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Sample records for renibacterium salmoninarum distinguishes

  1. Inactivation of Renibacterium salmoninarum by free chlorine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascho, Ronald J.; Landolt, Marsha L.; Ongerth, Jerry E.

    1995-01-01

    Salmonid fishes contract bacterial kidney disease by vertical or horizontal transmission of the pathogenic bacterium, Renibacterium salmoninarum. Procedures to reduce vertical transmission are under evaluation, but methods are still needed to eliminate sources of waterborne R. salmoninarum. We examined the efficacy of chlorine to inactivate R. salmoninarum. The bacterium was exposed to various levels of chlorine at pH 6, 7, or 8, and at 7.5 °C or 15 °C. At pH 7 and 15 °C, 99% inactivation occurred within 18 s, even at free chlorine concentrations as low as 0.05 mg/l. Chlorine was most effective at neutral or acidic pH, and 15 °C. The inactivation curves for 7.5 °C and pH 7, or 15 °C and pH 8, deviated from first-order kinetics by exhibiting shoulders or a tailing-off effect, suggesting that chlorine and the bacterial cells were not the sole reactants. A plot of the concentration-time (Ct) products for free chlorine at pH 7 and 15 °C produced a line with a slope less than 1, indicating that the duration of exposure was more important than the concentration of free chlorine. These data indicate that R. salmoninarum is very sensitive to chlorine, and that this disinfectant may be appropriate for use in fish hatcheries rearing salmonids affected by bacterial kidney disease.

  2. Virulence of Renibacterium salmoninarum to salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Starliper, C.E.; Smith, D.R.; Shatzer, T.

    1997-01-01

    Virulence of Renibacterium salmoninarum isolates representing five origins was evaluated in eight salmonid hosts; four origins were of Lake Michigan and the fifth was of the Pacific Northwest. The species type strain, ATCC (American Type Culture Collection) 33209, was also included. Each isolate was grown in a kidney disease medium (KDM2) supplemented with 1 % ATCC 33209 culture metabolite; serial 10-fold dilutions were prepared, and groups of fish were challenged by intraperitoneal injection with 0.1 mL of each dilution. A 70-d observation period followed, and bacterial kidney disease (BKD) was diagnosed by the fluorescent antibody technique. Virulence of isolates was quantified as a dose lethal to 50% of fish (LD50) for each host–isolate challenge. In the first set of experiments, 23 isolates were used to challenge groups of brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis. The mean LD50 was 1.087 x 106 colony-forming units per milliliter (cfu/mL; SD = 2.022 x 106), and the LD50 values ranged from 8.457 x 106 to 2.227 x 104 cfu/mL. Analysis of variance to evaluate the effect of isolate origin on virulence in brook trout revealed no significant difference (F = 1.502; P = 0.243). Susceptibilities of the other salmonid hosts were evaluated by challenge with six isolates of R. salmoninarum representing each origin and the species type strain. For many of the host–isolate challenge combinations, time to death was highly dependent on the dilution (number of bacteria) injected. In general, the isolates MCO4M, B26, and A34 (all of Lake Michigan origin) tended to be more virulent. Also, LD50 values were dispersed throughout a wider range among the more susceptible hosts. Lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, and brook trout were relatively resistant to challenge with the strains, whereas coho salmon O. kisutch, domestic Atlantic salmon Saltno salar, and chinook salmon O. tshawytscha were relatively susceptible. Another challenge evaluated the effect of

  3. Shedding of Renibacterium salmoninarum by infected chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tschawytscha

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKibben, C.L.; Pascho, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory studies of the transmission and pathogenesis of Renibacterium salmoninarum may describe more accurately what is occurring in the natural environment if test fish are infected by waterborne R. salmoninarum shed from infected fish. To quantify bacterial shedding by chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tschawytscha at 13??C in freshwater, groups of fish were injected intraperitoneally with R. salmoninarum at either 1.3 x 106 colony forming units (CFU) fish-1 (high-dose injection group) or 1.5 x 103 CFU fish-1 (low-dose injection group). R. salmoninarum infection levels were measured in the exposed fish by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (BKD-ELISA). At regular intervals for 30 d, the numbers of R. salmoninarum shed by the injected fish were calculated on the basis of testing water samples by the membrane filtration-fluorescent antibody test (MF-FAT) and bacteriological culture. Mean BKD-ELISA optical densities (ODs) for fish in the low-dose injection group were not different from those of control fish [p > 0.05), and no R. salmoninarum were detected in water samples taken up to 30 d after injection of fish in the low-dose group. By 12 d after injection a proportion of the fish from the high-dose infection group had high (BKD-ELISA OD ??? 1.000) to severe (BKD-ELISA OD ??? 2.000) R. salmoninarum infection levels, and bacteria were detected in the water by both tests. However, measurable levels of R. salmoninarum were not consistently detected in the water until a proportion of the fish maintained high to severe infection levels for an additional 8 d. The concentrations of R salmoninarum in the water samples ranged from undetectable up to 994 cells ml-1 on the basis of the MF-FAT, and up to 1850 CFU ml-1 on the basis of bacteriological culture. The results suggest that chinook salmon infected with R. salmoninarum by injection of approximately 1 x 106 CFU fish-1 can be used as the source of infection in cohabitation challenges beginning 20 darter injection.

  4. Growth of the fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum on different media.

    PubMed

    Bandín, I; Santos, Y; Barja, J I; Toranzo, A E

    1996-09-01

    In the present study, the ability of a group of Renibacterium salmoninarum strains to grow in the presence or absence of the amino acid cysteine and other mineral and organic sources of sulfur and nitrogen has been evaluated. Most of the isolates tested were able to grow on a mineral media supplemented with L-cysteine-HCl or other organic compounds, such as the vitamin thiamine and a casein hydrolysate (Bacto Casamino Acids, Difco). Bacterial growth was also recorded on commercial and specific media not supplemented with L-cysteine-HCl, or in which this amino acid was replaced by the compounds cited above.

  5. Method for flow cytometric monitoring of Renibacterium salmoninarum inactivation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascho, R.J.; Ongerth, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    The slow growth of Renibacterium salmoninarum limits the usefulness of culture as a research tool. Development of a 2-color flow cytometric assay to quantify the proportions of live and dead R. salmoninarum in a test population is described. Bacteria were simultaneously stained with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated immunoglobulin and exposed to the exclusion dye propidium iodide. Propidium iodide red fluorescence profiles of control groups of untreated and killed R. salmoninarum were compared with those for bacteria exposed to chlorine. Bacterial inactivation was based on mean red fluorescence intensity, and analyzed by high-red fluorescence intensity (HRFI) and curve subtraction (CS) analyses. When the concentration of R. salmoninarum was 8.65 x 106 bacteria ml-1 and the bacteria exposed to chlorine at 1 mg l-1 for periods from 1 to 20 min (high-Rs assessment), the mean red fluorescence intensity of the profile for each chlorine-exposure group was higher than that for the untreated control (p < 0.0001). When the concentration of R. salmoninarum was reduced to 1.76 x 106 bacteria ml-1 and exposed to 0.8 mg l-1 free chlorine level for periods from 20 s to 5 min (reduced-Rs assessment), the mean red fluorescence intensities of the exposure groups were higher than that for the untreated control only when the R. salmoninarum was exposed to chlorine for at least 1 min (p ??? 0.01). On the basis of red fluorescence intensity, the proportion of dead cells generally increased with the duration of chlorine exposure. Whereas the rates of inactivation derived from the HRFI and CS analyses did not correlate with the duration of exposure in the high-Rs assessment (r2 ??? 0.27), there was a correlation between these estimates and the duration of exposure in the reduced-Rs assessment (r2 ??? 0.92). Because of the rapid loss of culturable R. salmoninarum in both assessments following chlorine exposure, neither the duration of exposure nor the inactivation estimates correlated

  6. Microevolution of Renibacterium salmoninarum: evidence for intercontinental dissemination associated with fish movements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease, a major pathogen of salmonid fish species worldwide. Very low levels of intra-species genetic diversity have hampered efforts to understand the transmission dynamics and recent evolutionary history of this Gram-positive b...

  7. Evaluation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of Renibacterium salmoninarum bacterins affected by persistence of bacterial antigens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascho, R.J.; Goodrich, T.D.; McKibben, C.L.

    1997-01-01

    Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss were injected intraperitoneally with a bacterin containing killed Renibacterium salmoninarum cells delivered alone or in an oil-based adjuvant. We evaluated the relative abilities of the batterins to prevent the initiation or progression of infection in fish challenged by waterborne exposure to R. salmoninarum. Sixty-one days after vaccination, fish were held for 24 h in water containing either no bacteria or approximately 1.7 x 103, 1.7 x 105, or 5.3 x 106 live R. salmoninarum cells/mL. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to monitor changes in the levels of R. salmoninarum antigen in live fish before and after the immersion challenges. High levels of R. salmoninarum antigens were detected by ELISA in kidney-spleen tissue homogenates from vaccinated fish immediately before the challenges. Levels of those antigens remained high in the tissues of unchallenged fish throughout the study. We found that the ELISA used in this study may be unsuitable for evaluating the efficacy of batterins because it did not distinguish antigens produced by the challenge bacteria during an infection from those of the bacterins. Groups of control and vaccinated fish also were injected with either 1.7 x 104 or 1.7 x 106 R. salmoninarum cells and served as R. salmoninarum virulence controls. Relative survival among the various subgroups in the injection challenge suggests that adverse effects might have been associated with the adjuvant used in this study. The lowest survival at both injection challenge levels was among fish vaccinated with bacteria in adjuvant.

  8. Recovery of Renibacterium salmoninarum from naturally infected salmonine stocks in Michigan using a modified culture protocol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faisal, M.; Eissa, A.E.; Starliper, C.E.

    2010-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), is a fastidious and slow-growing bacterium that is extremely difficult to grow in vitro. Herein, we describe a modified primary culture protocol that encompasses a modified bacteriological culture medium and a tissue processing procedure. In order to facilitate the release of R. salmoninarum from granulomatous tissues, kidneys of infected fish were homogenized in a high speed stomacher. The kidney disease medium (KDM2), routinely used for primary culture of R. salmoninarum was modified by the addition of antibiotics and metabolites. When a relatively large inoculum of diluted kidney homogenate was streak-plate inoculated onto the modified KDM2, colonial growth of R. salmoninarum was achieved within 5-7. days, compared to the standard of two weeks or more. The modified procedure was then used to determine the prevalence of R. salmoninarum among representative captive and feral salmonid stocks in Michigan. Prevalence and clinical manifestations varied among species, strains of fish, and locations; however, R. salmoninarum isolates were biochemically homogenous. The improved primary culture procedure described in this study enabled selective and quick isolation of R. salmoninarum. Also, the isolates retrieved in this study constitute a unique biological resource for future studies of R. salmoninarum in the Laurentian Great Lakes. ?? 2009 University of Cairo.

  9. Testing of candidate non-lethal sampling methods for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum in juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Diane G.; McKibben, Constance L.; Conway, Carla M.; Purcell, Maureen K.; Chase, Dorothy M.; Applegate, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    Non-lethal pathogen testing can be a useful tool for fish disease research and management. Our research objectives were to determine if (1) fin clips, gill snips, surface mucus scrapings, blood draws, or kidney biopsies could be obtained non-lethally from 3 to 15 g Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, (2) non-lethal samples could accurately discriminate between fish exposed to the bacterial kidney disease agent Renibacterium salmoninarum and non-exposed fish, and (3) non-lethal samples could serve as proxies for lethal kidney samples to assess infection intensity. Blood draws and kidney biopsies caused ≥5% post-sampling mortality (Objective 1) and may be appropriate only for larger fish, but the other sample types were non-lethal. Sampling was performed over 21 wk following R. salmoninarum immersion challenge of fish from 2 stocks (Objectives 2 and 3), and nested PCR (nPCR) and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) results from candidate non-lethal samples were compared with kidney tissue analysis by nPCR, qPCR, bacteriological culture, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), fluorescent antibody test (FAT) and histopathology/immunohistochemistry. R. salmoninarum was detected by PCR in >50% of fin, gill, and mucus samples from challenged fish. Mucus qPCR was the only non-lethal assay exhibiting both diagnostic sensitivity and specificity estimates >90% for distinguishing between R. salmoninarum-exposed and non-exposed fish and was the best candidate for use as an alternative to lethal kidney sample testing. Mucus qPCR R. salmoninarum quantity estimates reflected changes in kidney bacterial load estimates, as evidenced by significant positive correlations with kidney R. salmoninaruminfection intensity scores at all sample times and in both fish stocks, and were not significantly impacted by environmentalR. salmoninarum concentrations.

  10. Effects of temperature on Renibacterium salmoninarum infection and transmission potential in Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; McKibben, Constance L.; Pearman-Gillman, Schuyler; Elliott, Diane G.; Winton, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is a significant pathogen of salmonids and the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD). Water temperature affects the replication rate of pathogens and the function of the fish immune system to influence the progression of disease. In addition, rapid shifts in temperature may serve as stressors that reduce host resistance. This study evaluated the effect of shifts in water temperature on established R. salmoninarum infections. We challenged Chinook salmon with R. salmoninarum at 12°C for 2 weeks and then divided the fish into three temperature groups (8, 12 and 15°C). Fish in the 8°C group had significantly higher R. salmoninarum-specific mortality, kidney R. salmoninarum loads and bacterial shedding rates relative to the fish held at 12 or 15°C. There was a trend towards suppressed bacterial load and shedding in the 15°C group, but the results were not significant. Bacterial load was a significant predictor of shedding for the 8 and 12°C groups but not for the 15°C group. Overall, our results showed little effect of temperature stress on the progress of infection, but do support the conclusion that cooler water temperatures contribute to infection progression and increased transmission potential in Chinook salmon infected with R. salmoninarum.

  11. Prevalence of Renibacterium salmoninarum among downstream-migrating salmonids in the Columbia River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanders, J.E.; Long, J.J; Arakawa, C.K.; Bartholomew, J.L.; Rohovec, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) is an important contributor to mortality of salmonids in hatcheries in the Columbia River basin. However, the impact of BKD on the survival of downstream migrants is difficult to determine because there is little information on the disease-related mortality among these fish. In this study, the impact of BKD on juvenile salmonids was examined by determining the percentage of downriver migrants infected with Renibacterium salmoninarum (the causative agent of BKD) and evaluating the effects of salt water on the progress of the disease. During the 2 years of this study, approximately 20% of the three species of migrating hatchery and wild salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) collected were infected with R. salmoninarum. Mortality caused by BKD increased when fish were held in salt water.

  12. Comparison of five techniques for the detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum in adult coho salmon.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascho, R.J.; Elliott, D.G.; Mallett, R.W.; Mulcahy, D.

    1987-01-01

    Samples of kidney, spleen, coelomic fluid, and blood from 56 sexually mature coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch were examined for infection by Renibacterium salmoninarum by five methods. The overall prevalence (all sample types combined) of R. salmoninarum in the fish was 100% by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, 86% by the combined results of the direct fluorescent antibody and the direct filtration-fluorescent antibody techniques, 39% by culture, 11% by counterimmunoelectrophoresis, and 5% by agarose gel immunodiffusion. There was a significant positive correlation (P < 0.001) between the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay absorbance levels and the counts by fluorescent antibody techniques for kidney, spleen, and coelomic fluid, and significant positive correlations (P < 0.001) in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay absorbance levels for all four of the sample types.

  13. Evidence that coded-wire-tagging procedures can enhance transmission of Renibacterium salmoninarum in chinook salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, D.G.; Pascho, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Binary coded wire tags (CWTs) are used extensively for identification and management of anadromous salmonid populations. A study of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in two brood year groups of hatchery-reared spring chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha provided strong evidence that horizontal transmission of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of BKD, might be enhanced by CWT-marking procedures. About 4 months after CWTs were implanted in the snouts of juvenile fish, 14-16 different tissues were sampled from each of 60 fish per brood year group for histological analysis. Of the fish that were positive for R. salmoninarum by histological examination, 41% (7 of 17) of the 1988 brood year fish and 24% (10 of 42) of the 1989 brood year fish had BKD lesions confined to the head near the site of tag implantation. These lesions often resulted in the destruction of tissues of one or both olfactory organs. No focal snout infections were observed in fish that had not been marked with CWTs. Further data obtained from tissue analyses by use of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a fluorescent antibody test for detection of R. salmoninarum supported the hypothesis that infections of R. salmoninarum can be initiated in the snout tissues of CWT-marked fish and then spread to other organs. The tagging procedures might promote transmission of the pathogen among fish via contaminated tagging needles, by facilitating the entry of pathogens through the injection wound, or both. Limited evidence from this study suggested that implantation of passive integrated transponder tags in the peritoneal cavities of fish might also promote the transmission of R. salmoninarum or exacerbate existing infections. The results indicated a need for strict sanitary procedures during the tagging of fish in populations positive for R. salmoninarum to reduce the probability of enhanced horizontal transmission of the pathogen.

  14. Both msa genes in Renibacterium salmoninarum are needed for full virulence in bacterial kidney disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coady, A.M.; Murray, A.L.; Elliott, D.G.; Rhodes, L.D.

    2006-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum, a gram-positive diplococcobacillus that causes bacterial kidney disease among salmon and trout, has two chromosomal loci encoding the major soluble antigen (msa) gene. Because the MSA protein is widely suspected to be an important virulence factor, we used insertion-duplication mutagenesis to generate disruptions of either the msa1 or msa2 gene. Surprisingly, expression of MSA protein in broth cultures appeared unaffected. However, the virulence of either mutant in juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) by intraperitoneal challenge was severely attenuated, suggesting that disruption of the msa1 or msa2 gene affected in vivo expression. Copyright ?? 2006, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Development of a specific biotinylated DNA probe for the detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed Central

    Hariharan, H; Qian, B; Despres, B; Kibenge, F S; Heaney, S B; Rainnie, D J

    1995-01-01

    A specific DNA probe for the identification of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), was developed from one of 3 clones pRS47, pRS49, and pRS26 of 5.1 kb, 5.3 kb, and 11.3 kb, respectively. The biotinylated pRS47/BamHI insert probe was tested on 3 dilutions of DNA extracted from 3 strains of R. salmoninarum and from 1 strain each of Arthrobacter protophormiae, Aeromonas salmonicida, Corynebacterium aquaticum, Carnobacterium piscicola, Listonella anguillarum, Micrococcus luteus, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Vibrio ordalii, and Yersinia ruckeri. In a dot blot assay, this probe hybridized only with the DNA from the R. salmoninarum strains. When used on kidney samples from fish challenged with R. salmoninarum, the dot blot hybridization assay with the probe was found to be as sensitive as culture. In a fluorescent antibody test, samples that were negative in culture and dot blot hybridization showed no more than one fluorescing cell in 50 microscopic fields examined. This DNA probe, therefore, has the potential for use in the diagnosis of BKD of fish. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:8548693

  16. Bactericidal activity of juvenile chinook salmon macrophages against Aeromonas salmonicida after exposure to live or heat-killed Renibacterium salmoninarum or to soluble proteins produced by R. salmoninarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Siegel, D.C.; Congleton, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Macrophages isolated from the anterior kidney of juvenile chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in 96-well microtiter plates were exposed for 72 h to 0, 105, or 106 live or heat-killed Renibacterium salmoninarum cells per well or to 0, 0.1, 1.0, or 10 ??g/mL of R. salmoninarum soluble proteins. After treatment, the bactericidal activity of the macrophages against Aerornonas salmonicida was determined by a colorimetric assay based on the reduction of the tetrazolium dye MTT to formazan by viable bacteria. The MTT assay was modified to allow estimation of the percentage of bacteria killed by reference to a standard curve relating the number of bacteria added to microtiter wells to absorbance by formazan at 600 nm. The live and heat-killed R. salmoninarum treatments significantly (P < 0.001) increased killing of A. salmonicida by chinook salmon macrophages. In each of the five trials, significantly (P < 0.05) greater increases in killing occurred after exposure to 105 R. salmoninarum cells than to 106 R. salmoninarum cells per well. In contrast, treatment of macrophages with 10 ??g/mL R. salmoninarum soluble proteins significantly (P < 0.001) decreased killing of A. salmonicida, but treatment with lower doses did not. These results show that the bactericidal activity of chinook salmon macrophages is stimulated by exposure to R. salmoninarum cells at lower dose levels but inhibited by exposure to R. salmoninarum cells or soluble proteins at higher dose levels.

  17. Pathological and immunological responses associated with differential survival of Chinook salmon following Renibacterium salmoninarum challenge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metzger, David C.; Elliott, Diane G.; Wargo, Andrew; Park, Linda K.; Purcell, Maureen K.

    2010-01-01

    Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha are highly susceptible to Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD). Previously we demonstrated that introduced Chinook salmon from Lake Michigan, Wisconsin (WI), USA, have higher survival following R. salmoninarum challenge relative to the progenitor stock from Green River, Washington, USA. In the present study, we investigated the pathological and immunological responses that are associated with differential survival in the 2 Chinook salmon stocks following intra-peritoneal R. salmoninarum challenge of 2 different cohort years (2003 and 2005). Histological evaluation revealed delayed appearance of severe granulomatous lesions in the kidney and lower overall prevalence of membranous glomerulopathy in the higher surviving WI stock. The higher survival WI stock had a lower bacterial load at 28 d post-infection, as measured by reverse-transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). However, at all other time points, bacterial load levels were similar despite higher mortality in the more susceptible Green River stock, suggesting the possibility that the stocks may differ in their tolerance to infection by the bacterium. Interferon-γ, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), Mx-1, and transferrin gene expression were up-regulated in both stocks following challenge. A trend of higher iNOS gene expression at later time points (≥28 d post-infection) was observed in the lower surviving Green River stock, suggesting the possibility that higher iNOS expression may contribute to greater pathology in that stock.

  18. Impact of stressors on transmission potential of Renibacterium salmoninarum in Chinook salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Winton, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) affecting several species of Pacific salmon.  The severity of BKD can range from a chronic infection to overt disease with high mortality as in the case of large losses of adult Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Great Lakes during late 1980s. The goal of this study was to empirically evaluate how environmental stressors relevant to the Great Lakes impact R. salmoninarum disease progression and bacterial shedding, the latter parameter being a proxy of horizontal transmission. In the first study (Aim 1), we focused on how endogenous host thiamine levels and dietary fatty acids impacted resistance of Chinook salmon to R. salmoninarum. Juvenile fish were fed one of four experimental diets, including a (1) thiamine replete diet formulated with fish oil, (2) thiamine deplete diet formulated with fish oil, (3) thiamine replete diet formulated with soybean oil, and (4) thiamine deplete diet formulated with soybean oil, before being challenged with buffer or R. salmoninarum. We observed significantly higher mortality in the R. salmoninarum infected groups relative to the corresponding mock controls in only the thiamine replete diet groups. We also observed a significant effect of time and diet on kidney bacterial load and bacterial shedding, with a significant trend towards higher shedding and bacterial load in the fish oil – thiamine replete diet group. However, during the course of the study, unexpected mortality occurred in all groups attributed to the myxozoan parasite Ceratomyxa shasta. Since the fish were dually-infected with C. shasta, we evaluated parasite DNA levels (parasitic load) in the kidney of sampled fish. We found that parasite load varied across time points but there was no significant effect of diet. However, parasite load did differ significantly between the mock and R. salmoninarum challenge groups with a trend towards longer persistence of C. shasta

  19. Demonstration of the salmonid humoral response to Renibacterium salmoninarum using a monoclonal antibody against salmonid immunoglobulin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholomew, J.L.; Arkoosh , M.R.; Rohovec, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    The specificity of the antibody response of salmonids to Renibacterium salmoninarum antigens was demonstrated by western blotting techniques that utilized a monoclonal antibody against salmonid immunoglobulin. In this study, the specificity of the response in immunized chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytschawas compared with the response in naturally infected chinook salmon and coho salmon O. kisutch, and immunized rabbits. The antibody response in immunized salmon and rabbits and the naturally infected fish was primarily against the 57–58kilodalton protein complex. In addition to recognizing these proteins in the extracellular fraction and whole-cell preparations, antibody from the immunized salmon and rabbits detected four proteins with lower molecular masses. Western blotting techniques allow identification of the specific antigens recognized and are a useful tool for comparing the immunogenicity of different R. salmoninarumpreparations. Immunofluorescent techniques with whole bacteria were less sensitive than western blotting in detecting salmonid anti-R. salmoninarumantibody.

  20. Comparison of traditional and molecular methods for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascho, R.J.; Elliott, D.G.; Chase, D.M.; Cunningham, C.O.

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum occurs in most parts of the world where wild or cultured salmonid fishes are present. Several extensive reviews have been written on the pathogen and the disease (Fryer and Sanders, 1981; Austin and Austin, 1987; Elliott et al., 1989; Evelyn, 1993; Evenden et al., 1993; Fryer and Lannan, 1993). Bacterial kidney disease can cause serious mortality in juvenile salmonids in both fresh water and seawater, and also in prespawning adults. Although the chronic nature of the disease has hindered accurate estimates of fish losses, particularly in feral fish populations, BKD is one the most important bacterial diseases affecting cultured salmonids, with reported losses as high as 80% in stocks of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) and 40% in stocks of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) (Evenden et al., 1993).

  1. Performance of serum-free broth media for growth of Renibacterium salmoninarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Starliper, C.E.; Schill, W.B.; Mathias, J.

    1998-01-01

    Growth of Renibacterium salmoninarum was compared in 14 different broth media; 13 serum-free, and 1 that contained newborn calf serum, KDM2+M. Supplementation with 1% v/v R. salmoninarum MCO4M metabolite was evaluated for 6 of the media that do not utilize it as part of their ingredients. Viable cells were enumerated on Days 10, 20, and 30 post inoculation to evaluate performance. The experiment was repeated 3 times using high, low, and medium (trials 1 to 3, respectively) cell concentrations as inoculum. In general there was no optimal medium and all performed well. The choice of which to employ depends on the ease of preparation and presence of certain ingredients that might affect subsequent assays. In trials 2 and 3, the pH was estimated using test papers at the same time as cells were counted. Maximum pH increase occurred with KDM2+M and those media containing charcoal. For most media, a simple pH determination could be used as a means to check that growth has occurred in a culture, particularly if charcoal was added directly to the media and a visual inspection could not be made to detect growth.

  2. Detection and quantification of Renibacterium salmoninarum DNA in salmonid tissues by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chase, D.M.; Elliott, D.G.; Pascho, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is an important salmonid pathogen that is difficult to culture. We developed and assessed a real-time, quantitative, polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for the detection and enumeration of R. salmoninarum. The qPCR is based on TaqMan technology and amplifies a 69-base pair (bp) region of the gene encoding the major soluble antigen (MSA) of R. salmoninarum. The qPCR assay consistently detected as few as 5 R. salmoninarum cells per reaction in kidney tissue. The specificity of the qPCR was confirmed by testing the DNA extracts from a panel of microorganisms that were either common fish pathogens or reported to cause false-positive reactions in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Kidney samples from 38 juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in a naturally infected population were examined by real-time qPCR, a nested PCR, and ELISA, and prevalences of R. salmoninarum detected were 71, 66, and 71%, respectively. The qPCR should be a valuable tool for evaluating the R. salmoninarum infection status of salmonids.

  3. Real-time PCR for quantification of viable Renibacterium salmoninarum in chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kunio; Sakai, D K

    2007-03-13

    Quantification of msa gene mRNA of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), was investigated using reverse transcription followed by real-time PCR assay on R. salmoninarum in culture, and in experimentally challenged chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta fry kidney tissues (total of 70 samples) after intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection and bath infection. Correlations of msa gene mRNA concentrations with culturable cell concentrations (as colony forming units [CFU]), determined by drop-plate culture method on selective kidney disease medium (SKDM) agar through a 12 wk incubation time, and msa gene DNA concentrations by real-time PCR assay were examined. Furthermore, ovarian fluid samples from wild chum salmon adults with no clinical signs of disease were collected from 8 rivers and from clinically infected kokanee 0. nerka and masu salmon O. masou that were reared in 1 and 2 hatcheries, respectively (total of 414 samples). All samples were examined by nested PCR assay. Then, positive samples were examined by real-time PCR assays for mRNA and DNA; mRNA was detectable at 8 log units (5.0 x 101 to 5.0 x 10(9) copies p11(-1)) with high correlation (R2 = 0.999). The mRNA concentration correlated with CFU in kidney tissue from fish infected by i.p. injection (R2 = 0.924), by bath infection (R2 = 0.502) and in culture (R2 = 0.888). R. salmoninarum was detected and quantified by real-time PCR assay for mRNA in ovarian fluid samples in both subclinically infected chum salmon adults and clinically infected kokanee and masu salmon adults; detection rates ranged from 0 to 44.4% and concentrations ranged from 9.7 x 10(2) to 5.6 x 10(5) copies pl(-1). These results indicate that real-time PCR assay for the mRNA is a rapid, sensitive and reliable method to detect and quantify the viability of R. salmoninarum in kidney and ovarian fluid samples of salmonid fishes with both clinical and subclinical infection of the pathogen.

  4. Antigenic and functional characterization of p57 produced by Renibacterium salmoninarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weins, G.; Chien, M.S.; Winton, J.R.; Kaatari, S.L.

    1999-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease, produces large quantities of a 57-58 kDa protein (p57) during growth in broth culture and during infection of salmonid fish. Biological activities of secreted p57 include agglutination of salrnonid leucocytes and rabbit erythrocytes. We define the location of epitopes on p57 recognized by agglutination-blocking monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 4Cl1, 4H8 and 4D3, and demonstrate that the majority of secreted p57 is a nlonomer that retains salrnonid leucocyte agglutinat~ng activity. The 3 MAbs bound a recombinant, amino-terminal fragment of p57 (211 aa) but not a carboxy-terminal fragment (315 aa) demonstrating that the neutralizing epitopes are located within the amino-terminal portion of p57. When combinations of the MAbs were used in an antigen capture ELISA. the epitopes recognized by the 3 MAbs were shown to be sterically separate. However, when the same MAb was used as both the coating and detection MAb, binding of the biotinylated detection MAb was not observed. These data indicate that the epitopes recognized by the 3 agglutination-blocking antibodies are functionally available only once per molecule and that native p57 exists as a monomer Similar ELISA results were obtained when kidney tissues from 3 naturally infected chinook salmon were assayed. Finally, a p57 monomer was purified using anion exchange and size exclusion chromatography that retained in vitro agglutinating activity. A model in which p57 is released from R. salmoninarum as a biologically active monomer during infection of salmonid fish is proposed.

  5. Renibacterium salmoninarum in spring-summer chinook salmon smolts at dams on the Columbia and Snake Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, D.G.; Pascho, R.J.; Jackson, L.M.; Matthews, G.M.; Harmon, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated Renibacterium salmoninarum infection in smolts of hatchery and wild spring-summer chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha sampled during most of the out-migration at Little Goose (1988) and Lower Granite dams (1988-1991) on the Snake River and at Priest Rapids and McNary dams on the Columbia River (1988-1990). We sampled 860-2,178 fish per dam each year. Homogenates of kidney-spleen tissue from all fish were tested for the presence of R. salmoninarum antigens by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and homogenates from 10% of the fish were examined by the fluorescent antibody technique (FAT). Although only 1-11% of fish sampled at a given dam during any 1 year exhibited lesions characteristic of bacterial kidney disease, 86-100% of the fish tested positive for R. salmoninarum antigen by ELISA, whereas 4-17% of the fish tested positive by the FAT. During most years, a majority (68-87%) of fish testing positive by the ELISA had low R. salmoninarum antigen levels, but in 1989, 53% of positive fish from Lower Granite Dam and 52% from McNary Dam showed medium-to-high antigen levels. For most years, the highest mean antigen levels were measured in fish sampled after 75% of the total out-migrants had passed a given dam. When the largest numbers of fish were being collected for bypass or downriver transportation, mean antigen levels were relatively low.

  6. Bench-top validation testing of selected immunological and molecular Renibacterium salmoninarum diagnostic assays by comparison with quantitative bacteriological culture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, D.G.; Applegate, L.J.; Murray, A.L.; Purcell, M.K.; McKibben, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    No gold standard assay exhibiting error-free classification of results has been identified for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Validation of diagnostic assays for R. salmoninarum has been hindered by its unique characteristics and biology, and difficulties in locating suitable populations of reference test animals. Infection status of fish in test populations is often unknown, and it is commonly assumed that the assay yielding the most positive results has the highest diagnostic accuracy, without consideration of misclassification of results. In this research, quantification of R. salmoninarum in samples by bacteriological culture provided a standardized measure of viable bacteria to evaluate analytical performance characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and repeatability) of non-culture assays in three matrices (phosphate-buffered saline, ovarian fluid and kidney tissue). Non-culture assays included polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), direct smear fluorescent antibody technique (FAT), membrane-filtration FAT, nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and three real-time quantitative PCR assays. Injection challenge of specific pathogen-free Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), with R. salmoninarum was used to estimate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Results did not identify a single assay demonstrating the highest analytical and diagnostic performance characteristics, but revealed strengths and weaknesses of each test.

  7. Effects of Renibacterium salmoninarum on olfactory organs of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) marked with coded wire tags

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Diane G.; Conway, Carla M.; Bruno, D.W.; Elliott, D.G.; Nowak, B.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum can cause significant morbidity and mortality in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), particularly in Chinook salmon of the stream (spring) life history type, which migrate to sea as yearlings rather than subyearlings. R. salmoninarum can be transmitted vertically from the female parent to the progeny in association with the egg, as well as horizontally from fish to fish. This study was conducted as part of a research project to investigate whether the prevalence and intensity of R. salmoninarum infections in adult spring Chinook salmon could affect the survival and pathogen prevalence and intensity in their progeny (Pascho et al., 1991, 1993; Elliott et al., 1995). Fish from two brood years (1988 and 1989) were reared at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery (Idaho, USA) for about 1-1/2 years, released as yearling smolts, and allowed to migrate to the Pacific Ocean for maturation. The majority of progeny fish were marked with coded wire tags (CWTs) about 4 months before they were released from the hatchery so that adult returns could be monitored. The CWTs were implanted in the snouts of the fish by an experienced team of fish markers using automated wire-tagging machines. The intended placement site was the cartilage, skeletal muscle or loose connective tissue of the snout.

  8. Comparison of the membrane-filtration fluorescent antibody test, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the polymerase chain reaction to detect Renibacterium salmoninarum in salmon ovarian fluid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascho, Ronald J.; Chase, Dorothy M.; McKibben, Constance L.

    1998-01-01

    Ovarian fluid samples from naturally infected chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were examined for the presence of Renibacterium salmoninarum by the membrane-filtration fluorescent antibody test (MF-FAT), an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). On the basis of the MF-FAT, 64% (66/103) samples contained detectable levels of R. salmoninarum cells. Among the positive fish, the R. salmoninarum concentrations ranged from 25 cells/ml to 4.3 × 109cells/ml. A soluble antigenic fraction of R. salmoninarum was detected in 39% of the fish (40/103) by the ELISA. The ELISA is considered one of the most sensitive detection methods for bacterial kidney disease in tissues, yet it did not detect R. salmoninarum antigen consistently at bacterial cell concentrations below about 1.3 × 104cells/ml according to the MF-FAT counts. When total DNA was extracted and tested in a nested PCR designed to amplify a 320-base-pair region of the gene encoding a soluble 57-kD protein of R. salmoninarum, 100% of the 100 samples tested were positive. The results provided strong evidence that R. salmoninarum may be present in ovarian fluids thought to be free of the bacterium on the basis of standard diagnostic methods.

  9. Swimming endurance of bull trout, lake trout, arctic char, and rainbow trout following challenge with Renibacterium salmoninarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, D.T.; Moffitt, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    We tested the swimming endurance of juvenile bull trout Salvelinus confluentus, lake trout S. namaycush, Arctic char S. alpinus, and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss at 9??C and 15??C to determine whether sublethal infection from a moderate challenge of Renibacterium salmoninarum administered months before testing affected the length of time fish could maintain a swimming speed of 5-6 body lengths per second in an experimental flume. Rainbow trout and Arctic char swam longer in trials than did bull trout or lake trout, regardless of challenge treatment. When we tested fish 14-23 weeks postchallenge, we found no measurable effect of R. salmoninarum on the swimming endurance of the study species except for bull trout, which showed a mixed response. We conducted additional trials with bull trout 5-8 weeks postchallenge to determine whether increasing the challenge dose would affect swimming endurance and hematocrit. In those tests, bull trout with clinical signs of disease and those exposed to the highest challenge doses had significantly reduced swimming endurance compared with unchallenged control fish. Fish hematocrit levels measured at the end of all swimming endurance tests varied among species and between test temperatures, and patterns were not always consistent between challenged and control fish.

  10. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for a soluble antigen of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent for salmonid bacterial kidney disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascho, R.J.; Mulcahy, D.

    1987-01-01

    A double-antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of a soluble fraction of Renibacterium salmoninarum was developed from components extracted from the supernatant of an R. salmoninarum broth culture. The Costar® Serocluster™ EIA microplate gave the highest absorbance and signal-to-noise ratios among seven types tested. Including Tween 80 in the wash buffer resulted in higher absorbances than Tween 20 when antigen was present. Background absorbance did not increase when Tween 80 was added to the wash buffer, but did when Tween 80 replaced Tween 20 in antigen and conjugate diluents. Adsorption of coating antibody peaked within 4 h at 37 °C and 16 h at 4 °C. Antigen attachment to antibody-coated microplate wells depended more on incubation temperature than duration; we adopted a 3-h incubation at 25 °C. Conjugate incubation for longer than 1 h at 37 °C or 3 h at 25 °C resulted in unacceptable background levels. No cross-reactions resulted from heat-extracted antigens of 10 other species of bacteria. The optimized ELISA is a 6-h test that enables detection of levels of soluble antigen as low as 2–20 ng.

  11. Mortality and kidney histopathology of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha exposed to virulent and attenuated Renibacterium salmoninarum strains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Farrell, Caroline L.; Elliott, Diane G.; Landolt, Marsha L.

    2001-01-01

    An isolate of Renibacterium salmoninarum (strain MT 239) exhibiting reduced virulence in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss was tested for its ability to cause bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, a salmonid species more susceptible to BKD. Juvenile chinook salmon were exposed to either 33209, the American Type Culture Collection type strain of R. salmoninarum, or to MT 239, by an intraperitoneal injection of 1 x 10(3) or 1 x 10(6) bacteria fish(-1), or by a 24 h immersion in 1 x 10(5) or 1 x 10(7) bacteria ml(-1). For 22 wk fish were held in 12 degrees C water and monitored for mortality. Fish were sampled periodically for histological examination of kidney tissues. In contrast to fish exposed to the high dose of strain 33209 by either injection or immersion, none of the fish exposed to strain MT 239 by either route exhibited gross clinical signs or histopathological changes indicative of BKD. However, the MT 239 strain was detected by the direct fluorescent antibody technique in 4 fish that died up to 11 wk after the injection challenge and in 5 fish that died up to 20 wk after the immersion challenge. Viable MT 239 was isolated in culture from 3 fish that died up to 13 wk after the immersion challenge. Total mortality in groups injected with the high dose of strain MT 239 (12%) was also significantly lower (p < 0.05) than mortality in groups injected with strain 33209 (73 %). These data indicate that the attenuated virulence observed with MT 239 in rainbow trout also occurs in a salmonid species highly susceptible to BKD. The reasons for the attenuated virulence of MT 239 were not determined but may be related to the reduced levels of the putative virulence protein p57 associated with this strain.

  12. Mortality and kidney histopathology of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha exposed to virulent and attenuated Renibacterium salmoninarum strains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Farrell, C. L.; Elliott, D.G.; Landolt, M.L.

    2000-01-01

    An isolate of Renibacterium salmoninarum (strain MT 239) exhibiting reduced virulence in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss was tested for its ability to cause bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, a salmonid species more susceptible to BKD. Juvenile chinook salmon were exposed to either 33209, the American Type Culture Collection type strain of R. salmoninarum, or to MT 239, by an intraperitoneal injection of 1 ?? 103 or 1 ?? 106 bacteria fish-1, or by a 24 h immersion in 1 ?? 105 or 1 ?? 107 bacteria ml-1. For 22 wk fish were held in 12??C water and monitored for mortality. Fish were sampled periodically for histological examination of kidney tissues. In contrast to fish exposed to the high dose of strain 33209 by either injection or immersion, none of the fish exposed to strain MT 239 by either route exhibited gross clinical signs or histopathological changes indicative of BKD. However, the MT 239 strain was detected by the direct fluorescent antibody technique in 4 fish that died up to 11 wk after the injection challenge and in 5 fish that died up to 20 wk after the immersion challenge. Viable MT 239 was isolated in culture from 3 fish that died up to 13 wk after the immersion challenge. Total mortality in groups injected with the high dose of strain MT 239 (12%) was also significantly lower (p < 0.05) than mortality in groups injected with strain 33209 (73%). These data indicate that the attenuated virulence observed with MT 239 in rainbow trout also occurs in a salmonid species highly susceptible to BKD. The reasons for the attenuated virulence of MT 239 were not determined but may be related to the reduced levels of the putative virulence protein p57 associated with this strain.

  13. Vulnerability to predation and physiological stress responses in juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) experimentally infected with Renibacterium salmoninarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mesa, M.G.; Poe, T.P.; Maule, A.G.; Schreck, C.B.

    1998-01-01

    We experimentally infected juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) with Renibacterium salmoninarum (Rs), the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), to examine the vulnerability to predation of fish with differing levels of Rs infection and assess physiological change during progression of the disease. Immersion challenges conducted during 1992 and 1994 produced fish with either a low to moderate (1992) or high (1994) infection level of Rs during the 14-week postchallenge rearing period. When equal numbers of treatment and unchallenged control fish were subjected to predation by either northern squaw fish (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) or smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui), Rs-challenged fish were eaten in significantly greater numbers than controls by nearly two to one. In 1994, we also sampled fish every 2 weeks after the challenge to determine some stressful effects of Rs infection. During disease progression in fish, plasma cortisol and lactate increased significantly whereas glucose decreased significantly. Our results indicate the role that BKD may play in predator-prey interactions, thus ascribing some ecological significance to this disease beyond that of direct pathogen-related mortality. In addition, the physiological changes observed in our fish during the chronic progression of BKD indicate that this disease is stressful, particularly during the later stages.

  14. Incidence of Renibacterium salmoninarum infections in juvenile hatchery spring chinook salmon in the Columbia and Snake Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maule, A.G.; Rondorf, D.W.; Beeman, J.W.; Haner, P.V.

    1996-01-01

    From 1988 through 1992, we assessed the prevalence (frequency of occurrence) and severity (degree of infection) of Renibacterium salmoninarum (RS) among fish in marked groups of Columbia River basin and Snake River basin hatchery spring chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha before release and during their seaward migration. During the study, prevalence of RS infection decreased (from >90% to <65%) in six of the eight hatchery groups. We attributed this decrease to changes in hatchery practices that reduced vertical and horizontal transmission. Fish from Snake River hatcheries had a higher prevalence of infection when sampled at dams (mean >90%) than in the hatchery (mean <70%), but there were no differences in similar comparisons of Columbia River fish. Although prevalence and severity of RS infection were not correlated in the groups studied, it appears that fish from the Snake River were more severely infected than those from the Columbia River. Some groups of Snake River fish had higher severity of infection at dams than in the hatchery, but infection in fish from Columbia River hatcheries did not change. These differences between Snake River and Columbia River fish might have resulted from differences in river conditions and the distances from hatcheries to dams.

  15. Comparison of two fluorescent antibody techniques (FATS) for detection and quantification of Renibacterium salmoninarum in coelomic fluid of spawning chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, D.G.; McKibben, C.L.

    1997-01-01

    Two versions of the fluorescent antibody technique (FAT) were compared for detection and quantification of Renibacterium salmoninarum in coelomic fluid samples from naturally infected spawning chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. For the membrane filtration-FAT (MF-FAT), trypsin-treated samples were passed through 0.2 ??m polycarbonate filters to concentrate bacteria for direct enumeration by immunofluorescence microscopy. For the smear-FAT (S-FAT), samples were centrifuged at 8800 x g for 10 min and the pelleted material was smeared on slides for immunofluorescence staining Detected prevalences of Renibacterium salmoninarum were 1.8 to 3.4 times higher by the MF-FAT than by the S-FAT: differences were significant at p ??? 0.0002. The S-FAT consistently detected R. salmoninarum only in samples with calculated bacterial concentrations ??? 2.4 x 103 cells ml-1 by MF-FAT testing. Increasing the area examined on a filter or slide from 50 to 100 microscope fields at 1000x magnification resulted in the detection of a maximum of 4% additional positive samples by the MF-FAT and 7% additional positive samples by the S-FAT. In individual samples for which bacterial counts were obtained by both the MF-FAT and the S-FAT, the counts averaged from 47 times (??30 SD) to 175 times (??165 SD) higher by the MF-FAT. Centrifugation of samples at 10000 x g for 10 min resulted in a 4-fold increase in mean bacterial counts by the S-FAT compared with a 10-min centrifugation at 2000 x g, but the highest calculated bacterial concentration obtained by S-FAT testing was more than 6-fold lower than that obtained for the same sample by MF-FAT testing. Because of its greater sensitivity, the MF-FAT is preferable to the S-FAT for use in critical situations requiring the detection of low numbers of R. salmoninarum.

  16. Influence of infection with Renibacterium salmoninarum on susceptibility of juvenile spring chinook salmon to gas bubble trauma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiland, L.K.; Mesa, M.G.; Maule, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    During experiments in our laboratory to assess the progression and severity of gas bubble trauma (GBT) in juvenile spring chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, we had the opportunity to assess the influence of Renibacterium salmoninarum (Rs), the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease, on the susceptibility of salmon to GBT. We exposed fish with an established infection of Rs to 120% total dissolved gas (TDG) for 96 h and monitored severity of GBT signs in the fins and gills, Rs infection level in kidneys by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and mortality. Mortality occurred rapidly after exposure to 120% TDG, with a LT20 (time necessary to kill 20% of the population) of about 37 h, which is at a minimum about 16% earlier than other bioassays we have conducted using fish that had no apparent signs of disease. Fish that died early (from 31 to 36 h and from 49 to 52 h) had significantly higher infection levels (mean ?? SE ELISA absorbance = 1.532 ?? 0.108) than fish that survived for 96h (mean ?? SE ELISA absorbance = 0.828 ?? 0.137). Fish that died early also had a significantly greater number of gill filaments occluded with bubbles than those that survived 96 h. Conversely, fish that survived for 96 h had a significantly higher median fin severity ranking than those that died early. Our results indicate that fish with moderate to high levels of Rs infection are more vulnerable to the effects of dissolved gas supersaturation (DGS) and die sooner than fish with lower levels of Rs infection. However, there is a substantial amount of individual variation in susceptibility to the apparent cumulative effects of DGS and Rs infection. Collectively, our findings have important implications to programs designed to monitor the prevalence and severity of GBT in juvenile salmonids in areas like the Columbia River basin and perhaps elsewhere.

  17. Interaction of infection with Renibacterium salmoninarum and physical stress in juvenile chinook salmon: Physiological responses, disease progression, and mortality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mesa, M.G.; Maule, A.G.; Schreck, C.B.

    2000-01-01

    We experimentally infected juvenile spring chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha with Renibacterium salmoninarum (Rs), the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), in order to compare the physiological responses of Rs-infected and Rs-noninfected fish to a series of multiple, acute stressors and to determine whether exposure to these stressors worsens the infection and leads to increased mortality. After subjecting groups of fish to a waterborne challenge of Rs, we sampled them biweekly to monitor infection levels, mortality, and some stress-related physiological changes. As infections worsened, fish developed decreased hematocrits and blood glucose levels and increased levels of cortisol and lactate, indicating that BKD is stressful, particularly during the later stages. Eight weeks after the challenge, when fish had moderate to high infection levels, we subjected them, along with unchallenged control fish, to three 60-s bouts of hypoxia, struggling, and mild agitation that were separated by 48-72 h. Our results indicate that the imposition of these stressors on Rs-infected fish did not lead to higher infection levels or increased mortality when compared with diseased fish that did not receive the stressors. Furthermore, the kinetics of plasma cortisol, glucose, and lactate over a 24-h period following each application of the stressor were similar between fish with moderate to high Rs infections and those that had low or no detectable infection. Some differences in the stress responses of these two groups did exist, however. Most notably, fish with moderate to high Rs infections had higher titers of cortisol and lactate prior to each application of the stressor and also were unable to consistently elicit a significant hyperglycemia in response to the stressors. Collectively, our results should be important in understanding the impact that BKD has on the survival of juvenile salmonids, but we caution that our results represent the combined effects of one

  18. Monitoring of the in-river migration of smolts from two groups of spring chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), with different profiles of Renibacterium salmoninarum infection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascho, R.J.; Elliott, D.G.; Achord, S.

    1993-01-01

    Broodstock segregation based on the measurement of maternal Renibacterium salmoninarum infection levels by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the membrane filtration-fluorescent antibody technique (MF-FAT) was previously shown to affect the prevalence and levels of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in progeny of chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), during hatchery rearing. Subgroups of fish from that study were marked with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, and monitored by PIT-tag detectors during the first 342km of their migration to the Pacific Ocean. Differences in the recovery of tagged fish were significant (P≤ 0·01) at each detection point and became more pronounced as the fish moved downstream. Cumulative recoveries of fish from the low-BKD group and the high-BKD group, respectively, were 31% and 28% after 116km, 44% and 37% after 176km, and 51% and 42% after 342km. There were no apparent differences in the migration timing of the two groups to the first detection point. The data suggested that in-river survival was higher in the progeny group from parents that had low R. salmoninarum infection levels or tested negative for R. salmoninarum (low-BKD group) than in the group female parents with high infection levels (high-BKD group).

  19. Membrane filtration – Fluorescent antibody staining procedure for detecting and quantifying Renibacterium salmoninarum in coelomic fluid of Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, D.G.; Barila, T.Y.

    1987-01-01

    We developed a rapid method for detecting and quantifying the pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum in coelomic fluid of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) by concentrating the bacteria on 0.2-μm polycarbonate filters and staining them with specific fluorescein-labeled antibody. Centrifugation of samples and resuspension of the sedimented material in phosphate-buffered saline containing Triton X-100 increased the ease of filtration. Background fluorescence was reduced by counterstaining filters with Eriochrome black T. Postfiltration staining, rinsing, and counterstaining were done in the syringe-mounted filter holders, reducing handling of the filters and possible loss of bacteria. The number of bacteria detected by the filtration – fluorescent antibody technique in a broth culture of R. salmoninarum ranged from 6.7 × 107to7.6 × 107/mL and was slightly higher than that determined by plate count (9.6 × 106/mL). Increasing the sample dilution or decreasing the number of microscope fields examined generally increased the variability of filter counts of R. salmoninarum. Using the filtration – fluorescent antibody technique, we detected the bacterium in the coelomic fluid of 85% of spawning female spring chinook salmon sampled from a hatchery population.

  20. Identifying copy number variation of the dominant virulence factors msa and p22 within genomes of the fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum

    PubMed Central

    Gulla, Snorre; Feil, Edward J.; Nørstebø, Simen Foyn; Rhodes, Linda D.

    2016-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease, an important disease of farmed and wild salmonid fish worldwide. Despite the wide spatiotemporal distribution of this disease and habitat pressures ranging from the natural environment to aquaculture and rivers to marine environments, little variation has been observed in the R. salmoninarum genome. Here we use the coverage depth from genomic sequencing corroborated by real-time quantitative PCR to detect copy number variation (CNV) among the genes of R. salmoninarum. CNV was primarily limited to the known dominant virulence factors msa and p22. Among 68 isolates representing the UK, Norway and North America, the msa gene ranged from two to five identical copies and the p22 gene ranged from one to five copies. CNV for these two genes co-occurred, suggesting they may be functionally linked. Isolates carrying CNV were phylogenetically restricted and originated predominantly from sites in North America, rather than the UK or Norway. Although both phylogenetic relationship and geographical origin were found to correlate with CNV status, geographical origin was a much stronger predictor than phylogeny, suggesting a role for local selection pressures in the repeated emergence and maintenance of this trait. PMID:28348850

  1. Identifying copy number variation of the dominant virulence factors msa and p22 within genomes of the fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Brynildsrud, Ola; Gulla, Snorre; Feil, Edward J; Nørstebø, Simen Foyn; Rhodes, Linda D

    2016-04-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease, an important disease of farmed and wild salmonid fish worldwide. Despite the wide spatiotemporal distribution of this disease and habitat pressures ranging from the natural environment to aquaculture and rivers to marine environments, little variation has been observed in the R. salmoninarum genome. Here we use the coverage depth from genomic sequencing corroborated by real-time quantitative PCR to detect copy number variation (CNV) among the genes of R. salmoninarum. CNV was primarily limited to the known dominant virulence factors msa and p22. Among 68 isolates representing the UK, Norway and North America, the msa gene ranged from two to five identical copies and the p22 gene ranged from one to five copies. CNV for these two genes co-occurred, suggesting they may be functionally linked. Isolates carrying CNV were phylogenetically restricted and originated predominantly from sites in North America, rather than the UK or Norway. Although both phylogenetic relationship and geographical origin were found to correlate with CNV status, geographical origin was a much stronger predictor than phylogeny, suggesting a role for local selection pressures in the repeated emergence and maintenance of this trait.

  2. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the gene coding for the 57kDa soluble antigen of the salmonid fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chien, Maw-Sheng; Gilbert , Teresa L.; Huang, Chienjin; Landolt, Marsha L.; O'Hara, Patrick J.; Winton, James R.

    1992-01-01

    The complete sequence coding for the 57-kDa major soluble antigen of the salmonid fish pathogen, Renibacterium salmoninarum, was determined. The gene contained an opening reading frame of 1671 nucleotides coding for a protein of 557 amino acids with a calculated Mr value of 57190. The first 26 amino acids constituted a signal peptide. The deduced sequence for amino acid residues 27–61 was in agreement with the 35 N-terminal amino acid residues determined by microsequencing, suggesting the protein in synthesized as a 557-amino acid precursor and processed to produce a mature protein of Mr 54505. Two regions of the protein contained imperfect direct repeats. The first region contained two copies of an 81-residue repeat, the second contained five copies of an unrelated 25-residue repeat. Also, a perfect inverted repeat (including three in-frame UAA stop codons) was observed at the carboxyl-terminus of the gene.

  3. Temperature-mediated differences in bacterial kidney disease expression and survival in Renibacterium salmoninarum-challenged bull trout and other salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, D.T.; Moffitt, C.M.; Peters, K.K.

    2007-01-01

    Resource managers considering restoration and reconnection of watersheds to protect and enhance threatened populations of bull trout Salvelinus confluentus have little information about the consequences of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum. To better understand the response of bull trout to R. salmoninarum challenge, we conducted several laboratory experiments at two water temperatures. The extent, severity, and lethality of BKD in bull trout were compared with those of similarly challenged lake trout S. namaycush, Arctic char S. alpinus, Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, and rainbow trout O. mykiss. The lethal dose of bacterial cells necessary to induce 50% mortality (LD50) was 10-fold lower at the 15??C challenge than at the 9??C challenge. Of the species tested, bull trout were relatively resistant to BKD, Arctic char were the most susceptible among Salvelinus species, and Chinook salmon were the most susceptible among Oncorhynchus species tested. Mean time to death was more rapid for all fish tested at 15??C than for fish challenged at 9??C. These results suggest that infection of bull trout with BKD likely poses a low risk to successful restoration of threatened populations. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  4. Effect of dietary vitamin E and selenium on growth, survival and the prevalence of Renibacterium salmoninarum infection in chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorarinsson, Ragnar; Landolt, Marsha L.; Elliott, Diane G.; Pascho, Ronald J.; Hardy, Ronald W.

    1994-01-01

    Groups of juvenile spring chinook salmon naturally infected with Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease, were fed diets containing different levels of vitamin E and selenium for 214 days in fresh water and 110 days in seawater. The fish were fed vitamin E at concentrations of either 53±3 mg (designated e) or 299±9 mg (designated E) α-tocopheryl acetate equivalence/kg dry diet in combination with sodium selenite to give selenium concentrations of either 0.038±0.008 mg (designated s) or 2.49±0.15 mg (designated S)/kg dry diet. No mortality occurred in the group fed the diet, whereas mortality was 3% in the groups fed the and diets, and 31% in the group fed the diet. At the end of the experiment, weight gain and hematocrit values were significantly greater in those fish fed the E diets compared with those fed the e diets, whereas the hepato-somatic index was significantly higher in fish fed the e diets. Glutathione peroxidase activity in blood plasma was significantly higher in fish fed the S diets compared with those fed the s diets. No definite effect of dietary vitamin E and selenium on the prevalence and severity of natural R. salmoninarum infections was demonstrated.

  5. Effect of dietary vitamin E and selenium on growth, survival and the prevalence of Renibacterium salmoninarum infection in chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorarinsson, Ragnar; Landolt, Marsha L.; Elliott, Diane G.; Pascho, Ronald J.; Hardy, Ronald W.

    1994-01-01

    Groups of juvenile spring chinook salmon naturally infected with Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease, were fed diets containing different levels of vitamin E and selenium for 214 days in fresh water and 110 days in seawater. The fish were fed vitamin E at concentrations of either 53±3 mg (designated e) or 299±9 mg (designated E) α-tocopheryl acetate equivalence/kg dry diet in combination with sodium selenite to give selenium concentrations of either 0.038±0.008 mg (designated s) or 2.49±0.15 mg (designated S)/kg dry diet. No mortality occurred in the group fed the SE diet, whereas mortality was 3% in the groups fed the sE and Se diets, and 31% in the group fed the se diet. At the end of the experiment, weight gain and hematocrit values were significantly greater in those fish fed the E diets compared with those fed the e diets, whereas the hepato-somatic index was significantly higher in fish fed the e diets. Glutathione peroxidase activity in blood plasma was significantly higher in fish fed the S diets compared with those fed the sdiets. No definite effect of dietary vitamin E and selenium on the prevalence and severity of natural R. salmoninarum infections was demonstrated.

  6. Differential expression of the virulence-associated protein p57 and characterization of its duplicated gene rosa in virulent and attenuated strains of Renibacterium salmoninarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Farrell, C. L.; Strom, M.S.

    1999-01-01

    Virulence mechanisms utilized by the salmonid fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum are poorly understood. One potential virulence factor is p57 (also designated MSA for major soluble antigen), an abundant 57 kDa soluble protein that is predominately localized on the bacterial cell surface with significant levels released into the extracellular milieu. Previous studies of an attenuated strain, MT 239, indicated that it differs from virulent strains in the amount of surface-associated p57. In this report, we show overall expression of p57 in R. salmoninarum MT 239 is considerably reduced as compared to a virulent strain, ATCC 33209. The amount of cell-associated p57 is decreased while the level of p57 in the culture supernatant is nearly equivalent between the strains. To determine if lowered amount of cell-associated p57 was due to a sequence defect in p57, a genetic comparison was performed. Two copies of the gene encoding p57 (msa1 and msa2) were found in 33209 and MT 239, as well as in several other virulent isolates. Both copies from 33209 and MT 239 were cloned and sequenced and found to be identical to each other, and identical between the 2 strains. A comparison of msa1 and msa2 within each strain showed that their sequences diverge 40 base pairs 5, to the open reading frame, while sequences 3' to the open reading frame are essentially identical for at least 225 base pairs. Northern blot analysis showed no difference in steady state levels of rosa mRNA between the 2 strains. These data suggest that while cell-surface localization of p57 may be important for R. salmoninarum virulence, the differences in localization, and total p57 expression between 33209 anti MT 239 are not due to differences in rosa sequence or differences in steady state transcript levels.

  7. Development of a nested polymerase chain reaction for amplification of a sequence of the p57 gene of Renibacterium salmoninarum that provides a highly sensitive method for detection of the bacterium in salmonid kidney

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chase, D.M.; Pascho, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based assays have shown promise for diagnosing Renibacterium salmoninarum in tissues and body fluids of salmonids. DeVelopment of a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method to detect a 320 bp DNA segment of the gene encoding the p57 protein of R. salmoninarum is described. Whereas a conventional PCR for a 383 bp segment of the p57 gene reliably detected 1000 R. salmoninarum cells per reaction in kidney tissue, the nested PCR detected as few as 10 R. salmoninarum per reaction in kidney tissue. Two DNA extraction methods for the nested PCR were compared and the correlation between replicate samples was generally higher in samples extracted by the QIAamp system compared with those extracted by the phenol/chloroform method. The specificity of the nested PCR was confirmed by testing DNA extracts of common bacterial fish pathogens and a panel of bacterial species reported to cause false-positive reactions in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the fluorescent antibody test (FAT) for R. salmoninarum. Kidney samples from 74 naturally infected chinook Salmon were examined by the nested PCR, the ELISA, and the FAT, and the detected prevalences of R. salmoninarum were 61, 47, and 43%, respectively.

  8. Characterization of susceptibility and carrier status of burbot, Lota lota (L.), to IHNV, IPNV, Flavobacterium psychrophilum, Aeromonas salmonicida and Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Polinski, M P; Fehringer, T R; Johnson, K A; Snekvik, K R; Lapatra, S E; Lafrentz, B R; Ireland, S C; Cain, K D

    2010-07-01

    In this study, susceptibility and potential carrier status of burbot, Lota lota, were assessed for five important fish pathogens. Burbot demonstrated susceptibility and elevated mortality following challenge with infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) by immersion and to Aeromonas salmonicida by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. IHNV persisted in fish for at least 28 days, whereas A. salmonicida was not re-isolated beyond 17 days post-challenge. In contrast, burbot appeared refractory to Flavobacterium psychrophilum following intramuscular (i.m.) injection and to infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) by immersion. However, i.p injection of IPNV resulted in re-isolation of virus from fish for the duration of the 28 day challenge. Renibacterium salmoninarum appeared to induce an asymptomatic carrier state in burbot following i.p. injection, but overt manifestation of disease was not apparent. Viable bacteria persisted in fish for at least 41 days, and bacterial DNA isolated by diagnostic polymerase chain reaction was detected from burbot kidney tissue 90 days after initial exposure. This study is the first to investigate susceptibility of burbot to selected fish pathogens, and this information will aid in efforts to culture and manage this species.

  9. Brood stock segregation of spring chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha by use of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the fluorescent antibody technique (FAT) affects the prevalence and levels of Renibacterium salmoninarum infection in progeny

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascho, Ronald J.; Elliott, Diane G.; Streufert, Jonathan M.

    1991-01-01

    A study of the effect of maternal Renibacterium salmoninarum infection levels on the prevalence and levels of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in progeny fish was conducted at a production salmon hatchery. A total of 302 mating pairs of spring chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha was screened in August 1988 for R. salmoninarum by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). On the basis of ELISA testing of kidney tissues from all fish and the testing of ovarian fluid samples from a subsample of the females by a direct membrane filtration fluorescent antibody technique (MF-FAT), selected egg lots were segregated into 2 groups of 30 egg lots or about 135 000 eggs each. One group contained egg lots from male and female parents that had low R. salmoninarum infection levels or tested negative for R. salmoninarum (low-BKD group), and the other group contained egg lots from female parents with relatively high R. salmoninarum infection levels and male parents with various infection levels (high-BKD group). The progeny groups were maintained in separate rearing units supplied with untreated river water, and were monitored for R. salmoninarum by the ELISA until they were released from the hatchery in April 1990. Total mortality of the juvenile fish was higher (p = 0.0001) in the high-BKD group (20%) than in the low-BKD group (10 %). Mortality in the high-BKD group was highest after the fish were moved from nursery tanks to raceways, and clinical BKD became evident in this group. During the 11 mo of raceway rearing, mortality in the high-BKD group was 17 % compared with 5 % for the low-BKD group. An ELISA analysis of smolts just before release showed an R. salmoninarum infection rate of 85 % in the high-BKD group and 62 % in the low-BKD group. Of the positive fish, 98 % in the low-BKD group and 55 % in the high-BKD group had low infection levels, whereas 36 % in the high-BKD group and only 1 % in the low-BKD group had high infection levels. The results of this research

  10. A single Alal 39-to-Glu substitution in the Renibacterium salmoninarum virulence-associated protein p57 results in antigenic variation and is associated with enhanced p57 binding to Chinook salmon leukocytes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiens, Gregory D.; Pascho, Ron; Winton, James R.

    2002-01-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Renibacterium salmoninarum produces relatively large amounts of a 57-kDa protein (p57) implicated in the pathogenesis of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Antigenic variation in p57 was identified by using monoclonal antibody 4C11, which exhibited severely decreased binding to R. salmoninarum strain 684 p57 and bound robustly to the p57 proteins of seven other R. salmoninarum strains. This difference in binding was not due to alterations in p57 synthesis, secretion, or bacterial cell association. The molecular basis of the 4C11 epitope loss was determined by amplifying and sequencing the two identical genes encoding p57, msa1 and msa2. The 5′ and coding sequences of the 684 msa1 and msa2 genes were identical to those of the ATCC 33209 msa1and msa2 genes except for a single C-to-A nucleotide mutation. This mutation was identified in both the msa1 and msa2 genes of strain 684 and resulted in an Ala139-to-Glu substitution in the amino-terminal region of p57. We examined whether this mutation in p57 altered salmonid leukocyte and rabbit erythrocyte binding activities. R. salmoninarum strain 684 extracellular protein exhibited a twofold increase in agglutinating activity for chinook salmon leukocytes and rabbit erythrocytes compared to the activity of the ATCC 33209 extracellular protein. A specific and quantitative p57 binding assay confirmed the increased binding activity of 684 p57. Monoclonal antibody 4C11 blocked the agglutinating activity of the ATCC 33209 extracellular protein but not the agglutinating activity of the 684 extracellular protein. These results indicate that the Ala139-to-Glu substitution altered immune recognition and was associated with enhanced biological activity of R. salmoninarum 684 p57.

  11. Prevalence and levels of Renibacterium salmoninarum in spring-summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) smolts at dams on the Columbia and Snake Rivers.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, D.G.; Pascho, R.J.; Jackson, L.M.; Mathews, G.M.; Harmon, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated Renibaeterium salmoninarum infection in smolts of hatchery and wild spring-summer Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha sampled during most of the outmigration at Little Goose (1988) and Lower Granite dams (1988–1991) on the Snake River and at Priest Rapids and McNary dams on the Columbia River (1988–1990). We sampled 860–2,178 fish per dam each year. Homogenates of kidney–spleen tissue from all fish were tested for the presence of R. salmoninarum antigens by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and homogenates from 10% of the fish were examined by the fluorescent antibody technique (FAT). Although only 1–11% of fish sampled at a given dam during any l year exhibited lesions characteristic of bacterial kidney disease, 86–100% of the fish tested positive for R. salmoninarum antigen by ELISA, whereas 4–17% of the fish tested positive by the FAT. During most years, a majority (68–87%) of fish testing positive by the ELISA had low R. salmoninarum antigen levels, but in 1989, 53% of positive fish from Lower Granite Dam and 52% from McNary Dam showed medium-to-high antigen levels. For most years, the highest mean antigen levels were measured in fish sampled after 75% of the total out-migrants had passed a given dam. When the largest numbers of fish were being collected for bypass or downriver transportation, mean antigen levels were relatively low.

  12. Distinguished Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marles, Daisy; Ink, Gary

    1999-01-01

    Presents the following lists of distinguished books: "Best Books of 1998"; "Best Young Adult Books"; "Notable Children's Videos"; "Best Children's Books"; "Notable Recordings for Children"; "Notable Software and Web Sites for Children"; "Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult…

  13. Application of isotope coded affinity tag (ICAT) analysis for the identification of differentially expressed proteins following infection of atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) with infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) or Renibacterium salmoninarum (BKD).

    PubMed

    Booy, A T; Haddow, J D; Ohlund, L B; Hardie, D B; Olafson, R W

    2005-01-01

    Aquaculture and commercial fisheries worldwide suffer from significant economic loss due to diseases of net-pen reared fish. In British Columbia, infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) and bacterial kidney disease (BKD) epidemics occur because there are currently no commercially available drugs or fully licensed vaccines to treat these diseases. With a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying these diseases, this circumstance might be significantly improved. In the present study, we have used a proteomics approach in an effort to identify and quantitate differentially expressed proteins in the liver and kidneys of diseased and healthy Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). Isotope coded affinity tagging (ICAT), 2D gel electrophoresis, and multidimensional liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC MS/MS) were used to identify hundreds of differentially expressed proteins. While the direct significance of changes in expression levels of many proteins remains to be elucidated, others appear to be more clearly related to the infectious process. Examples of the latter are discussed here and include, a natural killer cell enhancement factor (NKEF), procathepsin L, superoxide-producing NADPH oxidase and interferon-induced viral resistance protein Mx (IFI-Mx).

  14. Vaccination against salmonid bacterial kidney disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) of salmonid fishes, caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, has presented challenges for development of effective vaccines, despite several decades of research. The only vaccine against BKD that is commercially licensed is an injectable preparation containing live cells ...

  15. Distinguishing Radiculopathies from Mononeuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Robblee, Jennifer; Katzberg, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Identifying “where is the lesion” is particularly important in the approach to the patient with focal dysfunction where a peripheral localization is suspected. This article outlines a methodical approach to the neuromuscular patient in distinguishing focal neuropathies versus radiculopathies, both of which are common presentations to the neurology clinic. This approach begins with evaluation of the sensory examination to determine whether there are irritative or negative sensory signs in a peripheral nerve or dermatomal distribution. This is followed by evaluation of deep tendon reflexes to evaluate if differential hyporeflexia can assist in the two localizations. Finally, identification of weak muscle groups unique to a nerve or myotomal pattern in the proximal and distal extremities can most reliably assist in a precise localization. The article concludes with an application of the described method to the common scenario of distinguishing radial neuropathy versus C7 radiculopathy in the setting of a wrist drop and provides additional examples for self-evaluation and reference. PMID:27468275

  16. Entanglement of distinguishable quantum memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittorini, G.; Hucul, D.; Inlek, I. V.; Crocker, C.; Monroe, C.

    2014-10-01

    Time-resolved photon detection can be used to generate entanglement between distinguishable photons. This technique can be extended to entangle quantum memories that emit photons with different frequencies and identical temporal profiles without the loss of entanglement rate or fidelity. We experimentally realize this process using remotely trapped 171Yb+ ions where heralded entanglement is generated by interfering distinguishable photons. This technique may be necessary for future modular quantum systems and networks that are composed of heterogeneous qubits.

  17. Distinguishing cellulitis from its mimics.

    PubMed

    Keller, Emily C; Tomecki, Kenneth J; Alraies, M Chadi

    2012-08-01

    Distinguishing true cellulitis from its many imitators is challenging but critical if we are to avoid unnecessary use of antibiotics and delays in treatment. Common imitators of cellulitis are stasis dermatitis, lipodermatosclerosis, contact dermatitis, lymphedema, eosinophilic cellulitis, and papular urticaria. Specific criteria do not exist for the diagnosis of cellulitis, but the alert physician can find clues in the history and physical examination that point toward cellulitis.

  18. Partial polarization by quantum distinguishability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, Mayukh; Hochrainer, Armin; Lapkiewicz, Radek; Lemos, Gabriela Barreto; Zeilinger, Anton

    2017-03-01

    We establish that a connection exists between wave-particle duality of photons and partial polarization of a light beam. We perform a two-path lowest-order (single photon) interference experiment and demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that the degree of polarization of the light beam emerging from an output of the interferometer depends on path distinguishability. In our experiment, we are able to change the quantum state of the emerging photon from a pure state to a fully mixed state without any direct interaction with the photon. Although most lowest-order interference experiments can be explained by classical theory, our experiment has no genuine classical analog. Our results show that a case exists where the cause of partial polarization is beyond the scope of classical theory.

  19. Distinguishability of generic quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchała, Zbigniew; Pawela, Łukasz; Życzkowski, Karol

    2016-06-01

    Properties of random mixed states of dimension N distributed uniformly with respect to the Hilbert-Schmidt measure are investigated. We show that for large N , due to the concentration of measure, the trace distance between two random states tends to a fixed number D ˜=1 /4 +1 /π , which yields the Helstrom bound on their distinguishability. To arrive at this result, we apply free random calculus and derive the symmetrized Marchenko-Pastur distribution, which is shown to describe numerical data for the model of coupled quantum kicked tops. Asymptotic value for the root fidelity between two random states, √{F }=3/4 , can serve as a universal reference value for further theoretical and experimental studies. Analogous results for quantum relative entropy and Chernoff quantity provide other bounds on the distinguishablity of both states in a multiple measurement setup due to the quantum Sanov theorem. We study also mean entropy of coherence of random pure and mixed states and entanglement of a generic mixed state of a bipartite system.

  20. Distinguishing cell type using epigenotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wytock, Thomas; Motter, Adilson E.

    Recently, researchers have proposed that unique cell types are attractors of their epigenetic dynamics including gene expression and chromatin conformation patterns. Traditionally, cell types have been classified by their function, morphology, cytochemistry, and other macroscopically observable properties. Because these properties are the result of many proteins working together, it should be possible to predict cell types from gene expression or chromatin conformation profiles. In this talk, I present a maximum entropy approach to identify and distinguish cell type attractors on the basis of correlations within these profiles. I will demonstrate the flexibility of this method through its separate application to gene expression and chromatin conformation datasets. I show that our method out-performs other machine-learning techniques and uncorrelated benchmarks. We adapt our method to predict growth rate from gene expression in E. coli and S. cerevisiae and compare our predictions with those from metabolic models. In addition, our method identifies a nearly convex region of state-space associated with each cell type attractor basin. Estimates of the growth rate and attractor basin make it possible to rationally control gene regulatory networks independent of a model. This research was supported by NSF-GRFP, NSF-GK12, GAANN, and Northwestern's NIH-NIGMS Molecular Biophysics Training Grant.

  1. Direct fluorescent antibody technique for the detection of bacterial kidney disease in paraffin-embedded tissues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ochiai, T.; Yasutake, W.T.; Gould, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    The direct fluorescent antibody technique (FAT) was successfully used to detect the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), Renibacterium salmoninarum, in Bouin's solution flexed and paraffinembedded egg and tissue sections. This method is superior to gram stain and may be particularly useful in detecting the BKD organism in fish with low-grade infection.

  2. Distinguishing quantum operations: LOCC versus separable operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Indrani; Sarkar, Debasis

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we discuss the issue of distinguishing a pair of quantum operation in general. We use Krause theorem for representing the operations in unitary form. This supports the existence of pair of quantum operations that are not locally distinguishable, but distinguishable in asymptotic sense in some higher dimensional system. The process can even be successful without any use of the entangled initial state.

  3. Wootters' distance revisited: a new distinguishability criterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majtey, A.; Lamberti, P. W.; Martin, M. T.; Plastino, A.

    2005-03-01

    The notion of distinguishability between quantum states has shown to be fundamental in the frame of quantum information theory. In this paper we present a new distinguishability criterium by using a information theoretic quantity: the Jensen-Shannon divergence (JSD). This quantity has several interesting properties, both from a conceptual and a formal point of view. Previous to define this distinguishability criterium, we review some of the most frequently used distances defined over quantum mechanics’ Hilbert space. In this point our main claim is that the JSD can be taken as a unifying distance between quantum states.

  4. Expanding the principle of local distinguishability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Claudio; Heinosaari, Teiko; Schultz, Jussi; Toigo, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    The principle of local distinguishability states that an arbitrary physical state of a bipartite system can be determined by the combined statistics of local measurements performed on the subsystems. A necessary and sufficient requirement for the local measurements is that each one must be able to distinguish between all pairs of states of the respective subsystems. We show that, if the task is changed into the determination of an arbitrary bipartite pure state, then at least in certain cases it is possible to restrict to local measurements which can distinguish all pure states but not all states. Moreover, we show that, if the local measurements are such that the purity of the bipartite state can be verified from the statistics without any prior assumption, then in these special cases also this property is carried over to the composite measurement. These surprising facts give evidence that the principle of local distinguishability may be expanded beyond its usual applicability.

  5. Distinguishing Marks of Simply-Connected Universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebouças, M. J.; Dolgov, A.

    A statistical quantity suitable for distinguishing simply-connected Robertson-Walker (RW) universes is introduced, and its explicit expressions for the three possible classes of simply-connected RW universes with an uniform distribution of matter are determined. Graphs of the distinguishing mark for each class of RW universes are presented and analyzed. There sprout from our results an improvement on the procedure to extract the topological signature of multiply-connected RW universes, and a refined understanding of that topological signature of these universes studied in previous works.

  6. Beyond Benford's Law: Distinguishing Noise from Chaos

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qinglei; Fu, Zuntao; Yuan, Naiming

    2015-01-01

    Determinism and randomness are two inherent aspects of all physical processes. Time series from chaotic systems share several features identical with those generated from stochastic processes, which makes them almost undistinguishable. In this paper, a new method based on Benford's law is designed in order to distinguish noise from chaos by only information from the first digit of considered series. By applying this method to discrete data, we confirm that chaotic data indeed can be distinguished from noise data, quantitatively and clearly. PMID:26030809

  7. Can Values Be Distinguished from Prejudices?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhoyte, Robert L.; Sikula, John P.

    1977-01-01

    Using case studies, the authors demonstrate the difficulty of distinguishing an act influenced by a person's prejudice from an act influenced by a person's values. Social studies teachers are urged to deal with controversial topics to help students clarify their feelings about issues such as abortion, drug use, religion, and politics. (AV)

  8. Distinguishing the Spending Preferences of Seniors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmer, Zachary; Chappell, Neena L.

    1996-01-01

    The consumer spending preferences of 1,406 senior Canadians were surveyed. Age distinguished those who had product-specific preferences. Income and health status separated those interested in recreational spending from those more interested in basic needs. Diversity of health and social characteristics in this population extends to their…

  9. Characteristics of Distinguished Programs of Agricultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkenholz, Robert J.; Simonsen, Jon C.

    2011-01-01

    Academic program rankings are highly anticipated by many university administrators, faculty, and alumni. This study analyzed the perceptions of agricultural education departmental contact persons to identify esteemed post-secondary agricultural education programs and the distinguishing characteristics of each program. The ten most distinguished…

  10. The Humanity of English. 1972 Distinguished Lectures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council of Teachers of English, Urbana, IL.

    This is a collection of lectures by distinguished members of the English profession who were invited to lecture to schools located far from large urban and cultural centers. Included are papers by: John H. Fisher, "Truth Versus Beauty: An Inquiry into the Function of Language and Literature in an Articulate Society"; Walter Loban, "The Green…

  11. Career Patterns of Distinguished Male Social Scientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Robert T.; Havighurst, Robert J.

    Seventy-four male eminent social scientists provided career stage data by which adult development theory was tested. All were born between 1893 and 1903 and met the criteria of a distinguished (and for several still active) scholarly career. The subjects were separated into four groups on the basis of their degree of productivity as of age 60.…

  12. Entropy of Mixing of Distinguishable Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozliak, Evguenii I.

    2014-01-01

    The molar entropy of mixing yields values that depend only on the number of mixing components rather than on their chemical nature. To explain this phenomenon using the logic of chemistry, this article considers mixing of distinguishable particles, thus complementing the well-known approach developed for nondistinguishable particles, for example,…

  13. The ambiguity of "distinguishability" in statistical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swendsen, Robert H.

    2015-06-01

    Differences of opinion concerning fundamental issues in statistical mechanics directly related to the thermodynamic entropy have persisted through more than a century of debate. One reason is the lack of consensus on the definitions of key terms, especially the terms "distinguishable," "indistinguishable," and "identical." Several definitions occur in the literature, but are not always made explicit. The multiplicity of definitions has created confusion about the basic conditions under which entropy is to be defined. In this paper, I present an overview of definitions in current use for terms associated with distinguishability and relate them to various definitions that have been suggested for entropy. My hope is that consensus will be achievable if the definitions are clarified and agreed upon.

  14. Distinguishing juvenile homicide from violent juvenile offending.

    PubMed

    DiCataldo, Frank; Everett, Meghan

    2008-04-01

    Juvenile homicide is a social problem that has remained a central focus within juvenile justice research in recent years. The term juvenile murderer describes a legal category, but it is purported to have significant scientific meaning. Research has attempted to conceptualize adolescent murderers as a clinical category that can be reliably distinguished from their nonhomicidal counterparts. This study examined 33 adolescents adjudicated delinquent or awaiting trial for murder and 38 adolescents who committed violent, nonhomicidal offenses to determine whether the two groups differed significantly on family history, early development, delinquency history, mental health, and weapon possession variables. The nonhomicide group proved more problematic on many of these measures. Two key factors did distinguish the homicide group: These adolescents endorsed the greater availability of guns and substance abuse at the time of their commitment offenses. The significance of this finding is discussed, and the implications for risk management and policy are reviewed.

  15. Distinguishing Recent Admixture from Ancestral Population Structure

    PubMed Central

    Slatkin, Montgomery

    2017-01-01

    We develop and test two methods for distinguishing between recent admixture and ancestral population structure as explanations for greater similarity of one of two populations to an outgroup population. This problem arose when Neanderthals were found to be slightly more similar to nonAfrican than to African populations. The excess similarity is consistent with both recent admixture from Neanderthals into the ancestors of nonAfricans and subdivision in the ancestral population. Although later studies showed that there had been recent admixture, distinguishing between these two classes of models will be important in other situations, particularly when high-coverage genomes cannot be obtained for all populations. One of our two methods is based on the properties of the doubly conditioned frequency spectrum combined with the unconditional frequency spectrum. This method does not require a linkage map and can be used when there is relatively low coverage. The second method uses the extent of linkage disequilibrium among closely linked markers. PMID:28186554

  16. Distinguishing Provenance Equivalence of Earth Science Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilmes, Curt; Yesha, Ye; Halem, M.

    2010-01-01

    Reproducibility of scientific research relies on accurate and precise citation of data and the provenance of that data. Earth science data are often the result of applying complex data transformation and analysis workflows to vast quantities of data. Provenance information of data processing is used for a variety of purposes, including understanding the process and auditing as well as reproducibility. Certain provenance information is essential for producing scientifically equivalent data. Capturing and representing that provenance information and assigning identifiers suitable for precisely distinguishing data granules and datasets is needed for accurate comparisons. This paper discusses scientific equivalence and essential provenance for scientific reproducibility. We use the example of an operational earth science data processing system to illustrate the application of the technique of cascading digital signatures or hash chains to precisely identify sets of granules and as provenance equivalence identifiers to distinguish data made in an an equivalent manner.

  17. Kinetically Distinguishable Populations of Phytochrome 1

    PubMed Central

    Purves, William K.; Briggs, Winslow R.

    1968-01-01

    Two or more kinetically distinguishable populations of phytochrome molecules were observed in living tissues of oat, pea, maize, and cauliflower, as well as in extracts of oat. At least 3 different populations occurred in cauliflower florets, while 2 were observed in each of the other species. In extracted oat phytochrome, the relative proportions of the 2 forms remained constant during successive stages of purification. The physiological significance of this multiplicity of forms remains unclear. PMID:16656909

  18. Familial identification: population structure and relationship distinguishability.

    PubMed

    Rohlfs, Rori V; Fullerton, Stephanie Malia; Weir, Bruce S

    2012-02-01

    With the expansion of offender/arrestee DNA profile databases, genetic forensic identification has become commonplace in the United States criminal justice system. Implementation of familial searching has been proposed to extend forensic identification to family members of individuals with profiles in offender/arrestee DNA databases. In familial searching, a partial genetic profile match between a database entrant and a crime scene sample is used to implicate genetic relatives of the database entrant as potential sources of the crime scene sample. In addition to concerns regarding civil liberties, familial searching poses unanswered statistical questions. In this study, we define confidence intervals on estimated likelihood ratios for familial identification. Using these confidence intervals, we consider familial searching in a structured population. We show that relatives and unrelated individuals from population samples with lower gene diversity over the loci considered are less distinguishable. We also consider cases where the most appropriate population sample for individuals considered is unknown. We find that as a less appropriate population sample, and thus allele frequency distribution, is assumed, relatives and unrelated individuals become more difficult to distinguish. In addition, we show that relationship distinguishability increases with the number of markers considered, but decreases for more distant genetic familial relationships. All of these results indicate that caution is warranted in the application of familial searching in structured populations, such as in the United States.

  19. Familial Identification: Population Structure and Relationship Distinguishability

    PubMed Central

    Rohlfs, Rori V.; Fullerton, Stephanie Malia; Weir, Bruce S.

    2012-01-01

    With the expansion of offender/arrestee DNA profile databases, genetic forensic identification has become commonplace in the United States criminal justice system. Implementation of familial searching has been proposed to extend forensic identification to family members of individuals with profiles in offender/arrestee DNA databases. In familial searching, a partial genetic profile match between a database entrant and a crime scene sample is used to implicate genetic relatives of the database entrant as potential sources of the crime scene sample. In addition to concerns regarding civil liberties, familial searching poses unanswered statistical questions. In this study, we define confidence intervals on estimated likelihood ratios for familial identification. Using these confidence intervals, we consider familial searching in a structured population. We show that relatives and unrelated individuals from population samples with lower gene diversity over the loci considered are less distinguishable. We also consider cases where the most appropriate population sample for individuals considered is unknown. We find that as a less appropriate population sample, and thus allele frequency distribution, is assumed, relatives and unrelated individuals become more difficult to distinguish. In addition, we show that relationship distinguishability increases with the number of markers considered, but decreases for more distant genetic familial relationships. All of these results indicate that caution is warranted in the application of familial searching in structured populations, such as in the United States. PMID:22346758

  20. Quantum correlations and distinguishability of quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spehner, Dominique

    2014-07-01

    A survey of various concepts in quantum information is given, with a main emphasis on the distinguishability of quantum states and quantum correlations. Covered topics include generalized and least square measurements, state discrimination, quantum relative entropies, the Bures distance on the set of quantum states, the quantum Fisher information, the quantum Chernoff bound, bipartite entanglement, the quantum discord, and geometrical measures of quantum correlations. The article is intended both for physicists interested not only by collections of results but also by the mathematical methods justifying them, and for mathematicians looking for an up-to-date introductory course on these subjects, which are mainly developed in the physics literature.

  1. Neuroendocrine factors distinguish juvenile psychopathy variants.

    PubMed

    Kimonis, Eva R; Goulter, Natalie; Hawes, David J; Wilbur, Rhonda R; Groer, Maureen W

    2017-03-01

    The characteristic pattern of emotional hypo-reactivity observed in primary psychopathy is not evident in secondary psychopathy, which is thought to originate from childhood adversity and co-occurring anxiety. The main aim of this study was to test whether salivary afternoon cortisol, Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and cortisol-to-DHEA concentrations, which at high levels indicate risk for chronic stress and poor mental health, distinguished secondary from primary variants of callous-unemotional (CU) traits-the affective component of psychopathy. This aim was achieved by first identifying psychopathy variants using latent profile analysis of CU, anxiety, and aggression scores among 232 incarcerated adolescent boys (M age = 16.75). Based on a subset with neuroendocrine data (n = 201), aggressive secondary CU variants had lower afternoon DHEA concentrations and higher cortisol-to-DHEA ratios and comorbid psychopathology compared with all other groups. In contrast, two primary CU variants (aggressive and non-aggressive types) emerged with profiles characterized by low to average psychopathology and high DHEA levels. Findings contribute to a growing literature base suggesting that biomarkers may distinguish youth on separable developmental pathways to psychopathy.

  2. Distinguishing causal interactions in neural populations.

    PubMed

    Seth, Anil K; Edelman, Gerald M

    2007-04-01

    We describe a theoretical network analysis that can distinguish statistically causal interactions in population neural activity leading to a specific output. We introduce the concept of a causal core to refer to the set of neuronal interactions that are causally significant for the output, as assessed by Granger causality. Because our approach requires extensive knowledge of neuronal connectivity and dynamics, an illustrative example is provided by analysis of Darwin X, a brain-based device that allows precise recording of the activity of neuronal units during behavior. In Darwin X, a simulated neuronal model of the hippocampus and surrounding cortical areas supports learning of a spatial navigation task in a real environment. Analysis of Darwin X reveals that large repertoires of neuronal interactions contain comparatively small causal cores and that these causal cores become smaller during learning, a finding that may reflect the selection of specific causal pathways from diverse neuronal repertoires.

  3. Restricted connections among distinguished players support cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perc, Matjaž; Szolnoki, Attila; Szabó, György

    2008-12-01

    We study the evolution of cooperation within the spatial prisoner’s dilemma game on a square lattice where a fraction of players μ can spread their strategy more easily than the rest due to a predetermined larger teaching capability. In addition, players characterized by the larger teaching capability are allowed to temporarily link with distant opponents of the same kind with probability p , thus introducing shortcut connections among the distinguished players. We show that these additional temporary connections are able to sustain cooperation throughout the whole range of the temptation to defect. Remarkably, we observe that, as the temptation to defect increases the optimal μ decreases, and moreover only minute values of p warrant the best promotion of cooperation. Our study thus indicates that influential individuals must be few and sparsely connected in order for cooperation to thrive in a defection-prone environment.

  4. Distinguishing Feedback Mechanisms in Clock Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, Alexander; Lubensky, David

    Biological oscillators are very diverse but can be classified based on dynamical motifs such as type of feedback. The S. Elongatus circadian oscillator is a novel circadian oscillator that can operate at constant protein number by modifying covalent states. It can be reproduced in vitro with only 3 different purified proteins: KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC. We use computational and analytic techniques to compare models of the S. Elongatus post-translational oscillator that rely on positive feedback with models that rely on negative feedback. We show that introducing a protein that binds competitively with KaiA to the KaiB-KaiC complex can distinguish between positive and negative feedback as the primary driver of the rhythm, which has so far been difficult to address experimentally. NSF Grant DMR-1056456.

  5. Restricted connections among distinguished players support cooperation.

    PubMed

    Perc, Matjaz; Szolnoki, Attila; Szabó, György

    2008-12-01

    We study the evolution of cooperation within the spatial prisoner's dilemma game on a square lattice where a fraction of players mu can spread their strategy more easily than the rest due to a predetermined larger teaching capability. In addition, players characterized by the larger teaching capability are allowed to temporarily link with distant opponents of the same kind with probability p , thus introducing shortcut connections among the distinguished players. We show that these additional temporary connections are able to sustain cooperation throughout the whole range of the temptation to defect. Remarkably, we observe that, as the temptation to defect increases the optimal mu decreases, and moreover only minute values of p warrant the best promotion of cooperation. Our study thus indicates that influential individuals must be few and sparsely connected in order for cooperation to thrive in a defection-prone environment.

  6. Internal displacement in Colombia: Fifteen distinguishing features.

    PubMed

    Shultz, James M; Ceballos, Ángela Milena Gómez; Espinel, Zelde; Oliveros, Sofia Rios; Fonseca, Maria Fernanda; Florez, Luis Jorge Hernandez

    2014-01-01

    This commentary aims to delineate the distinguishing features of conflict-induced internal displacement in the nation of Colombia, South America. Even as Colombia is currently implementing a spectrum of legal, social, economic, and health programs for "victims of armed conflict," with particular focus on internally displaced persons (IDPs), the dynamics of forced migration on a mass scale within this country are little known beyond national borders.   The authors of this commentary are embarking on a global mental health research program in Bogota, Colombia to define best practices for reaching the displaced population and implementing sustainable, evidence-based screening and intervention for common mental disorders. Presenting the defining characteristics of internal displacement in Colombia provides the context for our work and, more importantly, conveys the compelling and complex nature of this humanitarian crisis. We attempt to demonstrate Colombia's unique position within the global patterning of internal displacement.

  7. Distinguishing treatment from research: a functional approach

    PubMed Central

    Lewens, T

    2006-01-01

    The best way to distinguish treatment from research is by their functions. This mode of distinction fits well with the basic ethical work that needs to be carried out. The distinction needs to serve as an ethical flag, highlighting areas in which the goals of doctors and patients are more likely than usual to diverge. The distinction also allows us to illuminate and understand some otherwise puzzling elements of debates on research ethics: it shows the peculiarity of exclusive conceptions of the distinction between research and treatment; it allows us to frame questions about therapeutic obligations in the research context, and it allows us to consider whether there may be research obligations in the therapeutic context. PMID:16816045

  8. Do open clusters have distinguishable chemical signatures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Soubiran, C.; Heiter, U.

    2014-07-01

    Past studies have already shown that stars in open clusters are chemically homogeneous (e.g. De Silva et al. 2006, 2007 and 2009). These results support the idea that stars born from the same giant molecular cloud should have the same chemical composition. In this context, the chemical tagging technique was proposed by Freeman et al. (2002). The principle is to recover disrupted stellar clusters by looking only to the stellar chemical composition. In order to evaluate the feasibility of this approach, it is necessary to test if we can distinguish between stars born from different molecular clouds. For this purpose, we studied the chemical composition of stars in 32 old and intermediate-age open clusters, and we applied machine learning algorithms to recover the original cluster by only considering the chemical signatures.

  9. 10 CFR 1002.22 - Use of distinguishing flag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of distinguishing flag. 1002.22 Section 1002.22 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) OFFICIAL SEAL AND DISTINGUISHING FLAG Distinguishing Flag § 1002.22... Department auditoriums, official presentation rooms, hearing rooms, lobbies, public document rooms, and...

  10. LDRD 149045 final report distinguishing documents.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Scott A.

    2010-09-01

    This LDRD 149045 final report describes work that Sandians Scott A. Mitchell, Randall Laviolette, Shawn Martin, Warren Davis, Cindy Philips and Danny Dunlavy performed in 2010. Prof. Afra Zomorodian provided insight. This was a small late-start LDRD. Several other ongoing efforts were leveraged, including the Networks Grand Challenge LDRD, and the Computational Topology CSRF project, and the some of the leveraged work is described here. We proposed a sentence mining technique that exploited both the distribution and the order of parts-of-speech (POS) in sentences in English language documents. The ultimate goal was to be able to discover 'call-to-action' framing documents hidden within a corpus of mostly expository documents, even if the documents were all on the same topic and used the same vocabulary. Using POS was novel. We also took a novel approach to analyzing POS. We used the hypothesis that English follows a dynamical system and the POS are trajectories from one state to another. We analyzed the sequences of POS using support vector machines and the cycles of POS using computational homology. We discovered that the POS were a very weak signal and did not support our hypothesis well. Our original goal appeared to be unobtainable with our original approach. We turned our attention to study an aspect of a more traditional approach to distinguishing documents. Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) turns documents into bags-of-words then into mixture-model points. A distance function is used to cluster groups of points to discover relatedness between documents. We performed a geometric and algebraic analysis of the most popular distance functions and made some significant and surprising discoveries, described in a separate technical report.

  11. 28 CFR 301.318 - Civilian compensation laws distinguished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Civilian compensation laws distinguished... INMATE ACCIDENT COMPENSATION Compensation for Work-Related Physical Impairment or Death § 301.318 Civilian compensation laws distinguished. The Inmate Accident Compensation system is not obligated...

  12. 28 CFR 301.318 - Civilian compensation laws distinguished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Civilian compensation laws distinguished... INMATE ACCIDENT COMPENSATION Compensation for Work-Related Physical Impairment or Death § 301.318 Civilian compensation laws distinguished. The Inmate Accident Compensation system is not obligated...

  13. Distinguishing between Knowledge and Beliefs: Students' Epistemic Criteria for Differentiating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boldrin, Angela; Mason, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    "I believe that he/she is telling the truth", "I know about the solar system": what epistemic criteria do students use to distinguish between knowledge and beliefs? If knowing and believing are conceptually distinguishable, do students of different grade levels use the same criteria to differentiate the two constructs? How do students understand…

  14. Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Charles L. Brewer Distinguished Teaching of Psychology Award recognizes an outstanding career contribution to the teaching of psychology. The 2009 recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award is William Buskist. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Teaching Award at the 117th…

  15. 29 CFR 779.328 - Retail and wholesale distinguished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Retail and wholesale distinguished. 779.328 Section 779.328... AS APPLIED TO RETAILERS OF GOODS OR SERVICES Exemptions for Certain Retail or Service Establishments ârecognizedâ As Retail âin the Particular Industryâ § 779.328 Retail and wholesale distinguished. (a)...

  16. 32 CFR 22.215 - Distinguishing grants and cooperative agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Appropriate Instrument § 22.215 Distinguishing grants and cooperative agreements. (a) Once a grants officer... appropriate instrument, the grants officer shall distinguish between the two instruments as follows: (1... solely to obtain the stricter controls typical of a contract. (b) In judging whether...

  17. 32 CFR 22.215 - Distinguishing grants and cooperative agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Appropriate Instrument § 22.215 Distinguishing grants and cooperative agreements. (a) Once a grants officer... appropriate instrument, the grants officer shall distinguish between the two instruments as follows: (1... solely to obtain the stricter controls typical of a contract. (b) In judging whether...

  18. 28 CFR 301.318 - Civilian compensation laws distinguished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civilian compensation laws distinguished... Civilian compensation laws distinguished. The Inmate Accident Compensation system is not obligated to... under civilian workmen's compensation laws in that hospitalization is usually completed prior to...

  19. Distinguishability of Biological Material Using Ultraviolet Multi-Spectral Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.C.; Heinen, R.J.; Rigdon, L.D.; Rosenthal, S.E.; Shokair, I.R.; Siragusa, G.R.; Tisone, G.C.; Wagner, J.S.

    1998-10-14

    Recent interest in the detection and analysis of biological samples by spectroscopic methods has led to questions concerning the degree of distinguishability and biological variability of the ultraviolet (W) fluorescent spectra from such complex samples. We show that the degree of distinguishability of such spectra is readily determined numerically.

  20. Astronaut Alan Shepard receives MASA Distinguished Service award

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Astronaut Alan B. Shepard recieves the NASA Distinguished Service Award from President John F. Kennedy in May 1961, days after his history making MR-3 flight (31387); Alan Shepard and his wife wave to the crowd after Shepard received the NASA Distinguished Service Award from President John F. Kennedy (31388).

  1. Options to Distinguish Heroin and Poppy Seed Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-28

    drug deterrence program were raised from 300 ng/ml to 4000 ng/ml for morphine and 2000 ng/ml for codeine in an attempt to distinguish between poppy seed ...Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5000 NRL Memorandum Report 6512 Options to Distinguish Heroin and Poppy Seed Use r- I- FCTE DAVID...Options to Distinguish Heroin and Poppy Seed Use 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Kidwell. D.A. 13a TYPE OF REPORT 113b TIME COVERED 14 DATE OF REPORT (Year

  2. Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article announces the 2007 recipient of the Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology: Baron Perlman. A brief biography, highlighting areas of special focus in Perlman's work, is provided.

  3. The Gibbs paradox and the distinguishability of identical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versteegh, Marijn A. M.; Dieks, Dennis

    2011-07-01

    Identical classical particles are distinguishable. This distinguishability affects the number of ways W a macrostate can be realized on the microlevel, and from the relation S =k ln W leads to a nonextensive expression for the entropy. This result is usually considered incorrect because of its inconsistency with thermodynamics. It is sometimes concluded from this inconsistency that identical particles are fundamentally indistinguishable and that quantum mechanics is indispensable for making sense of this inconsistency. In contrast, we argue that the classical statistics of distinguishable particles and the resulting nonextensive entropy function are perfectly acceptable from both a theoretical and an experimental perspective. The inconsistency with thermodynamics can be removed by taking into account that the entropy concept in statistical mechanics is not completely identical to the thermodynamical one. We observe that even identical quantum particles are in some cases distinguishable, and conclude that quantum mechanics is irrelevant to the Gibbs paradox.

  4. Development of children's ability to distinguish sarcasm and verbal irony.

    PubMed

    Glenwright, Melanie; Pexman, Penny M

    2010-03-01

    Adults distinguish between ironic remarks directed at targets (sarcasm) and ironic remarks not directed at specific targets. We investigated the development of children's appreciation for this distinction by presenting these speech acts to 71 five- to six-year-olds and 71 nine- to ten-year-olds. Five- to six-year-olds were beginning to understand the non-literal meanings of sarcastic speakers and ironic speakers but did not distinguish ironic and sarcastic speakers' intentions. Nine- to ten-year-olds were more accurate at understanding sarcastic and ironic speakers and they distinguished these speakers' intentions, rating sarcastic criticisms as more 'mean' than ironic criticisms. These results show that children can determine the non-literal meanings of sarcasm and irony by six years of age but do not distinguish the pragmatic purposes of these speech acts until later in middle childhood.

  5. Blood Test Might Someday Distinguish Early Depression, Schizophrenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... 164087.html Blood Test Might Someday Distinguish Early Depression, Schizophrenia A screen is still in development stages ... difficult for doctors to tell the difference between depression and schizophrenia, especially early on. Now, researchers say ...

  6. Selective AR Modulators that Distinguish Proliferative from Differentiative Gene Promoters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0292 TITLE: Selective AR Modulators that Distinguish Proliferative from Differentiative Gene Promoters PRINCIPAL...30 Jul 2014 - 29 Jul 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Selective AR Modulators that Distinguish Proliferative from Differentiative Gene Promoters 5a...differ in androgen response elements (AREs), with genes driving proliferation relying on consensus inverted repeats (cARE) and genes promoting

  7. Carol A. Barnes: Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    The APA Awards for Distinguished Scientific Contributions are presented to persons who, in the opinion of the Committee on Scientific Awards, have made distinguished theoretical or empirical contributions to basic research in psychology. One of the 2014 award winners is Carol A. Barnes, who received this award for her "groundbreaking work on the neurobiological mechanisms underlying memory changes in normal aging." Barnes' award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here.

  8. Entanglement as a resource to distinguish orthogonal product states

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Gao, Fei; Cao, Tian-Qing; Qin, Su-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2016-01-01

    It is known that there are many sets of orthogonal product states which cannot be distinguished perfectly by local operations and classical communication (LOCC). However, these discussions have left the following open question: What entanglement resources are necessary and/or sufficient for this task to be possible with LOCC? In m ⊗ n, certain classes of unextendible product bases (UPB) which can be distinguished perfectly using entanglement as a resource, had been presented in 2008. In this paper, we present protocols which use entanglement more efficiently than teleportation to distinguish some classes of orthogonal product states in m ⊗ n, which are not UPB. For the open question, our results offer rather general insight into why entanglement is useful for such tasks, and present a better understanding of the relationship between entanglement and nonlocality. PMID:27458034

  9. Entanglement as a resource to distinguish orthogonal product states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Gao, Fei; Cao, Tian-Qing; Qin, Su-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2016-07-01

    It is known that there are many sets of orthogonal product states which cannot be distinguished perfectly by local operations and classical communication (LOCC). However, these discussions have left the following open question: What entanglement resources are necessary and/or sufficient for this task to be possible with LOCC? In m ⊗ n, certain classes of unextendible product bases (UPB) which can be distinguished perfectly using entanglement as a resource, had been presented in 2008. In this paper, we present protocols which use entanglement more efficiently than teleportation to distinguish some classes of orthogonal product states in m ⊗ n, which are not UPB. For the open question, our results offer rather general insight into why entanglement is useful for such tasks, and present a better understanding of the relationship between entanglement and nonlocality.

  10. Genetic effects of ELISA-based segregation for control of bacterial kidney disease in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hard, J.J.; Elliott, D.G.; Pascho, R.J.; Chase, D.M.; Park, L.K.; Winton, J.R.; Campton, D.E.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated genetic variation in ability of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) to resist two bacterial pathogens: Renibacterium salmoninarum, the agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), and Listonella anguillarum, an agent of vibriosis. After measuring R. salmoninarum antigen in 499 adults by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we mated each of 12 males with high or low antigen levels to two females with low to moderate levels and exposed subsets of their progeny to each pathogen separately. We found no correlation between R. salmoninarum antigen level in parents and survival of their progeny following pathogen exposure. We estimated high heritability for resistance to R. salmoninarum (survival h2 = 0.890 ?? 0.256 (mean ?? standard error)) independent of parental antigen level, but low heritability for resistance to L. anguillarum (h2 = 0.128 ?? 0.078). The genetic correlation between these survivals (rA = -0.204 ?? 0.309) was near zero. The genetic and phenotypic correlations between survival and antigen levels among surviving progeny exposed to R. salmoninarum were both negative (rA = -0.716 ?? 0.140; rP = -0.378 ?? 0.041), indicating that variation in antigen level is linked to survival. These results suggest that selective culling of female broodstock with high antigen titers, which is effective in controlling BKD in salmon hatcheries, will not affect resistance of their progeny. ?? 2006 NRC.

  11. Distinguishing succulent plants from crop and woody plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Escobar, D. E.; Everitt, J. H.; Richardson, A. J.; Rodriguez, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    We compared laboratory spectrophotometrically measured leaf reflectances of six succulents (peperomia, possum-grape, prickly pear, spiderwort, Texas tuberose, wolfberry) with those of four nonsucculents (cenizo, honey mesquite, cotton, sugarcane) for plant species discrimination. Succulents (average leaf water content of 92.2 percent) could be distinguished from nonsucculents (average leaf water content of 71.2 percent) within the near-infrared water absorption waveband (1.35 to 2.5 microns). This was substantiated by field spectrophotometric reflectances of plant canopies. Sensor bands encompassing either the 1.6- or 2.2-wavelengths may be useful to distinguish succulent from nonsucculent plant species.

  12. Accurate thermochemistry from explicitly correlated distinguishable cluster approximation.

    PubMed

    Kats, Daniel; Kreplin, David; Werner, Hans-Joachim; Manby, Frederick R

    2015-02-14

    An explicitly correlated version of the distinguishable-cluster approximation is presented and extensively benchmarked. It is shown that the usual F12-type explicitly correlated approaches are applicable to distinguishable-cluster theory with single and double excitations, and the results show a significant improvement compared to coupled-cluster theory with singles and doubles for closed and open-shell systems. The resulting method can be applied in a black-box manner to systems with single- and multireference character. Most noticeably, optimized geometries are of coupled-cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples quality or even better.

  13. The distinguishable cluster approach from a screened Coulomb formalism.

    PubMed

    Kats, Daniel

    2016-01-28

    The distinguishable cluster doubles equations have been derived starting from an effective screened Coulomb formalism and a particle-hole symmetric formulation of the Fock matrix. A perturbative triples correction to the distinguishable cluster with singles and doubles (DCSD) has been introduced employing the screened integrals. It is shown that the resulting DCSD(T) method is more accurate than DCSD for reaction energies and is less sensitive to the static correlation than coupled cluster with singles and doubles with a perturbative triples correction.

  14. Kelly D. Brownell: Award for Distinguished Scientific Applications of Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of Kelly D. Brownwell, winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Applications of Psychology (2012). He won the award for outstanding contributions to our understanding of the etiology and management of obesity and the crisis it poses for the modern world. A seminal thinker in…

  15. Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions: Steven F. Maier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Steven F. Maier, winner of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions, is cited for his work in the fields of learned helplessness; cytokines, depressed mood, and cognitive interference; and the brain structures that produce and counteract learned helplessness. In addition to the citation, a biography and selected bibliography of Maier's…

  16. Distinguishing Schemes and Tasks in Children's Development of Multiplicative Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tzur, Ron; Johnson, Heather L.; McClintock, Evan; Kenney, Rachael H.; Xin, Yan P.; Si, Luo; Woordward, Jerry; Hord, Casey; Jin, Xianyan

    2013-01-01

    We present a synthesis of findings from constructivist teaching experiments regarding six schemes children construct for reasoning multiplicatively and tasks to promote them. We provide a task-generating platform game, depictions of each scheme, and supporting tasks. Tasks must be distinguished from children's thinking, and learning situations…

  17. Bifunctional mesoporous silicas with clearly distinguished localization of grafted groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roik, N. V.; Belyakova, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    Bifunctional mesoporous silicas with clearly distinguished localization of grafted groups on the surface of particles and inside their pores were obtained by means of sol-gel synthesis with postsynthetic vapor-phase treatment in vacuum. It was found that the synthesized materials have the hexagonally ordered porous structure typical of MCM-41 type silica.

  18. Michael J. Meaney: Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents Michael J. Meaney as one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions (2012). Michael J. Meaney has taken the phenomenon of "handling" of newborn rats and opened a new area of investigation that has given new meaning to epigenetics via his work demonstrating transgenerational…

  19. The Hues of English. NCTE Distinguished Lectures 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council of Teachers of English, Champaign, IL.

    The third volume in the NCTE Distinguished Lectures Series, this collection of papers includes (1) William Stafford on poetry and the language of everyday life, (2) Fred Stocking linking Shakespeare to his time and all time by analysing "temperance" in Sonnet 18, (3) Alan Downer discussing the nature of comedy in drama and the universal…

  20. Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions: Susan E. Carey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Susan E. Carey, winner of the 2009 Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions, is cited for groundbreaking studies of the nature of concepts and conceptual change. Her research deepens understanding of the development of concepts, and of the belief systems in which they are embedded, over human childhood, over the history of science, and…

  1. Distinguishing between Dirac and Majorana neutrinos withtwo-particle interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, Thomas D.

    2006-03-02

    Two-particle interferometry, a second-order interferenceeffect, is explored as another possible tool to distinguish betweenmassive Dirac and Majorana neutrinos. A simple theoretical framework isdiscussed in the context of several gedanken experiments. The method canin principle provide both the mass scale and the quantum nature of theneutrino for a certain class of incoherent left-handed sourcecurrents.

  2. A Tribute to My Ag Teacher: 2011 AAAE Distinguished Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrick, R. Kirby

    2012-01-01

    The author is a product of school-based agricultural education. In a way, this distinguished lecture could also be called a tribute to his high school ag teacher, John Stimpert. Mr. Stimpert was a true professional and an excellent teacher. He changed and he changed the program with the changing school and community. The more the author became…

  3. 32 CFR 22.205 - Distinguishing assistance from procurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Instrument § 22.205 Distinguishing assistance from procurement. Before using a grant or cooperative agreement... instrument, in accordance with 31 U.S.C. chapter 63 (“Using Procurement Contracts and Grant and Cooperative... research and development, the appropriate use of grants and cooperative agreements therefore is...

  4. 32 CFR 22.205 - Distinguishing assistance from procurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Instrument § 22.205 Distinguishing assistance from procurement. Before using a grant or cooperative agreement... instrument, in accordance with 31 U.S.C. chapter 63 (“Using Procurement Contracts and Grant and Cooperative... research and development, the appropriate use of grants and cooperative agreements therefore is...

  5. Edward F. Diener: Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions.

    PubMed

    2012-11-01

    Presents Edward F. Diener as one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions (2012). Edward F. Diener has been a leader in every aspect of well-being research. He provided an influential conception of well-being as consisting of cognitive and emotional elements. A citation, biography, and selected bibliography are presented here.

  6. Distinguishing between Poor/Dysfunctional Parenting and Child Emotional Maltreatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, David A.; McIsaac, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This paper was intended to distinguish between poor parenting and child emotional maltreatment (CEM), to inform child welfare and public health policymakers of the need for differentiated responses. Methods: Scientific literature was integrated with current practice and assumptions relating to poor/dysfunctional parenting and child…

  7. Award for Distinguished Scientific Applications of Psychology: Nancy E. Adler

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Nancy E. Adler, winner of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Applications of Psychology, is cited for her research on reproductive health examining adolescent decision making with regard to contraception, conscious and preconscious motivations for pregnancy, and perception of risk for sexually transmitted diseases, and for her groundbreaking…

  8. Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions: Alice H. Eagly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Alice H. Eagly, winner of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions, is cited for her work in the field of social psychology, the psychology of gender, and the use of meta-analytic techniques. She envisions a psychology that extends from individual cognitions to societal structures. In addition to the citation, a biography and selected…

  9. A Conceptual and Psychometric Framework for Distinguishing Categories and Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Boeck, Paul; Wilson, Mark; Acton, G. Scott

    2005-01-01

    An important, sometimes controversial feature of all psychological phenomena is whether they are categorical or dimensional. A conceptual and psychometric framework is described for distinguishing whether the latent structure behind manifest categories (e.g., psychiatric diagnoses, attitude groups, or stages of development) is category-like or…

  10. Daniel L. Schacter: Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents Daniel L. Schacter as one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions (2012). Daniel L. Schacter's major theoretical and empirical contributions include groundbreaking research on the psychological and neural foundations of implicit and explicit memory, memory distortions and…

  11. Development of Children's Ability to Distinguish Sarcasm and Verbal Irony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenwright, Melanie; Pexman, Penny M.

    2010-01-01

    Adults distinguish between ironic remarks directed at targets (sarcasm) and ironic remarks not directed at specific targets. We investigated the development of children's appreciation for this distinction by presenting these speech acts to 71 five- to six-year-olds and 71 nine- to ten-year-olds. Five- to six-year-olds were beginning to understand…

  12. Distinguishing between Realistic and Fantastical Figures in Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davoodi, Telli; Corriveau, Kathleen H.; Harris, Paul L.

    2016-01-01

    Children in the United States come to distinguish historical from fictional story figures between the ages of 3 and 5 years, guided by the plausibility of the story events surrounding the figure (Corriveau, Kim, Schwalen, & Harris, 2009; Woolley & Cox, 2007). However, U.S. children vary in their reactions to stories that include…

  13. Distinguishing Grammatical Constructions with fMRI Pattern Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Kachina; Pereira, Francisco; Botvinick, Matthew; Goldberg, Adele E.

    2012-01-01

    All linguistic and psycholinguistic theories aim to provide psychologically valid analyses of particular grammatical patterns and the relationships that hold among them. Until recently, no tools were available to distinguish neural correlates of particular grammatical constructions that shared the same content words, propositional meaning, and…

  14. 5 CFR 838.612 - Distinguishing between annuities and contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Distinguishing between annuities and contributions. 838.612 Section 838.612 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) COURT ORDERS AFFECTING RETIREMENT BENEFITS Terminology Used in...

  15. Edward F. Diener: Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents Edward F. Diener as one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions (2012). Edward F. Diener has been a leader in every aspect of well-being research. He provided an influential conception of well-being as consisting of cognitive and emotional elements. A citation, biography,…

  16. Recent Detrimental and Distinguished Books about Hispanic People and Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schon, Isabel

    1981-01-01

    The article discusses nine detrimental and six distinguished books about Hispanic people and cultures, published since 1979 for young readers. It is suggested that many recent books that depict Hispanic people and cultures repeat the same stereotypes, misconceptions and insensibilities that were prevalent in books published in the 1960s and early…

  17. The Identification of Conductor-Distinguished Functions of Conducting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gumm, Alan J.; Battersby, Sharyn L.; Simon, Kathryn L.; Shankles, Andrew E.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify whether conductors distinguish functions of conducting similarly to functions implied in previous research. A sample of 84 conductors with a full range of experience levels (M = 9.8) and of a full range of large ensemble types and ensemble age levels rated how much they pay attention to 82…

  18. A history of the Distinguished Service Foundation of Optometry.

    PubMed

    Goss, David A

    2015-01-01

    The Distinguished Service Foundation of Optometry was an organization which sought to encourage research and education to facilitate the conservation of vision through publications and the awarding of medals. It existed from 1927 to 1979, but was most active in the 1930s and 1940s. Its leaders and activities are discussed.

  19. On the distinguishability of HRF models in fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Paulo N.; Figueiredo, Patricia; Silvestre, Carlos J.

    2015-01-01

    Modeling the Hemodynamic Response Function (HRF) is a critical step in fMRI studies of brain activity, and it is often desirable to estimate HRF parameters with physiological interpretability. A biophysically informed model of the HRF can be described by a non-linear time-invariant dynamic system. However, the identification of this dynamic system may leave much uncertainty on the exact values of the parameters. Moreover, the high noise levels in the data may hinder the model estimation task. In this context, the estimation of the HRF may be seen as a problem of model falsification or invalidation, where we are interested in distinguishing among a set of eligible models of dynamic systems. Here, we propose a systematic tool to determine the distinguishability among a set of physiologically plausible HRF models. The concept of absolutely input-distinguishable systems is introduced and applied to a biophysically informed HRF model, by exploiting the structure of the underlying non-linear dynamic system. A strategy to model uncertainty in the input time-delay and magnitude is developed and its impact on the distinguishability of two physiologically plausible HRF models is assessed, in terms of the maximum noise amplitude above which it is not possible to guarantee the falsification of one model in relation to another. Finally, a methodology is proposed for the choice of the input sequence, or experimental paradigm, that maximizes the distinguishability of the HRF models under investigation. The proposed approach may be used to evaluate the performance of HRF model estimation techniques from fMRI data. PMID:26106322

  20. On the distinguishability of HRF models in fMRI.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Paulo N; Figueiredo, Patricia; Silvestre, Carlos J

    2015-01-01

    Modeling the Hemodynamic Response Function (HRF) is a critical step in fMRI studies of brain activity, and it is often desirable to estimate HRF parameters with physiological interpretability. A biophysically informed model of the HRF can be described by a non-linear time-invariant dynamic system. However, the identification of this dynamic system may leave much uncertainty on the exact values of the parameters. Moreover, the high noise levels in the data may hinder the model estimation task. In this context, the estimation of the HRF may be seen as a problem of model falsification or invalidation, where we are interested in distinguishing among a set of eligible models of dynamic systems. Here, we propose a systematic tool to determine the distinguishability among a set of physiologically plausible HRF models. The concept of absolutely input-distinguishable systems is introduced and applied to a biophysically informed HRF model, by exploiting the structure of the underlying non-linear dynamic system. A strategy to model uncertainty in the input time-delay and magnitude is developed and its impact on the distinguishability of two physiologically plausible HRF models is assessed, in terms of the maximum noise amplitude above which it is not possible to guarantee the falsification of one model in relation to another. Finally, a methodology is proposed for the choice of the input sequence, or experimental paradigm, that maximizes the distinguishability of the HRF models under investigation. The proposed approach may be used to evaluate the performance of HRF model estimation techniques from fMRI data.

  1. Mastomys (rodentia: muridae) species distinguished by hemoglobin pattern differences.

    PubMed

    Robbins, C B; Krebs, J W; Johnson, K M

    1983-05-01

    Hemoglobin electrophoresis patterns were found to be reliable markers for distinguishing two species of Mastomys in Sierra Leone having 32 and 38 chromosomes. All 32-chromosome animals exhibited a single hemoglobin pattern, whereas those with 38-chromosomes had four distinguishable patterns. Both karyotypes were present throughout Sierra Leone. The 38-chromosome species was more prevalent in the Guinea savanna zone to the north, while the 32-chromosome species was most dominant in human-modified high forest areas of the eastern and southern parts of the country. In almost all situations the 32-chromosome species was more common in houses than in bush habitats; the reverse was true for Mastomys having 38 chromosomes. Analysis of hemoglobin patterns thus becomes useful for species identification, and is necessary to understand the roles of the different Mastomys forms as reservoirs of human diseases, such as Lassa fever in West Africa.

  2. Improving text recognition by distinguishing scene and overlay text

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quehl, Bernhard; Yang, Haojin; Sack, Harald

    2015-02-01

    Video texts are closely related to the content of a video. They provide a valuable source for indexing and interpretation of video data. Text detection and recognition task in images or videos typically distinguished between overlay and scene text. Overlay text is artificially superimposed on the image at the time of editing and scene text is text captured by the recording system. Typically, OCR systems are specialized on one kind of text type. However, in video images both types of text can be found. In this paper, we propose a method to automatically distinguish between overlay and scene text to dynamically control and optimize post processing steps following text detection. Based on a feature combination a Support Vector Machine (SVM) is trained to classify scene and overlay text. We show how this distinction in overlay and scene text improves the word recognition rate. Accuracy of the proposed methods has been evaluated by using publicly available test data sets.

  3. Distinguishing different fictional worlds during sentence comprehension: ERP evidence.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Xue, Jin

    2014-01-01

    The neural mechanism of distinguishing reality from fiction has been explored recently. While people only represent one real world, they are likely to have representations for multiple fictional worlds. This study used event-related potentials to investigate how different fictional events were distinguished during sentence comprehension. Participants read fictional events involving real people (e.g., President Bush) or unreal characters (e.g., Lord Voldemort). Inconsistency of reality was created by introducing real people into the events involving unreal characters or introducing unreal characters into the events involving real people. The results indicated that inconsistency in reality in both types of fictional events elicited a late positive effect, and an interaction between event type and consistency effect was found in medial sites. These results suggested that reality information is important for the construction and updating of situation models.

  4. Trevor W. Robbins: Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions.

    PubMed

    2011-11-01

    Presents Trevor W. Robbins, the 2011 winner of the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions."For distinguished theoretical and empirical contributions to basic research in experimental psychology and neuroscience. Trevor W. Robbins has made innovative and landmark contributions to understanding monoaminergic and glutamatergic regulation of cortico-striatal-limbic function and its involvement in psychological processes and pathological states such as addiction, depression, schizophrenia, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. His pioneering accomplishments have included the development of methodologies for parallel sophisticated behavioral assessments in humans, rodents, and monkeys combined with psychopharmacological and imaging studies across species. His vigor and dedication to research, exemplary leadership, scholarship, and stellar productivity have advanced our knowledge of brain function and inspired several generations of cognitive neuroscientists." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Quantum scheme for secret sharing based on local distinguishability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahaman, Ramij; Parker, Matthew G.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we analyze the (im)possibility of the exact distinguishability of orthogonal multipartite entangled states under restricted local operation and classical communication. Based on this local distinguishability analysis, we propose a quantum secret sharing scheme (which we call LOCC-QSS). Our LOCC-QSS scheme is quite general and cost efficient compared to other schemes. In our scheme, no joint quantum operation is needed to reconstruct the secret. We also present an interesting (2 ,n ) -threshold LOCC-QSS scheme, where any two cooperating players, one from each of two disjoint groups of players, can always reconstruct the secret. This LOCC-QSS scheme is quite uncommon, as most (k ,n ) -threshold quantum secret sharing schemes have the restriction k ≥⌈n/2 ⌉ .

  6. Distinguishing quasiperiodic dynamics from chaos in short-time series.

    PubMed

    Zou, Y; Pazó, D; Romano, M C; Thiel, M; Kurths, J

    2007-07-01

    We propose a procedure to distinguish quasiperiodic from chaotic orbits in short-time series, which is based on the recurrence properties in phase space. The histogram of the return times in a recurrence plot is introduced to disclose the recurrence property consisting of only three peaks imposed by Slater's theorem. Noise effects on the statistics are studied. Our approach is demonstrated to be efficient in recognizing regular and chaotic trajectories of a Hamiltonian system with mixed phase space.

  7. Distinguishing Indirect Signatures Arising From New Physics at the NLC

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    1999-07-14

    Many sources of new physics can lead to shifts in the Standard Model predictions for cross sections and asymmetries at the NLC below their direct production thresholds. In this talk we discuss some of the tools that are useful for distinguishing amongst these new physics scenarios. R-parity violation and extensions of the Standard Model gauge structure are two typical non-minimal realizations of supersymmetry which provide us with an important test case to examine.

  8. Efficacy of Sonoelastography in Distinguishing Benign from Malignant Breast Masses

    PubMed Central

    Balçık, Adile; Polat, Ahmet Veysel; Bayrak, İlkay Koray; Polat, Ayfer Kamalı

    2016-01-01

    Objective The study aimed to evaluate the influence of sonoelastographic strain ratio in distinguishing benign from malignant breast masses. Materials and Methods Patients who were referred for diagnostic biopsy of a breast mass were examined by ultrasound and sonoelastography prior to percutaneous biopsy. Sonoelastography was performed twice by the same observer in the same session. The strain ratios (SR) were calculated for both measurements as well as the mean strain ratio. Results were compared with histopathologic findings. For each strain ratio, a threshold value was determined using a ROC analysis for the differentiation of benign and malignant masses. Results After histopathological examination of 135 mass lesions in 132 female patients (mean age 48±12 years), 65 masses were diagnosed as benign and 70 as malignant. According to the Tsukuba classification with 5 scores; 44 of 65 benign masses had scores of either 1 or 2 while 56 of 70 malignant lesions had scores of either 4 or 5. No benign lesion was classified as score 5, and no malignant lesion as score 1. The mean cut-off in the two ROC measurements in distinguishing benign from malignant lesions was calculated as 4.52. When a threshold value of 4.52 was used for the mean strain ratio: the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy rates were determined as 85.5%, 84.8%, 85.5%, 84.8% and 85.2%, respectively. Conclusion The threshold value for strain ratio in the differentiation of benign and malignant masses was detected as 4.52, and a significant intra-observer difference was not observed in this study. The diagnostic value of sonoelastograghy in distinguishing benign from malignant breast masses was higher in comparison to conventional ultrasound.

  9. Ratios of Biogenic Elements for Distinguishing Recent from Fossil Microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to distinguish possible microfossils from recent biological contaminants is of great importance to Astrobiology. In this paper we discuss the application of the ratios of life critical biogenic elements (C/O; C/N; and C/S) as determined by Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) to this problem. Biogenic element ratios will be provided for a wide variety of living cyanobacteria and other microbial extremophiles, preserved herbarium materials, and ancient biota from the Antarctic Ice Cores and Siberian and Alaskan Permafrost for comparison with megafossils and microfossils in ancient terrestrial rocks and carbonaceous meteorites.

  10. Distinguishing and diagnosing contemporary and conventional features of dental erosion.

    PubMed

    Bassiouny, Mohamed A

    2014-01-01

    The vast number and variety of erosion lesions encountered today require reconsideration of the traditional definition. Dental erosion associated with modern dietary habits can exhibit unique features that symbolize a departure from the decades-old conventional image known as tooth surface loss. The extent and diversity of contemporary erosion lesions often cause conflicting diagnoses. Specific examples of these features are presented in this article. The etiologies, genesis, course of development, and characteristics of these erosion lesions are discussed. Contemporary and conventional erosion lesions are distinguished from similar defects, such as mechanically induced wear, carious lesions, and dental fluorosis, which affect the human dentition.

  11. Possible Observational Criteria for Distinguishing Brown Dwarfs From Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, David C.

    1997-01-01

    The difference in formation process between binary stars and planetary systems is reflected in their composition, as well as orbital architecture, particularly in their orbital eccentricity as a function of orbital period. It is suggested here that this difference can be used as an observational criterion to distinguish between brown dwarfs and planets. Application of the orbital criterion suggests that, with three possible exceptions, all of the recently discovered substellar companions may be brown dwarfs and not planets. These criterion may be used as a guide for interpretation of the nature of substellar-mass companions to stars in the future.

  12. The increasing importance of distinguishing among plant nitrogen sources.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Arnold J

    2015-06-01

    Many studies of plant nitrogen relations assess only the total amount of the element available from the soil and the total amount of the element within the plant. Nitrogen, however, is a constituent of diverse compounds that participate in some of the most energy-intensive reactions in the biosphere. The following characterizes some of these reactions, especially those that involve ammonium and nitrate, and highlights the importance of distinguishing both among the nitrogen sources available to plants and among the nitrogen forms within plants when considering plant responses to rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations.

  13. Local distinguishability of Dicke states in quantum secret sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing-Tao; Xu, Gang; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Sun, Xing-Ming; Jia, Heng-Yue

    2017-03-01

    We comprehensively investigate the local distinguishability of orthogonal Dicke states under local operations and classical communication (LOCC) from both qualitative and quantitative aspects. Based on our work, defects in the LOCC-quantum secret sharing (QSS) scheme can be complemented, and the information leakage can be quantified. For (k1 ,k2 , k , n)-threshold LOCC-QSS scheme, more intuitive formulas for unambiguous probability and guessing probability were established, which can be used for determining the parameter k1 and k2 directly.

  14. Distinguishing Between Supra-Arcade Downflows and Plasmoids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Supra-arcade downflows (SADs) observed above flaring active regions during long-duration events are theorized to be signatures of magnetic reconnection. Observations of SADs strongly indicate an association with shrinking reconnected flux tubes characterized by a specific magnetic topology. Plasmoids comprise another proposed group of observational reconnection signatures. While some plasmoids occur under nearly the same conditions as SADs, the magnetic configuration of the two phenomena are quite incongruous, yet they are often categorized together. We present distinguishing characteristics between SADs and plasmoids and indicate how their respective observations may yield insight into the conditions within the current sheet above eruptive active regions.

  15. Award for Distinguished Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology.

    PubMed

    2016-11-01

    This award is given by the Board of Educational Affairs in recognition of the efforts of psychologists who have made distinguished contributions to education and training, who have produced imaginative innovations, or who have been involved in the developmental phases of programs in education and training in psychology. These contributions might include important research on education and training; the development of effective materials for instruction; the establishment of workshops, conferences, or networks of communication for education and training; achievement and leadership in administration that facilitates education and training; or activity in professional organizations that promote excellence. The Award for Distinguished Contributions to Education and Training in psychology recognizes a specific contribution to education and training. The Career designation is added to the award at the discretion of the Education and Training Awards Committee to recognize continuous significant contributions made over a lifelong career in psychology. This year the Education and Training Awards Committee selected a psychologist for the Career designation. The 2016 recipients of the APA Education and Training Contributions Awards were selected by the 2015 Education and Training Awards Committee appointed by the Board of Educational Affairs (BEA). Members of the 2015 Education and Training Awards Committee were Sharon L. Berry, PhD (Chair); Arthur C. Graesser, PhD; and Thomas R. Kratochwill, PhD; Erica Wise, PhD (Chair-Elect); Ron Rozensky, PhD; and Jane Halonen, PhD. (PsycINFO Database Record

  16. A statistical approach for distinguishing hybridization and incomplete lineage sorting.

    PubMed

    Joly, Simon; McLenachan, Patricia A; Lockhart, Peter J

    2009-08-01

    The extent and evolutionary significance of hybridization is difficult to evaluate because of the difficulty in distinguishing hybridization from incomplete lineage sorting. Here we present a novel parametric approach for statistically distinguishing hybridization from incomplete lineage sorting based on minimum genetic distances of a nonrecombining locus. It is based on the idea that the expected minimum genetic distance between sequences from two species is smaller for some hybridization events than for incomplete lineage sorting scenarios. When applied to empirical data sets, distributions can be generated for the minimum interspecies distances expected under incomplete lineage sorting using coalescent simulations. If the observed distance between sequences from two species is smaller than its predicted distribution, incomplete lineage sorting can be rejected and hybridization inferred. We demonstrate the power of the method using simulations and illustrate its application on New Zealand alpine buttercups (Ranunculus). The method is robust and complements existing approaches. Thus it should allow biologists to assess with greater accuracy the importance of hybridization in evolution.

  17. Nonlocality free wirings and the distinguishability between Bell boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, Rodrigo; Aolita, Leandro

    2017-03-01

    Bell nonlocality can be formulated in terms of a resource theory with local-hidden variable models as resourceless objects. Two such theories are known, one built upon local operations assisted by shared randomness (LOSRs) and the other one allowing, in addition, for prior-to-input classical communication. We show that prior communication, although unable to create nonlocality, leads to wirings not only beyond LOSRs but also not contained in a much broader class of (nonlocality-generating) global wirings. Technically, this is shown by proving that it can improve the statistical distinguishability between Bell correlations optimized over all fixed measurement choices. This has implications in nonlocality quantification, and leads us to a natural universal definition of Bell nonlocality measures. To end up with, we also consider the statistical strength of nonlocality proofs. We point out some issues of its standard definition in the resource-theoretic operational framework, and suggest simple fixes for them. Our findings reveal nontrivial features of the geometry of the set of wirings and may have implications in the operational distinguishability of nonlocal behaviors.

  18. Distinguishing Selection Bias and Confounding Bias in Comparative Effectiveness Research.

    PubMed

    Haneuse, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) aims to provide patients and physicians with evidence-based guidance on treatment decisions. As researchers conduct CER they face myriad challenges. Although inadequate control of confounding is the most-often cited source of potential bias, selection bias that arises when patients are differentially excluded from analyses is a distinct phenomenon with distinct consequences: confounding bias compromises internal validity, whereas selection bias compromises external validity. Despite this distinction, however, the label "treatment-selection bias" is being used in the CER literature to denote the phenomenon of confounding bias. Motivated by an ongoing study of treatment choice for depression on weight change over time, this paper formally distinguishes selection and confounding bias in CER. By formally distinguishing selection and confounding bias, this paper clarifies important scientific, design, and analysis issues relevant to ensuring validity. First is that the 2 types of biases may arise simultaneously in any given study; even if confounding bias is completely controlled, a study may nevertheless suffer from selection bias so that the results are not generalizable to the patient population of interest. Second is that the statistical methods used to mitigate the 2 biases are themselves distinct; methods developed to control one type of bias should not be expected to address the other. Finally, the control of selection and confounding bias will often require distinct covariate information. Consequently, as researchers plan future studies of comparative effectiveness, care must be taken to ensure that all data elements relevant to both confounding and selection bias are collected.

  19. Distinguishing suspicious actions in long-distance surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebe, Guy; Chen, Eli; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak

    2014-10-01

    Human action classification distinguishes different human behaviors at a video signal. Suspicious behavior can be defined by the user, and in long distance imaging it may include bending the body during walking or crawling, in contrast to regular walking for instance. When imaging is performed through relatively long distance, some difficulties occur which affect the performances regular action recognition tasks. The degradation sources that include turbulence and aerosols in the atmosphere cause blur and spatiotemporal-varying distortions (image dancing). These effects become more significant as the imaging distance increases and as the sizes of the objects of interest in the image are smaller. The process of action recognition is usually a part of surveillance system that naturally includes a detection of the moving objects as a first step, followed by tracking them in the video sequence. In this study, we first detect and track moving objects in long-distance horizontal imaging, and then we examine dynamic spatio-temporal (motion and shape) characteristics of correctly detected moving objects. According to such characteristics. We construct features that characterize different actions for such imaging conditions, and distinguish suspicious from non-suspicious actions, based on these characteristics.

  20. Transient inability to distinguish between faces: electrophysiologic studies.

    PubMed

    Mundel, Trevor; Milton, John G; Dimitrov, Alexander; Wilson, Hugh W; Pelizzari, Charles; Uftring, Stephen; Torres, Ivan; Erickson, Robert K; Spire, Jean-Paul; Towle, Vernon L

    2003-04-01

    It is not known with certainty at which level of face processing by the cortex the distinction between a familiar and an unfamiliar face is made. Subdural electrodes were implanted under the fusiform gyrus of the right temporal lobe in a patient who developed an unusual inability to distinguish differences between faces as part of the epileptic aura ("all faces looked the same"). A cortical region located posterior to the epileptic focus was identified that exhibited a maximum evoked response to the presentation of facial images (N165), but not to objects, scenes, or character strings. Evoked potentials elicited by a variety of visual images indicated that any perturbation away from novel whole-face stimuli produced submaximal responses from this region of the right temporal lobe. Electrical stimulation of this region resulted in an impairment of face discrimination. It was found that presentation of familiar faces (grandmother, treating physician) produced a different response from that observed for novel faces. These observations demonstrate that within 165 msec of face presentation, and before the conscious precept of face familiarity has formed, this cortical region has already begun to distinguish between a familiar and an unfamiliar face.

  1. Shifts of the psychometric function: distinguishing bias from perceptual effects.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Miguel A; Alcalá-Quintana, Rocío

    2013-01-01

    Morgan, Dillenburger, Raphael, and Solomon have shown that observers can use different response strategies when unsure of their answer, and, thus, they can voluntarily shift the location of the psychometric function estimated with the method of single stimuli (MSS; sometimes also referred to as the single-interval, two-alternative method). They wondered whether MSS could distinguish response bias from a true perceptual effect that would also shift the location of the psychometric function. We demonstrate theoretically that the inability to distinguish response bias from perceptual effects is an inherent shortcoming of MSS, although a three-response format including also an "undecided" response option may solve the problem under restrictive assumptions whose validity cannot be tested with MSS data. We also show that a proper two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) task with the three-response format is free of all these problems so that bias and perceptual effects can easily be separated out. The use of a three-response 2AFC format is essential to eliminate a confound (response bias) in studies of perceptual effects and, hence, to eliminate a threat to the internal validity of research in this area.

  2. Methods to distinguish various types of protein phosphatase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Brautigan, D.L.; Shriner, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    To distinguish the action of protein Tyr(P) and protein Ser(P)/Thr(P) phosphatases on /sup 32/P-labeled phosphoproteins in subcellular fractions different inhibitors and activators are utilized. Comparison of the effects of added compounds provides a convenient, indirect method to characterize dephosphorylation reactions. Protein Tyr(P) phosphatases are specifically inhibited by micromolar Zn2+ or vanadate, and show maximal activity in the presence of EDTA. The other class of cellular phosphatases, specific for protein Ser(P) and Thr(P) residues, are inhibited by fluoride and EDTA. In this class of enzymes two major functional types can be distinguished: those sensitive to inhibition by the heat-stable protein inhibitor-2 and not stimulated by polycations, and those not sensitive to inhibition and stimulated by polycations. Preparation of /sup 32/P-labeled Tyr(P) and Ser(P) phosphoproteins also is presented for the direct measurement of phosphatase activities in preparations by the release of acid-soluble (/sup 32/P)phosphate.

  3. Gene Transcript Abundance Profiles Distinguish Kawasaki Disease from Adenovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Popper, Stephen J.; Watson, Virginia E.; Shimizu, Chisato; Kanegaye, John T.; Burns, Jane C.; Relman, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute Kawasaki disease (KD) is difficult to distinguish from other illnesses that involve acute rash or fever, in part because the etiologic agent(s) and pathophysiology remain poorly characterized. As a result, diagnosis and critical therapies may be delayed. Methods We used DNA microarrays to identify possible diagnostic features of KD. We compared gene expression patterns in the blood of 23 children with acute KD and 18 age-matched febrile children with 3 illnesses that resemble KD. Results Genes associated with platelet and neutrophil activation were expressed at higher levels in patients with KD than in patients with acute adenovirus infections or systemic adverse drug reactions, but levels in patients with KD were not higher than those in patients with scarlet fever. Genes associated with B cell activation were also expressed at higher levels in patients with KD than in control subjects. A striking absence of interferon-stimulated gene expression in patients with KD was confirmed in an independent cohort of patients with KD. Using a set of 38 gene transcripts, we successfully predicted the diagnosis for 21 of 23 patients with KD and 7 of 8 patients with adenovirus infection. Conclusions These findings provide insight into the molecular features that distinguish KD from other febrile illnesses and support the feasibility of developing novel diagnostic reagents for KD based on the host response. PMID:19583510

  4. Elastography in Distinguishing Benign from Malignant Thyroid Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Colakoglu, Bulent; Yildirim, Duzgun; Alis, Deniz; Ucar, Gokhan; Samanci, Cesur; Ustabasioglu, Fethi Emre; Bakir, Alev; Ulusoy, Onur Levent

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to test the diagnostic success of strain elastography in distinguishing benign from malignant thyroid nodules. Materials and Methods: The size, echogenicity, and halo integrity of 293 thyroid nodules and the presence of microcalcification in these nodules were evaluated on gray-scale examination. Doppler characteristics and elastography patterns were also evaluated and recorded. Nodules were classified in four categories (patterns 1–4) based on elastographic examination. Results: According to the cytopathological findings, 222 nodules were benign, and 71 nodules were malignant. The risk of a nodule to be malignant was 3.8 times increased by hypoechogenicity, 7.7 times increased by the presence of microcalcification, and 11.5 times increased by the absence of halo. On Doppler patterns, the presence of central vascularity increased the malignancy risk of a nodule by 5.8 times. According to the receiver operating characteristic analysis, patterns 3 and 4 were malignant, and patterns 1 and 2 were benign. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of elastography were 100%, 80.2%, 61.7%, 100%, and 85%, respectively. Conclusion: Strain elastography can be used as a noninvasive method in distinguishing benign from malignant thyroid nodules and in identifying the patients who would undergo surgery. PMID:28123841

  5. Chamber catalogues of optical and fluorescent signatures distinguish bioaerosol classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Mark; Perring, Anne E.; McCabe, Kevin; Kok, Greg; Granger, Gary; Baumgardner, Darrel

    2016-07-01

    Rapid bioaerosol characterization has immediate applications in the military, environmental and public health sectors. Recent technological advances have facilitated single-particle detection of fluorescent aerosol in near real time; this leverages controlled ultraviolet exposures with single or multiple wavelengths, followed by the characterization of associated fluorescence. This type of ultraviolet induced fluorescence has been used to detect airborne microorganisms and their fragments in laboratory studies, and it has been extended to field studies that implicate bioaerosol to compose a substantial fraction of supermicron atmospheric particles. To enhance the information yield that new-generation fluorescence instruments can provide, we report the compilation of a referential aerobiological catalogue including more than 50 pure cultures of common airborne bacteria, fungi and pollens, recovered at water activity equilibrium in a mesoscale chamber (1 m3). This catalogue juxtaposes intrinsic optical properties and select bandwidths of fluorescence emissions, which manifest to clearly distinguish between major classes of airborne microbes and pollens.

  6. Distinguishing dark matter stabilization symmetries at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doojin

    2016-06-01

    We study ways of distinguishing models with Z2-stabilized dark matter (DM) from models where the DM becomes stable by other symmetries, employing the latter to be a Z3 symmetry for illustration. The idea is based on the observation that a Z3-charged mother particle can decay into one or two DM particles together with Standard Model particle(s), whereas a Z2-charged one (typically) decays into a single DM particle. As main toolkits, we employ four kinematic variables such as the invariant mass variable, the MT2 variable, the energy spectrum of visible particles, and the M2 variables. We emphasize that all those observables are complementary to one another, i.e., (almost) all potential scenarios arising in Z2 and Z3 models can be addressed by the strategies associated with them. Results from Monte Carlo simulation are presented to show the viability of the proposed techniques.

  7. Security against jamming in imaging with partially-distinguishable photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roga, Wojciech; Jeffers, John

    2016-10-01

    We describe a protocol in which we detect intercept-resend jamming of imaging and can reverse its effects. The security is based on control of the polarization states of photons that are sent to interrogate an object and form an image at a camera. The scheme presented here is a particular implementation of a general anti-jamming protocol established by Roga and Jeffers in Ref. 5. It is applied here to imaging by photons with partially distinguishable polarisation states. The protocol in this version is easily applicable as only single photon states are involved, however the efficiency is traded off against the intrusion detectability because of a leak of information to the intruder.

  8. Mathematically guided approaches to distinguish models of periodic patterning

    PubMed Central

    Hiscock, Tom W.; Megason, Sean G.

    2015-01-01

    How periodic patterns are generated is an open question. A number of mechanisms have been proposed – most famously, Turing's reaction-diffusion model. However, many theoretical and experimental studies focus on the Turing mechanism while ignoring other possible mechanisms. Here, we use a general model of periodic patterning to show that different types of mechanism (molecular, cellular, mechanical) can generate qualitatively similar final patterns. Observation of final patterns is therefore not sufficient to favour one mechanism over others. However, we propose that a mathematical approach can help to guide the design of experiments that can distinguish between different mechanisms, and illustrate the potential value of this approach with specific biological examples. PMID:25605777

  9. Distinguishing fiction from non-fiction with complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larue, David M.; Carr, Lincoln D.; Jones, Linnea K.; Stevanak, Joe T.

    2014-03-01

    Complex Network Measures are applied to networks constructed from texts in English to demonstrate an initial viability in textual analysis. Texts from novels and short stories obtained from Project Gutenberg and news stories obtained from NPR are selected. Unique word stems in a text are used as nodes in an associated unweighted undirected network, with edges connecting words occurring within a certain number of words somewhere in the text. Various combinations of complex network measures are computed for each text's network. Fisher's Linear Discriminant analysis is used to build a parameter optimizing the ability to separate the texts according to their genre. Success rates in the 70% range for correctly distinguishing fiction from non-fiction were obtained using edges defined as within four words, using 400 word samples from 400 texts from each of the two genres with some combinations of measures such as the power-law exponents of degree distributions and clustering coefficients.

  10. Distinguishing potential sources of genotoxic exposure via HPRT mutations.

    PubMed

    Molholt, B; Finette, B A

    2000-01-01

    We utilize T-cell HPRT mutations to monitor exposure to environmental mutagens in siblings of children who have developed cancer at a persistently high rate in Toms River, New Jersey, U.S.A. A preliminary epidemiological study has found a statistically-significant association between drinking public water (by pregnant mother or infant) and subsequent risk for childhood cancer. Three potential sources of mutagenic exposures in Toms River may have increased the rate of carcinogenic initiation significantly in children: 1. Benzidine-based, other azo dye and anthraquinone dye wastes released by Ciba-Geigy, 2. Styrene-acrylonitrile (SAN) trimer and other plastic wastes of Union Carbide, and 3. Radium-224, present in unusually high concentrations in the Cohansey aquifer. Specific patterns of HPRT mutations are utilized to distinguish these various potential sources of carcinogenic exposures in the drinking water of families with childhood cancer and to differentiate chemically or radiologically induced cancers from those which occur spontaneously.

  11. Asymptotic state discrimination and a strict hierarchy in distinguishability norms

    SciTech Connect

    Chitambar, Eric; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, we consider the problem of discriminating quantum states by local operations and classical communication (LOCC) when an arbitrarily small amount of error is permitted. This paradigm is known as asymptotic state discrimination, and we derive necessary conditions for when two multipartite states of any size can be discriminated perfectly by asymptotic LOCC. We use this new criterion to prove a gap in the LOCC and separable distinguishability norms. We then turn to the operational advantage of using two-way classical communication over one-way communication in LOCC processing. With a simple two-qubit product state ensemble, we demonstrate a strict majorization of the two-way LOCC norm over the one-way norm.

  12. Interference in the Mott Insulator State of Distinguishable Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lin; Fujiwara, Fumitaka; Byrnes, Tim; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2008-03-01

    Particle statistics plays a crucial role in strongly interacting quantum many-body systems. Here, we study the Hubbard model for distinguishable particles at unit filling. We show that when on-site repulsive interaction dominates over tunneling, the ground state is a Mott insulator state with higher order coherence between the particles. This result can be experimentally confirmed by the recovery of the interference pattern in the density correlation functions and is robust against non- uniformity of the interaction and tunneling parameters. We also show that this state is a maximally entangled state, in contrast to its bosonic counterpart. L. Tian, F. Fujiwara, T. Byrnes, and Y. Yamamoto, preprint, arXiv/0705.2023.

  13. Distinguishing Between Legally and Illegally Produced Gold in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Richard J; Dixon, Roger D; Merkle, Roland K W

    2016-01-01

    The identification of gold-bearing material is essential for combating the theft of gold in South Africa. Material seized in police operations is generally a mixture of gold from different mines, and as such cannot be traced back to a single location. ICP-OES analysis of material dissolved by acid dissolution provided a database of gold compositions comprising gold from South African mines, illegal gold stolen from the mines, and commercial gold alloys and jewelery. Discrimination between legal and illegal gold was possible due to the presence of Pb, As, Sb, Sn, Se, and Te in the stolen material, elements which are not present in legally produced gold. The presence of these elements is a quick and simple way to distinguish between gold alloys based on refined gold, such as in commercially manufactured jewelery, and gold alloys containing a proportion of unrefined and therefore illegally obtained gold.

  14. Alan E. Kazdin: Award for Distinguished Scientific Applications of Psychology.

    PubMed

    2011-11-01

    Presents Alan E. Kazdin, the 2011 winner of the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Scientific Applications of Psychology. "For outstanding and pathbreaking contributions to the understanding of the development, assessment, and treatment of psychopathology. Alan E. Kazdin's theoretically innovative, methodologically rigorous, and scientifically informed research has significantly advanced knowledge of child and adolescent psychopathologies such as depression and conduct problems. His writings on research strategies and methods have set a high standard for rigor in the field. His work and his ideas have had an enormous impact on the science, practice, and teaching of psychology, and his research has strengthened assessment and treatment of children and adolescents in scientific and clinical settings. His passion, energy, wisdom, and wit have inspired countless colleagues and students over the years, and his work will no doubt continue to do so for many generations to come." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Kelly D. Brownell: Award for Distinguished Scientific Applications of Psychology.

    PubMed

    2012-11-01

    Presents a short biography of Kelly D. Brownwell, winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Applications of Psychology (2012). He won the award for outstanding contributions to our understanding of the etiology and management of obesity and the crisis it poses for the modern world. A seminal thinker in the field, Kelly D. Brownell has been a persuasive proponent of the view that the surge in obesity is attributable to a 'toxic food environment' that includes easy access to abundant but energy-dense and aggressively marketed food. An exemplary leader, he has inspired students and colleagues alike through his tenacious advocacy of the social and behavioral sciences in the public interest. Brownwell's Award citation and a selected bibliography are also presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Distinguishing and grading human gliomas by IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Gerald; Shaw, Anthony; Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing; Abuid, Mario H; Schackert, Gabriele; Sobottka, Stephan; Steller, Wolfram; Salzer, Reiner; Mantsch, Henry H

    2003-01-01

    As a molecular probe of tissue composition, IR spectroscopy can potentially serve as an adjunct to histopathology in detecting and diagnosing disease. This study demonstrates that cancerous brain tissue (astrocytoma, glioblastoma) is distinguishable from control tissue on the basis of the IR spectra of thin tissue sections. It is further shown that the IR spectra of astrocytoma and glioblastoma affected tissue can be discriminated from one another, thus providing insight into the malignancy grade of the tissue. Both the spectra and the methods employed for their classification reveal characteristic differences in tissue composition. In particular, the nature and relative amounts of brain lipids, including both the gangliosides and phospholipids, appear to be altered in cancerous compared to control tissue. Using a genetic classification approach, classification success rates of up to 89% accuracy were obtained, depending on the number of regions included in the model. The diagnostic potential and practical applications of IR spectroscopy in brain tumor diagnosis are discussed.

  17. Distinguishing nanowire and nanotube formation by the deposition current transients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    High aspect ratio Ni nanowires (NWs) and nanotubes (NTs) were electrodeposited inside ordered arrays of self-assembled pores (approximately 50 nm in diameter and approximately 50 μm in length) in anodic alumina templates by a potentiostatic method. The current transients monitored during each process allowed us to distinguish between NW and NT formation. The depositions were long enough for the deposited metal to reach the top of the template and form a continuous Ni film. The overfilling process was found to occur in two steps when depositing NWs and in a single step in the case of NTs. A comparative study of the morphological, structural, and magnetic properties of the Ni NWs and NTs was performed using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometry, respectively. PMID:22650765

  18. Distinguishing standard model extensions using monotop chirality at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahverdi, Rouzbeh; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dutta, Bhaskar; Flórez, Andrés; Gao, Yu; Kamon, Teruki; Kolev, Nikolay; Mueller, Ryan; Segura, Manuel

    2016-12-01

    We present two minimal extensions of the standard model, each giving rise to baryogenesis. They include heavy color-triplet scalars interacting with a light Majorana fermion that can be the dark matter (DM) candidate. The electroweak charges of the new scalars govern their couplings to quarks of different chirality, which leads to different collider signals. These models predict monotop events at the LHC and the energy spectrum of decay products of highly polarized top quarks can be used to establish the chiral nature of the interactions involving the heavy scalars and the DM. Detailed simulation of signal and standard model background events is performed, showing that top quark chirality can be distinguished in hadronic and leptonic decays of the top quarks.

  19. Saliva microbiomes distinguish caries-active from healthy human populations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fang; Zeng, Xiaowei; Ning, Kang; Liu, Kuan-Liang; Lo, Chien-Chi; Wang, Wei; Chen, Jie; Wang, Dongmei; Huang, Ranran; Chang, Xingzhi; Chain, Patrick S; Xie, Gary; Ling, Junqi; Xu, Jian

    2012-01-01

    The etiology of dental caries remains elusive because of our limited understanding of the complex oral microbiomes. The current methodologies have been limited by insufficient depth and breadth of microbial sampling, paucity of data for diseased hosts particularly at the population level, inconsistency of sampled sites and the inability to distinguish the underlying microbial factors. By cross-validating 16S rRNA gene amplicon-based and whole-genome-based deep-sequencing technologies, we report the most in-depth, comprehensive and collaborated view to date of the adult saliva microbiomes in pilot populations of 19 caries-active and 26 healthy human hosts. We found that: first, saliva microbiomes in human population were featured by a vast phylogenetic diversity yet a minimal organismal core; second, caries microbiomes were significantly more variable in community structure whereas the healthy ones were relatively conserved; third, abundance changes of certain taxa such as overabundance of Prevotella Genus distinguished caries microbiota from healthy ones, and furthermore, caries-active and normal individuals carried different arrays of Prevotella species; and finally, no ‘caries-specific' operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were detected, yet 147 OTUs were ‘caries associated', that is, differentially distributed yet present in both healthy and caries-active populations. These findings underscored the necessity of species- and strain-level resolution for caries prognosis, and were consistent with the ecological hypothesis where the shifts in community structure, instead of the presence or absence of particular groups of microbes, underlie the cariogenesis. PMID:21716312

  20. Clinical and Laboratory Features Distinguishing Juvenile Polymyositis and Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    MAMYROVA, GULNARA; KATZ, JAMES D.; JONES, ROBERT V.; TARGOFF, IRA N.; LACHENBRUCH, PETER A.; JONES, OLCAY Y.; MILLER, FREDERICK W.; RIDER, LISA G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To differentiate juvenile polymyositis (PM) and muscular dystrophy, both of which may present with chronic muscle weakness and inflammation. Methods We studied 39 patients with probable or definite juvenile PM and 9 patients with muscular dystrophies who were initially misdiagnosed as having juvenile PM. Differences in demographic, clinical, and laboratory results; outcomes; and treatment responses were evaluated by Fisher’s exact and rank sum tests. Random forests classification analysis and logistic regression were performed to examine significant differences in multivariable models. Results Clinical features and serum muscle enzyme levels were similar between juvenile PM and dystrophy patients, except 89% of dystrophy patients had muscle atrophy compared with 46% of juvenile PM patients. Dystrophy patients had a longer delay to diagnosis (median 12 versus 4 months) and were less frequently hospitalized than juvenile PM patients (22% versus 74%). No dystrophy patients, but 54% of juvenile PM patients, had a myositis autoantibody. Dystrophy patients more frequently had myopathic features on muscle biopsy, including diffuse variation of myofiber size, fiber hypertrophy, and myofiber fibrosis (44–100% versus 8–53%). Juvenile PM patients more frequently had complex repetitive discharges on electromyography and a complete response to treatment with prednisone or other immunosuppressive agents than dystrophy patients (44% versus 0%). Random forests analysis revealed that the most important features in distinguishing juvenile PM from dystrophies were myositis autoantibodies, clinical muscle atrophy, and myofiber size variation on biopsy. Logistic regression confirmed muscle atrophy, myofiber fibrosis, and hospitalization as significant predictors. Conclusion Muscular dystrophy can present similarly to juvenile PM. Selected clinical and laboratory features are helpful in combination in distinguishing these conditions. PMID:23925923

  1. Comparing and distinguishing the structure of biological branching.

    PubMed

    Lamberton, Timothy O; Lefevre, James; Short, Kieran M; Smyth, Ian M; Hamilton, Nicholas A

    2015-01-21

    Bifurcating developmental branching morphogenesis gives rise to complex organs such as the lung and the ureteric tree of the kidney. However, a few quantitative methods or tools exist to compare and distinguish, at a structural level, the critical features of these important biological systems. Here we develop novel graph alignment techniques to quantify the structural differences of rooted bifurcating trees and demonstrate their application in the analysis of developing kidneys from in normal and mutant mice. We have developed two graph based metrics: graph discordance, which measures how well the graphs representing the branching structures of distinct trees graphs can be aligned or overlayed; and graph inclusion, which measures the degree of containment of a tree graph within another. To demonstrate the application of these approaches we first benchmark the discordance metric on a data set of 32 normal and 28Tgfβ(+/-) mutant mouse ureteric trees. We find that the discordance metric better distinguishes control and mutant mouse kidneys than alternative metrics based on graph size and fingerprints - the distribution of tip depths. Using this metric we then show that the structure of the mutant trees follows the same pattern as the normal kidneys, but undergo a major delay in elaboration at later stages. Analysis of both controls and mutants using the inclusion metric gives strong support to the hypothesis that ureteric tree growth is stereotypic. Additionally, we present a new generalised multi-tree alignment algorithm that minimises the sum of pairwise graph discordance and which can be used to generate maximum consensus trees that represent the archetype for fixed developmental stages. These tools represent an advance in the analysis and quantification of branching patterns and will be invaluable in gaining a deeper understanding of the mechanisms that drive development. All code is being made available with documentation and example data with this publication.

  2. Vaccination against bacterial kidney disease: Chapter 22

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Diane G.; Wiens, Gregory D.; Hammell, K. Larry; Rhodes, Linda D.; Edited by Gudding, Roar; Lillehaug, Atle; Evensen, Øystein

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) of salmonid fishes, caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, has been recognized as a serious disease in salmonid fishes since the 1930s. This chapter discusses the occurrence and significance, etiology, and pathogenesis of BKD. It then describes the different vaccination procedures and the effects and side-effects of vaccination. Despite years of research, however, only a single vaccine has been licensed for prevention of BKD, and has demonstrated variable efficacy. Therefore, in addition to a presentation of the current status of BKD vaccination, a discussion of potential future directions for BKD vaccine development is included in the chapter. This discussion is focused on the unique characteristics of R. salmoninarum and its biology, as well as aspects of the salmonid immune system that might be explored specifically to develop more effective vaccines for BKD prevention.

  3. A cohabitation challenge to compare the efficacies of vaccines for bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alcorn, S.; Murray, A.L.; Pascho, R.J.; Varney, J.

    2005-01-01

    The relative efficacies of 1 commercial and 5 experimental vaccines for bacterial kidney disease (BKD) were compared through a cohabitation waterborne challenge. Groups of juvenile chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha were vaccinated with one of the following: (1) killed Renibacterium salmoninarum ATCC 33209 (Rs 33209) cells; (2) killed Rs 33209 cells which had been heated to 37??C for 48 h, a process that destroys the p57 protein; (3) killed R. salmoninarum MT239 (Rs MT239) cells; (4) heated Rs MT239 cells; (5) a recombinant version of the p57 protein (r-p57) emulsified in Freund's incomplete adjuvant (FIA); (6) the commercial BKD vaccine Renogen; (7) phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) emulsified with an equal volume of FIA; or (8) PBS alone. Following injection, each fish was marked with a subcutaneous fluorescent latex tag denoting its treatment group and the vaccinated fish were combined into sham and disease challenge tanks. Two weeks after these fish were vaccinated, separate groups of fish were injected with either PBS or live R. salmoninarum GL64 and were placed inside coated-wire mesh cylinders (liveboxes) in the sham and disease challenge tanks, respectively. Mortalities in both tanks were recorded for 285 d. Any mortalities among the livebox fish were replaced with an appropriate cohort (infected with R. salmoninarum or healthy) fish. None of the bacterins evaluated in this study induced protective immunity against the R. salmoninarum shed from the infected livebox fish. The percentage survival within the test groups in the R. salmoninarum challenge tank ranged from 59% (heated Rs MT239 bacterin) to 81 % (PBS emulsified with FIA). There were no differences in the percentage survival among the PBS-, PBS/FIA-, r-p57-and Renogen-injected groups. There also were no differences in survival among the bacterin groups, regardless of whether the bacterial cells had been heated or left untreated prior to injection. ?? Inter-Research 2005.

  4. A cohabitation challenge to compare the efficacies of vaccines for bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha.

    PubMed

    Alcorn, Stewart; Murray, Anthony L; Pascho, Ronald J; Varney, Jed

    2005-02-28

    The relative efficacies of 1 commercial and 5 experimental vaccines for bacterial kidney disease (BKD) were compared through a cohabitation waterborne challenge. Groups of juvenile chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha were vaccinated with one of the following: (1) killed Renibacterium salmoninarum ATCC 33209 (Rs 33209) cells; (2) killed Rs 33209 cells which had been heated to 37 degrees C for 48 h, a process that destroys the p57 protein; (3) killed R. salmoninarum MT239 (Rs MT239) cells; (4) heated Rs MT239 cells; (5) a recombinant version of the p57 protein (r-p57) emulsified in Freund's incomplete adjuvant (FIA); (6) the commercial BKD vaccine Renogen; (7) phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) emulsified with an equal volume of FIA; or (8) PBS alone. Following injection, each fish was marked with a subcutaneous fluorescent latex tag denoting its treatment group and the vaccinated fish were combined into sham and disease challenge tanks. Two weeks after these fish were vaccinated, separate groups of fish were injected with either PBS or live R. salmoninarum GL64 and were placed inside coated-wire mesh cylinders (liveboxes) in the sham and disease challenge tanks, respectively. Mortalities in both tanks were recorded for 285 d. Any mortalities among the livebox fish were replaced with an appropriate cohort (infected with R. salmoninarum or healthy) fish. None of the bacterins evaluated in this study induced protective immunity against the R. salmoninarum shed from the infected livebox fish. The percentage survival within the test groups in the R. salmoninarum challenge tank ranged from 59% (heated Rs MT239 bacterin) to 81% (PBS emulsified with FIA). There were no differences in the percentage survival among the PBS-, PBS/FIA-, r-p57- and Renogen-injected groups. There also were no differences in survival among the bacterin groups, regardless of whether the bacterial cells had been heated or left untreated prior to injection.

  5. Development of a Vaccine for Bacterial Kidney Disease in Salmon, 1987 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaattari, Stephen

    1988-06-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) has been and remains a chronic contributory problem limiting the productivity of salmon in the Columbia River Basin. Control of this disease will not come easily, but it would lead to a tremendous increase in the health and numbers of salmon populations. Vaccination of salmon to Renibacterium salmoninarum (KDB) is a potentially successful method of controlling this disease. To date, however, no successful vaccine has been developed for general use. A possible solution to this problem, and thus the goal of this research, is to isolate the antigenic components of KDB and enhance their ability to activate the host defenses. This will be accomplished by the chemical modification of these antigens with potent immunomodulatory substances. These modified antigens will then be tested for their effectiveness in inducing immunity to BKD and thereby preventing the disease. The goal of the project's fourth year was to test the immunogenicity and prophylactic value in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) of various--chemical conjugates of Renibacterium salmoninarum cell and major antigens. This was accomplished by assessing the serum antibody response, the cellular immune response (chemiluminescence), and the kinetics of mortality after lethal injections of the bacteria. The studies completed this year have: (1) identified immunization procedures which enhance the induction of high levels of antibody; (2) identified functionally distinct serum antibodies which may possess different abilities to protect salmon against BKD; (3) begun the isolation and characterization of anti-R. salmoninarum antibodies which may correlate with varying degrees of protection; (4) identified chemiluminescence as a potential method for assessing cellular immunity to bacterial kidney disease; and (5) characterized two monoclonal antibodies to R. salmoninarum which will be of benefit in the diagnosis of this disease.

  6. Clinical decision rules to distinguish between bacterial and aseptic meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Dubos, F; Lamotte, B; Bibi‐Triki, F; Moulin, F; Raymond, J; Gendrel, D; Bréart, G; Chalumeau, M

    2006-01-01

    Background Clinical decision rules have been derived to distinguish between bacterial and aseptic meningitis in the emergency room to avoid unnecessary antibiotic treatments and hospitalisations. Aims To evaluate the reproducibility and to compare the diagnostic performance of five clinical decision rules. Methods All children hospitalised for bacterial meningitis between 1995 and 2004 or aseptic meningitis between 2000 and 2004 have been included in a retrospective cohort study. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated by applying each rule to the patients. The best rule was a priori defined as the one yielding 100% sensitivity for bacterial meningitis, the highest specificity, and the greatest simplicity for a bedside application. Results Among the 166 patients included, 20 had bacterial meningitis and 146 had aseptic meningitis. Although three rules achieved 100% sensitivity (95% CI 84–100), one had a significantly lower specificity (13%, 95% CI 8–19) than those of the other two rules (57%, 95% CI 48–65; and 66%, 95% CI 57–73), which were not statistically different. The ease of manual computation of the rule developed by Nigrovic et al (a simple list of five items: seizure, blood neutrophil count, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Gram stain, CSF protein, CSF neutrophil count) was higher than the one developed by Bonsu and Harper. Conclusion On our population, the rule derived by Nigrovic et al had the best balance between accuracy and simplicity of manual computation and could help to avoid two thirds of unnecessary antibiotic treatments and hospitalisations. PMID:16595647

  7. The role of orbital ultrasonography in distinguishing papilledema from pseudopapilledema

    PubMed Central

    Carter, S B; Pistilli, M; Livingston, K G; Gold, D R; Volpe, N J; Shindler, K S; Liu, G T; Tamhankar, M A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the sensitivity and specificity of orbital ultrasonography in distinguishing papilledema from pseudopapilledema in adult patients. Methods The records of all adult patients referred to the neuro-ophthalmology service who underwent orbital ultrasonography for the evaluation of suspected papilledema were reviewed. The details of history, ophthalmologic examination, and results of ancillary testing including orbital ultrasonography, MRI, and lumbar puncture were recorded. Results of orbital ultrasonography were correlated with the final diagnosis of papilledema or pseudopapilledema on the basis of the clinical impression of the neuro-ophthalmologist. Ultrasound was considered positive when the optic nerve sheath diameter was ≥3.3 mm along with a positive 30° test. Results The sensitivity of orbital ultrasonography for detection of papilledema was 90% (CI: 80.2–99.3%) and the specificity in detecting pseudopapilledema was 79% (CI: 67.7–90.7%). Conclusions Orbital ultrasonography is a rapid and noninvasive test that is highly sensitive, but less specific in differentiating papilledema from pseudopapilledema in adult patients, and can be useful in guiding further management of patients in whom the diagnosis is initially uncertain. PMID:25190532

  8. Prospects for distinguishing dark matter models using annual modulation

    DOE PAGES

    Witte, Samuel J.; Gluscevic, Vera; McDermott, Samuel D.

    2017-02-24

    It has recently been demonstrated that, in the event of a putative signal in dark matter direct detection experiments, properly identifying the underlying dark matter-nuclei interaction promises to be a challenging task. Given the most optimistic expectations for the number counts of recoil events in the forthcoming Generation 2 experiments, differentiating between interactions that produce distinct features in the recoil energy spectra will only be possible if a strong signal is observed simultaneously on a variety of complementary targets. However, there is a wide range of viable theories that give rise to virtually identical energy spectra, and may only differmore » by the dependence of the recoil rate on the dark matter velocity. In this work, we investigate how degeneracy between such competing models may be broken by analyzing the time dependence of nuclear recoils, i.e. the annual modulation of the rate. For this purpose, we simulate dark matter events for a variety of interactions and experiments, and perform a Bayesian model-selection analysis on all simulated data sets, evaluating the chance of correctly identifying the input model for a given experimental setup. Lastly, we find that including information on the annual modulation of the rate may significantly enhance the ability of a single target to distinguish dark matter models with nearly degenerate recoil spectra, but only with exposures beyond the expectations of Generation 2 experiments.« less

  9. Distinguishing between healthy and sick preschools by chemical classification

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, J.C.; Berglund, B.; Berglund, U.; Nicander-Bredberg, H.; Noma, E.

    1987-01-01

    The Swedish building code of 1975 emphasizes energy conservation and encourages the construction of tightly insulated structures with adequate ventilation systems. Some of the new buildings constructed along these guidelines have been labeled sick, because people working in them report an unusual number of health problems - e.g., eye irritation, skin rashes, and fatigue. One possible indicator of whether a building is healthy or sick may exist in the pattern of chemicals present in the air. This article outlines an approach designed to find sets of chemicals that can be used to separate buildings according to their designation as sick and healthy. Air samples were taken from a healthy and sick preschool and subsequently analyzed by gas chromatography. The prevalence of different chemical substances was determined and compared across 16 different locations from which air samples were obtained, including outdoor, supply, room, and exhaust air. In all, 158 different chemical substances were found; more in the healthy building than in the sick one. Cluster analysis, based on the pattern of presence and absence of chemicals, was able to separate locations within and between the two types of building. A large number of chemicals (approx. one-half the total) were effective in distinguishing among locations. The ten most critical chemicals in this respect were subjected to more complete statistical analysis in order to highlight further possible differences between the buildings. The general approach described may prove useful in recognizing the environmental conditions associated with the sick building syndrome.

  10. T regulatory cells distinguish two types of primary hypophysitis.

    PubMed

    Mirocha, S; Elagin, R B; Salamat, S; Jaume, J C

    2009-03-01

    Numerous cases of primary hypophysitis have been described over the past 25 years with, however, little insight into the cause(s) of this disease. In order to guide treatment, a better understanding of the pathogenesis is needed. We studied the pathogenesis of primary hypophysitis by analysing systematically the immune response at the pituitary tissue level of consecutive cases of 'lymphocytic' hypophysitis who underwent pituitary biopsy. In order to investigate further the pathogenesis of their diseases we characterized two cases at clinical, cellular and molecular levels. We show here, for the first time, that lymphocytic hypophysitis probably encompasses at least two separate entities. One entity, in agreement with the classical description of lymphocytic hypophysitis, demonstrates an autoimmune process with T helper 17 cell dominance and lack of T regulatory cells. The other entity represents a process in which T regulatory cells seem to control the immune response, which may not be self- but foreign-targeted. Our data suggest that it may be necessary to biopsy suspected primary hypophysitis and to analyse pituitary tissue with immune markers to guide treatment. Based on our results, hypophysitis driven by an immune homeostatic process should not be treated with immunosuppression, while autoimmune-defined hypophysitis may benefit from it. We show here for the first time two different pathogenic processes classified under one disease type and how to distinguish them. Because of our findings, changes in current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches may need to be considered.

  11. Croatian postage stamps featuring distinguished medical events and personalities.

    PubMed

    Salopek, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Modern Croatian history of postal services started with the first postage stamp issued as a sign of sovereignty and statehood after the Declaration of independence in 1991. A review of recent catalogues and theme collections has shown that of 654 definitive and commemorative stamps issued from 1991 to early 2008, sixteen were dedicated to medicine.Two stamps show health care institutions: ZRC Lipik, and health resort VaraZdinske Toplice; two commemorative stamps call attention to blindness-related issues, and one dedicated to disability is entitled "Mines". A series of three stamps entitled "Flora: Medicinal Herbs" recalls traditional folk medicine. In 2001, a stamp was issued on the occasion of the International Non-smoking Day to warn about the adverse effects of smoking on the development of cardiovascular diseases. The most common medicine-related subject on postage stamps were distinguished physicians and scientists: Ante Sercer, Stjepan Betleheim, Julije Domac, Dr agutin Gorjanović-Kramberger, and Duro Baglivi. Indispensable in medical philately are the semi-postal (charity) stamps issued by nonpostal institutions such as the Red Cross, Tuberculosis Week, the Croatian Anti-Cancer League, and the Croatian Diabetic Association. These postage stamps not only remind the public of the rich Croatian healthcare history, but they are also powerful tools to convey messages about public health and disease prevention.

  12. Distinguishing community benefits: tax exemption versus organizational legitimacy.

    PubMed

    Byrd, James D; Landry, Amy

    2012-01-01

    US policymakers continue to call into question the tax-exempt status of hospitals. As nonprofit tax-exempt entities, hospitals are required by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to report the type and cost of community benefits they provide. Institutional theory indicates that organizations derive organizational legitimacy from conforming to the expectations of their environment. Expectations from the state and federal regulators (the IRS, state and local taxing authorities in particular) and the community require hospitals to provide community benefits to achieve legitimacy. This article examines community benefit through an institutional theory framework, which includes regulative (laws and regulation), normative (certification and accreditation), and cultural-cognitive (relationship with the community including the provision of community benefits) pillars. Considering a review of the results of a 2006 IRS study of tax-exempt hospitals, the authors propose a model of hospital community benefit behaviors that distinguishes community benefits between cost-quantifiable activities appropriate for justifying tax exemption and unquantifiable activities that only contribute to hospitals' legitimacy.

  13. A Statistical Method to Distinguish Functional Brain Networks

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, André; Vidal, Maciel C.; Takahashi, Daniel Y.

    2017-01-01

    One major problem in neuroscience is the comparison of functional brain networks of different populations, e.g., distinguishing the networks of controls and patients. Traditional algorithms are based on search for isomorphism between networks, assuming that they are deterministic. However, biological networks present randomness that cannot be well modeled by those algorithms. For instance, functional brain networks of distinct subjects of the same population can be different due to individual characteristics. Moreover, networks of subjects from different populations can be generated through the same stochastic process. Thus, a better hypothesis is that networks are generated by random processes. In this case, subjects from the same group are samples from the same random process, whereas subjects from different groups are generated by distinct processes. Using this idea, we developed a statistical test called ANOGVA to test whether two or more populations of graphs are generated by the same random graph model. Our simulations' results demonstrate that we can precisely control the rate of false positives and that the test is powerful to discriminate random graphs generated by different models and parameters. The method also showed to be robust for unbalanced data. As an example, we applied ANOGVA to an fMRI dataset composed of controls and patients diagnosed with autism or Asperger. ANOGVA identified the cerebellar functional sub-network as statistically different between controls and autism (p < 0.001). PMID:28261045

  14. Psychogenic Tremor: A Video Guide to Its Distinguishing Features

    PubMed Central

    Thenganatt, Mary Ann; Jankovic, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background Psychogenic tremor is the most common psychogenic movement disorder. It has characteristic clinical features that can help distinguish it from other tremor disorders. There is no diagnostic gold standard and the diagnosis is based primarily on clinical history and examination. Despite proposed diagnostic criteria, the diagnosis of psychogenic tremor can be challenging. While there are numerous studies evaluating psychogenic tremor in the literature, there are no publications that provide a video/visual guide that demonstrate the clinical characteristics of psychogenic tremor. Educating clinicians about psychogenic tremor will hopefully lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment. Methods We selected videos from the database at the Parkinson’s Disease Center and Movement Disorders Clinic at Baylor College of Medicine that illustrate classic findings supporting the diagnosis of psychogenic tremor. Results We include 10 clinical vignettes with accompanying videos that highlight characteristic clinical signs of psychogenic tremor including distractibility, variability, entrainability, suggestibility, and coherence. Discussion Psychogenic tremor should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with tremor, particularly if it is of abrupt onset, intermittent, variable and not congruous with organic tremor. The diagnosis of psychogenic tremor, however, should not be simply based on exclusion of organic tremor, such as essential, parkinsonian, or cerebellar tremor, but on positive criteria demonstrating characteristic features. Early recognition and management are critical for good long-term outcome. PMID:25243097

  15. Distinguishing Nonpareil marketing group almond cultivars through multivariate analyses.

    PubMed

    Ledbetter, Craig A; Sisterson, Mark S

    2013-09-01

    More than 80% of the world's almonds are grown in California with several dozen almond cultivars available commercially. To facilitate promotion and sale, almond cultivars are categorized into marketing groups based on kernel shape and appearance. Several marketing groups are recognized, with the Nonpareil Marketing Group (NMG) demanding the highest prices. Placement of cultivars into the NMG is historical and no objective standards exist for deciding whether newly developed cultivars belong in the NMG. Principal component analyses (PCA) were used to identify nut and kernel characteristics best separating the 4 NMG cultivars (Nonpareil, Jeffries, Kapareil, and Milow) from a representative of the California Marketing Group (cultivar Carmel) and the Mission Marketing Group (cultivar Padre). In addition, discriminant analyses were used to determine cultivar misclassification rates between and within the marketing groups. All 19 evaluated carpological characters differed significantly among the 6 cultivars and during 2 harvest seasons. A clear distinction of NMG cultivars from representatives of the California and Mission Marketing Groups was evident from a PCA involving the 6 cultivars. Further, NMG kernels were successfully discriminated from kernels representing the California and Mission Marketing Groups with overall kernel misclassification of only 2% using 16 of the 19 evaluated characters. Pellicle luminosity was the most discriminating character, regardless of the character set used in analyses. Results provide an objective classification of NMG almond kernels, clearly distinguishing them from kernels of cultivars representing the California and Mission Marketing Groups.

  16. Method for distinguishing multiple targets using time-reversal acoustics

    DOEpatents

    Berryman, James G.

    2004-06-29

    A method for distinguishing multiple targets using time-reversal acoustics. Time-reversal acoustics uses an iterative process to determine the optimum signal for locating a strongly reflecting target in a cluttered environment. An acoustic array sends a signal into a medium, and then receives the returned/reflected signal. This returned/reflected signal is then time-reversed and sent back into the medium again, and again, until the signal being sent and received is no longer changing. At that point, the array has isolated the largest eigenvalue/eigenvector combination and has effectively determined the location of a single target in the medium (the one that is most strongly reflecting). After the largest eigenvalue/eigenvector combination has been determined, to determine the location of other targets, instead of sending back the same signals, the method sends back these time reversed signals, but half of them will also be reversed in sign. There are various possibilities for choosing which half to do sign reversal. The most obvious choice is to reverse every other one in a linear array, or as in a checkerboard pattern in 2D. Then, a new send/receive, send-time reversed/receive iteration can proceed. Often, the first iteration in this sequence will be close to the desired signal from a second target. In some cases, orthogonalization procedures must be implemented to assure the returned signals are in fact orthogonal to the first eigenvector found.

  17. Readers’ Eye Movements Distinguish Anomalies of Form and Content

    PubMed Central

    Braze, David; Shankweiler, Donald; Ni, Weijia; Palumbo, Laura Conway

    2010-01-01

    Evidence is presented that eye-movement patterns during reading distinguish costs associated with the syntactic processing of sentences from costs associated with relating sentence meaning to real world probabilities. Participants (N=30) read matching sets of sentences that differed by a single word, making the sentence syntactically anomalous (but understandable), pragmatically anomalous, or non-anomalous. Syntactic and pragmatic anomaly each caused perturbations in eye-movements. Subsequent to the anomaly, the patterns diverged. Syntactic anomaly generated many regressions initially, with rapid return to baseline. Pragmatic anomaly resulted in lengthened reading times, followed by a gradual increase in regressions that reached a maximum at the end of the sentence. Evidence of rapid sensitivity to pragmatic information supports the use of timing data in resolving the debate over the autonomy of linguistic processing. The divergent patterns of eye-movements support indications from neuro-cognitive studies of a principled distinction between syntactic and pragmatic processing procedures within the language processing mechanism. PMID:11924838

  18. A Statistical Method to Distinguish Functional Brain Networks.

    PubMed

    Fujita, André; Vidal, Maciel C; Takahashi, Daniel Y

    2017-01-01

    One major problem in neuroscience is the comparison of functional brain networks of different populations, e.g., distinguishing the networks of controls and patients. Traditional algorithms are based on search for isomorphism between networks, assuming that they are deterministic. However, biological networks present randomness that cannot be well modeled by those algorithms. For instance, functional brain networks of distinct subjects of the same population can be different due to individual characteristics. Moreover, networks of subjects from different populations can be generated through the same stochastic process. Thus, a better hypothesis is that networks are generated by random processes. In this case, subjects from the same group are samples from the same random process, whereas subjects from different groups are generated by distinct processes. Using this idea, we developed a statistical test called ANOGVA to test whether two or more populations of graphs are generated by the same random graph model. Our simulations' results demonstrate that we can precisely control the rate of false positives and that the test is powerful to discriminate random graphs generated by different models and parameters. The method also showed to be robust for unbalanced data. As an example, we applied ANOGVA to an fMRI dataset composed of controls and patients diagnosed with autism or Asperger. ANOGVA identified the cerebellar functional sub-network as statistically different between controls and autism (p < 0.001).

  19. Cues used for distinguishing African American and European American voices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Erik R.; Lass, Norman J.

    2005-04-01

    Past studies have shown that listeners can distinguish most African American and European American voices, but how they do so is poorly understood. Three experiments were designed to investigate this problem. Recordings of African American and European American college students performing various reading tasks were used as the basis for stimuli in all three. In the first experiment, stimuli were subjected to monotonization, lowpass filtering at 660 Hz, and no modification. In the second, stimuli featuring certain ethnically diagnostic vowels and control stimuli were subjected to monotonization, conversion of vowels to schwa, or no modification. In the third, stimuli featuring diagnostic vowels and control stimuli were modified so that the intonation of paired African American and European American speakers was swapped. In all three experiments, African American and European American listeners in North Carolina and European American listeners in West Virginia identified the ethnicity of the speaker of each stimulus. Vowel quality emerged as the most consistent cue for identifications. However, listeners accessed other cues differently for male and female speakers. Breathiness was correlated with identifications of male speakers but not of female speakers. F0-related factors proved more important for female speakers than for male speakers. [Work supported by NSF.

  20. Words matter: distinguishing "personalized medicine" and "biologically personalized therapeutics".

    PubMed

    Cherny, Nathan I; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; Emanuel, Linda; Fallowfield, Lesley; Francis, Prudence A; Gabizon, Alberto; Piccart, Martine J; Sidransky, David; Soussan-Gutman, Lior; Tziraki, Chariklia

    2014-12-01

    "Personalized medicine" has become a generic term referring to techniques that evaluate either the host or the disease to enhance the likelihood of beneficial patient outcomes from treatment interventions. There is, however, much more to personalization of care than just identifying the biotherapeutic strategy with the highest likelihood of benefit. In its new meaning, "personalized medicine" could overshadow the individually tailored, whole-person care that is at the bedrock of what people need and want when they are ill. Since names and definitional terms set the scope of the discourse, they have the power to define what personalized medicine includes or does not include, thus influencing the scope of the professional purview regarding the delivery of personalized care. Taxonomic accuracy is important in understanding the differences between therapeutic interventions that are distinguishable in their aims, indications, scope, benefits, and risks. In order to restore the due emphasis to the patient and his or her needs, we assert that it is necessary, albeit belated, to deconflate the contemporary term "personalized medicine" by taxonomizing this therapeutic strategy more accurately as "biologically personalized therapeutics" (BPT). The scope of truly personalized medicine and its relationship to biologically personalized therapeutics is described, emphasizing that the best of care must give due recognition and emphasis to both BPT and truly personalized medicine.

  1. On Making a Distinguished Vertex Minimum Degree by Vertex Deletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betzler, Nadja; Bredereck, Robert; Niedermeier, Rolf; Uhlmann, Johannes

    For directed and undirected graphs, we study the problem to make a distinguished vertex the unique minimum-(in)degree vertex through deletion of a minimum number of vertices. The corresponding NP-hard optimization problems are motivated by applications concerning control in elections and social network analysis. Continuing previous work for the directed case, we show that the problem is W[2]-hard when parameterized by the graph's feedback arc set number, whereas it becomes fixed-parameter tractable when combining the parameters "feedback vertex set number" and "number of vertices to delete". For the so far unstudied undirected case, we show that the problem is NP-hard and W[1]-hard when parameterized by the "number of vertices to delete". On the positive side, we show fixed-parameter tractability for several parameterizations measuring tree-likeness, including a vertex-linear problem kernel with respect to the parameter "feedback edge set number". On the contrary, we show a non-existence result concerning polynomial-size problem kernels for the combined parameter "vertex cover number and number of vertices to delete", implying corresponding nonexistence results when replacing vertex cover number by treewidth or feedback vertex set number.

  2. Establishing trauma: the difficulty distinguishing between memories and fantasies.

    PubMed

    Person, E S; Klar, H

    1994-01-01

    This paper is intended as a contribution to understanding why, up until recently, there have been so few case reports of actual abuse and its sequelae in the psychoanalytic literature. We suggest that psychoanalytic insights into the nature of psychic reality, while indispensable to the evolution of psychoanalytic thinking, have nonetheless had the adverse effect of collapsing any distinction between unconscious fantasies and repressed memories. Moreover, the idea that knowledge of external reality is itself mentally constructed also has diminished interest in uncovering trauma and "real" history. We present a report of an adult analysis that illustrates the recovery of a dissociated memory of sexual abuse that occurred during adolescence, as a springboard to discuss problems analysts have had in dealing with trauma theoretically. We hypothesize that repressed memories and conscious fantasies can often be distinguished insofar as they may be "stored" or encoded differently, and that consequently the sequelae of trauma and fantasy often, but not always, can be disentangled. We describe some different modes of encoding trauma and some different ways of remembering, reexperiencing, and reenacting it. And, finally, we suggest why traumatic memories are increasingly accessible to patients today.

  3. Adaptive inference for distinguishing credible from incredible patterns in nature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holling, Crawford S.; Allen, C.R.

    2002-01-01

    Strong inference is a powerful and rapid tool that can be used to identify and explain patterns in molecular biology, cell biology, and physiology. It is effective where causes are single and separable and where discrimination between pairwise alternative hypotheses can be determined experimentally by a simple yes or no answer. But causes in ecological systems are multiple and overlapping and are not entirely separable. Frequently, competing hypotheses cannot be distinguished by a single unambiguous test, but only by a suite of tests of different kinds, that produce a body of evidence to support one line of argument and not others. We call this process "adaptive inference". Instead of pitting each member of a pair of hypotheses against each other, adaptive inference relies on the exuberant invention of multiple, competing hypotheses, after which carefully structured comparative data are used to explore the logical consequences of each. Herein we present an example that demonstrates the attributes of adaptive inference that have developed out of a 30-year study of the resilience of ecosystems.

  4. Distinguishing k-defects from their canonical twins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Melinda; Lewandowski, Matt; Trodden, Mark; Wesley, Daniel

    2010-11-01

    We study k-defects—topological defects in theories with more than two derivatives and second-order equations of motion—and describe some striking ways in which these defects both resemble and differ from their analogues in canonical scalar field theories. We show that, for some models, the homotopy structure of the vacuum manifold is insufficient to establish the existence of k-defects, in contrast to the canonical case. These results also constrain certain families of Dirac-Born-Infeld instanton solutions in the 4-dimensional effective theory. We then describe a class of k-defect solutions, which we dub “doppelgängers,” that precisely match the field profile and energy density of their canonical scalar field theory counterparts. We give a complete characterization of Lagrangians which admit doppelgänger domain walls. By numerically computing the fluctuation eigenmodes about domain wall solutions, we find different spectra for doppelgängers and canonical walls, allowing us to distinguish between k-defects and the canonical walls they mimic. We search for doppelgängers for cosmic strings by numerically constructing solutions of Dirac-Born-Infeld and canonical scalar field theories. Despite investigating several examples, we are unable to find doppelgänger cosmic strings, hence the existence of doppelgängers for defects with codimension >1 remains an open question.

  5. Distinguishing Intrapsychic From Interpersonal Motives in Psychological Theory and Research.

    PubMed

    Leary, Mark R; Raimi, Kaitlin Toner; Jongman-Sereno, Katrina P; Diebels, Kate J

    2015-07-01

    Many psychological phenomena have been explained primarily in terms of intrapsychic motives to maintain particular cognitive or affective states--such as motives for consistency, self-esteem, and authenticity--whereas other phenomena have been explained in terms of interpersonal motives to obtain tangible resources, reactions, or outcomes from other people. In this article, we describe and contrast intrapsychic and interpersonal motives, and we review evidence showing that these two distinct sets of motives are sometimes conflated and confused in ways that undermine the viability of motivational theories. Explanations that invoke motives to maintain certain intrapsychic states offer a dramatically different view of the psychological foundations of human behavior than those that posit motives to obtain desired interpersonal outcomes. Several phenomena are examined as exemplars of instances in which interpersonal and intrapsychic motives have been inadequately distinguished, if not directly confounded, including cognitive dissonance, the self-esteem motive, biases in judgment and decision making, posttransgression accounts, authenticity, and self-conscious emotions. Our analysis of the literature suggests that theorists and researchers should consider the relative importance of intrapsychic versus interpersonal motives in the phenomena they study and that they should make a concerted effort to deconfound intrapsychic and interpersonal influences in their research.

  6. Limestones distinguished by magnetic hysteresis in three-dimensional projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, G. J.; Hamilton, Tom

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic hysteresis data determine the suitability of rocks for paleomagnetic work, provide clues to paleo-environment and paleo-climate and they may characterize depositional environments for limestones. However, the variables chosen for conventional two-dimensional hysteresis plots, such as that of Day et al. [1977], are not always suitable to discriminate between samples. Distinguishing samples by their regression surfaces in 3D hysteresis space may be more successful in some cases [Borradaile and Lagroix, 2000] but a 2D projection with a less arbitrary viewing axis is preferable for routine reporting. We show that limestone samples are simply discriminated in a new 2D projection produced by projecting hysteresis data from three dimensions (x, y, z = Mr/Ms, Bcr, Bc) onto a plane containing the Mr/Ms axis. The orientation of the plane is controlled by its x-axis that is defined by a suitably selected Bcr/Bc ratio, most often in the magnetite PSD range, 2< (Bcr/Bc) < 4.

  7. A single molecular marker to distinguish between species of Dioscorea.

    PubMed

    Techen, Natascha; Parveen, Iffat; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2017-03-01

    Yams are species of the genus Dioscorea (family Dioscoreaceae), which consists of approximately 630 species. The majority of the world production of yams occurs in Africa with 58.8 million t annually, but they are also produced in the Americas and Asia. The saponins in yams have been reported to possess various properties to improve health. The tuber and aerial parts of various species often share morphological similarities, which can cause problems in the proper identification of sample material. For example, the rootstocks and aerial parts of Dioscorea villosa L. share similarities with Dioscorea polystachia Turcz. Dioscorea bulbifera L. may be mistaken for Dioscorea alata L. owing to similar morphologies. Various molecular analyses have been published to help with the identification of species and varieties within the genus Dioscorea. The multi-loci or single-locus analysis has resulted in varying success, some with only a limited discrimination rate. In the present study, a single nuclear genomic region, biparentally inherited, was analyzed for its usefulness as a molecular marker for species identification and discrimination between D. bulbifera, D. villosa, D. nipponica, D. alata, D. caucasica, and D. deltoidea samples. The results of this study show that the LFY genomic region can be useful as a molecular marker to distinguish between samples.

  8. Distinguishing African and European honeybee matrilines using amplified mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, H G; Smith, D R

    1991-01-01

    Previous DNA studies have revealed that feral neotropical African bees have largely retained an African genetic integrity. Additional DNA testing is needed to confirm these findings, to understand the processes responsible, and to follow African bee spread into the temperate United States. To facilitate surveys, the polymerase chain reaction was utilized. African and European honeybee mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was identified through amplified segments that carry informative restriction site and length polymorphisms. The ability to discriminate among honeybee subspecies was established by testing a total of 129 colonies from Africa and Europe. Matriline identities could thus be determined for imported New World bees. Among 41 managed and feral colonies in the United States and north Mexico, two European lineages (west and east) were distinguished. From neotropical regions, 72 feral colonies had African mtDNA and 4 had European mtDNA. The results support earlier conclusions that neotropical African bees have spread as unbroken African maternal lineages. Old and New World African honeybee populations exhibit different frequencies of a mtDNA length polymorphism. Through standard analyses, a north African mtDNA type that may have been imported previously from Spain or Portugal was not detected among neotropical African bees. Images PMID:1674608

  9. Prospects for distinguishing dark matter models using annual modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, Samuel J.; Gluscevic, Vera; McDermott, Samuel D.

    2017-02-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that, in the event of a putative signal in dark matter direct detection experiments, properly identifying the underlying dark matter-nuclei interaction promises to be a challenging task. Given the most optimistic expectations for the number counts of recoil events in the forthcoming Generation 2 experiments, differentiating between interactions that produce distinct features in the recoil energy spectra will only be possible if a strong signal is observed simultaneously on a variety of complementary targets. However, there is a wide range of viable theories that give rise to virtually identical energy spectra, and may only differ by the dependence of the recoil rate on the dark matter velocity. In this work, we investigate how degeneracy between such competing models may be broken by analyzing the time dependence of nuclear recoils, i.e. the annual modulation of the rate. For this purpose, we simulate dark matter events for a variety of interactions and experiments, and perform a Bayesian model-selection analysis on all simulated data sets, evaluating the chance of correctly identifying the input model for a given experimental setup. We find that including information on the annual modulation of the rate may significantly enhance the ability of a single target to distinguish dark matter models with nearly degenerate recoil spectra, but only with exposures beyond the expectations of Generation 2 experiments.

  10. 10 CFR 1002.3 - Custody of official seal and distinguishing flags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Custody of official seal and distinguishing flags. 1002.3 Section 1002.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) OFFICIAL SEAL AND DISTINGUISHING FLAG General § 1002.3 Custody of official seal and distinguishing flags. The Secretary or his designee...

  11. 10 CFR 1002.3 - Custody of official seal and distinguishing flags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Custody of official seal and distinguishing flags. 1002.3 Section 1002.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) OFFICIAL SEAL AND DISTINGUISHING FLAG General § 1002.3 Custody of official seal and distinguishing flags. The Secretary or his designee...

  12. 10 CFR 1002.3 - Custody of official seal and distinguishing flags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Custody of official seal and distinguishing flags. 1002.3 Section 1002.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) OFFICIAL SEAL AND DISTINGUISHING FLAG General § 1002.3 Custody of official seal and distinguishing flags. The Secretary or his designee...

  13. 10 CFR 1002.3 - Custody of official seal and distinguishing flags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Custody of official seal and distinguishing flags. 1002.3 Section 1002.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) OFFICIAL SEAL AND DISTINGUISHING FLAG General § 1002.3 Custody of official seal and distinguishing flags. The Secretary or his designee...

  14. 10 CFR 1002.3 - Custody of official seal and distinguishing flags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Custody of official seal and distinguishing flags. 1002.3 Section 1002.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) OFFICIAL SEAL AND DISTINGUISHING FLAG General § 1002.3 Custody of official seal and distinguishing flags. The Secretary or his designee...

  15. Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology: Neil Lutsky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology recognizes an outstanding career contribution to the teaching of psychology. The 2011 recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award is Neil Lutsky. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Distinguished Teaching Award…

  16. Value of distinguishing differentiated thyroid carcinoma by miRNA

    PubMed Central

    XU, JIANLIN; ZHANG, DING; NIU, QIAN; NAN, YONGGANG; SHI, CHANGBEI; ZHAO, HUA; LIANG, XIAOYAN

    2016-01-01

    Current methods for diagnosing thyroid carcinoma are time consuming or expensive. Thus, alternative approaches are required. In the present study, microRNAs (miRNAs) with higher sensitivity and specificity were screened while distinguishing between differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) and subtype papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). A total of 120 cases suspected of having thyroid carcinoma were selected and examined using clinical color Doppler ultrasound, and computed tomography scan at the same time. The tissue specimens were obtained with fine needle aspiration, multiphase biopsy and surgical resection. The expression of miR146b, miR221 and miR222 was detected uisng the RT-quantitative polymerase chain reaction method. The receiver operating characteristic curve was used to obtain the cut-off value. Pathological examination identified 8 cases of normal thyroid tissue; 9 cases of hyperplastic nodules; 12 cases of thyroid adenoma; and 91 cases of thyroid carcinoma, of which 59 cases were DTC, 15 cases were follicular carcinoma and 17 cases were undifferentiated carcinoma. In the thyroid carcinoma, the expression levels of miR146b, miR221 and miR222 were significantly higher than those of other tissues (P<0.05). The expression levels of these miRNAs in the differentiated type were also significantly higher than those in the undifferentiated type (P<0.05). A comparison of the differentiated subunit identified no statistically significant difference (P>0.05). Following diagnosis of DTC, the area under curve (AUC) of miR146b, miR221 and miR222 was 0.832, 0.806 and 0.745, respectively; the cut-off values were 1.346, 1.213 and 1.425, respectively; susceptibility was 72.8, 71.5 and 68.7%, respectively; and specificity was 62.3, 60.9 and 59.3%, respectively. The AUC of the combined miR-146b and −221 following diagnosis of PTC was 0.695; the cut-off values were 1.506 and 1.462, respectively; susceptibility was 78.9%; and specificity was 68.5%. The AUC of the combined mi

  17. Mesiodistal odontometrics as a distinguishing trait: A comparative preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Sravya, Taneeru; Dumpala, Rakesh Kumar; Guttikonda, Venkateswara Rao; Manchikatla, Praveen Kumar; Narasimha, Vanajakshi China

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Sex determination is a vital step in reconstructing an individual profile from unidentified skeletal remnants. Variations in tooth size are influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Tooth size variations have been reported among different populations. Aim: To identify the sex by determining the mesiodistal (MD) dimensions of maxillary canines. Objectives: (1) To compare the MD diameter of all maxillary canines — (a) in the entire urban and tribal population, (b) in urban male and urban female populations, (c) in tribal male and tribal female populations, and (d) in the entire male and female populations and (2) To estimate the percentage of sexual dimorphism individually in urban and tribal populations. Materials and Methods: Fifty subjects each from urban and tribal populations in equal gender ratio were selected in Khammam district, Telangana, for the purpose of this study. After obtaining informed consent, maxillary study models of the selected subjects were made. MD diameters of left and right maxillary canines were measured on casts using vernier calipers. The obtained data were subjected to statistical analysis. Results: (1) The total tribal population showed a greater MD diameter of maxillary canines than the total urban population, (2) Urban males showed a greater MD diameter of maxillary canines than urban females, (3) Tribal males showed a greater MD diameter of maxillary canines than tribal females, (4) The entire male population showed a greater MD diameter of maxillary canines than the entire female population, and (5) The percentage of dimorphism between males and females in individual groups was found to be significant. Conclusion: The study showed maxillary canines exhibiting significant sexual dimorphism and can be used as a distinguishing trait for sex determination along with other procedures. PMID:27555727

  18. Distinguishing Biotic from Abiotic Phosphate Oxygen Isotopic Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, R.; Moyer, C.; Colman, A.; Liang, Y.; Dogru, D.

    2006-05-01

    On earth, phosphate has a strong biological oxygen isotope signature due to its concentration and intense cycling by living organisms as an essential nutrient. Phosphate does not undergo oxygen isotope exchange with water at low temperature without enzymatic catalysis, making the oxygen isotope ratio (18O/16O) of phosphate, δ18OP, an attractive biosignature in the search for early and extraterrestrial life. Recent laboratory and field studies have demonstrated that the δ18OP value of dissolved inorganic phosphate (PO4) records specific microbial activity and enzymatic reaction pathways in both laboratory cultures and natural waters/sediments (Blake et al., 2005; Colman et al 2005; Liang and Blake, 2005). Phosphate oxygen isotope biosignatures may be distinguished from abiotic signatures by: (1) evaluating the degree of temperature-dependent PO4-water oxygen isotope exchange in aqueous systems and deviation from equilibrium; and (2) evolution from an abiotic P reservoir signature towards a biotic P reservoir signature. Important abiotic processes potentially affecting phosphate δ18OP values include dissolution/precipitation, adsorption/desorption, recrystallization of PO4 mineral phases, diagenesis and metamorphism. For most of these processes, the recording, retention and alteration of δ18OP biosignatures have not been evaluated. Deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields are an ideal system in which to study the preservation and alteration of δ18OP biosignatures, as well as potential look-alikes produced by heat-promoted PO4 -water oxygen isotope exchange. Results from recent studies of δ18OP biosignatures in hydrothermal deposits near 9 and 21 degrees N. EPR and at Loihi seamount will be presented.

  19. Allosteric mechanisms can be distinguished using structural mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Dyachenko, Andrey; Gruber, Ranit; Shimon, Liat; Horovitz, Amnon; Sharon, Michal

    2013-01-01

    The activity of many proteins, including metabolic enzymes, molecular machines, and ion channels, is often regulated by conformational changes that are induced or stabilized by ligand binding. In cases of multimeric proteins, such allosteric regulation has often been described by the concerted Monod–Wyman–Changeux and sequential Koshland–Némethy–Filmer classic models of cooperativity. Despite the important functional implications of the mechanism of cooperativity, it has been impossible in many cases to distinguish between these various allosteric models using ensemble measurements of ligand binding in bulk protein solutions. Here, we demonstrate that structural MS offers a way to break this impasse by providing the full distribution of ligand-bound states of a protein complex. Given this distribution, it is possible to determine all the binding constants of a ligand to a highly multimeric cooperative system, and thereby infer its allosteric mechanism. Our approach to the dissection of allosteric mechanisms relies on advances in MS—which provide the required resolution of ligand-bound states—and in data analysis. We validated our approach using the well-characterized Escherichia coli chaperone GroEL, a double-heptameric ring containing 14 ATP binding sites, which has become a paradigm for molecular machines. The values of the 14 binding constants of ATP to GroEL were determined, and the ATP-loading pathway of the chaperone was characterized. The methodology and analyses presented here are directly applicable to numerous other cooperative systems and are therefore expected to promote further research on allosteric systems. PMID:23589876

  20. Distinguishing Alzheimer's disease from other major forms of dementia

    PubMed Central

    Karantzoulis, Stella; Galvin, James E

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common and most studied cause of dementia. Significant advances have been made since the first set of clinical criteria for AD were put forth in 1984 that are now captured in the new criteria for AD published in 2011. Key features include recognition of a broad AD spectrum (from preclinical to mild cognitive impairment to AD dementia) and requirement of AD biomarkers for diagnosis. Correctly diagnosing dementia type is increasingly important in an era when potential disease-modifying agents are soon to be marketed. The typical AD dementia syndrome has at its core, an amnestic syndrome of the hippocampal type, followed by associated deficits in word-finding, spatial cognition, executive functions and neuropsychiatric changes. Atypical presentations of AD have also been identified that are presumed to have a different disease course. It can be difficult to distinguish between the various dementia syndromes given the overlap in many common clinical features across the dementias. The clinical difficulty in diagnosis may reflect the underlying pathology, as AD often co-occurs with other pathologies at autopsy, such as cerebrovascular disease or Lewy bodies. Neuropsychological evaluation has provided clinicians and researchers with profiles of cognitive strengths and weaknesses that help to define the dementias. There is yet no single behavioral marker that can reliably discriminate AD from the other dementias. The combined investigation of cognitive and neurobehavioral symptoms coupled with imaging markers could provide a more accurate approach for differentiating between AD and other major dementia syndromes in the future. PMID:22014137

  1. Distinguishing between gaming and gambling activities in addiction research

    PubMed Central

    King, Daniel L.; Gainsbury, Sally M.; Delfabbro, Paul H.; Hing, Nerilee; Abarbanel, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Gambling and gaming activities have become increasingly recognised as sharing many common features at a structural and aesthetic level. Both have also been implicated as contributing to harm through excessive involvement. Despite this, relatively little attention has been given to the fundamental characteristics that differentiate these two classes of activity, especially in situations where the boundaries between them may be particularly hard to distinguish. This is evident, for example, in digital games that incorporate free and paid virtual currencies or items, as well as the capacity for wagering. Such overlaps create problems for regulatory classifications, screening, diagnosis and treatment. Is the problem related to the gambling or gaming content? Methods In this paper, we review the principal sources of overlap between the activity classes in terms of several dimensions: interactivity, monetisation, betting and wagering, types of outcomes, structural fidelity, context and centrality of content, and advertising. Results We argue that gaming is principally defined by its interactivity, skill-based play, and contextual indicators of progression and success. In contrast, gambling is defined by betting and wagering mechanics, predominantly chance-determined outcomes, and monetisation features that involve risk and payout to the player. A checklist measure is provided, with practical examples, to examine activities according to features of design and function, which may inform guidelines for policy makers, researchers and treatment providers. Discussion and conclusions We suggest that, in some instances, using category-based nomenclature (e.g., “gambling-like game”) may be too vague or cumbersome to adequately organise our understanding of new gaming/gambling hybrid activities. PMID:26690615

  2. Distinguishing true from false positives in genomic studies: p values.

    PubMed

    Broer, Linda; Lill, Christina M; Schuur, Maaike; Amin, Najaf; Roehr, Johannes T; Bertram, Lars; Ioannidis, John P A; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2013-02-01

    Distinguishing true from false positive findings is a major challenge in human genetic epidemiology. Several strategies have been devised to facilitate this, including the positive predictive value (PPV) and a set of epidemiological criteria, known as the "Venice" criteria. The PPV measures the probability of a true association, given a statistically significant finding, while the Venice criteria grade the credibility based on the amount of evidence, consistency of replication and protection from bias. A vast majority of journals use significance thresholds to identify the true positive findings. We studied the effect of p value thresholds on the PPV and used the PPV and Venice criteria to define usable thresholds of statistical significance. Theoretical and empirical analyses of data published on AlzGene show that at a nominal p value threshold of 0.05 most "positive" findings will turn out to be false if the prior probability of association is below 0.10 even if the statistical power of the study is higher than 0.80. However, in underpowered studies (0.25) with a low prior probability of 1 × 10(-3), a p value of 1 × 10(-5) yields a high PPV (>96 %). Here we have shown that the p value threshold of 1 × 10(-5) gives a very strong evidence of association in almost all studies. However, in the case of a very high prior probability of association (0.50) a p value threshold of 0.05 may be sufficient, while for studies with very low prior probability of association (1 × 10(-4); genome-wide association studies for instance) 1 × 10(-7) may serve as a useful threshold to declare significance.

  3. Distinguishing bias from sensitivity effects in multialternative detection tasks

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Devarajan; Steinmetz, Nicholas A.; Moore, Tirin; Knudsen, Eric I.

    2014-01-01

    Studies investigating the neural bases of cognitive phenomena increasingly employ multialternative detection tasks that seek to measure the ability to detect a target stimulus or changes in some target feature (e.g., orientation or direction of motion) that could occur at one of many locations. In such tasks, it is essential to distinguish the behavioral and neural correlates of enhanced perceptual sensitivity from those of increased bias for a particular location or choice (choice bias). However, making such a distinction is not possible with established approaches. We present a new signal detection model that decouples the behavioral effects of choice bias from those of perceptual sensitivity in multialternative (change) detection tasks. By formulating the perceptual decision in a multidimensional decision space, our model quantifies the respective contributions of bias and sensitivity to multialternative behavioral choices. With a combination of analytical and numerical approaches, we demonstrate an optimal, one-to-one mapping between model parameters and choice probabilities even for tasks involving arbitrarily large numbers of alternatives. We validated the model with published data from two ternary choice experiments: a target-detection experiment and a length-discrimination experiment. The results of this validation provided novel insights into perceptual processes (sensory noise and competitive interactions) that can accurately and parsimoniously account for observers' behavior in each task. The model will find important application in identifying and interpreting the effects of behavioral manipulations (e.g., cueing attention) or neural perturbations (e.g., stimulation or inactivation) in a variety of multialternative tasks of perception, attention, and decision-making. PMID:25146574

  4. T-Cell Immunophenotyping Distinguishes Active From Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Katrina M.; Whitworth, Hilary S.; Montamat-Sicotte, Damien J.; Grass, Lisa; Cooke, Graham S.; Kapembwa, Moses S.; Kon, Onn M.; Sampson, Robert D.; Taylor, Graham P.; Lalvani, Ajit

    2013-01-01

    Background. Changes in the phenotype and function of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets in response to stage of infection may allow discrimination between active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection. Methods. A prospective comparison of M. tuberculosis-specific cellular immunity in subjects with active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection, with and without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. Polychromatic flow cytometry was used to measure CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subset phenotype and secretion of interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 2 (IL-2), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Results. Frequencies of CD4+ and CD8+ cells secreting IFN-γ-only, TNF-α-only and dual IFN-γ/TNF-α were greater in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection. All M. tuberculosis-specific CD4+ subsets, with the exception of IL-2-only cells, switched from central to effector memory phenotype in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection, accompanied by a reduction in IL-7 receptor α (CD127) expression. The frequency of PPD-specific CD4+ TNF-α-only-secreting T cells with an effector phenotype accurately distinguished active tuberculosis from latent tuberculosis infection with an area under the curve of 0.99, substantially more discriminatory than measurement of function alone. Conclusions. Combined measurement of T-cell phenotype and function defines a highly discriminatory biomarker of tuberculosis disease activity. Unlocking the diagnostic and monitoring potential of this combined approach now requires validation in large-scale prospective studies. PMID:23966657

  5. Distinguishing Morphotypes of Foraminifera Orbulina Universa Using Shell Morphometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, B. J.; Thunell, R.

    2014-12-01

    Several recent genetic studies have revealed that many morphologically defined planktonic foraminiferal species contain multiple distinct cryptic or pseudocryptic genetic variants. In some cases, such as with the genetic variants of Globigerinoides ruber, past taxonomic "lumping" may be easily revised within the framework of the morphospecies concept. However, some planktonic foraminiferal cryptic species are not easily differentiated from one another based on identifiable morphological differences, as is the case with Orbulina universa cryptic species (Morard et al., 2009). Based on recent findings, it is believed that several of these O. universa cryptic species differ in their habitat preferences (Darling et al., 1999,2000; de Vargas et al., 1999, 2001), and the lumping of these cryptic species could possibly account for a significant amount of the noise observed in various paleoclimate records derived from this species (Kucera and Darling, 2002). The current study uses foraminiferal morphometrics (area density, Marshall et al., 2013, thickness and weight-diameter realtionships) to identify distinct groupings of individual Orbulina universa specimens collected from sediment trap samples in the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela. The study reveals three distinct groups of individuals, varying in their test thicknesses and pore space distribution, which likely correspond to the previously identified cryptic species of O. universa. We find significant differences in the isotopic compositions of these groupings - suggesting that the identified morphotypes differ in their habitat preferences. These morphotypes also exhibit different relationships with the measured hydrographic parameters and their relative distribution can be linked to changes in upwelling and non-upwelling hydrographic regimes. We agree with the results of previous studies that suggest different cryptic species should not be treated as ecophenotypic variants and need to be distinguished from one another

  6. Distinguishing iron-reducing from sulfate-reducing conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, F.H.; Bradley, P.M.; Thomas, M.A.; McMahon, P.B.

    2009-01-01

    Ground water systems dominated by iron- or sulfate-reducing conditions may be distinguished by observing concentrations of dissolved iron (Fe2+) and sulfide (sum of H2S, HS-, and S= species and denoted here as "H2S"). This approach is based on the observation that concentrations of Fe2+ and H2S in ground water systems tend to be inversely related according to a hyperbolic function. That is, when Fe2+ concentrations are high, H2S concentrations tend to be low and vice versa. This relation partly reflects the rapid reaction kinetics of Fe2+ with H2S to produce relatively insoluble ferrous sulfides (FeS). This relation also reflects competition for organic substrates between the iron- and the sulfate-reducing microorganisms that catalyze the production of Fe2+ and H 2S. These solubility and microbial constraints operate in tandem, resulting in the observed hyperbolic relation between Fe2+ and H 2S concentrations. Concentrations of redox indicators, including dissolved hydrogen (H2) measured in a shallow aquifer in Hanahan, South Carolina, suggest that if the Fe2+/H2S mass ratio (units of mg/L) exceeded 10, the screened interval being tapped was consistently iron reducing (H2 ???0.2 to 0.8 nM). Conversely, if the Fe 2+/H2S ratio was less than 0.30, consistent sulfate-reducing (H2 ???1 to 5 nM) conditions were observed over time. Concomitantly high Fe2+ and H2S concentrations were associated with H2 concentrations that varied between 0.2 and 5.0 nM over time, suggesting mixing of water from adjacent iron- and sulfate-reducing zones or concomitant iron and sulfate reduction under nonelectron donor-limited conditions. These observations suggest that Fe2+/H2S mass ratios may provide useful information concerning the occurrence and distribution of iron and sulfate reduction in ground water systems. ?? 2009 National Ground Water Association.

  7. Distinguishing Between Natural and Anthropogenic Part of Sea Level Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, M.; Karpytchev, M.; Lennartz-Sassinek, S.

    2014-12-01

    Detection and attribution of human influence on sea level rise are important topics that have not yet been explored in depth. From the perspective of assessing the contribution of human activities to climate changes, the sea level drivers can be partitioned in anthropogenic and natural forcing. In this study we try to answer the following two questions: (1) How large a sea level trend could be expected as result of natural internal variability? (2) Whether the sea level changes observed over the past century were natural in origin. We suppose that natural behavior of sea level consists of increases and decreases occurring with frequencies following a power law distribution and the monthly sea level records are power law long-term correlated time series. Then we search for the presence of unnatural external sea level trend by applying statistics of Lennartz and Bunde [2009]. We estimate the minimum anthropogenic sea level trend as a lower bound of statistically significant external sea level trend in the longest tide-gauge records worldwide. We apply this new method to distinguish between the trend-like natural oscillations and the external trends in the longest available sea level records and in global mean sea level reconstructions. The results show that the long-term persistence impacts strongly on sea level rise estimation. We provide statistical evidences that the observed sea level changes, at global and regional scales, are beyond its natural internal variability and cannot be explained without human influence. We found that sea level change during the past century contains an external component at 99% significance level in two thirds of the available longest tidal records worldwide. The anthropogenic sea level trend is about 1 mm/yr in global sea level reconstructions that is more than half of the total observed sea level trend during the XXth century, which is about 1.7 mm/yr. This work provides the first estimate of the minimal anthropogenic contribution

  8. Mapping groundwater quality distinguishing geogenic and anthropogenic contribution using NBL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preziosi, Elisabetta; Ducci, Daniela; Condesso de Melo, Maria Teresa; Parrone, Daniele; Sellerino, Mariangela; Ghergo, Stefano; Oliveira, Joana; Ribeiro, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Groundwaters are threatened by anthropic activities and pollution is interesting a large number of aquifers worldwide. Qualitative and quantitative monitoring is required to assess the status and track its evolution in time and space especially where anthropic pressures are stronger. Up to now, groundwater quality mapping has been performed separately from the assessment of its natural status, i.e. the definition of the natural background level of a particular element in a particular area or groundwater body. The natural background level (NBL) of a substance or element allows to distinguish anthropogenic pollution from contamination of natural origin in a population of groundwater samples. NBLs are the result of different atmospheric, geological, chemical and biological interaction processes during groundwater infiltration and circulation. There is an increasing need for the water managers to have sound indications on good quality groundwater exploitation. Indeed the extension of a groundwater body is often very large, in the order of tens or hundreds of square km. How to select a proper location for good quality groundwater abstraction is often limited to a question of facility for drilling (access, roads, authorizations, etc.) or at the most related to quantitative aspects driven by geophysical exploration (the most promising from a transmissibility point of view). So how to give indications to the administrators and water managers about the exploitation of good quality drinking water? In the case of anthropic contamination, how to define which area is to be restored and to which threshold (e.g. background level) should the concentration be lowered through the restoration measures? In the framework of a common project between research institutions in Italy (funded by CNR) and Portugal (funded by FCT), our objective is to establish a methodology aiming at merging together 1) the evaluation of NBL and 2) the need to take into account the drinking water standards

  9. Distinguishing "new" from "old" carbon in post mining soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vindušková, Olga; Frouz, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Introduction Soils developing on heaped overburden after open pit coal mining near Sokolov, Czech Republic, provide an exceptional opportunity to study sites of different ages (0-70 years) developing on similar substrate under relatively well-known conditions. Soil organic carbon (SOC) is an useful indicator of soil quality and represents an important global carbon pool. Post-mining soils would be a perfect model for long-term study of carbon dynamics. Unfortunately, quantifying SOC in Sokolov post-mining soils is quite complicated, since conventional quantification methods cannot distinguish between SOC derived from plant residues and fossil organic carbon derived from coal and kerogen present in the overburden. Moreover, also inorganic carbon may sometimes bias SOC quantification. Up to now, the only way to directly estimate recently derived SOC in these soils is radiocarbon dating (Rumpel et al. 1999; Karu et al. 2009). However, this method is costly and thus cannot be used routinely. The aim of our study is to find an accessible method to quantify recently derived SOC. We would highly appreciate ideas of other soil scientists, organic geochemists and sedimentologists on how to solve this challenge. Methods and hypotheses A set of 14 soil samples were analysed by radiocarbon (14C-AMS) analysis, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy, Rock-Eval and XRD. For calibration of NIRS, also 125 artificial mixtures were produced by mixing different amounts of claystone, coal and partially decomposed litter. NIRS (1000-2500 nm) as well as younger mid-infrared spectroscopy has been widely applied to soils (Janik et al. 2007; Vasques et al. 2009; Michel et al. 2009). When combined with multivariate chemometric techniques, it can be used to predict concentration of different compounds. No study has yet focused on NIRS application to soils where fossil carbon is found in two chemically different forms - whereas coal is rather aromatic, kerogen in our

  10. Brood stock segregation for the control of bacterial kidney disease can affect mortality of progeny chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in seawater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Diane G.; Pascho, Ronald J.; Palmisano, Aldo N.

    1995-01-01

    Segregation of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) brood stock based on the measurement of maternal Renibacterium salmoninarum infection levels by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the fluorescent antibody technique (FAT) was previously shown to affect the prevalence and levels of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in progeny fish during hatchery rearing. Smolts from that study were subjected to standardized fish health and condition evaluation procedures 2 weeks before the conclusion of hatchery rearing and release of the fish for migration to the Pacific Ocean. The results suggested that the general health of the smolts in the progeny group from parents that had low R. salmoninarum infection levels or tested negative for R. salmoninarum (low-BKD group) was better than that of the smolts in the progeny group from female parents with high R. salmoninarum infection levels (high-BKD group). Testing by the ELISA showed that the overall severity of R. salmoninarum infection also was lower in the smolts from the low-BKD group. Subgroups of smolts from the study were acclimated to tanks of seawater for extended holding. After a 22-day acclimation period and 98 days in full-strength (29 ppt salinity) seawater, total mortality was 12% in the low-BKD group and 44% in the high-BKD group. All of the mortality in the low-BKD group and 85% of the mortality in the high-BKD group occurred after the fish were transferred to full-strength seawater. Testing of kidney tissues from all dead fish by the FAT revealed that 85% of the fish that died in the high-BKD group had high R. salmoninarum numbers, indicating that BKD was the cause of death. In contrast, none of the fish that died in the low-BKD group had detectable numbers of R. salmoninarum. We concluded that brood stock segregation by use of the ELISA and the FAT can affect mortality and the R. salmoninarum status of progeny chinook salmon for as long as 21 months after hatching, even after the fish have

  11. Award for Distinguished Senior Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest: Beverly Greene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Beverly Greene, recipient of the Award for Distinguished Senior Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest, has a long history of distinguished contributions in the public interest through her research, scholarship, teaching, practice, and consultation. Her work raises the visibility of many populations that have been overlooked and…

  12. The Effect of Distinguished Educators on Academic Gain of Louisiana Academically Unacceptable Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scroggins, Ruby C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the degree of academic growth of Academically Unacceptable schools in Louisiana which have been assigned a Distinguished Educator. Distinguished Educators are external change agents who are placed in Academically Unacceptable schools in Louisiana. The data were generated from the Louisiana Department of…

  13. Concurrence as a measure of Markovianity: concurrence versus distinguishability and divisibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ze-Yu; Ren, Yu-Kun; Zeng, Hao-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    We examine the measure of Markovianity based on entanglement through two typical dynamical models in qubit systems and compare it with the measures of Markovianity based on state distinguishability and dynamical divisibility. We find that divisible dynamics always leads to the monotonic decrease in concurrence, but distinguishability does not constrain its behavior in the same way.

  14. Distinguishing Features in Scoring L2 Chinese Speaking Performance: How Do They Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Tan; Mak, Barley

    2013-01-01

    For Chinese as a second language (L2 Chinese), there has been little research into "distinguishing features" (Fulcher, 1996; Iwashita et al., 2008) used in scoring L2 Chinese speaking performance. The study reported here investigates the relationship between the distinguishing features of L2 Chinese spoken performances and the scores…

  15. Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Independent Practice: Jeffrey E. Barnett

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Jeffrey E. Barnett, recipient of the Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Independent Practice, is cited for outstanding, distinguished, and meritorious service in several areas of professional practice, especially professional ethics and psychotherapy treatment. Barnett has produced hundreds of high-quality publications,…

  16. Michael E. Barnes: Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Institutional Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography on the winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Institutional Practice. The 2012 winner is Michael E. Barnes for his pioneering leadership, dedication, and distinguished contributions to juvenile justice. As chief psychologist of the Superior Court of the…

  17. Daniel Landis: Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of one of the co-recipients of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology. One of the 2012 winners is Daniel Landis for his unparalleled contribution to the field of intercultural research in a distinguished academic career spanning almost…

  18. A Preliminary Analysis of the Kentucky Distinguished Education Initiative: A New Approach to Educational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Mimi Mitchell; And Others

    The goal of the Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA) of 1990 was that all schools would be successful as measured by the Kentucky Instructional Results Information System (KIRIS). The Kentucky Distinguished Educator Program was created to promote the goal. The program sought to create a pool of distinguished educators who would serve in School…

  19. Management of bacterial kidney disease in Chinook Salmon hatcheries based on broodstock testing by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay: A multiyear study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munson, A. Douglas; Elliott, Diane G.; Johnson, Keith

    2010-01-01

    From the mid-1980s through the early 1990s, outbreaks of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum continued in Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) hatcheries despite the use of three control methods: (1) injection of returning adult fish with erythromycin to reduce prespawning BKD mortality and limit vertical transmission of R. salmoninarum, (2) topical disinfection of green eggs with iodophor, and (3) prophylactic treatments of juvenile fish with erythromycin-medicated feed. In addition, programs to manage BKD through measurement of R. salmoninarum antigen levels in kidney tissues from spawning female Chinook salmon by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were tested over 13–15 brood years at three IDFG hatcheries. The ELISA results were used for either (1) segregated rearing of progeny from females with high ELISA optical density (OD) values (usually ≥0.25), which are indicative of high R. salmoninarum antigen levels, or (2) culling of eggs from females with high ELISA OD values. The ELISA-based culling program had the most profound positive effects on the study populations. Mortality of juvenile fish during rearing was significantly lower at each hatchery for brood years derived from culling compared with brood years for which culling was not practiced. The prevalence of R. salmoninarum in juvenile fish, as evidenced by detection of the bacterium in kidney smears by the direct fluorescent antibody test, also decreased significantly at each hatchery. In addition, the proportions of returning adult females with kidney ELISA OD values of 0.25 or more decreased 56–85% for fish reared in brood years during which culling was practiced, whereas the proportions of ELISA-negative adults increased 55–58%. This management strategy may allow IDFG Chinook salmon hatcheries to reduce or eliminate prophylactic erythromycin-medicated feed treatments. We recommend using ELISA

  20. The use of forensic tests to distinguish blowfly artifacts from human blood, semen, and saliva.

    PubMed

    Durdle, Annalisa; Mitchell, R John; van Oorschot, Roland A H

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated whether routinely used forensic tests can distinguish 3-day-old or 2-week-old fly artifacts, produced after feeding on human blood, semen, or saliva, from the biological fluid. Hemastix(®) , Hemident(™) , and Hemascein(™) were unable to distinguish blood from artifacts. Hemastix(®) returned false positives from negative controls. ABAcard(®) Hematrace(®) and Hexagon OBTI could distinguish blood from 3-day-old artifacts, but not 2-week-old artifacts. Phadebas(®) and SALIgAE(®) were unable to distinguish saliva from artifacts. RSID(™) -Saliva was able to distinguish saliva from 3-day-old artifacts, but not 2-week-old artifacts. Semen tests Seminal Acid Phosphatase, RSID(™) -Semen, and ABAcard(®) p30 were all able to distinguish semen from 3-day-old artifacts, but not 2-week-old artifacts. The tests investigated cannot be relied upon to distinguish artifacts from biological fluids. However, if an artifact is identified by its morphology, a positive result may indicate which biological fluid the fly consumed, and this knowledge may prove useful for investigators searching for DNA.

  1. 78 FR 12329 - Distinguishing Medical Device Recalls From Product Enhancements; Reporting Requirements; Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Distinguishing Medical Device Recalls From Product Enhancements; Reporting Requirements; Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and...

  2. Musical duplex perception: perception of figurally good chords with subliminal distinguishing tones.

    PubMed

    Hall, M D; Pastore, R E

    1992-08-01

    In a variant of duplex perception with speech, phoneme perception is maintained when distinguishing components are presented below intensities required for separate detection, forming the basis for the claim that a phonetic module takes precedence over nonspeech processing. This finding is replicated with music chords (C major and minor) created by mixing a piano fifth with a sinusoidal distinguishing tone (E or E flat). Individual threshold intensities for detecting E or E flat in the context of the fixed piano tones are established. Chord discrimination thresholds defined by distinguishing tone intensity were determined. Experiment 2 verified masked detection thresholds and subliminal chord identification for experienced musicians. Accurate chord perception was maintained at distinguishing tone intensities nearly 20 dB below the threshold for separate detection. Speech and music findings are argued to demonstrate general perceptual principles.

  3. Development of a Vaccine for Bacterial Kidney Disease in Salmon, 1986 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaattari, Stephen L.

    1987-06-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BRD) has been and remains a chronic contributory problem limiting the productivity of salmon of the Columbia River Basin. Control of this disease will not come easily, but it would lead to a tremendous increase in the health and numbers of salmon populations. Vaccination of salmon of Renibacterium salmoninarum (KDB) is a potentially successful method of controlling this disease. To date, however, no successful vaccine has been developed for general use. A possible solution to this problem,and thus the goal of this research, is to isolate the antigenic components of KDB and enhance their ability to activate the host defenses. This will be accomplished by the chemical modification of these antigens with potent immunomodulatory substances. These modified antigens will then be tested for their effectiveness in inducing immunity to BKD and thereby preventing the disease. The goal of the project's third year was to test the immunogenicity and prophylactic value in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) of various chemical conjugates of Renibacterium salmoninarum cells and major antigens. This was accomplished by assessing the serum antibody response, the cellular immune response (cellular proliferation), and the kinetics of mortality after Lethal injections of the bacterium. An important facet of this research is the identification and isolation of virulence factors. These studies are not only important to the dissection of the mechanism of pathogenesis of bacterial kidney disease, but the purification of such a factor(s) will insure the production of a more potent vaccine. The studies completed this year have: (1) identified antigenic material which protect; (2) identified antigenic material which can exacerbate the disease; (3) identified a possibly major mechanism of pathogenesis via the interference with antibody; (4) the general ability to produce delineated a western blot technique for identification of infected fish; (5) described the use of

  4. Pathogens associated with native and exotic trout populations in Shenandoah National Park and the relationships to fish stocking practices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panek, Frank M.; Atkinson, James; Coll, John

    2008-01-01

    Restrictive fish stocking policies in National Parks were developed as early as 1936 in order to preserve native fish assemblages and historic genetic diversity. Despite recent efforts to understand the effects of non-native or exotic fish introductions, park managers have limited information regarding the effects of these introductions on native fish communities. Shenandoah National Park was established in 1936 and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) restoration within selected streams in the park began in 1937 in collaboration with the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF). An analysis of tissue samples from brook, brown (Salmo trutta), and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from 29 streams within the park from 1998–2002 revealed the presence of Renibacterium salmoninarum, Yersinia ruckeri, and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNv). In order to investigate the relationships of the occurrence of fish pathogens with stocking histories we classified the streams into three categories: 1) streams with no record of stocking, 2) streams that are known to have been stocked historically, and 3) streams that were historically stocked within the park and continue to be stocked downstream of the park boundary. The occurrences of pathogens were summarized relative to this stocking history. Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease, was the most prevalent pathogen found, occurring in all three species and stream stocking categories, and appears to be endemic to the park. Two other pathogens, Yersinia ruckeri and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus were also described from brook trout populations within the park. IPNv was only found in brook trout populations in streams with prior stocking histories. Yersinia ruckeri was only found in brook trout in steams that have never been stocked and like R. salmoninarum, is likely endemic.

  5. Preclinical Testing of a New MR Imaging Approach to Distinguish Aggressive from Indolent Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0128 TITLE: ““Preclinical Testing of a New MR Imaging Approach to Distinguish Aggressive from Indolent Disease...9 May 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER “Preclinical Testing of a New MR Imaging Approach to Distinguish Aggressive from Indolent...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The aim of this project was to develop a new MRI approach to characterize aggressive prostate cancers and

  6. Distinguished Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryles, Daisy; Ink, Gary

    1998-01-01

    Lists best books by the American Library Association for the general reader, best young adult books, notable children's films and videos, best children's books, notable recordings for children, notable children's software and Web sites, quick picks for reluctant young adult readers, bestsellers of 1997, and literary prizes, 1997. (PEN)

  7. Distinguished Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryles, Daisy; Roback, Diane; Ink, Gary

    2001-01-01

    Includes 12 articles that list notable books for college-bound youth, young adults, and children; paperbacks for young adults; audiobooks for young adults; children's videos; recordings for children; software and Web sites for children; bestsellers of 2000; and literary prizes that were awarded in 2000. (LRW)

  8. ELISA-Based Segregation of Adult Spring Chinook Salmon for Control of Bacterial Kidney Disease, Annual Report FY 1989.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaattari, Stephen L.; Winton, James R.

    1989-12-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD), caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, is a serious disease of salmonid fish worldwide. The disease has a major impact on spring chinook salmon populations in the Columbia River system. There is strong evidence that R. safmoninarum can be transmitted from parent to progeny, and therefore culling of gametes from infected parents should obviate this mode of transmission. This report presents the results from the first year of our four year study to investigate segregation of broodstock as a tool for controlling BKD. The segregations will use Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISAs) as detection systems to identify, in tissues of infected fish, proteins produced by R. salmoninarum. A first step in the development of the described detection systems was the optimization of the production of important antigenic proteins from R. salmoninarum. Different culture media were qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated for their ability to support production of cellular and soluble proteins. The major factor affecting antigen quality was the presence and absence of calf serum. Media components and R. salmoninarum growth products could not be separated during harvest of proteins from the cultures containing serum. This caused problems with the quantitation of actual bacterial proteins in the preparation. Thus media without serum is currently employed. Two independent ELISA techniques for the identification of infected parents were examined. One technique is based on polyclonal antisera produced in rabbits and the second is based on mouse monoclonal antibodies (Mabs). To develop the latter system, several Mabs against a major R. salmoninarum antigenic protein were produced. These Mabs were used for the detection of R. salmoninarum antigens in infected fish and also to characterize proteins produced by the bacterium. Both ELISAs were deemed suitable for the segregation of parents into the high and low BKD groups required for this study. An

  9. Distinguished Practices of Distinguished Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for American Private Education, Germantown, MD.

    The Blue Ribbon Schools (BRS) program was designed in 1982 with three purposes in mind: to identify and recognize outstanding schools; to provide schools a tool and criteria for self-assessment and improvement; and to facilitate the sharing of best practices among schools. This book presents profiles and best practices of 12 elementary, 2 middle,…

  10. Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology: Sue Frantz.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Charles L. Brewer Distinguished Teaching of Psychology Award recognizes an outstanding career contribution to the teaching of psychology. The 2016 recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award is Sue Frantz. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the Distinguished Teaching Award at the 124th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 5, 2016, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2016 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; David H. Barlow, vice president; Melba J. T. Vasquez, secretary; Richard C. McCarty, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Cynthia Belar; Camilla Benbow; Rosie Phillips Bingham; Connie S. Chan; Anthony Jackson; Terence M. Keane; Archie L. Turner; W. Bruce Walsh; and Bonnie Markham and Rick McGraw, APA Board of Directors liaisons. (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. Distinguishing Features and Similarities Between Descriptive Phenomenological and Qualitative Description Research.

    PubMed

    Willis, Danny G; Sullivan-Bolyai, Susan; Knafl, Kathleen; Cohen, Marlene Z

    2016-09-01

    Scholars who research phenomena of concern to the discipline of nursing are challenged with making wise choices about different qualitative research approaches. Ultimately, they want to choose an approach that is best suited to answer their research questions. Such choices are predicated on having made distinctions between qualitative methodology, methods, and analytic frames. In this article, we distinguish two qualitative research approaches widely used for descriptive studies: descriptive phenomenological and qualitative description. Providing a clear basis that highlights the distinguishing features and similarities between descriptive phenomenological and qualitative description research will help students and researchers make more informed choices in deciding upon the most appropriate methodology in qualitative research. We orient the reader to distinguishing features and similarities associated with each approach and the kinds of research questions descriptive phenomenological and qualitative description research address.

  12. Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy: Dorothy L. Espelage.

    PubMed

    2016-11-01

    APA's Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy is given to a psychologist who has made a distinguished empirical and/or theoretical contribution to research in public policy, either through a single extraordinary achievement or a lifetime of work. Dorothy L. Espelage is the 2016 recipient of this award for her exceptional work on bullying, gender, and school violence. "She is an outstanding rigorous researcher who uses the most sophisticated methods in assessing the effects of interventions designed to improve the social and emotional lives of children both within and outside of school." Espelage's citation, biography, and selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Gary B. Melton: Award for Distinguished Senior Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    The APA Awards for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest recognize persons who have advanced psychology as a science and/or profession by a single extraordinary achievement or a lifetime of outstanding contributions in the public interest. The 2014 recipient of the Award for Distinguished Senior Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest is Gary B. Melton. Melton was selected for his "influential scholarship on critical topics in psychology in the public interest, especially child and family law and policy, forensic mental health services, child advocacy, rural psychology, research ethics, and child abuse and neglect." Melton's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here.

  14. Method and apparatus for distinguishing actual sparse events from sparse event false alarms

    DOEpatents

    Spalding, Richard E.; Grotbeck, Carter L.

    2000-01-01

    Remote sensing method and apparatus wherein sparse optical events are distinguished from false events. "Ghost" images of actual optical phenomena are generated using an optical beam splitter and optics configured to direct split beams to a single sensor or segmented sensor. True optical signals are distinguished from false signals or noise based on whether the ghost image is presence or absent. The invention obviates the need for dual sensor systems to effect a false target detection capability, thus significantly reducing system complexity and cost.

  15. Michael E. Barnes: Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Institutional Practice.

    PubMed

    2012-11-01

    Presents a short biography on the winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Institutional Practice. The 2012 winner is Michael E. Barnes for his pioneering leadership, dedication, and distinguished contributions to juvenile justice. As chief psychologist of the Superior Court of the District of Columbia's Child Guidance Clinic, Barnes and his staff have provided exceptional psychological service to thousands of adjudicated youths, developed an APA-accredited internship program, and supervised the development of a juvenile mental health court that diverts mentally ill court-involved youth from delinquency proceedings and into treatment.

  16. Award for Distinguished Contributions to the Applications of Psychology: James W. Pennebaker.

    PubMed

    2016-11-01

    The APA Award for Distinguished Scientific Applications of Psychology is presented to a person who, in the opinion of the Committee on Scientific Awards, has made distinguished theoretical or empirical advances leading to the understanding or amelioration of important practical problems. The 2016 recipient is James W. Pennebaker, whose research on the therapeutic benefits of expressive writing and the computer-based analysis of everyday language have affected most theoretical and applied areas of psychology. His award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. Award for Distinguished Early Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest: Anneliese A. Singh.

    PubMed

    2016-11-01

    The APA Awards for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest recognize persons who have advanced psychology as a science and/or profession by a single extraordinary achievement or a lifetime of outstanding contributions in the public interest. The 2016 corecipient of the Award for Distinguished Early Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest is Anneliese A. Singh. Dr. Singh's scholarship "has promoted major advancements in LBGT studies and intersectionality of multiple identities." Singh's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record

  18. Michael E. Lamb: Award for Distinguished Senior Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    The APA Awards for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest recognize persons who have advanced psychology as a science and/or profession by a single extraordinary achievement or a lifetime of outstanding contributions in the public interest. The 2015 co-recipient of the Award for Distinguished Senior Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest is Michael E. Lamb. Lamb was selected because his "work profoundly shaped the fields of developmental psychology, social welfare, child and family policy, and law." Lamb's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here.

  19. Children's Ability to Distinguish between Enjoyment and Non-Enjoyment Smiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosselin, Pierre; Perron, Melanie; Maassarani, Reem

    2010-01-01

    Children's ability to distinguish between enjoyment and non-enjoyment smiles was investigated by presenting participants with short video excerpts of smiles. Enjoyment smiles differed from non-enjoyment smiles by greater symmetry and by appearance changes produced in the eye region by the Cheek Raiser action. The results indicate that 6- and…

  20. Distinguishing boron desorption from mineral dissolution in arid-zone soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Boron release from six arid-zone soils from the San Joaquin Valley of California was investigated as a function of reaction time, solution pH, and suspension density. A multiple batch extraction experiment was carried out for 362 days to distinguish B desorption from mineral dissolution. Amounts o...

  1. Mona M. Amer: APA/APAGS award for distinguished graduate student in professional psychology.

    PubMed

    2006-11-01

    Presents the citation of Mona M. Amer, who received the APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology "for her outstanding and innovative leadership in addressing the mental health needs of Muslim and Arab Americans." A brief profile and a selected bibliography accompany the citation. ((c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Christian N. L. Olivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Christian N. L. Olivers, winner of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology, is cited for outstanding research on visual attention and working memory. Olivers uses classic experimental designs in an innovative and sophisticated way to determine underlying mechanisms. He has formulated important theoretical…

  3. Using Resident Reports of Quality of Life to Distinguish among Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Bershadsky, Boris; Kane, Rosalie A.; Degenholtz, Howard H.; Liu, Jiexin; Giles, Katherine; Kling, Kristen C.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: We used measures created to assess the quality of life (QOL) of nursing home residents to distinguish among nursing facilities. Design and Methods: We statistically adjusted scores for 10 QOL domains derived from standardized interviews with nursing home residents for age, gender, activities of daily living functioning, cognitive…

  4. The Roles of Principal Leadership Behaviors and Organizational Routines in Montana's Distinguished Title I Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, Sean Niles

    2012-01-01

    This embedded multiple-case study addressed the lack of qualitative research on the contributions of principal leadership behaviors and organizational routines in Montana's distinguished Title I schools. This study was guided by the research question, "How do principal leadership behaviors and organizational routines contribute to the high…

  5. Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy: Charlotte J. Patterson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Charlotte J. Patterson, winner of the Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy, is cited as the world's expert on psychological research on children and youths raised by lesbian and gay parents. Her early analytic syntheses of the literature on the subject greatly influenced other researchers in child and family…

  6. Distinguished Educators on Reading: Contributions That Have Shaped Effective Literacy Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padak, Nancy D., Ed.; Rasinski, Timothy V., Ed.; Peck, Jacqueline K., Ed.; Church, Brenda Weible, Ed.; Fawcett, Gay, Ed.; Hendershot, Judith M., Ed.; Henry, Justina M., Ed.; Moss, Barbara G., Ed.; Pryor, Elizabeth, Ed.; Roskos, Kathleen A., Ed.; Baumann, James F., Ed.; Dillon, Deborah R., Ed.; Hopkins, Carol J., Ed.; Humphrey, Jack W., Ed.; O'Brien, David G., Ed.

    Drawing from the popular "Distinguished Educator" series of articles in the journal "The Reading Teacher," this book presents 33 essays by respected scholars in nearly every field of reading research and instruction. In addition to the original articles, almost all featured educators have included a professional biography written especially for…

  7. Distinguishing Themes of Cultural Responsiveness: A Study of Document-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, Ellen E.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the distinguishing themes of cultural responsiveness in state- and federally-derived document-based learning materials. Two data sources--"Teaching with Documents" articles in Social Education and Document Based Questions on New York State 11th-grade U.S. History and Government Regents exams--were examined…

  8. Melissa L. Anderson: APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association/American Psychological Association of Graduate Students Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology. The 2012 winner is Melissa L. Anderson for her ongoing commitment to understanding, treating, and preventing domestic violence in Deaf women…

  9. Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Daniel J. Bauer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Daniel J. Bauer, winner of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology, is cited for the creative integration of sophisticated quantitative methods with empirical research in the psychological sciences. Bauer draws on his joint training as a developmental and quantitative psychologist to pursue the design,…

  10. Sandra L. Shullman: Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Independent Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Independent Practice. The 2012 winner is Sandra L. Shullman for her outstanding contributions and leadership as an independent practitioner in the fields of counseling and consulting psychology. Through her…

  11. Distinguishing between Positive and Negative Reinforcement: Responses to Nakajima (2006) and Staats (2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Alan; Galizio, Mark

    2006-01-01

    In a previous issue of "The Behavior Analyst," the authors discussed the ambiguities that surround the distinction between positive and negative reinforcement. Seven distinguished behavior analysts commented on their article. The authors believe that this dialogue represented a constructive step toward clarification of an important concept within…

  12. Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Ahmad R. Hariri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Ahmad R. Hariri, recipient of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology, is cited for pioneering contributions to understanding the neurobiological mechanisms driving individual differences in complex behavior traits. Hariri has integrated molecular genetics, neuropharmacology, neuroimaging, and psychology in…

  13. Do You "Want" to Play? Distinguishing between Conflicted Shyness and Social Disinterest in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coplan, Robert J.; Prakash, Kavita; O'Neil, Kim; Armer, Mandana

    2004-01-01

    This study attempted to distinguish two types of social withdrawal in early childhood: (a) one based on social fear and anxiety despite a desire to interact socially (conflicted shyness) and (b) one based on the lack of a strong motivation to engage in social interaction (social disinterest). Two samples of preschoolers (n = 119 and n = 127) 3-5…

  14. Using Tractography to Distinguish SWEDD from Parkinson's Disease Patients Based on Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mansu; Park, Hyunjin

    2016-01-01

    Background. It is critical to distinguish between Parkinson's disease (PD) and scans without evidence of dopaminergic deficit (SWEDD), because the two groups are different and require different therapeutic approaches. Objective. The aim of this study was to distinguish SWEDD patients from PD patients using connectivity information derived from diffusion tensor imaging tractography. Methods. Diffusion magnetic resonance images of SWEDD (n = 37) and PD (n = 40) were obtained from a research database. Tractography, the process of obtaining neural fiber information, was performed using custom software. Group-wise differences between PD and SWEDD patients were quantified using the number of connected fibers between two regions, and correlation analyses were performed based on clinical scores. A support vector machine classifier (SVM) was applied to distinguish PD and SWEDD based on group-wise differences. Results. Four connections showed significant group-wise differences and correlated with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale sponsored by the Movement Disorder Society. The SVM classifier attained 77.92% accuracy in distinguishing between SWEDD and PD using these identified connections. Conclusions. The connections and regions identified represent candidates for future research investigations.

  15. Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Adam K. Anderson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Adam K. Anderson, recipient of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology, is cited for his outstanding contribution to understanding the representation of emotion and its influence on cognition. By combining psychological and neuroscience techniques with rigorous and creative experimental designs, Anderson has…

  16. A mathematical ecogenetic predator-prey model where both populations are genetically distinguishable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellino, Luisa; Peretti, Sabrina; Rivoira, Stella; Venturino, Ezio

    2016-10-01

    A mathematical ecogenetic predator-prey model with both populations genetically distinguishable is introduced. Equilibria are investigated for feasibility and stability and are numerically found to be related via a transcritical bifurcation. These results are in line with parallel studies on related models. A sensitivity analysis in terms of pairs of model parameters is performed.

  17. J. David Creswell: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    APA's Awards for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology recognize excellent young psychologists who have not held a doctoral degree for more than nine years. One of the 2014 award winners is J. David Creswell, for "outstanding and innovative research on mechanisms linking stress management strategies to disease." Creswell's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here.

  18. Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy: Laurence Steinberg

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Laurence Steinberg, recipient of the Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy, is cited for his extraordinary impact on policy in juvenile justice and child labor and on research into the role of parent and peer relationships in the development of children and adolescents. His groundbreaking research is marked by a…

  19. A National Analysis of Endowed Chairs and Distinguished Professors in the Field of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartlep, Nicholas Daniel; Ball, Daisy; Theodosopoulos, Kendra; Wells, Kevin; Morgan, Grant B.

    2016-01-01

    Noting a gap in the literature, this study examines how race, gender, and prestige are related to endowed and distinguished faculty of education. Specifically, this study seeks to ascertain the makeup of higher education with regard to faculty diversity: what processes are at work that serve to recreate the "status quo" in terms of…

  20. Accuracy of radionuclide imaging in distinguishing renal masses from normal variants

    SciTech Connect

    Older, R.A.; Korobkin, M.; Workman, J.; Cleeve, D.M.; Cleeve, L.K.; Sullivan, D.; Webster, G.D.

    1980-08-01

    To determine the accuracy of scintigraphy in distinguishing true renal masses from normal variants, 40 patients with excretory urographic findings indicating a possible, but not definite, mass lesion were studied. Scintigraphy correctly identified 17 true masses and 17 normal variants. Four false positive and two false negative results were obtained.

  1. Distinguishing Perceived Competence and Self-Efficacy: An Example from Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Wendy M.; Markland, David; Selzler, Anne-Marie; Murray, Terra C.; Wilson, Philip M.

    2014-01-01

    This article examined the conceptual and statistical distinction between perceived competence and self-efficacy. Although they are frequently used interchangeably, it is possible that distinguishing them might assist researchers in better understanding their roles in developing enduring adaptive behavior patterns. Perceived competence is conceived…

  2. Angela J. Grippo: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology. The 2012 winner is Angela J. Grippo for her creative contributions in investigating the association between depression and cardiovascular disease in preclinical animal models.…

  3. Comparison of laboratory-based and phylogenetic methods to distinguish between Haemophilus influenzae and H. haemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Sandstedt, Sara A.; Zhang, Lixin; Patel, Mayurika; McCrea, Kirk W.; Qin, Zhaohui; Marrs, Carl F.; Gilsdorf, Janet R.

    2008-01-01

    Summary New methods to distinguish between nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and nonhemolytic Haemophilus haemolyticus were compared. The results of iga variable region hybridization to dotblots and library-on-a-slide microarrays were more similar to a “gold standard” multigene phylogenetic tree than iga conserved region hybridization or P6 7F3 epitope immunoblots. PMID:18652852

  4. A Methodology for Distinguishing between Extinction and Punishment Effects Associated with Response Blocking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerman, Dorothea C.; Iwata, Brian A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a method for distinguishing between extinction and punishment effects. In extinction and punishment, different schedules of reinforcement or punishment are in effect when a given proportion of responses is blocked. Response patterns in treatment of hand mouthing in an adult with profound mental retardation suggest that a…

  5. And then there were 12--distinguishing Van Leeuwenhoek microscopes from old or new copies.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Lesley A

    2015-07-01

    In the wake of announcements of the authentications of two previously unknown Van Leeuwenhoek microscopes in one month, this paper reviews the possibilities and potential pitfalls that might be involved in distinguishing 17th/18th century single-lensed microscopes from historical and modern copies. It is clear that a combination of characteristics must be considered, no single parameter will do.

  6. Marguerita Lightfoot: Award for Distinguished Early Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Early Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest. The 2012 winner is Marguerita Lightfoot for her leadership, innovation, and commitment to applying psychological principles to develop behavioral health interventions for…

  7. Bernice Lott: Award for Distinguished Senior Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Senior Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest. The 2012 winner is Bernice Lott. Lott's commitment to the public interest has always guided her career, as her groundbreaking research on gender, ethnicity, and race…

  8. A methodology for distinguishing between extinction and punishment effects associated with response blocking.

    PubMed

    Lerman, D C; Iwata, B A

    1996-01-01

    We present one method for distinguishing between extinction and punishment effects. The proportion of responses that produced a consequence (blocking) was varied while hand mouthing was treated in a man diagnosed with profound mental retardation. Response patterns across the schedule changes suggested that the blocking procedure functioned as a punishing event.

  9. Friederike Range: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology. The 2012 winner is Friederike Range for outstanding contributions to the understanding of the complex social minds of nonhuman animals. Through ingenious experimental approaches,…

  10. A Developmental Framework for Distinguishing Disruptive Behavior from Normative Misbehavior in Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakschlag, Lauren S.; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J.; Carter, Alice S.; Hill, Carri; Danis, Barbara; Keenan, Kate; McCarthy, Kimberly J.; Leventhal, Bennett L.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Attaining a developmentally sensitive nosology for preschool disruptive behavior requires characterization of the features that distinguish it from the normative misbehavior of this developmental period. We hypothesize that "quality of behavior and its pervasiveness across contexts" are critical dimensions for clinical discrimination…

  11. Bethany Ann Teachman: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology. The 2012 winner is Bethany Ann Teachman for transformative, translational research integrating social cognition, life-span, and perceptual approaches to investigating clinical…

  12. Fanny M. Cheung: Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of one of the co-recipients of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology. One of the 2012 winners is Fanny M. Cheung for her outstanding contributions to the assessment of cross-cultural psychopathology, personality psychology, and gender…

  13. Laurie R. Santos: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology. The 2012 winner is Laurie R. Santos for creative and insightful investigations of cognition across a broad range of species and psychological domains, illuminating cognitive…

  14. Can Young Children Distinguish Abstract Expressionist Art from Superficially Similar Works by Preschoolers and Animals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nissel, Jenny; Hawley-Dolan, Angelina; Winner, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    While it is sometimes claimed that abstract art requires little skill and is indistinguishable from the scribbles of young children, recent research has shown that even adults with no training in art can distinguish works by abstract expressionists from superficially similar works by children and even elephants, monkeys, and apes (Hawley-Dolan…

  15. Nonlinear forecasting as a way of distinguishing chaos from measurement error in time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugihara, George; May, Robert M.

    1990-04-01

    An approach is presented for making short-term predictions about the trajectories of chaotic dynamical systems. The method is applied to data on measles, chickenpox, and marine phytoplankton populations, to show how apparent noise associated with deterministic chaos can be distinguished from sampling error and other sources of externally induced environmental noise.

  16. Thomas L. Griffiths: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology (2012). Thomas L. Griffiths won the award for bringing mathematical precision to the deepest questions in human learning, reasoning, and concept formation. In his pioneering work,…

  17. Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Institutional Practice: Eduardo S. Morales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Eduardo S. Morales, recipient of the Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Institutional Practice, is cited for his leadership in and contributions to institutional practice through obtaining and implementing research and service grants and creating agencies and programs for Latinos, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender persons,…

  18. The Importance of Distinguishing "Propensity" versus "Ability" to Imitate in ASD Research and Early Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivanti, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Imitation abnormalities are often documented in young children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), however the relevance of imitation to early development and early detection of ASD remains unclear. Recent studies that investigated whether imitation at 12 months distinguishes children who will subsequently receive an ASD diagnosis from other…

  19. Comments on "Distinguishing Science from Pseudoscience in School Psychology:" Evidence-Based Interventions for Grandiose Bragging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochwill, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide some perspectives on Lilienfeld, Ammirati, and David's (2012) paper on distinguishing science from pseudoscience in school psychology. In many respects their work represents an intervention for "grandiose bragging," a problem that has occasionally occurred when various non-evidence-based or discredited…

  20. Sleeping in fits and starts: a practical guide to distinguishing nocturnal epilepsy from sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Derry, Christopher P

    2014-12-01

    Accurately diagnosing sleep-related events, and particularly distinguishing nocturnal frontal lobe seizures from other sleep disorders such as parasomnias, can be challenging. This article reviews the differential diagnosis of paroxysmal events from sleep, epileptic and non-epileptic, considers important diagnostic points in the history, and evaluates the role of investigations in this setting.

  1. Factors Distinguishing between Achievers and At Risk Students: A Qualitative and Quantitative Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eiselen, R.; Geyser, H.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify factors that distinguish between Achievers and At Risk Students in Accounting 1A, and to explore how qualitative and quantitative research methods complement each other. Differences between the two groups were explored from both a quantitative and a qualitative perspective, focusing on study habits,…

  2. Amanda Seed: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    APA's Awards for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology recognize excellent young psychologists who have not held a doctoral degree for more than nine years. One of the 2014 award winners is Amanda Seed, for "incisive and innovative contributions to comparative cognition." Seed's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here.

  3. Dan Olweus: Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy. The 2012 winner is Dan Olweus for his rigorous scientific research on bullying among children and youth and his early and tireless attention to its public policy implications. Dan Olweus's…

  4. Preclinical Testing of a New MR Imaging Approach to Distinguish Aggressive from Indolent Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    aggressiveness including histologic analysis, Ki-67 proliferative assays, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, LDH-A expression, cellularity, and micro...assay determinations of cancer aggressiveness including histologic analysis, Ki-67 proliferative assays, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, LDH-A...distinguish aggressive prostate cancers from indolent disease based on up- regulated lactate - dehydrogenase (LDH) conversion of HP-pyruvate to lactate and

  5. Leslie S. Greenberg: Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the 2012 winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research. Leslie S. Greenberg is an exemplary scientist-practitioner whose pioneering work has significantly altered the landscape of the field of psychotherapy research and practice. His seminal…

  6. Distinguished-Level Learning Online: Support Materials from LangNet and RussNet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leaver, Betty Lou; Ehrman, Madeline; Lekic, Maria

    2004-01-01

    This article introduces the reader to two online sources of materials for working on improving listening and reading skills. The materials are intended for learners already at Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR) Level 3 (Superior) proficiency in Arabic, Chinese, Hindi, Korean, Russian, and Spanish, who desire to reach Level 4 (Distinguished, or…

  7. Science 101: How Do We Distinguish between Living and Nonliving Things?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2016-01-01

    Since nearly every science curriculum in the country contains a section on living and non-living things, Bill Robertson believes that pretty much anyone who has taught the subject has run into difficulties. It seems as if no matter what criteria you use to distinguish between the two you can nearly always find exceptions. This article provides a…

  8. Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching in Psychology: G. William Hill IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The 2004 Distinguished Teaching Award is awarded to G. William Hill IV. He is recognized as a superb teacher who has helped the Kennesaw State University faculty through ambitious programs in the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning, built and sustained a regional psychology community through the vibrant Southeastern Conference on the…

  9. Distinguishing Features of Cuban Children Referred for Professional Help Because of ADHD: Looking beyond the Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Barry H.; Normand, Sebastien; Sotares deToro, Maria del Pilar; Santana Gonzalez, Yorkys; Guilarte Tellez, Jorge Antonio; Carbonell Naranjo, Migdalia; Musle, Miriam; Diaz Socarras, Felix Javier; Robaey, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To distinguish Cuban children clinically referred because of ADHD from an at-risk community sample and a community control group in terms of symptoms, associated difficulties and impairment of family and peer relations. Method: Parents and teachers of 1,036 children (6-8 years old) completed an established ADHD rating scale and a…

  10. Bob McMurray: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology. The 2012 winner is Bob McMurray for pioneering research on speech and language processing in infants and adults. McMurray has conducted influential work on the graded nature of…

  11. Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research: Luciano L'Abate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Luciano L'Abate, recipient of the Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research, contributed to applied research through the introduction of the laboratory method in clinical psychology assessment and intervention, leading to the development of the first automated playroom, linking play therapy with research in child…

  12. The Distinguishing Characteristics of High Schools with High and Low Enrollments in Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Koevering, Thomas E.

    This paper presents the procedures, results, and conclusions of a study designed to determine if high schools with either high or low enrollments in physics exhibit any distinguishing characteristics that are measurable. The study involved 48 schools, 51 physics teachers, and 3767 students in the State of Michigan. Questionnaires were administered…

  13. Distinguishing Science from Pseudoscience in School Psychology: Science and Scientific Thinking as Safeguards against Human Error

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilienfeld, Scott O.; Ammirati, Rachel; David, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Like many domains of professional psychology, school psychology continues to struggle with the problem of distinguishing scientific from pseudoscientific and otherwise questionable clinical practices. We review evidence for the scientist-practitioner gap in school psychology and provide a user-friendly primer on science and scientific thinking for…

  14. 76 FR 71048 - Sixth Annual Philip S. Chen, Jr. Distinguished Lecture on Innovation and Technology Transfer

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ... Innovation and Technology Transfer AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, HHS. ACTION....D. Distinguished Lecture on Innovation and Technology Transfer. DATES: Friday, December 9, 2011, at... Recombinant Immunotoxins: From Technology Transfer to the Patient.'' Dr. Pastan is an NIH...

  15. Using Airborne and Satellite Imagery to Distinguish and Map Black Mangrove

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reports the results of studies evaluating color-infrared (CIR) aerial photography, CIR aerial true digital imagery, and high resolution QuickBird multispectral satellite imagery for distinguishing and mapping black mangrove [Avicennia germinans (L.) L.] populations along the lower Texas g...

  16. Distinguishing among models of strong WL WL scattering at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Kilgore, W.B.

    1997-01-01

    Using a multi-channel analysis of strong W{sub L} W{sub L} scattering signals, I study the LHC`s ability to distinguish among various models of strongly interacting electroweak symmetry breaking sectors. 9 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  17. C. Cybele Raver: Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the 2012 winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training. C. Cybele Raver is a prolific and award-winning writer who has published widely and served as a reviewer on many high-quality journals. Her publications are well…

  18. Distinguishing Bark Beetle-infested Vegetation by Tree Species Types and Stress Levels using Landsat Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivanpillai, R.; Ewers, B. E.; Speckman, H. N.; Miller, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    In the Western United States, more than 3 million hectares of lodgepole pine forests have been impacted by the Mountain pine beetle outbreak, while another 166,000 hectares of spruce-fir forests have been attacked by Spruce beetle. Following the beetle attack, the trees lose their hydraulic conductivity thus altering their carbon and water fluxes. These trees go through various stages of stress until mortality, described by color changes in their needles prior to losing them. Modeling the impact of these vegetation types require thematically precise land cover data that distinguishes lodgepole pine and spruce-fir forests along with the stage of impact since the ecosystem fluxes are different for these two systems. However, the national and regional-scale land cover datasets derived from remotely sensed data do not have this required thematic precision. We evaluated the feasibility of multispectral data collected by Landsat 8 to distinguish lodgepole pine and spruce fir, and subsequently model the different stages of attack using field data collected in Medicine Bow National Forest (Wyoming, USA). Operational Land Imager, onboard Landsat 8 has more spectral bands and higher radiometric resolution (12 bit) in comparison to sensors onboard earlier Landsat missions which could improve the ability to distinguish these vegetation types and their stress conditions. In addition to these characteristics, its repeat coverage, rigorous radiometric calibration, wide swath width, and no-cost data provide unique advantages to Landsat data for mapping large geographic areas. Initial results from this study highlight the importance of SWIR bands for distinguishing different levels of stress, and the need for ancillary data for distinguishing species types. Insights gained from this study could lead to the generation of land cover maps with higher thematic precision, and improve the ability to model various ecosystem processes as a result of these infestations.

  19. Distinguishing Aspartic and Isoaspartic Acids in Peptides by Several Mass Spectrometric Fragmentation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGraan-Weber, Nick; Zhang, Jun; Reilly, James P.

    2016-12-01

    Six ion fragmentation techniques that can distinguish aspartic acid from its isomer, isoaspartic acid, were compared. MALDI post-source decay (PSD), MALDI 157 nm photodissociation, tris(2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl)phosphonium bromide (TMPP) charge tagging in PSD and photodissociation, ESI collision-induced dissociation (CID), electron transfer dissociation (ETD), and free-radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) with CID were applied to peptides containing either aspartic or isoaspartic acid. Diagnostic ions, such as the y-46 and b+H2O, are present in PSD, photodissociation, and charge tagging. c•+57 and z-57 ions are observed in ETD and FRIPS experiments. For some molecules, aspartic and isoaspartic acid yield ion fragments with significantly different intensities. ETD and charge tagging appear to be most effective at distinguishing these residues.

  20. Distinguishing essential tremor from Parkinson's disease: bedside tests and laboratory evaluations.

    PubMed

    Thenganatt, Mary Ann; Louis, Elan D

    2012-06-01

    Distinguishing essential tremor from Parkinson's disease can be challenging, both in the early stages of these diseases and as these diseases progress. Various tremor types (rest, postural, kinetic and intention) may be seen in both essential tremor and Parkinson's disease. Furthermore, with time, the two diseases may coexist within a single patient. Detailed clinical examination with attention to specific features of tremor (frequency, amplitude, pattern and distribution) and associated neurological findings may help distinguish patients with the two diseases. Laboratory testing may provide information that further aids in differentiating the two diseases. These tests include accelerometry and surface electromyography, spiral analysis, dopamine transporter imaging, olfactory testing and, eventually, postmortem histopathology. These tests have limitations and their diagnostic utility requires additional study.

  1. Main-Group Halide Semiconductors Derived from Perovskite: Distinguishing Chemical, Structural, and Electronic Aspects.

    PubMed

    Fabini, Douglas H; Labram, John G; Lehner, Anna J; Bechtel, Jonathon S; Evans, Hayden A; Van der Ven, Anton; Wudl, Fred; Chabinyc, Michael L; Seshadri, Ram

    2017-01-03

    Main-group halide perovskites have generated much excitement of late because of their remarkable optoelectronic properties, ease of preparation, and abundant constituent elements, but these curious and promising materials differ in important respects from traditional semiconductors. The distinguishing chemical, structural, and electronic features of these materials present the key to understanding the origins of the optoelectronic performance of the well-studied hybrid organic-inorganic lead halides and provide a starting point for the design and preparation of new functional materials. Here we review and discuss these distinguishing features, among them a defect-tolerant electronic structure, proximal lattice instabilities, labile defect migration, and, in the case of hybrid perovskites, disordered molecular cations. Additionally, we discuss the preparation and characterization of some alternatives to the lead halide perovskites, including lead-free bismuth halides and hybrid materials with optically and electronically active organic constituents.

  2. Distinguishing types of compact-object binaries using the gravitational-wave signatures of their mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, Ilya; Haster, Carl-Johan; Dominik, Michal; Belczynski, Krzysztof

    2015-06-01

    We analyse the distinguishability of populations of coalescing binary neutron stars, neutron-star black hole binaries, and binary black holes, whose gravitational-wave signatures are expected to be observed by the advanced network of ground-based interferometers LIGO and Virgo. We consider population-synthesis predictions for plausible merging binary distributions in mass space, along with measurement accuracy estimates from the main gravitational-wave parameter-estimation pipeline. We find that for our model compact-object binary mass distribution, we can always distinguish binary neutron stars and black hole-neutron-star binaries, but not necessarily black hole-neutron-star binaries and binary black holes; however, with a few tens of detections, we can accurately identify the three subpopulations and measure their respective rates.

  3. Distinguishing among tallgrass prairie cover types from measurements of multispectral reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asrar, G.; Weiser, R. L.; Johnson, D. E.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Killeen, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The heterogeneity in surface cover caused by management practices or natural events complicates monitoring the conditions of grasslands and assessing their productivity by remote sensing techniques. Statistical procedures were sought that would allow different grassland surface cover types (bare soil, senescent vegetation, and green vegetation) to be distinguished by using measurements of grassland multispectral reflectance. Two procedures, discriminant analysis and canonical discriminant analysis, were found suitable for achieving this objective. Linear classification functions and canonical variables were derived, which distinguish between the three cover types. A comparison between two sensor systems, a Barnes multiband radiometer and an Exotech radiometer that simulates the Landsat thematic mapper (TM) and multispectral scanner (MSS) bands, respectively, showed that the separability among the three cover types was substantially improved by the additional and improved spectral features of the Barnes radiometer.

  4. Distinguishing the cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) from other diamino acids.

    PubMed

    Banack, S A; Metcalf, J S; Spáčil, Z; Downing, T G; Downing, S; Long, A; Nunn, P B; Cox, P A

    2011-04-01

    β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is produced by diverse taxa of cyanobacteria, and has been detected by many investigators who have searched for it in cyanobacterial blooms, cultures and collections. Although BMAA is distinguishable from proteinogenic amino acids and its isomer 2,4-DAB using standard chromatographic and mass spectroscopy techniques routinely used for the analysis of amino acids, we studied whether BMAA could be reliably distinguished from other diamino acids, particularly 2,6-diaminopimelic acid which has been isolated from the cell walls of many bacterial species. We used HPLC-FD, UHPLC-UV, UHPLC-MS, and triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) to differentiate BMAA from the diamino acids 2,6-diaminopimelic acid, N-2(amino)ethylglycine, lysine, ornithine, 2,4-diaminosuccinic acid, homocystine, cystine, tryptophan, as well as other amino acids including asparagine, glutamine, and methionine methylsulfonium.

  5. Distinguishing essential tremor from Parkinson’s disease: bedside tests and laboratory evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Thenganatt, Mary Ann; Louis, Elan D

    2012-01-01

    Distinguishing essential tremor from Parkinson’s disease can be challenging, both in the early stages of these diseases and as these diseases progress. Various tremor types (rest, postural, kinetic and intention) may be seen in both essential tremor and Parkinson’s disease. Furthermore, with time, the two diseases may coexist within a single patient. Detailed clinical examination with attention to specific features of tremor (frequency, amplitude, pattern and distribution) and associated neurological findings may help distinguish patients with the two diseases. Laboratory testing may provide information that further aids in differentiating the two diseases. These tests include accelerometry and surface electromyography, spiral analysis, dopamine transporter imaging, olfactory testing and, eventually, postmortem histopathology. These tests have limitations and their diagnostic utility requires additional study. PMID:22650171

  6. Authentication of traditional Chinese medicine using infrared spectroscopy: distinguishing between ginseng and its morphological fakes.

    PubMed

    Yap, Kevin Yi-Lwern; Chan, Sui Yung; Lim, Chu Sing

    2007-03-01

    The quality of pharmaceutical products such as ginseng is important for ensuring consumer safety and efficacy. Ginseng is an expensive herb, and adulteration with other cheaper products may occur. Quality assurance of ginseng is needed since many of its commercial products now come in various formulations such as capsules, powder, softgels and tea. Thus traditional means of authentication via smell, taste or physical appearance are hardly reliable. Herbs like ginseng tend to exhibit characteristic infrared fingerprints due to their different chemical constituents. Here we report for the first time a rapid means of distinguishing American and Asian ginsengs from two morphological fakes--sawdust and Platycodon grandiflorum, via pattern differences and principal component analysis of their infrared spectra. Our results show that ginseng can be distinguished from both sawdust and Platycodon grandiflorum, hence there is a potential of using infrared spectroscopy as a novel analytical technique in the authentication of ginseng.

  7. Distinguishability and chiral stability in solution: Effects of decoherence and intermolecular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Heekyung; Wardlaw, David M.; Frolov, Alexei M.

    2014-05-28

    We examine the effect of decoherence and intermolecular interactions (chiral discrimination energies) on the chiral stability and the distinguishability of initially pure versus mixed states in an open chiral system. Under a two-level approximation for a system, intermolecular interactions are introduced by a mean-field theory, and interaction between a system and an environment is modeled by a continuous measurement of a population difference between the two chiral states. The resultant equations are explored for various parameters, with emphasis on the combined effects of the initial condition of the system, the chiral discrimination energies, and the decoherence in determining: the distinguishability as measured by a population difference between the initially pure and mixed states, and the decoherence process; the chiral stability as measured by the purity decay; and the stationary state of the system at times long relative to the time scales of the system dynamics and of the environmental effects.

  8. Distinguishing Standard Model Extensions using MonoTop Chirality at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Ryan; Allahverdi, Rouzbeh; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dutta, Bhaskar; Flórez, Andrés; Gao, Yu; Kamon, Teruki; Kolev, Nikolay; Segura, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Spectral analysis of the top quark final states is a promising method to distinguish physics beyond the standard model (BSM) from the SM. Many BSM physics with top quark final states feature top quarks with right or left handed polarized helicity. The energy spectrum of the top quark decay products can be used to distinguish the top quark helicity. A Delphes simulation of a minimal standard model extension featuring a color scalar triplet that decays into a left handed top and a dark matter (DM) candidate is compared with a right handed model to demonstrate how such an energy spectrum varies and differentiates models. Both the hadronic and leptonic decay channels of the top quark are considered in the analysis. In the hadronic channel the right and left handed models are separated at 95% CL with a production cross section of 20 fb and 100 fb-1 integrated luminosity of 13 TeV proton-proton collisions at the LHC.

  9. Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology: Roger P. Greenberg.

    PubMed

    2016-11-01

    The Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology is given in recognition of the efforts of psychologists who have made distinguished contributions to education and training, who have produced imaginative innovations, or who have been involved in the developmental phases of programs in education and training in psychology. The Career designation is added to the award at the discretion of the Education and Training Awards Committee to recognize continuous significant contributions made over a lifelong career in psychology. The 2016 recipient of this award is Roger P. Greenberg, whose "scholarship has generated important evidence on psychotherapy process and outcome, personality theories, psychosomatic conditions, and the comparative effectiveness of psychological and biological treatments for mental disorders." Greenberg's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record

  10. Belief in a Just What? Demystifying Just World Beliefs by Distinguishing Sources of Justice

    PubMed Central

    Stroebe, Katherine; Postmes, Tom; Täuber, Susanne; Stegeman, Alwin; John, Melissa-Sue

    2015-01-01

    People’s Belief in a Just World (BJW) plays an important role in coping with misfortune and unfairness. This paper demonstrates that understanding of the BJW concept, and its consequences for behavior, is enhanced if we specify what (or who) the source of justice might be. We introduce a new scale, the 5-Dimensional Belief in a Just Treatment Scale (BJT5), which distinguishes five causal dimensions of BJW (God, Nature, Other People, Self, Chance). We confirm the 5-factor structure of the BJT5. We then address whether the BJW should be considered a uni- and/or multi-dimensional construct and find support for our multi-dimensional approach. Finally, we demonstrate convergent and discriminant validity with respect to important correlates of BJW as well as action in response to important negative life events and societal attitudes. This work illustrates the importance of distinguishing causal dimensions with regard to who distributes justice. PMID:25803025

  11. Rodney K. Goodyear: Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    The Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology is given in recognition of the efforts of psychologists who have made distinguished contributions to education and training, who have produced imaginative innovations, or who have been involved in the developmental phases of programs in education and training in psychology. The Career designation is added to the award at the discretion of the Education and Training Awards Committee to recognize continuous significant contributions made over a lifelong career in psychology. The 2015 recipient of this award is Rodney K. Goodyear "for his substantive, sustained, and enduring contributions to research and practice in the training and supervision of students and educators in professional psychology, and for his leadership in helping to establish competency standards in the area of clinical supervision both in the United States and internationally. Goodyear's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here.

  12. Julio J. Ramirez: Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    The Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology is given in recognition of the efforts of psychologists who have made distinguished contributions to education and training, who have produced imaginative innovations, or who have been involved in the developmental phases of programs in education and training in psychology. The Career designation is added to the award at the discretion of the Education and Training Awards Committee to recognize continuous significant contributions made over a lifelong career in psychology. The 2014 recipient of this award is Julio J. Ramirez, for "creating a national infrastructure to support education and training in behavioral neuroscience and biological psychology, for playing a seminal role in creating an undergraduate neuroscience education journal, and for creating a nationally recognized mentoring program for junior faculty in the neurosciences, particularly with underrepresented groups." Ramirez's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here.

  13. Award for Distinguished Early Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest: Mark L. Hatzenbuehler.

    PubMed

    2016-11-01

    The APA Awards for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest recognize persons who have advanced psychology as a science and/or profession by a single extraordinary achievement or a lifetime of outstanding contributions in the public interest. The 2016 corecipient of the Award for Distinguished Early Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest is Mark L. Hatzenbuehler. The Award recognizes Dr. Hatzenbuehler's advancements in understanding stigma, particularly "the stigma experience of being gay or bisexual at the psychological level in terms of rumination, secret keeping, and the like; at the social level in terms of stigma-imbued social interactions; and at the structural level in terms of policies such as the presence or absence of anti-bullying interventions in schools or gay marriage prohibitions at the level of states." Hatzenbuehler's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. Fluctuation Analysis of Redox Potential to Distinguish Microbial Fe(II) Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enright, A. M. L.; Ferris, F. G.

    2016-11-01

    We developed a novel method for distinguishing abiotic and biological iron oxidation in liquid media using oxidation-reduction (redox) potential time series data. The instrument and processing algorithm were tested by immersing the tip of a Pt electrode with an Ag-AgCl reference electrode into an active iron-oxidizing biofilm in a groundwater discharge zone, as well as in two abiotic systems: a killed sample and a chemical control from the same site. We used detrended fluctuation analysis to characterize average root mean square fluctuation behavior, which was distinct in the live system. The calculated α value scaling exponents determined by detrended fluctuation analysis were significantly different at p < 0.001. This indicates that time series of electrode response data may be used to distinguish live and abiotic chemical reaction pathways. Due to the simplicity, portability, and small size, it may be suitable for characterization of extraterrestrial environments where water has been observed, such as Mars and Europa.

  15. Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Katie A. McLaughlin.

    PubMed

    2016-11-01

    APA's Awards for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology recognize psychologists who have demonstrated excellence early in their careers. One of the 2016 award winners is Katie A. McLaughlin, who has "has articulated important distinctions among the effects of early neglect and abuse and has uncovered specific processes that are disrupted by early adverse environmental experiences." McLaughlin's award citation, biography, and bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record

  16. Whole blood gene expression profiles distinguish clinical phenotypes of venous thromboembolism☆

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Deborah A.; Suchindran, Sunil; Beckman, Michele G.; Hooper, W. Craig; Grant, Althea M.; Heit, John A.; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn; Moll, Stephan; Philipp, Claire S.; Kenney, Kristy; De Staercke, Christine; Pyle, Meredith E.; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Ortel, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) occurs infrequently following a provoked event but occurs in up to 30% of individuals following an initial unprovoked event. There is limited understanding of the biological mechanisms that predispose patients to recurrent VTE. Objectives To identify whole blood gene expression profiles that distinguished patients with clinically distinct patterns of VTE. Patients/Methods We studied 107 patients with VTE separated into 3 groups: (1) ‘low-risk’ patients had one or more provoked VTE; (2) ‘moderate-risk’ patients had a single unprovoked VTE; (3) ‘high-risk’ patients had ≥2 unprovoked VTE. Each patient group was also compared to twenty-five individuals with no personal history of VTE. Total RNA from whole blood was isolated and hybridized to Illumina HT-12 V4 Beadchips to assay whole genome expression. Results Using class prediction analysis, we distinguished high-risk patients from low-risk patients and healthy controls with good receiver operating curve characteristics (AUC = 0.81 and 0.84, respectively). We also distinguished moderate-risk individuals and low-risk individuals from healthy controls with AUC’s of 0.69 and 0.80, respectively. Using differential expression analysis, we identified several genes previously implicated in thrombotic disorders by genetic analyses, including SELP, KLKB1, ANXA5, and CD46. Protein levels for several of the identified genes were not significantly different between the different groups. Conclusion Gene expression profiles are capable of distinguishing patients with different clinical presentations of VTE, and genes relevant to VTE risk are frequently differentially expressed in these comparisons. PMID:25684211

  17. Opacification of Middlebrook agar as an aid in distinguishing Nocardia farcinica within the Nocardia asteroides complex.

    PubMed Central

    Carson, M; Hellyar, A

    1994-01-01

    Among 58 aerobic actinomycetes isolated from different sources and geographical locations, none of 23 Nocardia asteroides isolates, at 18 N. farcinica isolates, 1 of 5 N. otitidiscaviarum isolates, and 1 of 4 Rhodococcus species isolates opacified Middlebrook 7H10 medium. Within the N. asteroides complex, this characteristic, together with growth at 45 degrees C and resistance to each of erythromycin, cefotaxime, and tobramycin, provides a simple means of distinguishing N. farcinica from N. asteroides. PMID:7814557

  18. Rosie Phillips Bingham: Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Institutional Practice.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    The APA Awards for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Institutional Practice are intended to recognize outstanding practitioners in psychology. One of the 2015 award winners is Rosie Phillips Bingham, who received this award for being "an extraordinary psychologist and dedicated, visionary leader who has made a tremendous difference in psychology and in the institutions in which she has worked." Rosie's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here.

  19. How many response levels do children distinguish on faces scales for pain assessment?

    PubMed

    Decruynaere, Céline; Thonnard, Jean-Louis; Plaghki, Léon

    2009-07-01

    Faces scales are one of the most commonly used instruments to assess pain intensity in children. Most available faces scales present five to seven faces. The present research was conducted to investigate the ability of 4- to 7-year-old children to distinguish the response categories of different faces scales. In the first study, 121 children were asked to rate painful situations on a 3- and a 6-level faces scale commencing with a smiling 'no pain' face. Children were divided into two age groups (4-5 and 6-7 years). Investigations of the category functioning were performed with a rating scale Rasch model for each age group. Results revealed the low performances of the 6-level faces scale as compared to the 3-level faces scale and also the difficulty children experienced in scoring the imaginary painfulness of items. Consequently, a second study was conducted. In this second study, 76 children were asked to rate pictures depicting painful situations on a 3-level faces scale beginning with a neutral 'no pain' face. Results of this second study confirmed an improvement in the ability to distinguish the three response categories with age. The 4-5 year-old children could only distinguish two response categories and the 6-7 year-old children were able to discern the three levels of the 3-level faces scale. In conclusion, young children do not distinguish as many faces as proposed by the majority of available faces scales. These results strongly recommend a reduction in the number of response levels of faces scales for pain assessment in children.

  20. What distinguishes autism spectrum disorders from other developmental disorders before the age of four years?

    PubMed

    Trillingsgaard, Anegen; Ulsted Sørensen, Ester; Nemec, Gerda; Jørgensen, Meta

    2005-03-01

    The increasing recognition of the benefits of early intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) stresses the importance of early identification of children who might benefit from those programs. However, in the early years of life it may be difficult to distinguish children with ASD from children with other developmental disorders. The aim of the present study was to identify behavioural patterns that could facilitate this differentiation. Prior to diagnostic assessment, 2- and 3-year-old children (n=30), all referred to a clinic for "possible autism", were observed in a semi-structured play interaction, and their parents were interviewed about the children's early development from 0 to 24 months. Following diagnostic assessment, the 17 children fulfilling the ICD-10 criteria for ASD were compared to the 13 children diagnosed with other developmental disorders (outside the autism spectrum). On the basis of parent reports only a few distinguishing signs of ASD were found before 24 months of age. On the basis of professional observations in a semi-structured play interaction several distinguishing signs were found for the 2- and 3-year-olds; smiles in response, responds to name, follows pointing, looks to "read" faces, initiates requesting verbal and nonverbal behaviours, and functional play.

  1. Distinguishing between the abyssal macrourids Coryphaenoides yaquinae and C. armatus from in situ photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, A. J.; Priede, I. G.; Craig, J.

    2012-06-01

    The scavenging fish communities at abyssal depths of the Pacific Ocean are dominated by two species of macrourids; the rough abyssal grenadier Coryphaenoides yaquinaeIwamoto and Stein, 1974 and the abyssal grenadier C. armatus (Hector, 1875). These two species are morphologically very similar, and in the absence of physical specimens are notoriously difficult to distinguish from photographic data. In an era of increasing reliance on imaging technology in the deep sea, we provide an analysis of images of the two species from around the Pacific Rim with supplementary data from the Atlantic and Southern Oceans. Our results show that image-specific morphometric characters are inadequate to distinguish the two species. However, the way in which artificial illumination is reflected from the body is both sufficient, and consistently different to distinguish between the two species. The results are also corroborated by known geographic and bathymetric distributions. This analysis is intended to provide a reliable method of identification from deep-sea imaging systems in the absence of standard fishing techniques.

  2. A rapid fingerprinting approach to distinguish between closely related strains of Shewanella.

    PubMed

    Kan, Jinjun; Flood, Beverly; McCrow, John P; Kim, Ji S; Tan, Lynette; Nealson, Kenneth H

    2011-07-01

    One of the big operational problems facing laboratories today is the ability to rapidly distinguish between strains of bacteria that, while physiologically distinct, are nearly impossible to separate based on 16S rRNA gene sequence differences. Here we demonstrate that ITS-DGGE provides a convenient approach to distinguishing between closely related strains of Shewanella, some of which were impossible to separate and identify by 16 rRNA gene sequence alone. Examined Shewanella genomes contain 8-11 copies of rrn (ribosomal RNA gene) operons, and variable size and sequence of 16S-23S ITS (intergenic transcribed spacer) regions which result in distinct ITS-DGGE profiles. Phylogenetic constructions based on ITS are congruent with the genomic trees generated from concatenated core genes as well as with those based on conserved indels, suggesting that ITS patterns appear to be linked with evolutionary lineages and physiology. In addition, three new Shewanella strains (MFC 2, MFC 6, and MFC 14) were isolated from microbial fuel cells enriched from wastewater sludge and identified by ITS-DGGE. Subsequent physiological and electrochemical studies of the three isolates confirmed that each strain is phenotypically/genotypically distinct. Thus, this study validates ITS-DGGE as a quick fingerprint approach to identifying and distinguishing between closely related but novel Shewanella ecotypes.

  3. Serum peptide reactivities may distinguish neuromyelitis optica subgroups and multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Metz, Imke; Beißbarth, Tim; Ellenberger, David; Pache, Florence; Stork, Lidia; Ringelstein, Marius; Aktas, Orhan; Jarius, Sven; Wildemann, Brigitte; Dihazi, Hassan; Friede, Tim; Ruprecht, Klemens; Paul, Friedemann

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess in an observational study whether serum peptide antibody reactivities may distinguish aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibody (Ab)–positive and -negative neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) and relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Methods: We screened 8,700 peptides that included human and viral antigens of potential relevance for inflammatory demyelinating diseases and random peptides with pooled sera from different patient groups and healthy controls to set up a customized microarray with 700 peptides. With this microarray, we tested sera from 66 patients with AQP4-Ab-positive (n = 16) and AQP4-Ab-negative (n = 19) NMOSD, RRMS (n = 11), and healthy controls (n = 20). Results: Differential peptide reactivities distinguished NMOSD subgroups from RRMS in 80% of patients. However, the 2 NMOSD subgroups were not well-discriminated, although those patients are clearly separated by their antibody reactivities against AQP4 in cell-based assays. Elevated reactivities to myelin and Epstein-Barr virus peptides were present in RRMS and to AQP4 and AQP1 peptides in AQP4-Ab-positive NMOSD. Conclusions: While AQP4-Ab-positive and -negative NMOSD subgroups are not well-discriminated by peptide antibody reactivities, our findings suggest that peptide antibody reactivities may have the potential to distinguish between both NMOSD subgroups and MS. Future studies should thus concentrate on evaluating peptide antibody reactivities for the differentiation of AQP4-Ab-negative NMOSD and MS. PMID:26894206

  4. [Expression of CD48 as a live marker to distinguish division of hematopoietic stem cells].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Zhang, Yu; Peng, Lu-Yun; Pang, Ya-Kun; Dong, Fang; Ji, Qing; Xu, Jing; Cheng, Tao; Yuan, Wei-Ping; Gao, Ying-Dai

    2014-06-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells are capable of self-renewal or differentiation when they divide. Three types of cell divisions exist. A dividing stem cell may generate 2 new stem cells (symmetrical renewal division), or 2 differentiating cells (symmetrical differentiation division), or 1 cell of each type (asymmetrical division). This study was aimed to explore an efficient and stable method to distinguish the way of cell division in hematopoietic stem cells. Previous studies showed that the distribution of Numb in a cell could be used to distinguish the type of cell division in various kinds of cells. Therefore, the distribution of Numb protein was detected by immunofluorescence in mitotic CD48(-)CD150(+)LSK cells of mice exploring the relationship between Numb protein and centrosomes. Since CD48 positive marks the HSC that have lost the ability to reconstitute the blood system in mice, CD48 marker could be used to distinguish cell fate decision between self-renewal and differentiation as a living marker. In this study, the CD48(-)CD150(+)LSK cells were sorted from bone marrow cells of mice and the cells were directly labeled with Alexa Fluor (AF) 488-conjugated anti-CD48 antibody in living cultures. After 3 days, the percentage of AF488(+) cells was evaluated under microscope and by FACS. Then colony forming cell assay (CFC) was performed and the ability of cell proliferation were compared between AF488(+) and AF488(-) cells. The results showed that Numb could be used to distinguish different cell division types of hematopoietic stem cells, which was symmetrically or asymmetrically segregated in mitotic CD48(-)CD150(+)LSK cells. The self-labeled fluorochrome could be detected both by FACS as well as microscope. There were about 40% AF488(+) cells after 3 day-cultures in medium titrated with self-labeled AF 488-conjugated anti-CD48 antibody, and the results were consistent between confocal fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analysis. The colony forming ability of

  5. Using wing pad characteristics and head capsule widths to distinguish nymphal instars of the cotton fleahopper (Miridae: Hemiptera)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies of the cotton fleahopper, Pseudatomoscelis seriatus (Reuter), often require the ability to distinguish between the five nymphal instars. The only guideline for distinguishing instars, based primarily on wing pad characteristics, was published in an experiment station bulletin in 1929. Alth...

  6. Use of Compound-Specific Stable Isotope Analysis to Distinguish between Vapor Intrusion and Indoor Sources of VOC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    in the environment (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [USEPA], 2008). Differences in the isotopic ratio measured in organic contaminants present in... environmental samples can be used to 1) distinguish between different sources of the contaminants , and 2) understand biodegradation and other...isotopic ratio measured in organic contaminants present in environmental samples can be used to: 1) distinguish between different sources of the

  7. 16 CFR 700.11 - Written warranty, service contract, and insurance distinguished for purposes of compliance under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the automobile breakdown insurance policies sold in many jurisdictions and regulated by the state as a... insurance distinguished for purposes of compliance under the Act. 700.11 Section 700.11 Commercial Practices... insurance distinguished for purposes of compliance under the Act. (a) The Act recognizes two types...

  8. 16 CFR 700.11 - Written warranty, service contract, and insurance distinguished for purposes of compliance under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the automobile breakdown insurance policies sold in many jurisdictions and regulated by the state as a... insurance distinguished for purposes of compliance under the Act. 700.11 Section 700.11 Commercial Practices... insurance distinguished for purposes of compliance under the Act. (a) The Act recognizes two types...

  9. 16 CFR 700.11 - Written warranty, service contract, and insurance distinguished for purposes of compliance under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the automobile breakdown insurance policies sold in many jurisdictions and regulated by the state as a... insurance distinguished for purposes of compliance under the Act. 700.11 Section 700.11 Commercial Practices... insurance distinguished for purposes of compliance under the Act. (a) The Act recognizes two types...

  10. Serum autoantibodies to myelin peptides distinguish acute disseminated encephalomyelitis from relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Van Haren, Keith; Tomooka, Beren H; Kidd, Brian A; Banwell, Brenda; Bar-Or, Amit; Chitnis, Tanuja; Tenembaum, Silvia N; Pohl, Daniela; Rostasy, Kevin; Dale, Russell C; O’Connor, Kevin C; Hafler, David A; Steinman, Lawrence; Robinson, William H

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis share overlapping clinical, radiologic, and laboratory features at onset. Because autoantibodies may contribute to the pathogenesis of both diseases, we sought to identify autoantibody biomarkers capable of distinguishing them. Methods We used custom antigen arrays to profile anti-myelin-peptide autoantibodies in sera derived from individuals with pediatric ADEM (n = 15), pediatric multiple sclerosis (n = 11), and adult multiple sclerosis (n = 15). Using isotype-specific secondary antibodies,we profiled both IgG and IgM reactivities. We used Statistical Analysis of Microarrays to confirm differences in autoantibody reactivity profiles between ADEM and multiple sclerosis samples. We used Prediction Analysis of Microarrays to generate and validate prediction algorithms based on the autoantibody reactivity profiles. Results ADEM was characterized by IgG autoantibodies targeting epitopes derived from myelin basic protein, proteolipid protein, myelin-associated oligodendrocyte basic glycoprotein, and alpha-B-crystallin. In contrast, multiple sclerosis was characterized by IgM autoantibodies targeting myelin basic protein, proteolipid protein, myelin-associated oligodendrocyte basic glycoprotein, and oligodendrocyte specific protein. We generated and validated prediction algorithms that distinguish ADEM serum (sensitivity 62–86%; specificity 56–79%) from multiple sclerosis serum (sensitivity 40–87%; specificity 62–86%) on the basis of combined IgG and IgM anti-myelin autoantibody reactivity to a small number of myelin peptides. Conclusions Combined profiles of serum IgG and IgM autoantibodies identify myelin antigens that may be useful for distinguishing multiple sclerosis from ADEM. Further studies are required to establish clinical utility. Further biological assays are required to delineate the pathogenic potential of these antibodies. PMID:23612879

  11. A PCR technique based on the Hip1 interspersed repetitive sequence distinguishes cyanobacterial species and strains.

    PubMed

    Smith, J K; Parry, J D; Day, J G; Smith, R J

    1998-10-01

    The use of primers based on the Hip1 sequence as a typing technique for cyanobacteria has been investigated. The discovery of short repetitive sequence structures in bacterial DNA during the last decade has led to the development of PCR-based methods for typing, i.e., distinguishing and identifying, bacterial species and strains. An octameric palindromic sequence known as Hip1 has been shown to be present in the chromosomal DNA of many species of cyanobacteria as a highly repetitious interspersed sequence. PCR primers were constructed that extended the Hip1 sequence at the 3' end by two bases. Five of the 16 possible extended primers were tested. Each of the five primers produced a different set of products when used to prime PCR from cyanobacterial genomic DNA. Each primer produced a distinct set of products for each of the 15 cyanobacterial species tested. The ability of Hip1-based PCR to resolve taxonomic differences was assessed by analysis of independent isolates of Anabaena flos-aquae and Nostoc ellipsosporum obtained from the CCAP (Culture Collection of Algae and Protozoa, IFE, Cumbria, UK). A PCR-based RFLP analysis of products amplified from the 23S-16S rDNA intergenic region was used to characterize the isolates and to compare with the Hip1 typing data. The RFLP and Hip1 typing yielded similar results and both techniques were able to distinguish different strains. On the basis of these results it is suggested that the Hip1 PCR technique may assist in distinguishing cyanobacterial species and strains.

  12. Identification of Strain-Specific Sequences That Distinguish a Mycoplasma gallisepticum Vaccine Strain from Field Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ricketts, Camir; Pickler, Larissa; Maurer, John; Ayyampalayam, Saravanaraj; García, Maricarmen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite attempts to control avian mycoplasmosis through management, vaccination, and surveillance, Mycoplasma gallisepticum continues to cause significant morbidity, mortality, and economic losses in poultry production. Live attenuated vaccines are commonly used in the poultry industry to control avian mycoplasmosis; unfortunately, some vaccines may revert to virulence and vaccine strains are generally difficult to distinguish from natural field isolates. In order to identify genome differences among vaccine revertants, vaccine strains, and field isolates, whole-genome sequencing of the M. gallisepticum vaccine strain ts-11 and several “ts-11-like” strains isolated from commercial flocks was performed using Illumina and 454 pyrosequencing and the sequenced genomes compared to the M. gallisepticum Rlow reference genome. The collective contigs for each strain were annotated using the fully annotated Mycoplasma reference genome. The analysis revealed genetic differences among vlhA alleles, as well as among genes annotated as coding for a cell wall surface anchor protein (mg0377) and a hypothetical protein gene, mg0359, unique to M. gallisepticum ts-11 vaccine strain. PCR protocols were designed to target 5 sequences unique to the M. gallisepticum ts-11 strain: vlhA3.04a, vlhA3.04b, vlhA3.05, mg0377, and mg0359. All ts-11 isolates were positive for the five gene alleles tested by PCR; however, 5 to 36% of field isolates were also positive for at least one of the alleles tested. A combination of PCR tests for vlhA3.04a, vlhA3.05, and mg0359 was able to distinguish the M. gallisepticum ts-11 vaccine strain from field isolates. This method will further supplement current approaches to quickly distinguish M. gallisepticum vaccine strains from field isolates. PMID:27847370

  13. Gene expression accurately distinguishes liver metastases of small bowel and pancreas neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Scott K; Maxwell, Jessica E; Carr, Jennifer C; Wang, Donghong; Bellizzi, Andrew M; Sue O'Dorisio, M; O'Dorisio, Thomas M; Howe, James R

    2014-12-01

    Small bowel (SBNETs) and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) often present with liver metastases. Although liver biopsy establishes a neuroendocrine diagnosis, the primary tumor site is frequently unknown without exploratory surgery. Gene expression differences in metastases may distinguish primary SBNETs and PNETs. This study sought to determine expression differences of four genes in neuroendocrine metastases and to create a gene expression algorithm to distinguish the primary site. Nodal and liver metastases from SBNETs and PNETs (n = 136) were collected at surgery under an Institutional Review Board-approved protocol. Quantitative PCR measured expression of bombesin-like receptor-3, opioid receptor kappa-1, oxytocin receptor, and secretin receptor in metastases. Logistic regression models defined an algorithm predicting the primary tumor site. Models were developed on a training set of 21 nodal metastases and performance was validated on an independent set of nodal and liver metastases. Expression of all four genes was significantly different in SBNET compared to PNET metastases. The optimal model employed expression of bombesin-like receptor-3 and opioid receptor kappa-1. When these genes did not amplify, the algorithm used oxytocin receptor and secretin receptor expression, which allowed classification of all 136 metastases with 94.1 % accuracy. In the independent liver metastasis validation set, 52/56 (92.9 %) were correctly classified. Positive predictive values were 92.5 % for SBNETs and 93.8 % for PNETs. This validated algorithm accurately distinguishes SBNET and PNET metastases based on their expression of four genes. High accuracy in liver metastases demonstrates applicability to the clinical setting. Studies assessing this algorithm's utility in prospective clinical decision-making are warranted.

  14. Distinguishing the tremor of Parkinson's disease from essential tremor: finger displacement.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Abraham; Dhall, Rohit; Dhanani, Sara; Salins, Naomi; Sadreddin, Arshia; Moguel-Cobos, Guillermo; Pan, Di; Santiago, Anthony; Prigatano, George; Krishnamurthi, Narayanan; Troster, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    Although, the tremor of Parkinson's disease (PD) usually, but not always, differs from essential tremor (ET), there is no simple bedside test to distinguish PD from ET. We believe we have made such an observation. We studied 50 consecutive tremor-dominant PD patients (mean age: 63.4 years; mean disease duration: 4.9 years) and 35 consecutive ET patients (mean age: 64.1 years; mean disease duration: 12.5 years). Among PD patients, 31 had a bilateral tremor and among ET patients, 29 patients had a bilateral tremor. Patients sat opposite the examiner and pointed both index fingers at the examiner's index fingers. Then they closed their eyes. Within 15 s, one or rarely both of the patient's index fingers moved, was displaced, either upward or laterally. Finger displacement occurred only with bilateral simultaneous pointing with the patient's eyes closed. All the tremor-dominant PD patients exhibited displacement of an index finger. In 46 patients, it occurred on the side of dominant tremor, in 4, it occurred bilaterally. In 31 of 35 ET patients, no displacement occurred. In 4 of 35 ET patients, it occurred unilaterally on the side of dominant tremor. Odds ratio of distinguishing PD from ET: 89.62 at 95% confidence limits (5.31-1513.4), p = 0. 0018. Sensitivity 100% (0.91-1), specificity 89% (0.72-0.96). Finger displacement can distinguish the tremor of PD from ET. The unilateral movement with eyes closed suggests the tremor of PD unlike ET may impact circuits involving the parietal and supplementary motor cortices.

  15. Adam M. Reid: APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    The APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology is awarded on an annual basis by the APA Board of Professional Affairs (BPA) and the American Psychological Association of Graduate Students (APAGS) to a graduate student who has demonstrated outstanding practice and application of psychology. One of the 2015 award winners is Adam M. Reid, who received this award "for his community service, in which he has integrated the highest standards of professional psychological clinical practice and science." Adam's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here.

  16. On the ability of cells to distinguish the coherence of optical radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Budagovsky, A V

    2005-04-30

    The role of coherent optical radiation in photoregulatory processes caused by chemiluminescence of living cells is discussed. The effect of low and highly coherent quasi-monochromatic light on a dynamic 'host-parasite' system is studied. It is shown that plant organisms can distinguish the statistical order of irradiation. A significant increase in the functional activity was observed only for cells that were completely located within the coherence volume of the electromagnetic field. It is concluded that the cell size in living organisms is the discrimination threshold of the statistical properties of radiation and may serve as a specific biological measure of coherence. (coherence)

  17. Distinguishing Anticipation from Causality: Anticipatory Bias in the Estimation of Information Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahs, Daniel W.; Pethel, Shawn D.

    2011-09-01

    We report that transfer entropy estimates obtained from low-resolution and/or small data sets show net information flow away from a purely anticipatory element whereas transfer entropy calculated using exact distributions show the flow towards it. This means that for real-world data sets anticipatory elements can appear to be strongly driving the network dynamics even when there is no possibility of such an influence. Furthermore, we show that in the low-resolution limit there is no statistic that can distinguish anticipatory elements from causal ones.

  18. Distinguishing Newly Born Strange Stars from Neutron Stars with g-Mode Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Weijie; Wei Haiqing; Liu Yuxin

    2008-10-31

    The gravity-mode (g-mode) eigenfrequencies of newly born strange quark stars (SQSs) and neutron stars (NSs) are studied. It is found that the eigenfrequencies in SQSs are much lower than those in NSs by almost 1 order of magnitude, since the components of a SQS are all extremely relativistic particles while nucleons in a NS are nonrelativistic. We therefore propose that newly born SQSs can be distinguished from the NSs by detecting the eigenfrequencies of the g-mode pulsations of supernovae cores through gravitational radiation by LIGO-class detectors.

  19. Distinguishing newly born strange stars from neutron stars with g-mode oscillations.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wei-Jie; Wei, Hai-Qing; Liu, Yu-Xin

    2008-10-31

    The gravity-mode (g-mode) eigenfrequencies of newly born strange quark stars (SQSs) and neutron stars (NSs) are studied. It is found that the eigenfrequencies in SQSs are much lower than those in NSs by almost 1 order of magnitude, since the components of a SQS are all extremely relativistic particles while nucleons in a NS are nonrelativistic. We therefore propose that newly born SQSs can be distinguished from the NSs by detecting the eigenfrequencies of the g-mode pulsations of supernovae cores through gravitational radiation by LIGO-class detectors.

  20. A dopamine gene (DRD2) distinguishes between offenders who have and have not been violently victimized.

    PubMed

    Vaske, Jamie; Wright, John Paul; Beaver, Kevin M

    2011-04-01

    Research has shown that offenders, on average, are more likely to be violently victimized than nonoffenders. However, a substantial percentage of offenders are not violently victimized. The current study uses data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) to investigate whether variants of a polymorphism in the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2) distinguish between offenders who are violently victimized and offenders who are not violently victimized. The results show that offenders who are violently victimized are more likely to carry the DRD2 (A1) risk allele than offenders who have not been violently victimized.

  1. Measurement of wavelength-dependent extinction to distinguish between absorbing and nonabsorbing aerosol particulates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portscht, R.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of spectral transmission factors in smoky optical transmission paths reveal a difference between wavelength exponents of the extinction cross section of high absorption capacity and those of low absorption capacity. A theoretical explanation of this behavior is presented. In certain cases, it is possible to obtain data on the absorption index of aerosol particles in the optical path by measuring the spectral decadic extinction coefficient at, at least, two wavelengths. In this manner it is possible, for instance, to distinguish smoke containing soot from water vapor.

  2. Distinguishing neutrino mass hierarchies using dark matter annihilation signals at IceCube

    SciTech Connect

    Allahverdi, Rouzbeh; Dutta, Bhaskar; Ghosh, Dilip Kumar; Knockel, Bradley; Saha, Ipsita

    2015-12-01

    We explore the possibility of distinguishing neutrino mass hierarchies through the neutrino signal from dark matter annihilation at neutrino telescopes. We consider a simple extension of the standard model where the neutrino masses and mixing angles are obtained via the type-II seesaw mechanism as an explicit example. We show that future extensions of IceCube neutrino telescope may detect the neutrino signal from DM annihilation at the Galactic Center and inside the Sun, and differentiate between the normal and inverted mass hierarchies, in this model.

  3. Gold, credit, and mortality: distinguishing deflationary pressures on the late medieval English economy.

    PubMed

    Nightingale, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    This article uses national and local records of debt and evidence from coins, prices, and wages to discuss the economic effects of the gold coinage that was introduced into England in 1344. It distinguishes between the deflationary effects of gold and those of the falling population on prices and credit, and shows that a coinage dominated by gold reduced the volume of credit and transactions far more than the mortality rate and the total circulation of coin would indicate was likely. It relates these findings to the economic and social changes of the fifteenth century.

  4. Time Domain Analysis of ARIANNA Data Acquisition: Distinguishing Askaryan Radiation from Thermal Backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Jordan

    2014-03-01

    The Antarctica Ross Ice Shelf Antenna Neutrino Array (ARIANNA) is a high energy astrophysical neutrino detector, currently under construction near McMurdo Station, Antarctica. The ARIANNA detector design is optimized for detection of Askaryan radio frequency pulses, created in the ice shelf above the Antarctic ocean, that originate from cosmogenic GZK neutrino interactions. A formal analysis of the electromagnetic properties of the ARIANNA detection chain in the time domain is presented, and combined with a theoretical understanding of the Askaryan signal. This combination produces signal templates, used to distinguish thermal backgrounds from true signal in the current ARIANNA data. The results of this data analysis are also presented.

  5. Failure in distinguishing colored noise from chaos using the ``noise titration'' technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Ubiratan S.; Letellier, Christophe; Aguirre, Luis A.

    2009-03-01

    Identifying chaos in experimental data—noisy data—remains a challenging problem for which conclusive arguments are still very difficult to provide. In order to avoid problems usually encountered with techniques based on geometrical invariants (dimensions, Lyapunov exponent, etc.), Poon and Barahona introduced a numerical titration procedure which compares one-step-ahead predictions of linear and nonlinear models [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 98, 7107 (2001)]. We investigate the aformentioned technique in the context of colored noise or other types of nonchaotic behaviors. The main conclusion is that in several examples noise titration fails to distinguish such nonchaotic signals from low-dimensional deterministic chaos.

  6. APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology: Luz Maria Garcini.

    PubMed

    2016-11-01

    The APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology is awarded on an annual basis by the APA Board of Professional Affairs (BPA) and the American Psychological Association of Graduate Students (APAGS) to a graduate student who has demonstrated outstanding practice and application of psychology. The 2016 award winners is Luz Maria Garcini, whose commitment to the health and mental health of those recently immigrated has led to research and service that "have greatly benefited the lives of undocumented individuals in the border area of southern California." Garcini's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record

  7. Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training: Cindy Lee Juntunen.

    PubMed

    2016-11-01

    The Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training acknowledges psychologists who contribute to new teaching methods or solutions to learning problems through the use of research findings or evidence-based practices. The 2016 recipient is Cindy Lee Juntunen. She is recognized for "her steadfast commitment to the training of future counseling psychologists, for her leadership in key national organizations focused on education and training, and for her contributions to training competencies and practice guidelines within counseling psychology." Juntunen's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record

  8. COHERENCE: On the ability of cells to distinguish the coherence of optical radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budagovsky, A. V.

    2005-04-01

    The role of coherent optical radiation in photoregulatory processes caused by chemiluminescence of living cells is discussed. The effect of low and highly coherent quasi-monochromatic light on a dynamic 'host—parasite' system is studied. It is shown that plant organisms can distinguish the statistical order of irradiation. A significant increase in the functional activity was observed only for cells that were completely located within the coherence volume of the electromagnetic field. It is concluded that the cell size in living organisms is the discrimination threshold of the statistical properties of radiation and may serve as a specific biological measure of coherence.

  9. Distinguishing between extra natural inflation and natural inflation after BICEP2

    SciTech Connect

    Kohri, Kazunori; Lim, C.S.; Lin, Chia-Min E-mail: lim@lab.twcu.ac.jp

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we carefully calculated the tensor-to-scalar ratio, the running spectral index, and the running of running spectrum for (extra) natural inflation in order to compare with recent BICEP2 data, PLANCK satellite data and future 21 cm data. We discovered that the prediction for running spectral index and the running of running spectrum in natural inflation is different from that in the case of extra natural inflation. Near future observation for the running spectral index can only provide marginal accuracy which may not allow us distinguishing between extra natural inflation from natural inflation clearly unless the experimental accuracy can be further improved.

  10. 2D Raman spectroscopy as an alternative technique for distinguishing oleanoic acid and ursolic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mello, César; Crotti, Antônio E. M.; Vessecchi, Ricardo; Cunha, Wilson R.

    2006-11-01

    The isomeric triterpenes oleanoic acid and ursolic acid are compounds exhibiting a variety of biological activities. Structurally, they differ only in the position of the methyl group (C-29) at ring E. The differentiation of these two compounds requires a detailed analysis of their 13C and 1H NMR spectra which is often tedious and time-consuming, besides the need of using deuterated solvents. In this work, we report the use of bidimensional Raman spectroscopy as a fast technique to distinguish these two bioactive isomeric compounds.

  11. Time-dependent distinguishability: Choosing to be a wave or a particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grayson, T. P.; Zou, X.-Y.; Branning, D.; Torgerson, J. R.; Mandel, Leonard

    1994-01-01

    Interference experiments with connected parametric down-converters have demonstrated that the possibility, in principle, of identifying the photon path through the interferometer is sufficient to wipe out all interference, irrespective of whether the identification is actually made. The distinguishability of the photon path can be controlled by a time-dependent shutter, which leaves the choice whether the photon behaves as a wave or as a particle in the experimenter's hands. By contrast, in some more recent experiments involving the addition of a low-Q cavity, each idler photon makes the choice whether the associated signal photon behaves like a wave and exhibits interference, or like a particle.

  12. Multiphoton imaging to distinguish grana and starch inside an intact leaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mei-Yu; Zhuo, Guan-Yu; Chen, Po-Fu; Wu, Pei-Chun; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2013-02-01

    We have demonstrated a straightforward and noninvasive method to identify the distribution of grana and starch within an intact leaf. Grana and starch are the major functional structures for photosynthesis and energy storage of plant, respectively. Both exhibit highly ordered molecular structures and appear as micrometer-sized granules inside chloroplasts. In order to distinguish grana and starch, we used multiphoton microscopy, with simultaneous acquisition of two photon fluorescence (2PF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) signals. Consequently, SHG is found on both grana and starch while 2PF from chlorophyll indicates the identity of grana.

  13. Discovery of Cancer Driver Long Noncoding RNAs across 1112 Tumour Genomes: New Candidates and Distinguishing Features

    PubMed Central

    Lanzós, Andrés; Carlevaro-Fita, Joana; Mularoni, Loris; Reverter, Ferran; Palumbo, Emilio; Guigó, Roderic; Johnson, Rory

    2017-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) represent a vast unexplored genetic space that may hold missing drivers of tumourigenesis, but few such “driver lncRNAs” are known. Until now, they have been discovered through changes in expression, leading to problems in distinguishing between causative roles and passenger effects. We here present a different approach for driver lncRNA discovery using mutational patterns in tumour DNA. Our pipeline, ExInAtor, identifies genes with excess load of somatic single nucleotide variants (SNVs) across panels of tumour genomes. Heterogeneity in mutational signatures between cancer types and individuals is accounted for using a simple local trinucleotide background model, which yields high precision and low computational demands. We use ExInAtor to predict drivers from the GENCODE annotation across 1112 entire genomes from 23 cancer types. Using a stratified approach, we identify 15 high-confidence candidates: 9 novel and 6 known cancer-related genes, including MALAT1, NEAT1 and SAMMSON. Both known and novel driver lncRNAs are distinguished by elevated gene length, evolutionary conservation and expression. We have presented a first catalogue of mutated lncRNA genes driving cancer, which will grow and improve with the application of ExInAtor to future tumour genome projects. PMID:28128360

  14. DNA barcoding distinguishes pest species of the black fly genus Cnephia (Diptera: Simuliidae).

    PubMed

    Conflitti, I M; Pruess, K P; Cywinska, A; Powers, T O; Currie, D C

    2013-11-01

    Accurate species identification is essential for cost-effective pest control strategies. We tested the utility of COI barcodes for identifying members of the black fly genus Cnephia Enderlein (Diptera: Simuliidae). Our efforts focus on four Nearctic Cnephia species-Cnephia dacotensis (Dyar & Shannon), Cnephia eremities Shewell, Cnephia ornithophilia (Davies, Peterson & Wood), and Cnephia pecuarum (Riley)--the latter two being current or potential targets of biological control programs. We also analyzed one Palearctic species, Cnephia pallipes (Fries). Although Cnephia adults can be identified anatomically to species, control programs target the larval stage, which is difficult or impossible to distinguish morphologically. By using neighbor-joining, maximum parsimony, and Bayesian methods, we found that COI barcodes successfully identified three Nearctic Cnephia species, but not C. pecuarum. The Palearctic C. pallipes was also successfully identified. Despite nonmonophyly of C. pecuarum, we show that data from COI barcoding, in combination with geographical and ecological information, can be used to distinguish all four Nearctic species. Finally, we discussed 1) possible reasons for paraphyly in C. pecuarum, 2) topological concordance to previously reported chromosomal dendrograms, and 3) evolution of diverse feeding strategies within the genus Cnephia.

  15. DNA Barcode ITS Effectively Distinguishes the Medicinal Plant Boerhavia diffusa from Its Adulterants

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Dhivya; Shanmughanandhan, Dhivya; Sarma, Rajeev Kumar; Joseph, Jijo C.; Srinivasan, Ramachandran V.; Ramalingam, Sathishkumar

    2012-01-01

    Boerhavia diffusa (B. diffusa), also known as Punarnava, is an indigenous plant in India and an important component in traditional Indian medicine. The accurate identification and collection of this medicinal herb is vital to enhance the drug’s efficacy and biosafety. In this study, a DNA barcoding technique has been applied to identify and distinguish B. diffusa from its closely-related species. The phylogenetic analysis was carried out for the four species of Boerhavia using barcode candidates including nuclear ribosomal DNA regions ITS, ITS1, ITS2 and the chloroplast plastid gene psbA-trnH. Sequence alignment revealed 26% polymorphic sites in ITS, 30% in ITS1, 16% in ITS2 and 6% in psbA-trnH, respectively. Additionally, a phylogenetic tree was constructed for 15 species using ITS sequences which clearly distinguished B. diffusa from the other species. The ITS1 demonstrates a higher transition/transversion ratio, percentage of variation and pairwise distance which differentiate B. diffusa from other species of Boerhavia. Our study revealed that ITS and ITS1 could be used as potential candidate regions for identifying B. diffusa and for authenticating its herbal products. PMID:23317705

  16. Distinguishing Gasoline Engine Oils of Different Viscosities Using Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adbul-Munaim, Ali Mazin; Reuter, Marco; Koch, Martin; Watson, Dennis G.

    2015-07-01

    Terahertz-time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) in the range of 0.5-2.0 THz was evaluated for distinguishing among gasoline engine oils of three different grades (SAE 5W-20, 10W-40, and 20W-50) from the same manufacturer. Absorption coefficient showed limited potential and only distinguished ( p < 0.05) the 20W-50 grade from the other two grades in the 1.7-2.0-THz range. Refractive index data demonstrated relatively flat and consistently spaced curves for the three oil grades. ANOVA results confirmed a highly significant difference ( p < 0.0001) in refractive index among each of the three oils across the 0.5-2.0-THz range. Linear regression was applied to refractive index data at 0.25-THz intervals from 0.5 to 2.0 THz to predict kinematic viscosity. All seven linear regression models, intercepts, and refractive index coefficients were highly significant ( p < 0.0001). All models had a similar fit with R 2 ranging from 0.9773 to 0.9827 and RMSE ranging from 6.33 to 7.75. The refractive indices at 1.25 THz produced the best fit. The refractive indices of these oil samples were promising for identification and distinction of oil grades.

  17. Multiplexed electrochemical detection of trypsin and chymotrypsin based on distinguishable signal nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ru-Ping; Tian, Xiao-Cui; Qiu, Ping; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2014-09-16

    In this work, we developed a novel multisignal output for simultaneous detection of multiple proteases by using nanoprobes labeled with distinguishable electrochemical probes. First, biotinylated peptide1 (S1) and biotinylated peptide2 (S2) were associated with biotinylated DNA1 and DNA2 via biotin-streptavidin interaction, forming DNA1-S1 and DNA2-S2, respectively. Two distinguishable signal nanoprobes (DNA1'-Au NPs-Thi and DNA2'-Au NPs-Fc) were prepared by initial assembling DNA1' and DNA2' on the Au NPs surface, respectively, and then carrying corresponding thionine (Thi) and 6-(Ferrocenyl)hexanethiol (Fc). Then, the peptide substrates (DNA1-S1 and DNA2-S2) were immobilized on gold electrode surface through Au-S bonds, and the DNA1'-Au NPs-Thi and DNA2'-Au NPs-Fc were assembled to the peptide-DNA-modified electrode surface via DNA hybridization. The targets of trypsin and chymotrypsin can specifically recognize and cleave peptides with different sequences, releasing DNA1'-Au NPs-Thi and DNA2'-Au NPs-Fc from the electrode surface into solution, thus decreasing the current of Thi and Fc. The decrease in the electrochemical currents of the two signal nanoprobes enables us to simultaneously and quantitatively determine the targets trypsin and chymotrypsin. More importantly, this strategy can be extended easily by designing various proteases-specific peptide substrates and utilizing corresponding electrochemical detectable elements for simultaneous multiplex protease assay in various biosystems.

  18. Fluctuation Analysis of Redox Potential to Distinguish Microbial Fe(II) Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Enright, A M L; Ferris, F G

    2016-11-01

    We developed a novel method for distinguishing abiotic and biological iron oxidation in liquid media using oxidation-reduction (redox) potential time series data. The instrument and processing algorithm were tested by immersing the tip of a Pt electrode with an Ag-AgCl reference electrode into an active iron-oxidizing biofilm in a groundwater discharge zone, as well as in two abiotic systems: a killed sample and a chemical control from the same site. We used detrended fluctuation analysis to characterize average root mean square fluctuation behavior, which was distinct in the live system. The calculated α value scaling exponents determined by detrended fluctuation analysis were significantly different at p < 0.001. This indicates that time series of electrode response data may be used to distinguish live and abiotic chemical reaction pathways. Due to the simplicity, portability, and small size, it may be suitable for characterization of extraterrestrial environments where water has been observed, such as Mars and Europa. Key Words: Oxidation-reduction potential-Detrended fluctuation analysis-Iron-oxidizing bacteria. Astrobiology 16, 846-852.

  19. Allozyme electrophoresis as a tool for distinguishing different zooxanthellae symbiotic with giant clams

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, B. K.; Monje, V.; Silvestre, V.; Sison, M.; Belda-Baillie, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    The taxonomy of zooxanthellae in marine invertebrate symbioses is not well understood owing mainly to their lack of reliable morphological differences. Nevertheless, previous work using protein and DNA electrophoreses has set the stage for advancing our taxonomic understanding of cnidarian zooxanthellae. Here we present the use of allozymes as genetic markers for distinguishing algal isolates from tridacnid hosts. Zooxanthellae from seven Tridacna and Hippopus species were isolated and maintained in axenic clonal cultures over many generations. Of 16 enzyme systems, α- and β-esterase (EST), esterase-F (EST-F), glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI), and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) were found suitable polymorphic markers of genetic differences among clonal cultures. Of 39 clonal isolates, 97% were found to be genetically distinguishable. This high extent of genetic variation in zooxanthellae within and between clam species was unexpected, and is difficult to explain based solely on the general notion of asexual reproduction in symbiotic zooxanthellae. Our results are also consistent with the occurrence of sexual reproduction in clam zooxanthellae. The close genetic similarity of the symbionts of Tridacna gigas, the largest and fastest-growing clam species, and the difficulty of initiating their clonal cultures in the given nutrient medium, compared with the symbionts of other clam species, are further indicative of possibly distinct algal symbionts in T. gigas. These findings are discussed in light of current taxonomic understanding of these organisms.

  20. Can one distinguish τ-neutrinos from antineutrinos in neutral-current pion production processes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, E.; Nieves, J.; Valverde, M.

    2007-04-01

    A potential way to distinguish τ-neutrinos from antineutrinos, below the τ-production threshold, but above the pion production one, is presented. It is based on the different behavior of the neutral-current pion production off the nucleon, depending on whether it is induced by neutrinos or antineutrinos. This procedure for distinguishing τ-neutrinos from antineutrinos neither relies on any nuclear model, nor it is affected by any nuclear effect (distortion of the outgoing nucleon waves, etc.). We show that neutrino-antineutrino asymmetries occur both in the totally integrated cross sections and in the pion azimuthal differential distributions. To define the asymmetries for the latter distributions we just rely on Lorentz-invariance. All these asymmetries are independent of the lepton family and can be experimentally measured by using electron or muon neutrinos, due to the lepton family universality of the neutral-current neutrino interaction. Nevertheless and to estimate their size, we have also used the chiral model of [E. Hernández, J. Nieves, M. Valverde, arxiv:hep-ph/0701149] at intermediate energies. Results are really significant since the differences between neutrino and antineutrino induced reactions are always large in all physical channels.

  1. Pointwise transinformation distinguishes a recurrent increase of synchronization in the rapid eye movement sleep electroencephalogram.

    PubMed

    Landwehr, Ralf; Jowaed, Ahmad

    2012-02-01

    The analysis of electroencephalogram (EEG) coupling patterns is essential for understanding how interrelations between cortical sites change with the wake-sleep cycle. Waking and sleep EEGs of 12 normal sleepers were analyzed by pointwise transinformation (PTI). Stage-dependent differences of PTI were assessed, and a spectral analysis of synchronized events was performed. A pattern of recurrent EEG synchronization was distinguished in all rapid eye movement (REM) sleep phases. The mean coupling of EEG leads differed regionally, with high coupling levels of frontal and occipital derivations and lower midtemporal and central coupling levels. Mean coupling levels were comparable in stages R, W, and N1 but were lower than in N2 and N3. An REM-specific pattern of low EEG synchronization was identified for F7-F8 and T3-T4, with lowest coupling levels during tonic REM sleep. Also, maximal intervals of uncoupled EEG were longer during tonic REM sleep. Because of these results, a new descriptive entity is proposed: the recurrent increase of synchronization in the EEG (RISE). This seems to reflect the dynamic aspects of spatiotemporal EEG synchronization on small time scales. A possibly specific low coupling pattern of the temporal leads may distinguish REM sleep from other states with a "desynchronized" EEG and, to some extent, tonic from phasic REM sleep.

  2. Displayed Trees Do Not Determine Distinguishability Under the Network Multispecies Coalescent.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Sha; Degnan, James H

    2017-03-01

    Recent work in estimating species relationships from gene trees has included inferring networks assuming that past hybridization has occurred between species. Probabilistic models using the multispecies coalescent can be used in this framework for likelihood-based inference of both network topologies and parameters, including branch lengths and hybridization parameters. A difficulty for such methods is that it is not always clear whether, or to what extent, networks are identifiable-that is whether there could be two distinct networks that lead to the same distribution of gene trees. For cases in which incomplete lineage sorting occurs in addition to hybridization, we demonstrate a new representation of the species network likelihood that expresses the probability distribution of the gene tree topologies as a linear combination of gene tree distributions given a set of species trees. This representation makes it clear that in some cases in which two distinct networks give the same distribution of gene trees when sampling one allele per species, the two networks can be distinguished theoretically when multiple individuals are sampled per species. This result means that network identifiability is not only a function of the trees displayed by the networks but also depends on allele sampling within species. We additionally give an example in which two networks that display exactly the same trees can be distinguished from their gene trees even when there is only one lineage sampled per species. [gene tree, hybridization, identifiability, maximum likelihood, species tree, phylogeny.].

  3. Distinguishing emotional coregulation from codysregulation: an investigation of emotional dynamics and body weight in romantic couples.

    PubMed

    Reed, Rebecca G; Barnard, Kobus; Butler, Emily A

    2015-02-01

    Well-regulated emotions, both within people and between relationship partners, play a key role in facilitating health and well-being. The present study examined 39 heterosexual couples' joint weight status (both partners are healthy-weight, both overweight, 1 healthy-weight, and 1 overweight) as a predictor of 2 interpersonal emotional patterns during a discussion of their shared lifestyle choices. The first pattern, coregulation, is one in which partners' coupled emotions show a dampening pattern over time and ultimately return to homeostatic levels. The second, codysregulation, is one in which partners' coupled emotions are amplified away from homeostatic balance. We demonstrate how a coupled linear oscillator (CLO) model (Butner, Amazeen, & Mulvey, 2005) can be used to distinguish coregulation from codysregulation. As predicted, healthy-weight couples and mixed-weight couples in which the man was heavier than the woman displayed coregulation, but overweight couples and mixed-weight couples in which the woman was heavier showed codysregulation. These results suggest that heterosexual couples in which the woman is overweight may face formidable coregulatory challenges that could undermine both partners' well-being. The results also demonstrate the importance of distinguishing between various interpersonal emotional dynamics for understanding connections between interpersonal emotions and health.

  4. A Rapid Diagnostic Test to Distinguish Between American and European Populations of Phytophthora ramorum.

    PubMed

    Kroon, Laurens P N M; Verstappen, Els C P; Kox, Linda F F; Flier, Wilbert G; Bonants, Peter J M

    2004-06-01

    ABSTRACT A new devastating disease in the United States, commonly known as Sudden Oak Death, is caused by Phytophthora ramorum. This pathogen, which previously was described attacking species of Rhododendron and Viburnum in Germany and the Netherlands, has established itself in forests on the central coast of California and is killing scores of native oak trees (Lithocarpus densiflora, Quercus agrifolia, Q. kelloggii, and Q. parvula var. shrevei). The phytosanitary authorities in the European Union consider non-European isolates of P. ramorum as a threat to forest trees in Europe. To date, almost all European isolates are mating type A1 while those from California and Oregon are type A2. The occurrence of both mating types in the same region could lead to a population capable of sexual recombination, which could generate a new source of diversity. To prevent contact between these two populations, a rapid, reliable, and discriminating diagnostic test was developed to easily distinguish the two populations. Based on a DNA sequence difference in the mitochondrial Cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (Cox1) gene, we developed a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) protocol to distinguish between isolates of P. ramorum originating in Europe and those originating in the United States. A total of 83 isolates of P. ramorum from Europe and 51 isolates from the United States were screened and all isolates could be consistently and correctly allocated to either the European or the U.S. populations using the SNP protocol.

  5. DNA barcode ITS effectively distinguishes the medicinal plant Boerhavia diffusa from its adulterants.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Dhivya; Shanmughanandhan, Dhivya; Sarma, Rajeev Kumar; Joseph, Jijo C; Srinivasan, Ramachandran V; Ramalingam, Sathishkumar

    2012-12-01

    Boerhavia diffusa (B. diffusa), also known as Punarnava, is an indigenous plant in India and an important component in traditional Indian medicine. The accurate identification and collection of this medicinal herb is vital to enhance the drug's efficacy and biosafety. In this study, a DNA barcoding technique has been applied to identify and distinguish B. diffusa from its closely-related species. The phylogenetic analysis was carried out for the four species of Boerhavia using barcode candidates including nuclear ribosomal DNA regions ITS, ITS1, ITS2 and the chloroplast plastid gene psbA-trnH. Sequence alignment revealed 26% polymorphic sites in ITS, 30% in ITS1, 16% in ITS2 and 6% in psbA-trnH, respectively. Additionally, a phylogenetic tree was constructed for 15 species using ITS sequences which clearly distinguished B. diffusa from the other species. The ITS1 demonstrates a higher transition/transversion ratio, percentage of variation and pairwise distance which differentiate B. diffusa from other species of Boerhavia. Our study revealed that ITS and ITS1 could be used as potential candidate regions for identifying B. diffusa and for authenticating its herbal products.

  6. APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology.

    PubMed

    2016-11-01

    The APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology is awarded on an annual basis by the APA Board of Professional Affairs (BPA) and the American Psychological Association of Graduate Students (APAGS) to a graduate student who has demonstrated outstanding practice and application of psychology. A qualified candidate must demonstrate exemplary performance in working with an underserved population in an applied setting or have developed an innovative method for delivering health services to an underserved population. The 2016 recipient of the APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology was selected by the 2015 Board of Professional Affairs (BPA) and the 2015 APAGS Scholarship and Awards Selection Committee. Members of the 2015 BPA were Patricia Arredondo, EdD; Helen L. Coons, PhD, ABPP; Vickie Mays, PhD, MSPH; Linda A. Reddy, PhD; Lois O. Condi, PhD; Antonette M. Zeiss, PhD; Timothy A. Cavell, PhD; Robert T. Kinscherff, PhD, JD; and Jared L. Skillings, PhD, ABPP. Members of the 2015 APAGS Scholarship and Awards Selection Committee were Emily Voelkel, PhD; Blaire Schembari; and Yolanda Perkins-Volk. (PsycINFO Database Record

  7. Distinguishing simulated from genuine dissociative identity disorder on the MMPI-2.

    PubMed

    Brand, Bethany L; Chasson, Gregory S

    2015-01-01

    Due to high elevations on validity and clinical scales on personality and forensic measures, it is challenging to determine if individuals presenting with symptoms of dissociative identity disorder (DID) are genuine or not. Little research has focused on malingering DID, or on the broader issue of the profiles these patients obtain on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-2), despite increasing awareness of dissociation. This study sought to characterize the MMPI-2 profiles of DID patients and to determine the utility of the MMPI-2 in distinguishing DID patients from uncoached and coached DID simulators. The analyses revealed that Infrequency, Back Infrequency, and Infrequency-Psychopathology (Fp) distinguished simulators from genuine DID patients. Fp was best able to discriminate simulated DID. Utility statistics and classification functions are provided for classifying individual profiles as indicative of genuine or simulated DID. Despite exposure to information about DID, the simulators were not able to accurately feign DID, which is inconsistent with the iatrogenic/sociocultural model of DID. Given that dissociation was strongly associated with elevations in validity, as well as clinical scales, including Scale 8 (i.e., Schizophrenia), considerable caution should be used in interpreting validity scales as indicative of feigning, and Scale 8 as indicative of schizophrenia, among highly dissociative individuals.

  8. [A case of pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection with pleural effusion, distinguished from pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yosuke; Kurosawa, Takayuki; Hosaka, Kiminori

    2014-09-01

    A case of pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection with pleural effusion is very rare. We report a case of pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection with pleural effusion, distinguished from pulmonary tuberculosis. A 44-year-old man presented to a clinic with a productive cough, sputum, and loss of appetite for several months. Chest X-ray and chest computed tomography (CT) showed right pleural effusion, centrilobular nodules and infiltrative shadows with cavities in the bilateral lung fields. The direct smear examination showed positive acid-fast bacilli (Gaffky 5). He was referred to our hospital for suspected recurrent pulmonary tuberculosis. We started anti-tuberculosis drugs because pulmonary tuberculosis complicated with pleurisy was first suspected from the findings of high ADA level (78.6 IU/l) of the effusion and positive result of interferon-gamma release assay (QuantiFERON TB-2G). But Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium complex was not identified by the polymerase chain reaction method and the culture of the sputum was negative. At a later date, Mycobacterium kansasii was detected by sputum culture. The patient was diagnosed as pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection and treatment with anti-tuberculosis drugs including RFP resulted in a good clinical response. This case was a rare case of pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection with pleural effusion, distinguished from pulmonary tuberculosis.

  9. A novel immunohistochemical classifier to distinguish Hodgkin lymphoma from ALK anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Döring, Claudia; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Agostinelli, Claudio; Piccaluga, Pier P; Facchetti, Fabio; Pileri, Stefano; Küppers, Ralf; Newrzela, Sebastian; Hartmann, Sylvia

    2014-10-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma and ALK(-) anaplastic large cell lymphoma share many features like strong CD30 expression and usually loss of B- and T-cell markers. However, their clinical course is dramatically different with curability rates of >90% for classical Hodgkin lymphoma and an unfavorable prognosis for anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Classical Hodgkin lymphoma and ALK(-) anaplastic large cell lymphoma can usually be distinguished by PAX5 expression in the Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma and expression of cytotoxic molecules in tumor cells of anaplastic large cell lymphoma. However, in some cases the differential diagnosis is difficult owing to absence of established markers. To be able to better classify these cases, we reevaluated gene expression data of microdissected tumor cells of both lymphomas for differentially expressed genes. A classifier was established, comprising four genes strongly expressed in Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (MDC/CCL22, CD83, STAT3, and TUBB2B). Applying this classifier to a test cohort, Hodgkin lymphoma was successfully distinguished from ALK(-) anaplastic large cell lymphoma with an accuracy of 97% (43/44). MDC/CCL22, CD83, and STAT3 have also been found to be expressed in antigen-presenting cells. Therefore, based on our established classifier, Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells differ from tumor cells of anaplastic large cell lymphoma, which can successfully be applied for practical purposes in histopathologic diagnostics.

  10. Distinguishing features of endometrial pathology after exposure to the progesterone receptor modulator mifepristone.

    PubMed

    Fiscella, Julietta; Bonfiglio, Thomas; Winters, Paul; Eisinger, Steven H; Fiscella, Kevin

    2011-07-01

    There is growing interest in the use of progesterone receptor modulators such as mifepristone for treatment of gynecologic and other conditions, but interest in progesterone receptor modulators is dampened by the effects of the agents on the endometrium. In this study, we examined the endometria of women exposed to mifepristone for treatment of leiomyomas in doses of 2.5 and 5 mg and compared them to unexposed endometria. We assessed the reliability of these features by comparing agreement in ratings between pathologists who were blinded to each other's readings. We assessed distinguishing features between exposed and unexposed groups by comparing frequency of features between groups. We found that key features could be reliably assessed by pathologists experienced in endometrial pathology. We observed several features (nonsynchronous endometrium, large fluid filled glands, and abnormal blood vessels) that distinguished endometrial samples that were and were not exposed to the drug. These findings suggest several features that can be tracked during studies involving mifepristone and, potentially, other progesterone receptor modulators.

  11. Using Relevance Feedback to Distinguish the Changes in EEG During Different Absence Seizure Phases.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Liu, Xianzeng; Ouyang, Gaoxiang

    2016-07-01

    We carried out a series of statistical experiments to explore the utility of using relevance feedback on electroencephalogram (EEG) data to distinguish between different activity states in human absence epilepsy. EEG recordings from 10 patients with absence epilepsy are sampled, filtered, selected, and dissected from seizure-free, preseizure, and seizure phases. A total of 112 two-second 19-channel EEG epochs from 10 patients were selected from each phase. For each epoch, multiscale permutation entropy of the EEG data was calculated. The feature dimensionality was reduced by linear discriminant analysis to obtain a more discriminative and compact representation. Finally, a relevance feedback technique, that is, direct biased discriminant analysis, was applied to 68 randomly selected queries over nine iterations. This study is a first attempt to apply the statistical analysis of relevance feedback to the distinction of different EEG activity states in absence epilepsy. The average precision in the top 10 returned results was 97.5%, and the standard deviation suggested that embedding relevance feedback can effectively distinguish different seizure phases in absence epilepsy. The experimental results indicate that relevance feedback may be an effective tool for the prediction of different activity states in human absence epilepsy. The simultaneous analysis of multichannel EEG signals provides a powerful tool for the exploration of abnormal electrical brain activity in patients with epilepsy.

  12. Diagnostic utility of Fli-1 and D2-40 in distinguishing atypical fibroxanthoma from angiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Cuda, Jonathan; Mirzamani, Neda; Kantipudi, Ramya; Robbins, Jason; Welsch, Micheal Jude; Sundram, Uma N

    2013-05-01

    Although in most cases one can easily distinguish between atypical fibroxanthomas and angiosarcomas, hemorrhagic atypical fibroxanthomas can pose a diagnostic problem. In rare cases, the large atypical cells of atypical fibroxanthoma can stain with CD31, leading to the erroneous diagnosis of angiosarcoma. We elected to further study this conundrum with 2 additional markers of lymphatic and vascular elements, namely D2-40 (podoplanin) and Fli-1, respectively. We studied 26 cases of atypical fibroxanthoma and 20 cases of angiosarcoma with Fli-1 and D2-40. We found that both Fli-1 and D2-40 stained a majority of cases of angiosarcoma (16/20 and 12/20, respectively), although only staining a minority of cases of atypical fibroxanthoma (8/26 for both). In addition, D2-40 staining of atypical fibroxanthoma was usually weak when positive, whereas Fli-1 staining of angiosarcomas was mostly strong and nuclear. Thus, both D2-40 and Fli-1 seem to be useful in distinguishing between atypical fibroxanthomas and angiosarcomas.

  13. Ancestry informative markers for distinguishing between Thai populations based on genome-wide association datasets.

    PubMed

    Vongpaisarnsin, Kornkiat; Listman, Jennifer Beth; Malison, Robert T; Gelernter, Joel

    2015-07-01

    The main purpose of this work was to identify a set of AIMs that stratify the genetic structure and diversity of the Thai population from a high-throughput autosomal genome-wide association study. In this study, more than one million SNPs from the international HapMap database and the Thai depression genome-wide association study have been examined to identify ancestry informative markers (AIMs) that distinguish between Thai populations. An efficient strategy is proposed to identify and characterize such SNPs and to test high-resolution SNP data from international HapMap populations. The best AIMs are identified to stratify the population and to infer genetic ancestry structure. A total of 124 AIMs were clearly clustered geographically across the continent, whereas only 89 AIMs stratified the Thai population from East Asian populations. Finally, a set of 273 AIMs was able to distinguish northern from southern Thai subpopulations. These markers will be of particular value in identifying the ethnic origins in regions where matching by self-reports is unavailable or unreliable, which usually occurs in real forensic cases.

  14. DISTINGUISHING FEATURES OF ENDOMETRIAL PATHOLOGY FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO THE PROGESTERONE RECEPTOR MODULATOR MIFEPRISTONE

    PubMed Central

    Fiscella, Julietta; Bonfiglio, Thomas; Winters, Paul; Eisinger, Steven H; Fiscella, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in use of progesterone receptor modulators (PRM) such as mifepristone for treatment of gynecological and other conditions, but interest in PRMs is dampened by effects of the agents on the endometrium. In this study, we examined the endometria of women exposed to mifepristone for treatment of leiomyomas in doses of 2.5 mg and 5 mg and compared them to unexposed endometria. We assessed the reliability of these features by comparing agreement in ratings between pathologists who were blinded to each other's readings. We assessed distinguishing features between exposed and unexposed groups by comparing frequency of features between groups. We found that key features could be reliably assessed by pathologists experienced in endometrial pathology. We observed several features (non synchronous endometrium, large fluid filled glands and abnormal blood vessels) that distinguished endometrial samples that were and were not exposed to the drug. These findings suggest several features that can be tracked during studies involving mifepristone and potentially other PRMs. PMID:21315422

  15. Enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) morphology distinguishes the lower molars of Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Matthew M; Gunz, Philipp; Wood, Bernard A; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2008-12-01

    Tooth crown morphology plays a central role in hominin systematics, but the removal of the original outer enamel surface by dental attrition often eliminates from consideration the type of detailed crown morphology that has been shown to discriminate among hominin taxa. This reduces the size of samples available for study. The enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) is the developmental precursor and primary contributor to the morphology of the unworn outer enamel surface, and its morphology is only affected after considerable attrition. In this paper, we explore whether the form of the EDJ can be used to distinguish between the mandibular molars of two southern African fossil hominins: Paranthropus (or Australopithecus) robustus and Australopithecus africanus. After micro-computed tomographic scanning the molar sample, we made high-resolution images of the EDJ and used geometric morphometrics to compare EDJ shape differences between species, in addition to documenting metameric variation along the molar row within each species. Landmarks were collected along the marginal ridge that runs between adjacent dentine horns and around the circumference of the cervix. Our results suggest that the morphology of the EDJ can distinguish lower molars of these southern African hominins, and it can discriminate first, second, and third molars within each taxon. These results confirm previous findings that the EDJ preserves taxonomically valuable shape information in worn teeth. Mean differences in EDJ shape, in particular dentine horn height, crown height, and cervix shape, are more marked between adjacent molars within each taxon than for the same molar between the two taxa.

  16. Calcium oxalate crystallization index (COCI): an alternative method for distinguishing nephrolithiasis patients from healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bowei; Dissayabutra, Thasinas; Ungjaroenwathana, Wattanachai; Tosukhowong, Piyaratana; Srisa-Art, Monpichar; Supaprom, Thavorn; Insin, Numpon; Boonla, Chanchai

    2014-01-01

    Urinary supersaturation triggers lithogenic crystal formation. We developed an alternative test, designated calcium oxalate crystallization index (COCI), to distinguish nephrolithiasis patients from healthy individuals based on their urinary crystallization capability. The effect of urine volume, oxalate, phosphate, citrate, potassium, and sodium on COCI values was investigated. COCI values were determined in 24-hr urine obtained from nephrolithiasis patients (n=72) and matched healthy controls (n=71). Increases in urine oxalate and phosphate and decreases in urine volume and citrate resulted in significantly increased COCI values. The urinary COCI in nephrolithiasis patients was significantly higher than that in healthy individuals. Two healthy subjects who had elevated COCI values were found to have asymptomatic kidney calculi. The receiver operating characteristic analysis showed an area under the curve of the urinary COCI test of 0.9499 (95%CI: 0.9131-0.9868) for distinguishing between nephrolithiasis and healthy subjects. At the cutoff of 165 mg oxalate equivalence/day, the urinary COCI test provided sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy amounts of 83.33%, 97.18%, and 90.21%, respectively. Urinary COCI values were primarily dependent on urine volume, oxalate, and phosphate. The test provided high sensitivity and specificity for clinically discriminating nephrolithiasis patients from healthy controls. It might be used to detect individuals with asymptomatic kidney calculi.

  17. Matching consequences to behavior: implications of failing to distinguish between noncompliance and nonresponsivity.

    PubMed

    Matejkowski, Jason; Festinger, David S; Benishek, Lois A; Dugosh, Karen L

    2011-01-01

    Neither punitive nor therapeutic approaches alone are effective at addressing the dual public health and public safety concerns associated with managing criminal behavior perpetrated by people who have psychiatric and substance use disorders. The optimal solution may instead require the integration of both criminal justice supervision and treatment. Using problem-solving courts (PSCs) as a model, we focus on one dimension of this integrated approach, distinguishing between behavior that stems from willful noncompliance with supervision and behavior that results from nonresponsivity to treatment. First, we discuss the public health and public safety consequences of using singular approaches to address the criminal behavior of this population. We then present lessons learned from PSCs that distinguish between noncompliant and nonresponsive behaviors in making treatment and supervision decisions. Finally, we consider how the concepts of nonresponsivity and noncompliance may be extended, via policy, to probation and parole settings as well as mental health and substance abuse treatment services outside the criminal justice setting in order to enhance public health and safety.

  18. Network deconvolution as a general method to distinguish direct dependencies in networks.

    PubMed

    Feizi, Soheil; Marbach, Daniel; Médard, Muriel; Kellis, Manolis

    2013-08-01

    Recognizing direct relationships between variables connected in a network is a pervasive problem in biological, social and information sciences as correlation-based networks contain numerous indirect relationships. Here we present a general method for inferring direct effects from an observed correlation matrix containing both direct and indirect effects. We formulate the problem as the inverse of network convolution, and introduce an algorithm that removes the combined effect of all indirect paths of arbitrary length in a closed-form solution by exploiting eigen-decomposition and infinite-series sums. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in several network applications: distinguishing direct targets in gene expression regulatory networks; recognizing directly interacting amino-acid residues for protein structure prediction from sequence alignments; and distinguishing strong collaborations in co-authorship social networks using connectivity information alone. In addition to its theoretical impact as a foundational graph theoretic tool, our results suggest network deconvolution is widely applicable for computing direct dependencies in network science across diverse disciplines.

  19. Structural basis for phosphatidylinositol-phosphate biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Oliver B.; Tomasek, David; Jorge, Carla D.; Dufrisne, Meagan Belcher; Kim, Minah; Banerjee, Surajit; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Santos, Helena; Mancia, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol is critical for intracellular signalling and anchoring of carbohydrates and proteins to outer cellular membranes. The defining step in phosphatidylinositol biosynthesis is catalysed by CDP-alcohol phosphotransferases, transmembrane enzymes that use CDP-diacylglycerol as donor substrate for this reaction, and either inositol in eukaryotes or inositol phosphate in prokaryotes as the acceptor alcohol. Here we report the structures of a related enzyme, the phosphatidylinositol-phosphate synthase from Renibacterium salmoninarum, with and without bound CDP-diacylglycerol to 3.6 and 2.5 Å resolution, respectively. These structures reveal the location of the acceptor site, and the molecular determinants of substrate specificity and catalysis. Functional characterization of the 40%-identical ortholog from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a potential target for the development of novel anti-tuberculosis drugs, supports the proposed mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis. This work therefore provides a structural and functional framework to understand the mechanism of phosphatidylinositol-phosphate biosynthesis. PMID:26510127

  20. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring in Idaho, 1989-1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hauck, A. K.

    1990-10-01

    The Idaho augmented fish health monitoring contract DE-A179-87BP65903 was awarded in June 1987 and fully implemented in January 1988. The third annual report of activities serviced under this contract is presented. The prevailing fish health problems in 1989 include persistent infections caused by infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), by Myxobolus (Myxosoma) cerebralis, Renibacterium salmoninarum and drug resistant Aeromonas salmonicida at select hatcheries on Idaho's upper Columbia River tributaries. Administrative focus during the year was to fill vacant positions and still maintain the monitoring effort at levels agreed on under contract. Complete diagnostic and inspection services were provided to eleven Idaho anadromous facilities. The present report describes work done to meet contract agreements and summarizes the fish health findings of anadromous stocks reared at and returning to Idaho's facilities during 1989.

  1. Work package 4 report: Broodfish testing for bacterial infections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michel, Christian; Elliott, Diane G.; Jansson, Eva; Urdaci, Maria; Midtlyng, Paul J.

    2005-01-01

    This report summarises current scientific information and experience obtained with various methods for testing of salmonid broodfish or spawn for bacterial kidney disease (BKD - Renibacterium salmoninarum infection) in order to prevent vertical transmission of the organism to the offspring. Assessment is also being performed for Flavobacterium psychrophilum infections causing rainbow trout fry syndrome (RTFS) or bacterial coldwater disease (CWD), and for Piscirickettsia salmonis infection causing salmon rickettsial syndrome (SRS) in salmonid fish species. Methods for screening to document the absence of BKD in fish populations are well established. Some of them have also proven successful for testing individual fish from infected populations in order to avoid vertical transmission of the infectious agent. Several diagnostic methods for flavobacteriosis and piscirickettsiosis have also been established but none of them, as yet, has been validated for use in programmes to prevent vertical transmission of disease. Priority subjects for further research in order to improve the management and control of these vertically transmissible fish diseases are suggested.

  2. Structural basis for phosphatidylinositol-phosphate biosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Oliver B.; Tomasek, David; Jorge, Carla D.; Dufrisne, Meagan Belcher; Kim, Minah; Banerjee, Surajit; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Santos, Helena; Mancia, Filippo

    2015-10-01

    Phosphatidylinositol is critical for intracellular signalling and anchoring of carbohydrates and proteins to outer cellular membranes. The defining step in phosphatidylinositol biosynthesis is catalysed by CDP-alcohol phosphotransferases, transmembrane enzymes that use CDP-diacylglycerol as donor substrate for this reaction, and either inositol in eukaryotes or inositol phosphate in prokaryotes as the acceptor alcohol. Here we report the structures of a related enzyme, the phosphatidylinositol-phosphate synthase from Renibacterium salmoninarum, with and without bound CDP-diacylglycerol to 3.6 and 2.5 Å resolution, respectively. These structures reveal the location of the acceptor site, and the molecular determinants of substrate specificity and catalysis. Functional characterization of the 40%-identical ortholog from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a potential target for the development of novel anti-tuberculosis drugs, supports the proposed mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis. This work therefore provides a structural and functional framework to understand the mechanism of phosphatidylinositol-phosphate biosynthesis.

  3. Some potentials and limits of the leucocrit test as a fish health assessment method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, G.A.; Gould, R.W.; Yasutake, W.T.

    1983-01-01

    The sensitivity of the leucocrit as a stress tolerance and fish health assessment method was evaluated by subjecting juvenile coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch, or steelhead trout, Salmo gairdneri, to standardized crowding, handling, temperature and disease challenges. The leucocrit was a sensitive indicator of the physiological stress resulting from crowding at population densities of 0·2–0·4 kg l−1, and to the stress of handling and to temperature changes. It was relatively insensitive to physiological sampling procedures which supports its continued development as a stress assessment method.In the case of fish diseases, subclinical or active Renibacterium salmoninarum and Yersinia ruckeriinfections had essentially no effect on leucocrit values. In contrast, active Aeromonas salmonicidainfections significantly depressed the leucocrit. However, no change was seen during the subclinical (incubation) phase prior to the development of an epizootic. Thus, the potential of the leucocrit as a fish health assessment method appears limited.

  4. Model distinguishability and inference robustness in mechanisms of cholera transmission and loss of immunity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Elizabeth C; Kelly, Michael R; Ochocki, Brad M; Akinwumi, Segun M; Hamre, Karen E S; Tien, Joseph H; Eisenberg, Marisa C

    2017-01-24

    Mathematical models of cholera and waterborne disease vary widely in their structures, in terms of transmission pathways, loss of immunity, and a range of other features. These differences can affect model dynamics, with different models potentially yielding different predictions and parameter estimates from the same data. Given the increasing use of mathematical models to inform public health decision-making, it is important to assess model distinguishability (whether models can be distinguished based on fit to data) and inference robustness (whether inferences from the model are robust to realistic variations in model structure). In this paper, we examined the effects of uncertainty in model structure in the context of epidemic cholera, testing a range of models with differences in transmission and loss of immunity structure, based on known features of cholera epidemiology. We fit these models to simulated epidemic and long-term data, as well as data from the 2006 Angola epidemic. We evaluated model distinguishability based on fit to data, and whether the parameter values, model behavior, and forecasting ability can accurately be inferred from incidence data. In general, all models were able to successfully fit to all data sets, both real and simulated, regardless of whether the model generating the simulated data matched the fitted model. However, in the long-term data, the best model fits were achieved when the loss of immunity structures matched those of the model that simulated the data. Two parameters, one representing person-to-person transmission and the other representing the reporting rate, were accurately estimated across all models, while the remaining parameters showed broad variation across the different models and data sets. The basic reproduction number (R0) was often poorly estimated even using the correct model, due to practical unidentifiability issues in the waterborne transmission pathway which were consistent across all models. Forecasting

  5. Linking chemical parameters to sensory panel results through neural networks to distinguish olive oil quality.

    PubMed

    Cancilla, John C; Wang, Selina C; Díaz-Rodríguez, Pablo; Matute, Gemma; Cancilla, John D; Flynn, Dan; Torrecilla, José S

    2014-11-05

    A wide variety of olive oil samples from different origins and olive types has been chemically analyzed as well as evaluated by trained sensory panelists. Six chemical parameters have been obtained for each sample (free fatty acids, peroxide value, two UV absorption parameters (K232 and K268), 1,2-diacylglycerol content, and pyropheophytins) and linked to their quality using an artificial neural network-based model. Herein, the nonlinear algorithms were used to distinguish olive oil quality. Two different methods were defined to assess the statistical performance of the model (a K-fold cross-validation (K = 6) and three different blind tests), and both of them showed around a 95-96% correct classification rate. These results support that a relationship between the chemical and the sensory analyses exists and that the mathematical tool can potentially be implemented into a device that could be employed for various useful applications.

  6. Diffuse reflectance near infrared spectroscopy can distinguish normal from enzymatically digested cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, C. P.; Bowden, J. C.; Rintoul, L.; Meder, R.; Oloyede, A.; Crawford, R. W.

    2009-09-01

    A non-destructive, diffuse reflectance near infrared spectroscopy (DR-NIRS) approach is considered as a potential tool for determining the component-level structural properties of articular cartilage. To this end, DR-NIRS was applied in vitro to detect structural changes, using principal component analysis as the statistical basis for characterization. The results show that this technique, particularly with first-derivative pretreatment, can distinguish normal, intact cartilage from enzymatically digested cartilage. Further, this paper establishes that the use of DR-NIRS enables the probing of the full depth of the uncalcified cartilage matrix, potentially allowing the assessment of degenerative changes in joint tissue, independent of the site of initiation of the osteoarthritic process.

  7. Mobile Robot Sonar Backscatter Algorithm for Automatically Distinguishing Walls, Fences and Hedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wen; Hinders, Mark

    2006-03-01

    An algorithm to distinguish brick walls, picket fences and hedges based on backscattered sonar echoes is described. The echo data are acquired by a mobile robot with a 50kHz computer-controlled sonar scanning system packaged as its sensor head. For several locations along a wall, fence or hedge a fan of backscatter sonar echoes are acquired and digitized as the sonar transducer is swept over a horizontal arc. Backscatter is then plotted vs. scan angle, with a series deformable templates fit to this data. The number of peaks in the best-fitting template indicates the presence and location of retro-reflectors, and allows automatic categorization of the various fences, hedges and brick walls.

  8. Distinguishing shocked from tectonically deformed quartz by the use of the SEM and chemical etching

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gratz, A.J.; Fisler, D.K.; Bohor, B.F.

    1996-01-01

    Multiple sets of crystallographically-oriented planar deformation features (PDFs) are generated by high-strain-rate shock waves at pressures of > 12 GPa in naturally shocked quartz samples. On surfaces, PDFs appear as narrow (50-500 nm) lamellae filled with amorphosed quartz (diaplectic glass) which can be etched with hydrofluoric acid or with hydrothermal alkaline solutions. In contrast, slow-strain-rate tectonic deformation pressure produces wider, semi-linear and widely spaced arrays of dislocation loops that are not glass filled. Etching samples with HF before examination in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) allows for unambiguous visual distinction between glass-filled PDFs and glass-free tectonic deformation arrays in quartz. This etching also reveals the internal 'pillaring' often characteristic of shock-induced PDFs. This technique is useful for easily distinguishing between shock and tectonic deformation in quartz, but does not replace optical techniques for characterizing the shock features.

  9. Identifying vehicles with VNIR-SWIR hyperspectral imagery: sources of distinguishability and confusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler-Golden, Steven; Sundberg, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Multispectral and hyperspectral imaging can facilitate vehicle tracking across a series of images by gathering spectral information that distinguishes the vehicle of interest from confusers. Developing effective algorithms for utilizing this information requires an understanding of the sources and nature of both the common and unique components in vehicle spectra, as well as the variations associated with lighting, view angle, and part of the vehicle being observed. In this study, focusing on the VNIR-SWIR spectral region, we analyze hyperspectral data from a recent field experiment at the Rochester Institute of Technology. We describe the spectra of painted vehicle surfaces in general terms, and demonstrate effective classification of automobiles based on spectra from upward facing surfaces (the roof, hood or trunk) using a method that combines the Support Vector Machine with data pre-conditioning.

  10. A type of nucleotide motif that distinguishes tobamovirus species more efficiently than nucleotide signatures.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, A J; Armstrong, J S; Gibbs, M J

    2004-10-01

    The complete genomic sequences of forty-eight tobamoviruses were classified and found to form at least twelve species clusters. Individual species were not conveniently defined by 'nucleotide signatures' (i.e. strings of one or more nucleotides unique to a taxon) as these were scattered sparsely throughout the genomes and were mostly single nucleotides. By contrast all the species were concisely and uniquely distinguished by short nucleotide motifs consisting of conserved genus-specific sites intercalated with variable sites that provided species-specific combinations of nucleotides (nucleotide combination motifs; NC-motifs). We describe the procedure for finding NC-motifs in a convenient and phylogenetically conserved region of the tobamovirus RNA polymerase gene, the '4404-50 motif'. NC-motifs have been found in other sets of homologous sequences, and are convenient for use in published taxonomic descriptions.

  11. Using lunar boulders to distinguish primary from distant secondary impact craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bart, Gwendolyn D.; Melosh, H. J.

    2007-04-01

    A high-resolution study of 18 lunar craters, including both primary and distant secondary craters, shows that the secondary craters produce larger ejecta fragments at a given crater size than do the primary craters. The maximum boulder diameter (B) increases with crater size (D) according to the power law B = KD 2/3; for primary craters, when B and D are in meters, K is 0.29, whereas for secondary craters, we find that K is 0.46 (60% larger). Next we show that impact fracture theory predicts that secondary craters, because of their lower impact velocity, will produce larger ejecta fragments than primary craters. This result provides an opportunity for distinguishing between primary and secondary craters in high resolution planetary images. The ability to identify distant secondary craters will help constrain primary production rates of small craters and improve surface age determination of small areas based on small crater counts.

  12. Distinguishing Pattern Formation Phenotypes: Applying Minkowski Functionals to Cell Biology Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rericha, Erin; Guven, Can; Parent, Carole; Losert, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    Spatial Clustering of proteins within cells or cells themselves frequently occur in cell biology systems. However quantifying the underlying order and determining the regulators of these cluster patterns have proved difficult due to the inherent high noise levels in the systems. For instance the patterns formed by wild type and cyclic-AMP regulatory mutant Dictyostelium cells are visually distinctive, yet the large error bars in measurements of the fractal number, area, Euler number, eccentricity, and wavelength making it difficult to quantitatively distinguish between the patterns. We apply a spatial analysis technique based on Minkowski functionals and develop metrics which clearly separate wild type and mutant cell lines into distinct categories. Having such a metric facilitated the development of a computational model for cellular aggregation and its regulators. Supported by NIH-NGHS Nanotechnology (R01GM085574) and the Burroughs Wellcome Fund.

  13. RAPD profiles distinguish Paracentrotus lividus populations living in a stressing environment (Amvrakikos Gulf, Greece).

    PubMed

    Rizzo, C; Cammarata, M; Di Carlo, M; Pancucci, A; Parrinello, N

    2009-04-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was performed to assess genetic markers of Paracentrotus lividus populations living in stressing environment in the Amvrakikos Gulf (Western Greece, Ionian Sea) where two populations distinguishable in body size, smaller than the open sea ones, were detected. The UPGMA dendrogram, constructed from pairwise. Phi(st) values among population nuclear DNA markers, revealed that the small and medium-sized populations living inside the Amvrakikos presented a lower polymorphism, and form a cluster that shows the genetic distance with normal-sized populations (Ionian and Tyrrhenian Seas) living in open sea. AMOVA analysis indicated a genetic distance among the sea urchin populations from the Tyrrhenian sea and Ionian sea.

  14. Future distinguishing competencies of baccalaureate-educated registered nurses in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Backhaus, Ramona; Verbeek, Hilde; van Rossum, Erik; Capezuti, Elizabeth; Hamers, Jan P H

    2015-01-01

    In view of the likelihood that the complexity of care required by those admitted to nursing homes will continue to increase, an expert consensus study was conducted to reach consensus on the competencies which distinguish baccalaureate-educated registered nurses from other nursing staff working in nursing homes. Thirty-one international experts, identified through literature and our professional network, participated in a two-round web-based survey and an expert meeting. Experts reached consensus on 16 desirable competencies, including some not traditionally associated with nursing expertise e.g. being a team leader, role model and coach within the nursing team. These findings suggest that revision of current nursing curricula, nurse training programs and nursing home job profiles might be needed to meet the medically and psychologically complex needs of nursing home residents.

  15. Colchicine-binding activity distinguishes sea urchin egg and outer doublet tubulins

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The colchicine-binding activity of tubulin has been utilized to distinguish the tubulins from two distinct microtubule systems of the same species, the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. We have analyzed the colchicine-binding affinities of highly purified tubulins from the unfertilized eggs and from the flagellar outer doublet microtubules by van't Hoff analysis, and have found significant differences in the free energy, enthalpy, and entropy changes characterizing the binding of colchicine to the two tubulins. The data indicate that significant chemical differences in the tubulins from the two functionally distinct microtubule systems exist, and that the differences are expressed in the native forms of the tubulins. Our findings are discussed in terms of the possibility that the colchicine- binding site may be an important regulatory site on the tubulin molecule. PMID:6539784

  16. Application of CSIA to distinguish between vapor intrusion and indoor sources of VOCs.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Thomas; Kuder, Tomasz; Fiorenza, Stephanie; Gorder, Kyle; Dettenmaier, Erik; Philp, Paul

    2011-07-15

    At buildings with potential for vapor intrusion of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) from the subsurface, the ability to accurately distinguish between vapor intrusion and indoor sources of VOCs is needed to support accurate and efficient vapor intrusion investigations. We have developed a method for application of compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) for this purpose that uses an adsorbent sampler to obtain sufficient sample mass from the air for analysis. Application of this method to five residences near Hill Air Force Base in Utah indicates that subsurface and indoor sources of tricholorethene and tetrachloroethene often exhibit distinct carbon and chlorine isotope ratios. The differences in isotope ratios between indoor and subsurface sources can be used to identify the source of these chemicals when they are present in indoor air.

  17. Catatonic Symptoms Appearing before Autonomic Symptoms Help Distinguish Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome from Malignant Catatonia.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Takayuki; Nomura, Tomohisa; Takami, Hiroki; Sakamoto, So; Mizuno, Keiko; Sekii, Hajime; Hatta, Kotaro; Sugita, Manabu

    A 42-year-old Japanese woman with a 10-year history of schizophrenia was admitted due to a disturbance in consciousness that met the diagnostic criteria for both neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) and malignant catatonia. Despite systemic supportive treatments, the catatonic symptoms preceding autonomic symptoms persisted. The symptoms improved after lorazepam administration, leading to a retrospective diagnosis of malignant catatonia. Catatonia is thought to be caused by a dysfunction of ganmma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors in the cortico-cortical networks of the frontal lobes, which causes hypoactivity of the dopaminergic transmission in the subcortical areas. Identifying the catatonic symptoms preceding autonomic symptoms could aid in distinguishing malignant catatonia from NMS.

  18. Aristotle on 'distinguished physicians' and on the medical significance of dreams.

    PubMed

    van der Eijk, P J

    1995-01-01

    This article studies the way in which Aristotle deals with the view-attributed by him to the 'distinguished physicians'-that dreams may be significant as clues for imminent diseases of the body of the dreamer. Aristotle is thinking of philosophically minded physicians (such as the author of De victu) who base their practice on principles derived from the study of nature in general and who take into account the constitution of the whole body. He accepts their view, but justifies it with his own theory of sleep and dreams; however, his attempt to incorporate the medical view into his own account brings him into conflict with his own presupposition that dreams are not actual perceptions, but experiences of the remnants of perceptions received during the waking state.

  19. Heinrich Hertz and Philipp Lenard: Two Distinguished Physicists, Two Disparate Men

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Joseph F.

    1999-12-01

    Heinrich Hertz (1857-1894) and Philipp Lenard (1862-1947) both had distinguished careers as physicists. They were together in Bonn from April 1891 to January 1894, Hertz as Director of the Bonn Physics Institute, and Lenard as his assistant. Each did important experimental work on cathode rays and the photoelectric effect, and in 1905 Lenard received the Nobel Prize for his work in these fields. Lenard had great respect and admiration for Hertz before going to Bonn and while there, but gradually allowed his esteem for his mentor (who died in 1894) to diminish as Lenard became increasingly anti-Semitic and involved in National Socialism and the Nazi movement. This article illustrates how differences in their characters and personalities, together with the tragic events of the Great War and its aftermath, resulted in Hertz deservedly being much more highly regarded today both as a physicist and as a man than is Lenard.

  20. Dan Olweus: Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology.

    PubMed

    2011-11-01

    Presents Dan Olweus, the 2011 winner for the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology. "For his lifelong commitment to understand bullying among children and create safe and humane school settings. Dan Olweus led the education of the global public about the nature and prevalence of bullying, its often serious consequences, and the behavior of adults that allows bullying to occur. He has done so as a careful researcher, a thoughtful theoretician, a creative program developer, and a tireless advocate. He uncovered the problem and created and evaluated a comprehensive solution. Throughout his career, he has been guided by a concern for careful psychological inquiry and a commitment to the promotion of human rights." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Dan Olweus: Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy.

    PubMed

    2012-11-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy. The 2012 winner is Dan Olweus for his rigorous scientific research on bullying among children and youth and his early and tireless attention to its public policy implications. Dan Olweus's research on the nature, prevalence, and consequences of bullying and his work to develop and disseminate an evidence-based prevention program provide a model of excellence in the field. His work has played a vital role in the dramatic changes that have occurred in many countries in recent years-from viewing bullying as a normative and accepted part of life at school to recognizing bullying as a pressing public health issue. Olweus's Award citation and a selected bibliography are also presented.

  2. Distinguishing Between Bombsags and Dropstones on Mars with Implications for Gusev and Gale Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Button, N. E.; Husch, J.; Karunatillake, S.; Skok, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Glaciolacustrine environments on Mars have been proposed at several locations, including Greg Crater[1], Gorgonum Chaos[2], and Meridiani Planum[3]. However, observations by orbiters and rovers provide only equivocal evidence, including difficulties in distinguishing between these environments and volcaniclastic counterparts. This creates a need to quantify differences between dropstones, typically associated with fine-grained marine or lacustrine sediments, and bombsags, typically associated with coarser, high-energy eruptive sediments. Impact cratering excavation may also provide a mechanism to entrain clasts into sediments, either directly or as a debris source for cold based glaciers and ice cover. However, we focused on the first two mechanisms. We developed quantitative measures to distinguish dropstones from bombsags using in situ and high-resolution remote sensing images, supplemented by chemical and mineralogical information. The development step employed images of paleo samples of both glacial and volcanic clasts on Earth, which represent the meta-stable configuration over geologic time scales. The resulting flow chart method involving distributional parameters can be applied in situ on Mars, advancing early work[4]. Four key indicators yield values that may distinguish between bombsag and dropstone deposits: (1) compositional distinctness from the sedimentary host layer, (2) penetration depth ratio, (3) impact symmetry ratio, and (4) clast population density. Dominance of cold-based mountain glaciers on Mars[5] may reduce debris entrainment and distal sampling, weakening the utility of Indicator 1, but terrestrial examples of significant entrainment and deposition by cold-based glaciers exist[6] We applied our newly developed flow chart to the putative bombsag at Gusev crater[7] as a case study. Any divergence from the consensus of the Home Plate clast as a bombsag would refine current models of pyroclastic activity[8], structural evolution[7], and

  3. Ability of the pig to distinguish between conspecific urine samples using olfaction.

    PubMed

    Meese, G B; Conner, D J; Baldwin, B A

    1975-07-01

    In two female pigs it has been shown using operant conditioning techniques in which the animals pushed panels with their snouts in order to obtain food, that they could distinguish between the oder from urine samples taken from other pigs. In the discrimination task, the pigs faced two panels and a tube adjacent to one of the panels emitted urine odor used as the positive discriminative stimulus while another tube adjacent to the other panel emitted the negative discriminative stimulus consisting of odor from another urine sample. Only presses on the panel associated with the positive stimulus were reinforced on a fixed ratio schedule of 6. Both positive and negative discrimination stimuli were presented simultaneously. After each reinforcement the position of the positive and negative odor stimuli was varied according to the Gellerman series. When fully trained, the pigs made very few responses on the incorrect panel.

  4. Quantitative super-resolution imaging of Bruchpilot distinguishes active zone states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehmann, Nadine; van de Linde, Sebastian; Alon, Amit; Ljaschenko, Dmitrij; Keung, Xi Zhen; Holm, Thorge; Rings, Annika; Diantonio, Aaron; Hallermann, Stefan; Ashery, Uri; Heckmann, Manfred; Sauer, Markus; Kittel, Robert J.

    2014-08-01

    The precise molecular architecture of synaptic active zones (AZs) gives rise to different structural and functional AZ states that fundamentally shape chemical neurotransmission. However, elucidating the nanoscopic protein arrangement at AZs is impeded by the diffraction-limited resolution of conventional light microscopy. Here we introduce new approaches to quantify endogenous protein organization at single-molecule resolution in situ with super-resolution imaging by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM). Focusing on the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ), we find that the AZ cytomatrix (CAZ) is composed of units containing ~137 Bruchpilot (Brp) proteins, three quarters of which are organized into about 15 heptameric clusters. We test for a quantitative relationship between CAZ ultrastructure and neurotransmitter release properties by engaging Drosophila mutants and electrophysiology. Our results indicate that the precise nanoscopic organization of Brp distinguishes different physiological AZ states and link functional diversification to a heretofore unrecognized neuronal gradient of the CAZ ultrastructure.

  5. Distinguishing dark matter from unresolved point sources in the Inner Galaxy with photon statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Samuel K.; Lisanti, Mariangela; Safdi, Benjamin R. E-mail: mlisanti@princeton.edu

    2015-05-01

    Data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope suggests that there is an extended excess of GeV gamma-ray photons in the Inner Galaxy. Identifying potential astrophysical sources that contribute to this excess is an important step in verifying whether the signal originates from annihilating dark matter. In this paper, we focus on the potential contribution of unresolved point sources, such as millisecond pulsars (MSPs). We propose that the statistics of the photons—in particular, the flux probability density function (PDF) of the photon counts below the point-source detection threshold—can potentially distinguish between the dark-matter and point-source interpretations. We calculate the flux PDF via the method of generating functions for these two models of the excess. Working in the framework of Bayesian model comparison, we then demonstrate that the flux PDF can potentially provide evidence for an unresolved MSP-like point-source population.

  6. Detecting and distinguishing topological defects in future data from the CMBPol satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Pia; Liddle, Andrew R.; Hindmarsh, Mark; Urrestilla, Jon; Kunz, Martin; Bevis, Neil

    2011-02-15

    The proposed CMBPol mission will be able to detect the imprint of topological defects on the CMB provided the contribution is sufficiently strong. We quantify the detection threshold for cosmic strings and for textures, and analyze the satellite's ability to distinguish between these different types of defects. We also assess the level of danger of misidentification of a defect signature as from the wrong defect type or as an effect of primordial gravitational waves. A 0.002 fractional contribution of cosmic strings to the CMB temperature spectrum at multipole ten, and similarly a 0.001 fractional contribution of textures, can be detected and correctly identified at the 3{sigma} level. We also confirm that a tensor contribution of r=0.0018 can be detected at over 3{sigma}, in agreement with the CMBPol mission concept study. These results are supported by a model selection analysis.

  7. Barbara L. Bonner: Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    The Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training acknowledges psychologists who contribute to new teaching methods or solutions to learning problems through the use of research findings or evidence-based practices. Particular emphasis is placed on the use of psychological knowledge to improve learning in educational settings, including prekindergarten to Grade 12, or in communities. The 2014 recipient is Barbara L. Bonner. She is acknowledged for "her passionate determination to improve the lives of children throughout the world by training countless professionals to be leaders in the field of child maltreatment, for her leadership in establishing one of the most highly respected centers for the study of child maltreatment in the nation, and for directing an interdisciplinary training program on child maltreatment. Bonner's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here.

  8. Efficacy of forensic statement analysis in distinguishing truthful from deceptive eyewitness accounts of highly stressful events.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Charles A; Colwell, Kevin; Hazlett, Gary A

    2011-09-01

    Laboratory-based detecting deception research suggests that truthful statements differ from those of deceptive statements. This nonlaboratory study tested whether forensic statement analysis (FSA) methods would distinguish genuine from false eyewitness accounts about exposure to a highly stressful event. A total of 35 military participants were assigned to truthful or deceptive eyewitness conditions. Genuine eyewitness reported truthfully about exposure to interrogation stress. Deceptive eyewitnesses studied transcripts of genuine eyewitnesses for 24 h and falsely claimed they had been interrogated. Cognitive Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and assessed by FSA raters blind to the status of participants. Genuine accounts contained more unique words, external and contextual referents, and a greater total word count than did deceptive statements. The type-token ratio was lower in genuine statements. The classification accuracy using FSA techniques was 82%. FSA methods may be effective in real-world circumstances and have relevance to professionals in law enforcement, security, and criminal justice.

  9. Distinguishing nanomaterial particles from background airborne particulate matter for quantitative exposure assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono-Ogasawara, Mariko; Serita, Fumio; Takaya, Mitsutoshi

    2009-10-01

    As the production of engineered nanomaterials quantitatively expands, the chance that workers involved in the manufacturing process will be exposed to nanoparticles also increases. A risk management system is needed for workplaces in the nanomaterial industry based on the precautionary principle. One of the problems in the risk management system is difficulty of exposure assessment. In this article, examples of exposure assessment in nanomaterial industries are reviewed with a focus on distinguishing engineered nanomaterial particles from background nanoparticles in workplace atmosphere. An approach by JNIOSH (Japan National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health) to quantitatively measure exposure to carbonaceous nanomaterials is also introduced. In addition to real-time measurements and qualitative analysis by electron microscopy, quantitative chemical analysis is necessary for quantitatively assessing exposure to nanomaterials. Chemical analysis is suitable for quantitative exposure measurement especially at facilities with high levels of background NPs.

  10. Richard Rogers: Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy.

    PubMed

    2011-11-01

    Presents Richard Rogers as the 2001 winner of the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy. "Richard Rogers casts a long shadow over the realm of psychological research with public policy implications. His achievements concerning criminal responsibility and malingering have been important and lasting, but his most uniquely impactful contribution to public policy is his enhancement of our understanding of the constitutional protections embodied in Miranda rights. His investigations have exploded the myth of a single, easily understood Miranda warning. The ramifications of this work are profound, especially for socially marginalized populations, and include its direct acknowledgment as the impetus for critical developments in American Bar Association policy on custodial interrogations." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Biological differences that distinguish the 2 major stages of wound healing in potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Lulai, Edward C; Campbell, Larry G; Fugate, Karen K; McCue, Kent F

    2016-12-01

    The two stages of potato tuber wound healing, closing layer formation (CLF) and wound periderm formation (WPF), have critical biological differences. The first stage, CLF, involves early induction of DNA synthesis and nuclear division in the absence of cell division. The transition phase from CLF to the second stage, WPF, is marked by a transient decrease in expression of suberin-specific genes. The second stage involves cell division. Although biologically active cytokinins (CKs) are not present in quantifiable amounts during this stage, the presence of precursor and catabolic products suggest the presence of trace amounts of active CKs that, in conjunction with increased auxin (indole acetic acid), provide necessary signals for meristematic activity. Augmenting these putative trace amounts with exogenous biologically active CK inhibits WPF; this suggests that the CK requirements for meristematic activity are finely controlled and sensitive to extremely low concentrations. Evidence is discussed for separate biological processes and signals that distinguish the 2 stages of wound healing.

  12. Distinguishing borderline personality disorder from adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a clinical and dimensional perspective.

    PubMed

    Prada, Paco; Hasler, Roland; Baud, Patrick; Bednarz, Giovanna; Ardu, Stefano; Krejci, Ivo; Nicastro, Rosetta; Aubry, Jean-Michel; Perroud, Nader

    2014-06-30

    Adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is frequently associated with borderline personality disorder (BPD). As both disorders share some core clinical features they are sometimes difficult to distinguish from one another. The present work aimed to investigate differences in the expression of impulsivity, anger and aggression, quality of life as well as the number and severity of the comorbidities between ADHD, BPD, comorbid BPD-ADHD and control subjects. ADHD and BPD-ADHD patients showed a higher level of impulsivity than BPD and control subjects. BPD-ADHD patients had higher levels of substance abuse/dependence and higher levels of aggression than the other groups. Comorbid BPD-ADHD patients showed high levels of impulsivity and aggression, a characteristic that should draw the attention of clinicians on the necessity of providing an accurate diagnosis. The question also arises as to whether they represent a distinct clinical subgroup with specific clinical characteristics, outcomes and vulnerability factors.

  13. Forensic document examiners' skill in distinguishing between natural and disguised handwriting behaviors.

    PubMed

    Bird, Carolyne; Found, Bryan; Rogers, Doug

    2010-09-01

    Disguised handwriting is problematic for forensic document examiners (FDEs) and attracts higher misleading and inconclusive rates on authorship opinions than does genuine writing (Found B, Rogers D, International Graphonomics Society, 2005). There are currently no published empirical data on FDEs' expertise in distinguishing between natural and disguised writing behavior. This paper reports on the skill of FDEs for determining the writing process of 140 pairs of natural and disguised writings and compares their results with those of a control group of laypeople. A significant difference was found between the examiner and lay group. FDEs' expertise is characterized by their conservatism, where FDEs express a higher proportion of inconclusive opinions (23.1% for FDEs compared to 8.4% for the control group). This leads to the FDEs expressing a smaller percentage of misleading responses when calling writings as either naturally written or disguised (4.3% for FDEs compared with 12.2% for the control group).

  14. [Techniques for measuring phakic and pseudophakic accommodation. Methodology for distinguishing between neurological and mechanical accommodative insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Roche, O; Roumes, C; Parsa, C

    2007-11-01

    The methods available for studying accommodation are evaluated: Donder's "push-up" method, dynamic retinoscopy, infrared optometry using the Scheiner principle, and wavefront analysis are each discussed with their inherent advantages and limitations. Based on the methodology described, one can also distinguish between causes of accommodative insufficiency. Dioptric insufficiency (accommodative lag) that remains equal at various testing distances from the subject indicates a sensory/neurologic (afferent), defect, whereas accommodative insufficiency changing with distance indicates a mechanical/restrictive (efferent) defect, such as in presbyopia. Determining accommodative insufficiency and the cause can be particularly useful when examining patients with a variety of diseases associated with reduced accommodative ability (e.g., Down syndrome and cerebral palsy) as well as in evaluating the effectiveness of various potentially accommodating intraocular lens designs.

  15. Distinguishing between sensor fault, structural damage, and environmental or operational effects in structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullaa, Jyrki

    2011-11-01

    Discrimination between three different sources of variability in a vibration-based structural health monitoring system is investigated: environmental or operational effects, sensor faults, and structural damage. Separating the environmental or operational effects from the other two is based on the assumption that measurements under different environmental or operational conditions are included in the training data. Distinguishing between sensor fault and structural damage utilizes the fact that the sensor faults are local, while structural damage is global. By localizing the change to a sensor which is then removed from the network, the two different influences can be separated. The sensor network is modelled as a Gaussian process and the generalized likelihood ratio test (GLRT) is then used to detect and localize a change in the system. A numerical and an experimental study are performed to validate the proposed method.

  16. Heterodimer of two distinguishable atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Odong, Otim; Sanders, Jerome C.; Javanainen, Juha

    2011-09-15

    Within the Bose-Hubbard model, we theoretically determine the stationary states of two distinguishable atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice and compare with the case of two identical bosons. A heterodimer has odd-parity dissociated states that do not depend on the interactions between the atoms, and the lattice momenta of the two atomic species may have different averages even for a bound state of the dimer. We discuss methods to detect the dimer. The different distributions of the quasimomenta of the two species may be observed in suitable time-of-flight experiments. Also, an asymmetry in the lineshape as a function of the modulation frequency may reveal the presence of the odd-parity dissociated states when a heterodimer is dissociated by modulating the depth of the optical lattice.

  17. Temporal acoustic measures distinguish primary progressive apraxia of speech from primary progressive aphasia.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Joseph R; Hanley, Holly; Utianski, Rene; Clark, Heather; Strand, Edythe; Josephs, Keith A; Whitwell, Jennifer L

    2017-02-07

    The purpose of this study was to determine if acoustic measures of duration and syllable rate during word and sentence repetition, and a measure of within-word lexical stress, distinguish speakers with primary progressive apraxia of speech (PPAOS) from nonapraxic speakers with the agrammatic or logopenic variants of primary progressive aphasia (PPA), and control speakers. Results revealed that the PPAOS group had longer durations and reduced rate of syllable production for most words and sentences, and the measure of lexical stress. Sensitivity and specificity indices for the PPAOS versus the other groups were highest for longer multisyllabic words and sentences. For the PPAOS group, correlations between acoustic measures and perceptual ratings of AOS were moderately high to high. Several temporal measures used in this study may aid differential diagnosis and help quantify features of PPAOS that are distinct from those associated with PPA in which AOS is not present.

  18. Thomas L. Griffiths: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology.

    PubMed

    2012-11-01

    Presents a short biography of one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology (2012). Thomas L. Griffiths won the award for bringing mathematical precision to the deepest questions in human learning, reasoning, and concept formation. In his pioneering work, Thomas L. Griffiths has used probabilistic models and Bayesian learning methods to illuminate an extraordinarily wide range of problems in areas including causal reasoning, high-level hierarchical thinking, cultural evolution, theory formation, and cognitive development while also showing that thinking probabilistically can provide a genuine resolution of the age-old tension between nativism and empiricism. His rigorous mathematical and computational abilities are accompanied by an immensely creative imagination, a sure sense of the important problem, and an unerring touch for the right experiment. Griffith's Award citation and a selected biblography are also presented here.

  19. Arthur C. Graesser: Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training.

    PubMed

    2011-11-01

    Presents Arthur C. Graesser as the 2011 winner of the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training. "As a multifaceted psychologist, cognitive engineer of useful education and training technologies, and mentor of new talent for the world of applied and translational cognitive science, Arthur C. Graesser is the perfect role model, showing how a strong scholar and intellect can shape both research and practice. His work is a mix of top-tier scholarship in psychology, education, intelligent systems, and computational linguistics. He combines cognitive science excellence with bold use of psychological knowledge and intelligent systems to design new generations of learning opportunities and to help lay the foundation for a translational science of learning." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Multiple stable isotope characterization as a forensic tool to distinguish acid scavenger samples

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, James J.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Carman, April J.; Wahl, Jon H.; Duckworth, Douglas C.

    2012-01-01

    Acid scavengers are frequently used as stabilizer compounds in a variety of applications. When used to stabilize volatile compounds such as nerve agents, the lower volatility and higher stability of acid scavengers make them more persistent in a post-event forensic setting. We are employing compound-specific stable isotope analysis of the carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen components of three acid scavenging compounds (N,N-diethylaniline, tributylamine, and triethylamine) as a tool for distinguishing between different samples of the stabilizers. Combined analysis of three stable isotopes in these samples improves the technique’s resolving potential, enhancing sample matching capabilities. The compound specific methods developed here can be applied to instances where these compounds are not pure, such as when mixed with an agent or when found as a residue at an event site. Effective sample matching can be crucial for linking compounds at multiple event sites or linking a supply inventory to an event.

  1. Distinguishing fissions of ^239Pu and ^235U with low-resolution detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanberg, E.; Norman, E. B.; Prussin, S. G.; Shugart, H.; Browne, E.

    2008-10-01

    When ^239Pu and ^235U undergo thermal neutron-induced fission, both produce significant numbers of β-delayed gamma rays with energies in the several MeV range. Experiments using high energy-resolution germanium detectorsootnotetextR. E. Marrs et al., Nucl. Instr. & Meth. A (in press). have shown that it is possible to distinguish the fission of ^239Pu from that of ^235U. Using differences in the temporal behavior and in the shapes of the gamma-ray energy spectra, we show that these two isotopes can also be differentiated using low-resolution plastic or liquid scintillators. It is likely this method could be extended to homeland security applications, such as screening of cargo containers for ^235U and ^239Pu, using a neutron source and such scintillators.

  2. Discrete domains of gene expression in germinal layers distinguish the development of gyrencephaly.

    PubMed

    de Juan Romero, Camino; Bruder, Carl; Tomasello, Ugo; Sanz-Anquela, José Miguel; Borrell, Víctor

    2015-07-14

    Gyrencephalic species develop folds in the cerebral cortex in a stereotypic manner, but the genetic mechanisms underlying this patterning process are unknown. We present a large-scale transcriptomic analysis of individual germinal layers in the developing cortex of the gyrencephalic ferret, comparing between regions prospective of fold and fissure. We find unique transcriptional signatures in each germinal compartment, where thousands of genes are differentially expressed between regions, including ~80% of genes mutated in human cortical malformations. These regional differences emerge from the existence of discrete domains of gene expression, which occur at multiple locations across the developing cortex of ferret and human, but not the lissencephalic mouse. Complex expression patterns emerge late during development and map the eventual location of folds or fissures. Protomaps of gene expression within germinal layers may contribute to define cortical folds or functional areas, but our findings demonstrate that they distinguish the development of gyrencephalic cortices.

  3. Jordan M. Braciszewski: APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology.

    PubMed

    2011-11-01

    Presents Jordan M. Braciszewski as the 2011 winner of the American psychological Association APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology. "For his concerted efforts to identify the needs of homeless and other at-risk populations and to design and provide necessary services for them. Jordan M. Braciszewski is committed to using applied psychological science and evidence-based intervention methods to assist the most disadvantaged in our society. He has already provided additions to the relevant research literature and has volunteered countless hours of his time to implement community-based interventions and provide direct services himself. He has sought out the training experiences necessary to assist him in doing an even better job in the future in these public service activities." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Allie Abrahamson: APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    The APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology is awarded on an annual basis by the APA Board of Professional Affairs (BPA) and the American Psychological Association of Graduate Students (APAGS) to a graduate student who has demonstrated outstanding practice and application of psychology. A qualified candidate must demonstrate exemplary performance in working with an underserved population in an applied setting or have developed an innovative method for delivering health services to an underserved population. This year there are joint recipients of the award, Allie Abrahamson and Rebeccah A. Bernard. Their vision, creativity, courage, and dedication led them to create the Human Rights Forum at Chestnut Hill College to promote human rights education, awareness, and community service opportunities for doctoral students. Allie Abrahamson's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here.

  5. Rebeccah A. Bernard: APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    The APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology is awarded on an annual basis by the APA Board of Professional Affairs (BPA) and the American Psychological Association of Graduate Students (APAGS) to a graduate student who has demonstrated outstanding practice and application of psychology. A qualified candidate must demonstrate exemplary performance in working with an underserved population in an applied setting or have developed an innovative method for delivering health services to an underserved population. This year there are joint recipients of the award, Allie Abrahamson and Rebeccah A. Bernard. Their vision, creativity, courage, and dedication led them to create the Human Rights Forum at Chestnut Hill College to promote human rights education, awareness, and community service opportunities for doctoral students. Rebeccah A. Bernard's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here.

  6. Catatonic Symptoms Appearing before Autonomic Symptoms Help Distinguish Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome from Malignant Catatonia

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Takayuki; Nomura, Tomohisa; Takami, Hiroki; Sakamoto, So; Mizuno, Keiko; Sekii, Hajime; Hatta, Kotaro; Sugita, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    A 42-year-old Japanese woman with a 10-year history of schizophrenia was admitted due to a disturbance in consciousness that met the diagnostic criteria for both neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) and malignant catatonia. Despite systemic supportive treatments, the catatonic symptoms preceding autonomic symptoms persisted. The symptoms improved after lorazepam administration, leading to a retrospective diagnosis of malignant catatonia. Catatonia is thought to be caused by a dysfunction of ganmma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors in the cortico-cortical networks of the frontal lobes, which causes hypoactivity of the dopaminergic transmission in the subcortical areas. Identifying the catatonic symptoms preceding autonomic symptoms could aid in distinguishing malignant catatonia from NMS. PMID:27725556

  7. Distinguishing science from pseudoscience in school psychology: science and scientific thinking as safeguards against human error.

    PubMed

    Lilienfeld, Scott O; Ammirati, Rachel; David, Michal

    2012-02-01

    Like many domains of professional psychology, school psychology continues to struggle with the problem of distinguishing scientific from pseudoscientific and otherwise questionable clinical practices. We review evidence for the scientist-practitioner gap in school psychology and provide a user-friendly primer on science and scientific thinking for school psychologists. Specifically, we (a) outline basic principles of scientific thinking, (b) delineate widespread cognitive errors that can contribute to belief in pseudoscientific practices within school psychology and allied professions, (c) provide a list of 10 key warning signs of pseudoscience, illustrated by contemporary examples from school psychology and allied disciplines, and (d) offer 10 user-friendly prescriptions designed to encourage scientific thinking among school psychology practitioners and researchers. We argue that scientific thinking, although fallible, is ultimately school psychologists' best safeguard against a host of errors in thinking.

  8. Laurie R. Santos: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology.

    PubMed

    2012-11-01

    Presents a short biography of one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology. The 2012 winner is Laurie R. Santos for creative and insightful investigations of cognition across a broad range of species and psychological domains, illuminating cognitive development and cognitive evolution. Laurie R. Santos links many branches of psychological inquiry in her research, including animal behavior, comparative psychology, developmental psychology, judgment and decision making, and social psychology. In particular, her studies of biases, irrationalities, and errors- where rational decision making fails, rather than succeeds-are providing remarkable insights into how cognitive biases evolved and how decision making operates at a fundamental level. Her accomplishments beautifully illustrate the power of comparative studies of animal learning and behavior to help us understand the human mind. Santos' Award citation and a selected bibliography are also presented here.

  9. [A new method of distinguishing weak and overlapping signals of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Gang; Quan, Hong; Wang, Cheng; Gong, Qiyong

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a new method of combining translation invariant (TI) and wavelet-threshold (WT) algorithm to distinguish weak and overlapping signals of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) is presented. First, the 1H-MRS spectrum signal is transformed into wavelet domain and then its wavelet coefficients are obtained. Then, the TI method and WT method are applied to detect the weak signals overlapped by the strong ones. Through the analysis of the simulation data, we can see that both frequency and amplitude information of small-signals can be obtained accurately by the algorithm, and through the combination with the method of signal fitting, quantitative calculation of the area under weak signals peaks can be realized.

  10. DNA-water interactions distinguish messenger RNA genes from transfer RNA genes.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Garima; Jayaram, B

    2012-05-30

    Physicochemical properties of DNA sequences as a guide to developing insights into genome organization has received little attention. Here, we utilize the energetics of DNA to further advance the knowledge on its language at a molecular level. Specifically, we ask the question whether physicochemical properties of different functional units on genomes differ. We extract intramolecular and solvation energies of different DNA base pair steps from a comprehensive set of molecular dynamics simulations. We then investigate the solvation behavior of DNA sequences coding for mRNAs and tRNAs. Distinguishing mRNA genes from tRNA genes is a tricky problem in genome annotation without assumptions on length of DNA and secondary structure of the product of transcription. We find that solvation energetics of DNA behaves as an extremely efficient property in discriminating 2,063,537 genes coding for mRNAs from 56,251 genes coding for tRNAs in all (~1500) completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes.

  11. Automatic Content Creation for Games to Train Students Distinguishing Similar Chinese Characters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Kwong-Hung; Leung, Howard; Tang, Jeff K. T.

    In learning Chinese, many students often have the problem of mixing up similar characters. This can cause misunderstanding and miscommunication in daily life. It is thus important for students learning the Chinese language to be able to distinguish similar characters and understand their proper usage. In this paper, we propose a game style framework in which the game content in identifying similar Chinese characters in idioms and words is created automatically. Our prior work on analyzing students’ Chinese handwriting can be applied in the similarity measure of Chinese characters. We extend this work by adding the component of radical extraction to speed up the search process. Experimental results show that the proposed method is more accurate and faster in finding more similar Chinese characters compared with the baseline method without considering the radical information.

  12. Roxane Cohen Silver: Award for Distinguished Senior Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest.

    PubMed

    2011-11-01

    Presents Roxane Cohen Silver, the 2011 winner of the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Senior Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest. "Roxane Cohen Silver is an internationally known expert in psychological responses to trauma. Her exceptional research has examined adjustment to an array of crises, including sudden loss, war, natural disasters, community violence, and the 9/11 attacks. As an advisor to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and in testimony to Congress, she has shaped policy concerning psychosocial dimensions of disaster preparedness and response. Through her service on the Board of Directors of Psychology Beyond Borders, she has addressed community health effects of terror and disasters. Her warmth, humor, and scholarship are truly inspiring, and she embodies the values this award was created to honor." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Sathasivan ("Saths") Cooper: Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    The Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology is given to individuals who have made sustained and enduring contributions to international cooperation and the advancement of knowledge in psychology. The 2014 recipient is Sathasivan ("Saths") Cooper. Cooper is active in global cooperation in psychology for the public and the discipline's benefit so that psychology can truly serve all of humanity. The first psychologist from outside the West to lead the International Union of Psychological Science, he is the driving force behind the Pan-African Psychology Union and continues to ensure that less-developed psychology dispensations play meaningful roles in international psychology." Cooper's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here.

  14. David Melcher: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology.

    PubMed

    2011-11-01

    Presents David Melcher, the 2011 winner of the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology. "For his elegant and groundbreaking work on one of the most important problems in perceptual psychology, the transfer of perceptual representations across eye movements. David Melcher's innovative experiments used perceptual aftereffects to show how remapping of visual locations underlies the creation of the percept of a clear and stable world. His work on the accumulation of memory contributed importantly to the understanding of natural perceptual representations and their neural underpinnings. His elegant reviews of transsaccadic perception communicated to a broad audience the remarkable capacity of the brain to create seamless perceptual representations despite the disruptions produced by eye movements." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Adam M. Grant: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology.

    PubMed

    2011-11-01

    Presents Adam M. Grant, the 2011 winner of the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology. "For extensive, elegant, and programmatic research on the power of relational job design in enhancing employee motivation, productivity, and satisfaction; for creative and rigorous studies documenting the profound and surprising effects of connecting employees to their impact on others; for highlighting prosocial motivation, not only extrinsic and intrinsic motivations, as a key force behind employee behavior; and for demonstrating by example the feasibility and benefits of conducting field experiments, yielding studies rich in internal validity, external validity, and practical impact. In addition to his accomplishments, Adam M. Grant is known for his generosity as a scholar, teacher, and colleague." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Jensen-Shannon divergence as a measure of distinguishability between mixed quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majtey, A. P.; Lamberti, P. W.; Prato, D. P.

    2005-11-01

    We discuss an alternative to relative entropy as a measure of distance between mixed quantum states. The proposed quantity is an extension to the realm of quantum theory of the Jensen-Shannon divergence (JSD) between probability distributions. The JSD has several interesting properties. It arises in information theory and, unlike the Kullback-Leibler divergence, it is symmetric, always well-defined, and bounded. We show that the quantum JSD shares with the relative entropy most of the physically relevant properties, in particular those required for a “good” quantum distinguishability measure. We relate it to other known quantum distances and we suggest possible applications in the field of the quantum information theory.

  17. Using lunar sounder imagery to distinguish surface from subsurface reflectors in lunar highlands areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Bonnie L.; Carter, James L.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a method using the Apollo 17 Lunar Sounder imagery data which appears capable of filtering out off-nadir surface noise from highland area profiles, so that subsurface features may now be detected in highland areas as well as mare areas. Previously, this had been impossible because the rough topography in the highland areas created noise in the profiles which could not be distinguished from subsurface echoes. The new method is an image processing procedure involving the computerized selection of pixels which represent intermediate echo intensity values, then manually removing those pixels from the profile. Using this technique, a subsurface feature with a horizontal extent of about 150 km, at a calculated depth of approximately 3 km, has been detected beneath the crater Riccioli in the highlands near Oceanus Procellarum. This result shows that the ALSE data contain much useful information that remains to be extracted and used.

  18. Autonomic nervous system testing may not distinguish multiple system atrophy from Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Riley, D; Chelimsky, T

    2003-01-01

    Background: Formal laboratory testing of autonomic function is reported to distinguish between patients with Parkinson's disease and those with multiple system atrophy (MSA), but such studies segregate patients according to clinical criteria that select those with autonomic dysfunction for the MSA category. Objective: To characterise the profiles of autonomic disturbances in patients in whom the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease or MSA used criteria other than autonomic dysfunction. Methods: 47 patients with parkinsonism and autonomic symptoms who had undergone autonomic laboratory testing were identified and their case records reviewed for non-autonomic features. They were classified clinically into three diagnostic groups: Parkinson's disease (19), MSA (14), and uncertain (14). The performance of the patients with Parkinson's disease was compared with that of the MSA patients on five autonomic tests: RR variation on deep breathing, heart rate changes with the Valsalva manoeuvre, tilt table testing, the sudomotor axon reflex test, and thermoregulatory sweat testing. Results: None of the tests distinguished one group from the other with any statistical significance, alone or in combination. Parkinson's disease and MSA patients showed similar patterns of autonomic dysfunction on formal testing of cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic, vasomotor, and central and peripheral sudomotor functions. Conclusions: This study supports the clinical observation that Parkinson's disease is often indistinguishable from MSA when it involves the autonomic nervous system. The clinical combination of parkinsonism and dysautonomia is as likely to be caused by Parkinson's disease as by MSA. Current clinical criteria for Parkinson's disease and MSA that direct patients with dysautonomia into the MSA group may be inappropriate. PMID:12486267

  19. Distinguishing SWEDDs patients with asymmetric resting tremor from Parkinson's disease: a clinical and electrophysiological study.

    PubMed

    Schwingenschuh, Petra; Ruge, Diane; Edwards, Mark J; Terranova, Carmen; Katschnig, Petra; Carrillo, Fatima; Silveira-Moriyama, Laura; Schneider, Susanne A; Kägi, Georg; Palomar, Francisco J; Talelli, Penelope; Dickson, John; Lees, Andrew J; Quinn, Niall; Mir, Pablo; Rothwell, John C; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2010-04-15

    Approximately 10% of patients diagnosed clinically with early Parkinson's disease (PD) have normal dopaminergic functional imaging (Scans Without Evidence of Dopaminergic Deficit [SWEDDs]). An important subgroup of SWEDDs are those with asymmetric rest tremor resembling parkinsonian tremor. Clinical and pathophysiological features which could help to distinguish SWEDDs from PD have not been explored. We therefore studied clinical details including non-motor symptoms in 25 tremulous SWEDDs patients in comparison to 25 tremor-dominant PD patients. Blinded video rating was used to compare examination findings. Electrophysiological tremor parameters and also response to a cortical plasticity protocol using paired associative stimulation (PAS) was studied in 9 patients with SWEDDs, 9 with tremor-dominant PD (with abnormal dopamine transporter single photon emission computed tomography findings), 8 with segmental dystonia, and 8 with essential tremor (ET). Despite clinical overlap, lack of true bradykinesia, presence of dystonia, and head tremor favored a diagnosis of SWEDDs, whereas re-emergent tremor, true fatiguing or decrement, good response to dopaminergic drugs, and presence of non-motor symptoms favored PD. A single tremor parameter could not differentiate between groups, but the combination of re-emergent tremor and highest tremor amplitude at rest was characteristic of PD tremor. SWEDDs and segmental dystonia patients exhibited an abnormal exaggerated response to the PAS protocol, in contrast to a subnormal response in PD and a normal response in ET. We conclude that despite clinical overlap, there are features that can help to distinguish between PD and SWEDDs which may be useful in clinical practice. The underlying pathophysiology of SWEDDs differs from PD but has similarities with primary dystonia.

  20. Perfusion Neuroimaging Abnormalities Alone Distinguish National Football League Players from a Healthy Population

    PubMed Central

    Amen, Daniel G.; Willeumier, Kristen; Omalu, Bennet; Newberg, Andrew; Raghavendra, Cauligi; Raji, Cyrus A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: National Football League (NFL) players are exposed to multiple head collisions during their careers. Increasing awareness of the adverse long-term effects of repetitive head trauma has raised substantial concern among players, medical professionals, and the general public. Objective: To determine whether low perfusion in specific brain regions on neuroimaging can accurately separate professional football players from healthy controls. Method: A cohort of retired and current NFL players (n = 161) were recruited in a longitudinal study starting in 2009 with ongoing interval follow up. A healthy control group (n = 124) was separately recruited for comparison. Assessments included medical examinations, neuropsychological tests, and perfusion neuroimaging with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Perfusion estimates of each scan were quantified using a standard atlas. We hypothesized that hypoperfusion particularly in the orbital frontal, anterior cingulate, anterior temporal, hippocampal, amygdala, insular, caudate, superior/mid occipital, and cerebellar sub-regions alone would reliably separate controls from NFL players. Cerebral perfusion differences were calculated using a one-way ANOVA and diagnostic separation was determined with discriminant and automatic linear regression predictive models. Results: NFL players showed lower cerebral perfusion on average (p < 0.01) in 36 brain regions. The discriminant analysis subsequently distinguished NFL players from controls with 90% sensitivity, 86% specificity, and 94% accuracy (95% CI 95-99). Automatic linear modeling achieved similar results. Inclusion of age and clinical co-morbidities did not improve diagnostic classification. Conclusion: Specific brain regions commonly damaged in traumatic brain injury show abnormally low perfusion on SPECT in professional NFL players. These same regions alone can distinguish this group from healthy subjects with high diagnostic accuracy. This

  1. Enhanced basal and disorderly growth hormone secretion distinguish acromegalic from normal pulsatile growth hormone release.

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, M L; Pincus, S M; Johnson, M L; Matthews, D H; Faunt, L M; Vance, M L; Thorner, M O; Veldhuis, J D

    1994-01-01

    Pulses of growth hormone (GH) release in acromegaly may arise from hypothalamic regulation or from random events intrinsic to adenomatous tissue. To distinguish between these possibilities, serum GH concentrations were measured at 5-min intervals for 24 h in acromegalic men and women with active (n = 19) and inactive (n = 9) disease and in normal young adults in the fed (n = 20) and fasted (n = 16) states. Daily GH secretion rates, calculated by deconvolution analysis, were greater in patients with active acromegaly than in fed (P < 0.05) but not fasted normal subjects. Significant basal (nonpulsatile) GH secretion was present in virtually all active acromegalics but not those in remission or in fed and fasted normal subjects. A recently introduced scale- and model-independent statistic, approximate entropy (ApEn), was used to test for regularity (orderliness) in the GH data. All but one acromegalic had ApEn values greater than the absolute range in normal subjects, indicating reduced orderliness of GH release; ApEn distinguished acromegalic from normal GH secretion (fed, P < 10(-12); fasted, P < 10(-7)) with high sensitivity (95%) and specificity (100%). Acromegalics in remission had ApEn scores larger than those of normal subjects (P < 0.0001) but smaller than those of active acromegalics (P < 0.001). The coefficient of variation of successive incremental changes in GH concentrations was significantly lower in acromegalics than in normal subjects (P < 0.001). Fourier analysis in acromegalics revealed reduced fractional amplitudes compared to normal subjects (P < 0.05). We conclude that GH secretion in acromegaly is highly irregular with disorderly release accompanying significant basal secretion. Images PMID:8083369

  2. T-wave morphology can distinguish healthy controls from LQTS patients.

    PubMed

    Immanuel, S A; Sadrieh, A; Baumert, M; Couderc, J P; Zareba, W; Hill, A P; Vandenberg, J I

    2016-09-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an inherited disorder associated with prolongation of the QT/QTc interval on the surface electrocardiogram (ECG) and a markedly increased risk of sudden cardiac death due to cardiac arrhythmias. Up to 25% of genotype-positive LQTS patients have QT/QTc intervals in the normal range. These patients are, however, still at increased risk of life-threatening events compared to their genotype-negative siblings. Previous studies have shown that analysis of T-wave morphology may enhance discrimination between control and LQTS patients. In this study we tested the hypothesis that automated analysis of T-wave morphology from Holter ECG recordings could distinguish between control and LQTS patients with QTc values in the range 400-450 ms. Holter ECGs were obtained from the Telemetric and Holter ECG Warehouse (THEW) database. Frequency binned averaged ECG waveforms were obtained and extracted T-waves were fitted with a combination of 3 sigmoid functions (upslope, downslope and switch) or two 9th order polynomial functions (upslope and downslope). Neural network classifiers, based on parameters obtained from the sigmoid or polynomial fits to the 1 Hz and 1.3 Hz ECG waveforms, were able to achieve up to 92% discrimination between control and LQTS patients and 88% discrimination between LQTS1 and LQTS2 patients. When we analysed a subgroup of subjects with normal QT intervals (400-450 ms, 67 controls and 61 LQTS), T-wave morphology based parameters enabled 90% discrimination between control and LQTS patients, compared to only 71% when the groups were classified based on QTc alone. In summary, our Holter ECG analysis algorithms demonstrate the feasibility of using automated analysis of T-wave morphology to distinguish LQTS patients, even those with normal QTc, from healthy controls.

  3. OrthoParaMap: Distinguishing orthologs from paralogs by integrating comparative genome data and gene phylogenies

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Steven B; Young, Nevin D

    2003-01-01

    Background In eukaryotic genomes, most genes are members of gene families. When comparing genes from two species, therefore, most genes in one species will be homologous to multiple genes in the second. This often makes it difficult to distinguish orthologs (separated through speciation) from paralogs (separated by other types of gene duplication). Combining phylogenetic relationships and genomic position in both genomes helps to distinguish between these scenarios. This kind of comparison can also help to describe how gene families have evolved within a single genome that has undergone polyploidy or other large-scale duplications, as in the case of Arabidopsis thaliana – and probably most plant genomes. Results We describe a suite of programs called OrthoParaMap (OPM) that makes genomic comparisons, identifies syntenic regions, determines whether sets of genes in a gene family are related through speciation or internal chromosomal duplications, maps this information onto phylogenetic trees, and infers internal nodes within the phylogenetic tree that may represent local – as opposed to speciation or segmental – duplication. We describe the application of the software using three examples: the melanoma-associated antigen (MAGE) gene family on the X chromosomes of mouse and human; the 20S proteasome subunit gene family in Arabidopsis, and the major latex protein gene family in Arabidopsis. Conclusion OPM combines comparative genomic positional information and phylogenetic reconstructions to identify which gene duplications are likely to have arisen through internal genomic duplications (such as polyploidy), through speciation, or through local duplications (such as unequal crossing-over). The software is freely available at . PMID:12952558

  4. Abundance-weighted phylogenetic diversity measures distinguish microbial community states and are robust to sampling depth.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Connor O; Matsen, Frederick A

    2013-01-01

    In microbial ecology studies, the most commonly used ways of investigating alpha (within-sample) diversity are either to apply non-phylogenetic measures such as Simpson's index to Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU) groupings, or to use classical phylogenetic diversity (PD), which is not abundance-weighted. Although alpha diversity measures that use abundance information in a phylogenetic framework do exist, they are not widely used within the microbial ecology community. The performance of abundance-weighted phylogenetic diversity measures compared to classical discrete measures has not been explored, and the behavior of these measures under rarefaction (sub-sampling) is not yet clear. In this paper we compare the ability of various alpha diversity measures to distinguish between different community states in the human microbiome for three different datasets. We also present and compare a novel one-parameter family of alpha diversity measures, BWPDθ, that interpolates between classical phylogenetic diversity (PD) and an abundance-weighted extension of PD. Additionally, we examine the sensitivity of these phylogenetic diversity measures to sampling, via computational experiments and by deriving a closed form solution for the expectation of phylogenetic quadratic entropy under re-sampling. On the three datasets, a phylogenetic measure always performed best, and two abundance-weighted phylogenetic diversity measures were the only measures ranking in the top four across all datasets. OTU-based measures, on the other hand, are less effective in distinguishing community types. In addition, abundance-weighted phylogenetic diversity measures are less sensitive to differing sampling intensity than their unweighted counterparts. Based on these results we encourage the use of abundance-weighted phylogenetic diversity measures, especially for cases such as microbial ecology where species delimitation is difficult.

  5. Distinguishing bacterial pathogens of potato using a genome-wide microarray approach.

    PubMed

    Aittamaa, M; Somervuo, P; Pirhonen, M; Mattinen, L; Nissinen, R; Auvinen, P; Valkonen, J P T

    2008-09-01

    A set of 9676 probes was designed for the most harmful bacterial pathogens of potato and tested in a microarray format. Gene-specific probes could be designed for all genes of Pectobacterium atrosepticum, c. 50% of the genes of Streptomyces scabies and c. 30% of the genes of Clavibacter michiganensis ssp. sepedonicus utilizing the whole-genome sequence information available. For Streptomyces turgidiscabies, 226 probes were designed according to the sequences of a pathogenicity island containing important virulence genes. In addition, probes were designed for the virulence-associated nip (necrosis-inducing protein) genes of P. atrosepticum, P. carotovorum and Dickeya dadantii and for the intergenic spacer (IGS) sequences of the 16S-23S rRNA gene region. Ralstonia solanacearum was not included in the study, because it is a quarantine organism and is not presently found in Finland, but a few probes were also designed for this species. The probes contained on average 40 target-specific nucleotides and were synthesized on the array in situ, organized as eight sub-arrays with an identical set of probes which could be used for hybridization with different samples. All bacteria were readily distinguished using a single channel system for signal detection. Nearly all of the c. 1000 probes designed for C. michiganensis ssp. sepedonicus, c. 50% and 40% of the c. 4000 probes designed for the genes of S. scabies and P. atrosepticum, respectively, and over 100 probes for S. turgidiscabies showed significant signals only with the respective species. P. atrosepticum, P. carotovorum and Dickeya strains were all detected with 110 common probes. By contrast, the strains of these species were found to differ in their signal profiles. Probes targeting the IGS region and nip genes could be used to place strains of Dickeya to two groups, which correlated with differences in virulence. Taken together, the approach of using a custom-designed, genome-wide microarray provided a robust means

  6. Evaluation of genotypic and phenotypic methods to distinguish clinical from environmental Vibrio vulnificus strains.

    PubMed

    Sanjuán, Eva; Fouz, Belén; Oliver, James D; Amaro, Carmen

    2009-03-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a heterogeneous bacterial species that comprises virulent and avirulent strains from environmental and clinical sources that have been grouped into three biotypes. To validate the typing methods proposed to distinguish clinical from environmental isolates, we performed phenotypic (API 20E, API 20NE, and BIOLOG tests) and genetic (ribotyping and DNA polymorphism at several loci) studies with a large strain collection representing different biotypes, origins, and host ranges. No phenotypic method was useful for biotyping or grouping strains with regard to the origin of an isolate, and only the BIOLOG system was reliable for identifying the strains at the species level. DNA polymorphisms divided the population into three major profiles. Profile 1 strains were vcg type C, 16S rRNA type B, and vvh type 1 and included most of the biotype 1 human septicemic isolates; profile 2 strains were vcg type E, 16S rRNA type A, and vvh type 2 and included all biotype 2 isolates together with biotype 1 isolates from fish and water and some human isolates; and profile 3 strains were vcg type E, 16S rRNA type AB, and vvh type 2 and included biotype 3 strains. Ribotyping divided the species into two groups: one group that included profile 1 biotype 1 isolates and one group that included isolates of all three biotypes with the three profiles described above. In conclusion, no genotyping system was able to distinguish either clinical strains from environmental strains or biogroups within the species V. vulnificus, which suggests that new typing methodologies useful for public health have to be developed for this species.

  7. Transcriptional Blood Signatures Distinguish Pulmonary Tuberculosis, Pulmonary Sarcoidosis, Pneumonias and Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Chloe I.; Graham, Christine M.; Berry, Matthew P. R.; Rozakeas, Fotini; Redford, Paul S.; Wang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Zhaohui; Wilkinson, Katalin A.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Kendrick, Yvonne; Devouassoux, Gilles; Ferry, Tristan; Miyara, Makoto; Bouvry, Diane; Dominique, Valeyre; Gorochov, Guy; Blankenship, Derek; Saadatian, Mitra; Vanhems, Phillip; Beynon, Huw; Vancheeswaran, Rama; Wickremasinghe, Melissa; Chaussabel, Damien; Banchereau, Jacques; Pascual, Virginia; Ho, Ling-pei; Lipman, Marc; O’Garra, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Rationale New approaches to define factors underlying the immunopathogenesis of pulmonary diseases including sarcoidosis and tuberculosis are needed to develop new treatments and biomarkers. Comparing the blood transcriptional response of tuberculosis to other similar pulmonary diseases will advance knowledge of disease pathways and help distinguish diseases with similar clinical presentations. Objectives To determine the factors underlying the immunopathogenesis of the granulomatous diseases, sarcoidosis and tuberculosis, by comparing the blood transcriptional responses in these and other pulmonary diseases. Methods We compared whole blood genome-wide transcriptional profiles in pulmonary sarcoidosis, pulmonary tuberculosis, to community acquired pneumonia and primary lung cancer and healthy controls, before and after treatment, and in purified leucocyte populations. Measurements and Main Results An Interferon-inducible neutrophil-driven blood transcriptional signature was present in both sarcoidosis and tuberculosis, with a higher abundance and expression in tuberculosis. Heterogeneity of the sarcoidosis signature correlated significantly with disease activity. Transcriptional profiles in pneumonia and lung cancer revealed an over-abundance of inflammatory transcripts. After successful treatment the transcriptional activity in tuberculosis and pneumonia patients was significantly reduced. However the glucocorticoid-responsive sarcoidosis patients showed a significant increase in transcriptional activity. 144-blood transcripts were able to distinguish tuberculosis from other lung diseases and controls. Conclusions Tuberculosis and sarcoidosis revealed similar blood transcriptional profiles, dominated by interferon-inducible transcripts, while pneumonia and lung cancer showed distinct signatures, dominated by inflammatory genes. There were also significant differences between tuberculosis and sarcoidosis in the degree of their transcriptional activity, the

  8. A rapid cycleave PCR method for distinguishing the vaccine strain Brucella abortus A19 in China.

    PubMed

    Nan, Wenlong; Zhang, Yueyong; Tan, Pengfei; Xu, Zouliang; Chen, Yuqi; Mao, Kairong; Chen, Yiping

    2016-05-01

    Brucellosis is a widespread zoonotic disease caused by Brucella spp. Immunization with attenuated vaccines has proved to be an effective method of prevention; however, it may also interfere with diagnosis. Brucella abortus strain A19, which is homologous to B. abortus strain S19, is widely used for the prevention of bovine brucellosis in China. For effective monitoring of the control of brucellosis, it is essential to distinguish A19 from field strains. Single-nucleotide polymorphism-based assays offer a new approach to such discrimination studies. In the current study, we developed a cycleave PCR assay that successfully distinguished attenuated vaccine strains A19 and S19 from 22 strains of B. abortus and 57 strains of 5 other Brucella species. The assay gave a negative reaction with 4 non-Brucella species. The minimum sensitivity of the assay, evaluated using 10-fold dilutions of chromosomal DNA, was 7.6 fg for the A19 strain and 220 fg for the single non-A19/non-S19 Brucella strain tested (B. abortus 104M). The assay was also reproducible (intra- and interassay coefficients of variation: 0.003-0.01 and 0.004-0.025, respectively). The cycleave assay gave an A19/S19-specific reaction in 3 out of 125 field serum samples, with the same 3 samples being positive in an alternative A19/S19-specific molecular assay. The cycleave assay gave a total of 102 Brucella-specific reactions (3 being the A19/S19-specific reactions), whereas an alternative Brucella-specific assay gave 92 positive reactions (all also positive in the cycleave assay). Therefore, this assay represents a simple, rapid, sensitive, and specific tool for use in brucellosis control.

  9. A Coaxial Dielectric Probe Technique for Distinguishing Tooth Enamel from Dental Resin

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Benjamin B.; Geimer, Shireen D.; Flood, Ann B.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2016-01-01

    For purposes of biodosimetry in the event of a large scale radiation disaster, one major and very promising point-of contact device is assessing dose using tooth enamel. This technique utilizes the capabilities of electron paramagnetic resonance to measure free radicals and other unpaired electron species, and the fact that the deposition of energy from ionizing radiation produces free radicals in most materials. An important stipulation for this strategy is that the measurements, need to be performed on a central incisor that is basically intact, i.e. which has an area of enamel surface that is as large as the probing tip of the resonator that is without decay or restorative care that replaces the enamel. Therefore, an important consideration is how to quickly assess whether the tooth has sufficient enamel to be measured for dose and whether there is resin present on the tooth being measured and to be able to characterize the amount of surface that is impacted. While there is a relatively small commercially available dielectric probe which could be used in this context, it has several disadvantages for the intended use. Therefore, a smaller, 1.19mm diameter 50 ohm, open-ended, coaxial dielectric probe has been developed as an alternative. The performance of the custom probe was validated against measurement results of known standards. Measurements were taken of multiple teeth enamel and dental resin samples using both probes. While the probe contact with the teeth samples was imperfect and added to measurement variability, the inherent dielectric contrast between the enamel and resin was sufficient that the probe measurements could be used as a robust means of distinguishing the two material types. The smaller diameter probe produced markedly more definitive results in terms of distinguishing the two materials. PMID:27182531

  10. Perfect State Distinguishability and Computational Speedups with Postselected Closed Timelike Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Todd A.; Wilde, Mark M.

    2012-03-01

    Bennett and Schumacher's postselected quantum teleportation is a model of closed timelike curves (CTCs) that leads to results physically different from Deutsch's model. We show that even a single qubit passing through a postselected CTC (P-CTC) is sufficient to do any postselected quantum measurement with certainty, and we discuss an important difference between "Deutschian" CTCs (D-CTCs) and P-CTCs in which the future existence of a P-CTC might affect the present outcome of an experiment. Then, based on a suggestion of Bennett and Smith, we explicitly show how a party assisted by P-CTCs can distinguish a set of linearly independent quantum states, and we prove that it is not possible for such a party to distinguish a set of linearly dependent states. The power of P-CTCs is thus weaker than that of D-CTCs because the Holevo bound still applies to circuits using them, regardless of their ability to conspire in violating the uncertainty principle. We then discuss how different notions of a quantum mixture that are indistinguishable in linear quantum mechanics lead to dramatically differing conclusions in a nonlinear quantum mechanics involving P-CTCs. Finally, we give explicit circuit constructions that can efficiently factor integers, efficiently solve any decision problem in the intersection of NP and coNP, and probabilistically solve any decision problem in NP. These circuits accomplish these tasks with just one qubit traveling back in time, and they exploit the ability of postselected closed timelike curves to create grandfather paradoxes for invalid answers.

  11. Attribution of human characteristics and bullying involvement in childhood: Distinguishing between targets.

    PubMed

    van Noorden, Tirza H J; Haselager, Gerbert J T; Lansu, Tessa A M; Cillessen, Antonius H N; Bukowski, William M

    2016-07-01

    This investigation researched the association between the attribution of human characteristics and bullying involvement in children by distinguishing between targets. Study 1 focused on the attribution of human characteristics by bullies, victims, bully/victims, and non-involved children toward friends and non-friends. The data from 405 children (M = 10.7 years old) showed that they attributed fewer prosocial and more antisocial human characteristics to non-friends than to friends. Moreover, boy victims attributed fewer prosocial human characteristics to non-friends than boy bullies and non-involved boys did. In addition, victims attributed more antisocial human characteristics to non-friends than non-involved children did. Study 2 addressed bullies', victims', bully/victims', and non-involved children's attribution of human characteristics to each other. The data of 264 children (M = 10.0 years old) showed that bullies, victims, and bully/victims attributed fewer prosocial and more antisocial human characteristics to each other than to non-involved children. Non-involved children attributed fewer prosocial human characteristics to bully/victims than to bullies and victims, and more antisocial human characteristics to bully/victims than to victims. In addition, girls attributed more prosocial and fewer antisocial human characteristics to girls than to boys, whereas boys did not distinguish between girls and boys. Based on these findings, suggestions for future research are provided and implications for bullying prevention and intervention are discussed. Aggr. Behav. 42:394-403, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Distinguishing solid bitumens formed by thermochemical sulfate reduction and thermal chemical alteration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelemen, S.R.; Walters, C.C.; Kwiatek, P.J.; Afeworki, M.; Sansone, M.; Freund, H.; Pottorf, R.J.; Machel, H.G.; Zhang, T.; Ellis, G.S.; Tang, Y.; Peters, K.E.

    2008-01-01

    Insoluble solid bitumens are organic residues that can form by the thermal chemical alteration (TCA) or thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) of migrated petroleum. TCA may actually encompass several low temperature processes, such as biodegradation and asphaltene precipitation, followed by thermal alteration. TSR is an abiotic redox reaction where petroleum is oxidized by sulfate. It is difficult to distinguish solid bitumens associated with TCA of petroleum from those associated with TSR when both processes occur at relatively high temperature. The focus of the present work was to characterize solid bitumen samples associated with TCA or TSR using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS is a surface analysis conducted on either isolated or in situ (>25 ??m diameter) solid bitumen that can provide the relative abundance and chemical speciation of carbon, organic and inorganic heteroatoms (NSO). In this study, naturally occurring solid bitumens from three locations, Nisku Fm. Brazeau River area (TSR-related), LaBarge Field Madison Fm. (TSR-related), and the Alaskan Brooks range (TCA-related), are compared to organic solids generated during laboratory simulation of the TSR and TCA processes. The abundance and chemical nature of organic nitrogen and sulfur in solid bitumens can be understood in terms of the nature of (1) petroleum precursor molecules, (2) the concentration of nitrogen by way of thermal stress and (3) the mode of sulfur incorporation. TCA solid bitumens originate from polar materials that are initially rich in sulfur and nitrogen. Aromaticity and nitrogen increase as thermal stress cleaves aliphatic moieties and condensation reactions take place. Organic sulfur in TCA organic solids remains fairly constant with increasing maturation (3.5 to ???17 sulfur per 100 carbons) into aromatic structures and to the low levels of nitrogen in their hydrocarbon precursors. Hence, XPS results provide organic chemical composition information that helps to

  13. Distinguishing dark matter stabilization symmetries using multiple kinematic edges and cusps

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Kim, Doojin; Toharia, Manuel; Walker, Devin G. E.

    2010-07-01

    We emphasize that the stabilizing symmetry for dark matter (DM) particles does not have to be the commonly used parity (Z{sub 2}) symmetry. We therefore examine the potential of the colliders to distinguish models with parity stabilized DM from models in which the DM is stabilized by other symmetries. We often take the latter to be a Z{sub 3} symmetry for illustration. We focus on signatures where a single particle, charged under the DM stabilization symmetry decays into the DM and standard model (SM) particles. Such a Z{sub 3}-charged mother particle can decay into one or two DM particles along with the same SM particles. This can be contrasted with the decay of a Z{sub 2}-charged mother particle, where only one DM particle appears. Thus, if the intermediate particles in these decay chains are off-shell, then the reconstructed invariant mass of the SM particles exhibits two kinematic edges for the Z{sub 3} case but only one for the Z{sub 2} case. For the case of on-shell intermediate particles, distinguishing the two symmetries requires more than the kinematic edges. In this case, we note that certain decay chain topologies of the mother particle which are present for the Z{sub 3} case (but absent for the Z{sub 2} case) generate a cusp in the invariant mass distribution of the SM particles. We demonstrate that this cusp is generally invariant of the various spin configurations. We further apply these techniques within the context of explicit models.

  14. Distinguishing the biomass allocation variance resulting from ontogenetic drift or acclimation to soil texture.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jiangbo; Tang, Lisong; Wang, Zhongyuan; Xu, Guiqing; Li, Yan

    2012-01-01

    In resource-poor environments, adjustment in plant biomass allocation implies a complex interplay between environmental signals and plant development rather than a delay in plant development alone. To understand how environmental factors influence biomass allocation or the developing phenotype, it is necessary to distinguish the biomass allocations resulting from environmental gradients or ontogenetic drift. Here, we compared the development trajectories of cotton plants (Gossypium herbaceum L.), which were grown in two contrasting soil textures during a 60-d period. Those results distinguished the biomass allocation pattern resulting from ontogenetic drift and the response to soil texture. The soil texture significantly changed the biomass allocation to leaves and roots, but not to stems. Soil texture also significantly changed the development trajectories of leaf and root traits, but did not change the scaling relationship between basal stem diameter and plant height. Results of nested ANOVAs of consecutive plant-size categories in both soil textures showed that soil gradients explained an average of 63.64-70.49% of the variation of biomass allocation to leaves and roots. Ontogenetic drift explained 77.47% of the variation in biomass allocation to stems. The results suggested that the environmental factors governed the biomass allocation to roots and leaves, and ontogenetic drift governed the biomass allocation to stems. The results demonstrated that biomass allocation to metabolically active organs (e.g., roots and leaves) was mainly governed by environmental factors, and that biomass allocation to metabolically non-active organs (e.g., stems) was mainly governed by ontogenetic drift. We concluded that differentiating the causes of development trajectories of plant traits was important to the understanding of plant response to environmental gradients.

  15. Acceptance of the 2014 Geochemical Society Distinguished Service Award by Carla Koretsky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koretsky, Carla

    2015-06-01

    I am deeply touched to have received the Geochemical Society Distinguished Service Award. It was a great surprise when I received the notice that I had been chosen for the award. It has been a tremendous pleasure to work on behalf of student members of the Geochemical Society, Japanese Geochemical Society and the European Association of Geochemists to organize the student travel grants over the past few years. Certainly, this is not an effort that I undertook on my own. Many, many members of the GS, the JGS and the EAG generously donated their time and expertise to serve as reviewers for the many travel grant applicants we receive each year. Seth Davis, the GS Chief Operating Officer, spent countless hours helping to organize applications, the website, distribution of funds and many other aspects of the competition. Without Seth and the many expert reviewers, we could not run the travel grant program each year and provide this important financial support to allow more students to experience the Goldschmidt Conference. I also enjoyed my time as Geochemical News co-editor, and I should point out that GN during those years was ably co-edited by Johnson Haas. It has been a pleasure to see Elements take off, and GN evolve into a timely source of important announcements and information about cutting-edge science since I stepped down as co-editor. I feel very fortunate to work with so many outstanding colleagues in the global geochemical community, and I am a little embarrassed, and also very grateful, to have been selected for the Geochemical Society Distinguished Service Award. Thank you!

  16. Distinguishing harmonic behavior of longitudinal resonant combustion in a variable geometry model rocket combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, Sarah

    Throughout the study of high frequency combustion instability in a single element Continuously Variable Resonance Combustor (CVRC), the excitation of the fundamental longitudinal mode is closely followed by the excitation of higher harmonic modes. In an attempt to establish a heuristic relationship between the appearances of the fundamental mode and its harmonics, several unstable fixed geometry and variable geometry tests from the CVRC are analyzed through traditional Fourier-based methods and alternative signal processing methods such as wavelet analysis and Instantaneous Frequency (IF) Analysis from PC Signal Analysis. Early results led to the conclusion that traditional Fourier-based analysis provides believable and consistent results for the first three modes. However, Fourier analysis is sensitive to effects from non-sinusoidal waveforms. Further work using manufactured signals with both sinusoidal and steepfronted waveforms established that it is unclear which parts of the calculated harmonic signals are data artifacts and which are true signal. Supplementary assessment of IF Analysis and the traditional Fourier-based analysis explored the applicability of each method, the inherent data artifacts, and distinguishing behavior between the experimental data and those data artifacts. The results obtained from the IF Analysis provide good agreement with the traditional Fourier-based analysis, though one uses FIR filters and the other uses IIR filters. The validity of the results is sensitive to the settings chosen for these filters. It is shown that harmonic modal content exists in the CVRC, but it is also shown that the current results include indistinguishable Fourier artifacts. Both methods are sensitive to the sinusoidal assumption and cannot correctly interpret steep-fronted waveforms. This supplementary assessment has shown that IF Analysis is no worse than traditional Fourier-based analysis, but it fails to provide additional useful information

  17. Assessing the distinguishable cluster approximation based on the triple bond-breaking in the nitrogen molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rishi, Varun; Perera, Ajith; Bartlett, Rodney J.

    2016-03-01

    Obtaining the correct potential energy curves for the dissociation of multiple bonds is a challenging problem for ab initio methods which are affected by the choice of a spin-restricted reference function. Coupled cluster (CC) methods such as CCSD (coupled cluster singles and doubles model) and CCSD(T) (CCSD + perturbative triples) correctly predict the geometry and properties at equilibrium but the process of bond dissociation, particularly when more than one bond is simultaneously broken, is much more complicated. New modifications of CC theory suggest that the deleterious role of the reference function can be diminished, provided a particular subset of terms is retained in the CC equations. The Distinguishable Cluster (DC) approach of Kats and Manby [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 021102 (2013)], seemingly overcomes the deficiencies for some bond-dissociation problems and might be of use in quasi-degenerate situations in general. DC along with other approximate coupled cluster methods such as ACCD (approximate coupled cluster doubles), ACP-D45, ACP-D14, 2CC, and pCCSD(α, β) (all defined in text) falls under a category of methods that are basically obtained by the deletion of some quadratic terms in the double excitation amplitude equation for CCD/CCSD (coupled cluster doubles model/coupled cluster singles and doubles model). Here these approximate methods, particularly those based on the DC approach, are studied in detail for the nitrogen molecule bond-breaking. The N2 problem is further addressed with conventional single reference methods but based on spatial symmetry-broken restricted Hartree-Fock (HF) solutions to assess the use of these references for correlated calculations in the situation where CC methods using fully symmetry adapted SCF solutions fail. The distinguishable cluster method is generalized: 1) to different orbitals for different spins (unrestricted HF based DCD and DCSD), 2) by adding triples correction perturbatively (DCSD(T)) and iteratively (DCSDT

  18. Physical criteria for distinguishing sandy tsunami and storm deposits using modern examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Robert A.; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2007-08-01

    Modern subaerial sand beds deposited by major tsunamis and hurricanes were compared at trench, transect, and sub-regional spatial scales to evaluate which attributes are most useful for distinguishing the two types of deposits. Physical criteria that may be diagnostic include: sediment composition, textures and grading, types and organization of stratification, thickness, geometry, and landscape conformity. Published reports of Pacific Ocean tsunami impacts and our field observations suggest that sandy tsunami deposits are generally < 25 cm thick, extend hundreds of meters inland from the beach, and fill microtopography but generally conform to the antecedent landscape. They commonly are a single homogeneous bed that is normally graded overall, or that consists of only a few thin layers. Mud intraclasts and mud laminae within the deposit are strong evidence of tsunami deposition. Twig orientation or other indicators of return flow during bed aggradation are also diagnostic of tsunami deposits. Sandy storm deposits tend to be > 30 cm thick, generally extend < 300 m from the beach, and will not advance beyond the antecedent macrotopography they are able to fill. They typically are composed of numerous subhorizontal planar laminae organized into multiple laminasets that are normally or inversely graded, they do not contain internal mud laminae and rarely contain mud intraclasts. Application of these distinguishing characteristics depends on their preservation potential and any deposit modifications that accompany burial. The distinctions between tsunami and storm deposits are related to differences in the hydrodynamics and sediment-sorting processes during transport. Tsunami deposition results from a few high-velocity, long-period waves that entrain sediment from the shoreface, beach, and landward erosion zone. Tsunamis can have flow depths greater than 10 m, transport sediment primarily in suspension, and distribute the load over a broad region where sediment falls

  19. How to identify garnet lherzolite melts and distinguish them from pyroxenite melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, T. L.; Holbig, E.; Barr, J. A.; Till, C.; Krawczynski, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Liquids form in equilibrium with garnet lherzolite sources when the Earth's mantle melts at depths of greater than ~ 60 km. We present a phase equilibrium investigation of Tibetan plateau olivine leucitites from 2.2 to 2.8 GPa and 1380 to 1480 °C. The resulting liquids were multiply saturated with spinel and garnet lherzolite assemblages (olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene and spinel +/-garnet) under nominally anhydrous conditions. These SiO2-undersaturated liquids and published experimental data have been used to develop a new model that parameterizes the major element compositions of garnet lherzolite partial melts, allowing the prediction of melt compositions from depleted to metasomatically enriched peridotite. The model is calibrated over the pressure range of 1.9 to 6 GPa. The model also predicts the suprasolidus pressure and temperature of the spinel to garnet lherzolite phase transition for natural peridotite compositions. Combined with the recent parameterization of melting in the plagioclase- and spinel- lherzolite facies (Till et al., 2012, JGR, 117, B06206), the new model distinguishes between melts of garnet vs. spinel vs. plagioclase lherzolites, but can also be used to distinguish between melts of lherzolitic vs. pyroxenitic source regions, allowing source lithology to be uniquely identified. Pyroxenite melts fall into two compositionally distinct groups; an olivine-normative, SiO2-undersaturated group and quartz-normative, SiO2-oversaturated group. Melts of plagioclase, spinel, and garnet lherzolite plot between these two types of pyroxenitic melts in mineral normative composition space. When our model is applied to high-K lavas erupted in the Tibetan plateau, we find that these magmas are derived from both pyroxenite and lherzolite source regions. Distinctive enrichments in compatible trace elements (Ni, Cr) are observed in the lherzolite-derived magmas. Applied to Hawaiian basalts, our model suggests the transitional and weakly alkaline pre

  20. Thermodynamics of Distinguishable Particles: A Key to High-Energy Strong Interactions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, Rolf

    A new kind of thermodynamical model for strong interactions at high energies is proposed. We start from the fact that strong interactions produce so many possible particle states (from \\uppi over its resonances to nucleons, strange particles and their resonances, up to highly excited `fireballs') that in an actual process each of these states practically never occurs more than once. We use this in order to treat the very first instant of a high-energy collision by statistical thermodynamics of a system of an illimited number of distinguishable particles. The model shows surprising properties: there exists a universal highest possible temperature T 0 of the order of 150-200 MeV (corresponding to ≈ 1012 K) which governs all high-energy processes of strongly interacting particles, independently of the actual energy and independently of the particle number, from cosmic ray jets down to elastic scattering. If a Lorentz contracted volume is introduced, the transverse momentum distribution in jets as well as in elastic scattering is described in agreement with experimental results. Paradoxically, this distribution is independent of whether or not `thermal equilibrium' is reached. If it is not reached—in the majority of cases it is not reached—then the jet structure for production processes is the consequence. If the model turns out to be as good as present experiments indicated, then the existence of a highest temperature is very likely; it implies that, from higher and higher energy experiments, not much new can be learnt about the structure of strong interactions, since the mode of excitation (which depends on the dynamical details we would like to know) has no influence on what is finally observed. The situation would then be similar to that in ordinary thermodynamics, where no experiment could possibly reveal how a certain system was brought into its thermodynamical state. In astrophysics, the method of thermodynamics of distinguishable particles may have

  1. Simultaneous immunoassay of phosphorylated proteins based on apoferritin templated metallic phosphates as voltammetrically distinguishable signal reporters.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Aidong; Lin, Yuehe; Du, Dan

    2016-06-15

    A novel electrochemical immunosensor has been developed to detect phosphorylated proteins, phospho-p53(15) and phospho-p53(392), simultaneously. Different apoferritin templated metal phosphates were used as distinguishable signal reporters (apoferritin templated cadmium phosphates (ATCP) and apoferritin templated lead phosphates (ATLP)) to enhance the detection sensitivity. Here, magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles functionalized phospho-p53(15) capture antibody (MP-p53(15)c-Ab) and phospho-p53(392) capture antibody (MP-p53(392)c-Ab), respectively, were used to specifically capture phospho-p53(15) and phospho-p53(392) antigens, followed by immunorecognition with p53(15) detection antibody (p53(15)d-Ab) and p53(392) detection antibody (p53(392)d-Ab) to form sandwich-like immunocomplexes. SiO2@Au nanocomposites served as nanocarriers for co-immobilization of both d-Ab and signal reporters (ATCP/SiO2@Au/p53(15)d-Ab, ATLP/SiO2@Au/p53(392)d-Ab), which greatly amplified the detection signal. The distinguished current responses were achieved by electrochemical detection of cadmium ions and lead ions with square wave voltammetry (SWV) after dissolution with acid. The proposed immunoassay exhibited high sensitivity and selectivity for the detection of phospho-p53(15) and phospho-p53(392) simultaneously. The linear relationships between electrochemical responses and the concentrations of phospho-p53(15) and phospho-p53(392) were obtained in the range of 0.1-20 ng/mL and 0.05-20 ng/mL, respectively. The detection limits were 0.05 and 0.02 ng/mL (S/N=3), respectively. This strategy provides a new platform for simultaneous immunoassay of multiple protein biomarkers.

  2. Quantifying "apparent" impact and distinguishing impact from invasiveness in multispecies plant invasions.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Dean E; Ortega, Yvette K; Eren, Özkan; Hierro, José L

    2016-01-01

    The quantification of invader impacts remains a major hurdle to understanding and managing invasions. Here, we demonstrate a method for quantifying the community-level impact of multiple plant invaders by applying Parker et al.'s (1999) equation (impact = range x local abundance x per capita effect or per unit effect) using data from 620 survey plots from 31 grasslands across west-central Montana, USA. In testing for interactive effects of multiple invaders on native plant abundance (percent cover), we found no evidence for invasional meltdown or synergistic interactions for the 25 exotics tested. While much concern exists regarding impact thresholds, we also found little evidence for nonlinear relationships between invader abundance and impacts. These results suggest that management actions that reduce invader abundance should reduce invader impacts monotonically in this system. Eleven of 25 invaders had significant per unit impacts (negative local-scale relationships between invader and native cover). In decomposing the components of impact, we found that local invader abundance had a significant influence on the likelihood of impact, but range (number of plots occupied) did not. This analysis helped to differentiate measures of invasiveness (local abundance and range) from impact to distinguish high-impact invaders from invaders that exhibit negligible impacts, even when widespread. Distinguishing between high- and low-impact invaders should help refine trait-based prediction of problem species. Despite the unique information derived from evaluation of per unit effects of invaders, invasiveness 'scores based on range and local abundance produced similar rankings to impact scores that incorporated estimates of per unit effects. Hence, information on range and local abundance alone was sufficient to identify problematic plant invaders at the regional scale. In comparing empirical data on invader impacts to the state noxious weed list, we found that the noxious

  3. Distinguishing adult-onset asthma from COPD: a review and a new approach

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, Michael J; Perret, Jennifer L; Dharmage, Shyamali C; McDonald, Vanessa M; McDonald, Christine F

    2014-01-01

    Adult-onset asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are major public health burdens. This review presents a comprehensive synopsis of their epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentations; describes how they can be distinguished; and considers both established and proposed new approaches to their management. Both adult-onset asthma and COPD are complex diseases arising from gene–environment interactions. Early life exposures such as childhood infections, smoke, obesity, and allergy influence adult-onset asthma. While the established environmental risk factors for COPD are adult tobacco and biomass smoke, there is emerging evidence that some childhood exposures such as maternal smoking and infections may cause COPD. Asthma has been characterized predominantly by Type 2 helper T cell (Th2) cytokine-mediated eosinophilic airway inflammation associated with airway hyperresponsiveness. In established COPD, the inflammatory cell infiltrate in small airways comprises predominantly neutrophils and cytotoxic T cells (CD8 positive lymphocytes). Parenchymal destruction (emphysema) in COPD is associated with loss of lung tissue elasticity, and small airways collapse during exhalation. The precise definition of chronic airflow limitation is affected by age; a fixed cut-off of forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity leads to overdiagnosis of COPD in the elderly. Traditional approaches to distinguishing between asthma and COPD have highlighted age of onset, variability of symptoms, reversibility of airflow limitation, and atopy. Each of these is associated with error due to overlap and convergence of clinical characteristics. The management of chronic stable asthma and COPD is similarly convergent. New approaches to the management of obstructive airway diseases in adults have been proposed based on inflammometry and also multidimensional assessment, which focuses on the four domains of the airways, comorbidity, self-management, and

  4. Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cell Is a Potential Marker to Distinguish Fibromyalgia Syndrome from Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Konno, Takahiko; Wakao, Rika; Fujita, Hiroko; Fujita, Hiroyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia (FM) is defined as a widely distributed pain. While many rheumatologists and pain physicians have considered it to be a pain disorder, psychiatry, psychology, and general medicine have deemed it to be a syndrome (FMS) or psychosomatic disorder. The lack of concrete structural and/or pathological evidence has made patients suffer prejudice that FMS is a medically unexplained symptom, implying inauthenticity. Furthermore, FMS often exhibits comorbidity with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or spondyloarthritis (SpA), both of which show similar indications. In this study, disease specific biomarkers were sought in blood samples from patients to facilitate objective diagnoses of FMS, and distinguish it from RA and SpA. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients and healthy donors (HD) were subjected to multicolor flow cytometric analysis. The percentage of mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in PBMCs and the mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) of cell surface antigen expression in MAIT cells were analyzed. Results There was a decrease in the MAIT cell population in FMS, RA, and SpA compared with HD. Among the cell surface antigens in MAIT cells, three chemokine receptors, CCR4, CCR7, and CXCR1, a natural killer (NK) receptor, NKp80, a signaling lymphocyte associated molecule (SLAM) family, CD150, a degrunulation marker, CD107a, and a coreceptor, CD8β emerged as potential biomarkers for FMS to distinguish from HD. Additionally, a memory marker, CD44 and an inflammatory chemokine receptor, CXCR1 appeared possible markers for RA, while a homeostatic chemokine receptor, CXCR4 deserved for SpA to differentiate from FMS. Furthermore, the drug treatment interruption resulted in alternation of the expression of CCR4, CCR5, CXCR4, CD27, CD28, inducible costimulatory molecule (ICOS), CD127 (IL-7 receptor α), CD94, NKp80, an activation marker, CD69, an integrin family member, CD49d, and a dipeptidase, CD26, in FMS. Conclusions

  5. Distinguishing internal and external sediment sources in a tidal freshwater wetland, the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Deijl, Eveline C.; van der Perk, Marcel; Kik, Nanda J.; Verschelling, Eelco; Middelkoop, Hans

    2015-04-01

    Many deltas across the globe suffer from drowning due to sea level rise or land subsidence in combination with sediment starvation. The process of drowning can be attenuated by enhancing sediment inputs or the sediment trapping efficiency of deltas. To examine the sediment budget of delta areas based on measurements of sediment deposition, it is essential to distinguish the sediment that has entered the area from upstream areas from sediment that has been redistributed within the area. This pilot study aims to explore the prospects to distinguish between external and internal sediment sources based on the geochemical composition of the sediment deposited. This study was carried out in the Kleine Noordwaard, which is part of the Brabantse Biesbosch, a former inland delta located in-between the Rhine and Meuse rivers in the south-western part of the Netherlands. A significant part of this area has been embanked and turned into polder areas in the early 19th century. In contrast to many tidal creeks and flats, the polder areas have not received inputs of severely contaminated river sediment between the 1930s and 1980s. A number of polders have recently or are currently being de-poldered again, i.e. converted from agricultural polder land into an inundated tidal freshwater wetland, in order to increase the conveyance capacity of the Rhine River during extreme discharge situations, thereby lowering the peak water levels upstream and to enhance the nature values of the area. The external and internal sediment sources of the sediment deposited in the Kleine Noordwaard could be discriminated based on the zinc (Zn) and rubidium (Rb) concentrations. These two elements exhibit a different linear relation for the more contaminated external sediment originating from the Rhine River and the less contaminated, internally redistributed sediment originating from the topsoil of the former polder area. The mixture proportion for each sediment sample could not be directly derived

  6. Distinguishing prostate cancer from benign confounders via a cascaded classifier on multi-parametric MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litjens, G. J. S.; Elliott, R.; Shih, N.; Feldman, M.; Barentsz, J. O.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C. A.; Kovacs, I.; Huisman, H. J.; Madabhushi, A.

    2014-03-01

    Learning how to separate benign confounders from prostate cancer is important because the imaging characteristics of these confounders are poorly understood. Furthermore, the typical representations of the MRI parameters might not be enough to allow discrimination. The diagnostic uncertainty this causes leads to a lower diagnostic accuracy. In this paper a new cascaded classifier is introduced to separate prostate cancer and benign confounders on MRI in conjunction with specific computer-extracted features to distinguish each of the benign classes (benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), inflammation, atrophy or prostatic intra-epithelial neoplasia (PIN). In this study we tried to (1) calculate different mathematical representations of the MRI parameters which more clearly express subtle differences between different classes, (2) learn which of the MRI image features will allow to distinguish specific benign confounders from prostate cancer, and (2) find the combination of computer-extracted MRI features to best discriminate cancer from the confounding classes using a cascaded classifier. One of the most important requirements for identifying MRI signatures for adenocarcinoma, BPH, atrophy, inflammation, and PIN is accurate mapping of the location and spatial extent of the confounder and cancer categories from ex vivo histopathology to MRI. Towards this end we employed an annotated prostatectomy data set of 31 patients, all of whom underwent a multi-parametric 3 Tesla MRI prior to radical prostatectomy. The prostatectomy slides were carefully co-registered to the corresponding MRI slices using an elastic registration technique. We extracted texture features from the T2-weighted imaging, pharmacokinetic features from the dynamic contrast enhanced imaging and diffusion features from the diffusion-weighted imaging for each of the confounder classes and prostate cancer. These features were selected because they form the mainstay of clinical diagnosis. Relevant features for

  7. Airborne monitoring to distinguish engineered nanomaterials from incidental particles for environmental health and safety

    PubMed Central

    Peters, TM; Elzey, S; Johnson, R; Park, H; Grassian, VH; Maher, T; O'Shaughnessy, P

    2016-01-01

    Two methods were used to distinguish airborne engineered nanomaterials from other airborne particles in a facility that produces nano-structured lithium titanate metal oxide powder. The first method involved off-line analysis of filter samples collected with conventional respirable samplers at each of seven locations (six near production processes and one outdoors). Throughout most of the facility and outdoors, respirable mass concentrations were low (<0.050 mg m−3) and were attributed to particles other than the nanomaterial (<10% by mass titanium determined with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry). In contrast, in a single area with extensive material handling, mass concentrations were greatest (0.118 mg m−3) and contained up to 39% +/− 11% lithium titanium, indicating the presence of airborne nanomaterial. Analysis of the filter samples collected in this area by transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope revealed that the airborne nanomaterial was associated only with spherical aggregates (clusters of fused 10–80 nm nanoparticles) that were larger than 200 nm. This analysis also showed that nanoparticles in this area were the smallest particles of a larger distribution of submicrometer chain agglomerates likely from welding in an adjacent area of the facility. The second method used two, hand-held, direct-reading, battery-operated instruments to obtain a time series of very fine particle number (<300 nm), respirable mass, and total mass concentration, which were then related to activities within the area of extensive material handling. This activity-based monitoring showed that very fine particle number concentrations (<300 nm) had no apparent correlation to worker activities, but that sharp peaks in the respirable and total mass concentration coincided with loading a hopper and replacing nanomaterial collection bags. These findings were consistent with those from the filter-based method in that they

  8. Distinguishing Between Site Waste, Natural, and Other Sources of Contamination at Uranium and Thorium Contaminated Sites - 12274

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, David C.

    2012-07-01

    Uranium and thorium processing and milling sites generate wastes (source, byproduct, or technically enhanced naturally occurring material), that contain contaminants that are similar to naturally occurring radioactive material deposits and other industry wastes. This can lead to mis-identification of other materials as Site wastes. A review of methods used by the US Army Corps of Engineers and the Environmental Protection Agency to distinguish Site wastes from potential other sources, enhanced materials, and natural deposits, at three different thorium mills was conducted. Real case examples demonstrate the importance of understanding the methods of distinguishing wastes. Distinguishing between Site wastes and enhanced Background material can be facilitated by establishing and applying a formal process. Significant project cost avoidance may be realized by distinguishing Site wastes from enhanced NORM. Collection of information on other potential sources of radioactive material and physical information related to the potential for other radioactive material sources should be gathered and reported in the Historical Site Assessment. At a minimum, locations of other such information should be recorded. Site decision makers should approach each Site area with the expectation that non site related radioactive material may be present and have a process in place to distinguish from Site and non Site related materials. (authors)

  9. Distinguishing the Chinese materia medica Tiepishihu from similar Dendrobium species of the same genus using histological and microscopic method.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kun-Zi; Yan, Hua; Tai, Hai-Chuan; Zhang, Nan-Ping; Cheng, Xian-Long; Guo, Zeng-Xi; Ma, Shuang-Cheng; Wei, Feng

    2017-03-17

    The Chinese Materia Medica, Tiepishihu, used as a tonic for over one thousand years, is a well-known precious medicine in China. According to the Chinese Pharmacopoeia, its source is the species Dendrobium officinale Kimura et Migo, which is distinguished from other species in Dendrobium genus. However, these species from the same genus are similar with Tiepishihu and caused confusion in the market. To find a quick and simple method to distinguish Tiepishihu from other similar species, histologic and microscopic methods were combined together to investigate the transverse section of stem of Tiepishihu and other similar species. Phloroglucinol test solution with hydrochloric acid was used to reveal the lignified tissue by staining the transverse section of Tiepishihu and similar species. Results revealed the unique identification characteristics to distinguish Tiepishihu from similar species, which were difficult to distinguish by other methods. The identification characteristics of Tiepishihu include the cells of vascular bundle sheath were stained red, parenchyma cells were not stained red. What's more, other species can be distinguished from each other with microscopic and histological characteristics. These characteristics proved stable and can be easily observed by normal light microscopic examination. This method is rapid, accurate, stable, and inexpensive.

  10. Children with postsurgical capillary leak syndrome can be distinguished by antigen expression on neutrophils and monocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnok, Attila; Pipek, Michal; Valet, Guenter; Richter, Jacqueline; Hambsch, Joerg; Schneider, Peter

    1999-04-01

    Our initial studies indicate that children who develop post- operative capillary leak syndrome (CLS) following cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) can be distinguished based on their pre-operative level of circulating cytokines an adhesion molecules. We tested flow cytometric analysis of surface antigen expression as a potential assay for risk assessment of CLS. 24th preoperative blood samples were stained with monoclonal antibodies for the adhesion molecules ICAM-1, LFA1, MAC1, (beta) -integrin, activation markers CD25, CD54, CD69, HLA- DR, CD14 or CD4. Cells were measured on a dual-laser flow cytometer calibrated with microbeads. Antigen expression was detected as mean fluorescence intensity. The data indicate, that neutrophils of CLS patients express preoperatively higher levels of LFA1 and monocytes higher levels of HLA-DR and activation markers thus are in a state of activation. This could in combination with surgical trauma and CPB lead to their additional stimulation and migration into sites of inflammation and induce postoperative CLS. It is planned to set up a Flow-Classification program for individual risk assessment. By discriminate analysis over 80 percent of the patients were correctly classified. Our preliminary study indicates that flow cytometry with its low samples requirements and rapid access of the results could be a powerful tool to perform risk assessment prior to pediatric open heart surgery.

  11. Owning an Overweight or Underweight Body: Distinguishing the Physical, Experienced and Virtual Body

    PubMed Central

    Piryankova, Ivelina V.; Wong, Hong Yu; Linkenauger, Sally A.; Stinson, Catherine; Longo, Matthew R.; Bülthoff, Heinrich H.; Mohler, Betty J.

    2014-01-01

    Our bodies are the most intimately familiar objects we encounter in our perceptual environment. Virtual reality provides a unique method to allow us to experience having a very different body from our own, thereby providing a valuable method to explore the plasticity of body representation. In this paper, we show that women can experience ownership over a whole virtual body that is considerably smaller or larger than their physical body. In order to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying body ownership, we use an embodiment questionnaire, and introduce two new behavioral response measures: an affordance estimation task (indirect measure of body size) and a body size estimation task (direct measure of body size). Interestingly, after viewing the virtual body from first person perspective, both the affordance and the body size estimation tasks indicate a change in the perception of the size of the participant's experienced body. The change is biased by the size of the virtual body (overweight or underweight). Another novel aspect of our study is that we distinguish between the physical, experienced and virtual bodies, by asking participants to provide affordance and body size estimations for each of the three bodies separately. This methodological point is important for virtual reality experiments investigating body ownership of a virtual body, because it offers a better understanding of which cues (e.g. visual, proprioceptive, memory, or a combination thereof) influence body perception, and whether the impact of these cues can vary between different setups. PMID:25083784

  12. Evaluation of rules to distinguish unique female grizzly bears with cubs in Yellowstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwartz, C.C.; Haroldson, M.A.; Cherry, S.; Keating, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    The United States Fish and Wildlife Service uses counts of unduplicated female grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) with cubs-of-the-year to establish limits of sustainable mortality in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, USA. Sightings are dustered into observations of unique bears based on an empirically derived rule set. The method has never been tested or verified. To evaluate the rule set, we used data from radiocollared females obtained during 1975-2004 to simulate populations under varying densities, distributions, and sighting frequencies. We tested individual rules and rule-set performance, using custom software to apply the rule-set and duster sightings. Results indicated most rules were violated to some degree, and rule-based dustering consistently underestimated the minimum number of females and total population size derived from a nonparametric estimator (Chao2). We conclude that the current rule set returns conservative estimates, but with minor improvements, counts of unduplicated females-with-cubs can serve as a reasonable index of population size useful for establishing annual mortality limits. For the Yellowstone population, the index is more practical and cost-effective than capture-mark-recapture using either DNA hair snagging or aerial surveys with radiomarked bears. The method has useful application in other ecosystems, but we recommend rules used to distinguish unique females be adapted to local conditions and tested.

  13. DISTINGUISHING COMPACT BINARY POPULATION SYNTHESIS MODELS USING GRAVITATIONAL WAVE OBSERVATIONS OF COALESCING BINARY BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, Simon; Ohme, Frank; Fairhurst, Stephen

    2015-09-01

    The coalescence of compact binaries containing neutron stars or black holes is one of the most promising signals for advanced ground-based laser interferometer gravitational-wave (GW) detectors, with the first direct detections expected over the next few years. The rate of binary coalescences and the distribution of component masses is highly uncertain, and population synthesis models predict a wide range of plausible values. Poorly constrained parameters in population synthesis models correspond to poorly understood astrophysics at various stages in the evolution of massive binary stars, the progenitors of binary neutron star and binary black hole systems. These include effects such as supernova kick velocities, parameters governing the energetics of common envelope evolution and the strength of stellar winds. Observing multiple binary black hole systems through GWs will allow us to infer details of the astrophysical mechanisms that lead to their formation. Here we simulate GW observations from a series of population synthesis models including the effects of known selection biases, measurement errors and cosmology. We compare the predictions arising from different models and show that we will be able to distinguish between them with observations (or the lack of them) from the early runs of the advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors. This will allow us to narrow down the large parameter space for binary evolution models.

  14. Actin binding domain of filamin distinguishes posterior from anterior actin filaments in migrating Dictyostelium cells

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Keitaro; Nagasaki, Akira; Adachi, Hiroyuki; Uyeda, Taro Q. P.

    2016-01-01

    Actin filaments in different parts of a cell interact with specific actin binding proteins (ABPs) and perform different functions in a spatially regulated manner. However, the mechanisms of those spatially-defined interactions have not been fully elucidated. If the structures of actin filaments differ in different parts of a cell, as suggested by previous in vitro structural studies, ABPs may distinguish these structural differences and interact with specific actin filaments in the cell. To test this hypothesis, we followed the translocation of the actin binding domain of filamin (ABDFLN) fused with photoswitchable fluorescent protein (mKikGR) in polarized Dictyostelium cells. When ABDFLN-mKikGR was photoswitched in the middle of a polarized cell, photoswitched ABDFLN-mKikGR rapidly translocated to the rear of the cell, even though actin filaments were abundant in the front. The speed of translocation (>3 μm/s) was much faster than that of the retrograde flow of cortical actin filaments. Rapid translocation of ABDFLN-mKikGR to the rear occurred normally in cells lacking GAPA, the only protein, other than actin, known to bind ABDFLN. We suggest that ABDFLN recognizes a certain feature of actin filaments in the rear of the cell and selectively binds to them, contributing to the posterior localization of filamin.

  15. Trace element chemistry of zircons from oceanic crust: A method for distinguishing detrital zircon provenance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimes, Craig B.; John, Barbara E.; Kelemen, P.B.; Mazdab, F.K.; Wooden, J.L.; Cheadle, Michael J.; Hanghoj, K.; Schwartz, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    We present newly acquired trace element compositions for more than 300 zircon grains in 36 gabbros formed at the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic and Southwest Indian Ridges. Rare earth element patterns for zircon from modern oceanic crust completely overlap with those for zircon crystallized in continental granitoids. However, plots of U versus Yb and U/Yb versus Hf or Y discriminate zircons crystallized in oceanic crust from continental zircon, and provide a relatively robust method for distinguishing zircons from these environments. Approximately 80% of the modern ocean crust zircons are distinct from the field defined by more than 1700 continental zircons from Archean and Phanerozoic samples. These discrimination diagrams provide a new tool for fingerprinting ocean crust zircons derived from reservoirs like that of modern mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) in both modern and ancient detrital zircon populations. Hadean detrital zircons previously reported from the Acasta Gneiss, Canada, and the Narryer Gneiss terrane, Western Australia, plot in the continental granitoid field, supporting hypotheses that at least some Hadean detrital zircons crystallized in continental crust forming magmas and not from a reservoir like modern MORB. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  16. Not simply more of the same: distinguishing between patient heterogeneity and parameter uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Vemer, Pepijn; Goossens, Lucas M A; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P M H

    2014-11-01

    In cost-effectiveness (CE) Markov models, heterogeneity in the patient population is not automatically taken into account. We aimed to compare methods of dealing with heterogeneity on estimates of CE, using a case study in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We first present a probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PSA) in which we sampled only from distributions representing parameter uncertainty. This ignores any heterogeneity. Next, we explored heterogeneity by presenting results for subgroups, using a method that samples parameter uncertainty simultaneously with heterogeneity in a single-loop PSA. Finally, we distinguished parameter uncertainty from heterogeneity in a double-loop PSA by performing a nested simulation within each PSA iteration. Point estimates and uncertainty differed substantially between methods. The incremental CE ratio (ICER) ranged from € 4900 to € 13,800. The single-loop PSA led to a substantially different shape of the CE plane and an overestimation of the uncertainty compared with the other 3 methods. The CE plane for the double-loop PSA showed substantially less uncertainty and a stronger negative correlation between the difference in costs and the difference in effects compared with the other methods. This came at the cost of higher calculation times. Not accounting for heterogeneity, subgroup analysis and the double-loop PSA can be viable options, depending on the decision makers' information needs. The single-loop PSA should not be used in CE research. It disregards the fundamental differences between heterogeneity and sampling uncertainty and overestimates uncertainty as a result.

  17. Dog experts' brains distinguish socially relevant body postures similarly in dogs and humans.

    PubMed

    Kujala, Miiamaaria V; Kujala, Jan; Carlson, Synnöve; Hari, Riitta

    2012-01-01

    We read conspecifics' social cues effortlessly, but little is known about our abilities to understand social gestures of other species. To investigate the neural underpinnings of such skills, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study the brain activity of experts and non-experts of dog behavior while they observed humans or dogs either interacting with, or facing away from a conspecific. The posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) of both subject groups dissociated humans facing toward each other from humans facing away, and in dog experts, a distinction also occurred for dogs facing toward vs. away in a bilateral area extending from the pSTS to the inferior temporo-occipital cortex: the dissociation of dog behavior was significantly stronger in expert than control group. Furthermore, the control group had stronger pSTS responses to humans than dogs facing toward a conspecific, whereas in dog experts, the responses were of similar magnitude. These findings suggest that dog experts' brains distinguish socially relevant body postures similarly in dogs and humans.

  18. Can Big Five Facets Distinguish between Hedonic and Eudaimonic Well-Being? A Dominance Analysis.

    PubMed

    Marrero, Rosario J; Rey, Mar; Hernández-Cabrera, Juan Andrés

    2016-11-22

    In this study, the aim was to analyze the relative importance of Five-Factor Model (FFM) personality facets for eudaimonic or psychological well-being (PWB) and hedonic or subjective well-being (SWB) through dominance analyses. The participants were 1,403 adult residents of Spain (mean age 37.2 years, SD = 13.9). As expected, facets captured a substantial proportion of the variance in PWB and SWB, with PWB being better predicted than SWB (explaining around 36-55% of the variance of PWB vs. 25% of the variance of SWB). Some facets were common to both types of well-being such as depression (explaining between 5-33% of the variance), vulnerability (explaining between 4-21% of the variance), positive emotions (explaining between 2-9% of the variance) and achievement striving (explaining between 2-10% of the variance), whereas others made a unique contribution according to type of well-being. Certain facets had a greater relative importance for women's well-being -e.g., positive emotions explained 9% of the variance of self-acceptance for women vs. 3% for men- and others for men's well-being -e.g., achievement striving explained 9% of the variance of personal growth for men vs. 2% for women-. The present results contribute to the literature by identifying which Big Five facets showed greater relative importance in explaining and distinguishing between PWB and SWB for women and men.

  19. Vortex Imprints at the Wall, But Not in the Bulk, Distinguish Ruptured from Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varble, Nicole; Meng, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Intracranial aneurysms affect 3% of the population. Risk stratification of aneurysms is important, as rupture often leads to death or permanent disability. Image-based CFD analyses of patient-specific aneurysms have identified low and oscillatory wall shear stress to predict rupture. These stresses are sensed biologically at the luminal wall, but the flow dynamics related to aneurysm rupture requires further understanding. We have conducted two studies: one examines vortex dynamics, and the other, high frequency flow fluctuations in patient-specific aneurysms. In the first study, based on Q-criterion vortex identification, we developed two measures to quantify regions within the aneurysm where rotational flow is dominate: the ratio of volume or surface area where Q >0 vs. the total aneurysmal volume or surface area, respectively termed volume vortex fraction (VVF) and surface vortex fraction (SVF). Statistical analysis of 204 aneurysms shows that SVF, but not VVF, distinguishes ruptured from unruptured aneurysms, suggesting that once again, the local flow patterns on the wall is directly relevant to rupture. In the second study, high-resolution CFD (high spatial and temporal resolutions and second-order discretization schemes) on 56 middle cerebral artery aneurysms shows the presence of temporal fluctuations in 8 aneurysms, but such flow instability bears no correlation with rupture. Support for this work was partially provided by NIH grant (R01 NS091075-01) and a grant from Toshiba Medical Systems Corp.

  20. Number of patient-reported allergies helps distinguish epilepsy from psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Nathaniel M; Larimer, Phillip; Bourgeois, James A; Lowenstein, Daniel H

    2016-02-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are relatively common, accounting for 5-40% of visits to tertiary epilepsy centers. Inpatient video-electroencephalogram (vEEG) monitoring is the gold standard for diagnosis, but additional positive predictive tools are necessary given vEEG's relatively scarce availability. In this study, we investigated if the number of patient-reported allergies distinguishes between PNES and epilepsy. Excessive allergy-reporting, like PNES, may reflect somatization. Using electronic medical records, ICD-9 codes, and text-identification algorithms to search EEG reports, we identified 905 cases of confirmed PNES and 5187 controls with epilepsy but no PNES. Patients with PNES averaged more self-reported allergies than patients with epilepsy alone (1.93 vs. 1.00, p<0.001). Compared to those with no allergies, each additional allergy linearly increased the percentage of patients with PNES by 2.98% (R(2)=0.71) such that with ≥12 allergies, 12/28 patients (42.8%) had PNES compared to 349/3368 (11.6%) of the population with no allergies (odds ratio=6.49). This relationship remained unchanged with logistic regression analysis. We conclude that long allergy lists may help identify patients with PNES. We hypothesize that a tendency to inaccurately self-report allergies reflects a maladaptive externalization of psychologic distress and that a similar mechanism may be responsible for PNES in some patients with somatic symptom disorder.