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Sample records for repair enzyme endonuclease

  1. Conserved structural chemistry for incision activity in structurally non-homologous apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease APE1 and endonuclease IV DNA repair enzymes.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Shin, David S.; Mol, Clifford D.; Izum, Tadahide; Arvai, Andrew S.; Mantha, Anil K.; Szczesny, Bartosz; Ivanov, Ivaylo N.; Hosfield, David J.; Maiti, Buddhadev; Pique, Mike E.; Frankel, Kenneth A.; Hitomi, Kenichi; Cunningham, Richard P.; Mitra, Sankar; Tainer, John A.

    2013-03-22

    Non-coding apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites in DNA form spontaneously and as DNA base excision repair intermediates are the most common toxic and mutagenic in vivo DNA lesion. For repair, AP sites must be processed by 5' AP endonucleases in initial stages of base repair. Human APE1 and bacterial Nfo represent the two conserved 5' AP endonuclease families in the biosphere; they both recognize AP sites and incise the phosphodiester backbone 5' to the lesion, yet they lack similar structures and metal ion requirements. Here, we determined and analyzed crystal structures of a 2.4 ? resolution APE1-DNA product complex with Mg(2+) and a 0.92 Nfo with three metal ions. Structural and biochemical comparisons of these two evolutionarily distinct enzymes characterize key APE1 catalytic residues that are potentially functionally similar to Nfo active site components, as further tested and supported by computational analyses. We observe a magnesium-water cluster in the APE1 active site, with only Glu-96 forming the direct protein coordination to the Mg(2+). Despite differences in structure and metal requirements of APE1 and Nfo, comparison of their active site structures surprisingly reveals strong geometric conservation of the catalytic reaction, with APE1 catalytic side chains positioned analogously to Nfo metal positions, suggesting surprising functional equivalence between Nfo metal ions and APE1 residues. The finding that APE1 residues are positioned to substitute for Nfo metal ions is supported by the impact of mutations on activity. Collectively, the results illuminate the activities of residues, metal ions, and active site features for abasic site endonucleases.

  2. Novel DNA binding motifs in the DNA repair enzyme endonuclease III crystal structure.

    PubMed Central

    Thayer, M M; Ahern, H; Xing, D; Cunningham, R P; Tainer, J A

    1995-01-01

    The 1.85 A crystal structure of endonuclease III, combined with mutational analysis, suggests the structural basis for the DNA binding and catalytic activity of the enzyme. Helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) and [4Fe-4S] cluster loop (FCL) motifs, which we have named for their secondary structure, bracket the cleft separating the two alpha-helical domains of the enzyme. These two novel DNA binding motifs and the solvent-filled pocket in the cleft between them all lie within a positively charged and sequence-conserved surface region. Lys120 and Asp138, both shown by mutagenesis to be catalytically important, lie at the mouth of this pocket, suggesting that this pocket is part of the active site. The positions of the HhH motif and protruding FCL motif, which contains the DNA binding residue Lys191, can accommodate B-form DNA, with a flipped-out base bound within the active site pocket. The identification of HhH and FCL sequence patterns in other DNA binding proteins suggests that these motifs may be a recurrent structural theme for DNA binding proteins. Images PMID:7664751

  3. Cloning and expression of APE, the cDNA encoding the major human apurinic endonuclease: definition of a family of DNA repair enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Demple, B; Herman, T; Chen, D S

    1991-01-01

    Abasic (AP) sites are common, potentially mutagenic DNA damages that are attacked by AP endonucleases. The biological roles of these enzymes in metazoans have not been tested. We have cloned the human cDNA (APE) that encodes the main nuclear AP endonuclease. The predicted Ape protein, which contains likely nuclear transport signals, is a member of a family of DNA repair enzymes that includes two bacterial AP endonucleases (ExoA protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae and exonuclease III of Escherichia coli) and Rrp1 protein of Drosophila melanogaster. Purified Ape protein lacks the 3'-exonuclease activity against undamaged DNA that is found in the bacterial and Drosophila enzymes, but the lack of obvious amino acid changes to account for this difference suggests that the various enzyme functions evolved by fine tuning a conserved active site. Expression of the active human enzyme in AP endonuclease-deficient E. coli conferred significant resistance to killing by the DNA-alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate. The APE cDNA provides a molecular tool for analyzing the role of this central enzyme in maintaining genetic stability in humans. Images PMID:1722334

  4. Endonucleases involved in repair and recombination of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Linn, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    When our DOE support began as a contract in 1970, from the AEC, it was our intent to begin to understand how several enzymes which we had detected in E. coli might be involved in DNA recombination and repair. These studies led to our characterization of the recBC DNase (exonuclease 5) as well as endonucleases 3 and 5. As research supported by that contract progressed, we expanded our interests to include mammalian enzymes involved in base excision repair, most notably AP endonucleases, DNA glycosylases and DNA purine insertase. A logical next step involved the inclusion of DNA polymerases into our studies of repair. Current progress includes research on: isolation of xeroderma pigmentosum correction factors; isolation of ultraviolet (UV) endonucleases; mitochondrial repair enzymes; alkylation damage repair; comparisons of repair in normal diploid, transformed, and non-mitotic cells; and repair reactions by DNA polymerases.

  5. EXPRESSION AND BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM DNA REPAIR ENZYME, FLAP ENDONUCLEASE-1 (PfFEN-1)

    PubMed Central

    Casta, Louis J.; Buguliskis, Jeffery S.; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Taraschi, Theodore F.

    2009-01-01

    Flap Endonuclease-1 (FEN-1) is a structure-specific endonuclease that is critical for the resolution of single-stranded DNA flap intermediates that form during long patch DNA Base Excision Repair (BER). This investigation reports that Plasmodium species encode FEN-1 homologs. Protein sequence analysis revealed the N and I domains of Plasmodium falciparum (PfFEN-1) and Plasmodium yoelii (PyFEN-1) to be homologous to FEN-1 from other species. However, each possessed an extended C domain which had limited homology to apicomplexan FEN-1s and no homology to eukaryotic FEN-1s. A conserved Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) binding site was identified at an internal location rather than the extreme C-terminal location typically seen in FEN-1 from other organisms. The endonuclease and exonuclease activities of PfFEN-1 and PyFEN-1 were investigated using recombinant protein produced in Escherichia coli. Pf and PyFEN-1 possessed DNA structure-specific flap endonuclease and 5′→3′ exonuclease activities, similar to FEN-1’s from other species. Endonuclease activity was stimulated by Mg+2 or Mn+2 and inhibited by monovalent ions (>20.0 mM). A PfFEN-1 C-terminal truncation mutant lacking the terminal 250 amino acids (PfFEN-1ΔC) had endonuclease activity that was ~130-fold greater (kcat= 1.2x10−1) than full-length PfFEN-1 (kcat= 9.1x10−4) or ~240-fold greater than PyFEN-1 (kcat= 4.9x10−4) in vitro. PfFEN-1 generated a nicked DNA substrate that was ligated by recombinant Pf DNA Ligase I (PfLigI) using an in vitro DNA repair assay. Plasmodium FEN-1s have enzymatic activities similar to other species but contain extended C-termini and a more internally located PCNA binding site. PMID:17928073

  6. DNA base-excision repair enzyme apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease/redox factor-1 is increased and competent in the brain and spinal cord of individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Arif Y; Martin, Lee J

    2002-01-01

    Motor neurons degenerate in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The mechanisms for this neuronal cell death are not known, although apoptosis has been implicated. Oxidative damage to DNA and activation of p53 has been identified directly in motor neurons in cases of ALS. We evaluated whether motor neuron degeneration in ALS is associated with changes in the levels and function of the multifunctional protein apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE/Ref-1). APE/Ref-1 functions as an enzyme in the DNA base-excision repair pathway and as a redox-regulation protein for transcription factors. The protein level and localization of APE/Ref-1 are changed in ALS. Immunoblotting showed that APE/Ref-1 protein levels are increased in selectively vulnerable central nervous system (CNS) regions in individuals with ALS compared to age-matched controls. Plasmid DNA repair assay demonstrated that APE from individuals with ALS is competent in repairing apurinic (AP) sites. DNA repair function in nuclear fractions is increased significantly in ALS motor cortex and spinal cord. Immunocytochemistry and single-cell densitometry revealed that APE/Ref-1 is expressed at lower levels in control motor neurons than in ALS motor neurons, which are decreased in number by 42% in motor cortex. APE/Ref-1 is increased in the nucleus of remaining upper motor neurons in ALS, which show a 38% loss of nuclear area. APE-Ref-1 is also upregulated in astrocytes in spinal cord white matter pathways in familial ALS. We conclude that mechanisms for DNA repair are activated in ALS, supporting the possibility that DNA damage is an upstream mechanism for motor neuron degeneration in this disease.

  7. Regulation of endonuclease activity in human nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Fagbemi, Adebanke F.; Orelli, Barbara; Schärer, Orlando D.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a DNA repair pathway that is responsible for removing a variety of lesions caused by harmful UV light, chemical carcinogens, and environmental mutagens from DNA. NER involves the concerted action of over 30 proteins that sequentially recognize a lesion, excise it in the form of an oligonucleotide, and fill in the resulting gap by repair synthesis. ERCC1-XPF and XPG are structure-specific endonucleases responsible for carrying out the incisions 5′ and 3′ to the damage respectively, culminating in the release of the damaged oligonucleotide. This review focuses on the recent work that led to a greater understanding of how the activities of ERCC1-XPF and XPG are regulated in NER to prevent unwanted cuts in DNA or the persistence of gaps after incision that could result in harmful, cytotoxic DNA structures. PMID:21592868

  8. Repair of 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen monoadducts and cross-links by the Escherichia coli UvrABC endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.K.; Yeung, A.T. )

    1988-11-01

    Using an oligonucleotide model substrate, the authors observed two unusual mechanisms of UvrABC endonuclease in the repair of 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen monaddducts and cross-links. (i) UvrABC endonuclease usually incises a psoralen monadduct only on the damaged strand. However, for one of the monadducts they studied, incision on the complementary undamaged strand was also observed at a very low frequency, as though the adduct were on the thymine across from the damaged strand. Although the details of the erroneous incision are not yet know, such erroneous incision is potentially mutagenic. (ii) In cross-link repair, they observed that the UvrABC endonuclease incises the cross-linked DNA on either the furan side strand or the pyrone side strand. The incisions are not equally efficient. These data suggest that the structure of a psoralen cross-link, as seen by a repair enzyme, varies with the DNA sequence.

  9. Human repair endonuclease incises DNA at cytosine photoproducts

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, P.E.; Weiss, R.B.; Brent, T.P.; Duker, N.J.

    1987-05-01

    The nature of DNA damage by uvB and uvC irradiation was investigated using a defined sequence of human DNA. A UV-irradiated, 3'-end-labeled, 92 base pair sequence from the human alphoid segment was incubated with a purified human lymphoblast endonuclease that incises DNA at non-dimer photoproducts. Analysis by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis identified all sites of endonucleolytic incision as cytosines. These were found in regions of the DNA sequence lacking adjacent pyrimidines and therefore are neither cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers nor 6-4'-pyrimidines. Incision at cytosine photoproducts was not detected at loci corresponding to alkali-labile sites in either control or irradiated substrates. This demonstrates that the bands detected after the enzymic reactions were not the result of DNA strand breaks, base loss sites or ring-opened cytosines. The optimal wavelengths for formation of cytosine photoproducts are 270-295 nm, similar to those associated with maximal tumor yields in animal ultraviolet carcinogenesis studies. Irradiation by monochromatic 254 nm light resulted in reduced cytosine photoproduct formation. This human UV endonuclease has an apparently identical substrate specificity to E. coli endonuclease III. Both the human and bacterial enzymes incise cytosine moieties in UV irradiated DNA and modified thymines in oxidized DNA.

  10. A Flap Endonuclease (TcFEN1) Is Involved in Trypanosoma cruzi Cell Proliferation, DNA Repair, and Parasite Survival.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Ivan; Aldunate, Carmen; Valenzuela, Lucia; Sepúlveda, Sofia; Garrido, Gilda; Kemmerling, Ulrike; Cabrera, Gonzalo; Galanti, Norbel

    2016-12-09

    FLAP endonucleases (FEN) are involved both in DNA replication and repair by processing DNA intermediaries presenting a nucleotide flap using its phosphodiesterase activity. In spite of these important functions in DNA metabolism, this enzyme was not yet studied in Trypanosomatids. Trypanosoma cruzi, the ethiological agent of Chagas disease, presents two dividing cellular forms (epimastigote and amastigote) and one non-proliferative, infective form (trypomastigote). The parasite survives DNA damage produced by reactive species generated in its hosts. The activity of a T. cruzi FLAP endonuclease (TcFEN1) was determined in the three cellular forms of the parasite using a DNA substrate generated by annealing three different oligonucleotides to form a double-stranded DNA with a 5' flap in the middle. This activity showed optimal pH and temperature similar to other known FENs. The substrate cut by the flap endonuclease activity could be ligated by the parasite generating a repaired DNA product. A DNA flap endonuclease coding sequence found in the T. cruzi genome (TcFEN1) was cloned, inserted in parasite expression vectors and transfected to epimastigotes. The purified native recombinant protein showed DNA flap endonuclease activity. This endonuclease was found located in the parasite nucleus of transfected epimastigotes and its over-expression increased both parasite proliferation and survival to H2 O2 . The presence of a flap endonuclease activity in T. cruzi and its nuclear location are indicative of the participation of this enzyme in DNA processing of flap fragments during DNA replication and repair in this parasite of ancient evolutive origin. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1-11, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Endonuclease EEPD1 Is a Gatekeeper for Repair of Stressed Replication Forks*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Suk; Nickoloff, Jac A.; Wu, Yuehan; Williamson, Elizabeth A.; Sidhu, Gurjit Singh; Reinert, Brian L.; Jaiswal, Aruna S.; Srinivasan, Gayathri; Patel, Bhavita; Kong, Kimi; Burma, Sandeep; Lee, Suk-Hee; Hromas, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    Replication is not as continuous as once thought, with DNA damage frequently stalling replication forks. Aberrant repair of stressed replication forks can result in cell death or genome instability and resulting transformation to malignancy. Stressed replication forks are most commonly repaired via homologous recombination (HR), which begins with 5′ end resection, mediated by exonuclease complexes, one of which contains Exo1. However, Exo1 requires free 5′-DNA ends upon which to act, and these are not commonly present in non-reversed stalled replication forks. To generate a free 5′ end, stalled replication forks must therefore be cleaved. Although several candidate endonucleases have been implicated in cleavage of stalled replication forks to permit end resection, the identity of such an endonuclease remains elusive. Here we show that the 5′-endonuclease EEPD1 cleaves replication forks at the junction between the lagging parental strand and the unreplicated DNA parental double strands. This cleavage creates the structure that Exo1 requires for 5′ end resection and HR initiation. We observed that EEPD1 and Exo1 interact constitutively, and Exo1 repairs stalled replication forks poorly without EEPD1. Thus, EEPD1 performs a gatekeeper function for replication fork repair by mediating the fork cleavage that permits initiation of HR-mediated repair and restart of stressed forks. PMID:28049724

  12. Mutations affecting a putative MutLα endonuclease motif impact multiple mismatch repair functions

    PubMed Central

    Erdeniz, Naz; Nguyen, Megan; Deschênes, Suzanne M.; Liskay, R. Michael

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) lead to increased mutation rates and higher recombination between similar, but not identical sequences, as well as resistance to certain DNA methylating agents. Recently, a component of human MMR machinery, MutLα, has been shown to display a latent endonuclease activity. The endonuclease active site appears to include a conserved motif, DQHA(X)2E(X)4E, within the COOH-terminus of human PMS2. Substitution of the glutamic acid residue (E705) abolished the endonuclease activity and mismatch-dependent excision in vitro. Previously, we showed that the PMS2-E705K mutation and the corresponding mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were both recessive loss of function alleles for mutation avoidance in vivo. Here, we show that mutations impacting this endonuclease motif also significantly affect MMR-dependent suppression of homeologous recombination in yeast and responses to Sn1-type methylating agents in both yeast and mammalian cells. Thus, our in vivo results suggest that the endonuclease activity of MutLα is important not only in MMR-dependent mutation avoidance but also for recombination and damage response functions. PMID:17567544

  13. Conformational Dynamics of DNA Repair by Escherichia coli Endonuclease III*

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Kladova, Olga A.; Kuznetsova, Alexandra A.; Ishchenko, Alexander A.; Saparbaev, Murat K.; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli endonuclease III (Endo III or Nth) is a DNA glycosylase with a broad substrate specificity for oxidized or reduced pyrimidine bases. Endo III possesses two types of activities: N-glycosylase (hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond) and AP lyase (elimination of the 3′-phosphate of the AP-site). We report a pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of structural rearrangements of the DNA substrates and uncleavable ligands during their interaction with Endo III. Oligonucleotide duplexes containing 5,6-dihydrouracil, a natural abasic site, its tetrahydrofuran analog, and undamaged duplexes carried fluorescent DNA base analogs 2-aminopurine and 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine as environment-sensitive reporter groups. The results suggest that Endo III induces several fast sequential conformational changes in DNA during binding, lesion recognition, and adjustment to a catalytically competent conformation. A comparison of two fluorophores allowed us to distinguish between the events occurring in the damaged and undamaged DNA strand. Combining our data with the available structures of Endo III, we conclude that this glycosylase uses a multistep mechanism of damage recognition, which likely involves Gln41 and Leu81 as DNA lesion sensors. PMID:25869130

  14. Arabidopsis ARP endonuclease functions in a branched base excision DNA repair pathway completed by LIG1.

    PubMed

    Córdoba-Cañero, Dolores; Roldán-Arjona, Teresa; Ariza, Rafael R

    2011-11-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is an essential cellular defence mechanism against DNA damage, but it is poorly understood in plants. We used an assay that monitors repair of damaged bases and abasic (apurinic/apyrimidinic, AP) sites in Arabidopsis to characterize post-excision events during plant BER. We found that Apurinic endonuclease-redox protein (ARP) is the major AP endonuclease activity in Arabidopsis cell extracts, and is required for AP incision during uracil BER in vitro. Mutant plants that are deficient in ARP grow normally but are hypersensitive to 5-fluorouracil, a compound that favours mis-incorporation of uracil into DNA. We also found that, after AP incision, the choice between single-nucleotide or long-patch DNA synthesis (SN- or LP-BER) is influenced by the 5' end of the repair gap. When the 5' end is blocked and not amenable to β-elimination, the SN sub-pathway is abrogated, and repair is accomplished through LP-BER only. Finally, we provide evidence that Arabidopsis DNA ligase I (LIG1) is required for both SN- and LP-BER. lig1 RNAi-silenced lines show very reduced uracil BER, and anti-LIG1 antibody abolishes repair in wild-type cell extracts. In contrast, knockout lig4(-/-) mutants exhibit normal BER and nick ligation levels. Our results suggest that a branched BER pathway completed by a member of the DNA ligase I family may be an ancient feature in eukaryotic species.

  15. Human Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease (APE1) Is Acetylated at DNA Damage Sites in Chromatin, and Acetylation Modulates Its DNA Repair Activity

    PubMed Central

    Roychoudhury, Shrabasti; Nath, Somsubhra; Song, Heyu; Hegde, Muralidhar L.; Bellot, Larry J.; Mantha, Anil K.; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Ray, Sutapa; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, the most frequently formed DNA lesions in the genome, inhibit transcription and block replication. The primary enzyme that repairs AP sites in mammalian cells is the AP endonuclease (APE1), which functions through the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Although the mechanism by which APE1 repairs AP sites in vitro has been extensively investigated, it is largely unknown how APE1 repairs AP sites in cells. Here, we show that APE1 is acetylated (AcAPE1) after binding to the AP sites in chromatin and that AcAPE1 is exclusively present on chromatin throughout the cell cycle. Positive charges of acetylable lysine residues in the N-terminal domain of APE1 are essential for chromatin association. Acetylation-mediated neutralization of the positive charges of the lysine residues in the N-terminal domain of APE1 induces a conformational change; this in turn enhances the AP endonuclease activity of APE1. In the absence of APE1 acetylation, cells accumulated AP sites in the genome and showed higher sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Thus, mammalian cells, unlike Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Escherichia coli cells, require acetylation of APE1 for the efficient repair of AP sites and base damage in the genome. Our study reveals that APE1 acetylation is an integral part of the BER pathway for maintaining genomic integrity. PMID:27994014

  16. Collaborative effects of Photobacterium CuZn superoxide dismutase (SODs) and human AP endonuclease in DNA repair and SOD-deficient Escherichia coli under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Gon

    2004-01-15

    The defenses against free radical damage include specialized repair enzymes that correct oxidative damage in DNA and detoxification systems such as superoxide dismutases (SODs). These defenses may be coordinated genetically as global responses. We hypothesized that the expression of SOD and DNA repair genes would inhibit DNA damage under oxidative stress. Therefore, protection of Escherichia coli mutants deficient in SOD and DNA repair genes (sod-, xth-, and nfo-) was demonstrated by transforming the mutant strain with a plasmid pYK9 that encoded Photobacterium leiognathi CuZnSOD and human AP endonuclease. The results show that survival rates were increased in sod+ xth- nfo+ cells compared with sod- xth- ape-, sod- xth- ape-, and sod+ xth- ape- cells under oxidative stress generated with 0.1 mM paraquat or 3 mM H2O2. The data suggest that, at the least, SOD and DNA repair enzymes may collaborate on protection and repair of damaged DNA. Additionally, both enzymes are required for protection against free radicals.

  17. Cell-Autonomous Progeroid Changes in Conditional Mouse Models for Repair Endonuclease XPG Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Vermeij, Wilbert P.; Tresini, Maria; Weymaere, Michael; Menoni, Hervé; Brandt, Renata M. C.; de Waard, Monique C.; Botter, Sander M.; Sarker, Altaf H.; Jaspers, Nicolaas G. J.; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; van der Pluijm, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS), or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional) Xpg−/− mouse model which -in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background- displays many progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4–5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities) and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg−/− mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging. PMID:25299392

  18. Cell-autonomous progeroid changes in conditional mouse models for repair endonuclease XPG deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhoorn, Sander; Uittenboogaard, Lieneke M.; Jaarsma, Dick; Vermeij, Wilbert P.; Tresini, Maria; Weymaere, Michael; Menoni, Hervé; Brandt, Renata M. C.; de Waard, Monique C.; Botter, Sander M.; Sarker, Altaf H.; Jaspers, Nicolaas G. J.; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Niedernhofer, Laura J.

    2014-10-09

    As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS), or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional) Xpg-/- mouse model which—in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background—displays many progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4–5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities) and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg-/- mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging.

  19. Cell-autonomous progeroid changes in conditional mouse models for repair endonuclease XPG deficiency

    DOE PAGES

    Barnhoorn, Sander; Uittenboogaard, Lieneke M.; Jaarsma, Dick; ...

    2014-10-09

    As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS), or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional) Xpg-/- mouse model which—in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background—displays manymore » progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4–5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities) and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg-/- mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging.« less

  20. Structural and functional characterization of two unusual endonuclease III enzymes from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Sarre, Aili; Ökvist, Mats; Klar, Tobias; Hall, David R; Smalås, Arne O; McSweeney, Sean; Timmins, Joanna; Moe, Elin

    2015-08-01

    While most bacteria possess a single gene encoding the bifunctional DNA glycosylase Endonuclease III (EndoIII) in their genomes, Deinococcus radiodurans possesses three: DR2438 (DrEndoIII1), DR0289 (DrEndoIII2) and DR0982 (DrEndoIII3). Here we have determined the crystal structures of DrEndoIII1 and an N-terminally truncated form of DrEndoIII3 (DrEndoIII3Δ76). We have also generated a homology model of DrEndoIII2 and measured activity of the three enzymes. All three structures consist of two all α-helical domains, one of which exhibits a [4Fe-4S] cluster and the other a HhH-motif, separated by a DNA binding cleft, similar to previously determined structures of endonuclease III from Escherichia coli and Geobacillus stearothermophilus. However, both DrEndoIII1 and DrEndoIII3 possess an extended HhH motif with extra helical features and an altered electrostatic surface potential. In addition, the DNA binding cleft of DrEndoIII3 seems to be less accessible for DNA interactions, while in DrEndoIII1 it seems to be more open. Analysis of the enzyme activities shows that DrEndoIII2 is most similar to the previously studied enzymes, while DrEndoIII1 seems to be more distant with a weaker activity towards substrate DNA containing either thymine glycol or an abasic site. DrEndoIII3 is the most distantly related enzyme and displays no detectable activity towards these substrates even though the suggested catalytic residues are conserved. Based on a comparative structural analysis, we suggest that the altered surface potential, shape of the substrate-binding pockets and specific amino acid substitutions close to the active site and in the DNA interacting loops may underlie the unexpected differences in activity.

  1. Role of Deubiquitinating Enzymes in DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Both proteolytic and nonproteolytic functions of ubiquitination are essential regulatory mechanisms for promoting DNA repair and the DNA damage response in mammalian cells. Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) have emerged as key players in the maintenance of genome stability. In this minireview, we discuss the recent findings on human DUBs that participate in genome maintenance, with a focus on the role of DUBs in the modulation of DNA repair and DNA damage signaling. PMID:26644404

  2. Coordination of Steps in Single-nucleotide Base Excision Repair Mediated by Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease 1 and DNA Polymerase β*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Prasad, Rajendra; Beard, William A.; Kedar, Padmini S.; Hou, Esther W.; Shock, David D.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2008-01-01

    The individual steps in single-nucleotide base excision repair (SN-BER) are coordinated to enable efficient repair without accumulation of cytotoxic DNA intermediates. The DNA transactions and various proteins involved in SN-BER of abasic sites are well known in mammalian systems. Yet, despite a wealth of information on SN-BER, the mechanism of step-by-step coordination is poorly understood. In this study we conducted experiments toward understanding step-by-step coordination during BER by comparing DNA binding specificities of two major human SN-BER enzymes, apurinic/aprymidinic endonuclease 1 (APE) and DNA polymerase β (Pol β). It is known that these enzymes do not form a stable complex in solution. For each enzyme, we found that DNA binding specificity appeared sufficient to explain the sequential processing of BER intermediates. In addition, however, we identified at higher enzyme concentrations a ternary complex of APE·Pol β·DNA that formed specifically at BER intermediates containing a 5′-deoxyribose phosphate group. Formation of this ternary complex was associated with slightly stronger Pol β gap-filling and much stronger 5′-deoxyribose phosphate lyase activities than was observed with the Pol β·DNA binary complex. These results indicate that step-by-step coordination in SN-BER can rely on DNA binding specificity inherent in APE and Pol β, although coordination also may be facilitated by APE·Pol β·DNA ternary complex formation with appropriate enzyme expression levels or enzyme recruitment to sites of repair. PMID:17355977

  3. N-Butyrate alters chromatin accessibility to DNA repair enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.J.

    1986-03-01

    Current evidence suggests that the complex nature of mammalian chromatin can result in the concealment of DNA damage from repair enzymes and their co-factors. Recently it has been proposed that the acetylation of histone proteins in chromatin may provide a surveillance system whereby damaged regions of DNA become exposed due to changes in chromatin accessibility. This hypothesis has been tested by: (i) using n-butyrate to induce hyperacetylation in human adenocarcinoma (HT29) cells; (ii) monitoring the enzymatic accessibility of chromatin in permeabilised cells; (iii) measuring u.v. repair-associated nicking of DNA in intact cells and (iv) determining the effects of n-butyrate on cellular sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. The results indicate that the accessibility of chromatin to Micrococcus luteus u.v. endonuclease is enhanced by greater than 2-fold in n-butyrate-treated cells and that there is a corresponding increase in u.v. repair incision rates in intact cells exposed to the drug. Non-toxic levels of n-butyrate induce a block to G1 phase transit and there is a significant growth delay on removal of the drug. Resistance of HT29 cells to u.v.-radiation and adriamycin is enhanced in n-butyrate-treated cells whereas X-ray sensitivity is increased. Although changes in the responses of cells to DNA damaging agents must be considered in relation to the effects of n-butyrate on growth rate and cell-cycle distribution, the results are not inconsistent with the proposal that increased enzymatic-accessibility/repair is biologically favourable for the resistance of cells to u.v.-radiation damage. Overall the results support the suggested operation of a histone acetylation-based chromatin surveillance system in human cells.

  4. Structure-based virtual screening toward the discovery of novel inhibitors of the DNA repair activity of the human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Patrícia S; Estácio, Sílvia G; Antunes, Fernando; Fernandes, Ana S; Pinheiro, Pedro F; Costa, João G; Castro, Matilde; Miranda, Joana P; Guedes, Rita C; Oliveira, Nuno G

    2016-12-01

    The DNA repair activity of human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) has been recognized as a promising target for the development of small-molecule inhibitors to be used in combination with anticancer agents. In an attempt to identify novel inhibitors of APE1, we present a structure-based virtual screening (SBVS) study based on molecular docking analysis of the compounds of NCI database using the GOLD 5.1.0 (Genetic Optimization for Ligand Docking) suite of programs. Compounds selected in this screening were tested with a fluorescence-based APE1 endonuclease activity assay. Two compounds (37 and 41) were able to inhibit the multifunctional enzyme APE1 in the micromolar range, while compound 22 showed inhibitory effects at nanomolar concentrations. These results were confirmed by a plasmid DNA nicking assay. In addition, the potential APE1 inhibitors did not affect the cell viability of non-tumor MCF10A cells. Overall, compounds 22, 37, and 41 appear to be important scaffolds for the design of novel APE1 inhibitors and this study highlights the relevance of in silico-based approaches as valuable tools in drug discovery.

  5. Activation of GLP-1 Receptor Enhances Neuronal Base Excision Repair via PI3K-AKT-Induced Expression of Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease 1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jenq-Lin; Chen, Wei-Yu; Chen, Yin-Ping; Kuo, Chao-Ying; Chen, Shang-Der

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an intestinal-secreted incretin that increases cellular glucose up-take to decrease blood sugar. Recent studies, however, suggest that the function of GLP-1 is not only to decrease blood sugar, but also acts as a neurotrophic factor that plays a role in neuronal survival, neurite outgrowth, and protects synaptic plasticity and memory formation from effects of β-amyloid. Oxidative DNA damage occurs during normal neuron-activity and in many neurological diseases. Our study describes how GLP-1 affected the ability of neurons to ameliorate oxidative DNA damage. We show that activation of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) protect cortical neurons from menadione induced oxidative DNA damage via a signaling pathway involving enhanced DNA repair. GLP-1 stimulates DNA repair by activating the cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) which, consequently, induces the expression of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), a key enzyme in the base excision DNA repair (BER) pathway. In this study, APE1 expression was down-regulated as a consequence phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) suppression by the inhibitor LY294002, but not by the suppression of MEK activity. Ischemic stroke is typically caused by overwhelming oxidative-stress in brain cells. Administration of exentin-4, an analogue of GLP-1, efficiently enhanced DNA repair in brain cells of ischemic stroke rats. Our study suggests that a new function of GLP-1 is to elevate DNA repair by inducing the expression of the DNA repair protein APE1. PMID:27698937

  6. Fluorogenic DNA ligase and base excision repair enzyme assays using substrates labeled with single fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, Theo T; Roman, Steven

    2015-05-15

    Continuing our work on fluorogenic substrates labeled with single fluorophores for nucleic acid modifying enzymes, here we describe the development of such substrates for DNA ligases and some base excision repair enzymes. These substrates are hairpin-type synthetic DNA molecules with a single fluorophore located on a base close to the 3' ends, an arrangement that results in strong fluorescence quenching. When such substrates are subjected to an enzymatic reaction, the position of the dyes relative to that end of the molecules is altered, resulting in significant fluorescence intensity changes. The ligase substrates described here were 5' phosphorylated and either blunt-ended or carrying short, self-complementary single-stranded 5' extensions. The ligation reactions resulted in the covalent joining of the ends of the molecules, decreasing the quenching effect of the terminal bases on the dyes. To generate fluorogenic substrates for the base excision repair enzymes formamido-pyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (FPG), human 8-oxo-G DNA glycosylase/AP lyase (hOGG1), endonuclease IV (EndoIV), and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1), we introduced abasic sites or a modified nucleotide, 8-oxo-dG, at such positions that their enzymatic excision would result in the release of a short fluorescent fragment. This was also accompanied by strong fluorescence increases. Overall fluorescence changes ranged from approximately 4-fold (ligase reactions) to more than 20-fold (base excision repair reactions).

  7. I-SceI endonuclease: a new tool for DNA repair studies and genetic manipulations in streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Siegl, Theresa; Petzke, Lutz; Welle, Elisabeth; Luzhetskyy, Andriy

    2010-07-01

    Actinomycetes are Gram-positive bacteria with a complex life cycle. They produce many pharmaceutically relevant secondary metabolites, including antibiotics and anticancer drugs. However, there is a limited number of biotechnological applications available as opposed to genetic model organisms like Bacillus subtilis or Escherichia coli. We report here a system for the functional expression of a synthetic gene encoding the I-SceI homing endonuclease in several streptomycetes. Using the synthetic sce(a) gene, we were able to create controlled genomic DNA double-strand breaks. A mutagenesis system, based on the homing endonuclease I-SceI, has been developed to construct targeted, non-polar, unmarked gene mutations in Streptomyces sp. Tü6071. In addition, we have shown that homologous recombination is a major pathway in streptomycetes to repair an I-SceI-generated DNA double-strand break. This novel I-SceI-based tool will be useful in fundamental studies on the repair mechanism of DNA double-strand breaks and for a variety of biotechnological applications.

  8. Recruitment of the Nucleotide Excision Repair Endonuclease XPG to Sites of UV-Induced DNA Damage Depends on Functional TFIIH▿

    PubMed Central

    Zotter, Angelika; Luijsterburg, Martijn S.; Warmerdam, Daniël O.; Ibrahim, Shehu; Nigg, Alex; van Cappellen, Wiggert A.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; van Driel, Roel; Vermeulen, Wim; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.

    2006-01-01

    The structure-specific endonuclease XPG is an indispensable core protein of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) machinery. XPG cleaves the DNA strand at the 3′ side of the DNA damage. XPG binding stabilizes the NER preincision complex and is essential for the 5′ incision by the ERCC1/XPF endonuclease. We have studied the dynamic role of XPG in its different cellular functions in living cells. We have created mammalian cell lines that lack functional endogenous XPG and stably express enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)-tagged XPG. Life cell imaging shows that in undamaged cells XPG-eGFP is uniformly distributed throughout the cell nucleus, diffuses freely, and is not stably associated with other nuclear proteins. XPG is recruited to UV-damaged DNA with a half-life of 200 s and is bound for 4 min in NER complexes. Recruitment requires functional TFIIH, although some TFIIH mutants allow slow XPG recruitment. Remarkably, binding of XPG to damaged DNA does not require the DDB2 protein, which is thought to enhance damage recognition by NER factor XPC. Together, our data present a comprehensive view of the in vivo behavior of a protein that is involved in a complex chromatin-associated process. PMID:17000769

  9. A novel regulatory circuit in base excision repair involving AP endonuclease 1, Creb1 and DNA polymerase β

    PubMed Central

    Pei, De-Sheng; Yang, Xiao-Jie; Liu, Wei; Guikema, Jeroen E. J.; Schrader, Carol E.; Strauss, Phyllis R.

    2011-01-01

    DNA repair is required to maintain genome stability in stem cells and early embryos. At critical junctures, oxidative damage to DNA requires the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Since early zebrafish embryos lack the major polymerase in BER, DNA polymerase ß, repair proceeds via replicative polymerases, even though there is ample polb mRNA. Here, we report that Polb protein fails to appear at the appropriate time in development when AP endonuclease 1 (Apex), the upstream protein in BER, is knocked down. Because polb contains a Creb1 binding site, we examined whether knockdown of Apex affects creb1. Apex knockdown results in loss of Creb1 and Creb complex members but not Creb1 phosphorylation. This effect is independent of p53. Although both apex and creb1 mRNA rescue Creb1 and Polb after Apex knockdown, Apex is not a co-activator of creb1 transcription. This observation has broad significance, as similar results occur when Apex is inhibited in B cells from apex+/− mice. These results describe a novel regulatory circuit involving Apex, Creb1 and Polb and provide a mechanism for lethality of Apex loss in higher eukaryotes. PMID:21172930

  10. Large negatively charged organic host molecules as inhibitors of endonuclease enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tauran, Yannick; Anjard, Christophe; Kim, Beomjoon; Rhimi, Moez; Coleman, Anthony W

    2014-10-07

    Three large negatively charged organic host molecules; β-cyclodextrin sulphate, para-sulphonato-calix[6]arene and para-sulphonato-calix[8]arene have been shown to be effective inhibitors of endonuclease in the low micromolar range, additionally para-sulphonato-calix[8]arene is a partial inhibitor of rhDNase I.

  11. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae homologues of endonuclease III from Escherichia coli, Ntg1 and Ntg2, are both required for efficient repair of spontaneous and induced oxidative DNA damage in yeast.

    PubMed

    Alseth, I; Eide, L; Pirovano, M; Rognes, T; Seeberg, E; Bjørås, M

    1999-05-01

    Endonuclease III from Escherichia coli is the prototype of a ubiquitous DNA repair enzyme essential for the removal of oxidized pyrimidine base damage. The yeast genome project has revealed the presence of two genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, NTG1 and NTG2, encoding proteins with similarity to endonuclease III. Both contain the highly conserved helix-hairpin-helix motif, whereas only one (Ntg2) harbors the characteristic iron-sulfur cluster of the endonuclease III family. We have characterized these gene functions by mutant and enzyme analysis as well as by gene expression and intracellular localization studies. Targeted gene disruption of NTG1 and NTG2 produced mutants with greatly increased spontaneous and hydrogen peroxide-induced mutation frequency relative to the wild type, and the mutation response was further increased in the double mutant. Both enzymes were found to remove thymine glycol and 2, 6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-N-methylformamidopyrimidine (faPy) residues from DNA with high efficiency. However, on UV-irradiated DNA, saturating concentrations of Ntg2 removed only half of the cytosine photoproducts released by Ntg1. Conversely, 5-hydroxycytosine was removed efficiently only by Ntg2. The enzymes appear to have different reaction modes, as judged from much higher affinity of Ntg2 for damaged DNA and more efficient borhydride trapping of Ntg1 to abasic sites in DNA despite limited DNA binding. Northern blot and promoter fusion analysis showed that NTG1 is inducible by cell exposure to DNA-damaging agents, whereas NTG2 is constitutively expressed. Ntg2 appears to be a nuclear enzyme, whereas Ntg1 was sorted both to the nucleus and to the mitochondria. We conclude that functions of both NTG1 and NTG2 are important for removal of oxidative DNA damage in yeast.

  12. Synthetic lethal targeting of DNA double strand break repair deficient cells by human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1) inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Rebeka; McNeill, Daniel R.; Abbotts, Rachel; Mohammed, Mohammed Z.; Zdzienicka, Małgorzata Z.; Qutob, Haitham; Seedhouse, Claire; Laughton, Charles A.; Fischer, Peter M.; Patel, Poulam M.; Wilson, David M.; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    An apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site is an obligatory cytotoxic intermediate in DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) that is processed by human AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 is essential for BER and an emerging drug target in cancer. We have isolated novel small molecule inhibitors of APE1. In the current study we have investigated the ability of APE1 inhibitors to induce synthetic lethality in a panel of DNA double strand break (DSB) repair deficient and proficient cells; a) Chinese hamster (CH) cells: BRCA2 deficient (V-C8), ATM deficient (V-E5), wild type (V79) and BRCA2 revertant (V-C8(Rev1)). b) Human cancer cells: BRCA1 deficient (MDA-MB-436), BRCA1 proficient (MCF-7), BRCA2 deficient (CAPAN-1 and HeLa SilenciX cells), BRCA2 proficient (PANC1 and control SilenciX cells). We also tested synthetic lethality (SL) in CH ovary cells expressing a dominant–negative form of APE1 (E8 cells) using ATM inhibitors and DNA-PKcs inhibitors (DSB inhibitors). APE1 inhibitors are synthetically lethal in BRCA and ATM deficient cells. APE1 inhibition resulted in accumulation of DNA DSBs and G2/M cell cycle arrest. Synthetic lethality was also demonstrated in CH cells expressing a dominant–negative form of APE1 treated with ATM or DNA-PKcs inhibitors. We conclude that APE1 is a promising synthetic lethality target in cancer. PMID:22377908

  13. The DNA repair endonuclease XPG interacts directly and functionally with the WRN helicase defective in Werner syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Trego, Kelly S.; Chernikova, Sophia B.; Davalos, Albert R.; Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Finger, L. David; Ng, Cliff; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Yannone, Steven M.; Tainer, John A.; Campisi, Judith; Cooper, Priscilla K.

    2011-04-20

    XPG is a structure-specific endonuclease required for nucleotide excision repair (NER). XPG incision defects result in the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum, whereas truncating mutations of XPG cause the severe postnatal progeroid developmental disorder Cockayne syndrome. We show that XPG interacts directly with WRN protein, which is defective in the premature aging disorder Werner syndrome, and that the two proteins undergo similar sub-nuclear redistribution in S-phase and co-localize in nuclear foci. The co-localization was observed in mid- to late-S-phase, when WRN moves from nucleoli to nuclear foci that have been shown to contain protein markers of both stalled replication forks and telomeric proteins. We mapped the interaction between XPG and WRN to the C-terminal domains of each and show that interaction with the C-terminal domain of XPG strongly stimulates WRN helicase activity. WRN also possesses a competing DNA single-strand annealing activity that, combined with unwinding, has been shown to coordinate regression of model replication forks to form Holliday junction/chicken foot intermediate structures. We tested whether XPG stimulated WRN annealing activity and found that XPG itself has intrinsic strand annealing activity that requires the unstructured R- and C-terminal domains, but not the conserved catalytic core or endonuclease activity. Annealing by XPG is cooperative, rather than additive, with WRN annealing. Taken together, our results suggest a novel function for XPG in S-phase that is at least in part carried out coordinately with WRN, and which may contribute to the severity of the phenotypes that occur upon loss of XPG.

  14. Structure of the endonuclease IV homologue from Thermotoga maritima in the presence of active-site divalent metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Hughes, Ronny C.; Ng, Joseph D.; Coates, Leighton

    2010-10-05

    The most frequent lesion in DNA is at apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites resulting from DNA-base losses. These AP-site lesions can stall DNA replication and lead to genome instability if left unrepaired. The AP endonucleases are an important class of enzymes that are involved in the repair of AP-site intermediates during damage-general DNA base-excision repair pathways. These enzymes hydrolytically cleave the 5{prime}-phosphodiester bond at an AP site to generate a free 3{prime}-hydroxyl group and a 5{prime}-terminal sugar phosphate using their AP nuclease activity. Specifically, Thermotoga maritima endonuclease IV is a member of the second conserved AP endonuclease family that includes Escherichia coli endonuclease IV, which is the archetype of the AP endonuclease superfamily. In order to more fully characterize the AP endonuclease family of enzymes, two X-ray crystal structures of the T. maritima endonuclease IV homologue were determined in the presence of divalent metal ions bound in the active-site region. These structures of the T. maritima endonuclease IV homologue further revealed the use of the TIM-barrel fold and the trinuclear metal binding site as important highly conserved structural elements that are involved in DNA-binding and AP-site repair processes in the AP endonuclease superfamily.

  15. I-SceI endonuclease, a new tool for studying DNA double-strand break repair mechanisms in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Bellaiche, Y; Mogila, V; Perrimon, N

    1999-01-01

    As a step toward the development of a homologous recombination system in Drosophila, we have developed a methodology to target double-strand breaks (DSBs) to a specific position in the Drosophila genome. This method uses the mitochondrial endonuclease I-SceI that recognizes and cuts an 18-bp restriction site. We find that >6% of the progeny derived from males that carry a marker gene bordered by two I-SceI sites and that express I-SceI in their germ line lose the marker gene. Southern blot analysis and sequencing of the regions surrounding the I-SceI sites revealed that in the majority of the cases, the introduction of DSBs at the I-SceI sites resulted in the complete deletion of the marker gene; the other events were associated with partial deletion of the marker gene. We discuss a number of applications for this novel technique, in particular its use to study DSB repair mechanisms. PMID:10388822

  16. Endonuclease IV (nfo) mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, R P; Saporito, S M; Spitzer, S G; Weiss, B

    1986-01-01

    A cloned gene, designated nfo, caused overproduction of an EDTA-resistant endonuclease specific for apurinic-apyrimidinic sites in DNA. The sedimentation coefficient of the enzyme was similar to that of endonuclease IV. An insertion mutation was constructed in vitro and transferred from a plasmid to the Escherichia coli chromosome. nfo mutants had an increased sensitivity to the alkylating agents methyl methanesulfonate and mitomycin C and to the oxidants tert-butyl hydroperoxide and bleomycin. The nfo mutation enhanced the killing of xth (exonuclease III) mutants by methyl methanesulfonate, H2O2, tert-butyl hydroperoxide, and gamma rays, and it enhanced their mutability by methyl methanesulfonate. It also increased the temperature sensitivity of an xth dut (dUTPase) mutant that is defective in the repair of uracil-containing DNA. These results are consistent with earlier findings that endonuclease IV and exonuclease III both cleave DNA 5' to an apurinic-apyrimidinic site and that exonuclease III is more active. However, nfo mutants were more sensitive to tert-butyl hydroperoxide and to bleomycin than were xth mutants, suggesting that endonuclease IV might recognize some lesions that exonuclease III does not. The mutants displayed no marked increase in sensitivity to 254-nm UV radiation, and the addition of an nth (endonuclease III) mutation to nfo or nfo xth mutants did not significantly increase their sensitivity to any of the agents tested. Images PMID:2430946

  17. Structure-specific endonucleases Xpf and Mus81 play overlapping but essential roles in DNA repair by homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Koji; Narita, Takeo; Thanh Van, Pham; Iijima, Junko; Hirota, Kouji; Keka, Islam Shamima; Mohiuddin; Okawa, Katsuya; Hori, Tetsuya; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Essers, Jeroen; Kanaar, Roland; Whitby, Matthew C.; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Taniguchi, Yoshihito; Kitagawa, Katsumi; Takeda, Shunichi

    2013-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) occur frequently during replication in sister chromatids, and are dramatically increased when cells are exposed to chemotherapeutic agents including camptothecin. Such DSBs are efficiently repaired specifically by homologous recombination (HR) with the intact sister chromatid. HR hence plays pivotal roles in cellular proliferation and cellular tolerance to camptothecin. Mammalian cells carry several structure-specific endonucleases, such as Xpf-Ercc1 and Mus81-Eme1, in which Xpf and Mus81 are the essential subunits for enzymatic activity. Here we show the functional overlap between Xpf and Mus81 by conditionally inactivating Xpf in the chicken DT40 cell line, which has no Mus81 ortholog. Although mammalian cells deficient in either Xpf or Mus81 are viable, Xpf inactivation in DT40 cells was lethal, resulting in a marked increase in the number of spontaneous chromosome breaks. Similarly, inactivation of both Xpf and Mus81 in human HeLa cells and murine embryonic stem cells caused numerous spontaneous chromosome breaks. Furthermore, the phenotype of Xpf-deficient DT40 cells was reversed by ectopic expression of human Mus81-Eme1 or human Xpf-Ercc1 heterodimers. These observations indicate the functional overlap of Xpf-Ercc1 and Mus81-Eme1 in the maintenance of genomic DNA. Both Mus81-Eme1 and Xpf-Ercc1 contribute to the completion of HR as evidenced by the following data that the expression of Mus81-Eme1 or Xpf-Ercc1 diminished the number of camptothecin-induced chromosome breaks in Xpf-deficient DT40 cells, and preventing early steps in HR by deleting XRCC3 suppressed the inviability of Xpf-deficient DT40 cells. In summary, Xpf and Mus81 have a substantially overlapping function in completion of HR. PMID:23576554

  18. Photoaffinity Labeling of Mouse Fibroblast Enzymes by a Base Excision Repair Intermediate: New Evidence on the Role of PARP-1 in DNA Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Lavrik, Olga I.; Prasad, Rajendra; Sobol, Robert W.; Horton, Julie K.; Ackerman, Eric J. ); Wilson, Samuel H.

    2001-07-06

    To examine mammalian base excision repair (BER) enzymes interacting with DNA intermediates formed during BER, we used a novel photoaffinity labeling probe and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) crude extract. The probe was formed in situ, using an end-labeled oligonucleotide containing a synthetic abasic site; this site was incised by AP endonuclease creating a nick with 3' hydroxyl and 5' reduced sugar phosphate groups at the margins, and then a dNMP carrying a photoreactive adduct was introduced at the 3' hydroxyl group. With near UV-light exposure (312nm) of the extract-probe mixture, only six proteins were strongly labeled, including poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1) and the well-known BER participants flap endonuclease (FEN-1), DNA polymerase b (b-pol), and AP endonuclease (APE). The amount of probe crosslinked to PARP-1 was greater than that crosslinked to the other proteins. The specificity of PARP-1 labeling was examined by competition experiments involving various oligonucleotide competitors; competition of labeling by the probe was much greater for the BER intermediates tested than for normal double-stranded DNA. The specificity of PARP-1 labeling also was examined using DNA probes with alternate structures; PARP-1 labeling was stronger with a DNA oligomer representing a BER intermediate than with a molecule representing a nick in double-stranded DNA. These results identifying interaction of PARP-1 with a BER intermediate are discussed in light of PARP-1's role in mammalian BER.

  19. Homing endonucleases: from basics to therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Marcaida, Maria J; Muñoz, Inés G; Blanco, Francisco J; Prieto, Jesús; Montoya, Guillermo

    2010-03-01

    Homing endonucleases (HE) are double-stranded DNAses that target large recognition sites (12-40 bp). HE-encoding sequences are usually embedded in either introns or inteins. Their recognition sites are extremely rare, with none or only a few of these sites present in a mammalian-sized genome. However, these enzymes, unlike standard restriction endonucleases, tolerate some sequence degeneracy within their recognition sequence. Several members of this enzyme family have been used as templates to engineer tools to cleave DNA sequences that differ from their original wild-type targets. These custom HEs can be used to stimulate double-strand break homologous recombination in cells, to induce the repair of defective genes with very low toxicity levels. The use of tailored HEs opens up new possibilities for gene therapy in patients with monogenic diseases that can be treated ex vivo. This review provides an overview of recent advances in this field.

  20. Structural comparison of AP endonucleases from the exonuclease III family reveals new amino acid residues in human AP endonuclease 1 that are involved in incision of damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Vigouroux, Armelle; Mursalimov, Aibek; Grin, Inga; Alili, Doria; Koshenov, Zhanat; Akishev, Zhiger; Maksimenko, Andrei; Bissenbaev, Amangeldy K; Matkarimov, Bakhyt T; Saparbaev, Murat; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Moréra, Solange

    2016-01-01

    Oxidatively damaged DNA bases are substrates for two overlapping repair pathways: DNA glycosylase-initiated base excision repair (BER) and apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease-initiated nucleotide incision repair (NIR). In the BER pathway, an AP endonuclease cleaves DNA at AP sites and 3'-blocking moieties generated by DNA glycosylases, whereas in the NIR pathway, the same AP endonuclease incises DNA 5' to an oxidized base. The majority of characterized AP endonucleases possess classic BER activities, and approximately a half of them can also have a NIR activity. At present, the molecular mechanism underlying DNA substrate specificity of AP endonucleases remains unclear mainly due to the absence of a published structure of the enzyme in complex with a damaged base. To identify critical residues involved in the NIR function, we performed biochemical and structural characterization of Bacillus subtilis AP endonuclease ExoA and compared its crystal structure with the structures of other AP endonucleases: Escherichia coli exonuclease III (Xth), human APE1, and archaeal Mth212. We found conserved amino acid residues in the NIR-specific enzymes APE1, Mth212, and ExoA. Four of these positions were studied by means of point mutations in APE1: we applied substitution with the corresponding residue found in NIR-deficient E. coli Xth (Y128H, N174Q, G231S, and T268D). The APE1-T268D mutant showed a drastically decreased NIR activity and an inverted Mg(2+) dependence of the AP site cleavage activity, which is in line with the presence of an aspartic residue at the equivalent position among other known NIR-deficient AP endonucleases. Taken together, these data show that NIR is an evolutionarily conserved function in the Xth family of AP endonucleases.

  1. Identification of a mismatch-specific endonuclease in hyperthermophilic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Ishino, Sonoko; Nishi, Yuki; Oda, Soichiro; Uemori, Takashi; Sagara, Takehiro; Takatsu, Nariaki; Yamagami, Takeshi; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2016-01-01

    The common mismatch repair system processed by MutS and MutL and their homologs was identified in Bacteria and Eukarya. However, no evidence of a functional MutS/L homolog has been reported for archaeal organisms, and it is not known whether the mismatch repair system is conserved in Archaea. Here, we describe an endonuclease that cleaves double-stranded DNA containing a mismatched base pair, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The corresponding gene revealed that the activity originates from PF0012, and we named this enzyme Endonuclease MS (EndoMS) as the mismatch-specific Endonuclease. The sequence similarity suggested that EndoMS is the ortholog of NucS isolated from Pyrococcus abyssi, published previously. Biochemical characterizations of the EndoMS homolog from Thermococcus kodakarensis clearly showed that EndoMS specifically cleaves both strands of double-stranded DNA into 5′-protruding forms, with the mismatched base pair in the central position. EndoMS cleaves G/T, G/G, T/T, T/C and A/G mismatches, with a more preference for G/T, G/G and T/T, but has very little or no effect on C/C, A/C and A/A mismatches. The discovery of this endonuclease suggests the existence of a novel mismatch repair process, initiated by the double-strand break generated by the EndoMS endonuclease, in Archaea and some Bacteria. PMID:27001046

  2. Oxidative stress alters base excision repair pathway and increases apoptotic response in Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/Redox factor-1 haploinsufficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Unnikrishnan, Archana; Raffoul, Julian J.; Patel, Hiral V.; Prychitko, Thomas M.; Anyangwe, Njwen; Meira, Lisiane B.; Friedberg, Errol C.; Cabelof, Diane C.; Heydari, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is the redox regulator of multiple stress-inducible transcription factors, such as NF-κB, and the major 5’-endonuclease in base excision repair (BER). We utilized mice containing heterozygous gene-targeted deletion of APE1/Ref-1 (Apex+/-) to determine the impact of APE1/Ref-1 haploinsufficiency on the processing of oxidative DNA damage induced by 2-nitropropane (2-NP) in the liver tissue of mice. APE1/Ref-1 haploinsufficiency results in a significant decline in NF-κB DNA binding activity in response to oxidative stress in liver. In addition, loss of APE1/Ref-1 increases the apoptotic response to oxidative stress where a significant increase in GADD45g expression, p53 protein stability and caspase activity are observed. Oxidative stress displays a differential impact on monofunctional (UDG) and bifunctional (OGG1) DNA glycosylase initiated BER in liver of Apex+/- mice. APE1/Ref-1 haploinsufficiency results in a significant decline in the repair of oxidized bases (e.g., 8-OHdG), while removal of uracil is increased in liver nuclear extracts of mice using an in vitro BER assay. Apex+/- mice exposed to 2-NP displayed a significant decline in 3’-OH-containing single-strand breaks and an increase in aldehydic lesions in their liver DNA suggesting an accumulation of repair intermediates of failed bifunctional DNA glycosylase initiated BER. PMID:19268524

  3. Arabidopsis ZDP DNA 3'-phosphatase and ARP endonuclease function in 8-oxoG repair initiated by FPG and OGG1 DNA glycosylases.

    PubMed

    Córdoba-Cañero, Dolores; Roldán-Arjona, Teresa; Ariza, Rafael R

    2014-09-01

    Oxidation of guanine in DNA generates 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), an ubiquitous lesion with mutagenic properties. 8-oxoG is primarily removed by DNA glycosylases distributed in two families, typified by bacterial Fpg proteins and eukaryotic Ogg1 proteins. Interestingly, plants possess both Fpg and Ogg1 homologs but their relative contributions to 8-oxoG repair remain uncertain. In this work we used Arabidopsis cell-free extracts to monitor 8-oxoG repair in wild-type and mutant plants. We found that both FPG and OGG1 catalyze excision of 8-oxoG in Arabidopsis cell extracts by a DNA glycosylase/lyase mechanism, and generate repair intermediates with blocked 3'-termini. An increase in oxidative damage is detected in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA from double fpg ogg1 mutants, but not in single mutants, which suggests that a single deficiency in one of these DNA glycosylases may be compensated by the other. We also found that the DNA 3'-phosphatase ZDP (zinc finger DNA 3'-phosphoesterase) and the AP(apurinic/apyirmidinic) endonuclease ARP(apurinic endonuclease redox protein) are required in the 8-oxoG repair pathway to process the 3'-blocking ends generated by FPG and OGG1. Furthermore, deficiencies in ZDP and/or ARP decrease germination ability after seed deteriorating conditions. Altogether, our results suggest that Arabidopsis cells use both FPG and OGG1 to repair 8-oxoG in a pathway that requires ZDP and ARP in downstream steps.

  4. Enhancement of DNA repair using topical T4 endonuclease V does not inhibit melanoma formation in Cdk4(R24C/R24C)/Tyr-Nras(Q61K) mice following neonatal UVR.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Elke; Muller, H Konrad; Hayward, Nicholas; Fahey, Paul; Walker, Graeme

    2010-02-01

    To further investigate the use of DNA repair-enhancing agents for skin cancer prevention, we treated Cdk4(R24C/R24C)/Nras(Q61K) mice topically with the T4 endonuclease V DNA repair enzyme (known as Dimericine) immediately prior to neonatal ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure, which has a powerful effect in exacerbating melanoma development in the mouse model. Dimericine has been shown to reduce the incidence of basal-cell and squamous cell carcinoma. Unexpectedly, we saw no difference in penetrance or age of onset of melanoma after neonatal UVR between Dimericine-treated and control animals, although the drug reduced DNA damage and cellular proliferation in the skin. Interestingly, epidermal melanocytes removed cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) more efficiently than surrounding keratinocytes. Our study indicates that neonatal UVR-initiated melanomas may be driven by mechanisms other than solely that of a large CPD load and/or their inefficient repair. This is further suggestive of different mechanisms by which UVR may enhance the transformation of keratinocytes and melanocytes.

  5. Polyphosphate present in DNA preparations from fungal species of Collectotrichum inhibits restriction endonucleases and other enzymes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    During the development of a procedure for the isolation of total genomic DNA from filamentous fungi (Rodriguez, R. J., and Yoder, 0. C., Exp. Mycol. 15, 232-242, 1991) a cell fraction was isolated which inhibited the digestion of DNA by restriction enzymes. After elimination of DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids, the active compound was purified by gel filtration to yield a single fraction capable of complete inhibition of restriction enzyme activity. The inhibitor did not absorb uv light above 220 nm, and was resistant to alkali and acid at 25°C and to temperatures as high as 100°C. More extensive analyses demonstrated that the inhibitor was also capable of inhibiting T4 DNA ligase and TaqI DNA polymerase, but not DNase or RNase. Chemical analyses indicated that the inhibitor was devoid of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids but rich in phosphorus. A combination of nuclear magnetic resonance, metachromatic shift of toluidine blue, and gel filtration indicated that the inhibitor was a polyphosphate (polyP) containing approximately 60 phosphate molecules. The mechanism of inhibition appeared to involve complexing of polyP to the enzymatic proteins. All species of Colletotrichum analyzed produced polyP equivalent in chain length and concentration. A modification to the original DNA extraction procedure is described which eliminates polyP and reduces the time necessary to obtain DNA of sufficient purity for restriction enzyme digestion and TaqI polymerase amplification.

  6. UV radiation effects on a DNA repair enzyme: conversion of a [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster into a [2Fe-2S] (2+).

    PubMed

    Folgosa, Filipe; Camacho, Inês; Penas, Daniela; Guilherme, Márcia; Fróis, João; Ribeiro, Paulo A; Tavares, Pedro; Pereira, Alice S

    2015-03-01

    Organisms are often exposed to different types of ionizing radiation that, directly or not, will promote damage to DNA molecules and/or other cellular structures. Because of that, organisms developed a wide range of response mechanisms to deal with these threats. Endonuclease III is one of the enzymes responsible to detect and repair oxidized pyrimidine base lesions. However, the effect of radiation on the structure/function of these enzymes is not clear yet. Here, we demonstrate the effect of UV-C radiation on E. coli endonuclease III through several techniques, namely UV-visible, fluorescence and Mössbauer spectroscopies, as well as SDS-PAGE and electrophoretic mobility shift assay. We demonstrate that irradiation with a UV-C source has dramatic consequences on the absorption, fluorescence, structure and functionality of the protein, affecting its [4Fe-4S] cluster and its DNA-binding ability, which results in its inactivation. An UV-C radiation-induced conversion of the [4Fe-4S](2+) into a [2Fe-2S](2+) was observed for the first time and proven by Mössbauer and UV-visible analysis. This work also shows that the DNA-binding capability of endonuclease III is highly dependent of the nuclearity of the endogenous iron-sulfur cluster. Thus, from our point of view, in a cellular context, these results strengthen the argument that cellular sensitivity to radiation can also be due to loss of radiation-induced damage repair ability.

  7. Antibody to a human DNA repair protein allows for cloning of a Drosophila cDNA that encodes an apurinic endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, M.R. ); Venugopal, S.; Harless, J.; Deutsch, W.A. . Dept. of Biochemistry)

    1989-03-01

    The cDNA of a Drosophila DNA repair gene, AP3, was cloned by screening an embryonic lambda gt11 expression library with an antibody that was originally prepared against a purified human apurinicapyrimidine (AP) endonuclease. The 1.2-kilobase (kb) AP3 cDNA mapped to a region on the third chromosome where a number of mutagen-sensitive alleles were located. The cDNA clone yielded an in vitro translation product of 35,000 daltons, in agreement with the predicted size of the translation product of the only open reading frame of AP3, and identical to the molecular size of an AP endonuclease activity recovered following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrymalide gel electrophoresis of Drosophilia extracts. The C-terminal portion of the predicted protein contained regions of presumptive DNA-binding domains, while the DNA sequence at the amino end of AP3 showed similarity to the Escherichia coli recA gene. AP3 is expressed as an abundant 1.3-kb mRNA that is detected throughout the life cycle of Drosophila melanogaster. Another 3.5-klb mRNA also hybridized to the AP3 cDNA, but species was restricted to the early stages of development.

  8. Fractured genes: a novel genomic arrangement involving new split inteins and a new homing endonuclease family.

    PubMed

    Dassa, Bareket; London, Nir; Stoddard, Barry L; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Pietrokovski, Shmuel

    2009-05-01

    Inteins are genetic elements, inserted in-frame into protein-coding genes, whose products catalyze their removal from the protein precursor via a protein-splicing reaction. Intein domains can be split into two fragments and still ligate their flanks by a trans-protein-splicing reaction. A bioinformatic analysis of environmental metagenomic data revealed 26 different loci with a novel genomic arrangement. In each locus, a conserved enzyme coding region is broken in two by a split intein, with a free-standing endonuclease gene inserted in between. Eight types of DNA synthesis and repair enzymes have this 'fractured' organization. The new types of naturally split-inteins were analyzed in comparison to known split-inteins. Some loci include apparent gene control elements brought in with the endonuclease gene. A newly predicted homing endonuclease family, related to very-short patch repair (Vsr) endonucleases, was found in half of the loci. These putative homing endonucleases also appear in group-I introns, and as stand-alone inserts in the absence of surrounding intervening sequences. The new fractured genes organization appears to be present mainly in phage, shows how endonucleases can integrate into inteins, and may represent a missing link in the evolution of gene breaking in general, and in the creation of split-inteins in particular.

  9. Fractured genes: a novel genomic arrangement involving new split inteins and a new homing endonuclease family

    PubMed Central

    Dassa, Bareket; London, Nir; Stoddard, Barry L.; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Pietrokovski, Shmuel

    2009-01-01

    Inteins are genetic elements, inserted in-frame into protein-coding genes, whose products catalyze their removal from the protein precursor via a protein-splicing reaction. Intein domains can be split into two fragments and still ligate their flanks by a trans-protein-splicing reaction. A bioinformatic analysis of environmental metagenomic data revealed 26 different loci with a novel genomic arrangement. In each locus, a conserved enzyme coding region is broken in two by a split intein, with a free-standing endonuclease gene inserted in between. Eight types of DNA synthesis and repair enzymes have this ‘fractured’ organization. The new types of naturally split-inteins were analyzed in comparison to known split-inteins. Some loci include apparent gene control elements brought in with the endonuclease gene. A newly predicted homing endonuclease family, related to very-short patch repair (Vsr) endonucleases, was found in half of the loci. These putative homing endonucleases also appear in group-I introns, and as stand-alone inserts in the absence of surrounding intervening sequences. The new fractured genes organization appears to be present mainly in phage, shows how endonucleases can integrate into inteins, and may represent a missing link in the evolution of gene breaking in general, and in the creation of split-inteins in particular. PMID:19264795

  10. Endonuclease IV and exonuclease III are involved in the repair and mutagenesis of DNA lesions induced by UVB in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Souza, L L; Eduardo, I R; Pádula, M; Leitão, A C

    2006-03-01

    Exonuclease III (Exo III) and endonuclease IV (Endo IV) play a critical role in the base excision repair (BER) of Escherichia coli. Both are endowed with AP endonucleolytic activity, cleaving the 5' phosphodiester bond adjacent to spontaneous or induced abasic sites in DNA. Although mutants defective in Exo III (xthA) are usually hypersensitive to oxidative agents such as hydrogen peroxide, near-UV-light and X-rays, mutants defective in Endo IV (nfo) are not as sensitive as the xthA strain. To further investigate the roles of these AP endonucleases in DNA repair, we evaluated the sensitivity and mutagenesis of xthA and nfo strains after UVB and compared with UVC light. Our results revealed that xthA but not nfo strain was hypersensitive to UVB. The use of Fe(+2) ion chelator (dipyridyl), prior to irradiation, completely protected the xthA mutant against UVB lethal lesions, suggesting the generation of toxic oxidative lesions mediated by transition metal reactions. The nfo strain displayed increased UVB-induced mutagenesis, which was significantly suppressed by pre-treatment with dipyridyl. Although xthA strain did not display increased mutagenesis after UVC and UVB treatments, this phenotype was not related to xthA mutation, but rather to an unknown secondary mutation specifying an antimutator phenotype. After UVB irradiation, the base substitution spectra of nfo strain revealed a bias towards AT-->GC transitions and GC-->CG transversions, which were also suppressed by previous treatment with the iron chelator. Overall, on the basis of the differential sensitivities and mutational spectra displayed after UVC and UVB treatments, we propose a role for Endo IV and Exo III to counteract DNA damage induced by the oxidative counterpart of UVB in E.coli.

  11. Cloning and analysis of a bifunctional methyltransferase/restriction endonuclease TspGWI, the prototype of a Thermus sp. enzyme family

    PubMed Central

    Zylicz-Stachula, Agnieszka; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Skowron, Piotr M

    2009-01-01

    Background Restriction-modification systems are a diverse class of enzymes. They are classified into four major types: I, II, III and IV. We have previously proposed the existence of a Thermus sp. enzyme family, which belongs to type II restriction endonucleases (REases), however, it features also some characteristics of types I and III. Members include related thermophilic endonucleases: TspGWI, TaqII, TspDTI, and Tth111II. Results Here we describe cloning, mutagenesis and analysis of the prototype TspGWI enzyme that recognises the 5'-ACGGA-3' site and cleaves 11/9 nt downstream. We cloned, expressed, and mutagenised the tspgwi gene and investigated the properties of its product, the bifunctional TspGWI restriction/modification enzyme. Since TspGWI does not cleave DNA completely, a cloning method was devised, based on amino acid sequencing of internal proteolytic fragments. The deduced amino acid sequence of the enzyme shares significant sequence similarity with another representative of the Thermus sp. family – TaqII. Interestingly, these enzymes recognise similar, yet different sequences in the DNA. Both enzymes cleave DNA at the same distance, but differ in their ability to cleave single sites and in the requirement of S-adenosylmethionine as an allosteric activator for cleavage. Both the restriction endonuclease (REase) and methyltransferase (MTase) activities of wild type (wt) TspGWI (either recombinant or isolated from Thermus sp.) are dependent on the presence of divalent cations. Conclusion TspGWI is a bifunctional protein comprising a tandem arrangement of Type I-like domains; particularly noticeable is the central HsdM-like module comprising a helical domain and a highly conserved S-adenosylmethionine-binding/catalytic MTase domain, containing DPAVGTG and NPPY motifs. TspGWI also possesses an N-terminal PD-(D/E)XK nuclease domain related to the corresponding domains in HsdR subunits, but lacks the ATP-dependent translocase module of the HsdR subunit

  12. Endonuclease IV of Escherichia coli is induced by paraquat

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, E.; Weiss, B.

    1987-05-01

    The addition of paraquat (methyl viologen) to a growing culture of Escherichia coli K-12 led within 1 hr to a 10- to 20-fold increase in the level of endonuclease IV, a DNase for apurinic/apyrimidinic sites. The induction was blocked by chloramphenicol. Increases of 3-fold or more were also seen with plumbagin, menadione, and phenazine methosulfate. H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ produced no more than a 2-fold increase in endonuclease IV activity. The following agents had no significant effect: streptonigrin, nitrofurantoin, tert-butyl hydroperoxide, ..gamma.. rays, 260-nm UV radiation, methyl methanesulfonate, mitomycin C, and ascorbate. Paraquat, plumbagin, menadione, and phenazine methosulfate are known to generate superoxide radical anions via redox cycling in vivo. A mutant lacking superoxide dismutase was unusually sensitive to induction by paraquat. In addition, endonuclease IV could be induced by merely growing the mutant in pure O/sub 2/. The levels of endonuclease IV in uninduced or paraquat-treated cells were unaffected by mutations of oxyR, a H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-inducible gene that governs an oxidative-stress regulon. The results indicate that endonuclease IV is an inducible DNA-repair enzyme and that its induction can be mediated via the production of superoxide radicals.

  13. Deficiency of base excision repair enzyme NEIL3 drives increased predisposition to autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Massaad, Michel J.; Zhou, Jia; Tsuchimoto, Daisuke; Chou, Janet; Jabara, Haifa; Janssen, Erin; Glauzy, Salomé; Olson, Brennan G.; Morbach, Henner; Ohsumi, Toshiro K.; Schmitz, Klaus; Kane, Jennifer; Torisu, Kumiko; Chouery, Eliane; Megarbane, Andre; Kang, Peter B.; Al-Idrissi, Eman; Aldhekri, Hasan; Meffre, Eric; Mizui, Masayuki; Manis, John P.; Al-Herz, Waleed; Wallace, Susan S.; Geha, Raif S.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the apoptosis of immune cells have been associated with autoimmunity. Here, we have identified a homozygous missense mutation in the gene encoding the base excision repair enzyme Nei endonuclease VIII-like 3 (NEIL3) that abolished enzymatic activity in 3 siblings from a consanguineous family. The NEIL3 mutation was associated with fatal recurrent infections, severe autoimmunity, hypogammaglobulinemia, and impaired B cell function in these individuals. The same homozygous NEIL3 mutation was also identified in an asymptomatic individual who exhibited elevated levels of serum autoantibodies and defective peripheral B cell tolerance, but normal B cell function. Further analysis of the patients revealed an absence of LPS-responsive beige-like anchor (LRBA) protein expression, a known cause of immunodeficiency. We next examined the contribution of NEIL3 to the maintenance of self-tolerance in Neil3–/– mice. Although Neil3–/– mice displayed normal B cell function, they exhibited elevated serum levels of autoantibodies and developed nephritis following treatment with poly(I:C) to mimic microbial stimulation. In Neil3–/– mice, splenic T and B cells as well as germinal center B cells from Peyer’s patches showed marked increases in apoptosis and cell death, indicating the potential release of self-antigens that favor autoimmunity. These findings demonstrate that deficiency in NEIL3 is associated with increased lymphocyte apoptosis, autoantibodies, and predisposition to autoimmunity. PMID:27760045

  14. Identification, characterisation and molecular modelling of two AP endonucleases from base excision repair pathway in sugarcane provide insights on the early evolution of green plants.

    PubMed

    Maira, N; Torres, T M; de Oliveira, A L; de Medeiros, S R B; Agnez-Lima, L F; Lima, J P M S; Scortecci, K C

    2014-05-01

    Unlike bacteria and mammals, plant DNA repair pathways are not well characterised, especially in monocots. The understanding of these processes in the plant cell is of major importance, since they may be directly involved in plant acclimation and adaptation to stressful environments. Hence, two sugarcane ESTs were identified as homologues of AP endonuclease from the base-excision repair pathway: ScARP1 and ScARP3. In order to understand their probable function and evolutionary origin, structural and phylogenetic studies were performed using bioinformatics approaches. The two predicted proteins present a considerable amino acid sequence similarity, and molecular modelling procedures indicate that both are functional, since the main structural motifs remain conserved. However, inspection of the sort signal regions on the full-length cDNAs indicated that these proteins have a distinct organelle target. Furthermore, variances in their promoter cis-element motifs were also found. Although the mRNA expression pattern was similar, there were significant differences in their expression levels. Taken together, these data raise the hypothesis that the ScARP is an example of a probable gene duplication event that occurred before monocotyledon/dicotyledon segregation, followed by a sub-functionalisation event in the Poaceae, leading to new intracellular targeting and different expression levels.

  15. Degenerate sequence recognition by the monomeric restriction enzyme: single mutation converts BcnI into a strand-specific nicking endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Kostiuk, Georgij; Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2011-01-01

    Unlike orthodox Type II restriction endonucleases that are homodimers and interact with the palindromic 4–8-bp DNA sequences, BcnI is a monomer which has a single active site but cuts both DNA strands within the 5′-CC↓CGG-3′/3′-GGG↓CC-5′ target site (‘↓’ designates the cleavage position). Therefore, after cutting the first strand, the BcnI monomer must re-bind to the target site in the opposite orientation; but in this case, it runs into a different central base because of the broken symmetry of the recognition site. Crystal-structure analysis shows that to accept both the C:G and G:C base pairs at the center of its target site, BcnI employs two symmetrically positioned histidines H77 and H219 that presumably change their protonation state depending on the binding mode. We show here that a single mutation of BcnI H77 or H219 residues restricts the cleavage activity of the enzyme to either the 5′-CCCGG-3′ or the 5′-CCGGG-3′ strand, thereby converting BcnI into a strand-specific nicking endonuclease. This is a novel approach for engineering of monomeric restriction enzymes into strand-specific nucleases. PMID:21227928

  16. Sensitive voltammetric detection of DNA damage at carbon electrodes using DNA repair enzymes and an electroactive osmium marker.

    PubMed

    Havran, Ludek; Vacek, Jan; Cahová, Katerina; Fojta, Miroslav

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a new approach to electrochemical sensing of DNA damage, using osmium DNA markers and voltammetric detection at the pyrolytic graphite electrode. The technique is based on enzymatic digestion of DNA with a DNA repair enzyme exonuclease III (exoIII), followed by single-strand (ss) selective DNA modification by a complex of osmium tetroxide with 2,2'-bipyridine. In double-stranded DNA possessing free 3'-ends, the exoIII creates ss regions that can accommodate the electroactive osmium marker. Intensity of the marker signal measured at the pyrolytic graphite electrode responded well to the extent of DNA damage. The technique was successfully applied for the detection of (1) single-strand breaks (ssb) introduced in plasmid DNA by deoxyribonuclease I, and (2) apurinic sites generated in chromosomal calf thymus DNA upon treatment with the alkylating agent dimethyl sulfate. The apurinic sites were converted into the ssb by DNA repair endonuclease activity of the exoIII enzyme. We show that the presented technique is capable of detection of one lesion per approximately 10(5) nucleotides in supercoiled plasmid DNA.

  17. PspGI, a type II restriction endonuclease from the extreme thermophile Pyrococcus sp.: structural and functional studies to investigate an evolutionary relationship with several mesophilic restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Pingoud, Vera; Conzelmann, Charlotte; Kinzebach, Steffen; Sudina, Anna; Metelev, Valeri; Kubareva, Elena; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Lurz, Rudi; Lüder, Gerhild; Xu, Shuang-Yong; Pingoud, Alfred

    2003-06-20

    We present here the first detailed biochemical analysis of an archaeal restriction enzyme. PspGI shows sequence similarity to SsoII, EcoRII, NgoMIV and Cfr10I, which recognize related DNA sequences. We demonstrate here that PspGI, like SsoII and unlike EcoRII or NgoMIV and Cfr10I, interacts with and cleaves DNA as a homodimer and is not stimulated by simultaneous binding to two recognition sites. PspGI and SsoII differ in their basic biochemical properties, viz. stability against chemical denaturation and proteolytic digestion, DNA binding and the pH, MgCl(2) and salt-dependence of their DNA cleavage activity. In contrast, the results of mutational analyses and cross-link experiments show that PspGI and SsoII have a very similar DNA binding site and catalytic center as NgoMIV and Cfr10I (whose crystal structures are known), and presumably also as EcoRII, in spite of the fact that these enzymes, which all recognize variants of the sequence -/CC-GG- (/ denotes the site of cleavage), are representatives of different subgroups of type II restriction endonucleases. A sequence comparison of all known restriction endonuclease sequences, furthermore, suggests that several enzymes recognizing other DNA sequences also share amino acid sequence similarities with PspGI, SsoII and EcoRII in the region of the presumptive active site. These results are discussed in an evolutionary context.

  18. Induction of E. coli oh8Gua endonuclease by oxidative stress: its significance in aerobic life.

    PubMed

    Kim, H S; Park, Y W; Kasai, H; Nishimura, S; Park, C W; Choi, K H; Chung, M H

    1996-06-12

    The induction of 8-hydroxyguanine (oh8Gua) endonuclease, a DNA repair enzyme for an oxidatively modified guanine, oh8Gua was studied in various growth conditions in Escherichia coli (AB1157). Anaerobically grown E. coli were found to have a very low activity of this enzyme while aerobically grown cells showed activity about 20 times that of the anaerobic level. Under the same condition, superoxide dismutase (SOD) showed about 6-fold increase in activity. A shift in growth conditions from anaerobic to aerobic resulted in rapid induction of this enzyme, and this induction was blocked (but not completely) by chloramphenicol. It is indicated that molecular oxygen is an effective stimulator to the induction of this enzyme and its induction depends partly on protein synthesis. Superoxide-producing compounds such as paraquat and menadione also increased the activity of endonuclease as well as SOD, but H2O2 showed no effect. Thus, superoxides are also implied as a stimulator. In contrast, hyperoxia induced only SOD not the endonuclease. This induction of the endonuclease by hyperoxia was only observed in a SOD-deficient strain (QC774). The aerobic activity of the endonuclease in QC774 was the same as that of wild types (AB1157, GC4468). It is implied that the responsiveness of oh8Gua endonuclease to superoxides is less sensitive than that of SOD. The endonuclease was also induced by a temperature shift from 30 to 43 degrees C and treatment with nalidixic acid. Among the stimuli used, molecular oxygen seems to be most effective for its induction. The inducible nature of this enzyme will serve as an important mechanism for the protection of oxidative DNA damage in the aerobic environment.

  19. The cutting edges in DNA repair, licensing, and fidelity: DNA and RNA repair nucleases sculpt DNA to measure twice, cut once

    PubMed Central

    Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien

    2014-01-01

    To avoid genome instability, DNA repair nucleases must precisely target the correct damaged substrate before they are licensed to incise. Damage identification is a challenge for all DNA damage response proteins, but especially for nucleases that cut the DNA and necessarily create a cleaved DNA repair intermediate, likely more toxic than the initial damage. How do these enzymes achieve exquisite specificity without specific sequence recognition or, in some cases, without a non-canonical DNA nucleotide? Combined structural, biochemical, and biological analyses of repair nucleases are revealing their molecular tools for damage verification and safeguarding against inadvertent incision. Surprisingly, these enzymes also often act on RNA, which deserves more attention. Here, we review protein-DNA structures for nucleases involved in replication, base excision repair, mismatch repair, double strand break repair (DSBR), and telomere maintenance: apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), Endonuclease IV (Nfo), tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase (TDP2), UV Damage endonuclease (UVDE), very short patch repair endonuclease (Vsr), Endonuclease V (Nfi), Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), exonuclease 1 (Exo1), RNase T and Meiotic recombination 11 (Mre11). DNA and RNA structure-sensing nucleases are essential to life with roles in DNA replication, repair, and transcription. Increasingly these enzymes are employed as advanced tools for synthetic biology and as targets for cancer prognosis and interventions. Currently their structural biology is most fully illuminated for DNA repair, which is also essential to life. How DNA repair enzymes maintain genome fidelity is one of the DNA double helix secrets missed by Watson-Crick, that is only now being illuminated though structural biology and mutational analyses. Structures reveal motifs for repair nucleases and mechanisms whereby these enzymes follow the old carpenter adage: measure twice, cut once. Furthermore, to measure twice these nucleases

  20. A second DNA methyltransferase repair enzyme in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Rebeck, G W; Coons, S; Carroll, P; Samson, L

    1988-01-01

    The Escherichia coli ada-alkB operon encodes a 39-kDa protein (Ada) that is a DNA-repair methyltransferase and a 27-kDa protein (AlkB) of unknown function. By DNA blot hybridization analysis we show that the alkylation-sensitive E. coli mutant BS23 [Sedgwick, B. & Lindahl, T. (1982) J. Mol. Biol. 154, 169-175] is a deletion mutant lacking the entire ada-alkB operon. Despite the absence of the ada gene and its product, the cells contain detectable levels of a DNA-repair methyltransferase activity. We conclude that the methyltransferase in BS23 cells is the product of a gene other than ada. A similar activity was detected in extracts of an ada-10::Tn10 insertion mutant of E. coli AB1157. This DNA methyltransferase has a molecular mass of about 19 kDa and transfers the methyl groups from O6-methylguanine and O4-methylthymine in DNA, but not those from methyl phosphotriester lesions. This enzyme was not induced by low doses of alkylating agent and is expressed at low levels in ada+ and a number of ada- E. coli strains. Images PMID:3283737

  1. Cloning and Characterization of a Wheat Homologue of Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease Ape1L

    PubMed Central

    Grin, Inga R.; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Ishenko, Alexander A.; Tudek, Barbara; Bissenbaev, Amangeldy K.; Saparbaev, Murat

    2014-01-01

    Background Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases are key DNA repair enzymes involved in the base excision repair (BER) pathway. In BER, an AP endonuclease cleaves DNA at AP sites and 3′-blocking moieties generated by DNA glycosylases and/or oxidative damage. A Triticum aestivum cDNA encoding for a putative homologue of ExoIII family AP endonucleases which includes E. coli Xth, human APE1 and Arabidopsis thaliana AtApe1L has been isolated and its protein product purified and characterized. Methodology/Principal Findings We report that the putative wheat AP endonuclease, referred here as TaApe1L, contains AP endonuclease, 3′-repair phosphodiesterase, 3′-phosphatase and 3′→5′ exonuclease activities. Surprisingly, in contrast to bacterial and human AP endonucleases, addition of Mg2+ and Ca2+ (5–10 mM) to the reaction mixture inhibited TaApe1L whereas the presence of Mn2+, Co2+ and Fe2+ cations (0.1–1.0 mM) strongly stimulated all its DNA repair activities. Optimization of the reaction conditions revealed that the wheat enzyme requires low divalent cation concentration (0.1 mM), mildly acidic pH (6–7), low ionic strength (20 mM KCl) and has a temperature optimum at around 20°C. The steady-state kinetic parameters of enzymatic reactions indicate that TaApe1L removes 3′-blocking sugar-phosphate and 3′-phosphate groups with good efficiency (kcat/KM = 630 and 485 μM−1·min−1, respectively) but possesses a very weak AP endonuclease activity as compared to the human homologue, APE1. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these data establish the DNA substrate specificity of the wheat AP endonuclease and suggest its possible role in the repair of DNA damage generated by endogenous and environmental factors. PMID:24667595

  2. Problem-Solving Test: Restriction Endonuclease Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2011-01-01

    The term "restriction endonuclease mapping" covers a number of related techniques used to identify specific restriction enzyme recognition sites on small DNA molecules. A method for restriction endonuclease mapping of a 1,000-basepair (bp)-long DNA molecule is described in the fictitious experiment of this test. The most important fact needed to…

  3. Characterization of DNA substrate specificities of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Abeldenov, Sailau; Talhaoui, Ibtissam; Zharkov, Dmitry O; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Ramanculov, Erlan; Saparbaev, Murat; Khassenov, Bekbolat

    2015-09-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases are key enzymes involved in the repair of abasic sites and DNA strand breaks. Pathogenic bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains two AP endonucleases: MtbXthA and MtbNfo members of the exonuclease III and endonuclease IV families, which are exemplified by Escherichia coli Xth and Nfo, respectively. It has been shown that both MtbXthA and MtbNfo contain AP endonuclease and 3'→5' exonuclease activities. However, it remains unclear whether these enzymes hold 3'-repair phosphodiesterase and nucleotide incision repair (NIR) activities. Here, we report that both mycobacterial enzymes have 3'-repair phosphodiesterase and 3'-phosphatase, and MtbNfo contains in addition a very weak NIR activity. Interestingly, depending on pH, both enzymes require different concentrations of divalent cations: 0.5mM MnCl2 at pH 7.6 and 10 mM at pH 6.5. MtbXthA requires a low ionic strength and 37 °C, while MtbNfo requires high ionic strength (200 mM KCl) and has a temperature optimum at 60 °C. Point mutation analysis showed that D180 and N182 in MtbXthA and H206 and E129 in MtbNfo are critical for enzymes activities. The steady-state kinetic parameters indicate that MtbXthA removes 3'-blocking sugar-phosphate and 3'-phosphate moieties at DNA strand breaks with an extremely high efficiency (kcat/KM=440 and 1280 μM(-1)∙min(-1), respectively), while MtbNfo exhibits much lower 3'-repair activities (kcat/KM=0.26 and 0.65 μM(-1)∙min(-1), respectively). Surprisingly, both MtbXthA and MtbNfo exhibited very weak AP site cleavage activities, with kinetic parameters 100- and 300-fold lower, respectively, as compared with the results reported previously. Expression of MtbXthA and MtbNfo reduced the sensitivity of AP endonuclease-deficient E. coli xth nfo strain to methylmethanesulfonate and H2O2 to various degrees. Taken together, these data establish the DNA substrate specificity of M. tuberculosis AP endonucleases and suggest their possible role

  4. 17β-estradiol increases expression of the oxidative stress response and DNA repair protein apurinic endonuclease (Ape1) in the cerebral cortex of female mice following hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Alicia K; Humphreys, Gwendolyn I; Nardulli, Ann M

    2013-11-01

    While it is well established that 17β-estradiol (E2) protects the rodent brain from ischemia-induced damage, it has been unclear how this neuroprotective effect is mediated. Interestingly, convincing evidence has also demonstrated that maintaining or increasing the expression of the oxidative stress response and DNA repair protein apurinic endonuclease 1 (Ape1) is instrumental in reducing ischemia-induced damage in the brain. Since E2 increases expression of the oxidative stress response proteins Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and thioredoxin in the brain, we hypothesized that E2 may also increase Ape1 expression and that this E2-induced expression of Ape1 may help to mediate the neuroprotective effects of E2 in the brain. To test this hypothesis, we utilized three model systems including primary cortical neurons, brain slice cultures, and whole animals. Although estrogen receptor α and Ape1 were expressed in primary cortical neurons, E2 did not alter Ape1 expression in these cells. However, immunofluorescent staining and quantitative Western blot analysis demonstrated that estrogen receptor α and Ape1 were expressed in the nuclei of cortical neurons in brain slice cultures and that E2 increased Ape1 expression in the cerebral cortex of these cultures. Furthermore, Ape1 expression was increased and oxidative DNA damage was decreased in the cerebral cortices of ovariectomized female C57Bl/6J mice that had been treated with E2 and exposed to hypoxia. Taken together, our studies demonstrate that the neuronal microenvironment may be required for increased Ape1 expression and that E2 enhances expression of Ape1 and reduces oxidative DNA damage, which may in turn help to reduce ischemia-induced damage in the cerebral cortex and mediate the neuroprotective effects of E2.

  5. Analysis of the Intrinsically Disordered N-Terminus of the DNA Junction-Resolving Enzyme T7 Endonuclease I: Identification of Structure Formed upon DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The four-way (Holliday) DNA junction of homologous recombination is processed by the symmetrical cleavage of two strands by a nuclease. These junction-resolving enzymes bind to four-way junctions in dimeric form, distorting the structure of the junction in the process. Crystal structures of T7 endonuclease I have been determined as free protein, and the complex with a DNA junction. In neither crystal structure was the N-terminal 16-amino acid peptide visible, yet deletion of this peptide has a marked effect on the resolution process. Here we have investigated the N-terminal peptide by inclusion of spin-label probes at unique sites within this region, studied by electron paramagnetic resonance. Continuous wave experiments show that these labels are mobile in the free protein but become constrained on binding a DNA junction, with the main interaction occurring for residues 7–10 and 12. Distance measurements between equivalent positions within the two peptides of a dimer using PELDOR showed that the intermonomeric distances for residues 2–12 are long and broadly distributed in the free protein but are significantly shortened and become more defined on binding to DNA. These results suggest that the N-terminal peptides become more organized on binding to the DNA junction and nestle into the minor grooves at the branchpoint, consistent with the biochemical data indicating an important role in the resolution process. This study demonstrates the presence of structure within a protein region that cannot be viewed by crystallography. PMID:27387136

  6. PCR-based bioprospecting for homing endonucleases in fungal mitochondrial rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Mohamed; Guha, Tuhin Kumar; Shen, Chen; Sethuraman, Jyothi; Hausner, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Fungal mitochondrial genomes act as "reservoirs" for homing endonucleases. These enzymes with their DNA site-specific cleavage activities are attractive tools for genome editing and gene therapy applications. Bioprospecting and characterization of naturally occurring homing endonucleases offers an alternative to synthesizing artificial endonucleases. Here, we describe methods for PCR-based screening of fungal mitochondrial rRNA genes for homing endonuclease encoding sequences, and we also provide protocols for the purification and biochemical characterization of putative native homing endonucleases.

  7. Maintenance of DNA and repair of Apurinic sites.

    PubMed

    Verly, W G

    1975-01-01

    Escherichia coli cells contain an enzyme which hydrolyzes a phosphodiester bond near each apurinic site in double-stranded DNA. This endonuclease is specific for apurinic sites; it has no effect on normal DNA, and its action on alkylated DNA is restricted to apurinic sites. In vitro incubation with the endonuclease for apurinic sites, DNA polymerase I, and ligase permits repair of DNA containing apurinic sites. The endonuclease for apurinic sites might thus play a role in cell survival after a treatment with alkylating agents; as DNA spontaneously loses purines, the enzyme might also play a role in the maintance of a normal DNA in every cell. Indeed, an endonuclease for apurinic sites has been found not only in bacteria but also in animal and plant cells; it is very active in thermophilic bacteria.

  8. Activity, specificity and structure of I-Bth0305I: a representative of a new homing endonuclease family

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gregory K.; Heiter, Daniel F.; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Stoddard, Barry L.

    2011-01-01

    Novel family of putative homing endonuclease genes was recently discovered during analyses of metagenomic and genomic sequence data. One such protein is encoded within a group I intron that resides in the recA gene of the Bacillus thuringiensis 0305ϕ8–36 bacteriophage. Named I-Bth0305I, the endonuclease cleaves a DNA target in the uninterrupted recA gene at a position immediately adjacent to the intron insertion site. The enzyme displays a multidomain, homodimeric architecture and footprints a DNA region of ∼60 bp. Its highest specificity corresponds to a 14-bp pseudopalindromic sequence that is directly centered across the DNA cleavage site. Unlike many homing endonucleases, the specificity profile of the enzyme is evenly distributed across much of its target site, such that few single base pair substitutions cause a significant decrease in cleavage activity. A crystal structure of its C-terminal domain confirms a nuclease fold that is homologous to very short patch repair (Vsr) endonucleases. The domain architecture and DNA recognition profile displayed by I-Bth0305I, which is the prototype of a homing lineage that we term the ‘EDxHD’ family, are distinct from previously characterized homing endonucleases. PMID:21890897

  9. Rhein Inhibits AlkB Repair Enzymes and Sensitizes Cells to Methylated DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Huang, Yue; Liu, Xichun; Gan, Jianhua; Chen, Hao; Yang, Cai-Guang

    2016-05-20

    The AlkB repair enzymes, including Escherichia coli AlkB and two human homologues, ALKBH2 and ALKBH3, are iron(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases that efficiently repair N(1)-methyladenine and N(3)-methylcytosine methylated DNA damages. The development of small molecule inhibitors of these enzymes has seen less success. Here we have characterized a previously discovered natural product rhein and tested its ability to inhibit AlkB repair enzymes in vitro and to sensitize cells to methyl methane sulfonate that mainly produces N(1)-methyladenine and N(3)-methylcytosine lesions. Our investigation of the mechanism of rhein inhibition reveals that rhein binds to AlkB repair enzymes in vitro and promotes thermal stability in vivo In addition, we have determined a new structural complex of rhein bound to AlkB, which shows that rhein binds to a different part of the active site in AlkB than it binds to in fat mass and obesity-associated protein (FTO). With the support of these observations, we put forth the hypothesis that AlkB repair enzymes would be effective pharmacological targets for cancer treatment.

  10. Human Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease 1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengxia

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1, also known as REF-1) was isolated based on its ability to cleave at AP sites in DNA or activate the DNA binding activity of certain transcription factors. We review herein topics related to this multi-functional DNA repair and stress-response protein. Recent Advances: APE1 displays homology to Escherichia coli exonuclease III and is a member of the divalent metal-dependent α/β fold-containing phosphoesterase superfamily of enzymes. APE1 has acquired distinct active site and loop elements that dictate substrate selectivity, and a unique N-terminus which at minimum imparts nuclear targeting and interaction specificity. Additional activities ascribed to APE1 include 3′–5′ exonuclease, 3′-repair diesterase, nucleotide incision repair, damaged or site-specific RNA cleavage, and multiple transcription regulatory roles. Critical Issues: APE1 is essential for mouse embryogenesis and contributes to cell viability in a genetic background-dependent manner. Haploinsufficient APE1+/− mice exhibit reduced survival, increased cancer formation, and cellular/tissue hyper-sensitivity to oxidative stress, supporting the notion that impaired APE1 function associates with disease susceptibility. Although abnormal APE1 expression/localization has been seen in cancer and neuropathologies, and impaired-function variants have been described, a causal link between an APE1 defect and human disease remains elusive. Future Directions: Ongoing efforts aim at delineating the biological role(s) of the different APE1 activities, as well as the regulatory mechanisms for its intra-cellular distribution and participation in diverse molecular pathways. The determination of whether APE1 defects contribute to human disease, particularly pathologies that involve oxidative stress, and whether APE1 small-molecule regulators have clinical utility, is central to future investigations. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 678–707

  11. Both DNA global deformation and repair enzyme contacts mediate flipping of thymine dimer damage

    PubMed Central

    Knips, Alexander; Zacharias, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The photo-induced cis-syn-cyclobutane pyrimidine (CPD) dimer is a frequent DNA lesion. In bacteria photolyases efficiently repair dimers employing a light-driven reaction after flipping out the CPD damage to the active site. How the repair enzyme identifies a damaged site and how the damage is flipped out without external energy is still unclear. Employing molecular dynamics free energy calculations, the CPD flipping process was systematically compared to flipping undamaged nucleotides in various DNA global states and bound to photolyase enzyme. The global DNA deformation alone (without protein) significantly reduces the flipping penalty and induces a partially looped out state of the damage but not undamaged nucleotides. Bound enzyme further lowers the penalty for CPD damage flipping with a lower free energy of the flipped nucleotides in the active site compared to intra-helical state (not for undamaged DNA). Both the reduced penalty and partial looping by global DNA deformation contribute to a significantly shorter mean first passage time for CPD flipping compared to regular nucleotides which increases the repair likelihood upon short time encounter between repair enzyme and DNA. PMID:28128222

  12. Both DNA global deformation and repair enzyme contacts mediate flipping of thymine dimer damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knips, Alexander; Zacharias, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The photo-induced cis-syn-cyclobutane pyrimidine (CPD) dimer is a frequent DNA lesion. In bacteria photolyases efficiently repair dimers employing a light-driven reaction after flipping out the CPD damage to the active site. How the repair enzyme identifies a damaged site and how the damage is flipped out without external energy is still unclear. Employing molecular dynamics free energy calculations, the CPD flipping process was systematically compared to flipping undamaged nucleotides in various DNA global states and bound to photolyase enzyme. The global DNA deformation alone (without protein) significantly reduces the flipping penalty and induces a partially looped out state of the damage but not undamaged nucleotides. Bound enzyme further lowers the penalty for CPD damage flipping with a lower free energy of the flipped nucleotides in the active site compared to intra-helical state (not for undamaged DNA). Both the reduced penalty and partial looping by global DNA deformation contribute to a significantly shorter mean first passage time for CPD flipping compared to regular nucleotides which increases the repair likelihood upon short time encounter between repair enzyme and DNA.

  13. RNA-splicing endonuclease structure and function.

    PubMed

    Calvin, K; Li, H

    2008-04-01

    The RNA-splicing endonuclease is an evolutionarily conserved enzyme responsible for the excision of introns from nuclear transfer RNA (tRNA) and all archaeal RNAs. Since its first identification from yeast in the late 1970s, significant progress has been made toward understanding the biochemical mechanisms of this enzyme. Four families of the splicing endonucleases possessing the same active sites and overall architecture but with different subunit compositions have been identified. Two related consensus structures of the precursor RNA splice sites and the critical elements required for intron excision have been established. More recently, a glimpse was obtained of the structural mechanism by which the endonuclease recognizes the consensus RNA structures and cleaves at the splice sites. This review summarizes these findings and discusses their implications in the evolution of intron removal processes.

  14. Accelerated search kinetics mediated by redox reactions of DNA repair enzymes.

    PubMed

    Fok, Pak-Wing; Chou, Tom

    2009-05-20

    A charge transport (CT) mechanism has been proposed in several articles to explain the localization of base excision repair (BER) enzymes to lesions on DNA. The CT mechanism relies on redox reactions of iron-sulfur cofactors that modify the enzyme's binding affinity. These redox reactions are mediated by the DNA strand and involve the exchange of electrons between BER enzymes along DNA. We propose a mathematical model that incorporates enzyme binding/unbinding, electron transport, and enzyme diffusion along DNA. Analysis of our model within a range of parameter values suggests that the redox reactions can increase desorption of BER enzymes not already bound to lesions, allowing the enzymes to be recycled--thus accelerating the overall search process. This acceleration mechanism is most effective when enzyme copy numbers and enzyme diffusivity along the DNA are small. Under such conditions, we find that CT BER enzymes find their targets more quickly than simple passive enzymes that simply attach to the DNA without desorbing.

  15. Role of DNA repair enzymes in the cellular resistance to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Laval, J

    1996-01-01

    Oxidative stress occurs in cells when the equilibrium between prooxidant and antioxidant species is broken in favor of the prooxidant state. It is due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated either by the cellular metabolism such as phagocytosis, mitochondrial respiration, xenobiotic detoxification, or by exogenous factors such as ionizing radiation or chemical compounds performing red-ox reactions. Some ROS are extremely reactive and interact with all the macromolecules including lipids, nucleic acids and proteins. Cells have numerous defence systems to counteract the deleterious effects of ROS. Proteins and small molecules specifically eliminate ROS when they are formed. There are three species of superoxyde dismutases which transform the superoxyde anion O2- in hydrogen peroxyde H2O2 which in turn will be destroyed by peroxysomal catalase or by various peroxydases. There are numerous small molecules in the cell such as glutathion, alpha-tocopherol, vitamines A and C, melanine, etc. which are antioxydant molecules. ROS escaping destruction generate various lesions in DNA such as base modifications, degradation products of deoxyribose, chain breaks. These various lesions have been characterized and it is possible to quantitate them in the DNA of cells which have been irradiated or treated by free radical generating systems. The biological properties of the bases modified by ROS have been established. For example C8-hydroxyguanine (8-oxoG) is promutagenic since, if present in DNA during replication, it leads to incorporation of dAMP residues, leading to transversion mutation (GC-->TA). Purines whose imidazole ring is opened (Fapy residues) are stops for the DNA polymerase during DNA replication and are therefore potentially lethal lesions for the cell. Oxidized pyrimidines have comparable coding properties. Efficient DNA repair mechanisms remove these oxidized bases. In Escherichia coli cells, endonuclease III (NTH protein) and endonuclease VIII (NEI protein

  16. The Human Homolog of Escherichia coli Endonuclease V Is a Nucleolar Protein with Affinity for Branched DNA Structures

    PubMed Central

    Laerdahl, Jon K.; Gran Neurauter, Christine; Heggelund, Julie E.; Thorgaard, Eirik; Strøm-Andersen, Pernille; Bjørås, Magnar; Dalhus, Bjørn; Alseth, Ingrun

    2012-01-01

    Loss of amino groups from adenines in DNA results in the formation of hypoxanthine (Hx) bases with miscoding properties. The primary enzyme in Escherichia coli for DNA repair initiation at deaminated adenine is endonuclease V (endoV), encoded by the nfi gene, which cleaves the second phosphodiester bond 3′ of an Hx lesion. Endonuclease V orthologs are widespread in nature and belong to a family of highly conserved proteins. Whereas prokaryotic endoV enzymes are well characterized, the function of the eukaryotic homologs remains obscure. Here we describe the human endoV ortholog and show with bioinformatics and experimental analysis that a large number of transcript variants exist for the human endonuclease V gene (ENDOV), many of which are unlikely to be translated into functional protein. Full-length ENDOV is encoded by 8 evolutionary conserved exons covering the core region of the enzyme, in addition to one or more 3′-exons encoding an unstructured and poorly conserved C-terminus. In contrast to the E. coli enzyme, we find recombinant ENDOV neither to incise nor bind Hx-containing DNA. While both enzymes have strong affinity for several branched DNA substrates, cleavage is observed only with E. coli endoV. We find that ENDOV is localized in the cytoplasm and nucleoli of human cells. As nucleoli harbor the rRNA genes, this may suggest a role for the protein in rRNA gene transactions such as DNA replication or RNA transcription. PMID:23139746

  17. Role of ATP in UV-induced DNA excision repair in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dresler, S.L.

    1986-05-01

    In permeable human fibroblasts, UV-induced DNA excision repair is dependent on ATP, with a K/sub m/ of approximately 1 mM. Omission of ATP from the reaction mix completely inhibits damage-specific incision of DNA, but has little effect on repair patch synthesis proceeding from previously incised sites. UV-induced excision repair in permeable xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells complemented with T4 UV endonuclease is also totally dependent on ATP. Because the T4 enzyme is not ATP-dependent, ATP must be required for an endogenous activity other than the incision of damaged DNA. Alkaline elution reveals that, in the absence of ATP, T4 UV endonuclease does incise the DNA of permeable UV-irradiated XP cells, but that the incision rate is stimulated approximately 2-fold by the addition of ATP. This 2-fold stimulation of incision can not, however, be responsible for the absolute ATP dependence of excision repair in UV endonuclease-complemented XP cells. Apparently, although T4 UV endonuclease can incise damaged nuclear DNA in the absence of ATP, the incised sites must also be altered in an ATP-dependent reaction before subsequent steps of the repair process can proceed. This conclusion, coupled with the fact that ATP stimulates incision of damaged nuclear DNA by T4 UV endonuclease and is absolutely required for incision of damaged nuclear DNA by the endogenous human UV endonuclease, suggests that an important function of the early ATP-dependent step in UV-induced excision repair is to make damaged sites in DNA accessible to repair enzymes.

  18. Characterisation of the oxysterol metabolising enzyme pathway in mismatch repair proficient and deficient colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Rebecca; Alnabulsi, Abdo; Cash, Beatriz; Alnabulsi, Ayham; Murray, Graeme I.

    2016-01-01

    Oxysterols are oxidised derivatives of cholesterol, formed by the enzymatic activity of several cytochrome P450 enzymes and tumour-derived oxysterols have been implicated in tumour growth and survival. The aim of this study was to profile the expression of oxysterol metabolising enzymes in primary colorectal cancer and assess the association between expression and prognosis. Immunohistochemistry was performed on a colorectal cancer tissue microarray containing 650 primary colorectal cancers using monoclonal antibodies to CYP2R1, CYP7B1, CYP8B1, CYP27A1, CYP39A1, CYP46A1 and CYP51A1, which we have developed. Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis was used to examine the overall relationship of oxysterol metabolising enzyme expression with outcome and based on this identify an oxysterol metabolising enzyme signature associated with prognosis. Cluster analysis of the whole patient cohort identified a good prognosis group (mean survival=146 months 95% CI 127-165 months) that had a significantly better survival (δ2=12.984, p<0.001, HR=1.983, 95% CI 1.341-2.799) than the poor prognosis group (mean survival=107 months, 95% CI 98-123 months). For the mismatch repair proficient cohort, the good prognosis group had a significantly better survival (δ2=8.985, p=0.003, HR=1.845, 95% CI 1.227-2.774) than the poor prognosis group. Multi-variate analysis showed that cluster group was independently prognostically significant in both the whole patient cohort (p=0.02, HR=1.554, 95% CI 1.072-2.252) and the mismatch repair proficient group (p=0.04, HR=1.530, 95% CI 1.014-2.310). Individual oxysterol metabolising enzymes are overexpressed in colorectal cancer and an oxysterol metabolising enzyme expression profile associated with prognosis has been identified in the whole patient cohort and in mismatch repair proficient colorectal cancers. PMID:27341022

  19. Ca2+, Mg2+-dependent endonuclease and ADP-ribosylation.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, K; Tanaka, Y; Kamiya, T

    1983-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of the inhibition of Ca2+, Mg2+-dependent endonuclease by ADP-ribosylation was studied by using purified bull seminal plasma Ca2+, Mg2+-dependent endonuclease, endonuclease-stimulating proteins, and poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase. The activity of an essentially homogeneous preparation of the endonuclease was markedly suppressed by its preincubation with NAD+, poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase, DNA, and Mg2+. These four components of the incubation mixture were all essential for the suppression of the activity. Analyses of the initial and the chased reaction product by Sephadex G-100 column chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that Ca2+, Mg2+-dependent endonuclease was ADP-ribosylated during the incubation and its activity was markedly inhibited by the elongation of the ADP-ribose polymer covalently attached to the endonuclease. When the suppressed enzymes were mildly treated with an alkaline pH of 10.0, the activity was restored almost to the level of the unmodified control sample. These facts indicate that the linkage between the enzyme and poly(ADP-ribose) is hydrolyzed at this pH, and that the liberated polymer itself does not appreciably affect the endonuclease activity. These results also suggest that an electric repulsion between negative charges on DNA and poly(ADP-ribose) attached to Ca2+, Mg2+-dependent endonuclease is the basis for the observed suppression of the enzyme by ADP-ribosylation. Though histone H2B and H1 are shown to be as good endonuclease-stimulators (1) as they are good acceptors of ADP-ribose in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase reaction (2), ADP-ribosylation of these two proteins did not affect their endonuclease-stimulating ability appreciably, at least under the conditions used.

  20. Mechanism of action of Micrococcus luteus. gamma. -endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, T.J.; Kow, Y.W.; Wallace, S.S.; Henner, W.D.

    1987-10-06

    Micrococcus luteus extracts contain ..gamma..-endonuclease, a Mg/sup 2 +/-independent endonuclease that cleaves ..gamma..-irradiated DNA. This enzyme has been purified approximately 1000-fold, and the purified enzyme was used to study its substrate specificity and mechanism of action. ..gamma..-Endonuclease cleaves DNA containing either thymine glycols, urea residues, or apurinic sites but not undamaged DNA or DNA containing reduced apurinic sites. The enzyme has both N-glycosylase activity that releases thymine glycol residues from OsO/sub 4/-treated DNA and an associated apurinic endonuclease activity. The location and nature of the cleavage site produced has been determined with DNA sequencing techniques. ..gamma..-Endonuclease cleaves DNA containing thymine glycols or apurinic sites immediately 3' to the damaged or missing base. Cleavage results in a 5'-phosphate terminus and a 3' baseless sugar residue. Cleavage sites can be converted to primers for DNA polymerase I by subsequent treatment with Escherichia coli exonuclease III. The mechanism of action of ..gamma..-endonuclease and its substrate specificity are very similar to those identified for E. coli endonuclease III.

  1. Combustion products of 1,3-butadiene inhibit catalase activity and induce expression of oxidative DNA damage repair enzymes in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Christopher H; Catallo, W James; Wilson, Vincent L; Mitchell, James B

    2009-10-01

    1,3-Butadiene, an important petrochemical, is commonly burned off when excess amounts need to be destroyed. This combustion process produces butadiene soot (BDS), which is composed of a complex mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in particulates ranging in size from <1 microm to 1 mm. An organic extract of BDS is both cytotoxic and genotoxic to normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells. Based on the oxidizing potential of BDS, we hypothesized that an organic extract of this particulate matter would (1) cause enzyme inactivation due to protein amino acid oxidation and (2) induce oxidative DNA damage in NHBE cells. Thus, our aims were to determine the effect of butadiene soot ethanol extract (BSEE) on both enzyme activity and the expression of proteins involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage. Catalase was found to be sensitive to BDS as catalase activity was potently diminished in the presence of BSEE. Using Western analysis, both the alpha isoform of human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (alpha-hOGG1) and human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE-1) were shown to be significantly overexpressed as compared to untreated controls after exposure of NHBE cells to BSEE. Our results indicate that BSEE is capable of effectively inactivating the antioxidant enzyme catalase, presumably via oxidation of protein amino acids. The presence of oxidized biomolecules may partially explain the extranuclear fluorescence that is detected when NHBE cells are treated with an organic extract of BDS. Overexpression of both alpha-hOGG1 and APE-1 proteins following treatment of NHBE cells with BSEE suggests that this mixture causes oxidative DNA damage.

  2. The EcoR V restriction endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Luke, P A; McCallum, S A; Halford, S E

    1987-01-01

    Type II restriction endonucleases have attracted attention for two main reasons: firstly, their many applications in the dissection of DNA and in the construction of novel DNA molecules; secondly, as systems for studying the interactions of proteins with specific DNA sequences. With respect to the latter, the EcoR I restriction endonuclease has been examined in greater depth than any other type II enzyme [1-3]. However, the EcoR I enzyme has a major disadvantage as a system for studying DNA-protein interactions: the protein has a remarkably low solubility. The solutions in which EcoR I shows maximal activity, and also affinity for its recognition site, are saturated at less than 0.5 microM of this protein [4]. Consequently, many techniques that have been developed to study protein-ligand interactions but which require high concentrations of the protein in solution, such as NMR spectroscopy, cannot be used on EcoR I. But this drawback does not apply to all type II restriction enzymes. A different enzyme, the EcoR V restriction endonuclease [5-7], has special advantages as a system for studying DNA-protein interactions. In particular, this is the only type II restriction enzyme (apart from EcoR I [3]) for which crystals of the protein have been reported [7].

  3. Distinct catalytic activity and in vivo roles of the ExoIII and EndoIV AP endonucleases from Sulfolobus islandicus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhou; Huang, Qihong; Ni, Jinfeng; Shen, Yulong

    2016-09-01

    AP endonuclease cleaves the phosphodiester bond 5'- to the AP (apurinic or apyrimidinic) sites and is one of the major enzymes involved in base excision repair. So far, the properties of several archaeal AP endonuclease homologues have been characterized in vitro, but little is known about their functions in vivo. Herein, we report on the biochemical and genetic analysis of two AP endonucleases, SisExoIII and SisEndoIV, from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus islandicus REY15A. Both SisExoIII and SisEndoIV exhibit AP endonuclease activity, but neither of them has 3'-5' exonuclease activity. SisExoIII and SisEndoIV have similar K M values on the substrate containing an AP site, but the latter cleaves the AP substrate at a dramatically higher catalytic rate than the former. Unlike other AP endonucleases identified in archaea, SisExoIII and SisEndoIV do not exhibit any cleavage activity on DNA having oxidative damage (8-oxo-dG) or uracil. Genetic analysis revealed that neither gene is essential for cell viability, and the growth of ∆SiRe_2666 (endoIV), ∆SiRe_0100 (exoIII), and ∆SiRe_0100∆SiRe_2666 is not affected under normal growth conditions. However, ∆SiRe_2666 exhibits higher sensitivity to the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) than ∆SiRe_0100. Over-expression of SiRe_0100 can partially complement the sensitivity of ∆SiRe_2666 to MMS, suggesting a backup role of SisExoIII in AP site processing in vivo. Intriguingly, over-expression of SisEndoIV renders the strain more sensitive to MMS than the control. Taken together, we conclude that SisEndoIV, but not SisExoIII, is the main AP endonuclease that participates directly in base excision repair in S. islandicus.

  4. Crystal structure of the DNA nucleotide excision repair enzyme UvrB from Thermus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Machius, Mischa; Henry, Lisa; Palnitkar, Maya; Deisenhofer, Johann

    1999-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the most important DNA-repair mechanism in living organisms. In prokaryotes, three enzymes forming the UvrABC system initiate NER of a variety of structurally different DNA lesions. UvrB, the central component of this system, is responsible for the ultimate DNA damage recognition and participates in the incision of the damaged DNA strand. The crystal structure of Thermus thermophilus UvrB reveals a core that is structurally similar to core regions found in helicases, where they constitute molecular motors. Additional domains implicated in binding to DNA and various components of the NER system are attached to this central core. The architecture and distribution of DNA binding sites suggest a possible model for the DNA damage recognition process. PMID:10518516

  5. Overproduction of the EcoR V endonuclease and methylase.

    PubMed

    Bougueleret, L; Tenchini, M L; Botterman, J; Zabeau, M

    1985-06-11

    Strains overproducing the EcoR V endonuclease and methylase have been obtained by inserting each of the two genes in expression vectors containing the lambda PL promoter. The methylase is overproduced to a level reaching 5-10% of the total cellular proteins, which represents a 50-100 fold increase. A 30 fold overproduction of endonuclease was achieved by randomly positioning the EndRV gene downstream of the lambda PL promoter. The situation in the endonuclease overproducing clone resembles that encountered in maxi-cells. The strains described here allowed a quick purification of both enzymes in sufficient amounts for crystallisation attempts.

  6. Monitoring DNA recombination initiated by HO endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Neal; Haber, James E

    2012-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) have proven to be very potent initiators of recombination in yeast and other organisms. A single, site-specific DSB initiates homologous DNA repair events such as gene conversion, break-induced replication, and single-strand annealing, as well as nonhomologous end joining, microhomology-mediated end joining, and new telomere addition. When repair is either delayed or prevented, a single DSB can trigger checkpoint-mediated cell cycle arrest. In budding yeast, expressing the HO endonuclease under the control of a galactose-inducible promoter has been instrumental in the study of these processes by providing us a way to synchronously induce a DSB at a unique site in vivo. We describe how the HO endonuclease has been used to study the recombination events in mating-type (MAT) switching. Southern blots provide an overview of the process by allowing one to examine the formation of the DSB, DNA degradation at the break, and formation of the product. Denaturing gels and slot blots as well as PCR have provided important tools to follow the progression of resection in wild-type and mutant cells. PCR has also been important in allowing us to follow the kinetics of certain recombination intermediates such as the initiation of repair DNA synthesis or the removal of nonhomologous Y sequences during MAT switching. Finally chromatin immunoprecipitation has been used to follow the recruitment of key proteins to the DSB and in subsequent steps in DSB repair.

  7. Trans-complementation by human apurinic endonuclease (Ape) of hypersensitivity to DNA damage and spontaneous mutator phenotype in apn1-yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, D M; Bennett, R A; Marquis, J C; Ansari, P; Demple, B

    1995-01-01

    Abasic (AP) sites in DNA are potentially lethal and mutagenic. 'Class II' AP endonucleases initiate the repair of these and other DNA lesions. In yeast, the predominant enzyme of this type is Apn1, and its elimination sensitizes the cells to killing by simple alkylating agents or oxidants, and raises the rate of spontaneous mutation. We investigated the ability of the major human class II AP endonuclease, Ape, which is structurally unrelated to Apn1, to replace the yeast enzyme in vivo. Confocal immunomicroscopy studies indicate that approximately 25% of the Ape expressed in yeast is present in the nucleus. High-level Ape expression corresponding to approximately 7000 molecules per nucleus, equal to the normal Apn1 copy number, restored resistance to methyl methanesulfonate to near wild-type levels in Apn1-deficient (apn1-) yeast. Ape expression in apn1- yeast provided little protection against H2O2 challenges, consistent with the weak 3'-repair diesterase activity of the human enzyme. Ape expression at approximately 2000 molecules per nucleus reduced the spontaneous mutation rate of apn1- yeast to that seen for wild-type cells. Because Ape has a powerful AP endonuclease but weak 3'-diesterase activity, these findings indicate that endogenously generated AP sites can drive spontaneous mutagenesis. Images PMID:8559661

  8. Down-regulation of the DNA-repair endonuclease 8-oxo-guanine DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) by sodium dichromate in cultured human A549 lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hodges, N J; Chipman, J K

    2002-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a genotoxic human pulmonary carcinogen that elevates DNA oxidation, apparently through the generation of reactive DNA-damaging intermediates including Cr(V), Cr(IV) and reactive oxygen species. We tested the hypothesis that elevation of DNA oxidation may also be through inhibition of the expression of the repair glycosylase for 8-oxo deoxyguanine (hOGG1) in cultured A549 human lung epithelial cells. Treatment with sodium dichromate (0-100 microM, 16 h) resulted in a concentration-dependent decrease in the levels of OGG1 mRNA as measured by both RT-PCR and RNase protection assay. Sodium dichromate at 25 microM and above gave a marked reduction of OGG1 mRNA expression which was not seen at 1 microM and below. No effect on the expression of the apurinic endonuclease hAPE or the house-keeping gene GAPDH was observed at any of the concentrations of sodium dichromate investigated. Treatment of cells with the pro-oxidant H(2)O(2) (0-200 microM) for 16 h had no detectable effect on the levels of OGG1 mRNA or protein expression suggesting that the effect of sodium dichromate is not mediated by H(2)O(2). Western blotting demonstrated that sodium dichromate (100 microM; 16 h and >25 microM; 28 h) markedly reduced levels of OGG1 protein in nuclear cell extracts. Additionally, treatment of cells with sodium dichromate (>25 microM, 28 h) resulted in a concentration-dependent decrease in the ability of nuclear extracts to nick a synthetic oligonucleotide containing 8-oxo deoxyguanine (8-oxo dG). We conclude that the elevation of 8-oxo dG levels observed in A549 cells treated with sodium dichromate may be, at least in part, due to a reduced capacity to repair endogenous and hexavalent chromium-induced 8-oxo dG.

  9. Thermodynamics of Damaged DNA Binding and Catalysis by Human AP Endonuclease 1.

    PubMed

    Miroshnikova, A D; Kuznetsova, A A; Kuznetsov, N A; Fedorova, O S

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases play an important role in DNA repair and initiation of AP site elimination. One of the most topical problems in the field of DNA repair is to understand the mechanism of the enzymatic process involving the human enzyme APE1 that provides recognition of AP sites and efficient cleavage of the 5'-phosphodiester bond. In this study, a thermodynamic analysis of the interaction between APE1 and a DNA substrate containing a stable AP site analog lacking the C1' hydroxyl group (F site) was performed. Based on stopped-flow kinetic data at different temperatures, the steps of DNA binding, catalysis, and DNA product release were characterized. The changes in the standard Gibbs energy, enthalpy, and entropy of sequential specific steps of the repair process were determined. The thermodynamic analysis of the data suggests that the initial step of the DNA substrate binding includes formation of non-specific contacts between the enzyme binding surface and DNA, as well as insertion of the amino acid residues Arg177 and Met270 into the duplex, which results in the removal of "crystalline" water molecules from DNA grooves. The second binding step involves the F site flipping-out process and formation of specific contacts between the enzyme active site and the everted 5'-phosphate-2'-deoxyribose residue. It was shown that non-specific interactions between the binding surfaces of the enzyme and DNA provide the main contribution into the thermodynamic parameters of the DNA product release step.

  10. Selective inhibition by methoxyamine of the apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease activity associated with pyrimidine dimer-DNA glycosylases from Micrococcus luteus and bacteriophage T4

    SciTech Connect

    Liuzzi, M.; Weinfeld, M.; Paterson, M.C.

    1987-06-16

    The UV endonucleases from Micrococcus luteus and bacteriophage T4 possess two catalytic activities specific for the site of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in UV-irradiated DNA: a DNA glycosylase that cleaves the 5'-glycosyl bond of the dimerized pyrimidines and an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease that thereupon incises the phosphodiester bond 3' to the resulting apyrimidinic site. The authors have explored the potential use of methoxyamine, a chemical that reacts at neutral pH with AP sites in DNA, as a selective inhibitor of the AP endonuclease activities residing in the M. luteus and T4 enzymes. The presence of 50 mM methoxyamine during incubation of UV-treated, (/sup 3/H)thymine-labeled poly(dA) x poly(dT) with either enzyme preparation was found to protect completely the irradiated copolymer from endonucleolytic attack at dimer sites, as assayed by yield of acid-soluble radioactivity. In contrast, the dimer-DNA glycosylase activity of each enzyme remained fully functional, as monitored retrospectively by release of free thymine after either photochemical-(5 kJ/m/sup 2/, 254 nm) or photoenzymic- (Escherichia coli photolyase plus visible light) induced reversal of pyrimidine dimers in the UV-damaged substrate. The data demonstrate that the inhibition of the strand-incision reaction arises because of chemical modification of the AP sites and is not due to inactivation of the enzyme by methoxyamine. The results, combined with earlier findings for 5'-acting AP endonucleases, strongly suggest that methoxyamine is a highly specific inhibitor of virtually all AP endonucleases, irrespective of their modes of action, and may therefore prove useful in a wide variety of DNA repair studies.

  11. Primase-polymerases are a functionally diverse superfamily of replication and repair enzymes.

    PubMed

    Guilliam, Thomas A; Keen, Benjamin A; Brissett, Nigel C; Doherty, Aidan J

    2015-08-18

    Until relatively recently, DNA primases were viewed simply as a class of proteins that synthesize short RNA primers requisite for the initiation of DNA replication. However, recent studies have shown that this perception of the limited activities associated with these diverse enzymes can no longer be justified. Numerous examples can now be cited demonstrating how the term 'DNA primase' only describes a very narrow subset of these nucleotidyltransferases, with the vast majority fulfilling multifunctional roles from DNA replication to damage tolerance and repair. This article focuses on the archaeo-eukaryotic primase (AEP) superfamily, drawing on recently characterized examples from all domains of life to highlight the functionally diverse pathways in which these enzymes are employed. The broad origins, functionalities and enzymatic capabilities of AEPs emphasizes their previous functional misannotation and supports the necessity for a reclassification of these enzymes under a category called primase-polymerases within the wider functional grouping of polymerases. Importantly, the repositioning of AEPs in this way better recognizes their broader roles in DNA metabolism and encourages the discovery of additional functions for these enzymes, aside from those highlighted here.

  12. Primase-polymerases are a functionally diverse superfamily of replication and repair enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Guilliam, Thomas A.; Keen, Benjamin A.; Brissett, Nigel C.; Doherty, Aidan J.

    2015-01-01

    Until relatively recently, DNA primases were viewed simply as a class of proteins that synthesize short RNA primers requisite for the initiation of DNA replication. However, recent studies have shown that this perception of the limited activities associated with these diverse enzymes can no longer be justified. Numerous examples can now be cited demonstrating how the term ‘DNA primase’ only describes a very narrow subset of these nucleotidyltransferases, with the vast majority fulfilling multifunctional roles from DNA replication to damage tolerance and repair. This article focuses on the archaeo-eukaryotic primase (AEP) superfamily, drawing on recently characterized examples from all domains of life to highlight the functionally diverse pathways in which these enzymes are employed. The broad origins, functionalities and enzymatic capabilities of AEPs emphasizes their previous functional misannotation and supports the necessity for a reclassification of these enzymes under a category called primase-polymerases within the wider functional grouping of polymerases. Importantly, the repositioning of AEPs in this way better recognizes their broader roles in DNA metabolism and encourages the discovery of additional functions for these enzymes, aside from those highlighted here. PMID:26109351

  13. Biochemical characterization of a thermostable HNH endonuclease from deep-sea thermophilic bacteriophage GVE2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Likui; Huang, Yanchao; Xu, Dandan; Yang, Lixiang; Qian, Kaicheng; Chang, Guozhu; Gong, Yong; Zhou, Xiaojian; Ma, Kesen

    2016-09-01

    His-Asn-His (HNH) proteins are a very common family of small nucleic acid-binding proteins that are generally associated with endonuclease activity and are found in all kingdoms of life. Although HNH endonucleases from mesophiles have been widely investigated, the biochemical functions of HNH endonucleases from thermophilic bacteriophages remain unknown. Here, we characterized the biochemical properties of a thermostable HNH endonuclease from deep-sea thermophilic bacteriophage GVE2. The recombinant GVE2 HNH endonuclease exhibited non-specific cleavage activity at high temperature. The optimal temperature of the GVE2 HNH endonuclease for cleaving DNA was 60-65 °C, and the enzyme retained its DNA cleavage activity even after heating at 100 °C for 30 min, suggesting the enzyme is a thermostable endonuclease. The GVE2 HNH endonuclease cleaved DNA over a wide pH spectrum, ranging from 5.5 to 9.0, and the optimal pH for the enzyme activity was 8.0-9.0. Furthermore, the GVE2 HNH endonuclease activity was dependent on a divalent metal ion. While the enzyme is inactive in the presence of Cu(2+), the GVE2 HNH endonuclease displayed cleavage activity of varied efficiency with Mn(2+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+), Zn(2+), and Ni(2+). The GVE2 HNH endonuclease activity was inhibited by NaCl. This study provides the basis for determining the role of this endonuclease in life cycle of the bacteriophage GVE2 and suggests the potential application of the enzyme in molecular biology and biotechnology.

  14. Induction of base excision repair enzymes NTH1 and APE1 in rat spleen following aniline exposure.

    PubMed

    Ma, Huaxian; Wang, Jianling; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z; Boor, Paul J; Khan, M Firoze

    2013-03-15

    Mechanisms by which aniline exposure elicits splenotoxicity, especially a tumorigenic response, are not well-understood. Earlier, we have shown that aniline exposure leads to oxidative DNA damage and up-regulation of OGG1 and NEIL1/2 DNA glycosylases in rat spleen. However, the contribution of endonuclease III homolog 1 (NTH1) and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) in the repair of aniline-induced oxidative DNA damage in the spleen is not known. This study was, therefore, focused on examining whether NTH1 and APE1 contribute to the repair of oxidative DNA lesions in the spleen, in an experimental condition preceding tumorigenesis. To achieve this, male SD rats were subchronically exposed to aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day via drinking water for 30 days), while controls received drinking water only. By quantitating the cleavage products, the activities of NTH1 and APE1 were assayed using substrates containing thymine glycol (Tg) and tetrahydrofuran, respectively. Aniline treatment led to significant increases in NTH1- and APE1-mediated BER activity in the nuclear extracts of spleen of aniline-treated rats compared to the controls. NTH1 and APE1 mRNA expression in the spleen showed 2.9- and 3.2-fold increases, respectively, in aniline-treated rats compared to the controls. Likewise, Western blot analysis showed that protein expression of NTH1 and APE1 in the nuclear extracts of spleen from aniline-treated rats was 1.9- and 2.7-fold higher than the controls, respectively. Immunohistochemistry indicated that aniline treatment also led to stronger immunoreactivity for both NTH1 and APE1 in the spleens, confined to the red pulp areas. These results, thus, show that aniline exposure is associated with induction of NTH1 and APE1 in the spleen. The increased repair activity of NTH1 and APE1 could be an important mechanism for the removal of oxidative DNA lesions. These findings thus identify a novel mechanism through which NTH1 and APE1 may regulate the repair of

  15. Structural insights into recognition and repair of UV-DNA damage by Spore Photoproduct Lyase, a radical SAM enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Benjdia, Alhosna; Heil, Korbinian; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Carell, Thomas; Schlichting, Ilme

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial spores possess an enormous resistance to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. This is largely due to a unique DNA repair enzyme, Spore Photoproduct Lyase (SP lyase) that repairs a specific UV-induced DNA lesion, the spore photoproduct (SP), through an unprecedented radical-based mechanism. Unlike DNA photolyases, SP lyase belongs to the emerging superfamily of radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzymes and uses a [4Fe–4S]1+ cluster and SAM to initiate the repair reaction. We report here the first crystal structure of this enigmatic enzyme in complex with its [4Fe–4S] cluster and its SAM cofactor, in the absence and presence of a DNA lesion, the dinucleoside SP. The high resolution structures provide fundamental insights into the active site, the DNA lesion recognition and binding which involve a β-hairpin structure. We show that SAM and a conserved cysteine residue are perfectly positioned in the active site for hydrogen atom abstraction from the dihydrothymine residue of the lesion and donation to the α-thyminyl radical moiety, respectively. Based on structural and biochemical characterizations of mutant proteins, we substantiate the role of this cysteine in the enzymatic mechanism. Our structure reveals how SP lyase combines specific features of radical SAM and DNA repair enzymes to enable a complex radical-based repair reaction to take place. PMID:22761404

  16. Oxygen-induced changes in mitochondrial DNA and DNA repair enzymes in aging rat lens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Ouyang, Shan; Zhang, Lan; Tang, Xianling; Song, Zhen; Liu, Ping

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of patients with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO), vitrectomy and loss of vitreous gel during aging is associated with a high risk of subsequent development of nuclear cataract. Many studies proved that oxidation is the key reason of nuclear cataract. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are formed in mitochondria as a by-product of normal metabolism and as a consequence of exposure to environmental compounds. Therefore, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is at particularly high risk of ROS-induced damage. Oxidative damage to mtDNA has been implicated as a causative factor in a wide variety of degenerative diseases and aging. However, the effect of mtDNA damage to the lens has not been studied. The goals of the study were to identify if there was increased mtDNA damage in lens when the eye were exposed to hyperoxic or hypoxic conditions and also to evaluate the changes in gene expression of mtDNA base excision repair (mtBER) enzymes. Our data have shown that the damage of mtDNA, the expression of mtBER enzymes and the level of 8-OHdG in lens increased after inspired hyperoxia, which is likely associated with oxidative stress. However, there was no effect to mtDNA and mtBER enzymes in lens after inspired hypoxia. Nuclear cataract appeared rapidly at 14 month old rats in hyperoxia group, and lens kept transparency in other groups.

  17. Enzyme plus light therapy to repair DNA damage in ultraviolet-B-irradiated human skin

    PubMed Central

    Stege, Helger; Roza, Len; Vink, Arie A.; Grewe, Markus; Ruzicka, Thomas; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Krutmann, Jean

    2000-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UVB) (290–320 nm) radiation-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers within the DNA of epidermal cells are detrimental to human health by causing mutations and immunosuppressive effects that presumably contribute to photocarcinogenesis. Conventional photoprotection by sunscreens is exclusively prophylactic in nature and of no value once DNA damage has occurred. In this paper, we have therefore assessed whether it is possible to repair UVB radiation-induced DNA damage through topical application of the DNA-repair enzyme photolyase, derived from Anacystis nidulans, that specifically converts cyclobutane dimers into their original DNA structure after exposure to photoreactivating light. When a dose of UVB radiation sufficient to induce erythema was administered to the skin of healthy subjects, significant numbers of dimers were formed within epidermal cells. Topical application of photolyase-containing liposomes to UVB-irradiated skin and subsequent exposure to photoreactivating light decreased the number of UVB radiation-induced dimers by 40–45%. No reduction was observed if the liposomes were not filled with photolyase or if photoreactivating exposure preceded the application of filled liposomes. The UVB dose administered resulted in suppression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), a molecule required for immunity and inflammatory events in the epidermis. In addition, in subjects hypersensitive to nickel sulfate, elicitation of the hypersensitivity reaction in irradiated skin areas was prevented. Photolyase-induced dimer repair completely prevented these UVB radiation-induced immunosuppressive effects as well as erythema and sunburn-cell formation. These studies demonstrate that topical application of photolyase is effective in dimer reversal and thereby leads to immunoprotection. PMID:10660687

  18. Rev1 is a base excision repair enzyme with 5′-deoxyribose phosphate lyase activity

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Rajendra; Poltoratsky, Vladimir; Hou, Esther W.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2016-01-01

    Rev1 is a member of the Y-family of DNA polymerases and is known for its deoxycytidyl transferase activity that incorporates dCMP into DNA and its ability to function as a scaffold factor for other Y-family polymerases in translesion bypass events. Rev1 also is involved in mutagenic processes during somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes. In light of the mutation pattern consistent with dCMP insertion observed earlier in mouse fibroblast cells treated with a base excision repair-inducing agent, we questioned whether Rev1 could also be involved in base excision repair (BER). Here, we uncovered a weak 5′-deoxyribose phosphate (5′-dRP) lyase activity in mouse Rev1 and demonstrated the enzyme can mediate BER in vitro. The full-length Rev1 protein and its catalytic core domain are similar in their ability to support BER in vitro. The dRP lyase activity in both of these proteins was confirmed by NaBH4 reduction of the Schiff base intermediate and kinetics studies. Limited proteolysis, mass spectrometry and deletion analysis localized the dRP lyase active site to the C-terminal segment of Rev1's catalytic core domain. These results suggest that Rev1 could serve as a backup polymerase in BER and could potentially contribute to AID-initiated antibody diversification through this activity. PMID:27683219

  19. Salient Features of Endonuclease Platforms for Therapeutic Genome Editing.

    PubMed

    Certo, Michael T; Morgan, Richard A

    2016-03-01

    Emerging gene-editing technologies are nearing a revolutionary phase in genetic medicine: precisely modifying or repairing causal genetic defects. This may include any number of DNA sequence manipulations, such as knocking out a deleterious gene, introducing a particular mutation, or directly repairing a defective sequence by site-specific recombination. All of these edits can currently be achieved via programmable rare-cutting endonucleases to create targeted DNA breaks that can engage and exploit endogenous DNA repair pathways to impart site-specific genetic changes. Over the past decade, several distinct technologies for introducing site-specific DNA breaks have been developed, yet the different biological origins of these gene-editing technologies bring along inherent differences in parameters that impact clinical implementation. This review aims to provide an accessible overview of the various endonuclease-based gene-editing platforms, highlighting the strengths and weakness of each with respect to therapeutic applications.

  20. Encounter and extrusion of an intrahelical lesion by a DNA repair enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Yan; Spong, Marie C.; Nam, Kwangho; Banerjee, Anirban; Jiralerspong, Sao; Karplus, Martin; Verdine, Gregory L.; Harvard-Med; Harvard

    2010-01-12

    How living systems detect the presence of genotoxic damage embedded in a million-fold excess of undamaged DNA is an unresolved question in biology. Here we have captured and structurally elucidated a base-excision DNA repair enzyme, MutM, at the stage of initial encounter with a damaged nucleobase, 8-oxoguanine (oxoG), nested within a DNA duplex. Three structures of intrahelical oxoG-encounter complexes are compared with sequence-matched structures containing a normal G base in place of an oxoG lesion. Although the protein-DNA interfaces in the matched complexes differ by only two atoms - those that distinguish oxoG from G - their pronounced structural differences indicate that MutM can detect a lesion in DNA even at the earliest stages of encounter. All-atom computer simulations show the pathway by which encounter of the enzyme with the lesion causes extrusion from the DNA duplex, and they elucidate the critical free energy difference between oxoG and G along the extrusion pathway.

  1. Assessing PreCR™ repair enzymes for restoration of STR profiles from artificially degraded DNA for human identification.

    PubMed

    Robertson, James M; Dineen, Shauna M; Scott, Kristina A; Lucyshyn, Jonathan; Saeed, Maria; Murphy, Devonie L; Schweighardt, Andrew J; Meiklejohn, Kelly A

    2014-09-01

    Forensic scientists have used several approaches to obtain short tandem repeat (STR) profiles from compromised DNA samples, including supplementing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with enhancers and using procedures yielding reduced-length amplicons. For degraded DNA, the peak intensities of the alleles separated by electrophoresis generally decrease as the length of the allele increases. When the intensities of the alleles decrease below an established threshold, they are described as drop-outs, thus contributing to a partial STR profile. This work assesses the use of repair enzymes to improve the STR profiles from artificially degraded DNA. The commercial PreCR™ repair kit of DNA repair enzymes was tested on both purified DNA and native DNA in body fluids exposed to oxidizing agents, hydrolytic conditions, ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiation, and desiccation. The strategy was to restrict the level of DNA damage to that which yields partial STR profiles in order to test for allele restoration as opposed to simple allele enhancement. Two protocols were investigated for allele restoration: a sequential protocol using the manufacturer's repair procedure and a modified protocol reportedly designed for optimal STR analysis of forensic samples. Allele restoration was obtained with both protocols, but the peak height appeared to be higher for the modified protocol (determined by Mann-Kendall Trend Test). The success of the approach using the PreCR™ repair enzymes was sporadic; it led to allele restoration as well as allele drop-out. Additionally, allele restoration with the PreCR™ enzymes was compared with restoration by alternative, but commonly implemented approaches using Restorase™, PCRBoost™, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and the Minifiler™ STR system. The alternative methods were also successful in improving the STR profile, but their success also depended on the quality of the template encountered. Our results indicate the PreCR™ repair kit may

  2. The multifunctional DNA repair/redox enzyme Ape1/Ref-1 promotes survival of neurons after oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Vasko, Michael R; Guo, Chunlu; Kelley, Mark R

    2005-03-02

    Although correlative studies demonstrate a reduction in the expression of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease/redox effector factor (Ape1/Ref-1 or Ape1) in neural tissues after neuronal insult, the role of Ape1 in regulating neurotoxicity remains to be elucidated. To address this issue, we examined the effects of reducing Ape1 expression in primary cultures of hippocampal and sensory neurons on several endpoints of neurotoxicity induced by H2O2. Ape1 is highly expressed in hippocampal and sensory neurons grown in culture as indicated by immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting and activity. Exposing hippocampal or sensory neuronal cultures to 25 or 50 nM small interfering RNA to Ape1 (Ape1siRNA), respectively, for 48 h, causes a reduction in immunoreactive Ape1 by approximately 65 and 54%, and an equivalent loss in endonuclease activity. The reduced expression of Ape1 is maintained for up to 5 days after the siRNA in the medium is removed, whereas exposing cultures to scrambled sequence siRNA (SCsiRNA) has no effect of Ape1 protein levels. The reduction in Ape1 significantly reduces cell viability in cultures 24 h after a 1-h exposure to 25-300 microM H2O2, compared to SCsiRNA treated controls. In cells treated with SCsiRNA, exposure to 300 microM H2O2 reduced cell viability by 40 and 30% in hippocampal and sensory neuronal cultures, respectively, whereas cultures treated with Ape1siRNA lost 93 and 80% of cells after the peroxide. Reduced Ape1 levels also increase caspase-3 activity in the cells, 2-3-fold, 60min after a 1-h exposure to 100 microM H2O2 in the cultures. Exposing neuronal cultures with reduced expression of Ape1 to 65 microM H2O2 (hippocampal) or 300 microM H2O2 (sensory) for 1h results in a 3-fold and 1.5-fold increase in the phosphorylation of histone H2A.X compared to cells exposed to SCsiRNA. Overexpressing wild-type Ape1 in hippocampal and sensory cells using adenoviral expression constructs results in significant increase in cell viability after

  3. Enzymological and structural studies of the mechanism of promiscuous substrate recognition by the oxidative DNA repair enzyme AlkB

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bomina; Hunt, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Promiscuous substrate recognition, the ability to catalyze transformations of chemically diverse compounds, is an evolutionarily advantageous, but poorly understood phenomenon. The promiscuity of DNA repair enzymes is particularly important, because it enables diverse kinds of damage to different nucleotide bases to be repaired in a metabolically parsimonious manner. We present enzymological and crystallographic studies of the mechanisms underlying promiscuous substrate recognition by Escherichia coli AlkB, a DNA repair enzyme that removes methyl adducts and some larger alkylation lesions from endocyclic positions on purine and pyrimidine bases. In vitro Michaelis–Menten analyses on a series of alkylated bases show high activity in repairing N1-methyladenine (m1A) and N3-methylcytosine (m3C), comparatively low activity in repairing 1,N6-ethenoadenine, and no detectable activity in repairing N1-methylguanine or N3-methylthymine. AlkB has a substantially higher kcat and Km for m3C compared with m1A. Therefore, the enzyme maintains similar net activity on the chemically distinct substrates by increasing the turnover rate of the substrate with nominally lower affinity. Cocrystal structures provide insight into the structural basis of this “kcat/Km compensation,” which makes a significant contribution to promiscuous substrate recognition by AlkB. In analyzing a large ensemble of crystal structures solved in the course of these studies, we observed 2 discrete global conformations of AlkB differing in the accessibility of a tunnel hypothesized to control diffusion of the O2 substrate into the active site. Steric interactions between a series of protein loops control this conformational transition and present a plausible mechanism for preventing O2 binding before nucleotide substrate binding. PMID:19706517

  4. Enzymological and Structural Studies of the Mechanism of Promiscuous Substrate Recognition by the Oxidative DNA Repair Enzyme AlkB

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, B.; Hunt, J

    2009-01-01

    Promiscuous substrate recognition, the ability to catalyze transformations of chemically diverse compounds, is an evolutionarily advantageous, but poorly understood phenomenon. The promiscuity of DNA repair enzymes is particularly important, because it enables diverse kinds of damage to different nucleotide bases to be repaired in a metabolically parsimonious manner. We present enzymological and crystallographic studies of the mechanisms underlying promiscuous substrate recognition by Escherichia coli AlkB, a DNA repair enzyme that removes methyl adducts and some larger alkylation lesions from endocyclic positions on purine and pyrimidine bases. In vitro Michaelis-Menten analyses on a series of alkylated bases show high activity in repairing N1-methyladenine (m1A) and N3-methylcytosine (m3C), comparatively low activity in repairing 1,N6-ethenoadenine, and no detectable activity in repairing N1-methylguanine or N3-methylthymine. AlkB has a substantially higher kcat and Km for m3C compared with m1A. Therefore, the enzyme maintains similar net activity on the chemically distinct substrates by increasing the turnover rate of the substrate with nominally lower affinity. Cocrystal structures provide insight into the structural basis of this 'kcat/Km compensation,' which makes a significant contribution to promiscuous substrate recognition by AlkB. In analyzing a large ensemble of crystal structures solved in the course of these studies, we observed 2 discrete global conformations of AlkB differing in the accessibility of a tunnel hypothesized to control diffusion of the O2 substrate into the active site. Steric interactions between a series of protein loops control this conformational transition and present a plausible mechanism for preventing O2 binding before nucleotide substrate binding.

  5. Impact of topical application of sulfur mustard on mice skin and distant organs DNA repair enzyme signature.

    PubMed

    Sauvaigo, Sylvie; Sarrazy, Fanny; Batal, Mohamed; Caillat, Sylvain; Pitiot, Benoit; Mouret, Stéphane; Cléry-Barraud, Cécile; Boudry, Isabelle; Douki, Thierry

    2016-01-22

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent that, upon topical application, damages skin and reaches internal organs through diffusion in blood. Two major toxic consequences of SM exposure are inflammation, associated with oxidative stress, and the formation of alkylated DNA bases. In the present study, we investigated the impact of exposure to SM on DNA repair, using two different functional DNA repair assays which provide information on several Base Excision Repair (BER) and Excision/Synthesis Repair (ESR) activities. BER activities were reduced in all organs as early as 4h after exposure, with the exception of the defense systems against 8-oxo-guanine and hypoxanthine which were stimulated. Interestingly, the resulting BER intermediates could activate inflammation signals, aggravating the inflammation triggered by SM exposure and leading to increased oxidative stress. ESR activities were found to be mostly inhibited in skin, brain and kidneys. In contrast, in the lung there was a general increase in ESR activities. In summary, exposure to SM leads to a significant decrease in DNA repair in most organs, concomitant with the formation of DNA damage. These synergistic genotoxic effects are likely to participate in the high toxicity of this alkylating agent. Lungs, possibly better equipped with repair enzymes to handle exogenous exposure, are the exception.

  6. Structural Characterization of the Catalytic Subunit of a Novel RNA Splicing Endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Calvin, Kate; Hall, Michelle D.; Xu, Fangmin; Xue, Song; Li, Hong

    2010-07-13

    The RNA splicing endonuclease is responsible for recognition and excision of nuclear tRNA and all archaeal introns. Despite the conserved RNA cleavage chemistry and a similar enzyme assembly, currently known splicing endonuclease families have limited RNA specificity. Different from previously characterized splicing endonucleases in Archaea, the splicing endonuclease from archaeum Sulfolobus solfataricus was found to contain two different subunits and accept a broader range of substrates. Here, we report a crystal structure of the catalytic subunit of the S. solfataricus endonuclease at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. The structure, together with analytical ultracentrifugation analysis, identifies the catalytic subunit as an inactive but stable homodimer, thus suggesting the possibility of two modes of functional assembly for the active enzyme.

  7. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study on the oxygen binding and substrate hydroxylation step in AlkB repair enzymes.

    PubMed

    Quesne, Matthew G; Latifi, Reza; Gonzalez-Ovalle, Luis E; Kumar, Devesh; de Visser, Sam P

    2014-01-07

    AlkB repair enzymes are important nonheme iron enzymes that catalyse the demethylation of alkylated DNA bases in humans, which is a vital reaction in the body that heals externally damaged DNA bases. Its mechanism is currently controversial and in order to resolve the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes, a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study was performed on the demethylation of the N(1) -methyladenine fragment by AlkB repair enzymes. Firstly, the initial modelling identified the oxygen binding site of the enzyme. Secondly, the oxygen activation mechanism was investigated and a novel pathway was found, whereby the catalytically active iron(IV)-oxo intermediate in the catalytic cycle undergoes an initial isomerisation assisted by an Arg residue in the substrate binding pocket, which then brings the oxo group in close contact with the methyl group of the alkylated DNA base. This enables a subsequent rate-determining hydrogen-atom abstraction on competitive σ- and π-pathways on a quintet spin-state surface. These findings give evidence of different locations of the oxygen and substrate binding channels in the enzyme and the origin of the separation of the oxygen-bound intermediates in the catalytic cycle from substrate. Our studies are compared with small model complexes and the effect of protein and environment on the kinetics and mechanism is explained.

  8. High resolution mapping of modified DNA nucleobases using excision repair enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, D. Suzi; Ransom, Monica; Adane, Biniam; York, Kerri

    2014-01-01

    The incorporation and creation of modified nucleobases in DNA have profound effects on genome function. We describe methods for mapping positions and local content of modified DNA nucleobases in genomic DNA. We combined in vitro nucleobase excision with massively parallel DNA sequencing (Excision-seq) to determine the locations of modified nucleobases in genomic DNA. We applied the Excision-seq method to map uracil in E. coli and budding yeast and discovered significant variation in uracil content, wherein uracil is excluded from the earliest and latest replicating regions of the genome, possibly driven by changes in nucleotide pool composition. We also used Excision-seq to identify sites of pyrimidine dimer formation induced by UV light exposure, where the method could distinguish between sites of cyclobutane and 6-4 photoproduct formation. These UV mapping data enabled analysis of local sequence bias around pyrimidine dimers and suggested a preference for an adenosine downstream from 6-4 photoproducts. The Excision-seq method is broadly applicable for high precision, genome-wide mapping of modified nucleobases with cognate repair enzymes. PMID:25015380

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpr protein binds to the uracil DNA glycosylase DNA repair enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Bouhamdan, M; Benichou, S; Rey, F; Navarro, J M; Agostini, I; Spire, B; Camonis, J; Slupphaug, G; Vigne, R; Benarous, R; Sire, J

    1996-01-01

    The role of the accessory gene product Vpr during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection remains unclear. We have used the yeast two-hybrid system to identify cellular proteins that interact with Vpr and could be involved in its function. A cDNA clone which encodes the human uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG), a DNA repair enzyme involved in removal of uracil in DNA, has been isolated. Interaction between Vpr and UNG has been demonstrated by in vitro protein-protein binding assays using translated, radiolabeled Vpr and UNG recombinant proteins expressed as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein. Conversely, purified UNG has been demonstrated to interact with Vpr recombinant protein expressed as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that Vpr and UNG are associated within cells expressing Vpr. By using a panel of C- and N-terminally deleted Vpr mutants, we have determined that the core protein of Vpr, spanning amino acids 15 to 77, is involved in the interaction with UNG. We also demonstrate by in vitro experiments that the enzymatic activity of UNG is retained upon interaction with Vpr. PMID:8551605

  10. Molecular Recognition of DNA Damage Sites by Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonucleases

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, W. A.

    2005-07-28

    The DNA repair/redox factor AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) is a multifunctional protein which is known to to be essential for DNA repair activity in human cells. Structural/functional analyses of the APE activity is thus been an important research field to assess cellular defense mechanisms against ionizing radiation.

  11. Identification of a new restriction endonuclease R.NciII, from Neisseria cinerea.

    PubMed

    Piekarowicz, A

    1994-01-01

    Site-specific restriction endonuclease R. Nci II has been purified from Neisseria cinerea strain 32615. The enzyme recognizes the sequence 5' GATC 3' and its activity is inhibited by the presence of methylated adenine residue within the recognition sequence.

  12. Current advances in DNA repair: regulation of enzymes and pathways involved in maintaining genomic stability.

    PubMed

    Neher, Tracy M; Turchi, John J

    2011-06-15

    Novel discoveries in the DNA repair field have lead to continuous and rapid advancement of our understanding of not only DNA repair but also DNA replication and recombination. Research in the field transcends numerous areas of biology, biochemistry, physiology, and medicine, making significant connections across these broad areas of study. From early studies conducted in bacterial systems to current analyses in eukaryotic systems and human disease, the innovative research into the mechanisms of repair machines and the consequences of ineffective DNA repair has impacted a wide scientific community. This Forum contains a select mix of primary research articles in addition to a number of timely reviews covering a subset of DNA repair pathways where recent advances and novel discoveries are improving our understanding of DNA repair, its regulation, and implications to human disease.

  13. Critical determinants for substrate recognition and catalysis in the M. tuberculosis class II AP-endonuclease/3'-5' exonuclease III.

    PubMed

    Khanam, Taran; Shukla, Ankita; Rai, Niyati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2015-05-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis AP-endonuclease/3'-5' exodeoxyribonuclease (MtbXthA) is an important player in DNA base excision repair (BER). We demonstrate that the enzyme has robust apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease activity, 3'-5' exonuclease, phosphatase, and phosphodiesterase activities. The enzyme functions as an AP-endonuclease at high ionic environments, while the 3'-5'-exonuclease activity is predominant at low ionic environments. Our molecular modelling and mutational experiments show that E57 and D251 are critical for catalysis. Although nicked DNA and gapped DNA are fair substrates of MtbXthA, the gap-size did not affect the excision activity and furthermore, a substrate with a recessed 3'-end is preferred. To understand the determinants of abasic-site recognition, we examined the possible roles of (i) the base opposite the abasic site, (ii) the abasic ribose ring itself, (iii) local distortions in the AP-site, and (iv) conserved residues located near the active site. Our experiments demonstrate that the first three determinants do not play a role in MtbXthA, and in fact the enzyme exhibits robust endonucleolytic activity against single-stranded AP DNA also. Regarding the fourth determinant, it is known that the catalytic-site of AP endonucleases is surrounded by conserved aromatic residues and intriguingly, the exact residues that are directly involved in abasic site recognition vary with the individual proteins. We therefore, used a combination of mutational analysis, kinetic assays, and structure-based modelling, to identify that Y237, supported by Y137, mediates the formation of the MtbXthA-AP-DNA complex and AP-site incision.

  14. Phosphorylation-Regulated Transitions in an Oligomeric State Control the Activity of the Sae2 DNA Repair Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiong; Chow, Julia; Bernstein, Kara A.; Makharashvili, Nodar; Arora, Sucheta; Lee, Chia-Fang; Person, Maria D.; Rothstein, Rodney

    2014-01-01

    In the DNA damage response, many repair and signaling molecules mobilize rapidly at the sites of DNA double-strand breaks. This network of immediate responses is regulated at the level of posttranslational modifications that control the activation of DNA processing enzymes, protein kinases, and scaffold proteins to coordinate DNA repair and checkpoint signaling. Here we investigated the DNA damage-induced oligomeric transitions of the Sae2 protein, an important enzyme in the initiation of DNA double-strand break repair. Sae2 is a target of multiple phosphorylation events, which we identified and characterized in vivo in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both cell cycle-dependent and DNA damage-dependent phosphorylation sites in Sae2 are important for the survival of DNA damage, and the cell cycle-regulated modifications are required to prime the damage-dependent events. We found that Sae2 exists in the form of inactive oligomers that are transiently released into smaller active units by this series of phosphorylations. DNA damage also triggers removal of Sae2 through autophagy and proteasomal degradation, ensuring that active Sae2 is present only transiently in cells. Overall, this analysis provides evidence for a novel type of protein regulation where the activity of an enzyme is controlled dynamically by posttranslational modifications that regulate its solubility and oligomeric state. PMID:24344201

  15. DNA damage in Fabry patients: An investigation of oxidative damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Biancini, Giovana Brondani; Moura, Dinara Jaqueline; Manini, Paula Regina; Faverzani, Jéssica Lamberty; Netto, Cristina Brinckmann Oliveira; Deon, Marion; Giugliani, Roberto; Saffi, Jenifer; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2015-06-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with loss of activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. In addition to accumulation of α-galactosidase A substrates, other mechanisms may be involved in FD pathophysiology, such as inflammation and oxidative stress. Higher levels of oxidative damage to proteins and lipids in Fabry patients were previously reported. However, DNA damage by oxidative species in FD has not yet been studied. We investigated basal DNA damage, oxidative DNA damage, DNA repair capacity, and reactive species generation in Fabry patients and controls. To measure oxidative damage to purines and pyrimidines, the alkaline version of the comet assay was used with two endonucleases, formamidopyrimidine DNA-glycosylase (FPG) and endonuclease III (EndoIII). To evaluate DNA repair, a challenge assay with hydrogen peroxide was performed. Patients presented significantly higher levels of basal DNA damage and oxidative damage to purines. Oxidative DNA damage was induced in both DNA bases by H2O2 in patients. Fabry patients presented efficient DNA repair in both assays (with and without endonucleases) as well as significantly higher levels of oxidative species (measured by dichlorofluorescein content). Even if DNA repair be induced in Fabry patients (as a consequence of continuous exposure to oxidative species), the repair is not sufficient to reduce DNA damage to control levels.

  16. Thermodynamics of Damaged DNA Binding and Catalysis by Human AP Endonuclease 1

    PubMed Central

    Miroshnikova, A. D.; Kuznetsova, A. A.; Kuznetsov, N. A.; Fedorova, O. S.

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases play an important role in DNA repair and initiation of AP site elimination. One of the most topical problems in the field of DNA repair is to understand the mechanism of the enzymatic process involving the human enzyme APE1 that provides recognition of AP sites and efficient cleavage of the 5’-phosphodiester bond. In this study, a thermodynamic analysis of the interaction between APE1 and a DNA substrate containing a stable AP site analog lacking the C1’ hydroxyl group (F site) was performed. Based on stopped-flow kinetic data at different temperatures, the steps of DNA binding, catalysis, and DNA product release were characterized. The changes in the standard Gibbs energy, enthalpy, and entropy of sequential specific steps of the repair process were determined. The thermodynamic analysis of the data suggests that the initial step of the DNA substrate binding includes formation of non-specific contacts between the enzyme binding surface and DNA, as well as insertion of the amino acid residues Arg177 and Met270 into the duplex, which results in the removal of “crystalline” water molecules from DNA grooves. The second binding step involves the F site flipping-out process and formation of specific contacts between the enzyme active site and the everted 5’-phosphate-2’-deoxyribose residue. It was shown that non-specific interactions between the binding surfaces of the enzyme and DNA provide the main contribution into the thermodynamic parameters of the DNA product release step. PMID:27099790

  17. The Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus ExoIII homologue Mth212 is a DNA uridine endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Georg, Jens; Schomacher, Lars; Chong, James P. J.; Majerník, Alan I.; Raabe, Monika; Urlaub, Henning; Müller, Sabine; Ciirdaeva, Elena; Kramer, Wilfried; Fritz, Hans-Joachim

    2006-01-01

    The genome of Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, as a hitherto unique case, is apparently devoid of genes coding for general uracil DNA glycosylases, the universal mediators of base excision repair following hydrolytic deamination of DNA cytosine residues. We have now identified protein Mth212, a member of the ExoIII family of nucleases, as a possible initiator of DNA uracil repair in this organism. This enzyme, in addition to bearing all the enzymological hallmarks of an ExoIII homologue, is a DNA uridine endonuclease (U-endo) that nicks double-stranded DNA at the 5′-side of a 2′-d-uridine residue, irrespective of the nature of the opposing nucleotide. This type of activity has not been described before; it is absent from the ExoIII homologues of Escherichia coli, Homo sapiens and Methanosarcina mazei, all of which are equipped with uracil DNA repair glycosylases. The U-endo activity of Mth212 is served by the same catalytic center as its AP-endo activity. PMID:17012282

  18. Human AP Endonuclease I Stimulates Multiple-Turnover Base Excision by Alkyladenine DNA Glycosylase†

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Michael R.; O’Brien, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) locates and excises a wide variety of damaged purine bases from DNA, including hypoxanthine that is formed by the oxidative deamination of adenine. We used steady state, pre-steady state, and single-turnover kinetic assays to show that the multiple-turnover excision of hypoxanthine in vitro is limited by release of the abasic DNA product. This suggests the possibility that the product release step is regulated in vivo by interactions with other base excision repair (BER) proteins. Such coordination of BER activities would protect the abasic DNA repair intermediate and ensure its correct processing. AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) is the predominant enzyme for processing abasic DNA sites in human cells. Therefore, we have investigated the functional effects of added APE1 on the base excision activity of AAG. We find that APE1 stimulates the multiple-turnover excision of hypoxanthine by AAG, but has no effect on single-turnover excision. Since the amino terminus of AAG has been implicated in other protein-protein interactions we also characterize the deletion mutant lacking the first 79 amino acids. We find that APE1 fully stimulates the multiple-turnover glycosylase activity of this mutant, demonstrating that the amino terminus of AAG is not strictly required for this functional interaction. These results are consistent with a model whereby APE1 displaces AAG from the abasic site, thereby coordinating the first two steps of the base excision repair pathway. PMID:19449863

  19. Restriction endonuclease MvaI is a monomer that recognizes its target sequence asymmetrically

    PubMed Central

    Kaus-Drobek, Magdalena; Czapinska, Honorata; Sokołowska, Monika; Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Szczepanowski, Roman H.; Urbanke, Claus; Bochtler, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Restriction endonuclease MvaI recognizes the sequence CC/WGG (W stands for A or T, ‘/’ designates the cleavage site) and generates products with single nucleotide 5′-overhangs. The enzyme has been noted for its tolerance towards DNA modifications. Here, we report a biochemical characterization and crystal structures of MvaI in an apo-form and in a complex with target DNA at 1.5 Å resolution. Our results show that MvaI is a monomer and recognizes its pseudosymmetric target sequence asymmetrically. The enzyme consists of two lobes. The catalytic lobe anchors the active site residues Glu36, Asp50, Glu55 and Lys57 and contacts the bases from the minor grove side. The recognition lobe mediates all major grove interactions with the bases. The enzyme in the crystal is bound to the strand with T at the center of the recognition sequence. The crystal structure with calcium ions and DNA mimics the prereactive state. MvaI shows structural similarities to BcnI, which cleaves the related sequence CC/SGG and to MutH enzyme, which is a component of the DNA repair machinery, and nicks one DNA strand instead of making a double-strand break. PMID:17344322

  20. Removal of hydantoin products of 8-oxoguanine oxidation by the Escherichia coli DNA repair enzyme, FPG.

    PubMed

    Leipold, M D; Muller, J G; Burrows, C J; David, S S

    2000-12-05

    An intriguing feature of 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (OG) is that it is highly reactive toward further oxidation. Indeed, OG has been shown to be a "hot spot" for oxidative damage and susceptible to oxidation by a variety of cellular oxidants. Recent work has identified two new DNA lesions, guanidinohydantoin (Gh) and spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp), resulting from one-electron oxidation of OG. The presence of Gh and Sp lesions in DNA templates has been shown to result in misinsertion of G and A by DNA polymerases, and therefore, both are potentially mutagenic DNA lesions. The base excision repair (BER) glycosylases Fpg and MutY serve to prevent mutations associated with OG in Escherichia coli, and therefore, we have investigated the ability of these two enzymes to process DNA duplex substrates containing the further oxidized OG lesions, Gh and Sp. The Fpg protein, which removes OG and a variety of other oxidized purine base lesions, was found to remove Gh and Sp efficiently opposite all four of the natural DNA bases. The intrinsic rate of damaged base excision by Fpg was measured under single-turnover conditions and was found to be highly dependent upon the identity of the base opposite the OG, Gh, or Sp lesion; as expected, OG is removed more readily from an OG:C- than an OG:A-containing substrate. However, when adenine is paired with Gh or Sp, the rate of removal of these damaged lesions by Fpg was significantly increased relative to the rate of removal of OG from an OG:A mismatch. The adenine glycosylase MutY, which removes misincorporated A residues from OG:A mismatches, is unable to remove A paired with Gh or Sp. Thus, the activity of Fpg on Gh and Sp lesions may dramatically influence their mutagenic potential. This work suggests that, in addition to OG, oxidative products resulting from further oxidation of OG should be considered when evaluating oxidative DNA damage and its associated effects on DNA mutagenesis.

  1. An experimental double-blind irradiation study of a novel topical product (TPF 50) compared to other topical products with DNA repair enzymes, antioxidants, and growth factors with sunscreens: implications for preventing skin aging and cancer.

    PubMed

    Emanuele, Enzo; Spencer, James M; Braun, Martin

    2014-03-01

    The exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is a major risk factor for skin aging and the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Although traditional sunscreens remain the mainstay for the prevention of UVR-induced skin damage, they cannot ensure a complete protection against the whole spectrum of molecular lesions associated with UVR exposure. The formation of helix-distorting photoproducts such as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), as well as oxidative damage to DNA bases, including the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG) are among the key DNA lesions associated with photoaging and tumorigenesis. Besides DNA lesions, UVR-induced formation of free radicals can result in protein carbonylation (PC), a major form of irreversible protein damage that inactivates their biological function. This study compares a complex novel topical product (TPF50) consisting of three actives, ie, 1) traditional physical sunscreens (SPF 50), 2) a liposome-encapsulated DNA repair enzymes complex (photolyase, endonuclease, and 8-oxoguanine glycosylase [OGG1]), and 3) a potent antioxidant complex (carnosine, arazine, ergothionine) to existing products. Specifically, we assessed the ability of TFP50 vs those of DNA repair and antioxidant and growth factor topical products used with SPF 50 sunscreens in preventing CPD, 8OHdG, and PC formation in human skin biopsies after experimental irradiations. In head-to-head comparison studies, TPF50 showed the best efficacy in reducing all of the three molecular markers. The results indicated that the three TPF50 components had a synergistic effect in reducing CPD and PC, but not 8OHdG. Taken together, our results indicate that TPF50 improves the genomic and proteomic integrity of skin cells after repeated exposure to UVR, ultimately reducing the risk of skin aging and NMSC.

  2. Dietary folate suppresses DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis in a rat model and affects DMH-induced expression of four DNA repair enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sadik, Nermin A H; Shaker, Olfat G

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the potential role of folate in the dimethylhydrazine (DMH) colon cancer model in male Wistar rats. For induction of colon cancer, group 1 rats were injected subcutaneously with 30 mg DMH/kg body weight weekly for 30 wk. Group 2 received DMH vehicle. Group 3 rats received DMH as in Group 1 but their diet was supplemented with 8 mg folate/kg diet. Group 4 was fed diet supplemented with 8 mg folate/kg diet. Upregulation of DNA damage repair genes Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1, X-ray repair complementing defective repair in Chinese hamster cells 5, 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, associated with a reduction of folic acid level was observed in colons of DMH group. Reductions of these gene upregulations and a significant increase of colonic folic acid level occurred in the DMH group supplemented with folic acid and this group also had significant inhibition of tumor incidence, normal survival rate and histologically nearly normal colonic architecture. It can be concluded that folate supplementation exerts a potent protective effect on rat colon carcinogenesis via significant modulation of DNA repair, providing a mechanism by which it plays a role in the etiology of human cancer.

  3. Structural stability and endonuclease activity of a PI-SceI GFP-fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    Senejani, Alireza G.; Gogarten, J. Peter

    2007-01-01

    Homing endonucleases are site-specific and rare cutting endonucleases often encoded by intron or intein containing genes. They lead to the rapid spread of the genetic element that hosts them by a process termed 'homing'; and ultimately the allele containing the element will be fixed in the population. PI-SceI, an endonuclease encoded as a protein insert or intein within the yeast V-ATPase catalytic subunit encoding gene (vma1), is among the best characterized homing endonucleases. The structures of the Sce VMA1 intein and of the intein bound to its target site are known. Extensive biochemical studies performed on the PI-SceI enzyme provide information useful to recognize critical amino acids involved in self-splicing and endonuclease functions of the protein. Here we describe an insertion of the Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP) into a loop which is located between the endonuclease and splicing domains of the Sce VMA1 intein. The GFP is functional and the additional GFP domain does not prevent intein excision and endonuclease activity. However, the endonuclease activity of the newly engineered protein was different from the wild-type protein in that it required the presence of Mn2+ and not Mg2+ metal cations for activity. PMID:17389927

  4. Structural stability and endonuclease activity of a PI-SceI GFP-fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Senejani, Alireza G; Gogarten, J Peter

    2007-02-16

    Homing endonucleases are site-specific and rare cutting endonucleases often encoded by intron or intein containing genes. They lead to the rapid spread of the genetic element that hosts them by a process termed 'homing'; and ultimately the allele containing the element will be fixed in the population. PI-SceI, an endonuclease encoded as a protein insert or intein within the yeast V-ATPase catalytic subunit encoding gene (vma1), is among the best characterized homing endonucleases. The structures of the Sce VMA1 intein and of the intein bound to its target site are known. Extensive biochemical studies performed on the PI-SceI enzyme provide information useful to recognize critical amino acids involved in self-splicing and endonuclease functions of the protein. Here we describe an insertion of the Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP) into a loop which is located between the endonuclease and splicing domains of the Sce VMA1 intein. The GFP is functional and the additional GFP domain does not prevent intein excision and endonuclease activity. However, the endonuclease activity of the newly engineered protein was different from the wild-type protein in that it required the presence of Mn(2+) and not Mg(2+) metal cations for activity.

  5. Construction of a Full-Atomic Mechanistic Model of Human Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease APE1 for Virtual Screening of Novel Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Khaliullin, I G; Nilov, D K; Shapovalova, I V; Svedas, V K

    2012-04-01

    A full-atomic molecular model of human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease APE1, an important enzyme in the DNA repair system, has been constructed. The research consisted of hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics modeling of the enzyme-substrate interactions, as well as calculations of the ionization states of the amino acid residues of the active site of the enzyme. The choice of the APE1 mechanism with an Asp210 residue as a proton acceptor was validated by means of a generalization of modeling and experimental data. Interactions were revealed in the active site that are of greatest significance for binding the substrate and potential APE1 inhibitors (potential co-drugs of interest in the chemo- and radiotherapy of oncological diseases).

  6. Cooperation of the N-terminal Helicase and C-terminal endonuclease activities of Archaeal Hef protein in processing stalled replication forks.

    PubMed

    Komori, Kayoko; Hidaka, Masumi; Horiuchi, Takashi; Fujikane, Ryosuke; Shinagawa, Hideo; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2004-12-17

    Blockage of replication fork progression often occurs during DNA replication, and repairing and restarting stalled replication forks are essential events in all organisms for the maintenance of genome integrity. The repair system employs processing enzymes to restore the stalled fork. In Archaea Hef is a well conserved protein that specifically cleaves nicked, flapped, and fork-structured DNAs. This enzyme contains two distinct domains that are similar to the DEAH helicase family and XPF nuclease superfamily proteins. Analyses of truncated mutant proteins consisting of each domain revealed that the C-terminal nuclease domain independently recognized and incised fork-structured DNA. The N-terminal helicase domain also specifically unwound fork-structured DNA and Holliday junction DNA in the presence of ATP. Moreover, the endonuclease activity of the whole Hef protein was clearly stimulated by ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the N-terminal domain. These enzymatic properties suggest that Hef efficiently resolves stalled replication forks by two steps, which are branch point transfer to the 5'-end of the nascent lagging strand by the N-terminal helicase followed by template strand incision for leading strand synthesis by the C-terminal endonuclease.

  7. Detection of treatment-resistant infectious HIV after genome-directed antiviral endonuclease therapy.

    PubMed

    De Silva Feelixge, Harshana S; Stone, Daniel; Pietz, Harlan L; Roychoudhury, Pavitra; Greninger, Alex L; Schiffer, Joshua T; Aubert, Martine; Jerome, Keith R

    2016-02-01

    Incurable chronic viral infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. One potential approach to cure persistent viral infections is via the use of targeted endonucleases. Nevertheless, a potential concern for endonuclease-based antiviral therapies is the emergence of treatment resistance. Here we detect for the first time an endonuclease-resistant infectious virus that is found with high frequency after antiviral endonuclease therapy. While testing the activity of HIV pol-specific zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) alone or in combination with three prime repair exonuclease 2 (Trex2), we identified a treatment-resistant and infectious mutant virus that was derived from a ZFN-mediated disruption of reverse transcriptase (RT). Although gene disruption of HIV protease, RT and integrase could inhibit viral replication, a chance single amino acid insertion within the thumb domain of RT produced a virus that could actively replicate. The endonuclease-resistant virus could replicate in primary CD4(+) T cells, but remained susceptible to treatment with antiretroviral RT inhibitors. When secondary ZFN-derived mutations were introduced into the mutant virus's RT or integrase domains, replication could be abolished. Our observations suggest that caution should be exercised during endonuclease-based antiviral therapies; however, combination endonuclease therapies may prevent the emergence of resistance.

  8. Computational redesign of endonuclease DNA binding and cleavage specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, Justin; Havranek, James J.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Sussman, Django; Monnat, Raymond J.; Stoddard, Barry L.; Baker, David

    2006-06-01

    The reprogramming of DNA-binding specificity is an important challenge for computational protein design that tests current understanding of protein-DNA recognition, and has considerable practical relevance for biotechnology and medicine. Here we describe the computational redesign of the cleavage specificity of the intron-encoded homing endonuclease I-MsoI using a physically realistic atomic-level forcefield. Using an in silico screen, we identified single base-pair substitutions predicted to disrupt binding by the wild-type enzyme, and then optimized the identities and conformations of clusters of amino acids around each of these unfavourable substitutions using Monte Carlo sampling. A redesigned enzyme that was predicted to display altered target site specificity, while maintaining wild-type binding affinity, was experimentally characterized. The redesigned enzyme binds and cleaves the redesigned recognition site ~10,000 times more effectively than does the wild-type enzyme, with a level of target discrimination comparable to the original endonuclease. Determination of the structure of the redesigned nuclease-recognition site complex by X-ray crystallography confirms the accuracy of the computationally predicted interface. These results suggest that computational protein design methods can have an important role in the creation of novel highly specific endonucleases for gene therapy and other applications.

  9. Sequence specificity of DNA cleavage by Micrococcus luteus. gamma. endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Hentosh, P.; Henner, W.D.; Reynolds, R.J.

    1985-04-01

    DNA fragments of defined sequence have been used to determine the sites of cleavage by ..gamma..-endonuclease activity in extracts prepared from Micrococcus luteus. End-labeled DNA restriction fragments of pBR322 DNA that had been irradiated under nitrogen in the presence of potassium iodide or t-butanol were treated with M. luteus ..gamma.. endonuclease and analyzed on irradiated DNA preferentially at the positions of cytosines and thymines. DNA cleavage occurred immediately to the 3' side of pyrimidines in irradiated DNA and resulted in fragments that terminate in a 5'-phosphoryl group. These studies indicate that both altered cytosines and thymines may be important DNA lesions requiring repair after exposure to ..gamma.. radiation.

  10. Small-molecule inhibitors of bacterial AddAB and RecBCD helicase-nuclease DNA repair enzymes.

    PubMed

    Amundsen, Susan K; Spicer, Timothy; Karabulut, Ahmet C; Londoño, Luz Marina; Eberhart, Christina; Fernandez Vega, Virneliz; Bannister, Thomas D; Hodder, Peter; Smith, Gerald R

    2012-05-18

    The AddAB and RecBCD helicase-nucleases are related enzymes prevalent among bacteria but not eukaryotes and are instrumental in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks and in genetic recombination. Although these enzymes have been extensively studied both genetically and biochemically, inhibitors specific for this class of enzymes have not been reported. We developed a high-throughput screen based on the ability of phage T4 gene 2 mutants to grow in Escherichia coli only if the host RecBCD enzyme, or a related helicase-nuclease, is inhibited or genetically inactivated. We optimized this screen for use in 1536-well plates and screened 326,100 small molecules in the NIH molecular libraries sample collection for inhibitors of the Helicobacter pylori AddAB enzyme expressed in an E. coli recBCD deletion strain. Secondary screening used assays with cells expressing AddAB or RecBCD and a viability assay that measured the effect of compounds on cell growth without phage infection. From this screening campaign, 12 compounds exhibiting efficacy and selectivity were tested for inhibition of purified AddAB and RecBCD helicase and nuclease activities and in cell-based assays for recombination; seven were active in the 0.1-50 μM range in one or another assay. Compounds structurally related to two of these were similarly tested, and three were active in the 0.1-50 μM range. These compounds should be useful in further enzymatic, genetic, and physiological studies of these enzymes, both purified and in cells. They may also lead to useful antibacterial agents, since this class of enzymes is needed for successful bacterial infection of mammals.

  11. Structure of the C-Terminal Half of UvrC Reveals an RNase H Endonuclease Domain with an Argonaute-like Catalytic Triad

    SciTech Connect

    Karakas,E.; Truglio, J.; Croteau, D.; Rhau, B.; Wang, L.; Van Houten, B.; Kisker, C.

    2007-01-01

    Removal and repair of DNA damage by the nucleotide excision repair pathway requires two sequential incision reactions, which are achieved by the endonuclease UvrC in eubacteria. Here, we describe the crystal structure of the C-terminal half of UvrC, which contains the catalytic domain responsible for 5' incision and a helix-hairpin-helix-domain that is implicated in DNA binding. Surprisingly, the 5' catalytic domain shares structural homology with RNase H despite the lack of sequence homology and contains an uncommon DDH triad. The structure also reveals two highly conserved patches on the surface of the protein, which are not related to the active site. Mutations of residues in one of these patches led to the inability of the enzyme to bind DNA and severely compromised both incision reactions. Based on our results, we suggest a model of how UvrC forms a productive protein-DNA complex to excise the damage from DNA.

  12. Biological significance of domain-oriented DNA repair in xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kantor, G.J.; Elking, C.F.

    1988-02-15

    The patterns (domain oriented versus a random location) and amounts of DNA excision repair, determined by standard density gradient techniques and sedimentation properties of partially repaired and UV-endonuclease-digested DNA in alkaline sucrose gradients, are reported for UV (254 nm)-irradiated nondividing xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C or A (XP-C, XP-A) and normal cells. Repair synthesis in relatively UV-resistant XP-C (XP4RO) cells is domain oriented and limited (10% of normal values) while it is randomly located and not as limited in more sensitive XP-A (XP8LO) cells. Thus, greater UV resistance is associated with a very limited but domain-oriented pattern of repair. In XP-C cells, both total and domain-oriented repair syntheses, while limited, increase with UV dose and plateau at about 15-20 J/m2, as observed for normal cells. We suggest that repair in XP-C is limited at the lower UV doses (less than 15-20 J/m2) by substrate levels in specific chromatin domains and not by availability of essential enzymes for domain-oriented repair. In contrast, the XP-A strain XP8LO exhibits normal repair activities for doses up to 5 J/m2 and limited repair at higher doses, indicating that repair occurs through normal pathways that are limited by reduced availability of an essential enzyme.

  13. Oncometabolite D-2-Hydroxyglutarate Inhibits ALKBH DNA Repair Enzymes and Sensitizes IDH Mutant Cells to Alkylating Agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pu; Wu, Jing; Ma, Shenghong; Zhang, Lei; Yao, Jun; Hoadley, Katherine A; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Perou, Charles M; Guan, Kun-Liang; Ye, Dan; Xiong, Yue

    2015-12-22

    Chemotherapy of a combination of DNA alkylating agents, procarbazine and lomustine (CCNU), and a microtubule poison, vincristine, offers a significant benefit to a subset of glioma patients. The benefit of this regimen, known as PCV, was recently linked to IDH mutation that occurs frequently in glioma and produces D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2-HG), a competitive inhibitor of α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). We report here that D-2-HG inhibits the α-KG-dependent alkB homolog (ALKBH) DNA repair enzymes. Cells expressing mutant IDH display reduced repair kinetics, accumulate more DNA damages, and are sensitized to alkylating agents. The observed sensitization to alkylating agents requires the catalytic activity of mutant IDH to produce D-2-HG and can be reversed by the deletion of mutant IDH allele or overexpression of ALKBH2 or AKLBH3. Our results suggest that impairment of DNA repair may contribute to tumorigenesis driven by IDH mutations and that alkylating agents may merit exploration for treating IDH-mutated cancer patients.

  14. Staphylococcus aureus Sepsis and Mitochondrial Accrual of the 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase DNA Repair Enzyme in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, Raquel R.; Suliman, Hagir B.; Fu, Ping; Welty-Wolf, Karen; Carraway, Martha Sue; MacGarvey, Nancy Chou; Withers, Crystal M.; Sweeney, Timothy E.; Piantadosi, Claude A.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Damage to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by the production of reactive oxygen species during inflammatory states, such as sepsis, is repaired by poorly understood mechanisms. Objectives: To test the hypothesis that the DNA repair enzyme, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1), contributes to mtDNA repair in sepsis. Methods: Using a well-characterized mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis, we analyzed molecular markers for mitochondrial biogenesis and OGG1 translocation into liver mitochondria as well as OGG1 mRNA expression at 0, 24, 48, and 72 hours after infection. The effects of OGG1 RNA silencing on mtDNA content were determined in control, tumor necrosis factor-α, and peptidoglycan-exposed rat hepatoma cells. Based on in situ analysis of the OGG1 promoter region, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays were performed for nuclear respiratory factor (NRF)-1 and NRF-2α GA-binding protein (GABP) binding to the promoter of OGG1. Measurements and Main Results: Mice infected with 107 cfu S. aureus intraperitoneally demonstrated hepatic oxidative mtDNA damage and significantly lower hepatic mtDNA content as well as increased mitochondrial OGG1 protein and enzyme activity compared with control mice. The infection also caused increases in hepatic OGG1 transcript levels and NRF-1 and NRF-2α transcript and protein levels. A bioinformatics analysis of the Ogg1 gene locus identified several promoter sites containing NRF-1 and NRF-2α DNA binding motifs, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed in situ binding of both transcription factors to the Ogg1 promoter within 24 hours of infection. Conclusions: These studies identify OGG1 as an early mitochondrial response protein during sepsis under regulation by the NRF-1 and NRF-2α transcription factors that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:20732986

  15. Effects of microinjected photoreactivating enzyme on thymine dimer removal and DNA repair synthesis in normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Roza, L.; Vermeulen, W.; Bergen Henegouwen, J.B.; Eker, A.P.; Jaspers, N.G.; Lohman, P.H.; Hoeijmakers, J.H. )

    1990-03-15

    UV-induced thymine dimers (10 J/m2 of UV-C) were assayed in normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts with a monoclonal antibody against these dimers and quantitative fluorescence microscopy. In repair-proficient cells dimer-specific immunofluorescence gradually decreased with time, reaching about 25% of the initial fluorescence after 27 h. Rapid disappearance of dimers was observed in cells which had been microinjected with yeast photoreactivating enzyme prior to UV irradiation. This photoreactivation (PHR) was light dependent and (virtually) complete within 15 min of PHR illumination. In general, PHR of dimers strongly reduces UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS). However, when PHR was applied immediately after UV irradiation, UDS remained unchanged initially; the decrease set in only after 30 min. When PHR was performed 2 h after UV exposure, UDS dropped without delay. An explanation for this difference is preferential removal of some type(s) of nondimer lesions, which is responsible for the PHR-resistant UDS immediately following UV irradiation. After the rapid removal of these photoproducts, the bulk of UDS is due to dimer repair. From the rapid effect of dimer removal by PHR on UDS it can be deduced that the excision of dimers up to the repair synthesis step takes considerably less than 30 min. Also in XP fibroblasts of various complementation groups the effect of PHR was investigated. The immunochemical dimer assay showed rapid PHR-dependent removal comparable to that in normal cells. However, the decrease of (residual) UDS due to PHR was absent (in XP-D) or much delayed (in XP-A and -E) compared to normal cells. This supports the idea that in these XP cells preferential repair of nondimer lesions does occur, but at a much lower rate.

  16. Lucanthone and its derivative hycanthone inhibit apurinic endonuclease-1 (APE1) by direct protein binding

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, M.; Naidu, M.; Agarwal, R.; Pena, L.A.; Cunha, L.; Mezei, M.; Shen, M.; Wilson, D.M.; Liu, Y.; Sanchez, Z.; Chaudhary, P.; Wilson, S.H.; Waring, M.J.

    2011-09-15

    Lucanthone and hycanthone are thioxanthenone DNA intercalators used in the 1980s as antitumor agents. Lucanthone is in Phase I clinical trial, whereas hycanthone was pulled out of Phase II trials. Their potential mechanism of action includes DNA intercalation, inhibition of nucleic acid biosyntheses, and inhibition of enzymes like topoisomerases and the dual function base excision repair enzyme apurinic endonuclease 1 (APE1). Lucanthone inhibits the endonuclease activity of APE1, without affecting its redox activity. Our goal was to decipher the precise mechanism of APE1 inhibition as a prerequisite towards development of improved therapeutics that can counteract higher APE1 activity often seen in tumors. The IC{sub 50} values for inhibition of APE1 incision of depurinated plasmid DNA by lucanthone and hycanthone were 5 {mu}M and 80 nM, respectively. The K{sub D} values (affinity constants) for APE1, as determined by BIACORE binding studies, were 89 nM for lucanthone/10 nM for hycanthone. APE1 structures reveal a hydrophobic pocket where hydrophobic small molecules like thioxanthenones can bind, and our modeling studies confirmed such docking. Circular dichroism spectra uncovered change in the helical structure of APE1 in the presence of lucanthone/hycanthone, and notably, this effect was decreased (Phe266Ala or Phe266Cys or Trp280Leu) or abolished (Phe266Ala/Trp280Ala) when hydrophobic site mutants were employed. Reduced inhibition by lucanthone of the diminished endonuclease activity of hydrophobic mutant proteins (as compared to wild type APE1) supports that binding of lucanthone to the hydrophobic pocket dictates APE1 inhibition. The DNA binding capacity of APE1 was marginally inhibited by lucanthone, and not at all by hycanthone, supporting our hypothesis that thioxanthenones inhibit APE1, predominantly, by direct interaction. Finally, lucanthone-induced degradation was drastically reduced in the presence of short and long lived free radical scavengers, e

  17. Functional complementation of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis AP endonuclease gene (lamap) in Escherichia coli mutant strains challenged with DNA damage agents

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo-Villela, Erika; Kitahara-Oliveira, Milene Yoko; dos Reis, Ana Beatriz de Bragança; Albano, Rodolpho Mattos; Da-Cruz, Alda Maria; Bello, Alexandre Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    During its life cycle Leishmania spp. face several stress conditions that can cause DNA damages. Base Excision Repair plays an important role in DNA maintenance and it is one of the most conserved mechanisms in all living organisms. DNA repair in trypanosomatids has been reported only for Old World Leishmania species. Here the AP endonuclease from Leishmania (L.) amazonensis was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli mutants defective on the DNA repair machinery, that were submitted to different stress conditions, showing ability to survive in comparison to the triple null mutant parental strain BW535. Phylogenetic and multiple sequence analyses also confirmed that LAMAP belongs to the AP endonuclease class of proteins. PMID:27223868

  18. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  19. Homing endonucleases from mobile group I introns: discovery to genome engineering

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Homing endonucleases are highly specific DNA cleaving enzymes that are encoded within genomes of all forms of microbial life including phage and eukaryotic organelles. These proteins drive the mobility and persistence of their own reading frames. The genes that encode homing endonucleases are often embedded within self-splicing elements such as group I introns, group II introns and inteins. This combination of molecular functions is mutually advantageous: the endonuclease activity allows surrounding introns and inteins to act as invasive DNA elements, while the splicing activity allows the endonuclease gene to invade a coding sequence without disrupting its product. Crystallographic analyses of representatives from all known homing endonuclease families have illustrated both their mechanisms of action and their evolutionary relationships to a wide range of host proteins. Several homing endonucleases have been completely redesigned and used for a variety of genome engineering applications. Recent efforts to augment homing endonucleases with auxiliary DNA recognition elements and/or nucleic acid processing factors has further accelerated their use for applications that demand exceptionally high specificity and activity. PMID:24589358

  20. Opposing roles of RNF8/RNF168 and deubiquitinating enzymes in ubiquitination-dependent DNA double-strand break response signaling and DNA-repair pathway choice

    PubMed Central

    Nakada, Shinichiro

    2016-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligases ring finger protein (RNF) 8 and RNF168 transduce the DNA double-strand break (DSB) response (DDR) signal by ubiquitinating DSB sites. The depletion of RNF8 or RNF168 suppresses the accumulation of DNA-repair regulating factors such as 53BP1 and RAP80 at DSB sites, suggesting roles for RNF8- and RNF168-mediated ubiquitination in DSB repair. This mini-review provides a brief overview of the RNF8- and RNF168-dependent DDR-signaling and DNA-repair pathways. The choice of DNA-repair pathway when RNF8- and RNF168-mediated ubiquitination-dependent DDR signaling is negatively regulated by deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) is reviewed to clarify how the opposing roles of RNF8/RNF168 and DUBs regulate ubiquitination-dependent DDR signaling and the choice of DNA-repair pathway. PMID:26983989

  1. Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) has 3' RNA phosphatase and 3' exoribonuclease activities.

    PubMed

    Chohan, Manbir; Mackedenski, Sebastian; Li, Wai-Ming; Lee, Chow H

    2015-01-30

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) is the predominant mammalian enzyme in DNA base excision repair pathway that cleaves the DNA backbone immediately 5' to abasic sites. In addition to its abasic endonuclease activity, APE1 has 3' phosphatase and 3'-5' exonuclease activities against DNA. We recently identified APE1 as an endoribonuclease that preferentially cleaves at UA, UG, and CA sites in single-stranded regions of RNAs and can regulate c-myc mRNA level and half-life in cells. APE1 can also endonucleolytically cleave abasic single-stranded RNA. Here, we show for the first time that the human APE1 has 3' RNA phosphatase and 3' exoribonuclease activities. Using three distinct RNA substrates, we show that APE1, but not RNase A, can remove the phosphoryl group from the 3' end of RNA decay products. Studies using various site-directed APE1 mutant proteins (H309N, H309S, D283N, N68A, D210N, Y171F, D308A, F266A, and D70A) suggest that the 3' RNA phosphatase activity shares the same active center as its other known nuclease activities. A number of APE1 variants previously identified in the human population, including the most common D148E variant, have greater than 80% reduction in the 3' RNA phosphatase activity. APE1 can remove a ribonucleotide from the 3' overhang of RNA decay product, but its 3'-5' exoribonuclease activity against unstructured poly(A), poly(C), and poly(U) RNAs is relatively weak. This study further underscores the significance of understanding the role of APE1 in RNA metabolism in vivo.

  2. Modulation of action of wheat seedling endonucleases WEN1 and WEN2 by histones.

    PubMed

    Fedoreyeva, L I; Smirnova, T A; Kolomijtseva, G Ya; Vanyushin, B F

    2013-05-01

    Wheat core histones and various subfractions of histone H1 modulate differently the action of endonucleases WEN1 and WEN2 from wheat seedlings. The character of this modulation depends on the nature of the histone and the methylation status of the substrate DNA. The modulation of enzyme action occurs at different stages of processive DNA hydrolysis and is accompanied by changes in the site specificity of the enzyme action. It seems that endonuclease WEN1 prefers to bind with protein-free DNA stretches in histone H1-DNA complex. The endonuclease WEN1 does not compete with histone H1/6 for DNA binding sites, but it does compete with histone H1/1, probably for binding with methylated sites of DNA. Unlike histone H1, the core histone H2b binds with endonuclease WEN1 and significantly increases its action. This is associated with changes in the site specificity of the enzyme action that is manifested by a significant increase in the amount of low molecular weight oligonucleotides and mononucleotides produced as a result of hydrolysis of DNA fragments with 120-140-bp length. The WEN2 endonuclease binds with histone-DNA complexes only through histones. The action of WEN2 is increased or decreased depending on the nature of the histone. Histone H1/1 stimulated the exonuclease activity of WEN2. It is supposed that endonucleases WEN1 and WEN2, in addition to the catalytic domain, should have a regulatory domain that is involved in binding of histones. As histone H1 is mainly located in the linker chromatin areas, it is suggested that WEN2 should attack DNA just in the chromatin linker zones. As differentiated from WEN2, DNA hydrolysis with endonuclease WEN1 is increased in the presence of core histones and, in particular, of H2b. Endonuclease WEN1 initially attacks different DNA sites in chromatin than WEN2. Endonuclease WEN2 activity can be increased or diminished depending on presence of histone H1 subfractions. It seems that just different fractions of the histone H1 are

  3. Lesion Recognition and Cleavage by Endonuclease V

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jun; Gao, Honghai; Schallhorn, Kathryn A.; Harris, Rebecca M.; Cao, Weiguo; Ke, Pu Chun

    2008-01-01

    Endonuclease V (endo V) recognizes and cleaves deoxyinosine in deaminated DNA. These enzymatic activities are precursors of DNA repair and are fueled by metal ions such as Ca2+ and Mg2+, with the former being associated with protein binding and the latter with DNA cleavage. Using the technique of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) we determined the single-molecule kinetics of endo V in a catalytic cycle using a substrate of deoxyinosine-containing single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The ssDNA was labeled with TAMRA, a fluorescence donor, while the endo V was labeled with Cy5, a fluorescence acceptor. The time lapses of FRET, resulting from the sequential association, recognition, and dissociation of the deoxyinosine by the endo V, were determined at 5.9 s, 14.5 s, and 9.1 s, respectively, in the presence of Mg2+. In contrast, the process of deoxyinosine recognition appeared little affected by the metal type. The prolonged association and dissociation events in the presence of the Ca2+-Mg2+ combination, as compared to that of Mg2+ alone, support the hypothesis that endo V has two metal binding sites to regulate its enzymatic activities. PMID:17521169

  4. Head and neck squamous-cell cancer and its association with polymorphic enzymes of xenobiotic metabolism and repair.

    PubMed

    Harth, Volker; Schafer, Martin; Abel, Josef; Maintz, Laura; Neuhaus, Thomas; Besuden, Mette; Primke, Robert; Wilkesmann, Anja; Thier, Ricarda; Vetter, Hans; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Bruning, Thomas; Bolt, Hermann M; Ickstadt, Katja

    2008-01-01

    Tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, and occupational exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are the major proven risk factors for human head and neck squamous-cell cancer (HNSCC). Major research focus on gene-environment interactions concerning HNSCC has been on genes encoding enzymes of metabolism for tobacco smoke constituents and repair enzymes. To investigate the role of genetically determined individual predispositions in enzymes of xenobiotic metabolism and in repair enzymes under the exogenous risk factor tobacco smoke in the carcinogenesis of HNSCC, we conducted a case-control study on 312 cases and 300 noncancer controls. We focused on the impact of 22 sequence variations in CYP1A1, CYP1B1, CYP2E1, ERCC2/XPD, GSTM1, GSTP1, GSTT1, NAT2, NQO1, and XRCC1. To assess relevant main and interactive effects of polymorphic genes on the susceptibility to HNSCC we used statistical models such as logic regression and a Bayesian version of logic regression. In subgroup analysis of nonsmokers, main effects in ERCC2 (Lys751Gln) C/C genotype and combined ERCC2 (Arg156Arg) C/A and A/A genotypes were predominant. When stratifying for smokers, the data revealed main effects on combined CYP1B1 (Leu432Val) C/G and G/G genotypes, followed by CYP1B1 (Leu432Val) G/G genotype and CYP2E1 (-70G>T) G/T genotype. When fitting logistic regression models including relevant main effects and interactions in smokers, we found relevant associations of CYP1B1 (Leu432Val) C/G genotype and CYP2E1 (-70G>T) G/T genotype (OR, 10.84; 95% CI, 1.64-71.53) as well as CYP1B1 (Leu432Val) G/G genotype and GSTM1 null/null genotype (OR, 11.79; 95% CI, 2.18-63.77) with HNSCC. The findings underline the relevance of genotypes of polymorphic CYP1B1 combined with exposures to tobacco smoke.

  5. A novel exocytoplasmic endonuclease from Streptomyces antibioticus.

    PubMed Central

    Cal, S; Aparicio, J F; de los Reyes-Gavilan, C G; Nicieza, R G; Sanchez, J

    1995-01-01

    A new exocytoplasmic, nutritionally controlled endodeoxyribonuclease (EC 3.1.21.-) was purified to homogeneity from Streptomyces antibioticus. The enzyme showed an apparent molecular mass of 29 kDa (being active in the monomeric form) and a pI of approximately 7.8. The nuclease hydrolysed endonucleolytically double-stranded circular and linear DNA. The enzyme makes nicks in one strand of the DNA in G-rich regions, leaving either 5' or 3' short, single-stranded overhangs with 3'-hydroxy and 5'-phosphate termini. Breaks in the DNA occur when two nicks in opposite strands are close together. The enzyme had an optimum pH of 7.5 and an absolute requirement for bivalent cations and > or = 100 mM NaCl in the reaction buffer. Activity was greatly diminished in the presence of phosphate, Hg2+ or iodoacetate and was stimulated by dimethyl sulphoxide. Single-stranded DNA was a much poorer substrate than double-stranded DNA. The nuclease hydrolyses sequences of three or preferably more (dG).(dC) tracts in the DNA. The initial specificity shifts to other sequences (including sequences shorter than those initially hydrolysed) during the course of the reaction, giving the changing pattern of bands observed in agarose gels. 5-Methylcytosine-hemimethylated DNA is not hydrolysed by the nuclease. The properties of this novel enzyme suggest a relationship with class II restriction endonucleases and also with some eukaryotic nucleases. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7864833

  6. Crystal Structure of the Homing Endonuclease I-CvuI Provides a New Template for Genome Modification*

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Rafael; Redondo, Pilar; López-Méndez, Blanca; Villate, Maider; Merino, Nekane; Blanco, Francisco J.; Valton, Julien; Grizot, Silvestre; Duchateau, Phillipe; Prieto, Jesús; Montoya, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Homing endonucleases recognize and generate a DNA double-strand break, which has been used to promote gene targeting. These enzymes recognize long DNA stretches; they are highly sequence-specific enzymes and display a very low frequency of cleavage even in complete genomes. Although a large number of homing endonucleases have been identified, the landscape of possible target sequences is still very limited to cover the complexity of the whole eukaryotic genome. Therefore, the finding and molecular analysis of homing endonucleases identified but not yet characterized may widen the landscape of possible target sequences. The previous characterization of protein-DNA interaction before the engineering of new homing endonucleases is essential for further enzyme modification. Here we report the crystal structure of I-CvuI in complex with its target DNA and with the target DNA of I-CreI, a homologue enzyme widely used in genome engineering. To characterize the enzyme cleavage mechanism, we have solved the I-CvuI DNA structures in the presence of non-catalytic (Ca2+) and catalytic ions (Mg2+). We have also analyzed the metal dependence of DNA cleavage using Mg2+ ions at different concentrations ranging from non-cleavable to cleavable concentrations obtained from in vitro cleavage experiments. The structure of I-CvuI homing endonuclease expands the current repertoire for engineering custom specificities, both by itself as a new scaffold alone and in hybrid constructs with other related homing endonucleases or other DNA-binding protein templates. PMID:26363068

  7. Crystal structure and assembly of the functional Nanoarchaeum equitans tRNA splicing endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Michelle; Xue, Song; Erdman, Rachel; Randau, Lennart; Söll, Dieter; Li, Hong

    2009-10-27

    The RNA splicing and processing endonuclease from Nanoarchaeum equitans (NEQ) belongs to the recently identified ({alpha}{beta}){sub 2} family of splicing endonucleases that require two different subunits for splicing activity. N. equitans splicing endonuclease comprises the catalytic subunit (NEQ205) and the structural subunit (NEQ261). Here, we report the crystal structure of the functional NEQ enzyme at 2.1 {angstrom} containing both subunits, as well as that of the NEQ261 subunit alone at 2.2 {angstrom}. The functional enzyme resembles previously known {alpha}{sub 2} and {alpha}{sub 4} endonucleases but forms a heterotetramer: a dimer of two heterodimers of the catalytic subunit (NEQ205) and the structural subunit (NEQ261). Surprisingly, NEQ261 alone forms a homodimer, similar to the previously known homodimer of the catalytic subunit. The homodimers of isolated subunits are inhibitory to heterodimerization as illustrated by a covalently linked catalytic homodimer that had no RNA cleavage activity upon mixing with the structural subunit. Detailed structural comparison reveals a more favorable hetero- than homodimerization interface, thereby suggesting a possible regulation mechanism of enzyme assembly through available subunits. Finally, the uniquely flexible active site of the NEQ endonuclease provides a possible explanation for its broader substrate specificity.

  8. Delineation of structural domains and identification of functionally important residues in DNA repair enzyme exonuclease VII

    PubMed Central

    Poleszak, Katarzyna; Kaminska, Katarzyna H.; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Lupas, Andrei; Skowronek, Krzysztof J.; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2012-01-01

    Exonuclease VII (ExoVII) is a bacterial nuclease involved in DNA repair and recombination that hydrolyses single-stranded DNA. ExoVII is composed of two subunits: large XseA and small XseB. Thus far, little was known about the molecular structure of ExoVII, the interactions between XseA and XseB, the architecture of the nuclease active site or its mechanism of action. We used bioinformatics methods to predict the structure of XseA, which revealed four domains: an N-terminal OB-fold domain, a middle putatively catalytic domain, a coiled-coil domain and a short C-terminal segment. By series of deletion and site-directed mutagenesis experiments on XseA from Escherichia coli, we determined that the OB-fold domain is responsible for DNA binding, the coiled-coil domain is involved in binding multiple copies of the XseB subunit and residues D155, R205, H238 and D241 of the middle domain are important for the catalytic activity but not for DNA binding. Altogether, we propose a model of sequence–structure–function relationships in ExoVII. PMID:22718974

  9. Recognition sequences of restriction endonucleases and methylases--a review.

    PubMed

    Kessler, C; Neumaier, P S; Wolf, W

    1985-01-01

    The properties and sources of all known endonucleases and methylases acting site-specifically on DNA are listed. The enzymes are crossindexed (Table I), classified according to homologies within their recognition sequences (Table II), and characterized within Table II by the cleavage and methylation positions, the number of recognition sites on the DNA of the bacteriophages lambda, phi X174 and M13mp7, the viruses Ad2 and SV40, the plasmids pBR322 and pBR328 and the microorganisms from which they originate. Other tabulated properties of the restriction endonucleases include relaxed specificities (Table III), the structure of the restriction fragment ends (Table IV), and the sensitivity to different kinds of DNA methylation (Table V). Table VI classifies the methylases according to the nature of the methylated base(s) within their recognition sequences. This table also comprises those restriction endonucleases, which are known to be inhibited by the modified nucleotides. Furthermore, this review includes a restriction map of bacteriophage lambda DNA based on sequence data. Table VII lists the exact nucleotide positions of the cleavage sites, the length of the generated fragments ordered according to size, and the effects of the Escherichia coli dam- and dcmI-coded methylases M X Eco dam and M X Eco dcmI on the particular recognition sites.

  10. Lack of the DNA repair enzyme OGG1 sensitizes dopamine neurons to manganese toxicity during development.

    PubMed

    Cardozo-Pelaez, Fernando; Cox, David P; Bolin, Celeste

    2005-01-01

    Onset of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Parkinson-like syndromes has been associated with exposure to diverse environmental stimuli. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that exposure to elevated levels of manganese produces neuropathological changes localized to the basal ganglia, including neuronal loss and depletions in striatal dopamine content. However, understanding the mechanisms associated with manganese neurotoxicity has been hampered by the lack of a good rodent model. Elevated levels of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (oxo8dG) have been found in brain areas affected in PD. Whether increased DNA damage is responsible for neuronal degeneration or is a mere epiphenomena of neuronal loss remains to be elucidated. Thus, by using mice deficient in the ability to remove oxo8dG we aimed to determine if dysregulation of DNA repair coupled to manganese exposure would be detrimental to dopaminergic neurons. Wild-type and OGG1 knockout mice were exposed to manganese from conception to postnatal day 30; in both groups, exposure to manganese led to alterations in the neurochemistry of the nigrostriatal system. After exposure, dopamine levels were elevated in the caudate of wild-type mice. Dopamine was reduced in the caudate of OGG1 knockout mice, a loss that was paralleled by an increase in the dopamine index of turnover. In addition, the reduction of dopamine in caudate putamen correlated with the accumulation of oxo8dG in midbrain. We conclude that OGG1 function is essential in maintaining neuronal stability during development and identify DNA damage as a common pathway in neuronal loss after a toxicological challenge.

  11. Studies on the repair of damaged DNA in bacteriophage, bacterial and mammalian systems. Comprehensive report, 1 February 1981-15 September 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    We have explored the molecular mechanism of the repair of DNA at a number of different levels of biological organization, by investigating bacteriophage, bacterial, yeast and mammalian (including human) cells. We have demonstrated that uv endonuclease of phage T4 not only possesses pyrimidine dimer (PD)-DNA glycosylase activity but also apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease activity. The demonstration of both activities provided an explanation for the specific endonucleosytic cleavage of DNA at sites of pyrimidine dimers catalyzed by this small protein. A new apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease, specific for sites of of base loss in single stranded DNA has been isolated from E. celi and presumably recognizes these lesions in single stranded regions of duplex DNA. We have partially purified this enzyme and have carried out a preliminary characterization of the activity. We treated xeroderma pigmentosum and normal cells with sodium butyrate in the hope of restoring normal levels of excision repair to the former. Although this result was not obtained, we established that all cells treated with sodium butyrate show enhanced levels of repair synthesis, thus providing a means for increasing the sensitivity of this commonly used technique for measuring DNA repair in mammalian cells in culture.

  12. N-acylhydrazone inhibitors of influenza virus PA endonuclease with versatile metal binding modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcelli, Mauro; Rogolino, Dominga; Gatti, Anna; de Luca, Laura; Sechi, Mario; Kumar, Gyanendra; White, Stephen W.; Stevaert, Annelies; Naesens, Lieve

    2016-08-01

    Influenza virus PA endonuclease has recently emerged as an attractive target for the development of novel antiviral therapeutics. This is an enzyme with divalent metal ion(s) (Mg2+ or Mn2+) in its catalytic site: chelation of these metal cofactors is an attractive strategy to inhibit enzymatic activity. Here we report the activity of a series of N-acylhydrazones in an enzymatic assay with PA-Nter endonuclease, as well as in cell-based influenza vRNP reconstitution and virus yield assays. Several N-acylhydrazones were found to have promising anti-influenza activity in the low micromolar concentration range and good selectivity. Computational docking studies are carried on to investigate the key features that determine inhibition of the endonuclease enzyme by N-acylhydrazones. Moreover, we here describe the crystal structure of PA-Nter in complex with one of the most active inhibitors, revealing its interactions within the protein’s active site.

  13. N-acylhydrazone inhibitors of influenza virus PA endonuclease with versatile metal binding modes

    PubMed Central

    Carcelli, Mauro; Rogolino, Dominga; Gatti, Anna; De Luca, Laura; Sechi, Mario; Kumar, Gyanendra; White, Stephen W.; Stevaert, Annelies; Naesens, Lieve

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus PA endonuclease has recently emerged as an attractive target for the development of novel antiviral therapeutics. This is an enzyme with divalent metal ion(s) (Mg2+ or Mn2+) in its catalytic site: chelation of these metal cofactors is an attractive strategy to inhibit enzymatic activity. Here we report the activity of a series of N-acylhydrazones in an enzymatic assay with PA-Nter endonuclease, as well as in cell-based influenza vRNP reconstitution and virus yield assays. Several N-acylhydrazones were found to have promising anti-influenza activity in the low micromolar concentration range and good selectivity. Computational docking studies are carried on to investigate the key features that determine inhibition of the endonuclease enzyme by N-acylhydrazones. Moreover, we here describe the crystal structure of PA-Nter in complex with one of the most active inhibitors, revealing its interactions within the protein’s active site. PMID:27510745

  14. Molecular Cloning and 3D Structure Modeling of APEX1, DNA Base Excision Repair Enzyme from the Camel, Camelus dromedarius

    PubMed Central

    Ataya, Farid Shokry; Fouad, Dalia; Malik, Ajamaluddin; Saeed, Hesham Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    The domesticated one-humped camel, Camelus dromedarius, is one of the most important animals in the Arabian Desert. It is exposed most of its life to both intrinsic and extrinsic genotoxic factors that are known to cause gross DNA alterations in many organisms. Ionic radiation and sunlight are known producers of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), one of the causes for DNA lesions. The damaged DNA is repaired by many enzymes, among of them Base Excision Repair enzymes, producing the highly mutagenic apurinic/apyrimidinicsites (AP sites). Therefore, recognition of AP sites is fundamental to cell/organism survival. In the present work, the full coding sequence of a putative cAPEX1 gene was amplified for the first time from C. dromedarius by RT-PCR and cloned (NCBI accession number are HM209828 and ADJ96599 for nucleotides and amino acids, respectively). cDNA sequencing was deduced to be 1041 nucleotides, of which 954 nucleotides encode a protein of 318 amino acids, similar to the coding region of the APEX1 gene and the protein from many other species. The calculated molecular weight and isoelectric point of cAPEX1 using Bioinformatics tools was 35.5 kDa and 8.11, respectively. The relative expressions of cAPEX1 in camel kidney, spleen, lung and testis were examined using qPCR and compared with that of the liver using a 18S ribosomal subunit as endogenous control. The highest level of cAPEX1 transcript was found in the testis; 325% higher than the liver, followed by spleen (87%), kidney (20%) and lung (5%), respectively. The cAPEX1 is 94%–97% similar to their mammalian counterparts. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that cAPEX1 is grouped together with that of S. scrofa. The predicted 3D structure of cAPEX1 has similar folds and topology with the human (hAPEX1). The root-mean-square deviation (rmsd) between cAPEX1 and hAPEX1 was 0.582 and the Q-score was 0.939. PMID:22942721

  15. Conserved Endonuclease Function of Hantavirus L Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberger, Sylvia; Torriani, Giulia; Johansson, Maria U.; Kunz, Stefan; Engler, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses are important emerging pathogens belonging to the Bunyaviridae family. Like other segmented negative strand RNA viruses, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) also known as L protein of hantaviruses lacks an intrinsic “capping activity”. Hantaviruses therefore employ a “cap snatching” strategy acquiring short 5′ RNA sequences bearing 5′cap structures by endonucleolytic cleavage from host cell transcripts. The viral endonuclease activity implicated in cap snatching of hantaviruses has been mapped to the N-terminal domain of the L protein. Using a combination of molecular modeling and structure–function analysis we confirm and extend these findings providing evidence for high conservation of the L endonuclease between Old and New World hantaviruses. Recombinant hantavirus L endonuclease showed catalytic activity and a defined cation preference shared by other viral endonucleases. Based on the previously reported remarkably high activity of hantavirus L endonuclease, we established a cell-based assay for the hantavirus endonuclase function. The robustness of the assay and its high-throughput compatible format makes it suitable for small molecule drug screens to identify novel inhibitors of hantavirus endonuclease. Based on the high degree of similarity to RdRp endonucleases, some candidate inhibitors may be broadly active against hantaviruses and other emerging human pathogenic Bunyaviruses. PMID:27144576

  16. Structural aspects of catalytic mechanisms of endonucleases and their binding to nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Balaev, V. V.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Lashkov, A. A.

    2012-05-01

    Endonucleases (EC 3.1) are enzymes of the hydrolase class that catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of deoxyribonucleic and ribonucleic acids at any region of the polynucleotide chain. Endonucleases are widely used both in biotechnological processes and in veterinary medicine as antiviral agents. Medical applications of endonucleases in human cancer therapy hold promise. The results of X-ray diffraction studies of the spatial organization of endonucleases and their complexes and the mechanism of their action are analyzed and generalized. An analysis of the structural studies of this class of enzymes showed that the specific binding of enzymes to nucleic acids is characterized by interactions with nitrogen bases and the nucleotide backbone, whereas the nonspecific binding of enzymes is generally characterized by interactions only with the nucleic-acid backbone. It should be taken into account that the specificity can be modulated by metal ions and certain low-molecular-weight organic compounds. To test the hypotheses about specific and nonspecific nucleic-acid-binding proteins, it is necessary to perform additional studies of atomic-resolution three-dimensional structures of enzyme-nucleic-acid complexes by methods of structural biology.

  17. Structural aspects of catalytic mechanisms of endonucleases and their binding to nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Balaev, V. V.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Lashkov, A. A.

    2012-05-15

    Endonucleases (EC 3.1) are enzymes of the hydrolase class that catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of deoxyribonucleic and ribonucleic acids at any region of the polynucleotide chain. Endonucleases are widely used both in biotechnological processes and in veterinary medicine as antiviral agents. Medical applications of endonucleases in human cancer therapy hold promise. The results of X-ray diffraction studies of the spatial organization of endonucleases and their complexes and the mechanism of their action are analyzed and generalized. An analysis of the structural studies of this class of enzymes showed that the specific binding of enzymes to nucleic acids is characterized by interactions with nitrogen bases and the nucleotide backbone, whereas the nonspecific binding of enzymes is generally characterized by interactions only with the nucleic-acid backbone. It should be taken into account that the specificity can be modulated by metal ions and certain low-molecular-weight organic compounds. To test the hypotheses about specific and nonspecific nucleic-acid-binding proteins, it is necessary to perform additional studies of atomic-resolution three-dimensional structures of enzyme-nucleic-acid complexes by methods of structural biology.

  18. The RecD subunit of the Escherichia coli RecBCD enzyme inhibits RecA loading, homologous recombination, and DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Susan K.; Taylor, Andrew F.; Smith, Gerald R.

    2000-01-01

    The RecBCD enzyme is required for homologous recombination and DNA repair in Escherichia coli. The structure and function of RecBCD enzyme is altered on its interaction with the recombination hotspot Chi (5′-GCTGGTGG-3′). It has been hypothesized that the RecD subunit plays a role in Chi-dependent regulation of enzyme activity [Thaler, D. S., Sampson, E., Siddiqi, I., Rosenberg, S. M., Stahl, F. W. & Stahl, M. (1988) in Mechanisms and Consequences of DNA Damage Processing, eds. Friedberg, E. & Hanawalt, P. (Liss, New York), pp. 413–422; Churchill, J. J., Anderson, D. G. & Kowalczykowski, S. C. (1999) Genes Dev. 13, 901–911]. We tested the hypothesis that the RecD subunit inhibits recombination by deleting recD from the nuclease- and recombination-deficient mutant recBD1080ACD. We report here that the resulting strain, recBD1080AC, was proficient for recombination and DNA repair. Recombination proficiency was accompanied by a change in enzyme activity: RecBD1080AC enzyme loaded RecA protein onto DNA during DNA unwinding whereas RecBD1080ACD enzyme did not. Together, these genetic and biochemical results demonstrate that RecA loading by RecBCD enzyme is required for recombination in E. coli cells and suggest that RecD interferes with the enzyme domain required for its loading. A nuclease-dependent signal appears to be required for a change in RecD that allows RecA loading. Because RecA loading is not observed with wild-type RecBCD enzyme until it acts at a Chi site, our observations support the view that RecD inhibits recombination until the enzyme acts at Chi. PMID:10840065

  19. AP endonucleases process 5-methylcytosine excision intermediates during active DNA demethylation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiyoon; Jang, Hosung; Shin, Hosub; Choi, Woo Lee; Mok, Young Geun; Huh, Jin Hoe

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is a primary epigenetic modification regulating gene expression and chromatin structure in many eukaryotes. Plants have a unique DNA demethylation system in that 5-methylcytosine (5mC) is directly removed by DNA demethylases, such as DME/ROS1 family proteins, but little is known about the downstream events. During 5mC excision, DME produces 3′-phosphor-α, β-unsaturated aldehyde and 3′-phosphate by successive β- and δ-eliminations, respectively. The kinetic studies revealed that these 3′-blocking lesions persist for a significant amount of time and at least two different enzyme activities are required to immediately process them. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis AP endonucleases APE1L, APE2 and ARP have distinct functions to process such harmful lesions to allow nucleotide extension. DME expression is toxic to E. coli due to excessive 5mC excision, but expression of APE1L or ARP significantly reduces DME-induced cytotoxicity. Finally, we propose a model of base excision repair and DNA demethylation pathway unique to plants. PMID:25228464

  20. Nucleosomes Inhibit Cas9 Endonuclease Activity in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Hinz, John M; Laughery, Marian F; Wyrick, John J

    2015-12-08

    During Cas9 genome editing in eukaryotic cells, the bacterial Cas9 enzyme cleaves DNA targets within chromatin. To understand how chromatin affects Cas9 targeting, we characterized Cas9 activity on nucleosome substrates in vitro. We find that Cas9 endonuclease activity is strongly inhibited when its target site is located within the nucleosome core. In contrast, the nucleosome structure does not affect Cas9 activity at a target site within the adjacent linker DNA. Analysis of target sites that partially overlap with the nucleosome edge indicates that the accessibility of the protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) is the critical determinant of Cas9 activity on a nucleosome.

  1. Direct observation of DNA threading in flap endonuclease complexes

    PubMed Central

    AlMalki, Faizah A; Flemming, Claudia S; Zhang, Jing; Feng, Min; Sedelnikova, Svetlana E; Ceska, Tom; Rafferty, John B; Sayers, Jon R; Artymiuk, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of genome integrity requires that branched nucleic acid molecules are accurately processed to produce double-helical DNA. Flap endonucleases are essential enzymes that trim such branched molecules generated by Okazaki fragment synthesis during replication. Here, we report crystal structures of bacteriophage T5 flap endonuclease in complexes with intact DNA substrates, and products, at resolutions of 1.9–2.2 Å. They reveal single-stranded DNA threading through a hole in the enzyme enclosed by an inverted V-shaped helical arch straddling the active site. Residues lining the hole induce an unusual barb-like conformation in the DNA substrate juxtaposing the scissile phosphate and essential catalytic metal ions. A series of complexes and biochemical analyses show how the substrate’s single-stranded branch approaches, threads through, and finally emerges on the far side of the enzyme. Our studies suggest that substrate recognition involves an unusual “fly-casting, thread, bend and barb” mechanism. PMID:27273516

  2. Structures and activities of archaeal members of the LigD 3'-phosphoesterase DNA repair enzyme superfamily.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul; Nair, Pravin A; Das, Ushati; Zhu, Hui; Shuman, Stewart

    2011-04-01

    LigD 3'-phosphoesterase (PE) is a component of the bacterial NHEJ apparatus that performs 3'-end-healing reactions at DNA breaks. The tertiary structure, active site and substrate specificity of bacterial PE are unique vis-à-vis other end-healing enzymes. PE homologs are present in archaea, but their properties are uncharted. Here, we demonstrate the end-healing activities of two archaeal PEs--Candidatus Korarchaeum cryptofilum PE (CkoPE; 117 amino acids) and Methanosarcina barkeri PE (MbaPE; 151 amino acids)--and we report their atomic structures at 1.1 and 2.1 Å, respectively. Archaeal PEs are minimized versions of bacterial PE, consisting of an eight-stranded β barrel and a 3(10) helix. Their active sites are located in a crescent-shaped groove on the barrel's outer surface, wherein two histidines and an aspartate coordinate manganese in an octahedral complex that includes two waters and a phosphate anion. The phosphate is in turn coordinated by arginine and histidine side chains. The conservation of active site architecture in bacterial and archaeal PEs, and the concordant effects of active site mutations, underscore a common catalytic mechanism, entailing transition state stabilization by manganese and the phosphate-binding arginine and histidine. Our results fortify the proposal that PEs comprise a DNA repair superfamily distributed widely among taxa.

  3. Structures and Activities of Archaeal Members of the LigD 3-Phosphoesterase DNA Repair Enzyme Superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    P Smith; P Nair; U Das; H Zhu; S Shuman

    2011-12-31

    LigD 3'-phosphoesterase (PE) is a component of the bacterial NHEJ apparatus that performs 3'-end-healing reactions at DNA breaks. The tertiary structure, active site and substrate specificity of bacterial PE are unique vis-a-vis other end-healing enzymes. PE homologs are present in archaea, but their properties are uncharted. Here, we demonstrate the end-healing activities of two archaeal PEs - Candidatus Korarchaeum cryptofilum PE (CkoPE; 117 amino acids) and Methanosarcina barkeri PE (MbaPE; 151 amino acids) - and we report their atomic structures at 1.1 and 2.1 {angstrom}, respectively. Archaeal PEs are minimized versions of bacterial PE, consisting of an eight-stranded {beta} barrel and a 3{sub 10} helix. Their active sites are located in a crescent-shaped groove on the barrel's outer surface, wherein two histidines and an aspartate coordinate manganese in an octahedral complex that includes two waters and a phosphate anion. The phosphate is in turn coordinated by arginine and histidine side chains. The conservation of active site architecture in bacterial and archaeal PEs, and the concordant effects of active site mutations, underscore a common catalytic mechanism, entailing transition state stabilization by manganese and the phosphate-binding arginine and histidine. Our results fortify the proposal that PEs comprise a DNA repair superfamily distributed widely among taxa.

  4. Engineering a Nickase on the Homing Endonuclease I-DmoI Scaffold*

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Rafael; Marcaida, María José; Redondo, Pilar; Marenchino, Marco; Duchateau, Phillippe; D'Abramo, Marco; Montoya, Guillermo; Prieto, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Homing endonucleases are useful tools for genome modification because of their capability to recognize and cleave specifically large DNA targets. These endonucleases generate a DNA double strand break that can be repaired by the DNA damage response machinery. The break can be repaired by homologous recombination, an error-free mechanism, or by non-homologous end joining, a process susceptible to introducing errors in the repaired sequence. The type of DNA cleavage might alter the balance between these two alternatives. The use of “nickases” producing a specific single strand break instead of a double strand break could be an approach to reduce the toxicity associated with non-homologous end joining by promoting the use of homologous recombination to repair the cleavage of a single DNA break. Taking advantage of the sequential DNA cleavage mechanism of I-DmoI LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease, we have developed a new variant that is able to cut preferentially the coding DNA strand, generating a nicked DNA target. Our structural and biochemical analysis shows that by decoupling the action of the catalytic residues acting on each strand we can inhibit one of them while keeping the other functional. PMID:26045557

  5. Investigation of the Role of the Histidine-Aspartate Pair in the Human Exonuclease III-like Abasic Endonuclease, Ape1

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, David F. ); Hoyt, David W. ); Khazi, Fayaz A.; Bagu, John R. ); Lindsey, Andrea G.; Wilson, David M.

    2003-05-30

    Hydrogen bonded histidine-aspartate (His-Asp) pairs are critical constituents in several key enzymatic reactions. To date, the role that these pairs play in catalysis is best understood in serine and trypsin-like proteases, where structural and biochemical NMR studies have revealed important pKa values and hydrogen-bonding patterns within the catalytic pocket. However, the role of the His-Asp pair in metal-assisted catalysis is less clear. Here, we apply liquid state NMR to investigate the role of a critical histidine of apurinic endonuclease 1 (Ape1), a human DNA repair enzyme that cleaves adjacent to abasic sites in DNA using one or more divalent cations and an active site His-Asp pair. The studies within suggest that the Ape1 His- Asp pair functions as neither a general base catalyst nor a metal ligand. Rather, the pair likely stabilizes the pentavalent transition state necessary for phospho-transfer.

  6. Human Rad54 protein stimulates human Mus81–Eme1 endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Mazina, Olga M.; Mazin, Alexander V.

    2008-01-01

    Rad54, a key protein of homologous recombination, physically interacts with a DNA structure-specific endonuclease, Mus81–Eme1. Genetic data indicate that Mus81–Eme1 and Rad54 might function together in the repair of damaged DNA. In vitro, Rad54 promotes branch migration of Holliday junctions, whereas the Mus81–Eme1 complex resolves DNA junctions by endonucleolytic cleavage. Here, we show that human Rad54 stimulates Mus81–Eme1 endonuclease activity on various Holliday junction-like intermediates. This stimulation is the product of specific interactions between the human Rad54 (hRad54) and Mus81 proteins, considering that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad54 protein does not stimulate human Mus81–Eme1 endonuclease activity. Stimulation of Mus81–Eme1 cleavage activity depends on formation of specific Rad54 complexes on DNA substrates occurring in the presence of ATP and, to a smaller extent, of other nucleotide cofactors. Thus, our results demonstrate a functional link between the branch migration activity of hRad54 and the structure-specific endonuclease activity of hMus81–Eme1, suggesting that the Rad54 and Mus81–Eme1 proteins may cooperate in the processing of Holliday junction-like intermediates during homologous recombination or DNA repair. PMID:19017809

  7. Homing endonuclease I-TevIII: dimerization as a means to a double-strand break

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Justin B.; Stapleton, Michelle; Stanger, Matthew J.; Smith, Dorie; Dansereau, John T.; Derbyshire, Victoria; Belfort, Marlene

    2007-01-01

    Homing endonucleases are unusual enzymes, capable of recognizing lengthy DNA sequences and cleaving site-specifically within genomes. Many homing endonucleases are encoded within group I introns, and such enzymes promote the mobility reactions of these introns. Phage T4 has three group I introns, within the td, nrdB and nrdD genes. The td and nrdD introns are mobile, whereas the nrdB intron is not. Phage RB3 is a close relative of T4 and has a lengthier nrdB intron. Here, we describe I-TevIII, the H–N–H endonuclease encoded by the RB3 nrdB intron. In contrast to previous reports, we demonstrate that this intron is mobile, and that this mobility is dependent on I-TevIII, which generates 2-nt 3′ extensions. The enzyme has a distinct catalytic domain, which contains the H–N–H motif, and DNA-binding domain, which contains two zinc fingers required for interaction with the DNA substrate. Most importantly, I-TevIII, unlike the H–N–H endonucleases described so far, makes a double-strand break on the DNA homing site by acting as a dimer. Through deletion analysis, the dimerization interface was mapped to the DNA-binding domain. The unusual propensity of I-TevIII to dimerize to achieve cleavage of both DNA strands underscores the versatility of the H–N–H enzyme family. PMID:17289754

  8. Structural and functional characterization of deep-sea thermophilic bacteriophage GVE2 HNH endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Likui; Xu, Dandan; Huang, Yanchao; Zhu, Xinyuan; Rui, Mianwen; Wan, Ting; Zheng, Xin; Shen, Yulong; Chen, Xiangdong; Ma, Kesen; Gong, Yong

    2017-01-01

    HNH endonucleases in bacteriophages play a variety of roles in the phage lifecycle as key components of phage DNA packaging machines. The deep-sea thermophilic bacteriophage Geobacillus virus E2 (GVE2) encodes an HNH endonuclease (GVE2 HNHE). Here, the crystal structure of GVE2 HNHE is reported. This is the first structural study of a thermostable HNH endonuclease from a thermophilic bacteriophage. Structural comparison reveals that GVE2 HNHE possesses a typical ββα-metal fold and Zn-finger motif similar to those of HNH endonucleases from other bacteriophages, apart from containing an extra α-helix, suggesting conservation of these enzymes among bacteriophages. Biochemical analysis suggests that the alanine substitutions of the conserved residues (H93, N109 and H118) in the HNH motif of GVE2 HNHE abolished 94%, 60% and 83% of nicking activity, respectively. Compared to the wild type enzyme, the H93A mutant displayed almost the same conformation while the N108A and H118A mutants had different conformations. In addition, the wild type enzyme was more thermostable than the mutants. In the presence of Mn2+ or Zn2+, the wild type enzyme displayed distinct DNA nicking patterns. However, high Mn2+ concentrations were needed for the N109A and H118A mutants to nick DNA while Zn2+ inactivated their nicking activity. PMID:28211904

  9. HIV-1 and HIV-2 exhibit divergent interactions with HLTF and UNG2 DNA repair proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hrecka, Kasia; Hao, Caili; Shun, Ming-Chieh; Kaur, Sarabpreet; Swanson, Selene K.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Skowronski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    HIV replication in nondividing host cells occurs in the presence of high concentrations of noncanonical dUTP, apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing, enzyme-catalytic, polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3) cytidine deaminases, and SAMHD1 (a cell cycle-regulated dNTP triphosphohydrolase) dNTPase, which maintains low concentrations of canonical dNTPs in these cells. These conditions favor the introduction of marks of DNA damage into viral cDNA, and thereby prime it for processing by DNA repair enzymes. Accessory protein Vpr, found in all primate lentiviruses, and its HIV-2/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) SIVsm paralogue Vpx, hijack the CRL4DCAF1 E3 ubiquitin ligase to alleviate some of these conditions, but the extent of their interactions with DNA repair proteins has not been thoroughly characterized. Here, we identify HLTF, a postreplication DNA repair helicase, as a common target of HIV-1/SIVcpz Vpr proteins. We show that HIV-1 Vpr reprograms CRL4DCAF1 E3 to direct HLTF for proteasome-dependent degradation independent from previously reported Vpr interactions with base excision repair enzyme uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG2) and crossover junction endonuclease MUS81, which Vpr also directs for degradation via CRL4DCAF1 E3. Thus, separate functions of HIV-1 Vpr usurp CRL4DCAF1 E3 to remove key enzymes in three DNA repair pathways. In contrast, we find that HIV-2 Vpr is unable to efficiently program HLTF or UNG2 for degradation. Our findings reveal complex interactions between HIV-1 and the DNA repair machinery, suggesting that DNA repair plays important roles in the HIV-1 life cycle. The divergent interactions of HIV-1 and HIV-2 with DNA repair enzymes and SAMHD1 imply that these viruses use different strategies to guard their genomes and facilitate their replication in the host. PMID:27335459

  10. Ntg2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae repairs the oxidation products of 8-hydroxyguanine.

    PubMed

    Kim, J E; You, H J; Choi, J Y; Doetsch, P W; Kim, J S; Chung, M H

    2001-08-03

    In Escherichia coli, endonuclease III (endo III) repairs the oxidation products of 8-OHGua. However, the corresponding repair enzymes in eukaryotes have not been identified. Here we report that 8-hydroxyguanine (8-OHGua) is highly sensitive to further oxidation. We also show that Ntg2, a functional homolog of endo III in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is capable of nicking the irradiated duplex DNA containing 8-OHGua. Moreover, Ntg2 formed a stable complex with the DNA upon incubation with NaBH(4). In contrast, Ntg1, another functional homolog of endo III, showed no such activities. These findings indicate that Ntg2 is, at least in part, responsible for repairing the oxidation products of 8-OHGua in eukaryotic cells.

  11. RNA-dependent DNA endonuclease Cas9 of the CRISPR system: Holy Grail of genome editing?

    PubMed

    Gasiunas, Giedrius; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2013-11-01

    Tailor-made nucleases for precise genome modification, such as zinc finger or TALE nucleases, currently represent the state-of-the-art for genome editing. These nucleases combine a programmable protein module which guides the enzyme to the target site with a nuclease domain which cuts DNA at the addressed site. Reprogramming of these nucleases to cut genomes at specific locations requires major protein engineering efforts. RNA-guided DNA endonuclease Cas9 of the type II (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat) CRISPR-Cas system uses CRISPR RNA (crRNA) as a guide to locate the DNA target and the Cas9 protein to cut DNA. Easy programmability of the Cas9 endonuclease using customizable RNAs brings unprecedented flexibility and versatility for targeted genome modification. We highlight the potential of the Cas9 RNA-guided DNA endonuclease as a novel tool for genome surgery, and discuss possible constraints and future prospects.

  12. Phage T4 mobE promotes trans homing of the defunct homing endonuclease I-TevIII.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Gavin W; Edgell, David R

    2009-11-01

    Homing endonucleases are site-specific DNA endonucleases that typically function as mobile genetic elements by introducing a double-strand break (DSB) in genomes that lack the endonuclease, resulting in a unidirectional gene conversion event that mobilizes the homing endonuclease gene and flanking DNA. Here, we characterize phage T4-encoded mobE, a predicted free-standing HNH family homing endonuclease. We show that mobE is promoterless and dependent on upstream transcription for expression, and that an internal intrinsic terminator regulates mobE transcript levels. Crucially, in vivo mapping experiments revealed a MobE-dependent, strand-specific nick in the non-coding strand of the nrdB gene of phage T2. An internal deletion of the predicted HNH catalytic motif of MobE abolishes nicking, and reduces high-frequency inheritance of mobE. Sequence polymorphisms of progeny phage that inherit mobE are consistent with DSB repair pathways. Significantly, we found that mobility of the neighboring I-TevIII, a defunct homing endonuclease encoded within a group I intron interrupting the nrdB gene of phage T4, was dependent on an intact mobE gene. Thus, our data indicate that the stagnant nrdB intron and I-TevIII are mobilized in trans as a consequence of a MobE-dependent gene conversion event, facilitating persistence of genetic elements that have no inherent means of promoting their own mobility.

  13. Phage T4 mobE promotes trans homing of the defunct homing endonuclease I-TevIII

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Gavin W.; Edgell, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Homing endonucleases are site-specific DNA endonucleases that typically function as mobile genetic elements by introducing a double-strand break (DSB) in genomes that lack the endonuclease, resulting in a unidirectional gene conversion event that mobilizes the homing endonuclease gene and flanking DNA. Here, we characterize phage T4-encoded mobE, a predicted free-standing HNH family homing endonuclease. We show that mobE is promoterless and dependent on upstream transcription for expression, and that an internal intrinsic terminator regulates mobE transcript levels. Crucially, in vivo mapping experiments revealed a MobE-dependent, strand-specific nick in the non-coding strand of the nrdB gene of phage T2. An internal deletion of the predicted HNH catalytic motif of MobE abolishes nicking, and reduces high-frequency inheritance of mobE. Sequence polymorphisms of progeny phage that inherit mobE are consistent with DSB repair pathways. Significantly, we found that mobility of the neighboring I-TevIII, a defunct homing endonuclease encoded within a group I intron interrupting the nrdB gene of phage T4, was dependent on an intact mobE gene. Thus, our data indicate that the stagnant nrdB intron and I-TevIII are mobilized in trans as a consequence of a MobE-dependent gene conversion event, facilitating persistence of genetic elements that have no inherent means of promoting their own mobility. PMID:19773422

  14. Comparison of avian Chlamydia psittaci isolates by restriction endonuclease analysis and serovar-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, A A

    1991-01-01

    Avian Chlamydia psittaci isolates were examined by restriction endonuclease analysis and serovar-specific monoclonal antibodies and compared with ovine abortion and polyarthritis isolates. The avian isolates were divided into four serovars (turkey, psittacine, pigeon, and duck) based on their reactivity to the monoclonal antibodies. The DNA digest patterns were similar across the four avian serovars; most bands were identical when the isolates were tested with PstI, BamHI, and EcoRI restriction endonuclease enzymes. The turkey group restriction endonuclease analysis patterns were distinguished from those of the other avian strains by three to four band differences with all enzymes. The duck and pigeon isolates showed only minor DNA pattern differences when compared with the psittacine isolates. Four psittacine isolates from various locations in Texas had an extra band with the EcoRI restriction enzyme, suggesting that they were from a common source; however, they were indistinguishable from the other psittacine isolates when examined with the monoclonal antibodies. The avian isolates were distinctly different from either abortion or polyarthritis isolates by both restriction endonuclease analysis and monoclonal antibody analysis. The data demonstrate that the avian isolates form a distinct group or separate biovar with at least four serovars. Images PMID:1848867

  15. Activity of FEN1 endonuclease on nucleosome substrates is dependent upon DNA sequence but not flap orientation.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, Indu; Pepenella, Sharon; Hayes, Jeffrey J

    2011-05-20

    We demonstrated previously that human FEN1 endonuclease, an enzyme involved in excising single-stranded DNA flaps that arise during Okazaki fragment processing and base excision repair, cleaves model flap substrates assembled into nucleosomes. Here we explore the effect of flap orientation with respect to the surface of the histone octamer on nucleosome structure and FEN1 activity in vitro. We find that orienting the flap substrate toward the histone octamer does not significantly alter the rotational orientation of two different nucleosome positioning sequences on the surface of the histone octamer but does cause minor perturbation of nucleosome structure. Surprisingly, flaps oriented toward the nucleosome surface are accessible to FEN1 cleavage in nucleosomes containing the Xenopus 5S positioning sequence. In contrast, neither flaps oriented toward nor away from the nucleosome surface are cleaved by the enzyme in nucleosomes containing the high-affinity 601 nucleosome positioning sequence. The data are consistent with a model in which sequence-dependent motility of DNA on the nucleosome is a major determinant of FEN1 activity. The implications of these findings for the activity of FEN1 in vivo are discussed.

  16. Intermolecular and intramolecular quencher based quantum dot nanoprobes for multiplexed detection of endonuclease activity and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Zhao, Shulin; Shi, Ming; Chen, Jia; Chen, Zhen-Feng; Liang, Hong

    2011-12-01

    DNA cleavage by endonucleases plays an important role in many biological events such as DNA replication, recombination, and repair and is used as a powerful tool in medicinal chemistry. However, conventional methods for assaying endonuclease activity and inhibition by gel electrophoresis and chromatography techniques are time-consuming, laborious, not sensitive, or costly. Herein, we combine the high specificity of DNA cleavage reactions with the benefits of quantum dots (QDs) and ultrahigh quenching abilities of inter- and intramolecular quenchers to develop highly sensitive and specific nanoprobes for multiplexed detection of endonucleases. The nanoprobe was prepared by conjugating two sets of DNA substrates carrying quenchers onto the surface of aminated QDs through direct assembly and DNA hybridization. With this new design, the background fluorescence was significantly suppressed by introducing inter- and intramolecular quenchers. When these nanoprobes are exposed to the targeted endonucleases, specific DNA cleavages occur and pieces of DNA fragments are released from the QD surface along with the quenchers, resulting in fluorescence recovery. The endonuclease activity was quantified by monitoring the change in the fluorescence intensity. The detection was accomplished with a single excitation light. Multiplexed detection was demonstrated by simultaneously assaying EcoRI and BamHI (as model analytes) using two different emissions of QDs. The limits of detection were 4.0 × 10(-4) U/mL for EcoRI and 8.0 × 10(-4) U/mL for BamHI, which were at least 100 times more sensitive than traditional gel electrophoresis and chromatography assays. Moreover, the potential application of the proposed method for screening endonuclease inhibitors has also been demonstrated. The assay protocol presented here proved to be simple, sensitive, effective, and easy to carry out.

  17. Structure of the Endonuclease Domain of MutL: Unlicensed to Cut

    SciTech Connect

    Pillon, M.; Lorenowicz, J; Uckelmann, M; Klocko, A; Chung, Y; Modrich, P; Walker, G; Simmons, L; Friedhoff, P; Guarne, A

    2010-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair corrects errors that have escaped polymerase proofreading, increasing replication fidelity 100- to 1000-fold in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. The MutL protein plays a central role in mismatch repair by coordinating multiple protein-protein interactions that signal strand removal upon mismatch recognition by MutS. Here we report the crystal structure of the endonuclease domain of Bacillus subtilis MutL. The structure is organized in dimerization and regulatory subdomains connected by a helical lever spanning the conserved endonuclease motif. Additional conserved motifs cluster around the lever and define a Zn{sup 2+}-binding site that is critical for MutL function in vivo. The structure unveils a powerful inhibitory mechanism to prevent undesired nicking of newly replicated DNA and allows us to propose a model describing how the interaction with MutS and the processivity clamp could license the endonuclease activity of MutL. The structure also provides a molecular framework to propose and test additional roles of MutL in mismatch repair.

  18. Identification of Egyptian Fasciola species by PCR and restriction endonucleases digestion of the nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene.

    PubMed

    El-Gozamy, Bothina R; Shoukry, Nahla M

    2009-08-01

    Fascioliasis is one of the familiar zoonotic health problems of worldwide distribution including Egypt. In this study, a simple and rapid polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR/RFLPs) assay, using the common restriction endonucleases Aval, EcoRI, Eael, Sac11 and Avail was applied to differentiate between both Fasciola gigantica and F. hepatica. The five restriction endonucleases were used to differentiate between the two species of Fasciola based on -1950 bp long sequence of the 18S nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene. Aval and EcoRI restriction endonucleases failed to differentiate between the two Fasciola species when each restriction enzyme gave the same restriction patterns in both of them. However, F. gigantica and F. hepatica were well-differentiated when their small subunit ribosomal DNA were digested with Eael and Sac 11 restriction endonucleases.

  19. Base excision repair activities in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Rolseth, Veslemøy; Rundén-Pran, Elise; Neurauter, Christine Gran; Yndestad, Arne; Luna, Luisa; Aukrust, Pål; Ottersen, Ole Petter; Bjørås, Magnar

    2008-06-01

    The capacity for DNA repair is likely to be one of the factors that determine the vulnerability of neurons to ischemic stress and may influence the pathological outcome of stroke. In this report, initiation of base excision repair (BER) was assessed by analysis of enzyme activity and gene expression level of DNA glycosylases and AP-endonucleases in rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) - an in vitro model of stroke. Under basal conditions, AP-endonuclease activity and base removal of ethenoadenine and 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) were higher (by approximately 20-35 %) in CA3/fascia dentata (FD) than in CA1. Base removal of uracil did not differ between the two hippocampal regions, while removal of 5-hydroxyuracil (5-OHU) was slightly less efficient in CA3/FD than in CA1. Analyses performed immediately after 30 min of OGD revealed a decreased AP-endonuclease activity (by approximately 20%) in CA1 as well as CA3/FD, and an increased ethenoadenine activity (by approximately 25%) in CA1. Activities for 8-oxoG, 5-OHU and uracil showed no significant changes at this time point. At 8h after OGD, none of the enzyme activities differed from control values. Real-time RT-PCR showed that transcription of DNA glycosylases, including Ogg1, Nth1, Ung, Aag, Neil1 and Neil2 were not changed in response to OGD treatment (t=0 h). The hippocampal expression of Neil2 was low compared with the other DNA glycosylases. These data indicate that CA1 has a lower capacity than CA3/FD for removal of base lesions under basal conditions. The relatively low capacity for BER in basal conditions and the apparent failure to upregulate repair of oxidative damage after OGD might contribute to the high vulnerability of CA1 to ischemic injury.

  20. The heteromeric Nanoarchaeum equitans splicing endonuclease cleaves noncanonical bulge–helix–bulge motifs of joined tRNA halves

    PubMed Central

    Randau, Lennart; Calvin, Kate; Hall, Michelle; Yuan, Jing; Podar, Mircea; Li, Hong; Söll, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    Among the tRNA population of the archaeal parasite Nanoarchaeum equitans are five species assembled from separate 5′ and 3′ tRNA halves and four species derived from tRNA precursors containing introns. In both groups an intervening sequence element must be removed during tRNA maturation. A bulge–helix–bulge (BHB) motif is the hallmark structure required by the archaeal splicing endonuclease for recognition and excision of all introns. BHB motifs are recognizable at the joining sites of all five noncontinuous tRNA species, although deviations from the canonical BHB motif are clearly present in at least two of them. Here, we show that the N. equitans splicing endonuclease cleaves tRNA precursors containing normal introns, as well as all five noncontinuous precursor tRNAs, at the predicted splice sites, indicating the enzyme's dual role in the removal of tRNA introns and processing of tRNA halves to be joined in trans. The cleavage activity on a set of synthetic canonical and noncanonical BHB constructs showed that the N. equitans splicing endonuclease accepts a broader range of substrates than the homodimeric Archaeoglobus fulgidus enzyme. In contrast to the A. fulgidus endonuclease, the N. equitans splicing enzyme possesses two different subunits. This heteromeric endonuclease type, found in N. equitans, in all Crenarchaeota, and in Methanopyrus kandleri, is able to act on the noncanonical tRNA introns present only in these organisms, which suggests coevolution of enzyme and substrate. PMID:16330750

  1. The role of the PHP domain associated with DNA polymerase X from Thermus thermophilus HB8 in base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Nakane, Shuhei; Nakagawa, Noriko; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Masui, Ryoji

    2012-11-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is one of the most commonly used DNA repair pathways involved in genome stability. X-family DNA polymerases (PolXs) play critical roles in BER, especially in filling single-nucleotide gaps. In addition to a polymerase core domain, bacterial PolXs have a polymerase and histidinol phosphatase (PHP) domain with phosphoesterase activity which is also required for BER. However, the role of the PHP domain of PolX in bacterial BER remains unresolved. We found that the PHP domain of Thermus thermophilus HB8 PolX (ttPolX) functions as two types of phosphoesterase in BER, including a 3'-phosphatase and an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease. Experiments using T. thermophilus HB8 cell lysates revealed that the majority of the 3'-phosphatase and AP endonuclease activities are attributable to the another phosphoesterase in T. thermophilus HB8, endonuclease IV (ttEndoIV). However, ttPolX possesses significant 3'-phosphatase activity in ΔttendoIV cell lysate, indicating possible complementation. Our experiments also reveal that there are only two enzymes that display the 3'-phosphatase activity in the T. thermophilus HB8 cell, ttPolX and ttEndoIV. Furthermore, phenotypic analysis of ΔttpolX, ΔttendoIV, and ΔttpolX/ΔttendoIV using hydrogen peroxide and sodium nitrite supports the hypothesis that ttPolX functions as a backup for ttEndoIV in BER.

  2. 7,8-Dihydroxyflavone suppresses oxidative stress-induced base modification in DNA via induction of the repair enzyme 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Cheon; Lee, In Kyung; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Cha, Ji Won; Cho, Suk Ju; Na, Soo Young; Chae, Sungwook; Kim, Hye Sun; Kim, Suhkmann; Hyun, Jin Won

    2013-01-01

    The modified guanine base 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) is abundantly produced by oxidative stress, can contribute to carcinogenesis, and can be removed from DNA by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1), which acts as an 8-oxoG glycosylase and endonuclease. This study investigated the mechanism by which 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (DHF) inhibits oxidative stress-induced 8-oxoG formation in hamster lung fibroblasts (V79-4). DHF significantly reduced the amount of 8-oxoG induced by hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and elevated the levels of OGG1 mRNA and protein. DHF increased the binding of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) to antioxidant response element sequences in the upstream promoter region of OGG1. Moreover, DHF increased the nuclear levels of Nrf2, small Maf proteins, and the Nrf2/small Maf complex, all of which are decreased by H₂O₂ treatment. Likewise, the level of phosphorylated Akt, which activates Nrf2, was decreased by H₂O₂ treatment but restored by DHF treatment. The levels of OGG1 and nuclear translocation of Nrf2 protein were decreased upon treatment with PI3K inhibitor or Akt inhibitor, and DHF treatment did not restore OGG1 and nuclear Nrf2 levels in these inhibitor-treated cells. Furthermore, PI3K and Akt inhibitors abolished the protective effects of DHF in cells undergoing oxidative stress. These data indicate that DHF induces OGG1 expression via the PI3K-Akt pathway and protects cells against oxidative DNA base damage by activating DNA repair systems.

  3. 7,8-Dihydroxyflavone Suppresses Oxidative Stress-Induced Base Modification in DNA via Induction of the Repair Enzyme 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase-1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Cheon; Lee, In Kyung; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Cha, Ji Won; Cho, Suk Ju; Na, Soo Young; Chae, Sungwook; Kim, Hye Sun; Hyun, Jin Won

    2013-01-01

    The modified guanine base 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) is abundantly produced by oxidative stress, can contribute to carcinogenesis, and can be removed from DNA by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1), which acts as an 8-oxoG glycosylase and endonuclease. This study investigated the mechanism by which 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (DHF) inhibits oxidative stress-induced 8-oxoG formation in hamster lung fibroblasts (V79-4). DHF significantly reduced the amount of 8-oxoG induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and elevated the levels of OGG1 mRNA and protein. DHF increased the binding of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) to antioxidant response element sequences in the upstream promoter region of OGG1. Moreover, DHF increased the nuclear levels of Nrf2, small Maf proteins, and the Nrf2/small Maf complex, all of which are decreased by H2O2 treatment. Likewise, the level of phosphorylated Akt, which activates Nrf2, was decreased by H2O2 treatment but restored by DHF treatment. The levels of OGG1 and nuclear translocation of Nrf2 protein were decreased upon treatment with PI3K inhibitor or Akt inhibitor, and DHF treatment did not restore OGG1 and nuclear Nrf2 levels in these inhibitor-treated cells. Furthermore, PI3K and Akt inhibitors abolished the protective effects of DHF in cells undergoing oxidative stress. These data indicate that DHF induces OGG1 expression via the PI3K-Akt pathway and protects cells against oxidative DNA base damage by activating DNA repair systems. PMID:24151624

  4. Permeabilization of ultraviolet-irradiated chinese hamster cells with polyethylene glycol and introduction of ultraviolet endonuclease from Micrococcus luteus

    SciTech Connect

    Yarosh, D.B.; Setlow, R.B.

    1981-03-01

    Chinese hamster V-79 cells were made permeable by treatment with polyethylene glycol and then incubated with a Micrococcus luteus extract containing ultraviolet-specific endonuclease activity. This treatment introduced nicks in irradiated, but not in unirradiated, deoxyribonucleic acid. The nicks remained open for at least 3 h; there was no loss of endonuclease-sensitive sites, and no excision of dimers as measured by chromatography was detected. In addition, there was no increase in ultraviolet resistance in treated cells. This suggests that the absence of a significant amount of excision repair in rodent cells is due to the lack of both incision and excision capacity.

  5. DNA base excision repair of uracil residues in reconstituted nucleosome core particles

    PubMed Central

    Nilsen, Hilde; Lindahl, Tomas; Verreault, Alain

    2002-01-01

    The human base excision repair machinery must locate and repair DNA base damage present in chromatin, of which the nucleosome core particle is the basic repeating unit. Here, we have utilized fragments of the Lytechinus variegatus 5S rRNA gene containing site-specific U:A base pairs to investigate the base excision repair pathway in reconstituted nucleosome core particles in vitro. The human uracil-DNA glycosylases, UNG2 and SMUG1, were able to remove uracil from nucleosomes. Efficiency of uracil excision from nucleosomes was reduced 3- to 9-fold when compared with naked DNA, and was essentially uniform along the length of the DNA substrate irrespective of rotational position on the core particle. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the excision repair pathway of an abasic site can be reconstituted on core particles using the known repair enzymes, AP-endonuclease 1, DNA polymerase β and DNA ligase III. Thus, base excision repair can proceed in nucleosome core particles in vitro, but the repair efficiency is limited by the reduced activity of the uracil-DNA glycosylases and DNA polymerase β on nucleosome cores. PMID:12411511

  6. DNA repair of a single UV photoproduct in a designed nucleosome

    SciTech Connect

    Kosmoskil, Joseph V.; Ackerman, Eric J. ); Smerdon, Michael J.

    2001-08-28

    Eukaryotic DNA repair enzymes must interact with the architectural hierarchy of chromatin. The challenge of finding damaged DNA complexed with histone proteins in nucleosomes is complicated by the need to maintain local chromatin structures involved in regulating other DNA processing events. The heterogeneity of lesions induced by DNA-damaging agents has led us to design homogeneously damaged substrates to directly compare repair of naked DNA with that of nucleosomes. Here we report that nucleotide excision repair in Xenopus nuclear extracts can effectively repair a single UV radiation photoproduct located 5 bases from the dyad center of a positioned nucleosome, although the nucleosome is repaired at about half the rate at which the naked DNA fragment is. Extract repair within the nucleosome is > 50-fold more rapid than either enzymatic photoreversal or endonuclease cleavage of the lesion in vitro. Furthermore, nucleosome formation occurs (after repair) only on damaged naked DNA ( 165-bp fragments) during a 1-h incubation in these extracts, even in the presence of a large excess of undamaged DNA. This is an example of selective nucleosome assembly by Xenopus nuclear extracts on a short linear DNA fragment containing a DNA lesion.

  7. Comparison of the cleavage of pyrimidine dimers by the bacteriophage T4 and Micrococcus luteus uv-specific endonucleases

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, L.K.; Haseltine, W.A.

    1980-12-25

    A comparison was made of the activity of the uv-specific endonucleases of bacteriophage T4 (T4 endonuclease V) and of Micrococcus luteus on ultraviolet light-irradiated DNA substrates of defined sequence. The two enzyms cleave DNA at the site of pyrimidine dimers with the same frequency. The products of the cleavage reaction are the same. The pyrimidine dimer DNA-glycosylase activity of both enzymes is more active on double-stranded DNA than it is on single-stranded DNA.

  8. Perpetuating the homing endonuclease life cycle: identification of mutations that modulate and change I-TevI cleavage preference

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Alexander C.; Wilson, Geoffrey G.; Edgell, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Homing endonucleases are sequence-tolerant DNA endonucleases that act as mobile genetic elements. The ability of homing endonucleases to cleave substrates with multiple nucleotide substitutions suggests a high degree of adaptability in that changing or modulating cleavage preference would require relatively few amino acid substitutions. Here, using directed evolution experiments with the GIY-YIG homing endonuclease I-TevI that targets the thymidylate synthase gene of phage T4, we readily isolated variants that dramatically broadened I-TevI cleavage preference, as well as variants that fine-tuned cleavage preference. By combining substitutions, we observed an ∼10 000-fold improvement in cleavage on some substrates not cleaved by the wild-type enzyme, correlating with a decrease in readout of information content at the cleavage site. Strikingly, we were able to change the cleavage preference of I-TevI to that of the isoschizomer I-BmoI which targets a different cleavage site in the thymidylate synthase gene, recapitulating the evolution of cleavage preference in this family of homing endonucleases. Our results define a strategy to isolate GIY-YIG nuclease domains with distinct cleavage preferences, and provide insight into how homing endonucleases may escape a dead-end life cycle in a population of saturated target sites by promoting transposition to different target sites. PMID:27387281

  9. Two unique restriction endonucleases from Neisseria lactamica.

    PubMed

    Qiang, B Q; Schildkraut, I

    1986-03-11

    Two new site-specific endonucleases, N1a III and N1a IV, have been isolated from Neisseria lactamica. N1a III recognizes the sequence, CATG, and cleaves 3' of the sequence to produce a four base 3' extension. N1a IV recognizes the sequence, GGNNCC, and cleaves between the two N's to produce blunt ended fragments.

  10. Shade avoidance 6 encodes an Arabidopsis flap endonuclease required for maintenance of genome integrity and development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yijuan; Wen, Chunhong; Liu, Songbai; Zheng, Li; Shen, Binghui; Tao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Flap endonuclease-1 (FEN1) belongs to the Rad2 family of structure-specific nucleases. It is required for several DNA metabolic pathways, including DNA replication and DNA damage repair. Here, we have identified a shade avoidance mutant, sav6, which reduces the mRNA splicing efficiency of SAV6. We have demonstrated that SAV6 is an FEN1 homologue that shows double-flap endonuclease and gap-dependent endonuclease activity, but lacks exonuclease activity. sav6 mutants are hypersensitive to DNA damage induced by ultraviolet (UV)-C radiation and reagents that induce double-stranded DNA breaks, but exhibit normal responses to chemicals that block DNA replication. Signalling components that respond to DNA damage are constitutively activated in sav6 mutants. These data indicate that SAV6 is required for DNA damage repair and the maintenance of genome integrity. Mutant sav6 plants also show reduced root apical meristem (RAM) size and defective quiescent centre (QC) development. The expression of SMR7, a cell cycle regulatory gene, and ERF115 and PSK5, regulators of QC division, is increased in sav6 mutants. Their constitutive induction is likely due to the elevated DNA damage responses in sav6 and may lead to defects in the development of the RAM and QC. Therefore, SAV6 assures proper root development through maintenance of genome integrity. PMID:26721386

  11. ATM-mediated phosphorylation of the chromatin remodeling enzyme BRG1 modulates DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Kwon, S-J; Park, J-H; Park, E-J; Lee, S-A; Lee, H-S; Kang, S W; Kwon, J

    2015-01-15

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes such as SWI/SNF (SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable) have been implicated in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair and damage responses. However, the regulatory mechanisms that control the function of chromatin remodelers in DNA damage response are largely unknown. Here, we show that ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) mediates the phosphorylation of BRG1, the catalytic ATPase of the SWI/SNF complex that contributes to DSB repair by binding γ-H2AX-containing nucleosomes via interaction with acetylated histone H3 and stimulating γ-H2AX formation, at Ser-721 in response to DNA damage. ATM-mediated phosphorylation of BRG1 occurs rapidly and transiently after DNA damage. Phosphorylated BRG1 binds γ-H2AX-containing nucleosomes to form the repair foci. The Ser-721 phosphorylation of BRG1 is critical for binding γ-H2AX-containing nucleosomes and stimulating γ-H2AX formation and DSB repair. BRG1 binds to acetylated H3 peptides much better after phosphorylation at Ser-721 by DNA damage. However, the phosphorylation of Ser-721 does not significantly affect the ATPase and transcriptional activities of BRG1. These results, establishing BRG1 as a novel and functional ATM substrate, suggest that the ATM-mediated phosphorylation of BRG1 facilitates DSB repair by stimulating the association of this remodeler with γ-H2AX nucleosomes via enhancing the affinity to acetylated H3. Our work also suggests that the mechanism of BRG1 stimulation of DNA repair is independent of the remodeler's enzymatic or transcriptional activities.

  12. DNA and Protein Requirements for Substrate Conformational Changes Necessary for Human Flap Endonuclease-1-catalyzed Reaction.

    PubMed

    Algasaier, Sana I; Exell, Jack C; Bennet, Ian A; Thompson, Mark J; Gotham, Victoria J B; Shaw, Steven J; Craggs, Timothy D; Finger, L David; Grasby, Jane A

    2016-04-08

    Human flap endonuclease-1 (hFEN1) catalyzes the essential removal of single-stranded flaps arising at DNA junctions during replication and repair processes. hFEN1 biological function must be precisely controlled, and consequently, the protein relies on a combination of protein and substrate conformational changes as a prerequisite for reaction. These include substrate bending at the duplex-duplex junction and transfer of unpaired reacting duplex end into the active site. When present, 5'-flaps are thought to thread under the helical cap, limiting reaction to flaps with free 5'-terminiin vivo Here we monitored DNA bending by FRET and DNA unpairing using 2-aminopurine exciton pair CD to determine the DNA and protein requirements for these substrate conformational changes. Binding of DNA to hFEN1 in a bent conformation occurred independently of 5'-flap accommodation and did not require active site metal ions or the presence of conserved active site residues. More stringent requirements exist for transfer of the substrate to the active site. Placement of the scissile phosphate diester in the active site required the presence of divalent metal ions, a free 5'-flap (if present), a Watson-Crick base pair at the terminus of the reacting duplex, and the intact secondary structure of the enzyme helical cap. Optimal positioning of the scissile phosphate additionally required active site conserved residues Tyr(40), Asp(181), and Arg(100)and a reacting duplex 5'-phosphate. These studies suggest a FEN1 reaction mechanism where junctions are bound and 5'-flaps are threaded (when present), and finally the substrate is transferred onto active site metals initiating cleavage.

  13. Quantitative determination of effective nibbling activities contaminating restriction endonuclease preparations.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto-Gotoh, T

    1995-10-10

    A simple and sensitive procedure with which to detect residual exonucleolytic nibbling activities contaminating restriction endonuclease preparations is described. The procedure uses the kyosei-plasmid, pKF4, which confers kanamycin resistance and enforces streptomycin sensitivity encoded by the trp promoter/operator-driven rpsL+amber(PO(trp)-rpsL+4(am)) gene onto Escherichia coli streptomycin-resistant, amber-suppressive, trp repressor-negative strains such as TH5. When TH5 cells transformed by pKF4 were selected on agar medium containing kanamycin plus streptomycin, the efficiency of transformation plating was substantially lower than that on agar containing kanamycin alone. However, when pKF4 DNA was digested by restriction enzymes that cut once per molecule within PO(trp)-rpsL+4(am) and relegated, the plating efficiency increased depending on the degree of contamination of exonucleolytic nibbling activities in the enzyme preparations, due to deletion mutation at the ligand junction. Plating efficiency was converted to "effective nibbling activity" corresponding to Bal31 nuclease-equivalent units. Using this procedure, effective nibbling activities were detected in 17 of 34 commercial samples of restriction enzymes tested. The method is simple and more sensitive than the procedures used by the commercial suppliers and it is applicable to the quality control testing of more than 100 restriction enzymes.

  14. Distinct roles of Ape1 protein, an enzyme involved in DNA repair, in high or low linear energy transfer ionizing radiation-induced cell killing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Xiang; Chen, Guangnan; Zhang, Xiangming; Tang, Xiaobing; Park, Dongkyoo; Cucinotta, Francis A; Yu, David S; Deng, Xingming; Dynan, William S; Doetsch, Paul W; Wang, Ya

    2014-10-31

    High linear energy transfer (LET) radiation from space heavy charged particles or a heavier ion radiotherapy machine kills more cells than low LET radiation, mainly because high LET radiation-induced DNA damage is more difficult to repair. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is the ratio of the effects generated by high LET radiation to low LET radiation. Previously, our group and others demonstrated that the cell-killing RBE is involved in the interference of high LET radiation with non-homologous end joining but not homologous recombination repair. This effect is attributable, in part, to the small DNA fragments (≤40 bp) directly produced by high LET radiation, the size of which prevents Ku protein from efficiently binding to the two ends of one fragment at the same time, thereby reducing non-homologous end joining efficiency. Here we demonstrate that Ape1, an enzyme required for processing apurinic/apyrimidinic (known as abasic) sites, is also involved in the generation of small DNA fragments during the repair of high LET radiation-induced base damage, which contributes to the higher RBE of high LET radiation-induced cell killing. This discovery opens a new direction to develop approaches for either protecting astronauts from exposure to space radiation or benefiting cancer patients by sensitizing tumor cells to high LET radiotherapy.

  15. In vitro and in vivo activities of T4 endonuclease V mutants altered in the C-terminal aromatic region

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, M.; Kanamori, Y.; Hori, N.; Inaoka, T.; Ohtsuka, E. )

    1990-04-24

    Genes encoding mutants of the thymine photodimer repair enzyme from bacteriophage T4 (T4 endonuclease V) having an amino acid substitution (T127M, W128A, W128S, Y129A, K130L, Y131A, Y132A) were constructed by use of a previously obtained synthetic gene and expressed in Escherichia coli under the control of the E. coli tryptophan promoter. An in vitro assay of partially fractionated mutant proteins for glycosylase activity was performed with chemically synthesized substrates containing a thymine photodimer. T127M and K130L showed almost the same activity as the wild-type protein. Although W128S, Y131A, and Y132A were slightly active, W128A and Y129A lost activity. The results indicated that the aromatic amino acids around position 130 may be important for the glycosylase activity. Mutant T127M was purified, and the Km value was found to be of the same order as that of the wild type (10(-8) M). In vivo activities for all mutants were characterized with UV-sensitive E. coli. The results showed that substitution of Thr-127 with Met or Lys-130 with Leu did not have an effect on the survival of the bacteria but substitution of aromatic amino acids (128-132) had various effects on survival.

  16. Crystal structure and MD simulation of mouse EndoV reveal wedge motif plasticity in this inosine-specific endonuclease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, Meh Sameen; Vik, Erik Sebastian; Ronander, Mia Elise; Solvoll, Anne Marthe; Blicher, Pernille; Bjørås, Magnar; Alseth, Ingrun; Dalhus, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    Endonuclease V (EndoV) is an enzyme with specificity for deaminated adenosine (inosine) in nucleic acids. EndoV from Escherichia coli (EcEndoV) acts both on inosines in DNA and RNA, whereas the human homolog cleaves only at inosines in RNA. Inosines in DNA are mutagenic and the role of EndoV in DNA repair is well established. In contrast, the biological function of EndoV in RNA processing is largely unexplored. Here we have characterized a second mammalian EndoV homolog, mouse EndoV (mEndoV), and show that mEndoV shares the same RNA selectivity as human EndoV (hEndoV). Mouse EndoV cleaves the same inosine-containing substrates as hEndoV, but with reduced efficiencies. The crystal structure of mEndoV reveals a conformation different from the hEndoV and prokaryotic EndoV structures, particularly for the conserved tyrosine in the wedge motif, suggesting that this strand separating element has some flexibility. Molecular dynamics simulations of mouse and human EndoV reveal alternative conformations for the invariant tyrosine. The configuration of the active site, on the other hand, is very similar between the prokaryotic and mammalian versions of EndoV.

  17. Effect of apelin on mitosis, apoptosis and DNA repair enzyme OGG 1/2 expression in intestinal cell lines IEC-6 and Caco-2.

    PubMed

    Antushevich, Hanna; Krawczynska, Agata; Kapica, Malgorzata; Herman, Andrzej Przemyslaw; Zabielski, Romuald

    2014-01-01

    Apelin is a regulatory peptide, identified as an endogenous ligand of the Apelin receptor (APJ). Both the apelin and the APJ were detected in brain, lung, heart, mammary gland, kidney, placenta, adipose tissues and the gastrointestinal tract. Apelin is considered an important regulatory gut peptide with a potential physiological role in gastrointestinal cytoprotection, regulation of food intake and drinking behaviour. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of the apelin on mitosis, apoptosis and the expression of DNA repair enzyme (OGG 1/2), and APJ receptor in intestinal cell lines: rat crypt (IEC-6) and human enterocyte model (Caco-2). The cell cultures were incubated with the apelin-12 (10-8 M) for 4, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h and the apoptosis (caspase 3), mitosis (Ki-67) and DNA repair enzyme (OGG1/2) markers were studied by Real-Time qRT-PCR and immunofluorescent methods. The results of Real-Time qRT-PCR and immunocytochemical analysis showed that the levels of mRNAs were inversely related to the expression level of corresponding proteins. Immunofluorescent studies revealed inhibitory effect of apelin-12 on apoptosis, mitosis and the expression of OGG1/2 in the intestinal crypt cell line IEC-6. However, in the enterocyte model Caco-2 cells apelin stimulated apoptosis and mitosis, and reduced OGG1/2 expression. These findings suggest that apelin may be involved in the control of epithelial cell turnover in the gastrointestinal tract.

  18. Crystal structure of endonuclease G in complex with DNA reveals how it nonspecifically degrades DNA as a homodimer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jason L. J.; Wu, Chyuan-Chuan; Yang, Wei-Zen; Yuan, Hanna S.

    2016-01-01

    Endonuclease G (EndoG) is an evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial protein in eukaryotes that digests nucleus chromosomal DNA during apoptosis and paternal mitochondrial DNA during embryogenesis. Under oxidative stress, homodimeric EndoG becomes oxidized and converts to monomers with diminished nuclease activity. However, it remains unclear why EndoG has to function as a homodimer in DNA degradation. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Caenorhabditis elegans EndoG homologue, CPS-6, in complex with single-stranded DNA at a resolution of 2.3 Å. Two separate DNA strands are bound at the ββα-metal motifs in the homodimer with their nucleobases pointing away from the enzyme, explaining why CPS-6 degrades DNA without sequence specificity. Two obligatory monomeric CPS-6 mutants (P207E and K131D/F132N) were constructed, and they degrade DNA with diminished activity due to poorer DNA-binding affinity as compared to wild-type CPS-6. Moreover, the P207E mutant exhibits predominantly 3′-to-5′ exonuclease activity, indicating a possible endonuclease to exonuclease activity change. Thus, the dimer conformation of CPS-6 is essential for maintaining its optimal DNA-binding and endonuclease activity. Compared to other non-specific endonucleases, which are usually monomeric enzymes, EndoG is a unique dimeric endonuclease, whose activity hence can be modulated by oxidation to induce conformational changes. PMID:27738134

  19. The endonuclease domain of MutL interacts with the β sliding clamp

    PubMed Central

    Pillon, Monica C.; Miller, Jeffrey H.; Guarné, Alba

    2010-01-01

    Mismatch repair corrects errors that have escaped polymerase proofreading enhancing replication fidelity by at least two orders of magnitude. The β and PCNA sliding clamps increase the polymerase processivity during DNA replication and are important at several stages of mismatch repair. Both MutS and MutL, the two proteins that initiate the mismatch repair response, interact with β. Binding of MutS to β is important to recruit MutS and MutL to foci. Moreover, the endonuclease activity of human and yeast MutLα is stimulated by PCNA. However, the concrete functions of the processivity clamp in the repair steps preceding DNA resynthesis remain obscure. Here, we demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of MutL encompasses a bona fide β-binding motif that mediates a weak, yet specific, interaction between the two proteins. Mutation of this conserved motif correlates with defects in mismatch repair, demonstrating that the direct interaction with β is important for MutL function. The interaction between the C-terminal domain of MutL and β is conserved in both B. subtilis and E. coli, but the repair defects associated with mutation of this β-binding motif are more severe in the former, suggesting that this interaction may have a more prominent role in methyl-independent than methyl-directed mismatch repair systems. Together with previously published data, our work strongly suggests that β may stimulate the endonuclease activity of MutL through its direct interaction with the C-terminal domain of MutL. PMID:21050827

  20. T7 Endonuclease I Mediates Error Correction in Artificial Gene Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Ana Filipa; Guerreiro, Catarina I P D; Vincentelli, Renaud; Fontes, Carlos M G A

    2016-09-01

    Efficacy of de novo gene synthesis largely depends on the quality of overlapping oligonucleotides used as template for PCR assembly. The error rate associated with current gene synthesis protocols limits the efficient and accurate production of synthetic genes, both in the small and large scales. Here, we analysed the ability of different endonuclease enzymes, which specifically recognize and cleave DNA mismatches resulting from incorrect impairments between DNA strands, to remove mutations accumulated in synthetic genes. The gfp gene, which encodes the green fluorescent protein, was artificially synthesized using an integrated protocol including an enzymatic mismatch cleavage step (EMC) following gene assembly. Functional and sequence analysis of resulting artificial genes revealed that number of deletions, insertions and substitutions was strongly reduced when T7 endonuclease I was used for mutation removal. This method diminished mutation frequency by eightfold relative to gene synthesis not incorporating an error correction step. Overall, EMC using T7 endonuclease I improved the population of error-free synthetic genes, resulting in an error frequency of 0.43 errors per 1 kb. Taken together, data presented here reveal that incorporation of a mutation-removal step including T7 endonuclease I can effectively improve the fidelity of artificial gene synthesis.

  1. All Three Subunits of RecBCD Enzyme Are Essential for DNA Repair and Low-Temperature Growth in the Antarctic Pseudomonas syringae Lz4W

    PubMed Central

    Pavankumar, Theetha L.; Sinha, Anurag K.; Ray, Malay K.

    2010-01-01

    Background The recD mutants of the Antarctic Pseudomonas syringae Lz4W are sensitive to DNA-damaging agents and fail to grow at 4°C. Generally, RecD associates with two other proteins (RecB and RecC) to produce RecBCD enzyme, which is involved in homologous recombination and DNA repair in many bacteria, including Escherichia coli. However, RecD is not essential for DNA repair, nor does its deletion cause any growth defects in E. coli. Hence, the assessment of the P. syringae RecBCD pathway was imperative. Methodology/Principal Findings Mutational analysis and genetic complementation studies were used to establish that the individual null-mutations of all three genes, recC, recB, and recD, or the deletion of whole recCBD operon of P. syringae, lead to growth inhibition at low temperature, and sensitivity to UV and mitomycin C. Viability of the mutant cells dropped drastically at 4°C, and the mutants accumulated linear chromosomal DNA and shorter DNA fragments in higher amounts compared to 22°C. Additional genetic data using the mutant RecBCD enzymes that were inactivated either in the ATPase active site of RecB (RecBK29Q) or RecD (RecDK229Q), or in the nuclease center of RecB (RecBD1118A and RecBΔnuc) suggested that, while the nuclease activity of RecB is not so critical in vivo, the ATP-dependent functions of both RecB and RecD are essential. Surprisingly, E. coli recBCD or recBC alone on plasmid could complement the defects of the ΔrecCBD strain of P. syringae. Conclusions/Significance All three subunits of the RecBCDPs enzyme are essential for DNA repair and growth of P. syringae at low temperatures (4°C). The RecD requirement is only a function of the RecBCD complex in the bacterium. The RecBCD pathway protects the Antarctic bacterium from cold-induced DNA damages, and is critically dependent on the helicase activities of both RecB and RecD subunits, but not on the nuclease of RecBCDPs enzyme. PMID:20195537

  2. A thermostable, sequence-specific restriction endonuclease from Bacillus stearothermophilus: BstPI.

    PubMed Central

    Pugatsch, T; Weber, H

    1979-01-01

    A restriction endonuclease, BstPI, was purified from a strain of B. stearothermophilus, and its cleavage specificity was determined. The enzyme cleaves at palindromic sites of the general structure: (Formula: see text) where N.N' can be any base pair. It produces phosphorylated 5'-termini which are single stranded over a length of 5 nucleotides. Ends generated by cleavage with BstPI can be rejoined by DNA ligase. Images PMID:503858

  3. Diallyl sulfide induces the expression of nucleotide excision repair enzymes in the breast of female ACI rats.

    PubMed

    Green, Mario; Newell, Oneil; Aboyade-Cole, Ayoola; Darling-Reed, Selina; Thomas, Ronald D

    2007-01-10

    Diethylstilbestrol (DES) causes DNA adducts resulting in breast cancer, whereas diallyl sulfide (DAS) inhibits cancer formation. We hypothesize that DAS induces the expression of nucleotide excision repair genes. To test this hypothesis, female ACI rats were treated for 4 days with corn oil, DES, DAS, and DAS/DES (50mg/kg). The expression of P53, Gadd45a, PCNA, and DNA polymerase delta was analyzed by real-time PCR. DES decreased the expression of P53, Gadd45a and PCNA. DAS and DAS/DES increased the expression of all four genes. These results suggest that DAS enhances the ability of breast tissue to repair DNA damage thus preventing cancer.

  4. Characterization of the Type III restriction endonuclease PstII from Providencia stuartii.

    PubMed

    Sears, Alice; Peakman, Luke J; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2005-01-01

    A new Type III restriction endonuclease designated PstII has been purified from Providencia stuartii. PstII recognizes the hexanucleotide sequence 5'-CTGATG(N)(25-26/27-28)-3'. Endonuclease activity requires a substrate with two copies of the recognition site in head-to-head repeat and is dependent on a low level of ATP hydrolysis ( approximately 40 ATP/site/min). Cleavage occurs at just one of the two sites and results in a staggered cut 25-26 nt downstream of the top strand sequence to generate a two base 5'-protruding end. Methylation of the site occurs on one strand only at the first adenine of 5'-CATCAG-3'. Therefore, PstII has characteristic Type III restriction enzyme activity as exemplified by EcoPI or EcoP15I. Moreover, sequence asymmetry of the PstII recognition site in the T7 genome acts as an historical imprint of Type III restriction activity in vivo. In contrast to other Type I and III enzymes, PstII has a more relaxed nucleotide specificity and can cut DNA with GTP and CTP (but not UTP). We also demonstrate that PstII and EcoP15I cannot interact and cleave a DNA substrate suggesting that Type III enzymes must make specific protein-protein contacts to activate endonuclease activity.

  5. An exocytoplasmic endonuclease with restriction function in Streptomyces antibioticus.

    PubMed Central

    de los Reyes-Gavilan, C G; Aparicio, J F; Barbes, C; Hardisson, C; Sanchez, J

    1988-01-01

    Streptomyces antibioticus produces a strong endo-DNase which is located between the cytoplasmic membrane and the cell wall. All DNA substrates assayed, including the chromosomal DNA of this species and several bacteriophage DNAs, were completely degraded in vitro by the enzyme. The rate of synthesis of the nuclease depended on the growth medium. In NBG medium, in which the enzyme is not produced, the size of lytic plaques of several actinophages was larger than that in GYM or GAE medium, in which synthesis of the nuclease takes place late in growth. In addition, one of the phages assayed, phi A6, showed a diminution of its efficiency of plating in GYM medium with respect to that in NBG medium; another phage, phi A9, grew in NBG medium but not in the other two media. It is postulated that the presence of the host nuclease, together with the capability of the particular phage to absorb on S. antibioticus of different growth phases, determines the efficiency of growth and the plaque size of the phages on productive media. This hypothesis was confirmed when the growth of phi A6 and phi A9 in a mutant of S. antibioticus lacking the endonuclease activity was analyzed. It is concluded that the enzyme can assume, under some circumstances, a role in in vivo restriction. Images PMID:2830237

  6. Photoreactivation of Escherichia coli after Low- or Medium-Pressure UV Disinfection Determined by an Endonuclease Sensitive Site Assay

    PubMed Central

    Oguma, Kumiko; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Ohgaki, Shinichiro

    2002-01-01

    Photoreactivation of Escherichia coli after inactivation by a low-pressure (LP) UV lamp (254 nm), by a medium-pressure (MP) UV lamp (220 to 580 nm), or by a filtered medium-pressure (MPF) UV lamp (300 to 580 nm) was investigated. An endonuclease sensitive site (ESS) assay was used to determine the number of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in the genomic DNA of E. coli, while a conventional cultivation assay was used to investigate the colony-forming ability (CFA) of E. coli. In photoreactivation experiments, more than 80% of the pyrimidine dimers induced by LP or MPF UV irradiation were repaired, while almost no repair of dimers was observed after MP UV exposure. The CFA ratios of E. coli recovered so that they were equivalent to 0.9-, 2.3-, and 1.7-log inactivation after 3-log inactivation by LP, MP, and MPF UV irradiation, respectively. Photorepair treatment of DNA in vitro suggested that among the MP UV emissions, wavelengths of 220 to 300 nm reduced the subsequent photorepair of ESS, possibly by causing a disorder in endogenous photolyase, an enzyme specific for photoreactivation. On the other hand, the MP UV irradiation at wavelengths between 300 and 580 nm was observed to play an important role in reducing the subsequent recovery of CFA by inducing damage other than damage to pyrimidine dimers. Therefore, it was found that inactivating light at a broad range of wavelengths effectively reduced subsequent photoreactivation, which could be an advantage that MP UV irradiation has over conventional LP UV irradiation. PMID:12450825

  7. Base excision DNA repair in the embryonic development of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Torgasheva, Natalya A; Menzorova, Natalya I; Sibirtsev, Yurii T; Rasskazov, Valery A; Zharkov, Dmitry O; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2016-06-21

    In actively proliferating cells, such as the cells of the developing embryo, DNA repair is crucial for preventing the accumulation of mutations and synchronizing cell division. Sea urchin embryo growth was analyzed and extracts were prepared. The relative activity of DNA polymerase, apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease, uracil-DNA glycosylase, 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase, and other glycosylases was analyzed using specific oligonucleotide substrates of these enzymes; the reaction products were resolved by denaturing 20% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We have characterized the profile of several key base excision repair activities in the developing embryos (2 blastomers to mid-pluteus) of the grey sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus intermedius. The uracil-DNA glycosylase specific activity sharply increased after blastula hatching, whereas the specific activity of 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase steadily decreased over the course of the development. The AP-endonuclease activity gradually increased but dropped at the last sampled stage (mid-pluteus 2). The DNA polymerase activity was high at the first cleavage division and then quickly decreased, showing a transient peak at blastula hatching. It seems that the developing sea urchin embryo encounters different DNA-damaging factors early in development within the protective envelope and later as a free-floating larva, with hatching necessitating adaptation to the shift in genotoxic stress conditions. No correlation was observed between the dynamics of the enzyme activities and published gene expression data from developing congeneric species, S. purpuratus. The results suggest that base excision repair enzymes may be regulated in the sea urchin embryos at the level of covalent modification or protein stability.

  8. Elevated level of acetylation of APE1 in tumor cells modulates DNA damage repair

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mantha, Anil K.; Song, Heyu; Roychoudhury, Shrabasti; Nath, Somsubhra; Ray, Sutapa; Bhakat, Kishor K.

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are frequently generated in the genome by spontaneous depurination/depyrimidination or after removal of oxidized/modified bases by DNA glycosylases during the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Unrepaired AP sites are mutagenic and block DNA replication and transcription. The primary enzyme to repair AP sites in mammalian cells is AP endonuclease (APE1), which plays a key role in this repair pathway. Although overexpression of APE1 in diverse cancer types and its association with chemotherapeutic resistance are well documented, alteration of posttranslational modification of APE1 and modulation of its functions during tumorigenesis are largely unknown. Here, we show that both classical histone deacetylase HDAC1 and NAD+-dependent deacetylase SIRT1 regulate acetylation level of APE1 and acetylation of APE1 enhances its AP-endonuclease activity both in vitro and in cells. Modulation of APE1 acetylation level in cells alters AP site repair capacity of the cell extracts in vitro. Primary tumor tissues of diverse cancer types have higher level of acetylated APE1 (AcAPE1) compared to adjacent non-tumor tissue and exhibit enhanced AP site repair capacity. Importantly, in the absence of APE1 acetylation, cells accumulate AP sites in the genome and show increased sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Together, our study demonstrates that elevation of acetylation level of APE1 in tumor could be a novel mechanism by which cells handle the elevated levels of DNA damages in response to genotoxic stress and maintain sustained proliferation. PMID:27655688

  9. An AP Endonuclease 1–DNA Polymerase β Complex: Theoretical Prediction of Interacting Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Abyzov, Alexej; Uzun, Alper; Strauss, Phyllis R.; Ilyin, Valentin A.

    2008-01-01

    Abasic (AP) sites in DNA arise through both endogenous and exogenous mechanisms. Since AP sites can prevent replication and transcription, the cell contains systems for their identification and repair. AP endonuclease (APEX1) cleaves the phosphodiester backbone 5′ to the AP site. The cleavage, a key step in the base excision repair pathway, is followed by nucleotide insertion and removal of the downstream deoxyribose moiety, performed most often by DNA polymerase beta (pol-β). While yeast two-hybrid studies and electrophoretic mobility shift assays provide evidence for interaction of APEX1 and pol-β, the specifics remain obscure. We describe a theoretical study designed to predict detailed interacting surfaces between APEX1 and pol-β based on published co-crystal structures of each enzyme bound to DNA. Several potentially interacting complexes were identified by sliding the protein molecules along DNA: two with pol-β located downstream of APEX1 (3′ to the damaged site) and three with pol-β located upstream of APEX1 (5′ to the damaged site). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, ensuring geometrical complementarity of interfaces, enabled us to predict interacting residues and calculate binding energies, which in two cases were sufficient (∼−10.0 kcal/mol) to form a stable complex and in one case a weakly interacting complex. Analysis of interface behavior during MD simulation and visual inspection of interfaces allowed us to conclude that complexes with pol-β at the 3′-side of APEX1 are those most likely to occur in vivo. Additional multiple sequence analyses of APEX1 and pol-β in related organisms identified a set of correlated mutations of specific residues at the predicted interfaces. Based on these results, we propose that pol-β in the open or closed conformation interacts and makes a stable interface with APEX1 bound to a cleaved abasic site on the 3′ side. The method described here can be used for analysis in any DNA-metabolizing pathway

  10. Affinity partitioning of restriction endonucleases. Application to the purification of EcoR I and EcoR V.

    PubMed

    Vlatakis, G; Bouriotis, V

    1991-02-01

    Partitioning of restriction endonucleases between two liquid aqueous phases can be strongly influenced by group-specific ligands included in the two-phase system. Three restriction endonucleases, namely EcoR I, EcoR V and BamH I, were partitioned within an aqueous dextran-polyethylene glycol (PEG) system. The enzymes could be extracted into the upper PEG phase by using either triazine dyes or herring DNA as affinity ligands. The influence of the endogenous bacterial nucleic acids, concentration of polymerbound dye and concentration of sodium chloride on the system were examined. A partial purification of EcoR I (up to 52-fold) and EcoR V (up to 37-fold) was achieved using a combination of affinity partitioning and ion-exchange chromatography, providing an extremely fast and economical method for the isolation of restriction endonucleases free from contaminating nuclease activities.

  11. Purification, crystallization, X-ray diffraction analysis and phasing of an engineered single-chain PvuII restriction endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Meramveliotaki, Chrysi; Kotsifaki, Dina; Androulaki, Maria; Hountas, Athanasios; Eliopoulos, Elias; Kokkinidis, Michael

    2007-10-01

    PvuII is the first type II restriction endonuclease to be converted from its wild-type homodimeric form into an enzymatically active single-chain variant. The enzyme was crystallized and phasing was successfully performed by molecular replacement. The restriction endonuclease PvuII from Proteus vulgaris has been converted from its wild-type homodimeric form into the enzymatically active single-chain variant scPvuII by tandemly joining the two subunits through the peptide linker Gly-Ser-Gly-Gly. scPvuII, which is suitable for the development of programmed restriction endonucleases for highly specific DNA cleavage, was purified and crystallized. The crystals diffract to a resolution of 2.35 Å and belong to space group P4{sub 2}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 101.92, c = 100.28 Å and two molecules per asymmetric unit. Phasing was successfully performed by molecular replacement.

  12. The homing endonuclease I-CreI uses three metals, one of which is shared between the two active sites.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, B S; Monnat, R J; Stoddard, B L

    2001-04-01

    Homing endonucleases, like restriction enzymes, cleave double-stranded DNA at specific target sites. The cleavage mechanism(s) utilized by LAGLIDADG endonucleases have been difficult to elucidate; their active sites are divergent, and only one low resolution cocrystal structure has been determined. Here we report two high resolution structures of the dimeric I-CreI homing endonuclease bound to DNA: a substrate complex with calcium and a product complex with magnesium. The bound metals in both complexes are verified by manganese anomalous difference maps. The active sites are positioned close together to facilitate cleavage across the DNA minor groove; each contains one metal ion bound between a conserved aspartate (Asp 20) and a single scissile phosphate. A third metal ion bridges the two active sites. This divalent cation is bound between aspartate residues from the active site of each subunit and is in simultaneous contact with the scissile phosphates of both DNA strands. A metal-bound water molecule acts as the nucleophile and is part of an extensive network of ordered water molecules that are positioned by enzyme side chains. These structures illustrate a unique variant of a two-metal endonuclease mechanism is employed by the highly divergent LAGLIDADG enzyme family.

  13. Mitotane sensitizes adrenocortical cancer cells to ionizing radiations by involvement of the cyclin B1/CDK complex in G2 arrest and mismatch repair enzymes modulation.

    PubMed

    Cerquetti, Lidia; Sampaoli, Camilla; Amendola, Donatella; Bucci, Barbara; Misiti, Silvia; Raza, Giorgio; De Paula, Ugo; Marchese, Rodolfo; Brunetti, Ercole; Toscano, Vincenzo; Stigliano, Antonio

    2010-08-01

    Mitotane inhibits steroid synthesis by an action on steroidogenic enzymes, as 11beta-hydroxylase and cholesterol side chain cleavage. It also has a cytotoxic effect on the adrenocortical cells and represents a primary drug used in the adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). H295R and SW13 cell lines were treated with mitotane 10(-5) M and ionizing radiations (IR) in combination therapy, inducing an irreversible inhibition of cell growth in both adrenocortical cancer cells. As shown in a previous report, mitotane/IR combination treatment induced a cell accumulation in the G2 phase. Here, we report the radiosensitizing properties of mitotane in two different ACC cell lines. The drug reveals the effectiveness to enhance the cytotoxic effects of IR by attenuating DNA repair and interfering on the activation of mitosis promoting factor (MPF), mainly regulated by the degradation of cyclin B1 in the mitotic process. These events may explain the inappropriate activation of cdc2, implicated in G2/M phase arrest and probably induced by the mitotane and IR in the combined treatment. Indeed, treatment with purvalanol, a cdc2-inhibitor prevents cell cycle arrest, triggering the G2/M transition. The observation that mitotane and IR in combination treatment amplifies the activation level of cyclin B/cdc2 complexes contributing to cell cycle arrest, suggests that the MPF could function as a master signal for controlling the temporal order of different mitotic events. Moreover, we report that mitotane interferes in modulation of mismatch repair (MMR) enzymes, revealing radiosensitizing drug ability.

  14. A second site specific endonuclease from Thermus thermophilus 111, Tth111II.

    PubMed Central

    Shinomiya, T; Kobayashi, M; Sato, S

    1980-01-01

    A second site specific endonuclease with novel specificity has been purified from Thermus thermophilus strain 111 and named Tth111II. The enzyme is active at temperature up to 80 degrees C and requires Mg2+ or Mn2+ for endonuclease activity. Tth111II cleaves phi X174RFDNA into 11 fragments and lambda NA into more than 25 fragments. From the 5'-terminal sequences of TthlllII fragments of phi X174RFDNA determined by the two dimensional homochromatography and the survey on nucleotide sequence of phi X174RFDNA, it was concluded that Tth111II recognizes the DNA sequence (see former index) and cleaves the sites as indicated by the arrows. Images PMID:6255411

  15. Atomic Structure and Biochemical Characterization of an RNA Endonuclease in the N Terminus of Andes Virus L Protein

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-García, Yaiza; Reguera, Juan; Busch, Carola; Witte, Gregor; Sánchez-Ramos, Oliberto; Betzel, Christian; Cusack, Stephen; Günther, Stephan; Reindl, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) is a human-pathogenic hantavirus. Hantaviruses presumably initiate their mRNA synthesis by using cap structures derived from host cell mRNAs, a mechanism called cap-snatching. A signature for a cap-snatching endonuclease is present in the N terminus of hantavirus L proteins. In this study, we aimed to solve the atomic structure of the ANDV endonuclease and characterize its biochemical features. However, the wild-type protein was refractory to expression in Escherichia coli, presumably due to toxic enzyme activity. To circumvent this problem, we introduced attenuating mutations in the domain that were previously shown to enhance L protein expression in mammalian cells. Using this approach, 13 mutant proteins encompassing ANDV L protein residues 1–200 were successfully expressed and purified. Protein stability and nuclease activity of the mutants was analyzed and the crystal structure of one mutant was solved to a resolution of 2.4 Å. Shape in solution was determined by small angle X-ray scattering. The ANDV endonuclease showed structural similarities to related enzymes of orthobunya-, arena-, and orthomyxoviruses, but also differences such as elongated shape and positively charged patches surrounding the active site. The enzyme was dependent on manganese, which is bound to the active site, most efficiently cleaved single-stranded RNA substrates, did not cleave DNA, and could be inhibited by known endonuclease inhibitors. The atomic structure in conjunction with stability and activity data for the 13 mutant enzymes facilitated inference of structure–function relationships in the protein. In conclusion, we solved the structure of a hantavirus cap-snatching endonuclease, elucidated its catalytic properties, and present a highly active mutant form, which allows for inhibitor screening. PMID:27300328

  16. Atomic Structure and Biochemical Characterization of an RNA Endonuclease in the N Terminus of Andes Virus L Protein.

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, Yaiza; Reguera, Juan; Busch, Carola; Witte, Gregor; Sánchez-Ramos, Oliberto; Betzel, Christian; Cusack, Stephen; Günther, Stephan; Reindl, Sophia

    2016-06-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) is a human-pathogenic hantavirus. Hantaviruses presumably initiate their mRNA synthesis by using cap structures derived from host cell mRNAs, a mechanism called cap-snatching. A signature for a cap-snatching endonuclease is present in the N terminus of hantavirus L proteins. In this study, we aimed to solve the atomic structure of the ANDV endonuclease and characterize its biochemical features. However, the wild-type protein was refractory to expression in Escherichia coli, presumably due to toxic enzyme activity. To circumvent this problem, we introduced attenuating mutations in the domain that were previously shown to enhance L protein expression in mammalian cells. Using this approach, 13 mutant proteins encompassing ANDV L protein residues 1-200 were successfully expressed and purified. Protein stability and nuclease activity of the mutants was analyzed and the crystal structure of one mutant was solved to a resolution of 2.4 Å. Shape in solution was determined by small angle X-ray scattering. The ANDV endonuclease showed structural similarities to related enzymes of orthobunya-, arena-, and orthomyxoviruses, but also differences such as elongated shape and positively charged patches surrounding the active site. The enzyme was dependent on manganese, which is bound to the active site, most efficiently cleaved single-stranded RNA substrates, did not cleave DNA, and could be inhibited by known endonuclease inhibitors. The atomic structure in conjunction with stability and activity data for the 13 mutant enzymes facilitated inference of structure-function relationships in the protein. In conclusion, we solved the structure of a hantavirus cap-snatching endonuclease, elucidated its catalytic properties, and present a highly active mutant form, which allows for inhibitor screening.

  17. Surveying the repair of ancient DNA from bones via high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mouttham, Nathalie; Klunk, Jennifer; Kuch, Melanie; Fourney, Ron; Poinar, Hendrik

    2015-07-01

    DNA damage in the form of abasic sites, chemically altered nucleotides, and strand fragmentation is the foremost limitation in obtaining genetic information from many ancient samples. Upon cell death, DNA continues to endure various chemical attacks such as hydrolysis and oxidation, but repair pathways found in vivo no longer operate. By incubating degraded DNA with specific enzyme combinations adopted from these pathways, it is possible to reverse some of the post-mortem nucleic acid damage prior to downstream analyses such as library preparation, targeted enrichment, and high-throughput sequencing. Here, we evaluate the performance of two available repair protocols on previously characterized DNA extracts from four mammoths. Both methods use endonucleases and glycosylases along with a DNA polymerase-ligase combination. PreCR Repair Mix increases the number of molecules converted to sequencing libraries, leading to an increase in endogenous content and a decrease in cytosine-to-thymine transitions due to cytosine deamination. However, the effects of Nelson Repair Mix on repair of DNA damage remain inconclusive.

  18. Differential requirement for SUB1 in chromosomal and plasmid double-strand DNA break repair.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lijian; Volkert, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Non homologous end joining (NHEJ) is an important process that repairs double strand DNA breaks (DSBs) in eukaryotic cells. Cells defective in NHEJ are unable to join chromosomal breaks. Two different NHEJ assays are typically used to determine the efficiency of NHEJ. One requires NHEJ of linearized plasmid DNA transformed into the test organism; the other requires NHEJ of a single chromosomal break induced either by HO endonuclease or the I-SceI restriction enzyme. These two assays are generally considered equivalent and rely on the same set of NHEJ genes. PC4 is an abundant DNA binding protein that has been suggested to stimulate NHEJ. Here we tested the role of PC4's yeast homolog SUB1 in repair of DNA double strand breaks using different assays. We found SUB1 is required for NHEJ repair of DSBs in plasmid DNA, but not in chromosomal DNA. Our results suggest that these two assays, while similar are not equivalent and that repair of plasmid DNA requires additional factor(s) that are not required for NHEJ repair of chromosomal double-strand DNA breaks. Possible roles for Sub1 proteins in NHEJ of plasmid DNA are discussed.

  19. USP45 deubiquitylase controls ERCC1–XPF endonuclease-mediated DNA damage responses

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Oliva, Ana B; Lachaud, Christophe; Szyniarowski, Piotr; Muñoz, Ivan; Macartney, Thomas; Hickson, Ian; Rouse, John; Alessi, Dario R

    2015-01-01

    Reversible protein ubiquitylation plays important roles in various processes including DNA repair. Here, we identify the deubiquitylase USP45 as a critical DNA repair regulator. USP45 associates with ERCC1, a subunit of the DNA repair endonuclease XPF–ERCC1, via a short acidic motif outside of the USP45 catalytic domain. Wild-type USP45, but not a USP45 mutant defective in ERCC1 binding, efficiently deubiquitylates ERCC1 in vitro, and the levels of ubiquitylated ERCC1 are markedly enhanced in USP45 knockout cells. Cells lacking USP45 are hypersensitive specifically to UV irradiation and DNA interstrand cross-links, similar to cells lacking ERCC1. Furthermore, the repair of UV-induced DNA damage is markedly reduced in USP45-deficient cells. ERCC1 translocation to DNA damage-induced subnuclear foci is markedly impaired in USP45 knockout cells, possibly accounting for defective DNA repair. Finally, USP45 localises to sites of DNA damage in a manner dependent on its deubiquitylase activity, but independent of its ability to bind ERCC1–XPF. Together, these results establish USP45 as a new regulator of XPF–ERCC1 crucial for efficient DNA repair. PMID:25538220

  20. Hypomorphic PCNA mutation underlies a human DNA repair disorder

    PubMed Central

    Baple, Emma L.; Chambers, Helen; Cross, Harold E.; Fawcett, Heather; Nakazawa, Yuka; Chioza, Barry A.; Harlalka, Gaurav V.; Mansour, Sahar; Sreekantan-Nair, Ajith; Patton, Michael A.; Muggenthaler, Martina; Rich, Phillip; Wagner, Karin; Coblentz, Roselyn; Stein, Constance K.; Last, James I.; Taylor, A. Malcolm R.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Ogi, Tomoo; Lehmann, Alan R.; Green, Catherine M.; Crosby, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous human disorders, including Cockayne syndrome, UV-sensitive syndrome, xeroderma pigmentosum, and trichothiodystrophy, result from the mutation of genes encoding molecules important for nucleotide excision repair. Here, we describe a syndrome in which the cardinal clinical features include short stature, hearing loss, premature aging, telangiectasia, neurodegeneration, and photosensitivity, resulting from a homozygous missense (p.Ser228Ile) sequence alteration of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). PCNA is a highly conserved sliding clamp protein essential for DNA replication and repair. Due to this fundamental role, mutations in PCNA that profoundly impair protein function would be incompatible with life. Interestingly, while the p.Ser228Ile alteration appeared to have no effect on protein levels or DNA replication, patient cells exhibited marked abnormalities in response to UV irradiation, displaying substantial reductions in both UV survival and RNA synthesis recovery. The p.Ser228Ile change also profoundly altered PCNA’s interaction with Flap endonuclease 1 and DNA Ligase 1, DNA metabolism enzymes. Together, our findings detail a mutation of PCNA in humans associated with a neurodegenerative phenotype, displaying clinical and molecular features common to other DNA repair disorders, which we showed to be attributable to a hypomorphic amino acid alteration. PMID:24911150

  1. On-bead fluorescent DNA nanoprobes to analyze base excision repair activities.

    PubMed

    Gines, Guillaume; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Gasparutto, Didier

    2014-02-17

    DNA integrity is constantly threatened by endogenous and exogenous agents that can modify its physical and chemical structure. Changes in DNA sequence can cause mutations sparked by some genetic diseases or cancers. Organisms have developed efficient defense mechanisms able to specifically repair each kind of lesion (alkylation, oxidation, single or double strand break, mismatch, etc). Here we report the adjustment of an original assay to detect enzymes' activity of base excision repair (BER), that supports a set of lesions including abasic sites, alkylation, oxidation or deamination products of bases. The biosensor is characterized by a set of fluorescent hairpin-shaped nucleic acid probes supported on magnetic beads, each containing a selective lesion targeting a specific BER enzyme. We have studied the DNA glycosylase alkyl-adenine glycosylase (AAG) and the human AP-endonuclease (APE1) by incorporating within the DNA probe a hypoxanthine lesion or an abasic site analog (tetrahydrofuran), respectively. Enzymatic repair activity induces the formation of a nick in the damaged strand, leading to probe's break, that is detected in the supernatant by fluorescence. The functional assay allows the measurement of DNA repair activities from purified enzymes or in cell-free extracts in a fast, specific, quantitative and sensitive way, using only 1 pmol of probe for a test. We recorded a detection limit of 1 μg mL(-1) and 50 μg mL(-1) of HeLa nuclear extracts for APE1 and AAG enzymes, respectively. Finally, the on-bead assay should be useful to screen inhibitors of DNA repair activities.

  2. Site specific endonucleases for human genome mapping. Final report, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Knoche, K.; Selman, S.; Hung, L.

    1994-06-01

    Current large scale genome mapping methodology suffers from a lack of tools for generating specific DNA fragments in the megabase size range. While technology such as pulsed field gel electrophoresis can resolve DNA fragments greater than 10 megabases in size, current methods for cleaving mammalian DNA using bacterial restriction enzymes are incapable of producing such fragments. Though several multidimensional approaches are underway to overcome this limitation, there currently is no single step procedure to generate specific DNA fragments in the 2-100 megabase size range. In order to overcome these limitations, we proposed to develop a family of site-specific endonucleases capable of generating DNA fragments in the 2-100 megabase size range in a single step. Additionally, we proposed to accomplish this by relaxing the specificity of a very-rare cutting intron-encoded endonucleases, I-Ppo I, and potentially using the process as a model for development of other enzymes. Our research has uncovered a great deal of information about intron-encoded endonucleases. We have found that I-Ppo I has a remarkable ability to tolerate degeneracy within its recognition sequence, and we have shown that the recognition sequence is larger than 15 base pairs. These findings suggest that a detailed study of the mechanism by which intron-encoded endonucleases recognize their target sequences should provide new sights into DNA-protein interactions; this had led to a continuation of the study of I-Ppo I in Dr. Raines` laboratory and we expect a more detailed understanding of the mechanism of I-Ppo I action to result.

  3. Creating a monomeric endonuclease TALE-I-SceI with high specificity and low genotoxicity in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jianfei; Chen, He; Luo, Ling; Lai, Yongrong; Xie, Wei; Kee, Kehkooi

    2015-01-01

    To correct a DNA mutation in the human genome for gene therapy, homology-directed repair (HDR) needs to be specific and have the lowest off-target effects to protect the human genome from deleterious mutations. Zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and CRISPR-CAS9 systems have been engineered and used extensively to recognize and modify specific DNA sequences. Although TALEN and CRISPR/CAS9 could induce high levels of HDR in human cells, their genotoxicity was significantly higher. Here, we report the creation of a monomeric endonuclease that can recognize at least 33 bp by fusing the DNA-recognizing domain of TALEN (TALE) to a re-engineered homing endonuclease I-SceI. After sequentially re-engineering I-SceI to recognize 18 bp of the human β-globin sequence, the re-engineered I-SceI induced HDR in human cells. When the re-engineered I-SceI was fused to TALE (TALE-ISVB2), the chimeric endonuclease induced the same HDR rate at the human β-globin gene locus as that induced by TALEN, but significantly reduced genotoxicity. We further demonstrated that TALE-ISVB2 specifically targeted at the β-globin sequence in human hematopoietic stem cells. Therefore, this monomeric endonuclease has the potential to be used in therapeutic gene targeting in human cells. PMID:25541197

  4. Homing endonucleases: from genetic anomalies to programmable genomic clippers.

    PubMed

    Belfort, Marlene; Bonocora, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    Homing endonucleases are strong drivers of genetic exchange and horizontal transfer of both their own genes and their local genetic environment. The mechanisms that govern the function and evolution of these genetic oddities have been well documented over the past few decades at the genetic, biochemical, and structural levels. This wealth of information has led to the manipulation and reprogramming of the endonucleases and to their exploitation in genome editing for use as therapeutic agents, for insect vector control and in agriculture. In this chapter we summarize the molecular properties of homing endonucleases and discuss their strengths and weaknesses in genome editing as compared to other site-specific nucleases such as zinc finger endonucleases, TALEN, and CRISPR-derived endonucleases.

  5. Homing Endonucleases: From Genetic Anomalies to Programmable Genomic Clippers

    PubMed Central

    Belfort, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Homing endonucleases are strong drivers of genetic exchange and horizontal transfer of both their own genes and their local genetic environment. The mechanisms that govern the function and evolution of these genetic oddities have been well documented over the past few decades at the genetic, biochemical, and structural levels. This wealth of information has led to the manipulation and reprogramming of the endonucleases and to their exploitation in genome editing for use as therapeutic agents, for insect vector control and in agriculture. In this chapter we summarize the molecular properties of homing endonucleases and discuss their strengths and weaknesses in genome editing as compared to other site-specific nucleases such as zinc finger endonucleases, TALEN, and CRISPR-derived endonucleases. PMID:24510256

  6. Some factors affecting the action of restriction endonucleases on human metaphase chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Mezzanotte, R; Ferrucci, L; Vanni, R; Sumner, A T

    1985-11-01

    We have investigated whether restriction endonucleases produce bands on human chromosomes by extracting DNA, using staining methods which are stoichiometric for DNA. Restriction enzymes that produce C-band patterns appear to remove DNA extensively from chromosome arms. In general, however, those restriction enzymes that produce G-bands do not extract DNA from chromosomes, and their effects are believed to be due to conformational change in the chromosomal DNA; in these cases, the chromosomal regions affected appear to be determined by the chromosome structure and not by the specificity of the enzyme. DNA loss from chromosomes due to digestion by restriction enzymes may in some cases be uniform, although a G-banding pattern is visible after Giemsa staining.

  7. The nicking homing endonuclease I-BasI is encoded by a group I intron in the DNA polymerase gene of the Bacillus thuringiensis phage Bastille

    PubMed Central

    Landthaler, Markus; Shub, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Here we describe the discovery of a group I intron in the DNA polymerase gene of Bacillus thuringiensis phage Bastille. Although the intron insertion site is identical to that of the Bacillus subtilis phages SPO1 and SP82 introns, the Bastille intron differs from them substantially in primary and secondary structure. Like the SPO1 and SP82 introns, the Bastille intron encodes a nicking DNA endonuclease of the H-N-H family, I-BasI, with a cleavage site identical to that of the SPO1-encoded enzyme I-HmuI. Unlike I-HmuI, which nicks both intron-minus and intron-plus DNA, I-BasI cleaves only intron-minus alleles, which is a characteristic of typical homing endonucleases. Interestingly, the C-terminal portions of these H-N-H phage endonucleases contain a conserved sequence motif, the intron-encoded endonuclease repeat motif (IENR1) that also has been found in endonucleases of the GIY-YIG family, and which likely comprises a small DNA-binding module with a globular ββααβ fold, suggestive of module shuffling between different homing endonuclease families. PMID:12799434

  8. The nicking homing endonuclease I-BasI is encoded by a group I intron in the DNA polymerase gene of the Bacillus thuringiensis phage Bastille.

    PubMed

    Landthaler, Markus; Shub, David A

    2003-06-15

    Here we describe the discovery of a group I intron in the DNA polymerase gene of Bacillus thuringiensis phage Bastille. Although the intron insertion site is identical to that of the Bacillus subtilis phages SPO1 and SP82 introns, the Bastille intron differs from them substantially in primary and secondary structure. Like the SPO1 and SP82 introns, the Bastille intron encodes a nicking DNA endonuclease of the H-N-H family, I-BasI, with a cleavage site identical to that of the SPO1-encoded enzyme I-HmuI. Unlike I-HmuI, which nicks both intron-minus and intron-plus DNA, I-BasI cleaves only intron-minus alleles, which is a characteristic of typical homing endonucleases. Interestingly, the C-terminal portions of these H-N-H phage endonucleases contain a conserved sequence motif, the intron-encoded endonuclease repeat motif (IENR1) that also has been found in endonucleases of the GIY-YIG family, and which likely comprises a small DNA-binding module with a globular betabetaalphaalphabeta fold, suggestive of module shuffling between different homing endonuclease families.

  9. Stimulation of intrachromosomal homologous recombination in human cells by electroporation with site-specific endonucleases.

    PubMed Central

    Brenneman, M; Gimble, F S; Wilson, J H

    1996-01-01

    In somatic mammalian cells, homologous recombination is a rare event. To study the effects of chromosomal breaks on frequency of homologous recombination, site-specific endonucleases were introduced into human cells by electroporation. Cell lines with a partial duplication within the HPRT (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase) gene were created through gene targeting. Homologous intrachromosomal recombination between the repeated regions of the gene can reconstruct a functioning, wild-type gene. Treatment of these cells with the restriction endonuclease Xba I, which has a recognition site within the repeated region of HPRT homology, increased the frequency or homologous recombination bv more than 10-fold. Recombination frequency was similarly increased by treatment with the rare-cutting yeast endonuclease PI-Sce I when a cleavage site was placed within the repeated region of HPRT. In contrast, four restriction enzymes that cut at positions either outside of the repeated regions or between them produced no change in recombination frequency. The results suggest that homologous recombination between intrachromosomal repeats can be specifically initiated by a double-strand break occurring within regions of homology, consistent with the predictions of a model. PMID:8622983

  10. Structural and Thermodynamic Basis for Enhanced DNA Binding by a Promiscuous Mutant EcoRI Endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Sapienza, Paul J.; Rosenberg, John M.; Jen-Jacobson, Linda

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Promiscuous mutant EcoRI endonucleases bind to the canonical site GAATTC more tightly than does the wild-type endonuclease, yet cleave variant (EcoRI*) sites more rapidly than does wild-type. The crystal structure of the A138T promiscuous mutant homodimer in complex with a GAATTC site is nearly identical to that of the wild-type complex, except that the Thr138 side chains make novel packing interactions with bases in the 5′-flanking regions outside the recognition hexanucleotide, while excluding two bound water molecules seen in the wild-type complex. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm exclusion of these waters. The structure and simulations suggest multiple possible reasons why binding of A138T protein to the GAATTC site has ΔS° more favorable and ΔH° less favorable than for wild-type endonuclease binding. The novel interactions of Thr138 with flanking bases may permit A138T, unlike wild-type enzyme, to form complexes with EcoRI* sites that structurally resemble the specific wild-type complex with GAATTC. PMID:17997963

  11. The Structure-Specific Endonucleases MUS81 and SEND1 Are Essential for Telomere Stability in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Goubely, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Structure-specific endonucleases act to repair potentially toxic structures produced by recombination and DNA replication, ensuring proper segregation of the genetic material to daughter cells during mitosis and meiosis. Arabidopsis thaliana has two putative homologs of the resolvase (structure-specific endonuclease): GEN1/Yen1. Knockout of resolvase genes GEN1 and SEND1, individually or together, has no detectable effect on growth, fertility, or sensitivity to DNA damage. However, combined absence of the endonucleases MUS81 and SEND1 results in severe developmental defects, spontaneous cell death, and genome instability. A similar effect is not seen in mus81 gen1 plants, which develop normally and are fertile. Absence of RAD51 does not rescue mus81 send1, pointing to roles of these proteins in DNA replication rather than DNA break repair. The enrichment of S-phase histone γ-H2AX foci and a striking loss of telomeric DNA in mus81 send1 further support this interpretation. SEND1 has at most a minor role in resolution of the Holliday junction but acts as an essential backup to MUS81 for resolution of toxic replication structures to ensure genome stability and to maintain telomere integrity. PMID:26704385

  12. The Structure-Specific Endonucleases MUS81 and SEND1 Are Essential for Telomere Stability in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Margaux; Da Ines, Olivier; Amiard, Simon; Serra, Heïdi; Goubely, Chantal; White, Charles I; Gallego, Maria E

    2016-01-01

    Structure-specific endonucleases act to repair potentially toxic structures produced by recombination and DNA replication, ensuring proper segregation of the genetic material to daughter cells during mitosis and meiosis. Arabidopsis thaliana has two putative homologs of the resolvase (structure-specific endonuclease): GEN1/Yen1. Knockout of resolvase genes GEN1 and SEND1, individually or together, has no detectable effect on growth, fertility, or sensitivity to DNA damage. However, combined absence of the endonucleases MUS81 and SEND1 results in severe developmental defects, spontaneous cell death, and genome instability. A similar effect is not seen in mus81 gen1 plants, which develop normally and are fertile. Absence of RAD51 does not rescue mus81 send1, pointing to roles of these proteins in DNA replication rather than DNA break repair. The enrichment of S-phase histone γ-H2AX foci and a striking loss of telomeric DNA in mus81 send1 further support this interpretation. SEND1 has at most a minor role in resolution of the Holliday junction but acts as an essential backup to MUS81 for resolution of toxic replication structures to ensure genome stability and to maintain telomere integrity.

  13. Differential repair of etheno-DNA adducts by bacterial and human AlkB proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zdżalik, Daria; Domańska, Anna; Prorok, Paulina; Kosicki, Konrad; van den Born, Erwin; Falnes, Pål Ø.; Rizzo, Carmelo J.; Guengerich, F. Peter; Tudek, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    AlkB proteins are evolutionary conserved Fe(II)/2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases, which remove alkyl and highly promutagenic etheno (ε)-DNA adducts, but their substrate specificity has not been fully determined. We developed a novel assay for the repair of ε-adducts by AlkB enzymes using oligodeoxynucleotides with a single lesion and specific DNA glycosylases and AP-endonuclease for identification of the repair products. We compared the repair of three ε-adducts, 1,N6-ethenoadenine (εA), 3,N4-ethenocytosine (εC) and 1,N2-ethenoguanine (1,N2-εG) by nine bacterial and two human AlkBs, representing four different structural groups defined on the basis of conserved amino acids in the nucleotide recognition lid, engaged in the enzyme binding to the substrate. Two bacterial AlkB proteins, MT-2B (from Mycobacterium tuberculosis) and SC-2B (Streptomyces coelicolor) did not repair these lesions in either double-stranded (ds) or single-stranded (ss) DNA. Three proteins, RE-2A (Rhizobium etli), SA-2B (Streptomyces avermitilis), and XC-2B (Xanthomonas campestris) efficiently removed all three lesions from the DNA substrates. Interestingly, XC-2B and RE-2A are the first AlkB proteins shown to be specialized for ε-adducts, since they do not repair methylated bases. Three other proteins, EcAlkB (Escherichia coli), SA-1A, and XC-1B removed εA and εC from ds and ssDNA but were inactive toward 1,N2-εG. SC-1A repaired only εA with the preference for dsDNA. The human enzyme ALKBH2 repaired all three ε-adducts in dsDNA, while only εA and εC in ssDNA and repair was less efficient in ssDNA. ALKBH3 repaired only εC in ssDNA Altogether, we have shown for the first time that some AlkB proteins, namely ALKBH2, RE-2A, SA-2B and XC-2B can repair 1,N2-εG and that ALKBH3 removes only εC from ssDNA. Our results also suggest that the nucleotide recognition lid is not the sole determinant of the substrate specificity of AlkB proteins. PMID:25797601

  14. Meningocele repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myelodysplasia repair; Spinal dysraphism repair; Meningomyelocele repair; Neural tube defect repair; Spina bifida repair ... If your child has hydrocephalus, a shunt (plastic tube) will be put in the child's brain to ...

  15. Peculiarities of Crystallization of the Restriction Endonuclease EcoRII

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpove, Elizaveta; Pusey, M.arc L.

    1998-01-01

    Nucleases interfere with most standard molecular biology procedures. We have purified and crystallized the restriction endonuclease EcoRII, which belongs to the type II of restriction- modification enzyme, to study the protein crystallization process using a "non standard" macromolecule. A procedure for the purification of EcoRII was developed and 99% pure protein as determined by SDS PAGE electrophoresis obtained. Light scattering experiments were performed to assist in screening protein suitable crystallization conditions. The second virial coefficient was determined as a function of precipitating salt concentration, using sodium chloride, ammonium sulfate, and sodium sulfate. Small (maximum size approximately 0.2 mm) well shaped crystals have been obtained. Larger poorly formed crystals (ca 0.5 mm) have also been obtained, but we have been unable to mount them for diff-raction analysis due to their extreme fragility. Crystallization experiments with PEG have shown that using this precipitant, the best crystals are obtained from slightly over-saturated solutions. Use of higher precipitant concentration leads to dendritic crystal formation. EcoRII is difficult to solubilize and meticulous attention must be paid to the presence of reducing agents.

  16. Type II restriction endonucleases--a historical perspective and more.

    PubMed

    Pingoud, Alfred; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Wende, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    This article continues the series of Surveys and Summaries on restriction endonucleases (REases) begun this year in Nucleic Acids Research. Here we discuss 'Type II' REases, the kind used for DNA analysis and cloning. We focus on their biochemistry: what they are, what they do, and how they do it. Type II REases are produced by prokaryotes to combat bacteriophages. With extreme accuracy, each recognizes a particular sequence in double-stranded DNA and cleaves at a fixed position within or nearby. The discoveries of these enzymes in the 1970s, and of the uses to which they could be put, have since impacted every corner of the life sciences. They became the enabling tools of molecular biology, genetics and biotechnology, and made analysis at the most fundamental levels routine. Hundreds of different REases have been discovered and are available commercially. Their genes have been cloned, sequenced and overexpressed. Most have been characterized to some extent, but few have been studied in depth. Here, we describe the original discoveries in this field, and the properties of the first Type II REases investigated. We discuss the mechanisms of sequence recognition and catalysis, and the varied oligomeric modes in which Type II REases act. We describe the surprising heterogeneity revealed by comparisons of their sequences and structures.

  17. Modulation of the DNA scanning activity of the Micrococcus luteus UV endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, R.W.; Lloyd, R.S. )

    1989-10-15

    Micrococcus luteus UV endonuclease incises DNA at the sites of ultraviolet (UV) light-induced pyrimidine dimers. The mechanism of incision has been previously shown to be a glycosylic bond cleavage at the 5'-pyrimidine of the dimer followed by an apyrimidine endonuclease activity which cleaves the phosphodiester backbone between the pyrimidines. The process by which M. luteus UV endonuclease locates pyrimidine dimers within a population of UV-irradiated plasmids was shown to occur, in vitro, by a processive or sliding mechanism on non-target DNA as opposed to a distributive or random hit mechanism. Form I plasmid DNA containing 25 dimers per molecule was incubated with M. luteus UV endonuclease in time course reactions. The three topological forms of plasmid DNA generated were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. When the enzyme encounters a pyrimidine dimer, it is significantly more likely to make only the glycosylase cleavage as opposed to making both the glycosylic and phosphodiester bond cleavages. Thus, plasmids are accumulated with many alkaline-labile sites relative to single-stranded breaks. In addition, reactions were performed at both pH 8.0 and pH 6.0, in the absence of NaCl, as well as 25,100, and 250 mM NaCl. The efficiency of the DNA scanning reaction was shown to be dependent on both the ionic strength and pH of the reaction. At low ionic strengths, the reaction was shown to proceed by a processive mechanism and shifted to a distributive mechanism as the ionic strength of the reaction increased. Processivity at pH 8.0 is shown to be more sensitive to increases in ionic strength than reactions performed at pH 6.0.

  18. Infrared laser effects at fluences used for treatment of dentin hypersensitivity on DNA repair in Escherichia coli and plasmids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha Teixeira, Gleica; da Silva Marciano, Roberta; da Silva Sergio, Luiz Philippe; Castanheira Polignano, Giovanni Augusto; Roberto Guimarães, Oscar; Geller, Mauro; de Paoli, Flavia; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson

    2014-12-01

    Low-intensity infrared lasers are proposed in clinical protocols based on biostimulative effects, yet dosimetry is inaccurate and their effects on DNA at therapeutic doses are controversial. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of low-intensity infrared laser on survival and induction of filamentation of Escherichia coli cells, and induction of DNA lesions in bacterial plasmids. E. coli cultures were exposed to laser (808 nm, 100 mW, 40 and 60 J/cm2) to study bacterial survival and filamentation. Also, bacterial plasmids were exposed to laser to study DNA lesions by electrophoretic profile and action of DNA repair enzymes. Data indicate low-intensity infrared laser has no effect on survival of E. coli wild type and exonuclease III, but decreases the survival of formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase/MutM protein and endonuclease III deficient cells in stationary growth phase, induces bacterial filamentation, does not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids in agarose gels and does not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with endonuclease III, formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase/MutM protein and exonuclease III. Our findings show that low-intensity laser exposure causes DNA lesions at sub-lethal level and induces cellular mechanisms involved in repair of oxidative lesions in DNA. Studies about laser dosimetry and safety strategies are necessary for professionals and patients exposed to low-intensity lasers at therapeutic doses.

  19. Different structural states in oligonucleosomes are required for early versus late steps of base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Shima; Prasad, Rajendra; Wilson, Samuel H.; Smerdon, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Chromatin in eukaryotic cells is folded into higher order structures of folded nucleosome filaments, and DNA damage occurs at all levels of this structural hierarchy. However, little is known about the impact of higher order folding on DNA repair enzymes. We examined the catalytic activities of purified human base excision repair (BER) enzymes on uracil-containing oligonucleosome arrays, which are folded primarily into 30 nm structures when incubated in repair reaction buffers. The catalytic activities of uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) and apyrimidinic/apurinic endonuclease (APE) digest G:U mismatches to completion in the folded oligonucleosomes without requiring significant disruption. In contrast, DNA polymerase β (Pol β) synthesis is inhibited in a major fraction (∼80%) of the oligonucleosome array, suggesting that single strand nicks in linker DNA are far more accessible to Pol β in highly folded oligonucleosomes. Importantly, this barrier in folded oligonucleosomes is removed by purified chromatin remodeling complexes. Both ISW1 and ISW2 from yeast significantly enhance Pol β accessibility to the refractory nicked sites in oligonucleosomes. These results indicate that the initial steps of BER (UDG and APE) act efficiently on highly folded oligonucleosome arrays, and chromatin remodeling may be required for the latter steps of BER in intact chromatin. PMID:17576692

  20. High-resolution crystal structures reveal plasticity in the metal binding site of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease I.

    PubMed

    He, Hongzhen; Chen, Qiujia; Georgiadis, Millie M

    2014-10-21

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease I (APE1) is an essential base excision repair enzyme that catalyzes a Mg²⁺-dependent reaction in which the phosphodiester backbone is cleaved 5' of an abasic site in duplex DNA. This reaction has been proposed to involve either one or two metal ions bound to the active site. In the present study, we report crystal structures of Mg²⁺, Mn²⁺, and apo-APE1 determined at 1.4, 2.2, and 1.65 Å, respectively, representing two of the highest resolution structures yet reported for APE1. In our structures, a single well-ordered Mn²⁺ ion was observed coordinated by D70 and E96; the Mg²⁺ site exhibited disorder modeled as two closely positioned sites coordinated by D70 and E96 or E96 alone. Direct metal binding analysis of wild-type, D70A, and E96A APE1, as assessed by differential scanning fluorimetry, indicated a role for D70 and E96 in binding of Mg²⁺ or Mn²⁺ to APE1. Consistent with the disorder exhibited by Mg²⁺ bound to the active site, two different conformations of E96 were observed coordinated to Mg²⁺. A third conformation for E96 in the apo structure is similar to that observed in the APE1-DNA-Mg²⁺ complex structure. Thus, binding of Mg²⁺ in three different positions within the active site of APE1 in these crystal structures corresponds directly with three different conformations of E96. Taken together, our results are consistent with the initial capture of metal by D70 and E96 and repositioning of Mg²⁺ facilitated by the structural plasticity of E96 in the active site.

  1. Purification of Restriction Endonuclease EcoRII and its Co-Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpova, E. A.; Chen, L.; Meehan, E.; Pusey, M.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Restriction endonuclease EcoRII (EcoRII) is a homodimeric DNA-binding protein. It belongs to the type II family of restriction-modification enzymes (subclass IIe). EcoRII recognizes the nucleotide sequence 5'-CCWGG (W=A or T) and cleaves the phosphodiester bond preceding the first cytosine. Methylation at C5 of the second cytosine inhibits cleavage. The enzyme has a unique ability to search for the presence of two substrate sites before cleavage. To the best of our knowledge no other subclass IIe restriction endonuclease has been crystallized yet, without or with a DNA-substrate. We have recently grown and characterized the crystals of this enzyme (1) Here we report on the result of co-crystallization experiments of EcoRII with an 11 b.p. oligonucleotide substrate. The dissociation constant (Kd) EcoRII: 11 b.p. was determined earlier (unpublished results). The needle-like crystals of oligonucleotide-EcoRII protein complex were obtained with this substrate by the technique of vapor diffusion hanging drops. The crystals obtained were washed and dissolved in an aliquot of 10 mM Tris-HCl buffer, pH=7.5. Running a portion of this solution on the SDS-get indicated the presence of endonuclease in the solution. A UV-spectrophotometric test of a second portion confirmed the presence of DNA. We are now working on improvement of the DNA-EcoRII protein crystals. Results obtained from these and ongoing efforts will be reported.

  2. Adapting capillary gel electrophoresis as a sensitive, high-throughput method to accelerate characterization of nucleic acid metabolic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Greenough, Lucia; Schermerhorn, Kelly M; Mazzola, Laurie; Bybee, Joanna; Rivizzigno, Danielle; Cantin, Elizabeth; Slatko, Barton E; Gardner, Andrew F

    2016-01-29

    Detailed biochemical characterization of nucleic acid enzymes is fundamental to understanding nucleic acid metabolism, genome replication and repair. We report the development of a rapid, high-throughput fluorescence capillary gel electrophoresis method as an alternative to traditional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to characterize nucleic acid metabolic enzymes. The principles of assay design described here can be applied to nearly any enzyme system that acts on a fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide substrate. Herein, we describe several assays using this core capillary gel electrophoresis methodology to accelerate study of nucleic acid enzymes. First, assays were designed to examine DNA polymerase activities including nucleotide incorporation kinetics, strand displacement synthesis and 3'-5' exonuclease activity. Next, DNA repair activities of DNA ligase, flap endonuclease and RNase H2 were monitored. In addition, a multicolor assay that uses four different fluorescently labeled substrates in a single reaction was implemented to characterize GAN nuclease specificity. Finally, a dual-color fluorescence assay to monitor coupled enzyme reactions during Okazaki fragment maturation is described. These assays serve as a template to guide further technical development for enzyme characterization or nucleoside and non-nucleoside inhibitor screening in a high-throughput manner.

  3. Adapting capillary gel electrophoresis as a sensitive, high-throughput method to accelerate characterization of nucleic acid metabolic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Greenough, Lucia; Schermerhorn, Kelly M.; Mazzola, Laurie; Bybee, Joanna; Rivizzigno, Danielle; Cantin, Elizabeth; Slatko, Barton E.; Gardner, Andrew F.

    2016-01-01

    Detailed biochemical characterization of nucleic acid enzymes is fundamental to understanding nucleic acid metabolism, genome replication and repair. We report the development of a rapid, high-throughput fluorescence capillary gel electrophoresis method as an alternative to traditional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to characterize nucleic acid metabolic enzymes. The principles of assay design described here can be applied to nearly any enzyme system that acts on a fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide substrate. Herein, we describe several assays using this core capillary gel electrophoresis methodology to accelerate study of nucleic acid enzymes. First, assays were designed to examine DNA polymerase activities including nucleotide incorporation kinetics, strand displacement synthesis and 3′-5′ exonuclease activity. Next, DNA repair activities of DNA ligase, flap endonuclease and RNase H2 were monitored. In addition, a multicolor assay that uses four different fluorescently labeled substrates in a single reaction was implemented to characterize GAN nuclease specificity. Finally, a dual-color fluorescence assay to monitor coupled enzyme reactions during Okazaki fragment maturation is described. These assays serve as a template to guide further technical development for enzyme characterization or nucleoside and non-nucleoside inhibitor screening in a high-throughput manner. PMID:26365239

  4. Endonucleases: new tools to edit the mouse genome.

    PubMed

    Wijshake, Tobias; Baker, Darren J; van de Sluis, Bart

    2014-10-01

    Mouse transgenesis has been instrumental in determining the function of genes in the pathophysiology of human diseases and modification of genes by homologous recombination in mouse embryonic stem cells remains a widely used technology. However, this approach harbors a number of disadvantages, as it is time-consuming and quite laborious. Over the last decade a number of new genome editing technologies have been developed, including zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated (CRISPR/Cas). These systems are characterized by a designed DNA binding protein or RNA sequence fused or co-expressed with a non-specific endonuclease, respectively. The engineered DNA binding protein or RNA sequence guides the nuclease to a specific target sequence in the genome to induce a double strand break. The subsequent activation of the DNA repair machinery then enables the introduction of gene modifications at the target site, such as gene disruption, correction or insertion. Nuclease-mediated genome editing has numerous advantages over conventional gene targeting, including increased efficiency in gene editing, reduced generation time of mutant mice, and the ability to mutagenize multiple genes simultaneously. Although nuclease-driven modifications in the genome are a powerful tool to generate mutant mice, there are concerns about off-target cleavage, especially when using the CRISPR/Cas system. Here, we describe the basic principles of these new strategies in mouse genome manipulation, their inherent advantages, and their potential disadvantages compared to current technologies used to study gene function in mouse models. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: From Genome to Function.

  5. Escherichia coli endonuclease VIII: cloning, sequencing, and overexpression of the nei structural gene and characterization of nei and nei nth mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, D; Hatahet, Z; Blaisdell, J O; Melamede, R J; Wallace, S S

    1997-01-01

    Escherichia coli possesses two DNA glycosylase/apurinic lyase activities with overlapping substrate specificities, endonuclease III and endonuclease VIII, that recognize and remove oxidized pyrimidines from DNA. Endonuclease III is encoded by the nth gene. Endonuclease VIII has now been purified to apparent homogeneity, and the gene, nei, has been cloned by using reverse genetics. The gene nei is located at 16 min on the E. coli chromosome and encodes a 263-amino-acid protein which shows significant homology in the N-terminal and C-terminal regions to five bacterial Fpg proteins. A nei partial deletion replacement mutant was constructed, and deletion of nei was confirmed by genomic PCR, activity analysis, and Western blot analysis. nth nei double mutants were hypersensitive to ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide but not as sensitive as mutants devoid of base excision repair (xth nfo). Single nth mutants exhibited wild-type sensitivity to X rays, while nei mutants were consistently slightly more sensitive than the wild type. Double mutants lacking both endonucleases III and VIII exhibited a strong spontaneous mutator phenotype (about 20-fold) as determined by a rifampin forward mutation assay. In contrast to nth mutants, which showed a weak mutator phenotype, nei single mutants behaved as the wild type. PMID:9171429

  6. Little or No Repair of Cyclobutyl Pyrimidine Dimers Is Observed in the Organellar Genomes of the Young Arabidopsis Seedling.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J. J.; Jiang, C. Z.; Britt, A. B.

    1996-01-01

    A Southern-blot-based, site-specific assay for ultraviolet (UV)-induced cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), employing the CPD-specific enzyme T4 endonuclease V, was used to follow the repair of this lesion in particular DNA sequences in 5- to 6-d-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. CPDs, measured as enzyme-sensitive sites, in nuclear sequences were removed rapidly in the light but were repaired slowly, if at all, in the dark. This result was identical to that obtained in prior analyses of CPDs in total cellular DNA. Assay of representative chloroplast and mitochondrial sequences in the same DNA preparations revealed that, in contrast to nuclear sequences, enzyme-sensitive sites are inefficiently eliminated in both the presence and absence of visible light. These observations suggest that Arabidopsis seedlings possess little or no capacity for the repair of CPDs in the organellar genomes. Given the fact that the UV dose employed only marginally affected the growth of the seedlings, we suggest that Arabidopsis seedlings must possess very efficient mechanism(s) for the tolerance of UV-induced DNA damage. PMID:12226273

  7. Structural basis for recruitment of human flap endonuclease 1 to PCNA

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Shigeru; Kitano, Ken; Yamaguchi, Hiroto; Hamada, Keisuke; Okada, Kengo; Fukuda, Kotaro; Uchida, Makiyo; Ohtsuka, Eiko; Morioka, Hiroshi; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2005-01-01

    Flap endonuclease-1 (FEN1) is a key enzyme for maintaining genomic stability and replication. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) binds FEN1 and stimulates its endonuclease activity. The structural basis of the FEN1–PCNA interaction was revealed by the crystal structure of the complex between human FEN1 and PCNA. The main interface involves the C-terminal tail of FEN1, which forms two β-strands connected by a short helix, the βA–αA–βB motif, participating in β–β and hydrophobic interactions with PCNA. These interactions are similar to those previously observed for the p21CIP1/WAF1 peptide. However, this structure involving the full-length enzyme has revealed additional interfaces that are involved in the core domain. The interactions at the interfaces maintain the enzyme in an inactive ‘locked-down' orientation and might be utilized in rapid DNA-tracking by preserving the central hole of PCNA for sliding along the DNA. A hinge region present between the core domain and the C-terminal tail of FEN1 would play a role in switching the FEN1 orientation from an inactive to an active orientation. PMID:15616578

  8. Three new restriction endonucleases MaeI, MaeII and MaeIII from Methanococcus aeolicus.

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, K; Thomm, M; Laminet, A; Laue, F G; Kessler, C; Stetter, K O; Schmitt, R

    1984-01-01

    Three type II restriction endonucleases, MaeI, MaeII and MaeIII, with novel site specificities have been isolated and purified from the archaebacterium Methanococcus aeolicus PL-15/H. The recognition sequences of these enzymes are (formula: see text) with the sites of cleavage as indicated by the arrows. The sequences were confirmed by restriction and computer analyses on sequenced DNA's of plasmid pBR322, bacteriophages lambda and phi X174 and virus SV40. Images PMID:6324124

  9. Quantum Entanglement in the Genome? The Role of Quantum Effects in Catalytic Synchronization of Type II Restriction Endonucleases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurian, P.

    Several living systems have been examined for their exhibition of macroscopic quantum effects, showcasing biology's apparent optimization of structure and function for quantum behavior. Prevalent in lower organisms with analogues in eukaryotes, type II restriction endonucleases are the largest class of restriction enzymes. Orthodox type II endonucleases recognize four-to-eight base pair sequences of palindromic DNA, cut both strands symmetrically, and act without an external metabolite such as ATP. While it is known that these enzymes induce strand breaks by nucleophilic attack on opposing phosphodiester bonds of the DNA helix, what remains unclear is the mechanism by which cutting occurs in concert at the catalytic centers. Previous studies indicate the primacy of intimate DNA contacts made by the specifically bound enzyme in coordinating the two synchronized cuts. We propose that collective electronic behavior in the DNA helix generates coherent oscillations---quantized through boundary conditions imposed by the endonuclease---that provide the energy required to break two phosphodiester bonds. Such quanta may be preserved in the presence of thermal noise and electromagnetic interference through the specific complex's exclusion of water and ions surrounding the helix, with the enzyme serving as a decoherence shield. Clamping energy imparted by the decoherence shield is comparable with zero-point modes of the dipole-dipole oscillations in the DNA recognition sequence. The palindromic mirror symmetry of this sequence should conserve parity during the process. Experimental data corroborate that symmetric bond-breaking ceases when the symmetry of the endonuclease complex is violated, or when environmental parameters are perturbed far from biological optima. Persistent correlation between states in DNA sequence across spatial separations of any length---a characteristic signature of quantum entanglement---may be explained by such a physical mechanism.

  10. Base excision repair in Archaea: back to the future in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Stefano; Tell, Gianluca

    2014-09-01

    Together with Bacteria and Eukarya, Archaea represents one of the three domain of life. In contrast with the morphological difference existing between Archaea and Eukarya, these two domains are closely related. Phylogenetic analyses confirm this evolutionary relationship showing that most of the proteins involved in DNA transcription and replication are highly conserved. On the contrary, information is scanty about DNA repair pathways and their mechanisms. In the present review the most important proteins involved in base excision repair, namely glycosylases, AP lyases, AP endonucleases, polymerases, sliding clamps, flap endonucleases, and ligases, will be discussed and compared with bacterial and eukaryotic ones. Finally, possible applications and future perspectives derived from studies on Archaea and their repair pathways, will be taken into account.

  11. A new specific DNA endonuclease activity in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Sargueil, B; Delahodde, A; Hatat, D; Tian, G L; Lazowska, J; Jacq, C

    1991-02-01

    Two group I intron-encoded proteins from the yeast mitochondrial genome have already been shown to have a specific DNA endonuclease activity. This activity mediates intron insertion by cleaving the DNA sequence corresponding to the splice junction of an intronless strain. We have discovered in mitochondrial extracts from the yeast strain 777-3A a new DNA endonuclease activity which cleaves the fused exon A3-exon A4 junction sequence of the CO XI gene.

  12. Use of a postlabelling assay to examine the removal of radiation-induced DNA lesions by purified enzymes and human cell extracts.

    PubMed

    Weinfeld, M; Lee, J; Ruiqi, G; Karimi-Busheri, F; Chen, D; Allalunis-Turner, J

    1997-08-01

    We have used a 32P-postlabelling assay to examine the activity of purified Esherichia coli endonuclease IV, human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease I and human cell-free extracts towards irradiated DNA. The assay can detect thymine glycols, 3'-phosphoglycolate groups and at least one other major lesion that has yet to be fully characterized. It was observed that endonuclease IV removed the phosphoglycolates and the uncharacterized lesion(s) suggesting that the latter are abasic sites with modified deoxyribose residues. The purified human enzyme acted only on the phosphoglycolate residues. Cell-free extract, prepared from A549 lung carcinoma cells by sonication or treatment with toluene, efficiently removed the phosphoglycolate and unknown lesions, but was less reactive towards thymine glycols. The extract was completely inactivated by heating at 60 degrees C for 10 min. Removal of the unknown product and phosphoglycolate did not require magnesium, but 1 mM EDTA did inhibit release of the latter. The cell-free extract exhibited substantially more activity towards native than heat-denatured DNA. A comparison of extracts prepared from 4 cell lines displaying a range of radiosensitivities, including an ataxia telangiectasia cell line, showed that all contained similar levels of repair activity towards the detectable lesions.

  13. Endonuclease domain of non-LTR retrotransposons: loss-of-function mutants and modeling of the R2Bm endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Govindaraju, Aruna; Cortez, Jeremy D.; Reveal, Brad; Christensen, Shawn M.

    2016-01-01

    Non-LTR retrotransposons are an important class of mobile elements that insert into host DNA by target-primed reverse transcription (TPRT). Non-LTR retrotransposons must bind to their mRNA, recognize and cleave their target DNA, and perform TPRT at the site of DNA cleavage. As DNA binding and cleavage are such central parts of the integration reaction, a better understanding of the endonuclease encoded by non-LTR retrotransposons is needed. This paper explores the R2 endonuclease domain from Bombyx mori using in vitro studies and in silico modeling. Mutations in conserved sequences located across the putative PD-(D/E)XK endonuclease domain reduced DNA cleavage, DNA binding and TPRT. A mutation at the beginning of the first α-helix of the modeled endonuclease obliterated DNA cleavage and greatly reduced DNA binding. It also reduced TPRT when tested on pre-cleaved DNA substrates. The catalytic K was located to a non-canonical position within the second α-helix. A mutation located after the fourth β-strand reduced DNA binding and cleavage. The motifs that showed impaired activity form an extensive basic region. The R2 biochemical and structural data are compared and contrasted with that of two other well characterized PD-(D/E)XK endonucleases, restriction endonucleases and archaeal Holliday junction resolvases. PMID:26961309

  14. DNA Triplet Repeat Expansion and Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ravi R.; Pluciennik, Anna; Napierala, Marek; Wells, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair is a conserved antimutagenic pathway that maintains genomic stability through rectification of DNA replication errors and attenuation of chromosomal rearrangements. Paradoxically, mutagenic action of mismatch repair has been implicated as a cause of triplet repeat expansions that cause neurological diseases such as Huntington disease and myotonic dystrophy. This mutagenic process requires the mismatch recognition factor MutSβ and the MutLα (and/or possibly MutLγ) endonuclease, and is thought to be triggered by the transient formation of unusual DNA structures within the expanded triplet repeat element. This review summarizes the current knowledge of DNA mismatch repair involvement in triplet repeat expansion, which encompasses in vitro biochemical findings, cellular studies, and various in vivo transgenic animal model experiments. We present current mechanistic hypotheses regarding mismatch repair protein function in mediating triplet repeat expansions and discuss potential therapeutic approaches targeting the mismatch repair pathway. PMID:25580529

  15. Development of APE1 enzymatic DNA repair assays: low APE1 activity is associated with increase lung cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Sevilya, Ziv; Leitner-Dagan, Yael; Pinchev, Mila; Kremer, Ran; Elinger, Dalia; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Rennert, Hedy S; Freedman, Laurence S; Rennert, Gad; Paz-Elizur, Tamar; Livneh, Zvi

    2015-09-01

    The key role of DNA repair in removing DNA damage and minimizing mutations makes it an attractive target for cancer risk assessment and prevention. Here we describe the development of a robust assay for apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease 1 (APE1; APEX1), an essential enzyme involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage. APE1 DNA repair enzymatic activity was measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cell protein extracts using a radioactivity-based assay, and its association with lung cancer was determined using conditional logistic regression with specimens from a population-based case-control study with 96 lung cancer cases and 96 matched control subjects. The mean APE1 enzyme activity in case patients was 691 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 655-727] units/ng protein, significantly lower than in control subjects (mean = 793, 95% CI = 751-834 units/ng protein, P = 0.0006). The adjusted odds ratio for lung cancer associated with 1 SD (211 units) decrease in APE1 activity was 2.0 (95% CI = 1.3-3.1; P = 0.002). Comparison of radioactivity- and fluorescence-based assays showed that the two are equivalent, indicating no interference by the fluorescent tag. The APE1Asp148Glu SNP was associated neither with APE1 enzyme activity nor with lung cancer risk. Taken together, our results indicate that low APE1 activity is associated with lung cancer risk, consistent with the hypothesis that 'bad DNA repair', rather than 'bad luck', is involved in cancer etiology. Such assays may be useful, along with additional DNA repair biomarkers, for risk assessment of lung cancer and perhaps other cancers, and for selecting individuals to undergo early detection techniques such as low-dose CT.

  16. Structure of the cauliflower mosaic virus genome. III. Restriction endonuclease mapping of thirty-three isolates.

    PubMed

    Hull, R

    1980-01-15

    The sites of various restriction endonucleases were mapped on the DNA of cauliflower mosaic virus isolate Cabb B-JI.FspAI,HgiAI,HhaI, andXhoI each cut at one site,PstI andPvuII each at two sites,BglII at five sites, andHindIII at nine sites;SacP,SmaI, andXbaI did not cut this DNA. These sites and those ofBamHI,EcoRI, andSalGI were compared with the sites of these enzymes on the DNAs of 32 other CaMV isolates. Considerable variations were found both in numbers and map positions of the sites of the restriction enzymes. The significance of this variation is discussed.

  17. Structures of Cas9 endonucleases reveal RNA-mediated conformational activation.

    PubMed

    Jinek, Martin; Jiang, Fuguo; Taylor, David W; Sternberg, Samuel H; Kaya, Emine; Ma, Enbo; Anders, Carolin; Hauer, Michael; Zhou, Kaihong; Lin, Steven; Kaplan, Matias; Iavarone, Anthony T; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Nogales, Eva; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-03-14

    Type II CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) systems use an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease, Cas9, to generate double-strand breaks in invasive DNA during an adaptive bacterial immune response. Cas9 has been harnessed as a powerful tool for genome editing and gene regulation in many eukaryotic organisms. We report 2.6 and 2.2 angstrom resolution crystal structures of two major Cas9 enzyme subtypes, revealing the structural core shared by all Cas9 family members. The architectures of Cas9 enzymes define nucleic acid binding clefts, and single-particle electron microscopy reconstructions show that the two structural lobes harboring these clefts undergo guide RNA-induced reorientation to form a central channel where DNA substrates are bound. The observation that extensive structural rearrangements occur before target DNA duplex binding implicates guide RNA loading as a key step in Cas9 activation.

  18. Human endonuclease VIII-like (NEIL) proteins in the giant DNA Mimivirus

    PubMed Central

    Bandaru, Viswanath; Zhao, Xiaobei; Newton, Michael R.; Burrows, Cynthia J.; Wallace, Susan S.

    2007-01-01

    Endonuclease VIII (Nei), which recognizes and repairs oxidized pyrimidines in the Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway, is sparsely distributed among both the prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Recently, we and others identified three homologs of E. coli endonuclease VIII-like (NEIL) proteins in humans. Here, we report identification of human NEIL homologs in Mimivirus, a giant DNA virus that infects Acanthamoeba. Characterization of the two mimiviral homologs, MvNei1 and MvNei2, showed that they share not only sequence homology but also substrate specificity to the human NEIL proteins, that is, they recognize oxidized pyrimidines in duplex DNA and in bubble substrates and as well show 5′2-deoxyribose-5-phosphate lyase (dRP lyase) activity. However, unlike MvNei1 and the human NEIL proteins, MvNei2 preferentially cleaves oxidized pyrimidines in single stranded DNA forming products with a different end chemistry. Interestingly, opposite base specificity of MvNei1 resembles human NEIL proteins for pyrimidine base damages whereas it resembles E. coli formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) for guanidinohydantoin (Gh), an oxidation product of 8-oxoguanine. Finally, a conserved arginine residue in the “zincless finger” motif, previously identified in human NEIL1, is required for the DNA glycosylase activity of MvNeil. Thus, Mimivirus represents the first example of a virus to carry oxidative DNA glycosylases with substrate specificities that resemble human NEIL proteins. Based on the sequence homology to the human NEIL homologs and novel bacterial NEIL homologs identified here, we predict that Mimivirus may have acquired the DNA glycosylases through the host-mediated lateral transfer from either a bacterium or from vertebrates. PMID:17627905

  19. Suppression of oxidative phosphorylation in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells deficient in apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Suganya, Rangaswamy; Chakraborty, Anirban; Miriyala, Sumitra; Hazra, Tapas K.; Izumi, Tadahide

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease 1 (APE1) is an essential DNA repair/gene regulatory protein. Decrease of APE1 in cells by inducible shRNA knockdown or by conditional gene knockout caused apoptosis. Here we succeeded in establishing a unique mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) line expressing APE1 at a level far lower than those achieved with shRNA knockdown. The cells, named MEFla (MEFlowAPE1), were hypersensitive to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), and showed little activity for repairing AP-sites and MMS induced DNA damage. While these results were consistent with the essential role of APE1 in repair of AP sites, the MEFla cells grew normally and the basal activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases in MEFla was lower than that in the wild-type MEF (MEFwt), indicating the low DNA damage stress in MEFla under the normal growth condition. Oxidative phosphorylation activity in MEFla was lower than in MEFwt, while the glycolysis rates in MEFla were higher than in MEFwt. In addition, we observed decreased intracellular oxidative stress in MEFla. These results suggest that cells with low APE1 reversibly suppress mitochondrial respiration and thereby reduce DNA damage stress and increases the cell viability. PMID:25645679

  20. Thermodynamics of DNA target site recognition by homing endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Eastberg, Jennifer H.; Smith, Audrey McConnell; Zhao, Lei; Ashworth, Justin; Shen, Betty W.; Stoddard, Barry L.

    2007-01-01

    The thermodynamic profiles of target site recognition have been surveyed for homing endonucleases from various structural families. Similar to DNA-binding proteins that recognize shorter target sites, homing endonucleases display a narrow range of binding free energies and affinities, mediated by structural interactions that balance the magnitude of enthalpic and entropic forces. While the balance of ΔH and TΔS are not strongly correlated with the overall extent of DNA bending, unfavorable ΔHbinding is associated with unstacking of individual base steps in the target site. The effects of deleterious basepair substitutions in the optimal target sites of two LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases, and the subsequent effect of redesigning one of those endonucleases to accommodate that DNA sequence change, were also measured. The substitution of base-specific hydrogen bonds in a wild-type endonuclease/DNA complex with hydrophobic van der Waals contacts in a redesigned complex reduced the ability to discriminate between sites, due to nonspecific ΔSbinding. PMID:17947319

  1. In vivo disruption of latent HSV by designer endonuclease therapy.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Martine; Madden, Emily A; Loprieno, Michelle; DeSilva Feelixge, Harshana S; Stensland, Laurence; Huang, Meei-Li; Greninger, Alexander L; Roychoudhury, Pavitra; Niyonzima, Nixon; Nguyen, Thuy; Magaret, Amalia; Galleto, Roman; Stone, Daniel; Jerome, Keith R

    2016-09-08

    A large portion of the global population carries latent herpes simplex virus (HSV), which can periodically reactivate, resulting in asymptomatic shedding or formation of ulcerative lesions. Current anti-HSV drugs do not eliminate latent virus from sensory neurons where HSV resides, and therefore do not eliminate the risk of transmission or recurrent disease. Here, we report the ability of HSV-specific endonucleases to induce mutations of essential HSV genes both in cultured neurons and in latently infected mice. In neurons, viral genomes are susceptible to endonuclease-mediated mutagenesis, regardless of the time of treatment after HSV infection, suggesting that both HSV lytic and latent forms can be targeted. Mutagenesis frequency after endonuclease exposure can be increased nearly 2-fold by treatment with a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Using a mouse model of latent HSV infection, we demonstrate that a targeted endonuclease can be delivered to viral latency sites via an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector, where it is able to induce mutation of latent HSV genomes. These data provide the first proof-of-principle to our knowledge for the use of a targeted endonuclease as an antiviral agent to treat an established latent viral infection in vivo.

  2. In vivo disruption of latent HSV by designer endonuclease therapy

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Emily A.; Loprieno, Michelle; Feelixge, Harshana S. DeSilva; Stensland, Laurence; Huang, Meei-Li; Greninger, Alexander L.; Nguyen, Thuy; Magaret, Amalia; Galleto, Roman

    2016-01-01

    A large portion of the global population carries latent herpes simplex virus (HSV), which can periodically reactivate, resulting in asymptomatic shedding or formation of ulcerative lesions. Current anti-HSV drugs do not eliminate latent virus from sensory neurons where HSV resides, and therefore do not eliminate the risk of transmission or recurrent disease. Here, we report the ability of HSV-specific endonucleases to induce mutations of essential HSV genes both in cultured neurons and in latently infected mice. In neurons, viral genomes are susceptible to endonuclease-mediated mutagenesis, regardless of the time of treatment after HSV infection, suggesting that both HSV lytic and latent forms can be targeted. Mutagenesis frequency after endonuclease exposure can be increased nearly 2-fold by treatment with a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Using a mouse model of latent HSV infection, we demonstrate that a targeted endonuclease can be delivered to viral latency sites via an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector, where it is able to induce mutation of latent HSV genomes. These data provide the first proof-of-principle to our knowledge for the use of a targeted endonuclease as an antiviral agent to treat an established latent viral infection in vivo. PMID:27642635

  3. Catalytic and non-catalytic roles of the CtIP endonuclease in double-strand break end resection

    PubMed Central

    Makharashvili, Nodar; Tubbs, Anthony T.; Yang, Soo-Hyun; Wang, Hailong; Barton, Olivia; Zhou, Yi; Deshpande, Rajashree A.; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Lobrich, Markus; Sleckman, Barry P.; Wu, Xiaohua; Paull, Tanya T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The CtIP protein is known to function in 5′ strand resection during homologous recombination similar to the budding yeast Sae2 protein, although its role in this process is unclear. Here we characterize recombinant human CtIP and find that it exhibits 5′ flap endonuclease activity on branched DNA structures, independent of the MRN complex. Phosphorylation of CtIP at known ATM-dependent sites and other sites is essential for its catalytic activity, although the S327 and T847 phosphorylation sites are dispensable. A catalytic mutant of CtIP that is deficient in endonuclease activity exhibits wild-type levels of homologous recombination at restriction enzyme-generated breaks but is deficient in processing topoisomerase adducts and radiation-induced breaks in human cells, suggesting that the nuclease activity of CtIP is specifically required for the removal of DNA adducts at sites of DNA breaks. PMID:24837676

  4. A multiplex assay based on encoded microbeads conjugated to DNA NanoBeacons to monitor base excision repair activities by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Gines, Guillaume; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Gasparutto, Didier

    2014-08-15

    We reported here a new assay to detect base excision repair activities from purified enzymes, as well as in cell-free extracts. The multiplex format rests upon the encoding of magnetic beads with the fluorophore Alexa 488, thanks to a fast and original procedure. Fluorescently encoded microbeads are subsequently functionalized by lesion-containing DNA NanoBeacons labeled with the fluorophore/quencher pair Cyanine 5/BHQ2. Probes cleavage, induced by targeted enzymes leads to Cyanine 5 signal enhancement, which is finally quantified by flow cytometry. The multiplex assay was applied to the detection of restriction enzymes activities as well as base excision repair processes. Each test requires only 500fmol of DNA substrate, which constitutes great sensitivity compared to other BER functional assays. The present biosensor is able to detect both uracil DNA N-glycosylase (UNG) and AP-endonuclease 1 (APE1) within few nanograms of nuclear extract. Additionally, we demonstrated that the corresponding assay has potential application in DNA repair inhibitor search. Finally, the current multiplexed tool shows several advantages in comparison to other functional BER assays with no need of electrophoretic separation, straightforward, easy and reproducible functionalization of encoded microbeads and a high stability of DNA probes in cell-free extracts.

  5. Genetic localization and characterization of a pKM101-coded endonuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Winans, S C; Walker, G C

    1983-01-01

    The genetic and biochemical properties of an endonuclease mediated by the mutagenesis-enhancing plasmid pKM101 have been investigated. Taking advantage of the observation that this endonuclease, unlike host-coded DNases, is active in the presence of EDTA, we have developed an assay with nondenaturing acrylamide gels containing DNA. We have localized the plasmid DNA sufficient for nuclease expression to a 0.8-kilobase sequence that is near regions of DNA necessary for conjugal transfer, and we have determined that this gene is transcribed clockwise on the pKM101 map. The pKM101 gene mediating this activity codes for a 16,000-dalton protein, which is the same molecular mass as the nuclease monomer, leading us to conclude that this gene codes for the nuclease itself rather than for an activator of some host-coded enzyme. Cellular fractionation experiments have shown that the enzyme is localized in the periplasm. We have not been able to demonstrate any physiological role for the enzyme, but we have ruled out a direct involvement of the nuclease in any of the following known plasmid-associated phenotypes: (i) mutagenesis enhancement, (ii) conjugal transfer, (iii) entry exclusion, (iv) fertility inhibition of coresident P-group plasmids, (v) killing of Klebsiella pneumoniae used as conjugal recipients, and (vi) plasmid curing induced by treatment of cells with fluorodeoxyuridine. In addition, we have shown that the enzyme does not restrict bacteriophage or affect the ability of the host to utilize DNA as a source of thymine. Finally, we have shown that 11 of the 26 other plasmids tested also elaborated EDTA-resistant DNases. Images PMID:6222033

  6. PEG-functionalized zinc oxide nanoparticles induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells through reactive oxygen species-dependent impairment of DNA damage repair enzyme NEIL2.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, Soumyananda; Chakraborty, Samik; Saha, Shilpi; Manna, Argha; Banerjee, Shruti; Adhikary, Arghya; Sarwar, Shamila; Hazra, Tapas K; Das, Tanya; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2017-02-01

    We find that PEG functionalized ZnO nanoparticles (NP) have anticancer properties primarily because of ROS generation. Detailed investigation revealed two consequences depending on the level of ROS - either DNA damage repair or apoptosis - in a time-dependent manner. At early hours of treatment, NP promote NEIL2-mediated DNA repair process to counteract low ROS-induced DNA damage. However, at late hours these NP produce high level of ROS that inhibits DNA repair process, thereby directing the cell towards apoptosis. Mechanistically at low ROS conditions, transcription factor Sp1 binds to the NEIL2 promoter and facilitates its transcription for triggering a 'fight-back mechanism' thereby resisting cancer cell apoptosis. In contrast, as ROS increase during later hours, Sp1 undergoes oxidative degradation that decreases its availability for binding to the promoter thereby down-regulating NEIL2 and impairing the repair mechanism. Under such conditions, the cells strategically switch to the p53-dependent apoptosis.

  7. Identification of a uniquely immunodominant, cross-reacting site in the human immunodeficiency virus endonuclease protein.

    PubMed Central

    Björling, E; Utter, G; Stålhandske, P; Norrby, E; Chiodi, F

    1991-01-01

    One of the features of the life cycle of retroviruses is insertion of the proviral DNA into host chromosomes. A protein encoded by the 3' end of the pol gene of the virus genome has been shown to possess endonuclease activity (D. P. Grandgenett, A. C. Vora, and R. D. Schiff, Virology 89:119-132, 1978), which is necessary for DNA integration. Sera from the majority of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals react with endonuclease protein p31 in serological tests (J. S. Allan, J. E. Coligan, T.-H. Lee, F. Barin, P. J. Kanki, S. M'Boup, M. F. McLane, J. E. Groopman, and M. Essex, Blood 69:331-333, 1987; E. F. Lillehoj, F. H. R. Salazar, R. J. Mervis, M. G. Raum, H. W. Chan, N. Ahmad, and S. Venkatesan, J. Virol. 62:3053-3058, 1988; K. S. Steimer, K. W. Higgins, M. A. Powers, J. C. Stephans, A. Gyenes, G. George-Nascimento, P. A. Liciw, P. J. Barr, R. A. Hallewell, and R. Sanchez-Pescador, J. Virol. 58:9-16, 1986). It is not known, however, which part of the protein represents the target(s) for antibody response. To study this, we synthesized peptides and used them in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system to map the reactivity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) antibody-positive sera to the different regions of the HIV endonuclease. A uniquely antigenic, HIV-1- and HIV-2-cross-reacting site was identified in the central part of this protein from Phe-663 to Trp-670. PMID:2072463

  8. An alternative eukaryotic DNA excision repair pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Freyer, G A; Davey, S; Ferrer, J V; Martin, A M; Beach, D; Doetsch, P W

    1995-01-01

    DNA lesions induced by UV light, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, and (6-4)pyrimidine pyrimidones are known to be repaired by the process of nucleotide excision repair (NER). However, in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, studies have demonstrated that at least two mechanisms for excising UV photo-products exist; NER and a second, previously unidentified process. Recently we reported that S. pombe contains a DNA endonuclease, SPDE, which recognizes and cleaves at a position immediately adjacent to cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and (6-4)pyrimidine pyrimidones. Here we report that the UV-sensitive S. pombe rad12-502 mutant lacks SPDE activity. In addition, extracts prepared from the rad12-502 mutant are deficient in DNA excision repair, as demonstrated in an in vitro excision repair assay. DNA repair activity was restored to wild-type levels in extracts prepared from rad12-502 cells by the addition of partially purified SPDE to in vitro repair reaction mixtures. When the rad12-502 mutant was crossed with the NER rad13-A mutant, the resulting double mutant was much more sensitive to UV radiation than either single mutant, demonstrating that the rad12 gene product functions in a DNA repair pathway distinct from NER. These data directly link SPDE to this alternative excision repair process. We propose that the SPDE-dependent DNA repair pathway is the second DNA excision repair process present in S. pombe. PMID:7623848

  9. PPR-SMR protein SOT1 has RNA endonuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen; Lu, Qingtao; Li, Qingwei; Wang, Lei; Ding, Shunhua; Zhang, Aihong; Wen, Xiaogang; Zhang, Lixin; Lu, Congming

    2017-02-21

    Numerous attempts have been made to identify and engineer sequence-specific RNA endonucleases, as these would allow for efficient RNA manipulation. However, no natural RNA endonuclease that recognizes RNA in a sequence-specific manner has been described to date. Here, we report that SUPPRESSOR OF THYLAKOID FORMATION 1 (SOT1), an Arabidopsis pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein with a small MutS-related (SMR) domain, has RNA endonuclease activity. We show that the SMR moiety of SOT1 performs the endonucleolytic maturation of 23S and 4.5S rRNA through the PPR domain, specifically recognizing a 13-nucleotide RNA sequence in the 5' end of the chloroplast 23S-4.5S rRNA precursor. In addition, we successfully engineered the SOT1 protein with altered PPR motifs to recognize and cleave a predicted RNA substrate. Our findings point to SOT1 as an exciting tool for RNA manipulation.

  10. Excision repair and patch size in UV-irradiated bacteriophage T4

    SciTech Connect

    Yarosh, D.B.; Rosenstein, B.S.; Setlow, R.B.

    1981-11-01

    We determined the average size of excision repair patches in repair of UV lesions in bacteriophage T4 by measuring the photolysis of bromodeoxyuridine incorporated during repair. The average patch was small, approximately four nucleotides long. In control, experiments with the denV/sub 1/ excision-deificient mutant, we encountered an artifact, a protein(s) which remained bound to phenol-extracted DNA and prevented nicking by the UV-specific endonucleases of Micrococcus luteus and bacteriophage T4.

  11. Excision repair and patch size in UV-irradiated bacteriophage T4

    SciTech Connect

    Yarosh, D.B.; Rosenstein, B.S.; Setlow, R.B.

    1981-11-01

    We determined the average size of excision repair patches in repair of UV lesions in bacteriophage T4 by measuring the photolysis of bromodeoxyuridine incorporated during repair. The average patch was small, approximately four nucleotides long. In control experiments with the denV1 excision-deficient mutant, we encountered an artifact, a protein(s) which remained bound to phenol-extracted DNA and prevented nicking by the UV-specific endonucleases of Micrococcus luteus and bacteriophage T4.

  12. BRCA1-CtIP interaction in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Tomas; Gautier, Jean

    2016-07-01

    DNA termini at double-strand breaks are often chemically heterogeneous and require processing before initiation of repair. In a recent report, we demonstrated that CtIP and the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) nuclease complex cooperate with BRCA1 to specifically repair topoisomerase II-DNA adducted breaks. In contrast, BRCA1 is dispensable for repair of restriction endonuclease-generated double-strand breaks.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the homing endonuclease I-CvuI from Chlorella vulgaris in complex with its target DNA

    PubMed Central

    Redondo, Pilar; Merino, Nekane; Villate, Maider; Blanco, Francisco J.; Montoya, Guillermo; Molina, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Homing endonucleases are highly specific DNA-cleaving enzymes that recognize long stretches of DNA. The engineering of these enzymes provides novel instruments for genome modification in a wide range of fields, including gene targeting, by inducing specific double-strand breaks. I-CvuI is a homing endonuclease from the green alga Chlorella vulgaris. This enzyme was purified after overexpression in Escherichia coli. Crystallization experiments of I-CvuI in complex with its DNA target in the presence of Mg2+ yielded crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 62.83, b = 83.56, c = 94.40 Å. The self-rotation function and the Matthews coefficient suggested the presence of one protein–DNA complex per asymmetric unit. The crystals diffracted to a resolution limit of 1.9 Å using synchrotron radiation. PMID:24637769

  14. Hybrid restriction enzymes: zinc finger fusions to Fok I cleavage domain.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y G; Cha, J; Chandrasegaran, S

    1996-01-01

    A long-term goal in the field of restriction-modification enzymes has been to generate restriction endonucleases with novel sequence specificities by mutating or engineering existing enzymes. This will avoid the increasingly arduous task of extensive screening of bacteria and other microorganisms for new enzymes. Here, we report the deliberate creation of novel site-specific endonucleases by linking two different zinc finger proteins to the cleavage domain of Fok I endonuclease. Both fusion proteins are active and under optimal conditions cleave DNA in a sequence-specific manner. Thus, the modular structure of Fok I endonuclease and the zinc finger motifs makes it possible to create "artificial" nucleases that will cut DNA near a predetermined site. This opens the way to generate many new enzymes with tailor-made sequence specificities desirable for various applications. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8577732

  15. Endonucleolytic cleavage of RNA at 5' endogenous stem structures by human flap endonuclease 1.

    PubMed

    Stevens, A

    1998-10-20

    Structure-specific nucleases called 5' flap endonucleases cleave unannealed 5' arms of template-primer DNA model substrates at the start of the duplex and are involved in Okazaki fragment processing during DNA synthesis. To determine the possible use of the enzymes in RNA structure analysis, the cleavage of synthetic and native RNAs was examined using flap endonuclease 1 (Fen1) of HeLa cells. RNAs are cleaved at about 20% of the rate of DNA model substrates, and most of the cleavage sites are within 200 nucleotides of the 5' end. Hydrolysis of MFA2 mRNA of yeast shows that the cleavages are at the start of five possible stem structures of a folded secondary structure predicted on the basis of both chemical and enzymatic structure probing. 16S ribosomal RNA of Escherichia coli is cleaved at several 5' stem structures of its phylogenetically predicted folded structure. This type of RNA cleavage specificity may be very useful in secondary structure analysis in the future and also may be used by cells for specific 5' end-geared RNA cleavages.

  16. Expanding LAGLIDADG endonuclease scaffold diversity by rapidly surveying evolutionary sequence space

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, Kyle; Metzger, Michael; Shen, Betty W.; Certo, Michael T.; Jarjour, Jordan; Stoddard, Barry L.; Scharenberg, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases (LHEs) are a family of highly specific DNA endonucleases capable of recognizing target sequences ∼20 bp in length, thus drawing intense interest for their potential academic, biotechnological and clinical applications. Methods for rational design of LHEs to cleave desired target sites are presently limited by a small number of high-quality native LHEs to serve as scaffolds for protein engineering—many are unsatisfactory for gene targeting applications. One strategy to address such limitations is to identify close homologs of existing LHEs possessing superior biophysical or catalytic properties. To test this concept, we searched public sequence databases to identify putative LHE open reading frames homologous to the LHE I-AniI and used a DNA binding and cleavage assay using yeast surface display to rapidly survey a subset of the predicted proteins. These proteins exhibited a range of capacities for surface expression and also displayed locally altered binding and cleavage specificities with a range of in vivo cleavage activities. Of these enzymes, I-HjeMI demonstrated the greatest activity in vivo and was readily crystallizable, allowing a comparative structural analysis. Taken together, our results suggest that even highly homologous LHEs offer a readily accessible resource of related scaffolds that display diverse biochemical properties for biotechnological applications. PMID:22334611

  17. How quantum entanglement in DNA synchronizes double-strand breakage by type II restriction endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Kurian, P; Dunston, G; Lindesay, J

    2016-02-21

    Macroscopic quantum effects in living systems have been studied widely in pursuit of fundamental explanations for biological energy transport and sensing. While it is known that type II endonucleases, the largest class of restriction enzymes, induce DNA double-strand breaks by attacking phosphodiester bonds, the mechanism by which simultaneous cutting is coordinated between the catalytic centers remains unclear. We propose a quantum mechanical model for collective electronic behavior in the DNA helix, where dipole-dipole oscillations are quantized through boundary conditions imposed by the enzyme. Zero-point modes of coherent oscillations would provide the energy required for double-strand breakage. Such quanta may be preserved in the presence of thermal noise by the enzyme's displacement of water surrounding the DNA recognition sequence. The enzyme thus serves as a decoherence shield. Palindromic mirror symmetry of the enzyme-DNA complex should conserve parity, because symmetric bond-breaking ceases when the symmetry of the complex is violated or when physiological parameters are perturbed from optima. Persistent correlations in DNA across longer spatial separations-a possible signature of quantum entanglement-may be explained by such a mechanism.

  18. APE1 is dispensable for S-region cleavage but required for its repair in class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianliang; Husain, Afzal; Hu, Wenjun; Honjo, Tasuku; Kobayashi, Maki

    2014-12-02

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for antibody diversification, namely somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR). The deficiency of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (Ape1) in CH12F3-2A B cells reduces CSR to ∼20% of wild-type cells, whereas the effect of APE1 loss on SHM has not been examined. Here we show that, although APE1's endonuclease activity is important for CSR, it is dispensable for SHM as well as IgH/c-myc translocation. Importantly, APE1 deficiency did not show any defect in AID-induced S-region break formation, but blocked both the recruitment of repair protein Ku80 to the S region and the synapse formation between Sμ and Sα. Knockdown of end-processing factors such as meiotic recombination 11 homolog (MRE11) and carboxy-terminal binding protein (CtBP)-interacting protein (CtIP) further reduced the remaining CSR in Ape1-null CH12F3-2A cells. Together, our results show that APE1 is dispensable for SHM and AID-induced DNA breaks and may function as a DNA end-processing enzyme to facilitate the joining of broken ends during CSR.

  19. The FEN1 L209P mutation interferes with long-patch base excision repair and induces cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, H; He, L; Wu, H; Pan, F; Wu, X; Zhao, J; Hu, Z; Sekhar, C; Li, H; Zheng, L; Chen, H; Shen, B H; Guo, Z

    2017-01-01

    Flap endonuclease-1 (FEN1) is a multifunctional, structure-specific nuclease that has a critical role in maintaining human genome stability. FEN1 mutations have been detected in human cancer specimens and have been suggested to cause genomic instability and cancer predisposition. However, the exact relationship between FEN1 deficiency and cancer susceptibility remains unclear. In the current work, we report a novel colorectal cancer-associated FEN1 mutation, L209P. This mutant protein lacks the FEN, exonuclease (EXO) and gap endonuclease (GEN) activities of FEN1 but retains DNA-binding affinity. The L209P FEN1 variant interferes with the function of the wild-type FEN1 enzyme in a dominant-negative manner and impairs long-patch base excision repair in vitro and in vivo. Expression of L209P FEN1 sensitizes cells to DNA damage, resulting in endogenous genomic instability and cellular transformation, as well as tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. These data indicate that human cancer-associated genetic alterations in the FEN1 gene can contribute substantially to cancer development. PMID:27270424

  20. APE1 is dispensable for S-region cleavage but required for its repair in class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianliang; Husain, Afzal; Hu, Wenjun; Honjo, Tasuku; Kobayashi, Maki

    2014-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for antibody diversification, namely somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR). The deficiency of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (Ape1) in CH12F3-2A B cells reduces CSR to ∼20% of wild-type cells, whereas the effect of APE1 loss on SHM has not been examined. Here we show that, although APE1’s endonuclease activity is important for CSR, it is dispensable for SHM as well as IgH/c-myc translocation. Importantly, APE1 deficiency did not show any defect in AID-induced S-region break formation, but blocked both the recruitment of repair protein Ku80 to the S region and the synapse formation between Sμ and Sα. Knockdown of end-processing factors such as meiotic recombination 11 homolog (MRE11) and carboxy-terminal binding protein (CtBP)-interacting protein (CtIP) further reduced the remaining CSR in Ape1-null CH12F3-2A cells. Together, our results show that APE1 is dispensable for SHM and AID-induced DNA breaks and may function as a DNA end-processing enzyme to facilitate the joining of broken ends during CSR. PMID:25404348

  1. Endonucleases induced TRAIL-insensitive apoptosis in ovarian carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Geel, Tessa M.; Meiss, Gregor; Gun, Bernardina T. van der; Kroesen, Bart Jan; Leij, Lou F. de; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Silanskas, Arunas; Kokkinidis, Michael; Ruiters, Marcel H.; McLaughlin, Pamela M.; Rots, Marianne G.

    2009-09-10

    TRAIL induced apoptosis of tumor cells is currently entering phase II clinical settings, despite the fact that not all tumor types are sensitive to TRAIL. TRAIL resistance in ovarian carcinomas can be caused by a blockade upstream of the caspase 3 signaling cascade. We explored the ability of restriction endonucleases to directly digest DNA in vivo, thereby circumventing the caspase cascade. For this purpose, we delivered enzymatically active endonucleases via the cationic amphiphilic lipid SAINT-18{sup Registered-Sign }:DOPE to both TRAIL-sensitive and insensitive ovarian carcinoma cells (OVCAR and SKOV-3, respectively). Functional nuclear localization after delivery of various endonucleases (BfiI, PvuII and NucA) was indicated by confocal microscopy and genomic cleavage analysis. For PvuII, analysis of mitochondrial damage demonstrated extensive apoptosis both in SKOV-3 and OVCAR. This study clearly demonstrates that cellular delivery of restriction endonucleases holds promise to serve as a novel therapeutic tool for the treatment of resistant ovarian carcinomas.

  2. Sequence studies on mouse L-cell satellite DNA by base-specific degradation with T4 endonuclease IV.

    PubMed

    Harbers, K; Spencer, J H

    1978-10-24

    The base sequence of mouse L-cell satellite DNA was investigated by degradation of the two separated complementary strands with the base specific enzyme, T4 endonuclease IV. Digestion of the heavy strand DNA released a limited number of oligonucleotides which were separated by ionophoresis/homochromatography, isolated, and sequenced by the 'wandering spot' method. The light strand DNA was resistant to digestion with T4 endonuclease IV and no detectable amounts of oligonucleotides were released. The oligonucleotides obtained from the heavy strand were related in sequence, indicating that mouse satellite DNA derived from a short tandemly repeated sequence. The sequence of part of the original repeat unit is proposed to be C-A-T-T-T-T-T-C. Five major oligonucleotides were identified, all of which differ from the proposed original sequence by single base changes. The five major oligonucleotides occur with about equal frequency and together comprise approximately 50% of the oligonucleotides released by T4 endonuclease IV from the heavy strand DNA. In addition to the five major oligonucleotides, several oligonucleotides were found to occur in lesser amounts. Since these oligonucleotides are related to the major oligonucleotides, it is likely that they have arisen from them by mutation.

  3. The PIN domain endonuclease Utp24 cleaves pre-ribosomal RNA at two coupled sites in yeast and humans

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Graeme R.; Weichmann, Franziska; Colvin, David; Sloan, Katherine E.; Kudla, Grzegorz; Tollervey, David; Watkins, Nicholas J.; Schneider, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    During ribosomal RNA (rRNA) maturation, cleavages at defined sites separate the mature rRNAs from spacer regions, but the identities of several enzymes required for 18S rRNA release remain unknown. PilT N-terminus (PIN) domain proteins are frequently endonucleases and the PIN domain protein Utp24 is essential for early cleavages at three pre-rRNA sites in yeast (A0, A1 and A2) and humans (A0, 1 and 2a). In yeast, A1 is cleaved prior to A2 and both cleavages require base-pairing by the U3 snoRNA to the central pseudoknot elements of the 18S rRNA. We found that yeast Utp24 UV-crosslinked in vivo to U3 and the pseudoknot, placing Utp24 close to cleavage at site A1. Yeast and human Utp24 proteins exhibited in vitro endonuclease activity on an RNA substrate containing yeast site A2. Moreover, an intact PIN domain in human UTP24 was required for accurate cleavages at sites 1 and 2a in vivo, whereas mutation of another potential site 2a endonuclease, RCL1, did not affect 18S production. We propose that Utp24 cleaves sites A1/1 and A2/2a in yeast and human cells. PMID:27034467

  4. Modulation of DNA polymerase beta-dependent base excision repair in cultured human cells after low dose exposure to arsenite

    SciTech Connect

    Sykora, Peter; Snow, Elizabeth T.

    2008-05-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is crucial for development and for the repair of endogenous DNA damage. However, unlike nucleotide excision repair, the regulation of BER is not well understood. Arsenic, a well-established human carcinogen, is known to produce oxidative DNA damage, which is repaired primarily by BER, whilst high doses of arsenic can also inhibit DNA repair. However, the mechanism of repair inhibition by arsenic and the steps inhibited are not well defined. To address this question we have investigated the regulation of DNA polymerase {beta} (Pol {beta}) and AP endonuclease (APE1), in response to low, physiologically relevant doses of arsenic. GM847 lung fibroblasts and HaCaT keratinocytes were exposed to sodium arsenite, As(III), and mRNA, protein levels and BER activity were assessed. Both Pol {beta} and APE1 mRNA exhibited significant dose-dependant down regulation at doses of As(III) above 1 {mu}M. However, at lower doses Pol {beta} mRNA and protein levels, and consequently, BER activity were significantly increased. In contrast, APE1 protein levels were only marginally increased by low doses of As(III) and there was no correlation between APE1 and overall BER activity. Enzyme supplementation of nuclear extracts confirmed that Pol {beta} was rate limiting. These changes in BER correlated with overall protection against sunlight UV-induced toxicity at low doses of As(III) and produced synergistic toxicity at high doses. The results provide evidence that changes in BER due to low doses of arsenic could contribute to a non-linear, threshold dose response for arsenic carcinogenesis.

  5. Crystal structure of the ββα-Me type II restriction endonuclease Hpy99I with target DNA

    PubMed Central

    Sokolowska, Monika; Czapinska, Honorata; Bochtler, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    The ββα-Me restriction endonuclease (REase) Hpy99I recognizes the CGWCG target sequence and cleaves it with unusual stagger (five nucleotide 5′-recessed ends). Here we present the crystal structure of the specific complex of the dimeric enzyme with DNA. The Hpy99I protomer consists of an antiparallel β-barrel and two β4α2 repeats. Each repeat coordinates a structural zinc ion with four cysteine thiolates in two CXXC motifs. The ββα-Me region of the second β4α2 repeat holds the catalytic metal ion (or its sodium surrogate) via Asp148 and Asn165 and activates a water molecule with the general base His149. In the specific complex, Hpy99I forms a ring-like structure around the DNA that contacts DNA bases on the major and minor groove sides via the first and second β4α2 repeats, respectively. Hpy99I interacts with the central base pair of the recognition sequence only on the minor groove side, where A:T resembles T:A and G:C is similar to C:G. The Hpy99I–DNA co-crystal structure provides the first detailed illustration of the ββα-Me site in REases and complements structural information on the use of this active site motif in other groups of endonucleases such as homing endonucleases (e.g. I-PpoI) and Holliday junction resolvases (e.g. T4 endonuclease VII). PMID:19380375

  6. Repair of gamma-ray-induced DNA base damage in xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Dobson, P.P.; Kinsella, T.J.

    1986-04-01

    The repair of DNA damage produced by /sup 137/Cs gamma irradiation was measured with a preparation from Micrococcus luteus containing DNA damage-specific endonucleases in combination with alkaline elution. The frequency of these endonuclease sensitive sites (ESS) was determined after 54 or 110 Gy of oxic irradiation in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts from complementation groups A, C, D, and G. Repair was rapid in all cell strains with greater than 50% repair after 1.5 h of repair incubation. At later repair times, 12-17 h, more ESS remained in XP than in normal cells. The frequency of excess ESS in XP cells was approximately 0.04 per 10(9) Da of DNA per Gy which was equivalent to 10% of the initial ESS produced. The removal of ESS was comparable in XP cells with normal radiosensitivity and XP3BR cells which have been reported to be moderately radiosensitive.

  7. Base excision repair of tandem modifications in a methylated CpG dinucleotide.

    PubMed

    Sassa, Akira; Çağlayan, Melike; Dyrkheeva, Nadezhda S; Beard, William A; Wilson, Samuel H

    2014-05-16

    Cytosine methylation and demethylation in tracks of CpG dinucleotides is an epigenetic mechanism for control of gene expression. The initial step in the demethylation process can be deamination of 5-methylcytosine producing the TpG alteration and T:G mispair, and this step is followed by thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) initiated base excision repair (BER). A further consideration is that guanine in the CpG dinucleotide may become oxidized to 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), and this could affect the demethylation process involving TDG-initiated BER. However, little is known about the enzymology of BER of altered in-tandem CpG dinucleotides; e.g. Tp8-oxoG. Here, we investigated interactions between this altered dinucleotide and purified BER enzymes, the DNA glycosylases TDG and 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1), apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease 1, DNA polymerase β, and DNA ligases. The overall TDG-initiated BER of the Tp8-oxoG dinucleotide is significantly reduced. Specifically, TDG and DNA ligase activities are reduced by a 3'-flanking 8-oxoG. In contrast, the OGG1-initiated BER pathway is blocked due to the 5'-flanking T:G mispair; this reduces OGG1, AP endonuclease 1, and DNA polymerase β activities. Furthermore, in TDG-initiated BER, TDG remains bound to its product AP site blocking OGG1 access to the adjacent 8-oxoG. These results reveal BER enzyme specificities enabling suppression of OGG1-initiated BER and coordination of TDG-initiated BER at this tandem alteration in the CpG dinucleotide.

  8. Identification and Characterization of Inhibitors of Human Apurinic/apyrimidinic Endonuclease APE1

    PubMed Central

    Simeonov, Anton; Kulkarni, Avanti; Dorjsuren, Dorjbal; Jadhav, Ajit; Shen, Min; McNeill, Daniel R.; Austin, Christopher P.; Wilson, David M.

    2009-01-01

    APE1 is the major nuclease for excising abasic (AP) sites and particular 3′-obstructive termini from DNA, and is an integral participant in the base excision repair (BER) pathway. BER capacity plays a prominent role in dictating responsiveness to agents that generate oxidative or alkylation DNA damage, as well as certain chain-terminating nucleoside analogs and 5-fluorouracil. We describe within the development of a robust, 1536-well automated screening assay that employs a deoxyoligonucleotide substrate operating in the red-shifted fluorescence spectral region to identify APE1 endonuclease inhibitors. This AP site incision assay was used in a titration-based high-throughput screen of the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC1280), a collection of well-characterized, drug-like molecules representing all major target classes. Prioritized hits were authenticated and characterized via two high-throughput screening assays – a Thiazole Orange fluorophore-DNA displacement test and an E. coli endonuclease IV counterscreen – and a conventional, gel-based radiotracer incision assay. The top, validated compounds, i.e. 6-hydroxy-DL-DOPA, Reactive Blue 2 and myricetin, were shown to inhibit AP site cleavage activity of whole cell protein extracts from HEK 293T and HeLa cell lines, and to enhance the cytotoxic and genotoxic potency of the alkylating agent methylmethane sulfonate. The studies herein report on the identification of novel, small molecule APE1-targeted bioactive inhibitor probes, which represent initial chemotypes towards the development of potential pharmaceuticals. PMID:19484131

  9. Effects of 5-(N-aminohexyl)carbamoyl-2'-deoxyuridine on endonuclease stability and the ability of oligodeoxynucleotide to activate RNase H.

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Y; Kumagai, I; Haginoya, N; Matsuda, A

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate an endonuclease resistance property of oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing 5-(N-aminohexyl)carbamoyl-2'-deoxyuridines (Hs) and to elucidate whether a duplex consisting of the ODN analogue and its complementary RNA induces RNase H activity, the ODNs containing the deoxyuridine analogues, Hs, at intervals of one, two, three, four and five natural nucleosides were synthesized. From partial hydrolysis of these ODNs with nuclease S1 (an endonuclease), it was found that the ODNs became more stable towards nucleolytic hydrolysis by the enzyme as the number of H increased. Furthermore, to examine whether the duplexes composed of the ODNs containing Hs and their complementary RNAs are substrates for RNase H or not, the duplexes of these ODNs and their complementary RNA strands were treated with Escherichia coliRNase H. It was found that cleavage of the RNA strands by the enzyme was kinetically affected by the introduction of Hs into the duplexes. PMID:9380497

  10. Minimal role of base excision repair in TET-induced global DNA demethylation in HEK293T cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chunlei; Qin, Taichun; Barton, Michelle Craig; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2015-01-01

    Oxidation of 5-methylcytosine by TET family proteins can induce DNA replication-dependent (passive) DNA demethylation and base excision repair (BER)-based (active) DNA demethylation. The balance of active vs. passive TET-induced demethylation remains incompletely determined. In the context of large scale DNA demethylation, active demethylation may require massive induction of the DNA repair machinery and thus compromise genome stability. To study this issue, we constructed a tetracycline-controlled TET-induced global DNA demethylation system in HEK293T cells. Upon TET overexpression, we observed induction of DNA damage and activation of a DNA damage response; however, BER genes are not upregulated to promote DNA repair. Depletion of TDG (thymine DNA glycosylase) or APEX1 (apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1), two key BER enzymes, enhances rather than impairs global DNA demethylation, which can be explained by stimulated proliferation. By contrast, growth arrest dramatically blocks TET-induced global DNA demethylation. Thus, in the context of TET-induction in HEK293T cells, the DNA replication-dependent passive mechanism functions as the predominant pathway for global DNA demethylation. In the same context, BER-based active demethylation is markedly restricted by limited BER upregulation, thus potentially preventing a disastrous DNA damage response to extensive active DNA demethylation. PMID:26440216

  11. Phototriggered formation and repair of DNA containing a site-specific single strand break of the type produced by ionizing radiation or AP lyase activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, K; Taylor, J S

    2001-01-09

    DNA strand breaks are produced by a variety of agents and processes such as ionizing radiation, xenobiotics, oxidative metabolism, and enzymatic processing of DNA base damage. One of the major types of strand breaks produced by these processes is a single nucleotide gap terminating in 5'- and 3'-phosphates. Previously, we had developed a method for sequence-specifically producing such phosphate-terminated strand breaks in an oligodeoxynucleotide by way of two photochemically activated (caged) building blocks placed in tandem. We now report the design and synthesis of a single caged building block consisting of 1,3-(2-nitrophenyl)-1,3-propanediol, for producing phosphate-terminated strand breaks, and its use producing such a break at a specific site in a double-stranded circular DNA vector. To produce the site-specific break in a duplex vector, a primer containing the caged single strand break was extended opposite the single strand form of a circular DNA vector followed by enzymatic ligation and purification. The single strand break could then be formed in quantitative yield by irradiation of the vector with 365 nm light. In contrast to a previous study, it was found that the strand break can be repaired by Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I and E. coli DNA ligase alone, though less efficiently than in the presence of the 3'-phosphate processing enzyme E. coli endonuclease IV. Repair in the absence of endonuclease IV could be attributed to hydrolysis of the 3'-phosphate in the presence of dNTP and to a lesser extent to exonucleolytic removal of the 3'-phosphate-bearing terminal nucleotide by way of the 3' --> 5' exonuclease activity of polymerase I. This work demonstrates that specialized 3'-end processing enzymes such as endonuclease IV or exonuclease III are not absolutely required for repair of phosphate-terminated gaps. In addition to preparing single strand breaks, the caged building block described should also be useful for preparing double strand breaks and

  12. An immunochemical approach to the study of DNA damage and repair

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, S.S. . Dept. of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics); Erlanger, B.F. . Dept. of Microbiology)

    1992-05-01

    The overall objective of this project has been to develop immunochemical methods to quantitate unique DNA base damages in order to facilitate studies on radiation-induced damage production and repair. Specifically, we have been using antibodies raised to damaged bases to quantitate unique lesions in model systems in order to evaluate their potential biological consequences. Our approach has been to synthesize modified nucleotides or nucleosides, conjugate them to protein carriers, and use the conjugates as immunogens in rabbits or to prepare monoclonal antibodies. We have been studying damages that are stable radiolysis products found in X-irradiated DNA and thus of potential biological consequence. Our aim is to build an in vitro and in vivo data base on the interactions between model DNA lesions and such cellular enzymes as DNA polymerases and repair endonucleases. Initial studies have focused on pyrimidine ring saturation products (thymine glycol.and dihydrothymine), products resulting from ring fragmentation or base loss (urea, {Beta}-ureidoisobutyric acid, abasic sites), 7-hydro-8-oxopurines, and more recently, cytosine radiolysis products. These modified bases serve as useful models for examining the potential lethal and/or mutagenic (carcinogenic) effects of the products of DNA radiolysis.

  13. A quantitative model of human DNA base excision repair. I. Mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A; Rodrigue, Garry R; Fitch, J Patrick; Wilson, David M

    2002-04-15

    Base excision repair (BER) is a multistep process involving the sequential activity of several proteins that cope with spontaneous and environmentally induced mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA damage. Quantitative kinetic data on single proteins of BER have been used here to develop a mathematical model of the BER pathway. This model was then employed to evaluate mechanistic issues and to determine the sensitivity of pathway throughput to altered enzyme kinetics. Notably, the model predicts considerably less pathway throughput than observed in experimental in vitro assays. This finding, in combination with the effects of pathway cooperativity on model throughput, supports the hypothesis of cooperation during abasic site repair and between the apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease, Ape1, and the 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, Ogg1. The quantitative model also predicts that for 8-oxoguanine and hydrolytic AP site damage, short-patch Polbeta-mediated BER dominates, with minimal switching to the long-patch subpathway. Sensitivity analysis of the model indicates that the Polbeta-catalyzed reactions have the most control over pathway throughput, although other BER reactions contribute to pathway efficiency as well. The studies within represent a first step in a developing effort to create a predictive model for BER cellular capacity.

  14. A quantitative model of human DNA base excision repair. I. mechanistic insights

    PubMed Central

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A.; Rodrigue, Garry R.; Fitch, J. Patrick; Wilson, David M.

    2002-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is a multistep process involving the sequential activity of several proteins that cope with spontaneous and environmentally induced mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA damage. Quantitative kinetic data on single proteins of BER have been used here to develop a mathematical model of the BER pathway. This model was then employed to evaluate mechanistic issues and to determine the sensitivity of pathway throughput to altered enzyme kinetics. Notably, the model predicts considerably less pathway throughput than observed in experimental in vitro assays. This finding, in combination with the effects of pathway cooperativity on model throughput, supports the hypothesis of cooperation during abasic site repair and between the apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease, Ape1, and the 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, Ogg1. The quantitative model also predicts that for 8-oxoguanine and hydrolytic AP site damage, short-patch Polβ-mediated BER dominates, with minimal switching to the long-patch subpathway. Sensitivity analysis of the model indicates that the Polβ-catalyzed reactions have the most control over pathway throughput, although other BER reactions contribute to pathway efficiency as well. The studies within represent a first step in a developing effort to create a predictive model for BER cellular capacity. PMID:11937636

  15. Engineering domain fusion chimeras from I-OnuI family LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Abigail R.; Kuhar, Ryan; Jarjour, Jordan; Kulshina, Nadia; Parmeggiani, Fabio; Danaher, Patrick; Gano, Jacob; Baker, David; Stoddard, Barry L.; Scharenberg, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    Although engineered LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases (LHEs) are finding increasing applications in biotechnology, their generation remains a challenging, industrial-scale process. As new single-chain LAGLIDADG nuclease scaffolds are identified, however, an alternative paradigm is emerging: identification of an LHE scaffold whose native cleavage site is a close match to a desired target sequence, followed by small-scale engineering to modestly refine recognition specificity. The application of this paradigm could be accelerated if methods were available for fusing N- and C-terminal domains from newly identified LHEs into chimeric enzymes with hybrid cleavage sites. Here we have analyzed the structural requirements for fusion of domains extracted from six single-chain I-OnuI family LHEs, spanning 40–70% amino acid identity. Our analyses demonstrate that both the LAGLIDADG helical interface residues and the linker peptide composition have important effects on the stability and activity of chimeric enzymes. Using a simple domain fusion method in which linker peptide residues predicted to contact their respective domains are retained, and in which limited variation is introduced into the LAGLIDADG helix and nearby interface residues, catalytically active enzymes were recoverable for ∼70% of domain chimeras. This method will be useful for creating large numbers of chimeric LHEs for genome engineering applications. PMID:22684507

  16. Evolution of CRISPR RNA recognition and processing by Cas6 endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Niewoehner, Ole; Jinek, Martin; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-01-01

    In many bacteria and archaea, small RNAs derived from clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) associate with CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins to target foreign DNA for destruction. In Type I and III CRISPR/Cas systems, the Cas6 family of endoribonucleases generates functional CRISPR-derived RNAs by site-specific cleavage of repeat sequences in precursor transcripts. CRISPR repeats differ widely in both sequence and structure, with varying propensity to form hairpin folds immediately preceding the cleavage site. To investigate the evolution of distinct mechanisms for the recognition of diverse CRISPR repeats by Cas6 enzymes, we determined crystal structures of two Thermus thermophilus Cas6 enzymes both alone and bound to substrate and product RNAs. These structures show how the scaffold common to all Cas6 endonucleases has evolved two binding sites with distinct modes of RNA recognition: one specific for a hairpin fold and the other for a single-stranded 5'-terminal segment preceding the hairpin. These findings explain how divergent Cas6 enzymes have emerged to mediate highly selective pre-CRISPR-derived RNA processing across diverse CRISPR systems.

  17. Rethinking transcription coupled DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Kamarthapu, Venu; Nudler, Evgeny

    2015-04-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an evolutionarily conserved, multistep process that can detect a wide variety of DNA lesions. Transcription coupled repair (TCR) is a subpathway of NER that repairs the transcribed DNA strand faster than the rest of the genome. RNA polymerase (RNAP) stalled at DNA lesions mediates the recruitment of NER enzymes to the damage site. In this review we focus on a newly identified bacterial TCR pathway in which the NER enzyme UvrD, in conjunction with NusA, plays a major role in initiating the repair process. We discuss the tradeoff between the new and conventional models of TCR, how and when each pathway operates to repair DNA damage, and the necessity of pervasive transcription in maintaining genome integrity.

  18. Evolution of I-SceI homing endonucleases with increased DNA recognition site specificity

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Rakesh; Ho, Kwok Ki; Tenney, Kristen; Chen, Jui-Hui; Golden, Barbara L.; Gimble, Frederick S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Elucidating how homing endonucleases undergo changes in recognition site specificity will facilitate efforts to engineer proteins for gene therapy applications. I-SceI is a monomeric homing endonuclease that recognizes and cleaves within an 18-base-pair (bp) target. It tolerates limited degeneracy in its target sequence, including substitution of a C/G+4 base-pair for the wild-type A/T+4 base-pair. Libraries encoding randomized amino acids at I-SceI residue positions that contact or are proximal to A/T+4 were used in conjunction with a bacterial one-hybrid system to select I-SceI derivatives that bind to recognition sites containing either the A/T+4 or C/G+4 base-pairs. As expected, isolates encoding wild-type residues at the randomized positions were selected using either target sequence. All I-SceI proteins isolated using the C/G+4 recognition site included small side chain substitutions at G100, and either contained (K86R/G100T, K86R/G100S and K86R/G100C) or lacked (G100A, G100T) a K86R substitution. Interestingly, the binding affinities of the selected variants for the wild-type A/T+4 target are 4–11-fold lower than that of wild-type I-SceI, whereas those for the C/G+4 target are similar. The increased specificity of the mutant proteins is also evident in binding experiments in vivo. These differences in binding affinities account for the observed ~36-fold difference in target preference between the K86R/G100T and wild-type proteins in DNA cleavage assays. An X-ray crystal structure of the K86R/G100T mutant protein bound to a DNA duplex containing the C/G+4 substitution suggests how sequence specificity of a homing enzyme can increase. This biochemical and structural analysis defines one pathway by which site specificity is augmented for a homing endonuclease. PMID:21029741

  19. Evolution of I-SceI Homing Endonucleases with Increased DNA Recognition Site Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Rakesh; Ho, Kwok Ki; Tenney, Kristen; Chen, Jui-Hui; Golden, Barbara L.; Gimble, Frederick S.

    2013-09-18

    Elucidating how homing endonucleases undergo changes in recognition site specificity will facilitate efforts to engineer proteins for gene therapy applications. I-SceI is a monomeric homing endonuclease that recognizes and cleaves within an 18-bp target. It tolerates limited degeneracy in its target sequence, including substitution of a C:G{sub +4} base pair for the wild-type A:T{sub +4} base pair. Libraries encoding randomized amino acids at I-SceI residue positions that contact or are proximal to A:T{sub +4} were used in conjunction with a bacterial one-hybrid system to select I-SceI derivatives that bind to recognition sites containing either the A:T{sub +4} or the C:G{sub +4} base pairs. As expected, isolates encoding wild-type residues at the randomized positions were selected using either target sequence. All I-SceI proteins isolated using the C:G{sub +4} recognition site included small side-chain substitutions at G100 and either contained (K86R/G100T, K86R/G100S and K86R/G100C) or lacked (G100A, G100T) a K86R substitution. Interestingly, the binding affinities of the selected variants for the wild-type A:T{sub +4} target are 4- to 11-fold lower than that of wild-type I-SceI, whereas those for the C:G{sub +4} target are similar. The increased specificity of the mutant proteins is also evident in binding experiments in vivo. These differences in binding affinities account for the observed -36-fold difference in target preference between the K86R/G100T and wild-type proteins in DNA cleavage assays. An X-ray crystal structure of the K86R/G100T mutant protein bound to a DNA duplex containing the C:G{sub +4} substitution suggests how sequence specificity of a homing enzyme can increase. This biochemical and structural analysis defines one pathway by which site specificity is augmented for a homing endonuclease.

  20. Effects of an Antimutagenic 1,4-Dihydropyridine AV-153 on Expression of Nitric Oxide Synthases and DNA Repair-related Enzymes and Genes in Kidneys of Rats with a Streptozotocin Model of Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ošiņa, Kristīne; Rostoka, Evita; Isajevs, Sergejs; Sokolovska, Jelizaveta; Sjakste, Tatjana; Sjakste, Nikolajs

    2016-11-01

    Development of complications of diabetes mellitus (DM), including diabetic nephropathy, is a complex multi-stage process, dependent on many factors including the modification of nitric oxide (NO) production and an impaired DNA repair. The goal of this work was to study in vivo effects of 1,4-dihydropyridine AV-153, known as antimutagen and DNA binder, on the expression of several genes and proteins involved in NO metabolism and DNA repair in the kidneys of rats with a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced model of DM. Transcription intensity was monitored by means of real-time RT-PCR and the expression of proteins by immunohistochemistry. Development of DM significantly induced PARP1 protein expression, while AV-153 (0.5 mg/kg) administration decreased it. AV-153 increased the expression of Parp1 gene in the kidneys of both intact and diabetic animals. Expression of H2afx mRNA and γH2AX histone protein, a marker of DNA breakage, was not changed in diabetic animals, but AV-153 up-regulated the expression of the gene without any impact on the protein expression. Development of DM was followed by a significant increase in iNOS enzyme expression, while AV-153 down-regulated the enzyme expression up to normal levels. iNos gene expression was also found to be increased in diabetic animals, but unlike the protein, the expression of mRNA was found to be enhanced by AV-153 administration. Expression of both eNOS protein and eNos gene in the kidneys was down-regulated, and the administration of AV-153 normalized the expression level. The effects of the compound in the kidneys of diabetic animals appear to be beneficial, as a trend for the normalization of expression of NO synthases is observed.

  1. The Role of Inducible DNA Repair in W-Reactivation and Related Phenomena.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-14

    luteus strongly decreases W-reactivation and mutagenic (error-prone) repair of UV-irradiated X DNA. Roulland- Dussoix (1967) and Boyle and Setlow...of DNA in vitro with UV-endonuclease from Micrococcus luteus . Mutat. Res. 27, 147-156 (1975) Tomizawa, J., Ogawa, T.: Effect of ultraviolet irradiation

  2. Diverse Small Molecule Inhibitors of Human Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease APE1 Identified from a Screen of a Large Public Collection

    PubMed Central

    Dorjsuren, Dorjbal; Kim, Daemyung; Vyjayanti, Vaddadi N.; Maloney, David J.; Jadhav, Ajit; Wilson, David M.; Simeonov, Anton

    2012-01-01

    The major human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease APE1 plays a pivotal role in the repair of base damage via participation in the DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway. Increased activity of APE1, often observed in tumor cells, is thought to contribute to resistance to various anticancer drugs, whereas down-regulation of APE1 sensitizes cells to DNA damaging agents. Thus, inhibiting APE1 repair endonuclease function in cancer cells is considered a promising strategy to overcome therapeutic agent resistance. Despite ongoing efforts, inhibitors of APE1 with adequate drug-like properties have yet to be discovered. Using a kinetic fluorescence assay, we conducted a fully-automated high-throughput screen (HTS) of the NIH Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository (MLSMR), as well as additional public collections, with each compound tested as a 7-concentration series in a 4 µL reaction volume. Actives identified from the screen were subjected to a panel of confirmatory and counterscreen tests. Several active molecules were identified that inhibited APE1 in two independent assay formats and exhibited potentiation of the genotoxic effect of methyl methanesulfonate with a concomitant increase in AP sites, a hallmark of intracellular APE1 inhibition; a number of these chemotypes could be good starting points for further medicinal chemistry optimization. To our knowledge, this represents the largest-scale HTS to identify inhibitors of APE1, and provides a key first step in the development of novel agents targeting BER for cancer treatment. PMID:23110144

  3. Physical mapping of the restriction fragments obtained from bacteriophage T4 dC-DNA with the restriction endonucleases SmaI, KpnI and BglII.

    PubMed

    Kiko, H; Niggemann, E; Rüger, W

    1979-01-01

    The cytosine-containing DNA of a mutant of bacteriophage T4 was digested with restriction endonucleases SmaI, KpnI and BglII producing 5, 7 and 13 fragments respectively. Complete physical maps of the T4 genome were constructed with the enzymes SmaI and KpnI and an almost complete map with the enzyme BglII.

  4. Inhibition of PA endonuclease activity of influenza virus RNA polymerase by Kampo medicines.

    PubMed

    Shirayama, Riku; Shoji, Masaki; Sriwilaijaroen, Nongluk; Hiramatsu, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Yasuo; Kuzuhara, Takashi

    To find a novel influenza inhibitor targeting the endonuclease activity of influenza A virus polymerase acidic protein (PA), which is essential for the acquisition of primers for viral mRNA transcription, seven Kampo extracts were tested in vitro for their ability to inhibit endonuclease activity of the recombinant PA protein that was expressed and purified from Escherichia coli. The Kampo medicines Kakkonto, Shosaikoto, Saikokeishito, Keishito, Maobushisaishinto, and Maoto, but not Chikujountanto, inhibited PA endonuclease activity in a dose-dependent manner. Our results indicate that Kampo medicines are good sources providing a structural lead for optimization of an influenza endonuclease inhibitor.

  5. Fractionated Radiation Exposure of Rat Spinal Cords Leads to Latent Neuro-Inflammation in Brain, Cognitive Deficits, and Alterations in Apurinic Endonuclease 1.

    PubMed

    Suresh Kumar, M A; Peluso, Michael; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Dhawan, Jasbeer; Beheshti, Afshin; Manickam, Krishnan; Thapar, Upasna; Pena, Louis; Natarajan, Mohan; Hlatky, Lynn; Demple, Bruce; Naidu, Mamta

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes degeneration of myelin, the insulating sheaths of neuronal axons, leading to neurological impairment. As radiation research on the central nervous system has predominantly focused on neurons, with few studies addressing the role of glial cells, we have focused our present research on identifying the latent effects of single/ fractionated -low dose of low/ high energy radiation on the role of base excision repair protein Apurinic Endonuclease-1, in the rat spinal cords oligodendrocyte progenitor cells' differentiation. Apurinic endonuclease-1 is predominantly upregulated in response to oxidative stress by low- energy radiation, and previous studies show significant induction of Apurinic Endonuclease-1 in neurons and astrocytes. Our studies show for the first time, that fractionation of protons cause latent damage to spinal cord architecture while fractionation of HZE (28Si) induce increase in APE1 with single dose, which then decreased with fractionation. The oligodendrocyte progenitor cells differentiation was skewed with increase in immature oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, which likely cause the observed decrease in white matter, increased neuro-inflammation, together leading to the observed significant cognitive defects.

  6. Fractionated Radiation Exposure of Rat Spinal Cords Leads to Latent Neuro-Inflammation in Brain, Cognitive Deficits, and Alterations in Apurinic Endonuclease 1

    PubMed Central

    Suresh Kumar, M. A.; Peluso, Michael; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Dhawan, Jasbeer; Beheshti, Afshin; Manickam, Krishnan; Thapar, Upasna; Pena, Louis; Natarajan, Mohan; Hlatky, Lynn; Demple, Bruce; Naidu, Mamta

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes degeneration of myelin, the insulating sheaths of neuronal axons, leading to neurological impairment. As radiation research on the central nervous system has predominantly focused on neurons, with few studies addressing the role of glial cells, we have focused our present research on identifying the latent effects of single/ fractionated -low dose of low/ high energy radiation on the role of base excision repair protein Apurinic Endonuclease-1, in the rat spinal cords oligodendrocyte progenitor cells’ differentiation. Apurinic endonuclease-1 is predominantly upregulated in response to oxidative stress by low- energy radiation, and previous studies show significant induction of Apurinic Endonuclease-1 in neurons and astrocytes. Our studies show for the first time, that fractionation of protons cause latent damage to spinal cord architecture while fractionation of HZE (28Si) induce increase in APE1 with single dose, which then decreased with fractionation. The oligodendrocyte progenitor cells differentiation was skewed with increase in immature oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, which likely cause the observed decrease in white matter, increased neuro-inflammation, together leading to the observed significant cognitive defects. PMID:26208353

  7. Hold your horSSEs: controlling structure-selective endonucleases MUS81 and Yen1/GEN1

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Miguel G.; Matos, Joao

    2015-01-01

    Repair of DNA lesions through homologous recombination promotes the establishment of stable chromosomal interactions. Multiple helicases, topoisomerases and structure-selective endonucleases (SSEs) act upon recombining joint molecules (JMs) to disengage chromosomal connections and safeguard chromosome segregation. Recent studies on two conserved SSEs – MUS81 and Yen1/GEN1– uncovered multiple layers of regulation that operate to carefully tailor JM-processing according to specific cellular needs. Temporal restriction of SSE function imposes a hierarchy in pathway usage that ensures efficient JM-processing while minimizing reciprocal exchanges between the recombining DNAs. Whereas a conserved strategy of fine-tuning SSE functions exists in different model systems, the precise molecular mechanisms to implement it appear to be significantly different. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the cellular switches that are in place to control MUS81 and Yen1/GEN1 functions. PMID:26284109

  8. Postreplication repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Resnick, M.A.; Boyce, J.; Cox, B.

    1981-04-01

    Postreplication events in logarithmically growing excision-defective mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were examined after low doses of ultraviolet light. Pulse-labeled deoxyribonucleic acid had interruptions, and when the cells were chased, the interruptions were no longer detected. Since the loss of interruptions was not associated with an exchange of pyrimidine dimers at a detection level of 10 to 20% of the induced dimers, it was concluded that postreplication repair in excision-defective mutants does not involve molecular recombination. Pyrimidine dimers were assayed by utilizing the ultraviolet-endonuclease activity in extracts of Micrococcus luteus and newly developed alkaline sucrose gradient techniques, which yielded chromosomal-size deoxyribonucleic acid after treatment of irradiated cells.

  9. A history of the DNA repair and mutagenesis field: The discovery of base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Errol C

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the early history of the discovery of an DNA repair pathway designated as base excision repair (BER), since in contrast to the enzyme-catalyzed removal of damaged bases from DNA as nucleotides [called nucleotide excision repair (NER)], BER involves the removal of damaged or inappropriate bases, such as the presence of uracil instead of thymine, from DNA as free bases.

  10. FEN1 participates in repair of the 5'-phosphotyrosyl terminus of DNA single-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Kametani, Yukiko; Takahata, Chiaki; Narita, Takashi; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Iwai, Shigenori; Kuraoka, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Etoposide is a widely used anticancer drug and a DNA topoisomerase II (Top2) inhibitor. Etoposide produces Top2-attached single-strand breaks (Top2-SSB complex) and double-strand breaks (Top2-DSB complex) that are thought to induce cell death in tumor cells. The Top2-SSB complex is more abundant than the Top2-DSB complex. Human tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) is required for efficient repair of Top2-DSB complexes. However, the identities of the proteins involved in the repair of Top2-SSB complexes are unknown, although yeast genetic data indicate that 5' to 3' structure-specific DNA endonuclease activity is required for alternative repair of Top2 DNA damage. In this study, we purified a flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) and xeroderma pigmentosum group G protein (XPG) in the 5' to 3' structure-specific DNA endonuclease family and synthesized single-strand break DNA substrates containing a 5'-phoshotyrosyl bond, mimicking the Top2-SSB complex. We found that FEN1 and XPG did not remove the 5'-phoshotyrosyl bond-containing DSB substrates but removed the 5'-phoshotyrosyl bond-containing SSB substrates. Under DNA repair conditions, FEN1 efficiently repaired the 5'-phoshotyrosyl bond-containing SSB substrates in the presence of DNA ligase and DNA polymerase. Therefore, FEN1 may play an important role in the repair of Top2-SSB complexes in etoposide-treated cells.

  11. The population genetics of using homing endonuclease genes in vector and pest management.

    PubMed

    Deredec, Anne; Burt, Austin; Godfray, H C J

    2008-08-01

    Homing endonuclease genes (HEGs) encode proteins that in the heterozygous state cause double-strand breaks in the homologous chromosome at the precise position opposite the HEG. If the double-strand break is repaired using the homologous chromosome, the HEG becomes homozygous, and this represents a powerful genetic drive mechanism that might be used as a tool in managing vector or pest populations. HEGs may be used to decrease population fitness to drive down population densities (possibly causing local extinction) or, in disease vectors, to knock out a gene required for pathogen transmission. The relative advantages of HEGs that target viability or fecundity, that are active in one sex or both, and whose target is expressed before or after homing are explored. The conditions under which escape mutants arise are also analyzed. A different strategy is to place HEGs on the Y chromosome that cause one or more breaks on the X chromosome and so disrupt sex ratio. This strategy can cause severe sex-ratio biases with efficiencies that depend on the details of sperm competition and zygote mortality. This strategy is probably less susceptible to escape mutants, especially when multiple X shredders are used.

  12. Single-molecule FRET unveils induced-fit mechanism for substrate selectivity in flap endonuclease 1

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Fahad; Harris, Paul D; Zaher, Manal S; Sobhy, Mohamed A; Joudeh, Luay I; Yan, Chunli; Piwonski, Hubert; Tsutakawa, Susan E; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Tainer, John A; Habuchi, Satoshi; Hamdan, Samir M

    2017-01-01

    Human flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) and related structure-specific 5’nucleases precisely identify and incise aberrant DNA structures during replication, repair and recombination to avoid genomic instability. Yet, it is unclear how the 5’nuclease mechanisms of DNA distortion and protein ordering robustly mediate efficient and accurate substrate recognition and catalytic selectivity. Here, single-molecule sub-millisecond and millisecond analyses of FEN1 reveal a protein-DNA induced-fit mechanism that efficiently verifies substrate and suppresses off-target cleavage. FEN1 sculpts DNA with diffusion-limited kinetics to test DNA substrate. This DNA distortion mutually ‘locks’ protein and DNA conformation and enables substrate verification with extreme precision. Strikingly, FEN1 never misses cleavage of its cognate substrate while blocking probable formation of catalytically competent interactions with noncognate substrates and fostering their pre-incision dissociation. These findings establish FEN1 has practically perfect precision and that separate control of induced-fit substrate recognition sets up the catalytic selectivity of the nuclease active site for genome stability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21884.001 PMID:28230529

  13. Increased human AP endonuclease 1 level confers protection against the paternal age effect in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Jamila R.; Reddick, Traci L.; Perez, Marissa; Centonze, Victoria E.; Mitra, Sankar; Izumi, Tadahide; McMahan, C. Alex; Walter, Christi A.

    2015-01-01

    Increased paternal age is associated with a greater risk of producing children with genetic disorders originating from de novo germline mutations. Mice mimic the human condition by displaying an age-associated increase in spontaneous mutant frequency in spermatogenic cells. The observed increase in mutant frequency appears to be associated with a decrease in the DNA repair protein, AP endonuclease1 (APEX1) and Apex1 heterozygous mice display an accelerated paternal age effect as young adults. In this study, we directly tested if APEX1 over-expression in cell lines and transgenic mice could prevent increases in mutagenesis. Cell lines with ectopic expression of APEX1 had increased APEX1 activity and lower spontaneous and induced mutations in the lacI reporter gene relative to the control. Spermatogenic cells obtained from mice transgenic for human APEX1 displayed increased APEX1 activity, were protected from the age-dependent increase in spontaneous germline mutagenesis, and exhibited increased apoptosis in the spermatogonial cell population. These results directly indicate that increases in APEX1 level confer protection against the murine paternal age effect, thus highlighting the role of APEX1 in preserving reproductive health with increasing age and in protection against genotoxin-induced mutagenesis in somatic cells. PMID:26201249

  14. Processing of joint molecule intermediates by structure-selective endonucleases during homologous recombination in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Erin K; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

    2011-04-01

    Homologous recombination is required for maintaining genomic integrity by functioning in high-fidelity repair of DNA double-strand breaks and other complex lesions, replication fork support, and meiotic chromosome segregation. Joint DNA molecules are key intermediates in recombination and their differential processing determines whether the genetic outcome is a crossover or non-crossover event. The Holliday model of recombination highlights the resolution of four-way DNA joint molecules, termed Holliday junctions, and the bacterial Holliday junction resolvase RuvC set the paradigm for the mechanism of crossover formation. In eukaryotes, much effort has been invested in identifying the eukaryotic equivalent of bacterial RuvC, leading to the discovery of a number of DNA endonucleases, including Mus81-Mms4/EME1, Slx1-Slx4/BTBD12/MUS312, XPF-ERCC1, and Yen1/GEN1. These nucleases exert different selectivity for various DNA joint molecules, including Holliday junctions. Their mutant phenotypes and distinct species-specific characteristics expose a surprisingly complex system of joint molecule processing. In an attempt to reconcile the biochemical and genetic data, we propose that nicked junctions constitute important in vivo recombination intermediates whose processing determines the efficiency and outcome (crossover/non-crossover) of homologous recombination.

  15. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mus81-Mms4 is a catalytic, DNA structure-selective endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Ehmsen, Kirk Tevebaugh; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

    2008-01-01

    The DNA structure-selective endonuclease Mus81-Mms4/Eme1 is a context-specific recombination factor that supports DNA replication, but is not essential for DSB repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We overexpressed Mus81-Mms4 in S. cerevisiae, purified the heterodimer to apparent homogeneity, and performed a classical enzymological characterization. Kinetic analysis (kcat, KM) demonstrated that Mus81-Mms4 is catalytically active and identified three substrate classes in vitro. Class I substrates reflect low KM (3–7 nM) and high kcat (∼1 min−1) and include the nicked Holliday junction, 3′-flapped and replication fork-like structures. Class II substrates share low KM (1–6 nM) but low kcat (≤0.3 min−1) relative to Class I substrates and include the D-loop and partial Holliday junction. The splayed Y junction defines a class III substrate having high KM (∼30 nM) and low kcat (0.26 min−1). Holliday junctions assembled from oligonucleotides with or without a branch migratable core were negligibly cut in vitro. We found that Mus81 and Mms4 are phosphorylated constitutively and in the presence of the genotoxin MMS. The endogenous complex purified in either modification state is negligibly active on Holliday junctions. Hence, Holliday junction incision activity in vitro cannot be attributed to the Mus81-Mms4 heterodimer in isolation. PMID:18281703

  16. Bme585 I [5'-CCCGC(4/6)-3'], a new isoschizomer of restriction endonuclease Fau I, isolated from a strain of Bacillus mesentericus.

    PubMed

    Davalieva, Katarina; Ziberovski, Jugoslav; Efremov, Georgi D

    2004-01-01

    Bme585 I is a new member of the restriction endonuclease type IIS family. It was partially purified from the heterothrophic, mesophilic bacterial strain Bacillus mesentericus 585 by ammonium sulphate precipitation and phosphocellulose column chromatography. Bme585 I is a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 62 kD. The enzyme is active over a broad pH range from 7.0 to 8.8, has a temperature optimum of 37 degrees C and tolerance of NaCl in reaction buffer from 0 to 400 mM. Bme585 I recognizes the asymmetric sequence 5'-CCCGC(4/6)-3' and is therefore an isoschizomer of restriction endonuclease Fau I.

  17. Crystal structure of the 5hmC specific endonuclease PvuRts1I

    PubMed Central

    Czapinska, Honorata; Bochtler, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    PvuRts1I is a prototype for a larger family of restriction endonucleases that cleave DNA containing 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) or 5-glucosylhydroxymethylcytosine (5ghmC), but not 5-methylcytosine (5mC) or cytosine. Here, we report a crystal structure of the enzyme at 2.35 Å resolution. Although the protein has been crystallized in the absence of DNA, the structure is very informative. It shows that PvuRts1I consists of an N-terminal, atypical PD-(D/E)XK catalytic domain and a C-terminal SRA domain that might accommodate a flipped 5hmC or 5ghmC base. Changes to predicted catalytic residues of the PD-(D/E)XK domain or to the putative pocket for a flipped base abolish catalytic activity. Surprisingly, fluorescence changes indicative of base flipping are not observed when PvuRts1I is added to DNA substrates containing pyrrolocytosine in place of 5hmC (5ghmC). Despite this caveat, the structure suggests a model for PvuRts1I activity and presents opportunities for protein engineering to alter the enzyme properties for biotechnological applications. PMID:24634440

  18. Crystal structure of the 5hmC specific endonuclease PvuRts1I.

    PubMed

    Kazrani, Asgar Abbas; Kowalska, Monika; Czapinska, Honorata; Bochtler, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    PvuRts1I is a prototype for a larger family of restriction endonucleases that cleave DNA containing 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) or 5-glucosylhydroxymethylcytosine (5ghmC), but not 5-methylcytosine (5mC) or cytosine. Here, we report a crystal structure of the enzyme at 2.35 Å resolution. Although the protein has been crystallized in the absence of DNA, the structure is very informative. It shows that PvuRts1I consists of an N-terminal, atypical PD-(D/E)XK catalytic domain and a C-terminal SRA domain that might accommodate a flipped 5hmC or 5ghmC base. Changes to predicted catalytic residues of the PD-(D/E)XK domain or to the putative pocket for a flipped base abolish catalytic activity. Surprisingly, fluorescence changes indicative of base flipping are not observed when PvuRts1I is added to DNA substrates containing pyrrolocytosine in place of 5hmC (5ghmC). Despite this caveat, the structure suggests a model for PvuRts1I activity and presents opportunities for protein engineering to alter the enzyme properties for biotechnological applications.

  19. Flow cytometric analysis of DNA binding and cleavage by cell surface-displayed homing endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Volná, Petra; Jarjour, Jordan; Baxter, Sarah; Roffler, Steve R; Monnat, Raymond J; Stoddard, Barry L; Scharenberg, Andrew M

    2007-01-01

    LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases (LHEs) cleave 18-24 bp DNA sequences and are promising enzymes for applications requiring sequence-specific DNA cleavage amongst genome-sized DNA backgrounds. Here, we report a method for cell surface display of LHEs, which facilitates analysis of their DNA binding and cleavage properties by flow cytometry. Cells expressing surface LHEs can be stained with fluorescently conjugated double-stranded oligonucleotides (dsOligos) containing their respective target sequences. The signal is absolutely sequence specific and undetectable with dsOligos carrying single base-pair substitutions. LHE-dsOligo interactions facilitate rapid enrichment and viable recovery of rare LHE expressing cells by both fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and magnetic cell sorting (MACS). Additionally, dsOligos conjugated with unique fluorophores at opposite termini can be tethered to the cell surface and used to detect DNA cleavage. Recapitulation of DNA binding and cleavage by surface-displayed LHEs provides a high-throughput approach to library screening that should facilitate rapid identification and analysis of enzymes with novel sequence specificities.

  20. Repair of 254 nm ultraviolet-induced (6-4) photoproducts: monoclonal antibody recognition and differential defects in xeroderma pigmentosum complementation groups A, D, and variant

    SciTech Connect

    Hiramoto, T.; Matsunaga, T.; Ichihashi, M.; Nikaido, O.; Fujiwara, Y.; Mishima, Y. )

    1989-11-01

    Repair kinetics of ultraviolet (UV) light-induced (6-4) photoproducts in xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A, D, and variant cells were studied by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a specific monoclonal antibody raised against (6-4) photoproducts, together with unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) and loss of T4 endonuclease V-susceptible sites (ESS). Group AXP35KO cells completely failed to repair both ESS (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and antibody-recognizing (6-4) photoproducts until tested 24 h after irradiation, and had 2% early-time UDS. Group DXP43KO cells showed about 10% removal of both (6-4) photoproducts and ESS in 24 h, despite showing a residually higher level of 40% early-time and cumulative UDS. Thus, the results substantiated the extreme UV hypersensitivity of XP group A and D cells. However, XP52KO variant cells exhibited the normal level of UDS and ESS loss, but a slightly reduced repair of antibody-recognizing (6-4) photoproducts at 6 and 12 h after irradiation, which may account for a small UV hypersensitivity of the XP variant cells.

  1. Multiple metal ions drive DNA association by PvuII endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Conlan, Lori H; Dupureur, Cynthia M

    2002-12-17

    Restriction enzymes serve as important model systems for understanding the role of metal ions in phosphodiester hydrolysis. To this end, a number of laboratories have reported dramatic differences between the metal ion-dependent and metal ion-independent DNA binding behaviors of these systems. In an effort to illuminate the underlying mechanistic details which give rise to these differences, we have quantitatively dissected these equilibrium behaviors into component association and dissociation rates for the representative PvuII endonuclease and use these data to assess the stoichiometry of metal ion involvement in the binding process. The dependence of PvuII cognate DNA on Ca(II) concentration binding appears to be cooperative, exhibiting half-saturation at 0.6 mM metal ion and yielding an n(H) of 3.5 +/- 0.2 per enzyme homodimer. Using both nitrocellulose filter binding and fluorescence assays, we observe that the cognate DNA dissociation rate (k(-)(1) or k(off)) is very slow (10(-)(3) s(-)(1)) and exhibits a shallow dependence on metal ion concentration. DNA trap cleavage experiments with Mg(II) confirm the general irreversibility of DNA binding relative to cleavage, even at low metal ion concentrations. More dramatically, the association rate (k(1) or k(on)) also appears to be cooperative, increasing more than 100-fold between 0.2 and 10 mM Ca(II), with an optimum value of 2.7 x 10(7) M(-)(1) s (-)(1). Hill analysis of the metal ion dependence of k(on) indicates an n(H) of 3.6 +/- 0.2 per enzyme dimer. This value is consistent with the involvement in DNA association of two metal ions per subunit active site, a result which lends new strength to arguments for two-metal ion mechanisms in restriction enzymes.

  2. Pyrimidine dimer formation and repair in human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, B.M.; Harber, L.C.; Kochevar, I.E.

    1980-09-01

    Cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers have been detected in the DNA of human skin following in vivo irradiation with suberythermal doses of ultraviolet (UV) radiation from FS-20 sun lamp fluorescent tubes. Dimers were assayed by treatment of extracted DNA with Micrococus luteus UV-specific endonuclease, alkaline agarose electrophoresis, and ethidum bromide staining. This technique, in contrast to conventional dimer assays, can be used with nonradioactive DNA and is optimal at low UV light doses. These data suggest that some dimer disappearance by excision repair occurs within 20 min of UV irradiation and that photoreactivation of dimers can make a contribution to the total repair process.

  3. Home and away- the evolutionary dynamics of homing endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Homing endonucleases (HEases) are a large and diverse group of site-specific DNAases. They reside within self-splicing introns and inteins, and promote their horizontal dissemination. In recent years, HEases have been the focus of extensive research due to their promising potential use in gene targeting procedures for the treatment of genetic diseases and for the genetic engineering of crop, animal models and cell lines. Results Using mathematical analysis and computational modeling, we present here a novel account for the evolution and population dynamics of HEase genes (HEGs). We describe HEGs as paradoxical selfish elements whose long-term persistence in a single population relies on low transmission rates and a positive correlation between transmission efficiency and toxicity. Conclusion Plausible conditions allow HEGs to sustain at high frequency through long evolutionary periods, with the endonuclease frequency being either at equilibrium or periodically oscillating. The predictions of our model may prove important not only for evolutionary theory but also for gene therapy and bio-engineering applications of HEases. PMID:22054298

  4. Crystal structure of an avian influenza polymerase PA[subscript N] reveals an endonuclease active site

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Puwei; Bartlam, Mark; Lou, Zhiyong; Chen, Shoudeng; Zhou, Jie; He, Xiaojing; Lv, Zongyang; Ge, Ruowen; Li, Xuemei; Deng, Tao; Fodor, Ervin; Rao, Zihe; Liu, Yingfang

    2009-11-10

    The heterotrimeric influenza virus polymerase, containing the PA, PB1 and PB2 proteins, catalyses viral RNA replication and transcription in the nucleus of infected cells. PB1 holds the polymerase active site and reportedly harbours endonuclease activity, whereas PB2 is responsible for cap binding. The PA amino terminus is understood to be the major functional part of the PA protein and has been implicated in several roles, including endonuclease and protease activities as well as viral RNA/complementary RNA promoter binding. Here we report the 2.2 angstrom (A) crystal structure of the N-terminal 197 residues of PA, termed PA(N), from an avian influenza H5N1 virus. The PA(N) structure has an alpha/beta architecture and reveals a bound magnesium ion coordinated by a motif similar to the (P)DX(N)(D/E)XK motif characteristic of many endonucleases. Structural comparisons and mutagenesis analysis of the motif identified in PA(N) provide further evidence that PA(N) holds an endonuclease active site. Furthermore, functional analysis with in vivo ribonucleoprotein reconstitution and direct in vitro endonuclease assays strongly suggest that PA(N) holds the endonuclease active site and has critical roles in endonuclease activity of the influenza virus polymerase, rather than PB1. The high conservation of this endonuclease active site among influenza strains indicates that PA(N) is an important target for the design of new anti-influenza therapeutics.

  5. An evolutionary analysis of the helix-hairpin-helix superfamily of DNA repair glycosylases.

    PubMed

    Denver, Dee R; Swenson, Stephanie L; Lynch, Michael

    2003-10-01

    The helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) superfamily of base excision repair DNA glycosylases is composed of multiple phylogenetically diverse enzymes that are capable of excising varying spectra of oxidatively and methyl-damaged bases. Although these DNA repair glycosylases have been widely studied through genetic, biochemical, and biophysical approaches, the evolutionary relationships of different HhH homologs and the extent to which they are conserved across phylogeny remain enigmatic. We provide an evolutionary framework for this pervasive and versatile superfamily of DNA glycosylases. Six HhH gene families (named AlkA: alkyladenine glycosylase; MpgII: N-methylpurine glycosylase II; MutY/Mig: A/G-specific adenine glycosylase/mismatch glycosylase; Nth: endonuclease III; OggI: 8-oxoguanine glycosylase I; and OggII: 8-oxoguanine glycosylase II) are identified through phylogenetic analysis of 234 homologs found in 94 genomes (16 archaea, 64 bacteria, and 14 eukaryotes). The number of homologs in each gene family varies from 117 in the Nth family (nearly every genome surveyed harbors at least one Nth homolog) to only five in the divergent OggII family (all from archaeal genomes). Sequences from all three domains of life are included in four of the six gene families, suggesting that the HhH superfamily diversified very early in evolution. The phylogeny provides evidence for multiple lineage-specific gene duplication events, most of which involve eukaryotic homologs in the Nth and AlkA gene families. We observe extensive variation in the number of HhH superfamily glycosylase genes present in different genomes, possibly reflecting major differences among species in the mechanisms and pathways by which damaged bases are repaired and/or disparities in the basic rates and spectra of mutation experienced by different genomes.

  6. Aberrant repair of etheno-DNA adducts in leukocytes and colon tissue of colon cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Obtułowicz, Tomasz; Winczura, Alicja; Speina, Elzbieta; Swoboda, Maja; Janik, Justyna; Janowska, Beata; Cieśla, Jarosław M; Kowalczyk, Paweł; Jawien, Arkadiusz; Gackowski, Daniel; Banaszkiewicz, Zbigniew; Krasnodebski, Ireneusz; Chaber, Andrzej; Olinski, Ryszard; Nair, Jagadesaan; Bartsch, Helmut; Douki, Thierry; Cadet, Jean; Tudek, Barbara

    2010-09-15

    To assess the role of lipid peroxidation-induced DNA damage and repair in colon carcinogenesis, the excision rates and levels of 1,N(6)-etheno-2'-deoxyadenosine (epsilondA), 3,N(4)-etheno-2'-deoxycytidine (epsilondC), and 1,N(2)-etheno-2'-deoxyguanosine (1,N(2)-epsilondG) were analyzed in polymorphic blood leukocytes (PBL) and resected colon tissues of 54 colorectal carcinoma (CRC) patients and PBL of 56 healthy individuals. In PBL the excision rates of 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine (epsilonAde) and 3,N(4)-ethenocytosine (epsilonCyt), measured by the nicking of oligodeoxynucleotide duplexes with single lesions, and unexpectedly also the levels of epsilondA and 1,N(2)-epsilondG, measured by LC/MS/MS, were lower in CRC patients than in controls. In contrast the mRNA levels of repair enzymes, alkylpurine- and thymine-DNA glycosylases and abasic site endonuclease (APE1), were higher in PBL of CRC patients than in those of controls, as measured by QPCR. In the target colon tissues epsilonAde and epsilonCyt excision rates were higher, whereas the epsilondA and epsilondC levels in DNA, measured by (32)P-postlabeling, were lower in tumor than in adjacent colon tissue, although a higher mRNA level was observed only for APE1. This suggests that during the onset of carcinogenesis, etheno adduct repair in the colon seems to be under a complex transcriptional and posttranscriptional control, whereby deregulation may act as a driving force for malignancy.

  7. DNA Repair in Human Cells Exposed to Combinations of Carcinogenic Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, R. B.; Ahmed, F. E.

    1980-01-01

    Normal human and XP2 fibroblasts were treated with UV plus UV-mimetic chemicals. The UV dose used was sufficient to saturate the UV excision repair system. Excision repair after combined treatments was estimated by unscheduled DNA synthesis, BrdUrd photolysis, and the loss of sites sensitive to a UV specific endonuclease. Since the repair of damage from UV and its mimetics is coordinately controlled we expected that there would be similar rate-limiting steps in the repair of UV and chemical damage and that after a combined treatment the total amount of repair would be the same as from UV or the chemicals separately. The expectation was not fulfilled. In normal cells repair after a combined treatment was additive whereas in XP cells repair after a combined treatment was usually less than after either agent separately. The chemicals tested were AAAF, DMBA-epoxide, 4NQO, and ICR-170.

  8. An immunochemical approach to the study of DNA damage and repair. Technical progress report, May 1, 1989--April 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, S.S.; Erlanger, B.F.

    1992-05-01

    The overall objective of this project has been to develop immunochemical methods to quantitate unique DNA base damages in order to facilitate studies on radiation-induced damage production and repair. Specifically, we have been using antibodies raised to damaged bases to quantitate unique lesions in model systems in order to evaluate their potential biological consequences. Our approach has been to synthesize modified nucleotides or nucleosides, conjugate them to protein carriers, and use the conjugates as immunogens in rabbits or to prepare monoclonal antibodies. We have been studying damages that are stable radiolysis products found in X-irradiated DNA and thus of potential biological consequence. Our aim is to build an in vitro and in vivo data base on the interactions between model DNA lesions and such cellular enzymes as DNA polymerases and repair endonucleases. Initial studies have focused on pyrimidine ring saturation products (thymine glycol.and dihydrothymine), products resulting from ring fragmentation or base loss (urea, {Beta}-ureidoisobutyric acid, abasic sites), 7-hydro-8-oxopurines, and more recently, cytosine radiolysis products. These modified bases serve as useful models for examining the potential lethal and/or mutagenic (carcinogenic) effects of the products of DNA radiolysis.

  9. Crystal Structure of the First Eubacterial Mre11 Nuclease Reveals Novel Features that may Discriminate Substrates During DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debanu; Moiani, Davide; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Miller, Mitchell D.; McMullan, Daniel; Jin, Kevin K.; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Burra, Prasad; Carlton, Dennis; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ernst, Dustin; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Tainer, John A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    Mre11 nuclease plays a central role in the repair of cytotoxic and mutagenic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). As x-ray structural information has only been available for the Pyrococcus furiosus enzyme (PfMre11), the conserved and variable features of this nuclease across the domains of life have not been experimentally defined. Our crystal structure and biochemical studies demonstrate that TM1635 from Thermotoga maritima, originally annotated as a putative nuclease, is the Mre11 endo/exonuclease from T. maritima (TmMre11) and the first such structure from eubacteria. TmMre11 and PfMre11 display similar overall structures, despite sequence identity in the twilight zone of only ∼20%. However, they differ substantially in their DNA specificity domains and in their dimeric organization. Residues in the nuclease domain are highly conserved, but those in the DNA specificity domain are not. The structural differences likely affect how Mre11s from different organisms recognize and interact with single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA and DNA hairpin structures during DNA repair. The TmMre11 nuclease active site has no bound metal ions, but is conserved in sequence and structure with exception of a histidine that is important in PfMre11 nuclease activity. Nevertheless, biochemical characterization confirms that TmMre11 possesses both endonuclease and exonuclease activities on ssDNA and dsDNA substrates, respectively. PMID:20122942

  10. Beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage and alteration in the expression patterns of DNA repair-related genes.

    PubMed

    Attia, Sabry M; Harisa, Gamaleldin I; Hassan, Memy H; Bakheet, Saleh A

    2013-09-01

    Beryllium metal has physical properties that make its use essential for very specific applications, such as medical diagnostics, nuclear/fusion reactors and aerospace applications. Because of the widespread human exposure to beryllium metals and the discrepancy of the genotoxic results in the reported literature, detail assessments of the genetic damage of beryllium are warranted. Mice exposed to beryllium chloride at an oral dose of 23mg/kg for seven consecutive days exhibited a significant increase in the level of DNA-strand breaking and micronuclei formation as detected by a bone marrow standard comet assay and micronucleus test. Whereas slight beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage was detected following formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase digestion, digestion with endonuclease III resulted in considerable increases in oxidative DNA damage after the 11.5 and 23mg/kg/day treatment as detected by enzyme-modified comet assays. Increased 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine was also directly correlated with increased bone marrow micronuclei formation and DNA strand breaks, which further confirm the involvement of oxidative stress in the induction of bone marrow genetic damage after exposure to beryllium chloride. Gene expression analysis on the bone marrow cells from beryllium chloride-exposed mice showed significant alterations in genes associated with DNA damage repair. Therefore, beryllium chloride may cause genetic damage to bone marrow cells due to the oxidative stress and the induced unrepaired DNA damage is probably due to the down-regulation in the expression of DNA repair genes, which may lead to genotoxicity and eventually cause carcinogenicity.

  11. SNPs of GSTM1, T1, P1, epoxide hydrolase and DNA repair enzyme XRCC1 and risk of urinary transitional cell carcinoma in southwestern Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, L.-I; Chiu, Allen W.; Huan, Steven K.; Chen, C.-L.; Wang, Y.-H.; Hsieh, F.-I; Chou, W.-L.; Wang, L.-H.; Chen, C.-J.

    2008-04-15

    A hospital-based case-control study was conducted near a former black-foot disease (BFD)-endemic area in southwestern Taiwan to examine the possible risk factors and genetic susceptibility for urinary transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). A total of 221 patients with pathologically confirmed TCC and 223 age-sex-matched control subjects from urology outpatient clinics were recruited between 1998 and 2002. The results showed that residency in the BFD area and consumption of well water for more than 10 years was a strong factor on urinary cancer risk (odds ratio [OR],8.16, 95% confidence interval [CI],3.34-19.90, p < 0.0001). Dose response relationship between average arsenic concentration in well water and TCC risk was also observed. Cigarette smoking played a relatively minor role in urinary carcinogenesis in this study. The GSTP1 Ile105Val A {yields} G polymorphism was significantly associated with cancer risk (A/G + G/G: OR = 0.60, 95%CI = 0.39-0.94, p = 0.02), and the effect of Val105 allele was largely confined to the subjects diagnosed earlier than 55 years old (A/G + G/G: OR,0.29; 95% CI, 0.09-0.87, p = 0.03). The results suggest that GSTP1 is a candidate for susceptibility locus and Ile105 allele may predispose individuals to early-onset urinary TCC. The GSTM1 null genotype was associated with tumors of high-invasiveness (OR,2.21; 95% CI, 1.34-4.73) as well as with early-onset TCC risk (OR,2.53; 95% CI, 0.97-6.59). Our preliminary results showed the XRCC1 Arg194Trp were associated with arsenic-related urinary TCC and the interaction between the genotype and the exposure was statistically significant. The modulating effect of the GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1 Ile105Val, EPHX Tyr113His and XRCC1 Arg280His on arsenic-related TCC risk was also suggestive. These observations implied that impaired metabolism of carcinogenic exposure as well as impaired DNA repair function play an important role in arsenic-related urinary transitional cell carcinogenesis.

  12. A simple, high sensitivity mutation screening using Ampligase mediated T7 endonuclease I and Surveyor nuclease with microfluidic capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mo Chao; Cheong, Wai Chye; Lim, Li Shi; Li, Mo-Huang

    2012-03-01

    Mutation and polymorphism detection is of increasing importance for a variety of medical applications, including identification of cancer biomarkers and genotyping for inherited genetic disorders. Among various mutation-screening technologies, enzyme mismatch cleavage (EMC) represents a great potential as an ideal scanning method for its simplicity and high efficiency, where the heteroduplex DNAs are recognized and cleaved into DNA fragments by mismatch-recognizing nucleases. Thereby, the enzymatic cleavage activities of the resolving nucleases play a critical role for the EMC sensitivity. In this study, we utilized the unique features of microfluidic capillary electrophoresis and de novo gene synthesis to explore the enzymatic properties of T7 endonuclease I and Surveyor nuclease for EMC. Homoduplex and HE DNAs with specific mismatches at desired positions were synthesized using PCR (polymerase chain reaction) gene synthesis. The effects of nonspecific cleavage, preference of mismatches, exonuclease activity, incubation time, and DNA loading capability were systematically examined. In addition, the utilization of a thermostable DNA ligase for real-time ligase mediation was investigated. Analysis of the experimental results has led to new insights into the enzymatic cleavage activities of T7 endonuclease I and Surveyor nuclease, and aided in optimizing EMC conditions, which enhance the sensitivity and efficiency in screening of unknown DNA variations.

  13. Envisioning the molecular choreography of DNA base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Parikh, S S; Mol, C D; Hosfield, D J; Tainer, J A

    1999-02-01

    Recent breakthroughs integrate individual DNA repair enzyme structures, biochemistry and biology to outline the structural cell biology of the DNA base excision repair pathways that are essential to genome integrity. Thus, we are starting to envision how the actions, movements, steps, partners and timing of DNA repair enzymes, which together define their molecular choreography, are elegantly controlled by both the nature of the DNA damage and the structural chemistry of the participating enzymes and the DNA double helix.

  14. Inteins, introns, and homing endonucleases: recent revelations about the life cycle of parasitic genetic elements.

    PubMed

    Gogarten, J Peter; Hilario, Elena

    2006-11-13

    Self splicing introns and inteins that rely on a homing endonuclease for propagation are parasitic genetic elements. Their life-cycle and evolutionary fate has been described through the homing cycle. According to this model the homing endonuclease is selected for function only during the spreading phase of the parasite. This phase ends when the parasitic element is fixed in the population. Upon fixation the homing endonuclease is no longer under selection, and its activity is lost through random processes. Recent analyses of these parasitic elements with functional homing endonucleases suggest that this model in its most simple form is not always applicable. Apparently, functioning homing endonuclease can persist over long evolutionary times in populations and species that are thought to be asexual or nearly asexual. Here we review these recent findings and discuss their implications. Reasons for the long-term persistence of a functional homing endonuclease include: More recombination (sexual and as a result of gene transfer) than previously assumed for these organisms; complex population structures that prevent the element from being fixed; a balance between active spreading of the homing endonuclease and a decrease in fitness caused by the parasite in the host organism; or a function of the homing endonuclease that increases the fitness of the host organism and results in purifying selection for the homing endonuclease activity, even after fixation in a local population. In the future, more detailed studies of the population dynamics of the activity and regulation of homing endonucleases are needed to decide between these possibilities, and to determine their relative contributions to the long term survival of parasitic genes within a population. Two outstanding publications on the amoeba Naegleria group I intron (Wikmark et al. BMC Evol Biol 2006, 6:39) and the PRP8 inteins in ascomycetes (Butler et al.BMC Evol Biol 2006, 6:42) provide important stepping stones

  15. Inteins, introns, and homing endonucleases: recent revelations about the life cycle of parasitic genetic elements

    PubMed Central

    Gogarten, J Peter; Hilario, Elena

    2006-01-01

    Self splicing introns and inteins that rely on a homing endonuclease for propagation are parasitic genetic elements. Their life-cycle and evolutionary fate has been described through the homing cycle. According to this model the homing endonuclease is selected for function only during the spreading phase of the parasite. This phase ends when the parasitic element is fixed in the population. Upon fixation the homing endonuclease is no longer under selection, and its activity is lost through random processes. Recent analyses of these parasitic elements with functional homing endonucleases suggest that this model in its most simple form is not always applicable. Apparently, functioning homing endonuclease can persist over long evolutionary times in populations and species that are thought to be asexual or nearly asexual. Here we review these recent findings and discuss their implications. Reasons for the long-term persistence of a functional homing endonuclease include: More recombination (sexual and as a result of gene transfer) than previously assumed for these organisms; complex population structures that prevent the element from being fixed; a balance between active spreading of the homing endonuclease and a decrease in fitness caused by the parasite in the host organism; or a function of the homing endonuclease that increases the fitness of the host organism and results in purifying selection for the homing endonuclease activity, even after fixation in a local population. In the future, more detailed studies of the population dynamics of the activity and regulation of homing endonucleases are needed to decide between these possibilities, and to determine their relative contributions to the long term survival of parasitic genes within a population. Two outstanding publications on the amoeba Naegleria group I intron (Wikmark et al. BMC Evol Biol 2006, 6:39) and the PRP8 inteins in ascomycetes (Butler et al.BMC Evol Biol 2006, 6:42) provide important stepping stones

  16. Ligation-mediated PCR amplification of specific fragments from a class-II restriction endonuclease total digest.

    PubMed Central

    Guilfoyle, R A; Leeck, C L; Kroening, K D; Smith, L M; Guo, Z

    1997-01-01

    A method is described which permits the ligation- mediated PCR amplification of specific fragments from a Class-II restriction endonuclease total digest. Feasibility was tested using Bcl I and phage lambda DNA as a model enzyme and amplicon system, respectively. Bcl I is one of many widely used restriction enzymes which cleave at palindromic recognition sequences and leave 5'-protruding ends of defined sequence. Using a single pair of universal primers, a given fragment can be specifically amplified after joining the fragments to adaptors consisting of a duplex primer region and a 9-nucleotide protruding single-stranded 5'-end containing the sequence complementary to the cleaved restriction site and a 4-nucleotide 'indexing sequence.' The protruding strand anneals to a restriction fragment by displacing its corresponding strand in the same fragment-specific indexing sequence located juxtaposed to the restriction site. The adaptor is covalently linked to the restriction fragment by T4 DNA ligase, and amplification is carried out under conditions for long-distance PCR using the M13 forward and reverse primers. The technique discriminated robustly between mismatches and perfect matches for the 16 indexing sequences tested to allow individual lambda Bcl I fragments to be amplified from their respective adaptor pairs. A strategy is proposed enabling a non-cloning approach to the accession, physical mapping and sequencing of genomic DNA. The method could also have application in high-throughput genetic mapping and fingerprinting and should expand the enzyme base for ligation- mediated indexing technology which has previously been limited to the Class-IIS and IP restriction endonucleases. PMID:9108171

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis on the homing endonuclease I-Dmo-I in complex with its target DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo, Pilar

    2007-12-01

    I-Dmo-I is a well characterized homing endonuclease from the archaeon Desulfurococcus mobilis. The enzyme was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Crystallization experiments of I-Dmo-I in complex with its DNA target in the presence of Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} yielded crystals that were suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis. Homing endonucleases are highly specific DNA-cleaving enzymes that recognize long stretches of base pairs. The availability of these enzymes has opened novel perspectives for genome engineering in a wide range of fields, including gene therapy, by taking advantage of the homologous gene-targeting enhancement induced by a double-strand break. I-Dmo-I is a well characterized homing endonuclease from the archaeon Desulfurococcus mobilis. The enzyme was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Crystallization experiments of I-Dmo-I in complex with its DNA target in the presence of Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} yielded crystals that were suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 106.75, b = 70.18, c = 106.85 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 119.93°. The self-rotation function and the Matthews coefficient suggested the presence of three protein–DNA complexes per asymmetric unit. The crystals diffracted to a resolution limit of 2.6 Å using synchrotron radiation at the Swiss Light Source (SLS) and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF)

  18. Base excision of oxidative purine and pyrimidine DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by a DNA glycosylase with sequence similarity to endonuclease III from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Eide, L; Bjørås, M; Pirovano, M; Alseth, I; Berdal, K G; Seeberg, E

    1996-10-01

    One gene locus on chromosome I in Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a protein (YAB5_YEAST; accession no. P31378) with local sequence similarity to the DNA repair glycosylase endonuclease III from Escherichia coli. We have analyzed the function of this gene, now assigned NTG1 (endonuclease three-like glycosylase 1), by cloning, mutant analysis, and gene expression in E. coli. Targeted gene disruption of NTG1 produces a mutant that is sensitive to H2O2 and menadione, indicating that NTG1 is required for repair of oxidative DNA damage in vivo. Northern blot analysis and expression studies of a NTG1-lacZ gene fusion showed that NTG1 is induced by cell exposure to different DNA damaging agents, particularly menadione, and hence belongs to the DNA damage-inducible regulon in S. cerevisiae. When expressed in E. coli, the NTG1 gene product cleaves plasmid DNA damaged by osmium tetroxide, thus, indicating specificity for thymine glycols in DNA similarly as is the case for EndoIII. However, NTG1 also releases formamidopyrimidines from DNA with high efficiency and, hence, represents a glycosylase with a novel range of substrate recognition. Sequences similar to NTG1 from other eukaryotes, including Caenorhabditis elegans, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and mammals, have recently been entered in the GenBank suggesting the universal presence of NTG1-like genes in higher organisms. S. cerevisiae NTG1 does not have the [4Fe-4S] cluster DNA binding domain characteristic of the other members of this family.

  19. Rational engineering of sequence specificity in R.MwoI restriction endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Skowronek, Krzysztof; Boniecki, Michal J.; Kluge, Boguslaw

    2012-01-01

    R.MwoI is a Type II restriction endonucleases enzyme (REase), which specifically recognizes a palindromic interrupted DNA sequence 5′-GCNNNNNNNGC-3′ (where N indicates any nucleotide), and hydrolyzes the phosphodiester bond in the DNA between the 7th and 8th base in both strands. R.MwoI exhibits remote sequence similarity to R.BglI, a REase with known structure, which recognizes an interrupted palindromic target 5′-GCCNNNNNGGC-3′. A homology model of R.MwoI in complex with DNA was constructed and used to predict functionally important amino acid residues that were subsequently targeted by mutagenesis. The model, together with the supporting experimental data, revealed regions important for recognition of the common bases in DNA sequences recognized by R.BglI and R.MwoI. Based on the bioinformatics analysis, we designed substitutions of the S310 residue in R.MwoI to arginine or glutamic acid, which led to enzyme variants with altered sequence selectivity compared with the wild-type enzyme. The S310R variant of R.MwoI preferred the 5′-GCCNNNNNGGC-3′ sequence as a target, similarly to R.BglI, whereas the S310E variant preferentially cleaved a subset of the MwoI sites, depending on the identity of the 3rd and 9th nucleotide residues. Our results represent a case study of a REase sequence specificity alteration by a single amino acid substitution, based on a theoretical model in the absence of a crystal structure. PMID:22735699

  20. Restriction-endonuclease-induced DNA double-strand breaks and chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Bryant, P E; Johnston, P J

    1993-05-01

    Restriction endonucleases (RE) can be used to mimic and model the clastogenic effects of ionising radiation. With the development of improved techniques for cell poration: electroporation and recently streptolysin O (SLO), it has become possible more confidently to study the relationships between DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) of various types (e.g. blunt or cohesive-ended) and the frequencies of induced metaphase chromosomal aberrations or micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked cells. Although RE-induced dsb do not mimic the chemical end-structure of radiation-induced dsb (i.e. the 'dirty' ends of radiation-induced dsb), it has become clear that cohesive-ended dsb, which are thought to be the major type of dsb induced by radiation, are much less clastogenic than blunt-ended dsb. It has also been possible, with the aid of electroporation or SLO to measure the kinetics of dsb in cells as a function of time after treatment. These experiments have shown that some RE (e.g. Pvu II) are extremely stable inside CHO cells and at high concentrations persist and induce dsb over a period of many hours following treatment. Cutting of DNA by RE is thought to be at specific recognition sequences (as in free DNA) although the frequencies of sites in native chromatin available to RE is not yet known. DNA condensation and methylation are both factors limiting the numbers of available cutting sites. Relatively little is known about the kinetics of incision or repair of RE-induced dsb in cells. Direct ligation may be a method used by cells to rejoin the bulk of RE-induced dsb, since inhibitors such as araA, araC and aphidicolin appear not prevent rejoining, although these inhibitors have been found to lead to enhanced frequencies of chromosomal aberrations. 3-Aminobenzimide, the poly-ADP ribose polymerase inhibitor is the only agent that has so far been shown to inhibit rejoining of RE-induced dsb. Data from the radiosensitive xrs5 cell line, where chromosomal aberration frequencies are

  1. Enzymic cleavage of purine ultraviolet photoproducts formed at biologically significant wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, P.E.; Duker, N.J.

    1986-05-01

    A paradox of ultraviolet carcinogenesis research has been that maximal absorption and mutagenesis occurs at 254 nm irradiation, while the greatest tumor yield in irradiated animals has been at wavelengths between 275 and 300 nm. Ambient actinic radiation contains mostly wavelengths above 280 nm with no substantial 254 nm component. Therefore, the authors investigated formation of DNA damage by 250-400 nm irradiation. Irradiated, 3'-end-labeled, 92 base pair sequence of the human alphoid segment was incubated with endonuclease v, purified from T4-infected E. coli, or with a crude extract of M. luteus. Analysis by gel electrophoresis showed that besides pyrimidine photodimers, previously unreported photoproducts were incised. These are not 6-4'(pyrimidin-2'-one)-pyrimidines, apurinic or apyrimidinic sites, or ring-opened purines. The new products are at specific purine loci and are formed in quantities similar to pyridimine dimers. The optimal wavelengths for their formation are 275-295 nm, similar to the maximum peak of actinic carcinogenesis. The enzyme incising these products is inactivated by different heating conditions than the pyrimidine dimer-DNA glycosylase, and they appear to be separable by column chromatography. The authors propose that a novel family of photoproducts, possibly purine-containing dimers, are incised by previously uncharacterized DNA repair enzymes.

  2. The Thy Pol-2 intein of Thermococcus hydrothermalis is an isoschizomer of PI-TliI and PI-TfuII endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Saves, Isabelle; Eleaume, Heïdy; Dietrich, Jacques; Masson, Jean-Michel

    2000-01-01

    Thy Pol-2 intein, from Thermococcus hydrothermalis, belongs to the same allelic family as Tli Pol-2 (PI-TliI), Tfu Pol-2 (PI-TfuII) and TspTY Pol-3 mini-intein, all inserted at the pol-c site of archaeal DNA polymerase genes. This new intein was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The intein is a specific endonuclease (PI-ThyI) which cleaves the inteinless sequence of the Thy DNA pol gene. Moreover, PI-TliI, PI-TfuII and PI-ThyI are very similar endonucleases which cleave DNA in the same optimal conditions at 70°C yielding similar 3′-hydroxyl overhangs of 4 bp and the reaction is subject to product inhibition. The three enzymes are able to cleave the three DNA sequences spanning the pol-c site and a 24 bp consensus cleavage site was defined for the three isoschizomers. However, the exact size of the minimal cleavage site depends both on the substrate sequence and the endonuclease. The inability of the isoschizomers to cleave the inteinless DNA polymerase gene from Pyrococcus spp. KOD is due to point substitutions on the 5′ side of the pol-c site, suggesting that the absence of inteins of this allelic family in DNA polymerase genes from Pyrococcus spp. can be linked to small differences in the target site sequence. PMID:11058140

  3. Evidence that the DNA mismatch repair system removes 1-nucleotide Okazaki fragment flaps.

    PubMed

    Kadyrova, Lyudmila Y; Dahal, Basanta K; Kadyrov, Farid A

    2015-10-02

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system plays a major role in promoting genome stability and suppressing carcinogenesis. In this work, we investigated whether the MMR system is involved in Okazaki fragment maturation. We found that in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the MMR system and the flap endonuclease Rad27 act in overlapping pathways that protect the nuclear genome from 1-bp insertions. In addition, we determined that purified yeast and human MutSα proteins recognize 1-nucleotide DNA and RNA flaps. In reconstituted human systems, MutSα, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and replication factor C activate MutLα endonuclease to remove the flaps. ATPase and endonuclease mutants of MutLα are defective in the flap removal. These results suggest that the MMR system contributes to the removal of 1-nucleotide Okazaki fragment flaps.

  4. Mitochondrial endonuclease G mediates breakdown of paternal mitochondria upon fertilization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qinghua; Li, Haimin; Li, Hanzeng; Nakagawa, Akihisa; Lin, Jason L J; Lee, Eui-Seung; Harry, Brian L; Skeen-Gaar, Riley Robert; Suehiro, Yuji; William, Donna; Mitani, Shohei; Yuan, Hanna S; Kang, Byung-Ho; Xue, Ding

    2016-07-22

    Mitochondria are inherited maternally in most animals, but the mechanisms of selective paternal mitochondrial elimination (PME) are unknown. While examining fertilization in Caenorhabditis elegans, we observed that paternal mitochondria rapidly lose their inner membrane integrity. CPS-6, a mitochondrial endonuclease G, serves as a paternal mitochondrial factor that is critical for PME. We found that CPS-6 relocates from the intermembrane space of paternal mitochondria to the matrix after fertilization to degrade mitochondrial DNA. It acts with maternal autophagy and proteasome machineries to promote PME. Loss of cps-6 delays breakdown of mitochondrial inner membranes, autophagosome enclosure of paternal mitochondria, and PME. Delayed removal of paternal mitochondria causes increased embryonic lethality, demonstrating that PME is important for normal animal development. Thus, CPS-6 functions as a paternal mitochondrial degradation factor during animal development.

  5. A complex family of class-II restriction endonucleases, DsaI-VI, in Dactylococcopsis salina.

    PubMed

    Laue, F; Evans, L R; Jarsch, M; Brown, N L; Kessler, C

    1991-01-02

    A series of class-II restriction endonucleases (ENases) was discovered in the halophilic, phototrophic, gas-vacuolated cyanobacterium Dactylococcopsis salina sp. nov. The six novel enzymes are characterized by the following recognition sequences and cut positions: 5'-C decreases CRYGG-3' (DsaI); 5'-GG decreases CC-3' (DsaII); 5'-R decreases GATCY-3' (DsaIII); 5'-G decreases GWCC-3' (DsaIV); 5'-decreases CCNGG-3' (DsaV); and 5'-GTMKAC-3' (DsaVI), where W = A or T, M = A or C, K = G or T, and N = A, G, C or T. In addition, traces of further possible activity were detected. DsaI has a novel sequence specificity and DsaV is an isoschizomer of ScrFI, but with a novel cut specificity. A purification procedure was established to separate all six ENases, resulting in their isolation free of contaminating nuclease activities. DsaI cleavage is influenced by N6-methyladenine residues [derived from the Escherichia coli-encoded DNA methyltransferase (MTase) M.Eco damI] within the overlapping sequence, 5'-CCRYMGGATC-3'; DsaV hydrolysis is inhibited by a C-5-methylcytosine residue in its recognition sequence (5'-CMCNGG-3'), generated in some DsaV sites by the E. coli-encoded MTase, M.Eco dcmI.

  6. Restriction endonuclease DNA analysis of Leptospira interrogans serovars icterohaemorrhagiae and hebdomadis.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, R B; Winter, P J; Yanagawa, R

    1984-01-01

    Antigenic variants of Leptospira interrogans serovars copenhageni and hebdomadis were examined by bacterial restriction endonuclease DNA analysis with EcoRI, XhoI, SalI, BstEII, and HindIII as the digesting enzymes. The antigenic variants were stable cloned strains which had been cultivated in media containing homologous immune serum. One of the strains examined has been reported elsewhere (R. Yanagawa and J. Takashima, Infect. Immun. 10:1439-1442) as having an antigenic makeup which more closely resembles serovar kremastos than the serovar hebdomadis parent. The closely antigenically related but naturally occurring serovars icterhaemorrhagiae strain RGA and copenhageni strain M20 were examined in parallel. No differences could be shown between the hebdomadis parent and any of its mutants. Serovars copenhageni and icterohaemorrhagiae produced patterns which differed in the high-molecular-weight bands only. The Shibaura parent strain did not differ from copenhageni M20, but the Shibaura M1 strain differed from the other mutants and from icterohaemorrhagiae RGA in its high-molecular-weight bands. Images PMID:6092434

  7. DNA interrogation by the CRISPR RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, Samuel H.; Redding, Sy; Jinek, Martin; Greene, Eric C.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2014-03-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated enzyme Cas9 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that uses RNA-DNA base-pairing to target foreign DNA in bacteria. Cas9-guide RNA complexes are also effective genome engineering agents in animals and plants. Here we use single-molecule and bulk biochemical experiments to determine how Cas9-RNA interrogates DNA to find specific cleavage sites. We show that both binding and cleavage of DNA by Cas9-RNA require recognition of a short trinucleotide protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). Non-target DNA binding affinity scales with PAM density, and sequences fully complementary to the guide RNA but lacking a nearby PAM are ignored by Cas9-RNA. Competition assays provide evidence that DNA strand separation and RNA-DNA heteroduplex formation initiate at the PAM and proceed directionally towards the distal end of the target sequence. Furthermore, PAM interactions trigger Cas9 catalytic activity. These results reveal how Cas9 uses PAM recognition to quickly identify potential target sites while scanning large DNA molecules, and to regulate scission of double-stranded DNA.

  8. P1 Ref Endonuclease: A Molecular Mechanism for Phage-Enhanced Antibiotic Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Ronayne, Erin A.; Wan, Y. C. Serena; Boudreau, Beth A.; Landick, Robert; Cox, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Ref is an HNH superfamily endonuclease that only cleaves DNA to which RecA protein is bound. The enigmatic physiological function of this unusual enzyme is defined here. Lysogenization by bacteriophage P1 renders E. coli more sensitive to the DNA-damaging antibiotic ciprofloxacin, an example of a phenomenon termed phage-antibiotic synergy (PAS). The complementary effect of phage P1 is uniquely traced to the P1-encoded gene ref. Ref is a P1 function that amplifies the lytic cycle under conditions when the bacterial SOS response is induced due to DNA damage. The effect of Ref is multifaceted. DNA binding by Ref interferes with normal DNA metabolism, and the nuclease activity of Ref enhances genome degradation. Ref also inhibits cell division independently of the SOS response. Ref gene expression is toxic to E. coli in the absence of other P1 functions, both alone and in combination with antibiotics. The RecA proteins of human pathogens Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus serve as cofactors for Ref-mediated DNA cleavage. Ref is especially toxic during the bacterial SOS response and the limited growth of stationary phase cultures, targeting aspects of bacterial physiology that are closely associated with the development of bacterial pathogen persistence. PMID:26765929

  9. DNA interrogation by the CRISPR RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Samuel H; Redding, Sy; Jinek, Martin; Greene, Eric C; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-03-06

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated enzyme Cas9 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that uses RNA-DNA base-pairing to target foreign DNA in bacteria. Cas9-guide RNA complexes are also effective genome engineering agents in animals and plants. Here we use single-molecule and bulk biochemical experiments to determine how Cas9-RNA interrogates DNA to find specific cleavage sites. We show that both binding and cleavage of DNA by Cas9-RNA require recognition of a short trinucleotide protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). Non-target DNA binding affinity scales with PAM density, and sequences fully complementary to the guide RNA but lacking a nearby PAM are ignored by Cas9-RNA. Competition assays provide evidence that DNA strand separation and RNA-DNA heteroduplex formation initiate at the PAM and proceed directionally towards the distal end of the target sequence. Furthermore, PAM interactions trigger Cas9 catalytic activity. These results reveal how Cas9 uses PAM recognition to quickly identify potential target sites while scanning large DNA molecules, and to regulate scission of double-stranded DNA.

  10. Cofactor Requirement of HpyAV Restriction Endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Siu-Hong; Opitz, Lars; Higgins, Lauren; O'loane, Diana; Xu, Shuang-yong

    2010-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is the etiologic agent of common gastritis and a risk factor for gastric cancer. It is also one of the richest sources of Type II restriction-modification (R-M) systems in microorganisms. Principal Findings We have cloned, expressed and purified a new restriction endonuclease HpyAV from H. pylori strain 26695. We determined the HpyAV DNA recognition sequence and cleavage site as CCTTC 6/5. In addition, we found that HpyAV has a unique metal ion requirement: its cleavage activity is higher with transition metal ions than in Mg++. The special metal ion requirement of HpyAV can be attributed to the presence of a HNH catalytic site similar to ColE9 nuclease instead of the canonical PD-X-D/EXK catalytic site found in many other REases. Site-directed mutagenesis was carried out to verify the catalytic residues of HpyAV. Mutation of the conserved metal-binding Asn311 and His320 to alanine eliminated cleavage activity. HpyAV variant H295A displayed approximately 1% of wt activity. Conclusions/Significance Some HNH-type endonucleases have unique metal ion cofactor requirement for optimal activities. Homology modeling and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that HpyAV is a member of the HNH nuclease family. The identification of catalytic residues in HpyAV paved the way for further engineering of the metal binding site. A survey of sequenced microbial genomes uncovered 10 putative R-M systems that show high sequence similarity to the HpyAV system, suggesting lateral transfer of a prototypic HpyAV-like R-M system among these microorganisms. PMID:20140205

  11. Mutational Analysis of the Binding Pockets of the Diketo Acid Inhibitor L-742,001 in the Influenza Virus PA Endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Stevaert, Annelies; Dallocchio, Roberto; Dessì, Alessandro; Pala, Nicolino; Rogolino, Dominga; Sechi, Mario

    2013-01-01

    The influenza virus PA endonuclease, which cleaves capped host pre-mRNAs to initiate synthesis of viral mRNA, is a prime target for antiviral therapy. The diketo acid compound L-742,001 was previously identified as a potent inhibitor of the influenza virus endonuclease reaction, but information on its precise binding mode to PA or potential resistance profile is limited. Computer-assisted docking of L-742,001 into the crystal structure of inhibitor-free N-terminal PA (PA-Nter) indicated a binding orientation distinct from that seen in a recent crystallographic study with L-742,001-bound PA-Nter (R. M. DuBois et al., PLoS Pathog. 8:e1002830, 2012). A comprehensive mutational analysis was performed to determine which amino acid changes within the catalytic center of PA or its surrounding hydrophobic pockets alter the antiviral sensitivity to L-742,001 in cell culture. Marked (up to 20-fold) resistance to L-742,001 was observed for the H41A, I120T, and G81F/V/T mutant forms of PA. Two- to 3-fold resistance was seen for the T20A, L42T, and V122T mutants, and the R124Q and Y130A mutants were 3-fold more sensitive to L-742,001. Several mutations situated at noncatalytic sites in PA had no or only marginal impact on the enzymatic functionality of viral ribonucleoprotein complexes reconstituted in cell culture, consistent with the less conserved nature of these PA residues. Our data provide relevant insights into the binding mode of L-742,001 in the PA endonuclease active site. In addition, we predict some potential resistance sites that should be taken into account during optimization of PA endonuclease inhibitors toward tight binding in any of the hydrophobic pockets surrounding the catalytic center of the enzyme. PMID:23824822

  12. A combinatorial approach to create artificial homing endonucleases cleaving chosen sequences

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Julianne; Grizot, Sylvestre; Arnould, Sylvain; Duclert, Aymeric; Epinat, Jean-Charles; Chames, Patrick; Prieto, Jesús; Redondo, Pilar; Blanco, Francisco J.; Bravo, Jerónimo; Montoya, Guillermo; Pâques, Frédéric; Duchateau, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Meganucleases, or homing endonucleases (HEs) are sequence-specific endonucleases with large (>14 bp) cleavage sites that can be used to induce efficient homologous gene targeting in cultured cells and plants. These findings have opened novel perspectives for genome engineering in a wide range of fields, including gene therapy. However, the number of identified HEs does not match the diversity of genomic sequences, and the probability of finding a homing site in a chosen gene is extremely low. Therefore, the design of artificial endonucleases with chosen specificities is under intense investigation. In this report, we describe the first artificial HEs whose specificity has been entirely redesigned to cleave a naturally occurring sequence. First, hundreds of novel endonucleases with locally altered substrate specificity were derived from I-CreI, a Chlamydomonas reinhardti protein belonging to the LAGLIDADG family of HEs. Second, distinct DNA-binding subdomains were identified within the protein. Third, we used these findings to assemble four sets of mutations into heterodimeric endonucleases cleaving a model target or a sequence from the human RAG1 gene. These results demonstrate that the plasticity of LAGLIDADG endonucleases allows extensive engineering, and provide a general method to create novel endonucleases with tailored specificities. PMID:17130168

  13. The Uve1 Endonuclease Is Regulated by the White Collar Complex to Protect Cryptococcus neoformans from UV Damage

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Surbhi; Idnurm, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans uses the Bwc1-Bwc2 photoreceptor complex to regulate mating in response to light, virulence and ultraviolet radiation tolerance. How the complex controls these functions is unclear. Here, we identify and characterize a gene in Cryptococcus, UVE1, whose mutation leads to a UV hypersensitive phenotype. The homologous gene in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe encodes an apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease acting in the UVDE-dependent excision repair (UVER) pathway. C. neoformans UVE1 complements a S. pombe uvde knockout strain. UVE1 is photoregulated in a Bwc1-dependent manner in Cryptococcus, and in Neurospora crassa and Phycomyces blakesleeanus that are species that represent two other major lineages in the fungi. Overexpression of UVE1 in bwc1 mutants rescues their UV sensitivity phenotype and gel mobility shift experiments show binding of Bwc2 to the UVE1 promoter, indicating that UVE1 is a direct downstream target for the Bwc1-Bwc2 complex. Uve1-GFP fusions localize to the mitochondria. Repair of UV-induced damage to the mitochondria is delayed in the uve1 mutant strain. Thus, in C. neoformans UVE1 is a key gene regulated in response to light that is responsible for tolerance to UV stress for protection of the mitochondrial genome. PMID:24039606

  14. Eardrum repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ossicular fixation - surgery Images Eardrum repair - series References Adams ME, El-Kashlan HK. Tympanoplasty and ossiculoplasty. In: ... commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer ...

  15. Hydrocele repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... is excellent. However, another hydrocele may form over time, or if there was also a hernia present. Alternative Names Hydrocelectomy Images Hydrocele repair - series References Aiken JJ, Oldham KT. Inguinal hernias. In: ...

  16. I-BasI and I-HmuI: two phage intron-encoded endonucleases with homologous DNA recognition sequences but distinct DNA specificities.

    PubMed

    Landthaler, Markus; Shen, Betty W; Stoddard, Barry L; Shub, David A

    2006-05-12

    I-HmuI and I-BasI are two highly similar nicking DNA endonucleases, which are each encoded by a group I intron inserted into homologous sites within the DNA polymerase genes of Bacillus phages SPO1 and Bastille, respectively. Here, we present a comparison of the DNA specificities and cleavage activities of these enconucleases with homologous target sites. I-BasI has properties that are typical of homing endonucleases, nicking the intron-minus polymerase genes in either host genome, three nucleotides downstream of the intron insertion site. In contrast, I-HmuI nicks both the intron-plus and intron-minus site in its own host genome, but does not act on the target from Bastille phage. Although the enzymes have distinct DNA substrate specificities, both bind to an identical 25bp region of their respective intron-minus DNA polymerase genes surrounding the intron insertion site. The endonucleases appear to interact with the DNA substrates in the downstream exon 2 in a similar manner. However, whereas I-HmuI is known to make its only base-specific contacts within this exon region, structural modeling analyses predict that I-BasI might make specific base contacts both upstream and downstream of the site of intron insertion. The predicted requirement for base-specific contacts in exon 1 for cleavage by I-BasI was confirmed experimentally. This explains the difference in substrate specificities between the two enzymes, including the observation that the former enzyme is relatively insensitive to the presence of an intron upstream of exon 2. These differences are likely a consequence of divergent evolutionary constraints.

  17. Extracting enzyme processivity from kinetic assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barel, Itay; Reich, Norbert O.; Brown, Frank L. H.

    2015-12-01

    A steady-state analysis for the catalytic turnover of molecules containing two substrate sites is presented. A broad class of Markovian dynamic models, motivated by the action of DNA modifying enzymes and the rich variety of translocation mechanisms associated with these systems (e.g., sliding, hopping, intersegmental transfer, etc.), is considered. The modeling suggests an elementary and general method of data analysis, which enables the extraction of the enzyme's processivity directly and unambiguously from experimental data. This analysis is not limited to the initial velocity regime. The predictions are validated both against detailed numerical models and by revisiting published experimental data for EcoRI endonuclease acting on DNA.

  18. PCNA is involved in the EndoQ-mediated DNA repair process in Thermococcales

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Miyako; Ishino, Sonoko; Yoshida, Kotaro; Yamagami, Takeshi; Cann, Isaac; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2016-01-01

    To maintain genome integrity for transfer to their offspring, and to maintain order in cellular processes, all living organisms have DNA repair systems. Besides the well-conserved DNA repair machineries, organisms thriving in extreme environments are expected to have developed efficient repair systems. We recently discovered a novel endonuclease, which cleaves the 5′ side of deoxyinosine, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus. The novel endonuclease, designated as Endonulcease Q (EndoQ), recognizes uracil, abasic site and xanthine, as well as hypoxanthine, and cuts the phosphodiester bond at their 5′ sides. To understand the functional process involving EndoQ, we searched for interacting partners of EndoQ and identified Proliferating Cell Nuclear Angigen (PCNA). The EndoQ activity was clearly enhanced by addition of PCNA in vitro. The physical interaction between the two proteins through a PIP-motif of EndoQ and the toroidal structure of PCNA are critical for the stimulation of the endonuclease activity. These findings provide us a clue to elucidate a unique DNA repair system in Archaea. PMID:27150116

  19. A genetic system for isolation and characterization of TaqI restriction endonuclease mutants.

    PubMed

    Barany, F

    1987-01-01

    The gene encoding TaqI restriction endonuclease has been subcloned downstream from an inducible phoA promoter. Certain strains of Escherichia coli remain viable when endonuclease is expressed, even in the absence of (protective) methylation. Infecting lambda phage DNA is not restricted in vivo. One E. coli strain, MM294, exhibited a temperature-sensitive phenotype when TaqI endonuclease was induced. This allowed for design of an in vivo plate assay for identification of specially constructed two-codon insertion mutants in the endonuclease gene. These mutants exhibited a wide range of in vitro activities, including wild-type activity, greater activity in low-salt buffer, and sequence-specific nicking activity.

  20. Endonuclease VIII-like 1 (NEIL1) promotes short-term spatial memory retention and protects from ischemic stroke-induced brain dysfunction and death in mice.

    PubMed

    Canugovi, Chandrika; Yoon, Jeong Seon; Feldman, Neil H; Croteau, Deborah L; Mattson, Mark P; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2012-09-11

    Recent findings suggest that neurons can efficiently repair oxidatively damaged DNA, and that both DNA damage and repair are enhanced by activation of excitatory glutamate receptors. However, in pathological conditions such as ischemic stroke, excessive DNA damage can trigger the death of neurons. Oxidative DNA damage is mainly repaired by base excision repair (BER), a process initiated by DNA glycosylases that recognize and remove damaged DNA bases. Endonuclease VIII-like 1 (NEIL1) is a DNA glycosylase that recognizes a broad range of oxidative lesions. Here, we show that mice lacking NEIL1 exhibit impaired memory retention in a water maze test, but no abnormalities in tests of motor performance, anxiety, or fear conditioning. NEIL1 deficiency results in increased brain damage and a defective functional outcome in a focal ischemia/reperfusion model of stroke. The incision capacity on a 5-hydroxyuracil-containing bubble substrate was lower in the ipsilateral side of ischemic brains and in the mitochondrial lysates of unstressed old NEIL1-deficient mice. These results indicate that NEIL1 plays an important role in learning and memory and in protection of neurons against ischemic injury.

  1. Effect of site-specific modification on restriction endonucleases and DNA modification methyltransferases.

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, M; Nelson, M; Raschke, E

    1994-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases have site-specific interactions with DNA that can often be inhibited by site-specific DNA methylation and other site-specific DNA modifications. However, such inhibition cannot generally be predicted. The empirically acquired data on these effects are tabulated for over 320 restriction endonucleases. In addition, a table of known site-specific DNA modification methyltransferases and their specificities is presented along with EMBL database accession numbers for cloned genes. PMID:7937074

  2. Unambiguous typing of canine adenovirus isolates by deoxyribonucleic acid restriction-endonuclease analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Assaf, R; Marsolais, G; Yelle, J; Hamelin, C

    1983-01-01

    Viral deoxyribonucleic acid extracted from a limited number of cells infected with canine adenovirus type 1 or type 2 was cleaved with several restriction endonucleases. Agarose gel electrophoresis of the limit digests showed stable differences between the canine adenovirus type 1 and type 2 cleavage patterns. Rapid and accurate typing of large numbers of clinical isolates may thus be done by deoxyribonucleic acid restriction-endonuclease analysis. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:6321002

  3. Guanine oxidation product 5-carboxamido-5-formamido-2-iminohydantoin induces mutations when bypassed by DNA polymerases and is a substrate for base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Alshykhly, Omar R; Fleming, Aaron M; Burrows, Cynthia J

    2015-09-21

    Guanine (G) is a target for oxidation by reactive oxygen species in DNA, RNA, and the nucleotide pool. Damage to DNA yields products with alternative properties toward DNA processing enzymes compared to those of the parent nucleotide. A new lesion, 5-carboxamido-5-formamido-2-iminohydantoin (2Ih), bearing a stereocenter in the base was recently identified from the oxidation of G. DNA polymerase and base excision repair processing of this new lesion has now been evaluated. Single nucleotide insertion opposite (S)-2Ih and (R)-2Ih in the template strand catalyzed by the DNA polymerases Klenow fragment exo(-), DPO4, and Hemo KlenTaq demonstrates these lesions to cause point mutations. Specifically, they promote 3-fold more G·C → C·G transversion mutations than G·C → T·A, and (S)-2Ih was 2-fold more blocking for polymerase bypass than (R)-2Ih. Both diastereomer lesions were found to be substrates for the DNA glycosylases NEIL1 and Fpg, and poorly excised by endonuclease III (Nth). The activity was independent of the base pair partner. Thermal melting, CD spectroscopy, and density functional theory geometric optimization calculations were conducted to provide insight into these polymerase and DNA glycosylase studies. These results identify that formation of the 2Ih lesions in a cell would be mutagenic in the event that they were not properly repaired.

  4. The metabolic enhancer piracetam attenuates mitochondrion-specific endonuclease G translocation and oxidative DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sonam; Verma, Dinesh Kumar; Biswas, Joyshree; Rama Raju, K Siva; Joshi, Neeraj; Wahajuddin; Singh, Sarika

    2014-08-01

    This study was performed to investigate the involvement of mitochondrion-specific endonuclease G in piracetam (P)-induced protective mechanisms. Studies have shown the antiapoptotic effects of piracetam but the mechanism of action of piracetam is still an enigma. To assess the involvement of endonuclease G in piracetam-induced protective effects, astrocyte glial cells were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and piracetam. LPS treatment caused significantly decreased viability, mitochondrial activity, oxidative stress, chromatin condensation, and DNA fragmentation, which were attenuated by piracetam cotreatment. Cotreatment of astrocytes with piracetam showed its significantly time-dependent absorption as observed with high-performance liquid chromatography. Astrocytes treated with piracetam alone showed enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) in comparison to control astrocytes. However, in LPS-treated cells no significant alteration in MMP was observed in comparison to control cells. Protein and mRNA levels of the terminal executor of the caspase-mediated pathway, caspase-3, were not altered significantly in LPS or LPS + piracetam-treated astrocytes, whereas endonuclease G was significantly translocated to the nucleus in LPS-treated astrocytes. Piracetam cotreatment attenuated the LPS-induced endonuclease G translocation. In conclusion this study indicates that LPS treatment of astrocytes caused decreased viability, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, chromatin condensation, DNA damage, and translocation of endonuclease G to the nucleus, which was inhibited by piracetam cotreatment, confirming that the mitochondrion-specific endonuclease G is one of the factors involved in piracetam-induced protective mechanisms.

  5. Tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    As living beings that encounter every kind of traumatic event from paper cut to myocardial infarction, we must possess ways to heal damaged tissues. While some animals are able to regrow complete body parts following injury (such as the earthworm who grows a new head following bisection), humans are sadly incapable of such feats. Our means of recovery following tissue damage consists largely of repair rather than pure regeneration. Thousands of times in our lives, a meticulously scripted but unseen wound healing drama plays, with cells serving as actors, extracellular matrix as the setting and growth factors as the means of communication. This article briefly reviews the cells involved in tissue repair, their signaling and proliferation mechanisms and the function of the extracellular matrix, then presents the actors and script for the three acts of the tissue repair drama. PMID:21220961

  6. Isolation and properties of the acid site-specific endonuclease from mature eggs of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius

    SciTech Connect

    Sibirtsev, Yu.T.; Konechnyi, A.A.; Rasskazov, V.A.

    1986-01-10

    An acid site-specific endonuclease has been detected in mature sea urchin eggs and cells of embryos at early stages of differentiation. Fractionation with ammonium sulfate, followed by chromatography on columns with DEAE, phosphocellulose, and hydroxyapatite resulted in an 18,000-fold purification. The molecular weight of the enzyme was determined at approx. 29,000, the optimum pH 5.5. The activity of the enzyme does not depend on divalent metal ions, EDTA, ATP, and tRNA, but it is modulated to a substantial degree by NaCl. The maximum rate of cleavage of the DNA supercoil (form I) is observed at 100 mM NaCl. Increasing the NaCl concentration to 350 mM only slightly lowers the rate of cleavage of form I, yielding form II, but entirely suppresses the accumulation of form III. Restriction analysis of the products of enzymatic hydrolysis of Co1E1 and pBR322 DNA showed that at the early stages of hydrolysis the enzyme exhibits pronounced specificity for definite sites, the number of which is 12 for Co1 E1 DNA and 8 sites for pBR322 DNA.

  7. Study on detection of mutation DNA fragment in gastric cancer by restriction endonuclease fingerprinting with capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Xie, Hua; Xu, Yue-Bing; Jia, Zheng-Ping; Meng, Xian-Dong; Zhang, Juan-Hong; Ma, Jun; Wang, Juan; Wang, Xian-Hua

    2012-03-01

    The DNA fragment detection focusing technique has further enhanced the sensitivity and information of DNA targets. The DNA fragment detection method was established by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection and restriction endonuclease chromatographic fingerprinting (CE-LIF-REF) in our experiment. The silica capillary column was coated with short linear polyarclarylamide (SLPA) using nongel sieving technology. The excision product of various restricted enzymes of DNA fragments was obtained by REF with the molecular biology software Primer Premier 5. The PBR322/BsuRI DNA marker was used to establish the optimization method. The markers were focused electrophoretically and detected by CE-LIF. The results demonstrate that the CE-LIF-REF with SLPA can improve separation, sensitivity and speed of analysis. This technique may be applied to analysis of the excision product of various restricted enzymes of prokaryotic plasmid (pIRES2), eukaryote plasmid (pcDNA3.1) and the PCR product of codon 248 region of gastric cancer tissue. The results suggest that this method could very sensitively separate the excision products of various restricted enzymes at a much better resolution than the traditional agarose electrophoresis.

  8. DNA endonuclease activities on psoralen plus ultraviolet light treated DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, M.W.; Clark, M.

    1986-03-01

    Activities of nuclear DNA endonucleases (Endos) from normal human lymphoblastoid cells on DNA treated with the DNA interstrand cross-linking agents 4,5'8-trimethyl psoralen (TMP) or 8-methoxypsoralen (MOP) plus long-wavelength (320-400 nm) ultraviolet light (UVA) were examined. Chromatin-associated DNA Endos were isolated from both cell lines and subjected to isoelectric focusing (IF). Each IF fraction was assayed for DNA Endo activity. Peaks of activity were pooled and assayed for activity on undamaged PM2 bacteriophage DNA and on PM2 DNA that had been treated with 15 ..mu..g/ml TMP or MOP in the dark and then exposed to UVA light. Unbound psoralen was removed by dialysis and a second dose of UVA light was given in order to increase the number of DNA cross-links. Two Endo activities were found which were active on TMP- and MOP-DNA: a major one, pI 4.6, which is also active on intercalated DNA, and a second, lesser one, pI 7.6, which is active on UVC (254 nm) light irradiated DNA. These results indicate that there are two different DNA Endos which act on both TMP- and MOP-treated DNA and that the major activity recognizes the intercalation of, and/or the cross-link produced by interaction of, psoralen with DNA.

  9. Effects of Dimerization of Serratia marcescens Endonuclease on Water Dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chuanying; Beck, Brian W.; Krause, Kurt; Weksberg, Tiffany E.; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2007-02-15

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The dynamics and structure of Serratia marcescens endonuclease and its neighboring solvent are investigated by molecular dynamics (MD). Comparisons are made with structural and biochemical experiments. The dimer form is physiologic and functions more processively than the monomer. We previously found a channel formed by connected clusters of waters from the active site to the dimer interface. Here, we show that dimerization clearly changes correlations in the water structure and dynamics in the active site not seen in the monomer. Our results indicate that water at the active sites of the dimer is less affected compared with bulk solvent than in the monomer where it has much slower characteristic relaxation times. Given that water is a required participant in the reaction, this gives a clear advantage to dimerization in the absence of an apparent ability to use both active sites simultaneously.

  10. Quantitative characterization of protein–protein complexes involved in base excision DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Moor, Nina A.; Vasil'eva, Inna A.; Anarbaev, Rashid O.; Antson, Alfred A.; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2015-01-01

    Base Excision Repair (BER) efficiently corrects the most common types of DNA damage in mammalian cells. Step-by-step coordination of BER is facilitated by multiple interactions between enzymes and accessory proteins involved. Here we characterize quantitatively a number of complexes formed by DNA polymerase β (Polβ), apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1) and tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1), using fluorescence- and light scattering-based techniques. Direct physical interactions between the APE1-Polβ, APE1-TDP1, APE1-PARP1 and Polβ-TDP1 pairs have been detected and characterized for the first time. The combined results provide strong evidence that the most stable complex is formed between XRCC1 and Polβ. Model DNA intermediates of BER are shown to induce significant rearrangement of the Polβ complexes with XRCC1 and PARP1, while having no detectable influence on the protein–protein binding affinities. The strength of APE1 interaction with Polβ, XRCC1 and PARP1 is revealed to be modulated by BER intermediates to different extents, depending on the type of DNA damage. The affinity of APE1 for Polβ is higher in the complex with abasic site-containing DNA than after the APE1-catalyzed incision. Our findings advance understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying coordination and regulation of the BER process. PMID:26013813

  11. Motorcycle Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Jim; Bundy, Mike

    This motorcycle repair curriculum guide contains the following ten areas of study: brake systems, clutches, constant mesh transmissions, final drives, suspension, mechanical starting mechanisms, electrical systems, fuel systems, lubrication systems, and overhead camshafts. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction. Each instructional…

  12. Snowmobile Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helbling, Wayne

    This guide is designed to provide and/or improve instruction for occupational training in the area of snowmobile repair, and includes eight areas. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction, with each instructional unit including some or all of the following basic components: Performance objectives, suggested activities for teacher and…

  13. Outboard Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardway, Jack

    This consortium-developed instructor's manual for small engine repair (with focus on outboard motors) consists of the following nine instructional units: electrical remote control assembly, mechanical remote control assembly, tilt assemblies, exhaust housing, propeller and trim tabs, cooling system, mechanical gearcase, electrical gearcase, and…

  14. Fractionated Radiation Exposure of Rat Spinal Cords Leads to Latent Neuro-Inflammation in Brain, Cognitive Deficits, and Alterations in Apurinic Endonuclease 1

    SciTech Connect

    Suresh Kumar, M. A.; Peluso, Michael; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Dhawan, Jasbeer; Beheshti, Afshin; Manickam, Krishnan; Thapar, Upasna; Pena, Louis; Natarajan, Mohan; Hlatky, Lynn; Demple, Bruce; Naidu, Mamta

    2015-07-24

    Ionizing radiation causes degeneration of myelin, the insulating sheaths of neuronal axons, leading to neurological impairment. As radiation research on the central nervous system has predominantly focused on neurons, with few studies addressing the role of glial cells, we have focused our present research on identifying the latent effects of single/ fractionated -low dose of low/ high energy radiation on the role of base excision repair protein Apurinic Endonuclease-1, in the rat spinal cords oligodendrocyte progenitor cells ’ differentiation. Apurinic endonuclease-1 is predominantly upregulated in response to oxidative stress by low- energy radiation, and previous studies show significant induction of Apurinic Endonucle- ase-1 in neurons and astrocytes. Our studies show for the first time, that fractionation of pro- tons cause latent damage to spinal cord architecture while fractionation of HZE (28Si) induce increase in APE1 with single dose, which then decreased with fractionation. In conclusion, the oligoden- drocyte progenitor cells differentiation was skewed with increase in immature oligodendro- cytes and astrocytes, which likely cause the observed decrease in white matter, increased neuro-inflammation, together leading to the observed significant cognitive defects

  15. Fractionated Radiation Exposure of Rat Spinal Cords Leads to Latent Neuro-Inflammation in Brain, Cognitive Deficits, and Alterations in Apurinic Endonuclease 1

    DOE PAGES

    Suresh Kumar, M. A.; Peluso, Michael; Chaudhary, Pankaj; ...

    2015-07-24

    Ionizing radiation causes degeneration of myelin, the insulating sheaths of neuronal axons, leading to neurological impairment. As radiation research on the central nervous system has predominantly focused on neurons, with few studies addressing the role of glial cells, we have focused our present research on identifying the latent effects of single/ fractionated -low dose of low/ high energy radiation on the role of base excision repair protein Apurinic Endonuclease-1, in the rat spinal cords oligodendrocyte progenitor cells ’ differentiation. Apurinic endonuclease-1 is predominantly upregulated in response to oxidative stress by low- energy radiation, and previous studies show significant induction ofmore » Apurinic Endonucle- ase-1 in neurons and astrocytes. Our studies show for the first time, that fractionation of pro- tons cause latent damage to spinal cord architecture while fractionation of HZE (28Si) induce increase in APE1 with single dose, which then decreased with fractionation. In conclusion, the oligoden- drocyte progenitor cells differentiation was skewed with increase in immature oligodendro- cytes and astrocytes, which likely cause the observed decrease in white matter, increased neuro-inflammation, together leading to the observed significant cognitive defects« less

  16. The SMX DNA Repair Tri-nuclease.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Haley D M; Laister, Rob C; Martin, Stephen R; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; West, Stephen C

    2017-03-02

    The efficient removal of replication and recombination intermediates is essential for the maintenance of genome stability. Resolution of these potentially toxic structures requires the MUS81-EME1 endonuclease, which is activated at prometaphase by formation of the SMX tri-nuclease containing three DNA repair structure-selective endonucleases: SLX1-SLX4, MUS81-EME1, and XPF-ERCC1. Here we show that SMX tri-nuclease is more active than the three individual nucleases, efficiently cleaving replication forks and recombination intermediates. Within SMX, SLX4 co-ordinates the SLX1 and MUS81-EME1 nucleases for Holliday junction resolution, in a reaction stimulated by XPF-ERCC1. SMX formation activates MUS81-EME1 for replication fork and flap structure cleavage by relaxing substrate specificity. Activation involves MUS81's conserved N-terminal HhH domain, which mediates incision site selection and SLX4 binding. Cell cycle-dependent formation and activation of this tri-nuclease complex provides a unique mechanism by which cells ensure chromosome segregation and preserve genome integrity.

  17. Turbine repair process, repaired coating, and repaired turbine component

    DOEpatents

    Das, Rupak; Delvaux, John McConnell; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-11-03

    A turbine repair process, a repaired coating, and a repaired turbine component are disclosed. The turbine repair process includes providing a turbine component having a higher-pressure region and a lower-pressure region, introducing particles into the higher-pressure region, and at least partially repairing an opening between the higher-pressure region and the lower-pressure region with at least one of the particles to form a repaired turbine component. The repaired coating includes a silicon material, a ceramic matrix composite material, and a repaired region having the silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material. The repaired turbine component a ceramic matrix composite layer and a repaired region having silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material.

  18. The MmeI family: type II restriction–modification enzymes that employ single-strand modification for host protection

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Richard D.; Dwinell, Elizabeth A.; Bhatia, Tanya K.; Lang, Elizabeth M.; Luyten, Yvette A.

    2009-01-01

    The type II restriction endonucleases form one of the largest families of biochemically-characterized proteins. These endonucleases typically share little sequence similarity, except among isoschizomers that recognize the same sequence. MmeI is an unusual type II restriction endonuclease that combines endonuclease and methyltransferase activities in a single polypeptide. MmeI cuts DNA 20 bases from its recognition sequence and modifies just one DNA strand for host protection. Using MmeI as query we have identified numerous putative genes highly similar to MmeI in database sequences. We have cloned and characterized 20 of these MmeI homologs. Each cuts DNA at the same distance as MmeI and each modifies a conserved adenine on only one DNA strand for host protection. However each enzyme recognizes a unique DNA sequence, suggesting these enzymes are undergoing rapid evolution of DNA specificity. The MmeI family thus provides a rich source of novel endonucleases while affording an opportunity to observe the evolution of DNA specificity. Because the MmeI family enzymes employ modification of only one DNA strand for host protection, unlike previously described type II systems, we propose that such single-strand modification systems be classified as a new subgroup, the type IIL enzymes, for Lone strand DNA modification. PMID:19578066

  19. Restriction enzyme body doubles and PCR cloning: on the general use of type IIs restriction enzymes for cloning.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Eszter; Huszár, Krisztina; Bencsura, Petra; Kulcsár, Péter István; Vodicska, Barbara; Nyeste, Antal; Welker, Zsombor; Tóth, Szilvia; Welker, Ervin

    2014-01-01

    The procedure described here allows the cloning of PCR fragments containing a recognition site of the restriction endonuclease (Type IIP) used for cloning in the sequence of the insert. A Type IIS endonuclease--a Body Double of the Type IIP enzyme--is used to generate the same protruding palindrome. Thus, the insert can be cloned to the Type IIP site of the vector without digesting the PCR product with the same Type IIP enzyme. We achieve this by incorporating the recognition site of a Type IIS restriction enzyme that cleaves the DNA outside of its recognition site in the PCR primer in such a way that the cutting positions straddle the desired overhang sequence. Digestion of the PCR product by the Body Double generates the required overhang. Hitherto the use of Type IIS restriction enzymes in cloning reactions has only been used for special applications, the approach presented here makes Type IIS enzymes as useful as Type IIP enzymes for general cloning purposes. To assist in finding Body Double enzymes, we summarised the available Type IIS enzymes which are potentially useful for Body Double cloning and created an online program (http://group.szbk.u-szeged.hu/welkergr/body_double/index.html) for the selection of suitable Body Double enzymes and the design of the appropriate primers.

  20. Base excision repair capacity in informing healthspan

    PubMed Central

    Brenerman, Boris M.; Illuzzi, Jennifer L.; Wilson, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is a frontline defense mechanism for dealing with many common forms of endogenous DNA damage, several of which can drive mutagenic or cell death outcomes. The pathway engages proteins such as glycosylases, abasic endonucleases, polymerases and ligases to remove substrate modifications from DNA and restore the genome back to its original state. Inherited mutations in genes related to BER can give rise to disorders involving cancer, immunodeficiency and neurodegeneration. Studies employing genetically defined heterozygous (haploinsufficient) mouse models indicate that partial reduction in BER capacity can increase vulnerability to both spontaneous and exposure-dependent pathologies. In humans, measurement of BER variation has been imperfect to this point, yet tools to assess BER in epidemiological surveys are steadily evolving. We provide herein an overview of the BER pathway and discuss the current efforts toward defining the relationship of BER defects with disease susceptibility. PMID:25355293

  1. Loss of mitochondrial exo/endonuclease EXOG affects mitochondrial respiration and induces ROS-mediated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Tigchelaar, Wardit; Yu, Hongjuan; de Jong, Anne Margreet; van Gilst, Wiek H; van der Harst, Pim; Westenbrink, B Daan; de Boer, Rudolf A; Silljé, Herman H W

    2015-01-15

    Recently, a locus at the mitochondrial exo/endonuclease EXOG gene, which has been implicated in mitochondrial DNA repair, was associated with cardiac function. The function of EXOG in cardiomyocytes is still elusive. Here we investigated the role of EXOG in mitochondrial function and hypertrophy in cardiomyocytes. Depletion of EXOG in primary neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVCs) induced a marked increase in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Depletion of EXOG, however, did not result in loss of mitochondrial DNA integrity. Although EXOG depletion did not induce fetal gene expression and common hypertrophy pathways were not activated, a clear increase in ribosomal S6 phosphorylation was observed, which readily explains increased protein synthesis. With the use of a Seahorse flux analyzer, it was shown that the mitochondrial oxidative consumption rate (OCR) was increased 2.4-fold in EXOG-depleted NRVCs. Moreover, ATP-linked OCR was 5.2-fold higher. This increase was not explained by mitochondrial biogenesis or alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential. Western blotting confirmed normal levels of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes. The increased OCR was accompanied by a 5.4-fold increase in mitochondrial ROS levels. These increased ROS levels could be normalized with specific mitochondrial ROS scavengers (MitoTEMPO, mnSOD). Remarkably, scavenging of excess ROS strongly attenuated the hypertrophic response. In conclusion, loss of EXOG affects normal mitochondrial function resulting in increased mitochondrial respiration, excess ROS production, and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

  2. Ctp1-dependent clipping and resection of DNA double-strand breaks by Mre11 endonuclease complex are not genetically separable

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kristi L.; Russell, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) repair of programmed meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs) requires endonucleolytic clipping of Rec12Spo11-oligonucleotides from 5′ DNA ends followed by resection to generate invasive 3′ single-stranded DNA tails. The Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) endonuclease and Ctp1 (CtIP and Sae2 ortholog) are required for both activities in fission yeast but whether they are genetically separable is controversial. Here, we investigate the mitotic DSB repair properties of Ctp1 C-terminal domain (ctp1-CD) mutants that were reported to be specifically clipping deficient. These mutants are sensitive to many clastogens, including those that create DSBs devoid of covalently bound proteins. These sensitivities are suppressed by genetically eliminating Ku nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) protein, indicating that Ctp1-dependent clipping by MRN is required for Ku removal from DNA ends. However, this rescue requires Exo1 resection activity, implying that Ctp1-dependent resection by MRN is defective in ctp1-CD mutants. The ctp1-CD mutants tolerate one but not multiple broken replication forks, and they are highly reliant on the Chk1-mediated cell cycle checkpoint arrest, indicating that HR repair is inefficient. We conclude that the C-terminal domain of Ctp1 is required for both efficient clipping and resection of DSBs by MRN and these activities are mechanistically similar. PMID:27325741

  3. Identification and characterization of influenza variants resistant to a viral endonuclease inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Min-Suk; Kumar, Gyanendra; Shadrick, William R.; Zhou, Wei; Jeevan, Trushar; Li, Zhenmei; Slavish, P. Jake; Fabrizio, Thomas P.; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Webb, Thomas R.; Webby, Richard J.; White, Stephen W.

    2016-03-14

    The influenza endonuclease is an essential subdomain of the viral RNA polymerase. It processes host pre-mRNAs to serve as primers for viral mRNA and is an attractive target for antiinfluenza drug discovery. Compound L-742,001 is a prototypical endonuclease inhibitor, and we found that repeated passaging of influenza virus in the presence of this drug did not lead to the development of resistant mutant strains. Reduced sensitivity to L-742,001 could only be induced by creating point mutations via a random mutagenesis strategy. These mutations mapped to the endonuclease active site where they can directly impact inhibitor binding. Engineered viruses containing the mutations showed resistance to L-742,001 both in vitro and in vivo, with only a modest reduction in fitness. Introduction of the mutations into a second virus also increased its resistance to the inhibitor. Using the isolated wild-type and mutant endonuclease domains, we used kinetics, inhibitor binding and crystallography to characterize how the two most significant mutations elicit resistance to L-742,001. These studies lay the foundation for the development of a new class of influenza therapeutics with reduced potential for the development of clinical endonuclease inhibitor-resistant influenza strains.

  4. Identification and characterization of influenza variants resistant to a viral endonuclease inhibitor

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Min-Suk; Kumar, Gyanendra; Shadrick, William R.; ...

    2016-03-14

    The influenza endonuclease is an essential subdomain of the viral RNA polymerase. It processes host pre-mRNAs to serve as primers for viral mRNA and is an attractive target for antiinfluenza drug discovery. Compound L-742,001 is a prototypical endonuclease inhibitor, and we found that repeated passaging of influenza virus in the presence of this drug did not lead to the development of resistant mutant strains. Reduced sensitivity to L-742,001 could only be induced by creating point mutations via a random mutagenesis strategy. These mutations mapped to the endonuclease active site where they can directly impact inhibitor binding. Engineered viruses containing themore » mutations showed resistance to L-742,001 both in vitro and in vivo, with only a modest reduction in fitness. Introduction of the mutations into a second virus also increased its resistance to the inhibitor. Using the isolated wild-type and mutant endonuclease domains, we used kinetics, inhibitor binding and crystallography to characterize how the two most significant mutations elicit resistance to L-742,001. These studies lay the foundation for the development of a new class of influenza therapeutics with reduced potential for the development of clinical endonuclease inhibitor-resistant influenza strains.« less

  5. Evidence that the DNA endonuclease ARTEMIS also has intrinsic 5'-exonuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Sicong; Chang, Howard H; Niewolik, Doris; Hedrick, Michael P; Pinkerton, Anthony B; Hassig, Christian A; Schwarz, Klaus; Lieber, Michael R

    2014-03-14

    ARTEMIS is a member of the metallo-β-lactamase protein family. ARTEMIS has endonuclease activity at DNA hairpins and at 5'- and 3'-DNA overhangs of duplex DNA, and this endonucleolytic activity is dependent upon DNA-PKcs. There has been uncertainty about whether ARTEMIS also has 5'-exonuclease activity on single-stranded DNA and 5'-overhangs, because this 5'-exonuclease is not dependent upon DNA-PKcs. Here, we show that the 5'-exonuclease and the endonuclease activities co-purify. Second, we show that a point mutant of ARTEMIS at a putative active site residue (H115A) markedly reduces both the endonuclease activity and the 5'-exonuclease activity. Third, divalent cation effects on the 5'-exonuclease and the endonuclease parallel one another. Fourth, both the endonuclease activity and 5'-exonuclease activity of ARTEMIS can be blocked in parallel by small molecule inhibitors, which do not block unrelated nucleases. We conclude that the 5'-exonuclease is intrinsic to ARTEMIS, making it relevant to the role of ARTEMIS in nonhomologous DNA end joining.

  6. Identification and characterization of influenza variants resistant to a viral endonuclease inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min-Suk; Kumar, Gyanendra; Shadrick, William R.; Zhou, Wei; Jeevan, Trushar; Li, Zhenmei; Slavish, P. Jake; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Webb, Thomas R.; Webby, Richard J.; White, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    The influenza endonuclease is an essential subdomain of the viral RNA polymerase. It processes host pre-mRNAs to serve as primers for viral mRNA and is an attractive target for antiinfluenza drug discovery. Compound L-742,001 is a prototypical endonuclease inhibitor, and we found that repeated passaging of influenza virus in the presence of this drug did not lead to the development of resistant mutant strains. Reduced sensitivity to L-742,001 could only be induced by creating point mutations via a random mutagenesis strategy. These mutations mapped to the endonuclease active site where they can directly impact inhibitor binding. Engineered viruses containing the mutations showed resistance to L-742,001 both in vitro and in vivo, with only a modest reduction in fitness. Introduction of the mutations into a second virus also increased its resistance to the inhibitor. Using the isolated wild-type and mutant endonuclease domains, we used kinetics, inhibitor binding and crystallography to characterize how the two most significant mutations elicit resistance to L-742,001. These studies lay the foundation for the development of a new class of influenza therapeutics with reduced potential for the development of clinical endonuclease inhibitor-resistant influenza strains. PMID:26976575

  7. Nuclear depletion of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (Ape1/Ref-1) is an indicator of energy disruption in neurons.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shilpee; Englander, Ella W

    2012-11-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (Ape1/Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein critical for cellular survival. Its involvement in adaptive survival responses includes key roles in redox sensing, transcriptional regulation, and repair of DNA damage via the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Ape1 is abundant in most cell types and central in integrating the first BER step catalyzed by different DNA glycosylases. BER is the main process for removal of oxidative DNA lesions in postmitotic brain cells, and after ischemic brain injury preservation of Ape1 coincides with neuronal survival, while its loss has been associated with neuronal death. Here, we report that in cultured primary neurons, diminution of cellular ATP by either oligomycin or H(2)O(2) is accompanied by depletion of nuclear Ape1, while other BER proteins are unaffected and retain their nuclear localization under these conditions. Importantly, while H(2)O(2) induces γH2AX phosphorylation, indicative of chromatin rearrangements in response to DNA damage, oligomycin does not. Furthermore, despite comparable diminution of ATP content, H(2)O(2) and oligomycin differentially affect critical parameters of mitochondrial respiration that ultimately determine cellular ATP content. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that in neurons, nuclear compartmentalization of Ape1 depends on ATP and loss of nuclear Ape1 reflects disruption of neuronal energy homeostasis. Energy crisis is a hallmark of stroke and other ischemic/hypoxic brain injuries. In vivo studies have shown that Ape1 deficit precedes neuronal loss in injured brain regions. Thus, our findings bring to light the possibility that energy failure-induced Ape1 depletion triggers neuronal death in ischemic brain injuries.

  8. Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease/Redox Factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) Redox Function Negatively Regulates NRF2*

    PubMed Central

    Fishel, Melissa L.; Wu, Xue; Devlin, Cecilia M.; Logsdon, Derek P.; Jiang, Yanlin; Luo, Meihua; He, Ying; Yu, Zhangsheng; Tong, Yan; Lipking, Kelsey P.; Maitra, Anirban; Rajeshkumar, N. V.; Scandura, Glenda; Kelley, Mark R.; Ivan, Mircea

    2015-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) (henceforth referred to as Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein that in addition to its base excision DNA repair activity exerts redox control of multiple transcription factors, including nuclear factor κ-light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), STAT3, activator protein-1 (AP-1), hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), and tumor protein 53 (p53). In recent years, Ref-1 has emerged as a promising therapeutic target in cancer, particularly in pancreatic ductal carcinoma. Although a significant amount of research has centered on Ref-1, no wide-ranging approach had been performed on the effects of Ref-1 inhibition and transcription factor activity perturbation. Starting with a broader approach, we identified a previously unsuspected effect on the nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (NRF2), a critical regulator of cellular defenses against oxidative stress. Based on genetic and small molecule inhibitor-based methodologies, we demonstrated that repression of Ref-1 potently activates NRF2 and its downstream targets in a dose-dependent fashion, and that the redox, rather than the DNA repair function of Ref-1 is critical for this effect. Intriguingly, our results also indicate that this pathway does not involve reactive oxygen species. The link between Ref-1 and NRF2 appears to be present in all cells tested in vitro, noncancerous and cancerous, including patient-derived tumor samples. In particular, we focused on understanding the implications of the novel interaction between these two pathways in primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tumor cells and provide the first evidence that this mechanism has implications for overcoming the resistance against experimental drugs targeting Ref-1 activity, with clear translational implications. PMID:25492865

  9. Nonhomologous end joining and homologous recombination DNA repair pathways in integration mutagenesis in the xylose-fermenting yeast Pichia stipitis.

    PubMed

    Maassen, Nicole; Freese, Stefan; Schruff, Barbara; Passoth, Volkmar; Klinner, Ulrich

    2008-08-01

    Pichia stipitis integrates linear homologous DNA fragments mainly ectopically. High rates of randomly occurring integration allow tagging mutagenesis with high efficiency using simply PCR amplificates of suitable selection markers from the P. stipitis genome. Linearization of an autonomously replicating vector caused a distinct increase of the transformation efficiency compared with the circular molecule. Cotransformation of a restriction endonuclease further enhanced the transformation efficiency. This effect was also observed with integrative vector DNA. In most cases vector integration in chromosomal targets did not depend on microhomologies, indicating that restriction-enzyme-mediated integration (REMI) does not play an essential role in P. stipitis. Small deletions were observed at the ends of the integrated vectors and in the target sites. Disruption of the PsKU80 gene increased the frequency of homologous integration considerably but resulted in a remarkable decrease of the transformation efficiency. These results suggest that in P. stipitis the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway obviously predominates the homologous recombination pathway of double-strand break repair.

  10. Nucleosomes Suppress the Formation of Double-strand DNA Breaks during Attempted Base Excision Repair of Clustered Oxidative Damages*

    PubMed Central

    Cannan, Wendy J.; Tsang, Betty P.; Wallace, Susan S.; Pederson, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation can produce multiple, clustered oxidative lesions in DNA. The near simultaneous excision of nearby lesions in opposing DNA strands by the base excision repair (BER) enzymes can produce double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). This attempted BER accounts for many of the potentially lethal or mutagenic DSBs that occur in vivo. To assess the impact of nucleosomes on the frequency and pattern of BER-dependent DSB formation, we incubated nucleosomes containing oxidative damages in opposing DNA strands with selected DNA glycosylases and human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1. Overall, nucleosomes substantially suppressed DSB formation. However, the degree of suppression varied as a function of (i) the lesion type and DNA glycosylase tested, (ii) local sequence context and the stagger between opposing strand lesions, (iii) the helical orientation of oxidative lesions relative to the underlying histone octamer, and (iv) the distance between the lesion cluster and the nucleosome edge. In some instances the binding of a BER factor to one nucleosomal lesion appeared to facilitate binding to the opposing strand lesion. DSB formation did not invariably lead to nucleosome dissolution, and in some cases, free DNA ends resulting from DSB formation remained associated with the histone octamer. These observations explain how specific structural and dynamic properties of nucleosomes contribute to the suppression of BER-generated DSBs. These studies also suggest that most BER-generated DSBs will occur in linker DNA and in genomic regions associated with elevated rates of nucleosome turnover or remodeling. PMID:24891506

  11. Identification of small molecule inhibitors of ERCC1-XPF that inhibit DNA repair and potentiate cisplatin efficacy in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sanjeevani; Heyza, Joshua; Zhang, Hao; Kalman-Maltese, Vivian; Tillison, Kristin; Floyd, Ashley M; Chalfin, Elaine M; Bepler, Gerold; Patrick, Steve M

    2016-11-15

    ERCC1-XPF heterodimer is a 5'-3' structure-specific endonuclease which is essential in multiple DNA repair pathways in mammalian cells. ERCC1-XPF (ERCC1-ERCC4) repairs cisplatin-DNA intrastrand adducts and interstrand crosslinks and its specific inhibition has been shown to enhance cisplatin cytotoxicity in cancer cells. In this study, we describe a high throughput screen (HTS) used to identify small molecules that inhibit the endonuclease activity of ERCC1-XPF. Primary screens identified two compounds that inhibit ERCC1-XPF activity in the nanomolar range. These compounds were validated in secondary screens against two other non-related endonucleases to ensure specificity. Results from these screens were validated using an in vitro gel-based nuclease assay. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) further show that these compounds do not inhibit the binding of purified ERCC1-XPF to DNA. Next, in lung cancer cells these compounds potentiated cisplatin cytotoxicity and inhibited DNA repair. Structure activity relationship (SAR) studies identified related compounds for one of the original Hits, which also potentiated cisplatin cytotoxicity in cancer cells. Excitingly, dosing with NSC16168 compound potentiated cisplatin antitumor activity in a lung cancer xenograft model. Further development of ERCC1-XPF DNA repair inhibitors is expected to sensitize cancer cells to DNA damage-based chemotherapy.

  12. Identification of small molecule inhibitors of ERCC1-XPF that inhibit DNA repair and potentiate cisplatin efficacy in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sanjeevani; Heyza, Joshua; Zhang, Hao; Kalman-Maltese, Vivian; Tillison, Kristin; Floyd, Ashley M.; Chalfin, Elaine M.; Bepler, Gerold; Patrick, Steve M.

    2016-01-01

    ERCC1-XPF heterodimer is a 5′-3′ structure-specific endonuclease which is essential in multiple DNA repair pathways in mammalian cells. ERCC1-XPF (ERCC1-ERCC4) repairs cisplatin-DNA intrastrand adducts and interstrand crosslinks and its specific inhibition has been shown to enhance cisplatin cytotoxicity in cancer cells. In this study, we describe a high throughput screen (HTS) used to identify small molecules that inhibit the endonuclease activity of ERCC1-XPF. Primary screens identified two compounds that inhibit ERCC1-XPF activity in the nanomolar range. These compounds were validated in secondary screens against two other non-related endonucleases to ensure specificity. Results from these screens were validated using an in vitro gel-based nuclease assay. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) further show that these compounds do not inhibit the binding of purified ERCC1-XPF to DNA. Next, in lung cancer cells these compounds potentiated cisplatin cytotoxicity and inhibited DNA repair. Structure activity relationship (SAR) studies identified related compounds for one of the original Hits, which also potentiated cisplatin cytotoxicity in cancer cells. Excitingly, dosing with NSC16168 compound potentiated cisplatin antitumor activity in a lung cancer xenograft model. Further development of ERCC1-XPF DNA repair inhibitors is expected to sensitize cancer cells to DNA damage-based chemotherapy. PMID:27650543

  13. Comparison of genomes of malignant catarrhal fever-associated herpesviruses by restriction endonuclease analysis.

    PubMed

    Shih, L M; Zee, Y C; Castro, A E

    1989-01-01

    The restriction endonuclease DNA cleavage patterns of eight isolates of malignant catarrhal fever-associated herpesviruses were examined using the restriction endonucleases HindIII and EcoRI. The eight viruses could be assigned to two distinct groups. Virus isolates from a blue wildebeest, a sika deer and an ibex had restriction endonuclease DNA cleavage patterns that were in general similar to each other. The restriction pattern of these three viruses was distinct from the other five. Of these five, four were isolated from a greater kudu, a white tailed wildebeest, a white bearded wildebeest, and a cape hartebeest. The fifth isolate C500, was isolated from a domestic cow with malignant catarrhal fever. These five viruses had similar DNA cleavage patterns.

  14. Inhibitors of Influenza Virus Polymerase Acidic (PA) Endonuclease: Contemporary Developments and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ju, Han; Zhang, Jian; Huang, Boshi; Kang, Dongwei; Huang, Bing; Liu, Xinyong; Zhan, Peng

    2017-02-07

    Influenza virus (IFV) causes periodic global influenza pandemics, resulting in substantial socioeconomic loss and burden on medical facilities. Yearly variation in the effectiveness of vaccines, slow responsiveness to vaccination in cases of pandemic IFV, and emerging resistance to available drugs highlight the need to develop additional small-molecular inhibitors that act on IFV proteins. One promising target is polymerase acidic (PA) endonuclease, which is a bridged dinuclear metalloenzyme that plays a crucial role in initiating IFV replication. During the past decade, intensive efforts have been made to develop small-molecular inhibitors of this endonuclease as candidate agents for treatment of IFV infection. Here, we review the current status of development of PA endonuclease inhibitors and we discuss the applicability of newer medicinal-chemistry strategies for the discovery more potent, selective, and safer inhibitors.

  15. Crystal structure of PvuII endonuclease reveals extensive structural homologies to EcoRV.

    PubMed

    Athanasiadis, A; Vlassi, M; Kotsifaki, D; Tucker, P A; Wilson, K S; Kokkinidis, M

    1994-07-01

    The crystal structure of the dimeric PvuII restriction endonuclease (R.PvuII) has been determined at a resolution of 2.4A. The protein has a mixed alpha/beta architecture and consists of two subdomains. Despite a lack of sequence homology, extensive structural similarities exist between one R.PvuII subdomain and the DNA-binding subdomain of EcoRV endonuclease (R.EcoRV); the dimerization subdomains are unrelated. Within the similar domains, flexible segments of R.PvuII are topologically equivalent to the DNA-binding turns of R.EcoRV; potential catalytic residues can be deduced from the structural similarities to R.EcoRV. Conformational flexibility is important for the interaction with DNA. A possible classification of endonuclease structures on the basis of the positions of the scissile phosphates is discussed.

  16. Extracting enzyme processivity from kinetic assays

    SciTech Connect

    Barel, Itay; Brown, Frank L. H.; Reich, Norbert O.

    2015-12-14

    A steady-state analysis for the catalytic turnover of molecules containing two substrate sites is presented. A broad class of Markovian dynamic models, motivated by the action of DNA modifying enzymes and the rich variety of translocation mechanisms associated with these systems (e.g., sliding, hopping, intersegmental transfer, etc.), is considered. The modeling suggests an elementary and general method of data analysis, which enables the extraction of the enzyme’s processivity directly and unambiguously from experimental data. This analysis is not limited to the initial velocity regime. The predictions are validated both against detailed numerical models and by revisiting published experimental data for EcoRI endonuclease acting on DNA.

  17. Enzyme assays.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Jean-Louis; Fluxà, Viviana S; Maillard, Noélie

    2009-01-07

    Enzyme assays are analytical tools to visualize enzyme activities. In recent years a large variety of enzyme assays have been developed to assist the discovery and optimization of industrial enzymes, in particular for "white biotechnology" where selective enzymes are used with great success for economically viable, mild and environmentally benign production processes. The present article highlights the aspects of fluorogenic and chromogenic substrates, sensors, and enzyme fingerprinting, which are our particular areas of interest.

  18. Live imaging of induced and controlled DNA double-strand break formation reveals extremely low repair by homologous recombination in human cells.

    PubMed

    Shahar, O D; Raghu Ram, E V S; Shimshoni, E; Hareli, S; Meshorer, E; Goldberg, M

    2012-07-26

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), the most hazardous DNA lesions, may result in genomic instability, a hallmark of cancer cells. The main DSB repair pathways are non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). In mammalian cells, NHEJ, which can lead to inaccurate repair, predominates. HR repair (HRR) is considered accurate and is restricted to S, G2 and M phases of the cell cycle. Despite its importance, many aspects regarding HRR remain unknown. Here, we developed a novel inducible on/off switch cell system that enables, for the first time, to induce a DSB in a rapid and reversible manner in human cells. By limiting the duration of DSB induction, we found that non-persistent endonuclease-induced DSBs are rarely repaired by HR, whereas persistent DSBs result in the published HRR frequencies (non-significant HR frequency versus frequency of ∼10%, respectively). We demonstrate that these DSBs are repaired by an accurate repair mechanism, which is distinguished from HRR (most likely, error-free NHEJ). Notably, our data reveal that HRR frequencies of endonuclease-induced DSBs in human cells are >10-fold lower than what was previously estimated by prevailing methods, which resulted in recurrent DSB formation. Our findings suggest a role for HRR mainly in repairing challenging DSBs, in contrast to uncomplicated lesions that are frequently repaired by NHEJ. Preventing HR from repairing DSBs in the complex and repetitive human genome probably has an essential role in maintaining genomic stability.

  19. Thermal stress and cellular signaling processes in hemocytes of native (Mytilus californianus) and invasive (M. galloprovincialis) mussels: cell cycle regulation and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Yao, Cui-Luan; Somero, George N

    2013-06-01

    In a previous study using hemocytes from native and invasive congeners of Mytilus (Mytilus californianus and Mytilus galloprovincialis, respectively) we showed that DNA damage and cell signaling transduction processes related to the cellular stress response and apoptosis were induced by acute temperature stress. The present study extends this work by examining effects of acute heat- and cold stress on total hemocyte counts (THCs) and expression of key regulatory molecules involved in responding to stress: tumor suppressor factor (p53), cell cycle arrest activator (p21), and a DNA base excision repair enzyme (apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE)). Hyperthermia (28 °C, 32 °C) led to significant decreases of THCs in both species. The extent of decrease in THC was temperature-, time-, and species-dependent; lower THC values were found in M. californianus, the more cold-adapted species. Western blot analyses of hemocyte extracts with antibodies specific for p53 protein, several site-specific phosphorylation states of p53, p21 protein, and APE indicated that heat- and cold (2 °C) stress induced a time-dependent activation of stress-related proteins in response to DNA damage; these stress-induced changes could govern cell cycle arrest or DNA damage repair. Our results show that the downstream regulatory response to temperature-induced cell damage may play an important role in deciding cellular fate following heat- and cold stress. Compared to M. californianus, the more warm-adapted M. galloprovincialis appears to have a higher temperature tolerance due to a lesser reduction in THC, faster signaling activation and transduction, and stronger DNA repair ability following heat stress.

  20. DNA translocation blockage, a general mechanism of cleavage site selection by type I restriction enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Janscak, P; MacWilliams, M P; Sandmeier, U; Nagaraja, V; Bickle, T A

    1999-01-01

    Type I restriction enzymes bind to a specific DNA sequence and subsequently translocate DNA past the complex to reach a non-specific cleavage site. We have examined several potential blocks to DNA translocation, such as positive supercoiling or a Holliday junction, for their ability to trigger DNA cleavage by type I restriction enzymes. Introduction of positive supercoiling into plasmid DNA did not have a significant effect on the rate of DNA cleavage by EcoAI endonuclease nor on the enzyme's ability to select cleavage sites randomly throughout the DNA molecule. Thus, positive supercoiling does not prevent DNA translocation. EcoR124II endonuclease cleaved DNA at Holliday junctions present on both linear and negatively supercoiled substrates. The latter substrate was cleaved by a single enzyme molecule at two sites, one on either side of the junction, consistent with a bi-directional translocation model. Linear DNA molecules with two recognition sites for endonucleases from different type I families were cut between the sites when both enzymes were added simultaneously but not when a single enzyme was added. We propose that type I restriction enzymes can track along a DNA substrate irrespective of its topology and cleave DNA at any barrier that is able to halt the translocation process. PMID:10228175

  1. DNA Repair by Reversal of DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chengqi; He, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous and exogenous factors constantly challenge cellular DNA, generating cytotoxic and/or mutagenic DNA adducts. As a result, organisms have evolved different mechanisms to defend against the deleterious effects of DNA damage. Among these diverse repair pathways, direct DNA-repair systems provide cells with simple yet efficient solutions to reverse covalent DNA adducts. In this review, we focus on recent advances in the field of direct DNA repair, namely, photolyase-, alkyltransferase-, and dioxygenase-mediated repair processes. We present specific examples to describe new findings of known enzymes and appealing discoveries of new proteins. At the end of this article, we also briefly discuss the influence of direct DNA repair on other fields of biology and its implication on the discovery of new biology. PMID:23284047

  2. Brain aneurysm repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  3. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  4. Ultraviolet-induced movement of the human DNA repair protein, xeroderma pigmentosum type G, in the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Park, M.S.; Knauf, J.A.; Pendergrass, S.H.

    1996-08-06

    Xeroderma pigmentosum type G (XPG) is a human genetic disease exhibiting extreme sensitivity to sunlight. XPG patients are defective XPG endonuclease, which is an enzyme essential for DNA repair of the major kinds of solar ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damages. Here we describe a novel dynamics of this protein within the cell nucleus after UV irradiation of human cells. USing confocal microscopy, we have localized the immunofluorescent, antigenic signal of XPG protein to foci throughout the cell nucleus. Our biochemical studies also established that XPG protein forms a tight association with nuclear structure(s). In human skin fibroblast cells, the number of XPG foci decreased within 2 h after UV irradiation, whereas total nuclear XPG fluorescence intensity remained constant, suggesting redistribution of XPG from a limited number of nuclear foci to the nucleus overall. Within 8 h after UV, most XPG antigenic signal was found as foci. Using {beta}-galactosidase-XPG fusion constructs ({beta}-gal-XPG) transfected into HeLa cells, we have identified a single region of XPG that is evidently responsible both for foci formation and for the UV dynamic response. The fusion protein carrying the C terminus of XPG (amino acids 1146-1185) localized {beta}-gal specific antigenic signal to foci and to the nucleolus regions. After UV irradiation, antigenic {beta}-gal translocated reversibly from the subnuclear structures to the whole nucleus with kinetics very similar to the movements of XPG protein. These findings lead us to propose a model in which distribution of XPG protein may regulate the rate of DNA repair within transcriptionally active and inactive compartments of the cell nucleus. 50 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. The Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathway Limits L1 Retrotransposition

    PubMed Central

    Servant, Geraldine; Streva, Vincent A.; Derbes, Rebecca S.; Wijetunge, Madushani I.; Neeland, Marc; White, Travis B.; Belancio, Victoria P.; Roy-Engel, Astrid M.; Deininger, Prescott L.

    2017-01-01

    Long interspersed elements 1 (L1) are active mobile elements that constitute almost 17% of the human genome. They amplify through a “copy-and-paste” mechanism termed retrotransposition, and de novo insertions related to these elements have been reported to cause 0.2% of genetic diseases. Our previous data demonstrated that the endonuclease complex ERCC1-XPF, which cleaves a 3′ DNA flap structure, limits L1 retrotransposition. Although the ERCC1-XPF endonuclease participates in several different DNA repair pathways, such as single-strand annealing, or in telomere maintenance, its recruitment to DNA lesions is best characterized in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. To determine if the NER pathway prevents the insertion of retroelements in the genome, we monitored the retrotransposition efficiencies of engineered L1 elements in NER-deficient cells and in their complemented versions. Core proteins of the NER pathway, XPD and XPA, and the lesion binding protein, XPC, are involved in limiting L1 retrotransposition. In addition, sequence analysis of recovered de novo L1 inserts and their genomic locations in NER-deficient cells demonstrated the presence of abnormally large duplications at the site of insertion, suggesting that NER proteins may also play a role in the normal L1 insertion process. Here, we propose new functions for the NER pathway in the maintenance of genome integrity: limitation of insertional mutations caused by retrotransposons and the prevention of potentially mutagenic large genomic duplications at the site of retrotransposon insertion events. PMID:28049704

  6. Choreography of oxidative damage repair in mammalian genomes.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sankar; Izumi, Tadahide; Boldogh, Istvan; Bhakat, Kishor K; Hill, Jeff W; Hazra, Tapas K

    2002-07-01

    The lesions induced by reactive oxygen species in both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes include altered bases, abasic (AP) sites, and single-strand breaks, all repaired primarily via the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Although the basic BER process (consisting of five sequential steps) could be reconstituted in vitro with only four enzymes, it is now evident that repair of oxidative damage, at least in mammalian cell nuclei, is more complex, and involves a number of additional proteins, including transcription- and replication-associated factors. These proteins may be required in sequential repair steps in concert with other cellular changes, starting with nuclear targeting of the early repair enzymes in response to oxidative stress, facilitation of lesion recognition, and access by chromatin unfolding via histone acetylation, and formation of metastable complexes of repair enzymes and other accessory proteins. Distinct, specific subclasses of protein complexes may be formed for repair of oxidative lesions in the nucleus in transcribed vs. nontranscribed sequences in chromatin, in quiescent vs. cycling cells, and in nascent vs. parental DNA strands in replicating cells. Characterizing the proteins for each repair subpathway, their signaling-dependent modifications and interactions in the nuclear as well as mitochondrial repair complexes, will be a major focus of future research in oxidative damage repair.

  7. Reconstitution of the Very Short Patch Repair Pathway from Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Adam B.; Matson, Steven W.

    2012-01-01

    The Escherichia coli very short patch (VSP) repair pathway corrects thymidine-guanine mismatches that result from spontaneous hydrolytic deamination damage of 5-methyl cytosine. The VSP repair pathway requires the Vsr endonuclease, DNA polymerase I, a DNA ligase, MutS, and MutL to function at peak efficiency. The biochemical roles of most of these proteins in the VSP repair pathway have been studied extensively. However, these proteins have not been studied together in the context of VSP repair in an in vitro system. Using purified components of the VSP repair system in a reconstitution reaction, we have begun to develop an understanding of the role played by each of these proteins in the VSP repair pathway and have gained insights into their interactions. In this report we demonstrate an in vitro reconstitution of the VSP repair pathway using a plasmid DNA substrate. Surprisingly, the repair track length can be modulated by the concentration of DNA ligase. We propose roles for MutL and MutS in coordination of this repair pathway. PMID:22846989

  8. DNA Repair Profiling Reveals Nonrandom Outcomes at Cas9-Mediated Breaks.

    PubMed

    van Overbeek, Megan; Capurso, Daniel; Carter, Matthew M; Thompson, Matthew S; Frias, Elizabeth; Russ, Carsten; Reece-Hoyes, John S; Nye, Christopher; Gradia, Scott; Vidal, Bastien; Zheng, Jiashun; Hoffman, Gregory R; Fuller, Christopher K; May, Andrew P

    2016-08-18

    The repair outcomes at site-specific DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) generated by the RNA-guided DNA endonuclease Cas9 determine how gene function is altered. Despite the widespread adoption of CRISPR-Cas9 technology to induce DSBs for genome engineering, the resulting repair products have not been examined in depth. Here, the DNA repair profiles of 223 sites in the human genome demonstrate that the pattern of DNA repair following Cas9 cutting at each site is nonrandom and consistent across experimental replicates, cell lines, and reagent delivery methods. Furthermore, the repair outcomes are determined by the protospacer sequence rather than genomic context, indicating that DNA repair profiling in cell lines can be used to anticipate repair outcomes in primary cells. Chemical inhibition of DNA-PK enabled dissection of the DNA repair profiles into contributions from c-NHEJ and MMEJ. Finally, this work elucidates a strategy for using "error-prone" DNA-repair machinery to generate precise edits.

  9. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2003-05-01

    The two broad categories of deposited weld metal repair and fiber-reinforced composite repair technologies were reviewed for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Preliminary test programs were developed for both deposited weld metal repairs and for fiber-reinforced composite repair. To date, all of the experimental work pertaining to the evaluation of potential repair methods has focused on fiber-reinforced composite repairs. Hydrostatic testing was also conducted on four pipeline sections with simulated corrosion damage: two with composite liners and two without.

  10. Plasmodium falciparum MLH is schizont stage specific endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Tarique, Mohammed; Satsangi, Akash Tripathi; Ahmad, Moaz; Singh, Shailja; Tuteja, Renu

    2012-02-01

    Malaria is one of the most important infectious diseases in many regions around the world including India. Plasmodium falciparum is the cause of most lethal form of malaria while Plasmodium vivax is the major cause outside Africa. Regardless of considerable efforts over the last many years there is still no commercial vaccine against malaria and the disease is mainly treated using a range of established drugs. With time, the malaria parasite is developing drug resistance to most of the commonly used drugs. This drug resistance might be due to defective mismatch repair in the parasite. Previously we have reported that the P. falciparum genome contains homologues to most of the components of mismatch repair (MMR) complex. In the present study we report the detailed biochemical characterization of one of the main component of MMR complex, MLH, from P. falciparum. Our results show that MLH is an ATPase and it can incise covalently closed circular DNA in the presence of Mn(2+) or Mg(2+) ions. Using the truncated derivatives we show that full length protein MLH is required for all the enzymatic activities. Using immunodepletion assays we further show that the ATPase and endomuclease activities are attributable to PfMLH protein. Using immunofluorescence assay we report that the peak expression of MLH in both 3D7 and Dd2 strains of P. falciparum is mainly in the schizont stages of the intraerythrocytic development, where DNA replication is active. MMR also contributes to the overall fidelity of DNA replication and the peak expression of MLH in the schizont stages suggests that MLH is most likely involved in correcting the mismatches occurring during replication. This study should make a significant contribution in our better understanding of DNA metabolic processes in the parasite.

  11. Mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Fishel, Richard

    2015-10-30

    Highly conserved MutS homologs (MSH) and MutL homologs (MLH/PMS) are the fundamental components of mismatch repair (MMR). After decades of debate, it appears clear that the MSH proteins initiate MMR by recognizing a mismatch and forming multiple extremely stable ATP-bound sliding clamps that diffuse without hydrolysis along the adjacent DNA. The function(s) of MLH/PMS proteins is less clear, although they too bind ATP and are targeted to MMR by MSH sliding clamps. Structural analysis combined with recent real-time single molecule and cellular imaging technologies are providing new and detailed insight into the thermal-driven motions that animate the complete MMR mechanism.

  12. Identification of genomic clonal types of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by restriction endonuclease analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Han, N; Hoover, C I; Winkler, J R; Ng, C Y; Armitage, G C

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate its utility in discriminating different strains, restriction endonuclease analysis was applied to 12 strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (3 serotype a, 5 serotype b, and 4 serotype c strains). DNA isolated from each strain was digested by 12 different restriction endonucleases, and the electrophoretic banding patterns of the resulting DNA fragments were compared. The DNA fragment patterns produced by SalI, XhoI, and XbaI for the 12 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains were simple (less than 30 bands) and allowed us to recognize easily 10 distinct genomic clonal types. The three serotype a strains exhibited distinctly different clonal types from one another, the five serotype b strains exhibited an additional four distinct clonal types, and the four serotype c strains showed another three different clonal types. The other endonucleases tested were less useful in typing A. actinomycetemcomitans. We conclude that restriction endonuclease analysis is a powerful tool for typing and discerning genetic heterogeneity and homogeneity among A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. It should, therefore, be very useful for epidemiologic studies. Images PMID:1761677

  13. Efficient targeting of a SCID gene by an engineered single-chain homing endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Grizot, Sylvestre; Smith, Julianne; Daboussi, Fayza; Prieto, Jesús; Redondo, Pilar; Merino, Nekane; Villate, Maider; Thomas, Séverine; Lemaire, Laetitia; Montoya, Guillermo; Blanco, Francisco J.; Pâques, Frédéric; Duchateau, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Sequence-specific endonucleases recognizing long target sequences are emerging as powerful tools for genome engineering. These endonucleases could be used to correct deleterious mutations or to inactivate viruses, in a new approach to molecular medicine. However, such applications are highly demanding in terms of safety. Mutations in the human RAG1 gene cause severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Using the I-CreI dimeric LAGLIDADG meganuclease as a scaffold, we describe here the engineering of a series of endonucleases cleaving the human RAG1 gene, including obligate heterodimers and single-chain molecules. We show that a novel single-chain design, in which two different monomers are linked to form a single molecule, can induce high levels of recombination while safeguarding more effectively against potential genotoxicity. We provide here the first demonstration that an engineered meganuclease can induce targeted recombination at an endogenous locus in up to 6% of transfected human cells. These properties rank this new generation of endonucleases among the best molecular scissors available for genome surgery strategies, potentially avoiding the deleterious effects of previous gene therapy approaches. PMID:19584299

  14. Efficient targeting of a SCID gene by an engineered single-chain homing endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Grizot, Sylvestre; Smith, Julianne; Daboussi, Fayza; Prieto, Jesús; Redondo, Pilar; Merino, Nekane; Villate, Maider; Thomas, Séverine; Lemaire, Laetitia; Montoya, Guillermo; Blanco, Francisco J; Pâques, Frédéric; Duchateau, Philippe

    2009-09-01

    Sequence-specific endonucleases recognizing long target sequences are emerging as powerful tools for genome engineering. These endonucleases could be used to correct deleterious mutations or to inactivate viruses, in a new approach to molecular medicine. However, such applications are highly demanding in terms of safety. Mutations in the human RAG1 gene cause severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Using the I-CreI dimeric LAGLIDADG meganuclease as a scaffold, we describe here the engineering of a series of endonucleases cleaving the human RAG1 gene, including obligate heterodimers and single-chain molecules. We show that a novel single-chain design, in which two different monomers are linked to form a single molecule, can induce high levels of recombination while safeguarding more effectively against potential genotoxicity. We provide here the first demonstration that an engineered meganuclease can induce targeted recombination at an endogenous locus in up to 6% of transfected human cells. These properties rank this new generation of endonucleases among the best molecular scissors available for genome surgery strategies, potentially avoiding the deleterious effects of previous gene therapy approaches.

  15. Efficient fdCas9 Synthetic Endonuclease with Improved Specificity for Precise Genome Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Aouida, Mustapha; Eid, Ayman; Ali, Zahir; Cradick, Thomas; Lee, Ciaran; Deshmukh, Harshavardhan; Atef, Ahmed; AbuSamra, Dina; Gadhoum, Samah Zeineb; Merzaban, Jasmeen; Bao, Gang; Mahfouz, Magdy

    2015-01-01

    The Cas9 endonuclease is used for genome editing applications in diverse eukaryotic species. A high frequency of off-target activity has been reported in many cell types, limiting its applications to genome engineering, especially in genomic medicine. Here, we generated a synthetic chimeric protein between the catalytic domain of the FokI endonuclease and the catalytically inactive Cas9 protein (fdCas9). A pair of guide RNAs (gRNAs) that bind to sense and antisense strands with a defined spacer sequence range can be used to form a catalytically active dimeric fdCas9 protein and generate double-strand breaks (DSBs) within the spacer sequence. Our data demonstrate an improved catalytic activity of the fdCas9 endonuclease, with a spacer range of 15–39 nucleotides, on surrogate reporters and genomic targets. Furthermore, we observed no detectable fdCas9 activity at known Cas9 off-target sites. Taken together, our data suggest that the fdCas9 endonuclease variant is a superior platform for genome editing applications in eukaryotic systems including mammalian cells. PMID:26225561

  16. Preferential repair of DNA double-strand break at the active gene in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Priyasri; Sen, Rwik; Pandita, Tej K; Bhaumik, Sukesh R

    2012-10-19

    Previous studies have demonstrated transcription-coupled nucleotide/base excision repair. We report here for the first time that DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is also coupled to transcription. We generated a yeast strain by introducing a homing (Ho) endonuclease cut site followed by a nucleotide sequence for multiple Myc epitopes at the 3' end of the coding sequence of a highly active gene, ADH1. This yeast strain also contains the Ho cut site at the nearly silent or poorly active mating type α (MATα) locus and expresses Ho endonuclease under the galactose-inducible GAL1 promoter. Using this strain, DSBs were generated at the ADH1 and MATα loci in galactose-containing growth medium that induced HO expression. Subsequently, yeast cells were transferred to dextrose-containing growth medium to stop HO expression, and the DSB repair was monitored at the ADH1 and MATα loci by PCR, using the primer pairs flanking the Ho cut sites. Our results revealed a faster DSB repair at the highly active ADH1 than that at the nearly silent MATα locus, hence implicating a transcription-coupled DSB repair at the active gene in vivo. Subsequently, we extended this study to another gene, PHO5 (carrying the Ho cut site at its coding sequence), under transcriptionally active and inactive growth conditions. We found a fast DSB repair at the active PHO5 gene in comparison to its inactive state. Collectively, our results demonstrate a preferential DSB repair at the active gene, thus supporting transcription-coupled DSB repair in living cells.

  17. Mutations That Extend the Specificity of the Endonuclease Activity of λ Terminase

    PubMed Central

    Arens, Jean Sippy; Hang, Qi; Hwang, Young; Tuma, Bill; Max, Sara; Feiss, Mike

    1999-01-01

    Terminase, an enzyme encoded by the Nu1 and A genes of bacteriophage lambda, is crucial for packaging concatemeric DNA into virions. cosN, a 22-bp segment, is the site on the virus chromosome where terminase introduces staggered nicks to cut the concatemer to generate unit-length virion chromosomes. Although cosN is rotationally symmetric, mutations in cosN have asymmetric effects. The cosN G2C mutation (a G-to-C change at position 2) in the left half of cosN reduces the phage yield 10-fold, whereas the symmetric mutation cosN C11G, in the right half of cosN, does not affect the burst size. The reduction in phage yield caused by cosN G2C is correlated with a defect in cos cleavage. Three suppressors of the cosN G2C mutation, A-E515G, A-N509K, and A-R504C, have been isolated that restore the yield of λ cosN G2C to the wild-type level. The suppressors are missense mutations that alter amino acids located near an ATPase domain of gpA. λ A-E515G, A-N509K, and A-R504C phages, which are cosN+, also had wild-type burst sizes. In vitro cos cleavage experiments on cosN G2C C11G DNA showed that the rate of cleavage for A-E515G terminase is three- to fourfold higher than for wild-type terminase. The A-E515G mutation changes residue 515 of gpA from glutamic acid to glycine. Uncharged polar and hydrophobic residues at position 515 suppressed the growth defect of λ cosN G2C C11G. In contrast, basic (K, R) and acidic (E, D) residues at position 515 failed to suppress the growth defect of λ cosN G2C C11G. In a λ cosN+ background, all amino acids tested at position 515 were functional. These results suggest that A-E515G plays an indirect role in extending the specificity of the endonuclease activity of λ terminase. PMID:9864333

  18. Mitochondrially targeted Endonuclease III has a powerful anti-infarct effect in an in vivo rat model of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xi-Ming; Cui, Lin; White, James; Kuck, Jamie; Ruchko, Mykhaylo V.; Wilson, Glenn L.; Alexeyev, Mikhail; Gillespie, Mark N.; Downey, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports indicate that elevating DNA glycosylase/AP lyase repair enzyme activity offers marked cytoprotection in cultured cells and a variety of injury models. In this study, we measured the effect of EndoIII, a fusion protein construct that traffics Endonuclease III, a DNA glycosylase/AP lyase, to the mitochondria, on infarct size in a rat model of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion. Open-chest, anesthetized rats were subjected to 30 min of occlusion of a coronary artery followed by 2 h of reperfusion. An intravenous bolus of EndoIII, 8 mg/kg, just prior to reperfusion reduced infarct size from 43.8 ± 1.4 % of the risk zone in control animals to 24.0 ± 1.3 % with no detectable hemodynamic effect. Neither EndoIII’s vehicle nor an enzymatically inactive EndoIII mutant (K120Q) offered any protection. The magnitude of EndoIII’s protection was comparable to that seen with the platelet aggregation inhibitor cangrelor (25.0 ± 1.8 % infarction of risk zone). Because loading with a P2Y12 receptor blocker to inhibit platelets is currently the standard of care for treatment of acute myocardial infarction, we tested whether EndoIII could further reduce infarct size in rats treated with a maximally protective dose of cangrelor. The combination reduced infarct size to 15.1 ± 0.9 % which was significantly smaller than that seen with either cangrelor or EndoIII alone. Protection from cangrelor but not EndoIII was abrogated by pharmacologic blockade of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase or adenosine receptors indicating differing cellular mechanisms. We hypothesized that EndoIII protected the heart from spreading necrosis by preventing the release of proinflammatory fragments of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) into the heart tissue. In support of this hypothesis, an intravenous bolus at reperfusion of deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I) which should degrade any DNA fragments escaping into the extracellular space was as protective as EndoIII. Furthermore, the combination of EndoIII and

  19. Restriction endonuclease analysis of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains: useful epidemiologic data from a simple and rapid method.

    PubMed Central

    Maher, W E; Kobe, M; Fass, R J

    1993-01-01

    Newer genetic techniques have replaced phenotypic methods of subtyping Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Widespread application of newer methodologies, however, may be limited by technologic complexity and the cost of equipment. We conducted restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) of sheared genomic DNAs from 48 clinical P. aeruginosa strains using the enzyme SalI and electrophoresis in horizontal, low-concentration (0.3 to 0.6%) agarose gels. Each REA profile consisted of a smear of lower-molecular-mass bands as well as a countable number of well-resolved bands in the 8.3- to 48.5-kbp range which could easily be compared when isolates were run side-by-side on the same gel. In general, the REA patterns of strains recovered from different patients differed by at least seven bands, and those of serial isolates from individual patients were identical or differed by, at most, two bands over this 8.3- to 48.5-kbp range. REA of strains already subtyped by field inversion gel electrophoresis revealed that the two techniques generally paralleled each other. Overall, some unrelated strains had similar REA profiles, but the relative simplicity and low cost of the approach coupled with the ability to demonstrate differences between most unrelated strains should make this type of REA an attractive first step in the investigation of institutional P. aeruginosa problems. Images PMID:8391021

  20. A T7 Endonuclease I Assay to Detect Talen-Mediated Targeted Mutation of HBV cccDNA.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Kristie; Ely, Abdullah; Arbuthnot, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Gene editing using designer nucleases is now widely used in many fields of molecular biology. The technology is being developed for the treatment of viral infections such as persistant hepatitis B virus (HBV). The replication intermediate of HBV comprising covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) is stable and resistant to available licensed antiviral agents. Advancing gene editing as a means of introducing targeted mutations into cccDNA thus potentially offers the means to cure infection by the virus. Essentially, targeted mutations are initiated by intracellular DNA cleavage, then error-prone nonhomologous end joining results in insertions and deletions (indels) at intended sites. Characterization of these mutations is crucial to confirm activity of potentially therapeutic nucleases. A convenient tool for evaluation of the efficiency of target cleavage is the single strand-specific endonuclease, T7EI. Assays employing this enzyme entail initial amplification of DNA encompassing the targeted region. Thereafter the amplicons are denatured and reannealed to allow hybridization between indel-containing and wild-type sequences. Heteroduplexes that contain mismatched regions are susceptible to action by T7EI and cleavage of the hybrid amplicons may be used as an indicator of efficiency of designer nucleases. The protocol described here provides a method of isolating cccDNA from transfected HepG2.2.15 cells and evaluation of the efficiency of mutation by a transcription activator-like effector nuclease that targets the surface open reading frame of HBV.

  1. Computerized restriction endonuclease analysis compared with O-serotype and phage type in the epidemiologic fingerprinting of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains.

    PubMed

    Garaizar, Javier; Latorre, Mikel; López-Molina, Nuria; Laconcha, Idoia; Alberdi, Leire; Rementeria, Aitor; Audicana, Ana; Uliarte, Rosario; Cisterna, Ramón

    1997-04-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) of chromosomal DNA using SalI enzyme, low-concentration (0.4%) agarose gels and digitalized data management of the REA patterns obtained for the typing of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. METHODS: A group of 67 clinical unrelated isolates from 10 Spanish hospitals was used to study the discriminatory power, reproducibility and typeability of REA typing. RESULTS: A SalI REA pattern consisted of a variety (1--10) of restriction bands in the range between 12.2 and 48.5 kb and an unresolvable smear of low-molecular-weight bands. Forty different SalI REA patterns with an index of discrimination of 0.979 were obtained. Low typeability (91.04%) was the major limitation of REA typing. Analysis of blinded subcultures of eight Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains showed the reproducibility of REA typing to be 87.5%. Combined phenotypic typing (O-serotyping and phage typing) performed on the same group of strains showed comparable discrimination but much lower reproducibility. Isolates selected from five clusters of nosocomial infections in hospitals in the UK were typed by REA typing, and the results show high agreement when compared with conventional phenotypic typing methods in distinguishing between strains. CONCLUSIONS: These data underline the usefulness of REA typing enhanced with digitalized data management for the epidemiologic subtyping of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates.

  2. Crystal structure of the primary piRNA biogenesis factor Zucchini reveals similarity to the bacterial PLD endonuclease Nuc.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Franka; Reuter, Michael; Kasaruho, Anisa; Schulz, Eike C; Pillai, Ramesh S; Barabas, Orsolya

    2012-12-01

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are a gonad-specific class of small RNAs that associate with the Piwi clade of Argonaute proteins and play a key role in transposon silencing in animals. Since biogenesis of piRNAs is independent of the double-stranded RNA-processing enzyme Dicer, an alternative nuclease that can process single-stranded RNA transcripts has been long sought. A Phospholipase D-like protein, Zucchini, that is essential for piRNA processing has been proposed to be a nuclease acting in piRNA biogenesis. Here we describe the crystal structure of Zucchini from Drosophila melanogaster and show that it is very similar to the bacterial endonuclease, Nuc. The structure also reveals that homodimerization induces major conformational changes assembling the active site. The active site is situated on the dimer interface at the bottom of a narrow groove that can likely accommodate single-stranded nucleic acid substrates. Furthermore, biophysical analysis identifies protein segments essential for dimerization and provides insights into regulation of Zucchini's activity.

  3. Optical mapping of site-directed cleavages on single DNA molecules by the RecA-assisted restriction endonuclease technique.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y K; Huff, E J; Schwartz, D C

    1995-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) resolution has advanced because newer techniques use increasingly decondensed chromatin. FISH cannot analyze restriction enzyme cutting sites due to limitations of the hybridization and detection technologies. The RecA-assisted restriction endonuclease (RARE) technique cleaves chromosomal DNA at a single EcoRI site within a given gene or selected sequence. We recently described a mapping technique, optical mapping, which uses fluorescence microscopy to produce high-resolution restriction maps rapidly by directly imaging restriction digestion cleavage events occurring on single deproteinized DNA molecules. Ordered maps are then constructed by noting fragment order and size, using several optically based techniques. Since we also wanted to map arbitrary sequences and gene locations, we combined RARE with optical mapping to produce site-specific visible EcoRI restriction cleavage sites on single DNA molecules. Here we describe this combined method, named optical RARE, and its initial application to mapping gene locations on yeast chromosomes. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7816810

  4. Structural and functional properties of CiNTH, an endonuclease III homologue of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis: critical role of N-terminal region.

    PubMed

    Kato, Seiji; Hashiguchi, Kazunari; Igarashi, Kento; Moriwaki, Takahito; Yonekura, Shin-Ichiro; Zhang-Akiyama, Qiu-Mei

    2012-01-01

    Oxidatively damaged bases in DNA can cause cell death, mutation and/or cancer induction. To overcome such deleterious effects of DNA base oxidation, cells are equipped with base excision repair (BER) initiated by DNA glycosylases. Endonuclease III (Nth), a major DNA glycosylase, mainly excises oxidatively damaged pyrimidines from DNA. The aims of this study were to obtain an overview of the repair mechanism of oxidatively damaged bases and to elucidate the function of BER in maintaining genome stability during embryogenesis and development. In this study, we used the ascidian Ciona intestinalis because at every developmental stage it is possible to observe the phenotype of individuals with DNA damage or mutations. Sequence alignment analysis revealed that the amino acid sequence of Ciona intestinalis Nth homologue (CiNTH) had high homology with those of Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Caenorhabditis elegans and human Nth homologues. It was evident that two domains, the Helix-hairpin-Helix and 4Fe-4S cluster domains that are critical regions for the Nth activity, are well conserved in CiNTH. CiNTH efficiently complemented the sensitivity of E. coli nth nei mutant to H(2)O(2). CiNTH was bifunctional, with DNA glycosylase and AP lyase activities. It removed thymine glycol, 5-formyluracil and 8-oxoguanine paired with G from DNA via a β-elimination reaction. Interestingly, the N-terminal 44 amino acids were essential for the DNA glycosylase activity of CiNTH.

  5. Site-specific DNA double-strand break generated by I-SceI endonuclease enhances ectopic homologous recombination in Pyricularia oryzae.

    PubMed

    Arazoe, Takayuki; Younomaru, Tetsuya; Ohsato, Shuichi; Kimura, Makoto; Arie, Tsutomu; Kuwata, Shigeru

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the contribution of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) to somatic homologous recombination (HR) in Pyricularia oryzae, we established a novel detection/selection system of DSBs-mediated ectopic HR. This system consists of donor and recipient nonfunctional yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)/blasticidin S deaminase (BSD) fusion genes and the yeast endonuclease I-SceI gene as a recipient-specific DSB inducer. The system enables to detect and select ectopic HR events by the restoration of YFP fluorescence and blasticidin S resistance. The transformed lines with donor and recipient showed low frequencies of endogenous ectopic HR (> 2.1%). Compared with spontaneous HR, c. 20-fold increases in HR and absolute frequency of HR as high as 40% were obtained by integration of I-SceI gene, indicating that I-SceI-mediated DSB was efficiently repaired via ectopic HR. Furthermore, to validate the impact of DSB on targeted gene replacement (TGR), the transformed lines with a recipient gene were transfected with an exogenous donor plasmid in combination with the DSB inducer. TGR events were not observed without the DSB inducer, whereas hundreds of colonies resulting from TGR events were obtained with the DSB inducer. These results clearly demonstrated that the introduction of site-specific DSB promotes ectopic HR repair in P. oryzae.

  6. Book Repair Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milevski, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    This book repair manual developed for the Illinois Cooperative Conservation Program includes book structure and book problems, book repair procedures for 4 specific problems, a description of adhesive bindings, a glossary, an annotated list of 11 additional readings, book repair supplies and suppliers, and specifications for book repair kits. (LRW)

  7. Physical Map of the Channel Catfish Virus Genome: Location of Sites for Restriction Endonucleases EcoRI, HindIII, HpaI, and XbaI

    PubMed Central

    Chousterman, Suzanne; Lacasa, Michel; Sheldrick, Peter

    1979-01-01

    The overall arrangement of nucleotide sequences in the DNA of channel catfish virus has been studied by cleavage with four restriction endonucleases. Physical maps have been developed for the location of sites for EcoRI, HindIII, HpaI, and XbaI. The sum of the molecular weights of fragments generated by each restriction enzyme indicates a molecular weight of approximately 86 × 106 for the channel catfish virus genome. Fragments corresponding to the molecular ends of channel catfish virus DNA have been identified by their sensitivity to exonuclease treatment. The distribution of restriction sites in the genome shows that sequences included in a 12 × 106-molecular weight region at one end are repeated with direct polarity at the other end, and that the overall genomic sequence order is nonpermuted. Images PMID:16789182

  8. Restriction endonuclease analysis of total deoxyribonucleic acid of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37RV (ATCC 27294) and of M. bovis (ATCC 19210).

    PubMed

    Labidi, A

    1988-01-01

    Total DNA from two slowly-growing pathogenic mycobacterial species propagated in vitro was isolated, digested with each of 34 restriction endonucleases and analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The most distinct profiles for M. tuberculosis (ATCC 27294) and for M. bovis (ATCC 19210) were obtained respectively using (BamHI, DraI, ClaI, EcoRI, EcoRV, HindIII, HpaI, SalI, SmaI, XbaI, and XmaI). The patterns produced for these strains were reproducible and distinguishable from each other. However, with several enzymes the patterns for M. tuberculosis and M. bovis were similar. Evidence was obtained for the presence of dam and dcmI methylations in the DNA of each mycobacterial species.

  9. Efficient nonmeiotic allele introgression in livestock using custom endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wenfang; Carlson, Daniel F.; Lancto, Cheryl A.; Garbe, John R.; Webster, Dennis A.; Hackett, Perry B.; Fahrenkrug, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    We have expanded the livestock gene editing toolbox to include transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nuclease (TALEN)- and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9-stimulated homology-directed repair (HDR) using plasmid, rAAV, and oligonucleotide templates. Toward the genetic dehorning of dairy cattle, we introgressed a bovine POLLED allele into horned bull fibroblasts. Single nucleotide alterations or small indels were introduced into 14 additional genes in pig, goat, and cattle fibroblasts using TALEN mRNA and oligonucleotide transfection with efficiencies of 10–50% in populations. Several of the chosen edits mimic naturally occurring performance-enhancing or disease- resistance alleles, including alteration of single base pairs. Up to 70% of the fibroblast colonies propagated without selection harbored the intended edits, of which more than one-half were homozygous. Edited fibroblasts were used to generate pigs with knockout alleles in the DAZL and APC genes to model infertility and colon cancer. Our methods enable unprecedented meiosis-free intraspecific and interspecific introgression of select alleles in livestock for agricultural and biomedical applications. PMID:24014591

  10. Structure of the EndoMS-DNA Complex as Mismatch Restriction Endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Nakae, Setsu; Hijikata, Atsushi; Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Yonezawa, Kouki; Kouyama, Ken-Ichi; Mayanagi, Kouta; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Shirai, Tsuyoshi

    2016-11-01

    Archaeal NucS nuclease was thought to degrade the single-stranded region of branched DNA, which contains flapped and splayed DNA. However, recent findings indicated that EndoMS, the orthologous enzyme of NucS, specifically cleaves double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) containing mismatched bases. In this study, we determined the structure of the EndoMS-DNA complex. The complex structure of the EndoMS dimer with dsDNA unexpectedly revealed that the mismatched bases were flipped out into binding sites, and the overall architecture most resembled that of restriction enzymes. The structure of the apo form was similar to the reported structure of Pyrococcus abyssi NucS, indicating that movement of the C-terminal domain from the resting state was required for activity. In addition, a model of the EndoMS-PCNA-DNA complex was preliminarily verified with electron microscopy. The structures strongly support the idea that EndoMS acts in a mismatch repair pathway.

  11. Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Owen; Cornelius, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Conveys an appreciation of enzyme kinetic analysis by using a practical and intuitive approach. Discusses enzyme assays, kinetic models and rate laws, the kinetic constants (V, velocity, and Km, Michaels constant), evaluation of V and Km from experimental data, and enzyme inhibition. (CW)

  12. Lifespan and Stress Resistance in Drosophila with Overexpressed DNA Repair Genes

    PubMed Central

    Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Proshkina, Ekaterina; Shilova, Lyubov; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Moskalev, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    DNA repair declines with age and correlates with longevity in many animal species. In this study, we investigated the effects of GAL4-induced overexpression of genes implicated in DNA repair on lifespan and resistance to stress factors in Drosophila melanogaster. Stress factors included hyperthermia, oxidative stress, and starvation. Overexpression was either constitutive or conditional and either ubiquitous or tissue-specific (nervous system). Overexpressed genes included those involved in recognition of DNA damage (homologs of HUS1, CHK2), nucleotide and base excision repair (homologs of XPF, XPC and AP-endonuclease-1), and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (homologs of BRCA2, XRCC3, KU80 and WRNexo). The overexpression of different DNA repair genes led to both positive and negative effects on lifespan and stress resistance. Effects were dependent on GAL4 driver, stage of induction, sex, and role of the gene in the DNA repair process. While the constitutive/neuron-specific and conditional/ubiquitous overexpression of DNA repair genes negatively impacted lifespan and stress resistance, the constitutive/ubiquitous and conditional/neuron-specific overexpression of Hus1, mnk, mei-9, mus210, and WRNexo had beneficial effects. This study demonstrates for the first time the effects of overexpression of these DNA repair genes on both lifespan and stress resistance in D. melanogaster. PMID:26477511

  13. Re-establishment of nucleosome occupancy during double-strand break repair in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Tsabar, Michael; Hicks, Wade M; Tsaponina, Olga; Haber, James E

    2016-11-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is an evolutionarily conserved pathway in eukaryotes that repairs a double-strand break (DSB) by copying homologous sequences from a sister chromatid, a homologous chromosome or an ectopic location. Recombination is challenged by the packaging of DNA into nucleosomes, which may impair the process at many steps, from resection of the DSB ends to the re-establishement of nucleosomes after repair. However, nucleosome dynamics during DSB repair have not been well described, primarily because of a lack of well-ordered nucleosomes around a DSB. We designed a system in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to monitor nucleosome dynamics during repair of an HO endonuclease-induced DSB. Nucleosome occupancy around the break is lost following DSB formation, by 5'-3' resection of the DSB end. Soon after repair is complete, nucleosome occupancy is partially restored in a repair-dependent but cell cycle-independent manner. Full re-establishment of nucleosome protection back to the level prior to DSB induction is achieved when the cell cycle resumes following repair. These findings may have implications to the mechanisms by which cells sense the completion of repair.

  14. Mm19, a Mycoplasma meleagridis Major Surface Nuclease that Is Related to the RE_AlwI Superfamily of Endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, Elhem; Ben Abdelmoumen Mardassi, Boutheina

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma meleagridis infection is widespread in turkeys, causing poor growth and feathering, airsacculitis, osteodystrophy, and reduction in hatchability. Like most mycoplasma species, M. meleagridis is characterized by its inability to synthesize purine and pyrimidine nucleotides de novo. Consistent with this intrinsic deficiency, we here report the cloning, expression, and characterization of a M. meleagridis gene sequence encoding a major surface nuclease, referred to as Mm19. Mm19 consists of a 1941- bp ORF encoding a 646-amino-acid polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 74,825 kDa. BLASTP analysis revealed a significant match with the catalytic/dimerization domain of type II restriction enzymes of the RE_AlwI superfamily. This finding is consistent with the genomic location of Mm19 sequence, which dispalys characteristics of a typical type II restriction-modification locus. Like intact M. meleagridis cells, the E. coli-expressed Mm19 fusion product was found to exhibit a nuclease activity against plasmid DNA, double-stranded DNA, single-stranded DNA, and RNA. The Mm19-associated nuclease activity was consistently enhanced with Mg2+ divalent cations, a hallmark of type II restriction enzymes. A rabbit hyperimmune antiserum raised against the bacterially expressed Mm19 strongly reacted with M. meleagridis intact cells and fully neutralized the surface-bound nuclease activity. Collectively, the results show that M. meleagridis expresses a strong surface-bound nuclease activity, which is the product of a single gene sequence that is related to the RE_AlwI superfamily of endonucleases. PMID:27010566

  15. Natural C-independent expression of restriction endonuclease in a C protein-associated restriction-modification system

    PubMed Central

    Rezulak, Monika; Borsuk, Izabela; Mruk, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Restriction–modification (R-M) systems are highly prevalent among bacteria and archaea, and appear to play crucial roles in modulating horizontal gene transfer and protection against phage. There is much to learn about these diverse enzymes systems, especially their regulation. Type II R-M systems specify two independent enzymes: a restriction endonuclease (REase) and protective DNA methyltransferase (MTase). Their activities need to be finely balanced in vivo. Some R-M systems rely on specialized transcription factors called C (controller) proteins. These proteins play a vital role in the temporal regulation of R-M gene expression, and function to indirectly modulate the horizontal transfer of their genes across the species. We report novel regulation of a C-responsive R-M system that involves a C protein of a poorly-studied structural class - C.Csp231I. Here, the C and REase genes share a bicistronic transcript, and some of the transcriptional auto-control features seen in other C-regulated R-M systems are conserved. However, separate tandem promoters drive most transcription of the REase gene, a distinctive property not seen in other tested C-linked R-M systems. Further, C protein only partially controls REase expression, yet plays a role in system stability and propagation. Consequently, high REase activity was observed after deletion of the entire C gene, and cells bearing the ΔC R-M system were outcompeted in mixed culture assays by those with the WT R-M system. Overall, our data reveal unexpected regulatory variation among R-M systems. PMID:26656489

  16. On the mutagenicity of homologous recombination and double-strand break repair in bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Shcherbakov, Victor P; Plugina, Lidiya; Shcherbakova, Tamara; Sizova, Svetlana; Kudryashova, Elena

    2011-01-02

    The double-strand break (DSB) repair via homologous recombination is generally construed as a high-fidelity process. However, some molecular genetic observations show that the recombination and the recombinational DSB repair may be mutagenic and even highly mutagenic. Here we developed an effective and precise method for studying the fidelity of DSB repair in vivo by combining DSBs produced site-specifically by the SegC endonuclease with the famous advantages of the recombination analysis of bacteriophage T4 rII mutants. The method is based on the comparison of the rate of reversion of rII mutation in the presence and in the absence of a DSB repair event initiated in the proximity of the mutation. We observed that DSB repair may moderately (up to 6-fold) increase the apparent reversion frequency, the effect of being dependent on the mutation structure. We also studied the effect of the T4 recombinase deficiency (amber mutation in the uvsX gene) on the fidelity of DSB repair. We observed that DSBs are still repaired via homologous recombination in the uvsX mutants, and the apparent fidelity of this repair is higher than that seen in the wild-type background. The mutator effect of the DSB repair may look unexpected given that most of the normal DNA synthesis in bacteriophage T4 is performed via a recombination-dependent replication (RDR) pathway, which is thought to be indistinguishable from DSB repair. There are three possible explanations for the observed mutagenicity of DSB repair: (1) the origin-dependent (early) DNA replication may be more accurate than the RDR; (2) the step of replication initiation may be more mutagenic than the process of elongation; and (3) the apparent mutagenicity may just reflect some non-randomness in the pool of replicating DNA, i.e., preferential replication of the sequences already involved in replication. We discuss the DSB repair pathway in the absence of UvsX recombinase.

  17. DNA repair capacity of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Raquel

    2007-08-14

    Damage to the genome is unavoidable in living creatures, because of sunlight exposure as well as environmental chemicals present in food and drinking water. There is a need to monitor and purify the drinking water; therefore, several methods of detection have been developed. A very promising model system for this purpose is the zebrafish (Danio rerio), which is endowed with special qualities for detecting external as well as internal abnormalities. Grossman and Wei's assay [Grossman L, Wei Q (1995) Clin Chem 12:1854-1863], which measures the expression level of a nonreplicating recombinant plasmid DNA containing a UV-damaged luciferase reporter gene, shows that zebrafish can repair chromosomal lesions to a much greater extent than the human population. This vertebrate model is still very promising after possible down-regulation of the DNA repair enzymes.

  18. DNA repair genes in the Megavirales pangenome.

    PubMed

    Blanc-Mathieu, Romain; Ogata, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The order 'Megavirales' represents a group of eukaryotic viruses with a large genome encoding a few hundred up to two thousand five hundred genes. Several members of Megavirales possess genes involved in major DNA repair pathways. Some of these genes were likely inherited from an ancient virus world and some others were derived from the genomes of their hosts. Here we examine molecular phylogenies of key DNA repair enzymes in light of recent hypotheses on the origin of Megavirales, and propose that the last common ancestors of the individual families of the order Megavirales already possessed DNA repair functions to achieve and maintain a moderately large genome and that this repair capacity gradually increased, in a family-dependent manner, during their recent evolution.

  19. Endonuclease cleavage of blocked replication forks: An indirect pathway of DNA damage from antitumor drug-topoisomerase complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, George; Kreuzer, Kenneth N.

    2003-04-01

    The cytotoxicity of several important antitumor drugs depends on formation of the covalent topoisomerase-DNA cleavage complex. However, cellular processes such as DNA replication are necessary to convert the cleavage complex into a cytotoxic lesion, but the molecular mechanism of this conversion and the precise nature of the cytotoxic lesion are unknown. Using a bacteriophage T4 model system, we have previously shown that antitumor drug-induced cleavage complexes block replication forks in vivo. In this report, we show that these blocked forks can be cleaved by T4 endonuclease VII to create overt DNA breaks. The accumulation of blocked forks increased in endonuclease VII-deficient infections, suggesting that endonuclease cleavage contributes to fork processing in vivo. Furthermore, purified endonuclease VII cleaved the blocked forks in vitro close to the branch points. These results suggest that an indirect pathway of branched-DNA cleavage contributes to the cytotoxicity of antitumor drugs that target DNA topoisomerases.

  20. The N-Terminal Domain of the Arenavirus L Protein Is an RNA Endonuclease Essential in mRNA Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Benjamin; Coutard, Bruno; Lelke, Michaela; Ferron, François; Kerber, Romy; Jamal, Saïd; Frangeul, Antoine; Baronti, Cécile; Charrel, Rémi; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Vonrhein, Clemens; Lescar, Julien; Bricogne, Gérard; Günther, Stephan; Canard, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Arenaviridae synthesize viral mRNAs using short capped primers presumably acquired from cellular transcripts by a ‘cap-snatching’ mechanism. Here, we report the crystal structure and functional characterization of the N-terminal 196 residues (NL1) of the L protein from the prototypic arenavirus: lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. The NL1 domain is able to bind and cleave RNA. The 2.13 Å resolution crystal structure of NL1 reveals a type II endonuclease α/β architecture similar to the N-terminal end of the influenza virus PA protein. Superimposition of both structures, mutagenesis and reverse genetics studies reveal a unique spatial arrangement of key active site residues related to the PD…(D/E)XK type II endonuclease signature sequence. We show that this endonuclease domain is conserved and active across the virus families Arenaviridae, Bunyaviridae and Orthomyxoviridae and propose that the arenavirus NL1 domain is the Arenaviridae cap-snatching endonuclease. PMID:20862324

  1. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Mara, Leo M.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find an the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was was heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past.

  2. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Mara, L.M.

    1998-05-05

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find at the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was not heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past. 2 figs.

  3. The democratization of gene editing: Insights from site-specific cleavage and double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Jasin, Maria; Haber, James E

    2016-08-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are dangerous lesions that if not properly repaired can lead to genomic change or cell death. Organisms have developed several pathways and have many factors devoted to repairing DSBs, which broadly occurs by homologous recombination, which relies on an identical or homologous sequence to template repair, or nonhomologous end-joining. Much of our understanding of these repair mechanisms has come from the study of induced DNA cleavage by site-specific endonucleases. In addition to their biological role, these cellular pathways can be co-opted for gene editing to study gene function or for gene therapy or other applications. While the first gene editing experiments were done more than 20 years ago, the recent discovery of RNA-guided endonucleases has simplified approaches developed over the years to make gene editing an approach that is available to the entire biomedical research community. Here, we review DSB repair mechanisms and site-specific cleavage systems that have provided insight into these mechanisms and led to the current gene editing revolution.

  4. Genetic mapping of nth, a gene affecting endonuclease III (thymine glycol-DNA glycosylase) in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, B; Cunningham, R P

    1985-01-01

    The nth gene of Escherichia coli affects the production of endonuclease III, a glycosylase-endonuclease that attacks DNA damaged by oxidizing agents or by ionizing radiation. An nth insertion mutant and a deletion mutant were studied. nth is located between add and tyrS on the linkage map of E. coli K-12 and was 97% linked to tyrS in a transduction with phage P1. PMID:3886628

  5. Repair of nonreplicating UV-irradiated DNA: cooperative dark repair by Escherichia coli uvr and phr functions

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, J.B.; Martin, S.J.; Bhatia, K.

    1985-02-01

    The system previously used to study recombination of nonreplicating UV-irradiated phage lambda DNA was adapted to study UV repair. Irradiated phages infected undamaged homoimmune lysogens. Pyrimidine dimer content (by treatment with Micrococcus luteus UV endonuclease and alkaline sucrose sedimentation) and a biological activity endpoint (infectivity in transfection of uvrB recA recB spheroplasts) were followed. Unless room light was excluded during DNA extraction procedures, photoreactivation (Phr function) was significant. In uvr ..delta..phr bacteria, repair, by both assays, was very low but not zero. Even when light was totally excluded, Phr function appeared to play a role in Uvr-mediated excision repair: both dimer removal and restoration of infectivity were two to five times as efficient in uvr/sup +/ phr/sup +/ bacteria as in uvr/sup +/ ..delta..phr bacteria. Similarly, UV-irradiated phages plated with higher efficiencies on phr/sup +/ than ..delta..phr bacteria even under totally dark conditions. In uvr phr/sup +/ repressed infections, removal of dimers from nonreplicating DNA did not increase infectivity as much as in uvr2= infections, suggesting a requirement for repair of nondimer photoproducts by the uvrABC system.

  6. On the role of steric clashes in methylation control of restriction endonuclease activity

    PubMed Central

    Mierzejewska, Karolina; Bochtler, Matthias; Czapinska, Honorata

    2016-01-01

    Restriction-modification systems digest non-methylated invading DNA, while protecting host DNA against the endonuclease activity by methylation. It is widely believed that the methylated DNA would not ‘fit’ into the binding site of the endonuclease in the productive orientation, and thus steric clashes should account for most of the protection. We test this concept statistically by grafting methyl groups in silico onto non-methylated DNA in co-crystal structures with restriction endonucleases. Clash scores are significantly higher for protective than non-protective methylation (P < 0.05% according to the Wilcoxon rank sum test). Structural data alone are sufficient to distinguish between protective and non-protective DNA methylation with 90% confidence and decision thresholds of 1.1 Å and 48 Å3 for the most severe distance-based and cumulative volume-based clash with the protein, respectively (0.1 Å was deducted from each interatomic distance to allow for coordinate errors). The most severe clashes are more pronounced for protective methyl groups attached to the nitrogen atoms (N6-methyladenines and N4-methylcytosines) than for C5-methyl groups on cytosines. Cumulative clashes are comparable for all three types of protective methylation. PMID:26635397

  7. DNA REPAIR. Mus81 and converging forks limit the mutagenicity of replication fork breakage.

    PubMed

    Mayle, Ryan; Campbell, Ian M; Beck, Christine R; Yu, Yang; Wilson, Marenda; Shaw, Chad A; Bjergbaek, Lotte; Lupski, James R; Ira, Grzegorz

    2015-08-14

    Most spontaneous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) result from replication-fork breakage. Break-induced replication (BIR), a genome rearrangement-prone repair mechanism that requires the Pol32/POLD3 subunit of eukaryotic DNA Polδ, was proposed to repair broken forks, but how genome destabilization is avoided was unknown. We show that broken fork repair initially uses error-prone Pol32-dependent synthesis, but that mutagenic synthesis is limited to within a few kilobases from the break by Mus81 endonuclease and a converging fork. Mus81 suppresses template switches between both homologous sequences and diverged human Alu repetitive elements, highlighting its importance for stability of highly repetitive genomes. We propose that lack of a timely converging fork or Mus81 may propel genome instability observed in cancer.

  8. MRN, CtIP, and BRCA1 mediate repair of topoisomerase II-DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Tomas; Baer, Richard; Gottesman, Max; Gautier, Jean

    2016-02-15

    Repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) with complex ends poses a special challenge, as additional processing is required before DNA ligation. For example, protein-DNA adducts must be removed to allow repair by either nonhomologous end joining or homology-directed repair. Here, we investigated the processing of topoisomerase II (Top2)-DNA adducts induced by treatment with the chemotherapeutic agent etoposide. Through biochemical analysis in Xenopus laevis egg extracts, we establish that the MRN (Mre11, Rad50, and Nbs1) complex, CtIP, and BRCA1 are required for both the removal of Top2-DNA adducts and the subsequent resection of Top2-adducted DSB ends. Moreover, the interaction between CtIP and BRCA1, although dispensable for resection of endonuclease-generated DSB ends, is required for resection of Top2-adducted DSBs, as well as for cellular resistance to etoposide during genomic DNA replication.

  9. Marine enzymes.

    PubMed

    Debashish, Ghosh; Malay, Saha; Barindra, Sana; Joydeep, Mukherjee

    2005-01-01

    Marine enzyme biotechnology can offer novel biocatalysts with properties like high salt tolerance, hyperthermostability, barophilicity, cold adaptivity, and ease in large-scale cultivation. This review deals with the research and development work done on the occurrence, molecular biology, and bioprocessing of marine enzymes during the last decade. Exotic locations have been accessed for the search of novel enzymes. Scientists have isolated proteases and carbohydrases from deep sea hydrothermal vents. Cold active metabolic enzymes from psychrophilic marine microorganisms have received considerable research attention. Marine symbiont microorganisms growing in association with animals and plants were shown to produce enzymes of commercial interest. Microorganisms isolated from sediment and seawater have been the most widely studied, proteases, carbohydrases, and peroxidases being noteworthy. Enzymes from marine animals and plants were primarily studied for their metabolic roles, though proteases and peroxidases have found industrial applications. Novel techniques in molecular biology applied to assess the diversity of chitinases, nitrate, nitrite, ammonia-metabolizing, and pollutant-degrading enzymes are discussed. Genes encoding chitinases, proteases, and carbohydrases from microbial and animal sources have been cloned and characterized. Research on the bioprocessing of marine-derived enzymes, however, has been scanty, focusing mainly on the application of solid-state fermentation to the production of enzymes from microbial sources.

  10. Artemis is required to improve the accuracy of repair of double-strand breaks with 5'-blocked termini generated from non-DSB-clustered lesions.

    PubMed

    Malyarchuk, Svitlana; Castore, Reneau; Shi, Runhua; Harrison, Lynn

    2013-05-01

    Clustered DNA lesions are defined as ≥2 damage events within 20 bp. Oxidised bases, abasic (AP) sites, single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks (DSBs) exist in radiation-induced clusters, and these lesions are more difficult to repair and can be more mutagenic than single lesions. Understanding clustered lesion repair is therefore important for the design of complementary treatments to enhance radiotherapy. Non-DSB-clustered lesions consisting of opposing AP sites can be converted to DSBs by base excision repair, and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) plays a role in repairing these DSBs. Artemis is an endonuclease that removes blocking groups from DSB termini during NHEJ. Hence, we hypothesised that Artemis plays a role in the processing of DSBs or complex DSBs generated from non-DSB-clustered lesions. We examined the repair of clusters containing two or three lesions in wild-type (WT) or Artemis-deficient (ART(-/-)) mouse fibroblasts using a reporter plasmid. Each cluster contained two opposing tetrahydrofurans (an AP site analogue), which AP endonuclease can convert to a DSB with blocked 5' termini. Loss of Artemis did not decrease plasmid survival, but did result in more mutagenic repair with plasmids containing larger deletions. This increase in deletions did not occur with ClaI-linearised plasmid. Since Mre11 has been implicated in deletional NHEJ, we used small interfering RNA to reduce Mre11 in WT and ART(-/-) cells, but decreasing Mre11 did not change the size of deletions in the repair products. This work implicates Artemis in limiting the deletions introduced during repair of 5'-blocked termini DSBs generated from non-DSB-clustered lesions. Decreasing repair accuracy without decreasing repair capacity could result in mutated cells surviving irradiation. Inhibiting Artemis in normal cells could promote carcinogenesis, while in tumour cells enhanced mutagenic repair following irradiation could promote tumour recurrence.

  11. Robust homology-directed repair within mouse mammary tissue is not specifically affected by Brca2 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Kass, Elizabeth M.; Lim, Pei Xin; Helgadottir, Hildur R.; Moynahan, Mary Ellen; Jasin, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The mammary gland undergoes significant proliferative stages after birth, but little is known about how the developmental changes impact DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Mutations in multiple genes involved in homology-directed repair (HDR), considered a particularly accurate pathway for repairing DSBs, are linked to breast cancer susceptibility, including BRCA2. Using reporter mice that express an inducible endonuclease, we find that HDR is particularly robust in mammary tissue during puberty and pregnancy, accounting for 34–40% of detected repair events, more than in other tissues examined. Brca2 hypomorphic mutation leads to HDR defects in mammary epithelium during puberty and pregnancy, including in different epithelial lineages. Notably, a similar dependence on Brca2 is observed in other proliferative tissues, including small intestine epithelium. Our results suggest that the greater reliance on HDR in the proliferating mammary gland, rather than a specific dependence on BRCA2, may increase its susceptibility to tumorigenesis incurred by BRCA2 mutation. PMID:27779185

  12. Differential repair of DNA damage in specific nucleotide sequences in monkey cells.

    PubMed Central

    Leadon, S A

    1986-01-01

    An immunological method was developed that isolates DNA fragments containing bromouracil in repair patches from unrepaired DNA using a monoclonal antibody that recognizes bromouracil. Cultured monkey cells were exposed to either UV light or the activated carcinogen aflatoxin B1 and excision repair of damage in DNA fragments containing the integrated and transcribed E. coli gpt gene was compared to that in the genome overall. A more rapid repair, of both UV and AFB1 damage was observed in the DNA fragments containing the E. coli gpt genes. The more efficient repair of UV damage was not due to a difference in the initial level of pyrimidine dimers as determined with a specific UV endonuclease. Consistent with previous observations using different methodology, repair of UV damage in the alpha sequences was found to occur at the same rate as that in the genome overall, while repair of AFB1 damage was deficient in alpha DNA. The preferential repair of damage in the gpt gene may be related to the functional state of the sequence and/or to alterations produced in the chromatin conformation by the integration of plasmid sequences carrying the gene. Images PMID:3786142

  13. Inguinal hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... This repair can be done with open or laparoscopic surgery. You and your surgeon can discuss which type ... the repair, the cuts are stitched closed. In laparoscopic surgery: The surgeon makes three to five small cuts ...

  14. Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some hernia repairs are performed using a small telescope known as a laparoscope. If your surgeon has ... in the abdominal wall (muscle) using small incisions, telescopes and a patch (mesh). Laparoscopic repair offers a ...

  15. Collision Repair Campaign

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Collision Repair Campaign targets meaningful risk reduction in the Collision Repair source category to reduce air toxic emissions in their communities. The Campaign also helps shops to work towards early compliance with the Auto Body Rule.

  16. Genes and junk in plant mitochondria-repair mechanisms and selection.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Alan C

    2014-06-05

    Plant mitochondrial genomes have very low mutation rates. In contrast, they also rearrange and expand frequently. This is easily understood if DNA repair in genes is accomplished by accurate mechanisms, whereas less accurate mechanisms including nonhomologous end joining or break-induced replication are used in nongenes. An important question is how different mechanisms of repair predominate in coding and noncoding DNA, although one possible mechanism is transcription-coupled repair (TCR). This work tests the predictions of TCR and finds no support for it. Examination of the mutation spectra and rates in genes and junk reveals what DNA repair mechanisms are available to plant mitochondria, and what selective forces act on the repair products. A model is proposed that mismatches and other DNA damages are repaired by converting them into double-strand breaks (DSBs). These can then be repaired by any of the DSB repair mechanisms, both accurate and inaccurate. Natural selection will eliminate coding regions repaired by inaccurate mechanisms, accounting for the low mutation rates in genes, whereas mutations, rearrangements, and expansions generated by inaccurate repair in noncoding regions will persist. Support for this model includes the structure of the mitochondrial mutS homolog in plants, which is fused to a double-strand endonuclease. The model proposes that plant mitochondria do not distinguish a damaged or mismatched DNA strand from the undamaged strand, they simply cut both strands and perform homology-based DSB repair. This plant-specific strategy for protecting future generations from mitochondrial DNA damage has the side effect of genome expansions and rearrangements.

  17. Enzymes, Industrial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enzymes serve key roles in numerous biotechnology processes and products that are commonly encountered in the forms of food and beverages, cleaning supplies, clothing, paper products, transportation fuels, pharmaceuticals, and monitoring devices. Enzymes can display regio- and stereo-specificity, p...

  18. Nucleotide excision repair in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Van Houten, B

    1990-01-01

    One of the best-studied DNA repair pathways is nucleotide excision repair, a process consisting of DNA damage recognition, incision, excision, repair resynthesis, and DNA ligation. Escherichia coli has served as a model organism for the study of this process. Recently, many of the proteins that mediate E. coli nucleotide excision have been purified to homogeneity; this had led to a molecular description of this repair pathway. One of the key repair enzymes of this pathway is the UvrABC nuclease complex. The individual subunits of this enzyme cooperate in a complex series of partial reactions to bind to and incise the DNA near a damaged nucleotide. The UvrABC complex displays a remarkable substrate diversity. Defining the structural features of DNA lesions that provide the specificity for damage recognition by the UvrABC complex is of great importance, since it represents a unique form of protein-DNA interaction. Using a number of in vitro assays, researchers have been able to elucidate the action mechanism of the UvrABC nuclease complex. Current research is devoted to understanding how these complex events are mediated within the living cell. PMID:2181258

  19. Distribution of ions around thymine dimer containing DNA: A possible recognition element for endonuclease V

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, R.; Luo, N.; Miaskiewicz, K.; Miller, J.

    1995-10-01

    The molecular link between sunlight exposure and skin cancer can be traced to the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers together with (6-4) photoadducts of pyrimidines in DNA upon exposure to UV radiation. The mutagenicity of these lesions is frequently explained by miscoding during DNA replication due to perturbations of base-pairing interactions. However the mutagenicity of UV photoproducts depends of their sequence context, suggesting that more global structural changes in DNA contribute to mutation induction. One of the most effective protections against the deleterious effects of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers is the wide range of repair of this lesion by different enzymatic pathways. This paper presents the results of a 200 ps molecular dynamics simulation on the dodecarner d(CGCGAATTCGCG){sub 2} containing a cis, syn-cyclobutane thymine dimer, explicit water and counterions. The averaged structure calculated from the simulation shows good agreement with the available NMR data. The distribution of counterions around the damaged DNA is different from that around a non damaged DNA and suggests a possible mechanism of damage recognition by the enzyme.

  20. The phosphate clamp: sequence selective nucleic acid binding profiles and conformational induction of endonuclease inhibition by cationic Triplatin complexes

    PubMed Central

    Prisecaru, Andreea; Molphy, Zara; Kipping, Ralph G.; Peterson, Erica J.; Qu, Yun; Kellett, Andrew; Farrell, Nicholas P.

    2014-01-01

    The substitution-inert polynuclear platinum(II) complex (PPC) series, [{trans-Pt(NH3)2(NH2(CH2)nNH3)}2-μ-(trans-Pt(NH3)2(NH2(CH2)nNH2)2}](NO3)8, where n = 5 (AH78P), 6 (AH78 TriplatinNC) and 7 (AH78H), are potent non-covalent DNA binding agents where nucleic acid recognition is achieved through use of the ‘phosphate clamp' where the square-planar tetra-am(m)ine Pt(II) coordination units all form bidentate N–O–N complexes through hydrogen bonding with phosphate oxygens. The modular nature of PPC–DNA interactions results in high affinity for calf thymus DNA (Kapp ∼5 × 107 M−1). The phosphate clamp–DNA interactions result in condensation of superhelical and B-DNA, displacement of intercalated ethidium bromide and facilitate cooperative binding of Hoechst 33258 at the minor groove. The effect of linker chain length on DNA conformational changes was examined and the pentane-bridged complex, AH78P, was optimal for condensing DNA with results in the nanomolar region. Analysis of binding affinity and conformational changes for sequence-specific oligonucleotides by ITC, dialysis, ICP-MS, CD and 2D-1H NMR experiments indicate that two limiting modes of phosphate clamp binding can be distinguished through their conformational changes and strongly suggest that DNA condensation is driven by minor-groove spanning. Triplatin-DNA binding prevents endonuclease activity by type II restriction enzymes BamHI, EcoRI and SalI, and inhibition was confirmed through the development of an on-chip microfluidic protocol. PMID:25414347

  1. Base excision repair of oxidative DNA damage coupled with removal of a CAG repeat hairpin attenuates trinucleotide repeat expansion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Lai, Yanhao; Torner, Justin; Zhang, Yanbin; Zhang, Zunzhen; Liu, Yuan

    2014-04-01

    Trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion is responsible for numerous human neurodegenerative diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Recent studies have shown that DNA base excision repair (BER) can mediate TNR expansion and deletion by removing base lesions in different locations of a TNR tract, indicating that BER can promote or prevent TNR expansion in a damage location-dependent manner. In this study, we provide the first evidence that the repair of a DNA base lesion located in the loop region of a CAG repeat hairpin can remove the hairpin, attenuating repeat expansion. We found that an 8-oxoguanine located in the loop region of CAG hairpins of varying sizes was removed by OGG1 leaving an abasic site that was subsequently 5'-incised by AP endonuclease 1, introducing a single-strand breakage in the hairpin loop. This converted the hairpin into a double-flap intermediate with a 5'- and 3'-flap that was cleaved by flap endonuclease 1 and a 3'-5' endonuclease Mus81/Eme1, resulting in complete or partial removal of the CAG hairpin. This further resulted in prevention and attenuation of repeat expansion. Our results demonstrate that TNR expansion can be prevented via BER in hairpin loops that is coupled with the removal of TNR hairpins.

  2. Nucleotide excision repair pathway assessment in DNA exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, A S; Campos, V M A; Magalhães, L A G; Paoli, F

    2015-10-01

    Low-intensity lasers are used for prevention and management of oral mucositis induced by anticancer therapy, but the effectiveness of treatment depends on the genetic characteristics of affected cells. This study evaluated the survival and induction of filamentation of Escherichia coli cells deficient in the nucleotide excision repair pathway, and the action of T4endonuclease V on plasmid DNA exposed to low-intensity red and near-infrared laser light. Cultures of wild-type (strain AB1157) E. coli and strain AB1886 (deficient in uvrA protein) were exposed to red (660 nm) and infrared (808 nm) lasers at various fluences, powers and emission modes to study bacterial survival and filamentation. Also, plasmid DNA was exposed to laser light to study DNA lesions produced in vitro by T4endonuclease V. Low-intensity lasers:i) had no effect on survival of wild-type E. coli but decreased the survival of uvrA protein-deficient cells,ii) induced bacterial filamentation, iii) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids in agarose gels, andiv) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with T4 endonuclease V. These results increase our understanding of the effects of laser light on cells with various genetic characteristics, such as xeroderma pigmentosum cells deficient in nucleotide excision pathway activity in patients with mucositis treated by low-intensity lasers.

  3. Nucleotide excision repair pathway assessment in DNA exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, A.S.; Campos, V.M.A.; Magalhães, L.A.G.; Paoli, F.

    2015-01-01

    Low-intensity lasers are used for prevention and management of oral mucositis induced by anticancer therapy, but the effectiveness of treatment depends on the genetic characteristics of affected cells. This study evaluated the survival and induction of filamentation of Escherichia coli cells deficient in the nucleotide excision repair pathway, and the action of T4endonuclease V on plasmid DNA exposed to low-intensity red and near-infrared laser light. Cultures of wild-type (strain AB1157) E. coli and strain AB1886 (deficient in uvrA protein) were exposed to red (660 nm) and infrared (808 nm) lasers at various fluences, powers and emission modes to study bacterial survival and filamentation. Also, plasmid DNA was exposed to laser light to study DNA lesions produced in vitro by T4endonuclease V. Low-intensity lasers:i) had no effect on survival of wild-type E. coli but decreased the survival of uvrA protein-deficient cells,ii) induced bacterial filamentation, iii) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids in agarose gels, andiv) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with T4 endonuclease V. These results increase our understanding of the effects of laser light on cells with various genetic characteristics, such as xeroderma pigmentosum cells deficient in nucleotide excision pathway activity in patients with mucositis treated by low-intensity lasers. PMID:26445337

  4. Flap endonucleases pass 5'-flaps through a flexible arch using a disorder-thread-order mechanism to confer specificity for free 5'-ends.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nikesh; Atack, John M; Finger, L David; Exell, Jack C; Thompson, Peter; Tsutakawa, Susan; Tainer, John A; Williams, David M; Grasby, Jane A

    2012-05-01

    Flap endonucleases (FENs), essential for DNA replication and repair, recognize and remove RNA or DNA 5'-flaps. Related to FEN specificity for substrates with free 5'-ends, but controversial, is the role of the helical arch observed in varying conformations in substrate-free FEN structures. Conflicting models suggest either 5'-flaps thread through the arch, which when structured can only accommodate single-stranded (ss) DNA, or the arch acts as a clamp. Here we show that free 5'-termini are selected using a disorder-thread-order mechanism. Adding short duplexes to 5'-flaps or 3'-streptavidin does not markedly impair the FEN reaction. In contrast, reactions of 5'-streptavidin substrates are drastically slowed. However, when added to premixed FEN and 5'-biotinylated substrate, streptavidin is not inhibitory and complexes persist after challenge with unlabelled competitor substrate, regardless of flap length or the presence of a short duplex. Cross-linked flap duplexes that cannot thread through the structured arch react at modestly reduced rate, ruling out mechanisms involving resolution of secondary structure. Combined results explain how FEN avoids cutting template DNA between Okazaki fragments and link local FEN folding to catalysis and specificity: the arch is disordered when flaps are threaded to confer specificity for free 5'-ends, with subsequent ordering of the arch to catalyze hydrolysis.

  5. Recombinant plasmids for encoding restriction enzymes DpnI and DpnII of streptococcus pneumontae

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1990-01-01

    Chromosomal DNA cassettes containing genes encoding either the DpnI or DpnII restriction endonucleases from Streptococcus pneumoniae are cloned into a streptococcal vector, pLS101. Large amounts of the restriction enzymes are produced by cells containing the multicopy plasmids, pLS202 and pLS207, and their derivatives pLS201, pLS211, pLS217, pLS251 and pLS252.

  6. Recombinant plasmids for encoding restriction enzymes DpnI and DpnII of Streptococcus pneumontae

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.

    1990-10-02

    Chromosomal DNA cassettes containing genes encoding either the DpnI or DpnII restriction endonucleases from Streptococcus pneumoniae are cloned into a streptococcal vector, pLS101. Large amounts of the restriction enzymes are produced by cells containing the multicopy plasmids, pLS202 and pLS207, and their derivatives pLS201, pLS211, pLS217, pLS251 and pLS252. 9 figs.

  7. Expansion of CAG triplet repeats by human DNA polymerases λ and β in vitro, is regulated by flap endonuclease 1 and DNA ligase 1.

    PubMed

    Crespan, Emmanuele; Hübscher, Ulrich; Maga, Giovanni

    2015-05-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurological genetic disorder caused by the expansion of the CAG trinucleotide repeats (TNR) in the N-terminal region of coding sequence of the Huntingtin's (HTT) gene. This results in the addition of a poly-glutamine tract within the Huntingtin protein, resulting in its pathological form. The mechanism by which TRN expansion takes place is not yet fully understood. We have recently shown that DNA polymerase (Pol) β can promote the microhomology-mediated end joining and triplet expansion of a substrate mimicking a double strand break in the TNR region of the HTT gene. Here we show that TNR expansion is dependent on the structure of the DNA substrate, as well as on the two essential Pol β co-factors: flap endonuclease 1 (Fen1) and DNA ligase 1 (Lig1). We found that Fen1 significantly stimulated TNR expansion by Pol β, but not by the related enzyme Pol λ, and subsequent ligation of the DNA products by Lig1. Interestingly, the deletion of N-terminal domains of Pol λ, resulted in an enzyme which displayed properties more similar to Pol β, suggesting a possible evolutionary mechanism. These results may suggest a novel mechanism for somatic TNR expansion in HD.

  8. Cae I: an endonuclease isolated from the African green monkey with properties indicating site-specific cleavage of homologous and heterologous mammalian DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, F L; Musich, P R; Maio, J J

    1978-01-01

    Component alpha DNA is a highly repetitive sequence that comprises nearly a quarter of the African green monkey (Cercopithecus aethiops) genome. A previous microbial restriction enzyme analysis showed that the repeat structure of component alpha DNA is based upon a monomeric unit of 176 +/- 4 base-pairs. An endonuclease, provisionally termed Case I, has been isolated from African green monkey testes that cleaves component alpha DNA into multimeric segments based upon the same repeat periodicity as that revealed by microbial restriction enzymes. The primary sites of Cae I cleavage in the component alpha sequence appear to be 120 +/- 6 base-pairs distant from the Hind III sites and 73 +/- 6 base-pairs distant from the Eco RI* sites. Cae I has been partially characterized with special reference to the effects of ATP and S-adenosylmethionine on the cleavage of component alpha DNA. Cae I may be a member of a class of similar site-specific nucleases present in mammalian cells. Cae I also cleaves mouse satellite DNA into a multimeric series of discrete segments: the periodicity of this series is shorter than that revealed by Eco RII retriction analysis of mouse satellite DNA. Images PMID:206873

  9. Base excision repair: A critical player in many games

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Susan S.

    2014-01-01

    This perspective reviews the many dimensions of base excision repair from a 10,000 foot vantage point and provides one person’s view on where the field is headed. Enzyme function is considered under the lens of X-ray diffraction and single molecule studies. Base excision repair in chromatin and telomeres, regulation of expression and the role of posttranslational modifications are also discussed in the context of enzyme activities, cellular localization and interacting partners. The specialized roles that base excision repair play in transcriptional activation by active demethylation and targeted oxidation as well as how base excision repair functions in the immune processes of somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination and its possible involvement in retroviral infection are also discussed. Finally the complexities of oxidative damage and its repair and its link to neurodegenerative disorders, as well as the role of base excision repair as a tumor suppressor are examined in the context of damage, repair and aging. By outlining the many base excision repair-related mysteries that have yet to be unraveled, hopefully this perspective will stimulate further interest in the field. PMID:24780558

  10. A stimulatory RNA associated with RecBCD enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, S K; Taylor, A F; Smith, G R

    1998-01-01

    RecBCD enzyme acts in the major pathway of homologous recombination of linear DNA in Escherichia coli. The enzyme unwinds DNA and is an ATP-dependent double-strand and single-strand exonuclease and a single-strand endonuclease; it acts at Chi recombination hotspots (5'-GCTGGTGG-3') to produce a recombinogenic single-stranded DNA 3'-end. We found that a small RNA with a unique sequence of approximately 24 nt was tightly bound to RecBCD enzyme and co-purified with it. When added to native enzyme this RNA, but not four others, increased DNA unwinding and Chi nicking activities of the enzyme. In seven similarly active enzyme preparations the molar ratio of RNA molecules to RecBCD enzyme molecules ranged from 0.2 to <0.008. These results suggest that, although this unique RNA is not an essential enzyme subunit, it has a biological role in stimulating RecBCD enzyme activity. PMID:9547270

  11. Flow Cytometric Assays for Interrogating LAGLIDADG Homing Endonuclease DNA-Binding and Cleavage Properties

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Sarah K.; Lambert, Abigail R.; Scharenberg, Andrew M.; Jarjour, Jordan

    2014-01-01

    A fast, easy, and scalable method to assess the properties of site-specific nucleases is crucial to understanding their in cellulo behavior in genome engineering or population-level gene drive applications. Here we describe an analytical platform that enables high-throughput, semiquantitative interrogation of the DNA-binding and catalytic properties of LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases (LHEs). Using this platform, natural or engineered LHEs are expressed on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast where they can be rapidly evaluated against synthetic DNA target sequences using flow cytometry. PMID:23423888

  12. PARP-mediated repair, homologous recombination, and back-up non-homologous end joining-like repair of single-strand nicks.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Michael J; Stoddard, Barry L; Monnat, Raymond J

    2013-07-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) in chromosomal DNA can induce both homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Recently we showed that single-strand nicks induce HR with a significant reduction in toxicity and mutagenic effects associated with NHEJ. To further investigate the differences and similarities of DSB- and nick-induced repair, we used an integrated reporter system in human cells to measure HR and NHEJ produced by the homing endonuclease I-AniI and a designed 'nickase' variant that nicks the same target site, focusing on the PARP and HR repair pathways. PARP inhibitors, which block single-strand break repair, increased the rate of nick-induced HR up to 1.7-fold but did not affect DSB-induced HR or mutNHEJ. Additionally, expression of the PALB2 WD40 domain in trans acted as a dominant-negative inhibitor of both DSB- and nick-induced HR, sensitized cells to PARP inhibition, and revealed an alternative mutagenic repair pathway for nicks. Thus, while both DSB- and nick-induced HR use a common pathway, their substrates are differentially processed by cellular factors. These results also suggest that the synthetic lethality of PARP and BRCA may be due to repair of nicks through an error prone, NHEJ-like mechanism that is active when both PARP and HR pathways are blocked.

  13. Identification of potential influenza virus endonuclease inhibitors through virtual screening based on the 3D-QSAR model.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Lee, C; Chong, Y

    2009-01-01

    Influenza endonucleases have appeared as an attractive target of antiviral therapy for influenza infection. With the purpose of designing a novel antiviral agent with enhanced biological activities against influenza endonuclease, a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (3D-QSAR) model was generated based on 34 influenza endonuclease inhibitors. The comparative molecular similarity index analysis (CoMSIA) with a steric, electrostatic and hydrophobic (SEH) model showed the best correlative and predictive capability (q(2) = 0.763, r(2) = 0.969 and F = 174.785), which provided a pharmacophore composed of the electronegative moiety as well as the bulky hydrophobic group. The CoMSIA model was used as a pharmacophore query in the UNITY search of the ChemDiv compound library to give virtual active compounds. The 3D-QSAR model was then used to predict the activity of the selected compounds, which identified three compounds as the most likely inhibitor candidates.

  14. Retinal detachment repair

    MedlinePlus

    Scleral buckling; Vitrectomy; Pneumatic retinopexy; Laser retinopexy; Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment repair ... it meets the hole in the retina. Scleral buckling can be done using numbing medicine while you ...

  15. EENdb: a database and knowledge base of ZFNs and TALENs for endonuclease engineering.

    PubMed

    Xiao, An; Wu, Yingdan; Yang, Zhipeng; Hu, Yingying; Wang, Weiye; Zhang, Yutian; Kong, Lei; Gao, Ge; Zhu, Zuoyan; Lin, Shuo; Zhang, Bo

    2013-01-01

    We report here the construction of engineered endonuclease database (EENdb) (http://eendb.zfgenetics.org/), a searchable database and knowledge base for customizable engineered endonucleases (EENs), including zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). EENs are artificial nucleases designed to target and cleave specific DNA sequences. EENs have been shown to be a very useful genetic tool for targeted genome modification and have shown great potentials in the applications in basic research, clinical therapies and agricultural utilities, and they are specifically essential for reverse genetics research in species where no other gene targeting techniques are available. EENdb contains over 700 records of all the reported ZFNs and TALENs and related information, such as their target sequences, the peptide components [zinc finger protein-/transcription activator-like effector (TALE)-binding domains, FokI variants and linker peptide/framework], the efficiency and specificity of their activities. The database also lists EEN engineering tools and resources as well as information about forms and types of EENs, EEN screening and construction methods, detection methods for targeting efficiency and many other utilities. The aim of EENdb is to represent a central hub for EEN information and an integrated solution for EEN engineering. These studies may help to extract in-depth properties and common rules regarding ZFN or TALEN efficiency through comparison of the known ZFNs or TALENs.

  16. Polyadenylation factor CPSF-73 is the pre-mRNA 3’-end processing endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Corey R.; Kaneko, Syuzo; Zhang, Hailong; Gebauer, Damara; Vethantham, Vasupradha; Manley, James L.; Tong, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Most eukaryotic messenger RNA precursors (pre-mRNAs) undergo extensive maturational processing, including 3’-end cleavage and polyadenylation1–8. Despite the characterization of a large number of proteins that are required for the cleavage reaction, the identity of the endoribonuclease is not known4,9,10. Recent analyses suggested that the 73 kD subunit of cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF-73) may be the endonuclease for this and related reactions10–15, although no direct data confirmed this. Here we report the crystal structures of human CPSF-73 at 2.1 Å resolution, complexed with zinc ions and a sulfate that may mimic the phosphate group of the substrate, and the related yeast protein CPSF-100 (Ydh1p) at 2.5 Å resolution. Both CPSF-73 and CPSF-100 contain two domains, a metallo-β-lactamase domain and a novel β-CASP domain. The activ