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Sample records for renasica ii mexican

  1. RENASICA II: A Mexican acute myocardial infarction registry that highlights the importance of regional registries

    PubMed Central

    Al Suwaidi, Jassim

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death, worldwide, with disproportionate representation in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The Registro Nacional de los Síndromes Coronarios Agudos II (RENASICA II) investigators reported smoking, hypertension and diabetes were the main risk factors among Mexican patients presenting with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Fibrinolytic therapy was administered to 37%. Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) was performed in only 15% of patients. 30-day mortality was 10%. This study highlights the importance of conducting regional registries for quality improvement. PMID:25780784

  2. RENASICA II: A Mexican acute myocardial infarction registry that highlights the importance of regional registries.

    PubMed

    Al Suwaidi, Jassim

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death, worldwide, with disproportionate representation in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The Registro Nacional de los Síndromes Coronarios Agudos II (RENASICA II) investigators reported smoking, hypertension and diabetes were the main risk factors among Mexican patients presenting with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Fibrinolytic therapy was administered to 37%. Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) was performed in only 15% of patients. 30-day mortality was 10%. This study highlights the importance of conducting regional registries for quality improvement.

  3. Risk factors, therapeutic approaches, and in-hospital outcomes in Mexicans with ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction: the RENASICA II multicenter registry.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Herrera, Úrsulo; Jerjes-Sánchez, Carlos

    2013-05-01

    Ischemic heart disease is a growing health problem in Latin America. We aimed to analyze risk factors, acute management, and short-term outcome of Mexicans with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Modifiable risk factors are associated with the occurrence of STEMI in Mexicans, and potentially preventable acute complications are responsible for most short-term deaths. Among 8600 patients enrolled in Registro Nacional de los Síndromes Coronarios Agudos II (RENASICA II) with a suspected acute coronary syndrome, we analyzed 4555 patients (56%; age 21-100 y) with confirmed STEMI who presented within 24 hours from symptoms' onset. Smoking (66%), hypertension (50%), and diabetes (43%) were the main risk factors. Most patients (74%) presented with Killip class I (class IV in 4%). Anterior-located STEMI occurred in 56% of cases, and posterior-inferior in 40% of cases. Significant Q waves were present in 43%, right bundle branch block in 7%, left bundle branch block in 5%, first-degree atrioventricular block in 2%, and high-degree atrioventricular block in 2%. A total of 1685 (37%) patients received fibrinolytic therapy (streptokinase, 82%; alteplase, 17%; tenecteplase, 1%), with 31% of patients receiving therapy in <2 hours, 36% in 2-4 hours, 19% in 4-6 hours, and 15% in >6 hours. Thirty percent of patients received either percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass grafting during hospitalization. Major adverse cardiovascular events were recurrent ischemia (12%), reinfarction (4%), cardiogenic shock (4%), and stroke (1%). The main predictors of 30-day mortality (10%) in multivariate analysis were age ≥65 years (odds ratio [OR]: 2.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.94-3.13), Killip class IV (OR: 10.60, 95% CI: 6.09-18.40), and cardiogenic shock (OR: 18.76, 95% CI: 10.60-33.20). Largely modifiable risk factors and preventable short-term complications are responsible for most STEMI cases and outcomes in this Mexican population. © 2013 Wiley

  4. Third national registry of acute coronary syndromes (RENASICA III).

    PubMed

    Jerjes-Sanchez, Carlos; Martinez-Sanchez, Carlos; Borrayo-Sanchez, Gabriela; Carrillo-Calvillo, Jorge; Juarez-Herrera, Ursulo; Quintanilla-Gutierrez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    RENASICA III is a prospective, multicenter registry on acute coronary syndromes (ACS). The main objective will be to identify the outcome in tertiary and community hospitals and perform strategies to improve quality of care in Mexico. RENASICA III will enroll 8000 patients in public health and private hospitals. The registry began in November 2012 with a planned recruitment during 12 months and a 1-year follow-up. The study population will comprise a consecutive, prospective cohort of patients >18 years with ACS final diagnosis and evidence of ischemic heart disease. The structure, data collection and data analysis will be based on quality current recommendations for registries. The protocol has been approved by institutional ethics committees in all participant centers. All patients will sign an informed consent form. Currently in Mexico, there is a need of observational registries that include patients with treatment in the everyday clinical practice so the data could be validated and additional information could be obtained versus the one from the clinical trials. In this way, RENASICA III emerges as a link among randomized clinical trials developed by experts and previous Mexican experience. Copyright © 2014 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical management and hospital outcomes of acute coronary syndrome patients in Mexico: The Third National Registry of Acute Coronary Syndromes (RENASICA III).

    PubMed

    Martinez-Sanchez, Carlos; Borrayo, Gabriela; Carrillo, Jorge; Juarez, Ursulo; Quintanilla, Juan; Jerjes-Sanchez, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    To describe current management and clinical outcomes in patients hospitalized with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in Mexico. RENASICA III was a prospective multicenter registry of consecutive patients hospitalized with an ACS. Patients had objective evidence of ischemic heart disease; those with type II infarction or secondary ischemic were excluded. Study design conformed to current quality recommendations. A total of 123 investigators at 29 tertiary and 44 community hospitals enrolled 8296 patients with an ACS (4038 with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction/unstable angina [NSTEMI/UA], 4258 with ST-elevation myocardial infarction [STEMI]). The majority were younger (62±12years) and 76.0% were male. On admission 80.5% had ischemic chest pain lasting >20min and clinical stability. Left ventricular dysfunction was more frequent in NSTEMI/UA than in those with STEMI (30.0% vs. 10.7%, p<0.0001). In STEMI 37.6% received thrombolysis and 15.0% primary PCI. PCI was performed in 39.6% of NSTEMI/UA (early strategy in 10.8%, urgent strategy in 3.0%). Overall hospital death rate was 6.4% (8.7% in STEMI vs. 3.9% in NSTEMI/UA, p<0.001). The strongest independent predictors of hospital mortality were cardiogenic shock (odds ratio 22.4, 95% confidence interval 18.3-27.3) and ventricular fibrillation (odds ratio 12.5, 95% confidence interval 9.3-16.7). The results from RENASICA III establish the urgent need to develop large-scale regional programs to improve adherence to guideline recommendations in ACS, including rates of pharmacological thrombolysis and increasing the ratio of PCI to thrombolysis. Copyright © 2016 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  6. Macrovascular complications in Mexican Americans with type II diabetes.

    PubMed

    Haffner, S M; Mitchell, B D; Stern, M P; Hazuda, H P

    1991-07-01

    Mexican Americans have a threefold greater prevalence of non-insulin-dependent (type II) diabetes mellitus than non-Hispanic whites in the San Antonio Heart Study, a population-based study of diabetes. In addition, Mexican-American diabetic subjects (n = 365) have greater fasting glycemia than non-Hispanic white diabetic subjects (P less than 0.001). Despite these findings, and despite a higher prevalence of microvascular complications among Mexican Americans, there does not appear to be a marked difference in prevalence of macrovascular complications between Mexican-American and non-Hispanic white diabetic subjects. Mexican-American diabetic subjects have only a moderate excess of peripheral vascular disease (as judged by ankle-arm blood pressure ratios) relative to non-Hispanic white diabetic subjects (sex-adjusted Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio 1.84, 95% confidence interval 0.75-4.49). Mexican-American diabetic subjects actually reported fewer myocardial infarctions than non-Hispanic white diabetic subjects (sex-adjusted Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio 0.73, 95% confidence interval 0.31-1.71). Duration was not associated with either peripheral vascular disease or myocardial infarction. Severity of glycemia was only mildly associated with presence of peripheral vascular disease and negatively associated with self-reported myocardial infarction. This latter finding may represent a survival bias in that more severe diabetic subjects have already died and are not ascertained in a prevalence study. The absence of an ethnic difference in the prevalence of macrovascular disease contrasts with our previous reports from the San Antonio Heart Study, in which the prevalence of both retinopathy and proteinuria was observed to be higher in Mexican-American diabetic subjects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. La Experiencia Mexicana (The Mexican Experience). Volumes I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finer, Neal B.

    Designed to be used as part of a comprehensive social studies program on Mexican culture, this two-volume manual, written in Spanish, offers an instructional package on Mexican culture, stressing an art-architecture perspective, which can be used at the secondary, college and adult levels. The teacher's guide, Volume I, includes a discussion of a…

  8. La Experiencia Mexicana (The Mexican Experience). Volumes I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finer, Neal B.

    Designed to be used as part of a comprehensive social studies program on Mexican culture, this two-volume manual, written in Spanish, offers an instructional package on Mexican culture, stressing an art-architecture perspective, which can be used at the secondary, college and adult levels. The teacher's guide, Volume I, includes a discussion of a…

  9. [The Mexican consensus on gastroesophageal reflux disease. Part II].

    PubMed

    Huerta-Iga, F; Tamayo-de la Cuesta, J L; Noble-Lugo, A; Hernández-Guerrero, A; Torres-Villalobos, G; Ramos-de la Medina, A; Pantoja-Millán, J P

    2013-01-01

    To update the themes of endoscopic and surgical treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) from the Mexican Consensus published in 2002. Part I of the 2011 Consensus dealt with the general concepts, diagnosis, and medical treatment of this disease. Part II covers the topics of the endoscopic and surgical treatment of GERD. In this second part, an expert in endoscopy and an expert in GERD surgery, along with the three general coordinators of the consensus, carried out an extensive bibliographic review using the Embase, Cochrane, and Medline databases. Statements referring to the main aspects of endoscopic and surgical treatment of this disease were elaborated and submitted to specialists for their consideration and vote, utilizing the modified Delphi method. The statements were accepted into the consensus if the level of agreement was 67% or higher. Twenty-five statements corresponding to the endoscopic and surgical treatment of GERD resulted from the voting process, and they are presented herein as Part II of the consensus. The majority of the statements had an average level of agreement approaching 90%. Currently, endoscopic treatment of GERD should not be regarded as an option, given that the clinical results at 3 and 5 years have not demonstrated durability or sustained symptom remission. The surgical indications for GERD are well established; only those patients meeting the full criteria should be candidates and their surgery should be performed by experts. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. Mexican Americans on the Home Front: Community Organizations in Arizona during World War II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marin, Christine

    During World War II Arizona's Mexican-American communities organized their own patriotic activities and worked, in spite of racism, to support the war effort. In Phoenix the Lenadores del Mundo, an active fraternal society, began this effort by sponsoring a festival in January 1942. Such "mutualistas" provided an essential support system…

  11. La Asociacion Hispano-Americana de Madres y Esposas: Tucson's Mexican American Women in World War II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marin, Christine

    The contributions made during World War II by Mexican-American women on the home front have not been recognized in their proper historical perspective. Like their Anglo counterparts, these women took up the responsibilities left by their men and worked to support the war effort. In 1944 the Mexican-American women of Tucson formed La Asociacion…

  12. Psychometric Properties of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in a Clinically-Identified Sample of Mexican American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanVoorhis, Carmen R. Wilson; Blumentritt, Tracie L.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the internal consistency reliability, convergent and divergent validity, and factor structure of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) in a sample of 131 Mexican American youth. The BDI-II demonstrated excellent internal consistency reliability (alpha = 0.90) and solid convergent and divergent validity with various clinical scales…

  13. Traditional beliefs and practices among Mexican American immigrants with type II diabetes: A case study.

    PubMed

    Lemley, Megan; Spies, Lori A

    2015-04-01

    To describe selected common health beliefs and practices among Mexican American immigrants with type II diabetes. Selected clinical trials, qualitative studies, and systematic reviews. The Hispanic folk illness belief susto refers to an episode of severe fright, and Mexican American immigrants hold varying views on its relation to diabetes. Culturally and in the research, susto has also been linked with depression. Sabila (aloe vera) and nopal (prickly pear cactus) are herbal remedies that have had widespread, longstanding use in Mexican culture and while this is not the gold standard of research, it does provide ample evidence and a strong cultural belief that these therapies work. There is some evidence in the literature to support their efficacy as glucose-lowering agents, but lack of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation, potential side effects, and a dearth of rigorous clinical trials preclude aloe vera and nopal from being recommended therapy. Awareness about susto beliefs, commonly used herbal remedies, and development of culturally sensitive communication skills are essential for nurse practitioners to effectively assist patients in this population achieve their glycemic goals. Research on the effects of nopal and aloe vera on diabetes is needed to guide clinical decisions. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  14. Towards the (Mexican) discovery of second class currents at Belle-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, Pablo

    2016-10-01

    Within the SM, the yet unmeasured decays are predicted as a suppressed, isospin-violating effect with branching ratios ≲ O(10-5). However, they can also proceed through other mechanisms (such as charged Higgs exchange) at comparable rates. This has motivated several studies of the corresponding QCD predictions for these second class current processes. In this contribution we discuss the prospects for the discovery of these decays at Belle-II emphasizing the Mexican involvement in this project. Our branching ratio prediction ∼ 1.7·10-5 (decay channel with an η meson) is well within the reach of Belle-II. The branching fraction for the decay channel with an η' meson is expected to be between one and two orders of magnitude mor suppressed.

  15. HLA-class II genes in Mexican Amerindian Mayas: relatedness with Guatemalan Mayans and other populations.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Granados, Julio; Pérez-Hernández, Nonanzit; Rodríguez-Pérez, José Manuel; Canto-Cetina, Thelma; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón Mauricio; Areces, Cristina; Gómez-Prieto, Pablo; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the HLA class II allele frequencies in 50 healthy unrelated Mayan individuals. The relationship with other worldwide populations was studied by using HLA data from 71 different populations. The most frequent alleles were HLA-DRB1*04, HLA-DRB1*01, HLA-DQB1*0302 and HLA-DQB1*0501. When comparisons with other Mexican Amerindian groups were made, some differences were observed. Mayans showed an increased frequency of HLA-DRB1*01 when compared to Nahuas, Mayos, Teenek and Mazatecans (p < 0.05), whereas the HLA-DRB1*04 was increased in Mayans when compared to Nahuas (p < 0.05). The analysis of HLA-DQB1 alleles showed an increased frequency of DQB1*0302 in Mayans when compared to Nahuas and Mazatecans (p < 0.05), whereas the frequency of HLA-DQB1*0301 was decreased in Mayans when compared to Nahuas, Mayos, Teenek and Mazatecans (p < 0.05). Decreased frequency of HLA-DQB1*0501 in Mayans when compared to Nahuas was found. Neighbour Joining dendrogram shows that Mexican Mayans are genetically close to some of the most ancient groups living in Mexico and some South American Amerindians. However, Guatemalan Mayans do not cluster together with Mexican Mayas showing that languages do not correlate with genes, particularly in Amerindians. The data corroborate the restricted polymorphism of HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 alleles and the high frequency of HLA-DRB1*04 and HLA-DQB1*0302 in Mayans from Mexico.

  16. [HLA class II in Mexican patients with pemphigus vulgaris: shared epitope for autoimmunity].

    PubMed

    Rangel-Gamboa, Lucía; Vega-Memije, María Elisa; Acuña-Alonzo, Víctor; Granados-Arriola, Julio

    Pemphigus is an autoimmune blistering disease of skin and mucous membranes characterized by presence of IgG antibodies against desmoglein 3, and 1. Desmoglein 3 and 1 are presented in pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceous, respectively. Desmoglein are transmembrane proteins that form part of cellular junctions called desmosomes. Major histocompatibility complex class II molecules have been related to autoimmune disease; in pemphigus vulgaris, different human lymphocyte antigens (HLA) were associated among different ethnic groups, such as HLA-DR4, HLA-DR14, and HLA-DR1. to determine the allele HLA-DR genetic frequencies in Mexican patients with pemphigus. Patients with clinical, histological, and immunofluorescence diagnosis monitored at the Dermatology Department of the Mexican General Hospital were included. DNA was extracted from blood samples and genetic recognition of HLA-DRβ1 was performed by polymerase chain reaction and hybridization. Forty-three patients with pemphigus were included: 35 (81.4%) women and eight men (18.6%) between 16 and 85 years old. The HLA-DR14 and HLA-DR1 genetic frequencies were elevated among pemphigus patients and these alleles confer risk to pemphigus 2.2 and 3.3, respectively. These findings suggest that pemphigus vulgaris susceptibility is part of a general predisposition to present autoimmune diseases.

  17. Analysis of Software Development Methodologies to Build Safety Software Applications for the SATEX-II: A Mexican Experimental Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar Cisneros, Jorge; Vargas Martinez, Hector; Pedroza Melendez, Alejandro; Alonso Arevalo, Miguel

    2013-09-01

    Mexico is a country where the experience to build software for satellite applications is beginning. This is a delicate situation because in the near future we will need to develop software for the SATEX-II (Mexican Experimental Satellite). SATEX- II is a SOMECyTA's project (the Mexican Society of Aerospace Science and Technology). We have experienced applying software development methodologies, like TSP (Team Software Process) and SCRUM in other areas. Then, we analyzed these methodologies and we concluded: these can be applied to develop software for the SATEX-II, also, we supported these methodologies with SSP-05-0 Standard in particular with ESA PSS-05-11. Our analysis was focusing on main characteristics of each methodology and how these methodologies could be used with the ESA PSS 05-0 Standards. Our outcomes, in general, may be used by teams who need to build small satellites, but, in particular, these are going to be used when we will build the on board software applications for the SATEX-II.

  18. HLA Class I and II Blocks Are Associated to Susceptibility, Clinical Subtypes and Autoantibodies in Mexican Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) Patients.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Reyna, Tatiana S; Mercado-Velázquez, Pamela; Yu, Neng; Alosco, Sharon; Ohashi, Marina; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos; Cabiedes-Contreras, Javier; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Granados, Julio; Zúñiga, Joaquin; Yunis, Edmond

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) polymorphism studies in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) have yielded variable results. These studies need to consider the genetic admixture of the studied population. Here we used our previously reported definition of genetic admixture of Mexicans using HLA class I and II DNA blocks to map genetic susceptibility to develop SSc and its complications. We included 159 patients from a cohort of Mexican Mestizo SSc patients. We performed clinical evaluation, obtained SSc-associated antibodies, and determined HLA class I and class II alleles using sequence-based, high-resolution techniques to evaluate the contribution of these genes to SSc susceptibility, their correlation with the clinical and autoantibody profile and the prevalence of Amerindian, Caucasian and African alleles, blocks and haplotypes in this population. Our study revealed that class I block HLA-C*12:03-B*18:01 was important to map susceptibility to diffuse cutaneous (dc) SSc, HLA-C*07:01-B*08:01 block to map the susceptibility role of HLA-B*08:01 to develop SSc, and the C*07:02-B*39:05 and C*07:02-B*39:06 blocks to map the protective role of C*07:02 in SSc. We also confirmed previous associations of HLA-DRB1*11:04 and -DRB1*01 to susceptibility to develop SSc. Importantly, we mapped the protective role of DQB1*03:01 using three Amerindian blocks. We also found a significant association for the presence of anti-Topoisomerase I antibody with HLA-DQB1*04:02, present in an Amerindian block (DRB1*08:02-DQB1*04:02), and we found several alleles associated to internal organ damage. The admixture estimations revealed a lower proportion of the Amerindian genetic component among SSc patients. This is the first report of the diversity of HLA class I and II alleles and haplotypes Mexican patients with SSc. Our findings suggest that HLA class I and class II genes contribute to the protection and susceptibility to develop SSc and its different clinical presentations as well as different

  19. HLA Class I and II Blocks Are Associated to Susceptibility, Clinical Subtypes and Autoantibodies in Mexican Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Reyna, Tatiana S.; Mercado-Velázquez, Pamela; Yu, Neng; Alosco, Sharon; Ohashi, Marina; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Granados, Julio; Zúñiga, Joaquin; Yunis, Edmond

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) polymorphism studies in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) have yielded variable results. These studies need to consider the genetic admixture of the studied population. Here we used our previously reported definition of genetic admixture of Mexicans using HLA class I and II DNA blocks to map genetic susceptibility to develop SSc and its complications. Methods We included 159 patients from a cohort of Mexican Mestizo SSc patients. We performed clinical evaluation, obtained SSc-associated antibodies, and determined HLA class I and class II alleles using sequence-based, high-resolution techniques to evaluate the contribution of these genes to SSc susceptibility, their correlation with the clinical and autoantibody profile and the prevalence of Amerindian, Caucasian and African alleles, blocks and haplotypes in this population. Results Our study revealed that class I block HLA-C*12:03-B*18:01 was important to map susceptibility to diffuse cutaneous (dc) SSc, HLA-C*07:01-B*08:01 block to map the susceptibility role of HLA-B*08:01 to develop SSc, and the C*07:02-B*39:05 and C*07:02-B*39:06 blocks to map the protective role of C*07:02 in SSc. We also confirmed previous associations of HLA-DRB1*11:04 and –DRB1*01 to susceptibility to develop SSc. Importantly, we mapped the protective role of DQB1*03:01 using three Amerindian blocks. We also found a significant association for the presence of anti-Topoisomerase I antibody with HLA-DQB1*04:02, present in an Amerindian block (DRB1*08:02-DQB1*04:02), and we found several alleles associated to internal organ damage. The admixture estimations revealed a lower proportion of the Amerindian genetic component among SSc patients. Conclusion This is the first report of the diversity of HLA class I and II alleles and haplotypes Mexican patients with SSc. Our findings suggest that HLA class I and class II genes contribute to the protection and susceptibility to develop SSc and its different clinical

  20. DQA1 and DQB1 promoter diversity and linkage disequilibrium with class II haplotypes in Mexican Mestizo population.

    PubMed

    Alaez, C; Vázquez-García, M N; Gorodezky, C

    2001-06-01

    The upstream sequences in the 5' flanking region of HLA class II genes, regulate their expression and contribute to the development of immunological diseases. We analyzed 105 healthy unrelated Mexican Mestizos for QAP and QBP polymorphism. DNA typing for DRB1, DQA1, DQB1, QAP1 and QBP1 was done using a standardized PCR-SSOP. Although all QAP alleles previously described were found in Mexicans, the distribution differed as compared to other populations. QAP-3.1, 4.1 and 4.2 were the most frequent alleles and were associated with DQA1*03, *0501 and *0402 respectively. The prevalent QBP alleles were 3.21, 3.1 and 4.1 found mainly associated with DQB1*0302, *0301 and *0501. Linkage disequilibria between the promoter and the corresponding DQA1 and DQB1 allele, are in general the same as described by others. A total of 61 different haplotypes were defined, only six of them with a frequency above 4%. The haplotypes DRB1*0407-QAP-3.1-DQA1*03-QBP-3.21-DQB1*0302 (HF = 14.37%) and DRB1*0802-QAP-4.2-DQA1*0401-QBP-4.1-DQB1*0402 (HF = 14.22%), which have an Amerindian ancestry, are the most frequent in Mexicans. Some rare combinations were detected such as DRB1*0405-QAP-1.3-DQA1*0101/4-QBP-5.11/5.12-DQB1*0501 and DRB1*0403-QAP-3.2-DQA1*03-QBP-3.21-DQB1*0302, probably due to ancient recombination events. This knowledge is relevant as a basis to evaluate functional implications and to explore the role of promoter diversity in disease expression.

  1. HLA Class I and Class II Conserved Extended Haplotypes and Their Fragments or Blocks in Mexicans: Implications for the Study of Genetic Diversity in Admixed Populations

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Marina; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Acuña-Alonzo, Víctor; Yunis, María; Granados-Montiel, Julio; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Rodríguez-Reyna, Tatiana S.; Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo; Granados, Julio; Yunis, Edmond J.

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are highly polymorphic and informative in disease association, transplantation, and population genetics studies with particular importance in the understanding of human population diversity and evolution. The aim of this study was to describe the HLA diversity in Mexican admixed individuals. We studied the polymorphism of MHC class I (HLA-A, -B, -C), and class II (HLA-DRB1, -DQB1) genes using high-resolution sequence based typing (SBT) method and we structured the blocks and conserved extended haplotypes (CEHs) in 234 non-related admixed Mexican individuals (468 haplotypes) by a maximum likelihood method. We found that HLA blocks and CEHs are primarily from Amerindian and Caucasian origin, with smaller participation of African and recent Asian ancestry, demonstrating a great diversity of HLA blocks and CEHs in Mexicans from the central area of Mexico. We also analyzed the degree of admixture in this group using short tandem repeats (STRs) and HLA-B that correlated with the frequency of most probable ancestral HLA-C/−B and -DRB1/−DQB1 blocks and CEHs. Our results contribute to the analysis of the diversity and ancestral contribution of HLA class I and HLA class II alleles and haplotypes of Mexican admixed individuals from Mexico City. This work will help as a reference to improve future studies in Mexicans regarding allotransplantation, immune responses and disease associations. PMID:24086347

  2. Risk factors for Type II diabetes and diabetic retinopathy in a mexican-american population: Proyecto VER.

    PubMed

    West, Sheila K; Munoz, Beatriz; Klein, Ronald; Broman, Aimee T; Sanchez, Rosario; Rodriguez, Jorge; Snyder, Robert

    2002-09-01

    Risk factors for type II diabetes and diabetic retinopathy were determined in a population-based study of Mexican-Americans. Proyecto VER (Vision, Evaluation, and Research) is a cross-sectional study in a random sample of the self-described Hispanic populations in Tucson and Nogales, Arizona, age 40 and older. Of 6,659 eligible subjects, 4,774 (72%) participated in the home questionnaire and clinic visit. Diabetes was defined as self-report of a physician diagnosis or hemoglobin A(1c) value of > or = 7.0%. Only type II diabetes was included. Diabetic retinopathy was assessed on stereo fundus photographs of all persons with diabetes. Questions were asked about demographic, personal, socioeconomic, and diabetes related variables. 1023 (21.4%) of the sample had type II diabetes, and 68% were in the low-income group (annual income less than $20,000). Diabetes was associated with Native-American ancestry, higher acculturation, low income, less education, and increasing body mass index after age and gender adjustment. Persons with previously undiscovered diabetes were more likely to have no regular source of care, no insurance, and currently smoke compared with persons with known diabetes. Only low income was related to proliferative retinopathy, once adjusted for other factors (odds ratio [OR] = 3.93, 95%, confidence limitations [CL] = 1.31-11.80). Several socioeconomic and other factors were associated with diabetes, but few were related to diabetic retinopathy. Persons in the low-income group appeared to be at greater risk of diabetes and the ocular complications of diabetes compared with those with more income. Further longitudinal studies in this population are needed to confirm the associations.

  3. Genetic and environmental determinants of type II diabetes in Mexican Americans. Is there a "descending limb" to the modernization/diabetes relationship?

    PubMed

    Stern, M P; Knapp, J A; Hazuda, H P; Haffner, S M; Patterson, J K; Mitchell, B D

    1991-07-01

    Evidence from migrant population studies and secular trend data indicates that environmental factors play a role in the etiology of non-insulin-dependent (type II) diabetes. These environmental factors appear to be concomitants of the process whereby traditional populations become "modernized" or "westernized" and include increased intake of total calories, fat, and sucrose, decreased intake of total and complex carbohydrates, including fiber, and decreased physical exercise. There also appears to be a "postmodernization" process, which we have characterized as the "descending limb of the curve." In Mexican Americans in San Antonio, the prevalence of type II diabetes declines with acculturation to the values, attitudes, and behaviors of "postmodernized" American society. However, examination of the dietary and exercise concomitants of this process revealed a mixed picture. There was some suggestion that Mexican-American women, although not men, had entered onto the descending limb of the curve. However, Native American genetic admixture in Mexican Americans also covaried with affluence and acculturation in such a way that the declining prevalence of diabetes could as easily be due to genetic factors as to environmental factors. The "pancreatic exhaustion" theory holds that resistance to insulin action is a principal lesion leading to hypersecretion of insulin, hyperinsulinemia, and eventual islet cell failure and clinical diabetes. This theory predicts that prediabetic subjects will be hyperinsulinemic. In conformity with this theory, we have shown that subgroups of the Mexican-American population, defined on the basis of family history of diabetes, who would be expected a priori to be enriched with prediabetic subjects, are hyperinsulinemic as predicted.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Novel Point Mutations and A8027G Polymorphism in Mitochondrial-DNA-Encoded Cytochrome c Oxidase II Gene in Mexican Patients with Probable Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Loera-Castañeda, Verónica; Sandoval-Ramírez, Lucila; Pacheco Moisés, Fermín Paul; Macías-Islas, Miguel Ángel; Alatorre Jiménez, Moisés Alejandro; González-Renovato, Erika Daniela; Cortés-Enríquez, Fernando; Célis de la Rosa, Alfredo; Velázquez-Brizuela, Irma E.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been thought to contribute to Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis through the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutations and net production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase plays a key role in the regulation of aerobic production of energy and is composed of 13 subunits. The 3 largest subunits (I, II, and III) forming the catalytic core are encoded by mitochondrial DNA. The aim of this work was to look for mutations in mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase gene II (MTCO II) in blood samples from probable AD Mexican patients. MTCO II gene was sequenced in 33 patients with diagnosis of probable AD. Four patients (12%) harbored the A8027G polymorphism and three of them were early onset (EO) AD cases with familial history of the disease. In addition, other four patients with EOAD had only one of the following point mutations: A8003C, T8082C, C8201T, or G7603A. Neither of the point mutations found in this work has been described previously for AD patients, and the A8027G polymorphism has been described previously; however, it hasn't been related to AD. We will need further investigation to demonstrate the role of the point mutations of mitochondrial DNA in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:24701363

  5. Novel Point Mutations and A8027G Polymorphism in Mitochondrial-DNA-Encoded Cytochrome c Oxidase II Gene in Mexican Patients with Probable Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Loera-Castañeda, Verónica; Sandoval-Ramírez, Lucila; Pacheco Moisés, Fermín Paul; Macías-Islas, Miguel Ángel; Alatorre Jiménez, Moisés Alejandro; González-Renovato, Erika Daniela; Cortés-Enríquez, Fernando; Célis de la Rosa, Alfredo; Velázquez-Brizuela, Irma E; Ortiz, Genaro Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been thought to contribute to Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis through the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutations and net production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase plays a key role in the regulation of aerobic production of energy and is composed of 13 subunits. The 3 largest subunits (I, II, and III) forming the catalytic core are encoded by mitochondrial DNA. The aim of this work was to look for mutations in mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase gene II (MTCO II) in blood samples from probable AD Mexican patients. MTCO II gene was sequenced in 33 patients with diagnosis of probable AD. Four patients (12%) harbored the A8027G polymorphism and three of them were early onset (EO) AD cases with familial history of the disease. In addition, other four patients with EOAD had only one of the following point mutations: A8003C, T8082C, C8201T, or G7603A. Neither of the point mutations found in this work has been described previously for AD patients, and the A8027G polymorphism has been described previously; however, it hasn't been related to AD. We will need further investigation to demonstrate the role of the point mutations of mitochondrial DNA in the pathogenesis of AD.

  6. Acculturation, optimism, and relatively fewer depression symptoms among Mexican immigrants and Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    González, Patricia; González, Gerardo M

    2008-10-01

    The mental health of individuals of Mexican origin may vary as a function of native status (i.e., Mexican born or U.S.A. born). Some have reported that Mexican Americans tend to display more depressive symptoms than Mexican immigrants. The present goal was to estimate the associations among acculturation and native status, and explore relative deprivation in the prevalence of depression. Participants included 153 individuals of Mexican origin who completed the Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans, the Beck Depression Inventory-II, the Revised Generalized Expectancy for Success Scale, and relative deprivation questions. Analyses indicated women and those scoring low on acculturation were significantly more likely to report depressive symptoms. Participants who felt they had relatively better family happiness than Euro-Americans reported lower depressive symptoms. So participants' sex, acculturation, and relative lack of depressive symptoms allow better understanding of depressive symptoms among these Mexican Americans and Mexican immigrants.

  7. HLA class II alleles in the Otomi population of the Mezquital Valley: a genetic approach to the history of interethnic migrations in the Mexican Central Plateau.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Martín, Ana Itzel; González-Sobrino, Blanca Zoila; Olvera, Ángel Eduardo Camarena; Falfán-Valencia, Ramcés

    2014-01-01

    From a historical and genetic point of view, the Otomi of the Mezquital Valley are a frontier people that have played an important role in the population dynamics of the Mexican Central Plateau. Due to the antiquity of their presence in the area, the Otomi may be bearers of ancient genetic variability, shared mainly today with other groups belonging to the Otomanguean linguistic family and with the Nahua. In this study we analyzed the HLA class II allele frequencies reported in Mexican indigenous populations, in order to provide an intraregional-level historical perspective of the genetic relationships between the Otomi of the Mezquital Valley and indigenous populations from other regions of Mexico. We examined genetic variation in HLA-DRB1 and -DQB1 loci in 66 nonrelated individuals belonging to seven indigenous communities from the Ixmiquilpan municipality in the Mezquital Valley, in the State of Hidalgo, Mexico. The variability of the HLA-DRB1 gene among the Otomi of the Mezquital Valley was mainly concentrated in five alleles: -DRB1*08:02 (31.06%), -DRB1*04:07 (25.77%), -DRB1*14:06 (7.55%), -DRB1*14:02 (6.06%), and -DRB1*16:02 (4.55%); these alleles have been previously described in other indigenous populations. The most frequent alleles at the HLA-DQB1 locus were -DQB1*03:02 (34.09%), -DQB1*04:02 (31.03%), and -DQB1*03:01 (19.7%). Furthermore, the HLA-DQB1*02:02 allele was found in the Otomi group with a frequency of 2.27%; this allele has not been reported in Mexican indigenous populations. In conclusion, the genetic constitution of the Otomi population is intermediate to the northern groups and the genetic variability shared by the peoples of the central regions of Mexico. Furthermore, HLA-DRB1 and -DQB1 allelic variability among the Otomi provides insight into the historical processes implied in the biological admixture with European, Asian, and African populations as well as in the admixture with the population of Mexico City associated with long

  8. Mexican environments

    SciTech Connect

    Babcock, L.; Nieder, P.

    1995-06-01

    This paper addresses the broad Mexican demographic/economic environment as it influences/interacts with the Mexican physical environment. Mexico is relatively resource-rich, but a high population yields a low per capita income, one sixth that of the United States an Canada, still above levels of most other American countries. The Mexican population has become highly urbanized, and population will continue to increase well into the next century. Mexico City will continue to dominate the Mexican urban hierarchy into the future, and the heavy concentration of people has resulted in a heavy concentration of environmental problems in the Mexico City region. A multi-billion-dollar program has been implemented with a goal of limiting air emissions in 2010 to the levels experienced in 1990. Numerous Mexican environmental problems exist beyond Mexico City, in border areas, and throughout Mexico, but qualified professionals and other resources needed for assessments and management are lacking. The authors conclude that continued economic/environmental cooperation among Canada, the United States, and Mexico will help Mexico to acquire resources needed to improve its infrastructure, environmental education, and environmental education, and environmental management, but the authors question whether Mexico, even with reduced population growth, will be able to attain levels of affluence currently enjoyed in the United State and Canada. They raise, but leave unanswered, the larger question of the level of environmentally sound development which is achievable, appropriate, and sustainable for Mexico and for the North American continent as a whole.

  9. X-ray fluorescence analysis of Mexican varieties of dried chili peppers II: Commercial and home-grown specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Dávila, E.; Miranda, J.; Pineda, J. C.

    2015-07-01

    Elemental analyses of samples of Mexican varieties of dried chili peppers were carried out using X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). Several specimens of Capsicum annuum L., Capsicum chinense, and Capsicum pubescens were analyzed and the results compared to previous studies of elemental contents in other varieties of Capsicum annuum (ancho, morita, chilpotle, guajillo, pasilla, and árbol). The first set of samples was bought packaged in markets. In the present work, the study focuses on home-grown samples of the árbol and chilpotle varieties, commercial habanero (Capsicum chinense), as well as commercial and home-grown specimens of manzano (Capsicum pubescencs). Samples were freeze dried and pelletized. XRF analyses were carried out using a spectrometer based on an Rh X-ray tube, using a Si-PIN detector. The system detection calibration was performed through the analysis of the NIST certified reference materials 1547 (peach leaves) and 1574 (tomato leaves), while accuracy was checked with the reference material 1571 (orchard leaves). Elemental contents of all elements in the new set of samples were similar to those of the first group. Nevertheless, it was found that commercial samples contain high amounts of Br, while home-grown varieties do not.

  10. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of pregnancy in women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases of the Mexican College of Rheumatology. Part II.

    PubMed

    Saavedra Salinas, Miguel Ángel; Barrera Cruz, Antonio; Cabral Castañeda, Antonio Rafael; Jara Quezada, Luis Javier; Arce-Salinas, C Alejandro; Álvarez Nemegyei, José; Fraga Mouret, Antonio; Orozco Alcalá, Javier; Salazar Páramo, Mario; Cruz Reyes, Claudia Verónica; Andrade Ortega, Lilia; Vera Lastra, Olga Lidia; Mendoza Pinto, Claudia; Sánchez González, Antonio; Cruz Cruz, Polita Del Rocío; Morales Hernández, Sara; Portela Hernández, Margarita; Pérez Cristóbal, Mario; Medina García, Gabriela; Hernández Romero, Noé; Velarde Ochoa, María Del Carmen; Navarro Zarza, José Eduardo; Portillo Díaz, Verónica; Vargas Guerrero, Angélica; Goycochea Robles, María Victoria; García Figueroa, José Luis; Barreira Mercado, Eduardo; Amigo Castañeda, Mary Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases is associated with several maternal and fetal complications. The development of clinical practice guidelines with the best available scientific evidence may help standardize the care of these patients. To provide recommendations regarding prenatal care, treatment, and a more effective monitoring of pregnancy in women with lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Nominal panels were formed for consensus, systematic search of information, development of clinical questions, processing and staging of recommendations, internal validation by peers and external validation of the final document. The quality criteria of the AGREE II instrument were followed. The panels answered 37 questions related to maternal and fetal care in lupus erythematosus, RA and APS, as well as for use of antirheumatic drugs during pregnancy and lactation. The recommendations were discussed and integrated into a final manuscript. Finally, the corresponding algorithms were developed. In this second part, the recommendations for pregnant women with RA, APS and the use of antirheumatic drugs during pregnancy and lactation are presented. We believe that the Mexican clinical practice guidelines for the management of pregnancy in women with RA and APS integrate the best available evidence for the treatment and follow-up of patients with these conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. High resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II allele typing in Mexican mestizo women with sporadic breast cancer: case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cantú de León, David; Pérez-Montiel, Delia; Villavicencio, Verónica; García Carranca, Alejandro; Mohar Betancourt, Alejandro; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; López-Tello, Alberto; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Barquera, Rodrigo; Yu, Neng; Yunis, Edmond J; Granados, Julio

    2009-02-05

    The development of breast cancer is multifactorial. Hormonal, environmental factors and genetic predisposition, among others, could interact in the presentation of breast carcinoma. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles play an important role in immunity (cellular immunity) and may be important genetic traits. HLAAllele-specific interaction has not been well established. Recently, several studies had been conducted in order to do so, but the results are controversial and in some instances contradictory. We designed a case-control study to quantify the association of HLA class I and II genes and breast cancer. HLA typing was performed by high resolution sequence-specific oligotyping after DNA amplification (PCR-SSOP) of 100 breast cancer Mexican mestizo patients and 99 matched healthy controls. HLA-A frequencies that we were able to observe that there was no difference between both groups from the statistical viewpoint. HLA-B*1501 was found three times more common in the case group (OR, 3.714; p = 0.031). HLA-Cw is not a marker neither for risk, nor protection for the disease, because we did not find significant statistical differences between the two groups. DRB1*1301, which is expressed in seven cases and in only one control, observing an risk increase of up to seven times and DRB1*1602, which behaves similarly in being present solely in the cases (OR, 16.701; 95% CI, 0.947 - 294.670). DQ*0301-allele expression, which is much more common in the control group and could be protective for the presentation of the disease (OR, 0.078; 95% CI, 0.027-0.223, p = 0.00001). Our results reveal the role of the MHC genes in the pathophysiology of breast cancer, suggesting that in the development of breast cancer exists a disorder of immune regulation. The triggering factor seems to be restricted to certain ethnic groups and certain geographical regions since the relevant MHC alleles are highly diverse. This is the first study in Mexican population where high resolutions HLA

  12. Mexican Cervical Cancer Screening Study II: 6-month and 2-year follow-up of HR-HPV women treated with cryotherapy in a low-resource setting.

    PubMed

    Starks, David; Arriba, Lucybeth Nieves; Enerson, Christine L; Brainard, Jennifer; Nagore, Norma; Chiesa-Vottero, Andres; Uribe, Jesús Villagran; Belinson, Jerome

    2014-10-01

    To determine the efficacy and tolerance of cryotherapy in a visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) triage protocol after primary human papillomavirus (HPV) screening in a low-resource setting. This continuous series conducted over 2 years enrolled nonpregnant, high-risk HPV (HR-HPV)-positive women between the ages of 30 and 50 years, who resided in the state of Michoacán, Mexico, and had a history of no Pap smear screening or knowledge of Pap smear results within the last 3 years. These women were initially enrolled in the Mexican Cervical Cancer Screening Study II (MECCS II) trial and were treated with cryotherapy after VIA triage. They subsequently followed up at 6 months and 2 years for repeat VIA, colposcopy, and biopsy. A total of 291 women were treated with cryotherapy, of whom 226 (78%) followed up at 6 months. Of these 226 women, 153 (68%) were HR-HPV-negative; there were no findings of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 (CIN2) or worse. The remaining 73 women (32%) were HR-HPV-positive; of these women, 2 had CIN2 and 3 had CIN3. Only 137 women followed up at 2 years. Of these 137 women, 116 were HR-HPV-negative and 21 were HR-HPV-positive. Of the 21 women positive for HR-HPV, 9 had negative biopsy results, 11 had CIN1, and 1 had no biopsy. The clearance rate of HR-HPV was 83% (95% confidence interval: 0.78-0.87). There were no biopsy findings of CIN2 or worse at 2 years. Before cryotherapy, of the 226 women, 15 (6.6%) were positive for endocervical curettage (ECC) and 5 (2.2%) were referred for surgical management. Of these 15 ECC-positive women, 10 (67%) followed up at 6 months and it was shown that no patient was ECC positive at that time point. Moreover, of the 15 ECC-positive women, 11 (73%) followed up at 2 years and it was shown that no patient was ECC positive at that time point. In our study, VIA had a false-positive rate of 5%. Cryotherapy was an effective, acceptable, and well-tolerated means of treating cervical dysplasia in a low

  13. The Social Significance and Value Dimension of Current Mexican American Dialectal Spanish. A Glossary for the Human Service Professions. Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Ernesto; Cerda, Gilberto

    Results of a study documenting the Mexican American's unique Spanish dialectal expressions used in the barrios of San Antonio, Texas, and its surrounding areas are presented. The expressions included are those which were not recorded in the "Diccionario de la Real Academia Espanola" (19th Edition) or which were recorded therein but with…

  14. The Social Significance and Value Dimension of Current Mexican American Dialectal Spanish. A Glossary for the Human Service Professions. Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Ernesto; Cerda, Gilberto

    Results of a study documenting the Mexican American's unique Spanish dialectal expressions used in the barrios of San Antonio, Texas, and its surrounding areas are presented. The expressions included are those which were not recorded in the "Diccionario de la Real Academia Espanola" (19th Edition) or which were recorded therein but with…

  15. Mexican Parenting Questionnaire (MPQ)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halgunseth, Linda C.; Ispa, Jean M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted in four phases and constructed a self-report parenting instrument for use with Mexican immigrant mothers of children aged 6 to 10. The 14-item measure was based on semistructured qualitative interviews with Mexican immigrant mothers (N = 10), was refined by a focus group of Mexican immigrant mothers (N = 5), and was…

  16. Mexican Parenting Questionnaire (MPQ)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halgunseth, Linda C.; Ispa, Jean M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted in four phases and constructed a self-report parenting instrument for use with Mexican immigrant mothers of children aged 6 to 10. The 14-item measure was based on semistructured qualitative interviews with Mexican immigrant mothers (N = 10), was refined by a focus group of Mexican immigrant mothers (N = 5), and was…

  17. Primary thrombophilia in Mexico. II. Factor V G1691A (Leiden), prothrombin G20210A, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T polymorphism in thrombophilic Mexican mestizos.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Argüelles, G J; Garcés-Eisele, J; Reyes-Núñez, V; Ramírez-Cisneros, F J

    2001-01-01

    We have shown that in Mexican mestizo patients with clinical features of primary thrombophilia, 39% have activated protein C resistance phenotype, 5% protein C deficiency, and 2% protein S deficiency. In the present study, in a group of 37 thrombophilic Mexicans and 50 normal controls, we assessed the factor V G1691A (Leiden), the prothrombin G20210A, and the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T gene polymorphisms. Four patients were found to be heterozygous for factor V Leiden, 5 heterozygous for the prothrombin 20210, 16 heterozygous, and 6 homozygous for the MTHFR 677. There were four individuals with co-segregation of alleles: two heterozygotes for the factor V Leiden/prothrombin 20210, one heterozygote for prothrombin 20210/MTHFR 677, and one heterozygote for prothrombin 20210/homozygote for MTHFR 677. For factor V Leiden, prothrombin 20210, and MTHFR 677 mutations, the allele frequencies were respectively 1% (+/-0.2%, alpha = 0.05), <1% and 51% (+/-5%, alpha = 0.05), with calculated relative risks for thrombosis of 5.94 (P = 0.08), >7.66 (P < 0.05), and 0.44 (P NS), respectively. In Mexican mestizo thrombophilic patients, the low prevalence of the factor V Leiden mutation (10.8%) and the high prevalence of the prothrombin 20210 mutation (13.5%) contrast with those identified in Caucasian thrombophilic patients (21% and 6%, respectively; P < 0.01). On the other hand, the high prevalence of the MTHFR 677 mutation gene both in normal controls (78%) and thrombophilic patients (61%) does not support a role of this mutation in the thrombogenesis of Mexican mestizo patients.

  18. Merchange of Labor. The Mexican Bracero Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galarza, Ernesto

    The subject of this study is the more or less seasonal influx of Mexican (bracero) laborers to work in agriculture in California between 1942 and 1960. The migration began as a joint effort between the governments of Mexico and the United States to ease the manpower shortage created by World War II. Dire needs of these migrants, and their…

  19. Merchange of Labor. The Mexican Bracero Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galarza, Ernesto

    The subject of this study is the more or less seasonal influx of Mexican (bracero) laborers to work in agriculture in California between 1942 and 1960. The migration began as a joint effort between the governments of Mexico and the United States to ease the manpower shortage created by World War II. Dire needs of these migrants, and their…

  20. Mexican Society of Bioelectromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Canedo, Luis

    2008-08-11

    In July 2007 physicians, biologists and physicists that have collaborated in previous meetings of the medical branch of the Mexican Physical Society constituted the Mexican Society of Bioelectromagnetism with the purpose of promote scientific study of the interaction of electromagnetic energy (at frequencies ranging from zero Hertz through those of visible light) and acoustic energy with biological systems. A second goal was to increase the contribution of medical and biological professionals in the meetings of the medical branch of the Mexican Physical Society. The following paragraphs summarize some objectives of the Mexican Society of Bioelectromagnetism for the next two years.

  1. The Mexican American.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowan, Helen

    The purpose of this paper, prepared for the U. S. Commission on Civil Rights, is to indicate the types and ranges of problems facing the Mexican American community and to suggest ways in which these problems are peculiar to Mexican Americans. Specific examples are cited to illustrate major problems and personal experiences. Topics covered in the…

  2. Cultural Vignette: Mexican Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Mary Ellen; And Others

    Developed as part of a multicultural research project in the San Diego Community College District, this booklet presents the findings of a 10-member research team about various elements of Mexican-American culture. The areas covered are: (1) historical background on the Mexican heritage of the United States from pre-colonial times to the present…

  3. The flow fields involved in hydrodynamic imaging by blind Mexican cave fish (Astyanax fasciatus). Part II: gliding parallel to a wall.

    PubMed

    Windsor, Shane P; Norris, Stuart E; Cameron, Stuart M; Mallinson, Gordon D; Montgomery, John C

    2010-11-15

    Blind Mexican cave fish (Astyanax fasciatus) are able to sense detailed information about objects by gliding alongside them and sensing changes in the flow field around their body using their lateral line sensory system. Hence the fish are able to build hydrodynamic images of their surroundings. This study measured the flow fields around blind cave fish using particle image velocimetry (PIV) as they swam parallel to a wall. Computational fluid dynamics models were also used to calculate the flow fields and the stimuli to the lateral line sensory system. Our results showed that characteristic changes in the form of the flow field occurred when the fish were within approximately 0.20 body lengths (BL) of a wall. The magnitude of these changes increased steadily as the distance between the fish and the wall was reduced. When the fish were within 0.02 BL of the wall there was a change in the form of the flow field owing to the merging of the boundary layers on the body of the fish and the wall. The stimuli to the lateral line appears to be sufficient for fish to detect walls when they are 0.10 BL away (the mean distance at which they normally swim from a wall), but insufficient for the fish to detect a wall when 0.25 BL away. This suggests that the nature of the flow fields surrounding the fish are such that hydrodynamic imaging can only be used by fish to detect surfaces at short range.

  4. Interviews with Mexican midwives.

    PubMed

    Bortin, S

    1993-01-01

    Mexican society contains a variety of indigenous cultures as well as European influences. Most babies in rural areas are delivered by midwives. Traditional midwives, government-trained and empirical midwives, nurse-midwives, and foreign-trained midwives all practice in Mexico. Nurse-midwives in one project are demonstrating their ability to meet the needs of urban childbearing women. A midwifery organization is developing under the leadership of midwives influenced by the contemporary midwifery movement in the United States. In this article, some traditional Mexican midwifery practices are discussed and interviews with several different Mexican midwives from a variety of backgrounds are presented.

  5. Influence of neighbourhood socioeconomic position on the transition to type II diabetes in older Mexican Americans: the Sacramento Area Longitudinal Study on Aging

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Lorena; Lee, Anne; Zeki Al Hazzouri, Adina; Neuhaus, John M; Aiello, Allison; Elfassy, Tali; Haan, Mary N

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the influence of neighbourhood socioeconomic position (NSEP) on development of diabetes over time. Design A longitudinal cohort study. Setting The data reported were from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging, a longitudinal study of the health of 1789 older Latinos. Participants Community-dwelling older Mexican Americans residing in the Sacramento Metropolitan Statistical Area. Main outcome Multistate Markov regression were used to model transitions through four possible states over time: 1=normal; 2=pre-diabetic; 3=diabetic; and 4=death without diabetes. Results At baseline, nearly 50% were non-diabetic, 17.5% were pre-diabetic and nearly 33% were diabetic. At the end of follow-up, there were a total of 824 people with type 2 diabetes. In a fully adjusted MSM regression model, among non-diabetics, higher NSEP was not associated with a transition to pre-diabetes. Among non-diabetics, higher NSEP was associated with an increased risk of diabetes (HR=1.66, 95% CI 1.14 to 2.42) and decreased risk of death without diabetes (HR: 0.56, 95% CI 0.33 to 0.96). Among pre-diabetics, higher NSEP was significantly associated with a transition to non-diabetic status (HR: 1.22, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.50). Adjusting for BMI, age, education, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, medical insurance and nativity did not affect this relationship. Conclusions Our findings show that high NSEP poses higher risk of progression from normal to diabetes compared with a lower risk of death without diabetes. This work presents a possibility that these associations are modified by nativity or culture. PMID:27515749

  6. Influence of neighbourhood socioeconomic position on the transition to type II diabetes in older Mexican Americans: the Sacramento Area Longitudinal Study on Aging.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Lorena; Lee, Anne; Zeki Al Hazzouri, Adina; Neuhaus, John M; Moyce, Sally; Aiello, Allison; Elfassy, Tali; Haan, Mary N

    2016-08-11

    To examine the influence of neighbourhood socioeconomic position (NSEP) on development of diabetes over time. A longitudinal cohort study. The data reported were from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging, a longitudinal study of the health of 1789 older Latinos. Community-dwelling older Mexican Americans residing in the Sacramento Metropolitan Statistical Area. Multistate Markov regression were used to model transitions through four possible states over time: 1=normal; 2=pre-diabetic; 3=diabetic; and 4=death without diabetes. At baseline, nearly 50% were non-diabetic, 17.5% were pre-diabetic and nearly 33% were diabetic. At the end of follow-up, there were a total of 824 people with type 2 diabetes. In a fully adjusted MSM regression model, among non-diabetics, higher NSEP was not associated with a transition to pre-diabetes. Among non-diabetics, higher NSEP was associated with an increased risk of diabetes (HR=1.66, 95% CI 1.14 to 2.42) and decreased risk of death without diabetes (HR: 0.56, 95% CI 0.33 to 0.96). Among pre-diabetics, higher NSEP was significantly associated with a transition to non-diabetic status (HR: 1.22, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.50). Adjusting for BMI, age, education, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, medical insurance and nativity did not affect this relationship. Our findings show that high NSEP poses higher risk of progression from normal to diabetes compared with a lower risk of death without diabetes. This work presents a possibility that these associations are modified by nativity or culture. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Ten Studies Pertaining to Residence, Mobility, and School Attendance Patterns of Discrete Black and Mexican American Populations in Tucson, Arizona, Between 1918 and 1976. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockman, John F.

    Volume II contains the substance of five studies originally filed with the United States District Court for the District of Arizona in the cases of "Fisher v. Lohr" and "Mendoza v. Tucson School District No. 1." Study VI examines the migration of Spanish-surnamed households from Tucson's south and west sides to the east side…

  8. Ten Studies Pertaining to Residence, Mobility, and School Attendance Patterns of Discrete Black and Mexican American Populations in Tucson, Arizona, Between 1918 and 1976. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockman, John F.

    Volume II contains the substance of five studies originally filed with the United States District Court for the District of Arizona in the cases of "Fisher v. Lohr" and "Mendoza v. Tucson School District No. 1." Study VI examines the migration of Spanish-surnamed households from Tucson's south and west sides to the east side…

  9. Extended Family Integration among Euro and Mexican Americans: Ethnicity, Gender, and Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarkisian, Natalia; Gerena, Mariana; Gerstel, Naomi

    2007-01-01

    This article compares the extended family integration of Euro and Mexican American women and men and assesses the importance of class and culture in explaining ethnic differences. Using National Survey of Families and Households II data (N = 7,929), we find that ethnic differences depend on the dimension of integration. Mexican Americans exhibit…

  10. Mexican Intellectuals' Perceptions of Mexican Americans and Chicanos, 1920-Present.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold del Castillo, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Mexican public opinion about emigrants to the United States has gradually changed from that of "cultural traitors." The Mexican government has increasingly come to see Chicano political leaders as important to Mexico's relationship with the United States, while Mexican intellectuals increasingly regard Chicano academics as their allies…

  11. Demythologizing the Mexican American Father

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saracho, Olivia N.; Spodek, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    This review presents recent studies on Mexican American fathers in the United Sates to provide researchers with an understanding of contemporary fatherhood of Mexican American individuals. It describes the myths that create methodological and conceptual problems in conducting research studies to characterize Mexican American fathers. It also…

  12. The Wealth of Mexican Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb-Clark, Deborah A.; Hildebrand, Vincent A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyzes the sources of disparities in the relative wealth position of Mexican Americans. Results reveal that--unlike the racial wealth gap--Mexican Americans' wealth disadvantage is in large part not the result of differences in wealth distributions conditional on the underlying determinants of wealth. Rather, Mexican Americans' wealth…

  13. The Prevalence of Hypertension in Older Mexicans and Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Jennifer J.; Eschbach, Karl A.; Markides, Kyriakos S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prevalence of hypertension in older Mexicans in the United States and Mexico. Design Stratified by sex, logistic regression models to predict physician diagnosed hypertension were conducted using the Hispanic EPESE (wave 3) and the Mexican Health and Aging Study (MHAS- 70 years and older) datasets. Setting Five Southwestern States of Texas, Arizona, California, Colorado, and New Mexico in the United States. Participants Older Mexican and Mexican Americans ages 70 and over living in the United States and Mexico. Main Outcome Measures Physician diagnosed hypertension. Results Older Mexican and Mexican American women have a greater prevalence of hypertension than their male counterparts. Mexican women, who have migrated to the United States and returned to Mexico, have similarly high rates of hypertension as their female counterparts in the United States. After adjusting for demographic characteristics, obesity, and smoking, older Mexican and Mexican American women who have migrated or immigrated to the United States are at increased risk for hypertension. Conclusions Gender differences exist in hypertension risk for older Mexicans and Mexican Americans living in the United States and Mexico. Older women who migrate to the United States are at a particular risk for hypertension in both the United States and Mexico. PMID:18785442

  14. What's Values Got to Do with It? Thriving among Mexican/Mexican American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan Consoli, Melissa L.; Llamas, Jasmín; Consoli, Andrés J.

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined traditional Mexican/Mexican American and perceived U.S. mainstream cultural values as predictors of thriving. One hundred twenty-four (37 men, 87 women) self-identified Mexican/Mexican American college students participated in the study. The traditional Mexican/Mexican American cultural values of family support and religion…

  15. What's Values Got to Do with It? Thriving among Mexican/Mexican American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan Consoli, Melissa L.; Llamas, Jasmín; Consoli, Andrés J.

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined traditional Mexican/Mexican American and perceived U.S. mainstream cultural values as predictors of thriving. One hundred twenty-four (37 men, 87 women) self-identified Mexican/Mexican American college students participated in the study. The traditional Mexican/Mexican American cultural values of family support and religion…

  16. The Mexican Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Stan

    For more than 400 years the ancestors of the Mexican American have contributed to the spiritual and material wealth of this land, yet recognition of their cultural and national rights has been slow to come. Like the American Indians, Chicanos can claim, "We did not come to America, America came to us". As a conquered people, they have…

  17. Notable Mexican American Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Judith

    This paper describes the careers of four notable Mexican American women, including their educational and family backgrounds, achievements, and importance as role models for young Hispanic women. Marie Acosta-Colon's political activism began as a college student volunteering for presidential candidate Eugene McCarthy in 1968. Active in political…

  18. Mexican Folkart for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominguez, Graciela; And Others

    Directions, suggested materials, and illustrations are given for making paper mache pinatas and masks, cascarones, Ojos de Dios, maracas, dresser scarf embroidery, burlap murals, yarn designs, paper plate trays, paper cut designs, the poppy, sarape aprons, and paper Mexican dolls. Filled with candy and broken, the pinata is used on most Mexican…

  19. Mexican Folkart for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominguez, Graciela; And Others

    Directions, suggested materials, and illustrations are given for making paper mache pinatas and masks, cascarones, Ojos de Dios, maracas, dresser scarf embroidery, burlap murals, yarn designs, paper plate trays, paper cut designs, the poppy, sarape aprons, and paper Mexican dolls. Filled with candy and broken, the pinata is used on most Mexican…

  20. The Mexican-American and the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bustamante, Charles J.; Bustamante, Patricia L.

    The historical study of the plight of Mexican Americans is divided into 3 sections. Part I relates the beginnings of Mexico, from Spanish injustices to the Indians to how the Indians felt about Black men. Various historical facts are briefly presented. Part II treats Mexico's efforts to become a republic, various aspects of the wars between…

  1. The Mexican-American and the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bustamante, Charles J.; Bustamante, Patricia L.

    The historical study of the plight of Mexican Americans is divided into 3 sections. Part I relates the beginnings of Mexico, from Spanish injustices to the Indians to how the Indians felt about Black men. Various historical facts are briefly presented. Part II treats Mexico's efforts to become a republic, various aspects of the wars between…

  2. The prevalence of hypertension in older Mexicans and Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Jennifer J; Eschbach, Karl A; Markides, Kyriakos S

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of hypertension in older Mexicans in the United States and Mexico. Stratified by sex, logistic regression models to predict physician-diagnosed hypertension were conducted by using the Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly (wave 3) and the Mexican Health and Aging Study (age > or =70 years) datasets. Older Mexican and Mexican American women have a greater prevalence of hypertension than their male counterparts. Mexican women who have migrated to the United States and returned to Mexico have similarly high rates of hypertension as their female counterparts in the United States. After adjusting for demographic characteristics, diabetes, obesity, alcohol use, and smoking, older Mexican women who have migrated to the United States are at increased risk for hypertension. Conversely, immigrant older Mexican American men are at significantly lower odds of hypertension. Sex differences exist in hypertension risk for older Mexicans and Mexican Americans living in the United States and Mexico. Older women who migrate to the United States are at a particular risk for hypertension in Mexico.

  3. Mexican Migration: Assessing Root Causes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    66 Figure 4 is derived from John Scott, “Metas y Mecanismo ,” Centro de Investigacion y Docencia Economicas...John Scott, “Metas y Mecanismo ,” 4. 31 Another explanation for the increase in migration concerns neither the Mexican economy nor the Mexican...Dominant Regime,” 135. 82 John Scott, “Metas y Mecanismo ,” 5. 83 World Bank: Mexican Health Foundation, “Trends and Empirical Causes of Violent

  4. [On Mexican medicinal plants].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, Alfredo; Izaguirre-Avila, Raúl

    2009-12-01

    During the XVIII century, two Spanish scientific expeditions arrived here led, respectively, by the naturalist Martín Sessé and by the Italian mariner Alessandro Malaspina di Mulazzo, dependent from the Spanish Government. The members collected a rich scientific material, which was carried to Madrid in 1820. At the end of XVIII century, the Franciscan friar Juan Navarro depicted and described several Mexican medicinal plants in the fifth volume of his "American Garden". In the last years of the Colonial period, fundamental works of Humboldt and Bonpland, on the geographic distribution of the American plants, were published. At the end of the XIX century, the first researches on the Mexican medicinal botany were performed at the laboratory of the "Instituto Médico Nacional" under the leadership of doctor Fernando Altamirano, starting pharmacological studies in our country. During the first half of the XX century, trials of cardiovascular pharmacology were performed in the small laboratories of the cardiological unit at the General Hospital of Mexico, due to doctor Ignacio Chávez, initiative. Mexican botanical-pharmacological tradition remains alive and vigorous in the modern scientific institutes of the country.

  5. Toward Quality Education for Mexican Americans. Mexican American Education Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Burciaga, Cecilia Preciado; And Others

    The 6th and final report of the Mexican American Education Study (MAES) focuses on specific educational problems of Mexican American children in the Southwest and recommends actions at various governmental and educational levels to alleviate these. Information was gathered from: (1) a 1969 survey and 1970-71 field study; (2) a literature review;…

  6. How Mexican Is a Spanish-Speaking Mexican American?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patella, Victoria M.

    To investigate the validity of language usage as an indicator of identification with the Mexican American subculture, this study hypothesized that greater use of Spanish than English would be correlated with characteristics consistent with the ideal, typical, Mexican American family in terms of family of orientation and aspirations for future…

  7. Converging Forces: Mexican Culture and Clinical Issues of Mexican Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkelman, Jeanne M.

    Mexican women tend to have limited access to medical and mental health care resources. Some of the common clinical issues experienced by Mexican woman are psychological conflict, depression, anxiety, and psychosomatic symptoms. Appropriate treatment approaches for therapy varies depending on the nature of the presenting problem. If clinical issues…

  8. Acculturation and Enculturation Trajectories Among Mexican-American Adolescent Offenders

    PubMed Central

    Knight, George P.; Vargas-Chanes, Delfino; Losoya, Sandra H.; Cota-Robles, Sonia; Chassin, Laurie; Lee, Joanna M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines changes over time in ethnic affirmation/belonging and ethnic identity achievement, Spanish language use, English language use, Mexican/Mexican-American affiliation/identification and Anglo affiliation/identification in a sample of Mexican-American adolescents participating in a longitudinal study of juvenile offenders. The Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure and the Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans-II were completed by the Mexican-American adolescents 7 times over a 3-year period. The findings from longitudinal growth modeling analyses and growth mixture modeling analyses indicate that there is heterogeneity in the initial scores and changes over time on these variables that are related to markers for the cultural qualities of the home environment (i.e., generational status and mother’s most frequent language use). In contrast to expectations, marginalized or assimilated acculturation trajectories/types were not overrepresented in this sample of adolescent offenders. Implications for our understanding of the nature of acculturation and enculturation processes and the way these processes are studied are discussed. PMID:20300539

  9. Mexican Americans in Comparative Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, Walker, Ed.

    The outgrowth of a conference intended to broaden the base of objective information about the Mexican American community, this collection of 13 papers examines the effects of immigration by people of Mexican origin on the economic, educational, social, political, and linguistic systems of the United States. Walker Connor's introduction puts the…

  10. [Mexican migration policies after IRCA].

    PubMed

    Alba, F

    1999-01-01

    The evolution since 1964 of Mexican government policy regarding migrant workers in the US is discussed. For a decade after the "bracero" program was terminated by the US, the Mexican government attempted to encourage creation of another legal framework for migration, regarded as inevitable whether legal or clandestine. Around 1974-75, a more distant attitude, termed the "policy of no policy," acquired considerable support in Mexican government and academic circles. The no-policy strategy allowed Mexico to achieve certain objectives regarding migration without prompting US intervention in its internal affairs, as for example by a linkage of US migration policy to specific Mexican government actions. The 1986 passage of the US Immigration Reform and Control Act effectively ended the no-policy strategy that had allowed the Mexican government to count on the continued emigration of Mexican workers without compromising its position of promoting respect for migrant rights. The unilateral change in the status quo by the US led to substitution of the "policy of dialogue," a clear signal of the Mexican government's search for a new migration agreement. The policy of dialogue has entailed greater discussion of the two traditional Mexican objectives regarding migration. Some progress has apparently been made concerning migrant rights, but the second and less explicit objective, that of preventing abrupt changes in US immigration policy and in migratory flows, is harder to judge. The atmosphere of freer public debate in Mexico is politicizing migratory policy.

  11. On Being a Mexican American.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Joe I.

    1994-01-01

    A well-acculturated migrant education program director reminisces about his Mexican upbringing in the United States, noting the persistence of his cultural heritage and the scars left by acts of segregation, prejudice, and racism. It is important for Mexican Americans to recognize that they are a unique group at a crossroads. They are not all…

  12. On Being a Mexican American.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Joe I.

    1994-01-01

    A well-acculturated migrant education program director reminisces about his Mexican upbringing in the United States, noting the persistence of his cultural heritage and the scars left by acts of segregation, prejudice, and racism. It is important for Mexican Americans to recognize that they are a unique group at a crossroads. They are not all…

  13. The Chicanos; Mexican American Voices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludwig, Edward W., Ed.; Santibanez, James, Ed.

    Articles, fiction, and poetry that form a picture of Chicano life today are presented in this anthology of writings about Mexican Americans. Included are reminiscences of Mexican American childhood, accounts of Chicanos in the American school system, reports on strikes by Chicano workers, and poems and stories that reflect the hard realities of…

  14. The Chicanos; Mexican American Voices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludwig, Edward W., Ed.; Santibanez, James, Ed.

    Articles, fiction, and poetry that form a picture of Chicano life today are presented in this anthology of writings about Mexican Americans. Included are reminiscences of Mexican American childhood, accounts of Chicanos in the American school system, reports on strikes by Chicano workers, and poems and stories that reflect the hard realities of…

  15. Effect of acculturation and mutuality on family loyalty among Mexican American caregivers of elders.

    PubMed

    Kao, Hsueh-Fen S; An, Kyungeh

    2012-06-01

    Informal family care for elders is conventional in Mexican American communities despite increasing intergenerational gaps in filial values. In our study, we explored whether acculturation and dyadic mutuality, as perceived by Mexican American family caregivers, explain the caregivers' expectations of family loyalty toward elderly relatives. A nonexperimental, correlational design with convenience sampling was used in El Paso, Texas, from October 2007 to January 2008. Three bilingual promotoras collected data from 193 Mexican American adult caregivers of community-dwelling elders using three scales designed for Mexican Americans: the Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans II-Short Form, the Mutuality Scale, and the Expectations of Family Loyalty of Children Toward Elderly Relatives Scale. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to analyze the data. Acculturation had a marginal effect (r = .21, p < .05), but mutuality presented a strong correlation (r = .45, p < .001) with the expectations of family loyalty toward elderly relatives. There was no significant correlation between acculturation and mutuality (r = .05). Although Mexican American caregivers with strong Mexican orientation may have high expectations of family loyalty toward elderly relatives, mutuality exhibits more significant effects on expectations. Among Mexican Americans, mutuality between the caregiving dyad, as perceived by caregivers, may be a better predictor of filial values than caregivers' acculturation alone. It may be useful to incorporate the dual paradigm of acculturation and mutuality into immigrant family care for elderly relatives. © 2012 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  16. Immigration and Suicidal Behavior Among Mexicans and Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Breslau, Joshua; Su, Maxwell; Miller, Matthew; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We examined migration to the United States as a risk factor for suicidal behavior among people of Mexican origin. Methods. We pooled data from 2 nationally representative surveys in the United States (2001–2003; n = 1284) and Mexico (2001–2002; n = 5782). We used discrete time survival models to account for time-varying and time-invariant characteristics, including psychiatric disorders. Results. Risk for suicidal ideation was higher among Mexicans with a family member in the United States (odds ratio [OR] = 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06, 2.11), Mexican-born immigrants who arrived in the United States at 12 years or younger (OR = 1.84; 95% CI = 1.09, 3.09), and US-born Mexican Americans (OR = 1.56; 95% CI = 1.03, 2.38) than among Mexicans with neither a history of migration to the United States nor a family member currently living there. Risk for suicide attempts was also higher among Mexicans with a family member in the United States (OR = 1.68; 95% CI = 1.13, 2.52) and US-born Mexican Americans (OR = 1.97; 95% CI = 1.06, 3.65). Selection bias caused by differential migration or differential return migration of persons at higher risk of suicidal ideation or attempt did not account for these findings. Conclusions. Public health efforts should focus on the impact of Mexico–US migration on family members of migrants and on US-born Mexican Americans. PMID:19150909

  17. Mexican contributions to Noncommutative Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Vergara, J. David; Garcia-Compean, H.

    2006-09-25

    In this paper we summarize the Mexican contributions to the subject of Noncommutative theories. These contributions span several areas: Quantum Groups, Noncommutative Field Theories, Hopf algebra of renormalization, Deformation Quantization, Noncommutative Gravity, and Noncommutative Quantum Mechanics.

  18. Freud's Mexican readers.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Rubén

    2011-01-01

    This essay presents an overview of artists and writers who read Freud's work in Mexico between 1920 and 1968. The focus is on cultural readings of Freud: non-clinical interpretations of psychoanalysis that applied Freud's theory to literary, artistic, philosophical, or religious questions. The essay focuses on Salvador Novo, one of the poets associated with the Contemporáneos group, and his reading of the "Three Essays in the Theory of Sexuality;" Raúl Carrancá y Trujillo, a judge and criminologist who used psychoanalysis in his work, including the trial of Trotky's assassin; Octavio Paz, a poet and intellectual who wrote an essay on Mexican history, "The Labyrinth of Solitude," as a response to "Moses and Monotheism;" and Gregorio Lemercier, a Benedictine monk who placed his monastery in group analysis. These unorthodox readings of Freud opened the door for some of the most daring intellectual experiments in the 20th century.

  19. Mexico, Mexicans and Mexican Americans in Secondary-School United States History Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salvucci, Linda K.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses coverage of Mexican history and Mexican Americans in 10 U.S. history textbooks approved for use in Texas. Criticizes the lack of complete information, ethnocentricity, and failure to present the Mexican point of view. Argues that U.S. history courses should cover topics of Mexican history, including Spanish colonialism, the Texas…

  20. Factors Affecting Career Decision Making of Mexican and Mexican-American Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newlon, Betty J.; Borboa, Roman

    The purpose of this research was to identify the self-reported factors affecting the career decision making of Mexican and Mexican-American students. It was hypothesized that the factor clusters would differ between the two sample populations, Mexican and Mexican-American. It was also hypothesized that these clusters would differ from six clusters…

  1. Mexico, Mexicans and Mexican Americans in Secondary-School United States History Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salvucci, Linda K.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses coverage of Mexican history and Mexican Americans in 10 U.S. history textbooks approved for use in Texas. Criticizes the lack of complete information, ethnocentricity, and failure to present the Mexican point of view. Argues that U.S. history courses should cover topics of Mexican history, including Spanish colonialism, the Texas…

  2. Factors Affecting Career Decision Making of Mexican and Mexican-American Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newlon, Betty J.; Borboa, Roman

    The purpose of this research was to identify the self-reported factors affecting the career decision making of Mexican and Mexican-American students. It was hypothesized that the factor clusters would differ between the two sample populations, Mexican and Mexican-American. It was also hypothesized that these clusters would differ from six clusters…

  3. Education Is Our Freedom: The American G.I. Forum and the Mexican American School Segregation in Texas, 1948-1957.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allsup, Carl

    1977-01-01

    Social prejudice by Texas-Anglo society as reflected by politicians and administrators resulted in a segregated school system. However, the Mexican community never passively accepted discrimination in the schools. The American G.I. Forum's records and the action of the World War II generation indicate that Mexicans have long struggled to acquire…

  4. Mexican-American Cultural Assumptions and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carranza, E. Lou

    The search for presuppositions of a people's thought is not new. Octavio Paz and Samuel Ramos have both attempted to describe the assumptions underlying the Mexican character. Paz described Mexicans as private, defensive, and stoic, characteristics taken to the extreme in the "pachuco." Ramos, on the other hand, described Mexicans as…

  5. Mexican-American Women: Diversity in Depth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Marleen E.

    Various literary views of the Mexican American woman have been presented over the past 150 years. Anglo treatment of Mexican American women in literature has varied from blatant prejudice or vague mystical eroticism in early portrayals to more realistic views of the Chicano in modern writing. The current identity crisis of Mexican Americans is…

  6. Mexican-American Cultural Assumptions and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carranza, E. Lou

    The search for presuppositions of a people's thought is not new. Octavio Paz and Samuel Ramos have both attempted to describe the assumptions underlying the Mexican character. Paz described Mexicans as private, defensive, and stoic, characteristics taken to the extreme in the "pachuco." Ramos, on the other hand, described Mexicans as…

  7. El Arte Culinario Mexicano (Mexican Culinary Art).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Card, Michelle

    This unit in Mexican cooking can be used in Junior High School home economics classes to introduce students to Mexican culture or as a mini-course in Spanish at almost any level. It is divided into two parts. Part One provides historical background and information on basic foods, the Mexican market, shopping tips, regional cooking and customs.…

  8. Mexican American Women in the Social Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baca Zinn, Maxine

    1982-01-01

    Suggests that the biased image of Mexican-American women in current literature can be improved by: locating Mexican-American females in precise organizational context; distinguishing between macro- and microanalytical levels; separating social structural from cultural phenomena; and relating Mexican-American women's studies to general feminist…

  9. El Arte Culinario Mexicano (Mexican Culinary Art).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Card, Michelle

    This unit in Mexican cooking can be used in Junior High School home economics classes to introduce students to Mexican culture or as a mini-course in Spanish at almost any level. It is divided into two parts. Part One provides historical background and information on basic foods, the Mexican market, shopping tips, regional cooking and customs.…

  10. 47 CFR 22.957 - Mexican condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... States-Mexican border must have the following condition attached: This authorization is subject to the... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mexican condition. 22.957 Section 22.957... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.957 Mexican condition. Pursuant to an agreement between the...

  11. 47 CFR 22.957 - Mexican condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... States-Mexican border must have the following condition attached: This authorization is subject to the... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mexican condition. 22.957 Section 22.957... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.957 Mexican condition. Pursuant to an agreement between the...

  12. 47 CFR 22.957 - Mexican condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... States-Mexican border must have the following condition attached: This authorization is subject to the... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mexican condition. 22.957 Section 22.957... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.957 Mexican condition. Pursuant to an agreement between the...

  13. 47 CFR 22.957 - Mexican condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... States-Mexican border must have the following condition attached: This authorization is subject to the... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mexican condition. 22.957 Section 22.957... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.957 Mexican condition. Pursuant to an agreement between the...

  14. Diabetic nephropathy among Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, Subrata; Thameem, Farook; Alves, Tahira; Nolen, Jacqueline; Al-Shahrouri, Hania; Bansal, Shweta; Abboud, Hanna E.; Fanti, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of diabetic nephropathy (DN) is growing rapidly worldwide as a consequence of the rising prevalence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Among U.S. ethnic groups, Mexican Americans have a disproportionately high incidence and prevalence of DN and associated end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In communities bordering Mexico, as many as 90% of Mexican American patients with ESRD also suffer from T2DM compared to only 50% of non-Hispanic Whites (NHW). Both socio-economic factors and genetic predisposition appear to have a strong influence on this association. In addition, certain pathogenetic and clinical features of T2DM and DN are different in Mexican Americans compared to NHW, raising questions as to whether the diagnostic and treatment strategies that are standard practice in the NHW patient population may not be applicable in Mexican Americans. This article reviews the epidemiology of DN in Mexican Americans, describes the pathophysiology and associated risk factors, and identifies gaps in our knowledge and understanding that needs to be addressed by future investigations. PMID:22445478

  15. Invited review: Artisanal Mexican cheeses.

    PubMed

    González-Córdova, Aarón F; Yescas, Carlos; Ortiz-Estrada, Ángel Martín; De la Rosa-Alcaraz, María de Los Ángeles; Hernández-Mendoza, Adrián; Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this review is to present an overview of some of the most commonly consumed artisanal Mexican cheeses, as well as those cheeses that show potential for a protected designation of origin. A description is given for each of these cheeses, including information on their distinguishing characteristics that makes some of them potential candidates for achieving a protected designation of origin status. This distinction could help to expand their frontiers and allow them to become better known and appreciated in other parts of the world. Due to the scarcity of scientific studies concerning artisanal Mexican cheeses, which would ultimately aid in the standardization of manufacturing processes and in the establishment of regulations related to their production, more than 40 varieties of artisanal cheese are in danger of disappearing. To preserve these cheeses, it is necessary to address this challenge by working jointly with government, artisanal cheesemaking organizations, industry, academics, and commercial partners on the implementation of strategies to protect and preserve their artisanal means of production. With sufficient information, official Mexican regulations could be established that would encompass and regulate the manufacture of Mexican artisanal cheeses. Finally, as many Mexican artisanal cheeses are produced from raw milk, more scientific studies are required to show the role of the lactic acid bacteria and their antagonistic effect on pathogenic microorganisms during aging following cheese making. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Mexican consensus on Gaucher's disease].

    PubMed

    Franco-Ornelas, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    The lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) are a group of entities with a meaningful organic affectation profile and important morbidity-mortality rates, which considerably affect the patients' quality of life. At present, new LSD are regularly described because their physiopathological mechanism is recognized and they are susceptible to be treated with enzyme replacement therapy. During 2009, a cross-disciplinary group of Mexican experts on the Gaucher's disease gathered to develop diagnosis and treatment guidelines. This document presents the approach and recommendations of Mexican experts, according to the demography, resources, and epidemiologic reality in Mexico, a country with over 100 million inhabitants.

  17. "The Mexican Culture" in the Education of the Mexican American.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vega, Maria Luisa

    1978-01-01

    This paper offers reasons for teaching Mexican culture in bilingual programs. The first section considers three important court decisions - Lau vs. Nichols, Serna vs. Portales Municipal Schools, and Keyes vs. School District N. 1, Denver, Colorado - and then discusses the extent of bilingual-bicultural education. The meaning of bicultural…

  18. Being Mexican: Strengths and Challenges of Mexican-Origin Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malott, Krista M.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides outcomes of a qualitative inquiry with 20 adolescents of Mexican origin, all of whom have lived in the United States at least two years. Questions addressed the perceived strengths and challenges related to the participants' ethnic heritage. Findings indicated the greatest perceived challenge was discrimination. Strengths…

  19. Mexican agencies reach teenagers.

    PubMed

    Brito Lemus, R; Beamish, J

    1992-08-01

    The Gente Joven project of the Mexican Foundation for Family Planning (MEXFAM) trains young volunteers in 19 cities to spread messages about sexually transmitted diseases and population growth to their peers. They also distribute condoms and spermicides. It also uses films and materials to spread its messages. The project would like to influence young men's behavior, but the Latin image of machismo poses a big challenge. It would like to become more responsible toward pregnancy prevention. About 50% of adolescents have sexual intercourse, but few use contraceptives resulting in a high adolescent pregnancy rate. Many of these pregnant teenagers choose not to marry. Adolescent pregnancy leads to girls leaving school, few marketable skills, and rearing children alone. Besides women who began childbearing as a teenager have 1.5 times more children than other women. Male involvement in pregnancy prevention should improve these statistics. As late as 1973, the Health Code banned promotion and sales of contraceptives, but by 1992 about 50% of women of reproductive age use contraceptives. The Center for the Orientation of Adolescents has organized 8 Young Men's Clubs in Mexico City to involve male teenagers more in family planning and to develop self-confidence. It uses a holistic approach to their development through discussions with their peers. A MEXFAM study shows that young men are not close with their fathers who tend to exude a machismo attitude, thus the young men do not have a role model for responsible sexual behavior. MEXFAM's work is cut out for them, however, since the same study indicates that 50% of the young men believe it is fine to have 1 girlfriend and 33% think women should earn more than men. A teenager volunteer reports, however, that more boys have been coming to him for contraception and information than girls in 1992 while in other years girls outnumbered the boys.

  20. The Impacts of Emigration on the Mexican Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Allen R.

    1982-01-01

    The assumption that Mexican emigration to the United States provides benefits to Mexico in the form of jobs for unemployed Mexicans and wage remittances has kept Mexican officials from discouraging illegal emigration. In fact, emigration drains the Mexican economy and should be a cause for Mexican government concern. (Author/MJL)

  1. Reading Exercises on Mexican Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almaraz, Felix D., Jr.; Almaraz, Maria O.

    Short biographical sketches and drawings of 30 prominent Mexican Americans are presented in this book of reading exercises. Written on a fourth or fifth grade level, the book includes figures representing a variety of occupations and fields of achievement: the arts, sports, business, journalism, education, entertainment, literature, medicine, law,…

  2. New Mexican Spanish Verb Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, J. Donald

    This paper presents a morphophonemic analysis of the characteristics that distinguish verb structure in New Mexican Spanish from that of Standard Spanish. Verb structure and classification are discussed, and verbs are analyzed as being composed of four components: stem, thematic vowel, tense-aspect, and person-number. Verbs are classified as…

  3. Mexican High Energy Physics Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Olivo, J. C.; Napsuciale, M.; Pérez-Angón, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    The Mexican High Energy Physics Network is one of CONACYT's thematic research networks, created with the aim of increasing the communication and cooperation of the scientific and technology communities of Mexico in strategic areas. In this report we review the evolution, challenges, achievements and opportunities faced by the network.

  4. The Mexican Axolotl in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    Suggests and describes laboratory activities in which the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum Shaw) is used, including experiments in embryology and early development, growth and regeneration, neoteny and metamorphosis, genetics and coloration, anatomy and physiology, and behavior. Discusses care and maintenance of animals. (CS)

  5. Pedagogics in Mexican American Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carranza, E. Lou

    A pedagogy appropriate to college level courses and comprised of interdisciplinary content, multidisciplinary faculty, and students from diverse academic backgrounds and with varying levels of skills merits development. A taxonomy of some of the difficulties in the construction of such a course in Mexican American studies, for example, focuses on…

  6. La Artesania Mexicana (Mexican Handicrafts).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Bettina

    This booklet contains instructions in English and Spanish for making eleven typical Mexican craft articles. The instructions are accompanied by pen-and-ink drawings. The objects are (1) "La Rosa" (The Rose); (2) "El Crisantemo" (The Chrysanthemum); (3) "La Amapola" (The Poppy); (4) "Ojos de Dios" (God's Eyes); (5) "Ojitos con dos caras" (Two-Sided…

  7. The Mexican Axolotl in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    Suggests and describes laboratory activities in which the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum Shaw) is used, including experiments in embryology and early development, growth and regeneration, neoteny and metamorphosis, genetics and coloration, anatomy and physiology, and behavior. Discusses care and maintenance of animals. (CS)

  8. Stigmatization of Overweight Mexican Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacardi-Gascon, Montserrat; Leon-Reyes, Maria Juana; Jimenez-Cruz, Arturo

    2007-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the weight-based stigmatization of Mexican overweight (OW) and non-OW children by their mothers and peers, who rated both boys and girls with varying physical characteristics. Four hundred and thirty-two fifth and sixth graders and 342 mothers participated in the study. Children were administered a…

  9. Historical aspects of Mexican psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Bayardo, Sergio Javier Villaseñor

    2016-04-01

    Mexican psychiatry initiated since pre-Hispanic times. Historically, treatments were a mixture of magic, science and religion. Ancient Nahuas had their own medical concepts with a holistic view of medicine, considering men and cosmos as a whole. The first psychiatric hospital appeared in 1566 and a more modern psychiatric asylum emerged until 1910. International exchanges of theoretical approaches started in the National University with the visit of Pierre Janet. There were other important figures that influenced Mexican psychiatry, such as Erich Fromm, Henri Ey, Jean Garrabé and Yves Thoret. Regarding Mexican psychiatrists, some of the most important contributors to Mexican psychiatry were José Luis Patiño Rojas, Manuel Guevara Oropeza and Ramón de la Fuente Muñiz. This article includes excerpts from "Clinical Psychiatry", a book by Patiño Rojas where he tries to understand and describe the inner world experienced by patients with schizophrenia; also, the thesis conducted by Guevara Oropeza ("Psychoanalisis"), which is a critical comparison between the theories of Janet and Freud. Finally, we include "The study of consciousness: current status" by Ramón de la Fuente, which leads us through the initial investigations concerning consciousness, its evolution, and the contributions made by psychology, philosophy and neurobiology.

  10. La Artesania Mexicana (Mexican Handicrafts).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Bettina

    This booklet contains instructions in English and Spanish for making eleven typical Mexican craft articles. The instructions are accompanied by pen-and-ink drawings. The objects are (1) "La Rosa" (The Rose); (2) "El Crisantemo" (The Chrysanthemum); (3) "La Amapola" (The Poppy); (4) "Ojos de Dios" (God's Eyes); (5) "Ojitos con dos caras" (Two-Sided…

  11. Anxiety Reporting and Culturally Associated Interpretation Biases and Cognitive Schemas: A Comparison of Mexican, Mexican American, and European American Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varela, R. Enrique; Vernberg, Eric M.; Sanchez-Sosa, Juan Jose; Riveros, Angelica; Mitchell, Montserrat; Mashunkashey, Joanna

    2004-01-01

    This study examined whether Mexican (n = 53), Mexican American (n = 50), and European American (n = 51) children differed in their reporting of anxiety symptoms and whether parental influence and specific cognitive schemas associated with Mexican culture were related to differences in anxiety reporting. As expected, Mexican and Mexican American…

  12. Latin Holidays: Mexican Americans, Latin Music, and Cultural Identity in Postwar Los Angeles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macias, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    This essay recreates the exciting Latin music and dance scenes of post-World War II Southern California, showing how Mexican Americans produced and consumed a range of styles and, in the process, articulated their complex cultural sensibilities. By participating in a Spanish-language expressive culture that was sophisticated and cosmopolitan,…

  13. Self-Reported Depressive Feelings and Cigarette Smoking among Mexican-American Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesa, Jacqueline A.; Cowdery, Joan E.; Wang, Min Qi; Fu, Qiang

    1997-01-01

    Examined the relationship between depressive feelings and cigarette smoking in Mexican-American adolescents who participated in the 1993 Teenage Attitudes and Practices Survey II. Results suggest a relationship between certain feelings of depression and smoking, beyond that experienced by nonsmokers, which may be more evident in females.…

  14. Latin Holidays: Mexican Americans, Latin Music, and Cultural Identity in Postwar Los Angeles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macias, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    This essay recreates the exciting Latin music and dance scenes of post-World War II Southern California, showing how Mexican Americans produced and consumed a range of styles and, in the process, articulated their complex cultural sensibilities. By participating in a Spanish-language expressive culture that was sophisticated and cosmopolitan,…

  15. Weight change among Mexican American students involved in an intensive intervention to prevent and treat obesity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The current study examined the effects of an intensive weight management intervention for Mexican American adolescents. A total of 228 adolescents were randomized to an environmental health promotion program (EHPP) or EHPP plus intensive intervention (EHPP+II). The EHPP consisted of a school-wide in...

  16. Erasing Differences for the Sake of Inclusion: How Mexican/Mexican American Students Construct Historical Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santiago, Maribel

    2017-01-01

    "Mendez v. Westminster," a case about 1940s Mexican American school segregation, is a new vehicle for including Mexican Americans into U.S. history classrooms. This study explores how a class of primarily Mexican American students, who because of their heritage might develop a personal connection to the case, made sense of…

  17. Recent Outstanding and Ordinary Books about Mexico, Mexicans, and Mexican-Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schon, Isabel

    1984-01-01

    This bibliographic essay reviews recent books about Mexico written for serious students and/or young adult readers; recent books for children and young adults which reflect authors' misunderstanding of Mexico, Mexicans, and Mexican-Americans; and recent books about Mexico and Mexican-Americans that might appeal to young readers with special…

  18. The Health Beliefs of Mexican, Mexican American and Anglo American Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro, Felipe G.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Interviews were conducted with 102 urban Mexican, Mexican American, and Anglo American women to examine health-illness beliefs in five health domains as related to acculturation level: folk and hot-cold beliefs, beliefs of responsibility and control over own health, and cardiovascular disease and stress-illness beliefs. Mexican-origin women mildly…

  19. Ethnic Isolation of Mexican Americans in the Public Schools of the Southwest. Mexican American Education Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Civil Rights, Washington, DC.

    Demographic characteristics and ethnic isolation of Mexican American students and staff in the Southwest are examined in terms of size and distribution of Mexican American enrollment, ethnic isolation of Mexican American pupils (by school and district), size and assignment of school staff, and school district administrators and school board…

  20. The Health Beliefs of Mexican, Mexican American and Anglo American Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro, Felipe G.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Interviews were conducted with 102 urban Mexican, Mexican American, and Anglo American women to examine health-illness beliefs in five health domains as related to acculturation level: folk and hot-cold beliefs, beliefs of responsibility and control over own health, and cardiovascular disease and stress-illness beliefs. Mexican-origin women mildly…

  1. Mexican Perspectives on Mexican-U.S. Relations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    administration of Mexican President Porfirio Diaz (1876 - 1911). He was a dictator whose pervasive and ruthless administration is considered an...placing the agricultural system in the hands of a few wealthy landowners. Porfirio Diaz accomplished his objectives by establishing an oligarchy...violent coup staged by Generals Victoriano Huerta and Felix Diax that overthrew the government of Porfirio Diaz ’ successor, President Francisco Madero

  2. Lactose intolerance among Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    Sowers, M F; Winterfeldt, E

    1975-07-01

    Thirty-three Mexican Americans between the ages of 9 and 60 were interviewed and tested for lactose intolerance. The participants of the study included 16 children and 17 persons not related by birth, including the parents of the children. Determination of lactose intolerance was based on a rise of less than 25mg/100 ml of blood glucose as measured by an Ames Dextrostix/Reflectance Meter following consumption of a lactose load. Forty-seven percent of the 17 nonrelated Mexican Americans were lactose intolerant. There was a marked relationship between low rise in blood glucose and symptoms of diarrhea, flatulence, and distention. Sixteen children from four families had an incidence of 50 per cent intolerance. The findings of intolerance in two successive generations of three families and in both sexes of the families adds support to the contention that lactose intolerance has a genetic basis, without sex predilection.

  3. New tariffs confuse Mexican market

    SciTech Connect

    Coeyman, M.

    1992-12-09

    Indelpro - the Grupo Alfa/Himont joint venture 150,000-m.t./year polypropylene (PP) plant in Altamira, Mexico - has been working to find its place in the Mexican market since coming onstream in March. At the same time, that market has been complicated by the imposition of import and export tariffs by the U.S. Department of Commerce early this fall. Commerce's accession to a 10% ad valorem tax on US PP exports to Mexico surprised some industry observers. The tariff is scheduled to be phased out within 10 years and is partly countermanded by a 5% tariff over a five-year period on Mexican PP exports to the US. But some market analysts say the arrangement is baffling.

  4. Frailty in older Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Ostir, Glenn V; Peek, M Kristen; Snih, Soham Al; Raji, Mukaila A; Markides, Kyriakos S

    2005-09-01

    To identify sociodemographic characteristics and health performance variables associated with frailty in older Mexican Americans. A prospective population-based survey. Homes of older adults living in the southwest. Six hundred twenty-one noninstitutionalized Mexican-American men and women aged 70 and older included in the Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly participated in a home-based interview. Interviews included information on sociodemographics, self-reports of medical conditions (arthritis, diabetes mellitus, heart attack, hip fracture, cancer, and stroke) and functional status. Weight and measures of lower and upper extremity muscle strength were obtained along with information on activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living. A summary measure of frailty was created based on weight loss, exhaustion, grip strength, and walking speed. Multivariable linear regression identified variables associated with frailty at baseline. Logistic regression examined variables predicting frailty at 1-year follow-up. Sex was associated with frailty at baseline (F=4.28, P=.03). Predictors of frailty in men included upper extremity strength, disability (activities of daily living), comorbidities, and mental status scores (Nagelkerke coefficient of determination (R(2))=0.37). Predictors for women included lower extremity strength, disability (activities of daily living), and body mass index (Nagelkerke R(2)=0.29). At 1-year follow-up, 83% of men and 79% of women were correctly classified as frail. Different variables were identified as statistically significant predictors of frailty in Mexican-American men and women aged 70 and older. The prevention, development, and treatment of frailty in older Mexican Americans may require consideration of the unique characteristics of this population.

  5. NAFTA and the Mexican Economy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-04

    their social and economic environment. The study states that NAFTA accelerated the transition of Mexico to a liberalized economy but did not create the...Trade Agreement (NAFTA), in effect since January 1994, plays a very strong role in the bilateral economic relationship between Mexico and the United...health issues. The effects of NAFTA on Mexico and the state of the Mexican economy have important impacts on U.S. economic and political interests. As

  6. Genetic structure and forensic parameters of 38 Indels for human identification purposes in eight Mexican populations.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cortés, G; Gusmão, L; Pereira, R; Salcido, V H; Favela-Mendoza, A F; Muñoz-Valle, J F; Inclán-Sánchez, A; López-Hernández, L B; Rangel-Villalobos, H

    2015-07-01

    Insertion-deletions for human identification purposes (HID-Indels) offer advantages to solve particular forensic situations and complex paternity cases. In Mexico, admixed population known as Mestizos is the largest (∼90%), plus a number of Amerindian groups (∼10%), which have not been studied with HID-Indels. For this reason, allele frequencies and forensic parameters for 38 HID-Indels were estimated in 531 unrelated individuals from one Amerindian (Purépecha) and seven Mestizo populations from different regions of the country. Genotype distribution was in agreement with Hardy-Weinberg expectations in almost all loci/populations. The linkage disequilibrium (LD) test did not reveal possible associations between loci pairs in all eight Mexican populations. The combined power of discrimination was high in all populations (PD >99.99999999998%). However, the power of exclusion of the 38 HID-Indel system (PE >99.6863%) was reduced regarding most of autosomal STR kits. The assessment of genetic structure (AMOVA) and relationships between populations (FST) demonstrated significant differences among Mexican populations, mainly of the Purépecha Amerindian group. Among Mexican-Mestizos, three population clusters consistent with geography were defined: (i) North-West region: Chihuahua, Sinaloa, and Jalisco; (ii) Central-Southern region: Mexico City, Veracruz and Yucatan; (iii) South region: Chiapas. In brief, this report validates the inclusion of the 38 HID-Indel system in forensic casework and paternity cases in seven Mexican-Mestizo populations from different regions, and in one Mexican Amerindian group.

  7. Mexican-Americans in the Southwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Reynaldo L.; And Others

    Of the 10 million Mexican Americans in the United States, 90% reside in the southwestern states of California, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas. Historically, the acquisition of Spanish speaking citizens by the U.S. has resulted from military conquest. Yet, Mexican Americans did not have a significant political voice until the high fatality…

  8. Mexicano, Mexican-American or Chicano?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Contreras, Maximiliano

    Although often considered to be homogeneous, the Hispanic community contains many culturally diverse groups. In the United States today, those of Mexican heritage--by far the largest subgroup within the Hispanic community--can be further classified as Mexicano (undocumented resident), Mexican American, or Chicano. This classification system…

  9. Mexican Celebrations. Latin American Culture Studies Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza-Lubeck, Maria; Salinas, Ana Maria

    Developed for elementary school children, this unit is designed to teach about Mexican American culture through the study of holidays celebrated throughout much of Latin America and the southwestern United States. The unit describes and provides background information about nine Mexican American holidays. Among the activities included are the…

  10. Mexican-Americans in the Southwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Reynaldo L.; And Others

    Of the 10 million Mexican Americans in the United States, 90% reside in the southwestern states of California, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas. Historically, the acquisition of Spanish speaking citizens by the U.S. has resulted from military conquest. Yet, Mexican Americans did not have a significant political voice until the high fatality…

  11. Mexican Celebrations. Latin American Culture Studies Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza-Lubeck, Maria; Salinas, Ana Maria

    Developed for elementary school children, this unit is designed to teach about Mexican American culture through the study of holidays celebrated throughout much of Latin America and the southwestern United States. The unit describes and provides background information about nine Mexican American holidays. Among the activities included are the…

  12. The First Mexican American Fictional Hero.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholl, James R.

    This paper describes the appearance of the first Mexican-American fictional hero in American literature. In 1878 a book entitled, "Live Boys; or, Charley and Nasho in Texas" was published in Boston; the book described the adventures of a Mexican-American hero called Nasho from the Southwestern United States. The author was Thomas…

  13. Mexican-Americans of South Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madsen, William

    The Hogg Foundation for Mental Health sponsored and financed the Hidalgo Project on Differential Culture Change and Mental Health during the 4-year period from 1957 to 1961; this document is an abbreviated report of that study of Mexican-American culture in Hidalgo County, Texas. Acculturation levels of various classes of the Mexican-American…

  14. Mexicans of Detroit. Peopling of Michigan Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baba, Marietta Lynn; Abonyi, Malvina Hauk

    Tracing the background and history of Mexican Americans in Detroit, Michigan, the booklet briefly reviews the early stages of Meso-American history, the Spaniards' arrival in Mexico, colonial Mexico, Mexico's revolt for independence, and the internal turmoil in Mexico which continued until early in 1861. The accomplishments of such Mexicans as…

  15. Mexican Managers' Perceptions of Cultural Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Christine Uber

    2001-01-01

    Global managers in Mexico identified what their U.S. counterparts should know about Mexican culture to do business effectively. Suggested Mexican and U.S.cultures are exact opposites in many respects. Discussed differences in building business relationships, attitudes toward time, family and religious values, communication patterns, and…

  16. Mexican Managers' Perceptions of Cultural Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Christine Uber

    2001-01-01

    Global managers in Mexico identified what their U.S. counterparts should know about Mexican culture to do business effectively. Suggested Mexican and U.S.cultures are exact opposites in many respects. Discussed differences in building business relationships, attitudes toward time, family and religious values, communication patterns, and…

  17. Mexican-Americans of South Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madsen, William

    The Hogg Foundation for Mental Health sponsored and financed the Hidalgo Project on Differential Culture Change and Mental Health during the 4-year period from 1957 to 1961; this document is an abbreviated report of that study of Mexican-American culture in Hidalgo County, Texas. Acculturation levels of various classes of the Mexican-American…

  18. Stress Resilience among Border Mexican American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinn, Bobby; Vincent, Vern; Dugas, Donna

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors distinguishing Mexican American women living near the U.S.-Mexican border who are resilient to the experience of stress from those who are not. The study sample consisted of 418 participants ranging in age from 20 to 61 years. Data were gathered through a self-report survey instrument composed of…

  19. Stress Resilience among Border Mexican American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinn, Bobby; Vincent, Vern; Dugas, Donna

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors distinguishing Mexican American women living near the U.S.-Mexican border who are resilient to the experience of stress from those who are not. The study sample consisted of 418 participants ranging in age from 20 to 61 years. Data were gathered through a self-report survey instrument composed of…

  20. Mexicans of Detroit. Peopling of Michigan Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baba, Marietta Lynn; Abonyi, Malvina Hauk

    Tracing the background and history of Mexican Americans in Detroit, Michigan, the booklet briefly reviews the early stages of Meso-American history, the Spaniards' arrival in Mexico, colonial Mexico, Mexico's revolt for independence, and the internal turmoil in Mexico which continued until early in 1861. The accomplishments of such Mexicans as…

  1. Employment Hardship among Mexican-Origin Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Anda, Roberto M.

    2005-01-01

    This study compares the prevalence and causes of employment hardship between Mexican-origin and White women. Data come from the March 1992, 1996, and 2000 Current Population Surveys. Using logistic regression, the author assesses whether there is a difference between Mexican-origin and White women in employment hardship, controlling for personal…

  2. Teachers and Counselors for Mexican American Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainsworth, C.L., Ed.

    The main problems confronting teachers of Mexican American children are the language and cultural barriers. Mexican American children are often limited in communication skills in both Spanish and English and hold different values and life styles than the Anglo American teacher. The "live now" attitude, which is characteristic of Latin cultures,…

  3. The First Mexican American Fictional Hero.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholl, James R.

    This paper describes the appearance of the first Mexican-American fictional hero in American literature. In 1878 a book entitled, "Live Boys; or, Charley and Nasho in Texas" was published in Boston; the book described the adventures of a Mexican-American hero called Nasho from the Southwestern United States. The author was Thomas…

  4. Recognizing Writers and Illustrators of Mexican American Children's Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battle, Jennifer; Menchaca, Velma D.

    Contemporary books about Mexican Americans are rare and frequently stereotypical in nature. Until recently, the very few children's books about Mexican Americans were usually written from an outsider's perspective and often displayed negative images and messages about traditional Mexican sex roles, Mexican living conditions, and the Spanish…

  5. Mexican Immigrant Children in American Schools: A Brief Sketch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saragoza, Alex M.

    This essay outlines Mexican immigration to the United States, with particular reference to Mexican children and the implications for schooling. The ability of Mexican immigrants to obtain jobs and the nature of the work itself has changed drastically for the worse in recent years. Children of Mexican origin differ in numerous ways in part because…

  6. Helping Mexican and Mexican-American Students in the Schools of the East Side Union High School District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Robert

    This document provides information about schools in Mexico and suggests ways that U.S. schools can use this information to improve education for Mexican and Mexican American students. Chapter 1 describes the Mexican educational system as a vantage point for understanding the expectations of Mexican parents in the United States. This chapter covers…

  7. Ethnopharmacology of Mexican asteraceae (Compositae).

    PubMed

    Heinrich, M; Robles, M; West, J E; Ortiz de Montellano, B R; Rodriguez, E

    1998-01-01

    Traditional herbal remedies have increased in popularity in Europe and the United States in recent years but have always been important to people living in rural Mexico and to their Mexican American/Chicano descendants in the United States. Mexican American patients will often be ingesting herbal teas at the same time that they are being treated for their ailments with antibiotics or antiinflammatory agents. The plant family Asteraceae (Compositae) has contributed the largest number of plants to this pharmacopoeia; the reasons for the importance of this family include its large number of species in Mexico and its wide array of natural products that are useful in the treatment of the maladies that have afflicted the inhabitants of rural Mexico. These natural products include sesquiterpene lactones, polyacetylenes, alkaloids, monoterpenes, and various phenolics such as flavonoids. In this review, we emphasize the sesquiterpene lactones, a large group of compounds with antiinflammatory properties and the ability to relax smooth muscles and thereby relieve gastrointestinal distress. These compounds also readily form adducts with glutathione or free thiols and can thereby affect the metabolism, activity, and toxicology of a wide array of pharmacological agents.

  8. [Mexican consensus on portal hypertension].

    PubMed

    Narváez-Rivera, R M; Cortez-Hernández, C A; González-González, J A; Tamayo-de la Cuesta, J L; Zamarripa-Dorsey, F; Torre-Delgadillo, A; Rivera-Ramos, J F J; Vinageras-Barroso, J I; Muneta-Kishigami, J E; Blancas-Valencia, J M; Antonio-Manrique, M; Valdovinos-Andraca, F; Brito-Lugo, P; Hernández-Guerrero, A; Bernal-Reyes, R; Sobrino-Cossío, S; Aceves-Tavares, G R; Huerta-Guerrero, H M; Moreno-Gómez, N; Bosques-Padilla, F J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the Mexican Consensus on Portal Hypertension was to develop documented guidelines to facilitate clinical practice when dealing with key events of the patient presenting with portal hypertension and variceal bleeding. The panel of experts was made up of Mexican gastroenterologists, hepatologists, and endoscopists, all distinguished professionals. The document analyzes themes of interest in the following modules: preprimary and primary prophylaxis, acute variceal hemorrhage, and secondary prophylaxis. The management of variceal bleeding has improved considerably in recent years. Current information indicates that the general management of the cirrhotic patient presenting with variceal bleeding should be carried out by a multidisciplinary team, with such an approach playing a major role in the final outcome. The combination of drug and endoscopic therapies is recommended for initial management; vasoactive drugs should be started as soon as variceal bleeding is suspected and maintained for 5 days. After the patient is stabilized, urgent diagnostic endoscopy should be carried out by a qualified endoscopist, who then performs the corresponding endoscopic variceal treatment. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be regarded as an integral part of treatment, started upon hospital admittance and continued for 5 days. If there is treatment failure, rescue therapies should be carried out immediately, taking into account that interventional radiology therapies are very effective in controlling refractory variceal bleeding. These guidelines have been developed for the purpose of achieving greater clinical efficacy and are based on the best evidence of portal hypertension that is presently available.

  9. [Contributions of the Mexican electrovectorcardiography].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, Alfredo; Iturralde-Torres, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    We narrate the main stages of the long journey that led to the structuring of modern electrovectorcardiography based on the fundamentals established by Willem Einthoven (1860-1927), who held the physiology chair of the Leyden University (The Netherlands), and presented his string electrocardiograph in 1901. The Mexican electrovectorcardiography became strong thanks to the endeavor of Dr. Demetrio Sodi Pallares, a disciple of F.N. Wilson of Ann Arbor. Dr. Sodi Pallares founded the Mexican School of Electrovectorcardiography, which was a cornerstone in the field and was widely recognized internationally for several decades. This fact is due to the rational and not empirical approach to the electrical exploration of the heart, thanks to the application of the inductive-deductive Galilean procedure. It was then possible to obtain these results, through the study of myocardial depolarization and repolarization processes, under normal conditions and with bundle branch block, performed by Dr. Gustavo A. Medrano and collaborators, in the 1950 decade. The electrovectorcardiographic manifestations of the non complicated myocardial infarct were the object of studies, as well as those of the infarction complicated with rhythm and conduction disorders. Likewise, proximal and distal or peripheral blocks were studied. The current disciples of that School are now studying of cardiac arrhythmias with promising results.

  10. Prevalence of diabetes in Mexican Americans. Relationship to percent of gene pool derived from native American sources.

    PubMed

    Gardner, L I; Stern, M P; Haffner, S M; Gaskill, S P; Hazuda, H P; Relethford, J H; Eifler, C W

    1984-01-01

    We have estimated the prevalence of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) in Mexican Americans and Anglos in three San Antonio neighborhoods. The age-adjusted NIDDM rates (both sexes pooled) for Mexican Americans were 14.5%, 10%, and 5% for residents of a low-income barrio, a middle-income transitional neighborhood, and a high-income suburb, respectively. In Mexican American women, though not in men, obesity also declined from barrio to suburbs. We have previously shown, however, that, although obesity is an important cause of NIDDM in Mexican Americans, there is a two- to fourfold excess in the rate of NIDDM in this ethnic group over and above that which can be attributed to obesity. We therefore speculated that genetic factors might also contribute to excess NIDDM in this ethnic group. The percent native American admixture of Mexican Americans as estimated from skin color measurements was 46% in the barrio, 27% in the transitional neighborhood, and 18% in the suburbs. The NIDDM rates in Mexican Americans thus paralleled the proportion of native American genes. Furthermore, the San Antonio Mexican American rates were intermediate between the NIDDM rates of "full-blooded" Pima Indians (49.9%), who presumably have close to 100% native American genes, and the San Antonio Anglo population (3.0%) and the predominantly Anglo HANES II population (3.1%), both of which presumably have few if any native American genes. The association of genetic admixture with NIDDM rates suggests that much of the epidemic of NIDDM in Mexican Americans is confined to that part of the population with a substantial native American heritage.

  11. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) variation in the endangered Mexican wolf and related canids.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, P W; Lee, R N; Parker, K M

    2000-12-01

    We have examined in Mexican wolves and related canids the amount of genetic variation for a class II gene in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), thought to be part of the most important genetic basis for pathogen resistance in vertebrates. In Mexican wolves, descended from only seven founders over three lineages, there were five different alleles. These were in three phylogenetic groups, only one of which was shared between lineages. Using single stand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), we found that in samples of animals from the two polymorphic lineages, the observed heterozygosity was 0.74 and the genotypes were not different statistically from Hardy-Weinberg proportions. The Ghost Ranch lineage of Mexican wolves was monomorphic for the locus, consistent with the lower level of variation found previously for microsatellite loci and predicted from pedigree analysis. Samples of grey wolves, red wolves, and coyotes had 16 additional alleles. One Mexican wolf allele was also found in grey wolves and another allele was shared between grey and red wolves. Most of the nucleotide variation resulted in amino acid variation and there were five different amino acids found at two different positions. Only two of the 21 variable amino acid positions had solely synonymous nucleotide variation. The average heterozygosity for eight individual amino acid positions in the Mexican wolves was greater than 0.4. The estimated rate of nonsynonymous substitution was 2.5 times higher than that for synonymous substitution for the putative antigen binding site positions, indicative of positive selection acting on these positions. Examination of the known dog sequences for this locus showed that one of the Mexican wolf alleles was found in dogs and that the allele found in both grey and red wolves is also found in dogs.

  12. Contribution of Common Genetic Variants to Obesity and Obesity-Related Traits in Mexican Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Villalobos-Comparán, Marisela; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; López-Contreras, Blanca; Gutiérrez-Vidal, Roxana; Vega-Badillo, Joel; Jacobo-Albavera, Leonor; Posadas-Romeros, Carlos; Canizalez-Román, Adrián; Río-Navarro, Blanca Del; Campos-Pérez, Francisco; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies have identified multiple obesity-associated loci mainly in European populations. However, their contribution to obesity in other ethnicities such as Mexicans is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to examine 26 obesity-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in a sample of Mexican mestizos. Methods 9 SNPs in biological candidate genes showing replications (PPARG, ADRB3, ADRB2, LEPR, GNB3, UCP3, ADIPOQ, UCP2, and NR3C1), and 17 SNPs in or near genes associated with obesity in first, second and third wave GWAS (INSIG2, FTO, MC4R, TMEM18, FAIM2/BCDIN3, BDNF, SH2B1, GNPDA2, NEGR1, KCTD15, SEC16B/RASAL2, NPC1, SFRF10/ETV5, MAF, PRL, MTCH2, and PTER) were genotyped in 1,156 unrelated Mexican-Mestizos including 683 cases (441 obese class I/II and 242 obese class III) and 473 normal-weight controls. In a second stage we selected 12 of the SNPs showing nominal associations with obesity, to seek associations with quantitative obesity-related traits in 3 cohorts including 1,218 Mexican Mestizo children, 945 Mexican Mestizo adults, and 543 Indigenous Mexican adults. Results After adjusting for age, sex and admixture, significant associations with obesity were found for 6 genes in the case-control study (ADIPOQ, FTO, TMEM18, INSIG2, FAIM2/BCDIN3 and BDNF). In addition, SH2B1 was associated only with class I/II obesity and MC4R only with class III obesity. SNPs located at or near FAIM2/BCDIN3, TMEM18, INSIG2, GNPDA2 and SEC16B/RASAL2 were significantly associated with BMI and/or WC in the combined analysis of Mexican-mestizo children and adults, and FTO locus was significantly associated with increased BMI in Indigenous Mexican populations. Conclusions Our findings replicate the association of 8 obesity-related SNPs with obesity risk in Mexican adults, and confirm the role of some of these SNPs in BMI in Mexican adults and children. PMID:23950976

  13. Contribution of common genetic variants to obesity and obesity-related traits in mexican children and adults.

    PubMed

    León-Mimila, Paola; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Villalobos-Comparán, Marisela; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; López-Contreras, Blanca; Gutiérrez-Vidal, Roxana; Vega-Badillo, Joel; Jacobo-Albavera, Leonor; Posadas-Romeros, Carlos; Canizalez-Román, Adrián; Río-Navarro, Blanca Del; Campos-Pérez, Francisco; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have identified multiple obesity-associated loci mainly in European populations. However, their contribution to obesity in other ethnicities such as Mexicans is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to examine 26 obesity-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in a sample of Mexican mestizos. 9 SNPs in biological candidate genes showing replications (PPARG, ADRB3, ADRB2, LEPR, GNB3, UCP3, ADIPOQ, UCP2, and NR3C1), and 17 SNPs in or near genes associated with obesity in first, second and third wave GWAS (INSIG2, FTO, MC4R, TMEM18, FAIM2/BCDIN3, BDNF, SH2B1, GNPDA2, NEGR1, KCTD15, SEC16B/RASAL2, NPC1, SFRF10/ETV5, MAF, PRL, MTCH2, and PTER) were genotyped in 1,156 unrelated Mexican-Mestizos including 683 cases (441 obese class I/II and 242 obese class III) and 473 normal-weight controls. In a second stage we selected 12 of the SNPs showing nominal associations with obesity, to seek associations with quantitative obesity-related traits in 3 cohorts including 1,218 Mexican Mestizo children, 945 Mexican Mestizo adults, and 543 Indigenous Mexican adults. After adjusting for age, sex and admixture, significant associations with obesity were found for 6 genes in the case-control study (ADIPOQ, FTO, TMEM18, INSIG2, FAIM2/BCDIN3 and BDNF). In addition, SH2B1 was associated only with class I/II obesity and MC4R only with class III obesity. SNPs located at or near FAIM2/BCDIN3, TMEM18, INSIG2, GNPDA2 and SEC16B/RASAL2 were significantly associated with BMI and/or WC in the combined analysis of Mexican-mestizo children and adults, and FTO locus was significantly associated with increased BMI in Indigenous Mexican populations. Our findings replicate the association of 8 obesity-related SNPs with obesity risk in Mexican adults, and confirm the role of some of these SNPs in BMI in Mexican adults and children.

  14. Genetic and environmental determinants of type II diabetes in Mexico City and San Antonio.

    PubMed

    Stern, M P; Gonzalez, C; Mitchell, B D; Villalpando, E; Haffner, S M; Hazuda, H P

    1992-04-01

    To study genetic and environmental determinants of non-insulin-dependent (type II) diabetes, we compared a random sample of 35- to 64-yr-old Mexican-American men and women living in several low-income barrio neighborhoods of San Antonio to similarly aged Mexicans living in a low-income colonia of Mexico City (Colonia Liberales). A total of 1138 Mexican Americans, representing 64.3% of the original sample, and 646 Mexicans, representing 69.2% of the original sample, participated in the survey. Diabetes was diagnosed using World Health Organization criteria. Genetic susceptibility to type II diabetes was inferred from the percentage of Native American genetic admixture as estimated from skin reflectance measurements. The prevalence of diabetes was 36% higher among San Antonio Mexican Americans than among Mexicans in Mexico City; this difference was highly statistically significant (age- and sex-adjusted prevalence ratio 1.36, P = 0.006). This excess was observed despite the fact that genetic susceptibility, as inferred from the admixture estimates, was similar in the two cities. On the other hand, Mexicans were somewhat leaner as measured by body mass index and skin folds. Mexican women consumed fewer total calories than Mexican-American women, but there was no difference in the caloric intake of men. Mexico City residents ate less fat (18-19% of total calories vs. 31-32% in San Antonio, P less than 0.001), more carbohydrate (64-65 vs. 49%, P less than 0.001), and performed more physical activity than San Antonio Mexican Americans. Mexicans appeared to consume more refined sugar than Mexican Americans.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Mexican American Political Behavior in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCleskey, Clifton; Merrill, Bruce

    1973-01-01

    The data presented here indicates improved opportunities for a larger role for Mexican Americans in Texas politics and may be used as a bench mark to periodically measure the rate and direction of political change. (Author)

  16. Elder care among Mexican American families.

    PubMed

    Clark, M; Huttlinger, K

    1998-02-01

    This exploratory study describes caregiving experiences of elderly family members as perceived by eight Mexican American women caregivers and characterizes the ideas that some Mexican Americans have about elder care. A qualitative approach, using open-ended questions, revealed a cultural picture that reflected a very rich cultural heritage. This picture includes the importance of the family's responsibility to care for its elder members and describes family commitments that reach beyond obligation. It also portrays a complex system of cultural beliefs and values that are based on Mexican American tradition. The themes of reciprocity and point of reckoning emerged as two descriptive characteristics of the Mexican American family in the southwestern United States that form the basis for the restructuring of a woman's responsibilities during middle age. This study indicated that the bicultural lens through which the caregiver views the world may differ markedly from that of the elderly family member.

  17. The current situation in mexican immigration.

    PubMed

    Vernez, G; Ronfeldt, D

    1991-03-08

    By 1988, the Mexican-origin population of the United States had grown to 12.1 million, largely from recent, sharp increases in immigration. The policy concerns raised by this phenomenon have been influenced by some perceptions that available research contradicts. Today most Mexican immigrants come to stay, about half are female, and they have increasingly less schooling compared to the native-born population and other immigrants. Nationally, they do not cause adverse economic effects for native-born workers and, across generations, their language and political assimilation is proceeding well. They put greater demands on education than on other public services. However, the Mexican-origin population affects the economy and public services more and differently in the areas where it is concentrated, primarily in the western United States and large urban areas. Further, the recent legalization of 2.3 million Mexican immigrants can be expected to increase the demand on public services, especially in those areas.

  18. Epianthropochory in Mexican weed communities.

    PubMed

    Vibrans, H

    1999-04-01

    The diaspores of the 50 most important maize field weed species (agrestals) in a traditional maize-growing area of south-central Mexico (region of Puebla and Tlaxcala) were analyzed for morphological adaptations to long-distance dispersal. Adaptations to wind-dispersal were absent and to endozoochory were minimal. Most species had no visible adaptations and are presumably transported with mud. However, about one-quarter of the taxa, particularly the tall and dominant ones, relied at least partially on burrs with hooks or awns. The possible vectors for these exo- or epizoochorous species are discussed: the most likely regular dispersers are humans (epianthropochory). Interviews with farmers confirm this conclusion. Using humans as vectors allows the plant to transport relatively large seeds to favorable habitats (directed dispersal). The importance of this relatively rare dispersal adaptation in Mexican maize field weeds leads to questions on the origin and evolution of these agrestals.

  19. The Mexican national satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Ruiz, M. E.; Briskman, R. D.

    1983-10-01

    The satellites, tracking, telemetry, command, and monitoring facilities, and the earth station complex for the Mexican national satellite system, Morelos, are described. The spacecraft are intended to provide educational television, rural telephony, data transmission, and business and industrial services. Scheduled for 1985 launch, the satellites will be placed in GEO and use the C and Ku bands with 12 narrow band and six wideband transponders. Spin-stabilized and solar cell powered, the functional mass will be 666 kg, including propellant. The solar panels will provide 940 W of power and 830 W will be available from NiCd batteries during eclipse conditions. The earth station will be located at Iztapalapa, which will have a 12 m antenna, redundant uplink and downlink radios, and command and ranging equipment. Back-up capability will be provided by a station at Tulancingo. Ku band and C band stations are in planning.

  20. Fair Start Program: Outreach to Mexican and Mexican American Farmworker Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters-Smith, Carol; Larner, Mary

    This presentation describes a home visiting health education program serving Mexican and Mexican-American migrant farmworkers in Florida. The purposes of the program were to educate farmworker families about pregnancy, childbirth, nutrition, and child development, and to encourage the use of preventive health care services. Home visitors were…

  1. Bullying of Mexican Immigrant Students by Mexican American Students: An Examination of Intracultural Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendez, Julian J.; Bauman, Sheri; Guillory, Raphael M.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a study using qualitative methods to investigate intracultural bullying, specifically, bullying between Mexican American (MA) and Mexican immigrant (MI) high school students. Previous research has reported specific cultural conflicts and discrimination within ethnic groups due to differences in acculturation. The purpose of…

  2. Living on the Line: Mexican and Mexican American Attitudes toward Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graf, Noreen M.; Blankenship, Charlene J.; Sanchez, Gabriel; Carlson, Ralph

    2007-01-01

    This study examined attitudes toward people with disabilities (PWD) among Mexicans and Mexican Americans at the U.S.-Mexico border. Participants (N = 160) were surveyed using the "Questions About Disability Survey" (QADS). A factor analysis identified five factors that accounted for 49% of the variance: Maleficent God; Social…

  3. Political Participation and Social Capital among Mexicans and Mexican Americans in Central Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albarracin, Julia; Valeva, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This study tested the influence of bridging and bonding social capital in political participation while controlling for sociodemographic and psychological factors among Mexicans and Mexican Americans in Illinois. Bridging social capital significantly predicted two types of participation. Participants who felt their lives were linked to those of…

  4. Fair Start Program: Outreach to Mexican and Mexican American Farmworker Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters-Smith, Carol; Larner, Mary

    This presentation describes a home visiting health education program serving Mexican and Mexican-American migrant farmworkers in Florida. The purposes of the program were to educate farmworker families about pregnancy, childbirth, nutrition, and child development, and to encourage the use of preventive health care services. Home visitors were…

  5. Mexican-American and Mexican National Farm Workers: A Literature Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael V.

    This paper is concerned with the scholarly treatment accorded to Mexican American and Mexican National farm workers by historical, legal, social work, and social science journals. Only those articles published after the arbitrary date of 1960 are reviewed due to space and time limitations. Works published since then are briefly summarized and…

  6. A Comparison of Delinquent and Nondelinquent Anglo-Americans, Mexican-Americans, and Mexican Nationals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Megargee, Edwin I.; Rosenquist, Carl M.

    Some 50 adjudicated male delinquents, aged 12-17, and 50 nondelinquent comparison subjects from the same lower class neighborhoods were selected from each of three cultural groups: (1) Mexican nationals, (2) Mexican-Americans, and (3) Anglo-Americans. Sociological and demographic data were collected. A standard psychological test battery,…

  7. Mexican-American Adolescent Inhalant Abuse: A Proposed Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworkin, A. Gary; Stephens, Richard C.

    1980-01-01

    Drawing from literature on differences between the Mexican American experience and that of other groups, offers a model to explain the higher rates of inhalant abuse among Mexican American youth. Considers cultural, ecological, structural, and economic factors. (Author/GC)

  8. Mexican-American Adolescent Inhalant Abuse: A Proposed Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworkin, A. Gary; Stephens, Richard C.

    1980-01-01

    Drawing from literature on differences between the Mexican American experience and that of other groups, offers a model to explain the higher rates of inhalant abuse among Mexican American youth. Considers cultural, ecological, structural, and economic factors. (Author/GC)

  9. Legal Status and Wage Disparities for Mexican Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Matthew; Greenman, Emily; Farkas, George

    2014-01-01

    This paper employs a unique method of imputing the legal status of Mexican immigrants in the 1996-1999 and 2001-2003 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation to provide new evidence of the role of legal authorization in the U.S. on workers’ wages. Using growth curve techniques, we estimate wage trajectories for four groups: documented Mexican immigrants, undocumented Mexican immigrants, U.S-born Mexican Americans, and native non-Latino whites. Our estimates reveal a 17 percent wage disparity between documented and undocumented Mexican immigrant men, and a 9 percent documented-undocumented wage disparity for Mexican immigrant women. We also find that in comparison to authorized Mexicans, undocumented Mexican immigrants have lower returns to human capital and slower wage growth. PMID:25414526

  10. The Mexican American Political Conference Urges Participation in National Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barcelo, Cosme Juan, Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Participants of the second semiannual meeting of the Arizona Mexican American Political Conference, held in Tucson on September 24, 1977, discussed the Mexican American influence and involvement in local, state, and national politics. (NQ)

  11. The Teaching of Mexican Culture in a Bilingual Bicultural Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pill, Albert

    1988-01-01

    A set of classroom experiences for teaching Mexican culture is outlined. Integrated into the Mexican cultural unit are stories, poems, songs, dances, art activities, science lessons, films, and a variety of language arts activities. (six references) (JL)

  12. Attitudes of Mexican Americans toward irregular immigration.

    PubMed

    Polinard, J L; Wrinkle, R D; Garza, R D

    1984-01-01

    This inquiry focuses on the attitudes of 314 Mexican Americans toward issues relating to current US immigration policy. Telephone and personal interviews were conducted in Hidalgo and Travis counties, Texas, with Mexican-Americans. Virtually all respondent groups oppose an increased rate of immigration, consider illegal immigration to be an important problem, support stricter enforcement of immigration laws, and believe that undocumented workers take jobs no one else wants. Half of the respondents identify illegal immigration as a regional rather than a personal problem. At the same time, the data suggest significant differences in both direction and intensity of attitudes between Mexican Americans of different generations, income, occupational levels, and region. There is general opposition to the requirement of a national identity card, but widespread support for penalizing employers of undocumented workers and for granting amnesty to undocumented workers. These findings allow an examination of the extent to which the Mexican American leadership, which has been overwhelmingly opposed to the Simpson-Mazzoli bill, accurately reflects the views of the Mexican American people. The leadership and the population at large agree on 2 of the 3 issues, amnesty and the national identity card, but disagree on employer sanctions. 1st, it may be that the leadership holds the kinds of jobs for which undocumented workers are unlikely to compete, so they may not feel threatened. 2nd, they may feel that instituting employer sanctions will create incentives for employers to discriminate in their hiring practices against all Latino-looking job applicants. Non-elite Mexican Americans who support employer sanctions may believe that the only way they can compete for jobs is to make it impossible for elites to be hired. Both groups appear to fear that, regardless of the specifics of immigration reform, Mexican Americans are likely to encounter increased discrimination in the job market.

  13. Two Decades of Mexican Particle Physics at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, R.

    2003-06-01

    This report is a view from Fermilab of Mexican particle physics at the Laboratory since about 1980; it is not intended to be a history of Mexican particle physics: that topic is outside the expertise of the writer. The period 1980 to the present coincides with the growth of Mexican experimental particle physics from essentially no activity to its current state where Mexican groups take part in experiments at several of the world's major laboratories.

  14. Mexican Americans. Ethnic Groups in American Life Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Joan W.; Cuellar, Alfredo

    Part of a series on ethnic groups in American life, this book treats the Mexican American experience in the U.S. Perspectives presented in the book result from interaction with Mexican American and Anglo students and with Mexican American community members, from responses to surveys in 3 southwestern cities, and from recent research findings.…

  15. Legal Status and Wage Disparities for Mexican Immigrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Matthew; Greenman, Emily; Farkas, George

    2010-01-01

    This article employs a unique method of inferring the legal status of Mexican immigrants in the Survey of Income and Program Participation to offer new evidence of the role of legal authorization in the United States on workers' wages. We estimate wage trajectories for four groups: documented Mexican immigrants, undocumented Mexican immigrants,…

  16. Legal Status and Wage Disparities for Mexican Immigrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Matthew; Greenman, Emily; Farkas, George

    2010-01-01

    This article employs a unique method of inferring the legal status of Mexican immigrants in the Survey of Income and Program Participation to offer new evidence of the role of legal authorization in the United States on workers' wages. We estimate wage trajectories for four groups: documented Mexican immigrants, undocumented Mexican immigrants,…

  17. A Qualitative Study of Mexican American Adolescents and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fornos, Laura B.; Mika, Virginia Seguin; Bayles, Bryan; Serrano, Alberto C.; Jimenez, Roberto L.; Villarreal, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    Depressive disorders are present in a high percentage of Mexican American adolescents. Among the US Mexican American population, suicide is the fourth leading cause of death among 10- to 19-year-olds. Little research, however, has focused on Mexican American adolescents' knowledge and views about depression and seeking help for depression. Results…

  18. The Representation of "Curanderismo" in Selected Mexican American Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pabon, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    "Curanderismo," a Mexican folk practice, is a prevalent subject in Mexican American literature. Because much of the presence of "curanderismo" in Mexican American literature is only explored in ethnographic studies, the purpose of this study is to examine the artistic representation of "curanderismo" in the novels "Bless Me, Ultima" by Rudolfo…

  19. Depression and Acculturation in Mexican-American Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masten, William G.

    It has been postulated that the result of the Mexican woman's inability to live up to the stiff requirements of her culture should show itself in depressive trends. These theories are often applied to the Mexican-American female as well. The aim of this study was to determine if acculturation is related to depression in Mexican-American females. A…

  20. Filial Responsibility Expectations among Mexican American Undergraduates: Gender and Biculturalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudolph, Bonnie; Chavez, Mary; Quintana, Fernando; Salinas, Gilberto

    2011-01-01

    How Mexican American college students perceive responsibility for parental care is important as Mexican American elders' numbers increase. The authors applied mixed methods to investigate the impact of gender and biculturalism within this group. Two hundred and eighty-six Mexican American undergraduates completed the Hamon Filial Responsibility…

  1. Strong selection at MHC in Mexicans since admixture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mexicans are a recent admixture of Amerindians, Europeans, and Africans. We performed local ancestry analysis of Mexican samples from two genome-wide association studies obtained from dbGaP, and discovered that at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region Mexicans have excessive African ance...

  2. Mexican Americans: A Brief Look at Their History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nava, Julian

    This short survey begins with a definition of the Mexican American and some of the questions asked by the general public about his culture and aims. It outlines the history of the United States' involvement with Mexico and explains the experience of the Mexican Americans after the end of the Mexican War in 1848. Their ethnic origins and the rich…

  3. The Chicanos: A History of Mexican Americans. American Century Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Matt S.; Rivera, Feliciano

    To identify the Mexican American as a member of a unique cultural group is the purpose of this history of the Chicanos. The history of the Mexican American is divided into 5 broad time periods: the Indo-Hispanic period, during which there was a blending of the Indian and Spanish cultures; the Mexican period, a time of political activity which…

  4. Mexican American Self-Referents and Linguistic Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Nancy de la Zerda; Whitehead, Jack

    In order to determine whether differences in choice of ethnic self-referent by Mexican-Americans reflect differences in ethnic identity and attitudes toward their culture, questionnaires were distributed among Mexican-Americans living in San Antonio. The measurable cultural attitude was that toward language, since to the Mexican-American Spanish…

  5. Filial Responsibility Expectations among Mexican American Undergraduates: Gender and Biculturalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudolph, Bonnie; Chavez, Mary; Quintana, Fernando; Salinas, Gilberto

    2011-01-01

    How Mexican American college students perceive responsibility for parental care is important as Mexican American elders' numbers increase. The authors applied mixed methods to investigate the impact of gender and biculturalism within this group. Two hundred and eighty-six Mexican American undergraduates completed the Hamon Filial Responsibility…

  6. Los Dos Mundos: Rural Mexican Americans, Another America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Richard

    This book explores race relations between Mexican Americans and Anglo Americans in "Middlewest," a fictitious name for an actual rural Idaho community with the highest proportion of Mexican Americans in the state. Many Mexican Americans in this predominantly agricultural area are current or former migrant workers. The first chapter…

  7. Conceptualizing Parent Involvement: Low-Income Mexican Immigrant Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to (a) investigate the conceptualization of low-income Mexican immigrant parents about their parental involvement and the family-school connection, (b) identify the influences on low-income Mexican immigrant parents' approach to parent involvement, and (c) identify the ways that Mexican immigrant parents…

  8. Green Medicine: Traditional Mexican-American Herbal Remedies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Eliseo

    Traditional Mexican American herbal potions and remedies and their history are explained in an introductory book for the general reader. The importance of curanderismo, or green medicine, in Mexican and Mexican American cultures is explored. A brief history traces the herbal aspects of curanderismo through Mayan and Aztec cultures, the Spanish…

  9. Cultural and Social Predictors of Psychological Distress in Mexican Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golding, Jacqueline M.; Burnam, M. Audrey

    Studies of relative levels of psychological distress among Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic Whites have found mixed results, possibly due to cultural differences within Mexican American samples which may confound potential ethnic differences. The hypothesis that differences in psychological distress between Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic…

  10. Los Dos Mundos: Rural Mexican Americans, Another America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Richard

    This book explores race relations between Mexican Americans and Anglo Americans in "Middlewest," a fictitious name for an actual rural Idaho community with the highest proportion of Mexican Americans in the state. Many Mexican Americans in this predominantly agricultural area are current or former migrant workers. The first chapter…

  11. A Qualitative Study of Mexican American Adolescents and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fornos, Laura B.; Mika, Virginia Seguin; Bayles, Bryan; Serrano, Alberto C.; Jimenez, Roberto L.; Villarreal, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    Depressive disorders are present in a high percentage of Mexican American adolescents. Among the US Mexican American population, suicide is the fourth leading cause of death among 10- to 19-year-olds. Little research, however, has focused on Mexican American adolescents' knowledge and views about depression and seeking help for depression. Results…

  12. Employment Instability and Earnings of Mexican-Origin Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Anda, Roberto M.

    1998-01-01

    Draws on the 1987 Current Population Survey to examine the effect of employment instability on earnings of 1,755 Mexican-origin men. Results show unequivocally that Whites received higher returns to education than did Mexican Americans, and that employment instability exerted a heavier penalty on Mexican-origin workers than Whites. (Author/SAS)

  13. Unemployment and Underemployment among Mexican-Origin Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Anda, Roberto M.

    1994-01-01

    Current Population Survey data reveal that the incidence of underemployment for Mexican American males was twice as high as white males, and underemployment was 1.6 times higher for Mexican American females than white females. Joblessness among Mexican Americans accounted for less than one-third of their underemployment. Young and poorly educated…

  14. The Chicanos: A History of Mexican Americans. American Century Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Matt S.; Rivera, Feliciano

    To identify the Mexican American as a member of a unique cultural group is the purpose of this history of the Chicanos. The history of the Mexican American is divided into 5 broad time periods: the Indo-Hispanic period, during which there was a blending of the Indian and Spanish cultures; the Mexican period, a time of political activity which…

  15. Two Scales for the Measurement of Mexican-American Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teske, Raymond, Jr.; Nelson, Bardin H.

    The development of scales to measure Mexican American identification with their population is discussed in this paper. The scales measure (1) identification with the Mexican American population using attitudinal items (Identity Scale) and (2) interaction behavior with the Mexican American population (Interaction Scale). The sample consisted of all…

  16. Folk Arts in the Home: New Mexican Tinwork.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Aurelia; Sullivan, Laura Temple

    New Mexican tinwork is a folk art tradition that developed out of Mexican and European silver work. Due to a lack of silver in New Mexico, tin became the material of choice. Rooted in European Hispanic traditions, this contemporary craft is yet another example of the resourceful ingenuity and adaptation that characterizes many New Mexican folk…

  17. Conceptualizing Parent Involvement: Low-Income Mexican Immigrant Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to (a) investigate the conceptualization of low-income Mexican immigrant parents about their parental involvement and the family-school connection, (b) identify the influences on low-income Mexican immigrant parents' approach to parent involvement, and (c) identify the ways that Mexican immigrant parents…

  18. The Representation of "Curanderismo" in Selected Mexican American Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pabon, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    "Curanderismo," a Mexican folk practice, is a prevalent subject in Mexican American literature. Because much of the presence of "curanderismo" in Mexican American literature is only explored in ethnographic studies, the purpose of this study is to examine the artistic representation of "curanderismo" in the novels "Bless Me, Ultima" by Rudolfo…

  19. Mexican forest fires and their decadal variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco Herrera, Graciela

    2016-11-01

    A high forest fire season of two to three years is regularly observed each decade in Mexican forests. This seems to be related to the presence of the El Niño phenomenon and to the amount of total solar irradiance. In this study, the results of a multi-cross wavelet analysis are reported based on the occurrence of Mexican forest fires, El Niño and the total solar irradiance for the period 1970-2014. The analysis shows that Mexican forest fires and the strongest El Niño phenomena occur mostly around the minima of the solar cycle. This suggests that the total solar irradiance minima provide the appropriate climatological conditions for the occurrence of these forest fires. The next high season for Mexican forest fires could start in the next solar minimum, which will take place between the years 2017 and 2019. A complementary space analysis based on MODIS active fire data for Mexican forest fires from 2005 to 2014 shows that most of these fires occur in cedar and pine forests, on savannas and pasturelands, and in the central jungles of the Atlantic and Pacific coasts.

  20. School food in Mexican children.

    PubMed

    Lozada, Michelle; Sánchez-Castillo, Claudia P; Cabrera, Georgina A; Mata, Irma I; Pichardo-Ontiveros, Edgar; Villa, Antonio R; James, W Philip T

    2008-09-01

    To establish the school eating habits of Mexican children, who are prone to obesity and later to high rates of adult chronic diseases. Questionnaires for students and parents with staff questionnaires and interviews. Randomly sampled schools in a socio-economically representative district of Mexico City. Subjects were 1504 adolescents aged 10-19 years attending schools in Mexico City, 27 teachers and seven headmasters, sampled from both public and private schools and from the full range of socio-economic groups. Foods brought from home were of a higher nutritional quality than those purchased at school, where purchases were dominated by crisps, soft drinks and other items with high energy density. Girls were more inclined to purchase inappropriately; those from poorer homes purchased less. Private-school students irrespective of socio-economic grade brought more food from home and purchased more expensive food at school. School policies allowed food and drink vendors to market any products within the schools, which benefited financially from these activities. Current school food policies are conducive to amplifying the current epidemic of obesity and related adult chronic diseases, and need to change.

  1. Mexican plants and human fertility.

    PubMed

    Crabbe, P

    1979-07-01

    Synthetic steroids are obtainable cheaply and in abundance from sapogenins, substances originating from plants of the Discorea family. Some 40 years ago, Russell Marker, an American chemist, discovered this source, which grows abundantly in Mexican jungles and is now exploited and cultivated commercially. Today synthetic steroids prepared from extracts from a wide range of vegetable sources are used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, allergies, inflammatory diseases, sterility, and various heart conditions, and form the basis of modern oral contraceptives. Nevertheless, oral contraceptives in current use are still fairly costly, and women have to be educated in their use. What is needed urgently is a cheaper contraceptive pill with a long-term effect, and research is continuing. For example, scientists from the People's Republic of China have reported significant anti-fertility effects associated with 2 substances, anordin and dinordin, prepared with steroids derived from the sisal plants Agave sisilana and Agave americana. These agents, whose anti-fertility properties have been confirmed by scientists in Sweden and the United States, constitute a new family of contraceptives with the great advantage of having to be taken only once or twice instead of 20 times per month necessary with the ordinary pill. Also from China, scientists have reported the effectiveness of gossypol as an orally administered male contraceptive, although gossypol is not a steroid. It may become, however, a leading candidate for a male contraceptive.

  2. Mexican Space Weather Service (SCIESMEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Esparza, A.; De la Luz, V.; Mejia-Ambriz, J. C.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Corona-Romero, P.; Gonzalez, L. X.

    2015-12-01

    Recent modifications of the Civil Protection Law in Mexico include now specific mentions to space hazards and space weather phenomena. During the last few years, the UN has promoted international cooperation on Space Weather awareness, studies and monitoring. Internal and external conditions motivated the creation of a Space Weather Service in Mexico (SCIESMEX). The SCIESMEX (www.sciesmex.unam.mx) is operated by the Geophysics Institute at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). The UNAM has the experience of operating several critical national services, including the National Seismological Service (SSN); besides that has a well established scientific group with expertise in space physics and solar- terrestrial phenomena. The SCIESMEX is also related with the recent creation of the Mexican Space Agency (AEM). The project combines a network of different ground instruments covering solar, interplanetary, geomagnetic, and ionospheric observations. The SCIESMEX has already in operation computing infrastructure running the web application, a virtual observatory and a high performance computing server to run numerical models. SCIESMEX participates in the International Space Environment Services (ISES) and in the Inter-progamme Coordination Team on Space Weather (ICTSW) of the Word Meteorological Organization (WMO).

  3. MEXICAN-AMERICAN STUDY PROJECT. ADVANCE REPORT 2, MEXICAN IMMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES--THE RECORD AND ITS IMPLICATIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GREBLER, LEO; AND OTHERS

    THIS PRELIMINARY REPORT DESCRIBES THAT PHASE OF THE UCLA MEXICAN-AMERICAN STUDY PROJECT WHICH CONCERNS THE IMMIGRATION PROCESS OF MEXICANS TO THE UNITED STATES. STATISTICS ARE PRESENTED ABOUT--(1) THE VOLUME OF IMMIGRATION OVER THE YEARS, (2) THE SOCIO-ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF IMMIGRATING MEXICANS, (3) THE GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION OF MIGRANTS…

  4. A Six-Wave Study of the Consistency of Mexican/Mexican American Preadolescents' Lifetime Substance Use Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagstaff, David A.; Kulis, Stephen; Elek, Elvira

    2009-01-01

    In the Fall of 2004, 1,948 5th grade students from Phoenix, AZ enrolled in an evaluation of a school-based, substance use prevention intervention. To assess the consistency of Mexican and Mexican-American students' self-reports of lifetime substance use, the present study analyzed data reported by 1,418 students who reported Mexican ancestry and…

  5. A Six-Wave Study of the Consistency of Mexican/Mexican American Preadolescents' Lifetime Substance Use Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagstaff, David A.; Kulis, Stephen; Elek, Elvira

    2009-01-01

    In the Fall of 2004, 1,948 5th grade students from Phoenix, AZ enrolled in an evaluation of a school-based, substance use prevention intervention. To assess the consistency of Mexican and Mexican-American students' self-reports of lifetime substance use, the present study analyzed data reported by 1,418 students who reported Mexican ancestry and…

  6. Craniofacial Secular Change in Recent Mexican Migrants.

    PubMed

    Spradley, Katherine; Stull, Kyra E; Hefner, Joseph T

    2016-01-01

    Research by economists suggests that recent Mexican migrants are better educated and have higher socioeconomic status (SES) than previous migrants. Because factors associated with higher SES and improved education can lead to positive secular changes in overall body form, secular changes in the craniofacial complex were analyzed within a recent migrant group from Mexico. The Mexican group represents individuals in the act of migration, not yet influenced by the American environment, and thus can serve as a starting point for future studies of secular change in this population group. The excavation of a historic Hispanic cemetery in Tucson, Arizona, also allows for a comparison between historic Hispanics and recent migrants to explore craniofacial trends over a broad time period, as both groups originate from Mexico. The present research addresses two main questions: (1) Are cranial secular changes evident in recent Mexican migrants? (2) Are historic Hispanics and recent Mexican migrants similar? By studying secular changes within a migrant population group, secular trends may be detected, which will be important for understanding the biological variation of the migrants themselves and will serve as a preliminary investigation of secular change within Mexican migrants. The comparison of a sample of recent Mexican migrants with a historic Hispanic sample, predominantly of Mexican origin, allows us to explore morphological similarities and differences between early and recent Mexicans within the United States. Vault and face size and a total of 82 craniofacial interlandmark distances were used to explore secular changes within the recent Mexican migrants (females, n = 38; males, n = 178) and to explore the morphological similarities between historic Hispanics (females, n = 54; males, n = 58) and recent migrants. Sexes were separated, and multivariate adaptive regression splines and basis splines (quadratic with one knot) were used to assess the direction and magnitude

  7. Chemical constituents of red Mexican propolis.

    PubMed

    Lotti, Cinzia; Campo Fernandez, Mercedes; Piccinelli, Anna Lisa; Cuesta-Rubio, Osmany; Márquez Hernández, Ingrid; Rastrelli, Luca

    2010-02-24

    Chemical investigation of a red-type Mexican propolis sample has led to the isolation of three new compounds, 1-(3',4'-dihydroxy-2'-methoxyphenyl)-3-(phenyl)propane (1), (Z)-1-(2'-methoxy-4',5'-dihydroxyphenyl)-2-(3-phenyl)propene (2) and 3-hydroxy-5,6-dimethoxyflavan (3), together with seven known flavanones, isoflavans, and pterocarpans. Structural determination, was accomplished by spectroscopic analysis, particularly 2D NMR and ESI-MS/MS techniques. The present study appears to be the first report on the occurrence of isoflavonoids in Mexican propolis. In addition, the presence of compounds with a 1,3-diarylpropane and 1,3-diarylpropene carbon skeleton were found for the first time in propolis. Isolated compounds 1-10 indicated the possible relation between red Mexican propolis and the genus Dalbergia.

  8. [Echinoderms (Echinodermata) of the Mexican Caribbean].

    PubMed

    Laguarda-Figueras, Alfredo; Solis-Marín, Francisco A; Durán-González, Alicia; Ahearn, Cynthia Gust; Buitrón Sánchez, Blanca Estela; Torres-Vega, Juan

    2005-12-01

    A systematic list of the echinoderms of the Mexican Caribbean based on museum specimens of the Colección Nacional de Equinodermos, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. is presented. This list reveals an important echinoderm biodiversity in the Mexican Caribbean, where five of the six echinoderm classes are represented. A total of 178 echinoderm species is recorded, distributed in 113 genera, 51 families and 22 orders. 30 new records for the Mexican Caribbean are presents: Crínoidea (three), Asteroidea (two), Ophiuroidea (eleven), Echinoidea (one), Holothuroidea (thirteen).

  9. The earnings of Mexican immigrants in the United States.

    PubMed

    Borjas, G J

    1996-10-01

    "This paper documents the trends in the earnings of Mexican immigrants during the 1970-1990 period. The empirical evidence indicates that there has been a decline in the relative wage of successive Mexican immigrant waves in the past three decades and that little wage convergence occurs between the typical Mexican immigrant and the typical native worker. The data also suggest that the increasing importance of Mexican immigration is partly responsible for the deterioration in relative skills observed in the aggregate immigrant population, but that there has also been a decline in relative skills even among non-Mexican immigrants."

  10. Chemical-reaction model for Mexican wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2003-05-01

    We present a chemical-reaction model to describe the Mexican wave ( La Ola) in football stadia. The spectator's action is described in terms of chemical reactions. The model is governed by three reaction rates k 1, k 2, and k3. We study the nonlinear waves on one- and two-dimensional lattices. The Mexican wave is formulated as a clockwise forwardly propagating wave. Waves are growing or disappear, depending on the values of reaction rates. In the specific case of k1= k2= k3=1, the nonlinear-wave equation produces a propagating pulse like soliton.

  11. The Mexican American Cultural Values scales for Adolescents and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Knight, George P.; Gonzales, Nancy A.; Saenz, Delia S.; Bonds, Darya D.; Germán, Miguelina; Deardorff, Julianna; Roosa, Mark W.; Updegraff, Kimberly A.

    2009-01-01

    This research evaluates the properties of a measure of culturally linked values of Mexican Americans in early adolescence and adulthood. The items measure were derived from qualitative data provided by focus groups in which Mexican Americans’ (adolescents, mothers and fathers) perceptions of key values were discussed. The focus groups and a preliminary item refinement resulted in the fifty-item Mexican American Cultural Values Scales (identical for adolescents and adults) that includes nine value subscales. Analyses of data from two large previously published studies sampling Mexican American adolescents, mothers, and fathers provided evidence of the expected two correlated higher order factor structures, reliability, and construct validity of the subscales of the Mexican American Cultural Values Scales as indicators of values that are frequently associated with Mexican/Mexican American culture. The utility of this measure for use in longitudinal research, and in resolving some important theoretical questions regarding dual cultural adaptation, are discussed. PMID:20644653

  12. Canine parvovirus enteritis, canine distemper, and major histocompatibility complex genetic variation in Mexican wolves.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Philip W; Lee, Rhonda N; Buchanan, Colleen

    2003-10-01

    The endangered Mexican wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) was recently reintroduced into Arizona and New Mexico (USA). In 1999 and 2000, pups from three litters that were part of the reintroduction program died of either canine parvovirus or canine distemper. Overall, half (seven of 14) of the pups died of either canine parvovirus or canine distemper. The parents and their litters were analyzed for variation at the class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene DRB1. Similar MHC genes are related to disease resistance in other species. All six of the surviving pups genotyped for the MHC gene were heterozygous while five of the pups that died were heterozygous and one was homozygous. Resistance to pathogens is an important aspect of the management and long-term survival of endangered taxa, such as the Mexican wolf.

  13. Protective neighborhoods: neighborhood proportion of Mexican Americans and depressive symptoms in very old Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    Gerst, Kerstin; Miranda, Patricia Y; Eschbach, Karl; Sheffield, Kristin M; Peek, M Kristen; Markides, Kyriakos S

    2011-02-01

    Research indicates that neighborhood context can have a significant effect on the health of older adults. The evidence suggests that there may be physical health benefits afforded to Mexican Americans living in ethnically homogenous neighborhoods, despite the relatively high economic risk in such neighborhoods, but few studies have considered the effect of neighborhood ethnic density on mental health outcomes in older adults. This study evaluated the association between neighborhoods with a high proportion of Mexican Americans and depressive symptoms in very old Mexican Americans. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to examine data from Wave 5 (2004/05) of the Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly. Subjects included 1,875 community-dwelling Mexican Americans aged 75 and older living in 386 neighborhoods in five states in the southwestern United States (Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas). Depressive symptoms were measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (α=0.88). Results showed that, in very old men, there was a significant negative association between percentage of Mexican Americans in the neighborhood and depressive symptoms (P=.01). In women, the direction of the association was the same, but the effect was not significant. These findings suggest that the proportion of Mexican Americans in the neighborhood matter more for very old Mexican American men than women. Further research may inform screening and treatment for depressive symptoms based on differences in neighborhood composition. Recommendations include culturally customized programs that offer older Mexican Americans greater mobility and access to programs and opportunities in culturally identifiable neighborhoods.

  14. Food Acculturation Drives Dietary Differences among Mexicans, Mexican Americans, and Non-Hispanic Whites123

    PubMed Central

    Batis, Carolina; Hernandez-Barrera, Lucia; Barquera, Simon; Rivera, Juan A.; Popkin, Barry M.

    2011-01-01

    Our aim was to examine the effects of food acculturation on Mexican Americans’ (MA) diets, taking the Mexican diet as reference. We used nationally representative samples of children (2–11 y) and female adolescents and adults (12–49 y) from the Mexican National Nutrition Survey 1999 and NHANES 1999–2006 to compare the diets of Mexicans (n = 5678), MA born in Mexico (MAMX) (n = 1488), MA born in the United States (MAUS) (n = 3654), and non-Hispanic white Americans (NH-White) (n = 5473). One 24-h diet recall was used to examine the percentage consuming and percentage energy consumed from selected food groups. Most of the food groups analyzed displayed a fairly linear increase or decrease in percent energy/capita intake in this order: Mexican, MAMX, MAUS, NH-White. However, few significant differences were observed among the US subpopulations, especially among MAUS and NH-Whites. Overall, compared to Mexicans, the US subpopulations had greater intakes of saturated fat, sugar, dessert and salty snacks, pizza and French fries, low-fat meat and fish, high-fiber bread, and low-fat milk, as well as decreased intakes of corn tortillas, low-fiber bread, high-fat milk, and Mexican fast food. Furthermore, the patterns were similar in all age groups. Although we found a mix of positive and negative aspects of food acculturation, the overall proportion of energy obtained from unhealthy foods was higher among the US subpopulations. Our findings indicate that within one generation in the US, the influence of the Mexican diet is almost lost. In addition, our results reinforce the need to discourage critical unhealthful components of the American diet among MA. PMID:21880951

  15. Subjective Social Status, Mental and Psychosocial Health, and Birth Weight Differences in Mexican-American and Mexican Immigrant Women.

    PubMed

    Fleuriet, K Jill; Sunil, T S

    2015-12-01

    Recent Mexican immigrant women on average have an unexpectedly low incidence of low birth weight (LBW). Birth weights decline and LBW incidence increases in post-immigrant generations. This pilot project tested the hypothesis that subjective social status (SSS) of pregnant women predicts variation in birth weight between Mexican immigrant and Mexican-American women. 300 low-income pregnant Mexican immigrant and Mexican-American women in South Texas were surveyed for SSS, depression, pregnancy-related anxiety, perceived social stress and self-esteem and subsequent birth weight. No significant difference in SSS levels between pregnant Mexican immigrant and Mexican-American women were found. However, SSS better predicted variation in birth weight across both groups than mental and psychosocial health variables. Results suggest distinct relationships among SSS, mental and psychosocial health that could impact birth weight. They underscore the relevance of a multilevel, biopsychosocial analytical framework to studying LBW.

  16. Susceptibility background for type 2 diabetes in eleven Mexican Indigenous populations: HNF4A gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Granados-Silvestre, M A; Ortiz-López, M G; Granados, J; Canizales-Quinteros, S; Peñaloza-Espinosa, Rosenda I; Lechuga, C; Acuña-Alonzo, V; Sánchez-Pozos, K; Menjivar, M

    2017-07-07

    The genetic risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D) increases in parallel with the proportion of Native American ancestry. Mestizo Mexicans have a 70% Native Amerindian genetic background. The T130I polymorphism in the HNF4A gene has been associated with early-onset T2D in mestizo Mexicans. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the frequency and relationship of the T130I variant in the HNF4A gene with risk factors for developing T2D in eleven indigenous groups from Mexico. In two groups, all exons of the HNF4A gene were directly sequenced; in the remaining the T130I polymorphism was analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Ancestry informative markers were assessed to confirm the Amerindian component. An additional analysis of EHH was carried out. Interestingly, HNF4A gene screening revealed only the presence of the T130I polymorphism. The range frequency of the risk allele (T) in the indigenous groups was from 2.7 to 16%. Genotypic frequencies (T130I/I130I) were higher and significantly different from those of all of the populations included in the HapMap Project (P < 0.005). EHH scores suggest a positive selection for T130I polymorphism. Metabolic traits indicate a relationship between the T130I/I130I genotypes with high triglyceride concentrations in the indigenous groups (P < 0.005). These results strongly suggest that the high frequency of the T130I polymorphism and its biological relationship with dysfunction in lipid metabolism in Mexican indigenous groups is a risk factor for the developing of T2D in Mexicans.

  17. Higher risk for obesity among Mexican-American and Mexican immigrant children and adolescents than among peers in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Valero, María A; Bustamante-Montes, L Patricia; Hernández, Mike; Halley-Castillo, Elizabeth; Wilkinson, Anna V; Bondy, Melissa L; Olvera, Norma

    2012-08-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional study among 1,717 children and adolescents of Mexican origin ages 5-19 years living in Mexico and Texas to explore the influence of country of birth and country of longest residence on their overweight and obesity status. Descriptive statistics were used to compare demographic and anthropometric characteristics of participants born and raised in Mexico (Mexicans), born in Mexico and raised in the United States (Mexican immigrants), and born and raised in the United States (Mexican-Americans). Univariate and multivariate nominal logistic regression was used to determine the demographic predictors of obesity adjusted by country of birth, country of residence, age, and gender. Almost half (48.8%) of the Mexican-Americans and 43.2% of the Mexican immigrants had body mass index at the 85th percentile or above, compared to only 29.3% of the Mexicans (P < .001). Thus, Mexican-Americans and Mexican immigrants were more likely to be obese than their Mexican peers [Mexican-Americans: odds ratio (OR) = 2.5 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.8-3.4); Mexican immigrants: OR = 2.2 (95% CI 1.6-3.0)]. In addition, males were more likely than females to be obese [OR = 1.6 (95% CI 1.2-2.1)], and adolescents 15-19 years of age were less likely than their younger counterparts [OR = 0.5 (95% CI 0.4-0.7)] to be obese. The high prevalence of obesity among children of Mexican origin in the United States is of great concern and underscores the urgent need to develop and implement obesity preventive interventions targeting younger children of Mexican origin, especially newly arrived immigrant children. In addition, future obesity research should take into consideration the country of origin of the study population to develop more culturally specific obesity interventions.

  18. Civic Engagement Patterns of Undocumented Mexican Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, William; Espinoza, Roberta; Ramos, Karina; Coronado, Heidi; Cortes, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the civic engagement of undocumented Mexican students. Civic engagement was defined as providing a social service, activism, tutoring, and functionary work. Survey data results (n = 126) suggest that despite high feelings of rejection because of their undocumented status, part-time employment, and household responsibilities,…

  19. Rio Grande Wetbacks: Mexican Migrant Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norquest, Carrol

    Farmers in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas saw a rise of wetback labor in the 1930s and 40s. The wetback laborers were Mexicans who had crossed the Rio Grande and were in the United States illegally to work. Carrol Norquest, a farmer in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, employed wetbacks regularly. In this book, Mr. Norquest writes about the…

  20. Black/Mexican-American Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston Council on Human Relations, TX.

    The Black/Mexican-American Project has two general goals congruent with the purpose of the Emergency School Assistance Program, under which it was funded: (1) to identify points of tension and cooperation between minority students in the Houston Independent School District; and (2) to suggest ways of improving relations between the minorities. So…

  1. Psychology for the Mexican or the Masses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz-Guerrero, Rogelio

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the impact of traditional cultural beliefs, called historic-sociocultural premises (HSCPs), on peoples' interpersonal and emotional lives. Results indicated that people in Mexican societies hold similar sociocultural premises and that HSCPs are related to how people cope with stress, personality traits, and vocational choice. (LLL)

  2. Activity patterns of nesting Mexican Spotted Owls

    Treesearch

    David K. Delaney; Teryl G. Grubb; Paul Beier

    1999-01-01

    We collected 2,665 hr of behavioral information using video surveillance on 19 Mexican Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis lucida) pairs between 25 April and 26 July 1996. Prey deliveries per day increased as the nesting season progressed, with an average of 2.68 prey deliveries during incubation, 4.10 items during brooding, and 4.51 items during the...

  3. Mexican-Americans in the Southwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galarza, Ernesto; And Others

    With findings as presented in this 1969 book, a 2-year field study conducted by a 3-member team analyzed the economic, cultural, political, and educational conditions of Mexican Americans in the Southwest (California, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Texas) with some reference to braceros and the situation in Mexico. An overview of 8 geographic…

  4. ESOL AND THE MEXICAN-AMERICAN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    REGAN, TIMOTHY F.; SCARTH, PETER

    CURRENTLY, FEDERAL AGENCIES AND VARIOUS STATE DEPARTMENTS OF EDUCATION ARE CONDUCTING LITERACY PROGRAMS AND PROGRAMS IN ESOL (ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES) FOR SOME 1,500,000 MEXICAN-AMERICAN MIGRANT WORKERS. TO A GREAT EXTENT THESE PROGRAMS HAVE BEEN TO SOME DEGREE UNSUCCESSFUL BECAUSE THEY HAVE DISREGARDED THE LEARNER'S PSYCHOLOGICAL…

  5. Socioeconomic differences in obesity among Mexican adolescents.

    PubMed

    Heidi Ullmann, S; Buttenheim, Alison M; Goldman, Noreen; Pebley, Anne R; Wong, Rebeca

    2011-06-01

    We investigate socioeconomic disparities in adolescent obesity in Mexico. Three questions are addressed. First, what is the social patterning of obesity among Mexican adolescents? Second, what are the separate and joint associations of maternal and paternal education with adolescent obesity net of household wealth? Third, are there differences in socioeconomic status (SES) gradients among Mexican boys and girls, rural residents and non-rural residents? Using data from the Mexican National Health Survey 2000 we examined the slope and direction of the association between SES and adolescent obesity. We also estimated models for sub-populations to examine differences in the social gradients in obesity by sex and non-rural residence. We find that household economic status (asset ownership and housing quality) is positively associated with adolescent obesity. High paternal education is related to lower obesity risk, whereas the association between maternal education and obesity is positive, but not always significant. The household wealth components of SES appear to predispose Mexican adolescents to higher obesity risk. The effects of parental education are more complex. These findings have important policy implications in Mexico and the United States.

  6. The Mexican American Heritage: With Writing Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez, Carlos M.

    Written by a Los Angeles history teacher frustrated by the lack of culturally relevant materials, this book covers some of the most interesting events in the history of Mexico and the heritage of Mexican Americans. Chapters are: (1) Indian Mexico (Teotihuacan, the Maya, the Toltecs, and the Aztecs); (2) La Conquista (Cortes and Moctezuma, conquest…

  7. The Mexican-Americans: An Awakening Minority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Servin, Manuel P.

    An anthology, the book attempts to trace and analyze the various aspects of the life and society of the Mexican American. It is not a mere collection of previously published papers or articles but includes selections from 6 new historical studies by trained historians and graduate students from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles.…

  8. Mexican-American: Movements and Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larralde, Carlos

    Biographical studies of 20 influential Chicano leaders trace Mexican American history from 1848 to the present. The book is organized chronologically by four historical periods: (1) The Cortinista Movement, 1848-1876; (2) The Teresita Movement, 1888-1905; (3) The Magonista Movement, 1904-1919; and (4) The Chicano Activists, 1920 ;o the present.…

  9. An International Student's Guide to Mexican Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Alan, Ed.; Salazar, Sylvia Ortega, Ed.

    This guide for students interested in studying at Mexican universities covers 50 universities including all state universities, the National University of Mexico, as well as a representative selection of the leading private universities. Introductory material provides a brief history of Mexico, a discussion of differences from and similarities to…

  10. The Mexican American Child in Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Richard Fajardo

    The over-representation of minority group children, particularly Mexican Americans, in special education has been well documented. The use of standardized, norm-referenced, psychological assessment measures has created obstacles to the advancement of minority group individuals in American society. This is especially true since results from such…

  11. Human Services for Mexican-American Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tijerina, Andres A., Comp.

    A compilation of five readings uses the Chicano perspective to analyze the interaction between Mexican American families, their children, and the institutions charged with the child welfare concerns of the society, and to attempt to reverse the existing negative and destructive views that lead to insensitive and ineffective services. A variety of…

  12. Validating the Mexican American Intergenerational Caregiving Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escandon, Socorro

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to substantiate and further develop a previously formulated conceptual model of Role Acceptance in Mexican American family caregivers by exploring the theoretical strengths of the model. The sample consisted of women older than 21 years of age who self-identified as Hispanic, were related through consanguinal or…

  13. A Documentary History of the Mexican Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moquin, Wayne, Ed.; Van Doren, Charles, Ed.

    A documentary history of the Mexican Americans from 1536 to 1970 is presented in this book consisting of 65 documents arranged chronologically and divided into 5 main chapters that deal with the periods of (1) the Spanish rule, (2) Mexico's rule over the Southwest, (3) the Anglo American take-over of the Southwest and its integration into the…

  14. Educating for Bilinguals in Mexican Transnational Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Patrick H.; Martinez-Leon, Natalia

    2003-01-01

    Describes the educational situation facing "retornado" families and children, Mexican transnational immigrants moving between New York City and Puebla, Mexico. Examines factors underlying the current lack of first language and second language instruction for the Spanish-English bilinguals returning to live in Mexico. Offers suggestions…

  15. Profile of the Mexican American Woman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotera, Martha

    The second largest group of minority women in the U.S., Mexican American women share multitudinous histories, vast differences in lifestyles, experiences and realities. A Chicana may have recently arrived from Mexico, or her ancestors may have been in the Southwest since 1520 (or before) or in the Midwest since the 1880's. She may be rural, urban,…

  16. The Mexican-American and Dramatic Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serrano, Hector M.

    In the area of the arts, the Mexican American has discovered a rich cultural heritage which gives him a strong sense of pride and a deep feeling of satisfaction. A new interest in the literature of Mexico and the Southwestern states of Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and California has started the Chicano people reading classic and modern…

  17. Conflict Resolution between Mexican Origin Adolescent Siblings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killoren, Sarah E.; Thayer, Shawna M.; Updegraff, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated correlates of adolescents' sibling conflict resolution strategies in 246, two-parent Mexican origin families. Specifically, we examined links between siblings' conflict resolution strategies and sibling dyad characteristics, siblings' cultural orientations and values, and sibling relationship qualities. Data were gathered during…

  18. Family Attitudes and Mexican Male Homosexuality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrier, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Given the family grasp on single males and the relatively late age at marriage it seems clear that the attitudes and behavior of the "mestizoized" Mexican family toward homosexuality play an important role in shaping the behavior of family members who are homosexually active. (Author)

  19. A Critical Bibliography of Mexican American Proverbs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arora, Shirley L.

    1982-01-01

    The 19-item bibliography surveys the compilations of Mexican-American proverbs published to date and describes each entry (categorized by region--California, New Mexico, Texas, Mexico) in terms of type and quantity of material included, presence or absence of interpretive comments or translations, sources, organization, and accuracy of…

  20. An International Student's Guide to Mexican Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Alan, Ed.; Salazar, Sylvia Ortega, Ed.

    This guide for students interested in studying at Mexican universities covers 50 universities including all state universities, the National University of Mexico, as well as a representative selection of the leading private universities. Introductory material provides a brief history of Mexico, a discussion of differences from and similarities to…

  1. Educational Research and the Mexican American Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Juan M., Ed.; Merino, Rene A., Ed.

    1991-01-01

    This annual theme issue is devoted to articles on educational research pertaining to the Mexican American child. In addition, there is an article proposing strategies for recruiting Hispanics in teacher education, and a poem recalling a childhood experience. Titles and authors are: (1) "Motivation for Learning English: Differences Between Non- and…

  2. Conflict Resolution between Mexican Origin Adolescent Siblings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killoren, Sarah E.; Thayer, Shawna M.; Updegraff, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated correlates of adolescents' sibling conflict resolution strategies in 246, two-parent Mexican origin families. Specifically, we examined links between siblings' conflict resolution strategies and sibling dyad characteristics, siblings' cultural orientations and values, and sibling relationship qualities. Data were gathered during…

  3. Mexican-American Bibliography. Bilingual Bicultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trueba, Henry T.

    Three hundred and six books and articles published between 1919 and 1973 are listed in this bibliography covering Mexican Americans and bilingual bicultural education. It is divided into 3 major sections: (1) social sciences, (2) education, and (3) bibliographies. The works deal with history, sociology, anthropology, economics, linguistics,…

  4. Psychology for the Mexican or the Masses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz-Guerrero, Rogelio

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the impact of traditional cultural beliefs, called historic-sociocultural premises (HSCPs), on peoples' interpersonal and emotional lives. Results indicated that people in Mexican societies hold similar sociocultural premises and that HSCPs are related to how people cope with stress, personality traits, and vocational choice. (LLL)

  5. Mexican Trends: The Next Five Years,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-12

    administration/- ENA/Paris, background in SHCP, IMSS , CONASUPO, Diconsa, SPP, father was governor of Hidalgo) Secretary General: Deputy Irma CUE Sarquis (b...IEPES - Institute for Social, Political, & Economic Studies IMSS - Mexican Social Security Institute NYU - New York University PAN - National Action

  6. Learning to Write in a Mexican School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teague, Brad L.; Smith, Patrick H.; Jiménez, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    This study documented the writing practices of students in a Mexican elementary school and identified participants' attitudes toward different forms of writing. Data included observations in two classrooms as well as interviews with six case-study children and their parents. Results revealed copious writing in the school including dictations,…

  7. Feminism and Mexican American Adolescent Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Lisa Y.; Carrubba, Maria D.; Good, Glenn E.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Feminist Identity Development Scale (FIDS) and the Attitudes Toward Feminism and the Womens Movement Scale (FWM) with 389 Mexican American 11th-grade and 12th-grade women. Results indicated internal consistency coefficients of .61, .62, .76, and .77 for the FIDS Passive Acceptance, Revelation,…

  8. CONSUMER EDUCATION FOR MEXICAN-AMERICANS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GROMATZKY, IRENE

    CONSUMER EDUCATION PROGRAMS IN SCHOOLS AND COMMUNITIES WERE ALWAYS MEANT TO BE AVAILABLE TO ALL INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES. HOWEVER, THOSE WITH THE GREATEST FINANCIAL NEED, INCLUDING MANY MEXICAN AMERICANS, OFTEN RECEIVE THE LEAST AMOUNT OF ASSISTANCE, DUE TO THE LACK OF SKILLED PERSONS TO BREAK THROUGH COMMUNICATION BARRIERS. WHILE PLANNING…

  9. Cholas, Mexican-American Girls, and Gangs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Mary G.

    1994-01-01

    Interviews with 21 present and former female gang members illustrate the lives of Mexican American girls in the gang milieu of the San Fernando Valley (Los Angeles, California). Gang structure, activities, and reasons for joining are discussed, along with the gang as a source of support. (SLD)

  10. Coping with Discrimination among Mexican Descent Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Lisa M.; Romero, Andrea J.

    2008-01-01

    The current research is designed to explore the relationship among discrimination stress, coping strategies, and self-esteem among Mexican descent youth (N = 73, age 11-15 years). Results suggest that primary control engagement and disengagement coping strategies are positively associated with discrimination stress. Furthermore, self-esteem is…

  11. Coping with Discrimination among Mexican Descent Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Lisa M.; Romero, Andrea J.

    2008-01-01

    The current research is designed to explore the relationship among discrimination stress, coping strategies, and self-esteem among Mexican descent youth (N = 73, age 11-15 years). Results suggest that primary control engagement and disengagement coping strategies are positively associated with discrimination stress. Furthermore, self-esteem is…

  12. The Mexican American Heritage: With Writing Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez, Carlos M.

    Written by a Los Angeles history teacher frustrated by the lack of culturally relevant materials, this book covers some of the most interesting events in the history of Mexico and the heritage of Mexican Americans. Chapters are: (1) Indian Mexico (Teotihuacan, the Maya, the Toltecs, and the Aztecs); (2) La Conquista (Cortes and Moctezuma, conquest…

  13. Young Mexicans with a Spanish Heart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyerratken, Leila

    2005-01-01

    The author, a teacher at an Indiana middle school, describes how her Mexican ESL students took a stand and helped make a statement against racism. These students, who had a fascination with Asian culture, were indignant when they read an article about a street in Texas called "Jap Road." Adamant that the road name should be changed, the…

  14. Educational Research and the Mexican American Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Juan M., Ed.; Merino, Rene A., Ed.

    1991-01-01

    This annual theme issue is devoted to articles on educational research pertaining to the Mexican American child. In addition, there is an article proposing strategies for recruiting Hispanics in teacher education, and a poem recalling a childhood experience. Titles and authors are: (1) "Motivation for Learning English: Differences Between Non- and…

  15. Socioeconomic differences in obesity among Mexican adolescents

    PubMed Central

    ULLMANN, S. HEIDI; BUTTENHEIM, ALISON M.; GOLDMAN, NOREEN; PEBLEY, ANNE R.; WONG, REBECA

    2012-01-01

    Objective We investigate socioeconomic disparities in adolescent obesity in Mexico. Three questions are addressed. First, what is the social patterning of obesity among Mexican adolescents? Second, what are the separate and joint associations of maternal and paternal education with adolescent obesity net of household wealth? Third, are there differences in socioeconomic status (SES) gradients among Mexican boys and girls, rural residents and non-rural residents? Methods Using data from the Mexican National Health Survey 2000 we examined the slope and direction of the association between SES and adolescent obesity. We also estimated models for sub-populations to examine differences in the social gradients in obesity by sex and non-rural residence. Results We find that household economic status (asset ownership and housing quality) is positively associated with adolescent obesity. High paternal education is related to lower obesity risk, whereas the association between maternal education and obesity is positive, but not always significant. Conclusion The household wealth components of SES appear to predispose Mexican adolescents to higher obesity risk. The effects of parental education are more complex. These findings have important policy implications in Mexico and the United States. PMID:20883181

  16. Barreda, Vasconcelos, and Mexican Educational Reforms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skirius, John

    1983-01-01

    Reviews the contributions to Mexican education of Gabino Barredas' positivism between 1867-1898 and the contributions of Jose Vasconcelos during the 1920s. Discusses the secondary curriculum reforms of Barreda's era and the vocational education and the education for women and adults during the Vasconcelos era. (SB)

  17. Educating for Bilinguals in Mexican Transnational Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Patrick H.; Martinez-Leon, Natalia

    2003-01-01

    Describes the educational situation facing "retornado" families and children, Mexican transnational immigrants moving between New York City and Puebla, Mexico. Examines factors underlying the current lack of first language and second language instruction for the Spanish-English bilinguals returning to live in Mexico. Offers suggestions…

  18. Rio Grande Wetbacks: Mexican Migrant Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norquest, Carrol

    Farmers in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas saw a rise of wetback labor in the 1930s and 40s. The wetback laborers were Mexicans who had crossed the Rio Grande and were in the United States illegally to work. Carrol Norquest, a farmer in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, employed wetbacks regularly. In this book, Mr. Norquest writes about the…

  19. The Undocumented Mexican Worker: A Social Problem?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baca-Ramirez, Reynaldo; Bryan, Dexter Edward

    1980-01-01

    Although presented by the press as a new phenomenon, the presence of undocumented Mexican workers in the United States is deeply rooted in history. While current policies tend to view illegal immigration as a social problem, the phenomenon persists because it benefits, politically and economically, both Mexico and the U.S. (Author/GC)

  20. 47 CFR 22.957 - Mexican condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.957 Mexican condition. Pursuant to an agreement between the United States and Mexico, FCC authorizations for cellular systems within 72 kilometers (45 miles) of the United... condition that, in the event cellular systems using the same frequencies granted herein are authorized in...

  1. Mexican Americans: Sons of the Southwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Ruth S.

    Concerned with the Mexican Americans, who constitute the largest ethnic group in the southwestern United States, this book traces the history of these people from the early explorations and colonizing efforts of the Spanish in North and South America during the 16th century to the present. Major divisions of this book are the Introduction,…

  2. Exclusive Breastfeeding Experiences among Mexican American Women.

    PubMed

    Wambach, Karen; Domian, Elaine Williams; Page-Goertz, Sallie; Wurtz, Heather; Hoffman, Kelli

    2016-02-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hispanic breastfeeding mothers begin early formula supplementation at higher rates than other ethnic groups, which can lead to shorter breastfeeding duration and decreased exclusive breastfeeding. Acculturation, the process of adopting beliefs and behaviors of another culture, appears to influence breastfeeding practices of Hispanic women in the United States. Little is known about Mexican American mothers' formula use and exclusive breastfeeding within the context of acculturation. Our study identified perceived benefits and barriers to exclusive breastfeeding and levels of acculturation among Mexican American women living in a Midwestern city. We used a qualitative descriptive design integrating Pender's Health Promotion Model concepts. Individual interviews were conducted in English or Spanish (N = 21). The revised Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans was used to examine acculturation levels. Acculturation scores indicated that the majority (66%) of the sample was "very Mexican oriented." Most women exclusively breastfed, with a few using early supplementation for "insufficient milk production." Three themes emerged: (1) It is natural that a woman give life and also provide the best food for her baby; (2) Breastfeeding is ultimately a woman's decision but is influenced by tradition, guidance, and encouragement; and (3) Breast milk is superior but life circumstances can challenge one's ability to breastfeed. Strong familial/cultural traditions supported and normalized breastfeeding. Barriers to exclusive breastfeeding were similar to breastfeeding women in general, in the United States. Findings support the need for culturally competent and individualized lactation care. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Barreda, Vasconcelos, and Mexican Educational Reforms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skirius, John

    1983-01-01

    Reviews the contributions to Mexican education of Gabino Barredas' positivism between 1867-1898 and the contributions of Jose Vasconcelos during the 1920s. Discusses the secondary curriculum reforms of Barreda's era and the vocational education and the education for women and adults during the Vasconcelos era. (SB)

  4. Cultural Challenges Faced by Mexican Immigrant Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zugel, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This purpose of this investigation is to explore the cultural challenges faced by Mexican immigrant students through the study of current literature. Four themes emerged as a result of the investigation: dominant pedagogy, educational skills, deficit model, and student identities. The themes are discussed and suggestions are made as to how these…

  5. Mexican-American: Movements and Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larralde, Carlos

    Biographical studies of 20 influential Chicano leaders trace Mexican American history from 1848 to the present. The book is organized chronologically by four historical periods: (1) The Cortinista Movement, 1848-1876; (2) The Teresita Movement, 1888-1905; (3) The Magonista Movement, 1904-1919; and (4) The Chicano Activists, 1920 ;o the present.…

  6. Treatment Acceptability among Mexican American Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borrego, Joaquin, Jr.; Ibanez, Elizabeth S.; Spendlove, Stuart J.; Pemberton, Joy R.

    2007-01-01

    There is a void in the literature with regard to Hispanic parents' views about common interventions for children with behavior problems. The purpose of this study was to examine the treatment acceptability of child management techniques in a Mexican American sample. Parents' acculturation was also examined to determine if it would account for…

  7. Open Access to Mexican Academic Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adame, Silvia I.; Llorens, Luis

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a description of the metadata harvester software development. This system provides access to reliable and quality educational resources, shared by Mexican Universities through their repositories, to anyone with Internet Access. We present the conceptual and contextual framework, followed by the technical basis, the results and…

  8. The Mexican American Woman and Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Guadalupe

    For a long time Chicanas have been self-denying, self sacrificing. Well, it is time that Mexican American women began thinking of themselves. It follows that if women love and cherish others, they must begin by loving and cherishing themselves. From the mental health perspective it is essential that they do so, not only for their sake, but for…

  9. The Mexican-American and Dramatic Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serrano, Hector M.

    In the area of the arts, the Mexican American has discovered a rich cultural heritage which gives him a strong sense of pride and a deep feeling of satisfaction. A new interest in the literature of Mexico and the Southwestern states of Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and California has started the Chicano people reading classic and modern…

  10. Underreporting of Food Intake among Mexican/Mexican-American Women: Rates and Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Guadalupe X.; Conway, Terry L.; Rock, Cheryl L.; Gallo, Linda C.; Elder, John P.

    2009-01-01

    Background Underreporters are those individuals who report a dietary intake level that is not biologically plausible given their physiological status and physical activity level. Underreporting of food intake threatens the validity of dietary assessment; yet, little is known about the prevalence or correlates of underreporting in the Mexican/Mexican-American community. Objective To examine underreporting rates and correlates among Mexican/Mexican-American women using dietary data based on repeated 24-hour recalls and the Goldberg equation. Design Cross-sectional study of baseline data collected as part of a larger randomized controlled trial through structured interviews and anthropometrics measurements. Subjects/setting A random sample of 357 Mexican/Mexican-American women, ranging in age from 21 to 67 years, living in south San Diego near the U.S./Mexico border. Statistical analyses performed Age, income level, education level, and weight status, all correlates of underreporting in samples of non-Hispanic white participants, were examined as potential correlates of underreporting among Mexican/Mexican-American women using binary logistic regression. Acculturation was examined to determine if it accounted for additional variance in underreporting. Finally, multivariate analyses using backward stepwise regression were conducted to determine which correlates remained significant in the final model. Results Rates of underreporting varied across the five detection methods employed, from 11.9% (n=42) to 81.3% (n=286). Obese weight status was the only significant correlate across all five underreporting detection methods and remained significant in the final model. Using backward stepwise regression, the final model showed weight status to be a significant correlate of underreporting both at the overweight (p<0.05) and obese levels (p<0.01). In addition, Anglo orientation score (p<0.05) remained significant in the final model, as well as the age group of 51 years or

  11. Inflammatory mediators and immune response in Mexican adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pardo Morales, R V; Zúñiga Torres, Ma G; Martínez Carrillo, B E; Gómez Martínez, S; Marcos, A; Valdés Ramos, R

    2011-01-01

    Low-grade inflammation and increased immunity related to cardiovascular diseases have been described in children and adults, however, studies in Mexican adolescents are being done at present. To evaluate inflammatory proteins and indicators of immunity in adolescents by gender and body mass index. 115 Mexican adolescents, 15-18 years old (36 men), were divided into non-overweight, risk of overweight and overweight by CDC pediatric criteria by body mass index. Serum concentrations of ceruloplasmin, C3 and C4 were quantified by nephelometry; IL-6 and TNF-α from stimulated supernatant were analyzed with Human Th1-Th2 cytokine CBA II kit (BD Biosciences Pharmigen, San Diego, CA), and detected by flow cytometry. Data were analysed by Mann-Whitney U. Gender differences were found in C3 (men: median 118.8, mean rank: 41.0; women: median: 143.9, mean rank: 65.7, p=0.001) and ceruloplasmin (men: median: 31.01, mean rank: 47.06; women: median: 31.0, mean rank: 62.9, p=0.015). Differences by BMI were found in C3 (women non-overweight: median: 137.00 mena rank: 36.52; women with risk of overweight/overweight: median: 175.80, mean rank: 57.69, p=0.002) and C4 (men non-overweight: median: 23.40, mean rank: 16.60; men with risk of overweight/overweight: median: 26.40, mean rank: 26.36, p=0.028; women non-overweight: median: 24.25, mean rank: 37.16 and women with risk of overweight/overweight: median: 32.80, mean rank: 54.42, p=0.013). Inflammatory proteins are increased in adolescents with risk of overweight and overweight, particularly in women.

  12. Trajectories of Mexican American and mainstream cultural values among Mexican American adolescents.

    PubMed

    Knight, George P; Basilio, Camille D; Cham, Heining; Gonzales, Nancy A; Liu, Yu; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J

    2014-12-01

    Mexican Americans are one of the largest and fastest growing ethnic groups in the United States, yet we have limited knowledge regarding changes (i.e., developmental trajectories) in cultural orientation based upon their exposure to the Mexican American and mainstream cultures. We examined the parallel trajectories of Mexican American and mainstream cultural values in a sample of 749 Mexican American adolescents (49 % female) across assessments during the fifth grade (approximately 11 years of age), the seventh grade (approximately 13 years of age) and the tenth grade (approximately 16 years of age). We expected that these values would change over this developmental period and this longitudinal approach is more appropriate than the often used median split classification to identify distinct types of acculturation. We found four distinct acculturation trajectory groups: two trajectory groups that were increasing slightly with age in the endorsement of mainstream cultural values, one of which was relatively stable in Mexican American cultural values while the other was declining in their endorsement of these values; and two trajectory groups that were declining substantially with age in their endorsement of mainstream cultural values, one of which was also declining in Mexican American cultural values and the other which was stable in these values. These four trajectory groups differed in expected ways on a number of theoretically related cultural variables, but were not highly consistent with the median split classifications. The findings highlight the need to utilize longitudinal data to examine the developmental changes of Mexican American individual's adaptation to the ethnic and mainstream culture in order to understand more fully the processes of acculturation and enculturation.

  13. Trajectories of Mexican American and Mainstream Cultural Values Among Mexican American Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Knight, George P.; Basilio, Camille D.; Cham, Heining; Gonzales, Nancy A.; Liu, Yu; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J.

    2013-01-01

    Mexican Americans are one of the largest and fastest growing ethnic groups in the United States, yet we have limited knowledge regarding changes (i.e., developmental trajectories) in cultural orientation based upon their exposure to the Mexican American and mainstream cultures. We examined the parallel trajectories of Mexican American and mainstream cultural values in a sample of 749 Mexican American adolescents (49% female) across assessments during the fifth grade (approximately 11 years of age), the seventh grade (approximately 13 years of age) and the tenth grade (approximately 16 years of age). We expected that these values would change over this developmental period and this longitudinal approach is more appropriate than the often used median split classification to identify distinct types of acculturation. We found four distinct acculturation trajectory groups: two trajectory groups that were increasing slightly with age in the endorsement of mainstream cultural values, one of which was relatively stable in Mexican American cultural values while the other was declining in their endorsement of these values; and two trajectory groups that were declining substantially with age in their endorsement of mainstream cultural values, one of which was also declining in Mexican American cultural values and the other which was stable in these values. These four trajectory groups differed in expected ways on a number of theoretically related cultural variables, but were not highly consistent with the median split classifications. The findings highlight the need to utilize longitudinal data to examine the developmental changes of Mexican American individual’s adaptation to the ethnic and mainstream culture in order to understand more fully the processes of acculturation and enculturation. PMID:23877194

  14. [Assessment of surgical competence. A Mexican pilot study].

    PubMed

    Anaya-Prado, Roberto; Ortega-León, Luis Humberto; Ramirez-Solis, Mauro Eduardo; Vázquez-García, José Arturo; Medina-Portillo, Juan Bernardo; Ayala-López, Ernesto Alonso

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of technical dexterity is currently the weakest issue in surgical evaluation. It is imperative to develop an objective exam that allows us to correct training deficiencies and abilities and to objectively feedback education programs and hospitals. The purpose of this study was to perform a correlation between theoretical knowledge and surgical skills. We performed a national pilot study in in surgeons certifying by the Mexican Board of Surgery in 2010. This was a two-stage study: written exam (stage I) and oral exam (viva voce) to all surgeons approving the written exam (stage II). In stage II we utilized an objective structured assessment of technical skills (OSATS) whose results were correlated with those of the written and oral exams. The assessment involved seven skill stations and a global rating scale to indicate correctly performed or not and a fail/pass exam, respectively. Sixty-two surgeons approved the written exam in two places. We found no statistical difference among skills in open surgery (bowel anastomosis, liver and vascular suture), laparoscopic surgery (grape pilling, cutting a circle and intracorporeal knot tying) and instrument identification. There was a statistically significant difference (p <0.001) when median values were compared between laparoscopic surgery vs. open surgery and the identification of surgical instruments. There was a correlation between theoretical knowledge and surgical skills. When applying an OSATS, we found a positive correlation between theoretical knowledge and surgical skills. This assessment proves to to be valid and reliable for the evaluation of surgical dexterity.

  15. Mexican ceratopsids: Considerations on their diversity and biogeography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Sylva, Héctor E.; Frey, Eberhard; Stinnesbeck, Wolfgang; Guzmán-Gutiérrez, José Rubén; González-González, Arturo H.

    2017-04-01

    During the past decade, three taxa of ceratopsid ornithischians have been described from Mexico. Apparently, this group experienced a regional diversification in this area. To date Mexican Ceratopsia are represented by three species, one of which is a centrosaurine and two are chasmosaurines. Here we provide a critical review on Mexican ceratopsians and formally name a new centrosaurine ceratopsid species from the Campanian Aguja Formation as Yehuecauhceratops mudei. We also discuss possible causes for the rapid endemic diversification of Mexican ceratopsians.

  16. Macronutrient intakes among adult Hispanics: a comparison of Mexican Americans, Cuban Americans, and mainland Puerto Ricans.

    PubMed Central

    Loria, C M; Bush, T L; Carroll, M D; Looker, A C; McDowell, M A; Johnson, C L; Sempos, C T

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to compare energy and macronutrient intakes between adult Mexican Americans, Cuban Americans, mainland Puerto Ricans, and non-Hispanics. METHODS. Age-specific mean intakes were estimated based on 24-hour recalls from the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (HHANES) (1982 to 1984) and the Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II) (1976 to 1980) and were compared with the use of t tests. RESULTS. Mexican Americans had higher total fat, saturated fat, and monounsaturated fat intakes than did Puerto Ricans and older Cuban Americans. Cuban Americans and Puerto Ricans had similar intakes, except for younger Cuban Americans, who had higher total and saturated fat and lower carbohydrate intakes. Cholesterol intakes among Mexican American men and 60- to 74-year-old women were higher than those among other Hispanic groups. Carbohydrate and protein intakes were higher among Hispanic groups compared with those among non-Hispanics while total fat intakes were generally lower. CONCLUSIONS. Since macronutrient intakes differ between Hispanic groups, dietary research, recommendations, and interventions should be targeted to each group individually. Older Puerto Rican and Cuban American adults met population guidelines for reducing chronic disease risk for more macronutrients than any other group. PMID:7733429

  17. The relationship between Mexican American cultural values and resilience among Mexican American college students: a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Morgan Consoli, Melissa L; Llamas, Jasmin D

    2013-10-01

    The current study investigated the role of cultural values in the resilience of Mexican American college students. Utilizing mixed methodology, 124 self-identified Mexican American college students were asked to complete an online survey, including a demographic questionnaire, the Resilience Scale, Mexican American Cultural Values Scale, and 2 open-ended questions concerning overcoming adversity and cultural values. As hypothesized, Mexican American traditional cultural values (Familismo, Respeto, Religiosidad, and Traditional Gender Roles) predicted resilience, with Familismo accounting for the majority of the variance. Consensual qualitative research (Hill, Thompson, & Nutt Williams, 1997) was used to identify emergent domains and themes within the open-ended question responses. Traditional Mexican American Value themes included Familismo, Ethnic Identity, Religiosidad, Perseverance, and Respeto. Results highlight the important role that certain Mexican American cultural values play in providing strength for overcoming adversities.

  18. A population-based comparison of weight and weight perceptions among overweight and obese Mexican and Mexican-American men.

    PubMed

    Guendelman, Sylvia; Ritterman-Weintraub, Miranda Lucia; Fernald, Lia C Haskin; Kaufer-Horwitz, Martha

    2013-01-01

    To examine actual and perceived weight in national cohorts of Mexican-origin adult men in Mexico and the United States (US). We used the 2001-06 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the 2006 Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey. The prevalence of overweight or obesity (OO) in Mexicans was 65% and in Mexican-Americans was 72%. OO Mexican-American men were more likely than OO Mexican men (56 vs. 49%) to perceive themselves as "overweight". Among OO men from both populations, those who had been screened for OO by a health provider were almost seven times more likely to have accurate weight perceptions. Only 9% of OO men in Mexico and 25% in the US recalled having been screened for weight. Weight misperceptions were common in both populations but more prevalent in Mexico; low screening by providers may contribute to poor weight control in both countries.

  19. Word association norms in Mexican Spanish.

    PubMed

    Barrón-Martínez, Julia B; Arias-Trejo, Natalia

    2014-12-19

    The aim of this research is to present a Spanish Word Association Norms (WAN) database of concrete nouns. The database includes 234 stimulus words (SWs) and 67,622 response words (RWs) provided by 478 young Mexican adults. Eight different measures were calculated to quantitatively analyze word-word relationships: 1) Associative strength of the first associate, 2) Associative strength of the second associate, 3) Sum of associative strength of first two associates, 4) Difference in associative strength between first two associates, 5) Number of different associates, 6) Blank responses, 7) Idiosyncratic responses, and 8) Cue validity of the first associate. The resulting database is an important contribution given that there are no published word association norms for Mexican Spanish. The results of this study are an important resource for future research regarding lexical networks, priming effects, semantic memory, among others.

  20. Health care seeking among Mexican American men.

    PubMed

    Sobralske, Mary C

    2006-04-01

    This focused ethnography explored health care seeking beliefs and behaviors of Mexican American men living in south central Washington State. Data collection included interviews with 36 research participants living in the community, participant observation in the research setting, and examination of ethnographic documents and cultural artifacts. Four major themes were identified: the identity of manhood dictates health care seeking, health means being able to be a man by fulfilling cultural obligations, illness means not being able to be a man, and men seek health care when their manhood is threatened or impaired. Machismo, the cultural concept of manliness, persisted among men despite the level of acculturation and other factors. Women influenced men's health care seeking behaviors. To fulfill their obligations, men must stay healthy and seek care when needed. Knowing when and why men do not seek health care enables nurses to better understand and serve the Mexican American community.

  1. The Diabetes Symptom Self-Care Inventory: Development and Psychometric Testing with Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    García, Alexandra A.

    2010-01-01

    Context Type 2 diabetes is prevalent throughout the world. In previous studies of Mexican Americans with type 2 diabetes, 95-97% of those sampled reported having symptoms they believe were caused by diabetes and most self-treated their symptoms. To more accurately capture Mexican Americans’ symptom prevalence and their self-treatments, the Diabetes Symptom Self-Care Instrument (DSSCI) was adapted from the Diabetes Self-Care Instrument. Objectives This paper describes the modification process used to perfect the DSSCI for use in improving self-care among people with Type 2 diabetes. Methods This instrumentation study used qualitative and quantitative methods. The study was completed in four phases that used focus groups, cognitive interviews, and survey administration. Four convenience samples were drawn from community-based Mexican American adults, aged 25-75, with type 2 diabetes in an urban area and a rural location in Texas. Results Phase I: Seven focus groups (n=45) generated data for revising items. Phase II: Cognitive interviews with 16 participants were used to evaluate four revisions of the questionnaire. Phase III: Surveys were administered to 81 participants. Total number of symptoms on the DSSCI correlated with scores on the Centers for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale (r=.65, p < .001), Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised Diabetes symptom subscale (r=.57, p < .001), and Audit of Diabetes-Dependent Quality of Life scale (r= -.42, p < .001). Minor revisions followed. Phase IV: Test-retest stability was demonstrated (n = 44). Conclusion The DSSCI is a culturally-relevant, sound measure of Mexican Americans’ diabetes symptoms and the actions they take to address them. PMID:21276705

  2. Asymptomatic Norovirus Infection in Mexican Children

    PubMed Central

    García, Coralith; DuPont, Herbert L.; Long, Kurt Z.; Santos, Jose I.; Ko, GwangPyo

    2006-01-01

    Sixty-three children in periurban Mexico City were examined for the occurrence of asymptomatic norovirus (NoV) infection from June to August 1998. NoV was detected in 48 of 161 stool specimens (29.8%), with 31 children (49.2%) having at least one positive stool. Asymptomatic NoV infection occurred commonly during summertime in a Mexican pediatric population. PMID:16891526

  3. Panoramic view of the Mexican Pacific Coastline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    In this scenic panoramic view, the orbiter tail points toward the Mexican Pacific coastline (18.0N, 103.0W) near the international resort of Acapulco on the nearly cloud free eastern Pacific Ocean. Almost all of southern Mexico can be seen from Puerto Vallarta in the north to the Isthmus of Tehuantepec in the south. The cloud covered Gulf of Mexico at the horizon contrasts sharply with the blue Pacific.

  4. The Mexican Participation in the ALICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera Corral, G.; Paic, G.

    2006-09-25

    A large portion of the Mexican community of experimental high energy and nuclear physicists has joined the ALICE collaboration with the aim to contribute effectively to the design and construction of the experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. This decision has long term consequences on the development of the physics in Mexico. We will review the main features of this commitment and the results obtained so far.

  5. [Nutrients in 39 Mexican coastal lagoons].

    PubMed

    Contreras, F; Castañeda, O; Torres-Alvarado, R; Gutiérrez, F

    1996-08-01

    An analysis of 39 Mexican coastal lagoons most in tropical environments, shows no nutrient limitation for primary productivity: even minimum nutrient values are higher than those of similar systems (mostly of temperate zones). In some cases, nutrient variations are large and indicative of heterogeneity. The N:P ratio is more important than simple nutrient concentrations. Using this ratio, coastal lagoons are classified as limited in nitrogen (< 5) or phosphorus (> 10).

  6. Yolk pigments of the Mexican leaf frog.

    PubMed

    Marinetti, G V; Bagnara, J T

    1983-02-25

    Eggs of the Mexican leaf frog contain blue and yellow pigments identified as biliverdin and lutein, respectively. Both pigments are bound to proteins that occur in crystalline form in the yolk platelet. The major blue pigment is biliverdin IX alpha. The eggs vary in color from brilliant blue to pale yellow-green depending on the amount of each pigment. These pigments may provide protective coloration to the eggs.

  7. Stress, coping, and health: a comparison of Mexican immigrants, Mexican-Americans, and non-Hispanic whites.

    PubMed

    Farley, Tillman; Galves, Al; Dickinson, L Miriam; Perez, Maria de Jesus Diaz

    2005-07-01

    Mexican immigrants, Mexican-Americans, and non-Hispanic white Americans all face different stressors. Stress-coping strategies may vary for each group as well. We compared relationships among perceived stress, stress-coping strategies, and health-related quality of life (HRQL) in a rural sample of Mexican citizens living in the United States, Mexican-Americans, and non-Hispanic whites. Health-related quality of life and stress-coping styles varied among the three groups. Mexican citizens reported significantly better physical functioning than did non-Hispanic whites or Mexican-Americans. Mexican-Americans reported significantly better mental health functioning than did non-Hispanic whites or Mexican citizens. Mexican citizens were more likely to use positive reframing, denial, and religion, and less likely to use substance abuse and self-distraction, as stress-coping strategies. Stress-coping style may be a potentially modifiable predictor of physical and mental HRQL, and may account for part of the Hispanic health paradox.

  8. Participants in urban Mexican male homosexual encounters.

    PubMed

    Carrier, J M

    1971-12-01

    Preliminary data are presented on 53 urban Mexican males interviewed during 1970-1971 in a study of homosexual encounters in a large Mexican city. These data are compared with data from recent studies in the United States and England of male homosexual behavior. Although preliminary and limited, the Mexican data indicate that cultural factors are important determinants of life styles and sex practices of homosexual males. Forty-eight of the 53 (90%) preferred and usually practiced anal intercourse, four preferred oral contacts, and one preferred mutual masturbation. Interviewees were also grouped according to major type of sex activity during the first sustained year of homosexual activity after puberty. One intragroup comparison indicates significant differences between anal active and anal passive interviewees. For example, as children anal passive subjects had significantly more homosexual contacts with adults; they also considered themselves more effeminate and as children were more involved with female sex-typed activities. Comparison of data from the English and United States studies with the present data suggests that preference for a particular sexual technique is not as developed in the former two countries; when there is a preference, it is not usually for anal intercourse.

  9. Predictors of Condom Use Among Mexican Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Carmen; Villarruel, Antonia M.; Zhou, Yan; Gallegos, Esther

    2012-01-01

    Mexican adolescents continue to be at increased risk for HIV infection due to inconsistent condom use. The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of condom use intentions and condom use among Mexican adolescents who participated in a randomized control trial designed to test a sexual-risk reduction intervention. Data from sexually active adolescents 17 to 21 years (n = 157) of age who were assigned to the control group were analyzed 48 months post intervention. Regression analysis showed that positive attitudes toward condoms, subjective norms, and control beliefs significantly explained intention to use condoms (R2 = .75, p < .001). Attitudes toward condoms (β = .67, p < .001), technical skills (β = .13, p = .01), and condom use self-efficacy (β = .24, p < .001) were significant predictors of condom use intention. Compared to those who inconsistently used condoms, adolescents who used condoms consistently had greater intention to use condoms and greater impulse control. Findings suggest that attitudes and control beliefs should be further explored with Mexican adolescents in order to support consistent condom use. PMID:20949835

  10. Dental variation among four prehispanic Mexican populations.

    PubMed

    Haydenblit, R

    1996-06-01

    In this paper, the dental morphology of prehispanic Meso-american populations is described, compared, and examined within the context of New World dental variation. Twenty-eight morphological dental traits were studied and compared in four samples of prehispanic Mexican populations. After eliminating intra- and interobserver error, the dental morphological characteristics observed show evidence of heterogeneity among the populations. In particular, the oldest population, Tlatilco (1300-800 BC), was significantly different from the other three groups, Cuicuilco (800-100 BC), Monte Albán (500 BC-700 AD) and Cholula (550-750 AD). When the four samples were compared to other Mongoloid populations, either univariately or multivariately, it was observed that the Mexican groups did not follow a strict Sinodont (characteristic of Northeast Asia)/Sundadont (characteristic of Southeast Asia) classification (Turner [1979] Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 51:619-636). From the traits examined, 27% presented frequencies consistent with Sinodont variation, while 73% of the traits showed similar incidence to Southeast Asian groups. Multivariately, the Mexican populations were found to fit an overall Sundadont classification. These results indicate that there is more dental morphological variation among American Indian populations than previously shown.

  11. Long-term surveillance plan for the Mexican Hat disposal site Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Mexican Hat, Utah, disposal site. This LSTP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Mexican Hat disposal site performs as designed and is cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed for custody and long-term care, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires the DOE to submit such a site-specific LTSP.

  12. Another Mexican birthweight paradox? The role of residential enclaves and neighborhood poverty in the birthweight of Mexican-origin infants.

    PubMed

    Osypuk, Theresa L; Bates, Lisa M; Acevedo-Garcia, Dolores

    2010-02-01

    Examining whether contextual factors influence the birth outcomes of Mexican-origin infants in the US may contribute to assessing rival explanations for the so-called Mexican health paradox. We examined whether birthweight among infants born to Mexican-origin women in the US was associated with Mexican residential enclaves and exposure to neighborhood poverty, and whether these associations were modified by nativity (i.e. mother's place of birth). We calculated metropolitan indices of neighborhood exposure to Mexican-origin population and poverty for the Mexican-origin population, and merged with individual-level, year 2000 natality data (n=490,332). We distinguished between neighborhood exposure to US-born Mexican-origin population (i.e. ethnic enclaves) and neighborhood exposure to foreign-born (i.e. Mexico-born) Mexican-origin population (i.e. immigrant enclaves). We used 2-level hierarchical linear regression models adjusting for individual, metropolitan, and regional covariates and stratified by nativity. We found that living in metropolitan areas with high residential segregation of US-born Mexican-origin residents (i.e. high prevalence of ethnic enclaves) was associated with lower birthweight for infants of US-born Mexican-origin mothers before and after covariate adjustment. When simultaneously adjusting for exposure to ethnic and immigrant enclaves, the latter became positively associated with birthweight and the negative effect of the former increased, among US-born mothers. We found no contextual birthweight associations for mothers born in Mexico in adjusted models. Our findings highlight a differential effect of context by nativity, and the potential health effects of ethnic enclaves, which are possibly a marker of downward assimilation, among US-born Mexican-origin women.

  13. Perceived social stress, pregnancy-related anxiety, depression and subjective social status among pregnant Mexican and Mexican American women in south Texas.

    PubMed

    Fleuriet, K Jill; Sunil, T S

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine differences in subjective social status, perceived social stress, depressive symptoms, and pregnancy-related anxiety between pregnant Mexican American and Mexican immigrant women. Three hundred pregnant Mexican immigrant and Mexican American women in South Texas were surveyed for pregnancy-related anxiety, perceived social stress, depressive symptoms, and subjective social status. Pregnant Mexican immigrant women had higher levels of pregnancy-related anxiety and lower levels of depression and perceived social stress than pregnant Mexican American women. Change in these variables among Mexican immigrant women was relatively linear as time of residence in the United States increased. Mexican immigrant and Mexican American women had significantly different correlations between subjective social status, self-esteem and perceived social stress. Results indicate that subjective social status is an important psychosocial variable among pregnant Hispanic women. Results contribute to ongoing efforts to provide culturally responsive prenatal psychosocial support services.

  14. The Education of the Mexican American--A Continuing Aspiration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Norma G.

    Since 1971 the status of Mexican American education hasn't changed significantly in three important areas: students, curriculum, and educational finance and resources. Mexican American students are underrepresented at all academic levels, especially higher levels, and in advanced science and math courses. Educational efforts begun in the 1960s…

  15. Mexican American Profiles. Bilingual Biographies for Today. Level Eight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nava, Julian; Hall, Michelle

    Short biographies of 26 Mexican American men and women are presented in this textbook for 8th grade students. The biographies reveal how each individual has made an impact upon the life of the Mexican American and on our society. Numerous occupations, professions, life styles, economic conditions, and different political points of view are…

  16. Nesting habitat of Mexican spotted owls in the Sacramento Mountains

    Treesearch

    Joseph L. Ganey; Darrell L. Apprill; Todd A. Rawlinson; Sean C. Kyle; Ryan S. Jonnes; James P. Ward

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the habitat relationships of rare species is critical to conserving populations and habitats of those species. Nesting habitat is suspected to limit distribution of the threatened Mexican spotted owl (Strix occidentalis lucida), and may vary among geographic regions. We studied selection of nesting habitat by Mexican spotted owls within their home ranges...

  17. Storytelling in Mexican Homes: Connections between Oral and Literacy Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    The study focuses on storytelling among Mexican families, documenting the frequency of storytelling in the homes of working- and middle-class Mexican families, the range of topics of the stories, characteristics and genres of stories, and intergenerational continuity of storytelling practices. Also examined are potential associations between…

  18. Parenting Models and Mexican Americans: A Process Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arciniega, Miguel; And Others

    A comprehensive overview of Mexican American families and their socialization practices is presented, along with a review of major parenting models and their applicability to Mexican American families. The evolutionary development of the Chicano family is analyzed using a psychological-sociological-cultural experience iconic model to explain the…

  19. A Portfolio of Outstanding Americans of Mexican Descent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lelevier, Benjamin, Jr.

    A cross section of Mexican American achievement is presented in a portfolio of 37 portraits of outstanding Americans of Mexican descent. Drawn in black and white on heavy paper stock by Mr. David L. Rodriguez, the sketches are suitable for display purposes. With the likenesses are biographical sketches in both English and Spanish which were…

  20. Smokeless Tobacco Consumption by Mexican-American High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Linda C.; Hamlin, Penelope A.

    A survey of 208 female and 191 male students attending a public high school in southwestern New Mexico assessed the extent of student use of smokeless tobacco products. The sample included 179 Mexican-American and 26 Anglo-American females, as well as 152 Mexican-American and 26 Anglo-American males. The average age of both female and male…

  1. Mexican Art and Architecture Databases: Needs, Achievements, Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barberena, Elsa

    At the international level, a lack of diffusion of Mexican art and architecture in indexes and abstracts has been detected. Reasons for this could be lack of continuity in publications, the use of the Spanish language, lack of interest in Mexican art and architecture, and sporadic financial resources. Nevertheless, even though conditions are not…

  2. Mexican American Adults in Higher Education: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeRosa, Janet Ann

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study used a narrative design to explore the perceptions, background and experiences of Mexican Americans who completed their bachelor's degree as adult learners. The study focuses in particular on their experiences of learning to be bicultural. A "Borderlands" framework whereby Mexican American adult learners negotiated…

  3. Transformative, Mixed Methods Checklist for Psychological Research with Mexican Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canales, Genevieve

    2013-01-01

    This is a description of the creation of a research methods tool, the "Transformative, Mixed Methods Checklist for Psychological Research With Mexican Americans." For conducting literature reviews of and planning mixed methods studies with Mexican Americans, it contains evaluative criteria calling for transformative mixed methods, perspectives…

  4. The Mexican American Cultural Values Scale for Adolescents and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, George P.; Gonzales, Nancy A.; Saenz, Delia S.; Bonds, Darya D.; German, Miguelina; Deardorff, Julianna; Roosav, Mark W.; Updegraff, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    This research evaluates the properties of a measure of culturally linked values of Mexican Americans in early adolescence and adulthood. The article discusses the items derived from qualitative data provided by focus groups in which Mexican Americans' (adolescents, mothers, and fathers) perceptions of key values were discussed. The focus groups…

  5. Mexicans as Model Minorities in the New Latino Diaspora

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wortham, Stanton; Mortimer, Katherine; Allard, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    Rapid Mexican immigration has challenged host communities to make sense of immigrants' place in New Latino Diaspora towns. We describe one town in which residents often characterize Mexican immigrants as model minorities with respect to work and civic life but not with respect to education. We trace how this stereotype is deployed, accepted, and…

  6. Promoting Reading among Mexican American Children. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Yvonne I.; Velazquez, Jose

    Good books can help children develop pride in their ethnic identity, knowledge about cultural history and positive role models, and improved self-esteem. However, Mexican American students often do not experience literature in this way. This digest briefly reviews Mexican American children's literature, recommends classroom strategies, provides…

  7. Losing American Students, Mexican Universities Struggle against a Scary Image

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrus, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Like most Mexicans, Eugenio Yarce has been deeply affected by the violence between drug cartels and the Mexican army, which has filled news coverage with accounts of kidnappings, assassinations, and torture. But for Mr. Yarce, deputy rector for outreach here at the private Autonomous Popular University of the State of Puebla, or Upaep, the…

  8. Child Abuse & Neglect in the Mexican American Community. Course Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camacho, Rosie Lee

    Consisting of three units, the course model aims to prepare students to address the problem of abuse and/or neglect in the Mexican American community. Unit one focuses on the two major parts of the informal helping system in the Mexican American community, the barrio and the family. Unit two concentrates on the traditional child welfare system and…

  9. Group Therapy with Low-Income Mexican Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulette, Teresa Ramirez

    1975-01-01

    Author describes difficulties facing counselors in dealing with low income Mexican Americans. Counselors should be bilingual and have comprehensive knowledge of Mexican-American culture to provide effective help to counselees. Counselors should encourage counselee to participate in group therapy sessions in which behavioral and problem solving…

  10. Mexican Spotted Owl Recovery Plan, First Revision (Strix occidentalis lucida)

    Treesearch

    Mexican Spotted Owl Recovery Team U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

    2012-01-01

    In 1993 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) listed the Mexican spotted owl (Strix occidentalis lucida; "owl") as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Critical habitat for the Mexican spotted owl was designated in 2004, comprising approximately 3.5 million hectares (ha) (8.6 million acres [ac]) on Federal lands in Arizona, Colorado, New...

  11. A Comparison of Mexican Children's Music Compositions and Contextual Songs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to make observations and comparisons between original music composed by Mexican children, and traditional Mexican songs. Data were obtained through notated music compositions created by the children, and through videotaped interviews during which the children performed their compositions, talked about both their…

  12. Cultural Resources for Mexican American Education. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Timothy; Hagerman, Robert

    Even though Mexican Americans are the fastest growing ethnic group in the United States, their history and literature receive limited attention in schools. Incorporating Mexican American culture and history into the curriculum should help minimize the cultural myopia characteristic of many students and the cultural alienation that may contribute…

  13. A Study of Mexican Attitudes toward Learning and Teaching English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaughter, Charles H.

    A study conducted in Guadalajara, Mexico assessed Mexican attitudes toward United States bilingual education. Subjects interviewed were 129 English-speaking Mexicans, aged from 12 to 66, most of them middle class. Forty percent were students. The interviews focused on the subjects' backgrounds, why and how they learned English, and how Mexican…

  14. More than Science: Family Learning in a Mexican Science Museum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briseno-Garzon, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Latin American audiences living in their countries of origin are poorly understood as museum learners due to the scarcity of research in this field. Through a case study approach, I investigate and report on the ways of learning of 20 Mexican family groups. In particular, I examine the influence of the Mexican sociocultural context on the…

  15. Culture, Context, and the Internalizing Distress of Mexican American Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polo, Antonio J.; Lopez, Steven R.

    2009-01-01

    Latino youth appear to be at higher risk for depression relative to youth from other ethnic groups. This study assessed the relationship between nativity and several forms of internalizing distress among Mexican American middle school students as well as sociocultural factors that may help explain this relationship. Immigrant Mexican American…

  16. Mexican American Profiles. Bilingual Biographies for Today. Level Eight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nava, Julian; Hall, Michelle

    Short biographies of 26 Mexican American men and women are presented in this textbook for 8th grade students. The biographies reveal how each individual has made an impact upon the life of the Mexican American and on our society. Numerous occupations, professions, life styles, economic conditions, and different political points of view are…

  17. Women's Networks and the Social Needs of Mexican Immigrants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Mary I.

    1990-01-01

    Reports on the persistence of a two-tiered economic and political system that routinely excludes Mexican immigrants. Focuses on the predominantly female employees of a wholesale nursery in Carpinteria (California), who have adapted the Mexican tradition of "confianza"-based relationships to form networks that facilitate communication and…

  18. Variations in Mexican-American Family Life: A Review Synthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael V.

    A review of the published empirical literature on families in the several areas of concentrated Mexican American settlement (primarily California, Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, and various cities in the Midwest) is presented in this paper. Objective is to provide a frame of reference on the sociology of Mexican American families.…

  19. Mexicans as Model Minorities in the New Latino Diaspora

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wortham, Stanton; Mortimer, Katherine; Allard, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    Rapid Mexican immigration has challenged host communities to make sense of immigrants' place in New Latino Diaspora towns. We describe one town in which residents often characterize Mexican immigrants as model minorities with respect to work and civic life but not with respect to education. We trace how this stereotype is deployed, accepted, and…

  20. Day of the Dead: A Mexican-American Celebration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt-Goldsmith, Diane

    This children's book describes how a Mexican-American family celebrates the traditional Mexican holiday, Day of the Dead (Dia de Muertos). The book centers on 10-year-old twins, Ximena and Azucena, who live in Sacramento, California, with their two brothers, older sister, and parents. The Day of the Dead takes place on the first and second day of…

  1. Day of the Dead: A Mexican-American Celebration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt-Goldsmith, Diane

    This children's book describes how a Mexican-American family celebrates the traditional Mexican holiday, Day of the Dead (Dia de Muertos). The book centers on 10-year-old twins, Ximena and Azucena, who live in Sacramento, California, with their two brothers, older sister, and parents. The Day of the Dead takes place on the first and second day of…

  2. A House of Mirrors: Seeing Myself, Seeing Mexican American Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    López, Regina; Vaughn, Courtney

    2015-01-01

    As a Mexican American and an educator, all of my life I have travelled between formal educational and Mexican American cultures. For decades I felt alienated professionally and thoroughly embedded within my ethnic origins until an educational trip to Mexico encouraged me to think differently. As a result, to become a more authentic educator and…

  3. Predictors of weight loss in Mexican American adolescents

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study examined predictors of weight change in Mexican American adolescents. Eighty overweight Mexican American children were randomized to receive either the intensive intervention or self help program. Physiological (e.g. standardized BMI (zBMI), percent body fat, and tanner stage), psychologi...

  4. Gifted Mexican American Children: An Ethnico-Scientific Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernal, Ernest M., Jr.

    Results and descriptions of an exploratory study designed to develop an instrument to identify gifted Mexican-American children who would not ordinarily be identified with traditional techniques are presented. The Mexican American community was used to develop a cultural-community based definition of giftedness and to develop a measure for…

  5. Corrections and the Mexican American Citizen: A Need for Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pompa, Gilbert G.

    Organizations like the Mexican American Correctional Association have brought to the attention of Spanish-speaking criminal justice groups the problems affecting Mexican American citizens. Although changes are necessary in all facets of the administration of the justice system, substantive progress is being made. For example, the Office for…

  6. Mexicans in the Southwest: A Culture in Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galarza, Ernesto

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the content and historical experience of Southwestern cultures and the self-concept/evaluation that sets critical boundaries between cultural types. Describes a typical Mexican community and deals with the cultural reactivity of the Mexican. Available from Centro de Publicaciones, Department of Chicano Studies, California State…

  7. A House of Mirrors: Seeing Myself, Seeing Mexican American Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    López, Regina; Vaughn, Courtney

    2015-01-01

    As a Mexican American and an educator, all of my life I have travelled between formal educational and Mexican American cultures. For decades I felt alienated professionally and thoroughly embedded within my ethnic origins until an educational trip to Mexico encouraged me to think differently. As a result, to become a more authentic educator and…

  8. Mexican American Male Masquerades in the Institution as Bully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oesterreich, Heather A.; Sosa-Provencio, Mia A.; Anatska, Tamara

    2017-01-01

    This Black and Chicana Feminist case study challenges national discourse surrounding school bullying as individualistic, student-centered. We explore the warrior lens of Mexican/Mexican-American males. While masquerading institutional compliance, they simultaneously unmask policies, practices as the means to control mind/bodies/spirit. This…

  9. Impact of adding foreign genomic information on Mexican Holstein imputation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The impact of adding US and Canada genomic information to the imputation of Mexican Holstein genotypes was measured by comparing 3 scenarios: 1) 2,018 Mexican genotyped animals; 2) animals from scenario 1 plus 886 related North American animals; and 3) animals from scenario 1 and all North American ...

  10. Acculturation and Health Locus of Control among Mexican American Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinn, Bobby

    1998-01-01

    Health locus of control was investigated across culture of origin (Mexicanism), mainstream culture (Americanism), and bicultural linguistic-acculturation domains among 424 Mexican-American adolescents. Belief in powerful others' external control was the strongest explanation of locus of control in the culture-of-origin domain; internal control was…

  11. Losing American Students, Mexican Universities Struggle against a Scary Image

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrus, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Like most Mexicans, Eugenio Yarce has been deeply affected by the violence between drug cartels and the Mexican army, which has filled news coverage with accounts of kidnappings, assassinations, and torture. But for Mr. Yarce, deputy rector for outreach here at the private Autonomous Popular University of the State of Puebla, or Upaep, the…

  12. Parenting Models and Mexican Americans: A Process Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arciniega, Miguel; And Others

    A comprehensive overview of Mexican American families and their socialization practices is presented, along with a review of major parenting models and their applicability to Mexican American families. The evolutionary development of the Chicano family is analyzed using a psychological-sociological-cultural experience iconic model to explain the…

  13. Activity Determinants among Mexican American Women in a Border Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinn, Bobby; Vincent, Vern

    2008-01-01

    Background: Mexican American women have the highest leisure-time physical inactivity prevalence of any ethnic minority group. Purpose: This study examined a sample of Mexican American females living near the U.S.-Mexico border to determine whether the variables of age, health status, educational level, marital status, and acculturation…

  14. 22 CFR 123.19 - Canadian and Mexican border shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Canadian and Mexican border shipments. 123.19 Section 123.19 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS LICENSES FOR THE EXPORT OF DEFENSE ARTICLES § 123.19 Canadian and Mexican border shipments. A...

  15. 22 CFR 123.19 - Canadian and Mexican border shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Canadian and Mexican border shipments. 123.19 Section 123.19 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS LICENSES FOR THE EXPORT OF DEFENSE ARTICLES § 123.19 Canadian and Mexican border shipments. A...

  16. Mexican Immigrant Families Crossing the Education Border: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plata-Potter, Sandra Ixa; de Guzman, Maria Rosario T.

    2012-01-01

    This phenomenological study examines Mexican immigrant parents' experiences of helping their children navigate and succeed in school and their perceptions regarding differences between the U.S. and Mexican educational systems. Findings highlight parents' challenges in helping their children succeed in a new and unfamiliar school system and the…

  17. 22 CFR 123.19 - Canadian and Mexican border shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canadian and Mexican border shipments. 123.19 Section 123.19 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS LICENSES FOR THE EXPORT OF DEFENSE ARTICLES § 123.19 Canadian and Mexican border shipments. A...

  18. 22 CFR 123.19 - Canadian and Mexican border shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Canadian and Mexican border shipments. 123.19 Section 123.19 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS LICENSES FOR THE EXPORT AND TEMPORARY IMPORT OF DEFENSE ARTICLES § 123.19 Canadian and Mexican border...

  19. 22 CFR 123.19 - Canadian and Mexican border shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Canadian and Mexican border shipments. 123.19 Section 123.19 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS LICENSES FOR THE EXPORT OF DEFENSE ARTICLES § 123.19 Canadian and Mexican border shipments. A...

  20. Transformative, Mixed Methods Checklist for Psychological Research with Mexican Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canales, Genevieve

    2013-01-01

    This is a description of the creation of a research methods tool, the "Transformative, Mixed Methods Checklist for Psychological Research With Mexican Americans." For conducting literature reviews of and planning mixed methods studies with Mexican Americans, it contains evaluative criteria calling for transformative mixed methods, perspectives…

  1. The Mexican American Cultural Values Scale for Adolescents and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, George P.; Gonzales, Nancy A.; Saenz, Delia S.; Bonds, Darya D.; German, Miguelina; Deardorff, Julianna; Roosav, Mark W.; Updegraff, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    This research evaluates the properties of a measure of culturally linked values of Mexican Americans in early adolescence and adulthood. The article discusses the items derived from qualitative data provided by focus groups in which Mexican Americans' (adolescents, mothers, and fathers) perceptions of key values were discussed. The focus groups…

  2. The Culture of Mexican Americans: Its Importance for Early Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saracho, Olivia N.; Martinez-Hancock, Frances

    2004-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to the Mexican American culture, describing (a) cultural diversity and linguistic policies in the United States; (b) cultural and linguistic studies that have examined the backgrounds of Mexican American individuals; (c) the characteristics of this population; (d) discrimination and human relations issues; (e)…

  3. Storytelling in Mexican Homes: Connections between Oral and Literacy Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    The study focuses on storytelling among Mexican families, documenting the frequency of storytelling in the homes of working- and middle-class Mexican families, the range of topics of the stories, characteristics and genres of stories, and intergenerational continuity of storytelling practices. Also examined are potential associations between…

  4. Mexican American Adults in Higher Education: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeRosa, Janet Ann

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study used a narrative design to explore the perceptions, background and experiences of Mexican Americans who completed their bachelor's degree as adult learners. The study focuses in particular on their experiences of learning to be bicultural. A "Borderlands" framework whereby Mexican American adult learners negotiated…

  5. Growth of Mexican-American Children in South Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinn, Bobby; Crofts, Alfred

    Height, weight, and triceps skinfold were measured in 1,680 Mexican American children, 10 through 14 years of age, from the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) region of Texas. Study sample measurements were compared to those gathered in 1972 involving LRGV Mexican American children as well as National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) reference data…

  6. Mexican-Origin Women's Employment Instability. Working Paper No. 51.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Anda, Roberto M.

    This paper compares the causes and consequences of employment instability among Mexican-origin women, White women, and White men. Data came from the work experience supplement in the March 1995 file of the Current Population Survey for a sample that included 1,399 Mexican-origin women, 17,092 White women, and 24,440 White men. All were experienced…

  7. Indigenous Mexican Culture and Chicana/o Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godina, Heriberto

    The Xinachtli Project, implemented by Chicano activists in Phoenix (Arizona) and El Paso (Texas), addresses the loss of ancestral culture by public school students of Mexican ancestry. The project teaches indigenous Mexican culture to students and their teachers through a series of presentations and lectures on Aztec dance, mathematics, language,…

  8. More than Science: Family Learning in a Mexican Science Museum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briseno-Garzon, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Latin American audiences living in their countries of origin are poorly understood as museum learners due to the scarcity of research in this field. Through a case study approach, I investigate and report on the ways of learning of 20 Mexican family groups. In particular, I examine the influence of the Mexican sociocultural context on the…

  9. Library Services to Mexican Americans: Policies, Practices and Prospects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urzua, Roberto, Ed.; And Others

    Much has happened in the field to alter the nature of library services to the Mexican American. The newest areas of library services available to Mexican Americans are at the public school and at the university level. This paper brings together some new concepts, trends, and feelings in the areas of library services in general, and in public,…

  10. Roles and Alliances within Mexican-American and Anglo Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaramillo, Patricio T.; Zapata, Jesse T.

    1987-01-01

    Examined Mexican-American and White children's perceptions of roles (of siblings and parents) and alliances (between parents and siblings) within their families. Tested whether assignment to roles and alliances was based on birth order and/or sex. Found birth-order and sex differences when treating Mexican-American and White samples separately.…

  11. Four Trajectories of Rectors in Mexican Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez Zarate, Romualdo

    2007-01-01

    Although rectors of Mexican public universities play an important role in their institutions, we know very little about them. This article first describes the different election processes in Mexican public universities for selecting a rector. These varied processes reveal the ambiguity of the concept of "autonomy" as applied to rectors,…

  12. The Mexican-American in the Health Care System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambler, Moses

    Mexican Americans differ from Anglo Americans in their types of health problems, relation to the American health care system, and responses to health care. Mexican Americans tend to underutilize available health resources because of fear of discrimination, perception of health workers as government representatives, and language and cultural…

  13. The Mexican-American in the Health Care System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambler, Moses

    Mexican Americans differ from Anglo Americans in their types of health problems, relation to the American health care system, and responses to health care. Mexican Americans tend to underutilize available health resources because of fear of discrimination, perception of health workers as government representatives, and language and cultural…

  14. Patterns of contraceptive use among Mexican-origin women.

    PubMed

    White, Kari L; Potter, Joseph E

    Mexican women in the United States (US) have higher rates of fertility compared to other ethnic groups and women in Mexico. Whether variation in women's access to family planning services or patterns of contraceptive use contributes to this higher fertility has received little attention. We explore Mexican women's contraceptive use, taking into account women's place in the reproductive life course. Using nationally representative samples from the US (National Survey of Family Growth) and Mexico (Encuesta National de la Dinámica Demográfica), we compared the parity-specific frequency of contraceptive use and fertility intentions for non-migrant women, foreign-born Mexicans in the US, US-born Mexicans, and whites. Mexican women in the US were less likely to use IUDs and more likely to use hormonal contraception than women in Mexico. Female sterilization was the most common method among higher parity women in both the US and Mexico, however, foreign-born Mexicans were less likely to be sterilized, and the least likely to use any permanent contraceptive method. Although foreign-born Mexicans were slightly less likely to report that they did not want more children, differences in method use remained after controlling for women's fertility intentions. At all parities, foreign-born Mexicans used less effective methods. These findings suggest that varying access to family planning services may contribute to variation in women's contraceptive use. Future studies are needed to clarify the extent to which disparities in fertility result from differences in contraceptive access.

  15. [Dichotic perception of Mandarin third tone by Mexican Chinese learners].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongbin

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the relationship between the advantage ear (cerebral hemisphere) of Spanish-speaking Mexican learners and the third Chinese tone. Third tone Chinese vowel syllables were used as experimental materials with dichotic listening technology to test the Spanish-speaking Mexican Chinese learners (20-32 years old) who studied Chinese about 20 h. In terms of error rates to identify the third Chinese tone, the Spanish-speaking Mexican Chinese learners's reaction to the third tone suggested that their left ears were the advantageous ear (the right cerebral hemisphere) (Z=-2.091, P=0.036). The verbal information of tones influenced the perception of Mexican Chinese learners' mandarin tones. In the process of learning mandarin tones, Mexican Chinese learners gradually formed the category of tones.

  16. Religion, suffering, and health among older Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Neal; Bastida, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Pain and suffering are deeply embedded in the ethos of Mexican American culture. Consequently, it is not surprising to find that many Mexican Americans turn to their faith in an effort to deal with the pain and suffering that arise in their lives. The purpose of the current study is to explore the interface between pain, suffering, religion, and health among older Mexican Americans. Three major themes emerged from in-depth qualitative interviews with 52 older Mexican Americans. The first is concerned with whether pain and suffering are a necessary part of religious life, the second has to do with the potential benefits that pain and suffering may provide, and the third involves whether it is necessary to bear pain and suffering in silence. In the process of reviewing these themes, an effort is made to show how they may be linked with the physical and mental health of older Mexican Americans. PMID:21415936

  17. Sugar Beets, Segregation, and Schools: Mexican Americans in a Northern Colorado Community, 1920-1960.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donato, Ruben

    2003-01-01

    What was unique about the Mexican American experience in Fort Collins (Colorado) was the extent to which the Great Western Sugar Company colonized Mexican workers. They lived in Mexican colonies, separate neighborhoods, or remote locations on sugar beet farms. In public schools, Mexican Americans were perceived as intellectually inferior and were…

  18. Sugar Beets, Segregation, and Schools: Mexican Americans in a Northern Colorado Community, 1920-1960.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donato, Ruben

    2003-01-01

    What was unique about the Mexican American experience in Fort Collins (Colorado) was the extent to which the Great Western Sugar Company colonized Mexican workers. They lived in Mexican colonies, separate neighborhoods, or remote locations on sugar beet farms. In public schools, Mexican Americans were perceived as intellectually inferior and were…

  19. MEXICAN-AMERICAN STUDY PROJECT. ADVANCE REPORT 6, INTERMARRIAGE OF MEXICAN-AMERICANS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MITTELBACH, FRANK G.; AND OTHERS

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY WAS TO INVESTIGATE ASPECTS OF INTERMARRIAGE AMONG MEXICAN-AMERICANS IN LOS ANGELES COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. DATA WERE OBTAINED BY ANALYZING LOS ANGELES COUNTY MARRIAGE LICENSES FOR 1963. USING THESE DATA THE FOLLOWING TOPICS WERE STATISTICALLY EXAMINED--(1) THE RATE OF INTERMARRIAGE AS AN INDICATOR OF SOCIAL DISTANCE, (2) THE…

  20. Regionalization and Evaluation of Impacts of Climate Change on Mexican Coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava-Sanchez, E. H.; Murillo-Jimenez, J. M.; Godinez-Orta, L.; Morales-Perez, R. A.

    2009-04-01

    Mexican coasts exhibit a high variety of geoforms and processes, and consequently, are exposed to a variability of types and impact levels of geological hazards. Tropical cyclones are the most devastating hazards for the Mexican coast, although, impact levels are higher on the southern coast of both Atlantic and Pacific oceans. The second dangerous geo-hazards are earthquakes and tsunamis, which affect all Pacific coast, causing more damage the earthquakes generated in the Cocos Trench. For seismic hazards, there is a regionalization of the Mexican territory, however, even though the high levels of damages caused by other natural hazards, there is a lack of initiatives for performing atlas of natural hazards or coastal management plans. Exceptions are the local scale atlas of natural hazards by the Mexican Geological Survey or some other local scale atlas made with several errors by non experience private consultant companies. Our work shows results of analyses of coastal geological hazards associated to global warming such as the sea level rise, and the increase in strength of some coastal processes. Initially, due to the high diversity in coastal environments for the Mexican coast, it was considered that, a regional characterization of the coastal zone, and the gathering of environmental data for determining levels of impact of the various coastal hazards, as an evaluation of coastal vulnerability. Thus, the basic criteria for defining Coastal Regions, in order of importance, were the following: geomorphology, climate, geology, tectonics, and oceanography. Also, some anthropogenic factors were taken in account for the coastal regionalization, such as civil construction along the coastline, land used and modification of the fluvial system. The analysis of such criteria, allows us to classify the Mexican coasts in 10 Coastal Regions. On the Pacific coast regions are: (I) Pacific Coast of Baja California, (II) Gulf Coast of Baja California, (III) Coastal Plain of

  1. Heterothallic mating observed between Mexican isolates of Glomerella lindemuthiana.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Guerra, Raúl; Ramírez-Rueda, María-Teresa; Cabral-Enciso, Mariandrea; García-Serrano, Mónica; Lira-Maldonado, Zoraida; Guevara-González, Ramón Gerardo; González-Chavira, Mario; Simpson, June

    2005-01-01

    Although several reports have described the occurrence of the teleomorphic state of Glomerella lindemuthiana (anamorph, Colletotrichum lindemuthianum), there has been a lack of continuity in this research. To identify G. lindemuthiana isolates capable of developing the teleomorphic state, 19 Mexican isolates were analyzed. Three types of response were observed: (i) negative, where only mycelial growth with or without acervuli was observed; (ii) potential, where in addition to the above, spherical perithecia-like structures were observed; (iii) positive, where perithecia containing asci and ascospores were observed. All strains were self-sterile and only one combination of strains produced fertile perithecia. From this fertile combination 168 individual ascospore cultures were isolated, including five from a single ascus. Forty-four monoascospore cultures were characterized with AFLP, confirming that these individuals were progeny from a sexual cross between the original two G. lindemuthiana isolates and that sexual reproduction in G. lindemuthiana is heterothallic in nature. Analysis of the parental strains with degenerate PCR primers indicated that sequences homologous to the HMG box of the MAT1-2 idiomorph are present in both parental isolates. This supports previous observations in other Glomerella species where the standard ascomycete configuration of distinct idiomorphs at the MAT locus does not hold true. The significance of these results is discussed.

  2. Tai chi diminishes oxidative stress in Mexican older adults.

    PubMed

    Rosado-Pérez, J; Santiago-Osorio, E; Ortiz, R; Mendoza-Núñez, V M

    2012-07-01

    To determine the effect of Tai Chi on oxidative stress in a population of elderly Mexican subjects. It was carried out a quasi-experimental study with a sample of 55 healthy subjects randomly divided into two age-matched groups: (i) a control group with 23 subjects and (ii) an experimental group with 32 subjects. The experimental group received daily training in Tai Chi for 50 min. It was measured before and after 6-month of exercise period: thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), total antioxidant status (TAS), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). It was found that the experimental group exhibited a statistically significant decrease in glucose levels, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC), and systolic blood pressure, as well as an increase in SOD and GPx activity and TAS compared with the control group (p < 0.05). Our findings suggest that the daily practice of Tai Chi is useful for reducing OxS in healthy older adults.

  3. Booming Mexican market may flourish with free trade

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-27

    Private power developers and utilities in the US are courting deals to build powerplants or supply electricity in Mexico. An the pending North American Free Trade Agreement, if passed, is expected to vastly increase the Mexican market for US constructors and manufacturers in the power sector. Ironically, a powerplant now under construction near the US border could be a factor in scuttling the NAFTA treaty. Mexico is seeking more than $18 billion in private sector investment. New regulations there now allow foreign firms to own 100% of the powerplants they build. The government-owned utility, Comision Federal de Electricidad, will offer firms power purchase agreements lasting up to 30 years. CFE also offers build-operate-transfer arrangements. It recently selected a consortium including General Electric Co., Bechtel Enterprises Inc., and Mexico's Groupo ICA to build the $600-million, 700-Mw, gas and oil-fired Samalayuca II project, about 20 miles south of El Paso, Texas. It will revert to CFE after 15 years.

  4. A Bicultural Heritage: Themes for the Exploration of Mexican and Mexican-American Culture in Books for Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schon, Isabel

    This resource for teachers and librarians who seek to use literature to expose students in grades K-12 to Mexican and Mexican American culture is organized in five major theme areas: customs, lifestyles, heroes, folklore, and key historical developments. Within each major area is a 4-part learning plan for each of three grade levels: K-2, 3-6, and…

  5. A Comparative Study of the Attitudes and Aspirations of Bilingual Mexican American Students with Monolingual Mexican American Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, Virginia Klewer

    The Toledo, Ohio, study of 72 Mexican American students was conducted to find whether bilingualism is a factor affecting aspirations and attitudes toward school and the educational process, and to determine attitudes of Mexican American students as a group. Students were equally divided into bilinguals and monolinguals, and responded to 3…

  6. Mexican/Mexican American Adolescents and "Keepin' It REAL": An Evidence-Based Substance Use Prevention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulis, Stephen; Marsiglia, Flavio F.; Elek, Elvira; Dustman, Patricia; Wagstaff, David A.; Hecht, Michael L.

    2005-01-01

    A randomized trial tested the efficacy of three curriculum versions teaching drug resistance strategies, one modeled on Mexican American culture; another modeled on European American and African American culture; and a multicultural version. Self-report data at baseline and 14 months post-intervention were obtained from 3,402 Mexican heritage…

  7. Economic Restructuring and Racialization: Incorporation of Mexicans and Mexican-Americans in the Rural Midwest. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naples, Nancy A.

    An 8-year ethnographic study in two rural Iowa towns examined the incorporation of recently arrived Mexicans and Mexican Americans into the social, economic, and political life of the community. Relocating to work in a nearby food processing plant, the newcomers altered the ethnic composition of this formerly homogeneous area. Data were gathered…

  8. Prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, and diabetes among Mexican adults: findings from the Mexican Health and Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Wong, Rebeca; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.; Al Snih, Soham

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to examine the prevalence and determinants of prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, and diabetes among Mexican adults from a subsample of the Mexican Health and Aging Study. Methods We examined 2012 participants from a subsample of the Mexican Health and Aging Study. Measures included sociodemographic characteristics, body mass index, central obesity, medical conditions, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hemoglobin A1c, and vitamin D. Logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, and self-reported diabetes. Results Prevalence of prediabetes, undiagnosed, and self-reported diabetes in this cohort was 44.2%, 18.0%, and 21.4%, respectively. Participants with high waist-hip ratio (1.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05–2.45) and high cholesterol (1.85, 95% CI = 1.36–2.51) had higher odds of prediabetes. Overweight (1.68, 95% CI = 1.07–2.64), obesity (2.38, 95% CI = 1.41–4.02), and high waist circumference (1.60, 95% CI = 1.06–2.40) were significantly associated with higher odds of having undiagnosed diabetes. Those residing in a Mexican state with high U.S. migration had lower odds of prediabetes (0.61, 95% CI = 0.45–0.82) and undiagnosed diabetes (0.53, 95% CI = 0.41–0.70). Those engaged in regular physical activity had lower odds of undiagnosed diabetes (0.74, 95% CI = 0.57–0.97). Conclusions There is a high prevalence of prediabetes and undiagnosed diabetes among Mexican adults in this subsample. Findings suggest the need for resources to prevent, identify, and treat persons with prediabetes and undiagnosed diabetes. PMID:26872919

  9. Prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, and diabetes among Mexican adults: findings from the Mexican Health and Aging Study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Wong, Rebeca; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Al Snih, Soham

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the prevalence and determinants of prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, and diabetes among Mexican adults from a subsample of the Mexican Health and Aging Study. We examined 2012 participants from a subsample of the Mexican Health and Aging Study. Measures included sociodemographic characteristics, body mass index, central obesity, medical conditions, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hemoglobin A1c, and vitamin D. Logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, and self-reported diabetes. Prevalence of prediabetes, undiagnosed, and self-reported diabetes in this cohort was 44.2%, 18.0%, and 21.4%, respectively. Participants with high waist-hip ratio (1.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05-2.45) and high cholesterol (1.85, 95% CI = 1.36-2.51) had higher odds of prediabetes. Overweight (1.68, 95% CI = 1.07-2.64), obesity (2.38, 95% CI = 1.41-4.02), and high waist circumference (1.60, 95% CI = 1.06-2.40) were significantly associated with higher odds of having undiagnosed diabetes. Those residing in a Mexican state with high U.S. migration had lower odds of prediabetes (0.61, 95% CI = 0.45-0.82) and undiagnosed diabetes (0.53, 95% CI = 0.41-0.70). Those engaged in regular physical activity had lower odds of undiagnosed diabetes (0.74, 95% CI = 0.57-0.97). There is a high prevalence of prediabetes and undiagnosed diabetes among Mexican adults in this subsample. Findings suggest the need for resources to prevent, identify, and treat persons with prediabetes and undiagnosed diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A Comparison of PBDE Serum Concentrations in Mexican and Mexican-American Children Living in California

    PubMed Central

    Fenster, Laura; Castorina, Rosemary; Marks, Amy R.; Sjödin, Andreas; Rosas, Lisa Goldman; Holland, Nina; Guerra, Armando Garcia; Lopez-Carillo, Lizbeth; Bradman, Asa

    2011-01-01

    Background: Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE), which are used as flame retardants, have been found to be higher in residents of California than of other parts of the United States. Objectives: We aimed to investigate the role of immigration to California on PBDE levels in Latino children. Methods: We compared serum PBDE concentrations in a population of first-generation Mexican-American 7-year-old children (n = 264), who were born and raised in California [Center for Health Analysis of Mothers and Children of Salinas (CHAMACOS) study], with 5-year-old Mexican children (n = 283), who were raised in the states in Mexico where most CHAMACOS mothers had originated (Proyecto Mariposa). Results: On average, PBDE serum concentrations in the California Mexican-American children were three times higher than their mothers’ levels during pregnancy and seven times higher than concentrations in the children living in Mexico. The PBDE serum concentrations were higher in the Mexican-American children regardless of length of time their mother had resided in California or the duration of the child’s breast-feeding. These data suggest that PBDE serum concentrations in these children resulted primarily from postnatal exposure. Conclusions: Latino children living in California have much higher PBDE serum levels than their Mexican counterparts. Given the growing evidence documenting potential health effects of PBDE exposure, the levels in young children noted in this study potentially present a major public health challenge, especially in California. In addition, as PBDEs are being phased out and replaced by other flame retardants, the health consequences of these chemical replacements should be investigated and weighed against their purported fire safety benefits. PMID:21498147

  11. Idioms of Distress Among Depressed White-Non-Mexican and Mexican-Origin Older Men.

    PubMed

    Apesoa-Varano, Ester Carolina; Barker, Judith C; Unutzer, Jurgen; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Johnson, Megan Dwight; Tran, Cindy; Guarnaccia, Peter; Hinton, Ladson

    2015-09-01

    Older men are less likely than older women to receive depression treatment. Latino older men in particular have been found to have significantly lower rates of depression treatment than their white-non-Mexican (WNM) counterparts. Prior research has shown that men are less likely than women to express overt affect and/or report depression symptoms that may prompt primary care physicians' inquiry about depression. Previous studies have overlooked the idioms of distress common among older men. This study investigates: a) the range of idioms of distress that emerge in the narratives of depressed older men, and b) the use of these idioms among depressed WNM and Mexican-origin older men. The present report is based on qualitative data collected through the Men's Health and Aging Study (MeHAS), a mixed-method study of clinically depressed WNM and Mexican-origin older (65 and above) men recruited in primary care settings. Qualitative analysis of 77 interviews led to identification of idioms of distress and informed idiom categories. Study findings show that: a) both groups of men utilized a range of idioms of distress that met current DSM criteria for depression, b) both groups were also likely to utilize idioms that feel outside clinical depression criteria, and c) there were similarities as well as differences between WNM and Mexican-origin men. This study provides a larger vocabulary that clinicians might consider in recognizing depression and initiating depression care for older men from diverse ethnic backgrounds. This is important to improve depression care among older men in general and those of Mexican-origin in particular.

  12. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Mexican Hat Site, Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Mexican Hat site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 2.2 million tons of tailings at the Mexican Hat site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site. Cost estimates for the four options range from about $15,200,000 for stabilization in place, to about $45,500,000 for disposal at a distance of about 16 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Mexican Hat tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $115/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ whether by heap leach or conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Reprocessing the Mexican Hat tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive under present conditions.

  13. San Pedro Martir Telescope: Mexican design endeavor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo-Ramirez, Gengis K.; Bringas-Rico, Vicente; Reyes, Noe; Uribe, Jorge; Lopez, Aldo; Tovar, Carlos; Caballero, Xochitl; Del-Llano, Luis; Martinez, Cesar; Macias, Eduardo; Lee, William; Carramiñana, Alberto; Richer, Michael; González, Jesús; Sanchez, Beatriz; Lucero, Diana; Manuel, Rogelio; Segura, Jose; Rubio, Saul; Gonzalez, German; Hernandez, Obed; García, Mary; Lazaro, Jose; Rosales-Ortega, Fabian; Herrera, Joel; Sierra, Gerardo; Serrano, Hazael

    2016-08-01

    The Telescopio San Pedro Martir (TSPM) is a new ground-based optical telescope project, with a 6.5 meters honeycomb primary mirror, to be built in the Observatorio Astronomico Nacional on the Sierra San Pedro Martir (OAN-SPM) located in Baja California, Mexico. The OAN-SPM has an altitude of 2830 meters above sea level; it is among the best location for astronomical observation in the world. It is located 1830 m higher than the atmospheric inversion layer with 70% of photometric nights, 80% of spectroscopic nights and a sky brightness up to 22 mag/arcsec2. The TSPM will be suitable for general science projects intended to improve the knowledge of the universe established on the Official Mexican Program for Science, Technology and Innovation 2014-2018. The telescope efforts are headed by two Mexican institutions in name of the Mexican astronomical community: the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico and the Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica. The telescope has been financially supported mainly by the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia (CONACYT). It is under development by Mexican scientists and engineers from the Center for Engineering and Industrial Development. This development is supported by a Mexican-American scientific cooperation, through a partnership with the University of Arizona (UA), and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO). M3 Engineering and Technology Corporation in charge of enclosure and building design. The TSPM will be designed to allow flexibility and possible upgrades in order to maximize resources. Its optical and mechanical designs are based upon those of the Magellan and MMT telescopes. The TSPM primary mirror and its cell will be provided by the INAOE and UA. The telescope will be optimized from the near ultraviolet to the near infrared wavelength range (0.35-2.5 m), but will allow observations up to 26μm. The TSPM will initially offer a f/5 Cassegrain focal station. Later, four folded Cassegrain and

  14. Prevalence of arthritis in older Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    al Snih, S; Markides, K S; Ray, L; Freeman, J L; Goodwin, J S

    2000-12-01

    This study examines the prevalence of self-reported physician-diagnosed arthritis and arthritis symptoms and their relationship to functional limitations in Mexican American elderly. We conducted a cross-sectional study using a probability sample of 2,873 non-institutionalized Mexican American men and women aged 65 or older, residing in the southwestern United States. Measures included self-reported physician-diagnosed arthritis, morning pain or stiffness, pain when standing, global health rating, activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), depressive symptoms, presence of chronic diseases (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, heart attack, stroke), and body mass index. The Mantel-Haenszel chi-square statistic was used to test differences by arthritis status, and a logistic regression model was used to predict the odds of having arthritis. The overall prevalence of self-reported physician-diagnosed arthritis in the sample was 40.8 percent, 50.0 percent among women and 28.8 percent among men (P < 0.001). Morning pain or stiffness was reported by 37.7 percent of respondents and pain when standing or walking by 31.9 percent. All comorbid conditions, and both IADL and ADL limitations, were more prevalent in those with arthritis than in those without arthritis. Female sex and several medical conditions were independently associated with self-reported arthritis. Self-reported physician-diagnosed arthritis is common among older Mexican Americans. Functional limitation and disability are more prevalent among subjects with arthritis than among those without arthritis.

  15. Alcohol Use Disorders in National Samples of Mexicans and Mexican-Americans: The Mexican National Addiction Survey and the U.S. National Alcohol Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borges, Guilherme; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Lown, Anne; Ye, Yu; Robertson, Marjorie J.; Cherpitel, Cheryl; Greenfield, Tom

    2006-01-01

    The authors show associations between immigration and alcohol disorders using data from the 1995 and 2000 U.S. National Alcohol Surveys and the 1998 Mexico National Household Survey on Addictions. The prevalence of alcohol dependence was 4.8% for the Mexicans, 4.2% for the Mexico-born immigrants, and 6.6% for the U.S.-born Mexican Americans. They…

  16. Alcohol Use Disorders in National Samples of Mexicans and Mexican-Americans: The Mexican National Addiction Survey and the U.S. National Alcohol Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borges, Guilherme; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Lown, Anne; Ye, Yu; Robertson, Marjorie J.; Cherpitel, Cheryl; Greenfield, Tom

    2006-01-01

    The authors show associations between immigration and alcohol disorders using data from the 1995 and 2000 U.S. National Alcohol Surveys and the 1998 Mexico National Household Survey on Addictions. The prevalence of alcohol dependence was 4.8% for the Mexicans, 4.2% for the Mexico-born immigrants, and 6.6% for the U.S.-born Mexican Americans. They…

  17. Mexican waves in an excitable medium.

    PubMed

    Farkas, I; Helbing, D; Vicsek, T

    2002-09-12

    The Mexican wave, or La Ola, which rose to fame during the 1986 World Cup in Mexico, surges through the rows of spectators in a stadium as those in one section leap to their feet with their arms up, and then sit down again as the next section rises to repeat the motion. To interpret and quantify this collective human behaviour, we have used a variant of models that were originally developed to describe excitable media such as cardiac tissue. Modelling the reaction of the crowd to attempts to trigger the wave reveals how this phenomenon is stimulated, and may prove useful in controlling events that involve groups of excited people.

  18. The Geography of Undocumented Mexican Migration

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Douglas S.; Rugh, Jacob S.; Pren, Karen A.

    2010-01-01

    Using data from Mexico’s Matrícula Consular program, we analyze the geographic organization of undocumented Mexican migration to the United States. We show that emigration has moved beyond its historical origins in west-central Mexico into the central region and, to a lesser extent, the southeast and border regions. In the United States, traditional gateways continue to dominate, but a variety of new destinations have emerged. California, in particular, has lost its overwhelming dominance. Although the geographic structure of Mexico-U.S. migration is relatively stable, it has nonetheless continued to evolve and change over time. PMID:20814589

  19. Noncoding chloroplast DNA variation in Mexican pines.

    PubMed

    Perez de la Rosa, J; Harris, S A; Farjon, A

    1995-11-01

    Universal primers were used for PCR amplification of three noncoding regions of chloroplast DNA in order to study restriction site variation in 12 Mexican pine species. Two length mutations were identified that are of diagnostic value for two subgenera or sections of the genus. Phylogenetic analysis of the restriction site and length variation showed patterns of variation largely consistent with previous arrangements of these pines, except for the position of Pinus nelsonii, indicating that Pinus section Parraya Mayr, as circumscribed by Little and Critchfield (1969) and later authors, is not a monophyletic group.

  20. Assays for important Mexican crudes updated

    SciTech Connect

    Manriguez, L.; Moreno, A.; Anaya, C.G. )

    1991-03-04

    Compared to Isthmus and Maya, Olmeca crude is the lightest of the Mexican export. It has fewer contaminants, and its 540{degrees} C. TBP distillation produces the largest quantity of distillate. The Olmeca fractions also have the lowest total sulfur content. The Maya crude is heavy, with an API gravity of 22.2{sup {degrees}}. It has a high contaminant content that induces corrosion in process equipment and causes low running times in thermal cracking units, such as visbreakers and cokers. A proposed refining scheme for the bottom of the Maya barrel consists of atmospheric distillation, vacuum distillation, the Impex process, and visbreaking.

  1. Homicidal Events Among Mexican American Street Gangs

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Avelardo; Cepeda, Alice; Kaplan, Charles

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the complexity of street gang homicides and focuses on situational factors that lead to gang members’ susceptibility to this violent behavior within the context of a disadvantaged minority community. This study is based on an analysis of 28 homicides involving Mexican American gang members. The absence of immigrant youth involvement in these types of violent crimes is discussed. Findings demonstrate how locally embedded social processes associated with specific gang types, ecology, drugs, circumstances, and motives unfold into homicidal events. These findings may contribute to the development of street-based social programs focused on gang mediation, dispute resolution, and crisis intervention. PMID:21218188

  2. Mexican Space Agency and NASA Agreement

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-03-18

    John Grunsfeld (far left), Associate Administrator for the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters, Dr. Francisco Javier Mendieta Jimenez, Director General of the Mexican Space Agency, NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, Leland Melvin, NASA Associate Administrator for Education and Al Condes (far right), Deputy Associate Administrator for International and Interagency Relations pose for a photo, Monday, March 18, 2013 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. A Reimbursable Space Act Agreement (RSAA) for a NASA International Internship Program was signed between the two agencies. This is the first NASA-Mexico agreement signed. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  3. Natural Variability of Mexican Forest Fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco-Herrera, Graciela; Velasco Herrera, Victor Manuel; Kemper-Valverdea, N.

    The purpose of this paper was 1) to present a new algorithm for analyzing the forest fires, 2) to discuss the present understanding of the natural variability at different scales with special emphasis on Mexico conditions since 1972, 3) to analyze the internal and external factors affecting forest fires for example ENSO and Total Solar Irradiance, and 4) to discuss the implications of this knowledge, on research and on restoration and management methods, which purpose is to enhance forest biodiversity conservation. 5) We present an estimate of the Mexican forest fires for the next decade. These results may be useful to minimize human and economic losses.

  4. The problem of lead in mexican pottery.

    PubMed

    Spielholtz, G I; Kaplan, F S

    1980-11-01

    Much public attention has been focused in the United States on utilitarian Mexican pottery as a source of lead poisoning. Our work demonstrates that, if a firing temperature of at least 1150 degrees is used, lead-glazed earthenware is made safe for the storage and preparation of foods. Examination by d.c. arc emission spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction shows that the lead then remains in crystalline form. An exchange-equilibrium for lead between solutions and earthenware material is postulated.

  5. Usual Vitamin Intakes by Mexican Populations.

    PubMed

    Pedroza-Tobías, Andrea; Hernández-Barrera, Lucía; López-Olmedo, Nancy; García-Guerra, Armando; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Sonia; Ramírez-Silva, Ivonne; Villalpando, Salvador; Carriquiry, Alicia; Rivera, Juan A

    2016-09-01

    In the past several years, the consumption of high-energy, nutrient-poor foods has increased globally. Dietary intake data collected by the National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANUT) 2012 provide information to assess the quality of the Mexican diet and to guide food and nutrition policy. The aim was to describe the usual intake and the prevalence of inadequate intakes of vitamins for the overall Mexican population and by subgroups defined by sex, age, region, urban or rural areas, and socioeconomic status (SES). ENSANUT 2012 is a cross-sectional probabilistic survey representative of the Mexican population. Dietary information was collected by using the 24-h recall automated multiple-pass method (n = 10,096) with a repeated measurement on a subsample (n = 889) to permit adjustment for intraindividual variability with the use of the Iowa State University method. Mean usual intakes and the prevalence of inadequate intakes of thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folate, and vitamins A, D, E, C, B-6, and B-12 were calculated for children aged 1-4 y (CH1-4y), children aged 5-11 y (CH5-11y), adolescents aged 12-19 y, and adults aged ≥20 y. In all of the age groups, prevalences of inadequate intakes of vitamins D and E were the highest (77-99% of adults and adolescents and 53-95% of CH5-11y and CH1-4y) and those of folate and vitamin A were intermediate (47-70% of adults and adolescents, 15-23% of CH5-11y and 8-13% of CH1-4y), whereas those of thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and vitamins B-6, B-12, and C were the lowest (0-37% of adults, 1-27% of adolescents, and 0-2.4% of CH5-11y and CH1-4y). With few exceptions, the highest prevalences of inadequate intakes for vitamins were observed in the poorest populations (rural South region and the lowest tertile of SES). The intake of vitamins among Mexicans is inadequate overall. Information collected by ENSANUT can help target food assistance programs and develop strategies to prevent vitamin deficiencies. © 2016 American Society

  6. Baryon semileptonic decays: the Mexican contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-Mendieta, Ruben; Martinez, Alfonso

    2006-09-25

    We give a detailed account of the techniques to compute radiative corrections in baryon semileptonic decays developed over the years by Mexican collaborations. We explain how the method works by obtaining an expression for the Dalitz plot of semileptonic decays of polarized baryons including radiative corrections to order O({alpha}q/{pi}M1), where q is the four-momentum transfer and M1 is the mass of the decaying baryon. From here we compute the totally integrated spin angular asymmetry coefficient of the emitted baryon and compare its value with other results.

  7. PREFACE: XIV Mexican Workshop on Particles and Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delepine, D.; Napsuciale, M.; Ibarguen, H. S.

    2015-11-01

    The Mexican Workshop on Particles and Fields (MWPF) is a biennial meeting organized by the Division of Particles and Fields of the Mexican Physical Society designed to gather specialists in different areas of high energy physics to discuss the latest developments in the field. The fourteenth edition of this meeting was held from November 25 to 29, 2013, at the colonial city of Oaxaca de Juárez, Oaxaca, Mexico. The XIV Mexican Workshop on Particles and Fields consisted of invited lectures, discussion and poster sessions. Experimental and theoretical developments were presented by distinguished physicists, addressing the most recent results in the field. The invited review talks included topics on collider physics, neutrino physics, physics beyond the Standard Model, flavor and hadronic physics, astroparticle physics, dark matter physics and effective theories, among others. The highlight topic of the conference was the presentation of the most resent results from the most popular high energy experiments in the world. The discovery of a particle consistent with the long-sought Higgs boson, considered one of the most important discoveries of the 21st century, was fully addressed by José Benítez and Kirill Prokofiev from CERN. The overview of the results of ALICE on the first run of the LHC was extensivly covered by Antonio Ortiz, from Lund University, and Daniel Tapia, from Universití Paris-Sud. The prospects and status of the new Belle II experiment were presented by Yoshi Sakai from KEK. The plans and projects of Tevatron on the new era of accelerators were explained by Gene Fisk from FERMILAB. Eric Vázquez from SNOLAB presented a wonderful explanation about the Dark Matter detection and the most resent results about the searches for it. The largest high energy cosmic rays detector, the Pierre Auger, was presented by Luis Villasñnor from University of Michoacán. On Friday 29th of November, we had an excursion to the archeological site of Mitla and to Santa

  8. [Genetic variants associated to male infertility in Mexican patients].

    PubMed

    Piña-Aguilar, Raúl Eduardo; Chima-Galán, María del Carmen; Yerena-de-vega, María de la Concepción A; Regalado-Hernández, Miguel Angel; Sánchez-Guerrero, Cecilia; García-Ortiz, Liliana; Santillán-Hernández, Yuritzi; Moreno-García, Jesús Daniel

    2013-05-01

    Recently Mexican Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology Colleges (Federación Mexicana de Colegios de Obstetricia y Ginecologia, FEMECOG) published the Mexican guideline forthe management of male infertility, which suggests performing genetic laboratory tests as part of diagnosis and management of infertile patients and states that these should receive genetic counseling. This paper reviews the genetic approach proposed by Mexican guideline. A systematic review of medical literature was performed in Pubmed and Web of Knowledge from 1980 to 2012 in order to find reports of genetic variants associated to male infertility in Mexican patients. Also it is discussed the current knowledge of these variants, their clinical implications and finally the guidelines and recommendations for their molecular diagnosis. Most genetic variants in Mexican infertile patients are chromosome abnormalities. In relation to other variants there is only a report of Y chromosome microdeletions, repeated CAG in androgen receptor and more common mutations in CFTR, and other article reporting mutations in CFTR in patients with congenital absence of vas deferens. Little is known about the genetics of Mexican infertile patients apart from chromosome abnormalities. However, the contribution of genetics as etiology of male infertility is taking more relevance and currently the consensual management of infertile male should include the screening of genetic background. This review pretends to be a quick guide for clinicians who want to know about reports of genetic variants related to male infertility in Mexican population and how to approach their diagnosis.

  9. Lactose malabsorption in Mexican-American children.

    PubMed

    Woteki, C E; Weser, E; Young, E A

    1976-01-01

    Inability to absorb lactose due to low intestinal lactase is common in many population groups. This study is the first to compare lactose tolerance in 282 Mexican-American (MA) children and 51 Anglo-American (AA) children 2 to 14 years of age with the dietary intake of selected nutrients found in milk. A lactose tolerance test and a 24-hr dietary recall were obtained for each child. Gastrointestinal symptoms were carefully recorded for a 24-hr period following the lactose load. Overall prevalence of lactose malabsorption was 37% in MA children and 8% in AA children, and it increased with age. Number of symptoms occurring in lactose malabsorbers of both ethnic groups also increased with age. Mean protein intake exceeded Recommended Dietary Allowances at all ages for both ethnic groups. Mean consumption of vitamin A, calcium, and energy was below the Recommended Dietary Allowance for MA children. There were no differences in calories, nutrient, or milk intakes between lactose absorbers and malabsorbers, but AA children drank more milk than MA children. Fifteen percent of lactose-absorbing MA, 23% of malabsorbing MA, but no AA children reported having symptoms after drinking milk. There was a significantly greater incidence of lactose intolerance in MA as compared to AA children. This suggests that Mexican-Americans share in the high incidence of primary lactose intolerance characteristic of the majority of the orld's peoples.

  10. An evaluation of two Mexican food guides.

    PubMed

    Bacardi-Gascon, M; Jiménez-Cruz, A; Jones, E

    2002-03-01

    In Mexico, the food guide developed by The National Institute of Nutrition for the Mexican population is 'The Pyramid of Health'. In the northwestern Mexican state of Baja California, the Nutrition Institute of Baja California (INUBAC) developed and validated another food guide. This guide, named 'The Apple of Health', is based on current nutrition research and the typical food patterns. The purpose of this article was to evaluate and compare (1) the graphical impact, (2) the understanding of the overall message, and (3) the ability to apply the information from both food guides, using a diet design score and focus group interviews, among women from two different education levels living in Baja California. Results showed that mean diet design percentage scores obtained by the participants using The Pyramid of Health were 64.1 and using The Apple of Health 76.7. No statistical difference was found between the two education levels. The majority of the focus group participants expressed that the most appealing food guide was The Apple of Health because of its color and graphic art. However, the Pyramid was more familiar to the participants. The study subjects strongly recommended The Apple of Health food guide as an educational tool for the whole family.

  11. Clinical comparison of two Mexican coccidioidins.

    PubMed

    Castañón-Olivares, Laura Rosío; Laniado-Laborín, Rafael; Concepcion, Toriello; Muñoz-Hernández, Bertha; Aroch-Calderón, Arturo; Aranda-Uribe, Iván Sammir; Flores-Sánchez, María Antonieta; del Rocío González-Martínez, María; Hernández-Navarez, Alfonso; Manjarrez-Zavala, María Eugenia; Miranda-Mauricio, Sandra; Palma, Gabriel; Pérez-Mejía, Amelia

    2010-06-01

    Coccidioidin, an extract from the saprophytic mycelial form of Coccidioides spp., has been a very useful antigen preparation both for skin and serological tests for coccidioidomycosis. Unfortunately, coccidioidin is not currently available for skin testing in the United States. Coccidioidin has been produced commercially in Mexico by a vaccine and reagents laboratory of the Mexican Federal Government. It also has been produced at the Microbiology Laboratory of the Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México exclusively as an antigen for research projects. The objective of the study was to compare both coccidioidins in their reactivity and safety when applied in humans. One hundred and eighty-four volunteers were tested; median age was 33 (range 14-82). When the cutoff point is set in 5 mm, 88 subjects (47.8%) had a positive test for the commercial coccidioidin and 76 (41.3%; CI(95%) 0.50, 1.15; P = 0.20) were positive with the research antigen. Seventy-five subjects were positive for both antigens and 96 were negative for both. Fifty-nine subjects (31.3%) reported an adverse reaction after the application of the antigen; they were mostly very mild local reactions. Mexican research coccidioidin is a safe and reliable antigen that can be used for the detection of coccidioidomycosis infection in mammals.

  12. Mexican registry of pulmonary hypertension: REMEHIP.

    PubMed

    Sandoval Zarate, Julio; Jerjes-Sanchez, Carlos; Ramirez-Rivera, Alicia; Zamudio, Tomas Pulido; Gutierrez-Fajardo, Pedro; Elizalde Gonzalez, Jose; Leon, Mario Seoane Garcia De; Gamez, Miguel Beltran; Abril, Francisco Moreno Hoyos; Michel, Rodolfo Parra; Aguilar, Humberto Garcia

    REMEHIP is a prospective, multicentre registry on pulmonary hypertension. The main objective will be to identify the clinical profile, medical care, therapeutic trends and outcomes in adult and pediatric Mexican patients with well-characterized pulmonary hypertension. REMEHIP a multicenter registry began in 2015 with a planned recruitment time of 12 months and a 4-year follow-up. The study population will comprise a longitudinal cohort study, collecting data on patients with prevalent and incident pulmonary hypertension. Will be included patients of age >2 years and diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension by right heart catheterization within Group 1 and Group 4 of the World Health Organization classification. The structure, data collection and data analysis will be based on quality current recommendations for registries. The protocol has been approved by institutional ethics committees in all participant centers. All patients will sign an informed consent form. Currently in Mexico, there is a need of observational registries that include patients with treatment in the everyday clinical practice so the data could be validated and additional information could be obtained versus the one from the clinical trials. In this way, REMEHIP emerges as a link among randomized clinical trials developed by experts and previous Mexican experience. Copyright © 2016 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. Testing Orem's theory with Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    Villarruel, A M; Denyes, M J

    1997-01-01

    To examine an ethnographic study using evaluation criteria for theory-testing through verification of personal experience. Ten theory-verification criteria developed by Silva and Sorrel (1992) for inductive methods of inquiry. A 1995 ethnographic study conducted with Mexican Americans and conceptualized within Orem's Self-Care Deficit Theory of Nursing. Twenty Mexican American key informants were from 13 families. Primary data sources were focused observations and a series of ethnographic interviews. The study, purposes, methods, selected findings, confirmability and credibility of study findings, and relevance to Orem's theory are presented in the context of each criterion. The purpose, design, analysis, and examination of results of the 1995 study sufficiently meet the 10 formative criteria. Because this study can be considered an example of theory verification research, findings are relevant to the development of Orem's theory. Through the use of theory-verification criteria, inductive methods of research can be used to test or verify theory. The testing of nursing theory with diverse populations is an important direction for continued theory development. Use of evaluation criteria can serve as a template for inclusion of diverse perspectives.

  14. Initial Development and Validation of the Mexican Intercultural Competence Scale.

    PubMed

    Torres, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    The current project sought to develop the Mexican Intercultural Competence Scale (MICS), which assesses group-specific skills and attributes that facilitate effective cultural interactions, among adults of Mexican descent. Study 1 involved an Exploratory Factor Analysis (N = 184) that identified five factors including Ambition/Perseverance, Networking, the Traditional Latino Culture, Family Relationships, and Communication. In Study 2, a Confirmatory Factor Analysis provided evidence for the 5-factor model for adults of Mexican origin living in the Midwest (N = 341) region of the U.S. The general findings are discussed in terms of a competence-based formulation of cultural adaptation and include theoretical and clinical implications.

  15. Initial Development and Validation of the Mexican Intercultural Competence Scale

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    The current project sought to develop the Mexican Intercultural Competence Scale (MICS), which assesses group-specific skills and attributes that facilitate effective cultural interactions, among adults of Mexican descent. Study 1 involved an Exploratory Factor Analysis (N = 184) that identified five factors including Ambition/Perseverance, Networking, the Traditional Latino Culture, Family Relationships, and Communication. In Study 2, a Confirmatory Factor Analysis provided evidence for the 5-factor model for adults of Mexican origin living in the Midwest (N = 341) region of the U.S. The general findings are discussed in terms of a competence-based formulation of cultural adaptation and include theoretical and clinical implications. PMID:24058890

  16. Reproductive habitus, psychosocial health, and birth weight variation in Mexican immigrant and Mexican American women in south Texas.

    PubMed

    Fleuriet, K Jill; Sunil, T S

    2015-08-01

    The Latina Paradox, or persistent, unexplained variation in low birth weight rates in recently immigrated Mexican women and the trend toward higher rates in subsequent generations of Mexican American women, is most often attributed to unidentified sociocultural causes. We suggest herein that different disciplinary approaches can be synthesized under the constructs of reproductive habitus and subjective social status to identify influences of sociocultural processes on birth weight. Reproductive habitus are "modes of living the reproductive body, bodily practices, and the creation of new subjects through interactions between people and structures" (Smith-Oka, 2012: 2276). Subjective social status infers comparison of self to others based on community definitions of status or socioeconomic status (Adler 2007). We present results from a prospective study of low-income Mexican immigrant and Mexican American women from south Texas that tested the ability of reproductive habitus and subjective social status to elucidate the Latina Paradox. We hypothesized that reproductive habitus between Mexican immigrant women and Mexican American women inform different subjective social statuses during pregnancy, and different subjective social statuses mediate responses to psychosocial stressors known to correlate with low birth weight. Six hundred thirty-one women were surveyed for psychosocial health, subjective social status, and reproductive histories between 2011 and 2013. Eighty-three women were interviewed between 2012 and 2013 for status during pregnancy, prenatal care practices, and pregnancy narratives and associations. Birth weight was extracted from medical records. Results were mixed. Subjective social status and pregnancy-related anxiety predicted low birth weight in Mexican immigrant but not Mexican American women. Mexican immigrant women had significantly lower subjective social status scores but a distinct reproductive habitus that could explain improved psychosocial

  17. The Mexican Revolution and health care or the health of the Mexican Revolution.

    PubMed

    Horn, J J

    1985-01-01

    Despite a victorious social revolution, a self-proclaimed "revolutionary" government, and a significant post-war economic growth, Mexico has not achieved a just or equitable social system. The Mexican Revolution led to the emergence of a new bureaucratic class whose "trickle-down" development strategy sacrificed social welfare to capital accumulation. Mexican morbidity and mortality patterns resemble those of more impoverished developing nations without revolutionary experience. The patterns of health care in Mexico reflect inequities and contradictions in the society and economy at large and flow from the erosion of the egalitarian aims of the revolution concomitant with the expansion of capitalism and the concentration of the benefits of "modernization" in the hands of privileged elites. Mexico's health problems are symptomatic of a general socio-economic malaise which questions the legitimacy of the Revolution.

  18. [Franco-Mexican medical action and the Mexican Expedition (1864-1867)].

    PubMed

    Robert, G

    1999-01-01

    In the days when French expeditionary troops were fighting in Mexico, Napoleon the Third founded a "Mexican Scientific Committee" in the same wave length as his uncle, General Bonaparte in Egypt. The Committee was headquartered in Paris and since April 1864, a "Franco-Mexican Committee" took place at Mexico-City. The medical branch was led, in Paris, by the Baron Hippolyte Larrey and chaired on the spot by Dr Ehrmann; it will become the "Academia de Medicina de Mexico" and published the "Gaceta Medica". Numerous researchs were undertaken and most of them printed in the "Gaceta Medica" with some regards to many diseases, particuliarly Yellow Fever and Typhus. The Academia and Gaceta will last long after war ending and, in 1970, a special session was hallowed to their foundation, more than one century before.

  19. [The beginning of Mexican cardiology in the springtime of the Mexican National Academy of Medicine].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    The National Academy of Medicine was founded 141 years ago during the French intervention. Under the sponsorship of this brand-new medical association, Mexican cardioangiology took its first steps in the medical and surgical field as well. After the falling of the second empire, the medical and surgical advances of this discipline continued. The corresponding publications appeared in different volumes of the "Gaceta Médica de México"; at present journal of the Academy still published in our time. These steps permitted the development of the true cardiologic speciality during 40s of the twentieth century, due to the vision of Professor Ignacio Chávez, father of Mexican cardiology. Some examples of application are the epistemologic criteria in cardiologycal domains such as the conception of Riva-Rocci's sphygmomanometer in Italy in the nineteenth century and the so-called cardiac metabolic therapy in Mexico of our time, are included.

  20. The Mexican-American Heritage: Developing Cultural Understanding. First Papers on Migrancy and Rural Poverty: An Introduction to the Education of Mexican-Americans in Rural Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Richard; And Others

    The following lectures are included in this volume: Needed: "Turned on" Teachers; The Most Important Advantage; HILT: High Intensity Language Training; The Education Gap: Why Mexican American Children Fail in School; The Mexican American Heritage; The Invisible Poor: The World of the Migrant; and Emergence of the Mexican American. The…

  1. Diabetes is more lethal in Mexicans and Mexican Americans compared to non-Hispanic Whites

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Kelly J; Gonzalez, Maria Elena; Lopez, Ruy; Haffner, Steve M; Stern, Michael P; Gonzalez-Villalpando, Clicerio

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To examine the mortality risk associated with diabetes in the Mexico City Diabetes Study (MCDS) and the San Antonio Heart Study (SAHS). Methods Prospective cohorts conducted 1990-2007 in MCDS and 1979-2000 in SAHS. Mortality risk was examined using Cox proportional hazard models in 1,402 non-Hispanic whites (NHW), 1,907 U.S.-born Mexican Americans (MA), 444 Mexican-born MA, 2,281 Mexico City residents (MCR) between the ages of 35 and 64. Results Age- and sex-adjusted mortality HRs comparing U.S.-born MA, Mexican-born MA and MCR to NHW were 1.09 (95% CI: 0.86, 1.37), 1.23 (95% CI: 0.86, 1.76) and 0.97 (95% CI: 0.77, 1.23), respectively, in non-diabetic individuals; in contrast, mortality risk varied in diabetic individuals with respective HRs of 1.77 (95% CI: 1.20, 2.61), 1.08 (95% CI: 0.59, 1.97) and 2.27 (95% CI: 1.53, 3.35) (interaction p-value=0.0003). Excluding Mexican-born MA and non-diabetic individuals, controlling for medication use, insulin use, fasting glucose levels and duration of diabetes explained a significant proportion of the mortality differential (HRs relative to NHW were 1.31 (95% CI: 0.87, 1.98) in U.S.-born MA and 1.38 (95% CI: 0.89, 2.12) in MCR). Conclusions This study provides evidence that diabetes is more lethal in U.S.-born MA and MCR than in NHW. PMID:21840730

  2. Muscle weakness is associated with diabetes in older Mexicans: The Mexican Health and Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Mark D.; McGrath, Ryan; Zhang, Peng; Markides, Kyriakos S.; Snih, Soham Al; Wong, Rebeca

    2016-01-01

    Background The risk of cardiovascular problems due to diabetes mellitus is highest among older Mexicans, and yet what remains to be determined is the association between muscle weakness and diabetes in this population. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the association between muscle strength and diabetes among Mexican adults greater than 50 years old. Design Cross-sectional. Setting National sample of households in both urban and rural areas. Participants A sub-sample of 1,841 individuals, aged 50 years and older, was included from the 2012 Mexican Health and Aging Study (MHAS). Measurements Strength was assessed using a hand-held dynamometer, and the single largest reading from either hand was normalized to body mass (NGS). Conditional inference tree analyses were used to identify sex-specific NGS weakness thresholds. Linear regression was used to examine the association between NGS and HbA1c, and logistic regression was used to assess the association between weakness and risk of diabetes (HbA1c ≥6.5% [≥48 mmol/mol]), after controlling for age, sex and waist circumference. Results Normalized grip strength was inversely associated with HbA1c (β=−1.56; p<0.001). Optimal sex-specific NGS weakness thresholds to detect diabetes were ≤0.46 and ≤0.30 for men and women respectively. Weakness was associated with significantly increased odds of diabetes (OR: 1.69, 95%CI: 1.37-2.10), even after adjusting for age, sex, and waist circumference. Conclusions NGS was robustly associated with diabetes and other cardiometabolic risk factors in older Mexicans. This simple screen may serve as a valuable tool to identify adults that are at risk for negative health consequences or early mortality, and that might benefit from lifestyle interventions to reduce risk. PMID:27450948

  3. Acculturation, Behavioral Factors, and Family History of Breast Cancer among Mexican and Mexican-American Women

    PubMed Central

    Nodora, Jesse N.; Cooper, Renee; Talavera, Gregory A.; Gallo, Linda; Montenegro, María Mercedes Meza; Komenaka, Ian; Natarajan, Loki; Millán, Luis Enrique Gutierrez; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian; Bondy, Melissa; Brewster, Abenaa; Thompson, Patricia; Martinez, María Elena

    2016-01-01

    Background Incidence rates for breast cancer are higher among Mexican-American (MA) women in the United States than women living in Mexico. Studies have shown higher prevalence of breast cancer risk factors in more acculturated than less acculturated Hispanic/Latinas in the United States. We compared the prevalence of behavioral risk factors and family history of breast cancer by level of acculturation and country of residence in women of Mexican descent. Methods Data were collected from 1,201 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients living in Mexico (n = 581) and MAs in the United States (n = 620). MA participants were categorized into three acculturation groups (Spanish dominant, bilingual, and English dominant); women living in Mexico were used as the referent group. The prevalence of behavioral risk factors and family history of breast cancer were assessed according to acculturation level, adjusting for age at diagnosis and education. Results In the adjusted models, bilingual and English-dominant MAs were significantly more likely to have a body mass index of 30 kg/m2 or greater, consume more than one alcoholic beverage a week, and report having a family history of breast cancer than women living in Mexico. All three U.S. acculturation groups were significantly more likely to have lower total energy expenditure (≤533 kcal/d) than women in Mexico. English-dominant women were significantly less likely to ever smoke cigarettes than the Mexican group. Conclusions Our findings add to the limited scientific literature on the relationships among acculturation, health behavior, and family history of breast cancer in Mexican and MA women. PMID:26189937

  4. Acculturation, Behavioral Factors, and Family History of Breast Cancer among Mexican and Mexican-American Women.

    PubMed

    Nodora, Jesse N; Cooper, Renee; Talavera, Gregory A; Gallo, Linda; Meza Montenegro, María Mercedes; Komenaka, Ian; Natarajan, Loki; Gutiérrez Millán, Luis Enrique; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian; Bondy, Melissa; Brewster, Abenaa; Thompson, Patricia; Martinez, María Elena

    2015-01-01

    Incidence rates for breast cancer are higher among Mexican-American (MA) women in the United States than women living in Mexico. Studies have shown higher prevalence of breast cancer risk factors in more acculturated than less acculturated Hispanic/Latinas in the United States. We compared the prevalence of behavioral risk factors and family history of breast cancer by level of acculturation and country of residence in women of Mexican descent. Data were collected from 1,201 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients living in Mexico (n = 581) and MAs in the United States (n = 620). MA participants were categorized into three acculturation groups (Spanish dominant, bilingual, and English dominant); women living in Mexico were used as the referent group. The prevalence of behavioral risk factors and family history of breast cancer were assessed according to acculturation level, adjusting for age at diagnosis and education. In the adjusted models, bilingual and English-dominant MAs were significantly more likely to have a body mass index of 30 kg/m(2) or greater, consume more than one alcoholic beverage a week, and report having a family history of breast cancer than women living in Mexico. All three U.S. acculturation groups were significantly more likely to have lower total energy expenditure (≤533 kcal/d) than women in Mexico. English-dominant women were significantly less likely to ever smoke cigarettes than the Mexican group. Our findings add to the limited scientific literature on the relationships among acculturation, health behavior, and family history of breast cancer in Mexican and MA women. Copyright © 2015 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Active Commuting to School in Mexican Adolescents: Evidence From the Mexican National Nutrition and Health Survey.

    PubMed

    Jáuregui, Alejandra; Medina, Catalina; Salvo, Deborah; Barquera, Simon; Rivera-Dommarco, Juan A

    2015-08-01

    Travel to school offers a convenient way to increase physical activity (PA) levels in youth. We examined the prevalence and correlates of active commuting to school (ACS) in a nationally representative sample of Mexican adolescents. A secondary objective was to explore the association between ACS and BMI status. Using data of adolescents (10-14 years old) from the 2012 Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey (n = 2952) we ran multivariate regression models to explore the correlates of ACS and to test the association between ACS and BMI z-score or overweight/obesity. Models were adjusted for potential confounders and design effect. 70.8% of adolescents engaged in ACS (walking: 68.8%, bicycling: 2.0%). ACS was negatively associated with travel time, age, mother's education level, household motor vehicle ownership, family socioeconomic status, and living in urban areas or the North region of the country (P < .05). Time in ACS was negatively associated with overweight/obesity: Each additional minute of ACS was associated with a 1% decrease in the odds for being overweight or obese (P < .05). Potential correlates of ACS that may result in benefits for Mexican adolescents are identified. More studies on this relationship are needed to develop interventions aimed at increasing PA through ACS in Mexico.

  6. Mexican immigration and the port-of-entry school.

    PubMed

    Baca, R; Bryan, D; Mclean-bardwell, C; Gomez, F

    1989-01-01

    The results of an immigrant student census in a California port-of-entry school district are used to describe the educational backgrounds of Mexican immigrant students and to distinguish types of Mexican immigrant students by school entry patterns. Interviews with recently arrived Mexican immigrant parents reveal the educational and occupational expectations they hold for their children in the US. The study findings are used as a basis for raising policy questions and generating research issues. The most notable observation from the study is that the children of Mexican immigrants in La Entrada do not migrate once they are in school. Parents may be migrating back and forth between the US and Mexico, but children once in La Entrada do not leave the school to return to school in Mexico. The study suggests that the parents of immigrant students do not know how the US educational system works but they are interested in helping teachers educate their children.

  7. More than science: family learning in a Mexican science museum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briseño-Garzón, Adriana

    2013-06-01

    Latin American audiences living in their countries of origin are poorly understood as museum learners due to the scarcity of research in this field. Through a case study approach, I investigate and report on the ways of learning of 20 Mexican family groups. In particular, I examine the influence of the Mexican sociocultural context on the participant family members' learning outcomes from a Mexican science museum. Conducted in Universum Museo de las Ciencias, a science museum located in Mexico City, this research study is based on the premise that understanding the role of the sociocultural elements of learning is essential to understanding the nature of learning in museums. The cognitive and social outcomes of the participants are discussed in the light of the sociocultural elements that define Mexicans as museum learners.

  8. Mexican norms for the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Armáss, Omar; Barabasz, Arreed F

    2005-07-01

    Normative data for the Mexican adaptation of the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (SHSS:C) are presented. Twenty-seven raters administered the scale to 513 Mexican volunteers. Score distribution, item analysis, and reliability of the SHSS:C are presented and compared to other international norming studies. The findings show that the Mexican adaptation of the SHSS:C has psychometric properties essentially comparable to those of the Dutch, German, Italian, and United States reference samples. However, the elevated sample mean suggests Mexicans may have an elevated ability to engage in hypnotic behavior, thus they would likely be especially good candidates for hypnotherapeutic interventions that would better the health options currently available.

  9. Studies of Electroweak Symmetry Breaking at Mexican Institutions

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz Cruz, J. Lorenzo

    2006-09-25

    This paper is aimed to review the contribution made by scientists working at Mexican Institutions on the subject of Electroweak symmetry breaking. This review covers the period from the 80 up to the present.

  10. B Physics at the D0 experiment A Mexican review

    SciTech Connect

    De La Cruz-Burelo, E.

    2010-07-29

    On April of 1992 a Mexican group from Cinvestav officially joined the D0 experiment, one of the two experiments in the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. The seed for this experimental group on high energy physics from Cinvestav was planted in Mexico in some measure by Augusto Garcia, to whom this workshop is in memorial. Augusto's efforts and support to groups dedicated to this area was clear and important. Some of these seeds have given origin to today's established Mexican groups on experimental high energy physics, one example of this is the Mexican group at D0. I present here a short review of some of the D0 results on which the Mexican group has contributed, emphasizing the last decade, which I have witnessed.

  11. Chronic progressive disseminated histoplasmosis in a Mexican cockfighter.

    PubMed

    Flores-Franco, René Agustín; Gómez-Díaz, Antonio; de Jesús Fernández-Alonso, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We present illustrative images from a Mexican 58-year-old man who had the occupation of cockfighting from childhood and presented with chronic progressive disseminated histoplasmosis with primarily cutaneous manifestations. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  12. Mexican Americans and historical trauma theory: a theoretical perspective.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Antonio L

    2009-01-01

    The observed intergenerational stress response to negative social and historical events is at the core of historical trauma theory, which has been applied to Native Americans, African Americans, and Pacific Islanders, among others. The historical and social experiences of the Mexican population living in the United States have many parallels that lend themselves to the application of historical trauma theory to macro-level and micro-level influences on access to health care, physical health status, and mental health status, including substance abuse among Mexican Americans. This article highlights the legacy of Spanish colonialism and Anglo-American neo-colonialism on Mexicans and Mexican Americans in the southwestern United States through a potential application of historical trauma theory.

  13. United States -- Mexican joint ventures: A case history approach

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, N.L.; Chidester, R.J.; Hughes, K.R.; Fowler, R.A.

    1993-03-01

    Because the Mexican government has encouraged investment in Mexico by increasing the percentage of ownership of a Mexican business that a US company can hold, joint ventures are more attractive now than they had been in the past. This study provides preliminary information for US renewable energy companies who are interested in forming a joint venture with a Mexican company. This report is not intended to be a complete reference but does identifies a number of important factors that should be observed when forming a Mexican joint venture: (1)Successful joint ventures achieve the goals of each partner. (2)It is essential that all parties agree to the allocation of responsibilities. (3)Put everything in writing. (4)Research in depth the country or countries in which you are considering doing business.

  14. The Food Environment in an Urban Mexican American Community

    PubMed Central

    Lisabeth, Lynda D; Sánchez, Brisa N; Escobar, James; Hughes, Rebecca; Meurer, William J; Zuniga, Belinda; Garcia, Nelda; Brown, Devin L; Morgenstern, Lewis B

    2010-01-01

    The objective was to determine whether ethnic composition of neighborhoods is associated with number and type of food stores in an urban, Mexican American US community. Data were from a commercial food store data source and the US Census. Multivariate count models were used to test associations with adjustment for neighborhood demographics, income, and commercialization. Neighborhoods at the 75th percentile of percent Mexican American (76%) had nearly four times the number of convenience stores (RR=3.9, 95% CI: 2.2–7.0) compared with neighborhoods at the 25th percentile (36%). Percent Mexican American in the neighborhood was not associated with the availability of other food store types (supermarkets, grocery stores, specialty stores, convenience stores with gas stations) in the adjusted model. The impact of greater access to convenience stores on Mexican American residents' diets requires exploration. PMID:20167528

  15. Language Learning on the U.S.-Mexican Border.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Scott; Kuravackal, Kate

    1998-01-01

    Describes modifications to the four original requirements of the foreign language program at the International School of the Americas, an experimental school located 150 miles from the Mexican border. (SR)

  16. Chronic Progressive Disseminated Histoplasmosis in a Mexican Cockfighter

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Franco, René Agustín; Gómez-Díaz, Antonio; de Jesús Fernández-Alonso, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We present illustrative images from a Mexican 58-year-old man who had the occupation of cockfighting from childhood and presented with chronic progressive disseminated histoplasmosis with primarily cutaneous manifestations. PMID:25568180

  17. Curanderas and Brujas--Herbal Healing in Mexican American Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toohey, Jack V.; Dezelsky, Thomas L.

    1980-01-01

    Health educators should strive to understand the origins and roles of curanderas (herbalists) and brujas (witches) in Mexican American culture and appreciate both the advantages and the related problems that these people bring to their patients and their communities. (CMJ)

  18. Molecular thrombophilic profile in Mexican patients with idiopathic recurrent pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    López-Jiménez, J J; Porras-Dorantes, Á; Juárez-Vázquez, C I; García-Ortiz, J E; Fuentes-Chávez, C A; Lara-Navarro, I J; Jaloma-Cruz, A R

    2016-10-05

    Idiopathic recurrent pregnancy loss (IRPL) is defined by three or more consecutive miscarriages occurring before the twentieth week of gestation as a result of unidentified etiological factors. The results of previous studies have indicated that prothrombotic factors play a pathogenic role in early and late pregnancy. This study aimed to identify inherited prothrombotic and hypofibrinolytic risk factors in Mexican-Mestizo patients with IRPL. Fifty-six women with IRPL and 50 control women with at least two full-term pregnancies and no history of RPL were included in this case-control study. Four prothrombotic (F5 G1691A, F2 G20210A, MTHFR C677T-A1298C) and one hypofibrinolytic (PAI1 4G/5G) restricted fragment length polymorphisms were subjected to molecular analysis. In the case of hypofibrinolytic ACE Ins/Del (I/D), identification was performed by direct PCR. The independent risk correlated with the presence of polymorphisms in IRPL patients was estimated using odds ratio (OR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI). MTHFR 677TT was the most frequent prothrombotic factor in the IRPL group (23%), followed by the compound-heterozygous C677T-A1298C (16%) and heterozygous F2 20210GA (3.6%). The heterozygous ACE I/D (62%) was the main hypofibrinolytic risk factor of IRPL, followed by the homozygote PAI1 4G/4G (18%). The ACE I/D polymorphism was the only significantly different factor among the cases and controls. The dominant genetic model D/D+I/D vs I/I showed an OR (95%CI) of 2.89 (1.22-6.89) and P = 0.019 in Mexican-Mestizo women. The results of this study support an association between the ACE I/D polymorphism and IRPL risk in a Mexican population.

  19. Using msa-2b as a molecular marker for genotyping Mexican isolates of Babesia bovis.

    PubMed

    Genis, Alma D; Perez, Jocelin; Mosqueda, Juan J; Alvarez, Antonio; Camacho, Minerva; Muñoz, Maria de Lourdes; Rojas, Carmen; Figueroa, Julio V

    2009-12-01

    Variable merozoite surface antigens of Babesia bovis are exposed glycoproteins having a role in erythrocyte invasion. Members of this gene family include msa-1 and msa-2 (msa-2c, msa-2a(1), msa-2a(2) and msa-2b). To determine the sequence variation among B. bovis Mexican isolates using msa-2b as a genetic marker, PCR amplicons corresponding to msa-2b were cloned and plasmids carrying the corresponding inserts were purified and sequenced. Comparative analysis of nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences revealed distinct degrees of variability and identity among the coding gene sequences obtained from 16 geographically different Mexican B. bovis isolates and a reference strain. Clustal-W multiple alignments of the MSA-2b deduced amino acid sequences performed with the 17 B. bovis Mexican isolates, revealed the identification of three genotypes with a distinct set each of amino acid residues present at the variable region: Genotype I represented by the MO7 strain (in vitro culture-derived from the Mexico isolate) as well as RAD, Chiapas-1, Tabasco and Veracruz-3 isolates; Genotype II, represented by the Jalisco, Mexico and Veracruz-2 isolates; and Genotype III comprising the sequences from most of the isolates studied, Tamaulipas-1, Chiapas-2, Guerrero-1, Nayarit, Quintana Roo, Nuevo Leon, Tamaulipas-2, Yucatan and Guerrero-2. Moreover, these three genotypes could be discriminated against each other by using a PCR-RFLP approach. The results suggest that occurrence of indels within the variable region of msa-2b sequences can be useful markers for identifying a particular genotype present in field populations of B. bovis isolated from infected cattle in Mexico.

  20. HLA-DR6 association confers increased resistance to T. rubrum onychomycosis in Mexican Mestizos.

    PubMed

    Asz-Sigall, Daniel; López-García, Lirio; Vega-Memije, María Elisa; Lacy-Niebla, Rosa María; García-Corona, Cristina; Ramírez-Rentería, Claudia; Granados, Julio; Villa, Antonio; Ameen, Mahreen; Arenas, Roberto

    2010-12-01

    Onychomycosis is multifactorial in origin. Studies have suggested an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance and human leukocyte antigen DR4 (HLA-DR4) has been shown to protect against onychomycosis in an Ashkenazi Jewish population. This study investigates HLA class II association in a Mexican Mestizo population with Trichophyton rubrum onychomycosis. This was a prospective case-control study. Mexican Mestizos with a clinical diagnosis of onychomycosis and culture positive for T. rubrum were recruited, together with age- and sex-matched controls. First-degree relatives were also investigated for onychomycosis. Case-control samples were HLA typed by polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific primer based analysis. Twenty-one cases and 42 controls were recruited with a mean age of 40 years (range: 18-58 years). HLA-DR6 was found in seven (33%) cases and 19 (45%) controls [P < 0.023, odds ratio (OR) = 0.088, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.01-0.71]. Six (29%) cases and three (7%) controls had an affected child (P < 0.043, OR = 9.15, 95% CI: 1.07-78.31), and 13 (62%) cases and 12 (29%) controls had an affected first-degree relative (P < 0.02, OR = 4.0, 95% CI: 1.1-14.3). These results suggest that HLA-DR6 confers protection against the development of onychomycosis in a Mexican Mestizo population. Having an affected first-degree relative significantly increases the risk of onychomycosis, suggesting genetic susceptibility. © 2010 The International Society of Dermatology.

  1. 47 CFR 101.1527 - Canadian and Mexican coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Canadian and Mexican coordination. 101.1527... Canadian and Mexican coordination. (a) A licensee of bands 71.0-76.0, 81.0-86.0, 92-94 GHz and 94.1-95 GHz... States borders, that area in each country within 35 miles of the borders; and (2) For a station...

  2. 47 CFR 101.1527 - Canadian and Mexican coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Canadian and Mexican coordination. 101.1527... Canadian and Mexican coordination. (a) A licensee of bands 71.0-76.0, 81.0-86.0, 92-94 GHz and 94.1-95 GHz... States borders, that area in each country within 35 miles of the borders; and (2) For a station...

  3. 47 CFR 101.1527 - Canadian and Mexican coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Canadian and Mexican coordination. 101.1527... Canadian and Mexican coordination. (a) A licensee of bands 71.0-76.0, 81.0-86.0, 92-94 GHz and 94.1-95 GHz... States borders, that area in each country within 35 miles of the borders; and (2) For a station...

  4. 47 CFR 101.1527 - Canadian and Mexican coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Canadian and Mexican coordination. 101.1527... Canadian and Mexican coordination. (a) A licensee of bands 71.0-76.0, 81.0-86.0, 92-94 GHz and 94.1-95 GHz... States borders, that area in each country within 35 miles of the borders; and (2) For a station...

  5. Patterns of contraceptive use among Mexican-origin women

    PubMed Central

    White, Kari L.; Potter, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mexican women in the United States (US) have higher rates of fertility compared to other ethnic groups and women in Mexico. Whether variation in women’s access to family planning services or patterns of contraceptive use contributes to this higher fertility has received little attention. OBJECTIVE We explore Mexican women’s contraceptive use, taking into account women’s place in the reproductive life course. METHODS Using nationally representative samples from the US (National Survey of Family Growth) and Mexico (Encuesta National de la Dinámica Demográfica), we compared the parity-specific frequency of contraceptive use and fertility intentions for non-migrant women, foreign-born Mexicans in the US, US-born Mexicans, and whites. RESULTS Mexican women in the US were less likely to use IUDs and more likely to use hormonal contraception than women in Mexico. Female sterilization was the most common method among higher parity women in both the US and Mexico, however, foreign-born Mexicans were less likely to be sterilized, and the least likely to use any permanent contraceptive method. Although foreign-born Mexicans were slightly less likely to report that they did not want more children, differences in method use remained after controlling for women’s fertility intentions. CONCLUSION At all parities, foreign-born Mexicans used less effective methods. These findings suggest that varying access to family planning services may contribute to variation in women’s contraceptive use. COMMENTS Future studies are needed to clarify the extent to which disparities in fertility result from differences in contraceptive access. PMID:26146485

  6. 47 CFR 101.1527 - Canadian and Mexican coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Canadian and Mexican coordination. 101.1527... Canadian and Mexican coordination. (a) A licensee of bands 71.0-76.0, 81.0-86.0, 92-94 GHz and 94.1-95 GHz must comply with § 1.928(f) of this chapter, which pertains to coordination with Canada. (b) A licensee...

  7. Hobby or job? Mexican female health workers.

    PubMed

    Harrison, M E

    1994-01-01

    A critical analysis of the role and status of female health workers in the primary health care service (PHC) of the Secretary of Health in the Federal District of Mexico is presented. Women are key workers in the health service; however, since the creation of the PHC service, women appear to have been kept in low-pay, low-status jobs. Data from questionnaires and in-depth interviews with female health workers in the Federal District illustrate the situation. Female health workers' status is determined by the structure and operation of the PHC system; by family and personal needs; by the cultural context of Mexican society; and by the fact that some female health workers view their job as a hobby, placing family considerations above career enhancement.

  8. Religiosity and Migration Aspirations among Mexican Youth.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Steven; Marsiglia, Flavio Francisco; Ayers, Stephanie L

    2015-02-01

    International migration has become an important topic of discussion from a policy and humanitarian perspective. Part of the debate includes a renewed interest in understanding the factors that influence decisions about migration to the US among Mexican youth still residing in their country of origin. The purpose of this study was to advance knowledge specifically about internal and external religiosity and their influence on youths' migration aspirations. The data for this study were collected in 2007 from students enrolled in an alternative high school program located in the state of Guanajuato, Mexico. The findings indicated that as external religiosity increases, the desire to work or live in the USA decreases. Furthermore, as internal religiosity increases, the desire to work or live in the USA and plans to migrate increase. The results are interpreted and discussed in light of previous research on religious and cultural norm adherence.

  9. Migration and relationship power among Mexican women.

    PubMed

    Parrado, Emilio A; Flippen, Chenoa A; McQuiston, Chris

    2005-05-01

    Our study drew on original data collected in Durham, NC, and four sending communities in Mexico to examine differences in women's relationship power that are associated with migration and residence in the United States. We analyzed the personal, relationship, and social resources that condition the association between migration and women's power and the usefulness of the Relationship Control Scale (RCS) for capturing these effects. We found support for perspectives that emphasize that migration may simultaneously mitigate and reinforce gender inequities. Relative to their nonmigrant peers, Mexican women in the United States average higher emotional consonance with their partners, but lower relationship control and sexual negotiation power. Methodologically, we found that the RCS is internally valid and useful for measuring the impact of resources on women's power. However, the scale appears to combine diverse dimensions of relationship power that were differentially related to migration in our study.

  10. Mexican Space Agency and NASA Agreement

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-03-18

    Leland Melvin (right), NASA Associate Administrator for Education, along with the head of the Mexican Space Agency, Dr. Francisco Javier Mendieta Jimenez pose for a photo after signing a Reimbursable Space Act Agreement (RSAA) for a NASA International Internship Program as NASA Administrator Charles Bolden looks on, Monday, March 18, 2013 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The International Internship Program is a pilot program developed at NASA which will provide and avenue for non-US students to come to NASA for an internship. US students will be paired with a foreign student to work on a NASA research project under the guidance of a mentor. This is the first NASA-Mexico agreement signed. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  11. Mexican Space Agency and NASA Agreement

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-03-18

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden (center) presents Dr. Francisco Javier Mendieta Jimenez, Director General of the Mexican Space Agency, a NASA montage in honor of the Reimbursable Space Act Agreement (RSAA) signed between the two agencies, Monday, March 18, 2013 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Leland Melvin (right), NASA Associate Administrator for Education looks on. The International Internship Program is a pilot program developed at NASA which will provide and avenue for non-US students to come to NASA for an internship. US students will be paired with a foreign student to work on a NASA research project under the guidance of a mentor. This is the first NASA-Mexico agreement signed. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  12. Mexican Space Agency and NASA Agreement

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-03-18

    Leland Melvin (right), NASA Associate Administrator for Education, along with the head of the Mexican Space Agency, Dr. Francisco Javier Mendieta Jimenez shake hands after signing a Reimbursable Space Act Agreement (RSAA) for a NASA International Internship Program as NASA Administrator Charles Bolden looks on, Monday, March 18, 2013 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The International Internship Program is a pilot program developed at NASA which will provide and avenue for non-US students to come to NASA for an internship. US students will be paired with a foreign student to work on a NASA research project under the guidance of a mentor. This is the first NASA-Mexico agreement signed. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  13. Researchers study tsunami generated by Mexican earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filonov, Anatoliy E.

    Barra de Navidad is a small Mexican tourist town on the coast of a lagoon that is buffered from the Pacific Ocean by a narrow strip of sand. The town is a favorite rest spot of American and Canadian tourists. On October 9, 1995, at 9:36 local time (1536 GMT), a strong earthquake that measured Mx = 8.0 disrupted the lives of the townspeople. The epicenter of the earthquake was located in the ocean at 18°51.5‧N and 104°8.4‧W [Ortiz and Synolakis, 1996], but it destroyed many hotels and homes, and the shifting of the land tore up the highway that connects Barra de Navidad and Manzanillo. Crevices of up to 3 m wide opened across the road, and bridges over small rivers were knocked down. In an instant, the town was disconnected from the outside world. Frightened townspeople roamed the streets, assessing the destruction.

  14. Gender, acculturation, and health among Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Bridget K; Read, Jen'nan Ghazal; Krueger, Patrick M

    2010-12-01

    This study examines whether the relationship between acculturation and physical health varies by gender among Mexican Americans, and if the mechanisms that mediate the acculturation-health relationship operate differently by gender. Using the 1998-2007 National Health Interview Study, we construct a composite measure of acculturation and estimate regression models for the total number of health conditions, hypertension, heart disease, and diabetes. Immigrants with the lowest levels of acculturation are the healthiest, but this association is stronger for men. Medical care plays a central role in accounting for gender and acculturation differences across health outcomes-increased access to and utilization of medical care is associated with worse health, which suggests that better health among recent arrivals (particularly men) partially results from their lack of knowledge about their own poor health.

  15. Mexican geothermal development and the future

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, J.M.E.V.

    1998-10-01

    Geothermics in Mexico started in 1954, by drilling the first geothermal well in Pathe, State of Hidalgo, which reached a depth of 237 meters. In 1959 electrical generation from geothermal origin began, with an installed capacity of 3.5 MW. From 1959 to 1994 Mexico increased its installed capacity to 753 MW, by developing three geothermal fields: Cerro Prieto, Los Azufres, and Los Humeros. Currently, 177 wells produce steam at a rate of 36 tons per hour (t/h) each. Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE, Federal Commission of Electricity) has planned to increase the geothermal-electric installed capacity through construction and installation of several projects. Repowering of operating units and development of new geothermal zones will also allow Mexican geothermal growth.

  16. [Epidemiological characteristics of depressed Mexican pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Ceballos-Martínez, Inés; Sandoval-Jurado, Luis; Jaimes-Mundo, Erika; Medina-Peralta, Gloria; Madera-Gamboa, Joel; Fernández-Arias, Yuri Francisco

    2010-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of depression in pregnant women, the epidemiological characteristics and associated factors. A cross-comparison, with a sample of 220 pregnant women between 18 and 32 weeks gestation. We excluded patients with depression six months before the current pregnancy. Depressed women were 6.4 %, mean age 26 years and 21.4 % were adolescent. The majority women were high school students (50 %); 71.4 % belong to a low medium socioeconomic status; 21.4 % were without a partner; 35.7 % had depression history in the family and 28.6 % had a history of prior antidepressant treatment. The prevalence of depression in Mexican pregnant women was low. Risk factors associated to depression were young age, low socio-economical status, a lack of a partner, a history of depression in the family.

  17. Religiosity and Migration Aspirations among Mexican Youth

    PubMed Central

    Marsiglia, Flavio Francisco; Ayers, Stephanie L.

    2014-01-01

    International migration has become an important topic of discussion from a policy and humanitarian perspective. Part of the debate includes a renewed interest in understanding the factors that influence decisions about migration to the US among Mexican youth still residing in their country of origin. The purpose of this study was to advance knowledge specifically about internal and external religiosity and their influence on youths' migration aspirations. The data for this study were collected in 2007 from students enrolled in an alternative high school program located in the state of Guanajuato, Mexico. The findings indicated that as external religiosity increases, the desire to work or live in the USA decreases. Furthermore, as internal religiosity increases, the desire to work or live in the USA and plans to migrate increase. The results are interpreted and discussed in light of previous research on religious and cultural norm adherence. PMID:25663825

  18. Preferences for facial profiles between Mexican Americans and Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Mejia-Maidl, Martha; Evans, Carla A; Viana, Grace; Anderson, Nina K; Giddon, Donald B

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine differences between Mexican American and Caucasian judges in the acceptability of lip protrusion in computer animations of two male and two female persons of Mexican descent. Thirty Caucasians and 30 Mexican Americans of varying age, sex, education, and level of acculturation responded to facial profile computer animations that moved lips from an extreme protrusive to an extreme retrusive position. Judges were asked to complete two tasks: (1) to press the mouse button when the image was perceived to be most pleasing (MP) and (2) to determine the boundaries of a zone of acceptability (ZA) of lip protrusion by pressing the mouse button when the moving image became acceptable and releasing it when the image of the protrusion became unacceptable. In general, Mexican Americans preferred upper or lower lip positions to be less protrusive than did Caucasians. Larger mean ZAs for both upper and lower lip positions with male computer animation images and lower lip position for female computer animation images were found among Caucasians when compared with low-acculturated Mexican Americans. A significant mean difference in midpoint of acceptability (MA) for lip position between Caucasians and low-acculturated Mexican Americans was observed for both upper and lower lip position with female computer animation images.

  19. Neighbourhood ethnic composition and diet among Mexican-Americans

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Ortiz, Carlos A; Ju, Hyunsu; Eschbach, Karl; Kuo, Yang-Fang; Gaadwin, James S

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We explore the association between a neighbourhood's ethnic composition and the foods and nutrients consumed by Mexican-Americans. Design Cross-sectional survey of a large national sample. from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-94), was linked to the 1990 Census. The outcomes were food frequencies and serum levels of micronutrients. The variable of interest was percentage of Mexican-Americans at the census tract level. Setting United States. Subjects A total of 5306 Mexican-American men and women aged 17-90 years. Results Increased percentage of Mexican-Americans at the census tract level was associated with less consumption of fruits, carrots, spinach/greens and broccoli and with lower serum levels of Se, Iycopene, α-carotene, vitamin C and folate. By conrrast, increased percentage of Mexican-Americans at the census tract level was associated with more consumption of corn, tomatoes, hot red chilli peppers and legumes such as beans, lentils or chickpeas. Conclusions An increased percentage of Mexican-Americans at the census tract level was associated with less consumption of selective foods (e.g. some fruits, broccoli) and low levels of serum Se or vitamin C, but it was associated with more consumption of other foods (e.g. legumes, tomatoes, corn products) that may have positive effects on health in this population. PMID:19254428

  20. Caloric beverage consumption patterns in Mexican children

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mexico has seen a very steep increase in child obesity level. Little is known about caloric beverage intake in this country as well as all other countries outside a few high income countries. This study examines overall patterns and trends in all caloric beverages from two nationally representative surveys from Mexico. Methods The two nationally representative dietary intake surveys (1999 and 2006) from Mexico are used to study caloric beverage intake in 17, 215 children. The volume (ml) and caloric energy (kcal) contributed by all beverages consumed by the sample subjects were measured. Results are weighted to be nationally representative. Results The trends from the dietary intake surveys showed very large increases in caloric beverages among pre-school and school children. The contribution of whole milk and sugar-sweetened juices was an important finding. Mexican pre-school children consumed 27.8% of their energy from caloric beverages in 2006 and school children consumed 20.7% of their energy from caloric beverages during the same time. The three major categories of beverage intake are whole milk, fruit juice with various sugar and water combinations and carbonated and noncarbonated sugared-beverages. Conclusion The Mexican government, greatly concerned about obesity, has identified the large increase in caloric beverages from whole milk, juices and soft drinks as a key target and is initiating major changes to address this problem. They have already used the data to shift 20 million persons in their welfare and feeding programs from whole to 1.5% fat milk and in a year will shift to nonfat milk. They are using these data to revise school beverage policies and national regulations and taxation policies related to an array of less healthful caloric beverages. PMID:20964842

  1. Persistent organochlorine pesticides in Mexican butter.

    PubMed

    Waliszewski, S M; Villalobos-Pietrini, R; Gómez-Arroyo, S; Infanzón, R M

    2003-04-01

    Organochlorine pesticides have been used in Mexico in malaria control programmes against ectoparasites and as seed dresser. Owing to their chemical stability, they tend to accumulate in the lipid part of the organisms. The stored pesticides are excreted with the endogenous fat during milk production. The aim was to monitor the organochlorine pesticide levels in butter manufactured in Mexico. From the pesticides, only HCB, beta-HCH, pp'-DDT, op'-DDT and pp'-DDE with major frequency and levels were detected. The HCB mean level was low at 0.008 mg kg(-1) on a fat basis. From the HCH isomer, only the beta-HCH at 0.065 mg kg(-1) on a fat basis was determined, remaining as the main contaminant of the monitored butters. Among DDTs, pp'-DDE was the major constituent (0.043 mg kg(-1) on a fat basis) followed by pp'-DDT (0.036 mg kg(-1)) and op'-DDT (0.009 mg kg(-1)). Comparing the previous study (1994) and this one (2001), all organochlorine pesticides had a descendent tendency; beta-HCH decreased from 0.095 to 0.065 mg kg(-1) on a fat basis, whereas the total DDT decreased from 0.056 to 0.047 mg kg(-1), pp'-DDT from 0.050 to 0.036 mg kg(-1), op'-DDT from 0.018 to 0.009 mg kg(-1), while pp'-DDE increased from 0.032 to 0.043 mg kg(-1). The decreased DDT levels in Mexican butters is caused by the substitution of organochlorine insecticides with pyrethroids used by the Mexican Ministry of Health since 1999 in sanitary programmes.

  2. PROFAM expands Mexican family planning clinics.

    PubMed

    1983-01-01

    Mexico's private, nonprofit social marketing company, known as PROFAM, intends to expand its family planning clinics to marginal urban areas. The clinics are part of PROFAM's push to diversify social marketing outlets for contraceptive products and other birth control methods. PROFAM expects to establish 3 new clinics, possibly including a pregnancy test laboratory, a small 1-doctor clinic, and a large clinic housing an operating room. 1 clinic will be located outside the Mexico City area, the program's traditional boundaries. The company currently runs 2 small clinics and a pregnancy testing laboratory in Ciudad Netzahualcoyti, a community of 3.5 million on Mexico City's outskirts. PROFAM recently obtaine d government approval to sell condoms in food stores, which should increase distribtuion and sales. Currently, the company sells over 1 million high quality, lubricated condoms each month, accounting for over half of the Mexican market. Distribution covers 85% of the country's drugstore. Program setbacks occurred in 1981, when the Mexican government cancelled PROFAM's sales permits for all contraceptive products except condoms. Cancelled products included an oral contraceptive and 3 vaginal spermicides. These 4 products had provided nearly 100,000 couple years of protection in 1979 and an estimated 120,000 CYP 1980. During 1979 and 1980, condoms provided about 27,000 and 60,000 CYP, respectively. PROFAM had relied heavily on the pill and spermicides because its early studies showed condoms had a negative image in Mexico, due largely to the product's association with extramarital affairs. To counter this, PROFAM launched a widespread, free product sampling program in 1979, along with a continuing educational and advertising drive. Subsequent consumer surveys revealed a marked increase in product acceptance, with PROFAM's condom becoming the most widely known brand available in Mexico.

  3. Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma in mexican patients.

    PubMed

    Arista-Nasr, Julian; Gutierrez-Villalobos, Lisa; Nuncio, Juan; Maldonaldo, Hector; Bornstein-Quevedo, Leticia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this report is to describe the frequency, clinical, and morphologic characteristics of fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma in Mexican patients. Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma (FLHCC) is a rare variant of hepatocellular carcinoma. Although this tumor appears to be predominant among the Caucasian population of the U.S, FLHCC has been described in many other countries. The frequency and characteristics of FLHCC in Latin American population is almost unknown. The clinico-pathologic characteristics of seven (5.8%) Mexican patients with FLHCC, obtained among 121 hepato-cellular carcinomas are described. The frequency of these tumors was compared with the frequency reported in other geographic areas in the international literature between 1980 and 1999. There were four women and three men. Two patients had taken oral contraceptives for six months and a year prior to diagnosis; another patient had positive serology for the hepatitis B virus. Common symptoms included a palpable mass, abdominal pain and weight loss; two patients presented jaundice. In two patients the tumor had been removed eight and three years previously, and they were readmitted when FLHCC recurred. In three patients the diagnosis was suspected in radiological studies (computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance). Laboratory tests were non-specific. In four patients, resection of the tumor was performed, and in the remaining three the neoplasm was diagnosed by percutaneous hepatic biopsy. Two patients had died of disease at the time of the study, and another was alive with recurrent disease. fibrolamellar hepatocarcinoma is an uncommon, but not an exceptional neoplasm in our population and represents 5.8% of all hepatocarcinomas reviewed.

  4. A cross-national comparison of Mexican and Mexican American couples using the Marital Satisfaction Inventory-Revised (Spanish).

    PubMed

    Negy, Charles; Snyder, Douglas K; Diáz-Loving, Rolando

    2004-03-01

    This study examined psychometric properties of the Spanish translation of the Marital Satisfaction Inventory-Revised (MSI-R) in a sample of 71 Spanish-speaking couples in Mexico. Results from this sample were compared to findings obtained from 65 Mexican American couples who completed the MSI-R in Spanish. Both the internal consistency and factor structure of the Spanish MSI-R with Mexican couples were found to be comparable to findings on the Spanish MSI-R for Mexican American couples. Moreover, multivariate analysis indicated no significant mean profile differences between these two groups as a function of nationality, gender, or nationality-by-gender interaction. These findings offer initial evidence toward establishing the appropriateness of the Spanish MSI-R for use with Spanish-dominant Mexican couples.

  5. [The family dysfunction as a risk factor of obesity in Mexican school children].

    PubMed

    González-Rico, José Luis; Vásquez-Garibay, Edgar M; Cabrera-Pivaral, Carlos E; González-Pérez, Guillermo J; Troyo-Sanromán, Rogelio

    2012-01-01

    it has been demonstrated that children obesity is a multifactorial disease and probably, the alteration of the family dynamic is another potential risk factor. The objective was to identify the association between obesity and family dysfunction in school children who attend to a family medicine unit. case and control study at Mexican Social Security Institute in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. Sociodemographic factors and family dynamic of obese and non-obese subjects (n = 452) of six to nine years old from nuclear families were achieved. the association between family dysfunction and obesity was [OR = 1.63 (1.08-2.46), p = 0.01]. Area II, Identity formation, and area VI, Discipline and methods, showed a lower score in cases of children with obesity (p < 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively). In a logistic regression model family dysfunction [RM 1.79 (1.19, 2.71), p = 0.005] and low literacy of mothers [RM 1.61 (1.06, 2.45), p = 0.02)] were risk factors for obesity in school children. the results showed an association between family dysfunction and obesity in school children. We suggest to consider it in the prevention of obesity in Mexican school children.

  6. Acoustic surveys for Mexican spotted owls (Strix occidentalis lucida): An analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowles, Ann E.; Martindell, Chris; Plotkin, Kenneth J.; Ikelheimer, Bruce; Lavallee, Tim

    2002-05-01

    During acoustic surveys for Mexican spotted owls, the effective detection range is presumed to be 0.25 mi (433 m). However, variations within and between surveys are observed, leading to a variance in owl density estimates. While owl behavior may explain some variation, topography and ambient noise are also likely to be important. To determine the influence of these factors, data from acoustic surveys for Mexican spotted owls in the Gila National Forest (April-July, 2000-2001) were examined. Measurements of owl and human call levels were made with a Sony TCD-10 Pro II DAT equipped with an ACO 7013 microphone. Ambient noise was collected using 40 Larson-Davis 820 and 824 sound level meters in owl activity centers. Wyle Laboratories NMSIM software was used to model propagation of owl and human calls. Owls produced calls with estimated maximum source levels of 92-98-dB SPL. Human callers produced maximum source levels of 88-95-dB SPL. Detection was possible out to more than 2 km under ideal conditions, but topography and ambient noise had a large effect. Corrections for these factors would greatly improve estimates of area surveyed, and thus owl density estimates. [Work supported by the U.S. Air Force, Air Combat Command.

  7. Weight Status of Mexican Immigrant Women: A Comparison With Women in Mexico and With US-Born Mexican American Women

    PubMed Central

    Ritterman-Weintraub, Miranda L.; Fernald, Lia C. H.; Kaufer-Horwitz, Martha

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the association between birthplace, residence, or years in the United States and actual weight (body mass index), perceived weight accuracy, or provider screens for overweight or obesity among Mexican immigrant women. Methods. We used linked data from Health and Nutrition Examination Survey waves 2001–2006 and 2006 National Mexican Health and Nutrition Survey to compare 513 immigrants with 9527 women in Mexico and 342 US-born Mexican American women. Results. Immigrants were more likely than women in Mexico to be obese and to perceive themselves as overweight or obese after adjustment for confounders. Recent immigrants had similar weight-related outcomes as women in Mexico. Immigrants were less likely to be obese than were US-born Mexican Americans. Within the overweight or obese population, reported provider screens were higher among immigrants than among women in Mexico, but lower than among US-born Mexican Americans. US residency of at least 5 years but less than 20 years and reporting insufficient provider screens elevated obesity risk. Conclusions. Mexican-origin women in the United States and Mexico are at risk for overweight and obesity. We found no evidence of a “healthy immigrant” effect. PMID:23865649

  8. Weight status of Mexican immigrant women: a comparison with women in Mexico and with US-born Mexican American women.

    PubMed

    Guendelman, Sylvia D; Ritterman-Weintraub, Miranda L; Fernald, Lia C H; Kaufer-Horwitz, Martha

    2013-09-01

    We assessed the association between birthplace, residence, or years in the United States and actual weight (body mass index), perceived weight accuracy, or provider screens for overweight or obesity among Mexican immigrant women. We used linked data from Health and Nutrition Examination Survey waves 2001-2006 and 2006 National Mexican Health and Nutrition Survey to compare 513 immigrants with 9527 women in Mexico and 342 US-born Mexican American women. Immigrants were more likely than women in Mexico to be obese and to perceive themselves as overweight or obese after adjustment for confounders. Recent immigrants had similar weight-related outcomes as women in Mexico. Immigrants were less likely to be obese than were US-born Mexican Americans. Within the overweight or obese population, reported provider screens were higher among immigrants than among women in Mexico, but lower than among US-born Mexican Americans. US residency of at least 5 years but less than 20 years and reporting insufficient provider screens elevated obesity risk. Mexican-origin women in the United States and Mexico are at risk for overweight and obesity. We found no evidence of a "healthy immigrant" effect.

  9. Familism, machismo and child rearing practices among Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    Tamez, E G

    1981-09-01

    Mexican Americans form the 2nd largest minority group in the US. Fertility is 50% higher than in any other ethnic group. Income levels are inordinately low. In 1970, 42% of Mexican Americans were indigent, making approxiamtely 4200 annually. The Mexican American poor can be categorized into newly arrived aliens or 2nd or 3rd generation American citizens. In the 1st instance, the couple is young and English is not spoken. 2nd or 3rd generation Mexican Americans speak English. The persistent socioeconomic status of the Mexican American relates directly to the level of education. 52% of all Mexican Americans do not finish high school. Paz and Remos described the Mexican in terms of Adler's inferiority model. Murillo stated that to an individual, the family--whether nuclear or extended--is the center of life. The inherent responsibility is that the individual behave properly lest the family be disgraced. The family provides emotional and material security. Familism was seen as a deterrant to utilization of health care services, although some studies claim opposing views. Familism and occupational stability related positively to seeking medical care when ill. Hayden believed that supreme male dominance, individualism, pride, wife beating, aversion to contraceptives, and other characteristics were attributable to machismo. A predominant pattern in Mexican American culture is that of elders' ordering young men and women to establish obedience and male dominance. The husband represents authority and the wife-mother maintains a role of complete devotion to her husband and children. Role differentiation is taught implicitly and explicitly from infancy. Studies on the psychological differences between the sexes indicated that females were oppressed and had lower self esteem than males. 18-24 year old Mexican Americans are becoming less insistent upon strict separation of sex roles and are beginning to reject the traditional Mexican notion of masculine superiority. The word

  10. The Importance of Family Factors to Protect Against Substance Use Related Problems among Mexican Heritage and White Youth*

    PubMed Central

    Kopak, Albert M.; Chen, Angela Chia-Chen; Haas, Steven A.; Gillmore, Mary Rogers

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study examined the ability of family cohesion, parental control, and parent-child attachment to prevent adolescents with a history of drug or alcohol use from experiencing subsequent problems related to their use. METHODS Data came from Wave I and Wave II of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health and included Mexican heritage and White adolescents who reported alcohol use (n = 4,894, 25% prevalence) or any other drug use (n = 2,875, 14% prevalence) in their lifetime. RESULTS Logistic regression results indicate greater parent-child attachment predicted lower risk of experiencing drug use problems (OR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.77 – 0.98) while stronger family cohesion predicted lower odds of experiencing drug- (OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.70 – 0.97) or alcohol-related (OR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.65 – 0.84) problems. Parental control was also negatively associated with odds of problems related to drug use (OR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.86 – 0.99) or alcohol use (OR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.90 – 0.99). Results also indicated family cohesion was the only protective factor for Mexican heritage youth while family cohesion and parent-child attachment were protective among White youth. Parental control protected White female adolescents from drug use problems more than males. Mexican heritage male adolescents experienced more protection from drug problems compared to females. CONCLUSION Findings highlight the need for prevention interventions to emphasize parent-child attachment for White youth and family cohesion for both Mexican-heritage and White youth to decrease adolescent substance users’ drug- and alcohol-related problems. PMID:22222253

  11. A new estuarine species, Nereis garwoodi (Polychaeta: Nereididae), from Bahía Chetumal, Mexican Caribbean coast.

    PubMed

    González-Escalante, Luis E; Salazar-Vallejo, Sergio I

    2003-03-01

    Nereis garwoodi n. sp. is described on the basis of eight syntype specimens (six atokous and two heteronereis) collected in Bahía Chetumal, Mexican Caribbean coast, and the variability in the paragnath numbers in the pharynx is established using 180 specimens; paragnath numbers are I:10(SD = 1.9); II:30 (SD = 2.6); III:41 (SD = 5.2); IV:29 (SD = 3.5), V:1, VI:4, VII-VIII: > 30. Its eyes are big and its longest tentacular cirri reaches setiger 11. A revised key to species of Nereis recorded from the Grand Caribbean Sea is included.

  12. Review Essay: On Mexican Immigration, the United States, and Chicano History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Mario T.

    1979-01-01

    After a review of current literature on Mexican immigration to this country, this paper focuses on the strengths and weaknesses of Mark Reisler's "By the Sweat of Their Brow: Mexican Immigrant Labor in the United States, 1900-1940." (EB)

  13. Mexican American Organizations and the Changing Politics of School Desegregation in Texas, 1945 to 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Miguel, Guadalupe, Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Mexican American organizations have influenced educational policy. They campaigned to eliminate the segregation of Mexican American children in the Texas public schools. Community organizations used several tactics and strategies to desegregate the schools. (Author/AM)

  14. Long-term surveillance plan for the Mexican Hat disposal site Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Mexican Hat, Utah, disposal site. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed regulations for the issuance of a general license for the custody and long-term care of UMTRA Project disposal sites in 10 CFR Part 40. The purpose of this general license is to ensure that the UMTRA Project disposal sites will be cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed, the NRC requires the DOE to submit a site-specific LTSP. The DOE prepared this LTSP to meet this requirement for the Mexican Hat disposal site. The general license becomes effective when the NRC concurs with the DOE`s determination of completion of remedial action for the disposal site and the NRC formally accepts this LTSP. This LTSP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure that the Mexican Hat disposal site performs as designed. The program is based on two distinct types of activities: (1) site inspections to identify potential threats to disposal cell integrity, and (2) monitoring of selected seeps to observe changes in flow rates and water quality. The LTSP is based on the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program guidance and meets the requirements of 10 CFR {section}40.27(b) and 40 CFR {section}192.03. 18 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Long-term surveillance plan for the Mexican Hat disposal site, Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This plan describes the long-term surveillance activities for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site at Mexican Hat, Utah. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal site continues to function as designed. This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive material (RRM). This LTSPC documents the land ownership interests and details how the long-term care of the disposal site will be accomplished.

  16. Self-Knowledge and Identity in a Mexican American Counseling Course: A Qualitative Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamarripa, Manuel X.; Lane, Ileana; Lerma, Eunice; Holin, Lyle, II

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the lived experiences of Mexican American graduate students who completed a course on Mexican American counseling and mental health. The experiences of Mexican American students taking a mental health course that focuses on their own ethnic group has not been previously discussed in the literature. Given the history of…

  17. Racial and Ethnic Socialization in Later Generations of a Mexican American Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavez-Reyes, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Later-generation Mexican American (third or more) experience diminishing educational gains compared with second-generation Mexican Americans. Positive racial and ethnic socialization (RES) and ethnic identity can facilitate strong academic performance. Using the oral histories of 18 third- and fourth-generation Mexican Americans in the same…

  18. A Qualitative Examination of Mexican Immigrants' Career Development: Perceived Barriers and Motivators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shinnar, Rachel Sheli

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the variables shaping career development among Mexican immigrants. Based on qualitative interviews with 17 adult, Mexican immigrants, a model describing the barriers and motivators to career development for this sample is offered. Findings indicate that Mexican immigrants' careers are shaped by three sets of interrelated…

  19. The Mexican Health Paradox: Expanding the Explanatory Power of the Acculturation Construct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horevitz, Elizabeth; Organista, Kurt C.

    2013-01-01

    The Mexican health paradox refers to initially favorable health and mental health outcomes among recent Mexican immigrants to the United States. The subsequent rapid decline in Mexican health outcomes has been attributed to the process of acculturation to U.S. culture. However, the construct of acculturation has come under significant criticism…

  20. Still "Unfinished Education": Latino Students Forty Years after the Mexican American Education Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madrigal-Gonzalez, Lizely

    2012-01-01

    The onus of this dissertation was to evaluate the educational conditions of Mexican American students forty years after the "Mexican American Education Study" published a six-volume study detailing the findings of the "Mexican American Education Study" (1970-1974). The "MAES" study focused on five southwest states…

  1. Forgotten History: Mexican American School Segregation in Arizona from 1900-1951

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Jeanne M.

    2008-01-01

    This article documents the efforts by Mexican Americans to challenge school segregation in Arizona in the first half of the twentieth century. As in Texas and California, although state law never formally mandated the segregation of Mexican American students, school districts in Arizona often established separate "Mexican Schools" for…

  2. 38 CFR 3.17 - Disability and death pension; Mexican border period and later war periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... pension; Mexican border period and later war periods. 3.17 Section 3.17 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans... Compensation General § 3.17 Disability and death pension; Mexican border period and later war periods. In... service which began before and extended into the Mexican border period or ended during World War I, or...

  3. 38 CFR 3.17 - Disability and death pension; Mexican border period and later war periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... pension; Mexican border period and later war periods. 3.17 Section 3.17 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans... Compensation General § 3.17 Disability and death pension; Mexican border period and later war periods. In... service which began before and extended into the Mexican border period or ended during World War I, or...

  4. 38 CFR 3.17 - Disability and death pension; Mexican border period and later war periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... pension; Mexican border period and later war periods. 3.17 Section 3.17 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans... Compensation General § 3.17 Disability and death pension; Mexican border period and later war periods. In... service which began before and extended into the Mexican border period or ended during World War I, or...

  5. 38 CFR 3.17 - Disability and death pension; Mexican border period and later war periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... pension; Mexican border period and later war periods. 3.17 Section 3.17 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans... Compensation General § 3.17 Disability and death pension; Mexican border period and later war periods. In... service which began before and extended into the Mexican border period or ended during World War I, or...

  6. A critical review of social and structural conditions that influence HIV risk among Mexican deportees

    PubMed Central

    Pinedo, Miguel; Burgos, José Luis; Ojeda, Victoria D.

    2014-01-01

    Mexican migrants who are deported from the US may be at elevated risk for HIV infection. Deportations of Mexican migrants by the US have reached record numbers. We critically reviewed existing literature to assess how social and structural conditions in post-deportation settings can influence Mexican deported migrants' HIV risk. We also identify critical research gaps and make research recommendations. PMID:24583278

  7. 38 CFR 3.17 - Disability and death pension; Mexican border period and later war periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... pension; Mexican border period and later war periods. 3.17 Section 3.17 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans... Compensation General § 3.17 Disability and death pension; Mexican border period and later war periods. In... service which began before and extended into the Mexican border period or ended during World War I, or...

  8. Parents' Promotion of Psychological Autonomy, Psychological Control, and Mexican-American Adolescents' Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sher-Censor, Efrat; Parke, Ross D.; Coltrane, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Mexican-American adolescents are at an elevated risk for adjustment difficulties. In an effort to identify parenting practices that can affect the adjustment of Mexican-American youth, the current study examined parents' promotion of psychological autonomy and parents' psychological control as perceived by Mexican-American early adolescents, and…

  9. The Mexican Health Paradox: Expanding the Explanatory Power of the Acculturation Construct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horevitz, Elizabeth; Organista, Kurt C.

    2013-01-01

    The Mexican health paradox refers to initially favorable health and mental health outcomes among recent Mexican immigrants to the United States. The subsequent rapid decline in Mexican health outcomes has been attributed to the process of acculturation to U.S. culture. However, the construct of acculturation has come under significant criticism…

  10. Contradictory Literacy Practices of Mexican-Background Students: An Ethnography From the Rural Midwest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godina, Heriberto

    2004-01-01

    This ethnographic study explores the contradictory literacy practices of 10 high school students of Mexican background from the rural Midwest. The author uses the term "Mexican background" to encompass both settled Mexican Americans and recent-immigrant Mexicanos. Literacy is investigated through English and Spanish in a sociocultural…

  11. 7 CFR 319.8-14 - Mexican cotton and covers not otherwise enterable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mexican cotton and covers not otherwise enterable. 319... Cotton and Covers Special Conditions for the Entry of Cotton and Covers from Mexico § 319.8-14 Mexican cotton and covers not otherwise enterable. Mexican cotton and covers not enterable under §...

  12. 7 CFR 319.8-14 - Mexican cotton and covers not otherwise enterable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mexican cotton and covers not otherwise enterable. 319... Cotton and Covers Special Conditions for the Entry of Cotton and Covers from Mexico § 319.8-14 Mexican cotton and covers not otherwise enterable. Mexican cotton and covers not enterable under §...

  13. 7 CFR 319.8-14 - Mexican cotton and covers not otherwise enterable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mexican cotton and covers not otherwise enterable. 319... Cotton and Covers Special Conditions for the Entry of Cotton and Covers from Mexico § 319.8-14 Mexican cotton and covers not otherwise enterable. Mexican cotton and covers not enterable under §...

  14. 7 CFR 319.8-14 - Mexican cotton and covers not otherwise enterable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mexican cotton and covers not otherwise enterable. 319... Cotton and Covers Special Conditions for the Entry of Cotton and Covers from Mexico § 319.8-14 Mexican cotton and covers not otherwise enterable. Mexican cotton and covers not enterable under §...

  15. The Relationships between Mexican American Acculturation, Cultural Values, Gender, and Help-Seeking Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos-Sanchez, Lucila; Atkinson, Donald R.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between Mexican acculturation, cultural values, gender, and help-seeking intentions among Mexican American community college students. Findings suggest that as Mexican Americans lose their culture of origin and increase their generational status, their attitudes toward help seeking become less favorable. This…

  16. The Political Economy of the Mexican Farm Labor Program, 1942-64

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Joon

    2004-01-01

    The Mexican Farm Labor Program brought in an unprecedented number of Mexican workers to perform harvesting jobs in U.S. agriculture between 1942 and 1964. A political economy perspective is used to examine the process by which U.S. agriculture has come to depend on Mexican workers.

  17. Filial Responsibility Among Mexican American College Students: A Pilot Investigation and Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudolph, Bonnie; Cornelius-White, Cecily; Quintana, Fernando

    2005-01-01

    As the number of Mexican American elders increases, their care becomes pressing. We sampled filial responsibility expectations of Mexican American college students to expand culture specific knowledge and found physical proximity to elders an important expectation. However, although some respondents adhere closely to the traditional Mexican value…

  18. Mexican Labor in California's Economy: From Rapid Growth to Likely Stability. RAND Reprints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernez, Georges

    Over the past 20 years, California has experienced a continuous, growing flow of Mexican immigrant laborers. Although Mexican labor was originally linked to agriculture, by 1980 Mexican-born labor was filling a substantial proportion of jobs in all sectors of the California economy, particularly in manufacturing. Because they are concentrated in…

  19. A critical review of social and structural conditions that influence HIV risk among Mexican deportees.

    PubMed

    Pinedo, Miguel; Burgos, José Luis; Ojeda, Victoria D

    2014-05-01

    Mexican migrants who are deported from the US may be at elevated risk for HIV infection. Deportations of Mexican migrants by the US have reached record numbers. We critically reviewed existing literature to assess how social and structural conditions in post-deportation settings can influence Mexican deported migrants' HIV risk. We also identify critical research gaps and make research recommendations.

  20. Mexican-American Preservice Teachers and the Intransigency of the Elementary School Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellez, Kip

    1999-01-01

    Investigated how Mexican-American student teachers expressed their cultural knowledge in lesson planning and implementation. Semistructured interviews with Mexican-American student teachers working in elementary Professional Development Schools revealed little ethnic expression, even when teaching Mexican-American children. They were never invited…

  1. "American" Abjection: "Chicanos," Gangs, and Mexican/Migrant Transnationality in Chicago

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Genova, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    Crime and street violence often evoke racialized discourses about urban space. In this ethnographic research in Chicago, however, the disdain that many Mexican migrants articulated about street gangs principally concerned issues "internal" to the Mexican/Chicano community, notably a profound ambivalence about U.S.-born Mexicans and a…

  2. A Student's Guide to Mexican American Genealogy. Oryx American Family Tree Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryskamp, George R.; Ryskamp, Peggy

    This book provides a step-by-step guide to genealogical research in the United States and Mexico for Mexican Americans. The book also contains information on the history of Mexico and its relationship with the United States. Chapters include: (1) "Why Do Mexican Americans Explore Family History?"; (2) "Your Mexican American…

  3. Racial and Ethnic Socialization in Later Generations of a Mexican American Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavez-Reyes, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Later-generation Mexican American (third or more) experience diminishing educational gains compared with second-generation Mexican Americans. Positive racial and ethnic socialization (RES) and ethnic identity can facilitate strong academic performance. Using the oral histories of 18 third- and fourth-generation Mexican Americans in the same…

  4. Five Mexican-American Women in Transition: A Case Study of Migrants in the Midwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindborg, Kristina; Ovando, Carlos J.

    Focusing on four Mexican American women from migrant farmworker backgrounds and one woman recently immigrated from Mexico, the study explored the attitudes and experiences of the Mexican American culture considered important by Mexican American migrant women themselves. Extensive open-ended interviews, conducted mostly in the women's homes, were…

  5. Five Mexican-American Women in Transition: A Case Study of Migrants in the Midwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindborg, Kristina; Ovando, Carlos J.

    Focusing on four Mexican American women from migrant farmworker backgrounds and one woman recently immigrated from Mexico, the study explored the attitudes and experiences of the Mexican American culture considered important by Mexican American migrant women themselves. Extensive open-ended interviews, conducted mostly in the women's homes, were…

  6. Contact with the Dead, Religion, and Death Anxiety among Older Mexican Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, Neal; Bastida, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to see if contact with the dead is associated with lower death anxiety among older Mexican Americans. The data come from a nationwide survey of older Mexican Americans (N = 1,005). The study model specifies that (a) older Mexican Americans who have experienced contact with the dead are more likely to see the…

  7. Voices from Mexico: How American Teachers Can Meet the Needs of Mexican Immigrant Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borjian, Ali; Padilla, Amado M.

    2010-01-01

    In this study 18 Mexican teachers of English as a foreign language in Guanajuato, Mexico were asked for their professional opinion about the teaching of English to Mexican immigrant students in the U.S. Teachers responded to a questionnaire that asked about attitudes toward the U.S. educational system, ways to support Mexican immigrant students,…

  8. Bilingual "Educación" in the Home: Everyday Mexican Immigrant Family Educational Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdez, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    As we embrace the increasing numbers of young Mexican immigrant children and their families present in our schools, it is important for educators to better understand the many family educational practices present in these households. This article examines the strategies and resources utilized by two Mexican-born and two U.S.-born Mexican immigrant…

  9. Raising Cultural Awareness of Second Grade African American Students Using Mexican American Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugh, Sandra Lyniece

    2009-01-01

    An increase in the Mexican American population within the predominantly African American community and school was the basis of this qualitative study. The purpose of the study was to introduce African American second grade students to authentic Mexican and Mexican American children's literature. Interactive read-alouds of nonfiction and realistic…

  10. 22 CFR 41.32 - Nonresident alien Mexican border crossing identification cards; combined border crossing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nonresident alien Mexican border crossing... IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Temporary Visitors § 41.32 Nonresident alien Mexican border... Mexico on Form I-186, Nonresident Alien Mexican Border Crossing Card, or Form I-586, Nonresident...

  11. 47 CFR 73.504 - Channel assignments in the Mexican border area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Channel assignments in the Mexican border area... assignments in the Mexican border area. (a) NCE-FM stations within 199 miles (320 km) of the United States-Mexican border shall comply with the separation requirements and other provisions of the...

  12. The Line between Us: Teaching about the Border and Mexican Immigration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Bill

    2006-01-01

    "The Line Between Us" explores the history of U.S-Mexican relations and the roots of Mexican immigration, all in the context of the global economy. And it shows how teachers can help students understand the immigrant experience and the drama of border life. "But The Line Between Us" is about more than Mexican immigration and…

  13. 49 CFR 1244.3 - Reporting contract shipment waybills and Canadian and Mexican international waybills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... traffic on the U.S. rail system to the Canadian or Mexican border shall include a representative sample of... and Mexican international waybills. 1244.3 Section 1244.3 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... shipment waybills and Canadian and Mexican international waybills. (a) All railroads shall identify...

  14. 22 CFR 41.32 - Nonresident alien Mexican border crossing identification cards; combined border crossing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nonresident alien Mexican border crossing... IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Temporary Visitors § 41.32 Nonresident alien Mexican border... Mexico on Form I-186, Nonresident Alien Mexican Border Crossing Card, or Form I-586, Nonresident...

  15. 49 CFR 1244.3 - Reporting contract shipment waybills and Canadian and Mexican international waybills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... traffic on the U.S. rail system to the Canadian or Mexican border shall include a representative sample of... and Mexican international waybills. 1244.3 Section 1244.3 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... shipment waybills and Canadian and Mexican international waybills. (a) All railroads shall identify...

  16. 49 CFR 1244.3 - Reporting contract shipment waybills and Canadian and Mexican international waybills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... traffic on the U.S. rail system to the Canadian or Mexican border shall include a representative sample of... and Mexican international waybills. 1244.3 Section 1244.3 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... shipment waybills and Canadian and Mexican international waybills. (a) All railroads shall identify...

  17. 22 CFR 41.32 - Nonresident alien Mexican border crossing identification cards; combined border crossing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonresident alien Mexican border crossing... IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Temporary Visitors § 41.32 Nonresident alien Mexican border... Mexico on Form I-186, Nonresident Alien Mexican Border Crossing Card, or Form I-586, Nonresident...

  18. Filial Responsibility Among Mexican American College Students: A Pilot Investigation and Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudolph, Bonnie; Cornelius-White, Cecily; Quintana, Fernando

    2005-01-01

    As the number of Mexican American elders increases, their care becomes pressing. We sampled filial responsibility expectations of Mexican American college students to expand culture specific knowledge and found physical proximity to elders an important expectation. However, although some respondents adhere closely to the traditional Mexican value…

  19. 47 CFR 73.504 - Channel assignments in the Mexican border area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Channel assignments in the Mexican border area... assignments in the Mexican border area. (a) NCE-FM stations within 199 miles (320 km) of the United States-Mexican border shall comply with the separation requirements and other provisions of the...

  20. 47 CFR 73.504 - Channel assignments in the Mexican border area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Channel assignments in the Mexican border area... assignments in the Mexican border area. (a) NCE-FM stations within 199 miles (320 km) of the United States-Mexican border shall comply with the separation requirements and other provisions of the...