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Sample records for rendu-osler-weber disease patient

  1. [Cerebral ischemia in Rendu-Osler-Weber disease].

    PubMed

    Delgado Reyes, S; García de la Rocha, M L; Fernández-Armayor Ajo, V; Sierra Sierra, I; Martín Araguz, A; Moreno Martínez, J M

    2000-02-01

    Neurologic manifestations occur in 8-12% of the patients with Rendu-Osler-Weber disease or hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), principally infectious and hemorrhagic and, less frequently, ischemic ones. More than a half of these neurologic complications are associated with pulmonary arterio-venous malformations (PAVM). The diagnosis of HHT is based on the presence of telangiectases, hemorrhagic events and a family history with an autosomal dominant pattern. We report a case of a patient diagnosed as having HHT with transient ischemic attacks and a PAVM, which was occluded by the use of embolotherapy. Cerebral ischemia in HHT is related to the existence of a PAVM and results from three mechanisms: 1) secondary poliglobulia and hyperviscosity because of the hypoxemia due to a right-left shunt; 2) communication between the airway and the pulmonary circulation during cough access, which produces gas embolism and hemoptysis; 3) and, finally, paradoxical embolism trough the PAVM, the same mechanism proposed to the infectious neurologic manifestations of the disease. When the diagnosis of HHT is suspected, early search and treatment of PAVM, with embolotherapy or surgery, are necessary in order to avoid respiratory problems (hemoptysis, exertional dyspnea, cianosis, clubbing) and neurologic complications. PMID:10769536

  2. Pancytopenia in a Patient with Rendu-Osler-Weber Syndrome and Uncommon Vascular Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome, or hereditary hemorrhagic teleangiectasia (HHT), is a rare autosomal dominant vascular disorder, characterized by multiple mucocutaneous teleangiectases with recurrent nasal and gastrointestinal bleedings and/or solid-organ arteriovenous shunts. We describe the first case to our knowledge of pancytopenia in a 53-year-old patient, with a known history of HHT and recurrent nasal and gastrointestinal bleedings, who was found to have a major splenic artery aneurysm and other uncommon vascular abnormalities. In the absence of other evident causes of pancytopenia, hypersplenism was diagnosed. The patient underwent coil embolization of the splenic artery aneurysm, followed by rapid and sustained increase of white blood cell and platelet count. Splenic artery aneurysms are extremely uncommon in HHT as only anecdotal cases have been reported to date. However, we believe that the aneurysm critically contributed to the progression of splenomegaly and the development of pancytopenia. PMID:27803822

  3. Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula ruptured to pleural cavity in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Freixinet, J; Sanchez-Palacios, M; Guerrero, D; Rodriguez de Castro, F; Gonzalez, D; Lopez, L; Guerra, M

    1995-01-01

    Congenital pulmonary arteriovenous fistula is frequently associated with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber disease). With the increased blood flow in pregnancy such fistulas enlarge, occasionally giving rise to haemothorax, which generally has a poor prognosis. A familial case is presented in which massive haemothorax required emergency thoracotomy in the 27th week of pregnancy.

  4. Imaging of Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Carette, Marie-France Nedelcu, Cosmina; Tassart, Marc; Grange, Jean-Didier; Wislez, Marie; Khalil, Antoine

    2009-07-15

    This pictorial review is based on our experience of the follow-up of 120 patients at our multidisciplinary center for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Rendu-Osler-Weber disease or HHT is a multiorgan autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance, characterized by epistaxis, mucocutaneous telangiectasis, and visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The research on gene mutations is fundamental and family screening by clinical examination, chest X-ray, research of pulmonary shunting, and abdominal color Doppler sonography is absolutely necessary. The angioarchitecture of pulmonary AVMs can be studied by unenhanced multidetector computed tomography; however, all other explorations of liver, digestive bowels, or brain require administration of contrast media. Magnetic resonance angiography is helpful for central nervous system screening, in particular for the spinal cord, but also for pulmonary, hepatic, and pelvic AVMs. Knowledge of the multiorgan involvement of HHT, mechanism of complications, and radiologic findings is fundamental for the correct management of these patients.

  5. Mice Lacking Endoglin in Macrophages Show an Impaired Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda-Fernández, Luisa; Recio-Poveda, Lucía; Aristorena, Mikel; Lastres, Pedro; Blanco, Francisco J.; Sanz-Rodríguez, Francisco; Gallardo-Vara, Eunate; de las Casas-Engel, Mateo; Corbí, Ángel; Arthur, Helen M.; Bernabeu, Carmelo; Botella, Luisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Endoglin is an auxiliary receptor for members of the TGF-β superfamily and plays an important role in the homeostasis of the vessel wall. Mutations in endoglin gene (ENG) or in the closely related TGF-β receptor type I ACVRL1/ALK1 are responsible for a rare dominant vascular dysplasia, the Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT), or Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome. Endoglin is also expressed in human macrophages, but its role in macrophage function remains unknown. In this work, we show that endoglin expression is triggered during the monocyte-macrophage differentiation process, both in vitro and during the in vivo differentiation of blood monocytes recruited to foci of inflammation in wild-type C57BL/6 mice. To analyze the role of endoglin in macrophages in vivo, an endoglin myeloid lineage specific knock-out mouse line (Engfl/flLysMCre) was generated. These mice show a predisposition to develop spontaneous infections by opportunistic bacteria. Engfl/flLysMCre mice also display increased survival following LPS-induced peritonitis, suggesting a delayed immune response. Phagocytic activity is impaired in peritoneal macrophages, altering one of the main functions of macrophages which contributes to the initiation of the immune response. We also observed altered expression of TGF-β1 target genes in endoglin deficient peritoneal macrophages. Overall, the altered immune activity of endoglin deficient macrophages could help to explain the higher rate of infectious diseases seen in HHT1 patients. PMID:27010826

  6. Abdominal vascular syndromes: characteristic imaging findings*

    PubMed Central

    Cardarelli-Leite, Leandro; Velloni, Fernanda Garozzo; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Lemos, Marcelo Delboni; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal vascular syndromes are rare diseases. Although such syndromes vary widely in terms of symptoms and etiologies, certain imaging findings are characteristic. Depending on their etiology, they can be categorized as congenital-including blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome)-or compressive-including "nutcracker" syndrome, median arcuate ligament syndrome, Cockett syndrome (also known as May-Thurner syndrome), and superior mesenteric artery syndrome. In this article, we aimed to illustrate imaging findings that are characteristic of these syndromes, through studies conducted at our institution, as well as to perform a brief review of the literature on this topic. PMID:27777480

  7. [When genetics matters: an unusual case of left-sided hemiparesis].

    PubMed

    Schmidhauser, T; Riglietti, A; Pons, M

    2008-11-19

    We report the case of a 35-year-old woman who has been admitted to our emergency room because of the sudden onset of a left-sided hemiparesis. The physical examination showed disseminated teleangiectases on the upper and lower lip, on the mucosal surface of the tongue and on the skin. The cerebral CT scan presented a right-sided fronto-parietal lesion, more likely an abscess, confirmed on surgical removal. A meticulous family history showed the presence of similar clinical features among several family members, raising the certainty about the presence of the Rendu-Osler-Weber disease. This case is highly instructive in emphasizing the value of taking a careful medical history and how doing it is extremely important in our daily practice. PMID:19016425

  8. Syndrome in Question*

    PubMed Central

    Meireles, Sheila Itamara Ferreira do Couto; de Andrade, Sônia Maria Fonseca; Gomes, Maria Fernanda; Castro, Fernanda Almeida Nunes; Tebcherani, Antonio José

    2014-01-01

    Rendu-Osler-Weber Syndrome also known as Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia is a rare systemic fibrovascular dysplasia, with dominant autosomal inheritance. It is characterized by recurrent epistaxis, mucocutaneous telangiectasia, visceral arteriovenous malformation and positive family history. There may be hematologic, neurologic, dermatologic and gastrointestinal complications. Therapy is supportive and aimed at preventing complications. In this article we report a case of Rendu-Osler-Weber in a 64 year-old man, with history of mucocutaneous telangiectasia since the third decade of life, recurrent epistaxis, positive family history and vascular ectasia in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25054766

  9. Bazedoxifene, a new orphan drug for the treatment of bleeding in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Zarrabeitia, Roberto; Ojeda-Fernandez, Luisa; Recio, Lucia; Bernabéu, Carmelo; Parra, Jose A; Albiñana, Virginia; Botella, Luisa M

    2016-06-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), or Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome, is a dominant genetic vascular disorder. In HHT, blood vessels are weak and prone to bleeding, leading to epistaxis and anaemia, severely affecting patients' quality of life. Development of vascular malformations in HHT patients is originated mainly by mutations in ACVRL1/ALK1 (activin receptor-like kinase type I) or Endoglin (ENG) genes. These genes encode proteins of the TGF-β signalling pathway in endothelial cells, controlling angiogenesis. Haploinsufficiency of these proteins is the basis of HHT pathogenicity. It was our objective to study the efficiency of Bazedoxifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) in HHT, looking for a decrease in epistaxis, and understanding the underlying molecular mechanism. Plasma samples of five HHT patients were collected before, and after 1 and 3 months of Bazedoxifene treatment. ENG and ALK1 expression in activated mononuclear cells derived from blood, as well as VEGF plasma levels, were measured. Quantification of Endoglin and ALK1 mRNA was done in endothelial cells derived from HHT and healthy donors, after in vitro treatment with Bazedoxifene. Angiogenesis was also measured by tubulogenesis and wound healing assays. Upon Bazedoxifene treatment, haemoglobin levels of HHT patients increased and the quantity and frequency of epistaxis decreased. Bazedoxifene increased Endoglin and ALK1 mRNA levels, in cells derived from blood samples and in cultured endothelial cells, promoting tube formation. In conclusion, Bazedoxifene seems to decrease bleeding in HHT by partial compensation of haploinsufficiency. The results shown here are the basis of a new orphan drug designation for HHT by the European Medicine Agency (EMA). PMID:26818701

  10. Patients with chronic pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hong, Caron M; Galvagno, Samuel M

    2013-11-01

    Chronic pulmonary disease is common among the surgical population and the importance of a thorough and detailed preoperative assessment is monumental for minimizing morbidity and mortality and reducing the risk of perioperative pulmonary complications. These comorbidities contribute to pulmonary postoperative complications, including atelectasis, pneumonia, and respiratory failure, and can predict long-term mortality. The important aspects of the preoperative assessment for patients with chronic pulmonary disease, and the value of preoperative testing and smoking cessation, are discussed. Specifically discussed are preoperative pulmonary assessment and management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, restrictive lung disease, obstructive sleep apnea, and obesity. PMID:24182721

  11. Kimura's disease in Malay patients.

    PubMed

    Shahrul, H; Baharudin, A; Effat, O

    2007-08-01

    Kimura's Disease (KD) is an uncommon, chronic inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology which is endemic in Orientals. It is characterized by painless, large solitary or multiple nodules in subcutis of head and neck region or the major salivary glands, associated with regional lymphadenopathy, blood eosinophilia and elevated IgE levels. Its treatment ranging from conservative observation in asymptomatic patient to surgical resection of the mass, corticotherapy and irradiation therapy for the symptomatic ones.

  12. Neurologic Diseases in Special Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Miriam R

    2016-07-01

    Neurologic diseases can have a major impact on functional capacity. Patients with neurologic disease require individualized management considerations depending on the extent of impairment and impact on functional capacity. This article reviews 4 of the more common and significant neurologic diseases (Alzheimer disease, cerebrovascular accident/stroke, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson disease) that are likely to present to a dental office and provides suggestions on the dental management of patients with these conditions.

  13. Information for patients about inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, J C; Tanner, A R; Bramble, M G

    1997-01-01

    In inflammatory bowel disease it is important that patients understand their condition since this helps to improve long-term management of the disease. The aim of this study was to assess the information given to patients with inflammatory bowel disease about their condition, its treatment and the National Association for Colitis and Crohn's disease. Two surveys were performed, using anonymous questionnaires. One was of all association members in north-east England, the other was a sample of patients attending medical outpatients. The surveys showed that more patients heard of the National Association for Colitis and Crohn's disease from the media than from medical sources. Of patients seen in medical clinics, 75% would welcome more information about their disease. In four of the six participating centres less than half the patients had been told about the existence of a patients' association. There was considerable variation in the instructions on what action to take in the event of a relapse. These findings suggest that the opportunity offered by out-patient clinics to educate and inform patients is often wasted. Clinicians often neglect to mention the National Association for Colitis and Crohn's disease, especially to patients with long-standing disease. A higher priority should be given to providing patients with appropriate information on inflammatory bowel disease. Three simple audit standards for the organisation of outpatient clinic information are proposed. PMID:9131520

  14. Kawasaki disease in a postpartum patient.

    PubMed Central

    Fason, Janet T.; Fry, Yvonne W.; Smith, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    Kawasaki disease, also known as mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome, is a multisystem disease. It usually affects children below the age of five, but it occasionally affects adults. There are less than 50 English-reported adult cases in the literature, and only five reported cases of Kawasaki disease and pregnancy, as of 2003. The cases associated with pregnancy involved patients who had a history of Kawasaki disease during childhood and addressed how the complications of the illness (i.e,. coronary artery aneurysms) were managed during pregnancy and delivery. There are no reported cases of Kawasaki disease in postpartum patients. This article presents a case of Kawasaki disease in a 21-year-old, four-week postpartum patient who initially responded to intravenous (IV) antibiotic therapy. This paper will review the diagnosis and treatment of Kawasaki disease as well as the multiple outside variables that impact the management of adult postpartum patients with Kawasaki disease. PMID:15586654

  15. Dermatological diseases in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon1, Amy L.; Desai, Tejas

    2013-01-01

    Context: There are a variety of dermatological diseases that are more commonly seen in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal transplants than the general population. Evidence Acquisitions: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science has been searched. Results: Some cutaneous diseases are clearly unique to this population. Of them, Lindsay’s Nails, xerosis cutis, dryness of the skin, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and acquired perforating dermatosis have been described in chronic kidney disease patients. The most common malignancy found in all transplant recipients is non-melanoma skin cancer. Conclusions: It is important for patients and physicians to recognize the manifestations of skin disease in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease to mitigate the morbidity associated with these conditions. PMID:24475435

  16. Radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Giaj-Levra, Niccolò; Sciascia, Savino; Fiorentino, Alba; Fersino, Sergio; Mazzola, Rosario; Ricchetti, Francesco; Roccatello, Dario; Alongi, Filippo

    2016-03-01

    The decision to offer radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases continues to be challenging. Radiotherapy might trigger the onset of connective tissue diseases by increasing the expression of self-antigens, diminishing regulatory T-cell activity, and activating effectors of innate immunity (dendritic cells) through Toll-like receptor-dependent mechanisms, all of which could potentially lead to breaks of immune tolerance. This potential risk has raised some debate among radiation oncologists about whether patients with connective tissue diseases can tolerate radiation as well as people without connective tissue diseases. Because the number of patients with cancer and connective tissue diseases needing radiotherapy will probably increase due to improvements in medical treatment and longer life expectancy, the issue of interactions between radiotherapy and connective tissue diseases needs to be clearer. In this Review, we discuss available data and evidence for patients with connective tissue diseases treated with radiotherapy.

  17. Sleep in patients with restrictive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Won, Christine H J; Kryger, Meir

    2014-09-01

    Restrictive lung disease leads to ventilatory defects and diffusion impairments. These changes may contribute to abnormal nocturnal pathophysiology, including sleep architecture disruption and impaired ventilation and oxygenation. Patients with restrictive lung disease may suffer significant daytime fatigue and dysfunction. Hypercarbia and hypoxemia during sleep may impact progression of lung disease and related symptoms. Little is known about the impact of treatment of sleep disruption on sleep quality and overall prognosis in restrictive lung disease. This review discusses the pathophysiology of sleep and comorbid sleep disorders in restrictive lung diseases including interstitial lung disease, neuromuscular disease, and obesity hypoventilation syndrome.

  18. Resilience in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Lemos, Conceição Maria Martins; Moraes, David William; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2016-01-01

    Background Resilience is a psychosocial factor associated with clinical outcomes in chronic diseases. The relationship between this protective factor and certain diseases, such heart diseases, is still under-explored. Objective The present study sought to investigate the frequency of resilience in individuals with ischemic heart disease. Method This was a cross-sectional study with 133 patients of both genders, aged between 35 and 65 years, treated at Rio Grande do Sul Cardiology Institute - Cardiology University Foundation, with a diagnosis of ischemic heart disease during the study period. Sixty-seven patients had a history of acute myocardial infarction. The individuals were interviewed and evaluated by the Wagnild & Young resilience scale and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Results Eighty-one percent of patients were classified as resilient according to the scale. Conclusion In the sample studied, resilience was identified in high proportion among patients with ischemic heart disease. PMID:26815312

  19. Parkinson's Disease Research Web - Information for Patients and Caregivers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find People About NINDS Parkinson's Disease Research Web - Information for Patients & Caregivers Parkinson's Disease Highlights for Patients & ... and progression biomarkers for PD. NINDS Parkinson's Disease Information Parkinson's Disease Information Page Parkinson's Disease: Hope Through ...

  20. Alloimmunization in multitransfused liver disease patients: Impact of underlying disease

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Meenu; Gupta, Shruti; Jain, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Transfusion support is vital to the management of patients with liver diseases. Repeated transfusions are associated with many risks such as transfusion-transmitted infection, transfusion immunomodulation, and alloimmunization. Materials and Methods: A retrospective data analysis of antibody screening and identification was done from February 2012 to February 2014 to determine the frequency and specificity of irregular red-cell antibodies in multitransfused liver disease patients. The clinical and transfusion records were reviewed. The data was compiled, statistically analyzed, and reviewed. Results: A total of 842 patients were included in our study. Alloantibodies were detected in 5.22% of the patients. Higher rates of alloimmunization were seen in patients with autoimmune hepatitis, cryptogenic liver disease, liver damage due to drugs/toxins, and liver cancer patients. Patients with alcoholic liver disease had a lower rate of alloimmunization. The alloimmunization was 12.7% (23/181) in females and 3.17% (21/661) in males. Antibodies against the Rh system were the most frequent with 27 of 44 alloantibodies (61.36%). The most common alloantibody identified was anti-E (11/44 cases, 25%), followed by anti-C (6/44 cases, 13.63%). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that alloimmunization rate is affected by underlying disease. Provision of Rh and Kell phenotype-matched blood can significantly reduce alloimmunization. PMID:27605851

  1. Alloimmunization in multitransfused liver disease patients: Impact of underlying disease

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Meenu; Gupta, Shruti; Jain, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Transfusion support is vital to the management of patients with liver diseases. Repeated transfusions are associated with many risks such as transfusion-transmitted infection, transfusion immunomodulation, and alloimmunization. Materials and Methods: A retrospective data analysis of antibody screening and identification was done from February 2012 to February 2014 to determine the frequency and specificity of irregular red-cell antibodies in multitransfused liver disease patients. The clinical and transfusion records were reviewed. The data was compiled, statistically analyzed, and reviewed. Results: A total of 842 patients were included in our study. Alloantibodies were detected in 5.22% of the patients. Higher rates of alloimmunization were seen in patients with autoimmune hepatitis, cryptogenic liver disease, liver damage due to drugs/toxins, and liver cancer patients. Patients with alcoholic liver disease had a lower rate of alloimmunization. The alloimmunization was 12.7% (23/181) in females and 3.17% (21/661) in males. Antibodies against the Rh system were the most frequent with 27 of 44 alloantibodies (61.36%). The most common alloantibody identified was anti-E (11/44 cases, 25%), followed by anti-C (6/44 cases, 13.63%). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that alloimmunization rate is affected by underlying disease. Provision of Rh and Kell phenotype-matched blood can significantly reduce alloimmunization.

  2. Chronic disease management for patients with respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Elizabeth

    National and international awareness of the heavy burden of chronic disease has led to the development of new strategies for managing care. Elisabeth Bryant explains how self-care, education and support for more patients with complex needs should be built into planned care delivery, and emphasises that the patient is the key member of the care team.

  3. Interventional treatment of congenital heart disease patients.

    PubMed

    Marini, D; Agnoletti, G

    2010-02-01

    During the last 10 years the interventional treatment of congenital and structural heart diseases has known enormous changes in techniques, methods and patients management. Lesions previously treated surgically are now approached in the catheterization laboratory. The advent of multidisciplinary approach of congenital heart disease has made possible the development of hybrid techniques, of fetal medicine and of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)- guided cardiac catheterization. Technological innovation has introduced new concepts in treatment of congenital heart disease patients and has allowed to adapt different techniques to single patients. The knowledge of the evolution of structural heart disease has allowed to chose the best percutaneous and/ or surgical technique and the best materials to optimize long term results. Improvement in non invasive imaging modality has allowed to diminish the radiation exposure and to provide useful information to interventional cardiologists and cardiac surgeons. Absorbable, drug eluting tools will change the treatment and probably the natural history of congenital and structural cardiac and vascular diseases.

  4. Serologic celiac disease in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Tavakkoli, Hamid; Haghdani, Saeid; Adilipour, Haiedeh; Daghaghzadeh, Hamed; Minakari, Mohammad; Adibi, Peyman; Ahmadi, Khalil; Emami, Mohammah Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is an association of celiac disease (CD) with several gastrointestinal illnesses. We aimed to determine the prevalence of CD in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to evaluate the value of the routine serological tests for CD in these patients. Materials and Methods: patients with IBD underwent screening test for CD. The screening test was based on IgA anti-tTG antibody evaluated by ELISA method and IgA EMA (endomysial antibody) measured by the indirect immunofluorescence method. Fisher exact and chi-square and t tests were used for data analysis. Results: the study was conducted on 100 patients, with a mean age of 34.74 ± 12.03 (SD) years. The mean simplified Crohn's disease activity index was 90 ± 17 (SE) and the mean colitis activity index was 3.46± 0.96 (SE). Seventeen patients (17%) had IgA anti-tTG antibody levels above the cutoff point (> 20). Thirty-two patients were positive for IgA EMA. IgA EMA was positive in nine IgA anti-tTG positive patients (three patients with Crohn's Disease and six ones with ulcerative colitis). Then, the prevalence of serologic CD was 9% that was higher than that of general population. A significant correlation was found between the results of IgA EMA and those of IgA anti-tTG (P=0.001) whereas Fisher exact test revealed significant difference between frequency distribution of positive and negative results of IgA EMA and IgA anti-tTG in patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease (P=0). Conclusion: the prevalence of serologic CD in general population in Iran has been reported to be 0.6–0.96%. Then, its prevalence in our sample size was about ten times more than that in general population. PMID:23264789

  5. Prism Management in Patients with Neurodegenerative Disease.

    PubMed

    Gilligan, Rikki

    2015-01-01

    Patients with motility problems due to neurodegenerative disease such as Parkinson's and its variations often present challenging cases for the orthoptist. A few "tricks of the trade" will be presented on how to make a Parkinson's patient's daily life a little easier.

  6. Tracheobronchitis in a Patient With Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Vincent; Govind, Anusha G.; Arastu, Sanaa

    2016-01-01

    We report a 63-year-old woman who presented with 1 month of non-productive cough and non-bloody diarrhea. She was on maintenance therapy for a 15-year history of Crohn's disease. Treatment with systemic corticosteroids resulted in rapid improvement of both her diarrhea and respiratory symptoms. Our patient is unique in that she presented with tracheobronchitis during an acute flare of her Crohn's without obvious lung pathology on chest imaging. Tracheobronchitis is a rare manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease that should be considered in Crohn's disease patients presenting with persistent non-infectious cough. PMID:27144198

  7. [Disease management for chronic heart failure patient].

    PubMed

    Bläuer, Cornelia; Pfister, Otmar; Bächtold, Christa; Junker, Therese; Spirig, Rebecca

    2011-02-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (HF) are limited in their quality of life, have a poor prognosis and face frequent hospitalisations. Patient self-management was shown to improve quality of life, reduce rehospitalisations and costs in patients with chronic HF. Comprehensive disease management programmes are critical to foster patient self-management. The chronic care model developed by the WHO serves as the basis of such programmes. In order to develop self-management skills a needs orientated training concept is mandatory, as patients need both knowledge of the illness and the ability to use the information to make appropriate decisions according to their individual situation. Switzerland has no established system for the care of patients with chronic diseases in particular those with HF. For this reason a group of Swiss experts for HF designed a model for disease management for HF patients in Switzerland. Since 2009 the Swiss Heart Foundation offers an education programme based on this model. The aim of this programme is to offer education and support for practitioners, patients and families. An initial pilot evaluation of the program showed mixed acceptance by practitioners, whereas patient assessed the program as supportive and in line with their requirements.

  8. Coronary artery disease in the military patient.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Iain; White, S; Gill, R; Gray, H H; Rees, P

    2015-09-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is the most common cause of sudden death in the UK, and the most common cardiac cause of medical discharge from the Armed Forces. This paper reviews current evidence pertaining to the diagnosis and management of coronary artery disease from a military perspective, encompassing stable angina and acute coronary syndromes. Emphasis is placed on the limitations inherent in the management of acute coronary syndromes in the deployed environment. Occupational issues affecting patients with coronary artery disease are reviewed. Consideration is also given to the potential for coronary artery disease screening in the military, and the management of modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factors, to help decrease the prevalence of coronary artery disease in the military population. PMID:26246347

  9. Laparoscopic splenectomy in patients with hematologic diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, J L; Lefor, A T; Steers, J; Heyman, M; Graham, S M; Imbembo, A L

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The authors review their initial experience with laparoscopic splenectomy in patients with hematologic diseases. Efficacy, morbidity, and mortality of the technique are presented, and other patient recovery parameters are discussed. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA. Laparoscopic splenectomy is performed infrequently and data regarding its safety and efficacy are scarce. Factors such as a high level of technical difficulty, the potential for sudden, severe hemorrhage, and slow accrual of operative experience due to a relatively limited number of procedures are responsible. The potential patient benefits from the development of a minimally invasive form of splenectomy are significant. METHODS. Clinical follow-up, a prospective longitudinal database, and review of medical records were analyzed for all patients referred for elective splenectomy for hematologic disease from March 1992 to March 1995. RESULTS. Laparoscopic splenectomy was attempted in 43 patients and successfully completed in 35 (81%). Therapeutic platelet response to splenectomy occurred in 82% of patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura and hematocrit level increased in 60% of patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia undergoing successful laparoscopic splenectomy. The morbidity rate was 11.6% (5 of 43 patients), and the mortality rate was 4.7% (2 of 43 patients). Return of gastrointestinal function occurred in patients 23.1 hours after laparoscopic splenectomy and 76 hours after conversion to open splenectomy (p < 0.05). Mean length of stay was 2.7 days after laparoscopic splenectomy and 6.8 days after conversion to open splenectomy (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION. Laparoscopic splenectomy may be performed with efficacy, morbidity, and mortality rates comparable to those of open splenectomy for hematologic diseases, and it appears to retain other patient benefits of laparoscopic surgery. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. PMID:8678613

  10. Analgesia for patients with advanced disease: 2

    PubMed Central

    Hall, E; Sykes, N

    2004-01-01

    The first article in this series explored epidemiology and patterns of pain in advanced disease, non-pharmacological treatments, and the use of opioids to manage pain. This second article examines the use of non-opioid drugs and anaesthetic interventions for pain relief in advanced disease. It also discusses an approach to managing analgesia in dying patients and finally looks at future developments. PMID:15082837

  11. The emergence of Parkinson disease among patients with Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Elstein, Deborah; Alcalay, Roy; Zimran, Ari

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade, several lines of evidence have been presented that document the clinical manifestations, genetic associations, and sub-cellular mechanisms of the inter-relatedness of β-glucocerebrosidase mutations and the emergence of Parkinson disease among carriers and patients with Gaucher disease. This review is an attempt to apprise the reader of the recent literature with the caveat that this is an area of intensive exploration that is constantly being updated because of the immediate clinical ramifications but also because of the impact on our understanding of Parkinson disease, and finally because of the unexpected inter-reactions between these entities on the molecular level. It has been an unexpected happenstance that it has been discovered that a rare monogenetic disease has an interface at many points with a neurological disorder of the elderly that has both familial and sporadic forms: to date there is no cure for either of these disorders.

  12. HLA genotyping in pediatric celiac disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Stanković, Biljana; Radlović, Nedeljko; Leković, Zoran; Ristić, Dragana; Radlović, Vladimir; Nikčević, Gordana; Kotur, Nikola; Vučićević, Ksenija; Kostić, Tatjana; Pavlović, Sonja; Zukić, Branka

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disease in the small intestine triggered by gluten uptake that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals. HLA-DQ2 protein encoded by HLA-DQA1*05 and DQB1*02 alleles is found in 90-95% of CD patients. All of the remaining patients carry HLA-DQ8 protein encoded by HLA-DQA1*03 and DQB1*03:02 alleles. Specific HLA-DQ genotypes define different risk for CD incidence. Presence of susceptible HLA-DQ genotypes does not predict certain disease development, but their absence makes CD very unlikely, close to 100%. Here we presented for the first time the distribution of HLA-DQ genotypes in the group of pediatric celiac patients from the University Children’s Hospital, Belgrade, Serbia and estimated risk for CD development that these genotypes confer. Seventy three celiac disease patients and 62 healthy individuals underwent genotyping for DQA1, DQB1 alleles and DRB1 allele. 94.5% of patients carried alleles that encode DQ2 protein variant and 2.7% carried alleles that encode DQ8 protein variant. Two patients carried single DQB1*02 allele. No patients were negative for all the alleles predisposing to CD. The highest HLA-DQ genotype risk for CD development was found in group of patients homozygous for DQ2.5 haplotype, followed by the group of heterozygous carriers of DQ2.5 haplotype in combination with DQB1*02 allele within the other haplotype. The lowest risk was observed in carriers of a single copy of DQB1*02 or DQA1*05 allele or other non-predisposing alleles. HLA genotyping, more informative than serological testing commonly used, proved to be a useful diagnostic tool for excluding CD development. PMID:25172978

  13. Managing coeliac disease in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Leonard, M M; Cureton, P A; Fasano, A

    2015-01-01

    The association between coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes has long been established. The combination of genetic susceptibility along with a potential role for gluten in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity makes defining gluten's role in type 1 diabetes extremely important. Evidence supporting the role of a gluten-free diet to improve complications associated with type 1 diabetes is not robust. However there is evidence to support improved growth, bone density and potentially the prevention of additional autoimmune diseases in patients with coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes. The gluten free diet is expensive and challenging to adhere to in people already on a modified diet. Early identification of those who have coeliac disease and would benefit from a gluten-free diet is of utmost importance to prevent complications associated with type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease.

  14. Musculoskeletal manifestations in patients with malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Gheita, Tamer A; Ezzat, Yasser; Sayed, Safaa; El-Mardenly, Ghada; Hammam, Waleed

    2010-02-01

    To detect and describe the incidence of musculoskeletal manifestations in different malignant diseases as well as their relation to the treatment received whether by chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Sixty patients with different malignant diseases were included in this study, 45 with solid tumors and 15 patients with hematological malignancy. The mean age was 46.55 +/- 11.04 years and the mean disease duration was 2 +/- 0.75 years. The patients were fully examined for any rheumatologic involvement, laboratory investigations were performed as well as dual energy X-ray absorptiometry study for bone densitometry. Treatment strategies were assessed including the chemotherapeutics, radiation therapy, and/or surgery. Myalgias and arthralgias were the most frequent followed by flexor tenosynovitis, frozen shoulder, and fibromyalgia syndrome. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy was seen in five patients, cutaneous vasculitis in two patients as well as arthritis. Osteonecrosis was present in one of the lunate carpal bones of a patient with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (1.67%) and receiving high dose steroids. Rheumatoid factor was positive in four patients, three of which had hepatitis C virus positivity and cryoglobulins. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody was negative in all the studied patients. The bone mineral density was significantly reduced in the patients with malignancy compared to the control. Mild to moderate osteoporosis was present, being more evident in the spine and forearm. The bone loss was higher in those with solid tumors and even more obvious in those receiving aromatase inhibitors. Musculoskeletal manifestations occurring during malignancies and following the treatment represent a significant percentage of symptoms and signs which may raise a clue to differential diagnosis.

  15. Arrhythmias in patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Edward P

    2002-12-01

    Improved surgical outcome for patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) has created a rapidly expanding population of adolescents and young adult survivors. Cardiac arrhythmias are a common late sequelae of this form of heart disease. Effective treatment requires clear understanding of the underlying anatomic defect as well as the specific surgical interventions. Intraatrial reentrant tachycardia (IART) is the most common and difficult arrhythmia encountered in these patients. Traditional IART treatment with medication has been largely unsuccessful, but radiofrequency ablation has emerged in recent years as a promising option for many patients. The availability of three-dimensional mapping systems and irrigated-tip ablation catheters has improved acute success rates for IART to better than 90%. Postablation recurrence of IART still remains problematic for patients who have undergone the Fontan operation, in which case atrial maze surgery may be considered. Ventricular tachycardia (VT) is seen in a smaller number of CHD patients, most notably those with tetralogy of Fallot or aortic stenosis. The adoption of implantable defibrillator (ICD) therapy for these patients has improved outcome. Owing to their complex anatomy, the CHD population presents unique challenges during both catheterization and device implant. Multicenter study of this unique patient group is needed in order to develop more objective treatment guidelines.

  16. Subsequent leukaemia in autoimmune disease patients.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, Kari; Liu, Xiangdong; Försti, Asta; Ji, Jianguang; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that patients diagnosed with some autoimmune (AI) diseases are at an increased risk of leukaemia but limited data are available on survival. We systematically analysed the risks (standardized incidence ratio, SIR) and survival (hazard ratio, HR) in nine types of leukaemia among 402 462 patients hospitalized for any of 33 AI diseases and compared to persons not hospitalized for AI diseases. Risk for all leukaemia was increased after 13 AI diseases and survival was decreased after six AI diseases. SIRs were increased after all AI diseases for seven types of leukaemia, including SIR 1·69 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1·29-2·19) for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), 1·85 (95% CI: 1·65-2·07) for acute myeloid leukaemia, 1·68 (95% CI: 1·37-2·04) for chronic myeloid leukaemia, 2·20 (95% CI: 1·69-2·81) for 'other myeloid leukaemia', 2·45 (95% 1·99-2·98) for 'other and unspecified leukaemia', 1·81 (95% CI: 1·11-2·81) for monocytic leukaemia, and 1·36 (95% CI: 1·08-1·69) for myelofibrosis. The HRs were increased for four types of leukaemia, most for myelofibrosis (1·74, 95% CI: 1·33-2·29) and ALL (1·42, 95% CI: 1·03-1·95). Some AI diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, were associated with increased SIRs and HRs in many types of leukaemia. The present data showed increases in risk and decreases in survival for many types of leukaemia after various AI diseases. Leukaemia is a rare complication in AI disease but findings about this comorbidity at the time of leukaemia diagnosis may help to optimize the treatment and improve survival.

  17. Asymmetrical Pedaling Patterns in Parkinson's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Penko, Amanda L.; Hirsch, Joshua R.; Voelcker-Rehage, Claudia; Martin, Philip E.; Blackburn, Gordon; Alberts, Jay L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately 1.5 million Americans are affected by Parkinson's disease [1] which includes the symptoms of postural instability and gait dysfunction. Currently, clinical evaluations of postural instability and gait dysfunction consist of a subjective rater assessment of gait patterns using items from the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, and assessments can be insensitive to the effectiveness of medical interventions. Current research suggests the importance of cycling for Parkinson's disease patients, and while Parkinson's gait has been evaluated in previous studies, little is known about lower extremity control during cycling. The purpose of this study is to examine the lower extremity coordination patterns of Parkinson's patients during cycling. Methods Twenty five participants, ages 44-72, with a clinical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease participated in an exercise test on a cycle ergometer that was equipped with pedal force measurements. Crank torque, crank angle and power produced by right and left leg were measured throughout the test to calculate Symmetry Index at three stages of exercise (20 Watt, 60 Watt, maximum performance). Findings Decreases in Symmetry Index were observed for average power output in Parkinson's patients as workload increased. Maximum power Symmetry Index showed a significant difference in symmetry between performance at both the 20 Watt and 60 Watt stage and the maximal resistance stage. Minimum power Symmetry Index did not show significant differences across the stages of the test. While lower extremity asymmetries were present in Parkinson's patients during pedaling, these asymmetries did not correlate to postural instability and gait dysfunction Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores. Interpretation This pedaling analysis allows for a more sensitive measure of lower extremity function than the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and may help to provide unique insight into current and

  18. Recovery of Lyme disease spirochetes from patients.

    PubMed Central

    Steere, A. C.; Grodzicki, R. L.; Craft, J. E.; Shrestha, M.; Kornblatt, A. N.; Malawista, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    Since the summer of 1982, we have cultured patient specimens for Lyme disease spirochetes. Of 118 patients cultured, four specimens yielded spirochetes: two from blood, one from a skin biopsy specimen of erythema chronicum migrans (ECM), and one from cerebrospinal fluid. All four isolates appeared identical when examined with a monoclonal antibody. However, attempts to recover the spirochete from synovium or synovial fluid were unsuccessful. In addition, the organism could not be visualized in skin or synovial biopsy specimens using the avidin-biotin peroxidase complex detection system. Thus, the current yield in culturing spirochetes from patients is quite low, and it is not yet known whether the organism is still alive later in the disease when arthritis is present. PMID:6393606

  19. Oral status in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Sundh, B; Hultén, L

    1982-01-01

    The dental status in a randomly selected group of patients with Crohn's disease was assessed and compared with that in a normal population. The results showed evidence that these patients in spite of an ordinary oral hygiene standard have a high caries frequency and activity, and that dental caries was particularly common in those subjected to extensive small bowel resection. Unusual dietary habits and malabsorption may probably be the main cause of the condition, although neglect of oral hygiene during active phases of the disease might also be important. Increased attention has to be directed towards this problem. A strict oral hygiene should be recommended and the regular use of fluoride treatment appears to be justified in such a high risk group of patients. PMID:7158213

  20. Infective endocarditis in patients with hepatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Seminari, E; De Silvestri, A; Ravasio, V; Ludovisi, S; Utili, R; Petrosillo, N; Castelli, F; Bassetti, M; Barbaro, F; Grossi, P; Barzaghi, N; Rizzi, M; Minoli, L

    2016-02-01

    Few data have been published regarding the epidemiology and outcome of infective endocarditis (IE) in patients with chronic hepatic disease (CHD). A retrospective analysis of the Studio Endocarditi Italiano (SEI) database was performed to evaluate the epidemiology and outcome of CHD+ patients compared with CHD- patients. The diagnosis of IE was defined in accordance with the modified Duke criteria. Echocardiography, diagnosis, and treatment procedures were in accordance with current clinical practice. Among the 1722 observed episodes of IE, 300 (17.4 %) occurred in CHD+ patients. The cause of CHD mainly consisted of chronic viral infection. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common bacterial species in CHD+ patients; the frequency of other bacterial species (S. epidermidis, streptococci, and enterococci) were comparable among the two groups. The percentage of patients undergoing surgery for IE was 38.9 in CHD+ patients versus 43.7 in CHD- patients (p = 0.06). Complications were more common among CHD+ patients (77 % versus 65.3 %, p < 0.001); embolization (43.3 % versus 26.1 %, p < 0.001) and congestive heart failure (42 % versus 34.1 %, p = 0.01) were more frequent among CHD+ patients. Mortality was comparable (12.5 % in CHD- and 15 % in CHD+ patients). At multivariable analysis, factors associated with hospital-associated mortality were having an infection sustained by S. aureus, a prosthetic valve, diabetes and a neoplasia, and CHD. Being an intravenous drug user (IVDU) was a protective factor and was associated with a reduced death risk. CHD is a factor worsening the prognosis in patients with IE, in particular in patients for whom cardiac surgery was required.

  1. Dyslipidemia, kidney disease, and cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-chi; Tseng, Chin-Hsiao

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the relationship between dyslipidemia, chronic kidney disease, and cardiovascular diseases in patients with diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is associated with complications in the cardiovascular and renal system, and is increasing in prevalence worldwide. Modification of the multifactorial risk factors, in particular dyslipidemia, has been suggested to reduce the rates of diabetes-related complications. Dyslipidemia in diabetes is a condition that includes hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein levels, and increased small and dense low-density lipoprotein particles. This condition is associated with higher cardiovascular risk and mortality in diabetic patients. Current treatment guidelines focus on lowering the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level; multiple trials have confirmed the cardiovascular benefits of treatment with statins. Chronic kidney disease also contributes to dyslipidemia, and dyslipidemia in turn is related to the occurrence and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Different patterns of dyslipidemia are associated with different stages of diabetic nephropathy. Some trials have shown that treatment with statins not only decreased the risk of cardiovascular events, but also delayed the progression of diabetic nephropathy. However, studies using statins as the sole treatment of hyperlipidemia in patients on dialysis have not shown benefits with respect to cardiovascular risk. Diabetic patients with nephropathy have a higher risk of cardiovascular events than those without nephropathy. The degree of albuminuria and the reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate are also correlated with the risk of cardiovascular events. Treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers to reduce albuminuria in diabetic patients has been shown to decrease the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:24380085

  2. MRI in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Michael S.; Harisinghani, Mukesh G.

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects approximately 1.4 million people in North America and, because of its typical early age of onset and episodic disease course, IBD patients often undergo numerous imaging studies over the course of their lifetimes. CT has become the standard imaging modality for assessment of IBD patients because of its widespread availability, rapid image acquisition, and ability to evaluate intraluminal and extraluminal disease. However, repetitive CT imaging has been associated with a significant ionizing radiation risk to patients, making MRI an appealing alternative IBD imaging modality. Pelvic MRI is currently the imaging gold standard for detecting perianal disease, while recent studies indicate that MRI bowel-directed techniques (enteroclysis, enterography, colonography) can accurately evaluate bowel inflammation in IBD. With recent technical innovations leading to faster and higher resolution body MRI, the role of MRI in IBD evaluation is likely to continue to expand. Future applications include surveillance imaging, detection of mural fibrosis, and early assessment of therapy response. PMID:21512607

  3. Sexual Therapy of Patients with Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Scalzi, Cynthia C.; Golden, Joshua S.; Loya, Fred

    1977-01-01

    Physical illness or disability inevitably has a damaging effect on sexual relationships. Physicians are usually unaware of the sexual consequences of illness on their patients, and lack experience in treating sexual dysfunctions. The report of treatment of a couple with serious cardiovascular disease illustrates the potential efficacy of brief sex therapy for improving the quality of a patient's life. If a primary physician lacks the skills to conduct sex therapy, he may collaborate with nonphysician therapists. The physician's knowledge of the physiological and psychological effects of a specific illness on his patient is essential to successful therapy. Often, simple education, encouragement or reassurance by the physician is enough to overcome the damaging effects of illness on a patient's sex life. PMID:613543

  4. PSYCHOSOMATIC ASPECTS IN PATIENTS WITH DERMATOLOGIC DISEASES.

    PubMed

    Tsintsadze, N; Beridze, L; Tsintsadze, N; Krichun, Y; Tsivadze, N; Tsintsadze, M

    2015-06-01

    The aim of our study was to find out the magnitude of anxiety and depression in our common dermatological patients and its correlation with age, sex. For this purpose, we used Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale HADS. The psychometric validity of HADS has been established by validating the questionnaire against the structured psychiatric interviews. A study of anxiety and depression in patients with dermatologic diseases was conducted on the basis of outpatients department in 211 patients with dermatologic diseases; among them were 107 male and 104 female, aged 16 to 75 years. Among them were patients with Acne, Alopecia Areata, Psoriasis, Vitiligo, Neurodermatitis, Scabies, Eczema and Other diseases (Atopic Dermatitis, Chronic Urticaria, Lichen Planus, Herpes Zoster, Melasma, Warts and Etc.). Based on studies of patients reveals that 65.4% of them are anxiety, depression - 56.2%, both anxiety and depression in 24.7%, there figures higher than the dates of other authorizes. As a result of a direct link research risk disorder depressive spectrum with sex, age; in woman anxiety and depression occurs more frequently than men, and anxiety occurs more frequently in young age. Especially there are hight frequencies of manifestation of abuse in patients with Psoriasis (anxiety - 83.3%, depression - 69.4%, both - 38.8%), Eczema (anxiety - 73.3%, depression - 56.6%, both - 26.7%), Acne (anxiety - 78.4%, depression - 54%, both - 21.6%), Vitiligo (anxiety - 66.7%, depression - 60%, both - 33.3%). Our study noticed higher dates of anxiety and depression than the dates of other outhorizes. PMID:26087735

  5. PSYCHOSOMATIC ASPECTS IN PATIENTS WITH DERMATOLOGIC DISEASES.

    PubMed

    Tsintsadze, N; Beridze, L; Tsintsadze, N; Krichun, Y; Tsivadze, N; Tsintsadze, M

    2015-06-01

    The aim of our study was to find out the magnitude of anxiety and depression in our common dermatological patients and its correlation with age, sex. For this purpose, we used Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale HADS. The psychometric validity of HADS has been established by validating the questionnaire against the structured psychiatric interviews. A study of anxiety and depression in patients with dermatologic diseases was conducted on the basis of outpatients department in 211 patients with dermatologic diseases; among them were 107 male and 104 female, aged 16 to 75 years. Among them were patients with Acne, Alopecia Areata, Psoriasis, Vitiligo, Neurodermatitis, Scabies, Eczema and Other diseases (Atopic Dermatitis, Chronic Urticaria, Lichen Planus, Herpes Zoster, Melasma, Warts and Etc.). Based on studies of patients reveals that 65.4% of them are anxiety, depression - 56.2%, both anxiety and depression in 24.7%, there figures higher than the dates of other authorizes. As a result of a direct link research risk disorder depressive spectrum with sex, age; in woman anxiety and depression occurs more frequently than men, and anxiety occurs more frequently in young age. Especially there are hight frequencies of manifestation of abuse in patients with Psoriasis (anxiety - 83.3%, depression - 69.4%, both - 38.8%), Eczema (anxiety - 73.3%, depression - 56.6%, both - 26.7%), Acne (anxiety - 78.4%, depression - 54%, both - 21.6%), Vitiligo (anxiety - 66.7%, depression - 60%, both - 33.3%). Our study noticed higher dates of anxiety and depression than the dates of other outhorizes.

  6. Foods for patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    As a general rule patients with celiac disease must avoid five cereals--wheat rye, triticale, barley and oats. Very sensitive individuals must also avoid two products of these cereals--malt and hydrolyzed vegetable protein. Some less sensitive individuals may be able to tolerate barley and oats in small quantities. All other foods are acceptable, including the cereals corn, rice, buckwheat, millet and sorghum, as well as malt-flavored breakfast cereals. Wine, spirits, beer and ale are also acceptable unless otherwise contraindicated. Monosodium glutamate, other food additives and pharmaceutical preparations are also acceptable. The ingredients of prepackaged processed foods are listed on the labels. Patients with celiac disease must examine labels to ensure that they avoid the harmful cereals. With appropriate precautions they need not be concerned about eating away from home. PMID:7139445

  7. Behavioral persistence deficit in Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Schneider, J S

    2007-03-01

    The present study was performed to examine the degree to which decreased task persistence may contribute to deficits in the ability of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients to perform a problem solving task. Patients with mild/moderate PD performed a computerized Tower of Hanoi task in which they planned and verbalized moves to solve the puzzle but did not need to produce a limb motor response. All patients were tested at least 14 h off medication. As expected from previous studies of planning abilities in PD, patients had significant problems performing this task and accuracy decreased specifically when patients were presented with the most difficult puzzles in the sequence. PD patients solved fewer of the most difficult puzzles than did control subjects, but also made significantly fewer attempts to solve those puzzles than controls. These results suggest that PD patients not only have planning and problem solving deficits as have been documented previously, but that at least part of this and perhaps other cognitive performance problems may result from difficulty in maintaining adequate mental effort to successfully complete difficult tasks. PMID:17355551

  8. [Vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Bühler, Silja; Hatz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The number of individuals with autoimmune diseases treated with immunosuppressive drugs is increasing steadily. The variety of immunosuppressive drugs and in particular biological therapies is also rising. The autoimmune disease itself as well as the immunosuppressive therapy increases the risk of infection in this population. Particularly the risk of vaccine-preventable infections is elevated. Thus, preventing infections by the means of vaccination is of utmost importance. The Division of Infectious Diseases of the Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute, University of Zurich, performed a literature search on the topic of vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases upon request by the Swiss Federal Commission for Vaccination Issues. Overall, data are scarce. The following main points were retrieved from the literature: Inactivated vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity may be reduced under immunosuppressive therapy. In addition to the generally recommended basic vaccinations, specific vaccinations, such as influenza and pneumococcal vaccination are indicated in these patient groups. Live vaccines are generally contraindicated under immunosuppressive therapy due to safety concerns. However, specific exceptions apply. Furthermore, certain time intervals for the administration of live vaccines after pausing or ceasing an immunosuppressive therapy should be respected. PMID:27268452

  9. Cardiac disease after radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease: analysis of 48 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Applefeld, M.M.; Wiernik, P.H.

    1983-06-01

    Occult or overt but delayed cardiac disease after thoracic radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease may be common. Detailed cardiac evaluations were performed in 48 patients with Hodgkin's disease at risk a mean of 97 months after radiotherapy. The study protocol included echocardiography, gated radionuclide ventriculography, and cardiac catheterization. Cardiac disease was found in 46 patients (96%) and included constrictive or occult constrictive pericarditis (24 patients), an abnormal hemodynamic response to a fluid challenge (14 patients), coronary artery disease (6 patients), and left ventricular dysfunction (2 patients). Most patients (53%) had normal echocardiograms. Gated blood pool radionuclide angiocardiography was performed in 42 patients. Excluding patients with occlusive coronary artery disease, the left ventricular ejection fraction at rest (mean 59%) and during exercise (mean 69%) was within normal limits. Thus (1) delayed cardiac disease after radiotherapy is common, (2) chronic pericardial disorders are the most frequent manifestations of this disease, and (3) the prognosis for patients who have radiation-induced cardiac disease is generally favorable.

  10. [Aspirin treatment for patients with Kawasaki disease].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Hiromichi

    2014-09-01

    Aspirin was first used for patients with Kawasaki disease(KD) at 1970s. Favorable outcomes of KD patients treated with aspirin were reported in 1970-80s and now it is one of the standard therapeutic agents for KD. Its anti-inflammation effects suppress vascular wall inflammation of KD at acute phase. In addition, its antiplatelet effects heal endothelial dysfunction and prevent clot formation in coronary arteries at sub-acute and convalescent phase. Long-term dosage for patients with coronary artery aneurysms(CAA) is also important, however, there are few evidences of risk-benefit assessment for its long-term use especially for middle-aged and senior adults with KD and CAA. PMID:25518411

  11. [Anesthetic management for patients with mitochondrial disease].

    PubMed

    Imai, Yousuke; Yamada, Yoshitsugu

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are caused by a decrease in ATP production due to mutations of mitochondrial or mitochondria-related nuclear DNA. Their effects are likely to appear in tissues with a high energy demand, including skeletal muscle, nervous, and cardiovascular systems. Cardiac manifestations of mitochondrial diseases can be divided into cardiomyopathies, which are primarily hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies, and electropathies, which are primarily conduction system disease and ventricular pre-excitation. The first principle of anesthesia for patients with mitochondrial diseases is to avoid any additional burden on the already declined metabolic functions. Appropriate oxygenation, minimization of the oxygen demand, stable cardiovascular management, maintenance of a normal blood glucose level and body temperature, and effective perioperative pain control are of importance. Most anesthetics have been reported to reduce mitochondrial functions, and although enhancement of the sensitivity and prolongation of the duration of action have been reported, they are clinically used with no major problems. Detailed preoperative evaluation of the disease condition and careful intraoperative monitoring are important for the prevention of perioperative complications.

  12. Assessing comorbidity in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Visser, Martine; Marinus, Johan; van Hilten, Jacobus J; Schipper, Ruth G B; Stiggelbout, Anne M

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of an interview-based assessment of comorbidity, in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The Cumulative Illness Rating Scale-Geriatric (CIRS-G) was completed (1) in an interview with 31 PD patients and their caregivers, and (2) by reviewing the patient's medical charts from their general practitioners. Based on the interview, all patients had some comorbidity, 84% had one or more moderate comorbid diseases. The most frequently affected organ systems were "lower gastrointestinal" and "genitourinary". The mean +/- SD total score of the interview-based (chart-based) CIRS-G was 6.9 +/- 3.8 (7.6 +/- 3.5) with a mean of 4.3 +/- 1.9 (5.0 +/- 1.9) affected organ systems and a mean of 2.1 +/- 1.7 (2.3 +/- 1.6) organ systems with at least moderate comorbidity per patient. The agreement (intraclass correlation coefficients) between the interview-based and chart-based assessments for the six summary scores ranged from 0.69 to 0.81. The agreement for the 14 organ systems ranged from 0.13 to 1.00 (weighted kappa); 12 had a K(w) above 0.40 (moderate agreement). The comorbidity summary scores had a moderate correlation with age and disability. The interview-based assessment of the CIRS-G is easy to apply and is an accurate method to assess comorbidity in patients with PD.

  13. Auditory Dysfunction in Patients with Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Auditory dysfunction is a common clinical symptom that can induce profound effects on the quality of life of those affected. Cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is the most prevalent neurological disorder today, but it has generally been considered a rare cause of auditory dysfunction. However, a substantial proportion of patients with stroke might have auditory dysfunction that has been underestimated due to difficulties with evaluation. The present study reviews relationships between auditory dysfunction and types of CVD including cerebral infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cerebrovascular malformation, moyamoya disease, and superficial siderosis. Recent advances in the etiology, anatomy, and strategies to diagnose and treat these conditions are described. The numbers of patients with CVD accompanied by auditory dysfunction will increase as the population ages. Cerebrovascular diseases often include the auditory system, resulting in various types of auditory dysfunctions, such as unilateral or bilateral deafness, cortical deafness, pure word deafness, auditory agnosia, and auditory hallucinations, some of which are subtle and can only be detected by precise psychoacoustic and electrophysiological testing. The contribution of CVD to auditory dysfunction needs to be understood because CVD can be fatal if overlooked. PMID:25401133

  14. Elderly patients and inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Nimmons, Danielle; Limdi, Jimmy K

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing globally. Coupled with an ageing population, the number of older patients with IBD is set to increase. The clinical features and therapeutic options in young and elderly patients are comparable but there are some significant differences. The wide differential diagnosis of IBD in elderly patients may result in a delay in diagnosis. The relative dearth of data specific to elderly IBD patients often resulting from their exclusion from pivotal clinical trials and the lack of consensus guidelines have made clinical decisions somewhat challenging. In addition, age specific concerns such as co-morbidity; loco-motor and cognitive function, poly-pharmacy and its consequences need to be taken into account. In applying modern treatment paradigms to the elderly, the clinician must consider the potential for more pronounced adverse effects in this vulnerable group and set appropriate boundaries maximising benefit and minimising harm. Meanwhile, clinicians need to make personalised decisions but as evidence based as possible in the holistic, considered and optimal management of IBD in elderly patients. In this review we will cover the clinical features and therapeutic options of IBD in the elderly; as well as addressing common questions and challenges posed by its management. PMID:26855812

  15. Ambiguous idiom processing in Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Papagno, Costanza; Mattavelli, Giulia; Cattaneo, Zaira; Romito, Luigi; Albanese, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Patients affected by Parkinson's disease (PD) can provide crucial information about the involvement of the motor system and prefrontal cortex in processing idioms including action verbs, since dopamine modulates the activity of these structures, and, consequently, different levels of this neurotransmitter can induce different cognitive impairments. In order to investigate the ability to process ambiguous idioms containing an action verb in patients, we asked 15 PD patients, in both OFF- and ON-phases, and 15 healthy matched participants to judge the plausibility of literal and idiomatic sentences, each presented at a self-paced rate. Patients in OFF-phase were faster in reading idiomatic than literal sentences, supporting the view that the motor system is not involved in online idiom processing. However, patients during OFF-phase were impaired in judging the plausibility of idiomatic ambiguous sentences, possibly due to the reduction of dopamine in prefrontal regions. The involvement of the motor system was evident in the ON-phase for literal sentences, suggesting that motor activation is strictly dependent on the context. PMID:24479736

  16. Cardiovascular diseases among patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Azad, Muhammad Chanchal; Shoesmith, Wendy Diana; Al Mamun, Mohammad; Abdullah, Ahmad Faris; Naing, Daw Khin Saw; Phanindranath, Mahadasa; Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury

    2016-02-01

    The presence of comorbid physical illnesses especially, cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in schizophrenia is a growing area of concern in recent years. In order to reduce disease burden, to improve quality of life and to provide holistic care, it is important to know about the relationship between schizophrenia and CVD. The objective of this review is to explore the extent of CVD problems, relevant risk factors and potential measures for early diagnosis and prevention of CVD among patients with schizophrenia. Worldwide studies show that patients with schizophrenia have a higher mortality and lower life expectancy than the general population. CVD is the leading cause of increased mortality in schizophrenia. Common CVD risk factors in schizophrenia include metabolic syndrome, sedentary behaviour, tobacco smoking, effects of antipsychotics, long chain omega-3 fatty acid deficiency and shared genetics between CVD and schizophrenia. The potential methods for early detection and prevention of CVD in schizophrenia are also discussed. Though the patients with schizophrenia form a high risk group for CVD, consensus guidelines for early detection and prevention of CVD in schizophrenia are lacking. Comorbidity of CVD in schizophrenia needs more serious attention by clinicians and researchers. PMID:26957335

  17. Cardiovascular diseases among patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Azad, Muhammad Chanchal; Shoesmith, Wendy Diana; Al Mamun, Mohammad; Abdullah, Ahmad Faris; Naing, Daw Khin Saw; Phanindranath, Mahadasa; Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury

    2016-02-01

    The presence of comorbid physical illnesses especially, cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in schizophrenia is a growing area of concern in recent years. In order to reduce disease burden, to improve quality of life and to provide holistic care, it is important to know about the relationship between schizophrenia and CVD. The objective of this review is to explore the extent of CVD problems, relevant risk factors and potential measures for early diagnosis and prevention of CVD among patients with schizophrenia. Worldwide studies show that patients with schizophrenia have a higher mortality and lower life expectancy than the general population. CVD is the leading cause of increased mortality in schizophrenia. Common CVD risk factors in schizophrenia include metabolic syndrome, sedentary behaviour, tobacco smoking, effects of antipsychotics, long chain omega-3 fatty acid deficiency and shared genetics between CVD and schizophrenia. The potential methods for early detection and prevention of CVD in schizophrenia are also discussed. Though the patients with schizophrenia form a high risk group for CVD, consensus guidelines for early detection and prevention of CVD in schizophrenia are lacking. Comorbidity of CVD in schizophrenia needs more serious attention by clinicians and researchers.

  18. Lower Muscle Endurance in Patients with Alcoholic Liver Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Henning; Aagaard, Niels K.; Jakobsen, Johannes; Dorup, Inge; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Patients with alcoholic liver disease often complain of restricted physical capacity, which could be due to decreased muscle endurance. The aim of this study was to assess the muscular endurance in patients with alcoholic liver disease. In a cross sectional study, 24 patients with alcoholic liver disease and 22 controls were evaluated using…

  19. Incidence of coronary artery disease in patients with valvular heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, G W; Thomas, R D; Grimmer, S F; Silverton, P N; Smith, D R

    1980-01-01

    The case notes, cardiac catheterisation data, and coronary arteriograms of 239 patients investigated for valvular heart disease during a five year period were reviewed. Angina present in 13 of 95 patients with isolated mitral valve disease, 43 of 90 patients with isolated aortic valve disease, and 18 of 54 patients with combined mitral and aortic valve disease. Significant coronary artery disease was present in 85 per cent of patients with mitral valve disease and angina, but in only 33 per cent of patients with aortic valve disease and angina. Patients with no chest pain still had a high incidence of coronary artery disease, significant coronary obstruction being present in 22 per cent with mitral valve disease, 22 per cent with aortic valve disease, and 11 per cent with combine mitral and aortic valve disease. Several possible clinical markers of coronary artery disease were examined but none was found to be of practical help. There was, however, a significant inverse relation between severity of coronary artery disease and severity of valve disease in patients with aortic valve disease. Asymptomatic coronary artery disease is not uncommon in patients with valvular heart disease and if it is policy to perform coronary artery bypass grafting in such patients, routine coronary arteriography must be part of the preoperative investigation. PMID:7459146

  20. Disease-Related Knowledge and Information Needs Among Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yang-Sook; Cha, Kyeong-Sook

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify disease-related knowledge and information needs of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The 313 patients (Crohn disease: n = 169, colitis: n = 144) presenting to an outpatient gastroenterology clinic of a tertiary care hospital in Seoul, Republic of Korea, were scored on their knowledge of Crohn disease and colitis and their information needs were assessed in the questionnaire. Patients with Crohn disease obtained a higher mean knowledge score than patients with colitis. The patients with Crohn disease had significantly higher scores about complications than patients with colitis. The patients with Crohn disease showed significantly higher mean scores relating to the patients' information needs than patients with colitis. The favorite topics of information needed were disease, medication, and diagnosis/operations. The patients with Crohn disease wanted more information than patients with colitis about medications used for treatment, daily life, and pregnancy. The effectiveness of the training and education given to patients can be maximized in this education system when the information about disease and medications for Crohn disease patients or information about disease and diet for colitis patients is primarily provided according to the degree of the patients' need for information. PMID:25159269

  1. Thyroid diseases in patients with acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Tarach, Jerzy Stanisław; Kurowska, Maria; Nowakowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Acromegaly often involves the presence of different pathologies of the thyroid gland. Long-lasting stimulation of the follicular epithelium by growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) can cause disorders in thyroid function, an increase in its mass and the development of goitre. Acromegalic patients present most frequently with non-toxic multinodular goitre. Nodules are more prevalent in patients with active acromegaly. It has been suggested that then thyroid size increases and it can be reduced through treatment with somatostatin analogues. The relationship between thyroid volume and the level of IGF-1 and the duration of the disease is unclear. Each acromegalic patient requires a hormonal and imaging evaluation of the thyroid when the diagnosis is made, and an accurate evaluation during further observation and treatment. Although the data concerning the co-occurrence of acromegaly and thyroid cancer still remain controversial, it is particularly important to diagnose the patient early and to rule out thyroid cancer. PMID:25276172

  2. Spinal Surgery Complications and Failures in Patients with Parkinsons Disease.

    PubMed

    Sapkas, George S; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Papastathis, Elias; Tsiavos, Kostas; Igoumenou, Vasilios; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Galanopoulos, Ioannis; Soultanis, Konstantinos; Papadopoulos, Elias C; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system affecting the substantia nigra in the midbrain. It accounts for 1.5% of the population in Europe over 60 years of age. Recent advances in the medical treatment of Parkinson's disease have improved the quality of life and life expectancy of the patients. However, it remains a debilitating disease. Spinal disorders are frequent in these patients, and as the population ages, more patients with Parkinson's disease are expected to require spinal surgery. Spinal surgery in patients with Parkinson's disease has been associated with an exceptionally high rate of complications; failures and reoperations are common, and patient outcomes are dismal.

  3. Famous Stone Patients and Their Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Michael E.

    2007-04-01

    The fact that stone patients have endured much throughout the ages and that prior to our current era, when the ultimate horror, "being cut for the stone" was the only alternative to the repeated episodes of colic, should be recalled from time to time. Urolithiasis has affected humanity throughout the ages and has been indiscriminate to those lives it touched. A full accounting of those who have suffered and recorded their agonies is beyond the scope of this investigation; however, even a partial accounting is valuable for present day physicians who care for those with stone disease. For the present work, the historical accounts of stone disease literature were scrutinized for individual sufferers who could be cross-referenced from other sources as legitimately afflicted by stones. Only those patients that could be documented and were (or are) well known were included, because the internet is now a verdant repository of thousands of "not so well knowns." Reliable historical data was found for a variety of persons from the pre-Christian era to the present, including those remembered as philosophers and scientists, physicians, clergy, leaders and rulers, entertainers, athletes and fictitious/Hollywood-type individuals. Verified accounts of famous stone formers were chosen for this paper, and are presented in chronological order. The list of urolithiasis sufferers presented here is undoubtedly incomplete, but it is not through lack of trying that they are missing. Most often, the suffering do so silently, and that is always allowed.

  4. Outcomes of Bowel Resection in Patients with Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Carmichael, Joseph C; Mills, Steven D; Pigazzi, Alessio; Stamos, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    There is limited data regarding outcomes of bowel resection in patients with Crohn's disease. We sought to investigate complications of such patients after bowel resection. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases were used to examine the clinical data of Crohn's patients who underwent bowel resection during 2002 to 2012. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to investigate outcomes of such patients. We sampled a total of 443,950 patients admitted with the diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Of these, 20.5 per cent had bowel resection. Among patients who had bowel resection, 51 per cent had small bowel Crohn's disease, 19.4 per cent had large bowel Crohn's disease, and 29.6 per cent had both large and small bowel Crohn's disease. Patients with large bowel disease had higher mortality risk compared with small bowel disease [1.8% vs 1%, adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 2.42, P < 0.01]. Risks of postoperative renal failure (AOR: 1.56, P < 0.01) and respiratory failure (AOR: 1.77, P < 0.01) were higher in colonic disease compared with small bowel disease but postoperative enteric fistula was significantly higher in patients with small bowel Crohn's disease (AOR: 1.90, P < 0.01). Of the patients admitted with the diagnosis of Crohn's disease, 20.5 per cent underwent bowel resection during 2002 to 2012. Although colonic disease has a higher mortality risk, small bowel disease has a higher risk of postoperative fistula.

  5. Nutrition in adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Hebuterne, Xavier; Filippi, Jerome; Schneider, Stephane M

    2014-01-01

    Seventy five percent of hospitalized patients with Crohn's disease suffer from malnutrition. One third of Crohn's disease patients have a body mass index below 20. Sixty percent of Crohn's disease patients have sarcopenia. However some inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients are obese or suffer from sarcopenic-obesity. IBD patients have many vitamin and nutrient deficiencies, which can lead to important consequences such as hyperhomocysteinemia, which is associated with a higher risk of thromboembolic disease. Nutritional deficiencies in IBD patients are the result of insufficient intake, malabsorption and protein-losing enteropathy as well as metabolic disturbances directly induced by the chronic disease and its treatments, in particular corticosteroids. Screening for nutritional deficiencies in chronic disease patients is warranted. Managing the deficiencies involves simple nutritional guidelines, vitamin supplements, and nutritional support in the worst cases. PMID:25266810

  6. The Expert Patient and Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The concept of “expert patient” has been developed in the last two decades to define a patient who has a significant knowledge of his/her disease and treatment in addition to self-management skills. However, this concept has evolved over the last years, and these patients are now considered, not only to be more efficient in the management of their own condition and communicating effectively with health professionals, but to also act as educators for other patients and as resources for the last, provide feedback on care delivery, and be involved in the production and implementation of practice guidelines, as well as in the development and conduct of research initiatives. There are some barriers, however, to the integration of this new contributor to the health care team, and specific requirements need to be considered for an individual to be considered as an expert. This new player has, however, a potentially important role to improve current care, particularly in respiratory health. PMID:27445572

  7. Renal co-morbidity in patients with rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Renal co-morbidity is common in patients with rheumatic disease based on regular assessment of serum and urine parameters of renal function. When patients present with both arthritis and renal abnormalities the following questions have to be addressed. Is kidney disease a complication of rheumatic disease or its management, or are they both manifestations of a single systemic autoimmune disease? Is rheumatic disease a complication of kidney disease and its management? How do rheumatic disease and kidney disease affect each other even when they are unrelated? The present review provides an overview of how to address these questions in daily practice. PMID:21722341

  8. Life style modification for patients with ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, V

    2013-01-01

    With a view to assess the effectiveness of lifestyle modification in patients with ischemic heart disease, a quasi-experimental study with quantitative approach was undertaken on 60 patients of ischemic heart disease. Purposive sampling technique was used in selecting the patients. The results showed that educating the patients about cessation of smoking, taking proper diet, anxiety reduction and counselling helped in preventing the progression of ischaemic heart disease.

  9. Exercise manual for liver disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Limongi, Vivian; Dos Santos, Daniele Costa; de Oliveira da Silva, Aurea Maria; Boin, Ilka de Fátima Santana Ferreira; Stucchi, Raquel Silveira Bello

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To increase inspiratory muscle strength and improve the quality of life of candidates for liver transplantation. METHODS: Twenty-three candidates for liver transplantation participated in the control group and 14 made up the intervention group. The control group consisted of 18 men and 5 women, body mass index (BMI) 27.3 ± 4.5 kg/m2 and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) 18.2 ± 6.1. The intervention group consisted of 11 men and 3 women, BMI 28.6 ± 5.4 kg/m2 and MELD 18 ± 4.5. The presence or absence of ascites was identified in the first patient evaluation and after three months. We evaluated maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximal expiratory pressure, spirometry, root mean square (RMS) of diaphragm and rectus abdominis, and the quality of life. The exercises were performed daily by patients at home for three months and were supervised at distance monthly. The manual consisted of diaphragmatic breathing exercises, diaphragmatic isometric exercise, Threshold IMT®, lifting upper limbs with a bat and strengthening the abdomen. RESULTS: There was significant difference (P = 0.01) between the first (initial) and the third month (final) MIP in the control group and in the intervention group, but there was no difference (P = 0.45) between the groups. The RMS of the diaphragm was lower (P = 0.001) and the functional capacity was higher (P = 0.006) in the intervention group compared to the control. The general health and mental health domains received higher scores after three months in the control group (P = 0.01) and the intervention group (P = 0.004), but there was no significant difference between them. The comparison between the presence of initial ascites with the presence of ascites was performed after three months in the control group (P = 0.083) and intervention group (P = 0.31). There was no significant difference, in relation to the presence of ascites after three months between groups (P = 0.21). In the intervention group, patients with

  10. Technology innovation for patients with kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mitsides, Nicos; Keane, David F; Lindley, Elizabeth; Mitra, Sandip

    2014-01-01

    The loss of kidney function is a life-changing event leading to life-long dependence on healthcare. Around 5000 people are diagnosed with kidney failure every year. Historically, technology in renal medicine has been employed for replacement therapies. Recently, a lot of emphasis has been placed on technologies that aid early identification and prevent progression of kidney disease, while at the same time empowering affected individuals to gain control over their chronic illness. There is a shift in diversity of technology development, driven by collaborative innovation initiatives such the National Institute's for Health Research Healthcare Technology Co-operative for Devices for Dignity. This has seen the emergence of the patient as a key figure in designing technologies that are fit for purpose, while business involvement has ensured uptake and sustainability of these developments. An embodiment of this approach is the first successful Small Business Research Initiative in the field of renal medicine in the UK.

  11. Managing patients for zoonotic disease in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Warwick, Clifford; Corning, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Zoonoses involve infections and infestations transmissible from animals to humans. Zoonoses are a major global threat. Exposure to zoonotic pathogens exists in various settings including encroachment on nature; foreign travel; pet keeping; bushmeat consumption; attendance at zoological parks, petting zoos, school ‘animal contact experiences’, wildlife markets, circuses, and domesticated and exotic animal farms. Under-ascertainment is believed to be common and the frequency of some zoonotic disease appears to be increasing. Zoonoses include direct, indirect and aerosolized transmission. Improved awareness of zoonoses in the hospital environment may be important to the growing need for prevention and control. We reviewed relevant literature for the years 2000 to present and identified a significant need for the promotion of awareness and management of zoonoses in the hospital environment. This article provides a new decision-tree, as well as staff and patient guidance on the prevention and control of zoonoses associated with hospitals. PMID:24040497

  12. Diurnal hypercapnia in patients with neuromuscular disease.

    PubMed

    Panitch, Howard B

    2010-03-01

    Subjects with progressive neuromuscular diseases undergo a typical sequence of respiratory compromise, leading from normal unassisted gas exchange to nocturnal hypoventilation with normal daytime gas exchange, and eventually to respiratory failure requiring continuous ventilatory support. Several different abnormalities in respiratory pump function have been described to explain the development of respiratory failure in subjects with neuromuscular weakness. Early in the progression of respiratory failure, the use of nocturnal assisted ventilation can reverse both night- and day-time hypercapnia. Eventually, however, diurnal hypercapnia will persist despite correction of nocturnal hypoventilation. The likely beneficial effects of mechanical ventilatory support include resting fatigue-prone respiratory muscles and resetting of the central chemoreceptors to PaCO(2). Recent experience shows that select patients who require daytime ventilation can be supported with non-invasive ventilation continuously to correct gas exchange abnormalities while avoiding detrimental aspects of tracheostomy placement.

  13. Approach to patients with refractory coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, Ikram; Nasr, Iman; Campling, Hannah; Ciclitira, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Refractory coeliac disease (RCD) is a recognised complication, albeit very rare, of coeliac disease (CD). This condition is described when individuals with CD continue to experience enteropathy and subsequent or ongoing malabsorption despite strict adherence to a diet devoid of gluten for at least 12 months and when all other causes mimicking this condition are excluded. Depending on the T-cell morphology and T-cell receptor (TCR) clonality at the β/γ loci, RCD can be subdivided into type 1 (normal intra-epithelial lymphocyte morphology, polyclonal TCR population) and type 2 (aberrant IELs with clonal TCR). It is important to differentiate between the two types as type 1 has an 80% survival rate and is managed with strict nutritional and pharmacological management. RCD type 2 on the other hand has a 5-year mortality of 50% and can be complicated by ulcerative jejunitis or enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL). Management of RCD type 2 has challenged many experts, and different treatment approaches have been adopted with variable results. Some of these treatments include immunomodulation with azathioprine and steroids, methotrexate, cyclosporine, alemtuzumab (an anti CD-52 monoclonal antibody), and cladribine or fludarabine sometimes with autologous stem cell transplantation. In this article, we summarise the management approach to patients with RCD type 2. PMID:27803799

  14. Thyroid Disease in the Older Patient

    MedlinePlus

    ... these patients, without treatment unless they are symptomatic. HYPOTHYROIDISM IN THE OLDER PATIENT Hypothyroidism is very common ... is given. TREATMENT OF THE OLDER PATIENT WITH HYPOTHYROIDISM As with the younger patient, pure synthetic thyroxine ( ...

  15. International Registry for Patients With Castleman Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-21

    Castleman Disease; Castleman's Disease; Giant Lymph Node Hyperplasia; Angiofollicular Lymph Hyperplasia; Angiofollicular Lymph Node Hyperplasia; Angiofollicular Lymphoid Hyperplasia; GLNH; Hyperplasia, Giant Lymph Node; Lymph Node Hyperplasia, Giant

  16. Cardiovascular disease and cognitive function in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cognitive impairment are common in dialysis patients. Given the proposed role of microvascular disease on cognitive function, particularly cognitive domains that incorporate executive functions, we hypothesized that prevalent systemic CVD would be associated with wor...

  17. Assessment of visual impairment in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sadun, A A; Borchert, M; DeVita, E; Hinton, D R; Bassi, C J

    1987-08-15

    We examined five patients with Alzheimer's disease who complained of poor vision. Two patients had mild Alzheimer's disease; they complained of problems with reading and of "bumping into things," yet both had normal visual acuities. One patient with moderate Alzheimer's disease had abnormal eye movements, visual-evoked potentials, and contrast sensitivity. The other two patients had severe Alzheimer's disease. Despite difficulties in performing the examination, we were able to see moderate impairments in visual acuity and visual fields, as well as marked dyschromatopsia, severe deficits in contrast sensitivity, and markedly abnormal eye movements and visual-evoked potentials.

  18. Ultrasonographic imaging of inflammatory bowel disease in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Chiorean, Liliana; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Braden, Barbara; Cui, Xin-Wu; Buchhorn, Reiner; Chang, Jian-Min; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2015-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is one of the most common chronic gastrointestinal diseases in pediatric patients. Choosing the optimal imaging modality for the assessment of gastrointestinal disease in pediatric patients can be challenging. The invasiveness and patient acceptance, the radiation exposure and the quality performance of the diagnostic test need to be considered. By reviewing the literature regarding imaging in inflammatory bowel disease the value of ultrasound in the clinical management of pediatric patients is highlighted. Transabdominal ultrasound is a useful, noninvasive method for the initial diagnosis of IBD in children; it also provides guidance for therapeutic decisions and helps to characterize and predict the course of the disease in individual patients. Ultrasound techniques including color Doppler imaging and contrast-enhanced ultrasound are promising imaging tools to determine disease activity and complications. Comparative studies between different imaging methods are needed. PMID:25954096

  19. Diagnosis, disease stage, and distress of Chinese cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Boyan; Chen, Huiping; Deng, Yaotiao; Yi, Tingwu; Wang, Yuqing

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective is to assess how cancer patients know about their diagnosis what they know about their real stage, and the relationship between cancer stage and psychological distress. Methods A questionnaire including the Distress Thermometer was delivered to 422 cancer inpatients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Most of patients (68.7%) knew the bad news immediately after diagnosis. Half of patients knew their diagnosis directly from medical reports. Nearly one third of patients were informed by doctors. Cancer stages, which patients believed, differed significantly from their real disease stages (P<0.001). Over half of patients did not know their real disease stages. Patients with stage I–III cancer were more likely to know their real disease stage than patients with stage IV cancer (P<0.001). Distress scores of cancer patients were determined by the real cancer stage (P=0.012), not the stage which patients believed. Conclusions Although most of participants knew the bad news immediately after diagnosis, less than half of them knew their real disease stage. Patient with stage I–III cancer was more likely to know the real disease stage and had a DT score <4 than patient with stage IV disease. PMID:27004220

  20. Subclinical intestinal inflammation in chronic granulomatous disease patients.

    PubMed

    Broides, Arnon; Sagi, Orli; Pinsk, Vered; Levy, Jacov; Yerushalmi, Baruch

    2016-02-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease is a primary immunodeficiency caused by impaired neutrophil production of reactive oxygen species. Non-infectious colitis is common in chronic granulomatous disease, and high levels of antimicrobial antibodies that are associated with Crohn's disease are common even without colitis. Fecal calprotectin concentration is a marker for intestinal inflammation. We sought to determine whether subclinical intestinal inflammation occurs in asymptomatic chronic granulomatous disease patients. Asymptomatic chronic granulomatous disease patients without overt gastrointestinal symptoms suggestive of colitis at the time of enrollment were studied for fecal calprotectin concentration, antibodies associated with Crohn's disease and systemic inflammatory markers. Eight patients were included, aged 54-176 months. In 7/8 (87.5 %) fecal calprotectin concentration was normal (<50) and elevated (137 mg/kg) in only one patient. This patient later developed colitis. In 7/8 (87.5 %) anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody was positive. C-reactive protein, albumin, complete blood count and p-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody were normal in all 8 patients. Subclinical colitis is not evident in most asymptomatic chronic granulomatous disease patients; however, in some patients, fecal calprotectin concentration may be elevated, possibly indicating the presence of subclinical colitis and predicting the occurrence of clinically relevant colitis. Serum anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody concentrations do not seem to correlate with fecal calprotectin concentration in asymptomatic chronic granulomatous disease patients.

  1. Subclinical intestinal inflammation in chronic granulomatous disease patients.

    PubMed

    Broides, Arnon; Sagi, Orli; Pinsk, Vered; Levy, Jacov; Yerushalmi, Baruch

    2016-02-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease is a primary immunodeficiency caused by impaired neutrophil production of reactive oxygen species. Non-infectious colitis is common in chronic granulomatous disease, and high levels of antimicrobial antibodies that are associated with Crohn's disease are common even without colitis. Fecal calprotectin concentration is a marker for intestinal inflammation. We sought to determine whether subclinical intestinal inflammation occurs in asymptomatic chronic granulomatous disease patients. Asymptomatic chronic granulomatous disease patients without overt gastrointestinal symptoms suggestive of colitis at the time of enrollment were studied for fecal calprotectin concentration, antibodies associated with Crohn's disease and systemic inflammatory markers. Eight patients were included, aged 54-176 months. In 7/8 (87.5 %) fecal calprotectin concentration was normal (<50) and elevated (137 mg/kg) in only one patient. This patient later developed colitis. In 7/8 (87.5 %) anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody was positive. C-reactive protein, albumin, complete blood count and p-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody were normal in all 8 patients. Subclinical colitis is not evident in most asymptomatic chronic granulomatous disease patients; however, in some patients, fecal calprotectin concentration may be elevated, possibly indicating the presence of subclinical colitis and predicting the occurrence of clinically relevant colitis. Serum anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody concentrations do not seem to correlate with fecal calprotectin concentration in asymptomatic chronic granulomatous disease patients. PMID:26603166

  2. Macrophage and polymorphonuclear leukocyte function in patients with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Cameron, D J; Durst, G G; Majeski, J A

    1985-01-01

    Monocyte derived macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) isolated from the peripheral blood of thirteen patients with Alzheimer disease were studied for their cytotoxic effects on a sensitive allogenic tumor target. PMN cells from 11 of the 13 patients with Alzheimer disease were able to kill the tumor cells. In addition, the macrophages from 12 of the 13 Alzheimer disease patients were cytotoxic towards the tumor targets. Four of these patients possessed a plasma inhibitory factor which was capable of suppressing macrophage mediated cytotoxicity. When the lymphocytes from these patients were studied for their ability to be stimulated with the specific antigen, streptokinase, to produce macrophage activating factor (MAF), only 5 of the 13 patients studied possessed lymphocytes which were capable of producing MAF. Thus, the only immunological defect in Alzheimer disease patients which was observed in this study was in the ability of the lymphocytes to synthesize MAF. PMID:4084662

  3. [Treatment strategy for patients with simultaneous cardiac and malignant diseases].

    PubMed

    Osawa, Hisayoshi; Muraki, Satoshi; Sakurada, Taku; Kawaharada, Nobuyoshi; Sasaki, Jun; Araki, Eiji; Nakashima, Shinji

    2014-03-01

    The choice of treatment strategy for patients with simultaneous cardiac and malignant diseases is often debatable. We report 11 patients with simultaneous cardiac and malignant diseases who were hospitalized in our institution over the past 6 years. The patients were 9 males and 2 females with a mean age of 71.9±9.0 years old. There were 7 cases of ischemic heart disease( IHD), and 4 cases of valvular disease. Malignant diseases consisted of 4 cases of colon cancer, 2 cases of pulmonary cancer, 2 cases of hepatic cancer, and 1 case each of sigmoid colon cancer with liver metastasis, gallbladder cancer, and pancreatic cancer. Eight of the 11 cases(73%)were hospitalized because of a symptom associated with cardiac disease, and malignant disease was diagnosed incidentally during examination or treatment. Four of the IHD cases preceded coronary revascularization by off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Two of the valvular cases and 2 of the IHD cases underwent cardiac surgery after treatment of malignant diseases. In 3 cases, only 1 of the diseases was treated. Seven cases died of malignant diseases at the present. The choice of treatment strategy should be established for patients with simultaneous cardiac and malignant diseases in consideration of the severity of the cardiac disease and the expected prognosis of the malignant disease because there is no standardized method of treatment.

  4. Spousal undermining of older diabetic patients' disease management.

    PubMed

    Henry, Shayna L; Rook, Karen S; Stephens, Mary A P; Franks, Melissa M

    2013-12-01

    Marriage can enhance health for individuals with a chronic disease, yet spouses may also undermine disease management. The current study investigated spousal undermining of dietary regimen in 129 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A total of 40 patients reported that their spouses tempted them with forbidden foods, and 15 reported that their spouses conveyed disregard for their diabetic diet. Spousal tempting was associated with worse dietary adherence, and spousal disregard with worse nondietary adherence. Spousal undermining is relatively rare but is associated with patients' disease management and warrants further investigation to better understand how spouses influence partners' day-to-day management of chronic diseases.

  5. Motility Evaluation in the Patient with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Sherine M; Kalra, Gorav; Moshiree, Baha

    2016-10-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) suffer frequently from functional bowel diseases (FBD) and motility disorders. Management of FBD and motility disorders in IBD combined with continued treatment of a patient's IBD symptoms will likely lead to better clinical outcomes and improve the patient's quality of life. The goals of this review were to summarize the most recent literature on motility disturbances in patients with IBD and to give a brief overview of the ranges of motility disturbances, from reflux disease to anorectal disorders, and discuss their diagnosis and specific management. PMID:27633599

  6. Motility Evaluation in the Patient with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Sherine M; Kalra, Gorav; Moshiree, Baha

    2016-10-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) suffer frequently from functional bowel diseases (FBD) and motility disorders. Management of FBD and motility disorders in IBD combined with continued treatment of a patient's IBD symptoms will likely lead to better clinical outcomes and improve the patient's quality of life. The goals of this review were to summarize the most recent literature on motility disturbances in patients with IBD and to give a brief overview of the ranges of motility disturbances, from reflux disease to anorectal disorders, and discuss their diagnosis and specific management.

  7. Hormones and arterial stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gungor, Ozkan; Kircelli, Fatih; Voroneanu, Luminita; Covic, Adrian; Ok, Ercan

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease constitutes the major cause of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Arterial stiffness is an important contributor to the occurrence and progression of cardiovascular disease. Various risk factors, including altered hormone levels, have been suggested to be associated with arterial stiffness. Based on the background that chronic kidney disease predisposes individuals to a wide range of hormonal changes, we herein review the available data on the association between arterial stiffness and hormones in patients with chronic kidney disease and summarize the data for the general population.

  8. Scintigraphic perfusion patterns in patients with diffuse lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, G.E.; Sullivan, D.C.; Gottschalk, A.; Putman, C.E.

    1982-04-01

    Perfusion scintigrams of 55 patients with radiographic evidence of diffuse lung disease were reviewed. Thirty-nine had acute and/or chronic changes caused by congestive heart failure, and 16 had diffuse reticulonodular disease. A normal or near-normal perfusion pattern was seen in 40/55 (73%), and this finding was equally common in the two groups. The authors conclude that perfusion scintigraphy is useful in excluding pulmonary embolism in patients with radiographic evidence of diffuse, symmetrical lung disease.

  9. Increased frequencies of caries, periodontal disease and tooth loss in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Ayumi; Kashihara, Kenichi

    2009-10-01

    We aimed to evaluate oral hygiene in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The incidence of periodontal disease and numbers of caries and remaining teeth were checked in 89 consecutive 60 to 79-year-old patients with PD and compared with two other patient groups: 68 patients with mild neurological disease, and 60 with acute ischemic stroke. Patients with PD had fewer remaining teeth, more caries and a higher incidence of deep periodontal pockets. The frequency of patients with PD with untreated caries was high at Hoehn and Yahr stage II and above, and frequency tended to increase in patients who had low compared to high mini-mental state examination scores. Careful attention should be paid to the oral hygiene of patients with PD, even in the early stages of the disease.

  10. Revascularization options in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ashrith, Guha; Elayda, MacArthur A; Wilson, James M

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients who have chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease and are undergoing hemodialysis. Chronic kidney disease is a recognized risk factor for premature atherosclerosis. Unfortunately, most major randomized clinical trials that form the basis for evidence-based use of revascularization procedures exclude patients who have renal insufficiency. Retrospective, observational studies suggest that patients with end-stage renal disease and severe coronary occlusive disease have a lower risk of death if they undergo coronary revascularization rather than medical therapy alone. Due to a lack of prospective studies, however, the relative merits of percutaneous versus surgical revascularization are merely a matter of opinion. Several small, retrospective studies have shown that coronary artery bypass grafting is associated with higher procedural death but better long-term survival than is percutaneous coronary intervention. This difference appears to result from poor long-term results of percutaneous coronary intervention in patients who have chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease.Because randomized trials comparing percutaneous coronary intervention and coronary artery bypass grafting have included patients undergoing balloon angioplasty and placement of bare-metal stents, their conclusions are suspect in the era of drug-eluting stents. In this review, we discuss different revascularization options for patients with chronic kidney disease, the outcomes of revascularization procedures, and the risk factors for adverse outcomes.

  11. [Actual diet of patients with gastrointestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Loranskaia, T I; Shakhovskaia, A K; Pavliuchkova, M S

    2000-01-01

    The study of actual nutrition of patients with erosive-ulcerative lesions in the gastroduodenal zone and of patients with operated ulcer has revealed defects in intake of essential nutrients by these patients: overeating of animal fat and refined carbohydrates, deficiency of oil, vitamins A, B2, C, D and food fibers.

  12. [The physician-patient relationship in chronic disease management].

    PubMed

    Ginies, P

    2008-07-01

    The relationship between patients and clinicians is a key element in the management of chronic diseases. With the objective of a more efficient communication, the clinician should know his own personality but also the patient personality. The organisation of the consultation, of the waiting room and of the secretary has to facilitate this relationship. The amelioration of this relationship is usefulness only for the clinician in particularly complicated cases but also for the patients suffering from chronic diseases.

  13. Vaccination recommendations for adult patients with rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tanrıöver, Mine Durusu; Akar, Servet; Türkçapar, Nuran; Karadağ, Ömer; Ertenli, İhsan; Kiraz, Sedat

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases in any age group can be successfully prevented through immunization. Protection provided through immunization in childhood decreases over the years. Immunization in adulthood is important because of the growing elderly population, chronic diseases, and globalization. Recommendations on this subject are being constantly updated through scientific guidelines. Immunization in adulthood is also important in rheumatology. There is an increased risk not only of infection in rheumatic diseases but also of infections being more severe. Most infections, and their frequently observed complications, are among those diseases that can be prevented through immunization. The type of immunization, immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory therapy received by the patient, disease activity, and presence of chronic diseases affect the immunization process in patients with rheumatic diseases. This review will consider the immunization process followed in rheumatic diseases and also refer to its application.

  14. Nutritional support for the patient with pancreatobiliary disease.

    PubMed

    Kohn, C L; Brozenec, S; Foster, P F

    1993-03-01

    Critically ill patients with severe pancreatobiliary disease exhibit multiple nutritional alterations compounded by the stress response. Acute pancreatitis may present as a life-threatening illness; patients are likely to be hypermetabolic and may have hyperglycemia and hypocalcemia. Nutritional support from parenteral or enteral feeding will probably be required in patients presenting with three or more positive risk factors as determined by Ranson criteria. Nutritional therapies for liver disease vary according to the specific disorder manifested. Patients with fulminant hepatic failure need to be monitored for profound hypoglycemia. Encephalopathy may develop in patients with acute-on-chronic liver disease, necessitating a protein restriction. Patients undergoing liver transplant are a perioperative challenge due to the combination of preoperative malnutrition, an extensive surgical procedure, and postoperative stress. Such patients require individualized assessment and management. PMID:8448001

  15. Alzheimer's disease care management plan: maximizing patient care.

    PubMed

    Treinkman, Anna

    2005-03-01

    Nurse practitioners have the potential to significantly impact the care of patients with dementia. Healthcare providers can now offer patients medications that will control symptoms and prolong functioning. As a result of ongoing contact with patients, NPs play an important role in assessing and screening patients for AD and educating the patients, families, and caregivers about the disease. Alzheimer's disease is a chronic, progressive illness that requires long-term management. Nurse practitioners should be familiar with available medications and appreciate the need to individualize therapy to maximize efficacy and minimize potential adverse drug reactions.

  16. [Vaccination prior to travelling for patients with rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Ehrenstein, B

    2011-06-01

    Rheumatologists increasingly face patient questions about the need, the safety and the effectiveness of travel-related vaccinations. Currently, there are no guidelines on travel vaccinations for patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases. The use of live attenuated vaccines remains contraindicated in patients receiving relevant immunosuppressive therapy despite some encouraging results from initial pilot studies. However, many inactivated travel vaccines can safely be used for patients with rheumatic diseases. Furthermore, rheumatologists should be vigilant in identifying and closing gaps in the routine vaccinations for patients.

  17. Late appearance of chronic pericardial disease in patients treated by radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Applefeld, M.M.; Cole, J.F.; Pollock, S.H.; Sutton, F.J.; Slawson, R.G.; Singleton, R.T.; Wiernik, P.H.

    1981-03-01

    Radiation-induced chronic pericardial disease was recognized in nine patients 53 to 124 months (mean, 88 months) after radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease. Depending on whether abnormal cardiac hemodynamics occurred before or after a fluid challenge, patients were considered to have either constrictive pericarditis (Group I) or occult constrictive pericarditis (Group II). There were no differences between these groups in various radiotherapy data, the use of chemotherapy, or the interval after treatment when the diagnosis of chronic pericardial disease was made. There were no consistent noninvasive variables to support the diagnosis of radiation-induced chronic pericardial disease before cardiac catheterization. Four patients underwent pericardiectomy. Two of the four operated patients had an excellent surgical result; a third patient died 4 months postoperatively of drug-induced granulocytopenia; the fourth patient has persistent visceral constrictive pericarditis 18 months after surgery. Speculation over the causes of radiation-induced chronic pericardial disease is made and our recommendations for its treatment given.

  18. Disease management programs for CKD patients: the potential and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Michael V

    2009-03-01

    Disease management describes the use of a number of approaches to identify and treat patients with chronic health conditions, especially those that are expensive to treat. Disease management programs have grown rapidly in the United States in the past several years. These programs have been established for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but some have been discontinued because of the high cost of the program. Disease management programs for CKD face unique challenges. Identification of patients with CKD is hampered by incomplete use of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for CKD by physicians and the less than universal use of estimated glomerular filtration rate from serum creatinine measurements to identify patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2). CKD affects multiple organ systems. Thus, a comprehensive disease management program will need to manage each of these aspects of CKD. These multiple interventions likely will make a CKD disease management program more costly than similar disease management programs designed for patients with diabetes mellitus, congestive heart failure, or other chronic diseases. The lack of data that can be used to develop effective disease management programs in CKD makes it difficult to determine goals for the management of each organ system affected by CKD. Finally, long periods of observation will be needed to determine whether a particular disease management program is effective in not only improving patient outcomes, but also decreasing both resource use and health care dollars. This long-term observation period is contrary to how most disease management contracts are written, which usually are based on meeting goals during a 1- to 3-year period. Until these challenges are resolved, it likely will be difficult to maintain effective disease management programs for CKD.

  19. Heart disease and physical activity: looking beyond patient characteristics.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Chris M

    2012-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) adherence is a problem that has plagued cardiovascular disease patients for years. Because of this, researchers have advocated for the identification of key theoretical correlates that can be used to guide PA intervention development. The present review will identify key PA correlates for these patients and provide subsequent recommendations to look beyond patient-level correlates.

  20. Addressing challenges and needs in patient education targeting hardly reached patients with chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Varming, Annemarie Reinhardt; Torenholt, Rikke; Møller, Birgitte Lund; Vestergaard, Susanne; Engelund, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    Some patients do not benefit from participation in patient education due to reasons related to disease burden, literacy, and socioeconomic challenges. In this communication, we address more specifically both the challenges that these hardly reached patients face in relation to patient education programs and the challenges educators face when conducting patient education with hardly reached patients. We define principles for the format and content of dialogue tools to better support this patient group within the population of individuals with diabetes. PMID:25729695

  1. Survival Analysis of Patients with End Stage Renal Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, J. D.; Gayo, W. S.; Bautista, L. A.; Baccay, E. B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper provides a survival analysis of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) under Kaplan-Meier Estimates and Weibull Distribution. The data were obtained from the records of V. L. MakabaliMemorial Hospital with respect to time t (patient's age), covariates such as developed secondary disease (Pulmonary Congestion and Cardiovascular Disease), gender, and the event of interest: the death of ESRD patients. Survival and hazard rates were estimated using NCSS for Weibull Distribution and SPSS for Kaplan-Meier Estimates. These lead to the same conclusion that hazard rate increases and survival rate decreases of ESRD patient diagnosed with Pulmonary Congestion, Cardiovascular Disease and both diseases with respect to time. It also shows that female patients have a greater risk of death compared to males. The probability risk was given the equation R = 1 — e-H(t) where e-H(t) is the survival function, H(t) the cumulative hazard function which was created using Cox-Regression.

  2. Coronary artery disease in patients with cerebrovascular disease: a prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Rokey, R.; Rolak, L.A.; Harati, Y.; Kutka, N.; Verani, M.S.

    1984-07-01

    Coronary artery disease is the cause of death in most patients who have transient ischemic attacks or stroke. Evaluation for this condition is not routinely performed in such patients, and no prospective studies have been reported. We prospectively examined 50 consecutive patients with transient ischemic attacks or mild stroke to determine the prevalence and importance of coronary artery disease. All patients were examined by a cardiologist and underwent both exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy and exercise radionuclide ventriculography. Sixteen patients were suspected to have coronary artery disease on the basis of clinical evaluation. In 15 of these the was confirmed by the nuclear scans. The remaining 34 patients had no clinical evidence of heart disease, yet 14 had abnormal cardiac scans. Twenty of 22 patients with abnormal scans who underwent cardiac catheterization had significant coronary artery disease or a cardiomyopathy. The discovery of heart disease altered clinical management in 13 patients. Overall, 29 of 50 patients had significant coronary artery disease, compared with a 7% prevalence of the condition in other patients of similar age at the same institution.

  3. Review article: hepatitis vaccination in patients with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Reiss, G; Keeffe, E B

    2004-04-01

    Evidence regarding the outcomes of viral super-infection in patients with chronic liver disease and practical strategies for hepatitis A and B vaccination of these individuals are reviewed. Patients with acute hepatitis A and chronic hepatitis B have a more severe clinical course and a higher death rate compared with otherwise healthy individuals with hepatitis A, and these differences are most pronounced in older patients and those with histological evidence of chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis, rather than in asymptomatic hepatitis B carriers. Patients with acute hepatitis A super-infection and chronic hepatitis C have an increased risk of fulminant hepatitis and death. In addition, patients with other chronic liver diseases also appear to be at increased risk for more severe disease with superimposed hepatitis A. Patients with chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus co-infection have more severe laboratory abnormalities, more severe histological disease, a greater frequency of cirrhosis and complications of cirrhosis, and a higher incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma. Vaccines for both hepatitis A and B are safe and effective if used early in the course of chronic liver disease. Hepatitis A and B vaccination should be part of the routine management of patients with chronic liver disease, preferably as early as possible in the natural course of their disease.

  4. Use of statins in patients with liver disease.

    PubMed

    Tandra, Sweta; Vuppalanchi, Raj

    2009-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is as common in individuals with chronic liver disease as in the general population. Moreover, recent data suggest that patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) may have a cardiovascular risk greater than that conferred by the conventional risk factors. There is unequivocal evidence that cardiovascular disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in this patient population and thus requires consideration of aggressive therapy with lipid-lowering agents such as statins. Because all statins are hepatically cleared and can cause elevations in liver biochemistries, there is a concern that patients with underlying liver disease may be at increased risk for hepatotoxicity. However, recent data, along with an assessment of statin safety by the Liver Expert Panel, suggest that statins are generally well tolerated in patients with chronic liver disease such as NAFLD, primary biliary cirrhosis, and hepatitis C virus. These drugs also appear to be safe in patients with stable/compensated cirrhosis. However, decompensated cirrhosis and acute liver failure should be considered contraindications for lipid-lowering therapy as these patients are unlikely to benefit because of their generally grave prognosis. Although routine hepatic biochemical test monitoring is recommended, the cost-effectiveness of this approach has been questioned. The benefit of statins in patients with underlying liver disease who are otherwise important candidates for statin therapy far outweighs the risk of a very rare event of serious liver injury. PMID:19627660

  5. Approach to the patient with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kevin E

    2015-06-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with motor, nonmotor, and behavioral findings. Imaging technology advances have allowed the characterization of the underlying pathologic changes to the brain and identification of specific lesions in dopaminergic neurons. Although certain imaging techniques allow for detection up to 20 years before the onset of motor symptoms, these advances have yet to produce meaningful treatments to halt the disease or reverse its course. Current treatments are directed at optimizing symptomatic management. Referral to a movement disorder specialist familiar with PD should be considered for providers with limited familiarity in diagnosis or treatment.

  6. Valvular heart disease and the military patient.

    PubMed

    Holdsworth, D A; Mulae, J; Williams, A; Jackson, S; Chambers, J

    2015-09-01

    Valvular heart disease refers to all inherited and acquired abnormalities impairing the function of one or more of the four cardiac valves. Pathology may be of the valve leaflets themselves, of the subvalvular apparatus or of the annulus or other surrounding structures that influences valve function. This paper examines the most common valve lesions, with specific reference to a military population; it focuses on detection and initial management of valve disease in a young adult population and specifically describes how the diagnosis and treatment of valve disease impacts military medical grading.

  7. Patients with Celiac Disease Are Not Followed Adequately

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Margot L.; Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Lahr, Brian D.; Larson, Joseph J.; Van Dyke, Carol T.; Murray, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Adherence to a gluten-free diet is the only effective treatment for celiac disease. It has been recommended that patients be followed, make regular visits to the clinic, and undergo serologic analysis for markers of celiac disease, although a follow-up procedure has not been standardized. We determined how many patients with celiac disease are actually followed. Methods We collected data on 122 patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease, diagnosed between 1996 and 2006 in Olmsted County, Minnesota (70% women, median age of 42 years) for whom complete medical records and verification of residency were available. We determined the frequency at which patients received follow-up examinations, from 6 months to 5 years after diagnosis. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate event rates at 1 and 5 year(s). Patients were classified according to categories of follow-up procedures recommended by the American Gastroenterology Association (AGA). Results We estimated that by 1 and 5 year(s) after diagnosis with celiac disease, 41.0% and 88.7% of the patients had follow-up visits, 33.6% and 79.8% were assessed for compliance with a gluten-free diet, 3.3% and 15.8% met with a registered dietitian, 2.5% and 18.1% had an additional intestinal biopsy, and 22.1% and 65.6% received serologic testing for markers of celiac disease. Among 113 patients (93%) who were followed for more than 4 years, only 35% received follow-up analyses that were consistent with AGA recommendations. Conclusions Patients with celiac disease are not followed consistently. Follow-up examinations are often inadequate and do not follow AGA recommendations. Improving follow-up strategies for patients with celiac disease could improve management of this disease. PMID:22610009

  8. Echocardiography in the Assessment of Patients with Rheumatologic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Al-Mohaissen, Maha A; Chan, Kwan-Leung

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is an important extra-articular manifestation of rheumatologic diseases leading to considerable mortality and morbidity. Echocardiography emerges as a useful non-invasive technique for the screening and evaluation of cardiac involvement in these patients. With the technological advancement in echocardiographic techniques, we have gained a greater appreciation of the prevalence and nature of the cardiac involvement in these patients, as detection of subclinical disease is increasingly feasible. This review discusses cardiac involvement in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome, systemic sclerosis and ankylosing spondylitis, and the role of different echocardiographic modalities in their evaluation.

  9. A case of phrynoderma in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Cobos, Gabriela; Cornejo, Christine; McMahon, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Phrynoderma is a type of follicular hyperkeratosis associated with nutritional deficiencies. It is rarely seen in developed countries, although cases have been reported in patients with severe malnutrition or malabsorption secondary to various causes. This report describes a 19-year-old patient with poorly controlled Crohn's disease and malnutrition who developed the characteristic hyperkeratotic papules and plaques on his trunk and extremities in the setting of low serum vitamin A levels. To our knowledge, there are no reports of phrynoderma associated with Crohn's disease. It is likely that our patient's low vitamin A level and subsequent phrynoderma was the result of increased Crohn's disease activity and malnutrition.

  10. Oral health of patients with severe rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Breminand; Vayej, Ahmed C

    2012-07-01

    In order to determine whether adequate attention is paid to the maintenance of good oral health in patients at risk of developing infective endocarditis, we studied 44 black patients with severe rheumatic heart disease before they had cardiac surgery. Plaque and gingival index scores were calculated and panoramic radiographs were done in all patients. There were 17 males and 27 females (mean age: 30.6 years). The plaque and gingival index scores were classified as poor in 31.8 and 54.6% of patients, respectively. Panoramic radiographic findings included caries in 56.8% of patients, peri-apical pathology in 18.1% and retained roots in 22.7% of patients. This study demonstrates that inadequate attention is paid to the maintenance of good oral health in patients with severe rheumatic heart disease. The oral and dental care of patients at risk of developing infective endocarditis needs to be improved. PMID:22836156

  11. Renal stone disease in spinal-cord-injured patients.

    PubMed

    Welk, Blayne; Fuller, Andrew; Razvi, Hassan; Denstedt, John

    2012-08-01

    Renal stone disease is common among patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). They frequently have recurrent stones, staghorn calculi, and bilateral stone disease. The potential risk factors for stones in the SCI population are lesion level, bladder management strategy, specific metabolic changes, and frequent urinary tract infections. There has been a reduction in struvite stones among these patients, likely as a result of advances in their urologic care. The clinical presentation of stone disease in patients with SCI may involve frequent urinary infections or urosepsis, and at the time of presentation patients may need emergency renal drainage. The proportion of patients who have their stones treated with different modalities is largely unknown. Shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) is commonly used to manage stones in patients with SCI, and there have been reports of stone-free rates of 50% to 70%. The literature suggests that the morbidity associated with percutaneous nephrolithotomy in these patients is considerable. Ureteroscopy is a common modality used in the general population to treat patients with upper tract stone disease. Traditional limitations of this procedure in patients with SCI have likely been overcome with new flexible scopes; however, the medical literature has not specifically reported on its use among patients with SCI.

  12. A new Internet resource for chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Ormandy, P; Vlaminck, H; Harrington, M; Forest, M; Visser, R

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of a portal in the World Wide Web (WWW), which captures and locates quality information for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). It examines the problems patients face when accessing and understanding information gleaned from Web sites and describes an idea from a Research Board Member to facilitate patient access to quality information. The idea germinated into the development of a patient specific Web site, providing one stop access and links to appropriate CKD information, assessed by patients and health professionals. Collaboration between the EDTNA/ERCA Research Board and CEAPIR the European Federation of Kidney Patients has enhanced the project. PMID:16700172

  13. Role of Myeloperoxidase in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kisic, Bojana; Miric, Dijana; Dragojevic, Ilija; Rasic, Julijana; Popovic, Ljiljana

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem. Patients with CKD have a number of disorders in the organism, and the presence of oxidative stress and systemic inflammation in these patients is the subject of numerous studies. Chronic inflammation joined with oxidative stress contributes to the development of numerous complications: accelerated atherosclerosis process and cardiovascular disease, emergence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, development of malnutrition, anaemia, hyperparathyroidism, and so forth, affecting the prognosis and quality of life of patients with CKD. In this review we presented the potential role of the myeloperoxidase enzyme in the production of reactive/chlorinating intermediates and their role in oxidative damage to biomolecules in the body of patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. In addition, we discussed the role of modified lipoprotein particles under the influence of prooxidant MPO intermediates in the development of endothelial changes and cardiovascular complications in renal failure. PMID:27127544

  14. Primary pulmonary histiocytosis X in two patients with Hodgkin's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sajjad, Syed M; Luna, Mario A

    1982-01-01

    The lungs may be involved in patients with histiocytosis X as part of the generalised disease, but histiocytosis X confined to the lungs without extrapulmonary involvement is rare. This report describes two cases of primary pulmonary histiocytosis arising in patients with Hodgkin's disease. It is impossible to state with certainty whether the pulmonary histiocytosis arose as a response to the defects of cell-mediated immunity, or as a consequence of immunosuppression by radiation and chemotherapy. Images PMID:6979116

  15. Palliative care for patients with non-malignant respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    McVeigh, Clare

    2015-05-01

    Non-malignant respiratory disease is a chronic life-limiting condition that requires holistic palliative care. Patients with non-malignant respiratory disease have a range of biopsychosocial and spiritual needs, which healthcare professionals should recognise and manage effectively. Healthcare professionals have an important role in enabling the delivery of effective palliative care to this group of patients and their carers, and in recognising the many factors that may impede delivery of palliative care. PMID:25942985

  16. Bone disease in calcium stone forming patients.

    PubMed

    Heilberg, I P; Martini, L A; Szejnfeld, V L; Carvalho, A B; Draibe, S A; Ajzen, H; Ramos, O L; Schor, N

    1994-09-01

    The association between idiopathic hypercalciuria and osteopenia (OP) has been recently recognized. It is not established whether or not calcium intake plays a critical role in the loss of bone mass. Fifty-five calcium stone forming patients with either absorptive hypercalciuria (AH) or fasting hypercalciuria (FH), 29 males and 26 premenopausal females, were submitted to dual photon absorptiometry at lumbar spine. Calcium intake was assessed by a 72 hr dietary record. OP was detected in 20% (11/55) of patients, being more common among men, 9/26 (35%) than in women, 2/29 (7%), p < 0.05. Male FH patients presented lower mean bone mineral density (BMD) than sex, weight and age-matched control (1.058 +/- 0.18 vs 1.209 +/- 0.13 g/cm2, X +/- SD, p < 0.05). OP was more frequent in FH patients, 7/20 (35%) than in AH patients 4/35 (11%), albeit the difference was not statistically significant. There was no correlation between calcium intake and BMD measurement. Six osteopenic male FH patients were further submitted to histomorphometric evaluation with tetracycline double labeling. Bone volume was lower than the controls (13.2 +/- 3.0 vs 27.2 +/- 3.7%, p < 0.05). Osteoid surfaces were reduced, although not significantly (10.1 +/- 8.2% vs 15.9 +/- 6.7%). Eroded surfaces were markedly increased (23.9 +/- 13.4 vs 4.2 +/- 1.4%, p < 0.05). The bone formation rate was very low with a complete lack of tetracycline double labeling in 4 patients. These data suggest low bone volume, tendency to low bone formation, increased bone resorption and a severe mineralization defect, consistent with normal or low bone turnover osteoporosis. PMID:7994936

  17. Quality of Life in Chronic Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Megari, Kalliopi

    2013-01-01

    During the past decades there was an increasing predominance of chronic disorders, with a large number of people living with chronic diseases that can adversely affect their quality of life. The aim of the present paper is to study quality of life and especially Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in chronic diseases. HRQOL is a multidimensional construct that consists of at least three broad domains – physical, psychological, and social functioning – that are affected by one’s disease and/or treatment. HRQoL is usually measured in chronic conditions and is frequently impaired to a great extent. In addition, factors that are associated with good and poor HRQoL, as well as HRQoL assessment will be discussed. The estimation of the relative impact of chronic diseases on HRQoL is necessary in order to better plan and distribute health care resources aiming at a better HRQoL. [«All the people perceive the concept of living good or being well, that is the same as being happy». (Aristotle. 384-322 BC. Ethica Nichomachea)] PMID:26973912

  18. Social Media Use in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ling; Reich, Jason; Groshek, Jacob; Farraye, Francis A

    2016-05-01

    Patients with chronic illnesses such as Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) have been more keen to utilize the Internet and in particular, social media to obtain patient educational information in recent years. It is important for the gastroenterologist to be aware of these modalities and how they might affect information exchange and ultimately, disease management. This article addresses the current prevalence of social media use, advent of mobile health applications, social media usage in patients with chronic conditions, usage amongst providers, and most notably, the usage and preferences in IBD patients. Over the last decade there has been an increasing desire from patients to receive educational material about their disease through social media. We reviewed the medical literature on the quality of IBD-related information on social media. Given the disparity of information available on the Internet, we remark on the quality of this information and stress the need for further research to assess the validity of IBD information posted on social media.

  19. [Orthopaedic neurological diseases in patient with diabetes].

    PubMed

    Natsume, Tadahiro; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2014-02-01

    Individuals with diabetes are at a greater risk for microvascular complications, such as retinopathy, neuropathy, and nephropathy, than are individuals without diabetes. Diabetic neuropathies are complex heterogeneous disorders that include both focal neuropathies and diffuse polyneuropathy. Entrapment neuropathy is an example of a focal neuropathy, while distal symmetric polyneuropathy is the most common type of diffuse polyneuropathy. Entrapment neuropathies are highly prevalent in the diabetic population, but they develop insidiously and progressively, making it difficult to determine their true prevalence. Entrapment neuropathies are suspected to be a more common complication of diabetes than is polyneuropathy. For example, carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS)-one of the most common entrapment neuropathies encountered in patients with diabetes-results from median nerve compression, and has been shown to occur three times more frequently in a diabetic population than in a normal healthy population. Entrapment neuropathies should be actively screened for in patients showing the signs and symptoms of neuropathy, because such patients may require surgical treatment.

  20. Metabolic syndrome in patients with hematological diseases.

    PubMed

    Annaloro, Claudio; Airaghi, Lorena; Saporiti, Giorgia; Onida, Francesco; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Deliliers, Giorgio Lambertenghi

    2012-08-01

    The term metabolic syndrome (MS) defines a clustering of cardiovascular risk factors, formerly known as syndrome X. There is some debate about the diagnostic criteria; but the most widely accepted framework is that defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III, which requires the simultaneous occurrence of at least three of abdominal obesity, arterial hypertension, hyperglycemia, hypertrigliceridemia and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). The prevalence of MS increases with age and varies depending on genetic factors. An abnormally high prevalence has been observed in patients with heterogeneous conditions, such as solid organ transplant recipients, AIDS patients and long-term cancer survivors. As some of the pathogenetic factors possibly involved include cyclosporine A, corticosteroids and cancer chemoradiotherapy, it is possible that MS may also be a complication in hematological patients. Some of the characteristics of MS have been reported with a certain frequency in thalassemia patients, and are mainly attributed to iron overload. Impaired hemostasis is a feature of MS rather than a factor predisposing to its development. In oncohematology, an abnormally high prevalence of MS features has been observed in survivors of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In addition to corticosteroid- and cancer therapy-related hypogonadism, hypothyroidism and defective growth hormone incretion are other factors related to the development of MS. Moreover, the highest frequency of MS is observed in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients. Pediatric patients and allogeneic HSCT recipients have been the subject of foremost investigations; but adult patients and autologous HSCT recipients have also been studied more recently. A wide range of factors may contribute to the development of MS in HSCT recipients. Unfortunately, the real entity of the problem is far from clear because of the retrospective design of

  1. Preoperative prediction of significant coronary artery disease in patients with valvular heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ramsdale, D R; Faragher, E B; Bennett, D H; Bray, C L; Ward, C; Beton, D C

    1982-01-01

    A prognostic index for predicting significant coronary artery disease was established using multiple logistic regression analysis of clinical data from 643 patients with valvular heart disease who had undergone routine coronary arteriography before valve replacement. The index or equation obtained incorporated the presence of angina, a family history of ischaemic heart disease, age, cigarette smoking habits, mitral valve disease, sex, and electrocardiographic evidence of myocardial infarction. The equation was validated using prospective data from 387 patients with valvular disease and shown to enable almost a third of routine coronary arteriograms to be omitted while maintaining 95% sensitivity for patients with coronary artery disease. Similar analysis of the more detailed prospective data produced a second discriminant function incorporating diastolic blood pressure, total cigarettes smoked in life, the severity of angina, family history of ischaemic heart disease, age, current cigarette smoking habits, and the ratio of total to high density lipoprotein cholesterol. This method improved the discrimination between patients with and without coronary artery disease, allowing omission of 30% of routine coronary arteriograms with 100% sensitivity for patients with coronary disease and omission of 41% with a 96% sensitivity level. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 PMID:6799111

  2. Patterns of cortical thinning in nondemented Parkinson's disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Uribe, Carme; Segura, Barbara; Baggio, Hugo Cesar; Abos, Alexandra; Marti, Maria Jose; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Compta, Yaroslau; Bargallo, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Clinical variability in the Parkinson's disease phenotype suggests the existence of disease subtypes. We investigated whether distinct anatomical patterns of atrophy can be identified in Parkinson's disease using a hypothesis‐free, data‐driven approach based on cortical thickness data. Methods T1‐weighted 3‐tesla MRI and a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment were performed in a sample of 88 nondemented Parkinson's disease patients and 31 healthy controls. We performed a hierarchical cluster analysis of imaging data using Ward's linkage method. A general linear model with cortical thickness data was used to compare clustering groups. Results We observed 3 patterns of cortical thinning in patients when compared with healthy controls. Pattern 1 (n = 30, 34.09%) consisted of cortical atrophy in bilateral precentral gyrus, inferior and superior parietal lobules, cuneus, posterior cingulate, and parahippocampal gyrus. These patients showed worse cognitive performance when compared with controls and the other 2 patterns. Pattern 2 (n = 29, 32.95%) consisted of cortical atrophy involving occipital and frontal as well as superior parietal areas and included patients with younger age at onset. Finally, in pattern 3 (n = 29, 32.95%), there was no detectable cortical thinning. Patients in the 3 patterns did not differ in disease duration, motor severity, dopaminergic medication doses, or presence of mild cognitive impairment. Conclusions Three cortical atrophy subtypes were identified in nondemented Parkinson's disease patients: (1) parieto‐temporal pattern of atrophy with worse cognitive performance, (2) occipital and frontal cortical atrophy and younger disease onset, and (3) patients without detectable cortical atrophy. These findings may help identify prognosis markers in Parkinson's disease. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement

  3. Nocardia infections among immunomodulated inflammatory bowel disease patients: A review

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Cândida; Rocha-Pereira, Nuno; Sarmento, António; Magro, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Human nocardiosis, caused by Nocardia spp., an ubiquitous soil-borne bacteria, is a rare granulomatous disease close related to immune dysfunctions. Clinically can occur as an acute life-threatening disease, with lung, brain and skin being commonly affected. The infection was classically diagnosed in HIV infected persons, organ transplanted recipients and long term corticosteroid treated patients. Currently the widespread use of immunomodulators and immunossupressors in the treatment of inflammatory diseases changed this scenario. Our purpose is to review all published cases of nocardiosis in immunomodulated patients due to inflammatory diseases and describe clinical and laboratory findings. We reviewed the literature concerning human cases of nocardiosis published between 1980 and 2014 in peer reviewed journals. Eleven cases of nocardiosis associated with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) prescription (9 related with infliximab and 2 with adalimumab) were identified; 7 patients had inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), 4 had rheumatological conditions; nocardia infection presented as cutaneous involvement in 3 patients, lung disease in 4 patients, hepatic in one and disseminated disease in 3 patients. From the 10 cases described in IBD patients 7 were associated with anti-TNF and 3 with steroids and azathioprine. In conclusion, nocardiosis requires high levels of clinical suspicion and experience of laboratory staff, in order to establish a timely diagnosis and by doing so avoid worst outcomes. Treatment for long periods tailored by the susceptibility of the isolated species whenever possible is essential. The safety of restarting immunomodulators or anti-TNF after the disease or the value of prophylaxis with cotrimoxazole is still debated. PMID:26074688

  4. [Mental status of patients with ulcer disease].

    PubMed

    Tsimmerman, Ia S; Belousov, F V; Tregubov, L Z

    2004-01-01

    Questionnaire survey has been performed among 100 patients with duodenal ulcer (DU). Character building of these patients when they were children and adolescents was wring in 80 +/- 4 cases (women) and in 88.6 +/- 3.2 cases (men). Most significant negative factors were undercare, hypercare and living in incomplete family. The Leongard's questionnaire distinguishes various accentuations with prevalence of cycloid, epileptoid, emotive and demonstrative; anxiety scale was low. The Gissen personality questionnaire "Ego" confirmed frequent occurrence among DU patients of emotive, hysteroid, epileptoid features with non-flexible type of reaction. By Luscher's test, anxiety was low or moderate. Overall prevalence of personality disorders totalled 29 +/- 4.5 cases, mostly in women. It was proved experimentally that psychosomatic disorders are realized in target organs. In DU these organs were gastrointestinal (36 +/- 5.7 cases). Similar data about involvement of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) were obtained in stress reactions. However, "ulcer personality" was not documented. Support of preferable realization of psychogenic factors action in GIT was obtained with Gissen somatic questionnaire. Operating psychogenic factors and their dynamics were characterized; emotional deprivation was leading. Among psychopathological manifestations, asthenodepressive symptoms prevailed in 76 +/- 4.3 cases. High efficiency of gestalt-psychotherapy and coaxil in the treatment of DU in patients with psychopathological disorders of the neurotic level were found. PMID:15114773

  5. [Anaesthesia for patients with obstructive airway diseases].

    PubMed

    Groeben, H; Keller, V; Silvanus, M T

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive lung diseases like asthma or chronic obstructive lung diseases have a high prevalence and are one of the four most frequent causes of death. Obstructive lung diseases can be significantly influenced by the choice of anesthetic techniques and anesthetic agents. Basically, the severity of the COPD and the degree of bronchial hyperreactivity will determine the perioperative anesthetic risk. This risk has to be assessed by a thorough preoperative evaluation and will give the rationale on which to decide for the adequate anaesthetic technique. In particular, airway instrumentation can cause severe reflex bronchoconstriction. The use of regional anaesthesia alone or in combination with general anaesthesia can help to avoid airway irritation and leads to reduced postoperative complications. Prophylactic antiobstructive treatment, volatile anesthetics, propofol, opioids, and an adequate choice of muscle relaxants minimize the anesthetic risk, when general anesthesia is required In case, despite all precautions intra-operative bronchospasm occurs, deepening of anaesthesia, repeated administration of beta2-adrenergic agents and parasympatholytics, and a single systemic dose of corticosteroids represent the main treatment options. PMID:24749300

  6. Patient satisfaction measurement in the disease management industry.

    PubMed

    Sen, Shaikat; Fawson, Paul; Cherrington, Graham; Douglas, Kathleen; Friedman, Neal; Maljanian, Rose; Fitzner, Karen; Tang, Pei; Soper, Steven; Wood, Steven

    2005-10-01

    In mid-2004, the Disease Management Association of America (DMAA) Patient Satisfaction Workgroup in association with J.D. Power and Associates (JDPA) conducted a literature review and a member survey to gain an understanding of the nature of patient satisfaction measurement as it pertains to disease management (DM) programs within the DM industry. A review of the relevant literature indicates that perhaps, with the exception of diabetes disease management, there are no prevalent, systematic, or statistically validated approaches for measuring patient satisfaction within the disease management industry. Most existing studies tend to focus on the effectiveness of a disease management program on clinical outcomes, with patient satisfaction measured only as a part of a battery of "outcome" measures. However, many of these studies do find positive associations between patient satisfaction and clinical outcomes. A majority of the 49 respondents who completed the member feedback survey hold relatively high positions in their organizations. The vast majority of respondents indicate their organizations conduct patient satisfaction surveys that assess overall satisfaction, satisfaction with materials and information provided, and with staff members. Patient satisfaction surveys are most common among the five common chronic diseases: diabetes, asthma, congestive heart failure (CHF), coronary artery disease (CAD), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). More than three in four respondents agree that patient satisfaction measurement is important to the long-term success of their programs. Respondents also indicate that along with intelligence on patients' overall satisfaction with the program, they would also like to gain an understanding of whether or not their programs actually help manage the patient's medical condition. Eight survey instruments currently in use and submitted by study participants were also reviewed. Most of these instruments are relatively short

  7. Learning Style Preferences of Elderly Coronary Artery Disease Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theis, Saundra L.; Merritt, Sharon L.

    1992-01-01

    The Patient Learning Styles Questionnaire derived from Canfield and administered to 134 elderly coronary artery disease patients revealed the following order of learning preferences: structure, iconics, listening, direct experience, reading, achievement, affiliation, and eminence. Level of education significantly influenced preferred learning…

  8. Joint Storytelling by Patients with Alzheimer's Disease and Their Spouses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemper, Susan; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses personal narratives of subjects with Alzheimer's disease and their spouses. Notes that solo narratives were gathered from patients and spouses separately, and then joint narratives were gathered. Compares patients' ability to provide settings in their solo narrative to their ability to supply information when prompted by spouses. Finds…

  9. Sarcopenia and Physical Inactivity in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Keiji; Ookawara, Susumu; Morishita, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Sarcopenia and physical inactivity synergistically progress in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and are strong predictors of mortality in this population. Exercise training and essential amino acids and vitamin D supplements may contribute to improving sarcopenia and physical inactivity in CKD patients. PMID:27570755

  10. Diagnosis of sickle cell disease in chronically transfused patients.

    PubMed

    Oliveri, D R; Ober, C L; Horwitz, A L

    1992-01-01

    Standard electrophoretic methods for the diagnosis of hemoglobinopathies are confounded in individuals chronically transfused. We present the accurate diagnosis of sickle cell disease in two such transfused patients by the application of polymerase chain reaction technology to analyze patient's hemoglobin beta-chain genes directly.

  11. Managing diabetes in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shridhar N; Tanenberg, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Because few randomized trials have been done, little is known about appropriate glycemic control in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes mellitus. These patients are at high risk of hypoglycemia. It is prudent to monitor glucose closely, set less-stringent blood sugar goals, avoid oral antidiabetic agents, and possibly reduce insulin dosage. PMID:27055204

  12. Assessing the Executive Function Deficits of Patients with Parkinsons Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbertson, William; Moberg, Paul; Duda, John; Stern, Matthew; Weintraub, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the utility of the Tower of London-Drexel (TOL DX ) in assessing the executive deficits associated with Parkinsons disease (PD). We sought to determine whether the TOL DX would differentiate between (a) patients with PD and healthy control participants (HCP), (b) demented and nondemented patients, and (c)…

  13. Sarcopenia and Physical Inactivity in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Keiji; Ookawara, Susumu; Morishita, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    Sarcopenia and physical inactivity synergistically progress in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and are strong predictors of mortality in this population. Exercise training and essential amino acids and vitamin D supplements may contribute to improving sarcopenia and physical inactivity in CKD patients. PMID:27570755

  14. Exercise Decreases Risk of Future Active Disease in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Patricia D.; Kappelman, Michael D.; Martin, Christopher F.; Chen, Wenli; Sandler, Robert S.; Long, Millie D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although exercise impacts quality of life in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), little is known about its role in disease activity. Among IBD patients in remission, we aimed to evaluate the association between exercise and subsequent active disease. Methods We performed a prospective study using the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA) Partners Internet-based cohort of individuals with self-reported IBD. We identified participants in remission, defined as short Crohn's disease activity index (sCDAI) <150 or simple clinical colitis activity index (SCCAI) ≤2. The primary exposure was exercise status, measured using the validated Godin leisure time activity index. The primary study outcome, assessed after six months, was active disease defined using the above disease activity index thresholds. We used bivariate and multivariate analyses to describe the independent association between exercise and risk of active disease. Results We identified 1308 patients with Crohn's Disease (CD) and 549 with ulcerative or indeterminate colitis (UC/IC) in remission, of whom 227(17.4%) with CD and 135 (24.6%) with UC/IC developed active disease after 6 months. Higher exercise level was associated with decreased risk of active disease for CD (adjusted RR 0.72, 95% CI 0.55-0.94) and UC/IC (adjusted RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.54-1.13). Conclusions In patients with CD in remission, those with higher exercise levels were significantly less likely to develop active disease at six months. In patients with UC/IC in remission, patients with higher exercise levels were less likely to develop active disease at six months, however this was not statistically significant. PMID:25723616

  15. Study of Hepatic Osteodystrophy in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Karoli, Yogesh; Fatima, Jalees; Manhar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic Liver Disease (CLD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It involves haemodynamic and metabolic complications. Hepatic Osteodystrophy is a metabolic bone disease that may occur in individuals with chronic liver disease. It can significantly affect morbidity and quality of life of these patients. Fractures are also associated with an excess mortality. It has been an under recognized and inadequately studied complication among Indian population. An early diagnosis is essential to correct reversible risk factors which predispose to bone mass loss. Aim To assess the prevalence of metabolic bone disease and identify the risk factors associated with hepatic osteodystrophy in patients with cirrhosis. Materials and Methods This was an observational, cross-sectional, hospital based study conducted at a medical college hospital. All patients more than 20-year-old, diagnosed with chronic liver disease/Cirrhosis were enrolled. They were subjected to haematological, biochemical investigations, evaluation of Vitamin D and other hormonal parameters. Bone Mineral Density (BMD) was estimated by Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA). Results A total of 72 patients with mean age 50.04±11.24 years were included in the study. Amongst causes of chronic liver disease were alcoholic liver disease 22 (30.6%), CLD due to hepatitis B 24 (33.3%) and chronic hepatitis C 26 (36.1%). Twenty one (29.2%) patients had normal BMD while 51 (70.8%) had a low BMD. Out of these 51 patients, 36 (70.6%) were diagnosed of osteopenia and 15 (29.4%) others were found to have osteoporosis. Vitamin D levels and severity of liver disease had correlation with low BMD. Conclusion Low BMD is highly prevalent in patients with chronic liver disease of variable aetiologies. We advocate more randomised and prospective studies to be conducted on homogeneous groups with chronic liver disease in its various stages. In view of numerous therapeutic options available both for liver

  16. Online Patient Education for Chronic Disease Management: Consumer Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Win, Khin Than; Hassan, Naffisah Mohd; Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri; Probst, Yasmine

    2016-04-01

    Patient education plays an important role in chronic disease management. The aim of this study is to identify patients' preferences in regard to the design features of effective online patient education (OPE) and the benefits. A review of the existing literature was conducted in order to identify the benefits of OPE and its essential design features. These design features were empirically tested by conducting survey with patients and caregivers. Reliability analysis, construct validity and regression analysis were performed for data analysis. The results identified patient-tailored information, interactivity, content credibility, clear presentation of content, use of multimedia and interpretability as the essential design features of online patient education websites for chronic disease management. PMID:26846749

  17. Online Patient Education for Chronic Disease Management: Consumer Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Win, Khin Than; Hassan, Naffisah Mohd; Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri; Probst, Yasmine

    2016-04-01

    Patient education plays an important role in chronic disease management. The aim of this study is to identify patients' preferences in regard to the design features of effective online patient education (OPE) and the benefits. A review of the existing literature was conducted in order to identify the benefits of OPE and its essential design features. These design features were empirically tested by conducting survey with patients and caregivers. Reliability analysis, construct validity and regression analysis were performed for data analysis. The results identified patient-tailored information, interactivity, content credibility, clear presentation of content, use of multimedia and interpretability as the essential design features of online patient education websites for chronic disease management.

  18. Motivational interviewing to engage patients in chronic kidney disease management.

    PubMed

    Martino, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) must manage numerous medical treatments and lifestyle changes that strain their treatment adherence. An important strategy to improve adherence is to activate the patients' motivation to manage their CKD. This article describes an approach for enhancing patients' motivation for change, called motivational interviewing (MI), a treatment that is increasingly being used in health care settings to counsel patients with chronic diseases. Its basic principles, techniques, empirical support, published applications for improving CKD patients' self-management, and how to learn MI are presented. Research is needed to determine the efficacy and mechanisms of MI for CKD treatment as well as the development of innovative ways to deliver it to patients and train busy health care practitioners in the approach.

  19. Mitochondrial disease patients' perception of dietary supplements' use.

    PubMed

    Karaa, Amel; Kriger, Joshua; Grier, Johnston; Holbert, Amy; Thompson, John L P; Parikh, Sumit; Hirano, Michio

    2016-09-01

    Surveys of mitochondrial disease physicians conducted through the Mitochondrial Medicine Society have shown that virtually all providers recommend a variety of dietary supplements as treatments to their patients in an effort to enhance energy production and reduce oxidative stress. In this survey, we asked patients and their parents about their experiences taking these dietary supplements for mitochondrial disease. The survey was disseminated through the North American Mitochondrial Disease Consortium (NAMDC) and the Rare Disease Clinical Research Network (RDCRN) registries and gathered 162 responses. The study ascertained each patient's mitochondrial disease diagnosis, dietary supplements used, adjunct therapy, and effects of the supplements on symptoms and health. Regardless of the specific underlying mitochondrial disease, the majority of the survey respondents stated they are or have been on dietary supplements. Most patients take more than four supplements primarily coenzyme Q10, l-carnitine, and riboflavin. The majority of patients taking supplements reported health benefits from the supplements. The onset of perceived benefits was between 2weeks to 3months of initiating intake. Supplements seem to be safe, with only 28% of patients experiencing mild side-effects and only 5.6% discontinuing their intake due to intolerance. Only 9% of patients had insurance coverage for their supplements and when paying out of pocket, 95% of them spend up to $500/month. Despite the use of concomitant therapies (prescribed medications, physical therapy, diet changes and other), 45.5% of patients think that dietary supplements are the only intervention improving their symptoms. Some limitations of this study include the retrospective collection of data probably associated with substantial recall bias, lack of longitudinal follow up to document pre- and post-supplement clinical status and second hand reports by parents for children which may reflect parents' subjective

  20. Mitochondrial disease patients' perception of dietary supplements' use.

    PubMed

    Karaa, Amel; Kriger, Joshua; Grier, Johnston; Holbert, Amy; Thompson, John L P; Parikh, Sumit; Hirano, Michio

    2016-09-01

    Surveys of mitochondrial disease physicians conducted through the Mitochondrial Medicine Society have shown that virtually all providers recommend a variety of dietary supplements as treatments to their patients in an effort to enhance energy production and reduce oxidative stress. In this survey, we asked patients and their parents about their experiences taking these dietary supplements for mitochondrial disease. The survey was disseminated through the North American Mitochondrial Disease Consortium (NAMDC) and the Rare Disease Clinical Research Network (RDCRN) registries and gathered 162 responses. The study ascertained each patient's mitochondrial disease diagnosis, dietary supplements used, adjunct therapy, and effects of the supplements on symptoms and health. Regardless of the specific underlying mitochondrial disease, the majority of the survey respondents stated they are or have been on dietary supplements. Most patients take more than four supplements primarily coenzyme Q10, l-carnitine, and riboflavin. The majority of patients taking supplements reported health benefits from the supplements. The onset of perceived benefits was between 2weeks to 3months of initiating intake. Supplements seem to be safe, with only 28% of patients experiencing mild side-effects and only 5.6% discontinuing their intake due to intolerance. Only 9% of patients had insurance coverage for their supplements and when paying out of pocket, 95% of them spend up to $500/month. Despite the use of concomitant therapies (prescribed medications, physical therapy, diet changes and other), 45.5% of patients think that dietary supplements are the only intervention improving their symptoms. Some limitations of this study include the retrospective collection of data probably associated with substantial recall bias, lack of longitudinal follow up to document pre- and post-supplement clinical status and second hand reports by parents for children which may reflect parents' subjective

  1. [Comparison and outcome of prevalence of concurrent diseases in patients with urological malignant diseases].

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Atsushi; Hayashi, Tetsuo; Yoshida, Soichiro; Ohno, Rena; Ishii, Nobuyuki; Terao, Toshiya; Watanabe, Toru; Yamada, Takumi

    2006-07-01

    We compared the prevalence of concurrent diseases (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, ischemic heart diseases and apoplexy) in patients with renal cell carcinoma, bladder carcinoma and prostatic carcinoma diagnosed in our department with that in all patients in our department analyzed using Mantel-Haenszel regression. In hypertension, there was a significantly high prevalence of patients with renal cell carcinoma (p < 0.05) in males and females, and prostatic carcinoma (p < 0.05). In diabetis mellitus, ischemic heart diseases and apoplexy, no apparent characteristic of prevalence was recognized. The close relationship between renal cell carcinoma, prostatic carcinoma and hypertension in this study corresponded with previous reports.

  2. Cancer of the small intestine in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Daijiro; Futami, Kitaro; Kojima, Daibo; Futatsuki, Ryo; Ishibashi, Yukiko; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yano, Yutaka; Takatsu, Noritaka; Hirai, Fumihito; Matsui, Toshiyuki; Iwashita, Akinori

    2013-07-01

    Due to an increase in the number of long-term cases of Crohn's disease, the risk of combined cancer in these patients has been assessed in numerous articles. Most of these reports have involved patients with cancer of the large intestine, while cases of cancer of the small intestine combined with Crohn's disease are very rare. We experienced two cases of cancer of the small intestine combined with Crohn's disease. In both cases, the patients had suffered from Crohn's disease for over 10 years and a second operation was performed after a long period without treatment following the first operation, which had achieved a favorable outcome. In both cases of combined cancer, the patients experienced ileus; however, it was difficult to discern this from ileus due to the presence of Crohn's disease. Therefore, making a definitive diagnosis of combined cancer was not possible before surgery, and the definitive diagnosis was obtained based on an intraoperative pathological diagnosis. It is thought that tumor markers transition in a manner parallel to the progression of cancer, providing a clue for cancer diagnosis. In patients with Crohn's disease, there is a pressing need to establish a method for diagnosing cancer of the small intestine at an early stage.

  3. Tachyarrhythmia in patients with congenital heart disease: inevitable destiny?

    PubMed

    Teuwen, C P; Taverne, Y J H J; Houck, C; Götte, M; Brundel, B J J M; Evertz, R; Witsenburg, M; Roos-Hesselink, J W; Bogers, A J J C; de Groot, N M S

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased over the last century. As a result, the number of CHD patients presenting with late, postoperative tachyarrhythmias has increased as well. The aim of this review is to discuss the present knowledge on the mechanisms underlying both atrial and ventricular tachyarrhythmia in patients with CHD and the advantages and disadvantages of the currently available invasive treatment modalities.

  4. Memantine-associated hyperkalaemia in a patient with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Tatsuo; Yamada, Hidetaka; Uchimura, Naohisa

    2013-09-01

    Memantine is an N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist that may improve cognitive functions in patients with Alzheimer's disease. It is predominantly excreted unchanged via the kidneys, and patients with decreased creatinine clearance must be treated with lower doses of memantine. However, it is unclear whether memantine itself can lead to renal dysfunction and/or hyperkalaemia. We report a patient with renal impairment and hyperkalaemia possibly associated with memantine administration.

  5. Graves' disease in a dialysis dependent chronic renal failure patient

    PubMed Central

    Nair, C. G.; Jacob, P.; Menon, R.; Babu, M. J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone level may be altered in chronic renal failure patients. Low levels of thyroxine protect the body from excess protein loss by minimizing catabolism. Hyperthyroidism is rarely encountered in end-stage dialysis dependent patients. Less than 10 well-documented cases of Graves' disease (GD) are reported in literature so far. We report a case of GD in a patient on dialysis. PMID:25484538

  6. Sexually transmitted diseases among psychiatric patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dutra, Maria Rita Teixeira; Campos, Lorenza Nogueira; Guimarães, Mark Drew Crosland

    2014-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases are still highly prevalent worldwide and represent an important public health problem. Psychiatric patients are at increased risk of sexually transmitted diseases but there are scarce published studies with representative data of this population. We sought to estimate the prevalence and correlates of self-reported sexually transmitted diseases among patients with mental illnesses under care in a national representative sample in Brazil (n=2145). More than one quarter of the sample (25.8%) reported a lifetime history of sexually transmitted disease. Multivariate analyses showed that patients with a lifetime sexually transmitted disease history were older, had history of homelessness, used more alcohol and illicit drugs, suffered violence, perceived themselves to be at greater risk for HIV and had high risk sexual behavioral: practised unprotected sex, started sexual life earlier, had more than ten sexual partners, exchanged money and/or drugs for sex and had a partner that refused to use condom. Our findings indicate a high prevalence of self-reported sexually transmitted diseases among psychiatric patients in Brazil, and emphasize the need for implementing sexually transmitted diseases prevention programs in psychiatric settings, including screening, treatment, and behavioral modification interventions.

  7. [Airway Management in a Patient with Forestier's Disease].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yuriko; Echigo, Noriyuki; Akata, Mariko; Yokoyama, Kaori; Takasugi, Naoya; Goto, Takahisa

    2016-04-01

    Airway management in a patient with Forestier's disease can be challenging clinically because this disease may cause not only dysphagia but also airway obstruction due to the compression of the pharynx and esophagus caused by the ossification of anterior longitudinal ligament. We report our anesthetic management in a patient with Forestier's disease. Meanwhile, we studied the causes of difficult airway and the most suitable airway device for a patient with this disease from a standpoint of anatomy of upper airway. Our study indicated the possibility that the most suitable airway device differed depending on the actual location of the ossification of anterior longitudinal ligament in the cervical spine and that more prudent airway management would be required if its lesion location extended to upper cervical spine. PMID:27188118

  8. Bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture in a renal disease patient.

    PubMed

    Devkota, Pramod; Ahmad, Shiraz

    2013-09-01

    Spontaneous bilateral femoral neck facture in a renal disease patient is not common. We report a case of 47-year-old female patient with chronic renal failure and on regular hemodialysis for the past 5 years who sustained bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture without history of trauma and injury and refused any surgical intervention. The patient was mobilised on wheel chair one year after the fractures. The cause of the fracture and the literature review of the bilateral femoral neck fracture in renal disease are discussed.

  9. Endoscopic Evaluation and Management of the Postoperative Crohn's Disease Patient.

    PubMed

    Hashash, Jana G; Binion, David G

    2016-10-01

    Approximately 70% of patients with Crohn's disease (CD) undergo surgical resection for the treatment of medically refractory disease or its complications. The sickest cohort of CD patients experience rapid postoperative relapse at the anastomotic site. Over the past 2 decades, the types of surgical anastomoses used in CD reconstruction have changed; end-to-side and end-to-end anastomoses have been surpassed by the more rapidly created side-to-side anastomoses. This article provides a review of the timing and purpose of endoscopic evaluation in postoperative CD patients and pragmatic information regarding interpretation of endoscopic findings at the different types of surgical anastomoses after ileocecal resection. PMID:27633596

  10. Mutation analysis of 28 gaucher disease patients: The Australasian experience

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, B.D.; Nelson, P.V.; Robertson, E.F.; Morris, C.P.

    1994-01-15

    Gaucher disease is the most common lysomal storage disease. It is an autosomal recessive disorder that results from a deficiency of {beta}-glucocerrebrosidase. Three clinical phenotypes have been described: non-neuronopathic, acute neuronopathic, and subacuteneuronopathic. Genomic DNA from 28 Australasian patients of diverse ethnic origin with Gaucher disease was screened for 3 common mutations (1226G, 1448C and 84GG) using the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS), and one uncommon mutation (1504T) by restriction enzyme digestion. Thirty-eight of the 56 independent alleles in these patients were characterized, with 1448C present in 42% and 1226G in 28% of the alleles. The 1226G mutation was associated only with the nonneuronopathic phenotype and 7 of the 15 patients who carried the 1448C mutation developed neuronopathic disease. Three infants who died in the neonatal period following a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative course carried no identifiable mutations. The 84GG mutation was carried by 2 Jewish patients and 1504T was present in one patient. It is now possible to rapidly identify the common Gaucher mutations using ARMS and restriction enzyme digestion, and our findings confirm the heterogeneity of mutations in Gaucher disease. It is also possible to predict in part the phenotypic outcome when screening patients for these mutations. The authors consider mutation analysis to be of most use in prenatal diagnosis and for carrier detection within affected families. 27 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Importance of Social Relationships in Patients with Chronic Respiratory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kurpas, Donata; Szwamel, Katarzyna; Mroczek, Bozena

    2016-01-01

    The literature lacks reports on the role of the social relationships domain (SRD) of quality of life (QoL) in shaping care for patients with chronic respiratory diseases in primary care. In this study we examined a group of 582 patients with chronic respiratory diseases and chronic non-respiratory diseases recruited from 199 primary care centers. In the patients with chronic respiratory diseases, higher SRD correlated with more frequent patient visits due to medical issue, fewer district nurse interventions over the past 12 months, less frequent hospitalizations over the past 3 years, and fewer chronic diseases. In these patients, a high SRD was most effectively created by high QoL in the Psychological, Environmental, and Physical domains, and the satisfaction with QoL. Programs for preventing a decline in SRD should include patients with low scores in the Psychological, Environmental, and Physical domains, those who show no improvement in mental or somatic well-being in the past 12 months, those with a low level of positive mental attitudes, unhealthy eating habits, and with low levels of met needs. Such programs should include older widows and widowers without permanent relationships, with only primary education, living far from a primary care center, and those whose visits were not due to a medical issue.

  12. Importance of Social Relationships in Patients with Chronic Respiratory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kurpas, Donata; Szwamel, Katarzyna; Mroczek, Bozena

    2016-01-01

    The literature lacks reports on the role of the social relationships domain (SRD) of quality of life (QoL) in shaping care for patients with chronic respiratory diseases in primary care. In this study we examined a group of 582 patients with chronic respiratory diseases and chronic non-respiratory diseases recruited from 199 primary care centers. In the patients with chronic respiratory diseases, higher SRD correlated with more frequent patient visits due to medical issue, fewer district nurse interventions over the past 12 months, less frequent hospitalizations over the past 3 years, and fewer chronic diseases. In these patients, a high SRD was most effectively created by high QoL in the Psychological, Environmental, and Physical domains, and the satisfaction with QoL. Programs for preventing a decline in SRD should include patients with low scores in the Psychological, Environmental, and Physical domains, those who show no improvement in mental or somatic well-being in the past 12 months, those with a low level of positive mental attitudes, unhealthy eating habits, and with low levels of met needs. Such programs should include older widows and widowers without permanent relationships, with only primary education, living far from a primary care center, and those whose visits were not due to a medical issue. PMID:27358182

  13. Hepatitis B Serology in Patients with Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Feuchtenberger, Martin; Schäfer, Arne; Philipp Nigg, Axel; Rupert Kraus, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: Only limited data are available on the prevalence of hepatitis B in patients with proven rheumatic diseases and thus the risk of reactivation under immunosuppressive therapy. Objective: To analyse hepatitis B serology in patients with rheumatic diseases prior to therapy. Method: In total, 1,338 patient records were analysed for HBsAg, HBsAb and HBcAb in a cross-sectional, single-centre study between 2011 and 2015 at first presentation. Data acquisition was realized using electronic patient files created during routine care. The main variables considered as predictors for HBV reactivation included (i) the exact type of rheumatic disease and (ii) the therapeutically induced immunosuppression. Results: Overall, 5.9% of patients (n=79) had proven contact with hepatitis B (HBcAb positive), and HBsAb were not detected in 1.3% (n=18). The rate of vaccinated subjects was 7.8%. HBsAg was detected in 3 patients (0.2%). In addition, 70.3% of patients were treated during the course of rheumatologic disease previously or currently with glucocorticoids, 85.2% with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and 20.1% with a biologic agent (e.g., anti-IL-6, anti-TNFalpha, anti-CD20, CTLA4Ig or anti-IL-12/23). Conclusion: Prevalence of hepatitis B serostatus in the analysed rheumatic patients regarding HBs-Ag and HBcAb with or without HBsAb prior to therapy does not differ from the data published for the general population in Germany. However, the rate of hepatitis B vaccinated patients was lower. In general, a significant portion of patients (5.9%) has been exposed to HBV and therefore exhibited an increased risk of reactivation of hepatitis B when undergoing immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:27708728

  14. Evidence for severe atherosclerotic changes in chronic hemodialysis patients: comparative autopsy study against cardiovascular disease patients without chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Chigure; Nakamura, Satoko; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Yoshihara, Fumiki; Kawano, Yuhei

    2011-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major cause of mortality and morbidity among hemodialysis patients, but whether it is more severe in hemodialysis patients than in cardiovascular disease patients without chronic kidney disease is unclear. We examined 46 autopsy patients who had undergone hemodialysis, and age and sex-matched 46 patients with cardiovascular disease and an eGFR of >60 mL/min/1.73 m(2). There was no difference in the prevalence of diabetes or hypertension between the groups. We divided the aorta into four segments: A, ascending artery to arch; B, descending artery to diaphragm; C, suprarenal; and D, infrarenal. We used the classification of the American Heart Association to evaluate atherosclerosis progression. Distribution was scored by the extent to which each segment was damaged: 0, none; 1, less than 1/3; 2, more than 1/3 to less than 2/3; 3, more than 2/3. Histological examination revealed that the progression score (P < 0.05) and distribution score (P<0.005) were more severe in the hemodialysis group, especially in segment A. Regression analysis showed that atherosclerosis of segment A was related to age, gender, dyslipidemia, smoking, hemodialysis therapy, and hemodialysis duration. In hemodialysis patients, atherosclerotic changes in the aorta were more severe than in cardiovascular disease patients with an eGFR of >60 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Aortic atherosclerosis was aggravated by traditional and chronic kidney disease-related risk factors.

  15. Phenotype-genotype correlations in patients with Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ferenci, Peter

    2014-05-01

    There is considerable phenotypic variation in Wilson's disease (WD). Some patients present with hepatic disease during the first decade of life and some with neurological degeneration in adolescence or adult life, with or without overt liver disease. Although the absence of neurologic disease in patients with liver disease in childhood or adolescence can be explained by the limited time exposure of the central nervous system to copper toxicity, it is surprising that late-onset neurologic WD can occur without any evidence of liver involvement. This huge variability in the clinical presentation of WD in general reflects our limited knowledge on the natural history of WD. Genetic association studies require the phenotype to be defined as accurately as possible.

  16. Management of Alcohol Dependence in Patients with Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Addolorato, Giovanni; Mirijello, Antonio; Leggio, Lorenzo; Ferrulli, Anna; Landolfi, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol dependence represents a chronic and relapsing disease affecting nearly 10% of the general population both in the United States and in Europe, with a widespread burden of morbidity and mortality. Alcohol dependence represents the most common cause of liver damage in the Western Countries. Although alcoholic liver disease is associated primarily with heavy drinking, continued alcohol consumption, even in low doses after the onset of liver disease, increases the risk of severe consequences, including mortality. Consequently the ideal treatment of patients affected by alcohol dependence and alcoholic liver disease should aim at achieving long-term total alcohol abstinence and preventing relapse. The aim of the present review is to provide an update on the management of alcohol dependence in patients with alcoholic liver disease. Increasing evidences suggests the usefulness of psychosocial interventions and medications combined in order to reduce alcohol intake, promote abstinence and prevent relapse in alcohol dependent patients. Disulfiram, naltrexone and acamprosate have been approved for this indication; gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is approved in Italy and Austria. However, these drugs have not been tested in patients with advanced liver disease. Amongst other emerging pharmacotherapies for alcoholism, topiramate, ondansetron, and baclofen seem the most promising ones. Both topiramate and ondansetron hold a safe profile in alcoholic patients; however, none of them has been tested in alcoholic patients with advanced liver disease. To date, baclofen represents the only anti-craving medication formally tested in a randomized clinical trial in alcoholic patients affected by liver cirrhosis, although additional confirmatory studies are warranted. PMID:23456576

  17. Excessive daytime sleepiness in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Knie, Bettina; Mitra, M Tanya; Logishetty, Kartik; Chaudhuri, K Ray

    2011-03-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is described as inappropriate and undesirable sleepiness during waking hours and is a common non-motor symptom in Parkinson's disease, affecting up to 50% of patients. EDS has a large impact on the quality of life of Parkinson's disease patients as well as of their caregivers, in some cases even more than the motor symptoms of the disease. Drug-induced EDS is a particular problem as many dopamine agonists used for the treatment of Parkinson's disease have EDS as an adverse effect. Dopaminergic treatment may also render a subset of Parkinson's disease patients at risk for sudden-onset sleep attacks that occur without warning and can be particularly hazardous if the patient is driving. This demonstrates the need for early recognition and management not only to increase health-related quality of life but also to ensure patient safety. There are many assessment tools for EDS, including the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT), although only the Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS) and the SCales for Outcomes in PArkinson's Disease-Sleep (SCOPA-S) are specifically validated for Parkinson's disease. Polysomnography can be used when necessary. Management comprises non-pharmacological and pharmacological approaches. Non-pharmacological approaches can be the mainstay of treatment for mild to moderate EDS. Advice on good sleep hygiene is instrumental, as pharmacological approaches have yet to provide consistent and reliable results without significant adverse effects. The efficacy of pharmacological treatment of EDS in Parkinson's disease using wakefulness-promoting drugs such as modafinil remains controversial. Further areas of research are now also focusing on adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists, sodium oxybate and caffeine to promote wakefulness. A definitive treatment for the highly prevalent drug-induced EDS has not yet been found. PMID:21323392

  18. [Verbal ability of Alzheimer's disease patients and very elderly control patients using the Aachen aphasia test].

    PubMed

    Ecklin, R; Schönenberger, P M

    1992-01-01

    We assessed language function, using the Aachen aphasia test (AAT), in 14 subjects with Alzheimer's disease and 6 control patients. Aphasia did not occur in control patients, but in 11 of 14 Alzheimer's disease patients. Impairment of object naming was the most prevalent abnormality. Performance in AAT subtests repetition, written language, object naming, comprehension and token test correlated strongly with Mini-Mental State scores.

  19. Inspiratory muscle training in the patient with neuromuscular disease.

    PubMed

    McCool, F D; Tzelepis, G E

    1995-11-01

    Pulmonary complications due to respiratory muscle dysfunction are commonly a source of morbidity and mortality in patients with neuromuscular diseases. This review discusses the adverse effects of respiratory muscle weakness on pulmonary mechanics and examines the role that inspiratory muscle training may play in reversing pulmonary dysfunction in these individuals. In asymptomatic persons, it is well established that the inspiratory muscles can be trained to increase both force and endurance. In patients with neuromuscular diseases, the effects of training protocols on force and endurance are more controversial. This article reviews seven studies that have evaluated respiratory muscle training in a total of 75 patients with varied neuromuscular disorders. Training regimens included breathing through inspiratory resistive loads and isocapnic hyperpnea. Despite methodologic differences among studies, investigators have generally shown that the inspiratory muscles are similar to other skeletal muscle groups in that they can be trained for both force and endurance in these patients. The training-related improvements in inspiratory muscle performance are more pronounced in patients who are less severely affected by their disease. In those patients who have disease to the extent that they are already retaining carbon dioxide, there is little change in force or endurance with training. In these individuals, the inspiratory muscles may already be working at a level sufficiently severe to provide a training stimulus with each breath. No adverse effects of inspiratory muscle training were reported. Inspiratory muscle training can improve force and endurance in patients with neuromuscular weakness.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7480122

  20. Sclerostin serum levels in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Roldán, Concepción; Genre, Fernanda; López-Mejías, Raquel; Ubilla, Begoña; Mijares, Verónica; Cano, Daniel Sánchez; Robles, Concepción López; Callejas-Rubio, José Luis; Fernández, Raquel Ríos; Ruiz, Manuela Expósito; González-Gay, Miguel Á; Ortego Centeno, Norberto

    2016-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases (SADs) are associated with lower bone mass and an increased risk of fractures. Sclerostin has a pivotal role in bone metabolism. Available data on circulating sclerostin levels in healthy subjects are limited, whereas those in SAD patients are absent. Our objective was to determine circulating sclerostin concentrations in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc) and Crohn's disease (CD) patients, and to analyze the factors associated with sclerostin concentrations. In this cross-sectional case-control study, serum sclerostin levels were measured in 38 SLE patients, 20 CD patients, 8 SSc patients and 20 healthy controls using a sclerostin ELISA. The mean values of the sclerostin (95% confidence interval) were 35.36 pmol l(-1) (12-101) in patients and 33.92 pmol l(-1) (2.31-100) in control subjects. The mean sclerostin value was 36.4 pmol l(-1) (22.1-48.5) in SLE patients, 26.7 pmol l(-1) (17.3-36.3) in CD patients and 51.8 pmol l(-1) (26.5-77.1) in SSc patients (P=0.001). Serum sclerostin levels were positively correlated with age (P<0.001), body mass index (BMI) (P=0.01) and lumbar spine Z-score (P=0.001) and negatively with creatinine clearance (P=0.001). Glucocorticoid treatment did not affect sclerostin levels. Sclerostin levels seem to have a heterogeneous pattern in different autoimmune diseases. SLE and SSc patients did not differ from healthy controls regarding sclerostin levels. The CD group had significantly lower values compared with SSc patients. Factors associated with sclerostin levels in autoimmune diseases seem to be the same than in the general population. PMID:26909149

  1. Endostatin level in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Salza, Romain; Oudart, Jean-Baptiste; Ramont, Laurent; Maquart, François-Xavier; Bakchine, Serge; Thoannès, Henri; Ricard-Blum, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the level of endostatin, a fragment of collagen XVIII that accumulates in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), in the cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. The concentrations of total protein, endostatin, amyloid-β1-42 peptide, tau, and hyperphosphorylated tau proteins were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in CSF of patients with AD (n = 57), behavioral frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD, n = 22), non AD and non FTD dementia (nAD/nFTD, n = 84), and 45 subjects without neurodegenerative diseases. The statistical significance of the results was assessed by Mann-Whitney and Kruskal and Wallis tests, and by ROC analysis. The concentration of endostatin in CSF was higher than the levels of the three markers of AD both in control subjects and in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. The endostatin/amyloid-β1-42 ratio was significantly increased in patients with AD (257%, p < 0.0001) and nAD/nFTD (140%, p < 0.0001) compared to controls. The endostatin/tau protein ratio was significantly decreased in patients with AD (-49%, p < 0.0001) but was increased in bvFTD patients (89%, p < 0.0001) compared to controls. In the same way, the endostatin/hyperphosphorylated tau protein ratio was decreased in patients with AD (-21%, p = 0.0002) but increased in patients with bvFTD (81%, p = 0.0026), compared to controls. The measurement of endostatin in CSF and the calculation of its ratio relative to well-established AD markers improve the diagnosis of bvFTD patients and the discrimination of patients with AD from those with bvFTD and nAD/nFTD. PMID:25408220

  2. Cavernous sinus sampling in patients with Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Till; Flitsch, Jörg; van Leyen, Philine; Sauer, Nina; Aberle, Jens; Grzyska, Ulrich; Lüdecke, Dieter K

    2015-02-01

    OBJECT Correct diagnosis and precise localization of adenomas in patients with Cushing's disease are essential for avoiding unsuccessful transsphenoidal pituitary exploration. In addition to the well-established inferior petrosal sinus sampling, preoperative cavernous sinus sampling (CSS) was introduced as a potentially improved way to predict adenoma lateralization. The authors present their results with CSS in a consecutive series of patients with Cushing's disease. METHODS During 1999-2014, transsphenoidal surgeries were consecutively performed in 510 patients with Cushing's disease. For most patients, suppression of cortisol in high-dose dexamethasone tests and stimulation of adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol after administration of corticotropin-releasing hormone were sufficient to prove the diagnosis of adrenocorticotropic hormone-dependent hypercortisolism. Of the 510 patients, 67 (13%) were referred to the department of neuroradiology for CSS according to the technique of Teramoto. The indications for CSS were unclear endocrine test results or negative MRI results. Data for all patients were retrospectively analyzed. RESULTS A central/peripheral gradient was found in 59 patients; lateralization to the left or right side was found in 51. For 8 patients with a central/peripheral gradient, no left/right gradient could be determined. For another 8 patients with equivocal test results, no central/peripheral gradient was found. No severe CSS-associated complications were encountered. Of the 51 patients who underwent transsphenoidal surgery, the predicted lateralization was proven correct for 42 (82%). CONCLUSIONS As MRI techniques have improved, the number of potential candidates for this invasive method has decreased in the past decade. However, because detecting minute adenomas remains problematic, CSS remains a useful diagnostic tool for patients with Cushing's disease.

  3. Nonpharmacological treatments for patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bloem, Bastiaan R; de Vries, Nienke M; Ebersbach, Georg

    2015-09-15

    Since 2013, a number of studies have enhanced the literature and have guided clinicians on viable treatment interventions outside of pharmacotherapy and surgery. Thirty-three randomized controlled trials and one large observational study on exercise and physiotherapy were published in this period. Four randomized controlled trials focused on dance interventions, eight on treatment of cognition and behavior, two on occupational therapy, and two on speech and language therapy (the latter two specifically addressed dysphagia). Three randomized controlled trials focused on multidisciplinary care models, one study on telemedicine, and four studies on alternative interventions, including music therapy and mindfulness. These studies attest to the marked interest in these therapeutic approaches and the increasing evidence base that places nonpharmacological treatments firmly within the integrated repertoire of treatment options in Parkinson's disease. PMID:26274930

  4. Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in Patients with Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroid Disease among Chinese Population.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhiyuan; Zou, Jing; Zhao, Lingling; Cheng, Yan; Cai, Hanqing; Li, Mo; Liu, Edwin; Yu, Liping; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity or tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGA) amongst patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in the Chinese population remains unknown. This study examined the rate of celiac disease autoimmunity amongst patients with T1D and AITD in the Chinese population. The study included 178 patients with type 1 diabetes and 119 with AITD where 36 had both T1D and AITD, classified as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 variant (APS3v). The study also included 145 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), 97 patients with non-autoimmune thyroid disease (NAITD), and 102 healthy controls. Serum islet autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies and TGA were measured by radioimmunoassay. TGA positivity was found in 22% of patients with either type 1 diabetes or AITD, much higher than that in patients with T2D (3.4%; p< 0.0001) or NAITD (3.1%; P < 0.0001) or healthy controls (1%; p<0.0001). The patients with APS3v having both T1D and AITD were 36% positive for TGA, significantly higher than patients with T1D alone (p = 0.040) or with AITD alone (p = 0.017). T1D and AITD were found to have a 20% and 30% frequency of overlap respectively at diagnosis. In conclusion, TGA positivity was high in the Chinese population having existing T1D and/or AITD, and even higher when both diseases were present. Routine TGA screening in patients with T1D or AITD will be important to early identify celiac disease autoimmunity for better clinical care of patients. PMID:27427767

  5. Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in Patients with Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroid Disease among Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhiyuan; Zou, Jing; Zhao, Lingling; Cheng, Yan; Cai, Hanqing; Li, Mo; Liu, Edwin; Yu, Liping; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity or tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGA) amongst patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in the Chinese population remains unknown. This study examined the rate of celiac disease autoimmunity amongst patients with T1D and AITD in the Chinese population. The study included 178 patients with type 1 diabetes and 119 with AITD where 36 had both T1D and AITD, classified as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 variant (APS3v). The study also included 145 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), 97 patients with non-autoimmune thyroid disease (NAITD), and 102 healthy controls. Serum islet autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies and TGA were measured by radioimmunoassay. TGA positivity was found in 22% of patients with either type 1 diabetes or AITD, much higher than that in patients with T2D (3.4%; p< 0.0001) or NAITD (3.1%; P < 0.0001) or healthy controls (1%; p<0.0001). The patients with APS3v having both T1D and AITD were 36% positive for TGA, significantly higher than patients with T1D alone (p = 0.040) or with AITD alone (p = 0.017). T1D and AITD were found to have a 20% and 30% frequency of overlap respectively at diagnosis. In conclusion, TGA positivity was high in the Chinese population having existing T1D and/or AITD, and even higher when both diseases were present. Routine TGA screening in patients with T1D or AITD will be important to early identify celiac disease autoimmunity for better clinical care of patients. PMID:27427767

  6. Myocardial performance and perfusion during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease caused by Kawasaki disease

    SciTech Connect

    Paridon, S.M.; Ross, R.D.; Kuhns, L.R.; Pinsky, W.W. )

    1990-01-01

    For a study of the natural history of coronary artery lesions after Kawasaki disease and their effect on myocardial blood flow reserve with exercise, five such patients underwent exercise testing on a bicycle. Oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, minute ventilation, and electrocardiograms were monitored continuously. Thallium-201 scintigraphy was performed for all patients. One patient stopped exercise before exhaustion of cardiovascular reserve but had no evidence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities. Four patients terminated exercise because of exhaustion of cardiovascular reserve; one had normal cardiovascular reserve and thallium scintiscans, but the remaining patients had diminished cardiovascular reserve. Thallium scintigrams showed myocardial ischemia in two and infarction in one. No patient had exercise-induced electrocardiographic changes. These results indicate that patients with residual coronary artery lesions after Kawasaki disease frequently have reduced cardiovascular reserve during exercise. The addition of thallium scintigraphy and metabolic measurements to exercise testing improved the detection of exercise-induced abnormalities of myocardial perfusion.

  7. Vitamin D deficiency in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Jane

    2016-08-11

    There are over 300 000 people in the UK affected by inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Though vitamin D deficiency is common in patients with IBD, National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance regarding vitamin D supplementation does not address the needs of patients with chronic inflammatory diseases. However, there is growing evidence that vitamin D plays an important role in the management of IBD. Nurses caring for patients with IBD should have an understanding of the causes and consequences of vitamin D deficiency in this patient group. This article looks at the role vitamin D plays in the body and the challenges of treating deficiency. Consideration is given to diet, sun exposure and supplementation as possible treatments and acknowledges the limitations of treatments for patients with IBD. With a lack of clear national guidance, it is hoped that raising awareness of these issues will inform nursing practice and ensure a holistic approach to care. PMID:27523756

  8. Multidisciplinary Care of the Patient with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kuzma, Anne Marie; Meli, Yvonne; Meldrum, Catherine; Jellen, Patricia; Butler-Lebair, Marianne; Koczen-Doyle, Debra; Rising, Peter; Stavrolakes, Kim; Brogan, Frances

    2008-01-01

    The National Emphysema Treatment Trial used a multidisciplinary team approach to implement the maximum medical care protocol, including adjustment of medications and outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation for all patients and nutritional and psychological counseling as needed. This article discusses the benefits of such an approach in the care of the patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Team member roles complement each other and contribute to the goal of providing the highest-quality medical care. The primary focus of the team is to reinforce the medical plan and to provide patient education and support. This article reviews the elements of the initial patient assessment and the functional and nutritional assessment. Patient education focuses on medication use, recognition and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation symptoms, smoking cessation, advance directives, and travel. PMID:18453373

  9. [Integrated care for patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Jassem, Ewa; Górecka, Dorota; Krakowiak, Piotr; Kozielski, Jerzy; Słomiński, J Marek; Krajnik, Małgorzata; Fal, Andrzej M

    2010-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third cause of mortality and disability (assessed by DALY) among patients above 60 year old. Severe and very severe COPD (FEV(1) = equal or less than 50% and 30% of expected value, respectively) is estimated at 20% of all COPD patients. Advanced COPD usually leads to physical and mental deterioration, the patients often manage with the problems caused by the disease and other comorbidities poorly. This leads to increased risk of COPD exacerbations and further deterioration of the patient's status, increased costs of medical care and eventually increased risk of death. Current organization of medical care for those patients does not provide adequate health and social support for them. However, it seems that introducing an integrated approach proposed by World Health Organization, could improve the situation of advanced COPD patients. In Poland, this kind of care has been provided in advanced cancer patients throughout stationary palliative care units and hospices during the last several years. This experience should be helpful in integrating actions of general practitioners and specialized nurses, as well as providing access for the specialists' consultations according to the individual needs of the patients. It should also allow for broad cooperation with auxiliary staff, such as social workers, medical assistants and volunteers, as well as psychologists and clergymen (especially in the terminal phase of the disease).

  10. Differential diagnosis of 201 possible Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients.

    PubMed

    Van Everbroeck, Bart; Dobbeleir, Itte; De Waele, Michele; De Deyn, Peter; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Cras, Patrick

    2004-03-01

    Our objective was to describe the clinical signs of 'possible' Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and to investigate whether current diagnostic criteria can accurately differentiate between different forms of dementia. We studied clinical data of 'definite' CJD, Alzheimer's disease (AD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and vascular dementia (VD) patients. Two subgroups were used: the first consisted of patients with clinical signs compatible with 'possible' CJD but in whom another final diagnosis was made and a second group with a typical evolution of the respective dementia. More focal neurological deficits were observed in AD, DLB or VD patients initially classified as 'possible' CJD than in typical patients. A typical electroencephalogram showing periodic sharp wave complexes was observed in 26 (50%) CJD and 6% of other dementia patients. The 14-3-3 protein was detected in all CJD and 8% of other dementia patients. In patients with rapidly progressive dementia and focal neurological signs, CJD should be considered. When faced with the triad: dementia, myoclonus, and initial memory problems AD should be considered if the disease duration is longer than 1 year. The diagnosis of DLB is suggested, if Parkinsonism or fluctuations are present, whereas a focal onset and compatible brain imaging can indicate VD. Findings suggestive of CJD on EEG, brain imaging, and CSF do not exclude other dementias but make them very unlikely. These observations cannot only assist in the differential diagnosis of CJD but also with the identification of AD, DLB or VD patients with atypical clinical history.

  11. [Why screen for lung cancer in patients with arterial disease?].

    PubMed

    Lederlin, M; Trédaniel, J; Priollet, P

    2015-12-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death in France. Such a prognosis is explained by late diagnosis at a metastatic stage for half of the patients. Tobacco is the main risk factor for lung cancer, as it is for peripheral arterial disease. A review of literature shows that between 2.3% and 19% of patients with arterial disease also have lung cancer. When lung cancer is detected after treatment of arterial disease, it is at an advanced stage. But it can be diagnosed at an early stage when it is searched simultaneously with arterial disease treatment. There is no recommendation for lung cancer screening specifically for patients with arterial disease. However individual screening based on an annual low-dose chest scan is proposed for smokers meeting the criteria defined by the study of the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST). Such screening has two disadvantages : the high number of false positives and the irradiation induced by the accumulation of examinations. The ISET method would alternatively help to identify circulating tumor cells on a simple blood test for subjects not yet at solid tumor stage, provided this method be subject to multicentric validation. Thus one could consider that the management of a patient with arterial disease meeting NLST criteria should be accompanied with screening for lung cancer by searching for tumor cells associated with low-dose scanner.

  12. [Individual in-patient and out-patient prevention in occupational skin diseases].

    PubMed

    Skudlik, C; Weisshaar, E

    2015-03-01

    Concerning all occupation-related diseases, one-third of those reported in Germany are skin diseases. Among them, contact dermatitis is the most frequent skin disease. It usually presents as hand eczema leading to a loss of function and ability to work as well as reduced quality of life. Due to the high demand a number of prevention programmes were introduced. They comprise measures of secondary (out-patient) and tertiary (in-patient) prevention. Out-patient prevention measures include dermatologist's report and occupation-tailored teaching and prevention programmes. If the occupational skin disease is severe, therapy is not successful or the diagnosis is not clear measures of tertiary prevention can be offered as an in-patient treatment and prevention programme. All this aims to prevent the job loss of the patient. Preventive measures in occupational dermatology have proven to be very effective in recent years, especially measures of individual in-patient and out-patient prevention as components of a complex hierarchical prevention concept. This integrated concept of an in-patient/out-patient disease management reveals remarkable pertinent effectivity for patients with severe occupational dermatoses in risk professions.

  13. Chronic Lyme disease: misconceptions and challenges for patient management

    PubMed Central

    Halperin, John J

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease, infection with the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, causes both specific and nonspecific symptoms. In untreated chronic infection, specific manifestations such as a relapsing large-joint oligoarthritis can persist for years, yet subside with appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Nervous system involvement occurs in 10%–15% of untreated patients and typically involves lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, and/or mononeuritis multiplex; in some rare cases, patients have parenchymal inflammation in the brain or spinal cord. Nervous system infection is similarly highly responsive to antimicrobial therapy, including oral doxycycline. Nonspecific symptoms such as fatigue, perceived cognitive slowing, headache, and others occur in patients with Lyme disease and are indistinguishable from comparable symptoms occurring in innumerable other inflammatory states. There is no evidence that these nonspecific symptoms reflect nervous system infection or damage, or that they are in any way specific to or diagnostic of this or other tick-borne infections. When these symptoms occur in patients with Lyme disease, they typically also subside after antimicrobial treatment, although this may take time. Chronic fatigue states have been reported to occur following any number of infections, including Lyme disease. The mechanism underlying this association is unclear, although there is no evidence in any of these infections that these chronic posttreatment symptoms are attributable to ongoing infection with B. burgdorferi or any other identified organism. Available appropriately controlled studies indicate that additional or prolonged courses of antimicrobial therapy do not benefit patients with a chronic fatigue-like state after appropriately treated Lyme disease. PMID:26028977

  14. Chronic Lyme disease: misconceptions and challenges for patient management.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease, infection with the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, causes both specific and nonspecific symptoms. In untreated chronic infection, specific manifestations such as a relapsing large-joint oligoarthritis can persist for years, yet subside with appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Nervous system involvement occurs in 10%-15% of untreated patients and typically involves lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, and/or mononeuritis multiplex; in some rare cases, patients have parenchymal inflammation in the brain or spinal cord. Nervous system infection is similarly highly responsive to antimicrobial therapy, including oral doxycycline. Nonspecific symptoms such as fatigue, perceived cognitive slowing, headache, and others occur in patients with Lyme disease and are indistinguishable from comparable symptoms occurring in innumerable other inflammatory states. There is no evidence that these nonspecific symptoms reflect nervous system infection or damage, or that they are in any way specific to or diagnostic of this or other tick-borne infections. When these symptoms occur in patients with Lyme disease, they typically also subside after antimicrobial treatment, although this may take time. Chronic fatigue states have been reported to occur following any number of infections, including Lyme disease. The mechanism underlying this association is unclear, although there is no evidence in any of these infections that these chronic posttreatment symptoms are attributable to ongoing infection with B. burgdorferi or any other identified organism. Available appropriately controlled studies indicate that additional or prolonged courses of antimicrobial therapy do not benefit patients with a chronic fatigue-like state after appropriately treated Lyme disease.

  15. Chronic Lyme disease: misconceptions and challenges for patient management.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease, infection with the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, causes both specific and nonspecific symptoms. In untreated chronic infection, specific manifestations such as a relapsing large-joint oligoarthritis can persist for years, yet subside with appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Nervous system involvement occurs in 10%-15% of untreated patients and typically involves lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, and/or mononeuritis multiplex; in some rare cases, patients have parenchymal inflammation in the brain or spinal cord. Nervous system infection is similarly highly responsive to antimicrobial therapy, including oral doxycycline. Nonspecific symptoms such as fatigue, perceived cognitive slowing, headache, and others occur in patients with Lyme disease and are indistinguishable from comparable symptoms occurring in innumerable other inflammatory states. There is no evidence that these nonspecific symptoms reflect nervous system infection or damage, or that they are in any way specific to or diagnostic of this or other tick-borne infections. When these symptoms occur in patients with Lyme disease, they typically also subside after antimicrobial treatment, although this may take time. Chronic fatigue states have been reported to occur following any number of infections, including Lyme disease. The mechanism underlying this association is unclear, although there is no evidence in any of these infections that these chronic posttreatment symptoms are attributable to ongoing infection with B. burgdorferi or any other identified organism. Available appropriately controlled studies indicate that additional or prolonged courses of antimicrobial therapy do not benefit patients with a chronic fatigue-like state after appropriately treated Lyme disease. PMID:26028977

  16. Alterations of pulmonary function in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiao-Qing; Ji, Yan-Bo; Wang, Shan-Xin; Zhang, Cai-Qing; Lu, De-Gan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the alterations of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and their relationship with disease activity in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). METHODS: Sixty-four IBD patients (31 Crohn's disease [CD] and 33 ulcerative colitis [UC]) and thirty healthy individuals (controls) were studied with regard to the following parameters of PFTs: Forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), their ratio, mid-forced expiratory flow of 25–75% (FEF 25–75), residual volume, total lung capacity, and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO). The disease activity was calculated using the Crohn's Disease Activity Index for CD and Mayo Clinic Score for UC. Correlation analysis was performed between disease activity and sputum cytology and PFTs. RESULTS: Nineteen of the 31 CD patients (61.29%) and 17 of the 33 UC patients (51.52%) but none of the controls showed at least one abnormal PFTs (P < 0.05). Compared with controls, both CD and UC patients exhibited a significant reduction in FEV1 (P < 0.05), FVC (P < 0.05), FEF 25–75 (P < 0.05), and DLCO (P < 0.05). The majority with decreased measurements of PFTs were in the active phase of diseases (P < 0.05). IBD activity scores correlated negatively with some parameters of PFTs and positively with lymphocytosis and eosinophilia of sputum (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Pulmonary function disorders are significantly common in IBD patients. The impairment in active disease is significantly greater than in remission. PMID:27803750

  17. Altered Esophageal Mucosal Structure in Patients with Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pinto-Sánchez, María Inés; Nachman, Fabio D.; Fuxman, Claudia; Iantorno, Guido; Hwang, Hui Jer; Ditaranto, Andrés; Costa, Florencia; Longarini, Gabriela; Wang, Xuan Yu; Huang, Xianxi; Vázquez, Horacio; Moreno, María L.; Niveloni, Sonia; Bercik, Premysl; Smecuol, Edgardo; Mazure, Roberto; Bilder, Claudio; Mauriño, Eduardo C.; Verdu, Elena F.; Bai, Julio C.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim. Reflux symptoms (RS) are common in patients with celiac disease (CD), a chronic enteropathy that affects primarily the small intestine. We evaluated mucosal integrity and motility of the lower esophagus as mechanisms contributing to RS generation in patients with CD. Methods. We enrolled newly diagnosed CD patients with and without RS, nonceliac patients with classical reflux disease (GERD), and controls (without RS). Endoscopic biopsies from the distal esophagus were assessed for dilated intercellular space (DIS) by light microscopy and electron microscopy. Tight junction (TJ) mRNA proteins expression for zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-2 and claudin-3 (CLDN-2; CLDN-3) was determined using qRT-PCR. Results. DIS scores were higher in patients with active CD than in controls, but similar to GERD patients. The altered DIS was found even in CD patients without RS and normalized after one year of a gluten-free diet. CD patients with and without RS had lower expression of ZO-1 than controls. The expression of CLDN-2 and CLDN-3 was similar in CD and GERD patients. Conclusions. Our study shows that patients with active CD have altered esophageal mucosal integrity, independently of the presence of RS. The altered expression of ZO-1 may underlie loss of TJ integrity in the esophageal mucosa and may contribute to RS generation. PMID:27446827

  18. Altered Esophageal Mucosal Structure in Patients with Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Sánchez, María Inés; Nachman, Fabio D; Fuxman, Claudia; Iantorno, Guido; Hwang, Hui Jer; Ditaranto, Andrés; Costa, Florencia; Longarini, Gabriela; Wang, Xuan Yu; Huang, Xianxi; Vázquez, Horacio; Moreno, María L; Niveloni, Sonia; Bercik, Premysl; Smecuol, Edgardo; Mazure, Roberto; Bilder, Claudio; Mauriño, Eduardo C; Verdu, Elena F; Bai, Julio C

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim. Reflux symptoms (RS) are common in patients with celiac disease (CD), a chronic enteropathy that affects primarily the small intestine. We evaluated mucosal integrity and motility of the lower esophagus as mechanisms contributing to RS generation in patients with CD. Methods. We enrolled newly diagnosed CD patients with and without RS, nonceliac patients with classical reflux disease (GERD), and controls (without RS). Endoscopic biopsies from the distal esophagus were assessed for dilated intercellular space (DIS) by light microscopy and electron microscopy. Tight junction (TJ) mRNA proteins expression for zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-2 and claudin-3 (CLDN-2; CLDN-3) was determined using qRT-PCR. Results. DIS scores were higher in patients with active CD than in controls, but similar to GERD patients. The altered DIS was found even in CD patients without RS and normalized after one year of a gluten-free diet. CD patients with and without RS had lower expression of ZO-1 than controls. The expression of CLDN-2 and CLDN-3 was similar in CD and GERD patients. Conclusions. Our study shows that patients with active CD have altered esophageal mucosal integrity, independently of the presence of RS. The altered expression of ZO-1 may underlie loss of TJ integrity in the esophageal mucosa and may contribute to RS generation. PMID:27446827

  19. [Perioperative myocardial ischemia in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive diseases].

    PubMed

    Rapp, H J; Buselmeier, P; Gasteiger, P; Hoberg, E; Striebel, J P

    1990-04-01

    Patients with peripheral vascular disease (PVD) often have coronary artery disease (CAD) which means an increased risk during anesthesia. The prevalence of CAD is nearly 50% among such patients. Owing to claudication, diagnostic stress tests can rarely be performed in PVD patients. In order to evaluate the frequency of transient perioperative myocardial ischemia, Holter monitoring was performed in 30 consecutive PVD patients with ASA II-III and AVK scale (Fontaine) II-IV who were undergoing femoropopliteal bypass surgery. Patients who had left bundle branch block and left ventricular hypertrophy or were taking digitalis medication were excluded from Holter monitoring. The ST-segment analysis of the frequency modulated recordings (n = 19) revealed episodes of myocardial ischemia in 26% of the patients. Most (75%) of the episodes occurred preoperatively, and 25%, during or after the anesthesia or during preparation for it. Risk factors for CAD were more often found in patients with ST segment alterations than in patients without ST segment deviations, even though the preoperative antianginal medication administered was comparable in the two subgroups. It is concluded that in a considerable subset of PVD patients silent myocardial ischemia occurs, which can be related to the different perioperative intervals by means of ST segment analyses of Holter recordings. The ST segment may allow a better insight into the cardiac state of PVD patients. Further studies are necessary in larger populations to test our suspicion.

  20. Patient Experiences of Depression and Anxiety with Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    DeJean, D; Giacomini, M; Vanstone, M; Brundisini, F

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression and anxiety are highly prevalent in patients with chronic disease, but remain undertreated despite significant negative consequences on patient health. A number of clinical groups have developed recommendations for depression screening practices in the chronic disease population. Objectives The objective of this analysis was to review empirical qualitative research on the experiences of patients with chronic disease (e.g., COPD, diabetes, heart disease, stroke) and comorbid depression or anxiety, and to highlight the implications of the screening and management of anxiety and/or depression on chronic disease outcomes. Review Methods We performed literature searches for studies published from January 2002 to May 2012. We applied a qualitative mega-filter to nine condition-specific search filters. Titles and abstracts were reviewed by two reviewers and, for the studies that met the eligibility criteria, full-text articles were obtained. Qualitative meta-synthesis was used to integrate findings across relevant published primary research studies. Qualitative meta-synthesis produced a synthesis of evidence that both retained the original meaning of the authors and offered a new, integrative interpretation of the phenomenon through a process of comparing and contrasting findings across studies. Results The findings of 20 primary qualitative studies were synthesized. Patients tended to experience their chronic conditions and anxiety or depression as either independent or inter-related (i.e., the chronic disease lead to depression/anxiety, the depression/anxiety lead to the chronic disease, or the two conditions exacerbated each other). Potential barriers to screening for depression or anxiety were also identified. Limitations A wider array of issues might have been captured if the analysis had focused on broader psychological responses to the chronic disease experience. However, given the objective to highlight implications for screening for anxiety

  1. Intestinal permeability in patients with coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis.

    PubMed Central

    Bjarnason, I; Marsh, M N; Price, A; Levi, A J; Peters, T J

    1985-01-01

    Intestinal permeability was investigated in patients with coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis by a 51Chromium-labelled ethylenediaminetetraacetate (51Cr-EDTA) absorption test and the results correlated with histomorphometric analysis and intraepithelial lymphocyte counts of jejunal biopsies. The mean (+/- SD) 24 hour urine excretion of 51Cr-EDTA in 34 healthy volunteers was 1.9 +/- 0.5% of the orally administered test dose. Patients with untreated coeliac disease (19) or untreated dermatitis herpetiformis (five) excreted significantly more 51Cr-EDTA than controls (5.9 +/- 2.7% and 4.6 +/- 2.1%, respectively, p less than 0.001) and all were outside the normal range of 1.0-2.6%. Patients with coeliac disease (42) treated for 6 months-23 years (mean 5 years) and patients with dermatitis herpetiformis (11) treated for 6 months-8 years (mean 3 years) excreted significantly more 51Cr-EDTA than controls, 4.2 +/- 2.4% p less than 0.0001 and 3.0 +/- 0.9% p less than 0.003 respectively. Eleven of 14 (79%) treated patients with coeliac disease with an entirely normal jejunal mucosae demonstrated abnormal intestinal permeability. Intestinal permeability did not correlate significantly with either the mucosal height/crypt depth ratio or intraepithelial lymphocyte counts in jejunal biopsies from patients with untreated or treated coeliac disease. The demonstration of a persistent increase in intestinal permeability in patients with both coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis may suggest a common pathogenetic mechanism in both disorders. It is postulated that altered permeability may facilitate the entry of gluten or a fraction thereof into the lamina propria where it causes a cascade of immunological events. PMID:3934051

  2. The Renal Histopathology Spectrum of Elderly Patients with Kidney Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ping; Zhou, Fu-de; Zhao, Ming-hui

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The elderly population has significantly increased in China. However, data regarding renal histopathology in this population is lacking. The present study retrospectively analyzed renal disease spectrum of 430 elderly patients who had received renal biopsy at Peking University First Hospital between January 2003 and December 2012. Among 6049 patients receiving renal biopsies during the same period, 430 (7.10%) were elderly (≥65 years). The ratio of male (263 patients) to female (167 patients) was 1.57:1, with an age of 70.29 ± 3.99 (range 65–82) years at the time of biopsy. The most common indication for renal biopsy was nephrotic syndrome (59.53%), followed by acute kidney injury (AKI, 19.53%) and chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN, 16.05%). The most common renal histopathology in primary glomerular disease was idiopathic membranous nephropathy (iMN, 61.02%), followed by IgA nephropathy (18.22%), minimal change disease (MCD, 9.32%) and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (6.78%). ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV, 43.95%) was the leading secondary glomerular disease, followed by HBV-related glomerulonephritis (HBV-GN, 24.2%), and amyloidosis (14.01%). In patients with nephrotic syndrome, iMN (50%) was the leading cause, followed by HBV-GN (16.02%), MCD (7.81%), and amyloidosis (7.81%). In patients with iMN, 89.5% presented as nephrotic syndrome, 8.39% as CGN. In patients with AKI, the leading cause was AAV (48.12%), followed by acute interstitial nephritis (20.48%) and acute tubular necrosis (8.43%). In conclusion, in elderly Chinese patients, the most common renal histopathology pattern was iMN in patients with nephrotic syndrome, and AAV in patients with AKI. PMID:25526441

  3. Nononcologic Disease in Patients with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lowitz, Barry B.; Benjamin, Robert S.

    1977-01-01

    Nononcologic medical problems are common in patients with cancer. Failure to evaluate and treat these problems leads to considerable morbidity and mortality in people who often have potential for both comfortable and productive lives. While a physician is sometimes powerless to prevent the progression of underlying cancer, he must not allow a diagnostic category to color his approach. By seeing only an end point which is inevitable for all people, one could be inclined not to treat what is treatable. With clinical judgment, information and the eternal question of diagnosticians, “What else could this be?”, a physician can focus not on the inevitability of death but on the quality of life. PMID:878475

  4. Anesthetic Management of a Pediatric Patient With Wilsons Disease

    PubMed Central

    Baykal, Mehmet; Karapolat, Sami

    2010-01-01

    Wilsons disease, characterized by cirrhosis, extrapyramidal symptoms and Kayser-Fleischer corneal rings, is a rare hereditary disease of human copper metabolism. Clinical findings in Wilsons disease are complex and neurological symptoms such as tremor, dysarthria, rigid dystonia, seizures, psychiatric disorders, acute liver failure, chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis may develop. A 4-year-old male patient was operated for traumatic depressed skull fracture and intracerebral hematoma. He was diagnosed with Wilsons disease at the age of 2.5 years and treated with zinc sulphate and D-penicillamine. General anesthesia was induced with propofol, fentanyl, atracurium, and maintained with isoflurane, and oxygen. No complications were encountered during the operation or in the postoperative period. We concluded that general anesthesia can successfully be given to Wilsons disease patients using an anesthetic agent, the metabolism of which is least affected by the liver disease, one that induces least hepatic toxicity. By close follow-up of patients clinically and biochemically, it is possible to reduce the complication rates to a minimum. Keywords Wilson's Disease; Craniocerebral trauma; Thoracic injuries; General anesthesia; Surgery PMID:21811529

  5. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy in patient with Crohn's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Sung-Min; Park, Ki Jeong; Ha, Yong-Chan

    2014-05-01

    Numerous causes of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) have been reported. Commonly, secondary osteoarthropathy accompanies pulmonary diseases such as carcinoma of the lung, pleural tumors, lung abscesses, and bronchiectasis. However, HOA in inflammatory bowel disease is a rare complication. There are only a few reports of secondary HOA with Crohn's disease. Our purpose was to report another case of HOA in Crohn's disease. We describe a case of a 27-year-old man with underlying Crohn's disease presenting with 2 years of pain in multiple joints. Radiographic findings suggested HOA in extremities. We performed a conservative treatment including medication and rehabilitations. The patient's symptoms were much improved at the latest follow-up. Although numerous studies on HOA have been published, the pathogenesis of HOA is still unclear. Various treatment modalities were recommended but further studies to uncover the pathogenesis of HOA with Crohn's disease and to establish a treatment modality are needed. PMID:25025001

  6. Nutritional Risk Screening in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Tan, Rongshao; Long, Jianting; Fang, Shi; Mai, Haiyan; Lu, Wei; Liu, Yan; Wei, Jianrui; Yan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge concerning nutritional status of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is limited. Nutritional Risk Screening-2002 (NRS-2002) has been used to evaluate the nutritional aspects of patients according to the recommendation of European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Here we aim to assess the prevalence and characteristics of nutritional risk in CKD patients by using NRS-2002. NRS-2002 scores of 292 CDK patients were recorded in first 24 hours subsequent to their admission to hospital. All patients have never been on dialysis. BMI, weight and various biochemical parameters were also characterized for these patients. Possible correlations between these parameters and NRS-2002 score were investigated. The overall prevalence of nutritional risk was 44.9% (53.6% in CKD stage 4-5 patients and 38.3% in stage 1-3 patients). Statistically significant differences were found in serum Albumin, Haemoglobin B, and lymphocyte counts between patients with or without increased nutritional risk. Under the situation that attending physicians were completely unaware of NRS-2002 scores, only 35.1% of the patients at risk received nutritional support. The nutritional risk status was associated with CKD stages but independent from primary diagnosis type. More attention should be paid to the nutritional status in CKD patients (including early stage patients). We recommended using NRS-2002 for nutritional risk assessment among non-dialysis CKD patients in routine clinical practice. PMID:27222407

  7. Palliative care for patients with end-stage liver disease.

    PubMed

    Larson, Anne M

    2015-05-01

    Liver disease results in over four million physician visits and over 750,000 hospitalizations per year in the USA. Those with chronic liver disease frequently progress to cirrhosis, end-stage liver disease (ESLD), and death. Patients with ESLD experience numerous complications, including muscle cramps, confusion (hepatic encephalopathy), protein calorie malnutrition, muscle wasting, fluid overload (ascites, edema), bleeding (esophagogastric variceal hemorrhage), infection (spontaneous bacterial peritonitis), fatigue, anxiety, and depression. Despite significant improvements in palliation of these complications, patients still suffer reduced quality of life and must confront the fact that their disease will often inexorably progress to death. Liver transplantation is a valid option in this setting, increasing the duration of survival and palliating many of the symptoms. However, many patients die waiting for an organ or are not candidates for transplantation due to comorbid illness. Others receive a transplant but succumb to complications of the transplant itself. Patients and families must struggle with simultaneously hoping for a cure while facing a life-threatening illness. Ideally, the combination of palliative care with life-sustaining therapy can maximize the patients' quality and quantity of life. If it becomes clear that life-sustaining therapy is no longer an option, these patients are then already in a system to help them with end-of-life care.

  8. Motor Sequence Learning Performance in Parkinson's Disease Patients Depends on the Stage of Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephan, Marianne A.; Meier, Beat; Zaugg, Sabine Weber; Kaelin-Lang, Alain

    2011-01-01

    It is still unclear, whether patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are impaired in the incidental learning of different motor sequences in short succession, although such a deficit might greatly impact their daily life. The aim of this study was thus to clarify the relation between disease parameters of PD and incidental motor learning of two…

  9. Management of renal stone disease in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Vujovic, Aleksandra; Keoghane, Stephen

    2007-12-01

    Obesity represents an increasing burden to health care resources. Nephrolithiasis is associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes and the consumption of diets rich in protein, fat and carbohydrates; this article addresses some of the pathophysiological mechanisms associated with stone formation in these patients. Management of stone disease can be more difficult in obese patients; even diagnosis can be problematic because imaging techniques are less sensitive in these patients. Treatment with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy and surgery in obese patients can be challenging, and outcome data for the different treatments are discussed in this Review.

  10. The Wired Patient: Patterns of Electronic Patient Portal Use Among Patients With Cardiac Disease or Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Jonathan P; Shah, Nirav R; Stewart, Walter F

    2015-01-01

    Background As providers develop an electronic health record–based infrastructure, patients are increasingly using Web portals to access their health information and participate electronically in the health care process. Little is known about how such portals are actually used. Objective In this paper, our goal was to describe the types and patterns of portal users in an integrated delivery system. Methods We analyzed 12 months of data from Web server log files on 2282 patients using a Web-based portal to their electronic health record (EHR). We obtained data for patients with cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes who had a Geisinger Clinic primary care provider and were registered “MyGeisinger” Web portal users. Hierarchical cluster analysis was applied to longitudinal data to profile users based on their frequency, intensity, and consistency of use. User types were characterized by basic demographic data from the EHR. Results We identified eight distinct portal user groups. The two largest groups (41.98%, 948/2258 and 24.84%, 561/2258) logged into the portal infrequently but had markedly different levels of engagement with their medical record. Other distinct groups were characterized by tracking biometric measures (10.54%, 238/2258), sending electronic messages to their provider (9.25%, 209/2258), preparing for an office visit (5.98%, 135/2258), and tracking laboratory results (4.16%, 94/2258). Conclusions There are naturally occurring groups of EHR Web portal users within a population of adult primary care patients with chronic conditions. More than half of the patient cohort exhibited distinct patterns of portal use linked to key features. These patterns of portal access and interaction provide insight into opportunities for electronic patient engagement strategies. PMID:25707036

  11. The Risk of Peripheral Arterial Disease after Parathyroidectomy in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Li, Tsai-Chung; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The changes of the risk of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in patients with end-stage renal disease after parathyroidectomy are scant. Methods We used a nationwide health insurance claims database to select all dialysis-dependent patients with end-stage renal disease aged 18 years and older for the study population in 2000 to 2006. Of the patients with end-stage renal disease, we selected 947 patients who had undergone parathyroidectomy as the parathyroidectomy group and frequency matched 3746 patients with end-stage renal disease by sex, age, years since the disease diagnosis, and the year of index date as the non-parathyroidectomy group. We used a multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis with the use of a robust sandwich covariance matrix estimate, accounting for the intra-cluster dependence of hospitals or clinics, to measure the risk of peripheral arterial disease for the parathyroidectomy group compared with the non-parathyroidectomy group after adjusting for sex, age, premium-based income, urbanization, and comorbidity. Results The mean post-op follow-up periods were 5.08 and 4.52 years for the parathyroidectomy and non-parathyroidectomy groups, respectively; the incidence density rate of PAD in the PTX group was 12.26 per 1000 person-years, significantly lower than the data in the non-PTX group (24.09 per 1000 person-years, adjusted HR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.46–0.94). Conclusion Parathyroidectomy is associated with reduced risk of peripheral arterial disease in patients with end-stage renal disease complicated with severe secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:27284924

  12. [Optimizing a system of medical rehabilitation for vibration disease patients].

    PubMed

    Suvorov, V G; Shelekhova, A E

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed to reveal efficiency of extracorporeal shock-wave therapy in complex treatment of vibration disease patients. Examination covered 92 patients with varying severity of vibration disease, 58 of which received extracorporeal shock-wave therapy with Piezo Wave device produced by Richard Wolf in addition to traditional treatment. The treatment efficiency was evaluated through its influence on intensity and regression of pain syndrome. Comparative analysis showed that extracorporeal shockwave therapy in the treatment complex considerably increases efficiency and leads to earlier and more stable regression of pain in distal parts of hands. Two variants of chronic pain response to extracorporeal shock-wave therapy were revealed. Marked analgetic potential, good tolerance and stability of the results obtained enable to recommend extracorporeal shock-wave therapy in rehabilitation complex for vibration disease patients.

  13. Stepping analysis in patients with spinocerebellar degeneration and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, O; Taguchi, K; Kikukawa, M; Ogiba, T

    1993-07-01

    POLGON (Polarized light goniometer) was used to evaluate ataxia during stepping movements in patients with spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and Parkinson's disease. The measurements included mean angular change of shoulders (M.A.C.S.) and its coefficient of variation (C.V.). In patients with SCD, the values of M.A.C.S. were significantly larger at 1.0 step/s than those at other stepping rhythms. This results suggests that the stepping rhythm of 1.0 step/s is useful for the detection of cerebellar ataxia. The values of C.V. correlated with the degree of advancement of SCD. In patients with Parkinson's disease, the values of M.A.C.S. tended to decrease because of the restricted elevation of the knee, while those of C.V. were increased. The results showed that the stepping test using the POLGON was useful for estimation of the characteristic disequilibrium of SCD and Parkinson's disease.

  14. Hyperphosphatemia Management in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Shaman, Ahmed M; Kowalski, Stefan R

    2016-07-01

    Hyperphosphatemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients is a potentially life altering condition that can lead to cardiovascular calcification, metabolic bone disease (renal osteodystrophy) and the development of secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT). It is also associated with increased prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and mortality rates. To effectively manage hyperphosphatemia in CKD patients it is important to not only consider pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment options but also to understand the underlying physiologic pathways involved in phosphorus homoeostasis. This review will therefore provide both a background into phosphorus homoeostasis and the management of hyperphosphatemia in CKD patients. In addition, it will cover some of the most important reasons for failure to control hyperphosphatemia with emphasis on the effect of the gastric pH on phosphate binders efficiency. PMID:27330380

  15. Endocrine Abnormalities in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kuczera, Piotr; Adamczak, Marcin; Wiecek, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    In patients with chronic kidney disease the alterations of the endocrine system may arise from several causes. The kidney is the site of degradation as well as synthesis of many different hormones. Moreover, a number of concomitant pathological conditions such as inflammation, metabolic acidosis and malnutrition may participate in the pathogenesis of endocrine abnormalities in this group of patients. The most pronounced endocrine abnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease are the deficiencies of: calcitriol, testosterone, insulin-like growth factor and, erythropoietin (EPO). Additionally accumulation of several hormones, such as: prolactin, growth hormone and insulin frequently also occur. The clinical consequences of the abovementioned endocrine abnormalities are among others: anemia, infertility and bone diseases.

  16. The role of the inflammasome in patients with autoinflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Hal M; Broderick, Lori

    2016-07-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases are disorders of the innate immune system, characterized by systemic inflammation often driven by inflammasomes, and independent of infection and autoreactive antibodies or antigen-specific T cells. These diseases are increasingly recognized as disorders of immune dysregulation, presenting with a constellation of fevers, rashes, and mucosal symptoms in many cases, which suggests that the allergist/immunologist is the appropriate specialist for these patients. However, many practicing physicians are unaware of these disorders in their pediatric and adult patient populations, leading to substantial delays in diagnosis. Recognizing autoinflammatory disease symptom patterns, performing appropriate diagnostic tests, and instituting early effective therapy are essential to reduce morbidity and mortality in these patients. This review will focus on understanding the molecular basis of inflammasomes, recognizing the distinguishing features of the classic autoinflammatory disorders, and appreciating the treatment modalities available. PMID:27373321

  17. Endocrine Abnormalities in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kuczera, Piotr; Adamczak, Marcin; Wiecek, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    In patients with chronic kidney disease the alterations of the endocrine system may arise from several causes. The kidney is the site of degradation as well as synthesis of many different hormones. Moreover, a number of concomitant pathological conditions such as inflammation, metabolic acidosis and malnutrition may participate in the pathogenesis of endocrine abnormalities in this group of patients. The most pronounced endocrine abnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease are the deficiencies of: calcitriol, testosterone, insulin-like growth factor and, erythropoietin (EPO). Additionally accumulation of several hormones, such as: prolactin, growth hormone and insulin frequently also occur. The clinical consequences of the abovementioned endocrine abnormalities are among others: anemia, infertility and bone diseases. PMID:27442377

  18. Wisdom teeth extraction in a patient with moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Seto, Mika; Aoyagi, Naoko; Koga, Sayo; Kikuta, Toshihiro

    2013-12-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare neurovascular disorder that involves constriction of certain arteries in the brain. In patients with moyamoya disease, it is very important to prevent cerebral ischemic attacks and intracerebral bleeding caused by fluctuating blood pressure and increased respiration. A 40-year-old woman with moyamoya disease was scheduled for extraction of her right upper and lower impacted wisdom teeth. Her lower impacted wisdom tooth was situated close to the inferior alveolar nerve. We decided to continue her oral antiplatelet therapy and planned intravenous sedation with analgesic agents administered approximately five minutes prior to extraction of the root of the mandibular wisdom tooth. Oral analgesic medications were regularly administered postoperatively to alleviate pain and anxiety. During the perioperative period, no cerebrovascular event occurred, and the wisdom teeth were successfully extracted as per the planned procedure. It is thought that the perioperative risks of wisdom tooth extraction in patients with moyamoya disease can be minimized with the use of our protocols.

  19. Dyslipidemia in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Chatrath, Hemant; Vuppalanchi, Raj; Chalasani, Naga

    2012-02-01

    Patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) often have dyslipidemia along with other features of metabolic syndrome such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. The dyslipidemia in NAFLD is characterized by increased serum triglycerides, increased small, dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL nontype A) particles, and low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. The pathogenesis of dyslipidemia in NAFLD is not well understood, but it is likely related to hepatic overproduction of the very low-density lipoprotein particles and dysregulated clearance of lipoproteins from the circulation. There is unequivocal evidence that cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of mortality in patients with NAFLD. Aggressive treatment of dyslipidemia plays a critical role in the overall management of patients with NAFLD. Statins are the first-line agents to treat high cholesterol and their dosage should be adjusted based on achieving therapeutic targets and tolerability. Although all statins appear to be effective in improving cholesterol levels in patients with NAFLD, there is more experience with atorvastatin in patients with NAFLD; furthermore, it is the only statin to date to show a reduced cardiovascular morbidity in patients with NAFLD. The risk for serious liver injury from statins is quite rare and patients with NAFLD are not at increased risk for statin hepatotoxicity. Omega-3 fatty acids are perhaps the first choice to treat hypertriglyceridemia because of their safety, tolerability, and efficacy in improving serum triglycerides, as well as their potential to improve liver disease. PMID:22418885

  20. [Cognitive plasticity in Alzheimer's disease patients receiving cognitive stimulation programs].

    PubMed

    Zamarrón Cassinello, Ma Dolores; Tárraga Mestre, Luis; Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío

    2008-08-01

    The main purpose of this article is to examine whether cognitive plasticity increases after cognitive training in Alzheimer's disease patients. Twenty six patients participated in this study, all of them diagnosed with mild Alzheimer's disease, 17 of them received a cognitive training program during 6 months, and the other 9 were assigned to the control group. Participants were assigned to experimental or control conditions for clinical reasons. In order to assess cognitive plasticity, all patients were assessed before and after treatment with three subtests from the "Bateria de Evaluación de Potencial de Aprendizaje en Demencias" [Assessment Battery of Learning Potential in Dementia] (BEPAD). After treatment, Alzheimer's disease patients improved their performance in all the tasks assessing cognitive plasticity: viso-spatial memory, audio-verbal memory and verbal fluency. However, the cognitive plasticity scores of the patients in the control group decreased. In conclusion, this study showed that cognitive stimulation programs can improve cognitive functioning in mildly demented patients, and patients who do not receive any cognitive interventions may reduce their cognitive functioning.

  1. [Cognitive plasticity in Alzheimer's disease patients receiving cognitive stimulation programs].

    PubMed

    Zamarrón Cassinello, Ma Dolores; Tárraga Mestre, Luis; Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío

    2008-08-01

    The main purpose of this article is to examine whether cognitive plasticity increases after cognitive training in Alzheimer's disease patients. Twenty six patients participated in this study, all of them diagnosed with mild Alzheimer's disease, 17 of them received a cognitive training program during 6 months, and the other 9 were assigned to the control group. Participants were assigned to experimental or control conditions for clinical reasons. In order to assess cognitive plasticity, all patients were assessed before and after treatment with three subtests from the "Bateria de Evaluación de Potencial de Aprendizaje en Demencias" [Assessment Battery of Learning Potential in Dementia] (BEPAD). After treatment, Alzheimer's disease patients improved their performance in all the tasks assessing cognitive plasticity: viso-spatial memory, audio-verbal memory and verbal fluency. However, the cognitive plasticity scores of the patients in the control group decreased. In conclusion, this study showed that cognitive stimulation programs can improve cognitive functioning in mildly demented patients, and patients who do not receive any cognitive interventions may reduce their cognitive functioning. PMID:18674439

  2. Depression in African-American patients with kidney disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kimmel, Paul L.; Patel, Somir S.; Peterson, Rolf A.

    2002-01-01

    There are few data on the epidemiology, consequences and treatment of depression in African-American patients with kidney disease in the US, even though such patients disproportionately bear the burden of this illness. This paper reviews data on the diagnosis and pathogenesis of depression and its consequences in patients with and without kidney disease, in addition to work on the epidemiology of depression in the African-American population and in the US End-stage Renal Disease (ESRD) program. African Americans are thought to have similar susceptibility to the development of depression as other populations in the US, but diminished access to care for this group of patients may be associated with differential outcomes. Data are presented from longitudinal studies of psychosocial outcomes in a population comprising primarily African-American patients with ESRD, and is reviewed the treatment of depression in patients with and without kidney disease. There are few studies of the management of depression that focus on minority populations. The authors agree with recommendations that treatment trials should include minority patients, patients with medical comorbidities, and the elderly, and assess function and quality of life as outcomes. The relationships between age, marital status and satisfaction, ethnicity, and perception of quality of life and depressive affect level and diagnosis of depression, and medical outcomes have not been determined in ESRD patients, or in African-American patients with ESRD. There are few studies of drugs for the treatment of depression in ESRD patients, and only one small randomized controlled trial. These have shown that therapy with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors appears to be a safe treatment option for patients with ESRD. The long-term effectiveness of therapy, and its association with clinically important outcomes such as perception of quality of life, compliance, and survival have not been evaluated in ESRD patients. Also

  3. Necrotising herpetic retinopathy in patients with advance HIV disease.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R F; Brink, N S; Cartledge, J; Sharvell, Y; Frith, P

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the presenting features, clinical and laboratory diagnosis, response to treatment, and outcome of necrotising herpetic retinopathy (NHR) in HIV infected patients. METHODS: Retrospective case records/laboratory data review of five HIV infected patients presenting to the specialist HIV/AIDS unit at UCL Hospitals, London from April 1994 to August 1996 with a clinical diagnosis of NHR. RESULTS: All patients had advanced HIV disease with a median CD4 count of 20.10(6)/1. Three patients had cutaneous varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection within the preceding 8 weeks. All had uniocular loss of visual acuity; one also had headache and another ocular pain. All had typical retinal appearances. VZV DNA was detected in cerebrospinal fluid of four patients (and in vitreous fluid of one of the four) and in vitreous fluid of one other. One patient refused therapy and rapidly became blind. Four patients received intravenous foscarnet with intravenous aciclovir for 6 weeks: three subsequently received oral famciclovir and one oral valaciclovir; two patients also had intravitreal injections of foscarnet. In none of the four did treatment bring about improvement in visual acuity, but in all four visual loss from retinitis was halted. CONCLUSIONS: NHR occurs in HIV infected patients with advanced HIV disease and is strongly associated with evidence of VZV infection. With aggressive use of antiviral drugs the outcome is not uniformly poor. Images PMID:9582461

  4. Prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Shyam Chand; Nanda, Satyan; Tripathi, Adarsh; Sawlani, Kamal Kumar; Gupta, Kamlesh Kumar; Himanshu, D; Verma, Ajay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Psychiatric disorders, especially anxiety and depression have been reported to have an increased prevalence in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, but there is a paucity of data from India. Aims and Objectives: Aim of our study is to study the frequency of psychiatric comorbidities in COPD patients and their correlation with severity of COPD, as per global initiative for obstructive lung disease guidelines. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital (King George's Medical University). A total of 74 COPD patients were included in this study and compared with 74 controls. The diagnosis and severity of COPD were assessed by spirometry. Psychiatric comorbidities were assessed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview questionnaire. Results: The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in COPD patients (28.4%) as compared to controls (2.7%). As regards to severity, the frequency was significantly increased in severe and very severe COPD. The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities in COPD patients increased significantly with the increase in duration of symptoms being present in 67% of patients with duration of symptoms more than 10 years and only 23% of patients with duration of symptoms ≤5 years. Conclusion: The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities is increased in COPD patients as compared to controls. We recommend that all patients with COPD should be screened for psychiatric comorbidity, if any. PMID:27051106

  5. Caffeine intake by patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vendramini, L C; Nishiura, J L; Baxmann, A C; Heilberg, I P

    2012-09-01

    Because caffeine may induce cyst and kidney enlargement in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), we evaluated caffeine intake and renal volume using renal ultrasound in ADPKD patients. Caffeine intake was estimated by the average of 24-h dietary recalls obtained on 3 nonconsecutive days in 102 ADPKD patients (68 females, 34 males; 39 ± 12 years) and compared to that of 102 healthy volunteers (74 females, 28 males; 38 ± 14 years). The awareness of the need for caffeine restriction was assessed. Clinical and laboratory data were obtained from the medical records of the patients. Mean caffeine intake was significantly lower in ADPKD patients versus controls (86 vs 134 mg/day), and 63% of the ADPKD patients had been previously aware of caffeine restriction. Caffeine intake did not correlate with renal volume in ADPKD patients. There were no significant differences between the renal volumes of patients in the highest and lowest tertiles of caffeine consumption. Finally, age-adjusted multiple linear regression revealed that renal volume was associated with hypertension, chronic kidney disease stage 3 and the time since diagnosis, but not with caffeine intake. The present small cross-sectional study indicated a low level of caffeine consumption by ADPKD patients when compared to healthy volunteers, which was most likely due to prior awareness of the need for caffeine restriction. Within the range of caffeine intake observed by ADPKD patients in this study (0-471 mg/day), the renal volume was not directly associated with caffeine intake.

  6. Hepatocellular Carcinoma Management in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Claudia P.; Alvares-da-Silva, Mario R.; Tani, Claudia M.; Diniz, Marcio A.; Stefano, Jose T.; Chagas, Aline L.; Alencar, Regiane S.S.M.; Vezozzo, Denise C.P.; Santos, Gilmar R.; Campos, Priscila B.; Alves, Venancio AF.; Ratziu, Vlad; Carrilho, Flair J.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as an important cause of chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) system is the preferred staging system to evaluate patients with HCC and links prognosis assessment with treatment recommendation. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate whether the BCLC staging system and its treatment algorithm are suitable for patients with HCC arising from NAFLD. Methods: Forty-two patients with HCC related to either to NAFLD or cryptogenic cirrhosis were retrieved retrospectively from 2 centers in Brazil. Patients were classified according to BCLC staging system. If the proposed HCC therapy could not be applied, the case was considered to represent deviations from the recommended BCLC guideline. Causes of treatment deviations were investigated. Results: There were 4 patients without evidence of cirrhosis according to liver biopsy and/or clinical evaluation. One (2%), 21 (50%), 10 (24%), 5 (12%), and 5 patients (12%) were classified initially to the very early (0), early (A), intermediate (B), advanced (C), and terminal (D) BCLC stages, respectively. Thirty-five patients (83%) were treated according to BCLC recommendations. There were 3 cases (of 5) of protocol deviation in BCLC C patients. The 1- and 2-year overall survival rates were 81% and 66%, respectively. Conclusions: The BCLC system is applied in most cases of NAFLD-related HCC cases. Deviation of BCLC is found more frequently in BCLC C stage patients. PMID:25268068

  7. [Hyperhomocysteinemia and cardiovascular risk profile in ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease comorbidity patients].

    PubMed

    Zharkova, A V; Orlovs'kyĭ, V F

    2014-01-01

    Present article is devoted to the study of the clinic features of ischemic heart desease associated with acid peptic disease. It was shown the more evident increase of myocardial infarction risk in associated pathology patients. Such results have to be caused by the special risk factor. As such factor we desided to study the hyperhomosysteinemia. During research there were discovered that the lowest vitamin B12 serum level and the highest homocysteine serum level have been registrated in associated pathology (ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease according to long-term proton pump inhibitor use) patients. It was shown evident correlation between that changes and dyslipidemia. PMID:24908957

  8. [Hyperhomocysteinemia and cardiovascular risk profile in ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease comorbidity patients].

    PubMed

    Zharkova, A V; Orlovs'kyĭ, V F

    2014-01-01

    Present article is devoted to the study of the clinic features of ischemic heart desease associated with acid peptic disease. It was shown the more evident increase of myocardial infarction risk in associated pathology patients. Such results have to be caused by the special risk factor. As such factor we desided to study the hyperhomosysteinemia. During research there were discovered that the lowest vitamin B12 serum level and the highest homocysteine serum level have been registrated in associated pathology (ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease according to long-term proton pump inhibitor use) patients. It was shown evident correlation between that changes and dyslipidemia.

  9. An approach to the patient with suspected pericardial disease.

    PubMed

    Kyriakakis, C G; Mayosi, B M; de Vries, E; Isaacs, A; Doubell, A F

    2016-02-01

    Diseases of the pericardium commonly manifest in one of three ways: acute pericarditis, pericardial effusion and constrictive pericarditis. In the developed world, the most common cause of acute pericarditis is viral or idiopathic disease, while in the developing world tuberculous aetiology, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, is commonplace owing to the high prevalence of HIV. This article provides an approach to the diagnosis, investigation and management of these patients. PMID:27303770

  10. [Aluminum-related bone disease in chronic hemodialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Jara, A; Rosenberg, H; Bruhn, C; Vaccarezza, A; Vial, S; Jalil, R; Cisternas, H

    1993-07-01

    Plasma aluminum (pAl) was measured in 58 patients coming from three centers using different preparation of dialysis water: deionizer (29 patients), softener (16 patients) and reverse osmosis (13 patients). Twenty five healthy subjects were used as controls. A deferoxamine test was performed to 11 of 19 patients with pAl between 40 and 200 micrograms/dl and a bone biopsy with double tetracycline staining was executed to 15 patients with pAl over 40 micrograms/dl. Mean pAl was 9.5 +/- 1.7 micrograms/dl in controls and 34.3 +/- 6.1 169 +/- 27.8 and 50.8 +/- 10.3 micrograms/dl in patients coming form centers using deionizers, softeners and reverse osmosis respectively. Seventy six percent of patients coming from centers using deionizers and 85% of patients coming from centers with reverse osmosis had pAl below 40 micrograms/dl and all had values below 200 micrograms/dl. Plasma aluminum had a increase of over 200 micrograms/dl in 6 of 11 patients in which the deferoxamine test was performed. Six patients had a positive staining for aluminum in bone biopsies (three with basal pAl over 200 micrograms/dl and one with a increase in pAL after deferoxamine < 200 micrograms/dl). Of these, 2 patients had a mixed osteodystrophy and 4 a low turnover bone disease. Centers with deionizers and reverse osmosis had very low aluminum levels in dialysis water and five of six patients with aluminum levels related bone disease came from the center using softener.

  11. Delusions in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease: A Multidimensional Approach.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Grazia; Panza, Francesco; Sancarlo, Daniele; Paris, Francesco F; Cascavilla, Leandro; Mangiacotti, Antonio; Lauriola, Michele; Paroni, Giulia H; Seripa, Davide; Greco, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients with delusions, clinical outcomes and mortality result from a combination of psychological, biological, functional, and environmental factors. We determined the effect of delusions on mortality risk, clinical outcomes linked to comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA), cognitive, depressive, and neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in 380 consecutive AD patients with Mini-Mental State Examination, Clinical Dementia Rating scale, 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale, and Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), assessing one-year mortality risk using the Multidimensional Prognostic Index (MPI). We included 121 AD patients with delusions (AD-D) and 259 AD patients without delusions (AD-noD). AD-D patients were significantly older, with higher age at onset and cognitive impairment, a more severe stage of dementia, and more depressive symptoms than AD-noD patients. Disease duration was slightly higher in AD-D patients than in those without delusions, although this difference was not statistically significant. At CGA, AD-D patients showed a higher grade of disability in basic and instrumental activities of daily living, and an increased risk of malnutrition and bedsores. The two groups of patients significantly differed in MPI score (AD-D: 0.65 versus AD-noD: 0.51, p <  0.0001) and MPI grade. AD-D patients showed also a significant higher score in NPI of the following NPS than AD-noD patients: hallucinations, agitation/aggression, depression mood, apathy, irritability/lability, aberrant motor activity, sleep disturbances, and eating disorders. Therefore, AD-D patients showed higher dementia severity, and higher impairment in cognitive and depressive symptoms, and several neuropsychiatric domains than AD-noD patients, and this appeared to be associated with higher multidimensional impairment and increased risk of mortality. PMID:26890768

  12. Deep vein thrombosis in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Daneschvar, H Leon; Seddighzadeh, Ali; Piazza, Gregory; Goldhaber, Samuel Z

    2008-06-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a poorly understood complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The objective of our analysis was to profile DVT patients with and without CKD. We defined CKD as patients requiring dialysis or patients having nephrotic syndrome. We compared 268 patients with CKD (184 patients with dialysis-dependent renal disease and 84 with nephrotic syndrome) to 4,307 patients with preserved renal function from a prospective United States multicenter deep venous thrombosis (DVT) registry. Compared with non-CKD patients, CKD patients with DVT were younger (median age 62 vs. 69 years, p < 0.0001), more often African-American (p < 0.0001), and more often Hispanic (p = 0.0003). CKD patients underwent surgery more frequently in the three months prior to developing DVT (48.9% vs. 39.0%, p = 0.001) and more often had concomitant congestive heart failure (20.9% vs. 14.6%, p = 0.005). CKD patients suffered upper extremity DVT more frequently (30.0% vs. 10.8%, p < 0.0001). Patients with CKD presented less often with typical DVT symptoms of extremity discomfort (42.9% vs. 52.4%, p = 0.003) and difficulty ambulating (5.4% vs. 10.1%, p = 0.01). Prophylaxis rates prior to DVT were similarly low in CKD and non-CKD patients (44.2% vs. 38.0%, p = 0.06). Future studies of DVT in CKD patients should explore novel strategies for improving prophylaxis utilization and the detection of DVT in this special population. PMID:18521505

  13. [Clinical associations between retinal vascular diseases and cardiovascular diseases in patients with systemic atheromatosis].

    PubMed

    Stefănescu-Dima, Alin; Bătăiosu, Constantin; Sas, Teodor; Puianu, Mihaela

    2013-01-01

    A clinical study was conducted on a sample of 48 patients examined within 3 months. Of these, 27 patients were recruited by ophtalmologic criteria and 21 recruited by cardiologic criteria, 25% of these patients coming for routine check. They were investigated by ophthalmic examination, cardiological examination, imaging and laboratory examination. Testing has shown a strong link between cardiovascular disease and the eye of the patients investigated. The study demonstrated the need for interdisciplinary consultation for patients with vascular complaints in the carotid territory and a close correlation between the vascular and ophthalmologic pathology at this level.

  14. Management of retinal vascular diseases: a patient-centric approach

    PubMed Central

    Brand, C S

    2012-01-01

    Retinal vascular diseases are a leading cause of blindness in the Western world. Advancement in the clinical management of these diseases has been fast-paced, with new treatments becoming available as well as license extensions of existing treatments. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated in certain retinal vascular diseases, including wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic macular oedema (DMO), and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Treatment of wet AMD and visual impairment due to either DMO or macular oedema secondary to RVO with an anti-VEGF on an as needed basis, rather than a fixed schedule, allows an individualised treatment approach; providing treatment when patients are most likely to benefit from it, while minimising the number of unnecessary intravitreal injections. Thus, an individualised treatment regimen reduces the chances of over-treatment and under-treatment, optimising both the risk/benefit profile of the treatment and the efficient use of NHS resource. Streamlining of treatment for patients with wet AMD and visual impairment due to either DMO or macular oedema secondary to RVO, by using one treatment with similar posology across all three diseases, may help to minimise burden of clinic capacity and complexity and hence optimise patient outcomes. Informed treatment decisions and efficient clinic throughput are important for optimal patient outcomes in the fast-changing field of retinal vascular diseases. PMID:22495396

  15. Xerostomy, dental caries and periodontal disease in HIV+ patients.

    PubMed

    Cavasin Filho, Julio César; Giovani, Elcio Magdalena

    2009-02-01

    We studied xerostomy and its correlation with periodontal and dental cavity diseases in HIV patients, through measurement of salivary flow and through variables such as saliva buffer capacity, salivary pH, periodontal index, MDF index, dental carie risk and risk of periodontal disease. One hundred patients were analyzed. They were distributed into two groups: Group I (test) - 50 patients evidently HIV+, from whom information was collected and analyzed regarding age, gender, skin color, habits, general and oral diseases, levels of T-CD4 lymphocytes, viral load and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART); and Group II - (control) 50 HIV- patients, from whom information was collected and analyzed regarding age, gender, skin color, habits, general and oral diseases. In both groups, measurement of salivary flow, pH and buffer capacity was made. Group I presented high MDF, bacteria plaque and bleeding, with a greater susceptibility to the risks of oral cavities and periodontal disease. The salivary flow and the buffering capacity of the saliva were low, indicating a high level of xerostomy. Two important modifying factors influence these pathologies in an incisive way: one is immunossuppression and the other is HAART therapy. The control exhibited results that are closer to normality; it had better oral-health conditions.

  16. Management of retinal vascular diseases: a patient-centric approach.

    PubMed

    Brand, C S

    2012-04-01

    Retinal vascular diseases are a leading cause of blindness in the Western world. Advancement in the clinical management of these diseases has been fast-paced, with new treatments becoming available as well as license extensions of existing treatments. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated in certain retinal vascular diseases, including wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic macular oedema (DMO), and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Treatment of wet AMD and visual impairment due to either DMO or macular oedema secondary to RVO with an anti-VEGF on an as needed basis, rather than a fixed schedule, allows an individualised treatment approach; providing treatment when patients are most likely to benefit from it, while minimising the number of unnecessary intravitreal injections. Thus, an individualised treatment regimen reduces the chances of over-treatment and under-treatment, optimising both the risk/benefit profile of the treatment and the efficient use of NHS resource. Streamlining of treatment for patients with wet AMD and visual impairment due to either DMO or macular oedema secondary to RVO, by using one treatment with similar posology across all three diseases, may help to minimise burden of clinic capacity and complexity and hence optimise patient outcomes. Informed treatment decisions and efficient clinic throughput are important for optimal patient outcomes in the fast-changing field of retinal vascular diseases.

  17. Patients' substantialization of disease, the hybrid symptom and metaphysical care.

    PubMed

    Pârvan, Alexandra

    2015-06-01

    In the context of current scholarship concerned with facilitating integration between the biomedical and the patient-centred models of care, the article suggests that disease brings about an ontological disruption in patients, which is not directly addressed in either model, and may interfere with treatment and therapy outcomes if not met with a type of care termed here as 'metaphysical'. The receipt of diagnosis and medical care can give patients the sense that they are ontologically diminished, or less of a human, and along with physicians' approaches to and discourses about disease, may prompt them to seek ontological restoration or security in the same way as psychologically traumatized patients sometimes do: by treating the disease and/or the experience of harm associated with it as a thing that exists per se. I call this 'substantialization' of disease (or harm) and draw on Augustine's theory of non-substantial deficiencies (physiological and moral) and on Plato's and Plotinus's different takes on such defects in order to discuss what substantialization can do for patients. Based on literature that examines patients' ways of talking about and living with their disease, I speculate that substantialization can generate a 'hybrid symptom', consisting in patterns of exercising agency which may predispose to non-adherence. Ways in which physicians could provide metaphysical care are proposed, along with an understanding of chronic patients as hybrid ontological and agentic units, which draws on theories of enactive cognition. I opine that metaphysical care may facilitate integration between the depersonalized and personalized models of care. PMID:25312387

  18. Anaesthesia for patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Duggappa, Devika Rani; Rao, G Venkateswara; Kannan, Sudheesh

    2015-01-01

    The chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has become a disease of public health importance. Among the various risk factors, smoking remains the main culprit. In addition to airway obstruction, the presence of intrinsic positive end expiratory pressure, respiratory muscle dysfunction contributes to the symptoms of the patient. Perioperative management of these patients includes identification of modifiable risk factors and their optimisation. Use of regional anaesthesia alone or in combination with general anaesthesia improves pulmonary functions and reduces the incidence of post-operative pulmonary complications. PMID:26556916

  19. The interpretation of dysprosody in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Caekebeke, J F; Jennekens-Schinkel, A; van der Linden, M E; Buruma, O J; Roos, R A

    1991-01-01

    Prosodic features in the speech production of 21 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease were tested. The appreciation of vocal and facial expression was also examined in the same patients. Significant intergroup differences were found in the prosody production tasks but, in contrast to previous results, not in the receptive tasks on the recognition and appreciation of prosody and of facial expression. The discrepancy between the production and recognition of prosodic features does not support the suggestion that dysprosody in Parkinson's disease is necessarily a disorder of processing emotional information that could be misinterpreted as a dysarthria. PMID:2019840

  20. Cognitive Impairment and Dementia in Patients with Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leverenz, James B.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Zabetian, Cyrus; Zhang, Jing; Montine, Kathleen S.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is an already prevalent neurodegenerative disease that is poised to at least double over the next 25 years. Although best known for its characteristic movement disorder, PD is now appreciated commonly to cause cognitive impairment, including dementia, and behavioral changes. Dementia in patients with PD is consequential and has been associated with reduced quality of life, shortened survival, and increased caregiver distress. Here we review clinical presentation and progression, pathological bases, identification of genetic risk factors, development of small molecule biomarkers, and emerging treatments for cognitive impairment in patients with PD. PMID:19754405

  1. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Patients with Acute Lyme Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-10-05

    Acute Lyme disease results from transmission of and infection by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi following a tick bite. During acute infection, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of Lyme meningitis. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing for a deep view into the proteome for a cohort of patients with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation leading to the identification of proteins that reflect host responses, which are distinct for subjects with acute Lyme disease. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified changes in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. The measured changes in protein abundances reflect the impact of acute Lyme disease on the CNS as presented in CSF. We have identified 89 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease. A number of the differentially abundant proteins have been found to be localized to brain synapse and thus constitute important leads for better understanding of the neurological consequence of disseminated Lyme disease.

  2. Heparinised clotting factor concentrates in patients with Christmas disease and liver disease.

    PubMed

    Preston, F E; Malia, R G; Lilleyman, J S; Blackburn, E K

    1977-08-31

    Evidence has been sought of activation of the coagulation system in two groups of patients following the infusion of two heparinised clotting factor concentrates. No changes were detected in 13 patients with mild hepatic dysfunction. In six studies on patients with Christmas disease induced abnormalities occurred in only one. Activation of the coagulation mechanism did not occur in another individual who had received the same batch of material.

  3. Hypertension management: special considerations in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Smith, James P; Lewis, Julia B

    2004-12-01

    It has been estimated that approximately 11% of the US adult population has chronic kidney disease (CKD), and it has been demonstrated that the prevalence of hypertension rises significantly as renal function declines. Even mild CKD significantly increases mortality risk, and cardiovascular disease remains the main cause of death among these patients. Although CKD patients have generally been excluded from trials testing the effect of lowering blood pressure on cardiovascular outcomes, guidelines suggest lowering blood pressure in hopes of reducing cardiovascular mortality and slowing the progression of renal disease. The preferred antihypertensive agents among these patients are drugs that block the renin-angiotensin system. In most hypertensive CKD patients, however, multiple agents are necessary to reach blood pressure targets. In general, diuretics and calcium channel blockers are added subsequently as adjunctive therapy. Hopefully, with increased recognition of the unique aspects of treating hypertension in this population, end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality will be delayed or avoided in the millions of patients with CKD.

  4. Anticoagulation in chronic kidney disease patients-the practical aspects.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Stephen; Szeki, Iren; Nash, Michael J; Thachil, Jecko

    2014-10-01

    There is an increasing awareness about the risks of arterial and venous thromboembolism (TE) in hospital patients and general public which has led to consideration of thrombosis prevention measures in earnest. Early recognition of the symptoms of TE disease has led to timely administration of antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs, translating to better outcome in many of these patients. In this respect, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) represent a special group. They indeed represent a high-risk group for thrombosis both in the cardiovascular territory and also in the venous circulation. At the same time, abnormalities in the platelet membranes put them at risk of bleeding which is significantly more than other patients with chronic diseases. Anticoagulation may be ideal to prevent the former, but the co-existing bleeding risk and also that the commonly used drugs for inhibiting coagulation are eliminated by renal pathways pose additional problems. In this review, we try to explain the complex thrombotic-haemorrhagic state of chronic kidney disease patients, and practical considerations for the management of anticoagulation in them with a focus on heparins. PMID:25878775

  5. Increasing Patient Activation Could Improve Outcomes for Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shawn L; Siegel, Corey A

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex disease process that often requires the integration of skills from various health care providers to adequately meet the needs of patients with IBD. The medical and surgical treatment options for IBD have become more complicated and are frequently a source of angst for both the patient and provider. However, it has become more important than ever to engage patients in navigating the treatment algorithm. Although novel in the IBD world, the concept of patients' becoming more active and effective managers of their care has been well studied in other disease processes such as diabetes mellitus and mental illness. This idea of patient activation refers to a patient understanding his or her role in the care process and having the skill sets and self-reliance necessary to manage his or her own health care. Over the past decade, evidence supporting the role of patient activation in chronic illness has grown, revealing improved health outcomes, enhanced patient experiences, and lower overall costs. Patient activation can be measured, and interventions have been shown to improve levels of activation over time and influence outcomes. A focus on patient activation is very appropriate for patients with IBD because this may potentially serve as a tool for IBD providers to not only improve patient outcomes and experience but also reduce health care costs.

  6. [Representations, myths, and behaviors among Chagas disease patients with pacemakers].

    PubMed

    Magnani, Claudia; Oliveira, Bruna Guimarães; Gontijo, Eliane Dias

    2007-07-01

    This anthropological study aimed to evaluate the incorporation of pacemakers into the lives of individuals with Chagas disease. An ethnographic methodology was used, based on an open interview focusing on the personal perceptions of 15 patients with chronic Chagas cardiopathy who had required pacemaker implants at the Federal University Hospital in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. As part of a broader quality of life analysis, the study investigated the cultural, physical, and psychological resources used by patients to confront, explain, and accept the disease process, including mental representations on the cultural perception of the illness and definition of social relations. The study was intended to contribute to comprehensive patient care by health professionals, including psychosocial aspects. Decoded and integrated orientation in the cultural sphere assumes an important role in order to prevent disinformation from perpetuating the dissemination of popular myths as active elements in patient stigmatization. PMID:17572811

  7. Treatment selection for stage IIIA Hodgkin's disease patients

    SciTech Connect

    Prosnitz, L.R.; Cooper, D.; Cox, E.B.; Kapp, D.S.; Farber, L.R.

    1985-08-01

    Two treatment policies for the therapy of patients with Stage IIIA Hodgkin's disease are compared. From 1969-1976, 49 newly diagnosed and pathologically staged IIIA patients received total nodal irradiation (TNI) alone (no liver irradiation). Although actuarial survival was 80% at 5 years and 68% at 10 years, actuarial freedom from relapse was only 38% at 5 years. Accordingly, a new treatment policy was instituted in 1976. Patients with either CS IIIA disease, multiple splenic nodules, IIIA with a large mediastinal mass or III/sub 2/, received combined modality therapy (combination chemotherapy and irradiation). All others received TNI. Thirty-six patients have been treated under the new program. The actuarial survival is 90% at 5 years and the relapse-free survival is 87%, suggesting the superiority of this approach. Complications from the treatments are discussed.

  8. New aspects of cerebrovascular diseases in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Naganuma, Toshihide; Takemoto, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that chronic kidney disease is a significant risk factor for stroke, subclinical cerebrovascular abnormalities, and cognitive impairment, independent of known cardiovascular risk factors. Cerebrovascular disease is also a major cause of death in dialysis patients, who have a much higher incidence of stroke compared to the normal population. Strokes in dialysis patients are also characterized by a higher incidence of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage compared with those in the general population. Recent studies on dialysis cohorts have shown that asymptomatic cerebrovascular diseases, including silent cerebral infarction (SCI), white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), and cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), are related to future onset of stroke, cognitive impairment, and dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging studies have revealed a higher prevalence of SCI in hemodialysis patients compared with that in controls, and a subsequent longitudinal study found that SCI is a risk factor for stroke and cardiovascular events as a whole. Other studies have shown that the prevalence of WMHs is significantly higher in dialysis patients than in healthy subjects and that WMHs are a risk factor for cardiovascular events. There is also a high prevalence of CMBs in hemodialysis patients, but the clinical significance of CMBs in these patients has not been examined in a longitudinal study. The incidence of cognitive impairment and dementia in dialysis patients is also twice as high as that in age-matched healthy subjects, and dialysis patients tend to have vascular-type dementia rather than Alzheimer-type dementia. More studies in dialysis patients are required to examine the prevention of stroke, cognitive impairment, and dementia in these patients.

  9. Simultaneous surgery in patients with both cardiac and noncardiac diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Xiao, Feng; Wang, Jin; Song, Bo; Li, Xi-Hui; Li, Jian; He, Zhi-Song; Zhang, Huan; Yin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the possibility and feasibility of simultaneous cardiac and noncardiac surgery. Methods From August 2000 to March 2015, 64 patients suffering from cardiac and noncardiac diseases have been treated by simultaneous surgeries. Results Two patients died after operations in hospital; thus, the hospital mortality rate was 3.1%. One patient with coronary heart disease, acute myocardial infarction, and a recurrence of bladder cancer accepted emergency simultaneous coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), bladder cystectomy, and ureterostomy. He died of acute cerebral infarction complicated with multiple organ failure on the 153rd day after operation. The other patient with chronic constrictive pericarditis and right lung cancer underwent pericardial stripping and right lung lower lobectomy, which resulted in multiple organ failure, and the patient died on the tenth day postoperatively. The remaining 62 patients recovered and were discharged. The total operative morbidity was 17.2%: postoperative hemorrhage (n, % [1, 1.6%]), pulmonary infection and hypoxemia (2, 3.1%), hemorrhage of upper digestive tract (1, 1.6%), incisional infection (3, 4.7%), subphrenic abscess (1, 1.6%), and postoperative acute renal failure and hemofiltration (3, 4.7%). Of the 62 patients discharged, 61 patients were followed up. Eleven patients died with 10 months to 10 years during the follow-up. The mean survival time is 116.2±12.4 months. The cumulative survival rate is 50.8%. Conclusion Simultaneous surgeries in patients suffering from both cardiac and noncardiac benign or malignant diseases are safe and possible with satisfactory short-term and long-term survival. PMID:27486311

  10. Thyroid carcinoma in patients with Graves' disease: an institutional experience.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuanzeng; Baloch, Zubair W; LiVolsi, Virginia A

    2015-03-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by diffuse hyperplasia and excessive production of thyroid hormone. The association between thyroid carcinoma and GD is controversial. The prevalence of thyroid carcinoma was investigated in patients with GD who underwent thyroidectomy for thyroid nodular lesions or GD from 1994 to 2013 at our institution. Three hundred and forty-seven patients were placed into two groups: Graves' disease with nodular lesions group (group GN) included 85 patients who had thyroidectomy for nodular lesion, and Graves' disease group (group G) included 262 patients who had thyroidectomy for hyperthyroidism. There were 59 patients with thyroid carcinomas in the 85 patients (69 %) of group GN, including 3 follicular carcinomas (5 %), 1 poorly differentiated carcinoma (2 %), and 55 papillary thyroid carcinomas (93 %). Among the 55 papillary thyroid carcinomas, 19 cases were papillary thyroid microcarcinomas (34 %); and 5 cases of tall cell variant (9 %) were identified. There were 8 cases with lymph node metastasis (14 %), 6 cases with lymphovascular invasion (10 %), and 12 cases with extrathyroidal invasion (20 %). In addition, 24 carcinomas showed multiple foci of tumor (41 %). In contrast, 51 patients (19 %) of 262 patients in group G had carcinoma, including 2 follicular carcinomas (4 %) and 49 papillary thyroid carcinomas (96 %). In the 49 cases of papillary thyroid carcinomas, 47 cases were microcarcinomas (96 %); and 2 cases of tall cell variant (4 %) were found. There were no lymph node metastasis or lymphovascular and extrathyroidal invasion, but 11 cases (22 %) demonstrated multiple carcinoma foci. In conclusion, thyroid nodular lesions in patients with GD should raise a high suspicion of carcinoma, and these lesions are frequently clinically significant tumors. Incidental thyroid carcinomas in patients with GD are not uncommon, but most of them are low-risk papillary thyroid microcarcinoma without lymph node

  11. Interstitial Nephritis in a Patient with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vasanth, Payaswini; Parmley, Michelle; Torrealba, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Tubulointerstitial nephritis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease has been linked to the use of 5-ASA derivatives. Various aspects of this theory have been challenged with a potential role for the underlying autoimmune disorder. Steroids are the mainstay of treatment and mycophenolate mofetil might be an effective alternative. We report a patient who responded well to mycophenolate despite continuing mesalamine, the suspected offending agent. PMID:27703822

  12. Inflammatory pancreatic diseases in older patients: recognition and management.

    PubMed

    Uomo, Generoso

    2003-01-01

    The aging process influences and modifies the clinical picture and treatment modalities of inflammatory pancreatic diseases in elderly patients. The two major categories of inflammatory exocrine pancreatic diseases seen in the elderly are acute pancreatitis (AP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP). In elderly patients with AP, the presence of concomitant diseases affecting renal, hepatic and cardiopulmonary function make the early clinical assessment of the severity of AP inaccurate at the time of admission to hospital. In addition, the classical multifactorial scoring system routinely utilised in clinical practice to determine the severity of AP may overscore elderly patients because increasing age is associated with more points. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography is particularly useful in assessing the severity of AP and is required in all patients suspected with severe AP. It should be repeated after a certain time period to monitor the disease. The most important aspect of the management of elderly patients with severe AP is the prevention and treatment of systemic and local complications. Treatment of AP should address the removal of aetiological factor(s) and support of organ systems and hydroelectrolytic/caloric balance; specific treatments (antiproteases, antibacterials) should also be administered to patients with severe AP. Surgery is indicated mainly when infection occurs following pancreatic necrosis and/or fluid collection. However, in selected patients with a high anaesthetic risk, alternative, less invasive drainage options (percutaneous, endoscopic) should be considered. CP rarely occurs in older age, and it should be suspected based on clinical findings. The greatest challenge is the differentiation between CP and pancreatic cancer. Treatment of CP in the elderly should be directed at controlling the symptoms, by management of diabetes and exocrine insufficiency because pain and complications are rare in elderly patients with CP. Compliance with

  13. Impact of Perceived Stigma on Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patient Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Taft, Tiffany H.; Keefer, Laurie; Leonhard, Christoph; Nealon-Woods, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Background Perceived stigma has been linked to disease outcome in several chronic illnesses. Stigmatization of illness often leads to increased psychological distress and poorer quality of life. While body stigma has been identified as a specific inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patient concern, no study to date has systematically investigated the presence of stigma in IBD or its effects on disease course and management. Methods Participants were recruited online and through the Illinois chapter of the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America. A screening measure was used to identify an established IBD diagnosis. Patients completed the Perceived Stigma Scale in IBS, Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, General Self-Efficacy Scale, the Brief Symptom Inventory, and the Rating Form of IBD Patient Concerns. Results A total of 211 patients (156 CD, 55 UC) with a confirmed diagnosis for a minimum of 6 months completed the study. Eighty-four percent of participants reported perceived stigma. Hierarchical regression demonstrated that perceived stigma accounted for 10%–22% of the variance in health-related quality of life scores, 4%–16% for psychological distress, 5% for medication adherence, 19% for self-esteem, and 8% for self-efficacy. Effect sizes were small, but comparable with more traditionally evaluated patient variables. Conclusions The majority of IBD patients report some perceived stigmatization. These results suggest that perceived stigma is a significant predictor of poorer outcomes in patients with IBD when controlling for illness and demographic variables. Perceived stigma is a potentially important psychosocial factor in IBD patient care and warrants further investigation. PMID:19180581

  14. Inflammatory pancreatic diseases in older patients: recognition and management.

    PubMed

    Uomo, Generoso

    2003-01-01

    The aging process influences and modifies the clinical picture and treatment modalities of inflammatory pancreatic diseases in elderly patients. The two major categories of inflammatory exocrine pancreatic diseases seen in the elderly are acute pancreatitis (AP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP). In elderly patients with AP, the presence of concomitant diseases affecting renal, hepatic and cardiopulmonary function make the early clinical assessment of the severity of AP inaccurate at the time of admission to hospital. In addition, the classical multifactorial scoring system routinely utilised in clinical practice to determine the severity of AP may overscore elderly patients because increasing age is associated with more points. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography is particularly useful in assessing the severity of AP and is required in all patients suspected with severe AP. It should be repeated after a certain time period to monitor the disease. The most important aspect of the management of elderly patients with severe AP is the prevention and treatment of systemic and local complications. Treatment of AP should address the removal of aetiological factor(s) and support of organ systems and hydroelectrolytic/caloric balance; specific treatments (antiproteases, antibacterials) should also be administered to patients with severe AP. Surgery is indicated mainly when infection occurs following pancreatic necrosis and/or fluid collection. However, in selected patients with a high anaesthetic risk, alternative, less invasive drainage options (percutaneous, endoscopic) should be considered. CP rarely occurs in older age, and it should be suspected based on clinical findings. The greatest challenge is the differentiation between CP and pancreatic cancer. Treatment of CP in the elderly should be directed at controlling the symptoms, by management of diabetes and exocrine insufficiency because pain and complications are rare in elderly patients with CP. Compliance with

  15. Functional capacity of Brazilian patients with Parkinson's disease (PD): relationship between clinical characteristics and disease severity.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Fabio A; Rinaldi, Natalia M; Santos, Paulo Cezar R; Lirani-Silva, Ellen; Vitório, Rodrigo; Teixeira-Arroyo, Cláudia; Stella, Florindo; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa B

    2012-01-01

    The present study had three objectives: (a) to characterize the functional capacity of patients with PD, (b) to assess the relationship between the physical fitness components of functional capacity with clinical characteristics and disease severity, and (c) to compare the physical fitness components of functional capacity with clinical characteristics according to disease severity. The study included 54 patients with idiopathic PD who were distributed into two groups according to PD severity: unilateral group (n=35); and bilateral group (n=19). All patients underwent psychiatric assessment by means of the Hoehn and Yahr (HY) staging of PD, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-A and HADS-D, respectively), and The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The physical fitness components of functional capacity were evaluated over a 2-day period, using recommendations by the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, and the Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Pearson correlation coefficients and multiple regressions were calculated to test the correlation between functional capacity and clinical characteristics, and to predict clinical scores from physical performance, respectively. Clinical variables and physical component data were compared between groups using analysis of variance to determine the effects of disease severity. Patients with advanced disease showed low levels of functional capacity. Interestingly, patients with good functional capacity in one of the physical fitness components also showed good capacities in the other components. Disease severity is a major factor affecting functional capacity and clinical characteristics. Medical providers should take disease severity into consideration when prescribing physical activity for PD patients, since the relationship between functional capacity and clinical characteristics is dependent on disease severity. PMID:21963176

  16. Oral disease in terminally ill cancer patients with xerostomia.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, M P; Bagg, J; Baxter, W P; Aitchison, T C

    1998-03-01

    Xerostomia is common among patients with advanced cancer and is likely to contribute to oral disease. This study determined the prevalence of oral signs and symptoms among a group of 70 terminally ill cancer patients [25 male, 45 female; age range 42-88 (mean 66) years] complaining of oral dryness, and examined the associated oral microflora. Imprint cultures for yeasts, coliforms and staphylococci were collected from the tongue and, in denture wearers, from the plate and denture fitting surface. A swab was collected for culture of herpes simplex virus. 68 patients (97%) complained of oral dryness during the day and 59 patients (84%) complained of oral dryness at night. Oral soreness was reported by 22 patients (31%). 46 patients (66%) had difficulty talking and 36 (51%) reported difficulty eating. Of the 56 denture wearers, 40% complained of denture problems. On examination, 63 (90%) of the patients had clinically dry mouths. Oral mucosal abnormalities were detected in 45 patients (65%), most commonly erythema (20%), coated tongue (20%), atrophic glossitis (17%), angular cheilitis (11%) and pseudomembraneous candidosis (9%). 47 (67%) of the patients carried yeasts, 18 (26%) were carriers of Staphylococcus aureus and 13 (19%) carried coliforms. Herpes simplex virus was isolated from 5 patients, of whom 2 had herpetic stomatitis. Oral complications and abnormalities of the oral microflora can be detected among significant numbers of terminally ill cancer patients with xerostomia.

  17. Genetics of cardiac disease in the small animal patient.

    PubMed

    Meurs, Kathryn M

    2010-07-01

    There is increasing evidence that many forms of congenital and acquired cardiovascular disease in small animal patients are of familial origin. The large number of familial diseases in domestic purebred animals is thought to be associated with the desire to breed related animals to maintain a specific appearance and the selection of animals from a small group of popular founders (founder effect). Clinicians can use knowledge that a particular trait or disease may be inherited to provide guidance to owners and animal breeders to reduce the frequency of the trait. Even if the molecular cause is not known, identification of a pattern of inheritance and information on clinical screening can be useful for a breeder trying to make breeding decisions. Common forms of inheritance for veterinary diseases include autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, X-linked recessive, and polygenic. These genetic traits and their possible involvement in cardiac disease in small animals are discussed in this article.

  18. Dental management of a patient with Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    da Silva Santos, Paulo Sergio; Fernandes, Karin Sa; Fraige, Alexandre; Gallottini, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive genetic disease, characterized by the accumulation of copper in the body--primarily in the brain and liver--due to defective biliary copper excretion by hepatocytes. WD may manifest clinically as liver disease, neurologic symptoms, and Kayser-Fleischer corneal rings. This article presents a case involving a 43-year-old man who had WD prior to liver transplantation. Oral examination revealed petechiae in the oral mucosa, poor oral hygiene, periodontal disease, missing teeth, and several carious teeth. Patients with WD may present systemic changes that affect dental care. Dental treatment prior to liver transplantation is recommended to eliminate the oral foci of infection and control oral disease.

  19. Palliative care for patients with advance chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Douglas, C A

    2014-01-01

    Over the past three decades there has been a dramatic rise in the number of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. The fastest expanding group receiving dialysis has been the elderly. However, for those patients who are very elderly with co-morbidity, dialysis may not offer a survival advantage. Therefore, active conservative management is a growing service offered by many renal units in the UK and focuses on non-dialytic correction of fluid and electrolyes, management of renal anaemia, and assessment and management of symptoms. The five-year survival of a patient over 75 years of age starting dialysis is 20% and if a patient is over 75 years, has co-morbidity, or a poor performance status, dialysis may not offer any survival advantage. Whether a patient is managed by dialysis or by conservative management the symptom burden suffered is high. These symptoms are under-recognised and often managed poorly because of increased drug toxicity in renal failure. This complex group of patients require close working between renal, palliative care, medicine for the elderly, and community teams, to allow best quality of life and end of life care. This review describes some of the challenges in providing Advanced Care Planning for dialysis and conservatively managed patients, highlights the symptom burden of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease, and offers guidance in how to manage the symptoms effectively.

  20. Cytokines in Pericardial Effusion of Patients with Inflammatory Pericardial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Karatolios, Konstantinos; Moosdorf, Rainer; Maisch, Bernhard; Pankuweit, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    Background. The role of inflammatory and angiogenic cytokines in patients with inflammatory pericardial effusion still remains uncertain. Methods. We assessed pericardial and serum levels of VEGF, bFGF, IL-1β and TNF-α by ELISA in patients with inflammatory pericardial effusion (PE) of autoreactive (n = 22) and viral (n = 11) origin, and for control in pericardial fluid (PF) and serum (n = 26) of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Results. VEGF levels were significantly higher in patients with autoreactive and viral PE than in patients with CAD in both PE (P = 0, 006 for autoreactive and P < 0, 001 for viral PE) and serum (P < 0, 001 for autoreactive and P < 0, 001 for viral PE). Pericardial bFGF levels were higher compared to serum levels in patients with inflammatory PE and patients with CAD (P ≤ 0, 001 for CAD; P ≤ 0, 001 for autoreactive PE; P = 0, 005 for viral PE). Pericardial VEGF levels correlated positively with markers of pericardial inflammation, whereas pericardial bFGF levels showed a negative correlation. IL-1β and TNF-α were detectable only in few PE and serum samples. Conclusions. VEGF and bFGF levels in pericardial effusion are elevated in patients with inflammatory PE. It is thus possible that VEGF and bFGF participate in the pathogenesis of inflammatory pericardial disease. PMID:22577248

  1. Low risk of coronary artery disease in patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Silva, Cintia Marques; Lima, G A B; Volschan, I C M; Gottlieb, I; Kasuki, L; Neto, L Vieira; Gadelha, M R

    2015-12-01

    The aims of this study are to determine the prevalence of coronary atherosclerosis in acromegalic patients and to investigate the relationship between the coronary artery calcium score (CS) and acromegaly status and clinical parameters [Framingham risk score (FRS)]. Fifty-six acromegalic patients and paired non-acromegalic volunteers were stratified according to the FRS into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups. CS was assessed using multidetector computed tomography. The patients were considered to have controlled or active acromegaly at the time they were submitted to evaluation. Sixty-six percent of acromegalic patients exhibited arterial hypertension, 36 % had diabetes mellitus, and 34 % had hypercholesterolemia. The median FRS and the median risk for cardiovascular event within the next 10 years were similar in the acromegalics and the controls. The median total CS and CS >75th percentile didn't differ significantly between these groups. In patients with controlled acromegaly, a low, intermediate, or high FRS risk was observed in 86, 14, and 0 %, respectively. In patients with active disease, a low, intermediate, or high FRS risk was verified in 94, 3, and 3 %, respectively, and differences between the controlled and active groups were not significant. Seventy-two percent of the patients had total CS = 0, and there were no differences between the controlled and active groups. The risk of coronary artery disease in acromegalic patients, determined according to FRS and CS, is low despite the high prevalence of metabolic abnormalities.

  2. Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Neuropeptide Expression in Patients with Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    van Wamelen, Daniel J.; Aziz, N. Ahmad; Anink, Jasper J.; van Steenhoven, Robin; Angeloni, Debora; Fraschini, Franco; Jockers, Ralf; Roos, Raymund A. C.; Swaab, Dick F.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective: To study whether sleep and circadian rhythm disturbances in patients with Huntington's disease (HD) arise from dysfunction of the body's master clock, the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. Design: Postmortem cohort study. Patients: Eight patients with HD and eight control subjects matched for sex, age, clock time and month of death, postmortem delay, and fixation time of paraffin-embedded hypothalamic tissue. Measurements and Results: Using postmortem paraffin-embedded tissue, we assessed the functional integrity of the suprachiasmatic nucleus in patients with HD and control subjects by determining the expression of two major regulatory neuropeptides, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and arginine vasopressin. Additionally, we studied melatonin 1 and 2 receptor expression. Compared with control subjects, the suprachiasmatic nucleus contained 85% fewer neurons immunoreactive for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and 33% fewer neurons for arginine vasopressin in patients with HD (P = 0.002 and P = 0.027). The total amount of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and arginine vasopressin messenger RNA was unchanged. No change was observed in the number of melatonin 1 or 2 receptor immunoreactive neurons. Conclusions: These findings indicate posttranscriptional neuropeptide changes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of patients with HD, and suggest that sleep and circadian rhythm disorders in these patients may at least partly arise from suprachiasmatic nucleus dysfunction. Citation: van Wamelen DJ; Aziz NA; Anink JJ; van Steenhoven R; Angeloni D; Fraschini F; Jockers R; Roos RAC; Swaab DF. Suprachiasmatic nucleus neuropeptide expression in patients with Huntington's disease. SLEEP 2013;36(1):117–125. PMID:23288978

  3. Perioperative corticosteroid management for patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Wick, Elizabeth C; Salvatori, Roberto; Ha, Christina Y

    2015-01-01

    Guidelines on the appropriate use of perioperative steroids in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are lacking. As a result, corticosteroid supplementation during and after colorectal surgery procedures has been shown to be highly variable. A clearer understanding of the indications for perioperative corticosteroid administration relative to preoperative corticosteroid dosing and duration of therapy is essential. In this review, we outline the basic tenets of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and its normal response to stress, describe how corticosteroid use is thought to affect this system, and provide an overview of the currently available data on perioperative corticosteroid supplementation including the limited evidence pertaining to patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Based on currently existing data, we define "adrenal suppression," and propose a patient-based approach to perioperative corticosteroid management in the inflammatory bowel disease population based on an individual's historical use of corticosteroids, the type of surgery they are undergoing, and HPA axis testing when applicable. Patients without adrenal suppression (<5 mg prednisone per day) do not require extra corticosteroid supplementation in the perioperative period; patients with adrenal suppression (>20 mg prednisone per day) should be treated with additional perioperative corticosteroid coverage above their baseline home regimen; and patients with unclear HPA axis function (>5 and <20 mg prednisone per day) should undergo preoperative HPA axis testing to determine the best management practices. The proposed management algorithm attempts to balance the risks of adrenal insufficiency and immunosuppression.

  4. Psychiatric disorders in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Martiny, Camila; e Silva, Adriana Cardoso de Oliveira; Neto, José Pedro Simões; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2012-09-01

    Psychiatric disorders in patients with end-stage renal disease are associated with poor prognosis and quality of life. The goal of this study is to investigate the association between psychiatric disorders and renal disease in patients undergoing dialysis treatment, compared with other chronic diseases, appreciating the demographic status of these patients. Sixty-nine patients participated in a diagnostic interview and gave socio-demographic data. The population was composed of 55% men aged 19-77 years with an average age of 50 years (95% CI = 47-54 years). The prevalence of psychiatric disorders found in this study (46.6%) was compared with that found in patients with asthma, polycystic ovary syndrome and HIV-positive. Moreover, the prevalence of the four most common psychiatric disorders which were identified among patients on dialysis were also the subject of comparison between them and others. These results demonstrate the relationship between the various psychiatric disorders and are compatible with other research studies.

  5. Inflammatory dysregulation of blood monocytes in Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Grozdanov, Veselin; Bliederhaeuser, Corinna; Ruf, Wolfgang P; Roth, Valerie; Fundel-Clemens, Kathrin; Zondler, Lisa; Brenner, David; Martin-Villalba, Ana; Hengerer, Bastian; Kassubek, Jan; Ludolph, Albert C; Weishaupt, Jochen H; Danzer, Karin M

    2014-11-01

    Despite extensive effort on studying inflammatory processes in the CNS of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, implications of peripheral monocytes are still poorly understood. Here, we set out to obtain a comprehensive picture of circulating myeloid cells in PD patients. We applied a human primary monocyte culture system and flow cytometry-based techniques to determine the state of monocytes from PD patients during disease. We found that the classical monocytes are enriched in the blood of PD patients along with an increase in the monocyte-recruiting chemoattractant protein CCL2. Moreover, we found that monocytes from PD patients display a pathological hyperactivity in response to LPS stimulation that correlates with disease severity. Inflammatory pre-conditioning was also reflected on the transcriptome in PD monocytes using next-generation sequencing. Further, we identified the CD95/CD95L as a key regulator for the PD-associated alteration of circulating monocytes. Pharmacological neutralization of CD95L reverses the dysregulation of monocytic subpopulations in favor of non-classical monocytes. Our results suggest that PD monocytes are in an inflammatory predisposition responding with hyperactivation to a "second hit". These results provide the first direct evidence that circulating human peripheral blood monocytes are altered in terms of their function and composition in PD patients. This study provides insights into monocyte biology in PD and establishes a basis for future studies on peripheral inflammation. PMID:25284487

  6. Self-Care Among Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yngman-Uhlin, Pia; Hjortswang, Henrik; Riegel, Barbara; Stjernman, Henrik; Hollman Frisman, Gunilla

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disease of unknown etiology. The disease occurs early in life and the burden of symptoms is significant. Patients need to perform self-care to handle their symptoms, but knowledge about what kind of self-care patients do is limited and these individuals need to learn how to manage the symptoms that arise. The aim of this study was to explore self-care among patients with IBD. Twenty adult patients with IBD, 25–66 years of age, were interviewed. Data were analyzed by performing a qualitative content analysis. Four categories with 10 subcategories emerged from the analysis of the interviews. The self-care patients perform consists of symptom recognition (subcategories: physiological sensations and psychological sensations), handling of symptoms (subcategories: adapting the diet, using medical treatment, stress management, and using complementary alternative medicine), planning life (subcategories: planning for when to do activities and when to refrain from activities), and seeking new options (subcategories: seeking knowledge and personal contacts). Self-care consists of symptom recognition, handling life through planning, and accommodating the existing situation with the ultimate goal of maintaining well-being. Being one step ahead facilitates living with IBD. A decision to actively participate in care of a chronic illness is a prerequisite for self-care. Healthcare professionals must consider patients' potential for and desire for self-care when giving advice on self-care activities. Doing so may help people better cope with IBD. PMID:26166423

  7. Vulval Crohn's disease: a clinical study of 22 patients.

    PubMed

    Laftah, Zainab; Bailey, Clare; Zaheri, Shirin; Setterfield, Jane; Fuller, Lucinda Claire; Lewis, Fiona

    2015-04-01

    Vulval Crohn's disease [VCD] is a challenging condition that can occur without gastrointestinal Crohn's disease [GCD]. We reviewed the clinical features and effects of therapy in a cohort of 22 patients with VCD to determine whether the presence of GCD affected the clinical presentation and treatment response. Of these, 64% had GCD and 65% of these presented with GCD prior to VCD. Fissuring, ulceration, and scarring were more common in those with VCD alone. Potent and ultra-potent topical steroids showed benefit in most patients. There was no clear evidence of sustained remission with metronidazole. Azathioprine was the most commonly used oral immunosuppressive agent, with an efficacy of 57%. Patients with both VCD and GCD had a better clinical response compared with those with VCD alone [70% and 25%, respectively]. Infliximab and adalimumab were effective in 56% and 71% of patients, respectively. Excision of redundant tissue was helpful in four patients. The absence of GCD may delay the diagnosis in women who present with vulval symptoms alone. The more active clinical features in those with VCD alone may represent a more aggressive condition, or the severity of the cutaneous disease may have been reduced by immunosuppression taken for GCD. Several patients obtained sustained remission in their GCD with anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha [anti-TNFα] agents while the VCD remained active.

  8. Body Image Dissatisfaction in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sumona; Zhao, Ying-Qi; Shah, Samir A.; Esposti, Silvia Degli; Lidofsky, Sheldon; Shapiro, Jason; LeLeiko, Neil; Bright, Renee; Law, Meaghan; Moniz, Heather; Samad, Zahid; Merrick, Marjorie; Sands, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the fact that the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and their treatments may affect physical appearance, the effect of IBD on body image is poorly understood. The aims of this study were to determine whether body image dissatisfaction (BID) changes over time in patients with IBD and to examine the demographic and disease-related variables associated with decreased body image. Methods Adults aged 18 and above in the Ocean State Crohn's and Colitis Area Registry with at least 2 years of follow-up were eligible for this study. All patients were enrolled within 6 months of IBD diagnosis and followed prospectively. BID was assessed using a modified version of the Adapted Satisfaction With Appearance (ASWAP) questionnaire. Total ASWAP scores and 2 sub-scores were calculated. To assess for changes over time, general linear models for correlated data were used for continuous outcomes and generalized estimating equations were used for discrete outcomes. Results Two hundred seventy-four patients were studied. BID was found to be stable over time among men and women with IBD despite overall improvements in disease activity. No differences were found in BID according to IBD subtype. Female gender, greater disease activity, higher symptom burden, longer duration of steroid use, dermatologic and musculoskeletal manifestations of IBD, and ileocolonic disease location among patients with Crohn's disease were associated with greater BID. Greater BID was associated with lower health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Conclusions BID remains stable in an incident cohort of IBD despite improved disease activity and is associated with lower HRQOL PMID:25569736

  9. T-Helper Cytokine Profiles in Patients with Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Bum; Kim, Young Hyun; Hyun, Myung Chul; Kim, Yeo Hyang; Kim, Hee Sun

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Kawasaki disease is an acute systemic vasculitis of which pathogenesis suspected is caused by immune dysregulation. The goal of this study is to evaluate the activation pattern of T helper cell type 1 (Th1) and T helper cell type 2 (Th2) in patients with Kawasaki disease. Subjects and Methods Prospective study of 60 patients (male 36, female 24) with diagnosis of Kawasaki disease were enrolled. One hundred and eighty blood samples from these patients were collected according to the different clinical stages {before initial intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), 5 days after initial IVIG, 2 months after initial IVIG}. The plasma level of Th1 cytokines; interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) & interleukin (IL)-2 and Th2 cytokines; IL-4 & IL-10 were measured by enzyme-liked immunosorbent assay. Results In all patients, the plasma level of Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2) and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) were markedly elevated during the acute stage of Kawasaki disease. Since then, the plasma level of all these cytokines decreased significantly along with the process of clinical stages. Regardless of the existence of coronary artery lesion or no response to initial IVIG treatment, there were no significant differences between them. Conclusion These data suggest that both Th1 and Th2 cells may be activated simultaneously during the acute stage of Kawasaki disease. Further studies are therefore required to establish the difference of activation pattern of T helper cells between Kawasaki disease and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:26617655

  10. Navigating patients and caregivers through the course of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Aupperle, Peter M

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) prevalence rates in the United States are expected to triple over the next 50 years, a consequence of the overall aging of the U.S. population. Because of the profound and far-reaching impact of AD, this projected increase in prevalence is expected to pose a tremendous challenge. Alzheimer's disease results in the cognitive and functional deterioration of the affected patient, and behavioral disturbances frequently accompany the disease. Furthermore, because of its progressive and debilitating nature, AD takes a dramatic emotional, physical, and financial toll on the patient's primary caregiver. Nonetheless, despite the burden experienced by both patients and caregivers, strategies for minimizing the negative consequences of AD are well characterized. Central to the successful management of AD is the prompt and accurate diagnosis of the disease, with current guidelines calling for a 2-tiered approach in which patients first undergo screening using a brief cognitive assessment tool, followed by a comprehensive battery of physical, psychological, and neurologic tests if signs of possible cognitive impairment are evident upon screening. Once a conclusive diagnosis of AD has been made, the development of a disease management approach targeting the needs of the patient and his or her caregiver becomes a primary concern. Pharmacologic interventions may play an important role in such approaches, as agents such as cholinesterase inhibitors and the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist memantine have been associated with favorable outcomes for patients and caregivers alike. However, in addition to the therapeutic benefits of these agents, associated side effects and potential drug-drug interactions must also factor into decisions regarding the pharmacologic treatment of AD.

  11. ISCHEMIA in chronic kidney disease: improving the representation of patients with chronic kidney disease in cardiovascular trials.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Christina M; Shineski, Matthew; Chertow, Glenn M; Bangalore, Sripal

    2016-06-01

    Despite the high cardiovascular risk associated with chronic kidney disease, a recent systematic review confirmed that patients with kidney disease remain underrepresented in cardiovascular trials. Two ongoing trials are assessing the risk:benefit of aggressive evaluation and intervention for ischemic heart disease in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease.

  12. Connective tissue diseases, arthritis require special patient counseling.

    PubMed

    Neinstein, L S; Katz, B

    1985-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematous occurs most frequently in reproductive aged women, giving rise to concern about contraception and pregnancy. Most of the literature on contraceptive choices for patients with connective tissue diseases specifically considers oral contraceptives (OCs) with systemic lupus. A possible role of female sex hormones in systemic lupus disease activity is suggested by the constant female-male disease ratio of 9 to 1, the tendency for increased disease activity premenstrually and postpartum, and the report of a 54% prevalence of clinical or serological exacerbation during pregnancy compared with a 4% prevalence in the 6 months preceding pregnancy. Another study however failed to confirm increased prevalence of major nonrenal manifestations of systemic lupus with pregnancy, and the results of 3 studies showed permanent deterioration in 15 of 114 pregnancies. In most cases, therefore, renal function did not deteriorate with pregnancy. The effect of OCs on lupus patients is also unclear despite several reports of exacerbation of lupus by OCs or induction of serologic markers. Studies of women attending family planning clinics do not indicate either developing rheumatologic symptoms or developing positive serologic tests in healthy women on OCs. IUDs should be avoided in lupus patients with moderate or severe anemia or thrombocytopenia, and the possible decreased effectiveness of IUDs for patients on steroids should be considered. Lupus patients should avoid pregnancy until the disease is in clinical remission. Combined OCs should probably be avoided because of the possible exacerbation of symptoms in known lupus. The progestagen-only pill can be considered for lupus patients without renal or liver disease or hypertension if the patient is closely watched. Barrier methods are possible for patients who are reliable and will comply with directions. No absolute contraindications appear to exist for women with rheumatoid arthritis. Women using OCs are

  13. Opioid Drugs in Patients With Liver Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Soleimanpour, Hassan; Safari, Saeid; Shahsavari Nia, Kavous; Sanaie, Sarvin; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2016-01-01

    Context The liver, one of the most important organs of the body, is known to be responsible for several functions. The functional contribution of the liver to the metabolism of carbohydrates, protein, drugs and toxins, fats and cholesterol and many other biological processes are still unknown. Liver disorders are classified into two types: acute and chronic. Different drugs are used in liver diseases to treat and control pain. Most pain relief medications such as opioids are metabolized via the liver; therefore, the adverse reactions of drugs are probably higher for patients with liver disease. The current study aimed to evaluate the effects of opioid drugs on patients with liver disease; therefore, it is necessary to select suitable opioids for such patients. Evidence Acquisition This review was written by referring to research literature including 70 articles and four textbooks published from 1958 to 2015 on various reputable sites. Searches were carried out on the key phrases of narcotic pain relievers (opioids), acute and chronic hepatic failure, opioid adverse drug reactions, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and other similar keywords. References included a variety of research papers (descriptive and analytical), intervention and review articles. Results In patients with liver disease, administration of opioid analgesics should be observed, accurately. As a general rule, lower doses of drugs should be administered at regular intervals based on the signs of drug accumulation. Secondly, the interactions of opioid drugs with different levels of substrates of the P450 cytochrome enzyme should be considered. Conclusions Pain management in patients with liver dysfunction is always challenging to physicians because of the adverse reactions of drugs, especially opioids. Opioids should be used cautiously since they can cause sedation, constipation and sudden encephalopathy effects. Since the clearance of these drugs in patients with hepatic insufficiency is decreased

  14. Prognosis of patients with carcinoid heart disease after valvular surgery.

    PubMed

    Manoly, Imthiaz; McAnelly, Sarah-Louise; Sriskandarajah, Sanjeevan; McLaughlin, Kenneth Edward

    2014-08-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. We addressed the following question: in patients who are diagnosed with carcinoid heart disease (CHD), do valvular surgeries improve their prognosis? Fifty percent of the patients with clinically diagnosed carcinoid syndrome had cardiac involvement which was present either as valvular dysfunction or as cardiac metastases. These patients often require surgery due to their heightened risk of cardiac disease. Altogether 217 relevant papers were identified as a result of the below-mentioned search, of which 10 papers represented the best evidence to answer the question. The author, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses were tabulated. Of the patients who were identified to have carcinoid heart disease in different studies, 193 patients had valve procedure, mainly replacements at tricuspid, mitral and aortic valve positions and either valvuloplasty or replacement at pulmonary valve. Tricuspid and pulmonary valves represented the majority of the excised valves among patients undergoing valvular surgery for CHD. The pathology of carcinoid valve was attributed to the presence of plaque, causing thickening and retraction. Pure regurgitation was the most common finding in all the valves except pulmonary valve which had both stenosis and insufficiency. Thirty-day mortality was 17% (range 1-63%) and long-term survivors were reported to be alive at an average of 58 months (28-80 months) after the valve surgery. The evidence demonstrates that surgical intervention can lead to improved prognosis and reduce the symptoms of heart failure. Postoperative mortality was mainly due to the carcinoid disease itself and not as a complication of the surgery. Therefore, surgery could be considered for symptomatic palliation in carefully selected individuals.

  15. Personal Health Records for Patients with Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rozenblum, R.; Park, A.; Dunn, M.; Bates, D.W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Personal health records (PHRs) connected to a physician’s electronic health record system hold substantial promise for supporting and engaging patients with chronic disease. Objectives: To explore how U.S. health care organizations are currently utilizing PHRs for chronic disease populations. Methods A mixed methods study including semi-structured interviews and a questionnaire was conducted. A purposive sample was developed of health care organizations which were recognized as exemplars for PHRs and were high performers in national patient satisfaction surveys (H-CAHPS or CAHPS). Within each organization, participants were health IT leaders or those managing high-risk or chronic disease populations. Results Interviews were conducted with 30 informants and completed questionnaires were received from 16 organizations (84% response rate). Most PHRs allowed patients to access health records and educational material, message their provider, renew prescriptions and request appointments. Patient generated data was increasingly being sought and combined with messaging, resulted in greater understanding of patient health and functioning outside of the clinic visit. However for chronic disease populations, there was little targeted involvement in PHR design and few tools to help interpret and manage their conditions beyond those offered for all. The PHR was largely uncoupled from high risk population management interventions and no clear framework for future PHR development emerged. Conclusion This technology is currently underutilized and represents a major opportunity given the potential benefits of patient engagement and shared decision making. A coherent patient-centric PHR design and evaluation strategy is required to realize its potential and maximize this natural hub for multidisciplinary care co-ordination. PMID:25024758

  16. Patient access to complex chronic disease records on the Internet

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Access to medical records on the Internet has been reported to be acceptable and popular with patients, although most published evaluations have been of primary care or office-based practice. We tested the feasibility and acceptability of making unscreened results and data from a complex chronic disease pathway (renal medicine) available to patients over the Internet in a project involving more than half of renal units in the UK. Methods Content and presentation of the Renal PatientView (RPV) system was developed with patient groups. It was designed to receive information from multiple local information systems and to require minimal extra work in units. After piloting in 4 centres in 2005 it was made available more widely. Opinions were sought from both patients who enrolled and from those who did not in a paper survey, and from staff in an electronic survey. Anonymous data on enrolments and usage were extracted from the webserver. Results By mid 2011 over 17,000 patients from 47 of the 75 renal units in the UK had registered. Users had a wide age range (<10 to >90 yrs) but were younger and had more years of education than non-users. They were enthusiastic about the concept, found it easy to use, and 80% felt it gave them a better understanding of their disease. The most common reason for not enrolling was being unaware of the system. A minority of patients had security concerns, and these were reduced after enrolling. Staff responses were also strongly positive. They reported that it aided patient concordance and disease management, and increased the quality of consultations with a neutral effect on consultation length. Neither patient nor staff responses suggested that RPV led to an overall increase in patient anxiety or to an increased burden on renal units beyond the time required to enrol each patient. Conclusions Patient Internet access to secondary care records concerning a complex chronic disease is feasible and popular, providing an increased

  17. Epidemiology of acute infections among patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, Lorien S; Go, Alan S

    2008-09-01

    The objectives of this review were (1) to review recent literature on the rates, risk factors, and outcomes of infections in patients who had chronic kidney disease (CKD) and did or did not require renal replacement therapy; (2) to review literature on the efficacy and use of selected vaccines for patients with CKD; and (3) to outline a research framework for examining key issues regarding infections in patients with CKD. Infection-related hospitalizations contribute substantially to excess morbidity and mortality in patients with ESRD, and infection is the second leading cause of death in this population. Patients who have CKD and do not require renal replacement therapy seem to be at higher risk for infection compared with patients without CKD; however, data about patients who have CKD and do not require dialysis therapy are very limited. Numerous factors potentially predispose patients with CKD to infection: advanced age, presence of coexisting illnesses, vaccine hyporesponsiveness, immunosuppressive therapy, uremia, dialysis access, and the dialysis procedure. Targeted vaccination seems to have variable efficacy in the setting of CKD and is generally underused in this population. In conclusion, infection is a primary issue when caring for patients who receive maintenance dialysis. Very limited data exist about the rates, risk factors, and outcomes of infection in patients who have CKD and do not require dialysis. Future research is needed to delineate accurately the epidemiology of infections in these populations and to develop effective preventive strategies across the spectrum of CKD severity. PMID:18650409

  18. Factors Influencing Smoking Cessation in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenna, Kryss; Higgins, Helen

    1997-01-01

    Ten sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological characteristics considered predictors of difficulty with smoking cessation in patients with coronary artery disease are reviewed. The compounding effects of nicotine addiction are discussed. Consideration of these factors may result in individualized programs for smoking cessation. A brief overview…

  19. Support Group Counseling for Caregivers of Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkle, J. Scott

    1991-01-01

    Describes Alzheimer's disease and the burdens that caregivers encounter in dealing with Alzheimer's patients. Presents information concerning support group counseling for caregivers, their particular needs, and special family issues. Emphasizes that relationships between caregivers and support group counselors are crucial to successful…

  20. Ocular disease in patients with ANCA-positive vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Angela S.; Kempen, John H.; Choi, Dongseok; Liesegang, Teresa L.; Pujari, S. S.; Newcomb, Craig; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Rosenbaum, James T.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Foster, C. Stephen; Jabs, Douglas A.; Levy-Clarke, Grace A.; Suhler, Eric B.

    2009-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-positive vasculitis—the term recently applied to Wegener's granulomatosis—is a rare multi-system inflammation characterized by necrotizing granulomas and vasculitis. We investigated the ocular manifestations of this disease in a group of patients drawn from five inflammatory eye disease clinics across the United States. Of 8,562 persons with ocular inflammation, 59 individuals were diagnosed with ANCA-positive vasculitis; 35 males and 21 females, aged 16 to 96 years, were included in this study. Ocular diagnoses were scleritis (75.0%), uveitis (17.9%), and other ocular inflammatory conditions (33.9%) including peripheral ulcerative keratitis and orbital pseudotumor. Mean duration of ocular disease was 4.6 years. Oral corticosteroids and other systemic immunosuppressive agents were used by 85.7% and 78.5% of patients, respectively. Over time, patients with ANCA-positive vasculitis experienced 2.75-fold higher mortality than other patients with inflammatory eye disease. PMID:20835396

  1. Semantic Priming for Coordinate Distant Concepts in Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perri, R.; Zannino, G. D.; Caltagirone, C.; Carlesimo, G. A.

    2011-01-01

    Semantic priming paradigms have been used to investigate semantic knowledge in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). While priming effects produced by prime-target pairs with associative relatedness reflect processes at both lexical and semantic levels, priming effects produced by words that are semantically related but not associated should…

  2. Investigation of Anxiety and Depression in Patients with Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gerontoukou, Evangelia-Ioanna; Michaelidoy, Sofia; Rekleiti, Maria; Saridi, Maria; Souliotis, Kyriakos

    2015-01-01

    The health of an individual depends on both his/her physical and psychological condition. In recent years it has been observed that chronic patients have frequently an affected psycho-emotional state. The purpose of this study is to investigate anxiety and depression in patients with chronic diseases and the correlation of the results with daily physical activity levels and individual health levels, as well comorbidity. This study included patients with chronic diseases that were treated in a local general hospital or were visiting often outpatient clinics of the same hospital due to their condition. The sample in this particular study included 204 patients; 118 of them were women and 86 men. From the total sample that participated in our research, 118 (57.8%) were females and the majority of the participants were secondary/basic education graduates (67%), married (71%), living in urban areas (53%). Hypertension was the most frequent chronic disease in our sample, followed by hypercholesterolemia and diabetes mellitus. Comparing the occurrence of depression and anxiety symptoms in both questionnaires in relation to the expected frequency in the general population, significant levels of depression and anxiety symptoms were recorded. Taking into consideration the findings of this research, anxiety and depression symptoms can have profound effects regarding the control of chronic diseases, the patients’ quality of life and their general health. PMID:26973961

  3. Ofuji's disease in an immunocompetent patient successfully treated with dapsone

    PubMed Central

    Anjaneyan, Gopikrishnan; Manne, Sindhura; Panicker, Vinitha Varghese; Eapen, Malini

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis or Ofuji's disease is a non-infectious eosinophilic infiltration of hair follicles, which usually presents with itchy papules and pustules in a circinate configuration. We report this case of an immunocompetent patient with erythematous papules and plaques without macropustules diagnosed as eosinophilic pustular folliculitis—a rarely reported entity outside Japan. He was successfully treated with oral dapsone. PMID:27730038

  4. Assessing Impact on Family Caregivers to Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talkington-Boyer, Shannon; Snyder, Douglas K.

    1994-01-01

    Examined impact of caregiving among 110 caregivers to aging family member with Alzheimer's disease. Family caregivers' appraisals along dimensions of subjective burden, negative impact, caregiving satisfaction, and caregiver mastery were correlated with extent of memory and behavior problems of patient and caregivers' coping style, locus of…

  5. Acute arthropathy in patients with rash diseases: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Solange Artimos; Bastos Camacho, Luiz Antonio; Fernandes Bruno, Letícia; de Gusmão, Rodrigo Coimbra; de Medeiros Pereira, Antonio Carlos; Coca Velarde, Luis Guillermo; Mendonça Siqueira, Marilda

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the association of acute arthropathy and selected clinical features in patients with acute rash diseases. Serum samples from 1,554 patients were tested for anti-measles, dengue, human parvovirus B19, and rubella virus IgM using enzyme immunoassay. Sera from children, in whom these infections were excluded, were studied for anti-human herpesvirus type 6 IgG antibodies using an indirect immunofluorescence test. Joint complaints occurred in 31.2% of the 862 patients with an etiologic diagnosis and were more frequently seen in adults than in children (OR 8.5). Among the adults, arthropathy prevailed in women compared to men (OR 1.8). Arthropathy was most frequently reported in rubella (41.2%) and in dengue fever cases (41.1%) than in the other rash diseases studied (p < 0.0001). Joint complaints were more frequently seen in patients with fever (OR 1.6) and with five or more days of onset of the disease (OR 1.6), regardless of serological diagnosis. Arthropathy appeared as a frequent condition in rash diseases, typically with low severity and no specific pattern of joint involvement.

  6. Sexual Concerns of Male Spouses of Female Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litz, Brett T.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents case study which highlights attendant cognitive changes that occur in Alzheimer's patient, presenting caregiver with challenges to couple's sexual functioning. Describes man who reported erectile dysfunction directly stemming from stressful changes that had occurred in his relationship to his wife who had Alzheimer's disease. General…

  7. Effects of statin treatment in patients with coronary artery disease and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Hidehiro; Yajima, Junji; Oikawa, Yuji; Tanaka, Shingo; Fukamachi, Daisuke; Suzuki, Shinya; Sagara, Koichi; Otsuka, Takayuki; Matsuno, Shunsuke; Funada, Ryuichi; Kano, Hiroto; Uejima, Tokuhisa; Koike, Akira; Nagashima, Kazuyuki; Kirigaya, Hajime; Sawada, Hitoshi; Aizawa, Tadanori; Yamashita, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Statins reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality from coronary artery disease (CAD). However, the effects of statin therapy in patients with CAD and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain unclear. Within a single hospital-based cohort in the Shinken Database 2004-2010 comprising all patients (n = 15,227) who visited the Cardiovascular Institute, we followed patients with CKD and CAD after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). A major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular event (MACCE) was defined by composite end points, including death, myocardial infarction, cerebral infarction, cerebral hemorrhage, and target lesion revascularization. A total of 391 patients were included in this study (median follow-up time 905 ± 679 days). Of these, 209 patients used statins. Patients with statin therapy were younger than those without. Obesity and dyslipidemia were more common, and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was significantly higher, in patients undergoing statin treatment. MACCE and cardiac death tended to be less common, and all-cause death was significantly less common, in patients taking statins. Multivariate analysis showed that low estimated GFR, poor left ventricular ejection fraction, and the absence of statin therapy were independent predictors for all-cause death of CKD patients after PCI. Statin therapy was associated with reduced all-cause mortality in patients with CKD and CAD after PCI.

  8. Strategies for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Claudio

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequently accompanied by multimorbidities in affected patients. Even though the majority of these comorbidities are also related to advanced age and cigarette smoke, also COPD itself has significant impact on insurgence, or worsening of these conditions. As a consequence, COPD is regarded as a complex disease with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary involvement. According to current guidelines for the management of COPD patients, the comprehensive treatment of this condition should target respiratory symptoms as well as comorbidities. Cardiovascular disease is one of the most frequent comorbidities in COPD patients and there are several strategies for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease in COPD patients. These include smoking cessation, pharmacologic prevention of cardiovascular disease, and the treatment of COPD. Beta-blockers for the prevention of cardiovascular disease have been traditionally limited in COPD patients, albeit current evidence supporting their efficacy and safety in these patients. With regard to COPD medications, corticosteroids are generally not recommended, except for exacerbations, while long-acting beta2-agonists have demonstrated an acceptable profile of cardiovascular safety. Long-acting anticholinergic bronchodilators, in particular tiotropium in the mist inhaler formulation, have been associated with an increased risk of major cardiovascular events and mortality. Data on this issue remain, however, controversial. Glycopyrronium, a recently introduced anticholinergic, demonstrated. a rapid and sustained relief of respiratory symptoms with a favorable safety profile and no increase in cardiovascular risk, in monotherapy and in combination with a long-acting beta2-agonist in a comprehensive trial program indicating a valid option for COPD patients with CV comorbidities.

  9. Nutritional supplementation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Meng-Jer; Yang, Tsung-Ming; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-08-01

    Malnutrition in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with cachexia, sarcopenia, and weight loss, and may result in poorer pulmonary function, decreased exercise capacity, and increased risk of exacerbations. Providing nutritional supplementation is an important therapeutic intervention, particularly for severely ill COPD patients with malnutrition. Higher calorie intake through nutritional supplementation significantly increases body weight and muscle strength, and improves quality of life in malnourished COPD patients. Difficulties may be experienced by these COPD patients, who are struggling to breathe and eliminate CO2 from the lungs, resulting in dyspnea, hypercapnia, hypoxia, and respiratory acidosis, which exacerbates muscle loss through oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. To overcome these problems, nutritional supplements should aim to reduce metabolic CO2 production, lower respiratory quotient, and improve lung function. Several studies have shown that high-fat supplements produce less CO2 and have lower respiratory quotient value than high-carbohydrate supplements. In addition, high-fat supplements may be the most efficient means of providing a low-volume, calorie-dense supplement to COPD patients, and may be most beneficial to patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation where hypercapnia and malnutrition are most pronounced. Further studies are required to investigate the optimal nutritional supplements for COPD patients according to their disease severity. PMID:26822811

  10. [Tuberculous sacroiliitis in a patient with Gaucher disease].

    PubMed

    Lukina, E A; Mamonov, V E; Lukina, K A; Khomenko, V A; Pisetskiĭ, M M; Iatsyk, G A

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is an inherited enzymatic defect resulting from a deficiency of acid [3-glucosidase, a lysosomal enzyme involved in the degradation of cell metabolic products. The major clinical manifestations of GD are hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenia, and bony involvement varying from asymptomatic osteopenia to severest osteoporosis and ischemic necrosis to develop irreversible orthopedic defects. Timely enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant glucosidase makes it possible to arrest disease progression and to prevent damage to the vital organs. However, GD in adult patients is frequently diagnosed in the presence of occurring osteoarticular lesions (arthrosis deformans, abnormal fractures). In these instances, besides enzyme replacement therapy, high-quality orthopedic care is required. The description of the case history of a patient undergoing splenectomy in childhood is given as a clinical example of severe osteoarticular lesion in GD and complex differential diagnosis with the intercurrent disease extrapulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:24137954

  11. Patient Identified Disease Burden in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nicholas E; Quinn, Christine; Eastwood, Eileen; Tawil, Rabi; Heatwole, Chad R

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The multitude of symptoms associated with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) disease burden are of varying importance. The extent of these symptoms and their cumulative effect on the FSHD population is unknown. Methods We conducted interviews with adult FSHD patients to identify which symptoms have the greatest effect on their lives. Each interview was recorded, transcribed, coded, and analyzed using a qualitative framework technique, triangulation, and 3-investigator consensus approach. Results 1375 quotes were obtained through 20 patient interviews. 251 symptoms of importance were identified representing 14 themes of FSHD disease burden. Symptoms associated with mobility impairment, activity limitation, and social role limitation were most frequently mentioned by participants. Conclusions There are multiple themes and symptoms, some previously under-recognized, that play a key role in FSHD disease burden. PMID:23225386

  12. Investigation of saliva of patients with periodontal disease using NAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamboni, C. B.; Metairon, S.; Medeiros, I. M. M. A.; Lewgoy, H. R.

    2013-05-01

    In this study the non-stimulated whole saliva of 26 healthy subjects (mean age 33.9 ± 11.0 years, range: 26 to 49 years) and 11 patients with periodontal disease (mean age 41.7 ± 11.5 years; range 29 to 55 years) was investigated using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique. The samples were obtained from donors at São Paulo city (Brazil). The analyses were performed in the nuclear reactor IEA-R1 (3.5-4.5MW, pool type) at IPEN/CNEN-SP (Brazil). Considerable changes in Ca and S saliva's level were identified in patients with periodontal disease suggesting they can be used as monitors of periodontal diseases.

  13. Investigation of saliva of patients with periodontal disease using NAA

    SciTech Connect

    Zamboni, C. B.; Metairon, S.; Medeiros, I. M. M. A.

    2013-05-06

    In this study the non-stimulated whole saliva of 26 healthy subjects (mean age 33.9 {+-} 11.0 years, range: 26 to 49 years) and 11 patients with periodontal disease (mean age 41.7 {+-} 11.5 years; range 29 to 55 years) was investigated using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique. The samples were obtained from donors at Sao Paulo city (Brazil). The analyses were performed in the nuclear reactor IEA-R1 (3.5-4.5MW, pool type) at IPEN/CNEN-SP (Brazil). Considerable changes in Ca and S saliva's level were identified in patients with periodontal disease suggesting they can be used as monitors of periodontal diseases.

  14. Are patients with Parkinson's disease blind to blindsight?

    PubMed

    Diederich, Nico J; Stebbins, Glenn; Schiltz, Christine; Goetz, Christopher G

    2014-06-01

    In Parkinson's disease, visual dysfunction is prominent. Visual hallucinations can be a major hallmark of late stage disease, but numerous visual deficits also occur in early stage Parkinson's disease. Specific retinopathy, deficits in the primary visual pathway and the secondary ventral and dorsal pathways, as well as dysfunction of the attention pathways have all been posited as causes of hallucinations in Parkinson's disease. We present data from patients with Parkinson's disease that contrast with a known neuro-ophthalmological syndrome, termed 'blindsight'. In this syndrome, there is an absence of conscious object identification, but preserved 'guess' of the location of a stimulus, preserved reflexive saccades and motion perception and preserved autonomical and expressive reactions to negative emotional facial expressions. We propose that patients with Parkinson's disease have the converse of blindsight, being 'blind to blindsight'. As such they preserve conscious vision, but show erroneous 'guess' localization of visual stimuli, poor saccades and motion perception, and poor emotional face perception with blunted autonomic reaction. Although a large data set on these deficits in Parkinson's disease has been accumulated, consolidation into one specific syndrome has not been proposed. Focusing on neuropathological and physiological data from two phylogenetically old and subconscious pathways, the retino-colliculo-thalamo-amygdala and the retino-geniculo-extrastriate pathways, we propose that aberrant function of these systems, including pathologically inhibited superior colliculus activity, deficient corollary discharges to the frontal eye fields, dysfunctional pulvinar, claustrum and amygdaloid subnuclei of the amygdala, the latter progressively burdened with Lewy bodies, underlie this syndrome. These network impairments are further corroborated by the concept of the 'silent amygdala'. Functionally being 'blind to blindsight' may facilitate the highly

  15. Urinary Stone Disease: Advancing Knowledge, Patient Care, and Population Health.

    PubMed

    Scales, Charles D; Tasian, Gregory E; Schwaderer, Andrew L; Goldfarb, David S; Star, Robert A; Kirkali, Ziya

    2016-07-01

    Expanding epidemiologic and physiologic data suggest that urinary stone disease is best conceptualized as a chronic metabolic condition punctuated by symptomatic, preventable stone events. These acute events herald substantial future chronic morbidity, including decreased bone mineral density, cardiovascular disease, and CKD. Urinary stone disease imposes a large and growing public health burden. In the United States, 1 in 11 individuals will experience a urinary stone in their lifetime. Given this high incidence and prevalence, urinary stone disease is one of the most expensive urologic conditions, with health care charges exceeding $10 billion annually. Patient care focuses on management of symptomatic stones rather than prevention; after three decades of innovation, procedural interventions are almost exclusively minimally invasive or noninvasive, and mortality is rare. Despite these advances, the prevalence of stone disease has nearly doubled over the past 15 years, likely secondary to dietary and health trends. The NIDDK recently convened a symposium to assess knowledge and treatment gaps to inform future urinary stone disease research. Reducing the public health burden of urinary stone disease will require key advances in understanding environmental, genetic, and other individual disease determinants; improving secondary prevention; and optimal population health strategies in an increasingly cost-conscious care environment. PMID:26964844

  16. Use of electrocochleography for assessing endolymphatic hydrops in patients with Lyme disease and Ménière's disease.

    PubMed

    Selmani, Ziane; Pyykkö, Ilmari; Ishizaki, Hisayoshi; Ashammakhi, Nureddin

    2002-03-01

    From an otological standpoint, Lyme disease can manifest itself as Ménière's disease both clinically and electrophysiologically. The aim of this study was to describe the findings of routine clinical, auditory and vestibular tests in patients with Ménière's and Lyme disease and to use electrocochleography (ECoG) to assess the presence of endolymphatic hydrops (EH) in both diseases. Transtympanic ECoG was performed in 91 patients with Ménière's disease and in 11 patients with confirmed Lyme disease. In both diseases the majority of patients had more than one complaint. There was one case with isolated hearing loss in the Lyme disease group. Typical clinical manifestations of Ménière's disease (vertigo, sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus) were found in 6/11 patients (54.5%) in the Lyme disease group. The ECoG results indicated that there were 65/91 patients (71.4%) with Ménière's disease and 5 patients (45.5%) with Lyme disease who presented with EH. No statistically significant difference was found between the incidence of different symptoms of Ménière's and Lyme disease. On the basis of these results, patients with Lyme disease should undergo careful examination and investigation, especially in endemic regions. The presence of EH does not exclude the presence of infection with borreliosis as a cause of Ménière's disease-like symptoms.

  17. Treatment of Anemia in Patients with Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice Guideline

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Treatment of Anemia in Patients With Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice ... Physicians The full report is titled “Treatment of Anemia in Patients With Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice ...

  18. Pain management in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Phuong-Chi T.; Toscano, Edgar; Pham, Phuong-Mai T.; Pham, Phuong-Anh T.; Pham, Son V.; Pham, Phuong-Thu T.

    2009-01-01

    Pain has been reported to be a common problem in the general population and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Although similar data for pre-ESRD patients are lacking, we recently reported that the prevalence of pain is also very high (>70%) among pre-ESRD patients at a Los Angeles County tertiary referral centre. The high prevalence of pain in the CKD population is particularly concerning because pain has been shown to be associated with poor quality of life. Of greater concern, poor quality of life, at least in dialysis patients, has been shown to be associated with poor survival. We herein discuss the pathophysiology of common pain conditions, review a commonly accepted approach to the management of pain in the general population, and discuss analgesic-induced renal complications and therapeutic issues specific for patients with reduced renal function. PMID:25949305

  19. Myocardial ischemia during intravenous DSA in patients with cardiac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hesselink, J.R.; Hayman, L.A.; Chung, K.J.; McGinnis, B.D.; Davis, K.R.; Taveras, J.M.

    1984-12-01

    A prospective study was performed for 48 patients who had histories of angina and were referred for digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Cardiac disease was graded according to the American Heart Association (AHA) functional classification system. Each patient received 2-5 injections of 40-ml diatrizoate meglumine and diatrizoate sodium at 15 ml per second in the superior vena cava. Of the 28 patients in functional Classes I or II, 11% had angina and 32% had definite ischemic ECG changes after the DSA injections. Of the patients in functional Class III 63% had angina, and 58% had definite ischemic ECG changes after the injections. These observed cardiac effects following bolus injections of hypertonic ionic contrast media indicate that special precautions are necessary when performing intravenous DSA examinations on this group of high risk patients.

  20. Uncontrolled chronic disease: patient non-compliance or clinical mismanagement?

    PubMed

    Javors, Jonathan R; Bramble, Judith E

    2003-01-01

    A study group of 30 individuals was randomly chosen from 1,379 beneficiaries predicted to be at risk for health care complications at a large, Midwest, industrial company currently experiencing increased health care costs. All 30 individuals had one or more chronic illness, primarily diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or asthma. Through analysis of medical records, a self-reporting health risk assessment survey, and personal contact with both patients and clinicians, each study individual was assessed as to whether his disease(s) was under control, the individual was compliant with his treatment protocol, and whether the supervising clinician was following nationally accepted standards of care. Fewer than 50% of the individuals in the study group had their chronic illness(es) under control. Those individuals whose treatment adhered to national guidelines were significantly more likely to have their disease under control (p < 0.001). For this study, patient compliance was high and unrelated to whether their disease was under control. Behavioral (external) barriers were most often cited as the reason a clinical practitioner did not follow the appropriate national standard of care. Most clinicians were aware of and familiar with the guidelines; a few either did not agree with or misunderstood the guidelines. The results of this study suggest that changing clinical practice behaviors to better ensure compliance to national standards of care may make a substantial difference in chronic disease control.

  1. Uncontrolled chronic disease: patient non-compliance or clinical mismanagement?

    PubMed

    Javors, Jonathan R; Bramble, Judith E

    2003-01-01

    A study group of 30 individuals was randomly chosen from 1,379 beneficiaries predicted to be at risk for health care complications at a large, Midwest, industrial company currently experiencing increased health care costs. All 30 individuals had one or more chronic illness, primarily diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or asthma. Through analysis of medical records, a self-reporting health risk assessment survey, and personal contact with both patients and clinicians, each study individual was assessed as to whether his disease(s) was under control, the individual was compliant with his treatment protocol, and whether the supervising clinician was following nationally accepted standards of care. Fewer than 50% of the individuals in the study group had their chronic illness(es) under control. Those individuals whose treatment adhered to national guidelines were significantly more likely to have their disease under control (p < 0.001). For this study, patient compliance was high and unrelated to whether their disease was under control. Behavioral (external) barriers were most often cited as the reason a clinical practitioner did not follow the appropriate national standard of care. Most clinicians were aware of and familiar with the guidelines; a few either did not agree with or misunderstood the guidelines. The results of this study suggest that changing clinical practice behaviors to better ensure compliance to national standards of care may make a substantial difference in chronic disease control. PMID:14570385

  2. Voluntary Imitation in Alzheimer’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bisio, Ambra; Casteran, Matthieu; Ballay, Yves; Manckoundia, Patrick; Mourey, France; Pozzo, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Although Alzheimer’s disease (AD) primarily manifests as cognitive deficits, the implicit sensorimotor processes that underlie social interactions, such as automatic imitation, seem to be preserved in mild and moderate stages of the disease, as is the ability to communicate with other persons. Nevertheless, when AD patients face more challenging tasks, which do not rely on automatic processes but on explicit voluntary mechanisms and require the patient to pay attention to external events, the cognitive deficits resulting from the disease might negatively affect patients’ behavior. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether voluntary motor imitation, i.e., a volitional mechanism that involves observing another person’s action and translating this perception into one’s own action, was affected in patients with AD. Further, we tested whether this ability was modulated by the nature of the observed stimulus by comparing the ability to reproduce the kinematic features of a human demonstrator with that of a computerized-stimulus. AD patients showed an intact ability to reproduce the velocity of the observed movements, particularly when the stimulus was a human agent. This result suggests that high-level cognitive processes involved in voluntary imitation might be preserved in mild and moderate stages of AD and that voluntary imitation abilities might benefit from the implicit interpersonal communication established between the patient and the human demonstrator. PMID:27014056

  3. Reactivity of neuroborreliosis patients (Lyme disease) to cardiolipin and gangliosides.

    PubMed

    García Moncó, J C; Wheeler, C M; Benach, J L; Furie, R A; Lukehart, S A; Stanek, G; Steere, A C

    1993-07-01

    A subset of patients (50%) with neuroborreliosis (Lyme disease) showed IgG reactivity to cardiolipin in solid phase ELISA. In addition, a subset of patients with neuroborreliosis (29%) and syphilis (59%) had IgM reactivity to gangliosides with a Gal(beta 1-3) GalNac terminal sequence (GM1, GD1b, and asialo GM1). Anti-ganglioside IgM antibodies were significantly more frequent in these two groups of patients compared to patients with cutaneous and articular Lyme disease, primary antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus and normal controls. Correlative evidence and adsorption experiments indicated that antibodies to cardiolipin had separate specificities from those directed against the gangliosides. IgM antibodies to Gal(beta 1-3) GalNac gangliosides appeared to have similar specificities since these were positively correlated and inhibitable by cross adsorption assays. Given the clinical associations of patients with neuroborreliosis and syphilis with IgM reactivity to gangliosides sharing the Gal(beta 1-3) GalNac terminus, we suggest that these antibodies could represent a response to injury in neurological disease or a cross reactive event caused by spirochetes.

  4. [Self-Management in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease].

    PubMed

    Chiou, Chou-Ping; Lu, Yung-Chuan; Hung, Shih-Yuan

    2016-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients typically self-manage their disease-care program. Self-management requires the investment of considerable time and energy in health management and in following the multifaceted CKD treatment regimen. CKD, a progressive disease, is classified into five stages that correspond to the five stages of decline in kidney function, as measured using the glomerular filtration rate (GRF). Each of these stages requires that a patient modify his / her lifestyle and shoulder the responsibility for day-to-day health management tasks. Key to promoting self-management is the partnership and collaboration between healthcare providers and patients. Tasks in this partnership include patient assessment and communication, regimen adherence, emotional management, negotiation of care plans, and the enhancement of self-efficacy, with the aims of creating positive changes in behavior, promoting correct symptoms interpretation and reporting, and promoting the appropriate use of resources. Nurses may help patients maneuver this initially frightening and sometimes difficult terrain with strategies that are tailored to each CKD stage.

  5. Social Media Use in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ling; Reich, Jason; Groshek, Jacob; Farraye, Francis A

    2016-05-01

    Patients with chronic illnesses such as Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) have been more keen to utilize the Internet and in particular, social media to obtain patient educational information in recent years. It is important for the gastroenterologist to be aware of these modalities and how they might affect information exchange and ultimately, disease management. This article addresses the current prevalence of social media use, advent of mobile health applications, social media usage in patients with chronic conditions, usage amongst providers, and most notably, the usage and preferences in IBD patients. Over the last decade there has been an increasing desire from patients to receive educational material about their disease through social media. We reviewed the medical literature on the quality of IBD-related information on social media. Given the disparity of information available on the Internet, we remark on the quality of this information and stress the need for further research to assess the validity of IBD information posted on social media. PMID:26894839

  6. Review of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Punjabi, Paawan; Hira, Angela; Prasad, Shanti; Wang, Xiangbing; Chokhavatia, Sita

    2015-09-01

    This article reviews the known pathophysiological mechanisms of comorbid gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the diabetic patient, discusses therapeutic options in care, and provides an approach to its evaluation and management. We searched for review articles published in the past 10 years through a PubMed search using the filters diabetes mellitus, GERD, pathophysiology, and management. The search only yielded a handful of articles, so we independently included relevant studies from these review articles along with related citations as suggested by PubMed. We found diabetic patients are more prone to developing GERD and may present with atypical manifestations. A number of mechanisms have been proposed to elucidate the connection between these two diseases. Studies involving treatment options for comorbid disease suggest conflicting drug-drug interactions. Currently, there are no published guidelines specifically for the evaluation and management of GERD in the diabetic patient. Although there are several proposed mechanisms for the higher prevalence of GERD in the diabetic patient, this complex interrelationship requires further research. Understanding the pathophysiology will help direct diagnostic evaluation. In our review, we propose a management algorithm for GERD in the diabetic patient.

  7. "Will I get Alzheimer disease?" when cognitively normal patients ask to be tested for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Snider, B Joy; Buckles, Virginia D

    2013-04-01

    This article presents the case of a cognitively normal patient who is requesting a procedure (amyloid imaging) recently approved for the diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD) in patients with cognitive impairment. The predictive value of this test in unaffected people is not clearly established. Knowing the results of the test will have no effect on therapeutic options, although the patient may make lifestyle decisions based on the results. There is potential risk to the patient in terms of insurability, employability, and psychological consequences. Physicians will face this situation with increasing frequency as the AD biomarker field progresses.

  8. [Features of dietary treatment in patients with coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    RUS

    2015-01-01

    The present review summarizes the current data of dietary treatment in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Numerous studies have shown that the diet can affect the modifiable risk factors for CHD that is the basis of primary and secondary prevention of this disease. The main areas of personalization of nutrition is the selection of an adequate energy value, a certain quota of protein,fats and carbohydrates in the diet, as well as other micronutrients that may influence the development of coronary artery disease. Caloric restriction of the diet in overweight patients is the most important factor of weight loss, independent of macronutrient composition of the diet. Diets with higher dietary protein content increase the rate of weight loss and improve blood lipid profile, but have a short-term effect. Excessive consumption of saturated fatty acids is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. As a result, numerous studies have shown that replacing saturated fats with mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids have a beneficial effect on blood lipid profile in patients with coronary artery disease. Several studies have shown that increasing the glycemic load is accompanied by an elevated risk of CHD, especially in women. Personalized dietary treatment on the basis of the etiopathogenic mechanisms of CHD and with the individual characteristics of a particular patient (sex, age, heredity, nutritional status, physical activity) is becoming increasingly important. Personalization of the diet provides a positive effect on risk factors for coronary heart disease, on the quality of life and increases the effectiveness of diet-therapy.

  9. [Features of dietary treatment in patients with coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    RUS

    2015-01-01

    The present review summarizes the current data of dietary treatment in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Numerous studies have shown that the diet can affect the modifiable risk factors for CHD that is the basis of primary and secondary prevention of this disease. The main areas of personalization of nutrition is the selection of an adequate energy value, a certain quota of protein,fats and carbohydrates in the diet, as well as other micronutrients that may influence the development of coronary artery disease. Caloric restriction of the diet in overweight patients is the most important factor of weight loss, independent of macronutrient composition of the diet. Diets with higher dietary protein content increase the rate of weight loss and improve blood lipid profile, but have a short-term effect. Excessive consumption of saturated fatty acids is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. As a result, numerous studies have shown that replacing saturated fats with mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids have a beneficial effect on blood lipid profile in patients with coronary artery disease. Several studies have shown that increasing the glycemic load is accompanied by an elevated risk of CHD, especially in women. Personalized dietary treatment on the basis of the etiopathogenic mechanisms of CHD and with the individual characteristics of a particular patient (sex, age, heredity, nutritional status, physical activity) is becoming increasingly important. Personalization of the diet provides a positive effect on risk factors for coronary heart disease, on the quality of life and increases the effectiveness of diet-therapy. PMID:26852529

  10. Non-motor symptoms in Chinese Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Gan, Jing; Zhou, Mingzhu; Chen, Wei; Liu, Zhenguo

    2014-05-01

    This study was designed to survey the prevalence and distribution of non-motor symptoms (NMS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients in Shanghai, China, and to investigate the association between NMS and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). One hundred fifty-five PD patients were evaluated using the NMS Questionnaire 30 (NMSQuest), Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39). These data were compared with an international cross-sectional study, and the associations of motor and non-motor measures with HRQoL were estimated. Predictors of HRQoL were sought through multiple linear regression analyses. Each PD patient had eight different individual NMS on average. The problems of memory (65.82%), constipation (64.56%) and nocturia (61.39%) were the most frequent complaints. NMS prevalence in PD patients in Shanghai was consistent with that in the international study, although the composition proportions were different. There was a significant association of PDQ-39 score with NMSQuest score (rs=0.433, p=0.000), UPDRS III score (rs=0.473, p=0.000), Hoehn and Yahr (H-Y) stage (rs=0.567, p=0.000), disease duration (rs=0.220, p=0.005), and levodopa equivalent dosage (rs=0.263, p=0.001). H-Y stage (disease severity) and NMS score were the strongest predictors for PDQ-39 score. This study confirmed that NMS are common in PD, occurring across all disease stages and have a great impact on quality of life. NMS progression contributes significantly to HRQoL decline, and should be well recognized and treated.

  11. [Asymptomatic celiac disease in patient with chronic acalculous cholecystitis].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, A I; Dolgasheva, G M; Krums, L M; Bystrovskaia, E V; Sabel'nikova, E A; Gudkova, R B; Vorob'eva, N N; Lishchinskaia, A A

    2011-01-01

    We described a patient 40 years old, admitted to the clinic with periodic attacks of pain in the right upper quadrant. With ultrasound it was confirmed chronic acalculous cholecystitis, and at endoscopy and multiple biopsies revealed atrophy of the mucosa of the duodenum (DM), corresponding to celiac disease (stage III in the Marsh classification). Titer of antibodies to gliadin (AGA) and tissue transglutaminase (AtTG) were higher: 60 and 110 units/ml, respectively, at a rate of 10 units/ml. The patient was assigned a lifetime adherence to a gluten-free diet, serologic test and a control endoscopy with biopsy at 6 months. The important role of the doctor-endoscopist in the diagnosis of latent forms of celiac disease. The significance of DM atrophy in the pathogenesis of patients with chronic cholecystitis. PMID:21695960

  12. Clinical and genetic characteristics of Mexican Huntington's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Alonso, María Elisa; Ochoa, Adriana; Boll, Marie-Catherine; Sosa, Ana Luisa; Yescas, Petra; López, Marisol; Macias, Rosario; Familiar, Itziar; Rasmussen, Astrid

    2009-10-15

    We report the characteristics of 691 Mexican patients with Huntington's disease (HD). These patients, representing 401 families, constitute the largest series of Mexican HD cases as yet described in the literature. We found the clinical characteristics of these patients to be similar to those of other populations, but we observed a higher frequency of infantile cases, a shorter disease duration and a lower suicide rate. In 626 cases, for which molecular analyses were available, CAG-trinucleotide expansion size ranged from 37-106 repeats. The large number of CAG repeats (19.04 +/- 3.02) in normal alleles and the presence of new mutations suggest that the overall prevalence of HD in the Mexican population could be expected to be within range of, or higher than, that reported for Europeans.

  13. Cardiovascular disease risk profiles comparison among dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sharabas, Islam; Siddiqi, Nauman

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to assess the cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in the prevalent peritoneal dialysis (PD) and hemodialysis (HD) patients and their association with cardiovascular events (CVEs) in a Saudi end-stage renal disease cohort. This was a prospective, observational, single-center study. A total of 192 patients were screened of which 157 patients were eligible (HD = 121, PD = 36). All patients underwent assessment of cardiovascular risk factors at the time of enrollment including electrocardiogram and echocardiography, lipid profile, homocysteine, and insulin levels. Patients were followed for one year and CVE [acute myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident (CVA), and congestive heart failure] and mortality were recorded. SPSS ® Version 16 was used for the analysis. T-test and ANOVA were used for continuous data; categorical data were analyzed using Chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests. The primary end-point of CVE and all-cause mortality was compared in the two groups using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. HD patients were older and had been longer on dialysis. While PD patients had higher urine output and better Kt/V values, they were more edematous and using more antihypertensive medications. PD patients also had a lower ejection fraction (EF). Age >57 years and the use of more than one antihypertensive medication were associated with higher risk of CVE, while EF >53 was found to be protective. Age >57 years and EF <53 at enrollment were predictive of all-cause mortality. Saudi patients undergoing PD have worse CVD risk profiles compared to HD patients. Age less than 57 years and an EF >53 were cardioprotective.

  14. Cardiovascular disease risk profiles comparison among dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sharabas, Islam; Siddiqi, Nauman

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to assess the cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in the prevalent peritoneal dialysis (PD) and hemodialysis (HD) patients and their association with cardiovascular events (CVEs) in a Saudi end-stage renal disease cohort. This was a prospective, observational, single-center study. A total of 192 patients were screened of which 157 patients were eligible (HD = 121, PD = 36). All patients underwent assessment of cardiovascular risk factors at the time of enrollment including electrocardiogram and echocardiography, lipid profile, homocysteine, and insulin levels. Patients were followed for one year and CVE [acute myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident (CVA), and congestive heart failure] and mortality were recorded. SPSS ® Version 16 was used for the analysis. T-test and ANOVA were used for continuous data; categorical data were analyzed using Chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests. The primary end-point of CVE and all-cause mortality was compared in the two groups using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. HD patients were older and had been longer on dialysis. While PD patients had higher urine output and better Kt/V values, they were more edematous and using more antihypertensive medications. PD patients also had a lower ejection fraction (EF). Age >57 years and the use of more than one antihypertensive medication were associated with higher risk of CVE, while EF >53 was found to be protective. Age >57 years and EF <53 at enrollment were predictive of all-cause mortality. Saudi patients undergoing PD have worse CVD risk profiles compared to HD patients. Age less than 57 years and an EF >53 were cardioprotective. PMID:27424685

  15. Hypoalbuminaemia predicts outcome in adult patients with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Kempny, Aleksander; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Alonso-Gonzalez, Rafael; Uebing, Anselm; Rafiq, Isma; Li, Wei; Swan, Lorna; Hooper, James; Donovan, Jackie; Wort, Stephen J; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Background In patients with acquired heart failure, hypoalbuminaemia is associated with increased risk of death. The prevalence of hypoproteinaemia and hypoalbuminaemia and their relation to outcome in adult patients with congenital heart disease (ACHD) remains, however, unknown. Methods Data on patients with ACHD who underwent blood testing in our centre within the last 14 years were collected. The relation between laboratory, clinical or demographic parameters at baseline and mortality was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Results A total of 2886 patients with ACHD were included. Mean age was 33.3 years (23.6–44.7) and 50.1% patients were men. Median plasma albumin concentration was 41.0 g/L (38.0–44.0), whereas hypoalbuminaemia (<35 g/L) was present in 13.9% of patients. The prevalence of hypoalbuminaemia was significantly higher in patients with great complexity ACHD (18.2%) compared with patients with moderate (11.3%) or simple ACHD lesions (12.1%, p<0.001). During a median follow-up of 5.7 years (3.3–9.6), 327 (11.3%) patients died. On univariable Cox regression analysis, hypoalbuminaemia was a strong predictor of outcome (HR 3.37, 95% CI 2.67 to 4.25, p<0.0001). On multivariable Cox regression, after adjusting for age, sodium and creatinine concentration, liver dysfunction, functional class and disease complexity, hypoalbuminaemia remained a significant predictor of death. Conclusions Hypoalbuminaemia is common in patients with ACHD and is associated with a threefold increased risk of risk of death. Hypoalbuminaemia, therefore, should be included in risk-stratification algorithms as it may assist management decisions and timing of interventions in the growing ACHD population. PMID:25736048

  16. Overuse of Computed Tomography in Patients with Complicated Gallstone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Benarroch-Gampel, Jaime; Boyd, Casey A.; Sheffield, Kristin M.; Townsend, Courtney M.; Riall, Taylor S.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND When compared to ultrasound, computed tomography scans (CT) are more expensive, have significant radiation exposure, and have lower sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values for patients with gallstone disease. METHODS We reviewed data on patients emergently admitted with complicated gallstone disease between 1/2005 and 5/2010. The use of CT and ultrasound imaging on admission was described. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate factors predicting receipt of CT. RESULTS 562 consecutive patients presented emergently with complicated gallstone disease. The mean age was 45 years. 72% of patients were female, 46% were white, and 41% were Hispanic. 72% of patients had an ultrasound during the initial evaluation and 41% had a CT. Both studies were performed in 25% of patients (n=141), while 16% (n=93) had CT only and 47% (n=259) had ultrasound only. CT was performed first in 67% of those who underwent both studies. Evening imaging (7pm–7am; OR=4.44, 95% CI 2.88–6.85), increased age (OR=1.14 per 5-year increase, 95% CI 1.07–1.21), leukocytosis (OR=1.67, 95% CI 1.10–2.53), and hyperamylasemia (OR=2.02, 95% CI 1.16–3.51) predicted receipt of CT. CONCLUSIONS Our study demonstrates the overuse of CT in the evaluation of complicated gallstone disease. Evening imaging was the biggest predictor of CT use, suggesting that CT is performed not to clarify the diagnosis, but rather a surrogate for the indicated study. Surgeons and emergency physicians should be trained to perform right upper quadrant ultrasounds to avoid receipt of unnecessary studies in the appropriate clinical setting. PMID:21862355

  17. Patients' knowledge of risk and protective factors for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Wartak, Siddharth A; Friderici, Jennifer; Lotfi, Amir; Verma, Ashish; Kleppel, Reva; Naglieri-Prescod, Deborah; Rothberg, Michael B

    2011-05-15

    Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. The American Heart Association has proposed improving overall cardiovascular health by promoting 7 components of ideal cardiovascular health, including health behaviors (not smoking, regular exercise, and healthy diet) and health factors (ideal body mass index, cholesterol, blood pressure, and blood glucose). The patients' knowledge of these 7 components is unknown. We performed a cross-sectional survey of patients at 4 primary care and 1 cardiology clinic. The survey measured demographic data, personal behaviors/health factors, cardiovascular disease history, and knowledge about these 7 components. A multivariate model was developed to assess patient characteristics associated with high knowledge scores. Of the 2,200 surveys distributed, 1,702 (77%) were returned with sufficient responses for analysis. Of these, 49% correctly identified heart disease as the leading cause of death, and 37% (95% confidence interval [CI] 35% to 39%) correctly identified all 7 components. The average respondent identified 4.9 components (95% CI 4.7 to 5.0). The lowest recognition rates were for exercise (57%), fruit/vegetable consumption (58%), and diabetes (63%). In a multivariate model, knowledge of all 7 components was positively associated with high school education or greater (odds ratio 2.43, 95% CI 1.68 to 3.52) and white ethnicity (odds ratio 1.78, 95% CI 1.27 to 2.50), and negatively associated with attending an urban neighborhood clinic (odds ratio 0.60, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.82). In conclusion, just >1/3 of patients could identify all 7 components of ideal cardiovascular health. Educational efforts should target patients in low socioeconomic strata and focus on improving knowledge about healthy diet and regular exercise. Although patients with diabetes were more likely than those without diabetes to recognize their risk, 1 in 5 were not aware that diabetes is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

  18. Functional assessment staging (FAST) in Korean patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Na, Hae-Ri; Kim, Sang-Yun; Chang, Young-Hee; Park, Moon-Ho; Cho, Sung-Tae; Han, Il-Woo; Kim, Tae-You; Hwang, Sul-A

    2010-01-01

    Functional Assessment Staging (FAST) was devised to meet the need for a more brief patient-derived rating scale for evaluating changes in functional performance and activities of daily living skills in all the stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). FAST was administered to 464 patients with probable AD according to the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Diseases and Stroke/Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association (NINCDS-ADRDA) criteria. The patients were also evaluated using the Korean version of the Mini-Mental Status Examination (K-MMSE), the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR), the Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes (CDR-SB), the Global Deterioration Scale (GDS), the Barthel Activities of Daily Living (B-ADL), and the Seoul-Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (S-IADL). For patients with moderate to severe dementia, the Korean versions of the Severe Impairment Battery (SIB-Ko) and Baylor profound mental status examination (BPMSE-Ko) were also administered. There were significant correlations between the FAST and the K-MMSE scores (r= - 0.71, p< 0.001), between the FAST and the SIB-Ko scores (r= - 0.54, p< 0.001) and between the FAST and the BPMSE-Ko scores (r=- 0.46, p< 0.001). The FAST was also correlated with the CDR, the CDR-SB, the B-ADL, and the S-IADL (p< 0.001). Ultimately, FAST is a reliable and valid assessment technique for evaluating functional deterioration in AD patients throughout the disease course. Moreover, the findings of the present study suggest that the FAST elucidates a characteristic pattern of progressive, ordinal, and functional decline in AD in Korean AD patients with dementia. PMID:20847407

  19. Depression and major depressive disorder in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takeshi; Kitagawa, Mayumi; Tanaka, Teruaki; Nakagawa, Shin; Koyama, Tsukasa

    2010-01-15

    The prevalence of depression in Parkinson's disease (PD) varies greatly. In this study, we investigated major depressive disorder (MDD) and depressive symptoms without MDD in patients with PD. The psychopathological characteristics of depressive symptoms were assessed by a psychiatric interview. A total of 105 Japanese patients with PD without dementia were included. The Japanese version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) with a cutoff score of 13/14 was used to screen for depression. Using a structured interview, a comprehensive psychiatric evaluation of patients with BDI-II scores >13 (high BDI patients) was completed using the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV-TR. Forty patients (38%) had a BDI-II >13, but 29 did not show any depressed mood. Five cases met the criteria for MDD (three current, two past) and one patient was diagnosed with minor depressive disorder. A slight depressed mood that was associated with worrying about PD was seen in 6 of 34 patients without any depressive disorder and fluctuated with aggravation of PD symptoms in two of these patients. For the diagnosis of MDD, the number of positive items from the DSM-IV-TR definition of MDD is most important and useful for differentiating MDD and non-MDD. The low-prevalence rate of MDD in our patient population suggests that PD may be a psychological stressor for MDD, but does not necessarily induce MDD.

  20. Depression risk in patients with coronary heart disease in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Konrad, Marcel; Jacob, Louis; Rapp, Michael A; Kostev, Karel

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the prevalence of depression and its risk factors among patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) treated in German primary care practices. METHODS Longitudinal data from nationwide general practices in Germany (n = 1072) were analyzed. Individuals initially diagnosed with CHD (2009-2013) were identified, and 59992 patients were included and matched (1:1) to 59992 controls. The primary outcome measure was an initial diagnosis of depression within five years after the index date among patients with and without CHD. Cox proportional hazards models were used to adjust for confounders. RESULTS Mean age was equal to 68.0 years (SD = 11.3). A total of 55.9% of patients were men. After a five-year follow-up, 21.8% of the CHD group and 14.2% of the control group were diagnosed with depression (P < 0.001). In the multivariate regression model, CHD was a strong risk factor for developing depression (HR = 1.54, 95%CI: 1.49-1.59, P < 0.001). Prior depressive episodes, dementia, and eight other chronic conditions were associated with a higher risk of developing depression. Interestingly, older patients and women were also more likely to be diagnosed with depression compared with younger patients and men, respectively. CONCLUSION The risk of depression is significantly increased among patients with CHD compared with patients without CHD treated in primary care practices in Germany. CHD patients should be routinely screened for depression to ensure improved treatment and management. PMID:27721937

  1. Refsum disease: the presentation and ophthalmic aspects of Refsum disease in a series of 23 patients.

    PubMed

    Claridge, K G; Gibberd, F B; Sidey, M C

    1992-01-01

    Refsum disease (heredopathia atactica polyneuritiformis) was first described in 1946 and is a rare recessively inherited metabolic disease affecting phytanic acid metabolism. It causes retinitis pigmentosa, cataracts, a chronic polyneuropathy, cerebellar ataxia and cardiac arrhythmias amongst other clinical signs. By limiting dietary intake, plasma phytanic acid levels fall with an improvement in the neurological signs. The onset of retinitis pigmentosa usually precedes biochemical diagnosis by several years by which time the retinal damage is severe. A series of 23 patients have been reviewed. There was an average delay of 11 years (range 1-28 years) between the patient presenting to the ophthalmologist and being diagnosed as having Refsum disease. Although serial examinations have failed to show a definite change in the course of visual deterioration with treatment, early diagnosis is important to prevent the development of neurological disease.

  2. Cancer Risk in Patients With Inflammatory Systemic Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kuang-Hui; Kuo, Chang-Fu; Huang, Lu Hsiang; Huang, Wen-Kuan; See, Lai-Chu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine whether inflammation is related to cancer development, and whether the incidence of cancer is increased and occurs in a site-specific manner in patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs). This study included a nationwide dynamic cohort of patients with various newly diagnosed SARDs from 1997 to 2010 with follow-up until 2012. This study included 75,123 patients with SARDs. During 562,870 person-years of follow-up, 2844 patients developed cancer. Between 1997 and 2010, the highest number of newly diagnosed SARDs cases were rheumatoid arthritis (n = 35,182), followed by systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, n = 15,623), Sjögren syndrome (n = 11,998), Kawasaki disease (n = 3469), inflammatory bowel disease (n = 2853), scleroderma (n = 1814), Behçet disease (n = 1620), dermatomyositis (n = 1119), polymyositis (n = 811), and vasculitis other than Kawasaki disease (n = 644). A significant standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of overall cancer was observed for patients with SLE (1.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28–1.56), Sjögren syndrome (1.19; 95% CI, 1.08–1.30), scleroderma (1.27; 95% CI, 1.02–1.59), dermatomyositis (4.79; 95% CI, 4.01–5.73), polymyositis (1.47; 95% CI, 1.05–2.06), vasculitis excluding Kawasaki disease (1.75; 95% CI, 1.20–2.55), and Kawasaki disease (2.88; 95% CI, 1.60–5.20). Overall, patients with most SARDs had a significantly higher risk of inflammation-associated site-specific cancers and hematologic malignancies. This study confirms that autoimmunity is associated with site-specific and hematological malignancies and provides clinical evidence of an association between inflammation and subsequent site-specific cancer development. These findings support the importance of inflammation in site-specific organ system carcinogenesis. PMID:27149461

  3. Alcoholic patients' response to their disease: perspective of patients and family

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Rodríguez, Joaquín Salvador; Guerra-Martín, María Dolores; Domínguez-Sánchez, Isabel; Lima-Serrano, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to know the perspective of alcoholic patients and their families about the behavioral characteristics of the disease, identifying the issues to modify the addictive behavior and seek rehabilitation. Method: ethnographic research using interpretative anthropology, via participant observation and a detailed interview with alcoholic patients and their families, members of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Alanon in Spain. Results: development of disease behavior in alcoholism is complex due to the issues of interpreting the consumption model as a disease sign. Patients often remain long periods in the pre-contemplation stage, delaying the search for assistance, which often arrives without them accepting the role of patient. This constrains the recovery and is related to the social thought on alcoholism and self-stigma on alcoholics and their families, leading them to deny the disease, condition of the patient, and help. The efforts of self-help groups and the involvement of health professionals is essential for recovery. Conclusion: understanding how disease behavior develops, and the change process of addictive behavior, it may be useful for patients, families and health professionals, enabling them to act in a specific way at each stage. PMID:26626009

  4. Updates in vaccination: Recommendations for adult inflammatory bowel disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Chaudrey, Khadija; Salvaggio, Michelle; Ahmed, Aftab; Mahmood, Sultan; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Treatment regimens for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) incorporate the use of a variety of immunosuppressive agents that increase the risk of infections. Prevention of many of these infections can be achieved by the timely and judicious use of vaccinations. IBD patients tend to be under-immunized. Some of the contributing factors are lack of awareness regarding the significance of vaccinating IBD patients, misperception about safety of vaccinations in immunocompromised patients, ambiguity about the perceived role of the gastroenterologist in contrast to the primary care physician and unavailability of vaccination guidelines focused on IBD population. In general, immunocompetent IBD patients can be vaccinated using standard vaccination recommendations. However there are special considerations for IBD patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy, IBD travelers and pregnant women with IBD. This review discusses current vaccination recommendations with updates for adult IBD patients. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2013 vaccination guidelines with 2014 updates and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommendations have been highlighted as a primary source of recommendations. PMID:25805924

  5. Trace elements in sera from patients with renal disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Yoshinori; Nakai, Keiko; Sera, Kouichiro; Sato, Michirou

    1999-04-01

    In hemodialysis (HD) patients, an accumulation of trace elements such as aluminum, copper, silicon and vanadium has been reported. Aluminum-caused encephalopathy and aluminum-related bone diseases are important trace element-related complications. Using particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) we determined concentrations of aluminum, silicon, copper, zinc, selenium and bromine in sera of 29 patients with HD, 14 nondialysis patients with renal disease (RD) and 27 normal controls. The concentration of serum silicon of the patients with HD was 107.4 ± 61.3 μmol/l, which is markedly higher than that of normal controls (48.3 ± 25.8 μmol/l, p < 0.0001). The serum concentrations of zinc and bromine in patients with HD were 11.9 ± 1.7 and 21.3 ± 3.0 μmol/l, respectively. Both were markedly lower than those of normal controls (15.6 ± 2.6, 69.2 ± 8.3 μmol/l, p < 0.0001). The concentrations of aluminium and bromine in the serum of patients with RD were 171.9 ± 64.3 and 81.9 ± 11.6 μmol/l, which were markedly higher than those of normal controls ( p < 0.0001, p < 0.001). No significant differences were observed in the concentration of copper and selenium among three groups.

  6. Cognitive function in patients with Parkinson's disease undergoing stereotaxic thalamotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Lund-Johansen, M; Hugdahl, K; Wester, K

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether thalamotomy leads to cognitive disturbances in patients with Parkinson's disease. METHODS--A total of 53 patients with Parkinson's disease undergoing stereotaxic ventrolateral thalamotomy for tremor and rigidity were tested for cognitive functions before and after surgery. The cognitive functions investigated involved visuospatial perception and memory. verbal memory, attention shift, and executive functions including set maintenance and shift. A neuropsychological test battery was used that contained the Wisconsin card sorting test, Street completion test, Stroop test, a dichotic memory listening test, and a facial recognition test. RESULTS--Clinically, a good or moderately good effect on parkinsonian symptoms was obtained in 50 patients. The neuropsychological investigations showed that the patients were impaired compared with healthy age matched control subjects on most tests, showing slight improvement postoperatively on verbal memory and visuospatial perception. No major differences were found between tests before and after operation, and there were no significant differences between patients undergoing surgery in the right or in the left thalamus. CONCLUSION--The study indicates that ventrolateral thalamotomy does not reduce the cognitive capacity in this group of patients. PMID:8778265

  7. Tai Chi Chuan Exercise for Patients with Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Ching; Chen, Ssu-Yuan; Wong, May-Kuen; Lai, Jin Shin

    2013-01-01

    Exercise training is the cornerstone of rehabilitation for patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although high-intensity exercise has significant cardiovascular benefits, light-to-moderate intensity aerobic exercise also offers health benefits. With lower-intensity workouts, patients may be able to exercise for longer periods of time and increase the acceptance of exercise, particularly in unfit and elderly patients. Tai Chi Chuan (Tai Chi) is a traditional Chinese mind-body exercise. The exercise intensity of Tai Chi is light to moderate, depending on its training style, posture, and duration. Previous research has shown that Tai Chi enhances aerobic capacity, muscular strength, balance, and psychological well-being. Additionally, Tai Chi training has significant benefits for common cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, poor exercise capacity, endothelial dysfunction, and depression. Tai Chi is safe and effective in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery, congestive heart failure (HF), and stroke. In conclusion, Tai Chi has significant benefits to patients with cardiovascular disease, and it may be prescribed as an alternative exercise program for selected patients with CVD. PMID:24348732

  8. MMPI for personality characteristics of patients with different diseases.

    PubMed

    Pop-Jordanova, N

    2015-01-01

    In the field of psychosomatic medicine the relationship between personality characteristics and diseases is supposed to be an important issue. The aim of this article is to present group's MMPI profiles obtained for patients with different chronic diseases and to discuss about possible specific features of these different groups. We summarized results obtained by psychological testing of following groups of patients: adult patients treated with chronic maintenance dialysis, patients with diabetic retinopathy, general anxiety group, attack panic syndrome, parents of children with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as adolescents with mental anorexia, cystic fibrosis, diabetes mellitus and leukemia. Two control groups comprised adults and adolescents, both without any health problems, selected randomly. As a psychometric test MMPI-201 was used. Statistic 10 package is used for statistical analysis. In our presentation it can be seen some typical personality characteristics for patients with chronic conditions. These findings could be helpful for clinicians concerning treatment planning and follow-up. In general, the MMPI helps us to obtain a global, factual picture from the self-assessment of the patient, explained in a psycho-technical language. Group's profile could be used in clinical practice for planning treatment and to suppose the prognosis of the illness. PMID:26076785

  9. [Vaccinations in patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases--EULAR recommendations for pediatric and adult patients].

    PubMed

    Müller-Ladner, Claudia; Müller-Ladner, Ulf

    2012-10-01

    Since patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases are prone to infectious complications--on one hand due to the rheumatic disease itself, on the other hand due to the immunosuppressive therapy--vaccination is an essential tool to prevent these infectious complications. Although there exist several recommendations for the vaccination of immunocompromised patients, many questions still remain for the distinct clinical situations of patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases. In addition, there are several questions concerning the safety and efficacy of various vaccinations, especially with regard to live-attenuated vaccines. Therefore, EULAR (European League Against Rheumatism) assembled two expert panels to clarify as much of these clinical problems as possible. After extensive literature review and evidence grading, the expert panels published recommendations for the vaccination of adult and pediatric patients, which are outlined in this review article.

  10. Diagnostic outcomes of magnetocardiography in patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingmei; Che, Zaiqian; Quan, Weiwei; Yuan, Rong; Shen, Yue; Liu, Zongjun; Wang, Weiqing; Jin, Huigen; Lu, Guoping

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic outcomes of magnetocardiography (MCG) on the patients with coronary artery disease and compared the outcomes between MCG, ECG and Echocardiography. Methods: MCG measurements were performed on 101 patients with coronary artery disease and 116 healthy volunteers with a seven-channel magnetocardiographic system (MCG7, SQUID AG, Germany) installed in an unshielded room. CAD was diagnosed when stenosis ≥ 70% in ≥ 1 vessel. Three quantitative indicators were analyzed, R-max/T-max ratio, R value and á average angle. Results: R-max/T-max ratio of CAD group (6.30 ± 4.07) was much higher than that of healthy group (3.73 ± 1.41) (P < 0.001), R value of CAD group (69.16 ± 27.87)% was significantly higher than that of healthy group (34.96 ± 19.09)% (P < 0.001), á average angle of CAD group (221.46° ± 64.53°) was higher than that of healthy group (24.32° ± 20.70°) (P < 0.01). In 75 of 101 CAD patients (74.26%), MCG had abnormal mapping patterns. The resting ECG examination showed ischemic changes, such as abnormal Q waves and ST-T change in 49 patients (48.51%). Echocardiography revealed abnormal left ventricular wall motion and asynergy in 46 patients (45.54%). Thus, the diagnostic outcomes of MCG for the patients with CAD were much significant than those of ECG and echocardiography (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Our result showed that resting MCG under condition of an advanced data analysis has higher diagnostic outcomes and is superior to ECG or echocardiography for patients with CAD. MCG can detect ST-segment displacement caused by ischemic myocardium, thus helpful in diagnosing coronary artery disease early. PMID:25932186

  11. Pneumococcal vaccination rates in VHA patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Case, David J; Copeland, Laurel A; Stock, Eileen M; Herrera, Henry R; Pfanner, Timothy P

    2015-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an inflammatory condition of the digestive tract not caused by infectious agents. Symptoms of IBD, such as diarrhea and pain, diminish one's quality of life. Underlying immune dysregulation may put IBD patients at risk for severe infectious disease making preventative vaccination highly recommended. Therefore, this study sought to assess rates of pneumococcal vaccination in patients with IBD.A cross-sectional observational study was employed utilizing administrative data extracts from the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) to identify patients diagnosed with IBD per International Classification of Diseases, Version 9, Clinical Modification codes. Their pneumococcal vaccine histories were determined from Common Procedural Terminology codes. Data were aggregated to the patient level and subjected to multivariable logistic regression to assess factors associated with receipt of the vaccination and 1-year mortality; survival analyses extended follow-up to as much as 4 years following IBD diagnosis.From October 2004 to September 2009, 49,350 patients were diagnosed with IBD in the VHA. Incidence was approximately 6000 cases/y. Patients averaged 62 years (±15, range 19-98) with 45% aged 65 or older. Approximately 6% were women, 21% were highly disabled from a military service-connected condition, 46% had hypertension, 38% dyslipidemia, and 18% diabetes. Only 20% of the cohort received pneumococcal vaccination including 5% vaccinated prior to IBD diagnosis, 2% on the date of diagnosis, and 13% subsequently. Being married, living outside the Northeast, and having more comorbidities were associated with vaccination before IBD diagnosis; models of vaccination at or after diagnosis demonstrated poor fit: little better than chance. Vaccinations before, after, and at diagnosis were protective against 1-year mortality adjusting for clinical and demographic covariates. Living in the South was an independent risk factor for death among IBD

  12. Treatment Outcome of Patients with Buruli Ulcer Disease in Togo

    PubMed Central

    Beissner, Marcus; Arens, Nathalie; Wiedemann, Franz; Piten, Ebekalisaï; Kobara, Basile; Bauer, Malkin; Herbinger, Karl-Heinz; Badziklou, Kossi; Banla Kere, Abiba; Löscher, Thomas; Nitschke, Jörg; Bretzel, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    Background Following introduction of antimycobacterial treatment of Buruli ulcer disease (BUD), several clinical studies evaluated treatment outcomes of BUD patients, in particular healing times, secondary lesions and functional limitations. Whereas recurrences were rarely observed, paradoxical reactions and functional limitations frequently occurred. Although systematic BUD control in Togo was established as early as 2007, treatment outcome has not been reviewed to date. Therefore, a pilot project on post-treatment follow-up of BUD patients in Togo aimed to evaluate treatment outcomes and to provide recommendations for optimization of treatment success. Methodology/Principal Findings Out of 199 laboratory confirmed BUD patients, 129 could be enrolled in the study. The lesions of 109 patients (84.5%) were completely healed without any complications, 5 patients (3.9%) had secondary lesions and 15 patients (11.6%) had functional limitations. Edema, category III ulcers >15cm, healing times >180 days and a limitation of movement at time of discharge constituted the main risk factors significantly associated with BUD related functional limitations (P<0.01). Review of all BUD related documentation revealed major shortcomings, in particular concerning medical records on adjuvant surgical and physiotherapeutic treatment. Conclusions/Significance This study presents the first systematic analysis of treatment outcome of BUD patients from Togo. Median times to healing and the absence of recurrences were in line with findings reported by other investigators. The percentage of functional limitations of 11.6% was lower than in other studies, and edema, category III ulcers, healing time >180 days and limitation of movement at discharge constituted the main risk factors for functional limitations in Togolese BUD patients. Standardized treatment plans, patient assessment and follow-up, as well as improved management of medical records are recommended to allow for intensified

  13. Falls in ambulatory non-demented patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rascol, Olivier; Perez-Lloret, Santiago; Damier, Philippe; Delval, Arnaud; Derkinderen, Pascal; Destée, Alain; Meissner, Wassilios G; Tison, Francois; Negre-Pages, Laurence

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed at determining the prevalence of falling in PD patients, to assess generic and disease-specific clinical and pharmacological factors, relationship with health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) and changes in falls from OFF to ON in patients with motor fluctuations. Six-hundred and eighty-three PD patients of the COPARK survey were evaluated (11 had missing data and were excluded from the analysis). Patients with falls were identified as those with a UPDRS Item 13 ≥ 1 in the ON condition. All patients were assessed in a standardized manner [demographics, treatments, Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Pittsburg questionnaire and HR-QoL scales (SF36, PDQ39)]. Falling was reported by 108/672 (16%) PD patients during the ON state and prevalence increased according to PD severity, from 5% in Hoehn and Yahr stage 1-60% in stage 4. Falling was significantly related to lower HR-QoL. Falling correlated with (1) generic factors such as female gender, age at the end of academic studies and diuretics consumption, (2) motor PD-specific factors including disease severity, frozen gait, difficulties when arising from a chair, dyskinesia and higher levodopa daily equivalent dose and (3) non-motor PD-specific factors such as orthostatic hypotension and hallucinations. Falling was more frequent in OFF than in ON in 48/74 (64%) patients with motor fluctuations and remained unchanged in 27 patients (36%). In summary, falling affected a significant proportion of PD patients, especially in advanced stages. It was associated with a variety of generic and PD-specific factors and was related to reduced HR-QoL. PMID:25845678

  14. Pulmonary arterial hypertension among Filipino patients with connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Santos Estrella, Paul V; Lin, Yih Chang; Navarra, Sandra V

    2007-01-01

    We describe the clinical features, therapies, and clinical course of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in a group of Filipinos with connective tissue diseases (CTDs). We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients diagnosed with PAH by a two-dimensional echocardiogram as a tricuspid regurgitant jet of more than 25 mmHg. All patients had underlying CTDs, defined by the American College of Rheumatology criteria, and were seen at the rheumatology clinics of the University of Santo Tomas Hospital and the St. Luke's Medical Center, Philippines. Of the 33 patients (32 women) included in the analysis, there were 14 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 12 with scleroderma, 5 with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), 1 with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), and 1 with dermatomyositis. The average age at PAH diagnosis was 38 +/- 14 years (mean +/- SD), and the mean duration of illness from CTD to PAH diagnosis was 53 +/- 52 months. Twelve patients had died at the time of this report, with a median duration of 15 months (range 1-57 months) from PAH diagnosis to mortality: six of these had scleroderma, five with SLE, and one with APS. The following therapies were used in this group of patients: low molecular weight heparin, warfarin, calcium-channel blockers, aspirin, cyclophosphamide, bosentan, iloprost, and sildenafil. We have described the clinical profile of PAH in a group of Filipino patients with CTDs, most commonly SLE. Various forms of pharmacologic therapies were used among these patients. Mortality remains high, particularly among those with underlying scleroderma. Early recognition and treatment are crucial in order to provide a better outcome for these patients.

  15. Quality of Life in Patients with Thyroid Eye Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bahmani-Kashkouli, Mohsen; Pakdel, Farzad; Astaraki, Arezoo; Hashemi, Masih; Honarbakhsh, Yasamin; Mirarmandehi, Bahareh; Jam, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate quality of life (QOL) before and after corticosteroid therapy for thyroid eye disease (TED) and to determine the impact of the disease on QOL. Methods A modified TED-QOL questionnaire was completed by consecutive patients before and at least 6 months after steroid therapy. All patients were clinically and biochemically euthyroid during the course of the study. QOL was assessed in subscales of visual function, psychosocial, and educational/counseling; TED was classified by severity score (NOSPECS) and Mourits’ clinical activity score. Results Overall, 61 patients including 18 (29.5%) male and 43 (70.5%) female subjects with mean age of 37.3±13.7 (range, 18–33) years were enrolled. Mean duration of thyroid dysfunction and TED were 40.1±44.8 and 26.5±38.2 months, respectively. Mean disease severity and activity significantly decreased, and visual and psychosocial function scores significantly improved following corticosteroid therapy for TED. Psychosocial score was significantly worse than visual function score before but not after steroid treatment. Linear regression analysis and Spearman correlation test showed no significant correlation between duration of thyroid dysfunction, duration of TED, disease severity and activity on one hand, and QOL scores on the other hand, before or after treatment. Conclusion TED seems to adversely affect psychosocial activity more than visual function. Corticosteroid therapy significantly improves QOL. No significant correlation seems to exist between QOL scores and the severity or activity of TED. PMID:23198067

  16. Histamine Blood Concentration in Ischemic Heart Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zdravkovic, Vladimir; Pantovic, Suzana; Rosic, Gvozden; Tomic-Lucic, Aleksandra; Zdravkovic, Nemanja; Colic, Maja; Obradovic, Zdravko; Rosic, Mirko

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate histamine blood concentration in subjects suffering from different types of ischemic heart diseases during the period of eight days. Our results showed that the histamine blood level was associated with different types of ischemic heart diseases. The blood histamine level in all investigated patients was significantly higher when compared to control subjects (44.87 ± 1.09 ng mL−1), indicating the increase of histamine release in patients suffering from coronary diseases. In patients suffering from ACS-UA and ACS-STEMI, the second day peak of histamine level occurs (90.85 ± 6.34 ng mL−1 and 121.7 ± 6.34 ng mL−1, resp.) probably as the reperfusion event. Furthermore, our data suggest that histamine can be additional parameter of myocardial ischemia along with cardiac specific enzymes and may prove to be an excellent single prognostic marker for multitude of ischemic heart diseases. PMID:21687546

  17. Mitochondrial DNA variants observed in Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease patients

    SciTech Connect

    Shoffner, J.M.; Brown, M.D.; Torroni, A.; Lott, M.T.; Cabell, M.F.; Mirra, S.S.; Yang, C.C.; Gearing, M.; Salvo, R. ); Beal, M.F. )

    1993-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD) were sought by restriction endonuclease analysis in a cohort of 71 late-onset Caucasian patients. A tRNA[sup Gln] gene variant at nucleotide pair (np) 4336 that altered a moderately conserved nucleotide was present in 9/173 (5.2%) of the patients surveyed but in only 0.7% of the general Caucasian controls. One of these patients harbored an additional novel 12S rRNA 5-nucleotide insertion at np 956-965, while a second had a missense variant at np 3397 that converted a highly conserved methionine to a valine. This latter mutation was also found in an independent AD + PD patient, as was a heteroplasmic 16S rRNA variant at np 3196. Additional studies will be required to determine the significance, if any, of these mutations. 122 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease in patients with molecularly confirmed diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Mierzewska, H; Jamroz, E; Mazurczak, T; Hoffman-Zacharska, D; Szczepanik, E

    2016-01-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is X-linked hypomyelinating leukodystrophy caused by mutations of the PLP1 gene, which codes the proteolipid protein 1. The result of mutations is abnormal myelination - hypomyelination and dysmyelination of cerebral white matter, and in some form of the disease hypomyelinating peripheral neuropathy. DNA samples from 68 patients suspected of PMD due to the clinical course and hypomyelination at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were analyzed. Medical history and detailed clinical course of PMD patients were also analyzed. Different mutations of the PLP1 gene were detected in 14 boys from 11 families (~20%). Amongst the molecularly confirmed patients, 13 presented classical PMD forms but clinical phenotypes varied in the severity even amongst siblings. One patient presented a severe connatal form. One mother, obligate carrier, presented complicated SPG2 (spastic paraparesis). There was no phenotype-genotype correlation in our material. In many cases PMD was suspected with a delay of many years, sometimes only after birth of another affected child in the family. Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease was most frequently misdiagnosed as cerebral palsy. PMID:27179222

  19. Methotrexate-induced pneumonitis in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Margagnoni, Giovanna; Papi, Valeria; Aratari, Annalisa; Triolo, Luca; Papi, Claudio

    2010-06-01

    Pulmonary toxicity is a well recognised but infrequent adverse event of treatment with methotrexate. The vast majority of cases have occurred in patients with rheumatoid arthritis; here we present the case of a 44-year old woman with ileo-colonic Crohn's disease who developed methotrexate pneumonitis. The patient had a 10 year history of Crohn's disease and, in the last 18 months, she was treated with oral methotrexate because of steroid-dependency and intolerance to thiopurines. She was admitted to the hospital because of acute dyspnoea, non-productive cough and fever. High-resolution CT scan showed diffuse bilateral areas of ground-glass opacity, and pulmonary function tests disclosed a mild obstructive pattern with a decrease in carbon monoxide diffusing capacity. Blood cultures for pathogenic bacteria or fungi were negative as well as serologic tests against major pneumotropic agents. Methotrexate-induced lung injury was considered: the drug was discontinued and the patient received a steroid course with rapid symptomatic improvement. After 4 weeks pulmonary function tests and high-resolution chest CT scan were normal. To our knowledge this is the second reported case of methotrexate-induced pneumonitis occurring in a patient with Crohn's disease. A definite diagnosis has been made not invasively according to clinical, laboratory and radiological criteria and excluding any infectious aetiology of the pulmonary findings. PMID:21122509

  20. Renal diseases in haemophilic patients: pathogenesis and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Pasquale; Rampino, Teresa; Gregorini, Marilena; Fasoli, Gianluca; Gamba, Gabriella; Dal Canton, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    Haemophilia A and B are genetic X-linked bleeding disorders, caused by mutations in genes encoding factors VIII and IX, respectively. Clinical manifestations of haemophilia are spontaneous haemorrhage or acute bleeding caused by minor trauma, resulting in severe functional consequences that can culminate in a debilitating arthropathy. Life expectancy and quality of life of patients with haemophilia have dramatically improved over the last years, mainly for new therapeutic options and the awareness to the risk of HCV and HIV infections. Different clinical problems arise from this important change in history of patients with haemophilia. In particular, ageing-related diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension and cancer, and chronic viral infections are emerging as new challenges in this patient population. Among the different types of chronic illnesses, renal diseases are of special interest as they involve some difficult management issues. In fact, decisions regarding adequate preventive strategies and viral infection treatment, the choice of the dialytic modality, placement of vascular access and prescription of dialytic treatments are particularly complicated, because only few data are available. In this review, we discuss the pathogenesis of renal damage in patients with haemophilia, especially in those with blood-transmitted viral infections, and the major issues about the management of renal diseases, including problems related to dialytic treatment and kidney transplantation, providing practical algorithms to guide the clinical decision-making process.

  1. Novel OCRL mutations in patients with Dent-2 disease.

    PubMed

    Böckenhauer, Detlef; Bökenkamp, Arend; Nuutinen, Matti; Unwin, Robert; Van't Hoff, William; Sirimanna, Tony; Vrljicak, Kristina; Ludwig, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Dent disease is an X-linked tubulopathy frequently caused by mutations in the CLCN5 gene encoding the voltage-gated chloride channel and chloride/proton antiporter, ClC-5. About 15% of patients with a Dent' phenotype have mutations in the OCRL gene, which also causes Lowe oculocerebrorenal syndrome. To distinguish these patients from the more severe Lowe phenotype, they are diagnosed as having Dent-2 disease. We studied 14 CLCN5-negative patients from 12 families with a phenotype resembling Dent disease for defects in OCRL. In six of these kindreds three novel (c.149+1G>A, c.1126A>T, c.1547T>C) and three repeatedly observed mutations (c.166_167delTT, c.901C>T, c.1426C>T) were discovered. With the exception of a lower prevalence of nephrocalcinosis, the renal phenotype is identical with patients harboring a CLCN5 mutation. Affected children may have some of the extra-renal symptoms of Lowe syndrome, such as peripheral cataracts, mental impairment, stunted growth or elevation of creatine kinase/lactate dehydrogenase, blurring the distinction between those two clinical entities. PMID:27625797

  2. Novel OCRL mutations in patients with Dent-2 disease

    PubMed Central

    Böckenhauer, Detlef; Bökenkamp, Arend; Nuutinen, Matti; Unwin, Robert; van't Hoff, William; Sirimanna, Tony; Vrljicak, Kristina; Ludwig, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Dent disease is an X-linked tubulopathy frequently caused by mutations in the CLCN5 gene encoding the voltage-gated chloride channel and chloride/proton antiporter, ClC-5. About 15% of patients with a Dent' phenotype have mutations in the OCRL gene, which also causes Lowe oculocerebrorenal syndrome. To distinguish these patients from the more severe Lowe phenotype, they are diagnosed as having Dent-2 disease. We studied 14 CLCN5-negative patients from 12 families with a phenotype resembling Dent disease for defects in OCRL. In six of these kindreds three novel (c.149+1G>A, c.1126A>T, c.1547T>C) and three repeatedly observed mutations (c.166_167delTT, c.901C>T, c.1426C>T) were discovered. With the exception of a lower prevalence of nephrocalcinosis, the renal phenotype is identical with patients harboring a CLCN5 mutation. Affected children may have some of the extra-renal symptoms of Lowe syndrome, such as peripheral cataracts, mental impairment, stunted growth or elevation of creatine kinase/lactate dehydrogenase, blurring the distinction between those two clinical entities.

  3. [Preparing patients with chronic pulmonary disease for air travel].

    PubMed

    Felkai, Péter; Böszörményi Nagy, György; Gyarmati, Ildikó

    2013-03-01

    Flying is the most important way of travelling in the continually growing international tourism. Number of passengers and those with preexisting diseases, mainly with cardiopulmonary problems, is increasing over years. One of the main tasks of the pre-travel advice is to assess tolerance to hypoxia of the traveler, and specify the necessity, as well as the type and volume of supplementary oxygen therapy. It is indispensable to know the cabin-environment and impact of that on the travelers' health. Travel medicine specialist has to be aware of the examinations which provide information for the appropriate decision on the fit-to-fly condition of the patient. The physician who prepares the patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease for repatriation by regular flight and the escorting doctor have to be fully aware of the possibilities, modalities, advantages and contraindications of the on-board oxygen supply and therapy. In this review, the authors give a summary of literature data, outline the tools of in-flight oxygen therapy as well as discuss possibilities for the preflight assessment of patients' condition including blood gas parameters required for safe air travel, as recommended in international medical literature. The preparation process for repatriation of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is also discussed. PMID:23434882

  4. Indirect self-destructive behavior in patients with Buerger's disease.

    PubMed

    Farberow, N L; Nehemkis, A M

    1979-02-01

    Patients with Buerger's disease (a circulatory illness) were studied to evaluate indirect self-destructive behavior (ISDB), evidence by neglect in following medical regimen, disregard of suggestions for environmental imporvements (avoidance of undue exposure to cold) and refusal to abstain from smoking. Personality characteristics and behavioral phenomena associated with ISDB were obtained by comparison of the files of 26 uncooperative patients with 26 matched cooperative controls with Buerger's disease and with 25 Buerger's disease patients representing a unselected annual population in a Veterans Administration (VA) hospital. The experimental group was characterized as more often complaining, manipulative, and aggressive. They manifested denial, negligence, and a tendency to minimize their illness. They were more likely to complain of pain and to demand relief. In a second clinical investigation of patients still in the hospital, 12 experimentals were compared with 12 controls using interview data and psychological tests measuring attitudes toward time and toward death. The experimentals did not seem to value time nor to be interested in achievement. They felt that a dull life was worse than death.

  5. Communication strategies employed by rare disease patient organizations in Spain.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Esparcia, Antonio; López-Villafranca, Paloma

    2016-08-01

    The current study focuses on communication strategies employed by rare disease patient organizations. The aims of these organizations are: educate and inform the public about rare diseases, raise awareness of the problems related to rare diseases, and achieve social legitimacy in order give visibility to their demands. We analyzed the portrayal of rare disease and patient organizations by Spain's major media organizations in terms of circulation and viewership - the press (El País, El Mundo, La Vanguardia,ABC and El Periódico), radio (CadenaSer, Onda Cero, Cope and RNE), and television (Telecinco, Antena 3, La 1, La Sexta, Cuatro) -between 2012 and 2014.We then carried out a descriptive analysis of communication activities performed via the World Wide Web and social networks by 143 national organizations. Finally, we conducted a telephone questionnaire of a representative sample of 90 organizations in order to explore the association between media presence and funding and public image. The triangulation of quantitative and qualitative methods allowed us to meet the study's objectives. Increased visibility of the organizations afforded by an increase in the coverage of the topic by the medialed to an increase in membership - but not in donations - and increased awareness of these diseases. PMID:27557016

  6. Clinical and radiological correlations in patients with gestational trophoblastic disease*

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Lana de Lourdes Aguiar; Parente, Raphael Câmara Medeiros; Maestá, Izildinha; Amim Junior, Joffre; de Rezende Filho, Jorge Fonte; Montenegro, Carlos Antonio Barbosa; Braga, Antônio

    2016-01-01

    Gestational trophoblastic disease is an abnormality of pregnancy that encompasses a group of diseases that differ from each other in their propensity for regression, invasion, metastasis, and recurrence. In the past, it was common for patients with molar pregnancy to present with marked symptoms: copious bleeding; theca lutein cysts; uterus larger than appropriate for gestational age; early preeclampsia; hyperemesis gravidarum; and hyperthyroidism. Currently, with early diagnosis made by ultrasound, most patients are diagnosed while the disease is still in the asymptomatic phase. In cases of progression to trophoblastic neoplasia, staging-typically with Doppler flow studies of the pelvis and chest X-ray, although occasionally with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging-is critical to the choice of an appropriate antineoplastic therapy regimen. Because it is an unusual and serious disease that affects women of reproductive age, as well as because its appropriate treatment results in high cure rates, it is crucial that radiologists be familiar with gestational trophoblastic disease, in order to facilitate its early diagnosis and to ensure appropriate follow-up imaging. PMID:27777478

  7. Economics of psychosocial factors in patients with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rodwin, Benjamin A; Spruill, Tanya M; Ladapo, Joseph A

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence supports a causal relationship between cardiovascular disease and psychosocial factors such as mental health and behavioral disorders, acute and chronic stress, and low socioeconomic status. While this has enriched our understanding of the interaction between cardiovascular risk factors, much less is known about its economic implications. In this review, we evaluate the economic impact of psychosocial factors in persons at risk for or diagnosed with cardiovascular disease. Most studies have focused on depression and almost uniformly conclude that patients with cardiovascular disease and comorbid depression use a greater number of ambulatory and hospital services and incur higher overall costs. Additionally, comorbid depression may also reduce employment productivity in patients with cardiovascular disease, further magnifying its economic impact. Recent randomized trials have demonstrated that innovative care delivery models that target depression may reduce costs or at least be cost neutral while improving quality of life. The growing population burden and overlap of cardiovascular disease, comorbid mental illness, and other psychosocial factors suggest that future research identifying cost-effective or cost-saving treatment models may have significant health and economic implications.

  8. Communication strategies employed by rare disease patient organizations in Spain.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Esparcia, Antonio; López-Villafranca, Paloma

    2016-08-01

    The current study focuses on communication strategies employed by rare disease patient organizations. The aims of these organizations are: educate and inform the public about rare diseases, raise awareness of the problems related to rare diseases, and achieve social legitimacy in order give visibility to their demands. We analyzed the portrayal of rare disease and patient organizations by Spain's major media organizations in terms of circulation and viewership - the press (El País, El Mundo, La Vanguardia,ABC and El Periódico), radio (CadenaSer, Onda Cero, Cope and RNE), and television (Telecinco, Antena 3, La 1, La Sexta, Cuatro) -between 2012 and 2014.We then carried out a descriptive analysis of communication activities performed via the World Wide Web and social networks by 143 national organizations. Finally, we conducted a telephone questionnaire of a representative sample of 90 organizations in order to explore the association between media presence and funding and public image. The triangulation of quantitative and qualitative methods allowed us to meet the study's objectives. Increased visibility of the organizations afforded by an increase in the coverage of the topic by the medialed to an increase in membership - but not in donations - and increased awareness of these diseases.

  9. Role of disease status and type D personality in outcomes in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Aquarius, Annelies E; Denollet, Johan; Hamming, Jaap F; De Vries, Jolanda

    2005-10-01

    Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) often experience diminishing quality of life (QOL) in many domains of their lives. However, factors associated with impaired QOL and perceived stress in these patients are not completely understood. The relative effects of disease status and type D ("distressed") personality (tendencies to experience negative emotions and be socially inhibited) on these patient-based outcomes were examined. It has been argued that type D personality might depend on disease status; therefore, its effect was examined in a combined sample of 150 patients with PAD and 150 healthy controls. The Type D Scale-14, World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment Instrument-100, and Perceived Stress Scale-10 Item assessed type D personality, QOL, and perceived stress, respectively. PAD severity (mild, moderate, or severe) was not associated with QOL or perceived stress. However, patients with PAD reported decreased QOL (p < 0.05) compared with healthy controls. Type D patients reported significantly poorer QOL than non-type D patients across PAD and healthy subgroups (p < 0.0001). After controlling for disease status (presence or absence of PAD), type D personality remained associated with increased risk for impaired QOL (odds ratio [OR] 7.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.39 to 15.96, p < 0.0001) and perceived stress (OR 6.45, 95% CI 3.42 to 12.18, p < 0.0001). Hence, type D personality was associated with impaired QOL beyond the impairment already related to PAD and with increased stress in this high-risk population. In conclusion, type D personality is not merely a function of PAD but seems to represent a different determinant of patient-based outcomes.

  10. [THE PROGRAM OF PHYSICAL REHABILITATION FOR PATIENTS WITH CORONARY HEART DISEASE AND HYPERTENSIVE DISEASE].

    PubMed

    Makarova, I N; Starikov, S M; Bolotov, D D

    2016-01-01

    The authors demonstrate the importance of individual criteria for the choice of dosed physical load for the patients with cardiological problems during hospitalization. The analysis of the functional state and hemodynamic parameters included 68 patients with various cardiovascular diseases before and after performance of the special program of physical rehabilitation. The results suggest high efficiency of the proposed treatment and good prospects for further studies in this field. PMID:27172720

  11. Use of complementary therapies in patients with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Gloria Y; Davis, Roger B; Phillips, Russell S

    2006-09-01

    Previous studies have suggested that patients with chronic medical conditions use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) at a higher rate than the general population. Despite recent interest in CAM for cardiovascular disease, few data are available regarding patterns of use in patients with cardiovascular disease in the United States. This study used the 2002 National Health Interview Survey and analyzed data on CAM use in 10,572 respondents with cardiovascular disease. Among those with cardiovascular disease, 36% had used CAM (excluding prayer) in the previous 12 months. The most commonly used therapies were herbal products (18%) and mind-body therapies (17%). Among herbs, echinacea, garlic, ginseng, ginkgo biloba, and glucosamine with or without chondroitin were most commonly used. Among mind-body therapies, deep-breathing exercises and meditation were most commonly used. Overall, CAM was used most frequently for musculoskeletal complaints (24% of respondents who used mind-body therapies, 22% who used herbs, 45% who used any CAM). Mind-body therapies were also used for anxiety or depression (23%) and stress or emotional health and wellness (16%). Herbs were commonly used for head and chest colds (22%). Fewer respondents (10%) used CAM specifically for their cardiovascular conditions (5% for hypertension, 2% for coronary disease, 3% for vascular insufficiency, < 1% for heart failure or stroke). Most, however, who used CAM for their cardiovascular condition perceived the therapies to be helpful (80% for herbs, 94% for mind-body therapies). CAM use was more common in younger respondents, women, Asians, and those with more education and greater incomes. In conclusion, CAM use, particularly herbs and mind-body therapies, is common in the United States in patients with cardiovascular disease and mirrors use in the general population. CAM use specifically to treat cardiovascular conditions, however, is less common.

  12. Evaluation of Nephrolithiasis in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nishiura, José L.; Neves, Rodrigo F.C.A.; Eloi, Samara R.M.; Cintra, Susan M.L.F.; Ajzen, Sergio A.; Heilberg, Ita P.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Nephrolithiasis (LIT) is more prevalent in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) than in the general population. Renal ultrasonography may underdetect renal stones because of difficulties imposed by parenchymal and/or cyst wall calcifications. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: A total of 125 patients with ADPKD underwent ultrasonography and unenhanced computed tomography (CT) scan, routine blood chemistry, and spot and 24-h urine collections. Results: CT scan detected calculi in 32 patients, including 20 whose previous ultrasonography revealed no calculi. The percentage of hypocitraturia was high but not statistically different between patients with ADPKD+LIT or ADPKD. Hyperuricosuria and distal renal tubular acidosis were less prevalent but also did not differ between groups, whereas hyperoxaluria was significantly higher in the former. Hypercalciuria was not detected. Renal volume was significantly higher in patients with ADPKD+LIT versus ADPKD, and a stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that a renal volume ≥500 ml was a significant predictor of LIT in patients with ADPKD and normal renal function, after adjustments for age and hypertension. Conclusions: CT scan was better than ultrasonography to detect LIT in patients with ADPKD. Larger kidneys from patients with ADPKD were more prone to develop stones, irrespective of the presence of metabolic disturbances. PMID:19339428

  13. Agalsidase benefits renal histology in young patients with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Tøndel, Camilla; Bostad, Leif; Larsen, Kristin Kampevold; Hirth, Asle; Vikse, Bjørn Egil; Houge, Gunnar; Svarstad, Einar

    2013-01-01

    The effect of early-onset enzyme replacement therapy on renal morphologic features in Fabry disease is largely unknown. Here, we evaluated the effect of 5 years of treatment with agalsidase alfa or agalsidase beta in 12 consecutive patients age 7-33 years (median age, 16.5 years). We performed renal biopsies at baseline and after 5 years of enzyme replacement therapy; 7 patients had additional biopsies after 1 and 3 years. After a median of 65 months, biopsy findings from all patients showed total clearance of glomerular endothelial and mesangial cell inclusions, and findings from 2 patients showed complete clearance of inclusions from epithelial cells of the distal tubule. The 4 patients who received the highest dose of agalsidase exhibited substantial clearance of podocyte inclusions, and the youngest patient had nearly complete clearance of these inclusions. Linear regression analysis showed a highly significant correlation between podocyte globotriaocylceramide clearance and cumulative agalsidase dose (r=0.804; P=0.002). Microalbuminuria normalized in five patients. In summary, long-term enzyme replacement therapy in young patients can result in complete globotriaocylceramide clearance of mesangial and glomerular endothelial cells across all dosage regimens, and clearance of podocyte inclusions is dose-dependent.

  14. Soluble interleukin-2 receptor in patients with glomerular diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H. S.; Wu, M. S.; Yen, T. S.; Chen, W. Y.

    1995-01-01

    In this study, we measured the soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) level to evaluate the cellular immune status in 61 patients with different types of glomerular diseases; 40 healthy volunteers were used as control. All patients with glomerular diseases had levels of serum sIL-2R significantly higher than those of the controls (766 +/- 59 vs 280 +/- 23 U/ml; p < 0.05). Even patients with normal renal function still had higher serum sIL-2R levels than the controls, no matter to which subgroups they belonged (primary glomerulonephritis, lupus nephritis or diabetic nephropathy). Serum sIL-2R levels were similar among the three subgroups. The serum levels of sIL-2R correlated well with age and were significantly higher in older patients, although this was not observed in the control group. Serum sIL-2R levels were significantly higher in patients with active urinary sediment and in patients with impaired renal function and showed a significant negative correlation with creatinine clearance (r = -0.56; p < 0.05). Although urinary and serum sIL-2R levels were quite well correlated, (r = 0.35; p < 0.05), the urinary levels of sIL-2R did not differ in patients with different disease activity or different renal functions although they had a significant correlation with 24-hour urinary protein (r = 0.39; p < 0.05). Patients with nephrotic syndrome also had higher urinary sIL-2R levels than other patients (529 +/- 106 vs 280 +/- 31 U/ml; p < 0.05). We conclude that greater T-cell activation might contribute to the pathogenesis of different glomerulonephritis entities, and serum levels of sIL-2R can serve as a useful clinical marker of glomerulonephritis activity. Renal function influenced the serum levels of sIL-2R significantly. This factor must be considered when we interpret the data. Urinary sIL-2R levels did not reflect the disease activity as well. This might be due to the secondary influence of the extent of the glomerular protein leak. Further investigation is

  15. [Patient education for children and adolescents with chronic diseases].

    PubMed

    Tubiana-Rufi, Nadia

    2009-12-01

    The education of children with chronic diseases and of their parents is a treatment procedure that must be integrated into the management of the child's disease: it is essential for his or her physical and psychological health and quality of life. This continuous process is part of long-term follow-up and of the child's development; it is not a procedure that can be carried out once and for all. The program must include initial, follow-up, and advanced education. Treatment education for parents occurs simultaneously with the child's medical management and has the same requirements as that of the child (which means that the time spent in this education requires financial support). The role of the pediatrics departments serving these children is essential, and they must work with other participants, whose roles are not identical to they perform in education for adult patients. Pediatric patient education requires an interdisciplinary pediatric team with specific skills and appropriate liaison with those involved in other aspects of the child's life (e.g., daycare and school). The child's psychological development is central to the design and implementation of pediatric patient education programs. Knowledge of child development is critical in providing these services for children and adolescents; training in this field is required in addition to that necessary for adult patient education. Epidemiologic findings of the increased incidence of several chronic diseases in children must be considered in decisions about the resources allocated to coping with them. The particularities and requirements of adolescence and its interactions with chronic disease must also be considered in specific patient education programs for adolescents, and in the training and skills of healthcare professionals.

  16. Skin autofluorescence is a predictor of cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Fumihiko; Shimura, Hiroki; Takahashi, Kazuya; Akiyama, Daiichiro; Motosugi, Ai; Ikegishi, Yukinobu; Haraguchi, Kazutaka; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2015-02-01

    Accelerated formation and tissue accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), reflecting cumulative glycemic and oxidative stress, occurs in age-related and chronic diseases like diabetes mellitus (DM) and renal failure, and contributes to vascular damage. Skin autofluorescence (AFR), a noninvasive measurement method, reflects tissue accumulation of AGEs. AFR has been reported to be an independent predictor of mortality in Caucasian hemodialysis patients. We assessed the relationship between levels of AFR and the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and clarified the prognostic usefulness of skin AFR levels in Asian (non-Caucasian) hemodialysis (HD) patients. AFR was measured with an autofluorescence reader in 64 HD patients. Overall and cardiovascular mortality was monitored prospectively during the 3-year follow-up. During follow-up, CVD events occurred in 21 patients. The deaths of 10 HD patients were associated with CVD. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that initial AFR was an independent risk factor for de novo CVD in HD patients with or without diabetes. When patients were classified on the basis of AFR tertiles, Cochran-Armitage analysis demonstrated that the highest tertile of AFR level showed an increased odds ratio for the prevalence of CVD. These findings suggest that AFR levels can be used to detect the prevalence of CVD in HD patients with or without diabetes.

  17. Skin autofluorescence is a predictor of cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Fumihiko; Shimura, Hiroki; Takahashi, Kazuya; Akiyama, Daiichiro; Motosugi, Ai; Ikegishi, Yukinobu; Haraguchi, Kazutaka; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2015-02-01

    Accelerated formation and tissue accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), reflecting cumulative glycemic and oxidative stress, occurs in age-related and chronic diseases like diabetes mellitus (DM) and renal failure, and contributes to vascular damage. Skin autofluorescence (AFR), a noninvasive measurement method, reflects tissue accumulation of AGEs. AFR has been reported to be an independent predictor of mortality in Caucasian hemodialysis patients. We assessed the relationship between levels of AFR and the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and clarified the prognostic usefulness of skin AFR levels in Asian (non-Caucasian) hemodialysis (HD) patients. AFR was measured with an autofluorescence reader in 64 HD patients. Overall and cardiovascular mortality was monitored prospectively during the 3-year follow-up. During follow-up, CVD events occurred in 21 patients. The deaths of 10 HD patients were associated with CVD. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that initial AFR was an independent risk factor for de novo CVD in HD patients with or without diabetes. When patients were classified on the basis of AFR tertiles, Cochran-Armitage analysis demonstrated that the highest tertile of AFR level showed an increased odds ratio for the prevalence of CVD. These findings suggest that AFR levels can be used to detect the prevalence of CVD in HD patients with or without diabetes. PMID:25545539

  18. Nuclear Medicine in Thyroid Diseases in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Volkan-Salancı, Bilge; Özgen Kıratlı, Pınar

    2015-01-01

    Both benign and malignant diseases of the thyroid are rare in the pediatric and adolescent population, except congenital hypothyroidism. Nuclear medicine plays a major role, both in the diagnosis and therapy of thyroid pathologies. Use of radioactivity in pediatric population is strictly controlled due to possible side effects such as secondary cancers; therefore, management of pediatric patients requires detailed literature knowledge. This article aims to overview current algorithms in the management of thyroid diseases and use of radionuclide therapy in pediatric and adolescent population. PMID:26316469

  19. Filiform polyposis in a patient without inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Tsung, Swei H

    2013-01-01

    Filiform polyposis is a rare condition of uncertain pathogenesis that is usually found in patients with a history of inflammatory bowel disease. Here I report a case of filiform polyposis with no associated inflammatory bowel disease. Numerous finger-like polypoid lesions with the appearance of stalactites were noted in the transverse colon at the time of colonoscopy. Filiform polyps may be misinterpreted on colonoscopy as unusual villous adenomas or small carcinomas. Endoscopists should be familiar with the varied morphology of filifform polypsis in order to arrive at a correct diagnosis, and to ensure proper management.

  20. Diagnosis and management of common gastrointestinal tract infectious diseases in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Landsman, Marc J; Sultan, Mohamed; Stevens, Michael; Charabaty, Aline; Mattar, Mark C

    2014-12-01

    Management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, stretches beyond control of flares. Some infections of the gastrointestinal tract are more commonly seen in patients with IBD. Work from the Human Microbiome Project has been instrumental in our understanding of the interplay between the vast gut microbiota and host immune responses. Patients with IBD may be more prone to infectious complications based on their underlying inflammatory disease and variations in their microbiome. Immunosuppressant medications commonly used to treat patients with Crohn's and colitis also play a role in predisposing these patients to acquire these infections. Here, we present a detailed review of the data focusing on the most common infections of the gastrointestinal tract in patients with IBD: Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) and cytomegalovirus (CMV). We will discuss appropriate diagnostic tools and treatment options for these infections. Other less common infections will also be reviewed briefly. Studying the various infections of the gastrointestinal tract in these patients could enhance our understanding of the pathophysiology of IBD. PMID:25208106

  1. Diagnosis and management of common gastrointestinal tract infectious diseases in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Landsman, Marc J; Sultan, Mohamed; Stevens, Michael; Charabaty, Aline; Mattar, Mark C

    2014-12-01

    Management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, stretches beyond control of flares. Some infections of the gastrointestinal tract are more commonly seen in patients with IBD. Work from the Human Microbiome Project has been instrumental in our understanding of the interplay between the vast gut microbiota and host immune responses. Patients with IBD may be more prone to infectious complications based on their underlying inflammatory disease and variations in their microbiome. Immunosuppressant medications commonly used to treat patients with Crohn's and colitis also play a role in predisposing these patients to acquire these infections. Here, we present a detailed review of the data focusing on the most common infections of the gastrointestinal tract in patients with IBD: Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) and cytomegalovirus (CMV). We will discuss appropriate diagnostic tools and treatment options for these infections. Other less common infections will also be reviewed briefly. Studying the various infections of the gastrointestinal tract in these patients could enhance our understanding of the pathophysiology of IBD.

  2. Care of Patients with Diabetic Foot Disease in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim S.; Abdulhadi, Nadia N.; Coppell, Kirsten J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health challenge and causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diabetic foot disease is one of the most debilitating and costly complications of diabetes. While simple preventative foot care measures can reduce the risk of lower limb ulcerations and subsequent amputations by up to 85%, they are not always implemented. In Oman, foot care for patients with diabetes is mainly provided in primary and secondary care settings. Among all lower limb amputations performed in public hospitals in Oman between 2002–2013, 47.3% were performed on patients with diabetes. The quality of foot care among patients with diabetes in Oman has not been evaluated and unidentified gaps in care may exist. This article highlights challenges in the provision of adequate foot care to Omani patients with diabetes. It concludes with suggested strategies for an integrated national diabetic foot care programme in Oman. PMID:27606104

  3. Care of Patients with Diabetic Foot Disease in Oman.

    PubMed

    Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim S; Abdulhadi, Nadia N; Coppell, Kirsten J

    2016-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health challenge and causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diabetic foot disease is one of the most debilitating and costly complications of diabetes. While simple preventative foot care measures can reduce the risk of lower limb ulcerations and subsequent amputations by up to 85%, they are not always implemented. In Oman, foot care for patients with diabetes is mainly provided in primary and secondary care settings. Among all lower limb amputations performed in public hospitals in Oman between 2002-2013, 47.3% were performed on patients with diabetes. The quality of foot care among patients with diabetes in Oman has not been evaluated and unidentified gaps in care may exist. This article highlights challenges in the provision of adequate foot care to Omani patients with diabetes. It concludes with suggested strategies for an integrated national diabetic foot care programme in Oman. PMID:27606104

  4. Prevalence of celiac disease in patients with severe food allergy.

    PubMed

    Pillon, R; Ziberna, F; Badina, L; Ventura, A; Longo, G; Quaglia, S; De Leo, L; Vatta, S; Martelossi, S; Patano, G; Not, T; Berti, I

    2015-10-01

    The association between food allergy and celiac disease (CD) is still to be clarified. We screened for CD 319 patients with severe food allergy (IgE > 85 kU/l against food proteins and a history of severe allergic reactions) who underwent specific food oral immunotherapy (OIT), together with 128 children with mild allergy who recovered without OIT, and compared the prevalence data with our historical data regarding healthy schoolchildren. Sixteen patients (5%) with severe allergy and one (0.8%) with mild allergy tested positive for both genetic and serological CD markers, while the prevalence among the schoolchildren was 1%. Intestinal biopsies were obtained in 13/16 patients with severe allergy and in the one with mild allergy, confirming the diagnosis of CD. Sufferers from severe food allergy seem to be at a fivefold increased risk of CD. Our findings suggest that routine screening for CD should be recommended in patients with severe food allergy.

  5. Evaluation of thyroid hormone levels in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Gandham; Chickballapur Rayappa, Wilma Delphine Silvia; Vijayalakshmi, Ravella; Swathi, Manchala; Kumar, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    We attempted in this study to determine the thyroid hormone levels in 45 adult chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and 45 ageand sex-matched healthy subjects as controls. The serum thyroid hormone levels were measured by a radioimmunoassay. Serum concentrations of creatinine, urea, electrolytes and total proteins and albumin were measured as well. There was a significant decrease in the levels of serum total T3, total T4 and total protein and albumin levels in CKD patients when compared with the controls. There was a significant increase in the level of thyroid stimulating hormone in the CKD patients compared with the controls. Our study suggests that CKD leads to significant changes in the thyroid hormone levels, which need to be interpreted carefully in these patients.

  6. Invasive fungal diseases in patients with acute lymphoid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nicolato, Andrea; Nouér, Simone A; Garnica, Marcia; Portugal, Rodrigo; Maiolino, Angelo; Nucci, Marcio

    2016-09-01

    Invasive fungal disease (IFD) represents an important complication in patients with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of IFD in ALL patients with neutropenia, identify factors associated with IFD, and estimate the impact of IFD on the outcome. All patients with ALL who developed febrile neutropenia from 1987 to 2013 were evaluated. Cases of IFD were classified as proven or probable. Factors associated with IFD were evaluated by comparing episodes with and without a diagnosis of IFD. Among 350 episodes of febrile neutropenia, 31 IFDs were diagnosed (8.8%). Prolonged neutropenia was the only factor associated with IFD caused by yeasts. Factors associated with IFD caused by molds by multivariate analysis were the period after 2008, receipt of allogeneic transplant, relapsed ALL and prolonged neutropenia. Patients in relapse should receive induction chemotherapy in rooms with HEPA filter and receive antifungal prophylaxis. PMID:26949001

  7. Meaningful rehabilitation of the end-stage renal disease patient.

    PubMed

    Thornton, T A; Hakim, R M

    1997-05-01

    In this highly technological age, health care providers are called to attend to the patient as a whole person, with dreams and goals and a desire for purpose and meaning in life. In this article, we propose a broadened definition of rehabilitation and a rehabilitation program designed to effect an improvement in the quality of life of each renal patient by aiming to restore meaningful existence in each of their lives. An individualized plan for rehabilitation can be constructed and implemented with far-reaching success when the focus is on the life goals of the patient, whether physical, social, psychological, or intellectual. These programs not only enhance the quality of life of the patient with end-stage renal disease, but are cost-effective, both at the societal level and at the level of the dialysis clinic. PMID:9165654

  8. Care of Patients with Diabetic Foot Disease in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim S.; Abdulhadi, Nadia N.; Coppell, Kirsten J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health challenge and causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diabetic foot disease is one of the most debilitating and costly complications of diabetes. While simple preventative foot care measures can reduce the risk of lower limb ulcerations and subsequent amputations by up to 85%, they are not always implemented. In Oman, foot care for patients with diabetes is mainly provided in primary and secondary care settings. Among all lower limb amputations performed in public hospitals in Oman between 2002–2013, 47.3% were performed on patients with diabetes. The quality of foot care among patients with diabetes in Oman has not been evaluated and unidentified gaps in care may exist. This article highlights challenges in the provision of adequate foot care to Omani patients with diabetes. It concludes with suggested strategies for an integrated national diabetic foot care programme in Oman.

  9. Patient and Other Stakeholder Engagement in Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Funded Studies of Patients with Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Cukor, Daniel; Cohen, Lewis M; Cope, Elizabeth L; Ghahramani, Nasrollah; Hedayati, S Susan; Hynes, Denise M; Shah, Vallabh O; Tentori, Francesca; Unruh, Mark; Bobelu, Jeanette; Cohen, Scott; Dember, Laura M; Faber, Thomas; Fischer, Michael J; Gallardo, Rani; Germain, Michael J; Ghahate, Donica; Grote, Nancy; Hartwell, Lori; Heagerty, Patrick; Kimmel, Paul L; Kutner, Nancy; Lawson, Susan; Marr, Lisa; Nelson, Robert G; Porter, Anna C; Sandy, Phillip; Struminger, Bruce B; Subramanian, Lalita; Weisbord, Steve; Young, Bessie; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2016-09-01

    Including target populations in the design and implementation of research trials has been one response to the growing health disparities endemic to our health care system, as well as an aid to study generalizability. One type of community-based participatory research is "Patient Centered-Research", in which patient perspectives on the germane research questions and methodologies are incorporated into the study. The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) has mandated that meaningful patient and stakeholder engagement be incorporated into all applications. As of March 2015, PCORI funded seven clinically-focused studies of patients with kidney disease. The goal of this paper is to synthesize the experiences of these studies to gain an understanding of how meaningful patient and stakeholder engagement can occur in clinical research of kidney diseases, and what the key barriers are to its implementation. Our collective experience suggests that successful implementation of a patient- and stakeholder-engaged research paradigm involves: (1) defining the roles and process for the incorporation of input; (2) identifying the particular patients and other stakeholders; (3) engaging patients and other stakeholders so they appreciate the value of their own participation and have personal investment in the research process; and (4) overcoming barriers and challenges that arise and threaten the productivity of the collaboration. It is our hope that the experiences of these studies will further interest and capacity for incorporating patient and stakeholder perspectives in research of kidney diseases.

  10. Patient and Other Stakeholder Engagement in Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Funded Studies of Patients with Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Cukor, Daniel; Cohen, Lewis M; Cope, Elizabeth L; Ghahramani, Nasrollah; Hedayati, S Susan; Hynes, Denise M; Shah, Vallabh O; Tentori, Francesca; Unruh, Mark; Bobelu, Jeanette; Cohen, Scott; Dember, Laura M; Faber, Thomas; Fischer, Michael J; Gallardo, Rani; Germain, Michael J; Ghahate, Donica; Grote, Nancy; Hartwell, Lori; Heagerty, Patrick; Kimmel, Paul L; Kutner, Nancy; Lawson, Susan; Marr, Lisa; Nelson, Robert G; Porter, Anna C; Sandy, Phillip; Struminger, Bruce B; Subramanian, Lalita; Weisbord, Steve; Young, Bessie; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2016-09-01

    Including target populations in the design and implementation of research trials has been one response to the growing health disparities endemic to our health care system, as well as an aid to study generalizability. One type of community-based participatory research is "Patient Centered-Research", in which patient perspectives on the germane research questions and methodologies are incorporated into the study. The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) has mandated that meaningful patient and stakeholder engagement be incorporated into all applications. As of March 2015, PCORI funded seven clinically-focused studies of patients with kidney disease. The goal of this paper is to synthesize the experiences of these studies to gain an understanding of how meaningful patient and stakeholder engagement can occur in clinical research of kidney diseases, and what the key barriers are to its implementation. Our collective experience suggests that successful implementation of a patient- and stakeholder-engaged research paradigm involves: (1) defining the roles and process for the incorporation of input; (2) identifying the particular patients and other stakeholders; (3) engaging patients and other stakeholders so they appreciate the value of their own participation and have personal investment in the research process; and (4) overcoming barriers and challenges that arise and threaten the productivity of the collaboration. It is our hope that the experiences of these studies will further interest and capacity for incorporating patient and stakeholder perspectives in research of kidney diseases. PMID:27197911

  11. Support for patients with celiac disease: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Card, Tim; Ciclitira, Paul J; Swift, Gillian L; Nasr, Ikram; Sanders, David S; Ciacci, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is a lifelong disorder. Patients are at increased risk of complications and comorbidity. Objectives We conducted a review of the literature on patient support and information in CD and aim to issue recommendations about patient information with regards to CD. Methods Data source: We searched PubMed for English-language articles published between 1900 and June 2014, containing terms related to costs, economics of CD, or education and CD. Study selection: Papers deemed relevant by any of the participating authors were included in the study. Data synthesis: No quantitative synthesis of data was performed. Instead we formulated a consensus view of the information that should be offered to all patients with CD. Results There are few randomized clinical trials examining the effect of patient support in CD. Patients and their families receive information from many sources. It is important that health care personnel guide the patient through the plethora of facts and comments on the Internet. An understanding of CD is likely to improve dietary adherence. Patients should be educated about current knowledge about risk factors for CD, as well as the increased risk of complications. Patients should also be advised to avoid other health hazards, such as smoking. Many patients are eager to learn about future non-dietary treatments of CD. This review also comments on novel therapies but it is important to stress that no such treatment is available at present. Conclusion Based on mostly observational data, we suggest that patient support and information should be an integral part of the management of CD, and is likely to affect the outcome of CD. PMID:25922674

  12. Survival of Korean Huntington’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Han-Joon; Shin, Chae-Won; Jeon, Beomseok; Park, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    Objective The survival of Huntington’s disease (HD) patients is reported to be 15–20 years. However, most studies on the survival of HD have been conducted in patients without genetic confirmation with the possible inclusion of non-HD patients, and all studies have been conducted in Western countries. The survival of patients with HD in East Asia, where its prevalence is 10–50-fold lower compared with Western populations, has not yet been reported. Methods Forty-seven genetically confirmed Korean HD patients from independent families were included in this retrospective medical record review study. Results The mean age at onset among the 47 patients was 46.1 ± 14.0 years. At the time of data collection, 25 patients had died, and these patients had a mean age at death of 57.8 ± 13.7 years. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of the median survival from onset in the 47 patients was 14.5 years (95% confidence interval: 12.3–16.6). None of the following factors were associated with the survival time in the univariate Cox regression analysis: gender, age at onset, normal CAG repeat size, mutant CAG repeat size, and the absence or presence of non-motor symptoms at onset. Conclusion This is the first Asian study on survival in HD patients. Survival in Korean HD patients may be shorter than that reported for Western populations, or at least is in the lower range of expected survival. A larger longitudinal observation study is needed to confirm the results found in this study. PMID:27667189

  13. [Patient education in rheumatology: a way to better disease management using patients' empowerment].

    PubMed

    Lind-Albrecht, Gudrun

    2006-11-01

    Patients' empowerment has become a main issue in modern treatment of chronic rheumatic diseases. Within this concept patient education is an important instrument. Specific standardized programs, developed by multicenter groups under the leadership of the DGRh (German Society for Rheumatology) have become widely used all over Germany. The DGRh takes care of the program quality and of the trainers and heads of courses. Based on modern educational theories for adults and using a modular concept, which must be adapted to the individual situation of the patients, the curricula are put into practice by trainees of the different professions concerned. Controlled studies have not only shown the progress of patients' knowledge, compliance and coping, but also showed striking socioeconomic advantages in long-term follow-up. Patient education leads to a better and cost-effective management of rheumatic diseases.

  14. Nutritional Strategies in the Management of Adult Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Dietary Considerations from Active Disease to Disease Remission.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Douglas L; Limketkai, Berkeley; Medici, Valentina; Saire Mendoza, Mardeli; Palmer, Lena; Bechtold, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of chronic, lifelong, and relapsing illnesses, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, which involve the gastrointestinal tract. There is no cure for these diseases, but combined pharmacological and nutritional therapy can induce remission and maintain clinical remission. Malnutrition and nutritional deficiencies among IBD patients result in poor clinical outcomes such as growth failure, reduced response to pharmacotherapy, increased risk for sepsis, and mortality. The aim of this review is to highlight the consequences of malnutrition in the management of IBD and describe nutritional interventions to facilitate induction of remission as well as maintenance; we will also discuss alternative delivery methods to improve nutritional status preoperatively.

  15. Facilitators and Threats to the Patient Dignity in Hospitalized Patients with Heart Diseases: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Borhani, Fariba; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Rabori, Roghayeh Mehdipour

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patient’s dignity is an important issue which is highlighted in nursing It is an issue that is highly dependent on context and culture. Heart disease is the most common disease in Iran and the world. Identification of facilitator and threatening patient dignity in heart patients is vital. This study aimed to explore facilitator and threatening patient dignity in hospitalized patients with heart disease. Methods: This qualitative content analysis study was performed in 2014 in Kerman, Iran. 20 patients admitted to coronary care units and 5 personnel were selected using purposeful sampling in semi-structured and in depth interviews. Researchers also used documentation and field notes until data saturation. Qualitative data analysis was done constantly and simultaneously with data collection Results: Three central themes emerged: a) Care context which includes human environment and physical environment, b) Holistic safe care including meeting the needs of patients both in the hospital and after discharge, c) Creating a sense of security and an effective relationship between patient and nurse, including a respectful relationship and account the family in health team. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that care context is important for patient dignity as well as physical environment and safe holistic care. PMID:26793729

  16. [Burden of illness in Polish patients with reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Reguła, Jarosław; Kulich, Károly R; Stasiewicz, Jan; Jasiński, Bolesław; Carlsson, Jonas; Wiklund, Ingela

    2005-01-01

    The clinical and socioeconomic burden of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is considerable. The primary symptom of GERD is heartburn, but it may also be associated with extraesophageal manifestations, such as asthma, chest pain and otolaryngologic disorders. The objective of the study was to describe the impact of heartburn on patients' Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQL) in Poland, using validated generic and disease-specific instruments to measure patient-reported outcomes. Patients with symptoms of heartburn completed the Polish versions of the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS), the Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia questionnaire (QOLRAD), the Short Form-36 (SF-36) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) scale. Frequency and severity of heartburn during the previous 7 days were also recorded. 135 patients completed the assessments (mean age of 44 years, SD = 15; 61% female). 55% of patients had moderate symptoms and nearly two thirds (64%) had symptoms on 5 or more days in the previous week. Patients were most bothered by symptoms of reflux (mean GSRS score of 4.1, on a scale of 1 [not bothered] to 7 [very bothered]), indigestion (3.5) and abdominal pain (3.2). As a result of their symptoms, patients experienced impaired vitality (mean QOLRAD score of 3.8, on a scale of 1 to 7, where 1 represents the most severe impact on daily functioning), problems with food and drink (3.9), emotional distress (4.1) and sleep disturbance (4.7). Using HAD, 32% of heartburn patients were anxious and 10% were depressed. In conclusion it should be stated that there is consistent evidence that GERD substantially impairs all aspects of health-related quality of life.

  17. Lung cancer screening in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jessica; Marín, Marta; Sánchez-Salcedo, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are two intimately related diseases, with great impact on public health. Annual screening using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) of the chest significantly reduces mortality due to lung cancer, and several scientific societies now recommend this technique. COPD, defined by the presence of airflow obstruction [forced expiratory volume and forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio less than 0.70], and their clinical phenotypes, namely emphysema and chronic bronchitis, have been associated with increased lung cancer risk. Several epidemiological studies, including lung cancer screening trials, have found a 2- to 4-fold increase in lung cancer risk in patients with COPD when compared to individuals without airflow obstruction. Part of the risk attributed to airflow obstruction appears to be derived from the presence of radiographic emphysema. The latter has proven to be an important lung cancer risk factor in smokers without airflow obstruction and even in never smokers. This evidence supports the idea of including patients with COPD and/or emphysema in lung cancer screening programs. There is evidence that lung cancer screening in this population is effective and can potentially reduce mortality. Specific lung cancer risk scores have been developed for patients with COPD [COPD lung cancer screening score (LUCSS) and COPD-LUCSS-diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO)] to identify those at high risk. A multidisciplinary approach for an adequate patient selection, especially of patients with severe disease, is key to maximize benefits and reduce harms from lung cancer screening in this population. Patients with COPD included in lung cancer screening programs could also benefit from other interventions, such as smoking cessation and adequate treatment. PMID:27195278

  18. [Trends in rehabilitation of patients with rheumatic diseases in Germany].

    PubMed

    Mau, W; Beyer, W; Ehlebracht-König, I; Engel, J-M; Genth, E; Jäckel, W H; Lange, U; Thiele, K

    2014-03-01

    Recent Deutsche Gesellschaft für Rheumatologie (DGRh, German Society of Rheumatology) guidelines emphasized the significance of coordinated multidisciplinary care and rehabilitation of patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Nationwide data from the German pension insurance funds showed that inpatient rehabilitation due to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) varied by a factor of 2.6 between the different German states. From 2000 to 2012 rehabilitation measures were reduced by one third, most significantly in men with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Rehabilitation measures because of RA or AS were provided up to 14 times more frequently by the German statutory pension insurance scheme compared with a large compulsory health insurance which is responsible for rehabilitation measures after retirement. In rehabilitation centers with high numbers of patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases, higher structural and process quality were demonstrated. In 2011 a total of 40 % of RA patients in the national database of the collaborative arthritis centers showed medium or severe functional limitations. Among these disabled RA patients inpatient rehabilitation was reduced by about 50 % between 1995 and 2011. Out of all RA patients from outpatient rheumatology care with severe functional limitations 38 % had no functional restoration therapy within the previous 12 months with a high variation between rheumatologists. Experiences from other European countries may inspire German rheumatologists and other involved health professionals to initiate a wider range of rehabilitative interventions in the future.

  19. Enteral nutrition in the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patient.

    PubMed

    DeBellis, Heather F; Fetterman, James W

    2012-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive, chronic disease, in which malnutrition can have an undesirable effect. Therefore, the patient's nutritional status is critical for optimizing outcomes in COPD. The initial nutrition assessment is focused on identifying calorically compromised COPD patients in order to provide them with appropriate nutrition. Nutritional intervention consists of oral supplementation and enteral nutrition to prevent weight loss and muscle mass depletion. Evaluation of nutritional status should include past medical history (medications, lung function, and exercise tolerance) and dietary history (patient's dietary habits, food choices, meal patterns, food allergy information, and malabsorption issues), in addition to physiological stress, visceral proteins, weight, fat-free mass, and body mass index. The current medical literature conflicts regarding the appropriate type of formulation to select for nutritional intervention, especially regarding the amount of calories from fat to provide COPD patients. This review article focuses on the enteral product formulations currently available, and how they are most appropriately utilized in patients with COPD.

  20. Celiac disease prevalence in Brazilian dilated cardiomyopathy patients.

    PubMed

    De Bem, Ricardo Schmit T; Da Ro Sa Utiyama, Shirley Ramos; Nisihara, Renato Mitsunori; Fortunato, Jerônimo Antônio; Tondo, Josué Augusto; Carmes, Eliane Ribeiro; Souza, Raquel Almada E; Pisani, Julio César; Amarante, Heda Maria Barska Dos Santos

    2006-05-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a permanent condition of gluten intolerance and a number of autoimmune diseases have been associated with it. In the past few years, a relation between CD and dilated cardiomyopathy (CM) was described in Europe and United States. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of CD among south Brazilian precardiac transplant patients with advanced CM. A total of 74 patients on a list for heart transplantation were evaluated for the presence CD. The presence of anti-endomisial antibody (IgA-EmA) was determined by indirect immunofluorescence and for the anti-transglutaminase antibody (IgA anti-h-tTG) by ELISA. Serologically positive patients were submitted to upper endoscopy with intestinal biopsy. Two individuals (2.63%) were positive for IgA-EmA and 5 (6.75%) for IgA anti-h-tTG; 1 (1.35%) had both tests positive. Histologic confirmation of CD occurred only in the IgA-EmA positive patients. In conclusion, data from the present study allows recommend the screening for CD in patients with CM using IgA-EmA test as the method of choice. PMID:16758314

  1. [Concept analysis of medication adherence in patients with chronic disease].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jen-Ying; Chen, Hsing-Mei

    2014-06-01

    Pharmacotherapy plays an important role in the management of chronic diseases. However, many patients with chronic disease do not adhere to their medication regimen. This results in worsening symptoms and frequent re-hospitalizations. As a result, healthcare providers may view these patients as bad. Medication adherence is a complex concept. Analyzing this concept may assist nurses to improve patient-centered care. This paper uses Walker & Avant's method to conduct a concept analysis of medication adherence. Results show the defining attributes of medication adherence as: (1) knowing and agreeing to the medication; (2) communicating and negotiating the regimen; and (3) active, continuous involvement in and appraisal of the treatment effect. Identified antecedents of medication adherence included the patient having: (1) a prescribed medication regimen; (2) cognitive and action abilities in her / his role as a patient; and (3) level of preparation for medication treatment. Identified consequences of medication adherence include: (1) improving symptom control; (2) decreasing re-hospitalizations and mortality; (3) reducing medical care costs; (4) restoring self-esteem; and (5) diminishing depression. It is hoped that this concept analysis provides a reference for nurses to achieve a better understanding of medication adherence and further improve nursing practice. PMID:24899565

  2. Analysis of Retinal Peripapillary Segmentation in Early Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Salobrar-Garcia, Elena; Hoyas, Irene; Leal, Mercedes; de Hoz, Rosa; Rojas, Blanca; Ramirez, Ana I.; Salazar, Juan J.; Yubero, Raquel; Gil, Pedro; Triviño, Alberto; Ramirez, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Decreased thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) may reflect retinal neuronal-ganglion cell death. A decrease in the RNFL has been demonstrated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) in addition to aging by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Twenty-three mild-AD patients and 28 age-matched control subjects with mean Mini-Mental State Examination 23.3 and 28.2, respectively, with no ocular disease or systemic disorders affecting vision, were considered for study. OCT peripapillary and macular segmentation thickness were examined in the right eye of each patient. Compared to controls, eyes of patients with mild-AD patients showed no statistical difference in peripapillary RNFL thickness (P > 0.05); however, sectors 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, and 11 of the papilla showed thinning, while in sectors 1, 5, 6, 7, and 10 there was thickening. Total macular volume and RNFL thickness of the fovea in all four inner quadrants and in the outer temporal quadrants proved to be significantly decreased (P < 0.01). Despite the fact that peripapillary RNFL thickness did not statistically differ in comparison to control eyes, the increase in peripapillary thickness in our mild-AD patients could correspond to an early neurodegeneration stage and may entail the existence of an inflammatory process that could lead to progressive peripapillary fiber damage. PMID:26557684

  3. In vivo bone aluminum measurements in patients with renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, K.J.; Kelleher, S.P.

    1986-01-01

    Contamination of the dialysis solution with trace amounts of aluminum and long-term use of aluminum-based phosphate binders have led to increased body burden of aluminum in patients with end-stage renal disease. A significant clinical problem associated with aluminum-overload is the early diagnosis of aluminum-induced dialysis dementia and osteomalacic osteodystrophy. There are few, if any, blood or urine indices that provide an early monitor of this bone disease, especially in the asymptomatic patient. Although a bone biopsy is usually the basis for the final clinical diagnosis, this procedure is not recommended for routine monitoring of patients. The present technique demonstrates the direct in vivo measurement of bone aluminum levels in patients with renal failure. The interference normally present from activation of bone phosphorus is eliminated by using a thermal/epithermal neutron beam. For the clinical management of the patients, the Al/Ca ratio for the hand may be more useful than an absolute measurement of the total body or skeletal aluminum burden. The relationship between the increased serum Al levels following disferrioxamine infusion and the direct in vivo measurement of bone aluminum using the Al/Ca ratio are currently under investigation. The neutron activation procedure presented in this pilot study is a promising new technique with an immediate clinical application. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Vitamin D deficiency in patients with either rheumatic diseases or inflammatory bowel diseases on biologic therapy.

    PubMed

    Bruzzese, Vincenzo; Zullo, Angelo; Piacchianti Diamanti, Andrea; Ridola, Lorenzo; Lorenzetti, Roberto; Marrese, Cinzia; Scolieri, Palma; De Francesco, Vincenzo; Hassan, Cesare; Migliore, Alberto; Laganà, Bruno

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been reported in patients with chronic inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatic and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). We evaluated the role of biologic therapy on vitamin D, calcium and parathormone (PTH) levels. This cross-sectional study enrolled consecutive patients with either rheumatic diseases or IBD who underwent an ambulatory visit. Patients receiving vitamin D/calcium supplementation were excluded. Vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency was diagnosed when values were <20 ng/mL and 21-29 ng/ml, respectively. Patients were sub-grouped according to biologic therapy. A multivariate analysis was performed. Two-hundred patients, including 136 with a rheumatic disease (M/F 37/99; mean age 60.7 ± 12.9 years) and 64 with IBD (M/F 41/23; Mean age 49.6 ± 13.1 years) were enrolled. Vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency was detected in as many as 63.5 % patients, being 61.8 and 67.2 % in patients with either rheumatic diseases or IBD, respectively. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency was higher in those receiving biologics than other therapies (78.3 vs 43.2 %; p < 0.0001), in either rheumatic diseases (78.7 vs 41 %; p < 0.0001) or IBD (75 vs 50 %; p = 0.03) group. At multivariate analysis, only biologic therapy was independently associated with vitamin D deficit (OR 4.61; p = 0.001). Patients with vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency had hypocalcemia more frequently than controls (22.8 vs 10.9 %; p = 0.03), while PTH values did not differ significantly. This study finds that the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency was very high in patients with either rheumatic diseases or IBD receiving a biologic therapy.

  5. May Patients with Alcohol Liver Disease Benefit from Herbal Medicines?

    PubMed

    Milosevic, Natasa; Milanovic, Maja; Turkulov, Vesna; Medić-Stojanoska, Milica; Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholism is currently listed as the third leading cause of death. Chronic alcohol consumption brings serious medical complications like gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, respiratory system disorders. Liver can be seriously damage by alcohol misuse. Alcoholic Liver Disease (ALD) is the first important warning sign of alcohol abuse. Since effective therapies for ALD are still limited, natural products in the treatment of ALD become very important. In this regard, there have been done very few clinical trials with poor results. Silymarin, glycyrrhizin, garlic show some promising results in ALD patients while the in vivo and in vitro studies with green tee, quercetin and curcumin indicate positive effect on patients with ALD. PMID:27457345

  6. Depression in adult patients with biotin responsive basal ganglia disease.

    PubMed

    Bubshait, Dalal K; Rashid, Asif; Al-Owain, Mohammed A; Sulaiman, Raashda A

    2016-01-01

    Biotin responsive basal ganglia disease (BBGD), is a potentially treatable inherited metabolic disorder which clinically presents as sub-acute encephalopathy in children. Early diagnosis and treatment of this disorder results in good clinical recovery in childhood. However, there is no report in the literature on the long term outcome of these treated patients in adult life. We report two patients with BBGD who were metabolically stable on treatment and developed depression later in life. These cases highlight the association of depression with basal ganglia disorders and demonstrate that depression is the potential long term complication of BBGD.

  7. Assessment of Aortic Elasticity in Patients with Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Çekin, Ayhan Hilmi; Arslan, Şakir; Çağırcı, Göksel; Küçükseymen, Selçuk; Çay, Serkan; Harmandar, Ferda Akbay; Yeşil, Bayram

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic autoimmune disorder induced by dietary gluten intake by individuals who are genetically sensitive. Many studies report an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases in such patients. The aim of this study is to assess aortic elasticity properties in patients with CD that may be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Subjects and Methods Eighty-one patients diagnosed with CD by antibody test and biopsy and 63 healthy volunteers were included in this prospective study. Electrocardiographic and echocardiographic examinations were performed. Results The CD group did not have any differences in the conventional echocardiographic parameters compared to the healthy individuals. However, patients in the CD group had an increased aortic stiffness beta index (4.3±2.3 vs. 3.6±1.6, p=0.010), increased pressure strain elastic modulus (33.6±17.0 kPa vs. 28.5±16.7 kPa, p=0.037), decreased aortic distensibility (7.0±3.0×10-6 cm2/dyn vs. 8.2±3.6×10-6 cm2/dyn, p=0.037), and similar aortic strain (17.9±7.7 vs. 16.0±5.5, p=0.070) compared to the control group. Patients with CD were found to have an elevated neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio compared to the control group (2.54±0.63 vs. 2.24±0.63, p=0.012). However, gluten-free diet and neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio were not found to be associated with aortic elasticity. Conclusion Patients with CD had increased aortic stiffness and decreased aortic distensibility. Gluten-free diet enabled the patients with CD to have a reduction in the inflammatory parameters whereas the absence of a significant difference in the elastic properties of the aorta may suggest that the risk of cardiovascular disease persists in this patient group despite a gluten-free diet. PMID:27014355

  8. Tumors masquerading in patients with thyroid eye disease.

    PubMed

    Griepentrog, Gregory J; Burkat, Cat N; Kikkawa, Don O; Lucarelli, Mark J

    2013-08-01

    Thyroid eye disease (TED) is the most common cause of proptosis in adults. The external manifestations of TED are characteristic and the diagnosis is typically made without imaging. Although there are multiple descriptions of primary and secondary orbital tumors initially mistaken for TED in the literature, there are limited reports detailing the findings of patients with long-standing TED whom developed an orbital tumor at a later date. Herein, we present a 6-year retrospective multi-center report of three patients with long-standing TED who developed an initially unsuspected orbital or cavernous sinus tumor. PMID:23662589

  9. Being Ready to Treat Ebola Virus Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Brett-Major, David M.; Jacob, Shevin T.; Jacquerioz, Frederique A.; Risi, George F.; Fischer, William A.; Kato, Yasuyuki; Houlihan, Catherine F.; Crozier, Ian; Bosa, Henry Kyobe; Lawler, James V.; Adachi, Takuya; Hurley, Sara K.; Berry, Louise E.; Carlson, John C.; Button, Thomas. C.; McLellan, Susan L.; Shea, Barbara J.; Kuniyoshi, Gary G.; Ferri, Mauricio; Murthy, Srinivas G.; Petrosillo, Nicola; Lamontagne, Francois; Porembka, David T.; Schieffelin, John S.; Rubinson, Lewis; O'Dempsey, Tim; Donovan, Suzanne M.; Bausch, Daniel G.; Fowler, Robert A.; Fletcher, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    As the outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa continues, clinical preparedness is needed in countries at risk for EVD (e.g., United States) and more fully equipped and supported clinical teams in those countries with epidemic spread of EVD in Africa. Clinical staff must approach the patient with a very deliberate focus on providing effective care while assuring personal safety. To do this, both individual health care providers and health systems must improve EVD care. Although formal guidance toward these goals exists from the World Health Organization, Medecin Sans Frontières, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other groups, some of the most critical lessons come from personal experience. In this narrative, clinicians deployed by the World Health Organization into a wide range of clinical settings in West Africa distill key, practical considerations for working safely and effectively with patients with EVD. PMID:25510724

  10. Tract specific analysis in patients with sickle cell disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yaqiong; Coloigner, Julie; Qu, Xiaoping; Choi, Soyoung; Bush, Adam; Borzage, Matt; Vu, Chau; Lepore, Natasha; Wood, John

    2015-12-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hereditary blood disorder in which the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin molecule in red blood cells is abnormal. It affects numerous people in the world and leads to a shorter life span, pain, anemia, serious infections and neurocognitive decline. Tract-Specific Analysis (TSA) is a statistical method to evaluate white matter alterations due to neurocognitive diseases, using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images. Here, for the first time, TSA is used to compare 11 major brain white matter (WM) tracts between SCD patients and age-matched healthy subjects. Alterations are found in the corpus callosum (CC), the cortico-spinal tract (CST), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), and uncinated fasciculus (UNC). Based on previous studies on the neurocognitive functions of these tracts, the significant areas found in this paper might be related to several cognitive impairments and depression, both of which are observed in SCD patients.

  11. [Planning of cardiothoracic surgery for chronic kidney disease patients].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yasuhisa; Nohmi, Tosihiro; Seki, Koichiro; Higa, Yuki

    2013-11-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is related to cardiac diseases. Cardiac surgery is also related to postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI). It means heart and kidney have close relationship. We analyzed recent published data to understand how to manage CRF patients undergoing cardiovascular surgeries. We compared endovascular surgery and open procedure for aortic aneurysm, especially about contrast media-related renal damage, On or Off CABG or PCI for ischemic heart disease. We also discussed the relation between cardiopulmonary bypass and AKI and the risk factors causing AKI after CPB. Finally, we discussed prevention and treatment options of CPB related AKI, including furosemide, hANP mannitol, and statin. Published evidence in this area is still insufficient, but many studies are still carried out focusing on postoperative AKI. In the future we may be able to find the best answer for managing CRF patients undergoing cardiovascular surgeries.

  12. Being ready to treat Ebola virus disease patients.

    PubMed

    Brett-Major, David M; Jacob, Shevin T; Jacquerioz, Frederique A; Risi, George F; Fischer, William A; Kato, Yasuyuki; Houlihan, Catherine F; Crozier, Ian; Bosa, Henry Kyobe; Lawler, James V; Adachi, Takuya; Hurley, Sara K; Berry, Louise E; Carlson, John C; Button, Thomas C; McLellan, Susan L; Shea, Barbara J; Kuniyoshi, Gary G; Ferri, Mauricio; Murthy, Srinivas G; Petrosillo, Nicola; Lamontagne, Francois; Porembka, David T; Schieffelin, John S; Rubinson, Lewis; O'Dempsey, Tim; Donovan, Suzanne M; Bausch, Daniel G; Fowler, Robert A; Fletcher, Thomas E

    2015-02-01

    As the outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa continues, clinical preparedness is needed in countries at risk for EVD (e.g., United States) and more fully equipped and supported clinical teams in those countries with epidemic spread of EVD in Africa. Clinical staff must approach the patient with a very deliberate focus on providing effective care while assuring personal safety. To do this, both individual health care providers and health systems must improve EVD care. Although formal guidance toward these goals exists from the World Health Organization, Medecin Sans Frontières, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other groups, some of the most critical lessons come from personal experience. In this narrative, clinicians deployed by the World Health Organization into a wide range of clinical settings in West Africa distill key, practical considerations for working safely and effectively with patients with EVD. PMID:25510724

  13. Patient education for phosphorus management in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This review explores the challenges and solutions in educating patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) to lower serum phosphorus while avoiding protein insufficiency and hypercalcemia. Methods: A literature search including terms “hyperphosphatemia,” “patient education,” “food fatigue,” “hypercalcemia,” and “phosphorus–protein ratio” was undertaken using PubMed. Results: Hyperphosphatemia is a strong predictor of mortality in advanced CKD and is remediated via diet, phosphorus binders, and dialysis. Dietary counseling should encourage the consumption of foods with the least amount of inorganic or absorbable phosphorus, low phosphorus-to-protein ratios, and adequate protein content, and discourage excessive calcium intake in high-risk patients. Emerging educational initiatives include food labeling using a “traffic light” scheme, motivational interviewing techniques, and the Phosphate Education Program – whereby patients no longer have to memorize the phosphorus content of each individual food component, but only a “phosphorus unit” value for a limited number of food groups. Phosphorus binders are associated with a clear survival advantage in CKD patients, overcome the limitations associated with dietary phosphorus restriction, and permit a more flexible approach to achieving normalization of phosphorus levels. Conclusion: Patient education on phosphorus and calcium management can improve concordance and adherence and empower patients to collaborate actively for optimal control of mineral metabolism. PMID:23667310

  14. Action naming in Parkinson's disease patients on/off dopamine.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Elena; Cuetos, Fernando

    2012-04-01

    Growing evidence supports the notion that the same brain areas involved in planning and execution of movements are also involved in verb processing. Recent studies have pointed out the existence of verb impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder typically characterized by motor disturbance related to dopamine deficiency in the nigrostriatal system. The aim of this study was to test the influence of dopaminergic treatment in a group of non-demented PD patients on the performance of action naming. The action pictures belonged to two categories: pictures with high and low degree of motor content. A group of 20 PD patients without dementia and 15 controls performed the task. PD patients were assessed twice, on and off medication, controls only once. A repeated measures ANOVA was carried out on the reaction times. The results showed a main effect of group and a significant interaction between group×motor content when comparing the three groups. When the comparison was made only on the PD groups (on vs. off medication) the interaction group×motor content was also significant, indicating that PD patients off medication had longer reaction times for pictures with a high degree of motor content compared to PD patients on medication. These results suggest a selective deficit in naming pictures associated with high motor content in PD patients without dopamine medication. This effect could be due to the relations between brain motor areas and verb processing associated with dopamine depletion.

  15. [Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Barberán, José; Mensa, José

    2014-01-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is a common infection in immunocompromised patients with hematological malignancies or allogenic stem cell transplantation, and is less frequent in the context of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mucociliary activity impairment, immunosuppression due to the inhibition of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils by steroids, and receiving broad-spectrum antibiotics, play a role in the development of IPA in COPD patients. Colonized patients or those with IPA are older, with severe CODP stage (GOLD≥III), and have a higher number of comorbidities. The mortality rate is high due to the fact that having a definitive diagnosis of IPA in COPD patients is often difficult. The main clinical and radiological signs of IPA in these types of patients are non-specific, and tissue samples for definitive diagnosis are often difficult to obtain. The poor prognosis of IPA in COPD patients could perhaps be improved by faster diagnosis and prompt initiation of antifungal treatment. Some tools, such as scales and algorithms based on risk factors of IPA, may be useful for its early diagnosis in these patients.

  16. Swallowing in patients with Parkinson's disease: a surface electromyography study.

    PubMed

    Ws Coriolano, Maria das Graças; R Belo, Luciana; Carneiro, Danielle; G Asano, Amdore; Al Oliveira, Paulo José; da Silva, Douglas Monteiro; G Lins, Otávio

    2012-12-01

    Our goal was to study deglutition of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and normal controls (NC) using surface electromyography (sEMG). The study included 15 patients with idiopathic PD and 15 age-matched normal controls. Surface electromyography was collected over the suprahyoid muscle group. Conditions were the following: swallow at once 10 and 20 ml of water and 5 and 10 ml of yogurt of firm consistency, and freely drink 100 ml of water. During swallowing, durations of sEMG were significantly longer in PD patients than in normal controls but no significant differences of amplitudes were found. Eighty percent of the PD patients and 20 % of the NC needed more than one swallow to consume 20 ml of water, while 70 % of the PD patients and none of the NC needed more than one swallow to consume 5 ml of yogurt. PD patients took significantly more time and needed significantly more swallows to drink 100 ml of water than normal controls. We conclude that sEMG might be a simple and useful tool to study and monitor deglutition in PD patients.

  17. Blood flow structure in patients with coronary heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-05-01

    Blood flow structure was studied by PC integrated video camera with following slide by slide analysis. Volumetric blood flow velocity was supporting on constant level (1 ml/h). Silicone tube of diameter comparable with coronary arteries diameter was used as vessel model. Cell-cell interactions were studied under glucose and anticoagulants influence. Increased adhesiveness of blood cells to tube walls was revealed in patient with coronary heart disease (CHD) compare to practically healthy persons (PHP). In patients with stable angina pectoris of high functional class and patients with AMI shear stress resistant erythrocyte aggregates were predominating in blood flow structure up to microclots formation. Clotting and erythrocytes aggregation increase as response to glucose solution injection, sharply defined in patients with CHD. Heparin injection (10 000 ED) increased linear blood flow velocity both in patients with CHD and PHP. After compare our results with other author's data we can consider that method used in our study is sensible enough to investigate blood flow structure violations in patients with CHD and PHP. Several differences of cell-cell interaction in flow under glucose and anticoagulant influence were found out in patients with CHD and PHP.

  18. Comparison of Risk Factors and Disease Severity Between Old and Young Patients With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shou-Wu; Lee, Teng-Yu; Lien, Han-Chung; Yeh, Hong-Zen; Chang, Chi-Sen; Ko, Chung-Wang

    2013-01-01

    Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) tends to relapse and develop complications. The aim of the study was to compare the risk factors and disease severity of GERD in young and old patients. Methods Data from patients with GERD were collected between January and November 2009. The enrolled cases were assigned to the younger group if they were below 65 years, or the elderly group if 65 years or older. The general demographic data, lifestyle characteristics and endoscopic findings of the two groups were compared. Results Among all enrolled 111 patients, 78 and 33 patients were classified in the younger and elderly groups, respectively. The elderly group had significantly more men than the younger group did (72.7% vs 39.7%, P = 0.001). Lower rates of smoking (3% vs 6.4%, P = 0.029) and tea drinking (21.3% vs 34.6%, P = 0.001) were noted in the elderly patients, but similar rates of alcohol and coffee drinking. There were more severe esophagitis, esophagocardiac junction (ECJ) ulcers (21.2% vs. 2.6%, P = 0.003) and hiatal hernia (36.4% vs 16.9%, P = 0.025) in the elderly group. Conclusion Elderly GERD patients were more likely to be male, and having severe esophagitis, but lower rates of cigarette smoking and tea drinking, than those of younger patients.

  19. Gender and disease features in Moroccan patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ibn Yacoub, Yousra; Amine, Bouchra; Laatiris, Assia; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2012-02-01

    This study was conducted to determine differences in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) between men and women in terms of clinical characteristics, biological features, structural severity and quality of life (QoL). A total of 130 consecutive AS patients fulfilling the modified New York criteria were included. Sociodemographic data were collected. The activity of disease was assessed by the Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI) and the functional disability by the Bath Ankylosing spondylitis functional index (BASFI). Spinal mobility was measured using the occiput-to-wall distance, chest expansion, Schober index and the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI). The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Radiologic Index (BASRI) was used to evaluate structural damage. Fatigue was evaluated using a visual analogue scale and the QoL was measured by using the generic instrument SF-36. Laboratory tests included the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and the C-reactive protein (CRP). In our sample, there were 87 (66.9%) men and 43 (33.1%) women. Women had significantly lower educational levels but there were no differences in socioeconomic status, age at onset, diagnosis delay, disease duration or treatments. Also, women had higher clinical disease activity (morning stiffness and BASDAI score), higher number of tender joints, more severe enthesitis and higher scores of fatigue (for all p ≤ 0.05). Moreover, hip involvement was more prevalent in men and the impairment of spinal mobility was significantly worse compared to women (for all p ≤ 0.001). Men had worse radiographic damage and lower scores in physical and social domains of QoL, but there were no differences in functional impairment scores. In this study, we noticed that AS presents differently according to gender in our patients. More longitudinal studies seem to be necessary to identify gender-related parameters of disease, thing that may help in diagnosis and therapeutic management of

  20. Clinical and Sociodemographic Aspects of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Delmondes, Leda Maria; Nunes, Marcelo Oliveira; Azevedo, Arthur Rangel; Oliveira, Murilo Matos de Santana; Coelho, Lorena Eugenia Rosa; Torres-Neto, Juvenal da Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Background In Brazil, there are few epidemiological studies available about the demographic and clinical aspects of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of this study was to identify epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients with IBD treated at the University Hospital (HU) of the Sergipe Federal University (UFS). Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in HU/UFS from October 2011 to January 2014. The sample consisted of 87 patients with IBD, who registered in the coloproctology clinic. We applied a questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables. Results Of the 87 patients, 40 (46%) had Crohn’s disease (CD) and 47 (54%) had ulcerative colitis (UC). Women had a higher prevalence of IBD. Data obtained were significant (P < 0.05) in the variables: age, origin and level of education. CD patients were younger (< 25 years old), had higher prevalence of smoking habits and were associated with urban origin, conjunctivitis, palpable mass, appendectomy and intestinal complications. UC was more prevalent in older individuals (> 25 years old), with rural origin, bloody diarrhea and rectal bleeding. Location and initial behavior of CD were ileum-colic (L3), inflammatory behavior and penetrating form of the disease. There is higher prevalence of proctitis and mild and severe forms of the UC among women. Osteoarticular and systemic manifestations predominated in both diseases. Conclusions IBD affected more women than men. The age, origin and level of education can interfere with early diagnosis. Demographic and clinical aspects were similar to the literature. Data differ in the time interval between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis, smoking habit, appendectomy and severity of UC for age and gender.

  1. Optimal Diagnostic Approaches for Patients with Suspected Small Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hyun; Moon, Won

    2016-01-01

    While the domain of gastrointestinal endoscopy has made great strides over the last several decades, endoscopic assessment of the small bowel continues to be challenging. Recently, with the development of new technology including video capsule endoscopy, device-assisted enteroscopy, and computed tomography/magnetic resonance enterography, a more thorough investigation of the small bowel is possible. In this article, we review the systematic approach for patients with suspected small bowel disease based on these advanced endoscopic and imaging systems. PMID:27334413

  2. ["SOS SEIN 84" accelerated breast disease management: Patients satisfaction survey].

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Antoine; Dumuids, Magali; Mège, Alice; de Rauglaudre, Gaëtan; Regis Arnaud, Anne; Martin, Nicole; Dupuy Meurat, Françoise; Dolle, Sabine; Gallon, Elise; Serin, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    In case of a new breast symptom or an abnormal result of breast imaging, some women have a problem finding a quick answer to allay their anxiety. The Institut Sainte-Catherine in Avignon has set up a new form of accelerated disease management through the opening of a new dedicated consultation called SOS SEIN 84. We present the result of a prospective quality study of our first new patients.

  3. Crohnic Kidney Disease: Recurrent Acute Kidney Failure in a Patient With Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Mehmet Emin; Ercan, Zafer; Karakas, Emel Yigit; Ulas, Turgay; Buyukhatipoglu, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    Context: Short bowel syndrome is a rare and devastating complication in chronic inflammatory bowel disease following functional or anatomic loss of extensive segments of the intestine. Case Report: A 60-year-old male patient with Crohn's disease had undergone multiple resections of the intestine and developed short bowel syndrome. Despite up to 4-5 liters of orally fluid, sufficient calcium and magnesium intake, he suffered from recurrent acute kidney injury due to profound volume depletion and those electrolyte deficiencies. Administration of intravenous fluid and electrolyte repleacement treatment at regular intervals prevented further kidney injuries. Conclusion: We present a case of recurrent acute kidney failure in a patient with Crohn's disease, and aimed to remark importance of receiving sufficient parenteral fluid and electrolyte support in those with short bowel syndrome. PMID:25599054

  4. Increased Risk of Osteoporosis in Patients With Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Tung, Yi-Ching; Chai, Chee-Yin; Lu, Ying-Yi; Su, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Tai-Hsin; Kuo, Keng-Liang; Lin, Chih-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate osteoporosis risk in patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD) using a nationwide population-based dataset. This Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) analysis included 27,132 patients aged 18 years and older who had been diagnosed with PUD (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] codes 531–534) during 1996 to 2010. The control group consisted of 27,132 randomly selected (age- and gender)-matched patients without PUD. The association between PUD and the risk of developing osteoporosis was estimated using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. During the follow-up period, osteoporosis was diagnosed in 2538 (9.35 %) patients in the PUD group and in 2259 (8.33 %) participants in the non-PUD group. After adjusting for covariates, osteoporosis risk was 1.85 times greater in the PUD group compared to the non-PUD group (13.99 vs 5.80 per 1000 person-years, respectively). Osteoporosis developed 1 year after PUD diagnosis. The 1-year follow-up period exhibited the highest significance between the 2 groups (hazard ratio [HR] = 63.44, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 28.19–142.74, P < 0.001). Osteoporosis risk was significantly higher in PUD patients with proton-pump-inhibitors (PPIs) use (HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.03–1.34) compared to PUD patients without PPIs use. This study revealed a significant association between PUD and subsequent risk of osteoporosis. Therefore, PUD patients, especially those treated with PPIs, should be evaluated for subsequent risk of osteoporosis to minimize the occurrence of adverse events. PMID:27100415

  5. Triheptanoin improves brain energy metabolism in patients with Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Adanyeguh, Isaac Mawusi; Rinaldi, Daisy; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Caillet, Samantha; Valabregue, Romain; Durr, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Based on our previous work in Huntington disease (HD) showing improved energy metabolism in muscle by providing substrates to the Krebs cycle, we wished to obtain a proof-of-concept of the therapeutic benefit of triheptanoin using a functional biomarker of brain energy metabolism validated in HD. Methods: We performed an open-label study using 31P brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to measure the levels of phosphocreatine (PCr) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) before (rest), during (activation), and after (recovery) a visual stimulus. We performed 31P brain MRS in 10 patients at an early stage of HD and 13 controls. Patients with HD were then treated for 1 month with triheptanoin after which they returned for follow-up including 31P brain MRS scan. Results: At baseline, we confirmed an increase in Pi/PCr ratio during brain activation in controls—reflecting increased adenosine triphosphate synthesis—followed by a return to baseline levels during recovery (p = 0.013). In patients with HD, we validated the existence of an abnormal brain energy profile as previously reported. After 1 month, this profile remained abnormal in patients with HD who did not receive treatment. Conversely, the MRS profile was improved in patients with HD treated with triheptanoin for 1 month with the restoration of an increased Pi/PCr ratio during visual stimulation (p = 0.005). Conclusion: This study suggests that triheptanoin is able to correct the bioenergetic profile in the brain of patients with HD at an early stage of the disease. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that, for patients with HD, treatment with triheptanoin for 1 month restores an increased MRS Pi/PCr ratio during visual stimulation. PMID:25568297

  6. Can patients with coronary heart disease go to high altitude?

    PubMed

    Dehnert, Christoph; Bärtsch, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Tourism to high altitude is very popular and includes elderly people with both manifest and subclinical coronary heart disease (CHD). Thus, risk assessment regarding high altitude exposure of patients with CHD is of increasing interest, and individual recommendations are expected despite the lack of sufficient scientific evidence. The major factor increasing cardiac stress is hypoxia. At rest and for a given external workload, myocardial oxygen demand is increased at altitude, particularly in nonacclimatized individuals, and there is some evidence that blood-flow reserve is reduced in atherosclerotic coronary arteries even in the absence of severe stenosis. Despite a possible imbalance between oxygen demand and oxygen delivery, studies on selected patients have shown that exposure and exercise at altitudes of 3000 to 3500 m is generally safe for patients with stable CHD and sufficient work capacity. During the first days at altitude, patients with stable angina may develop symptoms of myocardial ischemia at slightly lower heart rate x  blood-pressure products. Adverse cardiac events, however, such as unstable angina coronary syndromes, do not occur more frequently compared with sea level except for those who are unaccustomed to exercise. Therefore, training should start before going to altitude, and the altitude-related decrease in exercise capacity should be considered. Travel to 3500 m should be avoided unless patients have stable disease, preserved left ventricular function without residual capacity, and above-normal exercise capacity. CHD patients should avoid travel to elevations above 4500 m owing to severe hypoxia at these altitudes. The risk assessment of CHD patients at altitude should always consider a possible absence of medical support and that cardiovascular events may turn into disaster. PMID:20919884

  7. [Isosporiasis in an elderly patient with chronic diseases: case report].

    PubMed

    Ünal, Nevzat; Güney, Akif Koray; Bilgin, Kemal; Yavuz, Yücel; Hökelek, Murat; Günaydın, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Isospora belli is a coccidian protozoon that can cause serious diarrhea especially in immunocompromised patients. The laboratory diagnosis depends primarily on the identification of oocysts in stool specimens by direct microscopic examination with iodine or special stains. This case is presented in order to draw attention to isosporiasis among the diarrheas that can be seen in elderly patients with several chronic diseases. A 81 year-old debilitated male, who had a history of hypertension, Alzheimer's disease, previous cerebrovascular accident and right hemiplegia, was admitted to our hospital complaining of malaise, anorexia, chills, abdominal pain, dysuria, cough, sputum and diarrhea of ten days duration. I. belli oocysts were detected by microscopic examination of the sample with iodine after concentration by formalin-ethyl acetate sedimentation. Then, modified acid-fast and trichrome stains were performed and I. belli oocysts were detected with both methods. Similar to this case, infections caused by I. belli can occur in elderly immunocompromised patients with several chronic diseases and inadequate nutrition and care. Consequently, in individuals with persistent diarrhea, examinations and tests should be carried out by taking their immune status into consideration and stool examinations should be done at frequent intervals using the concentrations methods and special stains.

  8. Optimizing the management of patients with spinal myeloma disease.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Sean; Lai, Maggie; Pratt, Guy; Ramasamy, Karthik; Wilson, David; Quraishi, Nasir; Auger, Martin; Cumming, David; Punekar, Maqsood; Quinn, Michael; Ademonkun, Debo; Willis, Fenella; Tighe, Jane; Cook, Gordon; Stirling, Alistair; Bishop, Timothy; Williams, Cathy; Boszczyk, Bronek; Reynolds, Jeremy; Grainger, Mel; Craig, Niall; Hamilton, Alastair; Chalmers, Isobel; Ahmedzai, Sam; Selvadurai, Susanne; Low, Eric; Kyriakou, Charalampia

    2015-11-01

    Myeloma is one of the most common malignancies that results in osteolytic lesions of the spine. Complications, including pathological fractures of the vertebrae and spinal cord compression, may cause severe pain, deformity and neurological sequelae. They may also have significant consequences for quality of life and prognosis for patients. For patients with known or newly diagnosed myeloma presenting with persistent back or radicular pain/weakness, early diagnosis of spinal myeloma disease is therefore essential to treat and prevent further deterioration. Magnetic resonance imaging is the initial imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of spinal disease. Treatment of the underlying malignancy with systemic chemotherapy together with supportive bisphosphonate treatment reduces further vertebral damage. Additional interventions such as cement augmentation, radiotherapy, or surgery are often necessary to prevent, treat and control spinal complications. However, optimal management is dependent on the individual nature of the spinal involvement and requires careful assessment and appropriate intervention throughout. This article reviews the treatment and management options for spinal myeloma disease and highlights the value of defined pathways to enable the proper management of patients affected by it. PMID:26184699

  9. Follow-up of ischaemic heart disease in patients with coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Emilsson, Louise; Carlsson, Roland; James, Stefan; Hambraeus, Kristina; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2015-01-01

    Patients with coeliac disease and myocardial infarction have a more favourable atherosclerotic risk factor profile than controls with myocardial infarction (MI). Therefore, MI prognosis and treatment may differ according to coeliac status. This paper reports on the study of Swedish MI patients with and without coeliac disease (equal to villous atrophy; Marsh histopathology stage 3) based on duodenal or jejunal biopsy data. We used the Swedish Quality Register (SWEDEHEART) to identify individuals with a record of MI from 2005 to 2008 and to obtain data on medication, coronary interventions, and clinical and laboratory parameters at 6-10 weeks and one year after first MI. One-year mortality and coronary interventions were assessed for 430 coeliac patients and 1988 controls. For other outcome variables, we compared 42 coeliac patients with MI and 201 general population controls with MI. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated by logistic regression. The results showed that compared with controls with MI, coeliac individuals with MI had significantly higher one-year all-cause mortality (OR = 1.43; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04-1.95) but less often underwent a percutaneous coronary intervention (OR = 0.77; 95% CI = 0.61-0.96). Coeliac patients were more often prescribed warfarin but less often aspirin and statins. The readmission rate due to cardiac events in coeliac patients was 15.2% vs. 12.6% in controls (p-value = 0.69). Other clinical and laboratory parameters were similar. We conclude that the follow up of MI does not seem to differ between coeliac patients and controls, and is unlikely to explain the excess mortality from cardiovascular disease noted in Swedish patients with CD.

  10. Metabolic aspects of adult patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Di Renzo, Laura; Preveden, Tomislav; Medić-Stojanoska, Milica; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2016-08-21

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease and it encompasses a spectrum from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, or cirrhosis. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of NAFLD and its progression are probably due to a metabolic profile expressed within the context of a genetic predisposition and is associated with a higher energy intake. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic alterations associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. NAFLD patients have more than one feature of the MS, and now they are considered the hepatic components of the MS. Several scientific advances in understanding the association between NAFLD and MS have identified insulin resistance (IR) as the key aspect in the pathophysiology of both diseases. In the multi parallel hits theory of NAFLD pathogenesis, IR was described to be central in the predisposition of hepatocytes to be susceptible to other multiple pathogenetic factors. The recent knowledge gained from these advances can be applied clinically in the prevention and management of NAFLD and its associated metabolic changes. The present review analyses the current literature and highlights the new evidence on the metabolic aspects in the adult patients with NAFLD. PMID:27610012

  11. Metabolic aspects of adult patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Di Renzo, Laura; Preveden, Tomislav; Medić-Stojanoska, Milica; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease and it encompasses a spectrum from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, or cirrhosis. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of NAFLD and its progression are probably due to a metabolic profile expressed within the context of a genetic predisposition and is associated with a higher energy intake. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic alterations associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. NAFLD patients have more than one feature of the MS, and now they are considered the hepatic components of the MS. Several scientific advances in understanding the association between NAFLD and MS have identified insulin resistance (IR) as the key aspect in the pathophysiology of both diseases. In the multi parallel hits theory of NAFLD pathogenesis, IR was described to be central in the predisposition of hepatocytes to be susceptible to other multiple pathogenetic factors. The recent knowledge gained from these advances can be applied clinically in the prevention and management of NAFLD and its associated metabolic changes. The present review analyses the current literature and highlights the new evidence on the metabolic aspects in the adult patients with NAFLD. PMID:27610012

  12. Managing the pediatric patient with celiac disease: a multidisciplinary approach

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, Daniela Migliarese; Wu, Jessica; Mager, Diana R; Turner, Justine M

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune reaction to gluten, leading to intestinal inflammation, villous atrophy, and malabsorption. It is the most common autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder, with an increasing prevalence. A life-long gluten-free diet (GFD) is an effective treatment to alleviate symptoms, normalize autoantibodies, and heal the intestinal mucosa in patients with CD. Poorly controlled CD poses a significant concern for ongoing malabsorption, growth restriction, and the long-term concern of intestinal lymphoma. Achieving GFD compliance and long-term disease control poses a challenge, with adolescents at particular risk for high rates of noncompliance. Attention has turned toward innovative management strategies to improve adherence and achieve better disease control. One such strategy is the development of multidisciplinary clinic approach, and CD is a complex life-long disease state that would benefit from a multifaceted team approach as recognized by multiple national and international bodies, including the National Institutes of Health. Utilizing the combined efforts of the pediatric gastroenterologist, registered dietitian, registered nurse, and primary care provider (general practitioner or general pediatrician) in a CD multidisciplinary clinic model will be of benefit for patients and families in optimizing diagnosis, provision of GFD teaching, and long-term adherence to a GFD. This paper discusses the benefits and proposed structure for multidisciplinary care in improving management of CD. PMID:27785047

  13. Kyrle's Disease in a Patient with Delusions of Parasitosis.

    PubMed

    Tampa, M; Sârbu, Maria Isabela; Matei, Clara; Mihăilă, Daniela E; Potecă, T D; Georgescu, Simona-Roxana

    2016-01-01

    Acquired perforating disorders are a group of uncommon skin conditions characterized by transepidermal extrusion of altered dermal material, most often associated with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney failure. Delusional parasitosis is a primary psychiatric disorder in which affected patients have fixed, false beliefs that their skin is infested by parasites, in the absence of any evidence supporting their statements. A 69 year old malepatient addressed the Dermatology Department for a skin eruption consisting of multiple umbilicated keratotic papules with a generalized distribution. The patient believed that the lesions were produced by small parasites entering and exiting his skin. The histopathological examination confirmed the clinical diagnosis of Kyrle's disease. The psychiatric examination established the diagnosis of delusions of parasitosis. This is the first reported case of Kyrle's disease associated with delusions of parasitosis. There is no evidence supporting the hypothesis that delusions of parasitosis might be a predisposing factor for Kyrle's disease. However, we believe that the pruritic dermatosis might have triggered the delusions of parasitosis due to the associated pruritus. On the other hand the constant excoriations and traumatizing of a skin prone to develop idiopathic Kyrle's disease in the attempt to remove the parasites prevented the complete resolution of the lesions. PMID:27141573

  14. Problem based review: a patient with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Arora, A; Fletcher, P

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by bradykinesia, tremor and/ or rigidity, often with gait disturbance and postural instability. In addition to these typical features, patients with PD may experience further problems related to the disease itself or to the medications used to treat it. These comorbid problems include neuropsychiatric conditions (including psychosis, hallucinations, excessive daytime sleepiness, anxiety, depression, fatigue and dementia) as well as problems associated with autonomic nervous system function such as bowel and bladder function. PD can also present in emergency situations with a 'neuroleptic malignant like picture' and acute psychosis. It is not uncommon to see motor fluctuations due to drug interactions and 'withdrawal' symptoms following dose reduction of dopamine agonists. In patients with PD, disturbances of mental state constitute some of the most difficult treatment challenges of advanced disease, often limiting effective treatment of motor symptoms and leading to increased disability and poor quality of life. While some of these symptoms may be alleviated by antiparkinsonian medication, especially if they are 'off-period' related, treatment-related phenomena are usually exacerbated by increasing the number or dosage of antiparkinsonian drugs. Elimination of exacerbating factors and simplification of drug regimens are the first and most important steps in improvement of such symptoms.

  15. [Spectrum of cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Lozano, Fernando

    2009-09-01

    A large body of evidence indicates that HIV-infected patients, both men and women, as well as adults and children, have a higher risk of developing arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease. This evidence comes from studies whose main primary variables were the clinical manifestations of arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease (acute myocardial infarction, silent myocardial ischemia, stroke and peripheral arterial disease) and the distinct markers of premature atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction determined in different sites (carotid, coronary or peripheral arteries) and with distinct diagnostic procedures (carotid intimamedia thickening, coronary artery calcification, flow-mediated vasodilation, arterial rigidity, ankle/arm index, etc.). This excess risk of arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease in HIV-positive patients is clearly associated with the HIV infection per se and with classical cardiovascular risk factors, and, to a lesser extent and less uniformly, with the use of first-generation protease inhibitors. Hypertension, whose association with HIV infection is far less clear, is related to both traditional cardiovascular risk factors and to lipodystrophy.

  16. Thromboembolic disease in patients with high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Perry, James R

    2012-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is common throughout the course of disease in high-grade glioma (HGG). The interactions between the coagulation cascade, endothelium, and regulation of angiogenesis are complex and drive glioblastoma growth and invasion. We reviewed the incidence of VTE in HGG, the biology of the coagulome as related to glioblastoma progression, prevention and treatment of thrombosis, and the putative role of anticoagulants as anti-cancer therapy. VTE can be significantly reduced during the postoperative period with adherence to the use of mechanical and medical thromboprophylaxis. Activation of the coagulation cascade occurs throughout the course of disease because of a variety of complex interactions, including tumor hypoxia, upregulation of VEGR expression, and increases in both tumor cell-specific tissue factor (TF) expression and inducible TF expression in numerous intrinsic regulatory pathways. Long-term anticoagulation to prevent VTE is an attractive therapy; however, the therapeutic window is narrow and current data do not support its routine use. Most patients with proven symptomatic VTE can be safely anticoagulated, including those receiving anti-VEGF therapy, such as bevacizumab. Initial therapy should include low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), and protracted anticoagulant treatment, perhaps indefinitely, is indicated for patients with HGG because of the ongoing risk of thrombosis. A variety of coagulation- and tumor-related proteins, such as TF and circulating microparticles, may serve as potential disease-specific biomarkers in relation to disease recurrence, monitoring of therapy, and as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:23095833

  17. Metabolic aspects of adult patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Di Renzo, Laura; Preveden, Tomislav; Medić-Stojanoska, Milica; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease and it encompasses a spectrum from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, or cirrhosis. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of NAFLD and its progression are probably due to a metabolic profile expressed within the context of a genetic predisposition and is associated with a higher energy intake. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic alterations associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. NAFLD patients have more than one feature of the MS, and now they are considered the hepatic components of the MS. Several scientific advances in understanding the association between NAFLD and MS have identified insulin resistance (IR) as the key aspect in the pathophysiology of both diseases. In the multi parallel hits theory of NAFLD pathogenesis, IR was described to be central in the predisposition of hepatocytes to be susceptible to other multiple pathogenetic factors. The recent knowledge gained from these advances can be applied clinically in the prevention and management of NAFLD and its associated metabolic changes. The present review analyses the current literature and highlights the new evidence on the metabolic aspects in the adult patients with NAFLD.

  18. Siltuximab (Sylvant). Castleman's disease: good symptomatic efficacy in some patients.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    Multicentric Castleman's disease is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder characterised by disseminated lymphadenopathy. Symptoms and outcomes differ widely from one patient to another. The median survival time is about 2.5 years. There is no consensus on treatment. Siltuximab, a monoclonal antibody that antagonises interleukin-6, has been authorised in the European Union for patients with multicentric Castleman's disease who are not infected with HIV or HHV-8. In a randomised, double-blind trial in 79 patients, most of whom had mild or moderate symptoms, the estimated one-year survival rate was 100% in the siltuximab group versus 92% in the placebo group after a median follow-up of 60 weeks. However, half of the patients in the placebo group received siltuximab after disease progression. Symptoms disappeared for at least 18 weeks in one-quarter of patients in the siltuximab group versus none of those in the placebo group; the median symptom-free period in the siltuximab group was about 16 months. The known adverse effects of siltuximab are related to its immunosuppressive effect. They include frequent infections, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Reactions can occur during the infusion, and mouth sores have been reported. Other adverse events that appear to be more frequent with siltuximab include cutaneous disorders, oedema, renal and cardiac disorders, and peripheral neuropathy. Cases of gastrointestinal perforation have been reported in trials in other clinical settings. Siltuximab can mask the signs and symptoms of acute inflammation, in particular by suppressing fever and acute-phase markers such as C-reactive protein. Interleukin-6 is a cytochrome P450 inhibitor. Siltuximab activates its isoenzymes and can thus reduce the effectiveness of the numerous drugs that are substrates of this enzyme system. This risk of interactions is likely to persist up to several weeks after siltuximab withdrawal, because of its long plasma elimination half-life (about 16 days

  19. Antiplatelet effect of aspirin in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2012-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death globally, and atherothrombosis is the underlying cause of most cardiovascular events. Several studies have shown that antiplatelet therapy, including aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), reduces the risk of cardiovascular events and death. However, it is well-known that many patients experience cardiovascular events despite treatment with aspirin, often termed "aspirin low-responsiveness". This fact has caused considerable debate: does biochemical aspirin low-responsiveness have prognostic value? Can low-responders be reliably identified? And if so, should antithrombotic treatment be changed? Is the whole discussion of antiplatelet drug response merely a result of low compliance? Compliance should be carefully optimised, before evaluating the pharmacological effect of a drug. It is well-known that cardiovascular disease is multifactorial, and, therefore, total risk reduction is not feasible. Aetiological factors to the variable platelet inhibition by aspirin seem to include genetic factors, pharmacological interactions, smoking, diabetes mellitus, and increased platelet turnover. It is a captivating thought that antiplatelet therapy may be improved by individually tailored therapy based on platelet function testing. Ongoing studies are challenging the current one-size-fits-all dosing strategy, but the preceding evaluation of platelet function assays has not been adequate. The overall objective of this thesis was to evaluate the reproducibility of and aggreement between a number of widely used platelet function tests and to explore the importance of platelet turnover for the antiplatelet effect of aspirin in patients with coronary artery disease. In the intervention studies (studies 1, 3, and 4), optimal compliance was confirmed by measurements of serum thromboxane, which is the most sensitive assay to confirm compliance with aspirin. In study 1, platelet function tests widely used to measure the antiplatelet effect

  20. Economic evaluation of end stage renal disease patients undergoing hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Suja, A.; Anju, R.; Anju, V.; Neethu, J.; Peeyush, P.; Saraswathy, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In India the incidence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) is increasing day by day and the option for the treatment of ESRD is dialysis or transplantation. In the present scenario, due to the cost of treatment normal people can afford only hemodialysis rather than transplantation. Since the cost of hemodialysis differs across the country, research is needed to evaluate its exact cost. Aim: This study is to analyze the healthcare cost of hemodialysis in a private hospital of South India. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective, observational study carried out in a tertiary care hospital. Patients who are undergoing routine hemodialysis in this hospital were selected for the study. Patient data as well as cost details were collected for a period of six months. Thirty patients were selected for the study and a total of 2160 dialysis sessions were studied. Patient perspective was taken for the analysis of cost. Both direct and indirect costs were analyzed. This includes cost of dialysis, investigations, erythropoietin, food, transportation, lost wages etc. Socioeconomic status of the patient was also studied. Result: The total cost per session was found to be around Rs. 4500. Fifty six percent contributes direct medical cost whereas 20% contributes direct non medical cost. Twenty four percent cost was due to indirect costs. Since the patients are paying from their own pocket, only the upper or upper middle class patient can undergo hemodialysis regularly. Conclusion: These findings are important to find out the impact of cost of hemodialysis on patients suffering from ESRD. Further studies related to costs and outcome, otherwise known as pharmacoeconomic studies, are needed to analyze the pros and cons of renal replacement therapy and to improve the quality of life of ESRD patients. Thus pharmacoeconomical studies are needed to realize that government has to take initiative to provide insurance or reimbursement for the common people. PMID:22557920

  1. Neuropathic Pain in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brandow, Amanda M.; Farley, Rebecca A.; Panepinto, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the suggestion of a neuropathic component to sickle cell disease (SCD) pain, there are minimal data on the systematic assessment of neuropathic pain in patients with SCD. Neuropathic pain is defined as pain primarily initiated by dysfunction of the peripheral or central nervous system. Procedure In a cross-sectional study, we used the painDETECT questionnaire, a one-page validated neuropathic pain screening tool, to determine the presence of neuropathic pain in patients with SCD and to evaluate the relationship between neuropathic pain, age, and gender. We hypothesized that 20% of patients with SCD will experience neuropathic pain and that neuropathic pain will be associated with older age and female gender. The completed painDETECT questionnaire yields a total score between 0–38 (≥19=definite neuropathic pain, 13–18=probable neuropathic pain, ≤12=no neuropathic pain). Scores ≥13 were designated as having evidence of neuropathic pain. Results A total of 56 patients participated. Median age was 20.3 years and 77% were female. We found 37% of patients had evidence of neuropathic pain. Age was positively correlated with total score [r=0.43; p=0.001] suggesting older patients experience more neuropathic pain. Females had higher mean total scores [13 vs 8.4; p=0.04]. Significantly more patients with neuropathic pain were taking hydroxyurea [90% vs 59%; p=0.015]. Despite 37% of patients experiencing neuropathic pain, only 5% were taking a neuropathic pain drug. Conclusions Neuropathic pain exists in SCD. Valid screening tools can identify patients that would benefit from existing and future neuropathic pain therapies and could determine the impact of these therapies. PMID:24167104

  2. Subsequent Type 2 Diabetes in Patients with Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, Kari; Liu, Xiangdong; Försti, Asta; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina; Ji, Jianguang

    2015-01-01

    Immunological data show that type 2 diabetes (T2D) manifests autoimmune features. We wanted to test the association epidemiologically by assessing subsequent diagnosis of T2D following diagnosis of autoimmune disease (AId) and subsequent AId after T2D in the same individuals. Patients were identified from three Swedish health databases. A total of 32 different AId were included. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for T2D diagnosis in patients with previously diagnosed AId and compared to those without a previous AId. Among a total of 757,368 AId patients, 15,103 were diagnosed with T2D, giving an overall SIR for T2D of 1.66. T2D risks were increased after 27 AIds; the highest SIRs were noted for chorea minor (8.00), lupoid hepatitis (5.75), and Addison disease (2.63). T2D was increased after 27 of 32 AIds but we were unable to control for factors such as obesity and smoking. However, the clearly increased risks for T2D in most types of AId patients, and in reverse order increased risks for AId after T2D, do not support an overall confounding by life-style factors. Mechanistic links shared by T2D, AId and life-style factors such as obesity, perhaps through chronic inflammation, may drive autoimmune activation of T2D and many AIds. PMID:26350756

  3. DIABCARD a smart card for patients with chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, R; Hildebrand, C

    1997-01-01

    Within the European Union-sponsored project DIABCARD, the core of a chip-card-based medical information system for patients with chronic diseases, exemplified on diabetes mellitus, has been developed. The long-term goal of the project is to improve the medical record and the quality of care for patients with chronic diseases. The basic idea is to have a portable electronic medical record on a smart card. This will improve the communication between the different healthcare personnel and between different institutions and, at the same time, promote shared care. The DIABCARD chip-card-based medical information system will offer controlled access to the necessary and up-to-date patient record to everyone involved in the patient's treatment, and it will help reduce the constantly rising healthcare expenditure. The system first was implemented in a small version. The system architecture contains hardware, software, and orgware. It considers especially the memory of the chip card, the processor, the data structure, security functions, the operating system on the chip card, the interface between the chip card and the application, and various application areas. The DIABCARD dataset was defined via an information model, which describes the different communication processes, via acknowledged diabetes datasets and medical scenarios. It includes, among others, emergency data, data for quality assurance, and data for blood glucose self-monitoring. The first prototype has been developed, and a pilot was run for 3 months. PMID:10167214

  4. General Anesthesia for a Patient With Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease.

    PubMed

    Kamekura, Nobuhito; Nitta, Yukie; Takuma, Shigeru; Fujisawa, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    We report the successful management of general anesthesia for a patient with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD). PMD is one of a group of progressive, degenerative disorders of the cerebral white matter. The typical clinical manifestations of PMD include psychomotor retardation, nystagmus, abnormal muscle tone, seizures, and cognitive impairment. General anesthesia for a patient with PMD may be difficult mainly because of seizures and airway complications related to poor pharyngeal muscle control. In addition, the possibility of exacerbation of spasticity should be considered. A 20-year-old man with PMD required removal of impacted wisdom teeth under general anesthesia. General anesthesia was induced with thiamylal, fentanyl, and desflurane. Anesthesia was maintained with desflurane and continuous intravenous remifentanil under bispectral index and train-of-4 monitoring. Anesthesia lasted 1 hour 20 minutes and was completed uneventfully. Airway complications, seizures, and exacerbation of spasticity did not occur postoperatively. Preoperatively, our patient had no history of epilepsy attacks or aspiration pneumonia, and no clinical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Therefore, exacerbation of spasticity was one of the most likely potential complications. Identification of these associated conditions and evaluation of risk factors during preoperative examination is important for performing safe anesthesia in these patients.

  5. Ocular Surface Disease in Breast Cancer Patients Using Aromatase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chatziralli, Irini; Sergentanis, Theodoros; Zagouri, Flora; Chrysikos, Dimosthenis; Ladas, Ioannis; Zografos, George C; Moschos, Marilita

    2016-09-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are widely used as adjuvant hormonal therapy in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential impact of AIs on the anterior segment of the eye and especially the ocular surface. Participants in our study were 41 hormone receptor-positive early stage breast cancer patients (80 eyes), treated with AIs, while 80 eyes of 40 age- and gender-matched healthy controls, not previously used AIs for any purpose, were also evaluated. All participants underwent a complete ophthalmological examination, including best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) assessment, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, and dilated fundus examination. Ocular surface disease-related symptoms and signs were also recorded. The most common symptom was found to be blurred vision, while other symptoms included foreign body sensation, tearing, redness, and photophobia. Slit-lamp examination revealed blepharitis and meibomian gland dysfunction in 75% and 42.5% of patients, respectively. Superficial punctate keratitis and conjunctival injection were also present. Our results demonstrated a high prevalence of ocular surface disease-related symptoms and signs in patients receiving AIs compared to healthy controls. This study may raise a flag regarding the use of AIs. However, further and larger prospective longitudinal studies are needed to examine the possible effect of AIs alone or in combination with chemotherapy in the eyes of breast cancer patients.

  6. DIABCARD a smart card for patients with chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, R; Hildebrand, C

    1997-01-01

    Within the European Union-sponsored project DIABCARD, the core of a chip-card-based medical information system for patients with chronic diseases, exemplified on diabetes mellitus, has been developed. The long-term goal of the project is to improve the medical record and the quality of care for patients with chronic diseases. The basic idea is to have a portable electronic medical record on a smart card. This will improve the communication between the different healthcare personnel and between different institutions and, at the same time, promote shared care. The DIABCARD chip-card-based medical information system will offer controlled access to the necessary and up-to-date patient record to everyone involved in the patient's treatment, and it will help reduce the constantly rising healthcare expenditure. The system first was implemented in a small version. The system architecture contains hardware, software, and orgware. It considers especially the memory of the chip card, the processor, the data structure, security functions, the operating system on the chip card, the interface between the chip card and the application, and various application areas. The DIABCARD dataset was defined via an information model, which describes the different communication processes, via acknowledged diabetes datasets and medical scenarios. It includes, among others, emergency data, data for quality assurance, and data for blood glucose self-monitoring. The first prototype has been developed, and a pilot was run for 3 months.

  7. Subsequent Type 2 Diabetes in Patients with Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hemminki, Kari; Liu, Xiangdong; Försti, Asta; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina; Ji, Jianguang

    2015-01-01

    Immunological data show that type 2 diabetes (T2D) manifests autoimmune features. We wanted to test the association epidemiologically by assessing subsequent diagnosis of T2D following diagnosis of autoimmune disease (AId) and subsequent AId after T2D in the same individuals. Patients were identified from three Swedish health databases. A total of 32 different AId were included. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for T2D diagnosis in patients with previously diagnosed AId and compared to those without a previous AId. Among a total of 757,368 AId patients, 15,103 were diagnosed with T2D, giving an overall SIR for T2D of 1.66. T2D risks were increased after 27 AIds; the highest SIRs were noted for chorea minor (8.00), lupoid hepatitis (5.75), and Addison disease (2.63). T2D was increased after 27 of 32 AIds but we were unable to control for factors such as obesity and smoking. However, the clearly increased risks for T2D in most types of AId patients, and in reverse order increased risks for AId after T2D, do not support an overall confounding by life-style factors. Mechanistic links shared by T2D, AId and life-style factors such as obesity, perhaps through chronic inflammation, may drive autoimmune activation of T2D and many AIds. PMID:26350756

  8. [Health locus of control of patients in disease management programmes].

    PubMed

    Schnee, M; Grikscheit, F

    2013-06-01

    Health locus of control beliefs plays a major role in improving self-management skills of the chronically ill - a main goal in disease management programmes (DMP). This study aims at characterising participants in disease management regarding their health locus of control. Data are based on 4 cross-sectional postal surveys between spring and autumn of 2006 and 2007 within the Health Care Monitor of the Bertelsmann Foundation. Among the 6 285 respondents, 1 266 are chronically ill and not enrolled in a DMP and 327 are participating in a DMP. A high internal locus of control (HLC) occurs significantly less often in DMP patients than in normal chronically ill patients (and healthy people) controlling for age, gender and social class. With increasing age, a high internal locus of control is also significantly less likely. When comparing healthy people, the chronically ill and the DMP participants a social gradient of a high internal locus of control belief can be observed. The weaker internal and higher doctor-related external locus of control of DMP participants should be carefully observed by the physician when trying to strengthen the patients' self-management skills. Evaluators of DMP should take into account the different baselines of DMP patients and relevant control groups and incorporate these differences into the evaluation.

  9. Ocular Surface Disease in Breast Cancer Patients Using Aromatase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chatziralli, Irini; Sergentanis, Theodoros; Zagouri, Flora; Chrysikos, Dimosthenis; Ladas, Ioannis; Zografos, George C; Moschos, Marilita

    2016-09-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are widely used as adjuvant hormonal therapy in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential impact of AIs on the anterior segment of the eye and especially the ocular surface. Participants in our study were 41 hormone receptor-positive early stage breast cancer patients (80 eyes), treated with AIs, while 80 eyes of 40 age- and gender-matched healthy controls, not previously used AIs for any purpose, were also evaluated. All participants underwent a complete ophthalmological examination, including best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) assessment, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, and dilated fundus examination. Ocular surface disease-related symptoms and signs were also recorded. The most common symptom was found to be blurred vision, while other symptoms included foreign body sensation, tearing, redness, and photophobia. Slit-lamp examination revealed blepharitis and meibomian gland dysfunction in 75% and 42.5% of patients, respectively. Superficial punctate keratitis and conjunctival injection were also present. Our results demonstrated a high prevalence of ocular surface disease-related symptoms and signs in patients receiving AIs compared to healthy controls. This study may raise a flag regarding the use of AIs. However, further and larger prospective longitudinal studies are needed to examine the possible effect of AIs alone or in combination with chemotherapy in the eyes of breast cancer patients. PMID:27296769

  10. Pharmacotherapy for alcoholic patients with alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Vuittonet, Cynthia L.; Halse, Michael; Leggio, Lorenzo; Fricchione, Samuel B.; Brickley, Michael; Haass-Koffler, Carolina L.; Tavares, Tonya; Swift, Robert M.; Kenna, George A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose An update on pharmacotherapy for achieving and maintaining abstinence and mitigating hepatic damage in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is presented. Summary Currently there are limited pharmacotherapy options for managing ALD, which encompasses a broad spectrum of disorders ranging from steatosis and alcoholic hepatitis to fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular cancer. Individual variation in the severity, presentation, and complex pathologenesis of ALD defines barriers to effective treatment. Scoring of disease severity using validated assessment instruments should guide treatment approaches; abstinence and proper nutrition continue to be the cornerstones of management. A literature search (through December 31, 2013) identified no reports of randomized controlled trials using Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved medications for the treatment of alcohol dependence in ALD-spectrum disorders. Disulfiram, acamprosate, and naltrexone (oral and intramuscular), while approved by FDA for treatment of alcohol dependence, are not currently approved for use in patients with ALD. Baclofen (also not FDA-approved for use in ALD) is the only medication available in the United States with demonstrated safety and efficacy in reducing alcoholic behavior that has been formally tested in clinical trials in patients with ALD. Pharmacotherapy of alcoholic hepatitis using glucocorticoids or pentoxifylline has shown promise, but these options are reserved for severe ALD only. Conclusion Although various treatments have been investigated for ALD in patients with alcoholism, complete abstinence from alcohol is currently the only recommended form of hepatoprotection for the entire spectrum of ALD diagnoses. PMID:25027533

  11. Infectious Disease Report: Bordetella pertussis Infection in Patients With Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Abraham; Nanjappa, Sowmya; Janz, Tyler; Greene, John N

    2016-04-01

    We illustrate 2 cases of pneumonia associated with Bordetella pertussis infection in 72-year-old and 61-year-old patients with cancer receiving myelosuppressive therapy after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Bacterial infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer, and those receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplant, solid organ transplant, or myelosuppressive therapy are at increased risk. The infection was detected and the 2 patients had good outcomes following azithromycin treatment. Pertussis, also known as whooping cough, is a contagious respiratory illness that has become a public health challenge due to decreased immunity of the pertussis vaccine. Therefore, it is critical to recognize pertussis early in the course of the disease.

  12. Organising pneumonia mimicking invasive fungal disease in patients with leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Forghieri, Fabio; Potenza, Leonardo; Morselli, Monica; Maccaferri, Monica; Pedrazzi, Letizia; Barozzi, Patrizia; Vallerini, Daniela; Riva, Giovanni; Zanetti, Eleonora; Quadrelli, Chiara; Rossi, Giulio; Rivasi, Francesco; Messino', Massimino; Rumpianesi, Fabio; Grottola, Antonella; Venturelli, Claudia; Pecorari, Monica; Codeluppi, Mauro; Torelli, Giuseppe; Luppi, Mario

    2010-07-01

    Clinical charts from 63 consecutive highly immunocompromised haematologic patients presenting with pulmonary nodular lesions on CT scan, classified as either probable or possible invasive fungal disease (IFD) according to the revised EORTC/MSG classification, were retrospectively studied. Histopathological analysis of lung tissues, available for 23 patients, demonstrated proven IFD in 17 cases (14 invasive aspergillosis and 3 invasive zygomycosis), diffuse alveolar damage in one and organising pneumonia (OP) in five cases. In the OP cases, three of which have been defined as probable IFD according to EORTC/MSG classification, extensive immunohistochemical, molecular and immunological analyses for fungi were negative. Our case descriptions extend the notion that OP may be encountered as a distinct histopathological entity in pulmonary nodular lesions in patients with leukaemia with probable/possible IFD.

  13. Infectious Disease Report: Bordetella pertussis Infection in Patients With Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Abraham; Nanjappa, Sowmya; Janz, Tyler; Greene, John N

    2016-04-01

    We illustrate 2 cases of pneumonia associated with Bordetella pertussis infection in 72-year-old and 61-year-old patients with cancer receiving myelosuppressive therapy after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Bacterial infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer, and those receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplant, solid organ transplant, or myelosuppressive therapy are at increased risk. The infection was detected and the 2 patients had good outcomes following azithromycin treatment. Pertussis, also known as whooping cough, is a contagious respiratory illness that has become a public health challenge due to decreased immunity of the pertussis vaccine. Therefore, it is critical to recognize pertussis early in the course of the disease. PMID:27218794

  14. Acoustic characteristics of vowel sounds in patients with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Bang, Young-Im; Min, Kyunghoon; Sohn, Young H; Cho, Sung-Rae

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the acoustic voice and speech characteristics of patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Seven female patients with PD and seven female healthy controls participated in this study. Each subject was instructed to vocalize extended corner vowels (/a/, /e/, /i/, /u/) three times for at least 5 seconds at a comfortable voice loudness and tone. The voice was analyzed using the Praat program. As a result, female patients with PD showed a significant increase in jitter and noise-to-harmonics ratio (NHR). In addition, F1 and F2 among the PD patients demonstrated asymmetric centralization of unrounded vowels (/a/, /e/, /i/) in high/low/front/back positions of the tongue, consequently leading to a significant decrease in vowel space area, compared to healthy controls. This study showed the acoustic characteristics of vowel sounds not only by laryngeal variables such as abnormal jitter and NHR, but also by articulatory variables such as asymmetric centralization and reduced vowel space area in female patients with PD. Therefore, it is important to use these objective and sensitive variables to evaluate the status or severity of hypokinetic dysarthria in patients with PD.

  15. Aortic augmentation index in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Mariella; Scandale, Giovanni; Carzaniga, Gianni; Cinquini, Michela; Minola, Marzio; Antoniazzi, Valeria; Dimitrov, Gabriel; Carotta, Maria

    2014-11-01

    Aortic augmentation index (AIx) is used to investigate arterial stiffness. The authors tested the hypothesis that patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) demonstrate a higher AIx and also evaluated several related factors. In 97 patients with PAD, identified by ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI ≤ 0.9), and 97 controls (ABPI ≥ 0.91< 1.4), AIx (%) was determined using tonometry of the radial artery. There was no significant difference between patients and controls in characteristics of age, sex, height, diastolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure, and heart rate. AIx was higher in patients with PAD (32 ± 9 vs 28 ± 9; P = .001). In multivariate regression analysis, AIx was independently associated with heart rate (β = -0.40, P = .0005). This study showed that AIx increased in patients with PAD and that heart rate is a determinant of AIx. Further studies are necessary to assess the pathophysiological and clinical importance of AIx in patients with PAD. PMID:25228305

  16. Treatment of HCV infected patients and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kershenobich, David

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C signifies a highly prevalent infection in patients with end stage renal disease. Most frequently it is associated to glomerulonephritis, patients on hemodialysis and renal transplants. The prevalence of HCV antibodies in hemodialysis patients varies between 5-70% depending on the geographical location of the patients. Factors associated with the prevalence of anti HCV in patients with hemodialysis include: age, blood transfusions, tattoos, use of illegal drugs, time in hemodialysis, more than two hospitalizations, treatment in multiple hemodialysis units or a kidney transplant. In some of the reported outbreaks of hepatitis in hemodialysis units, the phylogenetic analysis indicate that the transmission of HCV could relate to failures or breaches in general precautions in the management of these type of patients resulting in nosocomial transmission owed to sharing equipment or instruments employed in the hemodialysis or by transmission from professional members of the hemodialysis units. Antiviral treatment may be affected by a number of co-factors and co-morbidities, it consist mainly of non pegylated interferon or pegylated interferon. The treatment with interferon after a renal transplant is associated with an increase in the number of rejections; reason enough to recommended that treatment should be administered before the transplant.

  17. Restless Legs Syndrome in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Novak, Marta; Winkelman, John W; Unruh, Mark

    2015-07-01

    Symptoms of restless legs syndrome (RLS) are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) on dialysis; symptoms of RLS are estimated to affect up to 25% of patients on dialysis when the international RLS diagnostic criteria are applied. RLS is a neurologic disorder with a circadian rhythmicity characterized by an overwhelming urge to move the legs during rest, which can be relieved temporarily by movement. RLS has been associated with an increase in sleep disturbance, higher cardiovascular morbidity, decreased quality of life, and an increased risk of death in patients with CKD. Although the exact pathophysiology of RLS is unknown, it is thought to involve an imbalance in iron metabolism and dopamine neurotransmission in the brain. The symptoms of moderate to severe RLS can be treated with several pharmacologic agents; however, data specific to patients on dialysis with RLS are lacking. The purpose of this article is to examine the relationship between, and complications of, RLS and CKD both in dialysis and nondialysis patients, and discuss the treatment options for patients on dialysis with RLS.

  18. Management of hepatitis C in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho-Filho, Roberto J; Feldner, Ana Cristina CA; Silva, Antonio Eduardo B; Ferraz, Maria Lucia G

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is highly prevalent among chronic kidney disease (CKD) subjects under hemodialysis and in kidney transplantation (KT) recipients, being an important cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients. The vast majority of HCV chronic infections in the hemodialysis setting are currently attributable to nosocomial transmission. Acute and chronic hepatitis C exhibits distinct clinical and laboratorial features, which can impact on management and treatment decisions. In hemodialysis subjects, acute infections are usually asymptomatic and anicteric; since spontaneous viral clearance is very uncommon in this context, acute infections should be treated as soon as possible. In KT recipients, the occurrence of acute hepatitis C can have a more severe course, with a rapid progression of liver fibrosis. In these patients, it is recommended to use pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) in combination with ribavirin, with doses adjusted according to estimated glomerular filtration rate. There is no evidence suggesting that chronic hepatitis C exhibits a more aggressive course in CKD subjects under conservative management. In these subjects, indication of treatment with PEG-IFN plus ribavirin relies on the CKD stage, rate of progression of renal dysfunction and the possibility of a preemptive transplant. HCV infection has been associated with both liver disease-related deaths and cardiovascular mortality in hemodialysis patients. Among those individuals, low HCV viral loads and the phenomenon of intermittent HCV viremia are often observed, and sequential HCV RNA monitoring is needed. Despite the poor tolerability and suboptimal efficacy of antiviral therapy in CKD patients, many patients can achieve sustained virological response, which improve patient and graft outcomes. Hepatitis C eradication before KT theoretically improves survival and reduces the occurrence of chronic graft nephropathy, de novo glomerulonephritis and post-transplant diabetes

  19. Cord-Blood Transplantation in Patients with Minimal Residual Disease.

    PubMed

    Milano, Filippo; Gooley, Ted; Wood, Brent; Woolfrey, Ann; Flowers, Mary E; Doney, Kristine; Witherspoon, Robert; Mielcarek, Marco; Deeg, Joachim H; Sorror, Mohamed; Dahlberg, Ann; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Salit, Rachel; Petersdorf, Effie; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Delaney, Colleen

    2016-09-01

    Background The majority of patients in need of a hematopoietic-cell transplant do not have a matched related donor. Data are needed to inform the choice among various alternative donor-cell sources. Methods In this retrospective analysis, we compared outcomes in 582 consecutive patients with acute leukemia or the myelodysplastic syndrome who received a first myeloablative hematopoietic-cell transplant from an unrelated cord-blood donor (140 patients), an HLA-matched unrelated donor (344), or an HLA-mismatched unrelated donor (98). Results The relative risks of death and relapse between the cord-blood group and the two other unrelated-donor groups appeared to vary according to the presence of minimal residual disease status before transplantation. Among patients with minimal residual disease, the risk of death was higher in the HLA-mismatched group than in the cord-blood group (hazard ratio, 2.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.52 to 5.63; P=0.001); the risk was also higher in the HLA-matched group than in the cord-blood group but not significantly so (hazard ratio, 1.69; 95% CI, 0.94 to 3.02; P=0.08). Among patients without minimal residual disease, the hazard ratios were lower (hazard ratio in the HLA-mismatched group, 1.36; 95% CI, 0.76 to 2.46; P=0.30; hazard ratio in the HLA-matched group, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.48 to 1.28; P=0.33). The risk of relapse among patients with minimal residual disease was significantly higher in the two unrelated-donor groups than in the cord-blood group (hazard ratio in the HLA-mismatched group, 3.01; 95% CI, 1.22 to 7.38; P=0.02; hazard ratio in the HLA-matched group, 2.92; 95% CI, 1.34 to 6.35; P=0.007). Among patients without minimal residual disease, the magnitude of these associations was lower (hazard ratio in the HLA-mismatched group, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.51 to 3.25; P=0.60; hazard ratio in the HLA-matched group, 1.30; 95% CI, 0.65 to 2.58; P=0.46). Conclusions Our data suggest that among patients with pretransplantation minimal

  20. Cord-Blood Transplantation in Patients with Minimal Residual Disease.

    PubMed

    Milano, Filippo; Gooley, Ted; Wood, Brent; Woolfrey, Ann; Flowers, Mary E; Doney, Kristine; Witherspoon, Robert; Mielcarek, Marco; Deeg, Joachim H; Sorror, Mohamed; Dahlberg, Ann; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Salit, Rachel; Petersdorf, Effie; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Delaney, Colleen

    2016-09-01

    Background The majority of patients in need of a hematopoietic-cell transplant do not have a matched related donor. Data are needed to inform the choice among various alternative donor-cell sources. Methods In this retrospective analysis, we compared outcomes in 582 consecutive patients with acute leukemia or the myelodysplastic syndrome who received a first myeloablative hematopoietic-cell transplant from an unrelated cord-blood donor (140 patients), an HLA-matched unrelated donor (344), or an HLA-mismatched unrelated donor (98). Results The relative risks of death and relapse between the cord-blood group and the two other unrelated-donor groups appeared to vary according to the presence of minimal residual disease status before transplantation. Among patients with minimal residual disease, the risk of death was higher in the HLA-mismatched group than in the cord-blood group (hazard ratio, 2.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.52 to 5.63; P=0.001); the risk was also higher in the HLA-matched group than in the cord-blood group but not significantly so (hazard ratio, 1.69; 95% CI, 0.94 to 3.02; P=0.08). Among patients without minimal residual disease, the hazard ratios were lower (hazard ratio in the HLA-mismatched group, 1.36; 95% CI, 0.76 to 2.46; P=0.30; hazard ratio in the HLA-matched group, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.48 to 1.28; P=0.33). The risk of relapse among patients with minimal residual disease was significantly higher in the two unrelated-donor groups than in the cord-blood group (hazard ratio in the HLA-mismatched group, 3.01; 95% CI, 1.22 to 7.38; P=0.02; hazard ratio in the HLA-matched group, 2.92; 95% CI, 1.34 to 6.35; P=0.007). Among patients without minimal residual disease, the magnitude of these associations was lower (hazard ratio in the HLA-mismatched group, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.51 to 3.25; P=0.60; hazard ratio in the HLA-matched group, 1.30; 95% CI, 0.65 to 2.58; P=0.46). Conclusions Our data suggest that among patients with pretransplantation minimal

  1. Depression in patients with Parkinson's disease and the associated features.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jin; Sun, Shenggang; Qiao, Xian; Liu, Yudong

    2009-12-01

    The study was aimed to examine the prevalence of depression in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and identify its features. A total of 131 out-patients, diagnosed as having idiopathic PD in accordance with the United Kingdom Parkinson's Disease Society Brain Bank criteria, were interviewed with questionnaire and evaluated by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Hohen &Yahr staging (H&Y staging) and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD). Patients were divided into three groups in terms of HRSD score: depression group, sub-threshold depression group and non-depression group. The clinical variables and symptom profiles were obtained and compared among the three groups. The results showed that 27 patients (20.6%) fell into the depression group, 71 (54.2%) into the sub-threshold depression group, and 33 (25.2%) into the non-depression group. There were no differences in age, gender or tremor score among the groups (P>0.05). Significant differences were found in duration of PD, UPDRS score, rigidity score and H&Y stage between the sub-threshold depression group (or the depression group) and the non-depression group (P<0.05). Moreover, the clinical variables in the subthreshold depression group had the trend of increasing with the severity of PD and their values were similar to those in the depression group. Anhedonia, feeling of incapability, sleep disturbance, gastrointestinal symptoms and depressive moods were most common in the depression group. And these symptoms also were more common in the other two groups. It is concluded that depression and sub-threshold depression are common in PD and share similar clinical features. Furthermore, subthreshold depression might be the prodrome of depression and may develop into depression as the condition progresses.

  2. Prognostic Analysis of Patients with Ebola Virus Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liming; Su, Haibin; Zhang, Jian; Teng, Guangju; Du, Ning; Chen, Haoyang; Fang, Yuan; Zhan, Wei; Kanu, Alex B. J.; Koroma, Sheku M.; Jin, Bo; Xu, Zhe; Song, Haihan

    2015-01-01

    Background The Ebola virus causes an acute, serious illness which is often fatal if untreated. However, factors affecting the survival of the disease remain unclear. Here, we investigated the prognostic factors of Ebola virus disease (EVD) through various statistical models. Methodology/Principal Findings Sixty three laboratory-confirmed EVD patients with relatively complete clinical profiles were included in the study. All the patients were recruited at Jui Government Hospital, Sierra Leone between October 1st, 2014 and January 18th, 2015. We first investigated whether a single clinical presentation would be correlated with the survival of EVD. Log-rank test demonstrated that patients with viral load higher than 106 copies/ml presented significantly shorter survival time than those whose viral load were lower than 106 copies/ml (P = 0.005). Also, using Pearson chi-square test, we identified that chest pain, coma, and viral load (>106 copies/ml) were significantly associated with poor survival of EVD patients. Furthermore, we evaluated the effect of multiple variables on the survival of EVD by Cox proportional hazards model. Interestingly, results revealed that patient’s age, symptom of confusion, and viral load were the significantly associated with the survival of EVD cases (P = 0.017, P = 0.002, and P = 0.027, respectively). Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that age, chest pain, coma, confusion and viral load are associated with the prognosis of EVD, in which viral load could be one of the most important factors for the survival of the disease. PMID:26398207

  3. Coeliac disease and risk for other autoimmune diseases in patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A higher prevalence of coeliac disease (CD) has been reported in patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), though coexistence with other autoimmune diseases has not been evaluated. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of the more frequent autoimmune diseases and organ- and non-organ specific autoantibodies in WBS. Methods We longitudinally analysed 46 WBS patients to evaluate the prevalence and co-occurrence of the major autoantibodies and HLA typing for CD diagnosis. These data were compared with healthy age- and sex-matched controls and Down (DS) and Turner (TS) syndrome patients. Results CD was diagnosed in one (2.2%) WBS patient; this differed significantly from DS and TS (respectively, 10.5% and 9.4%; P < 0.005) but not from healthy controls (0.6%; P = NS). However, no patients with WBS showed anti-thyroid antibodies or other organ- and non-organ specific autoantibodies, which differed significantly from DS (respectively, 10.5% and 7.0%; P < 0.005) and TS (respectively, 9.4% and 9.3%; P < 0.005) patients but not from healthy controls (1.1% and 2.3%). The frequencies of CD-specific HLA-DQ heterodimers were not significantly higher than controls, even though the WBS patients more frequently carried the DQA1*0505 allele (57% vs. 39%; P < 0.05). Conclusions CD may not be more frequent in patients with WBS. In fact, no evidence of a significantly higher prevalence of other autoimmune diseases or positivity of the main organ and non-organ specific autoantibodies was found in WBS, such as showed in the healthy controls and unlike by the patients with Turner or Down syndrome. This should prompt us to better understand the occurrence of CD in WBS. Other studies or longer follow-up might be useful to clarify this issue. PMID:24885139

  4. Heart Attacks, Strokes, and Peripheral Artery Disease in Patients With Giant-Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Annals of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Heart Attacks, Strokes, and Peripheral Artery Disease in Patients With Giant-Cell Arteritis The full report is titled “Risk for Cardiovascular Disease Early and Late ...

  5. A systematic review of disease-related stigmatization in patients living with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Taft, Tiffany H; Keefer, Laurie

    2016-01-01

    Chronic illness stigma is a global public health issue. Most widely studied in HIV/AIDS and mental illness, stigmatization of patients living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), chronic autoimmune conditions affecting the digestive tract, has garnered increasing attention in recent years. In this paper, we systematically review the scientific literature on stigma as it relates to IBD across its three domains: perception, internalization, and discrimination experiences. We aim to document the current state of research, identify gaps in our knowledge, recognize unique challenges that IBD patients may face as they relate to stigmatization, and offer suggestions for future research directions. Based on the current review, patients living with IBD may encounter stigmatization and this may, in turn, impact several patient outcomes including quality of life, psychological functioning, and treatment adherence. Significant gaps exist related to the understanding of IBD stigma, providing opportunity for future studies to address this important public health issue. PMID:27022294

  6. IR imaging of blood circulation of patients with vascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsin; Wade, Dwight R., Jr.; Kam, Jack

    2004-04-01

    We conducted a preliminary IR imaging study of blood circulation in patients with peripheral vascular diseases. Abnormal blood flow is common in older adults, especially those with elevated blood lipids, diabetes, hypertension, and a history of smoking. All of these conditions have a high prevalence in our population, often with more than one condition in the same individual. The differences in blood flow is revealed by temperature differences in areas of the extremities as well as other regions of the body. However, what is needed is an imaging technique that is relatively inexpensive and can reveal the blood flow in real time. The IR imaging can show detailed venous system and small tempearture changes associated with blood flow. Six patients with vascular diseases were tested in a clinic set up. Their legs and feet were imaged. We observed large temperature differences (cooling of more than 10° C) at the foot, especially toes. More valuable information were obtained from the temperature distribution maps. IR thermography is potentially a very valuable tool for medical application, especially for vascular diseases.

  7. Role of spleen elastography in patients with chronic liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Giunta, Mariangela; Conte, Dario; Fraquelli, Mirella

    2016-01-01

    The development of liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension (PH), one of its major complications, are structural and functional alterations of the liver, occurring in many patients with chronic liver diseases (CLD). Actually the progressive deposition of hepatic fibrosis has a key role in the prognosis of CLD patients. The subsequent development of PH leads to its major complications, such as ascites, hepatic encephalopathy, variceal bleeding and decompensation. Liver biopsy is still considered the reference standard for the assessment of hepatic fibrosis, whereas the measurement of hepatic vein pressure gradient is the standard to ascertain the presence of PH and upper endoscopy is the method of choice to detect the presence of oesophageal varices. However, several non-invasive tests, including elastographic techniques, are currently used to evaluate the severity of liver disease and predict its prognosis. More recently, the measurement of the spleen stiffness has become particularly attractive to assess, considering the relevant role accomplished by the spleen in splanchnic circulation in the course of liver cirrhosis and in the PH. Moreover, spleen stiffness as compared with liver stiffness better represents the dynamic changes occurring in the advanced stages of cirrhosis and shows higher diagnostic performance in detecting esophageal varices. The aim of this review is to provide an exhaustive overview of the actual role of spleen stiffness measurement as assessed by several elastographic techniques in evaluating both liver disease severity and the development of cirrhosis complications, such as PH and to highlight its potential and possible limitations. PMID:27672283

  8. Role of spleen elastography in patients with chronic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Giunta, Mariangela; Conte, Dario; Fraquelli, Mirella

    2016-09-21

    The development of liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension (PH), one of its major complications, are structural and functional alterations of the liver, occurring in many patients with chronic liver diseases (CLD). Actually the progressive deposition of hepatic fibrosis has a key role in the prognosis of CLD patients. The subsequent development of PH leads to its major complications, such as ascites, hepatic encephalopathy, variceal bleeding and decompensation. Liver biopsy is still considered the reference standard for the assessment of hepatic fibrosis, whereas the measurement of hepatic vein pressure gradient is the standard to ascertain the presence of PH and upper endoscopy is the method of choice to detect the presence of oesophageal varices. However, several non-invasive tests, including elastographic techniques, are currently used to evaluate the severity of liver disease and predict its prognosis. More recently, the measurement of the spleen stiffness has become particularly attractive to assess, considering the relevant role accomplished by the spleen in splanchnic circulation in the course of liver cirrhosis and in the PH. Moreover, spleen stiffness as compared with liver stiffness better represents the dynamic changes occurring in the advanced stages of cirrhosis and shows higher diagnostic performance in detecting esophageal varices. The aim of this review is to provide an exhaustive overview of the actual role of spleen stiffness measurement as assessed by several elastographic techniques in evaluating both liver disease severity and the development of cirrhosis complications, such as PH and to highlight its potential and possible limitations. PMID:27672283

  9. Role of spleen elastography in patients with chronic liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Giunta, Mariangela; Conte, Dario; Fraquelli, Mirella

    2016-01-01

    The development of liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension (PH), one of its major complications, are structural and functional alterations of the liver, occurring in many patients with chronic liver diseases (CLD). Actually the progressive deposition of hepatic fibrosis has a key role in the prognosis of CLD patients. The subsequent development of PH leads to its major complications, such as ascites, hepatic encephalopathy, variceal bleeding and decompensation. Liver biopsy is still considered the reference standard for the assessment of hepatic fibrosis, whereas the measurement of hepatic vein pressure gradient is the standard to ascertain the presence of PH and upper endoscopy is the method of choice to detect the presence of oesophageal varices. However, several non-invasive tests, including elastographic techniques, are currently used to evaluate the severity of liver disease and predict its prognosis. More recently, the measurement of the spleen stiffness has become particularly attractive to assess, considering the relevant role accomplished by the spleen in splanchnic circulation in the course of liver cirrhosis and in the PH. Moreover, spleen stiffness as compared with liver stiffness better represents the dynamic changes occurring in the advanced stages of cirrhosis and shows higher diagnostic performance in detecting esophageal varices. The aim of this review is to provide an exhaustive overview of the actual role of spleen stiffness measurement as assessed by several elastographic techniques in evaluating both liver disease severity and the development of cirrhosis complications, such as PH and to highlight its potential and possible limitations.

  10. Role of spleen elastography in patients with chronic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Giunta, Mariangela; Conte, Dario; Fraquelli, Mirella

    2016-09-21

    The development of liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension (PH), one of its major complications, are structural and functional alterations of the liver, occurring in many patients with chronic liver diseases (CLD). Actually the progressive deposition of hepatic fibrosis has a key role in the prognosis of CLD patients. The subsequent development of PH leads to its major complications, such as ascites, hepatic encephalopathy, variceal bleeding and decompensation. Liver biopsy is still considered the reference standard for the assessment of hepatic fibrosis, whereas the measurement of hepatic vein pressure gradient is the standard to ascertain the presence of PH and upper endoscopy is the method of choice to detect the presence of oesophageal varices. However, several non-invasive tests, including elastographic techniques, are currently used to evaluate the severity of liver disease and predict its prognosis. More recently, the measurement of the spleen stiffness has become particularly attractive to assess, considering the relevant role accomplished by the spleen in splanchnic circulation in the course of liver cirrhosis and in the PH. Moreover, spleen stiffness as compared with liver stiffness better represents the dynamic changes occurring in the advanced stages of cirrhosis and shows higher diagnostic performance in detecting esophageal varices. The aim of this review is to provide an exhaustive overview of the actual role of spleen stiffness measurement as assessed by several elastographic techniques in evaluating both liver disease severity and the development of cirrhosis complications, such as PH and to highlight its potential and possible limitations.

  11. Fibroblasts of Machado Joseph Disease patients reveal autophagy impairment

    PubMed Central

    Onofre, Isabel; Mendonça, Nuno; Lopes, Sara; Nobre, Rui; de Melo, Joana Barbosa; Carreira, Isabel Marques; Januário, Cristina; Gonçalves, António Freire; de Almeida, Luis Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Machado Joseph Disease (MJD) is the most frequent autosomal dominantly inherited cerebellar ataxia caused by the over-repetition of a CAG trinucleotide in the ATXN3 gene. This expansion translates into a polyglutamine tract within the ataxin-3 protein that confers a toxic gain-of-function to the mutant protein ataxin-3, contributing to protein misfolding and intracellular accumulation of aggregates and neuronal degeneration. Autophagy impairment has been shown to be one of the mechanisms that contribute for the MJD phenotype. Here we investigated whether this phenotype was present in patient-derived fibroblasts, a common somatic cell type used in the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells and subsequent differentiation into neurons, for in vitro disease modeling. We generated and studied adult dermal fibroblasts from 5 MJD patients and 4 healthy individuals and we found that early passage MJD fibroblasts exhibited autophagy impairment with an underlying mechanism of decreased autophagosome production. The overexpression of beclin-1 on MJD fibroblasts reverted partially autophagy impairment by increasing the autophagic flux but failed to increase the levels of autophagosome production. Overall, our results provide a well-characterized MJD fibroblast resource for neurodegenerative disease research and contribute for the understanding of mutant ataxin-3 biology and its molecular consequences. PMID:27328712

  12. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in Patients with Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a chronic, progressive, cerebrovascular occlusive disorder that displays various clinical features and results in cerebral infarct or hemorrhagic stroke. Specific genes associated with the disease have not yet been identified, making identification of at-risk patients difficult before clinical manifestation. Familial MMD is not uncommon, with as many as 15% of MMD patients having a family history of the disease, suggesting a genetic etiology. Studies of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in MMD have mostly focused on mechanical stress on vessels, endothelium, and the relationship to atherosclerosis. In this review, we discuss SNPs studies targeting the genetic etiology of MMD. Genetic analyses in familial MMD and genome-wide association studies represent promising strategies for elucidating the pathophysiology of this condition. This review also discusses future research directions, not only to offer new insights into the origin of MMD, but also to enhance our understanding of the genetic aspects of MMD. There have been several SNP studies of MMD. Current SNP studies suggest a genetic contribution to MMD, but further reliable and replicable data are needed. A large cohort or family-based design would be important. Modern SNP studies of MMD depend on novel genetic, experimental, and database methods that will hopefully hasten the arrival of a consensus conclusion. PMID:26180609

  13. Abnormal Cerebrovascular Reactivity in Patients with Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Carlos Henrique Ferreira; Martins, Eduardo Antunes; Lange, Marcos Christiano; Hoffmann, Henrique Alvaro; Luciano, Jissa Jeanete; Young Blood, Marcelo Rezende; Schafranski, Marcelo Derbli; Ferro, Marcelo Machado; Miyoshi, Edmar

    2015-01-01

    Background. Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is an important nonmotor manifestation of Parkinson's disease (PD). Changes in cerebrovascular reactivity may contribute to this manifestation and can be monitored using transcranial Doppler. Objective. To identify possible changes in cerebrovascular reactivity in patients with OH. Methods. Twenty-two individuals were selected and divided into three groups: with and without OH and controls. Transcranial Doppler was used to assess basal mean blood flow velocity, postapnea mean blood flow velocity, percentage increase in mean blood flow velocity, and cerebrovascular reactivity as measured by the breath-holding index. Results. PD patients had lower values of basal velocity (p = 0.019), postapnea velocity (p = 0.0015), percentage increase in velocity (p = 0.039), and breath-holding index (p = 0.04) than the controls. Patients with OH had higher values of basal velocity (p = 0.09) and postapnea velocity (p = 0.19) but lower values of percentage increase in velocity (p = 0.22) and breath-holding index (p = 0.32) than patients without OH. Conclusions. PD patients present with abnormalities in a compensatory mechanism that regulates cerebral blood flow. OH could be an indicator of these abnormalities. PMID:26167330

  14. [Pharmacological therapy of sialorrhea in patients with motor neuron disease].

    PubMed

    Levitskiĭ, G N; Alekhin, A V; Serdiuk, A V; Morgunova, M S; Koneva, O N; Skvortsova, V I

    2005-01-01

    A comparative trial of amithryptiline and dysport (botulinic toxin type A) in the treatment of sialorrhea in patients with motor neuron disease (MND) was conducted in 10 MND patients with sialorrhea, of whom 5 were treated with subcutaneous injections of Dysport and 5 with Amithriptiline, and 6 controls without salivary dysfunction. Gravimetry and scintigraphy of salivary glands were used before and after treatment. Compared to controls, saliva production was significantly decreased in MND patients. Both amithryptilin and dysport used in mean therapeutic doses decreased sialorrhea with similar effect. However, 3 patients, receiving amythryptiline in dosage 50 mg/day, experienced side effects (constipation, accommodation disturbances, dry mouth, sleepiness and poor concentration). Reducing of amithryptiline dose, along with prescribing dysport, removed the side-effects in these patients, while sialorrhea did not increase. The authors concluded that due to high efficacy and low cost of amithryptiline therapy of sialorrhea proved to be a golden standard of palliative care in MDN. However, in these terms dysport can not be an alternative to amithryptiline in sialorrhea therapy. Nevertheless, in cases when amithryptiline treatment is accomplished with side-effects, the drug dosage can be reduced and combined with dysport.

  15. Challenging Postural Tasks Increase Asymmetry in Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Beretta, Victor Spiandor; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken; Lirani-Silva, Ellen; Simieli, Lucas; Orcioli-Silva, Diego; Barbieri, Fabio Augusto

    2015-01-01

    The unilateral predominance of Parkinson's disease (PD) symptoms suggests that balance control could be asymmetrical during static tasks. Although studies have shown that balance control asymmetries exist in patients with PD, these analyses were performed using only simple bipedal standing tasks. Challenging postural tasks, such as unipedal or tandem standing, could exacerbate balance control asymmetries. To address this, we studied the impact of challenging standing tasks on postural control asymmetry in patients with PD. Twenty patients with PD and twenty neurologically healthy individuals (control group) participated in this study. Participants performed three 30s trials for each postural task: bipedal, tandem adapted and unipedal standing. The center of pressure parameter was calculated for both limbs in each of these conditions, and the asymmetry between limbs was assessed using the symmetric index. A significant effect of condition was observed, with unipedal standing and tandem standing showing greater asymmetry than bipedal standing for the mediolateral root mean square (RMS) and area of sway parameters, respectively. In addition, a group*condition interaction indicated that, only for patients with PD, the unipedal condition showed greater asymmetry in the mediolateral RMS and area of sway than the bipedal condition and the tandem condition showed greater asymmetry in the area of sway than the bipedal condition. Patients with PD exhibited greater asymmetry while performing tasks requiring postural control when compared to neurologically healthy individuals, especially for challenging tasks such as tandem and unipedal standing.

  16. Salivary changes related to systemic diseases in the edentulous patients

    PubMed Central

    Preoteasa, E; Tâncu, AM; Iosif, L; Melescanu Imre, M; Murariu-Măgureanu, C; Preoteasa, CT

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The relatively frequent systemic comorbidities of geriatric patients can be linked to salivary changes, which may induce oral alteration and discomfort with the removable prosthesis. The aim of the study was to evaluate the salivary parameters in completely edentulous patients treated by removable prosthesis, in relation to their general health status. Material and method: A cross-sectional study was performed on 30 completely edentulous patients, 53% male and 47% female, aged between 53 and 84. The evaluation of the salivary parameters (oral hydration index, pH and salivary flow, viscosity and saliva buffer capacity) was performed with the Saliva Check Buffer kit (GC Corporation). Results: The salivary changes encountered were the following: low hydration level (63%), high saliva viscosity (57%), below-average pH (27%), reduced salivary flow (77%) and low saliva buffer capacity (80%). A reduced salivary flow and saliva buffer capacity was found in women. A lower buffer capacity of the saliva was found in patients with respiratory and gastro-intestinal disease. Conclusions: The alterations of the salivary flow are relatively frequent in geriatric patients, removable denture wearers, with compromised systemic status. These changes may be a risk factor for denture stomatitis and oral candidiasis, with a negative effect on the patient’s comfort and quality of life. PMID:25713626

  17. Exome Analysis of Patients with Concurrent Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Andreoletti, Gaia; Ashton, James J.; Coelho, Tracy; Willis, Claire; Haggarty, Rachel; Gibson, Jane; Holloway, John; Batra, Akshay; Afzal, Nadeem A.; Beattie, Robert Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease (PIBD) is a chronic condition seen in genetically predisposed individuals. Genome-wide association studies have implicated >160 genomic loci in IBD with many genes coding for proteins in key immune pathways. This study looks at autoimmune disease burden in patients diagnosed with PIBD and interrogates exome data of a subset of patients. Methods: Patients were recruited from the Southampton Genetics of PIBD cohort. Clinical diagnosis of autoimmune disease in these individuals was ascertained from medical records. For a subset of patients with PIBD and concurrent asthma, exome data was interrogated to ascertain the burden of pathogenic variants within genes implicated in asthma. Association testing was conducted between cases and population controls using the SKAT-O test. Results: Forty-nine (28.3%) PIBD children (18.49% CD, 8.6% UC, and 21.15% IBDU patients) had a concurrent clinical diagnosis of at least one other autoimmune disorder; asthma was the most prevalent, affecting 16.2% of the PIBD cohort. Rare and common variant association testing revealed 6 significant genes (P < 0.05) before Bonferroni adjustment. Three of these genes were previously implicated in both asthma and IBD (ZPBP2 IL1R1, and IL18R1) and 3 in asthma only (PYHIN1, IL2RB, and GSTP1). Conclusions: One-third of our cohort had a concurrent autoimmune condition. We observed higher incidence of asthma compared with the overall pediatric prevalence. Despite a small sample size, SKAT-O evaluated a significant burden of rare and common mutations in 6 genes. Variant burden suggests that a systemic immune dysregulation rather than organ-specific could underpin immune dysfunction for a subset of patients. PMID:25895113

  18. Inflammatory mechanisms in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J

    2016-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with chronic inflammation affecting predominantly the lung parenchyma and peripheral airways that results in largely irreversible and progressive airflow limitation. This inflammation is characterized by increased numbers of alveolar macrophages, neutrophils, T lymphocytes (predominantly TC1, TH1, and TH17 cells), and innate lymphoid cells recruited from the circulation. These cells and structural cells, including epithelial and endothelial cells and fibroblasts, secrete a variety of proinflammatory mediators, including cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and lipid mediators. Although most patients with COPD have a predominantly neutrophilic inflammation, some have an increase in eosinophil counts, which might be orchestrated by TH2 cells and type 2 innate lymphoid cells though release of IL-33 from epithelial cells. These patients might be more responsive to corticosteroids and bronchodilators. Oxidative stress plays a key role in driving COPD-related inflammation, even in ex-smokers, and might result in activation of the proinflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), impaired antiprotease defenses, DNA damage, cellular senescence, autoantibody generation, and corticosteroid resistance though inactivation of histone deacetylase 2. Systemic inflammation is also found in patients with COPD and can worsen comorbidities, such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and osteoporosis. Accelerated aging in the lungs of patients with COPD can also generate inflammatory protein release from senescent cells in the lung. In the future, it will be important to recognize phenotypes of patients with optimal responses to more specific therapies, and development of biomarkers that identify the therapeutic phenotypes will be important. PMID:27373322

  19. Rheumatologic Manifestations in Iranian Patients with Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hezarkhani, Sharabeh; Aghaei, Mehrdad; Shamekhi, Maryam; Nomali, Mahin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are the most common endocrine diseases which result in rheumatologic manifestations. Some studies have shown association between rheumatologic disorders and ATDs. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the frequency of rheumatologic manifestations in patients with ATDs. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study during 2010 to 2011, 65 patients with ATDs referred to the Rheumatology clinic of 5 Azar Hospital in Gorgan (North of Iran) were studied via systematic random sampling and patients with positive antithyroid peroxides (anti-TPO) were included in the study. These patients were examined by a rheumatologist for diagnosis of rheumatologic manifestations and tested for serum levels of TSH, Free T3 and T4, Anti-Nuclear Antibodies (ANAs) and Rheumatoid Factor (RF). SPSS software (version 16) and descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Results: Nine males (14.8%) and 56 females (86.2%) with mean age of 38.81±1.44 years were studied. Overall, Rheumatologic manifestations were seen in 86.2 % (n=56). In this study, the most frequent rheumatologic manifestations were Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (36.1%) and Osteoarthritis (23%). Reynaud’s phenomenon (RP) (10.7%), Discopathy (8.9%), Fibromyalgia (5.3%), Myopathy (3.6%), Rheumatoid arthritis (3.6%) and trigger finger (3.6%) were other manifestations, respectively. Conclusion: In this region, there is a high frequency of rheumatologic manifestations in patients with ATDs. Thus, initial evaluation and regular checkings are recommended. PMID:25478383

  20. Hypoalbuminaemia – A Marker of Cardiovascular Disease in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease Stages II - IV

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nehal Rachit; Dumler, Francis

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Serum albumin, a negative acute-phase reactant and marker for underlying inflammation and/or malnutrition, is an independent predictor of CVD and mortality in CKD VI patients. Such an association in patients with less severe CKD is not well established. We conducted a cross sectional study of all CKD II - IV patients attending the nephrology clinic (N=376; mean age: 57±17 years; GFR: 47±20 mL/min/1.73m2; females 48%; blacks 15%; diabetics 27%; hypertensive 79%). Laboratory and clinical data including risk factors and evidence of CVD were obtained at the point of the most recent visit. The association between risk factors and CVD was evaluated by logistic regression. In the simple logistic regression model, age (p<0.0001), sex (P= 0.02), hypertension (P<0.0001), diabetes (P<.0001), dyslipidemia (p=.01), and serum albumin (p<.0001) were found to be statistically significant. Serum albumin was found to be an independent predictor (p=0.04) of CVD by multiple logistic regression analysis using the above risk factor variables. In conclusion: a) hypoalbuminaemia is an independent predictor of CVD in early CKD stages; b) hypoalbuminaemia may be used to identify the population at higher risk for CVD. PMID:19015744

  1. Lower extremity amputation in peripheral artery disease: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Aparna; Vemulapalli, Sreekanth; Patel, Manesh R; Jones, W Schuyler

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease affects over eight million Americans and is associated with an increased risk of mortality, cardiovascular disease, functional limitation, and limb loss. In its most severe form, critical limb ischemia, patients are often treated with lower extremity (LE) amputation (LEA), although the overall incidence of LEA is declining. In the US, there is significant geographic variation in the performing of major LEA. The rate of death after major LEA in the US is approximately 48% at 1 year and 71% at 3 years. Despite this significant morbidity and mortality, the use of diagnostic testing (both noninvasive and invasive testing) in the year prior to LEA is low and varies based on patient, provider, and regional factors. In this review we discuss the significance of LEA and methods to reduce its occurrence. These methods include improved recognition of the risk factors for LEA by clinicians and patients, strong advocacy for noninvasive and/or invasive imaging prior to LEA, improved endovascular revascularization techniques, and novel therapies. PMID:25075192

  2. Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome in a patient with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sturiale, Alessandro; Alemanno, Giovanni; Giudici, Francesco; Addasi, Rami; Bellucci, Francesco; Tonelli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome is a rare condition characterized by postprandial abdominal pain, bowel function disorder and weight loss. We report the first case to our knowledge of Crohn's disease and Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome. PRESENTATION OF CASE The patient was a 33 year-old female with a previous diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Acute postprandial abdominal pain affected the patient every day; she was, therefore, referred to US-Doppler and magnetic resonance angiography of the abdominal vessels and received a diagnosis of Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome. Consequently, the patient was surgically treated, releasing the vascular compression. After the operation, she reported a complete relief from postprandial pain which was one of her major concerns. Subocclusive symptoms occurred after six months due to the inflammatory reactivation of the terminal ileitis. DISCUSSION The diagnosis of Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome is mainly based on the exclusion of other intestinal disorders but it should be always confirmed using noninvasive tests such as US-Doppler, angio-CT or magnetic resonance angiography. CONCLUSION This case demonstrates that the Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome could be the major cause of symptoms, even in presence of other abdominal disorders. PMID:23500743

  3. Psychological modulation in patients surgically intervened for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Lara, F J Pérez; Carranque, G; Oehling, H; Hernández, J M; Oliva, H

    2014-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been related with certain psychological dimensions. The influence of mood, emotional intelligence, and perceived quality of life on clinical symptoms and outcome of antireflux surgery was evaluated in GERD patients with and without hiatal hernia. The study included 61 patients who were diagnosed with GERD between 2003 and 2008: 16 of them without hiatal hernia (group A) and 45 of them with hiatal hernia (group B). All of these patients had undergone laparoscopic antireflux surgery. Patients were clinically examined and evaluated with the following instruments: Short Form (SF)-36 Health Survey, Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) Scale, and Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS)-24. Proportions were compared by using the chi-squared test; averages were compared by using the Student's t-test (with Bonferroni's correction). In general, our patients intervened for GERD showed results lower than normal or close to the lower limit of normal in the administered tests. Patients in the group without hernia were younger (P < 0.001) and with lower American Society of Anaesthesiologists risk. They showed higher scores in the SF-36 dimensions: Physical Functioning, Physical Role and Emotional Role, and lower scores in the Social Role (P < 0.001). They showed lower scores in the Emotional dimension of Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (P = 0.0068) and worse results in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression subscales of Anxiety (P < 0.001) and Depression (not significant). Men in the group without hernia showed higher scores than men in the group with hernia in the TMMS subscales corresponding to Emotional Clarity and Emotional Repair (P < 0.001). Women in the group with hernia showed higher scores than women in the group without hernia regarding Emotional Clarity (P = 0.0012). GERD patients showed poor results in all the tests, and patients without hiatal hernia compared with patients with hernia showed

  4. Metabolic syndrome in hospitalized patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Slavova, Yanina; Tsakova, Adelina; Genova, Marianka; Kostadinov, Dimitar; Minchev, Delcho; Marinova, Dora

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The metabolic syndrome (MS) affects 21–53% of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with a higher prevalence in the early stages of COPD, with results being highly variable between studies. MS may also affect natural course of COPD—number of exacerbations, quality of life and lung function. Aim. To examine the prevalence of MS and its correlation with comorbidities and COPD characteristics in patients with COPD admitted for exacerbation. Material and methods. 152 patients with COPD admitted for exacerbation were studied for presence of MS. All of them were also assessed for vitamin D status and diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM). Data were gathered for smoking status and exacerbations during the last year. All patients completed CAT (COPD assessment test) and mMRC (Modified Medical Research Council Dyspnea scale) questionnaires and underwent spirometry. Duration of current hospital stay was recorded. Results. 25% of patients have MS. 23.1% of the male and 29.5% of the female patients have MS (p > 0.05). The prevalence of MS in this study is significantly lower when compared to a national representative study (44.6% in subjects over 45 years). 69.1% of all patients and 97.4% from MS patients have arterial hypertension. The presence of MS is associated with significantly worse cough and sleep (1st and 7th CAT questions; p = 0.002 and p = 0.001 respectively) and higher total CAT score (p = 0.017). Average BMI is 27.31. None of the patients have MS and BMI <25. There is a correlation between the presence of MS and DM (p = 0.008) and with the number of exacerbations in the last year (p = 0.015). There is no correlation between the presence of MS and the pulmonary function. Conclusion. This study among hospitalized COPD patients finds comparable but relatively low prevalence of MS (25%) compared to previously published data (21–53%) and lower prevalence compared to general population (44.6%). MS may impact quality of life and the

  5. Microbial Signature Profiles of Periodontally Healthy and Diseased Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Talita Gomes Baêta; Heller, Débora; da Silva-Boghossian, Carina Maciel; Cotton, Sean L.; Paster, Bruce J.; Colombo, Ana Paula Vieira

    2014-01-01

    Aim To determine microbial profiles that discriminate periodontal health from different forms of periodontal diseases. Methods Subgingival biofilm was obtained from patients with periodontal health (27), gingivitis (11), chronic periodontitis (35) and aggressive periodontitis (24), and analyzed for the presence of >250 species/phylotypes using HOMIM. Microbial differences among groups were examined by Mann-Whitney. Regression analyses were performed to determine microbial risk indicators of disease. Results Putative and potential new periodontal pathogens were more prevalent in subjects with periodontal diseases than periodontal health. Detection of Porphyromonas endodontalis/Porphyromonas spp. (OR 9.5 [1.2–73.1]) and Tannerella forsythia (OR 38.2 [3.2–450.6]), and absence of Neisseria polysaccharea (OR 0.004 [0–0.15]) and Prevotella denticola (OR 0.014 [0–0.49], p<0.05) were risk indicators of periodontal disease. Presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (OR 29.4 [3.4–176.5]), Cardiobacterium hominis (OR 14.9 [2.3–98.7]), Peptostreptococcaceae sp. (OR 35.9 [2.7–483.9]), P. alactolyticus (OR 31.3 [2.1–477.2]), and absence of Fretibacterium spp. (OR 0.024 [0.002–0.357]), Fusobacterium naviforme/Fusobacterium nucleatum ss vincentii (OR 0.015 [0.001–0.223]), Granulicatella adiacens/Granulicatella elegans (OR 0.013 [0.001–0.233], p<0.05) were associated with aggressive periodontitis. Conclusion There were specific microbial signatures of the subgingival biofilm that were able to distinguish between microbiomes of periodontal health and diseases. Such profiles may be used to establish risk of disease. PMID:25139407

  6. Glycaemic changes in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    De'Marziani, Guillermo; Soler Pujol, Gervasio; Obregón, Liliana Miriam; Morales, Elisa Mabel; Gonzalez, Claudio Daniel; Gonzalez Paganti, Luciana; Cacciagiú, Leonardo; Lopez, Graciela; Schreier, Laura; Elbert, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    In Argentina, there have been no studies aimed at establishing the prevalence of dysglycaemia (impaired fasting glucose [IFG], impaired glucose tolerance [IGT] and diabetes mellitus [DM]) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Our group decided to conduct an observational study to evaluate the frequency with oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in CKD patients with no previous data for dysglycaemia in their medical records. OGTT was performed in 254 patients (60.62% male) with stage 3, 4 and 5 CKD under conservative treatment, haemodialysis or transplantation. Results for DM were found in 10 patients according to fasting glucose alone (3.94%; 95% CI: 1.35-6.53%), 11 patients with exclusively the second hour criterion (4.33%; 95% CI: 1.63-7.03%), 15 with both criteria (5.91%; 95% CI: 2.81-9.00%) and 36 patients with at least one criteria (14.17%; 95% CI: 9.69-18.66%). In a multivariate analysis, DM was associated with waist circumference (OR=1.033 per cm; 95% CI, 1.005 to 1.062; P=.019) and with conservative treatment vs. replacement therapy (OR=0.41; 95% CI: 0.19-0.92; P=.028). IGT was evident in 24.6% and 20.3 on conservative vs. replacement therapy, with no statistically significant difference. IFG (ADA criteria) was 19.75 vs. 9.24% in conservative vs. replacement therapy, with a statistically significant difference. OGTT is suggested for all CKD patients since it is able to detect the full range of unknown dysglycaemias, which avoids underdiagnoses and favours performing treatments to prevent progression in DM risk groups (IFG and/or IGT). It also aids in the selection of the most appropriate medication for transplantation or treatment initiation in new cases of undiagnosed DM to decrease morbidity and mortality.

  7. Obesity paradox in end-stage kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Jongha; Ahmadi, Seyed-Foad; Streja, Elani; Molnar, Miklos Z; Flegal, Katherine M; Gillen, Daniel; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2014-01-01

    In the general population, obesity is associated with increased cardiovascular risk and decreased survival. In patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), however, an "obesity paradox" or "reverse epidemiology" (to include lipid and hypertension paradoxes) has been consistently reported, i.e. a higher body mass index (BMI) is paradoxically associated with better survival. This survival advantage of large body size is relatively consistent for hemodialysis patients across racial and regional differences, although published results are mixed for peritoneal dialysis patients. Recent data indicate that both higher skeletal muscle mass and increased total body fat are protective, although there are mixed data on visceral (intra-abdominal) fat. The obesity paradox in ESRD is unlikely to be due to residual confounding alone and has biologic plausibility. Possible causes of the obesity paradox include protein-energy wasting and inflammation, time discrepancy among competitive risk factors (undernutrition versus overnutrition), hemodynamic stability, alteration of circulatory cytokines, sequestration of uremic toxin in adipose tissue, and endotoxin-lipoprotein interaction. The obesity paradox may have significant clinical implications in the management of ESRD patients especially if obese dialysis patients are forced to lose weight upon transplant wait-listing. Well-designed studies exploring the causes and consequences of the reverse epidemiology of cardiovascular risk factors, including the obesity paradox, among ESRD patients could provide more information on mechanisms. These could include controlled trials of nutritional and pharmacologic interventions to examine whether gain in lean body mass or even body fat can improve survival and quality of life in these patients.

  8. PDT in periodontal disease of HAART resistance patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovani, Elcio M.; Noro-Filho, Gilberto A.; Caputo, Bruno V.; Casarin, Renato; Costa, Claudio; Salgado, Daniela; Santos, Camila C.

    2016-03-01

    HIV/Aids patients present a change of microbiota associated with host immunodeficiency. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) showed as a promising and viable alternative in reducing microbiota. Present study evaluate effectiveness of photodynamic therapy in periodontal disease of AIDS patients with highly activity antiretroviral therapy (HAART) failure, measuring the clinical periodontal parameters and periodontal microbiota. Twelve patients with HARRT resistance (R group) divided into two groups (control and PDT) and 12 patients with no HAART resistance (NR group) divided into two groups (control and PDT). The results show the difference in baseline of CD4 cells count, NR group 640.0 +/- 176.2 cells/mm3 R group and 333.3 +/- 205.8 cells / mm3 (p<0.05), and in 8.3% detectable viral load in NR group and 75% detectable (p <0.001) in R group. As clinical periodontal parameters (PD and CAL), PDT was more effective than the control group only in the NR group (p <0.05%), moreover, there was no difference in the evaluation of clinical periodontal parameters between the both R groups (p>0.05%). Microbiological evaluation in R group presents a general reduction in the Aa at 3 and 6 months. Furthermore, demonstrated a reduction of Pg in all groups at 6 months and in R group at 3 months. The impact assessment of photodynamic therapy in patients with different levels of immunosuppression determined that the combination of mechanical periodontal treatment with photodynamic therapy in patients with HAART failure did not cause additional benefits. Therefore, PDT in this study could not been indicated in HAART resistance patients.

  9. Glycaemic changes in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    De'Marziani, Guillermo; Soler Pujol, Gervasio; Obregón, Liliana Miriam; Morales, Elisa Mabel; Gonzalez, Claudio Daniel; Gonzalez Paganti, Luciana; Cacciagiú, Leonardo; Lopez, Graciela; Schreier, Laura; Elbert, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    In Argentina, there have been no studies aimed at establishing the prevalence of dysglycaemia (impaired fasting glucose [IFG], impaired glucose tolerance [IGT] and diabetes mellitus [DM]) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Our group decided to conduct an observational study to evaluate the frequency with oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in CKD patients with no previous data for dysglycaemia in their medical records. OGTT was performed in 254 patients (60.62% male) with stage 3, 4 and 5 CKD under conservative treatment, haemodialysis or transplantation. Results for DM were found in 10 patients according to fasting glucose alone (3.94%; 95% CI: 1.35-6.53%), 11 patients with exclusively the second hour criterion (4.33%; 95% CI: 1.63-7.03%), 15 with both criteria (5.91%; 95% CI: 2.81-9.00%) and 36 patients with at least one criteria (14.17%; 95% CI: 9.69-18.66%). In a multivariate analysis, DM was associated with waist circumference (OR=1.033 per cm; 95% CI, 1.005 to 1.062; P=.019) and with conservative treatment vs. replacement therapy (OR=0.41; 95% CI: 0.19-0.92; P=.028). IGT was evident in 24.6% and 20.3 on conservative vs. replacement therapy, with no statistically significant difference. IFG (ADA criteria) was 19.75 vs. 9.24% in conservative vs. replacement therapy, with a statistically significant difference. OGTT is suggested for all CKD patients since it is able to detect the full range of unknown dysglycaemias, which avoids underdiagnoses and favours performing treatments to prevent progression in DM risk groups (IFG and/or IGT). It also aids in the selection of the most appropriate medication for transplantation or treatment initiation in new cases of undiagnosed DM to decrease morbidity and mortality. PMID:26873550

  10. Metabolic effects of pamidronate in patients with metastatic bone disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vinholes, J.; Guo, C. Y.; Purohit, O. P.; Eastell, R.; Coleman, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    We have evaluated the value of specific bone resorption markers in monitoring metastatic bone disease to define the duration of action of a single high-dose pamidronate infusion. Twenty patients received a single infusion of pamidronate 120 mg for painful bone metastases. Ten out of these 20 patients also received a second infusion. They were evaluated at baseline, 2, 4 and 8 weeks after each infusion. A composite pain questionnaire, serum and urine tests were carried out at these time points. Bone resorption markers measured included urinary calcium, hydroxyproline and two new markers: pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline. Reference values were defined by 20 healthy controls matched by age and sex. Pamidronate induced a profound fall in bone resorption with a maximal effect within the first month after therapy. Changes in urinary calcium levels were confounded by a rise of 100% in the parathyroid hormone levels. Before treatment, pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline were increased in 70% of patients, while urinary calcium was increased in only 40% of them. Thirteen patients had a > or = 50% fall in deoxypyridinoline levels and were considered as biochemical responders. These patients had a mean reduction in pain score of about 30% of baseline levels, which was significantly higher than the seven non-biochemical responders. In conclusion, urinary calcium is not a precise marker of bone resorption. Deoxypyridinoline seems to be the most specific bone resorption marker in cancer patients. Biochemical responders have the most benefit from pamidronate in terms of pain relief. This suggests that patients may benefit from more potent or repeated infusions of bisphosphonates. PMID:8624269

  11. How to predict clinical relapse in inflammatory bowel disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Liverani, Elisa; Scaioli, Eleonora; Digby, Richard John; Bellanova, Matteo; Belluzzi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases have a natural course characterized by alternating periods of remission and relapse. Disease flares occur in a random way and are currently unpredictable for the most part. Predictors of benign or unfavourable clinical course are required to facilitate treatment decisions and to avoid overtreatment. The present article provides a literature review of the current evidence on the main clinical, genetic, endoscopic, histologic, serologic and fecal markers to predict aggressiveness of inflammatory bowel disease and discuss their prognostic role, both in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. No single marker seems to be reliable alone as a flare predictor, even in light of promising evidence regarding the role of fecal markers, in particular fecal calprotectin, which has reported good results recently. In order to improve our daily clinical practice, validated prognostic scores should be elaborated, integrating clinical and biological markers of prognosis. Finally, we propose an algorithm considering clinical history and biological markers to intercept patients with high risk of clinical relapse. PMID:26811644

  12. [Familiarization to treadmill walking in unimpaired Parkinson's disease patients].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sanpablo, Alberto Isaac; Hernández-Arenas, Claudia; Rodríguez-Reyes, Gerardo; Quiñones-Uriostegui, Ivett; Alessi Montero, Aldo; Núñez-Carrera, Lidia; Boll-Woehrlen, Marie Catherine; Galván Duque-Gastélum, Carlos

    2014-07-01

    Familiarization to treadmill walking in unimpaired Parkinson's disease (PD) patients is assessed, across multiple treadmill walking sessions. Thirteen PD subjects were enrolled into the study (Eight were in a moderate stage of the disease, and 5 in an advanced stage). PD subjects attended a progressive program consisting of 12 sessions of 20 min. Walking speed, cadence, step length and coefficient of variation were assessed. ANOVA test were used to evaluate progression of disease and time influence over familiarization. PD Subjects baseline characteristics did not differ significantly between both groups and typical dependencies over progression of disease and velocity were found for cadence, step length and coefficient of variation. However, we showed that some PD subjects may require longer familiarization times and that familiarization is an adaptation process which involves parameters as velocity, cadence and gait stability. A better definition of familiarization to treadmill is needed since some parameters such as step length does not change significantly while others such as cadence, coefficient of variation and intraclass correlation coefficient does. Therefore familiarization to treadmill walking should remain on measures of velocity, cadence, reliability and variability. However, a bigger sample size is needed in order to improve the results of the present study. PMID:25264794

  13. [Familiarization to treadmill walking in unimpaired Parkinson's disease patients].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sanpablo, Alberto Isaac; Hernández-Arenas, Claudia; Rodríguez-Reyes, Gerardo; Quiñones-Uriostegui, Ivett; Alessi Montero, Aldo; Núñez-Carrera, Lidia; Boll-Woehrlen, Marie Catherine; Galván Duque-Gastélum, Carlos

    2014-07-01

    Familiarization to treadmill walking in unimpaired Parkinson's disease (PD) patients is assessed, across multiple treadmill walking sessions. Thirteen PD subjects were enrolled into the study (Eight were in a moderate stage of the disease, and 5 in an advanced stage). PD subjects attended a progressive program consisting of 12 sessions of 20 min. Walking speed, cadence, step length and coefficient of variation were assessed. ANOVA test were used to evaluate progression of disease and time influence over familiarization. PD Subjects baseline characteristics did not differ significantly between both groups and typical dependencies over progression of disease and velocity were found for cadence, step length and coefficient of variation. However, we showed that some PD subjects may require longer familiarization times and that familiarization is an adaptation process which involves parameters as velocity, cadence and gait stability. A better definition of familiarization to treadmill is needed since some parameters such as step length does not change significantly while others such as cadence, coefficient of variation and intraclass correlation coefficient does. Therefore familiarization to treadmill walking should remain on measures of velocity, cadence, reliability and variability. However, a bigger sample size is needed in order to improve the results of the present study.

  14. CT pulmonary densitovolumetry in patients with acromegaly: a comparison between active disease and controlled disease

    PubMed Central

    Camilo, Gustavo B; Carvalho, Alysson R S; Machado, Dequitier C; Mogami, Roberto; Melo, Pedro L

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Our purpose was to compare the findings of CT pulmonary densitovolumetry and pulmonary function in patients with active acromegaly and controlled acromegaly and, secondarily, to correlate these findings. Methods: 11 patients with active acromegaly, 18 patients with controlled acromegaly and 17 control subjects, all non-smokers, underwent quantification of lung volume using multidetector CT (Q-MDCT) and pulmonary function tests. Results: Patients with active acromegaly had larger total lung mass (TLM) values than the controls and larger amounts of non-aerated compartments than the other two groups. Patients with active acromegaly also had larger amounts of poorly aerated compartments than the other two groups, a difference that was observed in both total lung volume (TLV) and TLM. TLV as measured by inspiratory Q-MDCT correlated significantly with total lung capacity, whereas TLV measured using expiratory Q-MDCT correlated significantly with functional residual capacity. Conclusion: Patients with active acromegaly have more lung mass and larger amounts of non-aerated and poorly aerated compartments. There is a relationship between the findings of CT pulmonary densitovolumetry and pulmonary function test parameters. Advances in knowledge: Although the nature of our results demands further investigation, our data suggest that both CT pulmonary densitovolumetry and pulmonary function tests can be used as useful tools for patients with acromegaly by assisting in the prediction of disease activity. PMID:26246281

  15. Stereological quantification of the cerebellum in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kjeld; Andersen, Birgitte Bo; Pakkenberg, Bente

    2012-01-01

    Nonquantitative studies indicate that the cerebellum is neuropathologically affected in Alzheimer's disease; however, no quantitative studies on the subject have yet been conducted. Ten cerebella from elderly female subjects with severe Alzheimer's disease and 10 age- and gender-matched controls were examined. The cerebellum was divided into 5 regions and the Purkinje and granule cell number and density, cortical volume, molecular and granular layer volume and thickness, white matter volume, surface area, and the Purkinje cell gradient were stereologically estimated. There was no significant difference between the groups in Purkinje or granule cell number or density, and no overall difference in Purkinje cell gradient. However, there was a significant 12.7% reduction in total cerebellar volume in the Alzheimer's group and significant localized differences between the groups regarding other parameters. The relative lack of neuropathological changes in the cerebellum of severely demented Alzheimer's patients suggests that neuronal cell bodies on a global scale apparently still are intact. PMID:20728248

  16. The challenging patient with varicella-zoster virus disease

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) reactivation from latently infected ganglia causes multiple neurologic diseases. The most common is herpes zoster, which is frequently complicated by postherpetic neuralgia, meningoencephalitis, and vasculopathy, including VZV temporal arteritis, myelopathy, and retinal necrosis. All of these disorders can develop without rash. Importantly, VZV vasculopathy is emerging as a significant cause of TIAs and stroke. In particular, a subset of patients who present with symptoms and signs of giant cell arteritis (GCA), but whose temporal artery biopsies are GCA-negative, have multifocal VZV vasculopathy with temporal artery infection. Herein we focus on the specific diagnostic and therapeutic challenges that clinical neurologists encounter in diseases caused by VZV, discuss guidelines for zoster vaccine, and highlight molecular features of VZV latency with a focus on preventing the serious neurologic and ocular complications of VZV reactivation. PMID:23914320

  17. Molecular characterization of maple syrup urine disease patients from Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, N; Moleirinho, A; Kerkeni, E; Monastiri, K; Seboui, H; Amorim, A; Prata, M J; Quental, S

    2013-03-15

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a rare disorder of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) metabolism caused by the defective function of branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex (BCKD). The disease causal mutations can occur either in BCKDHA, BCKDHB or DBT genes encoding respectively the E1α, E1β and E2 subunits of the complex. In this study we report the molecular characterization of 3 Tunisian patients with the classic form of MSUD. Two novel putative mutations have been identified: the alteration c.716A>G (p.Glu239Gly) in BCKDHB and a small deletion (c.1333_1336delAATG; p.Asn445X) detected in DBT gene.

  18. 42 CFR 32.91 - Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Persons with Hansen's Disease § 32.91 Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients....

  19. 42 CFR 32.91 - Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Persons with Hansen's Disease § 32.91 Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients....

  20. 42 CFR 32.91 - Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Persons with Hansen's Disease § 32.91 Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients....

  1. 42 CFR 32.91 - Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Persons with Hansen's Disease § 32.91 Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients....

  2. 42 CFR 32.91 - Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Persons with Hansen's Disease § 32.91 Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients....

  3. Bone mineral density among elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Hattiholi, Jyothi; Gaude, Gajanan S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Osteoporosis is one of the major extra-pulmonary manifestations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which limits the physical activity. The present study was undertaken to study the bone mineral density (BMD) and osteoporosis in the elderly COPD patients. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study carried out among elderly COPD patients. After a detailed clinical history spirometry was done to stage the severity of COPD. DEXA scan of the lumbar spine was performed using bone densitometer to determine osteoporosis. Statistical analysis was based on Chi-square test. Risk factors were identified by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: A total of 70 elderly COPD patients were included. Fourty-six patients (65.7%) had osteoporosis and 13 (18.6%) had osteopenia. Majority of the osteoporosis patients had stage III or stage IV COPD disease (77.2%). As the severity grade of COPD increased, the risk of osteoporosis also increased. Also, with the increasing severity of COPD, BMD decreased. Patients with lower body mass index (BMI) had higher prevalence of osteoporosis (45.7%). Using multivariate regression analysis, stage IV COPD, number of acute exacerbations >3 and steroid cumulative dose >1000 mg were independent risk factors for osteoporosis in elderly COPD patients. Conclusions: The prevalence of osteoporosis was 65.7%, and 18.6% had osteopenia. Stage III and IV patients had significantly lower BMI in elderly COPD patients. High clinical suspicion and early diagnosis and treatment are required in the evaluation of osteoporosis in elderly COPD patients. PMID:24403704

  4. Periodontal disease and inflammatory blood cytokines in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    KAMPITS, Cassio; MONTENEGRO, Marlon M.; RIBEIRO, Ingrid W. J.; FURTADO, Mariana V.; POLANCZYK, Carisi A.; RÖSING, Cassiano K.; HAAS, Alex. N

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Periodontal disease has been associated with elevations of blood cytokines involved in atherosclerosis in systemically healthy individuals, but little is known about this association in stable cardiovascular patients. The aim of this study was to assess the association between periodontal disease (exposure) and blood cytokine levels (outcomes) in a target population of patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Material and Methods This cross-sectional study included 91 patients with stable CAD who had been under optimized cardiovascular care. Blood levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IFN-γ, and TNF-α were measured by Luminex technology. A full-mouth periodontal examination was conducted to record probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment (CA) loss. Multiple linear regression models, adjusting for gender, body mass index, oral hypoglycemic drugs, smoking, and occurre:nce of acute myocardial infarction were applied. Results CAD patients that experienced major events had higher concentrations of IFN-γ (median: 5.05 pg/mL vs. 3.01 pg/mL; p=0.01), IL-10 (median: 2.33 pg/mL vs. 1.01 pg/mL; p=0.03), and TNF-α (median: 9.17 pg/mL vs. 7.47 pg/mL; p=0.02). Higher numbers of teeth with at least 6 mm of CA loss (R2=0.07) and PD (R2=0.06) were significantly associated with higher IFN-γ log concentrations. Mean CA loss (R2=0.05) and PD (R2=0.06) were significantly related to IL-10 concentrations. Elevated concentrations of TNF-α were associated with higher mean CA loss (R2=0.07). Conclusion Periodontal disease is associated with increased systemic inflammation in stable cardiovascular patients. These findings provide additional evidence supporting the idea that periodontal disease can be a prognostic factor in cardiovascular patients. PMID:27556206

  5. [Rare diseases and their patient organization: the Hungarian Federation of People with Rare and Congenital Diseases].

    PubMed

    Pogány, Gábor

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the author is to discuss special issues of rare diseases, with emphasis on circumstances present in Hungary, including those leading to the foundation of the non-governmental organization, the Hungarian Federation of People with Rare and Congenital Diseases. The author briefly reviews the most important findings of current international surveys which have been performed with or without the involvement of member associations of the Hungarian Federation of People with Rare and Congenital Diseases. At the level of medical and social services in Hungary, it is still "incidental" to get to the appropriate expert or centre providing the diagnosis or treatment. It is difficult to find the still very few existing services due to the lack of suitable "pathways" and referrals. There are long delays in obtaining the first appointment, resulting in vulnerability and inequality along the regions. The overall consequence is the insufficiency or lack of access to medical and social services. There are also difficulties related to the supply of orphan medication and the long duration of hospitalization. At the level of patient organizations financial scarcity and uncertainty are typical, combined with inappropriate infrastructural background and human resources. The poor quality of organization of patient bodies along with insufficient cooperation among them are characteristic as well. The author concludes that a National Plan or Strategy is needed to improve the current fragmentation of services which would enable patients and health, social and educational professionals to provide and use the best care in the practice. This would ensure all patients with rare diseases to be diagnosed within a possible shortest time allowing access to the care and support needed in time resulting in a decrease in burden of families and society.

  6. [Tobacco smoking among hospitalised patients with coronary arterial disease].

    PubMed

    Kara, Izabella; Zysnarska, Monika; Borkowicz, Monika; Maksymiuk, Tomasz

    2009-01-01

    The impact of tobacco smoking on the development of cardio-vascular diseases, including coronary arterial disease (CAD) is very well known by now. More than 1/3 of the Polish adult population are affected which roughly corresponds with WHO accepted percentage of smokers world-wide (over 30%, over 15 years of age). Smokers with cardio-vascular problems are, naturally, even more dramatically affected. The article focuses on selected consequences of tobacco smoking among patients with coronary arterial disease. One hundred patients, already diagnosed with CAD, and hospitalised because of it, formed the studied group (71 male, 29 female). A survey questionnaire was employed as a tool, to inquire the subjects on elements of their life-style, encompassing both declared, acquired knowledge on behavioural patterns conducive to health and its implementation in every-day life. The life-style patterns included, for example, proper diet, physical activity and tobacco smoking. The study results showed that 97% of the group were well aware of the negative influence of smoking on their health (the remaining 3% left the question unanswered). None of the respondents was convinced of the alleged positive aspects of tobacco smoking. At the same time, 17% of the subjects with CAD still smoked, 56% ceased smoking, and the remaining 27% never smoked. The study revealed moreover that the very realisation that nicotinism influenced the CAD progress was instrumental in ceasing smoking by the 56% of former tobacco addicts. Tobacco smoking remains an issue among persons with diagnosed coronary arterial disease. A clear discrepancy was noted, between the almost 100% awareness of the habit's harmful consequences and reality of every-day life.

  7. Delivering a one-stop, integrated, and patient-centered service for patients with rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Väre, Paula; Nikiphorou, Elena; Hannonen, Pekka; Sokka, Tuulikki

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe a one-stop, integrated rheumatology service and assess patient satisfaction. Methods: A descriptive report and patient satisfaction survey of a rheumatology clinic model first developed in 1996 to enhance the patient “journey” through rheumatology services. A patient-satisfaction survey over a 3-week period assessed several aspects of care including quality of services, consultations, and patient education. Results: All referrals are screened by a rheumatologist to pre-schedule laboratory/radiology/other tests for the visit. Upon arrival to the clinic, patients check-in at an electronic desk, and then complete the electronic GoTreatIT monitoring system which assesses patient-reported outcomes. The patient is reviewed by a doctor in a 30- to 60-min consultation, and then by a nurse (for diagnosis/treatment education, vaccinations). An ultrasound machine and capillaroscopy are available for use in the clinic. Patients can be scheduled on the same day to see a nutritionist, physiotherapist, or other heath professionals as necessary. An “early-rheumatoid arthritis treatment path” is available to ensure early, intensive treatment. A patient satisfaction survey revealed high rating of the overall service (90.6/100). None of the patients felt that they lacked education on their disease or medication. Only 6% of the respondents gave negative feedback, reasons including feeling overwhelmed with information or not being given a cause for their symptoms. The multi-disciplinary approach was highly valued and only 3% would rather see a doctor and nurse on separate days. Conclusion: The specific clinic model provides an ideal setting for a one-stop service, avoiding unnecessary visits, collecting patient data, and enhancing the patient experience and journey through the system. Where possible, the specific clinic model could be used or adapted to build similar models in other rheumatology departments. The clinic model could also form the basis for

  8. Hepatitis B vaccination in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Ben Musa, Ruwaida; Gampa, Anuhya; Basu, Sanjib; Keshavarzian, Ali; Swanson, Garth; Brown, Michael; Abraham, Rana; Bruninga, Keith; Losurdo, John; DeMeo, Mark; Mobarhan, Sohrab; Shapiro, David; Mutlu, Ece

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and HBV screening and vaccination practices for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: This study is a retrospective, cross-sectional observational study. A retrospective chart review was performed in 500 patients who have been consecutively treated for IBD between September 2008 and January 2013 at the Rush University Medical Center Gastroenterology section. The patients were identified through the electronic medical record with the criteria that they attended the gastroenterology clinic, and that they had a diagnosis of IBD at the time of visit discharge. Once identified, each record was analyzed to determine whether the subject had been infected with HBV in the past, already been vaccinated against HBV, or advised to get vaccinated and followed through with the recommended vaccination. RESULTS: About 254 out of 500 patients (51%) had HBV screening ordered. Among those ordered to have screening tests, 86% followed through with HBV serology. Gastroenterology physicians had significantly different screening ratios from each other (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences in the ratios of HBV screening when IBD specialists were compared to other gastroenterology physicians (0.505 ± 0.023 vs 0.536 ± 0.066, P = 0.66). Of those 220 patients screened, 51% of IBD patients were found not to be immune against HBV. Approximately 50% of gastroenterology physicians recommended HBV vaccinations to their patients in whom serology was negative for antibodies against HBV. IBD specialists recommended vaccinations to a higher percentage of their patients compared to other gastroenterology physicians (0.168 ± 0.019 vs 0.038 ± 0.026, P = 0.015). Present and/or past HBV infection was found in 3.6% of the patients who had serology checked. There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) between our study and that reported in previous studies done in

  9. Central Venous Disease in Hemodialysis Patients: An Update

    SciTech Connect

    Modabber, Milad; Kundu, Sanjoy

    2013-08-01

    Central venous occlusive disease (CVD) is a common concern among the hemodialysis patient population, with the potential to cause significant morbidity. Endovascular management of CVD, comprising percutaneous balloon angioplasty and bare-metal stenting, has been established as a safe alternative to open surgical treatment. However, these available treatments have poor long-term patency, requiring close surveillance and multiple repeat interventions. Recently, covered stents have been proposed and their efficacy assessed for the treatment of recalcitrant central venous stenosis and obstruction. Moreover, newly proposed algorithms for the surgical management of CVD warrant consideration. Here, we seek to provide an updated review of the current literature on the various treatment modalities for CVD.

  10. Gastrointestinal Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joong-Seok; Sung, Hye-Young

    2015-01-01

    Currently, gastrointestinal dysfunctions in Parkinson’s disease (PD) are well-recognized problems and are known to be an initial symptom in the pathological process that eventually results in PD. Gastrointestinal symptoms may result from the involvement of either the central or enteric nervous systems, or these symptoms may be side effects of antiparkinsonian medications. Weight loss, excessive salivation, dysphagia, nausea/gastroparesis, constipation, and defecation dysfunction all may occur. Increased identification and early detection of these symptoms can result in a significant improvement in the quality of life for PD patients. PMID:26090079

  11. Patient-reported outcome measures in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    El-Matary, Wael

    2014-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are increasingly used in both research and clinical health settings. With the recent development of United States Food and Drug Administration guidance on PROMs, more attention is being devoted to their role and importance in health care. Several methodological challenges in the development, validation and implementation of PROMs must be resolved to ensure their appropriate utilization and interpretation. The present review discusses recent developments and updates in PROMs, with specific focus on the area of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25390615

  12. The neurologic examination in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Huff, F J; Boller, F; Lucchelli, F; Querriera, R; Beyer, J; Belle, S

    1987-09-01

    Abnormal findings on a standardized neurologic examination were compared between patients with a clinical diagnosis of probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) and healthy control subjects. Aside from mental status findings, the most useful examination findings for differentiating AD from control subjects were the presence of release signs, olfactory deficit, impaired stereognosis or graphesthesia, gait disorder, tremor, and abnormalities on cerebellar testing. These abnormalities probably reflect the different areas of the central nervous system that are affected pathologically in AD. In the clinical diagnosis of AD, particular attention should be given to these aspects of the neurologic examination.

  13. Organizing Pneumonia in a Patient with Quiescent Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ozeki, Keiji; Katano, Takahito; Shimura, Takaya; Mori, Yoshinori; Joh, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old man with Crohn's disease (CD) was admitted to our hospital due to moderate risk of pneumonia while receiving scheduled adalimumab maintenance therapy. Symptoms remained virtually unchanged following administration of antibiotics. A final diagnosis of organizing pneumonia (OP) was made based on findings of intra-alveolar buds of granulation tissue and fibrous thickening of the alveolar walls on pathological examination and patchy consolidations and ground glass opacities on computed tomography. Immediate administration of prednisolone provided rapid, sustained improvement. Although a rare complication, OP is a pulmonary manifestation that requires attention in CD patients. PMID:27413560

  14. Three consecutive pregnancies in a patient with glycogen storage disease type IA (von Gierke's disease).

    PubMed

    Ryan, I P; Havel, R J; Laros, R K

    1994-06-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IA is associated with metabolic abnormalities that can compromise fetal outcome. Normal outcome can be achieved by maintaining euglycemia throughout gestation. We report three consecutive pregnancies in a patient with glycogen storage disease type IA. The patient, a 35-year-old woman, has been maintained on a regimen of nightly nasogastric or cornstarch feedings for the past 12 years with improving metabolic control, reduced liver size, and no progression of multiple hepatic adenomas. On confirmation of each pregnancy, early in the first trimester nightly feeding was changed from cornstarch ingestion to Polycose by nasogastric intubation, with good metabolic control. During the last trimester of each pregnancy metabolic control showed further improvement, with lowering of lactate, urate, and triglyceride levels. During the first pregnancy unexpected fetal death occurred at 33 weeks. During the last two pregnancies, the patient was admitted at 33 and 34 weeks, respectively, for closer supervision of metabolic status and fetal monitoring. She underwent a cesarean section at 35 weeks 4 days of gestation and was delivered of a girl. She underwent a repeat cesarean section at 35 weeks 2 days for the subsequent gestation and was delivered of a boy. Both infants are healthy and appear to be unaffected by von Gierke's disease. Hepatic adenomas did not enlarge during the pregnancies. Meticulous management resulted in normal pregnancy outcomes in two consecutive gestations. Rapid fetal growth late in the third trimester may require particularly careful supervision to maintain euglycemia. PMID:8203427

  15. [Sensitization to granary mites in patients with allergic diseases].

    PubMed

    Golysheva, M A

    1991-01-01

    As many as 71 patients selected from a group of 550 patients suffering from allergic diseases, sensitized to the house dust mites Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus were examined. A study was made of the presence of allergen-specific IgE antibodies against house dust mites, storage mites (7 species altogether) using allergenic discs and commercial kits RAST (Pharmacia, Sweden). The group under examination mostly manifested sensitization to the house dust mites: Dermatophagoides ferinae (80%), Euroglyphus maynei (55%); storage mites: Acarus siro (45%), Lepidoglyphus destructor (35%). The latter one possesses the most powerful allergenic properties as compared to the acaroid mites of other types. The elevated sensitivity to storage mites is encountered among adults and children living both in Moscow and other regions (urban and rural). The problem of sensitization to storage mites in the USSR mandates thorough studies, which will enable the treatment and diagnostic agents to be designed and introduced into practice.

  16. Vegetarianism: advantages and drawbacks in patients with chronic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Chauveau, Philippe; Combe, Christian; Fouque, Denis; Aparicio, Michel

    2013-11-01

    Vegetarian diet is a very old practice that is liable to confer some health benefits. Recent studies have demonstrated that modification of the dietary pattern with a reduction of animal protein intake and increased consumption of plant-based foods could influence cardiovascular risk profile and mortality rate. Moreover, phosphate bioavailability from plant proteins is reduced. These statements could lead to some benefits for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. This review summarizes the characteristics and benefits of vegetarian diets in the general population and the potential beneficial effects of such a diet on phosphate balance, insulin sensitivity, and the control of metabolic acidosis in CKD patients. Potential drawbacks exist when a vegetarian diet is associated with protein intake that is too restrictive and/or insufficient energy intake, justifying an early and regular nutritional follow-up jointly assumed by a nephrologist and a renal dietitian.

  17. Finger agnosia and cognitive deficits in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Davis, Andrew S; Trotter, Jeffrey S; Hertza, Jeremy; Bell, Christopher D; Dean, Raymond S

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the presence of finger agnosia in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to determine if level of finger agnosia was related to cognitive impairment. Finger agnosia is a sensitive measure of cerebral impairment and is associated with neurofunctional areas implicated in AD. Using a standardized and norm-referenced approach, results indicated that patients with AD evidenced significantly decreased performance on tests of bilateral finger agnosia compared with healthy age-matched controls. Finger agnosia was predictive of cognitive dysfunction on four of seven domains, including: Crystallized Language, Fluid Processing, Associative Learning, and Processing Speed. Results suggest that measures of finger agnosia, a short and simple test, may be useful in the early detection of AD.

  18. Intestinal parasites in pediatric patients with diarrhoeal diseases in Bangkok.

    PubMed

    Chavalittamrong, B; Jirapinyo, P

    1984-09-01

    Stool examinations of 147 pediatric patients with diarrhoeal disease were carried out at Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok by using the direct-smear technique. Stool of 27 patients (18.4%) were positive for intestinal parasites. Children under one year of age were free of intestinal helminths and protozoa. Parasites were equally prevalent in males and females and without any age group predilection. The prevalence of intestinal parasites were Entamoeba histolytica 6.8%, Giardia lamblia 6.1%, others were Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm, Trichuris trichiura and Balantidium coli. Although the incidence of parasitism was not high as to be the main causatic agent of pediatric diarrhoea, the intestinal parasites may increase susceptibility to infection with other intestinal pathogens. The diagnosis of intestinal parasitoses can be determined by a simple direct faecal-smear technique and so that specific therapy can be instituted without delay in management of parasite-related diarrhoeas. PMID:6523173

  19. Diets for patients with chronic kidney disease, should we reconsider?

    PubMed

    Mitch, William E; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Here we revisit how dietary factors could affect the treatment of patients with complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD), bringing to the attention of the reader the most recent developments in the field. We will briefly discuss five CKD-induced complications that are substantially improved by dietary manipulation: 1) metabolic acidosis and the progression of CKD; 2) improving the diet to take advantage of the benefits of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) on slowing the progression of CKD; 3) the diet and mineral bone disorders in CKD; 4) the safety of nutritional methods utilizing dietary protein restriction; and 5) evidence that new strategies can treat the loss of lean body mass that is commonly present in patients with CKD. PMID:27401192

  20. Saliva transit in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Cassiani, R A; Mota, G A; Aprile, L R O; Dantas, R O

    2015-10-01

    Saliva is an important factor in the neutralization of the acidity of the refluxed material that comes from the stomach to the esophagus. The impairment of saliva transit from oral cavity to distal esophagus may be one of the causes of esophagitis and symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). With the scintigraphic method, the transit of 2 mL of artificial saliva was measured in 30 patients with GERD and 26 controls. The patients with GERD had symptoms of heartburn and acid regurgitation, a 24-hour pH monitoring with more than 4.2% of the time with pH below four, 26 with erosive esophagitis, and four with non-erosive reflux disease. Fourteen had mild dysphagia for solid foods. Twenty-one patients had normal esophageal manometry, and nine had ineffective esophageal motility. They were 15 men and 15 women, aged 21-61 years, mean 39 years. The control group had 14 men and 12 women, aged 19-61 years, mean 35 years. The subjects swallowed in the sitting and supine position 2 mL of artificial saliva labeled with 18 MBq of (99m) Technetium phytate. The time of saliva transit was measured from oral cavity to esophageal-gastric transition, from proximal esophagus to esophageal-gastric transition, and the transit through proximal, middle, and distal esophageal body. There was no difference between patients and controls in the time for saliva to go from oral cavity to esophageal-gastric transition, and from proximal esophagus to esophageal-gastric transition, in the sitting and supine positions. In distal esophagus in the sitting position, the saliva transit duration was shorter in patients with GERD (3.0 ± 0.8 seconds) than in controls (7.6 ± 1.7 seconds, P = 0.03). In conclusion, the saliva transit from oral cavity to the esophageal-gastric transition in patients with GERD has the same duration than in controls. Saliva transit through the distal esophageal body is faster in patients with GERD than controls.

  1. Interleukin-19 impairment in active Crohn's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Cantó, Elisabet; Garcia Planella, Esther; Zamora-Atenza, Carlos; Nieto, Juan Camilo; Gordillo, Jordi; Ortiz, Ma Angels; Metón, Isidoro; Serrano, Elena; Vegas, Esteban; García-Bosch, Orlando; Juárez, Cándido; Vidal, Sílvia

    2014-01-01

    The exact function of interleukin-19 (IL-19) on immune response is poorly understood. In mice, IL-19 up-regulates TNFα and IL-6 expression and its deficiency increases susceptibility to DSS-induced colitis. In humans, IL-19 favors a Th2 response and is elevated in several diseases. We here investigate the expression and effects of IL-19 on cells from active Crohn's disease (CD) patient. Twenty-three active CD patients and 20 healthy controls (HC) were included. mRNA and protein IL-19 levels were analyzed in monocytes. IL-19 effects were determined in vitro on the T cell phenotype and in the production of cytokines by immune cells. We observed that unstimulated and TLR-activated monocytes expressed significantly lower IL-19 mRNA in active CD patients than in HC (logFC = -1.97 unstimulated; -1.88 with Pam3CSK4; and -1.91 with FSL-1; p<0.001). These results were confirmed at protein level. Exogenous IL-19 had an anti-inflammatory effect on HC but not on CD patients. IL-19 decreased TNFα production in PBMC (850.7 ± 75.29 pg/ml vs 2626.0 ± 350 pg/ml; p<0.01) and increased CTLA4 expression (22.04 ± 1.55% vs 13.98 ± 2.05%; p<0.05) and IL-4 production (32.5 ± 8.9 pg/ml vs 13.5 ± 2.9 pg/ml; p<0.05) in T cells from HC. IL-10 regulated IL-19 production in both active CD patients and HC. We observed that three of the miRNAs that can modulate IL-19 mRNA expression, were up-regulated in monocytes from active CD patients. These results suggested that IL-19 had an anti-inflammatory role in this study. Defects in IL-19 expression and the lack of response to this cytokine could contribute to inflammatory mechanisms in active CD patients.

  2. Genomic imbalances in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Verbitsky, Miguel; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Fasel, David A.; Levy, Brynn; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Wuttke, Matthias; Abraham, Alison G.; Kaskel, Frederick; Köttgen, Anna; Warady, Bradley A.; Furth, Susan L.; Wong, Craig S.; Gharavi, Ali G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND. There is frequent uncertainty in the identification of specific etiologies of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in ch