantly in association with greater glucocorticoid exposure and greater decreases in parathyroid hormone levels. Muscle and fat area both increased significantly, but section modulus did not improve. At 12 months, transplantation associated with significantly lower section modulus and greater fat area compared with reference participants. Muscle area and cortical BMD did not differ significantly between transplant recipients and reference participants. Trabecular BMD was no longer significantly elevated in younger recipients and was low in older recipients. Pediatric renal transplant associated with persistent deficits in section modulus, despite recovery of muscle, and low trabecular BMD in older recipients. Future studies should determine the implications of these data on fracture risk and identify strategies to improve bone density and structure.

  6. Desensitization protocols for prospective pediatric renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Mamode, Nizam; Marks, Stephen D

    2016-10-01

    Desensitization protocols should be considered for children with positive crossmatches awaiting renal transplantation. Children are sensitized usually due to previous renal (and/or other solid-organ) transplants but can be from administration of blood and/or platelet transfusions, infections, and immunizations (as sensitization from pregnancy is a rare occurrence in pediatric patients). However, the definition of HLA-incompatible (HLAi) renal transplantation in the literature varies and is best considered only when there is a positive cross-match (positive baseline flow cytometric cross-match or positive complement-dependent cytotoxic cross-match). Renal transplantation where the recipient has donor-specific antibodies (DSA) but a negative cross-match should not fall into this category, although they are higher risk. PMID:27270722

  7. Selective Embolization of Large Symptomatic Iatrogenic Renal Transplant Arteriovenous Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Barley, Fay L.; Kessel, David Nicholson, Tony; Robertson, Iain

    2006-12-15

    We report on the successful treatment of hypertension by occlusion of a large iatrogenic renal transplant arteriovenous fistula using detachable embolization coils with concomitant flow reduction by occlusion balloon in two patients.

  8. Desensitization protocols for prospective pediatric renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Mamode, Nizam; Marks, Stephen D

    2016-10-01

    Desensitization protocols should be considered for children with positive crossmatches awaiting renal transplantation. Children are sensitized usually due to previous renal (and/or other solid-organ) transplants but can be from administration of blood and/or platelet transfusions, infections, and immunizations (as sensitization from pregnancy is a rare occurrence in pediatric patients). However, the definition of HLA-incompatible (HLAi) renal transplantation in the literature varies and is best considered only when there is a positive cross-match (positive baseline flow cytometric cross-match or positive complement-dependent cytotoxic cross-match). Renal transplantation where the recipient has donor-specific antibodies (DSA) but a negative cross-match should not fall into this category, although they are higher risk.

  9. Fournier's gangrene due to perioperative iatrogenic colon perforation in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, Georgios; Koukoulaki, Maria; Vardas, Konstantinos; Grigorakis, Alkis; Vougas, Vasileios; Drakopoulos, Spiros

    2015-11-01

    Fournier's gangrene is not a common cause of morbidity in renal transplant recipients, but, if it occurs, it is difficult to treat because of the immunosuppression and associated increased mortality rate. We describe the case of a male patient who underwent renal transplantation with complicated post-operative course, resulting in cecum perforation (thermal injury due to cautery use during transplantation) requiring exploratory laparotomy and cecostomy. A few days later, he developed Fournier's gangrene and urgent radical surgical debridement of the scrotum was performed, along with aggressive antibiotic regimen and the immunosuppressive treatment was modified. Subsequently, the patient underwent scheduled cecostomy closure (right hemicolectomy), while the scrotum trauma healed with tertiary intention. Epidemiologic characteristics, clinical presentation, diagnostic workup, therapeutic options and morbidity-mortality rates of Fournier's gangrene are reviewed, emphasizing the role of immunosuppression in renal transplant recipients to disease development. PMID:26586068

  10. [Acute gouty arthritis in adolescents with renal transplants].

    PubMed

    Pela, I; Seracini, D; Lavoratti, G; Materassi, M

    1999-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is a common metabolic abnormality in subjects with renal transplantation: in fact in transplanted adults receiving immunosuppressive and diuretic drugs the frequency of hyperuricemia varied from 30 to 84% according to treatment. Conversely, the gout is an uncommon eventuality, representing less than 10%; predisposing factors are impaired renal function and older age. In the younger patients with renal transplantation hyperuricemia is also frequent, but the gout doesn't considered a possible complication in paediatric age. We reported our observation of 5 patients (3 males and 2 females), 13-18 years old who developed gout 2-84 months after renal transplantation. All the patients were receiving cyclosporine, 4 even with prednisone and azathioprine. Two patients were treated with furosemide because hypertension. The average of uric acid serum levels in the post transplantation follow-up was 7 +/- 2 mg/dl; at the moment of gout attack the uric acid serum levels raised to 12 +/- 1 mg/dl. The arthritis diagnosis were made by clinical, laboratory and instrumental data (Rx and US). In the most severe cases, uricasi therapy resolved clinical picture. The analysis of immunosuppressive and diuretic treatment, renal function and dietary uses induces us to think that the gout episode may be the result of many concomitant factors, in adolescents with renal transplant. PMID:10687163

  11. Acute renal failure in liver transplant patients: Indian study.

    PubMed

    Naik, Pradeep; Premsagar, B; Mallikarjuna, M

    2015-01-01

    The acute renal failure is the frequent medical complication observed in liver transplant patients. The objective of this study was to determine the cause of acute renal failure in post liver transplant patients. A total of 70 patients who underwent (cadaveric 52, live 18) liver transplantation were categorized based on clinical presentation into two groups, namely hepatorenal failure (HRF, n = 29), and Hepatic failure (HF, n = 41). All the patients after the liver transplant had received tacrolimus, mycophenolate and steroids. We analyzed the modification of diet in renal disease, (MDRD) serum urea, creatinine and albumin before and after 5th and 30th day of liver transplant and data was categorized into survivors and non-survivors group. In HRF survivor group, serum creatinine, and urea levels were high and, albumin, MDRD were low in pre- transplant and reached to normal levels on 30th day of post transplant, and 79.3 % of patients in this group showed resumption of normal kidney function. On the contrary in HRF nonsurvivor group, we did not observed any significant difference and 20.7 % of patients showed irreversible changes after the liver transplant. In HF survivor group, 82.9 % of liver failure patients did not show any deviation in serum creatinine, urea, albumin and MDRD, whereas in HF non survivor group, 17.1 % of liver failure patients who had HCV positive before the transplant developed acute renal failure. The levels of creatinine, urea, albumin and MDRD were normal before the transplant and on day 30th, the levels of albumin and MDRD were significantly low whereas serum urea, creatinine levels were high. In conclusion, based on these observations, an diagnosis and treatment of Acute renal failure is important among the liver transplantation cases in the early postoperative period.

  12. Successful renal transplantation following prior bone marrow transplantation in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Susan E; Hutchinson, Raymond J; DebRoy, Meelie; Magee, John C

    2004-10-01

    Improving survival rates following pediatric bone marrow transplantation (BMT) will likely result in greater numbers of children progressing to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) because of prior chemotherapy, irradiation, sepsis, and exposure to nephrotoxic agents. Renal transplantation remains the treatment of choice for ESRD; however, the safety of renal transplantation in this unique population is not well established. We report our experience with living related renal transplantation in three pediatric patients with ESRD following prior BMT. Two patients with neuroblastoma and ESRD because of BMT nephropathy, and one patient with Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia and ESRD because of immune complex mediated glomerulonephritis and nephrotic syndrome. Age at time of BMT ranged from 2 to 7 yr. All patients had stable bone marrow function prior to renal transplantation. Age at renal transplant ranged from 8 to 14 yr. All three patients have been managed with conventional immunosuppression, as no patient received a kidney and BMT from the same donor source. These patients are currently 7 months to 6 yr status post-living related transplant. All have functioning bone marrow and kidney transplants, with serum creatinine levels ranging 0.6-1.2 mg/dL. There have been no episodes of rejection. One patient with a history of grade III skin and grade IV gastrointestinal-graft-vs.-host disease (GI-GVHD) prior to transplantation, had a mild flare of GI-GVHD (grade I) post-renal transplant and is currently asymptomatic. The incidence of opportunistic infection has been comparable with our pediatric renal transplant population without prior BMT. One patient was treated for basal cell carcinoma via wide local excision. Renal transplantation is an excellent option for the treatment of pediatric patients with ESRD following BMT. Short-term results in this small population show promising patient and graft survival, however long-term follow-up is needed. Pre-existing immune system

  13. Post-renal Transplantation de novo Renal Cell Carcinoma in a Middle-aged Man

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, V. K.; Sutariya, H. C.

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is usually seen in the native kidney but may be seen in the renal allograft. We report a rare case of renal cell carcinoma in a 56-year-old renal allograft recipient who was transplanted for end-stage renal disease induced by analgesic nephropathy. This complication developed after 13 years of renal transplantation. Patient was investigated for hematuria and abdominal pain with a normal renal function. Computed tomography depicted a mass sized 9.0×7.3×6.8 cm that involved the upper pole of the transplant. There was no metastasis. The patient underwent radical allograft nephrectomy for the carcinoma that had extended up to the renal hilum. Histopathological examination revealed Furhman grade-1, clear cell variant, stage pT2 N0 M0. In the last visit, the patient was on maintenance hemodialysis via arterio-venous fistula and planned for cadaveric renal transplantation. Computed tomography could facilitate early diagnosis and proper management of patients with post-renal allograft renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26889374

  14. [Infected solitary renal cyst of the graft in a renal transplant recipient : a case report].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kenichiro; Tsuchiya, Tomohiro; Kondo, Hiromi; Nakane, Keita; Kato, Taku; Seike, Kensaku; Miwa, Kousei; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Yokoi, Sigeaki; Nakano, Masahiro; Deguchi, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    A 59-year-old woman with end-stage renal disease of diabetic nephropathy who had been on maintenance hemodialisis for 4 years, underwent a living-unrelated renal transplantation 6 years ago. She was admitted to our hospital, because of a low grade fever and edema. Ultrasonography revealed the cyst with heterogeneity structure in the upper pole of the transplanted kidney. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a high-intensity cystic mass measuring 68×53 mm. As fever and laboratory data did not improve sufficiently by the treatment with antibiotics, echo-guided puncture and drainage were performed for the abnormal structure in the upper pole of the transplanted kidney. In the culture of the purulent aspirate drained from renal cyst, Escherichia coli was isolated. To our knowledge, this is the first report of infected renal cyst of the graft in a renal transplant recipient in the world. PMID:22075611

  15. Angioplasty and stent treatment of transplant renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Del Pozo, Maitane; Martí, Jordi; Guirado, Lluís; Facundo, Carme; Canal, Cristina; de la Torre, Pablo; Ballarín, José; Díaz, Joan M

    2012-07-17

    Transplant renal artery stenosis is a major complication that requires a therapeutic approach involving surgery or angioplasty. The aim of this study was to analyse the evolution of renal transplant patients with renal allograft artery stenosis treated by angioplasty and stent placement. Thirteen patients were diagnosed with transplant renal artery stenosis. Clinical suspicion was based on deterioration of renal function and/or poorly controlled hypertension with compatible Doppler ultrasound findings. The diagnosis was confirmed by arteriography, performing an angioplasty with stent placement during the same operation. A progressive improvement in renal function was observed during the first 3 months after the angioplasty, and renal function then remained stable over 2 years. In addition, blood pressure improved during the first 2 years, and as a consequence there was no need to increase the average number of anti-hypertensive drugs administered (2.5 drugs per patient). In conclusion, angioplasty with stent placement is a safe and effective procedure for the treatment of transplant renal artery stenosis.

  16. Commercial cadaveric renal transplant: an ethical rather than medical issue.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chiao-Yin; Lee, Chin-Chan; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Hung, Cheng-Chih; Wu, Mai-Szu

    2006-01-01

    Donor organ shortage is a universal problem. The organ source has been extended to controversial death-penalty outlaws in certain countries. It was claimed that commercial transplant had a worse short-term clinical outcome. The aim of this study is to investigate the long-term outcome of patients receiving commercial cadaveric renal transplant. Seventy-five renal transplant recipients receiving long-term follow-up were included. Thirty-one patients received overseas commercial cadaveric transplant. Forty-four patients had legal domestic transplant in Taiwan. The age of the patients receiving the commercial cadaveric transplant was significantly older than those with legal domestic transplant (commerical vs. legal: 46.1 +/- 11.4 vs. 35.6 +/- 9.0 yr old, p < 0.001). The renal function estimated by creatinine and 1/creatinine up to eight yr showed no significant difference between the two groups. The graft survivals of the two groups were not different. The mortality rate between the two groups was comparable in 10 yr (91.1% in domestic and 88.9% in overseas). There was no significant difference in de novo viral hepatitis, cytomegalovirus infection, and acute rejection. The clinical outcome of overseas commercial cadaveric transplant was not different from the domestic legal transplant. To stop the unethical procedure, ethnicity and humanity are the major concerns.

  17. Donor non-specific MICA antibodies in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Sapák, Michal; Chreňová, Silvia; Tirpáková, Jana; Žilinská, Zuzana; Ďurmanová, Vladimíra; Shawkatová, Ivana; Jakuš, Vladimír; Kuba, Daniel; Buc, Milan

    2014-02-01

    Despite recent advances in solid organ transplantations, an antibody mediated rejection caused by donor specific antibodies is still a major problem in kidney graft survival. Besides HLA-induced humoral response, antibodies against MICA antigens have recently attracted attention because of their possible role in graft rejection. The aim of our study was to establish whether renal recipients produce antibodies against MICA molecules due to the transplantation and if they are specific for MICA antigens of the donors. MICA antibody screening was performed in 124 kidney recipient sera. 22 sera, that were found to be MICA antibody positive, were further examined for MICA antibody profiles and compared with donor MICA alleles. The analysis of MICA antibody positive sera showed mostly more complex reactivity patterns. A significant fraction of patient sera (59%) reacted not only with the donor MICA antigens, but also with other MICA patterns. A match between antibody specificities and MICA antigens was observed in 41% of renal recipients only. On the other hand, as much as in 36% of recipient sera were detected antibodies against their own MICA molecules. We did not prove a complete correlation between the recipient MICA antibody specificities and MICA antigens of the donor. We assume that MICA antibody induction occurs not only due to the allogeneic stimulation itself but also due to other factors that need to be elucidated.

  18. The Oral Cavity State in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Gašpar, Marija; Glavina, Ana; Grubišić, Kristina; Sabol, Ivan; Bušić, Mirela; Mravak, Marinka

    2015-01-01

    Aim Patients with a solid organ transplant can have many different complications in the mouth, as a result of immunosuppression and side effects of drugs. The aim of this study was to examine the frequency and type of oral lesions in renal transplant patients, dental status, oral hygiene, oral lesions related to drugs which patients take and the time of transplantation as well as the frequency of patient’s visits to the dentist in the post-transplant period. Material and methods The study was performed in a period of two years and included 100 subjects with a renal transplant during their regular control visits to the Department of Nephrology and Dialysis, Clinical Hospital Centre Zagreb and the Department of Oral Medicine, School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb and 100 randomly selected control subjects at the Department of Endodontics and Restorative Dentistry, School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb. Results Results showed a significantly higher incidence of oral lesions in patients with renal transplant (31%) compared to control subjects. The most frequent were erythematous (inflammatory changes), keratotic lesions and gingival hyperplasia. The average DMFT index was significantly lower in patients with renal transplant than in the control group. One third of patients had a subjective feeling of dry mouth. Oral hygiene was poor overall, and only a small number of subjects used the additional sustainers for oral hygiene. Most patients did not visit the dentist after the transplantation. Conclusion Renal transplant patients need a comprehensive and regular dental care during the pre- and post-transplant period and a doctor of dental medicine should be part of a multidisciplinary team of medical specialists.

  19. The Oral Cavity State in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Gašpar, Marija; Glavina, Ana; Grubišić, Kristina; Sabol, Ivan; Bušić, Mirela; Mravak, Marinka

    2015-01-01

    Aim Patients with a solid organ transplant can have many different complications in the mouth, as a result of immunosuppression and side effects of drugs. The aim of this study was to examine the frequency and type of oral lesions in renal transplant patients, dental status, oral hygiene, oral lesions related to drugs which patients take and the time of transplantation as well as the frequency of patient’s visits to the dentist in the post-transplant period. Material and methods The study was performed in a period of two years and included 100 subjects with a renal transplant during their regular control visits to the Department of Nephrology and Dialysis, Clinical Hospital Centre Zagreb and the Department of Oral Medicine, School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb and 100 randomly selected control subjects at the Department of Endodontics and Restorative Dentistry, School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb. Results Results showed a significantly higher incidence of oral lesions in patients with renal transplant (31%) compared to control subjects. The most frequent were erythematous (inflammatory changes), keratotic lesions and gingival hyperplasia. The average DMFT index was significantly lower in patients with renal transplant than in the control group. One third of patients had a subjective feeling of dry mouth. Oral hygiene was poor overall, and only a small number of subjects used the additional sustainers for oral hygiene. Most patients did not visit the dentist after the transplantation. Conclusion Renal transplant patients need a comprehensive and regular dental care during the pre- and post-transplant period and a doctor of dental medicine should be part of a multidisciplinary team of medical specialists. PMID:27688404

  20. Sclerotherapy with tetracycline for hydroceles in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Sankari, B R; Boullier, J A; Garvin, P J; Parra, R O

    1992-10-01

    A total of 17 patients with hydroceles following renal transplantation underwent sclerotherapy with tetracycline hydrochloride (10 ml. of a 5% solution of tetracycline in 1% lidocaine). A successful outcome was obtained in 15 patients (88%). Post-sclerotherapy hydrocelectomy was necessary in 2 patients (12%). No major complications (testicular loss, scrotal abscess or necrosis) occurred in any patient. Pain at injection was the only adverse effect. Tetracycline sclerotherapy for hydroceles appears to be an effective and safe procedure in the renal transplant population. We recommend this procedure as the initial treatment modality for hydroceles in patients with a renal allograft.

  1. Should Peripheral Vascular Disease- or Diabetes-related Amputation Contraindicate Renal Transplant?

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Nalani L

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates whether end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients with amputation secondary to peripheral vascular disease (PVD) or diabetes mellitus (DM) are appropriate candidates for renal transplant. Limb- or digit- amputees with ESRD on the renal transplant list from 1993–2008 were included. Comorbidities, amputation type, duration on the waitlist, and current transplant status were analyzed. Additionally, US renal transplant centers were surveyed regarding their views about amputees' transplant candidacy. Thirty-eight ESRD patients with amputations were identified; 3 patients underwent renal transplant, 14 expired on the waitlist, and 14 were removed for medical reasons. The survey indicated that centers generally don't consider amputation a contraindication to transplant listing. Few ESRD patients with amputations who are placed on the transplant list undergo renal transplant; most die or are removed for medical reasons. Amputation should be considered an indicator of severe PVD and possibly a relative contraindication to listing for renal transplant. PMID:22787569

  2. Tailoring tacrolimus-based immunotherapy in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Harold C

    2003-05-01

    Tacrolimus is a cornerstone immunosuppressive agent in renal transplantation and compared with cyclosporin, its use is associated with a reduced incidence of acute rejection. Optimizing immunosuppressive management in the early post-transplant period is important for achieving long-term graft function and survival. In attempts to improve the long-term outcomes of renal transplantation further, tacrolimus has been combined with two novel immunosuppressive agents, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and sirolimus, with encouraging results in terms of patient and graft survival, acute rejection rates and renal graft function. Tacrolimus in combination with MMF adjunctive therapy showed significantly better graft survival in patients with delayed graft function, fewer episodes of corticosteroid-resistant rejection and better renal function at the 3-year follow-up compared with cyclosporin microemulsion plus MMF immunosuppression. A tacrolimus plus MMF regimen was also effective for renal transplant recipients at our centre in Pennsylvania, resulting in excellent survival and rejection rates at 1 year post-transplantation. The 3-month results of a US multicentre study comparing tacrolimus in combination with either MMF or sirolimus showed these two treatment regimens to be equivalent in terms of patient and graft survival, delayed graft function, the incidence of biopsy-confirmed acute rejection and renal graft function, although differences were apparent in terms of acute tubular necrosis and hyperlipidaemia. In conclusion, the development of a new immunosuppressive regimen in renal transplantation should take account of factors that influence graft function, both in the short and long term, as a way of optimizing individual maintenance therapy. PMID:12738759

  3. The UNOS Renal Transplant Registry: Review of the Last Decade.

    PubMed

    Andre, Mark; Huang, Edmund; Everly, Matthew; Bunnapradist, Suphamai

    2014-01-01

    Kidney transplantation has become a preferred treatment for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) as transplant recipients enjoy freedom from dialysis and improvement in both quality and quantity of life. More patients are being placed on the transplant waiting list, although the waiting list patients still only represent a very small fraction of ESRD patients. The characteristics of both waitlisted and transplanted patients have changed considerably in the last decade, as the ESRD population has aged and waiting list times have increased. Over the last 10 years, we have witnessed an increasingly severe shortage of kidney donors. Even with increasing efforts of the transplant community to expand the donor pool by including larger numbers of high risk deceased donor transplants, the overall number of kidney transplants has remained relatively stable. Those who do receive transplants, however, benefit from excellent transplant outcomes. The use of paired exchange/chain transplant donors has increased the living donor pool significantly and with outstanding results. Belatacept, a costimulation blockage drug, represents a new class of transplant immunosuppression. It has been used sparingly in the first few years of its approval. Most kidney transplant patients are still maintained on immunosuppressive agents that were approved almost two decades ago. In the next decade, we will certainly continue to deal with an organ shortage as the number of eligible and waitlisted patients is likely to increase. Effective and efficient organ allocation policies will be increasingly necessary to address this scarcity. Optimizing the transplant candidate work-up, improving maintenance of waitlisted patients, and providing optimal post-transplant medical care will be vital to the continued success of kidney transplantation.

  4. Transplant graft vasculopathy: an emerging target for prevention and treatment of renal allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Duk-Hee; Kang, Shin-Wook; Jeong, Hyeon Joo; Kim, Yu Seun; Yang, Chul Woo; Johnson, Richard J

    2004-12-31

    Maintenance of healthy endothelium is essential to vascular homeostasis, and preservation of endothelial cell function is critical for transplant allograft function. Damage of microvascular endothelial cells is now regarded as a characteristic feature of acute vascular rejection and chronic allograft nephropathy, which is an important predictor of graft loss and is often associated with transplant vasculopathy. In this review, we will discuss the role of microvascular endothelium, in renal allograft dysfunction, particularly as it relates to markers of endothelial dysfunction and endothelial repair mechanisms. We also discuss the potential for therapies targeting endothelial dysfunction and transplant graft vasculopathy.

  5. Concomitant administration of cyclosporin and ketoconazole in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    First, M R; Schroeder, T J; Weiskittel, P; Myre, S A; Alexander, J W; Pesce, A J

    1989-11-18

    18 renal transplant recipients receiving cyclosporin, prednisone, and azathioprine were given ketoconazole, a potent inhibitor of the cytochrome P-450 enzyme system. Within a month ketoconazole-induced blockade of cyclosporin metabolism allowed a significant reduction (451 vs 106 mg/day; 77%) of the mean dose of cyclosporin without altering cyclosporin whole blood trough levels, although maximum blood levels were almost halved. This dose reduction was maintained in patients followed up for up to 13 months. Renal and hepatic function were unchanged after the addition of ketoconazole. This drug interaction has the potential to reduce dramatically expenditure on cyclosporin in transplant recipients. PMID:2572912

  6. Digital processing of histopathological aspects in renal transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Albuquerque Araujo, Arnaldo; de Andrade, Marcos C.; Bambirra, Eduardo A.; dos Santos, A. M. M.

    1993-07-01

    We describe here our initial experience with the digital image processing of histopathological aspects from multiple renal biopsies of transplanted kidney in a patient treated with Cyclosporine (CsA), a powerful immunosupressor drug whose use has improved the chances of a successful vascularized organ transplantation (Tx). Unfortunately, CsA promotes morphological alterations to the glomerular structure of the kidneys. To characterize this process, glomeruli, tufts, and lumen areas distributions are measured. The results are presented in form of graphics.

  7. [Serum beta 2 microglobulin (beta 2M) following renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Silva, A; Nishida, S K; Silva, M S; Ramos, O L; Azjen, H; Pereira, A B

    1994-01-01

    Although there was an important improvement in graft and patient survival the last 10 years, graft rejection continues to be a major barrier to the success of renal transplantation. Identification of a laboratory test that could help to diagnose graft rejection would facilitate the management of renal transplanted patients. PURPOSE--To evaluate the utility of monitoring serum beta 2M in recently transplanted patients. METHODS--We daily determined serum beta 2M levels in 20 receptors of renal grafts (10 from living related and 10 from cadaveric donors) and compared them to their clinical and laboratory evolution. RESULTS--Eight patients who presented immediate good renal function following grafting and did not have rejection had a mean serum beta 2M of 3.7 mg/L on the 4th day post transplant. The sensitivity of the test for the diagnosis of acute rejection was 87.5%, but the specificity was only 46%. Patients who presented acute tubular necrosis (ATN) without rejection had a progressive decrease in their serum levels of beta 2M, while their serum creatinine changed as they were dialyzed. In contrast, patients with ATN and concomitance of acute rejection or CSA nephrotoxicity presented elevated beta 2M and creatinine serum levels. CONCLUSION--Daily monitoring of serum beta 2M does not improve the ability to diagnose acute rejection in patients with good renal function. However, serum beta 2M levels seemed to be useful in diagnosing acute rejection or CSA nephrotoxicity in patients with ATN.

  8. [Renal transplantation from living donor in Italy and Europe].

    PubMed

    Frascà, Giovanni M; Gaffi, G; Taruscia, D; D'Arezzo, M; Benozzi, L; Sagripanti, S

    2009-01-01

    Renal transplantation from a living donor shows a better graft and patient survival when compared with cadaver donor grafts. Moreover, since surgery can be planned in advance when a living donor is available, the time spent on dialysis while awaiting transplantation can be greatly reduced and dialysis treatment can be completely avoided in some cases. Only few risks for the donor have been reported as a consequence of nephrectomy, both in the short and long term. Nevertheless, despite these advantages, the number of living donor renal transplants carried out in Europe each year varies greatly from country to country and is particularly low in Spain and Italy. Several factors account for these differences, mainly the effectiveness of the organ procurement system, which could make people reluctant to living donation, and doctors' and patients' limited knowledge about living donor transplants. Nephrologists have the responsibility to identify patients eligible for transplant early in the course of the disease, and to inform them and their relatives about living donor transplantation, enabling them to make informed choices among the various treatment options in end-stage renal disease. PMID:19644833

  9. Genetic susceptibility of the donor kidney contributes to the development of renal damage after syngeneic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kouwenhoven, E A; van Dokkum, R P; Marquet, R L; Heemann, U W; de Bruin, R W; IJzermans, J N; Provoost, A P

    1999-06-01

    the donor kidney appears to be an important factor in the development of chronic renal damage. This may play a role in the long-term functional changes seen after clinical renal transplantation.

  10. The development and current status of minimally invasive surgery to manage urological complications after renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sabnis, Ravindra B.; Singh, Abhishek G.; Ganpule, Arvind P.; Chhabra, Jaspreet S.; Tak, Gopal R.; Shah, Jaimin H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In the past, urological complications after renal transplantation were associated with significant morbidity. With the development and application of endourological procedures, it is now possible to manage these cases with minimally invasive techniques. Materials and Methods: A MEDLINE search for articles published in English using key words for the management of urological complications after renal transplantation was undertaken. Forty articles were selected and reviewed. Results: The incidence of urological complications postrenal transplantation was reported to be 2–13%. Ureteric leaks occurred in up to 8.6%, and 55% were managed endourologically. The incidence of lymphocele was as high as 20%, and less that 12% of the cases required treatment. Ureteric stricture was the most common complication, and endourological management was successful in 50–70%. The occurrence of complicated vesicoureteral reflux was 4.5%, and 90% of low-grade reflux cases were successfully treated with deflux injections. Stones and obstructive voiding dysfunction occurred in about 1% of kidney transplant recipients. Conclusion: Minimally invasive techniques have a critical role in the management of urological complications after renal transplantation. Urinary leakage should be managed with complete decompression. Percutaneous drainage should be the first line of treatment for lymphocele that is symptomatic or causing ureteric obstruction. Laparoscopic lymphocele deroofing is successful in aspiration-resistant cases. Deflux is highly successful for the management of complicated low-grade kidney transplant reflux. The principles of stone management in a native solitary kidney are applied to the transplanted kidney. Early identification and treatment of bladder outlet obstruction after renal transplantation can prevent urinary leakage and obstructive uropathy. PMID:27555675

  11. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  12. Menstruation. A hazard in radionuclide renal transplant evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Orzel, J.A.; Jaffers, G.J.

    1986-06-01

    Serial Tc-99m DTPA studies were performed to evaluate renal transplant blood flow and function in a 34-year-old woman. A hypervascular pelvic mass with increased blood pool activity was intermittently identified. This hypervascular lesion suggested a pathologic condition of the pelvis, and its blood pool simulated bladder activity, confusing interpretation of renal function. This perplexing vascular lesion was the uterus, with varying degrees of blood flow and blood pool activity depending on the timing of the renal study in relation to the menstrual cycle.

  13. Cavitary lung lesion 6 years after renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Arun Kumar; Arava, Sudheer; Bagchi, Soumita; Madan, Karan; Das, Chandan J; Agarwal, Sanjay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The differential diagnoses of a cavitary lung lesion in renal transplant recipients would include infection, malignancy and less commonly inflammatory diseases. Bacterial infection, Tuberculosis, Nocardiosis, fungal infections like Aspergillosis and Cryptococcosis need to be considered in these patients. Pulmonary cryptococcosis usually presents 16-21 mo after transplantation, more frequently in patients who have a high level of cumulative immunosuppression. Here we discuss an interesting patient who never received any induction/anti-rejection therapy but developed both BK virus nephropathy as well as severe pulmonary Cryptococcal infection after remaining stable for 6 years after transplantation. This case highlights the risk of serious opportunistic infections even in apparently low immunologic risk transplant recipients many years after transplantation. PMID:27358792

  14. Phomopsis bougainvilleicola prepatellar bursitis in a renal transplant recipient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pre-patellar bursitis is typically a monomicrobial bacterial infection. Rarely is a fungal cause identified. We describe a 61 year-old man who had received a renal transplant 21 months prior to presentation whose synovial fluid and surgical specimens grew Phomopsis bougainvilleicola, a pycnidial coe...

  15. Recurrence of Acute Page Kidney in a Renal Transplant Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Zayas, Carlos; Mulloy, Laura; Jagadeesan, Muralidharan

    2016-01-01

    Acute Page Kidney (APK) phenomenon is a rare cause of secondary hypertension, mediated by activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Timely intervention is of great importance to prevent any end organ damage from hypertension. We present a unique case of three episodes of APK in the same renal transplant allograft. PMID:27725836

  16. Transplant renal artery stenosis: clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Kayler, Liise K.; Zand, Martin S.; Muttana, Renu; Chernyak, Victoria; DeBoccardo, Graciela O.

    2015-01-01

    Transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) is a well-recognized vascular complication after kidney transplant. It occurs most frequently in the first 6 months after kidney transplant, and is one of the major causes of graft loss and premature death in transplant recipients. Renal hypoperfusion occurring in TRAS results in activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system; patients usually present with worsening or refractory hypertension, fluid retention and often allograft dysfunction. Flash pulmonary edema can develop in patients with critical bilateral renal artery stenosis or renal artery stenosis in a solitary kidney, and this unique clinical entity has been named Pickering Syndrome. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of TRAS can prevent allograft damage and systemic sequelae. Duplex sonography is the most commonly used screening tool, whereas angiography provides the definitive diagnosis. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with stent placement can be performed during angiography if a lesion is identified, and it is generally the first-line therapy for TRAS. However, there is no randomized controlled trial examining the efficacy and safety of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty compared with medical therapy alone or surgical intervention. PMID:25713713

  17. Management and outcome of brain abscess in renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Arunkumar, M; Rajshekhar, V.; Chandy, M.; Thomas, P.; Jacob, C. K.

    2000-01-01

    Although infection is the commonest central nervous system complication following renal transplantation, brain abscess is uncommon. Over the last 11 years, five renal transplant recipients who had brain abscesses were treated by computed tomography (CT)-guided stereotactic aspiration. Three patients had a fungal abscess, one a tuberculous abscess and the other had a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus abscess. One patient required a craniotomy for the excision of a fungal abscess which was persistent after two CT-guided stereotactic aspirations. The survivors in this group are the patient with a tuberculous abscess who is alive and well 5 years after diagnosis, and another with a dematiaceous fungal abscess (phaeohyphomycosis). CT-guided stereotactic surgery is minimally invasive, and can safely be performed in these patients. It often leads to an aetiological diagnosis in renal transplant recipients with brain abscesses. Specific antibiotic management directed towards the causative organism rather than empirical treatment can be instituted following the procedure. Although the ultimate prognosis in these patients is bleak even with specific antibiotic therapy, an occasional patient might have a good outcome with prompt and appropriate therapy.


Keywords: brain abscess; computed tomography guided stereotaxy; renal transplant recipients PMID:10727562

  18. [Ischemic colitis after renal transplantation:etiology and pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Alperovich, G; Idiarte, L; Besasso, O; Avagnina, A

    2003-01-01

    Ischemic colitis is a well-recognized complication occurring in renal transplant recipients. It has often been associated with cytomegalovirus (CMV) vasculitis. However, the diagnosis of this pathology in the absence of CMV suggests that other etiological factors might be involved. Drugs inducing mesenteric vasoconstriction, such as non-steroidal anti-inflamatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cyclosporine could be related to this entity.

  19. Phomopsis bougainvilleicola Prepatellar Bursitis in a Renal Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Wickes, Brian L.; Sutton, Deanna A.; Castlebury, Lisa A.; Levitz, Stuart M.; Finberg, Robert W.; Thompson, Elizabeth H.; Daly, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    Prepatellar bursitis is typically a monomicrobial bacterial infection. A fungal cause is rarely identified. We describe a 61-year-old man who had received a renal transplant 21 months prior to presentation whose synovial fluid and surgical specimens grew Phomopsis bougainvilleicola, a pycnidial coelomycete. PMID:23196359

  20. Cecal volvulus following laparoscopic nephrectomy and renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Eng, Mary; Ravindra, Kadiyala

    2009-01-01

    Cecal volvulus is a rare cause of bowel obstruction that carries a high mortality. Recent surgery is known to be a risk factor for the development of cecal volvulus. We present a case of cecal volvulus following laparoscopic nephrectomy and renal transplantation.

  1. Cladophialophora bantiana osteomyelitis in a renal transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Desmet, Stefanie; Smets, Liesbeth; Lagrou, Katrien; Derdelinckx, Inge; Neyt, Jeroen; Maertens, Johan; Sciot, Raf; Demaerel, Philip; Bammens, Bert

    2016-06-01

    Cladophialophora bantiana is a neurotropic dematiaceous fungus which rarely causes disseminated disease. We report a case of proven C. bantiana osteomyelitis in a renal transplant recipient, complicated with probable cerebral disease. Stable disease was reached after combined antifungal therapies, immune enhancement and amputation of the infected lower limb. PMID:27595060

  2. Risk factors for lung diseases after renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pencheva, Ventsislava P.; Petrova, Daniela S.; Genov, Diyan K.; Georgiev, Ognian B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung diseases are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality after renal transplantation. The aim of the study is to define the risk factors for infectious and noninfectious pulmonary complications in kidney transplant patients. Materials and Methods: We prospectively studied 267 patients after renal transplantation. The kidney recipients were followed-up for the development of pulmonary complications for a period of 7 years. Different noninvasive and invasive diagnostic tests were used in cases suspected of lung disease. Results: The risk factors associated with the development of pulmonary complications were diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR] = 4.60; P = 0.001), arterial hypertension (OR = 1.95; P = 0.015), living related donor (OR = 2.69; P = 0.004), therapy for acute graft rejection (OR = 2.06; P = 0.038), immunosuppressive regimens that includes mycophenolate (OR = 2.40; P = 0.011), azathioprine (OR = 2.25; P = 0.023), and tacrolimus (OR = 1.83; P = 0.041). The only factor associated with the lower risk of complications was a positive serology test for Cytomegalovirus of the recipient before transplantation (OR = 0.1412; P = 0.001). Conclusion: The risk factors can be used to identify patients at increased risk for posttransplant lung diseases. Monitoring of higher-risk patients allow timely diagnosis and early adequate treatment and can reduce the morbidity and mortality after renal transplantation. PMID:26958045

  3. [Quality of life following renal transplantation in childhood].

    PubMed

    Wingen, A M; Feldhoff, C

    1999-01-01

    The goal of renal transplantation is to achieve the best possible quality of life in patients with terminal renal failure. To evaluate some aspects of quality of life in patients with renal grafts during childhood of our center, data on medical, educational and professional rehabilitation were collected retrospectively. Between 1972 and 1997 135 renal transplantations had been performed in 123 patients below the age of 18 years. 12-year graft survival of patients transplanted before 1983 figured at 21% and rose to 62% during the following years, after introduction of cyclosporine A into the immunosuppressive regimen. The proportion of patients in the respective age group attending a secondary school (16%) was lower and of those attending elementary school (71%) or a school for disabled and handicapped children (11%) was higher than usual in the German population. But, 83% of all patients reached a school degree. After school 78% proceeded with a vocational training or university. 89% of patients completing professional training were employed at last observation as compared to only 60% of those who never finished a professional training. Renal replacement therapy starting already during the early phase of education is difficult to coordinate with normal schooling. Considering these health- and time-related obstacles, the degree of educational and professional rehabilitation of the patients is good. But, there is a need for special support accompanying educational and professional training. PMID:10209838

  4. Genes and beans: pharmacogenomics of renal transplant.

    PubMed

    Murray, Brian; Hawes, Emily; Lee, Ruth-Ann; Watson, Robert; Roederer, Mary W

    2013-05-01

    Advances in the management of patients after solid organ transplantation have led to dramatic decreases in rates of acute rejection, but long-term graft and patient survival have remained unchanged. Individualized therapy after transplant will ideally provide adequate immunosuppression while limiting the adverse effects of drug therapy that significantly impact graft survival. Therapeutic drug monitoring represents the best approximation of individualized drug therapy in transplant at this time; however, obtaining pharmacogenomic data in transplant patients has the potential to enhance our current practice. Polymorphisms of target genes that impact pharmacokinetics have been identified for most immunosuppressants, including tacrolimus, cyclosporine, mycophenolate, azathioprine and sirolimus. In the future, pre-emptive assessment of a patient's genetic profile may inform drug selection and provide information on specific doses that will improve efficacy and limit toxicity.

  5. Genes and beans: pharmacogenomics of renal transplant.

    PubMed

    Murray, Brian; Hawes, Emily; Lee, Ruth-Ann; Watson, Robert; Roederer, Mary W

    2013-05-01

    Advances in the management of patients after solid organ transplantation have led to dramatic decreases in rates of acute rejection, but long-term graft and patient survival have remained unchanged. Individualized therapy after transplant will ideally provide adequate immunosuppression while limiting the adverse effects of drug therapy that significantly impact graft survival. Therapeutic drug monitoring represents the best approximation of individualized drug therapy in transplant at this time; however, obtaining pharmacogenomic data in transplant patients has the potential to enhance our current practice. Polymorphisms of target genes that impact pharmacokinetics have been identified for most immunosuppressants, including tacrolimus, cyclosporine, mycophenolate, azathioprine and sirolimus. In the future, pre-emptive assessment of a patient's genetic profile may inform drug selection and provide information on specific doses that will improve efficacy and limit toxicity. PMID:23651025

  6. Physicians attitudes toward living non-related renal transplantation (LNRRT). The Living non-Related Renal Transplant Study Group.

    PubMed

    1993-06-01

    Renal transplantation is considered now the definitive treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Unfortunately, the worldwide shortage of kidneys remains the most important obstacle to transplantation. In developing countries, including those of the Middle East, the shortage is even more dramatic. Despite great efforts to establish and maintain successful transplant centers, the number of kidneys that have been transplanted in the last few years has actually declined. The lack of a dependable kidney source played well into the hands of unscrupulous entrepreneurs who started brokerage of organs for profit. In this practice, patients with ESRD travel to India and other countries to purchase kidneys from living genetically non-related poor donors. Patient care was therefore relegated to the laws of the marketplace and both patients and donors were exploited to maximize profit. Additionally, reported results of this type of transplantation were inferior to those of other types of transplantation. Not unexpectedly, these issues have created intense controversy among transplant physicians and the general public in which moral, ethical and medical issues were debated. To investigate these issues, we conducted a large multicenter study in Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and Egypt. In the first phase of this study, we surveyed 50 institutions regarding their attitude toward LNRRT, of which 22 responded. The results of our survey clearly show that patients with ESRD take the initiative in seeking LNRRT despite physician discouragement and significant financial burden.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. HLA-Mismatched Renal Transplantation without Maintenance Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Tatsuo; Cosimi, A. Benedict; Spitzer, Thomas R.; Tolkoff-Rubin, Nina; Suthanthiran, Manikkam; Saidman, Susan L.; Shaffer, Juanita; Preffer, Frederic I.; Ding, Ruchuang; Sharma, Vijay; Fishman, Jay A.; Dey, Bimalangshu; Ko, Dicken S.C.; Hertl, Martin; Goes, Nelson B.; Wong, Waichi; Williams, Winfred W.; Colvin, Robert B.; Sykes, Megan; Sachs, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Five patients with end-stage renal disease received combined bone marrow and kidney transplants from HLA single-haplotype mismatched living related donors, with the use of a nonmyeloablative preparative regimen. Transient chimerism and reversible capillary leak syndrome developed in all recipients. Irreversible humoral rejection occurred in one patient. In the other four recipients, it was possible to discontinue all immunosuppressive therapy 9 to 14 months after the transplantation, and renal function has remained stable for 2.0 to 5.3 years since transplantation. The T cells from these four recipients, tested in vitro, showed donor-specific unresponsiveness and in specimens from allograft biopsies, obtained after withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy, there were high levels of P3 (FOXP3) messenger RNA (mRNA) but not granzyme B mRNA. PMID:18216355

  8. Cadaver renal transplant outcome in recipients with autolymphocytotoxic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ettenger, R B; Jordan, S C; Fine, R N

    1983-05-01

    The major impact of autolymphocytotoxic antibodies (ALCA) on renal transplantation has been in the interpretation of the pretransplant crossmatch as a cause of false-positive results. Less attention has been paid to the direct affects of ALCA on renal allografts. We have examined the sera of 38 recipients of 41 cadaver renal allografts for the presence of ALCA. There were 9 patients with ALCA who received 10 allografts. In these allografts with ALCA, actuarial graft survival was significantly improved (P less than 0.05) over that of 31 transplants without ALCA. In recipients with ALCA, graft survival was 90% at six months and 60% at one and two years; in recipients without ALCA, graft survival was 48% at six months, 35% at one year and 24% at two years. ALCA may be exerting graft-enhancing properties by means of an autoregulatory effect upon the recipient's immunologic system.

  9. The first identical twin renal transplant.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Harold

    2015-03-01

    There is no doubt that it was the work of one man, Alexis Carrel, which laid the foundations of modern organ transplantation. Working first in his native city of Lyons, then in Chicago and finally at the Rockefeller Institute New York, he developed the techniques of successful anastomosis of blood vessels, using extremely fine silk sutures and tiny needles. As early as 1892, he successfully grafted a kidney into the neck of a dog. He was soon able to demonstrate that, although a dog's kidney transplanted into its own neck could survive, even when the opposite kidney was excised, transplant of a kidney to another animal would fail after a few days. Further experiments included transplantation of other organs, including ovary, thyroid, lower limb and heart. In 1914 he wrote to fellow Nobel Prize winning Swiss surgeon, Theodor Kocher about his experiments; "Concerning homoplastic transplantation (from one animal to another) of organs such as the kidney, I have never found positive results to continue after a few months, whereas ir autoplastic transplants the results were always positive. The biological side of the question has to be investigated very much more and we must find out by what means to prevent the reaction of the organism against a new organ" (my italics). This, in fact, was going to occupy the next half century of worldwide research! PMID:26016284

  10. The first identical twin renal transplant.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Harold

    2015-03-01

    There is no doubt that it was the work of one man, Alexis Carrel, which laid the foundations of modern organ transplantation. Working first in his native city of Lyons, then in Chicago and finally at the Rockefeller Institute New York, he developed the techniques of successful anastomosis of blood vessels, using extremely fine silk sutures and tiny needles. As early as 1892, he successfully grafted a kidney into the neck of a dog. He was soon able to demonstrate that, although a dog's kidney transplanted into its own neck could survive, even when the opposite kidney was excised, transplant of a kidney to another animal would fail after a few days. Further experiments included transplantation of other organs, including ovary, thyroid, lower limb and heart. In 1914 he wrote to fellow Nobel Prize winning Swiss surgeon, Theodor Kocher about his experiments; "Concerning homoplastic transplantation (from one animal to another) of organs such as the kidney, I have never found positive results to continue after a few months, whereas ir autoplastic transplants the results were always positive. The biological side of the question has to be investigated very much more and we must find out by what means to prevent the reaction of the organism against a new organ" (my italics). This, in fact, was going to occupy the next half century of worldwide research!

  11. Role of MICA antibodies in solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lei; Li, Zhengyu; Wu, Weidong; Luo, Guangheng; Xu, Chuan; Sun, Zhaolin; Mei, Hong

    2014-02-01

    As a potential transplant antigen, major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) antigen, has attracted increased attention because of its possible role in solid organ transplantation. There are two MICA forms, and MICA antibodies and soluble MICA (sMICA) have been found in the serum of transplant recipients. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for original reports of clinical studies involving the effect of MICA on outcomes of renal, heart, lung, and liver transplantation. In addition to the human leukocyte antigen antigens, which elicit a strong immune response, the polymorphic MICA antigens induce production of MICA antibodies and sMICA. A number of clinical studies have shown that MICA antibodies correlate with an increased incidence of rejection and a decreased allograft survival rate following renal or heart transplantation. Although it is clearly associated with chronic rejection of lung allografts, no such correlation was found for liver transplantation. Moreover, sMICA showed a negative association with acute rejection (AR) and may be a good predictor of heart transplant outcomes. These data suggest MICA expression patterns and regulatory function may be tissue specific and that different transplants have different organ-specific outcomes.

  12. BK polyoma virus infection and renal disease in non-renal solid organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kuppachi, Sarat; Kaur, Deepkamal; Holanda, Danniele G.; Thomas, Christie P.

    2016-01-01

    BK virus (BKV) is a non-enveloped DNA virus of the polyomaviridae family that causes an interstitial nephritis in immunosuppressed patients. BKV nephropathy is now a leading cause of chronic kidney disease and early allograft failure following kidney transplantation. It is also known to cause renal disease with a progressive decline in kidney function in non-renal solid organ transplant (NRSOT) recipients, although the disease may not be recognized nor its impact appreciated in this patient population. In this report, we review the existing literature to highlight our current understanding of its incidence in NRSOT populations, the approaches to diagnosis and the potential treatment options. PMID:26985385

  13. Inflammatory Cutaneous Diseases in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Savoia, Paola; Cavaliere, Giovanni; Zavattaro, Elisa; Veronese, Federica; Fava, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplant recipients frequently suffer from skin infections and malignancies, possibly due to the effects of long-term immunosuppressive therapy. While the relationships between immunosuppression and these pathological conditions have been widely investigated, little is known about the relative incidence and characteristics of inflammatory skin diseases in this type of patient. In this study, we analyze the incidence of a number of inflammatory cutaneous diseases in a cohort of patients who underwent kidney transplantation. Although our study shows a relatively low incidence of these pathologies in transplanted patients—in agreement with the general action of immunosuppressant therapies in reducing inflammation—we scored a different efficacy of the various immunosuppressive regimens on inflammatory and autoimmune skin diseases. This information can be key for designing immunosuppressive regimens and devising accurate follow-up protocols. PMID:27548160

  14. The new technique of using the epigastric arteries in renal transplantation with multiple renal arteries.

    PubMed

    Amirzargar, Mohammad Ali; Babolhavaeji, Hooshang; Hosseini, Shahriar Amir; Bahar, Habibmousavi; Gholyaf, Mahmood; Dadras, Farahnaz; Khoshjoo, Farhad; Yavangi, Mahnaz; Amirzargar, Nasibeh

    2013-03-01

    The most common anatomic variant seen in the donor kidneys for renal transplantation is multiple renal arteries (MRA), which can cause an increased risk of complications. We describe the long-term outcomes of 16 years of experience in 76 kidney transplantations with MRAs. In a new reconstruction technique, we remove arterial clamps after anastomosing the donor to the recipient's main renal vessels, which cause backflow from accessory arteries to prevent thrombosis. By this technique, we reduce the ischemic times as well as the operating times. Both in live or cadaver donor kidneys, lower polar arteries were anastomosed to the inferior epigastric artery and upper polar arteries were anastomosed to the superior epigastric arteries. Injection of Papaverine and ablation of sympathic nerves of these arteries dilate and prevent them from post-operative spasm. Follow-up DTPA renal scan in all patients showed good perfusion and function of the transplanted kidney, except two cases of polar arterial thrombosis. Mean creatinine levels during at least two years of follow-up remained acceptable. Patient and graft survival were excellent. No cases of ATN, hypertension, rejection and urologic complications were found. In conclusion, this technique can be safely and successfully utilized for renal transplantation with kidneys having MRAs, and may be associated with a lower complication rate and better graft function compared with the existing techniques.

  15. Preemptive Renal Transplantation-The Best Treatment Option for Terminal Chronic Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Arze Aimaretti, L; Arze, S

    2016-03-01

    Renal transplantation is the best therapeutic option for end-stage chronic renal disease. Assuming that it is more advisable if performed early, we aimed to show the clinical, social, and economic advantages in 70% of our patients who were dialyzed only for a short period. For this purpose, we retrospectively collected data over 28 years in 142 kidney transplants performed in patients with <6 weeks on dialysis. 66% of our patients were 30-60 years old; 98% of the patients had living donors. At transplantation, 64% of our patients had no public support; however, 64% of them returned to work and got health insurance 2 months later. Full rehabilitation was achieved in all cases, including integration to the family, return to full-time work, school and university, sports, and reproduction. Immunosuppression consisted of 3 drugs, including steroids, cyclosporine, and azathioprine or mycophenolate. The cost in the 1st year, including patient and donor evaluation, surgery, immunosuppression, and follow-up, was $13,300 USD versus $22,320 for hemodialysis. We conclude that preemptive renal transplantation with <6 weeks on dialysis is the best therapeutic option for end-stage renal failure, especially in developing countries such as Bolivia, where until last year, full public support for renal replacement therapy was unavailable. PMID:27110013

  16. Improved renal ischemia tolerance in females influences kidney transplantation outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Aufhauser, David D.; Wang, Zhonglin; Murken, Douglas R.; Bhatti, Tricia R.; Wang, Yanfeng; Ge, Guanghui; Redfield, Robert R.; Abt, Peter L.; Wang, Liqing; Reese, Peter P.; Hancock, Wayne W.; Levine, Matthew H.

    2016-01-01

    Experimentally, females show an improved ability to recover from ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) compared with males; however, this sex-dependent response is less established in humans. Here, we developed a series of murine renal ischemia and transplant models to investigate sex-specific effects on recovery after IRI. We found that IRI tolerance is profoundly increased in female mice compared with that observed in male mice and discovered an intermediate phenotype after neutering of either sex. Transplantation of adult kidneys from either sex into a recipient of the opposite sex followed by ischemia at a remote time resulted in ischemia recovery that reflected the sex of the recipient, not the donor, revealing that the host sex determines recovery. Likewise, renal IRI was exacerbated in female estrogen receptor α–KO mice, while female mice receiving supplemental estrogen before ischemia were protected. We examined data from the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) to determine whether there is an association between sex and delayed graft function (DGF) in patients who received deceased donor renal transplants. A multivariable logistic regression analysis determined that there was a greater association with DGF in male recipients than in female recipients. Together, our results demonstrate that sex affects renal IRI tolerance in mice and humans and indicate that estrogen administration has potential as a therapeutic intervention to clinically improve ischemia tolerance. PMID:27088798

  17. Occurrence of chronic renal failure in liver transplantation: monitoring of pre- and posttransplantation renal function.

    PubMed

    Umbro, I; Tinti, F; Piselli, P; Fiacco, F; Giannelli, V; Di Natale, V; Zavatto, A; Merli, M; Rossi, M; Ginanni Corradini, S; Poli, L; Berloco, P B; Mitterhofer, A P

    2012-09-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the occurrence of middle and long-term chronic renal failure (CRF) after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) in relation to acute renal failure (ARF). We prospectively monitored 75 patients, studying renal function on the basis of serum creatinine and glomerular filtration rate as estimated using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula before as well as 1,6, and 12 months after OLT. The prevalence of ARF was 56% classified by the Acute Kidney injury Network criteria (52% stage 1, 29% stage 2, and 19% stage 3). The occurrences of CRF were 18.6% (11/59), 11.5% (6/52), and 14% (6/43) at 1, 6, and 12 months after OLT, respectively. The occurrence of CRF before OLT was 14.7%. We did not find any association between ARF and post-OLT CRF. The most relevant result of our study was the association between CRF at 6 and 12 months after transplantation with pre-OLT CRF on univariate and multivariate analysis. We suggest that evaluation of pre-OLT renal function should always be considered in the follow-up of liver transplant patients. Pre-OLT renal dysfunction must be recognized to be a risk factor for post-OLT CRF, representing important criterion to define specific therapeutic interventions to reduce patient morbidity and mortality.

  18. [Serum beta 2 microglobulin (beta 2M) following renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Silva, A; Nishida, S K; Silva, M S; Ramos, O L; Azjen, H; Pereira, A B

    1994-01-01

    Although there was an important improvement in graft and patient survival the last 10 years, graft rejection continues to be a major barrier to the success of renal transplantation. Identification of a laboratory test that could help to diagnose graft rejection would facilitate the management of renal transplanted patients. PURPOSE--To evaluate the utility of monitoring serum beta 2M in recently transplanted patients. METHODS--We daily determined serum beta 2M levels in 20 receptors of renal grafts (10 from living related and 10 from cadaveric donors) and compared them to their clinical and laboratory evolution. RESULTS--Eight patients who presented immediate good renal function following grafting and did not have rejection had a mean serum beta 2M of 3.7 mg/L on the 4th day post transplant. The sensitivity of the test for the diagnosis of acute rejection was 87.5%, but the specificity was only 46%. Patients who presented acute tubular necrosis (ATN) without rejection had a progressive decrease in their serum levels of beta 2M, while their serum creatinine changed as they were dialyzed. In contrast, patients with ATN and concomitance of acute rejection or CSA nephrotoxicity presented elevated beta 2M and creatinine serum levels. CONCLUSION--Daily monitoring of serum beta 2M does not improve the ability to diagnose acute rejection in patients with good renal function. However, serum beta 2M levels seemed to be useful in diagnosing acute rejection or CSA nephrotoxicity in patients with ATN. PMID:7787867

  19. Maintenance pharmacological immunosuppressive strategies in renal transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Vella, J. P.; Sayegh, M. H.

    1997-01-01

    Current maintenance immunosuppressive regimens for transplantation are based on three classes of drugs: corticosteroids, immunophilin-binding agents (eg, cyclosporin and tacrolimus), and antimetabolites (eg, azathioprine and mycophenolate). Drugs from the various classes inhibit the immune system at different points and are thus synergistic when used in combination. PMID:9338020

  20. Urinary tract infection in renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Giessing, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Urinary tract infection (UTI), especially recurrent UTI, is a common problem, occurring in >75% of kidney transplant (KTX) recipients. UTI degrades the health-related quality of life and can impair graft function, potentially reducing graft and patient survival. As urologists are often involved in treating UTI after KTX, previous reports were searched to elucidate underlying causes, risk factors and treatment options, as well as recommendations for prophylaxis of UTI after KTX. Methods Pubmed/Medline was searched and international guidelines and recommendations for prevention and treatment of UTI after KTX were also assessed. Results Most studies on UTI after KTX have a small sample, and are descriptive and retrospective. Many transplant- and recipient-related risk factors have been identified. While asymptomatic bacteriuria is often treated, even though some studies advise against it, symptomatic UTI should be treated empirically after collecting urine for microbiological analysis, to avoid the development of transplant pyelonephritis with a high chance of urosepsis. The duration of treatment has not been determined in studies and recommendations refer to the treatment of complicated UTI in the non-transplant population. Prophylaxis has not been the focus of studies either. Conclusion UTI after KTX is still largely an under-represented field of study, despite many recipients developing UTI after KTX. Prospective studies on this topic are urgently needed. PMID:26558020

  1. The Cost and Utility of Renal Transplantation in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Bavanandan, Sunita; Yap, Yok-Chin; Ahmad, Ghazali; Wong, Hin-Seng; Azmi, Soraya; Goh, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Background Kidney transplantation is the optimal therapy for the majority of patients with end-stage renal disease. However, the cost and health outcomes of transplantation have not been assessed in a middle-income nation with a low volume of transplantation, such as Malaysia. Aim and Methods This study used microcosting methods to determine the cost and health outcomes of living and deceased donor kidney transplantation in adult and pediatric recipients. The perspective used was from the Ministry of Health Malaysia. Cost-effectiveness measures were cost per life year (LY) and cost per quality-adjusted LYs. The time horizon was the lifetime of the transplant recipient from transplant to death. Results Records of 206 KT recipients (118 adults and 88 children) were obtained for microcosting. In adults, discounted cost per LY was US $8609(Malaysian Ringgit [RM]29 482) and US $13 209(RM45 234) for living-donor kidney transplant (LKT) and deceased donor kidney transplant (DKT), respectively, whereas in children, it was US $10 485(RM35 905) and US $14 985(RM51 317), respectively. Cost per quality-adjusted LY in adults was US $8826 (RM30 224) for LKT and US $13 592(RM46 546) for DKT. Total lifetime discounted costs of adult transplants were US $119 702 (RM409 921) for LKT, US $147 152 (RM503 922) for DKT. Total costs for pediatric transplants were US $154 841(RM530 252) and US $159 313(RM545 566) for the 2 categories respectively. Conclusions Both LKT and DKT are economically favorable for Malaysian adult and pediatric patients with ESRD and result in improvement in quality of life. PMID:27500211

  2. Primary Care of the Renal Transplant Patient

    PubMed Central

    Unruh, Mark L.; Nolin, Thomas D.; Hasley, Peggy B.

    2010-01-01

    There has been a remarkable rise in the number of kidney transplant recipients (KTR) in the US over the last decade. Increasing use of potent immunosuppressants, which are also potentially diabetogenic and atherogenic, can result in worsening of pre-existing medical conditions as well as development of post-transplant disease. This, coupled with improving long-term survival, is putting tremendous pressure on transplant centers that were not designed to deliver primary care to KTR. Thus, increasing numbers of KTR will present to their primary care physicians (PCP) post-transplant for routine medical care. Similar to native chronic kidney disease patients, KTRs are vulnerable to cardiovascular disease as well as a host of other problems including bone disease, infections and malignancies. Deaths related to complications of cardiovascular disease and malignancies account for 60–65% of long-term mortality among KTRs. Guidelines from the National Kidney Foundation and the European Best Practice Guidelines Expert Group on the management of hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking, diabetes and bone disease should be incorporated into the long-term care plan of the KTR to improve outcomes. A number of transplant centers do not supply PCPs with protocols and guidelines, making the task of the PCP more difficult. Despite this, PCPs are expected to continue to provide general preventive medicine, vaccinations and management of chronic medical problems. In this narrative review, we examine the common medical problems seen in KTR from the PCP’s perspective. Medical management issues related to immunosuppressive medications are also briefly discussed. PMID:20422302

  3. Masked hypertension and hidden uncontrolled hypertension after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Paripovic, Dusan; Kostic, Mirjana; Spasojevic, Brankica; Kruscic, Divna; Peco-Antic, Amira

    2010-09-01

    Arterial hypertension is a risk factor affecting graft function in pediatric kidney transplants. Recent pediatric studies reported a high prevalence of hypertension, especially nocturnal hypertension in this population. Data regarding the prevalence of masked hypertension in pediatric patients with kidney transplants are still scarce. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of masked and hidden uncontrolled hypertension after renal transplantation. A total of 41 patients (25 males) with stable functioning renal graft were included in the study. Their median age was 14.5 years with the median interval since transplantation of 2.5 years (range 0.3 to 20.6). Spacelabs 90207 was used to measure ambulatory blood pressure (BP) during a 24-h period. Ambulatory hypertension was defined as mean systolic and/or diastolic BP index at day-time or nighttime >or=1. Masked hypertension was defined as normal office BP but daytime ambulatory hypertension in patients without antihypertensive medications. Hidden uncontrolled hypertension was defined as daytime ambulatory hypertension undetected by office BP measurements in treated patients. Antihypertensive medications were prescribed to 58%. Prevalence of nocturnal hypertension was 68%. On the basis of combination of office and ABPM masked hypertension and hidden uncontrolled hypertension was detected in 24% and 21% of the study population, respectively. Regular use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in transplanted patients enables detection of masked and hidden uncontrolled hypertension. PMID:20467790

  4. [BK virus infection in a pediatric renal transplant recipient].

    PubMed

    Bonaventura, R; Vázquez, A; Exeni, A; Rivero, K; Freire, M C

    2005-01-01

    BK Human Polyomavirus causes an asymptomatic primary infection in children, then establishing latency mainly in the urinary tratt. Viral reactivation can lead to renal pathology in individuals with impaired cellular immune response. This is particularly important in pediatric transplant recipients, who can suffer a primary infection when immunosupressed. We followed up the case of a 5 years old patient who received a renal transplant in October 2003, and presented damaged graft 45 days after the intervention. The patient suffered 3 episodes of renal function failure between October 2003 and June 2004. Blood, urine, renal biopsy and lymphocele liquid samples were analyzed. A differential diagnosis between acute rejection and infectious causes was established by testing for BK, CMV and ADV viruses, and the cytological study of renal tissue. Laboratory findings together with clinical signs suggest the patient was infected by BK virus. As a final consideration, the great importance of differentiating between acute rejection and BK infection is emphasized, since immunosuppressant management is opposite in each case.

  5. Type 4 renal tubular acidosis in a kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Manjunath

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of a 66-year-old diabetic patient who presented with muscle weakness 2 weeks after kidney transplantation. Her immunosuppressive regimen included tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroids. She was found to have hyperkalemia and normal anion gap metabolic acidosis. Tacrolimus levels were in therapeutic range. All other drugs such as beta blockers and trimethoprim - sulfamethoxazole were stopped. She did not respond to routine antikalemic measures. Further evaluation revealed type 4 renal tubular acidosis. Serum potassium levels returned to normal after starting sodium bicarbonate and fludrocortisone therapy. Though hyperkalemia is common in kidney transplant recipients, determining exact cause can guide specific treatment. PMID:27105603

  6. Epstein-Barr virus-positive multiple myeloma following an ABO incompatible second renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kirushnan, B; Subbarao, B; Prabhu, P

    2016-01-01

    ABO incompatible kidney transplant recipients receive higher dose of immunosuppression. Previous data indicate that the incidence of malignancy is not higher in these patients. Compared to the general population, renal transplant recipients are at 4.4-fold higher risk of developing myeloma. We describe a case of posttransplant multiple myeloma in an ABO incompatible renal transplant recipient of a second graft. PMID:27512301

  7. Epstein-Barr virus-positive multiple myeloma following an ABO incompatible second renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kirushnan, B.; Subbarao, B.; Prabhu, P.

    2016-01-01

    ABO incompatible kidney transplant recipients receive higher dose of immunosuppression. Previous data indicate that the incidence of malignancy is not higher in these patients. Compared to the general population, renal transplant recipients are at 4.4-fold higher risk of developing myeloma. We describe a case of posttransplant multiple myeloma in an ABO incompatible renal transplant recipient of a second graft. PMID:27512301

  8. Deceased donor renal transplantation and the disruptive effect of commercial transplants: the experience of Oman.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, N; Al-Busaidy, Q; Al-Marhuby, H; Al-Lawati, J; Daar, A S

    2014-01-01

    The Oman Renal Transplantation Program was established in 1988 as a joint venture between Sultan Qaboos University and the Ministry of Health. It began with both living related donor (LRD) and deceased donor (DD) transplants. Over the next nine years, while the LRD programme progressed relatively well, there were only thirteen DD transplants. Two of the DD kidneys were obtained from overseas via an active collaboration with the Euro-transplant organisation, and one DD kidney was obtained from Saudi Arabia within the Gulf Cooperative Council exchange programme. The rest of the DD kidneys were obtained in Oman. The Omani DD programme, although it was a pioneering effort in the Gulf region at the time, was not entirely sustainable. In this paper we focus on the challenges we encountered. Among the major challenges was the absence of resources to establish a dedicated DD programme and particularly the failure to develop a cadre of dedicated transplant coordinators.

  9. Disrupted Renal Mitochondrial Homeostasis after Liver Transplantation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qinlong; Krishnasamy, Yasodha; Rehman, Hasibur; Lemasters, John J.; Schnellmann, Rick G.; Zhong, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Background Suppressed mitochondrial biogenesis (MB) contributes to acute kidney injury (AKI) after many insults. AKI occurs frequently after liver transplantation (LT) and increases mortality. This study investigated whether disrupted mitochondrial homeostasis plays a role in AKI after LT. Methods Livers were explanted from Lewis rats and implanted after 18 h cold storage. Kidney and blood were collected 18 h after LT. Results In the kidney, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) proteins ATP synthase-β and NADH dehydrogenase-3 decreased 44% and 81%, respectively, with marked reduction in associated mRNAs. Renal PGC-1α, the major regulator of MB, decreased 57% with lower mRNA and increased acetylation, indicating inhibited synthesis and suppressed activation. Mitochondrial transcription factor-A, which controls mtDNA replication and transcription, protein and mRNA decreased 66% and 68%, respectively, which was associated with 64% decreases in mtDNA. Mitochondrial fission proteins Drp-1 and Fis-1 and mitochondrial fusion protein mitofusin-1 all decreased markedly. In contrast, PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 and microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 increased markedly after LT, indicating enhanced mitophagy. Concurrently, 18- and 13-fold increases in neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and cleaved caspase-3 occurred in renal tissue. Both serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen increased >2 fold. Mild to moderate histological changes were observed in the kidney, including loss of brush border, vacuolization of tubular cells in the cortex, cast formation and necrosis in some proximal tubular cells. Finally, myeloperoxidase and ED-1 also increased, indicating inflammation. Conclusion Suppression of MB, inhibition of mitochondrial fission/fusion and enhancement of mitophagy occur in the kidneys of recipients of liver grafts after long cold storage, which may contribute to the occurrence of AKI and increased mortality after LT. PMID:26480480

  10. Chronic renal disease in renal transplant patients: management of cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fresnedo, G; Gómez-Alamillo, C; Ruiz, J C; de Francisco, A L M; Arias, M

    2009-06-01

    Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage renal disease. Despite improvements in short-term patient and graft outcomes, there has been no major improvement in long-term outcomes. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and obesity, and the impact of their control among 526 stable renal transplant recipients according to the guidelines in the general population. Mean blood pressure was 133 +/- 16/81 +/- 9 mm Hg. The proportion of patients on antihypertensive therapy was 75%, and on ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers, 26%. The mean cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and triglycerides were 195 +/- 41, 115 +/- 32, 51 +/- 17, and 137 +/- 75 mg/dL, respectively. The proportion of patients on statin treatment was 49.7%, and those with body mass indices between 25 and 30, 30 and 35, and >35 kg/m(2) were 35%, 15%, and 4%. We observed a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and obesity among renal transplant patients. Suboptimal control was frequent and control of some of these complications was far below targets established for nontransplant patients despite progressive intensification of therapy with functional graft decline. The findings of this study may have an impact on the management of renal transplant recipients.

  11. Pityriasis versicolor on penile shaft in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Han-Won; Cho, Jae-We; Lee, Kyu-Suk

    2012-08-01

    Pityriasis versicolor is a superficial infection of the stratum corneum, which is caused by the Malassezia species. Tge Malassezia species consist of 12 subspecies, including M. furfur, M. pachydermatis, M. symphodialis and M. globasa. The Malassezia species are classified as a normal flora, particularly in the sebum rich areas of the skin, and they convert from saprophytic yeast to parasitic mycelial morpholgic form to cause clinical disease. But majorities of their distributions are in the upper back, the neck, the thighs, and the forearm, and not in the penis. It is well known that the renal transplant patients, who take immunosuppressive agents, have impairment in the protective cell mediated immunity. Thus, they are more susceptible to infectious diseases, such as a fungal infection. Therefore, clinical manifestations show higher incidence of disease, but they mostly occur in an expected distribution. We here report a case of pityriasis versicolor in a renal transplant recipient on penile shaft, which is an unusual area.

  12. A Longitudinal Study of Inflammation, CKD-Mineral Bone Disorder, and Carotid Atherosclerosis after Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sonmez, Alper; Saglam, Mutlu; Cayci, Tuncer; Kilic, Selim; Unal, Hilmi Umut; Karaman, Murat; Cetinkaya, Hakki; Eyileten, Tayfun; Gok, Mahmut; Oguz, Yusuf; Vural, Abdulgaffar; Mallamaci, Francesca; Zoccali, Carmine

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives The role of reversibility of nontraditional risk factors, like inflammation and CKD-mineral bone disorder, in the reduction of cardiovascular risk after renal transplantation is still scarcely defined. Design, setting, participants, and measurements The longitudinal relationship between C-reactive protein, CKD-mineral bone disorder biomarkers, and intima media thickness was investigated in a series of 178 patients (age=32±10 years) with stage 5 CKD maintained on chronic dialysis who underwent echo-color Doppler studies of the carotid arteries before and after renal transplantation. Smokers and patients with diabetes were excluded from the study. In all patients, immunosuppression was performed by a standard regimen on the basis of calcineurin inhibitors. Healthy controls were specifically selected to match the age and sex distribution of the patients. Biochemical and intima media thickness assessments were repeated 6 months after transplantation. Results Before transplantation, intima media thickness in patients with stage 5 CKD on dialysis (average=0.9±0.2 mm) was higher (P<0.001) than in well matched healthy controls (0.6±0.1 mm) and reduced substantially (−22%; 95% confidence interval, −24% to −20%) after transplantation (P=0.001). GFR (multivariable-adjusted β=0.23; P<0.001), C-reactive protein (β=0.15; P<0.001), and fibroblast growth factor 23 (β=0.28; P<0.001) were the strongest independent correlates of intima media thickness before transplantation. Similarly, longitudinal changes in the same biomarkers were the sole independent correlates of simultaneous changes in intima media thickness (C-reactive protein: β=0.25; fibroblast growth factor 23: β=0.26; P<0.001 for both) after renal transplantation. The evolution of intima media thickness after transplantation was largely independent of classic risk factors, including BP, LDL cholesterol, and insulin resistance, as measured by homeostatic model assessment. Conclusions

  13. First documented case of successful kidney transplantation from a donor with acute renal failure treated with dialysis.

    PubMed

    Bacak-Kocman, Iva; Peric, Mladen; Kastelan, Zeljko; Kes, Petar; Mesar, Ines; Basic-Jukic, Nikolina

    2013-10-01

    There is a widening gap between the needs and possibilities of kidney transplantation. In order to solve the problem of organ shortage, the selection criteria for kidney donors have been less stringent over the last years. Favorable outcome of renal transplantation from deceased donors with acute renal failure requiring dialysis may have an important role in expanding the pool of donors. We present the case of two renal transplantations from a polytraumatized 20-years old donor with acute renal failure requiring dialysis. One recipient established good diuresis from the first post-transplant day and did not require hemodialysis. The second recipient had delayed graft function and was treated with 8 hemodialysis sessions. The patient was discharged with good diuresis and normal serum creatinine. After two years of follow-up, both recipients have normal graft function. According to our experience, kidneys from deceased young donors with acute renal failure requiring dialysis may be transplanted, in order to decrease the number of patients on transplantation waiting lists.

  14. Native kidney post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in a non-renal transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Araya, Carlos E; Mehta, Mansi B; González-Peralta, Regino P; Hunger, Stephen P; Dharnidharka, Vikas R

    2009-06-01

    PTLD is an important post-transplant complication. Although PTLD affects kidney allografts after renal transplantation, it has not been reported in native kidneys of other solid organ recipients. Herein, we report a child who underwent an orthotropic liver transplant for cryptogenic cholestatic hepatitis and developed fever, generalized lymphadenopathy, chronic EBV viremia, and lymphatic PTLD. Subsequently, she also developed gross hematuria and nephrotic range proteinuria. Kidney histology revealed EBV-positive mononuclear infiltrates within the renal parenchyma consistent with PTLD. Electron microscopy examination demonstrated subepithelial electron-dense deposits consistent with a membranous glomerulopathy pattern. The PTLD was successfully treated with reduced immunosuppression and cyclic cyclophosphamide, rituximab, and prednisone, but the renal disease progressed to end-stage renal failure within two yr. Repeat kidney histology showed chronic nephropathy and membranous glomerulopathy without PTLD infiltrates or detectable EBV staining, although chronic viremia persisted. To our knowledge, this is the first such child to be reported and highlights the importance of remaining vigilant for renal PTLD even in non-kidney organ recipients.

  15. BK and JC polyomavirus infections in Tunisian renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Boukoum, Hanen; Nahdi, Imen; Sahtout, Wissal; Skiri, Habib; Aloui, Sabra; Achour, Abdelatif; Segondy, Michel; Aouni, Mahjoub

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the rate of BK (BKPyV) and JC (JCPyV) polyomavirus infections and their influence on allograft function in Tunisian renal transplant recipients. A total of 72 renal transplant recipients were studied. BKPyV and JCPyV were detected and quantified by real-time PCR in urine and plasma. Demographic and laboratory characteristics were collected for each patient. Polyomavirus DNAuria was detected in 54 (75%) of renal transplant recipients: 26 (36%) had BKPyV DNAuria, 20 (28%) had JCPyV DNAuria, and 8 (11%) had a dual BKPyV/JCPyV DNAuria. BKPyV DNAemia was detected in four (5.5%) patients, whereas no patient had JCPyV viremia. More than 70% of BKPyV and JCPyV infections started within the first 3 months post-transplant. The risk for positive DNAemia was observed in patients with DNAuria level >10(7) copies/ml. BK Polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (BKPyVAN) was observed in two patients. This study highlights the high frequency of BKPyV and JCPyV viruria during the first year post-transplant with the highest incidence observed in the third month. We identified several risk factors that were associated with BKV DNAuria including age, sex of patients, and the use of tacrolimus instead of cyclosporine A at month 3. The use of cyclosporine A instead of tacrolimus was identified as risk factor for JCV viruria in month 3. No statistical difference in the allograft function was found between BKPyV and/or JCPyV infected and uninfected patients.

  16. Human microbiota characterization in the course of renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fricke, W F; Maddox, C; Song, Y; Bromberg, J S

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that the human microbiota, the collection of microorganisms growing on and in individuals, have numerous bidirectional interactions with the host, influencing immunity, resistance to infection, inflammation and metabolism. Little has been done to study the potential associations between microbiota composition and transplant outcome. Here, we investigated the longitudinal changes in the blood, urinary, oral and rectal microbiota of renal allograft recipients before and at 1 and 6 months after transplantation. The results showed major changes in microbiota composition as a result of the transplant episode and associated medications, and these changes persisted over time. The high interindividual variation as well as differences in response to transplantation suggested that it is unlikely that the same specific microbiota members can serve as universal diagnostic markers. Rather, longitudinal changes in each individual's microbiota have the potential to be indicative of health or disease. Use of sensitive nucleic acid-based testing showed that urine, irrespective of disease states, more often harbors a diverse microbiota than appreciated by conventional culture techniques. These results lay the groundwork to construct more comprehensive future investigations to identify microbiota characteristics that can serve as diagnostic markers for transplant health and to guide intervention strategies to improve transplant outcome.

  17. Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Recurrence after Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bouatou, Yassine; Bacchi, Véronique Frémeaux; Villard, Jean; Moll, Solange; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Hadaya, Karine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Risk for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) recurrence after renal transplantation is low with an isolated membrane cofactor protein mutation (MCP). We report the case of a 32-year-old woman with a MCP who underwent kidney transplantation with a good evolution at 12 months. At 15 and 35 months, 2 episodes of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), after a miscarriage and a preeclampsia, were misinterpreted as triggered by tacrolimus. After each episode however serum creatinine returned to baseline. Five years after transplantation, she had a self-limited rhinosinusitis followed 3 weeks later by an oliguric renal failure. Her complement profile was normal. Graft biopsy showed C3 glomerulonephritis with no “humps” on electron microscopy. No significant renal function improvement followed methylprednisolone pulsing. A second biopsy showed severe acute TMA lesions with C3 glomerular deposits. Despite weekly eculizumab for 1 month, dialysis was resumed. A new workup identified the “at-risk” complement factor H haplotype. Thus, aHUS recurrence should be ruled out in aHUS patients considered at low recurrence risk when a TMA is found in graft biopsy. Prompt eculizumab therapy should be considered to avoid graft loss as aHUS recurrence can first present as a C3 glomerulonephritis. PMID:27500215

  18. Thirty-seven years of renal transplantation in Oregon.

    PubMed

    Barry, J M; Lemmers, M J; Conlin, M J; Norman, D J; Bennett, W M; Meyer, M M; DeMattos, A; Wetzsteon, P; Johnson-Tomanka, M; Seely, M

    1996-01-01

    What we accomplish today as a matter of routine was only imagined by a few 4 decades ago. The journey from that first successful kidney transplant in the 1950s to the multidisciplinary, multiorgan transplant program of today has been a fascinating one. Although we attribute our current results to careful recipient selection and preparation, improvements in organ procurement and preservation, refinement of surgical techniques, improvement in histocompatibility techniques and organ sharing, improvements in immunosuppression and infection control, and careful monitoring of recipients, we and our patients have benefited from significant contributions from our colleagues in government and the law. The 4 that come to mind are the provision of near-universal insurance coverage for end stage renal disease patients in 1972 under the Medicare program, the passage of brain death laws in the mid 1970s, the passage of the National Transplant Act in 1984, and the passage of the Oregon required request law in 1985. PMID:9286571

  19. Thirty-seven years of renal transplantation in Oregon.

    PubMed

    Barry, J M; Lemmers, M J; Conlin, M J; Norman, D J; Bennett, W M; Meyer, M M; DeMattos, A; Wetzsteon, P; Johnson-Tomanka, M; Seely, M

    1996-01-01

    What we accomplish today as a matter of routine was only imagined by a few 4 decades ago. The journey from that first successful kidney transplant in the 1950s to the multidisciplinary, multiorgan transplant program of today has been a fascinating one. Although we attribute our current results to careful recipient selection and preparation, improvements in organ procurement and preservation, refinement of surgical techniques, improvement in histocompatibility techniques and organ sharing, improvements in immunosuppression and infection control, and careful monitoring of recipients, we and our patients have benefited from significant contributions from our colleagues in government and the law. The 4 that come to mind are the provision of near-universal insurance coverage for end stage renal disease patients in 1972 under the Medicare program, the passage of brain death laws in the mid 1970s, the passage of the National Transplant Act in 1984, and the passage of the Oregon required request law in 1985.

  20. [Cryptosporidium parvum Gastroenteritis in a Patient with Renal Transplantation].

    PubMed

    Çetinkaya, Ülfet; Dursun, İsmail; Kuk, Salih; Şahin, İzzet; Yazar, Süleyman

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a case who starting abundant watery diarrhea on the 14th day of renal transplantation is presented. Stool sample was analyzed for Cryptosporidium spp. by carbol fuchsin staining method, copro-ELISA and nested polimeraze chain reaction (PCR). From sample found positive by Carbol-fuchsin staining method and Copro-ELISA, DNA sequence analysis was performed, gel-purified from amplicon obtained by nested PCR. As a result of DNA sequence analysis was determined to be Cryptosporidium parvum. Although C. parvum is a rare causative agent of gastroenteritis it can be cause serious clinical diarrhea solid organ transplantation patient. As a result, also C.parvum must be considered as a causative agent of diarrhea occurring after organ transplantation. PMID:26470932

  1. Immune Profile of Pediatric Renal Transplant Recipients following Alemtuzumab Induction

    PubMed Central

    De Serres, Sacha A.; Mfarrej, Bechara G.; Magee, Ciara N.; Benitez, Fanny; Ashoor, Isa; Sayegh, Mohamed H.; Harmon, William E.

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of developing circulating anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies and the kinetics of T cell depletion and recovery among pediatric renal transplant recipients who receive alemtuzumab induction therapy are unknown. In a collaborative endeavor to minimize maintenance immunosuppression in pediatric renal transplant recipients, we enrolled 35 participants from four centers and treated them with alemtuzumab induction therapy and a steroid-free, calcineurin-inhibitor–withdrawal maintenance regimen. At 3 months after transplant, there was greater depletion of CD4+ than CD8+ T cells within the total, naive, memory, and effector memory subsets, although depletion of the central memory subset was similar for CD4+ and CD8+ cells. Although CD8+ T cells recovered faster than CD4+ subsets overall, they failed to return to pretransplant levels by 24 months after transplant. There was no evidence for greater recovery of either CD4+ or CD8+ memory cells than naïve cells. Alemtuzumab relatively spared CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells, resulting in a rise in their numbers relative to total CD4+ cells and a ratio that remained at least at pretransplant levels throughout the study period. Seven participants (20%) developed anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies without adversely affecting allograft function or histology on 2-year biopsies. Long-term follow-up is underway to assess the potential benefits of this regimen in children. PMID:22052056

  2. Proteomics and Metabolomics in Renal Transplantation-Quo Vadis?

    PubMed Central

    Bohra, Rahul; Klepacki, Jacek; Klawitter, Jelena; Klawitter, Jost; Thurman, Joshua; Christians, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    The improvement of long-term transplant organ and patient survival remains a critical challenge following kidney transplantation. Proteomics and biochemical profiling (metabolomics) may allow for the detection of early changes in cell signal transduction regulation and biochemistry with high sensitivity and specificity. Hence, these analytical strategies hold the promise to detect and monitor disease processes and drug effects before histopathological and pathophysiological changes occur. In addition they will identify enriched populations and enable individualize drug therapy. However, proteomics and metabolomics have not yet lived up to such high expectations. Renal transplant patients are highly complex, making it difficult to establish cause-effect relationships between surrogate markers and disease processes. Appropriate study design, adequate sample handling, storage and processing, quality and reproducibility of bioanalytical multi-analyte assays, data analysis and interpretation, mechanistic verification and clinical qualification (=establishment of sensitivity and specificity in adequately powered prospective clinical trials) are important factors for the success of molecular marker discovery and development in renal transplantation. However, a newly developed and appropriately qualified molecular marker can only be successful if it is realistic that it can be implemented in a clinical setting. The development of combinatorial markers with supporting software tools is an attractive goal. PMID:23350848

  3. Hemoglobin variability after renal transplantation is associated with mortality

    PubMed Central

    Kainz, Alexander; Wilflingseder, Julia; Függer, Reinhold; Kramar, Reinhard; Oberbauer, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Summary Anemia is a common problem after renal transplantation. Therefore, the patients are treated with erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESAs). The varying response to treatment contributes to hemoglobin variability, which might be associated with mortality. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of first kidney allograft recipients between 1990 and 2008 represented in the Austrian Transplant Registry. We included 1441 patients of whom 683 received ESAs at any time after transplantation. Cox regression with cubic splines and linear estimates and the purposeful selection algorithm of covariables were used. The measure of variability was the moving standard deviation computed at three monthly intervals for the entire graft life. The hazard ratio (HR) of mortality and graft loss in the spline models increased with hemoglobin variability. The linear HR for mortality was 2.35 (95% confidence interval 1.75–3.17, P < 0.001) and functional graft loss 2.45 (1.76–3.40, P < 0.001). In an adjusted Cox model (ESA use, hemoglobin, age, diabetes, days on dialysis, eGFR, biopsy confirmed acute rejection and year of transplantation), hemoglobin variability was associated with mortality (HR: 2.11; 1.51–2.94; P < 0.001). No association with functional graft loss could be detected (HR: 1.34; 0.93-1.93; P = 0.121). These findings suggest that hemoglobin variability is associated with mortality of renal allograft recipients. PMID:22313094

  4. The Clinical Impact of Humoral Immunity in Pediatric Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Abanti; Ozawa, Mikki; Everly, Matthew J.; Ettenger, Robert; Dharnidharka, Vikas; Benfield, Mark; Mathias, Robert; Portale, Anthony; McDonald, Ruth; Harmon, William; Kershaw, David; Vehaskari, V. Matti; Kamil, Elaine; Baluarte, H. Jorge; Warady, Bradley; Li, Li; Sigdel, Tara K.; Hsieh, Szu-chuan; Dai, Hong; Naesens, Maarten; Waskerwitz, Janie; Salvatierra, Oscar; Terasaki, Paul I.

    2013-01-01

    The development of anti-donor humoral responses after transplantation associates with higher risks for acute rejection and 1-year graft survival in adults, but the influence of humoral immunity on transplant outcomes in children is not well understood. Here, we studied the evolution of humoral immunity in low-risk pediatric patients during the first 2 years after renal transplantation. Using data from 130 pediatric renal transplant patients randomized to steroid-free (SF) or steroid-based (SB) immunosuppression in the NIH-SNSO1 trial, we correlated the presence of serum anti-HLA antibodies to donor HLA antigens (donor-specific antibodies) and serum MHC class 1-related chain A (MICA) antibody with both clinical outcomes and histology identified on protocol biopsies at 0, 6, 12, and 24 months. We detected de novo antibodies after transplant in 24% (23% of SF group and 25% of SB group), most often after the first year. Overall, 22% developed anti-HLA antibodies, of which 6% were donor-specific antibodies, and 6% developed anti-MICA antibody. Presence of these antibodies de novo associated with significantly higher risks for acute rejection (P=0.02), chronic graft injury (P=0.02), and decline in graft function (P=0.02). In summary, antibodies to HLA and MICA antigens appear in approximately 25% of unsensitized pediatric patients, placing them at greater risk for acute and chronic rejection with accelerated loss of graft function. Avoiding steroids does not seem to modify this incidence. Whether serial assessments of these antibodies after transplant could guide individual tailoring of immunosuppression requires additional study. PMID:23449533

  5. The clinical impact of humoral immunity in pediatric renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Abanti; Ozawa, Mikki; Everly, Matthew J; Ettenger, Robert; Dharnidharka, Vikas; Benfield, Mark; Mathias, Robert; Portale, Anthony; McDonald, Ruth; Harmon, William; Kershaw, David; Vehaskari, V Matti; Kamil, Elaine; Baluarte, H Jorge; Warady, Bradley; Li, Li; Sigdel, Tara K; Hsieh, Szu-chuan; Dai, Hong; Naesens, Maarten; Waskerwitz, Janie; Salvatierra, Oscar; Terasaki, Paul I; Sarwal, Minnie M

    2013-03-01

    The development of anti-donor humoral responses after transplantation associates with higher risks for acute rejection and 1-year graft survival in adults, but the influence of humoral immunity on transplant outcomes in children is not well understood. Here, we studied the evolution of humoral immunity in low-risk pediatric patients during the first 2 years after renal transplantation. Using data from 130 pediatric renal transplant patients randomized to steroid-free (SF) or steroid-based (SB) immunosuppression in the NIH-SNSO1 trial, we correlated the presence of serum anti-HLA antibodies to donor HLA antigens (donor-specific antibodies) and serum MHC class 1-related chain A (MICA) antibody with both clinical outcomes and histology identified on protocol biopsies at 0, 6, 12, and 24 months. We detected de novo antibodies after transplant in 24% (23% of SF group and 25% of SB group), most often after the first year. Overall, 22% developed anti-HLA antibodies, of which 6% were donor-specific antibodies, and 6% developed anti-MICA antibody. Presence of these antibodies de novo associated with significantly higher risks for acute rejection (P=0.02), chronic graft injury (P=0.02), and decline in graft function (P=0.02). In summary, antibodies to HLA and MICA antigens appear in approximately 25% of unsensitized pediatric patients, placing them at greater risk for acute and chronic rejection with accelerated loss of graft function. Avoiding steroids does not seem to modify this incidence. Whether serial assessments of these antibodies after transplant could guide individual tailoring of immunosuppression requires additional study.

  6. CUBN as a novel locus for end-stage renal disease: insights from renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Reznichenko, Anna; Snieder, Harold; van den Born, Jacob; de Borst, Martin H; Damman, Jeffrey; van Dijk, Marcory C R F; van Goor, Harry; Hepkema, Bouke G; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Leuvenink, Henri G D; Niesing, Jan; Bakker, Stephan J L; Seelen, Marc; Navis, Gerjan

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex disorder. As genome-wide association studies identified cubilin gene CUBN as a locus for albuminuria, and urinary protein loss is a risk factor for progressive CKD, we tested the hypothesis that common genetic variants in CUBN are associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and proteinuria. First, a total of 1142 patients with ESRD, admitted for renal transplantation, and 1186 donors were genotyped for SNPs rs7918972 and rs1801239 (case-control study). The rs7918972 minor allele frequency (MAF) was higher in ESRD patients comparing to kidney donors, implicating an increased risk for ESRD (OR 1.39, p = 0.0004) in native kidneys. Second, after transplantation recipients were followed for 5.8 [3.8-9.2] years (longitudinal study) documenting ESRD in transplanted kidneys--graft failure (GF). During post-transplant follow-up 92 (9.6%) cases of death-censored GF occurred. Donor rs7918972 MAF, representing genotype of the transplanted kidney, was 16.3% in GF vs 10.7% in cases with functioning graft. Consistently, a multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that donor rs7918972 is a predictor of GF, although statistical significance was not reached (HR 1.53, p = 0.055). There was no association of recipient rs7918972 with GF. Rs1801239 was not associated with ESRD or GF. In line with an association with the outcome, donor rs7918972 was associated with elevated proteinuria levels cross-sectionally at 1 year after transplantation. Thus, we identified CUBN rs7918972 as a novel risk variant for renal function loss in two independent settings: ESRD in native kidneys and GF in transplanted kidneys. PMID:22574174

  7. Acute Renal Failure - A Serious Complication in Patients After Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Basta-Jovanovic, G; Bogdanovic, Lj; Radunovic, M; Prostran, M; Naumovic, R; Simic-Ogrizovic, S; Radojevic-Skodric, S

    2016-01-01

    Free radical-mediated injury releases proinflammatory cytokines and activates innate immunity. It has been suggested that the early innate response and the ischemic tissue damage play roles in the development of adaptive responses, which may lead to acute kidney rejection. Various durations of hypothermic kidney storage before transplantation add to ischemic tissue damage. The final stage of ischemic injury occurs during reperfusion that develops hours or days after the initial insult. Repair and regeneration processes occur together with cellular apoptosis, autophagy and necrosis and a favorable outcome is expected if regeneration prevails. Along the entire transplantation time course, there is a great demand for novel immune and nonimmune injury biomarkers. The use of these markers can be of great help in the monitoring of kidney injury in potential kidney donors, where acute kidney damage can be overlooked, in predicting acute transplant dysfunction during the early post-transplant periods, or in predicting chronic changes in long term followup. Numerous investigations have demonstrated that biomarkers that have the highest predictive value in acute kidney injury include NGAL, Cystatin C, KIM-1, IL-18, and L-FABP. Most investigations show that the ideal biomarker to fulfill all the needs in renal transplant has not been identified yet. Although, in many animal models, new biomarkers are emerging for predicting acute and chronic allograft damage, in human allograft analysis they are still not routinely accepted and renal biopsy still remains the gold standard. PMID:27498898

  8. Health information management for research and quality assurance: the Comprehensive Renal Transplant Research Information System.

    PubMed

    Famure, Olusegun; Phan, Nicholas Anh-Tuan; Kim, Sang Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The Kidney Transplant Program at the Toronto General Hospital uses numerous electronic health record platforms housing patient health information that is often not coded in a systematic manner to facilitate quality assurance and research. To address this, the comprehensive renal transplant research information system was conceived by a multidisciplinary healthcare team. Data analysis from comprehensive renal transplant research information system presented at programmatic retreats, scientific meetings, and peer-reviewed manuscripts contributes to quality improvement and knowledge in kidney transplantation.

  9. Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy: impact on an established renal transplant program.

    PubMed

    Shafizadeh, S; McEvoy, J R; Murray, C; Baillie, G M; Ashcraft, E; Sill, T; Rogers, J; Baliga, P; Rajagopolan, P R; Chavin, K

    2000-12-01

    The current disparity of viable organs and patients in need of a transplant has been an impetus for innovative measures. Live donor renal transplantation offers significant advantages compared with cadaveric donor transplantation: increased graft and patient survival, diminution in incidence of delayed graft function, acute tubular necrosis (ATN), and reduction in waiting time. Notwithstanding these gains live donors continue to be underutilized and account for only approximately one quarter of all renal transplants performed in the United States. It has been felt that inherent disincentives to live donation have slowed its growth. These include degree and duration of postoperative pain and convalescence, child care concerns, cosmetic concerns, and time until return to full activities and employment. In an attempt to curtail the disincentives to live donation, laparoscopic live donation (laparoscopic donor nephrectomy; LDN) was developed. The purpose of this study was to compare the results of our first 25 laparoscopic nephrectomies (performed over a 10-month period from September 1998 through July 1999) with the previous 25 standard open donor nephrectomies (ODNs) completed over the past 3 years. We conducted a retrospective review of all donor nephrectomies and recipient pairs performed over the past 3 years. End points included sex, operative time, length of stay, immediate and long-term renal function, and willingness to donate. There were no differences in demographics of the ODN versus the LDN group. The average length of stay was 2.48+/-0.72 days for the LDN versus 4.08+/-0.28 days for the ODN. ODN and LDN have comparable short- and long-term function with no delayed graft function and no complications. Growth of living donor transplant has increased from 16 per cent of all kidney transplants performed in 1995 to 23 per cent in 1999. We conclude that LDN is a viable alternative to the standard donor operation. LDN has had a positive impact on the donor pool

  10. Can pre-implantation biopsies predict renal allograft function in pediatric renal transplant recipients?

    PubMed Central

    Kari, Jameela A.; Ma, Alison L.; Dufek, Stephanie; Mohamed, Ismail; Mamode, Nizam; Sebire, Neil J.; Marks, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the utility of pre-implantation renal biopsy (PIB) to predict renal allograft outcomes. Methods: This is a retrospective review of all patients that underwent PIB from January 2003 to December 2011 at the Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London, United Kingdom. Thirty-two male patients (56%) aged 1.5-16 years (median: 10.2) at the time of transplantation were included in the study and followed-up for 33 (6-78) months. The results were compared with 33 controls. Results: The PIB showed normal histopathological findings in 13 patients (41%), mild chronic vascular changes in 8 (25%), focal tubular atrophy in one, moderate to severe chronic vascular change in 3, mild to moderate acute tubular damage in 6, and tissue was inadequate in one subject. Delayed graft function (DGF) was observed in 3 patients; 2 with vascular changes in PIB, and one with normal histopathological findings. Two subjects with PIB changes lost their grafts. The estimated glomerular filtration rate at 3-, and 6-months post-transplantation was lower in children with abnormal PIB changes compared with those with normal PIB. There was one case of DGF in the control group, and 4 children lost their grafts including the one with DGF. Conclusion: Pre-implantation renal biopsy can provide important baseline information of the graft with implications on subsequent medical treatment for pediatric renal transplant recipients. PMID:26593162

  11. Ethical and legal issues in renal transplantation in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ajayi, S O; Raji, Y; Salako, B L

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing number of patients being offered kidney transplantation by many centers in the developing world, it is not unexpected that there would be attendant ethical and legal issues even when the selection process for transplantation seems medically justified. Because of the inadequate infrastructure for hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, coupled with the challenges of logistics for maintenance dialysis, transplantation would seem to be the best option for patients with end-stage renal failure, even in developed economies where these can easily be tackled. The main issues here revolve around incentives for donors, organ trade and trafficking and the economics of eliminating the waiting list and the criminal activities of organ trans-plantation. In the developing world, with the current level of corruption and poverty, there is a need to redouble efforts to monitor transplant activities. Professional bodies should take the lead in this regard. Furthermore, there is a need for governments to engage in public consultation and community awareness concerning organ donation in living and deceased persons. PMID:26787578

  12. Ethical and legal issues in renal transplantation in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ajayi, S O; Raji, Y; Salako, B L

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing number of patients being offered kidney transplantation by many centers in the developing world, it is not unexpected that there would be attendant ethical and legal issues even when the selection process for transplantation seems medically justified. Because of the inadequate infrastructure for hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, coupled with the challenges of logistics for maintenance dialysis, transplantation would seem to be the best option for patients with end-stage renal failure, even in developed economies where these can easily be tackled. The main issues here revolve around incentives for donors, organ trade and trafficking and the economics of eliminating the waiting list and the criminal activities of organ trans-plantation. In the developing world, with the current level of corruption and poverty, there is a need to redouble efforts to monitor transplant activities. Professional bodies should take the lead in this regard. Furthermore, there is a need for governments to engage in public consultation and community awareness concerning organ donation in living and deceased persons.

  13. Laboratory use of hepcidin in renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Šimetić, Lucija; Zibar, Lada

    2016-01-01

    Hepcidin is a small peptide with a critical role in cellular iron homeostasis, as it regulates utilization of stored iron and antimicrobial defense in inflammation (bacterial and fungal). Since it was isolated in 2000, and especially in the last decade, numerous studies aimed to evaluate the clinical use of plasma and urine hepcidin as a marker of anemia, especially anemia of chronic disease and post-transplant anemia (PTA). Hepcidin regulation is delicately tuned by two inflammatory pathways activated by interleukin-6 (IL-6) and bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) and iron regulated pathway sensitive to circulating transferin-iron (TR-Fe) complex. BMP-mediated pathway and TR-Fe sensitive pathway seem to be connected by hemojuveline, a BMP co-factor that interacts with transferine receptor 2 (TRF2) in cases of high TR-Fe circulatory concentration. In addition to these regulatory mechanisms other regulators and signaling pathways are being extensively researched.
Hepcidin has been identified as an important contributor to morbidity and mortality in end stage renal disease (ESRD) but no such association has jet been found in case of PTA. However, there is an association between higher doses of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) and mortality in the posttransplant period and the assumption that hepcidin might play a role in ESA resistance in PTA. Thus the review’s main goal was to summarize papers published on the association of hepcidin with PTA, give up-to-date information on hepcidin regulation and on potential therapeutics that optimize hepcidin regulation. We also compared the performances of tests for hepcidin determination and reviewed research on immunosuppressants’ (IS) effect on hepcidin concentration. PMID:26981017

  14. Exogenous Lipocalin 2 Ameliorates Acute Rejection in a Mouse Model of Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, M. I.; Schwelberger, H. G.; Brendel, K. A.; Feurle, J.; Andrassy, J.; Kotsch, K.; Regele, H.; Pratschke, J.; Maier, H. T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2) is rapidly produced by damaged nephron epithelia and is one of the most promising new markers of renal injury, delayed graft function and acute allograft rejection (AR); however, the functional importance of Lcn2 in renal transplantation is largely unknown. To understand the role of Lcn2 in renal AR, kidneys from Balb/c mice were transplanted into C57Bl/6 mice and vice versa and analyzed for morphological and physiological outcomes of AR at posttransplantation days 3, 5, and 7. The allografts showed a steady increase in intensity of interstitial infiltration, tubulitis and periarterial aggregation of lymphocytes associated with a substantial elevation in serum levels of creatinine, urea and Lcn2. Perioperative administration of recombinant Lcn2:siderophore:Fe complex (rLcn2) to recipients resulted in functional and morphological amelioration of the allograft at day 7 almost as efficiently as daily immunosuppression with cyclosporine A (CsA). No significant differences were observed in various donor–recipient combinations (C57Bl/6 wild‐type and Lcn2−/−, Balb/c donors and recipients). Histochemical analyses of the allografts showed reduced cell death in recipients treated with rLcn2 or CsA. These results demonstrate that Lcn2 plays an important role in reducing the extent of kidney AR and indicate the therapeutic potential of Lcn2 in transplantation. PMID:26595644

  15. Urological complications after renal transplantation – a single centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Dembowski, Janusz; Kołodziej, Anna; Małkiewicz, Bartosz; Tupikowski, Krzysztof; Matuszewski, Michał; Chudoba, Paweł; Boratyńska, Maria; Klinger, Marian; Zdrojowy, Romuald

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Urological complications after renal transplantation occur in between 2.5% and 30% of all graft recipients. The aim of the study was to present 7 years of experience in urological treatment of patients with a transplanted kidney. We aimed to identify retrospectively late urological complications in renal transplant recipients at a single center and analyze the treatment modalities and their outcome. Material and methods Between January 2008 and December 2014, a total of 58 patients after KTX were treated in the Department of Urology because of post-transplant urological complications that occurred during follow-up at the Transplant Outpatient Department. Retrieved data were analysed in retrospectively. Results In the group of 38 patients with ureteral stenosis (Clavien grade III), 29 patients underwent endoscopy, 8 open surgical procedures and one both endoscopic and open operation. Ten patients were admitted with symptomatic lymphocoele (Clavien III), of which 9 were successfully treated with drainage and one with surgical marsupialization. Because of urolithiasis in the grafted kidney (Clavien grade III), 4 patients were treated with ureterorenoscopic lithotripsy (URSL) and one only with the extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) procedure. Five urethral strictures plasties and one graftectomy because of purulent pyelonephritis were also conducted. The average age in the group of recipients who experienced urologic complications was similar (46.1 vs. 47.8) to those without complications. There was no vesicoureteral reflux or ureteral necrosis requiring surgical intervention, no graft loss and death related to urological complication and treatment. Conclusions Most complications could be successfully treated with endourological procedures. The kidney function improved in the majority of patients. PMID:27730001

  16. A limited sampling strategy for tacrolimus in renal transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Binu S; Fleming, Denise H; Jeyaseelan, Visalakshi; Chandy, Sujith J; Annapandian, V M; Subbanna, P K; John, George T

    2008-01-01

    AIMS To develop and validate limited sampling strategy (LSS) equations to estimate area under the curve (AUC0–12) in renal transplant patients. METHODS Twenty-nine renal transplant patients (3–6 months post transplant) who were at steady state with respect to tacrolimus kinetics were included in this study. The blood samples starting with the predose (trough) and collected at fixed time points for 12 h were analysed by microparticle enzyme immunoassay. Linear regression analysis estimated the correlations of tacrolimus concentrations at different sampling time points with the total measured AUC0–12. By applying multiple stepwise linear regression analysis, LSS equations with acceptable correlation coefficients (R2), bias and precision were identified. The predictive performance of these models was validated by the jackknife technique. RESULTS Three models were identified, all with R2 ≥ 0.907. Two point models included one with trough (C0) and 1.5 h postdose (C1.5), another with trough and 4 h postdose. Increasing the number of sampling time points to more than two increased R2 marginally (0.951 to 0.990). After jackknife validation, the two sampling time point (trough and 1.5 h postdose) model accurately predicted AUC0–12. Regression coefficient R2 = 0.951, intraclass correlation = 0.976, bias [95% confidence interval (CI)] 0.53% (−2.63, 3.69) and precision (95% CI) 6.35% (4.36, 8.35). CONCLUSION The two-point LSS equation [AUC0–12 = 19.16 + (6.75.C0) + (3.33.C1.5)] can be used as a predictable and accurate measure of AUC0–12 in stable renal transplant patients prescribed prednisolone and mycophenolate. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THE SUBJECTTacrolimus trough concentration is being currently used for dose individualization.Limited sampling strategies (LSS) have been developed and validated for renal transplant patients.Earlier literature has suggested that measurement of tacrolimus AUC is more reliable than trough with respect to both rejection and

  17. Post Renal Transplant Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in a Case of Familial Juvenile Nephrophthisis

    PubMed Central

    BALGRADEAN, Mihaela; CINTEZA, Eliza; FERECHIDE, Dumitru

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Familial juvenile nephronophtisis, an autosomal recessive tubulointerstitial chronic nephritis, is characterized by progressive renal disease and end stage renal failure, which require kidney transplantation. Post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) incidence after kidney transplantation varies from 4–25%. Obesity, positive oral glucose tolerance test, metabolic syndromes, and post–transplantation multi-drug, high dose, long-term immunosuppressive therapy are the risk factors incriminated. We present the case of a 15-year-old overweight boy who was diagnosed with familial juvenile nephronophtisis five years before, afterwards progressive renal disease and end stage renal failure. This young patient developed PTDM three years after renal transplantation. His underweight brother, with the same medical history, did not develop PTDM. Transplantation was mandatory for a child with familial juvenile nephronophtisis. The case illustrates the risk factors for PTDM. PMID:24023594

  18. The knowledge, awareness, and acceptability of renal transplantation among patients with end-stage renal disease in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Takure, A O; Jinadu, Y O; Adebayo, S A; Shittu, O B; Salako, B L; Kadiri, S

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplantation is well established in the USA, Europe, India, and South Africa. However, it is still in its infancy in Nigeria. The objective of our study is to determine the knowledge, awareness, and acceptability of renal transplant among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the factors which are responsible for the low level of transplantation in Ibadan, Nigeria. A 15-item pilot-tested questionnaire was administered to willing patients with ESRD seen at the medical outpatient clinic of the University Teaching Hospital, from January to December 2011. There was 81% participation rate of the respondents. Exactly 90.1% had formal education and 44% earned <50,000 naira per month. Seventy-nine percent of respondents was aware of renal transplantation, 70.4% would recommend it to others, and 66.7% accepted renal transplantation; 77.8% would maintain a close relationship with their donors. About 61.7% considered it very expensive, while 33.3% did not know the cost for transplantation. Of the reason for the low level of kidney transplantation in Nigeria, 39.5% had no idea and in 27.2% of the respondents, the fear of death by potential donors may be responsible. Eleven percent of responded that recipients had no money for kidney transplantation and another 11% thought the potential donors would like to be paid for donating their kidneys. Most of the respondents with ESRD were knowledgeable, aware of, and accepted renal transplantation as the next step to treat chronic renal failure. However, majority of these patients could not afford the cost for renal transplantation. PMID:27424696

  19. Changes at the glomerulo-tubular junction in renal transplants.

    PubMed

    Lee, S J; Howie, A J

    1988-12-01

    We studied by microscopy 377 biopsies, nephrectomies, and necropsy kidneys from 123 human renal transplants. We discovered two common abnormalities of the renal corpuscle, both affecting the glomerulo-tubular junction. Adhesion of the tip of the glomerular tuft to the origin of the tubule, as reported in various non-transplant glomerulopathies, was seen in 197 specimens (52 per cent). This change was common in material showing acute or chronic vascular rejection and glomerulopathy, and was almost universal in transplants that had been in place for over 1 year. Another change at the glomerulo-tubular junction, not previously highlighted, consisted of an infiltrate of lymphocytes or neutrophil polymorphs into the epithelium at the tubular origin. This change was seen in 145 specimens (38 per cent) and was associated with cellular rejection and ascending infection. These changes are of importance because they show two responses of the kidney to injury that involve the glomerulo-tubular junction and thus suggest that this part of the kidney has some specific properties that have been largely neglected up to now.

  20. Induction treatment of previously undiagnosed ANCA-associated vasculitis in a renal transplant patient with Rituximab

    PubMed Central

    Graham-Brown, M. P. M.; Aljayyousi, R.; Baines, R. J.; Burton, J. O.; Brunskill, N. J.; Furness, P.; Topham, P.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 40-year-old female transplant patient with undiagnosed ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and renal allograft dysfunction who achieved disease remission with restoration of transplant function following induction therapy with rituximab. There are currently no trial data looking at the use of rituximab for induction of remission of renal transplant patients with AAV. Although recurrence of AAV following renal transplantation is rare, such patients have invariably had multiple previous exposures to induction and maintenance immunosuppressive regimens, often limiting treatment options post-transplantation. In this case, rituximab was well tolerated with no side effects, and was successful in salvaging transplant function. Optimal treatment regimens for relapsed AAV in the transplant population are not known, and clinical trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of rituximab at inducing and maintaining disease remission in relapsed AAV following transplantation. PMID:27699052

  1. Induction treatment of previously undiagnosed ANCA-associated vasculitis in a renal transplant patient with Rituximab

    PubMed Central

    Graham-Brown, M. P. M.; Aljayyousi, R.; Baines, R. J.; Burton, J. O.; Brunskill, N. J.; Furness, P.; Topham, P.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 40-year-old female transplant patient with undiagnosed ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and renal allograft dysfunction who achieved disease remission with restoration of transplant function following induction therapy with rituximab. There are currently no trial data looking at the use of rituximab for induction of remission of renal transplant patients with AAV. Although recurrence of AAV following renal transplantation is rare, such patients have invariably had multiple previous exposures to induction and maintenance immunosuppressive regimens, often limiting treatment options post-transplantation. In this case, rituximab was well tolerated with no side effects, and was successful in salvaging transplant function. Optimal treatment regimens for relapsed AAV in the transplant population are not known, and clinical trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of rituximab at inducing and maintaining disease remission in relapsed AAV following transplantation.

  2. Dengue in renal transplant patients: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Luiz S; Carvalho, Deise B M; Matuck, Tereza; Alvarenga, Maria F; Morgado, Luciano; Magalhães, Indalecio; Ianhez, Luiz E; Boulos, Marcos; David-Neto, Elias

    2007-09-27

    We reviewed the impact of dengue in 27 renal transplant recipients (9 females and 18 males) at a mean of 63 (6-287) months after transplantation. Their mean age was 37+/-14 years and all were first transplantations (21 live donors, 6 deceased donors). Twenty-six were dengue fever cases and one had dengue hemorrhagic fever. Symptoms were: fever (100%), muscular pain (90%), malaise (75%), and headache (68%). Eight (29%) patients were admitted to hospital with one death. All other cases had full recovery. Mean serum creatinine before dengue was 1.4+/-0.6 mg/dL, increased to a mean peak of 1.9+/-1.2 mg/dL (P<0.001), and returned to baseline after recovery (1.6+/-0.82 mg/dL, P=NS). After a mean follow-up of 39+/-18 months, four patients lost their grafts due to chronic allograft nephropathy and four died, due to infectious causes not related to dengue. The first episode of dengue in transplanted patients resembled a flu-like syndrome, as in the general population. It did not cause long-term damage to either the patient or the graft.

  3. Cyclosporin-erythromycin interaction in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, S K; Bakran, A; Johnson, R W; Rowland, M

    1989-01-01

    1. The interaction between cyclosporin (CyA) and erythromycin was studied in renal transplant patients following oral and intravenous administration of CyA. 2. Blood and plasma CyA concentrations and blood concentrations of metabolite 17 were measured by h.p.l.c. 3. Erythromycin produced almost a two-fold increase in bioavailability, from 36% to 60%; with a small (13%) decrease in clearance of CyA. 4. The metabolite 17 data further support the postulate that erythromycin increases the absorption of CyA rather than inhibits its metabolism, as generally believed. PMID:2655690

  4. Scintigraphic assessment of perivesical urinary extravasation following renal transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Bushnell, D.L.; Wilson, D.G.; Lieberman, L.M.

    1984-02-01

    Radionuclide scintigraphy is a safe and accurate means of detecting postoperative urologic complications in renal transplant recipients. Early identification of urinary leakage coupled with aggressive intervention significantly reduces the associated morbidity and mortality. Perivesical extravasate may be difficult to distinguish from adjacent or nearby bladder activity on scintiscan. Clarification of actual bladder contour and determination of its exact location within the pelvis may resolve such uncertainties. We describe imaging techniques that define the anatomic extent of the bladder and demonstrate our scintigraphic assessment of perivesical extravasation.

  5. Legionella tucsonensis sp. nov. isolated from a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, W L; Benson, R F; Schifman, R B; Pugh, E; Steigerwalt, A G; Mayberry, W R; Brenner, D J; Wilkinson, H W

    1989-01-01

    A Legionella-like organism (strain 1087-AZ-H) was isolated from a pleural-fluid specimen from a renal transplant patient undergoing immunosuppressive therapy. Growth characteristics and gas-liquid chromatography profiles of the isolate were consistent with those for Legionella spp. The isolate fluoresced blue-white under long-wave UV light. Strain 1087-AZ-H was serologically distinct in the slide agglutination test with absorbed antisera. DNA hybridization studies placed it in a new Legionella species, Legionella tucsonensis (ATCC 49180). PMID:2671032

  6. Confusion after starting citalopram in a renal transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Sran, Hersharan; Phanish, Mysore K

    2013-01-01

    The UK NICE (National Institute for Clinical Excellence) guidelines on management of depression in adults recommends use of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) as a first choice agent. Citalopram, an SSRI antidepressant, is a preferred antidepressant in those patients with concomitant chronic physical health problems. Hyponatraemia because of syndrome of inappropriate antiduretic hormone secrection has been reported with SSRI antidepressants but is usually mild and responds to fluid restriction and cessation of the drug. We report a case of severe hyponatraemia because of citalopram in a renal transplant patient who required treatment with hypertonic (3%) saline, with a good outcome avoiding any neurological complications. PMID:23843413

  7. Identification of donor melanoma in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Wilson, L J; Horvat, R T; Tilzer, L; Meis, A M; Montag, L; Huntrakoon, M

    1992-12-01

    A patient with chronic renal failure received a closely matched cadaveric kidney. Approximately 3 months after transplantation, the patient developed a metastatic malignant melanoma. A large retroperitoneal mass consisting of large pleomorphic polygonal neoplastic cells was found close to the donated kidney. This tumor was diagnosed as a malignant melanoma. DNA analysis of this tumor, the donated kidney, and the recipient indicated that the melanoma originated from the donor. Although this is not the first report of a donated melanoma, it is the first report of definitive DNA analysis of the origin of the malignant cells.

  8. Increasing renal mass improves survival in anephric rats following metanephros transplantation.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Damian; Dilworth, Mark R; Clancy, Marc; Bravery, Christopher A; Ashton, Nick

    2007-01-01

    Renal failure and end-stage renal disease are prevalent diseases associated with high levels of morbidity and mortality, the preferred treatment for which is kidney transplantation. However, the gulf between supply and demand for kidneys remains high and is growing every year. A potential alternative to the transplantation of mature adult kidneys is the transplantation of the developing renal primordium, the metanephros. It has been shown previously, in rodent models, that transplantation of a metanephros can provide renal function capable of prolonging survival in anephric animals. The aim of the present study was to determine whether increasing the mass of transplanted tissue can prolong survival further. Embryonic day 15 rat metanephroi were transplanted into the peritoneum of anaesthetized adult rat recipients. Twenty-one days later, the transplanted metanephroi were anastomosed to the recipient's urinary system, and 35 days following anastomosis the animal's native renal mass was removed. Survival times and composition of the excreted fluid were determined. Rats with single metanephros transplants survived 29 h longer than anephric controls (P < 0.001); animals with two metanephroi survived 44 h longer (P < 0.001). A dilute urine was formed, with low concentrations of sodium, potassium and urea; potassium and urea concentrations were elevated in terminal serum samples, but sodium concentration and osmolality were comparable to control values. These data show that survival time is proportional to the mass of functional renal tissue. While transplanted metanephroi cannot currently provide life-sustaining renal function, this approach may have therapeutic benefit in the future.

  9. A simple and accurate grading system for orthoiodohippurate renal scans in the assessment of post-transplant renal function

    SciTech Connect

    Zaki, S.K.; Bretan, P.N.; Go, R.T.; Rehm, P.K.; Streem, S.B.; Novick, A.C. )

    1990-06-01

    Orthoiodohippurate renal scanning has proved to be a reliable, noninvasive method for the evaluation and followup of renal allograft function. However, a standardized system for grading renal function with this test is not available. We propose a simple grading system to distinguish the different functional phases of hippurate scanning in renal transplant recipients. This grading system was studied in 138 patients who were evaluated 1 week after renal transplantation. There was a significant correlation between the isotope renographic functional grade and clinical correlates of allograft function such as the serum creatinine level (p = 0.0001), blood urea nitrogen level (p = 0.0001), urine output (p = 0.005) and need for hemodialysis (p = 0.007). We recommend this grading system as a simple and accurate method to interpret orthoiodohippurate renal scans in the evaluation and followup of renal allograft recipients.

  10. Ethical issues relating to renal transplantation from prediabetic living donor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In Mexico, diabetes mellitus is the main cause of end − stage kidney disease, and some patients may be transplant candidates. Organ supply is limited because of cultural issues. And, there is a lack of standardized clinical guidelines regarding organ donation. These issues highlight the tension surrounding the fact that living donors are being selected despite being prediabetic. This article presents, examines and discusses using the principles of non-maleficience, autonomy, justice and the constitutionally guaranteed right to health, the ethical considerations that arise from considering a prediabetic person as a potential kidney donor. Discussion Diabetes is an absolute contraindication for donating a kidney. However, the transplant protocols most frequently used in Mexico do not consider prediabetes as exclusion criteria. In prediabetic persons there are well known metabolic alterations that may compromise the long − term outcomes of the transplant if such donors are accepted. Even so, many of them are finally included because there are not enough donor candidates. Both, families and hospitals face the need to rapidly accept prediabetic donors before the clinical conditions of the recipient and the evolution of the disease exclude him/her as a transplant candidate; however, when using a kidney potentially damaged by prediabetes, neither the donor’s nor the recipient’s long term health is usually considered. Considering the ethical implication as well as the clinical and epidemiological evidence, we conclude that prediabetic persons are not suitable candidates for kidney donation. This recommendation should be taken into consideration by Mexican health institutions who should rewrite their transplant protocols. Summary We argue that the decision to use a kidney from a living donor known to be pre-diabetic or from those persons with family history of T2DM, obesity, hypertension, or renal failure, should be considered unethical in Mexico

  11. What is the impact of immunosuppressive treatment on the post-transplant renal osteopathy?

    PubMed

    Blaslov, Kristina; Katalinic, Lea; Kes, Petar; Spasovski, Goce; Smalcelj, Ruzica; Basic-Jukic, Nikolina

    2014-05-01

    Although glucocorticoid therapy is considered to be the main pathogenic factor, a consistent body of evidence suggests that other immunosuppressants might also play an important role in the development of the post-transplant renal osteopathy (PRO) through their pleiotropic pharmacological effects. Glucocorticoids seem to induce osteoclasts' activity suppressing the osteoblasts while data regarding other immunosuppressive drugs are still controversial. Mycophenolate mofetil and azathioprine appear to be neutral regarding the bone metabolism. However, the study analyzing any independent effect of antimetabolites on bone turnover has not been conducted yet. Calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) induce trabecular bone loss in rodent, with contradictory results in renal transplant recipients. Suppression of vitamin D receptor is probably the underlying mechanism of renal calcium wasting in renal transplant recipients receiving CNI. In spite of an increased 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D level, the kidney is not able to reserve calcium, suggesting a role of vitamin D resistance that may be related to bone loss. More efforts should be invested to determine the role of CNI in PRO. In particular, data regarding the role of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi), such as sirolimus and everolimus, in the PRO development are still controversial. Rapamycin markedly decreases bone longitudinal growth as well as callus formation in experimental models, but also lowers the rate of bone resorption markers and glomerular filtration in clinical studies. Everolimus potently inhibits primary mouse and human osteoclast activity as well as the osteoclast differentiation. It also prevents the ovariectomy-induced loss of cancellous bone by 60 %, an effect predominantly associated with a decreased osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, resulting in a partial preservation of the cancellous bone. At present, there is no clinical study analyzing the effect of everolimus on bone turnover in renal

  12. Five years renal transplantation data: Single-center experience from Iraq.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ala A; Al-Saedi, Ali J; Al-Mudhaffer, Ali J; Al-Taee, Kais H

    2016-03-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage renal disease. In Iraq, renal transplantation started in 1973 and has continued until now with live donor transplantation, since deceased donor transplant program is not approved as yet. Long-term transplant data are still scarce. The aim of our study is to present data on transplantation and medical follow-up at one year and, survival analysis at one, three and five years. A total of 250 renal transplantations were performed at the Nephrology and Renal Transplantation Center, Baghdad between January 2009 and January 2014. It is a living donor, blood group compatible donor program. All patients received triple immunosuppression (calcineurine inhibitor, mycophenolate mofetil or mycophenolic acid, and steroid). The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine the survival rate. There were 92 live related donors, 143 unrelated donors, and 15 spouse donors. The mean age was 34.07 ± 12.2 years. The one-year graft survival for related and unrelated donor transplants was 98.9% and 91.8%, respectively. Graft survival was lower (82.9%) in recipients with acute rejection episodes. The patient survival at one-year was 94%. The three-year graft and patient survival was 91% and 90%, respectively, and five-year survival for grafts and patients was 87.1% and 88%, respectively. The outcome of the renal transplantation in Iraq is improving. Long-term patient follow-up needs more meticulous attention. The development of renal transplant registry is critical for future planning. Moreover, renal transplantation practice in Iraq needs more social, religious, and governmental support.

  13. Shotgun Proteomics Identifies Proteins Specific for Acute Renal Transplant Rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Sigdel, Tara K.; Kaushal, Amit; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Qian, Weijun; Xiao, Wenzhong; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2010-01-04

    Acute rejection (AR) remains the primary risk factor for renal transplant outcome; development of non-invasive diagnostic biomarkers for AR is an unmet need. We used shotgun proteomics using LC-MS/MS and ELISA to analyze a set of 92 urine samples, from patients with AR, stable grafts (STA), proteinuria (NS), and healthy controls (HC). A total of 1446 urinary proteins were identified along with a number of NS specific, renal transplantation specific and AR specific proteins. Relative abundance of identified urinary proteins was measured by protein-level spectral counts adopting a weighted fold-change statistic, assigning increased weight for more frequently observed proteins. We have identified alterations in a number of specific urinary proteins in AR, primarily relating to MHC antigens, the complement cascade and extra-cellular matrix proteins. A subset of proteins (UMOD, SERPINF1 and CD44), have been further cross-validated by ELISA in an independent set of urine samples, for significant differences in the abundance of these urinary proteins in AR. This label-free, semi-quantitative approach for sampling the urinary proteome in normal and disease states provides a robust and sensitive method for detection of urinary proteins for serial, non-invasive clinical monitoring for graft rejection after

  14. Changing Role of Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kittleson, Michelle M

    2016-07-01

    Heart transplantation has become standard of care for end-stage heart failure. Challenges include the limited supply of donor organs and the increased complexity of heart transplant candidates who are at higher risk for poor outcomes. Recent advances may address these challenges, including proposed changes in heart transplant allocation policy, a better understanding of the definition and management of primary graft dysfunction, and advances in the management of sensitized heart transplant candidates. Developments in these areas may result in more equitable distribution and expansion of the donor pool and improved quality of life and survival for heart transplant recipients. PMID:27371517

  15. Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Renal Transplantation: Current Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    Schinstock, Carrie; Stegall, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Acute antibody mediated rejection (AMR) is recognized as a major cause of graft loss in renal transplant recipients. Early acute AMR in the first few days after transplantation occurs primarily in sensitized renal transplant recipients with donor-specific alloantibody at the time of transplant and is a relatively “pure” form of acute AMR. Late acute AMR occurs months to years after transplantation and is commonly a mixed cellular and humoral rejection. While there is no consensus regarding optimum treatment, we contend that rational therapeutic approaches are emerging and the acute episode can be managed in most instances. However, new therapies are needed to prevent ongoing chronic injury in these patients.

  16. Peliosis hepatis complicated by portal hypertension following renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chia-Ying; Chang, Liang-Che; Chen, Li-Wei; Lee, Tsung-Shih; Chien, Rong-Nan; Hsieh, Ming-Fang; Chiang, Kun-Chun

    2014-03-01

    Peliosis hepatis (PH) is a vascular lesion of the liver that mimics a hepatic tumor. PH is often associated with underlying conditions, such as chronic infection and tumor malignancies, or with the use of anabolic steroids, immunosuppressive drugs, and oral contraceptives. Most patients with PH are asymptomatic, but some present with abdominal distension and pain. In some cases, PH may induce intraperitoneal hemorrhage and portal hypertension. This study analyzed a 46-year-old male who received a transplanted kidney nine years prior and had undergone long-term immunosuppressive therapy following the renal transplantation. The patient experienced progressive abdominal distention and pain in the six months prior to this study. Initially, imaging studies revealed multiple liver tumor-like abnormalities, which were determined to be PH by pathological analysis. Because the hepatic lesions were progressively enlarged, the patient suffered from complications related to portal hypertension, such as intense ascites and esophageal varices bleeding. Although the patient was scheduled to undergo liver transplantation, he suffered hepatic failure and died prior to availability of a donor organ. PMID:24605041

  17. Renal artery stenosis in kidney transplants: assessment of the risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Etemadi, Jalal; Rahbar, Khosro; Haghighi, Ali Nobakht; Bagheri, Nazila; Falaknazi, Kianoosh; Ardalan, Mohammad Reza; Ghabili, Kamyar; Shoja, Mohammadali M

    2011-01-01

    Background: Transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) is an important cause of hypertension and renal allograft dysfunction occurring in kidney transplant recipients. However, conflicting predisposing risk factors for TRAS have been reported in the literature. Objective: The aim of the present study was to assess the potential correlation between possible risk factors and TRAS in a group of living donor renal transplant recipients 1 year after the renal transplantation. Methods: We evaluated the presence of renal artery stenosis in 16 recipients who presented with refractory hypertension and/or allograft dysfunction 1 year after renal transplantation. Screening for TRAS was made by magnetic resonance angiography and diagnosis was confirmed by conventional renal angiography. Age, gender, history of acute rejection, plasma lipid profile, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, serum uric acid, calcium phosphate (CaPO4) product, alkaline phosphatase, fasting blood sugar, hemoglobin, and albumin were compared between the TRAS and non-TRAS groups. Results: Of 16 kidney transplant recipients, TRAS was diagnosed in three patients (two men and one woman). High levels of calcium, phosphorous, CaPO4 product, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol were significantly correlated with the risk of TRAS 1 year after renal transplantation (P < 0.05). Serum level of uric acid tended to have a significant correlation (P = 0.051). Conclusion: Correlation between high CaPO4 product, LDL cholesterol, and perhaps uric acid and TRAS in living donor renal transplant recipients 1 year after renal transplantation might suggest the importance of early detection and tight control of these potential risk factors. PMID:21915167

  18. [Drug utilization in renal transplant patients: medication practices and representations].

    PubMed

    de Arruda, Guilherme Oliveira; Renovato, Rogério Dias

    2012-12-01

    Qualitative research approach, descriptive and exploratory with objective of to know the practices and representations of medication on the use of drugs by people transplanted kidney. 18 people participated in the Dourados (MS), through semistructured interview. The theoretical contributions of medication practices were Peter Conrad and representation of Stuart Hall. The definition of the categories of theoretical analysis was Michel Foucault. Respondents had a mean age of 53.5 years, 13 males and 5 females, with median time to transplant eight years. The medications predominantly used were immunosuppresssive. We developed three categories of analysis: the drug as part of everyday life, the central role of the drug and correlation with rejection, and medicine and the autonomy of the transplanted kidney. The drugs are part of everyday life and the representations of autonomy and quality enhance your daily use.

  19. The Tacrolimus Metabolism Rate Influences Renal Function after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Thölking, Gerold; Fortmann, Christian; Koch, Raphael; Gerth, Hans Ulrich; Pabst, Dirk; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Kabar, Iyad; Hüsing, Anna; Wolters, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    The effective calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) tacrolimus (Tac) is an integral part of the standard immunosuppressive regimen after renal transplantation (RTx). However, as a potent CNI it has nephrotoxic potential leading to impaired renal function in some cases. Therefore, it is of high clinical impact to identify factors which can predict who is endangered to develop CNI toxicity. We hypothesized that the Tac metabolism rate expressed as the blood concentration normalized by the dose (C/D ratio) is such a simple predictor. Therefore, we analyzed the impact of the C/D ratio on kidney function after RTx. Renal function was analyzed 1, 2, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after RTx in 248 patients with an immunosuppressive regimen including basiliximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. According to keep the approach simple, patients were split into three C/D groups: fast, intermediate and slow metabolizers. Notably, compared with slow metabolizers fast metabolizers of Tac showed significantly lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values at all the time points analyzed. Moreover, fast metabolizers underwent more indication renal biopsies (p = 0.006) which revealed a higher incidence of CNI nephrotoxicity (p = 0.015) and BK nephropathy (p = 0.024) in this group. We herein identified the C/D ratio as an easy calculable risk factor for the development of CNI nephrotoxicity and BK nephropathy after RTx. We propose that the simple C/D ratio should be taken into account early in patient’s risk management strategies. PMID:25340655

  20. The tacrolimus metabolism rate influences renal function after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Thölking, Gerold; Fortmann, Christian; Koch, Raphael; Gerth, Hans Ulrich; Pabst, Dirk; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Kabar, Iyad; Hüsing, Anna; Wolters, Heiner; Reuter, Stefan; Suwelack, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The effective calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) tacrolimus (Tac) is an integral part of the standard immunosuppressive regimen after renal transplantation (RTx). However, as a potent CNI it has nephrotoxic potential leading to impaired renal function in some cases. Therefore, it is of high clinical impact to identify factors which can predict who is endangered to develop CNI toxicity. We hypothesized that the Tac metabolism rate expressed as the blood concentration normalized by the dose (C/D ratio) is such a simple predictor. Therefore, we analyzed the impact of the C/D ratio on kidney function after RTx. Renal function was analyzed 1, 2, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after RTx in 248 patients with an immunosuppressive regimen including basiliximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. According to keep the approach simple, patients were split into three C/D groups: fast, intermediate and slow metabolizers. Notably, compared with slow metabolizers fast metabolizers of Tac showed significantly lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values at all the time points analyzed. Moreover, fast metabolizers underwent more indication renal biopsies (p = 0.006) which revealed a higher incidence of CNI nephrotoxicity (p = 0.015) and BK nephropathy (p = 0.024) in this group. We herein identified the C/D ratio as an easy calculable risk factor for the development of CNI nephrotoxicity and BK nephropathy after RTx. We propose that the simple C/D ratio should be taken into account early in patient's risk management strategies. PMID:25340655

  1. Plasma homocysteine concentration changes after renal transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Merouani, Aicha; Delvin, Edgar E; Genest, Jacques; Rozen, Rima; Lambert, Marie

    2002-07-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia, a risk factor for vascular disease, is found in children as well as in 80% of adult patients with end-stage renal disease. The aim of this study was to assess the changes in plasma homocysteine concentrations after renal transplantation (RT). Plasma homocysteine, vitamin B(12), and folate concentrations were prospectively measured in six patients at three points, before and post transplantation (6 months, 4 years), and compared with controls using standardized scores (Z score) for each of these parameters. Folic acid supplementation was introduced after the evaluation at 6 months. Patients had elevated median plasma homocysteine Z scores during dialysis (4.12). When assessed at 6 months and 4 years, median plasma homocysteine Z scores were, respectively, 2.35 and 0.29. Median folate Z scores were 1.89 during dialysis, -0.26 at 6 months, and 3.26 at 4 years post RT. Median vitamin B(12) Z score was 2.12 during dialysis, 0.58 at 6 months, and -0.07 at 4 years post RT. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) improved after RT, with median GFR of 84.5 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) at 6 months. This stabilized to a value of 70.5 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) at 4 years. When comparing values before and after RT at 6 months, changes were observed only for GFR ( P<0.03) and vitamin B(12) ( P<0.05). There were no changes in plasma homocysteine, folate, and serum albumin. At 4 years, a significant decrease in plasma homocysteine was observed ( P<0.05) with increased GFR ( P<0.03). No significant changes were observed in plasma albumin, folate, and vitamin B(12) concentrations. In conclusion, elevated plasma homocysteine in children during dialysis persists after RT despite a significant improvement in renal function. However, normalization was attained when patients were supplemented with folic acid. Further controlled studies are required to evaluate the determinants and treatment of elevated plasma homocysteine in pediatric transplant patients. PMID:12172766

  2. Global Scientific Vision With Local Vigilance: Renal Transplantation in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Ardalan, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Context: Renal Transplantation is the most effective treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease, which is fortunately available in the developing countries, even for poor people. Nonetheless, the way forward should be the implementation of advanced science of transplantation, allograft monitoring abilities, knowledge about the epidemiology of renal disease in any specific region, awareness about the influence of ethenic and genetic factors immunosuppressant bioavailability, and post-transplant complications all strongly affecting the patients and allograft survival. Evidence Acquisitions: In this process we searched mainly in PubMed, Web of Science and Google Scholar data bases for key words of renal allograft monitoring, post-transplant infections, renal/kidney transplantation and Iran. We followed the cross articles to follow our main idea to find a connection between modern advancement in renal allograft monitoring and our practice in developing countries. Another focus was on the special infectious and non-infection complication that do exist in specific region and need specific considerations. Results: Implementation of modern techniques of immune monitoring, allograft function, awareness about the specific infectious and non-infectious disease in each region improves the quality of renal transplantation. Conclusions: We need to combine the advance scientific vision with local vigilance to achieve the best outcome in renal allograft recipients PMID:25738120

  3. Quality of sleep and health-related quality of life in renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-Xia; Lin, Jun; Lin, Xiao-Hong; Wallace, Linda; Teng, Sha; Zhang, Shu-Ping; Hao, Yu-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Aims and objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the sleep quality and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients after renal transplantation and to explore the relationship between the quality of sleep and the HRQOL. Background: Sleep disorders are still an important clinical problem after renal transplantation. Previous studies mainly focused on patients’ sleep quality before kidney transplant. More studies are needed to document sleep quality after renal transplantation. Design: A cross-sectional design was used in this study. Methods: A convenience sample of renal transplant recipients was recruited at an outpatient transplant clinic of a general hospital in Beijing, China. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was used to measure quality of sleep. The Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form (MOS SF-36) was used to measure health-related quality of life. Results: The average PSQI score of the 204 renal transplant recipients was 5.81±3.52, significantly lower than the norm. Fifty (24.5%) recipients were classified as having poor sleep quality (global PSQI > 7). The mean scores of renal transplant recipients for SF-36 Mental Component Summary (MCS) and Physical Component Summary (PCS) were 47.57±6.71 and 48.26±9.66 respectively. Compared with residents in Sichuan province, recipients’ scores for SF-36 dimensions were statistically lower except the dimension of mental health. SF-36 scores of poor sleepers (PSQI > 7) were significantly lower than the good sleepers (PSQI ≤ 7) in both the MCS and PCS. Significant differences exist between the groups in physical function, bodily pain, vitality, and mental health dimensions. Conclusions: Sleep quality and HRQOL of patients after renal transplantation were lower than the norm. Poor sleep is associated with lower HRQOL. Relevance to clinical practice: Health professionals need to pay attention to sleep quality and HRQOL in renal transplant recipients and take appropriate measures to

  4. Renal graft biopsy assists diagnosis and treatment of renal allograft dysfunction after kidney transplantation: a report of 106 cases.

    PubMed

    Han, Yong; Guo, Hui; Cai, Ming; Xiao, Li; Wang, Qiang; Xu, Xiaoguang; Huang, Haiyan; Shi, Bingyi

    2015-01-01

    Acute antibody mediated rejection (AMR) is one of the most important complications after kidney transplantation. Renal graft biopsy is safe and reliable without adverse effects on the patients and transplanted kidneys, which was of great instructive significance in diagnosis and treatment of renal allograft dysfunction after renal transplantation. This paper reported a case series of 106 patients underwent renal allograft biopsies. All biopsies were evaluated according to the Banff 2007 schema. 52 examples were obtained within 1 month after transplantation, and there were another 20 examples in one to two months and other 34 examples in two to three months. Appropriate therapy was applied and clinical outcomes were observed. All patients received renal biopsies and anti-inflammatory and hemostasis treatment without complications. There were 2 cases of hyperacute rejection, and 15 cases of acute AMR. All Paraffin-embedded samples were stained by HE, periodic acid-Schiff (PAS), Masson, and immunohistochemistry (C4d, cd20, cd45RO, SV40). All samples were found C4d immunohistochemical staining positive. Patients with acute AMR were managed by steroid intravenous pulse therapy, Rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin intravenous pulse therapy, anti CD20 monoclonal antibody intravenous therapy and so on. Two cases of hyperacute rejection had renal failure, and received kidney excision; 12 cases in 15 cases of AMR recovered, another 2 cases did not recover with high-level creatine, and other 2 cases of renal allograft received excision.

  5. Symmetric Dimethylarginine as Predictor of Graft loss and All-Cause Mortality in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Pihlstrøm, Hege; Mjøen, Geir; Dahle, Dag Olav; Pilz, Stefan; Midtvedt, Karsten; März, Winfried; Abedini, Sadollah; Holme, Ingar; Fellström, Bengt; Jardine, Alan; Holdaas, Hallvard

    2014-01-01

    Background Elevated symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) has been shown to predict cardiovascular events and all cause mortality in diverse populations. The potential role of SDMA as a risk marker in renal transplant recipients (RTR) has not been investigated. Methods We analyzed SDMA in the placebo arm of the Assessment of Lescol in Renal Transplantation study, a randomized controlled trial of fluvastatin in RTR. Mean follow-up was 5.1 years. Patients were grouped into quartiles based on SDMA levels at study inclusion. Relationships between SDMA and traditional risk factors for graft function and all-cause mortality were analyzed in 925 RTR using univariate and multivariate survival analyses. Results In univariate analysis, SDMA was significantly associated with renal graft loss, all-cause death, and major cardiovascular events. After adjustment for established risk factors including estimated glomerular filtration rate, an elevated SDMA-level (4th quartile, >1.38 μmol/L) was associated with renal graft loss; hazard ratio (HR), 5.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.95–15.57; P=0.001, compared to the 1st quartile. Similarly, SDMA in the 4th quartile was independently associated with all-cause mortality (HR, 4.56; 95% CI, 2.15–9.71; P<0.001), and there was a strong borderline significant trend for an association with cardiovascular mortality (HR, 2.86; 95% CI, 0.99–8.21; P=0.051). Conclusion In stable RTR, an elevated SDMA level is independently associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality and renal graft loss. PMID:24999963

  6. [Early detection, prevention and management of renal failure in liver transplantation].

    PubMed

    Castells, Lluís; Baliellas, Carme; Bilbao, Itxarone; Cantarell, Carme; Cruzado, Josep Maria; Esforzado, Núria; García-Valdecasas, Juan Carlos; Lladó, Laura; Rimola, Antoni; Serón, Daniel; Oppenheimer, Federico

    2014-10-01

    Renal failure is a frequent complication in liver transplant recipients and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. A variety of risk factors for the development of renal failure in the pre- and post-transplantation periods have been described, as well as at the time of surgery. To reduce the negative impact of renal failure in this population, an active approach is required for the identification of those patients with risk factors, the implementation of preventive strategies, and the early detection of progressive deterioration of renal function. Based on published evidence and on clinical experience, this document presents a series of recommendations on monitoring RF in LT recipients, as well as on the prevention and management of acute and chronic renal failure after LT and referral of these patients to the nephrologist. In addition, this document also provides an update of the various immunosuppressive regimens tested in this population for the prevention and control of post-transplantation deterioration of renal function.

  7. BK Nephritis and Venous Thrombosis in Renal Transplant Recipient Detected by 111In Leukocyte Imaging.

    PubMed

    Pucar, Darko; Klein, Kandace; Corley, James; Williams, Hadyn T

    2015-07-01

    Three months after deceased donor kidney transplant, a patient who presented with proteinuric renal dysfunction and fever of undetermined origin was found to have BK viruria by quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. An ¹¹¹In leukocyte scan showed increased renal transplant uptake consistent with nephritis and linear uptake in the knee. Venous duplex ultrasound revealed acute occlusive thrombosis in the superficial right lesser saphenous vein in the area of increased radiolabeled leukocyte uptake. This ¹¹¹In leukocyte scan performed for fever of undetermined origin demonstrated findings of BK nephritis in a renal transplant patient and associated acute venous thrombosis related to leukocyte colonization.

  8. Prevalence of Hypercalcaemia in a Renal Transplant Population: A Single Centre Study

    PubMed Central

    Coates, P. Toby; Barbara, Jeffrey; Hakendorf, Paul; Karim, Nazmul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Postrenal transplant bone disease is a significant problem. Factors influencing postrenal transplant bone status include high dose acute and low dose long-term steroid use, persistent hypercalcaemia, and graft failure. In this study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of hypercalcaemia and to evaluate the risk factors for postrenal transplant hypercalcaemia in long-term renal transplant patients at our centre. Methods. This is a biochemical audit in which we studied renal transplant recipients from the Central Northern Adelaide Renal Transplant Services, South Australia. Inclusion criteria include kidney transplant patients with functioning graft since 1971 and at least 3 months after transplantation at the time of analysis. Hypercalcaemia was defined as persistently elevated serum corrected calcium greater than or equal to 2.56 mmol/L for three consecutive months. Results. 679 renal transplant recipients with a functioning graft were studied and 101 were hypercalcaemic between March 2011 and June 2011 (15%). 60% of the hypercalcaemic patients were male and 40% were female, with chronic glomerulonephritis (39%) being the commonest cause of their end stage kidney disease (ESKD). Prevalence was similar in those that had haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis pretransplantation. Hypercalcaemia in the renal transplant population was not secondary to suboptimal allograft function but secondary to pretransplantation hyperparathyroidism with persistent high parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels after transplantation. Conclusion. There is a high prevalence of hypercalcaemia (15%) in renal transplant recipients. The predominant cause for hypercalcaemia is pretransplantation hyperparathyroidism. The magnitude of pretransplantation hyperparathyroidism is the major determinant for long-term parathyroid function rather than graft function or pretransplantation duration on dialysis or mode of dialysis. PMID:27493801

  9. Simultaneous pancreas–kidney transplant for type I diabetes with renal failure: Anaesthetic considerations

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Lakshmi; Surendran, Sudhindran; Kesavan, Rajesh; Menon, Ramachandran Narayana

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic grafts have been successfully used in patients with diabetes and are combined with kidney transplantation in patients with renal failure. The propagation of awareness in organ donation in India has increased the donor pool of transplantable organs in the last few years making multi visceral transplants feasible in our country. We present the anaesthetic management of a 32-year-old male with diabetes mellitus and end-stage renal failure who was successfully managed with a combined pancreas and kidney transplantation. PMID:27013753

  10. Pheohyphomycosis in Renal Transplant Recipient Presenting as a Rare Case of Submandibular Salivary Gland Swelling.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rashmi D; Vanikar, Aruna V; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2016-08-01

    Renal transplant patients are at high risk of developing various infections causing morbidity and mortality. Invasive fungal infection has been recognized as a significant complication of organ transplantation. The major fungal infections in these patients are due to candida, aspergillus and mucormycosis. However, infection because of infrequently encountered fungi like hyaline molds, dematiaceous filamentous fungi and zygomycetes are increasing in immunocompromised hosts. Dematiaceous fungi are recognized pathogens in organ transplant recipients with skin and soft tissue infection. We report the case of a 37-year-old man, a renal transplant recipient who developed an asymptomatic dematiaceous fungal infection in submandibular salivary gland. He recovered after excision and antifungal therapy. PMID:27656452

  11. Live Donor Renal Anatomic Asymmetry and Post-Transplant Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Tanriover, Bekir; Fernandez, Sonalis; Campenot, Eric S.; Newhouse, Jeffrey H.; Oyfe, Irina; Mohan, Prince; Sandikci, Burhaneddin; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Wexler, Jennifer J.; Carroll, Maureen A.; Sharif, Sairah; Cohen, David J.; Ratner, Lloyd E.; Hardy, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Relationship between live donor renal anatomic asymmetry and post-transplant recipient function has not been studied extensively. Methods We analyzed 96 live-kidney donors, who had anatomical asymmetry (>10% renal length and/or volume difference calculated from CT angiograms) and their matching recipients. Split function differences (SFD) were quantified with 99mTc-DMSA renography. Implantation biopsies at time-zero were semi-quantitatively scored. A comprehensive model utilizing donor renal volume adjusted to recipient weight (Vol/Wgt), SFD, and biopsy score was used to predict recipient estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at one-year. Primary analysis consisted of a logistic regression model of outcome (odds of developing eGFR>60ml/min/1.73 m2 at one-year), a linear regression model of outcome (predicting recipient eGFR at one-year, using the CKD-EPI formula), and a Monte Carlo simulation based on the linear regression model (N=10,000 iterations). Results In the study cohort, the mean Vol/Wgt and eGFR at one-year were 2.04 ml/kg and 60.4 ml/min/1.73m2, respectively. Volume and split ratios between two donor kidneys were strongly correlated (r=0.79, p-value<0.001). The biopsy scores among SFD categories (<5%, 5–10%, >10%) were not different (p=0.190). On multivariate models, only Vol/Wgt was significantly associated with higher odds of having eGFR>60ml/min/1.73 m2 (OR=8.94, 95% CI 2.47–32.25, p=0.001) and had a strong discriminatory power in predicting the risk of eGFR<60ml/min/1.73m2 at one-year (ROC curve=0.78, 95% CI 0.68–0.89). Conclusion In the presence of donor renal anatomic asymmetry, Vol/Wgt appears to be a major determinant of recipient renal function at one-year post-transplantation. Renography can be replaced with CT volume calculation in estimating split renal function. PMID:25719258

  12. Urinary Tract Infection among Renal Transplant Recipients in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Gondos, Adnan S.; Al-Moyed, Khaled A.; Al-Robasi, Abdul Baki A.; Al-Shamahy, Hassan A.; Alyousefi, Naelah A.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common complication following kidney transplantation (KT), which could result in losing the graft. This study aims to identify the prevalence of bacterial UTI among KT recipients in Yemen and to determine the predisposing factors associated with post renal transplantation UTI. A cross sectional study included of 150 patients, who underwent KT was conducted between June 2010 and January 2011. A Morning mid-stream urine specimen was collected for culture and antibiotic susceptibility test from each recipient. Bacterial UTI was found in 50 patients (33.3%). The prevalence among females 40.3% was higher than males 29%. The UTI was higher in the age group between 41–50 years with a percentage of 28% and this result was statistically significant. Predisposing factors as diabetes mellitus, vesicoureteral reflux, neurogenic bladder and polycystic kidney showed significant association. High relative risks were found for polycystic kidney = 13.5 and neurogenic bladder = 13.5. The most prevalent bacteria to cause UTI was Escherichia coli represent 44%, followed by Staphylococcus saprophyticus 34%. Amikacin was the most effective antibiotic against gram-negative isolates while Ciprofloxacin was the most effective antibiotic against Staphylococcus saprophyticus. In conclusion, there is high prevalence of bacterial UTI among KT recipients in Yemen. Diabetes mellitus, vesicoureteral reflux, neurogenic bladder, polycystic kidney and calculi were the main predisposing factors. PMID:26657128

  13. Urinary Tract Infection among Renal Transplant Recipients in Yemen.

    PubMed

    Gondos, Adnan S; Al-Moyed, Khaled A; Al-Robasi, Abdul Baki A; Al-Shamahy, Hassan A; Alyousefi, Naelah A

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common complication following kidney transplantation (KT), which could result in losing the graft. This study aims to identify the prevalence of bacterial UTI among KT recipients in Yemen and to determine the predisposing factors associated with post renal transplantation UTI. A cross sectional study included of 150 patients, who underwent KT was conducted between June 2010 and January 2011. A Morning mid-stream urine specimen was collected for culture and antibiotic susceptibility test from each recipient. Bacterial UTI was found in 50 patients (33.3%). The prevalence among females 40.3% was higher than males 29%. The UTI was higher in the age group between 41-50 years with a percentage of 28% and this result was statistically significant. Predisposing factors as diabetes mellitus, vesicoureteral reflux, neurogenic bladder and polycystic kidney showed significant association. High relative risks were found for polycystic kidney = 13.5 and neurogenic bladder = 13.5. The most prevalent bacteria to cause UTI was Escherichia coli represent 44%, followed by Staphylococcus saprophyticus 34%. Amikacin was the most effective antibiotic against gram-negative isolates while Ciprofloxacin was the most effective antibiotic against Staphylococcus saprophyticus. In conclusion, there is high prevalence of bacterial UTI among KT recipients in Yemen. Diabetes mellitus, vesicoureteral reflux, neurogenic bladder, polycystic kidney and calculi were the main predisposing factors.

  14. Urinary Tract Infection among Renal Transplant Recipients in Yemen.

    PubMed

    Gondos, Adnan S; Al-Moyed, Khaled A; Al-Robasi, Abdul Baki A; Al-Shamahy, Hassan A; Alyousefi, Naelah A

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common complication following kidney transplantation (KT), which could result in losing the graft. This study aims to identify the prevalence of bacterial UTI among KT recipients in Yemen and to determine the predisposing factors associated with post renal transplantation UTI. A cross sectional study included of 150 patients, who underwent KT was conducted between June 2010 and January 2011. A Morning mid-stream urine specimen was collected for culture and antibiotic susceptibility test from each recipient. Bacterial UTI was found in 50 patients (33.3%). The prevalence among females 40.3% was higher than males 29%. The UTI was higher in the age group between 41-50 years with a percentage of 28% and this result was statistically significant. Predisposing factors as diabetes mellitus, vesicoureteral reflux, neurogenic bladder and polycystic kidney showed significant association. High relative risks were found for polycystic kidney = 13.5 and neurogenic bladder = 13.5. The most prevalent bacteria to cause UTI was Escherichia coli represent 44%, followed by Staphylococcus saprophyticus 34%. Amikacin was the most effective antibiotic against gram-negative isolates while Ciprofloxacin was the most effective antibiotic against Staphylococcus saprophyticus. In conclusion, there is high prevalence of bacterial UTI among KT recipients in Yemen. Diabetes mellitus, vesicoureteral reflux, neurogenic bladder, polycystic kidney and calculi were the main predisposing factors. PMID:26657128

  15. Hydrogen sulfide in renal physiology, disease and transplantation--the smell of renal protection.

    PubMed

    Koning, Anne M; Frenay, Anne-Roos S; Leuvenink, Henri G D; van Goor, Harry

    2015-04-30

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the third gasotransmitter, next to nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, is a key mediator in physiology and disease. It is involved in homeostatic functions, such as blood pressure control, electrolyte balance and apoptosis, and regulates pathological mechanisms, including oxidative stress and inflammation. Besides, it is believed to serve as an oxygen sensor under ischemic conditions. The kidney plays a decisive role in many of these processes, indicating an interplay between H2S and renal (patho)physiology. In this review we focus on the (protective) functions of H2S in the kidney. We first discuss endogenous renal H2S production and signaling and elaborate on its regulatory functions in renal physiology. Next, we present data on the role of aberrant H2S levels in the onset and progression of renal disease and suggest the use of H2S metabolites as biomarkers. Finally, we describe that exogenous H2S can protect the kidney against various forms of injury and conclude that modulation of renal H2S levels holds promise for renal patients in the future.

  16. Renal function and histology in children after small bowel transplantation.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Olivia; Noto, Cristian; De Serre, Natacha Patey-Mariaud; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Dechaux, Michèle; Goulet, Olivier; Niaudet, Patrick; Lacaille, Florence

    2013-02-01

    CKD is a frequent long-term complication after SBTx. CNIs are a well-known factor, but probably not the only cause. We assessed the incidence, risk factors, and severity of CKD in 27 children with SBTx (15 combined liver/SBTx) and prednisone/TAC-based maintenance immunosuppression. Median follow-up was seven yr (3-21). A renal biopsy was performed in 14 patients, 1-18 yr post-SBTx. A reduced GFR was observed in 17 children (63%) during the follow-up with none requiring dialysis. CNI toxicity was observed in 11/14 biopsies, as early as two yr post-transplant, and could occur with a normal mGFR. The dose of TAC was reduced by 50% in 13 patients with CKD and/or significant kidney histological lesions, and six were also given MMF. This led to a significant improvement in renal function: mGFR normalized in eight patients and improved or stabilized in five. No rejection occurred. At last follow-up, 37% had CKD stage 2 and 15% had CKD stage 3. In conclusion, CKD is frequent in children after SBTx and probably multifactorial. Less nephrotoxic immunosuppressive protocols may improve mGFR and should be further considered. The kidney histology helps in designing personalized immunosuppression strategies for patients.

  17. Self-reported sleep disturbances in renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Poor sleep quality (SQ) and daytime sleepiness (DS) are common in renal transplant (RTx) recipients; however, related data are rare. This study describes the prevalence and frequency of self-reported sleep disturbances in RTx recipients. Methods This cross-sectional study included 249 RTx recipients transplanted at three Swiss transplant centers. All had reported poor SQ and / or DS in a previous study. With the Survey of Sleep (SOS) self-report questionnaire, we screened for sleep and health habits, sleep history, main sleep problems and sleep-related disturbances. To determine a basis for preliminary sleep diagnoses according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD), 164 subjects were interviewed (48 in person, 116 via telephone and 85 refused). Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data and to determine the frequencies and prevalences of specific sleep disorders. Results The sample had a mean age of 59.1 ± 11.6 years (60.2% male); mean time since Tx was 11.1 ± 7.0 years. The most frequent sleep problem was difficulty staying asleep (49.4%), followed by problems falling asleep (32.1%). The most prevalent sleep disturbance was the need to urinate (62.9%), and 27% reported reduced daytime functionality. Interview data showed that most suffered from the first ICSD category: insomnias. Conclusion Though often disregarded in RTx recipients, sleep is an essential factor of wellbeing. Our findings show high prevalences and incidences of insomnias, with negative impacts on daytime functionality. This indicates a need for further research on the clinical consequences of sleep disturbances and the benefits of insomnia treatment in RTx recipients. PMID:24112372

  18. ABO-incompatible renal transplantation in developing world - crossing the immunological (and mental) barrier.

    PubMed

    Jha, P K; Bansal, S B; Sethi, S K; Jain, M; Sharma, R; Nandwani, A; Phanish, M K; Duggal, R; Tiwari, A K; Ghosh, P; Ahlawat, R; Kher, V

    2016-01-01

    ABO incompatibility has been considered as an important immunological barrier for renal transplantation. With the advent of effective preconditioning protocols, it is now possible to do renal transplants across ABO barrier. We hereby present a single center retrospective analysis of all consecutive ABOi renal transplants performed from November 2011 to August 2014. Preconditioning protocol consisted of rituximab, plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and maintenance immunosuppression consisted of tacrolimus, mycophenolate sodium, and prednisolone. The outcome of these ABOi transplants was compared with all other consecutive ABO-compatible (ABOc) renal transplants performed during same time. Twenty ABOi renal transplants were performed during the study period. Anti-blood group antibody titer varied from 1:2 to 1:512. Patient and graft survival was comparable between ABOi and ABOc groups. Biopsy proven acute rejection rate was 15% in ABOi group, which was similar to ABOc group (16.29%). There were no antibody-mediated rejections in ABOi group. The infection rate was also comparable. We conclude that the short-term outcome of ABOi and ABOc transplants is comparable. ABOi transplants should be promoted in developing countries to expand the donor pool.

  19. Mycophenolic acid formulations in adult renal transplantation – update on efficacy and tolerability

    PubMed Central

    Golshayan, Déla; Pascual, M; Vogt, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    The description more than 30 years ago of the role of de novo purine synthesis in T and B lymphocytes clonal proliferation opened the possibility for selective immunosuppression by targeting specific enzymatic pathways. Mycophenolic acid (MPA) blocks the key enzyme inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase and the production of guanosine nucleotides required for DNA synthesis. Two MPA formulations are currently used in clinical transplantation as part of the maintenance immunosuppressive regimen. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) was the first MPA agent to be approved for the prevention of acute rejection following renal transplantation, in combination with cyclosporine and steroids. Enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS) is an alternative MPA formulation available in clinical transplantation. In this review, we will discuss the clinical trials that have evaluated the efficacy and safety of MPA in adult kidney transplantation for the prevention of acute rejection and their use in new combination regimens aiming at minimizing calcineurin inhibitor toxicity and chronic allograft nephropathy. We will also discuss MPA pharmacokinetics and the rationale for therapeutic drug monitoring in optimizing the balance between efficacy and safety in individual patients. PMID:19753127

  20. Isometric tubular vacuolization in renal transplant recipient: the first case report in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ruangkanchanasetr, Prajej; Praechinavong, Weerasak; Paueksakon, Paisit; Satirapoj, Bancha; Supasyndh, Ouppatham; Supaporn, Thanom

    2012-05-01

    Cyclosporine can cause acute and chronic nephrotoxicity. Renal biopsy is a reliable tool for the diagnosis of cyclosporine nephrotoxicity. The authors report a 56-year-old Thai female with a history of end-stage renal disease who underwent cadaveric renal transplantation. A transplanted kidney biopsy was performed on day 9 post-transplant to identify the cause of delayed graft function. Light and electron microscopic findings revealed widespread (> 50% involvement) numerous tubules filled with uniformly-sized vacuoles in cytoplasm (isometric vacuolization). Serum cyclosporine trough level was 534 ng/mL. Neither acute rejection nor acute tubular necrosis was seen. Diagnosis of acute cyclosporine nephrotoxicity was made. Isometric vacuolization in more than 50% involvement of the tubules is rare (3%) in biopsy specimens. The tubular isometric vacuolization might not have the strong impact to the long term graft outcome. This is the first case report of isometric tubular vacuolization due to cyclosporine toxicity in renal transplant recipient in Thailand.

  1. The risk of cardiovascular disease associated with proteinuria in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fresnedo, Gema; Escallada, Rafael; Rodrigo, Emilio; De Francisco, Angel L M; Cotorruelo, Julio G; Sanz De Castro, Saturnino; Zubimendi, Jose A; Ruiz, J C; Arias, Manuel

    2002-04-27

    Proteinuria in the general population has been shown to be associated with cardiovascular disease, which is the main cause of death in renal transplantation. We investigated the effect of proteinuria on cardiovascular disease after renal transplantation in 532 renal transplant patients with functioning grafts for more than 1 year. Patients were classified into two groups depending on the presence of persistent proteinuria. We analyzed graft and patient survival, posttransplantation cardiovascular disease, and main causes of graft loss and death. Five- and 10-year graft and patient survival rates were lower in the group with proteinuria. The main cause of death was vascular disease in both groups. The presence of posttransplantation cardiovascular disease was higher in the group with proteinuria. Persistent proteinuria was associated with graft loss (RR=4.18), patient death (RR=1.92), and cardiovascular disease (RR=2.45). In conclusion, persistent proteinuria was an independent risk factor for increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in renal transplant patients.

  2. Successful Long-term Graft Survival of a Renal Transplantation Patient with Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kai, Kotaro; Sumida, Maki; Motoyoshi, Yaeko; Ogawa, Yuichi; Miki, Katsuyuki; Iwadoh, Kazuhiro; Sannomiya, Akihito; Murakami, Toru; Koyama, Ichiro; Kitajima, Kumiko; Nakajima, Ichiro; Morio, Tomohiro; Fuchinoue, Shohei

    2016-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, a rare X-linked hereditary syndrome, is characterized by immunodeficiency, thrombocytopenia, and eczema. The underlying T-cell defect renders renal transplantation and immunosuppressive treatments uncertain. The present case exhibited the mild clinical manifestation, regarded as X-linked thrombocytopenia. He successfully underwent a living-donor ABO-compatible renal transplantation and splenectomy in 2002, and thereafter experiencing no severe rejection, serious infection, or malignancy for more than 10 years. Though IgA nephropathy was detected 8 months after transplantation, the patient's renal function and proteinuria were stable without any treatment. The present case showed a successful long-term graft survival and the importance of splenectomy added to renal transplantation. PMID:27374679

  3. Survival of patients treated for end-stage renal disease by dialysis and transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, M. R.; Grace, M.; Dossetor, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    The results of treatment in 213 patients with end-stage renal disease who underwent hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis or transplantation, or a combination, between 1962 and 1975 were analysed. Comparison by censored survival analysis showed significantly better (P less than 0.01) patient survival with the integrated therapy of dialysis and transplantation than with either form of dialysis alone. There was no significant difference in survival of males and females but survival at the extremes of age was poorer. Analysis of survival by major cause of renal failure indicated best survival in patients with congenital renal disease. Graft and patient survival rates at 1 year after the first transplantation were 42% and 69%. The major cause of death in this series was vascular disease but infection was responsible for 50% of deaths after transplantation. While integration of dialysis with transplantation produces best patient survival, this course is possible only when sufficient cadaver kidneys are available. PMID:334354

  4. Role of the lectin complement pathway in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Conrad A; Zhou, Wuding; Sacks, Steven H

    2016-10-01

    In the last 15 years two major advances in the role of complement in the kidney transplant have come about. The first is that ischaemia reperfusion injury and its profound effect on transplant outcome is dependent on the terminal product of complement activation, C5b-9. The second key observation relates to the function of the small biologically active fragments C3a and C5a released by complement activation in increasing antigen presentation and priming the T cell response that results in transplant rejection. In both cases local synthesis of C3 principally by the renal tubule cells plays an essential role that overshadows the role of the circulating pool of C3 generated largely by hepatocyte synthesis. More recent efforts have investigated the molecules expressed by renal tissue that can trigger complement activation. These have revealed a prominent effect of collectin-11 (CL-11), a soluble C-type lectin that is expressed in renal tissue and aligns with its major ligand L-fucose at sites of complement activation following ischaemic stress. Biochemical studies have shown that interaction between CL-11 and L-fucose results in complement activation by the lectin complement pathway, precisely targeting the innate immune response to the ischaemic tubule surface. Therapeutic approaches to reduce inflammatory and immune stimulation in ischaemic kidney have so far targeted C3 or its activation products and several are in clinical trials. The finding that lectin-fucose interaction is an important trigger of lectin pathway complement activation within the donor organ opens up further therapeutic targets where intervention could protect the donor kidney against complement. PMID:27286717

  5. Visceral leishmaniasis in a kidney transplant recipient: parasitic interstitial nephritis, a cause of renal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Dettwiler, S; McKee, T; Hadaya, K; Chappuis, F; van Delden, C; Moll, S

    2010-06-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) due to Leishmania infantum is an endemic parasitic infection in the Mediterranean area. It most commonly affects immunosuppressed individuals, especially HIV patients and less frequently organ transplant recipients. Renal involvement seems to be frequent and is mostly associated with tubulointerstitial nephritis, as described in autopsy reports. In the 61 cases of renal transplant recipients with VL reported in the literature, renal dysfunction was noted at clinical presentation and was more frequently observed as a complication of antiparasitic therapy. However, no pathological analysis of the allograft lesions was reported. We present the case of a Swiss renal transplant recipient who developed VL after vacations in Spain and Tunisia, complicated by acute parasitic nephritis in the renal allograft 3 months after a well-conducted treatment of liposomal amphotericin B.

  6. Importance of anemia in the chronic Cardiorenal syndrome: Effects on renal function after heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Libório, Alexandre Braga; Uchoa, Russian Soares; Aragão, Alessa Peixoto; de Sousa Neto, João David; Valdivia, Juan Miguel Cosquillo; de Alencar Matos, Filipe; Mont’Alverne, Ricardo Everton Dias; de Sá Filho, Francisco Ivan Benício; Mejia, Juan Alberto Cosquillo

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Cardiorenal syndrome has been recently divided into 5 categories, according to acute or chronic evolution and primary organ dysfunction. Anemia can also accompany this disorder, leading to a more complex situation. This study aims to analyze the renal outcomes of patients, specifically patients with chronic Cardiorenal syndrome, with or without anemia, long-term after heart transplantation. Material/Methods This was a retrospective cohort study on chronic Cardiorenal syndrome patients submitted to heart transplantation. Patients were divided according to presence of anemia and renal dysfunction before heart transplantation. Results A total of 108 patients (92 males) with the mean age of 45±12 years were included. The etiologies of the heart failure were hypertensive dilated myocardiopathy (66%), ischemic (14%) and Chagasic (12%). Before the heart transplantation, 51 patients had an eGFR less than 60 mL/min. From these, 24 had concomitant anemia. One year after the transplantation, patients with previous isolated renal dysfunction ameliorates eGFR (45±11 vs. 65±26 mL/min, p<0.001), while those patients with previous renal dysfunction and anemia presented no improvement (eGFR 44±14 vs. 47±13 mL/min, p=0.619) 1 year after heart transplantation. Moreover, higher hemoglobin was an independent predictor of eGFR improvement after heart transplantation when associated with previous renal dysfunction (OR 1.8; CI 1.2–3.6, p<0.01 for each hemoglobin increment of 1 g/dL). Conclusions Patients with isolated Cardiorenal syndrome presented partial renal function recovery after heart transplantation, while the presence of cardiorenal anemia was a marker of renal function non-recovery 1 year after heart transplantation. PMID:23018354

  7. Commercial renal transplantation: A risky venture? A single Canadian centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Anil; Kwan, Kevin G.; Whelan, J. Paul

    2011-01-01

    Background: Canada, akin to other developed nations, faces the growing challenges of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Even with expanded donor criteria for renal transplantation (the treatment of choice for ESRD), the supply of kidneys is outpaced by the escalating demand. Remuneration for kidney donation is proscribed in Canada. Without an option of living-related transplantation (biological or emotional donors), patients often struggle with long waiting lists for deceased donor transplantation. Accordingly, many patients are now opting for more expedient avenues to obtaining a renal transplant. Through commercial organ retrieval programs, from living and deceased donors, patients are travelling outside Canada to have the procedure performed. Methods: Between September 2001 and July 2007, 10 patients (7 males, 3 females) underwent commercial renal transplantation outside Canada. We describe the clinical outcomes of these patients managed postoperatively at our single Canadian transplant centre. Results: Six living unrelated and 4 deceased donor renal transplantations were performed on these 10 patients (mean age 49.5 years). All procedures were performed in developing countries and the postoperative complications were subsequently treated at our centre. The mean post-transplant serum creatinine was 142 μmol/L. The average follow-up time was 29.8 months (range: 3 to 73 months). One patient required a transplant nephrectomy secondary to fungemia and subsequently died. One patient had a failed transplant and has currently resumed hemodialysis. Acute rejection was seen in 5 patients with 3 of these patients requiring re-initiation of hemodialysis. Only 1 patient had an uncomplicated course after surgery. Discussion: Despite the kidney trade being a milieu of corruption and commercialization, and the high risk of unconventional complications, patients returning to Canada after commercial renal transplantation are the new reality. Patients are often arriving without any

  8. Calcineurin activity in tacrolimus-treated renal transplant patients early after and 5 years after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, D M; Koefoed-Nielsen, P B; Jørgensen, K A

    2006-10-01

    The pharmacodynamic (PD) action of tacrolimus (FK) within the T-cell is inhibition of calcineurin phosphatase (CaN). Determination of CaN activity provides us with an important PD marker. Eleven renal transplant patients treated with FK were investigated on day 14 following transplantation and 5 years later. Blood samples drawn before as well as 1, 2, 3, and 4 hours after oral intake of FK were analyzed for CaN activity and blood FK concentrations. Twenty healthy subjects had one blood sample drawn for CaN activity, which was measured as the release of (32)P from a phosphorylated peptide. Radioactivity of (32)P was quantitated by liquid scintillation counting with the results converted to units of CaN utilizing a calibration curve. On day 14, we observed significant inhibition of CaN activity at T:1, 2, and 3 compared with the predose level (P = .002; P = .015; P = .015). Furthermore, all measured CaN activities were significantly different from those observed in healthy nonmedicated subjects. In contrast, at 5 years posttransplant only the CaN activity at T:2 was significantly inhibited compared with the predose level (P = .02). Additionally, all CaN activities at this time were not significantly different from CaN activities in the healthy subjects. We were not able to demonstrate individual CaN activity profiles in the patients. The lack of CaN inhibition at 5 years after transplantation despite relevant drug concentrations, probably reflected the lower drug dose used long after transplantation. This result raises the question of whether CaN inhibition is necessary to hold graft function and whether FK possess CaN-independent mechanisms of action. PMID:17098028

  9. Family caregivers' burden, quality of life, and health following patients' renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wicks, M N; Milstead, E J; Hathaway, D K; Cetingok, M

    1998-09-01

    Improved quality of life and physical functioning among renal transplant recipients have been documented; however, little of the literature has addressed the effects of transplantation on family caregivers. The purpose of this exploratory descriptive study was to characterize the level of subjective burden, quality of life, and self-rated health of caregivers who assist family members prior to transplantation as well as at 6 months following. The study sample included 19 caregivers of 19 renal transplant recipients. In general, caregiver burden, quality of life, and self-rated health did not improve following patients' transplants. In addition, 9 of 19 family caregivers reported increased burden. Because much of healthcare is family-based and greater reliance on family support seems inevitable, further studies are needed to examine the impact of transplantation on the family as well as the impact of the family on patients' posttransplant outcomes. PMID:9866547

  10. An Insight Into the Immunologic Events and Risk Assessment in Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Asif; Nasr, Patricia; El-Charabaty, Elie; El-Sayegh, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Organ transplantation has always been considered to be the optimal therapeutic intervention in patients with end-stage organ failure. In the US, approximately 615,000 patients are diagnosed with end-stage renal disease and less than 30% have received a kidney transplant. One of the crucial drawbacks in successful renal transplantation is allograft rejection. Survival rates among transplant recipients have greatly improved due to better understanding of transplant biology and more effective immunosuppressive agents. Post-transplant immune monitoring and optimization of the immunosuppressive therapy using non-invasive biomarkers can effectively predict impending graft rejection and may spare the need for renal biopsy. This article provides an insight into the immunomodulations of renal transplant recipients. It depicts the immune system including several types of kidney rejection and reviews the biomarkers that may serve in near future, as surveillance tools for graft monitoring. Finally, a summary on the main immunosuppressive drugs used in kidney transplant both in the induction and maintenance phases is also covered. PMID:27081421

  11. Colonisation with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus prior to renal transplantation is associated with long-term renal allograft failure.

    PubMed

    Moore, Carmel; Davis, Niall F; Burke, John P; Power, Richard; Mohan, Ponnusamy; Hickey, David; Smyth, Gordon; Eng, Molly; Little, Dilly M

    2014-09-01

    Renal transplant recipients are at an increased risk of developing Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus due to their immunosuppressed status. Herein, we investigate the incidence of MRSA infection in patients undergoing renal transplantation and determine the effect of MRSA colonisation on renal allograft function and overall mortality. Between January 1st 2007 and December 31st 2012, 1499 consecutive kidney transplants performed in our transplant unit and a retrospective 1:2 matched case-control study was performed on this patient cohort. The 1-, 3- and 5-year overall graft survival rates were 100%, 86% and 78%, respectively, in MRSA positive recipients compared with 100%, 100% and 93%, respectively, in the control group (P < 0.05). The 1-, 3- and 5-year overall patient survival rates were 100%, 97% and 79%, respectively, in MRSA positive recipients compared with 100%, 100% and 95%, respectively, in the control group (P = 0.1). In a multiple logistic regression analysis, colonisation with MRSA pre-operatively was an independent predictor for renal allograft failure at 5 years (hazard ratio: 4.6, 95% confidence interval: 1-30.7, P = 0.048). These findings demonstrate that the incidence of long-term renal allograft failure is significantly greater in this patient cohort compared with a matched control population.

  12. Urothelial carcinoma of the allograft kidney developed in a renal transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Gökçe, Mehmet İlker; Kocaay, Akın Fırat; Aktürk, Serkan; Tüzüner, Acar

    2016-09-01

    Renal transplantation is the best option in the treatment of end-stage renal disease However these patients are under the risk of developing malignancies particularly due to effects of immune supression. These malignancies tend to be more agressive compared to the general population. Here, we present a case of urothelial carcinoma develoing in the ureter of allograft kidney. PMID:27635300

  13. Urothelial carcinoma of the allograft kidney developed in a renal transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Gökçe, Mehmet İlker; Kocaay, Akın Fırat; Aktürk, Serkan; Tüzüner, Acar

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the best option in the treatment of end-stage renal disease However these patients are under the risk of developing malignancies particularly due to effects of immune supression. These malignancies tend to be more agressive compared to the general population. Here, we present a case of urothelial carcinoma develoing in the ureter of allograft kidney.

  14. Urothelial carcinoma of the allograft kidney developed in a renal transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Gökçe, Mehmet İlker; Kocaay, Akın Fırat; Aktürk, Serkan; Tüzüner, Acar

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the best option in the treatment of end-stage renal disease However these patients are under the risk of developing malignancies particularly due to effects of immune supression. These malignancies tend to be more agressive compared to the general population. Here, we present a case of urothelial carcinoma develoing in the ureter of allograft kidney. PMID:27635300

  15. Increased renal and forearm vasoconstriction in response to exercise after heart transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Haywood, G A; Counihan, P J; Sneddon, J F; Jennison, S H; Bashir, Y; McKenna, W J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To test the hypothesis that the loss of the inhibitory effect of the cardiac ventricular afferent fibres on the vasomotor centre would result in increased vasoconstrictor drive to the forearm and renal vascular beds during supine exercise in heart transplant recipients. DESIGN--Comparison of regional haemodynamic response to exercise in heart transplant recipients and two age matched control groups. SETTING--Regional heart transplant unit. PATIENTS AND METHODS--Orthotopic heart transplant recipients (n = 10), patients with NYHA class II heart failure (n = 10), and normal controls (n = 10) underwent short duration maximal supine bicycle exercise. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Simultaneous measurements were made of heart rate, systemic blood pressure, oxygen consumption (VO2), forearm blood flow, and renal blood flow. Forearm blood flow was measured by forearm plethysmography and renal blood flow by continuous renal vein thermodilution. RESULTS--The peak forearm vascular resistance was significantly greater in the transplant group than in the controls (mean (SEM) 75 (18) v 40 (7) resistance units, p < 0.05). The percentage fall in renal blood flow at peak exercise was significantly greater in heart transplant recipients than in the controls (44% (4%) v 32% (4%), p < 0.05) as was the percentage increase in renal vascular resistance (transplants: 116% (19%) v controls: 78% (17%), p < 0.05). Regional haemodynamics during exercise in the heart failure group were not significantly different from those in the controls. CONCLUSIONS--These findings suggest that surgical division of the cardiac ventricular afferent fibres results in increased vasoconstrictor drive to the kidneys and non-exercising muscle during exercise. This mechanism may contribute to persistent exercise limitation and renal impairment after heart transplantation. PMID:8398495

  16. Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma occurring in the renal allograft of a transplant recipient presenting with weight loss.

    PubMed

    Althaf, Mohammed Mahdi; Al-Sunaid, Mohammed S; Abdelsalam, Mohamed Said; Alkorbi, Lutfi A; Al-Hussain, Turki O; Dababo, Mohammed Anas; Haq, Naveed

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) in renal transplant recipients is reported as 1.1-1.5% in the native kidneys and 0.22-0.25% in the renal allograft. There are no data to support routine surveillance for tumors in transplant recipients. Most reported cases of RCCs occurring in renal allografts were incidental findings in asymptomatic patients. Herein, we report the second case of lone chromophobe RCC (ChRCC) of the renal allograft presenting with weight loss. Loss of weight is a presenting symptom in one-third of ChRCCs occurring in the native kidneys in the general population. Based on the age of the patient, R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score of the tumor and the lack of data on the prognosis of this histological subtype in a climate of long-term immunosuppression, we elected for radical nephrectomy. We suggest that RCCs should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a transplant recipient presenting with weight loss even in the absence of localizing symptoms or signs.

  17. Risk of Post-Lung Transplant Renal Dysfunction in Adults With Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Aitken, Moira L.; Goss, Christopher H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the leading indications for lung transplantation. The incidence and pre-lung transplant risk factors for posttransplant renal dysfunction in the CF population remain undefined. Methods: We conducted a cohort study using adults (≥ 18 years old) in the CF Foundation Patient Registry from 2000 to 2008 to determine the incidence of post-lung transplant renal dysfunction, defined by an estimated glomerular filtration rate of < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to identify independent pretransplant risk factors for post-lung transplant renal dysfunction. Results: The study cohort included 993 adult lung transplant recipients with CF, with a median follow-up of 2 years. During the study period, 311 individuals developed renal dysfunction, with a 2-year risk of 35% (95% CI, 32%-39%). Risk of posttransplant renal dysfunction increased substantially with increasing age (25 to < 35 years vs 18 to < 25 years: hazard ratio [HR], 1.60; 95% CI, 1.15-2.23; vs ≥ 35 years: HR, 2.45; 95% CI, 1.73-3.47) and female sex (HR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.22-1.99). CF-related diabetes requiring insulin therapy (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.02-1.67) and pretransplant renal function impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate, 60-90 mL/min/m2 vs > 90 mL/min/m2: HR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.19-2.12) also increased the risk of posttransplant renal dysfunction. Conclusions: Renal dysfunction is common following lung transplant in the adult CF population. Increased age, female sex, CF-related diabetes requiring insulin, and pretransplant renal impairment are significant risk factors. PMID:22222189

  18. Idiopathic portal hypertension in renal transplant recipients: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, N; Oka, T; Ohmori, Y; Yasumura, T; Kohnosu, H; Kobashi, T

    1994-01-01

    We present herein the cases of two patients who developed idiopathic portal hypertension (IPH) following renal transplantation. Both patients had been treated with azathioprine and prednisolone for 6 years and 4 months and for 4 years and 7 months, respectively, and presented with splenomegaly and thrombocytopenia suggesting hypersplenism. Celiac angiography showed a dilated splenic artery and vein in both patients. When the splenic artery was obliterated with a balloon catheter in case 1, the portal venous pressure decreased from 51 cmH2O to 36 cmH2O, and the direction of the superiomesenteric venous blood flow became hepatopetal rather than hepatofugal. These results suggested that the spleen might have played an important role in the development of IPH in these two patients. A splenectomy was therefore performed, immediately following which the portal venous pressure decreased remarkably, and the esophageal varices disappeared during the postoperative follow-up period. Microscopic examination of liver biopsies taken at the operation revealed lymphoplasmacytic infiltration with bile duct hyperplasia but no evidence of periportal fibrosis, and electron microscopy demonstrated very mild perisinusoidal fibrosis. Thus, the histological changes seen in the livers of these patients seemed not to have caused the portal hypertension. In conclusion, although few patients develop IPH after renal transplantation, we should be aware of its possibility and consider splenectomy as the treatment of choice.

  19. The Impact of 1,000 Renal Transplants at One Center

    PubMed Central

    Salvatierra, Oscar; Feduska, Nicholas J.; Cochrum, Kent C.; Najarian, John S.; Kountz, Samuel L.; Belzer, Folkert O.

    1977-01-01

    A large, comprehensive renal transplant program has a major impact not only on patient care, but also on the medical center itself and the larger community. The program at this center has advanced from 15 transplants in 1964 to 141 transplants in 1976. Fifty-nine per cent of patients transplanted have functioning kidneys at this time, including 76 children. Rehabilitation was equal to prerenal disease level in 91% of 169 recipients who lived five years with a functioning graft. Basic research in such diverse areas as renal preservation and immunology, as well as clinical research in optimum immunosuppressive therapy, resulted in significant contributions. Refinement of the mixed lymphocyte culture improved living-related graft survival at two years: 100% for HLA-identical and 91% for non-HLA-identical grafts, compared to 66% reported by the Transplant Registry for the combined group. Modification of immunosuppression improved patient survival at two years: 100% and 86% for recipients of living-related and cadaver grafts, respectively, compared to 83% and 65% reported by the Transplant Registry. The complexity of care of the patient with end-stage renal failure has required active interaction between transplant surgeons and almost every major specialty. The vast clinical material has been a great asset for training transplant surgeons, nephrologists, fellows and residents of multiple specialties, and medical students. The medical center's relationship with communities within a 250 mile radius has been strengthened, as reflected in patient referrals and the development of a multi-community-supported organ procurement system, which has allowed us to perform over 100 cadaver transplants per year for the past three years. Thus the performance of 1,000 renal transplants at this center has resulted not only in rehabilitation of many renal failure patients, but also in expanded and improved research and teaching capabilities, bringing support from multiple medical

  20. Delaying Renal Transplant after Radical Prostatectomy for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Özçelik, Ümit; Bircan, Hüseyin Yüce; Karakayalı, Feza; Moray, Gökhan; Demirağ, Alp

    2015-11-01

    To minimize the recurrence of a previously treated neoplasm in organ recipients, a period of 2 to 5 years without recurrence is advocated for most malignancies. However, prostate cancer is different because of its biological properties, diagnosis, and treatment. Most prostate cancers are detected at a low stage and demonstrate slow growth after detection. Definitive treatment with radical prostatectomy affords excellent results. Renal transplant candidates with early-stage prostate cancer have a higher risk of dying on dialysis than dying from prostate cancer; therefore, renal transplant candidates with organ-confined prostate cancer should be immediately considered for transplant.

  1. Renal Papillary Necrosis: Role of Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Vaidehi K.

    2016-01-01

    Renal Papillary Necrosis (RPN) is idefined as Ischemic necrobiosis of the papilla in the medulla of the kidneys. Variety of etiological factors are recognized which cause papillary necrosis, such as analgesic nephropathy, diabetes mellitus, urinary obstruction and sickle cell haemoglobinopathy. The early diagnosis of RPN is important to improve prognosis and reduce morbidity. Radiological Imaging offers early diagnosis and can guide prompt treatment of papillary necrosis and can minimize a decline in renal function. Here we report three cases of RPN with typical imaging findings. One of them was diabetic and hypertensive female with recurrent Urinary tract Infections and other was a male with no known co-morbidity. Both of them were diagnosed to have renal papillary necrosis on CT scan and were managed operatively and conservatively, respectively. Third case was a healthy female being investigated to be renal donor for her son. Here RPN was an incidental finding and was treated conservatively. Thus CT scan could detect it pre-operatively and complications due to transplantation of a kidney with papillary necrosis were avoided. So, we want to emphasize the importance of Radiology, particularly CT scanning in detection of RPN and to guide early and prompt treatment. PMID:26894147

  2. BK virus as a potential oncovirus for bladder cancer in a renal transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wen-Yao; Lee, Ming-Che; Lai, Ning-Sheng; Lu, Ming-Chi

    2015-04-01

    Renal transplant patients have high risk for bladder cancer. The reactivation of BK virus is common in renal transplant patients especially in the urinary tract. There was some evidence suggesting that the reactivation of BK virus (BKV) in renal transplant patients may associate with the development of bladder cancer. Here we demonstrated that a patient that had persistent elevated BKV viruria (urine BKV DNA concentration more than 10(11) copies/ml) after renal transplantation. Then, bladder cancer was found in 13 months after kidney transplantation. The urine BKV DNA concentration was detected by real-time PCR and the BKV DNA in the bladder tumor was detected by PCR. BKV DNA was found in the marginal and central part of the bladder tumor. After removal of the bladder cancer, the urine BKV viral load in this patients dropped dramatically to <10(2) copies/ml. However, the urine viral load had increased modestly to 10(6) copies/ml in 3 months after surgery. Since there is a close correlation between the urine BK viral load and the presence of bladder cancer, we suggested that there might be a causal relationship between the reactivation of BKV and the development of bladder cancer in renal transplant patient.

  3. Economic Evaluation of Pharmacogenetic Tests in Patients Subjected to Renal Transplantation: A Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rancic, Nemanja; Dragojevic-Simic, Viktorija; Vavic, Neven; Kovacevic, Aleksandra; Segrt, Zoran; Djordjevic, Natasa

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for the patients with end-stage renal failure. Genetic factors, among others, can influence variability in response to immunosuppressive drugs. Nowadays, due to restrictive health resources, the question arises whether routine pharmacogenetic analyses should be done in the renal transplant recipients or not. The aim of this literature review was to present the up-to-date information considering the economic feasibility of pharmacogenetic testing in patients subjected to renal transplantation. The organization United Network for Organ Sharing in the US estimated that total costs per renal transplant concerning these analyses were $334,300 in 2014. Pharmacogenetic testing prior to treatment initiation could be helpful to predict and assess treatment response and the risks for adverse drug reactions. This kind of testing before treatment initiation seems to be one of the most promising applications of pharmacokinetics. Although pharmacogenetic tests were found to be a cost-effective or cost-saving strategy in many cases, some authors represent another opinion. However, if the real costs of renal transplantation are recognized, the application of these tests in the standard daily practice could be considered more realistic, which additionally emphasizes the importance of future studies assessing their cost effectiveness.

  4. Economic Evaluation of Pharmacogenetic Tests in Patients Subjected to Renal Transplantation: A Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rancic, Nemanja; Dragojevic-Simic, Viktorija; Vavic, Neven; Kovacevic, Aleksandra; Segrt, Zoran; Djordjevic, Natasa

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for the patients with end-stage renal failure. Genetic factors, among others, can influence variability in response to immunosuppressive drugs. Nowadays, due to restrictive health resources, the question arises whether routine pharmacogenetic analyses should be done in the renal transplant recipients or not. The aim of this literature review was to present the up-to-date information considering the economic feasibility of pharmacogenetic testing in patients subjected to renal transplantation. The organization United Network for Organ Sharing in the US estimated that total costs per renal transplant concerning these analyses were $334,300 in 2014. Pharmacogenetic testing prior to treatment initiation could be helpful to predict and assess treatment response and the risks for adverse drug reactions. This kind of testing before treatment initiation seems to be one of the most promising applications of pharmacokinetics. Although pharmacogenetic tests were found to be a cost-effective or cost-saving strategy in many cases, some authors represent another opinion. However, if the real costs of renal transplantation are recognized, the application of these tests in the standard daily practice could be considered more realistic, which additionally emphasizes the importance of future studies assessing their cost effectiveness. PMID:27630984

  5. Economic Evaluation of Pharmacogenetic Tests in Patients Subjected to Renal Transplantation: A Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Rancic, Nemanja; Dragojevic-Simic, Viktorija; Vavic, Neven; Kovacevic, Aleksandra; Segrt, Zoran; Djordjevic, Natasa

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for the patients with end-stage renal failure. Genetic factors, among others, can influence variability in response to immunosuppressive drugs. Nowadays, due to restrictive health resources, the question arises whether routine pharmacogenetic analyses should be done in the renal transplant recipients or not. The aim of this literature review was to present the up-to-date information considering the economic feasibility of pharmacogenetic testing in patients subjected to renal transplantation. The organization United Network for Organ Sharing in the US estimated that total costs per renal transplant concerning these analyses were $334,300 in 2014. Pharmacogenetic testing prior to treatment initiation could be helpful to predict and assess treatment response and the risks for adverse drug reactions. This kind of testing before treatment initiation seems to be one of the most promising applications of pharmacokinetics. Although pharmacogenetic tests were found to be a cost-effective or cost-saving strategy in many cases, some authors represent another opinion. However, if the real costs of renal transplantation are recognized, the application of these tests in the standard daily practice could be considered more realistic, which additionally emphasizes the importance of future studies assessing their cost effectiveness. PMID:27630984

  6. Renal transplantation in a 14-year-old girl with vitamin B12-responsive cblA-type methylmalonic acidaemia.

    PubMed

    Coman, D; Huang, J; McTaggart, S; Sakamoto, O; Ohura, T; McGill, J; Burke, J

    2006-02-01

    Renal tubular dysfunction and chronic renal failure are well recognised complications of methylmalonic acidaemia (MMA) and can occur even in the context of optimal medical metabolic management. Organ transplantation, such as renal and combined liver and renal transplants, have been utilised in the past for children whose disease cannot be managed by conservative medical practices and those with end stage renal disease. Our patient was diagnosed with B(12)-responsive MMA (subsequently proven to be cblA-type MMA) in the postoperative period following renal transplantation for idiopathic chronic renal failure. She remains well, with excellent graft function and metabolic control 4 years after transplantation. This patient highlights the importance of testing for the inborn errors of metabolism in patients presenting with recurrent acidosis and progressive renal impairment.

  7. Tailoring the endovascular management of transplant renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Biederman, D M; Fischman, A M; Titano, J J; Kim, E; Patel, R S; Nowakowski, F S; Florman, S; Lookstein, R A

    2015-04-01

    In this study we analyze the different types of endovascular interventions (EVIs) in de novo transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) and its anatomical subtypes to examine any variation in recovery of allograft function, blood pressure control, EVI patency and allograft survival with respect to EVI type (DES: drug-eluting stent, BMS: bare-metal stent, PTA: percutaneous transluminal angioplasty). Forty-five patients underwent a total of 50 primary EVIs (DES: 18, BMS: 26, PTA: 6). Patients were stratified according to medical co-morbidities, graft characteristics, biopsy results, clinical presentation and TRAS anatomic subtypes (anastomotic: 26, postanastomotic: 17, bend-kink: 2). There was significant improvement in allograft function and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) control across all interventions (pre-EVI-creatinine [CR]: 2.8 ± 1.4, post-EVI-Cr: 2.1 ± 0.7, p < 0.001; pre-EVI-MAP: 117 ± 16, post-EVI-MAP: 112 ± 17, p = 0.03) with no significant difference among EVI types. There was no significant difference in allograft survival with respect to EVI type. Patency was significantly higher in EVIs performed with DES and BMS compared to PTA (p = 0.001). In the postanastomotic TRAS subtype, patency rates were significantly higher in DES compared to BMS (p = 0.012) in vessels of comparable reference diameter (≤5 mm). PMID:25703133

  8. Acute renal failure after cardiac transplantation: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, D. N.; Perazella, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a relatively frequent complication associated with heart transplantation. It develops in the first few days postoperatively and is characterized by oliguria with laboratory and urinary indices typical of pre-renal azotemia. Cyclosporine, especially with higher doses, is one of the many factors which play an integral part in the nephrotoxicity following cardiac transplant. Poor preoperative renal function and perioperative hemodynamic compromise may also contribute to ARF. The actual incidence of ARF now encountered by transplant centers may be lower than previously reported, the result of lower cyclosporine doses. Currently, management is entirely supportive, but novel therapeutic approaches with atrial natriuretic peptide-like substances are being explored. A case illustrating the typical clinical presentation of ARF after heart transplant will be presented and the clinical features will be reviewed. PMID:9381741

  9. In vivo regeneration of renal vessels post whole decellularized kidneys transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, KeZhi; Yu, YaLing; Zhao, LiNa; Chu, TingGang; Wu, LiZhi; Alkhawaji, Ali; Li, MiaoZhong; Shao, YingKuan; Li, Ting; Lou, XinFa; Chen, ShiXin; Tang, MaoLin; Mei, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 50 million patients in China live with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and only about 4000 patients may receive kidney transplantation. The purpose of this study was to investigate regeneration of renal vessels post whole decellularized kidneys transplantation in vivo. We decellularized kidneys of donor rats by perfusing a detergent through the abdominal aorta, yielding feasible extracellular matrix, confirmed for acellularity before transplantation. Based on the concept of using the body as a bioreactor, we orthotopically transplanted the kidney and ureter scaffolds in recipient rats, and found the regeneration of vessels including artery and vein in the renal sinus following a spontaneous recanalization. Although the findings only represent an initial step toward the ultimate goal of the generation of fully functional kidneys in vivo, these findings suggest that the body itself, as the bioreactor, is a viable strategy for kidney regeneration. PMID:26575172

  10. Fractionated total lymphoid irradiation as preparative immunosuppression in high risk renal transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Najarian, J.S.; Ferguson, R.M.; Sutherland, D.E.; Slavin, S.; Kim, T.; Kersey, J.; Simmons, R.L.

    1982-10-01

    Twenty-two patients at high risk to reject renal allografts have been treated with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (FTLI) prior to transplantation of primary (2), secondary (16) or tertiary (4) renal allografts. All patients undergoing retransplantation had rapidly rejected previous grafts. At 24 months following transplantation, 72% of grafts were functioning in the TLI group compared with a 38% graft function in an historical control group of recipients receiving secondary or tertiary grafts and treated with conventional immunosuppression. Important variables in determining success of transplantation following fractionated TLI include the dose of TLI, the interval from radiation to transplantation, and maintenance post-transplant immunosuppressive therapy. Optimal results were achieved with 2500 rads delivered in 100 rad fractions followed by transplantation within two weeks, and a tapering prednisone schedule and maintenance azathioprine post-transplantation. Seventeen patients had significant complications of the radiation treatment and there was one death, prior to transplantation, associated with pneumonitis. In vitro assessment of immune function demonstrated marked peripheral T cell depletion and loss of in vitro responsiveness to mitogen and allogeneic stimulation following FTLI. The administration of donor bone marrow at the time of transplantation did not produce chimerism. The results suggest that when properly utilized FTLI can produce effective adjunctive immunosuppression for clinical transplantation.

  11. Fractionated total lymphoid irradiation as preparative immunosuppression in high risk renal transplantation: clinical and immunological studies

    SciTech Connect

    Najarian, J.S.; Ferguson, R.M.; Sutherland, D.E.; Slavin, S.; Kim, T.; Kersey, J.; Simmons, R.S.

    1982-10-01

    Twenty-two patients at high risk to reject renal allografts have been treated with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (FTLI) prior to transplantation of primary (2), secondary (16) or teritary (4) renal allografts. All patients undergoing retransplantation had rapidly rejected previous grafts. At 24 months following transplantation, 72% of grafts were functioning in the TLI group compared with a 38% graft function in an historical control group of recipients receiving secondary or tertiary grafts and treated with conventional immunosuppression. Important variables in determining success of transplantation following fractionated TLI include the dose of TLI, the interval from radiation to transplantation, and maintenance, post-transplant immunosuppressive therapy. Optimal results were achieved with 2500 rads delivered in 100 rad fractions followed by transplantation within two weeks, and a tapering prednisone schedule and maintenance azathioprine post-transplantation. Seventeen patients had significant complications of the radiation treatment and there was one death, prior to transplantation, associated with pneumonitis. In vitro assessment of immune function demonstrated marked peripheral T cell depletion and loss of in vitro responsiveness to mitogen and allogeneic stimulation following FTLI. The administration of donor bone marrow at the time of transplantation did not produce chimerism. The results suggest that when properly utilized FTLI can produce effective adjunctive immunosuppression for clinical transplantation.

  12. Alport syndrome: significance of gingival biopsy in the initial diagnosis and periodontal evaluation after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Toygar, Hilal Uslu; Toygar, Okan; Guzeldemir, Esra; Cilasun, Ulkem; Nacar, Ahmet; Bal, Nebil

    2009-01-01

    Alport Syndrome (AS) is an important hereditary disorder affecting the glomerular basement membrane. Diagnosis of AS is based on the presence of hematuric nephropathy, renal failure, hearing loss, ocular abnormalities and changes in the glomerular basement membrane of the lamina densa. The aims of this case report were to show the changes in the gingival tissues in a patient with AS under therapy with cyclosporin-A after renal transplantation and to discuss the possible role of type IV collagen in gingival basal lamina as an alternative approach for the diagnosis of AS. A 20-year-old male patient with AS underwent periodontal therapy including a series of gingivectomy surgeries. Gingival samples obtained during the second surgery were examined histopathologically and by transmission electron microscopy for further pathological examination. Gingivectomy procedures have been performed every 6 months over the last 4 years. The excessive and fibrous gingival enlargements resulted in migration of the anterior teeth, but no alveolar bone loss occurred. This is the first report to demonstrate the possible changes in the gingival tissues caused by AS. It is suggested that gingival biopsy can be an initial diagnostic tool instead of renal or skin biopsies. Proper dental and periodontal care and regular visits to the dentist could provide limited gingival hyperplasia to patients with AS.

  13. Personalization of the immunosuppressive treatment in renal transplant recipients: the great challenge in "omics" medicine.

    PubMed

    Zaza, Gianluigi; Granata, Simona; Tomei, Paola; Dalla Gassa, Alessandra; Lupo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation represents the most favorable treatment for patients with advanced renal failure and it is followed, in most cases, by a significant enhancement in patients' quality of life. Significant improvements in one-year renal allograft and patients' survival rates have been achieved over the last 10 years primarily as a result of newer immunosuppressive regimens. Despite these notable achievements in the short-term outcome, long-term graft function and survival rates remain less than optimal. Death with a functioning graft and chronic allograft dysfunction result in an annual rate of 3%-5%. In this context, drug toxicity and long-term chronic adverse effects of immunosuppressive medications have a pivotal role. Unfortunately, at the moment, except for the evaluation of trough drug levels, no clinically useful tools are available to correctly manage immunosuppressive therapy. The proper use of these drugs could potentiate therapeutic effects minimizing adverse drug reactions. For this purpose, in the future, "omics" techniques could represent powerful tools that may be employed in clinical practice to routinely aid the personalization of drug treatment according to each patient's genetic makeup. However, it is unquestionable that additional studies and technological advances are needed to standardize and simplify these methodologies.

  14. Acute promyelocytic leukemia after renal transplant and filgrastim treatment for neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Krause, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged immunosuppression in solid organ transplant recipients has been considered a risk for developing opportunistic infections and malignancies. Acute leukemia is a rare complication. We report a case of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) (FAB M3) after cadaveric renal transplant for focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in a 24-year-old woman. Her immunosuppressive therapy included tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone. Approximately 2 years after transplant, she became pancytopenic, prompting administration of filgrastim. A few doses caused a markedly increased blast count, resulting in a diagnosis of APL. She was successfully treated with all-trans-retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide. Myeloproliferative neoplasms after organ transplant or due to filgrastim are rare. PMID:27695174

  15. Acute promyelocytic leukemia after renal transplant and filgrastim treatment for neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Krause, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged immunosuppression in solid organ transplant recipients has been considered a risk for developing opportunistic infections and malignancies. Acute leukemia is a rare complication. We report a case of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) (FAB M3) after cadaveric renal transplant for focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in a 24-year-old woman. Her immunosuppressive therapy included tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone. Approximately 2 years after transplant, she became pancytopenic, prompting administration of filgrastim. A few doses caused a markedly increased blast count, resulting in a diagnosis of APL. She was successfully treated with all-trans-retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide. Myeloproliferative neoplasms after organ transplant or due to filgrastim are rare.

  16. [Cost of a renal transplant: medico-economic analysis of the amount reimbursed by the French national health program to finance renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Sainsaulieu, Yoël; Sambuc, Cléa; Logerot, Hélène; Bongiovanni, Isabelle; Couchoud, Cécile

    2014-07-01

    Successful organ transplantation relies on several ancillary activities such as the identification of a compatible donor, organ allocation and procurement and the coordination of the transplant process. No existing study of the overall costs, in France, of these additional transplantation activities could be identified. This study determines the total additional costs of ancillary transplantation activities by comparing the costs of kidney transplantations with living donors against those using deceased donors. The data used are drawn from the 2013 public healthcare tariff calculations, PMSI recorded activity and transplant activity in 2012 as assessed and reported by the Agence de la biomédecine. The results show that, in 2012, additional transplant costs varied from 13835.44 € to 20050.67 € for a deceased donor and were 13601.66 € for a living donor. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that all the costs covered by National Health Insurance need to be taken into account in the economic impact evaluation of renal transplantation and during the development of this national priority activity.

  17. Diet-induced increase in plasma oxidized LDL promotes early fibrosis in a renal porcine auto-transplantation model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In kidney transplantation, the prevalence of hypercholesterolemia as a co-morbidity factor known to affect graft function, is rising due to the increased number of older donors in response to organ shortage as well as to the hyperlipidemic effects of immunosuppressors in recipient. This study aimed to characterize the effects of hypercholesterolemia on renal graft outcome, investigating the role of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL). Methods In vivo, we used a porcine preclinical model of renal auto-transplantation modulated by two experimental diets: a normal (n = 6) or a hyperlipidemic diet (n = 5) maintained during the 3 month follow-up after the surgical procedure. Kidney function and OxLDL levels were monitored as well as fibrosis, LOX-1 and TGF beta signaling pathways. In vitro, we used human artery endothelial cells subjected to OxLDL to investigate the TGF beta profibrotic pathway and the role of the scavenger receptor LOX-1. Results Hyperlipidemic diet-induced increase in plasma OxLDL levels at the time of surgery correlated with an increase in proteinuria 3 months after transplantation, associated with an early graft fibrosis combined with an activation of renal TGF beta signaling. These data suggest a direct involvement of OxLDL in the hyperlipidemic diet-induced activation of the pro-fibrotic TGF beta pathway which seems to be activated by LOX-1 signaling. These results were supported by studies with endothelial cells incubated in culture medium containing OxLDL promoting TGF beta expression inhibited by LOX-1 antibody. Conclusions These results implicate OxLDL in the hyperlipidemic diet-promoted fibrosis in transplanted kidneys, suggesting LOX-1 as a potential therapeutic target and reinforce the need to control cholesterol levels in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:24655356

  18. Cyclosporine dose reduction by ketoconazole administration in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    First, M R; Schroeder, T J; Alexander, J W; Stephens, G W; Weiskittel, P; Myre, S A; Pesce, A J

    1991-02-01

    Cyclosporine metabolism occurs in the liver via hepatic cytochrome P-450 microsomal enzymes. Ketoconazole, an imidazole derivative, has been shown to inhibit the cytochrome P-450 enzyme system. Thirty-six renal transplant recipients receiving cyclosporine as part of a triple immunosuppressive drug regimen were started on 200 mg/day of oral ketoconazole. The dose of cyclosporine was reduced by 70% at the start of ketoconazole; this dose reduction was based on our previous experience with concomitant cyclosporine-ketoconazole therapy. Ketoconazole was started in patients who had been on cyclosporine for between 10 days and 74 months. The mean cyclosporine dose was 420 mg/day (5.9 mg/kg/day) before starting ketoconazole and 66 mg/day (0.9 mg/kg/day) one year after the addition of ketoconazole; this represents a cyclosporine dose reduction of 84.7% (P less than 0.0001). The mean trough whole-blood cyclosporine concentrations measured by HPLC, were 130 ng/mL preketoconazole and 149 ng/mL after 1 year of combination therapy. Mean serum creatinine and BUN levels were unchanged before and during ketoconazole administration, and no changes in liver function tests were noted. Cyclosporine pharmacokinetics were performed before and after at least three weeks of ketoconazole. Hourly whole-blood samples were measured by HPLC (parent cyclosporine only) and TDX (parent + metabolites). Combination therapy resulted in decreases in the maximum blood concentration and the steady-state volume of distribution divided by the fractional absorption, and increases in mean residence time and the parent-to-parent plus metabolite ratio (calculated by dividing the HPLC by the TDX value). The addition of ketoconazole to cyclosporine-treated patients resulted in a significant inhibition of cyclosporine metabolism and decrease in the dosage. There was minimal nephrotoxicity, and only four rejection episodes occurred on combined therapy. The concomitant administration of the two drugs was well

  19. Myoglobinuria masquerading as acute rejection in a renal allograft recipient with recurrent post transplant diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pallav; Sharma, Amit; Khullar, Dinesh

    2014-08-01

    Rhabdomyolysis contributes to 7-10% of total AKI cases. Myoglobinuria as a cause of acute renal allograft dysfunction is extremely uncommon. Renal allograft recipient on cyclosporine or tacrolimus can develop myoglobinuria in presence of other precipitating factors. Present case describes an interesting report of myoglobinuria in a patient with post transplant diabetic nephropathy mimicking acute graft rejection. Clinically myoglobinuria presenting as renal allograft dysfunction is diagnosis of exclusion and renal biopsy is extremely important in making a correct diagnosis and planning optimal management in such cases.

  20. Risk of bladder cancer in renal transplant recipients: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, L; Chen, P; Chen, E-Z; Gu, A; Jiang, Z-Y

    2014-01-01

    Background: Renal transplantation has been associated with a significantly increased risk of developing cancers during long-term follow-up, but for bladder cancer, this risk is less clear. We therefore performed a meta-analysis to determine whether bladder cancer risk in renal transplant recipients was increased. Methods: Eligible studies were identified through searches of PubMed and other public resources. Random-effects meta-analyses were used to pool overall estimates for standardised incidence ratios (SIRs). Heterogeneity test, sensitivity analysis, and assessment of publishing bias were also performed. Results: We identified a 3.18-fold higher SIR (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.34–7.53, P=0.008) of bladder cancer in patients following renal transplantation compared with the general population, based on data from 79 988 patients with a total follow-up of 308 458 patient-years. When stratified by ethnicity, the SIRs for bladder cancer were 2.00 (95% CI: 1.51–2.65, P=0.001) and 14.74 (95% CI: 3.66–59.35, P<0.001) between European and Asian renal transplant recipients, respectively. Conclusions: Our study demonstrated that the risk of developing bladder cancer in transplant populations was increased. Such association suggests that physicians should be more vigilant in checking for bladder cancer in transplantation recipient population. PMID:24496458

  1. Longitudinal renal function in pediatric heart transplant recipients: 20-years experience.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Punkaj; Rettiganti, Mallikarjuna; Gossett, Jeffrey M; Gardner, Megan; Bryant, Janet C; Noel, Tommy R; Knecht, Kenneth R

    2015-03-01

    This study was initiated to assess the temporal trends of renal function, and define risk factors associated with worsening renal function in pediatric heart transplant recipients in the immediate post-operative period. We performed a single-center retrospective study in children ≤18 yr receiving OHT (1993-2012). The AKIN's validated, three-tiered AKI staging system was used to categorize the degree of WRF. One hundred sixty-four patients qualified for inclusion. Forty-seven patients (28%) were classified as having WRF after OHT. Nineteen patients (11%) required dialysis after heart transplantation. There was a sustained and steady improvement in renal function in children following heart transplantation in all age groups, irrespective of underlying disease process. The significant factors associated with risk of WRF included body surface area (OR: 1.89 for 0.5 unit increase, 95% CI: 1.29-2.76, p = 0.001) and use of ECMO prior to and/or after heart transplantation (OR: 3.50, 95% CI: 1.51-8.13, p = 0.004). Use of VAD prior to heart transplantation was not associated with WRF (OR: 0.50, 95% CI: 0.17-1.51, p = 0.22). On the basis of these data, we demonstrate that worsening renal function improves early after orthotopic heart transplantation.

  2. Impact of the Great Eastern Japan Earthquake on transplant renal function in Iwaki city, Fukushima.

    PubMed

    Shimmura, H; Kawaguchi, H; Tokiwa, M; Tanabe, K

    2014-01-01

    Tokiwa-kai group is a urologic and dialysis institution complex located in Iwaki city, Fukushima, Japan, and has performed renal transplantation since 1997. Although water is mandatory for renal transplant recipients, the water supply did not work for approximately a month after the earthquake in Iwaki city. Moreover, after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident struck Iwaki city, there was a critical shortage of food and medical supplies, including immunosuppressant drugs. Therefore, we investigated the impact of the Great Eastern Japan Earthquake on transplant renal function. We followed 30 patients who underwent renal transplantation before the Great Eastern Japan Earthquake. There were 19 males and 11 females with a mean age of 47 years. All recipients were not injured by the earthquake or the tsunami. Of the 30 recipients, 1 lost his renal graft at 12 months after the earthquake, and 1 has deterioration of graft function with a serum creatinine level of 5.5 mg/dL. Their creatinine levels before the earthquake were 2.79 mg/dL and 3.78 mg/dL, respectively. The other recipients have good graft function with a mean creatinine level of 1.5 mg/dL. All recipients did not experience any rejection episode after the earthquake. The shortage of water and food after the Great Eastern Japan Earthquake exacerbated the renal graft function, especially in the recipients with the lower graft function.

  3. Diffuse parenchymal form of malakoplakia in renal transplant recipient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Keitel, Elizete; Pêgas, Karla Lais; do Nascimento Bittar, Antonio Eduardo; dos Santos, Auri Ferreira; da Cas Porto, Francisco; Cambruzzi, Eduardo

    2014-06-01

    Malakoplakia is an unusual chronic inflammatory disease related to prior urinary tract infection. It is characterized by the presence of macrophages with foamy cytoplasm exhibiting larger PAS positive inclusions that stain for calcium and iron. Malakoplakia affects renal allograft and is associated with severe morbidity. Herein, the authors report a new case of renal graft malakoplakia in a 23-year-old female patient. The patient received a living-related donor renal transplantation with a high immunological risk. Plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin (i.v. Ig) treatment, pre- and post-transplant, and induction with rabbit anti-thymocyte globulins were used due to presence of donor specific antibodies and positive B cross match by flow cytometry. The patient had an early urinary tract infection with a good outcome. On Day 36 post-transplant (PO), the patient returned to the clinic with fever, graft pain and acute renal dysfunction leading to hemodialysis. Escherichia coli (E. coli) was present in the blood and urine culture. At the time, the renal biopsy revealed numerous sheets of macrophages with foamy, eosinophilic cytoplasm showing several PAS positive granules and large inclusions that stained strongly with hematoxylin, calcium (von Kossa method) and iron (Prussian blue). The patient was diagnosed with malakoplakia related to a kidney transplant. Despite prolonged treatment with antibiotics, determined by a susceptibility test, the patient did not recover renal function and remained on dialysis. PMID:23195831

  4. What's new in renal and pancreatic transplantation in 2011?

    PubMed

    Weekers, L

    2012-11-01

    At the 11th meeting of the SFT Congress in Montpellier, several presentations were devoted to humoral rejection of kidney transplants, new immunosuppressive drugs, cancer after transplantation, and second pancreas transplantations. The main information drawn from these papers is summarized in this brief review.

  5. Rapid steroid discontinuation for pediatric renal transplantation: a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Lau, Keith K; Haddad, Maha N; Berg, Gerre M; Perez, Richard V; Butani, Lavjay

    2007-08-01

    To determine the outcomes of pediatric renal transplant recipients who received immunosuppression consisting of early withdrawal of corticosteroids at a single Northern California center. Protocols using minimal steroid exposure have been recently reported in adult transplant recipients with successful results. We examined the outcomes of pediatric renal transplant recipients who were managed at our center using a protocol with very early discontinuation of steroids after renal transplantation. We retrospectively studied the medical records of all renal transplant recipients followed at the Children's Hospital at the University of California, Davis Medical Center from 01/2004 to 12/2005. All patients were less than 18 yr of age at the time of transplantation. The immunosuppressive protocol included three tapering daily doses of methylprednisolone, together with five doses of thymoglobulin followed by maintenance therapy with tacrolimus and MMF. Eight patients with equal numbers of males and females were transplanted during this time period. There were equal numbers of Caucasians, African-Americans, Hispanics, and Asians. A total of 37.5% (3/8) of the subjects received preemptive transplantation, 25% (2/8) received peritoneal, and 37.5% (3/8) received hemodialysis before transplantation. The median (range) age at transplantation was 12.3 (3.1-16.0) year with a follow-up of 1.7 (0.9-2.8) year. At one yr post-transplantation, 57% (4/7) of patients still required anti-hypertensives. Three children required erythropoietin supplementation after transplantation. The mean delta height standard deviation score at 12 months was 0.20 +/- 0.56. There were no episodes of clinical acute rejection. One patient switched from tacrolimus to sirolimus due to biopsy-proven CAN. No patient became diabetic or required hypoglycemic agents. Surveillance biopsies showed no subclinical acute rejection in any patient. Steroid-free immunosuppression is safe in children after renal

  6. Experience of bevacizumab in a patient with colorectal cancer after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Müsri, Fatma Yalcin; Mutlu, Hasan; Eryılmaz, Melek Karakurt; Salim, Derya Kıvrak; Coşkun, Hasan Şenol

    2015-01-01

    Bevacizumab is a drug that is widely used for the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Bevacizumab neutralizes vascular endothelial growth factor and can lead to proteinuria and renal damage. In this case, experience on full dose short-time treatment of bevacizumab in a patient under immunosuppressive treatment for renal transplantation with chronic renal failure has been shared. The patients were diagnosed with mCRC 7 months ago. The patient had multiple liver metastases at the time of the diagnosis. He had a history of renal transplantation 2 years ago because of renal failure, and he had been under immunosuppressive treatment for this reason. 5-fluorouracil-leucovorin-irinotecan -bevacizumab regimen was begun for the treatment of mCRC. The dose of bevacizumab was 5 mg/kg/day for 14 days. There was 2.5 g/day of proteinuria at the start of the treatment. However, renal dysfunction progressed, and proteinuria increased to 4 g/day in the 3rd month of treatment. In this case, the experience of using bevacizumab in a patient under immunosuppressive treatment for renal transplantation with chronic failure has been presented.

  7. [Laparoscopic fenestration of lymphocele after renal transplantation: report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Kise, H; Shibahara, T; Matsuura, H; Fumino, M; Hayashi, N; Arima, K; Yanagawa, M; Kawamura, J

    1998-05-01

    Lymphocele after renal transplantation is a complication that often requires surgical treatment. We performed laparoscopic drainage for the postoperative lymphocele in two renal transplantation patients. The patients were suffering from perineal discomfort and urinary frequency due to the lymphocele after the renal transplantation. Percutaneous catheter drainages and injections of tissue sclerosing agents such as povidone-iodine solution and tetracycline were not effective. Then fenestration of the lymphocele by laparoscopic technique was done. This procedure made the lymphatic fluid free from the lymphocele in the retroperitoneal space to the peritoneal cavity following creation of a peritoneal window. There were no apparent complications. The patients were free from symptoms and had no relapse 10 months after the operation. We report the procedure and the results of the laparoscopic fenestration.

  8. The Risk of Septicemia in End-Stage Renal Disease With and Without Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Te-Chun; Wang, I-Kuan; Wei, Chang-Ching; Lin, Cheng-Li; Tsai, Chia-Ta; Hsia, Te-Chun; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is a well-known risk factor for septicemia. Renal transplantation (RTx) is the treatment of choice for ESRD. However, RTx recipients should undergo long-term immunosuppressive therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of septicemia in ESRD patients with and without RTx. This cohort study used the National Health Insurance (NHI) data of Taiwan from 2000 to 2010. The RTx group consisted of 3286 RTx recipients. The non-RTx comparison group also consisted of 3286 subjects with ESRD matched by propensity scores for age, sex, index date, comorbidities, and medications. The subjects were followed until the end of 2011 to evaluate the septicemia risk. The risk of septicemia was lower in the RTx group than the non-RTx group, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.73 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.64–0.84, P < 0.001]. In addition, we observed insignificantly lower intensive care unit (ICU) admission rate (35.8% vs. 39.8%) and lower 30-day all-cause mortality rate (17.2% vs. 18.5%) in the RTx group than the non-RTx group. However, the mean cost for septicemia in the RTx group was insignificantly higher than the non-RTx group (7175 vs. 6421 USD, P = 0.39). RTx recipients had a significantly reduced risk of developing septicemia compared to the propensity-matched non-RTx ESRD patients. The ICU admission and 30-day all-cause mortality rates also slightly decreased in RTx recipients but without statistical significance. PMID:26313801

  9. Male microchimerism at high levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from women with end stage renal disease before kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Albano, Laetitia; Rak, Justyna M; Azzouz, Doua F; Cassuto-Viguier, Elisabeth; Gugenheim, Jean; Lambert, Nathalie C

    2012-01-01

    Patients with end stage renal diseases (ESRD) are generally tested for donor chimerism after kidney transplantation for tolerance mechanism purposes. But, to our knowledge, no data are available on natural and/or iatrogenic microchimerism (Mc), deriving from pregnancy and/or blood transfusion, acquired prior to transplantation. In this context, we tested the prevalence of male Mc using a real time PCR assay for DYS14, a Y-chromosome specific sequence, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 55 women with ESRD, prior to their first kidney transplantation, and compared them with results from 82 healthy women. Male Mc was also quantified in 5 native kidney biopsies obtained two to four years prior to blood testing and in PBMC from 8 women collected after female kidney transplantation, several years after the initial blood testing. Women with ESRD showed statistically higher frequencies (62%) and quantities (98 genome equivalent cells per million of host cells, gEq/M) of male Mc in their PBMC than healthy women (16% and 0.3 gEq/M, p<0.00001 and p = 0.0005 respectively). Male Mc was increased in women with ESRD whether they had or not a history of male pregnancy and/or of blood transfusion. Three out of five renal biopsies obtained a few years prior to the blood test also contained Mc, but no correlation could be established between earlier Mc in a kidney and later presence in PBMC. Finally, several years after female kidney transplantation, male Mc was totally cleared from PBMC in all women tested but one. This intriguing and striking initial result of natural and iatrogenic male Mc persistence in peripheral blood from women with ESRD raises several hypotheses for the possible role of these cells in renal diseases. Further studies are needed to elucidate mechanisms of recruitment and persistence of Mc in women with ESRD.

  10. Acute prostatitis caused by Raoultella planticola in a renal transplant recipient: a novel case.

    PubMed

    Koukoulaki, M; Bakalis, A; Kalatzis, V; Belesiotou, E; Papastamopoulos, V; Skoutelis, A; Drakopoulos, S

    2014-06-01

    We present a unique case of acute bacterial prostatitis caused by a very rare human pathogen, Raoultella planticola, in a renal allograft recipient 3.5 months post transplantation. Only a few cases of human infection by this pathogen have been reported worldwide. The present study reports the case of a 67-year-old man who was admitted to our transplant unit 3.5 months post transplantation with fever, dysuria, suprapubic pain, symptoms and signs of acute prostatitis, and elevated markers of inflammation and prostate-specific antigen. R. planticola was isolated in the urine culture. The patient was treated with ciprofloxacin (based on the antibiogram) and had a full recovery, with satisfactory renal function. To the best of our knowledge, this is not only the first reported case of R. planticola prostatitis, but also the first report of such an infection in a solid organ transplant recipient or in a patient on immunosuppressive medication.

  11. Travel-related disseminated Penicillium marneffei infection in a renal transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Hart, J; Dyer, J R; Clark, B M; McLellan, D G; Perera, S; Ferrari, P

    2012-08-01

    Penicillium marneffei is a thermally dimorphic fungus that causes severe human immunodeficiency virus-related opportunistic infection in endemic areas of Southeast Asia and has rarely been reported in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. We report here the case of an Australian renal transplant patient who presented with disseminated P. marneffei infection shortly after a 10-day holiday to Vietnam, and review all previously published cases of penicilliosis associated with renal transplantation. This is the first reported case, to our knowledge, of P. marneffei infection in an SOT recipient acquired during travel to an endemic country, and highlights the importance of an accurate travel history when opportunistic infection is suspected, as well as giving appropriate health advice to transplant patients who travel.

  12. Travel-related disseminated Penicillium marneffei infection in a renal transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Hart, J; Dyer, J R; Clark, B M; McLellan, D G; Perera, S; Ferrari, P

    2012-08-01

    Penicillium marneffei is a thermally dimorphic fungus that causes severe human immunodeficiency virus-related opportunistic infection in endemic areas of Southeast Asia and has rarely been reported in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. We report here the case of an Australian renal transplant patient who presented with disseminated P. marneffei infection shortly after a 10-day holiday to Vietnam, and review all previously published cases of penicilliosis associated with renal transplantation. This is the first reported case, to our knowledge, of P. marneffei infection in an SOT recipient acquired during travel to an endemic country, and highlights the importance of an accurate travel history when opportunistic infection is suspected, as well as giving appropriate health advice to transplant patients who travel. PMID:22188555

  13. Two consecutive recurrences of crescentic immunoglobulin A nephropathy in a renal transplant recipient

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, N.; Murugananth, S.; Dineshkumar, T.; Dhanapriya, J.; Sakthirajan, R.; Balasubramaniyan, T.

    2016-01-01

    We report a 21-year-old male who developed end-stage renal disease, probably due to immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN), received a renal transplant from his mother, which was lost due to crescentic IgAN after 18 months. Two years later, he received a second transplant from a deceased donor. He developed rapidly progressive graft dysfunction 3 years later. Allograft biopsy revealed crescentic IgAN, which was successfully treated with intravenous steroids and cyclophosphamide. Recurrence of IgAN in two successive allografts in one patient has not been reported previously.

  14. Continuous sulfa prophylaxis for urinary tract infection in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Peters, C; Peterson, P; Marabella, P; Simmons, R L; Najarian, J S

    1983-11-01

    During a 12 to 25 month follow-up period, 252 renal transplant recipients maintained with continuous sulfa prophylaxis were observed for evidence of bacteriuria. Although symptoms were rare, positive cultures were obtained in 6 percent of the patients who responded to conventional antibiotic outpatient therapy. Compared with sulfisoxazole, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole led to slightly fewer infections, especially with gram-negative organisms. Toxicity from sulfa was minimal and occasional leukopenia reversed by temporarily withholding azathioprine. Continuous sulfa prophylaxis in renal transplant patients is therefore safe and effective in minimizing the incidence of urinary tract infection, as well as other opportunistic infections known to be treatable by sulfa agents.

  15. Persistent mediastinal and axillary lymph node tuberculosis in a renal transplant patient with successful outcome.

    PubMed

    Oguz, Y; Yilmaz, M I; Eyileten, T; Caglar, K; Yenicesu, M; Kaya, A; Tasar, M; Saglam, M; Doganci, L; Gulec, B; Oner, K; Oktenli, C; Vural, A

    2006-06-01

    Tuberculosis is an opportunistic infection that carries substantial morbidity and mortality in renal transplant recipients. We report here about a 21 year-old man with a living related renal transplant from his mother who developed persistent extra-pulmonary tuberculosis. The disease showed aggressive invasion to the axillary and mediastinal regions with abscess formations, despite standard antituberculosis treatment. During the course of the disease, immunosuppressive therapy was stopped, and the patient received extraordinary doses of multiple antituberculosis drugs. The patient then showed an uneventful course with good clinical and radiological responses.

  16. Effect of age on the outcome of renal transplantation: A single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Ozkul, Faruk; Erbis, Halil; Yilmaz, Vural Taner; Kocak, Huseyin; Osmanoglu, Ibrahim Ali; Dinckan, Ayhan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the effects of old age on renal transplantation (Tx) results and graft survival, and compared elderly patient population with the young patients. Methods: A total of 1946 renal transplant were performed from 1537 living and 409 cadaveric donors between 2003 and 2014. The recipients were divided into two groups according to their age at the time of transplantation. The young age group consisted of 18-59-year-old, and the elderly group consisted of the ones ≥ 60 years. Results: Acute rejection was seen in 19.5% of the young age group while this rate was 16.7% in the old age group (p=0.535). DGF was seen in 6.3% of the young age group, and in 13.5% of the old age group (p<0.001). Analysis of the overall survival rates demonstrated that 1.6% of the patients in the young age group and 6.8% of the patients in the old age groups died (p=0.003). Conclusions: Renal transplant had high graft survival rates in the elderly as in the young patients. However, the risks for complications were higher in the older age group compared to the younger age group. Thus, it is important to make a careful selection among elderly candidates for renal transplantation. PMID:27648022

  17. Acute renal failure and volume overload syndrome secondary to a femorofemoral arteriovenous fistula angioplasty in a kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Dominique; Desbuissons, Geoffroy; Pallet, Nicolas; Sartorius, Albane; Legendre, Christophe; Mamzer, Marie-France; Sberro Soussan, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Experimental and clinical studies analyzing the impact of AVF on cardiovascular and renal parameters, as well as outcomes, in kidney transplant recipients are lacking. On the other hand, it is not known whether AVF ligation after transplantation modifies hemodynamic parameters and kidney function. We report a case of a renal transplant recipient who developed an acute congestive heart failure accompanied by renal failure, which were triggered by femorofemoral AVF angioplasty. Prompt AVF ligation rapidly reversed clinical symptoms and normalized cardiac and renal functions. This paper illustrates the potential deleterious consequences of high-output AVF after kidney transplantation and raises considerations regarding the impact of the fistula on cardiac status and kidney function after kidney transplantation and, consequently, the management AVF after transplantation. PMID:23533921

  18. Embolization of polycystic kidneys as an alternative to nephrectomy before renal transplantation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, F; Couzi, L; Le Bras, Y; Hubrecht, R; Dodré, E; Geneviève, M; Pérot, V; Wallerand, H; Ferrière, J M; Merville, P; Grenier, N

    2010-10-01

    In autosomal polycystic kidney disease, nephrectomy is required before transplantation if kidney volume is excessive. We evaluated the effectiveness of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) to obtain sufficient volume reduction for graft implantation. From March 2007 to December 2009, 25 patients with kidneys descending below the iliac crest had unilateral renal TAE associated with a postembolization syndrome protocol. Volume reduction was evaluated by CT before, 3, and 6 months after embolization. The strategy was considered a success if the temporary contraindication for renal transplantation could be withdrawn within 6 months after TAE. TAE was well tolerated and the objective was reached in 21 patients. The temporary contraindication for transplantation was withdrawn within 3 months after TAE in 9 patients and within 6 months in 12 additional patients. The mean reduction in volume was 42% at 3 months (p = 0.01) and 54% at 6 months (p = 0.001). One patient required a cyst sclerosis to reach the objective. The absence of sufficient volume reduction was due to an excessive basal renal volume, a missed accessory artery and/or renal artery revascularization. Embolization of enlarged polycystic kidneys appears to be an advantageous alternative to nephrectomy before renal transplantation.

  19. Methods in renal research: kidney transplantation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Tillou, Xavier; Howden, Brian O; Kanellis, John; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Ma, Frank Y

    2016-06-01

    Kidney transplantation in small animals has been crucial in the development of anti-rejection therapies. While there is no substitute for a skilled microsurgeon, there are many aspects of the transplant procedure that can be modified to optimize the reproducibility and utility of the technique. This article provides a detailed description, including video recording, of orthotopic kidney transplantation in the rat. The key variables in the technique are also discussed. PMID:26648592

  20. Metabolic syndrome in hemodialysis patients as a risk factor for new-onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplant: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Bonet, Josep; Martinez-Castelao, Albert; Bayés, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of biochemical abnormalities including cardiovascular and diabetes risk factors. The development of diabetes mellitus after renal transplant represents a major posttransplant complication that may adversely affect graft/patient survival. The aim of this study was to assess the role of metabolic syndrome in patients on hemodialysis as a risk factor for the incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplant. Patients and methods This was a prospective observational epidemiologic study carried out in adult nondiabetic patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis and on the renal transplant waiting list between November 2008 and April 2009. Patients were followed up from Visit 1 (baseline) to 6 months after the renal transplant. The analysis of the role of metabolic syndrome in hemodialysis patients as a risk factor for the incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplant included the estimation of relative risk and its 95% confidence interval (CI). Results A total of 383 evaluable patients were entered into the study (mean age, 52.7 years; male, 57.7%; Caucasian, 90.1%). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome on hemodialysis was 30.4% (95% CI, 25.8%–35.4%). Hypertension was the most prevalent criterion for metabolic syndrome (65.0%), followed by low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (52.7%), abdominal obesity (36.2%), hypertriglyceridemia (32.4%), and impaired glucose (8.9%). After the renal transplant, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was still 25.8%. During the posttransplant period, the incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus reached 13.0% (95% CI, 7.8%–20.6%) and patients with pretransplant metabolic syndrome were 2.6 times (95% CI, 1.043–6.608) more likely to develop new-onset diabetes mellitus after the renal transplant than those without metabolic syndrome. Conclusion The presence of metabolic syndrome in patients undergoing hemodialysis represents an independent risk factor

  1. Safety of Eplerenone for Kidney-Transplant Recipients with Impaired Renal Function and Receiving Cyclosporine A

    PubMed Central

    Barbe, Coralie; Lavaud, Sylvie; Toupance, Olivier; Nazeyrollas, Pierre; Jaisser, Frederic; Rieu, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background Animal studies have highlighted the role of vascular mineralocorticoid receptor during Cyclosporine A-induced nephrotoxicity. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists could improve kidney survival but are not commonly used during renal impairment and in association with several immunosuppressive drugs due to a supposed higher risk of adverse events. We tested the tolerance of eplerenone according to its expected adverse events: hyperkalemia, metabolic acidosis, hypotension, acute kidney failure, or any other adverse event. Methods We conducted a single-center, prospective, open-label study in 31 kidney-transplant recipients with impaired renal function (30 and 50 mL/min/1.73m2) and receiving cyclosporine A. All patients received eplerenone 25 mg/d for 8 weeks. Serum potassium, renal function and expected adverse events were closely monitored. Results Eight patients experienced mild hyperkalemia (>5 mmol/L), one moderate hyperkalemia (>5.5 mmol/L) and had to receive potassium-exchange resin. No severe hyperkalemia (>6 mmol/L) occurred. One acute kidney failure was observed, secondary to diarrhea. Basal serum potassium and bicarbonate were independently associated with a higher risk of developing mild hyperkalemia (>5 mmol/L) under treatment (OR 6.5, p = 0.003 and 0.7, p = 0.007, respectively). A cut-off value of 4.35 mmol/L for basal serum potassium was the best factor to predict the risk of developing mild hyperkalemia (>5 mmol/L). Conclusions Until eGFR falls to 30 mL/min/1.73m2, eplerenone could be safely given to kidney-transplant recipients receiving cyclosporine A, if kalemia is closely monitored. When renal function is impaired and if basal kalemia is >4.35 mmol/L, then clinicians should properly balance risk and benefit of eplerenone use and offer dietary advice. An adequately powered prospective randomized study is now needed to test its efficiency (and safety) in this population. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01834768 PMID:27088859

  2. In-111-labeled leukocytes in the diagnosis of rejection and cytomegalovirus infection in renal transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Forstrom, L.A.; Loken, M.K.; Cook, A.; Chandler, R.; McCullough, J.

    1981-04-01

    Indium-111-labelled (In-111) leukocytes have been shown to be useful in the localization of inflammatory processes, including renal transplant rejection. Using previously reported labelling methods, 63 studies with this agent have been performed in 53 renal transplant patients. Indications for study included suspected rejection or cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Studies were performed in 33 men and 20 women, with ages ranging from 6 to 68 years. Autologous cells were normally used for labeling, although leukocytes obtained from ABO-compatible donors were used in three subjects. Rectilinear scanner and/or scintillation camera images were obtained at 24 hours after intravenous administration of 0.1 to 0.6 mCi of In-111 leukocytes. There was abnormal uptake of In-111-leukocytes in the transplanted kidney in 11 of 15 cases of rejection. In three additional cases of increased transplant uptake, CMV infection was present in two. Abnormal lung uptake was present in 13 of 14 patients with CMV infection. In four additional cases, increased lung uptake was associated with other pulmonary inflammatory disease. Increased lung activity was not seen in patients with uncomplicated transplant rejection. These results suggest that In-111-leukocyte imaging may be useful in the differential diagnosis of rejection versus CMV infection in renal transplant patients.

  3. In-111-labeled leukocytes in the diagnosis of rejection and cytomegalovirus infection in renal transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Forstrom, L.A.; Loken, M.K.; Cook, A.; Chandler, R.; McCullough, J.

    1981-04-01

    Indium-111-labeled (In-111) leukocytes have been shown to be useful in the localization of inflammatory processes, including renal transplant rejection. Using previously reported labeling methods, 63 studies with this agent have been performed in 53 renal transplant patients. Indications for study included suspected rejection or cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Studies were performed in 33 men and 20 women, with ages ranging from 6 to 68 years. Autologous cells were normally used for labeling, although leukocytes obtained from ABO-compatible donors were used in three subjects. Rectilinear scanner and/or scintillation camera images were obtained at 24 hours after intravenous administration of 0.1 to 0.6 mCi of In-111-leukocytes. There was abnormal uptake of In-111-leukocytes in the transplanted kidney in 11 of 15 cases of rejection. In three additional cases of increased transplant uptake, CMV infection was present in two. Abnormal lung uptake was present in 13 of 14 patients with CMV infection. In four additional cases, increased lung uptake was associated with other pulmonary inflammatory disease. Increased lung activity was not seen in patients with uncomplicated transplant rejection. These results suggest that In-111-leukocyte imaging may be useful in the differential diagnosis of rejection versus CMV infection in renal transplant patients.

  4. Update on the treatment of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Maria; Gallo, Ester; Mella, Alberto; Pagani, Fabiola; Biancone, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) represents one of the most severe glomerular diseases, with frequent progression to end-stage renal disease and a high rate of recurrence in renal allografts (30%-50%). Recurrent FSGS portends a negative outcome, with the hazard ratio of graft failure being two-fold higher then that of other glomerulonephritis. Two patterns of clinical presentations are observed: Early recurrence, which is characterized by massive proteinuria within hours to days after implantation of the renal graft, and late recurrence, which occurs several months or years after the transplantation. Many clinical conditions have been recognized as risk factors for recurrence, including younger age, rapid progression of the disease to end-stage renal disease on native kidneys, and loss of previous renal allografts due to recurrence. However, much less is known about the incidence and risk factors of the so-called “de novo” type of FSGS, for which sufferers are transplanted patients without disease on native kidneys; but, rapid development of allograft failure is frequently observed. Management of both forms is challenging, and none of the approaches proposed to date have been demonstrated as consistently beneficial or effective. In the present review we report an update on the available therapeutic strategies for FSGS in renal transplantation within the context of a critical overview of the current literature. PMID:27011905

  5. Risk of renal cancer in liver transplant recipients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xun; Wang, Jing-zhe; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Min; Chen, Pen; Wang, Cun-zu

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation is associated with a significantly increased risk of de novo malignancies, but for renal cancer this risk is less clear. We therefore performed a meta-analysis of published studies to determine whether renal cancer risk in liver transplant recipients (LTRs) was increased. To obtain a more precise conclusion, a systematic search was performed in PubMed and Web of Science databases until June 10, 2015. Standardized incidence ratio (SIR) corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to estimate risk of renal cancer in LTRs. Heterogeneity test, sensitivity analysis, and publishing bias were also performed. We identified 8 eligible studies and performed a meta-analysis on data of 49,654 LTRs with a total follow-up of 121,514.6 patient-years. The SIR for renal cancer was identified a 3.275-fold higher SIR (95% CI: 1.857-5.777; P < 0.001) in LTRs compared with the general population. This systematic review and meta-analysis demonstrated that the LTRs was associated with a significant increase in the incidence of renal cancer. Such association suggests that yearly routine post-transplant surveillance is need for renal cancer in LTRs.

  6. Organ transplantation and replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Cerilli, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 49 chapters. Some of the titles are: Molecular, Genetic, and Clinical Aspects of the HLA System; The Normal Immune Response; Significance of the ABO Antigen System; The Role of Dialysis in the Management of End-Stage Renal Disease; Access for Dialysis; Patient Selection for Renal Transplantation; The Living Donor in Kidney Transplantation; and Kidney Preservation by Cold Storage.

  7. Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Manifest as Gingival Hyperplasia in a Renal Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jung Hyun; Song, Joon Chang; Lee, Sang Hun; Lee, So Young; Kim, Yong Soo; Bang, Byung Kee

    2005-01-01

    Gingival hyperplasia is a frequent complication in transplant patients who receive cyclosporine or calcium channel blockers. We studied an unusual case involving a renal transplant recipient with post-transplant non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that manifested as gingival hyperplasia. We initially consider that it was a side effect of cyclosporine and nifedipine. The lesion did not respond to dose reductions or the withdrawal of cyclosporine and nifedipine, and the gingival hyperplasia progressed in a localized fashion, becoming ulcerated and bleeding easily. Histological examination revealed the presence of malignant lymphoma. PMID:16491832

  8. Impact of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-human leukocyte antigens ligand incompatibility among renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Alam, S.; Rangaswamy, D.; Prakash, S.; Sharma, R. K.; Khan, M. I.; Sonawane, A.; Agrawal, S.

    2015-01-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene shows a high degree of polymorphism. Natural killer cell receptor gets activated once they bind to self-human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) with specific ligand. KIR gene and HLA ligand incompatibility due to the presence/absence of KIR in the recipient and the corresponding HLA ligand in the allograft may impact graft survival in solid organ transplantation. This study evaluates the effect of matches between KIR genes and known HLA ligands. KIR genotypes were determined using sequence specific primer polymerase chain reaction. Presence of certain KIR in a recipient, where the donor lacked the corresponding HLA ligand was considered a mismatch. The allograft was considered matched when both KIR receptor and HLA alloantigen reveald compatibility among recipient and donor. The data revealed better survival among individuals with matched inhibitory KIR receptors and their corresponding HLA ligands (KIR2DL2/DL3-HLAC2, KIR3DL1-HLABw4). On the contrary, no adverse effect was seen for matched activating KIR receptors and their corresponding HLA ligands. One of the activating gene KIR2DS4 showed risk (P = 0.0413, odds ratio = 1.91, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-3.57) association with renal allograft rejection. We conclude that the presence of inhibitory KIR gene leads to better survival; whereas activating motifs show no significant role in renal allograft survival. PMID:25684869

  9. Impact of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-human leukocyte antigens ligand incompatibility among renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Alam, S; Rangaswamy, D; Prakash, S; Sharma, R K; Khan, M I; Sonawane, A; Agrawal, S

    2015-01-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene shows a high degree of polymorphism. Natural killer cell receptor gets activated once they bind to self-human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) with specific ligand. KIR gene and HLA ligand incompatibility due to the presence/absence of KIR in the recipient and the corresponding HLA ligand in the allograft may impact graft survival in solid organ transplantation. This study evaluates the effect of matches between KIR genes and known HLA ligands. KIR genotypes were determined using sequence specific primer polymerase chain reaction. Presence of certain KIR in a recipient, where the donor lacked the corresponding HLA ligand was considered a mismatch. The allograft was considered matched when both KIR receptor and HLA alloantigen reveald compatibility among recipient and donor. The data revealed better survival among individuals with matched inhibitory KIR receptors and their corresponding HLA ligands (KIR2DL2/DL3-HLAC2, KIR3DL1-HLABw4). On the contrary, no adverse effect was seen for matched activating KIR receptors and their corresponding HLA ligands. One of the activating gene KIR2DS4 showed risk (P = 0.0413, odds ratio = 1.91, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-3.57) association with renal allograft rejection. We conclude that the presence of inhibitory KIR gene leads to better survival; whereas activating motifs show no significant role in renal allograft survival.

  10. Video‐assisted thoracoscopic surgery after renal transplantation: A single‐institution experience

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Hideyuki; Sakamoto, Kei; Kikkawa, Takuma; Isaka, Tamami; Oyama, Kunihiro; Murasugi, Masahide; Fuchinoue, Shohei; Tanabe, Kazunari; Onuki, Takamasa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The number of renal transplantations performed for patients with chronic kidney disease has increased in Japan, but little is known about the outcomes in those who subsequently undergo video‐assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). We therefore investigated the outcomes of consecutive patients requiring VATS after renal transplantation at our institute. Methods We retrospectively collected the clinical data for patients undergoing VATS after renal transplantation between January 2003 and September 2014. Specifically, we compared the serum creatinine level and estimated glomerular filtration rate preoperatively and postoperatively, and investigated the postoperative complications. Results In total, 12 patients underwent VATS after renal transplantation during the study period. All patients received two or three immunosuppressive agents. Operative methods used included VATS wedge resection (n = 4), segmentectomy (n = 4), lobectomy (n = 2), mediastinal tumor resection (n = 1), and chest wall tumor resection (n = 1). No patients required perioperative hemodialysis. There were no intraoperative complications, but one patient developed postoperative hemorrhagic cystitis and another developed pneumonia. One patient developed pneumocystis pneumonia 2 months after left lower lobectomy and required hemodialysis. No further hemodialysis was required by any patient. Of note, no statistically significant differences were observed between the preoperative and postoperative serum creatinine level (P = 0.666) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (P = 0.388). There were no in‐hospital deaths. Univariate analysis revealed no significant risk factors for postoperative complications. Conclusion This report showed favorable results for VATS after renal transplantation. However, clinicians must remain vigilant for complications because transplant recipients remain permanently immunocompromised. PMID:26486097

  11. Impact of computer-based patient education on illness-specific knowledge and renal function in adolescents after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Freier, Christina; Oldhafer, Martina; Offner, Gisela; Dorfman, Suzanne; Kugler, Christiane

    2010-08-01

    Interactive CBE holds potential to increase IRK and IRB in adolescents following transplantation. An experimental design assessed the effect of CBE on IRK and renal function in adolescents after transplantation (N = 50, aged 15-20 yr). The IGr (N = 26) completed a nine-item questionnaire (9-iQ) covering IRK and IRB prior to completing CBE at three consecutive time points (T0-T2). The CGr (N = 24) received standard care. Renal function was determined by GFR 12 months before, at start of intervention, and at three, six, and 12 months after intervention (T-1; T0; T3; T4; T5). Overall IRK improved significantly over time (p < 0.0001) for IGr patients relative to CGr. Analysis of IRK demonstrated a significant increase in knowledge from T0 to T1 (p < 0.028) and from T1 to T2 (p < 0.045) in the IGr when compared to the CGr. With respect to IRB, a tendency to improve was seen (p = 0.06). The GFR gradient was stable in the IGr relative to a significant decrease in the CGr (p < 0.001). Our data suggest that interactive CBE improves IRK in adolescent renal transplant recipients. In addition, these programmes demonstrate improvements on IRB.

  12. Iniquities in the access to renal transplant for patients with end-stage chronic renal disease in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Machado, Elaine Leandro; Caiaffa, Waleska Teixeira; César, Cibele Comini; Gomes, Isabel Cristina; Andrade, Eli Iola Gurgel; Acúrcio, Francisco de Assis; Cherchiglia, Mariangela Leal

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this present study is to analyze individual and contextual factors associated with access to renal transplant in Brazil. An observational, prospective and non-concurrent study was carried out, based on data from the National Database on renal replacement therapies in Brazil. Patients undergoing dialysis between 01/Jan/2000 and 31/Dec/2000 were included and monitored up to the point of transplant, death or until the end of the study period. Variables that were analyzed included: individual variables (age, sex, region of residence, primary renal disease, hospitalizations); and context variables concerning both the dialysis unit (level of complexity, juridical nature, hemodialysis machines and location) and the city (geographic region, location and HDI). Proportional hazard models were adjusted with hierarchical entry to identify factors associated with the risk of transplant. The results point to differentials in access according to socio-demographic, clinical, geographic and social factors, indicating that the organ allocation system has not eliminated avoidable disparities for those who compete for an organ in the nationwide waiting list.

  13. Quality of life in a cohort of patients diagnosed with renal failure in childhood and who received renal transplant.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Alberto E; Mazzotti, Eva; Di Ciommo, Vincenzo Maria; Dello Strologo, Luca; Cuttini, Marina

    2012-12-01

    Studies on HRQOL on kidney-transplanted young adults who had a diagnosis of chronic renal failure (CRF) in the pediatric age are uncommon. We studied HRQOL and its predictors in a sample of young adults with CRF in childhood who underwent a renal transplant. We recruited patients ≥18 yr old with renal transplant. We measured HRQOL by a standardized questionnaire on lifestyle, Short Form-36 (SF-36; including a PCS and a MCS; scale: 0-100), the GHQ (for short-term changes in mental health; scale: 0-36), and the MSPSS (with scales for family, friends, and significant others; scale: 0-100). We assessed the association of potential predictors of HRQOL through multiple linear regression models. We studied 66 patients aged 18-34 yr. The average PCS score was 76.4, and the average MCS score was 73.9. The mean GHQ total score was 14.8, and the total scale MSPSS mean score was 70. Severe comorbidities significantly affected the PCS score. Individuals with severe comorbidities had lower PCS scores.

  14. Geographic variation in end-stage renal disease incidence and access to deceased donor kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mathur, A K; Ashby, V B; Sands, R L; Wolfe, R A

    2010-04-01

    The effect of demand for kidney transplantation, measured by end-stage renal disease (ESRD) incidence, on access to transplantation is unknown. Using data from the U.S. Census Bureau, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network/Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (OPTN/SRTR) from 2000 to 2008, we performed donation service area (DSA) and patient-level regression analyses to assess the effect of ESRD incidence on access to the kidney waiting list and deceased donor kidney transplantation. In DSAs, ESRD incidence increased with greater density of high ESRD incidence racial groups (African Americans and Native Americans). Wait-list and transplant rates were relatively lower in high ESRD incidence DSAs, but wait-list rates were not drastically affected by ESRD incidence at the patient level. Compared to low ESRD areas, high ESRD areas were associated with lower adjusted transplant rates among all ESRD patients (RR 0.68, 95% CI 0.66-0.70). Patients living in medium and high ESRD areas had lower transplant rates from the waiting list compared to those in low ESRD areas (medium: RR 0.68, 95% CI 0.66-0.69; high: RR 0.63, 95% CI 0.61-0.65). Geographic variation in access to kidney transplant is in part mediated by local ESRD incidence, which has implications for allocation policy development.

  15. Organ allocation in pediatric renal transplants: is there an optimal donor?

    PubMed

    Pitt, Susan C; Vachharajani, Neeta; Doyle, Maria B; Lowell, Jeffrey A; Chapman, William C; Anderson, Christopher D; Shenoy, Surendra; Wellen, Jason R

    2013-01-01

    The 2005 revised allocation scheme for pediatric renal transplantation made the decision of whether to transplant an available living-donor (LD) kidney or use a deceased-donor (DD) kidney controversial. The aim of this study was to examine kidney allograft utilization, sensitization, and outcomes of pediatric transplant recipients. Between January 2000 and December 2009, 91 consecutive pediatric kidney recipients (<20 yr) were transplanted. The LD (n = 38) and DD (n = 53) groups were similar in age, gender, dialysis status at transplant, warm ischemia time, and overall patient survival. LD recipients were more likely to be Caucasian (92 vs. 69%), receive older allografts (39 ± 10 vs. 23 ± 9 yr), and have fewer human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatches (3.3 ± 1.6 vs. 4.4 ± 1.5, p < 0.01 for all). Graft survival at one, three, and five yr post-transplant was longer for LD recipients (97%, 91%, 87% vs. DD 89%, 79%, 58%, respectively, p < 0.05). At the time of transplant, 17 (33%) DD recipients had an available LD (mean age 40 yr). A greater proportion of all patients were moderately (PRA 21-79%) sensitized post-transplant (p < 0.05). A multivariable analysis of graft survival indicated that the advantage in LD organs was likely due to fewer HLA mismatched in this group. Nonetheless, LD organs appear to provide optimal outcomes in pediatric renal transplants when considering the risk of becoming sensitized post-transplant complicating later use of the LD kidney.

  16. [Clinical results of the various replacement therapies for chronic renal failure: haemodialysis and renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Altieri, P; Piredda, G; Murgia, M G; Onano, B; Meloni, F

    2004-01-01

    Results from recent studies have demonstrated that kidney-transplanted patients have better expectation and quality of life than dialysis patients on a waiting list for kidney transplant. Moreover, the scientific literature has conclusively shown that the survival of the patient and of the kidney graft are better in patients who received a kidney from a living donor, than in patients who received a cadaveric kidney. The main factors that may have a negative influence on the kidney transplant are: the recipient's age, diabetes mellitus, smoking and the time spent on dialysis before the transplant. The shortage of cadaveric kidneys and the small number of living kidney transplant are the main obstacles to a more widespread use of kidney transplantation. Kidney transplant from living donors needs to be implemented because it represents the best treatment for patients with kidney failure and it can decrease or even avoid the need for dialysis before kidney transplantation.

  17. Hormonal profile in pubertal females with chronic renal failure: before and under haemodialysis and after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, J R; Domene, H M; Escobar, M E; Caletti, M G; Ramirez, J A; Rivarola, M A

    1987-07-01

    The effects of chronic renal failure on the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis in 25 girls, aged 9.1 to 20.9 years (mean 13.8) were studied. Twelve patients on conservative treatment (group A) had serum creatinine values between 176.8 and 1502.8 mumol/l; 9 patients were on haemodialysis (group B); and 12 patients had received a renal transplant (group C). Tanner stage of breast development was delayed relative to chronological age in 5 out of 18 patients. Serum oestradiol was normal or low when related to pubertal stages in all groups. Serum LH was elevated in group A and B patients, but normal in group C patients. Serum FSH was elevated in 6 out of the 21 patients in group A plus B, and in 2 out of the 12 patients in group C. Serum PRL was elevated in 12/12, 6/8, and 4/11 patients in group A, B, and C respectively. After GnRH administration to 4 patients in group A, 3 showed delayed or absent gonadotropin response; all 4 patients studied in group C showed normal gonadotropin response. The data indicate a decreased E2 secretion, abnormal gonadotropin and PRL levels and a blunted gonadotropin response to GnRH in girls with chronic renal failure. These results seem to indicate an alteration of the hypothalamic-pituitary unit that can be reversed after successful renal transplantation.

  18. Acute Rejection in Renal Transplant Patients of a Hospital in Bogota, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    García, P.; Huerfano, M; Rodríguez, M; Caicedo, A; Berrío, F; Gonzalez, C

    2016-01-01

    Background: Renal transplantation is the best treatment for end stage renal disease. Acute graft rejection is one of the main complications and may influence graft survival. Objective: To determine the incidence and features of acute cellular rejection (ACR) episodes confirmed by biopsy. Methods: We studied a cohort of 175 patients who underwent renal transplantation between 2004 and 2012 to determine the cumulative incidence of ACR confirmed by biopsy and to identify the associated risk factors using multivariate analysis. Results: The one-year patient survival was 96.6%; the graft survival was 93.7%. The incidence of ACR within one year was 14.3%, of which 46% were observed within 6 months following transplantation. The most frequently observed ACR type was 1B according to the Banff classification system (42%). A relationship between ACR and receipt of a kidney from expanded criteria donors was observed, both in univariate and adjusted multiple log-binomial regression analyses, but only 6.3% of patients received extended criteria donor kidneys. No other relationships between variables were found. Conclusion: ACR frequency in this study was similar to that of other cohorts reported previously. We need a bigger sample of renal transplants from expanded criteria donors, PRA and DSA test to support the results. PMID:27721962

  19. Relevance of chronic kidney disease classification (K/DOQI) in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fresnedo, G; de Francisco, A; Ruiz, J C; Cotorruelo, J G; Alamillo, C G; Valero, R; Castañeda, O; Zalduendo, B; Izquierdo, M J; Arias, M

    2006-10-01

    The National Kidney Foundation has developed guidelines for diagnosis and classification of chronic kidney disease (CKD) but it is not known whether they are applicable to renal transplant patients. This study analyzed the prevalence, the complications, and the influence of the CKD stage on the presence of complications in 506 stable transplant recipients. The mean age of the patients was 52.9 +/- 12 years, 34% were men, and the mean time after transplantation was 9.56 +/- 6.18 years. CKD was present in 90.3% with 9.9% were in CKD stages 4 or 5 with glomerular filtration rates lower than 30 mL/min per 1.73 m(2). The prevalence of anemia, phospho-calcium metabolism disorders, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypertension increased with the stage of CKD. We concluded that CKD and the complications of CKD were highly prevalent in renal transplant recipients. The classification of renal transplant patients by CKD stage may help clinicians to identify patients at increased risk and to target appropriate therapy to improve outcomes.

  20. The Reasons of Renal Transplant Recipients’ Admission to the Emergency Department; a Case Series Study

    PubMed Central

    Uysal, Erdal; Dokur, Mehmet; Bakir, Hasan; Ikidag, Mehmet Ali; Kirdak, Turkay; Kazimoglu, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Renal transplantation are admitted to emergency department (ED) more than normal population. The present brief report aimed to determine the reasons of renal transplant patients’ ED visits. Methods: This retrospective case series study analyzed the reasons of renal transplant recipients’ admission to one ED between 2011 and 2014. The patient data were collected via a checklist and presented using descriptive statistics tools. Results: 41 patients with the mean age of 40.63 ± 10.95 years were studied (60.9% male). The most common ED presenting complaints were fever (36.6%) and abdominal pain (26.8%). Infections were the most common final diagnosis (68.3%). Among non-infectious causes, the most common was acute renal failure (9.7 %). 73.2% of the patients were hospitalized and no cases of graft loss and mortality were seen. Conclusion: The most common reason for ED admission was fever, and infections were the most common diagnosis. Acute gastroenteritis being the most frequent infection and among non-infectious problems, acute renal failure was the most frequent one. PMID:27800542

  1. The prevalence and implications of BK virus replication in non-renal solid organ transplant recipients: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Viswesh, Velliyur; Yost, Sarah E; Kaplan, Bruce

    2015-07-01

    The significance of BK viruria and viremia in non-renal solid organ transplants is poorly understood. A systematic review was performed reviewing the incidence and implications of BK virus replication in non-renal solid organ transplants. Ninety-seven studies were identified, of which 18 including lung, heart, liver and pancreas transplants were included. The overall incidence of BK viruria and viremia was 20% and 3% respectively and 17 cases of BK nephropathy were identified. Heart transplant recipients had a higher overall incidence of BK viremia than other non-renal organ types, and the majority of cases of BK virus-associated nephropathy were in heart transplant recipients. The incidence of BK viremia was significantly lower in non-renal solid organ transplants than that of renal transplant recipients and BK virus-associated nephropathy was rare. BK virus-associated nephropathy may be considered in heart transplant recipients who have unexplained and persistent renal dysfunction not attributable to other causes.

  2. The standard of urological consultation of patients qualified for renal transplant – a review

    PubMed Central

    Antoniewicz, Artur Andrzej; Bogucki, Arkadiusz; Małecki, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Urological consultation is an important step in the procedure of a patient's preparation before placing him/her on a waiting list for a renal transplant. Urological work-up aims to diagnose, treat, and optimize any preexisting urological disease. In the present paper we present the review of the literature together with the authors’ conclusions based on literature and their experience. There is not enough data in current literature and urology manuals on the adequate sequence of the urological management with patients qualified for renal transplant and the literature needs an update. This study presents the crucial steps of the qualification and emphasizes the urge for a more standardized urological approach in patients qualified for a kidney transplantation. PMID:26568885

  3. The standard of urological consultation of patients qualified for renal transplant - a review.

    PubMed

    Antoniewicz, Artur Andrzej; Zapała, Łukasz; Bogucki, Arkadiusz; Małecki, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Urological consultation is an important step in the procedure of a patient's preparation before placing him/her on a waiting list for a renal transplant. Urological work-up aims to diagnose, treat, and optimize any preexisting urological disease. In the present paper we present the review of the literature together with the authors' conclusions based on literature and their experience. There is not enough data in current literature and urology manuals on the adequate sequence of the urological management with patients qualified for renal transplant and the literature needs an update. This study presents the crucial steps of the qualification and emphasizes the urge for a more standardized urological approach in patients qualified for a kidney transplantation. PMID:26568885

  4. Campylobacter jejuni bacteremia and Guillain-Barré syndrome in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Maccario, M; Tarantino, A; Nobile-Orazio, E; Ponticelli, C

    1998-01-01

    In patients who have not undergone transplantation, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is typically preceded by an acute infection often sustained by Campylobacter jejuni. Thus far, in renal transplant recipients, only eight cases of GBS have been reported. In seven patients GBS was attributed to cytomegalovirus infection and in the eighth patient to cyclosporin A neurotoxicity. We report here the case of a GBS in a renal transplant recipient following C. jejuni bacteremia. The infection quickly disappeared after erythromycin and methronidazole therapy. GBS progressively evolved into a paraparesis within 1 week. After reaching a plateau phase, the clinical status improved and the patient was able to walk unassisted after 3 weeks. At this last check-up, 54 months later, the patient was doing well with a functioning graft and only minimal weakness of the lower limbs.

  5. Malignancies in a renal transplant population: The St. Michael's Hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Saleeb, R.; Faragalla, H.; Yousef, G. M.; Stewart, R.; Streutker, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Previous publications have shown an increased incidence of various malignancies amongst renal transplant populations. The objective of this study was to analyze the rate and types of malignancies occurring in the St. Michael's Hospital renal transplant population and to determine whether our results were comparable to those previously published. Methods: After approval by the hospital's research ethic board, review of the records and pathology of the 1584 patients in the renal transplant clinic database patients was performed. The reports dated back to the year 1970. Results: Amongst the 1584 renal transplant patients, 106 patients with 132 dysplastic and malignant posttransplant lesions were identified. The highest incidence amid the malignancies was in nonmelanoma skin malignancies squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), basal cell carcinoma, and Kaposi sarcoma, with a total of 32 patients having 54 separate tumors (2.02% of all patients, 43.2% of tumors). Following skin tumors in incidence were genitourinary (28 tumors), gastrointestinal tract (GIT) lesions (8 adenocarcinomas, 14 dysplastic lesions, 1 low grade neuroendocrine tumor/carcinoid), posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) (10 cases), gynecologic (6 carcinomas), cervical/anal/vulvar dysplasia and invasive (SCCs) (4), and thyroid (3 papillary tumors). Nine patients had tumors of multiple sites/types. With respect to outcome, 14 patients died of malignancy, with the highest mortality being in the GIT malignancies (six patients). Second in mortality were the PTLD and skin tumor groups. Discussion: Information on the incidence and outcome of various malignancies in renal transplant patients is important in designing guidelines for the follow-up of these patients regarding tumor screening and prevention. The rate of malignancies in our group is comparable to that reported in other centers. PMID:27141185

  6. Alemtuzumab induction with tacrolimus monotherapy in 25 pediatric renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jennifer; Barry, John M; Jenkins, Randy; Rozansky, David; Iragorri, Sandra; Conlin, Michael; Al-Uzri, Amira

    2013-12-01

    ALA induction in transplantation has been shown to reduce the need for maintenance immunosuppression. We report the outcome of 25 pediatric renal transplants between 2007 and 2010 using ALA induction followed by tacrolimus maintenance monotherapy. Patient ages were 1-19 yr (mean 14 ± 4.1 yr). Time of follow-up was 7-51 months (mean 26 ± 13 months). Tacrolimus monotherapy was maintained in 48% of patients, and glucocorticoids were avoided in 80% of recipients. Mean plasma creatinine and GFR at one yr post-transplant were 0.88 ± 0.3 mg/dL and 104.4 ± 25 mL/min/1.73m(2) , respectively. One, two, and three-yr actuarial patient and graft survival rates were 100%. The incidence of early AR (<12 months after transplantation) was 12%, while the incidence of late AR (after 12 months) was 16%. Forty-four percent of the recipients recovered normal, baseline renal function after an episode of AR, and 44% had persistent renal dysfunction (plasma creatinine 1.0-1.8 mg/dL). One graft was lost four yr after transplantation due to medication non-compliance. Four (16%) patients developed BK or CMV infection. In our experience, ALA induction with tacrolimus monotherapy resulted in excellent short- and mid-term patient and graft survival in low-immunologic risk pediatric renal transplant recipients.

  7. Hypertension and ace gene insertion/deletion polymorphism in pediatric renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Serdaroglu, Erkin; Mir, Sevgi; Berdeli, Afig

    2005-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to define the risk factors for hypertension and to analyze the influence of insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) on hypertension in pediatric renal transplant recipients. Twenty-six pediatric renal transplant recipients with stable renal function and treated with the same immunosuppression protocol were included in the study. Their mean age was 12.5 +/- 3.3 yr and mean time after transplantation was 38.5 +/- 39.8 month. Twenty-four hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was performed by SpaceLabs (90207) device. The I/D polymorphism of the ACE was determined by PCR and ACE serum level was analyzed by colorimetric method. Hypertension was present in 15 patients (57.7%) by causal blood pressure measurements and 19 patients (73.1%) by ABPM. Twenty-two patients (84.6%) were found to be non-dipper and eight of them had reverse dipping. Only time after transplantation (38 +/- 31 vs. 79 +/-49 month, p = 0.016) and cyclosporin A trough plasma levels (206 +/-78 vs. 119 +/- 83 ng/mL, p = 0.020) influenced the presence of hypertension by multiple logistic regression analysis. The distribution of genotypes were II = 2 (7.7%), ID = 8 (30.8%), DD = 16 (61.5%). There was no effect of ACE gene I/D polymorphism or serum ACE levels on hypertension prevalence and circadian variability of blood pressures. Hypertension was related to the time after transplantation and cyclosporin A levels. The ACE gene I/D polymorphism and serum ACE levels did not influence the blood pressure values or circadian variability of blood pressure among pediatric renal transplant patients. PMID:16176418

  8. Kidney transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Renal transplant; Transplant - kidney ... Barry JM, Conlin MJ. In: Renal transplantation. Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 44. Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes ( ...

  9. Prevalence and subtypes of BK virus in pediatric renal transplant recipients in Russia.

    PubMed

    Momynaliev, K T; Gorbatenko, E V; Shevtsov, A B; Gribanov, O G; Babenko, N N; Kaabak, M M

    2012-03-01

    BKV reactivation is associated with impaired graft function in kidney transplant patients. The objective of our study was to determine the prevalence of BKV infection in consecutive pediatric kidney transplant recipients at our center. Fifty-eight pediatric kidney transplant recipients were studied. The mean age at screening was 9.4 ± 2.8 yr, and samples were obtained at a median of 2.4 ± 1.4 yr after transplantation. BKV-DNA was analyzed in urine and plasma by quantitative PCR. Occurrences of BK-DNAuria and BK-DNAemia did not change in the first two yr after transplantation in children and amounted to 21-23% and 7-8%, respectively (p > 0.05). In the third year, the occurrences of BK-DNAuria and BK-DNAemia increased insignificantly to 27% and 9% in the pediatric patients. We also determined the subtypes and subgroups of BK virus isolated from Russian renal transplant recipients and found that BKV isolates were composed of subtypes Ib-2 and IV/c2. The data we obtained indicate that although only 5% of BKVAN cases occurred between years two and five post-transplantation, it seems necessary to regularly monitor pediatric patients for BKV infection through the third year after transplantation.

  10. A decade of experience with renal transplantation in African-Americans.

    PubMed

    Foster, Clarence E; Philosophe, Benjamin; Schweitzer, Eugene J; Colonna, John O; Farney, Alan C; Jarrell, Bruce; Anderson, Leslie; Bartlett, Stephen T

    2002-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the strategies instituted by the authors' center to decrease the time to transplantation and increase the rate of transplantation for African-Americans, consisting of a formal education program concerning the benefits of living organ donation that is oriented to minorities; a laparoscopic living donation program; use of hepatitis C-positive donors in documented positive recipients; and encouraging vaccination for hepatitis B, allowing the use of hepatitis B core Ab-positive donors. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA The national shortage of suitable kidney donor organs has disproportional and adverse effects on African-Americans for several reasons. Type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension, major etiologic factors for end-stage renal disease, are more prevalent in African-Americans than in the general population. Once kidney failure has developed, African-Americans are disadvantaged for the following reasons: this patient cohort has longer median waiting times on the renal transplant list; African-Americans have higher rates of acute rejection, which affects long-term allograft survival; and once they are transplanted, the long-term graft survival rates are lower in this population than in other groups. METHODS From March 1990 to November 2001 the authors' center performed 2,167 renal transplants; 944 were in African-Americans (663 primary cadaver renal transplants and 253 primary Living donor renal transplants). The retransplants consisted of 83 cadaver transplants and 17 living donor transplants. Outcome measures of this retrospective analysis included median waiting time, graft and patient survival rates, and the rate of living donation in African-Americans and comparable non-African-Americans. Where applicable, data are compared to United Network for Organ Sharing national statistics. Statistical analysis employed appropriate SPSS applications. RESULTS One- and 5-year patient survival rates for living donor kidneys were 97.1% and 91.3% for non

  11. Intestinal reconstruction of the lower urinary tract as a prerequisite for renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Djakovic, Nenad; Wagener, Nina; Adams, Judith; Gilfrich, Christian; Haferkamp, Axel; Pfitzenmaier, Jesco; Toenshoff, Burkhard; Schmidt, Jan; Hohenfellner, Markus

    2009-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To report a two-stage protocol for children in whom bladder reconstruction was followed by kidney transplantation, as about a quarter of children requiring a kidney transplantation show significant lower urinary tract dysfunction, and consequently their bladder is unsuitable for a kidney transplant. PATIENTS AND METHODS Twelve children (median age 9.5 years, range 4.2-16.8) with end-stage renal disease had a lower urinary tract reconstruction before kidney transplantation. The cause of bladder dysfunction and renal failure included posterior urethral valves in five, neuropathic bladder in two, prune-belly syndrome in two, anal-rectum and urethral atresia syndrome in one, primary obstructive uropathy in one and caudal regression syndrome in one. Two children were diverted with an ileal conduit; four had a bladder augmentation, and four had a bladder augmentation with additional continent cutaneous stoma. A continent urinary reservoir was constructed in one boy, and one boy had a Mitrofanoff-only procedure. Subsequently, 11 children were transplanted. RESULTS The graft survival rate was 11 of 12 at 1 year and eight of 12 at 5 years. No patient lost the graft related to the reconstructed lower urinary tract. During the median (range) follow-up of 5.4 (1.6-12.5) years all but one child had free drainage of the upper urinary tract. All 10 children who did not have an ileal conduit are continent. CONCLUSION Reconstruction of the lower urinary tract followed by renal transplantation is a safe and efficient approach. It has the advantage of restoring the lower urinary tract before immunosuppressive therapy, and supplies the best possible reservoir for a transplanted kidney. PMID:19076129

  12. Outcomes following renal transplantation in older people: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The mean age of renal transplant recipients is rising, with age no longer considered a contraindication. Outcomes in older patients have not, however, been fully defined. The aim of our study is to evaluate outcomes in older people following renal transplantation at a Scottish regional transplant unit. Methods All renal transplants from January 2001 to December 2010 were analysed (n = 762). Outcomes following renal transplantation in people over 65 years old were compared to those in younger patients. Outcome measures were: delayed graft function (DGF), primary non-function (PNF), biopsy proven acute rejection (BPAR), serum creatinine at 1 year and graft and recipient survival. Lengths of initial hospital stay and re-admission rates were also assessed. Student’s T-Test was used to analyse continuous variables, Pearson’s Chi-Squared test for categorical variables and the Kaplan-Meier estimator for survival analysis. Results Older recipients received proportionately more kidneys from older donors (27.1% vs. 6.3%; p  <  0.001). Such kidneys were more likely to have DGF (40.7% vs. 16.9%; p < 0.001). Graft loss at 1 year was higher in kidneys from older donors (15.3% vs. 7.6%; p = 0.04). There was no significant difference in patient survival at 1 year based on the age of the donor kidney. Recipient age did not affect DGF (16.9% vs. 18.5%; p = 0.77) or graft loss at 1 year (11.9% vs. 7.8%; p = 0.28). Older recipients were, however, more likely to die in the first year post transplant (6.8% vs. 2.1%; p = 0.03). BPAR was less common in older patients (6.8% vs. 22%; p < 0.01). Older recipients were more likely to be readmitted to hospital (31.8% vs. 10.9%; p < 0.001). Conclusions Older patients experience good outcomes following renal transplantation and donor or recipient age alone should not preclude this treatment. An awareness of this in clinicians managing older patients is important since the prevalence of End

  13. Use of pharmacogenomics in pediatric renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Mara; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto; Ross, Colin J. D.; Carleton, Bruce C.

    2015-01-01

    Transplant recipients receive potent immunosuppressive drugs in order to prevent graft rejection. Therapeutic drug monitoring is the current approach to guide the dosing of calcineurin inhibitors, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi) and mofetil mycophenolate. Target concentrations used in pediatric patients are extrapolated from adult studies. Gene polymorphisms in metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters such as cytochromes CYP3A4 and CYP3A5, UDP-glucuronosyl transferase, and P-glycoprotein are known to influence the pharmacokinetics and dose requirements of immunosuppressants. The implications of pharmacogenomics in this patient population is discussed. Genetic information can help with achieving target concentrations in the early post-transplant period, avoiding adverse drug reactions and drug-drug interactions. Evidence about genetic studies and transplant outcomes is revised. PMID:25741362

  14. Expression of granzyme B during primary cytomegalovirus infection after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wever, P C; Spaeny, L H; van der Vliet, H J; Rentenaar, R J; Wolbink, A M; Surachno, J; Wertheim, P M; Schellekens, P T; Hack, C E; ten Berge, I J

    1999-03-01

    CD8+ T cells employ granzyme B (GrB) to induce apoptosis in target cells. Increased expression of GrB has been put forward as a diagnostic marker in transplant rejection and viral infection. Three-color flow cytometric analysis revealed that peripheral blood CD8+ T lymphocytosis during primary cytomegalovirus infection after renal transplantation resulted from expansion of a CD8+GrB+CD62L+ T cell subset that was almost absent during stable transplant function or acute rejection. This expansion coincided with a temporary increase in systemic soluble GrB (sGrB) levels. No such increase was observed during stable transplant function or acute rejection. Thus, the primary immune response to cytomegalovirus infection is accompanied by appearance of CD8+GrB+CD62L+ T cells and increased sGrB levels in the peripheral blood compartment. Determination of the latter may provide a novel approach for monitoring viral infections.

  15. Postrenal transplant urinary leakage caused by segmental infarction of a renal allograft treated by partial nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Salehipour, Mehdi; Roozbeh, Jamshid; Eshraghian, Ahad; Nikeghbalian, Saman; Salahi, Heshmatollah; Bahador, Ali; Malek-hosseini, Seyed Ali

    2011-04-01

    Kidney transplant is the final treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease. Urinary leakage is the most-common surgical complication early after transplant. Another complication in the early posttransplant period is segmental allograft infarction. We report a kidney recipient who developed urinary leakage secondary to a segmental infarction of the upper pole of the transplanted kidney 2 months after transplant. The patient was treated successfully by a partial nephrectomy of the infracted upper lobe of the kidney. Three months after the partial nephrectomy of the allograft, serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine were normal, and the patient was able to partake in her daily activities. Partial nephrectomy in the context of infarction of a kidney allograft is safe and can be used in similar cases.

  16. Mesenchymal stromal cells in renal transplantation: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Casiraghi, Federica; Perico, Norberto; Cortinovis, Monica; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Lifelong immunosuppressive therapy is essential to prevent allograft rejection in transplant recipients. Long-term, nonspecific immunosuppression can, however, result in life-threatening complications and fail to prevent chronic graft rejection. Bone marrow (BM)-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have emerged as a potential candidate for cell-based therapy to modulate the immune response in organ transplantation. These cells can repair tissue after injury and downregulate many of the effector functions of immune cells that participate in the alloimmune response, converting them into regulatory cells. The findings of preclinical and initial clinical studies support the potential tolerance-inducing effects of MSCs and highlight the unanticipated complexity of MSC therapy in kidney transplantation. In animal models of transplantation MSCs promote donor-specific tolerance through the generation of regulatory T cells and antigen-presenting cells. In some settings, however, MSCs can acquire proinflammatory properties and contribute to allograft dysfunction. The available data from small clinical studies suggest that cell infusion is safe and well tolerated by kidney transplant recipients. Ongoing and future trials will provide evidence regarding the long-term safety of MSC therapy and determine the optimum cell source (either autologous or allogeneic) and infusion protocol to achieve operational tolerance in kidney transplant recipients. These studies will also provide additional evidence regarding the risks and benefits of MSC infusion and will hopefully offer definitive answers to the important questions of when, where, how many and which types of MSCs should be infused to fully exploit their immunomodulatory, pro-tolerogenic and tissue-repairing properties. PMID:26853275

  17. Basic and clinical research in the AMC Renal Transplant Unit.

    PubMed

    ten Berge, Ineke J M; Bemelman, Fréderike J

    2014-10-01

    Our research is aimed at characterization of the antiviral and allo-immune responses in kidney transplant recipients. In particular, we are interested in the differentiation, effector function and memory formation of T cells specific for the latent viruses cytomegalovirus (CMV) and BK virus (BKV) and in the impact of virus-specific immune responses on alloimmunity. Furthermore, we perform studies towards the most optimal, tailor-made immunosuppressive drug regimen and towards the impact of immunosuppression on infectious diseases; cognitive function and cardiovascular status of kidney transplant recipients.

  18. Role of claudins in renal calcium handling.

    PubMed

    Negri, Armando Luis

    2015-01-01

    Paracellular channels occurring in tight junctions play a major role in transepithelial ionic flows. This pathway includes a high number of proteins, such as claudins. Within renal epithelium, claudins result in an ionic selectivity in tight junctions. Ascending thick limb of loop of Henle (ATLH) is the most important segment for calcium reabsorption in renal tubules. Its cells create a water-proof barrier, actively transport sodium and chlorine through a transcellular pathway, and provide a paracellular pathway for selective calcium reabsorption. Several studies have led to a model of paracellular channel consisting of various claudins, particularly claudin-16 and 19. Claudin-16 mediates cationic paracellular permeability in ATLH, whereas claudin-19 increases cationic selectivity of claudin-16 by blocking anionic permeability. Recent studies have shown that claudin-14 promoting activity is only located in ATLH. When co-expressed with claudin-16, claudin-14 inhibits the permeability of claudin-16 and reduces paracellular permeability to calcium. Calcium reabsorption process in ATLH is closely regulated by calcium sensor receptor (CaSR), which monitors circulating Ca levels and adjusts renal excretion rate accordingly. Two microRNA, miR-9 and miR-374, are directly regulated by CaSR. Thus, miR-9 and miR-374 suppress mRNA translation for claudin-14 and induce claudin-14 decline.

  19. Percutaneous Therapy of Ureteral Obstructions and Leak After Renal Transplantation: Long-Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Aytekin, Cueneyt Boyvat, Fatih; Harman, Ali; Ozyer, Umut; Colak, Turan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2007-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of percutaneous therapy of ureteral complications after renal transplantation. Between January 2000 and June 2006 we percutaneously treated 26 renal transplant patients with ureteral obstruction (n=19) and leak (n=7). Obstructions were classified as early (<2 months after transplantation) or late (>2 months). Patients with leak were treated with nephro-ureteral catheter placement and subsequent double-J stenting. Balloon dilatation, stent placement, and basket extraction were used to treat ureteral obstructions. Patients were followed with ultrasonography. No major procedure-related complication occurred. The mean follow-up time was 34.3 months (range: 6 to 74 months). Initial clinical success was achieved in all 19 patients with obstruction and 6 of 7 patients with leak. Four of 9 early obstructions and 4 of 10 late obstructions recurred during the follow-up. All recurrences were initially managed again with percutaneous methods, including cutting balloon technique and metallic stent placement. Although there was no recurrence in patients with successfully treated leak, stricture was seen at the previous leak site in two patients. These strictures were also successfully managed percutaneously. We conclude that in the treatment of ureteral obstruction and leak following renal transplantation, percutaneous therapy is an effective alternative to surgery. However, further interventions are usually needed to maintain long-term patency.

  20. Influenza vaccination on renal transplant patients is safe and serologically effective.

    PubMed

    Grekas, D; Alivanis, P; Kiriazopoulou, V; Dioudis, C; Sioulis, A; Derveniotis, V; Tourkantonis, A

    1993-11-01

    Since immunosuppressed patients are at higher risk of serious influenza virus infection than healthy subjects, we decided to study the serological effectiveness of influenza vaccination on renal transplant patients, despite the theoretical aspect that such treatment could induce glomerular lesions through an immunological process. Forty transplant patients aged from 20 to 50 years with well functioning renal graft and no febrile episode were studied. Blood samples were collected before the intramuscular injection of 0.5 ml of multivalent influenza vaccine (PASTEUR MERIEUX SERUM VACCINS), at one and at two months after the vaccination. Before vaccination, the antibody titers to influenza virus ranged from 0 to 1/20 and after vaccination from 1/20 to 1/320. One month after vaccination 17/40 (42.5%), 18/31 (58%) and 16/33 (48%) patients showed a four-fold or greater increase of serum influenza antibody titers to antigens A/H3N2, A/H1N1 and B, respectively. A similar response at two months in relation to the first month response rate after vaccination was found in 15/17 (88%), 18/18 (100%), and 15/16 (93%) of transplant patients for the above mentioned three antigens. Side-effects were observed in two of the studied patients. Serum creatinine and urine protein were not changed. Also acute graft rejection episodes were not observed. It is suggested that influenza vaccination is safe and serologically effective on renal transplant patients.

  1. Opportunistic infections (non-cytomegalovirus) in live related renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Vinod, P. B.; Sharma, Raj Kumar

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of review was increasing number of opportunistic infections with use of newer immunosuppression and difficulty in diagnosis and management of such patients. For this review, MEDLINE database was searched from 2000 to 2006 with the keywords of opportunistic infections in renal transplantation. Opportunistic infection is a serious clinical complication in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy after kidney transplantation. The two major factors for successful renal transplantation are better control of rejection and better prevention and treatment of infection. In renal allograft recipient, immunosuppressive drug therapy is the major cause of immunocompromised status and occurrence of infections, which arise most commonly as a result of invasion by endogenous opportunists. The opportunistic infections with varicella zoster viruses, parvovirus B-19, polyomavirus, nocardia and mucormycosis in immunosuppressed patients were present with severe complications that are reviewed in this article. As a result of use of strong immunosuppressive drugs like tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetyl and antirejection therapy with antithymocyte globulins, these infections are now seen frequently, so they should always be included in differential diagnostic consideration. New diagnostic procedures and new treatment strategies are required to allow early detection and successful treatment of opportunistic infections in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:19672339

  2. Pulse pressure is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular disease in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fresnedo, G; Escallada, R; Rodrigo, E; de Francisco, A L M; Sanz de Castro, S; Ruiz, J C; Piñera, C; Cotorruelo, J G; Arias, M

    2003-08-01

    Elevated pulse pressure in the general population has been shown to be associated with cardiovascular disease, which is the main cause of death in renal transplant patients. We investigated the effects that a wide pulse pressure has on cardiovascular disease after renal transplantation in a cohort of 532 transplant patients with functioning grafts for more than one year. Patients were classified into two groups depending on whether the one-year pulse pressure was less than or greater than 65 mm Hg. We analyzed patient survival, posttransplant cardiovascular disease and principle causes of death. Five- and ten-year patient survival were lower among the group with higher pulse pressures. The main cause of death was vascular disease in both groups. The presence of posttransplant cardiovascular disease was higher among the group with higher pulse pressures (RR=1.73). In addition, the incidence of an elevated pulse pressure was directly associated with recipient age and posttransplant diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, pulse pressure represents an independent risk factor for increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in renal transplant patients.

  3. Urological complications of renal transplantation: the impact of double J ureteric stents.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, M. L.; Veitch, P. S.; Donnelly, P. K.; Bell, P. R.

    1991-01-01

    In a 10 year series of 350 consecutive renal transplant operations, the overall urological complication rate was 7.7%. During this period double J stents were introduced and were used either in the treatment of actual urological complications or as a prophylactic measure to protect ureters which had been damaged at retrieval. A total of 34 double J stents were used in 33 patients. The indications were: ureteric obstruction (n = 13), urinary leak (n = 5), short transplant ureter anastomosed using an extravesical ureteroneocystostomy (n = 10) and ureteric injury at the time of organ retrieval (n = 6). Thirty-two double J stents were inserted at open operation and two were inserted by an antegrade method after percutaneous nephrostomy. Improvement in renal function occurred in 16 out of the 18 cases of urological complications. No kidneys were lost and there were no deaths as a direct result of these complications. In a number of cases the insertion of a double J stent was the only treatment, thus eliminating the need for more complex surgery. All 16 patients who had a ureteric stent inserted as a prophylactic measure at the time of transplantation made uncomplicated postoperative recoveries. Urinary tract infection was relatively common (27%) after double J stent insertion, but other complications were rare. In conclusion, double J stents have proved to be a useful adjunct in the management of renal transplant related urological complications. PMID:1929136

  4. [Postbiopsy giant pseudoaneurysm in renal transplant: treatment with embolization].

    PubMed

    Zaragozano Guillén, R; García Díez, A I; Cobos Hernández, M V; Yagüe Romeo, D

    1998-03-01

    Pseudoaneurism in renal grafts is a well known complication of the percutaneous biopsy. Colour Doppler has been shown to be the choice technique for their diagnosis and subsequent control, the most effective treatment being embolization. This paper presents an unusual form of pseudoaneurism in terms of its size (up to 8 cm diameter) in a renal graft, following performance of a percutaneous biopsy with automatic needle. The findings of the colour Doppler study and the angiography are shown and discussed, as well as the treatment by embolization with metal spirals which achieved the stable, complete occlusion of the lesion after six months control. PMID:9616940

  5. Maternally acquired IgG immunity in neonates born to renal transplanted women.

    PubMed

    Viana, Patrícia Oliveira; Ono, Erika; Dinelli, Maria Isabel Saraiva; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares; Santos, Amélia Miyashiro Nunes Dos; Sass, Nelson; Moraes-Pinto, Maria Isabel de

    2015-06-17

    Neonates born to renal transplanted women are exposed in utero to immunosuppressors and to antenatal conditions that may predispose the neonate to a high risk of prematurity and intrauterine growth retardation. These factors might interfere with the transfer of maternal IgG immunity. Total IgG levels and specific antibodies to measles, varicella, tetanus, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (serotypes 4,6B,9V,14,18C,19F and 23F) were evaluated on maternal and cord blood samples of 23 sets of renal transplanted women and their newborns and 32 sets of healthy women-newborns at term. Total IgG levels were measured by nephelometry and specific antibodies, by ELISA. Renal transplanted mothers had lower median tetanus antibodies (0.67IU/mL) than controls (1.53IU/mL; p=0.017). Neonates from renal transplanted mothers had lower median tetanus antibodies (0.95IU/mL) than controls (1.97IU/mL, p=0.008). Antibodies to measles, varicella, Hib and the 7 serotypes of S. pneumoniae were similar between groups. Maternal antibodies were associated with an increase in neonatal antibodies for all antigens; gestational age was associated with an increase in Hib neonatal antibodies. Preeclampsia was associated with a decrease in neonatal total IgG and serotype 4 S. pneumoniae antibodies; chronic hypertension was associated with a decrease in neonatal serotype 6B S. pneumoniae antibodies. As neonates from transplanted women may be born with lower tetanus antibodies than controls, efforts should be made to keep maternal vaccines up-to-date. Clinical antenatal care with control of preeclampsia, chronic hypertension and prevention of premature delivery might also contribute to neonatal antibody levels to specific antigens at birth. PMID:25987539

  6. [Use of related live donors in renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Broyer, M

    1996-06-01

    Collecting pertinent information is first step in assessing the use of living-related kidneys for transplantation. Current bioethics legislation in France limits kidney donation to first-degree family members and spouses in emergency situations. Severe penalties are inflicted for use of other donors or sale of organs. Further valuable information can be obtained from reports in the literature on complications in donors and on the advantages of living donor organs. The proportion of live donors in France is small (3.5% from 1984 through 1993) indicating that transplantation teams prefer cadaver organs except in pediatric cases. The proportion of live donor organs transplanted in northern Europe and North America is much higher. A quick survey of French teams show that opinions and practices vary. Questions still under debate include how to guarantee freedom to refuse or accept, a freedom directly related to correct information. Several propositions have been made in an attempt to harmonize management. First, an information sheet could be distributed during the early discussions, outlining the advantages and disadvantages of live organ donation. A list of complementary examinations could also be established to identify possible contraindications for nephrectomy and define exclusion criteria. A similar procedure adopted by all transplantation teams could be based on these propositions presented in the appendix. Potential donors could then benefit from uniform protection. PMID:8685149

  7. Phaeohyphomycosis in renal transplantation: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Walmar Roncalli Pereira; Borsato, Maria Fernanda Longo; Dabronzo, Maria Luiza Ducati; Festa Neto, Cyro; Rocha, Larissa Aragão; Nunes, Ricardo Spina

    2016-01-01

    Phaeohyphomycosis is an infection caused by a filamentous fungus that contains pigment melanin in its cell wall. We report two cases caused by Exophiala sp. emphasizing the clinical variability of the disease, as well as diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties of this opportunistic infection in immunosuppressed patients (kidney transplant). PMID:26982786

  8. Phaeohyphomycosis in renal transplantation: report of two cases*

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Walmar Roncalli Pereira; Borsato, Maria Fernanda Longo; Dabronzo, Maria Luiza Ducati; Festa Neto, Cyro; Rocha, Larissa Aragão; Nunes, Ricardo Spina

    2016-01-01

    Phaeohyphomycosis is an infection caused by a filamentous fungus that contains pigment melanin in its cell wall. We report two cases caused by Exophiala sp. emphasizing the clinical variability of the disease, as well as diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties of this opportunistic infection in immunosuppressed patients (kidney transplant). PMID:26982786

  9. Renal transplantation induces mitochondrial uncoupling, increased kidney oxygen consumption, and decreased kidney oxygen tension.

    PubMed

    Papazova, Diana A; Friederich-Persson, Malou; Joles, Jaap A; Verhaar, Marianne C

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is an acknowledged pathway to renal injury and ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) and is known to reduce renal oxygen tension (Po2). We hypothesized that renal I/R increases oxidative damage and induces mitochondrial uncoupling, resulting in increased oxygen consumption and hence kidney hypoxia. Lewis rats underwent syngenic renal transplantation (TX) and contralateral nephrectomy. Controls were uninephrectomized (1K-CON) or left untreated (2K-CON). After 7 days, urinary excretion of protein and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances were measured, and after 14 days glomerular filtration rate (GFR), renal blood flow, whole kidney Qo2, cortical Po2, kidney cortex mitochondrial uncoupling, renal oxidative damage, and tubulointerstitial injury were assessed. TX, compared with 1K-CON, resulted in mitochondrial uncoupling mediated via uncoupling protein-2 (16 ± 3.3 vs. 0.9 ± 0.4 pmol O2 · s(-1)· mg protein(-1), P < 0.05) and increased whole kidney Qo2 (55 ± 16 vs. 33 ± 10 μmol O2/min, P < 0.05). Corticomedullary Po2 was lower in TX compared with 1K-CON (30 ± 13 vs. 47 ± 4 μM, P < 0.05) whereas no significant difference was observed between 2K-CON and 1K-CON rats. Proteinuria, oxidative damage, and the tubulointerstitial injury score were not significantly different in 1K-CON and TX. Treatment of donors for 5 days with mito-TEMPO reduced mitochondrial uncoupling but did not affect renal hemodynamics, Qo2, Po2, or injury. Collectively, our results demonstrate increased mitochondrial uncoupling as an early event after experimental renal transplantation associated with increased oxygen consumption and kidney hypoxia in the absence of increases in markers of damage.

  10. Ethical aspects of renal transplantation from living donors.

    PubMed

    Bruzzone, P; Berloco, P B

    2007-01-01

    Kidney transplantation from living donors is widely performed all over the world. Living nephrectomy for transplantation has no direct advantages for the donor other than increased self-esteem, but it at least remains an extremely safe procedure, with a worldwide overall mortality of 0.03%. This theoretical risk for the donor seems to be justified by the socioeconomic advantages and increased quality of life of the recipient, especially in selected cases, such as pediatric patients, when living donor kidney transplantation can be performed in a preuremic phase, avoiding the psychological and physical stress of dialysis, which in children is not well tolerated and cannot prevent retarded growth. According to the Ethical Council of the Transplantation Society, commercialism must be effectively prevented, not only for ethical but also medical reasons. The risks are too high, not only for the donors, but also for the recipients, as a consequence of poor donor screening and evaluation with consequent transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or other infective agents, as well as of inappropriate medical and surgical management of donors and also recipients, who are often discharged too early. Most public or private insurance companies consider kidney donation a safe procedure without long-term impairment and therefore do not increase the premium, whereas recipient insurance of course should cover hospital fees for the donors. "Rewarded gifting" or other financial incentives to compensate for the inconvenience and loss of income related to the donation are not advisable, at least in our opinion. Our Center does not perform anonymous living organ donation or "cross-over" transplantation. PMID:17692612

  11. Ethical aspects of renal transplantation from living donors.

    PubMed

    Bruzzone, P; Berloco, P B

    2007-01-01

    Kidney transplantation from living donors is widely performed all over the world. Living nephrectomy for transplantation has no direct advantages for the donor other than increased self-esteem, but it at least remains an extremely safe procedure, with a worldwide overall mortality of 0.03%. This theoretical risk for the donor seems to be justified by the socioeconomic advantages and increased quality of life of the recipient, especially in selected cases, such as pediatric patients, when living donor kidney transplantation can be performed in a preuremic phase, avoiding the psychological and physical stress of dialysis, which in children is not well tolerated and cannot prevent retarded growth. According to the Ethical Council of the Transplantation Society, commercialism must be effectively prevented, not only for ethical but also medical reasons. The risks are too high, not only for the donors, but also for the recipients, as a consequence of poor donor screening and evaluation with consequent transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or other infective agents, as well as of inappropriate medical and surgical management of donors and also recipients, who are often discharged too early. Most public or private insurance companies consider kidney donation a safe procedure without long-term impairment and therefore do not increase the premium, whereas recipient insurance of course should cover hospital fees for the donors. "Rewarded gifting" or other financial incentives to compensate for the inconvenience and loss of income related to the donation are not advisable, at least in our opinion. Our Center does not perform anonymous living organ donation or "cross-over" transplantation.

  12. Hafnia alvei pyelonephritis in a renal transplant recipient: case report and review of an under-recognized nosocomial pathogen.

    PubMed

    Cardile, A P; Forbes, D; Cirigliano, V; Stout, B; Das, N P; Hsue, G

    2011-08-01

    We describe the first case to our knowledge of Hafnia alvei pyelonephritis in a renal transplant recipient. Clinicians should consider this under-recognized pathogen when clinically evaluating immunosuppressed patients with a history of invasive procedures. PMID:21299775

  13. Pre-transplant gingival hyperplasia predicts severe cyclosporin-induced gingival overgrowth in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Varga, E; Lennon, M A; Mair, L H

    1998-03-01

    The relationship between the pre-transplant periodontal status and the development of post-transplant gingival overgrowth was investigated in a longitudinal study. The periodontal condition of 35 patients was examined on 2 occasions while they were on the transplant waiting list and then at 4-6, 10-12, 16 and 20 weeks post-transplant. At each visit the plaque index, the bleeding index and a pocket index (CPITN) were measured. Dental impressions were taken of the pre- and post-transplant gingival condition and used to make stone models which were used to score the gingival overgrowth index (GOI). The patients divided into 3 distinct groups having severe (n=13), mild (n=16) or no post-transplant gingival overgrowth (n=6). Only 1 of the patients had taken cyclosporin prior to inclusion into the study. All the patients who developed severe overgrowth had evidence of gingival hyperplasia before the transplant. There was no difference in the serum cyclosporin levels between the three groups (chi2<2.28, p>0.319). Furthermore, there was no statistical difference for any of the periodontal indices. This study indicates that the hyperplastic gingival inflammatory response of some individuals appears to be potentiated by cyclosporin resulting in severe post-transplant overgrowth. In other patients the same reaction may allow the fibroblastic activity to occur to an extent where it produces a mild clinically apparent overgrowth.

  14. Studies on Erythropoiesis in Uremic and Post-Transplant (Renal) Patients Utilizing Radioactive Iron and Chromium

    PubMed Central

    Farooki, M. S.; Kimber, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    The association of anemia with chronic renal disease is well known. The striking hematologic improvement following a successful renal allotransplantation led to the present study. Using radioactive 59Fe, ferrokinetic measurements were carried out in nine uremic patients (seven with and two without anemia), four post-allotransplant cases, three patients with iron deficiency anemia and a group of five normal subjects. Erythrocyte life-span was calculated by 51Cr-labelled, autotransfused red cells in all patients who had had transplants and in three patients with renal anemia. The results showed that in patients with renal anemia the plasma radioiron clearance was slightly delayed but the 59Fe incorporation into the circulating erythrocytes was significantly decreased. Red cell life-span was moderately shortened in two out of three uremic patients investigated. The findings constitute evidence of ineffective erythropoiesis in patients with renal anemia. By comparison, the four transplant patients showed normal 59Fe plasma clearance and red cell incorporation; the 51Cr erythrocyte survival was normal in all four patients. PMID:4931770

  15. Return to dialysis after renal transplantation. Which would be the best way?

    PubMed

    Arias, Manuel; Escallada, Rafael; de Francisco, Angel L Martín; Rodrigo, Emilio; Fernández-Fresnedo, Gema; Setién, Ma Angeles; Piñera, Celestino; Ruiz, Juan Carlos; Herráez, Isabel; Cotorruelo, Julio

    2002-05-01

    The exact moment to return to dialysis when a graft fails has not clearly been established. Furthermore, there is no agreement with respect to whether the guidelines accepted for patients entering dialysis for the first time are adequate for this subgroup of patients with advanced renal failure, due to the special characteristics of these patients, derived from the immunosuppressive medications they are taking among other accompanying factors. We reviewed a group of renal transplant patients who returned to dialysis and compared them with a group of patients entering dialysis for the first time. Patients with chronic renal failure due to graft failure had a poorer renal function at the time entering dialysis and a more profound anemia. Additionally, complications considered such as the number of hospital admissions during the first year after initiation of dialysis were considerably higher in the group of transplanted patients. We advocate for an earlier referral to the dialysis unit, a more aggressive erythropoietin therapy in the phase of advanced renal failure due to chronic allograft nephropathy, and in selected cases retransplantation before definitive graft loss.

  16. Renal failure and abdominal hypertension after liver transplantation: determination of critical intra-abdominal pressure.

    PubMed

    Biancofiore, Gianni; Bindi, Lucia; Romanelli, Anna Maria; Bisà, Massimo; Boldrini, Antonella; Consani, Giovanni; Danella, Augusta; Urbani, Lucio; Filipponi, Franco; Mosca, Franco

    2002-12-01

    There is growing interest in measuring intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) in postsurgical and critically ill patients because increased pressure can impair various organs and functions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different IAP levels on the postoperative renal function of subjects undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation. IAP was measured every 8 hours with the urinary bladder pressure method for at least 72 hours after surgery. At the end of the study, the patients were classified on the basis of their IAP values: < or = 18 mm Hg (group A), 19 to 24 mm Hg (group B), > or = 25 mm Hg (group C). The three groups were compared in terms of the incidence of acute renal failure (defined as blood creatinine > 1.5 mg/dL or an increase in the same of > 1.1 mg/dL within 72 hours of surgery), hourly diuresis, blood creatinine, the filtration gradient, hemodynamic variations, and outcome. The incidence of renal failure was higher among the subjects in group C (P < .05 versus group A and < .01 versus group B), who also had higher creatinine levels (P < .01), a greater need for diuretics (P < .01) and a worse outcome (P < .05). Receiver Operator Characteristic curve analysis showed that an abdominal pressure of 25 mm Hg had the best sensitivity/specificity ratio for renal failure. An intra-abdominal pressure of > or = 25 mm Hg is an important risk factor for renal failure in subjects undergoing liver transplant.

  17. Renal denervation of the native kidneys for drug-resistant hypertension after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dobrowolski, Linn C.; Bemelman, Frederike J.; ten Berge, Ineke J.M.; van den Born, Bert-Jan H.; Reekers, Jim A.; Krediet, C.T. Paul

    2015-01-01

    There is a strong rationale for renal denervation (RDN) of the native kidneys in kidney transplant recipients with treatment-resistant hypertension. We present a patient with a stable graft function, who underwent RDN for posttransplant therapy-resistant hypertension (24-h ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM) 143/89 mmHg, while compliantly using five different antihypertensive agents). After RDN, BP measurements and orthostatic complaints required withdrawal of two antihypertensive agents and halving a third. At 6 months, ABPM was 134/84 mmHg and allograft function remained unchanged. This case calls for designing well-designed prospective studies on RDN in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:25713714

  18. Risk Factors for Graft Failure and Death following Geriatric Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyungjin; Yu, Hoon; Shin, Eunhye; Kim, Young Hoon; Park, Su-Kil; Jo, Min-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background Population aging is a major health concern in Asian countries and it has affected the age distribution of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). As a consequence, the need for kidney transplantation in the geriatric population has increased, but the shortage of donors is an obstacle for geriatric renal transplantation. The aim of this study was to evaluate risk factors for graft failure and death in geriatric renal transplantation. Methods Kidney transplantations performed in a tertiary hospital in South Korea from May 1995 to December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Recipients younger than 60 years of age or who underwent other organ transplantations were excluded. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to assess patient and graft survival. A Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate risk factors for graft failure and patient death. Results A total of 229 kidney transplantation patients were included. Graft survival at 1, 5, and 10 years were 93.2%, 82.9%, and 61.2% respectively. Patient survival at 1, 5, and 10 years were 94.6%, 86.9%, and 68.8%, respectively. According to the Cox multivariate analysis, ABO incompatibility (hazard ratio [HR] 3.91, p < 0.002), DGF (HR 3.544, p < 0.004), CMV infection (HR 2.244, p < 0.011), and HBV infection (HR 6.349, p < 0.015) were independent risk factors for graft survival. Recipient age (HR 1.128, p < 0.024), ABO incompatibility (HR 3.014, p < 0.025), CMV infection (HR 2.532, p < 0.010), and the number of HLA mismatches (HR 1.425, p < 0.007) were independent risk factors for patient death. Conclusion Kidney transplantation in the geriatric population showed good clinical outcomes. ABO incompatibility, DGF, CMV infection, and HBV infection were risk factors for graft failure and the recipient age, ABO incompatibility, CMV infection, and the number of HLA mismatches were risk factors for patient death in geriatric renal transplantation. PMID:27074003

  19. Endocarditis due to Burkholderia cepacia and an intracardiac foreign body in a renal transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Falcão Pedrosa Costa, André; Castelo Branco Cavalcanti, Frederico; Modesto dos Santos, Vitorino

    2014-02-01

    The authors describe the case of a renal transplant patient who developed late infective endocarditis associated with an intracardiac fragment of a catheter inserted 16 years before. Clinical presentation was anemia of undetermined cause and weight loss. Three blood cultures were positive for Burkholderia cepacia. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed a foreign body in the right atrium and right ventricle, confirmed by computed tomography. The patient underwent intravenous antibiotic therapy, followed by cardiac surgery to remove the foreign body. There were no postoperative complications, with improvement of anemia and stabilization of renal function.

  20. [Clinical and bacteriological characteristic of infectious purulent complications in patients after related renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Volynchik, E P; Bol'shakov, L V; Bogomolova, N S; Kuznetsova, S M

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the frequency and characteristics of infectious purulent and non-infectious complications in living related renal transplant recipients in early postoperative period. It was identified the prevalent microorganisms in urinary tract infections and its antibiotic sensitivity: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter freundii, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis, Candida albicans. 182 strains of bacteria and Candida were isolated from urine of renal graft patients in early postoperative period (from 2 days to 3 months). The prevention and treatment schemes, antimicrobial drugs dosing regimen were developed. It leads to decrease the infectious complications rate. PMID:25327674

  1. Cat Scratch Disease in a Renal Transplant Recipient.

    PubMed

    Yalin, Serkan Feyyaz; Sahin, Serdar; Yemisen, Mucahit; Tuzuner, Nukhet; Altiparmak, Mehmet Riza; Seyahi, Nurhan

    2016-09-01

    Cat scratch disease (CSD) is a disorder characterized by self-limited regional lymphadenopathy and fever. We reported a case of CSD in a kidney transplant recipient who presented with fever and lymphadenopathy. Lymph node biopsy demonstrated bacterial histiocytic lymphadenitis. The patient was diagnosed with CSD. Patient had good clinical improvement after treatment. Therefore, CSD should also be borne in mind for kidney recipients though CSD had been infrequently reported in this group.

  2. Why are cadaveric renal transplants so hard to find in Japan? An analysis of economic and attitudinal aspects.

    PubMed

    Ohi, G; Hasegawa, T; Kumano, H; Kai, I; Takenaga, N; Taguchi, Y; Saito, H; Ino, T

    1986-01-01

    In view of the fact that in Japan treatment of end-stage renal disease depends disproportionately heavily on hemodialysis and almost negligible on transplants from cadaveric donors (hemodialysis 44.4/100,000; renal transplants 0.31/100,000 per year; cadaveric renal transplants 0.11/100,000 per year (1983 data)), we analysed the cost-effectiveness of hemodialysis and renal transplantation, predicted economic gains under expected changes in variables and described attitudes of the Japanese hampering cadaveric renal transplantation. Adjusted life expectancy of transplant recipients (live and cadaveric combined) under the current technical conditions is longer than that of those on hemodialysis (18.3 vs. 14.7 years) and the cost per year for maintaining the transplant is approximately one third of hemodialysis ($12,000 vs $32,000). If the proportion of cadaveric transplant recipients would increase to the levels of the USA (hemodialysis 30.8/100,000; transplants 2.6/100,000 per year; cadaveric transplants 1.9/100,000 per year (1983 data)) along with improvement in graft survival rate, the life expectancy for transplant recipients in Japan could increase by 2 years, thus reducing the annual cost even further. The current number of patients starting hemodialysis (11,500 cases per year) coupled with their life expectancy predicts the number of patients on hemodialysis to reach equilibrium at around 174,000 in a decade (Japanese population 110 million). Based on current price, their annual cost will be about 5.3 billion dollars. Medical expenditure of this magnitude for such a small fraction of people is expected to become an increasingly strong economic incentive for cadaveric renal transplantation. A review of studies on Japanese attitudes toward cadaveric renal transplantation in both urban and rural areas shows that approximately 60% are in favor of donating their kidney after death, though with the majority of cases the donation is contingent upon agreement of their

  3. Socioeconomic rehabilitation of successful renal transplant patients and impact of funding source: Indian scenario

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Rakesh; Sharma, Raj Kumar; Srivastava, Aneesh; Kapoor, Rohit; Arora, Sohrab; Sureka, Sanjoy Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Socio-economic rehabilitation is an important outcome parameter in successful renal transplant recipients, particularly in developing countries with low income patients who often depend on extraneous sources to fund their surgery costs. We studied the socioeconomic rehabilitation and changes in socioeconomic status (SES) of successful renal allograft recipients among Indian patients and its correlation with their source of funding for the surgery. Materials and Method: A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study was conducted on 183 patients between January 2010 to January 2013. Patients with follow up of at least 1 year after successful renal transplant were included. During interview, two questionnaires were administered, one related to the SES including source of funding before transplantation and another one relating to the same at time of interview. Changes in SES were categorized as improvement, stable and deterioration if post-transplant SES score increased >5%, increased or decreased by <5% and decreased >5% of pre-transplant value, respectively. Results: In this cohort, 97 (52.7%), 67 (36.4%) and 19 (10.3%) patients were non-funded (self-funded), one-time funded and continuous funded, respectively. Fifty-six (30.4%) recipients had improvement in SES, whereas 89 (48.4%) and 38 (20.7%) recipients had deterioration and stable SES. Improvement in SES was seen in 68% patients with continuous funding support whereas, in only 36% and 12% patients with non-funded and onetime funding support (P = 0.001) respectively. Significant correlation was found (R = 0.715) between baseline socioeconomic strata and changes in SES after transplant. 70% of the patients with upper and upper middle class status had improving SES. Patients with middle class, lower middle and lower class had deterioration of SES after transplant in 47.4%, 79.6% and 66.7% patients, respectively. Conclusions: Most of the recipients from middle and lower social strata, which included

  4. Is there a role for therapy after transplant?

    PubMed

    Oran, Betül

    2015-01-01

    Despite the steady increase in the number of stem cell transplants performed since 1980 and improvements in survival rates, disease relapse remains the major cause of death after HLA matched sibling and unrelated donor transplants for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Given this situation, maintenance therapy after transplant may be an appropriate strategy to reduce the relapse rate and prolong survival. A number of agents are being investigated as maintenance therapy after stem cell transplant in AML patients, including azacitidine, decitabine, and other agents. This paper focuses on the role of maintenance treatment to reduce the risk of relapse after transplant. PMID:26590769

  5. Ethics and commerce in live donor renal transplantation: classification of the issues.

    PubMed

    Daar, A S; Salahudeen, A K; Pingle, A; Woods, H F

    1990-06-01

    Renal transplantation is now very successful. A shortage of kidneys continues to be a problem. Attempts to increase the supply have recently led to unethical practices, but the issues in the discussion of the ethics need clarification. We propose a classification that we believe will help to achieve this for living donor renal transplantation. This can be considered under five categories: (1) living-related donation; (2) emotionally related donation; (3) altruistic donation; (4) "rewarded" gifting; and (5) rampant commercialism. Ethical issues for categories 1, 2, and 3 are either esoteric or have been resolved. Category 4 needs further discussion and elucidation and should be the area of concentration. Category 5 we perceive to be unethical.

  6. Acute cortical necrosis following renal transplantation in a case of sickle cell trait

    PubMed Central

    Shiradhonkar, S.; Jha, R.; Rao, B. S.; Narayan, G.; Sinha, S.; Swarnalata, G.

    2011-01-01

    Renal transplant recipients who have sickle cell disease are at risk of infection, recurrent graft disease, and sickling crisis that affects the long-term outcome. We report a patient of sickle cell trait who developed patchy cortical necrosis in the perioperative period but had a good long-term outcome. The renal cortical necrosis was presumed to be secondary to cyclosporine-basiliximab interaction in the backdrop of sickling trait. The patient additionally had spontaneous closure of vascular access and severe hypertension immediately following transplantation suggestive of vaso-occlusive crisis. Cyclosporine and basiliximab drug interaction needs to be recognized and steps need to be taken in patients to avoid perioperative graft dysfunction. PMID:22022093

  7. Evidence for Kidney Rejection after Combined Bone Marrow and Renal Transplantation Despite Ongoing Whole-blood Chimerism in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Swetha K; Page, Andrew; Farris, Alton B.; Singh, Karnail; Leopardi, Frank; Hamby, Kelly; Sen, Sharon; Polnett, Aneesah; Deane, Taylor; Song, Mingqing; Stempora, Linda; Strobert, Elizabeth; Kirk, Allan D.; Larsen, Christian P.; Kean, Leslie S.

    2012-01-01

    Although there is evidence linking hematopoietic chimerism-induction and solid organ transplant tolerance, the mechanistic requirements for chimerism-induced tolerance are not clearly elucidated. To address this, we used an MHC-defined primate model to determine the impact of impermanent, T cell-poor, mixed-chimerism on renal allograft survival. We compared two cohorts: one receiving a bone marrow + renal transplant (“BMT/renal”) and one receiving only a renal transplant. Both cohorts received maintenance immunosuppression with CD28/CD40-directed costimulation blockade and sirolimus. As previously demonstrated, this transplant strategy consistently induced compartmentalized donor chimerism, (significant whole-blood chimerism, lacking T cell chimerism). This chimerism was not sufficient to prolong renal allograft acceptance: the BMT/renal mean survival time (MST, 76 days) was not significantly different than the renal transplant alone MST (85 days, p= 0. 46), with histopathology documenting T-cell mediated rejection. Flow cytometric analysis revealed significant enrichment for CD28-/CD95+ CD4+ and CD8+ Tem cells in the rejected kidney, suggesting a link between CD28-negative Tem and costimulation blockade-resistant rejection. These results suggest that in some settings, transient T cell-poor chimerism is not sufficient to induce tolerance to a concurrently placed renal allograft and that the presence of this chimerism per se is not an independent biomarker to identify tolerance. PMID:22642491

  8. Ischemia and reperfusion injury in renal transplantation: hemodynamic and immunological paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Requião-Moura, Lúcio Roberto; Durão, Marcelino de Souza; de Matos, Ana Cristina Carvalho; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia and reperfusion injury is an inevitable event in renal transplantation. The most important consequences are delayed graft function, longer length of stay, higher hospital costs, high risk of acute rejection, and negative impact of long-term follow-up. Currently, many factors are involved in their pathophysiology and could be classified into two different paradigms for education purposes: hemodynamic and immune. The hemodynamic paradigm is described as the reduction of oxygen delivery due to blood flow interruption, involving many hormone systems, and oxygen-free radicals produced after reperfusion. The immune paradigm has been recently described and involves immune system cells, especially T cells, with a central role in this injury. According to these concepts, new strategies to prevent ischemia and reperfusion injury have been studied, particularly the more physiological forms of storing the kidney, such as the pump machine and the use of antilymphocyte antibody therapy before reperfusion. Pump machine perfusion reduces delayed graft function prevalence and length of stay at hospital, and increases long-term graft survival. The use of antilymphocyte antibody therapy before reperfusion, such as Thymoglobulin™, can reduce the prevalence of delayed graft function and chronic graft dysfunction. PMID:25993079

  9. Fatal outcome after renal transplant in a pediatric patient with Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Araz, Coskun; Kaval, Ebru; Torgay, Adnan; Moray, Gokhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2015-04-01

    Noonan syndrome is a congenital, common, hereditary disorder. Facial dysmorphism, growth retardation, and various heart defects are typical clinical features. In patients with minor cardiac pathology, life expectancy is normal. We report a case of renal transplant in a pediatric patient with Noonan syndrome that ended with death of the patient. Our patient presented with unexpected and refractory postoperative neurological complications that were unresponsive to intensive therapy, and the patient died because of secondary complications.

  10. BK virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Yaich, S; Charfeddine, K; Hsairi, D; Zaghdane, S; Kammoun, K; Makni, S; Boudawara, T; Hachicha, J

    2014-05-01

    Hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) is a life-threatening hematological disorder in immunocompromised patients. Reactive HPS is observed in patients with systemic infection, neoplasia or auto-immune diseases. It is a rare hematological disorder after renal transplantation and must be suspected when fever and pancytopenia are seen in association with viral infections. HPS is usually associated with infection with the Cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr viruses. We report here a case of BK-virus-associated HPS.

  11. Outbreak of OXY-2-Producing Klebsiella oxytoca in a renal transplant unit.

    PubMed

    Zárate, Mariela Soledad; Gales, Ana C; Picão, Renata C; Pujol, Gervasio Soler; Lanza, Alejandra; Smayevsky, Jorgelina

    2008-06-01

    We describe a Klebsiella oxytoca infection outbreak in a renal transplant unit that involved seven patients. All strains belonged to a single pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern and were resistant to amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefuroxime, piperacillin-tazobactam, and aztreonam but susceptible to ceftriaxone, ceftazidime, cefepime, and imipenem. Chromosomal beta-lactamase hyperproduction was caused by a point mutation in the bla(OXY-2) gene promoter region.

  12. Outbreak of OXY-2-Producing Klebsiella oxytoca in a Renal Transplant Unit▿

    PubMed Central

    Zárate, Mariela Soledad; Gales, Ana C.; Picão, Renata C.; Pujol, Gervasio Soler; Lanza, Alejandra; Smayevsky, Jorgelina

    2008-01-01

    We describe a Klebsiella oxytoca infection outbreak in a renal transplant unit that involved seven patients. All strains belonged to a single pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern and were resistant to amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefuroxime, piperacillin-tazobactam, and aztreonam but susceptible to ceftriaxone, ceftazidime, cefepime, and imipenem. Chromosomal β-lactamase hyperproduction was caused by a point mutation in the blaOXY-2 gene promoter region. PMID:18417660

  13. Development of chronic allograft rejection and arterial hypertension in Brown Norway rats after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vaskonen, T; Mervaala, E; Nevala, R; Soots, A; Krogerus, L; Lähteenmäki, T; Karppanen, H; Vapaatalo, H; Ahonen, J

    2000-01-01

    The cardiovascular and renal pathophysiology associated with chronic renal allograft rejection under triple drug immunosuppressive treatment was studied using a recently developed model (Brown Norway (BN) rats) in a 6-week experiment. Renal transplantation was performed to 10-week-old rats in a rat strain combination of Dark Agouti (DA) --> BN. The right kidney was removed from another group of BN rats (uninephrectomized). A triple drug treatment comprising cyclosporine (10 mg/kg subcutaneously, s.c.), azathioprine (2 mg/kg s.c.) and methylprednisolone (1.6 mg/kg s.c.) was given to each rat daily for 6 weeks. A control group underwent no operations nor drug treatment. After the transplantation, the systolic blood pressure in this group was increased from 116 +/- 2 to 166 +/- 2 mmHg, while in the uninephrectomized group the rise was from 115 +/- 4 to 146 +/- 4 mmHg, and no change was observed in the blood pressures of the control group. The vascular relaxation responses of mesenteric arterial rings in vitro to acetylcholine were inhibited in both the transplantation group and the uninephrectomized group as compared with the control group, but few significant differences were found in the contraction responses to noradrenaline and potassium chloride. Graft histology was examined after 6 weeks, quantified by using the chronic allograft damage index (CADI). Changes specific to a chronic rejection reaction were observed in the allografts (CADI mean 6.0) but no injuries were seen in the rats' own kidneys (CADI mean 1.2). Our findings show that allograft rejection in BN rats after renal transplantation is associated with the development of arterial hypertension. The combination of cyclosporine, methylprednisolone and azathioprine also rises blood pressure in uninephrectomized BN rats. The hypertensive effects of the drug treatment and graft rejection are associated with endothelial dysfunction.

  14. Transplant renal artery stenosis secondary to mechanical compression from polycystic kidney disease: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Linda; Gunaratnam, Lakshman; Sener, Alp

    2013-01-01

    Transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) is a potentially treatable cause of allograft dysfunction, hypertension and graft loss. The mainstay of treatment includes angioplasty and endovascular stenting, although observation and surgery are at times indicated. We present an unusual case of TRAS secondary to mechanical compression from a patient’s enlarged native polycystic kidneys. This was treated with bilateral native nephrectomy and evidence of TRAS improved both clinically and radiographically. Recognition and treatment are important in preventing irreversible complications of TRAS. PMID:23671537

  15. Renal safety of intravenous gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in patients awaiting liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Katherine M; Parikh, Mehul R; Runge, Thomas M; Perez, Sebastian D; Sakaria, Sonali S; Subramanian, Ram M

    2015-11-01

    Renal dysfunction in cirrhosis carries a high morbidity and mortality. Given the potential risk of contrast-induced nephropathy associated with iodinated intravenous contrast used in computed tomography (CT), alternate contrast modalities for abdominal imaging in liver transplant candidates need to be examined. The purpose of this study was to examine the renal safety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium in patients awaiting liver transplantation. The study involved a retrospective analysis of 352 patients of abdominal MRI with low-dose gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance) (0.05 mmol/kg) in patients with cirrhosis and without renal replacement therapy at a single center during the period from 2007 to 2013. For each case, serum creatinine before and within a few days after the MRI were compared. In addition, the patients were analyzed for the development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), a reported complication of gadolinium in chronic kidney disease. The pre-MRI serum creatinine values ranged from 0.36 to 4.86 mg/dL, with 70 patients (20%) having values ≥ 1.5 mg/dL. A comparison of the pre- and post-MRI serum creatinine values did not demonstrate a clinically significant difference (mean change = 0.017 mg/dL; P = 0.38), including those patients with a pre-MRI serum creatinine ≥ 1.5 mg/dL. In addition, no cases of NSF were noted. In conclusion, our findings suggest that MRI with low-dose gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance) is a nonnephrotoxic imaging modality in liver transplant candidates, and its use can be cautiously expanded to liver transplant candidates with concomitant renal insufficiency.

  16. Detection of human papillomavirus DNA in plucked hairs from renal transplant recipients and healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Boxman, I L; Berkhout, R J; Mulder, L H; Wolkers, M C; Bouwes Bavinck, J N; Vermeer, B J; ter Schegget, J

    1997-05-01

    We have previously detected a group of human papillomaviruses originally found in skin lesions of epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) patients in skin cancers from renal transplant recipients and from non-immunosuppressed patients. The reservoir of EV-HPVs is still unknown. In the current study we investigated whether EV-HPV DNA can be detected in plucked hairs from renal transplant recipients and healthy volunteers. Hairs were plucked from eyebrows, scalp, arms, and/or legs and DNA was subsequently isolated. To detect EV-HPV, we used nested PCR with degenerate primers located in the HPV L1 open reading frame. HPV DNA was detected in hairs from one or more sites in all 26 renal transplant recipients tested. Forty-five of 49 samples (92%) from these 26 patients were positive. The HPV type was successfully determined by sequencing in 38 samples, and all types belonged to the EV-HPVs. In ten of 22 healthy volunteers (45%), EV-HPV DNA was also detected in hairs from one or more sites. Twenty of 38 samples (53%) were positive, of which 17 samples were typed as EV-HPV types. These findings indicate that EV-HPV is subclinically present in the skin of the general population. Immunosuppression may lead to activation of the virus, explaining the finding that the apparent prevalence of EV-HPV in plucked hairs from renal transplant patients is higher than in those from the volunteers. If a dose-response situation exists for the carcinogenic potential of HPV infection, this finding may be relevant to the increased risk of skin cancer in this group of patients.

  17. Evaluation of Heparin Anticoagulation Protocols in Post–Renal Transplant Recipients (EHAP-PoRT Study)

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Joan Chung Yan; Leung, Marianna; Landsberg, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Disturbances in hemostasis are common among renal transplant recipients. Because of the risk of thromboembolism and graft loss after transplant, a prophylactic heparin protocol was implemented at St Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia, in 2011. Therapeutic heparin is sometimes prescribed perioperatively for patients with preexisting prothrombotic conditions. There is currently limited literature on the safety and efficacy of heparin use in the early postoperative period. Objectives: The primary objectives were to document, for patients who underwent renal transplant, the incidence of major bleeding and of thrombosis in those receiving therapeutic heparin, prophylactic heparin, and no heparin anticoagulation in the early postoperative period and to compare these rates for the latter 2 groups. The secondary objectives included a comparison of the risk factors associated with major bleeding and thrombosis. Methods: Adult patients who received a renal transplant at St Paul’s Hospital between January 2008 and July 2013 were included in this retrospective cohort study. Electronic health records and databases were used to divide patients into the 3 heparin-use cohorts, to identify cases of major bleeding and thrombosis, and to characterize patients and events. The Fisher exact test was used for the primary outcome analysis, and descriptive statistics were used for all other outcomes. Results: A total of 547 patients were included in the analysis. Major bleeding was observed in 6 (46%) of the 13 patients who received therapeutic heparin; no cases of thrombosis occurred in these patients. Major bleeding occurred in 8 (3.0%) of the 266 patients who received prophylactic heparin and 9 (3.4%) of the 268 who received no heparin (p > 0.99). Thrombosis occurred in 1 (0.4%) and 3 (1.1%) of these patients, respectively (p = 0.62). Major bleeding occurred more frequently among patients with a low-target heparin protocol, but 61% of values for partial

  18. The role of renal biopsy in small renal masses.

    PubMed

    Burruni, Rodolfo; Lhermitte, Benoit; Cerantola, Yannick; Tawadros, Thomas; Meuwly, Jean-Yves; Berthold, Dominik; Jichlinski, Patrice; Valerio, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Renal biopsy is being increasingly proposed as a diagnostic tool to characterize small renal masses (SRM). Indeed, the wide adoption of imaging in the diagnostic workup of many diseases had led to a substantial increased incidence of SRM (diameter ≤4 cm). While modern ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have high sensitivity for detecting SRM, none is able to accurately and reliably characterize them in terms of histological features. This is currently of key importance in guiding clinical decision-making in some situations, and in these cases renal biopsy should be considered. In this review, we aim to summarize the technique, diagnostic performance, and predicting factors of nondiagnostic biopsy, as well as the future perspectives.

  19. The role of renal biopsy in small renal masses

    PubMed Central

    Burruni, Rodolfo; Lhermitte, Benoit; Cerantola, Yannick; Tawadros, Thomas; Meuwly, Jean-Yves; Berthold, Dominik; Jichlinski, Patrice; Valerio, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Renal biopsy is being increasingly proposed as a diagnostic tool to characterize small renal masses (SRM). Indeed, the wide adoption of imaging in the diagnostic workup of many diseases had led to a substantial increased incidence of SRM (diameter ≤4 cm). While modern ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have high sensitivity for detecting SRM, none is able to accurately and reliably characterize them in terms of histological features. This is currently of key importance in guiding clinical decision-making in some situations, and in these cases renal biopsy should be considered. In this review, we aim to summarize the technique, diagnostic performance, and predicting factors of nondiagnostic biopsy, as well as the future perspectives. PMID:26858784

  20. Latin American Dialysis and Transplant Registry: Experience and contributions to end-stage renal disease epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Cusumano, Ana Maria; Rosa-Diez, Guillermo Javier; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria Carlota

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, 634387 million people (9% of the world’s population) resided in Latin America (LA), with half of those populating Brazil and Mexico. The LA Dialysis and Transplant Registry was initiated in 1991, with the aim of collecting data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) from the 20 LA-affiliated countries. Since then, the Registry has revealed a trend of increasing prevalence and incidence of end-stage kidney disease on RRT, which is ongoing and is correlated with gross national income, life expectancy at birth, and percentage of population that is older than 65 years. In addition, the rate of kidney transplantation has increased yearly, with > 70% being performed from deceased donors. According to the numbers reported for 2013, the rates of prevalence, incidence and transplantation were (in patients per million population) 669, 149 and 19.4, respectively. Hemodialysis was the treatment of choice (90%), and 43% of the patients undergoing this treatment was located in Brazil; in contrast, peritoneal dialysis prevailed in Costa Rica, El Salvador and Guatemala. To date, the Registry remains the only source of RRT data available to healthcare authorities in many LA countries. It not only serves to promote knowledge regarding epidemiology of end-stage renal disease and the related RRT but also for training of nephrologists and renal researchers, to improve understanding and clinical application of dialysis and transplantation services. In LA, accessibility to RRT is still limited and it remains necessary to develop effective programs that will reduce risk factors, promote early diagnosis and treatment of chronic kidney disease, and strengthen transplantation programs. PMID:27648403

  1. Latin American Dialysis and Transplant Registry: Experience and contributions to end-stage renal disease epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Cusumano, Ana Maria; Rosa-Diez, Guillermo Javier; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria Carlota

    2016-09-01

    In 2015, 634387 million people (9% of the world's population) resided in Latin America (LA), with half of those populating Brazil and Mexico. The LA Dialysis and Transplant Registry was initiated in 1991, with the aim of collecting data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) from the 20 LA-affiliated countries. Since then, the Registry has revealed a trend of increasing prevalence and incidence of end-stage kidney disease on RRT, which is ongoing and is correlated with gross national income, life expectancy at birth, and percentage of population that is older than 65 years. In addition, the rate of kidney transplantation has increased yearly, with > 70% being performed from deceased donors. According to the numbers reported for 2013, the rates of prevalence, incidence and transplantation were (in patients per million population) 669, 149 and 19.4, respectively. Hemodialysis was the treatment of choice (90%), and 43% of the patients undergoing this treatment was located in Brazil; in contrast, peritoneal dialysis prevailed in Costa Rica, El Salvador and Guatemala. To date, the Registry remains the only source of RRT data available to healthcare authorities in many LA countries. It not only serves to promote knowledge regarding epidemiology of end-stage renal disease and the related RRT but also for training of nephrologists and renal researchers, to improve understanding and clinical application of dialysis and transplantation services. In LA, accessibility to RRT is still limited and it remains necessary to develop effective programs that will reduce risk factors, promote early diagnosis and treatment of chronic kidney disease, and strengthen transplantation programs. PMID:27648403

  2. Survival of childhood polycystic kidney disease following renal transplantation: the impact of advanced hepatobiliary disease.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ira D; Ho, Martin; Hupertz, Vera; Avner, Ellis D

    2003-10-01

    Childhood PKD encompasses the diagnoses of AR and ADPKD, glomerulocystic disease, and syndromes such as tuberous sclerosis or Jeune's syndrome. Given the fact that a majority of PKD children with ESRD carry the diagnosis of ARPKD, natural history studies assessing the long-term prognosis of PKD patients following renal transplantation must focus on morbidity and mortality issues related to complications from congenital hepatic fibrosis. Using the NAPRTCS registry, we analyzed the patient and graft survival rates of 203 PKD patients and 7044 non-PKD patients undergoing renal transplantation between 1987 and 2001. Deceased PKD patients, all with a diagnosis of ARPKD, were further identified and characterized using a special questionnaire submitted to the principal investigators. Overall graft and patient survival rates were not significantly different between PKD and non-PKD patients. No differences in rates of acute rejection or time to first rejection were noted between PKD and non-PKD patients. The relative risk of living longer than 3 yr in the PKD patients was not significantly different from non-PKD patients (RR = 0.70, p = 0.28). Sepsis was identified as a likely factor in the cause of death in nine (64%) ARPKD patients and was comfirmed with a positive blood culture in four patients. Despite similar graft and patient survival rates among PKD and non-PKD children following renal transplantation, our results suggest that ARPKD transplant recipients appear to be at increased risk for sepsis that may be related to hepatic fibrosis and ascending cholangitis. The utility of early liver transplantation in ARPKD patients with significant hepatobiliary disease is discussed.

  3. A rare case of cytomegalovirus, scedosporium apiospermum and mycobacterium tuberculosis in a renal transplant recipient

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Renal transplant recipients are at high risk of developing multiple infections, often concomitantly because of their immunocompromised status. Post renal transplant infections are often elusive and require extensive evaluation for proper diagnosis and treatment. A high index of suspicion is required and an attempt should be made to confirm the microbiological diagnosis from each site involved to rule out multiple infections. Case presentation We report a 50-year-old female, a renal allograft recipient who presented with left hemiplegia, esophageal ulcers and fever 3 months after her transplant. Esophageal biopsy revealed Cytomegalovirus (CMV) inclusions and the whole blood quantitative CMV polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was positive. Neuroimaging showed a brain abscess, stereotactic biopsy from which revealed Scedosporium apiospermum on fungal culture. Her tacrolimus and mycophenolate were stopped and she was managed with intravenous ganciclovir and voriconazole. With these measures, she showed marked improvement in her general and neurological condition. Two months later, she developed recurrence of fever with dry cough. Radiological investigation revealed a cavitating lung lesion, a needle aspiration from which demonstrated acid-fast bacilli. She was started on antituberculous treatment. With these measures, she recovered completely and maintained good graft function despite being on only prednisolone 10 mg once a day. Conclusion Although CMV disease is not uncommon in the first three months post transplant, Scedosporium is a rare cause of brain abscess. On the other hand, tuberculosis is common in transplant recipients, especially in developing countries, like India. However, this is the first case report of occurrence of these three infections in the same patient, demonstrating the importance of a good microbiological work-up from each site involved in immunosuppressed subjects. PMID:24885965

  4. Latin American Dialysis and Transplant Registry: Experience and contributions to end-stage renal disease epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Cusumano, Ana Maria; Rosa-Diez, Guillermo Javier; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria Carlota

    2016-09-01

    In 2015, 634387 million people (9% of the world's population) resided in Latin America (LA), with half of those populating Brazil and Mexico. The LA Dialysis and Transplant Registry was initiated in 1991, with the aim of collecting data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) from the 20 LA-affiliated countries. Since then, the Registry has revealed a trend of increasing prevalence and incidence of end-stage kidney disease on RRT, which is ongoing and is correlated with gross national income, life expectancy at birth, and percentage of population that is older than 65 years. In addition, the rate of kidney transplantation has increased yearly, with > 70% being performed from deceased donors. According to the numbers reported for 2013, the rates of prevalence, incidence and transplantation were (in patients per million population) 669, 149 and 19.4, respectively. Hemodialysis was the treatment of choice (90%), and 43% of the patients undergoing this treatment was located in Brazil; in contrast, peritoneal dialysis prevailed in Costa Rica, El Salvador and Guatemala. To date, the Registry remains the only source of RRT data available to healthcare authorities in many LA countries. It not only serves to promote knowledge regarding epidemiology of end-stage renal disease and the related RRT but also for training of nephrologists and renal researchers, to improve understanding and clinical application of dialysis and transplantation services. In LA, accessibility to RRT is still limited and it remains necessary to develop effective programs that will reduce risk factors, promote early diagnosis and treatment of chronic kidney disease, and strengthen transplantation programs.

  5. Inflammation, Coronary Artery Calcification and Cardiovascular Events in Incident Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Peter; Wolfe, Megan; Joffe, Marshall; Rosas, Sylvia E

    2010-01-01

    Objective Coronary artery calcification (CAC) predicts cardiovascular events in the general population. We conducted a prospective study to determine if inflammatory markers were predictive of CAC and if CAC predicted cardiovascular events and mortality in incident renal transplant recipients. Methods A prospective cohort of 112 asymptomatic incident renal transplant recipients who had no prior history of coronary artery revascularization or myocardial infarction had coronary calcifications measured early post-transplant and at least 18 months later by Agatston score and volume method. Results The mean CAC score was 367.7 (682.3). Inflammatory markers such as WBC and CRP were predictive of CAC severity. Recipients with cardiovascular events (n=11) or death (n=12) during the follow-up period had higher mean [675.1 (669.3) vs. 296.8(669.0), p=0.02] and median [434.8 vs. 28.9, p=0.01] CAC score compared to those without them. Recipients with CAC score less than 100 had a better cumulative survival rate compared to the recipients with CAC score greater than 100 [95.1 vs. 82.3%, p=0.03]. We found a significant unadjusted and adjusted association between CAC score and cardiovascular events and mortality. A quarter (25.9%) of recipients had CAC progression. Coronary calcification progression also predicted cardiovascular events and mortality after adjustment for diabetes, age, dialysis vintage and presence of CAC at time of transplant. Conclusion CAC is prevalent in renal recipients and is predictive of cardiovascular events and mortality. Changes in coronary calcification are common and predict clinical outcomes. Inflammatory markers are predictive of CAC severity at time of transplant, but are not predictive of future cardiovascular event or mortality. PMID:20934074

  6. Latin American Dialysis and Transplant Registry: Experience and contributions to end-stage renal disease epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Cusumano, Ana Maria; Rosa-Diez, Guillermo Javier; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria Carlota

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, 634387 million people (9% of the world’s population) resided in Latin America (LA), with half of those populating Brazil and Mexico. The LA Dialysis and Transplant Registry was initiated in 1991, with the aim of collecting data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) from the 20 LA-affiliated countries. Since then, the Registry has revealed a trend of increasing prevalence and incidence of end-stage kidney disease on RRT, which is ongoing and is correlated with gross national income, life expectancy at birth, and percentage of population that is older than 65 years. In addition, the rate of kidney transplantation has increased yearly, with > 70% being performed from deceased donors. According to the numbers reported for 2013, the rates of prevalence, incidence and transplantation were (in patients per million population) 669, 149 and 19.4, respectively. Hemodialysis was the treatment of choice (90%), and 43% of the patients undergoing this treatment was located in Brazil; in contrast, peritoneal dialysis prevailed in Costa Rica, El Salvador and Guatemala. To date, the Registry remains the only source of RRT data available to healthcare authorities in many LA countries. It not only serves to promote knowledge regarding epidemiology of end-stage renal disease and the related RRT but also for training of nephrologists and renal researchers, to improve understanding and clinical application of dialysis and transplantation services. In LA, accessibility to RRT is still limited and it remains necessary to develop effective programs that will reduce risk factors, promote early diagnosis and treatment of chronic kidney disease, and strengthen transplantation programs.

  7. Graft Loss Due to Percutaneous Sclerotherapy of a Lymphocele Using Acetic Acid After Renal Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Adani, Gian Luigi Baccarani, Umberto; Bresadola, Vittorio; Lorenzin, Dario; Montanaro, Domenico; Risaliti, Andrea; Terrosu, Giovanni; Sponza, Massimo; Bresadola, Fabrizio

    2005-12-15

    Development of lymphoceles after renal transplantation is a well-described complication that occurs in up to 40% of recipients. The gold standard approach for the treatment of symptomatic cases is not well defined yet. Management options include simple aspiration, marsupialization by a laparotomy or laparoscopy, and percutaneous sclerotherapy using different chemical agents. Those approaches can be associated, and they depend on type, dimension, and localization of the lymphocele. Percutaneous sclerotherapy is considered to be less invasive than the surgical approach; it can be used safely and effectively, with low morbidity, in huge, rapidly accumulating lymphoceles. Moreover, this approach is highly successful, and the complication rate is acceptable; the major drawback is a recurrence rate close to 20%. We herewith report a renal transplant case in which the patient developed a symptomatic lymphocele that was initially treated by ultrasound-guided percutaneous sclerotherapy with ethanol and thereafter using acetic acid for early recurrence. A few hours after injection of acetic acid in the lymphatic cavity, the patient started to complain of acute pain localized to the renal graft and fever. An ultrasound of the abdomen revealed thrombosis of the renal vein and artery. The patient was immediately taken to the operating room, where the diagnosis of vascular thrombosis was confirmed and the graft was urgently explanted. In conclusion, we strongly suggest avoiding the use of acetic acid as a slerosating agent for the percutaneous treatment of post-renal transplant lymphocele because, based on our experience, it could be complicated by vascular thrombosis of the kidney, ending in graft loss.

  8. Alemtuzumab with corticosteroid minimization for pediatric deceased donor renal transplantation: a seven-yr experience.

    PubMed

    Supe-Markovina, Katarina; Melquist, Jonathan J; Connolly, Deirdre; DiCarlo, Heather N; Waltzer, Wayne C; Fine, Richard N; Darras, Frank S

    2014-06-01

    Alemtuzumab is a monoclonal antibody targeting CD52 receptors on B and T lymphocytes and is an effective induction agent in pediatric renal transplantation. We report a seven-yr experience using alemtuzumab induction and steroid-free protocol in the pediatric population as safe and effective. Twenty-one pediatric deceased donor renal transplants were performed at a single academic institution. All received induction with single-dose alemtuzumab and were maintained on a steroid-free protocol using TAC and MMF immunosuppression. There were 15 males and six females in the study whose ages ranged from one to 19 yr. The average follow-up was 32 months (range from 12 to 78.2 months and median 33.7 ± 23.7 months). All patients had immediate graft function. Graft survival was 95%, and patient survival was 100%. Mean 12 and 36 months eGFR were 63.33 ± 21.01 and 59.90 ± 15.27 mL/min/1.73m(2), respectively. Three patients developed acute T-cell-mediated rejection due to non-adherence while no recipients developed cytomegalovirus infection, PTLD, or polyoma BK viral nephropathy. Steroid avoidance with single-dose alemtuzumab induction provides adequate and safe immunosuppression in pediatric deceased donor renal transplant recipients receiving TAC and low-dose MMF maintenance therapy.

  9. Comparison between valganciclovir and aciclovir/valaciclovir for CMV prophylaxis in pediatric renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fila, M; Dechartes, A; Maisin, A; Dossier, C; Zhao, W; Deschênes, G; Baudouin, V

    2015-01-01

    Prophylaxis has dramatically decreased the occurrence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection after renal transplantation. Optimal regimens of treatment remain controversial, especially in pediatric recipients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of valganciclovir (VGC) versus aciclovir/valaciclovir (ACV) in a pediatric renal transplant population. Data from 101 renal transplantations were retrospectively analyzed. Except those with R-/Dstatus, all patients received prophylaxis either with ACV, n = 39 or VGC, n = 38. Incidences of positive CMV antigenemia and disease, as well as the delay in relation to the prophylaxis, were collected during at least 12 months after the end of treatment. Positive CMV antigenemia was reported in 34 patients (ACV: 16, VGC: 16, no prophylaxis: 2). CMV disease occurred in 15 patients (ACV: 5; VGC: 8) (ns). For the majority of patients under VGC, positive CMV antigenemia occurred within the year following the withdrawal of prophylaxis (VGC: 14; ACV: 5, P <0.05), whereas it occurred during prophylaxis in 11 patients under ACV versus two under VGC (P <0.05). The over-all incidence of positive CMV antigenemia was similar between ACV and VGC prophylaxis. However, VGC was more efficient to prevent early CMV infection while patients treated with ACV had less CMV infection or disease after the end of the prophylaxis. PMID:26022014

  10. Comparison between valganciclovir and aciclovir/valaciclovir for CMV prophylaxis in pediatric renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fila, M; Dechartes, A; Maisin, A; Dossier, C; Zhao, W; Deschênes, G; Baudouin, V

    2015-01-01

    Prophylaxis has dramatically decreased the occurrence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection after renal transplantation. Optimal regimens of treatment remain controversial, especially in pediatric recipients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of valganciclovir (VGC) versus aciclovir/valaciclovir (ACV) in a pediatric renal transplant population. Data from 101 renal transplantations were retrospectively analyzed. Except those with R-/Dstatus, all patients received prophylaxis either with ACV, n = 39 or VGC, n = 38. Incidences of positive CMV antigenemia and disease, as well as the delay in relation to the prophylaxis, were collected during at least 12 months after the end of treatment. Positive CMV antigenemia was reported in 34 patients (ACV: 16, VGC: 16, no prophylaxis: 2). CMV disease occurred in 15 patients (ACV: 5; VGC: 8) (ns). For the majority of patients under VGC, positive CMV antigenemia occurred within the year following the withdrawal of prophylaxis (VGC: 14; ACV: 5, P <0.05), whereas it occurred during prophylaxis in 11 patients under ACV versus two under VGC (P <0.05). The over-all incidence of positive CMV antigenemia was similar between ACV and VGC prophylaxis. However, VGC was more efficient to prevent early CMV infection while patients treated with ACV had less CMV infection or disease after the end of the prophylaxis.

  11. New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus Associated with Sirolimus Use in Renal Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Vural Taner; Kocak, Huseyin; Dinckan, Ayhan; Cetinkaya, Ramazan

    2015-10-01

    New-onset diabetes after transplantation and impaired glucose tolerance are very common in renal transplant patients. New-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, reduced graft and patient survival. Several risk factors for NODAT have been identified: age, obesity, family history of diabetes mellitus and HCV infection. In addition, steroid and calcineurin inhibitors also contribute to the development of NODAT. Sirolimus causes immunosuppressive effects by inhibiting mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and has well known side effects. The effects of sirolimus on glucose metabolism and contribution to NODAT development are not clearly known. In this report, we presented five RTX patients who developed NODAT under the treatment of sirolimus. PMID:26644772

  12. Case of early-disseminated Rhizopus microsporus var. microsporus mucormycosis in a renal transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Dikshya; Dahal, Kumud; Pathak, Bandana; Dahal, Udip

    2016-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare infection caused by the ubiquitous filamentous fungi of the order Mucorales and class Zygomycetes. These species are vasotropic, causing rapid onset of tissue infarctions and necrosis and subsequent thrombosis by invading vascular bed. The disease spectrum ranges from involvement of skin, sinuses, lung, and brain to disseminated and mostly fatal infections, especially in immunocompromised hosts. Here, we present a case of a fatal disseminated mucormycosis in a 56-year-old female who had deceased donor renal allograft transplantation ~2 weeks prior to presentation. She presented with shortness of breath and dry cough. Despite being on broad-spectrum antibiotics/antifungals and proper management by transplant, infectious disease, and primary team, she died within 3 weeks of admission. Autopsy showed disseminated mucormycosis of lungs and thyroid. Disseminated infection within 2 weeks of solid organ transplantation in this patient was one of the rare features of mucormycosis. PMID:27354831

  13. Pathologic findings of renal biopsy were a helpful diagnostic clue of stenosis of the iliac segment proximal to the transplant renal artery: a case report.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, H; Saigo, K; Hasegawa, M; Akutsu, N; Maruyama, M; Otsuki, K; Matsumoto, I; Kawaguchi, T; Kitamura, H; Asano, T; Kenmochi, T; Itou, T; Matsubara, H

    2014-01-01

    Common iliac artery stenosis after renal transplantation is a rare complication; it can occur in the course of hypertension and renal dysfunction. We report a case of suspected renal allograft rejection with iliac artery stenosis proximal to a transplanted kidney. A 52-year-old man with a history of cadaveric kidney transplantation 26 years previously underwent a second cadaveric kidney transplantation in the left iliac fossa because of graft failure 3 years before. In June 2012, the patient had progressive renal dysfunction. In July, a percutaneous needle biopsy was taken, and it showed no rejection; however, his renal function continued to get worse through September. A percutaneous allograft renal biopsy was performed under ultrasound guidance and showed hyperplasia of the juxtaglomerular apparatus and renin granules. Magnetic resonance angiography was used to evaluate the arteries in the pelvis and showed left common iliac artery stenosis, and a stent was placed. After percutaneous intervention, the patient's ankle brachial pressure index was within the normal range and the allograft function had improved. PMID:24656037

  14. Lymphatic disorders after renal transplantation: new insights for an old complication

    PubMed Central

    Ranghino, Andrea; Segoloni, Giuseppe Paolo; Lasaponara, Fedele; Biancone, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    In renal transplanted patients, lymphoceles and lymphorrhea are well-known lymphatic complications. Surgical damage of the lymphatics of the graft during the procurement and of the lymphatic around the iliac vessels of the recipients has been associated with development of lymphatic complications. However, lymphatic complications may be related to medical factors such as diabetes, obesity, blood coagulation abnormalities, anticoagulation prophylaxis, high dose of diuretics, delay in graft function and immunosuppressive drugs. Consistently, immunosuppression regimens based on the use of mTOR inhibitors, especially in association with steroids and immediately after transplantation, has been associated with a high risk to develop lymphocele or lymphorrhea. In addition, several studies have demonstrated the association between rejection episodes and lymphatic complications. However, before the discovery of reliable markers of lymphatic vessels, the pathogenic mechanisms underlining the development of lymphatic complications during rejection and the influence of mTOR inhibitors remained not fully understood. The recent findings on the lymphatic systems of either native or transplanted kidneys together with the advances achieved on lymphangiogenesis shared some lights on the pathogenesis of lymphatic complications after renal transplantation. In this review, we describe the surgical and medical causes of lymphatic complications focusing on the rejection and immunosuppressive drugs as causes of lymphatic complications. PMID:26413290

  15. Cytomegalovirus infection in renal transplantation: clinical aspects, management and the perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Requião-Moura, Lúcio Roberto; de Matos, Ana Cristina Carvalho; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus infection is one of most frequent infectious complications after renal transplantation, and can be classified as primo-infection, when the transmission occurs through the graft, or reactivation, when the recipient is cytomegalovirus seropositive. After transplantation, cytomegalovirus can appear as an infection, when the patient presents with evidence of viral replication without symptoms or disease, which has two clinical spectra: typical viral syndrome or invasive disease, which is a less common form. Their effects can be classified as direct, while the disease is developed, or indirect, with an increase of acute rejection and chronic allograft dysfunction risks. Diagnosis must be made based on viremia by one of the standardized methods: antigenemia or PCR, which is more sensitive. The risk factors related to infection after transplantation are the serologic matching (positive donor and negative recipient) and anti-lymphocyte antibody drugs. One of the strategies to reduce risk of disease should be chosen for patients at high risk: preemptive treatment or universal prophylaxis. Recent clinical research has described ganciclovir resistance as an emergent problem in management of cytomegalovirus infection. Two types of mutation that cause resistance were described: UL97 (most frequent) and UL54. Today, sophisticated methods of immunologic monitoring to detect specific T-cell clones against cytomegalovirus are used in clinical practice to improve the management of high-risk patients after renal transplantation. PMID:25993081

  16. Survival of living donor renal transplant recipients in Sri Lanka: a single-center study.

    PubMed

    Galabada, Dinith Prasanna; Nazar, Abdul L M; Ariyaratne, Prasad

    2014-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease is one of the main public health concerns in Sri Lanka. In comparison with dialysis, successful kidney transplantation improves both patient survival and quality of life, relieves the burden of dialysis in patients suffering from end-stage renal disease and decreases the cost of healthcare to the society and government. The objective of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate graft and patient survival rates in patients who were transplanted from living donors at the Nephrology Unit of the National Hospital of Sri Lanka from January 2005 to January 2011. Data were collected using an interviewer-administered questionnaire and through a review of past medical records. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine the survival rate, the log rank test was used to compare survival curves and the Cox proportional hazard model was used for multivariate analysis. Mean follow-up was 26.44±16.6 months. The five-year death-censored graft survival of kidney transplant recipients from living donors in our center was 93.5% and the five-year patient survival was 82.2%, which is comparable with other transplant programs around the world. The number of acute rejection episodes was an independent risk factor for graft survival. Delayed graft function, younger recipient age and unknown cause of end-stage renal disease were found to be risk factors for graft failure but after adjusting for confounding factors, and the difference was not apparent.

  17. Hypertension after renal transplantation in patients treated with cyclosporin and azathioprine.

    PubMed Central

    Gordjani, N; Offner, G; Hoyer, P F; Brodehl, J

    1990-01-01

    The incidence of hypertension was sought in 102 children who had undergone renal transplantation. Fifty five were being treated with cyclosporin and 47 with azathioprine, and they were followed up for a maximum of five years. After one year 35 of those receiving cyclosporin (64%) and 34 of those receiving azathioprine (72%) were hypertensive; after five years the figures were 5/6 (83%) and 25/35 (71%), respectively. Recipients of grafts from living related donors had a lower incidence of hypertension than recipients of cadaveric grafts. The incidence of hypertension was higher in patients with acquired original kidney disease than in children with congenital or familial diseases. In both groups creatinine clearance and the frequency of acute rejection episodes did not differ between normotensive and hypertensive patients. When the lowest concentrations of cyclosporin in whole blood were more than 400 ng/ml the incidence of hypertension one year after transplantation was higher. The incidence of hypertension after renal transplantation in children is higher than that reported in adults. Acquired original disease, transplantation of cadaveric grafts, and nephrotoxicity of cyclosporin are all contributory factors. PMID:2334203

  18. Acute bacterial sternoclavicular osteomyelitis in a long-term renal transplant recipient

    PubMed Central

    Dounousi, Evangelia; Duni, Anila; Xiromeriti, Sofia; Pappas, Charalambos; Siamopoulos, Kostas C

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for a significant number of patients with end-stage renal disease. Although immunosuppression therapy improves graft and patient’s survival, it is a major risk factor for infection following kidney transplantation altering clinical manifestations of the infectious diseases and complicating both the diagnosis and management of renal transplant recipients (RTRs). Existing literature is very limited regarding osteomyelitis in RTRs. Sternoclavicular osteomyelitis is rare and has been mainly reported after contiguous spread of infection or direct traumatic seeding of the bacteria. We present an interesting case of acute, bacterial sternoclavicular osteomyelitis in a long-term RTR. Blood cultures were positive for Streptococcus mitis, while the portal entry site was not identified. Magnetic resonance imaging of the sternoclavicluar region and a three-phase bone scan were positive for sternoclavicular osteomyelitis. Eventually, the patient was successfully treated with Daptomycin as monotherapy. In the presence of immunosuppression, the transplant physician should always remain alert for opportunistic pathogens or unusual location of osteomyelitis. PMID:27358791

  19. Optimal management of distal ureteric strictures following renal transplantation: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Justin; Schiefer, Danielle; Aboalsamh, Ghaleb; Archambault, Jason; Luke, Patrick P; Sener, Alp

    2016-05-01

    Our objective was to define optimal management of distal ureteric strictures following renal transplantation. A systematic review on PubMed identified 34 articles (385 patients). Primary endpoints were success rates and complications of specific primary and secondary treatments (following failure of primary treatment). Among primary treatments (n = 303), the open approach had 85.4% success (95% CI 72.5-93.1) and the endourological approach had 64.3% success (95% CI 58.3-69.9). Among secondary treatments (n = 82), the open approach had 93.1% success (95% CI 77.0-99.2) and the endourological approach had 75.5% success (95% CI 62.3-85.2). The most common primary open treatment was ureteric reimplantation (n = 33, 81.8% success, 95% CI 65.2-91.8). The most common primary endourological treatment was dilation (n = 133, 58.6% success, 95% CI 50.1-66.7). Fourteen complications, including death (4 weeks post-op) and graft loss (12 days post-op), followed endourological treatment. One complication followed open treatment. This is the first systematic review to examine the success rates and complications of specific treatments for distal ureteric strictures following renal transplantation. Our review indicates that open management has higher success rates and fewer complications than endourological management as a primary and secondary treatment for post-transplant distal ureteric strictures. We also outline a post-transplant ureteric stricture evaluation and treatment algorithm.

  20. Incidence and risk factors for early renal dysfunction after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wiesen, Patricia; Massion, Paul B; Joris, Jean; Detry, Olivier; Damas, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine renal dysfunction post liver transplantation, its incidence and risk factors in patients from a Belgian University Hospital. METHODS: Orthotopic liver transplantations performed from January 2006 until September 2012 were retrospectively reviewed (n = 187). Patients with no renal replacement therapy (RRT) before transplantation were classified into four groups according to their highest creatinine plasma level during the first postoperative week. The first group had a peak creatinine level below 12 mg/L, the second group between 12 and 20 mg/L, the third group between 20 and 35 mg/L, and the fourth above 35 mg/L. In addition, patients who needed RRT during the first week after transplantation were also classified into the fourth group. Perioperative parameters were recorded as risk factors, namely age, sex, body mass index (BMI), length of preoperative hospital stay, prior bacterial infection within one month, preoperative ascites, preoperative treatment with β-blocker, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, preoperative creatinine and bilirubin levels, donor status (cardiac death or brain death), postoperative lactate level, need for intraoperative vasopressive drugs, surgical revision, mechanical ventilation for more than 24 h, postoperative bilirubin and transaminase peak levels, postoperative hemoglobin level, amount of perioperative blood transfusions and type of immunosuppression. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed using logistic ordinal regression method. Post hoc analysis of the hemostatic agent used was also done. RESULTS: There were 78 patients in group 1 (41.7%), 46 in group 2 (24.6%), 38 in group 3 (20.3%) and 25 in group 4 (13.4%). Twenty patients required RRT: 13 (7%) during the first week after transplantation. Using univariate analysis, the severity of renal dysfunction was correlated with presence of ascites and prior bacterial infection, preoperative bilirubin, urea and

  1. Role of the renal sympathetic nerves in renal sodium/potassium handling and renal damage in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianling; He, Qiaoling; Wu, Weifeng; Li, Qingjie; Huang, Rongjie; Pan, Xiaofeng; Lai, Wenying

    2016-01-01

    Renal sympathetic nerve activity has an important role in renal disease-associated hypertension and in the modulation of fluid homeostasis. In the present study, changes in renal function and renal sodium/potassium handling were investigated in groups of 12-week-old male, spontaneously hypertensive rats with renal denervation (RDNX group) or sham denervation (sham group). The RDNX group excreted significantly more sodium than the sham group during the 2-week observation period (P<0.05). Following bilateral renal denervation, the fractional lithium excretion was elevated in the RDNX group compared with the sham group, but no significant effect was observed of renal denervation on the fractional distal reabsorption rate of sodium or the fractional excretion of potassium. Furthermore, the glomerular injury score and the wall-to-lumen ratio of the interlobular artery were significantly lower in the RDNX group than in the sham group (P<0.05). In conclusion, the present study indicates an involvement of the renal sympathetic nerves in the regulation of renal tubular sodium reabsorption in spontaneously hypertensive rats and in the renal damage associated with hypertension. PMID:27698757

  2. Role of the renal sympathetic nerves in renal sodium/potassium handling and renal damage in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianling; He, Qiaoling; Wu, Weifeng; Li, Qingjie; Huang, Rongjie; Pan, Xiaofeng; Lai, Wenying

    2016-01-01

    Renal sympathetic nerve activity has an important role in renal disease-associated hypertension and in the modulation of fluid homeostasis. In the present study, changes in renal function and renal sodium/potassium handling were investigated in groups of 12-week-old male, spontaneously hypertensive rats with renal denervation (RDNX group) or sham denervation (sham group). The RDNX group excreted significantly more sodium than the sham group during the 2-week observation period (P<0.05). Following bilateral renal denervation, the fractional lithium excretion was elevated in the RDNX group compared with the sham group, but no significant effect was observed of renal denervation on the fractional distal reabsorption rate of sodium or the fractional excretion of potassium. Furthermore, the glomerular injury score and the wall-to-lumen ratio of the interlobular artery were significantly lower in the RDNX group than in the sham group (P<0.05). In conclusion, the present study indicates an involvement of the renal sympathetic nerves in the regulation of renal tubular sodium reabsorption in spontaneously hypertensive rats and in the renal damage associated with hypertension.

  3. Effect of early graft function on patient survival in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fresnedo, G; Rodrigo, E; Escallada, R; de Francisco, A L M; Zubimendi, J A; Ruiz, J C; Cotorruelo, J G; Arias, M

    2003-08-01

    The influence of early graft function on long-term graft survival has been widely reported but its association with patient survival has received less attention. We investigated the effect of early renal function on patient survival and on cardiovascular disease after renal transplantation among 532 transplant patients who had grafts functioning for >1 year. Patients were classified into two groups, depending on the early creatinine clearance (< or >60 mL/min). We analyzed graft and patient survival, posttransplant cardiovascular disease, and the principal causes of death. Five- and 10-year graft and patient survival were lower among the group with worse early renal function. The main cause of death was vascular disease. Poorer early renal function increased the risk (RR) of patient death by 2.2-fold, and also the presence of posttransplant cardiovascular disease. In conclusion, patients with poor levels of early graft function are at an increased risk of death. These high-risk groups should be targeted for interventional studies to improve patient survival.

  4. Limitations of indium-111 leukocyte scanning in febrile renal transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Sebrechts, C.; Biberstein, M.; Klein, J.L.; Witztum, K.F.

    1986-04-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte scanning was evaluated as a technique for investigating possible abscess as the cause of fever in 10 renal allograft recipients under therapy for rejection, acute tubular necrosis, or urinary infection. The usefulness of the method in this setting was found to be limited by marked nonspecificity of renal, pulmonary, and other focal leukocyte accumulation. Although wound infections were correctly identified, false-positive scans resulted in multiple nonproductive consultations and radiologic procedures (some invasive) and contributed to the decision to perform one negative exploratory laparotomy. Such generalized nonspecificity in this patient population is in distinct contrast to the experience with this diagnostic test in nontransplant patients, and has not previously been reported. Possible explanations and implications of these findings are discussed. Consequently, great caution is recommended in the use of indium-111 leukocyte scans to diagnose infection in febrile renal transplant patients who present in a similar clinical setting.

  5. Simultaneous Bilateral Rupture of the Triceps Tendon in a Renal Transplant Patient

    PubMed Central

    Zaidenberg, Ezequiel E.; Gallucci, Gerardo L.; Boretto, Jorge G.; De Carli, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    The unilateral rupture of the triceps brachii tendon is a rare lesion representing 1% of all tendon injuries. The most common causes are the result of a contraction against resistance (especially weightlifters) and direct trauma. It has also been associated with systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and use of systemic corticosteroids. Simultaneous bilateral rupture of the triceps tendons is less frequent and has been described in association with chronic metabolic disorders, especially in those patients on hemodialysis. This paper presents a case of bilateral triceps tendon rupture of a 36-year-old woman with renal transplantation secondary to chronic renal failure. Early surgical repair was performed using a bone tunnel technique with a nonabsorbable suture. Clinically active extension with 135 degrees of range of motion was achieved. PMID:26366314

  6. NSS for an RCC in a patient with renal insufficiency after heart transplant because of right ventricular tumor

    PubMed Central

    Życzkowski, Marcin; Nowakowski, Krzysztof; Bryniarski, Piotr; Paradysz, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the immunosuppressive therapy on the development of neoplasms has become the object of an ever increasing interest for clinicians all over the world. The literature on neoplasms development in the course of therapy following transplants has confirmed a considerable increase in the incidence of neoplasms of the skin and lymph nodes. Organ neoplasms developing in patients after transplants are characterized by increased progression, poor cellular diversification and a more unfavorable prognosis than in the general population The aim of the study is to present the case of a nephron–sparing surgery of a renal tumor (NSS) without any intraoperative ischaemia in a 55–year–old female patient with an orthotopic heart transplant and renal insufficiency following a prolonged immune suppression. It is estimated that the patients at the highest risk of neoplasm development are those in the first months after transplant, especially heart transplant. They require maximum doses of immunosuppressive drugs. In the case of patients with initial renal insufficiency the duration of ischaemia of the organ operated on should be minimized, and if possible, surgery should be conducted without clamping the renal pedicle. The surgical treatment of RCC (renal cell carcinoma) in transplant patients does not require any reduction in the amount of the immunosuppressive drugs. PMID:24578985

  7. NSS for an RCC in a patient with renal insufficiency after heart transplant because of right ventricular tumor.

    PubMed

    Prokopowicz, Grzegorz; Zyczkowski, Marcin; Nowakowski, Krzysztof; Bryniarski, Piotr; Paradysz, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the immunosuppressive therapy on the development of neoplasms has become the object of an ever increasing interest for clinicians all over the world. The literature on neoplasms development in the course of therapy following transplants has confirmed a considerable increase in the incidence of neoplasms of the skin and lymph nodes. Organ neoplasms developing in patients after transplants are characterized by increased progression, poor cellular diversification and a more unfavorable prognosis than in the general population The aim of the study is to present the case of a nephron-sparing surgery of a renal tumor (NSS) without any intraoperative ischaemia in a 55-year-old female patient with an orthotopic heart transplant and renal insufficiency following a prolonged immune suppression. It is estimated that the patients at the highest risk of neoplasm development are those in the first months after transplant, especially heart transplant. They require maximum doses of immunosuppressive drugs. In the case of patients with initial renal insufficiency the duration of ischaemia of the organ operated on should be minimized, and if possible, surgery should be conducted without clamping the renal pedicle. The surgical treatment of RCC (renal cell carcinoma) in transplant patients does not require any reduction in the amount of the immunosuppressive drugs.

  8. Telbivudine in liver transplant recipients: Renal protection does not overcome the risk of polyneuropathy and myopathy.

    PubMed

    Turan, Ilker; Yapali, Suna; Bademkiran, Fikret; Kose, Timur; Duman, Soner; Sozbilen, Murat; Gunsar, Fulya; Ersoz, Galip; Akarca, Ulus Salih; Ozutemiz, Omer; Karasu, Zeki

    2015-08-01

    The recently reported benefit of telbivudine for renal function has not been systematically studied in long-term liver transplantation (LT) recipients who are at high risk for renal impairment. We aimed to examine whether switching lamivudine therapy to telbivudine could improve renal function in LT recipients who have impaired renal function. This single-center, prospective cohort study enrolled LT recipients who were on lamivudine for hepatitis B virus (HBV) prophylaxis and who had renal impairment for at least 1 year. Lamivudine was switched to telbivudine. The primary outcome was to evaluate the change in renal function at weeks 12, 24, 36, and 48. The secondary outcomes were to assess the efficacy of telbivudine for HBV prophylaxis and the safety profile of telbivudine in the posttransplant setting. After 45 patients were enrolled, the study was terminated early because of increased rates of polyneuropathy/myopathy. During telbivudine treatment (median, 64 weeks), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) increased in 34 patients (76%). The improvement in renal function was prominent after 24 weeks of telbivudine treatment. Telbivudine was effective as prophylaxis against HBV recurrence. Twenty-six patients (58%) developed polyneuropathy and/or myopathy. The 1-year estimated incidence of polyneuropathy/myopathy was 28%. Diabetes was the strongest predictor of polyneuropathy/myopathy (hazard ratio, 4.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.49-11.50; P = 0.007). In conclusion, although it seems to have a favorable effect in the improvement of renal function and seems to be effective in the prevention of HBV recurrence, the high risk of polyneuropathy and myopathy hampers the use of telbivudine in LT recipients.

  9. Successful technical and clinical outcome using a second generation balloon expandable coronary stent for transplant renal artery stenosis: Our experience

    PubMed Central

    Salsamendi, Jason; Pereira, Keith; Baker, Reginald; Bhatia, Shivank S; Narayanan, Govindarajan

    2015-01-01

    Transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) is a vascular complication frequently seen because of increase in the number of renal transplantations. Early diagnosis and management is essential to optimize a proper graft function. Currently, the endovascular treatment of TRAS using angioplasty and/or stenting is considered the treatment of choice with the advantage that it does not preclude subsequent surgical correction. Treatment of TRAS with the use of stents, particularly in tortuous transplant renal anatomy presents a unique challenge to an interventional radiologist. In this study, we present three cases from our practice highlighting the use of a balloon-expandable Multi-Link RX Ultra coronary stent system (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Illinois, USA) for treating high grade focal stenosis along very tortuous renal arterial segments. Cobalt–Chromium alloy stent scaffold provides excellent radial force, whereas the flexible stent design conforms to the vessel course allowing for optimal stent alignment. PMID:26629289

  10. Measles-associated encephalopathy in children with renal transplants.

    PubMed

    Turner, A; Jeyaratnam, D; Haworth, F; Sinha, M D; Hughes, E; Cohen, B; Jin, L; Kidd, I M; Rigden, S P A; MacMahon, E

    2006-06-01

    Two children, boys of 8 and 13 years, presented with measles-associated encephalopathy several years after kidney transplantation for congenital nephrotic syndrome. In the absence of prior clinical measles, the neurological symptoms initially eluded diagnosis, but retrospective analysis of stored samples facilitated the diagnosis of measles-associated encephalopathy without recourse to biopsy of deep cerebral lesions. Each had received a single dose of measles mumps and rubella vaccine before 12 months of age. Prior vaccination, reduction of immunosuppression and treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin and ribavirin may have contributed to their survival. Persistent measles virus RNA shedding, present in one child, was not controlled by treatment with i.v. ribavirin. Two years later, both patients continue to have functioning allografts with only minimal immunosuppression. These cases illustrate the difficulty in diagnosing measles-associated encephalopathy in the immunocompromised host, even in the era of molecular diagnostics, and highlight the renewed threat of neurological disease in communities with incomplete herd immunity.

  11. Management of cardiovascular disease in the renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Rigatto, Claudio

    2005-08-01

    RTRs are at high risk for ischemic heart disease and heart failure. Although some differences pertain, most of the major risk factors are similar to those in the general population. It is highly probable that interventions of proven benefit in the general population will also be of benefit in RTRs. A combination of lifestyle modifications (smoking cessation, maintenance of ideal bodyweight, healthy diet), aggressive blood pressure control (<130/80 mm Hg), use of ACE inhibitors or ARBs, lipid lowering with statins, antiplatelet therapy for diabetics and those with established coronary disease, and beta blockers for CHF or after myocardial infarction is likely to have a major benefit on patient survival and cardiac morbidity among transplant recipients. Coronary revascularization should be considered for the same indications as in the general population.

  12. Influence of nifedipine on interstitial fibrosis in renal transplant allografts treated with cyclosporin A.

    PubMed Central

    McCulloch, T A; Harper, S J; Donnelly, P K; Moorhouse, J; Bell, P R; Walls, J; Feehally, J; Furness, P N

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To compare the degree of interstitial fibrosis in renal transplant biopsy specimens from immunosuppressed patients using conventional doses of cyclosporin with and without calcium channel blockade with a combination of low dose cyclosporin and azathioprine; to correlate the degree of interstitial fibrosis with the glomerular filtration rate. METHODS--A single blind histomorphometric assessment was done of cortical interstitial volume fraction from biopsy specimens taken intraoperatively and at one, six, and 12 months after transplantation from three prospectively randomised groups of patients: (A) conventional dose cyclosporin; (B) conventional dose cyclosporin plus nifedipine; (C) low dose cyclosporin plus azathioprine. RESULTS--Interstitial volume increased with time in all groups. No differences in interstitial volume were present at operation or at one month, but at six months interstitial volume was significantly less in group B than group A (p < 0.001) or group C (p < 0.05). More grafts failed in group A than group B leaving only small numbers for comparison at 12 months. At 12 months the differences persisted but did not reach significance. These results strongly reflected the clinical findings, where glomerular filtration rate was significantly lower in group A than groups B or C at six and 12 months; no differences in glomerular filtration rate were found at one month. In a direct comparison glomerular filtration rate showed a significant negative correlation with interstitial volume fraction. CONCLUSIONS--These findings suggest that calcium channel blockade with nifedipine slows the development of interstitial fibrosis in renal transplant recipients treated with cyclosporin. When clinical data are considered, it is suggested that calcium channel blockade may have a mitigating effect on the long term nephrotoxic effects of cyclosporin and should be considered as adjunctive treatment in patients requiring this immunosuppressant following renal

  13. The Latin American Dialysis and Renal Transplantation Registry Annual Report 2002.

    PubMed

    Cusumano, Ana Maria; Di Gioia, Cristina; Hermida, Osvaldo; Lavorato, Carlos

    2005-08-01

    Latin America is a conglomerate of adjacent countries having in common a Latin extraction and language (Spanish or Portuguese) and exhibiting extreme variations in socioeconomic status. The Latin American Society of Nephrology and Hypertension Dialysis and Renal Transplantation Registry was created in 1991. Annual data are sent by local societies in 3 forms: patient, center, and country. The prevalence of renal replacement therapy (RRT) (all modalities) increased from 119 patients per million population (pmp) in 1991 to 349 pmp in 2001; the acceptance rate was 91.7 pmp in 2001. Dialysis prevalence was 277 pmp; hemodialysis was the predominant modality, except in Mexico (86% on peritoneal dialysis). The highest dialysis prevalence and acceptance rates were reported by Puerto Rico, Uruguay, and Chile. Among incident patients, diabetic nephropathy (33%) and nephroangioesclerosis (32%) were the primary causes; 38% were older than 65 years old. Renal transplants increased from 3.7 pmp in 1987 to 13.7 pmp in 2001. In 2003, 6357 transplants were performed (55% living donor); the cumulative number performed since 1987 reached 55,947. Prevalence and incidence are low because not all patients with end-stage renal disease have access to RRT because of restricted availability, difficulties in referral, and inequities in coverage. The annual increase in the number of patients on RRT (8%-10%) is higher, proportionally, than the annual growth of the Latin American population in general (1.5%). Efforts must be focused on prevention and treatment of chronic kidney disease, especially in diabetic and older patients, and in implementing better organ donation programs to improve the pool of cadaveric donors.

  14. Personalization of the Immunosuppressive Treatment in Renal Transplant Recipients: The Great Challenge in “Omics” Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zaza, Gianluigi; Granata, Simona; Tomei, Paola; Dalla Gassa, Alessandra; Lupo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation represents the most favorable treatment for patients with advanced renal failure and it is followed, in most cases, by a significant enhancement in patients’ quality of life. Significant improvements in one-year renal allograft and patients’ survival rates have been achieved over the last 10 years primarily as a result of newer immunosuppressive regimens. Despite these notable achievements in the short-term outcome, long-term graft function and survival rates remain less than optimal. Death with a functioning graft and chronic allograft dysfunction result in an annual rate of 3%–5%. In this context, drug toxicity and long-term chronic adverse effects of immunosuppressive medications have a pivotal role. Unfortunately, at the moment, except for the evaluation of trough drug levels, no clinically useful tools are available to correctly manage immunosuppressive therapy. The proper use of these drugs could potentiate therapeutic effects minimizing adverse drug reactions. For this purpose, in the future, “omics” techniques could represent powerful tools that may be employed in clinical practice to routinely aid the personalization of drug treatment according to each patient’s genetic makeup. However, it is unquestionable that additional studies and technological advances are needed to standardize and simplify these methodologies. PMID:25690039

  15. COMBINED PANCREATIC ISLET AND KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION IN A CHILD WITH UNSTABLE TYPE 1 DIABETES AND END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, K.A.; Moassesfar, S.; Adi, S.; Gitelman, S.E.; Brennan, J.L.; McEnhill, M.; Stock, P.G.; Portale, A.A.; Posselt, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Islet transplantation after successful kidney transplantation is a recognized treatment for adults with diabetes and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), but has not been considered an option in the pediatric population. To our knowledge, we report the first combined islet and kidney transplant in a child. The patient was born with bilateral renal hypoplasia and was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus at age 13 months. He had erratic glycemic control and hypoglycemia unawareness. At 6 years of age, the child safely underwent simultaneous islet and live donor kidney transplantation. Although function of the islet graft was transient, the combined transplant provided significant benefits in terms of glucose control and overall growth and development. Such an approach represents a viable treatment option for pediatric patients with ESRD and unstable diabetes. PMID:23763601

  16. Impact of Drug Therapy, Radiation Dose, and Dose Rate on Renal Toxicity Following Bone Marrow Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jonathan C.; Schultheiss, Timothy E. Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate a radiation dose response and to determine the dosimetric and chemotherapeutic factors that influence the incidence of late renal toxicity following total body irradiation (TBI). Methods and Materials: A comprehensive retrospective review was performed of articles reporting late renal toxicity, along with renal dose, fractionation, dose rate, chemotherapy regimens, and potential nephrotoxic agents. In the final analysis, 12 articles (n = 1,108 patients), consisting of 24 distinct TBI/chemotherapy conditioning regimens were included. Regimens were divided into three subgroups: adults (age {>=}18 years), children (age <18 years), and mixed population (both adults and children). Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify dosimetric and chemotherapeutic factors significantly associated with late renal complications. Results: Individual analysis was performed on each population subgroup. For the purely adult population, the only significant variable was total dose. For the mixed population, the significant variables included total dose, dose rate, and the use of fludarabine. For the pediatric population, only the use of cyclosporin or teniposide was significant; no dose response was noted. A logistic model was generated with the exclusion of the pediatric population because of its lack of dose response. This model yielded the following significant variables: total dose, dose rate, and number of fractions. Conclusion: A dose response for renal damage after TBI was identified. Fractionation and low dose rates are factors to consider when delivering TBI to patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation. Drug therapy also has a major impact on kidney function and can modify the dose-response function.

  17. The Association between Marine n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Levels and Survival after Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jenssen, Trond; Hartmann, Anders; Diep, Lien M.; Dahle, Dag O.; Reisæter, Anna V.; Bjerve, Kristian S.; Christensen, Jeppe H.; Schmidt, Erik B.; Svensson, My

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Several studies have reported beneficial cardiovascular effects of marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. To date, no large studies have investigated the potential benefits of marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in recipients of renal transplants. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In this observational cohort study of 1990 Norwegian recipients of renal transplants transplanted between 1999 and 2011, associations between marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid levels and mortality were investigated by stratified analysis and multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression analysis adjusting for traditional and transplant-specific mortality risk factors. Marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid levels in plasma phospholipids were measured by gas chromatography in a stable phase 10 weeks after transplantation. Results There were 406 deaths (20.4%) during a median follow-up period of 6.8 years. Mortality rates were lower in patients with high marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid levels (≥7.95 weight percentage) compared with low levels (<7.95 weight percentage) for all age categories (pooled mortality rate ratio estimate, 0.69; 95% confidence interval, 0.57 to 0.85). When divided into quartiles according to marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid levels, patients in the upper quartile compared with the lower quartile had a 56% lower risk of death (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.44; 95% confidence interval, 0.26 to 0.75) using multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. There was a lower hazard ratio for death from cardiovascular disease with high levels of marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid and a lower hazard ratio for death from infectious disease with high levels of the marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid, whereas there was no association between total or individual marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid levels and cancer mortality. Conclusions Higher plasma phospholipid marine n-3

  18. Could living unrelated renal transplantation ameliorate the actual shortage of organs in the Balkan region?

    PubMed Central

    Rambabova-Busljetic, I; Popov, Z; Masin-Spasovska, j; Sikole, A; Selim, Gj; Dohcev, S; Ivanovski, N

    2013-01-01

    Background: Despite the efforts for more transplants performed with organs from deceased donors, the living renal transplantation is still the predominant transplant activity in the Balkan region. In order to adress the severe organ shortage, we started accepting unrelated (emotionally related) living donors (LURD). Here we present our 10-year experience with living unrelated renal transplantation (LURT). Methods: Twenty four LURT were performed in our center in the last 10 years. The mean recipients and donors age was 41.7 and 47.2 years, respectively. As LURD spouses (n=17) and extended family members (n=7) were accepted predominantly. All donors went through careful psychological evaluation in order to confirm emotional relationship. The final decision was taken after both the recipient and the donor signed a consent in front of a judge. A quadruple sequential immunosuppressive protocol was used in all recipients. The 5-year Kaplan Meier graft survival rate, HLA mismatch, rejection episodes, delayed graft function, serum creatinine and Glomerular filtration rate-Modification of the diet in renal disease (GFR-MDRD) were analyzed. The results were compared with 30 living related renal transplants (LRT) performed during the same time with mean recipients and donors age of 35.9 and 58.5 years, respectively. Results: The mean follow up for LURT and LRT recipients were 81.4 and 79.6 months, respectively. There was a significant difference regarding recipients and donors age, HLA mismatch (5.07 and 2.9) and rejection episodes (16% vs. 11%) in LURT and LRT recipients. The 5 years graft survival rate was excellent in both groups (83 and 81%, respectively). There was no significant difference in 5 years serum creatinine (129.3 vs 121.1 μmol/lit) and 5 years GFR-MDRD (56.6 and 58.6 ml/min). Conclusion: The authors present an excellent 5-year graft survival rate in both LURT and LRT recipients. Therefore, LURT could ameliorate the severe organ shortage in the region and

  19. Conversion from Tacrolimus to Cyclosporine A Improves Glucose Tolerance in HCV-Positive Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Handisurya, Ammon; Kerscher, Corinna; Tura, Andrea; Herkner, Harald; Payer, Berit Anna; Mandorfer, Mattias; Werzowa, Johannes; Winnicki, Wolfgang; Reiberger, Thomas; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Pacini, Giovanni; Säemann, Marcus; Schmidt, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Background Calcineurin-inhibitors and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increase the risk of post-transplant diabetes mellitus. Chronic HCV infection promotes insulin resistance rather than beta-cell dysfunction. The objective was to elucidate whether a conversion from tacrolimus to cyclosporine A affects fasting and/or dynamic insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion or all in HCV-positive renal transplant recipients. Methods In this prospective, single-center study 10 HCV-positive renal transplant recipients underwent 2h-75g-oral glucose tolerance tests before and three months after the conversion of immunosuppression from tacrolimus to cyclosporine A. Established oral glucose tolerance test-based parameters of fasting and dynamic insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion were calculated. Data are expressed as median (IQR). Results After conversion, both fasting and challenged glucose levels decreased significantly. This was mainly attributable to a significant amelioration of post-prandial dynamic glucose sensitivity as measured by the oral glucose sensitivity-index OGIS [422.17 (370.82–441.92) vs. 468.80 (414.27–488.57) mL/min/m2, p = 0.005), which also resulted in significant improvements of the disposition index (p = 0.017) and adaptation index (p = 0.017) as markers of overall glucose tolerance and beta-cell function. Fasting insulin sensitivity (p = 0.721), insulinogenic index as marker of first-phase insulin secretion [0.064 (0.032–0.106) vs. 0.083 (0.054–0.144) nmol/mmol, p = 0.093) and hepatic insulin extraction (p = 0.646) remained unaltered. No changes of plasma HCV-RNA levels (p = 0.285) or liver stiffness (hepatic fibrosis and necroinflammation, p = 0.463) were observed after the conversion of immunosuppression. Conclusions HCV-positive renal transplant recipients show significantly improved glucose-stimulated insulin sensitivity and overall glucose tolerance after conversion from tacrolimus to cyclosporine A. Considering the HCV

  20. The role of biopsy in incidental renal tumours☆

    PubMed Central

    Al-Marhoon, Mohammed S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Historically, the biopsy of renal masses was not advocated, and to date there remains some controversy on the role of biopsy for renal masses in making treatment decisions. With the widespread use of imaging methods, the incidental diagnosis of renal masses has increased, necessitating renal biopsies to better plan the management of these tumours. Here I review previous reports to define the role of biopsy in incidental renal tumours. Methods Data were obtained from English-language studies listed in PubMed on the use of renal biopsy for evaluating incidental solid small renal tumours. Results The biopsy of small renal tumours is increasingly accepted due to: the increase in the incidence of small renal tumours; the finding that a significant number of these tumours are benign; the availability of new management options, such as ablative therapy and surveillance strategies; that imaging alone is unable to predict the biological behaviour of these tumours; and advances in the pathological evaluation of the biopsies. The biopsy procedure has an acceptable complication rate but is not free of limitations. The current recommendations for the use of renal biopsy in small renal tumours are: to help in differentiating benign from malignant renal tumours; before or during ablative therapies and during the follow-up after ablative therapies, for defining treatment success or failure; and to exclude nonrenal cell primary tumours (metastasis and lymphoma) or benign conditions (abscess), which may not require surgery. Conclusions The biopsy of small renal tumours is a safe and accurate procedure, and can help in the planning of definitive patient management. PMID:26579260

  1. Causes of death in renal transplant recipients: a study of 102 autopsies from 1968 to 1991.

    PubMed Central

    Reis, M A; Costa, R S; Ferraz, A S

    1995-01-01

    A study was conducted on 102 patients submitted to renal transplant who died and were autopsied at the University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, from 1968 to 1991. The cause of death, based on a review of medical records and autopsy reports, was assigned to one of the following categories: infectious (69.6%); cardiovascular (12.7%); gastrointestinal (7.8%); graft rejection (6.9%); tumoral (2.0%); and undetermined (1.0%). Among the 71 cases of death caused by infection, 28 (39.4%) showed disseminated agents involving two or more organs. Isolated pneumonia involved 17 patients (23.9%), followed by acute pyelonephritis in the transplanted kidney in 10 patients (14.1%). The most frequent agents were: bacteria (58.0%), divided into 'non-classified' (83.0%), Nocardia (10.6%) and Mycobacterium (6.4%); fungi (27.5%) represented by Cryptococcus (22.7%), Aspergillus, Candida and Pneumocystis carinii (18.1% each), Histoplasma (13.6%), Mucor and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (4.5% each); viruses (6.2%) represented by Herpes simplex (60.0%); metazoa (5.0%, S. stercoralis), and protozoa (2.5%, T. cruzi). Cytomegalovirus (CMV) was identified in the lungs of 12 patients and was not directly correlated with death but was associated with other agents. In conclusion, immunodepressed patients such as renal transplant recipients should be carefully monitored for infection due to the high mortality rate. PMID:7884765

  2. The phenomenon of hemoglobin variability with erythropoiesis stimulating agents in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Fernández Fresnedo, G; de Francisco, A L M; Gomez Alamillo, C; Ruiz, J C; Rodrigo, E; Arias, M

    2009-10-01

    Treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) is often associated with fluctuation in hemoglobin (Hb) levels that has been considered a factor that influences morbidity/mortality in hemodialysis patients. Our aim was to describe the hemoglobin variability during ESA treatment and to study associated factors in kidney transplants. Hb variability (defined as fluctuations of Hb +/- 1.5 g/dl) was assessed in 85 renal transplant patients treated with ESA for at least 3 months and with a minimum of 6 Hb measurements along 1 year. 58% of patients experienced Hb variability during follow-up. Although 71.3% of patients maintained Hb levels greater than 11 g/dl along the whole follow-up, only 3% of patients maintained stable Hb levels within the target range all the time (11 - 13 g/dl). By multivariate analysis, clinical factors associated with variability were changes in ESA dose (RR 2.92, p = 0.04), infectious events with hospitalization (RR 1.95, p = 0.03) and the use of sirolimus (RR 1.1, p < 0.05). Excluding dose changes and hospitalization in the analysis variability was an independent predictor of graft function deterioration. In conclusion, Hb variability is common in renal transplants treated with ESA. Only few patients maintained Hb levels in the therapeutic range (11 - 13 g/dl). Dose changes, inflammatory status and graft function deterioration are the determining factors.

  3. Late acute antibody mediated rejection after nine years of renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Halim, Medhat Abdel; Al-Otaibi, Torki; Al-Waheeb, Salah; Tawab, Khaled Abdel; El Kholy, Osama; Nair, Prasad; Said, Tarek; Narayanan Nampoory, M R

    2010-11-01

    Acute antibody mediated rejection (AMR) is rarely reported as a long-term com-plication of renal transplantation, and it can present on top of another chronic pathology affecting the graft. A 45-year-old gentleman with chronic kidney disease due to unknown etiology received renal transplantation from his sister with 4 HLA mismatches. He received antithymocte globulin induction therapy and was maintained on steroids, azathioprine (AZA) and cyclosporine A (CsA). Up to eight years post-transplantation he was clinically and biochemically stable. He lost follow-up for about one year, and then presented with nephritic nephrotic syndrome and rise of serum creatinine (SCr.) to 210 μmol/L. Graft biopsy revealed picture suggestive of acute AMR on top of de novo membranoprolipherative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) with focal crescent formation, diffuse immune complex deposition and peritubular capillaries C4d positivity. Anti-HLA donor specific antibodies were highly positive for B and T cells class I and class II. The patient was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange and anti-CD20 (rituximab). AZA was changed to mycophenolate mofetil and CsA to tacrolimus. He had partial response, but SCr. continued at 220 μmol/L.

  4. Effect of exercise on markers of vascular health in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Piťha, J; Králová Lesná, I; Stávek, P; Mahrová, A; Racek, J; Sekerková, A; Teplan, V; Štollová, M

    2015-01-01

    The cornerstone of cardiovascular risk management is lifestyle intervention including exercise which could exert favorable impact also in renal transplant recipients. Nevertheless, reliable assessment of the effect of lifestyle interventions is complicated and the available data in this population are not consistent. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of physical activity on selected laboratory markers of vascular health including circulating stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, microparticles, and plasma asymmetric dimethyl arginine in renal transplant recipients. Nineteen men and 7 women were recruited in 6-month program of standardized and supervised exercise. Control group consisted of 23 men and 13 women of similar age and body mass index not included into the program. One year after the transplantation, the main difference between intervention and control group was found in the change of endothelial progenitor cells (p=0.006). Surprisingly, more favorable change was seen in the control group in which endothelial progenitor cells significantly increased compared to the intervention group. The explanation of this finding might be a chronic activation of reparative mechanisms of vascular system in the population exposed to multiple risk factors which is expressed as relatively increased number of endothelial progenitor cells. Therefore, their decrease induced by exercise might reflect stabilization of these processes.

  5. Donor/Recipient Delta Age: A Possible Risk for Arterial Stenosis in Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pallotti, Giovanni; Donati, Gabriele; Capelli, Irene; Baraldi, Olga; Comai, Giorgia; Agati, Patrizia; Nichelatti, Michele; Cianciolo, Giuseppe; La Manna, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Different arterial wall properties can significantly increase the risk of blood turbulent fluxes leading to complications such as atherosclerosis. Since the mechanical properties of arterial vessels are influenced by age, we investigated, in a retrospective study, the effects on renal artery stenosis of an age difference >15 years between donor and recipient in a cohort of 164 patients undergoing renal transplantation between 1981 and 1991. The age difference between donor and recipient was ≤15 years in 87 patients (53.0%) (Group A) and >15 years in 77 patients (47.0%) (Group B, p = ns). None of the Group A patients developed an anastomotic arterial stenosis, whereas 8/77 Group B patients (10.4%) had an anastomotic arterial stenosis (p < 0.001). This study shows that an age difference >15 years is significantly linked to the risk of developing arterial stenosis after renal transplantation. Indeed, different wall properties can significantly increase the risk of generation of blood turbulent fluxes and involve, in the arterial vessels, the development of complications such as atherosclerosis. PMID:26933444

  6. A 3’-UTR Polymorphism in Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Gene Is Associated with Acute Rejection in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Gervasini, Guillermo; García-Cerrada, Montserrat; Coto, Eliecer; Vergara, Esther; García-Pino, Guadalupe; Alvarado, Raul; Fernández-Cavada, Maria Jesús; Suárez-Álvarez, Beatriz; Barroso, Sergio; Doblaré, Emilio; Díaz-Corte, Carmen; López-Larrea, Carlos; Cubero, Juan Jose

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are arachidonic acid metabolites that play a protective role against damaging processes that may occur after re-oxygenation of the graft. We aimed to investigate whether the presence of functional polymorphisms in the gene encoding soluble epoxy hydrolase (EPHX2), which metabolizes EETs to less active compounds, may play a role in the outcome of renal transplantation. Methods In a group of 259 Caucasian renal transplant recipients and 183 deceased donors, we determined the presence of three common EPHX2 SNPs, namely rs41507953 (K55R), rs751141 (R287Q) and rs1042032 A/G. Associations with parameters of graft function and the incidence of acute rejection were retrospectively investigated throughout the first year after grafting by logistic regression adjusting for clinical and demographic variables. Results Carriers of the rs1042032 GG genotype displayed significantly lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (38.15 ± 15.57 vs. 45.99 ± 16.05; p = 0.04) and higher serum creatinine values (1.57 ± 0.58 vs. 1.30 ± 0.47 g/dL; p=0.02) one year after grafting, compared to patients carrying the wildtype A-allele. The same GG genotype was also associated to increased risk of acute rejection. Interestingly, this association was observed for the genotype of both recipients [OR =6.34 (1.35-29.90); p = 0.015] and donors [OR = 5.53 (1.10-27.80); p=0.042]. A statistical model including both genotypes along with other meaningful demographic and clinical variables resulted in an increased significance for the association with the recipients’ genotype [OR=8.28 (1.21-74.27); p=0.031]. Conclusions Our results suggest that genetic variability in the EETs-metabolizing gene, EPHX2, may have a significant impact on the outcome of deceased-donor renal transplantation. PMID:26230946

  7. UK Renal Registry 18th Annual Report: Chapter 3 Demographic and Biochemistry Profile of Kidney Transplant Recipients in the UK in 2014: National and Centre-specific Analyses.

    PubMed

    Pruthi, Rishi; Casula, Anna; MacPhee, Iain

    2016-01-01

    There was a 2% fall in overall renal transplant numbers in 2014, with a significant fall in kidney donation from donors after circulatory death (10%). In 2014, death-censored renal transplant failure rates in prevalent patients were similar to previous years at 2.4% per annum. Transplant patient death rates remained stable at 2.3 per 100 patient years. The median age of incident and prevalent renal transplant patients in the UK was 50.6 and 53.3 years respectively. The median eGFR of prevalent renal transplant recipients was 52.5 ml/min/1.73 m2. The median eGFR of patients one year after transplantation was 57.4 ml/min/1.73 m2 post live transplant, 53.6 ml/min/1.73 m2 post brainstem death transplant and 50.1 ml/min/1.73 m2 post circulatory death transplant. In 2014, 13% of prevalent transplant patients had eGFR ,30 ml/min/1.73 m2. The median decline in eGFR slope beyond the first year after transplantation was −0.48 ml/min/1.73 m2/year.In 2014, malignancy (26%) and infection (24%) remained the commonest causes of death in patients with a functioning renal transplant. PMID:27116674

  8. Effect of ureteric stents on urological infection and graft function following renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Akoh, Jacob A; Rana, Tahawar

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To compare urological infections in patients with or without stents following transplantation and to determine the effect of such infections on graft function. METHODS: All 285 recipients of kidney transplantation at our centre between 2006 and 2010 were included in the study. Detailed information including stent use and transplant function was collected prospectively and analysed retrospectively. The diagnosis of urinary tract infection was made on the basis of compatible symptoms supported by urinalysis and/or microbiological culture. Graft function, estimated glomerular filtration rate and creatinine at 6 mo and 12 mo, immediate graft function and infection rates were compared between those with a stent or without a stent. RESULTS: Overall, 196 (183 during initial procedure, 13 at reoperation) patients were stented following transplantation. The overall urine leak rate was 4.3% (12/277) with no difference between those with or without stents - 7/183 vs 5/102, P = 0.746. Overall, 54% (99/183) of stented patients developed a urological infection compared to 38.1% (32/84) of those without stents (P = 0.0151). All 18 major urological infections occurred in those with stents. The use of stent (Wald χ2 = 5.505, P = 0.019) and diabetes mellitus (Wald χ2 = 5.197, P = 0.023) were found to have significant influence on urological infection rates on multivariate analysis. There were no deaths or graft losses due to infection. Stenting was associated with poorer transplant function at 12 mo. CONCLUSION: Stents increase the risks of urological infections and have a detrimental effect on early to medium term renal transplant function. PMID:24175202

  9. Active video gaming in patients with renal transplant: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with renal transplant are at higher risk of mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with the general population. Physical activity has been shown to reduce the risk of CVD mortality in these patients. Unfortunately, barriers such as the harsh Canadian climate prevent patients from engaging in and harvesting the health benefits of physical activity. This pilot study explored active video gaming (AVG) as a way for patients with renal transplant to obtain physical activity and examined its effect on their functional status and quality of life (QOL). Main text We recruited nine patients for an 8-week prospective pilot study. All patients received a Microsoft Xbox 360™ video gaming console, a Microsoft Kinect™ sensor, and the video game Your Shape Fitness Evolved 2012. Assessment of each participant before and after the intervention included blood pressure measures, a 6-minute walk test, and the Godin Leisure Time Questionnaire (GLTQ). We analyzed all nine patients at the end of the 8-week study period, and found no changes in blood pressure or GLTQ scores. However, there was a significant increase in the 6-minute walk distance (P = 0.022), which represented a consistent increase for most patients (correlation = 0.977). In addition, participants over the age of 45 years (n = 4) were more likely to use the AVG system (P = 0.042). Conclusion AVG has the potential to improve the functional status in patients with renal transplant. Further research is required to corroborate the full health benefits of AVG in this patient population. PMID:25114788

  10. Outcome of deceased donor renal transplantation - a single-center experience from developing country.

    PubMed

    Patel, Himanshu V; Kute, Vivek B; Ghelani, Ghanshyam H; Vanikar, Aruna V; Shah, Pankaj R; Gumber, Manoj R; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2013-03-01

    Renal transplantation (RTx) is considered as the best therapeutic modality for patient suffering from end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Dearth of donor kidneys is a major problem everywhere, and deceased donor renal transplantation (DDRTx) is seen as at least a partial solution. Even so, DDRTx accounts for only less than 4% of RTx in India. We report our 6-year single-center experience on DDRTx vis-à-vis patient/graft survival, graft function in terms of serum creatinine (SCr), rejection episodes, and delayed graft function (DGF). Between January 2005 and March 2011, 236 DDRTx were performed. Majority of the donors were those with brain death due to road traffic/cerebrovascular accidents. The commonest recipient diseases leading to ESRD were chronic glomerulonephritis (42.8%), diabetes (12.7%), and hypertension (10.6%). Mean recipient age was 36.2 ± 14.2 years; 162 were males and 74 were females. Mean donor age was 45.3 ± 17.13 years; 144 were males and 92 were females. Mean dialysis duration pre-transplantation was 18.5 ± 2.5 months. All recipients received single-dose rabbit-anti-thymocyte globulin induction and steroids, calcinueurin inhibitor, and mycophenolate mofetil/azathioprine for maintenance immunosuppression. Delayed graft function was observed in 29.6% patients and 22% had biopsy-proven acute rejection. Over the mean follow-up of 2.18 ± 1.75 years, patient and graft survival rates were 74.57% and 86.8%, respectively, with mean SCr of 1.42 ± 0.66 mg%. DDRTx achieves acceptable graft function with patient/graft survival, encouraging the use of this approach in view of organ shortage. PMID:23538375

  11. Psychological well-being and psychiatric disturbance in dialysis and renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Petrie, K

    1989-03-01

    The rate of psychiatric morbidity and levels of psychological well-being and distress were assessed in groups of dialysis, renal transplant and general practice patients. Dialysis patients suffered from significantly higher rates of psychiatric morbidity, with 43 per cent falling into the probable psychiatric case range on the GHQ. Results from the Mental Health Inventory also showed dialysis patients to have a significantly poorer level of psychological adjustment than the other groups. While positive mental health states in dialysis patients were not significantly different from transplant and general practice controls, higher rates of psychological distress were found in patients on dialysis. Distress was characterized by a loss of emotional control and higher levels of depression.

  12. Experience with pyeloureterostomy associated with simple ligation of native ureter without ipsilateral nephrectomy in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Baquero, A; Ginsberg, P C; Kaschak, D; Raja, R; Schneeberg, A; Solish, L; Bannett, A D

    1985-03-01

    Ureteroneocystostomy was used as the primary method of urinary tract reconstruction in 282 allograft renal transplants at our center since 1965. A nonrefluxing anastomosis was incorporated whenever possible. Seven patients who suffered major urological complications involving the ureteroneocystostomy required pyeloureterostomy as the method of repair using the patient's distal native ureter. No ipsilateral nephrectomy was performed and simple ligation of the native ureter with nonabsorbable suture was accomplished. Of the 7 patients 3 suffered hydronephrosis of the native kidney. None of these patients had signs or symptoms secondary to acute and chronic ureteral occlusion. Our experience suggests that intentional ligation of the native ureter during pyeloureterostomy does not result in increased morbidity to the transplant patient, and that the need for ipsilateral nephrectomy with its own added morbidity may not be necessary.

  13. Cryptosporidiosis: a rare and severe infection in a pediatric renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Acikgoz, Yonca; Ozkaya, Ozan; Bek, Kenan; Genc, Gurkan; Sensoy, Sema Gulnar; Hokelek, Murat

    2012-06-01

    Cryptosporidium is an intracellular protozoan parasite that causes gastroenteritis in human. In immunocompromised individuals, cryptosporidium causes far more serious disease. There is no effective specific therapy for cryptosporidiosis, and spontaneous recovery is the rule in healthy individuals. However, immunocompromised patients need effective and prolonged therapy. Here, we present our clinical experience in a six-yr-old boy who underwent living-related donor renal transplantation and who was infected with Cryptosporidium spp. Our patient was successfully treated with antimicrobial agents consisting of spiramycin, nitazoxanide, and paromomycin. At the end of second week of therapy, his stool became negative for Cryptosporidium spp. antigen and spiramycin was discontinued. Nitazoxanide and paromomycin treatment was extended to four wk. With this case, we want to emphasize that cryptosporidiosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of severe or persistent diarrhea in solid organ transplant recipients where rigorous antimicrobial therapy is needed.

  14. Cutaneous bacillary angiomatosis due to Bartonella quintana in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Orsag, Jiri; Flodr, Patrik; Melter, Oto; Tkadlec, Jan; Sternbersky, Jan; Hruby, Miroslav; Klicova, Anna; Zamboch, Kamil; Krejci, Karel; Zadrazil, Josef

    2015-05-01

    Bacillary angiomatosis (BA) is a disorder of neovascular proliferation involving skin and other organs of immunosuppressed patients caused by Bartonella species. BA has been recognized in both immunocompetent and immunodeficient patients, mostly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons, much more rare in those with other immunodeficiencies, including organ transplantation. Diagnosis is based on serologic analysis, culture and molecular biology [detection of Bartonella species deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in tissue biopsy extracts by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR)]. All immunosuppressed patients with BA should be treated with antibiotics because of potentially life-threatening course of the disease. We report the first case of cutaneous bacillary angiomatosis due to Bartonella quintana in renal transplant recipient. This presentation demonstrates that BA should be considered a differential diagnosis in immunocompromised patients presenting with fever and cutaneous angioma-like lesions.

  15. A Challenging Case of Rapid Progressive Kaposi Sarcoma After Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Stefan; Vrachimis, Alexis; Huss, Sebastian; Wardelmann, Eva; Weckesser, Mathias; Pavenstädt, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Abstract De-novo malignancy is a serious posttransplant complication. While the incidence of Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is low, the time for its diagnosis is early after renal transplantation. Typically, it can be identified because of the classical skin lesion. We herein report an unusual case of rapid progressive KS without skin lesions in a 52-year-old patient leading to death within 8 months after kidney transplantation. This striking case illustrates the usefulness of [18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography for demonstrating the cause of unexplained deterioration of patient’s condition. Early identification of KS is critical because early (modification of) therapy can substantially improve patient’s prognosis. PMID:25192485

  16. World Kidney Day 2012: the global role of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Guillermo Garcia; Harden, Paul N; Chapman, Jeremy R

    2012-03-01

    There remain major challenges to providing optimal treatment for ESRD worldwide and a need, particularly in low-income economies, to mandate more focus on community screening and implementation of simple measures to minimize progression of chronic kidney disease. The recent designation of renal disease as an important noncommunicable disease at the United Nations High Level Meeting on Noncommunicable Diseases is one step in this direction.(32) But early detection and prevention programs will never prevent ESRD in everyone with chronic kidney disease, and kidney transplantation is an essential, viable, cost-effective, and life-saving therapy which should be equally available to all people in need. It may be the only tenable long-term treatment option for ESRD in low-income countries since it is both cheaper and provides a better outcome for patients than other treatment for ESRD. However, the success of transplantation has not been delivered evenly across the world and substantial disparities still exist in access to transplantation.We remain troubled by commercialization of living donor transplantation and exploitation of vulnerable populations for profit. There are solutions available. These include demonstrably successful models of kidney transplant programs in many developing countries; growing availability of less-expensive generic immunosuppressive agents; improved clinical training opportunities; governmental and professional guidelines legislating prohibition of commercialization and defining professional standards of ethical practice; and a framework for each nation to develop self-sufficiency in organ transplantation through focus on both living donation and especially nationally managed deceased organ donation programs. The Transplantation Society and the ISN have pledged to work together in coordinated joint global outreach programs to help establish and grow appropriate kidney transplant programs in low- and middle-income countries utilizing their

  17. Clinical and immunological features of very long-term survivors with a single renal transplant.

    PubMed

    Bererhi, Lynda; Pallet, Nicolas; Zuber, Julien; Anglicheau, Dany; Kreis, Henri; Legendre, Christophe; Candon, Sophie

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical and immunological features of the 56 still alive patients at our institution harboring a functional first renal transplant since more than 30 years. The mean post-transplant graft survival in all patients was 35.4 ± 3.1 years, the mean serum creatinine concentration was 128.7 ± 7 μmol/l, and the mean urinary protein concentration was 0.6 ± 0.5 g/l. Fifty-one percent of the patients had experienced cancer involving the skin (46.1%) and/or other tissues (28%). Hepatocarcinoma was diagnosed in 11% of the patients with chronic viral hepatitis B and/or C (48%). The 5-year patient survival rate (considered after the 30th transplantation anniversary) was 27% in patients presenting a tumor versus 87% in those tumor-free (P < 0.0001). The thymic output, the proportions of the memory and naïve T cell subsets, and the frequencies of EBV- and CMV-reactive, IFN-γ-producing T cells did not differ from those observed in more recently transplanted patients. These results suggest that the impact of chronic immunosuppression on some immune functions does not worsen over time and that the observed high prevalence of cancer in these patients may be related to the synergistic effects of decreased immunosurveillance and the time required for carcinogenesis. PMID:22353435

  18. PD1-Expressing T Cell Subsets Modify the Rejection Risk in Renal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Rebecca; Thomas, Niclas; Workman, Sarita; Ambrose, Lyn; Guzman, David; Sivakumaran, Shivajanani; Johnson, Margaret; Thorburn, Douglas; Harber, Mark; Chain, Benny; Stauss, Hans J.

    2016-01-01

    We tested whether multi-parameter immune phenotyping before or after renal ­transplantation can predict the risk of rejection episodes. Blood samples collected before and weekly for 3 months after transplantation were analyzed by multi-parameter flow cytometry to define 52 T cell and 13 innate lymphocyte subsets in each sample, producing more than 11,000 data points that defined the immune status of the 28 patients included in this study. Principle component analysis suggested that the patients with histologically confirmed rejection episodes segregated from those without rejection. Protein death 1 (PD-1)-expressing subpopulations of regulatory and conventional T cells had the greatest influence on the principal component segregation. We constructed a statistical tool to predict rejection using a support vector machine algorithm. The algorithm correctly identified 7 out of 9 patients with rejection, and 14 out of 17 patients without rejection. The immune profile before transplantation was most accurate in determining the risk of rejection, while changes of immune parameters after transplantation were less accurate in discriminating rejection from non-rejection. The data indicate that pretransplant immune subset analysis has the potential to identify patients at risk of developing rejection episodes, and suggests that the proportion of PD1-expressing T cell subsets may be a key indicator of rejection risk. PMID:27148254

  19. Hepatocellular carcinoma after kidney transplantation: analysis of Hong Kong Renal Registry.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Chi Yuen; Lam, Man Fai; Chow, Kai Ming; Lee, William; Cheng, Yuk Lun; Yuen, Sze Kit; Wong, Ping Nam; Mo, Ka Leung; Leung, Kay Tai; Wong, Sze Ho; Ho, Yiu Wing; Chau, Ka Foon

    2014-07-01

    Kidney transplant recipients have increased risk of cancers when compared with the general population. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is extremely important in Asia where hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is endemic. The aim is to study the epidemiological and clinical aspects of all de novo HCC in our kidney transplant recipients. Moreover, various preventive strategies which may help to optimize the outcome will also be discussed. A retrospective review of all patients who developed HCC after kidney transplantation between May 1972 and December 2011 in Hong Kong, based on the data from Hong Kong Renal Registry. After a follow-up period of 40,246 person-years, 20 patients (males 15: females 5) developed HCC. The annual incidence was 49.7/100,000 persons per year. Among them, 16 were HBV carriers, 2 were hepatitis C (HCV) carriers and 2 had HBV and HCV co-infection. Presence of HBV infection was associated with 78-fold higher risk for HCC development. Majority (85%) were asymptomatic when HCC was diagnosed by ultrasound or alpha-fetoprotein surveillance. All patients diagnosed by surveillance received active treatment while 2/3 of symptomatic patients could only receive symptomatic care and died rapidly. In conclusion, HBV infection is the major etiological factor for HCC development in kidney transplant recipients in HBV endemic areas. Regular HCC surveillance appeared to be able to detect early stage cancers which are amenable to treatment and offer the best hope of cure.

  20. Rhodococcus equi Sepsis in a Renal Transplant Recipient: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Macken, Eline; de Jonge, Hylke; Van Caesbroeck, Daniël; Verhaegen, Jan; Van Kerkhoven, Dana; Van Wijngaerden, Eric; Kuypers, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Rhodococcus equi is an unusual cause of infection in humans, but has emerged as an opportunistic pathogen among immunocompromised patients. Primary pulmonary involvement is the most common clinical presentation, although the spectrum of disease is broad. Diagnosing R. equi infections remains challenging, both from clinical and microbiological view, and no standard treatment has been established. In this report, we present a detailed case of a 57-year-old male renal transplant recipient who developed R. equi bacteremia with a concomitant Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. We describe the clinical features of R. equi infections, highlight the importance of an early diagnosis, and briefly review treatment options for this rare infection. PMID:27500216

  1. [EFFECTIVENESS OF URETERAL STENTS WITH NANOSTRUCTURED COATING IN RENAL TRANSPLANTATION (PRELIMINARY RESULTS)].

    PubMed

    Kogan, M I; Mojsjuk, Ja G; Shkodkin, S V; Sajdulaev, D A; Idashkin, Ju B

    2015-01-01

    From a surgeon's perspective, intraureteral jj-stent is an optimal tool to ensure upper urinary tract drainage. This paper presents preliminary results of our study investigating the use of ureteral stents with nanostructured coating in renal transplant recipients. The use of nanostructured coating based on amorphous carbon and silver nanocrystallites eliminated bacteriuria by week 4 after stenting in the treatment group with significant decrease of urine sediments while in the control group bacteriuria was found in 83,3% cases. Symptoms of bladder irritability depended on stent construction rather than presence of coating.

  2. Adenocarcinoma at ureterosigmoidostomy junction in a renal transplant recipient 15 years after conversion to ileal conduit.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, T; Zevin, D; Kyzer, S; Korzets, A; Halperin, M; Luria, B; Levi, J

    1995-08-01

    In recent years, adenocarcinoma of the colon mucosa has become a recognized complication of ureterosigmoidostomy and in most cases the tumor arises at the site of ureterocolonic anastomosis. We report a case of a 29-year-old renal transplant recipient who developed two colonic carcinomas at the site of ureterosigmoidostomy 25 years after the urinary diversion and 15 years after conversion to an ileal conduit. This case emphasizes the need for a careful life-long follow-up of all patients who undergo ureterosigmoidostomy. PMID:8529301

  3. Cerebral phaeohyphomycosis caused by Chaetomium globosum in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Anandi, V; John, T J; Walter, A; Shastry, J C; Lalitha, M K; Padhye, A A; Ajello, L; Chandler, F W

    1989-10-01

    A 32-year-old male patient developed headaches, vomiting, blurring of vision, and focal seizures of the left side of the face 2 months after a renal transplant. He developed a brain abscess and died. Direct KOH examination of the brain tissue demonstrated hyaline as well as dematiaceous, septate hyphae. Histologic examination of brain sections revealed polymorphous fungal elements consisting of septate, dark-pigmented hyphae, intercalary and terminal swollen fungal cells, and budding yeastlike cells characteristic of phaeohyphomycosis. Chaetomium globosum was isolated from the brain tissue on all of the fungal media used. This case represents the first histologically and culturally documented phaeohyphomycotic brain infection caused by C. globosum. PMID:2584374

  4. Rhodococcus equi Sepsis in a Renal Transplant Recipient: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Macken, Eline; de Jonge, Hylke; Van Caesbroeck, Daniël; Verhaegen, Jan; Van Kerkhoven, Dana; Van Wijngaerden, Eric; Kuypers, Dirk

    2015-04-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an unusual cause of infection in humans, but has emerged as an opportunistic pathogen among immunocompromised patients. Primary pulmonary involvement is the most common clinical presentation, although the spectrum of disease is broad. Diagnosing R. equi infections remains challenging, both from clinical and microbiological view, and no standard treatment has been established. In this report, we present a detailed case of a 57-year-old male renal transplant recipient who developed R. equi bacteremia with a concomitant Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. We describe the clinical features of R. equi infections, highlight the importance of an early diagnosis, and briefly review treatment options for this rare infection. PMID:27500216

  5. Effect of HLA matching and cyclosporine A in renal transplantation. ANZDATA Registry.

    PubMed

    Disney, A P

    1986-01-01

    1. Graft survival rates increased significantly in primary and second cadaver transplants as well as in one-haplotype matched living related donor renal allografts treated with CsA. 2. HLA mismatching did not seem to influence survival of primary cadaver grafts in transfused recipients. 3. No pertinent analysis was available owing to the small size of the group of nontransfused patients. 4. HLA mismatching did not appear to influence survival of second cadaver grafts in CsA-treated patients; the number of patients was small. 5. Graft survival of living donor grafts was not influenced by haplotype identity.

  6. Use of indium 111-labeled white blood cell scan in the diagnosis of cytomegalovirus pneumonia in a renal transplant recipient with a normal chest roentgenogram

    SciTech Connect

    Chinsky, K.; Goodenberger, D.M. )

    1991-03-01

    Opportunistic infections are common in patients after renal transplantation. This report describes a case of cytomegalovirus pneumonia in a renal transplant recipient with a normal chest roentgenogram and normal arterial oxygenation. An abnormal 111In-white blood cell scan led to the discovery of a pulmonary source of his recurrent fevers.

  7. The Global role of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Guillermo Garcia; Harden, Paul; Chapman, Jeremy; For The World Kidney Day Steering Committee 2012

    2012-07-01

    World Kidney Day on March 8th 2012 provides a chance to reflect on the success of kidney transplantation as a therapy for end stage kidney disease that surpasses dialysis treatments both for the quality and quantity of life that it provides and for its cost effectiveness. Anything that is both cheaper and better, but is not actually the dominant therapy, must have other drawbacks that prevent replacement of all dialysis treatment by transplantation. The barriers to universal transplantation as the therapy for end stage kidney disease include the economic limitations which, in some countries place transplantation, appropriately, at a lower priority than public health fundamentals such as clean water, sanitation and vaccination. Even in high income countries the technical challenges of surgery and the consequences of immunosuppression restrict the number of suitable recipients, but the major finite restrictions on kidney transplantation rates are the shortage of donated organs and the limited medical, surgical and nursing workforces with the required expertise. These problems have solutions which involve the full range of societal, professional, governmental and political environments. World Kidney Day is a call to deliver transplantation therapy to the one million people a year who have a right to benefit.

  8. The global role of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Garcia Garcia, Guillermo; Harden, Paul; Chapman, Jeremy

    2012-02-01

    World Kidney Day on March 8th, 2012 provides a chance to reflect on the success of kidney transplantation as a therapy for end stage kidney disease that surpasses dialysis treatments both for the quality and quantity of life that it provides and for its cost effectiveness. Anything that is both cheaper and better, but is not actually the dominant therapy, must have other drawbacks that prevent replacement of all dialysis treatment by transplantation. The barriers to universal transplantation as the therapy for end stage kidney disease include the economic limitations which, in some countries place transplantation, appropriately, at a lower priority than public health fundamentals such as clean water, sanitation and vaccination. Even in high income countries the technical challenges of surgery and the consequences of immunosuppression restrict the number of suitable recipients, but the major finite restrictions on kidney transplantation rates are the shortage of donated organs and the limited medical, surgical and nursing workforces with the required expertise. These problems have solutions which involve the full range of societal, professional, governmental and political environments. World Kidney Day is a call to deliver transplantation therapy to the one million people a year who have a right to benefit.

  9. The global role of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Guillermo G; Harden, Paul; Chapman, Jeremy

    2012-08-01

    World Kidney Day on March 8th 2012 provides a chance to reflect on the success of kidney transplantation as a therapy for end-stage kidney disease that surpasses dialysis treatments both for the quality and quantity of life that it provides and for its cost-effectiveness. Anything that is both cheaper and better, but is not actually the dominant therapy, must have other drawbacks that prevent replacement of all dialysis treatment by transplantation. The barriers to universal transplantation as the therapy for end-stage kidney disease include the economic limitations that in some countries place transplantation, appropriately, at a lower priority than public health fundamentals such as clean water, sanitation and vaccination. Even in high-income countries, the technical challenges of surgery and the consequences of immunosuppression restrict the number of suitable recipients, but the major finite restrictions on kidney transplantation rates are the shortage of donated organs and the limited medical, surgical and nursing workforces with the required expertise. These problems have solutions that involve the full range of societal, professional, governmental and political environments. World Kidney Day is a call to deliver transplantation therapy to the one million people a year who have a right to benefit.

  10. Role of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signaling in Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Zhuang, Shougang

    2016-01-01

    Renal fibrosis can be induced in different renal diseases, but ultimately progresses to end stage renal disease. Although the pathophysiologic process of renal fibrosis have not been fully elucidated, it is characterized by glomerulosclerosis and/or tubular interstitial fibrosis, and is believed to be caused by the proliferation of renal inherent cells, including glomerular epithelial cells, mesangial cells, and endothelial cells, along with defective kidney repair, renal interstitial fibroblasts activation, and extracellular matrix deposition. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulate a variety of cell physiological processes, including metabolism, growth, differentiation, and survival. Many studies from in vitro and animal models have provided evidence that RTKs play important roles in the pathogenic process of renal fibrosis. It is also showed that tyrosine kinases inhibitors (TKIs) have anti-fibrotic effects in basic research and clinical trials. In this review, we summarize the evidence for involvement of specific RTKs in renal fibrosis process and the employment of TKIs as a therapeutic approach for renal fibrosis. PMID:27331812

  11. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) for cancer after renal transplant in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and non-SLE recipients

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Brar, Amarpali; Richardson, Carrie; Salifu, Moro O; Clarke, Ann; Bernatsky, Sasha; Stefanov, Dimitre G; Jindal, Rahul M

    2016-01-01

    Objective We investigated malignancy risk after renal transplantation in patients with and without systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods Using the United States Renal Data System from 2001 to 2009, 143 652 renal transplant recipients with and without SLE contributed 585 420 patient-years of follow-up to determine incident cancers using Medicare claims codes. We calculated standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) of cancer by group using age, sex, race/ethnicity-specific and calendar year-specific cancer rates compared with the US population. Results 10 160 cancers occurred at least 3 months after renal transplant. Overall cancer risk was increased in both SLE and non-SLE groups compared with the US general population, SIR 3.5 (95% CI 2.1 to 5.7) and SIR 3.7 (95% CI 2.4 to 5.7), respectively. Lip/oropharyngeal, Kaposi, neuroendocrine, thyroid, renal, cervical, lymphoma, liver, colorectal and breast cancers were increased in both groups, whereas only melanoma was increased in SLE and lung cancer was increased in non-SLE. In Cox regression analysis, SLE status (HR 1.1, 95% CI 0.9 to 1.3) was not associated with increased risk of developing cancer, adjusted for other independent risk factors for developing cancer in renal transplant recipients. We found that smoking (HR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2 to 4.0), cytomegalovirus positivity at time of transplant (HR 1.3, 95% CI 1.2 to 1.4), white race (HR 1.2, 95% CI 1.2 to 1.3) and older recipient age at time of transplantation (HR 1.0 95% CI 1.0 to 1.2) were associated with an increased risk for development of cancer, whereas shorter time on dialysis, Epstein-Barr virus or HIV were associated with a lower risk for development of cancer. Conclusions Cancer risk in renal transplant recipients appeared similar in SLE and non-SLE subjects, aside from melanoma. Renal transplant recipients may need targeted counselling regarding surveillance and modifiable risk factors. PMID:27335659

  12. Long-Term Outcome after Rehabilitation of Bilateral Total Hip Arthroplasty in Renal Transplant Recipient – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrova, Erieta Nikolikj; Adamov, Aleksandar; Koevska, Valentina; Mitrevska, Biljana; Gacevikj, Ivan; Agushi, Arsim

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Total hip replacement is generally proposed for renal transplant patients with avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PURPOSE: The purpose of the study is to report the long-term outcome after rehabilitation of bilateral total hip arthroplasty in a patient with renal transplantation suffering from avascular osteonecrosis of the both femoral heads. MATERIAL AND METHOD: The patient S.D, 49 years old at follow-up. Few months after renal transplantation, the patient had got avascular osteonecrosis of both femoral head. One year after transplantation the total hip arthroplasty for both hip joints were performed. Three years later repeat total hip arthroplasty surgery for left hip was performed. After any surgery intervention the patient was referred for inpatient rehabilitation. For clinical assessment the clinical findings and Harris Hip Score have been used. The rehabilitation program consisted of exercises, occupational therapy, and patient education. RESULTS: After any rehabilitation treatment the patient had improvement of clinical findings. At follow-up assessment outcome for both hip function was good - Harris Hip Score was 81 points. CONCLUSION: Rehabilitation is integral part of multidisciplinary treatment of renal transplant recipient after total hip arthroplasty. Regular exercise training of these patients is very important for improving of their long-term outcome. PMID:27275350

  13. Halo naevi and café au lait macule regression in a renal transplant patient on immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Lolatgis, Helena; Varigos, George; Braue, Anna; Scardamaglia, Laura; Boyapati, Ann; Winship, Ingrid

    2015-11-01

    A case of halo naevi and café au lait macule regression in a renal transplant patient receiving long-term immunosuppressive therapy is described. We propose the direct transfer of an auto-reactive antibody, CD8 T-cells or tumour necrosis factor α from the transplant donor to the recipient as a possible cause. We have also considered insufficient immunosuppressive therapy as a possible mechanism.

  14. Polyomavirus BK Induces Inflammation via Up-regulation of CXCL10 at Translation Levels in Renal Transplant Patients with Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kariminik, Ashraf; Dabiri, Shahriar; Yaghobi, Ramin

    2016-08-01

    Polyomavirus BK-associated nephropathy (BKAN) is an important mechanism for renal losing after kidney transplantation. It seems that Polyomavirus BK can induce nephropathy by direct cell lysis and stimulation of the immune system and induction of inflammation. CXCL10 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine which stimulates the migration and activation of immune cells to the infected sites. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to evaluate the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of CXCL10 in the Polyomavirus BK-infected and Polyomavirus BK-non-infected post renal transplanted nephropathic patients in comparison to healthy controls. In this cross-sectional study, Polyomavirus BK-infected post renal transplanted nephropathic patients, Polyomavirus BK-non-infected post renal transplanted nephropathic patients, and healthy controls were enrolled to evaluate mRNA and protein levels of CXCL10 by real-time PCR and ELISA techniques, respectively. mRNA levels of CXCL10 were not significantly different among participants, while serum levels of CXCL10 were significantly elevated in the Polyomavirus BK-infected patients when compared to non-infected patients as well as controls and in non-infected patients when compared to healthy controls. Due to the results, it seems that Polyomavirus BK may potentially induce renal losing through stimulation of inflammation via increasing translation of CXCL10, as a pro-inflammatory chemokine.

  15. Applying best practices to designing patient education for patients with end-stage renal disease pursuing kidney transplant.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Stacy L; Waterman, Amy D; Davis, LaShara A; Peipert, John D; Fish, Anne F

    2015-03-01

    Despite the known benefits of kidney transplant, less than 30% of the 615 000 patients living with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States have received a transplant. More than 100 000 people are presently on the transplant waiting list. Although the shortage of kidneys for transplant remains a critical factor in explaining lower transplant rates, another important and modifiable factor is patients' lack of comprehensive education about transplant. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of known best practices from the broader literature that can be used as an evidence base to design improved education for ESRD patients pursuing a kidney transplant. Best practices in chronic disease education generally reveal that education that is individually tailored, understandable for patients with low health literacy, and culturally competent is most beneficial. Effective education helps patients navigate the complex health care process successfully. Recommendations for how to incorporate these best practices into transplant education design are described. Providing more ESRD patients with transplant education that encompasses these best practices may improve their ability to make informed health care decisions and increase the numbers of patients interested in pursuing transplant.

  16. Applying best practices to designing patient education for patients with end-stage renal disease pursuing kidney transplant

    PubMed Central

    Skelton, Stacy L.; Waterman, Amy D.; Davis, LaShara A.; Peipert, John D.; Fish, Anne F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the known benefits of kidney transplant, less than 30% of the 615000 patients living with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States have received a transplant. More than 100000 people are presently on the transplant waiting list. Although the shortage of kidneys for transplant remains a critical factor in explaining lower transplant rates, another important and modifiable factor is patients’ lack of comprehensive education about transplant. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of known best practices from the broader literature that can be used as an evidence base to design improved education for ESRD patients pursuing a kidney transplant. Best practices in chronic disease education generally reveal that education that is individually tailored, understandable for patients with low health literacy, and culturally competent is most beneficial. Effective education helps patients navigate the complex health care process successfully. Recommendations for how to incorporate these best practices into transplant education design are described. Providing more ESRD patients with transplant education that encompasses these best practices may improve their ability to make informed health care decisions and increase the numbers of patients interested in pursuing transplant. PMID:25758805

  17. Testicular function and prolactin responsiveness to TRH and cimetidine after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    De Besi, L; Serafini, E; Gasparotto, M L; Mastrogiacomo, I

    1988-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis and the regulation of prolactin secretion were investigated in eleven male renal transplant recipients. Mean serum levels of testosterone and estrone were normal, whereas those of androstenedione and estradiol were low. Mean basal luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were slightly elevated, but the peak responses to 50 micrograms i.v. gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) were not dissimilar from controls. Both basal and GnRH-stimulated follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were elevated (p less than 0.02-0.05) and also positively correlated with the time spent on hemodialysis (p less than 0.005-0.002). Basal prolactin (PRL) levels were normal, in all subjects. Nine out of 11 patients had a normal PRL response to Thyrotropin-releasing Hormone (TRH). However only six out of 11 had a normal response to 200 mg i.v. Cimetidine (Cim). Three subjects normally responding to TRH failed to respond to Cim. Uremic primary hypogonadism is not fully reversed by renal transplantation: a slight defect in the pituitary LH release may persist and the impairment of the tubular testicular function is left unchanged. While uremic hyperprolactinemia is corrected, the responsiveness to PRL-stimulating agents, particularly Cim, is not restored to normal, reflecting a derangement at the pituitary as well as the hypothalamic level.

  18. Racial disparities in reaching the renal transplant waitlist: is geography as important as race?

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Milda R.; Lee, Haena; Alexander, G. Caleb; Tak, Hyo Jung; Thistlethwaite, J. Richard; Ross, Lainie Friedman

    2016-01-01

    Background In the United States, African Americans and whites differ in access to the deceased donor renal transplant waitlist. The extent to which racial disparities in waitlisting differ between United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) regions is understudied. Methods The US Renal Data System (USRDS) was linked with US census data to examine time from dialysis initiation to waitlisting for whites (n = 188 410) and African Americans (n = 144 335) using Cox proportional hazards across 11 UNOS regions, adjusting for potentially confounding individual, neighborhood, and state characteristics. Results Likelihood of waitlisting varies significantly by UNOS region, overall and by race. Additionally, African Americans face significantly lower likelihood of waitlisting compared to whites in all but two regions (1 and 6). Overall, 39% of African Americans with ESRD reside in Regions 3 and 4 – regions with a large racial disparity and where African Americans comprise a large proportion of the ESRD population. In these regions, the African American–white disparity is an important contributor to their overall regional disparity. Conclusions Race remains an important factor in time to transplant waitlist in the United States. Race contributes to overall regional disparities; however, the importance of race varies by UNOS region. PMID:25818547

  19. Improving the outcome of kidney transplantation by ameliorating renal ischemia reperfusion injury: lost in translation?

    PubMed

    Saat, T C; van den Akker, E K; IJzermans, J N M; Dor, F J M F; de Bruin, R W F

    2016-01-20

    Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice in patients with end stage renal disease. During kidney transplantation ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) occurs, which is a risk factor for acute kidney injury, delayed graft function and acute and chronic rejection. Kidneys from living donors show a superior short- and long-term graft survival compared with deceased donors. However, the shortage of donor kidneys has resulted in expansion of the donor pool by using not only living- and brain death donors but also kidneys from donation after circulatory death and from extended criteria donors. These grafts are associated with an increased sensitivity to IRI and decreased graft outcome due to prolonged ischemia and donor comorbidity. Therefore, preventing or ameliorating IRI may improve graft survival. Animal experiments focus on understanding the mechanism behind IRI and try to find methods to minimize IRI either before, during or after ischemia. This review evaluates the different experimental strategies that have been investigated to prevent or ameliorate renal IRI. In addition, we review the current state of translation to the clinical setting. Experimental research has contributed to the development of strategies to prevent or ameliorate IRI, but promising results in animal studies have not yet been successfully translated to clinical use.

  20. Spontaneous rectus sheath haematoma in a deceased donor renal transplant recipient: a rare complication.

    PubMed

    Sreenivas, Jayaram; Karthikeyan, Vilvapathy Senguttuvan; SampathKumar, Nathee; Umesha, Lingaraju

    2016-01-01

    Rectus sheath haematoma (RSH) is rarely thought of as a cause of abdominal pain in renal transplant recipients. A 36-year-old woman, a post-deceased donor renal allograft transplant recipient for chronic interstitial nephritis, on triple drug immunosuppression (tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone) with basiliximab induction, developed acute vascular rejection and acute tubular injury with suspected antibody-mediated rejection. While on plasmapheresis and haemodialysis for delayed graft function, she developed acute left lower abdominal pain on the 16th postoperative day with tender swelling in the left paraumbilical region. CT of the abdomen showed a large haematoma in the left rectus sheath with no extension. The patient underwent haematoma evacuation through a left paramedian incision and had an uneventful recovery. Serum creatinine stabilised at 0.8 mg/dL and she is on regular follow-up with excellent graft function at 6 months. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion, and prompt treatment prevents morbidity and can expedite patient recovery. PMID:26847807

  1. Cyclosporine versus tacrolimus: cost-effectiveness analysis for renal transplantation in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Augusto Afonso; Silva, Grazielle Dias; Andrade, Eli Iola Gurgel; Cherchiglia, Mariângela Leal; Costa, Juliana de Oliveira; Almeida, Alessandra Maciel; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the cost-effectiveness of treatment regimens with cyclosporine or tacrolimus, five years after renal transplantation. METHODS This cost-effectiveness analysis was based on historical cohort data obtained between 2000 and 2004 and involved 2,022 patients treated with cyclosporine or tacrolimus, matched 1:1 for gender, age, and type and year of transplantation. Graft survival and the direct costs of medical care obtained from the National Health System (SUS) databases were used as outcome results. RESULTS Most of the patients were women, with a mean age of 36.6 years. The most frequent diagnosis of chronic renal failure was glomerulonephritis/nephritis (27.7%). In five years, the tacrolimus group had an average life expectancy gain of 3.96 years at an annual cost of R$78,360.57 compared with the cyclosporine group with a gain of 4.05 years and an annual cost of R$61,350.44. CONCLUSIONS After matching, the study indicated better survival of patients treated with regimens using tacrolimus. However, regimens containing cyclosporine were more cost-effective. PMID:25741648

  2. Effect of periodontal treatment on gingival overgrowth among cyclosporine A-treated renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Pernu, H E; Pernu, L M; Knuuttila, M L

    1993-11-01

    No data exist on any association between combined cyclosporine A (Cy A) and dihydropyridine (DHP) medication and the effect of periodontal treatment on the occurrence of gingival overgrowth (GO) among renal transplant recipients. Clinical data on 27 renal transplant recipients treated with Cy A are presented here, including determinations of serum creatinine, whole blood Cy A concentration, existence of DHP treatment, and periodontal status. GO was classified into four categories according to the clinical changes: score 0 = no GO; score 1 = mild GO; score 2 = moderate GO; and score 3 = severe GO. All participants received hygiene phase periodontal treatment and gingivectomies were performed on 10 who originally had score 2 or 3 GO and pocketing. Fourteen (14) of the recipients had no overgrown gingiva or less than at the initial examination, and none of them had GO score 2 or 3 at the time of re-examination (group A). Thirteen (13) participants had more overgrown gingiva than initially or developed score 2 GO after gingivectomies (group B). Group B included significantly more DHP-medicated recipients than group A (6/13 and 1/14 respectively; P < 0.03). The concomitant administration of Cy A and DHP resulted in a significantly increased percentage of score 2 overgrown gingival units as compared with Cy A alone (P < 0.03). It is concluded that combined treatment with Cy A and DHP is a significant risk factor for progression or recurrence of GO after periodontal treatment among susceptible patients.

  3. Epidemiological aspects of hepatitis C virus infection among renal transplant recipients in Central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Sílvia M; Ferreira, Renata C; Reis, Nádia R S; Kozlowski, Aline G; Carneiro, Megmar A S; Teles, Sheila A; Yoshida, Clara F T; Martins, Regina M B

    2008-08-01

    An investigation was conducted involving 255 renal transplant recipients in the state of Goiás, Central Brazil, to determine the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV), its risk factors, the genotypes involved, and the level of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) present in the patients. All serum samples were tested for anti-HCV antibodies and HCV RNA. Forty-one patients were anti-HCV and/or HCV RNA positive, resulting in an overall HCV infection prevalence of 16.1% (95% CI: 11.9-21.3). A multivariate analysis of risk factors showed that a history of blood transfusions without anti-HCV screening, the length of time spent on hemodialysis, and renal transplantation before 1994 are all associated with HCV positivity. In HCV-positive patients, only 12.2% had ALT levels above normal. Twenty-eight samples were genotyped as genotype 1, subtypes 1a (62.5%) and 1b (31.3%), and two samples (6.2%) were genotype 3, subtype 3a. These data show a high prevalence of HCV infection and low ALT levels in the studied population. The risk factor analysis findings emphasize the importance of public health strategies such as anti-HCV screening of candidate blood and organ donors, in addition to the stricter adoption of hemodialysis-specific infection control measures. The present study also demonstrates that HCV genotype 1 (subtype 1a) is predominant in this population.

  4. Cyclosporine versus tacrolimus: cost-effectiveness analysis for renal transplantation in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Guerra Júnior, Augusto Afonso; Silva, Grazielle Dias; Andrade, Eli Iola Gurgel; Cherchiglia, Mariângela Leal; Costa, Juliana de Oliveira; Almeida, Alessandra Maciel; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the cost-effectiveness of treatment regimens with cyclosporine or tacrolimus, five years after renal transplantation. METHODS This cost-effectiveness analysis was based on historical cohort data obtained between 2000 and 2004 and involved 2,022 patients treated with cyclosporine or tacrolimus, matched 1:1 for gender, age, and type and year of transplantation. Graft survival and the direct costs of medical care obtained from the National Health System (SUS) databases were used as outcome results. RESULTS Most of the patients were women, with a mean age of 36.6 years. The most frequent diagnosis of chronic renal failure was glomerulonephritis/nephritis (27.7%). In five years, the tacrolimus group had an average life expectancy gain of 3.96 years at an annual cost of R$78,360.57 compared with the cyclosporine group with a gain of 4.05 years and an annual cost of R$61,350.44. CONCLUSIONS After matching, the study indicated better survival of patients treated with regimens using tacrolimus. Moreover, regimens containing cyclosporine were more cost-effective [corrected].

  5. Infection in the bone marrow transplant recipient and role of the microbiology laboratory in clinical transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    LaRocco, M T; Burgert, S J

    1997-01-01

    Over the past quarter century, tremendous technological advances have been made in bone marrow and solid organ transplantation. Despite these advances, an enduring problem for the transplant recipient is infection. As immunosuppressive regimens have become more systematic, it is apparent that different pathogens affect the transplant recipient at different time points in the posttransplantation course, since they are influenced by multiple intrinsic and extrinsic factors. An understanding of this evolving risk for infection is essential to the management of the patient following transplantation and is a key to the early diagnosis and treatment of infection. Likewise, diagnosis of infection is dependent upon the quality of laboratory support, and services provided by the clinical microbiology laboratory play an important role in all phases of clinical transplantation. These include the prescreening of donors and recipients for evidence of active or latent infection, the timely and accurate microbiologic evaluation of the transplant patient with suspected infection, and the surveillance of asymptomatic allograft recipients for infection. Expert services in bacteriology, mycology, parasitology, virology, and serology are needed and communication between the laboratory and the transplantation team is paramount for providing clinically relevant, cost-effective diagnostic testing. PMID:9105755

  6. Mitigation of Late Renal and Pulmonary Injury After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Eric P.; Bedi, Manpreet; Irving, Amy A.; Jacobs, Elizabeth; Tomic, Rade; Klein, John; Lawton, Colleen A.; Moulder, John E.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To update the results of a clinical trial that assessed whether the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril was effective in mitigating chronic renal failure and pulmonary-related mortality in subjects undergoing total body irradiation (TBI) in preparation for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Methods and Materials: Updated records of the 55 subjects who were enrolled in this randomized controlled trial were analyzed. Twenty-eight patients received captopril, and 27 patients received placebo. Definitions of TBI-HSCT-related chronic renal failure (and relapse) were the same as those in the 2007 analysis. Pulmonary-related mortality was based on clinical or autopsy findings of pulmonary failure or infection as the primary cause of death. Follow-up data for overall and pulmonary-related mortality were supplemented by use of the National Death Index. Results: The risk of TBI-HSCT-related chronic renal failure was lower in the captopril group (11% at 4 years) than in the placebo group (17% at 4 years), but this was not statistically significant (p > 0.2). Analysis of mortality was greatly extended by use of the National Death Index, and no patients were lost to follow-up for reasons other than death prior to 67 months. Patient survival was higher in the captopril group than in the placebo group, but this was not statistically significant (p > 0.2). The improvement in survival was influenced more by a decrease in pulmonary mortality (11% risk at 4 years in the captopril group vs. 26% in the placebo group, p = 0.15) than by a decrease in chronic renal failure. There was no adverse effect on relapse risk (p = 0.4). Conclusions: Captopril therapy produces no detectable adverse effects when given after TBI. Captopril therapy reduces overall and pulmonary-related mortality after radiation-based HSCT, and there is a trend toward mitigation of chronic renal failure.

  7. Treatment of hypertension after renal transplantation: long-term efficacy of verapamil, enalapril, and doxazosin.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Castelao, A; Hueso, M; Sanz, V; Rejas, J; Alsina, J; Grinyó, J M

    1998-12-01

    Normal blood pressure is a good marker of graft survival after renal transplantation, and effective antihypertensive treatment reduces the progression of graft damage. We conducted a long-term follow-up study of 88 hypertensive renal transplant recipients, all of whom were taking sustained cyclosporine A (CsA) immunosuppression. The patients were treated for at least three years, and initially received 240 mg/day of verapamil (N = 24, group I), 5 mg/day of enalapril (N = 24, group II) or 1 mg/day of doxazosin (N = 40, group III). Baseline creatinine did not differ in the three groups, but proteinuria was higher in the enalapril group (7 patients had proteinuria > 1.5 g/day). Treatment was withdrawn in 5 patients in the verapamil group, 5 in the enalapril group and 2 in the doxazosin group due to drug-related side effects. Blood pressure (BP) control at three years was equivalent in the three groups (systolic BP, group I 157 +/- 12; group II 149 +/- 19; group III 154 +/- 21; diastolic BP, group I 90 +/- 8.7, group II 84 +/- 9.8, group III 90.5 +/- 16; mean BP, group I 113 +/- 7, group II 106 +/- 10, group III 106 +/- 29). Two patients in group I, 3 in group II and 15 in group III required additional antihypertensive drugs. CsA levels increased in the verapamil-treated patients, allowing for an early decrease in CsA doses (1 year doses, 3.3 +/- 1 mg/kg body wt/day in group I, 4.3 +/- 1.6 in group II, 3.7 +/- 1.6 in group III). Six cardiovascular events occurred, 3 in group I, 1 in group II, and 2 in group III patients. One patient died in the enalapril group and another in the doxazosin group. Eight verapamil-treated patients, 8 enalapril-treated patients and 4 doxazosin-treated patients lost their grafts due to biopsy-proven chronic transplant nephropathy. In conclusion, the three antihypertensive agents are effective in reducing blood pressure, with no clear advantage of one above any other. Verapamil allows the CsA dose to be reduced, thus decreasing the cost of

  8. Elevated Circulating Interleukin 33 Levels in Stable Renal Transplant Recipients at High Risk for Cardiovascular Events

    PubMed Central

    Mansell, Holly; Soliman, Mahmoud; Elmoselhi, Hamdi; Shoker, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background The Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events calculator (CRCRTR-MACE) estimates the burden of cardiovascular risk in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Our recent study of 95 RTR reported the 7-year median risk of cardiovascular events (CVE) to be 9.97%, ranging from 1.93 to 84.27%. Nearly a third (28.4%) of the cohort was above 20% risk for a CVE. Since interleukins (ILs) as part of the inflammatory response may play a role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), we extended this study to identify which ILs are associated with high cardiovascular risk in this population. Methods Twenty-two ILs were measured by multiplexed fluorescent bead-based immunoassay in 95 RTR and 56 normal controls. Stepwise analysis after multivariate determination of significant demographic and inflammatory variables was performed between the high and low-CVD risk groups (which were arbitrarily set at scores <10% and ≥20%, respectively). Normalized data was presented as mean ± SD and non-normalized data as median (minimum–maximum). Significance was measured at <0.05. Results 27.5% of the low-risk and 31.3% of the high-risk groups had mean IL levels above the 95 percentile of the normal control levels. In the non-parametric analysis IL-6, 9, 16, 17 and 33 were significantly higher in the high-risk group compared to the control. Univariate analysis (UVA) of the high-risk group identified IL-33 as the only IL that remained significantly higher than the control and low-risk groups (p = 0.000). The percentage of patients with IL-33 levels above the 90 percentile of control value in the low and high-risk groups were 15.6% and 52.0%, respectively (p<0.002). UVA of factors significant to high IL-33 levels included estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), while diabetes mellitus, serum phosphorus, microalbuminuria and age also remained significant in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Circulating IL-33 level is positively associated with high CRCRTR-MACE score

  9. [The epithelial-mesenchymal transition and fibrosis of the renal transplant].

    PubMed

    Mezni, Imen; Galichon, Pierre; Bacha, Mohamed Mongi; Sfar, Imen; Hertig, Alexandre; Goucha, Rim; Xu-Dubois, Yi-Chun; Abderrahim, Ezzedine; Gorgi, Yousr; Rondeau, Eric; Abdallah, Taieb Ben

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process by which differentiated epithelial cells undergo a phenotypic conversion and acquire a mesenchymal phenotype, including elongated morphology, enhanced migratory and invasion capacity, and greatly increased production of extracellular matrix (ECM) components. This phenomenon plays a pivotal role in embryonic development, wound healing and tissue regeneration. It has also been involved in organ fibrosis. Some studies suggest that following injury, renal tubular epithelial cells undergo reprograming in mesenchymal cells, and thus constitute an important source of de novo myofibroblasts invading the renal interstitium and contributing to fibrosis. However, an increasing number of studies raise doubts about the existence of this process in vivo. The role of EMT in the development of renal fibrosis remains a matter of intense debate and may depend on the model studied. In this review, we describe the role of EMT in the development of fibrosis of renal graft, and then we propose approaches for detecting and treating renal fibrogenesis by targeting TEM.

  10. Vascular Endothelium as a Target of Immune Response in Renal Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Piotti, Giovanni; Palmisano, Alessandra; Maggiore, Umberto; Buzio, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    This review of clinical and experimental studies aims at analyzing the interplay between graft endothelium and host immune system in renal transplantation, and how it affects the survival of the graft. Graft endothelium is indeed the first barrier between self and non-self that is encountered by host lymphocytes upon reperfusion of vascularized solid transplants. Endothelial cells (EC) express all the major sets of antigens (Ag) that elicit host immune response, and therefore represent a preferential target in organ rejection. Some of the Ag expressed by EC are target of the antibody-mediated response, such as the AB0 blood group system, the human leukocyte antigens (HLA), and MHC class I related chain A antigens (MICA) systems, and the endothelial cell-restricted Ag; for each of these systems, the mechanisms of interaction and damage of both preformed and de novo donor-specific antibodies are reviewed along with their impact on renal graft survival. Moreover, the rejection process can force injured EC to expose cryptic self-Ag, toward which an autoimmune response mounts, overlapping to the allo-immune response in the damaging of the graft. Not only are EC a passive target of the host immune response but also an active player in lymphocyte activation; therefore, their interaction with allogenic T-cells is analyzed on the basis of experimental in vitro and in vivo studies, according to the patterns of expression of the HLA class I and II and the co-stimulatory molecules specific for cytotoxic and helper T-cells. Finally, as the response that follows transplantation has proven to be not necessarily destructive, the factors that foster graft endothelium functioning in spite of rejection, and how they could be therapeutically harnessed to promote long-term graft acceptance, are described: accommodation that is resistance of EC to donor-specific antibodies, and endothelial cell ability to induce Foxp3+ regulatory T-cells, that are crucial mediators of tolerance. PMID

  11. Role of NK, NKT cells and macrophages in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fahrner, René; Dondorf, Felix; Ardelt, Michael; Settmacher, Utz; Rauchfuss, Falk

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation has become the treatment of choice for acute or chronic liver disease. Because the liver acts as an innate immunity-dominant organ, there are immunological differences between the liver and other organs. The specific features of hepatic natural killer (NK), NKT and Kupffer cells and their role in the mechanism of liver transplant rejection, tolerance and hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury are discussed in this review. PMID:27468206

  12. Effect of FTY720 (fingolimod) on graft survival in renal transplant recipients: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Gholamnezhadjafari, Reza; Falak, Reza; Aflatoonian, Reza; Ali Keshtkar, Abbas; Rezaei, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Studies have shown that FTY720 has inconsistent effects in kidney transplant recipients. Several review articles on FTY720 have been published, but most have focused on the mechanism of action of FTY720. Therefore, this review aims to evaluate and determine the beneficial and harmful effects of FTY720 therapy in kidney transplant recipients. Methods and analysis We electronically searched the following databases: PubMed, Scopus, the Web of Sciences, EMBASE, Cochrane databases and the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials. Any clinical, randomised controlled trials relating to FTY720 for treating kidney transplant recipients were included without publication status or language restriction. Study selection, data extraction and assessment of study quality were performed independently by two researchers. Data were synthesised by either the fixed effects or the random effects model according to a heterogeneity test. If the extracted data were suitable for meta-analysis, STATA software was used to combine the relative risks for dichotomous outcomes, and the mean differences for continuous outcomes with 95% CIs were measured. Death, loss of function and incidence of acute kidney rejection were assessed as the primary outcomes. Renal graft function, malignancy, delayed graft function and infection were evaluated as secondary outcomes. Ethics/dissemination This review does not require formal ethics approval because the data are not individualised. The resulting review article will be submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. Trial registration number CRD42015024648. PMID:27126975

  13. Risk Factors for the Development of BK Virus Nephropathy in Renal Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Pai, D; Mann, D M; Malik, A; Hoover, D R; Fyfe, B; Mann, R A

    2015-10-01

    The BK polyoma virus has, in recent years, become a significant cause of renal allograft dysfunction and failure. Among 260 adult kidney transplant recipients, those with biopsy-proven BK virus nephropathy (BKVN) were compared with those without BKVN with regard to gender, age, race, rejection episodes, time on dialysis, number of organs transplanted, HLA match, live donor versus deceased donor, cold ischemia time, delayed graft function, cytomegalovirus (CMV) serostatus of donor and recipient, induction therapy, and maintenance immunosuppression. Episodes of rejection (35.7% of patients with BKVN vs 8.5% of patients without BKVN; P = .01), transplantation of >1 organ (35.7% of patients with BKVN vs 9.0% of patients without BKVN; P = .01), positive CMV serology in both donor and recipient (71.4% of patients with BKVN vs 41.1% of patients without BKVN; P = .03), and a greater cumulative dose of daclizumab use at the time of induction (2.24 ± 0.05 mg/kg in patients with BKVN vs 2.03 ± 0.14 mg/kg in patients without BKVN; P = .04) were statistically significant risk factors for the development of BKVN. Those who developed BKVN received a higher mean cumulative dose of rabbit antithymoglobulin for induction therapy, but that difference failed to achieve statistical significance (P = .07).

  14. The Role of Hydrogen Sulfide in Renal System

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xu; Bian, Jin-Song

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide has gained recognition as the third gaseous signaling molecule after nitric oxide and carbon monoxide. This review surveys the emerging role of H2S in mammalian renal system, with emphasis on both renal physiology and diseases. H2S is produced redundantly by four pathways in kidney, indicating the abundance of this gaseous molecule in the organ. In physiological conditions, H2S was found to regulate the excretory function of the kidney possibly by the inhibitory effect on sodium transporters on renal tubular cells. Likewise, it also influences the release of renin from juxtaglomerular cells and thereby modulates blood pressure. A possible role of H2S as an oxygen sensor has also been discussed, especially at renal medulla. Alternation of H2S level has been implicated in various pathological conditions such as renal ischemia/reperfusion, obstructive nephropathy, diabetic nephropathy, and hypertensive nephropathy. Moreover, H2S donors exhibit broad beneficial effects in renal diseases although a few conflicts need to be resolved. Further research reveals that multiple mechanisms are underlying the protective effects of H2S, including anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation, and anti-apoptosis. In the review, several research directions are also proposed including the role of mitochondrial H2S in renal diseases, H2S delivery to kidney by targeting D-amino acid oxidase/3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (DAO/3-MST) pathway, effect of drug-like H2S donors in kidney diseases and understanding the molecular mechanism of H2S. The completion of the studies in these directions will not only improves our understanding of renal H2S functions but may also be critical to translate H2S to be a new therapy for renal diseases. PMID:27803669

  15. External iliac vein – transplant ureteral fistula combined with renal cell carcinoma: an unusual case of hematuria

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jin-dan; Liu, Ben; Wang, Ping; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Xiang-lai; Li, Shi-qi; Cai, Song-liang; Wang, Yi-min

    2014-01-01

    Iliac vein-ureteral fistula is a rare cause of hematuria. The diagnosis of an iliac vein-ureteral fistula can be elusive even with the use of multiple methods. With regards to the treatment, there appears to be a shift in management from primarily open surgical to primarily angiographic management. We present a unique case of an external iliac vein – transplant ureteral fistula. A 48 year-old female complained of recurrent gross hematuria. She underwent transplant nephrectomy and radical left nephrectomy because of rejection of transplanted kidney and cystic renal cell carcinoma when the hematuria arose for the first time. Ten months later, the hematuria recurred again, and cystoscopy showed bleeding from the right transplant ureteral orifice. Open exploration confirmed the diagnosis of external iliac vein – transplant ureteral fistula. Diagnostic difficulties and treatment dilemma of such a rare cause of hematuria are also discussed. PMID:25092990

  16. Digital vascular imaging and selective renin sampling in evaluation of vascular anatomy in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, G A; Irving, J D; Farrington, K; Varghese, Z; Persaud, J W; Sweny, P; Moorhead, J F; Fernando, O N

    1983-01-01

    Sixty-five renal transplant recipients underwent digital vascular imaging of the graft and simultaneous selective venous sampling for plasma renin activity. Renal artery stenosis was found in seven patients but did not appear to be functionally important. Diffuse intrarenal arterial attenuation was found in seven patients and was associated with impaired graft function and perfusion; it may indicate chronic rejection. Lower pole hypoperfusion was found in nine patients without impaired graft function or perfusion; its clinical relevance is uncertain. Aneurysmal dilatation of the main renal artery was found in two patients. Severe hypertension was common in patients with these three major abnormalities, but a causal association between the abnormality and hypertension could rarely be inferred. It may be the abnormalities on digital vascular imaging, especially diffuse intrarenal arterial attenuation and lower pole hypoperfusion, are secondary to severe hypertension. Digital vascular imaging with simultaneous selective venous sampling for plasma renin activity is useful in evaluating the vascular anatomy of the grafted kidney and in assessing any abnormality found. The combined procedure was well tolerated by all patients with no complications and no incidence of acute tubular dysfunction or proteinuria after the investigation. Images p1005-a PMID:6403169

  17. Cardiorespiratory fitness is a marker of cardiovascular health in renal transplanted children.

    PubMed

    Tangeraas, Trine; Midtvedt, Karsten; Fredriksen, Per Morten; Cvancarova, Milada; Mørkrid, Lars; Bjerre, Anna

    2010-11-01

    Children with renal transplants (TX) are at increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease. Study objectives were to assess the level of cardiorespiratory fitness (CR fitness) and daily physical activity (PA) in renal TX children and adolescents in relation to traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Laboratory testing included assessment of CR fitness by treadmill exercise testing (VO(2peak)), 24-h ambulatory blood-pressure (ABPM) measurement, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), anthropometrics and measurement of lipid levels. PA was self-reported by questionnaire. Twenty-two TX patients with a median (range) age 14.5 (9-18) years were tested. Median V0(2peak) was 66% (36-97) of the expected values compared with controls. Nineteen (86%) children reported <60 min of daily moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Sixteen (73%) were hypertensive and 8 (34%) were overweight or obese. Four children fulfilled the criteria for a metabolic syndrome. Children with at least 2 of the 3 metabolic risk factors (hypertension, overweight, and glucose intolerance, n=7) achieved significantly lower VO(2peak) compared with those with one or none of these factors (median V0(2peak) 45% and 73% of the expected values respectively, p=0.003). Renal TX children and adolescents have severely impaired CR fitness and PA. Reduced CR fitness was associated with the clustering of CV risk factors. Routine counseling for increased PA is strongly recommended.

  18. Role of socioeconomic status in kidney transplant outcome.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb-Rumyantzev, Alexander S; Koford, James K; Baird, Bradley C; Chelamcharla, Madhukar; Habib, Arsalan N; Wang, Ben-Jr; Lin, Shih-jui; Shihab, Fuad; Isaacs, Ross B

    2006-03-01

    There is controversy regarding the influence of genetic versus environmental factors on kidney transplant outcome in minority groups. The goal of this project was to evaluate the role of certain socioeconomic factors in allograft and recipient survival. Graft and recipient survival data from the United States Renal Data System were analyzed using Cox modeling with primary variables of interest, including recipient education level, citizenship, and primary source of pay for medical service. College (hazard ratio [HR] 0.93, P < 0.005) and postcollege education (HR 0.85, P < 0.005) improved graft outcome in the whole group and in patients of white race. Similar trends were observed for recipient survival (HR 0.9, P < 0.005 for college; HR 0.88, P = 0.09 for postcollege education) in the whole population and in white patients. Resident aliens had a significantly better graft outcome in the entire patient population (HR 0.81, P < 0.001) and in white patients in subgroup analysis (HR 0.823, P < 0.001) compared with US citizens. A similar effect was observed for recipient survival. Using Medicare as a reference group, there is a statistically significant benefit to graft survival from having private insurance in the whole group (HR 0.87, P < 0.001) and in the black (HR 0.8, P < 0.001) and the white (HR 0.89, P < 0.001) subgroups; a similar effect of private insurance is observed on recipient survival in the entire group of patients and across racial groups. Recipients with higher education level, resident aliens, and patients with private insurance have an advantage in the graft and recipient outcomes independent of racial differences. PMID:17699222

  19. Decreased retinol-binding protein 4 in the sera of patients with end-stage renal disease after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W X; Zhou, W; Zhang, Z M; Zhang, Z Q; He, J F; Shi, B Y

    2014-01-01

    Retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) is a novel adipokine that has been associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have very high serum RBP4 levels. However, whether successful kidney transplantation alleviates these elevated serum RBP4 levels is unclear. The serum RBP4 levels of 24 ESRD patients were determined before transplantation and at 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month after kidney transplantation. The control group included 22 healthy subjects. Serum RBP4 concentrations were measured using a commercial kit via the immunologic turbidimetric method, and were related to biomarkers for renal and liver function. The serum RBP4 level of ESRD patients before kidney transplantation (160.8 ± 29.1 mg/L) was approximately 7-fold higher than that of normal controls (22.6 ± 11.0 mg/L; P = 0.000). The serum RBP4 level before transplantation was significantly higher than that at 1 day (65.3 ± 28.4 mg/L), 1 week (48.3 ± 22.9 mg/L), and 1 month after transplantation (53.1 ± 25.5 mg/L; P = 0.000). However, these values were still higher than those of controls (P = 0.000). Univariate regression analysis showed that the percent changes in serum RBP4 concentration before and after kidney transplantation were positively correlated with serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, phosphate, and pre-albumin concentrations and negatively correlated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate. The serum RBP4 concentration of patients with ESRD decreased significantly after kidney transplantation; therefore, we found that serum RBP4 concentration was related to renal function. PMID:25299197

  20. Pain in the left ear as the presenting symptom of acute myocardial infarction in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Basic-Jukic, N; Novosel, D; Ivanac, I; Danic-Hadzibegovic, A; Kes, P

    2014-01-01

    Chest pain is the main presenting symptom in patients with acute myocardial infarction. However, many patients present with atypical symptoms, which may delay proper diagnosis and treatment. We present the first documented case of pain in the left ear as an atypical presentation of acute myocardial infarction 5 days after renal transplantation.

  1. Renal Transplant Recipients Treated with Calcineurin-Inhibitors Lack Circulating Immature Transitional CD19+CD24hiCD38hi Regulatory B-Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tebbe, Bastian; Wilde, Benjamin; Ye, Zeng; Wang, Junyu; Wang, Xinning; Jian, Fu; Dolff, Sebastian; Schedlowski, Manfred; Hoyer, Peter F.; Kribben, Andreas; Witzke, Oliver; Hoerning, André

    2016-01-01

    Background CD19+CD24hiCD38hi transitional immature B-lymphocytes have been demonstrated to play an important role in regulating the alloimmune response in transplant recipients. Here, we analyzed the effect of calcineurin inhibition on these peripherally circulating regulatory B-cells (Breg) in renal transplant recipients receiving cyclosporine A (CsA) or tacrolimus. Methods PBMCs from healthy subjects (HS) (n = 16) and renal transplant recipients (n = 46) were isolated. Flow cytometry was performed for CD19, CD24, CD38 and IL-10 either after isolation or after 72 hours of co-culture in presence of PMA/Ionomycin and TLR9-ligand in presence or absence of increasing concentrations of tacrolimus or CsA. Results The amount of CD19+ B-cells among lymphocytes was ∼9.1% in HS, ∼3.6% in CsA (n = 11, p<0.05) and ∼6.4% in TAC (n = 35, p<0.05) treated patients. Among B-cells, a distinct subset of Breg was found to be 4.7% in HS, 1.4% in tacrolimus treated patients and almost blunted in patients receiving CsA. Similarily, ∼4% of B-cells in HS and even fewer in CsA or tacrolimus treated patients produced IL-10 (0.5% and 1.5%, p<0.05) and this was confirmed both in non-transplanted CsA-treated healthy subjects and in in vitro co-culture experiments. Among 29 patients with <1% of Breg, 9 cases (31%) displayed an allograft rejection in contrast to only one case of rejection (6%) among 17 patients with >1%. Conclusion Calcineurin inhibitors reduce number and IL-10 production of Bregs in the peripheral circulation of both renal transplant recipients and non-transplanted healthy subjects. CNI induced Breg reduction is not restricted to a solid organ transplant setting and is not mediated by co-medication with steroids or MPA. A low proportion of Breg cells is associated with an elevated frequency of allograft rejection events. PMID:27045291

  2. Renal transplantation experience in a patient with factor V Leiden homozygous, MTHFR C677T heterozygous, and PAI heterozygous mutation.

    PubMed

    Gülhan, Bora; Tavil, Betül; Gümrük, Fatma; Aki, Tuncay F; Topaloglu, Rezan

    2015-08-01

    Vascular complications are important causes of allograft loss in renal transplantation. A two and a half-month-old boy was diagnosed with posterior urethral valve and progressed to end-stage renal disease at eight yr of age. During the HD period, a central venous catheter was replaced three times for repeated thrombosis. The boy was found to be homozygous for FVL and heterozygous for both MTHFR (C677T) and PAI. At the age of 12, renal transplantation was performed from a deceased donor. Postoperative anticoagulation therapy was initiated with continuous intravenous administration of heparin at the dose of 10 IU/kg/h. HD was performed for the first three days. By the fourth day of transplantation, his urine output had increased gradually. Heparin infusion was continued for 18 days during hospitalization at the same dosage. Thereafter, he was discharged with LMWH. On the third month after transplantation, his serum creatinine level was 1.1 mg/dL and eGFR was 75.7 mL/min/1.73 m(2). He has still been using LMWH, and his eGFR was 78.7 mL/min/1.73 m(2) eight months after transplantation. Postoperative low-dose heparin treatment is a safe strategy for managing a patient with multiple thrombotic risk factors. PMID:25996881

  3. Renal function improvement in liver transplant recipients after early everolimus conversion: A clinical practice cohort study in Spain.

    PubMed

    Bilbao, Itxarone; Salcedo, Magdalena; Gómez, Miguel Angel; Jimenez, Carlos; Castroagudín, Javier; Fabregat, Joan; Almohalla, Carolina; Herrero, Ignacio; Cuervas-Mons, Valentín; Otero, Alejandra; Rubín, Angel; Miras, Manuel; Rodrigo, Juan; Serrano, Trinidad; Crespo, Gonzalo; De la Mata, Manuel; Bustamante, Javier; Gonzalez-Dieguez, M Luisa; Moreno, Antonia; Narvaez, Isidoro; Guilera, Magda

    2015-08-01

    A national, multicenter, retrospective study was conducted to assess the results obtained for liver transplant recipients with conversion to everolimus in daily practice. The study included 477 recipients (481