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Sample records for rendu-osler-weber disease patient

  1. Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome: dermatological approach*

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Aline Blanco; Hans Filho, Günter; Vicari, Carolina Faria dos Santos; Medeiros, Marcelo Zanolli; Couto, Daíne Vargas; Takita, Luiz Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome is a rare systemic fibrovascular dysplasia, recognized by mucocutaneous telangiectasias, arteriovenous malformations, epistaxis and family history. Recurrent bleeding, hypoxemia, congestive heart failure, portosystemic encephalopathy, and symptoms related to angiodysplasia of the central nervous system may occur. Since the treatment is based on supportive measures, early recognition is of utmost importance. This article reports the case of a 53-year-old male patient who presented telangiectasias on fingers, oral cavity and nasal mucosa for 10 years, with a history of recurrent epistaxis of varying severity since childhood. Mother, sister and daughter have similar lesions. PMID:26312724

  2. [Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome and cerebral infarction].

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Aaike S; Hijdra, Albert; Reesink, Herre J; van Delden, Otto M; Majoie, Charles B

    2010-01-01

    A 30 year old man with a history of migraine presented at the neurology outpatient clinic with hypesthesia of the left side of his body during a migraine attack, which was unusual for him. His family history was positive for Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome. MRI and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the brain showed multiple small infarcts, without vascular malformations. CT angiography revealed an arteriovenous fistula in the lung. Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome (or hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia, HHT) is an autosomal dominant condition affecting the blood vessels. It is estimated that about 60-80% of the patients with a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (AVM) have HHT. Neurological complications include cerebral infarction and brain abscess. Also, there is a higher prevalence of migraine in patients with HHT, although the role that HHT plays in the pathogenesis of migraine is unclear. The treatment of choice of pulmonary AVM is endovascular treatment, with a success rate of 75% in the long term.

  3. Use of an electrosurgical scalpel in gingival overgrowth associated with Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Francisco Javier Rodríguez; Pérez, A Sanchez; Villaescusa, M J Moya

    2008-11-01

    We present a case of gingival overgrowth, with aesthetic repercussions, associated with Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome. Treatment consisted of electric gingivectomy. We noted that it is necessary to carefully monitor hemorrhaging during surgery as well as to provide a correct differential diagnosis to distinguish this syndrome from other illnesses that involve gingival growth.

  4. [Screening for systemic manifestations of vascular malformations in patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (Osler disease)].

    PubMed

    Cerra Pohl, Ana; Werner, Jochen Alfred; Folz, Benedikt Josef

    2008-11-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler- Weber syndrome) is a disease characterized by systemic vascular malformations. Typical clinical manifestations are recurrent epistaxis and telangiectases of the skin and the mucous membranes. The syndrome is furthermore characterized by its hereditary aspect. The disease seems to be much more complicated than previously thought, mainly because of the accompanying vascular malformations in vital organs, like the liver, the kidney, the lung, the brain, and the eyes. The diagnosis and treatment of systemic vascular malformations requires interdisciplinary management.

  5. Correlation of severity of epistaxis with nasal telangiectasias in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) patients.

    PubMed

    Pagella, Fabio; Colombo, Andrea; Matti, Elina; Giourgos, Georgios; Tinelli, Carmine; Olivieri, Carla; Danesino, Cesare

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), also known as Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome, is an autosomal dominant disease that leads to multiregional angiodysplasia. The presence of telangiectasias in nasal mucosa leads to recurrent epistaxis that affects up to 96% of patients but with unpredictable severity. Some authors have previously explained that endonasal morphology and distribution of telangiectasias can be variable too. The purpose of this study was to evaluate any possible relationship between the severity of epistaxis and the different morphology and distribution of nasal telangiectasias in HHT patients. A review was performed of nasal endoscopy records of 76 consecutive HHT patients treated for epistaxis between 2003 and 2007 at our institution. An evaluation was performed of severity of epistaxis in the same patient group using a questionnaire and considering frequency, intensity, duration of nosebleeds, and need for blood transfusions. Comparison of data collected on morphology and distribution of nasal telangiectasias with data collected on severity of epistaxis was performed. Morphology and distribution of nasal telangiectasias showed a statistically significant correlation with frequency and intensity of epistaxis. Presence of telangiectasias endoscopically appearing as large and prominent correlates with higher frequency of epistaxis. An increase in number of nasal subsites involved correlates with higher intensity of nosebleeds. Our data suggest that to reduce frequency and intensity of epistaxis in HHT patients, treatments should be directed also at lesions located in the posterior part of nasal fossae and especially on telangiectasias endoscopically appearing as large and prominent.

  6. [Double-balloon enteroscopy for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with unexplained gastrointestinal blood loss].

    PubMed

    van der Veer, W M; Hekmat, H; Mulder, C J J; Jacobs, M A J M

    2007-09-22

    In 3 patients, 2 women aged 56 and 57 and a 65-year-old man, who presented with overt and occult gastrointestinal bleeding, no focus of the bleeding could be found during gastroscopy and colonoscopy. The patients were then examined and treated by double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE). DBE is a relatively new endoscopic technique that allows high-resolution visualisation of the entire small intestine with full endoscopic instrumentation. The 56-year-old woman had coeliac disease and an enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma with stenoses over approximately 150 cm of bowel length. She was given chemotherapy and responded well. The 57-year-old woman suffered from Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome with multiple angiodysplasias in the small intestine. She was treated 5 times with argon plasma coagulation during DBE, for more than 40 angiodysplasias, and thereafter no longer needed blood transfusions. The 65-year-old man had a history of recurrent melanoma. During DBE, multiple metastases of a melanoma in the small intestine were found and tattooed. The tumours were later surgically excised, with no further metastases in the following 2 years. DBE has proven to be a good diagnostic and therapeutic tool in the management of small intestinal diseases.

  7. Metformin as possible therapy of pulmonary arterio venous malformation in HHT patients.

    PubMed

    Lacout, Alexis; Marcy, Pierre Yves; El Hajjam, Mostafa; Lacombe, Pascal

    2015-09-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) or Rendu-Osler-Weber disease is an autosomic dominant disorder, which is characterized by the development of multiple arteriovenous malformations. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations may either rupture or be responsible for a right-to-left shunting leading to paradoxical embolism causing stroke or cerebral abscess. Metformin may harbor a pleiotropic action, (a) decreasing inflammation (via anti COX 2 pathway and other mechanism), (b) decreasing COX 2 and VEGF mediated angiogenesis, (c) increasing negative angiogenic regulation pathway by stimulating SMAD 2/3 expression either directly or via the AMPK pathway and preventing from pulmonary hypertension development and (d) diminushin oxidative stress. An animal model could be experimented to show its effects on PAVM formation. Metformin could also be tested in human individuals, particularly in patients presenting a diffuse HHT type with tiny PAVM. Metformin may be indicated as a prophylactic or curative therapy in HHT patients presenting with initial lung involvement. Metformin may be proposed to prevent from pulmonary arteriovenous malformation development and subsequent related complications.

  8. Imaging of Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Carette, Marie-France Nedelcu, Cosmina; Tassart, Marc; Grange, Jean-Didier; Wislez, Marie; Khalil, Antoine

    2009-07-15

    This pictorial review is based on our experience of the follow-up of 120 patients at our multidisciplinary center for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Rendu-Osler-Weber disease or HHT is a multiorgan autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance, characterized by epistaxis, mucocutaneous telangiectasis, and visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The research on gene mutations is fundamental and family screening by clinical examination, chest X-ray, research of pulmonary shunting, and abdominal color Doppler sonography is absolutely necessary. The angioarchitecture of pulmonary AVMs can be studied by unenhanced multidetector computed tomography; however, all other explorations of liver, digestive bowels, or brain require administration of contrast media. Magnetic resonance angiography is helpful for central nervous system screening, in particular for the spinal cord, but also for pulmonary, hepatic, and pelvic AVMs. Knowledge of the multiorgan involvement of HHT, mechanism of complications, and radiologic findings is fundamental for the correct management of these patients.

  9. Functional and splicing defect analysis of 23 ACVRL1 mutations in a cohort of patients affected by Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Alaa el Din, Ferdos; Patri, Sylvie; Thoreau, Vincent; Rodriguez-Ballesteros, Montserrat; Hamade, Eva; Bailly, Sabine; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Abou Merhi, Raghida; Kitzis, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia syndrome (HHT) or Rendu-Osler-Weber (ROW) syndrome is an autosomal dominant vascular disorder. Two most common forms of HHT, HHT1 and HHT2, have been linked to mutations in the endoglin (ENG) and activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ACVRL1or ALK1) genes respectively. This work was designed to examine the pathogenicity of 23 nucleotide variations in ACVRL1 gene detected in more than 400 patients. Among them, 14 missense mutations and one intronic variant were novels, and 8 missense mutations were previously identified with questionable implication in HHT2. The functionality of missense mutations was analyzed in response to BMP9 (specific ligand of ALK1), the maturation of the protein products and their localization were analyzed by western blot and fluorescence microscopy. The splicing impairment of the intronic and of two missense mutations was examined by minigene assay. Functional analysis showed that 18 out of 22 missense mutations were defective. Splicing analysis revealed that one missense mutation (c.733A>G, p.Ile245Val) affects the splicing of the harboring exon 6. Similarly, the intronic mutation outside the consensus splicing sites (c.1048+5G>A in intron 7) was seen pathogenic by splicing study. Both mutations induce a frame shift creating a premature stop codon likely resulting in mRNA degradation by NMD surveillance mechanism. Our results confirm the haploinsufficiency model proposed for HHT2. The affected allele of ACVRL1 induces mRNA degradation or the synthesis of a protein lacking the receptor activity. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that functional and splicing analyses together, represent two robust diagnostic tools to be used by geneticists confronted with novel or conflicted ACVRL1 mutations. PMID:26176610

  10. [Laser in gastroenterologic endoscopic therapy].

    PubMed

    Naveau, S; Chaput, J C

    1991-01-21

    Endoscopic gastrointestinal laser therapy was originally inspired by the haemostatic properties of the laser beam and was subsequently used to destroy tumours. In endoscopic gastroenterology, the most commonly used type of laser is the neodyme+-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) laser. Endoscopic Nd:YAG laser therapy of obstructive cancers of the oesophagus and cardia rapidly reduces dysphagia in 70 to 100% of the patients. In the treatment of colorectal cancers, the intestinal transit returns to normal in 57 to 83% of the cases, and rectal haemorrhages are controlled in 38 to 92% of the cases. However, sustained results can only be obtained by a maintenance treatment with at least one application every 4 weeks. The Nd:YAG laser makes it possible to destroy villose tumours in patients who cannot, or will not, be operated upon; the number of applications depends on the size of the tumour. Finally, the Nd:YAG laser seems to be able to control bleeding due to gastrointestinal angiodysplasia and to stabilize the course of Rendu-Osler-Weber disease.

  11. Mice Lacking Endoglin in Macrophages Show an Impaired Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda-Fernández, Luisa; Recio-Poveda, Lucía; Aristorena, Mikel; Lastres, Pedro; Blanco, Francisco J.; Sanz-Rodríguez, Francisco; Gallardo-Vara, Eunate; de las Casas-Engel, Mateo; Corbí, Ángel; Arthur, Helen M.; Bernabeu, Carmelo; Botella, Luisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Endoglin is an auxiliary receptor for members of the TGF-β superfamily and plays an important role in the homeostasis of the vessel wall. Mutations in endoglin gene (ENG) or in the closely related TGF-β receptor type I ACVRL1/ALK1 are responsible for a rare dominant vascular dysplasia, the Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT), or Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome. Endoglin is also expressed in human macrophages, but its role in macrophage function remains unknown. In this work, we show that endoglin expression is triggered during the monocyte-macrophage differentiation process, both in vitro and during the in vivo differentiation of blood monocytes recruited to foci of inflammation in wild-type C57BL/6 mice. To analyze the role of endoglin in macrophages in vivo, an endoglin myeloid lineage specific knock-out mouse line (Engfl/flLysMCre) was generated. These mice show a predisposition to develop spontaneous infections by opportunistic bacteria. Engfl/flLysMCre mice also display increased survival following LPS-induced peritonitis, suggesting a delayed immune response. Phagocytic activity is impaired in peritoneal macrophages, altering one of the main functions of macrophages which contributes to the initiation of the immune response. We also observed altered expression of TGF-β1 target genes in endoglin deficient peritoneal macrophages. Overall, the altered immune activity of endoglin deficient macrophages could help to explain the higher rate of infectious diseases seen in HHT1 patients. PMID:27010826

  12. Abdominal vascular syndromes: characteristic imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Cardarelli-Leite, Leandro; Velloni, Fernanda Garozzo; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Lemos, Marcelo Delboni; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal vascular syndromes are rare diseases. Although such syndromes vary widely in terms of symptoms and etiologies, certain imaging findings are characteristic. Depending on their etiology, they can be categorized as congenital-including blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome)-or compressive-including "nutcracker" syndrome, median arcuate ligament syndrome, Cockett syndrome (also known as May-Thurner syndrome), and superior mesenteric artery syndrome. In this article, we aimed to illustrate imaging findings that are characteristic of these syndromes, through studies conducted at our institution, as well as to perform a brief review of the literature on this topic.

  13. Mononuclear cells and vascular repair in HHT.

    PubMed

    Dingenouts, Calinda K E; Goumans, Marie-José; Bakker, Wineke

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) or Rendu-Osler-Weber disease is a rare genetic vascular disorder known for its endothelial dysplasia causing arteriovenous malformations and severe bleedings. HHT-1 and HHT-2 are the most prevalent variants and are caused by heterozygous mutations in endoglin and activin receptor-like kinase 1, respectively. An undervalued aspect of the disease is that HHT patients experience persistent inflammation. Although endothelial and mural cells have been the main research focus trying to unravel the mechanism behind the disease, wound healing is a process with a delicate balance between inflammatory and vascular cells. Inflammatory cells are part of the mononuclear cells (MNCs) fraction, and can, next to eliciting an immune response, also have angiogenic potential. This biphasic effect of MNC can hold a promising mechanism to further elucidate treatment strategies for HHT patients. Before MNC are able to contribute to repair, they need to home to and retain in ischemic and damaged tissue. Directed migration (homing) of MNCs following tissue damage is regulated by the stromal cell derived factor 1 (SDF1). MNCs that express the C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) migrate toward the tightly regulated gradient of SDF1. This directed migration of monocytes and lymphocytes can be inhibited by dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4). Interestingly, MNC of HHT patients express elevated levels of DPP4 and show impaired homing toward damaged tissue. Impaired homing capacity of the MNCs might therefore contribute to the impaired angiogenesis and tissue repair observed in HHT patients. This review summarizes recent studies regarding the role of MNCs in the etiology of HHT and vascular repair, and evaluates the efficacy of DPP4 inhibition in tissue integrity and repair.

  14. Abdominal vascular syndromes: characteristic imaging findings*

    PubMed Central

    Cardarelli-Leite, Leandro; Velloni, Fernanda Garozzo; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Lemos, Marcelo Delboni; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal vascular syndromes are rare diseases. Although such syndromes vary widely in terms of symptoms and etiologies, certain imaging findings are characteristic. Depending on their etiology, they can be categorized as congenital-including blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome)-or compressive-including "nutcracker" syndrome, median arcuate ligament syndrome, Cockett syndrome (also known as May-Thurner syndrome), and superior mesenteric artery syndrome. In this article, we aimed to illustrate imaging findings that are characteristic of these syndromes, through studies conducted at our institution, as well as to perform a brief review of the literature on this topic. PMID:27777480

  15. Liver involvement in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT).

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2007-03-01

    Liver involvement in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) consists of extensive intrahepatic vascular malformations associated with blood shunting (arteriovenous, arterioportal and/or portovenous). It is a rare disorder that nevertheless can result in significant systemic and hepatobiliary abnormalities. Although hepatic vascular malformations are present in a majority of patients with HHT, symptoms occur in a only a minority with a clear predominance for the female gender. Symptoms from liver vascular malformations are often misdiagnosed and this can lead to potentially harmful interventions. In this review article, clinical findings of liver involvement in HHT and their pathophysiology are discussed as well as diagnostic methodologies, therapies used and their outcome. Data presented is based on a review of the literature performed in October 2006 using the following MEDLINE search terms: (hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia [ALL] OR Rendu-Osler-Weber [ALL]) AND (liver OR hepatic [ALL]). Papers were considered if they were published in English and if they included specific cases that were sufficiently described.

  16. The liver in hereditary haemorrhagic teleangiectasia: an inborn error of vascular structure with multiple manifestations: a reappraisal.

    PubMed Central

    Martini, G A

    1978-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic teleangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber disease) is an inborn error of vascular structure with multiple manifestations. Its incidence is about 1-2:100 000 in the European population. The incidence of telangiectases and/or fistula formation was estimated to be 1 in 10 carriers of the Osler trait. The findings in the family reported herewith suggest a much higher incidence if angiography is more frequently performed. Apart from the skin and mucous membrane, teleangiectases and/or arteriovenous fistulas may be present in the lungs, intestinal tract, spleen, kidney, brain, and bones. The liver apparently is more involved than was orginally suspected. The vascular derangement includes teleangiectases, arteriovenous fistulas, and connective tissue formation with fibrosis and atypical cirrhosis. In intestinal bleeding laser coagulation seems to be very efficient. The pathogenesis of teleangiectases is not known but involves several factors such as special formation of venules, capillaries and arterioles, abnormal perivascular connective tissue and endothelial cells. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:308029

  17. [Care for patients with rare diseases].

    PubMed

    Smetsers, Stephanie E; Takkenberg, J J M Hanneke; Bierings, Marc B

    2014-01-01

    A rare disease usually concerns only a handful of patients, but all patients with a rare disease combined represent a significant health burden. Due to limited knowledge and the absence of treatment guidelines, patients with rare diseases usually experience delayed diagnosis and suboptimal treatment. Historically, rare diseases have never been considered a major health problem. However, rare diseases have recently been receiving increased attention. In the Netherlands, a national plan for rare diseases was published in late 2013, with recommendations on how to improve the organisation of healthcare for people with rare diseases. Using the example of the rare disease Fanconi anemia, this paper describes the challenges and opportunities in organising healthcare for rare diseases. Two critical steps in optimising healthcare for rare diseases are developing multidisciplinary healthcare teams and stimulating patient empowerment. Optimal cooperation between patients, patient organisations, multidisciplinary healthcare teams and scientists is of great importance. In this respect, transition to adult healthcare requires special attention.

  18. Thromboembolic disease in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hindi, Nadia; Cordero, Nazaret; Espinosa, Enrique

    2013-05-01

    Thromboembolic events are common among patients with cancer as a consequence of cancer- and treatment-related factors. As these events are the second most frequent cause of death in this population, their prevention and treatment are important. Venous ultrasonography is the technique of choice for diagnosis, with sensitivity and specificity above 95 % in symptomatic thrombosis. Routine prophylaxis is not recommended for ambulatory patients, although it could be useful in selected cases. On the other hand, all inpatients should receive prophylactic therapy unless contraindicated. Therapy of thromboembolic disease is based on anticoagulants. Clinical trials demonstrate that the use of low-weight heparins is associated with a lower incidence of bleeding and recurrent thrombosis as compared with non-fractionated heparin or warfarin. Options for recurrent thrombosis include change to another anticoagulant agent, increasing doses of the same agent and cava filters.

  19. Gallstones in Patients with Chronic Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    With prevalence of 10–20% in adults in developed countries, gallstone disease (GSD) is one of the most prevalent and costly gastrointestinal tract disorders in the world. In addition to gallstone disease, chronic liver disease (CLD) is also an important global public health problem. The reported frequency of gallstone in chronic liver disease tends to be higher. The prevalence of gallstone disease might be related to age, gender, etiology, and severity of liver disease in patients with chronic liver disease. In this review, the aim was to identify the epidemiology, mechanisms, and treatment strategies of gallstone disease in chronic liver disease patients. PMID:28251162

  20. Neurologic Diseases in Special Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Miriam R

    2016-07-01

    Neurologic diseases can have a major impact on functional capacity. Patients with neurologic disease require individualized management considerations depending on the extent of impairment and impact on functional capacity. This article reviews 4 of the more common and significant neurologic diseases (Alzheimer disease, cerebrovascular accident/stroke, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson disease) that are likely to present to a dental office and provides suggestions on the dental management of patients with these conditions.

  1. Frequency of rheumatic diseases in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Soy, Mehmet; Guldiken, Sibel; Arikan, Ender; Altun, Betul Ugur; Tugrul, Armagan

    2007-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the frequency of rheumatic diseases in patients suffering from autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATD). Sixty-five patients (56 F, 9 M), who were followed by diagnosis of ATD, were questioned and examined for the presence of rheumatic disease. Basic laboratory tests and antithyroid antibodies, antinuclear antibody and rheumatoid factor (RF) levels were also measured by appropriate methods. Various rheumatic diseases were detected in 40 (62%) of patients with ATD. The most frequent rheumatic conditions were fibromyalgia, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, osteoarthritis, keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia and carpal tunnel syndrome which were detected in 20 (31%), 13 (20%), 10 (15%), 9 (14%) and 8 (12%) of patients, respectively. Autoimmune diseases, except Sjogren's syndrome, which were detected in ten patients with ATD, are as follows-vitiligo: two; autoimmune hepatitis: two; oral lichen planus: one, ulcerative colitis: one, inflammatory arthritis in four patients (two of them had rheumatoid arthritis, one had psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and one had mixed collagen tissue disease). RF was positive in two patients, one of them had rheumatoid arthritis and FANA was positive in six (9%) patients; all of them had hypothyroidism. The frequency of rheumatic diseases seems to be higher in patients suffering from ATD. Initial evaluation and a regular checking for rheumatic diseases in patients suffering from ATD were recommended.

  2. [Inpatients days in patients with respiratory diseases and periodontal disease].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Plata, Rosario; Olmedo-Torres, Daniel; Martínez-Briseño, David; González-Cruz, Herminia; Casa-Medina, Guillermo; García-Sancho, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory gingival process that has been associated with the severity of respiratory diseases. In Mexico a prevalence of 78% was found in population with social security and > 60 years old. The aim of this study is to establish the association between periodontal disease and respiratory diseases according to the inpatient days. A cross-sectional study was conducted from January to December 2011. We included hospitalized patients, ≥ 18 years of age, without sedation or intubated. A dentist classified patients into two groups according to the severity of the periodontal disease: mild-to-moderate and severe. We estimated medians of inpatient days by disease and severity. Negative binomial models were adjusted to estimate incidence rate ratios and predicted inpatient days. 3,059 patients were enrolled. The median of observed and predicted inpatient days was higher in the group of severe periodontal disease (p < 0.05). Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, tuberculosis, and influenza had the highest incidence rates ratios of periodontal disease (p < 0.05). The severity of periodontal disease is positively -associated with inpatient days of patients with respiratory diseases.

  3. Infectious diseases in end-stage liver disease patients.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Aneesh K; Lyon, G Marshall

    2010-09-01

    Patients with chronic liver diseases sustain impairment to immune systems, which worsens over time. These defects in their host defense lead to risks of bacterial infections and increased morbidity. Providers should have heightened surveillance for infectious diseases and suspect one with any acute change in status. Patient history may reveal rare infections and allow initiation of early appropriate therapy. There should be a low threshold for obtaining diagnostic cultures and peritoneal fluid samples and discussing possible causes with an infectious diseases consultant or a microbiology laboratory. These maneuvers will maximize therapy in patients at high risk for death due to infectious disease.

  4. Dermatological diseases in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gagnon1, Amy L; Desai, Tejas

    2013-04-01

    There are a variety of dermatological diseases that are more commonly seen in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal transplants than the general population. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science has been searched. Some cutaneous diseases are clearly unique to this population. Of them, Lindsay's Nails, xerosis cutis, dryness of the skin, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and acquired perforating dermatosis have been described in chronic kidney disease patients. The most common malignancy found in all transplant recipients is non-melanoma skin cancer. It is important for patients and physicians to recognize the manifestations of skin disease in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease to mitigate the morbidity associated with these conditions.

  5. Dermatological diseases in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon1, Amy L.; Desai, Tejas

    2013-01-01

    Context: There are a variety of dermatological diseases that are more commonly seen in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal transplants than the general population. Evidence Acquisitions: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science has been searched. Results: Some cutaneous diseases are clearly unique to this population. Of them, Lindsay’s Nails, xerosis cutis, dryness of the skin, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and acquired perforating dermatosis have been described in chronic kidney disease patients. The most common malignancy found in all transplant recipients is non-melanoma skin cancer. Conclusions: It is important for patients and physicians to recognize the manifestations of skin disease in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease to mitigate the morbidity associated with these conditions. PMID:24475435

  6. Encephalopathy in a patient with Addison disease.

    PubMed

    Prasad, S; Patankar, T; Perumpillichira, J; Chowdhry, S

    1999-02-01

    Patients with adrenal insufficiency manifest a myriad of metabolic disorders which can inflict neurologic damage. Here we present an unusual clinical presentation and distinctive imaging features in a patient with Addison disease.

  7. [Preoperative Management of Patients with Collagen Disease and Endocrine Disease].

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Yoshiro

    2015-09-01

    Collagen disease and endocrine disease are frequently associated with systemic organ dysfunctions with a high perioperative morbidity and mortality. The aims of pre-operative management of these patients are to evaluate the extent of the disease process, systemic consequences and side effects of drugs therapy for the disease and to stabilize the symptoms so that the risk of surgery and anesthesia may be minimized.

  8. Radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Giaj-Levra, Niccolò; Sciascia, Savino; Fiorentino, Alba; Fersino, Sergio; Mazzola, Rosario; Ricchetti, Francesco; Roccatello, Dario; Alongi, Filippo

    2016-03-01

    The decision to offer radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases continues to be challenging. Radiotherapy might trigger the onset of connective tissue diseases by increasing the expression of self-antigens, diminishing regulatory T-cell activity, and activating effectors of innate immunity (dendritic cells) through Toll-like receptor-dependent mechanisms, all of which could potentially lead to breaks of immune tolerance. This potential risk has raised some debate among radiation oncologists about whether patients with connective tissue diseases can tolerate radiation as well as people without connective tissue diseases. Because the number of patients with cancer and connective tissue diseases needing radiotherapy will probably increase due to improvements in medical treatment and longer life expectancy, the issue of interactions between radiotherapy and connective tissue diseases needs to be clearer. In this Review, we discuss available data and evidence for patients with connective tissue diseases treated with radiotherapy.

  9. Addressing cardiovascular disease in patients with renal disease.

    PubMed

    Crook, Errol D; Washington, David O

    2002-01-01

    It is well-established that patients with renal disease are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) death. Despite better understanding of CVD in endstage renal disease (ESRD) patients and more rigid guidelines addressing the major risk factors for CVD in this population, CVD continues to be the number one cause of death in patients with ESRD. Moreover, higher rates of CVD are seen in patients with moderate, and even mild, renal dysfunction and in patients with albuminuria (micro and macroscopic). Few studies with CVD endpoints have included patients with renal disease. There is sufficient evidence to support appropriate blood pressure reduction as having a beneficial effect on CVD morbidity and mortality in patients with renal disease (especially for patients with diabetes). Data supporting the benefit of modification of other CVD risk factors is not as strong, but current recommendations do stress aggressive control of lipids, smoking cessation, and maintenance of adequate nutritional status. Inclusion of patients with renal disease in studies with CVD endpoints is necessary. Until then, it is generally recommended that CVD risk stratification and modification strategies be applied to this high-risk population.

  10. Sleep in patients with restrictive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Won, Christine H J; Kryger, Meir

    2014-09-01

    Restrictive lung disease leads to ventilatory defects and diffusion impairments. These changes may contribute to abnormal nocturnal pathophysiology, including sleep architecture disruption and impaired ventilation and oxygenation. Patients with restrictive lung disease may suffer significant daytime fatigue and dysfunction. Hypercarbia and hypoxemia during sleep may impact progression of lung disease and related symptoms. Little is known about the impact of treatment of sleep disruption on sleep quality and overall prognosis in restrictive lung disease. This review discusses the pathophysiology of sleep and comorbid sleep disorders in restrictive lung diseases including interstitial lung disease, neuromuscular disease, and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Resilience in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Lemos, Conceição Maria Martins; Moraes, David William; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2016-01-01

    Background Resilience is a psychosocial factor associated with clinical outcomes in chronic diseases. The relationship between this protective factor and certain diseases, such heart diseases, is still under-explored. Objective The present study sought to investigate the frequency of resilience in individuals with ischemic heart disease. Method This was a cross-sectional study with 133 patients of both genders, aged between 35 and 65 years, treated at Rio Grande do Sul Cardiology Institute - Cardiology University Foundation, with a diagnosis of ischemic heart disease during the study period. Sixty-seven patients had a history of acute myocardial infarction. The individuals were interviewed and evaluated by the Wagnild & Young resilience scale and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Results Eighty-one percent of patients were classified as resilient according to the scale. Conclusion In the sample studied, resilience was identified in high proportion among patients with ischemic heart disease. PMID:26815312

  12. Cystic fibrosis lung disease in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Vender, Robert L

    2008-04-01

    As the longevity of all patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) continues to increase (median 2005 survival=36.8 years), more adult patients will be receiving their medical care from nonpediatric adult-care providers. Cystic fibrosis remains a fatal disease, with more than 80% of patients dying after the age of 18 years, and most deaths resulting from pulmonary disease. The changing epidemiology requires adult-care providers to become knowledgeable and competent in the clinical management of adults with CF. Physicians must understand the influence of specific genotype on phenotypic disease presentation and severity, the pathogenic factors determining lung disease onset and progression, the impact of comorbid disease factors such as CF-related diabetes and malnutrition upon lung disease severity, and the currently approved or standard accepted therapies used for chronic management of CF lung disease. This knowledge is critical to help alleviate morbidity and improve mortality for the rapidly expanding population of adults with CF.

  13. Integrating Patient Concerns into Parkinson's Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Lim, Shen-Yang; Tan, Ai Huey; Fox, Susan H; Evans, Andrew H; Low, Soon Chai

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex motor and non-motor disorder and management is often challenging. In this review, we explore emerging approaches to improve the care of patients, drawing from the literature regarding patient-centred care, patient and caregiver perspectives and priorities, gaps in knowledge among patients and caregivers and the need for accurate information, individual variability in disease manifestations, prognostication of disease course, new developments in health technologies and personalized medicine, specialty care, pharmacological and non-pharmacological management, financial burden, lifestyle and work-related issues, support groups and palliative care.

  14. [Hearing loss in patients with Fabry disease].

    PubMed

    Limberger, A; Beck, M; Delgado-Sanchez, S; Keilmann, A

    2007-03-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease involving deficient activity of alpha-galactosidase A, which leads initially to pain, and later to renal insufficiency, cardiomyopathy and stroke. Until now few details are available on hearing impairment in patients with Fabry disease, and especially few relating to female patients. We examined 43 female and 29 male patients. In this study we looked into the question of whether and to what extent patients of both genders are affected by hearing impairment. Hearing loss is characteristic being more severe at high frequencies frequencies. Overall, 22 female and 15 male patients were found to have suffered a hearing loss. Patients with severe symptoms of Fabry disease usually demonstrate more prominent hearing losses. Both men and women with Fabry disease are affected by hearing impairment. It seems that the hearing loss is less marked in female than in male patients. Children with Fabry disease complain of tinnitus more frequently than other children and quite early in the course of the disease.

  15. Chronic disease management for patients with respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Elizabeth

    National and international awareness of the heavy burden of chronic disease has led to the development of new strategies for managing care. Elisabeth Bryant explains how self-care, education and support for more patients with complex needs should be built into planned care delivery, and emphasises that the patient is the key member of the care team.

  16. Periodontal findings in patients with Hansen's disease.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Aravindhan Thiruputkuzhi; Khalid, Waleed; Saraswathy, Ponnandai Krishnamurthy; Chandran, Chitraa Rama; Mahalingam, Lakshmiganthan

    2014-09-01

    To find out whether there are any relationship between leprosy and periodontitis as evidenced by clinical parameters. Fifteen diagnosed patients with Hansen's disease were selected and compared against 50 healthy individuals. Clinical parameters like probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level were evaluated for both the groups and the results were subjected to statistical analysis. Mean probing depth and attachment loss is seen more in patients with Hansen's disease than the healthy controls which are statistically significant. Patients with Hansen's disease tend to have more periodontal destruction than the healthy controls. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Kidney transplantation in patients with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Cybulla, Markus; Walter, Kerstin Nanette; Schwarting, Andreas; Divito, Raffaelle; Feriozzi, Sandro; Sunder-Plassmann, Gere

    2009-04-01

    Little is known about the effects of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in kidney transplant recipients with Fabry disease. Clinical characteristics of transplant recipients in the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS) were therefore examined in patients with Fabry disease with or without ERT. Of the 837 European patients in FOS (March 2006), 34 male patients and two female patients had received kidney transplants. Mean age at transplantation was 37.6 +/- 10.9 years, mean time since transplantation was 7.7 +/- 6.4 years, median estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 44.4 ml/min/1.73 m(2), and median proteinuria was 296 mg/24 h. Of 27 patients with baseline data, 59% had hypertension, 74% had left ventricular hypertrophy, 22% had cardiac valve disease, 30% had arrhythmia, and 22% had transient ischaemic attacks and 15% stroke. Twenty patients (74%; two female patients, 18 male patients) were receiving ERT with agalsidase alfa. At enrollment or at the start of ERT, median eGFRs were 59 and 35 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (P = 0.05) and median proteinuria levels were 240 and 420 mg/24 h (not significant) in treated and untreated patients respectively. Renal function remained stable in patients receiving ERT. In conclusion, agalsidase alfa is well tolerated in patients with Fabry disease who have undergone renal transplantation.

  18. Autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Robazzi, Teresa Cristina Martins Vicente; Adan, Luis Fernando Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid function abnormalities and thyroid autoantibodies have been frequently described in patients with rheumatologic autoimmune diseases, such as Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma. Limited data are available regarding the prevalence and clinical characteristics of autoimmune thyroiditis in other rheumatologic disorders, such as rheumatic fever and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus. The authors review the association of endocrine autoimmune and rheumatic autoimmune diseases, assessing various age groups and clinical conditions. The bibliographic survey was conducted through the search for scientific articles indexed in the general health sciences databases, such as Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS), Medline/PubMed, and Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO). The following descriptors were used: "rheumatic autoimmune diseases and autoimmune thyroid diseases"; "thyroid disorders and rheumatic diseases"; "thyroiditis and rheumatic diseases"; "autoimmune diseases and thyroid"; and "pediatric rheumatic diseases and autoimmune thyroid diseases". This study showed that, despite contradictory results in the literature, there is a greater prevalence of the association between autoimmune thyroid diseases and rheumatic diseases, highlighting the possibility of common pathogenic mechanisms among them.

  19. Cardiovascular disease in patients with dysvascular amputation.

    PubMed

    Roth, E J; Park, K L; Sullivan, W J

    1998-02-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in individuals with peripheral vascular disease (PVD). Among patients who have undergone lower extremity amputation as a result of PVD, the prevalence of concomitant cardiovascular disease may be as high as 75%. Comorbid heart disease may complicate the postamputation course of recovery, delay initiation of rehabilitation training, and inhibit the achievement of maximal functional independence. A variety of methods have been used to assess cardiac status and risk in amputation patients undergoing physical training; these have included clinical evaluation, resting electrocardiography, and continuous dynamic electrocardiography during either standard physical therapy exercise or adapted ergometry. Several conditioning training programs have been developed to improve the cardiovascular fitness of patients with dysvascular amputation, the results of which have been favorable. These assessment and intervention strategies have extensive applicability in the clinical management of patients with dysvascular amputation.

  20. Nursing care of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Szigeti, E

    1988-01-01

    Nursing interventions for each of the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, muscle rigidity, bradykinesia, tremors at rest and postural reflex abnormalities, are designed to increase the patient's quality of life by minimizing symptoms. Nurses are responsible for planning patient medication schedules to maximize drug effectiveness. Dietary implications include a low-protein regimen for the patient during the day, eliminating foods high in Vitamin B6, high caloric foods, and soft-solid foods offered at frequent feedings. Constipation is addressed by increasing the patient's fiber and fluid intake and by increasing the patient's mobility. Patient mobility is increased when the patient is taught purposeful activities and to concentrate on the way he walks. Communication is facilitated if the patient takes deep breaths before speaking and uses diaphragmatic speech. A telephone receiver which amplifies the patient's voice is also available. Interventions are good only if the patient chooses to implement them; he is the head of the health team planning his care.

  1. Fungal infection in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Ruth; Pisa, Diana; Marina, Ana Isabel; Morato, Esperanza; Rábano, Alberto; Carrasco, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that leads to dementia mainly among the elderly. This disease is characterized by the presence in the brain of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles that provoke neuronal cell death, vascular dysfunction, and inflammatory processes. In the present work, we have analyzed the existence of fungal infection in Alzheimer's disease patients. A proteomic analysis provides compelling evidence for the existence of fungal proteins in brain samples from Alzheimer's disease patients. Furthermore, PCR analysis reveals a variety of fungal species in these samples, dependent on the patient and the tissue tested. DNA sequencing demonstrated that several fungal species can be found in brain samples. Together, these results show that fungal macromolecules can be detected in brain from Alzheimer's disease patients. To our knowledge these findings represent the first evidence that fungal infection is detectable in brain samples from Alzheimer's disease patients. The possibility that this may represent a risk factor or may contribute to the etiological cause of Alzheimer's disease is discussed.

  2. Perioperative management of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Katus, Linn; Shtilbans, Alexander

    2014-04-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease worldwide, leading to a wide range of disability and medical complications. Managing patients with Parkinson's disease in the perioperative hospital setting can be particularly challenging. Suboptimal management can lead to medical complications, prolonged hospital stays, and delayed recovery. This review aims to address the most important issues related to caring for patients with Parkinson's disease perioperatively who are undergoing emergent or planned general surgery. It also intends to help hospitalists, internists, and other health care providers mitigate potential in-hospital morbidity and prevent prolonged recovery. Challenges in managing patients with Parkinson's disease in the perioperative hospital setting include disruption of medication schedules, "nothing by mouth" status, reduced mobility, and medication interactions and their side effects. Patients with Parkinson's disease are more prone to immobility and developing dysphagia, respiratory dysfunction, urinary retention, and psychiatric symptoms. These issues lead to higher rates of pneumonia, urinary tract infections, deconditioning, and falls compared with patients without Parkinson's disease, as well as prolonged hospital stays and a greater need for post-hospitalization rehabilitation. Steps can be taken to decrease these complications, including minimizing nothing by mouth status duration, using alternative routes of drugs administration when unable to give medications orally, avoiding drug interactions and medications that can worsen parkinsonism, assessing swallowing ability frequently, encouraging incentive spirometry, performing bladder scans, avoiding Foley catheters, and providing aggressive physical therapy. Knowing and anticipating these potential complications allow hospital physicians to mitigate nosocomial morbidity and shorten recovery times and hospital stays.

  3. [Chronic kidney disease in the elderly patient].

    PubMed

    Mora-Gutiérrez, José María; Slon Roblero, María Fernanda; Castaño Bilbao, Itziar; Izquierdo Bautista, Diana; Arteaga Coloma, Jesús; Martínez Velilla, Nicolás

    2016-05-06

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is widely prevalent worldwide, with a special impact on elderly population. Around half of people aged over 75 meet diagnostic criteria for CKD according to the recent 'Kidney disease improving global outcomes' (KDIGO) 2012 clinical practice guideline on the evaluation and management of CKD. However, geriatric patients have characteristics that may not be addressed by general guidelines. Therefore, it is important to know the natural history of the disease, symptoms, and 'red-flags' that could help in the management of these patients. In this review, a complete approach is presented on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of CKD in the geriatric population.

  4. [Parasitic diseases in pediatric cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Bialek, R

    2005-11-01

    Parasitic infections are rare events in pediatric oncology. Transmission routes and diseases of most parasites do not differ significantly from those seen in otherwise healthy children. However, latent asymptomatic infections with Cryptosporidium spp., Leishmania spp., Strongyloides stercoralis and Toxoplasma gondii might exacerbate during immunosuppression. Screening in asymptomatic patients is often unsuccessful due to the low sensitivity of available assays except in toxoplasmosis. This article provides the recommendations of the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the German Society for Pediatric Infectious Diseases (DGPI) and the German Society for Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (GPOH) for the appropriate diagnostic procedures and antiparasitic treatment immunocompromised patients.

  5. Tracheobronchitis in a Patient With Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Vincent; Govind, Anusha G; Arastu, Sanaa; Henry, Christopher H

    2016-04-01

    We report a 63-year-old woman who presented with 1 month of non-productive cough and non-bloody diarrhea. She was on maintenance therapy for a 15-year history of Crohn's disease. Treatment with systemic corticosteroids resulted in rapid improvement of both her diarrhea and respiratory symptoms. Our patient is unique in that she presented with tracheobronchitis during an acute flare of her Crohn's without obvious lung pathology on chest imaging. Tracheobronchitis is a rare manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease that should be considered in Crohn's disease patients presenting with persistent non-infectious cough.

  6. Manifestations of periodontal diseases in AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Rêgo, T I; Pinheiro, A L

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze periodontal diseases in AIDS patients. Although AIDS was first detected in Brazil in 1982, it is growing steadily and is more frequent in the Southeast. Oral manifestations are common and may represent early signs of the disease. These lesions often precede systemic symptoms. The development of periodontal lesions in AIDS patients differs from that in non-infected patients. This is due to its chronic nature and lack of full recovery in AIDS patients. Characteristically, these lesions are not related to local irritants and progress quickly. Because these lesions do not respond properly to conventional treatment used in non-infected patients, the use of preventive methods is extremely important. These methods must include patient education and periodical professional scaling. It is important to reinforce the use of preventive measures in AIDS patients mainly in those presenting severe manifestations of the disease. The aim of treatment must be to preserve the teeth and periodontal tissues and allow more comfort to the patient during the progression of the disease.

  7. Supporting communication for patients with neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Fried-Oken, Melanie; Mooney, Aimee; Peters, Betts

    2015-01-01

    Communication supports, referred to as augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), are an integral part of medical speech-language pathology practice, yet many providers remain unfamiliar with assessment and intervention principles. For patients with complex communication impairments secondary to neurodegenerative disease, AAC services differ depending on whether their condition primarily affects speech and motor skills (ALS), language (primary progressive aphasia) or cognition (Alzheimer's disease). This review discusses symptom management for these three conditions, identifying behavioral strategies, low- and high-tech solutions for implementation during the natural course of disease. These AAC principles apply to all neurodegenerative diseases in which common symptoms appear. To present AAC interventions for patients with neurodegenerative diseases affecting speech, motor, language and cognitive domains. Three themes emerge: (1) timing of intervention: early referral, regular re-evaluations and continual treatment are essential; (2) communication partners must be included from the onset to establish AAC acceptance and use; and (3) strategies will change over time and use multiple modalities to capitalize on patients' strengths. AAC should be standard practice for adults with neurodegenerative disease. Patients can maintain effective, functional communication with AAC supports. Individualized communication systems can be implemented ensuring patients remain active participants in daily activities.

  8. Persistent Hypoglycemia in Patient with Hodgkin's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Harold Cinco; Munshi, Lubna Bashir; Sharon, David

    2015-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a rare complication of Hodgkin's disease. Several explanations have been postulated but the exact pathophysiology is not well understood. We are presenting a case of newly diagnosed Stage IV Hodgkin's disease that developed persistent and recurrent hypoglycemia despite giving glucagon, repeated 50% dextrose, and D5 and D10 continuous infusion. Hypoglycemia workup showed the C-peptide level to be low. Patient was suspected of having hypoglycemia related to lymphoma and was given a trial of prednisone which resolved the hypoglycemic episodes and made the patient euglycemic for the rest of his hospital stay. The presence of a substance that mimicked the effects of insulin was highly suspected. Several case reports strengthen the hypothesis of an insulin-like growth factor or antibodies secreted by the cancer cells causing hypoglycemia in Hodgkin's disease but none of them have been confirmed. Further investigation is warranted to more clearly define the pathophysiology of persistent hypoglycemia in patients with Hodgkin's disease. PMID:26839722

  9. Venous thromboembolic disease in colorectal patients.

    PubMed

    McNally, Michael P; Burns, Christopher J

    2009-02-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease, which includes deep vein thromboses as well as pulmonary emboli, can be a significant complication in the postoperative patient. In particular, colorectal patients often carry a higher risk for venous thromboembolism when compared with patients undergoing other operative procedures. Features unique to colorectal patients are the high incidence of inflammatory bowel disease or malignancy. Typically, these patients will undergo lengthy pelvic procedures, which also contribute to a cumulative risk of venous thrombosis. It is critical that all patients and the proposed operative procedure are appropriately risk stratified. Risk stratification allows for easier implementation of an appropriate prophylactic strategy. There are a wide range of safe and effective mechanical and pharmacologic measures available. The authors provide very specific recommendations, but note that clinical judgment plays a significant role.

  10. Vaccinating Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Jason; Wasan, Sharmeel

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are not vaccinated at the same rate as general medical patients. IBD places patients at increased risk for developing vaccine-preventable illnesses, and this risk is further exacerbated by immunosuppressive therapy. Therefore, gastroenterologists should familiarize themselves with health maintenance measures pertaining to patients with IBD. This article highlights the vaccinations required for patients with IBD, especially those who are immunosuppressed: influenza; pneumococcal pneumonia; hepatitis A and B viruses; human papilloma virus; meningococcal disease; tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis; measles, mumps, and rubella; varicella zoster; and herpes zoster. This article also discusses issues regarding patients with IBD who travel outside of the United States, as well as highlights and provides suggestions for areas of quality improvement that are needed in the field. PMID:27917091

  11. Vaccination recommendations for patients with neuromuscular disease.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Bruno, Claudio; Berardinelli, Angela; Filosto, Massimiliano; Mongini, Tiziana; Morandi, Lucia; Musumeci, Olimpia; Pegoraro, Elena; Siciliano, Gabriele; Tonin, Paola; Marrosu, Gianni; Minetti, Carlo; Servida, Maura; Fiorillo, Chiara; Conforti, Giorgio; Scapolan, Silvia; Ansaldi, Filippo; Vianello, Andrea; Castaldi, Silvana; Principi, Nicola; Toscano, Antonio; Moggio, Maurizio

    2014-10-14

    Neuromuscular diseases (NMDs) encompass a broad spectrum of conditions. Because infections may be relevant to the final prognosis of most NMDs, vaccination appears to be the simplest and most effective solution for protecting NMD patients from vaccine-preventable infections. However, very few studies have evaluated the immunogenicity, safety, tolerability, and efficacy of different vaccines in NMD patients; therefore, detailed vaccination recommendations for NMD patients are not available. Here, we present vaccination recommendations from a group of Italian Scientific Societies for optimal disease prevention in NMD patients that maintain high safety levels. We found that NMD patients can be classified into two groups according to immune function: patients with normal immunity and patients who are immunocompromised, including those who intermittently or continuously take immunosuppressive therapy. Patients with normal immunity and do not take immunosuppressive therapy can be vaccinated as healthy subjects. In contrast, immunocompromised patients, including those who take immunosuppressive therapy, should receive all inactivated vaccines as well as influenza and pneumococcal vaccines; these patients should not be administered live attenuated vaccines. In all cases, the efficacy and long-term persistence of immunity from vaccination in NMD patients can be lower than in normal subjects. Household contacts of immunocompromised NMD patients should also be vaccinated appropriately. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Current treatments for patients with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Gerald G; Saunders, Amanda Vaughn

    2010-09-01

    There is neither proven effective prevention for Alzheimer disease nor a cure for patients with this disorder. Nevertheless, a spectrum of biopsychosocial therapeutic measures is available for slowing progression of the illness and enhancing quality of life for patients. These measures include a range of educational, psychological, social, and behavioral interventions that remain fundamental to effective care. Also available are a number of pharmacologic treatments, including prescription medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for Alzheimer disease, "off-label" uses of medications to manage target symptoms, and controversial complementary therapies. Physicians must make the earliest possible diagnosis to use these treatments most effectively. Physicians' goals should be to educate patients and their caregivers, to plan long-term care options, to maximally manage concurrent illnesses, to slow and ameliorate the most disabling symptoms, and to preserve effective functioning for as long as possible. The authors review the various current treatments for patients with Alzheimer disease.

  13. [Disease management for chronic heart failure patient].

    PubMed

    Bläuer, Cornelia; Pfister, Otmar; Bächtold, Christa; Junker, Therese; Spirig, Rebecca

    2011-02-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (HF) are limited in their quality of life, have a poor prognosis and face frequent hospitalisations. Patient self-management was shown to improve quality of life, reduce rehospitalisations and costs in patients with chronic HF. Comprehensive disease management programmes are critical to foster patient self-management. The chronic care model developed by the WHO serves as the basis of such programmes. In order to develop self-management skills a needs orientated training concept is mandatory, as patients need both knowledge of the illness and the ability to use the information to make appropriate decisions according to their individual situation. Switzerland has no established system for the care of patients with chronic diseases in particular those with HF. For this reason a group of Swiss experts for HF designed a model for disease management for HF patients in Switzerland. Since 2009 the Swiss Heart Foundation offers an education programme based on this model. The aim of this programme is to offer education and support for practitioners, patients and families. An initial pilot evaluation of the program showed mixed acceptance by practitioners, whereas patient assessed the program as supportive and in line with their requirements.

  14. [Sighting dominance in patients with macular disease].

    PubMed

    Akaza, Eriko; Fujita, Kyoko; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Yuzawa, Mitsuko

    2007-04-01

    To study sighting dominance by comparing macular disease patients undergoing surgical treatment with controls. We studied visual acuity and sighting dominance in 92 macular disease patients, 27 of whom were assessed for both outcomes. We also studied visual acuity and sighting dominance in 412 controls. Sighting dominance was evaluated using the hole-in-card test. Among the controls, 70% showed right sighting dominance, and 30%, left sighting dominance. On the other hand, in patients with macular disease, right sighting dominance was demonstrated in 51%, and left in 49%; that is, 24% showed sighting dominance of the affected eye and 76%, of the fellow eye. During follow-up, sighting dominance of three of the 27 macular disease patients shifted from the affected eye to the fellow eye, which showed improvement in visual acuity. This study raises the possibility of sighting dominance shifting in patients with macular disease. There were differences among cases in the timing of the shift in sighting dominance, indicating that visual acuity may not be the only factor influencing sighting dominance. Further study is needed to confirm the factors contributing to sighting dominance.

  15. Psychosocial interventions for patients with chronic disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of patients with chronic diseases will be one of the main challenges of medicine in the future. This paper presents an overview of different origins, mechanism, and symptoms necessary for understanding new and different interventions that include a psychosomatic view. In a psychosomatic therapeutic intervention there are very different targets, such as psychological symptoms, personality traits, attitudes toward disease and life, risk behaviour, and social isolation and as biological targets the change of autonomic imbalance and of the effects of the psycho-endocrinological or psycho-immunological stress responses. And there are also different psychosomatic measures that influence the individual biological, psychological and sociological targets. There is a need to give different answer to different questions in the field of psychosomatic and behavioral medicine. Comparative effectiveness research is an important strategy for solving some methodological issues. What is the target of treatment for different diseases: Symptom reduction, healing, or limiting progression to the worst case - the death of patients. We know that, the patient-physician relationship is important for every medical/therapeutic action for patients with chronic diseases. This volume of BioPsychoSocial Medicine will present four different psychosomatic treatment studies from the clinical field in the sense of phase 2 studies: Reports of patients with obesity, anorexia nervosa, chronic somatoform pain and coronary artery disease were presented PMID:22293471

  16. Cystathionine Levels in Patients With Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, N.A.; Onkenhout, W.; Kerstens, H.J.; Roos, Raymund A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently a profound depletion of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), the principal enzyme involved in the generation of cysteine from cystathionine, was shown in Huntington disease (HD) patients and several transgenic HD mouse models. We therefore hypothesized that blood and urine cystathionine levels may be increased in HD patients and that this increase might correlate with disease progression. Methods: We measured concentrations of cystathionine as well as 22 other amino acids in fasting plasma and 24-h urine samples of nine early-stage HD patients and nine age, sex, and body mass index matched controls. Results: There were no significant differences in the plasma or urine concentrations of cystathionine or any other amino acid between HD patients and controls. Conclusion: We found no evidence for changes in plasma or urine concentrations of cystathionine in early-stage HD patients. Therefore, cystathionine levels are unlikely to be useful as a state biomarker in HD. PMID:26435880

  17. The emergence of Parkinson disease among patients with Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Elstein, Deborah; Alcalay, Roy; Zimran, Ari

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade, several lines of evidence have been presented that document the clinical manifestations, genetic associations, and sub-cellular mechanisms of the inter-relatedness of β-glucocerebrosidase mutations and the emergence of Parkinson disease among carriers and patients with Gaucher disease. This review is an attempt to apprise the reader of the recent literature with the caveat that this is an area of intensive exploration that is constantly being updated because of the immediate clinical ramifications but also because of the impact on our understanding of Parkinson disease, and finally because of the unexpected inter-reactions between these entities on the molecular level. It has been an unexpected happenstance that it has been discovered that a rare monogenetic disease has an interface at many points with a neurological disorder of the elderly that has both familial and sporadic forms: to date there is no cure for either of these disorders.

  18. [Skin diseases in geriatric patients. Epidemiologic data].

    PubMed

    Makrantonaki, E; Liakou, A I; Eckardt, R; Zens, M; Steinhagen-Thiessen, E; Zouboulis, C C

    2012-12-01

    The incidence of skin diseases more common in older patients, e.g. inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, benign and malignant tumors and paraneoplastic syndromes, is increasing worldwide rapidly mainly due to early or lifelong UV-overexposure and to an aging population. In order to transform this demographic change into a chance a better understanding of the pathomechanisms of these diseases, an early diagnosis and therapy are essential steps. In addition, a joint effort to raise public awareness, patient education, preventive measures and consistent monitoring of high-risk groups is of great importance. In this article, the relationship between aging and associated skin diseases will be presented with a particular focus on the epidemiology and risk factors.

  19. Periodontal management of patients with cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    2002-08-01

    Periodontists are often called upon to provide periodontal therapy for patients with a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Safe and effective periodontal treatment requires a general understanding of the underlying cardiovascular diseases, their medical management, and necessary modifications to dental/periodontal therapy that may be required. In this informational paper more common cardiovascular disorders will be discussed and dental management considerations briefly described. This paper is intended for the use of periodontists and members of the dental profession.

  20. Gastrostomy in patients with prion disease.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yasushi; Mori, Keiko; Ito, Masumi; Kawai, Yoshinari; Hoshino, Ken-Ichiro; Kawabata, Yuko; Mimuro, Maya; Yoshida, Mari

    2017-05-04

    Patients with prion diseases can live for long periods of time in a state of akinetic mutism given appropriate management of their symptoms. To study symptom support in these cases, we performed gastrostomies on 3 patients with V180I genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) who had become akinetic and mute, and compared them to 14 other similar patients being fed by tube. In the 3 gastrostomy cases, there were no direct complications due to the gastrostomy or tube feeding, nor were there episodes of discontinuation of tube feeding or initiation of continuous drip infusion due to severe complications. Antibiotics were administered for mild infections, a complication of CJD, with 0.2% and 8.8% of the total time after gastrostomy being used for intravenous or transluminal administration, respectively. We compared the present patient series with that of our previous report statistically, and found that patients undergoing gastrostomy required significantly fewer discontinuations of tube feeding than those who did not. No significant difference in antibiotic administration was found between groups, however. It is our conclusion that gastrostomy should be allowed for symptom support in akinetic patients with prion disease, but adequate informed consent must be provided to the patient's family.

  1. Patients, populations and policy: patient outcomes in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Powe, N R

    2001-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease represents an interesting illustration for evaluating an epidemic of chronic illness, the impact of care processes and technology on health outcomes, the impact of financial incentives and cost containment on health outcomes, and the choices society must consider in responding to a chronic illness. The evidence suggests that strong economic pressures exist in the care of chronic kidney disease and that cost containment is important. The results in large part reflect the impact of economic pressures on clinical decision making in the absence of good evidence on outcomes. To improve clinical decision making we need valid evidence linking specific processes of care to patient outcomes. Specific processes amenable to study include the provision of preventive services, physician and nurse technical and interpersonal care and adherence to clinical practice guidelines. The ESRD Quality Study (EQUAL) currently underway and supported by the National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, may help to guide physicians and centers in caring for their patients with chronic kidney disease. This investigation examines the relation between process of care and outcomes and expands outcomes measure to include disease-specific quality-of-life measures and patient satisfaction and accounts for case mix using the Index of Co-Existent Disease, a measure of the extent of different comorbid diseases as well as their severity (18,19,20). Better data on how processes of care are linked to health outcomes can inform decision making and allow educated cost cutting and quality maintenance.

  2. [Cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Abe, Nobuhito; Mori, Etsuro

    2012-04-01

    Parkinson disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder resulting in motor symptoms and cognitive deficits. Neuropsychological studies have suggested that patients with Parkinson disease exhibit a broad range of cognitive deficits even in the early stages of the disease. In this review, we discuss the neuropsychological evidence for cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson disease, outlining the different domains of cognitive disturbance. First, we review previous findings on executive dysfunction, which is associated with a disruption in frontostriatal circuitry mainly driven by dopaminergic dysmodulation. Executive dysfunction is the core symptom in the cognitive deficits in Parkinson disease. Second, we focus on impairment in different domains of memory function, such as short-term and long-term memory. Third, we discuss the pattern of cognitive deficits in visuospatial ability, ranging from basic perceptual processes to rather complex motor skills. Next, we summarize the profile of cognitive deficits in language, although previous findings are mixed and hence this topic is relatively controversial. Finally, we introduce several recent findings on social cognitive deficits, which is a new area of research that has emerged in the past decade. We also discuss the possible neural mechanisms underlying each domain of cognitive deficits in patients with Parkinson disease.

  3. Exercise for older patients with chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Petrella, R J

    1999-10-01

    Coronary artery disease, hypertension, congestive heart failure, type 2 diabetes mellitus, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and cognitive disorders become more prevalent as people age. Besides delaying the onset of many of these conditions, regular exercise may improve function and delay disability and morbidity in those who have them. Further, exercise may work synergistically with medication to combat the effects of some chronic diseases. Special adaptations for older patients include lower-intensity exercise (eg, fewer repetitions), low-impact exercise (cycling, exercise while sitting), and modified equipment (smaller weights, special shoes, loose clothing). Unresolved issues include development of optimal strategies for motivating older patients to begin and maintain exercise programs.

  4. The adult patient with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Baum, V C

    1996-02-01

    In adults with congenital heart disease who are confronted with noncardiac surgery, perioperative risks can be reduced, often appreciably, when problems inherent to this patient population are anticipated. The first necessity is to clarify the diagnosis and to be certain that appropriate information is obtained from a cardiologist with adequate knowledge of congenital heart disease in adults. Physiology and anatomy can vary significantly among patients who superficially carry identical diagnoses. Elective noncardiac surgery should be preceded by clinical assessment including review of clinical and laboratory data and securing the results of necessary diagnostic studies. Preoperative assessment should be performed far enough in advance of the anticipated date of surgery to allow critical assessment of the data and potential discussions with colleagues. Appropriate cardiovascular laboratory studies to be obtained or reviewed include electrocardiograms, chest radiographs, echocardiograms, and cardiac catheterization data, which may include specialized intracardiac electrophysiologic testing. Congenital heart disease in adults is a new and evolving area of special interest and expertise in cardiovascular medicine. Multidisciplinary centers for the care of these patients are being developed. The 22nd Bethesda Conference recommended that these centers include among their consultants anesthesiologists with special expertise in managing patients with congenital heart disease. These anesthesiologists can have the option of serving either as the attending anesthesiologists when patients require noncardiac surgery or as consultants and resource individuals to other anesthesiologists.

  5. Managing coeliac disease in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Leonard, M M; Cureton, P A; Fasano, A

    2015-01-01

    The association between coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes has long been established. The combination of genetic susceptibility along with a potential role for gluten in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity makes defining gluten's role in type 1 diabetes extremely important. Evidence supporting the role of a gluten-free diet to improve complications associated with type 1 diabetes is not robust. However there is evidence to support improved growth, bone density and potentially the prevention of additional autoimmune diseases in patients with coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes. The gluten free diet is expensive and challenging to adhere to in people already on a modified diet. Early identification of those who have coeliac disease and would benefit from a gluten-free diet is of utmost importance to prevent complications associated with type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Crohn disease and the gynecologic patient.

    PubMed

    Sides, Cleve; Trinidad, Mari Charisse; Heitlinger, Leo; Anasti, James

    2013-01-01

    Although Crohn disease (CD) is considered an inflammatory bowel disease, extraintestinal gynecologic manifestations are varied, frequent, and oftentimes difficult to manage. Its predilection for young and reproductive-age women makes it an important disease process for the gynecologist to understand, as its complications can have long-term repercussions on the developmental, sexual, reproductive, and psychological health of affected women. Patients may present with a variety of vulvovaginal, perineal, perianal, and urologic complaints. Perianal involvement from an intestinal fistula is the most common skin manifestation seen in CD. Other gynecologic manifestations include metastatic CD and rectovaginal and urovaginal fistulas. Recognition and accurate diagnosis of extraintestinal gynecologic manifestations, as well as a good understanding of the gynecologic effects of chronic disease, are necessary for optimal management. The article provides an overview of CD and highlights the gynecologic considerations in caring for women affected by this disease.

  7. Monitoring nonresponsive patients who have celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Norbert; Schuppan, Detlef

    2006-04-01

    Because of the wide variations in the clinical presentation of celiac disease and because treatment exists that is effective in most cases, screening of the general population for celiac disease has been considered. There is still no evidence that patients who have symptom-free celiac disease are at increased risk of small intestinal lymphoma or other complications. Prevention of osteoporosis seems to be the strongest indicator for widespread screening today [22]. The major cause of failure to respond to a gluten-free diet is continuing ingestion of gluten, but other underlying diseases must be considered. Many different drugs (eg, anti-tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-alpha) have been used in patients who have RCD [23]. Steroid treatment has been reported to be effective even in patients who have underlying early EATL. Histologic recovery in patients who have celiac disease usually takes several months but can take up to 1 year, even if the patient remains on a strict gluten-free diet. Some patients report celiac-related symptoms for months after a single gluten intake. The definitions for RCD in literature vary. The authors consider the definition give by Daum and colleagues [24] suitable. They defined true RCD as villous atrophy with crypt hyperplasia and increased IELs persisting for more than 12 months in spite of a strict gluten-free diet. If a patient is not responding well to a gluten-free diet, three considerations are necessary: (1) the initial diagnosis of celiac disease must be reassessed;(2) the patient should be sent to a dietician to check for errors in diet or compliance problems, because problems with the gluten-free diet are the most important cause for persisting symptoms; (3) other reasons for persisting symptoms (eg, pancreatic insufficiency, irritable bowel syndrome, bacterial overgrowth, lymphocytic colitis, collagenous colitis, ulcerative jejunitis, protein-losing enteropathy,T-cell lymphoma, fructose intolerance, cavitating lymphadenopathy, and

  8. Voluntary Imitation in Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Bisio, Ambra; Casteran, Matthieu; Ballay, Yves; Manckoundia, Patrick; Mourey, France; Pozzo, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Although Alzheimer's disease (AD) primarily manifests as cognitive deficits, the implicit sensorimotor processes that underlie social interactions, such as automatic imitation, seem to be preserved in mild and moderate stages of the disease, as is the ability to communicate with other persons. Nevertheless, when AD patients face more challenging tasks, which do not rely on automatic processes but on explicit voluntary mechanisms and require the patient to pay attention to external events, the cognitive deficits resulting from the disease might negatively affect patients' behavior. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether voluntary motor imitation, i.e., a volitional mechanism that involves observing another person's action and translating this perception into one's own action, was affected in patients with AD. Further, we tested whether this ability was modulated by the nature of the observed stimulus by comparing the ability to reproduce the kinematic features of a human demonstrator with that of a computerized-stimulus. AD patients showed an intact ability to reproduce the velocity of the observed movements, particularly when the stimulus was a human agent. This result suggests that high-level cognitive processes involved in voluntary imitation might be preserved in mild and moderate stages of AD and that voluntary imitation abilities might benefit from the implicit interpersonal communication established between the patient and the human demonstrator.

  9. Learning disabilities in Darier's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Dodiuk-Gad, R; Lerner, M; Breznitz, Z; Cohen-Barak, E; Ziv, M; Shani-Adir, A; Amichai, B; Zlotogorski, A; Shalev, S; Rozenman, D

    2014-03-01

    Neuropsychiatric features and intellectual difficulties have been reported in studies of Darier's disease. Learning disabilities have never been reported or evaluated systematically in these patients. To assess the prevalence of learning disabilities in 76 patients with Darier's disease, and cognitive functioning in 19 of them. The data were collected by two methods: a questionnaire, as part of a larger study on the clinical characteristics of 76 patients; and neuropsychological measures for the assessment of learning disabilities in 19 of them. Thirty-one of the 76 patients reported learning disabilities (41%) and 56 (74%) reported a family history of learning disabilities. Significant differences were found between the 19 patients evaluated on cognitive tasks and a control group of 42 skilled learners on subtraction and multiplication tasks. Six (32%) of the 19 were identified as having reading difficulties and five (26%) exhibited low performance on the Concentration Performance Test. All patients had general cognitive ability in the average range. Findings suggest an association between Darier's disease and learning disabilities, a heretofore unreported association, pointing to the need to obtain personal and family history of such disabilities in order to refer cases of clinical concern for further study. © 2013 The Authors Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2013 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  10. Osteoporosis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Compston, J E; Judd, D; Crawley, E O; Evans, W D; Evans, C; Church, H A; Reid, E M; Rhodes, J

    1987-01-01

    Bone mineral content in spinal trabecular and peripheral cortical bone was measured in 75 unselected patients with small and/or large intestinal inflammatory bowel disease. Osteoporosis, defined as a bone mineral content greater than 2 SD below the age and sex matched normal mean value was present in 23 patients (30.6%). Three amenorrhoeic females aged 34, 38, and 42 years had severe clinical osteoporosis and a further three patients had one or more vertebral crush fractures. Eighteen of the 23 patients with osteoporosis had small intestinal disease with one or more resections and the mean lifetime steroid dose in those with osteoporosis was significantly higher than in those with normal bone mineral content. Bone mineral content in spinal trabecular bone showed significant negative correlations with lifetime steroid dose and serum alkaline phosphatase and a significant positive correlation with serum albumin. Peripheral cortical bone mineral content was positively correlated with body weight, height and body mass index. We conclude that the prevalence of osteoporosis is increased in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, severe clinical osteoporosis developing in some relatively young patients. The pathogenesis of this bone loss is probably multifactorial; steroid therapy is likely to be an important contributory factor. PMID:3583068

  11. Interstitial lung diseases in the hospitalized patient.

    PubMed

    Disayabutr, Supparerk; Calfee, Carolyn S; Collard, Harold R; Wolters, Paul J

    2015-09-25

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) are disorders of the lung parenchyma. The pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and prognosis of ILDs vary depending on the underlying disease. The onset of most ILDs is insidious, but they may also present subacutely or require hospitalization for management. ILDs that may present subacutely include acute interstitial pneumonia, connective tissue disease-associated ILDs, cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, drug-induced ILDs, and acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Prognosis and response to therapy depend on the type of underlying ILD being managed. This opinion piece discusses approaches to differentiating ILDs in the hospitalized patient, emphasizing the role of bronchoscopy and surgical lung biopsy. We then consider pharmacologic treatments and the use of mechanical ventilation in hospitalized patients with ILD. Finally, lung transplantation and palliative care as treatment modalities are considered. The diagnosis of ILD in hospitalized patients requires input from multiple disciplines. The prognosis of ILDs presenting acutely vary depending on the underlying ILD. Patients with advanced ILD or acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis have poor outcomes. The mainstay treatment in these patients is supportive care, and mechanical ventilation should only be used in these patients as a bridge to lung transplantation.

  12. Tyrosine Metabolism in Patients with Liver Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Robert J.; Conn, Harold O.

    1967-01-01

    Plasma levels of tyrosine were assayed in the fasting state and after oral administration of either tyrosine (tyrosine tolerance test) or phenylalanine (phenlyalanine conversion test) in normal subjects and in patients with hepatitis, biliary obstruction, or cirrhosis. Fasting tyrosine levels tended to be slightly increased in patients with hepatitis and biliary obstruction and markedly increased in patients with cirrhosis. Tyrosine tolerance tests in patients with cirrhosis were characterized by larger than normal increments in tyrosine levels and by delayed returns toward fasting levels. The results of phenylalanine conversion tests were abnormal in approximately one-half of patients with either hepatitis or biliary obstruction and four-fifths of patients with cirrhosis. Abnormalities were characterized by elevated fasting plasma tyrosine levels, or small and delayed increments in tyrosine levels, or both. Abnormal phenylalanine conversion test results in patients with cirrhosis did not correlate closely with any clinical feature of cirrhosis or with the results of any standard liver function test; there was positive correlation only with abnormal ammonia tolerance, a test of portalsystemic shunting. Tests of tyrosine metabolism do not appear to be useful for routine clinical assessment of liver function. Tyrosine tolerance tests and phenylalanine conversion tests done for purposes of diagnosis of other diseases may yield misleading results in patients with liver disease. PMID:6074004

  13. Cancer risks in Crohn disease patients.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, K; Li, X; Sundquist, J; Sundquist, K

    2009-03-01

    Patients diagnosed with Crohn disease (CD) are known to be at an increased risk of bowel cancers and lymphoma. CD is an autoimmune disease and we hypothesize that the patients are predisposed to a wider spectrum of cancers. A CD research database was constructed by identifying hospitalized CD patients from the Hospital Discharge Register and cancer patients from the Swedish Cancer Registry. Follow-up of 21 788 CD patients first hospitalized during the years 1964-2004 identified 1424 cancer cases. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated by comparing cancers in CD patients with subjects without CD. In addition to the known sites, many additional sites were in excess in CD patients. These included liver, pancreatic, lung, prostate, testicular, kidney and skin (squamous cell) cancers; nonthyroid endocrine tumors and leukemia. The previously established sites showed the highest SIRs; however, SIRs >2.0 were noted for the novel sites of the liver, testis and kidney. For testicular cancer, the SIR of seminoma was 2.74. Cancer risks were influences by age at first hospitalization for CD but whether the age effects were increasing or decreasing depending on the cancer type. This large study identified many novel subsequent cancers in CD patients.

  14. Sialadenosis in Patients with Advanced Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Close, John M.; Eghtesad, Bijan

    2009-01-01

    Sialadenosis (sialosis) has been associated most often with alcoholic liver disease and alcoholic cirrhosis, but a number of nutritional deficiencies, diabetes, and bulimia have also been reported to result in sialadenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sialadenosis in patients with advanced liver disease. Patients in the study group consisted of 300 candidates for liver transplantation. Types of liver disease in subjects with clinical evidence of sialadenosis were compared with diagnoses in cases who had no manifestations of sialadenosis. The data were analyzed for significant association. Sialadenosis was found in 28 of the 300 subjects (9.3%). Among these 28 cases, 11 (39.3%) had alcoholic cirrhosis. The remaining 17 (60.7%) had eight other types of liver disease. There was no significant association between sialadenosis and alcoholic cirrhosis (P = 0.389). These findings suggest that both alcoholic and non-alcoholic cirrhosis may lead to the development of sialadenosis. Advanced liver disease is accompanied by multiple nutritional deficiencies which may be exacerbated by alcohol. Similar metabolic abnormalities may occur in patients with diabetes or bulimia. Malnutrition has been associated with autonomic neuropathy, the pathogenic mechanism that has been proposed for sialadenosis. PMID:19644542

  15. Sialadenosis in patients with advanced liver disease.

    PubMed

    Guggenheimer, James; Close, John M; Eghtesad, Bijan

    2009-06-01

    Sialadenosis (sialosis) has been associated most often with alcoholic liver disease and alcoholic cirrhosis, but a number of nutritional deficiencies, diabetes, and bulimia have also been reported to result in sialadenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sialadenosis in patients with advanced liver disease. Patients in the study group consisted of 300 candidates for liver transplantation. Types of liver disease in subjects with clinical evidence of sialadenosis were compared with diagnoses in cases who had no manifestations of sialadenosis. The data were analyzed for significant association. Sialadenosis was found in 28 of the 300 subjects (9.3%). Among these 28 cases, 11 (39.3%) had alcoholic cirrhosis. The remaining 17 (60.7%) had eight other types of liver disease. There was no significant association between sialadenosis and alcoholic cirrhosis (P = 0.389). These findings suggest that both alcoholic and non-alcoholic cirrhosis may lead to the development of sialadenosis. Advanced liver disease is accompanied by multiple nutritional deficiencies which may be exacerbated by alcohol. Similar metabolic abnormalities may occur in patients with diabetes or bulimia. Malnutrition has been associated with autonomic neuropathy, the pathogenic mechanism that has been proposed for sialadenosis.

  16. Subsequent leukaemia in autoimmune disease patients.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, Kari; Liu, Xiangdong; Försti, Asta; Ji, Jianguang; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that patients diagnosed with some autoimmune (AI) diseases are at an increased risk of leukaemia but limited data are available on survival. We systematically analysed the risks (standardized incidence ratio, SIR) and survival (hazard ratio, HR) in nine types of leukaemia among 402 462 patients hospitalized for any of 33 AI diseases and compared to persons not hospitalized for AI diseases. Risk for all leukaemia was increased after 13 AI diseases and survival was decreased after six AI diseases. SIRs were increased after all AI diseases for seven types of leukaemia, including SIR 1·69 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1·29-2·19) for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), 1·85 (95% CI: 1·65-2·07) for acute myeloid leukaemia, 1·68 (95% CI: 1·37-2·04) for chronic myeloid leukaemia, 2·20 (95% CI: 1·69-2·81) for 'other myeloid leukaemia', 2·45 (95% 1·99-2·98) for 'other and unspecified leukaemia', 1·81 (95% CI: 1·11-2·81) for monocytic leukaemia, and 1·36 (95% CI: 1·08-1·69) for myelofibrosis. The HRs were increased for four types of leukaemia, most for myelofibrosis (1·74, 95% CI: 1·33-2·29) and ALL (1·42, 95% CI: 1·03-1·95). Some AI diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, were associated with increased SIRs and HRs in many types of leukaemia. The present data showed increases in risk and decreases in survival for many types of leukaemia after various AI diseases. Leukaemia is a rare complication in AI disease but findings about this comorbidity at the time of leukaemia diagnosis may help to optimize the treatment and improve survival. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Myopathy in patients with Hashimoto's disease.

    PubMed

    Villar, Jaqueline; Finol, Héctor J; Torres, Sonia H; Roschman-González, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland. Patients may present or not a hypothyroid state, and frequently have manifestations of myopathy. The present work was aimed to assess the clinical symptoms and signs of skeletal muscle alterations in HT, describe the muscular pathological changes and relate them to the functional thyroid status and to the autoimmune condition of the patient. Clinical and laboratory studies were performed in ten HT patients and three control subjects (hormonal levels and electromyography). Biopsies from their vastus lateralis of quadriceps femoris muscle were analyzed under light (histochemistry and immunofluorescense) and electron microscopy. All patients showed muscle focal alterations, ranging from moderate to severe atrophy, necrosis, activation of satellite cells, presence of autophagosomes, capillary alterations and macrophage and mast cell infiltration, common to autoimmune diseases. The intensity of clinical signs and symptoms was not related to the morphological muscle findings, the electromyography results, or to the state of the thyroid function. Reactions for immunoglobulin in muscle fibers were positive in 80% of the patients. Fiber type II proportion was increased in all patients, with the exception of those treated with L-thyroxine. In conclusion, autoimmune processes in several of the patients may be associated to the skeletal muscle alterations, independently of the functional state of the thyroid gland; however, fiber II type proportion could have been normalized by L-thyroxine treatment.

  18. Asymmetrical Pedaling Patterns in Parkinson's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Penko, Amanda L.; Hirsch, Joshua R.; Voelcker-Rehage, Claudia; Martin, Philip E.; Blackburn, Gordon; Alberts, Jay L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately 1.5 million Americans are affected by Parkinson's disease [1] which includes the symptoms of postural instability and gait dysfunction. Currently, clinical evaluations of postural instability and gait dysfunction consist of a subjective rater assessment of gait patterns using items from the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, and assessments can be insensitive to the effectiveness of medical interventions. Current research suggests the importance of cycling for Parkinson's disease patients, and while Parkinson's gait has been evaluated in previous studies, little is known about lower extremity control during cycling. The purpose of this study is to examine the lower extremity coordination patterns of Parkinson's patients during cycling. Methods Twenty five participants, ages 44-72, with a clinical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease participated in an exercise test on a cycle ergometer that was equipped with pedal force measurements. Crank torque, crank angle and power produced by right and left leg were measured throughout the test to calculate Symmetry Index at three stages of exercise (20 Watt, 60 Watt, maximum performance). Findings Decreases in Symmetry Index were observed for average power output in Parkinson's patients as workload increased. Maximum power Symmetry Index showed a significant difference in symmetry between performance at both the 20 Watt and 60 Watt stage and the maximal resistance stage. Minimum power Symmetry Index did not show significant differences across the stages of the test. While lower extremity asymmetries were present in Parkinson's patients during pedaling, these asymmetries did not correlate to postural instability and gait dysfunction Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores. Interpretation This pedaling analysis allows for a more sensitive measure of lower extremity function than the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and may help to provide unique insight into current and

  19. Dyslipidemia, kidney disease, and cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-chi; Tseng, Chin-Hsiao

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the relationship between dyslipidemia, chronic kidney disease, and cardiovascular diseases in patients with diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is associated with complications in the cardiovascular and renal system, and is increasing in prevalence worldwide. Modification of the multifactorial risk factors, in particular dyslipidemia, has been suggested to reduce the rates of diabetes-related complications. Dyslipidemia in diabetes is a condition that includes hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein levels, and increased small and dense low-density lipoprotein particles. This condition is associated with higher cardiovascular risk and mortality in diabetic patients. Current treatment guidelines focus on lowering the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level; multiple trials have confirmed the cardiovascular benefits of treatment with statins. Chronic kidney disease also contributes to dyslipidemia, and dyslipidemia in turn is related to the occurrence and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Different patterns of dyslipidemia are associated with different stages of diabetic nephropathy. Some trials have shown that treatment with statins not only decreased the risk of cardiovascular events, but also delayed the progression of diabetic nephropathy. However, studies using statins as the sole treatment of hyperlipidemia in patients on dialysis have not shown benefits with respect to cardiovascular risk. Diabetic patients with nephropathy have a higher risk of cardiovascular events than those without nephropathy. The degree of albuminuria and the reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate are also correlated with the risk of cardiovascular events. Treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers to reduce albuminuria in diabetic patients has been shown to decrease the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  20. Steatorrhea in patients with liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C. N.; Sidorov, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Intestinal function was studied in 26 patients with seven types of acute and chronic liver disease, documented by liver biopsy. Steatorrhea, defined by a stool fat higher than 6 g. per day, was present in 18 of 23 consecutive patients studied, an incidence of 78.3%. Two patients with infectious hepatitis associated with steatorrhea studied previously were added and the 20 cases were analyzed. The malabsorption found was confined to fat and fat-soluble vitamins; stool excretion varied from 6.1 to 22 g. per day in the seven groups studied. No histological abnormality was seen on jejunal biopsy, serum vitamin B12, D-xylose and Schilling tests were normal, and no radiological findings associated with malabsorption were detected in the small bowel. It is concluded that steatorrhea is a common finding in a wide variety of acute and chronic liver diseases and cannot be attributed to a primary defect of the small bowel. PMID:5150072

  1. Oral Hygiene in Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Batista, Leonardo M; Portela de Oliveira, Millena Teles; Magalhaes, Wilrama B; Bastos, Poliana Lima

    2015-11-02

    Parkinson's disease is a chronic progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a multifactorial etiology. The symptoms are characterized by motor disorders - tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia and postural instability, which hinder oral hygiene. Oral and dental health in Parkinson's disease has been under-documented and findings are conflicting. Moreover, a number of dentists have limited experience regarding the management of these patients. This article reviews literature published within the last fifteen years, to better understand the impact of this disease in oral health. A literature search (MEDLINE and PUBMED), using keywords Parkinson Disease and Oral Hygiene, yielded 27 articles, from which 20 were selected. All of the articles were published in English in the last 15 years.

  2. Extending palliative care to patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Sarah K

    2010-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease have an illness which shortens their life and involves a heavy symptom burden for patient and carer. This article discusses some common palliative care issues pertinent to patients with Parkinson's disease.

  3. Nonmotor symptoms in patients with Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tie-mei; Yu, Shu-yang; Guo, Peng; Du, Yang; Hu, Yang; Piao, Ying-shan; Zuo, Li-jun; Lian, Teng-hong; Wang, Rui-dan; Yu, Qiu-jin; Jin, Zhao; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Parkinson disease (PD) is usually accompanied by numerous nonmotor symptoms (NMS), such as neuropsychiatric symptoms, sleep disorders, autonomic dysfunctions, and sensory disturbances. However, it is not clear that the factors influencing the occurrence of NMS and its sequence with motor symptoms (MS). We conducted comprehensive assessments of NMS by using 13 scales in 1119 PD patients. A total of 70.8% PD patients present NMS. Olfactory dysfunction tends to occur in PD patients with older age, more severe depression, sleep problems, and autonomic dysfunctions. Older patients are more likely to have olfactory dysfunction before MS than younger patients. Rapid eye movement behavior disorder is more prone to happen in patients with older age, older onset age, more severe depression, sleep problems, and autonomic dysfunctions. Patients with rapid eye movement behavior disorder before MS are older in onset age than after group. Olfactory dysfunction, constipation, rapid eye movement behavior disorder, and depression, as early warning NMSs of PD, connected to each other. There is a clinical heterogeneity that older patients are more likely to have NMS before MS, while younger patients are opposite. PMID:27977578

  4. Articular manifestations in patients with Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-López, María Esther; Díez-Morrondo, Carolina; Sánchez-Andrade, Amalia; Pego-Reigosa, Robustiano; Díaz, Pablo; Castro-Gago, Manuel

    To determine the percentage of Lyme patients with articular manifestations in NW Spain and to know their evolution and response to treatment. A retrospective study (2006-2013) was performed using medical histories of confirmed cases of Lyme disease showing articular manifestations. Clinical and laboratory characteristics, together with the treatment and evolution of the patients, were analysed. Seventeen out of 108 LD confirmed patients (15.7%) showed articular manifestations. Regarding those 17 patients, 64.7%, 29.4% and 5.9% presented arthritis, arthralgia and bursitis, respectively. The knee was the most affected joint. Articular manifestations were often associated to neurological, dermatological and cardiac pathologies. Otherwise, most patients were in Stage III. The 11.8% of the cases progressed to a recurrent chronic arthritis despite the administration of an appropriate treatment. Lyme disease patients showing articular manifestations should be included in the diagnosis of articular affections in areas of high risk of hard tick bite, in order to establish a suitable and early treatment and to avoid sequels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  5. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Patients with Neuromuscular Disease

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    In neuromuscular disease (NMD) patients with progressive muscle weakness, respiratory muscles are also affected and hypercapnia can increase gradually as the disease progresses. The fundamental respiratory problems NMD patients experience are decreased alveolar ventilation and coughing ability. For these reasons, it is necessary to precisely evaluate pulmonary function to provide the proper inspiratory and expiratory muscle aids in order to maintain adequate respiratory function. As inspiratory muscle weakening progresses, NMD patients experience hypoventilation. At this point, respiratory support by mechanical ventilator should be initiated to relieve respiratory distress symptoms. Patients with adequate bulbar muscle strength and cognitive function who use a non-invasive ventilation aid, via a mouthpiece or a nasal mask, may have their hypercapnia and associated symptoms resolved. For a proper cough assist, it is necessary to provide additional insufflation to patients with inspiratory muscle weakness before using abdominal thrust. Another effective method for managing airway secretions is a device that performs mechanical insufflation-exsufflation. In conclusion, application of non-invasive respiratory aids, taking into consideration characterization of respiratory pathophysiology, have made it possible to maintain a better quality of life in addition to prolonging the life span of patients with NMD. PMID:16807978

  6. Pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with neuromuscular disease.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seong-Woong

    2006-06-30

    In neuromuscular disease (NMD) patients with progressive muscle weakness, respiratory muscles are also affected and hypercapnia can increase gradually as the disease progresses. The fundamental respiratory problems NMD patients experience are decreased alveolar ventilation and coughing ability. For these reasons, it is necessary to precisely evaluate pulmonary function to provide the proper inspiratory and expiratory muscle aids in order to maintain adequate respiratory function. As inspiratory muscle weakening progresses, NMD patients experience hypoventilation. At this point, respiratory support by mechanical ventilator should be initiated to relieve respiratory distress symptoms. Patients with adequate bulbar muscle strength and cognitive function who use a non-invasive ventilation aid, via a mouthpiece or a nasal mask, may have their hypercapnia and associated symptoms resolved. For a proper cough assist, it is necessary to provide additional insufflation to patients with inspiratory muscle weakness before using abdominal thrust. Another effective method for managing airway secretions is a device that performs mechanical insufflation-exsufflation. In conclusion, application of non-invasive respiratory aids, taking into consideration characterization of respiratory pathophysiology, have made it possible to maintain a better quality of life in addition to prolonging the life span of patients with NMD.

  7. [Treating HIV disease: back to the patient?

    PubMed

    Girardi, Enrico; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Camoni, Laura; Pezzotti, Patrizio; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Ammassari, Adriana; Antinori, Andrea; Bonora, Stefano; Mussini, Cristina; Cingolani, Antonella; Corbelli, Giulio Maria; Adami, Silvia; Degli Esposti, Luca; Andretta, Margherita

    2016-10-01

    HIV disease has dramatically changed in the last two decades from a progressive, lethal disease to a chronic manageable condition. These changes are due to the availability of potent antiretroviral combination therapy, which also have the potential to contribute significantly to the control of the epidemic. Among persons living with HIV, incidence of immunosuppression-related opportunistic illnesses has clearly decreased, while an increase was observed in the prevalence of age-related noncommunicable comorbidities, including cardiovascular, metabolic, renal, bone and hepatic disease, due to chronic inflammatory state and to an overall aging of the population of persons with HIV. It has been predicted that by 2030 more than 80% of older persons with HIV will have at least one comorbidity, compared to 19% of non HIV-infected persons, and that one fourth of these persons will have three or more comorbidities. Among persons with HIV, the prevalence of frailty is increasing. Choice of therapeutic approach to HIV disease should take into account, in addition to the ability of drug combination to suppress viral replication, the potential for long term adherence to treatment, the lack of long term toxicity, the possibility to fully restore immune function and prevent immune activation, thus reducing the risk of chronic inflammation related disease. In addition the overall impact of treatment on patients' well-being must be considered, and patients related outcomes should be used to measure this impact.

  8. Cardiometabolic factors and disease duration in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Cassani, Erica; Cereda, Emanuele; Barichella, Michela; Madio, Carmen; Cancello, Raffaella; Caccialanza, Riccardo; Zini, Michela; Cilia, Roberto; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have a favorable cardiometabolic risk profile. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between cardiometabolic risk factors and the duration of disease. One hundred and fifty patients with PD (56.7% men) were studied, measuring body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), body fat percentage (BF%) by impedance, fasting glucose, serum lipids, and transaminases. In sex- and age-adjusted correlation models, duration of PD was inversely related to BMI (r = -0.20; P < 0.05) and BF% (r = -0.29; P < 0.005). Using multivariable regression models (adjustments: age, gender, smoking status, levodopa dose and, alternatively, BMI, WC, or BF%), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels were positively correlated with disease duration (P < 0.01 for all). In models adjusted for WC and BF%, total HDL-cholesterol ratio was also inversely associated with duration of PD (P < 0.05 for both). No other association between biochemical variables and the duration of PD was found. Moreover, no dose-response effect of levodopa on metabolic risk factors was observed. HDL levels and total HDL-cholesterol ratio were favorably associated with duration of PD. This factor may contribute to cardiometabolic protection in PD. The mechanisms underlying this association deserve further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Water may cure patients with Meniere disease.

    PubMed

    Naganuma, Hideaki; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Tokumasu, Koji; Okamoto, Makito

    2006-08-01

    We examined whether sufficient water intake is effective in the long-term control of vertigo and hearing activity in patients with Meniere disease (MD) for whom conventional therapy has proven unsuccessful. The authors conducted a time-series study with historical control. Eighteen patients with MD in group 1 drank 35 mL/kg per day of water for 2 years. Twenty-nine patients with MD treated with the conventional dietary and diuretic therapy for more than 2 years during 1992 to 1999 at the same hospital were enrolled in a historical control of group 2. Patients in group 1 dramatically relieved vertigo and significantly improved in the hearing of the worst pure-tone average of three frequencies (0.125, 0.25, and 0.5 kHz) (low PTA) during the last 6 months of the study period. In contrast, patients in group 2 became worse in both the four- (0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz) frequency PTA and the low PTA, although their vertigo did improve. The number of patients whose hearing were improved, unchanged, and worse were 4, 12, and 2 in group 1 and 2, 11, and 16 in group 2, respectively. Deliberate modulation of the intake of water may be the simplest and most cost-effective medical treatment for patients with MD. Larger studies will be needed to confirm these results in a larger patient cohort.

  10. Emotional Working Memory in Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Satler, Corina; Tomaz, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Background Few studies have assessed whether emotional content affects processes supporting working memory in Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. Methods We assessed 22 AD patients and 40 elderly controls (EC) with a delayed matching and non-matching to sample task (DMST/DNMST), and a spatial-delayed recognition span task (SRST; unique/varied) using emotional stimuli. Results AD patients showed decreased performance on both tasks compared with EC. With regard to the valence of the stimuli, we did not observe significant performance differences between groups in the DMST/DNMST. However, both groups remembered a larger number of negative than positive or neutral pictures on unique SRST. Conclusion The results suggest that AD patients show a relative preservation of working memory for emotional information, particularly for negative stimuli. PMID:22163239

  11. PSYCHOSOMATIC ASPECTS IN PATIENTS WITH DERMATOLOGIC DISEASES.

    PubMed

    Tsintsadze, N; Beridze, L; Tsintsadze, N; Krichun, Y; Tsivadze, N; Tsintsadze, M

    2015-06-01

    The aim of our study was to find out the magnitude of anxiety and depression in our common dermatological patients and its correlation with age, sex. For this purpose, we used Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale HADS. The psychometric validity of HADS has been established by validating the questionnaire against the structured psychiatric interviews. A study of anxiety and depression in patients with dermatologic diseases was conducted on the basis of outpatients department in 211 patients with dermatologic diseases; among them were 107 male and 104 female, aged 16 to 75 years. Among them were patients with Acne, Alopecia Areata, Psoriasis, Vitiligo, Neurodermatitis, Scabies, Eczema and Other diseases (Atopic Dermatitis, Chronic Urticaria, Lichen Planus, Herpes Zoster, Melasma, Warts and Etc.). Based on studies of patients reveals that 65.4% of them are anxiety, depression - 56.2%, both anxiety and depression in 24.7%, there figures higher than the dates of other authorizes. As a result of a direct link research risk disorder depressive spectrum with sex, age; in woman anxiety and depression occurs more frequently than men, and anxiety occurs more frequently in young age. Especially there are hight frequencies of manifestation of abuse in patients with Psoriasis (anxiety - 83.3%, depression - 69.4%, both - 38.8%), Eczema (anxiety - 73.3%, depression - 56.6%, both - 26.7%), Acne (anxiety - 78.4%, depression - 54%, both - 21.6%), Vitiligo (anxiety - 66.7%, depression - 60%, both - 33.3%). Our study noticed higher dates of anxiety and depression than the dates of other outhorizes.

  12. Immune blood biomarkers of Alzheimer disease patients.

    PubMed

    Avagyan, Hripsime; Goldenson, Ben; Tse, Eric; Masoumi, Ava; Porter, Verna; Wiedau-Pazos, Martina; Sayre, James; Ong, Reno; Mahanian, Michelle; Koo, Patrick; Bae, Susan; Micic, Miodrag; Liu, Philip T; Rosenthal, Mark J; Fiala, Milan

    2009-05-29

    Alzheimer disease (AD) patients have an impairment of anti-amyloid-beta (Abeta) innate immunity and a defect in immune gene transcription [Fiala, M., Liu, P.T., Espinosa-Jeffrey, A., Rosenthal, M.J., Bernard, G., Ringman, J.M., Sayre, J., Zhang, L., Zaghi, J., Dejbakhsh, S., Chiang, B., Hui, J., Mahanian, M., Baghaee, A., Hong, P., Cashman, J., 2007b. Innate immunity and transcription of MGAT-III and Toll-like receptors in Alzheimer's disease patients are improved by bisdemethoxycurcumin. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 104, 12849-12854]. Early diagnosis is a cornerstone of preventive approaches to AD. Phospho-tau and Abeta CSF levels are useful markers of neurodegeneration but not of a process leading to neurodegeneration. To detect an early biomarker of AD, we developed a flow cytometric test of Abeta phagocytosis, which was 94% positive (<400 MFI units) in AD patients (mean age+/-SEM 77+2.2 years; mean score+/-SEM 198.6+/-25.5 MFI units) and 60% positive in MCI patients (77+/-5.6 years; 301+/-106 MFI units). Control subjects, active senior university professors, were 100% negative (74.2+/-4.2 years; 1348+/-174 MFI units). The test had a low specificity in older caregivers and older amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. We also tested transcriptional regulation of the genes MGAT-III and Toll-like receptor-3 in macrophages. Macrophages of "Type I" patients (a majority of patients) showed gene down regulation at baseline and up regulation by curcuminoids; macrophages of "Type II" patients showed opposite responses. The results of flow cytometric testing suggest that normal Abeta phagocytosis is associated with healthy cognition and lesser risk of AD. The significance of abnormal results in aged persons should be investigated by prospective studies to determine the risk of AD.

  13. Anticardiolipin antibodies in patients with Behcet's disease.

    PubMed

    Zivkovic, Maja; Zlatanovic, Marko; Zlatanovic, Gordana; Djordjevic-Jocic, Jasmina; Cekic, Sonja

    2011-02-01

    The aims of this study are to determine anticardiolipin antibodies in patients with Sy Behcet and to determine correlation between the levels of anticardiolipin antibodies in serum in patients with clinic systemic and ocular manifestations. The study was conducted on 11 patients with Behcet disease (group I), and on 11 healthy subjects (group II). Anticardiolipin antibodies -aCL were determined by the standard ELISA method, where 1GPL= 1 microgram/ml IgG aCL and 1 MPL= 1 microgram/ ml IgM, and were considered negative < 10 GPL or MPL, low positive (10-40 GPL and MPL), or high positive (>40 GPL and MPL). In the group of 11 patients with the diagnosis Sy Behcet, 6 of them were (54.5%) with values of anticardiolipin antibodies over 10 positive. In the control group of the healthy examinees aCl were positive in 2 cases (18.2%). There are no statistically significant differences in the presence of systemic clinic characteristics between aCl positive and negative patients. All the patients with SY Behcet in whom anticardiolipn antibodies were found have extremely severe visual damage which is not present in the group of those patients where the values of aCl were low. The difference is statistically significant. The level of anticardiolipin antibodies is increased in the patients with Behcet. There are no statistically significant differences in the presence of systemic clinical characteristics between aCL positive and negative patients. Visual acuity in patients with SY Behcet is statistically significantly much lower in patients who had increased values of aCL.

  14. Migraine features in patients with Meniere's disease.

    PubMed

    Ghavami, Yaser; Mahboubi, Hossein; Yau, Amy Y; Maducdoc, Marlon; Djalilian, Hamid R

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the features of migraine in Meniere's disease (MD). Retrospective review of prospectively obtained surveys in an outpatient clinic of a tertiary medical center. Detailed questionnaires on headaches and dizziness were given to consecutive patients presenting with dizziness. The responses were verified by the clinician with the patient. The data, in addition to the clinical history and audiogram, were used to diagnose patients with migraine headaches and MD using criteria set by the International Headache Society (IHS) and the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, respectively. The prevalence of migraine-like symptoms in those patients with MD, who did not fit the diagnostic criteria for migraine, was evaluated. Thirty-seven patients with definite MD were included. There was a predominance of females (female/male:26/11). Mean age of patients was 52 ± 14 years. Nineteen patients (51%) had migraine headaches. Fifteen patients fulfilled the criteria for definite vestibular migraine. Of those who did not fulfill the IHS migraine criteria, a majority had characteristics such as a family history of migraine, visual motion sensitivity, or lifelong motion sickness that were highly suggestive of a migraine disorder. A majority of patients with MD have migraine headaches as defined by the IHS. Sensitivity to visual motion, light and sound, head motion, smells, weather changes, or medication was present in 95% of all patients with definite MD and 82% of non-IHS migraine MD patients. This may suggest that MD may be an atypical variant of migraine. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  15. Foods for patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    As a general rule patients with celiac disease must avoid five cereals--wheat rye, triticale, barley and oats. Very sensitive individuals must also avoid two products of these cereals--malt and hydrolyzed vegetable protein. Some less sensitive individuals may be able to tolerate barley and oats in small quantities. All other foods are acceptable, including the cereals corn, rice, buckwheat, millet and sorghum, as well as malt-flavored breakfast cereals. Wine, spirits, beer and ale are also acceptable unless otherwise contraindicated. Monosodium glutamate, other food additives and pharmaceutical preparations are also acceptable. The ingredients of prepackaged processed foods are listed on the labels. Patients with celiac disease must examine labels to ensure that they avoid the harmful cereals. With appropriate precautions they need not be concerned about eating away from home. PMID:7139445

  16. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease in liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Christina; Schuchmann, Marcus; Zimmermann, Tim

    2011-02-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are a life-threatening complication following solid organ transplantation. Many posttransplant lymphomas develop from the uncontrolled proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B-cells, whereas EBV-negative PTLDs were increasingly recognized within the past decade. Major risk factors for the development of PTLDs after liver transplantation are immunosuppressive therapy and the type of underlying disease: viral hepatitis, autoimmune liver disease, or alcoholic liver cirrhosis contribute to an increased risk for PTLD. Therapeutic regimens include reduction of immunosuppression, the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab, and chemotherapy, as well as new approaches using interferon-α and anti-interleukin-6 antibodies. Despite the different therapeutic regimens, mortality from PTLD remains high. Therefore, it is of major importance to identify patients at risk at an early stage of the disease. In this review, risk factors for PTLD development after liver transplantation, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and therapy are discussed.

  17. Aquatic therapy for patients with rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    McNeal, R L

    1990-11-01

    Aquatic therapy is justifiably a rapidly expanding, beneficial form of patient treatment. The goals established at the initial and subsequent evaluations usually are met as quickly and as sensibly as possible. Understanding the theory of water techniques is essential in implementing an aquatic therapy program. The success of the program, however, will always depend on the pleasure and benefits achieved by the patients. Remember, rheumatic patients most likely will need to modify their previous daily functioning. Patients need to be aware of the long-term ramifications of the disease process and understand how treatment and care may be altered during various stages of exacerbation and remission. Patient education is critical in ensuring individual responsibility for the changes that must be made when not supervised by a professional. Aquatic therapy is a step in molding a positive lifestyle change for the patient. The patient can be encouraged to be fitness oriented and, at the same time, exercise in a manner that is safe, effective, and biomechanically and physiologically sound. The environment, hopefully, also will be conductive to family and social interaction that ultimately encourages the compliance of long-term exercise programs.

  18. [Vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Bühler, Silja; Hatz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The number of individuals with autoimmune diseases treated with immunosuppressive drugs is increasing steadily. The variety of immunosuppressive drugs and in particular biological therapies is also rising. The autoimmune disease itself as well as the immunosuppressive therapy increases the risk of infection in this population. Particularly the risk of vaccine-preventable infections is elevated. Thus, preventing infections by the means of vaccination is of utmost importance. The Division of Infectious Diseases of the Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute, University of Zurich, performed a literature search on the topic of vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases upon request by the Swiss Federal Commission for Vaccination Issues. Overall, data are scarce. The following main points were retrieved from the literature: Inactivated vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity may be reduced under immunosuppressive therapy. In addition to the generally recommended basic vaccinations, specific vaccinations, such as influenza and pneumococcal vaccination are indicated in these patient groups. Live vaccines are generally contraindicated under immunosuppressive therapy due to safety concerns. However, specific exceptions apply. Furthermore, certain time intervals for the administration of live vaccines after pausing or ceasing an immunosuppressive therapy should be respected.

  19. [Nephrolithiasis in patients with intestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Cirillo, M; Iudici, M; Marcarelli, F; Laudato, M; Zincone, F

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal diseases may cause the formation of urinary stones through changes in the metabolism of oxalate, calcium, and uric acid. The oxalate that is excreted into urine comes from the catabolism of ascorbic acid and some amino acids or from intestinal absorption of food oxalate. Calcium is absorbed by the gut after the stimulation of active vitamin D and is excreted by the kidney under the control of the bone/parathyroid hormone axis. Uric acid is generated by the oxidation of exogenous and endogenous purine bases, is excreted by the kidney through glomerular filtration/tubular secretion, and is soluble in alkaline urine. Several data indicate that patients with inflammatory bowel diseases are at high risk of urinary stones containing calcium-oxalate salt or uric acid. Calcium-oxalate stones are caused by colonic oxalate hyperabsorption (secondary to intestinal dysfunction) or by parenteral nutrition. Uric acid stones are typical of patients with severe diarrhea and/or intestinal neostomy, that is, in patients with hyperconcentrated acidic urine. Relationships between malabsorptive intestinal diseases and urinary stones are less well defined. Preventive countermeasures are not the same for all disorders. Hyperoxaluria should be controlled by diets with a low content of lipids and oxalate but supplemented with calcium and probiotics. The presence of hyperconcentrated acidic urine should be controlled by correct hydration and administration of citrate.

  20. Micronutrient supplementation in mild Alzheimer disease patients.

    PubMed

    Planas, M; Conde, M; Audivert, S; Pérez-Portabella, C; Burgos, R; Chacón, P; Rossello, J; Boada, M; Tàrraga, L L

    2004-04-01

    To evaluate if nutritional supplementation with or without micronutrient enhancement prevent weight loss and the progression of the disease in mild Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients. Mild AD patients were recruited from an Alzheimer Day Centre. Subjects received oral liquid supplements with (Study-group: S) or without (Control-group: C) micronutrient enhancement. Intake assessment, nutritional status, biochemical parameters, cognitive function, and eating behaviour disorders were determined at baseline and at 6 months of treatment. At baseline both groups were not different in any variable measured. They were norm nourished, with normal biochemical parameters. Blandford scale demonstrated a mild alteration of feeding behaviour, the cognitive scale classified the patients as impaired and there was presence of memory complaints. After 6 months of nutritional supplements, a similar increase in energy consumption was observed in both groups of patients (P<0.05). In the within-group analysis, we found a trend (P=0.05) to increase body mass index; a significant increase in triceps skin fold thickness, mid-upper-arm circumference and serum magnesium, zinc and selenium, and a significant reduction in serum vitamin E (P<0.001, each). Serum cholesterol decreased substantially only in the S-group (P=0.025). No significant differences at baseline, within-group, neither between-group analysis in feeding behaviour nor in cognitive function were observed. According to our results no benefits in the progression of the disease was observed with micronutrient enhancement supplements. Effectiveness of nutritional supplements in preventing weight loss in mild AD patients showed a similar behaviour as observed in other populations. Due to the beneficial evolution of serum cholesterol in the S-group, this intervention deserves further investigation.

  1. [Psychopharmacotherapy in patients with cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Cordes, J; Lange-Asschenfeldt, C; Hiemke, C; Kahl, K G

    2012-11-01

    Increased cardiometabolic morbidity and increased overall mortality has been observed in patients with severe mental disorders. Therefore, cardiometabolic safety is an important issue in the treatment of patients with psychiatric disorders, in particular in patients with comorbid cardiometabolic diseases. Frequent adverse side effects include disturbances of lipid and glucose metabolism, body weight changes and alterations of the QTc interval. Dependent on the particular substance used and on factors concerning individual vulnerability, these side effects vary in relative frequency. Therefore, regular monitoring is recommended including ECG. Furthermore, interactions between different medicaments may occur, either leading to enhanced or decreased drug concentrations. Prior to psychopharmacological treatment, proper cardiological treatment is recommended. The management of cardiovascular risks under psychopharmacology requires interdisciplinary cooperation between the cardiologist, general practitioner and psychiatrist.

  2. Fabry disease: experience of screening dialysis patients for Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Eiji; Saito, Osamu; Akimoto, Tetsu; Asano, Yasushi

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence rate for Fabry disease is conventionally considered to be 1 case in 40,000; however, due to increased screening accuracy, reports now suggest that prevalence is 1 case in 1,500 among male children, and it is likely that the clinical importance of the condition will increase in the future. In dialysis patients to date, prevalence rates are between 0.16 and 1.2 %. Globotriaosylsphingosine (Lyso-GL-3), which is a substrate of α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A), has surfaced as a new biomarker, and is also effective in the determination and monitoring of the effects of enzyme replacement therapy. In terms of genetic abnormalities, the E66Q mutation has recently become a topic of discussion, and although doubts have been expressed over whether or not it is the gene responsible for Fabry disease, there is still a strong possibility that it is a functional genetic polymorphism. At present, the standard treatment for Fabry disease is enzyme replacement therapy, and in order to overcome the problems involved with this, a method of producing recombinant human α-Gal A using methanol-assimilating yeast, and chemical or medicinal chaperone treatment are of current interest. Migalastat hydrochloride is known as a pharmacological chaperone, but is currently in Phase III global clinical trials. Adding saposin B to modified α-N-acetyl galactosaminidase is also under consideration as a treatment method.

  3. Auditory Dysfunction in Patients with Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Auditory dysfunction is a common clinical symptom that can induce profound effects on the quality of life of those affected. Cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is the most prevalent neurological disorder today, but it has generally been considered a rare cause of auditory dysfunction. However, a substantial proportion of patients with stroke might have auditory dysfunction that has been underestimated due to difficulties with evaluation. The present study reviews relationships between auditory dysfunction and types of CVD including cerebral infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cerebrovascular malformation, moyamoya disease, and superficial siderosis. Recent advances in the etiology, anatomy, and strategies to diagnose and treat these conditions are described. The numbers of patients with CVD accompanied by auditory dysfunction will increase as the population ages. Cerebrovascular diseases often include the auditory system, resulting in various types of auditory dysfunctions, such as unilateral or bilateral deafness, cortical deafness, pure word deafness, auditory agnosia, and auditory hallucinations, some of which are subtle and can only be detected by precise psychoacoustic and electrophysiological testing. The contribution of CVD to auditory dysfunction needs to be understood because CVD can be fatal if overlooked. PMID:25401133

  4. Auditory dysfunction in patients with Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Profant, Oliver; Roth, Jan; Bureš, Zbyněk; Balogová, Zuzana; Lišková, Irena; Betka, Jan; Syka, Josef

    2017-10-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal, dominantly inherited, neurodegenerative disease. The main clinical features are motor impairment, progressive cognitive deterioration and behavioral changes. The aim of our study was to find out whether patients with HD suffer from disorders of the auditory system. A group of 17 genetically verified patients (11 males, 6 females) with various stages of HD (examined by UHDRS - motor part and total functional capacity, MMSE for cognitive functions) underwent an audiological examination (high frequency pure tone audiometry, otoacoustic emissions, speech audiometry, speech audiometry in babble noise, auditory brainstem responses). Additionally, 5 patients underwent a more extensive audiological examination, focused on central auditory processing. The results were compared with a group of age-matched healthy volunteers. Our results show that HD patients have physiologic hearing thresholds, otoacoustic emissions and auditory brainstem responses; however, they display a significant decrease in speech understanding, especially under demanding conditions (speech in noise) compared to age-matched controls. Additional auditory tests also show deficits in sound source localization, based on temporal and intensity cues. We also observed a statistically significant correlation between the perception of speech in noise, and motoric and cognitive functions. However, a correlation between genetic predisposition (number of triplets) and function of inner ear was not found. We conclude that HD negatively influences the function of the central part of the auditory system at cortical and subcortical levels, altering predominantly speech processing and sound source lateralization. We have thoroughly characterized auditory pathology in patients with HD that suggests involvement of central auditory and cognitive areas. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Mirror movements in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, Donatella; Tiple, Dorina; Suppa, Antonio; Colosimo, Carlo; Fabbrini, Giovanni; Cincotta, Massimo; Defazio, Giovanni; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2008-01-30

    Mirror movements (MM) refer to ipsilateral involuntary movements that appear during voluntary activity in contralateral homologous body regions. This study aimed to compare the frequency and distribution of MM in an unselected sample of 274 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and 100 healthy subjects, and to check a possible relationship between MM and parkinsonian features. MM of the hand were scored according to the Woods and Teuber scale. The frequency of MM was lower in PD patients than in healthy subjects (29% vs. 71%, P < 0.0001). The distribution of MM also differed in the two groups being often bilateral in healthy subjects, invariably unilateral in PD patients. When parkinsonian signs were unilateral, MM always manifested on the unaffected side; when parkinsonian signs were bilateral, MM manifested on the less affected side. PD patients manifesting MM scored significantly lower on Hohen and Yahr staging than patients without MM. Likewise, there was a significant inverse correlation between the intensity of MM as rated by the Woods and Teuber score and HY staging (r = -0.16, P < 0.01). The low frequency of MM in PD probably relates to the complex interactions between the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to parkinsonian signs and the mechanisms responsible for movement lateralization.

  6. Elderly patients and inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Nimmons, Danielle; Limdi, Jimmy K

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing globally. Coupled with an ageing population, the number of older patients with IBD is set to increase. The clinical features and therapeutic options in young and elderly patients are comparable but there are some significant differences. The wide differential diagnosis of IBD in elderly patients may result in a delay in diagnosis. The relative dearth of data specific to elderly IBD patients often resulting from their exclusion from pivotal clinical trials and the lack of consensus guidelines have made clinical decisions somewhat challenging. In addition, age specific concerns such as co-morbidity; loco-motor and cognitive function, poly-pharmacy and its consequences need to be taken into account. In applying modern treatment paradigms to the elderly, the clinician must consider the potential for more pronounced adverse effects in this vulnerable group and set appropriate boundaries maximising benefit and minimising harm. Meanwhile, clinicians need to make personalised decisions but as evidence based as possible in the holistic, considered and optimal management of IBD in elderly patients. In this review we will cover the clinical features and therapeutic options of IBD in the elderly; as well as addressing common questions and challenges posed by its management. PMID:26855812

  7. Incidence of coronary artery disease in patients with valvular heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, G W; Thomas, R D; Grimmer, S F; Silverton, P N; Smith, D R

    1980-01-01

    The case notes, cardiac catheterisation data, and coronary arteriograms of 239 patients investigated for valvular heart disease during a five year period were reviewed. Angina present in 13 of 95 patients with isolated mitral valve disease, 43 of 90 patients with isolated aortic valve disease, and 18 of 54 patients with combined mitral and aortic valve disease. Significant coronary artery disease was present in 85 per cent of patients with mitral valve disease and angina, but in only 33 per cent of patients with aortic valve disease and angina. Patients with no chest pain still had a high incidence of coronary artery disease, significant coronary obstruction being present in 22 per cent with mitral valve disease, 22 per cent with aortic valve disease, and 11 per cent with combine mitral and aortic valve disease. Several possible clinical markers of coronary artery disease were examined but none was found to be of practical help. There was, however, a significant inverse relation between severity of coronary artery disease and severity of valve disease in patients with aortic valve disease. Asymptomatic coronary artery disease is not uncommon in patients with valvular heart disease and if it is policy to perform coronary artery bypass grafting in such patients, routine coronary arteriography must be part of the preoperative investigation. PMID:7459146

  8. Bivalirudin in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Linden, Julie A; Chrysant, George S

    2010-10-01

    Bivalirudin, a DTI, has evolved from relative obscurity as an anticoagulation option in patients resistant to or allergic to either LMWH or UFH to a commonly used, safe alternative. Most of the early studies comparing bivalirudin to UFH with or without a GP IIb/IIIa agent had composite endpoints (death, MI, bleeding) whose statistical significance were driven exclusively by a significant reduction in bleeding. Newer studies now demonstrate reductions in mortality, which has led to a paradigm shift in anticoagulant choice both in elective and emergent coronary procedures. We present the major studies that have brought bivalirudin to the forefront of coronary artery disease, specifically coronary interventional procedures.

  9. [Transition experience of patients with neuromuscular disease].

    PubMed

    Greif, Valeria; Ugo, Florencia; de Castro Pérez, M Fernanda; Mozzoni, Julieta; Aguerre, Verónica; Saldías, Milagros; Monges, M Soledad

    2017-02-01

    Neuromuscular diseases are mostly genetic disorders, with chronic and progressive course. Affected people are at high risk of developing physical and emotional disabilities. In the last decades, the advance in technology and science has increased chronic pediatric patients survival rate, thus requiring an ongoing assistance in adult hospitals, making the transition a necessity and a challenge. This article reports the clinical practice designed between Hospital Garrahan and Hospital Ramos Mejía for the transition of 27 adolescents during 2015, setting achievements, findings and challenges resulting from this experience. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  10. Lower Muscle Endurance in Patients with Alcoholic Liver Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Henning; Aagaard, Niels K.; Jakobsen, Johannes; Dorup, Inge; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Patients with alcoholic liver disease often complain of restricted physical capacity, which could be due to decreased muscle endurance. The aim of this study was to assess the muscular endurance in patients with alcoholic liver disease. In a cross sectional study, 24 patients with alcoholic liver disease and 22 controls were evaluated using…

  11. Lower Muscle Endurance in Patients with Alcoholic Liver Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Henning; Aagaard, Niels K.; Jakobsen, Johannes; Dorup, Inge; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Patients with alcoholic liver disease often complain of restricted physical capacity, which could be due to decreased muscle endurance. The aim of this study was to assess the muscular endurance in patients with alcoholic liver disease. In a cross sectional study, 24 patients with alcoholic liver disease and 22 controls were evaluated using…

  12. Cerebral microbleeds in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ham, Jee Hyun; Yi, Han; Sunwoo, Mun Kyung; Hong, Jin Yong; Sohn, Young H; Lee, Phil Hyu

    2014-08-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are known to be associated with cognitive impairments in the elderly and in patients with various diseases; however, the nature of this association has not yet been evaluated in Parkinson's disease (PD). In the present study, we analyzed the incidence of CMBs in PD according to cognitive status, and the impact of CMBs on cognitive performance was also evaluated. The CMBs in PD with dementia (n = 36), mild cognitive impairment (MCI, n = 46), or cognitively normal (n = 41) were analyzed using conventional T2*-weighted gradient-recalled echo images. Additionally, the relationship between the presence of CMBs and cognitive performance on individual tests of cognitive subdomains was analyzed using a detailed neuropsychological test. CMBs occurred more frequently in PD patients with dementia (36.1 %) compared to those with MCI (15.2 %), those who are cognitively normal (14.6 %), and normal controls (12.2 %, p = 0.025). However, the significant association of CMBs with PD dementia disappeared after adjusting white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) as a covariate. The frequencies of deep, lobar, and infratentorial CMBs did not differ among the four groups. After adjusting for age, sex, years of education, and WMHs, PD patients with CMBs had poorer performance in attention domain compared with those without CMBs (34.9 vs 42.6, p = 0.018). The present data demonstrate that even though CMBs were inseparably associated with the presence of WMHs, CMBs occur more commonly in PD patients with dementia than in those without dementia. Additionally, the burden of CMBs may contribute to further cognitive impairment in PD.

  13. Thyroid diseases in patients with acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Tarach, Jerzy Stanisław; Kurowska, Maria; Nowakowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Acromegaly often involves the presence of different pathologies of the thyroid gland. Long-lasting stimulation of the follicular epithelium by growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) can cause disorders in thyroid function, an increase in its mass and the development of goitre. Acromegalic patients present most frequently with non-toxic multinodular goitre. Nodules are more prevalent in patients with active acromegaly. It has been suggested that then thyroid size increases and it can be reduced through treatment with somatostatin analogues. The relationship between thyroid volume and the level of IGF-1 and the duration of the disease is unclear. Each acromegalic patient requires a hormonal and imaging evaluation of the thyroid when the diagnosis is made, and an accurate evaluation during further observation and treatment. Although the data concerning the co-occurrence of acromegaly and thyroid cancer still remain controversial, it is particularly important to diagnose the patient early and to rule out thyroid cancer. PMID:25276172

  14. Famous Stone Patients and Their Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Michael E.

    2007-04-01

    The fact that stone patients have endured much throughout the ages and that prior to our current era, when the ultimate horror, "being cut for the stone" was the only alternative to the repeated episodes of colic, should be recalled from time to time. Urolithiasis has affected humanity throughout the ages and has been indiscriminate to those lives it touched. A full accounting of those who have suffered and recorded their agonies is beyond the scope of this investigation; however, even a partial accounting is valuable for present day physicians who care for those with stone disease. For the present work, the historical accounts of stone disease literature were scrutinized for individual sufferers who could be cross-referenced from other sources as legitimately afflicted by stones. Only those patients that could be documented and were (or are) well known were included, because the internet is now a verdant repository of thousands of "not so well knowns." Reliable historical data was found for a variety of persons from the pre-Christian era to the present, including those remembered as philosophers and scientists, physicians, clergy, leaders and rulers, entertainers, athletes and fictitious/Hollywood-type individuals. Verified accounts of famous stone formers were chosen for this paper, and are presented in chronological order. The list of urolithiasis sufferers presented here is undoubtedly incomplete, but it is not through lack of trying that they are missing. Most often, the suffering do so silently, and that is always allowed.

  15. [Caring for patients with Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Hirono, Nobutsugu

    2010-07-01

    The term "caring" refers to the process aimed at enabling people with disabilities to achieve and maintain optimal functioning. According to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) proposed by the World Health Organization in 2001, the functioning involves all aspects of daily life and applies to 3 levels: body functions and structures, activities, and participation. Caring is of 2 types; (1) therapeutic care, which restores and maintains the body functions; and (2) compensatory care, which compensates for the impairment of body functions and thus enhances and maintains the level of activity and participation. Alzheimer disease impairs multiple domains, including cognitive function and behaviors; therefore, it is very important to systematically and individually assess these impairments in each domain. Because there is inadequate data on the efficacy of cognitive training, compensatory care is principally used to overcome cognitive dysfunction. Caregivers should be equipped with skills required to cope with behavioral problems so that they can compensate for and even reduce these problems. Further, caregivers should not be overburdened, as this is reported to be a significant predictor for the poor outcome of patients with Alzheimer disease. Therefore, appropriate information regarding the disease, the impairments caused by it, the skills required to cope with these impairments, and social support services should be provided to the caregivers.

  16. Lumbo-sacral spine disease due to bovine tuberculosis in a patient with concurrent pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nawaid; Srinivasan, Koottalai; Panayi, Jeannette; Moudgil, Harmesh

    2011-12-01

    Lumbo-sacral spinal disease due to bovine tuberculosis (TB) in a patient with concurrent pulmonary disease is rare. We report this unpredicted finding in an immunocompetent patient and discuss the natural history in an area of low prevalence.

  17. Outcomes of Bowel Resection in Patients with Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Carmichael, Joseph C; Mills, Steven D; Pigazzi, Alessio; Stamos, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    There is limited data regarding outcomes of bowel resection in patients with Crohn's disease. We sought to investigate complications of such patients after bowel resection. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases were used to examine the clinical data of Crohn's patients who underwent bowel resection during 2002 to 2012. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to investigate outcomes of such patients. We sampled a total of 443,950 patients admitted with the diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Of these, 20.5 per cent had bowel resection. Among patients who had bowel resection, 51 per cent had small bowel Crohn's disease, 19.4 per cent had large bowel Crohn's disease, and 29.6 per cent had both large and small bowel Crohn's disease. Patients with large bowel disease had higher mortality risk compared with small bowel disease [1.8% vs 1%, adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 2.42, P < 0.01]. Risks of postoperative renal failure (AOR: 1.56, P < 0.01) and respiratory failure (AOR: 1.77, P < 0.01) were higher in colonic disease compared with small bowel disease but postoperative enteric fistula was significantly higher in patients with small bowel Crohn's disease (AOR: 1.90, P < 0.01). Of the patients admitted with the diagnosis of Crohn's disease, 20.5 per cent underwent bowel resection during 2002 to 2012. Although colonic disease has a higher mortality risk, small bowel disease has a higher risk of postoperative fistula.

  18. Treadmill training for patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mehrholz, Jan; Kugler, Joachim; Storch, Alexander; Pohl, Marcus; Elsner, Bernhard; Hirsch, Kathleen

    2015-08-22

    Treadmill training is used in rehabilitation and is described as improving gait parameters of patients with Parkinson's disease. To assess the effectiveness of treadmill training in improving the gait of patients with Parkinson's disease and the acceptability and safety of this type of therapy. We searched the Cochrane Movement Disorders Group Specialised Register (see Review Group details for more information) (last searched September 2014), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 10), MEDLINE (1950 to September 2014), and EMBASE (1980 to September 2014). We also handsearched relevant conference proceedings, searched trials and research registers, and checked reference lists (last searched September 2014). We contacted trialists, experts and researchers in the field and manufacturers of commercial devices. We included randomised controlled trials comparing treadmill training with no treadmill training in patients with Parkinson's disease. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted the trialists for additional information. We analysed the results as mean differences (MDs) for continuous variables and relative risk differences (RD) for dichotomous variables. We included 18 trials (6 3 3 participants) in this update of this review. Treadmill training improved gait speed (MD = 0.09 m/s; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.03 to 0.14; P = 0.001; I(2) = 24%; m oderate quality of evidence), stride length (MD = 0.05 metres; 95% CI 0.01 to 0.09; P = 0.01; I(2) = 0%; l ow quality of e vidence), but walking distance (MD = 48.9 metres; 95% CI -1.32 to 99.14; P = 0.06; I(2) = 91%; very low quality of evidence) and cadence did not improve (MD = 2.16 steps/minute; 95% CI -0.13 to 4.46; P = 0.07; I(2) = 28%; low quality of evidence) at the end of study. Treadmill training did not increase the risk of patients dropping out from intervention (RD = -0.02; 95% CI -0.06 to

  19. Treadmill training for patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mehrholz, Jan; Kugler, Joachim; Storch, Alexander; Pohl, Marcus; Hirsch, Kathleen; Elsner, Bernhard

    2015-09-13

    Treadmill training is used in rehabilitation and is described as improving gait parameters of patients with Parkinson's disease. To assess the effectiveness of treadmill training in improving the gait of patients with Parkinson's disease and the acceptability and safety of this type of therapy. We searched the Cochrane Movement Disorders Group Specialised Register (see Review Group details for more information) (last searched September 2014), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 10), MEDLINE (1950 to September 2014), and EMBASE (1980 to September 2014). We also handsearched relevant conference proceedings, searched trials and research registers, and checked reference lists (last searched September 2014). We contacted trialists, experts and researchers in the field and manufacturers of commercial devices. We included randomised controlled trials comparing treadmill training with no treadmill training in patients with Parkinson's disease. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted the trialists for additional information. We analysed the results as mean differences (MDs) for continuous variables and relative risk differences (RD) for dichotomous variables. We included 18 trials (633 participants) in this update of this review. Treadmill training improved gait speed (MD = 0.09 m/s; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.03 to 0.14; P = 0.001; I(2) = 24%; moderate quality of evidence), stride length (MD = 0.05 metres; 95% CI 0.01 to 0.09; P = 0.01; I(2) = 0%; low quality of evidence), but walking distance (MD = 48.9 metres; 95% CI -1.32 to 99.14; P = 0.06; I(2) = 91%; very low quality of evidence) and cadence did not improve (MD = 2.16 steps/minute; 95% CI -0.13 to 4.46; P = 0.07; I(2) = 28%; low quality of evidence) at the end of study. Treadmill training did not increase the risk of patients dropping out from intervention (RD = -0.02; 95% CI -0.06 to 0

  20. The Expert Patient and Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The concept of “expert patient” has been developed in the last two decades to define a patient who has a significant knowledge of his/her disease and treatment in addition to self-management skills. However, this concept has evolved over the last years, and these patients are now considered, not only to be more efficient in the management of their own condition and communicating effectively with health professionals, but to also act as educators for other patients and as resources for the last, provide feedback on care delivery, and be involved in the production and implementation of practice guidelines, as well as in the development and conduct of research initiatives. There are some barriers, however, to the integration of this new contributor to the health care team, and specific requirements need to be considered for an individual to be considered as an expert. This new player has, however, a potentially important role to improve current care, particularly in respiratory health. PMID:27445572

  1. Expression of periodontal interleukin-6 protein is increased across patients with neither periodontal disease nor diabetes, patients with periodontal disease alone and patients with both diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Jonathan H.; Hardy, Douglas Crane; Schuyler, Corinne A.; Slate, Elizabeth H.; Huang, Yan

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives Epidemiological studies have established that patients with diabetes have an increased prevalence and severity of periodontal disease. Interleukin (IL)-6, a multifunctional cytokine, plays a role in the tissue inflammation that characterizes periodontal disease. Our recent study has shown a trend of increase in periodontal IL-6 expression at the mRNA level across patients with neither periodontal disease nor diabetes, patients with periodontal disease alone and patients with both diseases. However, the periodontal IL-6 expression at the protein level in these patients has not been investigated. Material and Methods Periodontal tissue specimens were collected from eight patients without periodontal disease and diabetes (group 1), from 17 patients with periodontal disease alone (group 2) and from 10 patients with both periodontal disease and diabetes (group 3). The frozen sections were prepared from these tissue specimens and IL-6 protein expression was detected and quantified. Results The nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test showed that differences in IL-6 protein levels among the three groups were statistically significant (p = 0.035). Nonparametric analysis using Jonckheere-Terpstra test showed a tendency of increase in periodontal IL-6 protein levels across group 1 to group 2 to group 3 (p = 0.006). Parametric analysis of variance (ANOVA) on IL-6 protein levels showed that neither age nor gender significantly affected the difference of IL-6 levels among the groups. Conclusion Periodontal IL-6 expression at the protein level is increased across patients with neither periodontal disease nor diabetes, patients with periodontal disease alone, and patients with both diseases. PMID:20682019

  2. Expression of periodontal interleukin-6 protein is increased across patients with neither periodontal disease nor diabetes, patients with periodontal disease alone and patients with both diseases.

    PubMed

    Ross, J H; Hardy, D C; Schuyler, C A; Slate, E H; Mize, T W; Huang, Y

    2010-10-01

    Epidemiological studies have established that patients with diabetes have an increased prevalence and severity of periodontal disease. Interleukin (IL)-6, a multifunctional cytokine, plays a role in the tissue inflammation that characterizes periodontal disease. Our recent study has shown a trend of increase in periodontal IL-6 expression at the mRNA level across patients with neither periodontal disease nor diabetes, patients with periodontal disease alone and patients with both diseases. However, the periodontal IL-6 expression at the protein level in these patients has not been investigated. Periodontal tissue specimens were collected from eight patients without periodontal disease and diabetes (group 1), from 17 patients with periodontal disease alone (group 2) and from 10 patients with both periodontal disease and diabetes (group 3). The frozen sections were prepared from these tissue specimens and IL-6 protein expression was detected and quantified. The nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test showed that the difference in IL-6 protein levels among the three groups was statistically significant (p = 0.035). Nonparametric analysis using the Jonckheere-Terpstra test showed a tendency of increase in periodontal IL-6 protein levels across group 1 to group 2 to group 3 (p = 0.006). Parametric analysis of variance (ANOVA) on IL-6 protein levels showed that neither age nor gender significantly affected the difference of IL-6 levels among the groups. Periodontal IL-6 expression at the protein level is increased across patients with neither periodontal disease nor diabetes, patients with periodontal disease alone and patients with both diseases. (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Life style modification for patients with ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, V

    2013-01-01

    With a view to assess the effectiveness of lifestyle modification in patients with ischemic heart disease, a quasi-experimental study with quantitative approach was undertaken on 60 patients of ischemic heart disease. Purposive sampling technique was used in selecting the patients. The results showed that educating the patients about cessation of smoking, taking proper diet, anxiety reduction and counselling helped in preventing the progression of ischaemic heart disease.

  4. Exercise manual for liver disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Limongi, Vivian; Dos Santos, Daniele Costa; de Oliveira da Silva, Aurea Maria; Boin, Ilka de Fátima Santana Ferreira; Stucchi, Raquel Silveira Bello

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To increase inspiratory muscle strength and improve the quality of life of candidates for liver transplantation. METHODS: Twenty-three candidates for liver transplantation participated in the control group and 14 made up the intervention group. The control group consisted of 18 men and 5 women, body mass index (BMI) 27.3 ± 4.5 kg/m2 and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) 18.2 ± 6.1. The intervention group consisted of 11 men and 3 women, BMI 28.6 ± 5.4 kg/m2 and MELD 18 ± 4.5. The presence or absence of ascites was identified in the first patient evaluation and after three months. We evaluated maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximal expiratory pressure, spirometry, root mean square (RMS) of diaphragm and rectus abdominis, and the quality of life. The exercises were performed daily by patients at home for three months and were supervised at distance monthly. The manual consisted of diaphragmatic breathing exercises, diaphragmatic isometric exercise, Threshold IMT®, lifting upper limbs with a bat and strengthening the abdomen. RESULTS: There was significant difference (P = 0.01) between the first (initial) and the third month (final) MIP in the control group and in the intervention group, but there was no difference (P = 0.45) between the groups. The RMS of the diaphragm was lower (P = 0.001) and the functional capacity was higher (P = 0.006) in the intervention group compared to the control. The general health and mental health domains received higher scores after three months in the control group (P = 0.01) and the intervention group (P = 0.004), but there was no significant difference between them. The comparison between the presence of initial ascites with the presence of ascites was performed after three months in the control group (P = 0.083) and intervention group (P = 0.31). There was no significant difference, in relation to the presence of ascites after three months between groups (P = 0.21). In the intervention group, patients with

  5. Exercise manual for liver disease patients.

    PubMed

    Limongi, Vivian; Dos Santos, Daniele Costa; de Oliveira da Silva, Aurea Maria; Boin, Ilka de Fátima Santana Ferreira; Stucchi, Raquel Silveira Bello

    2016-06-24

    To increase inspiratory muscle strength and improve the quality of life of candidates for liver transplantation. Twenty-three candidates for liver transplantation participated in the control group and 14 made up the intervention group. The control group consisted of 18 men and 5 women, body mass index (BMI) 27.3 ± 4.5 kg/m(2) and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) 18.2 ± 6.1. The intervention group consisted of 11 men and 3 women, BMI 28.6 ± 5.4 kg/m(2) and MELD 18 ± 4.5. The presence or absence of ascites was identified in the first patient evaluation and after three months. We evaluated maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximal expiratory pressure, spirometry, root mean square (RMS) of diaphragm and rectus abdominis, and the quality of life. The exercises were performed daily by patients at home for three months and were supervised at distance monthly. The manual consisted of diaphragmatic breathing exercises, diaphragmatic isometric exercise, Threshold IMT(®), lifting upper limbs with a bat and strengthening the abdomen. There was significant difference (P = 0.01) between the first (initial) and the third month (final) MIP in the control group and in the intervention group, but there was no difference (P = 0.45) between the groups. The RMS of the diaphragm was lower (P = 0.001) and the functional capacity was higher (P = 0.006) in the intervention group compared to the control. The general health and mental health domains received higher scores after three months in the control group (P = 0.01) and the intervention group (P = 0.004), but there was no significant difference between them. The comparison between the presence of initial ascites with the presence of ascites was performed after three months in the control group (P = 0.083) and intervention group (P = 0.31). There was no significant difference, in relation to the presence of ascites after three months between groups (P = 0.21). In the intervention group, patients with ascites at the end

  6. Technology innovation for patients with kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mitsides, Nicos; Keane, David F; Lindley, Elizabeth; Mitra, Sandip

    2014-01-01

    The loss of kidney function is a life-changing event leading to life-long dependence on healthcare. Around 5000 people are diagnosed with kidney failure every year. Historically, technology in renal medicine has been employed for replacement therapies. Recently, a lot of emphasis has been placed on technologies that aid early identification and prevent progression of kidney disease, while at the same time empowering affected individuals to gain control over their chronic illness. There is a shift in diversity of technology development, driven by collaborative innovation initiatives such the National Institute's for Health Research Healthcare Technology Co-operative for Devices for Dignity. This has seen the emergence of the patient as a key figure in designing technologies that are fit for purpose, while business involvement has ensured uptake and sustainability of these developments. An embodiment of this approach is the first successful Small Business Research Initiative in the field of renal medicine in the UK.

  7. Managing patients for zoonotic disease in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Warwick, Clifford; Corning, Susan

    2013-07-01

    Zoonoses involve infections and infestations transmissible from animals to humans. Zoonoses are a major global threat. Exposure to zoonotic pathogens exists in various settings including encroachment on nature; foreign travel; pet keeping; bushmeat consumption; attendance at zoological parks, petting zoos, school 'animal contact experiences', wildlife markets, circuses, and domesticated and exotic animal farms. Under-ascertainment is believed to be common and the frequency of some zoonotic disease appears to be increasing. Zoonoses include direct, indirect and aerosolized transmission. Improved awareness of zoonoses in the hospital environment may be important to the growing need for prevention and control. We reviewed relevant literature for the years 2000 to present and identified a significant need for the promotion of awareness and management of zoonoses in the hospital environment. This article provides a new decision-tree, as well as staff and patient guidance on the prevention and control of zoonoses associated with hospitals.

  8. Managing patients for zoonotic disease in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Warwick, Clifford; Corning, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Zoonoses involve infections and infestations transmissible from animals to humans. Zoonoses are a major global threat. Exposure to zoonotic pathogens exists in various settings including encroachment on nature; foreign travel; pet keeping; bushmeat consumption; attendance at zoological parks, petting zoos, school ‘animal contact experiences’, wildlife markets, circuses, and domesticated and exotic animal farms. Under-ascertainment is believed to be common and the frequency of some zoonotic disease appears to be increasing. Zoonoses include direct, indirect and aerosolized transmission. Improved awareness of zoonoses in the hospital environment may be important to the growing need for prevention and control. We reviewed relevant literature for the years 2000 to present and identified a significant need for the promotion of awareness and management of zoonoses in the hospital environment. This article provides a new decision-tree, as well as staff and patient guidance on the prevention and control of zoonoses associated with hospitals. PMID:24040497

  9. Diurnal hypercapnia in patients with neuromuscular disease.

    PubMed

    Panitch, Howard B

    2010-03-01

    Subjects with progressive neuromuscular diseases undergo a typical sequence of respiratory compromise, leading from normal unassisted gas exchange to nocturnal hypoventilation with normal daytime gas exchange, and eventually to respiratory failure requiring continuous ventilatory support. Several different abnormalities in respiratory pump function have been described to explain the development of respiratory failure in subjects with neuromuscular weakness. Early in the progression of respiratory failure, the use of nocturnal assisted ventilation can reverse both night- and day-time hypercapnia. Eventually, however, diurnal hypercapnia will persist despite correction of nocturnal hypoventilation. The likely beneficial effects of mechanical ventilatory support include resting fatigue-prone respiratory muscles and resetting of the central chemoreceptors to PaCO(2). Recent experience shows that select patients who require daytime ventilation can be supported with non-invasive ventilation continuously to correct gas exchange abnormalities while avoiding detrimental aspects of tracheostomy placement. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Approach to patients with refractory coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, Ikram; Nasr, Iman; Campling, Hannah; Ciclitira, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Refractory coeliac disease (RCD) is a recognised complication, albeit very rare, of coeliac disease (CD). This condition is described when individuals with CD continue to experience enteropathy and subsequent or ongoing malabsorption despite strict adherence to a diet devoid of gluten for at least 12 months and when all other causes mimicking this condition are excluded. Depending on the T-cell morphology and T-cell receptor (TCR) clonality at the β/γ loci, RCD can be subdivided into type 1 (normal intra-epithelial lymphocyte morphology, polyclonal TCR population) and type 2 (aberrant IELs with clonal TCR). It is important to differentiate between the two types as type 1 has an 80% survival rate and is managed with strict nutritional and pharmacological management. RCD type 2 on the other hand has a 5-year mortality of 50% and can be complicated by ulcerative jejunitis or enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL). Management of RCD type 2 has challenged many experts, and different treatment approaches have been adopted with variable results. Some of these treatments include immunomodulation with azathioprine and steroids, methotrexate, cyclosporine, alemtuzumab (an anti CD-52 monoclonal antibody), and cladribine or fludarabine sometimes with autologous stem cell transplantation. In this article, we summarise the management approach to patients with RCD type 2. PMID:27803799

  11. Approach to patients with refractory coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Ikram; Nasr, Iman; Campling, Hannah; Ciclitira, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Refractory coeliac disease (RCD) is a recognised complication, albeit very rare, of coeliac disease (CD). This condition is described when individuals with CD continue to experience enteropathy and subsequent or ongoing malabsorption despite strict adherence to a diet devoid of gluten for at least 12 months and when all other causes mimicking this condition are excluded. Depending on the T-cell morphology and T-cell receptor (TCR) clonality at the β/γ loci, RCD can be subdivided into type 1 (normal intra-epithelial lymphocyte morphology, polyclonal TCR population) and type 2 (aberrant IELs with clonal TCR). It is important to differentiate between the two types as type 1 has an 80% survival rate and is managed with strict nutritional and pharmacological management. RCD type 2 on the other hand has a 5-year mortality of 50% and can be complicated by ulcerative jejunitis or enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL). Management of RCD type 2 has challenged many experts, and different treatment approaches have been adopted with variable results. Some of these treatments include immunomodulation with azathioprine and steroids, methotrexate, cyclosporine, alemtuzumab (an anti CD-52 monoclonal antibody), and cladribine or fludarabine sometimes with autologous stem cell transplantation. In this article, we summarise the management approach to patients with RCD type 2.

  12. Updated management of chronic kidney disease in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hass, Virginia McCoy

    2014-06-01

    Chronic diseases, including chronic kidney disease (CKD), are the primary threat to global public health in the 21st century. Recently updated guidelines from the National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative provide patient care benchmarks that physician assistants can use when caring for patients with diabetes and CKD and developing clinical performance improvement plans.

  13. International Registry for Patients With Castleman Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-12

    Castleman Disease; Castleman's Disease; Giant Lymph Node Hyperplasia; Angiofollicular Lymph Hyperplasia; Angiofollicular Lymph Node Hyperplasia; Angiofollicular Lymphoid Hyperplasia; GLNH; Hyperplasia, Giant Lymph Node; Lymph Node Hyperplasia, Giant

  14. Patients with perianal Crohn's disease have poor disease outcomes after primary bowel resection.

    PubMed

    Han, Yoo Min; Kim, Ji Won; Koh, Seong-Joon; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Lee, Kook Lae; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-08-01

    The presence of perianal disease in Crohn's disease patients is one of the factors of postoperative recurrence. The aim of this study is to evaluate long-term prognosis of perianal Crohn's disease patients in Asian. Patients with Crohn's disease who had undergone surgical bowel resection were divided into two groups according to the presence of perianal lesion. We monitored the occurrences of abdominal and/or perianal reoperation and readmission due to disease flare-up. The 132 patients included in the study were divided into 2 groups, those with perianal disease (45 patients, 34.1%) and those without perianal disease (87 patients, 65.9%). Patients with perianal disease was younger in age (33.8 years versus 39.8 years, p = 0.015) and had been diagnosed as CD at a younger age (21.9 years versus 28.6 years, p = 0.005) than patients without perianal disease. Patients with perianal disease showed more extra-intestinal manifestation than patients without perianal disease (8 versus 3, p = 0.008). Reoperation was required in 46 (44.8%) patients during the follow-up period. The presence of perianal disease independently increased the risk of reoperation [hazard ratio (HR), 3.112; confidence interval (CI), 1.707-5.675]. Furthermore, patients with perianal disease had increasing risks of abdominal reoperation (HR 1.978; 95% CI, 1.034-3.784). Patients with Crohn's disease and perianal lesions had a higher risk of reoperation. Considering these findings, physicians should consider aggressive and early top down therapy for patients with perianal Crohn's disease. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. [Autonomy of the patient with chronic diseases: from passive patient to active patient].

    PubMed

    González Mestre, Assumpció

    2014-01-01

    Due to social, economic and cultural changes, there has been a transformation of Health Services around the world. A new figure has emerged from this: the Active Patient, more responsible, with more information and willing to change his life as a chronic patient. In order to respond to this new situation, several countries have established initiatives such as self-reliance programmes for chronic patients. The aim of this article is to underline the Expert Patient Programme Catalonia(®) and to explain its operation and the results obtained up until now. The purpose of this program is to improve the experience of chronic disease by patients, from meetings in which an expert patient provides his knowledge and experiences to a group of patients with the same disease, with the aim of promoting changes in habits and lifestyles that improve the quality of life and the coexistence of the person with his chronic process.

  16. Huntington's disease: visuomotor disturbance in patients and offspring.

    PubMed Central

    Oepen, G; Mohr, U; Willmes, K; Thoden, U

    1985-01-01

    In 15 patients with Huntington's disease, 17 offspring at risk and 63 healthy controls, visuomotor performances were assessed by quantitative (statistical) and qualitative analysis. The much enlarged error score of the nondominant left hand in patients with Huntington's disease was explained as callosal dyspraxia. Five of the 17 offspring revealed results similar to that of the patients. PMID:3158723

  17. Celiac disease markers in patients with liver diseases: a single center large scale screening study.

    PubMed

    Drastich, Pavel; Honsová, Eva; Lodererová, Alena; Jarešová, Marcela; Pekáriková, Aneta; Hoffmanová, Iva; Tučková, Ludmila; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, Helena; Spičák, Julius; Sánchez, Daniel

    2012-11-21

    To study the coincidence of celiac disease, we tested its serological markers in patients with various liver diseases. Large-scale screening of serum antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (tTG), and deamidated gliadin using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and serum antibodies against endomysium using immunohistochemistry, in patients with various liver diseases (n = 962) and patients who underwent liver transplantation (OLTx, n = 523) was performed. The expression of tTG in liver tissue samples of patients simultaneously suffering from celiac disease and from various liver diseases using immunohistochemistry was carried out. The final diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed by histological analysis of small-intestinal biopsy. We found that 29 of 962 patients (3%) with liver diseases and 5 of 523 patients (0.8%) who underwent OLTx were seropositive for IgA and IgG anti-tTG antibodies. However, celiac disease was biopsy-diagnosed in 16 patients: 4 with autoimmune hepatitis type I, 3 with Wilson's disease, 3 with celiac hepatitis, 2 with primary sclerosing cholangitis, 1 with primary biliary cirrhosis, 1 with Budd-Chiari syndrome, 1 with toxic hepatitis, and 1 with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Unexpectedly, the highest prevalence of celiac disease was found in patients with Wilson's disease (9.7%), with which it is only rarely associated. On the other hand, no OLTx patients were diagnosed with celiac disease in our study. A pilot study of the expression of tTG in liver tissue using immunohistochemistry documented the overexpression of this molecule in endothelial cells and periportal hepatocytes of patients simultaneously suffering from celiac disease and toxic hepatitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis or autoimmune hepatitis type I. We suggest that screening for celiac disease may be beneficial not only in patients with associated liver diseases, but also in patients with Wilson's disease.

  18. Managing Acute Complications Of Sickle Cell Disease In Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Sathyaseelan; Chao, Jennifer H

    2016-11-01

    Sickle cell disease is a chronic hematologic disease with a variety of acute, and often recurring, complications. Vaso-occlusive crisis, a unique but common presentation in sickle cell disease, can be challenging to manage. Acute chest syndrome is the leading cause of death in patients with sickle cell disease, occurring in more than half of patients who are hospitalized with a vaso-occlusive crisis. Uncommon diagnoses in children, such as stroke, priapism, and transient red cell aplasia, occur more frequently in patients with sickle cell disease and necessitate a degree of familiarity with the disease process and its management. Patients with sickle cell trait generally have a benign course, but are also subject to serious complications. This issue provides a current review of evidence-based management of the most common acute complications of sickle cell disease seen in pediatric patients in the emergency department.

  19. Dobutamine Stress Echocardiography Safety in Chagas Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rassi, Daniela do Carmo; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Furtado, Rogerio Gomes; Turco, Fabio de Paula; Melato, Luciano Henrique; Hotta, Viviane Tiemi; Nunes, Colandy Godoy de Oliveira; Rassi Jr., Luiz; Rassi, Salvador

    2017-01-01

    Background A few decades ago, patients with Chagas disease were predominantly rural workers, with a low risk profile for obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). As urbanization has increased, they became exposed to the same risk factors for CAD of uninfected individuals. Dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) has proven to be an important tool in CAD diagnosis. Despite being a potentially arrhythmogenic method, it is safe for coronary patients without Chagas disease. For Chagas disease patients, however, the indication of DSE in clinical practice is uncertain, because of the arrhythmogenic potential of that heart disease. Objectives To assess DSE safety in Chagas disease patients with clinical suspicion of CAD, as well as the incidence of arrhythmias and adverse events during the exam. Methods Retrospective analysis of a database of patients referred for DSE from May/2012 to February/2015. This study assessed 205 consecutive patients with Chagas disease suspected of having CAD. All of them had their serology for Chagas disease confirmed. Results Their mean age was 64±10 years and most patients were females (65.4%). No patient had significant adverse events, such as acute myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation, asystole, stroke, cardiac rupture and death. Regarding arrhythmias, ventricular extrasystoles occurred in 48% of patients, and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia in 7.3%. Conclusion DSE proved to be safe in this population of Chagas disease patients, in which no potentially life-threatening outcome was found. PMID:28099588

  20. Cardiovascular disease and cognitive function in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cognitive impairment are common in dialysis patients. Given the proposed role of microvascular disease on cognitive function, particularly cognitive domains that incorporate executive functions, we hypothesized that prevalent systemic CVD would be associated with wor...

  1. Chagas' disease and ageing: the coexistence of other chronic diseases with Chagas' disease in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Alves, Rosalía Matera de Angelis; Thomaz, Raquel Prado; Almeida, Eros Antônio de; Wanderley, Jamiro da Silva; Guariento, Maria Elena

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the main comorbidities in elderly chagasic patients treated in a reference service and identify possible associations between the clinical form of Chagas' disease and chronic diseases. Ninety patients aged 60 years-old or over were interviewed and their clinical diagnoses recorded. The study population profile was: women (55.6%); median age (67 years); married (51.1%); retired (73.3%); up to four years' education (64.4%); and earning less than two minimum wages (67.8%). The predominant forms of Chagas' disease were the cardiac (46.7%) and mixed forms (30%). There was a greater proportion of mild cardiac dysfunction (84.1%), frequently in association with megaesophagus. The mean number of concurrent diseases was 2.856 +/- 1.845, and 33% of the patients had four or more comorbidities. The most frequent were systemic arterial hypertension (56.7%), osteoporosis (23.3%), osteoarthritis (21.2%) and dyslipidemia (20%). Positive correlations were verified between sex and comorbidities and between age group and comorbidities.

  2. Perioperative Management of Patients with Connective Tissue Disease

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Susan M.; Figgie, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Diseases of the connective tissue are a varied group of disorders with major musculoskeletal manifestations such as joint pain and loss of function. As a consequence of the accompanying inflammatory joint disease, such patients often require surgery. Due to the protean organ-related consequences of these conditions, patients who suffer from chronic connective tissue disease are a highly challenging population in the perioperative context. This paper reviews the management of such patients in this clinical setting. PMID:22294961

  3. Peripartum cardiomyopathy in a patient with Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Kajiya, Takashi; Lee, Souki; Yamashita, Makoto; Sasaki, Yuichi; Kamizono, Yusuke; Imamura, Masakazu; Toyonaga, Koichi; Toda, Hitoshi; Koriyama, Nobuyuki; Tei, Chuwa

    2010-11-05

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare life-threatening cardiomyopathy of unknown etiology that occurs during the peripartum period in previously healthy women. Autoimmune and viral factors have been suggested to be involved in PPCM. Here we describe a patient with Graves' disease, which is one of the organ-specific autoimmune diseases, who developed acute heart failure due to PPCM at 2 weeks after her first delivery. The patient recovered completely with conservative treatment for heart failure. An association between PPCM and Graves' disease has not been reported before. PPCM may be an organ-specific autoimmune disease, so the coexistence of other autoimmune diseases should be considered in PPCM patients.

  4. Prevalence of coeliac disease in Italian patients affected by Addison's disease.

    PubMed

    Biagi, Federico; Campanella, Jonia; Soriani, Alessandra; Vailati, Alberto; Corazza, Gino R

    2006-03-01

    It is well known that coeliac disease is associated with autoimmune endocrine diseases, such as autoimmune thyroid disease and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Recently, coeliac disease has been shown in approximately 10% of patients with autoimmune Addison's disease. Addison's disease is the most common cause of primary adrenocortical insufficiency and it shares several clinical features with coeliac disease. Although hyperpigmentation and hypotension are the most specific signs, gastrointestinal symptoms are common and can be the first complaints of the patients. The aim of our study was to investigate the prevalence of coeliac disease in Italian patients with Addison's disease. Seventeen consecutive patients affected by Addison's disease (14 F, mean age 53.9 years, range 26-79 years) were enrolled in the study. Eleven of them were affected by Addison's disease associated with autoimmune thyroid disease and/or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus; the other 6 patients were suffering from isolated Addison's disease. Diagnosis had been performed at the age of 40.5 years (range 23-55). Steroid treatment had already been started in 16 of the patients. Endomysial antibodies were tested in all of them and a duodenal biopsy was taken in those found to be positive for antiendomysial antibody (EMA). One out of 17 patients was found to be EMA positive. Duodenal biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of coeliac disease by showing subtotal villous atrophy. Although we studied only a small sample, our preliminary results confirmed that Addison's disease is associated with coeliac disease, being present in 5.9% of patients with Addison's disease. Since the symptoms can be similar and treatment of Addison's disease can mask coeliac disease, this association should always be actively investigated.

  5. [Pregnancy in a patient with mitochondrial disease].

    PubMed

    Racine, A-C; Blanchot, G; Le Vaillant, C; Boog, G

    2004-04-01

    We report a case of a pregnant woman with a mitochondrial disorder affecting the energy-generating pathway of oxidative phosphorylation which was suggested when the patient presented the progressive clinical phenotype of a proximal tubular renal insufficiency, a muscular weakness of extremities, a bilateral optic neuropathy and a brain magnetic resonance imaging suggesting diffuse leucoencephalopathy. Her diagnosis was made on the basis of abnormal mitochondria on a muscle biopsy and of spectrophotometric deficiencies of the complexes I, II+III and IV of the respiratory chain. No specific molecular mutation could be detected. Her pregnancy was complicated by a severe preeclampsia, an insulin requiring gestational diabetes and a worrying renal failure which precipitated the premature delivery by cesarean section at 30 weeks gestation. The clinical course of the female neonate weighing 1030 grams was uneventful. At two Years of age she showed no sign of mitochondrial disease. But the postpartum course of the mother was complicated by seizures and a terminal renal failure leading presently to dialysis, but requiring a kidney transplantation in the near future.

  6. Respiratory disease terminology: Discordance between pulmonologists and patients.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nishtha; Singh, Sheetu; Jain, Nirmal Kumar; Singh, Virendra

    2017-01-01

    A number of local dialects and languages exist in India, which leads to a single disease being addressed by a number of names which may overlap with other disease names also. This creates misunderstanding and is a hindrance to effective patient-doctor communication. The paper aims to find out how effectively the name of the respiratory disease is communicated to the patient. The terminology used by patients to describe their disease was also noted at limited level. The study was conducted in the form of parallel cross-sectional surveys, among pulmonologists and patients. Among the members of the Indian Chest Society and those attending the National Conference on Pulmonary Diseases (NAPCON-2015), 1028 pulmonologists participated in the online survey which was the first part of the study. The term used to address the common respiratory disease was inquired in the survey. To find the response of patients, a questionnaire was given to the patients attending four respiratory disease clinics of a city. They were inquired about the name of respiratory disease they were suffering from. Pneumonia was the disease which was communicated with exact terminology by 898 (87.4%) doctors to their patients. In contrast, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis was communicated with precise terminology by only 171 (16.6%) doctors. Pulmonary tuberculosis was exactly told by 708 (69%), asthma by 731 (71.1%), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by 593 (57.7%) doctors. However, only 17.6% of the 1122 patients participating in the survey had a knowledge of the name of disease they were suffering from. The exact terminology of the common respiratory diseases is not effectively used by many doctors and most of the patients. The study identifies an important gap in patient-doctor communication, and therefore, highlights the need of effective patient education.

  7. Ultrasonographic imaging of inflammatory bowel disease in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Chiorean, Liliana; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Braden, Barbara; Cui, Xin-Wu; Buchhorn, Reiner; Chang, Jian-Min; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is one of the most common chronic gastrointestinal diseases in pediatric patients. Choosing the optimal imaging modality for the assessment of gastrointestinal disease in pediatric patients can be challenging. The invasiveness and patient acceptance, the radiation exposure and the quality performance of the diagnostic test need to be considered. By reviewing the literature regarding imaging in inflammatory bowel disease the value of ultrasound in the clinical management of pediatric patients is highlighted. Transabdominal ultrasound is a useful, noninvasive method for the initial diagnosis of IBD in children; it also provides guidance for therapeutic decisions and helps to characterize and predict the course of the disease in individual patients. Ultrasound techniques including color Doppler imaging and contrast-enhanced ultrasound are promising imaging tools to determine disease activity and complications. Comparative studies between different imaging methods are needed. PMID:25954096

  8. [POMPE DISEASE - GUIDELINES FOR DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF ADULT PATIENTS].

    PubMed

    Pećin, Ivan; Muačević-Katanec, Diana; Šimić, Iveta; Fumić, Ksenija; Potočki, Kristina; Šućur, Nediljko; Reiner, Željko

    2015-01-01

    These guidelines provide a short summary of recommendations on Pompe disease, how to diagnose this disease, management of adult patients with this disease, follow-up of the patients and recommendations on therapy and genetic testing. Early diagnosis and management of patients with Pompe disease requires a multidisciplinary approach of several different experts. These guidelines were produced by the Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Center Zagreb which is a Referral expert center for rare and metabolic diseases of the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Croatia. They were endorsed by the Croatian Society for Rare Diseases, Croatian Medical Association.These are the first guidelines published in Croatia on diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of Pompe disease.

  9. Crohn disease in patients with familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Fidder, Herma H; Chowers, Yehuda; Lidar, Merav; Sternberg, Matan; Langevitz, Pnina; Livneh, Avi

    2002-11-01

    Crohn disease and familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) are inflammatory diseases characterized by abdominal pain and fever. The concurrence of the 2 diseases (FMF-CD) may pose a challenge to diagnosis and treatment. We undertook the present study to determine the prevalence of Crohn disease in FMF and to characterize FMF-CD patients clinically and genetically. Using a computerized search, the patients of our FMF clinic were screened for a concomitant diagnosis of Crohn disease. Patients and their medical records were thoroughly examined, and their DNA was genotyped for mutations in the MEFV gene. Control groups of ethnically and sex-matched patients suffering from each of the diseases alone, either Crohn disease or FMF, were used for comparison. We identified 7 patients with concomitant Crohn disease and FMF, which is more than the expected prevalence in the general population (p = 0.03). Crohn disease presented at a significantly later age in the FMF-CD group (40.6 +/- 10.0 yr versus 26.2 +/- 11.4 yr; p < 0.004). Disease severity and other characteristics of Crohn disease were comparable to the Crohn disease control group. Contrary to the FMF control group patients, FMF in FMF-CD patients was characterized by a higher attack frequency (p < 0.05) and increased prevalence of amyloidosis (p < 0.02). The overall severity score was similar in both groups. In conclusion, Crohn disease appears to be more prevalent in FMF and presents later than in patients without FMF. FMF in this group of patients shows a higher attack frequency and is more often complicated by amyloidosis.

  10. Subclinical intestinal inflammation in chronic granulomatous disease patients.

    PubMed

    Broides, Arnon; Sagi, Orli; Pinsk, Vered; Levy, Jacov; Yerushalmi, Baruch

    2016-02-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease is a primary immunodeficiency caused by impaired neutrophil production of reactive oxygen species. Non-infectious colitis is common in chronic granulomatous disease, and high levels of antimicrobial antibodies that are associated with Crohn's disease are common even without colitis. Fecal calprotectin concentration is a marker for intestinal inflammation. We sought to determine whether subclinical intestinal inflammation occurs in asymptomatic chronic granulomatous disease patients. Asymptomatic chronic granulomatous disease patients without overt gastrointestinal symptoms suggestive of colitis at the time of enrollment were studied for fecal calprotectin concentration, antibodies associated with Crohn's disease and systemic inflammatory markers. Eight patients were included, aged 54-176 months. In 7/8 (87.5 %) fecal calprotectin concentration was normal (<50) and elevated (137 mg/kg) in only one patient. This patient later developed colitis. In 7/8 (87.5 %) anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody was positive. C-reactive protein, albumin, complete blood count and p-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody were normal in all 8 patients. Subclinical colitis is not evident in most asymptomatic chronic granulomatous disease patients; however, in some patients, fecal calprotectin concentration may be elevated, possibly indicating the presence of subclinical colitis and predicting the occurrence of clinically relevant colitis. Serum anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody concentrations do not seem to correlate with fecal calprotectin concentration in asymptomatic chronic granulomatous disease patients.

  11. Changes in Semantic Memory in Early Stage Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weingartner, Herbert J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Contrasts changes in semantic memory in elderly normal controls and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients before patients expressed symptoms. Found that controls generated more uncommon exemplars from closed semantic categories (fruits and vegetables) than did AD patients prior to presumed onset of AD. AD patients were just as productive as controls…

  12. Celiac disease and other autoimmune diseases in patients with collagenous colitis.

    PubMed

    Vigren, Lina; Tysk, Curt; Ström, Magnus; Kilander, Anders F; Hjortswang, Henrik; Bohr, Johan; Benoni, Cecilia; Larson, Lasse; Sjöberg, Klas

    2013-08-01

    Collagenous colitis (CC) is associated with autoimmune disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between CC and autoimmune disorders in a Swedish multicenter study. Patients with CC answered questionnaires about demographic data and disease activity. The patient's files were scrutinized for information about autoimmune diseases. A total number of 116 CC patients were included; 92 women, 24 men, median age 62 years (IQR 55-73). In total, 30.2% had one or more autoimmune disorder. Most common were celiac disease (CeD; 12.9%) and autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD, 10.3%), but they also had Sjögren's syndrome (3.4%), diabetes mellitus (1.7%) and conditions in skin and joints (6.0%). Patients with associated autoimmune disease had more often nocturnal stools. The majority of the patients with associated CeD or ATD got these diagnoses before the colitis diagnosis. Autoimmune disorders occurred in one-third of these patients, especially CeD. In classic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), liver disease is described in contrast to CC where no cases occurred. Instead, CeD was prevalent, a condition not reported in classic IBD. Patients with an associated autoimmune disease had more symptoms. Patients with CC and CeD had an earlier onset of their colitis. The majority of the patients with both CC and CeD were smokers. Associated autoimmune disease should be contemplated in the follow-up of these patients.

  13. Respiratory disease terminology: Discordance between pulmonologists and patients

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nishtha; Singh, Sheetu; Jain, Nirmal Kumar; Singh, Virendra

    2017-01-01

    Context: A number of local dialects and languages exist in India, which leads to a single disease being addressed by a number of names which may overlap with other disease names also. This creates misunderstanding and is a hindrance to effective patient–doctor communication. Aims: The paper aims to find out how effectively the name of the respiratory disease is communicated to the patient. The terminology used by patients to describe their disease was also noted at limited level. Settings and Design: The study was conducted in the form of parallel cross-sectional surveys, among pulmonologists and patients. Methods: Among the members of the Indian Chest Society and those attending the National Conference on Pulmonary Diseases (NAPCON-2015), 1028 pulmonologists participated in the online survey which was the first part of the study. The term used to address the common respiratory disease was inquired in the survey. To find the response of patients, a questionnaire was given to the patients attending four respiratory disease clinics of a city. They were inquired about the name of respiratory disease they were suffering from. Results: Pneumonia was the disease which was communicated with exact terminology by 898 (87.4%) doctors to their patients. In contrast, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis was communicated with precise terminology by only 171 (16.6%) doctors. Pulmonary tuberculosis was exactly told by 708 (69%), asthma by 731 (71.1%), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by 593 (57.7%) doctors. However, only 17.6% of the 1122 patients participating in the survey had a knowledge of the name of disease they were suffering from. Conclusions: The exact terminology of the common respiratory diseases is not effectively used by many doctors and most of the patients. The study identifies an important gap in patient–doctor communication, and therefore, highlights the need of effective patient education. PMID:28144053

  14. Two adolescent patients with coexistent Graves' disease and Moyamoya disease in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Chong Kun; Kim, Su Yung

    2014-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a cerebrovascular condition that results in the narrowing of the vessels of the circle of Willis and collateral vessel formation at the base of the brain. Although relationships between Graves' disease and cerebrovascular accidents in Moyamoya disease are obscure, the coexistence of the two diseases is noteworthy. Moyamoya disease has been rarely reported in adolescent patients with thyrotoxicosis. Recently, we encountered two adolescent Korean patients with Moyamoya disease associated with Graves' disease who presented with episodic right-sided hemiparesis and syncope. These two girls who had Graves' disease had no history of other diseases or head trauma. A thyroid function test revealed a euthyroid state and a high thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor antibody titer at that time. The patients were diagnosed with Moyamoya disease based on brain magnetic resonance angiography and cerebral four-vessel angiography. The patients underwent cranial revascularization by encephalo-duroarterio-synangiosis as soon as a diagnosis was made, which resulted in successful symptom resolution. They fared well and had no additional neurological symptoms as of their last follow-up visits. Here, we report these two cases of confirmed Moyamoya disease complicated by Graves' disease with a review of the literature, and discuss the possible association between the two diseases. To our knowledge, this is the first report in South Korea on Moyamoya disease associated with Graves' disease in adolescents with a euthyroid. PMID:25076974

  15. Sentinel lymph node biopsy in patients with extramammary Paget's disease.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Naohito; Morita, Reiji; Yamada, Mizuki; Echigo, Takeshi; Hirano, Takashi; Takehara, Kazuhiko; Ichiyanagi, Kenji; Yokoyama, Kunihiko

    2004-10-01

    Patients with invasive extramammary Paget's disease appear to have a risk of regional lymph node metastasis. Despite the poor prognosis for patients with lymph node metastasis, management of extramammary Paget's disease without clinical evidence of involved nodes is controversial. To evaluate the usefulness of sentinel lymph node biopsy, patients with extramammary Paget's disease underwent sentinel lymph node biopsy using preoperative lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperative patent blue dye injection with a handheld gamma-detecting probe. Thirteen patients with primary genital extramammary Paget's disease were included in the study. Sentinel nodes identified were excised and examined by hematoxylin and eosin staining. All sentinel lymph nodes were also subjected to immunohistochemical staining for carcinoembryonic antigen, MUC1, cytokeratin 7, and gross cystic disease fluid protein-15. A total of 23 nodes were removed successfully. Tumor cells were detected in 4 nodes from four patients by hematoxylin and eosin staining. No additional lymph nodes were positive by immunohistochemistry. Three of the four sentinel-node-positive patients developed distant metastases. All nine patients without node involvement were free from disease during the follow-up period. Sentinel lymph node biopsy was safe and feasible method and may have an important role in the management of extramammary Paget's disease with clinically N0 status. To establish the optimal management of inguinal lymph nodes in extramammary Paget's disease, additional studies in large number of patients are needed.

  16. The medical, social, and functional profile of Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, K S; Merriman, A; Owen, A; Chew, B; Tan, T C

    1994-06-01

    The study looked at the medical, social, and functional aspects of 34 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's Disease (PD). Eighty-five percent were above 55 years and 35% were over 70 years. Twenty-four (71%) were males. Most patients had Stage II disease. Overall functional state of the patient correlated closely with the stage of Parkinson's disease. Patients were likely to be dependent if their disease severity was stage III or more. Eighteen (53%) patients would require a carer to be present at least part of the day and 3 (9%) patients would require a carer most of the time. Domestic chores such as meal preparation, housework, and shopping were also affected in most of those who were previously active in these tasks. Ten patients had given up work due to their Parkinson's disease. The lack of knowledge of the disease was shown both in the carers and the patients. Twenty-nine of the patients had no knowledge of the disease, and only one carer had superficial knowledge of the disease. The major social problems associated with the disease were loss of social contact, behavioural problems, family members under strain and communication problems within the family. Since Parkinson's Disease is a chronic illness, with associated disabilities, it is important that the physician should aim for a multidisciplinary approach. Patient and carer education should be given emphasis, and the many everyday functional problems addressed. Advice on life-style management and aids to overcome disabilities may help improve quality of life of the patient and reduce carer's stress.

  17. Anorectal Complications During Neutropenic Period in Patients with Hematologic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Solmaz, Soner; Korur, Aslı; Gereklioğlu, Çiğdem; Asma, Süheyl; Büyükkurt, Nurhilal; Kasar, Mutlu; Yeral, Mahmut; Kozanoğlu, İlknur; Boğa, Can; Ozdoğu, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Neutropenic patients are susceptible to any anorectal disease, and symptomatic anorectal disease afflicts 2-32% of oncology patients. Perianal infections are the most feared complication, considering the lack of natural defense against infectious microorganisms. When septic complications develop, the anorectal disease is potentially fatal, especially in neutropenic patients in whom mortality rates range between 11-57%. Although anorectal diseases are a frequent complication with potentially fatal outcomes among patients with hematologic diseases, sufficient data are not available in the literature. In this study, we aimed to investigate the anorectal complications developing during the neutropenic period in patients with hematologic diseases. A total of 79 patients whose neutropenic period (absolute neutrophil count <500/mcL) continued for 7 days, or longer were included in the study. A total of 34 patients out of 79 (43%) were detected to develop anorectal complications, of them 6 (7.6%) developed an anorectal infection. The patients were characterized according to the hematological disease and its status (active or not), the type of treatment and the presence of a history of an anorectal pathology before the onset of the hematologic disease. Nineteen (24.1%) patients had the history of anorectal disturbances before diagnosis of the hematologic disease, and recurrence of an anorectal pathology was found in 14 out of 19 patients(73.7%). In addition, the overall mortality rate was higher among the patients who developed anorectal complications compared to another group (41.2% vs. 22.2%, p=0.059). Anorectal pathology is a common complication with high recurrence rate in neutropenic patients. Perianal infections are important as they can cause life-threatening outcomes although they are relatively rare among all anorectal complications. Therefore perianal signs and symptoms should be meticulously evaluated concerning early diagnosis and treatment.

  18. Anorectal Complications During Neutropenic Period in Patients with Hematologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Solmaz, Soner; Korur, Aslı; Gereklioğlu, Çiğdem; Asma, Süheyl; Büyükkurt, Nurhilal; Kasar, Mutlu; Yeral, Mahmut; Kozanoğlu, İlknur; Boğa, Can; Ozdoğu, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Background Neutropenic patients are susceptible to any anorectal disease, and symptomatic anorectal disease afflicts 2–32% of oncology patients. Perianal infections are the most feared complication, considering the lack of natural defense against infectious microorganisms. When septic complications develop, the anorectal disease is potentially fatal, especially in neutropenic patients in whom mortality rates range between 11–57%. Although anorectal diseases are a frequent complication with potentially fatal outcomes among patients with hematologic diseases, sufficient data are not available in the literature. In this study, we aimed to investigate the anorectal complications developing during the neutropenic period in patients with hematologic diseases. Methods A total of 79 patients whose neutropenic period (absolute neutrophil count <500/mcL) continued for 7 days, or longer were included in the study. Results A total of 34 patients out of 79 (43%) were detected to develop anorectal complications, of them 6 (7.6%) developed an anorectal infection. The patients were characterized according to the hematological disease and its status (active or not), the type of treatment and the presence of a history of an anorectal pathology before the onset of the hematologic disease. Nineteen (24.1%) patients had the history of anorectal disturbances before diagnosis of the hematologic disease, and recurrence of an anorectal pathology was found in 14 out of 19 patients(73.7%). In addition, the overall mortality rate was higher among the patients who developed anorectal complications compared to another group (41.2% vs. 22.2%, p=0.059). Conclusion Anorectal pathology is a common complication with high recurrence rate in neutropenic patients. Perianal infections are important as they can cause life-threatening outcomes although they are relatively rare among all anorectal complications. Therefore perianal signs and symptoms should be meticulously evaluated concerning early

  19. Periodontal disease in diabetic patients - clinical and histopathological aspects.

    PubMed

    Corlan Puşcu, Dorina; Ciuluvică, Radu Constantin; Anghel, Andreea; Mălăescu, Gheorghe Dan; Ciursaş, Adina Nicoleta; Popa, Gabriel Valeriu; Agop Forna, Doriana; Busuioc, Cristina Jana; Siloşi, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is one of the most frequent diseases affecting people all over the world. The relation between periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus raised the interest both of dentists and doctors treating metabolic diseases, as the two conditions influence one another. In our study, we analyzed a number of 75 patients with diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease that presented to the medical consultory for conditions of the dental maxillary system. The clinical study showed that periodontal disease and diabetes may affect young adults as well, still this pathological association more frequently appears after the age of 50. The disease was identified especially in the women living in urban area. The clinical examination of the dental maxillary system identified the presence of gingival ulcerations, dental calculus, gingival bleeding, radicular leftovers with anfractuous margins, fixed prostheses with an inappropriate cervical adjustment. Of the systemic diseases associated to periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus, there was observed that 66.66% of the patients also suffered from cardiovascular diseases (high blood pressure, ischemic cardiopathy, heart failure), and 37.33% suffered from obesity. The histopathological and immunohistochemical tests highlighted the presence of an inflammatory chronic, intense reaction, mainly formed of lymphocytes, plasmocytes, macrophages and granulocytes, heterogeneously disseminated and alteration of the structure of marginal and superficial periodontium. The inflammatory reaction in the patients with periodontal disease and diabetes was more intense than in the patients with periodontal disease without diabetes.

  20. Hormones and arterial stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gungor, Ozkan; Kircelli, Fatih; Voroneanu, Luminita; Covic, Adrian; Ok, Ercan

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease constitutes the major cause of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Arterial stiffness is an important contributor to the occurrence and progression of cardiovascular disease. Various risk factors, including altered hormone levels, have been suggested to be associated with arterial stiffness. Based on the background that chronic kidney disease predisposes individuals to a wide range of hormonal changes, we herein review the available data on the association between arterial stiffness and hormones in patients with chronic kidney disease and summarize the data for the general population.

  1. Factors contributing to malnutrition in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung R; Chung, Sun J; Yoo, Sung-Hee

    2016-04-01

    Our objective in this study was to evaluate the nutritional status and to identify clinical, psychosocial, and nutritional factors contributing to malnutrition in Korean patients with Parkinson's disease. We used a descriptive, cross-sectional study design. Of 102 enrolled patients, 26 (25.5%) were malnourished and 27 (26.5%) were at risk of malnutrition based on Mini-Nutritional Assessment scores. Malnutrition was related to activity of daily living score, Hoehn and Yahr stage, duration of levodopa therapy, Beck Depression Inventory and Spielberger's Anxiety Inventory scores, body weight, body weight at onset of Parkinson's disease, and body mass index. On multiple logistic regression analysis, anxiety score, duration of levodopa therapy, body weight at onset of Parkinson's disease, and loss of body weight were significant factors predicting malnutrition in Parkinson's disease patients. Therefore, nutritional assessment, including psychological evaluation, is required for Parkinson's disease patients to facilitate interdisciplinary nutritional intervention for malnourished patients.

  2. Intensive care of the adult patient with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Allan, Catherine K

    2011-01-01

    Prevalence of congenital heart disease in the adult population has increased out of proportion to that of the pediatric population as survival has improved, and adult congenital heart disease patients make up a growing percentage of pediatric and adult cardiac intensive care unit admissions. These patients often develop complex multiorgan system disease as a result of long-standing altered cardiac physiology, and many require reoperation during adulthood. Practitioners who care for these patients in the cardiac intensive care unit must have a strong working knowledge of the pathophysiology of complex congenital heart disease, and a full team of specialists must be available to assist in the care of these patients. This chapter will review some of the common multiorgan system effects of long-standing congenital heart disease (eg, renal and hepatic dysfunction, coagulation abnormalities, arrhythmias) as well as some of the unique cardiopulmonary physiology of this patient population.

  3. [Comorbid autoimmune pathology in patients treated with disease modifying drugs].

    PubMed

    Goncharova, Z A; Sizyakina, L P; Belovolova, R A; Megeryan, V A

    2016-01-01

    Because of intensive growth of the prevalence of multiple sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune diseases (AID) during the last years, the comorbidity of MS and AID is not a rarity. In this literature review, the development of comorbid AID in patients with MS is considered to be the probable complication of disease modifying therapy with drugs of different groups. The authors present the own data on the prevalence of comorbid autoimmune pathology in patients with MS treated with disease modifying drugs.

  4. Scintigraphic perfusion patterns in patients with diffuse lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, G.E.; Sullivan, D.C.; Gottschalk, A.; Putman, C.E.

    1982-04-01

    Perfusion scintigrams of 55 patients with radiographic evidence of diffuse lung disease were reviewed. Thirty-nine had acute and/or chronic changes caused by congestive heart failure, and 16 had diffuse reticulonodular disease. A normal or near-normal perfusion pattern was seen in 40/55 (73%), and this finding was equally common in the two groups. The authors conclude that perfusion scintigraphy is useful in excluding pulmonary embolism in patients with radiographic evidence of diffuse, symmetrical lung disease.

  5. Non-surgical periodontal management in scleroderma disease patients.

    PubMed

    Laforgia, A; Corsalini, M; Stefanachi, G; Tafuri, S; Ballini, A; Pettini, F; Di Venere, D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the periodontal status of people with scleroderma and their response to non-surgical treatment protocol aimed at controlling the evolution of the disease. The response to non-surgical periodontal treatment was tested on patients belonging to a scleroderma group and a control group: the data show an improvement of the periodontal conditions of all these patients in response to treatment. When compared on the same diagram, a slight remission of the periodontal disease was obtained in both scleroderma and healthy patients. This highlights the benefit to soft tissues produced by non-surgical periodontal treatment also in patients affected by systemic diseases.

  6. Celiac disease in patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mıhçı, Ercan; Nur, Banu Güzel; Berker-Karaüzüm, Sibel; Yılmaz, Aygen; Artan, Reha

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune, gastrointestinal disorder characterized by intolerance to the dietary grain protein gluten. An increased prevalence of celiac disease has been reported in Down syndrome and Turner syndrome, but there has been only few previous reports with respect to the association of celiac disease in Williams-Beuren syndrome. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of celiac disease in our 24 Williams-Beuren syndrome patients. Gastrointestinal problems and celiac disease symptoms of patients were noted. All patients were analyzed by the titer of tissue transglutaminases IgA and IgG. HLA genotyping and intestinal biopsy was performed to the patients with positive serology. We also performed gluten free diet in the presence of compatible symptoms, serology, HLA genotyping and intestinal biopsy. In our study, two patients had positive tTG antibodies, but only one had positive biopsy finding for celiac disease. The frequency of celiac disease in patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome was estimated as 1/24 (4.1%). Though the number of participants in this study was limited, the results show that the frequency of celiac disease is higher in Williams-Beuren syndrome compared to the general population. We suggest that a high suspicion and testing for celiac disease should be recommended at certain intervals in all cases with Williams-Beuren syndrome to detect the cause of growth retardation and gastrointestinal problems.

  7. Treatment of patients with minimal stage IIIA Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Powlis, W.D.; Mauch, P.; Goffman, T.; Goodman, R.L.

    1987-10-01

    Treatment recommendations for patients with upper abdominal Stage IIIA Hodgkin's (III1A) disease have varied widely. The current study reports on a combined institutional retrospective review of 85 patients with surgically staged III1A Hodgkin's disease. Twenty-two patients received combined modality therapy (CMT), 36 patients were treated initially with total nodal irradiation (TNI), and 27 with mantle and para-aortic radiotherapy (MPA). Patients treated with CMT had an actuarial 8-year freedom from relapse (FFR) of 96% as compared to a FFR of 51% in TNI treated patients (p = 0.002), and a FFR of 54% in MPA treated patients (p = 0.004). Of the 11 relapses in MPA treated patients, 7 had a component of their failure in the untreated pelvic or inguinal nodes. The patients treated with CMT had an 8-year actuarial survival of 100% as compared to 79% in TNI treated patients (p = 0.055) and 78% in patients treated with MPA (p = 0.025). Histology and the number of splenic nodules were the most important prognostic variables. Patients with MC/LD histology and greater than or equal to 5 splenic nodules have a high risk of relapse (10/13) when treated with radiation alone (TNI or MPA). We recommend CMT for this group of patients. Patients with NS/LP histology and 1-4 splenic nodules represent a favorable subset of Stage III1A patients. Only 4/21 patients have relapsed and all 21 patients are currently alive without disease regardless of treatment. We currently feel that patients with Stage III1A Hodgkin's disease with NS/LP histology and splenic disease limited to 1-4 nodules are good candidates for MPA as an alternative to TNI or CMT.

  8. Diagnostic indicators for blood stasis syndrome patients with gynaecological diseases.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jeeyoun; Ko, Mi Mi; Lee, Myeong Soo; Lee, So Min; Lee, Ju Ah

    2017-06-20

    To investigate the important diagnostic indicators for blood stasis syndrome (BSS) in patients of childbearing age with gynaecological diseases. A partial least squared-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to BSS symptoms data of patients with gynaecological diseases, and the diagnostic indicators used by doctors of Korean medicine (DKMs) among BSS patients with gynaecological diseases were also investigated. A total of 103 patients of childbearing age with gynaecological diseases and 40 healthy controls were enrolled. Among the 103 patients, 63 (61.7%) and 40 (38.8%) were diagnosed with BSS and non-BSS, respectively, and BSS patients exhibited a more severe extent of disease. A score plot of PLS-DA showed clearly different patterns among the 3 groups. Based on the variable importance on projection of PLS-DA model, menstrual pains, dark lumps in the menstrual blood, ileocoecal tenderness and resistance, sharp pains, and sublingual varicosities were selected as the top fifive most important indicators. Moreover, more than 75% of DKMs chose dark lumps in menstrual blood, menstrual pain, and dark menstrual blood as the diagnostic indicators of BSS in patients with gynaecological diseases, and more than 49% of them also considered sharp pains, dark red tongue, sublingual varicosities, and tendency to bruise easily as diagnostic indicators of BSS. DKMs focused on menstrual symptoms and certain gynaecological symptoms to diagnose BSS patients of childbearing age with female diseases.

  9. Nephrolithiasis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease in the community

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Dídia Bismara; Moss, Alan C; Schor, Nestor

    2013-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been associated with renal stone formation. The objective of this study was to determine prospectively the prevalence of nephrolithiasis in a community-based population of patients with IBD and to analyze factors associated with renal calculus formation. Methods Screening renal ultrasound was performed in a well characterized cohort of patients seen between 2009 and 2012 at an IBD clinic. We enrolled 168 patients, including 93 with Crohn’s disease and 75 with ulcerative colitis. Clinical and phenotypic variables associated with asymptomatic nephrolithiasis were determined. Results Nephrolithiasis was detected in 36 patients with Crohn’s disease and in 28 patients with ulcerative colitis (38% for both). Although none of the patients had been previously hospitalized for symptomatic nephrolithiasis, nine with Crohn’s disease and five with ulcerative colitis had recurrent urinary tract infections or hydronephrosis. In patients with Crohn’s disease, ileocolonic (L3) disease was associated with a greater risk of nephrolithiasis than was ileal (L1) or colonic (L2) disease (odds ratio [OR] 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.8–7). Active ulcerative colitis (regardless of severity) represented a significant risk factor for formation of renal calculi (OR 4.2, 95% CI 1.1–15, P = 0.02). Conclusion In surgery-naïve patients with IBD in the community, asymptomatic nephrolithiasis is common and should be considered when renal dysfunction or infection is detected. PMID:23935383

  10. [Spontaneous hypothyroidism in 4 patients with Graves-Basedow disease].

    PubMed

    González-González, Abel; Recio Cordova, José María; Aznar Ondoño, Itziar; Del Monte Jarabo Bueno, María

    2009-05-01

    We present 4 patients with Graves' disease who developed spontaneous hypothyroidism during follow-up. The two most plausible physiopathologic mechanisms for this development were progressive autoimmune-mediated destruction of the thyroid follicular epithelium and a predominance of blocking antibodies to the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor at the expense of stimulating antibodies in the same patient. Description of these patients not only illustrates the heterogeneous nature of this disease, but also the interrelation among its distinct clinical forms.

  11. Disease management programs for CKD patients: the potential and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Michael V

    2009-03-01

    Disease management describes the use of a number of approaches to identify and treat patients with chronic health conditions, especially those that are expensive to treat. Disease management programs have grown rapidly in the United States in the past several years. These programs have been established for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but some have been discontinued because of the high cost of the program. Disease management programs for CKD face unique challenges. Identification of patients with CKD is hampered by incomplete use of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for CKD by physicians and the less than universal use of estimated glomerular filtration rate from serum creatinine measurements to identify patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2). CKD affects multiple organ systems. Thus, a comprehensive disease management program will need to manage each of these aspects of CKD. These multiple interventions likely will make a CKD disease management program more costly than similar disease management programs designed for patients with diabetes mellitus, congestive heart failure, or other chronic diseases. The lack of data that can be used to develop effective disease management programs in CKD makes it difficult to determine goals for the management of each organ system affected by CKD. Finally, long periods of observation will be needed to determine whether a particular disease management program is effective in not only improving patient outcomes, but also decreasing both resource use and health care dollars. This long-term observation period is contrary to how most disease management contracts are written, which usually are based on meeting goals during a 1- to 3-year period. Until these challenges are resolved, it likely will be difficult to maintain effective disease management programs for CKD.

  12. Approach to the patient with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kevin E

    2015-06-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with motor, nonmotor, and behavioral findings. Imaging technology advances have allowed the characterization of the underlying pathologic changes to the brain and identification of specific lesions in dopaminergic neurons. Although certain imaging techniques allow for detection up to 20 years before the onset of motor symptoms, these advances have yet to produce meaningful treatments to halt the disease or reverse its course. Current treatments are directed at optimizing symptomatic management. Referral to a movement disorder specialist familiar with PD should be considered for providers with limited familiarity in diagnosis or treatment.

  13. Therapeutic experience of 289 elderly patients with biliary diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zong-Ming; Liu, Zhuo; Liu, Li-Min; Zhang, Chong; Yu, Hong-Wei; Wan, Bai-Jiang; Deng, Hai; Zhu, Ming-Wen; Liu, Zi-Xu; Wei, Wen-Ping; Song, Meng-Meng; Zhao, Yue

    2017-01-01

    AIM To present clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment strategies in elderly patients with biliary diseases. METHODS A total of 289 elderly patients with biliary diseases were enrolled in this study. The clinical data relating to these patients were collected in our hospital from June 2013 to May 2016. Patient age, disease type, coexisting diseases, laboratory examinations, surgical methods, postoperative complications and therapeutic outcomes were analyzed. RESULTS The average age of the 289 patients with biliary diseases was 73.9 ± 8.5 years (range, 60-102 years). One hundred and thirty-one patients (45.3%) had one of 10 different biliary diseases, such as gallbladder stones, common bile duct stones, and cholangiocarcinoma. The remaining patients (54.7%) had two types of biliary diseases. One hundred and seventy-nine patients underwent 9 different surgical treatments, including pancreaticoduodenectomy, radical resection of hilar cholangiocarcinoma and laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Ten postoperative complications occurred with an incidence of 39.3% (68/173), and hypopotassemia showed the highest incidence (33.8%, 23/68). One hundred and sixteen patients underwent non-surgical treatments, including anti-infection, symptomatic and supportive treatments. The cure rate was 97.1% (168/173) in the surgical group and 87.1% (101/116) in the non-surgical group. The difference between these two groups was statistically significant (χ2 = 17.227, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Active treatment of coexisting diseases, management of indications and surgical opportunities, appropriate selection of surgical procedures, improvements in perioperative therapy, and timely management of postoperative complications are key factors in enhancing therapeutic efficacy in elderly patients with biliary diseases. PMID:28428722

  14. Coronary artery disease in patients with cerebrovascular disease: a prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Rokey, R.; Rolak, L.A.; Harati, Y.; Kutka, N.; Verani, M.S.

    1984-07-01

    Coronary artery disease is the cause of death in most patients who have transient ischemic attacks or stroke. Evaluation for this condition is not routinely performed in such patients, and no prospective studies have been reported. We prospectively examined 50 consecutive patients with transient ischemic attacks or mild stroke to determine the prevalence and importance of coronary artery disease. All patients were examined by a cardiologist and underwent both exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy and exercise radionuclide ventriculography. Sixteen patients were suspected to have coronary artery disease on the basis of clinical evaluation. In 15 of these the was confirmed by the nuclear scans. The remaining 34 patients had no clinical evidence of heart disease, yet 14 had abnormal cardiac scans. Twenty of 22 patients with abnormal scans who underwent cardiac catheterization had significant coronary artery disease or a cardiomyopathy. The discovery of heart disease altered clinical management in 13 patients. Overall, 29 of 50 patients had significant coronary artery disease, compared with a 7% prevalence of the condition in other patients of similar age at the same institution.

  15. Erectile dysfunction in patients with cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Ophuis, A.J.M. Oude; Nijeholt, A.A.B. Lycklama à

    2006-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a highly prevalent disease, especially in cardiovascular-compromised men. Many of the well-established risk factors for cardiovascular disease are also risk factors for erectile dysfunction. A correlation between erectile dysfunction and endothelial dysfunction is well established. It is postulated that erectile dysfunction with an arteriovascular aetiology can predate and be an indicator of potential coronary artery disease. In this paper we will attempt to increase awareness among cardiologists for the predictive value of erectile dysfunction for future cardiovascular disease in order to optimise cardiovascular risk management. The treatment of erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular interactions is also discussed in detail. ImagesFigure 1AFigure 1B PMID:25696612

  16. Case report: Patient presenting with Cushing's disease

    PubMed Central

    Shaver, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Backgound: Cushing's syndrome is a rare disease that is caused by the overproduction of cortisol by the adrenal glands. This can be caused by a tumor of the adrenal glands, the lungs or the pituitary gland. When a pituitary tumor produces too much ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone), it causes the overproduction of cortisol by the adrenal glands. When the pituitary is the source of the over production, it is called Cushing's disease. Case Description: A 32-year-old female who developed symptoms of Cushing's about one and a half years prior to her visit at a large teaching hospital in the Mid-Atlantic. Her symptoms included amenorrhea, facial hair and acne, and back pain. She had previously been diagnosed with polycystic ovarian syndrome. Conclusion: Cushing's disease is a rare disease, which can be successfully treated by experienced pituitary specialists. PMID:26069847

  17. Case report: Patient presenting with Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Shaver, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome is a rare disease that is caused by the overproduction of cortisol by the adrenal glands. This can be caused by a tumor of the adrenal glands, the lungs or the pituitary gland. When a pituitary tumor produces too much ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone), it causes the overproduction of cortisol by the adrenal glands. When the pituitary is the source of the over production, it is called Cushing's disease. A 32-year-old female who developed symptoms of Cushing's about one and a half years prior to her visit at a large teaching hospital in the Mid-Atlantic. Her symptoms included amenorrhea, facial hair and acne, and back pain. She had previously been diagnosed with polycystic ovarian syndrome. Cushing's disease is a rare disease, which can be successfully treated by experienced pituitary specialists.

  18. Survival Analysis of Patients with End Stage Renal Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, J. D.; Gayo, W. S.; Bautista, L. A.; Baccay, E. B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper provides a survival analysis of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) under Kaplan-Meier Estimates and Weibull Distribution. The data were obtained from the records of V. L. MakabaliMemorial Hospital with respect to time t (patient's age), covariates such as developed secondary disease (Pulmonary Congestion and Cardiovascular Disease), gender, and the event of interest: the death of ESRD patients. Survival and hazard rates were estimated using NCSS for Weibull Distribution and SPSS for Kaplan-Meier Estimates. These lead to the same conclusion that hazard rate increases and survival rate decreases of ESRD patient diagnosed with Pulmonary Congestion, Cardiovascular Disease and both diseases with respect to time. It also shows that female patients have a greater risk of death compared to males. The probability risk was given the equation R = 1 — e-H(t) where e-H(t) is the survival function, H(t) the cumulative hazard function which was created using Cox-Regression.

  19. Sentence Comprehension in Slovak-Speaking Patients with Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marková, Jana; Horváthová, Lubica; Králová, Mária; Cséfalvay, Zsolt

    2017-01-01

    Background: According to some studies, sentence comprehension is diminished in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, but they differ on what underlies the sentence comprehension impairment. Sentence comprehension in AD patients has been studied mainly in the English language. It is less clear how patients with AD speaking a morphologically rich…

  20. Thrombophilic Risk Factors in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, Ayten; Senturk, Omer; Aygun, Cem; Celebi, Altay; Caglayan, Cigdem; Hulagu, Sadettin

    2010-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients have an increased risk for thromboembolism. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of thrombophilic risk factors in IBD patients and to assess the associations of these factors with disease activity. Methods Forty-eight patients with IBD (24 ulcerative colitis, 24 Crohn’s disease) and 40 matched healthy control individuals were enrolled. In addition to routine biochemical analysis, fasting blood samples were studied for prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen, protein-C, protein-S, antithrombin III, factor VII, factor VIII, D-dimer, vitamin B12, folic acid and homocysteine. Results Levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, D-dimer and the number of platelets were significantly higher in patients with IBD. When compared to control group, in patients with Crohn’s disease serum homocystein levels were significantly higher (p = 0.025) while serum folic acid levels were significantly lower (p < 0.019). Levels of fibrinogen, D-dimer, protein C, factor VIII, total homocystein and the number of platelets were found to be significantly higher in Crohn’s disease patients who were in active period of the disease. Conclusions Thrombophilic defects are multifactorial and might be frequently seen in IBD patients. They might contribute to thrombotic complications of this disease. PMID:27942288

  1. Splenectomy for hematologic disease. The UCLA experience with 306 patients.

    PubMed

    Musser, G; Lazar, G; Hocking, W; Busuttil, R W

    1984-07-01

    Between 1956 and 1981, 306 splenectomies for hematologic diseases were performed at the UCLA Medical Center. Of these operations, more than 75% were performed for therapeutic reasons to control anemia, thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, or painful symptoms of splenomegaly. Of the 65 patients who had idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, 77% showed an excellent response, and of the 39 patients who had hereditary spherocytosis, 90% responded. Other diseases with predictably good response rates were autoimmune hemolytic anemias, Felty's syndrome, and hairy cell leukemia. Forty patients with Hodgkin's disease had splenectomies for diagnostic purposes the last 10 years. The overall morbidity and mortality were 24% and 6%, respectively, the most common complications being pneumonia, wound infections, and local postoperative bleeding, and the most common cause of death being sepsis. The review supports the thesis that in carefully selected patients, therapeutic splenectomy can have desirable palliative effects and that diagnostic splenectomy has a sufficiently low risk to warrant its consideration in patients with Hodgkin's disease.

  2. Carnitine metabolism in patients with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Krähenbühl, S; Reichen, J

    1997-01-01

    Carnitine metabolism was studied in 79 patients with chronic liver disease, including 22 patients with noncirrhotic liver disease and 57 patients with different types of cirrhosis (22 patients with hepatitis B- or C-associated cirrhosis, 15 patients with alcohol-induced cirrhosis, 15 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis [PBC], and 5 patients with cryptogenic cirrhosis), and compared with 28 control subjects. In comparison with control subjects, patients with noncirrhotic liver disease showed no change in the plasma carnitine pool, whereas patients with cirrhosis had a 29% increase in the long-chain acylcarnitine concentration. Analysis of subgroups of patients with cirrhosis showed that patients with alcohol-induced cirrhosis had an increase in the total plasma carnitine concentration (67.8 +/- 29.5 vs. 55.2 +/- 9.9 micromol/L in control subjects), resulting from increases in both the short-chain and long-chain acylcarnitine concentration. In this group of patients, the acylcarnitine concentrations showed a close correlation with the total carnitine concentration, and the total carnitine concentration with the serum bilirubin concentration. Urinary excretion of carnitine was not different between patients with noncirrhotic or cirrhotic liver disease and control patients. However, patients with PBC showed an increased urinary excretion of total carnitine (52.5 +/- 40.0 vs. 28.0 +/- 16.7 micromol carnitine/mmol creatinine), resulting from an increase in the fractional excretion of both free carnitine and short-chain acylcarnitine. The current studies show that patients with cirrhosis are normally not carnitine deficient. Patients with alcohol-induced cirrhosis have increased plasma carnitine concentrations, which may result from increased carnitine biosynthesis because of increased skeletal muscle protein turnover. The increase in the fractional carnitine excretion in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis may result from competition of bile acids and

  3. Clostridium difficile infection in a patient with Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chien-Hui; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Ni, Yen-Hsuan

    2012-06-01

    Crohn disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder, which is rare in pediatric patients. The definite etiology and mechanism to induce an acute exacerbation of Crohn disease remains mostly unknown. The authors report on a 14-year-old girl with Crohn disease who has acute gastrointestinal symptoms caused by toxin A-producing Clostridium difficile, which mimicked a flare-up of Crohn disease. There was no preceding antibiotic prescription before the episode. The disease activity did not improve after steroid treatment, which is unusual for Crohn disease. However, all symptoms were dramatically relieved after eradication of C difficile, and led to a symptom-free period for more than 3 years. This case report aims to address the unusual presentation of a usual pathogen, C difficile, in a pediatric patient with Crohn disease. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Designing patient-centric applications for chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Tsalatsanis, Athanasios; Gil-Herrera, Eleazar; Yalcin, Ali; Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Barnes, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease are the leading causes of disability and death in the developed world. Technological interventions such as mobile applications have the ability to facilitate and motivate patients in chronic disease management, but these types of interventions present considerable design challenges. The primary objective of this paper is to present the challenges arising from the design and implementation of software applications aiming to assist patients in chronic disease management. We also outline preliminary results regarding a self-management application currently under development targeting young adults suffering from type 1 diabetes.

  5. Development of Hodgkin's disease in a patient with leprosy.

    PubMed

    Weshler, Z; Leviatan, A; Gordon, R; Kopolovic, J

    1978-01-01

    We present a patient with leprosy who developed Hodgkin's disease of the nodular sclerosing type. There are two previous reports describing the combination of leprosy and Hodgkin's disease in a single patient [3, 9]. Hodgkin's disease was diagnosed 14 months after the complete disappearance of mycobacterium leprae from the skin lesions, under treatment with DDS (diamino-diphenyl-sulfone). Hodgkin's disease was treated by irradiation and chemotherapy. Obstructive jaundice developed which resolved under treatment by irradiation of the hilar area of the liver, chemotherapy and hormones. During two years of immuno-suppressive therapy, without DDS, no exacerbation of the leprosy occurred.

  6. Recurrent Cholangitis in a Patient with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) and Caroli's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Eiko; Sawa, Naoki; Hoshino, Junichi; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Hayami, Noriko; Yamanouchi, Masayuki; Sekine, Akinari; Hiramatsu, Rikako; Imafuku, Aya; Kawada, Masahiro; Ubara, Yoshifumi; Imamura, Tsunao; Takaichi, Kenmei

    We herein present a rare case of an autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patient with Caroli's disease, a congenital embryonic biliary tree ductal plate abnormality often associated with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. A 76-year-old woman with ADPKD on hemodialysis was admitted to our hospital with recurrent cholangitis and hepatobiliary stones. Caroli's disease was diagnosed according to typical imaging findings of cystic intrahepatic bile duct dilatation and the central dot sign. Hepatobiliary system abnormalities such as Caroli's disease should be considered in febrile ADPKD patients, even in the absence of typical clinical signs or symptoms.

  7. Osteoporosis and bone health in patients with lung disease.

    PubMed

    Bolster, Marcy B

    2010-09-01

    Osteoporosis is a common systemic disease whose presentation crosses many specialties in medicine. Low bone mass, (osteopenia) and osteoporosis increases a patient's risk of suffering from a fracture, and fragility fractures are known to have a significant effect on morbidity and mortality, with up to a 1-year 20% mortality risk. Early detection of osteoporosis is essential to reduce a patient's risk of fracture. Several diseases are associated with an increased risk of osteoporosis because of the medications used to treat these diseases, including but not limited to the prescribing of glucocorticoids. It is important to recognize which patients warrant therapy for bone health and to implement medical management as appropriate.

  8. Clinical aspects of Alzheimer's disease in black and white patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hargrave, R.; Stoeklin, M.; Haan, M.; Reed, B.

    1998-01-01

    This article examines the association between ethnicity and psychiatric symptoms in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Data from a cross-sectional study of patients evaluated at nine California Department of Health Alzheimer's Disease Diagnostic and Treatment Centers (ADDTCs) were used. Using the ADDTC patient database, sociodemographic and clinical variables in 207 black patients and 1818 white patients with probable and possible Alzheimer's disease were compared. Logistic and linear regression analysis indicated the following results: 1) black patients had fewer years of education and more often had hypertension, 2) black patients reported shorter duration of illness at the time of initial diagnosis of dementia, 3) black patients had lower Mini-Mental State Examination scores and higher Blessed Roth Dementia Rating Scale scores at the time of initial diagnosis, and 4) black patients more frequently reported insomnia and less frequently reported anxiety. Additional studies are needed to validate these findings and to generate hypotheses about the role of cardiovascular disease and pathophysiology of psychiatric symptoms in ethnic populations with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:9510621

  9. Nosocomial Infections among Pediatric Patients with Neoplastic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Oberdorfer, Peninnah; Pongwilairat, Natthida; Washington, Charles H.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases are more likely to develop nosocomial infections (NIs). NIs may prolong their hospital stay, and increase morbidity and mortality. Objectives. The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) the incidence of NIs, (2) sites of NIs, (3) causal organisms, and (4) outcomes of NIs among pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases. Methods. This study was a prospective cohort study of pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases who were admitted to the Chiang Mai University Hospital, Thailand. Results. A total of 707 pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases were admitted. Forty-six episodes of NIs in 30 patients were reported (6.5 NIs/100 admission episodes and 7 NIs/1000 days of hospitalization). Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia had the highest number of NIs (41.3%). The most common causal organisms were gram-negative bacteria (47.1%). Patients who had undergone invasive procedures were more likely to develop NIs than those who had not (P < .05). The mortality rate of patients with NIs was 19.6%. Conclusion. Pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases are more likely to develop NIs after having undergone invasive procedures. Pediatricians should be aware of this and strictly follow infection control guidelines in order to reduce morbidity and mortality rates related to NIs. PMID:20049342

  10. Nosocomial Infections among Pediatric Patients with Neoplastic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Oberdorfer, Peninnah; Pongwilairat, Natthida; Washington, Charles H

    2009-01-01

    Background. Pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases are more likely to develop nosocomial infections (NIs). NIs may prolong their hospital stay, and increase morbidity and mortality. Objectives. The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) the incidence of NIs, (2) sites of NIs, (3) causal organisms, and (4) outcomes of NIs among pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases. Methods. This study was a prospective cohort study of pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases who were admitted to the Chiang Mai University Hospital, Thailand. Results. A total of 707 pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases were admitted. Forty-six episodes of NIs in 30 patients were reported (6.5 NIs/100 admission episodes and 7 NIs/1000 days of hospitalization). Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia had the highest number of NIs (41.3%). The most common causal organisms were gram-negative bacteria (47.1%). Patients who had undergone invasive procedures were more likely to develop NIs than those who had not (P < .05). The mortality rate of patients with NIs was 19.6%. Conclusion. Pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases are more likely to develop NIs after having undergone invasive procedures. Pediatricians should be aware of this and strictly follow infection control guidelines in order to reduce morbidity and mortality rates related to NIs.

  11. [Pregnancy in patients with underlying renal disease].

    PubMed

    Golshayan, D; Mathieu, C; Burnier, M

    2007-03-07

    Pregnancy has generally been regarded as very high risk in women with chronic renal insufficiency. In this review, we describe the physiologic changes in systemic and renal haemodynamics during pregnancy, as well as the nature and severity of possible maternal and foetal complications in the setting of underlying renal disease. The risks are proportional to the degree of functional renal impairment, the presence or not of proteinuria and/or arterial hypertension at the time of conception, and are related to the type of underlying nephropathy or systemic disease in the mother. Furthermore, if the renal disease has been diagnosed before pregnancy, a better planning of the moment of conception, as well as a tight follow-up, allow for a better maternal and obstetrical outcome.

  12. Neuropsychological findings in patients with Unverricht-Lundborg disease.

    PubMed

    Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Gagliano, Antonella; Calarese, Tiziana; Magaudda, Adriana; Striano, Pasquale; Cortese, Lara; Cedro, Clemente; Laguitton, Virgilie; Bramanti, Placido; Carbonaro, Marilena; Albachiara, Addolorata; Fragassi, Nina; Italiano, Domenico; Sessa, Edoardo; Coppola, Antonietta; Genton, Pierre

    2009-03-01

    The aims of this study were to clarify if patients with Unverricht-Lundborg disease (ULD) have adequate cognitive functioning and to delineate their neuropsychological profile. We evaluated 20 patients with ULD and 20 healthy, matched controls. Mean age of the patients was 35 years, and mean duration of disease, 22 years. Patients underwent a neuropsychological battery exploring intelligence, executive functions, visuospatial and verbal memory, depression, and anxiety. Eleven of 20 subjects with ULD had mild to moderate cognitive impairment. Compared with controls, patients with ULD had lower scores on all short-term memory and executive function tasks. Linear regression analysis disclosed significant associations between impaired performance on some memory tests and duration of disease and between severity of myoclonus and performance on most executive function tests. In conclusion, most patients with ULD seem to be impaired with respect to cognitive abilities. Longitudinal prospective studies are needed to confirm and further expand our findings.

  13. Addressing challenges and needs in patient education targeting hardly reached patients with chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Varming, Annemarie Reinhardt; Torenholt, Rikke; Møller, Birgitte Lund; Vestergaard, Susanne; Engelund, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    Some patients do not benefit from participation in patient education due to reasons related to disease burden, literacy, and socioeconomic challenges. In this communication, we address more specifically both the challenges that these hardly reached patients face in relation to patient education programs and the challenges educators face when conducting patient education with hardly reached patients. We define principles for the format and content of dialogue tools to better support this patient group within the population of individuals with diabetes.

  14. Addressing challenges and needs in patient education targeting hardly reached patients with chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Varming, Annemarie Reinhardt; Torenholt, Rikke; Møller, Birgitte Lund; Vestergaard, Susanne; Engelund, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    Some patients do not benefit from participation in patient education due to reasons related to disease burden, literacy, and socioeconomic challenges. In this communication, we address more specifically both the challenges that these hardly reached patients face in relation to patient education programs and the challenges educators face when conducting patient education with hardly reached patients. We define principles for the format and content of dialogue tools to better support this patient group within the population of individuals with diabetes. PMID:25729695

  15. Risk factors for erectile dysfunction in patients with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Rakesh Kumar; Shamsi, Bilal Haider; Chen, Hui-Ming; Tan, Tan; Tang, Kai-Fa; Xing, Jun-Ping

    2016-06-01

    To examine the relationship between risk factors for cardiac disease and erectile dysfunction (ED) in men from Xi'an, China. Participants were patients with cardiovascular disease who visited the Cardiovascular Medicine Department of Xi'an Jiaotong University First Affiliated Hospital between September 2011 and March 2012. Two hundred and fifty patients were issued with questionnaires and underwent a physical examination and blood test.Risk factors for ED were identified using univariate and multivariate analyses. In total, 222 participants returned valid questionnaires (89% response rate), underwent a physical examination and blood test, and were included in the study. The most common cardiovascular diseases were hypertension (n = 142; 64%), coronary heart disease (n = 90; 41%) and angina pectoris (n = 78; 35%). Most patients (n = 144; 65%) had two or more cardiovascular diseases. Age, smoking, body mass index, total cholesterol level, hypertension and the ratio of total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly associated with ED. Domestic location, level of education, participation in physical activity, diabetes and drinking alcohol were not associated with ED. Common risk factors for cardiovascular disease are associated with ED in patients with cardiovascular disease. This study furthers understanding of the risk factors for ED in Chinese patients with cardiovascular disease and paves the way for further research into the prevention of ED. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Clinical Analysis of Algerian Patients with Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Medjroubi, M.; Froissart, R.; Taghane, N.; Sifi, K.; Benhabiles, A.; Lemai, S.; Semra, S.; Benmekhebi, H.; Bouderda, Z.; Abadi, N.; Hamri, A.

    2017-01-01

    Pompe's disease is a metabolic myopathy caused by a deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA), also called acid maltase, an enzyme that degrades lysosomal glycogen. The clinical presentation of Pompe's disease is variable with respect to the age of onset and rate of disease progression. Patients with onset of symptoms in early infancy (infantile-onset Pompe disease (IOPD)) typically exhibit rapidly progressive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and marked muscle weakness. Most of them die within the first year of life from cardiac and/or respiratory failure. In the majority of cases of Pompe's disease, onset of symptoms occurs after infancy, ranging widely from the first to sixth decade of life (late-onset Pompe's disease or LOPD). Progression of the disease is relentless and patients eventually progress to loss of ambulation and death due to respiratory failure. The objective of this study was to characterize the clinical presentation of 6 patients (3 with EOPD and the other 3 with LOPD) of 5 families from the East of Algeria. All our patients were diagnosed as having Pompe's disease based on biochemical confirmations of GAA deficiency by dried blood spots (DBS) and GAA gene mutations were analyzed in all patients who consented (n = 4). Our results are similar to other ethnic groups. PMID:28265479

  17. Thyroid gland diseases in adult patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Vondra, K; Vrbikova, J; Dvorakova, K

    2005-12-01

    This review concerns the relation between most frequent thyroid gland diseases and diabetes mellitus in adult patients. Special attention is paid to autoimmune thyroiditis, Graves' disease, thyroid autoimmunity in pregnant diabetic women, and iodine metabolism. We focused on mechanisms leading to coexistence of both endocrine disorders, and on distinctions in the prevalence, diagnosis, clinical course and treatment of thyroid diseases in diabetic patients. The prevalence of thyroid diseases in diabetic patients is 2-3 times higher than in nondiabetic subjects; it raises with age, and is strongly influenced by female gender and autoimmune diabetes. Clinical relevance of thyroid diseases, especially in diabetic patients, significantly increases if it is associated with deteriorated function, which always cause a number problems with metabolic compensation of diabetes. Most serious consequences are increased frequency of hypoglycaemia in hypothyroidism and development of potentially life-threatening ketoacidosis in thyrotoxicosis. In spite of that, little attention is paid to the diagnosis of thyroid diseases in diabetics, as they are diagnosed in only about half of the patients. At the end, we provide recommendations for the thyroid disease screening and diagnosis in patients with diabetes mellitus based on our experience.

  18. Rare disease patients in China anticipate the sunlight of legislation.

    PubMed

    Gao, J J; Song, P P; Tang, W

    2013-06-01

    It is estimated that there are over ten million rare disease patients in China currently. Due to a lack of effective drugs and reimbursement regulations for medical expenses the diseases bring most patients enormous physical suffering and psychological despair. Past experience in other countries such as the United States, Japan, and the European Union have shown that legislation is the critical step to improve the miserable situation of rare disease patients. Laws and regulations for rare diseases in these countries prescribe a series of incentives for research and development of orphan drugs which turn out to obviously allow these drugs to flourish. Legislation has also established a drug reimbursement system to reduce the medical burden of the patients. These measures effectively protect the rights and interests of patients with rare diseases. In China, legislation for rare diseases has begun to attract the attention of authorities. It is anticipated that relevant laws and regulations will be established as early as possible to provide safeguards for rare disease patients in China.

  19. Hemorheological Alteration in Patients Clinically Diagnosed with Chronic Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Jang, Bohyun; Han, Ji Won; Sung, Pil Soo; Jang, Jeong Won; Bae, Si Hyun; Choi, Jong Young; Cho, Young I; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2016-12-01

    Since liver function is changed by chronic liver diseases, chronic liver disease can lead to different hemorheological alterations during the course of the progression. This study aims to compare alterations in whole blood viscosity in patients with chronic liver disease, focusing on the gender effect. Chronic liver diseases were classified into three categories by patient's history, serologic markers, and radiologic findings: nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (n = 63), chronic viral hepatitis B and C (n = 50), and liver cirrhosis (LC) (n = 35). Whole blood viscosity was measured by automated scanning capillary tube viscometer, while liver stiffness was measured by transient elastography using FibroScan®. Both systolic and diastolic whole blood viscosities were significantly lower in patients with LC than NAFLD and chronic viral hepatitis (P < 0.001) in male patients, but not in female patients. In correlation analysis, there were inverse relationships between both systolic and diastolic whole blood viscosity and liver stiffness (systolic: r = -0.25, diastolic: r = -0.22). Whole blood viscosity was significantly lower in male patients with LC than NAFLD or chronic viral hepatitis. Our data suggest that whole blood viscosity test can become a useful tool for classifying chronic liver disease and determining the prognosis for different types of chronic liver diseases.

  20. Raynaud's disease: patient education as a primary nursing intervention.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, M W; All, A C

    1996-06-01

    The terms Raynaud's disease and Raynaud's phenomenon are often used interchangeably to identify two distinct disease states that initially appear with similar symptoms but then have very different sequelae. Triggered primarily by cold weather, both conditions commonly result in a vasospastic response predominantly observed in the fingers and toes. A review of the relevant health care literature indicates that there is little, if any, information available on Raynaud's disease that would be of particular and specific interest to the nursing profession. So that they can provide appropriate patient teaching, nurses need to be familiar with the precipitating factors, signs and symptoms, evaluation methods, and treatments of Raynaud's disease. This article focuses specifically on Raynaud's disease, which affects many women but relatively few men. A historic perspective on this disease state is provided, and postulated pathophysiologic mechanisms for the onset of this condition are addressed. The patient who is experiencing symptoms of this disease may have complaints of pain and numbness particularly in the fingers. The nurse's primary role is patient education so that the onset of symptoms associated with this disease can be identified and minimized. A discussion of nursing implications with a focus on teaching is provided. A case study is presented of a patient with Raynaud's disease, which will serve to highlight and expound on key information provided throughout the text of this article.

  1. Management of alcohol misuse in patients with liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jennifer L; Patel, Milan Prakash; McGee, Breann; Liang, Tiebing; Chandler, Kristina; Tayarachakul, Sucharat; O'Connor, Sean; Liangpunsakul, Suthat

    2017-03-01

    Excessive alcohol use not only causes alcoholic liver disease (ALD) but also increases the risk of liver-related mortality in patients who already have other chronic liver diseases. Screening for alcohol misuse or alcohol use disorder (AUD) among patients with underlying liver disease is essential. This clinical review covers what is known about ALD, the impact of alcohol in patients with underlying liver diseases, current management of alcohol misuse and AUD, and the management of alcohol misuse and AUD specifically in patients with liver diseases. Several treatment options for alcohol misuse and AUD exist such as psychosocial intervention and behavioral and pharmacological therapies. The strategies used in the treatment of alcohol misuse and AUD are still applicable in those who consume alcohol and have underlying liver disease. However, certain medications still need to be carefully used due to potentially worsening already compromised liver function. Screening of ongoing alcohol use in subjects with liver disease is important, and prompt intervention is needed to prevent the associated morbidity and mortality from the detrimental effects of continued alcohol use on underlying liver disease. Considering alcoholism is a complex disease, probably a multidisciplinary approach combining psychotherapy and comprehensive medical care will be the most effective. Future research could focus on identifying additional treatment options for addressing the psychotherapy component since the self-determination and will to quit drinking alcohol can play such a crucial role in promoting abstinence.

  2. Elective Thoracolumbar Spine Fusion Surgery in Patients with Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Puvanesarajah, Varun; Jain, Amit; Qureshi, Rabia; Carstensen, S Evan; Tyger, Rosemarie; Hassanzadeh, Hamid

    2016-12-01

    Few data are available concerning clinical outcomes in patients with Parkinson disease who undergo elective thoracolumbar spine fusion surgery. The goal of this study is to elucidate complication and revision rates after posterior thoracolumbar fusion surgery in patients with Parkinson disease, with a focus on how Parkinson disease modifies these rates. The PearlDiver database (2005-2012) was queried for patients who underwent posterior approach thoracolumbar fusion from 2006 to 2011. Cohorts of patients with a previous diagnosis of Parkinson disease (n = 4816) and without (n = 280,702) were compared. Multivariate analysis that included various comorbidities and demographics was used to calculate effects of Parkinson disease on development of postoperative infection and major medical complications within 90 days and revision surgery within 1 year. For analyses, significance was set at P < 0.001. Major medical complications were observed in 545 patients (11.3%) for 90 days after the index procedure. Postoperative infection was noted in 91 patients (1.9%) within 90 days, and revision surgeries were performed in 250 patients (5.2%) within 1 year. Multivariate analysis showed that Parkinson disease was significantly associated with an increased risk for medical complications (adjusted odds ratio, 1.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-1.34; P < 0.001) and revision surgery (adjusted odds ratio, 1.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.49-1.93; P < 0.001), but not postoperative infection (P = 0.02). Patients with Parkinson disease are more likely to require revision surgery and have higher rates of adverse medical events postoperatively. Patients with Parkinson disease should be appropriately selected to ensure favorable clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Thyroid Disease in the Older Patient

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the normal range. Symptoms and signs of angina pectoris and heart failure must be treated in tandem ... replacement more quickly. In patients who experience increased angina pectoris, symptoms of congestive heart failure, or mental changes ...

  4. Cerebral white matter lesions in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Merry; Lee, Grace; Kwong, Lawrence N; Lamont, Sharon; Chaves, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the incidence, characteristics, and predisposing factors for cerebral white matter lesions in patients with Crohn's disease. We retrospectively evaluated the incidence and characteristics of cerebral T2 white matter abnormalities in 54 patients with Crohn's disease and compared to 100 age-matched controls. We also investigated potential co-morbidities known to be associated with white matter abnormalities in Crohn's patients with normal and abnormal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Seventy-two percent of patients with Crohn's disease had T2 white matter abnormalities, as compared with 34% of the age-matched controls (P < .001). Lesion severity and size were not significantly different between the two groups; however, periventricular distribution and fulfillment of the Barkhof MRI criteria were overrepresented in Crohn's population. History of hypertension, diabetes, and migraine; gender, duration of disease and prior exposure to anti-tumor necrosis factor were not significantly different between Crohn's patients with and without white matter abnormalities; however, patients with lesions were significantly older than those without. Patients with Crohn's disease have a higher incidence of white matter T2 hyperintensities as compared with controls. Age was the only significant factor for the abnormalities within Crohn's group. White matter T2 hyperintensities are likely another extra-intestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease. Copyright © 2010 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  5. [Burden among caregivers of patients with Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Benavides, Olga; Alburquerque, Daniela; Chaná-Cuevas, Pedro

    2013-03-01

    Parkinson disease (EPI) patients often require being assisted by others. These caregivers are exposed to a decrease in their quality of Ufe. To explore Parkinson disease patient features associated with a greater burden among their caregivers. Fifty one patients with Parkinson disease (aged 67 ± 12 years, 29 men, with 8 ± 5 years of disease) and their caregivers, were studied. Patients were assessed with the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale III, the Hoehn & Yahr stage standardization, Parkinson s minimental test, the neuropsychiatric inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory (IDB). The Zarit Burden Interview (ESZ) was applied to caregivers. According to IDB, 45% of patients whose caregivers presented little or no burden had a depression, compared to 78% of those whose caregivers had modérate or intense burden. (p < 0.01). The ESZ score of caregivers correlated significantly with Parkinson patients' age, IDB and axial involvement in the UPDRS-III (correlation coefficients ofOAp < 0.01, 0.6p < 0.01 and 0.46 p < 0.01, respectively). Motor alterations, cognitive impairment and most importantly depression of patients with Parkinson disease are deteminants of burden for their caregivers.

  6. Psychiatric morbidity in patients with alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ewusi-Mensah, I; Saunders, J B; Wodak, A D; Murray, R M; Williams, R

    1983-01-01

    Seventy one patients with alcoholic liver disease and an equal number with non-alcoholic liver disease were interviewed using the schedule for affective disorders and schizophrenia. Forty seven (66%) of the group with alcoholic liver disease had or had had psychiatric illnesses compared with 23 (32%) of the control group (p less than 0.001). Affective disorder, particularly major depression, neurotic disorders, and antisocial personality, were all more common among the patients with alcoholic liver disease than the controls. No patient had schizophrenia or other forms of psychosis. Among the patients with alcoholic liver disease 11 men (24%) and 14 women (54%) had an affective or a neurotic disorder that had antedated their heavy drinking, and 30 (77%) of those who had had such a problem at any time had symptoms at the time of interview. Abstinence from alcohol is essential for patients with severe alcoholic liver disease. In view of the high prevalence of psychiatric disorders in these patients psychiatric assessment is important to increase the patients' likelihood of complying with such advice. PMID:6416437

  7. The large spectrum of renal disease in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo, Sheila; Pascual, Julio

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The prevalence of diabetic nephropathy (DN) among diabetic patients seems to be overestimated. Recent studies with renal biopsies show that the incidence of non-diabetic nephropathy (NDN) among diabetic patients is higher than expected. Renal impairment of diabetic patients is frequently attributed to DN without meeting the KDOQI criteria or performing renal biopsy to exclude NDN. In this editorial, we update the spectrum of renal disease in diabetic patients and the impact on diagnosis, prognosis and therapy.

  8. Patient web portals, disease management, and primary prevention.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Steven S; Prochaska, Judith J; Williams, Lovoria B; Besenyi, Gina M; Heboyan, Vahé; Goggans, D Stephen; Yoo, Wonsuk; De Leo, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Efforts aimed at health care reform and continued advances in information technologies have prompted interest among providers and researchers in patient web portals. Patient web portals are password-protected online websites that offer the patients 24-hour access to personal health information from anywhere with an Internet connection. This article, which is based upon bibliographic searches in PubMed, reviews important developments in web portals for primary and secondary disease prevention, including patient web portals tethered to electronic medical records, disease-specific portals, health disparities, and health-related community web portals. Although findings have not been uniformly positive, several studies of the effectiveness of health care system patient portals in chronic disease management have shown promising results with regard to patient outcomes. Patient web portals have also shown promising results in increasing adherence with screening recommendations. Racial and ethnic minorities, younger persons, and patients who are less educated or have lower health literacy have been found to be less likely to use patient portals. Additional studies are needed of the utility and effectiveness of different elements of web portals for different patient populations. This should include additional diseases and health topics such as smoking cessation and weight management.

  9. Management of patients with hepatitis C infection and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Bunchorntavakul, Chalermrat; Maneerattanaporn, Monthira; Chavalitdhamrong, Disaya

    2015-02-27

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with more rapid liver disease progression and reduced renal graft and patients' survival following kidney transplantation. Evaluations and management of HCV in patients with renal disease are challenging. The pharmacokinetics of interferons (IFN), ribavirin (RBV) and some direct acting antiviral (DAA), such as sofosbuvir, are altered in patients with ESRD. With dose adjustment and careful monitoring, treatment of HCV in patients with ESRD can be associated with sustained virological response (SVR) rates nearly comparable to that of patients with normal renal function. DAA-based regimens, especially the IFN-free and RBV-free regimens, are theoretically preferred for patients with ESRD and KT in order to increase SVR rates and to reduce treatment side effects. However, based on the data for pharmacokinetics, dosing safety and efficacy of DAA for patients with severe renal impairment are lacking. This review will be focused on the evaluations, available pharmacologic data, and management of HCV in patients with severe renal impairment, patients who underwent KT, and those who suffered from HCV-related renal disease, according to the available treatment options, including DAA.

  10. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with peptic disease.

    PubMed

    Sirinthornpunya, Siam

    2012-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common human infections worldwide. It has been established as etiology of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma and mucosal associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma (MALT). During this decade, there have been some reports showing a decline in global prevalence of H. pylori infection and peptic diseases including in many Asian countries. To study the H. pylori infection in patients with peptic diseases, association with other factors and comparison to previous data. Retrospective observational study of endoscopic reports for upper gastrointestinal tract diseases in patients with peptic diseases from October 2009 to September 2010 at the Endoscopic Unit, Department of Medicine, Rajavithi Hospital. Patients were examined for the presence of H. pylori infection by rapid urease test (RUT) or histology staining. Five hundred and seventy patients with a mean age of 55.0 +/- 16.02 years with peptic diseases were studies. Endoscopic findings showed 106 GU patients (18.6%), 29 DU patients (5.1%), 3 combined GU and DU patients (0.5%) and 432 NUD patients (75.8%). The prevalence of H. pylori infection were 64% (365 of 570 patients). Prevalence of H. pylori infection were 61.3% of NUD cases, 68.9% of GU cases, 82.8% in DU cases and 100% in combined GU and DU cases. Comparison with previous data (Anantapunpong S. Rajavithi Med J 1999; 10: 17-26), the prevalence of H. pylori infection overall and in DU are not changed but in NUD and GU are increased. The prevalence of H. pylori infection is still high in peptic diseases. The patients with age more than 50 years have more GU, less NUD than the younger groups. In comparison with a previous study, the prevalence of H. pylori infection in overall and in DU are not changed but in NUD and GU are increased.

  11. Screening Fabry's disease in chronic kidney disease patients not on dialysis: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Yeniçerioğlu, Yavuz; Akdam, Hakan; Dursun, Belda; Alp, Alper; Sağlam Eyiler, Funda; Akın, Davut; Gün, Yelda; Hüddam, Bülent; Batmazoğlu, Mehmet; Gibyeli Genek, Dilek; Pirinççi, Serhat; Ersoy, İsmail Rıfkı; Üzüm, Atilla; Soypaçacı, Zeki; Tanrısev, Mehmet; Çolak, Hülya; Demiral Sezer, Sibel; Bozkurt, Gökay; Akyıldız, Utku Oğan; Akyüz Ünsal, Ayşe İpek; Ünübol, Mustafa; Uslu, Meltem; Eryılmaz, Ufuk; Günel, Ceren; Meteoğlu, İbrahim; Yavaşoğlu, İrfan; Ünsal, Alparslan; Akar, Harun; Okyay, Pınar

    2017-11-01

    Fabry's disease is an X-linked inherited, rare, progressive, lysosomal storage disorder, affecting multiple organs due to the deficient activity of α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A) enzyme. The prevalence has been reported to be 0.15-1% in hemodialysis patients; however, the information on the prevalence in chronic kidney disease not on dialysis is lacking. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of Fabry's disease in chronic kidney disease. The patients older than 18 years, enclosing KDIGO 2012 chronic kidney disease definitions, not on dialysis, were enrolled. Dried blood spots on Guthrie papers were used to analyze α-Gal A enzyme and genetic analysis was performed in individuals with enzyme activity ≤1.2 μmol/L/h. A total of 1453 chronic kidney disease patients not on dialysis from seven clinics in Turkey were screened. The mean age of the study population was 59.3 ± 15.9 years. 45.6% of patients were female. The creatinine clearance of 77.3% of patients was below 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2), 8.4% had proteinuria, and 2.5% had isolated microscopic hematuria. The mean value of patients' α-Gal A enzyme was detected as 2.93 ± 1.92 μmol/L/h. 152 patients had low levels of α-Gal A enzyme activity (≤1.2 μmol/L/h). In mutation analysis, A143T and D313Y variants were disclosed in three male patients. The prevalence of Fabry's disease in chronic kidney disease not on dialysis was found to be 0.2% (0.4% in male, 0.0% in female). Fabry's disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic kidney disease with unknown etiology even in the absence of symptoms and signs suggestive of Fabry's disease.

  12. Role of Myeloperoxidase in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kisic, Bojana; Miric, Dijana; Dragojevic, Ilija; Rasic, Julijana; Popovic, Ljiljana

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem. Patients with CKD have a number of disorders in the organism, and the presence of oxidative stress and systemic inflammation in these patients is the subject of numerous studies. Chronic inflammation joined with oxidative stress contributes to the development of numerous complications: accelerated atherosclerosis process and cardiovascular disease, emergence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, development of malnutrition, anaemia, hyperparathyroidism, and so forth, affecting the prognosis and quality of life of patients with CKD. In this review we presented the potential role of the myeloperoxidase enzyme in the production of reactive/chlorinating intermediates and their role in oxidative damage to biomolecules in the body of patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. In addition, we discussed the role of modified lipoprotein particles under the influence of prooxidant MPO intermediates in the development of endothelial changes and cardiovascular complications in renal failure.

  13. Fractal dynamics of body motion in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Masaki; Akay, Metin; Tamura, Toshiyo; Higashi, Yuji; Fujimoto, Toshiro

    2004-03-01

    In this paper, we assess the complexity (fractal measure) of body motion during walking in patients with Parkinson's disease. The body motion of 11 patients with Parkinson's disease and 10 healthy elderly subjects was recorded using a triaxial accelerometry technique. A triaxial accelerometer was attached to the lumbar region. An assessment of the complexity of body motion was made using a maximum-likelihood-estimator-based fractal analysis method. Our data suggest that the fractal measures of the body motion of patients with Parkinson's disease are higher than those of healthy elderly subjects. These results were statistically different in the X (anteroposterior), Y (lateral) and Z (vertical) directions of body motion between patients with Parkinson's disease and the healthy elderly subjects (p < 0.01 in X and Z directions and p < 0.05 in Y direction). The complexity (fractal measure) of body motion can be useful to assess and monitor the output from the motor system during walking in clinical practice.

  14. Interdisciplinary Management of Patient with Advanced Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Kochar, Gagan Deep; Jayan, B; Chopra, S S; Mechery, Reenesh; Goel, Manish; Verma, Munish

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes the interdisciplinary management of an adult patient with advanced periodontal disease. Treatment involved orthodontic and periodontal management. Good esthetic results and dental relationships were achieved by the treatment.

  15. Utilizing a disease management approach to improve ESRD patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Anand, Shaan; Nissenson, Allen R

    2002-01-01

    In this era of processes and systems to improve quality, disease management is one methodology to improve care delivery and outcomes for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In most disease management systems a senior renal nurse coordinates all aspects of the patient's care and ensures that the prescribed and necessary care is delivered for both CKD-related and comorbid conditions. The nurse also continually monitors outcomes on quality indicators and key performance measures. These outcome data are then aggregated and analyzed, are compared with local and national benchmarks, and drive the continuous quality improvement (CQI) process. Such a system attempts to centralize the currently fragmented care delivery system, continually improve patient outcomes, and conserve scarce economic resources. Early data suggest a disease management approach may improve both the morbidity and mortality of CKD patients.

  16. Role of Myeloperoxidase in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kisic, Bojana; Miric, Dijana; Dragojevic, Ilija; Rasic, Julijana; Popovic, Ljiljana

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem. Patients with CKD have a number of disorders in the organism, and the presence of oxidative stress and systemic inflammation in these patients is the subject of numerous studies. Chronic inflammation joined with oxidative stress contributes to the development of numerous complications: accelerated atherosclerosis process and cardiovascular disease, emergence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, development of malnutrition, anaemia, hyperparathyroidism, and so forth, affecting the prognosis and quality of life of patients with CKD. In this review we presented the potential role of the myeloperoxidase enzyme in the production of reactive/chlorinating intermediates and their role in oxidative damage to biomolecules in the body of patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. In addition, we discussed the role of modified lipoprotein particles under the influence of prooxidant MPO intermediates in the development of endothelial changes and cardiovascular complications in renal failure. PMID:27127544

  17. Premovement facilitation of corticospinal excitability in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Koichi; Notani, Masaru; Iwata, Akira; Minamida, Fumiko; Abe, Kazuo

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the abnormality of premovement facilitation in patients with Parkinson's disease. Seven patients with Parkinson's disease and seven healthy subjects participated in this study. The subjects attempted abduction of the index finger in response to a visual start cue, and motor-evoked potentials were recorded from the first dorsal interosseous muscle before movement onset. The rate of premovement facilitation in patients with Parkinson's disease was slower than that in healthy subjects. Additionally, the rate of premovement facilitation as a function of delay from the start cue was positively correlated with the reaction time. These findings indicate that premovement facilitation is abnormal in patients with Parkinson's disease. This abnormality may be partially related to akinesia.

  18. Discussing sexuality with patients in a motor neurone disease clinic.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Rachael; Botell, Rachel

    Sexual relationships remain an important aspect of life for people living with motor neurone disease. This article explores the use of the Extended-PLISSIT model when discussing relationships and sexual function with patients and their partners in a motor neurone disease clinic. The model provides a structured approach to assist discussions with patients as well as promoting reflection and exchange of knowledge in the multidisciplinary team. It is a useful model when addressing issues that are sometimes difficult to discuss.

  19. [Palliative care of patients with terminal obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    von Plessen, Christian; Nielsen, Thyge L; Steffensen, Ida E; Larsen, Shuruk Al-Halwai; Taudorf, Ebbe

    2011-10-17

    Terminal chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and advanced cancer have similar prognosis and symptom burden. However, palliative care of patients with terminal COPD has been neglected in Denmark. We describe the symptoms of terminal COPD and suggest criteria for defining the palliative phase of the disease. Furthermore we discuss the prognostic and ethical challenges for patients, their families and their caregivers. Finally, we summarize the current evidence for palliative treatment of dyspnoea and ways to evaluate response to treatment.

  20. Prevalence and overlap of Disease Management Program diseases in older hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Juul-Larsen, Helle Gybel; Petersen, Janne; Sivertsen, Ditte Maria; Andersen, Ove

    2017-09-01

    Many countries, like Denmark, have tailored Disease Management Programs (DMPs) based on patients having single chronic diseases [defined institutionally as "program diseases" (PDs)], which can complicate treatment for those with multiple chronic diseases. The aims of this study were (a) to assess the prevalence and overlap among acutely hospitalized older medical patients of PDs defined by the DMPs, and (b) to examine transitions between different departments during hospitalization and mortality and readmission within two time intervals among patients with the different PDs. We conducted a registry study of 4649 acutely hospitalized medical patients ≥65 years admitted to Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark, in 2012, and divided patients into six PD groups (type 2 diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal disease, dementia and cancer), each defined by several ICD-10 codes predefined in the DMPs. Of these patients, 904 (19.4%) had 2 + PDs, and there were 47 different combinations of the six different PDs. The most prevalent pair of PDs was type 2 diabetes with cardiovascular disease in 203 (22.5%) patients, of whom 40.4% had an additional PD. The range of the cumulative incidence of being readmitted within 90 days was between 28.8% for patients without a PD and 46.6% for patients with more than one PD. PDs overlapped in many combinations, and all patients had a high probability of being readmitted. Hence, developing strategies to create a new generation of DMPs applicable to older patients with comorbidities could help clinicians organize treatment across DMPs.

  1. Eosinophilic heart disease in a paediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Dedieu, Natalie; Giardini, Alessandro; Khambadkone, Sachin; Marek, Jan

    2011-01-01

    A 12-year-old child with no previous medical history was referred with a 4-day history of cough, shortness of breath, and peripheral blood eosinophilia. Transthoracic echocardiography showed a soft tissue infiltrating the left ventricular free wall, the lateral mitral annulus, and the mitral valve leaflets. A soft tissue strand connecting the lateral left atrial wall and mitral leaflets across the mitral valve orifice was also identified, causing reduced opening and functional mitral stenosis. The diagnosis of Löeffler endocarditis was made, and after 10 weeks of treatment with oral prednisolone, there was complete resolution of symptoms and of the infiltrative tissue with normalization of mitral valve function. The present case highlights some atypical features of eosinophilic heart disease-like occurrence in paediatric age, the complete preservation of the right ventricle and left ventricular apex, and the presentation with mitral stenosis compared with mitral regurgitation typically observed in the late phase of the disease.

  2. Patient specific Parkinson's disease detection for adaptive deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Ameer; Zamani, Majid; Bayford, Richard; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Continuous deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease (PD) patients results in side effects and shortening of the pacemaker battery life. This can be remedied using adaptive stimulation. To achieve adaptive DBS, patient customized PD detection is required due to the inconsistency associated with biomarkers across patients and time. This paper proposes the use of patient specific feature extraction together with adaptive support vector machine (SVM) classifiers to create a patient customized detector for PD. The patient specific feature extraction is obtained using the extrema of the ratio between the PD and non-PD spectra bands of each patient as features, while the adaptive SVM classifier adjusts its decision boundary until a suitable model is obtained. This yields individualised features and classifier pairs for each patient. Datasets containing local field potentials of PD patients were used to validate the method. Six of the nine patient datasets tested achieved a classification accuracy greater than 98%. The adaptive detector is suitable for realization on chip.

  3. Aggregation of red blood cells in patients with Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Adar, Tomer; Ben-Ami, Ronen; Elstein, Deborah; Zimran, Ari; Berliner, Shlomo; Yedgar, Saul; Barshtein, Gershon

    2006-08-01

    Gaucher disease is associated with increased red blood cell (RBC) aggregation, but the pathophysiological significance of this phenomenon and its correlation with disease manifestations are unclear. RBC aggregation was evaluated in 43 patients with Gaucher disease and 53 healthy controls. Dynamic RBC aggregation was examined in a narrow-gap flow chamber at varying shear stress. Compared with the controls, RBC aggregation in Gaucher disease was increased by 25%. Comparison of RBC aggregation in autologous plasma and in dextran (500 kDa) showed an increase both in plasma-dependent (extrinsic) and -independent (intrinsic) RBC aggregation. Subgroup analysis revealed that increased RBC aggregation was limited to patients with an intact spleen. RBC aggregation in patients did not correlate with plasma fibrinogen concentration, disease severity, enzyme replacement therapy or genotype. We conclude that RBC aggregation is increased in patients with Gaucher disease and an intact spleen, possibly reflecting the accumulation of glucocerebroside and other substances in the plasma and RBC membranes of these patients. Our results do not support a role for RBC aggregation in the pathogenesis of vascular complications of Gaucher disease.

  4. Hemorheological Alteration in Patients Clinically Diagnosed with Chronic Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Since liver function is changed by chronic liver diseases, chronic liver disease can lead to different hemorheological alterations during the course of the progression. This study aims to compare alterations in whole blood viscosity in patients with chronic liver disease, focusing on the gender effect. Chronic liver diseases were classified into three categories by patient’s history, serologic markers, and radiologic findings: nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (n = 63), chronic viral hepatitis B and C (n = 50), and liver cirrhosis (LC) (n = 35). Whole blood viscosity was measured by automated scanning capillary tube viscometer, while liver stiffness was measured by transient elastography using FibroScan®. Both systolic and diastolic whole blood viscosities were significantly lower in patients with LC than NAFLD and chronic viral hepatitis (P < 0.001) in male patients, but not in female patients. In correlation analysis, there were inverse relationships between both systolic and diastolic whole blood viscosity and liver stiffness (systolic: r = −0.25, diastolic: r = −0.22). Whole blood viscosity was significantly lower in male patients with LC than NAFLD or chronic viral hepatitis. Our data suggest that whole blood viscosity test can become a useful tool for classifying chronic liver disease and determining the prognosis for different types of chronic liver diseases. PMID:27822933

  5. Anxiety in Patients with Cardiac Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    J. Impact of psychological factors on the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease and implications for therapy . Circulation. 1999;99:2192-2217. 32...admission, use of various therapies in the emergency department, and pain level. None of these variables interacted with country to affect anxiety. There was...fraction < 30%; 2) have undergone evaluation of HF and optimization of medical therapy , and have not been referred for heart transplantation; 3) no history

  6. Stress Ulcer Disease in the Burned Patient

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    association of acute upper gastrointestinal tract disease with burn injury was noted as early as 1823 by both Cumin |l| and Swan [2|. but was largely...recommend intragastric irrigation with warm saline [42] and/or selective arterial injec- tion of vasoactive agents such as posterior pituitary extract [43... Cumin , W.: Cases of severe burn, with dissections and remarks. Edinburgh Medical Journal 7^:337, 1823 2. Swan. J.: Practical observations: case of a

  7. Management of cardiovascular diseases in patients with obesity.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Carl J; Arena, Ross; Alpert, Martin A; Milani, Richard V; Ventura, Hector O

    2017-07-27

    The management of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in patients with obesity presents numerous challenges. Obesity has a negative effect on almost all of the major CVD risk factors, and adversely influences cardiovascular structure and function. Patients who are overweight or obese have a higher incidence of almost all CVDs compared with patients who are of normal weight. However, those who are overweight or obese seem to have a better short-term and medium-term prognosis after major CVD events and interventional procedures or cardiac surgeries than leaner patients, a phenomenon termed the 'obesity paradox'. In considering the mechanisms underlying this paradox, we review evidence of the deleterious consequences of obesity in patients with coronary heart disease, and the limited data on the benefits of weight loss in patients with CVD. Additional studies are needed on the efficacy of purposeful weight loss on cardiovascular outcomes to determine the ideal body composition for patients with CVD.

  8. Management of sickle cell disease in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Todd C; Carter, Michael V; Patel, Rina K; Suarez-Pierre, Alejandro; Lin, Sophie Z; Magruder, Jonathan Trent; Grimm, Joshua C; Cameron, Duke E; Baumgartner, William A; Mandal, Kaushik

    2017-02-01

    Sickle cell disease is a life-limiting inherited hemoglobinopathy that poses inherent risk for surgical complications following cardiac operations. In this review, we discuss preoperative considerations, intraoperative decision-making, and postoperative strategies to optimize the care of a patient with sickle cell disease undergoing cardiac surgery. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Steven Johnson syndrome in a patient with Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, N; Periyasamy, P; Kamaruddin, N

    2009-09-01

    Cushing's syndrome is a pathological condition associated with excessive cortisol production, the commonest etiology being Cushing's disease. Corticosteroids in high doses have been used in the management of Steven Johnson Syndrome (SJS) with favourable outcome. We describe a patient with Cushing's disease who developed SJS, one week after taking sperulina a product from sea-weed while waiting for transphenoidal surgery.

  10. Pharmacological therapy in patients diagnosed with Peyronie's disease.

    PubMed

    Halal, A A; Geavlete, P; Ceban, E

    2012-06-12

    Peyronie's disease is still a therapeutic dilemma for the urologist. Although medical treatment includes multiple versions, few therapeutic agents had significant effects. The combination between oral therapy and intralesional agents can improve the quality of life of the patients with Peyronie's disease.

  11. Pharmacological therapy in patients diagnosed with Peyronie's disease

    PubMed Central

    Halal, AA; Geavlete, P; Ceban, E

    2012-01-01

    Peyronie's disease is still a therapeutic dilemma for the urologist. Although medical treatment includes multiple versions, few therapeutic agents had significant effects. The combination between oral therapy and intralesional agents can improve the quality of life of the patients with Peyronie's disease. PMID:22802890

  12. Cardiovascular disease, hypertension, dyslipidaemia and obesity in patients with hypothalamic‐pituitary disease

    PubMed Central

    Deepak, D; Furlong, N J; Wilding, J P H; MacFarlane, I A

    2007-01-01

    Objective Adults with hypothalamic‐pituitary disease have increased morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, the prevalence of CVD and adequacy of treatment of cardiovascular risk factors (according to current treatment guidelines) was studied in a large group of patients with hypothalamic‐pituitary disease. Study design In 2005, 152 consecutive adult patients with hypothalamic‐pituitary disease attending our neuro‐endocrine centre were clinically examined and blood pressure (BP), lipid profile, type 2 diabetes mellitus, body composition and smoking status were assessed. Results Of the 152 patients, 36.8% had treated hypertension and 28.2% had treated dyslipidaemia. Many of these patients had inadequate BP control (BP >140/85 mm Hg, 44.6%) and undesirable lipid levels (total cholesterol >4.0 mmol/l, 69%). Also, many of the untreated patients had BP and lipid levels which should have been considered for treatment (26 patients (27%) and 83 patients (76%), respectively). Smoking was admitted in 18% of patients. Central adiposity was present in 86% and obesity (body mass index ⩾30) was present in 50%. Conclusions Cardiovascular risk factors are highly prevalent and often inadequately treated in adult patients with hypothalamic‐pituitary disease. Aggressive treatment of these factors is essential to reduce mortality and morbidity from CVD in these patients. PMID:17403957

  13. Coronary artery ectasia in Egyptian patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed Central

    Waly, H M; Elayda, M A; Lee, V V; el-Said, G; Reul, G J; Hall, R J

    1997-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective study of 45 Egyptian patients with coronary artery ectasia who underwent coronary bypass grafting at our institution between 1980 and 1995. We examined the anatomic distribution and type of coronary ectasia and its association with coronary risk factors in these patients, and evaluated the severity of their coronary artery disease. We compared these findings with those from a group of 230 Egyptian patients who did not have coronary ectasia. These patients also underwent coronary artery bypass grafting between 1980 and 1995 at our institution. Obesity was present in 60% of the patients who had coronary artery ectasia, compared with 42% of patients who did not have ectasia (P < 0.01). Coronary artery ectasia was not related to any coronary risk factors other than obesity. However, patients who had ectasia did have a higher rate of triple-vessel coronary artery disease than did patients without ectasia (82% vs 67%, P < 0.05). Of the coronary vessels affected by ectasia, 43% were left anterior descending arteries. Diffuse disease was noted in 84% of all ectatic segments. We conclude that in this patient population, 2 conditions had a positive correlation with coronary ectasia: obesity and the severity of coronary artery disease. Images PMID:9456489

  14. Managing the lipid profile of coronary heart disease patients.

    PubMed

    Drakopoulou, Maria; Toutouzas, Konstantinos; Stathogiannis, Konstantinos; Synetos, Andreas; Trantalis, George; Tousoulis, Dimitrios

    2016-11-01

    Lipid profile management is even more critical in patients treated for secondary prevention, since patients with established coronary heart disease are at higher risk of developing events. Current guidelines encourage lifestyle modification and patient engagement in disease prevention. However, the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines seem to differ considerably from their predecessors, having an impact on clinical practice of lipid management. Area covered: This review article discusses and provides a summary of the current recommendations for lipid profile management in patients with coronary heart disease, with a view to present lifestyle modification and novel treatment strategies, and to indicate areas of dispute among recent guidelines. Expert commentary: Existing controversies between current guidelines concerning treatment goals and therapeutic decisions may have potential implications on the clinical management of patients. In the meantime, we eagerly wait for the results of randomized controlled trials evaluating promising, potent, safe and prolonged drugs that are in progress.

  15. Social Media Use in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ling; Reich, Jason; Groshek, Jacob; Farraye, Francis A

    2016-05-01

    Patients with chronic illnesses such as Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) have been more keen to utilize the Internet and in particular, social media to obtain patient educational information in recent years. It is important for the gastroenterologist to be aware of these modalities and how they might affect information exchange and ultimately, disease management. This article addresses the current prevalence of social media use, advent of mobile health applications, social media usage in patients with chronic conditions, usage amongst providers, and most notably, the usage and preferences in IBD patients. Over the last decade there has been an increasing desire from patients to receive educational material about their disease through social media. We reviewed the medical literature on the quality of IBD-related information on social media. Given the disparity of information available on the Internet, we remark on the quality of this information and stress the need for further research to assess the validity of IBD information posted on social media.

  16. Apolipoprotein (a) concentrations and susceptibility to coronary artery disease in patients with peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Groves, P; Rees, A; Bishop, A; Morgan, R; Ruttley, M; Lewis, N; Lane, I; Hall, R

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the relation between apolipoprotein(a) concentrations and angiographically defined coronary artery disease in patients with atheromatous peripheral vascular disease. DESIGN--40 consecutive patients were recruited at the time of admission for peripheral vascular surgery. All underwent clinical assessment and coronary arteriography. Apolipoprotein(a) concentrations were measured by an immunoradiometric assay. SETTING--Tertiary referral centre. SUBJECTS--Patients requiring surgical intervention for large vessel peripheral vascular disease. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Presence or absence and severity and distribution of angiographically defined coronary artery disease. Measurement of circulating contractions of apolipoprotein(a) and other lipid indices. RESULTS--Coronary artery disease was absent in 11 patients (group 1), mild to moderate in 12 (group 2), and severe in 17 (group 3). The distribution of peripheral vascular disease and of standard lipid indices was similar in these three groups of patients. There was a significant difference in apolipoprotein(a) concentrations between the three groups, with concentrations progressively increasing with the severity of coronary artery disease (mean (95% confidence interval): group 1, 112 U/1 (52 to 242); group 2, 214 U/1 (129 to 355); group 3, 537 U/1 (271 to 1064) (analysis of variance p < 0.005). The prevalence of coronary artery disease was increased 7.4 fold in patients with apolipoprotein(a) concentrations that were greater than the cohort median (206 U/1) (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS--The results show an association between apolipoprotein(a) concentrations and angiographically defined coronary artery disease in patients with large vessel peripheral vascular disease. The findings imply differences in the pathogenesis of coronary and peripheral atheroma and suggest that the measurement of apolipoprotein(a) may prove a useful additional tool in the risk factor assessment of patients undergoing peripheral

  17. Rare disease policies to improve care for patients in Europe.

    PubMed

    Rodwell, Charlotte; Aymé, Ségolène

    2015-10-01

    Rare diseases are those with a particularly low prevalence; in Europe, diseases are considered to be rare when they affect not more than 5 in 10000 persons in the European Union. The specificities of rare diseases make the area a veritable public health challenge: the limited number of patients and scarcity of knowledge and expertise single rare diseases out as a distinctive domain of high European added-value. The Orphan Medicinal Product Regulation of 1999 was the first European legislative text concerning rare diseases, followed by many initiatives, including recommendations by the Council of Ministers of the European Union in 2009. These initiatives contributed to the development of rare diseases policies at European and national level aimed at improving care for patients with rare diseases. A review of the political framework at European level and in European countries is provided to demonstrate how legislation has created a dynamic that is progressively improving care for patients with rare diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: "Current Research on the Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (Batten Disease)".

  18. [Neuroimaging for patients with Alzheimer disease in routine practice].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    In routine practice neuroimaging has been applied as an adjunct technique for early and differential diagnosis of Alzheimer disease in routine practice. Of the several neuroimaging modalities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have been commonly used in Japan; further software programs are used to aid statistical analysis of the imaging results. For example voxel-based specific regional analysis system for Alzheimer disease (VSRAD) for MRI and easy Z-score imaging system (eZIS) are used for the analysis of MRI and SPECT. In the early stage of Alzheimer disease, specific findings of regional atrophy and perfusion reduction are observed in some areas. In the posterior cingulate gyrus precuneus and parietal cortex, perfusion reduction was more frequently observed than atrophy. On the other hand, in the medial temporal structures, perfusion reduction was less frequently observed than atrophy. Perfusion reduction in the the posterior cingulate gyrus precuneus and in the parietal cortex was more prominent in the case of patients with early-onset Alzheimer disease than in the case of patients with late-onset Alzheimer disease. Further, atrophy in the medial temporal structures was more prominent in the case of patients with late-onset Alzheimer disease than in the case of those with early-onset Alzheimer disease. These findings are helpful for differentiating of Alzheimer disease from other diseases characterized by dementia.

  19. Medical management of the patient with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Mask, A G

    2000-06-01

    Cigarette smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and periodontal disease have been established as major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Dentists and physicians should work aggressively to educate periodontitis patients about this relationship in an effort to improve the quality of health and contribute to their long-term survival. Blood pressure should be checked at the initial dental visit and at each subsequent visit in patients whose blood pressure is found to be high and/or has a history of hypertension. Dental and medical assistants should receive in-service training to assure competency in measuring blood pressures. All staff should be certified in basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Emergency protocol procedures should be in writing and rehearsed regularly. Patients should take their blood pressure medication as usual on the day of the dental procedure. It is helpful for the patients to bring all medications to the office for review at the time of the dental procedure. Good communication should be established between the dentist and physician to maximize good dental and physical health. Because the patient with periodontal disease is at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, a standardized form should be developed for the convenient exchange of vital information, including but not limited to: blood pressure, medications, allergies, medical conditions and pertinent highlights of dental procedures. Minimize stress in patients with coronary artery disease. This includes providing solid local anesthesia, avoidance of intravascular medication injections, and encouraging relaxation techniques. Antibiotic prophylaxis is indicated in patients with valvular heart disease but does not guarantee the prevention of endocarditis. These patients should be alerted to monitor any symptoms such as fever, chills or shortness of breath. It has also been documented that toothbrushing, flossing and home plaque removers can cause transient bacteremia in

  20. Utility of colour Doppler sonography in patients with Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K V S Hari; Vamsikrishna, P; Verma, A; Muthukrishnan, J; Rayudu, B Ramasubba; Modi, K D

    2009-12-01

    Assessment of thyroid blood flow gives valuable information about underlying functional status. Colour Flow Doppler Sonography (CFDS) is a powerful tool which displays tissue blood flow and vascularity. Colour Flow Doppler Sonography of the thyroid gland in different subsets of patients with Graves' disease was studied to define its role in initial diagnosis and management. Eighty consecutive patients with Graves' disease (both treated and untreated) presented to hospital between August 2007 and February 2008. All patients were evaluated with CFDS of the thyroid for size, vascularity and peak systolic velocity (PSV) of the Inferior Thyroid Artery (ITA). Pertechnate scan and thyroidal autoantibody levels were done in selected cases. The patients were divided into Untreated Graves' disease (n = 31), Graves' disease on treatment but hyperthyroid (n = 26) and euthyroid Graves' disease on therapy (n = 23). Mann-Whitney U-test was used for statistical analysis and a p-value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Thyroid blood flow, as assessed by PSV of ITA, was significantly higher in untreated Graves' disease than in Graves disease on treatment but hyperthyroid and euthyroid Graves respectively (61.5 +/- 19.5 versus 42.9 +/- 24.7 versus 32.2 +/- 12.9 cm/s, p < 0.05). Parenchymal vascularity of the thyroid gland was higher in hyperthyroid patients than in euthyroid patients irrespective of therapy. In both groups on therapy, the dose of carbimazole correlated with the vascularity of the gland (r = 0.492 versus 0.564, p < 0.05). Colour Flow Doppler Sonography parameters correlated significantly with pertechnate scan results giving comparable sensitivity and specificity. Assessment of thyroid blood flow by CFDS is an effective marker in the initial diagnosis of Graves' disease. Vascularity of the gland can predict long term disease course while on medical therapy.

  1. Barriers to optimal disease control for rheumatoid arthritis patients with moderate and high disease activity.

    PubMed

    Tymms, Kathleen; Zochling, Jane; Scott, James; Bird, Paul; Burnet, Simon; de Jager, Julien; Griffiths, Hedley; Nicholls, Dave; Roberts, Lynden; Arnold, Mark; Littlejohn, Geoffrey

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate barriers that prevent rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients from achieving Disease Activity Score in 28 joints using the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28-ESR) scores within the current recommended levels for low disease activity (LDA) or clinical remission (DAS28-ESR score <3.2). Using an electronic medical record program, clinical data for RA patients treated in Optimising Patient Outcomes in Australian Rheumatology clinics, with a recorded DAS28-ESR score, were collected at one point in time. The data included demographics, medications, disease measures, and the rheumatologist's opinion of the main barriers preventing improvement to the recommended DAS28 score. Of the 4,037 patients with a recorded DAS28-ESR score, 304 patients (7.5%) had high disease activity (HDA) and 1,211 patients (30%) had moderate disease activity (MDA). For 584 HDA or MDA patients, the barriers to disease control (BTCs) were recorded by the rheumatologist when there was no adjustment to disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy. The recorded BTCs were irreversible joint damage (19.7%), patient-driven preference (14.7%), noninflammatory musculoskeletal pain (9.2%), insufficient time to assess the effect of recently initiated DMARDs (9.2%), safety concerns (7.5%), comorbidities (6.5%), resistant disease (6.3%), and other less common reasons. These patients received DMARDs (97.4%), including biologic agents (34.1%), methotrexate (74.8%), and oral corticosteroids (41.8%). This study identified clinical situations in which rheumatologists elected to continue RA patients with MDA or HDA on DMARD therapy without adjustment to achieve clinical remission or an LDA target of a DAS28-ESR score <3.2. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  2. Evaluation of an automated connective tissue disease screening assay in Korean patients with systemic rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seri; Yang, Heeyoung; Hwang, Hyunyong

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic utilities of the automated connective tissues disease screening assay, CTD screen, in patients with systemic rheumatic diseases. A total of 1093 serum samples were assayed using CTD screen and indirect immunofluorescent (IIF) methods. Among them, 162 were diagnosed with systemic rheumatic disease, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and mixed connective tissue disease (MCT). The remaining 931 with non-systemic rheumatic disease were assigned to the control group. The median ratios of CTD screen tests were significantly higher in the systemic rheumatic disease group than in the control group. The positive likelihood ratios of the CTD screen were higher than those of IIF in patients with total rheumatic diseases (4.1 vs. 1.6), including SLE (24.3 vs. 10.7). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC-AUCs) of the CTD screen for discriminating total rheumatic diseases, RA, SLE, and MCT from controls were 0.68, 0.56, 0.92 and 0.80, respectively. The ROC-AUCs of the combinations with IIF were significantly higher in patients with total rheumatic diseases (0.72) and MCT (0.85) than in those of the CTD screen alone. Multivariate analysis indicated that both the CTD screen and IIF were independent variables for predicting systemic rheumatic disease. CTD screen alone and in combination with IIF were a valuable diagnostic tool for predicting systemic rheumatic diseases, particularly for SLE.

  3. Evaluation of an automated connective tissue disease screening assay in Korean patients with systemic rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seri; Yang, Heeyoung; Hwang, Hyunyong

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic utilities of the automated connective tissues disease screening assay, CTD screen, in patients with systemic rheumatic diseases. A total of 1093 serum samples were assayed using CTD screen and indirect immunofluorescent (IIF) methods. Among them, 162 were diagnosed with systemic rheumatic disease, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and mixed connective tissue disease (MCT). The remaining 931 with non-systemic rheumatic disease were assigned to the control group. The median ratios of CTD screen tests were significantly higher in the systemic rheumatic disease group than in the control group. The positive likelihood ratios of the CTD screen were higher than those of IIF in patients with total rheumatic diseases (4.1 vs. 1.6), including SLE (24.3 vs. 10.7). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC-AUCs) of the CTD screen for discriminating total rheumatic diseases, RA, SLE, and MCT from controls were 0.68, 0.56, 0.92 and 0.80, respectively. The ROC-AUCs of the combinations with IIF were significantly higher in patients with total rheumatic diseases (0.72) and MCT (0.85) than in those of the CTD screen alone. Multivariate analysis indicated that both the CTD screen and IIF were independent variables for predicting systemic rheumatic disease. CTD screen alone and in combination with IIF were a valuable diagnostic tool for predicting systemic rheumatic diseases, particularly for SLE. PMID:28273146

  4. Patterns of cortical thinning in nondemented Parkinson's disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Uribe, Carme; Segura, Barbara; Baggio, Hugo Cesar; Abos, Alexandra; Marti, Maria Jose; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Compta, Yaroslau; Bargallo, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Clinical variability in the Parkinson's disease phenotype suggests the existence of disease subtypes. We investigated whether distinct anatomical patterns of atrophy can be identified in Parkinson's disease using a hypothesis‐free, data‐driven approach based on cortical thickness data. Methods T1‐weighted 3‐tesla MRI and a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment were performed in a sample of 88 nondemented Parkinson's disease patients and 31 healthy controls. We performed a hierarchical cluster analysis of imaging data using Ward's linkage method. A general linear model with cortical thickness data was used to compare clustering groups. Results We observed 3 patterns of cortical thinning in patients when compared with healthy controls. Pattern 1 (n = 30, 34.09%) consisted of cortical atrophy in bilateral precentral gyrus, inferior and superior parietal lobules, cuneus, posterior cingulate, and parahippocampal gyrus. These patients showed worse cognitive performance when compared with controls and the other 2 patterns. Pattern 2 (n = 29, 32.95%) consisted of cortical atrophy involving occipital and frontal as well as superior parietal areas and included patients with younger age at onset. Finally, in pattern 3 (n = 29, 32.95%), there was no detectable cortical thinning. Patients in the 3 patterns did not differ in disease duration, motor severity, dopaminergic medication doses, or presence of mild cognitive impairment. Conclusions Three cortical atrophy subtypes were identified in nondemented Parkinson's disease patients: (1) parieto‐temporal pattern of atrophy with worse cognitive performance, (2) occipital and frontal cortical atrophy and younger disease onset, and (3) patients without detectable cortical atrophy. These findings may help identify prognosis markers in Parkinson's disease. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement

  5. Nocardia infections among immunomodulated inflammatory bowel disease patients: A review

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Cândida; Rocha-Pereira, Nuno; Sarmento, António; Magro, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Human nocardiosis, caused by Nocardia spp., an ubiquitous soil-borne bacteria, is a rare granulomatous disease close related to immune dysfunctions. Clinically can occur as an acute life-threatening disease, with lung, brain and skin being commonly affected. The infection was classically diagnosed in HIV infected persons, organ transplanted recipients and long term corticosteroid treated patients. Currently the widespread use of immunomodulators and immunossupressors in the treatment of inflammatory diseases changed this scenario. Our purpose is to review all published cases of nocardiosis in immunomodulated patients due to inflammatory diseases and describe clinical and laboratory findings. We reviewed the literature concerning human cases of nocardiosis published between 1980 and 2014 in peer reviewed journals. Eleven cases of nocardiosis associated with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) prescription (9 related with infliximab and 2 with adalimumab) were identified; 7 patients had inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), 4 had rheumatological conditions; nocardia infection presented as cutaneous involvement in 3 patients, lung disease in 4 patients, hepatic in one and disseminated disease in 3 patients. From the 10 cases described in IBD patients 7 were associated with anti-TNF and 3 with steroids and azathioprine. In conclusion, nocardiosis requires high levels of clinical suspicion and experience of laboratory staff, in order to establish a timely diagnosis and by doing so avoid worst outcomes. Treatment for long periods tailored by the susceptibility of the isolated species whenever possible is essential. The safety of restarting immunomodulators or anti-TNF after the disease or the value of prophylaxis with cotrimoxazole is still debated. PMID:26074688

  6. Lumbar Spine Surgery in Patients with Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Joshua E; Hughes, Alexander; Sama, Andrew; Weinstein, Joseph; Kaplan, Leon; Cammisa, Frank P; Girardi, Federico P

    2015-10-21

    Parkinson disease is the second most common neurodegenerative condition. The literature on patients with Parkinson disease and spine surgery is limited, but increased complications have been reported. All patients with Parkinson disease undergoing lumbar spine surgery between 2002 and 2012 were identified. Patients' charts, radiographs, and outcome questionnaires were reviewed. Parkinson disease severity was assessed with use of the modified Hoehn and Yahr staging scale. Complications and subsequent surgeries were analyzed. Risk for reoperation was assessed. Ninety-six patients underwent lumbar spine surgery. The mean patient age was 63.0 years. The mean follow-up duration was 30.1 months. The Parkinson disease severity stage was <2 in thirteen patients, 2 in thirty patients, 2.5 in twenty-three patients, and ≥3 in thirty patients. The primary indication for surgery was spinal stenosis in seventy-two patients, spondylolisthesis in seventeen patients, and coronal and/or sagittal deformity in seven patients. There were nineteen early complications, including postoperative infections requiring surgical irrigation and debridement and long-term antibiotics in ten patients. The visual analog scale for back pain improved from 7.4 cm preoperatively to 1.8 cm postoperatively (p < 0.001). The visual analog scale for lower-limb pain improved from 7.7 cm preoperatively to 2.3 cm postoperatively (p < 0.001). The Oswestry Disability Index score dropped from 54.1 points to 17.7 points at the time of the latest follow-up (p < 0.001). The Short Form-12 Physical Component Summary score improved from 26.6 points preoperatively to 30.5 points postoperatively (p < 0.05). Twenty patients required revision surgery. Risks for further surgery included a Parkinson disease severity stage of ≥3 (p < 0.05), a history of diabetes mellitus, treatment for osteoporosis, and a combined anterior and posterior approach. Despite a higher rate of complications than in the general population, the

  7. Limited Knowledge of Acetaminophen in Patients with Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Saab, Sammy; Konyn, Peter G.; Viramontes, Matthew R.; Jimenez, Melissa A.; Grotts, Jonathan F.; Hamidzadah, Wally; Dang, Veronica P.; Esmailzadeh, Negin L.; Choi, Gina; Durazo, Francisco A.; El-Kabany, Mohamed M.; Han, Steven-Huy B.; Tong, Myron J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and Aims: Unintentional acetaminophen overdose remains the leading cause of acute liver failure in the United States. Patients with underlying liver disease are at higher risk of poor outcomes from acetaminophen overdose. Limited knowledge of acetaminophen may be a preventable contributor to elevated rates of overdose and thus acute liver failure. The purpose of this study is to assess knowledge of acetaminophen dosing and presence of acetaminophen in common combination products in patients with liver disease. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of patients with liver disease at the Pfleger Liver Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles between June 2015 and August 2016. Patients completed a demographic questionnaire and an acetaminophen knowledge survey. Additional information was obtained from the medical record. Results: Of 401 patients with liver disease, 30 (15.7%) were able to correctly identify that people without liver disease can safely take up to 4 g/day of acetaminophen. The majority of patients (79.9%–86.8%) did not know that Norco® (hydrocone/acetaminophen), Vicodin® (hydrocone/acetaminophen) and Percocet® (oxycodone/acetaminophen) contained acetaminophen. Only 45.3% of the patients knew that Tylenol® #3 contained acetaminophen. Conclusions: We conclude that patients with liver disease have critically low levels of knowledge of acetaminophen, putting them at risk both of acetaminophen overdose, as well as undermedication, and inadequate management of chronic pain. We recommend an increase in education efforts regarding acetaminophen dosage and its safety in the setting of liver disease. Increasing education for those at risk of low acetaminophen knowledge is essential to minimizing acetaminophen overdose rates and optimizing pain management. PMID:28097095

  8. Limited Knowledge of Acetaminophen in Patients with Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Saab, Sammy; Konyn, Peter G; Viramontes, Matthew R; Jimenez, Melissa A; Grotts, Jonathan F; Hamidzadah, Wally; Dang, Veronica P; Esmailzadeh, Negin L; Choi, Gina; Durazo, Francisco A; El-Kabany, Mohamed M; Han, Steven-Huy B; Tong, Myron J

    2016-12-28

    Background and Aims: Unintentional acetaminophen overdose remains the leading cause of acute liver failure in the United States. Patients with underlying liver disease are at higher risk of poor outcomes from acetaminophen overdose. Limited knowledge of acetaminophen may be a preventable contributor to elevated rates of overdose and thus acute liver failure. The purpose of this study is to assess knowledge of acetaminophen dosing and presence of acetaminophen in common combination products in patients with liver disease. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of patients with liver disease at the Pfleger Liver Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles between June 2015 and August 2016. Patients completed a demographic questionnaire and an acetaminophen knowledge survey. Additional information was obtained from the medical record. Results: Of 401 patients with liver disease, 30 (15.7%) were able to correctly identify that people without liver disease can safely take up to 4 g/day of acetaminophen. The majority of patients (79.9%-86.8%) did not know that Norco® (hydrocone/acetaminophen), Vicodin® (hydrocone/acetaminophen) and Percocet® (oxycodone/acetaminophen) contained acetaminophen. Only 45.3% of the patients knew that Tylenol® #3 contained acetaminophen. Conclusions: We conclude that patients with liver disease have critically low levels of knowledge of acetaminophen, putting them at risk both of acetaminophen overdose, as well as undermedication, and inadequate management of chronic pain. We recommend an increase in education efforts regarding acetaminophen dosage and its safety in the setting of liver disease. Increasing education for those at risk of low acetaminophen knowledge is essential to minimizing acetaminophen overdose rates and optimizing pain management.

  9. Collapsing glomerulopathy in a patient with mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Rifkin, S I; Gutta, H; Nair, R; McFarren, C; Wheeler, D E

    2011-02-01

    Collapsing glomerulopathy (CG) is a distinct clinicopathological entity characterized by glomerular capillary collapse, podocyte proliferation, diffuse mesangial sclerosis, and podocyte maturation arrest. Initially noted primarily in HIV infected patients, a number of other diseases have now been associated with CG. Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a disease with overlapping features of systemic lupus erythematosus, progressive systemic sclerosis, and polymyositis. It was originally thought that renal involvement was a rare complication of MCTD. However, over the years, it has become clearer that renal involvement, although not always clinically apparent, is frequent. In this report we present a patient with MCTD who developed CG.

  10. Study of Hepatic Osteodystrophy in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Karoli, Yogesh; Fatima, Jalees; Manhar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic Liver Disease (CLD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It involves haemodynamic and metabolic complications. Hepatic Osteodystrophy is a metabolic bone disease that may occur in individuals with chronic liver disease. It can significantly affect morbidity and quality of life of these patients. Fractures are also associated with an excess mortality. It has been an under recognized and inadequately studied complication among Indian population. An early diagnosis is essential to correct reversible risk factors which predispose to bone mass loss. Aim To assess the prevalence of metabolic bone disease and identify the risk factors associated with hepatic osteodystrophy in patients with cirrhosis. Materials and Methods This was an observational, cross-sectional, hospital based study conducted at a medical college hospital. All patients more than 20-year-old, diagnosed with chronic liver disease/Cirrhosis were enrolled. They were subjected to haematological, biochemical investigations, evaluation of Vitamin D and other hormonal parameters. Bone Mineral Density (BMD) was estimated by Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA). Results A total of 72 patients with mean age 50.04±11.24 years were included in the study. Amongst causes of chronic liver disease were alcoholic liver disease 22 (30.6%), CLD due to hepatitis B 24 (33.3%) and chronic hepatitis C 26 (36.1%). Twenty one (29.2%) patients had normal BMD while 51 (70.8%) had a low BMD. Out of these 51 patients, 36 (70.6%) were diagnosed of osteopenia and 15 (29.4%) others were found to have osteoporosis. Vitamin D levels and severity of liver disease had correlation with low BMD. Conclusion Low BMD is highly prevalent in patients with chronic liver disease of variable aetiologies. We advocate more randomised and prospective studies to be conducted on homogeneous groups with chronic liver disease in its various stages. In view of numerous therapeutic options available both for liver

  11. Patient satisfaction measurement in the disease management industry.

    PubMed

    Sen, Shaikat; Fawson, Paul; Cherrington, Graham; Douglas, Kathleen; Friedman, Neal; Maljanian, Rose; Fitzner, Karen; Tang, Pei; Soper, Steven; Wood, Steven

    2005-10-01

    In mid-2004, the Disease Management Association of America (DMAA) Patient Satisfaction Workgroup in association with J.D. Power and Associates (JDPA) conducted a literature review and a member survey to gain an understanding of the nature of patient satisfaction measurement as it pertains to disease management (DM) programs within the DM industry. A review of the relevant literature indicates that perhaps, with the exception of diabetes disease management, there are no prevalent, systematic, or statistically validated approaches for measuring patient satisfaction within the disease management industry. Most existing studies tend to focus on the effectiveness of a disease management program on clinical outcomes, with patient satisfaction measured only as a part of a battery of "outcome" measures. However, many of these studies do find positive associations between patient satisfaction and clinical outcomes. A majority of the 49 respondents who completed the member feedback survey hold relatively high positions in their organizations. The vast majority of respondents indicate their organizations conduct patient satisfaction surveys that assess overall satisfaction, satisfaction with materials and information provided, and with staff members. Patient satisfaction surveys are most common among the five common chronic diseases: diabetes, asthma, congestive heart failure (CHF), coronary artery disease (CAD), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). More than three in four respondents agree that patient satisfaction measurement is important to the long-term success of their programs. Respondents also indicate that along with intelligence on patients' overall satisfaction with the program, they would also like to gain an understanding of whether or not their programs actually help manage the patient's medical condition. Eight survey instruments currently in use and submitted by study participants were also reviewed. Most of these instruments are relatively short

  12. [Physician-patient relations and stress caused by coloscopy in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Frenzer, A; Binek, J; Hammer, B

    1996-01-01

    The relationship between doctors and patients with inflammatory bowel disease is usually considered complex and difficult. We analyzed the quality of this relationship and the stress inflicted on the patients by endoscopy. 76 patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis answered a questionnaire. More than three quarters considered their relationship to their doctors good or very good. The patients expressed a wish for more information on the pathophysiology and treatment options of their disease. The stress placed on the patients by endoscopy was considered severe or very severe by 57%. We conclude that the relationship between doctor and patients with inflammatory bowel disease is generally considered good or very good. Endoscopies are highly stressful for most patients and we recommend appropriate sedation.

  13. [Invasive mould disease in haematological patients].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Camps, Isabel; Jarque, Isidro

    2014-01-01

    Invasive mould infections (IMI) are a persistent problem with high morbidity and mortality rates among patients receiving chemotherapy for hematological malignancies and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Management of IMI in this setting has become increasingly complex with the advent of new antifungal agents and diagnostic tests, which have resulted in different therapeutic strategies (prophylactic, empirical, pre-emptive, and directed). A proper assessment of the individual risk for IMI appears to be critical in order to use the best prophylactic and therapeutic approach and increase the survival rates. Among the available antifungal drugs, the most frequently used in the hematologic patient are fluconazole, mould-active azoles (itraconazole, posaconazole and voriconazole), candins (anidulafungin, caspofungin and micafungin), and lipid formulations of amphotericin B. Specific recommendations for their use, and criteria for selecting the antifungal agents are discussed in this paper. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  14. Chronic Disease Management Programmes: an adequate response to patients' needs?

    PubMed

    Rijken, Mieke; Bekkema, Nienke; Boeckxstaens, Pauline; Schellevis, François G; De Maeseneer, Jan M; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2014-10-01

    Inspired by American examples, several European countries are now developing disease management programmes (DMPs) to improve the quality of care for patients with chronic diseases. Recently, questions have been raised whether the disease management approach is appropriate to respond to patient-defined needs. In this article we consider the responsiveness of current European DMPs to patients' needs defined in terms of multimorbidity, functional and participation problems, and self-management. Information about existing DMPs was derived from a survey among country-experts. In addition, we made use of international scientific literature. Most European DMPs do not have a solid answer yet to the problem of multimorbidity. Methods of linking DMPs, building extra modules to deal with the most prevalent comorbidities and integration of case management principles are introduced. Rehabilitation, psychosocial and reintegration support are not included in all DMPs, and the involvement of the social environment of the patient is uncommon. Interventions tailored to the needs of specific social or cultural patient groups are mostly not available. Few DMPs provide access to individualized patient information to strengthen self-management, including active engagement in decision making. To further improve the responsiveness of DMPs to patients' needs, we suggest to monitor 'patient relevant outcomes' that might be based on the ICF-model. To address the needs of patients with multimorbidity, we propose a generic comprehensive model, embedded in primary care. A goal-oriented approach provides the opportunity to prioritize goals that really matter to patients. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Assessing the Executive Function Deficits of Patients with Parkinsons Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbertson, William; Moberg, Paul; Duda, John; Stern, Matthew; Weintraub, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the utility of the Tower of London-Drexel (TOL DX ) in assessing the executive deficits associated with Parkinsons disease (PD). We sought to determine whether the TOL DX would differentiate between (a) patients with PD and healthy control participants (HCP), (b) demented and nondemented patients, and (c)…

  16. Learning Style Preferences of Elderly Coronary Artery Disease Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theis, Saundra L.; Merritt, Sharon L.

    1992-01-01

    The Patient Learning Styles Questionnaire derived from Canfield and administered to 134 elderly coronary artery disease patients revealed the following order of learning preferences: structure, iconics, listening, direct experience, reading, achievement, affiliation, and eminence. Level of education significantly influenced preferred learning…

  17. Learning Style Preferences of Elderly Coronary Artery Disease Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theis, Saundra L.; Merritt, Sharon L.

    1992-01-01

    The Patient Learning Styles Questionnaire derived from Canfield and administered to 134 elderly coronary artery disease patients revealed the following order of learning preferences: structure, iconics, listening, direct experience, reading, achievement, affiliation, and eminence. Level of education significantly influenced preferred learning…

  18. Airway management in patients with pituitary disease: a review of 746 patients.

    PubMed

    Nemergut, Edward C; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2006-01-01

    Difficulties in airway management are observed among patients with pituitary disease. The purpose of this study was to better characterize the relationship between disease factors such as tumor characteristics on difficult endotracheal intubation. The perioperative records of 746 patients that underwent transsphenoidal microsurgery at the University of Virginia between January 1995 and June 2001 were reviewed. Among the 746 patients studied, difficulty with endotracheal intubation was encountered in 28 patients (3.8%). Patient gender and tumor size were not associated with a difference in the incidence of unanticipated airway management difficulty. Unanticipated difficulty with airway management was more than three times more common in acromegalic patients (n = 121) than in patients with nonfunctioning pituitary tumors (9.1% [5.8-14%] vs 2.6% [1.5-4.5%], P = 0.007). Patients with Cushing disease (n = 182) and patients with a prolactinoma (n = 87) were no more difficult to intubate than patients with nonfunctioning tumors. Among patients with acromegaly, neither tumor size nor patient gender has any impact on the incidence of intubation difficulty. Among all patients, when difficulty was encountered, intubation assisted by the gum elastic bougie was successful 100% of the time. The incidence of difficulty in intubation is not higher among patients with pituitary disease than in the general surgical population; however, patients with acromegaly have difficult intubations three times more often.

  19. Mitochondrial disease patients' perception of dietary supplements' use.

    PubMed

    Karaa, Amel; Kriger, Joshua; Grier, Johnston; Holbert, Amy; Thompson, John L P; Parikh, Sumit; Hirano, Michio

    2016-09-01

    Surveys of mitochondrial disease physicians conducted through the Mitochondrial Medicine Society have shown that virtually all providers recommend a variety of dietary supplements as treatments to their patients in an effort to enhance energy production and reduce oxidative stress. In this survey, we asked patients and their parents about their experiences taking these dietary supplements for mitochondrial disease. The survey was disseminated through the North American Mitochondrial Disease Consortium (NAMDC) and the Rare Disease Clinical Research Network (RDCRN) registries and gathered 162 responses. The study ascertained each patient's mitochondrial disease diagnosis, dietary supplements used, adjunct therapy, and effects of the supplements on symptoms and health. Regardless of the specific underlying mitochondrial disease, the majority of the survey respondents stated they are or have been on dietary supplements. Most patients take more than four supplements primarily coenzyme Q10, l-carnitine, and riboflavin. The majority of patients taking supplements reported health benefits from the supplements. The onset of perceived benefits was between 2weeks to 3months of initiating intake. Supplements seem to be safe, with only 28% of patients experiencing mild side-effects and only 5.6% discontinuing their intake due to intolerance. Only 9% of patients had insurance coverage for their supplements and when paying out of pocket, 95% of them spend up to $500/month. Despite the use of concomitant therapies (prescribed medications, physical therapy, diet changes and other), 45.5% of patients think that dietary supplements are the only intervention improving their symptoms. Some limitations of this study include the retrospective collection of data probably associated with substantial recall bias, lack of longitudinal follow up to document pre- and post-supplement clinical status and second hand reports by parents for children which may reflect parents' subjective

  20. Visual dysfunction in patients with Parkinson's disease and essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Štenc Bradvica, Ivanka; Bradvica, Mario; Matić, Suzana; Reisz-Majić, Patricia

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the specificity and sensitivity of the Pelli-Robson and Ishihara diagnostic methods in differing Parkinson's disease from essential tremor compared to DaTSCAN (dopamine transporter scan) findings. The intention was to investigate whether visual dysfunction appears in the early state of Parkinson's disease. Therefore, we included patients with the symptomatology of parkinsonism lasting between 6 and 12 months. The study included 164 patients of which 59 (36.0%) suffered from Parkinson's disease, 51 (31.1%) from essential tremor, and 54 (32.9%) healthy patients which presented the control group. The specificity of Pelli-Robson test in confirming Parkinson's disease was 53% and the sensitivity 81.4%. The specificity of Ishihara test in confirming Parkinson's disease was 88.2%, and sensitivity 55.9%. We found that the colour and contrast dysfunction are present as the earliest symptoms of Parkinson's disease. In this study the Pelli-Robson test is highly sensitive and the Ishihara tables are highly specific in the differential diagnosis between Parkinson's disease and essential tremor, but neither of these methods fulfils the criteria for the validity of a test. We suggest performing both of these methods to evaluate which patients are indicated for DaTSCAN.

  1. T-Helper Cytokine Profiles in Patients with Kawasaki Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Bum; Kim, Young Hyun; Hyun, Myung Chul; Kim, Yeo Hyang; Kim, Hee Sun; Lee, Young Hwan

    2015-11-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute systemic vasculitis of which pathogenesis suspected is caused by immune dysregulation. The goal of this study is to evaluate the activation pattern of T helper cell type 1 (Th1) and T helper cell type 2 (Th2) in patients with Kawasaki disease. Prospective study of 60 patients (male 36, female 24) with diagnosis of Kawasaki disease were enrolled. One hundred and eighty blood samples from these patients were collected according to the different clinical stages {before initial intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), 5 days after initial IVIG, 2 months after initial IVIG}. The plasma level of Th1 cytokines; interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) & interleukin (IL)-2 and Th2 cytokines; IL-4 & IL-10 were measured by enzyme-liked immunosorbent assay. In all patients, the plasma level of Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2) and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) were markedly elevated during the acute stage of Kawasaki disease. Since then, the plasma level of all these cytokines decreased significantly along with the process of clinical stages. Regardless of the existence of coronary artery lesion or no response to initial IVIG treatment, there were no significant differences between them. These data suggest that both Th1 and Th2 cells may be activated simultaneously during the acute stage of Kawasaki disease. Further studies are therefore required to establish the difference of activation pattern of T helper cells between Kawasaki disease and other inflammatory diseases.

  2. Sexually transmitted diseases among psychiatric patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dutra, Maria Rita Teixeira; Campos, Lorenza Nogueira; Guimarães, Mark Drew Crosland

    2014-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases are still highly prevalent worldwide and represent an important public health problem. Psychiatric patients are at increased risk of sexually transmitted diseases but there are scarce published studies with representative data of this population. We sought to estimate the prevalence and correlates of self-reported sexually transmitted diseases among patients with mental illnesses under care in a national representative sample in Brazil (n=2145). More than one quarter of the sample (25.8%) reported a lifetime history of sexually transmitted disease. Multivariate analyses showed that patients with a lifetime sexually transmitted disease history were older, had history of homelessness, used more alcohol and illicit drugs, suffered violence, perceived themselves to be at greater risk for HIV and had high risk sexual behavioral: practised unprotected sex, started sexual life earlier, had more than ten sexual partners, exchanged money and/or drugs for sex and had a partner that refused to use condom. Our findings indicate a high prevalence of self-reported sexually transmitted diseases among psychiatric patients in Brazil, and emphasize the need for implementing sexually transmitted diseases prevention programs in psychiatric settings, including screening, treatment, and behavioral modification interventions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Cancer of the small intestine in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Daijiro; Futami, Kitaro; Kojima, Daibo; Futatsuki, Ryo; Ishibashi, Yukiko; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yano, Yutaka; Takatsu, Noritaka; Hirai, Fumihito; Matsui, Toshiyuki; Iwashita, Akinori

    2013-07-01

    Due to an increase in the number of long-term cases of Crohn's disease, the risk of combined cancer in these patients has been assessed in numerous articles. Most of these reports have involved patients with cancer of the large intestine, while cases of cancer of the small intestine combined with Crohn's disease are very rare. We experienced two cases of cancer of the small intestine combined with Crohn's disease. In both cases, the patients had suffered from Crohn's disease for over 10 years and a second operation was performed after a long period without treatment following the first operation, which had achieved a favorable outcome. In both cases of combined cancer, the patients experienced ileus; however, it was difficult to discern this from ileus due to the presence of Crohn's disease. Therefore, making a definitive diagnosis of combined cancer was not possible before surgery, and the definitive diagnosis was obtained based on an intraoperative pathological diagnosis. It is thought that tumor markers transition in a manner parallel to the progression of cancer, providing a clue for cancer diagnosis. In patients with Crohn's disease, there is a pressing need to establish a method for diagnosing cancer of the small intestine at an early stage.

  4. Online Patient Education for Chronic Disease Management: Consumer Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Win, Khin Than; Hassan, Naffisah Mohd; Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri; Probst, Yasmine

    2016-04-01

    Patient education plays an important role in chronic disease management. The aim of this study is to identify patients' preferences in regard to the design features of effective online patient education (OPE) and the benefits. A review of the existing literature was conducted in order to identify the benefits of OPE and its essential design features. These design features were empirically tested by conducting survey with patients and caregivers. Reliability analysis, construct validity and regression analysis were performed for data analysis. The results identified patient-tailored information, interactivity, content credibility, clear presentation of content, use of multimedia and interpretability as the essential design features of online patient education websites for chronic disease management.

  5. [Vascular rehabilitation in patients with peripheral arterial disease].

    PubMed

    de Holanda, Ana; Aubourg, Marion; Dubus-Bausière, Valérie; Eveno, Dominique; Abraham, Pierre

    2013-06-01

    Lower limb peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a frequent debilitating disease associated with a high morbidity and mortality rate. The benefit of rehabilitation in PAD patients has been largely demonstrated, both for patients that undergo amputation, and for patients with claudication. In these latter patients, rehabilitation programs rely on a variety of additional techniques or tools, among which: stretching, specific muscle proprioception, walking and a variety of other physical activities, exercise or situations adapted to community life, lower limb and respiratory physiotherapy, patient's education, support for smoking cessation and healthy nutrition, social support, etc. Whether rehabilitation is performed in specialised integrated structures or performed on a home-based basis, various clinicians are involved. Despite evidence-based proof of efficacy, rehabilitation of PAD patients with claudication is still under-used. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Sensorineural hearing loss in pediatric patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Urganci, Nafiye; Kalyoncu, Derya; Calis, Asli Batur

    2015-09-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) as an extraintestinal manifestation of celiac disease (CD) has been reported in several studies. The aim of this study was to determine presence of subclinical sensorineural hearing loss associated with CD in pediatric patients. Otoscopy, tympanometry and pure tone audiometry were performed in 44 patients with CD and 20 healthy age and sex-matched controls. Pure tone audiometry did not show significant sensorineural hearing loss over all frequencies in patients with CD compared with controls (P > 0.05). SNHL was detected in only three (6.8 %) patients with CD. In conclusion, subclinical sensorineural hearing loss was demonstrated in adult patients with CD; therefore, we recommend to perform audiometric examinations in pediatric patients for recognizing hearing loss early during the course of the disease.

  7. Detection of coronary artery disease by thallium scintigraphy in patients with valvar heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Huikuri, H V; Korhonen, U R; Heikkilä, J; Takkunen, J T

    1986-01-01

    In patients with valvar heart disease detection of coronary artery disease by conventional non-invasive methods may be difficult. The usefulness of thallium-201 exercise scintigraphy for detecting coronary artery disease was evaluated in 16 patients with aortic stenosis, 17 with aortic regurgitation, nine with mitral stenosis, and six with mitral regurgitation who were investigated by coronary angiography. Only two of 21 patients with greater than or equal to 50% coronary artery obstruction had normal thallium images. Three patients without angiographic evidence of coronary artery stenoses had perfusion defects demonstrated by thallium scintigraphy. Only one patient with greater than or equal to 75% coronary stenosis had a normal thallium scan. Angina pectoris or ST segment depression evoked by exercise test were not useful in distinguishing patients with coronary artery disease from those with normal coronary vessels. These data suggest that thallium exercise scintigraphy may be a useful non-invasive test for detecting coronary artery disease in patients with valvar heart disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:3730215

  8. [Exercise tolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Chlumský, J

    2005-01-01

    Limitation of exercise tolerance, especially activities of daily living, is the most significant clinical experience, which greatly affects quality of life of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Many advances in the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of bronchial obstruction in patients with COPD and their meanings for diagnosis and monitoring of the disease have occurred during the last two decades. The author discusses the most significant factors, which influence tolerance of physical exercise in patients with more advanced forms of COPD, and brings the attention to a practical test of physical capacity.

  9. [Suplemented restricted diet in old patients with chronic renal disease].

    PubMed

    Teplan, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    In last decades was confirmed remarkable increase in number of old patients with chronic kidney disease. Despide of developments in dialysis technology and kidney transplantation there is a growing number of old patients who are not suitable for these methods. Recently were published data showing long-term effect of protein restricted diet supplemented with keto amino acids in elderly. Based on our results obtained in re-analysis of 3 000 patients we can confirm also good compliance and low risk of malnutrition.Key words: chronic kidney disease - keto amino acids - old age - restricted diet.

  10. Bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture in a renal disease patient.

    PubMed

    Devkota, Pramod; Ahmad, Shiraz

    2013-09-01

    Spontaneous bilateral femoral neck facture in a renal disease patient is not common. We report a case of 47-year-old female patient with chronic renal failure and on regular hemodialysis for the past 5 years who sustained bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture without history of trauma and injury and refused any surgical intervention. The patient was mobilised on wheel chair one year after the fractures. The cause of the fracture and the literature review of the bilateral femoral neck fracture in renal disease are discussed.

  11. Serum lipoproteins of patients with glycogen storage disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, E L; Chibisov, I V; Karmansky, I M; Tabolin, V A; Chistova, L V; Leontiev, A F

    1980-03-14

    Seventeen patients with different types of glycogen storage disease (GSD) were under observation. The type of the disease was defined from glucaemic and lactotaemic curves obtained in glucose, galactose and adrenaline tolerance tests and by biochemical analysis of liver biopsy specimens. Seven patients were found to have Type I; five patients, Type III; one patient, Type VI; and four patients, the Type IX (or X) of GSD. The serum lipoprotein (LP) content was determined in all patients using analytical ultracentrifugation. Hyperlipoproteinaemia (HLP) was found in virtually all patients. Patients with Type I of GSD were found to have Types 2b and 4 of HLP; and patients with Type III of GSD, 2b Type of HLP. 2a Type of HLP was diagnosed in patients with GSD of VI and IX (X) Types. Patients with Type III GSD, in contrast to those with GSD of other types, had enhanced levels of Sf 12-20 LP. The levels of Sf 100-400 and Sf 20-100 LP were greatly increased only in patients with Type I GSD.

  12. Renal and testicular agenesis in a patient with Darier's disease.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, L Y; Wortsman, J; McConnachie, P

    1985-05-01

    Darier's disease is a familial disorder of the skin that has been associated with corneal, bone, pulmonary, and urogenital abnormalities. This report describes a novel urogenital anomaly, namely renal and testicular agenesis, in a patient with Darier's disease. Detailed study of the kindred demonstrated an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance for Darier's disease and also revealed the presence of autoimmune thyroiditis in several family members. Thyroid involvement ranged from isolated goiter to hypothyroidism. Tissue typing for HLA-A, B, C, and DR antigens did not reveal a specific haplotype common to all the carriers of the cutaneous or thyroid disorder. It is concluded that patients with Darier's disease should be carefully evaluated for the occurrence of systemic diseases, especially urogenital abnormalities and thyroid disorders.

  13. Management of Pulmonary Hypertension in Patients with Chronic Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Barberà, Joan Albert; Blanco, Isabel

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common complication of chronic pulmonary diseases, especially in advanced disease, and is associated with greater mortality and worse clinical course. Patients with symptoms that exceed those expected by their pulmonary disease should be further evaluated by echocardiography. Confirmatory right heart catheterization is indicated in those conditions where the results of the hemodynamic assessment will determine treatment options. The treatment of choice for patients who are hypoxemic and have pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung disease is long-term oxygen therapy. Conventional vasodilators or drugs approved for pulmonary arterial hypertension are not recommended in patients with mild-to-moderate PH because they may impair gas exchange and because there is a lack of evidence supporting their efficacy. Patients with severe PH should be considered for referral to a center with expertise in PH and lung diseases. Ideally, these patients should be included in randomized controlled trials to determine which patients are more likely to derive benefit and which therapies are most likely to be successful.

  14. Microbial Dysbiosis in Pediatric Patients with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaakoush, Nadeem O.; Day, Andrew S.; Huinao, Karina D.; Leach, Steven T.; Lemberg, Daniel A.; Dowd, Scot E.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial dysbiosis has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD); however, many studies of gut microbial communities have been confounded by environmental and patient-related factors. In this study, the microbial flora of fecal samples from 19 children newly diagnosed with CD and 21 age-matched controls were analyzed using high-throughput sequencing to determine differences in the microbial composition between CD patients and controls. Analysis of the microbial composition of specific bacterial groups revealed that Firmicutes percentages were significantly lower in CD patients than in controls and that this was due largely to changes in the class Clostridia. Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria percentages were higher and significantly higher in CD patients than in controls, respectively. Both the detection frequencies of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes correlated (positively and negatively, respectively) with the calculated pediatric Crohn's disease activity index scores of patients. Upon further analysis, differences in the microbial compositions of patients with mild disease and moderate to severe disease were identified. Our findings indicate that a combination of different bacterial species or a dynamic interplay between individual species is important for disease and is consistent with the dysbiosis hypothesis of CD. PMID:22837318

  15. [Organization of therapeutic aid to patients with hereditary neuromuscular diseases].

    PubMed

    Kalinin, V A; Temin, P A; Arkhipov, B A; Zavadenko, N N

    1989-01-01

    The paper summarizes experience gained for many years by the All-Union Research Methodological Center for Study of Hereditary Neuromuscular Diseases. The specialists of the Center render counselling and therapeutic assistance to patients afflicted with neuromuscular diseases. The counselling and diagnostic services are characterized by the fact that it is based on the activity of a large hospital intended for the treatment of various diseases. The problems which are being solved by the out- and inpatient services of the Center are considered in detail. The advantages of the setting up of the common in- and outpatient complex on the basis of the hospital intended for the treatment of various diseases are described.

  16. Graves' disease in a dialysis dependent chronic renal failure patient

    PubMed Central

    Nair, C. G.; Jacob, P.; Menon, R.; Babu, M. J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone level may be altered in chronic renal failure patients. Low levels of thyroxine protect the body from excess protein loss by minimizing catabolism. Hyperthyroidism is rarely encountered in end-stage dialysis dependent patients. Less than 10 well-documented cases of Graves' disease (GD) are reported in literature so far. We report a case of GD in a patient on dialysis. PMID:25484538

  17. Memantine-associated hyperkalaemia in a patient with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Tatsuo; Yamada, Hidetaka; Uchimura, Naohisa

    2013-09-01

    Memantine is an N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist that may improve cognitive functions in patients with Alzheimer's disease. It is predominantly excreted unchanged via the kidneys, and patients with decreased creatinine clearance must be treated with lower doses of memantine. However, it is unclear whether memantine itself can lead to renal dysfunction and/or hyperkalaemia. We report a patient with renal impairment and hyperkalaemia possibly associated with memantine administration.

  18. Gait in SWEDDs patients: comparison with Parkinson's disease patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Mian, Omar S; Schneider, Susanne A; Schwingenschuh, Petra; Bhatia, Kailash P; Day, Brian L

    2011-06-01

    Patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease on clinical grounds who subsequently turn out to have normal dopamine transporter imaging have been referred to as SWEDDs (scans without evidence of dopaminergic deficits). Despite having clinical features similar to those of Parkinson's disease, these patients seem to have different pathophysiology, prognosis, and treatment requirements. In this study we determined the similarities and differences in the gaits of SWEDDs and Parkinson's disease patients to investigate whether walking patterns can distinguish these entities. We used 3-D motion capture to analyze the gaits of 11 SWEDDs patients (who had unilateral or asymmetric upper limb tremor with a rest component), 12 tremor-dominant Parkinson's disease patients, and 13 healthy control participants. In common with Parkinson's disease patients, SWEDDs patients had a slow gait mainly because of a small stride length, as well as a reduced arm swing. However, several abnormal features of posture and gait in Parkinson's disease were normal in SWEDDs. Thus, SWEDDs patients had normal trunk and elbow posture, normal stride length variability, and normal bilateral step-phase coordination, all of which were abnormal in Parkinson's disease patients. We also searched for signs of ataxic movements during normal and tandem walking, but found no evidence that ataxic gait was a general feature in SWEDDs. These findings could aid the clinician in identification of potential tremulous SWEDDs cases. © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

  19. Excessive daytime sleepiness in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Knie, Bettina; Mitra, M Tanya; Logishetty, Kartik; Chaudhuri, K Ray

    2011-03-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is described as inappropriate and undesirable sleepiness during waking hours and is a common non-motor symptom in Parkinson's disease, affecting up to 50% of patients. EDS has a large impact on the quality of life of Parkinson's disease patients as well as of their caregivers, in some cases even more than the motor symptoms of the disease. Drug-induced EDS is a particular problem as many dopamine agonists used for the treatment of Parkinson's disease have EDS as an adverse effect. Dopaminergic treatment may also render a subset of Parkinson's disease patients at risk for sudden-onset sleep attacks that occur without warning and can be particularly hazardous if the patient is driving. This demonstrates the need for early recognition and management not only to increase health-related quality of life but also to ensure patient safety. There are many assessment tools for EDS, including the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT), although only the Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS) and the SCales for Outcomes in PArkinson's Disease-Sleep (SCOPA-S) are specifically validated for Parkinson's disease. Polysomnography can be used when necessary. Management comprises non-pharmacological and pharmacological approaches. Non-pharmacological approaches can be the mainstay of treatment for mild to moderate EDS. Advice on good sleep hygiene is instrumental, as pharmacological approaches have yet to provide consistent and reliable results without significant adverse effects. The efficacy of pharmacological treatment of EDS in Parkinson's disease using wakefulness-promoting drugs such as modafinil remains controversial. Further areas of research are now also focusing on adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists, sodium oxybate and caffeine to promote wakefulness. A definitive treatment for the highly prevalent drug-induced EDS has not yet been found.

  20. The relationship between different information sources and disease-related patient knowledge and anxiety in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Selinger, C P; Carbery, I; Warren, V; Rehman, A F; Williams, C J; Mumtaz, S; Bholah, H; Sood, R; Gracie, D J; Hamlin, P J; Ford, A C

    2017-01-01

    Patient education forms a cornerstone of management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The Internet has opened new avenues for information gathering. To determine the relationship between different information sources and patient knowledge and anxiety in patients with IBD. The use of information sources in patients with IBD was examined via questionnaire. Anxiety was assessed with the hospital anxiety and depression scale and disease-related patient knowledge with the Crohn's and colitis knowledge score questionnaires. Associations between these outcomes and demographics, disease-related factors, and use of different information sources were analysed using linear regression analysis. Of 307 patients (165 Crohn's disease, 142 ulcerative colitis) 60.6% were female. Participants used the hospital IBD team (82.3%), official leaflets (59.5%), and official websites (53.5%) most frequently in contrast to alternative health websites (9%). University education (P < 0.001), use of immunosuppressants (P = 0.025), Crohn's and Colitis UK membership (P = 0.001), frequent use of the hospital IBD team (P = 0.032), and frequent use of official information websites (P = 0.005) were associated with higher disease-related patient knowledge. Female sex (P = 0.004), clinically active disease (P < 0.001), frequent use of general practitioners (P = 0.014), alternative health websites (homoeopathy, nutritionists, etc.) (P = 0.004) and random links (P = 0.016) were independently associated with higher anxiety. Different patient information sources are associated with better knowledge or worse anxiety levels. Face-to-face education and written information materials remain the first line of patient education. Patients should be guided towards official information websites and warned about the association between the use of alternative health websites or random links and anxiety. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Nonpharmacological treatments for patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bloem, Bastiaan R; de Vries, Nienke M; Ebersbach, Georg

    2015-09-15

    Since 2013, a number of studies have enhanced the literature and have guided clinicians on viable treatment interventions outside of pharmacotherapy and surgery. Thirty-three randomized controlled trials and one large observational study on exercise and physiotherapy were published in this period. Four randomized controlled trials focused on dance interventions, eight on treatment of cognition and behavior, two on occupational therapy, and two on speech and language therapy (the latter two specifically addressed dysphagia). Three randomized controlled trials focused on multidisciplinary care models, one study on telemedicine, and four studies on alternative interventions, including music therapy and mindfulness. These studies attest to the marked interest in these therapeutic approaches and the increasing evidence base that places nonpharmacological treatments firmly within the integrated repertoire of treatment options in Parkinson's disease.

  2. [Enteric microflora in inflammatory bowel disease patients].

    PubMed

    Rahmouni, Oumaira; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Desreumaux, Pierre; Neut, Christel

    2016-11-01

    During the last years, the importance of a well equilibrated intestinal microbiota (eubiosis) has become more and more obvious in human health. Dysbiosis is now a well-recognized feature associated with IBD (inflammatory bowel disease). Rupture of the normal microbiota can occur through different mechanisms: (1) by a typical Western diet rich in fat and low in fiber, (2) by an acute disruption of the microbiota (by an acute gastroenteritis or by intake of antibiotics) or (3) by a combination of event in early childhood avoiding the establishment of eubiosis (the hygiene hypothesis). Risk factors for IBD are stated for each disruption mechanism. Dysbiosis can also induce colonization by several pathobionts able to aggravate inflammation. Among the potential candidates in IBD, most attention has been paid on AIEC during the last years.

  3. Hepatitis B Serology in Patients with Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Feuchtenberger, Martin; Schäfer, Arne; Philipp Nigg, Axel; Rupert Kraus, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: Only limited data are available on the prevalence of hepatitis B in patients with proven rheumatic diseases and thus the risk of reactivation under immunosuppressive therapy. Objective: To analyse hepatitis B serology in patients with rheumatic diseases prior to therapy. Method: In total, 1,338 patient records were analysed for HBsAg, HBsAb and HBcAb in a cross-sectional, single-centre study between 2011 and 2015 at first presentation. Data acquisition was realized using electronic patient files created during routine care. The main variables considered as predictors for HBV reactivation included (i) the exact type of rheumatic disease and (ii) the therapeutically induced immunosuppression. Results: Overall, 5.9% of patients (n=79) had proven contact with hepatitis B (HBcAb positive), and HBsAb were not detected in 1.3% (n=18). The rate of vaccinated subjects was 7.8%. HBsAg was detected in 3 patients (0.2%). In addition, 70.3% of patients were treated during the course of rheumatologic disease previously or currently with glucocorticoids, 85.2% with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and 20.1% with a biologic agent (e.g., anti-IL-6, anti-TNFalpha, anti-CD20, CTLA4Ig or anti-IL-12/23). Conclusion: Prevalence of hepatitis B serostatus in the analysed rheumatic patients regarding HBs-Ag and HBcAb with or without HBsAb prior to therapy does not differ from the data published for the general population in Germany. However, the rate of hepatitis B vaccinated patients was lower. In general, a significant portion of patients (5.9%) has been exposed to HBV and therefore exhibited an increased risk of reactivation of hepatitis B when undergoing immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:27708728

  4. Automated Peritoneal Dialysis is Suitable for Polycystic Kidney Disease Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Ren, Hong; Xie, Jingyuan; Huang, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Chun-Yan; Chen, Nan

    2015-01-01

    A female patient with polycystic kidney disease (PKD) was treated with automated peritoneal dialysis when she reached end-stage renal disease. The patient has been doing very well on automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) for almost 6 years without peritonitis or abdominal hernias. Intra-abdominal pressures are lower in the supine position than in an erect or sitting position. Larger volumes of dialysate are better tolerated while the patient is supine, as during nocturnal APD. Therefore, APD is an option of the renal replacement therapy for patients with PKD.

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid proteome of patients with acute Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Warren, H. Shaw

    2012-01-01

    During acute Lyme disease, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of meningitis and other neurologic symptoms. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing a deep view into the proteome for patients diagnosed with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified differences in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. We identified 108 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease from controls. Comparison between infected patients and control subjects revealed differences in proteins in the CSF associated with cell death localized to brain synapses and others that likely originate from brain parenchyma. PMID:22900834

  6. Interleukin-6 serum levels in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Kerly Wollmeister; Schuh, Artur Francisco Schumacher; Saute, Jonas; Townsend, Raquel; Fricke, Daniele; Leke, Renata; Souza, Diogo O; Portela, Luis Valmor; Chaves, Márcia Lorena Fagundes; Rieder, Carlos R M

    2009-08-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that neuroimmune mechanisms may be involved in the neurodegenerative process of Parkinson's disease (PD). Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is increased in the nigrostriatal region and in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with PD. IL-6 serum level was evaluated in PD patients. The effects of levodopa treatment and disease severity on IL-6 were also studied. The IL-6 levels were similar between PD patients (treated and not treated) and controls. However, there was a negative correlation of IL-6 levels and the activities of daily living scale (P < 0.05), indicating that patients with more severe disease have higher levels of this cytokine. No correlation involving levodopa treatment and IL-6 serum level was found. The results suggest that only marginal effects of IL-6 occur on the peripheral immune system, and that the role of IL-6 and others neuroimmune factors needs to be well elucidated on PD.

  7. Management of "refractory" skin disease in patients with lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Callen, Jeffrey P

    2005-10-01

    Skin disease in patients with lupus erythematosus can be subdivided into two broad categories-those lesions that, when biopsied, demonstrate an interface dermatitis and those that do not demonstrate an interface dermatitis. The skin lesions that are represented by the interface dermatitis include discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE), subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE), and acute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Many patients with these cutaneous lesions can be managed with "standard" therapies, including sunscreens, protective clothing and behavioral alteration, and topical corticosteroids with or without an oral antimalarial agent. These standard therapies are often not used appropriately, resulting in a situation in which the patient is felt to have refractory disease. This chapter discusses these therapies and defines what is meant by refractory disease and how the author approaches these patients.

  8. Biomarkers of connective tissue disease in patients with intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Yurt, Alaattin; Vardar, Enver; Selçuki, Mehmet; Ertürk, Ali Riza; Ozbek, Gülriz; Atçi, Burak

    2010-09-01

    Connective tissue defects may play a significant role in the development of intracranial aneurysms (IAs). Multiorgan connective tissue disorders may, therefore, indicate a risk of IA development. We investigated biomarkers of connective tissue disease in patients with IAs. A series of 62 patients with IAs was studied by physical examination, echocardiography, ultrasound examination of the kidneys and abdomen, and microscopic examination of skin tissue (temporal area) and superficial temporal artery taken at operation. Patients with IAs had a higher incidence of biomarkers of systemic connective tissue disease than controls and identification of these markers may be important for screening for IAs. Microscopic investigation of biopsies of the skin and superficial temporal artery from patients and their relatives may become valuable for clinical diagnosis, identification of people at risk and basic studies of the pathogenesis of this vascular disease.

  9. Low Serum Hepcidin in Patients with Autoimmune Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lyberopoulou, Aggeliki; Chachami, Georgia; Gatselis, Nikolaos K; Kyratzopoulou, Eleni; Saitis, Asterios; Gabeta, Stella; Eliades, Petros; Paraskeva, Efrosini; Zachou, Kalliopi; Koukoulis, George K; Mamalaki, Avgi; Dalekos, George N; Simos, George

    2015-01-01

    Hepcidin, a liver hormone, is important for both innate immunity and iron metabolism regulation. As dysfunction of the hepcidin pathway may contribute to liver pathology, we analysed liver hepcidin mRNA and serum hepcidin in patients with chronic liver diseases. Hepcidin mRNA levels were determined in liver biopsies obtained from 126 patients with HCV (n = 21), HBV (n = 23), autoimmune cholestatic disease (primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis; PBC/PSC; n = 34), autoimmune hepatitis (AIH; n = 16) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD; n = 32). Sera sampled on the biopsy day from the same patients were investigated for serum hepcidin levels. Hepatic hepcidin mRNA levels correlated positively with ferritin and negatively with serum γ-GT levels. However, no correlation was found between serum hepcidin and either ferritin or liver hepcidin mRNA. Both serum hepcidin and the serum hepcidin/ferritin ratio were significantly lower in AIH and PBC/PSC patients' sera compared to HBV, HCV or NAFLD (P<0.001 for each comparison) and correlated negatively with serum ALP levels. PBC/PSC and AIH patients maintained low serum hepcidin during the course of their two-year long treatment. In summary, parallel determination of liver hepcidin mRNA and serum hepcidin in patients with chronic liver diseases shows that circulating hepcidin and its respective ratio to ferritin are significantly diminished in patients with autoimmune liver diseases. These novel findings, once confirmed by follow-up studies involving bigger size and better-matched disease subgroups, should be taken into consideration during diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune liver diseases.

  10. Management of Alcohol Dependence in Patients with Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Addolorato, Giovanni; Mirijello, Antonio; Leggio, Lorenzo; Ferrulli, Anna; Landolfi, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol dependence represents a chronic and relapsing disease affecting nearly 10% of the general population both in the United States and in Europe, with a widespread burden of morbidity and mortality. Alcohol dependence represents the most common cause of liver damage in the Western Countries. Although alcoholic liver disease is associated primarily with heavy drinking, continued alcohol consumption, even in low doses after the onset of liver disease, increases the risk of severe consequences, including mortality. Consequently the ideal treatment of patients affected by alcohol dependence and alcoholic liver disease should aim at achieving long-term total alcohol abstinence and preventing relapse. The aim of the present review is to provide an update on the management of alcohol dependence in patients with alcoholic liver disease. Increasing evidences suggests the usefulness of psychosocial interventions and medications combined in order to reduce alcohol intake, promote abstinence and prevent relapse in alcohol dependent patients. Disulfiram, naltrexone and acamprosate have been approved for this indication; gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is approved in Italy and Austria. However, these drugs have not been tested in patients with advanced liver disease. Amongst other emerging pharmacotherapies for alcoholism, topiramate, ondansetron, and baclofen seem the most promising ones. Both topiramate and ondansetron hold a safe profile in alcoholic patients; however, none of them has been tested in alcoholic patients with advanced liver disease. To date, baclofen represents the only anti-craving medication formally tested in a randomized clinical trial in alcoholic patients affected by liver cirrhosis, although additional confirmatory studies are warranted. PMID:23456576

  11. Abdominal wall abscesses in patients with Crohn's disease: clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, David; Keidar, Andrei; Gutman, Mordechai; Zissin, Rivka

    2006-03-01

    Abdominal wall abscess due to Crohn's Disease used to be one of the definitive indications for operative treatment. The advent of interventional radiology, the accessibility to percutaneous drainage, and the availability of new medications raised the possibility of nonoperative treatment of this condition. The clinical presentation, treatment, and follow-up of 13 patients with abdominal wall abscesses secondary to Crohn's Disease were retrospectively reviewed. During a 10-year period (1993-2003), 13 patients with abdominal wall abscess were treated. Five patients had an anterolateral abdominal wall abscess and eight had a posterior abscess (psoas). In 11 patients, 17 drainage procedures were performed: 12 percutaneous and 5 operative. Despite initial adequate drainage and resolution of the abscess, all 13 patients eventually needed resection of the offending bowel segment, which was undertaken in 12 patients. The mean time between abscess presentation and definitive operation was 2 months. Percutaneous drainage is an attractive option in most cases of abdominal abscesses. However, in Crohn's Disease patients with an abdominal wall abscess, we found a high failure rate despite initial adequate drainage. We suggest that surgical resection of the diseased bowel segment should be the definitive therapy.

  12. Vaccinations in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rahier, Jean-François; Moutschen, Michel; Van Gompel, Alfons; Van Ranst, Marc; Louis, Edouard; Segaert, Siegfried; Masson, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMID) such as RA, IBD or psoriasis, are at increased risk of infection, partially because of the disease itself, but mostly because of treatment with immunomodulatory or immunosuppressive drugs. In spite of their elevated risk for vaccine-preventable disease, vaccination coverage in IMID patients is surprisingly low. This review summarizes current literature data on vaccine safety and efficacy in IMID patients treated with immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory drugs and formulates best-practice recommendations on vaccination in this population. Especially in the current era of biological therapies, including TNF-blocking agents, special consideration should be given to vaccination strategies in IMID patients. Clinical evidence indicates that immunization of IMID patients does not increase clinical or laboratory parameters of disease activity. Live vaccines are contraindicated in immunocompromized individuals, but non-live vaccines can safely be given. Although the reduced quality of the immune response in patients under immunotherapy may have a negative impact on vaccination efficacy in this population, adequate humoral response to vaccination in IMID patients has been demonstrated for hepatitis B, influenza and pneumococcal vaccination. Vaccination status is best checked and updated before the start of immunomodulatory therapy: live vaccines are not contraindicated at that time and inactivated vaccines elicit an optimal immune response in immunocompetent individuals. PMID:20591834

  13. [Patient-centred care in rare diseases. A patient organisations' perspective].

    PubMed

    Reimann, A; Bend, J; Dembski, B

    2007-12-01

    Patients living with rare diseases have special common needs. Although the 5,000-6,000 rare diseases are very different, many patients share the experience of a time-consuming and sometimes frustrating journey towards diagnosis, the lack of established standards of care and foremost the search for competent physicians. Because of their complexity, rare diseases mostly demand an interdisciplinary and cross-sectional medical care. The model of the "patient-centred health-care value chain" explains how primary (prevention, diagnosis, treatment) and secondary activities (exchange of information, quality management, identification of unmet needs, research and development) contribute to the patient benefit applying a holistic approach. This model thereby prevents an isolated view from the perspective of single health-care providers. A survey to which 21 German patient-organisations in the rare-disease field contributed, was performed to obtain insight into preferred medical care concepts and preferences in the way that care is provided. The results clearly suggest that the patient organisations have a clear view on how disease-specific care should be delivered; however, in reality those preferences seem to be met to a minor extent in Germany at present. According to patient organisations, rare-disease patient care should always be a patient- centred, interdisciplinary and holistic effort. The solidaric health-care system in Germany provides an excellent basis for this kind of medical care. However, a new patient- rather than system-oriented approach is needed to make it work in reality.

  14. [Valvular heart disease in patients with anti-phospholipid syndrome].

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Rodríguez, F J; Reverter Calatayud, J C; Font Franco, J; Espinosa Garriga, G; Tàssies Penella, D; Ingelmo Morin, M

    2002-10-01

    Anti-phospholipid antibodies (APA) may involve heart and valvular heart disease seems to be the most common clinical manifestation. To study the prevalence and characteristics of valvular heart disease in a large patient population with anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) and also to analyze the clinical and immunological profile of patients with valvular involvement compared with those without involvement. Patients and methods. Retrospective analysis of 113 patients diagnosed of APS. Eighty-one percent were females and the mean age was 39 years (SD:14). Sixty-two percent of patients were diagnosed of primary APS (70 patients) and the remaining 38% (43 patients) corresponded to patients with APS associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The median follow-up of patients was 55 months (range: 7-144 months). The cardiologic assessment was performed by means of transthoracic echocardiogram. The study of anti-lupus anticoagulant (AL) was performed by means of coagulometric assays and measurement of anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL), anti-beta2 glycoprotein I (abeta2-PGI) and anti-prothrombin (aPT) by ELISA. The prevalence of valvular heart disease was 19%. The mitral valve was mostly involved (91%) and the most common structural abnormality corresponded to mitral insufficiency. Valvular replacement was required in 24% of patients. In the subgroup of patients with valvular heart disease, a significantly higher prevalence was observed in the following parameters: total thrombosis (71% versus 49%; p = 0.05), arterial thrombosis (57% versus 23%; p = 0.002), stroke (38% versus 13%; p = 0.01), trombocitopenia (71% versus 45%; p = 0.02), hemolytic anemia (29% versus 9%; p = 0.02), and livedo reticularis (48% versus 3%; p < 0.0001). As for immunological differences, only a higher prevalence of LA was found (81% versus 59%; p= 0.04) and abeta2-GPI (IgG isotype) (43% versus 22%; p = 0.05) in patients with valvular heart disease. Valvular heart disease is more frequent in pa-tients

  15. Sclerostin serum levels in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Roldán, Concepción; Genre, Fernanda; López-Mejías, Raquel; Ubilla, Begoña; Mijares, Verónica; Cano, Daniel Sánchez; Robles, Concepción López; Callejas-Rubio, José Luis; Fernández, Raquel Ríos; Ruiz, Manuela Expósito; González-Gay, Miguel Á; Ortego Centeno, Norberto

    2016-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases (SADs) are associated with lower bone mass and an increased risk of fractures. Sclerostin has a pivotal role in bone metabolism. Available data on circulating sclerostin levels in healthy subjects are limited, whereas those in SAD patients are absent. Our objective was to determine circulating sclerostin concentrations in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc) and Crohn's disease (CD) patients, and to analyze the factors associated with sclerostin concentrations. In this cross-sectional case-control study, serum sclerostin levels were measured in 38 SLE patients, 20 CD patients, 8 SSc patients and 20 healthy controls using a sclerostin ELISA. The mean values of the sclerostin (95% confidence interval) were 35.36 pmol l(-1) (12-101) in patients and 33.92 pmol l(-1) (2.31-100) in control subjects. The mean sclerostin value was 36.4 pmol l(-1) (22.1-48.5) in SLE patients, 26.7 pmol l(-1) (17.3-36.3) in CD patients and 51.8 pmol l(-1) (26.5-77.1) in SSc patients (P=0.001). Serum sclerostin levels were positively correlated with age (P<0.001), body mass index (BMI) (P=0.01) and lumbar spine Z-score (P=0.001) and negatively with creatinine clearance (P=0.001). Glucocorticoid treatment did not affect sclerostin levels. Sclerostin levels seem to have a heterogeneous pattern in different autoimmune diseases. SLE and SSc patients did not differ from healthy controls regarding sclerostin levels. The CD group had significantly lower values compared with SSc patients. Factors associated with sclerostin levels in autoimmune diseases seem to be the same than in the general population.

  16. Sclerostin serum levels in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Roldán, Concepción; Genre, Fernanda; López-Mejías, Raquel; Ubilla, Begoña; Mijares, Verónica; Cano, Daniel Sánchez; Robles, Concepción López; Callejas-Rubio, José Luis; Fernández, Raquel Ríos; Ruiz, Manuela Expósito; González-Gay, Miguel Á; Centeno, Norberto Ortego

    2016-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases (SADs) are associated with lower bone mass and an increased risk of fractures. Sclerostin has a pivotal role in bone metabolism. Available data on circulating sclerostin levels in healthy subjects are limited, whereas those in SAD patients are absent. Our objective was to determine circulating sclerostin concentrations in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc) and Crohn's disease (CD) patients, and to analyze the factors associated with sclerostin concentrations. In this cross-sectional case–control study, serum sclerostin levels were measured in 38 SLE patients, 20 CD patients, 8 SSc patients and 20 healthy controls using a sclerostin ELISA. The mean values of the sclerostin (95% confidence interval) were 35.36 pmol l−1 (12–101) in patients and 33.92 pmol l−1 (2.31–100) in control subjects. The mean sclerostin value was 36.4 pmol l−1 (22.1–48.5) in SLE patients, 26.7 pmol l−1 (17.3–36.3) in CD patients and 51.8 pmol l−1 (26.5–77.1) in SSc patients (P=0.001). Serum sclerostin levels were positively correlated with age (P<0.001), body mass index (BMI) (P=0.01) and lumbar spine Z-score (P=0.001) and negatively with creatinine clearance (P=0.001). Glucocorticoid treatment did not affect sclerostin levels. Sclerostin levels seem to have a heterogeneous pattern in different autoimmune diseases. SLE and SSc patients did not differ from healthy controls regarding sclerostin levels. The CD group had significantly lower values compared with SSc patients. Factors associated with sclerostin levels in autoimmune diseases seem to be the same than in the general population. PMID:26909149

  17. Cavernous sinus sampling in patients with Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Till; Flitsch, Jörg; van Leyen, Philine; Sauer, Nina; Aberle, Jens; Grzyska, Ulrich; Lüdecke, Dieter K

    2015-02-01

    OBJECT Correct diagnosis and precise localization of adenomas in patients with Cushing's disease are essential for avoiding unsuccessful transsphenoidal pituitary exploration. In addition to the well-established inferior petrosal sinus sampling, preoperative cavernous sinus sampling (CSS) was introduced as a potentially improved way to predict adenoma lateralization. The authors present their results with CSS in a consecutive series of patients with Cushing's disease. METHODS During 1999-2014, transsphenoidal surgeries were consecutively performed in 510 patients with Cushing's disease. For most patients, suppression of cortisol in high-dose dexamethasone tests and stimulation of adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol after administration of corticotropin-releasing hormone were sufficient to prove the diagnosis of adrenocorticotropic hormone-dependent hypercortisolism. Of the 510 patients, 67 (13%) were referred to the department of neuroradiology for CSS according to the technique of Teramoto. The indications for CSS were unclear endocrine test results or negative MRI results. Data for all patients were retrospectively analyzed. RESULTS A central/peripheral gradient was found in 59 patients; lateralization to the left or right side was found in 51. For 8 patients with a central/peripheral gradient, no left/right gradient could be determined. For another 8 patients with equivocal test results, no central/peripheral gradient was found. No severe CSS-associated complications were encountered. Of the 51 patients who underwent transsphenoidal surgery, the predicted lateralization was proven correct for 42 (82%). CONCLUSIONS As MRI techniques have improved, the number of potential candidates for this invasive method has decreased in the past decade. However, because detecting minute adenomas remains problematic, CSS remains a useful diagnostic tool for patients with Cushing's disease.

  18. Nononcologic Disease in Patients with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lowitz, Barry B.; Benjamin, Robert S.

    1977-01-01

    Nononcologic medical problems are common in patients with cancer. Failure to evaluate and treat these problems leads to considerable morbidity and mortality in people who often have potential for both comfortable and productive lives. While a physician is sometimes powerless to prevent the progression of underlying cancer, he must not allow a diagnostic category to color his approach. By seeing only an end point which is inevitable for all people, one could be inclined not to treat what is treatable. With clinical judgment, information and the eternal question of diagnosticians, “What else could this be?”, a physician can focus not on the inevitability of death but on the quality of life. PMID:878475

  19. Myocardial performance and perfusion during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease caused by Kawasaki disease

    SciTech Connect

    Paridon, S.M.; Ross, R.D.; Kuhns, L.R.; Pinsky, W.W. )

    1990-01-01

    For a study of the natural history of coronary artery lesions after Kawasaki disease and their effect on myocardial blood flow reserve with exercise, five such patients underwent exercise testing on a bicycle. Oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, minute ventilation, and electrocardiograms were monitored continuously. Thallium-201 scintigraphy was performed for all patients. One patient stopped exercise before exhaustion of cardiovascular reserve but had no evidence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities. Four patients terminated exercise because of exhaustion of cardiovascular reserve; one had normal cardiovascular reserve and thallium scintiscans, but the remaining patients had diminished cardiovascular reserve. Thallium scintigrams showed myocardial ischemia in two and infarction in one. No patient had exercise-induced electrocardiographic changes. These results indicate that patients with residual coronary artery lesions after Kawasaki disease frequently have reduced cardiovascular reserve during exercise. The addition of thallium scintigraphy and metabolic measurements to exercise testing improved the detection of exercise-induced abnormalities of myocardial perfusion.

  20. Conditional disease-free survival among patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Hyun-June; Lee, Se Kyung; Ryu, Jai Min; Park, Sungmin; Kim, Isaac; Bae, Soo Youn; Yu, Jonghan; Lee, Jeong Eon; Kim, Seok Won; Nam, Seok Jin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Conditional disease-free survival (CDFS) reflects changes over time. Because traditional disease-free survival (DFS) is estimated from the date of diagnosis, it is limited in the ability to predict risk of recurrence in patients who have been disease free. In this study, we determined CDFS of breast cancer patients and estimated the prognostic factors for DFS. We retrospectively reviewed clinical data of 7587 consecutive patients who underwent curative surgery for breast cancer between January 2004 and December 2013 at Samsung Medical Center. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify risk factors for DFS, which was computed using the Kaplan–Meier method. CDFS rates were based on cumulative DFS estimates. Median follow-up duration was 20.59 months. Three-year DFS was 93.46% at baseline. Three-year CDFS survival estimates for patients who had been disease free for 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years after treatment were calculated as 92.84%, 92.37%, 93.03%, 89.41%, and 79.64%, respectively. Three-year CDFS increased continuously each year after 1 year of DFS in hormone receptor (HR)-negative patients but decreased each year in HR-positive patients. In HR-positive patients who are disease free after 3 years, continuous care including surveillance and metastases workup should be considered, although this is not recommended in the current guidelines. On the other hand, the social costs may be reduced in HR-negative patients by extending the surveillance interval. Further studies are needed to identify indicators of DFS prognosis in breast cancer patients. PMID:28072715

  1. [Drug prescription profile in patients with advanced chronic diseases].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Duque, Nieves; Rivas-Cobas, Carlota; Bernabeu-Wittel, Máximo; Ruiz-Cantero, Alberto; Murcia-Zaragoza, José; Oliver, Miguel; Díez-Manglano, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the prescription profile and the factors associated with multiple medications (polypharmacy) and non-adherence in patients with advanced chronic diseases. Longitudinal cross-sectional study including 41 Spanish hospitals (PALIAR project). Polypharmacy was defined as a prescribed treatment with five or more drugs, and excessive polypharmacy when the number was ten or more. The adherence was evaluated using a questionnaire completed by the patients or their caregivers. Description of drug prescription profile and analysis was performed on the risk factors associated with multiple medications and non-adherence. The study included 1847 patients, and 1778 (96.2%) completed the questionnaire. Mean age was 78.74±10 years. Antihypertensives (82.6%), gastroprotectives (73.8%), anti-platelets/anticoagulants (70.3%), and psychotropic drugs (51.8%) were the most frequently prescribed drugs. Prevalence of polypharmacy/excessive polypharmacy was 86.2%/31.3%, with a mean of 8±3.5 drugs per patient. Errors in treatment compliance were detected in 48.2% of patients, but 38.5% and 9.6% referred to an occasional or almost daily failure, respectively. Factors associated with non-adherence were: to be a patient with multiple diseases, cognitive impairment, three or more 3 hospital admissions in the last three months, and having polypharmacy. Factors associated with polypharmacy were: to be a patient with multiple diseases, an ECOG score <3, age <85 years, and 3 or more hospital admissions. Factors associated with excessive polypharmacy were: to be a patient with multiple diseases and previous frequent hospital admissions. The prevalence of polypharmacy in patients with advanced chronic diseases is high, and mistakes in treatment compliance are frequent. Further studies with better defined objectives and more specific therapeutic limits are needed. Copyright © 2013 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Conditional disease-free survival among patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Paik, Hyun-June; Lee, Se Kyung; Ryu, Jai Min; Park, Sungmin; Kim, Isaac; Bae, Soo Youn; Yu, Jonghan; Lee, Jeong Eon; Kim, Seok Won; Nam, Seok Jin

    2017-01-01

    Conditional disease-free survival (CDFS) reflects changes over time. Because traditional disease-free survival (DFS) is estimated from the date of diagnosis, it is limited in the ability to predict risk of recurrence in patients who have been disease free. In this study, we determined CDFS of breast cancer patients and estimated the prognostic factors for DFS.We retrospectively reviewed clinical data of 7587 consecutive patients who underwent curative surgery for breast cancer between January 2004 and December 2013 at Samsung Medical Center. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify risk factors for DFS, which was computed using the Kaplan-Meier method. CDFS rates were based on cumulative DFS estimates.Median follow-up duration was 20.59 months. Three-year DFS was 93.46% at baseline. Three-year CDFS survival estimates for patients who had been disease free for 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years after treatment were calculated as 92.84%, 92.37%, 93.03%, 89.41%, and 79.64%, respectively. Three-year CDFS increased continuously each year after 1 year of DFS in hormone receptor (HR)-negative patients but decreased each year in HR-positive patients.In HR-positive patients who are disease free after 3 years, continuous care including surveillance and metastases workup should be considered, although this is not recommended in the current guidelines. On the other hand, the social costs may be reduced in HR-negative patients by extending the surveillance interval. Further studies are needed to identify indicators of DFS prognosis in breast cancer patients.

  3. Motor Sequence Learning Performance in Parkinson's Disease Patients Depends on the Stage of Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephan, Marianne A.; Meier, Beat; Zaugg, Sabine Weber; Kaelin-Lang, Alain

    2011-01-01

    It is still unclear, whether patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are impaired in the incidental learning of different motor sequences in short succession, although such a deficit might greatly impact their daily life. The aim of this study was thus to clarify the relation between disease parameters of PD and incidental motor learning of two…

  4. Motor Sequence Learning Performance in Parkinson's Disease Patients Depends on the Stage of Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephan, Marianne A.; Meier, Beat; Zaugg, Sabine Weber; Kaelin-Lang, Alain

    2011-01-01

    It is still unclear, whether patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are impaired in the incidental learning of different motor sequences in short succession, although such a deficit might greatly impact their daily life. The aim of this study was thus to clarify the relation between disease parameters of PD and incidental motor learning of two…

  5. Cancer in patients with rheumatic diseases exposed to TNF antagonists.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Loreto; Abasolo, Lydia; Descalzo, Miguel A; Pérez-Zafrilla, Beatriz; Sellas, Agustí; de Abajo, Francisco; Gomez-Reino, Juan J

    2011-08-01

    To describe the risk of cancer in patients exposed to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists. The following 2 clinical cohorts were studied: (1) BIOBADASER 2.0: a registry of patients suffering from rheumatic diseases exposed to TNF antagonists (2531 rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 1488 spondyloarthropathies, and 675 other rheumatic conditions); and (2) EMECAR: a cohort of 789 RA patients not exposed to TNF antagonists. Cancer incidence rates (IR) per 1000 patient-years and incidence rate ratios (IRR) were calculated for BIOBADASER 2.0 and EMECAR patients. The IR over time in BIOBADASER 2.0 patients was analyzed by joinpoint regression. The IRR was estimated to compare cancer rates in exposed versus nonexposed RA patients. Standardized incidence and mortality ratios (SIR, SMR) were also estimated. Risk factors for cancer in patients exposed to TNF antagonists were investigated by generalized linear models. The SMR for cancer in BIODASER 2.0 was 0.67 (95% CI: 0.51-0.86), and the SIR was 0.1 (95% CI 0.03-0.23). The IR in RA patients exposed to TNF antagonists was 5.8 (95% CI: 4.4-7.6), and the adjusted IRR was 0.48 (95% CI: 0.09-2.45). The IR in patients with previous cancer was 26.4 (95% CI: 4.1-171.5). Age, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and steroids were associated with a higher risk of developing cancer. The IR decreased after the first 4 months of exposure, without statistical significance. Overall cancer and mortality rates in patients with rheumatic diseases exposed to TNF antagonists are no higher than in the background Spanish population. However special attention should be paid to elderly patients, those with previous cancers, and patients treated with steroids. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of a regional disease management programme for patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Steuten, Lotte; Vrijhoef, Bert; Van Merode, Frits; Wesseling, Geert-Jan; Spreeuwenberg, Cor

    2006-12-01

    To assess the impact of a population-based disease management programme for adult patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on process measures, intermediate outcomes, and endpoints of care. Quasi-experimental design with 12-month follow-up. Region of Maastricht (the Netherlands) including university hospital and 16 general practices. Nine hundred and seventy-five patients of whom 658 have asthma and 317 COPD. Disease management programme. Endpoints of care are respiratory health, health utility, patient satisfaction, and total health care costs related to asthma or COPD. Quality aspects of care, disease control, self-care behaviour, smoking status, disease-specific knowledge, and patients' satisfaction improved after implementation of the programme. Lung function was not affected by implementation of the programme. For COPD patients, a significant improvement in health utility was found. For patients with asthma, significant cost savings were measured. Organizing health care according to principles of disease management for adults with asthma or COPD is associated with significant improvements in several processes and outcomes of care, while costs of care do not exceed the existing budget.

  7. Disease Awareness and Management Behavior of Patients with Atopic Dermatitis: A Questionnaire Survey of 313 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Eun; Lee, Young Bok; Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Hye Sung; Lee, Kyung Ho; Park, Young Min; Lee, Jun Young

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) should be relatively well informed about the disorder to control their condition and prevent flare-ups. Thus far, there is no accurate information about the disease awareness levels and therapeutic behavior of AD patients. Objective To collect data on patients' knowledge about AD and their behavior in relation to seeking information about the disease and its treatment. Methods We performed a questionnaire survey on the disease awareness and self-management behavior of AD patients. A total of 313 patients and parents of patients with AD who had visited the The Catholic University of Korea, Catholic Medical Center between November 2011 and October 2012 were recruited. We compared the percentage of correct answers from all collected questionnaires according to the demographic and disease characteristics of the patients. Results Although dermatologists were the most frequent disease information sources and treatment providers for the AD patients, a significant proportion of participants obtained information from the Internet, which carries a huge amount of false medical information. A considerable number of participants perceived false online information as genuine, especially concerning complementary and alternative medicine treatments of AD, and the adverse effects of steroids. Some questions on AD knowledge had significantly different answers according to sex, marriage status, educational level, type of residence and living area, disease duration, disease severity, and treatment history with dermatologists. Conclusion Dermatologists should pay more attention to correcting the common misunderstandings about AD to reduce unnecessary social/economic losses and improve treatment compliance. PMID:25673930

  8. Atypical form of cat scratch disease in immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Kojić, Miroslav; Mikić, Dragan; Nozić, Darko; Zolotarevski, Lidija

    2013-01-01

    Cat scratch disease (CSD) is an acute infectious disease with benign course caused by the bacteria Bartonella henselae. Clinically, it is usually manifested as regional lymphadenopathy and mild infective syndrome. Rare forms of the disease which usually occur in immunocompromised presons are: encephalitis, transverse myelitis, neuroretinitis, granulomatosus conjunctivitis, arthritis, hepatitis etc. We presented an atypical form of cat scratch disease in a young immunocompetent female person. The disease was manifested with prolonged fever, rash, purulent lymphadenitis and hepatitis. The diagnosis was based on characteristic patohystological finding and exclusion of the other causes of lymphadenopathy. The patient was treated by antibiotics for a few weeks, with surgical incision and drainage of the purulent lymphadenitis. Atypical forms of CSD could be an important differential-diagnostic problem, especially if there is no opportunity for serological confirmation of the disease.

  9. Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy in Patient with Crohn's Disease: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Sung-Min; Park, Ki Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Numerous causes of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) have been reported. Commonly, secondary osteoarthropathy accompanies pulmonary diseases such as carcinoma of the lung, pleural tumors, lung abscesses, and bronchiectasis. However, HOA in inflammatory bowel disease is a rare complication. There are only a few reports of secondary HOA with Crohn's disease. Our purpose was to report another case of HOA in Crohn's disease. We describe a case of a 27-year-old man with underlying Crohn's disease presenting with 2 years of pain in multiple joints. Radiographic findings suggested HOA in extremities. We performed a conservative treatment including medication and rehabilitations. The patient's symptoms were much improved at the latest follow-up. Although numerous studies on HOA have been published, the pathogenesis of HOA is still unclear. Various treatment modalities were recommended but further studies to uncover the pathogenesis of HOA with Crohn's disease and to establish a treatment modality are needed. PMID:25025001

  10. The prevalence of autoimmune disease in patients with esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Booy, J D; Takata, J; Tomlinson, G; Urbach, D R

    2012-04-01

    Achalasia is a rare disease of the esophagus that has an unknown etiology. Genetic, infectious, and autoimmune mechanisms have each been proposed. Autoimmune diseases often occur in association with one another, either within a single individual or in a family. There have been separate case reports of patients with both achalasia and one or more autoimmune diseases, but no study has yet determined the prevalence of autoimmune diseases in the achalasia population. This paper aims to compare the prevalence of autoimmune disease in patients with esophageal achalasia to the general population. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 193 achalasia patients who received treatment at Toronto's University Health Network between January 2000 and May 2010 to identify other autoimmune diseases and a number of control conditions. We determined the general population prevalence of autoimmune diseases from published epidemiological studies. The achalasia sample was, on average, 10-15 years older and had slightly more men than the control populations. Compared to the general population, patients with achalasia were 5.4 times more likely to have type I diabetes mellitus (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-19), 8.5 times as likely to have hypothyroidism (95% CI 5.0-14), 37 times as likely to have Sjögren's syndrome (95% CI 1.9-205), 43 times as likely to have systemic lupus erythematosus (95% CI 12-154), and 259 times as likely to have uveitis (95% CI 13-1438). Overall, patients with achalasia were 3.6 times more likely to suffer from any autoimmune condition (95% CI 2.5-5.3). Our findings are consistent with the impression that achalasia's etiology has an autoimmune component. Further research is needed to more conclusively define achalasia as an autoimmune disease.

  11. Optimising care of patients with chronic disease: patient-oriented education may improve disease knowledge and self-management.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Kelly L; Horsfall, Leigh U; Ruffin, Brittany J; Cottrell, W Neil; Chachay, Veronique S; Irvine, Katharine M; Martin, Jennifer H; Powell, Elizabeth E; Valery, Patricia C

    2017-08-01

    Many patients with chronic disease do not possess the knowledge and skills required to access and interpret appropriate health information. A pilot study in people with liver cirrhosis (n = 50) identified that only 54% of patients could recall being given written information by a clinician and 64% had self-sought information, most commonly using the Internet. Many patients reported difficulties understanding the material and the majority wanted more accessible information. A pilot chronic disease educational booklet was well received by the study participants with 85% reporting it was helpful and 78% using it in between clinic appointments. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  12. Illness perception patterns in patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Kunschitz, E; Friedrich, O; Schöppl, Ch; Maitz, J; Sipötz, J

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify patterns of illness perception in patients with angiografically verified Coronary Artery Disease. A total of 166 patients (age: 64.4 ± 12.1, 80.7% male) were recruited after angiography. Cluster analysis on the items of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire was used to identify patterns of illness perception. The resulting groups were characterized with regard to Quality of Life (MacNew), anxiety and depression (GAD-7 and PHQ-9) and resilience (RS-13). The analysis revealed 4 distinct groups differing with regard to the items covering the perception of the physical and emotional impact of disease. Stronger perceptions in these domains were associated with lower Health Related Quality of Life and higher levels of emotional distress. Group 1 (33.1%) reported the strongest perceptions of the physical and emotional impact of disease and expressed low treatment control, high chronic timeline and significantly higher levels of depression than the other groups. Group 2 (27.7%) was characterized by more moderate perceptions of the emotional and physical impact of disease together with low scores on illness coherence and chronic timeline. Groups 3 (25.3%) and 4 (13.9%) reported smaller physical and emotional impact of illness but differed in chronic timeline. Our results correspond largely to recent findings in patients with other chronic diseases. Further research is needed to explore if stratification of patients according patterns of illness perception can help to inform patient-physician communication strategies.

  13. DIFFERENCES IN ILLNESS REPRESENTATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Pagels, Agneta A; Söderquist, Birgitta Klang; Heiwe, Susanne

    2015-09-01

    To explore the impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on individual illness representations, including symptoms and causal attributions. Fifty-four patients responded to the Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) and a further seven patients undertook cognitive interviews regarding the IPQ-R. All respondents had CKD stage 2-5, not undergoing renal replacement therapy. Those in earlier CKD stages and those with fewer symptoms perceived a significantly different understanding of their condition than those in more advanced disease stages or with more symptoms. Behavioural and psychological attributions were commonly referred to as contributing causes to CKD. These attributions were associated to negative illness representations. An uncertainty assessing symptoms attributed to CKD was indicated, especially in earlier disease stages. Illness representations differ with CKD stages and symptom burden. The patients in earlier disease stages or with fewer symptoms did not hold as strong beliefs about their illness as being a threat as those in advanced stages or with more symptoms. Self-blame emerged as a common causal attribution. Patients did not always relate symptoms to CKD, therefore this study identifies a gap in patients' disease knowledge, especially in earlier stages of the condition. © 2015 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  14. Weak central coherence in patients with Alzheimer's disease(•).

    PubMed

    Mårdh, Selina

    2013-03-15

    Central coherence refers to the ability to interpret details of information into a whole. To date, the concept of central coherence is mainly used in research of autism, Asperger's syndrome and recently in the research on eating disorders. The main purpose of the present study was to examine central coherence in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Nine Alzheimer's disease patients and ten age- and gender-matched control subjects, who differed significantly in neurological assessment, were shown a picture of a fire. Compared to control subjects, the Alzheimer's disease patients described the picture in a fragmented way by mentioning details and separate objects without perceiving the context of the fire. In conclusion, patients with Alzheimer's disease are at the weak end of central coherence, and hence suffer from a fragmented view of their surroundings. The findings have important clinical implications for the understanding of patients with Alzheimer's diseaseand also for the possibility of caregivers to meet the Alzheimer's disease individual in an appropriate way in the everyday care.

  15. Chronic Lyme disease: misconceptions and challenges for patient management

    PubMed Central

    Halperin, John J

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease, infection with the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, causes both specific and nonspecific symptoms. In untreated chronic infection, specific manifestations such as a relapsing large-joint oligoarthritis can persist for years, yet subside with appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Nervous system involvement occurs in 10%–15% of untreated patients and typically involves lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, and/or mononeuritis multiplex; in some rare cases, patients have parenchymal inflammation in the brain or spinal cord. Nervous system infection is similarly highly responsive to antimicrobial therapy, including oral doxycycline. Nonspecific symptoms such as fatigue, perceived cognitive slowing, headache, and others occur in patients with Lyme disease and are indistinguishable from comparable symptoms occurring in innumerable other inflammatory states. There is no evidence that these nonspecific symptoms reflect nervous system infection or damage, or that they are in any way specific to or diagnostic of this or other tick-borne infections. When these symptoms occur in patients with Lyme disease, they typically also subside after antimicrobial treatment, although this may take time. Chronic fatigue states have been reported to occur following any number of infections, including Lyme disease. The mechanism underlying this association is unclear, although there is no evidence in any of these infections that these chronic posttreatment symptoms are attributable to ongoing infection with B. burgdorferi or any other identified organism. Available appropriately controlled studies indicate that additional or prolonged courses of antimicrobial therapy do not benefit patients with a chronic fatigue-like state after appropriately treated Lyme disease. PMID:26028977

  16. Alpha-1-antitrypsin phenotypes in adult liver disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Alempijevic, Tamara; Milutinovic, Aleksandra Sokic; Kovacevic, Nada

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) is an important serine protease inhibitor in humans. Hereditary alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) affects lungs and liver. Liver disease caused by AATD in paediatric patients has been previously well documented. However, the association of liver disease with alpha-1-antitrypsin gene polymorphisms in adults is less clear. Therefore, we aimed to study AAT polymorphisms in adults with liver disease. We performed a case-control study. AAT polymorphisms were investigated by isoelectric focusing in 61 patients with liver cirrhosis and 9 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. The control group consisted of 218 healthy blood donors. A significant deviation of observed and expected frequency of AAT phenotypes from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (chi-square = 34.77, df 11, P = 0.000) in the patient group was caused by a higher than expected frequency of Pi ZZ homozygotes (f = 0.0143 and f = 0.0005, respectively, P = 0.000). In addition, Pi M homozygotes were more frequent in patients than in controls (63% and 46%, respectively, P = 0.025). Our study results show that Pi ZZ homozygosity in adults could be associated with severe liver disease. Presence of Pi M homozygosity could be associated with liver disease via some mechanism different from Z allele-induced liver damage through accumulation of AAT polymers. PMID:19961268

  17. [ADHD: Burden of Disease According to Subtypes in Adult Patients].

    PubMed

    Retz-Junginger, Petra; Rösler, Michael; Giesen, Lisa Katharina; Philipp-Wiegmann, Florence; Römer, Konstanze; Zinnow, Toivo; Retz, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    In consideration of ADHD subtype we assessed burden of disease of adult ADHD patients and neuroticism. 511 adult ADHD patients were enrolled in the study. We measured ADHD symptoms categorically and dimensionally by the "Homburger ADHS-Skalen für Erwachsene (HASE)". All participants rated their ADHD associated level of suffering. To assess personality traits, the psychometric instrument NEO-PI-R was used. In patients with higher levels of neuroticism, there was no significant difference in the level of suffering between the ADHD subtypes. In the group of ADHD patients which scored low on the neuroticism scale, ADHD combined patients are significant more affected compared to the predominantly hyperactive-impulsive or the predominantly inattentive type. These results underline the hypothesis that the burden of disease is not only related to the level of ADHD symptoms and subtype but also moderated by neuroticism. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Vitamin D deficiency in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Jane

    2016-08-11

    There are over 300 000 people in the UK affected by inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Though vitamin D deficiency is common in patients with IBD, National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance regarding vitamin D supplementation does not address the needs of patients with chronic inflammatory diseases. However, there is growing evidence that vitamin D plays an important role in the management of IBD. Nurses caring for patients with IBD should have an understanding of the causes and consequences of vitamin D deficiency in this patient group. This article looks at the role vitamin D plays in the body and the challenges of treating deficiency. Consideration is given to diet, sun exposure and supplementation as possible treatments and acknowledges the limitations of treatments for patients with IBD. With a lack of clear national guidance, it is hoped that raising awareness of these issues will inform nursing practice and ensure a holistic approach to care.

  19. Careful counseling is required for patients with pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Neinstein, L S; Katz, B

    1984-11-01

    Patients with asthma, cystic fibrosis, and other pulmonary diseases require careful family planning counseling. The asmatic patient should be given a birth control method that does not affect the disease or interfere with asthma medications. Oral contraceptives (OCs) are not contraindicated in asthmatic patients, although they may produce rhinitis symptoms. It is possible that the antiinflammatory action of steroids taken by asthmatics may decrease IUD effectiveness. Pregnancy can be a significant risk for patients with cystic fibrosis. In terms of contraception, there is concern that progesterone may cause bronchial mucus to thicken. Methods such as foam, the diaphragm, and condoms are preferred. An IUD can be offered to the patient who must avoid pregnancy due to poor cardiopulmonary status. It should be noted that pulmonary exacerbations of asthma and cystic fibrosis could potentially be confused with a pulmonary embolism.

  20. Kleptomania in patients with neuro-Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Shugaiv, Erkingül; Kıyat-Atamer, Aslı; Tüzün, Erdem; Kürtüncü, Murat; Baral-Kulaksızoğlu, Işın; Akman Demir, Gülşen

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to characterize the prevalence and clinical features of kleptomania, an impulse control disorder, in patients with Behçet's disease involving the central nervous system. Medical records of 350 patients with neuro-Behçet's disease were evaluated, and clinical and neuropsychological features of patients with kleptomania were noted. Of the 350 neuro-Behçet's disease patients 6 (1.7%) had presented with symptoms that fulfilled the criteria of kleptomania according to the revised 4th version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. The 6 patients (5 men, 1 woman) had parenchymal lesions and had developed kleptomania during remission. Magnetic resonance imaging done on the 6 patients before the onset of kleptomania mostly revealed brainstem lesions. Psychiatric assessment did not show any comorbid psychiatric disorders and neuropsychological evaluation showed executive dysfunction in all patients. The 6 patients with kleptomania had developed a frontal lobe syndrome. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. [Otorhinolaryngological manifestations in patients with Behçet disease].

    PubMed

    Morales-Angulo, Carmelo; Vergara Pastrana, Sandra; Obeso-Agüera, Sergio; Acle, Leticia; González-Gay, Miguel Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Behçet disease (BD) is a systemic immune-mediated vasculitis of unknown origin characterised by recurrent orogenital ulceration, ocular inflammation and skin lesions. The aim of our study was to identify ear, nose and throat (ENT) manifestations associated with BD. Retrospective review of the medical records of all patients diagnosed with BD who attended a tertiary public hospital in Cantabria (Spain) over a period of 22 years. Clinical manifestations, in particular those concerning ENT, were retrieved from medical records. A medical literature review of ENT manifestations was conducted. Thirty-three patients (age range: 17-64 years) were included in the study. Most of them presented oral ulcers (97%). Eight patients (24%) presented oropharyngeal ulcers and 5 patients (15%) experienced audiovestibular symptoms (high frequency sensorineural hearing loss, vertigo and bilateral vestibular hypofunction). One patient had symptoms compatible with vestibular neuronitis as the presentation manifestation of Neuro-Behçet. In 4 patients (12%) the presence of odynophagia secondary to the presence of oropharyngeal lesions, initially interpreted as acute or recurrent tonsillitis, was the first manifestation of the disease, alone or associated with cutaneous or ocular lesions. In addition to the characteristic oral ulcers present in most patients with BD, ulcers in the oropharynx, occasionally interpreted as acute pharyngitis, are also common in these patients. Audiovestibular manifestations frequently appear during the course of the disease and may be the first symptom of central nervous system involvement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. [Disease management system in patients with chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Scardi, Sabino; Humar, Franco; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Mazzone, Carmine; Giansante, Carlo; Sinagra, Gianfranco

    2007-02-01

    Healthcare managers are more and more interested in the role of general practitioners (GP) in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Continuing adjustments of the health organization are the old/new challenge in improving patient care. The European Society of Cardiology guidelines recommend a disease-management program for heart failure (HF); moreover, observational studies and randomized controlled trials have reported better patient outcomes if patients are in charge of cardiologists rather than GPs or other physicians. Patients with chronic HF are often very old and affected by multiple comorbid conditions, by themselves associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, too many patients receive neither a correct diagnosis nor treatment until advanced disease occurs. New treatment approaches, some of them requiring the expertise of well-trained cardiologists, are ongoing to improve the clinical outcomes. The optimal management of patients with HF needs teamwork, i.e. GPs, cardiologists, nurses and caregivers, since a multidisciplinary program, only, can embody the best answer for outpatients with chronic HF. Currently, the Cardiovascular Center in Trieste is performing an experimental trial, so far never attempted before, in treating patients with chronic HF using a thorough approach with the full involvement of local cardiologists, GPs and nurses. Such approach is, at the same time, as well a challenge as an opportunity: a challenge because conventional clinical habits must be changed; an opportunity because patients can benefit from a proper whole care-group, aimed at prolonging life and reducing morbidity and symptoms.

  3. Interventional differences among Huntington's disease patients by disease progression in commercial and medicaid populations.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Karen E; Divino, Victoria; DeKoven, Mitch; Langbehn, Douglas; Warner, John H; Giuliano, Joseph; Lee, Won Chan

    2014-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that spans distinct disease stages over 15-20 years. Various interventions are available which may allow patients to live outside of a nursing home for a longer time. However, little is known about use of these interventions by disease stage and by insurance type. We compared use of interventions among early, middle and late stages of HD in commercial (C) and Medicaid (M) health insurance populations. HD patients (ICD-9-CM 333.4) were identified from Thomson Reuters' MarketScan C and M database (2002-2009) and hierarchically grouped into disease stages based upon the presence of defining clinical markers. A total of 1,272 HD patients (752/520 C/M) were identified. While stage distribution was nearly uniform in the C database - 34.0/35.5/34.0% (early/middle/late stage) - in the M population the majority were late stage (74.0%). Overall mean age was similar between C and M populations. Among late-stage patients, more M patients resided in a nursing home (M:73.8% v. C:40.6%) and received hospice care (M:18.4% v. C:11.3%). Physical therapy (PT) and home assistance were the most frequent interventions used by middle-stage patients, however more C patients received PT (C:64.0% v. M:37.1%) while more M patients received home assistance (M:75.3% v. C:53.2%). Among late-stage patients, PT was also higher in the C population (56.3% v. 48.3%). More M patients had assistive devices at home in both middle (M:25.8% v. C:9.7%) and late stages (M:35.6% v.C:23.4%). Apparent interventional differences emerged which varied by disease stage and insurance type.

  4. Diagnosis and treatment of patients with severe Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Voisin, Thierry; Vellas, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    In contrast with the earlier stages and, in particular, the predementia stage, of Alzheimer's disease (AD), severe dementia is often neglected. However, the advanced stages of dementia are just as important as the earlier stages because of their frequency, their impact on the lives of patients and their caregivers, and their economic consequences. All patients with moderately severe to severe dementia must be evaluated for cognitive, functional, psychological and behavioural symptoms. Thorough and regular evaluation of patients in the advanced stages of the disease has the following objectives: improving patients' quality of life by encouraging use of their remaining capacities; setting up or modifying a care plan; playing a role in the follow-up of measures instituted; and documenting the natural history of the disease. Therapeutic trials with cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine have been conducted in patients with severe stages of AD. As a consequence, memantine has been approved by numerous drug agencies and donepezil has been approved by the US FDA for use in severe stages of the disease. However, it is important to note that at this stage of AD, and perhaps more than in any other, management must be global and multidisciplinary because of the expression of the disease, its complications and intercurrent disorders. Indeed, thorough knowledge by health professionals of the expression of all disease disorders and intercurrent disorders, and of their significance during the severe stage of AD, is important in the management of these patients to limit complications and facilitate prompt establishment of appropriate care. More effort is needed in both clinical and research settings to ensure that patients with severe AD and their relatives can be offered optimal management.

  5. Specific gastroduodenoscopic findings in Crohn's disease: Comparison with findings in patients with ulcerative colitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, M; Kato, J; Morimoto, N; Fujimoto, T; Okada, H; Yamamoto, K

    2008-06-01

    Crohn's disease patients often carry gastroduodenal lesions. However, few reports have addressed specific gastroduodenoscopic findings in Crohn's disease patients. The gastroduodenoscopic findings of 63 Crohn's disease patients were examined. Those of 62 ulcerative colitis and 63 age- and gender-matched gastroesophageal reflux disease patients were also reviewed as controls. Findings of bamboo-joint-like appearance, gastric antral erosions, and duodenal lesions were the specific findings that were highlighted. Of 63 Crohn's disease patients, 47 (75%) had at least one of the specific gastroduodenoscopic findings, and the prevalence of these findings was significantly higher in Crohn's disease patients than in ulcerative colitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease patients (ulcerative colitis, 24/62, 39%; gastroesophageal reflux disease, 15/63, 24%, P < 0.0001). In particular, bamboo-joint-like appearance was almost unique to Crohn's disease patients (Crohn's disease, 28/63, 44%; ulcerative colitis, 3/62, 5%; gastroesophageal reflux disease, 0/63, 0%, P < 0.0001). Analysis of the relationship between the Crohn's disease patient's background and gastrodunodenoscopic findings revealed that both patients with disease affecting the ileum and those with previous gut operations were more likely to exhibit the specific gastroduodenoscopic findings (P = 0.030 and P = 0.043, respectively). Specific gastroduodenoscopic findings were observed in Crohn's disease patients. In particular, bamboo-joint-like appearance could be a unique marker of Crohn's disease.

  6. [Euthanasia, catastrophic disease and the moribund patient].

    PubMed

    Picard-Ami, L A

    2001-01-01

    Euthanasia has always constituted a controversial subject, but has recently been revived by a good number of well meaning intellectuals, many of whom, by and large, are not physicians. The present resurgence of this matter is due, primarily, to the prevalence of modern medical technology that makes it possible to maintain a futile life, often vegetative in nature, for an extended and even indefinite period of time. This is a complex situation that must be focused from different angles, one of which can be attributed to the conflict often experienced by physicians who have to deal with the management of catastrophic illness and realize how impotent they may be to achieve such difficult task. Another important aspect is the prospect of the greater degree of dehumanization that can arise from the management of patients with a devastating and incurable sickness. We feel that the ethical and healthy answer to this issue lies on the norm that advises health-care takers to convey optimal palliative care and constant emotional support to the sick persons and their families.

  7. Relation between Voice Handicap Index (VHI) and disease severity in Iranian patients with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Karkheiran, Siamak; Moradi, Negin; Shahidi, Gholam Ali; Salehi, Masoud

    2012-01-01

    Background One third of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have mentioned “dysphonia” as their most debilitating communication deficit. Patient-based measurements, such as Voice Handicap Index (VHI) add necessary supplementary information to clinical and physiological assessment. There are a few studies about relation between VHI and disease severity in PD, although none of them showed any significant correlation. The goal of this study was to find correlation between these variables in Iranian PD patients. Method This cross-sectional, analytical and non-interventional study was done on 23 PD patients who reported a voice disorder related to their disease. They were selected from attendants of movement disorders clinic of Hazrat Rasool Akram Hospital. The relationship between disease severity (according to Hoehn and Yahr/H&Y and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-part3 /UPDRS-III) and VHI questionnaire (and its 3 domains) was investigated based on patients’ sex, UPDRS-III score H&Y and VHI. Results Total VHI and its 3 domains had no relationship with disease severity (H&Y) in all patients and by sex separation. However, there was a positive correlation between VHI and disease severity (UPDRS-III) (r = 0.485). There was also a relation between physical and functional domains of VHI and UPDRS (rP=0.530, rF=0.479) while no relationship observed regarding sex differences. 9 out of 18 UPDRS-III items had strong relationship with VHI (total and 3subscales). Conclusion Iranian PD patients feel handicap according to voice disorder caused by PD. Patient satisfaction of voice decreases with the disease severity and progression. A larger sample size is necessary to find relationship in genders. VHI is an important issue could be offered to be used in PD beside other assessments PMID:23482344

  8. Cardiovascular disease relates to intestinal uptake of p-cresol in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Serum p-cresyl sulfate (PCS) associates with cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease. PCS concentrations are determined by intestinal uptake of p-cresol, human metabolism to PCS and renal clearance. Whether intestinal uptake of p-cresol itself is directly associated with cardiovascular disease in patients with renal dysfunction has not been studied to date. Methods We performed a prospective study in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 1 – 5 (NCT00441623). Intestinal uptake of p-cresol, under steady state conditions, was estimated from 24 h urinary excretion of PCS. Primary endpoint was time to first cardiovascular event, i.e., cardiac death, myocardial infarction/ischemia, ventricular arrhythmia, cardiovascular surgery, ischemic stroke or symptomatic peripheral arterial disease. Statistical analysis was done using Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox proportional hazard analyses. Results In a cohort of 200 patients, median 24 h urinary excretion of PCS amounted to 457.47 μmol (IQR 252.68 – 697.17). After a median follow-up of 52 months, 25 patients reached the primary endpoint (tertile 1/2/3: 5/6/14 events, log rank P 0.037). Higher urinary excretion of PCS was directly associated with cardiovascular events (univariate hazard ratio per 100 μmol increase: 1.112, P 0.002). In multivariate analysis, urinary excretion of PCS remained a predictor of cardiovascular events, independent of eGFR (hazard ratio 1.120, P 0.002). Conclusions In patients with chronic kidney disease, intestinal uptake of p-cresol associates with cardiovascular disease independent of renal function. The intestinal generation and absorption of p-cresol may be therapeutic targets to reduce cardiovascular disease risk in patients with renal dysfunction. PMID:24912660

  9. Foot pathology in patients with Paget's disease of bone.

    PubMed

    Williams, Anita E; O'Neill, Terence W; Mercer, Sylvia; Toro, Brigitte; Nester, Christopher J

    2006-01-01

    The characteristic bone deformities associated with advanced Paget's disease of bone may result in abnormal gait and plantar foot pressures, which contribute to the development of pressure-related skin problems. This study aimed to characterize the foot problems and foot-care needs in this patient group and to investigate the effect of disease distribution on the occurrence of foot pathology. One hundred thirty-four patients with Paget's disease were assessed clinically, and the Foot Structure Index was completed for each patient. Patients completed self-administered questionnaires concerning foot function (Foot Function Index) and quality of life (12-Item Short Form). The results of this study suggest that foot-health and footwear problems are common in patients with Paget's disease. Forty percent of the patients required professional foot care in addition to those already receiving it. The site of pagetic involvement did not affect the occurrence of foot pathology. Further research is required on the impact of the extent of any femoral or tibial deformity on foot symptoms and pathology. Biomechanical studies of the forces and motion in the foot related to different degrees of femoral and tibial deformity might also help determine the impact of deformity on foot pathology.

  10. Palliative care for patients with end-stage liver disease.

    PubMed

    Larson, Anne M

    2015-05-01

    Liver disease results in over four million physician visits and over 750,000 hospitalizations per year in the USA. Those with chronic liver disease frequently progress to cirrhosis, end-stage liver disease (ESLD), and death. Patients with ESLD experience numerous complications, including muscle cramps, confusion (hepatic encephalopathy), protein calorie malnutrition, muscle wasting, fluid overload (ascites, edema), bleeding (esophagogastric variceal hemorrhage), infection (spontaneous bacterial peritonitis), fatigue, anxiety, and depression. Despite significant improvements in palliation of these complications, patients still suffer reduced quality of life and must confront the fact that their disease will often inexorably progress to death. Liver transplantation is a valid option in this setting, increasing the duration of survival and palliating many of the symptoms. However, many patients die waiting for an organ or are not candidates for transplantation due to comorbid illness. Others receive a transplant but succumb to complications of the transplant itself. Patients and families must struggle with simultaneously hoping for a cure while facing a life-threatening illness. Ideally, the combination of palliative care with life-sustaining therapy can maximize the patients' quality and quantity of life. If it becomes clear that life-sustaining therapy is no longer an option, these patients are then already in a system to help them with end-of-life care.

  11. Screening for asymptomatic cardiovascular disease in Arab patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Elsharawy, M A; Al-Elq, A H; Alkhadra, A H; Moghazy, K M; Elsaid, A S

    2011-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis and accordingly increased morbidity and mortality. This study aimed at screening high risk diabetic patients for atherosclerosis in different arterial territories. All high risk asymptomatic patients attending the diabetic clinic, King Fahd Hospital of the University, Saudi Arabia were invited to be screened for peripheral arterial disease (PAD), extra-cranial cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and coronary artery disease (CAD) over one year. All participants underwent measurement of ankle brachial pressure index, carotid Duplex scan and exercise electrocardiography (ECG). All patients underwent evaluation of conventional risk factors for atherosclerosis One hundred and sixty nine patients were invited to be screened. Of these 138 (82%) completed all the screening tests. The mean age was 53.5±7.18 years. Seventy-five (55%) had evidence of subclinical atherosclerosis. In the atherosclerotic group, 24 patients had PAD, 47 had CVD and 30 had CAD. There were significant differences between the atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic groups with regard to most risk factors. In age, sex adjusted, the risk of developing atherosclerosis was significantly increased with all risk factors. Dyslipidemia had the highest association (OR 9.7, 95% CI 8.1-10.2) Participation and diagnostic yield of screening for atherosclerosis had satisfactory validity and reliability. Routine screening in high-risk diabetic patients can serve as an effective tool for diagnosis of sub clinical cardiovascular disease and provide strategies to optimize risk reduction.

  12. Cerebral hemodynamics and endothelial function in patients with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Segura, Tomás; Ayo-Martín, Oscar; Gómez-Fernandez, Isabel; Andrés, Carolina; Barba, Miguel A; Vivancos, José

    2013-11-11

    Cerebral vasculopathy have been described in Fabry disease, in which altered cerebral blood flow, vascular remodelling or impairment of endothelial function could be involved. Our study aims to evaluate these three possibilities in a group of Fabry patients, and compare it to healthy controls. Cerebral hemodynamics, vascular remodelling and systemic endothelial function were investigated in 10 Fabry patients and compared to data from 17 healthy controls. Transcranial Doppler was used to study blood flow velocity of intracranial arteries and cerebral vasomotor reactivity. For the study of vascular remodelling and endothelial function, intima-media thickness of common carotid arteries, flow-mediated dilation in brachial artery and serum levels of soluble VCAM-1, TNF-α, high-sensitive CRP and IL-6 were measured. Differences between groups were evaluated using appropriate tests. No relevant differences were observed in cerebral hemodynamic parameters, intima-media thickness or flow-mediated dilation. There was a trend for low serum levels of IL-6 and high serum levels of TNF-α and high-sensitive CRP in Fabry patients; plasma concentrations of soluble VCAM-1 were significantly higher in Fabry disease patients than in healthy volunteers (p = 0.02). In our sample, we did not find relevant alterations of cerebral hemodynamics in Fabry disease patients. Increased levels of plasmatic endothelial biomarkers seem to be the most important feature indicative of possible vascular dysfunction in Fabry disease patients.

  13. Cerebral hemodynamics and endothelial function in patients with Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cerebral vasculopathy have been described in Fabry disease, in which altered cerebral blood flow, vascular remodelling or impairment of endothelial function could be involved. Our study aims to evaluate these three possibilities in a group of Fabry patients, and compare it to healthy controls. Methods Cerebral hemodynamics, vascular remodelling and systemic endothelial function were investigated in 10 Fabry patients and compared to data from 17 healthy controls. Transcranial Doppler was used to study blood flow velocity of intracranial arteries and cerebral vasomotor reactivity. For the study of vascular remodelling and endothelial function, intima-media thickness of common carotid arteries, flow-mediated dilation in brachial artery and serum levels of soluble VCAM-1, TNF-α, high-sensitive CRP and IL-6 were measured. Differences between groups were evaluated using appropriate tests. Results No relevant differences were observed in cerebral hemodynamic parameters, intima-media thickness or flow-mediated dilation. There was a trend for low serum levels of IL-6 and high serum levels of TNF-α and high-sensitive CRP in Fabry patients; plasma concentrations of soluble VCAM-1 were significantly higher in Fabry disease patients than in healthy volunteers (p = 0.02). Conclusions In our sample, we did not find relevant alterations of cerebral hemodynamics in Fabry disease patients. Increased levels of plasmatic endothelial biomarkers seem to be the most important feature indicative of possible vascular dysfunction in Fabry disease patients. PMID:24207059

  14. Altered Esophageal Mucosal Structure in Patients with Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pinto-Sánchez, María Inés; Nachman, Fabio D.; Fuxman, Claudia; Iantorno, Guido; Hwang, Hui Jer; Ditaranto, Andrés; Costa, Florencia; Longarini, Gabriela; Wang, Xuan Yu; Huang, Xianxi; Vázquez, Horacio; Moreno, María L.; Niveloni, Sonia; Bercik, Premysl; Smecuol, Edgardo; Mazure, Roberto; Bilder, Claudio; Mauriño, Eduardo C.; Verdu, Elena F.; Bai, Julio C.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim. Reflux symptoms (RS) are common in patients with celiac disease (CD), a chronic enteropathy that affects primarily the small intestine. We evaluated mucosal integrity and motility of the lower esophagus as mechanisms contributing to RS generation in patients with CD. Methods. We enrolled newly diagnosed CD patients with and without RS, nonceliac patients with classical reflux disease (GERD), and controls (without RS). Endoscopic biopsies from the distal esophagus were assessed for dilated intercellular space (DIS) by light microscopy and electron microscopy. Tight junction (TJ) mRNA proteins expression for zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-2 and claudin-3 (CLDN-2; CLDN-3) was determined using qRT-PCR. Results. DIS scores were higher in patients with active CD than in controls, but similar to GERD patients. The altered DIS was found even in CD patients without RS and normalized after one year of a gluten-free diet. CD patients with and without RS had lower expression of ZO-1 than controls. The expression of CLDN-2 and CLDN-3 was similar in CD and GERD patients. Conclusions. Our study shows that patients with active CD have altered esophageal mucosal integrity, independently of the presence of RS. The altered expression of ZO-1 may underlie loss of TJ integrity in the esophageal mucosa and may contribute to RS generation. PMID:27446827

  15. Normal cardiovascular reflex testing in patients with parkin disease.

    PubMed

    Del Sorbo, Francesca; Elia, Antonio E; De Joanna, Gabriella; Romito, Luigi M; Garavaglia, Barbara; Albanese, Alberto

    2007-03-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate cardiovascular autonomic function in patients with parkin disease. Ten patients with a genetically confirmed diagnosis were compared to 11 healthy controls. Symptoms related to autonomic dysfunction were collected by structured interviews. Cardiovascular autonomic reflex function was evaluated using a standard battery of eight tests. Autonomic tests included the study of sympathetic function through the analysis of blood pressure responses to head-up tilt, standing, isometric hand grip, cold pressor, mental arithmetic, Valsalva maneuver (Valsalva overshoot), and the study of parasympathetic function through the analysis of heart rate responses to deep breathing, hyperventilation, and Valsalva ratio. Seven out of 10 patients reported symptoms involving different aspects of autonomic function, while 5 out of 11 controls reported symptoms related exclusively to orthostatic dizziness and constipation. Symptoms related to bladder dysfunction were the most frequent autonomic abnormality occurring in six patients, followed by orthostatic dizziness and dry mouth (in four patients each). Constipation occurred in three patients, sialorrhea in two, and erectile dysfunction, dry eye, and warm intolerance in one each. Cardiovascular reflex testing revealed no difference between patients and controls in quantitative assessment of both sympathetic and parasympathetic functions, except for diastolic blood pressure after isometric hand grip that did not increase normally in parkin patients compared to controls (P = 0.007). These data show that cardiovascular dysautonomia is not associated to the parkin phenotype, whereas urinary complaints are more frequently reported by parkin patients than by controls. Urinary dysautonomia warrants further investigation in patients with parkin disease.

  16. [Analysis of 2 patients with occupational hard mental lung disease].

    PubMed

    Ding, Bangmei; Ding, Lu; Yu, Bin; Fan, Cunhua; Han, Lei; Hu, Jinmei; Zhu, Baoli

    2015-01-01

    We sought to master the clinical characteristics and prognosis of hard mental lung disease, improving this disease's diagnosis and treatment quality. We recruited two suspected patients with hard mental lung disease and collected their occupational history, examination results of occupational health, and past medical records. By virtue of laboratory tests, high Kv chest radiography, CT and HRCT of chest, fiberoptic bronchoscopy and ECG examination, diagnostic report was synthesized respectively by respiratory physicians and pathologist from three different agencies. Then the report was submitted to diagnosis organizations of occupational disease, and diagnostic conclusion of occupational disease was drawn after discussion by at least three diagnosticians of occupational disease. We found that both of the two suspected patients were exposed to dusts of hard metal, and length of exposure service ranged from 8 to 9 years. Clinical manifestations were dominated by dry cough, wheezing after activities, and pathological manifestation was characteristic giant cell interstitial pneumonia. The prognosis and outcome of the disease were different. According to exact occupational exposure history, clinical manifestations, combined with the results of high Kv chest radiography, CT of chest and pathological manifestation, it can be diagnosed with hard mental lung disease.

  17. Erythema at BCG Inoculation Site in Kawasaki Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Rezai, Mohammad Sadegh; Shahmohammadi, Soheila

    2014-08-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute, self-limiting childhood systemic vasculitis with unknown etiology. Because there is no diagnostic test for Kawasaki disease, the diagnosis is based on clinical criteria. An important clinical sign that is not included in the classical clinical criteria for Kawasaki disease is a reaction at the Bacille Calmette-Guérin inoculation site that are present in about 30-50% of Kawasaki disease patients. of this review was to highlight the usefulness of the inflammation at the Bacille Calmette-Guérin inoculation site for early diagnosis of Kawasaki disease, we conducted a literature review on Medline in PubMed area, Google scholar, Magiran and Scientific Information Database using the search terms "Kawasaki disease, Erythema, BCG, inoculation site, children, cardiac complications, coronary artery lesion, aneurysm, incomplete Kawasaki in 2013. A total of 15 articles had been found. Erythema at the Bacille Calmette-Guérin inoculation site was found in 49.87% of Kawasaki disease patients. Coronary artery abnormalities were found in 10.3% of cases. According to this review, BCGitis is more prevalent than cervical lymphadenopathy and rash and it can be a useful criterion in the diagnosis of incomplete Kawasaki disease in cases not fulfills the classic criteria of at least four of the five findings.

  18. Preserving Patient Privacy When Sharing Same-Disease Data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoping; Li, Xiao-Bai; Motiwalla, Luvai; Li, Wenjun; Zheng, Hua; Franklin, Patricia D

    2016-10-01

    Medical and health data are often collected for studying a specific disease. For such same-disease microdata, a privacy disclosure occurs as long as an individual is known to be in the microdata. Individuals in same-disease microdata are thus subject to higher disclosure risk than those in microdata with different diseases. This important problem has been overlooked in data-privacy research and practice, and no prior study has addressed this problem. In this study, we analyze the disclosure risk for the individuals in same-disease microdata and propose a new metric that is appropriate for measuring disclosure risk in this situation. An efficient algorithm is designed and implemented for anonymizing same-disease data to minimize the disclosure risk while keeping data utility as good as possible. An experimental study was conducted on real patient and population data. Experimental results show that traditional reidentification risk measures underestimate the actual disclosure risk for the individuals in same-disease microdata and demonstrate that the proposed approach is very effective in reducing the actual risk for same-disease data. This study suggests that privacy protection policy and practice for sharing medical and health data should consider not only the individuals' identifying attributes but also the health and disease information contained in the data. It is recommended that data-sharing entities employ a statistical approach, instead of the HIPAA's Safe Harbor policy, when sharing same-disease microdata.

  19. Preserving Patient Privacy When Sharing Same-Disease Data

    PubMed Central

    LIU, XIAOPING; LI, XIAO-BAI; MOTIWALLA, LUVAI; LI, WENJUN; ZHENG, HUA; FRANKLIN, PATRICIA D.

    2016-01-01

    Medical and health data are often collected for studying a specific disease. For such same-disease microdata, a privacy disclosure occurs as long as an individual is known to be in the microdata. Individuals in same-disease microdata are thus subject to higher disclosure risk than those in microdata with different diseases. This important problem has been overlooked in data-privacy research and practice, and no prior study has addressed this problem. In this study, we analyze the disclosure risk for the individuals in same-disease microdata and propose a new metric that is appropriate for measuring disclosure risk in this situation. An efficient algorithm is designed and implemented for anonymizing same-disease data to minimize the disclosure risk while keeping data utility as good as possible. An experimental study was conducted on real patient and population data. Experimental results show that traditional reidentification risk measures underestimate the actual disclosure risk for the individuals in same-disease microdata and demonstrate that the proposed approach is very effective in reducing the actual risk for same-disease data. This study suggests that privacy protection policy and practice for sharing medical and health data should consider not only the individuals’ identifying attributes but also the health and disease information contained in the data. It is recommended that data-sharing entities employ a statistical approach, instead of the HIPAA's Safe Harbor policy, when sharing same-disease microdata. PMID:27867450

  20. Risk of Periodontal Diseases in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Te-Chun; Chang, Pei-Ying; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Chia-Hung; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Shih, Chuen-Ming; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have reported an association between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and periodontal diseases. However, a large-scale population-based cohort study was previously absent from the literature. Therefore, we evaluated the risk of periodontal diseases in patients with COPD in a nationwide population. From the National Health Insurance claims data of Taiwan, we identified 22,332 patients with COPD who were newly diagnosed during 2000 to 2010. For each case, two individuals without COPD were randomly selected and frequency matched by age, sex, and diagnosis year. Both groups were followed up till the end of 2011. The overall incidence of periodontal diseases was 1.19-fold greater in the COPD group than in the comparison group (32.2 vs 26.4 per 1000 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15–1.24). Compared with non-COPD patients, the adjusted hazard ratios of patients with COPD increased with the number of emergency room visits (from 1.14 [95% CI 1.10–1.19] to 5.09 [95% CI 4.53–5.72]) and admissions (from 1.15 [95% CI 1.10–1.20] to 3.17 [95% CI 2.81–3.57]). In addition, the adjusted hazard ratios of patients with COPD treated with inhaled corticosteroids (1.22, 95% CI 1.11–1.34) and systemic corticosteroids (1.15, 95% CI 1.07–1.23) were significantly higher than those of patients not treated with corticosteroids. Patient with COPD are at a higher risk of developing periodontal diseases than the general population. Our results also support that the risk of periodontal diseases is proportional to COPD control. In addition, patients who receive corticosteroid treatment are at a higher risk of developing periodontal diseases. PMID:26579813

  1. [Hyperhomocysteinemia and cardiovascular risk profile in ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease comorbidity patients].

    PubMed

    Zharkova, A V; Orlovs'kyĭ, V F

    2014-01-01

    Present article is devoted to the study of the clinic features of ischemic heart desease associated with acid peptic disease. It was shown the more evident increase of myocardial infarction risk in associated pathology patients. Such results have to be caused by the special risk factor. As such factor we desided to study the hyperhomosysteinemia. During research there were discovered that the lowest vitamin B12 serum level and the highest homocysteine serum level have been registrated in associated pathology (ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease according to long-term proton pump inhibitor use) patients. It was shown evident correlation between that changes and dyslipidemia.

  2. Disease burden for patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases identified at reference hospitals in Guanajuato, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Guaní-Guerra, Eduardo; Jiménez-Romero, Ana Isabel; García-Ramírez, Ulises Noel; Velázquez-Ávalos, José Manuel; Martínez-Guzmán, Edgar; Sandoval-Ramírez, Eunice; Camacho-Meza, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    In addition to the deleterious effect on health, there is considerable economic and psychosocial morbidity associated with primary immunodeficiency diseases (PID). Also, the cost of a late diagnosis frequently results in a heavy disease burden on the patient. The objective of this study was to collect and analyze data on patients with PID in the state of Guanajuato in Mexico, to indirectly estimate the burden of the disease. An observational, longitudinal, and comparative study was conducted. A total of 44 patients were included and grouped according to the updated classification of PID. The median time elapsed from the onset of symptoms to the reference and diagnosis by a tertiary hospital was of 2.17 (IQR = 6.44) years. Before diagnosis, the number of hospitalizations/year per patient was 0.86 (IQR = 2.28), the number of visit to emergency room/year per patient was 0.92 (IQR = 1.77), the number of doctor's visits/year per patient was 15 (IQR = 11.25), whereas the school/work absence days per patient were reported in 52.72 (IQR = 56.35) days per year. After diagnosis, 20 patients (45.45%) received IVIG replacement therapy, and all of them presented a significant improvement (p <0.05) in all the mentioned variables. Characteristically, even when patients with PID received IVIG, there was still an important disease burden when comparing them against healthy controls. Complications secondary to PID were detected in 19 patients (43.18%). The reported overall mortality rate was 6.82% (n = 3). We were able to indirectly estimate an important disease burden in patients with PID; which is considered to be preventable, at least in part, with effective interventions like health planning, research, collaboration with primary care providers, and generation of policies and practices, in order to improve the quality of life and care of families with PID.

  3. Enhanced prolactin responsiveness to galanin in patients with Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Invitti, C; Pecori Giraldi, F; Tagliaferri, A; Scacchi, M; Dubini, A; Cavagnini, F

    1993-08-01

    Galanin is believed to play a role in the control of prolactin (PRL) secretion in the rat. Such a role is uncertain in humans where the neuropeptide is expressed by the corticotrophs. However, in clinical conditions of enhanced ACTH secretion, increased PRL levels are often observed. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of galanin infusion on serum PRL levels in patients with Cushing's disease and in control subjects. For comparison, the PRL responses to TRH and metoclopramide were also investigated in the same patients. Four tests were performed: (a) 40-minute infusion of 0.3 micrograms/kg/min of galanin; (b) infusion of normal saline only; (c) metoclopramide test (10 mg as i.v. bolus); (d) TRH test (200 mg as i.v. bolus). Twenty-four normal subjects and nine patients suffering from active Cushing's disease were investigated. Serum concentrations of PRL were measured by radioimmunoassay on blood samples collected before and for 90 minutes after drug or saline administration. Serum baseline PRL levels were superimposable in normal subjects and in patients with Cushing's disease. In normal subjects, infusion of galanin induced a distinct PRL increase compared to saline (mean +/- SEM incremental areas 6514 +/- 2572 vs 540 +/- 571 mU/l/90 min, P = 0.05, respectively). In patients with Cushing's disease, galanin evoked a remarkable PRL rise with hormone levels which were significantly greater (P < 0.001) than those observed in the same patients after infusion of saline (21908 +/- 4180 vs 534 +/- 1556 mU/l/90 min) or after galanin administration in controls (P < 0.01). The PRL response to TRH and, much more so, to metoclopramide was significantly lower in patients with Cushing's disease than in normal subjects (42125 +/- 8000 vs 73181 +/- 7246 mU/l/90 min, P < 0.01 after TRH and 79095 +/- 27265 vs 229049 +/- 10602 mU/l/90 min, P < 0.01 after metoclopramide). Galanin appears to be a specific, though weak, PRL secretagogue in normal subjects. The galanin-induced PRL release

  4. The impact of ulcerative colitis on patients' lives compared to other chronic diseases: a patient survey.

    PubMed

    Rubin, David T; Dubinsky, Marla C; Panaccione, Remo; Siegel, Corey A; Binion, David G; Kane, Sunanda V; Hopper, Joseph

    2010-04-01

    This study was designed to identify the impact chronic ulcerative colitis (UC) has on the lives of patients compared to other chronic conditions. Overall, 451 patients with UC, 309 with rheumatoid arthritis, 305 with asthma, and 305 with migraine headaches were recruited in an Internet survey designed to assess a variety of disease-impact indices. Patients with UC reported a mean of eight (self-defined) flare-ups in the previous 12 months. Significantly more patients with UC (81%) believed that the quantity of flare-ups they experienced was 'normal', compared to patients with migraine headaches (64%) or asthma (75%). Patients with UC also reported significantly more worry about disease complications (84%), depression (62%), and embarrassment (70%) than patients with the other chronic conditions. Compared to patients with other chronic conditions, patients with UC perceive substantially more negative impact upon their lives, especially with regard to the psychological burden.

  5. Effects of Ethamivan in Patients with Chronic Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sproule, B. J.; Jans, Ronald L.; Breitkreutz, H.; Mahon, W.

    1964-01-01

    Nineteen patients suffering from chronic respiratory disease were evaluated before, during and after ethamivan administration by serial measurement of arterial pH, pCO2, plasma ethamivan levels and alveolar ventilation. Ethamivan was administered intravenously as a single injection of 50 mg. in five patients; as an injection of 25 mg./kg. in five patients; as an intravenous injection of (a) 50 mg. over 15 minutes and (b) 150 mg. over 15 minutes in five patients; and finally as an oral dose of 300 to 500 mg. in five patients. Plasma levels of ethamivan became unmeasurable within 15 minutes of receiving the largest dose. Alveolar ventilation increased only in patients receiving the highest intravenous dose, and no significant changes in blood gases were elicited in any patient. PMID:14226094

  6. Learning style preferences of coronary artery disease patients.

    PubMed

    Merritt, S L

    1991-01-01

    Using the Patient Learning Style Questionnaire, the author examined differences in perceived learning styles of 125 subjects with coronary artery disease (CAD) for conditions and modes of learning commonly found in patient education. The relation of these preferences to selected personal demographic characteristics was also determined. The results indicate that these subjects most preferred organized, detailed instruction using oral and pictorial-graphic modes of presentation. Independent modes of instruction were less preferred. Additional research on the preferred learning style of CAD patients is needed to enable health professionals involved in CAD patient education to design teaching activities.

  7. Is hyperhomocysteinemia relevant in patients with celiac disease?

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Giovanni; Bassotti, Gabrio; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Bella, Camillo Di; Pagni, Fabio; Corti, Gian Luigi; Sabatino, Giuseppe; Piatti, Mara; Baldini, Vittorio

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether this might be related to the presence of hyperhomocysteinemia. METHODS: From January 1998 to December 2008, we evaluated the presence of hyperhomocysteinemia in a series of 165 adult celiac disease (CD) patients (138 females and 27 males, mean age 43 years). RESULTS: Hyperhomocysteinemia was evident in 32 patients (19.3%), although most of them had moderate levels (mean value 25 mcg/ml; range 15-30). Only one patient had a history of myocardial infarction (heterozygosis for N5-N10-metil tetrahydrofolate reductase mutation). CONCLUSION: The systematic assessment of hyperhomocysteinemia seems, at present, unjustified in CD patients. PMID:21734805

  8. Identification of mutations in Colombian patients affected with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Alfredo; Mateus, Heidi Eliana; Prieto, Juan Carlos; Palacios, Maria Fernanda; Ospina, Sandra Yaneth; Pasqualim, Gabriela; da Silveira Matte, Ursula; Giugliani, Roberto

    2015-12-15

    Fabry Disease (FD) is an X-linked inborn error of glycosphingolipid catabolism, caused by a deficiency of the lisosomal α-galactosidase A (AGAL). The disorder leads to a vascular disease secondary to the involvement of kidney, heart and the central nervous system. The mutation analysis is a valuable tool for diagnosis and genetic counseling. Although more than 600 mutations have been identified, most mutations are private. Our objective was to describe the analysis of nine Colombian patients with Fabry disease by automated sequencing of the seven exons of the GLA gene. Two novel mutations were identified in two patients affected with the classical subtype of FD, in addition to other 6 mutations previously reported. The present study confirms the heterogeneity of mutations in Fabry disease and the importance of molecular analysis for genetic counseling, female heterozygotes detection as well as therapeutic decisions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Wisdom teeth extraction in a patient with moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Seto, Mika; Aoyagi, Naoko; Koga, Sayo; Kikuta, Toshihiro

    2013-12-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare neurovascular disorder that involves constriction of certain arteries in the brain. In patients with moyamoya disease, it is very important to prevent cerebral ischemic attacks and intracerebral bleeding caused by fluctuating blood pressure and increased respiration. A 40-year-old woman with moyamoya disease was scheduled for extraction of her right upper and lower impacted wisdom teeth. Her lower impacted wisdom tooth was situated close to the inferior alveolar nerve. We decided to continue her oral antiplatelet therapy and planned intravenous sedation with analgesic agents administered approximately five minutes prior to extraction of the root of the mandibular wisdom tooth. Oral analgesic medications were regularly administered postoperatively to alleviate pain and anxiety. During the perioperative period, no cerebrovascular event occurred, and the wisdom teeth were successfully extracted as per the planned procedure. It is thought that the perioperative risks of wisdom tooth extraction in patients with moyamoya disease can be minimized with the use of our protocols.

  10. [Fabry disease: An overlooked diagnosis in adult cardiac patients].

    PubMed

    Kayıkçıoğlu, Meral; Şimşek, Evrim; Kalkan Uçar, Sema; Bayraktaroğlu, Selen; Onay, Hüseyin; Sözmen, Eser; Çoker, Mahmut

    2017-09-01

    Fabry disease is a rare, X-linked, lysosomal glycosphingolipid storage disorder. A deficiency of the enzyme alpha-galactosidase results in intracellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in multiple cell types, such as those of the nerves, kidneys, cardiac, and cutaneous tissues, leading to a multisystem disease. Male patients are more severely affected; however, heterozygous female patients may also be afflicted, though often the symptoms develop later. Cardiac involvement can include left ventricular hypertrophy, conduction abnormalities, arrhythmias, valvular abnormalities, and heart failure. A variant of the disease affects only cardiac tissue and mostly manifests as unexplained ventricular hypertrophy. Presently described are 2 cases of Fabry disease and the signs and symptoms of cardiac involvement, as well as the importance of early diagnosis to start enzyme replacement therapy before the development of irreversible tissue damage.

  11. Endocrine Abnormalities in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kuczera, Piotr; Adamczak, Marcin; Wiecek, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    In patients with chronic kidney disease the alterations of the endocrine system may arise from several causes. The kidney is the site of degradation as well as synthesis of many different hormones. Moreover, a number of concomitant pathological conditions such as inflammation, metabolic acidosis and malnutrition may participate in the pathogenesis of endocrine abnormalities in this group of patients. The most pronounced endocrine abnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease are the deficiencies of: calcitriol, testosterone, insulin-like growth factor and, erythropoietin (EPO). Additionally accumulation of several hormones, such as: prolactin, growth hormone and insulin frequently also occur. The clinical consequences of the abovementioned endocrine abnormalities are among others: anemia, infertility and bone diseases.

  12. Mycobacterium abscessus Lung Disease in a Patient with Kartagener Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Song, Won Jun; Jun, Ji Eun; Ryu, Duck Hyun; Lee, Ji Eun; Jeong, Ho Jung; Jeong, Suk Hyeon; Kang, Hyung Koo; Kim, Jung Soo; Lee, Hyun; Chon, Hae Ri; Jeon, Kyeongman; Kim, Dohun; Kim, Jhingook; Koh, Won-Jung

    2014-09-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is characterized by the congenital impairment of mucociliary clearance. When accompanied by situs inversus, chronic sinusitis and bronchiectasis, PCD is known as Kartagener syndrome. The main consequence of impaired ciliary function is a reduced mucus clearance from the lungs, and susceptibility to chronic respiratory infections due to opportunistic pathogens, including nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). There has been no report of NTM lung disease combined with Kartagener syndrome in Korea. Here, we report an adult patient with Kartagener syndrome complicated with Mycobacterium abscessus lung disease. A 37-year-old female presented to our hospital with chronic cough and sputum. She was ultimately diagnosed with M. abscessus lung disease and Kartagener syndrome. M. abscessus was repeatedly isolated from sputum specimens collected from the patient, despite prolonged antibiotic treatment. The patient's condition improved and negative sputum culture conversion was achieved after sequential bilateral pulmonary resection.

  13. Post-bleaching sensitivity in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Lisboa, Guacyra M; Guedes, Verónica L; Luna, Maria do R Ml; Carneiro-Jr, Américo M; Stegun, Roberto C

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a monogenic disease that affects millions of people worldwide. This study analyzed the effectiveness of bleaching and tooth sensitivity after in-office bleaching in patients with SCD. Forty volunteers were randomly assigned to four groups of 10 patients each (five with the SCD and five healthy controls) and treated using in-office bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide and different light activation protocols. No statistically significant difference was observed with relation to presence of tooth sensitivity, with or without use of a source of light for peroxide activation, and all bleaching therapies were effective, regardless of the technique employed and the presence/absence of sickle cell disease. The data showed that in-office dental bleaching is a viable alternative for improvement of oral esthetics for patients with SCD.

  14. Telemedicine in the treatment of patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Aguas, Mariam; Del Hoyo, Javier; Faubel, Raquel; Valdivieso, Bernardo; Nos, Pilar

    2017-08-07

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic and relapsing disorder with significant medical, social and financial impacts. IBD patients require continuous follow-up, and healthcare resource use in this context increases over time. In the last decade, telemedicine has influenced the treatment of chronic diseases like IBD via the application of information and communication technologies to provide healthcare services remotely. Telemedicine and its various applications (telemanagement, teleconsulting and tele-education) enable closer follow-up and provide education resources that promote patient empowerment, encouraging treatment optimisation over the entire course of the disease. We describe the impact of using telemedicine on IBD health outcomes and discuss the limitations of implementing these systems in the real-life management of IBD patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U., AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  15. Complex partial status epilepticus in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Montserrat G; Vega, Juan; Santamarta, Elena; Caminal, Luis

    2013-09-06

    Few cases of Crohn's disease complicated with meningitis and epidural abscess have been described in literature. We present a case of a 42-year-old former smoker female patient diagnosed with Crohn's disease in September 1995 (with severe nutritional problems). On 20 February 2012, she was admitted due to a probable sepsis (without any previous treatment). After several days she developed a confusion syndrome (probable Wernicke's disease). On 5 March 2012, the patient presented with a febrile episode of 39 ° C. Two days later, the patient presented aphasia and paraparesis, and 3 days later she presented a complex partial status epilepticus. A lumbar puncture was performed and showed 131 leucocytes (63% granulocytes) and proteins 296.3. The abdominopelvic CT scan revealed a presacral collection that seem to extend cranially towards the lumbosacral spine. The lumbar MRI confirmed the lumbar epidural abscess secondary to the fistulisation of the presacral abscess.

  16. Two pediatric patients with Von Hippel-Lindau disease type 2b: from patient to screening, from screening to patient.

    PubMed

    Gonc, Nazli; Engiz, Ozlem; Neumann, Hartmut P H; Demirbilek, Huseyin; Ozon, Alev; Alikasifoglu, Ayfer; Kandemir, Nurgun

    2011-01-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is an autosomal dominantly inherited tumor susceptibility disease characterized by the development of hemangioblastomas of the brain, spinal cord and retina; pheochromocytomas and renal cell carcinoma. The disease is caused by mutations in the VHL tumor suppressor gene located on chromosome 3p26-p25. In this paper, we present two patients with VHL disease type 2B confirmed by genetic analysis. Diagnosis in the first patient was based on demonstration of retinal hemangioblastoma in association with bilateral pheochromocytoma. Family screening revealed renal cell carcinoma in her father and uncle. The second patient was discovered during family screening of another index case in adult age. VHL disease should be clinically suspected in any individual with a pheochromocytoma especially when there is bilateral and/or multifocal disease or family history. Screening of patients and at-risk family members for VHL-associated tumors should be essential in management of VHL.

  17. High-utilizing Crohn's disease patients under psychosomatic therapy*

    PubMed Central

    Deter, Hans-Christian; von Wietersheim, Jörn; Jantschek, Günther; Burgdorf, Friederike; Blum, Brigitta; Keller, Wolfram

    2008-01-01

    Objective Few studies have been published on health care utilization in Crohn's disease and the influence of psychological treatment on high utilizers. Methods The present sub study of a prospective multi center investigation conducted in 87 of 488 consecutive Crohn's disease (CD) patients was designed to investigate the influence of the course of Crohn's disease on health care utilization (hospital days (HD) and sick leave days (SLD) collected by German insurance companies) and to examine the conditions of high-utilizing patients. Predictors of health care utilization should be selected. Based on a standardized somatic treatment, high health care utilizing patients of the psychotherapy and control groups should be compared before and after a one-year treatment. Results Multivariate regression analysis identified disease activity at randomization as an important predictor of the clinical course (r2 = 0.28, p < 0.01). Health care utilization correlated with duration of disease (p < 0.04), but the model was not significant (r2 = 0.15, p = 0.09). The patients' level of anxiety, depression and lack of control at randomization predicted their health-related quality of life at the end of the study (r2 = 0.51, p < 0.00001). Interestingly, steroid intake and depression (t1) predicted the combined outcome measure (clinical course, HRQL, health care utilization) of Crohn's disease at the end of the study (r2 = 0.22, p < 0.001). Among high utilizers, a significantly greater drop in HD (p < 0.03) and in mean in SLD were found in the treatment compared to the control group. Conclusion The course of Crohn's disease is influenced by psychological as well as somatic factors; especially depression seems important here. A significant drop of health care utilization demonstrates the benefit of psychological treatment in the subgroup of high-utilizing CD patients. Further studies are needed to replicate the findings of the clinical outcome in this CD subgroup. PMID:18851749

  18. Misdiagnosis of Addison's disease in a patient with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kocyigit, Ismail; Unal, Aydin; Tanriverdi, Fatih; Hayri Sipahioglu, Murat; Tokgoz, Bulent; Oymak, Oktay; Utas, Cengiz

    2011-01-01

    Addison's disease is a rare disorder in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In patients, the diagnosis of Addison's disease is difficult in clinical practice because most of the clinical findings of this disease are similar to those of the renal failure. We present a 51-year-old male patient, who underwent hemodialysis therapy for 8 years, diagnosed with Addison's disease after having myalgia, skin hyperpigmentation, weight loss, sweating, and nausea for the past few weeks. The physical examination was completely normal except for muscle weakness, hyperpigmentation on labial mucosa and skin in a patient. The laboratory tests revealed anemia and hypoglycemia. Serum cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels, and ACTH stimulation test results were consistent with Addison's disease. Adrenal computerized tomography revealed bilateral atrophic glands. Additionally, it was found that elevated serum thyroid stimulating hormone levels and antithyroid peroxidase antibody titer were positive. Our purpose is to emphasize that physicians should be alert to the potential for additional different conditions particularly in terms of adrenal failure in patients with ESRD.

  19. Rationale for Using Social Media to Collect Patient-Reported Outcomes in Patients with Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Kt; Harris, Merissa; Khavari, Nasim; Khosla, Chaitan

    2014-02-01

    Patients with celiac disease (CD) are increasingly interconnected through social media, exchanging patient experiences and health-tracking information between individuals through various web-based platforms. Social media represents potentially unique communication interface between gastroenterologists and active social media users - especially young adults and adolescents with celiac disease-regarding adherence to the strict gluten-free diet, gastrointestinal symptoms, and meaningful discussion about disease management. Yet, various social media platforms may be underutilized for research purposes to collect patient-reported outcomes data. In this commentary, we summarize the scientific rationale and potential for future growth of social media in patient-reported outcomes research, focusing on college freshmen with celiac disease as a case study and provide overview of the methodological approach. Finally, we discuss how social media may impact patient care in the future through increasing mobile technology use.

  20. Extrahepatic Autoimmune Diseases in Patients with Autoimmune Liver Diseases: A Phenomenon Neglected by Gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Baoru

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases (AILDs) often coexist with other extrahepatic autoimmune diseases (EHAIDs). The spectrum of EHAIDs in patients with AILDs is similar, whereas the incidence is different. Notably, autoimmune thyroid disease and Sjogren's syndrome are the most common EHAIDs. Associated extrahepatic diseases may predate the appearance of AILDs or coincide with their onset. More frequently, they may appear during the course and even occur years after the diagnosis of AILDs. Importantly, associated EHAIDs may influence the natural course and prognosis of AILDs. To date, a definite pathophysiological pathway which contributes to the coexistence of AILDs and EHAIDs is still lacking. The current view of autoimmunity clustering involves a common susceptibility genetic background which applies to related pathologies. Herein, we review the current published researches regarding EHAIDs in patients with AILDs, particularly in relation to their clinical impact and pathophysiology. In managing patients with AILDs, gastroenterologists should be aware of the possibly associated EHAIDs to ensure a prompt diagnosis and better outcome. PMID:28191014

  1. Retinal Arterial Occlusive Disease in a Young Patient with Cat Scratch Disease

    PubMed Central

    Batsos, Georgios; Kabanarou, Stamatina A.; Fotiou, Pantelis; Rouvas, Alexandros; Xirou, Tina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report an unusual case of a branch retinal arterial occlusion and bilateral multifocal retinitis in a young woman with cat scratch disease. Methods A 23-year-old woman was referred to our clinic complaining of a sudden scotoma in the upper part of the visual field of her left eye. Fundoscopy revealed occlusion of an inferior temporal branch of the retinal artery in the left eye and bilateral multifocal retinitis, which was confirmed by fluorescein angiography. Subsequent indocyanine angiography did not reveal choroidal involvement. Laboratory analysis showed rising IgG titers for Bartonella henselae. Results Cat scratch disease was diagnosed, and a 4-week course of doxycycline was initiated. The patient responded well to the antibiotics. Both retinitis and arterial occlusion were resolved, the visual field was regained and the patient reported elimination of her symptoms. Conclusions Cat scratch disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis in young patients with retinal occlusive disease. PMID:24019792

  2. Retinal arterial occlusive disease in a young patient with cat scratch disease.

    PubMed

    Batsos, Georgios; Kabanarou, Stamatina A; Fotiou, Pantelis; Rouvas, Alexandros; Xirou, Tina

    2013-01-01

    To report an unusual case of a branch retinal arterial occlusion and bilateral multifocal retinitis in a young woman with cat scratch disease. A 23-year-old woman was referred to our clinic complaining of a sudden scotoma in the upper part of the visual field of her left eye. Fundoscopy revealed occlusion of an inferior temporal branch of the retinal artery in the left eye and bilateral multifocal retinitis, which was confirmed by fluorescein angiography. Subsequent indocyanine angiography did not reveal choroidal involvement. Laboratory analysis showed rising IgG titers for Bartonella henselae. Cat scratch disease was diagnosed, and a 4-week course of doxycycline was initiated. The patient responded well to the antibiotics. Both retinitis and arterial occlusion were resolved, the visual field was regained and the patient reported elimination of her symptoms. Cat scratch disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis in young patients with retinal occlusive disease.

  3. [Olanzapine improves chorea in patients with Huntington's disease].

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Jiménez, F J; de Toledo, M; Puertas, I; Barón, M; Zurdo, M; Barcenilla, B

    The main treatment for choreatic movements associated to Huntington s disease are the neuroleptic drugs, however, its use causes long term troubles. We describe two patients with a predominantly choreic Huntington s disease, who experience improvement of choreatic movements after introduction of olanzapine to their treatment, being this drug well tolerated. The improvement of chorea suggests that olanzapine has a dopaminergic D2 receptors blocking action.

  4. Patients' knowledge of heart disease in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Philip; Garraway, Michael

    1977-01-01

    Interviews with 400 consecutive patients attending a general practice sought their knowledge of the signs and symptoms of an acute heart attack, what action they would take for such an event, and their understanding of the predisposing factors contributing to heart disease. The survey revealed poor recognition of the relevant signs and symptoms of an acute heart attack and lack of knowledge of some of the main predisposing factors associated with heart disease. PMID:618352

  5. Actigraphy monitoring of symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pan, Weidong; Kwak, Shin; Li, Fuzhong; Wu, Chunlan; Chen, Yiyun; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu; Cai, Dingfang

    2013-07-02

    Although the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) is the "gold-standard" tool in assessing the severity of symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), not all activity-related disease symptoms can be accurately captured by the well-established clinical rating scale. Using an alternative approach, this study examined the level of physical activity measured by actigraphy over time and whether change in physical activity was associated with disease severity assessed by UPDRS. We used a longitudinal design in which physical activity and disease severity were assessed repeatedly during a 4-month interval, over a 3-year observational period, in a sample of 61 patients with idiopathic PD and a control group of 32 neurologically intact individuals. Physical activity data during awake-time were analyzed using the power-law exponent (PLE) method. Correlational relationships between changes in maxima values of PLE and scores of total UPDRS, UPDRS-part II (Activities of Daily Living), and UPDRS-part III (Motor Examination) in patients with PD were examined. Results show an increase in maxima values of PLE and the UPDRS total score in PD patients and that there is a positive association between changes in maxima values and total UPDRS score (r=0.746, p=0.032), UPDRS-part II score (r=0.687, p=0.027), and UPDRS-part III score (r=0.893, p=0.018). There was no significant change in the level of physical activity over time for the controls. Findings from this study indicate that change in physical activity, as captured by actigraphy, is associated with increased severity in patients' clinical symptoms of PD over time. Thus, these data suggest that, when used in conjunction with the conventional UPDRS measure, an actigraphic measure of physical activity may provide clinicians an adjunct measurement approach to monitor patients' activity-based disease progression or responses to treatment in outpatient clinic settings.

  6. Clinico- pathological profile of patients with breast diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate the spectrum of breast diseases and their association with presenting complains of patients. Methodology It was a cross sectional study conducted from 1st January 2010 – 30th December 2012. A total of 254 breast specimens of patients, who were admitted in Civil Hospital Karachi with breast complaints, were included. Specimens were collected either from mastectomy, lumpectomy or needle biopsy from the admitted patients. Informed written consent was taken from all the patients. All patients with primary breast diseases were included. Patients undergoing chemotherapy or with secondary breast disease and slides with insufficient specimen were excluded. All data was entered and analyzed through SPSS 19. Result There were 254 breast lesions, histologically diagnosed in 3 year review period. The overall mean age of patients with breast lesion was 25.18, SD ± 11.73 with a wide age range of 12–74 years. Most common cases identified are benign 191(75.3%), followed by inflammatory 30(11.8%) and malignant lesions 30(11.8%). Most patients presenting with the complain of pain have diagnosis of fibroadenoma 24 (63.2%) while patient with complain of lump also have the most common diagnosis of fibroadenoma 147 (72.8%). Conclusions Study shows that in Pakistani females, mostly encountered breast lesion was fibroadenoma. Due to lack of awareness breast diseases present lately. Awareness must be created among women to reduce the mortality and morbidity with breast lesions. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1037059088969395. PMID:23659667

  7. [Cognitive plasticity in Alzheimer's disease patients receiving cognitive stimulation programs].

    PubMed

    Zamarrón Cassinello, Ma Dolores; Tárraga Mestre, Luis; Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío

    2008-08-01

    The main purpose of this article is to examine whether cognitive plasticity increases after cognitive training in Alzheimer's disease patients. Twenty six patients participated in this study, all of them diagnosed with mild Alzheimer's disease, 17 of them received a cognitive training program during 6 months, and the other 9 were assigned to the control group. Participants were assigned to experimental or control conditions for clinical reasons. In order to assess cognitive plasticity, all patients were assessed before and after treatment with three subtests from the "Bateria de Evaluación de Potencial de Aprendizaje en Demencias" [Assessment Battery of Learning Potential in Dementia] (BEPAD). After treatment, Alzheimer's disease patients improved their performance in all the tasks assessing cognitive plasticity: viso-spatial memory, audio-verbal memory and verbal fluency. However, the cognitive plasticity scores of the patients in the control group decreased. In conclusion, this study showed that cognitive stimulation programs can improve cognitive functioning in mildly demented patients, and patients who do not receive any cognitive interventions may reduce their cognitive functioning.

  8. Clinical characteristics of sleep disorders in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhi-Juan; Liu, Chan-Chan; Ji, Su-Qiong; Yang, Qing-Mei; Ye, Hong-Xiang; Han, Hai-Yan; Xue, Zheng

    2017-02-01

    In order to investigate the sleep quality and influencing factors in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), 201 PD patients were enrolled and underwent extensive clinical evaluations. Subjective sleep evaluation was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). It was found that poor sleep quality (77.11%) and excessive daytime sleepiness (32.34%) were commonly seen in PD patients and positively correlated with disease severity. Then 70 out of the 201 PD patients and 70 age- and sex-matched controls underwent a polysomnographic recording. The parameters were compared between PD group and control group and the influencing factors of sleep in PD patients were analyzed. The results showed that sleep efficiency (SE) was significantly decreased (P<0.01), and sleep latency (SL) and the arousal index (AI) were increased (P<0.05) in the PD group as compared with those in the control group. SE and total sleep time (TST) were positively correlated with the Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) stage. There was significant difference in the extent of hypopnea and hypoxemia between the PD group and the control group (P<0.05). Our results indicate that PD patients have an overall poor sleep quality and a high prevalence of sleep disorder, which may be correlated with the disease severity. Respiratory function and oxygen supply are also affected to a certain degree in PD patients.

  9. Oropharynx in patients with cerebrovascular disease: evaluation with videofluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, M Y; Ott, D J; Peele, V N; Gelfand, D W

    1990-09-01

    Forty-six patients with cerebrovascular disease underwent videofluoroscopic examination of the oropharynx to assess location and severity of swallowing dysfunction with use of boluses of various consistencies. Low- and high-viscosity barium suspensions, a barium paste, and a paste-coated cookie were used; not all patients were given all materials. Thirty-nine patients had abnormalities of both oral and pharyngeal function. Two patients had oral dysfunction only, and five had pharyngeal abnormalities only. Mild swallowing difficulties occurred in 18 patients (39%), moderate dysfunction in 23 (50%), and severe dysfunction in five (11%). Thirty-one patients had pharyngeal stasis, which was symmetric in 25 patients (81%), right-sided in three, and left-sided in three. Asymmetric stasis did not correlate to the site of cerebrovascular disease. Twenty-four episodes of aspiration occurred, half of them with the low-viscosity barium suspension. Thus, video-fluoroscopy can be used to define the location and severity of oropharyngeal abnormalities, which is critical for feeding recommendations. The abnormalities present, however, were not useful in predicting the type of cerebrovascular disease.

  10. Metabolic syndrome in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Estirado, E; Lahoz, C; Laguna, F; García-Iglesias, F; González-Alegre, M T; Mostaza, J M

    2014-11-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and coronary or cerebrovascular disease is increasing, but it is not known whether this association also exists in patients with isolated PAD. The aim of the current study was to assess the prevalence of MS in patients with PAD who had no coronary or cerebrovascular disease, the prescription rate of evidence-based cardiovascular therapies and the attainment of therapeutic goals in patients with PAD and with and without MS. Multicenter, cross-sectional study of 3.934 patients aged ≥ 45 years with isolated PAD who were treated in primary care and specialized outpatient clinics during 2009. A diagnosis of PAD was reached for ankle brachial indices <0.9, a previous history of amputation or revascularization. In the overall population, the mean age was 67.6 years, 73.8% were males and 63% had MS (95% CI 61.5-64.3%). Patients with MS had a higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities, more severe PAD and higher prescription rate of evidence-based cardiovascular therapies. After adjusting for risk factors and comorbidity, there was a more frequent use of renin-angiotensin system blockers, beta-blockers, diuretics and statins among the patients with MS. A lower percentage of patients with MS achieved the therapeutic goals for blood pressure (22% vs. 41.5%, p<0.001). Similarly, a lower percentage of patients with diabetes achieved the glycated hemoglobin goals (44% vs. 53.1%, p<0.001), with no differences in LDL-cholesterol levels (29.8% vs. 39.1%, p=0.265). Patients with PAD have a high prevalence of MS. Patients with MS do not attain therapeutic goals as frequently as those without, despite taking more cardiovascular drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. [Clinical associations between retinal vascular diseases and cardiovascular diseases in patients with systemic atheromatosis].

    PubMed

    Stefănescu-Dima, Alin; Bătăiosu, Constantin; Sas, Teodor; Puianu, Mihaela

    2013-01-01

    A clinical study was conducted on a sample of 48 patients examined within 3 months. Of these, 27 patients were recruited by ophtalmologic criteria and 21 recruited by cardiologic criteria, 25% of these patients coming for routine check. They were investigated by ophthalmic examination, cardiological examination, imaging and laboratory examination. Testing has shown a strong link between cardiovascular disease and the eye of the patients investigated. The study demonstrated the need for interdisciplinary consultation for patients with vascular complaints in the carotid territory and a close correlation between the vascular and ophthalmologic pathology at this level.

  12. The Patient Education Program for Huntington's Disease (PEP-HD).

    PubMed

    A'Campo, Laura E I; Spliethoff-Kamminga, Noëlle G A; Roos, Raymund A C

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the Patient Education Program for Huntington's disease is to improve quality of life for patients and caregivers, to educate and train them in order to develop coping strategies to deal with psychosocial stressors. The program was derived from a standardized evidence-based program for Parkinson's disease. This pilot study assessed the feasibility of the program in Huntington's disease. Forty manifest patients with 28 caregivers and 19 premanifest carriers with 14 partners participated. Assessments for depression and anxiety, psychosocial burden, need for help, quality of life, coping, behavioral, motor and cognitive status were performed. After program completion, significant improvement of behavioral symptoms and anxiety was found for manifest HD patients, and they used a less passive coping style and more social support. Their caregivers reported less psychosocial burden. Premanifest carriers and their partners improved their coping by seeking social support more often. This pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of the program in Huntington's disease, especially in the manifest stage of the disease. Further research to assess the effectiveness of the program seems warranted.

  13. Management of retinal vascular diseases: a patient-centric approach.

    PubMed

    Brand, C S

    2012-04-01

    Retinal vascular diseases are a leading cause of blindness in the Western world. Advancement in the clinical management of these diseases has been fast-paced, with new treatments becoming available as well as license extensions of existing treatments. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated in certain retinal vascular diseases, including wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic macular oedema (DMO), and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Treatment of wet AMD and visual impairment due to either DMO or macular oedema secondary to RVO with an anti-VEGF on an as needed basis, rather than a fixed schedule, allows an individualised treatment approach; providing treatment when patients are most likely to benefit from it, while minimising the number of unnecessary intravitreal injections. Thus, an individualised treatment regimen reduces the chances of over-treatment and under-treatment, optimising both the risk/benefit profile of the treatment and the efficient use of NHS resource. Streamlining of treatment for patients with wet AMD and visual impairment due to either DMO or macular oedema secondary to RVO, by using one treatment with similar posology across all three diseases, may help to minimise burden of clinic capacity and complexity and hence optimise patient outcomes. Informed treatment decisions and efficient clinic throughput are important for optimal patient outcomes in the fast-changing field of retinal vascular diseases.

  14. Sense of Coherence in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Opheim, Randi; Fagermoen, May Solveig; Jelsness-Jørgensen, Lars-Petter; Bernklev, Tomm; Moum, Bjørn

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim. Sense of coherence (SOC) is a health-promoting concept reflecting a person's view of life and response to stressful situations and may be of importance in coping with chronic illness. The aim of this study was to explore associations between SOC and sociodemographic, disease-related, and personal characteristics in a sample of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods. Measures included sociodemographic and disease-related data, the Sense of Coherence Scale, General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE), and Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS-5). Results. In total, 428 IBD patients had evaluable questionnaires (response rate 93%). The overall mean SOC total score was 66.25 (SD 11.47) and with no statistically significant difference between patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and patients with Crohn's disease (CD). In the multivariate analyses, higher GSE scores were significantly associated with higher SOC scores and higher FSS-5 scores were significantly associated with lower SOC scores in both UC and CD. Conclusion. GSE and FSS-5 contributed more to the variance in SOC than sociodemographic and disease-related variables. Longitudinal studies are warranted to investigate the value of SOC as a predictor of disability, medication adherence, coping behavior, and health-related quality of life. PMID:24527028

  15. Sensorineural hearing loss in patients with Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun Young; Kim, Young Hyun; Kim, Yeo Hyang; Hyun, Myung Chul; Lee, Young Hwan

    2015-11-01

    Kawasaki disease involves acute febrile systemic vasculitis that can cause a variety of symptoms by affecting various organs. Here, we aimed to evaluate the prevalence, causes, and prognosis of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) occurring in children with Kawasaki disease. Patients who were diagnosed with Kawasaki disease and received inpatient treatment in the Pediatrics Department at one of three university hospitals in Daegu city from February 2012 to September 2012 were enrolled in the study. The clinical features, hematological results, echocardiography results, audiometry results, and aspirin and salicylic acid serum levels of the patients were evaluated. Of the 59 children enrolled in the study, three showed mild bilateral SNHL on audiometry tests conducted after 48 hours of defervescence; these patients demonstrated normal patterns of recovery on follow-up tests 8 weeks later. Aspirin serum levels were significantly higher in the SNHL group after 48 hours of afebrile condition with high dose aspirin intake (P=0.034). However, no significant differences were found in other laboratory tests or for fever duration (P>0.05). Upon echocardiography, coronary artery abnormality was observed in 9 cases, but none of these patients showed hearing loss. The results indicate that SNHL in children with Kawasaki disease might occur during treatment of the acute phase; this SNHL usually involves mild bilateral hearing loss and recovers naturally. However, this study suggests that determination of the causes and clinical implications of hearing loss in Kawasaki disease requires long-term follow-up studies with more cases.

  16. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Patients with Acute Lyme Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-10-05

    Acute Lyme disease results from transmission of and infection by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi following a tick bite. During acute infection, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of Lyme meningitis. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing for a deep view into the proteome for a cohort of patients with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation leading to the identification of proteins that reflect host responses, which are distinct for subjects with acute Lyme disease. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified changes in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. The measured changes in protein abundances reflect the impact of acute Lyme disease on the CNS as presented in CSF. We have identified 89 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease. A number of the differentially abundant proteins have been found to be localized to brain synapse and thus constitute important leads for better understanding of the neurological consequence of disseminated Lyme disease.

  17. Littoral Cell Angioma in a Patient with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Björnsson, Bergthor; Ignatova, Simone; Sandström, Per; Ekstedt, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    Littoral cell angioma is a rare vascular tumor of the spleen. The pathogenesis is unknown but the lesion is associated with several malignancies and immunological disorders. The diagnosis requires histopathological examination. The malignant potential of this lesion is unknown, which is why splenectomy is recommend for all cases. Symptomatic cases generally suffer from hypersplenism and pyrexia. A previously healthy 20-year-old female was diagnosed with colonic Crohn's disease; as part of the work-up a magnetic resonance enterography was performed which showed multiple signal changes of the spleen. The patient reported chronic abdominal pain in the left upper quadrant, malaise, and fever. The unknown splenic lesions prompted a laparoscopic splenectomy; pathology revealed a littoral cell angioma. The abdominal pain and malaise remitted but the fever persisted one year despite adequate treatment of the patient's Crohn's disease. Littoral cell angioma is associated with immune-dysregulation including Crohn's disease with several reported cases. Signs and symptoms of hypersplenism and splenic lesions on imaging should raise suspicion of littoral cell angioma in patients with Crohn's disease. Magnetic resonance enterography to assess disease severity in Crohn's disease may provide an opportunity to study the prevalence and natural history of this rare splenic tumor. PMID:25705528

  18. Prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Shyam Chand; Nanda, Satyan; Tripathi, Adarsh; Sawlani, Kamal Kumar; Gupta, Kamlesh Kumar; Himanshu, D; Verma, Ajay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Psychiatric disorders, especially anxiety and depression have been reported to have an increased prevalence in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, but there is a paucity of data from India. Aims and Objectives: Aim of our study is to study the frequency of psychiatric comorbidities in COPD patients and their correlation with severity of COPD, as per global initiative for obstructive lung disease guidelines. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital (King George's Medical University). A total of 74 COPD patients were included in this study and compared with 74 controls. The diagnosis and severity of COPD were assessed by spirometry. Psychiatric comorbidities were assessed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview questionnaire. Results: The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in COPD patients (28.4%) as compared to controls (2.7%). As regards to severity, the frequency was significantly increased in severe and very severe COPD. The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities in COPD patients increased significantly with the increase in duration of symptoms being present in 67% of patients with duration of symptoms more than 10 years and only 23% of patients with duration of symptoms ≤5 years. Conclusion: The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities is increased in COPD patients as compared to controls. We recommend that all patients with COPD should be screened for psychiatric comorbidity, if any. PMID:27051106

  19. [Treatment of venous thromboembolic disease in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Farge-Bancel, D; Florea, L; Bosquet, L; Debourdeau, P

    2008-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) disease, as defined by the occurrence of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, occurs among 4 to 20% of patients with cancer and is a leading cause of death among these patients. Use of classical anticoagulation to treat VTE in a cancer patient is associated with a higher risk of major bleeding and of VTE recurrence as compared to noncancer patients. Updated comprehensive and systematic review of current data from the medical literature allows to reconsider the classical approach used for anticoagulant treatment in cancer patients and to implement adapted recommendations. In 2008, the use of daily subcutaneous low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) for at least three to six months is recommended as first line therapy to treat VTE disease in cancer patients. If LMWH are contra-indicated (renal insufficiency), other therapeutic approaches are warranted, such as use of unfractionated heparin (UFH) with early introduction of anti-vitamin K for at least three months or venous cava filter in case of absolute contra-indications to anticoagulation. VTE prophylaxis in cancer patients relies on the same therapeutic approaches as currently used for noncancer patients at high risk of VTE. The definition of more specific prophylactic approaches for patients with cancer considered at higher risks of VTE, will be the subject of many clinical trials in the forthcoming years.

  20. Caffeine intake by patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Vendramini, L.C.; Nishiura, J.L.; Baxmann, A.C.; Heilberg, I.P.

    2012-01-01

    Because caffeine may induce cyst and kidney enlargement in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), we evaluated caffeine intake and renal volume using renal ultrasound in ADPKD patients. Caffeine intake was estimated by the average of 24-h dietary recalls obtained on 3 nonconsecutive days in 102 ADPKD patients (68 females, 34 males; 39 ± 12 years) and compared to that of 102 healthy volunteers (74 females, 28 males; 38 ± 14 years). The awareness of the need for caffeine restriction was assessed. Clinical and laboratory data were obtained from the medical records of the patients. Mean caffeine intake was significantly lower in ADPKD patients versus controls (86 vs 134 mg/day), and 63% of the ADPKD patients had been previously aware of caffeine restriction. Caffeine intake did not correlate with renal volume in ADPKD patients. There were no significant differences between the renal volumes of patients in the highest and lowest tertiles of caffeine consumption. Finally, age-adjusted multiple linear regression revealed that renal volume was associated with hypertension, chronic kidney disease stage 3 and the time since diagnosis, but not with caffeine intake. The present small cross-sectional study indicated a low level of caffeine consumption by ADPKD patients when compared to healthy volunteers, which was most likely due to prior awareness of the need for caffeine restriction. Within the range of caffeine intake observed by ADPKD patients in this study (0-471 mg/day), the renal volume was not directly associated with caffeine intake. PMID:22801417

  1. Influenza vaccination in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are considered at higher risk of influenza-related complications and are listed worldwide among the subjects for whom yearly influenza vaccination is strongly recommended. However, influenza vaccination coverage of patients with ESRD is significantly lower than desired. This paper explores why compliance with official recommendations for influenza vaccination is poor in patients with ESRD and analyzes the true risk of infection as well as the immunogenicity, the effectiveness and the safety of influenza vaccination in these patients. Epidemiological and clinical data support the importance of influenza in conditioning clinical deterioration of patients with ESRD, particularly in relation to their level of immunosuppression. However, the variable levels of immunodeficiency detected in patients with ESRD may reduce the immune response to influenza vaccination, which appears to be lower than that usually found in healthy subjects. However, few studies are available, and they are difficult to compare for several reasons. Additionally, limited data have been collected on influenza vaccine effectiveness, although the available studies support positive results of vaccination on outcomes of severe disease. Despite such limitations, it is important to highlight that all the available studies have confirmed the good safety and tolerability of inactivated influenza vaccines. These findings, together with the risks associated with influenza in these patients, support annual influenza vaccination in patients with ESRD as well as vaccination of their close contacts and should be presented in educational programs organized for nephrologists and patient associations.

  2. Caffeine intake by patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vendramini, L C; Nishiura, J L; Baxmann, A C; Heilberg, I P

    2012-09-01

    Because caffeine may induce cyst and kidney enlargement in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), we evaluated caffeine intake and renal volume using renal ultrasound in ADPKD patients. Caffeine intake was estimated by the average of 24-h dietary recalls obtained on 3 nonconsecutive days in 102 ADPKD patients (68 females, 34 males; 39 ± 12 years) and compared to that of 102 healthy volunteers (74 females, 28 males; 38 ± 14 years). The awareness of the need for caffeine restriction was assessed. Clinical and laboratory data were obtained from the medical records of the patients. Mean caffeine intake was significantly lower in ADPKD patients versus controls (86 vs 134 mg/day), and 63% of the ADPKD patients had been previously aware of caffeine restriction. Caffeine intake did not correlate with renal volume in ADPKD patients. There were no significant differences between the renal volumes of patients in the highest and lowest tertiles of caffeine consumption. Finally, age-adjusted multiple linear regression revealed that renal volume was associated with hypertension, chronic kidney disease stage 3 and the time since diagnosis, but not with caffeine intake. The present small cross-sectional study indicated a low level of caffeine consumption by ADPKD patients when compared to healthy volunteers, which was most likely due to prior awareness of the need for caffeine restriction. Within the range of caffeine intake observed by ADPKD patients in this study (0-471 mg/day), the renal volume was not directly associated with caffeine intake.

  3. Discharge Disposition After Stroke in Patients With Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Neal S; Merkler, Alexander E; Schneider, Yecheskel; Navi, Babak B; Kamel, Hooman

    2017-02-01

    Liver disease is associated with both hemorrhagic and thrombotic processes, including an elevated risk of intracranial hemorrhage. We sought to assess the relationship between liver disease and outcomes after stroke, as measured by discharge disposition. Using administrative claims data, we identified a cohort of patients hospitalized with stroke in California, Florida, and New York from 2005 to 2013. The predictor variable was liver disease. All diagnoses were defined using validated diagnosis codes. Ordinal logistic regression was used to analyze the association between liver disease and worsening discharge disposition: home, nursing/rehabilitation facility, or death. Secondarily, multiple logistic regression was used to analyze the association between liver disease and in-hospital mortality. Models were adjusted for demographics, vascular risk factors, and comorbidities. We identified 121 428 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage and 703 918 with ischemic stroke. Liver disease was documented in 13 584 patients (1.7%). Liver disease was associated with worse discharge disposition after both intracerebral hemorrhage (global odds ratio, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-1.38) and ischemic stroke (odds ratio, 1.23; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-1.29). Similarly, liver disease was associated with in-hospital death after both intracerebral hemorrhage (odds ratio, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-1.44) and ischemic stroke (odds ratio, 1.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.51-1.71). Liver disease was associated with worse hospital discharge disposition and in-hospital mortality after stroke, suggesting worse functional outcomes. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Functional capacity of Brazilian patients with Parkinson's disease (PD): relationship between clinical characteristics and disease severity.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Fabio A; Rinaldi, Natalia M; Santos, Paulo Cezar R; Lirani-Silva, Ellen; Vitório, Rodrigo; Teixeira-Arroyo, Cláudia; Stella, Florindo; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa B

    2012-01-01

    The present study had three objectives: (a) to characterize the functional capacity of patients with PD, (b) to assess the relationship between the physical fitness components of functional capacity with clinical characteristics and disease severity, and (c) to compare the physical fitness components of functional capacity with clinical characteristics according to disease severity. The study included 54 patients with idiopathic PD who were distributed into two groups according to PD severity: unilateral group (n=35); and bilateral group (n=19). All patients underwent psychiatric assessment by means of the Hoehn and Yahr (HY) staging of PD, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-A and HADS-D, respectively), and The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The physical fitness components of functional capacity were evaluated over a 2-day period, using recommendations by the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, and the Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Pearson correlation coefficients and multiple regressions were calculated to test the correlation between functional capacity and clinical characteristics, and to predict clinical scores from physical performance, respectively. Clinical variables and physical component data were compared between groups using analysis of variance to determine the effects of disease severity. Patients with advanced disease showed low levels of functional capacity. Interestingly, patients with good functional capacity in one of the physical fitness components also showed good capacities in the other components. Disease severity is a major factor affecting functional capacity and clinical characteristics. Medical providers should take disease severity into consideration when prescribing physical activity for PD patients, since the relationship between functional capacity and clinical characteristics is dependent on disease severity.

  5. Clinical Presentation and Patient Evaluation in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vaishali; Sanyal, Arun J; Sterling, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a diagnosis of exclusion. Most patients are asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally. Most patients remain undiagnosed. A high index of suspicion and serologic work-up to rule out alternative causes of liver disease is required. In NALFD, fibrosis correlates with outcomes, including mortality. To diagnose, assess severity, and monitor fibrosis, 2 noninvasive methods can be used. However, noninvasive tests are more helpful at extremes of fibrosis: excluding it or diagnosing advanced fibrosis. Liver biopsy is usually reserved for cases whereby noninvasive tests fail to accurately determine the degree of fibrosis or the diagnosis is unclear.

  6. Blink reflex in dyskinetic and nondyskinetic patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Iriarte, L M; Chacon, J; Madrazo, J; Chaparro, P; Vadillo, J

    1989-01-01

    An electrophysiological study of the blink Reflex was undertaken in 40 dyskinetic and 20 nondyskinetic patients with Parkinson's disease, who were matched for age, stage of disease, duration of illness and amount and nature of antiparkinsonian medication. We found that latencies of R2 responses (both ipsilateral and contralateral) were prolonged in the dyskinetic group compared to the nondyskinetic group. Moreover, the late response was more easily inhibited by conditioning stimulation in dyskinetic patients. This behavior of late response in dyskinetic parkinsonians may be attributed to the reinstatement of dopaminergic suppressive control over the segmental multisynaptic systems belonging to the reflex.

  7. Cognitive Impairment and Dementia in Patients with Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leverenz, James B.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Zabetian, Cyrus; Zhang, Jing; Montine, Kathleen S.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is an already prevalent neurodegenerative disease that is poised to at least double over the next 25 years. Although best known for its characteristic movement disorder, PD is now appreciated commonly to cause cognitive impairment, including dementia, and behavioral changes. Dementia in patients with PD is consequential and has been associated with reduced quality of life, shortened survival, and increased caregiver distress. Here we review clinical presentation and progression, pathological bases, identification of genetic risk factors, development of small molecule biomarkers, and emerging treatments for cognitive impairment in patients with PD. PMID:19754405

  8. Anaesthesia for patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Duggappa, Devika Rani; Rao, G Venkateswara; Kannan, Sudheesh

    2015-01-01

    The chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has become a disease of public health importance. Among the various risk factors, smoking remains the main culprit. In addition to airway obstruction, the presence of intrinsic positive end expiratory pressure, respiratory muscle dysfunction contributes to the symptoms of the patient. Perioperative management of these patients includes identification of modifiable risk factors and their optimisation. Use of regional anaesthesia alone or in combination with general anaesthesia improves pulmonary functions and reduces the incidence of post-operative pulmonary complications. PMID:26556916

  9. Venous disease and chronic oedema: treatment and patient concordance.

    PubMed

    Todd, Marie

    Compression therapy is the mainstay in the management of chronic venous disease, venous leg ulceration (VLU) and chronic oedema. The management of VLU alone is thought to cost a staggering £400 million per year and accounts for 13% of all district nursing visits. The predicted increase in elderly, obese and chronically ill patients will pose a further strain on already stretched resources. The impact of chronic venous and lymphovenous disease is also costly in terms of physical and psychological terms for patients. Adopting a preventive approach would reduce the financial, workload and symptomatic aspects of this condition.

  10. Transient dynamics in motor control of patients with Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuter, Anne; Labrie, Christiane; Vasilakos, Konstantinon

    1991-10-01

    Experimental observations of movement disorders including tremor and voluntary microdisplacements recorded in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) during a simple visuomotor tracking task are analyzed. The performance of patients with PD having a very large amplitude tremor is characterized either by the intermittent appearance of transient dynamics or by the presence of sudden transitions in the amplitude or frequency of the signal. The need to develop new tools to characterize changes in dynamics (i.e., transitions) and to redefine neurological degeneration, such as Parkinson's disease, in terms of qualitative changes in oscillatory behaviors is emphasized.

  11. Making oats safer for patients with coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Dickey, William

    2008-06-01

    (Table is included in full-text article). Studies suggest that oats can be tolerated in the gluten-free diet by a majority of patients with coeliac disease. Concerns remain, however, about the possibility of contamination of commercially available oat products by wheat, barley and rye. The R5 ELISA allows the identification and quantification of wheat, barley and rye prolamins, and has demonstrated significant contamination in a range of products. If patients with coeliac disease are to take oats, it is important that those consumed are free of contamination. This assay should allow the identification of safe oat products.

  12. Familial mediterranean fever in an Iranian patient with behcet disease.

    PubMed

    Mobini, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most prevalent disorder among the hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes. This disorder is characterized by fever and some painful attacks such as abdominal, chest or joint pain and potentially development of AA amyloidosis. Several vasculitis are more common in FMF than general population. There are some reports about association of FMF with Behcet Disease (BD). In this study, we describe a 27 year old patient with BD who suffered from attacks of fever, arthralgia, abdominal pain and genetic study confirmed the diagnosis of FMF. FMF should be considered in a patient with Behcet disease who is suffering from attacks of fever, arthralgia and abdominal pain.

  13. Patients' substantialization of disease, the hybrid symptom and metaphysical care.

    PubMed

    Pârvan, Alexandra

    2015-06-01

    In the context of current scholarship concerned with facilitating integration between the biomedical and the patient-centred models of care, the article suggests that disease brings about an ontological disruption in patients, which is not directly addressed in either model, and may interfere with treatment and therapy outcomes if not met with a type of care termed here as 'metaphysical'. The receipt of diagnosis and medical care can give patients the sense that they are ontologically diminished, or less of a human, and along with physicians' approaches to and discourses about disease, may prompt them to seek ontological restoration or security in the same way as psychologically traumatized patients sometimes do: by treating the disease and/or the experience of harm associated with it as a thing that exists per se. I call this 'substantialization' of disease (or harm) and draw on Augustine's theory of non-substantial deficiencies (physiological and moral) and on Plato's and Plotinus's different takes on such defects in order to discuss what substantialization can do for patients. Based on literature that examines patients' ways of talking about and living with their disease, I speculate that substantialization can generate a 'hybrid symptom', consisting in patterns of exercising agency which may predispose to non-adherence. Ways in which physicians could provide metaphysical care are proposed, along with an understanding of chronic patients as hybrid ontological and agentic units, which draws on theories of enactive cognition. I opine that metaphysical care may facilitate integration between the depersonalized and personalized models of care. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Potential role for retinoic acid in patients with Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Pecori Giraldi, Francesca; Ambrogio, Alberto Giacinto; Andrioli, Massimiliano; Sanguin, Francesca; Karamouzis, Ioannis; Karamouzis, Iannis; Corsello, Salvatore Maria; Scaroni, Carla; Arvat, Emanuela; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Pontercorvi, Alfredo; Cavagnini, Francesco

    2012-10-01

    Cushing's disease, i.e. cortisol excess due to an ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma, is a rare disorder with considerable morbidity and mortality but no satisfactory medical treatment as yet. Experimental data have recently shown that retinoic acid restrains ACTH secretion by tumoral corticotropes. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy and safety profile of retinoic acid treatment in patients with Cushing's disease. This is a prospective, multicenter study. Seven patients with Cushing's disease (three men, four postmenopausal women) were started on 10 mg retinoic acid daily and dosage increased up to 80 mg daily for 6-12 months. ACTH, urinary free cortisol (UFC), and serum cortisol as well as clinical features of hypercortisolism and possible side effects of retinoic acid were evaluated at baseline, during retinoic acid administration, and after drug withdrawal. A marked decrease in UFC levels was observed in five patients; mean UFC levels on retinoic acid were 22-73% of baseline values and normalization in UFC was achieved in three patients. Plasma ACTH decreased in the first month of treatment and then returned to pretreatment levels in responsive patients whereas no clear-cut pattern could be detected for serum cortisol. Blood pressure, glycemia, and signs of hypercortisolism, e.g. body weight and facial plethora, were ameliorated to a variable extent on treatment. Patients reported only mild adverse effects, e.g. xerophthalmia and arthralgias. Long-term treatment with retinoic acid proved beneficial and well tolerated in five of seven patients with Cushing's disease. This represents a novel, promising approach to medical treatment in Cushing's disease.

  15. Increase risk of allergic diseases in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-Pin; Kuo, Chun-Nan; Kuo, Li-Na; Wang, Yao-Tung; Perng, Wuu-Tsun; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Wei, James Cheng-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Th2 and Th17 cells are both associated with developing ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and asthma. Th2 cells are also associated with allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis (AD). The prevalence of such allergic diseases in AS patients is unknown. In this study, we intended to study the risk of allergic diseases in a 10-year follow-up population of newly diagnosed patients with AS. We used a nationwide 10-year population-based database retrieved from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005 (LHID2005) in Taiwan. The study cohort comprised 857 patients with AS who had at least 1 claim of inpatient admission or at least 2 claims of ambulatory visit. The comparison cohort consisted of 4285 randomly selected subjects matched with AS group at a ratio of 5:1. We used Cox proportional-hazards regression to determine the 10-year disease-free survival rates after adjusting for potentially confounding factors. The AS patients had a 1.31 times greater risk of developing asthma within 10 years of diagnosis when compared with non-AS age- and sex-matched subjects, after adjusting for other risk factors (95% confidence interval = 1.00–1.75). But the difference was not significantly different. The AS patients also had a 1.46 times and a 1.22 times greater risk of developing allergic rhinitis and AD significantly. AS patients also had a lower allergic disease-free survival rate compared to non-AS group. Our results showed that patients with AS had a higher risk of developing allergic diseases later in life. PMID:27828843

  16. The Wired Patient: Patterns of Electronic Patient Portal Use Among Patients With Cardiac Disease or Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Jonathan P; Shah, Nirav R; Stewart, Walter F

    2015-01-01

    Background As providers develop an electronic health record–based infrastructure, patients are increasingly using Web portals to access their health information and participate electronically in the health care process. Little is known about how such portals are actually used. Objective In this paper, our goal was to describe the types and patterns of portal users in an integrated delivery system. Methods We analyzed 12 months of data from Web server log files on 2282 patients using a Web-based portal to their electronic health record (EHR). We obtained data for patients with cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes who had a Geisinger Clinic primary care provider and were registered “MyGeisinger” Web portal users. Hierarchical cluster analysis was applied to longitudinal data to profile users based on their frequency, intensity, and consistency of use. User types were characterized by basic demographic data from the EHR. Results We identified eight distinct portal user groups. The two largest groups (41.98%, 948/2258 and 24.84%, 561/2258) logged into the portal infrequently but had markedly different levels of engagement with their medical record. Other distinct groups were characterized by tracking biometric measures (10.54%, 238/2258), sending electronic messages to their provider (9.25%, 209/2258), preparing for an office visit (5.98%, 135/2258), and tracking laboratory results (4.16%, 94/2258). Conclusions There are naturally occurring groups of EHR Web portal users within a population of adult primary care patients with chronic conditions. More than half of the patient cohort exhibited distinct patterns of portal use linked to key features. These patterns of portal access and interaction provide insight into opportunities for electronic patient engagement strategies. PMID:25707036

  17. [Clinical approach to hydatid disease in uremic patients].

    PubMed

    Vaccaro, F; Pagano, A; Romano, G; Romano, G

    1996-03-01

    Uremic patients in hemodialytic treatment have the same opportunity to be affected with hydatid disease as healthy people. However, because these patients usually have an immunodeficiency syndrome, it is always necessary to evaluate correctly the most common immune diagnostic procedures; furthermore the clinical approach and successive surgical treatment must evaluate carefully electrolyte and acid-base balances, the cardiovascular system, hemostasis and energy intake. Authors, in this paper, report 8 cases of hydatid disease in as many patients during a period of 27 years. At the beginning they describe diagnostic and therapeutic management; later they emphasize the necessity of a careful immunological diagnostic evaluation (which is often falsely negative), and of radiological, ultrasonographic and scintigraphic diagnosis. They conclude by emphasizing that uremic patients with hemodialytic treatment survive with disease and although a surgical approach of hydatid disease is not really different from others it could be insidious not to consider the peculiar immunological and clinical metabolic state of uremic patients also to perform a correct treatment.

  18. [Occurrence of autoantibodies in patients with alcoholic liver disease].

    PubMed

    Szulzyk, Tomasz; Parfieniuk-Kowerda, Anna; Luto, Magdalena; Lapiński, Tadeusz Wojciech; Flisiak, Robert

    2012-09-01

    Autoantigens are present in normal cells and tissues. However, in physiological conditions autoantigens pose no danger due to the phenomenon of immunologic tolerance. The loss of immunologic tolerance and following autoagression could result from the structure changes of autoantigens as an effect of the activity of chemical factors, such as acetaldehyde, which is metabolite of ethanol. The aim of the study was to evaluate of occurrence of autoantibodies in patients with alcoholic liver disease. Ninety-five patients with chronic alcoholic liver disease and 16 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The presence of autoantibodies against liver proteins were assessed. The occurrence of studied autoantibodies was evaluated with regard to the degree of liver damage. Inclusion criteria were: age over 21 yrs, at least 3-yrs history of alcoholic liver disease, HBV and HCV-negativity, absence of autoimmunological diseases. The presence of autoantibodies AMA-M2, SLA/LP, LKM-1, LC1, anti-F-actin, desmin and miozin in serum was assessed by immunoblotting method and ANA by ELISA. Autoantibodies were demonstrated in sera of 33% of patients. Single isolated autoantibodies were present in 24% of patients, whereas 9% of patients have several autoantibodies. The most prevalent were anti-F-actin (19%) and antinuclear antibodies (11%). Occurrence of anti-F-actin antibodies increased with degree of liver damage. Concluding these results suggest that alcohol may contribute to the activation of autoimmune processes, and particularly against contractile filaments of cells for which F-actin antibodies are produced.

  19. Cardiovascular Pharmacogenomics – Implications for Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cavallari, Larisa H.; Mason, Darius L.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Thus, patients with CKD often require treatment with cardiovascular drugs, such as antiplatelet, antihypertensive, anticoagulant, and lipid-lowering agents. There is significant inter-patient variability in response to cardiovascular therapies, which contributes to risk for treatment failure or adverse drug effects. Pharmacogenomics offers the potential to optimize cardiovascular pharmacotherapy and improve outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disease, though data in patients with concomitant CKD are limited. The drugs with the most pharmacogenomic evidence are warfarin, clopidogrel, and statins. There are also accumulating data for genetic contributions to β-blocker response. Guidelines are now available to assist with applying pharmacogenetic test results to optimize warfarin dosing, selection of antiplatelet therapy after percutaneous coronary intervention, and prediction of risk for statin-induced myopathy. Clinical data, such as age, body size, and kidney function have long been used to optimize drug prescribing. An increasing number of institutions are also implementing genetic testing to be considered in the context of important clinical factors to further personalize drug therapy for patients with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26979147

  20. Salivary gland disease in pediatric HIV patients: an update.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Andres; De Rossi, Scott S

    2004-01-01

    Oral manifestations are one of the earliest clinical indicators of HIV infection and progression in children. Prompt recognition of these signs and symptoms by dental providers can help in the diagnosis and intervention of delaying the progression of HIV disease to AIDS. Salivary gland disease is a common manifestation of HIV infection in pediatric patients, presenting either as gland enlargement and/or xerostomia. The parotid glands by far are most frequently affected, though the other major glands are commonly involved. Diseases of the salivary glands and the corresponding quantitative changes in saliva affect the homeostasis of the oral cavity and account for significant morbidity during the progression of HIV disease. This paper summarizes the research on HIV-related salivary gland disease and outlines treatment and management considerations.

  1. Genetics of cardiac disease in the small animal patient.

    PubMed

    Meurs, Kathryn M

    2010-07-01

    There is increasing evidence that many forms of congenital and acquired cardiovascular disease in small animal patients are of familial origin. The large number of familial diseases in domestic purebred animals is thought to be associated with the desire to breed related animals to maintain a specific appearance and the selection of animals from a small group of popular founders (founder effect). Clinicians can use knowledge that a particular trait or disease may be inherited to provide guidance to owners and animal breeders to reduce the frequency of the trait. Even if the molecular cause is not known, identification of a pattern of inheritance and information on clinical screening can be useful for a breeder trying to make breeding decisions. Common forms of inheritance for veterinary diseases include autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, X-linked recessive, and polygenic. These genetic traits and their possible involvement in cardiac disease in small animals are discussed in this article.

  2. Development of Kawasaki disease in a patient with PFAPA.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Takahito; Takada, Hidetoshi; Nagatomo, Yusaku; Nanishi, Etsuro; Nagata, Hazumu; Yamamura, Kenichiro; Doi, Takehiko; Ikeda, Kazuyuki; Hara, Toshiro

    2013-12-01

    Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis syndrome (PFAPA) is one of the autoinflammatory diseases of unknown etiology characterized by regularly recurrent fever episodes with attacks lasting 3-6 days every 3-8 weeks associated with at least one of the three cardinal clinical signs: aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis. Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute, self-limited systemic vasculitis that occurs predominantly in infants and young children. In most KD patients, i.v. immunoglobulin leads to a rapid amelioration of clinical symptoms and significantly decreases the risk of coronary artery aneurysms. Although the etiology of KD is still unknown, it was reported that innate immunity was activated in the patients. Described herein is a patient with PFAPA who developed KD. This is the first report of KD development in a PFAPA patient. The association between KD and PFAPA may represent a genetic predisposition to dysregulated innate immune response.

  3. Assessment of Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Make, Barry J.; Martinez, Fernando J.

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is important to establish an accurate diagnosis, assist in making therapeutic decisions, measuring outcomes for clinical and research purposes, and determining prognosis. Chest computed tomography (CT) scans are useful in patients who present with airflow limitation and clinical features suggestive of COPD but in whom other diagnoses are being considered. In such cases, a chest CT may indicate another diagnosis. The amount and distribution of emphysema can identify outcomes from lung volume reduction surgery, and chest CT scans are mandatory in assessment of patients for this surgery. Quantitative parameters from chest CT scans have been used to define longitudinal progression of disease. Assessment of patients with COPD for both clinical and research purposes should incorporate a variety of different outcomes. There are outcome measures that have been successfully incorporated in large clinical trials, and the design and outcomes of these trials can be used to plan future clinical investigations in COPD. PMID:19056711

  4. Jumping to conclusions in untreated patients with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    de Rezende Costa, Flavio Henrique; Averbeck, Bruno; O'Sullivan, Sean S.; Vincent, Maurice Borges; Rosso, Ana Lucia; Lees, Andrew J.; Djamshidian, Atbin

    2016-01-01

    Background Jumping to conclusions due to impulsivity has been shown to be a sensitive marker for dopamine dysregulation and addictive behaviour patterns in treated patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). It is unknown whether drug naïve PD patients, who have never received dopaminergic therapy also have deficits in information sampling. Methods Twenty five de novo PD patients and twenty matched healthy controls were recruited and tested on the beads task, which is a validated information sampling task to assess reflection impulsivity and a temporal discounting questionnaire. Results Patients gathered significantly less information and made more irrational choices than matched controls. There was, however, no group difference on the temporal discounting questionnaire. Conclusions Poor information sampling and irrational decision making may be an inherent component of the neuropsychological deficit in Parkinson's disease. These findings suggest that underlying impulsivity detected by a metric task is common in de novo PD. PMID:26956927

  5. Assessment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Make, Barry J; Martinez, Fernando J

    2008-12-15

    Assessment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is important to establish an accurate diagnosis, assist in making therapeutic decisions, measuring outcomes for clinical and research purposes, and determining prognosis. Chest computed tomography (CT) scans are useful in patients who present with airflow limitation and clinical features suggestive of COPD but in whom other diagnoses are being considered. In such cases, a chest CT may indicate another diagnosis. The amount and distribution of emphysema can identify outcomes from lung volume reduction surgery, and chest CT scans are mandatory in assessment of patients for this surgery. Quantitative parameters from chest CT scans have been used to define longitudinal progression of disease. Assessment of patients with COPD for both clinical and research purposes should incorporate a variety of different outcomes. There are outcome measures that have been successfully incorporated in large clinical trials, and the design and outcomes of these trials can be used to plan future clinical investigations in COPD.

  6. Innovation by patients with rare diseases and chronic needs.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Pedro; Zejnilovic, Leid; Canhão, Helena; von Hippel, Eric

    2015-04-09

    We provide the first empirical exploration of disease-related innovation by patients and their caregivers. Our aims were to explore to what degree do patients develop innovative solutions; how many of these are unique developments; and do these solutions have positive perceived impact on the patients' overall quality of life? In addition, we explored the factors associated with patient innovation development, and sharing of the solutions that the patients developed. We administered a questionnaire via telephone interviewing to a sample of 500 rare disease patients and caregivers. The solutions reported were pre-screened by the authors for their fit with the self-developed innovation aim of the study. All the reported solutions were then validated for their novelty by two medical professionals. Logistic regression models were used to test the relationships between our key variables, patient innovation and solution sharing. 263 (53%) of our survey respondents reported developing and using a solution to improve management of their diseases. An initial screening removed 81 (16%) solutions for being an obvious misfit to the self-developed innovation aim of the study. This lowered the sample of potentially innovative solutions to 182 (36%). Assessment of novelty and usefulness of the solutions, conducted by two medical evaluators, confirmed that 40 solutions (8%) were indeed novel, while the remaining 142 (28%) were already known to medicine. The likelihood of patient innovation increased as the education level increased (OR 2, p < 0.05), and as their perception of limitations imposed by their disease increased (OR 1.3, p < 0.05). 55 individuals diffused their solutions to some degree, with 50 of these sharing via direct diffusion to other patients. There is a positive relationship between the impact of a solution on the respondents' overall quality of life and likelihood of solution sharing. Given that hundreds of millions of people worldwide are afflicted by rare

  7. Gender differences in presentation and course of disease in pediatric patients with Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neera; Bostrom, Alan G; Kirschner, Barbara S; Ferry, George D; Winter, Harland S; Baldassano, Robert N; Gold, Benjamin D; Abramson, Oren; Smith, Terry; Cohen, Stanley A; Heyman, Melvin B

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine gender differences in pediatric patients with Crohn disease. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 989 consecutive pediatric patients (566 boys, 423 girls) who had Crohn disease (aged 0 to 17 years at diagnosis) by using the Pediatric IBD Consortium Registry. Uniform data were analyzed to compare the presentation and course of disease according to gender. Median follow-up time was 2.8 years. Mean +/- SD age at diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (11.5 +/- 3.8 years) did not differ by gender. Compared with boys, girls had a higher prevalence of mouth sores at symptom onset and a higher prevalence of hypoalbuminemia at the time of diagnosis. Location of disease did not differ by gender. A higher proportion of girls had abnormal anti-outer membrane porin of Escherichia coli levels compared with boys. Girls were at increased risk for erythema nodosum/pyoderma gangrenosum and decreased risk for growth failure compared with boys. Girls appear to have an overall more severe course of disease; however, boys are at increased risk for developing growth failure. Disease course and the impact of disease severity on growth according to gender in pediatric Crohn disease require prospective study.

  8. Acute appendicitis in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Chao, Pei-Wen; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Chen, Yung-Tai; Lee, Yi-Jung; Wang, Feng-Ming; Liu, Chia-Jen; Yang, Wu-Chang; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chen, Tzen-Wen; Li, Szu-Yuan

    2012-10-01

    Acute appendicitis in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) poses a diagnostic challenge. Delayed surgery can contribute to higher morbidity and mortality rates. However, few studies have evaluated this disease among ESRD patients. Our study focused on the lack of data on the incidence and risk factors of acute appendicitis among ESRD patients and compared the outcomes in patients who underwent different dialysis modalities. This national survey was conducted between 1997 and 2005 and included ESRD patients identified from the Taiwan National Health Insurance database. The incidence rate of acute appendicitis in ESRD patients was compared with that in randomly selected age-, sex-, and Charlson comorbidity score-matched non-dialysis controls. A Cox regression hazard model was used to identify risk factors. Among 59,781 incident ESRD patients, matched one-to-one with controls, there were 328 events of acute appendicitis. The incidence rate of 16.9 per 10,000 person-years in the ESRD cohort was higher than that in the control cohort (p = 0.003). The independent risk factors were atrial fibrillation (hazard ratio [HR], 2.08), severe liver disease (HR, 1.74), diabetes mellitus (HR, 1.58), and hemodialysis (HR, 1.74). Compared with the control cohort, subsequent perforation and mortality rates of acute appendicitis were also higher in the ESRD cohorts. There was no effect of dialysis modality on the patient outcomes. ESRD patients had a higher risk for acute appendicitis and poorer outcomes than non-dialysis populations. A careful examination of ESRD patients presenting with atypical abdominal pain to avoid misdiagnosis is extremely important to prevent delayed surgery.

  9. Influenza vaccination perception and coverage among patients with malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Poeppl, Wolfgang; Lagler, Heimo; Raderer, Markus; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Zielinski, Christoph; Herkner, Harald; Burgmann, Heinz

    2015-03-30

    Patients with malignancies are at increased risk of serious influenza related complications with higher rates of hospitalization and mortality than healthy cohorts. Although annual vaccination against influenza infection is recommended, vaccination rates among cancer patients are apparently low. The reasons for the low compliance to influenza vaccine and the influenza vaccination rate among Austrian cancer patients have not been studied in detail yet. From July 1, 2013 to October 31, 2013, 444 patients treated in the outpatient departments of the Clinical Division of Oncology and the Clinical Division of Haematology and Haemostaseology of the General Hospital Vienna participated in a survey on different aspects of influenza vaccination. In total, only 80 out of 444 patients (18%) had received influenza vaccination in the previous year. The influenza vaccination rate was higher amongst patients with haematological malignancies (22%) compared to patients with solid tumours (13%). Higher age was significantly associated with a higher probability for being vaccinated. Collecting information about influenza vaccination primarily from media or the internet was not significantly associated with influenza vaccination status. Information through a medical consultation or a recommendation by the attending physician resulted in significant higher influenza vaccination coverage rates. Only 199 out of the 444 patients (44.8%) were informed by a physician about influenza vaccination and only 18 out of 337 patients (5.3%) with a diagnosis of a malignant disease were informed by their treating oncologist. The main reasons for influenza vaccination denial were concerns about interaction with the malignant disease and potential side-effects. Information about influenza vaccination during a medical consultation and a clear recommendation by the attending physician are highly predictive for acceptance of influenza vaccination. Increased awareness among physicians, especially

  10. Simultaneous surgery in patients with both cardiac and noncardiac diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Xiao, Feng; Wang, Jin; Song, Bo; Li, Xi-Hui; Li, Jian; He, Zhi-Song; Zhang, Huan; Yin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the possibility and feasibility of simultaneous cardiac and noncardiac surgery. Methods From August 2000 to March 2015, 64 patients suffering from cardiac and noncardiac diseases have been treated by simultaneous surgeries. Results Two patients died after operations in hospital; thus, the hospital mortality rate was 3.1%. One patient with coronary heart disease, acute myocardial infarction, and a recurrence of bladder cancer accepted emergency simultaneous coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), bladder cystectomy, and ureterostomy. He died of acute cerebral infarction complicated with multiple organ failure on the 153rd day after operation. The other patient with chronic constrictive pericarditis and right lung cancer underwent pericardial stripping and right lung lower lobectomy, which resulted in multiple organ failure, and the patient died on the tenth day postoperatively. The remaining 62 patients recovered and were discharged. The total operative morbidity was 17.2%: postoperative hemorrhage (n, % [1, 1.6%]), pulmonary infection and hypoxemia (2, 3.1%), hemorrhage of upper digestive tract (1, 1.6%), incisional infection (3, 4.7%), subphrenic abscess (1, 1.6%), and postoperative acute renal failure and hemofiltration (3, 4.7%). Of the 62 patients discharged, 61 patients were followed up. Eleven patients died with 10 months to 10 years during the follow-up. The mean survival time is 116.2±12.4 months. The cumulative survival rate is 50.8%. Conclusion Simultaneous surgeries in patients suffering from both cardiac and noncardiac benign or malignant diseases are safe and possible with satisfactory short-term and long-term survival. PMID:27486311

  11. Safety of rasagiline in elderly patients with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Goetz, C G; Schwid, S R; Eberly, S W; Oakes, D; Shoulson, I

    2006-05-09

    The authors examined age effects on adverse events from two randomized, controlled trials of rasagiline, comparing younger (younger than 70 years) and older (70 years and older) subjects. Older patients were more prone to serious adverse effects than younger patients, but there was no statistical interaction between age and rasagiline exposure. This absence of an age-rasagiline interaction suggests that rasagiline does not require special safety precautions for elderly subjects with Parkinson disease.

  12. Impact of Perceived Stigma on Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patient Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Taft, Tiffany H.; Keefer, Laurie; Leonhard, Christoph; Nealon-Woods, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Background Perceived stigma has been linked to disease outcome in several chronic illnesses. Stigmatization of illness often leads to increased psychological distress and poorer quality of life. While body stigma has been identified as a specific inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patient concern, no study to date has systematically investigated the presence of stigma in IBD or its effects on disease course and management. Methods Participants were recruited online and through the Illinois chapter of the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America. A screening measure was used to identify an established IBD diagnosis. Patients completed the Perceived Stigma Scale in IBS, Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, General Self-Efficacy Scale, the Brief Symptom Inventory, and the Rating Form of IBD Patient Concerns. Results A total of 211 patients (156 CD, 55 UC) with a confirmed diagnosis for a minimum of 6 months completed the study. Eighty-four percent of participants reported perceived stigma. Hierarchical regression demonstrated that perceived stigma accounted for 10%–22% of the variance in health-related quality of life scores, 4%–16% for psychological distress, 5% for medication adherence, 19% for self-esteem, and 8% for self-efficacy. Effect sizes were small, but comparable with more traditionally evaluated patient variables. Conclusions The majority of IBD patients report some perceived stigmatization. These results suggest that perceived stigma is a significant predictor of poorer outcomes in patients with IBD when controlling for illness and demographic variables. Perceived stigma is a potentially important psychosocial factor in IBD patient care and warrants further investigation. PMID:19180581

  13. Predicting Stroke Risk in Hypertensive Patients With Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Coca, Antonio; Messerli, Franz H.; Benetos, Athanase; Zhou, Qian; Champion, Annette; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M.; Pepine, Carl J.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Our understanding of factors influencing stroke risk among patients with coronary artery disease is incomplete. Accordingly, factors predicting stroke risk in hypertensive, clinically stable coronary artery disease patients were determined with data from the INternational VErapamil SR-trandolapril STudy (INVEST). Methods The effect of baseline characteristics and on-treatment blood pressure (BP) were analyzed to determine the risk of stroke (fatal or nonfatal) among the 22 576 patients enrolled. Cox proportional-hazards models (unadjusted, adjusted, and time dependent) were used to identify predictors of stroke among subgroups with these characteristics present at entry and on-treatment BP. Results Excellent BP control (at 24 months, >70% <140/90 mm Hg) was achieved during 61 835 patient-years of follow-up, as 377 patients had a stroke (6.1 strokes/1000 patient-years) and 28% of those patients had a fatal stroke. Increased age, black race, US residency, and history of prior myocardial infarction, smoking, stroke/transient ischemic attack, arrhythmia, diabetes, and coronary bypass surgery were associated with an increased risk of stroke. Achieving a systolic BP <140 mm Hg and a diastolic BP <90 mm Hg was associated with a decreased risk of stroke. There was no statistically significant difference in stroke risk comparing the verapamil SR–based with the atenolol-based treatment strategy (adjusted hazard ratio=0.87; 95% CI, 0.71 to 1.06; P=0.17). Conclusions Among hypertensive patients with chronic coronary artery disease, stroke was an important complication associated with significant mortality. Black race, US residency, and conditions associated with increased vascular disease severity and arrhythmia predicted increased stroke risk, whereas achieving a BP <140/90 mm Hg on treatment predicted a reduced stroke risk. PMID:18162623

  14. Thromboembolic Events in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Algahtani, Farjah H.; Farag, Youssef M. K.; Aljebreen, Abdulrahman M.; Alazzam, Nahla A.; Aleem, Aamer S.; Jabri, Fouad F.; Rajab, Mohammad H.; Shoukri, Mohamed M.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) is characterized by a chronic inflammatory condition, and is accompanied by abnormalities in coagulation and a hyper-coagulable state. This study was conducted to examine the risk factors for developing Thromboembolic Events in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) in a population with prevalent consanguinity. Patients and Methods: Patients with a definitive diagnosis of IBD who were seen in the gastroenterology clinic of King Khalid University Hospital (Riyadh, Saudi Arabia) from 2010- to 2012, were asked to participate in this prospective cohort study, and were followed for one 1 year. Data was collected using specifically designed case report forms (CRF) by trained research personnel. Results: A total of 100 Saudi patients with IBD were studied. There were 51 (51%) women and the mean ± standard deviation (SD) age of the group was 31.24 ± 10.78 years. Those with Crohn's disease constituted 72% of the patients, and 28% had ulcerative colitis. Eight patients (8%) had at least one Thrombotic Event ([six deep venous thrombosis (DVT), and two pulmonary embolism (PE)]. Family history of deep venous thrombosis was present in 5%, and family history of pulmonary embolism (PE) in 4% of the patients. After adjusting for age and gender, a family history of Thrombotic event was identified as to be the only statistically significant predictor of thrombosis in IBD patients (RR = 9.22, 95% CI: 2.10--40.43). Conclusion: In a population with high consanguinity, Thromboembolic events (DVT and PE) had a prevalence of 8% among IBD patients, positive family history of pulmonary embolism was a predictor of thrombosis. Further studies are needed to explore the role of genetic factors in this population. PMID:27976637

  15. Periodontal and coronary heart disease in patients undergoing coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Berent, Robert; Auer, Johann; Schmid, Peter; Krennmair, Gerald; Crouse, Stephen F; Green, John S; Sinzinger, Helmut; von Duvillard, Serge P

    2011-01-01

    Periodontal inflammation has been implicated in atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease (CHD). Coronary angiography (CA) is used in the assessment of CHD; only a few studies have evaluated periodontal disease (PD) and angiographic measures of coronary atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between CHD and PD. In this prospective epidemiologic study, 466 patients underwent CA and were assessed for PD. All patients underwent physical, laboratory, cardiac, and dental examination including dental x-rays. Periodontal disease and coronary angiograms were evaluated blindly by a dentist and 2 cardiologists, respectively. A coronary stenosis greater than 50% was ruled as CHD. Periodontal disease was defined and measured with the Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN); and if at least 2 sextants (segments dividing mandible and maxilla into 6) were recorded as having CPITN of at least 3 (signifying that sextant had periodontal pocket depth ≥ 3.5 mm), the patient was coded as having PD. Three-hundred forty-nine patients (74.9%) had CHD assessed by CA The CHD patients had PD in 55.6% vs 41.9% in the non-CHD patients (P < .01). The CPITN scores were significantly higher in patients with vs without CHD, 2.43 vs 2.16, respectively (P = .023). After adjusting for age, sex, and risk factors for atherosclerosis with additional inclusion of C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, PD remained significantly related to CHD (odds ratio = 1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-3.1). Other predictors for CHD were male sex, age, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and diabetes. Our results demonstrate an increased odds ratio for angiographically determined CHD in patients with PD and that CHD and PD may cluster in particular groups of a population. Our data indicate that PD represents a potentially modifiable risk factor that is both preventable and treatable with predictable treatments that pose negligible risk.

  16. Metformin therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Duong, J K; Roberts, D M; Furlong, T J; Kumar, S S; Greenfield, J R; Kirkpatrick, C M; Graham, G G; Williams, K M; Day, R O

    2012-10-01

    Metformin therapy is limited in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) due to the potential risk of lactic acidosis. This open-label observational study investigated metformin and lactate concentrations in patients with CKD (n = 22; creatinine clearances 15-40 ml/min) and in two dialysed patients. Patients were prescribed a range of metformin doses (250-2000 mg daily) and metformin concentrations were compared with data from healthy subjects (scaled to 1500 mg twice daily). A subset of patients (n = 7) was controlled on low doses of metformin (250 or 500 mg daily). No correlation between metformin and lactate concentrations was observed. Three patients had high lactate concentrations (>2.7 mmol/l) and two had high metformin concentrations (3-5 mg/l), but none had any symptoms of lactic acidosis. Reducing metformin dosage and monitoring metformin concentrations will allow the safe use of metformin in CKD, provided that renal function is stable.

  17. T-Helper Cytokine Profiles in Patients with Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Bum; Kim, Young Hyun; Hyun, Myung Chul; Kim, Yeo Hyang; Kim, Hee Sun

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Kawasaki disease is an acute systemic vasculitis of which pathogenesis suspected is caused by immune dysregulation. The goal of this study is to evaluate the activation pattern of T helper cell type 1 (Th1) and T helper cell type 2 (Th2) in patients with Kawasaki disease. Subjects and Methods Prospective study of 60 patients (male 36, female 24) with diagnosis of Kawasaki disease were enrolled. One hundred and eighty blood samples from these patients were collected according to the different clinical stages {before initial intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), 5 days after initial IVIG, 2 months after initial IVIG}. The plasma level of Th1 cytokines; interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) & interleukin (IL)-2 and Th2 cytokines; IL-4 & IL-10 were measured by enzyme-liked immunosorbent assay. Results In all patients, the plasma level of Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2) and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) were markedly elevated during the acute stage of Kawasaki disease. Since then, the plasma level of all these cytokines decreased significantly along with the process of clinical stages. Regardless of the existence of coronary artery lesion or no response to initial IVIG treatment, there were no significant differences between them. Conclusion These data suggest that both Th1 and Th2 cells may be activated simultaneously during the acute stage of Kawasaki disease. Further studies are therefore required to establish the difference of activation pattern of T helper cells between Kawasaki disease and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:26617655

  18. The impact of Parkinson disease on patients' sexuality and relationship.

    PubMed

    Buhmann, C; Dogac, S; Vettorazzi, E; Hidding, U; Gerloff, C; Jürgens, T P

    2016-11-16

    This study aimed at examining the impact of Parkinson disease (PD) on patients' sexuality and relationship and to evaluate gender-specific differences. Using a standardized questionnaire on sexual functioning in chronic diseases (SFCE), the impact of PD diagnosis on 38 domains of sexuality before and since PD diagnosis was evaluated retrospectively in 53 consecutive patients in a relationship. Changes in self-assessed ratings on a four-point Likert scale were determined for all patients. In addition, gender-specific differences and the influence of age, depression (BDI-II), medication, disease severity and disease duration on domains of the SFCE were calculated. The importance of non-sexual relational aspects, such as talking about feelings or tenderness increased for both genders after PD diagnosis, especially in women. Sexual function, such as frequency of intercourse, sexual arousal, subjective abnormal sexual fantasies or sexual satisfaction deteriorated in both genders, especially in men. Some sexual aspects improved in women but worsened in men after PD diagnosis. This includes frequency of orgasm dysfunction, fear not to fulfill sexual expectations of the partner, avoidance of sexual acts, withdrawal from relationship, increase of thoughts about divorce, or increase of dissatisfaction with sexuality and relationship. With age, thoughts about divorce declined. With disease duration, frequency of tenderness with the partner increased. Depression unexpectedly correlated with higher frequency of intercourse. Dopaminergic dosage influenced stability of the relationship negatively. PD influences patients' sexuality negatively, independently of age, disease duration or disease severity and men show greater sexual dysfunction and impairment of their sexual relationship than women.

  19. Body Image Dissatisfaction in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sumona; Zhao, Ying-Qi; Shah, Samir A.; Esposti, Silvia Degli; Lidofsky, Sheldon; Shapiro, Jason; LeLeiko, Neil; Bright, Renee; Law, Meaghan; Moniz, Heather; Samad, Zahid; Merrick, Marjorie; Sands, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the fact that the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and their treatments may affect physical appearance, the effect of IBD on body image is poorly understood. The aims of this study were to determine whether body image dissatisfaction (BID) changes over time in patients with IBD and to examine the demographic and disease-related variables associated with decreased body image. Methods Adults aged 18 and above in the Ocean State Crohn's and Colitis Area Registry with at least 2 years of follow-up were eligible for this study. All patients were enrolled within 6 months of IBD diagnosis and followed prospectively. BID was assessed using a modified version of the Adapted Satisfaction With Appearance (ASWAP) questionnaire. Total ASWAP scores and 2 sub-scores were calculated. To assess for changes over time, general linear models for correlated data were used for continuous outcomes and generalized estimating equations were used for discrete outcomes. Results Two hundred seventy-four patients were studied. BID was found to be stable over time among men and women with IBD despite overall improvements in disease activity. No differences were found in BID according to IBD subtype. Female gender, greater disease activity, higher symptom burden, longer duration of steroid use, dermatologic and musculoskeletal manifestations of IBD, and ileocolonic disease location among patients with Crohn's disease were associated with greater BID. Greater BID was associated with lower health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Conclusions BID remains stable in an incident cohort of IBD despite improved disease activity and is associated with lower HRQOL PMID:25569736

  20. Body image dissatisfaction in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sumona; Zhao, Ying-Qi; Shah, Samir A; Esposti, Silvia Degli; Lidofsky, Sheldon; Shapiro, Jason; Leleiko, Neal; Bright, Renee; Law, Meaghan; Moniz, Heather; Samad, Zahid; Merrick, Marjorie; Sands, Bruce E

    2015-02-01

    Despite the fact that the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and their treatments may affect physical appearance, the effect of IBD on body image is poorly understood. The aims of this study were to determine whether body image dissatisfaction (BID) changes over time in patients with IBD and to examine the demographic and disease-related variables associated with decreased body image. Adults aged 18 and above in the Ocean State Crohn's and Colitis Area Registry with at least 2 years of follow-up were eligible for this study. All patients were enrolled within 6 months of IBD diagnosis and followed prospectively. BID was assessed using a modified version of the Adapted Satisfaction With Appearance questionnaire. Total Adapted Satisfaction With Appearance scores and 2 subscores were calculated. To assess for changes over time, general linear models for correlated data were used for continuous outcomes, and generalized estimating equations were used for discrete outcomes. Two hundred seventy-four patients were studied. BID was found to be stable over time among men and women with IBD despite overall improvements in disease activity. No differences were found in BID according to IBD subtype. Female gender, greater disease activity, higher symptom burden, longer duration of steroid use, dermatologic and musculoskeletal manifestations of IBD, and ileocolonic disease location among patients with Crohn's disease were associated with greater BID. Greater BID was associated with lower health-related quality of life. BID remains stable in an incident cohort of IBD despite improved disease activity and is associated with lower health-related quality of life.

  1. Relationship between disease activity and infection in patients with spondyloarthropathies

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, A; Pacheco-Tena, C; Vazquez-Mellado, J; Burgos-Vargas, R

    2004-01-01

    Methods: A cross sectional study of 95 non-selected patients with SpA (62 men; mean age 26.4 years), who were examined for signs and symptoms of infection and their association with disease activity. 52 had ankylosing spondylitis (AS), 32 undifferentiated SpA (uSpA), 6 chronic reactive arthritis (ReA), and 5 psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Categorical data were analysed by χ2 or Fisher's tests. Results: 53 (56%) patients had infections: 41 (43%) upper respiratory tract (URT), 34 (36%) enteric, and 20 (21%) genitourinary infections. More infections occurred in HLA-B27 positive patients as a whole (39 v 5; p = 0.003) and in uSpA (12 v 2; p = 0.005). In AS and uSpA, infections occurred in ∼50%. 30/39 (77%) patients with active disease (group A) and 23/56 (41%) (group B) (p = 0.001) had infection. There were more enteric infections in group A (47%; p<0.001) and more URT infections in group B (52%; p = NS). 22/30 (73%) patients attributed disease activity to infection. Conclusion: Enteric, and less commonly, URT infections in Mexican patients with SpA, particularly those who were HLA-B27 positive, seem to have a role in the active phase of AS and uSpA. PMID:15361397

  2. [Intestinal parasitic diseases in HIV-infected patients in Uzbekistan].

    PubMed

    Nurtaev, Kh S; Badalova, N S; Zalialieva, M V; Osipova, S O

    2005-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic diseases were diagnosed in 100 HIV-infected patients at different stages of disease (its asymptomatic form, persistent generalized lymphoadenopathy, pre-AIDS, and AIDS) (Group 1), 100 Tashkent residents (Group 2), and 349 patients with gastrointestinal diseases, allergic dermatoses, and skin depigmentation foci (Group 3). The HIV-infected patients were found to have virtually all parasites, such as Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium parvum, Chilomastix mesnili, Entamoeba coli, Iodamoeba butschlii, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Endolimax nana, Blastocystis hominis, Enlerobius vermicularis, Ascaris lumbricoides, Hymenolepis nana, detectable in the population of Tashkent. The highest infestation with intestinal protozoa, including nonpathogenic amoebas and helmninths, was found in Groups 1 and 3. However, in all the forms of HIV infection, the infestation with E. histolytical/dispar was 10 times greater than that in Groups 2 and 3 (1% and 0.8%, respectively). G. lamblia was detected in 16, 21, and 45.2% in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. In all the HIV-infected patients, the content of CD8 lymphocytes was increased, but that of CD20 lymphocytes was normal. Parasites were detectable with different levels of CD4 lymphocytes, but C. parvum was found only if its count was > 200/ml. In the HIV-infected patients, the hyperproduction of IgE was caused mainly by helminths rather than protozoa. In these patients, the increased level of IgE was also noted in the absence of parasites.

  3. Self-Care Among Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yngman-Uhlin, Pia; Hjortswang, Henrik; Riegel, Barbara; Stjernman, Henrik; Hollman Frisman, Gunilla

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disease of unknown etiology. The disease occurs early in life and the burden of symptoms is significant. Patients need to perform self-care to handle their symptoms, but knowledge about what kind of self-care patients do is limited and these individuals need to learn how to manage the symptoms that arise. The aim of this study was to explore self-care among patients with IBD. Twenty adult patients with IBD, 25–66 years of age, were interviewed. Data were analyzed by performing a qualitative content analysis. Four categories with 10 subcategories emerged from the analysis of the interviews. The self-care patients perform consists of symptom recognition (subcategories: physiological sensations and psychological sensations), handling of symptoms (subcategories: adapting the diet, using medical treatment, stress management, and using complementary alternative medicine), planning life (subcategories: planning for when to do activities and when to refrain from activities), and seeking new options (subcategories: seeking knowledge and personal contacts). Self-care consists of symptom recognition, handling life through planning, and accommodating the existing situation with the ultimate goal of maintaining well-being. Being one step ahead facilitates living with IBD. A decision to actively participate in care of a chronic illness is a prerequisite for self-care. Healthcare professionals must consider patients' potential for and desire for self-care when giving advice on self-care activities. Doing so may help people better cope with IBD. PMID:26166423

  4. A system to monitor tremors in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bermeo, A; Bravo, M; Huerta, M; Soto, A

    2016-08-01

    In this work the design and development of a system to monitor tremors in patients with Parkinson's disease based on Arduino open-source prototyping platform is presented. For processing data tremors acquired by the sensor device we have developed an Android application which allows an evaluation of the state of PD patients based on three types of tests that are in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale recommended by the Movement Disorder Society (MDS-UPDRS); the tests performed in the application are: postural tremor of the hands, kinetic tremors of the hands and resting tremor amplitude. The results of PD Patients showed that despite receiving medication to minimize symptoms of their disease, patients have a considerable tremor amplitude, which affects the normal development of their daily activities. In addition, the spectral analysis of the tremors shows that two of the patients were correctly diagnosed with PD while the third patient showed spectral characteristics which led us to suggest to the treating physician reconsider the diagnosis.

  5. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia: treatment options for patients with refractory disease.

    PubMed

    Motta, Marina; Wierda, William G; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2009-09-01

    Patients with purine analogue-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have short survival and limited treatment options. Defining the best salvage strategies for this population is challenging, because limited data are available from clinical trials, and because studies have enrolled mixed populations (patients with recurrent and refractory disease or patients with refractory disease and Richter transformation). Moreover, patients with refractory CLL have a high incidence of unfavorable molecular and clinical features, such as high-risk genomic profiles, unmutated immunoglobulin heavy-chain genes, expression of zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70, and bulky lymphadenopathies. These patients are also severely immunosuppressed because of the underlying disease and the treatments received, and experience a high rate of infectious complications that pose an additional difficulty in selecting treatment. Despite these challenges, in parallel with better characterizations of the biologic features of refractory CLL, the number of available treatment modalities for this population has increased. Several chemoimmunotherapy combinations have been developed, and novel agents with a different mechanism of action are being investigated in clinical trials. Furthermore, allogeneic stem cell transplantation with nonmyeloablative conditioning regimens is a therapeutic strategy that is increasingly offered to patients with refractory CLL.

  6. Hepatitis B virus infection in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Permin, H; Aldershvile, J; Nielsen, J O

    1982-01-01

    Two hundred and thirty-nine patients with different rheumatic diseases were investigated for serological markers of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. An increased prevalence of anti-HBs was found in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The total prevalence of HBV markers in patients with polymyalgia rheumatica, temporal arteritis, juvenile and adult rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic sclerosis was not significantly different from age-matched controls. Remarkably, 6 patients were HBsAg-positive of whom 3 had RA (4%). Two patients with RA were "healthy' HBsAg carriers. The third patient had circulating HBeAg as well and had shown progression from acute hepatitis to cirrhosis during the time of observation. Three of 18 patients with polyarteritis nodosa were HBsAg- and HBeAg-positive, and all 3 were young men. Clinical improvement was seen in one of these patients and was associated with seroconversion from HBeAg to anti-HBe. Our data do not support the theory that HBV is an aetiological factor in rheumatic diseases except in some cases of polyarteritis nodosa. PMID:6127059

  7. Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Neuropeptide Expression in Patients with Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    van Wamelen, Daniel J.; Aziz, N. Ahmad; Anink, Jasper J.; van Steenhoven, Robin; Angeloni, Debora; Fraschini, Franco; Jockers, Ralf; Roos, Raymund A. C.; Swaab, Dick F.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective: To study whether sleep and circadian rhythm disturbances in patients with Huntington's disease (HD) arise from dysfunction of the body's master clock, the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. Design: Postmortem cohort study. Patients: Eight patients with HD and eight control subjects matched for sex, age, clock time and month of death, postmortem delay, and fixation time of paraffin-embedded hypothalamic tissue. Measurements and Results: Using postmortem paraffin-embedded tissue, we assessed the functional integrity of the suprachiasmatic nucleus in patients with HD and control subjects by determining the expression of two major regulatory neuropeptides, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and arginine vasopressin. Additionally, we studied melatonin 1 and 2 receptor expression. Compared with control subjects, the suprachiasmatic nucleus contained 85% fewer neurons immunoreactive for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and 33% fewer neurons for arginine vasopressin in patients with HD (P = 0.002 and P = 0.027). The total amount of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and arginine vasopressin messenger RNA was unchanged. No change was observed in the number of melatonin 1 or 2 receptor immunoreactive neurons. Conclusions: These findings indicate posttranscriptional neuropeptide changes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of patients with HD, and suggest that sleep and circadian rhythm disorders in these patients may at least partly arise from suprachiasmatic nucleus dysfunction. Citation: van Wamelen DJ; Aziz NA; Anink JJ; van Steenhoven R; Angeloni D; Fraschini F; Jockers R; Roos RAC; Swaab DF. Suprachiasmatic nucleus neuropeptide expression in patients with Huntington's disease. SLEEP 2013;36(1):117–125. PMID:23288978

  8. Pneumococci Can Persistently Colonize Adult Patients with Chronic Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Domenech, A.; Balsalobre, L.; Marti, S.; Calatayud, L.; De la Campa, A. G.; Brueggemann, A. B.; Liñares, J.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae plays an important role in causing acute exacerbations in patients with chronic respiratory disease. However, few data are available regarding pneumococcal persistence in adult patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Fifty pneumococci recovered from sputum samples (1995 to 2010) from 13 adult patients with ≥3 episodes of acute exacerbation or pneumonia, with the same serotype and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern, were studied. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) loci, penicillin-binding protein (PBP) genes (pbp2x, pbp1a, pbp2b), and the quinolone-resistant determining regions (QRDRs) of parC, parE, and gyrA were PCR amplified and sequenced. The average time between the first and last episode was 582 days (standard deviation [SD], ±362). All but two patients received multiple courses of β-lactam treatment, and all persistent strains were resistant to penicillin; however, the PBP sequences were stable over time apart from one variable nucleotide in pbp2x, observed among pneumococci isolated from three patients. In contrast, 7/11 patients treated with fluoroquinolones had fluoroquinolone-resistant pneumococci. In three patients, the initially fluoroquinolone-susceptible strain developed resistance after fluoroquinolone therapy, and in the remaining four patients, the persistent strain was fluoroquinolone resistant from the first episode. QRDR changes involved in fluoroquinolone resistance were frequently observed in persistent strains after fluoroquinolone treatment; however, the PBP sequences and MLST genotypes of these strains were stable over time. PMID:23052300

  9. Risk factors for osteoporosis in inflammatory bowel disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Carla Andrade; Lyra, Andre Castro; Rocha, Raquel; Santana, Genoile Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients exhibit higher risk for bone loss than the general population. The chronic inflammation causes a reduction in bone mineral density (BMD), which leads to osteopenia and osteoporosis. This article reviewed each risk factor for osteoporosis in IBD patients. Inflammation is one of the factors that contribute to osteoporosis in IBD patients, and the main system that is involved in bone loss is likely RANK/RANKL/osteoprotegerin. Smoking is a risk factor for bone loss and fractures, and many mechanisms have been proposed to explain this loss. Body composition also interferes in bone metabolism and increasing muscle mass may positively affect BMD. IBD patients frequently use corticosteroids, which stimulates osteoclastogenesis. IBD patients are also associated with vitamin D deficiency, which contributes to bone loss. However, infliximab therapy is associated with improvements in bone metabolism, but it is not clear whether the effects are because of inflammation improvement or infliximab use. Ulcerative colitis patients with proctocolectomy and ileal pouches and Crohn’s disease patients with ostomy are also at risk for bone loss, and these patients should be closely monitored. PMID:26600979

  10. Hepatic disease in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Lodenyo, Hudson; Segal, Issy

    2004-01-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is now the leading cause of death in the world. Liver involvement in opportunistic infections and neoplasms affecting patients with human immunodeficiency disease syndrome are common. Many of these patients also take many medicines and toxins that are potentially harmful to the liver. This is an overview on the aetiology and possible diagnostic guide to determine liver involvement in patients with HIV infection. A literature review was performed on major published series on the liver and HIV infection between 1985 and 1999, both years inclusive. Data and opinions from 5 general reviews and 31 original articles from MEDLINE on liver disease in patients with HIV infection regarding aetiology, pathology, presentation and patient evaluation are summarised. The liver is frequently affected in patients with AIDS. The majority of the patients have hepatomegaly and abnormal liver enzymes secondary to involvement with opportunities infections, AIDS associated neoplasms and drug therapy. Most of the infections reach the liver by lymphohaematogeneous spread from other sites in the body. Methodical approach in patient evaluation is therefore essential for prompt diagnosis and treatment to minimise morbidity and early mortality.

  11. Inflammatory bowel diseases activity in patients undergoing pelvic radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Seisen, Thomas; Klotz, Caroline; Mazeron, Renaud; Maroun, Pierre; Petit, Claire; Deutsch, Eric; Bossi, Alberto; Haie-Meder, Christine; Chargari, Cyrus; Blanchard, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Background Few studies with contradictory results have been published on the safety of pelvic radiation therapy (RT) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods From 1989 to 2015, a single center retrospective analysis was performed including all IBD patients who received pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BT) for a pelvic malignancy. Treatment characteristics, IBD activity and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were examined. Results Overall, 28 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) (n=13) or ulcerative colitis (n=15) were included in the present study. Median follow-up time after irradiation was 5.9 years. Regarding IBD activity, only one and two patients experienced a severe episode within and after 6 months of follow-up, respectively. Grade 3/4 acute GI toxicity occurred in 3 (11%) patients, whereas one (3.6%) patient experienced late grade 3/4 GI toxicity. Only patients with rectal IBD location (P=0.016) or low body mass index (BMI) (P=0.012) experienced more severe IBD activity within or after 6 months following RT, respectively. Conclusions We report an acceptable tolerance of RT in IBD patients with pelvic malignancies. Specifically, a low risk of uncontrolled flare-up was observed. PMID:28280621

  12. Hodgkin's disease in a patient with Von Hippel-Lindau disease. A case report.

    PubMed

    D'hondt, R; Thomas, J; Van Oosterom, A T; Dewolf-Peeters, C

    2000-01-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder with a predisposition to develop a wide variety of lesions: retinal, cerebellar, spinal and medullar hemangioblastomas, renal cell carcinomas, phaeochromocytomas, and renal, pancreatic and epididymal cysts are the most frequent manifestations of the disease. The prevalence of VHL disease has been estimated to be 1 per 36,000 persons. We report the case of a 68-year-old woman with Von Hipple-Lindau disease who developed high fever with pulmonary and hepatic lesions proven to be Hodgkin's disease on biopsy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Hodgkin's disease in a patient with Von Hippel-Lindau.

  13. Integrated Transitions of Care for Patients With Rare Pulmonary Diseases.

    PubMed

    Moreo, Kathleen; Lattimer, Cheri; Lett, James E; Heggen-Peay, Cherilyn L; Simone, Laura

    Many continuing education (CE) resources are available to support case management professionals in developing competencies in transitions of care (TOC) that apply generally across disease areas. However, CE programs and tools are lacking for advanced TOC competencies in specific disease areas. This article describes 2 projects in which leading TOC, case management, and CE organizations collaborated to develop CE-accredited interdisciplinary pathways for promoting safe and effective TOC for patients with rare pulmonary diseases, including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The interdisciplinary pathways apply to PAH and IPF case management practice and TOC across settings that include community-based primary care and specialty care, PAH or IPF centers of expertise, acute care and post-acute settings, long-term care, rehabilitation and skilled nursing facilities, and patients' homes. Both PAH and IPF are chronic, progressive respiratory diseases that are associated with severe morbidity and mortality, along with high health care costs. Because they are relatively rare diseases with nonspecific symptoms and many comorbidities, PAH and IPF are difficult to diagnose. Early diagnosis, referral to centers of expertise, and aggressive treatment initiation are essential for slowing disease progression and maintaining quality of life and function. Both the rarity and complexity of PAH and IPF pose unique challenges to ensuring effective and safe TOC. Expert consensus and evidence-based approaches to meeting these challenges, and thereby improving PAH and IPF patient outcomes, are presented in the 2 interdisciplinary TOC pathways that are described in this article. In coordinating care for patients with complex pulmonary diseases such as PAH and IPF, case managers across practice settings can play key roles in improving workflow processes and communication, transition planning, coordinating TOC with centers of expertise

  14. [Nutritional status of patients with chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Brunori, Giuliano

    2012-01-01

    The population of patients with chronic kidney disease is aging, and approximately 50% of those starting renal replacement therapy are older than 65 years. Aging poses challenges to maintaining the nutritional status of these patients. As patients get older, purchasing and preparing food may become difficult if the patient is not supported by relatives or social workers. In addition, appetite may decrease as a result of depression. Furthermore, intercurrent illnesses may become more frequent, leading to changes in nutrient requirements. Mobility and cognitive function often decline in elderly patients and the combination of these factors may result in malnutrition. Since malnutrition has been demonstrated to impact on survival in dialysis patients of all ages, appropriate attention to nutritional status and its management is essential in the elderly patient, both in the predialysis phase and on dialysis. This article reviews the issues associated with the maintenance of good nutrition in elderly patients and describes the potential causes of malnutrition. It also reviews the nutrient requirements of older dialysis patients (which differ somewhat from those of younger patients) as well as the assessment of their nutritional status. Finally, recommendations for the management of nutrition in the elderly patient are discussed.

  15. Abnormal magnesium status in patients with cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, S; Oshima, T; Matsuura, H; Ozono, R; Higashi, Y; Sasaki, N; Matsumoto, T; Nakano, Y; Ueda, A; Yoshimizu, A; Kurisu, S; Kambe, M; Kajiyama, G

    2000-02-01

    To investigate magnesium status in patients with cardiovascular diseases and in those presenting high factors for these diseases, we measured the concentrations of serum total Mg, serum ionized Mg and intra-erythrocyte Mg. Mg is an important cofactor for many enzymes, especially those involved in phosphate transfer reactions. Mg deficiency has been shown to be associated with fatal cardiovascular diseases, as well as with risk factors for these diseases. Only measurement of the serum concentration of total Mg is routinely available, but ionized Mg is the physiologically active component. Furthermore, most of the body's Mg is present in the intracellular space. Subjects included patients with ischaemic heart disease (n=80), cardiac arrhythmia (n=60), diabetes mellitus (n=36), essential hypertension (n=194) and hypercholesterolaemia (n=60). The same measurements were made in healthy controls (30 men and 26 women; mean age 58+/-11 years). The serum ionized Mg concentration was measured with a selective ion electrode. The intra-erythrocyte Mg concentration was measured by atomic absorption. No gender difference was found for any Mg parameter, nor was age related to any Mg parameter. The serum albumin concentration was positively correlated only with the serum total Mg concentration. Although the serum total Mg concentration was similar in all groups, patients with diabetes mellitus and arrhythmia had lower serum levels of ionized Mg. Patients with essential hypertension exhibited higher intra-erythrocyte Mg concentrations than the healthy controls. Thus the measurement of serum total Mg concentration may obscure the presence of extracellular Mg deficiency in patients with arrhythmia and diabetes mellitus. Furthermore, the intracellular accumulation of Mg does not support the hypothesis of Mg deficiency in patients with essential hypertension.

  16. Serum Procalcitonin for Differentiating Bacterial Infection from Disease Flares in Patients with Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Kowoon; Lim, Mie-Jin; Kwon, Seong-Ryul; Yoon, Jiyeol

    2011-01-01

    Early differentiation between bacterial infections and disease flares in autoimmune disease patients is important due to different treatments. Seventy-nine autoimmune disease patients with symptoms suggestive of infections or disease flares were collected by retrospective chart review. The patients were later classified into two groups, disease flare and infection. C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum procalcitonin (PCT) levels were measured. The CRP and PCT levels were higher in the infection group than the disease flare group (CRP,11.96 mg/dL ± 9.60 vs 6.42 mg/dL ± 7.01, P = 0.003; PCT, 2.44 ng/mL ± 6.55 vs 0.09 ng/mL ± 0.09, P < 0.001). The area under the ROC curve (AUC; 95% confidence interval) for CRP and PCT was 0.70 (0.58-0.82) and 0.84 (0.75-0.93), which showed a significant difference (P < 0.05). The predicted AUC for the CRP and PCT levels combined was 0.83, which was not significantly different compared to the PCT level alone (P = 0.80). The best cut-off value for CRP was 7.18 mg/dL, with a sensitivity of 71.9% and a specificity of 68.1%. The best cut-off value for PCT was 0.09 ng/mL, with a sensitivity of 81.3% and a specificity of 78.7%. The PCT level had better sensitivity and specificity compared to the CRP level in distinguishing between bacterial infections and disease flares in autoimmune disease patients. The CRP level has no additive value when combined with the PCT level when differentiating bacterial infections from disease flares. PMID:21935268

  17. Increasing Patient Activation Could Improve Outcomes for Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shawn L; Siegel, Corey A

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex disease process that often requires the integration of skills from various health care providers to adequately meet the needs of patients with IBD. The medical and surgical treatment options for IBD have become more complicated and are frequently a source of angst for both the patient and provider. However, it has become more important than ever to engage patients in navigating the treatment algorithm. Although novel in the IBD world, the concept of patients' becoming more active and effective managers of their care has been well studied in other disease processes such as diabetes mellitus and mental illness. This idea of patient activation refers to a patient understanding his or her role in the care process and having the skill sets and self-reliance necessary to manage his or her own health care. Over the past decade, evidence supporting the role of patient activation in chronic illness has grown, revealing improved health outcomes, enhanced patient experiences, and lower overall costs. Patient activation can be measured, and interventions have been shown to improve levels of activation over time and influence outcomes. A focus on patient activation is very appropriate for patients with IBD because this may potentially serve as a tool for IBD providers to not only improve patient outcomes and experience but also reduce health care costs.

  18. Strategies for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Claudio

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequently accompanied by multimorbidities in affected patients. Even though the majority of these comorbidities are also related to advanced age and cigarette smoke, also COPD itself has significant impact on insurgence, or worsening of these conditions. As a consequence, COPD is regarded as a complex disease with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary involvement. According to current guidelines for the management of COPD patients, the comprehensive treatment of this condition should target respiratory symptoms as well as comorbidities. Cardiovascular disease is one of the most frequent comorbidities in COPD patients and there are several strategies for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease in COPD patients. These include smoking cessation, pharmacologic prevention of cardiovascular disease, and the treatment of COPD. Beta-blockers for the prevention of cardiovascular disease have been traditionally limited in COPD patients, albeit current evidence supporting their efficacy and safety in these patients. With regard to COPD medications, corticosteroids are generally not recommended, except for exacerbations, while long-acting beta2-agonists have demonstrated an acceptable profile of cardiovascular safety. Long-acting anticholinergic bronchodilators, in particular tiotropium in the mist inhaler formulation, have been associated with an increased risk of major cardiovascular events and mortality. Data on this issue remain, however, controversial. Glycopyrronium, a recently introduced anticholinergic, demonstrated. a rapid and sustained relief of respiratory symptoms with a favorable safety profile and no increase in cardiovascular risk, in monotherapy and in combination with a long-acting beta2-agonist in a comprehensive trial program indicating a valid option for COPD patients with CV comorbidities.

  19. Evaluation of foot static disturbances in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kuryliszyn-Moskal, Anna; Kaniewska, Katarzyna; Dzięcioł-Anikiej, Zofia; Klimiuk, Piotr Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis constitute the most frequent pathological states leading to the development of foot deformities, which reduce quality of life and cause disability. The aim of the present study was to compare the results of plantoconturographic examinations, obtained by means of a computer podoscope, in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis patients. Special attention was paid to the differences in the values of each parameter determining the level of foot function. The study was performed in 94 female patients divided into two groups according to the type of disease. There were 54 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 40 with osteoarthritis. The control group consisted of 34 healthy women. The plantographic assessment of static foot structure was carried out by means of a device for computer-aided foot examination. A fallen transverse arch of the right foot was statistically much more frequent in the rheumatoid arthritis patients than in osteoarthritis patients or the control group (p < 0.005 and p < 0.05, respectively). Significant differences in the values of the Wejsflog index were observed in the case of left foot between rheumatoid arthritis patients and the control group (p < 0.05). Similarly, there were statistically significant differences in the values of the hallux valgus angle (α) for the right foot between rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis patients or control group (in both cases p < 0.05). Rheumatic diseases predispose patients to disturbances of static foot function. The obtained results highlight the importance of diagnosing foot static disturbances in the prevention of destructive changes affecting the functioning of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  20. Lipoprotein(a) concentrations in adult congenital heart disease patients.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2014-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) contributes to the formation to atherosclerosis, promotes inflammation and stimulates prothrombotic processes. One hundred seventeen adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patients and 152 controls were studied to compare serum Lp(a) concentrations in different subgroups of congenital heart abnormalities. Analytically, Lp(a), total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were studied. In congenital heart disease patients, N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels were also determined. Thirty-nine (25.6%) patients in the control group and 33 (28.2) ACHD patients (2 hypoxemic and 31 nonhypoxemic) had a Lp(a) concentration higher than 30 mg/dL. No significant differences were seen between patients with Lp(a) concentration ≤30 or >30 mg/dL after performing a binary logistic regression multivariate analysis including as covariates all the variables that showed significance (P < .001) between the case and control groups (age, gender, CRP, and total, LDL, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) besides being congenital or not. Similarly, no significant differences were found between ACHD patients with Lp(a) concentration lower and higher than 30 mg/dL after performing a multivariate analysis in which age, sex, body mass index, LDL-cholesterol levels, and being or not hypoxemic were included as covariates. Pearson's correlation showed a significant positive correlation (0.27) between LDL-cholesterol and Lp(a) concentrations (P = .004) and between CRP and N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels (0.19) in ACHD patients (P = .035). Adult congenital heart disease patients showed lower serum total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels than no-congenital patients although no significant differences were seen in Lp(a) concentrations between both groups. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Clinical COPD Questionnaire in patients with chronic respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Canavan, Jane L; Dilaver, Deniz; Clark, Amy L; Jones, Sarah E; Nolan, Claire M; Kon, Samantha S C; Man, William D-C

    2014-10-01

    The Clinical Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Questionnaire (CCQ) is an easy to complete, health-related quality of life questionnaire which has been well-validated in COPD. The responsiveness of the CCQ in chronic respiratory disease patients other than COPD has not been previously described. The study aims were to determine if the CCQ in chronic respiratory disease correlates with other health related quality of life questionnaires, to assess the responsiveness of the CCQ to pulmonary rehabilitation and to determine the minimum important difference. The CCQ, COPD Assessment Test (CAT), the Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire (CRQ) and St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) were measured in 138 chronic respiratory disease patients completing pulmonary rehabilitation. Change in CCQ with pulmonary rehabilitation was correlated with change in the other questionnaires. The minimum important difference of the CCQ was calculated using distribution and anchor-based approaches. The CCQ, CAT, CRQ and SGRQ improved significantly with rehabilitation with effect sizes of -0.43, -0.26, 0.62, -0.37. Change in CCQ correlated significantly with CAT, CRQ and SGRQ (r = 0.53, -0.64, 0.30, all P < 0.0001). The minimum important difference was -0.42 at the population level and -0.4 at the individual level. The CCQ is responsive to pulmonary rehabilitation in chronic respiratory disease patients, with an MID estimated at -0.4 at the individual level. © 2014 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  2. Treating patients with peripheral arterial disease and claudication.

    PubMed

    Treat-Jacobson, Diane; Walsh, M Eileen

    2003-03-01

    The vascular nurse plays an important role in the treatment of patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD), a prevalent atherosclerotic occlusive disease that affects approximately 8 to 12 million people in the United States. Approximately 4 to 5 million individuals with PAD experience claudication, the exercise-induced ischemic pain in the lower extremities that is relieved upon rest. Both PAD and claudication are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, limitations in functional capacity, and a decreased quality of life. Despite its prevalence, PAD is often undiagnosed and, therefore, increases the risk for cardiovascular ischemic events, disease progression, functional disability, amputation, and death. Risk factors for PAD and claudication are similar to those for other atherosclerotic diseases, including age, cigarette smoking, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and hyperhomocysteinemia. Effective treatment to normalize these risk factors can reduce disease progression and the incidence of cardiovascular ischemic events. Claudication symptoms can be improved most effectively through exercise training, which may be used in conjunction with medications specifically indicated to improve these symptoms. Vascular nurses, practicing in a multitude of inpatient and outpatient settings, can assist patients with risk-factor modifications and behavioral changes to help them stop smoking, maintain glycemic control, normalize high blood pressure and lipid levels, and ensure initiation of lifelong antiplatelet therapy and participation in exercise rehabilitation programs, thus, promoting positive outcomes for patients with claudication.

  3. Overweight predicts poorer exercise capacity in congenital heart disease patients.

    PubMed

    Kuehl, Karen; Tucker, Alicia; Khan, Munziba; Goldberg, Paula; Anne Greene, E; Smith, Megan

    2015-12-07

    Overweight (OW) and obesity (OB) are endemic in the United States and affect adolescents and adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD). Defining the burden of excess weight on the cardiovascular system in ACHD is the goal of this study. Limitation of exercise capacity due to overweight or obesity might be reversible with weight loss and improve quality of life for ACHD adults. Exercise tests performed using a Bruce protocol and measurement of maximum oxygen consumption were retrospectively reviewed on 418 CHD patients. OW and OB were defined as the 85-95 or > 95 percentile respectively for age and gender or by adult criteria. Severity of CHD was assigned based on criteria published in standard guidelines. 63 patients had mild, 198 moderate, and 157 severe heart disease. Each ACHD group was 32 to 34% OW or OB. Measured exercise time (ET) of CHD patients with moderate or severe heart disease was less than that of controls in each weight categories. However, OB or OW people have shorter ET than their normal weight peers with CHD. Multiple regression using ET as the dependent variable finds that female sex, relative BMI, and VE/VCO2 at peak exercise are all associated with lesser ET with high significance. Peak heart rate is associated with greater ET, with borderline significance. Severity of heart disease is not independently associated with ET. OW and OB are strongly associated with reduced ET in persons with congenital heart disease. Losing weight may improve exercise capacity in ACHD.

  4. Olfactory dysfunction in persian patients suffering from parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Soltanzadeh, Akbar; Shams, Mehdi; Noorolahi, Hamid; Ghorbani, Askar

    2011-01-01

    Background Looking in literature reveals that aging is accompanied by olfactory dysfunction and hyposmia/anosmia is a common manifestation in some neurodegenerative disorders. Olfactory dysfunction is regarded as non-motor manifestations of Parkinson disease (PD). The main goal of this study was to examine the extent of olfactory dysfunction in Persian PD patients. Methods We used seven types of odors including rosewater, mint, lemon, garlic which were produced by Barij Essence Company in Iran. Additionally, coffee and vinegar were used. Subjects had to distinguish and name between seven previously named odors, stimuli were administered to each nostril separately. Results Totally, 92 patients and 40 controls were recruited. The mean (standard deviation) (SD) age patients was 64.88 (11.30) versus 61.05 (7.93) in controls. The male: female ratio in patients was 50:42 versus 22:18 in control group. Also, mean UPDRS score (SD) in patients was 24.42 (5.08) and the disease duration (SD) was 3.72 (3.53). Regarding the number of truly detected odors, there were a significant higher number of correct identified odors in control group in comparison with the PD patients. Furthermore, there was a significant negative correlation between number of correct diagnosed smells and UPDRS (Pearson Correlation= -0.27, P = 0.009); conversely, no significant correlation between the duration of Parkinson disease and number of correct diagnosed smells (P > 0.05). Conclusion Smelling dysfunction is a major problem in Persian PD patients and it requires vigilant investigation for the cause of olfactory dysfunction exclusively in elder group and looking for possible PD disease. PMID:24250835

  5. Prognosis of patients with carcinoid heart disease after valvular surgery.

    PubMed

    Manoly, Imthiaz; McAnelly, Sarah-Louise; Sriskandarajah, Sanjeevan; McLaughlin, Kenneth Edward

    2014-08-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. We addressed the following question: in patients who are diagnosed with carcinoid heart disease (CHD), do valvular surgeries improve their prognosis? Fifty percent of the patients with clinically diagnosed carcinoid syndrome had cardiac involvement which was present either as valvular dysfunction or as cardiac metastases. These patients often require surgery due to their heightened risk of cardiac disease. Altogether 217 relevant papers were identified as a result of the below-mentioned search, of which 10 papers represented the best evidence to answer the question. The author, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses were tabulated. Of the patients who were identified to have carcinoid heart disease in different studies, 193 patients had valve procedure, mainly replacements at tricuspid, mitral and aortic valve positions and either valvuloplasty or replacement at pulmonary valve. Tricuspid and pulmonary valves represented the majority of the excised valves among patients undergoing valvular surgery for CHD. The pathology of carcinoid valve was attributed to the presence of plaque, causing thickening and retraction. Pure regurgitation was the most common finding in all the valves except pulmonary valve which had both stenosis and insufficiency. Thirty-day mortality was 17% (range 1-63%) and long-term survivors were reported to be alive at an average of 58 months (28-80 months) after the valve surgery. The evidence demonstrates that surgical intervention can lead to improved prognosis and reduce the symptoms of heart failure. Postoperative mortality was mainly due to the carcinoid disease itself and not as a complication of the surgery. Therefore, surgery could be considered for symptomatic palliation in carefully selected individuals.

  6. Statin use in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Harris, Sheena K; Roos, Matt G; Landry, Gregory J

    2016-12-01

    Statins are recommended for use in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) to reduce cardiovascular events and mortality. However, much of the data regarding benefits of statins stem from the cardiovascular literature. Here, we review the literature regarding statin use specifically in patients with PAD regarding its effects on cardiovascular events and mortality, limb-related outcomes, statin use after endovascular interventions, statin dosing, and concerns about statins. We performed a literature review using PubMed for literature after the year 2000. Search terms included "statins," "peripheral arterial disease," "peripheral vascular disease," "lipid-lowering medication," and "cardiovascular disease." There is good evidence of statins lowering cardiovascular events and cardiovascular-related mortality in patients with PAD. Though revascularization rates were reduced with statins, amputation rates and amputation-free survival did not improve. Small randomized controlled trials show that patients taking statins can slightly improve pain-free walking distance or pain-free walking time, although the extent of the effect on quality of life is unclear. Statin use for patients undergoing endovascular interventions is recommended because of the reduction of postoperative cardiovascular events. Not enough data exist to support local effects of systemic statin therapy, such as prevention of restenosis. For statin dosing, there is little increased benefit to intense therapy compared with the adverse effects, whereas moderate-dose therapy has significant benefits with very few adverse effects. Adverse effects of moderate-dose statin therapy are rare and mild and are greatly outweighed by the cardiovascular benefits. There is strong evidence to support use of statins in patients with PAD to reduce cardiovascular events and mortality. Use in patients undergoing open and endovascular interventions is also recommended. Statin use may reduce the need for

  7. Personal Health Records for Patients with Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rozenblum, R.; Park, A.; Dunn, M.; Bates, D.W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Personal health records (PHRs) connected to a physician’s electronic health record system hold substantial promise for supporting and engaging patients with chronic disease. Objectives: To explore how U.S. health care organizations are currently utilizing PHRs for chronic disease populations. Methods A mixed methods study including semi-structured interviews and a questionnaire was conducted. A purposive sample was developed of health care organizations which were recognized as exemplars for PHRs and were high performers in national patient satisfaction surveys (H-CAHPS or CAHPS). Within each organization, participants were health IT leaders or those managing high-risk or chronic disease populations. Results Interviews were conducted with 30 informants and completed questionnaires were received from 16 organizations (84% response rate). Most PHRs allowed patients to access health records and educational material, message their provider, renew prescriptions and request appointments. Patient generated data was increasingly being sought and combined with messaging, resulted in greater understanding of patient health and functioning outside of the clinic visit. However for chronic disease populations, there was little targeted involvement in PHR design and few tools to help interpret and manage their conditions beyond those offered for all. The PHR was largely uncoupled from high risk population management interventions and no clear framework for future PHR development emerged. Conclusion This technology is currently underutilized and represents a major opportunity given the potential benefits of patient engagement and shared decision making. A coherent patient-centric PHR design and evaluation strategy is required to realize its potential and maximize this natural hub for multidisciplinary care co-ordination. PMID:25024758

  8. Update on radiation therapy in patients with Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Tritos, Nicholas A; Biller, Beverly M K

    2015-04-01

    Radiation therapy is an important therapy for patients with Cushing's disease who are not in remission or relapse after transsphenoidal pituitary surgery and are not considered surgical candidates. The development of stereotactic radiation therapy, using gamma knife, linear accelerators or proton beam based methods, has enabled selective radiation delivery to the target while minimizing exposure of healthy tissues. In patients whose tumors are sufficiently distant from the optic apparatus, stereotactic radiation therapy can be delivered in a single session, a procedure termed radiosurgery, which significantly improves patient convenience. Original articles on radiation therapy in Cushing's disease, published during the past 12 months (2013-2014), were identified and pertinent data extracted. Recent studies have reported on the outcomes of patients with Cushing's disease who received mostly stereotactic radiation therapy. While tumor control has been excellent, biochemical remission was less consistently achieved. Some studies suggested that stereotactic radiation may lead to biochemical remission faster than conventional radiation therapy. In addition, retrospective data have suggested that withdrawing medical therapy around the time stereotactic radiation therapy is administered might lead to a faster biochemical response. Regardless of the radiation therapy method, biochemical recurrences may develop and these patients are at long-term risk of developing anterior hypopituitarism and require lifelong periodic endocrine follow-up. Other, less frequent complications may include cranial neuropathies, secondary tumor formation or temporal lobe necrosis. It is plausible that complications may be less frequent after stereotactic radiation therapy, but this requires confirmation. Radiation therapy is an effective second line therapy in patients with Cushing's disease. Ongoing refinements in delivery of radiation therapy are anticipated to lead to improved patient

  9. Thromboembolic events in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Algahtani, Farjah H; Farag, Youssef M K; Aljebreen, Abdulrahman M; Alazzam, Nahla A; Aleem, Aamer S; Jabri, Fouad F; Rajab, Mohammad H; Shoukri, Mohamed M

    2016-11-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) is characterized by a chronic inflammatory condition, and is accompanied by abnormalities in coagulation and a hyper-coagulable state. This study was conducted to examine the risk factors for developing Thromboembolic Events in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) in a population with prevalent consanguinity. Patients with a definitive diagnosis of IBD who were seen in the gastroenterology clinic of King Khalid University Hospital (Riyadh, Saudi Arabia) from 2010- to 2012, were asked to participate in this prospective cohort study, and were followed for one 1 year. Data was collected using specifically designed case report forms (CRF) by trained research personnel. A total of 100 Saudi patients with IBD were studied. There were 51 (51%) women and the mean ± standard deviation (SD) age of the group was 31.24 ± 10.78 years. Those with Crohn's disease constituted 72% of the patients, and 28% had ulcerative colitis. Eight patients (8%) had at least one Thrombotic Event ([six deep venous thrombosis (DVT), and two pulmonary embolism (PE)]. Family history of deep venous thrombosis was present in 5%, and family history of pulmonary embolism (PE) in 4% of the patients. After adjusting for age and gender, a family history of Thrombotic event was identified as to be the only statistically significant predictor of thrombosis in IBD patients (RR = 9.22, 95% CI: 2.10--40.43). In a population with high consanguinity, Thromboembolic events (DVT and PE) had a prevalence of 8% among IBD patients, positive family history of pulmonary embolism was a predictor of thrombosis. Further studies are needed to explore the role of genetic factors in this population.

  10. Opioid Drugs in Patients With Liver Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Soleimanpour, Hassan; Safari, Saeid; Shahsavari Nia, Kavous; Sanaie, Sarvin; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2016-01-01

    Context The liver, one of the most important organs of the body, is known to be responsible for several functions. The functional contribution of the liver to the metabolism of carbohydrates, protein, drugs and toxins, fats and cholesterol and many other biological processes are still unknown. Liver disorders are classified into two types: acute and chronic. Different drugs are used in liver diseases to treat and control pain. Most pain relief medications such as opioids are metabolized via the liver; therefore, the adverse reactions of drugs are probably higher for patients with liver disease. The current study aimed to evaluate the effects of opioid drugs on patients with liver disease; therefore, it is necessary to select suitable opioids for such patients. Evidence Acquisition This review was written by referring to research literature including 70 articles and four textbooks published from 1958 to 2015 on various reputable sites. Searches were carried out on the key phrases of narcotic pain relievers (opioids), acute and chronic hepatic failure, opioid adverse drug reactions, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and other similar keywords. References included a variety of research papers (descriptive and analytical), intervention and review articles. Results In patients with liver disease, administration of opioid analgesics should be observed, accurately. As a general rule, lower doses of drugs should be administered at regular intervals based on the signs of drug accumulation. Secondly, the interactions of opioid drugs with different levels of substrates of the P450 cytochrome enzyme should be considered. Conclusions Pain management in patients with liver dysfunction is always challenging to physicians because of the adverse reactions of drugs, especially opioids. Opioids should be used cautiously since they can cause sedation, constipation and sudden encephalopathy effects. Since the clearance of these drugs in patients with hepatic insufficiency is decreased

  11. Immunohistochemical CD3 staining detects additional patients with celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Mubarak, Amani; Wolters, Victorien M; Houwen, Roderick HJ; ten Kate, Fiebo JW

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether performing immunohistochemical CD3 staining, in order to improve the detection of intra-epithelial lymphocytosis, has an additional value in the histological diagnosis of celiac disease. METHODS: Biopsies obtained from 159 children were stained by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and evaluated using the Marsh classification. CD3 staining was subsequently evaluated separately and independently. RESULTS: Differences in evaluation between the routine HE sections and CD3 staining were present in 20 (12.6%) cases. In 10 (6.3%) patients the diagnosis of celiac disease (Marsh II and III) changed on examination of CD3 staining: in 9 cases, celiac disease had initially been missed on the HE sections, while 1 patient had been over-diagnosed on the routine sections. In all patients, the final diagnosis based on CD3 staining, was concordant with serological results, which was not found previously. In the other 10 (12.3%) patients, the detection of sole intra-epithelial lymphocytosis (Marsh I) improved. Nine patients were found to have Marsh I on CD3 sections, which had been missed on routine sections. Interestingly, the only patient with negative serology had Giardiasis. Finally, in 1 patient with negative serology, in whom Marsh I was suspected on HE sections, this diagnosis was withdrawn after evaluation of the CD3 sections. CONCLUSION: Staining for CD3 has an additional value in the histological detection of celiac disease lesions, and CD3 staining should be performed when there is a discrepancy between serology and the diagnosis made on HE sections. PMID:26140002

  12. Thymic hyperplasia and Graves disease: management of anterior mediastinal masses in patients with Graves disease.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Ator; Gaitonde, David Y; Wood, Joseph C

    2009-01-01

    To describe a case of an anterior mediastinal mass (AMM) in a patient with Graves disease. We report the clinical presentation, diagnosis, management, and outcome of a 34-year-old man with dyspnea on exertion. Initial evaluation of the patient's complaints revealed a large AMM on chest radiography and then chest computed tomography. After occurrence of additional symptoms, the patient was diagnosed as having Graves disease and treated with antithyroid medications. Despite an appropriate biochemical response, he continued to experience severe dyspnea on exertion. A repeated computed tomographic scan 8 weeks after initiation of therapy showed no appreciable decrease in size of the AMM. He elected to undergo thymectomy. An intraoperative phrenic nerve injury resulted in a paralyzed left hemidiaphragm, leaving the patient with considerable difficulties in his career and profoundly decreased exercise tolerance. The differential diagnosis of an AMM includes several malignant lesions with a risk often warranting early surgical excision. In light of the association of benign thymic hyperplasia with Graves disease, thymectomy may be delayed in expectation of thymic regression with medical therapy. The timing of regression is variable, and very few reports exist in the literature. In our current case, the patient opted for thymectomy relatively early and had an unfortunate complication. The lack of clinical evidence regarding management of an enlarged thymus in patients with Graves disease, however, makes management decisions more difficult.

  13. Markers of vascular disease in plasma from patients with chronic kidney disease identified by proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, Eric; Liabeuf, Sophie; Lacroix, Chrystelle; Temmar, Mohamed; Renard, Cedric; Monsarrat, Bernard; Choukroun, Gabriel; Lemke, Horst-Dieter; Vanholder, Raymond; Mischak, Harald; Massy, Ziad A

    2011-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients belong to the group of patients with a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial calcification and aortic stiffness are currently used as surrogates for vascular alterations. However, still little is known about prediction and the patho-physiologic mechanisms leading to CVD. We applied capillary electrophoresis coupled mass spectrometry profiling to blood specimens collected from 34 CKD stage 5D patients suffering from vascular alterations to allow insights into the molecular pathology of the disease. Statistical comparison of plasma profiles from mild and severe CVD cases according to either arterial calcification or aortic stiffness unveiled 13 novel biomarkers for vascular disease. Tandem mass spectrometry identified four of these as fragments of collagen alpha-1 type I and III and one as fragment of apolipoprotein CIII. Integrated in a distinct pattern the candidates were validated using the moderate CVD cases among the 34 CKD patients (N=11) and an additional independent blinded cohort of CKD stage 4-5 patients (N=21), who all had not been considered during biomarker discovery. The panel distinguished mild and severe CVD with sensitivity of 89% and specificity of 67% in this independent cohort. This diagnostic phase I/II study supports the notion that vascular alterations are reflected by distinct changes in plasma profiles of CKD patients.

  14. Semantic Priming for Coordinate Distant Concepts in Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perri, R.; Zannino, G. D.; Caltagirone, C.; Carlesimo, G. A.

    2011-01-01

    Semantic priming paradigms have been used to investigate semantic knowledge in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). While priming effects produced by prime-target pairs with associative relatedness reflect processes at both lexical and semantic levels, priming effects produced by words that are semantically related but not associated should…

  15. [Skin diseases in hemodialysis and kidney transplant patients].

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Clarissa Morais Busatto; Gussão, Bruna Calvi; de Matos, Jorge Paulo Strogoff; Lugon, Jocemir Ronaldo; Pinto, Jane Marcy Neffá

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the world is facing an escalate in the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Databases containing information about patients in end stage renal disease (ESRD), especially in the United States, were the sources of initial information about it. Brazil has the third largest population on dialysis in the world, and there are about 680 dialysis centers, spread across all units of the federation in the present, providing treatment to an estimated population of almost 90,000 patients. Cutaneous involvement in the chronic renal failure is characterized by a number of manifestations, which may be related to three processes: the primary renal disease, the uremic state, or the therapeutic measures used in their handling. The skin changes in these two classes of patients, dialysis and transplant recipients, have been the subject of several studies. n recent years, however, great progress has been achieved in these two therapeutic modalities, which may have changed not only the type of the dermatologic disorders associated with these two conditions, but also their intensity or frequency. This article aims to yield an update as to the topic skin diseases in hemodialysis and kidney transplant patients.

  16. Pretibial mucinosis in a patient without Graves disease.

    PubMed

    Mir, Mohsin; Jogi, Reena; Rosen, Ted

    2011-12-01

    Although an uncommon location, cutaneous mucinoses may present in the pretibial area in distinct clinical circumstances. The terms pretibial myxedema and pretibial mucinosis often are used interchangeably, but pretibial myxedema should be regarded as a type of pretibial mucinosis. We present a case of cutaneous mucinosis localized to the pretibial area of a patient without Graves disease.

  17. Assessing Impact on Family Caregivers to Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talkington-Boyer, Shannon; Snyder, Douglas K.

    1994-01-01

    Examined impact of caregiving among 110 caregivers to aging family member with Alzheimer's disease. Family caregivers' appraisals along dimensions of subjective burden, negative impact, caregiving satisfaction, and caregiver mastery were correlated with extent of memory and behavior problems of patient and caregivers' coping style, locus of…

  18. Factors Influencing Smoking Cessation in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenna, Kryss; Higgins, Helen

    1997-01-01

    Ten sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological characteristics considered predictors of difficulty with smoking cessation in patients with coronary artery disease are reviewed. The compounding effects of nicotine addiction are discussed. Consideration of these factors may result in individualized programs for smoking cessation. A brief overview…

  19. Sexual Concerns of Male Spouses of Female Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litz, Brett T.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents case study which highlights attendant cognitive changes that occur in Alzheimer's patient, presenting caregiver with challenges to couple's sexual functioning. Describes man who reported erectile dysfunction directly stemming from stressful changes that had occurred in his relationship to his wife who had Alzheimer's disease. General…

  20. Sexual Concerns of Male Spouses of Female Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litz, Brett T.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents case study which highlights attendant cognitive changes that occur in Alzheimer's patient, presenting caregiver with challenges to couple's sexual functioning. Describes man who reported erectile dysfunction directly stemming from stressful changes that had occurred in his relationship to his wife who had Alzheimer's disease. General…

  1. Ofuji's disease in an immunocompetent patient successfully treated with dapsone

    PubMed Central

    Anjaneyan, Gopikrishnan; Manne, Sindhura; Panicker, Vinitha Varghese; Eapen, Malini

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis or Ofuji's disease is a non-infectious eosinophilic infiltration of hair follicles, which usually presents with itchy papules and pustules in a circinate configuration. We report this case of an immunocompetent patient with erythematous papules and plaques without macropustules diagnosed as eosinophilic pustular folliculitis—a rarely reported entity outside Japan. He was successfully treated with oral dapsone. PMID:27730038

  2. Factors Influencing Smoking Cessation in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenna, Kryss; Higgins, Helen

    1997-01-01

    Ten sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological characteristics considered predictors of difficulty with smoking cessation in patients with coronary artery disease are reviewed. The compounding effects of nicotine addiction are discussed. Consideration of these factors may result in individualized programs for smoking cessation. A brief overview…

  3. Investigation of Anxiety and Depress