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Sample records for repair genes predispose

  1. Germline mutations in DNA repair genes predispose asbestos-exposed patients to malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Betti, Marta; Casalone, Elisabetta; Ferrante, Daniela; Aspesi, Anna; Morleo, Giulia; Biasi, Alessandra; Sculco, Marika; Mancuso, Giuseppe; Guarrera, Simonetta; Righi, Luisella; Grosso, Federica; Libener, Roberta; Pavesi, Mansueto; Mariani, Narciso; Casadio, Caterina; Boldorini, Renzo; Mirabelli, Dario; Pasini, Barbara; Magnani, Corrado; Matullo, Giuseppe; Dianzani, Irma

    2017-10-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare, aggressive cancer caused by asbestos exposure. An inherited predisposition has been suggested to explain multiple cases in the same family and the observation that not all individuals highly exposed to asbestos develop the tumor. Germline mutations in BAP1 are responsible for a rare cancer predisposition syndrome that includes predisposition to mesothelioma. We hypothesized that other genes involved in hereditary cancer syndromes could be responsible for the inherited mesothelioma predisposition. We investigated the prevalence of germline variants in 94 cancer-predisposing genes in 93 MPM patients with a quantified asbestos exposure. Ten pathogenic truncating variants (PTVs) were identified in PALB2, BRCA1, FANCI, ATM, SLX4, BRCA2, FANCC, FANCF, PMS1 and XPC. All these genes are involved in DNA repair pathways, mostly in homologous recombination repair. Patients carrying PTVs represented 9.7% of the panel and showed lower asbestos exposure than did all the other patients (p = 0.0015). This suggests that they did not efficiently repair the DNA damage induced by asbestos and leading to carcinogenesis. This study shows that germline variants in several genes may increase MPM susceptibility in the presence of asbestos exposure and may be important for specific treatment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Genomic scan for genes predisposing to schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, H.; Jensen. S.; Holik, J.

    1994-03-15

    We initiated a genome-wide search for genes predisposing to schizophrenia by ascertaining 9 families, each containing three to five cases of schizophrenia. The 9 pedigrees were initially genotyped with 329 polymorphic DNA loci distributed throughout the genome. Assuming either autosomal dominant or recessive inheritance, 254 DNA loci yielded lod scores less than -2.0 at {theta} = 0.0, 101 DNA markers gave lod scores less than -2.0 at {theta} = 0.05, while 5 DNA loci produced maximum lod scores greater than 1: D4S35, D14S17, D15S1, D22S84, and D22S55. Of the DNA markers yielding lod scores greater than 1, D4S35 and D22S55 also were suggestive of linkage when the Affected-Pedigree-Member method was used. The families were then genotyped with four highly polymorphic simple sequence repeat markers; possible linkage diminished with DNA markers mapping nearby D4S35, while suggestive evidence of linkage remained with loci in the region of D22S55. Although follow-up investigation of these chromosomal regions may be warranted, our linkage results should be viewed as preliminary observations, as 35 unaffected persons are not past the age of risk. 90 refs., 3 tabs.

  3. Incidence and predisposing factors of cold intolerance after arterial repair in upper extremity injuries.

    PubMed

    Klocker, Josef; Peter, Tobias; Pellegrini, Lukas; Mattesich, Monika; Loescher, Wolfgang; Sieb, Michael; Klein-Weigel, Peter; Fraedrich, Gustav

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this report was to present abnormal posttraumatic cold intolerance in patients that previously underwent repair of arterial injuries after civilian upper limb trauma in our institution. All patients who underwent repair of arterial lesions after upper limb trauma since 1990 were reviewed, and clinical follow-up studies were performed. Patients were asked to complete the cold intolerance symptom severity (CISS) questionnaire to evaluate presence and severity of self-reported cold sensitivity, and the disabilities of arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) questionnaire to analyze functional disability. Abnormal cold intolerance was defined as a CISS score over 30. Further analysis included evaluation of epidemiologic, clinical, and perioperative data for factors predisposing to abnormal cold intolerance. A total of 87 patients with previous repair of upper limb arterial injuries were eligible to answer the CISS and DASH questionnaires, and 56 patients (64%; 43 men; median age: 31.9 years) completed both. In our cohort, blunt trauma was the predominant cause of injury (n = 50; 89%). Accompanying lesions of nerves (n = 22; 39%) and/or orthopedic injuries (n = 36; 64%) were present in 48 patients (86%). After a median follow-up period of 5.5 years (range, 0.5-19.7), 23 patients (41% of 56) reported on abnormal cold intolerance. Patients with cold intolerance had worse functional results (as measured by the DASH questionnaire; mean ± SD, 42.7 ± 29.7 vs 11.5 ± 23.9; P < .001) when compared with patients without. Cold intolerance was more frequently seen in patients with previous nerve lesion (P = .027) and in proximal injuries (subclavian or axillary vs brachial or forearm arteries: P = .006), but was not correlated to gender, age, involvement of the dominant or nondominant arm, and the presence of ischemia, bone injury, or an isolated vascular injury. Abnormal cold intolerance is frequently seen in patients with a history of arterial repair in upper limb trauma

  4. Mutations in Cockayne Syndrome-Associated Genes (Csa and Csb) Predispose to Cisplatin-Induced Hearing Loss in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rainey, Robert N.; Ng, Sum-yan; Llamas, Juan; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is a common and effective chemotherapeutic agent, yet it often causes permanent hearing loss as a result of sensory hair cell death. The causes of sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents in nondividing cell populations, such as cochlear hair and supporting cells, are poorly understood, as are the specific DNA repair pathways that protect these cells. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a conserved and versatile DNA repair pathway for many DNA-distorting lesions, including cisplatin-DNA adducts. Progressive sensorineural hearing loss is observed in a subset of NER-associated DNA repair disorders including Cockayne syndrome and some forms of xeroderma pigmentosum. We investigated whether either of the two overlapping branches that encompass NER, transcription-coupled repair or global genome repair, which are implicated in Cockayne syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum group C, respectively, modulates cisplatin-induced hearing loss and cell death in the organ of Corti, the auditory sensory epithelium of mammals. We report that cochlear hair cells and supporting cells in transcription-coupled repair-deficient Cockayne syndrome group A (Csa−/−) and group B (Csb−/−) mice are hypersensitive to cisplatin, in contrast to global genome repair-deficient Xpc−/− mice, both in vitro and in vivo. We show that sensory hair cells in Csa−/− and Csb−/− mice fail to remove cisplatin-DNA adducts efficiently in vitro; and unlike Xpc−/− mice, Csa−/− and Csb−/− mice lose hearing and manifest outer hair cell degeneration after systemic cisplatin treatment. Our results demonstrate that Csa and Csb deficiencies predispose to cisplatin-induced hearing loss and hair/supporting cell damage in the mammalian organ of Corti, and emphasize the importance of transcription-coupled DNA repair in the protection against cisplatin ototoxicity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The utility of cisplatin in chemotherapy remains limited due to serious side effects, including

  5. Regional genomic instability predisposes to complex dystrophin gene rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Junko; Magner, Daniel B; Lee, Jennifer A; Breman, Amy M; Schmitt, Eric S; White, Lisa D; Crowe, Carol A; Merrill, Michelle; Jayakar, Parul; Rajadhyaksha, Aparna; Eng, Christine M; del Gaudio, Daniela

    2009-09-01

    Mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD) cause Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies and the majority of cases are due to DMD gene rearrangements. Despite the high incidence of these aberrations, little is known about their causative molecular mechanism(s). We examined 792 DMD/BMD clinical samples by oligonucleotide array-CGH and report on the junction sequence analysis of 15 unique deletion cases and three complex intragenic rearrangements to elucidate potential underlying mechanism(s). Furthermore, we present three cases with intergenic rearrangements involving DMD and neighboring loci. The cases with intragenic rearrangements include an inversion with flanking deleted sequences; a duplicated segment inserted in direct orientation into a deleted region; and a splicing mutation adjacent to a deletion. Bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that 7 of 12 breakpoints combined among 3 complex cases aligned with repetitive sequences, as compared to 4 of 30 breakpoints for the 15 deletion cases. Moreover, the inversion/deletion case may involve a stem-loop structure that has contributed to the initiation of this rearrangement. For the duplication/deletion and splicing mutation/deletion cases, the presence of the first mutation, either a duplication or point mutation, may have elicited the deletion events in an attempt to correct preexisting mutations. While NHEJ is one potential mechanism for these complex rearrangements, the highly complex junction sequence of the inversion/deletion case suggests the involvement of a replication-based mechanism. Our results support the notion that regional genomic instability, aided by the presence of repetitive elements, a stem-loop structure, and possibly preexisting mutations, may elicit complex rearrangements of the DMD gene.

  6. Human DNA repair and recombination genes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Jones, N.J.

    1988-09-01

    Several genes involved in mammalian DNA repair pathways were identified by complementation analysis and chromosomal mapping based on hybrid cells. Eight complementation groups of rodent mutants defective in the repair of uv radiation damage are now identified. At least seven of these genes are probably essential for repair and at least six of them control the incision step. The many genes required for repair of DNA cross-linking damage show overlap with those involved in the repair of uv damage, but some of these genes appear to be unique for cross-link repair. Two genes residing on human chromosome 19 were cloned from genomic transformants using a cosmid vector, and near full-length cDNA clones of each gene were isolated and sequenced. Gene ERCC2 efficiently corrects the defect in CHO UV5, a nucleotide excision repair mutant. Gene XRCC1 normalizes repair of strand breaks and the excessive sister chromatid exchange in CHO mutant EM9. ERCC2 shows a remarkable /approximately/52% overall homology at both the amino acid and nucleotide levels with the yeast RAD3 gene. Evidence based on mutation induction frequencies suggests that ERCC2, like RAD3, might also be an essential gene for viability. 100 refs., 4 tabs.

  7. Variation in Telangiectasia Predisposing Genes Is Associated With Overall Radiation Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Tanteles, George A.; Murray, Robert J.S.; Mills, Jamie; Barwell, Julian; Chakraborti, Prabir; Chan, Steve; Cheung, Kwok-Leung; Ennis, Dawn; Khurshid, Nazish; Lambert, Kelly; Machhar, Rohan; Meisuria, Mitul; Osman, Ahmed; Peat, Irene; Sahota, Harjinder; Woodings, Pamela; Talbot, Christopher J.; and others

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: In patients receiving radiotherapy for breast cancer where the heart is within the radiation field, cutaneous telangiectasiae could be a marker of potential radiation-induced heart disease. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes known to cause heritable telangiectasia-associated disorders could predispose to such late, normal tissue vascular damage. Methods and Materials: The relationship between cutaneous telangiectasia as a late normal tissue radiation injury phenotype in 633 breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy was examined. Patients were clinically assessed for the presence of cutaneous telangiectasia and genotyped at nine SNPs in three candidate genes. Candidate SNPs were within the endoglin (ENG) and activin A receptor, type II-like 1 (ACVRL1) genes, mutations in which cause hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene associated with ataxia-telangiectasia. Results: A total of 121 (19.1%) patients exhibited a degree of cutaneous telangiectasiae on clinical examination. Regression was used to examine the associations between the presence of telangiectasiae in patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery, controlling for the effects of boost and known brassiere size (n=388), and individual geno- or haplotypes. Inheritance of ACVRL1 SNPs marginally contributed to the risk of cutaneous telangiectasiae. Haplotypic analysis revealed a stronger association between inheritance of a ATM haplotype and the presence of cutaneous telangiectasiae, fibrosis and overall toxicity. No significant association was observed between telangiectasiae and the coinheritance of the candidate ENG SNPs. Conclusions: Genetic variation in the ATM gene influences reaction to radiotherapy through both vascular damage and increased fibrosis. The predisposing variation in the ATM gene will need to be better defined to optimize it as a predictive marker for assessing radiotherapy late effects.

  8. Preferential DNA repair in expressed genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hanawalt, P.C.

    1987-12-01

    Potentially deleterious alterations to DNA occur nonrandomly within the mammalian genome. These alterations include the adducts produced by many chemical carcinogens, but not the UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer, which may be an exception. Recent studies in our laboratory have shown that the excision repair of pyrimidine dimers and certain other lesions is nonrandom in the mammalian genome, exhibiting a distinct preference for actively transcribed DNA sequences. An important consequence of this fact is that mutagenesis and carcinogenesis may be determined in part by the activities of the relevant genes. Repair may also be processive, and a model is proposed in which excision repair is coupled to transcription at the nuclear matrix. Similar but freely diffusing repair complexes may account for the lower overall repair efficiencies in the silent domains of the genome. Risk assessment in relations to chemical carcinogenesis requires assays that determine effective levels of DNA damage for producing malignancy. The existence of nonrandom repair in the genome casts into doubt the reliability of overall indicators of DNA binding and lesion repair for such determinations. Furthermore, some apparent differences between the intragenomic repair heterogeneity in rodent cells and that in human cells mandate a reevaluation of rodent test systems for human risk assessment. Tissue-specific and cell-specific differences in the coordinate regulation of gene expression and DNA repair may account for corresponding differences in the carcinogenic response.

  9. A cancer-predisposing "hot spot" mutation of the fumarase gene creates a dominant negative protein.

    PubMed

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Olivero, Martina; Perro, Mario; Brière, Jean Jacques; Rustin, Pierre; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2008-02-15

    The Fumarase (Fumarate Hydratase, FH) is a tumor suppressor gene whose germline heterozygous mutations predispose to hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC). The FH gene encodes an enzyme of the Krebs cycle, functioning as a homotetramer and catalyzing the hydration of fumarate to malate. Among the numerous FH mutations reported so far, the R190H missense mutation is the most frequent in HLRCC patients. Here we show the functional analyses of the R190H, in comparison to the better characterized E319Q mutation. We first expressed wild-type and mutated proteins in FH deficient human skin fibroblasts, using lentiviral vectors. The wild-type transgene was able to restore the FH enzymatic activity in cells, while the R190H- and E319Q-FH were not. More interestingly, when the same transgenes were expressed in normal, FH-proficient cells, only the R190H-FH reduced the endogenous FH enzymatic activity. By enforcing the expression of equal amount of wild-type and R190H-FH in the same cell, we showed that the mutated FH protein directly inhibited enzymatic activity by nearly abrogating the FH homotetramer formation. These data demonstrate the dominant negative effect of the R190H missense mutation in the FH gene and suggest that the FH tumor-suppressing activity might be impaired in cells carrying a heterozygous mutation.

  10. DNA repair genes in the Megavirales pangenome.

    PubMed

    Blanc-Mathieu, Romain; Ogata, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The order 'Megavirales' represents a group of eukaryotic viruses with a large genome encoding a few hundred up to two thousand five hundred genes. Several members of Megavirales possess genes involved in major DNA repair pathways. Some of these genes were likely inherited from an ancient virus world and some others were derived from the genomes of their hosts. Here we examine molecular phylogenies of key DNA repair enzymes in light of recent hypotheses on the origin of Megavirales, and propose that the last common ancestors of the individual families of the order Megavirales already possessed DNA repair functions to achieve and maintain a moderately large genome and that this repair capacity gradually increased, in a family-dependent manner, during their recent evolution.

  11. Suboptimal DNA repair capacity predisposes coke-oven workers to accumulate more chromosomal damages in peripheral lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Juan; Leng, Shuguang; Li, Haishan; Huang, Chuanfeng; Niu, Yong; Zhang, Linyuan; Liang, Xuemiao; Lin, Han; Zheng, Yuxin

    2009-03-01

    DNA repair is an essential mechanism for cells to maintain their genomic integrity under endogenous or exogenous assault. Reduced DNA repair capacity (DRC) is associated with increased risk for several environmentally related cancers. The micronucleus in peripheral lymphocytes has been validated as a biomarker of chromosomal damage, increasing cancer risk in human populations. We hypothesized that suboptimal DRC is associated with the increase in chromosomal damage among 94 coke-oven workers and 64 noncoke-oven controls. DRC was evaluated in isolated lymphocytes by comet assay. Chromosomal damage in peripheral lymphocytes was detected by cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. Four common coding single nucleotide polymorphisms in the XRCC1 gene were genotyped. Coke-oven workers have significantly increased urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (9.0; 6.8-11.7 microg/L versus 1.5, 1.3-1.7 microg/L; P<0.01) and micronucleus frequency (7.4 per thousand+/-4.3 per thousand versus 3.0 per thousand+/-3.0 per thousand; P<0.01), and decreased DRC (55.9%+/-16.4% versus 63.6%+/-18.5%; P<0.01) compared with controls. Significant correlations between DRC and micronucleus frequency were found in coke-oven workers (r=-0.32; P<0.01; n = 94) and all study subjects (r=-0.32; P<0.001; n=158) but not in controls (r=-0.21; P=0.11; n=64). Variants of the Arg399Gln polymorphism were associated with a decreased DRC in both coke-oven workers (51.6%+/-16.1% versus 60.6%+/-15.7%; P<0.01) and controls (59.1%+/-18.5% versus 68.4%+/-17.5%; P=0.04). The complicated interrelationship of these multiple biomarkers was also identified by path analysis. These findings should facilitate developing a biomarker-based risk assessment model for lung cancer in this occupational population.

  12. Transactivation of repair genes by BRCA1.

    PubMed

    El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies have identified a link between the BRCA1 tumor suppressor and transcriptional regulation of a group of genes involved in nucleotide excision repair. There is some controversy regarding the precise mechanism of upregulation of XPE DDB2 or XPC by BRCA1, with some evidence suggesting that p53 is involved in their regulation. Some evidence suggests BRCA1 may stabilize p53 and direct regulation of DNA repair genes, although how BRCA1 stabilizes p53 remains unclear and whether BRCA1 can upregulate DNA repair genes in a p53-independent manner remains a possibility. A transcriptional component to the action of BRCA1 and involvement of XP genes brings up new and interesting questions about breast cancer development and therapy.

  13. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase δ gene mutation predisposes to respiratory infection and airway damage

    PubMed Central

    Angulo, Ivan; Vadas, Oscar; Garçon, Fabien; Banham-Hall, Edward; Plagnol, Vincent; Leahy, Timothy R.; Baxendale, Helen; Coulter, Tanya; Curtis, James; Wu, Changxin; Blake-Palmer, Katherine; Perisic, Olga; Smyth, Deborah; Maes, Mailis; Fiddler, Christine; Juss, Jatinder; Cilliers, Deirdre; Markelj, Gašper; Chandra, Anita; Farmer, George; Kielkowska, Anna; Clark, Jonathan; Kracker, Sven; Debré, Marianne; Picard, Capucine; Pellier, Isabelle; Jabado, Nada; Morris, James A.; Barcenas-Morales, Gabriela; Fischer, Alain; Stephens, Len; Hawkins, Phillip; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Abinun, Mario; Clatworthy, Menna; Durandy, Anne; Doffinger, Rainer; Chilvers, Edwin; Cant, Andrew J.; Kumararatne, Dinakantha; Okkenhaug, Klaus; Williams, Roger L.; Condliffe, Alison; Nejentsev, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations cause primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs), which predispose to infections. Here we describe Activated PI3K-δ Syndrome (APDS), a PID associated with a dominant gain-of-function mutation E1021K in the p110δ protein, the catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase δ (PI3Kδ), encoded by the PIK3CD gene. We found E1021K in 17 patients from seven unrelated families, but not among 3,346 healthy subjects. APDS was characterized by recurrent respiratory infections, progressive airway damage, lymphopenia, increased circulating transitional B cells, increased IgM and reduced IgG2 levels in serum and impaired vaccine responses. The E1021K mutation enhanced membrane association and kinase activity of p110δ. Patient-derived lymphocytes had increased levels of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate and phosphorylated AKT protein and were prone to activation-induced cell death. Selective p110δ inhibitors IC87114 and GS-1101 reduced the activity of the mutant enzyme in vitro, suggesting a therapeutic approach for patients with APDS. PMID:24136356

  14. A common variant in the FTO gene is associated with body mass index and predisposes to childhood and adult obesity.

    PubMed

    Frayling, Timothy M; Timpson, Nicholas J; Weedon, Michael N; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Freathy, Rachel M; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Perry, John R B; Elliott, Katherine S; Lango, Hana; Rayner, Nigel W; Shields, Beverley; Harries, Lorna W; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Ellard, Sian; Groves, Christopher J; Knight, Bridget; Patch, Ann-Marie; Ness, Andrew R; Ebrahim, Shah; Lawlor, Debbie A; Ring, Susan M; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Sovio, Ulla; Bennett, Amanda J; Melzer, David; Ferrucci, Luigi; Loos, Ruth J F; Barroso, Inês; Wareham, Nicholas J; Karpe, Fredrik; Owen, Katharine R; Cardon, Lon R; Walker, Mark; Hitman, Graham A; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Morris, Andrew D; Smith, George Davey; Hattersley, Andrew T; McCarthy, Mark I

    2007-05-11

    Obesity is a serious international health problem that increases the risk of several common diseases. The genetic factors predisposing to obesity are poorly understood. A genome-wide search for type 2 diabetes-susceptibility genes identified a common variant in the FTO (fat mass and obesity associated) gene that predisposes to diabetes through an effect on body mass index (BMI). An additive association of the variant with BMI was replicated in 13 cohorts with 38,759 participants. The 16% of adults who are homozygous for the risk allele weighed about 3 kilograms more and had 1.67-fold increased odds of obesity when compared with those not inheriting a risk allele. This association was observed from age 7 years upward and reflects a specific increase in fat mass.

  15. Gene Therapy for Fracture Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    chemotactic factor for human mast cells. J. Immunol. 153: 3717-3723. 36 41. Ono I, Yamashita T, Hida T, Jin HY, Ito Y, Hamada H, Akasaka Y, Ishii T...1994;153:3717–23. [37] Ono I, Yamashita T, Hida T, Jin HY, Ito Y, Hamada H, et al. Local administration of hepatocyte growth factor gene enhances the

  16. Gene Therapy for Fracture Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    relative transgene expression efficiencies for the MLV-based and lentiviral-based vectors, the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP) was used as...for both Cy3 and Cy5 2,-15i Hybridized to to Aigilent Rat -s 2-- Gene Chip - iGnTrr. . tea 2 ug universal RNAw silx sl59 (?es) Cy310-0 (control) 1...fractures were also examined at sacrifice for evidence of fibrosis due to irritation or migration of the stabilizing pin. None was observed and the fracture

  17. Frequency of 3' VNTR Polymorphism in the Dopamine Transporter Gene SLC6A3 in Humans Predisposed to Antisocial Behavior.

    PubMed

    Cherepkova, E V; Aftanas, L I; Maksimov, N; Menshanov, P N

    2016-11-01

    Predisposition to antisocial behavior can be related to the presence of certain polymorphic variants of genes encoding dopaminergic system proteins. We studied the frequencies of allele variants and genotypes of variable number tandem repeat polymorphism in 3' untranslated region (3' VTNR) of the dopaminergic transporter SLC6A3 gene in Caucasian men committed socially dangerous violent and non-violent crimes. Alleles with 9 and 10 repeats were most frequent in both the control group and group of men predisposed to antisocial behavior. At the same time, the 10/10 genotype was more frequently observed in the group of men prone to antisocial non-violent behavior. Hence, the presence of certain variants of 3' VTNR polymorphism of SLC6A3 gene in men is associated with predisposition to certain forms of antisocial behavior.

  18. DNA repair genes of mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Fuscoe, J.C.; Weber, C.A.

    1985-09-27

    In the CHO cell line various mutations affecting DNA repair have been obtained. Mutants that belong to five genetic complementation groups for UV sensitivity and resemble the cells from individuals having the cancer-prone genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum were previously identified. Each mutant is defective in the incision step of nucleotide excision repair and hypersensitive to bulky DNA lesions. A sixth genetic complementation group for UV sensitivity has now been identified with UV27-1. These UV mutants can be divided into two subgroups; only Groups 2 and 4 are extremely sensitive to mitomycin C and other DNA cross-linking agents. The clear-cut phenotypes of the CHO mutants have allowed us to construct hybrid cells by fusion with human lymphocytes and thereby identify which human chromosomes carry genes that correct the CHO mutations. The first two mutants analyzed, UV20 (excision-repair deficient; UV Group 2) and EM9, which has very high SCE, are both corrected by chromosome 19. 46 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Gene repair and transposon-mediated gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Paul D; Augustin, Lance B; Kren, Betsy T; Steer, Clifford J

    2002-01-01

    The main strategy of gene therapy has traditionally been focused on gene augmentation. This approach typically involves the introduction of an expression system designed to express a specific protein in the transfected cell. Both the basic and clinical sciences have generated enough information to suggest that gene therapy would eventually alter the fundamental practice of modern medicine. However, despite progress in the field, widespread clinical applications and success have not been achieved. The myriad deficiencies associated with gene augmentation have resulted in the development of alternative approaches to treat inherited and acquired genetic disorders. One, derived primarily from the pioneering work of homologous recombination, is gene repair. Simply stated, the process involves targeting the mutation in situ for gene correction and a return to normal gene function. Site-specific genetic repair has many advantages over augmentation although it too is associated with significant limitations. This review outlines the advantages and disadvantages of gene correction. In particular, we discuss technologies based on chimeric RNA/DNA oligonucleotides, single-stranded and triplex-forming oligonucleotides, and small fragment homologous replacement. While each of these approaches is different, they all share a number of common characteristics, including the need for efficient delivery of nucleic acids to the nucleus. In addition, we review the potential application of a novel and exciting nonviral gene augmentation strategy--the Sleeping Beauty transposon system.

  20. Targeted Exome Sequencing of Krebs Cycle Genes Reveals Candidate Cancer-Predisposing Mutations in Pheochromocytomas and Paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Remacha, Laura; Comino-Méndez, Iñaki; Richter, Susan; Contreras, Laura; Currás-Freixes, María; Pita, Guillermo; Letón, Rocío; Galarreta, Antonio; Torres-Pérez, Rafael; Honrado, Emiliano; Jiménez, Scherezade; Maestre, Lorena; Moran, Sebastian; Esteller, Manel; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Robledo, Mercedes; Cascón, Alberto

    2017-07-18

    Purpose: Mutations in Krebs cycle genes are frequently found in patients with pheochromocytomas/paragangliomas. Disruption of SDH, FH or MDH2 enzymatic activities lead to accumulation of specific metabolites, which give rise to epigenetic changes in the genome that cause a characteristic hypermethylated phenotype. Tumors showing this phenotype, but no alterations in the known predisposing genes, could harbor mutations in other Krebs cycle genes.Experimental Design: We used downregulation and methylation of RBP1, as a marker of a hypermethylation phenotype, to select eleven pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas for targeted exome sequencing of a panel of Krebs cycle-related genes. Methylation profiling, metabolite assessment and additional analyses were also performed in selected cases.Results: One of the 11 tumors was found to carry a known cancer-predisposing somatic mutation in IDH1. A variant in GOT2, c.357A>T, found in a patient with multiple tumors, was associated with higher tumor mRNA and protein expression levels, increased GOT2 enzymatic activity in lymphoblastic cells, and altered metabolite ratios both in tumors and in GOT2 knockdown HeLa cells transfected with the variant. Array methylation-based analysis uncovered a somatic epigenetic mutation in SDHC in a patient with multiple pheochromocytomas and a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Finally, a truncating germline IDH3B mutation was found in a patient with a single paraganglioma showing an altered α-ketoglutarate/isocitrate ratio.Conclusions: This study further attests to the relevance of the Krebs cycle in the development of PCC and PGL, and points to a potential role of other metabolic enzymes involved in metabolite exchange between mitochondria and cytosol. Clin Cancer Res; 1-10. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Modeling tumor predisposing FH mutations in yeast: effects on fumarase activity, growth phenotype and gene expression profile.

    PubMed

    Kokko, Antti; Ylisaukko-Oja, Sanna S K; Kiuru, Maija; Takatalo, Maarit S; Salmikangas, Paula; Tuimala, Jarno; Arango, Diego; Karhu, Auli; Aaltonen, Lauri A; Jäntti, Jussi

    2006-03-15

    Heterozygous mutations in the fumarase (FH) gene cause the tumor predisposition syndrome hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (MIM 605839). While most families segregate a benign phenotype of multiple leiomyomas, others display a phenotype with early-onset renal cancer and leiomyosarcoma. Modifier genes may play a role in this, but an alternative explanation is simple genotype-phenotype association. FH mutations predisposing to cancer appear to be truncating or in fully conserved amino acids, suggesting that mutations severely affecting FH activity might predispose to malignancy. In the present study, we analyzed 2 conserved fumarase mutations in yeast. H153R has been described in 3 cancer predisposition families; whereas all 3 reported K187R families have displayed the benign phenotype. Examining H153R and K187R should clarify whether cancer-related FH mutations differ from their benign phenotype-associated counterparts. Yeast strains containing the 2 mutations, and knockout and wild type (WT) references, were created and the growth phenotypes studied on selected carbon sources to assess mitochondrial function. Additionally, Fum1 protein production and activity were measured, and the strains were subjected to transcriptional profiling. On nonfermentable lactate medium, the fumarase knockout strains did not grow, whereas the mutants showed no differences, as compared to WT yeast. Although both mutant strains produced fumarase, a considerable decrease in enzyme activity was seen in mutants with respect to WT. Transcription of the majority of Krebs cycle enzymes was downregulated in response to mutations in fumarase. In conclusion, both mutants displayed some, albeit greatly reduced, fumarase activity. This activity was sufficient to support normal growth on nonfermentable carbon source, unlike the deletion phenotype, demonstrating the significance of the residual activity. The findings support the hypothesis that modifier gene(s), rather than phenotype

  2. Germline variants in the SEMA4A gene predispose to familial colorectal cancer type X

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Eduard; Klampfl, Petra; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Janecke, Andreas R.; Ulz, Peter; Renner, Wilfried; Kashofer, Karl; Nojima, Satoshi; Leitner, Anita; Zebisch, Armin; Wölfler, Albert; Hofer, Sybille; Gerger, Armin; Lax, Sigurd; Beham-Schmid, Christine; Steinke, Verena; Heitzer, Ellen; Geigl, Jochen B.; Windpassinger, Christian; Hoefler, Gerald; Speicher, Michael R.; Richard Boland, C.; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Sill, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) is characterized by clinical features of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer with a yet undefined genetic background. Here we identify the SEMA4A p.Val78Met germline mutation in an Austrian kindred with FCCTX, using an integrative genomics strategy. Compared with wild-type protein, SEMA4AV78M demonstrates significantly increased MAPK/Erk and PI3K/Akt signalling as well as cell cycle progression of SEMA4A-deficient HCT-116 colorectal cancer cells. In a cohort of 53 patients with FCCTX, we depict two further SEMA4A mutations, p.Gly484Ala and p.Ser326Phe and the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) p.Pro682Ser. This SNP is highly associated with the FCCTX phenotype exhibiting increased risk for colorectal cancer (OR 6.79, 95% CI 2.63 to 17.52). Our study shows previously unidentified germline variants in SEMA4A predisposing to FCCTX, which has implications for surveillance strategies of patients and their families. PMID:25307848

  3. Mutations in genes encoding the glycine cleavage system predispose to neural tube defects in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Narisawa, Ayumi; Komatsuzaki, Shoko; Kikuchi, Atsuo; Niihori, Tetsuya; Aoki, Yoko; Fujiwara, Kazuko; Tanemura, Mitsuyo; Hata, Akira; Suzuki, Yoichi; Relton, Caroline L; Grinham, James; Leung, Kit-Yi; Partridge, Darren; Robinson, Alexis; Stone, Victoria; Gustavsson, Peter; Stanier, Philip; Copp, Andrew J; Greene, Nicholas D E; Tominaga, Teiji; Matsubara, Yoichi; Kure, Shigeo

    2012-04-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs), including spina bifida and anencephaly, are common birth defects of the central nervous system. The complex multigenic causation of human NTDs, together with the large number of possible candidate genes, has hampered efforts to delineate their molecular basis. Function of folate one-carbon metabolism (FOCM) has been implicated as a key determinant of susceptibility to NTDs. The glycine cleavage system (GCS) is a multi-enzyme component of mitochondrial folate metabolism, and GCS-encoding genes therefore represent candidates for involvement in NTDs. To investigate this possibility, we sequenced the coding regions of the GCS genes: AMT, GCSH and GLDC in NTD patients and controls. Two unique non-synonymous changes were identified in the AMT gene that were absent from controls. We also identified a splice acceptor site mutation and five different non-synonymous variants in GLDC, which were found to significantly impair enzymatic activity and represent putative causative mutations. In order to functionally test the requirement for GCS activity in neural tube closure, we generated mice that lack GCS activity, through mutation of AMT. Homozygous Amt(-/-) mice developed NTDs at high frequency. Although these NTDs were not preventable by supplemental folic acid, there was a partial rescue by methionine. Overall, our findings suggest that loss-of-function mutations in GCS genes predispose to NTDs in mice and humans. These data highlight the importance of adequate function of mitochondrial folate metabolism in neural tube closure.

  4. Therapeutics Targeting Drivers of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Acute Aortic Dissections: Insights from Predisposing Genes and Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Milewicz, Dianna M; Prakash, Siddharth K; Ramirez, Francesco

    2017-01-14

    Thoracic aortic diseases, including aneurysms and dissections of the thoracic aorta, are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Risk factors for thoracic aortic disease include increased hemodynamic forces on the ascending aorta, typically due to poorly controlled hypertension, and heritable genetic variants. The altered genes predisposing to thoracic aortic disease either disrupt smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction or adherence to an impaired extracellular matrix, or decrease canonical transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling. Paradoxically, TGF-β hyperactivity has been postulated to be the primary driver for the disease. More recently, it has been proposed that the response of aortic SMCs to the hemodynamic load on a structurally defective aorta is the primary driver of thoracic aortic disease, and that TGF-β overactivity in diseased aortas is a secondary, unproductive response to restore tissue function. The engineering of mouse models of inherited aortopathies has identified potential therapeutic agents to prevent thoracic aortic disease.

  5. Candidate gene linkage approach to Identify DNA variants that predispose to preterm birth

    PubMed Central

    Bream, Elise N.A.; Leppellere, Cara R.; Cooper, Margaret E.; Dagle, John M.; Merrill, David C.; Christensen, Kaare; Simhan, Hyagriv N.; Fong, Chin-To; Hallman, Mikko; Muglia, Louis J.; Marazita, Mary L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    Background To identify genetic variants contributing to preterm birth using a linkage candidate gene approach. Methods We studied 99 single nucleotide polymorphisms for 33 genes in 257 families with preterm births segregating. Nonparametric and parametric analyses were used. Premature infants and mothers of premature infants were defined as affected cases in independent analyses. Results Analyses with the infant as the case identified two genes with evidence of linkage: CRHR1 (p=0.0012) and CYP2E1 (p=0.0011). Analyses with the mother as the case identified four genes with evidence of linkage: ENPP1 (p=0.003), IGFBP3 (p=0.006), DHCR7 (p=0.009), and TRAF2 (p=0.01). DNA sequence analysis of the coding exons and splice sites for CRHR1 and TRAF2 identified no new likely etiologic variants. Conclusion These findings suggest the involvement of six genes acting through the infant and/or the mother in the etiology of preterm birth. PMID:23168575

  6. Isolating human DNA repair genes using rodent-cell mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Mitchell, D.L.

    1987-03-23

    The DNA repair systems of rodent and human cells appear to be at least as complex genetically as those in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The use of mutant lines of rodent cells as a means of identifying human repair genes by functional complementation offers a new approach toward studying the role of repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In each of six cases examined using hybrid cells, specific human chromosomes have been identified that correct CHO cell mutations affecting repair of damage from uv or ionizing radiations. This finding suggests that both the repair genes and proteins may be virtually interchangeable between rodent and human cells. Using cosmid vectors, human repair genes that map to chromosome 19 have cloned as functional sequences: ERCC2 and XRCC1. ERCC1 was found to have homology with the yeast excision repair gene RAD10. Transformants of repair-deficient cell lines carrying the corresponding human gene show efficient correction of repair capacity by all criteria examined. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. Germline mutations in the PAF1 complex gene CTR9 predispose to Wilms tumour.

    PubMed

    Hanks, Sandra; Perdeaux, Elizabeth R; Seal, Sheila; Ruark, Elise; Mahamdallie, Shazia S; Murray, Anne; Ramsay, Emma; Del Vecchio Duarte, Silvana; Zachariou, Anna; de Souza, Bianca; Warren-Perry, Margaret; Elliott, Anna; Davidson, Alan; Price, Helen; Stiller, Charles; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy; Rahman, Nazneen

    2014-08-07

    Wilms tumour is a childhood kidney cancer. Here we identify inactivating CTR9 mutations in 3 of 35 Wilms tumour families, through exome and Sanger sequencing. By contrast, no similar mutations are present in 1,000 population controls (P<0.0001). Each mutation segregates with Wilms tumour in the family and a second mutational event is present in available tumours. CTR9 is a key component of the polymerase-associated factor 1 complex which has multiple roles in RNA polymerase II regulation and is implicated in embryonic organogenesis and maintenance of embryonic stem cell pluripotency. These data establish CTR9 as a Wilms tumour predisposition gene and suggest it acts as a tumour suppressor gene.

  8. A common haplotype of the LBP gene predisposes to severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Flores, Carlos; Pérez-Méndez, Lina; Maca-Meyer, Nicole; Muriel, Arturo; Espinosa, Elena; Blanco, Jesús; Sangüesa, Rubén; Muros, Mercedes; Garcia, Joe G N; Villar, Jesús

    2009-10-01

    To investigate whether common variants across the LBP gene contribute to the development of severe sepsis. Sepsis is the leading cause of multiple system organ dysfunction and death in critically ill patients. The lipopolysaccharide-binding protein is an acute-phase protein that plays a dominant role in the genesis of sepsis by initiating signal transduction pathways leading to the activation of the inflammatory host response. Prospectively enrolled case-control study of adults with severe sepsis. A network of intensive care units. We enrolled 175 patients meeting international definition criteria for severe sepsis and 357 population-based controls for comparison. Genotyping of the LBP gene was performed and disease association was tested. Serum lipopolysaccharide-binding protein levels were measured in patients and related to genetic variants. A haplotype window analysis revealed that a common 4-SNP risk haplotype from the 5'-flanking region of the LBP gene, comprising positions -1978 to -763 from the transcription start site, was strongly associated with susceptibility to severe sepsis. Risk haplotype homozygous carriers had an increased risk for severe sepsis (odds ratio = 2.21; 95% confidence interval = 1.39-3.51; unadjusted p < .001; adjusted p < .025). Mean serum lipopolysaccharide-binding protein levels from inclusion to 7th day were significantly higher in homozygous carriers patients (130.1 [102.9-164.5] and 98.9 [79.7-122.8] microg/mL, respectively) than in noncarriers (101.6 [87.9-117.5] and 58.7 [51.4-67.2] microg/mL, respectively) (p = .046). This study strongly supports the involvement of LBP gene variants in severe sepsis susceptibility and reinforces the merit of further exploration of the role of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein in sepsis.

  9. Nature and nurture predispose to violent behavior: serotonergic genes and adverse childhood environment.

    PubMed

    Reif, Andreas; Rösler, Michael; Freitag, Christine M; Schneider, Marc; Eujen, Andrea; Kissling, Christian; Wenzler, Denise; Jacob, Christian P; Retz-Junginger, Petra; Thome, Johannes; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Retz, Wolfgang

    2007-11-01

    Aggressive behavior is influenced by variation in genes of the serotonergic circuitry and early-life experience alike. The present study aimed at investigating the contribution of polymorphisms shown to moderate transcription of two genes involved in serotonergic neurotransmission (serotonin transporter, 5HTT, and monoamine oxidase A, MAOA) to the development of violence and to test for gene-environment interactions relating to adverse childhood environment. A cohort of 184 adult male volunteers referred for forensic assessment participated in the study. Each individual was assigned to either a violent or a nonviolent group. Logistic regression was performed and the best-fitting model, with a predictive power of 74%, revealed independent effects of adverse childhood environment and MAOA genotype. High environmental adversity during childhood was associated significantly with violent behavior. Forty-five percent of violent, but only 30% of nonviolent individuals carried the low-activity, short MAOA allele. Most interestingly, an interaction effect between childhood environment and 5HTT genotype on violent behavior was found in that high adversity during childhood impacted only the later-life violence if the short promoter alleles were present. These findings indicate complex interactions between genetic variation of the serotonergic circuitry and environmental factors arguing against simplistic, mono-causal explanations of violent behavior.

  10. MAPT as a predisposing gene for sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in the Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Pu; Xu, Wenyuan; Wu, Chengsi; Zhu, Min; Li, Xiaobing; Hong, Daojun

    2013-01-01

    A previous study of European Caucasian patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis demonstrated that a polymorphism in the microtubule-associated protein Tau (MAPT) gene was significantly associated with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis pathogenesis. Here, we tested this association in 107 sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients and 100 healthy controls from the Chinese Han population. We screened the mutation-susceptible regions of MAPT – the 3' and 5' untranslated regions as well as introns 9, 10, 11, and 12 – by direct sequencing, and identified 33 genetic variations. Two of these, 105788 A > G in intron 9 and 123972 T > A in intron 11, were not present in the control group. The age of onset in patients with the 105788 A > G and/or the 123972 T > A variant was younger than that in patients without either genetic variation. Moreover, the pa-tients with a genetic variation were more prone to bulbar palsy and breathing difficulties than those with the wild-type genotype. This led to a shorter survival period in patients with a MAPT genetic variant. Our study suggests that the MAPT gene is a potential risk gene for sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in the Chinese Han population. PMID:25206632

  11. Lipid Status and Predisposing Genes in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 from Various Ethnic Groups.

    PubMed

    Kolesnikova, L I; Kolesnikov, S I; Darenskaya, M A; Grebenkina, L A; Semenova, N V; Osipova, E V; Gnusina, S V; Bardymova, T A

    2015-12-01

    The peculiarities of HLA class II profile and lipid metabolism were examined in Buryat and Russian ethnic groups of patients with diabetes mellitus type 1. The incidence of type 1 haplotypes in HLA class II gene family was lower in Buryats than that in Russians. In comparison with Russians, the course of diabetes mellitus type 1 in Buryat patients was characterized with a lower content of total lipids, triacylglycerols, total cholesterol, and LDL, which probably explains a more favorable course of the disease in Buryat population.

  12. Detection of a Tumor Suppressor Gene Variant Predisposing to Colorectal Cancer in an 18th Century Hungarian Mummy

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Michal; Hershkovitz, Israel; Sklan, Ella H.; Kahila Bar-Gal, Gila; Pap, Ildikó; Szikossy, Ildikó; Rosin-Arbesfeld, Rina

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene are common and strongly associated with the development of colorectal adenomas and carcinomas. While extensively studied in modern populations, reports on visceral tumors in ancient populations are scarce. To the best of our knowledge, genetic characterization of mutations associated with colorectal cancer in ancient specimens has not yet been described. In this study we have sequenced hotspots for mutations in the APC gene isolated from 18th century naturally preserved human Hungarian mummies. While wild type APC sequences were found in two mummies, we discovered the E1317Q missense mutation, known to be a colorectal cancer predisposing mutation, in a large intestine tissue of an 18th century mummy. Our data suggests that this genetic predisposition to cancer already existed in the pre-industrialization era. This study calls for similar investigations of ancient specimens from different periods and geographical locations to be conducted and shared for the purpose of obtaining a larger scale analysis that will shed light on past cancer epidemiology and on cancer evolution. PMID:26863316

  13. Detection of a Tumor Suppressor Gene Variant Predisposing to Colorectal Cancer in an 18th Century Hungarian Mummy.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Michal; Hershkovitz, Israel; Sklan, Ella H; Kahila Bar-Gal, Gila; Pap, Ildikó; Szikossy, Ildikó; Rosin-Arbesfeld, Rina

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene are common and strongly associated with the development of colorectal adenomas and carcinomas. While extensively studied in modern populations, reports on visceral tumors in ancient populations are scarce. To the best of our knowledge, genetic characterization of mutations associated with colorectal cancer in ancient specimens has not yet been described. In this study we have sequenced hotspots for mutations in the APC gene isolated from 18th century naturally preserved human Hungarian mummies. While wild type APC sequences were found in two mummies, we discovered the E1317Q missense mutation, known to be a colorectal cancer predisposing mutation, in a large intestine tissue of an 18th century mummy. Our data suggests that this genetic predisposition to cancer already existed in the pre-industrialization era. This study calls for similar investigations of ancient specimens from different periods and geographical locations to be conducted and shared for the purpose of obtaining a larger scale analysis that will shed light on past cancer epidemiology and on cancer evolution.

  14. Reelin gene alleles and haplotypes as a factor predisposing to autistic disorder.

    PubMed

    Persico, A M; D'Agruma, L; Maiorano, N; Totaro, A; Militerni, R; Bravaccio, C; Wassink, T H; Schneider, C; Melmed, R; Trillo, S; Montecchi, F; Palermo, M; Pascucci, T; Puglisi-Allegra, S; Reichelt, K L; Conciatori, M; Marino, R; Quattrocchi, C C; Baldi, A; Zelante, L; Gasparini, P; Keller, F

    2001-03-01

    Autistic disorder (MIM 209850) is currently viewed as a neurodevelopmental disease. Reelin plays a pivotal role in the development of laminar structures including the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum and of several brainstem nuclei. Neuroanatomical evidence is consistent with Reelin involvement in autistic disorder. In this study, we describe several polymorphisms identified using RNA-SSCP and DNA sequencing. Association and linkage were assessed comparing 95 Italian patients to 186 ethnically-matched controls, and using the transmission/disequilibrium test and haplotype-based haplotype relative risk in 172 complete trios from 165 families collected in Italy and in the USA. Both case-control and family-based analyses yield a significant association between autistic disorder and a polymorphic GGC repeat located immediately 5' of the reelin gene (RELN) ATG initiator codon, as well as with specific haplotypes formed by this polymorphism with two single-base substitutions located in a splice junction in exon 6 and within exon 50. Triplet repeats located in 5' untranslated regions (5'UTRs) are indicative of strong transcriptional regulation. Our findings suggest that longer triplet repeats in the 5'UTR of the RELN gene confer vulnerability to autistic disorder.

  15. A genome-wide search for genes predisposing to manic-depression, assuming autosomal dominant inheritance

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, H.; Jensen, S.; Hoff, M.; Holik, J.; Plaetke, R.; Reimherr, F.; Wender, P.; Leppert, M.; Byerley, W. )

    1993-06-01

    Manic-depressive illness (MDI), also known as [open quotes]bipolar affective disorder[close quotes], is a common and devastating neuropsychiatric illness. Although pivotal biochemical alterations underlying the disease are unknown, results of family, twin, and adoption studies consistently implicate genetic transmission in the pathogenesis of MDI. In order to carry out linkage analysis, the authors ascertained eight moderately sized pedigrees containing multiple cases of the disease. For a four-allele marker mapping at 5 cM from the disease gene, the pedigree sample has >97% power to detect a dominant allele under genetic homogeneity and has >73% power under 20% heterogeneity. To date, the eight pedigrees have been genotyped with 328 polymorphic DNA loci throughout the genome. When autosomal dominant inheritance was assumed, 273 DNA markers gave lod scores <[minus]2.0 at [theta] = .05, and 4 DNA marker loci yielded lod scores >1 (chromosome 5 -- D5S39, D5S43, and D5S62; chromosome 11 -- D11S85). Of the markers giving lod scores >1, only D5S62 continued to show evidence for linkage when the affected-pedigree-member method was used. The D5S62 locus maps to distal 5q, a region containing neurotransmitter-receptor genes for dopamine, norepinephrine, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid. Although additional work in this region may be warranted, the linkage results should be interpreted as preliminary data, as 68 unaffected individuals are not past the age of risk. 72 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. DNA Repair in Drosophila: Mutagens, Models, and Missing Genes.

    PubMed

    Sekelsky, Jeff

    2017-02-01

    The numerous processes that damage DNA are counterbalanced by a complex network of repair pathways that, collectively, can mend diverse types of damage. Insights into these pathways have come from studies in many different organisms, including Drosophila melanogaster Indeed, the first ideas about chromosome and gene repair grew out of Drosophila research on the properties of mutations produced by ionizing radiation and mustard gas. Numerous methods have been developed to take advantage of Drosophila genetic tools to elucidate repair processes in whole animals, organs, tissues, and cells. These studies have led to the discovery of key DNA repair pathways, including synthesis-dependent strand annealing, and DNA polymerase theta-mediated end joining. Drosophila appear to utilize other major repair pathways as well, such as base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, and interstrand crosslink repair. In a surprising number of cases, however, DNA repair genes whose products play important roles in these pathways in other organisms are missing from the Drosophila genome, raising interesting questions for continued investigations. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  17. Identification of germline mutations in the cancer predisposing gene CDH1 in patients with orofacial clefts.

    PubMed

    Vogelaar, Ingrid P; Figueiredo, Joana; van Rooij, Iris A L M; Simões-Correia, Joana; van der Post, Rachel S; Melo, Soraia; Seruca, Raquel; Carels, Carine E L; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline

    2013-03-01

    Orofacial clefts (OFC) are among the most common birth defects worldwide. The etiology of non-syndromic OFC is still largely unknown. During embryonic development, the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin, encoded by CDH1, is highly expressed in the median edge epithelium of the palate. Furthermore, in multiple families with CDH1 mutations, OFC cases are observed. To determine whether CDH1 is a causative gene for non-syndromic OFC and to assess whether CDH1 mutation screening in non-syndromic OFC patients enables identification of families at risk of cancer, direct sequencing of the full coding sequence of CDH1 was performed in a cohort of 81 children with non-syndromic OFC. Eleven children had heterozygous CDH1 sequence variants, 5 cases with 4 distinct missense mutations and 8 cases with 4 intronic variants. Using a combination of in silico predictions and in vitro functional assays, three missense mutations in four non-syndromic OFC patients were predicted to be damaging to E-cadherin protein function. The intronic variants including one tested in an in vitro assay appeared to be benign, showing no influence on splicing. Functionally relevant heterozygous CDH1 missense mutations were found in 4 out of 81 (5%) patients with non-syndromic OFC. This finding opens a new pathway to reveal the molecular basis of non-syndromic OFC. Cancer risk among carriers of these mutations needs to be defined.

  18. Common PHOX2B poly-alanine contractions impair RET gene transcription, predisposing to Hirschsprung disease.

    PubMed

    Di Zanni, Eleonora; Adamo, Annalisa; Belligni, Elga; Lerone, Margherita; Martucciello, Giuseppe; Mattioli, Girolamo; Pini Prato, Alessio; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Silengo, Margherita; Bachetti, Tiziana; Ceccherini, Isabella

    2017-07-01

    HSCR is a congenital disorder of the enteric nervous system, characterized by the absence of neurons along a variable length of the gut resulting from loss-of-function RET mutations. Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome (CCHS) is a rare neurocristopathy characterized by impaired response to hypercapnia and hypoxemia caused by heterozygous mutations of the PHOX2B gene, mostly polyalanine (polyA) expansions but also missense, nonsense, and frameshift mutations, while polyA contractions are common in the population and believed neutral. HSCR associated CCHS can present in patients carrying PHOX2B mutations. Indeed, RET expression is orchestrated by different transcriptional factors among which PHOX2B, thus suggesting its possible role in HSCR pathogenesis. Following the observation of HSCR patients carrying in frame trinucleotide deletions within the polyalanine stretch in exon 3 (polyA contractions), we have verified the hypothesis that these PHOX2B variants do reduce its transcriptional activity, likely resulting in a down-regulation of RET expression and, consequently, favouring the development of the HSCR phenotype. Using proper reporter constructs, we show here that the in vitro transactivation of the RET promoter by different HSCR-associated PHOX2B polyA variants has resulted significantly lower compared to the effect of PHOX2B wild type protein. In particular, polyA contractions do induce a reduced transactivation of the RET promoter, milder compared to the severe polyA expansions associated with CCHS+HSCR, and correlated with the length of the deleted trait, with a more pronounced effect when contractions are larger. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Polymorphism in the Serotonin Receptor 2a (HTR2A) Gene as Possible Predisposal Factor for Aggressive Traits

    PubMed Central

    Banlaki, Zsofia; Elek, Zsuzsanna; Nanasi, Tibor; Szekely, Anna; Nemoda, Zsofia; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria; Ronai, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive manifestations and their consequences are a major issue of mankind, highlighting the need for understanding the contributory factors. Still, aggression-related genetic analyses have so far mainly been conducted on small population subsets such as individuals suffering from a certain psychiatric disorder or a narrow-range age cohort, but no data on the general population is yet available. In the present study, our aim was to identify polymorphisms in genes affecting neurobiological processes that might explain some of the inter-individual variation between aggression levels in the non-clinical Caucasian adult population. 55 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were simultaneously determined in 887 subjects who also filled out the self-report Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ). Single marker association analyses between genotypes and aggression scores indicated a significant role of rs7322347 located in the HTR2A gene encoding serotonin receptor 2a following Bonferroni correction for multiple testing (p = 0.0007) both for males and females. Taking the four BPAQ subscales individually, scores for Hostility, Anger and Physical Aggression showed significant association with rs7322347 T allele in themselves, while no association was found with Verbal Aggression. Of the subscales, relationship with rs7322347 was strongest in the case of Hostility, where statistical significance virtually equaled that observed with the whole BPAQ. In conclusion, this is the first study to our knowledge analyzing SNPs in a wide variety of genes in terms of aggression in a large sample-size non-clinical adult population, also describing a novel candidate polymorphism as predisposal to aggressive traits. PMID:25658328

  20. Mismatch repair genes in renal cortical neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Baiyee, Daniel; Banner, Barbara

    2006-02-01

    Mutation of human mutL homolog 1 (MLH-1) and human mutS homolog 2 (MSH-2) has been linked with the pathogenesis of colorectal carcinoma in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome and other carcinomas. Mutations of these genes in renal cell carcinomas were recently described. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of MLH-1 and MSH-2 in renal cortical neoplasms of various histological types by immunohistochemistry. Thirty-eight (n = 38) resected renal tumors were obtained from the surgical pathology files of the UMass Memorial Healthcare, including clear cell carcinomas (CLEARs, n = 20), papillary carcinomas (PAPs, n = 8), chromophobe carcinomas (CHRs, n = 4), and oncocytomas (ONCs, n = 6). Positive immunostaining for MLH-1 and MSH-2 was graded by the number of positive tumor cell nuclei, as follows: 0, negative; 1, up to one third of positive nuclei; 2, one to two thirds positive; and 3, greater than two thirds positive. Loss of MLH-1 or MSH-2 was defined as a tumor with grade 0 or 1, compared with the normal tubules. Normal tubules and intercalated ducts contained cells positive for MLH-1 and MSH-2 in all cases. For both antibodies, positive staining in tumors ranged from grade 1 to 3 in the CLEAR and PAP but was only grade 2 to 3 in the CHR and ONC. Loss of MLH-1 and/or MSH-2 occurred in malignant tumors but not in ONC. Loss of MLH-1 was present in 8 (40%) of 20 CLEARs and 4 (50%) of 8 PAPs, compared with loss of MSH-2 in 4 (20%) of 20 CLEARs and 1 (25%) of 4 CHRs. Our results suggest that loss of mismatch repair genes is involved in the malignant transformation in some renal carcinomas, particularly those derived from the proximal tubules.

  1. Control of gene editing by manipulation of DNA repair mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Danner, Eric; Bashir, Sanum; Yumlu, Saniye; Wurst, Wolfgang; Wefers, Benedikt; Kühn, Ralf

    2017-04-03

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are produced intentionally by RNA-guided nucleases to achieve genome editing through DSB repair. These breaks are repaired by one of two main repair pathways, classic non-homologous end joining (c-NHEJ) and homology-directed repair (HDR), the latter being restricted to the S/G2 phases of the cell cycle and notably less frequent. Precise genome editing applications rely on HDR, with the abundant c-NHEJ formed mutations presenting a barrier to achieving high rates of precise sequence modifications. Here, we give an overview of HDR- and c-NHEJ-mediated DSB repair in gene editing and summarize the current efforts to promote HDR over c-NHEJ.

  2. [Gene c-Fos expression in brain of rats resistant and predisposed to emotional stress after intraperitoneal injection of the ACTH(4-10)analog--semax].

    PubMed

    Umriukhin, P E; Koplik, E V; Grivennikov, I A; Miasoedov, N F; Sudakov, K V

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the ACTH(4-10) analog Semax on immediate early gene c-Fos expression was studied in Wistar rats with high and low resistance to emotional stress under the usual conditions and during psychoemotional loading. Fos-immunoreactive cells in the were counted automatically with the help of a computer. It was shown that under the usual conditions the intraperitoneal Semax injection induced immediate early gene c-Fos expression in the lateral septal region in rats predisposed to emotional stress and in the paraventricular hypothalamus in rats of both groups. Preliminary Semax injection decreased the stress-induced c-Fos expression in the paraventricular hypothalamus and medial septum in rats predisposed to emotional stress and tended to reduce the number of stress-induced c-Fos-immunopositive cells in the lateral septum and basolateral amygdala in both groups of animals. The obtained data suggest that Semax differently affects the immediate early c-Fos gene expression in the brain of rats resistant and predisposed to emotional stress and this effect reflects the antistressor properties of the regulatory peptide.

  3. Genes Predisposing to Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections: Associated Phenotypes, Gene-Specific Management, and Genetic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Milewicz, Dianna M.; Carlson, Alicia A.; Regalado, Ellen S.

    2011-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms leading to type A dissections (TAAD) are the major diseases affecting the aorta. A genetic predisposition for TAAD can occur as part of a genetic syndrome, as is the case for Marfan syndrome, due to mutations in FBN1, and Loeys-Dietz syndrome, which results from mutations in either TGFBR1 or TGFBR2. A predisposition to TAAD in the absence of syndromic features can be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner with decreased penetrance and variable expression, termed familial TAAD. Familial TAAD exhibits clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Genetic heterogeneity for familial TAAD has been demonstrated by the identification of four genes leading to TAAD, including TGFBR2 and TGFBR1, MYH11, and ACTA2. The phenotype and management of patients harboring mutations in these genes, along with genetic testing, will be addressed in this review. PMID:20452526

  4. Suppressed expression of non-DSB repair genes inhibits gamma-radiation-induced cytogenetic repair and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H; Emami, Kamal; Hammond, Dianne; Casey, Rachael; Mehta, Satish K; Jeevarajan, Antony S; Pierson, Duane L; Wu, Honglu

    2008-11-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in double-strand break (DSB) repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been well studied. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of IR inducible genes in regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression. In this study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. Frequency of micronuclei (MN) formation and chromosome aberrations were measured to determine efficiency of cytogenetic repair, especially DSB repair. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of five genes: Ku70 (DSB repair pathway), XPA (nucleotide excision repair pathway), RPA1 (mismatch repair pathway), RAD17 and RBBP8 (cell cycle control). Knocked-down expression of four genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Moreover, decreased XPA, p21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Nine of these eleven genes, whose knock-down expression affected cytogenetic repair, were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate IR-induced biological consequences. Furthermore, eight non-DBS repair genes showed involvement in regulating DSB repair, indicating that

  5. Non-functional genes repaired at the RNA level.

    PubMed

    Burger, Gertraud

    2016-01-01

    Genomes and genes continuously evolve. Gene sequences undergo substitutions, deletions or nucleotide insertions; mobile genetic elements invade genomes and interleave in genes; chromosomes break, even within genes, and pieces reseal in reshuffled order. To maintain functional gene products and assure an organism's survival, two principal strategies are used - either repair of the gene itself or of its product. I will introduce common types of gene aberrations and how gene function is restored secondarily, and then focus on systematically fragmented genes found in a poorly studied protist group, the diplonemids. Expression of their broken genes involves restitching of pieces at the RNA-level, and substantial RNA editing, to compensate for point mutations. I will conclude with thoughts on how such a grotesquely unorthodox system may have evolved, and why this group of organisms persists and thrives since tens of millions of years.

  6. Targeted gene repair: the ups and downs of a promising gene therapy approach.

    PubMed

    de Semir, David; Aran, Josep M

    2006-08-01

    As a novel form of molecular medicine based on direct actions over the genes, targeted gene repair has raised consideration recently above classical gene therapy strategies based on genetic augmentation or complementation. Targeted gene repair relies on the local induction of the cell's endogenous DNA repair mechanisms to attain a therapeutic gene conversion event within the genome of the diseased cell. Successful repair has been achieved both in vitro and in vivo with a variety of corrective molecules ranging from oligonucleotides (chimeraplasts, modified single-stranded oligonucleotides, triplex-forming oligonucleotides), to small DNA fragments (small fragment homologous replacement (SFHR)), and even viral vectors (AAV-based). However, controversy on the consistency and lack of reproducibility of early experiments regarding frequencies and persistence of targeted gene repair, particularly for chimeraplasty, has flecked the field. Nevertheless, several hurdles such as inefficient nuclear uptake of the corrective molecules, and misleading assessment of targeted repair frequencies have been identified and are being addressed. One of the key bottlenecks for exploiting the overall potential of the different targeted gene repair modalities is the lack of a detailed knowledge of their mechanisms of action at the molecular level. Several studies are now focusing on the assessment of the specific repair pathway(s) involved (homologous recombination, mismatch repair, etc.), devising additional strategies to increase their activity (using chemotherapeutic drugs, chimeric nucleases, etc.), and assessing the influence of the cell cycle in the regulation of the repair process. Until therapeutic correction frequencies for single gene disorders are reached both in cellular and animal models, precision and undesired side effects of this promising gene therapy approach will not be thoroughly evaluated.

  7. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes and associations with cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Goode, Ellen L; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Potter, John D

    2002-12-01

    Common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may alter protein function and an individual's capacity to repair damaged DNA; deficits in repair capacity may lead to genetic instability and carcinogenesis. To establish our overall understanding of possible in vivo relationships between DNA repair polymorphisms and the development of cancer, we performed a literature review of epidemiological studies that assessed associations between such polymorphisms and risk of cancer. Thirty studies of polymorphisms in OGG1, XRCC1, ERCC1, XPC, XPD, XPF, BRCA2, and XRCC3 were identified in the April 30, 2002 MEDLINE database (National Center for Biotechnology Information. PubMed Database: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez). These studies focused on adult glioma, bladder cancer, breast cancer, esophageal cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer, skin cancer (melanoma and nonmelanoma), squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, and stomach cancer. We found that a small proportion of the published studies were large and population-based. Nonetheless, published data were consistent with associations between: (a) the OGG1 S326C variant and increased risk of various types of cancer; (b) the XRCC1 R194W variant and reduced risk of various types of cancer; and (c) the BRCA2 N372H variant and increased risk of breast cancer. Suggestive results were seen for polymorphisms in other genes; however, small sample sizes may have contributed to false-positive or false-negative findings. We conclude that large, well-designed studies of common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes are needed. Such studies may benefit from analysis of multiple genes or polymorphisms and from the consideration of relevant exposures that may influence the likelihood of cancer in the presence of reduced DNA repair capacity.

  8. uv excision-repair gene transfer in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells

    SciTech Connect

    MacInnes, M.A.; Bingham, J.M.; Strniste, G.F.; Thompson, L.H.

    1983-01-01

    uvc-sensitive mutants of CHO cells provide a model system for molecular studies of DNA repair. We present our recent results which show that these mutants are competent recipients for plasmid marker gene transfer and incorporation of a putative CHO repair gene. The applicability and advantages of this system for interspecies human repair gene identification are discussed.

  9. Bone tissue engineering and repair by gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Betz, Volker M; Betz, Oliver B; Harris, Mitchel B; Vrahas, Mark S; Evans, Christopher H

    2008-01-01

    Many clinical conditions require the stimulation of bone growth. The use of recombinant bone morphogenetic proteins does not provide a satisfying solution to these conditions due to delivery problems and high cost. Gene therapy has emerged as a very promising approach for bone repair that overcomes limitations of protein-based therapy. Several preclinical studies have shown that gene transfer technology has the ability to deliver osteogenic molecules to precise anatomical locations at therapeutic levels for sustained periods of time. Both in-vivo and ex-vivo transduction of cells can induce bone formation at ectopic and orthotopic sites. Genetic engineering of adult stem cells from various sources with osteogenic genes has led to enhanced fracture repair, spinal fusion and rapid healing of bone defects in animal models. This review describes current viral and non-viral gene therapy strategies for bone tissue engineering and repair including recent work from the author's laboratory. In addition, the article discusses the potential of gene-enhanced tissue engineering to enter widespread clinical use.

  10. A massive parallel sequencing workflow for diagnostic genetic testing of mismatch repair genes

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Maren F; Neckmann, Ulrike; Lavik, Liss A S; Vold, Trine; Gilde, Bodil; Toft, Ragnhild K; Sjursen, Wenche

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a massive parallel sequencing (MPS) workflow for diagnostic analysis of mismatch repair (MMR) genes using the GS Junior system (Roche). A pathogenic variant in one of four MMR genes, (MLH1, PMS2, MSH6, and MSH2), is the cause of Lynch Syndrome (LS), which mainly predispose to colorectal cancer. We used an amplicon-based sequencing method allowing specific and preferential amplification of the MMR genes including PMS2, of which several pseudogenes exist. The amplicons were pooled at different ratios to obtain coverage uniformity and maximize the throughput of a single-GS Junior run. In total, 60 previously identified and distinct variants (substitutions and indels), were sequenced by MPS and successfully detected. The heterozygote detection range was from 19% to 63% and dependent on sequence context and coverage. We were able to distinguish between false-positive and true-positive calls in homopolymeric regions by cross-sample comparison and evaluation of flow signal distributions. In addition, we filtered variants according to a predefined status, which facilitated variant annotation. Our study shows that implementation of MPS in routine diagnostics of LS can accelerate sample throughput and reduce costs without compromising sensitivity, compared to Sanger sequencing. PMID:24689082

  11. N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) gene polymorphism as a predisposing factor for phenytoin intoxication in tuberculous meningitis or tuberculoma patients having seizures - A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Adole, Prashant S.; Kharbanda, Parampreet S.; Sharma, Sadhna

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Simultaneous administration of phenytoin and isoniazid (INH) in tuberculous meningitis (TBM) or tuberculoma patients with seizures results in higher plasma phenytoin level and thus phenytoin intoxication. N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) enzyme catalyses two acetylation reactions in INH metabolism and NAT2 gene polymorphism leads to slow and rapid acetylators. The present study was aimed to evaluate the effect of allelic variants of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) gene as a predisposing factor for phenytoin toxicity in patients with TBM or tuberculoma having seizures, and taking INH and phenytoin simultaneously. Methods: Sixty patients with TBM or tuberculoma with seizures and taking INH and phenytoin simultaneously for a minimum period of seven days were included in study. Plasma phenytoin was measured by high performance liquid chromatography. NAT2 gene polymorphism was studied using restriction fragment length polymorphism and allele specific PCR. Results: The patients were grouped into those having phenytoin intoxication and those with normal phenytoin level, and also classified as rapid or slow acetylators by NAT2 genotyping. Genotypic analysis showed that of the seven SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) of NAT2 gene studied, six mutations were found to be associated with phenytoin intoxication. For rs1041983 (C282T), rs1799929 (C481T), rs1799931 (G857A), rs1799930 (G590A), rs1208 (A803G) and rs1801280 (T341C) allelic variants, the proportion of homozygous mutant was higher in phenytoin intoxicated group than in phenytoin non-intoxicated group. Interpretation & conclusions: Homozygous mutant allele of NAT2 gene at 481site may act as a predisposing factor for phenytoin intoxication among TBM or tuberculoma patients having seizures. PMID:27488001

  12. Endogenous sequence patterns predispose the repair modes of CRISPR/Cas9-induced DNA double-stranded breaks in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Vu, Giang T H; Cao, Hieu X; Fauser, Friedrich; Reiss, Bernd; Puchta, Holger; Schubert, Ingo

    2017-10-01

    The possibility to predict the outcome of targeted DNA double-stranded break (DSB) repair would be desirable for genome editing. Furthermore the consequences of mis-repair of potentially cell-lethal DSBs and the underlying pathways are not yet fully understood. Here we study the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9-induced mutation spectra at three selected endogenous loci in Arabidopsis thaliana by deep sequencing of long amplicon libraries. Notably, we found sequence-dependent genomic features that affected the DNA repair outcome. Deletions of 1-bp to <1000-bp size and/or very short insertions, deletions >1 kbp (all due to NHEJ) and deletions combined with insertions between 5-bp to >100 bp [caused by a synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA)-like mechanism] occurred most frequently at all three loci. The appearance of single-stranded annealing events depends on the presence and distance between repeats flanking the DSB. The frequency and size of insertions is increased if a sequence with high similarity to the target site was available in cis. Most deletions were linked to pre-existing microhomology. Deletion and/or insertion mutations were blunt-end ligated or via de novo generated microhomology. While most mutation types and, to some degree, their predictability are comparable with animal systems, the broad range of deletion mutations seems to be a peculiar feature of the plant A. thaliana. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Effect of capsular release in the treatment of shoulder stiffness concomitant with rotator cuff repair: diabetes as a predisposing factor associated with treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Young; Chung, Seok Won; Hassan, Zulkifli; Bang, Jin-Young; Oh, Kyung-Soo

    2014-04-01

    In spite of the high prevalence of shoulder stiffness during rotator cuff repair, optimal management remains unclear. To identify the effect of capsular release during rotator cuff repair on the outcomes of patients with both shoulder stiffness and a rotator cuff tear, based on subgroup analyses. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Forty-nine consecutive patients (mean age, 61.5 ± 8.3 years) were enrolled who underwent arthroscopic repair of a small- to large-sized full-thickness rotator cuff tear and manipulation for concomitant shoulder stiffness (passive forward flexion ≤120°, external rotation at the side ≤45°). The first 21 consecutive patients underwent manipulation alone to treat stiffness; the second 28 consecutive patients underwent capsular release with manipulation. Among the 49 patients, 25 showed severe stiffness (forward flexion ≤100°, external rotation at the side ≤30°; 11 in the first series and 14 in the second series), and 15 had diabetes mellitus (30.6%; 6 in the first series and 9 in the second series). Shoulder range of motion was measured 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year postoperatively and at final follow-up visit. Simultaneously, functional outcome was evaluated by visual analog scale for pain, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, Constant score, and muscle strength ratio (involved/uninvolved), and cuff integrity was assessed ultrasonographically at least 1 year postoperatively. All range of motion measurements, functional scores, and muscle strength ratios significantly improved postoperatively regardless of the treatment method of stiffness. No outcome measure differed significantly between patients who did and did not undergo capsular release, regardless of the severity of stiffness, except for a temporary improvement in external rotation at side 3 months postoperatively in favor of those who underwent capsular release in cases with severe stiffness. Among patients with diabetes mellitus however, those who

  14. Gene therapy and peripheral nerve repair: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Hoyng, Stefan A; de Winter, Fred; Tannemaat, Martijn R; Blits, Bas; Malessy, Martijn J A; Verhaagen, Joost

    2015-01-01

    Clinical phase I/II studies have demonstrated the safety of gene therapy for a variety of central nervous system disorders, including Canavan's, Parkinson's (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), retinal diseases and pain. The majority of gene therapy studies in the CNS have used adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) and the first AAV-based therapeutic, a vector encoding lipoprotein lipase, is now marketed in Europe under the name Glybera. These remarkable advances may become relevant to translational research on gene therapy to promote peripheral nervous system (PNS) repair. This short review first summarizes the results of gene therapy in animal models for peripheral nerve repair. Secondly, we identify key areas of future research in the domain of PNS-gene therapy. Finally, a perspective is provided on the path to clinical translation of PNS-gene therapy for traumatic nerve injuries. In the latter section we discuss the route and mode of delivery of the vector to human patients, the efficacy and safety of the vector, and the choice of the patient population for a first possible proof-of-concept clinical study.

  15. Gene therapy and peripheral nerve repair: a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hoyng, Stefan A.; de Winter, Fred; Tannemaat, Martijn R.; Blits, Bas; Malessy, Martijn J. A.; Verhaagen, Joost

    2015-01-01

    Clinical phase I/II studies have demonstrated the safety of gene therapy for a variety of central nervous system disorders, including Canavan’s, Parkinson’s (PD) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD), retinal diseases and pain. The majority of gene therapy studies in the CNS have used adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) and the first AAV-based therapeutic, a vector encoding lipoprotein lipase, is now marketed in Europe under the name Glybera. These remarkable advances may become relevant to translational research on gene therapy to promote peripheral nervous system (PNS) repair. This short review first summarizes the results of gene therapy in animal models for peripheral nerve repair. Secondly, we identify key areas of future research in the domain of PNS-gene therapy. Finally, a perspective is provided on the path to clinical translation of PNS-gene therapy for traumatic nerve injuries. In the latter section we discuss the route and mode of delivery of the vector to human patients, the efficacy and safety of the vector, and the choice of the patient population for a first possible proof-of-concept clinical study. PMID:26236188

  16. Factors Predisposing Drug Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheney, Carl D.; Phelps, Brady J.

    The exact nature of the events which may predispose a person to substance abuse is not known. This paper provides a theoretical discussion and review which emphasizes three contexts which have been shown to predispose on individual to drug abuse: (1) prenatal exposure to a given substance; (2) environmental conditions present upon first exposure…

  17. Gene- and strand-specific repair in vitro: Partial purification of a transcription-repair coupling factor

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, C.P.; Sancar, A. )

    1991-09-15

    In eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, actively transcribed genes and, in some instances, the template strand of these genes have been found to be repaired 2-10 times more rapidly than nontranscribed genes or the coding strand of transcribed genes. The authors demonstrate here gene- and template strand-specific repair synthesis in vitro by using an Escherichia coli cell-free extract and a plasmid carrying a gene with the strong tac promoter. Strand-specific repair of UV, 4{prime}-hydroxymethyl-4,5{prime}, 8-trimethylpsoralen, and cis-dicholorodiammine platinum(II) damage was dependent upon transcription and a functional nucleotide excision repair system and was stimulated by 6% (wt/vol) polyethylene glycol. A defined system consisting of the transcription and repair proteins in highly purified form did not perform strand-specific repair; however, active fractions of extract conferred strand specificity to the defined system. Transcription-repair coupling activity was partially purified from extract by successive DEAE-agarose and gel filtration chromatography. The coupling factor is heat-labile, with an estimated M{sub r} of 100,000.

  18. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  19. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  20. Germline mutations predisposing to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Leeksma, O C; de Miranda, N F; Veelken, H

    2017-01-01

    Genetic studies of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) in humans have revealed numerous targets of somatic mutations and an increasing number of potentially relevant germline alterations. The latter often affect genes involved in DNA repair and/or immune function. In general, defects in these genes also predispose to other conditions. Knowledge of these mutations can lead to disease-preventing measures in the patient and relatives thereof. Conceivably, these germline mutations will be taken into account in future therapy of the lymphoma. In other hematological malignancies, mutations originally found as somatic aberrations have also been shown to confer predisposition to these diseases, when occurring in the germline. Further interrogations of the genome in DLBCL patients are therefore expected to reveal additional hereditary predisposition genes. Our review shows that germline mutations have already been described in over one-third of the genes that are somatically mutated in DLBCL. Whether such germline mutations predispose carriers to DLBCL is an open question. Symptoms of the inherited syndromes associated with these genes range from anatomical malformations to intellectual disability, immunodeficiencies and malignancies other than DLBCL. Inherited or de novo alterations in protein-coding and non-coding genes are envisioned to underlie this lymphoma. PMID:28211887

  1. Single-stranded oligonucleotide-mediated gene repair in mammalian cells has a mechanism distinct from homologous recombination repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zai; Zhou, Zhong-Jun; Liu, De-Pei; Huang, Jian-Dong

    2006-11-24

    Single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide (SSO)-mediated gene repair has great potentials for gene therapy and functional genomic studies. However, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. Previous studies from other groups have suggested that DNA damage response via the ATM/ATR pathway may be involved in this process. In this study, we measured the effect of two ATM/ATR inhibitors caffeine and pentoxifylline on the correction efficiency in SSO-mediated gene repair. We also checked their effect on double-stranded break (DSB)-induced homologous recombination repair (HRR) as a control, which is well known to be dependent on the ATM/ATR pathway. We found these inhibitors could completely inhibit DSB-induced HRR, but could only partially inhibit SSO-mediated process, indicating SSO-mediated gene repair is not dependent on the ATM/ATR pathway. Furthermore, we found that thymidine treatment promotes SSO-mediated gene repair, but inhibits DSB-induced HRR. Collectively, our results demonstrate that SSO-mediated and DSB-induced gene repairs have distinct mechanisms.

  2. A stem cell-like chromatin pattern may predispose tumor suppressor genes to DNA hypermethylation and heritable silencing.

    PubMed

    Ohm, Joyce E; McGarvey, Kelly M; Yu, Xiaobing; Cheng, Linzhao; Schuebel, Kornel E; Cope, Leslie; Mohammad, Helai P; Chen, Wei; Daniel, Vincent C; Yu, Wayne; Berman, David M; Jenuwein, Thomas; Pruitt, Kevin; Sharkis, Saul J; Watkins, D Neil; Herman, James G; Baylin, Stephen B

    2007-02-01

    Adult cancers may derive from stem or early progenitor cells. Epigenetic modulation of gene expression is essential for normal function of these early cells but is highly abnormal in cancers, which often show aberrant promoter CpG island hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing of tumor suppressor genes and pro-differentiation factors. We find that for such genes, both normal and malignant embryonic cells generally lack the hypermethylation of DNA found in adult cancers. In embryonic stem cells, these genes are held in a 'transcription-ready' state mediated by a 'bivalent' promoter chromatin pattern consisting of the repressive mark, histone H3 methylated at Lys27 (H3K27) by Polycomb group proteins, plus the active mark, methylated H3K4. However, embryonic carcinoma cells add two key repressive marks, dimethylated H3K9 and trimethylated H3K9, both associated with DNA hypermethylation in adult cancers. We hypothesize that cell chromatin patterns and transient silencing of these important regulatory genes in stem or progenitor cells may leave these genes vulnerable to aberrant DNA hypermethylation and heritable gene silencing during tumor initiation and progression.

  3. A novel splice site associated polymorphism in the tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) gene may predispose to the development of sporadic gangliogliomas.

    PubMed

    Platten, M; Meyer-Puttlitz, B; Blümcke, I; Waha, A; Wolf, H K; Nöthen, M M; Louis, D N; Sampson, J R; von Deimling, A

    1997-07-01

    The tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) gene is thought to function as a growth suppressor in sporadic and TSC-associated hamartomas and tumors. Clusters of dysplastic glial cells are a common feature of cortical tubers and subependymal nodules in tuberous sclerosis patients. In an effort to identify TSC2 gene alterations in sporadic gliomas, we detected a novel polymorphism adjacent to the 3'splice site of intron 4. We evaluated the distribution of this variant allele in a series of 244 patients with glial tumors, including 55 gangliogliomas, 31 pilocytic astrocytomas (WHO grade I), 50 astrocytomas (WHO grades II and III), and 108 glioblastomas (WHO grade IV). The allelic distribution in the general population was estimated by examining 381 healthy blood donors. This rare allele appeared in the control population and in the patients with astrocytic gliomas with a virtually identical frequency (8.14%, and 8.20%, respectively). The frequency of the rare allele in gangliogliomas, however, was significantly higher (15.5%; p = 0.024). The fact that both gangliogliomas and cortical tubers in tuberous sclerosis contain neuronal and astrocytic elements and may resemble each other histologically suggests that the TSC2 gene may be involved in the development of these tumors. The rare allele of the TSC2 gene emerges as a candidate for a predisposing factor for the formation of sporadic gangliogliomas.

  4. Transient Silencing of DNA Repair Genes Improves Targeted Gene Integration in the Filamentous Fungus Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Chum, Pak Yang; Schmidt, Georg; Saloheimo, Markku; Landowski, Christopher P

    2017-08-01

    Trichoderma reesei is a filamentous fungus that is used worldwide to produce industrial enzymes. Industrial strains have traditionally been created though systematic strain improvement using mutagenesis and screening approaches. It is also desirable to specifically manipulate the genes of the organism to further improve and to modify the strain. Targeted integration in filamentous fungi is typically hampered by very low frequencies of homologous recombination. To address this limitation, we have developed a simple transient method for silencing genes in T. reesei Using gene-specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeted to mus53, we could achieve up to 90% knockdown of mus53 mRNA. As a practical example, we demonstrated that transient silencing of DNA repair genes significantly improved homologous integration of DNA at a specific locus in a standard protoplast transformation. The best transient silencing of mus53 with siRNAs in protoplasts could achieve up to 59% marker gene integration.IMPORTANCE The previous solution for improving targeted integration efficiency has been deleting nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair genes. However, deleting these important repair genes may lead to unintended consequences for genomic stability and could lead to the accumulation of spontaneous mutations. Our method of transiently silencing NHEJ repair pathway genes allows recovery of their important repair functions. Here we report a silencing approach for improving targeted DNA integration in filamentous fungi. Furthermore, our transient silencing method is a truly flexible approach that is capable of knocking down the expression of a target gene in growing mycelial cultures, which could facilitate the broad study of gene functions in T. reesei. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. Approaches to diagnose DNA mismatch repair gene defects in cancer.

    PubMed

    Peña-Diaz, Javier; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2016-02-01

    The DNA repair pathway mismatch repair (MMR) is responsible for the recognition and correction of DNA biosynthetic errors caused by inaccurate nucleotide incorporation during replication. Faulty MMR leads to failure to address the mispairs or insertion deletion loops (IDLs) left behind by the replicative polymerases and results in increased mutation load at the genome. The realization that defective MMR leads to a hypermutation phenotype and increased risk of tumorigenesis highlights the relevance of this pathway for human disease. The association of MMR defects with increased risk of cancer development was first observed in colorectal cancer patients that carried inactivating germline mutations in MMR genes and the disease was named as hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Currently, a growing list of cancers is found to be MMR defective and HNPCC has been renamed Lynch syndrome (LS) partly to include the associated risk of developing extra-colonic cancers. In addition, a number of non-hereditary, mostly epigenetic, alterations of MMR genes have been described in sporadic tumors. Besides conferring a strong cancer predisposition, genetic or epigenetic inactivation of MMR genes also renders cells resistant to some chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, diagnosis of MMR deficiency has important implications for the management of the patients, the surveillance of their relatives in the case of LS and for the choice of treatment. Some of the alterations found in MMR genes have already been well defined and their pathogenicity assessed. Despite this substantial wealth of knowledge, the effects of a large number of alterations remain uncharacterized (variants of uncertain significance, VUSs). The advent of personalized genomics is likely to increase the list of VUSs found in MMR genes and anticipates the need of diagnostic tools for rapid assessment of their pathogenicity. This review describes current tools and future strategies for addressing the relevance

  6. Regulation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA repair gene RAD16.

    PubMed Central

    Bang, D D; Timmermans, V; Verhage, R; Zeeman, A M; van de Putte, P; Brouwer, J

    1995-01-01

    The RAD16 gene product has been shown to be essential for the repair of the silenced mating type loci [Bang et al. (1992) Nucleic Acids Res. 20, 3925-3931]. More recently we demonstrated that the RAD16 and RAD7 proteins are also required for repair of non-transcribed strands of active genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae [Waters et al. (1993) Mol. Gen. Genet. 239, 28-32]. We have studied the regulation of the RAD16 gene and found that the RAD16 transcript levels increased up to 7-fold upon UV irradiation. Heat shock at 42 degrees C also results in elevated levels of RAD16 mRNA. In sporulating MAT alpha/MATa diploid cells RAD16 mRNA is also induced. The basal level of the RAD16 transcript is constant during the mitotic cell cycle. G1-arrested cells show normal induction of RAD16 mRNA upon UV irradiation demonstrating that the induction is not a secondary consequence of G2 cell cycle arrest following UV irradiation. However, in cells arrested in G1 the induction of RAD16 mRNA after UV irradiation is not followed by a rapid decline as occurs in normal growing cells suggesting that the down regulation of RAD16 transcription is dependent on progression into the cell cycle. Images PMID:7784171

  7. Structural Rearrangements in DNA Repair Genes in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    bind RAD51B and XRCC3 , components of the homologous recombination pathway. RAD51C was found to bind both RAD51B and XRCC3 , however, the RAD51C...repair due to lack of binding partners in its C-terminus was not correct. Figure 11: RAD51C:ATXN7 fusion gene binds RAD51B and XRCC3 similar to wild...terminus. In vitro expressed GST fusion proteins were incubated with in vitro expressed RAD51B or XRCC3 and interaction tested via GST pull down assay

  8. POLE mutations in families predisposed to cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Aoude, Lauren G; Heitzer, Ellen; Johansson, Peter; Gartside, Michael; Wadt, Karin; Pritchard, Antonia L; Palmer, Jane M; Symmons, Judith; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Tomlinson, Ian; Kearsey, Stephen; Hayward, Nicholas K

    2015-12-01

    Germline mutations in the exonuclease domain of POLE have been shown to predispose to colorectal cancers and adenomas. POLE is an enzyme involved in DNA repair and chromosomal DNA replication. In order to assess whether such mutations might also predispose to cutaneous melanoma, we interrogated whole-genome and exome data from probands of 34 melanoma families lacking pathogenic mutations in known high penetrance melanoma susceptibility genes: CDKN2A, CDK4, BAP1, TERT, POT1, ACD and TERF2IP. We found a novel germline mutation, POLE p.(Trp347Cys), in a 7-case cutaneous melanoma family. Functional assays in S. pombe showed that this mutation led to an increased DNA mutation rate comparable to that seen with a Pol ε mutant with no exonuclease activity. We then performed targeted sequencing of POLE in 1243 cutaneous melanoma cases and found that a further ten probands had novel or rare variants in the exonuclease domain of POLE. Although this frequency is not significantly higher than that in unselected Caucasian controls, we observed multiple cancer types in the melanoma families, suggesting that some germline POLE mutations may predispose to a broad spectrum of cancers, including melanoma. In addition, we found the first mutation outside the exonuclease domain, p.(Gln520Arg), in a family with an extensive history of colorectal cancer.

  9. Effect of GDNF on depressive-like behavior, spatial learning and key genes of the brain dopamine system in genetically predisposed to behavioral disorders mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Vladimir S; Kondaurova, Elena M; Bazovkina, Daria V; Tsybko, Anton S; Ilchibaeva, Tatyana V; Khotskin, Nikita V; Semenova, Alina A; Popova, Nina K

    2014-11-01

    The effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on behavior and brain dopamine system in predisposed to depressive-like behavior ASC (Antidepressant Sensitive Cataleptics) mice in comparison with the parental "nondepressive" CBA mice was studied. In 7days after administration (800ng, i.c.v.) GDNF decreased escape latency time and the path traveled to reach hidden platform in Morris water maze in ASC mice. GDNF enhanced depressive-like behavioral traits in both "nondepressive" CBA and "depressive" ASC mice. In CBA mice, GDNF decreased functional response to agonists of D1 (chloro-APB hydrobromide) and D2 (sumanirole maleate) receptors in tail suspension test, reduced D2 receptor gene expression in the substantia nigra and increased monoamine oxydase A (MAO A) gene expression in the striatum. GDNF increased D1 and D2 receptor genes expression in the nucleus accumbens of ASC mice but failed to alter expression of catechol-O-methyltransferase, dopamine transporter, MAO B and tyrosine hydroxylase genes in both investigated mouse strains. Thus, GDNF produced long-term genotype-dependent effect on behavior and the brain dopamine system. GDNF pretreatment (1) reduced D1 and D2 receptors functional responses and D2 receptor gene expression in s. nigra of CBA mice; (2) increased D1 and D2 receptor genes expression in n. accumbens of ASC mice and (3) improved spatial learning in ASC mice. GDNF enhanced depressive-like behavior both in CBA and ASC mice. The data suggest that genetically defined variance in the cross-talk between GDNF and brain dopamine system contributes to the variability of GDNF-induced responses and might be responsible for controversial GDNF effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Simulated microgravity influenced the expression of DNA damage repair genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Jiawei, Liu; Wang, Ting

    2016-07-01

    Ionizing radiation and microgravity were considered to be the most important stress factors of space environmental the respective study of the biological effects of the radiation and microgravity carried out earlier, but the interaction of the effects of radiation with microgravity started later, and due to difference of the materials and methods the result of this experiment were not consistent. To further investigate the influence of microgravity on the expression of the radiation damage repair genes, the seed of Arabidopsis (Col) and its gravity-insensitive mutant (PIN2) were exposed to 0.1Gy of the dose of energetic carbon-ion beam radiation (LET = 30KeV / μm), and the germinated seed were than fixed in the 3D random positioning apparatus immediately for a 10-day simulated microgravity. By measuring the deflection angle of root tip and the changes of the expression of Ku70 and RAD51 protein, we investigated the impact of microgravity effect on radiation damage repair systems. The results shown that radiation, microgravity and microgravity with radiation could increase the angle of the root of the Col significantly, but no obvious effect on PIN2 type. The radiation could increase the expression of Ku70 significantly in both Col and PIN2, microgravity does not affect the expression, but the microgravity with radiation could decrease the expression of Ku70. This result shown that the microgravity could influence the radiation damage repair systems in molecular level. Moreover, our findings were important to understand the molecular mechanism of the impact of microgravity effect on radiation damage repair systems in vivo.

  11. Polymorphism of the DNA Base Excision Repair Genes in Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Katarzyna A.; Synowiec, Ewelina; Sobierajczyk, Katarzyna; Izdebska, Justyna; Blasiak, Janusz; Szaflik, Jerzy; Szaflik, Jacek P.

    2014-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is a degenerative corneal disorder for which the exact pathogenesis is not yet known. Oxidative stress is reported to be associated with this disease. The stress may damage corneal biomolecules, including DNA, and such damage is primarily removed by base excision repair (BER). Variation in genes encoding BER components may influence the effectiveness of corneal cells to cope with oxidative stress. In the present work we genotyped 5 polymorphisms of 4 BER genes in 284 patients and 353 controls. The A/A genotype of the c.–1370T>A polymorphism of the DNA polymerase γ (POLG) gene was associated with increased occurrence of KC, while the A/T genotype was associated with decreased occurrence of KC. The A/G genotype and the A allele of the c.1196A>G polymorphism of the X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) were associated with increased, and the G/G genotype and the G allele, with decreased KC occurrence. Also, the C/T and T as well as C/C genotypes and alleles of the c.580C>T polymorphism of the same gene displayed relationship with KC occurrence. Neither the g.46438521G>C polymorphism of the Nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (NEIL1) nor the c.2285T>C polymorphism of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) was associated with KC. In conclusion, the variability of the XRCC1 and POLG genes may play a role in KC pathogenesis and determine the risk of this disease. PMID:25356504

  12. An Obesity-Predisposing Variant of the FTO Gene Regulates D2R-Dependent Reward Learning.

    PubMed

    Sevgi, Meltem; Rigoux, Lionel; Kühn, Anne B; Mauer, Jan; Schilbach, Leonhard; Hess, Martin E; Gruendler, Theo O J; Ullsperger, Markus; Stephan, Klaas Enno; Brüning, Jens C; Tittgemeyer, Marc

    2015-09-09

    Variations in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene are linked to obesity. However, the underlying neurobiological mechanisms by which these genetic variants influence obesity, behavior, and brain are unknown. Given that Fto regulates D2/3R signaling in mice, we tested in humans whether variants in FTO would interact with a variant in the ANKK1 gene, which alters D2R signaling and is also associated with obesity. In a behavioral and fMRI study, we demonstrate that gene variants of FTO affect dopamine (D2)-dependent midbrain brain responses to reward learning and behavioral responses associated with learning from negative outcome in humans. Furthermore, dynamic causal modeling confirmed that FTO variants modulate the connectivity in a basic reward circuit of meso-striato-prefrontal regions, suggesting a mechanism by which genetic predisposition alters reward processing not only in obesity, but also in other disorders with altered D2R-dependent impulse control, such as addiction. Significance statement: Variations in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene are associated with obesity. Here we demonstrate that variants of FTO affect dopamine-dependent midbrain brain responses and learning from negative outcomes in humans during a reward learning task. Furthermore, FTO variants modulate the connectivity in a basic reward circuit of meso-striato-prefrontal regions, suggesting a mechanism by which genetic vulnerability in reward processing can increase predisposition to obesity.

  13. Hirudo medicinalis: a platform for investigating genes in neural repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, W Z; Emes, R D; Christoffers, K; Verrall, J; Blackshaw, S E

    2005-03-01

    We have used the nervous system of the medicinal leech as a preparation to study the molecular basis of neural repair. The leech central nervous system, unlike mammalian CNS, can regenerate to restore function, and contains identified nerve cells of known function and connectivity. We have constructed subtractive cDNA probes from whole and regenerating ganglia of the ventral nerve cord and have used these to screen a serotonergic Retzius neuron library. This identifies genes that are regulated as a result of axotomy, and are expressed by the Retzius cell. This approach identifies many genes, both novel and known. Many of the known genes identified have homologues in vertebrates, including man. For example, genes encoding thioredoxin (TRX), Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum Protein 1 (RER-1) and ATP synthase are upregulated at 24 h postinjury in leech nerve cord. To investigate the functional role of regulated genes in neuron regrowth we are using microinjection of antisense oligonucleotides in combination with horseradish peroxidase to knock down expression of a chosen gene and to assess regeneration in single neurons in 3-D ganglion culture. As an example of this approach we describe experiments to microinject antisense oligonucleotide to a leech isoform of the structural protein, Protein 4.1. Our approach thus identifies genes regulated at different times after injury that may underpin the intrinsic ability of leech neurons to survive damage, to initiate regrowth programs and to remake functional connections. It enables us to determine the time course of gene expression in the regenerating nerve cord, and to study the effects of gene knockdown in identified neurons regenerating in defined conditions in culture.

  14. Identification of Fetal and Maternal Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Candidate Genes That Predispose to Spontaneous Preterm Labor with Intact Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Roberto; Velez, Digna R.; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Hassan, Sonia S.; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Vaisbuch, Edi; Kim, Chong Jai; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Pearce, Brad; Friel, Lara A.; Bartlett, Jacquelaine; Anant, Madan Kumar; Salisbury, Benjamin A.; Vovis, Gerald F.; Lee, Min Seob; Gomez, Ricardo; Behnke, Ernesto; Oyarzun, Enrique; Tromp, Gerard; Williams, Scott M.; Menon, Ramkumar

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether maternal/fetal SNPs in candidate genes are associated with spontaneous preterm labor/delivery. Study Design A genetic association study was conducted in 223 mothers and 179 fetuses [preterm labor with intact membranes who delivered <37 weeks (PTB)], and 599 mothers and 628 fetuses (normal pregnancy): 190 candidate genes and 775 SNPs were studied. Single locus/haplotype association analyses were performed; FDR was used to correct for multiple testing (q*=0.15)]. Results 1) The strongest single locus associations with PTB were IL6R (fetus: p=0.000148) and TIMP2 (mother: p=0.000197), remaining significant after correction for multiple comparisons; 2) Global haplotype analysis indicated an association between a fetal DNA variant in IGF2 and maternal COL4A3 (global p=0.004 and 0.007, respectively). Conclusion A SNP involved in controlling fetal inflammation (IL6R) and DNA variants in maternal genes encoding for proteins involved in extracellular matrix biology approximately doubled the risk of PTB. PMID:20452482

  15. Does 24bp Duplication of Human CHIT1 Gene (Chitotriosidase1) Predispose to Filarial Chyluria? A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Shriya; Agarwal, Jyotsna; Gangwar, Pravin K; Waseem, Mohammad; Gupta, Prashant; Sankhwar, Satya N; Purkait, Bimalesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chyluria which is endemic in many parts of the world is mainly caused by Wuchereria bancrofti. CHIT1 (chitotriosidase) is produced by macrophages and plays an important role in the defense against chitin containing pathogen such as filarial parasite. Variation in the coding region with 24 bp duplication allele results in reduced CHIT1 activity that enhance the survival of parasite which may play a role in the occurrence of disease. Aim To examine the role of 24bp duplication of CHIT1 gene in patients of filarial chyluria (FC). Materials and Methods A case-control study was carried out where 155 confirmed FC patients and equal number of age-, sex- and residence-matched controls without any symptoms or signs of lymphatic filariasis, confirmed by negative immunochromatographic card test (ICT) and IgG/IgM combo rapid antibody test, from a hospital-based population were enrolled. Filarial aetiology was confirmed on the basis of DEC-provocative test (Giemsa staining), ICT and IgG/IgM- antifiarial antibody test. The patients positive by either of these tests were enrolled as FC cases. 24bp duplication in CHIT1 gene in FC was detected by the product size 99bp of amplified gene using polymerase chain reaction. Results The mean ages of patients and controls were 38.25±12.09 and 35.45±12.53 years, respectively while male: female ratio was 2.4:1. The mean duration of illness in chyluria patients was 62.81±60.83 months and mean number of episodes was 2.54±1.11. Homozygous wild type, heterozygous and homozygous mutant frequencies were 10.3%, 81.3% and 8.4% in FC patients and 18.7%, 75.5%, and 5.8% in controls, respectively. The 24bp duplication in CHIT1 gene showed a significant association in Heterozygous (HT) genotype with Odd Ratio (OR) of 1.95, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) (1.01-3.77); p=0.04. However, the homozygous mutant genotype (TT) was found to be non-significant with OR of 2.61, 95% CI (0.91-7.45); p=0.07. The combination of both HT+TT was also found

  16. groE genes affect SOS repair in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.K.; Tessman, I. )

    1990-10-01

    Repair of UV-irradiated bacteriophage in Escherichia coli by Weigle reactivation requires functional recA+ and umuD+C+ genes. When the cells were UV irradiated, the groE heat shock gene products, GroES and GroEL, were needed for at least 50% of the Weigle reactivation of the single-stranded DNA phage S13. Because of repression of the umuDC and recA genes, Weigle reactivation is normally blocked by the lexA3(Ind-) mutation (which creates a noncleavable LexA protein), but it was restored by a combination of a high-copy-number umuD+C+ plasmid and a UV dose that increases groE expression. Maximal reactivation was achieved by elevated amounts of the Umu proteins, which was accomplished in part by UV-induced expression of the groE genes. By increasing the number of copies of the umuD+C+ genes, up to 50% of the normal amount of reactivation of S13 was achieved in an unirradiated recA+ host.

  17. Whole exome sequencing in families at high risk for Hodgkin lymphoma: identification of a predisposing mutation in the KDR gene

    PubMed Central

    Rotunno, Melissa; McMaster, Mary L.; Boland, Joseph; Bass, Sara; Zhang, Xijun; Burdett, Laurie; Hicks, Belynda; Ravichandran, Sarangan; Luke, Brian T.; Yeager, Meredith; Fontaine, Laura; Hyland, Paula L.; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Tucker, Margaret A.; Goldin, Lynn R.

    2016-01-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma shows strong familial aggregation but no major susceptibility genes have been identified to date. The goal of this study was to identify high-penetrance variants using whole exome sequencing in 17 Hodgkin lymphoma prone families with three or more affected cases or obligate carriers (69 individuals), followed by targeted sequencing in an additional 48 smaller HL families (80 individuals). Alignment and variant calling were performed using standard methods. Dominantly segregating, rare, coding or potentially functional variants were further prioritized based on predicted deleteriousness, conservation, and potential importance in lymphoid malignancy pathways. We selected 23 genes for targeted sequencing. Only the p.A1065T variant in KDR (kinase insert domain receptor) also known as VEGFR2 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2) was replicated in two independent Hodgkin lymphoma families. KDR is a type III receptor tyrosine kinase, the main mediator of vascular endothelial growth factor induced proliferation, survival, and migration. Its activity is associated with several diseases including lymphoma. Functional experiments have shown that p.A1065T, located in the activation loop, can promote constitutive autophosphorylation on tyrosine in the absence of vascular endothelial growth factor and that the kinase activity was abrogated after exposure to kinase inhibitors. A few other promising mutations were identified but appear to be “private”. In conclusion, in the largest sequenced cohort of Hodgkin lymphoma families to date, we identified a causal mutation in the KDR gene. While independent validation is needed, this mutation may increase downstream tumor cell proliferation activity and might be a candidate for targeted therapy. PMID:27365461

  18. Association of KALRN, ADIPOQ, and FTO gene polymorphism in type 2 diabetic patients with coronary artery disease: possible predisposing markers.

    PubMed

    Mofarrah, Mohsen; Ziaee, Shayan; Pilehvar-Soltanahmadi, Yones; Zarghami, Faraz; Boroumand, Mohammadali; Zarghami, Nosratollah

    2016-09-01

    Recently, several genes have been introduced as potential genetic markers for diabetes mellitus and coronary artery diseases (CAD). In this case-control study, the associations of rs2241766 T/G of ADIPOQ, rs9289231 T/G of KALRN, and rs9939609 A/T of FTO polymorphisms with genetic susceptibility to CAD in type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients were investigated. A total of 224 T2D patients undergoing coronary angiography were randomly recruited into the study. Of the total diabetic patients, 152 were also diagnosed with CAD, whereas the rest were control participants. Genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms was performed by high-resolution melting analysis. Genotype analysis showed that the minor allele (G) frequency of rs2241766 ADIPOQ was statistically significant in the CAD group compared with the control group [odds ratio (OR), 2.779; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.403-5.504; P=0.003]. Also, it was found that the minor allele (G) frequency of rs9289231 KALRN was significantly associated with the risk of CAD (OR, 2.098; 95% CI, 1.096-4.017; P=0.025). In addition, no significant association was observed between the minor allele (A) of the FTO rs9939609 polymorphism and CAD (OR, 1.088; 95% CI, 0.578-2.015; P=0.788). It is speculated that the GG genotype and the G allele of the rs9289231 polymorphism of KALRN and the rs224766 polymorphism of ADIPOQ genes may be considered genetic risk factors for CAD in T2D patients and genetic variations of these genes may play a major role in the process of these disorders. Our case-control study in the Iranian population suggested a possible association between the mentioned single-nucleotide polymorphisms and CAD in T2D patients. However, further replication studies and comprehensive meta-analyses are required.

  19. Targeted resequencing identifies TRPM4 as a major gene predisposing to progressive familial heart block type I.

    PubMed

    Daumy, Xavier; Amarouch, Mohamed-Yassine; Lindenbaum, Pierre; Bonnaud, Stéphanie; Charpentier, Eric; Bianchi, Beatrice; Nafzger, Sabine; Baron, Estelle; Fouchard, Swanny; Thollet, Aurélie; Kyndt, Florence; Barc, Julien; Le Scouarnec, Solena; Makita, Naomasa; Le Marec, Hervé; Dina, Christian; Gourraud, Jean-Baptiste; Probst, Vincent; Abriel, Hugues; Redon, Richard; Schott, Jean-Jacques

    2016-03-15

    Progressive cardiac conduction disease (PCCD) is one of the most common cardiac conduction disturbances. It has been causally related to rare mutations in several genes including SCN5A, SCN1B, TRPM4, LMNA and GJA5. In this study, by applying targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) in 95 unrelated patients with PCCD, we have identified 13 rare variants in the TRPM4 gene, two of which are currently absent from public databases. This gene encodes a cardiac calcium-activated cationic channel which precise role and importance in cardiac conduction and disease is still debated. One novel variant, TRPM4-p.I376T, is carried by the proband of a large French 4-generation pedigree. Systematic familial screening showed that a total of 13 family members carry the mutation, including 10 out of the 11 tested affected individuals versus only 1 out of the 21 unaffected ones. Functional and biochemical analyses were performed using HEK293 cells, in whole-cell patch-clamp configuration and Western blotting. TRPM4-p.I376T results in an increased current density concomitant to an augmented TRPM4 channel expression at the cell surface. This study is the first extensive NGS-based screening of TRPM4 coding variants in patients with PCCD. It reports the third largest pedigree diagnosed with isolated Progressive Familial Heart Block type I and confirms that this subtype of PCCD is caused by mutation-induced gain-of-expression and function of the TRPM4 ion channel. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  20. Common variants of NFE2L2 gene predisposes to acute respiratory distress syndrome in patients with severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Herrera, Marialbert; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Blanco, Jesús; Ballesteros, Juan Carlos; Ambrós, Alfonso; Corrales, Almudena; Gandía, Francisco; Subirá, Carlés; Domínguez, David; Baluja, Aurora; Añón, José Manuel; Adalia, Ramón; Pérez-Méndez, Lina; Flores, Carlos; Villar, Jesus

    2015-06-16

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether common variants across the nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 (NFE2L2) gene contribute to the development of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in patients with severe sepsis. NFE2L2 is involved in the response to oxidative stress, and it has been shown to be associated with the development of ARDS in trauma patients. We performed a case-control study of 321 patients fulfilling international criteria for severe sepsis and ARDS who were admitted to a Spanish network of post-surgical and critical care units, as well as 871 population-based controls. Six tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of NFE2L2 were genotyped, and, after further imputation of additional 34 SNPs, association testing with ARDS susceptibility was conducted using logistic regression analysis. After multiple testing adjustments, our analysis revealed 10 non-coding SNPs in tight linkage disequilibrium (0.75 ≤ r (2)  ≤ 1) that were associated with ARDS susceptibility as a single association signal. One of those SNPs (rs672961) was previously associated with trauma-induced ARDS and modified the promoter activity of the NFE2L2 gene, showing an odds ratio of 1.93 per T allele (95 % confidence interval, 1.17-3.18; p = 0.0089). Our findings support the involvement of NFE2L2 gene variants in ARDS susceptibility and reinforce further exploration of the role of oxidant stress response as a risk factor for ARDS in critically ill patients.

  1. Gene specific damage and repair after treatment of cells with UV and chemotherapeutical agents

    SciTech Connect

    Bohr, V.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated preferential DNA repair of active genes in mammalian cells. The methodology involves the use of a specific endonuclease or other more direct approaches to create nicks at sites of damage followed by quantitative Southern analysis and probing for specific genes. Initially, they used pyrimidine dimer specific endonuclease to detect pyrimidine dimers after UV irradiation. They now also use the bacterial enzyme ABC excinuclease to examine the DNA damage and repair of a number of adducts other than pyrimidine dimers in specific genes. They can detect gene specific alkylation damage by creating nicks via depurination and alkaline hydrolysis. In our assay for preferential repair, they compare the efficiency of repair in the DHFR gene to that in the 3{prime} flanking, non-coding region to the gene. In CHO cells, UV induced pyrimidine dimers are efficiently repaired from the active DHFR gene, but not from the inactive region. They have demonstrated that the 6-4 photoproducts are also preferentially repaired and that they are removed faster from the regions studied than pyrimidine dimers. Using similar approaches, they find that DNA adducts and crosslinks caused by cisplatinum are preferentially repaired in the active gene compared to the inactive regions and to the inactive c-fos oncogene. Also, nitrogen mustard and methylnitrosurea damage is preferentially repaired whereas dimethylsulphate damage is not. NAAAF adducts do not appear to be preferentially repaired in this system. 32 refs.

  2. Identification of genes differentially expressed in menstrual breakdown and repair.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Premila; Lockhart, Michelle G; Girling, Jane E; Olshansky, Moshe; Woodrow, Nicole; Marino, Jennifer L; Hickey, Martha; Rogers, Peter A W

    2016-12-01

    Does the changing molecular profile of the endometrium during menstruation correlate with the histological profile of menstruation. We identified several genes not previously associated with menstruation; on Day 2 of menstruation (early-menstruation), processes related to inflammation are predominantly up-regulated and on Day 4 (late-menstruation), the endometrium is predominantly repairing and regenerating. Menstruation is induced by progesterone withdrawal at the end of the menstrual cycle and involves endometrial tissue breakdown, regeneration and repair. Perturbations in the regulation of menstruation may result in menstrual disorders including abnormal uterine bleeding. Endometrial samples were collected by Pipelle biopsy on Days 2 (n = 9), 3 (n = 9) or 4 (n = 6) of menstruation. RNA was extracted from endometrial biopsies and analysed by genome wide expression Illumina Sentrix Human HT12 arrays. Data were analysed using 'Remove Unwanted Variation-inverse (RUV-inv)'. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) and the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) v6.7 were used to identify canonical pathways, upstream regulators and functional gene clusters enriched between Days 2, 3 and 4 of menstruation. Selected individual genes were validated by quantitative PCR. Overall, 1753 genes were differentially expressed in one or more comparisons. Significant canonical pathways, gene clusters and upstream regulators enriched during menstrual bleeding included those associated with immune cell trafficking, inflammation, cell cycle regulation, extracellular remodelling and the complement and coagulation cascade. We provide the first evidence for a role for glutathione-mediated detoxification (glutathione-S-transferase mu 1 and 2; GSTM1 and GSTM2) during menstruation. The largest number of differentially expressed genes was between Days 2 and 4 of menstruation (n = 1176). We identified several genes not previously associated with menstruation

  3. CIKS/Act1-mediated signaling by IL-17 cytokines in context: Implications for how a CIKS gene variant may predispose to psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Sønder, Søren Ulrik; Paun, Andrea; Ha, Hye-Lin; Johnson, Peter F.; Siebenlist, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Psoriasis is a relapsing skin disease characterized by abnormal keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation and by an influx of inflammatory immune cells. Recently IL-17 cytokines have been strongly implicated as critical for the pathogenesis of this disease. IL-17A (a.k.a. IL-17) and IL-17F are the signature cytokine of Th17 cells, but are also produced by innate cells, including γδ T cells present in skin, while epithelial cells, including keratinocytes, may produce IL-17C. IL-17 cytokines signal via the adaptor protein CIKS/Act1. Psoriasis is a disease with a strong genetic predisposition and the gene encoding CIKS has recently been identified as a susceptibility locus. Unexpectedly, one predisposing gene variant features a mutation that impairs rather than enhances CIKS-mediated IL-17 cytokine signaling, counter to the predicted role for IL-17 cytokines in psoriatic inflammation. Here we demonstrate, however, that this mutant adaptor does not impair the IL-17-specific contributions to the genetic response if combined with TNFα, a cytokine also prominent in psoriatic inflammation. Interestingly, TNFα signals compensate IL-17 signaling defects imposed by this mutant adaptor even for genes that are not induced by TNFα alone, including the transcription factors C/EBPδ and IκBζ, which help regulate secondary gene expression in response to IL-17. Based on these findings we discuss a scenario in which the mutant adaptor may interfere with homeostatic maintenance of epithelial barriers, thereby potentially enabling the initiation of inflammatory responses to insults, while this same mutant adaptor would still be able to mediate IL-17-specific contributions to inflammation once TNFα is present. PMID:22581863

  4. ApcMin, A Mutation in the Murine Apc Gene, Predisposes to Mammary Carcinomas and Focal Alveolar Hyperplasias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Amy Rapaich; Mattes, Ellen M.; Dove, William F.; Lindstrom, Mary J.; Haag, Jill D.; Gould, Michael N.

    1993-10-01

    ApcMin (Min, multiple intestinal neoplasia) is a point mutation in the murine homolog of the APC gene. Min/+ mice develop multiple intestinal adenomas, as do humans carrying germ-line mutations in APC. Female mice carrying Min are also prone to develop mammary tumors. Min/+ mammary glands are more sensitive to chemical carcinogenesis than are +/+ mammary glands. Transplantation of mammary cells from Min/+ or +/+ donors into +/+ hosts demonstrates that the propensity to develop mammary tumors is intrinsic to the Min/+ mammary cells. Long-term grafts of Min/+ mammary glands also gave rise to focal alveolar hyperplasias, indicating that the presence of the Min mutation also has a role in the development of these lesions.

  5. Co-occurrence of Risk Alleles in or Near Genes Modulating Insulin Secretion Predisposes Obese Youth to Prediabetes

    PubMed Central

    Giannini, Cosimo; Dalla Man, Chiara; Groop, Leif; Cobelli, Claudio; Zhao, Hongyu; Shaw, Melissa M.; Duran, Elvira; Pierpont, Bridget; Bale, Allen E.; Caprio, Sonia; Santoro, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Paralleling the rise of pediatric obesity, the prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing among youth. In this study, we asked whether the co-occurrence of risk alleles in or near five genes modulating insulin secretion (TCF7L2 rs7903146, IGF2BP2 rs4402960, CDKAL1 rs7754840, HHEX rs1111875, and HNF1A rs1169288) is associated with a higher risk of IGT/T2D in obese children and adolescents. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied 714 obese subjects (290 boys and 424 girls; mean age 13.6 ± 3.1 years; mean z score BMI 2.2 ± 0.4) and evaluated the insulin secretion by using the oral minimal model and, in a subgroup of 37 subjects, the hyperglycemic clamp. Also, 203 subjects were followed up for a mean of 2.1 years. RESULTS We observed that the increase of risk alleles was associated with a progressive worsening of insulin secretion (P < 0.001) mainly due to an impairment of the dynamic phase of insulin secretion (P = 0.004); the higher the number of the risk alleles, the higher the chance of progression from normal glucose tolerance (NGT) to IGT/T2D (P = 0.022). Also, for those who were IGT at baseline, a higher risk score was associated with a lower odds to revert to NGT (P = 0.026). CONCLUSIONS Obese children and adolescents developing IGT/T2D have a higher genetic predisposition than those who do not show these diseases, and this predisposition is mainly related to gene variants modulating the early phase of insulin secretion. Although these data are very interesting, they need to be replicated in other cohorts. PMID:24062323

  6. Targeted DNA methylation by homology-directed repair in mammalian cells. Transcription reshapes methylation on the repaired gene.

    PubMed

    Morano, Annalisa; Angrisano, Tiziana; Russo, Giusi; Landi, Rosaria; Pezone, Antonio; Bartollino, Silvia; Zuchegna, Candida; Babbio, Federica; Bonapace, Ian Marc; Allen, Brittany; Muller, Mark T; Chiariotti, Lorenzo; Gottesman, Max E; Porcellini, Antonio; Avvedimento, Enrico V

    2014-01-01

    We report that homology-directed repair of a DNA double-strand break within a single copy Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) gene in HeLa cells alters the methylation pattern at the site of recombination. DNA methyl transferase (DNMT)1, DNMT3a and two proteins that regulate methylation, Np95 and GADD45A, are recruited to the site of repair and are responsible for selective methylation of the promoter-distal segment of the repaired DNA. The initial methylation pattern of the locus is modified in a transcription-dependent fashion during the 15-20 days following repair, at which time no further changes in the methylation pattern occur. The variation in DNA modification generates stable clones with wide ranges of GFP expression. Collectively, our data indicate that somatic DNA methylation follows homologous repair and is subjected to remodeling by local transcription in a discrete time window during and after the damage. We propose that DNA methylation of repaired genes represents a DNA damage code and is source of variation of gene expression.

  7. CHRM2 gene predisposes to alcohol dependence, drug dependence and affective disorders: results from an extended case-control structured association study.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xingguang; Kranzler, Henry R; Zuo, Lingjun; Wang, Shuang; Blumberg, Hilary P; Gelernter, Joel

    2005-08-15

    Cholinergic muscarinic 2 receptor (CHRM2) is implicated in memory and cognition, functions impaired in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Wang et al. [Wang, J.C., Hinrichs, A.L., Stock, H., Budde, J., Allen, R., Bertelsen, S., Kwon, J.M., Wu, W., Dick, D.M., Rice, J. et al. (2004) Evidence of common and specific genetic effects: association of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 (CHRM2) gene with alcohol dependence and major depressive syndrome. Hum. Mol. Genet., 13, 1903-1911] reported that variation in CHRM2 gene predisposed to alcohol dependence (AD) and major depressive syndrome. We examined the relationships between variation in CHRM2 and AD, drug dependence (DD) and affective disorders, using a novel extended case-control structured association (SA) method. Six markers at CHRM2 and 38 ancestry-informative markers (AIMs) were genotyped in a sample of 871 subjects, including 333 healthy controls [287 European-Americans (EAs) and 46 African-Americans (AAs)] and 538 AD and/or DD subjects (415 with AD and 346 with DD and 382 EAs and 156 AAs). The same CHRM2 markers were genotyped in a sample of 137 EA subjects with affective disorders. All of the six markers were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in controls, but SNP3 (rs1824024) was in Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium in the AD and DD groups. Using conventional case-control comparisons, some markers were nominally significantly or suggestively associated with phenotypes before or after controlling for population stratification and admixture effects, but these associations were not significant after multiple test correction. However, regression analysis identified specific alleles, genotypes, haplotypes and diplotypes that were significantly associated with risk for each disorder. We conclude that variation in CHRM2 predisposes to AD, DD and affective disorders. One haplotype block within the 5'-UTR of CHRM2 may be more important for the development of these disorders than other regions. Interaction between two

  8. Muir-Torre Syndrome and founder mismatch repair gene mutations: A long gone historical genetic challenge.

    PubMed

    Ponti, G; Manfredini, M; Tomasi, A; Pellacani, G

    2016-09-10

    A "cancer predisposing syndrome" later labeled as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch Syndrome, was firstly described by Warthin, about one century ago. An increased predisposition to the development of multiple familial tumors is described as characteristic of this syndrome where visceral and cutaneous malignancies may appear at an early age namely endometrial, gastric, small bowel, ureteral and renal pelvis, ovarian, hepatobiliary tract, pancreatic, brain (Turcot Syndrome) and sebaceous glands (Muir-Torre Syndrome). The latter, a variant of Lynch Syndrome, is characterized by the presence of sebaceous skin adenomas, carcinomas and/or keratoacanthomas associated with visceral malignancies. Both Lynch Syndrome and Muir-Torre Syndrome have been recognized due to germline mutations in mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. To date, 56 Lynch Syndrome founder mutations dependent on MLH1, MSH2 and, although less frequently found, MSH6 and PMS2 are described. Some of these founder mutations, principally of MSH2 gene, have been described to cause Muir-Torre phenotype and have been traced in large and outbreed Muir-Torre Syndrome families living in different US and European territories. Due to the evidences of highly specific Muir-Torre phenotypes related to the presence of widespread MSH2 founder mutations, preliminary search for these MSH2 common mutations in individuals carrying sebaceous tumors and/or keratoacanthomas, at early age or in association to visceral and familial tumors, permits cost-effective and time-saving diagnostic strategies for Lynch/Muir-Torre Syndromes. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Genetic Variation in Renal Expression of Folate Receptor 1 (Folr1) Gene Predisposes Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats to Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pravenec, Michal; Kožich, Viktor; Krijt, Jakub; Sokolová, Jitka; Zídek, Václav; Landa, Vladimír; Mlejnek, Petr; Šilhavý, Jan; Šimáková, Miroslava; Škop, Vojtěch; Trnovská, Jaroslava; Kazdová, Ludmila; Kajiya, Takashi; Wang, Jiaming; Kurtz, Theodore W

    2016-02-01

    Metabolism of homocysteine and other sulfur amino acids is closely associated with metabolism of folates. In this study, we analyzed the possible role of folates and sulfur amino acids in the development of features of the metabolic syndrome in the BXH/HXB recombinant inbred strains derived from the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) and Brown Norway progenitors. We mapped a quantitative trait locus for cysteine concentrations to a region of chromosome 1 that contains a cis-acting expression quantitative trait locus regulating mRNA levels of folate receptor 1 (Folr1) in the kidney. Sequence analysis revealed a deletion variant in the Folr1 promoter region of the SHR. Transfection studies demonstrated that the SHR-promoter region of Folr1 is less effective in driving luciferase reporter gene expression than the Brown Norway promoter region of Folr1. Results in the SHR.BN-chr.1 congenic strain confirmed that the SHR variant in Folr1 cosegregates with markedly reduced renal expression of Folr1 and renal folate reabsorption, decreased serum levels of folate, increased serum levels of cysteine and homocysteine, increased adiposity, ectopic fat accumulation in liver and muscle, reduced muscle insulin sensitivity, and increased blood pressure. Transgenic rescue experiments performed by expressing a Folr1 transgene in the SHR ameliorated most of the metabolic disturbances. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that inherited variation in the expression of Folr1 in the kidney influences the development of the metabolic syndrome and constitutes a previously unrecognized genetic mechanism that may contribute to increased risk for diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease.

  10. Sister chromatid exchange, DNA repair, and single-gene mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Carrano, A.V.; Thompson, L.H.

    1982-01-01

    Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) has been studied in cultured mammalian cells with regard to the nature of the inducing lesion, mutation induction, and factors that modify the observed frequency following mutagen exposure, SCEs can be induced by a wide spectrum of DNA lesions and, for nine agents examined, the frequency of induced SCE is linearly related to induced single-gene mutation. Further, a deficiency in DNA repair may alter the expression of both SCE and mutation in a qualitatively similar manner. The frequency of SCE induced by mitomycin-C is suppressed in heterochromatic relative to euchromatin and, in nondividing lymphocytes, the lesions leading to the formation of SCEs may persist for several months.

  11. Energy and Technology Review: Unlocking the mysteries of DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Quirk, W.A.

    1993-04-01

    DNA, the genetic blueprint, has the remarkable property of encoding its own repair following diverse types of structural damage induced by external agents or normal metabolism. We are studying the interplay of DNA damaging agents, repair genes, and their protein products to decipher the complex biochemical pathways that mediate such repair. Our research focuses on repair processes that correct DNA damage produced by chemical mutagens and radiation, both ionizing and ultraviolet. The most important type of DNA repair in human cells is called excision repair. This multistep process removes damaged or inappropriate pieces of DNA -- often as a string of 29 nucleotides containing the damage -- and replaces them with intact ones. We have isolated, cloned, and mapped several human repair genes associated with the nucleotide excision repair pathway and involved in the repair of DNA damage after exposure to ultraviolet light or mutagens in cooked food. We have shown that a defect in one of these repair genes, ERCC2, is responsible for the repair deficiency in one of the groups of patients with the recessive genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP group D). We are exploring ways to purify sufficient quantities (milligrams) of the protein products of these and other repair genes so that we can understand their functions. Our long-term goals are to link defective repair proteins to human DNA repair disorders that predispose to cancer, and to produce DNA-repair-deficient mice that can serve as models for the human disorders.

  12. Oligonucleotide-mediated gene repair at DNA level: the potential applications for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang-Mei; Liu, De-Pei; Liang, Chih-Chuan

    2002-10-01

    Mutations in gene sequence can cause many genetic disorders, and researchers have attempted to develop treatments or cures at the DNA level for these diseases. Several strategies including triple-helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs), chimeric RNA/DNA oligonucleotide (RDO), and short single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) have been used to correct the dysfunctional genes in situ in the chromosome. Experimental data from cells and animal models suggest that all these strategies can repair the mutations in situ at DNA level. More effective structures of oligonucleotide, efficient delivery systems, and gene correction efficiency should be improved. Development of these strategies holds great potentials for treatments of genetic defects and other disorders.

  13. Pathogenic Mutations in Cancer-Predisposing Genes: A Survey of 300 Patients with Whole-Genome Sequencing and Lifetime Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    He, Karen Y.; McPherson, Elizabeth W.; Li, Quan; Xia, Fan; Weng, Chunhua; Wang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether and how whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data can be used to implement genomic medicine. Our objective is to retrospectively evaluate whether WGS can facilitate improving prevention and care for patients with susceptibility to cancer syndromes. Methods and Findings We analyzed genetic mutations in 60 autosomal dominant cancer-predisposition genes in 300 deceased patients with WGS data and nearly complete long-term (over 30 years) medical records. To infer biological insights from massive amounts of WGS data and comprehensive clinical data in a short period of time, we developed an in-house analysis pipeline within the SeqHBase software framework to quickly identify pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants. The clinical data of the patients who carried pathogenic and/or likely pathogenic variants were further reviewed to assess their clinical conditions using their lifetime EHRs. Among the 300 participants, 5 (1.7%) carried pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants in 5 cancer-predisposing genes: one in APC, BRCA1, BRCA2, NF1, and TP53 each. When assessing the clinical data, each of the 5 patients had one or more different types of cancers, fully consistent with their genetic profiles. Among these 5 patients, 2 died due to cancer while the others had multiple disorders later in their lifetimes; however, they may have benefited from early diagnosis and treatment for healthier lives, had the patients had genetic testing in their earlier lifetimes. Conclusions We demonstrated a case study where the discovery of pathogenic or likely pathogenic germline mutations from population-wide WGS correlates with clinical outcome. The use of WGS may have clinical impacts to improve healthcare delivery. PMID:27930734

  14. Lifespan and Stress Resistance in Drosophila with Overexpressed DNA Repair Genes

    PubMed Central

    Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Proshkina, Ekaterina; Shilova, Lyubov; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Moskalev, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    DNA repair declines with age and correlates with longevity in many animal species. In this study, we investigated the effects of GAL4-induced overexpression of genes implicated in DNA repair on lifespan and resistance to stress factors in Drosophila melanogaster. Stress factors included hyperthermia, oxidative stress, and starvation. Overexpression was either constitutive or conditional and either ubiquitous or tissue-specific (nervous system). Overexpressed genes included those involved in recognition of DNA damage (homologs of HUS1, CHK2), nucleotide and base excision repair (homologs of XPF, XPC and AP-endonuclease-1), and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (homologs of BRCA2, XRCC3, KU80 and WRNexo). The overexpression of different DNA repair genes led to both positive and negative effects on lifespan and stress resistance. Effects were dependent on GAL4 driver, stage of induction, sex, and role of the gene in the DNA repair process. While the constitutive/neuron-specific and conditional/ubiquitous overexpression of DNA repair genes negatively impacted lifespan and stress resistance, the constitutive/ubiquitous and conditional/neuron-specific overexpression of Hus1, mnk, mei-9, mus210, and WRNexo had beneficial effects. This study demonstrates for the first time the effects of overexpression of these DNA repair genes on both lifespan and stress resistance in D. melanogaster. PMID:26477511

  15. Molecular epidemiology of DNA repair gene polymorphisms and head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meilin; Chu, Haiyan; Zhang, Zhengdong; Wei, Qingyi

    2013-01-01

    Although tobacco and alcohol consumption are two common risk factors of head and neck cancer (HNC), other specific etiologic causes, such as viral infection and genetic susceptibility factors, remain to be understood. Human DNA is often damaged by numerous endogenous and exogenous mutagens or carcinogens, and genetic variants in interaction with environmental exposure to these agents may explain interindividual differences in HNC risk. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA damage-repair response are reported to be risk factors for various cancer types, including HNC. Here, we reviewed epidemiological studies that have assessed the associations between HNC risk and SNPs in DNA repair genes involved in base-excision repair, nucleotide-excision repair, mismatch repair, double-strand break repair and direct reversion repair pathways. We found, however, that only a few SNPs in DNA repair genes were found to be associated with significantly increased or decreased risk of HNC, and, in most cases, the effects were moderate, depending upon locus-locus interactions among the risk SNPs in the pathways. We believe that, in the presence of exposure, additional pathway-based analyses of DNA repair genes derived from genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in HNC are needed. PMID:23720673

  16. Dystrophin Gene Replacement and Gene Repair Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in 2016: An Interview

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    After years of relentless efforts, gene therapy has now begun to deliver its therapeutic promise in several diseases. A number of gene therapy products have received regulatory approval in Europe and Asia. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked inherited lethal muscle disease. It is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Replacing and/or repairing the mutated dystrophin gene holds great promises to treated DMD at the genetic level. Last several years have evidenced significant developments in preclinical experimentations in murine and canine models of DMD. There has been a strong interest in moving these promising findings to clinical trials. In light of rapid progress in this field, the Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD) recently interviewed me on the current status of DMD gene therapy and readiness for clinical trials. Here I summarized the interview with PPMD. PMID:27003751

  17. Dystrophin gene replacement and gene repair therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy in 2016.

    PubMed

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2016-03-04

    After years of relentless efforts, gene therapy has now begun to deliver its therapeutic promise in several diseases. A number of gene therapy products have received regulatory approval in Europe and Asia. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked inherited lethal muscle disease. It is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Replacing and/or repair the mutated dystrophin gene holds great promises to treated DMD at the genetic level. Last several years have evidenced significant developments in preclinical experimentations in murine and canine models of DMD. There has been a strong interest in moving these promising findings to clinical trials. In light of rapid progress in this field, the Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD) recently interviewed me on the current status of DMD gene therapy. Here I summarized the interview with PPMD.

  18. Dystrophin Gene Replacement and Gene Repair Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in 2016: An Interview.

    PubMed

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2016-03-01

    After years of relentless efforts, gene therapy has now begun to deliver its therapeutic promise in several diseases. A number of gene therapy products have received regulatory approval in Europe and Asia. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked inherited lethal muscle disease. It is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Replacing and/or repairing the mutated dystrophin gene holds great promises to treated DMD at the genetic level. Last several years have evidenced significant developments in preclinical experimentations in murine and canine models of DMD. There has been a strong interest in moving these promising findings to clinical trials. In light of rapid progress in this field, the Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD) recently interviewed me on the current status of DMD gene therapy and readiness for clinical trials. Here I summarized the interview with PPMD.

  19. Influence of Morinda citrifolia (Noni) on Expression of DNA Repair Genes in Cervical Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Bajpai, Deepti; Singh, Neeta

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that Morinda citrifolia (Noni) has potential to reduce cancer risk. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Noni, cisplatin, and their combination on DNA repair genes in the SiHa cervical cancer cell line. SiHa cells were cultured and treated with 10% Noni, 10 μg/dl cisplatin or their combination for 24 hours. Post culturing, the cells were pelleted, RNA extracted, and processed for investigating DNA repair genes by real time PCR. The expression of nucleotide excision repair genes ERCC1, ERCC2, and ERCC4 and base excision repair gene XRCC1 was increased 4 fold, 8.9 fold, 4 fold, and 5.5 fold, respectively, on treatment with Noni as compared to untreated controls (p<0.05). In contrast, expression was found to be decreased 22 fold, 13 fold, 16 fold, and 23 fold on treatment with cisplatin (p<0.05). However, the combination of Noni and cisplatin led to an increase of 2 fold, 1.6 fold, 3 fold, 1.2 fold, respectively (p<0.05). Noni enhanced the expression of DNA repair genes by itself and in combination with cisplatin. However, high expression of DNA repair genes at mRNA level only signifies efficient DNA transcription of the above mentioned genes; further investigations are needed to evaluate the DNA repair protein expression.

  20. A new nucleotide-excision-repair gene associated with the disorder trichothiodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanini, M.; Giliani, S. ); Vermuelen, W.; Weeda, G.; Hoeijmakers, H.J.; Mezzina, M.; Sarasin, A.; Harper, J.I.; Arlett, C.F.; Lehmann, A.R.

    1993-10-01

    The sun-sensitive, cancer-prone genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is associated in most cases with a defect in the ability to carry out excision repair of UV damage. Seven genetically distinct complementation groups (i.e., A-G) have been identified. A large proportion of patients with the unrelated disorder trichothiodystrophy (TTD), which is characterized by hair-shaft abnormalities, as well as by physical and mental retardation, are also deficient in excision repair of UV damage. In most of these cases the repair deficiency is in the same complementation group as is XP group D. The authors report here on cells from a patient, TTD1BR, in which the repair defect complements all known XP groups (including XP-D). Furthermore, microinjection of various cloned human repair genes fails to correct the repair defect in this cell strain. The defect in TTD1BR cells is therefore in a new gene involved in excision repair in human cells. The finding of a second DNA repair gene that is associated with the clinical features of TTD argues strongly for an involvement of repair proteins in hair-shaft development. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Triple Negative Breast Cancers Have a Reduced Expression of DNA Repair Genes

    PubMed Central

    Andreis, Daniele; Bertoni, Ramona; Giardini, Roberto; Fox, Stephen B.; Broggini, Massimo; Bottini, Alberto; Zanoni, Vanessa; Bazzola, Letizia; Foroni, Chiara; Generali, Daniele; Damia, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    DNA repair is a key determinant in the cellular response to therapy and tumor repair status could play an important role in tailoring patient therapy. Our goal was to evaluate the mRNA of 13 genes involved in different DNA repair pathways (base excision, nucleotide excision, homologous recombination, and Fanconi anemia) in paraffin embedded samples of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) compared to luminal A breast cancer (LABC). Most of the genes involved in nucleotide excision repair and Fanconi Anemia pathways, and CHK1 gene were significantly less expressed in TNBC than in LABC. PARP1 levels were higher in TNBC than in LABC. In univariate analysis high level of FANCA correlated with an increased overall survival and event free survival in TNBC; however multivariate analyses using Cox regression did not confirm FANCA as independent prognostic factor. These data support the evidence that TNBCs compared to LABCs harbour DNA repair defects. PMID:23825533

  2. Network-based characterization and prediction of human DNA repair genes and pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Hui; Zhang, Gai-Gai

    2017-01-01

    Network biology is a useful strategy to understand cell’s functional organization. In this study, for the first time, we successfully introduced network approaches to study properties of human DNA repair genes. Compared with non-DNA repair genes, we found distinguishing features for DNA repair genes: (i) they tend to have higher degrees; (ii) they tend to be located at global network center; (iii) they tend to interact directly with each other. Based on these features, we developed the first algorithm to predict new DNA repair genes. We tested several machine-learning models and found that support vector machine with kernel function of radial basis function (RBF) achieve the best performance, with precision = 0.74 and area under curve (AUC) = 0.96. In the end, we applied the algorithm to predict new DNA repair genes and got 32 new candidates. Literature supporting four of the predictions was found. We believe the network approaches introduced here might open a new avenue to understand DNA repair genes and pathways. The suggested algorithm and the predicted genes might be helpful for scientists in the field. PMID:28368026

  3. Genes and Junk in Plant Mitochondria—Repair Mechanisms and Selection

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Alan C.

    2014-01-01

    Plant mitochondrial genomes have very low mutation rates. In contrast, they also rearrange and expand frequently. This is easily understood if DNA repair in genes is accomplished by accurate mechanisms, whereas less accurate mechanisms including nonhomologous end joining or break-induced replication are used in nongenes. An important question is how different mechanisms of repair predominate in coding and noncoding DNA, although one possible mechanism is transcription-coupled repair (TCR). This work tests the predictions of TCR and finds no support for it. Examination of the mutation spectra and rates in genes and junk reveals what DNA repair mechanisms are available to plant mitochondria, and what selective forces act on the repair products. A model is proposed that mismatches and other DNA damages are repaired by converting them into double-strand breaks (DSBs). These can then be repaired by any of the DSB repair mechanisms, both accurate and inaccurate. Natural selection will eliminate coding regions repaired by inaccurate mechanisms, accounting for the low mutation rates in genes, whereas mutations, rearrangements, and expansions generated by inaccurate repair in noncoding regions will persist. Support for this model includes the structure of the mitochondrial mutS homolog in plants, which is fused to a double-strand endonuclease. The model proposes that plant mitochondria do not distinguish a damaged or mismatched DNA strand from the undamaged strand, they simply cut both strands and perform homology-based DSB repair. This plant-specific strategy for protecting future generations from mitochondrial DNA damage has the side effect of genome expansions and rearrangements. PMID:24904012

  4. Genes and junk in plant mitochondria-repair mechanisms and selection.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Alan C

    2014-06-05

    Plant mitochondrial genomes have very low mutation rates. In contrast, they also rearrange and expand frequently. This is easily understood if DNA repair in genes is accomplished by accurate mechanisms, whereas less accurate mechanisms including nonhomologous end joining or break-induced replication are used in nongenes. An important question is how different mechanisms of repair predominate in coding and noncoding DNA, although one possible mechanism is transcription-coupled repair (TCR). This work tests the predictions of TCR and finds no support for it. Examination of the mutation spectra and rates in genes and junk reveals what DNA repair mechanisms are available to plant mitochondria, and what selective forces act on the repair products. A model is proposed that mismatches and other DNA damages are repaired by converting them into double-strand breaks (DSBs). These can then be repaired by any of the DSB repair mechanisms, both accurate and inaccurate. Natural selection will eliminate coding regions repaired by inaccurate mechanisms, accounting for the low mutation rates in genes, whereas mutations, rearrangements, and expansions generated by inaccurate repair in noncoding regions will persist. Support for this model includes the structure of the mitochondrial mutS homolog in plants, which is fused to a double-strand endonuclease. The model proposes that plant mitochondria do not distinguish a damaged or mismatched DNA strand from the undamaged strand, they simply cut both strands and perform homology-based DSB repair. This plant-specific strategy for protecting future generations from mitochondrial DNA damage has the side effect of genome expansions and rearrangements.

  5. Frequent germline deleterious mutations in DNA repair genes in familial prostate cancer cases are associated with advanced disease

    PubMed Central

    Leongamornlert, D; Saunders, E; Dadaev, T; Tymrakiewicz, M; Goh, C; Jugurnauth-Little, S; Kozarewa, I; Fenwick, K; Assiotis, I; Barrowdale, D; Govindasami, K; Guy, M; Sawyer, E; Wilkinson, R; Antoniou, A C; Eeles, R; Kote-Jarai, Z

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer (PrCa) is one of the most common diseases to affect men worldwide and among the leading causes of cancer-related death. The purpose of this study was to use second-generation sequencing technology to assess the frequency of deleterious mutations in 22 tumour suppressor genes in familial PrCa and estimate the relative risk of PrCa if these genes are mutated. Methods: Germline DNA samples from 191 men with 3 or more cases of PrCa in their family were sequenced for 22 tumour suppressor genes using Agilent target enrichment and Illumina technology. Analysis for genetic variation was carried out by using a pipeline consisting of BWA, Genome Analysis Toolkit (GATK) and ANNOVAR. Clinical features were correlated with mutation status using standard statistical tests. Modified segregation analysis was used to determine the relative risk of PrCa conferred by the putative loss-of-function (LoF) mutations identified. Results: We discovered 14 putative LoF mutations in 191 samples (7.3%) and these mutations were more frequently associated with nodal involvement, metastasis or T4 tumour stage (P=0.00164). Segregation analysis of probands with European ancestry estimated that LoF mutations in any of the studied genes confer a relative risk of PrCa of 1.94 (95% CI: 1.56–2.42). Conclusions: These findings show that LoF mutations in DNA repair pathway genes predispose to familial PrCa and advanced disease and therefore warrants further investigation. The clinical utility of these findings will become increasingly important as targeted screening and therapies become more widespread. PMID:24556621

  6. Definition of a DNA repair domain in the genomic region containing the human p53 gene.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, D M; Kantor, G J

    1996-07-15

    The human p53 gene is repaired in UV (254 nm)-irradiated xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XP-C) cells as part of a large genomic region that is about twice the size of the gene. Surrounding genomic regions are not repaired. Through DNA cloning and measurements of DNA repair, we mapped the location of the repair domain, including the terminal regions, relative to the topological features of the gene. The domain includes only the DNA strand that is transcribed and extends in both 3' and 5' directions beyond the promoter and transcription termination sites. No transcriptional activity other than that associated with the p53 gene was detected. The results suggest that nontranscribed regions adjacent to the p53 transcribed regions are efficiently repaired in XP-C cells. This means that factors associated with transcription other than RNA polymerase II and the associated transcription repair coupling factor must also play a role in the selective repair process in XP-C cells. We also found that a DNA fragment that contains the p53 promoters is nearly twice as sensitive to cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer induction by UV irradiation than are the surrounding fragments, which have the expected sensitivity.

  7. Genomic survey and expression analysis of DNA repair genes in the genus Leptospira.

    PubMed

    Martins-Pinheiro, Marinalva; Schons-Fonseca, Luciane; da Silva, Josefa B; Domingos, Renan H; Momo, Leonardo Hiroyuki Santos; Simões, Ana Carolina Quirino; Ho, Paulo Lee; da Costa, Renata M A

    2016-04-01

    Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonosis with important economic and public health consequences and is caused by pathogenic leptospires. The genus Leptospira belongs to the order Spirochaetales and comprises saprophytic (L. biflexa), pathogenic (L. interrogans) and host-dependent (L. borgpetersenii) members. Here, we present an in silico search for DNA repair pathways in Leptospira spp. The relevance of such DNA repair pathways was assessed through the identification of mRNA levels of some genes during infection in animal model and after exposition to spleen cells. The search was performed by comparison of available Leptospira spp. genomes in public databases with known DNA repair-related genes. Leptospires exhibit some distinct and unexpected characteristics, for instance the existence of a redundant mechanism for repairing a chemically diverse spectrum of alkylated nucleobases, a new mutS-like gene and a new shorter version of uvrD. Leptospira spp. shares some characteristics from Gram-positive, as the presence of PcrA, two RecQ paralogs and two SSB proteins; the latter is considered a feature shared by naturally competent bacteria. We did not find a significant reduction in the number of DNA repair-related genes in both pathogenic and host-dependent species. Pathogenic leptospires were enriched for genes dedicated to base excision repair and non-homologous end joining. Their evolutionary history reveals a remarkable importance of lateral gene transfer events for the evolution of the genus. Up-regulation of specific DNA repair genes, including components of SOS regulon, during infection in animal model validates the critical role of DNA repair mechanisms for the complex interplay between host/pathogen.

  8. Transcript RNA supports precise repair of its own DNA gene.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Havva; Meers, Chance; Storici, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of genetic information from RNA to DNA is considered an extraordinary process in molecular biology. Despite the fact that cells transcribe abundant amount of RNA with a wide range of functions, it has been difficult to uncover whether RNA can serve as a template for DNA repair and recombination. An increasing number of experimental evidences suggest a direct role of RNA in DNA modification. Recently, we demonstrated that endogenous transcript RNA can serve as a template to repair a DNA double-strand break (DSB), the most harmful DNA lesion, not only indirectly via formation of a DNA copy (cDNA) intermediate, but also directly in a homology driven mechanism in budding yeast. These results point out that the transfer of genetic information from RNA to DNA is more general than previously thought. We found that transcript RNA is more efficient in repairing a DSB in its own DNA (in cis) than in a homologous but ectopic locus (in trans). Here, we summarize current knowledge about the process of RNA-driven DNA repair and recombination, and provide further data in support of our model of DSB repair by transcript RNA in cis. We show that a DSB is precisely repaired predominately by transcript RNA and not by residual cDNA in conditions in which formation of cDNA by reverse transcription is inhibited. Additionally, we demonstrate that defects in ribonuclease (RNase) H stimulate precise DSB repair by homologous RNA or cDNA sequence, and not by homologous DNA sequence carried on a plasmid. These results highlight an antagonistic role of RNase H in RNA-DNA recombination. Ultimately, we discuss several questions that should be addressed to better understand mechanisms and implications of RNA-templated DNA repair and recombination.

  9. Lung cancer and DNA repair genes: multilevel association analysis from the International Lung Cancer Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Kazma, Rémi; Babron, Marie-Claude; Gaborieau, Valérie; Génin, Emmanuelle; Brennan, Paul; Hung, Rayjean J.; McLaughlin, John R.; Krokan, Hans E.; Elvestad, Maiken B.; Skorpen, Frank; Anderssen, Endre; Vooder, Tõnu; Välk, Kristjan; Metspalu, Andres; Field, John K.; Lathrop, Mark; Sarasin, Alain; Benhamou, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer (LC) is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide and tobacco smoking is the major associated risk factor. DNA repair is an important process, maintaining genome integrity and polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may contribute to susceptibility to LC. To explore the role of DNA repair genes in LC, we conducted a multilevel association study with 1655 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 211 DNA repair genes using 6911 individuals pooled from four genome-wide case–control studies. Single SNP association corroborates previous reports of association with rs3131379, located on the gene MSH5 (P = 3.57 × 10-5) and returns a similar risk estimate. The effect of this SNP is modulated by histological subtype. On the log-additive scale, the odds ratio per allele is 1.04 (0.84–1.30) for adenocarcinomas, 1.52 (1.28–1.80) for squamous cell carcinomas and 1.31 (1.09–1.57) for other histologies (heterogeneity test: P = 9.1 × 10−3). Gene-based association analysis identifies three repair genes associated with LC (P < 0.01): UBE2N, structural maintenance of chromosomes 1L2 and POLB. Two additional genes (RAD52 and POLN) are borderline significant. Pathway-based association analysis identifies five repair pathways associated with LC (P < 0.01): chromatin structure, DNA polymerases, homologous recombination, genes involved in human diseases with sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents and Rad6 pathway and ubiquitination. This first international pooled analysis of a large dataset unravels the role of specific DNA repair pathways in LC and highlights the importance of accounting for gene and pathway effects when studying LC. PMID:22382497

  10. Replication protein A binds to regulatory elements in yeast DNA repair and DNA metabolism genes.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, K K; Samson, L

    1995-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae responds to DNA damage by arresting cell cycle progression (thereby preventing the replication and segregation of damaged chromosomes) and by inducing the expression of numerous genes, some of which are involved in DNA repair, DNA replication, and DNA metabolism. Induction of the S. cerevisiae 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase repair gene (MAG) by DNA-damaging agents requires one upstream activating sequence (UAS) and two upstream repressing sequences (URS1 and URS2) in the MAG promoter. Sequences similar to the MAG URS elements are present in at least 11 other S. cerevisiae DNA repair and metabolism genes. Replication protein A (Rpa) is known as a single-stranded-DNA-binding protein that is involved in the initiation and elongation steps of DNA replication, nucleotide excision repair, and homologous recombination. We now show that the MAG URS1 and URS2 elements form similar double-stranded, sequence-specific, DNA-protein complexes and that both complexes contain Rpa. Moreover, Rpa appears to bind the MAG URS1-like elements found upstream of 11 other DNA repair and DNA metabolism genes. These results lead us to hypothesize that Rpa may be involved in the regulation of a number of DNA repair and DNA metabolism genes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7761422

  11. Gene expression profiling identifies eleven DNA repair genes down-regulated during mouse neural crest cell migration.

    PubMed

    Albino, Domenico; Brizzolara, Antonella; Moretti, Stefano; Falugi, Carla; Mirisola, Valentina; Scaruffi, Paola; Di Candia, Michele; Truini, Mauro; Coco, Simona; Bonassi, Stefano; Tonini, Gian Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Neural Crest Cells (NCCs) are transient multipotent migratory cells that derive from the embryonic neural crest which is itself derived from the margin of the neural tube. DNA repair genes are expressed in the early stages of mammalian development to reduce possible replication errors and genotoxic damage. Some birth defects and cancers are due to inappropriate or defective DNA repair machinery, indicating that the proper functioning of DNA repair genes in the early stages of fetal development is essential for maintaining DNA integrity. We performed a genome-wide expression analysis combining laser capture microdissection (LCM) and high-density oligo-microarray of murine NCCs at pre-migratory embryonic days 8.5 (E8.5), and at E13.5, as well as on neural crest-derived cells from the adrenal medulla at postnatal day 90. We found 11 genes involved in DNA repair activity (response to DNA damage stimulus, DNA damage checkpoint, base-excision repair, mismatch repair), over-expressed in the early stages of mouse embryo development. Expression of these 11 genes was very low or undetectable in the differentiated adrenal medulla of the adult mouse. Amongst the 11 genes, 6 had not been previously reported as being over-expressed during mouse embryonic development. High expression of DNA repair genes in enriched NCCs during early embryonic development may contribute to maintaining DNA integrity whilst failure of some of these genes may be associated with the onset of genetic disease and cancer. Our model of enriched murine NCCs and neural crest-derived cells can be used to elucidate the key roles of genes during normal embryonic development and in cancer pathogenesis.

  12. Analysis of gene repair tracts from Cas9/gRNA double-stranded breaks in the human CFTR gene

    PubMed Central

    Hollywood, Jennifer A.; Lee, Ciaran M.; Scallan, Martina F.; Harrison, Patrick T.

    2016-01-01

    To maximise the efficiency of template-dependent gene editing, most studies describe programmable and/or RNA-guided endonucleases that make a double-stranded break at, or close to, the target sequence to be modified. The rationale for this design strategy is that most gene repair tracts will be very short. Here, we describe a CRISPR Cas9/gRNA selection-free strategy which uses deep sequencing to characterise repair tracts from a donor plasmid containing seven nucleotide differences across a 216 bp target region in the human CFTR gene. We found that 90% of the template-dependent repair tracts were >100 bp in length with equal numbers of uni-directional and bi-directional repair tracts. The occurrence of long repair tracts suggests that a single gRNA could be used with variants of the same template to create or correct specific mutations within a 200 bp range, the size of ~80% of human exons. The selection-free strategy used here also allowed detection of non-homologous end joining events in many of the homology-directed repair tracts. This indicates a need to modify the donor, possibly by silent changes in the PAM sequence, to prevent creation of a second double-stranded break in an allele that has already been correctly edited by homology-directed repair. PMID:27557525

  13. Analysis of gene repair tracts from Cas9/gRNA double-stranded breaks in the human CFTR gene.

    PubMed

    Hollywood, Jennifer A; Lee, Ciaran M; Scallan, Martina F; Harrison, Patrick T

    2016-08-25

    To maximise the efficiency of template-dependent gene editing, most studies describe programmable and/or RNA-guided endonucleases that make a double-stranded break at, or close to, the target sequence to be modified. The rationale for this design strategy is that most gene repair tracts will be very short. Here, we describe a CRISPR Cas9/gRNA selection-free strategy which uses deep sequencing to characterise repair tracts from a donor plasmid containing seven nucleotide differences across a 216 bp target region in the human CFTR gene. We found that 90% of the template-dependent repair tracts were >100 bp in length with equal numbers of uni-directional and bi-directional repair tracts. The occurrence of long repair tracts suggests that a single gRNA could be used with variants of the same template to create or correct specific mutations within a 200 bp range, the size of ~80% of human exons. The selection-free strategy used here also allowed detection of non-homologous end joining events in many of the homology-directed repair tracts. This indicates a need to modify the donor, possibly by silent changes in the PAM sequence, to prevent creation of a second double-stranded break in an allele that has already been correctly edited by homology-directed repair.

  14. The effect of acute dose charge particle radiation on expression of DNA repair genes in mice.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Muhammad Akram; Soedipe, Ayodotun; Ramesh, Govindarajan; Wu, Honglu; Zhang, Ye; Shishodia, Shishir; Gridley, Daila S; Pourmand, Nader; Jejelowo, Olufisayo

    2011-03-01

    The space radiation environment consists of trapped particle radiation, solar particle radiation, and galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), in which protons are the most abundant particle type. During missions to the moon or to Mars, the constant exposure to GCR and occasional exposure to particles emitted from solar particle events (SPE) are major health concerns for astronauts. Therefore, in order to determine health risks during space missions, an understanding of cellular responses to proton exposure is of primary importance. The expression of DNA repair genes in response to ionizing radiation (X-rays and gamma rays) has been studied, but data on DNA repair in response to protons is lacking. Using qPCR analysis, we investigated changes in gene expression induced by positively charged particles (protons) in four categories (0, 0.1, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy) in nine different DNA repair genes isolated from the testes of irradiated mice. DNA repair genes were selected on the basis of their known functions. These genes include ERCC1 (5' incision subunit, DNA strand break repair), ERCC2/NER (opening DNA around the damage, Nucleotide Excision Repair), XRCC1 (5' incision subunit, DNA strand break repair), XRCC3 (DNA break and cross-link repair), XPA (binds damaged DNA in preincision complex), XPC (damage recognition), ATA or ATM (activates checkpoint signaling upon double strand breaks), MLH1 (post-replicative DNA mismatch repair), and PARP1 (base excision repair). Our results demonstrate that ERCC1, PARP1, and XPA genes showed no change at 0.1 Gy radiation, up-regulation at 1.0 Gy radiation (1.09 fold, 7.32 fold, 0.75 fold, respectively), and a remarkable increase in gene expression at 2.0 Gy radiation (4.83 fold, 57.58 fold and 87.58 fold, respectively). Expression of other genes, including ATM and XRCC3, was unchanged at 0.1 and 1.0 Gy radiation but showed up-regulation at 2.0 Gy radiation (2.64 fold and 2.86 fold, respectively). We were unable to detect gene expression for the

  15. Relationship between DNA mismatch repair genes expression, Ku-genes expression and ploidy-related parameters in the progression of pigmented lesions of the skin.

    PubMed

    Korabiowska, Monika; Tscherny, Michael; Stachura, Jerzy; Ruschenburg, Ilka; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Brinck, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    Defects of DNA repair systems in cutaneous tumours are related to DNA mismatch repair genes (MLH1, MSH2, PMS1, PMS2) and Ku70/80 genes involved in double- strand repair. In this study we investigated the statistical relationship between these systems and DNA-ploidy-related parameters in 19 naevus cell naevi, 23 lentigos maligna, 76 primary melanomas and 31 melanoma metastases, applying the correlation coefficient according to Spearman. In naevi significant correlations were found between Ku70/80 gene expression and some ploidy-related parameters. In lentigos, additionally, some significant correlations between the expression of DNA mismatch repair genes were found. Similar results were demonstrated for primary melanomas. In metastases no one significant correlation between DNA mismatch repair genes and Ku-genes was present. We postulate that DNA mismatch repair genes and Ku70/80 genes are functionally independent and that some of them are able to influence ploidy-related parameters.

  16. Bi-allelic alterations in DNA repair genes underpin homologous recombination DNA repair defects in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mutter, Robert W; Riaz, Nadeem; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Delsite, Rob; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Edelweiss, Marcia; Martelotto, Luciano G; Sakr, Rita A; King, Tari A; Giri, Dilip D; Drobnjak, Maria; Brogi, Edi; Bindra, Ranjit; Bernheim, Giana; Lim, Raymond S; Blecua, Pedro; Desrichard, Alexis; Higginson, Dan; Towers, Russell; Jiang, Ruomu; Lee, William; Weigelt, Britta; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Powell, Simon N

    2017-03-15

    Homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair deficient (HRD) breast cancers have been shown to be sensitive to DNA repair targeted therapies. Burgeoning evidence suggests that sporadic breast cancers, lacking germline BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations, may also be HRD. We developed a functional ex vivo RAD51-based test to identify HRD primary breast cancers. An integrated approach examining methylation, gene expression and whole-exome sequencing was employed to ascertain the etiology of HRD. Functional HRD breast cancers displayed genomic features of lack of competent HR, including large-scale state transitions and specific mutational signatures. Somatic and/or germline genetic alterations resulting in bi-allelic loss-of-function of HR genes underpinned functional HRD in 89% of cases, and were observed in only one of the 15 HR-proficient samples tested. These findings indicate the importance of a comprehensive genetic assessment of bi-allelic alterations in the HR pathway to deliver a precision medicine-based approach to select patients for therapies targeting tumor-specific DNA repair defects.

  17. Germline mutations in DNA repair genes may predict neoadjuvant therapy response in triple negative breast patients.

    PubMed

    Spugnesi, Laura; Gabriele, Michele; Scarpitta, Rosa; Tancredi, Mariella; Maresca, Luisa; Gambino, Gaetana; Collavoli, Anita; Aretini, Paolo; Bertolini, Ilaria; Salvadori, Barbara; Landucci, Elisabetta; Fontana, Andrea; Rossetti, Elena; Roncella, Manuela; Naccarato, Giuseppe Antonio; Caligo, Maria Adelaide

    2016-12-01

    Triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs) represent about 15-20% of all breast cancer cases and are characterized by a complex molecular heterogeneity. Some TNBCs exhibit clinical and pathological properties similar to BRCA-mutated tumors, without actually bearing a mutation in BRCA genes. This "BRCAness" phenotype may be explained by germline mutations in other genes involved in DNA repair. Although respond to chemotherapy with alkylating agents, they have a high risk of recurrence and progression. Some studies have shown the efficacy of neoadjuvant therapy in TNBC patients with DNA repair defects, but proper biomarkers of DNA repair deficiency are still needed. Here, we investigated if mutations in DNA repair genes may be correlated with anthracyclines/taxanes neoadjuvant therapy response. DNA from 19 TNBC patients undergoing neoadjuvant therapy were subjected to next generation sequencing of a panel of 24 genes in DNA repair and breast cancer predisposition. In this study, 5 of 19 patients (26%) carried a pathogenic mutation in BRCA1, PALB2, RAD51C and two patients carried a probable pathogenic missense variant. Moreover, VUS (Variants of Unknown Significance) in other genes, predicted to be deleterious by in silico tools, were detected in five patients. Germline mutations in DNA repair genes were found to be associated with the group of TNBC patients who responded to therapy. We conclude that a subgroup of TNBC patients have defects in DNA repair genes, other than BRCA1, and such patients respond favourably to neoadjuvant anthracyclines/taxanes therapy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Preferential repair of DNA double-strand break at the active gene in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Priyasri; Sen, Rwik; Pandita, Tej K; Bhaumik, Sukesh R

    2012-10-19

    Previous studies have demonstrated transcription-coupled nucleotide/base excision repair. We report here for the first time that DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is also coupled to transcription. We generated a yeast strain by introducing a homing (Ho) endonuclease cut site followed by a nucleotide sequence for multiple Myc epitopes at the 3' end of the coding sequence of a highly active gene, ADH1. This yeast strain also contains the Ho cut site at the nearly silent or poorly active mating type α (MATα) locus and expresses Ho endonuclease under the galactose-inducible GAL1 promoter. Using this strain, DSBs were generated at the ADH1 and MATα loci in galactose-containing growth medium that induced HO expression. Subsequently, yeast cells were transferred to dextrose-containing growth medium to stop HO expression, and the DSB repair was monitored at the ADH1 and MATα loci by PCR, using the primer pairs flanking the Ho cut sites. Our results revealed a faster DSB repair at the highly active ADH1 than that at the nearly silent MATα locus, hence implicating a transcription-coupled DSB repair at the active gene in vivo. Subsequently, we extended this study to another gene, PHO5 (carrying the Ho cut site at its coding sequence), under transcriptionally active and inactive growth conditions. We found a fast DSB repair at the active PHO5 gene in comparison to its inactive state. Collectively, our results demonstrate a preferential DSB repair at the active gene, thus supporting transcription-coupled DSB repair in living cells.

  19. DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms in Hereditary and Sporadic Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    joining repair, the two double-strand-breaks are directly ligated and in HR, the DNA ends are first resected in the 5 ’ to 3’ direction by nucleases; the...DNA polymerase, which copies information from the partner. In HR, the DNA ends are first resected in the 5 ’ to 3’ direction by nucleases; the resulting...genotypes by studying DNA repair proficiency in the terms of 5 chromosomal breaks in EBV-immortalized lymphocytes following in vitro treatment with

  20. DNA repair genes polymorphisms and genetic susceptibility to Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms in a Portuguese population: The role of base excision repair genes polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Ana P; Silva, Susana N; De Lima, João P; Reichert, Alice; Lima, Fernando; Júnior, Esmeraldina; Rueff, José

    2017-06-01

    The role of base excision repair (BER) genes in Philadelphia-negative (PN)-myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) susceptibility was evaluated by genotyping eight polymorphisms [apurinic/apyrimidinic endodeoxyribonuclease 1, mutY DNA glycosylase, earlier mutY homolog (E. coli) (MUTYH), 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1, PARP4 and X-ray repair cross-complementing 1 (XRCC1)] in a case-control study involving 133 Caucasian Portuguese patients. The results did not reveal a correlation between individual BER polymorphisms and PN-MPNs when considered as a whole. However, stratification for essential thrombocythaemia revealed i) borderline effect/tendency to increased risk when carrying at least one variant allele for XRCC1_399 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP); ii) decreased risk for Janus kinase 2-positive patients carrying at least one variant allele for XRCC1_399 SNP; and iii) decreased risk in females carrying at least one variant allele for MUTYH SNP. Combination of alleles demonstrated an increased risk to PN-MPNs for one specific haplogroup. These findings may provide evidence for gene variants in susceptibility to MPNs. Indeed, common variants in DNA repair genes may hamper the capacity to repair DNA, thus increasing cancer susceptibility.

  1. DNA repair genes polymorphisms and genetic susceptibility to Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms in a Portuguese population: The role of base excision repair genes polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Ana P.; Silva, Susana N.; De Lima, João P.; Reichert, Alice; Lima, Fernando; Júnior, Esmeraldina; Rueff, José

    2017-01-01

    The role of base excision repair (BER) genes in Philadelphia-negative (PN)-myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) susceptibility was evaluated by genotyping eight polymorphisms [apurinic/apyrimidinic endodeoxyribonuclease 1, mutY DNA glycosylase, earlier mutY homolog (E. coli) (MUTYH), 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1, PARP4 and X-ray repair cross-complementing 1 (XRCC1)] in a case-control study involving 133 Caucasian Portuguese patients. The results did not reveal a correlation between individual BER polymorphisms and PN-MPNs when considered as a whole. However, stratification for essential thrombocythaemia revealed i) borderline effect/tendency to increased risk when carrying at least one variant allele for XRCC1_399 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP); ii) decreased risk for Janus kinase 2-positive patients carrying at least one variant allele for XRCC1_399 SNP; and iii) decreased risk in females carrying at least one variant allele for MUTYH SNP. Combination of alleles demonstrated an increased risk to PN-MPNs for one specific haplogroup. These findings may provide evidence for gene variants in susceptibility to MPNs. Indeed, common variants in DNA repair genes may hamper the capacity to repair DNA, thus increasing cancer susceptibility. PMID:28599464

  2. FISH comets show that the salvage enzyme TK1 contributes to gene-specific DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Katherine A.; Yasseen, Akeel A.; McKerr, George; Downes, C. S.; McKelvey-Martin, Valerie J.

    2014-01-01

    Thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) is a salvage enzyme that phosphorylates thymidine, imported from surrounding fluids, to create dTMP, which is further phosphorylated to the DNA precursor dTTP. TK1 deficiency has for a long time been known to cause increased cellular sensitivity to DNA damage. We have examined preferential strand break repair of DNA domains in TK1+ and TK1- clones of the Raji cell line, by the Comet-FISH technique, in bulk DNA and in the actively transcribed tumor suppressor (TP53) and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene regions, over 1 h after 5Gy γ-irradiation. Results showed that repair of the TP53 and hTERT gene regions was more efficient in TK1+ compared to TK1- cells, a trend also reflected to a lesser degree in genomic DNA repair between the cell-lines. The targeted gene-specific repair in TK+ cells occurred rapidly, mainly over the first 15 min repair-period. Therefore, TK1 is needed for preferential repair of actively transcribed regions, through a previously unsuspected mechanism. In principle, TK1 could exert its protective effects through supply of a supplementary dTTP pool for accurate repair of damaged genes; but Raji TK1+ cells in thymidine free media still show preferential repair of transcribed regions. TK1 therefore does not exert its protective effects through dTTP pools, but through another unidentified mechanism, which affects sensitivity to and mutagenicity by DNA damaging agents. PMID:25152750

  3. Survival of UV-irradiated mammalian cells correlates with efficient DNA repair in an essential gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bohr, V.A.; Okumoto, D.S.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1986-06-01

    The survival of UV-irradiated mammalian cells is not necessarily correlated with their overall capacity to carry out DNA repair. Human cells typically remove 80% of the pyrimidine dimers produced by a UV dose of 5 J/m2 within 24 hr. In contrast, a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line survives UV irradiation equally well while removing only 15% of the dimers. Using a newly developed technique to measure dimer frequencies in single-copy specific sequences, we find that the CHO cells remove 70% of the dimers from the essential dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene but only 20% from sequences located 30 kilobases or more upstream from the 5' end of the gene in a 24-hr period. Repair-deficient human cells from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) are similar to the CHO cells in overall repair levels, but they are extremely sensitive to killing by UV irradiation. In the XPC cells, we find little or no repair in the DHFR gene; in contrast, in normal human fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes, greater than 80% of the dimers induced in the gene by 20 J/m2 are removed in 24 hr. Since the CHO and normal human cells exhibit similar UV resistance, much higher than that of XPC cells, our findings suggest a correlation between efficient repair of essential genes and resistance to DNA-damaging agents such as UV light.

  4. Genetic variants of the DNA repair genes from Exome Aggregation Consortium (EXAC) database: significance in cancer.

    PubMed

    Das, Raima; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar

    2017-04-01

    DNA repair pathway is a primary defense system that eliminates wide varieties of DNA damage. Any deficiencies in them are likely to cause the chromosomal instability that leads to cell malfunctioning and tumorigenesis. Genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes have demonstrated a significant association with cancer risk. Our study attempts to give a glimpse of the overall scenario of the germline polymorphisms in the DNA repair genes by taking into account of the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) database as well as the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD) for evaluating the disease link, particularly in cancer. It has been found that ExAC DNA repair dataset (which consists of 228 DNA repair genes) comprises 30.4% missense, 12.5% dbSNP reported and 3.2% ClinVar significant variants. 27% of all the missense variants has the deleterious SIFT score of 0.00 and 6% variants carrying the most damaging Polyphen-2 score of 1.00, thus affecting the protein structure and function. However, as per HGMD, only a fraction (1.2%) of ExAC DNA repair variants was found to be cancer-related, indicating remaining variants reported in both the databases to be further analyzed. This, in turn, may provide an increased spectrum of the reported cancer linked variants in the DNA repair genes present in ExAC database. Moreover, further in silico functional assay of the identified vital cancer-associated variants, which is essential to get their actual biological significance, may shed some lights in the field of targeted drug development in near future. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. MUTYH the base excision repair gene family member associated with colorectal cancer polyposis.

    PubMed

    Kashfi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Golmohammadi, Mina; Behboudi, Faeghe; Nazemalhosseini-Mojarad, Ehsan; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    sporadic (70-75%), familial (20-25%) and hereditary (5-10%). hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes classified into two different subtypes: polyposis and non polyposis. Familial Adenomatous polyposis (FAP; OMIM #175100) is the most common polyposis syndrome, account for <1% of colorectal cancer incidence and characterized by germline mutations in the Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC, 5q21- q22; OMIM #175100). FAP is a dominant cancer predisposing syndrome which 20-25% cases are de novo. There is also another polyposis syndrome; MUTYH associated polyposis (MAP, OMIM 608456) which it is caused by mutation in human Mut Y homologue MUTYH (MUTYH; OMIM 604933) and it is associated with multiple (15-100) colonic adenomas. In this paper we discuss MUTYH mechanism as an important member of Base Excision Repair (BER) family and its important role in polyposis condition.

  6. MUTYH the base excision repair gene family member associated with colorectal cancer polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Kashfi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Golmohammadi, Mina; Behboudi, Faeghe; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is classified in to three forms: sporadic (70–75%), familial (20–25%) and hereditary (5–10%). hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes classified into two different subtypes: polyposis and non polyposis. Familial Adenomatous polyposis (FAP; OMIM #175100) is the most common polyposis syndrome, account for <1% of colorectal cancer incidence and characterized by germline mutations in the Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC, 5q21- q22; OMIM #175100). FAP is a dominant cancer predisposing syndrome which 20–25% cases are de novo. There is also another polyposis syndrome; MUTYH associated polyposis (MAP, OMIM 608456) which it is caused by mutation in human Mut Y homologue MUTYH (MUTYH; OMIM 604933) and it is associated with multiple (15–100) colonic adenomas. In this paper we discuss MUTYH mechanism as an important member of Base Excision Repair (BER) family and its important role in polyposis condition. PMID:24834277

  7. Polymorphisms in DNA Repair Genes, Recreational Physical Activity and Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Lauren E.; Santella, Regina M.; Cleveland, Rebecca J.; Millikan, Robert C.; Olshan, Andrew F.; North, Kari E.; Bradshaw, Patrick T.; Eng, Sybil M.; Terry, Mary Beth; Shen, Jing; Crew, Katherine D.; Rossner, Pavel; Teitelbaum, Susan L.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Gammon, Marilie D.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms driving the inverse association between recreational physical activity (RPA) and breast cancer risk are complex. While exercise is associated with increased reactive oxygen species production it may also improve damage repair systems, particularly those that operate on single-strand breaks including base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER) and mismatch repair (MMR). Of these repair pathways, the role of MMR in breast carcinogenesis is least investigated. Polymorphisms in MMR or other DNA repair gene variants may modify the association between RPA and breast cancer incidence. We investigated the individual and joint effects of variants in three MMR pathway genes (MSH3, MLH1 and MSH2) on breast cancer occurrence using resources from the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project. We additionally characterized interactions between RPA and genetic polymorphisms in MMR, BER and NER pathways. We found statistically significant multiplicative interactions (p<0.05) between MSH2 and MLH1, as well as between postmenopausal RPA and four variants in DNA repair (XPC-Ala499Val, XPF-Arg415Gln, XPG-Asp1104His and MLH1-lle219Val). Significant risk reductions were observed among highly active women with the common genotype for XPC (OR=0.54; 95% CI, 0.36–0.81) and XPF (OR=0.62; 95% CI, 0.44–0.87), as well as among active women who carried at least one variant allele in XPG (OR=0.46; 95% CI, 0.29–0.77) and MLH1 (OR=0.46; 95% CI, 0.30–0.71). Our data show that women with minor alleles in both MSH2 and MLH1 could be at increased breast cancer risk. RPA may be modified by genes in the DNA repair pathway, and merit further investigation. PMID:23852586

  8. Gene Expression in Experimental Aortic Coarctation and Repair: Candidate Genes for Therapeutic Intervention?

    PubMed Central

    LaDisa, John F.; Bozdag, Serdar; Olson, Jessica; Ramchandran, Ramani; Kersten, Judy R.; Eddinger, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta (CoA) is a constriction of the proximal descending thoracic aorta and is one of the most common congenital cardiovascular defects. Treatments for CoA improve life expectancy, but morbidity persists, particularly due to the development of chronic hypertension (HTN). Identifying the mechanisms of morbidity is difficult in humans due to confounding variables such as age at repair, follow-up duration, coarctation severity and concurrent anomalies. We previously developed an experimental model that replicates aortic pathology in humans with CoA without these confounding variables, and mimics correction at various times using dissolvable suture. Here we present the most comprehensive description of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) to date from the pathology of CoA, which were obtained using this model. Aortic samples (n=4/group) from the ascending aorta that experiences elevated blood pressure (BP) from induction of CoA, and restoration of normal BP after its correction, were analyzed by gene expression microarray, and enriched genes were converted to human orthologues. 51 DEGs with >6 fold-change (FC) were used to determine enriched Gene Ontology terms, altered pathways, and association with National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headers (MeSH) IDs for HTN, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and CoA. The results generated 18 pathways, 4 of which (cell cycle, immune system, hemostasis and metabolism) were shared with MeSH ID’s for HTN and CVD, and individual genes were associated with the CoA MeSH ID. A thorough literature search further uncovered association with contractile, cytoskeletal and regulatory proteins related to excitation-contraction coupling and metabolism that may explain the structural and functional changes observed in our experimental model, and ultimately help to unravel the mechanisms responsible for persistent morbidity after treatment for CoA. PMID:26207811

  9. Gene Expression in Experimental Aortic Coarctation and Repair: Candidate Genes for Therapeutic Intervention?

    PubMed

    LaDisa, John F; Bozdag, Serdar; Olson, Jessica; Ramchandran, Ramani; Kersten, Judy R; Eddinger, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta (CoA) is a constriction of the proximal descending thoracic aorta and is one of the most common congenital cardiovascular defects. Treatments for CoA improve life expectancy, but morbidity persists, particularly due to the development of chronic hypertension (HTN). Identifying the mechanisms of morbidity is difficult in humans due to confounding variables such as age at repair, follow-up duration, coarctation severity and concurrent anomalies. We previously developed an experimental model that replicates aortic pathology in humans with CoA without these confounding variables, and mimics correction at various times using dissolvable suture. Here we present the most comprehensive description of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) to date from the pathology of CoA, which were obtained using this model. Aortic samples (n=4/group) from the ascending aorta that experiences elevated blood pressure (BP) from induction of CoA, and restoration of normal BP after its correction, were analyzed by gene expression microarray, and enriched genes were converted to human orthologues. 51 DEGs with >6 fold-change (FC) were used to determine enriched Gene Ontology terms, altered pathways, and association with National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headers (MeSH) IDs for HTN, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and CoA. The results generated 18 pathways, 4 of which (cell cycle, immune system, hemostasis and metabolism) were shared with MeSH ID's for HTN and CVD, and individual genes were associated with the CoA MeSH ID. A thorough literature search further uncovered association with contractile, cytoskeletal and regulatory proteins related to excitation-contraction coupling and metabolism that may explain the structural and functional changes observed in our experimental model, and ultimately help to unravel the mechanisms responsible for persistent morbidity after treatment for CoA.

  10. The convergence of fracture repair and stem cells: interplay of genes, aging, environmental factors and disease.

    PubMed

    Hadjiargyrou, Michael; O'Keefe, Regis J

    2014-11-01

    The complexity of fracture repair makes it an ideal process for studying the interplay between the molecular, cellular, tissue, and organ level events involved in tissue regeneration. Additionally, as fracture repair recapitulates many of the processes that occur during embryonic development, investigations of fracture repair provide insights regarding skeletal embryogenesis. Specifically, inflammation, signaling, gene expression, cellular proliferation and differentiation, osteogenesis, chondrogenesis, angiogenesis, and remodeling represent the complex array of interdependent biological events that occur during fracture repair. Here we review studies of bone regeneration in genetically modified mouse models, during aging, following environmental exposure, and in the setting of disease that provide insights regarding the role of multipotent cells and their regulation during fracture repair. Complementary animal models and ongoing scientific discoveries define an increasing number of molecular and cellular targets to reduce the morbidity and complications associated with fracture repair. Last, some new and exciting areas of stem cell research such as the contribution of mitochondria function, limb regeneration signaling, and microRNA (miRNA) posttranscriptional regulation are all likely to further contribute to our understanding of fracture repair as an active branch of regenerative medicine. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  11. Lack of association between polymorphisms of the DNA base excision repair genes MUTYH and hOGG1 and keratoconus in a Polish subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Synowiec, Ewelina; Wójcik, Katarzyna A.; Czubatka, Anna; Polakowski, Piotr; Izdebska, Justyna; Szaflik, Jerzy; Błasiak, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Keratoconus (KC) is a non-inflammatory thinning of the cornea and a leading indication for corneal transplantation. Oxidative stress plays a role in the pathogenesis of this disease. The products of the hOGG1 and MUTYH genes play an important role in the repair of oxidatively modified DNA in the base excision repair pathway. We hypothesized that variability in these genes may change susceptibility to oxidative stress and predispose individuals to the development of KC. We investigated the possible association between the c.977C>G polymorphism of the hOGG1 gene (rs1052133) and the c.972G>C polymorphism of the MUTYH gene (rs3219489) and KC occurrence as well as the modulation of this association by some KC risk factors. Material and methods A total of 205 patients with KC and 220 controls were included in this study. The polymorphisms were genotyped with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) restriction fragment length polymorphism and PCR-confronting two-pair primer techniques. Differences in genotype and allele frequency distributions were evaluated using the χ2 test, and KC risk was estimated with an unconditional multiple logistic regression with and without adjustment for co-occurrence of visual impairment, allergies, sex and family history for KC. Results We did not find any association between the genotypes and combined genotypes of the c.977C>G polymorphism of the hOGG1 gene and the c.972G>C polymorphism of the MUTYH gene and the occurrence of KC. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the c.977C>G-hOGG1 polymorphism and the c.972G>C-MUTYH polymorphism may not be linked with KC occurrence in this Polish subpopulation. PMID:26528356

  12. Functional characterization of polymorphisms in DNA repair genes using cytogenetic challenge assays.

    PubMed Central

    Au, William W; Salama, Salama A; Sierra-Torres, Carlos H

    2003-01-01

    A major barrier to understanding the role of polymorphic DNA repair genes for environmental cancer is that the functions of variant genotypes are largely unknown. Using our cytogenetic challenge assays, we conducted an investigation to address the deficiency. Using X-rays or ultraviolet (UV) light, we irradiated blood lymphocytes from 80 nonsmoking donors to challenge the cells to repair the induced DNA damage, and we analyzed expression of chromosome aberrations (CA) specific to the inducing agents. We have genotyped polymorphic DNA repair genes preferentially involved with base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide excision repair (NER) activities (XRCC1, XRCC3, APE1, XPD) corresponding to the repair of X-ray- and UV light-induced DNA damage, respectively. We expected that defects in specific DNA repair pathways due to polymorphisms would cause corresponding increases of specific CA. From our data, XRCC1 399Gln and XRCC3 241Met were associated with significant increases in chromosome deletions compared with the corresponding homozygous wild types (18.27 1.1 vs 14.79 1.2 and 18.22 0.99 vs 14.20 1.39, respectively); XPD 312Asn and XPD 751Gln were associated with significant increases in chromatid breaks compared with wild types (16.09 1.36 vs 11.41 0.98 and 16.87 1.27 vs 10.54 0.87, respectively), p < 0.05. The data indicate that XRCC1 399Gln and XRCC3 241Met are significantly defective in BER, and the XPD 312Asn and XPD 751Gln are significantly defective in NER. In addition, the variant genotypes interact significantly, with limited overlap of the two different repair pathways. PMID:14630517

  13. Isolation of the functional human excision repair gene ERCC5 by intercosmid recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Mudgett, J.S.; MacInnes, M.A. )

    1990-12-01

    The complete human nucleotide exicision repair gene ERCC5 was isolated as a functional gene on overlapping cosmids. ERCC5 corrects the excision repair deficiency of Chinese hamster ovary cell line UV135, of complementation group 5. Cosmids that contained human sequences were obtained from a UV-resistant cell line derived from UV135 cells transformed with human genomic DNA. Individually, none of the cosmids complemented the UV135 repair defect; cosmid groups were formed to represent putative human genomic regions, and specific pairs of cosmids that effectively transformed UV135 cells to UV resistance were identified. Analysis of transformants derived from the active cosmid pairs showed that the functional 32-kbp ERCC5 gene was reconstructed by homologous intercosmid recombination. The cloned human sequences exhibited 100% concordance with the locus designated genetically as ERCC5 located on human chromosome 13q. Cosmid-transformed UV135 host cells repaired cytotoxic damage to levels about 70% of normal and repaired UV-irradiated shuttle vector DNA to levels about 82% of normal.

  14. Repair of rDNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: RAD4-independent strand-specific nucleotide excision repair of RNA polymerase I transcribed genes.

    PubMed Central

    Verhage, R A; Van de Putte, P; Brouwer, J

    1996-01-01

    Removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from the individual strands of the rDNA locus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied. Yeast rDNA, that is transcribed by RNA polymerase I(RNA pol I), is repaired efficiently, slightly strand-specific and independently of RAD26, which has been implicated in transcription-coupled repair of the RNA pol II transcribed RPB2 gene. No repair of rDNA is observed in rad1,2,3 and 14 mutants, demonstrating that dimer removal from this highly repetitive DNA is accomplished by nucleotide excision repair (NER). In rad7 and rad16 mutants, which are specifically deficient in repair of non-transcribed DNA, there is a clear preferential repair of the transcribed strand of rDNA, indicating that strand-specific and therefore probably transcription-coupled repair of RNA pol I transcribed genes does exist in yeast. Unexpectedly, the transcribed but not the non-transcribed strand of rDNA can be repaired in rad4 mutants, which seem otherwise completely NER-deficient. PMID:8604332

  15. The clinical value of aberrant epigenetic changes of DNA damage repair genes in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Dan; Herman, James G.; Guo, Mingzhou

    2016-01-01

    The stability and integrity of the human genome are maintained by the DNA damage repair (DDR) system. Unrepaired DNA damage is a major source of potentially mutagenic lesions that drive carcinogenesis. In addition to gene mutation, DNA methylation occurs more frequently in DDR genes in human cancer. Thus, DNA methylation may play more important roles in DNA damage repair genes to drive carcinogenesis. Aberrant methylation patterns in DNA damage repair genes may serve as predictive, diagnostic, prognostic and chemosensitive markers of human cancer. MGMT methylation is a marker for poor prognosis in human glioma, while, MGMT methylation is a sensitive marker of glioma cells to alkylating agents. Aberrant epigenetic changes in DNA damage repair genes may serve as therapeutic targets. Treatment of MLH1-methylated colon cancer cell lines with the demethylating agent 5′-aza-2′-deoxycytidine induces the expression of MLH1 and sensitizes cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil. Synthetic lethality is a more exciting approach in patients with DDR defects. PARP inhibitors are the most effective anticancer reagents in BRCA-deficient cancer cells. PMID:26967246

  16. Higher expression of somatic repair genes in long-lived ant queens than workers

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Eric R.; Privman, Eyal; Keller, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Understanding why organisms senesce is a fundamental question in biology. One common explanation is that senescence results from an increase in macromolecular damage with age. The tremendous variation in lifespan between genetically identical queen and worker ants, ranging over an order of magnitude, provides a unique system to study how investment into processes of somatic maintenance and macromolecular repair influence lifespan. Here we use RNAseq to compare patterns of expression of genes involved in DNA and protein repair of age-matched queens and workers. There was no difference between queens and workers in 1-day-old individuals, but the level of expression of these genes increased with age and this up-regulation was greater in queens than in workers, resulting in significantly queen-biased expression in 2-month-old individuals in both legs and brains. Overall, these differences are consistent with the hypothesis that higher longevity is associated with increased investment into somatic repair. PMID:27617474

  17. Inherited DNA-Repair Gene Mutations in Men with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, C.C.; Mateo, J.; Walsh, M.F.; De Sarkar, N.; Abida, W.; Beltran, H.; Garofalo, A.; Gulati, R.; Carreira, S.; Eeles, R.; Elemento, O.; Rubin, M.A.; Robinson, D.; Lonigro, R.; Hussain, M.; Chinnaiyan, A.; Vinson, J.; Filipenko, J.; Garraway, L.; Taplin, M-E.; AlDubayan, S.; Han, G.C.; Beightol, M.; Morrissey, C.; Nghiem, B.; Cheng, H.H.; Montgomery, B.; Walsh, T.; Casadei, S.; Berger, M.; Zhang, L.; Zehir, A.; Vijai, J.; Scher, H.I.; Sawyers, C.; Schultz, N.; Kantoff, P.W.; Solit, D.; Robson, M.; Van Allen, E.M.; Offit, K.; de Bono, J.; Nelson, P.S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Inherited mutations in DNA-repair genes such as BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of lethal prostate cancer. Although the prevalence of germline mutations in DNA-repair genes among men with localized prostate cancer who are unselected for family predisposition is insufficient to warrant routine testing, the frequency of such mutations in patients with metastatic prostate cancer has not been established. METHODS We recruited 692 men with documented metastatic prostate cancer who were unselected for family history of cancer or age at diagnosis. We isolated germline DNA and used multiplex sequencing assays to assess mutations in 20 DNA-repair genes associated with autosomal dominant cancer-predisposition syndromes. RESULTS A total of 84 germline DNA-repair gene mutations that were presumed to be deleterious were identified in 82 men (11.8%); mutations were found in 16 genes, including BRCA2 (37 men [5.3%]), ATM (11 [1.6%]), CHEK2 (10 [1.9% of 534 men with data]), BRCA1 (6 [0.9%]), RAD51D (3 [0.4%]), and PALB2 (3 [0.4%]). Mutation frequencies did not differ according to whether a family history of prostate cancer was present or according to age at diagnosis. Overall, the frequency of germline mutations in DNA-repair genes among men with metastatic prostate cancer significantly exceeded the prevalence of 4.6% among 499 men with localized prostate cancer (P<0.001), including men with high-risk disease, and the prevalence of 2.7% in the Exome Aggregation Consortium, which includes 53,105 persons without a known cancer diagnosis (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS In our multicenter study, the incidence of germline mutations in genes mediating DNA-repair processes among men with metastatic prostate cancer was 11.8%, which was significantly higher than the incidence among men with localized prostate cancer. The frequencies of germline mutations in DNA-repair genes among men with metastatic disease did not differ significantly according to age at diagnosis or family

  18. A multistep genomic screen identifies new genes required for repair of DNA double-strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Jennifer Summers; Sethi, Sunaina; Tripp, Jennifer DeMars; Nguyen, Thuy N; Sanderson, Brian A; Westmoreland, James W; Resnick, Michael A; Lewis, L Kevin

    2013-04-15

    Efficient mechanisms for rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are vital because misrepair of such lesions leads to mutation, aneuploidy and loss of cell viability. DSB repair is mediated by proteins acting in two major pathways, called homologous recombination and nonhomologous end-joining. Repair efficiency is also modulated by other processes such as sister chromatid cohesion, nucleosome remodeling and DNA damage checkpoints. The total number of genes influencing DSB repair efficiency is unknown. To identify new yeast genes affecting DSB repair, genes linked to gamma radiation resistance in previous genome-wide surveys were tested for their impact on repair of site-specific DSBs generated by in vivo expression of EcoRI endonuclease. Eight members of the RAD52 group of DNA repair genes (RAD50, RAD51, RAD52, RAD54, RAD55, RAD57, MRE11 and XRS2) and 73 additional genes were found to be required for efficient repair of EcoRI-induced DSBs in screens utilizing both MATa and MATα deletion strain libraries. Most mutants were also sensitive to the clastogenic chemicals MMS and bleomycin. Several of the non-RAD52 group genes have previously been linked to DNA repair and over half of the genes affect nuclear processes. Many proteins encoded by the protective genes have previously been shown to associate physically with each other and with known DNA repair proteins in high-throughput proteomics studies. A majority of the proteins (64%) share sequence similarity with human proteins, suggesting that they serve similar functions. We have used a genetic screening approach to detect new genes required for efficient repair of DSBs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The findings have spotlighted new genes that are critical for maintenance of genome integrity and are therefore of greatest concern for their potential impact when the corresponding gene orthologs and homologs are inactivated or polymorphic in human cells.

  19. Polymorphisms in base excision repair genes: Breast cancer risk and individual radiosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Patrono, Clarice; Sterpone, Silvia; Testa, Antonella; Cozzi, Renata

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cancer among women worldwide. The aetiology and carcinogenesis of BC are not clearly defined, although genetic, hormonal, lifestyle and environmental risk factors have been established. The most common treatment for BC includes breast-conserving surgery followed by a standard radiotherapy (RT) regimen. However, radiation hypersensitivity and the occurrence of RT-induced toxicity in normal tissue may affect patients’ treatment. The role of DNA repair in cancer has been extensively investigated, and an impaired DNA damage response may increase the risk of BC and individual radiosensitivity. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA repair genes may alter protein function and modulate DNA repair efficiency, influencing the development of various cancers, including BC. SNPs in DNA repair genes have also been studied as potential predictive factors for the risk of RT-induced side effects. Here, we review the literature on the association between SNPs in base excision repair (BER) genes and BC risk. We focused on X-ray repair cross complementing group 1 (XRCC1), which plays a key role in BER, and on 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, which encode three important BER enzymes that interact with XRCC1. Although no association between SNPs and radiation toxicity has been validated thus far, we also report published studies on XRCC1 SNPs and variants in other BER genes and RT-induced side effects in BC patients, emphasising that large well-designed studies are needed to determine the genetic components of individual radiosensitivity. PMID:25493225

  20. Association study of genetic variation in DNA repair pathway genes and risk of basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan; Chahal, Harvind S; Wu, Wenting; Cho, Hyunje G; Ransohoff, Katherine J; Song, Fengju; Tang, Jean Y; Sarin, Kavita Y; Han, Jiali

    2017-09-01

    DNA repair plays a critical role in protecting the genome from ultraviolet radiation and maintaining the genomic integrity of cells. Genetic variants in DNA repair-related genes can influence an individual's DNA repair capacity, which may be related to the risk of developing basal cell carcinoma (BCC). We comprehensively assessed the associations of 2,965 independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across 165 DNA repair pathway genes with BCC risk in a genome-wide association meta-analysis totaling 17,187 BCC cases and 287,054 controls from two data sets. After multiple testing corrections, we identified three SNPs (rs2805831 upstream of XPA: OR = 0.93, P = 1.35 × 10(-6) ; rs659857 in exon of MUS81: OR = 1.06, P = 3.09 × 10(-6) and rs57343616 in 3' UTR of NABP2: OR = 1.11, P = 6.47 × 10(-6) ) as significantly associated with BCC risk in meta-analysis, and all of them were nominally significant in both data sets. Furthermore, rs659857 [T] was significantly associated with decreased expression of MUS81 mRNA in the expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis. Our findings suggest that the inherited common variation in three DNA repair genes-XPA, MUS81 and NABP2-may be involved in the development of BCC. To our knowledge, our study is the first report thoroughly examining the effects of SNPs across DNA repair pathway genes on BCC risk based on a genome-wide association meta-analysis. © 2017 UICC.

  1. Semiconservative replication, genetic repair, and many-gened genomes: Extending the quasispecies paradigm to living systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannenbaum, Emmanuel; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2005-12-01

    Quasispecies theory has emerged as an important tool for modeling the evolutionary dynamics of biological systems. We review recent advances in the field, with an emphasis on the quasispecies dynamics of semiconservatively replicating genomes. Applications to cancer and adult stem cell growth are discussed. Additional topics, such as genetic repair and many-gene genomes, are covered as well.

  2. Review: gene- and stem cell-based therapeutics for bone regeneration and repair.

    PubMed

    Kimelman, Nadav; Pelled, Gadi; Helm, Gregory A; Huard, J; Schwarz, Edward M; Gazit, Dan

    2007-06-01

    Many clinical conditions require regeneration or implantation of bone. This is one focus shared by neurosurgery and orthopedics. Current therapeutic options (bone grafting and protein-based therapy) do not provide satisfying solutions to the problem of massive bone defects. In the past few years, gene- and stem cell-based therapy has been extensively studied to achieve a viable alternative to current solutions offered by modern medicine for bone-loss repair. The use of adult stem cells for bone regeneration has gained much focus. This unique population of multipotential cells has been isolated from various sources, including bone marrow, adipose, and muscle tissues. Genetic engineering of adult stem cells with potent osteogenic genes has led to fracture repair and rapid bone formation in vivo. It is hypothesized that these genetically modified cells exert both an autocrine and a paracrine effects on host stem cells, leading to an enhanced osteogenic effect. The use of direct gene delivery has also shown much promise for in vivo bone repair. Several viral and nonviral methods have been used to achieve substantial bone tissue formation in various sites in animal models. To advance these platforms to the clinical setting, it will be mandatory to overcome specific hurdles, such as control over transgene expression, viral vector toxicity, and prolonged culture periods of therapeutic stem cells. This review covers a prospect of cell and gene therapy for bone repair as well as some very recent advancements in stem cell isolation, genetic engineering, and exogenous control of transgene expression.

  3. Intake of fruits and vegetables and polymorphisms in DNA repair genes in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Sacerdote, Carlotta; Matullo, Giuseppe; Polidoro, Silvia; Gamberini, Sara; Piazza, Alberto; Karagas, Margaret R; Rolle, Luigi; De Stefanis, Paolo; Casetta, Giovanni; Morabito, Francesco; Vineis, Paolo; Guarrera, Simonetta

    2007-07-01

    The objective is to investigate the relationships between fruit and vegetable intake, DNA repair gene polymorphisms and the risk of bladder cancer. We have analyzed a hospital-based case-control study of 266 individuals with incident, histologically confirmed bladder cancer diagnosed between 1994 and 2003. Controls (n = 193) were patients treated for benign diseases recruited daily in a random fashion from the same hospital as the cases. All cases and controls were interviewed face-to-face for major risk factors, along fruit and vegetable consumption. Odds ratios (ORs) for fruit and vegetable intake and DNA repair gene polymorphisms were adjusted for age and smoking status, using unconditional logistic regression. A statistically significant decreased risk was observed for fruit and vegetable intake above median (versus below the median) [unadjusted OR 0.61, confidence interval (CI) 95% 0.50-0.96 and OR 0.54, CI 95% 0.39-0.80, respectively]; the decreased risk persisted after adjustment for age and cigarette smoking (OR 0.73, CI 95% 0.49-1.01 and OR 0.86, CI 95% 0.56-1.08, respectively). The fruits and vegetables associated with decreased risks included leafy green vegetables, cruciferous vegetables, apples and citrus fruits. We did not find any interactions between DNA repair gene polymorphisms and fruit and vegetable intake. This study found a reduced risk associated with fruit and vegetable intake. No interaction was observed between fruit and vegetable consumption and DNA repair gene polymorphisms.

  4. Transcription-coupled repair in RNA polymerase I-transcribed genes of yeast

    PubMed Central

    Conconi, Antonio; Bespalov, Vyacheslav A.; Smerdon, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) was measured in the individual strands of transcriptionally active and inactive ribosomal genes of yeast. Ribosomal genes (rDNA) are present in multiple copies, but only a fraction of them is actively transcribed. Restriction enzyme digestion was used to specifically release the transcriptionally active fraction from yeast nuclei, and selective psoralen crosslinking was used to distinguish between active and inactive rDNA chromatin. Removal of CPDs was followed in both rDNA populations, and the data clearly show that strand-specific repair occurs in transcriptionally active rDNA while being absent in the inactive rDNA fraction. Thus, transcription-coupled repair occurs in RNA polymerase I-transcribed genes in yeast. Moreover, the nontranscribed strand of active rDNA is repaired faster than either strand of inactive rDNA, implying that NER has preferred access to the active, non-nucleosomal rDNA chromatin. Finally, restriction enzyme accessibility to active rDNA varies during NER, suggesting that there is a change in ribosomal gene chromatin structure during or soon after CPD removal. PMID:11782531

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi modulates gene expression of plasma membrane repair-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Brígido, Rebecca Tavares E Silva; Tavares, Paula Cristina Brígido; Santos, Marlus Alves Dos; Santos, Júlia de Gouveia; Souza, Maria Aparecida de; Goulart, Isabela Maria Bernardes; Silva, Claudio Vieira da

    2017-10-01

    Plasma membrane injury and repair is particularly prevalent in muscle cells. Here, we aimed to verify dysferlin, acid sphingomyelinase and transcriptional factor EB gene expression during Trypanosoma cruzi infection in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that the parasite modulates gene expression of these proteins in a way dependent on the number of plasma membrane interacting parasites and in a rapamycin-sensitive manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Loss of transcription factor early growth response gene 1 results in impaired endochondral bone repair.

    PubMed

    Reumann, Marie K; Strachna, Olga; Yagerman, Sarah; Torrecilla, Daniel; Kim, Jihye; Doty, Stephen B; Lukashova, Lyudmila; Boskey, Adele L; Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp

    2011-10-01

    Transcription factors that play a role in ossification during development are expected to participate in postnatal fracture repair since the endochondral bone formation that occurs in embryos is recapitulated during fracture repair. However, inherent differences exist between bone development and fracture repair, including a sudden disruption of tissue integrity followed by an inflammatory response. This raises the possibility that repair-specific transcription factors participate in bone healing. Here, we assessed the consequence of loss of early growth response gene 1 (EGR-1) on endochondral bone healing because this transcription factor has been shown to modulate repair in vascularized tissues. Model fractures were created in ribs of wild type (wt) and EGR-1(-/-) mice. Differences in tissue morphology and composition between these two animal groups were followed over 28 post fracture days (PFDs). In wt mice, bone healing occurred in healing phases characteristic of endochondral bone repair. A similar healing sequence was observed in EGR-1(-/-) mice but was impaired by alterations. A persistent accumulation of fibrin between the disconnected bones was observed on PFD7 and remained pronounced in the callus on PFD14. Additionally, the PFD14 callus was abnormally enlarged and showed increased deposition of mineralized tissue. Cartilage ossification in the callus was associated with hyper-vascularity and -proliferation. Moreover, cell deposits located in proximity to the callus within skeletal muscle were detected on PFD14. Despite these impairments, repair in EGR-1(-/-) callus advanced on PFD28, suggesting EGR-1 is not essential for healing. Together, this study provides genetic evidence that EGR-1 is a pleiotropic regulator of endochondral fracture repair.

  7. Loss of transcription factor early growth response gene 1 results in impaired endochondral bone repair

    PubMed Central

    Reumann, Marie K.; Strachna, Olga; Yagerman, Sarah; Torrecilla, Daniel; Kim, Jihye; Doty, Steven B.; Lukashova, Lyudmila; Boskey, Adele L.; Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors that play a role in ossification during development are expected to participate in postnatal fracture repair since the endochondral bone formation that occurs in embryos is recapitulated during fracture repair. However, inherent differences exist between bone development and fracture repair, including a sudden disruption of tissue integrity followed by an inflammatory response. This raises the possibility that repair-specific transcription factors participate in bone healing. Here, we assessed the consequence of loss of early growth response gene 1 (EGR-1) on endochondral bone healing because this transcription factor has been shown to modulate repair in vascularized tissues. Model fractures were created in ribs of wild type (wt) and EGR-1−/− mice. Differences in tissue morphology and composition between these two animal groups were followed over 28 post fracture days (PFDs). In wt mice, bone healing occurred in healing phases characteristic of endochondral bone repair. A similar healing sequence was observed in EGR-1−/− mice but was impaired by alterations. A persistent accumulation of fibrin between the disconnected bones was observed on PFD7 and remained pronounced in the callus on PFD14. Additionally, the PFD14 callus was abnormally enlarged and showed increased deposition of mineralized tissue. Cartilage ossification in the callus was associated with hyper-vascularity and -proliferation. Moreover, cell deposits located in proximity to the callus within skeletal muscle were detected on PFD14. Despite these impairments, repair in EGR-1−/− callus advanced on PFD28, suggesting EGR-1 is not essential for healing. Together, this study provides genetic evidence that EGR-1 is a pleiotropic regulator of endochondral fracture repair. PMID:21726677

  8. Cytogenetic Response to Ionizing Radiation Exposure in Human Fibroblasts with Suppressed Expression of Non-DSB Repair Genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Hammond, Dianne; Mehta, Satish K.; Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Pierson, Duane L.; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in double-strand break (DSB) repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been well studied. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of IR inducible genes in radiation-induced chromosome aberrations and micronuclei formation. In the study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN) formation and chromosome aberrations were measured to determine the efficiency of cytogenetic repair, and the fraction of bi-nucleated cells in the MN analysis was used as a marker for cell cycle progression. In response to gamma radiation, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of five genes: Ku70 (DSB repair pathway), XPA (nucleotide excision repair pathway), RPA1 (mismatch repair pathway), RAD17 and RBBP8 (cell cycle control). Knocked-down expression of four genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Moreover, decreased XPA, p21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Nine of these eleven genes, whose knock-down expression affected cytogenetic repair, were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate IR

  9. Cytogenetic Response to Ionizing Radiation Exposure in Human Fibroblasts with Suppressed Expression of Non-DSB Repair Genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Hammond, Dianne; Mehta, Satish K.; Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Pierson, Duane L.; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in double-strand break (DSB) repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been well studied. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of IR inducible genes in radiation-induced chromosome aberrations and micronuclei formation. In the study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN) formation and chromosome aberrations were measured to determine the efficiency of cytogenetic repair, and the fraction of bi-nucleated cells in the MN analysis was used as a marker for cell cycle progression. In response to gamma radiation, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of five genes: Ku70 (DSB repair pathway), XPA (nucleotide excision repair pathway), RPA1 (mismatch repair pathway), RAD17 and RBBP8 (cell cycle control). Knocked-down expression of four genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Moreover, decreased XPA, p21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Nine of these eleven genes, whose knock-down expression affected cytogenetic repair, were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate IR

  10. Polymorphic DNA repair and metabolic genes: a multigenic study on gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Palli, Domenico; Polidoro, Silvia; D'Errico, Mariarosaria; Saieva, Calogero; Guarrera, Simonetta; Calcagnile, Angelo S; Sera, Francesco; Allione, Alessandra; Gemma, Simonetta; Zanna, Ines; Filomena, Alessandro; Testai, Emanuela; Caini, Saverio; Moretti, Renato; Gomez-Miguel, Maria-Jesus; Nesi, Gabriella; Luzzi, Ida; Ottini, Laura; Masala, Giovanna; Matullo, Giuseppe; Dogliotti, Eugenia

    2010-11-01

    Risk factors for gastric cancer (GC) include inter-individual variability in the inflammatory response to Helicobacter pylori infection, in the ability of detoxifying DNA reactive species and repairing DNA damage generated by oxidative stress and dietary carcinogens. To evaluate the association between polymorphic DNA repair genes and GC risk, a case-control study including 314 histologically confirmed GC patients and 548 healthy controls was conducted in a GC high-risk area in Tuscany, Italy. Polymorphic variants of base excision repair (APE1-D148E, XRCC1-R194W, XRCC1-R399Q and OGG1-S326C), nucleotide excision repair (XPC-PAT, XPA-23G>A, ERCC1-19007T>C and XPD-L751Q), recombination (XRCC3-T241M) and alkylation damage reversal (MGMT-L84F) were tested for their potential role in the development of GC by using logistic regression models. The same population was also characterised for GSTT1 and GSTM1 variant alleles to search for possible functional interactions between metabolic and DNA repair genotypes by two-way interactions using multivariate logistic models. No significant association between any single DNA repair genotype and GC risk was detected with a borderline association with the XPC-PAT homozygous genotype [odds ratio (OR) =1.42; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.94-2.17]. Gene-gene interaction analysis revealed combinations of unfavourable genotypes involving either multiple DNA repair polymorphisms or DNA repair and GST-specific genotypes. The combination of the XPC-PAT and the XPA variant alleles significantly increased GC risk (OR=2.15; 95% CI 1.17-3.93, P=0.0092). A significant interaction was also found between the APE1 wild-type genotype and either the single GSTT1 (OR=4.90; 95% CI 2.38-10.11, P=0.0079) or double GSTM1-GSTT1 null (OR=7.84; 95% CI 3.19-19.22, P=0.0169) genotypes or the XPA-mutant allele (OR=3.56; 95% CI 1.53-8.25, P=0.0012). These findings indicate that a complex interaction between host factors such as oxidative stress, antioxidant

  11. Screening of the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 in a Greek cohort of Lynch syndrome suspected families

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes predispose to Lynch syndrome, thus conferring a high relative risk of colorectal and endometrial cancer. The MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 mutational spectrum reported so far involves minor alterations scattered throughout their coding regions as well as large genomic rearrangements. Therefore, a combination of complete sequencing and a specialized technique for the detection of genomic rearrangements should be conducted during a proper DNA-testing procedure. Our main goal was to successfully identify Lynch syndrome families and determine the spectrum of MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 mutations in Greek Lynch families in order to develop an efficient screening protocol for the Greek colorectal cancer patients' cohort. Methods Forty-two samples from twenty-four families, out of which twenty two of Greek, one of Cypriot and one of Serbian origin, were screened for the presence of germline mutations in the major mismatch repair genes through direct sequencing and MLPA. Families were selected upon Amsterdam criteria or revised Bethesda guidelines. Results Ten deleterious alterations were detected in twelve out of the twenty-four families subjected to genetic testing, thus our detection rate is 50%. Four of the pathogenic point mutations, namely two nonsense, one missense and one splice site change, are novel, whereas the detected genomic deletion encompassing exon 6 of the MLH1 gene has been described repeatedly in the LOVD database. The average age of onset for the development of both colorectal and endometrial cancer among mutation positive families is 43.2 years. Conclusion The mutational spectrum of the MMR genes investigated as it has been shaped by our analysis is quite heterogeneous without any strong indication for the presence of a founder effect. PMID:20937110

  12. Transcription-coupled and global genome repair in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RPB2 gene at nucleotide resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Tijsterman, M; Tasseron-de Jong, J G; van de Putte, P; Brouwer, J

    1996-01-01

    Repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) was examined at single nucleotide resolution in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using an improved protocol for genomic end-labelling. To obtain the sensitivity required for adduct detection in yeast, an oligonucleotide-directed enrichment step was introduced into the current methodology developed for adduct detection in Escherichia coli. With this method, heterogeneous repair of CPDs within the RPB2 locus is observed. Individual CPDs positioned in the transcribed strand are removed very efficiently with identical kinetics. This fast repair starts within 23 bases downstream of the transcription initiation site. The non-transcribed strand of the active gene exhibits slow repair without detectable repair variations between individual lesions. In contrast, CPDs positioned in the promoter region show profound repair heterogeneity. Here, CPDs at specific sites are removed very quickly, with comparable rates to CPDs positioned in the transcribed strand, while at other positions lesions are not repaired at all during the period studied. Interestingly, the fast repair in the promoter region is dependent on the RAD7 and RAD16 genes, as are the slowly repaired CPDs in this region and in the non-transcribed strand. This indicates that the global genome repair pathway is not intrinsically slow and at specific positions can be as efficient as the transcription-coupled repair pathway. PMID:8836174

  13. Biochemical studies of DNA strand break repair and molecular characterization of mei-41, a gene involved in DNA break repair

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveri, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    The ability to repair X-irradiation induced single-strand DNA breaks was examined in mutagen-sensitive mutants of Drosophila melanogaster. This analysis demonstrated that examined stocks possess a normal capacity to repair X-ray induced single-strand breaks. One of the mutants in this study, mei-41, has been shown to be involved in a number of DNA metabolizing functions. A molecular characterization of this mutant is presented. A cDNA hybridizing to genomic DNA both proximal and distal to a P element inducing a mei-41 mutation was isolated from both embryonic and adult female recombinant lambda phage libraries. A 2.2 kilobase embryonic cDNA clone was sequenced; the sequence of an open reading frame was identified which would predict a protein of 384 amino acids with a molecular weight of 43,132 daltons. An examination of homologies to sequences in protein and nucleic acid data bases revealed no sequences with significant homology to mei-41, however, two potential Zinc-finger domains were identified. Analysis of RNA hybridizing to the embryonic cDNA demonstrated the existence of a major 2.2 kilobase transcript expressed primarily in embryos and adult flies. An examination of the transcription of this gene in mei-41 mutants revealed significant variation from wild-type, an indication that the embryonic cDNA does represent a mei-41 transcript. Expression in tissues from adult animals demonstrated that the 2.2 kilobase RNA is expressed primarily in reproductive tissues. A 3.8kb transcript is the major species of RNA in the adult head and thorax. Evidence is presented which implies that expression of the mei-41 gene is strongly induced by exposure of certain cells to mutagens.

  14. Low-level infrared laser modulates muscle repair and chromosome stabilization genes in myoblasts.

    PubMed

    da Silva Neto Trajano, Larissa Alexsandra; Stumbo, Ana Carolina; da Silva, Camila Luna; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; Fonseca, Adenilson S

    2016-08-01

    Infrared laser therapy is used for skeletal muscle repair based on its biostimulative effect on satellite cells. However, shortening of telomere length limits regenerative potential in satellite cells, which occurs after each cell division cycle. Also, laser therapy could be more effective on non-physiologic tissues. This study evaluated low-level infrared laser exposure effects on mRNA expression from muscle injury repair and telomere stabilization genes in myoblasts in normal and stressful conditions. Laser fluences were those used in clinical protocols. C2C12 myoblast cultures were exposed to low-level infrared laser (10, 35, and 70 J/cm(2)) in standard or normal (10 %) and reduced (2 %) fetal bovine serum concentrations; total RNA was extracted for mRNA expression evaluation from muscle injury repair (MyoD and Pax7) and chromosome stabilization (TRF1 and TRF2) genes by real time quantitative polymerization chain reaction. Data show that low-level infrared laser increases the expression of MyoD and Pax7 in 10 J/cm(2) fluence, TRF1 expression in all fluences, and TRF2 expression in 70 J/cm(2) fluence in both 10 and 2 % fetal bovine serum. Low-level infrared laser increases mRNA expression from genes related to muscle repair and telomere stabilization in myoblasts in standard or normal and stressful conditions.

  15. Gene-specific repair of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide DNA damage in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Denisenko, M.F.; Venkatachalam, S.; Wani, A.A.

    1995-11-01

    Gene-specific preferential repair of UV damage has been well documented in a variety of organisms. Less is known about many other types of critical DNA lesions, the data available being not numerous and contradictory. To date, the majority of observations with UV were obtained by using T4 endonuclease V system. Recent report questions the applicability of UvrABC nuclease incision method for detecting gene-specific repair. This has stimulated our search for simple and sensitive approach based on a different principle. We have employed the idea of detection by the Southern hybridization of restriction cleavage inhibition at rare sites and developed a method for the analysis of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (anti-BPDE) DNA damage in human H-ras proto-oncogene. Damage-dependent induction of individual facultative bands resulting from cleavage inhibition was observed in in vitro modified (4-50 adducts/10{sup 3}kb) p220-ras plasmid DNA digested with EcoRI/NotI, Xhol/Xbal/PstI, and SstI/XbaI/Pst/I. In vivo lesion formation and removal was monitored at several PstI sites distributed along the 6.4 kb single copy ras sequence. Rapid gene-specific repair was seen in primary culture of normal human fibroblasts and in SV40 transformed GM00637 cells. Surprisingly, SV40 transformed XP12BE (complementation group A) GM4429 fibroblasts also repaired anti-BPDE DNA damage at comparable levels. All investigated sites within ras sequence were repaired faster than the genome overall. The results show the utility of the above approach for fine mapping of anti-BPDE DNA lesions. Data suggests that the xeroderma pigmentosum (group A) fibroblasts have a capacity of removing these bulky adducts at least from the active genes.

  16. Chromosomal localization of three repair genes: The xeroderma pigmentosum group C gene and two human homologs of yeast RAD23

    SciTech Connect

    Spek, P.J. van der; Smit, E.M.E.; Beverloo, H.B.

    1994-10-01

    The nucleotide excision repair (NER) disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by sun (UV) sensitivity, predisposition to skin cancer, and extensive genetic heterogeneity. Recently, we reported the cloning and analysis of three human NER genes, XPC, HHR23A, and HHR23B. The previously cloned XPC gene is involved in the common XP complementation group C, which is defective in excision repair of nontranscribed sequences in the genome. The XPC protein was found to be complexed with the product of HHR23B, one of the two human homologs of the Saccharomyes cerevisiae NER gene RAD23. Here we present the chromosomal localization by in situ hybridization using haptenized probes of all three genes. The HHR23A gene was assigned to chromosome 19p13.2. Interestingly, the HHR23B and XPC genes, the product of which forms a tight complex, were found to colocalize on band 3p25.1. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that the HHR23B and XPC genes possibly share a MluI restriction fragment of about 625 kb. Potential involvement of the HHR23 genes in human genetic disorders is discussed. 53 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Differential introduction of DNA damage and repair in mammalian genes transcribed by RNA polymerase I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Vos, J.H.; Wauthier, E.L. )

    1991-04-01

    The authors have developed a general quantitative method for comparing the levels of drug-induced DNA crosslinking in specific mammalian genes. They observed a dramatic difference between the efficiency of the removal of both psoralen monoadducts and interstrand crosslinks from the rRNA genes and the efficiency of their removal from the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene in cultured human and hamster cells. While 90% of the interstrand crosslinks were removed from the human DHFR gene in 48 h, less than 25% repair occurred in the rRNA genes. Similarly, in Chinese hamster ovary cells, 85% repair of interstrand crosslinks within 8 h in the DHFR gene versus only 20% repair in the rRNA genes. The preferential repair of the DHFR gene relative to that of the rRNA genes was also observed for psoralen monoadducts in cells from both mammalian species. In human-mouse hybrid cells, the active mouse rRNA genes were five times more susceptible to psoralen modification than are the silent rRNA human genes, but adduct removal was similarly inefficient for both classes. They conclude that the repair of chemical damage such as psoralen photadducts in an expressed mammalian gene may depend upon the class of transcription to which it belongs.

  18. Adrenomedullin Haploinsufficiency Predisposes to Secondary Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Nikitenko, Leonid L; Shimosawa, Tatsuo; Henderson, Stephen; Mäkinen, Taija; Shimosawa, Hiromi; Qureshi, Uzma; Pedley, R Barbara; Rees, Margaret C P; Fujita, Toshiro; Boshoff, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Secondary lymphedema is a debilitating condition, and genetic factors predisposing to its development remain largely unknown. Adrenomedullin (AM) is peptide encoded, together with proadrenomedullin N-terminal peptide (PAMP), by the Adm gene (adrenomedullin gene). AM and its putative receptor calcitonin receptor–like receptor (CLR) are implicated in angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis during embryogenesis and wound healing, suggesting their possible involvement in secondary lymphedema. To investigate whether AM deficiency predisposes to secondary lymphedema, we used heterozygous adult mice with Adm gene-knockin stop mutation, which selectively abrogated AM, but preserved PAMP, expression (AdmAM+/Δ animals). After hind limb skin incision, Adm messenger RNA expression was upregulated in wounded tissue of both AdmAM+/+ and AdmAM+/Δ mice. However, only AdmAM+/Δ animals developed limb swelling and histopathological lymphedematous changes, including epidermal thickening, elevated collagen fiber density, and increased microvessel diameter. Secondary lymphedema was prevented when circulating AM levels in AdmAM+/Δ mice were restored by systemic peptide delivery. In human skin, CLR was expressed in tissue components affected by lymphedema, including epidermis, lymphatics, and blood vessels. Our study identified a previously unrecognized role for endogenous AM as a key factor in secondary lymphedema pathogenesis and provided experimental in vivo evidence of an underlying germ-line genetic predisposition to developing this disorder. PMID:23364478

  19. Capturing the biological impact of CDKN2A and MC1R genes as an early predisposing event in melanoma and non melanoma skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Escámez, María José; Garcia-Garcia, Francisco; Tell-Marti, Gemma; Fabra, Àngels; Martínez-Santamaría, Lucía; Badenas, Celia; Aguilera, Paula; Pevida, Marta; Dopazo, Joaquín; del Río, Marcela; Puig, Susana

    2014-03-30

    Germline mutations in CDKN2A and/or red hair color variants in MC1R genes are associated with an increased susceptibility to develop cutaneous melanoma or non melanoma skin cancer. We studied the impact of the CDKN2A germinal mutation p.G101W and MC1R variants on gene expression and transcription profiles associated with skin cancer. To this end we set-up primary skin cell co-cultures from siblings of melanoma prone-families that were later analyzed using the expression array approach. As a result, we found that 1535 transcripts were deregulated in CDKN2A mutated cells, with over-expression of immunity-related genes (HLA-DPB1, CLEC2B, IFI44, IFI44L, IFI27, IFIT1, IFIT2, SP110 and IFNK) and down-regulation of genes playing a role in the Notch signaling pathway. 3570 transcripts were deregulated in MC1R variant carriers. In particular, genes related to oxidative stress and DNA damage pathways were up-regulated as well as genes associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer and Huntington. Finally, we observed that the expression signatures indentified in phenotypically normal cells carrying CDKN2A mutations or MC1R variants are maintained in skin cancer tumors (melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma). These results indicate that transcriptome deregulation represents an early event critical for skin cancer development.

  20. Capturing the biological impact of CDKN2A and MC1R genes as an early predisposing event in melanoma and non melanoma skin cancer

    PubMed Central

    Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Escámez, María José; Garcia-Garcia, Francisco; Tell-Marti, Gemma; Fabra, Àngels; Martínez-Santamaría, Lucía; Badenas, Celia; Aguilera, Paula; Pevida, Marta; Dopazo, Joaquín; del Río, Marcela; Puig, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Germline mutations in CDKN2A and/or red hair color variants in MC1R genes are associated with an increased susceptibility to develop cutaneous melanoma or non melanoma skin cancer. We studied the impact of the CDKN2A germinal mutation p.G101W and MC1R variants on gene expression and transcription profiles associated with skin cancer. To this end we set-up primary skin cell co-cultures from siblings of melanoma prone-families that were later analyzed using the expression array approach. As a result, we found that 1535 transcripts were deregulated in CDKN2A mutated cells, with over-expression of immunity-related genes (HLA-DPB1, CLEC2B, IFI44, IFI44L, IFI27, IFIT1, IFIT2, SP110 and IFNK) and down-regulation of genes playing a role in the Notch signaling pathway. 3570 transcripts were deregulated in MC1R variant carriers. In particular, genes related to oxidative stress and DNA damage pathways were up-regulated as well as genes associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer and Huntington. Finally, we observed that the expression signatures indentified in phenotypically normal cells carrying CDKN2A mutations or MC1R variants are maintained in skin cancer tumors (melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma). These results indicate that transcriptome deregulation represents an early event critical for skin cancer development. PMID:24742402

  1. The barley EST DNA Replication and Repair Database (bEST-DRRD) as a tool for the identification of the genes involved in DNA replication and repair.

    PubMed

    Gruszka, Damian; Marzec, Marek; Szarejko, Iwona

    2012-06-14

    The high level of conservation of genes that regulate DNA replication and repair indicates that they may serve as a source of information on the origin and evolution of the species and makes them a reliable system for the identification of cross-species homologs. Studies that had been conducted to date shed light on the processes of DNA replication and repair in bacteria, yeast and mammals. However, there is still much to be learned about the process of DNA damage repair in plants. These studies, which were conducted mainly using bioinformatics tools, enabled the list of genes that participate in various pathways of DNA repair in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh to be outlined; however, information regarding these mechanisms in crop plants is still very limited. A similar, functional approach is particularly difficult for a species whose complete genomic sequences are still unavailable. One of the solutions is to apply ESTs (Expressed Sequence Tags) as the basis for gene identification. For the construction of the barley EST DNA Replication and Repair Database (bEST-DRRD), presented here, the Arabidopsis nucleotide and protein sequences involved in DNA replication and repair were used to browse for and retrieve the deposited sequences, derived from four barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) sequence databases, including the "Barley Genome version 0.05" database (encompassing ca. 90% of barley coding sequences) and from two databases covering the complete genomes of two monocot models: Oryza sativa L. and Brachypodium distachyon L. in order to identify homologous genes. Sequences of the categorised Arabidopsis queries are used for browsing the repositories, which are located on the ViroBLAST platform. The bEST-DRRD is currently used in our project during the identification and validation of the barley genes involved in DNA repair. The presented database provides information about the Arabidopsis genes involved in DNA replication and repair, their expression patterns and models

  2. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Aurélie; Sarasin, Alain

    2015-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients.

  3. Overexpression of DNA repair genes is associated with metastasis: a new hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Sarasin, Alain; Kauffmann, Audrey

    2008-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is a multistep process, where it is believed that the transformation of normal cells into tumoral cells needs a succession of genetic and epigenetic changes, such as point mutations, chromosomal rearrangements, and changes in gene expression level. All these modifications are supposed to confer a selective advantage and to generate highly malignant cancer cells. Until recently, the same selection procedure of rare cells in the tumour mass was believed to be necessary for the metastatic process. Using gene expression profiling, several recent publications report that a gene expression signature could discriminate between primary tumours with high metastatic potentiality and poor clinical outcome, and primary tumours that are not going to metastasize. Analysis of the biological pathways associated with metastatic potential points to cell adhesion, angiogenesis, cell cycle regulation, initiation of DNA synthesis, and DNA repair. Analysing human primary malignant melanoma and various biological processes, we have shown that the overexpression of DNA repair pathways, particularly those involved in double-stand break repair and surveillance of the DNA replication forks, is associated with metastasis and poor patient survival [V. Winnepenninckx, V. Lazar, S. Michiels, P. Dessen, M. Stas, S.R. Alonso, M.F. Avril, P.L. Ortiz Romero, T. Robert, O. Balacescu, A.M. Eggermont, G. Lenoir, A. Sarasin, T. Tursz, J.J. van den Oord, A. Spatz, Gene expression profiling of primary cutaneous melanoma and clinical outcome, J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 98 (2006) 472-482]. These results, also found by analysing other types of human tumours, such as breast or bladder cancers, would clearly explain the high resistance of metastasis towards chemo- and radiotherapies. Our hypothesis is that genetic instability is absolutely necessary to go from normal cells to tumoral cells, but one needs some type of genetic stabilization, which can be obtained by overexpressing specific DNA repair

  4. Glial kon/NG2 gene network for central nervous system repair.

    PubMed

    Losada-Perez, Maria; Harrison, Neale; Hidalgo, Alicia

    2017-01-01

    The glial regenerative response to central nervous system (CNS) injury, although limited, can be harnessed to promote regeneration and repair. Injury provokes the proliferation of ensheathing glial cells, which can differentiate to remyelinate axons, and partially restore function. This response is evolutionarily conserved, strongly implying an underlying genetic mechanism. In mammals, it is elicited by NG2 glia, but most often newly generated cells fail to differentiate. Thus an important goal had been to find out how to promote glial differentiation following the proliferative response. A gene network involving Notch and prospero (pros) controls the balance between glial proliferation and differentiation in flies and mice, and promotes CNS repair at least in fruit-flies. A key missing link had been how to relate the function of NG2 to this gene network. Recent findings by Losada-Perez et al., published in JCB, demonstrated that the Drosophila NG2 homologue kon-tiki (kon) is functionally linked to Notch and pros in glia. By engaging in two feedback loops with Notch and Pros, in response to injury, Kon can regulate both glial cell number and glial shape homeostasis, essential for repair. Drosophila offers powerful genetics to unravel the control of stem and progenitor cells for regeneration and repair.

  5. Low intensity infrared laser affects expression of oxidative DNA repair genes in mitochondria and nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Magalhães, L. A. G.; Mencalha, A. L.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2014-11-01

    Practical properties and physical characteristics of low intensity lasers have made possible their application to treat soft tissue diseases. Excitation of intracellular chromophores by red and infrared radiation at low energy fluences with increase of mitochondrial metabolism is the basis of the biostimulation effect but free radicals can be produced. DNA lesions induced by free radicals are repaired by the base excision repair pathway. In this work, we evaluate the expression of POLγ and APEX2 genes related to repair of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, respectively. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats were exposed to low intensity infrared laser at different fluences. One hour and 24 hours after laser exposure, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and evaluation of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA expression by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats exposed to laser radiation show different expression of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA depending of the fluence and time after exposure. Our study suggests that a low intensity infrared laser affects expression of genes involved in repair of oxidative lesions in mitochondrial and nuclear DNA.

  6. Glial kon/NG2 gene network for central nervous system repair

    PubMed Central

    Losada-Perez, Maria; Harrison, Neale; Hidalgo, Alicia

    2017-01-01

    The glial regenerative response to central nervous system (CNS) injury, although limited, can be harnessed to promote regeneration and repair. Injury provokes the proliferation of ensheathing glial cells, which can differentiate to remyelinate axons, and partially restore function. This response is evolutionarily conserved, strongly implying an underlying genetic mechanism. In mammals, it is elicited by NG2 glia, but most often newly generated cells fail to differentiate. Thus an important goal had been to find out how to promote glial differentiation following the proliferative response. A gene network involving Notch and prospero (pros) controls the balance between glial proliferation and differentiation in flies and mice, and promotes CNS repair at least in fruit-flies. A key missing link had been how to relate the function of NG2 to this gene network. Recent findings by Losada-Perez et al., published in JCB, demonstrated that the Drosophila NG2 homologue kon-tiki (kon) is functionally linked to Notch and pros in glia. By engaging in two feedback loops with Notch and Pros, in response to injury, Kon can regulate both glial cell number and glial shape homeostasis, essential for repair. Drosophila offers powerful genetics to unravel the control of stem and progenitor cells for regeneration and repair. PMID:28250735

  7. Coevolution between Nuclear-Encoded DNA Replication, Recombination, and Repair Genes and Plastid Genome Complexity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Ruhlman, Tracey A; Sabir, Jamal S M; Blazier, John Chris; Weng, Mao-Lun; Park, Seongjun; Jansen, Robert K

    2016-02-17

    Disruption of DNA replication, recombination, and repair (DNA-RRR) systems has been hypothesized to cause highly elevated nucleotide substitution rates and genome rearrangements in the plastids of angiosperms, but this theory remains untested. To investigate nuclear-plastid genome (plastome) coevolution in Geraniaceae, four different measures of plastome complexity (rearrangements, repeats, nucleotide insertions/deletions, and substitution rates) were evaluated along with substitution rates of 12 nuclear-encoded, plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes from 27 Geraniales species. Significant correlations were detected for nonsynonymous (dN) but not synonymous (dS) substitution rates for three DNA-RRR genes (uvrB/C, why1, and gyrA) supporting a role for these genes in accelerated plastid genome evolution in Geraniaceae. Furthermore, correlation between dN of uvrB/C and plastome complexity suggests the presence of nucleotide excision repair system in plastids. Significant correlations were also detected between plastome complexity and 13 of the 90 nuclear-encoded organelle-targeted genes investigated. Comparisons revealed significant acceleration of dN in plastid-targeted genes of Geraniales relative to Brassicales suggesting this correlation may be an artifact of elevated rates in this gene set in Geraniaceae. Correlation between dN of plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes and plastome complexity supports the hypothesis that the aberrant patterns in angiosperm plastome evolution could be caused by dysfunction in DNA-RRR systems.

  8. Coevolution between Nuclear-Encoded DNA Replication, Recombination, and Repair Genes and Plastid Genome Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Ruhlman, Tracey A.; Sabir, Jamal S. M.; Blazier, John Chris; Weng, Mao-Lun; Park, Seongjun; Jansen, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of DNA replication, recombination, and repair (DNA-RRR) systems has been hypothesized to cause highly elevated nucleotide substitution rates and genome rearrangements in the plastids of angiosperms, but this theory remains untested. To investigate nuclear–plastid genome (plastome) coevolution in Geraniaceae, four different measures of plastome complexity (rearrangements, repeats, nucleotide insertions/deletions, and substitution rates) were evaluated along with substitution rates of 12 nuclear-encoded, plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes from 27 Geraniales species. Significant correlations were detected for nonsynonymous (dN) but not synonymous (dS) substitution rates for three DNA-RRR genes (uvrB/C, why1, and gyrA) supporting a role for these genes in accelerated plastid genome evolution in Geraniaceae. Furthermore, correlation between dN of uvrB/C and plastome complexity suggests the presence of nucleotide excision repair system in plastids. Significant correlations were also detected between plastome complexity and 13 of the 90 nuclear-encoded organelle-targeted genes investigated. Comparisons revealed significant acceleration of dN in plastid-targeted genes of Geraniales relative to Brassicales suggesting this correlation may be an artifact of elevated rates in this gene set in Geraniaceae. Correlation between dN of plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes and plastome complexity supports the hypothesis that the aberrant patterns in angiosperm plastome evolution could be caused by dysfunction in DNA-RRR systems. PMID:26893456

  9. The rad2 gene of haloarchaeum Halobacterium salinarum is functional in the repair of ultraviolet light induced DNA photoproducts.

    PubMed

    Vafadarnejad, Ehsan; Amoozgar, Mohammad Ali; Khansha, Javad; Fallahzade, Ramin

    2015-04-01

    There are a lot of bacterial and eukaryotic DNA repair gene homologs among sequenced archaeal genomes but there is little information about DNA repair mechanisms and the interaction of involved repair proteins. In order to study DNA repair mechanisms in the third domain of life, we studied these processes in the model archaeon, Halobacterium salinarum. H. salinarum has homologs of eukaryotic nucleotide excision repair genes such as rad2 gene. A functional analysis of rad2 was performed by knocking down of this gene. We introduced an antisense RNA expression vector into the cells and the sensitivity of transformants against ultraviolet light exposure was measured to determine whether rad2 gene performs any role in the repair of the DNA lesions induced by UV light or not. Our data suggests that rad2 is functional in this pathway and knocked down strains were unable to completely repair the UV induced DNA damages. In this study, for the first time antisense RNA is used for functional analysis of a gene in H. salinarum and it is shown that antisense RNA could be used as a reliable genetic tool for understanding of the archaeal genetics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Inactivation of the Tumor Suppressor Genes Causing the Hereditary Syndromes Predisposing to Head and Neck Cancer via Promoter Hypermethylation in Sporadic Head and Neck Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ian M.; Mithani, Suhail K.; Mydlarz, Wojciech K.; Chang, Steven S.; Califano, Joseph A.

    2010-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) and dyskeratosis congenita (DC) are rare inherited syndromes that cause head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC). Prior studies of inherited forms of cancer have been extremely important in elucidating tumor suppressor genes inactivated in sporadic tumors. Here, we studied whether sporadic tumors have epigenetic silencing of the genes causing the inherited forms of HNSCC. Using bisulfite sequencing, we investigated the incidence of promoter hypermethylation of the 17 Fanconi- and DC-associated genes in sporadic HNSCC. Genes that only showed methylation in the tumor patients were chosen for quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP) in a set of 45 tumor and 16 normal patients. Three gene promoters showed differences in methylation: FancB (FAAP95, FA core complex), FancJ (BRIP1, DNA Helicase/ATPase), and DKC1 (dyskeratin). Bisulfite sequencing revealed that only FancB and DKC1 showed no methylation in normal patients, yet the presence of promoter hypermethylation in tumor patients. On qMSP, 1/16 (6.25%) of the normal mucosal samples from non-cancer patients and 14/45 (31.1%) of the tumor patients demonstrated hypermethylation of the FancB locus (p < 0.05). These results suggest that inactivation of FancB may play a role in the pathogenesis of sporadic HNSCC. PMID:20332657

  11. Expression of DNA repair genes in porcine oocytes before and after fertilization by ICSI using freeze-dried sperm.

    PubMed

    Men, Nguyen Thi; Kikuchi, Kazuhiro; Furusawa, Tadashi; Dang-Nguyen, Thanh Quang; Nakai, Michiko; Fukuda, Atsunori; Noguchi, Junko; Kaneko, Hiroyuki; Viet Linh, Nguyen; Xuan Nguyen, Bui; Tajima, Atsushi

    2016-11-01

    Boar sperm freeze-dried with trehalose showed a protective effect against sperm DNA fragmentation. However, normal fertilization and embryonic development were not improved. Damaged sperm may activate maternal DNA repair genes when injected into oocytes. Therefore, we investigated the expression profile of some DNA repair genes in porcine oocytes after intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection. First, the expression levels of MGMT, UDG, XPC, MSH2, XRCC6 and RAD51 genes that are concerned with different types of DNA repair were examined in in vitro mature (IVM) oocytes injected with ejaculated sperm, or freeze-dried sperm with or without trehalose. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that expression of six DNA repair genes in the oocytes at 4 h after injection did not differ among the four groups. Next, we investigated the gene expression levels of these genes at different stages of maturation. The relative expression levels of UDG and XPC were significantly up-regulated in mature oocytes compared with earlier stages. Furthermore, there was an increased tendency in relative expression of MSH2 and RAD51. These results suggested two possible mechanisms that messenger RNA of DNA repair genes are either accumulated during IVM to be ready for fertilization or increased expression levels of DNA repair genes in oocytes caused by suboptimal IVM conditions.

  12. Genes Involved in DNA Double-Strand Break Repair: Implications for Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    locus . The disruption of one of 3 the two Ku alleles might lead to a phenotype, since Chinese hamster ovary cells are functionally...significant in-frame deletions. This is the substantial part of the genome in Chinese hamster cell lines is first direct evidence that mutant cells in group 5...Department of the Army, by grant A135763 from DNA repair gene in Chinese hamster ovary cells . Mol. Cell . Biol. 6:2944- the National

  13. DNA Repair Gene Expression and Risk of Locoregional Relapse in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Le Scodan, Romuald; Cizeron-Clairac, Geraldine

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy appears to kill cells mainly by inducing DNA double-strand breaks. We investigated whether the DNA repair gene expression status might influence the risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) in breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: We used a quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR-based approach to measure messenger RNA levels of 20 selected DNA repair genes in tumor samples from 97 breast cancer patients enrolled in a phase III trial (Centre Rene Huguenin cohort). Normalized mRNA levels were tested for an association with LRR-free survival (LRR-FS) and overall survival (OS). The findings were validated in comparison with those of an independent cohort (Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI) cohort). Multivariate analysis encompassing known prognostic factors was used to assess the association between DNA repair gene expression and patient outcome. Results: RAD51 was the only gene associated with LRR in both cohorts. With a median follow-up of 126 months in the CRH cohort, the 5-year LRR-FS and OS rates were 100% and 95% in the 61 patients with low RAD51 expression, compared with 70% and 69% in the 36 patients with high RAD51 expression, respectively (p < 0.001). RAD51 overexpression was associated with a higher risk of LRR (hazard ratio [HR], 12.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.6-45.6) and death (HR, 4.10; 95% CI, 1.7-9.7). RAD51 overexpression was also significantly associated with shorter LRR-FS and OS in the NKI cohort. Conclusions: Overexpression of RAD51, a key component of the homologous DNA repair pathway, is associated with poor breast cancer outcome. This finding warrants prospective studies of RAD51 as a prognosticator and therapeutic target.

  14. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes, medical exposure to ionizing radiation, and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Millikan, Robert C; Player, Jon S; Decotret, Allan Rene; Tse, Chiu-Kit; Keku, Temitope

    2005-10-01

    An epidemiologic study was conducted to determine whether polymorphisms in DNA repair genes modify the association between breast cancer risk and exposure to ionizing radiation. Self-reported exposure to ionizing radiation from medical sources was evaluated as part of a population-based, case-control study of breast cancer in African-American (894 cases and 788 controls) and White (1,417 cases and 1,234 controls) women. Genotyping was conducted for polymorphisms in four genes involved in repair of radiation-induced DNA damage, the double-strand break repair pathway: X-ray cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3) codon 241 Thr/Met, Nijmegen breakage syndrome 1 (NBS1) codon 185 Glu/Gln, X-ray cross-complementing group 2 (XRCC2) codon 188 Arg/His, and breast cancer susceptibility gene 2 (BRCH2) codon 372 Asn/His. Allele and genotype frequencies were not significantly different in cases compared with controls for all four genetic polymorphisms, and odds ratios for breast cancer were close to the null. Combining women with two, three, and four variant genotypes, a positive association was observed between breast cancer and number of lifetime mammograms (P(trend) < 0.0001). No association was observed among women with zero or one variant genotype (P = 0.86). Odds ratios for radiation treatments to the chest and number of lifetime chest X-rays were slightly elevated but not statistically significant among women with two to four variant genotypes. The study has several limitations, including inability to distinguish between diagnostic and screening mammograms or reliably classify prediagnostic mammograms and chest X-rays in cases. Prospective studies are needed to address whether common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes modify the effects of low-dose radiation exposure from medical sources.

  15. cDNA structure, alternative splicing and exon-intron organization of the predisposing tuberous sclerosis (Tsc2) gene of the Eker rat model.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, T; Nishizawa, M; Hirayama, Y; Kobayashi, E; Hino, O

    1995-01-01

    The Eker rat hereditary renal carcinoma (RC) is an excellent example of a Mendelian dominant predisposition to a specific cancer in an experimental animal. We recently reported that a germline insertion in the rat homologue of the human tuberous sclerosis gene (TSC2) gives rise to the dominantly inherited cancer in the Eker rat model. We now describe the entire cDNA (5375 bp without exons 25 and 31) and genomic structure of the rat Tsc2 gene. The deduced amino acid sequence (1743 amino acids) shows 92% identity to the human counterpart. Surprisingly, there are a great many (> or = 41) coding exons with small sized introns spanning only approximately 35 kb of genomic DNA. Two alternative splicing events [involving exons 25 (129 bp) and 31 (69 bp)] make for a complex diversity of the Tsc2 product. The present determination of the Tsc2 gene and establishment of strong conservation between the rat and man provide clues for assessing unknown gene functions apart from that already predicted from the GTPase activating proteins (GAP3) homologous domain and for future analysis of intragenic mutations in tumors using methods such as PCR-SSCP and for insights into diverse phenotypes between species. Images PMID:7651821

  16. Rearrangement of Rag-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient/immunodeficient ``wasted`` mice

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C-M.; Libertin, C.R.

    1992-11-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene ``wasted`` (wst) display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (Rag-l/Rag-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed that in thymus tissue, a small Rag-I transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/{sm_bullet} mice, a two-fold increase in Rag-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. Rag-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/{sm_bullet} and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF, mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement or deletion within the Rag-1 gene of affected wasted mice that was not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the Rag-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  17. Rearrangement of Rag-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient/immunodeficient wasted'' mice

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C-M. ); Libertin, C.R. )

    1992-01-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene wasted'' (wst) display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (Rag-l/Rag-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed that in thymus tissue, a small Rag-I transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/[sm bullet] mice, a two-fold increase in Rag-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. Rag-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/[sm bullet] and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF, mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement or deletion within the Rag-1 gene of affected wasted mice that was not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the Rag-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  18. Mutation mismatch repair gene deletions in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Couronné, Lucile; Ruminy, Philippe; Waultier-Rascalou, Agathe; Rainville, Vinciane; Cornic, Marie; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Figeac, Martin; Bastard, Christian; Tilly, Hervé; Jardin, Fabrice

    2013-05-01

    To further unravel the molecular pathogenesis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), we performed high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization on lymph node biopsies from 70 patients. With this strategy, we identified microdeletions of genes involved in the mutation mismatch repair (MMR) pathway in two samples. The first patient presented with a homozygous deletion of MSH2-MSH6 due to duplication of an unbalanced pericentric inversion of chromosome 2. The other case showed a PMS2 heterozygous deletion. PMS2 and MSH2-MSH6 abnormalities, respectively, resulted in a decrease and complete loss of gene expression. However, unlike tumors associated with the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome or immunodeficiency-related lymphomas, no microsatellite instability was detected. Mutational profiles revealed especially in one patient an aberrant hypermutation without a clear activation-induced cytidine deaminase signature, indicating a breakdown of the high-fidelity repair in favor of the error-prone repair pathway. Our findings suggest that in a rare subset of patients, inactivation of the genes of the MMR pathway is likely an important step in the molecular pathogenesis of DLBCL and does not involve the same molecular mechanisms as other common neoplasms with MMR deficiency.

  19. Genetic ablation of Ptprj, a mouse cancer susceptibility gene, results in normal growth and development and does not predispose to spontaneous tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Trapasso, Francesco; Drusco, Alessandra; Costinean, Stefan; Alder, Hansjuerg; Aqeilan, Rami I; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Gaudio, Eugenio; Raso, Cinzia; Zanesi, Nicola; Croce, Carlo M; Fusco, Alfredo

    2006-06-01

    Ptprj is a ubiquitously expressed murine gene encoding a receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase, which has recently been proposed as a candidate gene on the locus Scc1 for colon cancer susceptibility. It has been demonstrated that PTPRJ, the human homologue of Ptprj, is involved in the control of cell growth and adhesion, being furthermore altered in several types of cancer including mammary, thyroid, lung, colon, and pancreatic cancers. To investigate the biological functions of Ptprj, we have generated mice deficient in this receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase. Ptprj-deficient mice are viable, fertile, and show no gross anatomical alterations. Furthermore, neither changes in life span nor spontaneous tumor appearance were observed in Ptprj-null mice. Our results indicate that Ptprj is dispensable for normal growth and development in mice.

  20. Preferential repair and strand-specific repair of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide adducts in the HPRT gene of diploid human fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, R H; Maher, V M; Brouwer, J; van de Putte, P; McCormick, J J

    1992-01-01

    If excision repair-proficient human cells are allowed time for repair before onset of S phase, the premutagenic lesions formed by (+/-)-7 beta,8 alpha-dihydroxy-9 alpha,10 alpha-epoxy- 7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide, BPDE) are lost from the transcribed strand of the hypoxanthine (guanine) phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene faster than from the nontranscribed strand. No change in strand distribution is seen with repair-deficient cells. These results suggest strand-specific repair of BPDE-induced DNA damage in human cells. To test this, we measured the initial number of BPDE adducts formed in each strand of the actively transcribed HPRT gene and the rate of repair, using UvrABC excinuclease in conjunction with Southern hybridization and strand-specific probes. We also measured the rate of loss of BPDE adducts from the inactive 754 locus. The frequencies of adducts formed by exposure to BPDE (1.0 or 1.2 microM) in either strand of a 20-kilobase fragment that lies entirely within the transcription unit of the HPRT gene were similar; the frequency in the 14-kilobase 754 fragment was approximately 20% lower. The rates of repair in the two strands of the HPRT fragment differed significantly. Within 7 hr after treatment with 1.2 microM BPDE, 53% of the adducts had been removed from the transcribed strand, but only 26% from the nontranscribed strand; after 20 hr, these values were 87% and 58%, respectively. In contrast, only approximately 14% of the BPDE adducts were lost from the 754 locus in 20 hr, a value even lower than the rate of loss from the overall genome (i.e., 38%). These results demonstrate strand-specific and preferential repair of BPDE adducts in human cells. They suggest that the heterogeneous repair of BPDE adducts in the human genome cannot be accounted for merely by the greatly increased rate of the repair specific to the transcribed strand of the active genes, and they point to a role for the chromatin structure. Images

  1. Microsatellites in the Eukaryotic DNA Mismatch Repair Genes as Modulators of Evolutionary Mutation Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Dong Kyung; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Boland, C. Richard

    2003-01-01

    All "minor" components of the human DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system-MSH3, MSH6, PMS2, and the recently discovered MLH3-contain mononucleotide microsatellites in their coding sequences. This intriguing finding contrasts with the situation found in the major components of the DNA MMR system-MSH2 and MLH1-and, in fact, most human genes. Although eukaryotic genomes are rich in microsatellites, non-triplet microsatellites are rare in coding regions. The recurring presence of exonal mononucleotide repeat sequences within a single family of human genes would therefore be considered exceptional.

  2. A Genome-Scale DNA Repair RNAi Screen Identifies SPG48 as a Novel Gene Associated with Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Słabicki, Mikołaj; Theis, Mirko; Krastev, Dragomir B.; Samsonov, Sergey; Mundwiller, Emeline; Junqueira, Magno; Paszkowski-Rogacz, Maciej; Teyra, Joan; Heninger, Anne-Kristin; Poser, Ina; Prieur, Fabienne; Truchetto, Jérémy; Confavreux, Christian; Marelli, Cécilia; Durr, Alexandra; Camdessanche, Jean Philippe; Brice, Alexis; Shevchenko, Andrej; Pisabarro, M. Teresa; Stevanin, Giovanni; Buchholz, Frank

    2010-01-01

    DNA repair is essential to maintain genome integrity, and genes with roles in DNA repair are frequently mutated in a variety of human diseases. Repair via homologous recombination typically restores the original DNA sequence without introducing mutations, and a number of genes that are required for homologous recombination DNA double-strand break repair (HR-DSBR) have been identified. However, a systematic analysis of this important DNA repair pathway in mammalian cells has not been reported. Here, we describe a genome-scale endoribonuclease-prepared short interfering RNA (esiRNA) screen for genes involved in DNA double strand break repair. We report 61 genes that influenced the frequency of HR-DSBR and characterize in detail one of the genes that decreased the frequency of HR-DSBR. We show that the gene KIAA0415 encodes a putative helicase that interacts with SPG11 and SPG15, two proteins mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). We identify mutations in HSP patients, discovering KIAA0415/SPG48 as a novel HSP-associated gene, and show that a KIAA0415/SPG48 mutant cell line is more sensitive to DNA damaging drugs. We present the first genome-scale survey of HR-DSBR in mammalian cells providing a dataset that should accelerate the discovery of novel genes with roles in DNA repair and associated medical conditions. The discovery that proteins forming a novel protein complex are required for efficient HR-DSBR and are mutated in patients suffering from HSP suggests a link between HSP and DNA repair. PMID:20613862

  3. β2AR antagonists and β2AR gene deletion both promote skin wound repair processes.

    PubMed

    Pullar, Christine E; Le Provost, Gabrielle S; O'Leary, Andrew P; Evans, Sian E; Baier, Brian S; Isseroff, R Rivkah

    2012-08-01

    Skin wound healing is a complex process requiring the coordinated, temporal orchestration of numerous cell types and biological processes to regenerate damaged tissue. Previous work has demonstrated that a functional β-adrenergic receptor autocrine/paracrine network exists in skin, but the role of β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) in wound healing is unknown. A range of in vitro (single-cell migration, immunoblotting, ELISA, enzyme immunoassay), ex vivo (rat aortic ring assay), and in vivo (chick chorioallantoic membrane assay, zebrafish, murine wild-type, and β2AR knockout excisional skin wound models) models were used to demonstrate that blockade or loss of β2AR gene deletion promoted wound repair, a finding that is, to our knowledge, previously unreported. Compared with vehicle-only controls, β2AR antagonism increased angiogenesis, dermal fibroblast function, and re-epithelialization, but had no effect on wound inflammation in vivo. Skin wounds in β2AR knockout mice contracted and re-epithelialized faster in the first few days of wound repair in vivo. β2AR antagonism enhanced cell motility through distinct intracellular signalling mechanisms and increased vascular endothelial growth factor secretion from keratinocytes. β2AR antagonism promoted wound repair processes in the early stages of wound repair, revealing a possible new avenue for therapeutic intervention.

  4. Transplantation of novel vascular endothelial growth factor gene delivery system manipulated skeletal myoblasts promote myocardial repair.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kai; Guo, Changfa; Xia, Yu; Lai, Hao; Yang, Wuli; Wang, Yang; Song, Dongli; Wang, Chunsheng

    2013-10-03

    Skeletal myoblast (SkM) transplantation combined with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene delivery has been proposed as a promising therapy for cardiac repair. Nevertheless, the defective gene vectors and unregulable VEGF expression in vivo hinder its application. Therefore, the search for an economical, effective, controllable gene delivery system is quite necessary. In our study, hyperbranched polyamidoamine (h-PAMAM) dendrimer was synthesized as a novel gene delivery vector using a modified method. And hypoxia-regulated human VEGF-165 plasmids (pHRE-hVEGF165) were constructed for controllable VEGF gene expression. The efficiency and feasibility of h-PAMAM-HRE-hVEGF165 gene delivery system manipulated SkM transplantation for cardiac repair were investigated in myocardial infarction models. The h-PAMAM encapsulated pHRE-hVEGF165 could resist nuclease digestion for over 120 min. In primary SkMs, h-PAMAM-pHRE-hVEGF165 gene delivery system showed high transfection efficiency (43.47 ± 2.22%) and minor cytotoxicity (cell viability = 91.38 ± 0.48%). And the transfected SkMs could express hVEGF165 for 18 days under hypoxia in vitro. For myocardial infarction models, intramyocardial transplantation of the transfected SkMs could result in reduction of apoptotic myocardiocytes, improvement of grafted cell survival, decrease of infarct size and interstitial fibrosis, and increase of blood vessel density, which inhibited left ventricle remodeling and improved heart function at the late phase following infarction. These results indicate that h-PAMAM based pHRE-hVEGF165 gene delivery into SkMs is feasible and effective, and may serve as a novel and promising gene therapy strategy in ischemic heart disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Introduction of the yeast DNA repair gene PHR1 into normal and xeroderma pigmentosum human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Whyte, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the work described herein is to determine how UV light kills and mutates human cells. Specifically, the hypothesis to be tested states that the major cause of cell death is the cyclobutane dimer. The yeast (S. cerevisiae) enzyme photolyase provides an elegant means of dissecting the biological effects of the two lesions. Photolyase, the product of the PHR1 gene, catalyzes the visible light-dependent reversal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Introducing the gene for photolyase into human cells, which do not have a functional photoreactivation mechanism, should allow specific repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. To express the yeast DNA repair gene in human cells, the yeast PHR1 coding sequence was cloned into the mammalian expression vector pRSV4NEO-I. The resulting plasmid, pRSVPHR1, contains the coding sequence of the yeast gene, under control of transcription signals recognized by mammalian cells, and the dominant selectable gene neo. pRSVPHR1 was introduced into normal and XP SV40-transformed fibroblasts by the calcium phosphate coprecipitation technique, and G418-resistant clones were isolated. The level of PHR1 expression was determined by cytoplasmic RNA dot blots. Two clones, XP-3B and GM-20A, had high levels of expression.

  6. Immune regulatory gene polymorphisms as predisposing risk factors for the development of factor VIII inhibitors in Indian severe haemophilia A patients.

    PubMed

    Pinto, P; Ghosh, K; Shetty, S

    2012-09-01

    Development of inhibitors to factor VIII, a serious complication of replacement therapy in haemophilia A patients, leads to increased bleeding, morbidity and mortality. There is no data on the risk factors for inhibitor development in Indian patients with severe haemophilia A. Our aim was to study the role of immune regulatory gene polymorphisms in the development of inhibitors. Fourteen immune regulatory gene polymorphisms (IL1β, IL4, IL10, TNFA and CTLA4) were analysed in 120 patients with severe haemophilia A, i.e. 50 inhibitor positive patients, and 70 inhibitor negative control patients, by PCR-RFLP, DNA sequencing and allele-specific PCRs. The IL10 promoter 'GCC' haplotypes overall (P: 0.002, OR: 3.452, 95% CI: 1.607-7.416), and 'GCC/ATA' (P: 0.011, OR: 3.492, 95% CI: 1.402-8.696) haplotype, associated with high and intermediate IL10 production, respectively, were significantly higher in inhibitor positive patients, whereas the 'non-GCC' haplotypes overall (P: 0.002,OR: 0.290, 95% CI 0.135-0.622) and 'ATA/ATA' haplotype (P: 0.025, OR: 0.278, 95% CI: 0.096-0.802), associated with low IL10 synthesis, were significantly higher among inhibitor negative patients. The TNFA rs1799724 C/T heterozygote prevalence was significantly higher in the inhibitor positive group (P: 0.021, OR: 3.190, 95% CI: 1.273-7.990), whereas the other polymorphisms showed no statistically significant association with the presence of inhibitors. Different immune regulatory gene polymorphisms play a significant role as possible risk factors for the development of inhibitors in severe haemophilia A patients.

  7. Genes and environment as predisposing factors in autoimmunity: acceleration of spontaneous thyroiditis by dietary iodide in NOD.H2(h4) mice.

    PubMed

    Kolypetri, Panayota; King, Justin; Larijani, Mani; Carayanniotis, George

    2015-01-01

    In the field of autoimmune thyroiditis, NOD.H2(h4) mice have attracted significant and increasing attention since they not only develop spontaneous disease but they present thyroiditis with accelerated incidence and severity if they ingest iodide through their drinking water. This animal model highlights the interplay between genetic and dietary factors in the triggering of autoimmune disease and offers new opportunities to study immunoregulatory parameters influenced by both genes and environment. Here, we review experimental findings with this mouse model of thyroiditis.

  8. The role of point mutations in the genes, predisposing inherited thrombophilia in the pathogeneses of proximal and distal deep vein thrombosis in Georgian population.

    PubMed

    Pirtskhelani, N; Kochiashvili, N; Makhaldiani, L; Pargalava, N; Gaprindashvili, E; Kartvelishvili, K

    2014-02-01

    Duration of treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and prevention of its recurrence represent significant problems of contemporary medicine, as the basic method of treatment - anticoagulation is frequently complicated by hemorrhage. Therefore, its duration is strictly defined and depends on existence of risk factors related to recurrence of thrombosis. Purpose of the conducted study was to establish the role of point mutations of prothrombin (PHG) - 20210G/A; Factor V Leiden (FVL) - 1691G/A and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) - 677C/T genes, i.e. inherited thrombophilia in the pathogenesis of proximal and distal lower extremity deep vein thrombosis in patients of the Georgian population, as in case of proximal thrombosis there is a higher risk of recurrent thrombosis. The above mutations were detected by PCR and single nucleotide primer extension reaction, followed by Enzyme Linked Immuno-Sorbent Assay (ELISA) in 61 patients with venous thromboembolism of various localizations, out of which: 49 patients were diagnosed with unprovoked proximal thromboembolism confirmed by objective studies and 12 patients were diagnosed with distal thromboembolism. The difference between the groups was evaluated by F (Fisher) precise criterion. According to statistical analysis of the results, incidence of FVL mutation in the group of patients with proximal thrombosis was significantly higher compared to patients with distal thrombosis 0.43 and 0.08 (p=0.0256), respectively. Similar tendencies were observed in case of carriage of prothrombin gene and MTHFR gene mutations, as their presence was higher in the group of patients having proximal thrombosis than in patients with distal thrombosis, however, this difference was not found to be statistically significant. It should be particularly mentioned that double or triple heterozygous or homozygous carriage of studied mutations with various options was confirmed in 15 of 61 patients and the above genotypes were observed

  9. Influence of DNA-repair gene variants on the micronucleus frequency in thyroid cancer patients.

    PubMed

    García-Quispes, W A; Pastor, S; Galofré, P; Biarnés, F; Castell, J; Velázquez, A; Marcos, R

    2013-01-20

    The role of different DNA-repair genes (OGG1, XRCC1, XRCC2 and XRCC3) on both the spontaneous and the induced frequency of micronuclei (MN) has been studied in the lymphocytes of a group of 114 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Induction of MN was achieved by treatment of the lymphocytes with 0.5Gy of gamma-radiation. The selected genes are involved in base-excision repair (BER) (OGG1, Ser326Cys; XRCC1, Arg280His and Arg399Gln), and in homologous recombination repair (HRR) (XRCC2, Arg188His and XRCC3, IVS5-14G). Genotyping was carried out by use of the iPLEX (Sequenom) technique. Results indicate that only the OGG1-Ser326Cys polymorphism was able to modulate the MN frequency. This effect was only observed in the spontaneous MN frequency (P=0.016), but not in the MN frequency induced after irradiation. In addition, a strong correlation was observed between spontaneous and induced MN frequency, which would suggest an underlying genetic background.

  10. Methylation profile analysis of DNA repair genes in hepatocellular carcinoma with MS-MLPA.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Ozge; Bilezikci, Banu; Aktas, Sema; Sahin, Feride I

    2013-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the rare tumors with well-defined risk factors. The multifactorial etiology of HCC can be explained by its complex molecular pathogenesis. In the current study, the methylation status of 7 genes involved in DNA repair mechanisms, namely MLH1, PMS2, MSH6, MSH2, MGMT, MSH3, and MLH3, was investigated in tumor samples from HCC patients, using the methylation-specific-multiplex ligated probe amplification method and the results were correlated with available clinical findings. The most common etiological factor in these cases was the presence of hepatitis B alone (47.2%). Among the 56 cases that were studied, promoter methylation was detected in at least one of the genes in 27 (48.2%) cases, only in 1 gene in 13 (23.2%) cases, and in >1 gene in 14 (25%) cases. Of the 7 genes investigated, methylation was most frequently observed in MSH3, in 14 (25%) cases. Methylation of at least 1 gene was significantly more frequent in patients with single tumors than multifocal tumors. There were significant differences regarding hepatitis B status, Child Class, tumor number, grade, and TNM stage in cases where PMS2 methylation was detected. Our results suggest that methylation of genes involved in mismatch repair may be responsible in the pathogenesis of HCC, and evaluating changes in multiple genes in these pathways simultaneously would be more informative. Despite being a robust and relatively inexpensive method, the methylation-specific-multiplex ligated probe amplification assay could be more extensively applied with improvements in the currently intricate data analysis component.

  11. Genetic Polymorphisms in DNA Repair Genes as Modulators of Hodgkin Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    El-Zein, Randa; Monroy, Claudia M.; Etzel, Carol J.; Cortes, Andrea C.; Xing, Yun; Collier, Amanda L.; Strom, Sara S.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although the pathogenesis of Hodgkin disease (HD) remains unknown, the results of epidemiologic studies suggest that heritable factors are important in terms of susceptibility. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may contribute to individual susceptibility for development of different cancers. However, to the authors’ knowledge, few studies to date have investigated the role of such polymorphisms as risk factors for development of HD. METHODS The authors evaluated the relation between polymorphisms in 3 nucleotide excision repair pathway genes (XPD [Lys751Gln], XPC [Lys939Gln], and XPG [Asp1104His]), the base excision repair XRCC1 (Arg399Gln), and double-strand break repair XRCC3 (Thr241Met) in a population of 200 HD cases and 220 matched controls. Variants were investigated independently and in combination; odd ratios (OR) were calculated. RESULTS A positive association was found for XRCC1 gene polymorphism Arg399Gln (OR, 1.77; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.16−2.71) and risk of HD. The combined analysis demonstrated that XRCC1/XRCC3 and XRCC1/XPC polymorphisms were associated with a significant increase in HD risk. XRCC1 Arg/Arg and XRCC3 Thr/Met genotypes combined were associated with an OR of 2.38 (95% CI, 1.24−4.55). The XRCC1 Arg/Gln and XRCC3 Thr/Thr, Thr/Met, and Met/Met genotypes had ORs of 1.88 (95% CI, 1.02−4.10), 1.97 (95% CI, 1.05−3.73), and 4.13 (95% CI, 1.50−11.33), respectively. XRCC1 Gln/Gln and XRCC3 Thr/Thr variant led to a significant increase in risk, with ORs of 3.00 (95% CI, 1.15−7.80). Similarly, XRCC1 Arg/Gln together with XPC Lys/Lys was found to significantly increase the risk of HD (OR, 2.14; 95% CI, 1.09−4.23). CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may modify the risk of HD, especially when interactions between the pathways are considered. PMID:19280628

  12. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes, traffic-related polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure and breast cancer incidence.

    PubMed

    Mordukhovich, Irina; Beyea, Jan; Herring, Amy H; Hatch, Maureen; Stellman, Steven D; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Richardson, David B; Millikan, Robert C; Engel, Lawrence S; Shantakumar, Sumitra; Steck, Susan E; Neugut, Alfred I; Rossner, Pavel; Santella, Regina M; Gammon, Marilie D

    2016-07-15

    Vehicular traffic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been associated with breast cancer incidence in epidemiologic studies, including our own. Because PAHs damage DNA by forming adducts and oxidative lesions, genetic polymorphisms that alter DNA repair capacity may modify associations between PAH-related exposures and breast cancer risk. Our goal was to examine the association between vehicular traffic exposure and breast cancer incidence within strata of a panel of nine biologically plausible nucleotide excision repair (NER) and base excision repair (BER) genotypes. Residential histories of 1,508 cases and 1,556 controls were assessed in the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project between 1996 and 1997 and used to reconstruct residential traffic exposures to benzo[a]pyrene, as a proxy for traffic-related PAHs. Likelihood ratio tests from adjusted unconditional logistic regression models were used to assess multiplicative interactions. A gene-traffic interaction was evident (p = 0.04) for ERCC2 (Lys751); when comparing the upper and lower tertiles of 1995 traffic exposure estimates, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval) was 2.09 (1.13, 3.90) among women with homozygous variant alleles. Corresponding odds ratios for 1960-1990 traffic were also elevated nearly 2-3-fold for XRCC1(Arg194Trp), XRCC1(Arg399Gln) and OGG1(Ser326Cys), but formal multiplicative interaction was not evident. When DNA repair variants for ERCC2, XRCC1 and OGG1 were combined, among women with 4-6 variants, the odds ratios were 2.32 (1.22, 4.49) for 1995 traffic and 2.96 (1.06, 8.21) for 1960-1990 traffic. Our study is first to report positive associations between traffic-related PAH exposure and breast cancer incidence among women with select biologically plausible DNA repair genotypes.

  13. Correction of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D mutant cell phenotypes by chromosome and gene transfer: Involvement of the human ERCC2 DNA repair gene

    SciTech Connect

    Flejter, W.L.; McDaniel, L.D.; Johns, D.; Schultz, R.A. ); Friedberg, E.C. )

    1992-01-01

    Cultured cells from individuals afflicted with the genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) exhibit sensitivity to UV radiation and defective nucleotide excision repair. Complementation of these mutant phenotypes after the introduction of single human chromosomes from repair-proficient cells into XP cells has provided a means of mapping the genes involved in this disease. The authors now report the phenotypic correction of XP cells from genetic complementation group D (XP-D) by a single human chromosome designated Tneo. Detailed molecular characterization of Tneo revealed a rearranged structure involving human chromosomes 16 and 19, including the excision repair cross-complementing 2 (ERCC2) gene from the previously described human DNA repair gene cluster at 19q13.2-q13.3. Direct transfer of a cosmid bearing the ERCC2 gene conferred UV resistance to XP-D cells.

  14. Mismatch repair genes identified using genetic screens in Blm-deficient embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ge; Wang, Wei; Bradley, Allan

    2004-06-24

    Phenotype-driven recessive genetic screens in diploid organisms require a strategy to render the mutation homozygous. Although homozygous mutant mice can be generated by breeding, a reliable method to make homozygous mutations in cultured cells has not been available, limiting recessive screens in culture. Cultured embryonic stem (ES) cells provide access to all of the genes required to elaborate the fundamental components and physiological systems of a mammalian cell. Here we have exploited the high rate of mitotic recombination in Bloom's syndrome protein (Blm)-deficient ES cells to generate a genome-wide library of homozygous mutant cells from heterozygous mutations induced with a revertible gene trap retrovirus. We have screened this library for cells with defects in DNA mismatch repair (MMR), a system that detects and repairs base-base mismatches. We demonstrate the recovery of cells with homozygous mutations in known and novel MMR genes. We identified Dnmt1(ref. 5) as a novel MMR gene and confirmed that Dnmt1-deficient ES cells exhibit micro-satellite instability, providing a mechanistic explanation for the role of Dnmt1 in cancer. The combination of insertional mutagenesis in Blm-deficient ES cells establishes a new approach for phenotype-based recessive genetic screens in ES cells.

  15. Acute myeloid leukemia fusion proteins deregulate genes involved in stem cell maintenance and DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Alcalay, Myriam; Meani, Natalia; Gelmetti, Vania; Fantozzi, Anna; Fagioli, Marta; Orleth, Annette; Riganelli, Daniela; Sebastiani, Carla; Cappelli, Enrico; Casciari, Cristina; Sciurpi, Maria Teresa; Mariano, Angela Rosa; Minardi, Simone Paolo; Luzi, Lucilla; Muller, Heiko; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Frosina, Guido; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemias (AMLs) are genetically heterogeneous and characterized by chromosomal rearrangements that produce fusion proteins with aberrant transcriptional regulatory activities. Expression of AML fusion proteins in transgenic mice increases the risk of myeloid leukemias, suggesting that they induce a preleukemic state. The underlying molecular and biological mechanisms are, however, unknown. To address this issue, we performed a systematic analysis of fusion protein transcriptional targets. We expressed AML1/ETO, PML/RAR, and PLZF/RAR in U937 hemopoietic precursor cells and measured global gene expression using oligonucleotide chips. We identified 1,555 genes regulated concordantly by at least two fusion proteins that were further validated in patient samples and finally classified according to available functional information. Strikingly, we found that AML fusion proteins induce genes involved in the maintenance of the stem cell phenotype and repress DNA repair genes, mainly of the base excision repair pathway. Functional studies confirmed that ectopic expression of fusion proteins constitutively activates pathways leading to increased stem cell renewal (e.g., the Jagged1/Notch pathway) and provokes accumulation of DNA damage. We propose that expansion of the stem cell compartment and induction of a mutator phenotype are relevant features underlying the leukemic potential of AML-associated fusion proteins. PMID:14660751

  16. DNA Repair Genes XRCC1, XRCC3, XPD, and OGG1 Polymorphisms among the Central Region Population of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alanazi, Mohammad; Pathan, Akbar Ali Khan; Ajaj, Sana Abdulla; Khan, Wajahatullah; Shaik, Jilani P; Al Tassan, Nada; Parine, Narasimha Reddy

    2013-01-01

    DNA repair is one of the central defense mechanisms against mutagenic exposures. Inherited SNPs of DNA repair genes may contribute to variations in DNA repair capacity and susceptibility to cancer. Due to the presence of these variants, inter-individual and ethnic differences in DNA repair capacity have been established in various populations. Saudi Arabia harbors enormous genetic and cultural diversity. In the present study we aimed to determine the genotype and allele frequencies of XRCC1 Arg399Gln (rs25487), XRCC3 Thr241Met (rs861539), XPD Lys751Gln (rs13181), and OGG1 Ser326Cys (rs1052133) gene polymorphisms in 386 healthy individuals residing in the central region of Saudi Arabia and compare them with HapMap and other populations. The genotype and allele frequencies of the four DNA repair gene loci in central Saudi population showed a distinctive pattern. Furthermore, comparison of polymorphisms in these genes with other populations also showed a unique pattern for the central Saudi population. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that deals with these DNA repair gene polymorphisms among the central Saudi population.

  17. Isolation of novel human and mouse genes of the recA/RAD51 recombination-repair gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, R; Dunn, A M; Simpson, P J; Tambini, C E; Thacker, J

    1998-01-01

    Genes from the recA/RAD51 family play essential roles in homologous recombination in all organisms. Using sequence homologies from eukaryotic members of this family we have identified fragments of two additional mammalian genes with homology to RAD51. Cloning the full-length cDNAs for both human and mouse genes showed that the sequences are highly conserved, and that the predicted proteins have characteristic features of this gene family. One of the novel genes (R51H2) occurs in two forms in human cDNA, differing extensively at the 3' end, probably due to an unusual form of alternative splicing. The new genes (R51H2 and R51H3) were mapped to human chromosomes 14q23-24 and 17q1.2, respectively. Expression studies showed that R51H2 is expressed at lower levels than R51H3 , but that expression of both genes occurs at elevated levels in the testis compared with other tissues. The combination of gene structure conservation and the transcript expression patterns suggests that these new members of the recA/RAD51 family may also function in homologous recombination-repair pathways. PMID:9512535

  18. The analysis of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and interleukin-1beta gene polymorphisms in Turkish FMF patients: do they predispose to secondary amyloidosis?

    PubMed

    Balci-Peynircioğlu, B; Taşkiran, Z E; Türel, B; Arici, M; Bakkaloğlu, A; Ozen, S; Yilmaz, E

    2008-01-01

    Amyloid development in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) patients is associated with acute phase response and the acute phase reactant serum amyloid A which is induced by IL-1Beta. Its concentration can increase to more than 1000 fold during inflammation. In view of the inflammatory nature of FMF disease we have investigated whether IL-1Beta and IL-1 receptor antagonist gene polymorphisms may be involved in amyloid development in FMF patients. Ninety-nine FMF patients without amyloidosis; 54 FMF patients with amyloidosis and 60 healthy controls samples were genotyped for IL-1Beta-511 (C/T) and IL-1Beta+3953 (C/T) polymorphisms using PCR-RFLP and for IL-1Ra VNTR polymorphism using PCR. The allele and genotype frequencies of IL-1Beta-511 (C/T), IL-1Beta+3953 (C/T) and IL-1Ra VNTR polymorphisms in FMF patients with and without amyloidosis were all compared with those in controls. There were no significant differences between FMF patients with and without amyloidosis and healthy control samples for these polymorphisms (all P-values are >0.05). These polymorphisms were not associated with M694V mutation in FMF patients with and without amyloidosis. IL-1Beta-511 (C/T), IL-1Beta+3953 (C/T) and IL-1Ra VNTR polymorphisms are not associated with the development of amyloid in FMF patients.

  19. Polymorphisms in catechol-O-methyltransferase and cytochrome p450 subfamily 19 genes predispose towards Madurella mycetomatis-induced mycetoma susceptibility.

    PubMed

    van de Sande, Wendy W J; Fahal, Ahmed; Tavakol, Mehri; van Belkum, Alex

    2010-11-01

    Mycetoma caused by Madurella mycetomatis is a devastating and neglected disease which primarily affects males. Since this predominance cannot be easily explained by behaviour differences between men and women, other factors, including sex hormones, could be the cause. To monitor for possible deficiencies in hormone synthesis among mycetoma patients, we investigated the types and allele frequencies of the genes encoding for catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), cytochrome p450 subfamily 1 (CYP1B1), cytochrome p450 subfamily 17 (CYP17), cytochrome p450 subfamily 19 (CYP19) and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3B (HSD3B). Significant differences in allele distribution were demonstrated for CYP19 (P=0.004) and COMT (P=0.005), as well as gender dimorphism for both CYP19 and COMT polymorphisms. The COMT polymorphism was associated with lesion size. The genotypes obtained for COMT and CYP19 were connected with higher 17β-estradiol production, which was confirmed by significantly elevated serum levels of 17β-estradiol in male patients. In contrast, lowered levels of dehydroepiandrosteron (DHEA) were found in mycetoma patients. The in vitro growth of M. mycetomatis was not influenced by 17β-estradiol, progesterone, DHEA and testosterone. The differences in hormone levels we noted between mycetoma patients and healthy controls did not directly affect the fungus itself. Indirect effects on the patients' hormone regulated immune states are the more likely explanations for mycetoma susceptibility.

  20. Relevance of DNA repair gene polymorphisms to gastric cancer risk and phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Carrera-Lasfuentes, Patricia; Lanas, Angel; Bujanda, Luis; Strunk, Mark; Quintero, Enrique; Santolaria, Santos; Benito, Rafael; Sopeña, Federico; Piazuelo, Elena; Thomson, Concha; Pérez-Aisa, Angeles; Nicolás-Pérez, David; Hijona, Elizabeth; Espinel, Jesús; Campo, Rafael; Manzano, Marisa; Geijo, Fernando; Pellise, María; Zaballa, Manuel; González-Huix, Ferrán; Espinós, Jorge; Titó, Llúcia; Barranco, Luis; D'Amato, Mauro; García-González, María Asunción

    2017-01-01

    Variations in DNA repair genes have been reported as key factors in gastric cancer (GC) susceptibility but results among studies are inconsistent. We aimed to assess the relevance of DNA repair gene polymorphisms and environmental factors to GC risk and phenotype in a Caucasian population in Spain. Genomic DNA from 603 patients with primary GC and 603 healthy controls was typed for 123 single nucleotide polymorphisms in DNA repair genes using the Illumina platform. Helicobacter pylori infection with CagA strains (odds ratio (OR): 1.99; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.55–2.54), tobacco smoking (OR: 1.77; 95% CI: 1.22–2.57), and family history of GC (OR: 2.87; 95% CI: 1.85–4.45) were identified as independent risk factors for GC. By contrast, the TP53 rs9894946A (OR: 0.73; 95% CI: 0.56–0.96), TP53 rs1042522C (OR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.56–0.96), and BRIP1 rs4986764T (OR: 0.55; 95% CI: 0.38–0.78) variants were associated with lower GC risk. Significant associations with specific anatomopathological GC subtypes were also observed, most notably in the ERCC4 gene with the rs1799801C, rs2238463G, and rs3136038T variants being inversely associated with cardia GC risk. Moreover, the XRCC3 rs861528 allele A was significantly increased in the patient subgroup with diffuse GC (OR: 1.75; 95% CI: 1.30–2.37). Our data show that specific TP53, BRIP1, ERCC4, and XRCC3 polymorphisms are relevant in susceptibility to GC risk and specific subtypes in Caucasians. PMID:28415781

  1. Risk of childhood leukemia associated with diagnostic irradiation and polymorphisms in DNA repair genes.

    PubMed Central

    Infante-Rivard, C; Mathonnet, G; Sinnett, D

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to measure risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia associated with reported postnatal diagnostic X rays and to determine if it was modified in the presence of variants in genes involved in DNA repair. We conducted a population-based case-control study with 491 cases and 491 healthy controls among children 0-9 years of age at diagnosis. To evaluate gene-environment interaction, we used a subgroup of 129 cases. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) for one reported postnatal child X ray versus none was 1.04 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.72-1.49], whereas the OR for two or more X rays was 1.61 (CI, 1.13-2.28). Among girls, the former ORs were 1.14 (CI, 0.66-1.96) and 2.26 (1. 20-4.23), respectively. Among girls who carried the hMSH3 [exon (ex) 23] variant, the ORs were 3.33 (CI, 0.75-14.82) for one X ray and 0. 27 (CI, 0.05-1.57) for two or more X rays, whereas among those who carried the XRCCI (ex 6) variant, the ORs were 1.45 (0.11-19.08) and 6.66 (0.78-56.63), respectively. On the other hand, at low levels of exposure, boys seemed protected by the variant hMLH1 (ex 8). The latter results must be interpreted with caution but suggest that the effect of diagnostic X rays could be modified by variants in repair genes according to sex. Few studies have evaluated the risk of postnatal diagnostic irradiation, which was moderately strong here; we are not aware of any studies that also considered the effect of polymorphisms in DNA repair genes. Based on the present results, both aspects deserve further study. PMID:10856021

  2. Reduced Activity of Double-Strand Break Repair Genes in Prostate Cancer Patients With Late Normal Tissue Radiation Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Oorschot, Bregje van; Hovingh, Suzanne E.; Moerland, Perry D.; Medema, Jan Paul; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Vrieling, Harry; Franken, Nicolaas A.P.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate clinical parameters and DNA damage response as possible risk factors for radiation toxicity in the setting of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Clinical parameters of 61 prostate cancer patients, 34 with (overresponding, OR) and 27 without (non-responding, NR) severe late radiation toxicity were assembled. In addition, for a matched subset the DNA damage repair kinetics (γ-H2AX assay) and expression profiles of DNA repair genes were determined in ex vivo irradiated lymphocytes. Results: Examination of clinical data indicated none of the considered clinical parameters to be correlated with the susceptibility of patients to develop late radiation toxicity. Although frequencies of γ-H2AX foci induced immediately after irradiation were similar (P=.32), significantly higher numbers of γ-H2AX foci were found 24 hours after irradiation in OR compared with NR patients (P=.03). Patient-specific γ-H2AX foci decay ratios were significantly higher in NR patients than in OR patients (P<.0001). Consequently, NR patients seem to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) more efficiently than OR patients. Moreover, gene expression analysis indicated several genes of the homologous recombination pathway to be stronger induced in NR compared with OR patients (P<.05). A similar trend was observed in genes of the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway (P=.09). This is congruent with more proficient repair of DNA DSBs in patients without late radiation toxicity. Conclusions: Both gene expression profiling and DNA DSB repair kinetics data imply that less-efficient repair of radiation-induced DSBs may contribute to the development of late normal tissue damage. Induction levels of DSB repair genes (eg, RAD51) may potentially be used to assess the risk for late radiation toxicity.

  3. Altered Gene Expressions and Cytogenetic Repair Efficiency in Cells with Suppressed Expression of XPA after Proton Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Gridley, Daila S.; Mehta, Satish K.; Pierson, Duane L.; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    Cellular responses to damages from ionizing radiation (IR) exposure are influenced not only by the genes involved in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair, but also by non- DSB repair genes. We demonstrated previously that suppressed expression of several non-DSB repair genes, such as XPA, elevated IR-induced cytogenetic damages. In the present study, we exposed human fibroblasts that were treated with control or XPA targeting siRNA to 250 MeV protons (0 to 4 Gy), and analyzed chromosome aberrations and expressions of genes involved in DNA repair. As expected, after proton irradiation, cells with suppressed expression of XPA showed a significantly elevated frequency of chromosome aberrations compared with control siRNA treated (CS) cells. Protons caused more severe DNA damages in XPA knock-down cells, as 36% cells contained multiple aberrations compared to 25% in CS cells after 4Gy proton irradiation. Comparison of gene expressions using the real-time PCR array technique revealed that expressions of p53 and its regulated genes in irradiated XPA suppressed cells were altered similarly as in CS cells, suggesting that the impairment of IR induced DNA repair in XPA suppressed cells is p53-independent. Except for XPA, which was more than 2 fold down regulated in XPA suppressed cells, several other DNA damage sensing and repair genes (GTSE1, RBBP8, RAD51, UNG and XRCC2) were shown a more than 1.5 fold difference between XPA knock-down cells and CS cells after proton exposure. The possible involvement of these genes in the impairment of DNA repair in XPA suppressed cells will be further investigated.

  4. Altered Gene Expressions and Cytogenetic Repair Efficiency in Cells with Suppressed Expression of XPA after Proton Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Gridley, Daila S.; Mehta, Satish K.; Pierson, Duane L.; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    Cellular responses to damages from ionizing radiation (IR) exposure are influenced not only by the genes involved in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair, but also by non- DSB repair genes. We demonstrated previously that suppressed expression of several non-DSB repair genes, such as XPA, elevated IR-induced cytogenetic damages. In the present study, we exposed human fibroblasts that were treated with control or XPA targeting siRNA to 250 MeV protons (0 to 4 Gy), and analyzed chromosome aberrations and expressions of genes involved in DNA repair. As expected, after proton irradiation, cells with suppressed expression of XPA showed a significantly elevated frequency of chromosome aberrations compared with control siRNA treated (CS) cells. Protons caused more severe DNA damages in XPA knock-down cells, as 36% cells contained multiple aberrations compared to 25% in CS cells after 4Gy proton irradiation. Comparison of gene expressions using the real-time PCR array technique revealed that expressions of p53 and its regulated genes in irradiated XPA suppressed cells were altered similarly as in CS cells, suggesting that the impairment of IR induced DNA repair in XPA suppressed cells is p53-independent. Except for XPA, which was more than 2 fold down regulated in XPA suppressed cells, several other DNA damage sensing and repair genes (GTSE1, RBBP8, RAD51, UNG and XRCC2) were shown a more than 1.5 fold difference between XPA knock-down cells and CS cells after proton exposure. The possible involvement of these genes in the impairment of DNA repair in XPA suppressed cells will be further investigated.

  5. Molecular genetic and biochemical analyses of a DNA repair gene from Serratia marcescens

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the SOS response and two 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylases (TagI and TagII) are required for repair of DNA damaged by alkylating agents such as methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Mutations of the recA gene eliminate the SOS response. TagI and TagII are encoded by the tag and alkA genes, respectively. A gene (rpr) encoding 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase activity was isolated from the Gram-negative bacterium Serratia marcescens. The gene, localized to a 1.5-kilobase pair SmaI-HindIII restriction fragment, was cloned into plasmid pUC18. The clone complemented E. coli tag alkA and recA mutations for MMS resistance. The rpr gene did not, however, complement recA mutations for resistance to ultraviolet light or the ability to perform homologous recombination reactions, nor did it complement E. coli ada or alkB mutations. Two proteins of molecular weights 42,000 and 16,000 were produced from the rpr locus. Analysis of deletion and insertion mutants of rpr suggested that the 42kD molecule is the active protein. The 16kD protein may either be a breakdown product of the 42kD species or may be encoded by another gene overlapping the reading frame of the rpr gene. Biochemical assays showed that the rpr gene product (Rpr) possesses 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase activity.

  6. MMP3 and TIMP2 gene variants as predisposing factors for Achilles tendon pathologies: Attempted replication study in a British case-control cohort.

    PubMed

    El Khoury, Louis; Ribbans, William J; Raleigh, Stuart M

    2016-09-01

    Variants within the MMP3 (rs679620) and TIMP2 (rs4789932) genes have been associated with the risk of Achilles tendon pathology (ATP) in populations from South Africa and Australia. This study aimed to determine whether these variants were associated with the risk of ATP in British Caucasians. We recruited 118 cases with ATP, including a subset of 25 individuals with Achilles tendon rupture (RUP) and 131 controls. DNA samples were isolated from saliva and genotyped using qPCR. For the TIMP2 rs4789932 variant we found a significant (p = 0.038) difference in the genotype distribution frequency between males with ATP (CC, 39.4%; CT, 43.7%; TT, 16.9%) compared to male controls (CC, 20.7%; CT, 59.8%; TT, 19.5%). We also observed a difference in the TIMP2 rs4789932 genotype distribution between males with rupture compared to male controls (p = 0.038). The MMP3 rs679620 GG genotype was found to be overrepresented in the Achilles tendon rupture (RUP) group (AA, 24.0%; AG, 32.0%; GG, 44.0%) compared to controls (AA, 26.7%; AG, 54.2%; GG, 19.1%). In conclusion, the CT genotype of the TIMP2 rs4789932 variant was associated with lower risk of ATP in males. Furthermore, while we revealed differences for both variants in genotype distribution between the RUP and control groups, the sample size of the RUP group was small and confirmation would be required in additional cohorts. Finally, although both the TIMP2 rs4789932 and MMP3 rs679620 variants tentatively associated with ATP, there were differences in the direction of association compared to earlier work.

  7. Proteasome inhibition enhances resistance to DNA damage via upregulation of Rpn4-dependent DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Karpov, Dmitry S; Spasskaya, Daria S; Tutyaeva, Vera V; Mironov, Alexander S; Karpov, Vadim L

    2013-09-17

    The 26S proteasome is an ATP-dependent multi-subunit protease complex and the major regulator of intracellular protein turnover and quality control. However, its role in the DNA damage response is controversial. We addressed this question in yeast by disrupting the transcriptional regulation of the PRE1 proteasomal gene. The mutant strain has decreased proteasome activity and is hyper-resistant to various DNA-damaging agents. We found that Rpn4-target genes MAG1, RAD23, and RAD52 are overexpressed in this strain due to Rpn4 stabilisation. These genes represent three different pathways of base excision, nucleotide excision and double strand break repair by homologous recombination (DSB-HR). Consistently, the proteasome mutant displays increased DSB-HR activity. Our data imply that the proteasome may have a negative role in DNA damage response.

  8. Bacterial DNA repair genes and their eukaryotic homologues: 5. The role of recombination in DNA repair and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Nowosielska, Anetta

    2007-01-01

    Recombinational repair is a well conserved DNA repair mechanism present in all living organisms. Repair by homologous recombination is generally accurate as it uses undamaged homologous DNA molecule as a repair template. In Escherichia coli homologous recombination repairs both the double-strand breaks and single-strand gaps in DNA. DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) can be induced upon exposure to exogenous sources such as ionizing radiation or endogenous DNA-damaging agents including reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as during natural biological processes like conjugation. However, the bulk of double strand breaks are formed during replication fork collapse encountering an unrepaired single strand gap in DNA. Under such circumstances DNA replication on the damaged template can be resumed only if supported by homologous recombination. This functional cooperation of homologous recombination with replication machinery enables successful completion of genome duplication and faithful transmission of genetic material to a daughter cell. In eukaryotes, homologous recombination is also involved in essential biological processes such as preservation of genome integrity, DNA damage checkpoint activation, DNA damage repair, DNA replication, mating type switching, transposition, immune system development and meiosis. When unregulated, recombination can lead to genome instability and carcinogenesis.

  9. Radiation dose effect of DNA repair-related gene expression in mouse white blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming-juan; Wang, Wei-wei; Chen, Shi-wei; Shen, Qian; Min, Rui

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The aim of this study was to screen molecular biomarkers for biodosimetry from DNA repair-related gene expression profiles. Material/Methods Mice were subjected to whole-body exposure with 60Co γ rays with a dose range of 0–8 Gy at a dose rate of 0.80 Gy/min. RNA was extracted from the peripheral blood of irradiated mice at 4, 8, 12, 24 and 48hrs post-irradiation. The mRNA transcriptional changes of 11 genes related to DNA damage and repair were detected using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results Of the 11 genes examined, CDKN1A (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A or p21, Cip1) and ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) expression levels were found to be heavily up- and down-regulated, respectively, with exposure dose increasing at different post-irradiation times. RAD50 (RAD50 homolog), PLK3 (polo-like kinase 3), GADD45A (growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible, alpha), DDB2 (damage-specific DNA-binding protein 2), BBC3 (BCL2-binding component 3) and IER5 (immediate early response 5) gene expression levels were found to undergo significant oscillating changes over a broad dose range of 2–8 Gy at post-exposure time points observed. Three of the genes were found not to change within the observed exposure dose and post-radiation time ranges. Conclusions The results of this study add to the biodosimetry with biomarker data pool and will be helpful for constructing appropriate gene expression biomarker systems to evaluate radiation exposure doses. PMID:21959603

  10. Rearrangement of RAG-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient ``wasted`` mice

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Libertin, C.R.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C.M.

    1993-11-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene ``wasted`` wst display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (RAG-l/RAG-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed expression of RAG-1 mRNA in spinal cord (but not brain) of control mice; no expression of RAG-1 mRNA was detected in spinal cord or brain from wst/wst mice or their normal littermates (wst/{center_dot}mice). In thymus tissue, a small RAG-1 transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/{center_dot}mice, a two-fold increase in RAG-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. RAG-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/{center_dot} and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF{sub 1} mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement/deletion within the RAG-1 gene of affected wasted mice, not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the RAG-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  11. Differential expression of tissue repair genes in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Gosselink, John V; Hayashi, Shizu; Elliott, W Mark; Xing, Li; Chan, Becky; Yang, Luojia; Wright, Claire; Sin, Don; Paré, Peter D; Pierce, John A; Pierce, Richard A; Patterson, Alex; Cooper, Joel; Hogg, James C

    2010-06-15

    The airflow limitation that defines severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is caused by a combination of small airway obstruction and emphysematous lung destruction. To examine the hypothesis that small airway obstructive and emphysematous destructive lesions are produced by differential expression of genes associated with tissue repair. The expression of 54 genes associated with repair of repetitively damaged tissue was measured in 136 paired samples of small bronchioles and surrounding lung tissue separated by laser capture microdissection. These samples were collected from 63 patients at different levels of disease severity who required surgery for either lung cancer or lung transplantation for very severe COPD. Gene expression was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction in these paired samples and compared with the FEV(1) by linear regression analysis. After corrections for false discovery rates, only 2 of 10 genes (serpin peptidase inhibitor/plasminogen activator inhibitor member 2 and matrix metalloproteinase [MMP] 10) increased, whereas 8 (MMP2, integrin-alpha1, vascular endothelial growth factor, a disintegrin and metallopeptidase domain 33, scatter factor/hepatocyte growth factor, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-2, fibronectin, and collagen 3alpha1) decreased in small airways in association with FEV(1). In contrast, 8/12 genes (early growth response factor 1, MMP1, MMP9, MMP10, plasminogen activator urokinase, plasminogen activator urokinase receptor, tumor necrosis factor, and IL13) increased and 4/12 (MMP2, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1, collagen 1alpha1, and transforming growth factor-beta3) decreased in the surrounding lung tissue in association with progression of COPD. The progression of COPD is associated with the differential expression of a cluster of genes that favor the degradation of the tissue surrounding the small conducting airways.

  12. Paradoxical DNA Repair and Peroxide Resistance Gene Conservation in Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xiang; Jiang, Huaiyang; Igboeli, Okezie C.; Muzny, Donna; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Ding, Yan; Hawes, Alicia; Liu, Wen; Perez, Lesette; Kovar, Christie; Dinh, Huyen; Lee, Sandra; Nazareth, Lynne; Blyth, Peter; Holder, Michael; Buhay, Christian; Tirumalai, Madhan R.; Liu, Yamei; Dasgupta, Indrani; Bokhetache, Lina; Fujita, Masaya; Karouia, Fathi; Eswara Moorthy, Prahathees; Siefert, Johnathan; Uzman, Akif; Buzumbo, Prince; Verma, Avani; Zwiya, Hiba; McWilliams, Brian D.; Olowu, Adeola; Clinkenbeard, Kenneth D.; Newcombe, David; Golebiewski, Lisa; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Nicholson, Wayne L.; Fox, George E.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Highlander, Sarah K.; Weinstock, George M.

    2007-01-01

    Background Bacillus spores are notoriously resistant to unfavorable conditions such as UV radiation, γ-radiation, H2O2, desiccation, chemical disinfection, or starvation. Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 survives standard decontamination procedures of the Jet Propulsion Lab spacecraft assembly facility, and both spores and vegetative cells of this strain exhibit elevated resistance to UV radiation and H2O2 compared to other Bacillus species. Principal Findings The genome of B. pumilus SAFR-032 was sequenced and annotated. Lists of genes relevant to DNA repair and the oxidative stress response were generated and compared to B. subtilis and B. licheniformis. Differences in conservation of genes, gene order, and protein sequences are highlighted because they potentially explain the extreme resistance phenotype of B. pumilus. The B. pumilus genome includes genes not found in B. subtilis or B. licheniformis and conserved genes with sequence divergence, but paradoxically lacks several genes that function in UV or H2O2 resistance in other Bacillus species. Significance This study identifies several candidate genes for further research into UV and H2O2 resistance. These findings will help explain the resistance of B. pumilus and are applicable to understanding sterilization survival strategies of microbes. PMID:17895969

  13. The Democratization of Gene Editing: Insights from site-specific cleavage and double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Jasin, Maria; Haber, James E.

    2017-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are dangerous lesions that if not properly repaired can lead to genomic change or cell death. Organisms have developed several pathways and have many factors devoted to repairing DSBs, which broadly occur by homologous recombination that relies on an identical or homologous sequence to template repair, or nonhomologous end-joining. Much of our understanding of these repair mechanisms has come from the study of induced DNA cleavage by site-specific endonucleases. In addition to their biological role, these cellular pathways can be co-opted for gene editing to study gene function or for gene therapy or other applications. While the first gene editing experiments were done more than 20 years ago, the recent discovery of RNA-guided endonucleases has simplified approaches developed over the years to make gene editing an approach that is available to the entire biomedical research community. Here, we review DSB repair mechanisms and site-specific cleavage systems that have provided insight into these mechanisms and led to the current gene editing revolution. PMID:27261202

  14. The democratization of gene editing: Insights from site-specific cleavage and double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Jasin, Maria; Haber, James E

    2016-08-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are dangerous lesions that if not properly repaired can lead to genomic change or cell death. Organisms have developed several pathways and have many factors devoted to repairing DSBs, which broadly occurs by homologous recombination, which relies on an identical or homologous sequence to template repair, or nonhomologous end-joining. Much of our understanding of these repair mechanisms has come from the study of induced DNA cleavage by site-specific endonucleases. In addition to their biological role, these cellular pathways can be co-opted for gene editing to study gene function or for gene therapy or other applications. While the first gene editing experiments were done more than 20 years ago, the recent discovery of RNA-guided endonucleases has simplified approaches developed over the years to make gene editing an approach that is available to the entire biomedical research community. Here, we review DSB repair mechanisms and site-specific cleavage systems that have provided insight into these mechanisms and led to the current gene editing revolution.

  15. Specific targeted gene repair using single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides at an endogenous locus in mammalian cells uses homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Jennifer; Fernandez, Serena; Helleday, Thomas; Bryant, Helen E

    2009-12-03

    The feasibility of introducing point mutations in vivo using single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssON) has been demonstrated but the efficiency and mechanism remain elusive and potential side effects have not been fully evaluated. Understanding the mechanism behind this potential therapy may help its development. Here, we demonstrate the specific repair of an endogenous non-functional hprt gene by a ssON in mammalian cells, and show that the frequency of such an event is enhanced when cells are in S-phase of the cell cycle. A potential barrier in using ssONs as gene therapy could be non-targeted mutations or gene rearrangements triggered by the ssON. Both the non-specific mutation frequencies and the frequency of gene rearrangements were largely unaffected by ssONs. Furthermore, we find that the introduction of a mutation causing the loss of a functional endogenous hprt gene by a ssON occurred at a similarly low but statistically significant frequency in wild type cells and in cells deficient in single strand break repair, nucleotide excision repair and mismatch repair. However, this mutation was not induced in XRCC3 mutant cells deficient in homologous recombination. Thus, our data suggest ssON-mediated targeted gene repair is more efficient in S-phase and involves homologous recombination.

  16. Polymorphisms in double-strand breaks repair genes are associated with impaired fertility in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Ji, Guixiang; Yan, Lifeng; Liu, Wei; Huang, Cong; Gu, Aihua; Wang, Xinru

    2013-05-01

    The DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) repair pathway plays a critical role in repairing double-strand breaks, and genetic variants in DSBs repair pathway genes are potential risk factors for various diseases. To test the hypothesis that polymorphisms in DSBs genes are associated with susceptibility to male infertility, we examined 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms in eight key DSBs genes (XRCC3, XRCC2, BRCA2, RAG1, XRCC5, LIG4, XRCC4 and ATM) in 580 infertility cases and 580 controls from a Chinese population-based case-control study (NJMU Infertility Study). Genotypes were determined using the OpenArray platform, and sperm DNA fragmentation was detected using the TUNEL assay. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) and 95% CI were estimated using logistic regression. The results indicate that LIG4 rs1805388 (Ex2+54C>T, Thr9Ile) T allele could increase the susceptibility to male infertility (adjusted OR=2.78; 95% CI, 1.77-4.36 for TT genotype; and adjusted OR=1.58; 95% CI, 1.77-4.36 for TC genotype respectively). In addition, the homozygous variant genotype GG of RAG1 rs2227973 (A>G, K820R) was associated with a significantly increased risk of male infertility (adjusted OR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.01-2.04). Moreover, linear regression analysis revealed that carriers of LIG4 rs1805388 or RAG1 rs2227973 variants had a significantly higher level of sperm DNA fragmentation and that T allele carriers of LIG4 rs1805388 also had a lower level of sperm concentration when compared with common homozygous genotype carriers. This study demonstrates, for the first time, to our knowledge, that functional variants of RAG1 rs2227973 and LIG4 rs1805388 are associated with susceptibility to male infertility.

  17. TEX15: A DNA repair gene associated with prostate cancer risk in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoling; Chen, Zhongzhong; Gao, Peng; Gao, Zhimei; Chen, Haitao; Qi, Jun; Liu, Fang; Ye, Dingwei; Jiang, Haowen; Na, Rong; Yu, Hongjie; Shi, Rong; Lu, Daru; Zheng, Siqun Lilly; Mo, Zengnan; Sun, Yinghao; Ding, Qiang; Xu, Jianfeng

    2017-09-01

    Both common and rare genetic variants may contribute to risk of developing prostate cancer. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified ∼100 independent, common variants associated with prostate cancer risk. However, little is known about the association of rare variants (minor allele frequency [MAF] <1%) in the genome with prostate cancer risk. A two-stage study was used to test the association of rare, deleterious coding variants, annotated using predictive algorithms, with prostate cancer risk in Chinese men. Predicted rare, deleterious coding variants in the Illumina HumanExome-12 v1.1 beadchip were first evaluated in 1343 prostate cancer patients and 1008 controls. Significant variants were then validated in an additional 1816 prostate cancer patients and 1549 controls. In the discovery stage, 14 predicted rare, deleterious coding variants were significantly associated with prostate cancer risk (P < 0.01). In the confirmation stage, Q1631H in TEX15 (rs142485241), a DNA repair gene, was significantly associated with prostate cancer risk (P = 0.0069). The estimated odds ratio (OR) of the variant in the combined analysis was 3.24 (95% Confidence Interval 1.85-6.06), P = 8.81 × 10(-5) . Additionally, rs28756990 (V741F) at MLH3 (P = 0.06) and rs2961144 (I126V) at OR2A5 (P = 0.065) were marginally associated with prostate cancer risk in the replication stage. Our study provided preliminary evidence that the rare variant Q1631H in DNA repair gene TEX15 is associated with prostate cancer risk. This finding complements known common prostate cancer risk-associated variants and suggests the possible role of DNA repair genes in prostate cancer development. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. [Direct bone morphogenetic protein 2 gene therapy for repairing segmental radial defect in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Li, Jianjun; Bai, Lunhao; Sun, Hongbin; Han, Dong; Gu, Jiaxiang; Wang, Huan; Duan, Jingzhu; Xu, Xinxiang

    2005-09-01

    To study the effect of direct bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) gene therapy mediated by adenovirus on repairing bone defect. The radial defect models were made on 60 rabbits, which were evenly divided into 4 groups randomly. The 4 groups were treated with different materials: group A, adenovirus carrying BMP-2 gene (Ad-BMP-2) plus bovine cancellous bone (BCB); group B, reconstructed BMP-2 plus BCB; group C, Ad-Lacz plus BCB; and group D, only BCB scaffolds. The X-ray, histological examination, biomechanics analysis, and immunohistochemical staining were made 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the operation. Group A gained better effect in the volume of new bones, the anti-bending intensity of the healing bone, and the expression of BMP-2 than those of group B. The defect in group A was healed. No new bones were observed in group C and group D. Direct BMP-2 gene therapy is easy to perform and has very strong osteo-induction ability. It is a good method to repair segmental bone defects.

  19. DNA mismatch repair gene MSH6 implicated in determining age at natural menopause

    PubMed Central

    Perry, John R.B.; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Chasman, Daniel I.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Elks, Cathy; Albrecht, Eva; Andrulis, Irene L.; Beesley, Jonathan; Berenson, Gerald S.; Bergmann, Sven; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Brown, Judith; Buring, Julie E.; Campbell, Harry; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Corre, Tanguy; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; D'adamo, Adamo Pio; Davies, Gail; Deary, Ian J.; Dennis, Joe; Easton, Douglas F.; Engelhardt, Ellen G.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Esko, Tõnu; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Flyger, Henrik; Fraser, Abigail; Garcia-Closas, Montse; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Giles, Graham; Guenel, Pascal; Hägg, Sara; Hall, Per; Hayward, Caroline; Hopper, John; Ingelsson, Erik; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Kasiman, Katherine; Knight, Julia A.; Lahti, Jari; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Margolin, Sara; Marsh, Julie A.; Metspalu, Andres; Olson, Janet E.; Pennell, Craig E.; Polasek, Ozren; Rahman, Iffat; Ridker, Paul M.; Robino, Antonietta; Rudan, Igor; Rudolph, Anja; Salumets, Andres; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Smith, Erin N.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Southey, Melissa; Stöckl, Doris; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Thompson, Deborah J.; Truong, Therese; Ulivi, Sheila; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wang, Qin; Wild, Sarah; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F.; Zgaga, Lina; Ong, Ken K.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Karasik, David; Murray, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The length of female reproductive lifespan is associated with multiple adverse outcomes, including breast cancer, cardiovascular disease and infertility. The biological processes that govern the timing of the beginning and end of reproductive life are not well understood. Genetic variants are known to contribute to ∼50% of the variation in both age at menarche and menopause, but to date the known genes explain <15% of the genetic component. We have used genome-wide association in a bivariate meta-analysis of both traits to identify genes involved in determining reproductive lifespan. We observed significant genetic correlation between the two traits using genome-wide complex trait analysis. However, we found no robust statistical evidence for individual variants with an effect on both traits. A novel association with age at menopause was detected for a variant rs1800932 in the mismatch repair gene MSH6 (P = 1.9 × 10−9), which was also associated with altered expression levels of MSH6 mRNA in multiple tissues. This study contributes to the growing evidence that DNA repair processes play a key role in ovarian ageing and could be an important therapeutic target for infertility. PMID:24357391

  20. Are SNP-Smoking Association Studies Needed in Controls? DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms and Smoking Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Verde, Zoraida; Reinoso, Luis; Chicharro, Luis Miguel; Resano, Pilar; Sánchez-Hernández, Ignacio; Rodríguez González-Moro, Jose Miguel; Bandrés, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Variations in tobacco-related cancers, incidence and prevalence reflect differences in tobacco consumption in addition to genetic factors. Besides, genes related to lung cancer risk could be related to smoking behavior. Polymorphisms altering DNA repair capacity may lead to synergistic effects with tobacco carcinogen-induced lung cancer risk. Common problems in genetic association studies, such as presence of gene-by-environment (G x E) correlation in the population, may reduce the validity of these designs. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the independence assumption for selected SNPs and smoking behaviour in a cohort of 320 healthy Spanish smokers. We found an association between the wild type alleles of XRCC3 Thr241Met or KLC3 Lys751Gln and greater smoking intensity (OR = 12.98, 95% CI = 2.86–58.82 and OR=16.90, 95% CI=2.09-142.8; respectively). Although preliminary, the results of our study provide evidence that genetic variations in DNA-repair genes may influence both smoking habits and the development of lung cancer. Population-specific G x E studies should be carried out when genetic and environmental factors interact to cause the disease. PMID:26017978

  1. Expression of DNA repair genes in burned skin exposed to low-level red laser.

    PubMed

    Trajano, Eduardo Tavares Lima; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa; Pôrto, Luís Cristóvão; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson

    2014-11-01

    Although red laser lights lie in the region of non-ionizing radiations in the electromagnetic spectrum, there are doubts whether absorption of these radiations causes lesions in the DNA molecule. Our aim was to investigate the expression of the genes involved with base excision and nucleotide excision repair pathways in skin tissue submitted to burn injury and exposed to low-level red laser. Wistar rats were divided as follows: control group-rats burned and not irradiated, laser group-rats burned and irradiated 1 day after injury for five consecutive days, and later laser group-rats injured and treated 4 days after injury for five consecutive days. Irradiation was performed according to a clinical protocol (20 J/cm(2), 100 mW, continuous wave emission mode). The animals were sacrificed on day 10, and scarred tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, complementary DNA (cDNA) synthesis, and evaluation of gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Low-level red laser exposure (1) reduces the expression of APE1 messenger (mRNA), (2) increases the expression of OGG1 mRNA, (3) reduces the expression of XPC mRNA, and (4) increases the expression of XPA mRNA both in laser and later laser groups. Red laser exposure at therapeutic fluences alters the expression of genes related to base excision and nucleotide excision pathways of DNA repair during wound healing of burned skin.

  2. Diabetes causes multiple genetic alterations and downregulates expression of DNA repair genes in the prostate.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chunwei; Li, Xiaojuan; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Yuying; Cai, Mengyin; Zhu, Baoyi; Mu, Panwei; Xia, Xuan; Zhao, Yi; Weng, Jianping; Gao, Xin; Wen, Xingqiao

    2011-09-01

    The molecular impact of diabetes mellitus on prostate gland has not been elucidated. In this study, we performed a whole-genome cDNA microarray analysis using a streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model to identify the effects of diabetes on the gene expression profiles in prostate. Our study shows that diabetes causes changes in the expression of multiple genes, particularly those related to cell proliferation and differentiation, oxidative stress, DNA damage repair, cell cycle checkpoints, angiogenesis and apoptosis. These findings were confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical staining using rat and human prostate tissue. We also used a cell culture model (human normal prostatic RWPE-1 cell line) to study the direct effect of high glucose. We found that high glucose caused increased intracellular oxidative stress and DNA damage, as well as downregulation of anti-oxidative enzymes and DNA damage repair genes MRE11 and XRCC3. Our findings provide important insights into understanding the pathogenesis of the diabetes-induced changes in prostate as well as identifying potential therapeutic targets for future studies.

  3. Are SNP-Smoking Association Studies Needed in Controls? DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms and Smoking Intensity.

    PubMed

    Verde, Zoraida; Reinoso, Luis; Chicharro, Luis Miguel; Resano, Pilar; Sánchez-Hernández, Ignacio; Rodríguez González-Moro, Jose Miguel; Bandrés, Fernando; Gómez-Gallego, Félix; Santiago, Catalina

    2015-01-01

    Variations in tobacco-related cancers, incidence and prevalence reflect differences in tobacco consumption in addition to genetic factors. Besides, genes related to lung cancer risk could be related to smoking behavior. Polymorphisms altering DNA repair capacity may lead to synergistic effects with tobacco carcinogen-induced lung cancer risk. Common problems in genetic association studies, such as presence of gene-by-environment (G x E) correlation in the population, may reduce the validity of these designs. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the independence assumption for selected SNPs and smoking behaviour in a cohort of 320 healthy Spanish smokers. We found an association between the wild type alleles of XRCC3 Thr241Met or KLC3 Lys751Gln and greater smoking intensity (OR = 12.98, 95% CI = 2.86-58.82 and OR=16.90, 95% CI=2.09-142.8; respectively). Although preliminary, the results of our study provide evidence that genetic variations in DNA-repair genes may influence both smoking habits and the development of lung cancer. Population-specific G x E studies should be carried out when genetic and environmental factors interact to cause the disease.

  4. Cloning and sequencing of the PIF gene involved in repair and recombination of yeast mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Foury, F; Lahaye, A

    1987-01-01

    The nuclear gene PIF of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for both repair of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and recognition of a recombinogenic signal characterized by a 26-bp palindromic AT sequence in the ery region of mtDNA. This gene has been cloned in yeast by genetic complementation of pif mutants. Its chromosomal disruption does not destroy the genetic function of mitochondria. The nucleotide sequence of the 3.5-kb insert from a complementing plasmid reveals an open reading frame encoding a potential protein of 857 amino acids and Mr = 97,500. An ATP-binding domain is present in the central part of the gene and in the carboxy-terminal region a putative DNA-binding site is present. Its alpha helix-turn-alpha helix motif is found in DNA-binding proteins such as lambda and lactose repressors which recognize symmetric sequences. Significant amino acid homology is observed with yeast RAD3 and E. coli UvrD (helicase II) proteins which are required for excision repair of damaged DNA. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:3038524

  5. A systematic gene-gene and gene-environment interaction analysis of DNA repair genes XRCC1, XRCC2, XRCC3, XRCC4, and oral cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Lin, Yu-Da; Yen, Ching-Yui; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2015-04-01

    Oral cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide with a high mortality rate. Biomarkers that anticipate susceptibility, prognosis, or response to treatments are much needed. Oral cancer is a polygenic disease involving complex interactions among genetic and environmental factors, which require multifaceted analyses. Here, we examined in a dataset of 103 oral cancer cases and 98 controls from Taiwan the association between oral cancer risk and the DNA repair genes X-ray repair cross-complementing group (XRCCs) 1-4, and the environmental factors of smoking, alcohol drinking, and betel quid (BQ) chewing. We employed logistic regression, multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR), and hierarchical interaction graphs for analyzing gene-gene (G×G) and gene-environment (G×E) interactions. We identified a significantly elevated risk of the XRCC2 rs2040639 heterozygous variant among smokers [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 3.7, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.1-12.1] and alcohol drinkers [adjusted OR=5.7, 95% CI=1.4-23.2]. The best two-factor based G×G interaction of oral cancer included the XRCC1 rs1799782 and XRCC2 rs2040639 [OR=3.13, 95% CI=1.66-6.13]. For the G×E interaction, the estimated OR of oral cancer for two (drinking-BQ chewing), three (XRCC1-XRCC2-BQ chewing), four (XRCC1-XRCC2-age-BQ chewing), and five factors (XRCC1-XRCC2-age-drinking-BQ chewing) were 32.9 [95% CI=14.1-76.9], 31.0 [95% CI=14.0-64.7], 49.8 [95% CI=21.0-117.7] and 82.9 [95% CI=31.0-221.5], respectively. Taken together, the genotypes of XRCC1 rs1799782 and XRCC2 rs2040639 DNA repair genes appear to be significantly associated with oral cancer. These were enhanced by exposure to certain environmental factors. The observations presented here warrant further research in larger study samples to examine their relevance for routine clinical care in oncology.

  6. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes and therapeutic outcomes of AML patients from SWOG clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Kuptsova, Nataliya; Kopecky, Kenneth J; Godwin, John; Anderson, Jeanne; Hoque, Ashraful; Willman, Cheryl L; Slovak, Marilyn L; Ambrosone, Christine B

    2007-05-01

    Repair of damage to DNA resulting from chemotherapy may influence drug toxicity and survival in response to treatment. We evaluated the role of polymorphisms in DNA repair genes APE1, XRCC1, ERCC1, XPD, and XRCC3 in predicting therapeutic outcomes of older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from 2 Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) clinical trials. All patients received standard chemotherapy induction regimens. Using logistic and proportional hazards regression models, relationships between genotypes, haplotypes, and toxicities, response to induction therapy, and overall survival were evaluated. Patients with XPD Gln751C/Asp312G ('D') haplotype were more likely to have complete response (OR = 3.06; 95% CI, 1.44-6.70) and less likely to have resistant disease (OR = 0.32; 95%CI, 0.14-0.72) than patients with other haplotypes. ERCC1 polymorphisms were significantly associated with lung (P = .037) and metabolic (P = .041) toxicities, and patients with the XRCC3 241Met variant had reduced risk of liver toxicity (OR = 0.32; 95%CI, 0.11-0.95). Significant associations with other toxicities were also found for variant XPD genotypes/haplotypes. These data from clinical trials of older patients treated for AML indicate that variants in DNA repair pathways may have an impact on both outcomes of patients and toxicities associated with treatments. With validation of results in larger samples, these findings could lead to optimizing individual chemotherapy options.

  7. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes, hair dye use, and the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huan; Bassig, Bryan A; Lan, Qing; Zhu, Yong; Zhang, Yawei; Holford, Theodore R; Leaderer, Brian; Boyle, Peter; Qin, Qin; Zhu, Cairong; Li, Ni; Rothman, Nathaniel; Zheng, Tongzhang

    2014-10-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes and hair dye use may both have a role in the development of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). We aimed to examine the interaction between variants in DNA repair genes and hair dye use with risk of NHL in a population-based case-control study of Connecticut women. We examined 24 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 16 DNA repair genes among 518 NHL cases and 597 controls and evaluated the associations between hair dye use and risk of overall NHL and common NHL subtypes, stratified by genotype, using unconditional logistic regression. Women who used hair dye before 1980 had a significantly increased risk of NHL, particularly for the follicular lymphoma (FL) subtype, but not for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The following genotypes in combination with hair dye use before 1980 were associated with FL risk: BRCA2 rs144848 AC+CC [odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (CI)) 3.28(1.27-8.50)], WRN rs1346044 TT [OR(95% CI) 2.70(1.30-5.65)], XRCC3 rs861539 CT+TT [OR(95% CI) 2.76(1.32-5.77)], XRCC4 rs1805377 GG [OR(95% CI) 2.07(1.10-3.90)] and rs1056503 TT [OR(95% CI) 2.17(1.16-4.07)], ERCC1 rs3212961 CC [OR(95% CI) 1.93(1.00-3.72)], RAD23B rs1805329 CC [OR(95% CI) 2.28(1.12-4.64)], and MGMT rs12917 CC, rs2308321 AA, and rs2308327 AA genotypes [OR(95% CI) 1.96(1.06-3.63), 2.02(1.09-3.75), and 2.23(1.16-4.29), respectively]. In addition, a significant interaction with risk of overall NHL was observed between WRN rs1346044 and hair dye use before 1980 (p(interaction) = 0.032). Our results indicated that genetic variation in DNA repair genes modifies susceptibility to NHL in relation to hair dye use, particularly for the FL subtype and in women who began using hair dye before 1980. Further studies are needed to confirm these observations.

  8. Functional role of DNA mismatch repair gene PMS2 in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Shinichiro; Chang, Inik; Mitsui, Yozo; Chiyomaru, Takeshi; Yamamura, Soichiro; Majid, Shahana; Saini, Sharanjot; Deng, Guoren; Gill, Ankurpreet; Wong, Darryn K; Shiina, Hiroaki; Nonomura, Norio; Lau, Yun-Fai C; Dahiya, Rajvir; Tanaka, Yuichiro

    2015-06-30

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) enzymes act as proofreading complexes that maintains genomic integrity and MMR-deficient cells show an increased mutation rate. MMR has also been shown to influence cell signaling and the regulation of tumor development. MMR consists of various genes and includes post-meiotic segregation (PMS) 2 which is a vital component of mutL-alpha. In prostate, the functional role of this gene has never been reported and in this study, our aim was to investigate the effect of PMS2 on growth properties of prostate cancer (PCa) cells. Previous studies have shown PMS2 to be deficient in DU145 cells and this lack of expression was confirmed by Western blotting whereas normal prostatic PWR-1E and RWPE-1 cells expressed this gene. PMS2 effects on various growth properties of DU145 were then determined by creating stable gene transfectants. Interestingly, PMS2 caused decreased cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and in vivo growth; and increased apoptosis as compared to vector control. We further analyzed genes affected by PMS2 expression and observe the apoptosis-related TMS1 gene to be significantly upregulated whereas anti-apoptotic BCL2A1 was downregulated. These results demonstrate a functional role for PMS2 to protect against PCa progression by enhancing apoptosis of PCa cells.

  9. Damage, Repair, and Mutagenesis in Nuclear Genes after Mouse Forebrain Ischemia–Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Philip K.; Hsu, Chung Y.; Dizdaroglu, Miral; Floyd, Robert A.; Kow, Yoke W.; Karakaya, Asuman; Rabow, Lois E.; Cui, Jian-K.

    2009-01-01

    To determine whether oxidative stress after cerebral ischemia–reperfusion affects genetic stability in the brain, we studied mutagenesis after forebrain ischemia–reperfusion in Big Blue transgenic mice (male C57BL/6 strain) containing a reporter lacI gene, which allows detection of mutation frequency. The frequency of mutation in this reporter lacI gene increased from 1.5 to 7.7 (per 100,000) in cortical DNA after 30 min of forebrain ischemia and 8 hr of reperfusion and remained elevated at 24 hr reperfusion. Eight DNA lesions that are characteristic of DNA damage mediated by free radicals were detected. Four mutagenic lesions (2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine, 8-hydroxyadenine, 5-hydroxycytosine, and 8-hydroxyguanine) examined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and one corresponding 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine by a method of HPLC with electrochemical detection increased in cortical DNA two- to fourfold (p < 0.05) during 10–20 min of reperfusion. The damage to γ-actin and DNA polymerase-β genes was detected within 20 min of reperfusion based on the presence of formamidopyrimidine DNA N-glycosylase-sensitive sites. These genes became resistant to the glycosylase within 4–6 hr of reperfusion, suggesting a reduction in DNA damage and presence of DNA repair in nuclear genes. These results suggest that nuclear genes could be targets of free radicals. PMID:8824320

  10. Smad gene expression in pulmonary fibroblasts: indications for defective ECM repair in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Zandvoort, Andre; Postma, Dirkje S; Jonker, Marnix R; Noordhoek, Jacobien A; Vos, Johannes TWM; Timens, Wim

    2008-01-01

    Background Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is characterized by defective extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover as a result of prolonged cigarette smoking. Fibroblasts have a central role in ECM turnover. The TGFβ induced Smad pathway provides intracellular signals to regulate ECM production. We address the following hypothesis: fibroblasts have abnormal expression of genes in the Smad pathway in COPD, resulting in abnormal proteoglycan modulation, the ground substance of ECM. Methods We compared gene expression of the Smad pathway at different time points after stimulation with TGFβ, TNF or cigarette smoke extract (CSE) in pulmonary fibroblasts of GOLD stage II and IV COPD patients, and controls. Results Without stimulation, all genes were similarly expressed in control and COPD fibroblasts. TGFβ stimulation: downregulation of Smad3 and upregulation of Smad7 occurred in COPD and control fibroblasts, indicating a negative feedback loop upon TGFβ stimulation. CSE hardly influenced gene expression of the TGFβ-Smad pathway in control fibroblasts, whereas it reduced Smad3 and enhanced Smad7 gene expression in COPD fibroblasts. Furthermore, decorin gene expression decreased by all stimulations in COPD but not in control fibroblasts. Conclusion Fibroblasts of COPD patients and controls differ in their regulation of the Smad pathway, the contrast being most pronounced under CSE exposure. This aberrant responsiveness of COPD fibroblasts to CSE might result in an impaired tissue repair capability and is likely important with regard to the question why only a subset of smokers demonstrates an excess ECM destruction under influence of cigarette smoking. PMID:19087346

  11. Emphysematous pancreatitis predisposed by Olanzapine

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Sukhen; Samanta, Sujay; Banik, Krishanu; Baronia, Arvind Kumar

    2014-01-01

    A 32-year-old male presented to our intensive care unit with severe abdominal pain and was diagnosed as acute pancreatitis after 2 months of olanzapine therapy for bipolar disorder. His serum lipase was 900 u/L, serum triglyceride 560 mg/dL, and blood sugar, fasting and postprandial were 230 and 478 mg/dL, respectively on admission. Contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT) of abdomen was suggestive of acute pancreatitis. Repeat CECT showed gas inside pancreas and collection in peripancreatic area and patient underwent percutaneous drainage and antibiotics irrigation through the drain into pancreas. We describe the rare case of emphysematous pancreatitis due to development of diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia and immunosuppression predisposed by short duration olanzapine therapy. PMID:25024479

  12. Differential expression of thymic DNA repair genes in low-dose-rate irradiated AKR/J mice

    PubMed Central

    Bong, Jin Jong; Kang, Yu Mi; Shin, Suk Chul; Choi, Seung Jin

    2013-01-01

    We previously determined that AKR/J mice housed in a low-dose-rate (LDR) (137Cs, 0.7 mGy/h, 2.1 Gy) γ-irradiation facility developed less spontaneous thymic lymphoma and survived longer than those receiving sham or high-dose-rate (HDR) (137Cs, 0.8 Gy/min, 4.5 Gy) radiation. Interestingly, histopathological analysis showed a mild lymphomagenesis in the thymus of LDR-irradiated mice. Therefore, in this study, we investigated whether LDR irradiation could trigger the expression of thymic genes involved in the DNA repair process of AKR/J mice. The enrichment analysis of Gene Ontology terms and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways showed immune response, nucleosome organization, and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors signaling pathway in LDR-irradiated mice. Our microarray analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction data demonstrated that mRNA levels of Lig4 and RRM2 were specifically elevated in AKR/J mice at 130 days after the start of LDR irradiation. Furthermore, transcriptional levels of H2AX and ATM, proteins known to recruit DNA repair factors, were also shown to be upregulated. These data suggest that LDR irradiation could trigger specific induction of DNA repair-associated genes in an attempt to repair damaged DNA during tumor progression, which in turn contributed to the decreased incidence of lymphoma and increased survival. Overall, we identified specific DNA repair genes in LDR-irradiated AKR/J mice. PMID:23820165

  13. DNA repair gene XRCC3 Thr241Met polymorphism and hepatocellular carcinoma risk.

    PubMed

    Duan, Chenyang; Zhang, Wanli; Lu, Jiangfeng; Wu, Huawen; Liu, Mengying; Zhu, Wentao

    2013-10-01

    The DNA repair genes have been indicated as candidates in the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Published data on the association between X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3), a critical member of the DNA repair genes, and HCC risk were contradictory. The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess the effect of XRCC3 Thr241Met polymorphism on HCC risk by pooling available data from published case-control studies. We calculated the pooled odds ratio (OR) with the corresponding 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) to estimate the effect. Based on the inclusion criteria, six individual studies with 2,288 cases and 3,170 controls were included into our study. Overall, significant association between the XRCC3 Thr241Met variant and HCC risk was observed under the following contrast models (OR Met vs. Thr = 1.68, 95 %CI 1.08-2.62; OR MetMet vs. ThrThr = 5.54, 95 %CI 3.09-9.94; OR MetMet vs. ThrThr + ThrMet = 5.70, 95 % CI 4.24-7.64). Besides, the pooled ORs indicated that the XRCC3 Thr241Met polymorphism exerted risk effect on the HCC pathogenesis among Asians. Additionally, when stratifying by the status of smoking and hepatitis B virus infection, the XRCC3 Thr241Met variant was significantly associated with HCC risk among the HBsAg (+) individuals but not the HBsAg (-) individuals, smokers, and non-smokers. The present meta-analysis suggests that the XRCC3 Thr241Met polymorphism is an independent risk factor for HCC, particularly among Asians and the HBsAg (+) individuals.

  14. DNA repair mechanisms in cancer development and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Torgovnick, Alessandro; Schumacher, Björn

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage has been long recognized as causal factor for cancer development. When erroneous DNA repair leads to mutations or chromosomal aberrations affecting oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, cells undergo malignant transformation resulting in cancerous growth. Genetic defects can predispose to cancer: mutations in distinct DNA repair systems elevate the susceptibility to various cancer types. However, DNA damage not only comprises a root cause for cancer development but also continues to provide an important avenue for chemo- and radiotherapy. Since the beginning of cancer therapy, genotoxic agents that trigger DNA damage checkpoints have been applied to halt the growth and trigger the apoptotic demise of cancer cells. We provide an overview about the involvement of DNA repair systems in cancer prevention and the classes of genotoxins that are commonly used for the treatment of cancer. A better understanding of the roles and interactions of the highly complex DNA repair machineries will lead to important improvements in cancer therapy. PMID:25954303

  15. Haplotype Analyses of DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms and Their Role in Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Bardia, Avinash; Tiwari, Santosh K.; Vishwakarma, Sandeep K.; Habeeb, Md. Aejaz; Nallari, Pratibha; Sultana, Shaik A.; Pasha, Shaik A.; Reddy, Yugandhar P.; Khan, Aleem A.

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a major clinical form of inflammatory bowel disease. UC is characterized by mucosal inflammation limited to the colon, always involving the rectum and a variable extent of the more proximal colon in a continuous manner. Genetic variations in DNA repair genes may influence the extent of repair functions, DNA damage, and thus the manifestations of UC. This study thus evaluated the role of polymorphisms of the genes involved in DNA repair mechanisms. A total of 171 patients and 213 controls were included. Genotyping was carried out by ARMS PCR and PCR-RFLP analyses for RAD51, XRCC3 and hMSH2 gene polymorphisms. Allelic and genotypic frequencies were computed in both control & patient groups and data was analyzed using appropriate statistical tests. The frequency of ‘A’ allele of hMSH2 in the UC group caused statistically significant increased risk for UC compared to controls (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.16–2.31, p = 0.004). Similarly, the CT genotype of XRCC3 gene was predominant in the UC group and increased the risk for UC by 1.75 fold compared to controls (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.15–2.67, p = 0.03), further confirming the risk of ‘T’ allele in UC. The GC genotype frequency of RAD51 gene was significantly increased (p = 0.02) in the UC group (50.3%) compared to controls (38%). The GC genotype significantly increased the risk for UC compared to GG genotype by 1.73 fold (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.14–2.62, p = 0.02) confirming the strong association of ‘C’ allele with UC. Among the controls, the SNP loci combination of hMSH2:XRCC3 were in perfect linkage. The GTC and ACC haplotypes were found to be predominant in UC than controls with a 2.28 and 2.93 fold significant increase risk of UC. PMID:25247297

  16. The Drosophila Meiotic Recombination Gene Mei-9 Encodes a Homologue of the Yeast Excision Repair Protein Rad1

    PubMed Central

    Sekelsky, J. J.; McKim, K. S.; Chin, G. M.; Hawley, R. S.

    1995-01-01

    Meiotic recombination and DNA repair are mediated by overlapping sets of genes. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, many genes required to repair DNA double-strand breaks are also required for meiotic recombination. In contrast, mutations in genes required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) have no detectable effects on meiotic recombination in S. cerevisiae. The Drosophila melanogaster mei-9 gene is unique among known recombination genes in that it is required for both meiotic recombination and NER. We have analyzed the mei-9 gene at the molecular level and found that it encodes a homologue of the S. cerevisiae excision repair protein Rad1, the probable homologue of mammalian XPF/ERCC4. Hence, the predominant process of meiotic recombination in Drosophila proceeds through a pathway that is at least partially distinct from that of S. cerevisiae, in that it requires an NER protein. The biochemical properties of the Rad1 protein allow us to explain the observation that mei-9 mutants suppress reciprocal exchange without suppressing the frequency of gene conversion. PMID:8647398

  17. Polymorphisms in genes controlling inflammation and tissue repair in rheumatoid arthritis: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Various cytokines and inflammatory mediators are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We hypothesized that polymorphisms in selected inflammatory response and tissue repair genes contribute to the susceptibility to and severity of RA. Methods Polymorphisms in TNFA, IL1B, IL4, IL6, IL8, IL10, PAI1, NOS2a, C1INH, PARP, TLR2 and TLR4 were genotyped in 376 Caucasian RA patients and 463 healthy Caucasian controls using single base extension. Genotype distributions in patients were compared with those in controls. In addition, the association of polymorphisms with the need for anti-TNF-α treatment as a marker of RA severity was assessed. Results The IL8 781 CC genotype was associated with early onset of disease. The TNFA -238 G/A polymorphism was differentially distributed between RA patients and controls, but only when not corrected for age and gender. None of the polymorphisms was associated with disease severity. Conclusions We here report an association between IL8 781 C/T polymorphism and age of onset of RA. Our findings indicate that there might be a role for variations in genes involved in the immune response and in tissue repair in RA pathogenesis. Nevertheless, additional larger genomic and functional studies are required to further define their role in RA. PMID:21385363

  18. DNA Repair Gene Expression Levels as Indicators of Breast Cancer in the Breast Cancer Family Registry

    PubMed Central

    KAPPIL, MAYA A.; LIAO, YUYAN; TERRY, MARY BETH; SANTELLA, REGINA M.

    2017-01-01

    Aim The expression level of DNA repair-related genes and their association with breast cancer status among participants of the New York site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry was investigated. Materials and Methods RNA from mononuclear cells in 194 sister sets (n=475 women) were assayed for ATM, BRCA1, MSH2, MUTYH and XPC gene expression levels and analyzed using generalized estimating equations (GEE). Results Individuals with decreased ATM and MSH2 expression had significantly higher odds for breast cancer compared to individuals with higher levels of expression (odds ratio (OR)=1.1, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.02, 1.18) and (OR=1.90, 95% CI=1.21, 2.97), respectively. Upon stratifying the GEE model, reductions in ATM and MSH2 expression levels was heightened among women with an extended family history (FH) of breast cancer. Conclusion Reduced expression of ATM and MSH2 compromises DNA repair capacity and, thereby, increases breast cancer prevalence. PMID:27466510

  19. Selected Polymorphisms of Base Excision Repair Genes and Pancreatic Cancer Risk in Japanese

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Makoto; Hosono, Satoyo; Ito, Hidemi; Watanabe, Miki; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Sato, Shigeki; Yatabe, Yasushi; Yamao, Kenji; Ueda, Ryuzo; Tajima, Kazuo; Tanaka, Hideo; Matsuo, Keitaro

    2012-01-01

    Background Although several reports have described a possible association between DNA repair genes and pancreatic cancer (PC) in smokers, this association has not been fully evaluated in an Asian population. We assessed the impact of genetic polymorphisms in the base excision repair (BER) pathway on PC risk among Japanese. Methods This case-control study compared the frequency of 5 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of BER genes, namely rs1052133 in OGG1, rs1799782 and rs25487 in XRCC1, rs1130409 in APE1, and rs1136410 in PARP1. SNPs were investigated using the TaqMan assay in 185 PC cases and 1465 controls. Associations of PC risk with genetic polymorphisms and gene–environment interaction were examined with an unconditional logistic regression model. Exposure to risk factors was assessed from the results of a self-administered questionnaire. We also performed haplotype-based analysis. Results We observed that the minor allele of rs25487 in XRCC1 was significantly associated with PC risk in the per-allele model (odds ratio = 1.29, CI = 1.01–1.65; trend P = 0.043). Haplotype analysis of XRCC1 also showed a statistically significant association with PC risk. No statistically significant interaction between XRCC1 polymorphisms and smoking status was seen. Conclusions Our findings suggest that XRCC1 polymorphisms affect PC risk in Japanese. PMID:22850545

  20. Tissue repair genes: the TiRe database and its implication for skin wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Yanai, Hagai; Budovsky, Arie; Tacutu, Robi; Barzilay, Thomer; Abramovich, Amir; Ziesche, Rolf; Fraifeld, Vadim E.

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing is an inherent feature of any multicellular organism and recent years have brought about a huge amount of data regarding regular and abnormal tissue repair. Despite the accumulated knowledge, modulation of wound healing is still a major biomedical challenge, especially in advanced ages. In order to collect and systematically organize what we know about the key players in wound healing, we created the TiRe (Tissue Repair) database, an online collection of genes and proteins that were shown to directly affect skin wound healing. To date, TiRe contains 397 entries for four organisms: Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Sus domesticus, and Homo sapiens. Analysis of the TiRe dataset of skin wound healing-associated genes showed that skin wound healing genes are (i) over-conserved among vertebrates, but are under-conserved in invertebrates; (ii) enriched in extracellular and immuno-inflammatory genes; and display (iii) high interconnectivity and connectivity to other proteins. The latter may provide potential therapeutic targets. In addition, a slower or faster skin wound healing is indicative of an aging or longevity phenotype only when assessed in advanced ages, but not in the young. In the long run, we aim for TiRe to be a one-station resource that provides researchers and clinicians with the essential data needed for a better understanding of the mechanisms of wound healing, designing new experiments, and the development of new therapeutic strategies. TiRe is freely available online at http://www.tiredb.org. PMID:27049721

  1. DNA repair genes and prognosis in sporadic forms of urothelial carcinoma of the upper urinary tract.

    PubMed

    García-Tello, A; Ramón de Fata, F; Andrés, G; Ropero, S; López, J I; Angulo, J C

    2014-11-01

    Lynch syndrome or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is caused by mutations in DNA repair genes, known as mismatch repair (MMR) genes, and is associated with microsatellite instability. Urothelial carcinoma of the renal pelvis is also associated with this syndrome. These genetic abnormalities have been described in sporadic forms of upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). This was a descriptive study and survival analysis of a series of 80 patients with sporadic UTUC with no metastases at diagnosis (N0/Nx M0) treated exclusively with nephroureterectomy. We evaluated the expression of MMR genes (hMLH1, hPMS2, hMSH2 and hMSH6) in sections performed with tissue microarray (TMA) and their association with clinical-pathological parameters. We analyzed the prognostic value of the loss of expression of these genes in UTUC. We detected no loss of MSH2 or of MSH6, but there was a loss of MLH1 in 11 cases (13.8%) and of PMS2 in 21 cases (26.3%). The expression of hMLH1 and hPMS2 were strongly associated (P<.0001), and this phenotype expression entails significant clinical implications. The loss of MLH1 was associated with a low grade (P=.02). Loss of PMS2 was associated with a lower stage (P=.05), a pushing pattern with no invasive edges (P=.008) and less angiogenesis (P=.008). The inactivation of hPMS2 or hMLH1 is an independent protective factor (HR, 0.309) and, along with the histologic grade (HR, 5.561), defines the patients' prognosis. In our experience, the inactivation of hPMS2 or hMLH1 is an independent marker of good prognosis and occurs in a quarter of sporadic UTUC cases. The immunohistochemical study of these patients can be used to assess the screening of hidden forms of Lynch syndrome. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Oxidative DNA damage is epigenetic by regulating gene transcription via base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Aaron M.; Ding, Yun; Burrows, Cynthia J.

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have emerged as important cellular-signaling agents for cellular survival. Herein, we demonstrate that ROS-mediated oxidation of DNA to yield 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (OG) in gene promoters is a signaling agent for gene activation. Enhanced gene expression occurs when OG is formed in guanine-rich, potential G-quadruplex–forming sequences (PQS) in promoter-coding strands, initiating base excision repair (BER) by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1), yielding an abasic site (AP). The AP enables melting of the duplex to unmask the PQS, adopting a G-quadruplex fold in which apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) binds, but inefficiently cleaves, the AP for activation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or endonuclease III-like protein 1 (NTHL1) genes. These details were mapped via synthesis of OG and AP analogs at single-nucleotide precision within the promoter of a luciferase reporter system. The reporters were analyzed in human and mouse cells while selectively knocking out or down critical BER proteins to identify the impact on luciferase expression. Identification of the oxidatively modified DNA base OG to guide BER activity in a gene promoter and impact cellular phenotype ascribes an epigenetic role to OG. PMID:28143930

  3. Tissue-engineering strategies to repair joint tissue in osteoarthritis: nonviral gene-transfer approaches.

    PubMed

    Madry, Henning; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2014-10-01

    Loss of articular cartilage is a common clinical consequence of osteoarthritis (OA). In the past decade, substantial progress in tissue engineering, nonviral gene transfer, and cell transplantation have provided the scientific foundation for generating cartilaginous constructs from genetically modified cells. Combining tissue engineering with overexpression of therapeutic genes enables immediate filling of a cartilage defect with an engineered construct that actively supports chondrogenesis. Several pioneering studies have proved that spatially defined nonviral overexpression of growth-factor genes in constructs of solid biomaterials or hydrogels is advantageous compared with gene transfer or scaffold alone, both in vitro and in vivo. Notably, these investigations were performed in models of focal cartilage defects, because advanced cartilage-repair strategies based on the principles of tissue engineering have not advanced sufficiently to enable resurfacing of extensively degraded cartilage as therapy for OA. These studies serve as prototypes for future technological developments, because they raise the possibility that cartilage constructs engineered from genetically modified chondrocytes providing autocrine and paracrine stimuli could similarly compensate for the loss of articular cartilage in OA. Because cartilage-tissue-engineering strategies are already used in the clinic, combining tissue engineering and nonviral gene transfer could prove a powerful approach to treat OA.

  4. Chromatin remodelling and DNA repair genes are frequently mutated in endometrioid endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    García-Sanz, Pablo; Triviño, Juan Carlos; Mota, Alba; Pérez López, María; Colás, Eva; Rojo-Sebastián, Alejandro; García, Ángel; Gatius, Sonia; Ruiz, María; Prat, Jaime; López-López, Rafael; Abal, Miguel; Gil-Moreno, Antonio; Reventós, Jaume; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Moreno-Bueno, Gema

    2017-04-01

    In developed countries, endometrial carcinoma is the most common cancer that affects the female genital tract. Endometrial carcinoma is divided into two main histological types, type I or endometrioid and type II or non-endometrioid, each of which have characteristic, although not exclusive, molecular alterations and mutational profiles. Nevertheless, information about the implication and relevance of some of these genes in this disease is lacking. We sought here to identify new recurrently mutated genes in endometrioid cancers that play a role in tumourigenesis and that influence the clinical outcome. We focused on low-grade, non-ultramutated tumours as these tumours have a worse prognosis than the ultramutated POLE-positive endometrioid endometrial carcinomas (EECs). We performed exome-sequencing of 11 EECs with matched normal tissue and subsequently validated 15 candidate genes in 76 samples. For the first time, we show that mutations in chromatin remodelling-related genes (KMT2D, KMT2C, SETD1B and BCOR) and in DNA-repair-related genes (BRCA1, BRCA2, RAD50 and CHD4) are frequent in this subtype of endometrial cancer. The alterations to these genes occurred with frequencies ranging from 35.5% for KMT2D to 10.5% for BRCA1 and BCOR, with some showing a tendency toward co-occurrence (RAD50-KMT2D and RAD50-SETD1B). All these genes harboured specific mutational hotspots. In addition, the mutational status of KMT2C, KMT2D and SETD1B helps to predict the degree of myometrial invasion, a critical prognostic feature. These results highlight the possible implication of these genes in this disease, creating opportunities for new therapeutic approaches.

  5. The study of the relation of DNA repair pathway genes SNPs and the sensitivity to radiotherapy and chemotherapy of NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunbo; Nie, Huan; Li, Yiqun; Liu, Guiyou; Wang, Xu; Xing, Shijie; Zhang, Liping; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yue; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the relation between SNPs in DNA repair pathway-related genes and sensitivity of tumor radio-chemotherapy, 26 SNPs in 20 DNA repair genes were genotyped on 176 patients of NSCLC undertaking radio-chemotherapy treatment. In squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), as the rs2228000, rs2228001 (XPC), rs2273953 (TP73), rs2279744 (MDM2), rs2299939 (PTEN) and rs8178085, rs12334811 (DNA-PKcs) affected the sensitivity to chemotherapy, so did the rs8178085, rs12334811 to radiotherapy. Moreover rs344781, rs2273953 and rs12334811 were related with the survival time of SCC. In general, the “good” genotype GG (rs12334811) showed greater efficacy of radio-chemotherapy and MSF (24 months) on SCC. In adenocarcinoma, as the rs2699887 (PIK3), rs12334811 (DNA-PKcs) influenced the sensitivity to chemotherapy, so did the rs2299939, rs2735343 (PTEN) to radiotherapy. And rs402710, rs80270, rs2279744 and rs2909430 impacted the survival time of the adenocarcinoma patients. Both GG (rs2279744) and AG (rs2909430) showed a shorter survival time (MFS = 6). Additionally, some SNPs such as rs2228000, rs2228001 and rs344781 were found to regulate the expression of DNA repair pathway genes through eQTLs dataset analysis. These results indicate that SNPs in DNA repair pathway genes might regulate the expression and affect the DNA damage repair, and thereby impact the efficacy of radio-chemotherapy and the survival time of NSCLC. PMID:27246533

  6. beta-Glucosidase as a reporter for the gene expression studies in Thermus thermophilus and constitutive expression of DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Toshihiro; Tokishita, Shin-Ichi; Imazuka, Reiko; Mori, Ichiro; Okamura, Jin; Yamagata, Hideo

    2006-07-01

    Thermus thermophilus is an extremely thermophilic eubacterium that grows optimally at 70-75 degrees C. Because the frequency of DNA damage, such as deamination, depurination and single-strand breaks, increases as the temperature rises, the regulation of expression as well as the specificities and activities of T.thermophilus DNA repair systems are of particular interest. To study those systems, we developed a gene expression vector using the T.thermophilus beta-glucosidase gene (bgl) with host strain JOS9 (Deltabgl) derived from the T.thermophilus wild-type strain HB27. Since HB27 has two putative beta-galactosidase genes, the use of a single bgl gene as a reporter in combination with a Deltabgl host strain permits the study of gene expression against a low background level. We assayed Bgl activity with 2-nitrophenyl-beta-d-glucopyranoside as the substrate at 80 degrees C. We measured the expression of seven genes involved in DNA repair--three nucleotide excision repair genes (uvrA, uvrB and uvrC) and four recombinational repair genes (recA, ruvA, ruvB and ruvC). Expression levels of uvrA and uvrB were about three times those of uvrC, while those of ruvA, ruvB and ruvC were almost equal. Both ruvA and ruvC formed an operon with their adjacent 5'-upstream gene paaG and ftsQAZ, respectively. recA was transcribed as an operon of four genes, amt-cinA-ligT-recA. All seven DNA repair genes were expressed constitutively, and the DNA damaging agent mitomycin C did not increase their expression.

  7. Mannose-binding lectin gene polymorphic variants predispose to the development of bronchopulmonary complications but have no influence on other clinical and laboratory symptoms or signs of common variable immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Litzman, J; Freiberger, T; Grimbacher, B; Gathmann, B; Salzer, U; Pavlík, T; Vlček, J; Postránecká, V; Trávníčková, Z; Thon, V

    2008-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), activating protein of the lectin pathway of the complement system, is an important component of the non-specific immune response. MBL2 gene polymorphisms, both in the coding and promoter regions, lead to low or deficient serum MBL levels. Low serum MBL levels were shown to be associated with serious infectious complications, mainly in patients in whom other non-specific immune system barriers were disturbed (granulocytopenia, cystic fibrosis). We have analysed two promoter (−550 and −221) and three exon (codons 52, 54 and 57) MBL2 polymorphisms in a total of 94 patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) from two immunodeficiency centres. Low-producing genotypes were associated with the presence of bronchiectasis (P = 0·009), lung fibrosis (P = 0·037) and also with respiratory insufficiency (P = 0·029). We could not demonstrate any association of MBL deficiency with age at onset of clinical symptoms, age at diagnosis, the number of pneumonias before diagnosis or serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgA and IgM levels before initiation of Ig treatment. No association with emphysema development was observed, such as with lung function test abnormalities. No effect of MBL2 genotypes on the presence of diarrhoea, granuloma formation, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, frequency of respiratory tract infection or the number of antibiotic courses of the patients was observed. Our study suggests that low MBL-producing genotypes predispose to bronchiectasis formation, and also fibrosis and respiratory insufficiency development, but have no effect on other complications in CVID patients. PMID:18637104

  8. Effect of irradiation on the expression of DNA repair genes studied in human fibroblasts by real-time qPCR using three methods of reference gene validation.

    PubMed

    Reuther, Sebastian; Reiter, Martina; Raabe, Annette; Dikomey, Ekkehard

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ionizing radiation on gene expression by using for a first time a qPCR platform specifically established for the detection of 94 DNA repair genes but also to test the robustness of these results by using three analytical methods (global pattern recognition, ΔΔCq/Normfinder and ΔΔCq/Genorm). Study was focused on these genes because DNA repair is known primarily to determine the radiation response. Six strains of normal human fibroblasts were exposed to 2 Gy, and changes in gene expression were analyzed 24 h thereafter. A significant change in gene expression was found for only few genes, but the genes detected were mostly different for the three analytical methods used. For GPR, a significant change was found for four genes, in contrast to the eight or nine genes when applying ΔΔCq/Genorm or ΔΔCq/Normfinder, respectively. When using all three methods, a significant change in expression was only seen for GADD45A and PCNA. These data demonstrate that (1) the genes identified to show an altered expression upon irradiation strongly depend on the analytical method applied, and that (2) overall GADD45A and PCNA appear to play a central role in this response, while no significant change is induced for any of the other DNA repair genes tested.

  9. [Phosphorylatable short peptide conjugated chitosan mediated gene therapy for repair of articular cartilage defect in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ronglan; Peng, Xiaoxiang; Chu, Hairong; Song, Wei

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the effect of phosphorylatable short peptide ((P)SP) conjugated chitosan (CS) ((P)SP-CS)mediated insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) gene and human interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) gene local transfection on the repair of articular cartilage defect. Co-expression plasmid pBudCE4.1-IL-1Ra + IGF-1, single gene expression plasmid pBudCE4.1-IL-1Ra and pBudCE4.1-IGF-1 were constructed and combined with (P)SP-CS to form (P)SP-CS/pDNA complexes. Thirty 3-month-old healthy male New Zealand white rabbits, weighing 2.0-2.5 kg, double legs were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 12). Lateral femoral condyle articular surface was only exposed in sham-operated group (group A); full-thickness cartilage defects were created in the articular surface of the lateral femoral condyle of the knee in 4 intervention groups: (P)SP-CS/pBudCE4.1 (group B), (P)SP-CS/pBudCE4.1-IL-1Ra (group C), (P)SP-CS/pBudCE4.1-IGF-1 (group D), and (P)SP-CS/pBudCE4.1-IL-1Ra + IGF-1 (group E). At 1 week after operation, intra-articular injection of (P)SP-CS/pDNA complexes was administrated 2 times a week for 7 weeks in each intervention group, the same volume normal saline in group A. The general condition of animal was observed after operation, and rabbits were sacrificed at 8 weeks. Knee joint synovial fluid was collected to measure the concentrations of the IL-1Ra and IGF-1 by ELISA; mRNA expressions of Aggrecan, matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3), and MMP inhibitor 1 (TIMP-1) were detected by real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR; the chondrogenic phenotype of nascent cells in the damage zone was identified by alcian blue-periodic acid/schiff (AB-PAS) histochemistry and Aggrecan immunohistochemistry staining. Thirty experimental rabbits all survived to the end of experiment, without infection and death. Large amounts of exogenous proteins of IGF-1 and IL-1Ra were detected in the synovial fluid of 4 intervention groups. There were significant differences between groups D, E and

  10. Polymorphisms in selected DNA repair genes and cell cycle regulating genes involved in the risk of papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Halkova, Tereza; Dvorakova, Sarka; Sykorova, Vlasta; Vaclavikova, Eliska; Vcelak, Josef; Vlcek, Petr; Sykorova, Pavla; Kodetova, Daniela; Betka, Jan; Lastuvka, Petr; Bavor, Petr; Hoch, Jiri; Katra, Rami; Bendlova, Bela

    2016-06-07

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common type of thyroid cancer. In addition to causal somatic mutations in the BRAF gene and RET/PTC rearrangements, the contribution of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in low-penetrance genes in the development of PTC has been proposed. Four SNPs in the XRCC1 (Arg399Gln, Arg280His, Arg194Trp and T-77C) and one SNP from each of three other genes participating in DNA repair pathways and/or cell cycle regulation (ATM Asp1853Asn, TP53 Arg72Pro, CDKN1B Val109Gly) were selected. The allelic and genotypic distributions of these variants as well as haplotypes of the XRCC1 were examined in 583 individuals comprising well-characterized cohorts of 209 PTC patients and 374 healthy volunteers. Correlations of polymorphism with clinical-pathological data and mutation status were performed. XRCC1 T-77C polymorphism affects the genetic susceptibility for PTC development in men, the specific combination of XRCC1 haplotypes correlates with RET/PTC incidence, CDKN1B Val109Gly significantly influences the risk of developing PTC regardless of gender and in PTC cases, selected genotypes of TP53 Arg72Pro and ATM Asp1853Asn were significantly associated with monitored tumour characteristics. It seems that SNPs in studied regulating genes contribute to the development of PTC and modify the tumour behaviour or characteristics.

  11. Horizontal Gene Transfer Regulation in Bacteria as a “Spandrel” of DNA Repair Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Fall, Saliou; Mercier, Anne; Bertolla, Franck; Calteau, Alexandra; Gueguen, Laurent; Perrière, Guy; Vogel, Timothy M.; Simonet, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is recognized as the major force for bacterial genome evolution. Yet, numerous questions remain about the transferred genes, their function, quantity and frequency. The extent to which genetic transformation by exogenous DNA has occurred over evolutionary time was initially addressed by an in silico approach using the complete genome sequence of the Ralstonia solanacearum GMI1000 strain. Methods based on phylogenetic reconstruction of prokaryote homologous genes families detected 151 genes (13.3%) of foreign origin in the R. solanacearum genome and tentatively identified their bacterial origin. These putative transfers were analyzed in comparison to experimental transformation tests involving 18 different genomic DNA positions in the genome as sites for homologous or homeologous recombination. Significant transformation frequency differences were observed among these positions tested regardless of the overall genomic divergence of the R. solanacearum strains tested as recipients. The genomic positions containing the putative exogenous DNA were not systematically transformed at the highest frequencies. The two genomic “hot spots”, which contain recA and mutS genes, exhibited transformation frequencies from 2 to more than 4 orders of magnitude higher than positions associated with other genes depending on the recipient strain. These results support the notion that the bacterial cell is equipped with active mechanisms to modulate acquisition of new DNA in different genomic positions. Bio-informatics study correlated recombination “hot-spots” to the presence of Chi-like signature sequences with which recombination might be preferentially initiated. The fundamental role of HGT is certainly not limited to the critical impact that the very rare foreign genes acquired mainly by chance can have on the bacterial adaptation potential. The frequency to which HGT with homologous and homeologous DNA happens in the environment might have led

  12. Dimethylarsinic acid in drinking water changed the morphology of urinary bladder but not the expression of DNA repair genes of bladder transitional epithelium in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Amy; Wolf, Douglas C; Sen, Banalata; Knapp, Geremy W; Holladay, Steven D; Huckle, William R; Caceci, Thomas; Robertson, John L

    2009-06-01

    Inorganic arsenic increases urinary bladder transitional cell carcinoma in humans. In F344 rats, dimethylarsinic acid (DMA[V]) increases transitional cell carcinoma. Arsenic-induced inhibition of DNA repair has been reported in cultured cell lines and in lymphocytes of arsenic-exposed humans, but it has not been studied in urinary bladder. Should inhibition of DNA damage repair in transitional epithelium occur, it may contribute to carcinogenesis or cocarcinogenesis. We investigated morphology and expression of DNA repair genes in F344 rat transitional cells following up to 100 ppm DMA(V) in drinking water for four weeks. Mitochondria were very sensitive to DMA(V), and swollen mitochondria appeared to be the main source of vacuoles in the transitional epithelium. Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (Real-Time RT PCR) showed the mRNA levels of tested DNA repair genes, ataxia telangectasia mutant (ATM), X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1), excision repair cross-complementing group 3/xeroderma pigmentosum B (ERCC3/XPB), and DNA polymerase beta (Polbeta), were not altered by DMA(V). These data suggested that either DMA(V) does not affect DNA repair in the bladder or DMA(V) affects DNA repair without affecting baseline mRNA levels of repair genes. The possibility remains that DMA(V) may lower damage-induced increases in repair gene expression or cause post-translational modification of repair enzymes.

  13. Stimulation of proteoglycan synthesis by glucuronosyltransferase-I gene delivery: A strategy to promote cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, N.; Barré, L.; Benani, A.; Netter, P.; Magdalou, J.; Fournel-Gigleux, S.; Ouzzine, M.

    2004-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease characterized by a progressive loss of articular cartilage components, mainly proteoglycans (PGs), leading to destruction of the tissue. We investigate a therapeutic strategy based on stimulation of PG synthesis by gene transfer of the glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-synthesizing enzyme, β1,3-glucuronosyltransferase-I (GlcAT-I) to promote cartilage repair. We previously reported that IL-1β down-regulated the expression and activity of GlcAT-I in primary rat chondrocytes. Here, by using antisense oligonucleotides, we demonstrate that GlcAT-I inhibition impaired PG synthesis and deposition in articular cartilage explants, emphasizing the crucial role of this enzyme in PG anabolism. Thus, primary chondrocytes and cartilage explants were engineered by lipid-mediated gene delivery to efficiently overexpress a human GlcAT-I cDNA. Interestingly, GlcAT-I overexpression significantly enhanced GAG synthesis and deposition as evidenced by 35S-sulfate incorporation, histology, estimation of GAG content, and fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis analysis. Metabolic labeling and Western blot analyses further suggested that GlcAT-I expression led to an increase in the abundance rather than in the length of GAG chains. Importantly, GlcAT-I delivery was able to overcome IL-1β-induced PG depletion and maintain the anabolic activity of chondrocytes. Moreover, GlcAT-I also restored PG synthesis to a normal level in cartilage explants previously depleted from endogenous PGs by IL-1β-treatment. In concert, our investigations strongly indicated that GlcAT-I was able to control and reverse articular cartilage defects in terms of PG anabolism and GAG content associated with IL-1β. This study provides a basis for a gene therapy approach to promote cartilage repair in degenerative joint diseases. PMID:15601778

  14. AAV-Mediated Gene Editing via Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Matthew L.; Samulski, R. Jude

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the ability to edit the mammalian genome was inhibited by the inherent low efficiency of homologous recombination (HR; approximately <1 in a million events) and the inability to deliver DNA efficiently to dividing and non-dividing cells/tissue. Despite these limitations, creative selections designed over 20 years ago, clearly demonstrated the powerful implications of gene knock-in and knockout technology for the genetic engineering of mice (Doetschman et al. Nat 330(6148): 576–578, 1987; Thomas and Capecchi. Cell 51(3): 503–512, 1987). The development and application of recombinant vectors based on adeno-associated virus (rAAV) have helped to overcome both of the initial limitations regarding DNA delivery and the frequency of HR. Considering DNA delivery, rAAV infects non-dividing and dividing cultured cells as well as most tissues in mouse and larger animal models (including humans). At the DNA editing level, rAAV genomes have been reported to increase the frequency of HR several orders of magnitude by serving as the repair substrate (Russell and Hirata. Nat Genet 18(4): 325–330, 1998). However, reports on the ability of rAAV genomes to stimulate HR, compared to plasmid DNA and oligonucleotides, are variable, and many labs have found it necessary to augment the frequency of rAAV-induced HR using site-specific endonucleases (Ellis et al. Gene Ther, 2012; Hirsch et al. Gene Ther 17(9): 1175–1180, 2010; Porteus et al. Mol Cell Biol 23(10): 3558–3565, 2003; Radecke et al. Mol Ther 14(6): 798–808, 2006). In this protocol, we describe a method to perform rAAV-mediated double-strand break (DSB) repair for precise genetic engineering in human cells. PMID:24557911

  15. Matrix immobilization enhances the tissue repair activity of growth factor gene therapy vectors.

    PubMed

    Doukas, J; Chandler, L A; Gonzalez, A M; Gu, D; Hoganson, D K; Ma, C; Nguyen, T; Printz, M A; Nesbit, M; Herlyn, M; Crombleholme, T M; Aukerman, S L; Sosnowski, B A; Pierce, G F

    2001-05-01

    Although growth factor proteins display potent tissue repair activities, difficulty in sustaining localized therapeutic concentrations limits their therapeutic activity. We reasoned that enhanced histogenesis might be achieved by combining growth factor genes with biocompatible matrices capable of immobilizing vectors at delivery sites. When delivered to subcutaneously implanted sponges, a platelet-derived growth factor B-encoding adenovirus (AdPDGF-B) formulated in a collagen matrix enhanced granulation tissue deposition 3- to 4-fold (p < or = 0.0002), whereas vectors encoding fibroblast growth factor 2 or vascular endothelial growth factor promoted primarily angiogenic responses. By day 8 posttreatment of ischemic excisional wounds, collagen-formulated AdPDGF-B enhanced granulation tissue and epithelial areas up to 13- and 6-fold (p < 0.009), respectively, and wound closure up to 2-fold (p < 0.05). At longer times, complete healing without excessive scar formation was achieved. Collagen matrices were shown to retain both vector and transgene products within delivery sites, enabling the transduction and stimulation of infiltrating repair cells. Quantitative PCR and RT-PCR demonstrated both vector DNA and transgene mRNA within wound beds as late as 28 days posttreatment. By contrast, aqueous formulations allowed vector seepage from application sites, leading to PDGF-induced hyperplasia in surrounding tissues but not wound beds. Finally, repeated applications of PDGF-BB protein were required for neotissue induction approaching equivalence to a single application of collagen-immobilized AdPDGF-B, confirming the utility of this gene transfer approach. Overall, these studies demonstrate that immobilizing matrices enable the controlled delivery and activity of tissue promoting genes for the effective regeneration of injured tissues.

  16. The effects of mismatch repair and RAD1 genes on interchromosomal crossover recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Ainsley; Fabbri, Rebecca M; Reeves, Jason W; Crouse, Gray F

    2006-06-01

    We have previously shown that recombination between 400-bp substrates containing only 4-bp differences, when present in an inverted repeat orientation, is suppressed by >20-fold in wild-type strains of S. cerevisiae. Among the genes involved in this suppression were three genes involved in mismatch repair--MSH2, MSH3, and MSH6--and one in nucleotide excision repair, RAD1. We now report the involvement of these genes in interchromosomal recombination occurring via crossovers using these same short substrates. In these experiments, recombination was stimulated by a double-strand break generated by the HO endonuclease and can occur between completely identical (homologous) substrates or between nonidentical (homeologous) substrates. In addition, a unique feature of this system is that recombining DNA strands can be given a choice of either type of substrate. We find that interchromosomal crossover recombination with these short substrates is severely inhibited in the absence of MSH2, MSH3, or RAD1 and is relatively insensitive to the presence of mismatches. We propose that crossover recombination with these short substrates requires the products of MSH2, MSH3, and RAD1 and that these proteins have functions in recombination in addition to the removal of terminal nonhomology. We further propose that the observed insensitivity to homeology is a result of the difference in recombinational mechanism and/or the timing of the observed recombination events. These results are in contrast with those obtained using longer substrates and may be particularly relevant to recombination events between the abundant short repeated sequences that characterize the genomes of higher eukaryotes.

  17. Mismatch repair genes founder mutations and cancer susceptibility in Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ponti, G; Castellsagué, E; Ruini, C; Percesepe, A; Tomasi, A

    2015-06-01

    Founder mutations in specific populations are common in several Mendelian disorders. They are shared by apparently unrelated families that inherited them from a common ancestor that existed hundreds to thousands of years ago. They have been proven to impact in molecular diagnostics strategies in specific populations, where they can be assessed as the first screening step and, if positive, avoid further expensive gene scanning. In Lynch syndrome (LS), a dominantly inherited colorectal cancer disease, more than 50 founder pathogenic mutations have been described so far in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2). We here provide a comprehensive summary of the founder mutations found in the MMR genes and an overview of their main characteristics. At a time when high-throughput strategies are being introduced in the molecular diagnostics of cancer, genetic testing for founder mutations can complement next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to most efficiently identify MMR gene mutations in any given population. Additionally, special attention is paid to MMR founder mutations with interesting anthropological significance. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. DNA Repair Gene Polymorphism and the Risk of Mitral Chordae Tendineae Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Kalayci Yigin, Aysel; Bulent Vatan, Mehmet; Akdemir, Ramazan; Necati Murat Aksoy, Muhammed; Cakar, Mehmet Akif; Kilic, Harun; Erkorkmaz, Unal; Karacan, Keziban; Kaleli, Suleyman

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphisms in Lys939Gln XPC gene may diminish DNA repair capacity, eventually increasing the risk of carcinogenesis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the significance of polymorphism Lys939Gln in XPC gene in patients with mitral chordae tendinea rupture (MCTR). Twenty-one patients with MCTR and thirty-seven age and sex matched controls were enrolled in the study. Genotyping of XPC gene Lys939Gln polymorphism was carried out using polymerase chain reaction- (PCR-) restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The frequencies of the heterozygote genotype (Lys/Gln-AC) and homozygote genotype (Gln/Gln-CC) were significantly different in MCTR as compared to control group, respectively (52.4% versus 43.2%, p = 0.049; 38.15% versus 16.2%, p = 0.018). Homozygote variant (Gln/Gln) genotype was significantly associated with increased risk of MCTR (OR = 2.059; 95% CI: 1.097–3.863; p = 0.018). Heterozygote variant (Lys/Gln) genotype was also highly significantly associated with increased risk of MCTR (OR = 1.489; 95% CI: 1.041–2.129; p = 0.049). The variant allele C was found to be significantly associated with MCTR (OR = 1.481; 95% CI: 1.101–1.992; p = 0.011). This study has demonstrated the association of XPC gene Lys939Gln polymorphism with MCTR, which is significantly associated with increased risk of MCTR. PMID:26604426

  19. Evidence for presence of mismatch repair gene expression positive Lynch syndrome cases in India.

    PubMed

    Bashyam, Murali D; Kotapalli, Viswakalyan; Raman, Ratheesh; Chaudhary, Ajay K; Yadav, Brijesh K; Gowrishankar, Swarnalata; Uppin, Shantveer G; Kongara, Ravikanth; Sastry, Regulagadda A; Vamsy, Mohana; Patnaik, Sujit; Rao, Satish; Dsouza, Shoba; Desai, Devendra; Tester, Ashavaid

    2015-12-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS), the most common form of familial CRC predisposition that causes tumor onset at a young age, is characterized by the presence of microsatellite instability (MSI) in tumors due to germline inactivation of mismatch repair (MMR) system. Two MMR genes namely MLH1 and MSH2 account for majority of LS cases while MSH6 and PMS2 may account for a minor proportion. In order to identify MMR genes causing LS in India, we analyzed MSI and determined expression status of the four MMR genes in forty eight suspected LS patient colorectal tumor samples. Though a majority exhibited MSI, only 58% exhibited loss of MMR expression, a significantly low proportion compared to reports from other populations. PCR-DNA sequencing and MLPA-based mutation and exonic deletion/duplication screening respectively, revealed genetic lesions in samples with and without MMR gene expression. Interestingly, tumor samples with and without MMR expression exhibited significant differences with respect to histological (mucin content) and molecular (instability exhibited by mononucleotide microsatellites) features. The study has revealed for the first time a significant proportion of LS tumors not exhibiting loss of MMR expression. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Gene expression in vessel-associated cells upon xylem embolism repair in Vitis vinifera L. petioles.

    PubMed

    Chitarra, Walter; Balestrini, Raffaella; Vitali, Marco; Pagliarani, Chiara; Perrone, Irene; Schubert, Andrea; Lovisolo, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    In this work, the involvement of vessel-associated cells in embolism recovery was investigated by studying leaf petiole hydraulics and expression profiles of aquaporins and genes related to sugar metabolism. Two different stress treatments were imposed onto grapevines to induce xylem embolism: one involved a pressure collar applied to the stems, while the other consisted of water deprivation (drought). Embolism formation and repair were monitored during stress application and release (recovery). At the same time, stomatal conductance (g(s)), leaf water potential (Ψ(leaf)) and leaf abscisic acid (ABA) concentration were measured. For each treatment, gene transcript levels were assessed on vessel-associated cells (isolated from leaf petioles by laser microdissection technique) and whole petioles. Both treatments induced severe xylem embolism formation and drops in g s and Ψ (leaf) at a lesser degree and with faster recovery in the case of application of the pressure collar. Leaf ABA concentration only increased upon drought and subsequent recovery. Transcripts linked to sugar mobilisation (encoding a β-amylase and a glucose-6-P transporter) were over-expressed upon stress or recovery, both in vessel-associated cells and whole petioles. However, two aquaporin genes (VvPIP2;1 and VvPIP2;4N) were activated upon stress or recovery only in vessel-associated cells, suggesting a specific effect on embolism refilling. Furthermore, the latter gene was only activated upon drought and subsequent recovery, suggesting that either severe water stress or ABA is required for its regulation.

  1. Fibrin patch-based insulin-like growth factor-1 gene-modified stem cell transplantation repairs ischemic myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Zhu, Kai; Yang, Shan; Wang, Yulin; Guo, Changfa; Yin, Kanhua; Wang, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), tissue-engineered cardiac patch, and therapeutic gene have all been proposed as promising therapy strategies for cardiac repair after myocardial infarction. In our study, BMSCs were modified with insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) gene, loaded into a fibrin patch, and then transplanted into a porcine model of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) myocardium injury. The results demonstrated that IGF-1 gene overexpression could promote proliferation of endothelial cells and cardiomyocyte-like differentiation of BMSCs in vitro. Four weeks after transplantation of fibrin patch loaded with gene-modified BMSCs, IGF-1 overexpression could successfully promote angiogenesis, inhibit remodeling, increase grafted cell survival and reduce apoptosis. In conclusion, the integrated strategy, which combined fibrin patch with IGF-1 gene modified BMSCs, could promote the histological cardiac repair for a clinically relevant porcine model of I/R myocardium injury. PMID:25767192

  2. Environmental exposure to benzene, micronucleus formation and polymorphisms in DNA-repair genes: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Sabrina; Maffei, Francesca; Bermejo, Justo Lorenzo; Ravegnini, Gloria; L'insalata, Domenica; Cantelli-Forti, Giorgio; Violante, Francesco Saverio; Hrelia, Patrizia

    2012-03-18

    This report is part of a biomarker study conducted in an Italian population with exposure to environmental benzene ranging from 1.43 to 31.41 μg/m³ (values from personal sampling). DNA damage induced by benzene is the crucial mechanism of its genotoxicity, which leads to chronic benzene poisoning, haematotoxicity and leukaemia. Therefore, genetic variation in DNA-repair genes may modulate susceptibility to benzene-induced DNA damage. In light of this, the effects of polymorphisms in DNA-repair genes (APEX1, hOGG1, NBS1, XPD, XRCC1, and XRCC3) on micronucleus (MN) formation as a biomarker of early biological effects were evaluated. A significantly higher median MN frequency was recorded in traffic wardens than in controls. However, none of the analysed polymorphisms was significantly associated with the median MN frequency. A gene-gender interaction was observed for the APEX1 genotype. The APEX1 variant genotype was associated with significantly lower median MN frequency in men, not in women. Statistical analysis did not reveal any association between the score of the protective alleles - hypothetically pushing the pathway towards optimal DNA-damage repair - and MN. Even though there are some limitations in the study, our results indicate that the general population may be exposed to benzene concentrations higher than the threshold level for air-quality standards in the European Union of 10 μg/m³. Furthermore, urban traffic wardens are exposed to significantly higher levels of benzene than individuals spending most of the time indoors. This higher exposure may contribute to DNA damage, suggesting that benzene might be implicated both as an environmental and occupational risk factor in leukaemia and other haematological diseases. In conclusion, this study suggest the need for (i) regular monitoring of traffic wardens for possible exposure to benzene, as a precautionary step to reduce the associated health risks, and (ii) more comprehensive studies in order to

  3. Enzymatic repair of selected cross-linked homoduplex molecules enhances nuclear gene rescue from Pompeii and Herculaneum remains

    PubMed Central

    Di Bernardo, Giovanni; Del Gaudio, Stefania; Cammarota, Marcella; Galderisi, Umberto; Cascino, Antonino; Cipollaro, Marilena

    2002-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) samples extracted from the bone remains of six equids buried by the Vesuvius eruption in 79 AD were investigated to test pre-amplification and enzymatic repair procedures designed to enhance the rescue of nuclear genes. The extracts, which proved all positive for Equidae mtDNA amplification, proved positive only four times out of 18 when tested for single-copy Equidae nuclear genes (ɛ globin, p53 and γ interferon). Pre-amplification did not change the number of retrieved aDNA sequences but 10 times out of 14 enzymatic repair restored the amplifiability of the genes analysed, proving that repair increases the rate of successful rescue from 22 to αλµοστ 80%. These findings support the hypothesis that some of these cross-linked aDNA molecules, which are not completely separated when DNA is extracted under denaturing conditions, become homoduplex substrates for Pol I and/or T4 ligase action upon renaturation. aDNA authenticity is proved by the homology of the nucleotide sequences of loci tested to the corresponding modern Equidae sequences. Data also indicate that cross-linked homoduplex molecules selected by denaturation of the extract are repaired without any chimera formation. The general features of aDNA amplification with and without denaturation and enzymatic repair are discussed. PMID:11842122

  4. Enzymatic repair of selected cross-linked homoduplex molecules enhances nuclear gene rescue from Pompeii and Herculaneum remains.

    PubMed

    Di Bernardo, Giovanni; Del Gaudio, Stefania; Cammarota, Marcella; Galderisi, Umberto; Cascino, Antonino; Cipollaro, Marilena

    2002-02-15

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) samples extracted from the bone remains of six equids buried by the Vesuvius eruption in 79 AD were investigated to test pre-amplification and enzymatic repair procedures designed to enhance the rescue of nuclear genes. The extracts, which proved all positive for Equidae mtDNA amplification, proved positive only four times out of 18 when tested for single-copy Equidae nuclear genes (epsilon globin, p53 and gamma interferon). Pre-amplification did not change the number of retrieved aDNA sequences but 10 times out of 14 enzymatic repair restored the amplifiability of the genes analysed, proving that repair increases the rate of successful rescue from 22 to alpha(lambda)mu(omicron)sigma(tau) 80%. These findings support the hypothesis that some of these cross-linked aDNA molecules, which are not completely separated when DNA is extracted under denaturing conditions, become homoduplex substrates for Pol I and/or T4 ligase action upon renaturation. aDNA authenticity is proved by the homology of the nucleotide sequences of loci tested to the corresponding modern Equidae sequences. Data also indicate that cross-linked homoduplex molecules selected by denaturation of the extract are repaired without any chimera formation. The general features of aDNA amplification with and without denaturation and enzymatic repair are discussed.

  5. Homozygous germ-line mutation of the PMS2 mismatch repair gene: a unique case report of constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD).

    PubMed

    Ramchander, N C; Ryan, N A J; Crosbie, E J; Evans, D G

    2017-04-05

    Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome results from bi-allelic inheritance of mutations affecting the key DNA mismatch repair genes: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. Individuals with bi-allelic mutations have a dysfunctional mismatch repair system from birth; as a result, constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome is characterised by early onset malignancies. Fewer than 150 cases have been reported in the literature over the past 20 years. This is the first report of the founder PMS2 mutation - NM_000535.5:c.1500del (p.Val501TrpfsTer94) in exon 11 and its associated cancers in this family. The proband is 30 years old and is alive today. She is of Pakistani ethnic origin and a product of consanguinity. She initially presented aged 24 with painless bleeding per-rectum from colorectal polyps and was referred to clinical genetics. Clinical examination revealed two café-au-lait lesions, lichen planus, and a dermoid cyst. Her sister had been diagnosed in childhood with an aggressive brain tumour followed by colorectal cancer. During follow up, the proband developed 37 colorectal adenomatous polyps, synchronous ovarian and endometrial adenocarcinomas, and ultimately a metachronous gastric adenocarcinoma. DNA sequencing of peripheral lymphocytes revealed a bi-allelic inheritance of the PMS2 mutation NM_000535.5:c.1500del (p.Val501TrpfsTer94) in exon 11. Ovarian tumour tissue demonstrated low microsatellite instability. To date, she has had a total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and a total gastrectomy. Aspirin and oestrogen-only hormone replacement therapy provide some chemoprophylaxis and manage postmenopausal symptoms, respectively. An 18-monthly colonoscopy surveillance programme has led to the excision of three high-grade dysplastic colorectal tubular adenomatous polyps. The proband's family pedigree displays multiple relatives with cancers including a likely case of 'true' Turcot syndrome. Constitutional mismatch repair

  6. Ndrg3 gene regulates DSB repair during meiosis through modulation the ERK signal pathway in the male germ cells

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Hongjie; Zhang, Xuan; Jiang, Hanwei; Jiang, Xiaohua; Wang, Liu; Qi, Qi; Bi, Yuan; Wang, Jian; Shi, Qinghua; Li, Runsheng

    2017-01-01

    The N-myc downstream regulated gene (NDRG) family consists of 4 members, NDRG-1, -2, -3, -4. Physiologically, we found Ndrg3, a critical gene which led to homologous lethality in the early embryo development, regulated the male meiosis in mouse. The expression of Ndrg3 was enhanced specifically in germ cells, and reached its peak level in the pachytene stage spermatocyte. Haplo-insufficiency of Ndrg3 gene led to sub-infertility during the male early maturation. In the Ndrg3+/− germ cells, some meiosis events such as DSB repair and synaptonemal complex formation were impaired. Disturbances on meiotic prophase progression and spermatogenesis were observed. In mechanism, the attenuation of pERK1/2 signaling was detected in the heterozygous testis. With our primary spermatocyte culture system, we found that lactate promoted DSB repair via ERK1/2 signaling in the male mouse germ cells in vitro. Deficiency of Ndrg3 gene attenuated the activation of ERK which further led to the aberrancy of DSB repair in the male germ cells in mouse. Taken together, we reported that Ndrg3 gene modulated the lactate induced ERK pathway to facilitate DSB repair in male germ cells, which further regulated meiosis and subsequently fertility in male mouse. PMID:28290521

  7. Ndrg3 gene regulates DSB repair during meiosis through modulation the ERK signal pathway in the male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hongjie; Zhang, Xuan; Jiang, Hanwei; Jiang, Xiaohua; Wang, Liu; Qi, Qi; Bi, Yuan; Wang, Jian; Shi, Qinghua; Li, Runsheng

    2017-03-14

    The N-myc downstream regulated gene (NDRG) family consists of 4 members, NDRG-1, -2, -3, -4. Physiologically, we found Ndrg3, a critical gene which led to homologous lethality in the early embryo development, regulated the male meiosis in mouse. The expression of Ndrg3 was enhanced specifically in germ cells, and reached its peak level in the pachytene stage spermatocyte. Haplo-insufficiency of Ndrg3 gene led to sub-infertility during the male early maturation. In the Ndrg3(+/-) germ cells, some meiosis events such as DSB repair and synaptonemal complex formation were impaired. Disturbances on meiotic prophase progression and spermatogenesis were observed. In mechanism, the attenuation of pERK1/2 signaling was detected in the heterozygous testis. With our primary spermatocyte culture system, we found that lactate promoted DSB repair via ERK1/2 signaling in the male mouse germ cells in vitro. Deficiency of Ndrg3 gene attenuated the activation of ERK which further led to the aberrancy of DSB repair in the male germ cells in mouse. Taken together, we reported that Ndrg3 gene modulated the lactate induced ERK pathway to facilitate DSB repair in male germ cells, which further regulated meiosis and subsequently fertility in male mouse.

  8. p53 Gene Repair with Zinc Finger Nucleases Optimised by Yeast 1-Hybrid and Validated by Solexa Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Frank; Garriga-Canut, Mireia; Baumstark, Rebecca; Fajardo-Sanchez, Emmanuel; Cotterell, James; Minoche, André; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Isalan, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The tumor suppressor gene p53 is mutated or deleted in over 50% of human tumors. As functional p53 plays a pivotal role in protecting against cancer development, several strategies for restoring wild-type (wt) p53 function have been investigated. In this study, we applied an approach using gene repair with zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs). We adapted a commercially-available yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) selection kit to allow rapid building and optimization of 4-finger constructs from randomized PCR libraries. We thus generated novel functional zinc finger nucleases against two DNA sites in the human p53 gene, near cancer mutation ‘hotspots’. The ZFNs were first validated using in vitro cleavage assays and in vivo episomal gene repair assays in HEK293T cells. Subsequently, the ZFNs were used to restore wt-p53 status in the SF268 human cancer cell line, via ZFN-induced homologous recombination. The frequency of gene repair and mutation by non-homologous end-joining was then ascertained in several cancer cell lines, using a deep sequencing strategy. Our Y1H system facilitates the generation and optimisation of novel, sequence-specific four- to six-finger peptides, and the p53-specific ZFN described here can be used to mutate or repair p53 in genomic loci. PMID:21695267

  9. Benzo(a)pyrene induces similar gene expression changes in testis of DNA repair proficient and deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Benzo [a]pyrene (B[a]P) exposure induces DNA adducts at all stages of spermatogenesis and in testis, and removal of these lesions is less efficient in nucleotide excision repair deficient Xpc-/- mice than in wild type mice. In this study, we investigated by using microarray technology whether compromised DNA repair in Xpc-/- mice may lead to a transcriptional reaction of the testis to cope with increased levels of B[a]P induced DNA damage. Results Two-Way ANOVA revealed only 4 genes differentially expressed between wild type and Xpc-/- mice, and 984 genes between testes of B[a]P treated and untreated mice irrespective of the mouse genotype. However, the level in which these B[a]P regulated genes are expressed differs between Wt and Xpc-/- mice (p = 0.000000141), and were predominantly involved in the regulation of cell cycle, translation, chromatin structure and spermatogenesis, indicating a general stress response. In addition, analysis of cell cycle phase dependent gene expression revealed that expression of genes involved in G1-S and G2-M phase arrest was increased after B[a]P exposure in both genotypes. A slightly higher induction of average gene expression was observed at the G2-M checkpoint in Xpc-/- mice, but this did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.086). Other processes that were expected to have changed by exposure, like apoptosis and DNA repair, were not found to be modulated at the level of gene expression. Conclusion Gene expression in testis of untreated Xpc-/- and wild type mice were very similar, with only 4 genes differentially expressed. Exposure to benzo(a)pyrene affected the expression of genes that are involved in cell cycle regulation in both genotypes, indicating that the presence of unrepaired DNA damage in testis blocks cell proliferation to protect DNA integrity in both DNA repair proficient and deficient animals. PMID:20504355

  10. Variation in DNA repair gene XRCC3 affects susceptibility to astrocytomas and glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Custódio, A C; Almeida, L O; Pinto, G R; Santos, M J; Almeida, J R W; Clara, C A; Rey, J A; Casartelli, C

    2012-02-10

    The gene XRCC3 (X-ray cross complementing group 3) has the task of repairing damage that occurs when there is recombination between homologous chromosomes. Repair of recombination between homologous chromosomes plays an important role in maintaining genome integrity, although it is known that double-strand breaks are the main inducers of chromosomal aberrations. Changes in the XRCC3 protein lead to an increase in errors in chromosome segregation due to defects in centrosomes, resulting in aneuploidy and other chromosomal aberrations, such as small increases in telomeres. We examined XRCC3 Thr241Met polymorphism using PCR-RFLP in 80 astrocytoma and glioblastoma samples. The individuals of the control group (N = 100) were selected from the general population of the São Paulo State. Odds ratio and 95%CI were calculated using a logistic regression model. Patients who had the allele Met of the XRCC3 Thr241Met polymorphism had a significantly increased risk of tumor development (odds ratio = 3.13; 95% confidence interval = 1.50-6.50). There were no significant differences in overall survival of patients. We suggest that XRCC3 Thr241Met polymorphism is involved in susceptibility for developing astrocytomas and glioblastomas.

  11. Contribution of double strand break repair gene XRCC3 genotypes to nasopharyngeal carcinoma risk in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juhn-Cherng; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Hsu, Chin-Mu; Chang, Wen-Shin; Li, Chi-Yuan; Liu, Shih-Ping; Shen, Wu-Chung; Bau, Da-Tian

    2015-02-28

    The DNA double strand break repair protein XRCC3 plays a central role in removing double strand breaks from the genome and defects in cellular repair capacity is closely related to human cancer initiation. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the contribution of XRCC3 genotypes to individual nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) susceptibility. In this hospital-based population research, the genotyping and analyzing of XRCC3 rs1799794, rs45603942, rs861530, rs3212057, rs1799796, rs861539, rs28903081 in a large Taiwanese population was performed. Totally, 176 NPC patients and 880 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were genotyped and analyzed by PCR-RFLP method. The results showed that there was a differential distribution among NPC and control subjects in the genotypic (P = 0.000488) and allelic (P = 0.0002) frequencies of XRCC3 rs861539. As for the gene-environment interaction, we have firstly provided evidence showing that there is an obvious joint effect of XRCC3 rs861539 CT and TT genotypes with individual smoking habits on increased NPC risk. In conclusion, the T allele of XRCC3 rs861539, interacts with smoking habit in increasing NPC risk, may be an early detection marker for NPC.

  12. Mismatch repair genes expression defects & association with clinicopathological characteristics in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gurjeet; Masoud, Abdelhafid; Raihan, N.; Radzi, M.; Khamizar, W.; Kam, Lee Suk

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: DNA mismatch repair gene (MMR) abnormalities are seen in 95 per cent of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) and 10-15 per cent of sporadic colorectal cancers. There are no data on MMR abnormalities in Malaysian colorectal cancer patients. This study was aimed to determine the frequency of abnormal MMR gene protein expression in colorectal carcinoma in Northern Peninsular Malaysia using immunohistochemistry. Methods: Clinicopathological information was obtained from 148 patients’ records who underwent bowel resection for colorectal cancer (CRC) at the three hospitals in Malaysia. Immunohistochemistry for MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 proteins were performed on paraffin embedded tissue containing carcinoma. Results: A total of 148 subjects and 150 colorectal carcinomas of sporadic and hereditary types were assessed. Three patients had synchronous tumours. Twenty eight cancers (18.6%) from 26 subjects (17.6%) had absent immunohistochemical expression of any one of the MMR gene proteins. This comprised absent MLH1 only – 3 cancers, absent MSH2 only – 3, absent MSH6 only – 2, absent PMS2 only – 3, absent MLH1 and PMS2 – 14, absent MSH2 and MSH6 – 2 and absent MLH1, MSH6 and PMS2 – 1. There was significant association between abnormal MMR gene protein expression and proximal colon cancers, mucinous, signet ring and poorly differentiated morphology. Interpretation & conclusions: Cancers with abnormal MMR gene expression were associated with microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) phenotype. About 15 per cent demonstrated absent MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 protein expression in isolation or in combination with other MMR genes, which often predicts a germline mutation, synonymous with a diagnosis of HNPCC. This appears to be high frequency compared to reported data. PMID:21911971

  13. Genetic variants of DNA repair genes and prostate cancer: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Ritchey, Jamie D; Huang, Wen-Yi; Chokkalingam, Anand P; Gao, Yu-Tang; Deng, Jie; Levine, Paul; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Hsing, Ann W

    2005-07-01

    As part of a population-based case-control study in Shanghai, China, we investigated whether variants in several DNA repair genes, either alone or in conjunction with other risk factors, are associated with prostate cancer risk. Genomic DNA from 162 patients newly diagnosed with prostate cancer and 251 healthy men randomly selected from the population were typed for five nonsynonymous DNA repair markers. We found that the XRCC1-Arg399Gln AA and the MGMT-Leu84Phe CT+TT genotypes were associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer [odds ratio (OR), 2.18; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.99-4.81 and OR, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.19-3.34, respectively]. In contrast, XRCC3-Thr241Met, XPD-Lys751Gln, and MGMT-Ile143Val markers showed no significant associations with risk, although due to the much lower frequency of their variant alleles in this population we cannot rule out small to modest effects. There was a significant interaction between the MGMT-84 marker and insulin resistance (P(interaction) = 0.046). Relative to men with the MGMT-84 CC genotype and a low insulin resistance (<0.097), those having the CT-TT genotype and a greater insulin resistance had a 5.4-fold risk (OR, 5.39; 95% CI, 2.46-11.82). In addition, for the XRCC3-241 marker, relative to men with the CC genotype and a low intake of preserved foods (<12.7 g/d), those harboring the CT+TT genotype and having a higher intake of preserved foods (>12.7 g/d), which contain nitrosamines and nitrosamine precursors, had a significantly increased risk of prostate cancer risk (OR, 2.62; 95% CI, 1.13-6.06). In contrast, men with the CT+TT genotype and a low intake of preserved foods had a 69% reduction in risk (OR, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.10-0.96; P(interaction) = 0.005). These results suggest that genetic variants in the DNA repair pathways may be involved in prostate cancer etiology and that other risk factors, including preserved foods and insulin resistance, may modulate prostate cancer risk in combination with genetic

  14. A peek into the possible future of management of articular cartilage injuries: gene therapy and scaffolds for cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hubert T; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Mizuno, Shuichi; Abelow, Stephen; Safran, Marc R

    2006-10-01

    Two rapidly progressing areas of research will likely contribute to cartilage repair procedures in the foreseeable future: gene therapy and synthetic scaffolds. Gene therapy refers to the transfer of new genetic information to cells that contribute to the cartilage repair process. This approach allows for manipulation of cartilage repair at the cellular and molecular level. Scaffolds are the core technology for the next generation of autologous cartilage implantation procedures in which synthetic matrices are used in conjunction with chondrocytes. This approach can be improved further using bioreactor technologies to enhance the production of extracellular matrix proteins by chondrocytes seeded onto a scaffold. The resulting "neo-cartilage implant" matures within the bioreactor, and can then be used to fill cartilage defects.

  15. Phenotypic Heterogeneity by Germline Mismatch Repair Gene Defect in Lynch Syndrome Patients.

    PubMed

    Hernâni-Eusébio, Jorge; Barbosa, Elisabete

    2016-10-01

    Introdução: A síndrome de Lynch é a forma hereditária mais comum de cancro colo-rectal, sendo também responsável por cancro do endométrio e de outros tipos. Associa-se a mutações germinativas nos genes de mismatch repair do ADN e a instabilidade de microssatélites. As mutações MLH1 e MSH2 têm um fenótipo de síndrome de Lynch ‘clássico’, sendo o MSH2 mais associado a cancro extra-cólico. Mutações do MSH6 e PMS2 têm um fenótipo atípico. A expressão clínica é heterogénea, existindo uma correlação entre o gene mismatch repair mutado e o padrão fenotípico. Material e Métodos: Análise retrospetiva dos dados clínicos de doentes que cumpriam os critérios de Amesterdão ou que tinha mutações nos genes mismatch repair, entre setembro de 2012 e outubro de 2015. Resultados: Identificámos 28 doentes. Dezassete tinham cancro colo-rectal sendo a localização no cólon direito predominante. Cinco tiveram cancro do endométrio (mediana da idade de diagnóstico – 53), sem qualquer mutação no MSH6. Cinco desenvolveram outros cancros. Todos os casos com mutações mismatch repair estudados tinham instabilidade de microssatélites. Discussão: Na maioria dos casos foi encontrada mutação no MSH2 apesar de o MLH1 ser descrito na literatura como o gene mais frequentemente mutado. Interessa dizer que os doentes com cancro colo-rectal não evidenciam uma tendência para ter muito infiltrado inflamatório. Na maioria dos casos foi realizada colectomia parcial apesar da incidência elevada de lesões síncronas e metácronas associadas. Histerectomia e anexectomia profilática foi realizada em doentes em menopausa/perimenopausa. Conclusão: O registo standardizado dos dados dos doentes poderá levar a um melhor acompanhamento e conhecimento desta síndrome. O uso das Guidelines de Bethesda poderá identificar novos casos que escapam aos critérios de Amesterdão. A pesquisa de instabilidade de microssatélites deve ser feita em muito maior n

  16. Polymorphisms in nucleotide excision repair genes and susceptibility to colorectal cancer in the Polish population.

    PubMed

    Paszkowska-Szczur, Katarzyna; Scott, Rodney J; Górski, Bohdan; Cybulski, Cezary; Kurzawski, Grzegorz; Dymerska, Dagmara; Gupta, Satish; van de Wetering, Thierry; Masojć, Bartłomiej; Kashyap, Aniruddh; Gapska, Paulina; Gromowski, Tomasz; Kładny, Józef; Lubiński, Jan; Dębniak, Tadeusz

    2015-03-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive disease that is associated with a severe deficiency in nucleotide excision repair. Genetic polymorphisms in XP genes may be associated with a change in DNA repair capacity, which could be associated with colorectal cancer development. We assessed the association between 94 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within seven XP genes (XPA-XPG) and the colorectal cancer risk in the Polish population. We genotyped 758 unselected patients with colorectal cancer and 1,841 healthy adults. We found that a significantly decreased risk of colorectal cancer was associated with XPC polymorphism rs2228000_CT genotype (OR 0.59; p < 0.0001) and the rs2228000_TT genotype (OR 0.29; p < 0.0001) compared to the reference genotype (CC). And an increased disease risk was associated with the XPD SNP, rs1799793_AG genotype (OR 1.44, p = 0.018) and rs1799793_AA genotype (OR 3.31, p < 0.0001) compared to the reference genotype. Haplotype analysis within XPC, XPD and XPG revealed haplotypes associated with an altered colorectal cancer risk. Stratified analysis by gender showed differences between the association of three SNPs: XPC rs2228000, XPD rs1799793 and XPD rs238406 in females and males. Association analysis between age of disease onset and polymorphisms in XPD (rs1799793) and XPC (rs2228000) revealed differences in the prevalence of these variants in patients under and over 50 years of age. Our results confirmed that polymorphisms in XPC and XPD may be associated with the risk of colorectal cancer.

  17. ABCB5 is a limbal stem cell gene required for corneal development and repair

    PubMed Central

    Ksander, Bruce R.; Kolovou, Paraskevi E.; Wilson, Brian J.; Saab, Karim R.; Guo, Qin; Ma, Jie; McGuire, Sean P.; Gregory, Meredith S.; Vincent, William J. B.; Perez, Victor L.; Cruz-Guilloty, Fernando; Kao, Winston W. Y.; Call, Mindy K.; Tucker, Budd A.; Zhan, Qian; Murphy, George F.; Lathrop, Kira L.; Alt, Clemens; Mortensen, Luke J.; Lin, Charles P.; Zieske, James D.; Frank, Markus H.; Frank, Natasha Y.

    2014-01-01

    Corneal epithelial homeostasis and regeneration are sustained by limbal stem cells (LSCs)1–3, and LSC deficiency is a major cause of blindness worldwide4. Transplantation is often the only therapeutic option available to patients with LSC deficiency. However, while transplant success depends foremost on LSC frequency within grafts5, a gene allowing for prospective LSC enrichment has not been identified so far5. Here we show that ATP-binding cassette, sub-family B, member 5 (ABCB5)6,7 marks LSCs and is required for LSC maintenance, corneal development and repair. Furthermore, we demonstrate that prospectively isolated human or murine ABCB5-positive LSCs possess the exclusive capacity to fully restore the cornea upon grafting to LSC-deficient mice in xenogeneic or syngeneic transplantation models. ABCB5 is preferentially expressed on label-retaining LSCs2 in mice and p63α-positive LSCs8 in humans. Consistent with these findings, ABCB5-positive LSC frequency is reduced in LSC-deficient patients. Abcb5 loss of function in Abcb5 knockout mice causes depletion of quiescent LSCs due to enhanced proliferation and apoptosis, and results in defective corneal differentiation and wound healing. Our results from gene knockout studies, LSC tracing and transplantation models, as well as phenotypic and functional analyses of human biopsy specimens, provide converging lines of evidence that ABCB5 identifies mammalian LSCs. Identification and prospective isolation of molecularly defined LSCs with essential functions in corneal development and repair has important implications for the treatment of corneal disease, particularly corneal blindness due to LSC deficiency. PMID:25030174

  18. Identification of Region-Specific Myocardial Gene Expression Patterns in a Chronic Swine Model of Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Charron, Sabine; Roubertie, François; Benoist, David; Dubes, Virginie; Gilbert, Stephen H; Constantin, Marion; Vieillot, Delphine; Elbes, Delphine; Quesson, Bruno; Bordachar, Pierre; Haissaguerre, Michel; Bernus, Olivier; Thambo, Jean-Benoit; Rooryck, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Surgical repair of Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is highly successful but may be complicated in adulthood by arrhythmias, sudden death, and right ventricular or biventricular dysfunction. To better understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms of these delayed cardiac events, a chronic animal model of postoperative TOF was studied using microarrays to perform cardiac transcriptomic studies. The experimental study included 12 piglets (7 rTOF and 5 controls) that underwent surgery at age 2 months and were further studied after 23 (+/- 1) weeks of postoperative recovery. Two distinct regions (endocardium and epicardium) from both ventricles were analyzed. Expression levels from each localization were compared in order to decipher mechanisms and signaling pathways leading to ventricular dysfunction and arrhythmias in surgically repaired TOF. Several genes were confirmed to participate in ventricular remodeling and cardiac failure and some new candidate genes were described. In particular, these data pointed out FRZB as a heart failure marker. Moreover, calcium handling and contractile function genes (SLN, ACTC1, PLCD4, PLCZ), potential arrhythmia-related genes (MYO5B, KCNA5), and cytoskeleton and cellular organization-related genes (XIRP2, COL8A1, KCNA6) were among the most deregulated genes in rTOF ventricles. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive report on global gene expression profiling in the heart of a long-term swine model of repaired TOF.

  19. Statin therapy and the expression of genes that regulate calcium homeostasis and membrane repair in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Draeger, Annette; Sanchez-Freire, Verónica; Monastyrskaya, Katia; Hoppeler, Hans; Mueller, Matthias; Breil, Fabio; Mohaupt, Markus G; Babiychuk, Eduard B

    2010-07-01

    In skeletal muscle of patients with clinically diagnosed statin-associated myopathy, discrete signs of structural damage predominantly localize to the T-tubular region and are suggestive of a calcium leak. The impact of statins on skeletal muscle of non-myopathic patients is not known. We analyzed the expression of selected genes implicated in the molecular regulation of calcium and membrane repair, in lipid homeostasis, myocyte remodeling and mitochondrial function. Microscopic and gene expression analyses were performed using validated TaqMan custom arrays on skeletal muscle biopsies of 72 age-matched subjects who were receiving statin therapy (n = 38), who had discontinued therapy due to statin-associated myopathy (n = 14), and who had never undergone statin treatment (n = 20). In skeletal muscle, obtained from statin-treated, non-myopathic patients, statins caused extensive changes in the expression of genes of the calcium regulatory and the membrane repair machinery, whereas the expression of genes responsible for mitochondrial function or myocyte remodeling was unaffected. Discontinuation of treatment due to myopathic symptoms led to a normalization of gene expression levels, the genes encoding the ryanodine receptor 3, calpain 3, and dystrophin being the most notable exceptions. Hence, even in clinically asymptomatic (non-myopathic) patients, statin therapy leads to an upregulation in the expression of genes that are concerned with skeletal muscle regulation and membrane repair.

  20. The Arabidopsis DNA mismatch repair gene PMS1 restricts somatic recombination between homeologous sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangliang; Dion, Eric; Richard, Gabriel; Domingue, Olivier; Jean, Martine; Belzile, François J

    2009-04-01

    The eukaryotic DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system contributes to maintaining the fidelity of genetic information by correcting replication errors and preventing illegitimate recombination events. This study aimed to examine the function(s) of the Arabidopsis thaliana PMS1 gene (AtPMS1), one of three homologs of the bacterial MutL gene in plants. Two independent mutant alleles (Atpms1-1 and Atpms1-2) were obtained and one of these (Atpms1-1) was studied in detail. The mutant exhibited a reduction in seed set and a bias against the transmission of the mutant allele. Somatic recombination, both homologous and homeologous, was examined using a set of reporter constructs. Homologous recombination remained unchanged in the mutant while homeologous recombination was between 1.7- and 4.8-fold higher than in the wild type. This increase in homeologous recombination frequency was not correlated with the degree of sequence divergence. In RNAi lines, a range of increases in homeologous recombination were observed with two lines showing a 3.3-fold and a 3.6-fold increase. These results indicate that the AtPMS1 gene contributes to an antirecombination activity aimed at restricting recombination between diverged sequences.

  1. Air pollution and childhood bronchitis: Interaction with xenobiotic, immune regulatory and DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rakesh; Rossner, Pavel; Honkova, Katerina; Dostal, Miroslav; Sram, Radim J; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2016-02-01

    Gene-environment interactions have been investigated for diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cancer etc. but acute disease like bronchitis has rarely been studied. We investigated interactions between air pollution (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and particulate matter <2.5 μm (PM2.5)) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in EPHX1, IL10, STAT4 and XPC genes in relation to bronchitis in children aged 0-2 years. A stratified random sample of 1133 Czech children, born between 1994 and 1998 in two districts, were followed since birth, of which 626 were genotyped. Pediatrician-diagnosed bronchitis episodes were obtained from the medical records. Central-site monitors measured air pollution exposure. We used multivariable logistic regression and estimated coefficients using generalized estimating equations. Interaction was assessed between pollutants and genes and associations in genotype-specific strata were presented. False discovery rate was used to adjust for multiple comparisons. There were 803 episodes of bronchitis with an incidence rate of 56 per 1000 child-months. We found significant gene-environment interaction between PAH and four SNPs (EPHX1, (rs2854461), STAT4 (rs16833215), XPC (rs2228001 and rs2733532)), which became non-significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. PM2.5 interactions with two XPC SNPs (rs2228001 and rs2733532) remained significant after accounting for multiple comparisons and those with CC alleles had a more than doubling of odds, OR=2.65 (95% CI: 1.91, 3.69) and 2.72 (95% CI: 1.95, 3.78), respectively, per 25 μg/m(3) increase in exposure. The findings suggest that the DNA repair gene XPC may play an important role in the air pollution-induced pathogenesis of the inflammatory disease bronchitis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Genetic variations in the homologous recombination repair pathway genes modify risk of glioma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haishi; Liu, Yanhong; Zhou, Keke; Zhou, Chengcheng; Zhou, Renke; Cheng, Chunxia; Wei, Qingyi; Lu, Daru; Zhou, Liangfu

    2016-01-01

    Accumulative epidemiological evidence suggests that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair pathway play an important role in glioma susceptibility. However, the effects of such SNPs on glioma risk remain unclear. We used a used a candidate pathway-based approach to elucidate the relationship between glioma risk and 12 putative functional SNPs in genes involved in the HR pathway. Genotyping was conducted on 771 histologically-confirmed glioma patients and 752 cancer-free controls from the Chinese Han population. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated both for each SNP individually and for grouped analyses, examining the effects of the numbers of adverse alleles on glioma risk, and evaluated their potential gene-gene interactions using the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR). In the single-locus analysis, two variants, the NBS1 rs1805794 (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.15-1.76, P = 0.001), and RAD54L rs1048771 (OR 1.61, 95% CI 1.17-2.22, P = 0.002) were significantly associated with glioma risk. When we examined the joint effects of the risk-conferring alleles of these three SNPs, we found a significant trend indicating that the risk increases as the number of adverse alleles increase (P = 0.005). Moreover, the MDR analysis suggested a significant three-locus interaction model involving NBS1 rs1805794, MRE11 rs10831234, and ATM rs227062. These results suggested that these variants of the genes involved in the HR pathway may contribute to glioma susceptibility.

  3. Repair of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in the individual genes Gart, Notch and white from Drosophila melanogaster cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    de Cock, J G; Klink, E C; Ferro, W; Lohman, P H; Eeken, J C

    1991-01-01

    The excision repair of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers was investigated in three genes: Gart, Notch and white in a permanent Drosophila cell line Kc, derived from wild type Drosophila melanogaster embryonic cells. In this cell line Gart and Notch are actively transcribed, whereas white is not expressed. In all three genes UV-induced pyrimidine dimers were removed with the same rate and to the same extent: 60% removal within 16 hours, up to 80-100% in 24 hours after irradiation with 10 or 15 J/m2 UV. These kinetics are similar to the time course of dimer removal measured in the genome overall. No difference in repair of the inactive white locus compared to the active Gart and Notch genes was found. Similar results were obtained using a different wild type cell line, SL2, although repair appeared to be somewhat slower in this cell line. The results are discussed with respect to the data found for gene specific repair in other eukaryotic systems. Images PMID:1648203

  4. Conserved pattern of antisense overlapping transcription in the homologous human ERCC-1 and yeast RAD10 DNA repair gene regions.

    PubMed Central

    van Duin, M; van Den Tol, J; Hoeijmakers, J H; Bootsma, D; Rupp, I P; Reynolds, P; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1989-01-01

    We report that the genes for the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD10 and human ERCC-1 DNA excision repair proteins harbor overlapping antisense transcription units in their 3' regions. Since naturally occurring antisense transcription is rare in S. cerevisiae and humans (this is the first example in human cells), our findings indicate that antisense transcription in the ERCC-1-RAD10 gene regions represents an evolutionarily conserved feature. Images PMID:2471070

  5. Repair of uv damaged DNA: Genes and proteins of yeast and human

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, L.

    1992-04-01

    Our objectives are to determine the molecular mechanism of the incision step of excision repair of ultraviolet (UV) light damaged DNA in eukaryotic organisms, using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, and to study the human homologs of yeast excision repair and postreplication repair proteins progress is described.

  6. Mismatch repair genes of Streptococcus pneumoniae: HexA confers a mutator phenotype in Escherichia coli by negative complementation.

    PubMed

    Prudhomme, M; Méjean, V; Martin, B; Claverys, J P

    1991-11-01

    DNA repair systems able to correct base pair mismatches within newly replicated DNA or within heteroduplex molecules produced during recombination are widespread among living organisms. Evidence that such generalized mismatch repair systems evolved from a common ancestor is particularly strong for two of them, the Hex system of the gram-positive Streptococcus pneumoniae and the Mut system of the gram-negative Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. The homology existing between HexA and MutS and between HexB and MutL prompted us to investigate the effect of expressing hex genes in E. coli. Complementation of mutS or mutL mutations, which confer a mutator phenotype, was assayed by introducing on a multicopy plasmid the hexA and hexB genes, under the control of an inducible promoter, either individually or together in E. coli strains. No decrease in mutation rate was conferred by either hexA or hexB gene expression. However, a negative complementation effect was observed in wild-type E. coli cells: expression of hexA resulted in a typical Mut- mutator phenotype. hexB gene expression did not increase the mutation rate either individually or in conjunction with hexA. Since expression of hexA did not affect the mutation rate in mutS mutant cells and the hexA-induced mutator effect was recA independent, it is concluded that this effect results from inhibition of the Mut system. We suggest that HexA, like its homolog MutS, binds to mismatches resulting from replication errors, but in doing so it protects them from repair by the Mut system. In agreement with this hypothesis, an increase in mutS gene copy number abolished the hexA-induced mutator phenotype. HexA protein could prevent repair either by being unable to interact with Mut proteins or by producing nonfunctional repair complexes.

  7. HLA-DQ2.5 genes associated with celiac disease risk are preferentially expressed with respect to non-predisposing HLA genes: Implication for anti-gluten T cell response.

    PubMed

    Pisapia, Laura; Camarca, Alessandra; Picascia, Stefania; Bassi, Virginia; Barba, Pasquale; Del Pozzo, Giovanna; Gianfrani, Carmen

    2016-06-01

    HLA genes represent the main risk factor in autoimmune disorders. In celiac disease (CD), the great majority of patients carry the HLA DQA1*05 and DQB1*02 alleles, both of which encode the DQ2.5 molecule. The formation of complexes between DQ2.5 and gluten peptides on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is necessary to activate pathogenic CD4(+) T lymphocytes. It is widely accepted that the DQ2.5 genes establish the different intensities of anti-gluten immunity, depending whether they are in a homozygous or a heterozygous configuration. Here, we demonstrated that HLA DQA1*05 and DQB1*02 gene expression is much higher than expression of non-CD-associated genes. This influences the protein levels and causes a comparable cell surface exposure of DQ2.5 heterodimers between DQ2.5 homozygous and heterozygous celiac patients. As a consequence, the magnitude of the anti-gluten CD4(+) T cell response is strictly dependent on the antigen dose and not on the DQ2.5 gene configuration of APCs. Furthermore, our findings support the concept that the expression of DQ2.5 genes is an important risk factor in celiac disease. The preferential expression of DQ2.5 alleles provides a new functional explanation of why these genes are so frequently associated with celiac disease and with other autoimmune disorders.

  8. Variable continental distribution of polymorphisms in the coding regions of DNA-repair genes.

    PubMed

    Mathonnet, Géraldine; Labuda, Damian; Meloche, Caroline; Wambach, Tina; Krajinovic, Maja; Sinnett, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    DNA-repair pathways are critical for maintaining the integrity of the genetic material by protecting against mutations due to exposure-induced damages or replication errors. Polymorphisms in the corresponding genes may be relevant in genetic epidemiology by modifying individual cancer susceptibility or therapeutic response. We report data on the population distribution of potentially functional variants in XRCC1, APEX1, ERCC2, ERCC4, hMLH1, and hMSH3 genes among groups representing individuals of European, Middle Eastern, African, Southeast Asian and North American descent. The data indicate little interpopulation differentiation in some of these polymorphisms and typical FST values ranging from 10 to 17% at others. Low FST was observed in APEX1 and hMSH3 exon 23 in spite of their relatively high minor allele frequencies, which could suggest the effect of balancing selection. In XRCC1, hMSH3 exon 21 and hMLH1 Africa clusters either with Middle East and Europe or with Southeast Asia, which could be related to the demographic history of human populations, whereby human migrations and genetic drift rather than selection would account for the observed differences.

  9. Association Study of Xenobiotic Detoxication and Repair Genes with Malignant Brain Tumors in Children

    PubMed Central

    Salnikova, L.E.; Zelinskaya, N.I.; Belopolskaya, O.B.; Aslanyan, M.M.; Rubanovich, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the results of research on DNA polymorphism in children with malignant brain tumors (172 patients, 183 in the control group). Genotyping was performed using an allele-specific tetraprimer reaction for the genes of the first (CYP1A1 (2 sites)) and second phases of xenobiotic detoxication (GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1, GSTM3), DNA repair genesXRCC1, XPD(2 sites),OGG1, as well asNOS1andMTHFR.The increased risk of disease is associated with a minor variant ofCYP1A1(606G) (p = 0.009; OR = 1.50) and a deletion variant ofGSTT1, (p = 0.013, OR = 1.96). Maximum disease risk was observed in carriers of double deletions inGSTT1-GSTM1(p = 0.017, OR = 2.42). The obtained results are discussed in reference to literary data on the risk of malignant brain tumor formation in children and adults. PMID:22649665

  10. Characterisation of the promoter region of the human DNA-repair gene Rad51.

    PubMed

    Hasselbach, L; Haase, S; Fischer, D; Kolberg, H C; Stürzbecher, H W

    2005-01-01

    Regulatory elements of the 5'-flanking region of the DNA-repair gene Rad51 were analysed to characterise pathological alterations of Rad51 mRNA expression during tumour development. Various fragments of the Rad51 promoter were cloned into the pGL3 reporter vector and the respective promoter activity was determined by luciferase assays in transfected U2-OS cells. Transcription factor binding was identified using Protein/DNA arrays. The region encompassing base pairs -204 to -58 was identified as crucial for Rad51 gene transcription. Down regulator sequences are present upstream (-305 to -204) and downstream (-48 and +204) of this core promoter element. Promoter activity is significantly enhanced by substituting G at the polymorphic positions +135 and +172 for C and T, respectively. Transcription factors Ets1/PEA3, E2F1, p53, EGR1, and Stat5 were identified as relevant for regulating expression of Rad51. We identified three separate cis-sequence elements within the Rad51 transcriptional promoter, one ensuring basal levels of expression and two elements limiting expression to relatively low levels. The characterisation of transcription factor binding might help to explain high-level expression of Rad51 in a variety of solid tumours. The polymorphic sites appear important for the increased risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers.

  11. Genetic polymorphisms of the DNA repair gene MPG may be associated with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, S Y; Wan, L; Huang, C M; Huang, Y C; Sheu, J J C; Lin, Y J; Liu, S P; Lan, Y C; Lai, C H; Lin, C W; Tsai, C H; Tsai, F J

    2010-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease and can lead to deformities and severe disabilities, due to irreversible damage of tendons, joints, and bones. A previous study indicated that a DNA repair system was involved in the development of RA. In this study, we investigated the association of four N-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG) gene polymorphisms (rs3176364, rs710079, rs2858056, and rs2541632) with susceptibility to RA in 384 Taiwanese individuals (192 RA patients and 192 control subjects). Our data show a statistically significant difference in genotype frequency distributions at rs710079 and rs2858056 SNPs between RA patients and control groups (P = 0.040 and 0.029, respectively). Our data also indicated that individuals with the GG genotype at rs2858056 SNP may have a higher risk of developing RA. In addition, compared with the haplotype frequencies between case and control groups, individuals with the GCGC haplotype appeared to be at a greater risk of RA progression (P = 0.003, OR = 1.75; 95% CI = 1.20-1.55). Our results suggest that rs710079 and rs2858056 polymorphisms and the GCGC haplotype in the MPG gene are associated with the risk of RA progression, and thus may be used as molecular markers of RA if they are confirmed by further research.

  12. DNA repair gene XRCC3 variants are associated with susceptibility to glioma in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Huang, J Y; Yang, J F; Qu, Q; Qu, J; Liu, F; Liu, F E; Xiong, T; Lu, S H

    2015-09-08

    The susceptibility to glioma is not well understood. It has been suggested that the X-ray cross complementing group 3 (XRCC3) gene influences the capacity to repair DNA damage, leading to increased glioma susceptibility. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between XRCC3 mutations and glioma risk. Genotypes were assessed in 389 Chinese glioma patients and 358 healthy controls. XRCC3 Thr241Met (rs861539) and 2 additional polymorphisms, rs3212112 (c.774+19T>G) and rs1799796 (c.562-14A>G), were directly sequenced. The frequency of the rs861539 T allele was significantly lower in the glioma group than in healthy controls [11.1 vs 17.7%, odds ratio = 0.62 (0.48-0.80), P < 0.001]; the frequencies of the CT or CT+TT genotypes differed between groups (18.5 vs 31%, 20.3 vs 33.2%, respectively). The frequency of the rs3212112 G allele was significantly higher in the glioma group than in healthy controls [15.8 vs 5.3%, odds ratio = 2.94 (2.07-4.17), P < 0.001]. The frequencies of the GT or TG+GG genotypes differed between groups (25.4 vs 7.8%, 28.5 vs 9.2%, respectively). This study demonstrates that the rs861539 and rs3212112 polymorphisms in the XRCC3 gene may influence the risk of glioma development in Chinese populations.

  13. RNA polymerase I transcription factors in active yeast rRNA gene promoters enhance UV damage formation and inhibit repair.

    PubMed

    Meier, Andreas; Thoma, Fritz

    2005-03-01

    UV photofootprinting and repair of pyrimidine dimers by photolyase was used to investigate chromatin structure, protein-DNA interactions, and DNA repair in the spacer and promoter of Saccharomyces cerevisiae rRNA genes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains about 150 copies of rRNA genes separated by nontranscribed spacers. Under exponential growth conditions about half of the genes are transcribed by RNA polymerase I (RNAP-I). Initiation of transcription requires the assembly of the upstream activating factor (UAF), the core factor (CF), TATA binding protein, and RNAP-I with Rrn3p on the upstream element and core promoter. We show that UV irradiation of wild-type cells and transcription factor mutants generates photofootprints in the promoter elements. The core footprint depends on UAF, while the UAF footprint was also detected in absence of the CFs. Fractionation of active and inactive promoters showed the core footprint mainly in the active fraction and similar UAF footprints in both fractions. DNA repair by photolyase was strongly inhibited in active promoters but efficient in inactive promoters. The data suggest that UAF is present in vivo in active and inactive promoters and that recruitment of CF and RNAP-I to active promoters generates a stable complex which inhibits repair.

  14. Genetic variation in nucleotide excision repair pathway genes, pesticide exposure and prostate cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Kathryn Hughes; Koutros, Stella; Andreotti, Gabriella; Sandler, Dale P.; Burdette, Laurie A.; Yeager, Meredith; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Lubin, Jay H.; Zheng, Tongzhang; Alavanja, Michael C.R.; Berndt, Sonja I.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research demonstrates increased prostate cancer risk for pesticide applicators and pesticide manufacturing workers. Although underlying mechanisms are unknown, human biomonitoring studies indicate increased genetic damage (e.g. chromosomal aberrations) with pesticide exposure. Given that the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway repairs a broad range of DNA damage, we evaluated interactions between pesticide exposure and 324 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tagging 27 NER genes among 776 prostate cancer cases and 1444 male controls in a nested case–control study of white Agricultural Health Study pesticide applicators. We determined interaction P values using likelihood ratio tests from logistic regression models and three-level pesticide variables (none/low/high) based on lifetime days of use weighted to an intensity score. We adjusted for multiple comparisons using the false discovery rate (FDR) method. Of the 17 interactions that met FDR <0.2, 3 displayed a monotonic increase in prostate cancer risk with increasing exposure in one genotype group and no significant association in the other group. Men carrying the variant A allele at ERCC1 rs2298881 exhibited increased prostate cancer risk with high versus no fonofos use [odds ratio (OR) 2.98; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.65–5.39; Pinteract = 3.6 × 10−4; FDR-adjusted P = 0.11]. Men carrying the homozygous wild-type TT genotype at two correlated CDK7 SNPs, rs11744596 and rs2932778 (r2 = 1.0), exhibited increased risk with high versus no carbofuran use (OR 2.01; 95% CI 1.31–3.10 for rs11744596; Pinteract = 7.2 × 10−4; FDR-adjusted P = 0.09). In contrast, we did not observe associations among men with other genotypes at these loci. While requiring replication, our findings suggest a role for NER genetic variation in pesticide-associated prostate cancer risk. PMID:22102698

  15. Genetic Variation in Base Excision Repair Pathway Genes, Pesticide Exposure, and Prostate Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Koutros, Stella; Berndt, Sonja I.; Andreotti, Gabriella; Hoppin, Jane A.; Sandler, Dale P.; Burdette, Laurie A.; Yeager, Meredith; Freeman, Laura E. Beane; Lubin, Jay H.; Ma, Xiaomei; Zheng, Tongzhang; Alavanja, Michael C.R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Previous research indicates increased prostate cancer risk for pesticide applicators and pesticide manufacturing workers. Although underlying mechanisms are unknown, evidence suggests a role of oxidative DNA damage. Objectives: Because base excision repair (BER) is the predominant pathway involved in repairing oxidative damage, we evaluated interactions between 39 pesticides and 394 tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for 31 BER genes among 776 prostate cancer cases and 1,444 male controls in a nested case–control study of white Agricultural Health Study (AHS) pesticide applicators. Methods: We used likelihood ratio tests from logistic regression models to determine p-values for interactions between three-level pesticide exposure variables (none/low/high) and SNPs (assuming a dominant model), and the false discovery rate (FDR) multiple comparison adjustment approach. Results: The interaction between fonofos and rs1983132 in NEIL3 [nei endonuclease VIII-like 3 (Escherichia coli)], which encodes a glycosylase that can initiate BER, was the most significant overall [interaction p-value (pinteract) = 9.3 × 10–6; FDR-adjusted p-value = 0.01]. Fonofos exposure was associated with a monotonic increase in prostate cancer risk among men with CT/TT genotypes for rs1983132 [odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for low and high use compared with no use were 1.65 (0.91, 3.01) and 3.25 (1.78, 5.92), respectively], whereas fonofos was not associated with prostate cancer risk among men with the CC genotype. Carbofuran and S-ethyl dipropylthiocarbamate (EPTC) interacted similarly with rs1983132; however, these interactions did not meet an FDR < 0.2. Conclusions: Our significant finding regarding fonofos is consistent with previous AHS findings of increased prostate cancer risk with fonofos exposure among those with a family history of prostate cancer. Although requiring replication, our findings suggest a role of BER genetic variation in pesticide

  16. Polymorphisms in MGMT and DNA repair genes and the risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Doecke, James; Zhao, Zhen Zhen; Pandeya, Nirmala; Sadeghi, Shahram; Stark, Mitchell; Green, Adèle C; Hayward, Nicholas K; Webb, Penelope M; Whiteman, David C

    2008-07-01

    Rates of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus (EAC) and esophago-gastric junction (EGJAC) have increased rapidly in recent decades. The primary risk factors, gastro-esophageal acid reflux and smoking, are potentially genotoxic through the generation of N-nitroso compounds. The DNA repair protein O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is the major cellular defense against alkylating DNA damage. We compared patients with EAC (n = 263) or EGJAC (n = 303) with matched population controls (n = 1,337) for the frequency of 5 MGMT single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs12269324, rs12268840, L84F, I143V, K178R), as well as SNPs in DNA repair genes ERCC1 (N118N), XRCC1 (Q399R) and XPD (K751Q). Relative risks were estimated using multivariable logistic regression. Potential biological interaction was assessed through the synergy index S. Each MGMT SNP conferred increased risks of EAC but not EGJAC; strongest associations were found for the 2 variant MGMT alleles rs12268840 and I143V (p = 0.005 and p < 0.001, respectively). Homozygous carriers of MGMT rs12268840 with frequent acid reflux had significantly higher risks of EAC (OR 15.5, 95% CI 5.8-42) than expected under an additive model, consistent with biological interaction (S = 3.3, 95% CI 1.1-10). Modest, nonsignificant interactions with smoking were also observed. Homozygous variant ERCC1 genotype was associated with reduced risks of EAC (OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.4-1.1), while the homozygous variant XRCC1 genotype conferred higher risks of EGJAC (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.4). No associations with EAC or EGJAC were observed with XPD (rs13181). In summary, MGMT SNPs are associated with increased risks of EAC. Exposure to acid reflux, and possibly smoking, confer markedly higher risks among homozygous variant genotype carriers.

  17. Polymorphisms in three base excision repair genes and breast cancer risk in Thai women.

    PubMed

    Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Schmezer, Peter; Burkholder, Iris; Waas, Peter; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Bartsch, Helmut; Wiangnon, Surapon; Popanda, Odilia

    2008-09-01

    DNA repair plays an important role in tumor development. The base excision repair (BER) pathway mainly removes DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation and reactive oxidative species. Here, we examined possible associations between polymorphisms in three important BER genes (OGG1 Ser326Cys, APEX1 Asp148Glu, XRCC1 Arg194Trp, XRCC1 Arg280His, XRCC1 Arg399Gln) and breast cancer incidence in Thai women. The study population consisted of 507 breast cancer cases and 425 controls. Odds ratios (OR) were adjusted by multivariate logistic regression analysis for age, body mass index, age at menarche, family history of breast cancer, menopausal status, reproduction parameters, use of contraceptives, tobacco smoking, involuntary tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, and education. For homozygous carriers of the Glu allele in APEX1, a significant protective effect was found when compared to Asp/Asp carriers (odds ratio (OR) = 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.38-0.94). Subgroup analysis based on menopausal status revealed increased breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women and OGG1 (OR = 2.05, 95% CI 1.14-3.69). Reconstructed diplotypes for XRCC1 showed that CGA/CGA carriers had an increased risk of breast cancer compared with carriers of the wild type diplotype CGG/CGG (OR = 2.56, 95% CI 1.28-5.15). When the joint effects of XRCC1, APEX1 and OGG1 polymorphisms were evaluated, individuals homozygous for two or three risk alleles were at increased risk (OR = 1.88, 95% CI 1.26-2.82). In conclusion, our data suggest that Thai women with a certain XRCC1 diplotype or homozygous for two or three variant alleles of XRCC1, OGG1, and APEX1 are likely to have an increased susceptibility to breast cancer.

  18. A common element involved in transcriptional regulation of two DNA alkylation repair genes (MAG and MGT1) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, W; Singh, K K; Chen, B; Samson, L

    1993-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae MAG gene encodes a 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase that protects cells from killing by alkylating agents. MAG mRNA levels are induced not only by alkylating agents but also by DNA-damaging agents that do not produce alkylated DNA. We constructed a MAG-lacZ gene fusion to help identify the cis-acting promoter elements involved in regulating MAG expression. Deletion analysis defined the presence of one upstream activating sequence and one upstream repressing sequence (URS) and suggested the presence of a second URS. One of the MAG URS elements matches a decamer consensus sequence present in the promoters of 11 other S. cerevisiae DNA repair and metabolism genes, including the MGT1 gene, which encodes an O6-methylguanine DNA repair methyltransferase. Two proteins of 26 and 39 kDa bind specifically to the MAG and MGT1 URS elements. We suggest that the URS-binding proteins may play an important role in the coordinate regulation of these S. cerevisiae DNA repair genes. Images PMID:8246943

  19. Downregulation of Homologous Recombination DNA Repair Genes by HDAC Inhibition in Prostate Cancer Is Mediated through the E2F1 Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Kachhap, Sushant K.; Rosmus, Nadine; Collis, Spencer J.; Kortenhorst, Madeleine S. Q.; Wissing, Michel D.; Hedayati, Mohammad; Shabbeer, Shabana; Mendonca, Janet; Deangelis, Justin; Marchionni, Luigi; Lin, Jianqing; Höti, Naseruddin; Nortier, Johan W. R.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Hammers, Hans; Carducci, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) re-express silenced tumor suppressor genes and are currently undergoing clinical trials. Although HDACis have been known to induce gene expression, an equal number of genes are downregulated upon HDAC inhibition. The mechanism behind this downregulation remains unclear. Here we provide evidence that several DNA repair genes are downregulated by HDAC inhibition and provide a mechanism involving the E2F1 transcription factor in the process. Methodology/Principal Findings Applying Analysis of Functional Annotation (AFA) on microarray data of prostate cancer cells treated with HDACis, we found a number of genes of the DNA damage response and repair pathways are downregulated by HDACis. AFA revealed enrichment of homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair genes of the BRCA1 pathway, as well as genes regulated by the E2F1 transcription factor. Prostate cancer cells demonstrated a decreased DNA repair capacity and an increased sensitization to chemical- and radio-DNA damaging agents upon HDAC inhibition. Recruitment of key HR repair proteins to the site of DNA damage, as well as HR repair capacity was compromised upon HDACi treatment. Based on our AFA data, we hypothesized that the E2F transcription factors may play a role in the downregulation of key repair genes upon HDAC inhibition in prostate cancer cells. ChIP analysis and luciferase assays reveal that the downregulation of key repair genes is mediated through decreased recruitment of the E2F1 transcription factor and not through active repression by repressive E2Fs. Conclusions/Significance Our study indicates that several genes in the DNA repair pathway are affected upon HDAC inhibition. Downregulation of the repair genes is on account of a decrease in amount and promoter recruitment of the E2F1 transcription factor. Since HDAC inhibition affects several pathways that could potentially have an impact on DNA repair, compromised DNA repair upon HDAC inhibition could

  20. Preferential repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage in the transcribed strand of an active human gene is defective in Cockayne syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Leadon, S.A. ); Copper, P.K. )

    1993-11-15

    Cells from patients with Cockayne syndrome (CS), which are sensitive to killing by UV although overall damage removal appears normal, are specifically defective in repair of UV damage in actively transcribe genes. Because several CS strains display cross-sensitivity to killing by ionizing radiation, the authors examined whether ionizing radiation-induced damage in active genes is preferentially repaired by normal cells and whether the radiosensitivity of CS cells can be explained by a defect in this process. They found that ionizing radiation-induced damage was repaired more rapidly in the transcriptionally active metallothionein IIA (MTIIA) gene than in the inactive MTIIB gene or in the genome overall in normal cells as a result of faster repair on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Cells of the radiosensitive CS strain CS1AN are completely defective in this strand-selective repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage, although their overall repair rate appears normal. CS3BE cells, which are intermediate in radiosensitivity, do exhibit more rapid repair of the transcribed strand but at a reduced rate compared to normal cells. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A cells, which are hypersensitive to UV light because of a defect in the nucleotide excision repair pathway but do not show increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation, preferentially repair ionizing radiation-induced damage on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Thus, the ability to rapidly repair ionizing radiation-induced damage in actively transcribing genes correlates with cell survival. The results extend the generality of preferential repair in active genes to include damage other than bulky lesions.

  1. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in nucleotide excision repair genes, cancer treatment, and head and neck cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Wyss, Annah B.; Weissler, Mark C.; Avery, Christy L.; Herring, Amy H.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Funkhouser, William K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Head and neck cancers (HNC) are commonly treated with radiation and platinum-based chemotherapy, which produce bulky DNA adducts to eradicate cancerous cells. Because nucleotide excision repair (NER) enzymes remove adducts, variants in NER genes may be associated with survival among HNC cases both independently and jointly with treatment. Methods Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate race-stratified (White, African American) hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals for overall (OS) and disease-specific (DS) survival based on treatment (combinations of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy) and 84 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 15 NER genes among 1,227 HNC cases from the Carolina Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Study. Results None of the NER variants evaluated were associated with survival at a Bonferroni-corrected alpha of 0.0006. However, rs3136038 [OS HR = 0.79 (0.65, 0.97), DS HR = 0.69 (0.51, 0.93)] and rs3136130 [OS HR = 0.78 (0.64, 0.96), DS HR = 0.68 (0.50, 0.92)] of ERCC4 and rs50871 [OS HR = 0.80 (0.64, 1.00), DS HR = 0.67 (0.48, 0.92)] of ERCC2 among Whites, and rs2607755 [OS HR = 0.62 (0.45, 0.86), DS HR = 0.51 (0.30, 0.86)] of XPC among African Americans were suggestively associated with survival at an uncorrected alpha of 0.05. Three SNP-treatment joint effects showed possible departures from additivity among Whites. Conclusions Our study, a large and extensive evaluation of SNPs in NER genes and HNC survival, identified mostly null associations, though a few variants were suggestively associated with survival and potentially interacted additively with treatment. PMID:24487794

  2. Cloning of the hexA mismatch-repair gene of Streptococcus pneumoniae and identification of the product.

    PubMed

    Martin, B; Prats, H; Claverys, J P

    1985-01-01

    The hexA mismatch repair gene of Streptococcus pneumoniae has been cloned into multicopy plasmid vectors. The cloned hexA gene is expressed as judged from its ability to complement various chromosomal hexA- alleles. Its direction of transcription was defined and the functional limits were localized by original methods relying on homology-dependent integration of nonautonomous chimeric plasmids carrying chromosomal inserts into the chromosome. Comparison of the proteins encoded by recombinant plasmids and by restriction fragments allowed us to identify an Mr 94 000 protein as the probable product of the hexA gene.

  3. Use of the Comet-FISH Assay to Compare DNA Damage and Repair in p53 and hTERT Genes following Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Declan J.; Doherty, Bernadette A.; Downes, C. Stephen; McKeown, Stephanie R.; McKelvey-Martin, Valerie J.

    2012-01-01

    The alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay can be combined with fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) methodology in order to investigate the localisation of specific gene domains within an individual cell. The number and position of the fluorescent signal(s) provides information about the relative damage and subsequent repair that is occurring in the targeted gene domain(s). In this study, we have optimised the comet-FISH assay to detect and compare DNA damage and repair in the p53 and hTERT gene regions of bladder cancer cell-lines RT4 and RT112, normal fibroblasts and Cockayne Syndrome (CS) fibroblasts following γ-radiation. Cells were exposed to 5Gy γ-radiation and repair followed for up to 60 minutes. At each repair time-point, the number and location of p53 and hTERT hybridisation spots was recorded in addition to standard comet measurements. In bladder cancer cell-lines and normal fibroblasts, the p53 gene region was found to be rapidly repaired relative to the hTERT gene region and the overall genome, a phenomenon that appeared to be independent of hTERT transcriptional activity. However, in the CS fibroblasts, which are defective in transcription coupled repair (TCR), this rapid repair of the p53 gene region was not observed when compared to both the hTERT gene region and the overall genome, proving the assay can detect variations in DNA repair in the same gene. In conclusion, we propose that the comet-FISH assay is a sensitive and rapid method for detecting differences in DNA damage and repair between different gene regions in individual cells in response to radiation. We suggest this increases its potential for measuring radiosensitivity in cells and may therefore have value in a clinical setting. PMID:23145163

  4. NOD2 prevents emergence of disease-predisposing microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Secher, Thomas; Normand, Sylvain; Chamaillard, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    The gut flora is composed of a huge number of diverse, well-adapted symbionts that interact with epithelial lining throughout the host's entire life. Not all commensals have the same ability to maintain quiescent, protective inflammation. Importantly, instability in the composition of gut microbial communities (referred to as dysbiosis) has been linked to loss of gut barrier in the context of common human illnesses with increasing socio-economic impacts, such as Crohn disease and colorectal cancer. Our recent findings suggest that disease-predisposing dysbiosis can now be intentionally manipulated by targeting the major Crohn disease-predisposing NOD2 gene. That knowledge will not only add a new dimension to the often overlooked microbiology of Crohn disease and colorectal cancer, but will also have a broad impact on biomedical sciences worldwide. PMID:23778641

  5. DNA repair genes polymorphism and lung cancer risk with the emphasis to sex differences.

    PubMed

    Letkova, L; Matakova, T; Musak, L; Sarlinova, M; Krutakova, M; Slovakova, P; Kavcova, E; Jakusova, V; Janickova, M; Drgova, A; Berzinec, P; Halasova, E

    2013-09-01

    Polymorphisms in nucleotide and base excision repair genes are associated with the variability in the risk of developing lung cancer. In the present study, we investigated the polymorphisms of following selected DNA repair genes: XPC (Lys939Gln), XPD (Lys751Gln), hOGG1 (Ser326Cys) and XRCC1 (Arg399Gln), and the risks they present towards the development of lung cancer with the emphasis to gender differences within the Slovak population. We analyzed 761 individuals comprising 382 patients with diagnosed lung cancer and 379 healthy controls. Genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism method. We found out statistically significant increased risk for lung cancer development between genders. Female carrying XPC Gln/Gln, XPC Lys/Gln+Gln/Gln and XRCC1 Arg/Gln, XRCC1 Arg/Gln+Gln/Gln genotypes had significantly increased risk of lung cancer corresponding to OR = 2.06; p = 0.04, OR = 1.66; p = 0.04 and OR = 1.62; p = 0.04, OR = 1.69; p = 0.02 respectively. In total, significantly increased risk of developing lung cancer was found in the following combinations of genotypes: XPD Lys/Gln+XPC Lys/Lys (OR = 1.62; p = 0.04), XRCC1 Gln/Gln+hOGG1 Ser/Ser (OR = 2.14; p = 0.02). After stratification for genders, the following combinations of genotype were found to be significant in male: XPD Lys/Gln+XPC Lys/Lys (OR = 1.87; p = 0.03), XRCC1 Arg/Gln+XPC Lys/Lys (OR = 4.52; p = 0.0007), XRCC1 Arg/Gln+XPC Lys/Gln (OR = 5.44; p < 0.0001). In female, different combinations of the following genotypes were found to be significant: XRCC1 Arg/Gln+hOGG1 Ser/Ser (OR = 1.98; p = 0.04), XRCC1 Gln/Gln+hOGG1 Ser/Ser (OR = 3.75; p = 0.02), XRCC1 Arg/Gln+XPC Lys/Gln (OR = 2.40; p = 0.04), XRCC1 Arg/Gln+XPC Gln/Gln (OR = 3.03; p = 0.04). We found out decreased cancer risk in genotype combinations between female patients and healthy controls: XPD Lys/Lys+XPC Lys/Gln (OR = 0.45; p = 0.02), XPD Lys

  6. Stimulation of DNA repair and increased light output in response to UV irradiation in Escherichia coli expressing lux genes.

    PubMed

    Cutter, Kerry L; Alloush, Habib M; Salisbury, Vyv C

    2007-01-01

    It has previously been suggested that the evolutionary drive of bacterial bioluminescence is a mechanism of DNA repair. By assessing the UV sensitivity of Escherichia coli, it is shown that the survival of UV-irradiated E. coli constitutively expressing luxABCDE in the dark is significantly better than either a strain with no lux gene expression or the same strain expressing only luciferase (luxAB) genes. This shows that UV resistance is dependent on light output, and not merely on luciferase production. Also, bacterial survival was found to be dependent on the conditions following UV irradiation, as bioluminescence-mediated repair was not as efficient as repair in visible light. Moreover, photon emission revealed a dose-dependent increase in light output per cell after UV exposure, suggesting that increased lux gene expression correlates with UV-induced DNA damage. This phenomenon has been previously documented in organisms where the lux genes are under their natural luxR regulation but has not previously been demonstrated under the regulation of a constitutive promoter.

  7. The role of the MORF/MRG family of genes in cell growth, differentiation, DNA repair, and thereby aging.

    PubMed

    Pena, Andreana N; Pereira-Smith, Olivia M

    2007-04-01

    The discovery that replicative cellular senescence is a dominant phenotype over immortality led to the discovery that there are at least four unique genetic subgroups of immortal cell lines that use distinct mechanistic pathways to evade cell cycle exit. Study of one of these genetic complementation groups demonstrated that one gene, MORF4, possessed the ability to induce senescence in group B cell lines. The MRG family of genes, of which MORF4 is a member, has since proven important for cellular aging, proliferation, positive and negative transcriptional regulation, and DNA damage repair. MRG15, the evolutionary ancestor of the family, is highly conserved in yeast, C. elegans, drosophila, plants, and mammals and has been implicated in chromatin remodeling in these species. Our proteomics studies have found that MRG15 is unique among mammalian genes in that it associates with both histone deacetylases and histone acetyl transferase complexes, and thus potentially plays a role in both transcriptional silencing and activation. Its knockout in mice is embryonic lethal, resulting in improper organogenesis, as well as cell proliferation and DNA damage repair defects. Future study of these genes will help clarify the role of chromatin remodeling in aging, cellular proliferation, and DNA damage repair.

  8. c-Myc directly regulates the transcription of the NBS1 gene involved in DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yu-Chi; Teng, Shu-Chun; Su, Yi-Ning; Hsieh, Fon-Jou; Wu, Kou-Juey

    2003-05-23

    The c-myc proto-oncogene encodes a ubiquitous transcription factor involved in the control of cell growth and implicated in inducing tumorigenesis. Understanding the function of c-Myc and its role in cancer depends upon the identification of c-Myc target genes. Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a chromosomal-instability syndrome associated with cancer predisposition, radiosensitivity, and chromosomal instability. The NBS gene product, NBS1 (p95 or nibrin), is a part of the hMre11 complex, a central player associated with double-strand break (DSB) repair. NBS1 contains domains characteristic for proteins involved in DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Here we show that c-Myc directly activates NBS1. c-Myc-mediated induction of NBS1 gene transcription occurs in different tissues, is independent of cell proliferation, and is mediated by a c-Myc binding site in the intron 1 region of NBS1 gene. Overexpression of NBS1 in Rat1a cells increased cell proliferation. These results indicate that NBS1 is a direct transcriptional target of c-Myc and links the function of c-Myc to the regulation of DNA DSB repair pathway operating during DNA replication.

  9. Mechanical properties and structure-function relationships in articular cartilage repaired using IGF-I gene-enhanced chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Darvin J; Ortved, Kyla F; Nixon, Alan J; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the benefits of IGF-I gene therapy in enhancing the histologic and biochemical content of cartilage repaired by chondrocyte transplantation. However, there is little to no data on the mechanical performance of IGF-I augmented cartilage grafts. This study evaluated the compressive properties of full-thickness chondral defects in the equine femur repaired with and without IGF-I gene therapy. Animals were randomly assigned to one of three study cohorts based on chondrocyte treatment provided in each defect: (i) IGF-I gene delivered by recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-5; (ii) AAV-5 delivering GFP as a reporter; (iii) naïve cells without virus. In each case, the opposite limb was implanted with a fibrin carrier without cells. Samples were prepared for confined compression testing to measure the aggregate modulus and hydraulic permeability. All treatment groups, regardless of cell content or transduction, had mechanical properties inferior to native cartilage. Overexpression of IGF-I increased modulus and lowered permeability relative to other treatments. Investigation of structure-property relationships revealed that Ha and k were linearly correlated with GAG content but logarithmically correlated with collagen content. This provides evidence that IGF-I gene therapy can improve healing of articular cartilage and can greatly increase the mechanical properties of repaired grafts.

  10. Gypenosides causes DNA damage and inhibits expression of DNA repair genes of human oral cancer SAS cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kung-Wen; Chen, Jung-Chou; Lai, Tung-Yuan; Yang, Jai-Sing; Weng, Shu-Wen; Ma, Yi-Shih; Tang, Nou-Ying; Lu, Pei-Jung; Weng, Jing-Ru; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2010-01-01

    Gypenosides (Gyp) are the major components of Gynostemma pentaphyllum Makino, a Chinese medical plant. Recently, Gyp has been shown to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in many human cancer cell lines. However, there is no available information to address the effects of Gyp on DNA damage and DNA repair-associated gene expression in human oral cancer cells. Therefore, we investigated whether Gyp induced DNA damage and DNA repair gene expression in human oral cancer SAS cells. The results from flow cytometric assay indicated that Gyp-induced cytotoxic effects led to a decrease in the percentage of viable SAS cells. The results from comet assay revealed that the incubation of SAS cells with Gyp led to a longer DNA migration smear (comet tail) when compared with control and this effect was dose-dependent. The results from real-time PCR analysis indicated that treatment of SAS cells with 180 mug/ml of Gyp for 24 h led to a decrease in 14-3-3sigma, DNA-dependent serine/threonine protein kinase (DNAPK), p53, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) and breast cancer gene 1 (BRCA1) mRNA expression. These observations may explain the cell death caused by Gyp in SAS cells. Taken together, Gyp induced DNA damage and inhibited DNA repair-associated gene expressions in human oral cancer SAS cells in vitro.

  11. Contribution of DNA double-strand break repair gene XRCC3 genotypes to oral cancer susceptibility in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chang, Wen-Shin; Liu, Juhn-Cherng; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Bau, Da-Tian

    2014-06-01

    The DNA repair gene X-ray repair cross complementing protein 3 (XRCC3) is thought to play a major role in double-strand break repair and in maintaining genomic stability. Very possibly, defective double-strand break repair of cells can lead to carcinogenesis. Therefore, a case-control study was performed to reveal the contribution of XRCC3 genotypes to individual oral cancer susceptibility. In this hospital-based research, the association of XRCC3 rs1799794, rs45603942, rs861530, rs3212057, rs1799796, rs861539, rs28903081 genotypes with oral cancer risk in a Taiwanese population was investigated. In total, 788 patients with oral cancer and 956 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were genotyped. The results showed that there was significant differential distribution among oral cancer and controls in the genotypic (p=0.001428) and allelic (p=0.0013) frequencies of XRCC3 rs861539. As for the other polymorphisms, there was no difference between case and control groups. In gene-lifestyle interaction analysis, we have provided the first evidence showing that there is an obvious joint effect of XRCC3 rs861539 genotype with individual areca chewing habits on oral cancer risk. In conclusion, the T allele of XRCC3 rs861539, which has an interaction with areca chewing habit in oral carcinogenesis, may be an early marker for oral cancer in Taiwanese.

  12. Polymorphisms in nucleotide excision repair genes and risk of multiple primary melanoma: the Genes Environment and Melanoma Study.

    PubMed

    Millikan, Robert C; Hummer, Amanda; Begg, Colin; Player, Jon; de Cotret, Allan René; Winkel, Scott; Mohrenweiser, Harvey; Thomas, Nancy; Armstrong, Bruce; Kricker, Anne; Marrett, Loraine D; Gruber, Stephen B; Culver, Hoda Anton; Zanetti, Roberto; Gallagher, Richard P; Dwyer, Terence; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Busam, Klaus; From, Lynn; Mujumdar, Urvi; Berwick, Marianne

    2006-03-01

    Polymorphisms in six genes involved in nucleotide excision repair of DNA were examined in a large population-based case-control study of melanoma. Genotyping was conducted for 2485 patients with a single primary melanoma (controls) and 1238 patients with second or higher order primary melanomas (cases). Patients were ascertained from nine geographic regions in Australia, Canada, Italy and the United States. Positive associations were observed for XPD 312 Asn/Asn versus Asp/Asp [odds ratio (OR) = 1.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-1.9] and XPD 751 Gln/Gln versus Lys/Lys (OR = 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.7) genotypes and melanoma. The combined XPD Asn (A) 312 + Gln (C) 751 haplotype was significantly more frequent in cases (32%) compared with controls (29%) (P = 0.003) and risk of melanoma increased significantly with one and two copies of the haplotype (ORs 1.2, 95% CI 1.0-1.4, and 1.6, 95% CI 1.2-2.0, trend P = 0.002). No significant associations were observed for HR23B codon 249, XPG codon 1104, XPC codon 939, XPF codon 415, XPF nt 2063, ERCC6 codon 1213 or ERCC6 codon 1230. ORs for XPD and XPC genotypes were stronger for melanoma diagnosed at an early age, but tests for interaction were not statistically significant. The results provide further evidence for a role of XPD in the etiology of melanoma.

  13. Do all of the neurologic diseases in patients with DNA repair gene mutations result from the accumulation of DNA damage?

    PubMed

    Brooks, P J; Cheng, Tsu-Fan; Cooper, Lori

    2008-06-01

    The classic model for neurodegeneration due to mutations in DNA repair genes holds that DNA damage accumulates in the absence of repair, resulting in the death of neurons. This model was originally put forth to explain the dramatic loss of neurons observed in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum neurologic disease, and is likely to be valid for other neurodegenerative diseases due to mutations in DNA repair genes. However, in trichiothiodystrophy (TTD), Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS), and Cockayne syndrome (CS), abnormal myelin is the most prominent neuropathological feature. Myelin is synthesized by specific types of glial cells called oligodendrocytes. In this review, we focus on new studies that illustrate two disease mechanisms for myelin defects resulting from mutations in DNA repair genes, both of which are fundamentally different than the classic model described above. First, studies using the TTD mouse model indicate that TFIIH acts as a co-activator for thyroid hormone-dependent gene expression in the brain, and that a causative XPD mutation in TTD results in reduction of this co-activator function and a dysregulation of myelin-related gene expression. Second, in AGS, which is caused by mutations in either TREX1 or RNASEH2, recent evidence indicates that failure to degrade nucleic acids produced during S-phase triggers activation of the innate immune system, resulting in myelin defects and calcification of the brain. Strikingly, both myelin defects and brain calcification are both prominent features of CS neurologic disease. The similar neuropathology in CS and AGS seems unlikely to be due to the loss of a common DNA repair function, and based on the evidence in the literature, we propose that vascular abnormalities may be part of the mechanism that is common to both diseases. In summary, while the classic DNA damage accumulation model is applicable to the neuronal death due to defective DNA repair, the myelination defects and brain calcification seem to

  14. Association of DNA Repair Gene APE1 Asp148Glu Polymorphism with Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    AlMutairi, Fatima; Ali Khan Pathan, Akbar; Alanazi, Mohammed; Shalaby, Manal; Alabdulkarim, Huda A.; Alamri, Abdullah; Al Naeem, Abdulrahman; Elrobh, Moammad; Shaik, Jilani P.; Khan, Wajahatullah; Khan, Zahid; Reddy Parine, Narasimha

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of APE1 Asp148Glu polymorphism in breast cancer progression in Saudi population. Methods. We examined the genetic variations (rs1130409) in the DNA base excision repair gene APE1 at codon 148 (Asp148Glu) and its association with breast cancer risk using genotypic assays and in silico structural as well as functional predictions. In silico structural analysis was performed with Asp148Glu allele and compared with the predicted native protein structure. The wild and mutant 3D structures of APE1 were compared and analyzed using solvent accessibility models for protein stability confirmation. Results. Genotypic analysis of APE1 (rs1130409) showed statistically significant association of Asp148Glu with elevated susceptibility to breast cancer. The in silico analysis results indicated that the nsSNP Asp148Glu may cause changes in the protein structure and is associated with breast cancer risk. Conclusion. Taken together, this is the first report that established that Asp148Glu variant has structural and functional effect on the APE1 and may play an important role in breast cancer progression in Saudi population. PMID:26257461

  15. Human INO80 chromatin-remodelling complex contributes to DNA double-strand break repair via the expression of Rad54B and XRCC3 genes.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jung; Hur, Shin-Kyoung; Kwon, Jongbum

    2010-10-15

    Recent studies have shown that the SWI/SNF family of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodelling complexes play important roles in DNA repair as well as in transcription. The INO80 complex, the most recently described member of this family, has been shown in yeast to play direct role in DNA DSB (double-strand break) repair without affecting the expression of the genes involved in this process. However, whether this function of the INO80 complex is conserved in higher eukaryotes has not been investigated. In the present study, we found that knockdown of hINO80 (human INO80) confers DNA-damage hypersensitivity and inefficient DSB repair. Microarray analysis and other experiments have identified the Rad54B and XRCC3 (X-ray repair complementing defective repair in Chinese-hamster cells 3) genes, implicated in DSB repair, to be repressed by hINO80 deficiency. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies have shown that hINO80 binds to the promoters of the Rad54B and XRCC3 genes. Re-expression of the Rad54B and XRCC3 genes rescues the DSB repair defect in hINO80-deficient cells. These results suggest that hINO80 assists DSB repair by positively regulating the expression of the Rad54B and XRCC3 genes. Therefore, unlike yeast INO80, hINO80 can contribute to DSB repair indirectly via gene expression, suggesting that the mechanistic role of this chromatin remodeller in DSB repair is evolutionarily diversified.

  16. Slow repair of bulky DNA adducts along the nontranscribed strand of the human p53 gene may explain the strand bias of transversion mutations in cancers.

    PubMed

    Denissenko, M F; Pao, A; Pfeifer, G P; Tang, M

    1998-03-12

    Using UvrABC incision in combination with ligation-mediated PCR (LMPCR) we have previously shown that benzo(a)pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE) adduct formation along the nontranscribed strand of the human p53 gene is highly selective; the preferential binding sites coincide with the major mutation hotspots found in human lung cancers. Both sequence-dependent adduct formation and repair may contribute to these mutation hotspots in tumor tissues. To test this possibility, we have extended our previous studies by mapping the BPDE adduct distribution in the transcribed strand of the p53 gene and quantifying the rates of repair for individual damaged bases in exons 5, 7, and 8 for both DNA strands of this gene in normal human fibroblasts. We found that: (i) on both strands, BPDE adducts preferentially form at CpG sequences, and (ii) repair of BPDE adducts in the transcribed DNA strand is consistently faster than repair of adducts in the nontranscribed strand, while repair at the major damage hotspots (guanines at codons 157, 248 and 273) in the nontranscribed strand is two to four times slower than repair at other damage sites. These results strongly suggest that both preferential adduct formation and slow repair lead to hotspots for mutations at codons 157, 248 and 273, and that the strand bias of bulky adduct repair is primarily responsible for the strand bias of G to T transversion mutations observed in the p53 gene in human cancers.

  17. Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency in Israel: High Proportion of Founder Mutations in MMR Genes and Consanguinity.

    PubMed

    Baris, Hagit N; Barnes-Kedar, Inbal; Toledano, Helen; Halpern, Marisa; Hershkovitz, Dov; Lossos, Alexander; Lerer, Israela; Peretz, Tamar; Kariv, Revital; Cohen, Shlomi; Half, Elizabeth E; Magal, Nurit; Drasinover, Valerie; Wimmer, Katharina; Goldberg, Yael; Bercovich, Dani; Levi, Zohar

    2016-03-01

    Heterozygous germline mutations in any of the mismatch repair (MMR) genes, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2, cause Lynch syndrome (LS), an autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome conferring a high risk of colorectal, endometrial, and other cancers in adulthood. Offspring of couples where both spouses have LS have a 1:4 risk of inheriting biallelic MMR gene mutations. These cause constitutional MMR deficiency (CMMRD) syndrome, a severe recessively inherited cancer syndrome with a broad tumor spectrum including mainly hematological malignancies, brain tumors, and colon cancer in childhood and adolescence. Many CMMRD children also present with café au lait spots and axillary freckling mimicking neurofibromatosis type 1. We describe our experience in seven CMMRD families demonstrating the role and importance of founder mutations and consanguinity on its prevalence. Clinical presentations included brain tumors, colon cancer, lymphoma, and small bowel cancer. In children from two nonconsanguineous Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) families, the common Ashkenazi founder mutations were detected; these were homozygous in one family and compound heterozygous in the other. In four consanguineous families of various ancestries, different homozygous mutations were identified. In a nonconsanguineous Caucasus/AJ family, lack of PMS2 was demonstrated in tumor and normal tissues; however, mutations were not identified. CMMRD is rare, but, especially in areas where founder mutations for LS and consanguinity are common, pediatricians should be aware of it since they are the first to encounter these children. Early diagnosis will enable tailored cancer surveillance in the entire family and a discussion regarding prenatal genetic diagnosis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Association between nucleotide excision repair gene polymorphisms and chromosomal damage in coke-oven workers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J; Leng, S; Dai, Y; Huang, C; Pan, Z; Niu, Y; Li, B; Zheng, Y

    2007-01-01

    The associations between several genetic polymorphisms of nucleotide excision repair genes (NER) and chromosome damage level were studied among 140 coke-oven workers exposed to a high level of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and 66 non-exposed workers. Seven polymorphisms with functional potential in five NER genes (ERCC1, ERCC2, ERCC4, ERCC5 and ERCC6) were genotyped in the 206 study subjects. Multivariate analysis of covariance revealed that coke-oven workers with the ERCC1 19007 CC genotype had significantly higher cytokinesis-block micronucleus frequency (CBMN) (10.5 +/- 6.8 per thousand) than those with CT (8.1 +/- 6.6 per thousand, p = 0.01) or TT (6.6 +/- 3.7-/ per thousand p = 0.05) or CT+TT genotypes (7.5 +/- 6.3 per thousand, p = 0.004). The ERCC6 A3368G polymorphism was also associated with CBMN frequency among coke-oven workers. Subjects with the AA genotype have a significantly higher CBMN frequency (10.0 +/- 6.9 per thousand) than those with AG (6.7 +/- 4.2 per thousand, p = 0.05) or AG+GG genotypes (6.6 +/- 4.1 per thousand, p = 0.02). Stratification analysis revealed the significant associations between ERCC1 C19007T and ERCC6 A3368G, and the CBMN frequencies were only found among older workers. In addition, a significant association between ERCC2 G23591A polymorphism and CBMN frequencies was also found among older coke-oven workers. The results suggest that polymorphisms of ERCC1 C19007T, ERCC6 A3368G and ERCC2 G23591A are associated with the CBMN frequencies among coke-oven workers.

  19. Risk of colorectal cancer for people with a mutation in both a MUTYH and a DNA mismatch repair gene.

    PubMed

    Win, Aung Ko; Reece, Jeanette C; Buchanan, Daniel D; Clendenning, Mark; Young, Joanne P; Cleary, Sean P; Kim, Hyeja; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dowty, James G; MacInnis, Robert J; Tucker, Katherine M; Winship, Ingrid M; Macrae, Finlay A; Burnett, Terrilea; Le Marchand, Loïc; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W; Newcomb, Polly A; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Lindor, Noralane M; Hopper, John L; Gallinger, Steven; Jenkins, Mark A

    2015-12-01

    The base excision repair protein, MUTYH, functionally interacts with the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. As genetic testing moves from testing one gene at a time, to gene panel and whole exome next generation sequencing approaches, understandin g the risk associated with co-existence of germline mutations in these genes will be important for clinical interpretation and management. From the Colon Cancer Family Registry, we identified 10 carriers who had both a MUTYH mutation (6 with c.1187G>A p.(Gly396Asp), 3 with c.821G>A p.(Arg274Gln), and 1 with c.536A>G p.(Tyr179Cys)) and a MMR gene mutation (3 in MLH1, 6 in MSH2, and 1 in PMS2), 375 carriers of a single (monoallelic) MUTYH mutation alone, and 469 carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Of the 10 carriers of both gene mutations, 8 were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Using a weighted cohort analysis, we estimated that risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of both a MUTYH and a MMR gene mutation was substantially higher than that for carriers of a MUTYH mutation alone [hazard ratio (HR) 21.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 9.19-50.1; p < 0.001], but not different from that for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone (HR 1.94, 95% CI 0.63-5.99; p = 0.25). Within the limited power of this study, there was no evidence that a monoallelic MUTYH gene mutation confers additional risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Our finding suggests MUTYH mutation testing in MMR gene mutation carriers is not clinically informative.

  20. Risk of colorectal cancer for people with a mutation in both a MUTYH and a DNA mismatch repair gene

    PubMed Central

    Win, Aung Ko; Reece, Jeanette C.; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Clendenning, Mark; Young, Joanne P.; Cleary, Sean P.; Kim, Hyeja; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dowty, James G.; MacInnis, Robert J.; Tucker, Katherine M.; Winship, Ingrid M.; Macrae, Finlay A.; Burnett, Terrilea; Le Marchand, Loïc; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Hopper, John L.; Gallinger, Steven; Jenkins, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The base excision repair protein, MUTYH, functionally interacts with the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. As genetic testing moves from testing one gene at a time, to gene panel and whole exome next generation sequencing approaches, understanding the risk associated with co-existence of germline mutations in these genes will be important for clinical interpretation and management. From the Colon Cancer Family Registry, we identified 10 carriers who had both a MUTYH mutation (6 with c.1187G>A p.(Gly396Asp), 3 with c.821G>A p.(Arg274Gln), and 1 with c.536A>G p.(Tyr179Cys)) and a MMR gene mutation (3 in MLH1, 6 in MSH2, and 1 in PMS2), 375 carriers of a single (monoallelic) MUTYH mutation alone, and 469 carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Of the 10 carriers of both gene mutations, 8 were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Using a weighted cohort analysis, we estimated that risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of both a MUTYH and a MMR gene mutation was substantially higher than that for carriers of a MUTYH mutation alone [hazard ratio (HR) 21.5, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 9.19–50.1; p < 0.001], but not different from that for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone (HR 1.94, 95 % CI 0.63–5.99; p = 0.25). Within the limited power of this study, there was no evidence that a monoallelic MUTYH gene mutation confers additional risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Our finding suggests MUTYH mutation testing in MMR gene mutation carriers is not clinically informative. PMID:26202870

  1. Clinical heterogeneity within xeroderma pigmentosum associated with mutations in the DNA repair and transcription gene ERCC3.

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, W.; Scott, R. J.; Rodgers, S.; Müller, H. J.; Cole, J.; Arlett, C. F.; Kleijer, W. J.; Bootsma, D.; Hoeijmakers, J. H.; Weeda, G.

    1994-01-01

    The human DNA excision repair gene ERCC3 specifically corrects the nucleotide excision repair (NER) defect of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group B. In addition to its function in NER, the ERCC3 DNA helicase was recently identified as one of the components of the human BTF2/TFIIH transcription factor complex, which is required for initiation of transcription of class II genes. To date, a single patient (XP11BE) has been assigned to this XP group B (XP-B), with ther remarkable conjunction of two autosomal recessive DNA repair deficiency disorders: XP and Cockayne syndrome (CS). The intriguing involvement of the ERCC3 protein in the vital process of transcription may provide an explanation for the rarity, severity, and wide spectrum of clinical features in this complementation group. Here we report the identification of two new XP-B patients: XPCS1BA and XPCS2BA (siblings), by microneedle injection of the cloned ERCC3 repair gene as well as by cell hybridization. Molecular analysis of the ERCC3 gene in both patients revealed a single base substitution causing a missense mutation in a region that is completely conserved in yeast, Drosophila, mouse, and human ERCC3. As in patient XP11BE, the expression of only one allele (paternal) is detected. The mutation causes a virtually complete inactivation of the NER function of the protein. Despite this severe NER defect, both patients display a late onset of neurologic impairment, mild cutaneous symptoms, and a striking absence of skin tumors even at an age of > 40 years. Analysis of the frequency of hprt- mutant T-lymphocytes in blood samples suggests a relatively low in vivo mutation frequency in these patients. Factors in addition to NER deficiency may be required for the development of cutaneous tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8304337

  2. Clinical heterogeneity within xeroderma pigmentosum associated with mutations in the DNA repair and transcription gene ERCC3

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeulen, W.; Kleijer, W.J.; Bootsma, D.; Hoeijmakers, J.H.J.; Weeda, G. ); Scott, R.J.; Rodgers, S.; Mueller, H.J. ); Cole, J.; Arlett, C.F. )

    1994-02-01

    The human DNA excision repair gene ERCC3 specifically corrects the nucleotide excision repair (NER) defect of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group B. In addition to its function in NER, the ERCC3 DNA helicase was recently identified as one of the components of the human BTF2/TFIIH transcription factor complex, which is required for initiation of transcription of class II genes. To date, a single patient (XP11BE) has been assigned to this XP group B (XP-B), with the remarkable conjunction of two autosomal recessive DNA repair deficiency disorders: XP and Cockayne syndrome (CS). The intriguing involvement of the ERCC3 protein in the vital process of transcription may provide an explanation for the rarity, severity, and wide spectrum of clinical features in this complementation group. Here the authors report the identification of two new XP-B patients: XPCS1BA and XPCS2BA (siblings), by microneedle injection of the cloned ERCC3 repair gene as well as by cell hybridization. Molecular analysis of the ERCC3 gene in both patients revealed a single base substitution causing a missense mutation in a region that is completely conserved in yeast, Drosophila, mouse, and human ERCC3. As in patient XP11BE, the expression of only one allele (paternal) is detected. The mutation causes a virtually complete inactivation of the NER function of the protein. Despite this severe NER defect, both patients display a late onset of neurologic impairment, mild cutaneous symptoms, and a striking absence of skin tumors even at an age of >40 years. Analysis of the frequency of hprt[sup [minus

  3. Nucleotide Excision Repair Gene Polymorphisms, Meat Intake and Colon Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Steck, Susan E.; Butler, Lesley M.; Keku, Temitope; Antwi, Samuel; Galanko, Joseph; Sandler, Robert S.; Hu, Jennifer J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Much of the DNA damage from colon cancer-related carcinogens, including heterocyclic amines (HCA) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from red meat cooked at high temperature, are repaired by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. Thus, we examined whether NER non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) modified the association between red meat intake and colon cancer risk. Methods The study consists of 244 African-American and 311 white colon cancer cases and population-based controls (331 African Americans and 544 whites) recruited from 33 counties in North Carolina from 1996 to 2000. Information collected by food frequency questionnaire on meat intake and preparation methods were used to estimate HCA and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP, a PAH) intake. We tested 7 nsSNPs in 5 NER genes: XPC A499V and K939Q, XPD D312N and K751Q, XPF R415Q, XPG D1104H, and RAD23B A249V. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using unconditional logistic regression. Results Among African Americans, we observed a statistically significant positive association between colon cancer risk and XPC 499 AV+VV genotype (OR=1.7, 95% CI: 1.1, 2.7, AA as referent), and an inverse association with XPC 939 QQ (OR=0.3, 95%CI: 0.2, 0.8, KK as referent). These associations were not observed among whites. For both races combined, there was interaction between the XPC 939 genotype, well-done red meat intake and colon cancer risk (OR=1.5, 95% CI=1.0, 2.2 for high well-done red meat and KK genotype as compared to low well-done red meat and KK genotype, pinteraction =0.05). Conclusions Our data suggest that NER nsSNPs are associated with colon cancer risk and may modify the association between well-done red meat intake and colon cancer risk. PMID:24607854

  4. Genetic skin diseases predisposing to basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Morrone, Aldo; Kanitakis, Jean; Grammatico, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the commonest cancer in humans. Predisposing factors reflect common genetic variations and environmental influences in most cases. However, an underlying Mendelian disorder should be suspected in a specific subset of patients, namely those with multiple, early onset lesions. Some specific conditions, including Gorlin, Bazex-Dupré-Christol and Rombo syndromes, and Xeroderma Pigmentosum, show BCC as a prominent feature. In addition, BCC may represent a relatively common, although less specific, finding in many other genodermatoses. These include disorders of DNA replication/repair functions (Bloom, Werner, Rothmund-Thomson and Muir-Torre syndromes), genodermatoses affecting the folliculo-sebaceus unit (Brooke-Spiegler, Schöpf-Schulz-Passarge and Cowden syndromes), immune response (cartilage-hair hypoplasia and epidermodysplasia verruciformis) and melanin biosynthesis (oculocutaneous albinism and Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome), and some epidermal nevus syndromes. Further conditions occasionally associated with BCCs exist, but the significance of the association remains to be proven.

  5. Up-regulation of photoprotection and PSII-repair gene expression by irradiance in the unicellular green alga Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Park, Seunghye; Polle, Juergen E W; Melis, Anastasios; Lee, Taek Kyun; Jin, Eonseon

    2006-01-01

    The unicellular green alga Dunaliella salina is an attractive model organism for studying photoacclimation responses and the photosystem II (PSII) damage and repair process in the photosynthetic apparatus. Irradiance during cell growth defines both the photoacclimation and the PSII repair status of the cells. To identify genes specific to these processes, a cDNA library was created from irradiance-stressed D. salina. From the cDNA library, 1112 randomly selected expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were analyzed. Because ESTs constitute the expressed part of the genome, the strategy of randomly sequencing cDNA clones at their 5'-ends allowed us to obtain information about the transcript level of numerous genes in light-stressed D. salina. The results of a BLASTX search performed on the obtained total set of ESTs showed that approximately 1% of the ESTs could be assigned to genes coding for proteins that are known to be up-regulated in response to high-light stress. Specifically, after 48 h of high-light exposure of the cells, an increase in the expression level of antioxidant genes, such as Fe-SOD and APX, was observed, as well as elevated levels of the Cbr transcript, a light-harvesting Chl-protein homolog. Further, the ATP-dependent Clp protease gene was also up-regulated in D. salina cells after 48 h of exposure to high light. The results provide initial insight into the global gene regulation process in response to irradiance.

  6. Repair genes expression profile of MLH1, MSH2 and ATM in the normal oral mucosa of chronic smokers.

    PubMed

    Alves, Mônica Ghislaine Oliveira; Carta, Celina Faig Lima; de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Issa, Jaqueline Scholz; Nunes, Fábio Daumas; Almeida, Janete Dias

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chronic smoking on the expression profile of the repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and ATM in the normal oral mucosa of chronic smokers and never smokers. The sample consisted of thirty exfoliative cytology smears per group obtained from Smokers and Never Smokers. Total RNA was extracted and expression of the MLH1, MSH2 and ATM genes were evaluated by quantitative real-time and immunocytochemistry. The gene and protein expression data were correlated to the clinical data. Gene expression was analyzed statistically using the Student t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient, with p<0.05. MLH1, MSH2 and ATM genes were downregulated in the smoking group compared to the control with significant values for MLH1 (p=0.006), MSH2 (p=0.0001) and ATM (p=0.0001). Immunocytochemical staining for anti-MLH1, anti-MSH2 and anti-ATM was negative in Never Smokers; in Smokers it was rarely positive. No significant correlation was observed among the expression of MLH1, MSH2, ATM and age, number of cigarettes consumed per day, time of smoking during life, smoking history or levels of CO in expired air. The expression of genes and proteins related to DNA repair mechanism MLH1, MSH2 and ATM in the normal oral mucosa of chronic smokers was reduced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. New single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in homologous recombination repair genes detected by microarray analysis in Polish breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Romanowicz, Hanna; Strapagiel, Dominik; Słomka, Marcin; Sobalska-Kwapis, Marta; Kępka, Ewa; Siewierska-Górska, Anna; Zadrożny, Marek; Bieńkiewicz, Jan; Smolarz, Beata

    2016-11-30

    Breast cancer is the most common cause of malignancy and mortality in women worldwide. This study aimed at localising homologous recombination repair (HR) genes and their chromosomal loci and correlating their nucleotide variants with susceptibility to breast cancer. In this study, authors analysed the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in homologous recombination repair genes and the incidence of breast cancer in the population of Polish women. Blood samples from 94 breast cancer patients were analysed as test group. Individuals were recruited into the study at the Department of Oncological Surgery and Breast Diseases of the Institute of the Polish Mother's Memorial Hospital in Lodz, Poland. Healthy controls (n = 500) were obtained from the Biobank Laboratory, Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz. Then, DNA of breast cancer patients was compared with one of the disease-free women. The test was supported by microarray analysis. Statistically significant correlations were identified between breast cancer and 3 not described previously SNPs of homologous recombination repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2: rs59004709, rs4986852 and rs1799950. Further studies on larger groups are warranted to support the hypothesis of correlation between the abovementioned genetic variants and breast cancer risk.

  8. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes, smoking, and bladder cancer risk: findings from the International Consortium of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Mariana C.; Lin, Jie; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Kelsey, Karl T.; Kiltie, Anne E.; Yuan, Jian-Min; Matullo, Giuseppe; Fletcher, Tony; Benhamou, Simone; Taylor, Jack A.; Placidi, Donatella; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Steineck, Gunnar; Rothman, Nathaniel; Kogevinas, Manolis; Silverman, Debra; Malats, Nuria; Chanock, Stephen; Wu, Xifeng; Karagas, Margaret R.; Andrew, Angeline S.; Nelson, Heather H.; Bishop, D. Timothy; Sak, Sei Chung; Choudhury, Ananya; Barrett, Jennifer H; Elliot, Faye; Corral, Román; Joshi, Amit D.; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Vineis, Paolo; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Guarrera, Simonetta; Polidoro, Silvia; Allione, Alessandra; Gurzau, Eugen; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Kumar, Rajiv; Rudnai, Peter; Porru, Stefano; Carta, Angela; Campagna, Marcello; Arici, Cecilia; Park, SungShim Lani; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2009-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is the most important and well-established bladder cancer risk factor, and a rich source of chemical carcinogens and reactive oxygen species that can induce damage to DNA in urothelial cells. Therefore, common variation in DNA repair genes might modify bladder cancer risk. In this study we present results from meta- and pooled analyses conducted as part of the International Consortium of Bladder Cancer. We included data on 10 single nucleotide polymorphisms corresponding to 7 DNA repair genes from 13 studies. Pooled- and meta-analyses included 5,282 cases and 5,954 controls of non-Latino white origin. We found evidence for weak but consistent associations with ERCC2 D312N (rs1799793) (per allele OR = 1.10; 95% CI = 1.01–1.19; p = 0.021), NBN E185Q (rs1805794) (per allele OR = 1.09; 95% CI = 1.01–1.18; p = 0.028), and XPC A499V (rs2228000) (per allele OR = 1.10; 95% CI = 1.00–1.21, p = 0.044). The association with NBN E185Q was limited to ever smokers (interaction p = 0.002), and was strongest for the highest levels of smoking dose and smoking duration. Overall, our study provides the strongest evidence to date for a role of common variants in DNA repair genes in bladder carcinogenesis. PMID:19706757

  9. Analysis of the base excision repair genes MTH1, OGG1 and MUTYH in patients with squamous oral carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Görgens, Heike; Müller, Annegret; Krüger, Stefan; Kuhlisch, Eberhard; König, Inke R; Ziegler, Andreas; Schackert, Hans K; Eckelt, Uwe

    2007-09-01

    A number of environmental factors, such as tobacco and alcohol, have been implicated, through oxidative DNA damage, in the development of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN). Several pathways are involved in the repair of DNA lesions caused by oxidative stress, such as the base excision repair system (BER), which repairs mutation involving 8-oxoguanine and comprises the MUTYH, OGG1 and MTH1 genes. We analysed 29 patients, assessing germline polymorphisms or mutations in these genes by complete genomic sequencing of exons and adjacent intronic regions. Thirty healthy blood donors served as controls. No pathogenic germline mutations were identified. We found common and rare new variants in the coding and adjacent intronic regions. In summary, our data do not support a major role for MUTYH, OGG1 and MTH1 variants in the etiology of sporadic squamous oral/oropharyngeal carcinomas. This does not exclude the involvement of the three BER genes in the tumorigenesis of SCCHN through other mechanisms such as promotor hypermethylation, genomic rearrangements or mutations involving regulatory sequences.

  10. Knockout targeting of the Drosophila nap1 gene and examination of DNA repair tracts in the recombination products.

    PubMed Central

    Lankenau, Susanne; Barnickel, Thorsten; Marhold, Joachim; Lyko, Frank; Mechler, Bernard M; Lankenau, Dirk-Henner

    2003-01-01

    We used ends-in gene targeting to generate knockout mutations of the nucleosome assembly protein 1 (Nap1) gene in Drosophila melanogaster. Three independent targeted null-knockout mutations were produced. No wild-type NAP1 protein could be detected in protein extracts. Homozygous Nap1(KO) knockout flies were either embryonic lethal or poorly viable adult escapers. Three additional targeted recombination products were viable. To gain insight into the underlying molecular processes we examined conversion tracts in the recombination products. In nearly all cases the I-SceI endonuclease site of the donor vector was replaced by the wild-type Nap1 sequence. This indicated exonuclease processing at the site of the double-strand break (DSB), followed by replicative repair at donor-target junctions. The targeting products are best interpreted either by the classical DSB repair model or by the break-induced recombination (BIR) model. Synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA), which is another important recombinational repair pathway in the germline, does not explain ends-in targeting products. We conclude that this example of gene targeting at the Nap1 locus provides added support for the efficiency of this method and its usefulness in targeting any arbitrary locus in the Drosophila genome. PMID:12618400

  11. Unique DNA repair gene variations and potential associations with the primary antibody deficiency syndromes IgAD and CVID.

    PubMed

    Offer, Steven M; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; Hammarström, Lennart; Harris, Reuben S

    2010-08-18

    Despite considerable effort, the genetic factors responsible for >90% of the antibody deficiency syndromes IgAD and CVID remain elusive. To produce a functionally diverse antibody repertoire B lymphocytes undergo class switch recombination. This process is initiated by AID-catalyzed deamination of cytidine to uridine in switch region DNA. Subsequently, these residues are recognized by the uracil excision enzyme UNG2 or the mismatch repair proteins MutSalpha (MSH2/MSH6) and MutLalpha (PMS2/MLH1). Further processing by ubiquitous DNA repair factors is thought to introduce DNA breaks, ultimately leading to class switch recombination and expression of a different antibody isotype. Defects in AID and UNG2 have been shown to result in the primary immunodeficiency hyper-IgM syndrome, leading us to hypothesize that additional, potentially more subtle, DNA repair gene variations may underlie the clinically related antibody deficiencies syndromes IgAD and CVID. In a survey of twenty-seven candidate DNA metabolism genes, markers in MSH2, RAD50, and RAD52 were associated with IgAD/CVID, prompting further investigation into these pathways. Resequencing identified four rare, non-synonymous alleles associated with IgAD/CVID, two in MLH1, one in RAD50, and one in NBS1. One IgAD patient carried heterozygous non-synonymous mutations in MLH1, MSH2, and NBS1. Functional studies revealed that one of the identified mutations, a premature RAD50 stop codon (Q372X), confers increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Our results are consistent with a class switch recombination model in which AID-catalyzed uridines are processed by multiple DNA repair pathways. Genetic defects in these DNA repair pathways may contribute to IgAD and CVID.

  12. DNA repair gene XRCC3 polymorphisms and bladder cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qiliu; Mo, Cuiju; Tang, Weizhong; Chen, Zhiping; Li, Ruolin; Zhai, Limin; Yang, Shi; Wu, Junrong; Sui, Jingzhe; Li, Shan; Qin, Xue

    2014-03-01

    The X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3) in homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathway plays a vital role in DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR). Variants in the XRCC3 gene might result in altered protein structure or function which may influence DSBR efficiency and lead to cancer. Numerous epidemiological studies have been conducted to evaluate the association between XRCC3 polymorphisms and bladder cancer risk. However, the results of these previous studies have been inconsistent. To derive a more precise estimation of the association, we performed a meta-analysis of all available studies relating XRCC3 polymorphisms and bladder cancer. All studies published up to April 2013 on the association between XRCC3 polymorphisms and bladder cancer risk were identified by searching electronic databases PubMed, EMBASE, and Chinese Biomedical Literature databases. The association between the XRCC3 polymorphisms and bladder cancer risk was assessed by odds ratios (ORs) together with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 16 case-control studies met the inclusion criteria and were selected. With respect to C18067T polymorphism, significant increased bladder cancer risk was found when all eligible studies were pooled into the meta-analysis (TT vs. CC: OR = 1.174, 95%CI = 1.033-1.335, P = 0.014 and recessive model TT vs. TC + CC: OR = 1.147, 95%CI = 1.020-1.290, P = 0.022, respectively). The results were still significant after excluding the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium violation studies (TT vs. CC: OR = 1.178, 95%CI = 1.036-1.339, P = 0.013 and recessive model TT vs. TC + CC: OR = 1.144, 95%CI = 1.017-1.287, P = 0.025, respectively). In subgroup analysis by ethnicity, significant elevated risk was found among Asians (dominant model TT + TC vs. CC: OR = 1.285, 95%CI = 1.012-1.631). In the subgroup analyses according to smoking status, no significant association was detected in all

  13. Transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modified neural stem cells improves the repair of injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min-Fei; Zhang, Shu-Quan; Gu, Rui; Liu, Jia-Bei; Li, Ye; Zhu, Qing-San

    2015-09-01

    The protective effects of erythropoietin on spinal cord injury have not been well described. Here, the eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3.1 human erythropoietin was transfected into rat neural stem cells cultured in vitro. A rat model of spinal cord injury was established using a free falling object. In the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, transfected neural stem cells were injected into the rat subarachnoid cavity, while the neural stem cells group was injected with non-transfected neural stem cells. Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/F12 medium was injected into the rats in the spinal cord injury group as a control. At 1-4 weeks post injury, the motor function in the rat lower limbs was best in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, followed by the neural stem cells group, and lastly the spinal cord injury group. At 72 hours, compared with the spinal cord injury group, the apoptotic index and Caspase-3 gene and protein expressions were apparently decreased, and the bcl-2 gene and protein expressions were noticeably increased, in the tissues surrounding the injured region in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. At 4 weeks, the cavities were clearly smaller and the motor and somatosensory evoked potential latencies were remarkably shorter in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than those in the spinal cord injury group. These differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. More CM-Dil-positive cells and horseradish peroxidase-positive nerve fibers and larger amplitude motor and somatosensory evoked potentials were found in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than in the spinal cord injury group. Again, these differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. These data indicate that transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modified neural stem cells into the

  14. Alcohol Consumption and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer for Mismatch Repair Gene Mutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    Dashti, S Ghazaleh; Buchanan, Daniel D; Jayasekara, Harindra; Ait Ouakrim, Driss; Clendenning, Mark; Rosty, Christophe; Winship, Ingrid M; Macrae, Finlay A; Giles, Graham G; Parry, Susan; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W; Gallinger, Steven; Le Marchand, Loïc; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A; Potter, John D; Baron, John A; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Win, Aung Ko

    2017-03-01

    Background: People with germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes have increased colorectal cancer risk. For these high-risk people, study findings of the relationship between alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer risk have been inconclusive.Methods: 1,925 MMR gene mutations carriers recruited into the Colon Cancer Family Registry who had completed a questionnaire on lifestyle factors were included. Weighted Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer.Results: Colorectal cancer was diagnosed in 769 carriers (40%) at a mean (SD) age of 42.6 (10.3) years. Compared with abstention, ethanol consumption from any alcoholic beverage up to 14 g/day and >28 g/day was associated with increased colorectal cancer risk (HR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.09-2.07 and 1.69; 95% CI, 1.07-2.65, respectively; Ptrend = 0.05), and colon cancer risk (HR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.27-2.49 and 1.94; 95% CI, 1.19-3.18, respectively; Ptrend = 0.02). However, there was no clear evidence for an association with rectal cancer risk. Also, there was no evidence for associations between consumption of individual alcoholic beverage types (beer, wine, spirits) and colorectal, colon, or rectal cancer risk.Conclusions: Our data suggest that alcohol consumption, particularly more than 28 g/day of ethanol (∼2 standard drinks of alcohol in the United States), is associated with increased colorectal cancer risk for MMR gene mutation carriers.Impact: Although these data suggested that alcohol consumption in MMR carriers was associated with increased colorectal cancer risk, there was no evidence of a dose-response, and not all types of alcohol consumption were associated with increased risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(3); 366-75. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Two DNA repair and recombination genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, RAD52 and RAD54, are induced during meiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, G.M.; Mortimer, R.K. ); Schild, D. )

    1989-07-01

    The DNA repair and recombination genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, RAD52 and RAD54, were transcriptionally induced approximately 10- to 15-fold in sporulating MATa/{alpha} cells. Congenic MATa/a cells, which did not sporulate, did not show similar increases. Assays of {beta}-galactosidase activity in strains harboring either a RAD52- or RAD54-lacZ gene fusion indicated that this induction occurred at a time concomitant with a commitment to meiotic recombination, as measured by prototroph formation from his1 heteroalleles.

  16. Enhanced DNA repair of bleomycin-induced 3'-phosphoglycolate termini at the transcription start sites of actively transcribed genes in human cells.

    PubMed

    Murray, Vincent; Chen, Jon K; Galea, Anne M

    2014-11-01

    The anti-tumour agent, bleomycin, cleaves DNA to give 3'-phosphoglycolate and 5'-phosphate termini. The removal of 3'-phosphoglycolate to give 3'-OH ends is a very important step in the DNA repair of these lesions. In this study, next-generation DNA sequencing was utilised to investigate the repair of these 3'-phosphoglycolate termini at the transcription start sites (TSSs) of genes in HeLa cells. The 143,600 identified human TSSs in HeLa cells comprised 82,596 non-transcribed genes and 61,004 transcribed genes; and the transcribed genes were divided into quintiles of 12,201 genes comprising the top 20%, 20-40%, 40-60%, 60-80%, 80-100% of expressed genes. Repair of bleomycin-induced 3'-phosphoglycolate termini was enhanced at actively transcribed genes. The top 20% and 20-40% quintiles had a very similar level of enhanced repair, the 40-60% quintile was intermediate, while the 60-80% and 80-100% quintiles were close to the low level of enhancement found in non-transcribed genes. There were also interesting differences regarding bleomycin repair on the sense and antisense strands of DNA at TSSs. The sense strand had highly enhanced repair between 0 and 250bp relative to the TSS, while for the antisense strand highly enhanced repair was between 150 and 450bp. Repair of DNA damage is a major mechanism of resistance to anti-tumour drugs and this study provides an insight into this process in human tumour cells.

  17. Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms of Genes Involved in Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage and the Risk of Recurrent Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Czarny, Piotr; Kwiatkowski, Dominik; Toma, Monika; Gałecki, Piotr; Orzechowska, Agata; Bobińska, Kinga; Bielecka-Kowalska, Anna; Szemraj, Janusz; Berk, Michael; Anderson, George; Śliwiński, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Background Depressive disorder, including recurrent type (rDD), is accompanied by increased oxidative stress and activation of inflammatory pathways, which may induce DNA damage. This thesis is supported by the presence of increased levels of DNA damage in depressed patients. Such DNA damage is repaired by the base excision repair (BER) pathway. BER efficiency may be influenced by polymorphisms in BER-related genes. Therefore, we genotyped nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in six genes encoding BER proteins. Material/Methods Using TaqMan, we selected and genotyped the following SNPs: c.-441G>A (rs174538) of FEN1, c.2285T>C (rs1136410) of PARP1, c.580C>T (rs1799782) and c.1196A>G (rs25487) of XRCC1, c.*83A>C (rs4796030) and c.*50C>T (rs1052536) of LIG3, c.-7C>T (rs20579) of LIG1, and c.-468T>G (rs1760944) and c.444T>G (rs1130409) of APEX1 in 599 samples (288 rDD patients and 311 controls). Results We found a strong correlation between rDD and both SNPs of LIG3, their haplotypes, as well as a weaker association with the c.-468T>G of APEXI which diminished after Nyholt correction. Polymorphisms of LIG3 were also associated with early onset versus late onset depression, whereas the c.-468T>G polymorphism showed the opposite association. Conclusions The SNPs of genes involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage may modulate rDD risk. Since this is an exploratory study, the results should to be treated with caution and further work needs to be done to elucidate the exact involvement of DNA damage and repair mechanisms in the development of this disease. PMID:27866211

  18. The Polycomb Group Protein EZH2 Impairs DNA Damage Repair Gene Expression in Human Uterine Fibroids1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiwei; Nair, Sangeeta; Laknaur, Archana; Ismail, Nahed; Diamond, Michael P.; Al-Hendy, Ayman

    2016-01-01

    Uterine fibroids are benign, smooth muscle tumors that occur in approximately 70%–80% of women by age 50 yr. The cellular and molecular mechanism(s) by which uterine fibroids (UFs) develop are not fully understood. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that several genetic abnormalities, including deletions, rearrangements, translocations, as well as mutations, have been found in UFs. These genetic anomalies suggest that low DNA damage repair capacity may be involved in UF formation. The objective of this study was to determine whether expression levels of DNA damage repair-related genes were altered, and how they were regulated in the pathogenesis of UFs. Expression levels of DNA repair-related genes RAD51 and BRCA1 were deregulated in fibroid tissues as compared to adjacent myometrial tissues. Expression levels of chromatin protein enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) were higher in a subset of fibroids as compared to adjacent myometrial tissues by both immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Treatment with an inhibitor of EZH2 markedly increased expression levels of RAD51 and BRCA1 in fibroid cells and inhibited cell proliferation paired with cell cycle arrest. Restoring the expression of RAD51 and BRCA1 by treatment with EZH2 inhibitor was dependent on reducing the enrichment of trimethylation of histone 3 lysine 27 epigenetic mark in their promoter regions. This study reveals the important role of EZH2-regulated DNA damage-repair genes via histone methylation in fibroid biology, and may provide novel therapeutic targets for the medical treatment of women with symptomatic UFs. PMID:26888970

  19. Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms of Genes Involved in Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage and the Risk of Recurrent Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Czarny, Piotr; Kwiatkowski, Dominik; Toma, Monika; Gałecki, Piotr; Orzechowska, Agata; Bobińska, Kinga; Bielecka-Kowalska, Anna; Szemraj, Janusz; Berk, Michael; Anderson, George; Śliwiński, Tomasz

    2016-11-20

    BACKGROUND Depressive disorder, including recurrent type (rDD), is accompanied by increased oxidative stress and activation of inflammatory pathways, which may induce DNA damage. This thesis is supported by the presence of increased levels of DNA damage in depressed patients. Such DNA damage is repaired by the base excision repair (BER) pathway. BER efficiency may be influenced by polymorphisms in BER-related genes. Therefore, we genotyped nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in six genes encoding BER proteins. MATERIAL AND METHODS Using TaqMan, we selected and genotyped the following SNPs: c.-441G>A (rs174538) of FEN1, c.2285T>C (rs1136410) of PARP1, c.580C>T (rs1799782) and c.1196A>G (rs25487) of XRCC1, c.*83A>C (rs4796030) and c.*50C>T (rs1052536) of LIG3, c.-7C>T (rs20579) of LIG1, and c.-468T>G (rs1760944) and c.444T>G (rs1130409) of APEX1 in 599 samples (288 rDD patients and 311 controls). RESULTS We found a strong correlation between rDD and both SNPs of LIG3, their haplotypes, as well as a weaker association with the c.-468T>G of APEXI which diminished after Nyholt correction. Polymorphisms of LIG3 were also associated with early onset versus late onset depression, whereas the c.-468T>G polymorphism showed the opposite association. CONCLUSIONS The SNPs of genes involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage may modulate rDD risk. Since this is an exploratory study, the results should to be treated with caution and further work needs to be done to elucidate the exact involvement of DNA damage and repair mechanisms in the development of this disease.

  20. The uvrA, uvrB and uvrC genes are required for repair of ultraviolet light induced DNA photoproducts in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, David J; Boubriak, Ivan; Berquist, Brian R; Clark, Monika; Richard, Emily; Sullivan, Lynn; DasSarma, Shiladitya; McCready, Shirley

    2006-01-01

    Background Sequenced archaeal genomes contain a variety of bacterial and eukaryotic DNA repair gene homologs, but relatively little is known about how these microorganisms actually perform DNA repair. At least some archaea, including the extreme halophile Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, are able to repair ultraviolet light (UV) induced DNA damage in the absence of light-dependent photoreactivation but this 'dark' repair capacity remains largely uncharacterized. Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 possesses homologs of the bacterial uvrA, uvrB, and uvrC nucleotide excision repair genes as well as several eukaryotic repair genes and it has been thought that multiple DNA repair pathways may account for the high UV resistance and dark repair capacity of this model halophilic archaeon. We have carried out a functional analysis, measuring repair capability in uvrA, uvrB and uvrC deletion mutants. Results Deletion mutants lacking functional uvrA, uvrB or uvrC genes, including a uvrA uvrC double mutant, are hypersensitive to UV and are unable to remove cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers or 6–4 photoproducts from their DNA after irradiation with 150 J/m2 of 254 nm UV-C. The UV sensitivity of the uvr mutants is greatly attenuated following incubation under visible light, emphasizing that photoreactivation is highly efficient in this organism. Phylogenetic analysis of the Halobacterium uvr genes indicates a complex ancestry. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that homologs of the bacterial nucleotide excision repair genes uvrA, uvrB, and uvrC are required for the removal of UV damage in the absence of photoreactivating light in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1. Deletion of these genes renders cells hypersensitive to UV and abolishes their ability to remove cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 6–4 photoproducts in the absence of photoreactivating light. In spite of this inability to repair UV damaged DNA, uvrA, uvrB and uvrC deletion mutants are substantially less UV sensitive than excision repair mutants of

  1. [Association between nucleotide excision repair gene polymorphisms and chromosomal damage in coke-oven workers].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Juan; Leng, Shu-Guang; Dai, Yu-Fei; Pan, Zu-Fei; Niu, Yong; Li, Bin; Zheng, Yu-Xin

    2006-11-01

    To investigate the association of polymorphisms of nucleotide excision repair genes and chromosomal damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes among coke-oven workers. The genotypes of ERCC1 C19007T, ERCC2 C22541A, ERCC2 G23591A, ERCC2 A35931C, ERCC4 T30028C, ERCC5 G3507C and ERCC6 A3368G among 140 coke-oven workers and 66 non-coke-oven controls were determined by PCR-PFLP methods. Chromosomal damage was detected by cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay. Multivariate analysis of covariance revealed that in coke-oven workers, the ERCC1 19007 CC genotype exhibited significantly higher CBMN frequency [(1.05 +/- 0.68)%] than did the CT [(0.81 +/- 0.66)%] (P = 0.01) or TT [(0.66 +/- 0.37)%] (P = 0.05) or CT + TT genotypes [(0.75 +/- 0.63)%] (P = 0.004). For the ERCC6 A3368G polymorphism, AA genotype exhibited significantly higher CBMN frequency [(1.00 +/- 0.69)%] than did the AG [(0.67 +/- 0.42)%] (P = 0.05) or AG + GG genotypes [(0.66 +/- 0.41)%] (P = 0.02). Stratification analysis found the significant association between the two polymorphisms, ERCC1 C19007T and ERCC6 A3368G, and the CBMN frequencies were most pronounced in older workers. In addition, for the polymorphism of ERCC2 G23591A, GA carriers had significantly higher CBMN frequencies [(1.40 +/- 0.63)%] than those GG carriers [(0.98 +/- 0.59)%] (P = 0.01) in older workers. Our results suggested that polymorphisms of ERCC1 C19007T, ERCC6 A3368G and ERCC2 G23591A were associated with the CBMN frequencies in coke-oven workers.

  2. Ovarian steroids regulate gene expression related to DNA repair and neurodegenerative diseases in serotonin neurons of macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bethea, Cynthia L.; Reddy, Arubala P.

    2015-01-01

    Depression often accompanies the peri-menopausal transition and it often precedes overt symptomology in common neurodegenerative diseases (NDD; Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington, ALS). Serotonin dysfunction is frequently found in the different etiologies of depression. We have shown that ovariectomized (Ovx) monkeys treated with estradiol (E) for 28 days supplement with placebo or progesterone (P) on days 14-28 had reduced DNA fragmentation in serotonin neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus; and long-term Ovx monkeys had fewer serotonin neurons than intact controls. We questioned the effect of E alone or E+P on gene expression related to DNA repair, protein folding (chaperones), the ubiquitin proteosome, axon transport, and NDD specific genes in serotonin neurons. Ovx macaques were treated with placebo, E or E+P (n=3/group) for 1 month. Serotonin neurons were laser captured and subjected to microarray analysis and qRT-PCR. Increases were confirmed with qRT-PCR in 5 genes that code for proteins involved in repair of strand breaks and nucleotide excision. NBN1, PCNA, GADD45A, RAD23A and GTF2H5 significantly increased with E or E+P treatment (all ANOVA p< 0.01). Chaperone genes HSP70, HSP60 and HSP27 significantly increased with E or E+P treatment (all ANOVA p<0.05). HSP90 showed a similar trend. Ubiquinase coding genes UBEA5, UBE2D3 and UBE3A (Parkin) increased with E or E+P (all ANOVA p<0.003). Transport related genes coding kinesin, dynein, and dynactin increased with E or E+P (all ANOVA p<0.03). SCNA (α synuclein) and ADAM10 (α secretase) increased (both ANOVA p<0.02), but PSEN1 (presenilin1) decreased (ANOVA p<0.02) with treatment. APP decreased 10-fold with E or E+P administration. Newman-Keuls posthoc comparisons indicated variation in the response to E alone versus E+P across the different genes. In summary, E or E+P increased gene expression for DNA repair mechanisms in serotonin neurons, thereby rendering them less vulnerable to stress-induced DNA

  3. Association of DNA Damage Repair Gene Polymorphisms hOGG1, XRCC1and p53 with Sickle Cell Disease Patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Nishank, Sudhansu Sekhar

    2015-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress constitutes one of the significant cause of vaso-occlusive clinical episodes in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. It brings about the generation of reactive oxygen species and consequent damage to DNA. DNA damage repair genes such as hOGG1, XRCC1 and p53 play an important role in the repair of DNA damage during oxidative stress. However, it is not known as to the role of these genes in oxidative stress mediated vaso-occlusive clinical complications of SCD patients. Objective To see the possible association of DNA repair gene polymorphisms with clinical manifestation of SCD patients. Methods: Genotyping of DNA damage repair genes by PCR-RFLP, measurement of oxidant and anti-oxidant status, along with a clinical evaluation of 250 SCD patients and their comparison with normal individuals. Result The level of oxidants were high, and that of antioxidants were low in SCD patients compared to normal individuals. The prevalence of mutant alleles of hOGG1 gene, XRCC1 gene (codon 280 Arg>His) were found to be significantly higher among SCD patients as compared to controls. However, SCD patients did not show clinical association with any of these DNA repair gene polymorphisms. Conclusion This indicates that hOGG1, p53and XRCC1 gene polymorphisms have no clinical association with SCD patients in India. PMID:26185611

  4. Chromosomal aberrations in tire plant workers and interaction with polymorphisms of biotransformation and DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Musak, Ludovit; Soucek, Pavel; Vodickova, Ludmila; Naccarati, Alessio; Halasova, Erika; Polakova, Veronika; Slyskova, Jana; Susova, Simona; Buchancova, Janka; Smerhovsky, Zdenek; Sedikova, Jana; Klimentova, Gabriela; Osina, Oto; Hemminki, Kari; Vodicka, Pavel

    2008-05-10

    We evaluated chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of 177 workers exposed to xenobiotics in a tire plant and in 172 controls, in relation to their genetic background. Nine polymorphisms in genes encoding biotransformation enzymes and nine polymorphisms in genes involved in main DNA repair pathways were investigated for possible modulation of chromosomal damage. Chromosomal aberration frequencies were the highest among exposed smokers and the lowest in non-smoking unexposed individuals (2.5+/-1.8% vs. 1.7+/-1.2%, respectively). The differences between groups (ANOVA) were borderline significant (F=2.6, P=0.055). Chromosomal aberrations were higher in subjects with GSTT1-null (2.4+/-1.7%) than in those with GSTT1-plus genotype (1.8+/-1.4%; F=7.2, P=0.008). Considering individual groups, this association was significant in smoking exposed workers (F=4.4, P=0.040). Individuals with low activity EPHX1 genotype exhibited significantly higher chromosomal aberrations (2.3+/-1.6%) in comparison with those bearing medium (1.7+/-1.2%) and high activity genotype (1.5+/-1.2%; F=4.7, P=0.010). Both chromatid- and chromosome-type aberration frequencies were mainly affected by exposure and smoking status. Binary logistic regression analysis revealed that frequencies of chromatid-type aberrations were modulated by NBS1 Glu185Gln (OR 4.26, 95%CI 1.38-13.14, P=0.012), and to a moderate extent, by XPD Lys751Gln (OR 0.16, 95%CI 0.02-1.25, P=0.081) polymorphisms. Chromosome-type aberrations were lowest in individuals bearing the EPHX1 genotype conferring the high activity (OR 0.38, 95%CI 0.15-0.98, P=0.045). Present results show that exposed individuals in the tire production, who smoke, exhibit higher chromosomal aberrations frequencies, and the extent of chromosomal damage may additionally be modified by relevant polymorphisms.

  5. High prevalence of mismatch repair deficiency in prostate cancers diagnosed in mismatch repair gene mutation carriers from the colon cancer family registry

    PubMed Central

    Rosty, Christophe; Walsh, Michael D.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Mundt, Erin; Gallinger, Steven; Aronson, Melyssa; Pollett, Aaron; Baron, John A.; Pearson, Sally; Clendenning, Mark; Walters, Rhiannon J.; Nagler, Belinda N.; Crawford, William J.; Young, Joanne P.; Winship, Ingrid; Win, Aung Ko; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The question of whether prostate cancer is part of the Lynch syndrome spectrum of tumors is unresolved. We investigated the mismatch repair (MMR) status and pathologic features of prostate cancers diagnosed in MMR gene mutation carriers. Prostate cancers (mean age at diagnosis = 62 ± SD = 8 years) from 32 MMR mutation carriers (23 MSH2, 5 MLH1 and 4 MSH6) enrolled in the Australasian, Mayo Clinic and Ontario sites of the Colon Cancer Family Registry were examined for clinico-pathologic features and MMR-deficiency (immunohistochemical loss of MMR protein expression and high levels of microsatellite instability; MSI-H). Tumor MMR-deficiency was observed for 22 cases [69 %; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 50–83 %], with the highest prevalence of MMR-deficiency in tumors from MSH2 mutation carriers (19/23, 83 %) compared with MLH1 and MSH6 carriers combined (3/9, 33 %; p = 0.01). MMR-deficient tumors had increased levels of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes compared with tumors without MMR-deficiency (p = 0.04). Under the assumption that tumour MMR-deficiency occurred only because the cancer was caused by the germline mutation, mutation carriers are at 3.2-fold (95 % CI 2.0–6.3) increased risk of prostate cancer, and when assessed by gene, the relative risk was greatest for MSH2 carriers (5.8, 95 % CI 2.6–20.9). Prostate cancer was the first or only diagnosed tumor in 37 % of carriers. MMR gene mutation carriers have at least a twofold or greater increased risk of developing MMR-deficient prostate cancer where the risk is highest for MSH2 mutation carriers. MMR IHC screening of prostate cancers will aid in identifying MMR gene mutation carriers. PMID:25117503

  6. Altered expression and new mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1 and MSH2 in melanoma brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Korabiowska, Monika; König, Fatima; Verheggen, Raphaela; Schlott, Thilo; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Romeike, Bernd; Brinck, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    Brain metastases, including those of malignant melanoma (known for its high genomic instability), are the most common intracranial tumors. The main objective of this study was to investigate expression and mutation in the DNA mismatch repair system in melanoma brain metastases. Expression of MLH1, MSH2, PMS1 and PMS2 was investigated immunohistochemically in 31 melanoma metastatic tumors. Mutational analysis of MLH1 and MSH2 was performed in 17 melanoma brain metastases. Loss of MLH1 and MSH2 expression was found in 10/31 and 12/31 tumors. PMS1 (27/31) and PMS2 (28/31) expression was preserved in the majority of lesions. Potential missense mutation was found in MSH2 (exon 13) in 2/17 melanomas. Mutation in the intron sequence between exon 14 and 15 of MLH1 (exon 15) was observed in 4/17 cases. Our results indicate that the two major DNA mismatch repair genes, MLH1 and MSH2, are more frequently affected by alterations in the DNA mismatch repair system than the helper genes PMS1 and PMS2. The presence of mutations of MSH2 and MLH1 in melanoma brain metastases, which has not been found in primary melanomas, indicates the high genomic instability of melanoma brain metastases.

  7. Yeast DNA-repair gene RAD14 encodes a zinc metalloprotein with affinity for ultraviolet-damaged DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Guzder, S.N.; Sung, P.; Prakash, S. ); Prakash, L. )

    1993-06-15

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients suffer from a high incidence of skin cancers due to a defect in excision repair of UV light-damaged DNA. Of the seven XP complementation groups, A--G, group A represents a severe and frequent form of the disease. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD14 gene is a homolog of the XP-A correcting (XPAC) gene. Like XP-A cells, rad14-null mutants are defective in the incision step of excision repair of UV-damaged DNA. The authors have purified RAD14 protein to homogeneity from extract of a yeast strain genetically tailored to overexpress RAD14. As determined by atomic emission spectroscopy, RAD14 contains one zinc atom. They also show in vitro that RAD14 binds zinc but does not bind other divalent metal ions. In DNA mobility-shift assays, RAD14 binds specifically to UV-damaged DNA. Removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers from damaged DNA by enzymatic photoreactivation has no effect on binding, strongly suggesting that RAD14 recognizes pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproduct sites. These findings indicate that RAD14 functions in damage recognition during excision repair. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Relationship between polymorphisms of nucleotide excision repair genes and oral cancer risk in Taiwan: evidence for modification of smoking habit.

    PubMed

    Bau, Da-Tian; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Huang, Chih-Yang; Lee, Cheng-Chun; Tseng, Hsien-Chang; Lo, Yen-Li; Tsai, Yuhsin; Tsai, Fuu-Jen

    2007-12-31

    Inherited polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may be associated with differences in the repair capacity and contribute to individual's susceptibility to smoking-related cancers. Both XPA and XPD encode proteins that are part of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. In a hospital-based case-control study, we have investigated the influence of XPA A-23G and XPD Lys751Gln polymorphisms on oral cancer risk in a Taiwanese population. In total, 154 patients with oral cancer, and 105 age-matched controls recruited from the Chinese Medical Hospital in Central Taiwan were genotyped. No significant association was found between the heterozygous variant allele (AG), the homozygous variant allele (AA) at XPA A-23G, the heterozygous variant allele (AC), the homozygous variant allele (CC) at XPD Lys751Gln, and oral cancer risk. There was no significant joint effect of XPA A-23G and XPD Lys751Gln on oral cancer risk either. Since XPA and XPD are both NER genes, which are very important in removing tobacco-induced DNA adducts, further stratified analyses of both genotype and smoking habit were performed. We found a synergistic effect of variant genotypes of both XPA and XPD, and smoking status on oral cancer risk. Our results suggest that the genetic polymorphisms are modified by environmental carcinogen exposure status, and combined analyses of both genotype and personal habit record are a better access to know the development of oral cancer and useful for primary prevention and early intervention.

  9. Homology Requirements and Competition between Gene Conversion and Break-Induced Replication during Double-Strand Break Repair.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Anuja; Beach, Annette; Haber, James E

    2017-02-02

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating-type switching is initiated by a double-strand break (DSB) at MATa, leaving one cut end perfectly homologous to the HMLα donor, while the second end must be processed to remove a non-homologous tail before completing repair by gene conversion (GC). When homology at the matched end is ≤150 bp, efficient repair depends on the recombination enhancer, which tethers HMLα near the DSB. Thus, homology shorter than an apparent minimum efficient processing segment can be rescued by tethering the donor near the break. When homology at the second end is ≤150 bp, second-end capture becomes inefficient and repair shifts from GC to break-induced replication (BIR). But when pol32 or pif1 mutants block BIR, GC increases 3-fold, indicating that the steps blocked by these mutations are reversible. With short second-end homology, absence of the RecQ helicase Sgs1 promotes gene conversion, whereas deletion of the FANCM-related Mph1 helicase promotes BIR.

  10. 32 CFR 644.391 - Predisposal conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the predisposal conference should provide for: (1) Determinations on maintenance guidelines based on... advisability of transferring custody and maintenance responsibilities to GSA at an early date. (4) Planning for... operations are phased out. This will do much to lessen the impact of the installation's closing on the...

  11. 32 CFR 644.391 - Predisposal conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the predisposal conference should provide for: (1) Determinations on maintenance guidelines based on... advisability of transferring custody and maintenance responsibilities to GSA at an early date. (4) Planning for... operations are phased out. This will do much to lessen the impact of the installation's closing on the...

  12. 32 CFR 644.391 - Predisposal conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the predisposal conference should provide for: (1) Determinations on maintenance guidelines based on... advisability of transferring custody and maintenance responsibilities to GSA at an early date. (4) Planning for... operations are phased out. This will do much to lessen the impact of the installation's closing on the...

  13. 32 CFR 644.391 - Predisposal conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the predisposal conference should provide for: (1) Determinations on maintenance guidelines based on... advisability of transferring custody and maintenance responsibilities to GSA at an early date. (4) Planning for... operations are phased out. This will do much to lessen the impact of the installation's closing on the...

  14. 32 CFR 644.391 - Predisposal conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the predisposal conference should provide for: (1) Determinations on maintenance guidelines based on... advisability of transferring custody and maintenance responsibilities to GSA at an early date. (4) Planning for... operations are phased out. This will do much to lessen the impact of the installation's closing on the...

  15. Gene Expression Profiling in the Injured Spinal Cord of Trachemys scripta elegans: An Amniote with Self-Repair Capabilities.

    PubMed

    Valentin-Kahan, Adrián; García-Tejedor, Gabriela B; Robello, Carlos; Trujillo-Cenóz, Omar; Russo, Raúl E; Alvarez-Valin, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Slider turtles are the only known amniotes with self-repair mechanisms of the spinal cord that lead to substantial functional recovery. Their strategic phylogenetic position makes them a relevant model to investigate the peculiar genetic programs that allow anatomical reconnection in some vertebrate groups but are absent in others. Here, we analyze the gene expression profile of the response to spinal cord injury (SCI) in the turtle Trachemys scripta elegans. We found that this response comprises more than 1000 genes affecting diverse functions: reaction to ischemic insult, extracellular matrix re-organization, cell proliferation and death, immune response, and inflammation. Genes related to synapses and cholesterol biosynthesis are down-regulated. The analysis of the evolutionary distribution of these genes shows that almost all are present in most vertebrates. Additionally, we failed to find genes that were exclusive of regenerating taxa. The comparison of expression patterns among species shows that the response to SCI in the turtle is more similar to that of mice and non-regenerative Xenopus than to Xenopus during its regenerative stage. This observation, along with the lack of conserved "regeneration genes" and the current accepted phylogenetic placement of turtles (sister group of crocodilians and birds), indicates that the ability of spinal cord self-repair of turtles does not represent the retention of an ancestral vertebrate character. Instead, our results suggest that turtles developed this capability from a non-regenerative ancestor (i.e., a lineage specific innovation) that was achieved by re-organizing gene expression patterns on an essentially non-regenerative genetic background. Among the genes activated by SCI exclusively in turtles, those related to anoxia tolerance, extracellular matrix remodeling, and axonal regrowth are good candidates to underlie functional recovery.

  16. Induction of direct repeat recombination by psoralen-DNA adducts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: defects in DNA repair increase gene copy number variation.

    PubMed

    Saffran, Wilma A; Ahmed, Anam; Binyaminov, Olga; Gonzalez, Cynthia; Gupta, Amita; Fajardo, Manuel A; Kishun, Devindra; Nandram, Ashana; Reyes, Kenneth; Scalercio, Karina; Senior, Charles W

    2014-09-01

    Psoralen photoreaction produces covalent monoadducts and interstrand crosslinks in DNA. The interstrand DNA crosslinks are complex double strand lesions that require the involvement of multiple pathways for repair. Homologous recombination, which can carry out error-free repair, is a major pathway for crosslink repair; however, some recombination pathways can also produce DNA rearrangements. Psoralen photoreaction-induced recombination in yeast was measured using direct repeat substrates that can detect gene conversions, a form of conservative recombination, as well as deletions and triplications, which generate gene copy number changes. In repair-proficient cells the major products of recombination were gene conversions, along with substantial fractions of deletions. Deficiencies in DNA repair pathways increased non-conservative recombination products. Homologous recombination-deficient rad51, rad54, and rad57 strains had low levels of crosslink-induced recombination, and most products were deletions produced by single strand annealing. Nucleotide excision repair-deficient rad1 and rad2 yeast had increased levels of triplications, and rad1 cells had lower crosslink-induced recombination. Deficiencies in post-replication repair increased crosslink-induced recombination and gene copy number changes. Loss of REV3 function, in the error-prone branch, and of RAD5 and UBC13, in the error-free branch, produced moderate increases in deletions and triplications; rad18 cells, deficient in both post-replication repair sub-pathways, exhibited hyperrecombination, with primarily non-conservative products. Proper functioning of all the DNA repair pathways tested was required to maintain genomic stability and avoid gene copy number variation in response to interstrand crosslinks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. 17alpha-Ethinylestradiol decreases expression of multiple hepatic nucleotide excision repair genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Notch, Emily G; Miniutti, Danielle M; Mayer, Gregory D

    2007-10-15

    Waterborne 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE(2)) alters hormone-mediated biological indicators in fish. These alterations include increased plasma vitellogenin, increased intersex individuals, decreased egg and sperm production, reduced gamete quality, and complete feminization of male fish. Together, these observations implicate aquatic estrogens in a broad range of detrimental effects on fish reproduction and fitness. In addition to impairing reproductive processes, EE(2) is also a strong promoter of hepatic tumor formation. Since many ubiquitous, aquatic hepatocarcinogens form DNA adducts that are preferentially repaired by nucleotide excision repair (NER) processes, we hypothesized that EE(2) may exert co-carcinogenic effects by reducing an organisms ability to repair DNA adducts via this mechanism. The present study used fluorescence-based quantitative RT-PCR to examine effects of environmentally relevant concentrations of the semisynthetic estrogen, EE(2), on hepatic nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene expression. Adult male and female zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to 1ng/L, 10ng/L or 100ng/L concentrations of EE(2), or to a solvent control (0.05%, v/v ethanol), for 7 days with static water renewal every 24h. Effectiveness of EE(2) exposure in the liver was confirmed by examining hepatic expression of two estrogen-responsive biomarkers, vitellogenin-1 and cytochrome P450-1A1 (CYP1A1). Quantitative analysis confirmed that exposure to 100ng/L EE(2) caused significant decreases in transcript abundance of several hepatic NER genes in male zebrafish, including XPC (>17-fold), XPA (>7-fold), XPD (>8-fold), and XPF (>8-fold). Adult female zebrafish exhibited a four-fold decreased in XPC mRNA abundance at all exposure concentrations. Decreased mRNA abundance of NER genes was also seen to a lesser degree at lower concentrations of EE(2). Adult male zebrafish showed greater reduction of hepatic NER transcript levels than their female counterparts, which is

  18. Humans and chimpanzees differ in their cellular response to DNA damage and non-coding sequence elements of DNA repair-associated genes.

    PubMed

    Weis, E; Galetzka, D; Herlyn, H; Schneider, E; Haaf, T

    2008-01-01

    Compared to humans, chimpanzees appear to be less susceptible to many types of cancer. Because DNA repair defects lead to accumulation of gene and chromosomal mutations, species differences in DNA repair are one plausible explanation. Here we analyzed the repair kinetics of human and chimpanzee cells after cisplatin treatment and irradiation. Dot blots for the quantification of single-stranded (ss) DNA repair intermediates revealed a biphasic response of human and chimpanzee lymphoblasts to cisplatin-induced damage. The early phase of DNA repair was identical in both species with a peak of ssDNA intermediates at 1 h after DNA damage induction. However, the late phase differed between species. Human cells showed a second peak of ssDNA intermediates at 6 h, chimpanzee cells at 5 h. One of four analyzed DNA repair-associated genes, UBE2A, was differentially expressed in human and chimpanzee cells at 5 h after cisplatin treatment. Immunofluorescent staining of gammaH2AX foci demonstrated equally high numbers of DNA strand breaks in human and chimpanzee cells at 30 min after irradiation and equally low numbers at 2 h. However, at 1 h chimpanzee cells had significantly less DNA breaks than human cells. Comparative sequence analyses of approximately 100 DNA repair-associated genes in human and chimpanzee revealed 13% and 32% genes, respectively, with evidence for an accelerated evolution in promoter regions and introns. This is strikingly contrasting to the 3% of DNA repair-associated genes with positive selection in the coding sequence. Compared to the rhesus macaque as an outgroup, chimpanzees have a higher accelerated evolution in non-coding sequences than humans. The TRF1-interacting, ankyrin-related ADP-ribose polymerase (TNKS) gene showed an accelerated intraspecific evolution among humans. Our results are consistent with the view that chimpanzee cells repair different types of DNA damage faster than human cells, whereas the overall repair capacity is similar in

  19. Association between common genetic variation in Cockayne syndrome A and B genes and nucleotide excision repair capacity among smokers.

    PubMed

    Leng, Shuguang; Bernauer, Amanda; Stidley, Christine A; Picchi, Maria A; Sheng, Xin; Frasco, Melissa A; Van Den Berg, David; Gilliland, Frank D; Crowell, Richard E; Belinsky, Steven A

    2008-08-01

    Mutagen sensitivity in in vitro cultured lymphocytes challenged by benzo[a]pyrene diolepoxide (BPDE) has been validated as an intrinsic susceptibility factor for several cancers. Bulky BPDE-DNA adducts are repaired via either transcription-coupled repair or global genome nucleotide excision repair depending on the location of lesions. Cockayne syndrome A (CSA) and B (CSB) play essential roles in integrating the recognition of damage, chromatin remodeling, and the core nucleotide excision repair proteins. This study evaluated the hypothesis that common genetic variation in CSA and CSB is associated with mutagen sensitivity induced by BPDE in 276 cancer-free smokers. Tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP; n = 37) selected across the entire coding and putative regulatory regions of CSA and CSB based on a high-density SNP database were genotyped by the Illumina Golden Gate assay. Major principal components of CSA and CSB that captured the linkage disequilibrium from multiple SNPs were globally associated with the number of breaks per cell at the threshold of 80% (P < or = 0.02 for both genes). Haplotype H125 in CSA and H97 in CSB as well as SNPs in high linkage disequilibrium with these two haplotypes were significantly associated with a 13% to 15% reduction in the mean number of chromatid breaks per cell (P < 0.05). A resampling-based omnibus test supported the significant association between SNPs and haplotypes in CSA and mutagen sensitivity induced by BPDE (P = 0.035). This study implicates transcription-coupled repair in protecting the cell from BPDE-induced DNA damage.

  20. Evaluation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and dna-repair genes as potential biomarkers for ethanol-induced cns alterations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) lead to alterations in central nervous system (CNS) architecture along with impaired learning and memory. Previous work from our group and that of others suggests that one mechanism underlying these changes is alteration of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and DNA-repair in neural stem cells (NSCs) produced as a consequence of ethanol-induced effects on the expression of genes related to p53-signaling. This study tests the hypothesis that changes in the expression of p53-signaling genes represent biomarkers of ethanol abuse which can be identified in the peripheral blood of rat drinking models and human AUD subjects and posits that specific changes may be correlated with differences in neuropsychological measures and CNS structure. Results Remarkably, microarray analysis of 350 genes related to p53-signaling in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) of binge-drinking rats revealed 190 genes that were significantly altered after correcting for multiple testing. Moreover, 40 of these genes overlapped with those that we had previously observed to be changed in ethanol-exposed mouse NSCs. Expression changes in nine of these genes were tested for independent confirmation by a custom QuantiGene Plex (QGP) assay for a subset of p53-signaling genes, where a consistent trend for decreased expression of mitosis-related genes was observed. One mitosis-related gene (Pttg1) was also changed in human lymphoblasts cultured with ethanol. In PBLs of human AUD subjects seven p53-signaling genes were changed compared with non-drinking controls. Correlation and principal components analysis were then used to identify significant relationships between the expression of these seven genes and a set of medical, demographic, neuropsychological and neuroimaging measures that distinguished AUD and control subjects. Two genes (Ercc1 and Mcm5) showed a highly significant correlation with AUD-induced decreases in the volume of the left parietal supramarginal

  1. Evaluation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and DNA-repair genes as potential biomarkers for ethanol-induced CNS alterations.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Steven D; Lewis, Lambert; Ritchie, Julie; Burke, Patrick; Abdul-Malak, Ynesse; Adackapara, Nyssa; Canfield, Kelly; Shwarts, Erik; Gentile, Karen; Meszaros, Zsuzsa Szombathyne; Middleton, Frank A

    2012-10-25

    Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) lead to alterations in central nervous system (CNS) architecture along with impaired learning and memory. Previous work from our group and that of others suggests that one mechanism underlying these changes is alteration of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and DNA-repair in neural stem cells (NSCs) produced as a consequence of ethanol-induced effects on the expression of genes related to p53-signaling. This study tests the hypothesis that changes in the expression of p53-signaling genes represent biomarkers of ethanol abuse which can be identified in the peripheral blood of rat drinking models and human AUD subjects and posits that specific changes may be correlated with differences in neuropsychological measures and CNS structure. Remarkably, microarray analysis of 350 genes related to p53-signaling in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) of binge-drinking rats revealed 190 genes that were significantly altered after correcting for multiple testing. Moreover, 40 of these genes overlapped with those that we had previously observed to be changed in ethanol-exposed mouse NSCs. Expression changes in nine of these genes were tested for independent confirmation by a custom QuantiGene Plex (QGP) assay for a subset of p53-signaling genes, where a consistent trend for decreased expression of mitosis-related genes was observed. One mitosis-related gene (Pttg1) was also changed in human lymphoblasts cultured with ethanol. In PBLs of human AUD subjects seven p53-signaling genes were changed compared with non-drinking controls. Correlation and principal components analysis were then used to identify significant relationships between the expression of these seven genes and a set of medical, demographic, neuropsychological and neuroimaging measures that distinguished AUD and control subjects. Two genes (Ercc1 and Mcm5) showed a highly significant correlation with AUD-induced decreases in the volume of the left parietal supramarginal gyrus and

  2. Molecular cloning of the human gene SUVCC1 associated with the repair of nondimer DNA damage induced by solar UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, B S; Vaslet, C A; Rosenstein, R B

    1995-02-01

    A mutant cell line, DRP 287, sensitive to solar UV radiation and deficient in the repair of solar UV-induced nondimer DNA damage, was derived from ICR 2A frog cells. These cells were transfected with human DNA and a secondary transformant obtained in which normal solar UV sensitivity was restored and the repair defect corrected. The DNA from this secondary transformant was used to construct a genomic DNA library from which a recombinant phage was isolated containing the human gene capable of restoring normal solar UV sensitivity and correcting the repair defect in the DRP 287 cells. This represents the first human gene which has been isolated that is specifically involved in the repair of nondimer DNA damage induced by solar UV radiation. It has been designated SUVCC1 to denote solar UV cross-complementing gene number 1.

  3. Deficiency in Nucleotide Excision Repair Family Gene Activity, Especially ERCC3, Is Associated with Non-Pigmented Hair Fiber Growth

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mei; Bell, Robert H.; Ho, Maggie M.; Leung, Gigi; Haegert, Anne; Carr, Nicholas; Shapiro, Jerry; McElwee, Kevin J.

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a microarray study to discover gene expression patterns associated with a lack of melanogenesis in non-pigmented hair follicles (HF) by microarray. Pigmented and non-pigmented HFs were collected and micro-dissected into the hair bulb (HB) and the upper hair sheaths (HS) including the bulge region. In comparison to pigmented HS and HBs, nucleotide excision repair (NER) family genes ERCC1, ERCC2, ERCC3, ERCC4, ERCC5, ERCC6, XPA, NTPBP, HCNP, DDB2 and POLH exhibited statistically significantly lower expression in non- pigmented HS and HBs. Quantitative PCR verified microarray data and identified ERCC3 as highly differentially expressed. Immunohistochemistry confirmed ERCC3 expression in HF melanocytes. A reduction in ERCC3 by siRNA interference in human melanocytes in vitro reduced their tyrosinase production ability. Our results suggest that loss of NER gene function is associated with a loss of melanin production capacity. This may be due to reduced gene transcription and/or reduced DNA repair in melanocytes which may eventually lead to cell death. These results provide novel information with regard to melanogenesis and its regulation. PMID:22615732

  4. Improved fermentation performance of a lager yeast after repair of its AGT1 maltose and maltotriose transporter genes.

    PubMed

    Vidgren, Virve; Huuskonen, Anne; Virtanen, Hannele; Ruohonen, Laura; Londesborough, John

    2009-04-01

    The use of more concentrated, so-called high-gravity and very-high-gravity (VHG) brewer's worts for the manufacture of beer has economic and environmental advantages. However, many current strains of brewer's yeasts ferment VHG worts slowly and incompletely, leaving undesirably large amounts of maltose and especially maltotriose in the final beers. alpha-Glucosides are transported into Saccharomyces yeasts by several transporters, including Agt1, which is a good carrier of both maltose and maltotriose. The AGT1 genes of brewer's ale yeast strains encode functional transporters, but the AGT1 genes of the lager strains studied contain a premature stop codon and do not encode functional transporters. In the present work, one or more copies of the AGT1 gene of a lager strain were repaired with DNA sequence from an ale strain and put under the control of a constitutive promoter. Compared to the untransformed strain, the transformants with repaired AGT1 had higher maltose transport activity, especially after growth on glucose (which represses endogenous alpha-glucoside transporter genes) and higher ratios of maltotriose transport activity to maltose transport activity. They fermented VHG (24 degrees Plato) wort faster and more completely, producing beers containing more ethanol and less residual maltose and maltotriose. The growth and sedimentation behaviors of the transformants were similar to those of the untransformed strain, as were the profiles of yeast-derived volatile aroma compounds in the beers.

  5. Redox regulation of genome stability by effects on gene expression, epigenetic pathways and DNA damage/repair

    PubMed Central

    Mikhed, Yuliya; Görlach, Agnes; Knaus, Ulla G.; Daiber, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (e.g. H2O2, nitric oxide) confer redox regulation of essential cellular signaling pathways such as cell differentiation, proliferation, migration and apoptosis. In addition, classical regulation of gene expression or activity, including gene transcription to RNA followed by translation to the protein level, by transcription factors (e.g. NF-κB, HIF-1α) and mRNA binding proteins (e.g. GAPDH, HuR) is subject to redox regulation. This review will give an update of recent discoveries in this field, and specifically highlight the impact of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species on DNA repair systems that contribute to genomic stability. Emphasis will be placed on the emerging role of redox mechanisms regulating epigenetic pathways (e.g. miRNA, DNA methylation and histone modifications). By providing clinical correlations we discuss how oxidative stress can impact on gene regulation/activity and vise versa, how epigenetic processes, other gene regulatory mechanisms and DNA repair can influence the cellular redox state and contribute or prevent development or progression of disease. PMID:26079210

  6. Restoration of Chinese hamster cell radiation resistance by the human repair gene ERCC-5 and progress in molecular cloning of this gene

    SciTech Connect

    Strniste, G.F.; Chen, D.J.; deBruin, D.; McCoy, L.S.; Luke, J.A.; Mudgett, J.S.; Nickols, J.W.; Okinaka, R.T.; Tesmer, J.G.; MacInnes, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The uv-sensitive Chinese hamster cell uv-135 is being used to identify and isolate the human gene, ERCC-5, which corrects nucleotide excision repair in this incision-defective mutant. A cosmid library, constructed from a 3/sup 0/ transformant of uv-135, has been screened for transfected gpt and human Alu family sequences. An ordered physical map of overlapping positives cosmids has been determined. Molecular evidence suggests a region of this map of <40 Kbp contains the ERCC-5 gene. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Escherichia coli radD (yejH) gene: a novel function involved in radiation resistance and double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Chen, Stefanie H; Byrne, Rose T; Wood, Elizabeth A; Cox, Michael M

    2015-03-01

    A transposon insertion screen implicated the yejH gene in the repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage. The yejH gene, which exhibits significant homology to the human transcription-coupled DNA repair gene XPB, is involved in the repair of double-strand DNA breaks. Deletion of yejH significantly sensitized cells to agents that cause double-strand breaks (ionizing radiation, UV radiation, ciprofloxacin). In addition, deletion of both yejH and radA hypersensitized the cells to ionizing radiation, UV and ciprofloxacin damage, indicating that these two genes have complementary repair functions. The ΔyejH ΔradA double deletion also showed a substantial decline in viability following an induced double-strand DNA break, of a magnitude comparable with the defect measured when the recA, recB, recG or priA genes are deleted. The ATPase activity and C-terminal zinc finger motif of yejH play an important role in its repair function, as targeted mutant alleles of yejH did not rescue sensitivity. We propose that yejH be renamed radD, reflecting its role in the DNA repair of radiation damage.

  8. Yeast MPH1 gene functions in an error-free DNA damage bypass pathway that requires genes from Homologous recombination, but not from postreplicative repair.

    PubMed Central

    Schürer, K Anke; Rudolph, Christian; Ulrich, Helle D; Kramer, Wilfried

    2004-01-01

    The MPH1 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encoding a member of the DEAH family of proteins, had been identified by virtue of the spontaneous mutator phenotype of respective deletion mutants. Genetic analysis suggested that MPH1 functions in a previously uncharacterized DNA repair pathway that protects the cells from damage-induced mutations. We have now analyzed genetic interactions of mph1 with a variety of mutants from different repair systems with respect to spontaneous mutation rates and sensitivities to different DNA-damaging agents. The dependence of the mph1 mutator phenotype on REV3 and REV1 and the synergy with mutations in base and nucleotide excision repair suggest an involvement of MPH1 in error-free bypass of lesions. However, although we observed an unexpected partial suppression of the mph1 mutator phenotype by rad5, genetic interactions with other mutations in postreplicative repair imply that MPH1 does not belong to this pathway. Instead, mutations from the homologous recombination pathway were found to be epistatic to mph1 with respect to both spontaneous mutation rates and damage sensitivities. Determination of spontaneous mitotic recombination rates demonstrated that mph1 mutants are not deficient in homologous recombination. On the contrary, in an sgs1 background we found a pronounced hyperrecombination phenotype. Thus, we propose that MPH1 is involved in a branch of homologous recombination that is specifically dedicated to error-free bypass. PMID:15126389

  9. A mutation in the XPB/ERCC3 DNA repair transcription gene, associated with trichothiodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Weeda, G.; Donker, I.; Vermeulen, W.

    1997-02-01

    Trichothiodystrophy (TTD) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by sulfur-deficient brittle hair and nails, mental retardation, impaired sexual development, and ichthyosis. Photosensitivity has been reported in {approximately}50% of the cases, but no skin cancer is associated with TTD. Virtually all photosensitive TTD patients have a deficiency in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) of UV-induced DNA damage that is indistinguishable from that of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group D (XP-D) patients. DNA repair defects in XP-D are associated with two additional, quite different diseases; XP, a sun-sensitive and cancer-prone repair disorder, and Cockayne syndrome (CS), a photosensitive condition characterized by physical and mental retardation and wizened facial appearance. One photosensitive TTD case constitutes a new repair-deficient complementation group, TTD-A. Remarkably, both TTD-A and XP-D defects are associated with subunits of TFIIH, a basal transcription factor with a second function in DNA repair. Thus, mutations in TFIIH components may, on top of a repair defect, also cause transcriptional insufficiency, which may explain part of the non-XP clinical features of TTD. To date, three patients with the remarkable conjunction of XP and CS but not TM have been assigned to XP complementation group B (XP-B). Here we present the characterization of the NER defect in two mild TTD patients (TTD6VI and TTD4VI) and confirm the assignment to X-PB. The causative mutation was found to be a single base substitution resulting in a missense mutation (T119P) in a region of the XPB protein. These findings define a third TTD complementation group, extend the clinical heterogeneity associated with XP-B, stress the exclusive relationship between TTD and mutations in subunits of repair/transcription factor TFIIH, and strongly support the concept of {open_quotes}transcription syndromes.{close_quotes} 46 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Gene Expression Profiling in the Injured Spinal Cord of Trachemys scripta elegans: An Amniote with Self-Repair Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Valentin-Kahan, Adrián; García-Tejedor, Gabriela B.; Robello, Carlos; Trujillo-Cenóz, Omar; Russo, Raúl E.; Alvarez-Valin, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Slider turtles are the only known amniotes with self-repair mechanisms of the spinal cord that lead to substantial functional recovery. Their strategic phylogenetic position makes them a relevant model to investigate the peculiar genetic programs that allow anatomical reconnection in some vertebrate groups but are absent in others. Here, we analyze the gene expression profile of the response to spinal cord injury (SCI) in the turtle Trachemys scripta elegans. We found that this response comprises more than 1000 genes affecting diverse functions: reaction to ischemic insult, extracellular matrix re-organization, cell proliferation and death, immune response, and inflammation. Genes related to synapses and cholesterol biosynthesis are down-regulated. The analysis of the evolutionary distribution of these genes shows that almost all are present in most vertebrates. Additionally, we failed to find genes that were exclusive of regenerating taxa. The comparison of expression patterns among species shows that the response to SCI in the turtle is more similar to that of mice and non-regenerative Xenopus than to Xenopus during its regenerative stage. This observation, along with the lack of conserved “regeneration genes” and the current accepted phylogenetic placement of turtles (sister group of crocodilians and birds), indicates that the ability of spinal cord self-repair of turtles does not represent the retention of an ancestral vertebrate character. Instead, our results suggest that turtles developed this capability from a non-regenerative ancestor (i.e., a lineage specific innovation) that was achieved by re-organizing gene expression patterns on an essentially non-regenerative genetic background. Among the genes activated by SCI exclusively in turtles, those related to anoxia tolerance, extracellular matrix remodeling, and axonal regrowth are good candidates to underlie functional recovery. PMID:28223917

  11. Analysis of gene expression dynamics revealed delayed and abnormal epidermal repair process in aged compared to young skin.

    PubMed

    Sextius, Peggy; Marionnet, Claire; Tacheau, Charlotte; Bon, François-Xavier; Bastien, Philippe; Mauviel, Alain; Bernard, Bruno A; Bernerd, Françoise; Dubertret, Louis

    2015-05-01

    With aging, epidermal homeostasis and barrier function are disrupted. In a previous study, we analyzed the transcriptomic response of young skin epidermis after stratum corneum removal, and obtained a global kinetic view of the molecular processes involved in barrier function recovery. In the present study, the same analysis was performed in aged skin in order to better understand the defects which occur with aging. Thirty healthy male volunteers (67 ± 4 years old) were involved. Tape-strippings were carried out on the inner face of one forearm, the other unstripped forearm serving as control. At 2, 6, 18, 30 and 72 h after stripping, TEWL measurements were taken, and epidermis samples were collected. Total RNA was extracted and analyzed using DermArray(®) cDNA microarrays. The results highlighted that barrier function recovery and overall kinetics of gene expression were delayed following stripping in aged skin. Indeed, the TEWL measurements showed that barrier recovery in the young group appeared to be dramatically significant during the overall kinetics, while there were no significant evolution in the aged group until 30 h. Moreover, gene expression analysis revealed that the number of modulated genes following tape stripping increased as a function of time and reached a peak at 6 h after tape stripping in young skin, while it was at 30 h in aged skin, showing that cellular activity linked to the repair process may be engaged earlier in young epidermis than in aged epidermis. A total of 370 genes were modulated in the young group. In the aged group, 382 genes were modulated, whose 184 were also modulated in the young group. Only eight genes that were modulated in both groups were significantly differently modulated. The characterization of these genes into 15 functional families helped to draw a scenario for the aging process affecting epidermal repair capacity.

  12. Identification of the mismatch repair genes PMS2 and MLH1 as p53 target genes by using serial analysis of binding elements

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiguo; Sadowski, Ivan

    2005-01-01

    The ability to determine the global location of transcription factor binding sites in vivo is important for a comprehensive understanding of gene regulation in human cells. We have developed a technology, called serial analysis of binding elements (SABE), involving subtractive hybridization of chromatin immunoprecipitation-enriched DNA fragments followed by the generation and analysis of concatamerized sequence tags. We applied the SABE technology to search for p53 target genes in the human genome, and have identified several previously described p53 targets in addition to numerous potentially novel targets, including the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1 and PMS2. Both of these genes were determined to be responsive to DNA damage and p53 activation in normal human fibroblasts, and have p53-response elements within their first intron. These two genes may serve as a sensor in DNA repair mechanisms and a critical determinant for the decision between cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. These results also demonstrate the potential for use of SABE as a broadly applicable means to globally identify regulatory elements for human transcription factors in vivo. PMID:15781865

  13. Site-specific excision repair of 1-nitrosopyrene-induced DNA adducts at the nucleotide level in the HPRT gene of human fibroblasts: effect of adduct conformation on the pattern of site-specific repair.

    PubMed Central

    Wei, D; Maher, V M; McCormick, J J

    1996-01-01

    Studies showing that different types of DNA adducts are repaired in human cells at different rates suggest that DNA adduct conformation is the major determinant of the rate of nucleotide excision repair. However, recent studies of repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers or benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE)-induced adducts at the nucleotide level in DNA of normal human fibroblasts indicate that the rate of repair of the same adduct at different nucleotide positions can vary up to 10-fold, suggesting an important role for local DNA conformation. To see if site-specific DNA repair is a common phenomenon for bulky DNA adducts, we determined the rate of repair of 1-nitrosopyrene (1-NOP)-induced adducts in exon 3 of the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene at the nucleotide level using ligation-mediated PCR. To distinguish between the contributions of adduct conformation and local DNA conformation to the rate of repair, we compared the results obtained with 1-NOP with those we obtained previously using BPDE. The principal DNA adduct formed by either agent involves guanine. We found that rates of repair of 1-NOP-induced adducts also varied significantly at the nucleotide level, but the pattern of site-specific repair differed from that of BPDE-induced adducts at the same guanine positions in the same region of DNA. The average rate of excision repair of 1-NOP adducts in exon 3 was two to three times faster than that of BPDE adducts, but at particular nucleotides the rate was slower or faster than that of BPDE adducts or, in some cases, equal to that of BPDE adducts. These results indicate that the contribution of the local DNA conformation to the rate of repair at a particular nucleotide position depends upon the specific DNA adduct involved. However, the data also indicate that the conformation of the DNA adduct is not the only factor contributing to the rate of repair at different nucleotide positions. Instead, the rate of repair at a particular nucleotide

  14. Smoking and selected DNA repair gene polymorphisms in controls: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, M. Elizabeth; Poole, Charles; Olshan, Andrew F.; North, Kari E.; Zeng, Donglin; Millikan, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    Background When the case-only study design is used to estimate statistical interaction between genetic (G) and environmental (E) exposures, G and E must be independent in the underlying population, or the case-only estimate of interaction (COR) will be biased. Few studies have examined the occurrence of G-E association in published control group data. Methods To examine the assumption of G-E independence in empirical data, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of G-E associations in controls for frequently investigated DNA repair genes (XRCC1 Arg399Gln, Arg194Trp, or Arg280His, XPD Lys751Gln, and Asp312Asn, and XRCC3 Thr241Met) and smoking (ever/never smoking, current/not current smoker, smoking duration, smoking intensity and pack-years). Results Across the 55 included studies, SNP-smoking associations in controls (ORz) were not reliably at the null value of 1.0 for any SNP-smoking combinations. Two G-E combinations were too heterogeneous for summary estimates: XRCC1 399 and ever-never smoking (N=21), and XPD 751 and pack-years (N=12). ORz ranges for these combinations were: [ORz (95% confidence interval (CI)] 0.7 (0.4, 1.2) – 1.9 (1.2, 2.8) and 0.8 (0.5, 1.3) – 2.3 (0.8, 6.1), respectively). Estimates for studies considered homogeneous (Cochran’s Q p-value <0.10) varied 2- to 5-fold. No study characteristics were identified that could explain heterogeneity. Conclusions We recommend the independence assumption be evaluated in the population underlying any potential case-only study, rather than in a proxy control group(s) or pooled controls. Impact These results suggest that G-E association in controls may be population-specific. Increased access to control data would improve evaluation of the independence assumption. PMID:20935063

  15. A deficiency in chromatin repair, genetic instability, and predisposition to cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, K.K.; Parshad, R.; Gantt, R.R.; Tarone, R.E. )

    1989-01-01

    This review traces steps leading to malignant neoplastic transformation of rodent and human cells in culture and in vivo. Emphasis is placed on an abnormal response characterized by persistent chromatid damage following irradiation of cells in culture with X-rays or fluorescent light during G2 phase of the cell cycle. Evidence is presented that deficient or unbalanced DNA repair during G2 accounts for the abnormal response. This G2 repair deficiency can be inherited or acquired by normal tissue cells during the process of or following attainment of infinite lifespan. It appears as an early, possibly initiating step in neoplastic transformation. It characterizes all human tumor cells examined irrespective of histopathology or tissue of origin. It has a genetic basis. In an animal model, the BALB/c mouse, this phenotype is associated with genes on chromosomes 1 and 4. It characterizes skin fibroblasts and blood lymphocytes from individuals with genetic or familial conditions predisposing to cancer and can be used to identify clinically normal family members carrying a gene(s) for any one of the three cancer-prone genetic disorders studied to date. Furthermore, it can provide the basis of a test for carriers of genes predisposing to a high risk of cancer. We conclude that the G2 repair deficiency, whether inherited or acquired, is a prerequisite for cancer development and that it accounts for the genetic instability of the cancer cell. 167 refs.

  16. Cloning, comparative mapping, and RNA expression of the mouse homologues of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleotide excision repair gene RAD23

    SciTech Connect

    Spek, P.J. van der; Visser, C.E.; Bootsma, D.

    1996-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD23 gene is involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER). Two human homologs of RAD23, HHR23A and HHR23B (HGMW-approved symbols RAD23A and RAD23B), were previously isolated. The HHR23B protein is complexed with the protein defective in the cancer-prone repair syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group C, and is specifically involved in the global genome NER subpathway. The cloning of both mouse homologs (designated MHR23A and MHR23B) and detailed sequence comparison permitted the deduction of the following overall structure for all RAD23 homologs: an ubiquitin-like N-terminus followed by a strongly conserved 50-amino-acid domain that is repeated at the C-terminus. We also found this domain as a specific C-terminal extension of one of the ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes, providing a second link with the ubiquitin pathway. By means of in situ hybridization, MHR23A was assigned to mouse chromosome 8C3 and MHR23B to 4B3. Because of the close chromosomal proximity of human XPC and HHR23B, the mouse XPC chromosomal location was determined (6D). Physical disconnection of the genes in mouse argues against a functional significance of the colocalization of these genes in human. Northern blot analysis revealed constitutive expression of both MHR23 genes in all tissues examined. Elevated RNA expression of both MHR23 genes was observed in testis. Although the RAD23 equivalents are well conserved during evolution, the mammalian genes did not express the UV-inducible phenotype of their yeast counterpart. This may point to a fundamental difference between the UV responses of yeast and human. No stage-specific mRNA expression during the cell cycle was observed for the mammalian RAD23 homologs. 38 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Methylation of the nonhomologous end joining repair pathway genes does not explain the increase of translocations with aging.

    PubMed

    Martín-Guerrero, Idoia; de Prado, Elena; Lopez-Lopez, Elixabet; Ardanaz, Maite; Vitoria, Juan Carlos; Parada, Luis A; García-Orad, Cristina; García-Orad, Africa

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome translocations are especially frequent in human lymphomas and leukemias but are insufficient to drive carcinogenesis. Indeed, several of the so-called tumor specific translocations have been detected in peripheral blood of healthy individuals, finding a higher frequency of some of them with aging. The inappropriate repair of DNA double strand breaks by the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway is one of the reasons for a translocation to occur. Moreover, fidelity of this pathway has been shown to decline with age. Although the mechanism underlying this inefficacy is unknown, other repair pathways are inactivated by methylation with aging. In this study, we analyzed the implication of NHEJ genes methylation in the increase of translocations with the age. To this aim, we determined the relationship between translocations and aging in 565 Spanish healthy individuals and correlated these data with the methylation status of 11 NHEJ genes. We found higher frequency of BCL2-JH and BCR-ABL (major) translocations with aging. In addition, we detected that two NHEJ genes (LIG4 and XRCC6) presented age-dependent promoter methylation changes. However, we did not observe a correlation between the increase of translocations and methylation, indicating that other molecular mechanisms are involved in the loss of NHEJ fidelity with aging.

  18. Beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage and alteration in the expression patterns of DNA repair-related genes.

    PubMed

    Attia, Sabry M; Harisa, Gamaleldin I; Hassan, Memy H; Bakheet, Saleh A

    2013-09-01

    Beryllium metal has physical properties that make its use essential for very specific applications, such as medical diagnostics, nuclear/fusion reactors and aerospace applications. Because of the widespread human exposure to beryllium metals and the discrepancy of the genotoxic results in the reported literature, detail assessments of the genetic damage of beryllium are warranted. Mice exposed to beryllium chloride at an oral dose of 23mg/kg for seven consecutive days exhibited a significant increase in the level of DNA-strand breaking and micronuclei formation as detected by a bone marrow standard comet assay and micronucleus test. Whereas slight beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage was detected following formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase digestion, digestion with endonuclease III resulted in considerable increases in oxidative DNA damage after the 11.5 and 23mg/kg/day treatment as detected by enzyme-modified comet assays. Increased 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine was also directly correlated with increased bone marrow micronuclei formation and DNA strand breaks, which further confirm the involvement of oxidative stress in the induction of bone marrow genetic damage after exposure to beryllium chloride. Gene expression analysis on the bone marrow cells from beryllium chloride-exposed mice showed significant alterations in genes associated with DNA damage repair. Therefore, beryllium chloride may cause genetic damage to bone marrow cells due to the oxidative stress and the induced unrepaired DNA damage is probably due to the down-regulation in the expression of DNA repair genes, which may lead to genotoxicity and eventually cause carcinogenicity.

  19. Purkinje Cell Degeneration in pcd Mice Reveals Large Scale Chromatin Reorganization and Gene Silencing Linked to Defective DNA Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Baltanás, Fernando C.; Casafont, Iñigo; Lafarga, Vanesa; Weruaga, Eduardo; Alonso, José R.; Berciano, María T.; Lafarga, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    DNA repair protects neurons against spontaneous or disease-associated DNA damage. Dysfunctions of this mechanism underlie a growing list of neurodegenerative disorders. The Purkinje cell (PC) degeneration mutation causes the loss of nna1 expression and is associated with the postnatal degeneration of PCs. This PC degeneration dramatically affects nuclear architecture and provides an excellent model to elucidate the nuclear mechanisms involved in a whole array of neurodegenerative disorders. We used immunocytochemistry for histone variants and components of the DNA damage response, an in situ transcription assay, and in situ hybridization for telomeres to analyze changes in chromatin architecture and function. We demonstrate that the phosphorylation of H2AX, a DNA damage signal, and the trimethylation of the histone H4K20, a repressive mark, in extensive domains of genome are epigenetic hallmarks of chromatin in degenerating PCs. These histone modifications are associated with a large scale reorganization of chromatin, telomere clustering, and heterochromatin-induced gene silencing, all of them key factors in PC degeneration. Furthermore, ataxia telangiectasia mutated and 53BP1, two components of the DNA repair pathway, fail to be concentrated in the damaged chromatin compartments, even though the expression levels of their coding genes were slightly up-regulated. Although the mechanism by which Nna1 loss of function leads to PC neurodegeneration is undefined, the progressive accumulation of DNA damage in chromosome territories irreversibly compromises global gene transcription and seems to trigger PC degeneration and death. PMID:21700704

  20. Meningocele repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myelodysplasia repair; Spinal dysraphism repair; Meningomyelocele repair; Neural tube defect repair; Spina bifida repair ... If your child has hydrocephalus, a shunt (plastic tube) will be put in the child's brain to ...

  1. Radiation-Induced Upregulation of Gene Expression From Adenoviral Vectors Mediated by DNA Damage Repair and Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nokisalmi, Petri; Rajecki, Maria; Pesonen, Sari; Escutenaire, Sophie; Soliymani, Rabah; Tenhunen, Mikko; Ahtiainen, Laura; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In the present study, we evaluated the combination of replication-deficient adenoviruses and radiotherapy in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the mechanism of radiation-mediated upregulation of adenoviral transgene expression. Methods and Materials: Adenoviral transgene expression (luciferase or green fluorescent protein) was studied with and without radiation in three cell lines: breast cancer M4A4-LM3, prostate cancer PC-3MM2, and lung cancer LNM35/enhanced green fluorescent protein. The effect of the radiation dose, modification of the viral capsid, and five different transgene promoters were studied. The cellular responses were studied using mass spectrometry and immunofluorescence analysis. Double strand break repair was modulated by inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, topoisomerase-I, and DNA protein kinase, and transgene expression was measured. Results: We found that a wide range of radiation doses increased adenoviral transgene expression regardless of the cell line, transgene, promoter, or viral capsid modification. Treatment with adenovirus, radiation, and double strand break repair inhibitors resulted in persistence of double strand breaks and subsequent increases in adenovirus transgene expression. Conclusions: Radiation-induced enhancement of adenoviral transgene expression is linked to DNA damage recognition and repair. Radiation induces a global cellular response that results in increased production of RNA and proteins, including adenoviral transgene products. This study provides a mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with adenoviral gene delivery.

  2. Early age decline in DNA repair capacity in the liver: in depth profile of differential gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Guedj, Avital; Geiger-Maor, Anat; Galun, Eithan; Amsalem, Hagai; Rachmilewitz, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with progressive decline in cell function and with increased damage to macromolecular components. DNA damage, in the form of double-strand breaks (DSBs), increases with age and in turn, contributes to the aging process and age-related diseases. DNA strand breaks triggers a set of highly orchestrated signaling events known as the DNA damage response (DDR), which coordinates DNA repair. However, whether the accumulation of DNA damage with age is a result of decreased repair capacity, remains to be determined. In our study we showed that with age there is a decline in the resolution of foci containing γH2AX and pKAP-1 in diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-treated mouse livers, already evident at a remarkably early age of 6-months. Considerable age-dependent differences in global gene expression profiles in mice livers after exposure to DEN, further affirmed these age related differences in the response to DNA damage. Functional analysis identified p53 as the most overrepresented pathway that is specifically enhanced and prolonged in 6-month-old mice. Collectively, our results demonstrated an early decline in DNA damage repair that precedes ‘old age’, suggesting this may be a driving force contributing to the aging process rather than a phenotypic consequence of old age. PMID:27922819

  3. Assignment of the XRCC2 human DNA repair gene to chromosome 7q36 by complementation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, N.J.; Thompson, L.H.; Zhao, Y.

    1995-04-10

    The V79 hamster cell line irs1 is a repair-deficient mutant hypersensitive to radiation and DNA-reactive chemical agents. Somatic cell hybrids were formed by fusing irs1 cells with human lymphocytes and selecting for complementation in medium containing concentrations of mitomycin C (MMC) that are toxic to irs1. Thirty-eight MMC-resistant hybrids showed extensive segregation of human chromosomes, with 35 of them retaining human chromosome 7, as indicated by molecular marker and cytogenetic analyses. Inter-Alu-PCR products from the DNA of hybrids, when used as a fluorescence in situ hybridization probe onto normal human metaphases, indicated that one resistant hybrid was monochromosomal for chromosome 7 and that the three resistant hybrids shown to be negative for chromosome 7 markers have retained portions of chromosome 7, with region 7q36 being the smallest common region. MMC-sensitive subclones of a resistant hybrid lost human chromosome 7. Therefore, the gene complementing the repair defect, XRCC2 (X-ray repair cross complementing), is assigned to human chromosome 7q36. 27 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Spatial expression of a DNA repair gene, N-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG) during development in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, N K; Lee, S H; Sohn, T J; Roy, R; Mitra, S; Chung, H M; Ko, J J; Cha, K Y

    2000-01-01

    DNA repair is a crucial phenomenon that maintains the chromosome integrity of genome which are continuously damaged by endogenous and exogenous alkylating agents. If the damaged DNA is not repaired, it may lead to mutation, chromosomal aberration, aging and cancer. N-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG), a ubiquitous DNA repair enzyme, removes N-methylpurine and other damaged purines in DNA. MPG mRNA expression was revealed at various stages of mouse development from day 7.5 p.c. (post coitum) embryo to day 400 mature adult by Northern blot hybridization or RT-PCR. MPG transcripts were abundant in the mouse embryo during pregnancy and in adult testis and ovary. The MPG mRNA level in the testis was low in 1-week-old mice, but the level showed its maximum among the organs tested in 4-week-old young adults. In placenta, the level of MPG mRNA continuously decreased from day 7.5 p.c. to day 17.5 p.c. The spatial expression of MPG gene is highly regulated. Transcription of MPG is maximum in rapidly dividing and growing tissues during development. These data suggest that an elevated rate of MPG transcription is required for DNA replication.

  5. Predisposing factors and prevention of frostbite.

    PubMed

    Rintamäki, H

    2000-04-01

    This review focuses on the physiological, behavioural and environmental factors which predispose to frostbite. Also prevention of frostbite is summarised. Predisposing factors may increase heat loss, decrease heat production, decrease the insulation of the clothing, make people especially susceptible to cold or make them to behave inadequately. Marked increase in convective or conductive heat loss is often the immediate reason for frostbite. Wind (as described by wind chill index) increases convective heat loss and touching of metal objects increases conductive cooling. Poor insulation of the clothing is also a common reason of frostbite. The insulation can be insufficient when clothing is wet, tight, permeable to wind or does not cover the cold sensitive body parts. Individual factors predisposing to frostbite are inadequate behaviour, low physical fitness, fatigue, dehydration, earlier cold injuries, sickness or poor circulation in peripheral parts of the body. Frostbite is often associated with the use of alcohol. To prevent frostbite, it is necessary to recognise cold risks, practise tasks in the cold, eat and drink well, have physical exercise, have sufficient clothing (also spare clothing), change into dry clothing if necessary and take care of companions. In the cold it is not advisable to get fatigued until exhaustion, sweat excessively, use tight and/or wet clothing, drink alcohol, smoke and expose oneself unnecessarily to wind, metals or fluids.

  6. ERCC2: cDNA cloning and molecular characterization of a human nucleotide excision repair gene with high homology to yeast RAD3.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, C A; Salazar, E P; Stewart, S A; Thompson, L H

    1990-01-01

    Human ERCC2 genomic clones give efficient, stable correction of the nucleotide excision repair defect in UV5 Chinese hamster ovary cells. One clone having a breakpoint just 5' of classical promoter elements corrects only transiently, implicating further flanking sequences in stable gene expression. The nucleotide sequences of a cDNA clone and genomic flanking regions were determined. The ERCC2 translated amino acid sequence has 52% identity (73% homology) with the yeast nucleotide excision repair protein RAD3. RAD3 is essential for cell viability and encodes a protein that is a single-stranded DNA dependent ATPase and an ATP dependent helicase. The similarity of ERCC2 and RAD3 suggests a role for ERCC2 in both cell viability and DNA repair and provides the first insight into the biochemical function of a mammalian nucleotide excision repair gene. Images Fig. 5. PMID:2184031

  7. Genetic variability of DNA repair mechanisms and glutathione-S-transferase genes influences treatment outcome in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Goričar, Katja; Kovač, Viljem; Jazbec, Janez; Zakotnik, Branko; Lamovec, Janez; Dolžan, Vita

    2015-04-01

    Osteosarcoma patients are commonly treated with cisplatin-based preoperative and postoperative chemotherapy. Cisplatin binds to DNA and forms both intrastrand and interstrand crosslinks, inhibiting DNA replication. Glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) participate in cisplatin detoxification, while several independent DNA repair mechanisms repair cisplatin-induced lesions. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of genetic variability of DNA repair mechanisms and GSTs on efficacy and toxicity of cisplatin-based chemotherapy in osteosarcoma patients. A total of 66 osteosarcoma patients were genotyped for ERCC1, ERCC2, NBN, RAD51, XRCC3, and GSTP1 polymorphisms, as well as GSTM1 and GSTT1 gene deletion. We determined the influence of polymorphisms on survival and treatment outcome using Cox regression and logistic regression. Carriers of at least one polymorphic ERCC2 rs1799793 allele had longer event-free survival (EFS) (P=0.006; hazard ratio (HR)=0.28; 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.11-0.70). Polymorphic GSTP1 rs1138272 allele was associated with both shorter EFS and OS (P=0.005; HR=3.67; 95%CI=1.47-9.16; and P=0.004; HR=3.52; 95%CI=1.51-8.22, respectively). Compared to the reference NBN CAA haplotype, NBN CGA haplotype was associated with shorter EFS (P=0.001; HR=4.12; 95%CI=1.77-9.56). Our results suggest that DNA repair polymorphisms and GST polymorphisms could be used as predictive factors for cisplatin-based chemotherapy in osteosarcoma patients and could contribute to treatment personalization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Functional nucleotide excision repair is required for the preferential removal of N-ethylpurines from the transcribed strand of the dihydrofolate reductase gene of Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sitaram, A; Plitas, G; Wang, W; Scicchitano, D A

    1997-01-01

    Transcription-coupled repair of DNA adducts is an essential factor that must be considered when one is elucidating biological endpoints resulting from exposure to genotoxic agents. Alkylating agents comprise one group of chemical compounds which modify DNA by reacting with oxygen and nitrogen atoms in the bases of the double helix. To discern the role of transcription-coupled DNA repair of N-ethylpurines present in discrete genetic domains, Chinese hamster ovary cells were exposed to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea, and the clearance of the damage from the dihydrofolate reductase gene was investigated. The results indicate that N-ethylpurines were removed from the dihydrofolate reductase gene of nucleotide excision repair-proficient Chinese hamster ovary cells; furthermore, when repair rates in the individual strands were determined, a statistically significant bias in the removal of ethyl-induced, alkali-labile sites was observed, with clearance occurring 30% faster from the transcribed strand than from its nontranscribed counterpart at early times after exposure. In contrast, removal of N-ethylpurines was observed in the dihydrofolate reductase locus in cells that lacked nucleotide excision repair, but both strands were repaired at the same rate, indicating that transcription-coupled clearance of these lesions requires the presence of active nucleotide excision repair. PMID:9001209

  9. POLYMORPHISMS IN THE DNA NUCLEOTIDE EXCISION REPAIR GENES AND LUNG CANCER RISK IN XUAN WEI, CHINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The lung cancer mortality rate in Xuan Wei County, China is among the highest in the country and has been etiologically attributed to exposure to indoor smoky coal emissions that contain very high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Nucleotide excision repair (NE...

  10. POLYMORPHISMS IN THE DNA NUCLEOTIDE EXCISION REPAIR GENES AND LUNG CANCER RISK IN XUAN WEI, CHINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The lung cancer mortality rate in Xuan Wei County, China is among the highest in the country and has been etiologically attributed to exposure to indoor smoky coal emissions that contain very high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Nucleotide excision repair (NE...

  11. Impaired Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Regulation in Response to Ionizing Radiation in Human Fibroblast Cells with Individual Knock-down of 25 Genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry; Emami, Kamal; Hammond, Dianne; Casey, Rachael; Mehta, Satish; Jeevarajan, Antony; Pierson, Duane; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have demonstrated that genes with upregulated expression induced by IR may play important roles in DNA damage sensing, cell cycle checkpoint and chromosomal repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR and its impact on cytogenetic responses to ionizing radiation has not been systematically studied. In our present study, the expression of 25 genes selected based on their transcriptional changes in response to IR or from their known DNA repair roles were individually knocked down by siRNA transfection in human fibroblast cells. Chromosome aberrations (CA) and micronuclei (MN) formation were measured as the cytogenetic endpoints. Our results showed that the yield of MN and/or CA formation were significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes that included Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway; XPA in the NER pathway; RPA1 in the MMR pathway; RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes including MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, and SESN1 and SUMO1 showed significant inhibition of cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, p21 and MLH1 expression resulted in both enhanced cell cycle progression and significantly higher yield of cytogenetic damage, indicating the involvement of these gene products in both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Of these 11 genes that affected the cytogenetic response, 9 were up-regulated in the cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulating the biological consequences after IR. Failure to express these IR-responsive genes, such as by gene mutation, could seriously change the outcome of the post IR scenario and lead to carcinogenesis.

  12. Antimutagenicity of Cinnamaldehyde and Vanillin in Human Cells: Global Gene Expression and Possible Role of DNA Damage and Repair

    PubMed Central

    King, Audrey A.; Shaughnessy, Daniel T.; Mure, Kanae; Leszczynska, Joanna; Ward, William O.; Umbach, David M.; Xu, Zongli; Ducharme, Danica; Taylor, Jack A.; DeMarini, David M.; Klein, Catherine B.

    2007-01-01

    Vanillin (VAN) and cinnamaldehyde (CIN) are dietary flavorings that exhibit antimutagenic activity against mutagen-induced and spontaneous mutations in bacteria. Although these compounds were antimutagenic against chromosomal mutations in mammalian cells, they have not been studied for antimutagenesis against spontaneous gene mutations in mammalian cells. Thus, we initiated studies with VAN and CIN in human mismatch repair-deficient (hMLH1−) HCT116 colon cancer cells, which exhibit high spontaneous mutation rates (mutations/cell/generation) at the HPRT locus, permitting analysis of antimutagenic effects of agents against spontaneous mutation. Long-term (1–3-week) treatments of HCT116 cells with VAN at minimally toxic concentrations (0.5–2.5 mM) reduced the spontaneous HPRT mutant fraction (MF, mutants/106 survivors) in a concentration-related manner by 19% to 73%. A similar treatment with CIN at 2.5–7.5 μM yielded a 13% to 56% reduction of the spontaneous MF. Short-term (4–h) treatments also reduced the spontaneous MF by 64% (VAN) and 31% (CIN). To investigate the mechanisms of antimutagenesis, we evaluated the ability of VAN and CIN to induce DNA damage (comet assay) and to alter global gene expression (Affymetrix GeneChip) after 4-h treatments. Both VAN and CIN induced DNA damage in both mismatch repair-proficient (HCT116 + chr3) and deficient (HCT116) cells at concentrations that were antimutagenic in HCT116 cells. There were 64 genes in common whose expression was changed similarly by both VAN and CIN; these included genes related to DNA damage, stress responses, oxidative damage, apoptosis, and cell growth. RT-PCR results paralleled the Affymetrix results for 4 selected genes (HMOX1, DDIT4, GCLM, and CLK4). Our results show for the first time that VAN and CIN are antimutagenic against spontaneous mutations in mammalian (human) cells. These and other data lead us to propose that VAN and CIN may induce DNA damage that elicits recombinational DNA

  13. Antimutagenicity of cinnamaldehyde and vanillin in human cells: Global gene expression and possible role of DNA damage and repair.

    PubMed

    King, Audrey A; Shaughnessy, Daniel T; Mure, Kanae; Leszczynska, Joanna; Ward, William O; Umbach, David M; Xu, Zongli; Ducharme, Danica; Taylor, Jack A; Demarini, David M; Klein, Catherine B

    2007-03-01

    Vanillin (VAN) and cinnamaldehyde (CIN) are dietary flavorings that exhibit antimutagenic activity against mutagen-induced and spontaneous mutations in bacteria. Although these compounds were antimutagenic against chromosomal mutations in mammalian cells, they have not been studied for antimutagenesis against spontaneous gene mutations in mammalian cells. Thus, we initiated studies with VAN and CIN in human mismatch repair-deficient (hMLH1(-)) HCT116 colon cancer cells, which exhibit high spontaneous mutation rates (mutations/cell/generation) at the HPRT locus, permitting analysis of antimutagenic effects of agents against spontaneous mutation. Long-term (1-3 weeks) treatment of HCT116 cells with VAN at minimally toxic concentrations (0.5-2.5mM) reduced the spontaneous HPRT mutant fraction (MF, mutants/10(6) survivors) in a concentration-related manner by 19-73%. A similar treatment with CIN at 2.5-7.5microM yielded a 13-56% reduction of the spontaneous MF. Short-term (4-h) treatments also reduced the spontaneous MF by 64% (VAN) and 31% (CIN). To investigate the mechanisms of antimutagenesis, we evaluated the ability of VAN and CIN to induce DNA damage (comet assay) and to alter global gene expression (Affymetrix GeneChip) after 4-h treatments. Both VAN and CIN induced DNA damage in both mismatch repair-proficient (HCT116+chr3) and deficient (HCT116) cells at concentrations that were antimutagenic in HCT116 cells. There were 64 genes whose expression was changed similarly by both VAN and CIN; these included genes related to DNA damage, stress responses, oxidative damage, apoptosis, and cell growth. RT-PCR results paralleled the Affymetrix results for four selected genes (HMOX1, DDIT4, GCLM, and CLK4). Our results show for the first time that VAN and CIN are antimutagenic against spontaneous mutations in mammalian (human) cells. These and other data lead us to propose that VAN and CIN may induce DNA damage that elicits recombinational DNA repair, which reduces

  14. Molecular cloning of a mouse DNA repair gene that complements the defect of group-A xeroderma pigmentosum.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, K; Satokata, I; Ogita, Z; Uchida, T; Okada, Y

    1989-01-01

    For isolation of the gene responsible for xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group A, plasmid pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from a mouse embryo were cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells, a group-A XP cell line. Two primary UV-resistant XP transfectants were isolated from about 1.6 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from the primary transfectants were again cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells and a secondary UV-resistant XP transfectant was obtained by screening about 4.8 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. The secondary transfectant retained fewer mouse repetitive sequences. A mouse gene that complements the defect of XP2OSSV cells was cloned into an EMBL3 vector from the genome of a secondary transfectant. Transfections of the cloned DNA also conferred UV resistance on another group-A XP cell line but not on XP cell lines of group C, D, F, or G. Northern blot analysis of poly(A)+ RNA with a subfragment of cloned mouse DNA repair gene as the probe revealed that an approximately 1.0 kilobase mRNA was transcribed in the donor mouse embryo and secondary transfectant, and approximately 1.0- and approximately 1.3-kilobase mRNAs were transcribed in normal human cells, but none of these mRNAs was detected in three strains of group-A XP cells. These results suggest that the cloned DNA repair gene is specific for group-A XP and may be the mouse homologue of the group-A XP human gene. Images PMID:2748601

  15. Molecular cloning of a mouse DNA repair gene that complements the defect of group-A xeroderma pigmentosum

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, K.; Satokata, I.; Ogita, Z.; Uchida, T.; Okada, Y.

    1989-07-01

    For isolation of the gene responsible for xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group A, plasmid pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from a mouse embryo were cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells, a group-A XP cell line. Two primary UV-resistant XP transfectants were isolated from about 1.6 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from the primary transfectants were again cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells and a secondary UV-resistant XP transfectant was obtained by screening about 4.8 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. The secondary transfectant retained fewer mouse repetitive sequences. A mouse gene that complements the defect of XP2OSSV cells was cloned into an EMBL3 vector from the genome of a secondary transfectant. Transfections of the cloned DNA also conferred UV resistance on another group-A XP cell line but not on XP cell lines of group C, D, F, or G. Northern blot analysis of poly(A)+ RNA with a subfragment of cloned mouse DNA repair gene as the probe revealed that an approximately 1.0 kilobase mRNA was transcribed in the donor mouse embryo and secondary transfectant, and approximately 1.0- and approximately 1.3-kilobase mRNAs were transcribed in normal human cells, but none of these mRNAs was detected in three strains of group-A XP cells. These results suggest that the cloned DNA repair gene is specific for group-A XP and may be the mouse homologue of the group-A XP human gene.

  16. The cumulative effects of polymorphisms in the DNA mismatch repair genes and tobacco smoking in oesophageal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Vogelsang, Matjaz; Wang, Yabing; Veber, Nika; Mwapagha, Lamech M; Parker, M Iqbal

    2012-01-01

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) enzymes repair errors in DNA that occur during normal DNA metabolism or are induced by certain cancer-contributing exposures. We assessed the association between 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 5 MMR genes and oesophageal cancer risk in South Africans. Prior to genotyping, SNPs were selected from the HapMap database, based on their significantly different genotypic distributions between European ancestry populations and four HapMap populations of African origin. In the Mixed Ancestry group, the MSH3 rs26279 G/G versus A/A or A/G genotype was positively associated with cancer (OR = 2.71; 95% CI: 1.34-5.50). Similar associations were observed for PMS1 rs5742938 (GG versus AA or AG: OR = 1.73; 95% CI: 1.07-2.79) and MLH3 rs28756991 (AA or GA versus GG: OR = 2.07; 95% IC: 1.04-4.12). In Black individuals, however, no association between MMR polymorhisms and cancer risk was observed in individual SNP analysis. The interactions between MMR genes were evaluated using the model-based multifactor-dimensionality reduction approach, which showed a significant genetic interaction between SNPs in MSH2, MSH3 and PMS1 genes in Black and Mixed Ancestry subjects, respectively. The data also implies that pathogenesis of common polymorphisms in MMR genes is influenced by exposure to tobacco smoke. In conclusion, our findings suggest that common polymorphisms in MMR genes and/or their combined effects might be involved in the aetiology of oesophageal cancer.

  17. Cell cycle and mismatch repair genes as potential biomarkers in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings exposed to silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan Nair, Prakash M; Chung, Ill-Min

    2014-06-01

    The expression of cell cycle genes and DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes were analyzed in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings exposed to 0, 0.2, 0.5 and 1 mg/L of silver nanoparticles for 24, 48 and 72 h using real-time PCR. Significant up-regulation of AtPCNA1 was observed after 24 h exposure to 0.2 and 0.5 mg/L of silver nanoparticles. AtPCNA2 gene was up-regulated after 24, 48 and 72 h exposure to 0.5 and 1 mg/L of silver nanoparticles. AtMLH1 gene was up-regulated after 48 h exposure to 0.5 and 1 mg/L of silver nanoparticles and down-regulated after 72 h. Down-regulation of AtMSH2, AtMSH3, AtMSH6 and AtMSH7 mRNA was observed after exposure to all concentrations of silver nanoparticles for different time periods. Exposure to silver ions showed no significant change in the expression levels of AtPCNA and MMR genes. The results show that AtPCNA and MMR genes could be used as potential molecular biomarkers.

  18. MAT2A mutations predispose individuals to thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong-chuan; Gong, Limin; Regalado, Ellen S; Santos-Cortez, Regie L; Zhao, Ren; Cai, Bo; Veeraraghavan, Sudha; Prakash, Siddharth K; Johnson, Ralph J; Muilenburg, Ann; Willing, Marcia; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Moran, Rocio; Debacker, Julie; Bamshad, Michael J; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A; Leal, Suzanne M; Raman, C S; Swindell, Eric C; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2015-01-08

    Up to 20% of individuals who have thoracic aortic aneurysms or acute aortic dissections but who do not have syndromic features have a family history of thoracic aortic disease. Significant genetic heterogeneity is established for this familial condition. Whole-genome linkage analysis and exome sequencing of distant relatives from a large family with autosomal-dominant inheritance of thoracic aortic aneurysms variably associated with the bicuspid aortic valve was used for identification of additional genes predisposing individuals to this condition. A rare variant, c.1031A>C (p.Glu344Ala), was identified in MAT2A, which encodes methionine adenosyltransferase II alpha (MAT IIα). This variant segregated with disease in the family, and Sanger sequencing of DNA from affected probands from unrelated families with thoracic aortic disease identified another MAT2A rare variant, c.1067G>A (p.Arg356His). Evidence that these variants predispose individuals to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections includes the following: there is a paucity of rare variants in MAT2A in the population; amino acids Glu344 and Arg356 are conserved from humans to zebrafish; and substitutions of these amino acids in MAT Iα are found in individuals with hypermethioninemia. Structural analysis suggested that p.Glu344Ala and p.Arg356His disrupt MAT IIα enzyme function. Knockdown of mat2aa in zebrafish via morpholino oligomers disrupted cardiovascular development. Co-transfected wild-type human MAT2A mRNA rescued defects of zebrafish cardiovascular development at significantly higher levels than mRNA edited to express either the Glu344 or Arg356 mutants, providing further evidence that the p.Glu344Ala and p.Arg356His substitutions impair MAT IIα function. The data presented here support the conclusion that rare genetic variants in MAT2A predispose individuals to thoracic aortic disease.

  19. MAT2A Mutations Predispose Individuals to Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong-chuan; Gong, Limin; Regalado, Ellen S.; Santos-Cortez, Regie L.; Zhao, Ren; Cai, Bo; Veeraraghavan, Sudha; Prakash, Siddharth K.; Johnson, Ralph J.; Muilenburg, Ann; Willing, Marcia; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Moran, Rocio; Debacker, Julie; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Leal, Suzanne M.; Raman, C.S.; Swindell, Eric C.; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2015-01-01

    Up to 20% of individuals who have thoracic aortic aneurysms or acute aortic dissections but who do not have syndromic features have a family history of thoracic aortic disease. Significant genetic heterogeneity is established for this familial condition. Whole-genome linkage analysis and exome sequencing of distant relatives from a large family with autosomal-dominant inheritance of thoracic aortic aneurysms variably associated with the bicuspid aortic valve was used for identification of additional genes predisposing individuals to this condition. A rare variant, c.1031A>C (p.Glu344Ala), was identified in MAT2A, which encodes methionine adenosyltransferase II alpha (MAT IIα). This variant segregated with disease in the family, and Sanger sequencing of DNA from affected probands from unrelated families with thoracic aortic disease identified another MAT2A rare variant, c.1067G>A (p.Arg356His). Evidence that these variants predispose individuals to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections includes the following: there is a paucity of rare variants in MAT2A in the population; amino acids Glu344 and Arg356 are conserved from humans to zebrafish; and substitutions of these amino acids in MAT Iα are found in individuals with hypermethioninemia. Structural analysis suggested that p.Glu344Ala and p.Arg356His disrupt MAT IIα enzyme function. Knockdown of mat2aa in zebrafish via morpholino oligomers disrupted cardiovascular development. Co-transfected wild-type human MAT2A mRNA rescued defects of zebrafish cardiovascular development at significantly higher levels than mRNA edited to express either the Glu344 or Arg356 mutants, providing further evidence that the p.Glu344Ala and p.Arg356His substitutions impair MAT IIα function. The data presented here support the conclusion that rare genetic variants in MAT2A predispose individuals to thoracic aortic disease. PMID:25557781

  20. Macrolide antibiotics allosterically predispose the ribosome for translation arrest

    PubMed Central

    Sothiselvam, Shanmugapriya; Liu, Bo; Han, Wei; Ramu, Haripriya; Klepacki, Dorota; Atkinson, Gemma Catherine; Brauer, Age; Remm, Maido; Tenson, Tanel; Schulten, Klaus; Vázquez-Laslop, Nora; Mankin, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    Translation arrest directed by nascent peptides and small cofactors controls expression of important bacterial and eukaryotic genes, including antibiotic resistance genes, activated by binding of macrolide drugs to the ribosome. Previous studies suggested that specific interactions between the nascent peptide and the antibiotic in the ribosomal exit tunnel play a central role in triggering ribosome stalling. However, here we show that macrolides arrest translation of the truncated ErmDL regulatory peptide when the nascent chain is only three amino acids and therefore is too short to be juxtaposed with the antibiotic. Biochemical probing and molecular dynamics simulations of erythromycin-bound ribosomes showed that the antibiotic in the tunnel allosterically alters the properties of the catalytic center, thereby predisposing the ribosome for halting translation of specific sequences. Our findings offer a new view on the role of small cofactors in the mechanism of translation arrest and reveal an allosteric link between the tunnel and the catalytic center of the ribosome. PMID:24961372

  1. Enhanced repair of the anterior cruciate ligament by in situ gene transfer: evaluation in an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Pascher, Arnulf; Steinert, Andre F; Palmer, Glyn D; Betz, Oliver; Gouze, Jean-Noel; Gouze, Elvire; Pilapil, Carmencita; Ghivizzani, Stephen C; Evans, Christopher H; Murray, Martha Meaney

    2004-08-01

    The inability of the ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee joint to heal spontaneously presents numerous clinical problems. Here we describe a novel, gene-based approach to augment ACL healing. It is based upon the migration of cells from the ruptured ends of the ligament into a collagen hydrogel laden with recombinant adenovirus. Cells entering the gel become transduced by the vector, which provides a basis for the local synthesis of gene products that aid repair. Monolayers of bovine ACL cells were readily transduced by first-generation, recombinant adenovirus, and transgene expression remained high after the cells were incorporated into collagen hydrogels. Using an in vitro model of ligament repair, cells migrated from the cut ends of the ACL into the hydrogel and were readily transduced by recombinant adenovirus contained within it. The results of experiments in which GFP was used as the transgene suggest highly efficient transduction of ACL cells in this manner. Moreover, during a 21-day period GFP+ cells were observed more than 6 mm from the severed ligament. This distance is ample for the projected clinical application of this technology. In response to TGF-beta1 as the transgene, greater numbers of ACL cells accumulated in the hydrogels, where they deposited larger amounts of type III collagen. These data confirm that it is possible to transduce ACL cells efficiently in situ as they migrate from the ruptured ACL, that transduction does not interfere with the cells' ability to migrate distances necessary for successful repair, and that ACL cells will respond in a suitable manner to the products of the transgenes they express. This permits optimism over a possible clinical use for this technology.

  2. Antioxidative Dietary Compounds Modulate Gene Expression Associated with Apoptosis, DNA Repair, Inhibition of Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Likui; Gao, Shijuan; Jiang, Wei; Luo, Cheng; Xu, Maonian; Bohlin, Lars; Rosendahl, Markus; Huang, Wenlin

    2014-01-01

    Many dietary compounds are known to have health benefits owing to their antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. To determine the molecular mechanism of these food-derived compounds, we analyzed their effect on various genes related to cell apoptosis, DNA damage and repair, oxidation and inflammation using in vitro cell culture assays. This review further tests the hypothesis proposed previously that downstream products of COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) called electrophilic oxo-derivatives induce antioxidant responsive elements (ARE), which leads to cell proliferation under antioxidative conditions. Our findings support this hypothesis and show that cell proliferation was inhibited when COX-2 was down-regulated by polyphenols and polysaccharides. Flattened macrophage morphology was also observed following the induction of cytokine production by polysaccharides extracted from viili, a traditional Nordic fermented dairy product. Coix lacryma-jobi (coix) polysaccharides were found to reduce mitochondrial membrane potential and induce caspase-3- and 9-mediated apoptosis. In contrast, polyphenols from blueberries were involved in the ultraviolet-activated p53/Gadd45/MDM2 DNA repair system by restoring the cell membrane potential. Inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 by saponin extracts of ginsenoside (Ginsen) and Gynostemma and inhibition of S100A4 by coix polysaccharides inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion. These observations suggest that antioxidants and changes in cell membrane potential are the major driving forces that transfer signals through the cell membrane into the cytosol and nucleus, triggering gene expression, changes in cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis or DNA repair. PMID:25226533

  3. Decreased DNA repair gene XRCC1 expression is associated with radiotherapy-induced acute side effects in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Batar, Bahadir; Guven, Gulgun; Eroz, Seda; Bese, Nuran Senel; Guven, Mehmet

    2016-05-10

    DNA repair plays a critical role in response to ionizing radiation (IR) and developing of radiotherapy induced normal tissue reactions. In our study, we investigated the association of radiotherapy related acute side effects, with X-ray repair cross complementing group 1 (XRCC1) and Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) DNA repair gene expression levels, their changes in protein expression and DNA damage levels in breast cancer patients. The study included 40 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer; an experimental case group (n=20) with acute side effects and the control group (n=20) without side effects. For gene and protein expression analysis, lymphocytes were cultured for 72 h and followed by in vitro 2 Gray (Gy) gamma-irradiation. For detection of DNA damage levels, lymphocytes were irradiated with in vitro 2 Gy gamma-rays and followed by incubation for 72 h. XRCC1 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly higher in controls than in experimental cases (P=0.020). In terms of DNA damage levels, an increased frequency of micronucleus (MN) was observed in experimental cases versus controls, but this association was not significant (P=0.206). We also observed a significant negative correlation between MN frequency and XRCC1 protein levels in experimental (r=-0.469, P=0.037) vs control (r=-0.734, P<0.001). Our results suggested that decreased XRCC1 expression levels might be associated with the increased risk of therapeutic IR-related acute side effects in patients with breast cancer.

  4. Recurrent APC gene mutations in Polish FAP families

    PubMed Central

    Pławski, Andrzej; Podralska, Marta; Słomski, Ryszard

    2007-01-01

    The molecular diagnostics of genetically conditioned disorders is based on the identification of the mutations in the predisposing genes. Hereditary cancer disorders of the gastrointestinal tracts are caused by mutations of the tumour suppressor genes or the DNA repair genes. Occurrence of recurrent mutation allows improvement of molecular diagnostics. The mutation spectrum in the genes causing hereditary forms of colorectal cancers in the Polish population was previously described. In the present work an estimation of the frequency of the recurrent mutations of the APC gene was performed. Eight types of mutations occurred in 19.4% of our FAP families and these constitute 43% of all Polish diagnosed families. PMID:19725996

  5. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae phleomycin-sensitive mutant, ph140, is defective in the RAD6 DNA repair gene.

    PubMed

    He, C H; Masson, J Y; Ramotar, D

    1996-12-01

    The antibiotic bleomycin is used as an anticancer agent for treating a variety of tumours. The antitumour effect of bleomycin is related to its ability to produce lesions such as apurinic/apyrimidinic sites and single- and double-strand breaks in the cellular DNA. Phleomycin is a structurally related form of bleomycin, but it is not used as an anticancer agent. While phleomycin can also damage DNA, neither the exact nature of these DNA lesions nor the cellular process that repairs phleomycin-induced DNA lesions is known. As a first step to understand how eukaryotic cells provide resistance to phleomycin, we used the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system. Several phleomycin-sensitive mutants were generated following gamma-radiation treatment and among these mutants, ph140 was found to be the most sensitive to phleomycin. Molecular analysis revealed that the mutant ph140 harbored a mutation in the DNA repair gene RAD6. Moreover, a functional copy of the RAD6 gene restored full phleomycin resistance to strain ph140. Our findings indicate that the RAD6 protein is essential for yeast cellular resistance to phleomycin.

  6. Trichostatin A enhances vascular repair by injected human endothelial progenitors through increasing the expression of TAL1-dependent genes.

    PubMed

    Palii, Carmen G; Vulesevic, Branka; Fraineau, Sylvain; Pranckeviciene, Erinija; Griffith, Alexander J; Chu, Alphonse; Faralli, Hervé; Li, Yuhua; McNeill, Brian; Sun, Jie; Perkins, Theodore J; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Perez-Iratxeta, Carol; Suuronen, Erik J; Allan, David S; Brand, Marjorie

    2014-05-01

    A major goal of cell therapy for vascular diseases is to promote revascularization through the injection of endothelial stem/progenitor cells. The gene regulatory mechanisms that underlie endothelial progenitor-mediated vascular repair, however, remain elusive. Here, we identify the transcription factor TAL1/SCL as a key mediator of the vascular repair function of primary human endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs). Genome-wide analyses in ECFCs demonstrate that TAL1 activates a transcriptional program that promotes cell adhesion and migration. At the mechanistic level, we show that TAL1 upregulates the expression of migratory and adhesion genes through recruitment of the histone acetyltransferase p300. Based on these findings, we establish a strategy that enhances the revascularization efficiency of ECFCs after ischemia through ex vivo priming with the histone deacetylase inhibitor TSA. Thus, small molecule epigenetics drugs are effective tools for modifying the epigenome of stem/progenitor cells prior to transplantation as a means to enhance their therapeutic potential.

  7. Incisional hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Millikan, Keith W

    2003-10-01

    Incisional ventral hernias are a common problem encountered by surgeons, with over 100,000 repairs being performed annually in the United States. Although many predisposing factors for incisional ventral hernia are patient-related, some factors such as type of primary closure and materials used may reduce the overall incidence of incisional ventral hernia. With the advent of prosthetic meshes being used for incisional ventral hernia repair, the recurrence rate has dropped to approximately 10%. More recently, with the development of prosthetic mesh that is now safe to place intraperitoneally, the recurrence rate has dropped to under 5%. The current controversies that exist for incisional ventral hernia repair are which approach to use (open versus laparoscopic) and what type of fixation (partial- versus full-thickness abdominal muscular/fascial wall) is necessary to stabilize the position of the mesh while tissue ingrowth occurs. During the next decade the answers to these controversies should be available in the surgical literature.

  8. Heterogeneity of excision repair cross-complementation group 1 gene expression in non-small-cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    SMIRNOV, SERHEY; PASHKEVICH, ANASTASIYA; LIUNDYSHEVA, VALERIYA; BABENKO, ANDREY; SMOLYAKOVA, RAISA

    2015-01-01

    Excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) gene expression analysis is currently used widely in the molecular diagnosis of cancer. According to numerous studies, ERCC1 gene expression correlates with overall survival and effectiveness of chemotherapy with platinum agents. However, the degree of this correlation differs among various studies, with certain authors reporting a complete lack of such a correlation. These contradictions may be attributed to a number of factors, including the heterogeneity of the tumor tissue. In this study, we attempted to assess the degree of genetic heterogeneity exhibited by tissue samples obtained from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) through the expression of the ERCC1 gene. This study included 25 samples of tumor tissue from patients with a morphologically confirmed NSCLC diagnosis. A total of three randomized sections of each specimen were used. The ERCC1 gene expression was assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in the TaqMan format. When planning the experiment and analysis of qPCR data, the MIQE guidelines were taken into consideration. We established that the coefficient of variation of the relative level of ERCC1 gene expression in the majority of the samples exceeded 33% (P<0.05), indicating the significant heterogeneity of the sample. We also demonstrated that the degree of heterogeneity of the tumor tissue is largely dependent on disease stage. PMID:25469300

  9. Mismatch Repair in Schizosaccharomyces Pombe Requires the Mutl Homologous Gene Pms1: Molecular Cloning and Functional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schar, P.; Baur, M.; Schneider, C.; Kohli, J.

    1997-01-01

    Homologues of the bacterial mutS and mutL genes involved in DNA mismatch repair have been found in organisms from bacteria to humans. Here, we describe the structure and function of a newly identified Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene that encodes a predicted amino acid sequence of 794 residues with a high degree of homology to MutL related proteins. On the basis of its closer relationship to the eukaryotic ``PMS'' genes than to the ``MLH'' genes, we have designated the S. pombe homologue pms1. Disruption of the pms1 gene causes a significant increase of spontaneous mutagenesis as documented by reversion rate measurements. Tetrad analyses of crosses homozygous for the pms1 mutation reveal a reduction of spore viability from >92% to 80% associated with a low proportion (~50%) of meioses producing four viable spores and a significant, allele-dependent increase of the level of post-meiotic segregation of genetic marker allele pairs. The mutant phenotypes are consistent with a general function of pms1 in correction of mismatched base pairs arising as a consequence of DNA polymerase errors during DNA synthesis, or of hybrid DNA formation between homologous but not perfectly complementary DNA strands during meiotic recombination. PMID:9258673

  10. Gene and pathway level analyses of germline DNA-repair gene variants and prostate cancer susceptibility using the iCOGS-genotyping array.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Edward J; Dadaev, Tokhir; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Benlloch, Sara; Giles, Graham G; Wiklund, Fredrik; Gronberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher A; Schleutker, Johanna; Nordestgaard, Borge G; Travis, Ruth C; Neal, David; Pasayan, Nora; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L; Blot, William J; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Maier, Christiane; Kibel, Adam S; Cybulski, Cezary; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Park, Jong Y; Kaneva, Radka; Batra, Jyotsna; Teixeira, Manuel R; Pandha, Hardev; Govindasami, Koveela; Muir, Ken; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Rosalind A; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia

    2016-04-12

    Germline mutations within DNA-repair genes are implicated in susceptibility to multiple forms of cancer. For prostate cancer (PrCa), rare mutations in BRCA2 and BRCA1 give rise to moderately elevated risk, whereas two of B100 common, low-penetrance PrCa susceptibility variants identified so far by genome-wide association studies implicate RAD51B and RAD23B. Genotype data from the iCOGS array were imputed to the 1000 genomes phase 3 reference panel for 21 780 PrCa cases and 21 727 controls from the Prostate Cancer Association Group to Investigate Cancer Associated Alterations in the Genome (PRACTICAL) consortium. We subsequently performed single variant, gene and pathway-level analyses using 81 303 SNPs within 20 Kb of a panel of 179 DNA-repair genes. Single SNP analyses identified only the previously reported association with RAD51B. Gene-level analyses using the SKAT-C test from the SNP-set (Sequence) Kernel Association Test (SKAT) identified a significant association with PrCa for MSH5. Pathway-level analyses suggested a possible role for the translesion synthesis pathway in PrCa risk and Homologous recombination/Fanconi Anaemia pathway for PrCa aggressiveness, even though after adjustment for multiple testing these did not remain significant. MSH5 is a novel candidate gene warranting additional follow-up as a prospective PrCa-risk locus. MSH5 has previously been reported as a pleiotropic susceptibility locus for lung, colorectal and serous ovarian cancers.

  11. Gene and pathway level analyses of germline DNA-repair gene variants and prostate cancer susceptibility using the iCOGS-genotyping array

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Edward J; Dadaev, Tokhir; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Benlloch, Sara; Giles, Graham G; Wiklund, Fredrik; Grönberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher A; Schleutker, Johanna; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Travis, Ruth C; Neal, David; Pasayan, Nora; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L; Blot, William J; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Maier, Christiane; Kibel, Adam S; Cybulski, Cezary; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Park, Jong Y; Kaneva, Radka; Batra, Jyotsna; Teixeira, Manuel R; Pandha, Hardev; Govindasami, Koveela; Muir, Ken; Abbasi, Z; Abdul-Hamid, M Akhlil; Abel, Paul D; Abrams, Paul H; Adab, Fawzi A; Adamson, Andrew; Adeyoju, A; Afzal, Naveed; Ahiaku, Ernest K N; Ahmed, Munir; Al Sudani, Mohammed L; Alcock, Christopher; Ali, Zulfiqar; Almond, David J; Alonzi, Roberto; Al-Samarraie, Amir S M; Al-Samerraie; Al-Singary, Waleed; Al-Sudani; Anderson, John; Andrews, Steven; Andrews, Henry; Anjum, Iqbal; Anson, Ken; Anyamene, Nicola A; Apakama, Ike; Aparcia, F; Archbold, J A A; Ash, D; Ashford, Richard F U; Azzabi, A; Badenoch, David; Bahl, Amit; Bailey, M J; Bailey, Karen; Ball, Andrew J; Banerjee, G; Barber, N; Barber, Jim; Baria; Barnes, Douglas G; Bashir, J; Basu, Pradip; Bates, Christopher A; Bax, N A; Baxter-Smith, D; Bdesha, Amar; Beacock, Christopher J M; Beaney, Ronald P; Beard, Ralph; Beatty, John D; Beck, Rupert; Beese, Gail; Beesley, Sharon; Bell, C Richard W; Bellringer, James; Benson, Richard; Beresford; Bevis, Christopher R A; Bhana, Rajanee; Bhanot, S; Bhatnagar, A; Bhatt, R I; Birch, Brian; Birtle, Alison; Bishop, M; Biyani, C Shekhar; Blacklock, A R E; Blades, Rosemary; Bliss, Peter; Bloomfield, David J; Boddy, S; Booth, C M; Bose, Pradeep; Bott, Michael C; Bottomley, David; Boucher, Nigel R; Bowen, J; Bower, Mark; Bowsher, W G; Boyd, P J R; Bramble, F James; Brewster, Simon F; Briggs, Tim; Brock, Cathryn; Brock, Sue; Bromage, Stephen; Brough, Richard; Brown, Richard; Brown, Stephen; Brown, Richard; Browning, Tony J; Bryan, N; Burgess, Neil A; Burns-Cox, Nicholas; Butterworth, Paul C; Cahill, D; Callaghan, P S; Calleary, John; Calleja, M; Calman, Frances; Camilleri, Philip; Campbell, Alister; Cannon, Andrea; Carnell, Dawn M; Carr, T W; Carter, Simon; Carter, Charles J M; Carter, Adam C; Castle, Bruce M; Chadwick, David; Chahal, Rohit; Chakraborti, P; Chappell; Charig, C; Chetiyawardana, Anula D; Chilton, Christopher; Chinegwundoh, F I; Chong, Irene; Choudhury, Ananya; Chow, Wai-Man; Christmas, Timothy J; Churn, Mark J; Clarke, Noel W; Clavijo-Eisele, Jorge; Coe, M; Cohen, N P; Coker, C; Cole, Trevor; Cole, David J; Cole, O; Collins, Gerald; Collinson, Matthew; Conn, I; Connell, C; Cook, Audrey; Cooke, Peter; Cooksey, Graeme; Coombs, L; Copland, Robert F; Cornaby, Andrew J; Cornford, P A; Corolis; Corr, John; Costello, C B; Coull, N; Cowan, Richard; Cox, Robert; Coyle, C; Crew, Jeremy; Crisp, John C; Cross, W; Cross, W; Cruger, Dorthe; Crundwell, Malcolm; Cummings; Dahar, Nazeer; Daniel, Francis N; Darrad, J; Daruwala, Pallon; Das, Gautam; Datta, Shibendra; Davidson, S; Davies, Joseph; Davison, Owen W; Dawkins, Guy; Dawson, Chris; Bolla, Alan R De; Dearnaley, David; Desai, Ken M; Deutsch, George P; Dick, John; Dickinson, Andrew J; Dickson, Jeanette; Dinneen, Michael; Dixit, Sanjay; Dobbs, H Jane; Doble, A; Dodds, David; Doherty, Alan; Donaldson, P; Dooldeniya, M; Douglas, S Fiona; Drake; Duchesne, Gill M; Duffy, Peter; Dunn, Michael; Dunsmuir, W D; Durrani, Sajid K; Eaton, Alan C; Eccles, Diane; Eddy, B; Eden, C D; Edwards, J; Elkabir, Jeremy; Elliott, P Tony; Ellis, B W; Ellis, R; El-Modir, A; Elves, Andrew W S; Elwell, Christine; Emberton, Mark; Emmerson, Louise; England, Roland C D; Errington, R D; Evans, D Gareth; Falconer, Alison; Fawcett, Derek; Featherston, C; Featherstone, Carolyn J; Feggetter, Jeremy; Ferguson, C; Fermont, D; Ferro, Michael; Fletcher, Matthew; Folkes, A; Ford, Trevor F; Foster, Paul W; Franks, Kevin N; Frim, Olivera; Gale, Joanna; Gallegos, Christopher; Gelister, James S; Ghana; Gibbs, Stephanie; Gilbert, Hugh; Gillatt, David; Glaholm, John; Glass, Jonathan M; Glenister, James; Goode, Thomas D; Gordon, E M; Gower, Richard L; Graham, John; Green, Damian; Greenland, Jonathan; Grieve, Robert; Griffiths, Thomas R L; Gujral, Sandy; Gupta, Nishi; Gurun, Riza Murat; Guy, Peter J; Haldar, Neil; Halder, N; Hamdy, F C; Hamilton, C; Hammonds, John; Hampson, S J; Hanbury, Damien C; Hardman, P D John; Harland, Stephen J; Harney, John M; Harper, Peter; Harris, Sarah; Harris, D; Harrison, G S M; Harriss, D R; Harvey-Hills, N; Hawkyard, Simon; Heath, Catherine M; Hehir, Michael; Hellawell, Giles O; Hendry, David; Henley, Mike; Henry, Ann; Hetherington, John; Hickish, Tamas; Hicks, James A; Hilman, Serena; Hindley, Richard; Hindmarsh, John R; Hines, John; Hingorani, M; Ho, Edwin T S; Hodgson, Shirley; Hoffman, U; Holden, David; Hollingdale, A; Hollins, Graham W; Holmes, Simon A V; Horan, Gail; Horwich, Alan; Hoskin, Peter; Howell, Graham P; Hrouda, D; Huddart, Robert; Hudson, Liz; Hughes, Rob; Hughes, Michael; Hughes, Owen; Humber, Caroline; Iacovou, John W; Ibrahim, A; Inglis, John A; Irving, Stuart; Irwin, C; Izatt, Louise; Izegbu, Victor; Jameel, Basharat; James, Michael J; James, N; James, R Lester; Javle, Pradip; Jenkins, P; Jhavar, Sameer; Jones, Gareth; Jones, Chris R; Jones, David A; Joseph, J; Joss, Shelagh; Kaisary, Amir; Kaliski, Alexandre L; Kapur, G; Karim, O; Karp, Stephen J; Keeley, F X; Kelkar, Anand R; Kelleher, J P; Kelly, John; Kenwrick, Sue; Khan, F; Khoo, Vincent; Kimber, Rachel M; Kinder, R; Kirby, Roger S; Kirk, David; Kirkbride, Peter; Kirollos, Magdi M; Kockelbergh, Roger; Koenig, Philip C W C; Kooiman, Gordon G; Koreich, O; Koupparis, Anthony; Kourah, Mohamed; Kraus, Sigurd; Kujawa, Magda L; Kulkarni, Ravi; Kumar, M; Kunkler, Ian H; Kynaston, H; Lachlan, Katherine L; Laing, Robert; Lalloo, Fiona; Lancashire, M; Langley, Stephen E M; Laniado, Marc; Larner, T R; Lau, Maurice W; Lawrence, W T; Lawson, Anne; Le Roux, Pieter J; Leader, Mary; Lee, J O; Lee, L; Lee, A; Lemburger, R John; Leone, Priscilla; Lester, Jason; Leung, Hing; Lewis, J; Lewis, D Christopher; Liston, Thomas; Livsey, Jacqueline; Lloyd, S; Locke, Imogen; Lodge, Richard; Logue, John; Longmuir, Mark; Lucas, Malcolm G; Luscombe, C J; Lydon, Anna; Lynch, Michael; Lynn, Naing N K; MacDermott, James P A; Macdonagh, Ruaraidh P; Macdonald; Madaan, Sanjeev; Madhava, Kudingila R; Maguire, Joseph; Maher, E R; Mahmood, Rana; Mair, Graeme H M; Malone, Peter R; Mangar, Stephen A; Mantle, Mark; Mark, I; Mason, Robert; Mason, M D; Matanhelia; Matenhelia, Shyam; Matthews, Philip N; McAleese, J; McBride, Donna; McFarlane, Jonathan; McGrath; McIlhenny, Craig; McInerney, Paul; McIntosh, Gregor; McKinna, F; McLaren, Duncan; McLarty, Esther; McMenemin, Rhona; McNeill, Alan; McNicholas, T A; Meddings, Robert N; Mee, A David; Melcher, Lucinda; Memon; Menzes, Pravin; Miller, Marek; Mills, Robert; Mitchell, S; Mithal, Natasha; Mitra, Anita; Mobb, Gillian E; Moffat, Leslie E F; Mokete; Money-Kyrle, Julian; Montgomery, Bruce; Moody, Martin P; Morley, Roland; Morris, Sean B; Morrison, Patrick; Mort, Diana; Mostafid, Amir H; Motiwala, Hanif; Mufti, Gulzar; Muir, Gordon; Mumtaz, Faiz; Murphy, Michael; Murray, Keith W; Murray, Alexandra; Murrell, Shirley; Muthukumar, D; Naerger, Harry; Namasivayam, Siva; Nargund, Vinod; Nawrocki; Neilson, Donald; Nethersell, A; Barwell, Julian; Newby, Jacqueline C; Newman, Hugh; Newton, R; Oakley, Neil; O'Boyle, P J; O'Brien, J; O'Brien, Tim S; O'Donnell, H; O'Donoghue, Neil; O'Donoghue, E; Ogden, Chris; Ohja, Hemant; Oliver, Tim; Ong, Eng K; O'Reilly, P; O'Rourke, J S; Osborn, David; Ostler, Peter; O'Sullivan, Joe; Owen, J; Palfrey, Edward; Panades, Miguel; Panakis, Niki; Pancharatnam, M; Pantelides, Michalakis L; Panwar, U; Parikh, Omi; Parker, Chris; Parker, Christopher H; Parys, Bohdan T; Pascoe, Sarah; Patel, Anup; Paterson, Joan; Pathack, S; Pati, Jhumur; Patterson, Helen; Pattu; Paul, A; Payne, Heather; Peake, David; Pedley, I; Pengelly, A; Peracha, Amjad M; Perry, Matthew; Persad, Raj; Peters, John; Philp, N H; Philp, T; Pickering, Lisa M; Pigott, Katharine; Plail, R; Plowman, P Nicholas; Pocock, Richard D; Pope, A J; Popert, Rick; Porter, Tim; Potter, John M; Powell, Christopher; Powles, Thomas B; Prasad, Krishna; Prasad, Seshadri Sri; Prejbisz, J W; Prescott, Stephen; Protheroe, Andrew; Qureshi, Khaver N; Raby, Nigel; Ragavan, Narasimhan; Raju, Palaniappa G S; Ramachandra, Prakash B; Raman, R; Rane, Abhay; Rankin, Julia; Rao, Y; Ratan, Hari L; Ravi, Ramachandran; Ravishankar, K; Read; Reddy, Paul J; Rimington, Peter R; Ritchie, Peter A; Roberts, J Trevor; Robertson, Andrew; Robinson, Angus; Robinson, Anne C; Robinson, Lee Q; Rochester, Mark A; Rogers, P B; Rosenbaum, Tomas P; Rothwell, Neil; Rowbotham, Carl; Rowe; Rowley, Kathryn; Ruddy, Deborah; Rundle, John; Russell, John M; Ryan, P G; Sabharwal, A; Saggar, Anand K; Samanci, Ali; Sangar, Vijay K; Saxby, M F; Schwaibold, Hartwig; Scoble, John E; Scrase, Christopher; Selim; Sells, Henry; Sethia, Krishna K; Shackley, David C; Shaffer; Shah, Nihil; Shakespeare, D; Shanley, Sue; Sharma, Neerah K; Sheehan, Denise J; Sherwin, Elizabeth; Shum, Poh Lin; LucySide; Sidek, Norma; Sikora, Karol; Simcock, R; Sinclair, Andrew M; Singh, Pravin; Siva, M; Smith, Michael F; Smith, James; Sokal, Michael; Sole, Graham M; Speakman, Mark J; Spiers, Alexander; Sreenivasan, Thiagarajan; Srihari, Narayanan N; Srinivasan; Sriram, Rajagopalan; Staffurth, John N; Stewart, D; Stockdale, Andrew; Stott, Mark A; Stower, M J; Strachan, John R; Stuart, Nicholas S A; Sugden, Elaine; Summerton, Duncan; Sundar, Santhanam; Sundaram, S K; Suresh, Gokarakonda; Susnerwala, Shabbir; Swami, Kuchibhotla S; Symons, Stephanie J; Syndikus, Isabel; Tahir, Saad; Tanquay, J; Taylor, John W; Taylor, J W; Terry, T; Thomas, Robert J; Thomas, Stephen A; Thompson, Alan; Thomson, Alastair H; Thurston, A; Tilsley, Owen; Tindall, Stuart F; Tipples, K; Tong; Toussi, Hamid; Toy, Elizabeth W; Trembath, Richard C; Tulloch, David N; Turner, Kevin J; Tweedle, James; Tyrell, C J; Umez-Eronini, N; Urwin, Graeme H; Vale, Justin A; Van As; Van As, Nicholas; Vasanthan, Subramaniam; Vesey, Sean; Vilarino-Varela, Maria; Violet, John; Virdi, Jaspal; Wade, Robert; Waite, Katherine; Walker, E M; Walker, Roger; Wallace, David M A; Watkin, Nicholas A; Watson, M E; Waxman, J H; Waymont, Brian; Weaver, Andrew; Webb, Ralph J; Wedderburn, Andrew; Wells, Paula; Wemyss-Holden, G D; Weston, P M T; Wheatley, Duncan; Whelan, P; Whillis, D; Wilde, Adam D; Wiles, Vicki; Wilkins, Marie; Williams, John H; Williams, Simon; Willis, Michael; Wills, Michael I; Wilson, Richard; Wilson, J R; Winkler, Mathias H; Wise, Marcus; Woodhams, Simon; Woodhouse, C; Woodward, Cathryn; Woolf; Woolfenden, K A; Worlding, Jane; Wright, Mark; WYLIE; Wylie, James P; Wynne, Chris; Zang, Angelika; Zarkar, A; Cox, Angela; Brown, Paul M.; George, Anne; Marsden, Gemma; Lane, Athene; Davis, Michael; Bollina, Prasad; Bonnington, Sue; Bradshaw, Lynne; Catto, James; Cooper, Debbie; Down, Liz; Doble, Andrew; Doherty, Alan; Durkan, Garrett; Elliott, Emma; Gillatt, David; Herbert, Pippa; Holding, Peter; Howson, Joanne; Jones, Mandy; Kockelbergh, Roger; Kumar, Rajeev; Kynaston, Howard; Lane, Athene; Lennon, Teresa; Lyons, Norma; Leung, Hing; Mason, Malcolm; Moody, Hilary; Powell, Philip; Paul, Alan; Prescott, Stephen; Rosario, Derek; OSullivan, Patricia; Thompson, Pauline; Tidball, Sarah; Cook, Margaret; Morgan, Angela; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Fisher, Cyril; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Guy, Michelle; Wilkinson, Rosemary; Jugurnauth-Little, Sara; Hazel, Steve; Southey, Melissa C; Fitzgerald, Liesel M; Pedersen, John; Hopper, John; Karlsson, Ami; Cavalli-Bjoerkman, Carin; Johansson, Jan-Erik; Adolfson, Jan; Aly, Markus; Broms, Michael; Stattin, Paer; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Auvinen, Anssi; Taari, Kimmo; Maeaettaenen, Liisa; Kujala, Paula; Murtola, Teemu; Tammela, Teuvo LJ; Wahlfors, Tiina; Roder, Andreas; Iversen, Peter; Klarskov, Peter; Nielsen, Sune F; Key, Tim J; Wallinder, Hans; Gustafsson, Sven; Donovan, Jenny L; Hamdy, Freddie; Cox, Angela; George, Anne; Lane, Athene; Marsden, Gemma; Davis, Michael; Brown, Paul; Pharoah, Paul; Signorello, Lisa B; Zheng, Wei; McDonnell, Shannon K; Schaid, Daniel J; Wang, Liang; Tillmans, Lori; Riska, Shaun; Schnoeller, Thomas; Herkommer, Kathleen; Luedeke, Manuel; Vogel, Walther; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Lubiski, Jan; Kluzniak, Wojciech; Butterbach, Katja; Stegmaier, Christa; Holleczek, Bernd; Lin, Hui-Yi; Park, Hyun; Pow-Sang, Julio; Sellers, Thomas; Slavov, Chavdar; Vlahova, Aleksandrina; Mitkova, Atanaska; Kachakova, Darina; Popov, Elenko; Christova, Svetlana; Dikov, Tihomir; Mitev, Vanio; Eckert, Allison; Spurdle, Amanda; Collins, Angus; Wood, Glenn; Malone, Greg; Clements, Judith A; Kerr, Kris; Turner, Megan; Saunders, Pamela; Heathcote, Peter; Srinivasan, Srilakshmi; Moya, Leire; Yeadon, Trina; Santos, Joana; Jerónimo, Carmen; Paulo, Paula; Pinto, Pedro; Henrique, Rui; Maia, Sofia; Michael, Agnieszka; Kierzek, Andrzej; Wu, Huihai; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Rosalind A; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Germline mutations within DNA-repair genes are implicated in susceptibility to multiple forms of cancer. For prostate cancer (PrCa), rare mutations in BRCA2 and BRCA1 give rise to moderately elevated risk, whereas two of ∼100 common, low-penetrance PrCa susceptibility variants identified so far by genome-wide association studies implicate RAD51B and RAD23B. Methods: Genotype data from the iCOGS array were imputed to the 1000 genomes phase 3 reference panel for 21 780 PrCa cases and 21 727 controls from the Prostate Cancer Association Group to Investigate Cancer Associated Alterations in the Genome (PRACTICAL) consortium. We subsequently performed single variant, gene and pathway-level analyses using 81 303 SNPs within 20 Kb of a panel of 179 DNA-repair genes. Results: Single SNP analyses identified only the previously reported association with RAD51B. Gene-level analyses using the SKAT-C test from the SNP-set (Sequence) Kernel Association Test (SKAT) identified a significant association with PrCa for MSH5. Pathway-level analyses suggested a possible role for the translesion synthesis pathway in PrCa risk and Homologous recombination/Fanconi Anaemia pathway for PrCa aggressiveness, even though after adjustment for multiple testing these did not remain significant. Conclusions: MSH5 is a novel candidate gene warranting additional follow-up as a prospective PrCa-risk locus. MSH5 has previously been reported as a pleiotropic susceptibility locus for lung, colorectal and serous ovarian cancers. PMID:26964030

  12. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes as risk factors for asbestos-related malignant mesothelioma in a general population study.

    PubMed

    Dianzani, I; Gibello, L; Biava, A; Giordano, M; Bertolotti, M; Betti, M; Ferrante, D; Guarrera, S; Betta, G P; Mirabelli, D; Matullo, G; Magnani, C

    2006-07-25

    Differences in response to carcinogenic agents are due to the allelic variants of the genes that control it. Key genes are those involved in the repair of the DNA damage caused by such agents. This paper describes the results of a case-control epidemiological study designed to determine the genotypes of four of these genes in persons exposed to a single genotoxic factor, i.e. asbestos, who had or had not developed malignant mesothelioma (MM). Our working hypothesis was that an imperfect DNA repair, as revealed by subtle polymorphic variants, could reduce protection against the chronic DNA insult provoked by asbestos and eventually result in mutagenesis and cancer. Seven variants (i.e. XRCC1-R399Q-NCBI SNP, XRCC1-R194W, XRCC3-T241M, XRCC3-IVS6-14, XPD-K751Q, XPD-D312N, OGG1-S326C) were investigated in 81 patients and 110 age and sex-matched controls, all residents at Casale Monferrato, a Piedmontese town highly exposed to asbestos pollution. Unconditional multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). When considered as a categorical variable, XRCC1-399Q showed an increased OR both in heterozygotes (OR=2.08; 95% CI=1.00-4.33) and homozygotes (2.38; 95% CI=0.82-6.94), although individual ORs were not significant. When it was considered as a continuous variable OR was significant (OR=1.68; 95% CI: 1.02-2.75). When genotypes were divided into "non-risk" and "risk" genotypes, i.e. those thought to be associated with increased risk in the light of the functional significance of the variants, XRCC1-399Q (Q homozygotes+Q/R heterozygotes versus R homozygotes) had an OR=2.147 (95% CI: 1.08-4.28), whereas that of XRCC3-241T (T homozygotes+M/T heterozygotes versus M homozygotes) was 4.09 (95% CI: 1.26-13.21) and that of OGG1-326C was increased, though not significantly. None of the haplotypes showed a significantly different frequency between patients and controls. This is the first report of an association between

  13. The GH/IGF-1 axis in a critical period early in life determines cellular DNA repair capacity by altering transcriptional regulation of DNA repair-related genes: implications for the developmental origins of cancer.

    PubMed

    Podlutsky, Andrej; Valcarcel-Ares, Marta Noa; Yancey, Krysta; Podlutskaya, Viktorija; Nagykaldi, Eszter; Gautam, Tripti; Miller, Richard A; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2017-02-23

    Experimental, clinical, and epidemiological findings support the concept of developmental origins of health and disease (DOHAD), suggesting that early-life hormonal influences during a sensitive period around adolescence have a powerful impact on cancer morbidity later in life. The endocrine changes that occur during puberty are highly conserved across mammalian species and include dramatic increases in circulating GH and IGF-1 levels. Importantly, patients with developmental IGF-1 deficiency due to GH insensitivity (Laron syndrome) do not develop cancer during aging. Rodents with developmental GH/IGF-1 deficiency also exhibit significantly decreased cancer incidence at old age, marked resistance to chemically induced carcinogenesis, and cellular resistance to genotoxic stressors. Early-life treatment of GH/IGF-1-deficient mice and rats with GH reverses the cancer resistance phenotype; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that developmental GH/IGF-1 status impacts cellular DNA repair mechanisms. To achieve that goal, we assessed repair of γ-irradiation-induced DNA damage (single-cell gel electrophoresis/comet assay) and basal and post-irradiation expression of DNA repair-related genes (qPCR) in primary fibroblasts derived from control rats, Lewis dwarf rats (a model of developmental GH/IGF-1 deficiency), and GH-replete dwarf rats (GH administered beginning at 5 weeks of age, for 30 days). We found that developmental GH/IGF-1 deficiency resulted in persisting increases in cellular DNA repair capacity and upregulation of several DNA repair-related genes (e.g., Gadd45a, Bbc3). Peripubertal GH treatment reversed the radiation resistance phenotype. Fibroblasts of GH/IGF-1-deficient Snell dwarf mice also exhibited improved DNA repair capacity, showing that the persisting influence of peripubertal GH/IGF-1 status is not species-dependent. Collectively, GH/IGF-1 levels during a critical period

  14. Tight correlation between inhibition of DNA repair in vitro and transcription factor IIIA binding in a 5S ribosomal RNA gene.

    PubMed

    Conconi, A; Liu, X; Koriazova, L; Ackerman, E J; Smerdon, M J

    1999-03-01

    UV-induced photoproducts (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, CPDs) in DNA are removed by nucleotide excision repair (NER), and the presence of transcription factors on DNA can restrict the accessibility of NER enzymes. We have investigatigated the modulation of NER in a gene promoter using the Xenopus transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA)-5S rDNA complex and Xenopus oocyte nuclear extracts. TFIIIA alters CPD formation primarily in the transcribed strand of the 50 bp internal control region (ICR) of 5S rDNA. During NER in vitro, CPD removal is reduced at most sites in both strands of the ICR when TFIIIA is bound. Efficient repair occurs just outside the TFIIIA-binding site (within 10 bp), and in the absence of 5S rRNA transcription. Interestingly, three CPD sites within the ICR [+56, +75 (transcribed strand) and +73 (non-transcribed strand)] are repaired rapidly when TFIIIA is bound, while CPDs within approximately 5 bases of these sites are repaired much more slowly. CPDs at these three sites may partially displace TFIIIA, thereby enabling rapid repair. However, TFIIIA is not completely displaced during NER, at least at sites outside the ICR, even though the NER complex could be sterically hindered by TFIIIA. Such inefficient repair of transcription factor binding sites could increase mutation frequency in regulatory regions of genes.

  15. A Mutation in a Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Gene (Rad3) Required for Nucleotide Excision Repair and Transcription Increases the Efficiency of Mismatch Correction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y.; Johnson, A. L.; Johnston, L. H.; Siede, W.; Friedberg, E. C.; Ramachandran, K.; Kunz, B. A.

    1996-01-01

    RAD3 functions in DNA repair and transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and particular rad3 alleles confer a mutator phenotype, possibly as a consequence of defective mismatch correction. We assessed the potential involvement of the Rad3 protein in mismatch correction by comparing heteroduplex repair in isogenic rad3-1 and wild-type strains. The rad3-1 allele increased the spontaneous mutation rate but did not prevent heteroduplex repair or bias its directionality. Instead, the efficiency of mismatch correction was enhanced in the rad3-1 strain. This surprising result prompted us to examine expression of yeast mismatch repair genes. We determined that MSH2, but not MLH1, is transcriptionally regulated during the cell-cycle like PMS1, and that rad3-1 does not increase the transcript levels for these genes in log phase cells. These observations suggest that the rad3-1 mutation gives rise to an enhanced efficiency of mismatch correction via a process that does not involve transcriptional regulation of mismatch repair. Interestingly, mismatch repair also was more efficient when error-editing by yeast DNA polymerase δ was eliminated. We discuss our results in relation to possible mechanisms that may link the rad3-1 mutation to mismatch correction efficiency. PMID:8889512

  16. Pathological complete response after cisplatin neoadjuvant therapy is associated with the downregulation of DNA repair genes in BRCA1-associated triple-negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Domagala, Pawel; Hybiak, Jolanta; Rys, Janusz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Lubinski, Jan

    2016-10-18

    Pathologic complete response (pCR) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy is considered a suitable surrogate marker of treatment efficacy in patients with triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying pCR as a result of such treatment remain obscure. Using real-time PCR arrays we compared the expression levels of 120 genes involved in the main mechanisms of DNA repair in 43 pretreatment biopsies of BRCA1-associated TNBCs exhibiting pCR and no pathological complete response (non-pCR) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin. Altogether, 25 genes were significantly differentially expressed between tumors exhibiting pCR and non-pCR, and these genes were downregulated in the pCR group compared to the non-pCR group. A difference in expression level greater than 1.5-fold was detected for nine genes: MGMT, ERCC4, FANCB, UBA1, XRCC5, XPA, XPC, PARP3, and RPA1. The non-homologous end joining and nucleotide excision repair pathways of DNA repair showed the most significant relevance. Expression profile of DNA repair genes associated with pCR was different in the node-positive (20 genes with fold change >1.5) and node-negative (only 3 genes) subgroups. Although BRCA1 germline mutations are the principal defects in BRCA1-associated TNBC, our results indicate that the additional downregulation of other genes engaged in major pathways of DNA repair may play a decisive role in the pathological response of these tumors to cisplatin neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The results suggest that patients with node-positive BRCA1-associated TNBCs that do not exhibit pCR after cisplatin neoadjuvant c